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Sample records for fish-specific duplicated dmrt2b

  1. Sex dimorphic expression of five dmrt genes identified in the Atlantic cod genome. The fish-specific dmrt2b diverged from dmrt2a before the fish whole-genome duplication.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Hanne; Andersen, Øivind

    2012-09-01

    The Doublesex and Mab-3 related transcription factors (Dmrt) are characterised by the zinc finger-like DM domain binding similar DNA sequences, but show different spatio-temporal expression patterns and functions throughout ontogenesis. Dmrt1 is the master regulator of sex determination in very distant metazoans, while Dmrt2 and Dmrt4 are of crucial importance in vertebrate somitogenesis and neurogenesis, respectively. To elucidate the evolutionary divergence of the fish dmrt genes, we examined the expression patterns and the chromosomal synteny of the five dmrt genes identified in the Atlantic cod genome. Quantitative PCR analyses of cod dmrt1, dmrt2a, dmrt3, dmrt4 and dmrt5 revealed distinct expression patterns in the embryo and larvae, and indicated conserved extragonadal functions during early development. Several dmrt genes seem to be involved in the sexual differentiation of gonads and brain, but the sex-dimorphic expression patterns differed substantially between teleosts, suggesting functional switch between Dmrt members. The dmrt2a-dmrt3-dmrt1 cluster was found to be located in a conserved syntenic region, and the flanking genes have become duplicated in teleosts and are closely linked in a paralogous region lacking the dmrt cluster. Similarly, the region containing the fish-specific dmrt2b gene was found to have a paralogous region without a dmrt2b duplicate in a separate linkage group in the teleost genomes. We propose that the teleost segments paralogous to the dmrt2a- and dmrt2b regions, respectively, were formed through the fish-specific whole genome duplication (3R), while dmrt2a and dmrt2b originated from the second round (2R) of whole genome duplication of the ancestral dmrt2. The dmrt2b paralog seems to have been lost in Atlantic cod as in tetrapods and may be a pseudogene in pufferfish, while dmrt2a and dmrt2b have acquired different functions in zebrafish. Contrasting with the retained duplicates of dmrt flanking genes, the massive losses of

  2. Asymmetric evolution in two fish-specifically duplicated receptor tyrosine kinase paralogons involved in teleost coloration.

    PubMed

    Braasch, Ingo; Salzburger, Walter; Meyer, Axel

    2006-06-01

    The occurrence of a fish-specific genome duplication (FSGD) in the lineage leading to teleost fishes is widely accepted, but the consequences of this event remain elusive. Teleosts, and the cichlid fishes from the species flocks in the East African Great Lakes in particular, evolved a unique complexity and diversity of body coloration and color patterning. Several genes involved in pigment cell development have been retained in duplicate copies in the teleost genome after the FSGD. Here we investigate the evolutionary fate of one of these genes, the type III receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (csf1r). We isolated and shotgun sequenced two paralogous csf1r genes from a bacterial artificial chromosome library of the cichlid fish Astatotilapia burtoni that are both linked to paralogs of the pdgfr beta gene, another type III RTK. Two pdgfr beta-csf1r paralogons were also identified in the genomes of pufferfishes and medaka, and our phylogenetic analyses suggest that the pdgfr beta-csf1r locus was duplicated during the course of the FSGD. Comparisons of teleosts and tetrapods suggest asymmetrical divergence at different levels of genomic organization between the teleost-specific pdgfr beta-csf1r paralogons, which seem to have evolved as coevolutionary units. The high-evolutionary rate in the teleost B-paralogon, consisting of csf1rb and pdgfr betab, further suggests neofunctionalization by functional divergence of the extracellular, ligand-binding region of these cell-surface receptors. Finally, we hypothesize that genome duplications and the associated expansion of the RTK family might be causally linked to the evolution of coloration in vertebrates and teleost fishes in particular.

  3. Structural and evolutionary characteristics of fish-specific TLR19.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinlan; Zhang, Zheng; Fu, Hui; Zhang, Shangli; Liu, Jing; Chang, Fen; Li, Fang; Zhao, Jing; Yin, Deling

    2015-11-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important pattern recognition receptors in the innate immune system of fish. Although ten years have passed since the first identification, the systematic knowledge about fish-specific TLR19 is still far insufficient. In present study, a phylogenetic analysis showed that TLR19 belonged to family 11, and clustered with TLR20 and TLR11/12 on the evolutionary tree. TLR20 is the closest paralogue of TLR19. The ectodomain of TLR19 contains 24 leucine-rich repeat (LRR) modules. The electrostatic surface potential analysis indicated that the modeled structure of TLR19 ectodomain showed much stronger polarity on the ascending lateral surface than on the descending lateral surface. The ascending lateral surface with strong electrostatic surface potential possibly mainly participates in the ligand binding of TLR19 ectodomain. The quite small dN/dS value at the TLR19 locus showed that TLR19 was very conserved. Approximately one third codons in the coding sequence of TLR19 were subjected to significantly negative selection, whereas only 5 codons underwent significantly positive selection. Overall, these findings possibly help in deepening the understanding to fish-specific TLR19.

  4. Plant Genome Duplication Database.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae-Ho; Kim, Junah; Robertson, Jon S; Paterson, Andrew H

    2017-01-01

    Genome duplication, widespread in flowering plants, is a driving force in evolution. Genome alignments between/within genomes facilitate identification of homologous regions and individual genes to investigate evolutionary consequences of genome duplication. PGDD (the Plant Genome Duplication Database), a public web service database, provides intra- or interplant genome alignment information. At present, PGDD contains information for 47 plants whose genome sequences have been released. Here, we describe methods for identification and estimation of dates of genome duplication and speciation by functions of PGDD.The database is freely available at http://chibba.agtec.uga.edu/duplication/.

  5. Interstitial duplication 19p

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, R.F.; DuPont, B.R.; Moore, C.M.

    1995-07-17

    We report on a 9-month-old girl with an interstitial duplication of 19p, developmental delay, and multiple anomalies including bifrontal prominence, obtuse frontonasal angle, short columella, additional midline philtral pillar, midline ridge on the tongue, vertical midline ridge at the mental symphysis, and a complex congenital heart defect including severe branch pulmonary artery stenosis, secundum atrial septal defect (ASD), and several ventricular septal defects (VSDs). Use of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome 19- specific probes showed a direct duplication of bands 19p13.13 and 19p13.2. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Perspectives on Program Duplication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Gail M.

    2010-01-01

    Concerns about program duplication in higher education are often reminiscent of Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart's now famous remark about pornography: "I know it when I see it." The problem with that reaction is that, at least on its surface, this response seems intuitive and emotional, to say nothing of subjective and personal. The…

  7. Duplication Is Ubiquitous

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses how Phil Davis, Life Sciences Bibliographer at Cornell University, found duplicate articles in Emerald/MCB University Press journals. According to Davis, he has found hundreds of examples of the same article published in more than one journal in at least 73 Emerald/MCB journals over 30 years. This article gives the details…

  8. Current Duplicating Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groneman, Nancy

    1978-01-01

    While business instructors are still teaching spirit and stencil duplicating processes, most businesses now use copiers or offset printing processes. The article discusses offset and copier skills needed by office workers, pointing out that the processes being taught should be compatible with those used in business. (MF)

  9. Duplicated middle cerebral artery.

    PubMed

    Perez, Jesus; Machado, Calixto; Scherle, Claudio; Hierro, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Duplicated middle cerebral artery (DMCA) is an anomalous vessel arising from the internal carotid artery. The incidence DMCA is relatively law, and an association between this anomaly and cerebral aneurysms has been documented. There is a controversy whether DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is an important fact to consider in aneurysm surgery. We report the case of a 34-year-old black woman who suffered a subarachnoid hemorrhage and the angiography a left DMCA, and an aneurysm in an inferior branch of the main MCA. The DMCA and the MCA had perforating arteries. The aneurysm was clipped without complications. The observation of perforating arteries in our patient confirms that the DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is very important to be considered in cerebral aneurysms surgery. Moreover, the DMCA may potentially serve as a collateral blood supply to the MCA territory in cases of MCA occlusion.

  10. Evolution of pigment synthesis pathways by gene and genome duplication in fish

    PubMed Central

    Braasch, Ingo; Schartl, Manfred; Volff, Jean-Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    Background Coloration and color patterning belong to the most diverse phenotypic traits in animals. Particularly, teleost fishes possess more pigment cell types than any other group of vertebrates. As the result of an ancient fish-specific genome duplication (FSGD), teleost genomes might contain more copies of genes involved in pigment cell development than tetrapods. No systematic genomic inventory allowing to test this hypothesis has been drawn up so far for pigmentation genes in fish, and almost nothing is known about the evolution of these genes in different fish lineages. Results Using a comparative genomic approach including phylogenetic reconstructions and synteny analyses, we have studied two major pigment synthesis pathways in teleost fish, the melanin and the pteridine pathways, with respect to different types of gene duplication. Genes encoding three of the four enzymes involved in the synthesis of melanin from tyrosine have been retained as duplicates after the FSGD. In the pteridine pathway, two cases of duplicated genes originating from the FSGD as well as several lineage-specific gene duplications were observed. In both pathways, genes encoding the rate-limiting enzymes, tyrosinase and GTP-cyclohydrolase I (GchI), have additional paralogs in teleosts compared to tetrapods, which have been generated by different modes of duplication. We have also observed a previously unrecognized diversity of gchI genes in vertebrates. In addition, we have found evidence for divergent resolution of duplicated pigmentation genes, i.e., differential gene loss in divergent teleost lineages, particularly in the tyrosinase gene family. Conclusion Mainly due to the FSGD, teleost fishes apparently have a greater repertoire of pigment synthesis genes than any other vertebrate group. Our results support an important role of the FSGD and other types of duplication in the evolution of pigmentation in fish. PMID:17498288

  11. Evolution of Gene Duplication in Plants.

    PubMed

    Panchy, Nicholas; Lehti-Shiu, Melissa; Shiu, Shin-Han

    2016-08-01

    Ancient duplication events and a high rate of retention of extant pairs of duplicate genes have contributed to an abundance of duplicate genes in plant genomes. These duplicates have contributed to the evolution of novel functions, such as the production of floral structures, induction of disease resistance, and adaptation to stress. Additionally, recent whole-genome duplications that have occurred in the lineages of several domesticated crop species, including wheat (Triticum aestivum), cotton (Gossypium hirsutum), and soybean (Glycine max), have contributed to important agronomic traits, such as grain quality, fruit shape, and flowering time. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms and impacts of gene duplication will be important to future studies of plants in general and of agronomically important crops in particular. In this review, we survey the current knowledge about gene duplication, including gene duplication mechanisms, the potential fates of duplicate genes, models explaining duplicate gene retention, the properties that distinguish duplicate from singleton genes, and the evolutionary impact of gene duplication.

  12. Advances on Genome Duplication Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Yves; Savard, Olivier Tremblay; Bertrand, Denis; El-Mabrouk, Nadia

    Given a phylogenetic tree involving Whole Genome Duplication events, we contribute to the problem of computing the rearrangement distance on a branch of a tree linking a duplication node d to a speciation node or a leaf s. In the case of a genome G at s containing exactly two copies of each gene, the genome halving problem is to find a perfectly duplicated genome D at d minimizing the rearrangement distance with G. We generalize the existing exact linear-time algorithm for genome halving to the case of a genome G with missing gene copies. In the case of a known ancestral duplicated genome D, we develop a greedy approach for computing the distance between G and D that is shown time-efficient and very accurate for both the rearrangement and DCJ distances.

  13. Fast Anomaly Discovery Given Duplicates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    skipping the computations for duplicate points in SN(ui) that have ci larger than k, the runtime complexity is enhanced significantly. That is, in...Fast anomaly discovery given duplicates Jay-Yoon Lee, U Kang, Danai Koutra, Christos Faloutsos Dec 2012 CMU-CS-12-146 School of Computer Science...ES) Carnegie Mellon University,School of Computer Science,Pittsburgh,PA,15213 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING

  14. Duplication. Units of Instruction. Office Duplication Practices. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Theressa

    This teacher's guide is designed for use in helping secondary and postsecondary students in office occupations education programs to become familiar with duplication procedures and machines. Addressed in the individual units of the guide are the following topics: measurement, paper characteristics and classifications, copy preparation for pasteup…

  15. ALTERNATIVES TO DUPLICATE DIET METHODOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Duplicate Diet (DD) methodology has been used to collect information about the dietary exposure component in the context of total exposure studies. DD methods have been used to characterize the dietary exposure component in the NHEXAS pilot studies. NERL desired to evaluate it...

  16. Office Duplication Practices Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East Texas State Univ., Commerce. Occupational Curriculum Lab.

    As one of a series of curriculum guides for office education programs in Texas, this guide contains 24 units of instruction in office duplication practices. Each of the units contains a unit outline that lists unit objective, specific objectives, teacher and student activities, estimated completion time, re-teach activities, and resources; and a…

  17. Duplicated Information Acquired by Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Carl M.

    The object of this study is to make a start toward determining the extent of duplicated information that is being acquired in spite of customary precautions to avoid it. Referring to a specific case, the percentages in Table II show the frequency of appearance in five other works of 19 items in Mitchell's "Encyclopedia of American Politics." While…

  18. Autopolyploidy genome duplication preserves other ancient genome duplications in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, William S.

    2017-01-01

    Salmonids (e.g. Atlantic salmon, Pacific salmon, and trouts) have a long legacy of genome duplication. In addition to three ancient genome duplications that all teleosts are thought to share, salmonids have had one additional genome duplication. We explored a methodology for untangling these duplications from each other to better understand them in Atlantic salmon. In this methodology, homeologous regions (paralogous/duplicated genomic regions originating from a whole genome duplication) from the most recent genome duplication were assumed to have duplicated genes at greater density and have greater sequence similarity. This assumption was used to differentiate duplicated gene pairs in Atlantic salmon that are either from the most recent genome duplication or from earlier duplications. From a comparison with multiple vertebrate species, it is clear that Atlantic salmon have retained more duplicated genes from ancient genome duplications than other vertebrates--often at higher density in the genome and containing fewer synonymous mutations. It may be that polysomic inheritance is the mechanism responsible for maintaining ancient gene duplicates in salmonids. Polysomic inheritance (when multiple chromosomes pair during meiosis) is thought to be relatively common in salmonids compared to other vertebrate species. These findings illuminate how genome duplications may not only increase the number of duplicated genes, but may also be involved in the maintenance of them from previous genome duplications as well. PMID:28241055

  19. Thumb Duplication: Concepts and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Within the Oberg, Manske, Tonkin (OMT) classification, thumb duplications are a failure of formation and/or differentiation affecting the radial-ulnar axis of the hand plate. The Wassel description of seven types of thumb duplication provides a good structure from which an approach to management is based. The aim of surgical reconstruction is to obtain a stable, mobile thumb of adequate size and appropriate shape. The most common form of reconstruction is removal of the lesser digit and reconstruction of the dominant digit. Surgical techniques address the problems of deviation, instability and lack of size. The disadvantages of the Bilhaut-Cloquet procedure, these being joint stiffness and a nail ridge, may be lesser concerns when reconstruction of one digit will not create a satisfactory thumb of adequate mobility, stability, alignment and size. Complicated problems of triphalangism, triplication, ulnar dimelia and the rare circumstance in which neither of the duplicated thumbs may be adequately reconstructed present specific challenges which demand alternative techniques. PMID:22379552

  20. Chromosome I Duplications in Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    McKim, K. S.; Rose, A. M.

    1990-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized 76 duplications of chromosome I in the genome of Caenorhabditis elegans. The region studied is the 20 map unit left half of the chromosome. Sixty-two duplications were induced with gamma radiation and 14 arose spontaneously. The latter class was apparently the result of spontaneous breaks within the parental duplication. The majority of duplications behave as if they are free. Three duplications are attached to identifiable sequences from other chromosomes. The duplication breakpoints have been mapped by complementation analysis relative to genes on chromosome I. Nineteen duplication breakpoints and seven deficiency breakpoints divide the left half of the chromosome into 24 regions. We have studied the relationship between duplication size and segregational stability. While size is an important determinant of mitotic stability, it is not the only one. We observed clear exceptions to a size-stability correlation. In addition to size, duplication stability may be influenced by specific sequences or chromosome structure. The majority of the duplications were stable enough to be powerful tools for gene mapping. Therefore the duplications described here will be useful in the genetic characterization of chromosome I and the techniques we have developed can be adapted to other regions of the genome. PMID:2307351

  1. Detecting long tandem duplications in genomic sequences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Detecting duplication segments within completely sequenced genomes provides valuable information to address genome evolution and in particular the important question of the emergence of novel functions. The usual approach to gene duplication detection, based on all-pairs protein gene comparisons, provides only a restricted view of duplication. Results In this paper, we introduce ReD Tandem, a software using a flow based chaining algorithm targeted at detecting tandem duplication arrays of moderate to longer length regions, with possibly locally weak similarities, directly at the DNA level. On the A. thaliana genome, using a reference set of tandem duplicated genes built using TAIR,a we show that ReD Tandem is able to predict a large fraction of recently duplicated genes (dS < 1) and that it is also able to predict tandem duplications involving non coding elements such as pseudo-genes or RNA genes. Conclusions ReD Tandem allows to identify large tandem duplications without any annotation, leading to agnostic identification of tandem duplications. This approach nicely complements the usual protein gene based which ignores duplications involving non coding regions. It is however inherently restricted to relatively recent duplications. By recovering otherwise ignored events, ReD Tandem gives a more comprehensive view of existing evolutionary processes and may also allow to improve existing annotations. PMID:22568762

  2. Genomic evidence for adaptation by gene duplication.

    PubMed

    Qian, Wenfeng; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2014-08-01

    Gene duplication is widely believed to facilitate adaptation, but unambiguous evidence for this hypothesis has been found in only a small number of cases. Although gene duplication may increase the fitness of the involved organisms by doubling gene dosage or neofunctionalization, it may also result in a simple division of ancestral functions into daughter genes, which need not promote adaptation. Hence, the general validity of the adaptation by gene duplication hypothesis remains uncertain. Indeed, a genome-scale experiment found similar fitness effects of deleting pairs of duplicate genes and deleting individual singleton genes from the yeast genome, leading to the conclusion that duplication rarely results in adaptation. Here we contend that the above comparison is unfair because of a known duplication bias among genes with different fitness contributions. To rectify this problem, we compare homologous genes from the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We discover that simultaneously deleting a duplicate gene pair in S. cerevisiae reduces fitness significantly more than deleting their singleton counterpart in S. pombe, revealing post-duplication adaptation. The duplicates-singleton difference in fitness effect is not attributable to a potential increase in gene dose after duplication, suggesting that the adaptation is owing to neofunctionalization, which we find to be explicable by acquisitions of binary protein-protein interactions rather than gene expression changes. These results provide genomic evidence for the role of gene duplication in organismal adaptation and are important for understanding the genetic mechanisms of evolutionary innovation.

  3. Tubular Colonic Duplication Presenting as Rectovestibular Fistula.

    PubMed

    Karkera, Parag J; Bendre, Pradnya; D'souza, Flavia; Ramchandra, Mukunda; Nage, Amol; Palse, Nitin

    2015-09-01

    Complete colonic duplication is a very rare congenital anomaly that may have different presentations according to its location and size. Complete colonic duplication can occur in about 15% of all gastrointestinal duplications. Double termination of tubular colonic duplication in the perineum is even more uncommon. We present a case of a Y-shaped tubular colonic duplication which presented with a rectovestibular fistula and a normal anus. Radiological evaluation and initial exploration for sigmoidostomy revealed duplicated colons with a common vascular supply. Endorectal mucosal resection of theduplicated distal segment till the colostomy site with division of the septum of the proximal segment and colostomy closure proved curative without compromise of the continence mechanism. Tubular colonic duplication should always be ruled out when a diagnosis of perineal canal is considered in cases of vestibular fistula alongwith a normal anus.

  4. Tubular Colonic Duplication Presenting as Rectovestibular Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Bendre, Pradnya; D'souza, Flavia; Ramchandra, Mukunda; Nage, Amol; Palse, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    Complete colonic duplication is a very rare congenital anomaly that may have different presentations according to its location and size. Complete colonic duplication can occur in about 15% of all gastrointestinal duplications. Double termination of tubular colonic duplication in the perineum is even more uncommon. We present a case of a Y-shaped tubular colonic duplication which presented with a rectovestibular fistula and a normal anus. Radiological evaluation and initial exploration for sigmoidostomy revealed duplicated colons with a common vascular supply. Endorectal mucosal resection of theduplicated distal segment till the colostomy site with division of the septum of the proximal segment and colostomy closure proved curative without compromise of the continence mechanism. Tubular colonic duplication should always be ruled out when a diagnosis of perineal canal is considered in cases of vestibular fistula alongwith a normal anus. PMID:26473141

  5. Mechanisms of Gene Duplication and Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Reams, Andrew B.; Roth, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in gene copy number are among the most frequent mutational events in all genomes and were among the mutations for which a physical basis was first known. Yet mechanisms of gene duplication remain uncertain because formation rates are difficult to measure and mechanisms may vary with position in a genome. Duplications are compared here to deletions, which seem formally similar but can arise at very different rates by distinct mechanisms. Methods of assessing duplication rates and dependencies are described with several proposed formation mechanisms. Emphasis is placed on duplications formed in extensively studied experimental situations. Duplications studied in microbes are compared with those observed in metazoan cells, specifically those in genomes of cancer cells. Duplications, and especially their derived amplifications, are suggested to form by multistep processes often under positive selection for increased copy number. PMID:25646380

  6. 40 CFR 710.35 - Duplicative reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Duplicative reporting. 710.35 Section 710.35 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT TSCA CHEMICAL INVENTORY REGULATIONS 2002 Inventory Update Reporting § 710.35 Duplicative...

  7. 10 CFR 9.35 - Duplication fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Duplication fees. 9.35 Section 9.35 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PUBLIC RECORDS Freedom of Information Act Regulations § 9.35 Duplication fees. (a)(1...″ reduced). Pages 11″ × 17″ are $0.30 per page. Pages larger than 11″ × 17″, including engineering...

  8. 40 CFR 710.35 - Duplicative reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Duplicative reporting. 710.35 Section 710.35 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT TSCA CHEMICAL INVENTORY REGULATIONS 2002 Inventory Update Reporting § 710.35 Duplicative...

  9. Some asymptotic properties of duplication graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raval, Alpan

    2003-12-01

    Duplication graphs are graphs that grow by duplication of existing vertices, and are important models of biological networks, including protein-protein interaction networks and gene regulatory networks. Three models of graph growth are studied: pure duplication growth, and two two-parameter models in which duplication forms one element of the growth dynamics. A power-law degree distribution is found to emerge in all three models. However, the parameter space of the latter two models is characterized by a range of parameter values for which duplication is the predominant mechanism of graph growth. For parameter values that lie in this “duplication-dominated” regime, it is shown that the degree distribution either approaches zero asymptotically, or approaches a nonzero power-law degree distribution very slowly. In either case, the approach to the true asymptotic degree distribution is characterized by a dependence of the scaling exponent on properties of the initial degree distribution. It is therefore conjectured that duplication-dominated, scale-free networks may contain identifiable remnants of their early structure. This feature is inherited from the idealized model of pure duplication growth, for which the exact finite-size degree distribution is found and its asymptotic properties studied.

  10. 15 CFR 750.9 - Duplicate licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Duplicate licenses. 750.9 Section 750.9 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU... PROCESSING, ISSUANCE, AND DENIAL § 750.9 Duplicate licenses. (a) Lost, stolen or destroyed. If a license...

  11. 15 CFR 750.9 - Duplicate licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Duplicate licenses. 750.9 Section 750.9 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU... PROCESSING, ISSUANCE, AND DENIAL § 750.9 Duplicate licenses. (a) Lost, stolen or destroyed. If a license...

  12. 15 CFR 750.9 - Duplicate licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Duplicate licenses. 750.9 Section 750.9 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU... PROCESSING, ISSUANCE, AND DENIAL § 750.9 Duplicate licenses. (a) Lost, stolen or destroyed. If a license...

  13. 15 CFR 750.9 - Duplicate licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Duplicate licenses. 750.9 Section 750.9 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU... PROCESSING, ISSUANCE, AND DENIAL § 750.9 Duplicate licenses. (a) Lost, stolen or destroyed. If a license...

  14. 15 CFR 750.9 - Duplicate licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Duplicate licenses. 750.9 Section 750.9 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU... PROCESSING, ISSUANCE, AND DENIAL § 750.9 Duplicate licenses. (a) Lost, stolen or destroyed. If a license...

  15. Evolution of Gene Duplication in Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ancient duplication events and a high rate of retention of extant pairs of duplicate genes have contributed to an abundance of duplicate genes in plant genomes. These duplicates have contributed to the evolution of novel functions, such as the production of floral structures, induction of disease resistance, and adaptation to stress. Additionally, recent whole-genome duplications that have occurred in the lineages of several domesticated crop species, including wheat (Triticum aestivum), cotton (Gossypium hirsutum), and soybean (Glycine max), have contributed to important agronomic traits, such as grain quality, fruit shape, and flowering time. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms and impacts of gene duplication will be important to future studies of plants in general and of agronomically important crops in particular. In this review, we survey the current knowledge about gene duplication, including gene duplication mechanisms, the potential fates of duplicate genes, models explaining duplicate gene retention, the properties that distinguish duplicate from singleton genes, and the evolutionary impact of gene duplication. PMID:27288366

  16. ANSYS duplicate finite-element checker routine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, R.

    1995-01-01

    An ANSYS finite-element code routine to check for duplicated elements within the volume of a three-dimensional (3D) finite-element mesh was developed. The routine developed is used for checking floating elements within a mesh, identically duplicated elements, and intersecting elements with a common face. A space shuttle main engine alternate turbopump development high pressure oxidizer turbopump finite-element model check using the developed subroutine is discussed. Finally, recommendations are provided for duplicate element checking of 3D finite-element models.

  17. All duplicates are not equal: the difference between small-scale and genome duplication

    PubMed Central

    Hakes, Luke; Pinney, John W; Lovell, Simon C; Oliver, Stephen G; Robertson, David L

    2007-01-01

    Background Genes in populations are in constant flux, being gained through duplication and occasionally retained or, more frequently, lost from the genome. In this study we compare pairs of identifiable gene duplicates generated by small-scale (predominantly single-gene) duplications with those created by a large-scale gene duplication event (whole-genome duplication) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Results We find a number of quantifiable differences between these data sets. Whole-genome duplicates tend to exhibit less profound phenotypic effects when deleted, are functionally less divergent, and are associated with a different set of functions than their small-scale duplicate counterparts. At first sight, either of these latter two features could provide a plausible mechanism by which the difference in dispensability might arise. However, we uncover no evidence suggesting that this is the case. We find that the difference in dispensability observed between the two duplicate types is limited to gene products found within protein complexes, and probably results from differences in the relative strength of the evolutionary pressures present following each type of duplication event. Conclusion Genes, and the proteins they specify, originating from small-scale and whole-genome duplication events differ in quantifiable ways. We infer that this is not due to their association with different functional categories; rather, it is a direct result of biases in gene retention. PMID:17916239

  18. Duplicate pancreas meets gastric duplication cyst: A tale of two anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Christians, Kathleen K.; Pappas, Sam; Pilgrim, Charles; Tsai, Susan; Quebbeman, Edward

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Congenital anomalies are a rare cause of pancreatitis in adults. Gastric duplications are the least common duplication of the gastrointestinal tract and are even more uncommon in the setting of a duplicate pancreas. PRESENTATION OF CASE This manuscript contains a case report and review of the literature of an adult who presented with recurrent pancreatitis and was found to have a gastric duplication cyst that communicated with a duplicate pancreas. The study aim is to alert practitioners to the duplicate anomaly and recommend appropriate therapy. DISCUSSION Combined gastric and pancreatic duplications usually occur in young females with nonspecific, recurrent abdominal pain. This combined duplication can result in pancreatitis when the gastric duplication is contiguous with the stomach. Heightened awareness of the condition, appropriate diagnostics with accurate interpretation and a minimalist approach to resection are warranted. CONCLUSION Recurrent abdominal pain and pancreatitis in young adults devoid of risk factors should lead to consideration of congenital anomalies. Not all cysts near the pancreas and stomach are pseudocysts. ECRP and abdominal CT/MRI provide critical diagnostic information. This dual anomaly is best treated by simple excision of the gastric duplication and heterotopic pancreas. PMID:23827696

  19. Duplication/deletion of chromosome 8p

    SciTech Connect

    Priest, J.H.

    1995-09-11

    The article by Guo et al. provides evidence for deletion of D8S596 loci (assigned to 8p23) in at least some patients with inverted duplications of 8p. Cytogenetic break points forming the inverted duplication are remarkably similar among most of their patients and those reported previously, suggesting a common mechanism for this interesting rearrangement. Why should similar breaks occur in 8p and why is a FISH signal absent in the distal short arm when the ONCOR digoxigenin-labeled probe for loci D8S596 is used? Other studies also indicate that duplication for the region 8p12-p22 is associated with a deletion distal to the duplication itself. 4 refs.

  20. NASA printing, duplicating, and copying management handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This handbook provides information and procedures for the implementation of NASA policy and applicable laws and regulations relating to printing, duplicating, and copying. The topics addressed include a description of relevant laws and regulations, authorizations required, and responsible entities for NASA printing, duplicating, and copying. The policy of NASA is to ensure understanding and application of authority and responsibility on printing matters. Where necessary, the handbook clarifies the intent of basic laws and regulations applicable to NASA.

  1. Drosophila melanogaster metallothionein genes: Selection for duplications

    SciTech Connect

    Lange, B.W.

    1989-01-01

    The metallothionein genes of Drosophila melanogaster, Mtn and Mto, may play an important role in heavy-metal detoxification. In order to investigate the possibility of increased selection for duplications of these genes in natural populations exposed to high levels of heavy metals, I compared the frequencies of such duplications among flies collected from metal-contaminated and non-contaminated orchards in Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Georgia. Contaminated of collection sites and of local flies was confirmed by atomic absorption spectrosphotometry. Six-nucleotide-recognizing restriction enzyme analysis was used to screen 1666 wild third chromosomes for Mtn duplications. A subset (327) of these lines was screened for Mto duplications: none were found. Cadmium tolerance test performed on F{sub 2} progeny of wild females failed to detect a difference in tolerance levels between flies from contaminated orchards and flies from control orchards. Estimates of sequence diversity among a subsample (92) of the chromosomes used in the duplication survey, including all 27 Mtn duplication chromosomes, were obtained using four-nucleotide-recognizing restriction enzyme analysis.

  2. Brain evolution by brain pathway duplication

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Mukta; Jarvis, Erich D.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of evolution of brain pathways for complex behaviours is still in its infancy. Making further advances requires a deeper understanding of brain homologies, novelties and analogies. It also requires an understanding of how adaptive genetic modifications lead to restructuring of the brain. Recent advances in genomic and molecular biology techniques applied to brain research have provided exciting insights into how complex behaviours are shaped by selection of novel brain pathways and functions of the nervous system. Here, we review and further develop some insights to a new hypothesis on one mechanism that may contribute to nervous system evolution, in particular by brain pathway duplication. Like gene duplication, we propose that whole brain pathways can duplicate and the duplicated pathway diverge to take on new functions. We suggest that one mechanism of brain pathway duplication could be through gene duplication, although other mechanisms are possible. We focus on brain pathways for vocal learning and spoken language in song-learning birds and humans as example systems. This view presents a new framework for future research in our understanding of brain evolution and novel behavioural traits. PMID:26554045

  3. 48 CFR 1331.205-70 - Duplication of effort.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Duplication of effort....205-70 Duplication of effort. The Department will not pay any costs for work that is duplicative of..., Duplication of Effort, in all cost-reimbursement, time and materials, and labor hour solicitations...

  4. Do Children Think that Duplicating the Body also Duplicates the Mind?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hood, Bruce; Gjersoe, Nathalia L.; Bloom, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Philosophers use hypothetical duplication scenarios to explore intuitions about personal identity. Here we examined 5- to 6-year-olds' intuitions about the physical properties and memories of a live hamster that is apparently duplicated by a machine. In Study 1, children thought that more of the original's physical properties than episodic…

  5. Genome Duplication: The Heartbeat of Developing Organisms

    PubMed Central

    DePamphilis, Melvin L.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism that duplicates the nuclear genome during the trillions of cell divisions required to develop from zygote to adult is the same throughout the eukarya, but the mechanisms that determine where, when and how much nuclear genome duplication occur regulate development and differ among the eukarya. They allow organisms to change the rate of cell proliferation during development, to activate zygotic gene expression independently of DNA replication, and to restrict nuclear DNA replication to once per cell division. They allow specialized cells to exit their mitotic cell cycle and differentiate into polyploid cells, and in some cases, to amplify the number of copies of specific genes. It is genome duplication that drives evolution, by virtue of the errors that inevitably occur when the same process is repeated trillions of times. It is, unfortunately, the same errors that produce age-related genetic disorders such as cancer. PMID:26970621

  6. Single Incision Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy for Gallbladder Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Kabul Gürbulak, Esin; Özşahin, Hamdi; Düzköylü, Yiğit; Akgün, Ismail Ethem; Battal, Muharrem; Gürbulak, Bünyamin

    2015-01-01

    Duplication of the gallbladder is a rare congenital anomaly of the gallbladder, with an estimated prevalence of 1–3 per 3800 individuals. Unless properly diagnosed preoperatively, it can lead to biliary tract injuries and postoperative complications which may require reoperative surgeries. While previously reported cases have been treated with conventional laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC), treatment with single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) has not been reported yet. We herein present the case of a 58-year-old female with gallbladder duplication who was successfully treated with SILS cholecystectomy. PMID:26266074

  7. Aligning Two Genomic Sequences That Contain Duplications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Minmei; Riemer, Cathy; Berman, Piotr; Hardison, Ross C.; Miller, Webb

    It is difficult to properly align genomic sequences that contain intra-species duplications. With this goal in mind, we have developed a tool, called TOAST (two-way orthologous alignment selection tool), for predicting whether two aligned regions from different species are orthologous, i.e., separated by a speciation event, as opposed to a duplication event. The advantage of restricting alignment to orthologous pairs is that they constitute the aligning regions that are most likely to share the same biological function, and most easily analyzed for evidence of selection. We evaluate TOAST on 12 human/mouse gene clusters.

  8. Fetal Cyst Reveling Retroperitoneal Enteric Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Ayadi, Imene Dahmane; Bezzine, Ahlem; Hamida, Emira Ben; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2017-01-01

    Retroperitoneum is a very uncommon site of enteric duplication (ED). We report a new case of retroperitoneal ED cyst suspected in utero. Prenatal ultrasound showed an abdominal cystic mass. Noncommunicating retroperitoneal ED cyst measuring 70 mm × 30 mm was resected. Histopathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis. PMID:28082784

  9. 40 CFR 710.55 - Duplicative reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Duplicative reporting. 710.55 Section 710.55 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT TSCA CHEMICAL INVENTORY REGULATIONS Inventory Update Reporting for 2006 and Beyond §...

  10. Duplication of the nipples and areolae.

    PubMed

    Hundleby, Christopher J B; Beighton, Peter

    2007-04-01

    A young South African woman has bilateral duplication of the nipples and areolae in an apparently horizontal plane on each breast. She is otherwise normal in every respect, and her family history is negative. This configuration of breast tissue is very unusual and, to the best of our knowledge, it has not previously been reported.

  11. Organising European technical documentation to avoid duplication.

    PubMed

    Donawa, Maria

    2006-04-01

    The development of comprehensive accurate and well-organised technical documentation that demonstrates compliance with regulatory requirements is a resource-intensive, but critically important activity for medical device manufacturers. This article discusses guidance documents and method of organising technical documentation that may help avoid costly and time-consuming duplication.

  12. Filtering duplicate reads from 454 pyrosequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Balzer, Susanne; Malde, Ketil; Grohme, Markus A.; Jonassen, Inge

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Throughout the recent years, 454 pyrosequencing has emerged as an efficient alternative to traditional Sanger sequencing and is widely used in both de novo whole-genome sequencing and metagenomics. Especially the latter application is extremely sensitive to sequencing errors and artificially duplicated reads. Both are common in 454 pyrosequencing and can create a strong bias in the estimation of diversity and composition of a sample. To date, there are several tools that aim to remove both sequencing noise and duplicates. Nevertheless, duplicate removal is often based on nucleotide sequences rather than on the underlying flow values, which contain additional information. Results: With the novel tool JATAC, we present an approach towards a more accurate duplicate removal by analysing flow values directly. Making use of previous findings on 454 flow data characteristics, we combine read clustering with Bayesian distance measures. Finally, we provide a benchmark with an existing algorithm. Availability: JATAC is freely available under the General Public License from http://malde.org/ketil/jatac/. Contact: Ketil.Malde@imr.no Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online PMID:23376350

  13. 40 CFR 710.55 - Duplicative reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Duplicative reporting. 710.55 Section 710.55 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT TSCA CHEMICAL INVENTORY REGULATIONS Inventory Update Reporting for 2006 and Beyond §...

  14. 20 CFR 410.705 - Duplicate claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Duplicate claims. 410.705 Section 410.705 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Rules for the Review of Denied and Pending Claims Under the Black...

  15. 20 CFR 410.705 - Duplicate claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Duplicate claims. 410.705 Section 410.705 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Rules for the Review of Denied and Pending Claims Under the Black...

  16. Differential retention and divergent resolution of duplicate genes following whole-genome duplication

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Casey L.; Gout, Jean-Francois; Johri, Parul; Doak, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    The Paramecium aurelia complex is a group of 15 species that share at least three past whole-genome duplications (WGDs). The macronuclear genome sequences of P. biaurelia and P. sexaurelia are presented and compared to the published sequence of P. tetraurelia. Levels of duplicate-gene retention from the recent WGD differ by >10% across species, with P. sexaurelia losing significantly more genes than P. biaurelia or P. tetraurelia. In addition, historically high rates of gene conversion have homogenized WGD paralogs, probably extending the paralogs’ lifetimes. The probability of duplicate retention is positively correlated with GC content and expression level; ribosomal proteins, transcription factors, and intracellular signaling proteins are overrepresented among maintained duplicates. Finally, multiple sources of evidence indicate that P. sexaurelia diverged from the two other lineages immediately following, or perhaps concurrent with, the recent WGD, with approximately half of gene losses between P. tetraurelia and P. sexaurelia representing divergent gene resolutions (i.e., silencing of alternative paralogs), as expected for random duplicate loss between these species. Additionally, though P. biaurelia and P. tetraurelia diverged from each other much later, there are still more than 100 cases of divergent resolution between these two species. Taken together, these results indicate that divergent resolution of duplicate genes between lineages acts to reinforce reproductive isolation between species in the Paramecium aurelia complex. PMID:25085612

  17. Characterization of duplicated Dunaliella viridis SPT1 genes provides insights into early gene divergence after duplication.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zhenwei; Meng, Xiangzong; Sun, Zhenhua; Xu, Zhengkai; Song, Rentao

    2008-10-15

    The sodium-dependent phosphate transporter gene from unicellular green algae Dunaliella viridis, DvSPT1, shares similarity with members of Pi transporter family. Sequencing analysis of D. viridis BAC clone containing the DvSPT1 gene revealed two inverted duplicated copies of this gene (DvSPT1 and DvSPT1-2 respectively). The duplication covered most of both genes except for their 3' downstream region. The duplicated genomic sequences exhibited 97.9% identity with a synonymous divergence of Ks=0.0126 in the coding region. This data indicated very recent gene duplication in D. viridis genome, providing an excellent opportunity to investigate sequence and expression divergence of duplicated genes at an early stage. Scattered point mutations and length polymorphism of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were predominant among the sequence divergence soon after gene duplication. Due to sequence divergence in the 5' regulatory regions and a swap of the entire 3' downstream regions (3'-UTR), DvSPT1 and DvSPT1-2 showed expression divergence in response to extra-cellular NaCl concentration changes. According to their expression patterns, the two diverged gene copies would provide better adaptation to a broader range of extra-cellular NaCl concentration. Furthermore, Southern blot analysis indicated that there might be a large phosphate transporter gene family in D. viridis.

  18. Chromosomal duplications in bacteria, fruit flies, and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Lupski, J.R.; Weinstock, G.M.; Roth, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    Tandem duplication of chromosomal segments has been recognized as a frequent mutational mechanism in several genetic model systems. In bacteria, fruit flies, and humans, duplications form by similar molecular mechanisms and appear to be important in genome evolution. 80 refs.

  19. DUPLICATE OF THE HISTORIC VIEW SHOWING HOW THE SOUTHEAST (FRONT) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DUPLICATE OF THE HISTORIC VIEW SHOWING HOW THE SOUTHEAST (FRONT) WALL AFTER THE 1862 BATTLE LOOKS IN 1998 (DUPLICATE OF HABS No. GA-2158-54) - Fort Pulaski, Cockspur Island, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  20. Duplication cysts: Diagnosis, management, and the role of endoscopic ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Roy; Adler, Douglas G

    2014-07-01

    Gastrointestinal tract duplication cysts are rare congenital gastrointestinal malformation in young patients and adults. They consist of foregut duplication cysts, small bowel duplication cysts, and large bowel duplication cysts. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has been widely used as a modality for the evaluation and diagnosis of duplication cysts. EUS is the diagnostic tool of choice to investigate duplication cysts since it can distinguish between solid and cystic lesions. The question of whether or not to perform EUS-fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) on a lesion suspected of being a duplication cyst is controversial as these lesions can become infected with significant consequences, although EUS-FNA is often required to obtain a definitive diagnosis and to rule out more ominous lesions. This manuscript will review the literature on duplication cysts throughout the body and will also focus on the role of EUS and FNA with regards to these lesions.

  1. Whole Genome Duplications Shaped the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Repertoire of Jawed Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Brunet, Frédéric G.; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Schartl, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) gene family, involved primarily in cell growth and differentiation, comprises proteins with a common enzymatic tyrosine kinase intracellular domain adjacent to a transmembrane region. The amino-terminal portion of RTKs is extracellular and made of different domains, the combination of which characterizes each of the 20 RTK subfamilies among mammals. We analyzed a total of 7,376 RTK sequences among 143 vertebrate species to provide here the first comprehensive census of the jawed vertebrate repertoire. We ascertained the 58 genes previously described in the human and mouse genomes and established their phylogenetic relationships. We also identified five additional RTKs amounting to a total of 63 genes in jawed vertebrates. We found that the vertebrate RTK gene family has been shaped by the two successive rounds of whole genome duplications (WGD) called 1R and 2R (1R/2R) that occurred at the base of the vertebrates. In addition, the Vegfr and Ephrin receptor subfamilies were expanded by single gene duplications. In teleost fish, 23 additional RTK genes have been retained after another expansion through the fish-specific third round (3R) of WGD. Several lineage-specific gene losses were observed. For instance, birds have lost three RTKs, and different genes are missing in several fish sublineages. The RTK gene family presents an unusual high gene retention rate from the vertebrate WGDs (58.75% after 1R/2R, 64.4% after 3R), resulting in an expansion that might be correlated with the evolution of complexity of vertebrate cellular communication and intracellular signaling. PMID:27260203

  2. Whole Genome Duplications Shaped the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Repertoire of Jawed Vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Brunet, Frédéric G; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Schartl, Manfred

    2016-06-03

    The receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) gene family, involved primarily in cell growth and differentiation, comprises proteins with a common enzymatic tyrosine kinase intracellular domain adjacent to a transmembrane region. The amino-terminal portion of RTKs is extracellular and made of different domains, the combination of which characterizes each of the 20 RTK subfamilies among mammals. We analyzed a total of 7,376 RTK sequences among 143 vertebrate species to provide here the first comprehensive census of the jawed vertebrate repertoire. We ascertained the 58 genes previously described in the human and mouse genomes and established their phylogenetic relationships. We also identified five additional RTKs amounting to a total of 63 genes in jawed vertebrates. We found that the vertebrate RTK gene family has been shaped by the two successive rounds of whole genome duplications (WGD) called 1R and 2R (1R/2R) that occurred at the base of the vertebrates. In addition, the Vegfr and Ephrin receptor subfamilies were expanded by single gene duplications. In teleost fish, 23 additional RTK genes have been retained after another expansion through the fish-specific third round (3R) of WGD. Several lineage-specific gene losses were observed. For instance, birds have lost three RTKs, and different genes are missing in several fish sublineages. The RTK gene family presents an unusual high gene retention rate from the vertebrate WGDs (58.75% after 1R/2R, 64.4% after 3R), resulting in an expansion that might be correlated with the evolution of complexity of vertebrate cellular communication and intracellular signaling.

  3. 44 CFR 204.62 - Duplication and recovery of assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Duplication and recovery of assistance. 204.62 Section 204.62 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY... Administration § 204.62 Duplication and recovery of assistance. (a) Duplication of benefits. We...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: 22q11.2 duplication

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions 22q11.2 duplication 22q11.2 duplication Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description 22q11.2 duplication is a condition caused by an extra ...

  5. 48 CFR 1352.231-71 - Duplication of effort.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Duplication of effort. 1352.231-71 Section 1352.231-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CLAUSES... Duplication of effort. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1331.205-70, insert the following clause: Duplication of...

  6. Case report: Antenatal MRI diagnosis of esophageal duplication cyst.

    PubMed

    Rangasami, Rajeswaran; Chandrasekharan, Anupama; Archana, Lal; Santhosh, Joseph

    2009-02-01

    Esophageal duplication cysts are classified as a subgroup of foregut duplication cysts. They are very rare and are predominantly detected in children. Antenatal detection is very rare. We report a case of an esophageal duplication cyst that was accurately identified antenatally by USG and MRI.

  7. 38 CFR 10.52 - Duplication of payments prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Duplication of payments prohibited. 10.52 Section 10.52 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUSTED COMPENSATION Payments § 10.52 Duplication of payments prohibited. Duplication of payments...

  8. 47 CFR 80.467 - Duplication of VHF service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Duplication of VHF service. 80.467 Section 80... STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Public Coast Stations Use of Telephony § 80.467 Duplication of VHF service. No duplication of service areas as determined by subpart P of this part will be permitted...

  9. Ideal photon number amplifier and duplicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dariano, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    The photon number-amplification and number-duplication mechanism are analyzed in the ideal case. The search for unitary evolutions leads to consider also a number-deamplification mechanism, the symmetry between amplification and deamplification being broken by the integer-value nature of the number operator. Both transformations, amplification and duplication, need an auxiliary field which, in the case of amplification, turns out to be amplified in the inverse way. Input-output energy conservation is accounted for using a classical pump or through frequency-conversion of the fields. Ignoring one of the fields is equivalent to considering the amplifier as an open system involving entropy production. The Hamiltonians of the ideal devices are given and compared with those of realistic systems.

  10. Evolution by leaps: gene duplication in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Sequence related families of genes and proteins are common in bacterial genomes. In Escherichia coli they constitute over half of the genome. The presence of families and superfamilies of proteins suggest a history of gene duplication and divergence during evolution. Genome encoded protein families, their size and functional composition, reflect metabolic potentials of the organisms they are found in. Comparing protein families of different organisms give insight into functional differences and similarities. Results Equivalent enzyme families with metabolic functions were selected from the genomes of four experimentally characterized bacteria belonging to separate genera. Both similarities and differences were detected in the protein family memberships, with more similarities being detected among the more closely related organisms. Protein family memberships reflected known metabolic characteristics of the organisms. Differences in divergence of functionally characterized enzyme family members accounted for characteristics of taxa known to differ in those biochemical properties and capabilities. While some members of the gene families will have been acquired by lateral exchange and other former family members will have been lost over time, duplication and divergence of genes and functions appear to have been a significant contributor to the functional diversity of today’s microbes. Conclusions Protein families seem likely to have arisen during evolution by gene duplication and divergence where the gene copies that have been retained are the variants that have led to distinct bacterial physiologies and taxa. Thus divergence of the duplicate enzymes has been a major process in the generation of different kinds of bacteria. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Drs. Iyer Aravind, Ardcady Mushegian, and Pierre Pontarotti. PMID:19930658

  11. Pseudomyxoma peritonei originating from an intestinal duplication.

    PubMed

    Lemahieu, Julie; D'Hoore, André; Deloose, Stijn; Sciot, Raf; Moerman, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Alimentary tract duplications are rare congenital anomalies. They most often become symptomatic in childhood and rarely undergo malignant transformation. Pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) is an equally uncommon condition, most frequently originating from a primary appendiceal mucinous neoplasm. We report an extremely unusual case of PMP arising from an intestinal duplication. A 67-year-old woman presented with vague upper abdominal pain, and, unexpectedly, explorative laparoscopy revealed diffuse jelly-like peritoneal implants. The histopathological diagnosis of a low-grade PMP or "disseminated peritoneal adenomucinosis" was made. At that moment, no primary tumor was found. During later surgery, a cystic lesion located in the mesentery of the small bowel could be resected. Histologically, the cyst wall clearly showed the concentric layering of a normal bowel wall. The mucosa, however, displayed a diffuse low-grade villous adenoma. We concluded that this histological picture was most consistent with a small intestinal duplication, containing a low-grade villous adenoma. The adenoma caused a mucocele, which subsequently leaked or ruptured, giving rise to noninvasive mucinous peritoneal implants or low-grade PMP, also known as "disseminated peritoneal adenomucinosis" (DPAM).

  12. Pseudomyxoma Peritonei Originating from an Intestinal Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Lemahieu, Julie; D'Hoore, André; Deloose, Stijn; Sciot, Raf; Moerman, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Alimentary tract duplications are rare congenital anomalies. They most often become symptomatic in childhood and rarely undergo malignant transformation. Pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) is an equally uncommon condition, most frequently originating from a primary appendiceal mucinous neoplasm. We report an extremely unusual case of PMP arising from an intestinal duplication. A 67-year-old woman presented with vague upper abdominal pain, and, unexpectedly, explorative laparoscopy revealed diffuse jelly-like peritoneal implants. The histopathological diagnosis of a low-grade PMP or “disseminated peritoneal adenomucinosis” was made. At that moment, no primary tumor was found. During later surgery, a cystic lesion located in the mesentery of the small bowel could be resected. Histologically, the cyst wall clearly showed the concentric layering of a normal bowel wall. The mucosa, however, displayed a diffuse low-grade villous adenoma. We concluded that this histological picture was most consistent with a small intestinal duplication, containing a low-grade villous adenoma. The adenoma caused a mucocele, which subsequently leaked or ruptured, giving rise to noninvasive mucinous peritoneal implants or low-grade PMP, also known as “disseminated peritoneal adenomucinosis” (DPAM). PMID:24024058

  13. Genome changes after gene duplication: haploidy vs. diploidy.

    PubMed

    Xue, Cheng; Huang, Ren; Maxwell, Taylor J; Fu, Yun-Xin

    2010-09-01

    Since genome size and the number of duplicate genes observed in genomes increase from haploid to diploid organisms, diploidy might provide more evolutionary probabilities through gene duplication. It is still unclear how diploidy promotes genomic evolution in detail. In this study, we explored the evolution of segmental gene duplication in haploid and diploid populations by analytical and simulation approaches. Results show that (1) under the double null recessive (DNR) selective model, given the same recombination rate, the evolutionary trajectories and consequences are very similar between the same-size gene-pool haploid vs. diploid populations; (2) recombination enlarges the probability of preservation of duplicate genes in either haploid or diploid large populations, and haplo-insufficiency reinforces this effect; and (3) the loss of duplicate genes at the ancestor locus is limited under recombination while under complete linkage the loss of duplicate genes is always random at the ancestor and newly duplicated loci. Therefore, we propose a model to explain the advantage of diploidy: diploidy might facilitate the increase of recombination rate, especially under sexual reproduction; more duplicate genes are preserved under more recombination by originalization (by which duplicate genes are preserved intact at a special quasi-mutation-selection balance under the DNR or haplo-insufficient selective model), so genome sizes and the number of duplicate genes in diploid organisms become larger. Additionally, it is suggested that small genomic rearrangements due to the random loss of duplicate genes might be limited under recombination.

  14. Investigating Occurrence of Duplicate Updates in BGP Announcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong Han; Jen, Dan; Lad, Mohit; Amante, Shane; McPherson, Danny; Zhang, Lixia

    BGP is a hard-state protocol that uses TCP connections to reliably exchange routing state updates between neighbor BGP routers. According to the protocol, only routing changes should trigger a BGP router to generate updates; updates that do not express any routing changes are superfluous and should not occur. Nonetheless, such 'duplicate' BGP updates have been observed in reports as early as 1998 and as recently as 2007. To date, no quantitative measurement has been conducted on how many of these duplicates get sent, who is sending them, when they are observed, what impact they have on the global health of the Internet, or why these 'duplicate' updates are even being generated. In this paper, we address all of the above through a systematic assessment on the BGP duplicate updates. We first show that duplicates can have a negative impact on router processing loads; routers can receive upto 86.42% duplicates during their busiest times. We then reveal that there is a significant number of duplicates on the Internet - about 13% of all BGP routing updates are duplicates. Finally, through a detailed investigation of duplicate properties, we manage to discover the major cause behind the generation of pathological duplicate BGP updates.

  15. Duplication of the pituitary gland - plus syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Debraj; Arora, Vijinder

    2016-01-01

    Duplication of the pituitary gland (DPG) is a very rare developmental anomaly that is often associated with other anomalies – the DPG-plus syndrome and occurs due to splitting of the rostral notochord and prechordal plate during blastogenesis. DPG with the constellation of associated anomalies as in our patient has not been reported previously. This article illustrates the importance of imaging the brain in all patients with obvious midline facial anomalies and the complementary role of MRI and CT in such cases. PMID:27081236

  16. Gene duplication as a major force in evolution.

    PubMed

    Magadum, Santoshkumar; Banerjee, Urbi; Murugan, Priyadharshini; Gangapur, Doddabhimappa; Ravikesavan, Rajasekar

    2013-04-01

    Gene duplication is an important mechanism for acquiring new genes and creating genetic novelty in organisms. Many new gene functions have evolved through gene duplication and it has contributed tremendously to the evolution of developmental programmes in various organisms. Gene duplication can result from unequal crossing over, retroposition or chromosomal (or genome) duplication. Understanding the mechanisms that generate duplicate gene copies and the subsequent dynamics among gene duplicates is vital because these investigations shed light on localized and genomewide aspects of evolutionary forces shaping intra-specific and inter-specific genome contents, evolutionary relationships, and interactions. Based on whole-genome analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana, there is compelling evidence that angiosperms underwent two whole-genome duplication events early during their evolutionary history. Recent studies have shown that these events were crucial for creation of many important developmental and regulatory genes found in extant angiosperm genomes. Recent studies also provide strong indications that even yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), with its compact genome, is in fact an ancient tetraploid. Gene duplication can provide new genetic material for mutation, drift and selection to act upon, the result of which is specialized or new gene functions. Without gene duplication the plasticity of a genome or species in adapting to changing environments would be severely limited. Whether a duplicate is retained depends upon its function, its mode of duplication, (i.e. whether it was duplicated during a whole-genome duplication event), the species in which it occurs, and its expression rate. The exaptation of preexisting secondary functions is an important feature in gene evolution, just as it is in morphological evolution.

  17. Preservation of duplicate genes by complementary, degenerative mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Force, A; Lynch, M; Pickett, F B; Amores, A; Yan, Y L; Postlethwait, J

    1999-01-01

    The origin of organismal complexity is generally thought to be tightly coupled to the evolution of new gene functions arising subsequent to gene duplication. Under the classical model for the evolution of duplicate genes, one member of the duplicated pair usually degenerates within a few million years by accumulating deleterious mutations, while the other duplicate retains the original function. This model further predicts that on rare occasions, one duplicate may acquire a new adaptive function, resulting in the preservation of both members of the pair, one with the new function and the other retaining the old. However, empirical data suggest that a much greater proportion of gene duplicates is preserved than predicted by the classical model. Here we present a new conceptual framework for understanding the evolution of duplicate genes that may help explain this conundrum. Focusing on the regulatory complexity of eukaryotic genes, we show how complementary degenerative mutations in different regulatory elements of duplicated genes can facilitate the preservation of both duplicates, thereby increasing long-term opportunities for the evolution of new gene functions. The duplication-degeneration-complementation (DDC) model predicts that (1) degenerative mutations in regulatory elements can increase rather than reduce the probability of duplicate gene preservation and (2) the usual mechanism of duplicate gene preservation is the partitioning of ancestral functions rather than the evolution of new functions. We present several examples (including analysis of a new engrailed gene in zebrafish) that appear to be consistent with the DDC model, and we suggest several analytical and experimental approaches for determining whether the complementary loss of gene subfunctions or the acquisition of novel functions are likely to be the primary mechanisms for the preservation of gene duplicates. For a newly duplicated paralog, survival depends on the outcome of the race between

  18. The Duplicate-Replacement System: An Alternative Method of Handling Book Duplicates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clement, Russell T.

    This report studied the alternative method of using book duplicates as replacement copies for worn or missing stack items. The simple operational procedure which is proposed and evaluated could be adapted to virtually any library setting. When tested in Brigham Young University's Lee Library, it was found that such a procedure cost an estimated…

  19. Analysis of LMNB1 Duplications in Autosomal Dominant Leukodystrophy Provides Insights into Duplication Mechanisms and Allele-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Giorgio, Elisa; Rolyan, Harshvardhan; Kropp, Laura; Chakka, Anish Baswanth; Yatsenko, Svetlana; Gregorio, Eleonora Di; Lacerenza, Daniela; Vaula, Giovanna; Talarico, Flavia; Mandich, Paola; Toro, Camilo; Pierre, Eleonore Eymard; Labauge, Pierre; Capellari, Sabina; Cortelli, Pietro; Vairo, Filippo Pinto; Miguel, Diego; Stubbolo, Danielle; Marques, Lourenco Charles; Gahl, William; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile; Melberg, Atle; Hassin-Baer, Sharon; Cohen, Oren S; Pjontek, Rastislav; Grau, Armin; Klopstock, Thomas; Fogel, Brent; Meijer, Inge; Rouleau, Guy; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre L; Ganapathiraju, Madhavi; Vanderver, Adeline; Dahl, Niklas; Hobson, Grace; Brusco, Alfredo; Brussino, Alessandro; Padiath, Quasar Saleem

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autosomal dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD) is an adult onset demyelinating disorder that is caused by duplications of the lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene. However, as only a few cases have been analyzed in detail, the mechanisms underlying LMNB1 duplications are unclear. We report the detailed molecular analysis of the largest collection of ADLD families studied, to date. We have identified the minimal duplicated region necessary for the disease, defined all the duplication junctions at the nucleotide level and identified the first inverted LMNB1 duplication. We have demonstrated that the duplications are not recurrent; patients with identical duplications share the same haplotype, likely inherited from a common founder and that the duplications originated from intrachromosomal events. The duplication junction sequences indicated that nonhomologous end joining or replication-based mechanisms such fork stalling and template switching or microhomology-mediated break induced repair are likely to be involved. LMNB1 expression was increased in patients’ fibroblasts both at mRNA and protein levels and the three LMNB1 alleles in ADLD patients show equal expression, suggesting that regulatory regions are maintained within the rearranged segment. These results have allowed us to elucidate duplication mechanisms and provide insights into allele-specific LMNB1 expression levels. PMID:23649844

  20. Clinical characterization and identification of duplication breakpoints in a Japanese family with Xq28 duplication syndrome including MECP2.

    PubMed

    Fukushi, Daisuke; Yamada, Kenichiro; Nomura, Noriko; Naiki, Misako; Kimura, Reiko; Yamada, Yasukazu; Kumagai, Toshiyuki; Yamaguchi, Kumiko; Miyake, Yoshishige; Wakamatsu, Nobuaki

    2014-04-01

    Xq28 duplication syndrome including MECP2 is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by axial hypotonia at infancy, severe intellectual disability, developmental delay, mild characteristic facial appearance, epilepsy, regression, and recurrent infections in males. We identified a Japanese family of Xq28 duplications, in which the patients presented with cerebellar ataxia, severe constipation, and small feet, in addition to the common clinical features. The 488-kb duplication spanned from L1CAM to EMD and contained 17 genes, two pseudo genes, and three microRNA-coding genes. FISH and nucleotide sequence analyses demonstrated that the duplication was tandem and in a forward orientation, and the duplication breakpoints were located in AluSc at the EMD side, with a 32-bp deletion, and LTR50 at the L1CAM side, with "tc" and "gc" microhomologies at the duplication breakpoints, respectively. The duplicated segment was completely segregated from the grandmother to the patients. These results suggest that the duplication was generated by fork-stalling and template-switching at the AluSc and LTR50 sites. This is the first report to determine the size and nucleotide sequences of the duplicated segments at Xq28 of three generations of a family and provides the genotype-phenotype correlation of the patients harboring the specific duplicated segment.

  1. FT Duplication Coordinates Reproductive and Vegetative Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Chuan-Yu; Adams, Joshua P.; Kim, Hyejin; No, Kyoungok; Ma, Caiping; Strauss, Steven; Drnevich, Jenny; Wickett, Norman; Vandervelde, Lindsay; Ellis, Jeffrey D.; Rice, Brandon; Gunter, Lee E; Tuskan, Gerald A; Brunner, Amy M.; Page, Grier P.; Carlson, John E.; DePamphilis, Claude; Luthe, Dawn S.; Yuceer, Cetin

    2011-01-01

    Annual plants grow vegetatively at early developmental stages and then transition to the reproductive stage, followed by senescence in the same year. In contrast, after successive years of vegetative growth at early ages, woody perennial shoot meristems begin repeated transitions between vegetative and reproductive growth at sexual maturity. However, it is unknown how these repeated transitions occur without a developmental conflict between vegetative and reproductive growth. We report that functionally diverged paralogs FLOWERING LOCUS T1 (FT1) and FLOWERING LOCUS T2 (FT2), products of whole-genome duplication and homologs of Arabidopsis thaliana gene FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), coordinate the repeated cycles of vegetative and reproductive growth in woody perennial poplar (Populus spp.). Our manipulative physiological and genetic experiments coupled with field studies, expression profiling, and network analysis reveal that reproductive onset is determined by FT1 in response to winter temperatures, whereas vegetative growth and inhibition of bud set are promoted by FT2 in response to warm temperatures and long days in the growing season. The basis for functional differentiation between FT1 and FT2 appears to be expression pattern shifts, changes in proteins, and divergence in gene regulatory networks. Thus, temporal separation of reproductive onset and vegetative growth into different seasons via FT1 and FT2 provides seasonality and demonstrates the evolution of a complex perennial adaptive trait after genome duplication.

  2. Gene duplication, genome duplication, and the functional diversification of vertebrate globins

    PubMed Central

    Storz, Jay F.; Opazo, Juan C.; Hoffmann, Federico G.

    2015-01-01

    The functional diversification of the vertebrate globin gene superfamily provides an especially vivid illustration of the role of gene duplication and whole-genome duplication in promoting evolutionary innovation. For example, key globin proteins that evolved specialized functions in various aspects of oxidative metabolism and oxygen signaling pathways (hemoglobin [Hb], myoglobin [Mb], and cytoglobin [Cygb]) trace their origins to two whole-genome duplication events in the stem lineage of vertebrates. The retention of the proto-Hb and Mb genes in the ancestor of jawed vertebrates permitted a physiological division of labor between the oxygen-carrier function of Hb and the oxygen-storage function of Mb. In the Hb gene lineage, a subsequent tandem gene duplication gave rise to the proto α- and β-globin genes, which permitted the formation of multimeric Hbs composed of unlike subunits (α2β2). The evolution of this heteromeric quaternary structure was central to the emergence of Hb as a specialized oxygen-transport protein because it provided a mechanism for cooperative oxygen-binding and allosteric regulatory control. Subsequent rounds of duplication and divergence have produced diverse repertoires of α- and β-like globin genes that are ontogenetically regulated such that functionally distinct Hb isoforms are expressed during different stages of prenatal development and postnatal life. In the ancestor of jawless fishes, the proto Mb and Hb genes appear to have been secondarily lost, and the Cygb homolog evolved a specialized respiratory function in blood-oxygen transport. Phylogenetic and comparative genomic analyses of the vertebrate globin gene superfamily have revealed numerous instances in which paralogous globins have convergently evolved similar expression patterns and/or similar functional specializations in different organismal lineages. PMID:22846683

  3. Gene duplication, genome duplication, and the functional diversification of vertebrate globins.

    PubMed

    Storz, Jay F; Opazo, Juan C; Hoffmann, Federico G

    2013-02-01

    The functional diversification of the vertebrate globin gene superfamily provides an especially vivid illustration of the role of gene duplication and whole-genome duplication in promoting evolutionary innovation. For example, key globin proteins that evolved specialized functions in various aspects of oxidative metabolism and oxygen signaling pathways (hemoglobin [Hb], myoglobin [Mb], and cytoglobin [Cygb]) trace their origins to two whole-genome duplication events in the stem lineage of vertebrates. The retention of the proto-Hb and Mb genes in the ancestor of jawed vertebrates permitted a physiological division of labor between the oxygen-carrier function of Hb and the oxygen-storage function of Mb. In the Hb gene lineage, a subsequent tandem gene duplication gave rise to the proto α- and β-globin genes, which permitted the formation of multimeric Hbs composed of unlike subunits (α(2)β(2)). The evolution of this heteromeric quaternary structure was central to the emergence of Hb as a specialized oxygen-transport protein because it provided a mechanism for cooperative oxygen-binding and allosteric regulatory control. Subsequent rounds of duplication and divergence have produced diverse repertoires of α- and β-like globin genes that are ontogenetically regulated such that functionally distinct Hb isoforms are expressed during different stages of prenatal development and postnatal life. In the ancestor of jawless fishes, the proto Mb and Hb genes appear to have been secondarily lost, and the Cygb homolog evolved a specialized respiratory function in blood-oxygen transport. Phylogenetic and comparative genomic analyses of the vertebrate globin gene superfamily have revealed numerous instances in which paralogous globins have convergently evolved similar expression patterns and/or similar functional specializations in different organismal lineages.

  4. MR Imaging Findings in Xp21.2 Duplication Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Matthew T; Helman, Guy; Gropman, Andrea L

    2016-05-01

    Xp21.2 duplication syndrome is a rare genetic disorder of undetermined prevalence and clinical relevance. As the use of chromosomal microarray has become first line for the work-up of childhood developmental delay, more gene deletions and duplications have been recognized. To the best of our knowledge, the imaging findings of Xp21.2 duplication syndrome have not been reported. We report a case of a 33 month-old male referred for developmental delay that was found to have an Xp21.2 duplication containing IL1RAPL1 and multiple midline brain malformations.

  5. Method of making an apertured casting. [using duplicate mold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terray, A. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An apertured casting is made by first forming a duplicate in the shape of the finished casting, positioning refractory metal bodies such as wires in the duplicate at points corresponding to apertures or passageways in finished products, forming a ceramic coating on the duplicate, removing the duplicate material, firing the ceramic in a vacuum or inert atmosphere, vacuum casting the metal in the ceramic form, removing the ceramic form, heating the cast object in an atmospheric furnace to oxidize the refractory metal bodies and then leaching the oxidized refractory bodies from the casting with a molten caustic agent or acid solution.

  6. MR Imaging Findings in Xp21.2 Duplication Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Matthew T; Helman, Guy; Gropman, Andrea L

    2016-01-01

    Xp21.2 duplication syndrome is a rare genetic disorder of undetermined prevalence and clinical relevance. As the use of chromosomal microarray has become first line for the work-up of childhood developmental delay, more gene deletions and duplications have been recognized. To the best of our knowledge, the imaging findings of Xp21.2 duplication syndrome have not been reported. We report a case of a 33 month-old male referred for developmental delay that was found to have an Xp21.2 duplication containing IL1RAPL1 and multiple midline brain malformations. PMID:27761175

  7. Functional requirements driving the gene duplication in 12 Drosophila species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene duplication supplies the raw materials for novel gene functions and many gene families arisen from duplication experience adaptive evolution. Most studies of young duplicates have focused on mammals, especially humans, whereas reports describing their genome-wide evolutionary patterns across the closely related Drosophila species are rare. The sequenced 12 Drosophila genomes provide the opportunity to address this issue. Results In our study, 3,647 young duplicate gene families were identified across the 12 Drosophila species and three types of expansions, species-specific, lineage-specific and complex expansions, were detected in these gene families. Our data showed that the species-specific young duplicate genes predominated (86.6%) over the other two types. Interestingly, many independent species-specific expansions in the same gene family have been observed in many species, even including 11 or 12 Drosophila species. Our data also showed that the functional bias observed in these young duplicate genes was mainly related to responses to environmental stimuli and biotic stresses. Conclusions This study reveals the evolutionary patterns of young duplicates across 12 Drosophila species on a genomic scale. Our results suggest that convergent evolution acts on young duplicate genes after the species differentiation and adaptive evolution may play an important role in duplicate genes for adaption to ecological factors and environmental changes in Drosophila. PMID:23945147

  8. Gene duplication and transfer events in plant mitochondria genome

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong Aisheng Peng Rihe; Zhuang Jing; Gao Feng; Zhu Bo; Fu Xiaoyan; Xue Yong; Jin Xiaofen; Tian Yongsheng; Zhao Wei; Yao Quanhong

    2008-11-07

    Gene or genome duplication events increase the amount of genetic material available to increase the genomic, and thereby phenotypic, complexity of organisms during evolution. Gene duplication and transfer events have been important to molecular evolution in all three domains of life, and may be the first step in the emergence of new gene functions. Gene transfer events have been proposed as another accelerator of evolution. The duplicated gene or genome, mainly nuclear, has been the subject of several recent reviews. In addition to the nuclear genome, organisms have organelle genomes, including mitochondrial genome. In this review, we briefly summarize gene duplication and transfer events in the plant mitochondrial genome.

  9. Duplicate inferior vena cava filters: more is not always better.

    PubMed

    Katyal, Anup; Javed, Muhammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Duplication of the inferior vena cava (IVC) has been reported in literature. This achieves clinical significance in the setting of lower extremity venous thromboembolism with a contraindication for anticoagulation. We describe a case of lower extremity deep vein thrombosis with duplicate IVC. Anticoagulation was contraindicated in this case leading to successful treatment with double IVC filters. We conducted a PubMed search for all current English language published literature, where filters were placed in the presence of duplicate IVC. We suggest that patients with deep vein thrombosis should have an accurate assessment of venous anatomy before IVC filter placement. Duplication of IVC, although rare, should be considered as this has management implications.

  10. Inherited partial duplication of chromosome No. 15

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Atsuko; Towner, Joseph W.; Ebbin, Allan J.; Kahlstrom, Emily J.; Wilson, Miriam G.

    1974-01-01

    A boy with unusual facial appearance and mental retardation was found to have duplication for the distal half of the long arm of chromosome No. 15 and possibly deficiency for the distal end of the long arm of No. 21. The chromosome abnormality was inherited from his mother, who had a translocation involving chromosomes Nos. 15 and 21. Giemsa-banding localized the break point in chromosome No. 15 just distal to the intense band at the midportion of the long arm. The break point in chromosome No. 21 appeared to be at the distal end of the long arm. The difficulty encountered in cytogenetic analysis of the propositus with conventional staining, the importance of chromosome analysis of the parents, and the application of differential staining techniques are also presented. Images PMID:4139262

  11. The centrosome and its duplication cycle.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jingyan; Hagan, Iain M; Glover, David M

    2015-02-02

    The centrosome was discovered in the late 19th century when mitosis was first described. Long recognized as a key organelle of the spindle pole, its core component, the centriole, was realized more than 50 or so years later also to comprise the basal body of the cilium. Here, we chart the more recent acquisition of a molecular understanding of centrosome structure and function. The strategies for gaining such knowledge were quickly developed in the yeasts to decipher the structure and function of their distinctive spindle pole bodies. Only within the past decade have studies with model eukaryotes and cultured cells brought a similar degree of sophistication to our understanding of the centrosome duplication cycle and the multiple roles of this organelle and its component parts in cell division and signaling. Now as we begin to understand these functions in the context of development, the way is being opened up for studies of the roles of centrosomes in human disease.

  12. The Centrosome and Its Duplication Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jingyan; Hagan, Iain M.; Glover, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The centrosome was discovered in the late 19th century when mitosis was first described. Long recognized as a key organelle of the spindle pole, its core component, the centriole, was realized more than 50 or so years later also to comprise the basal body of the cilium. Here, we chart the more recent acquisition of a molecular understanding of centrosome structure and function. The strategies for gaining such knowledge were quickly developed in the yeasts to decipher the structure and function of their distinctive spindle pole bodies. Only within the past decade have studies with model eukaryotes and cultured cells brought a similar degree of sophistication to our understanding of the centrosome duplication cycle and the multiple roles of this organelle and its component parts in cell division and signaling. Now as we begin to understand these functions in the context of development, the way is being opened up for studies of the roles of centrosomes in human disease. PMID:25646378

  13. 10 CFR 7.21 - Cost of duplication of documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cost of duplication of documents. 7.21 Section 7.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ADVISORY COMMITTEES § 7.21 Cost of duplication of documents. Copies of the records, reports, transcripts, minutes, appendices, working papers, drafts, studies, agenda, or...

  14. 44 CFR 206.191 - Duplication of benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Duplication of benefits. 206.191 Section 206.191 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY... duplication of benefits, according to the general policy guidance of the Federal Emergency Management...

  15. 47 CFR 76.122 - Satellite network non-duplication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Satellite network non-duplication. 76.122 Section 76.122 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Network Non-duplication Protection, Syndicated Exclusivity...

  16. 12 CFR 1073.205 - No requirement for duplicate notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false No requirement for duplicate notice. 1073.205 Section 1073.205 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION PROCEDURES FOR BUREAU DEBT COLLECTION Administrative Offset § 1073.205 No requirement for duplicate notice. Where the...

  17. Supervised Learning for Detection of Duplicates in Genomic Sequence Databases

    PubMed Central

    Zobel, Justin; Zhang, Xiuzhen; Verspoor, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Motivation First identified as an issue in 1996, duplication in biological databases introduces redundancy and even leads to inconsistency when contradictory information appears. The amount of data makes purely manual de-duplication impractical, and existing automatic systems cannot detect duplicates as precisely as can experts. Supervised learning has the potential to address such problems by building automatic systems that learn from expert curation to detect duplicates precisely and efficiently. While machine learning is a mature approach in other duplicate detection contexts, it has seen only preliminary application in genomic sequence databases. Results We developed and evaluated a supervised duplicate detection method based on an expert curated dataset of duplicates, containing over one million pairs across five organisms derived from genomic sequence databases. We selected 22 features to represent distinct attributes of the database records, and developed a binary model and a multi-class model. Both models achieve promising performance; under cross-validation, the binary model had over 90% accuracy in each of the five organisms, while the multi-class model maintains high accuracy and is more robust in generalisation. We performed an ablation study to quantify the impact of different sequence record features, finding that features derived from meta-data, sequence identity, and alignment quality impact performance most strongly. The study demonstrates machine learning can be an effective additional tool for de-duplication of genomic sequence databases. All Data are available as described in the supplementary material. PMID:27489953

  18. 10 CFR 7.21 - Cost of duplication of documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cost of duplication of documents. 7.21 Section 7.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ADVISORY COMMITTEES § 7.21 Cost of duplication of documents. Copies of the records, reports, transcripts, minutes, appendices, working papers, drafts, studies, agenda, or...

  19. 10 CFR 7.21 - Cost of duplication of documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cost of duplication of documents. 7.21 Section 7.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ADVISORY COMMITTEES § 7.21 Cost of duplication of documents. Copies of the records, reports, transcripts, minutes, appendices, working papers, drafts, studies, agenda, or...

  20. 10 CFR 7.21 - Cost of duplication of documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cost of duplication of documents. 7.21 Section 7.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ADVISORY COMMITTEES § 7.21 Cost of duplication of documents. Copies of the records, reports, transcripts, minutes, appendices, working papers, drafts, studies, agenda, or...

  1. 10 CFR 7.21 - Cost of duplication of documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cost of duplication of documents. 7.21 Section 7.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ADVISORY COMMITTEES § 7.21 Cost of duplication of documents. Copies of the records, reports, transcripts, minutes, appendices, working papers, drafts, studies, agenda, or...

  2. 47 CFR 80.467 - Duplication of VHF service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Duplication of VHF service. 80.467 Section 80... STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Public Coast Stations Use of Telephony § 80.467 Duplication of VHF... public coast stations operating on the same VHF public correspondence channel. Within the service area...

  3. 47 CFR 76.122 - Satellite network non-duplication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... by time of day (local time) and by network (if more than one) for each day of the week that the... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Satellite network non-duplication. 76.122... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Network Non-duplication Protection, Syndicated Exclusivity...

  4. 47 CFR 76.122 - Satellite network non-duplication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... by time of day (local time) and by network (if more than one) for each day of the week that the... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Satellite network non-duplication. 76.122... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Network Non-duplication Protection, Syndicated Exclusivity...

  5. 47 CFR 76.122 - Satellite network non-duplication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... by time of day (local time) and by network (if more than one) for each day of the week that the... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Satellite network non-duplication. 76.122... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Network Non-duplication Protection, Syndicated Exclusivity...

  6. Widespread genome duplications throughout the history of flowering plants

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Liying; Wall, P. Kerr; Leebens-Mack, James H.; Lindsay, Bruce G.; Soltis, Douglas E.; Doyle, Jeff J.; Soltis, Pamela S.; Carlson, John E.; Arumuganathan, Kathiravetpilla; Barakat, Abdelali; Albert, Victor A.; Ma, Hong; dePamphilis, Claude W.

    2006-01-01

    Genomic comparisons provide evidence for ancient genome-wide duplications in a diverse array of animals and plants. We developed a birth–death model to identify evidence for genome duplication in EST data, and applied a mixture model to estimate the age distribution of paralogous pairs identified in EST sets for species representing the basal-most extant flowering plant lineages. We found evidence for episodes of ancient genome-wide duplications in the basal angiosperm lineages including Nuphar advena (yellow water lily: Nymphaeaceae) and the magnoliids Persea americana (avocado: Lauraceae), Liriodendron tulipifera (tulip poplar: Magnoliaceae), and Saruma henryi (Aristolochiaceae). In addition, we detected independent genome duplications in the basal eudicot Eschscholzia californica (California poppy: Papaveraceae) and the basal monocot Acorus americanus (Acoraceae), both of which were distinct from duplications documented for ancestral grass (Poaceae) and core eudicot lineages. Among gymnosperms, we found equivocal evidence for ancient polyploidy in Welwitschia mirabilis (Gnetales) and no evidence for polyploidy in pine, although gymnosperms generally have much larger genomes than the angiosperms investigated. Cross-species sequence divergence estimates suggest that synonymous substitution rates in the basal angiosperms are less than half those previously reported for core eudicots and members of Poaceae. These lower substitution rates permit inference of older duplication events. We hypothesize that evidence of an ancient duplication observed in the Nuphar data may represent a genome duplication in the common ancestor of all or most extant angiosperms, except Amborella. PMID:16702410

  7. 47 CFR 76.122 - Satellite network non-duplication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Satellite network non-duplication. 76.122... Sports Blackout § 76.122 Satellite network non-duplication. (a) Upon receiving notification pursuant to paragraph (c) of this section, a satellite carrier shall not deliver, to subscribers within zip code...

  8. Gene duplication models for directed networks with limits on growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enemark, Jakob; Sneppen, Kim

    2007-11-01

    Background: Duplication of genes is important for evolution of molecular networks. Many authors have therefore considered gene duplication as a driving force in shaping the topology of molecular networks. In particular it has been noted that growth via duplication would act as an implicit means of preferential attachment, and thereby provide the observed broad degree distributions of molecular networks. Results: We extend current models of gene duplication and rewiring by including directions and the fact that molecular networks are not a result of unidirectional growth. We introduce upstream sites and downstream shapes to quantify potential links during duplication and rewiring. We find that this in itself generates the observed scaling of transcription factors for genome sites in prokaryotes. The dynamical model can generate a scale-free degree distribution, p(k)\\propto 1/k^{\\gamma } , with exponent γ = 1 in the non-growing case, and with γ>1 when the network is growing. Conclusions: We find that duplication of genes followed by substantial recombination of upstream regions could generate features of genetic regulatory networks. Our steady state degree distribution is however too broad to be consistent with data, thereby suggesting that selective pruning acts as a main additional constraint on duplicated genes. Our analysis shows that gene duplication can only be a main cause for the observed broad degree distributions if there are also substantial recombinations between upstream regions of genes.

  9. 42 CFR 457.626 - Prevention of duplicate payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prevention of duplicate payments. 457.626 Section 457.626 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Payments to States § 457.626 Prevention of duplicate payments. (a) General rule. No payment shall be...

  10. Analysis of recent segmental duplications in the bovine genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Duplicated sequences are an important source of gene innovation and structural variation within mammalian genomes. We describe the first systematic and genome-wide analysis of segmental duplications in the modern domesticated cattle (Bos taurus). Using two distinct computational analyses, we estimat...

  11. 49 CFR 24.3 - No duplication of payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false No duplication of payments. 24.3 Section 24.3 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation UNIFORM RELOCATION ASSISTANCE AND REAL PROPERTY ACQUISITION FOR FEDERAL AND FEDERALLY-ASSISTED PROGRAMS General § 24.3 No duplication of payments. No...

  12. 47 CFR 61.73 - Duplication of rates or regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Duplication of rates or regulations. 61.73 Section 61.73 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES... Duplication of rates or regulations. A carrier concurring in schedules of another carrier must not...

  13. Evolution after whole-genome duplication: a network perspective.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun; Lin, Zhenguo; Nakhleh, Luay

    2013-11-06

    Gene duplication plays an important role in the evolution of genomes and interactomes. Elucidating how evolution after gene duplication interplays at the sequence and network level is of great interest. In this work, we analyze a data set of gene pairs that arose through whole-genome duplication (WGD) in yeast. All these pairs have the same duplication time, making them ideal for evolutionary investigation. We investigated the interplay between evolution after WGD at the sequence and network levels and correlated these two levels of divergence with gene expression and fitness data. We find that molecular interactions involving WGD genes evolve at rates that are three orders of magnitude slower than the rates of evolution of the corresponding sequences. Furthermore, we find that divergence of WGD pairs correlates strongly with gene expression and fitness data. Because of the role of gene duplication in determining redundancy in biological systems and particularly at the network level, we investigated the role of interaction networks in elucidating the evolutionary fate of duplicated genes. We find that gene neighborhoods in interaction networks provide a mechanism for inferring these fates, and we developed an algorithm for achieving this task. Further epistasis analysis of WGD pairs categorized by their inferred evolutionary fates demonstrated the utility of these techniques. Finally, we find that WGD pairs and other pairs of paralogous genes of small-scale duplication origin share similar properties, giving good support for generalizing our results from WGD pairs to evolution after gene duplication in general.

  14. 29 CFR 1912.4 - Avoidance of duplication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Avoidance of duplication. 1912.4 Section 1912.4 Labor... (CONTINUED) ADVISORY COMMITTEES ON STANDARDS Organizational Matters § 1912.4 Avoidance of duplication. No... advisory committee established under section 7(b) of the Act....

  15. MECP2 duplication: possible cause of severe phenotype in females.

    PubMed

    Scott Schwoerer, Jessica; Laffin, Jennifer; Haun, Joanne; Raca, Gordana; Friez, Michael J; Giampietro, Philip F

    2014-04-01

    MECP2 duplication syndrome, originally described in 2005, is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder comprising infantile hypotonia, severe to profound intellectual disability, autism or autistic-like features, spasticity, along with a variety of additional features that are not always clinically apparent. The syndrome is due to a duplication (or triplication) of the gene methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2). To date, the disorder has been described almost exclusively in males. Female carriers of the duplication are thought to have no or mild phenotypic features. Recently, a phenotype for females began emerging. We describe a family with ∼290 kb duplication of Xq28 region that includes the MECP2 gene where the proposita and affected family members are female. Twin sisters, presumed identical, presented early with developmental delay, and seizures. Evaluation of the proposita at 25 years of age included microarray comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) which revealed the MECP2 gene duplication. The same duplication was found in the proposita's sister, who is more severely affected, and the proband's mother who has mild intellectual disability and depression. X-chromosome inactivation studies showed significant skewing in the mother, but was uninformative in the twin sisters. We propose that the MECP2 duplication caused for the phenotype of the proband and her sister. These findings support evidence for varied severity in some females with MECP2 duplications.

  16. Duplication of the mandible in Klippel-Feil syndrome.

    PubMed

    Durmus Kocaaslan, Nihal; Satır, Tevfik; Celebiler, Ozhan; Numanoğlu, Ayhan

    2013-04-01

    The duplication of the mandible is an extremely rare case, which was first described by McLaughlin in 1948 as a case report of duplication of the mouth, the tongue and the mandible. Betty in 1956 and Davies in 1973 reported similar cases. The duplication of the mandible may be associated with the Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS). A low hairline, short neck with cervical vertebral fusion and painless limitation of the head movement are the characteristic findings of this syndrome. The incidence of the syndrome varies from 1/30,000 to 1/40,000. Although autosomal recessive inheritance was suggested, no familial inheritance was found in some cases. A very rare case of mandibular duplication in association with KFS, whose duplicated mass was removed following distraction, has been reported.

  17. Detection of tandam duplications and implications for linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Matise, T.C.; Weeks, D.E. ); Chakravarti, A. ); Patel, P.I.; Lupski, J.R. ); Nelis, E.; Timmerman, V.; Van Broeckhoven, C. )

    1994-06-01

    The first demonstration of an autosomal dominant human disease caused by segmental trisomy came in 1991 for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A). For this disorder, the segmental trisomy is due to a large tandem duplication of 1.5 Mb of DNA located on chromosome 17p11.2-p12. The search for the CMT1A disease gene was misdirected and impeded because some chromosome 17 genetic markers that are linked to CMT1A lie within this duplication. To better understand how such a duplication might affect genetic analyses in the context of disease gene mapping, the authors studied the effects of marker duplication on transmission probabilities of marker alleles, on linkage analysis of an autosomal dominant disease, and on tests of linkage homogeneity. They demonstrate that the undetected presence of a duplication distorts transmission ratios, hampers fine localization of the disease gene, and increases false evidence of linkage heterogeneity. In addition, they devised a likelihood-based method for detecting the presence of a tandemly duplicated marker when one is suspected. They tested their methods through computer simulations and on CMT1A pedigrees genotyped at several chromosome 17 markers. On the simulated data, the method detected 96% of duplicated markers (with a false-positive rate of 5%). On the CMT1A data the method successfully identified two of three loci that are duplicated (with no false positives). This method could be used to identify duplicated markers in other regions of the genome and could be used to delineate the extent of duplications similar to that involved in CMT1A. 18 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. The probability of duplicate gene preservation by subfunctionalization.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, M; Force, A

    2000-01-01

    It has often been argued that gene-duplication events are most commonly followed by a mutational event that silences one member of the pair, while on rare occasions both members of the pair are preserved as one acquires a mutation with a beneficial function and the other retains the original function. However, empirical evidence from genome duplication events suggests that gene duplicates are preserved in genomes far more commonly and for periods far in excess of the expectations under this model, and whereas some gene duplicates clearly evolve new functions, there is little evidence that this is the most common mechanism of duplicate-gene preservation. An alternative hypothesis is that gene duplicates are frequently preserved by subfunctionalization, whereby both members of a pair experience degenerative mutations that reduce their joint levels and patterns of activity to that of the single ancestral gene. We consider the ways in which the probability of duplicate-gene preservation by such complementary mutations is modified by aspects of gene structure, degree of linkage, mutation rates and effects, and population size. Even if most mutations cause complete loss-of-subfunction, the probability of duplicate-gene preservation can be appreciable if the long-term effective population size is on the order of 10(5) or smaller, especially if there are more than two independently mutable subfunctions per locus. Even a moderate incidence of partial loss-of-function mutations greatly elevates the probability of preservation. The model proposed herein leads to quantitative predictions that are consistent with observations on the frequency of long-term duplicate gene preservation and with observations that indicate that a common fate of the members of duplicate-gene pairs is the partitioning of tissue-specific patterns of expression of the ancestral gene. PMID:10629003

  19. Detection of tandem duplications and implications for linkage analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Matise, T. C.; Chakravarti, A.; Patel, P. I.; Lupski, J. R.; Nelis, E.; Timmerman, V.; Van Broeckhoven, C.; Weeks, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    The first demonstration of an autosomal dominant human disease caused by segmental trisomy came in 1991 for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A). For this disorder, the segmental trisomy is due to a large tandem duplication of 1.5 Mb of DNA located on chromosome 17p11.2-p12. The search for the CMT1A disease gene was misdirected and impeded because some chromosome 17 genetic markers that are linked to CMT1A lie within this duplication. To better understand how such a duplication might affect genetic analyses in the context of disease gene mapping, we studied the effects of marker duplication on transmission probabilities of marker alleles, on linkage analysis of an autosomal dominant disease, and on tests of linkage homogeneity. We demonstrate that the undetected presence of a duplication distorts transmission ratios, hampers fine localization of the disease gene, and increases false evidence of linkage heterogeneity. In addition, we devised a likelihood-based method for detecting the presence of a tandemly duplicated marker when one is suspected. We tested our methods through computer simulations and on CMT1A pedigrees genotyped at several chromosome 17 markers. On the simulated data, our method detected 96% of duplicated markers (with a false-positive rate of 5%). On the CMT1A data our method successfully identified two of three loci that are duplicated (with no false positives). This method could be used to identify duplicated markers in other regions of the genome and could be used to delineate the extent of duplications similar to that involved in CMT1A. PMID:8198134

  20. Gene duplication in the evolution of sexual dimorphism.

    PubMed

    Wyman, Minyoung J; Cutter, Asher D; Rowe, Locke

    2012-05-01

    Males and females share most of the same genes, so selection in one sex will typically produce a correlated response in the other sex. Yet, the sexes have evolved to differ in a multitude of behavioral, morphological, and physiological traits. How did this sexual dimorphism evolve despite the presence of a common underlying genome? We investigated the potential role of gene duplication in the evolution of sexual dimorphism. Because duplication events provide extra genetic material, the sexes each might use this redundancy to facilitate sex-specific gene expression, permitting the evolution of dimorphism. We investigated this hypothesis at the genome-wide level in Drosophila melanogaster, using the presence of sex-biased expression as a proxy for the sex-specific specialization of gene function. We expected that if sexually antagonistic selection is a potent force acting upon individual genes, duplication will result in paralog families whose members differ in sex-biased expression. Gene members of the same duplicate family can have different expression patterns in males versus females. In particular, duplicate pairs containing a male-biased gene are found more frequently than expected, in agreement with previous studies. Furthermore, when the singleton ortholog is unbiased, duplication appears to allow one of the paralog copies to acquire male-biased expression. Conversely, female-biased expression is not common among duplicates; fewer duplicate genes are expressed in the female-soma and ovaries than in the male-soma and testes. Expression divergence exists more in older than in younger duplicates pairs, but expression divergence does not correlate with protein sequence divergence. Finally, genomic proximity may have an effect on whether paralogs differ in sex-biased expression. We conclude that the data are consistent with a role of gene duplication in fostering male-biased, but not female-biased, gene expression, thereby aiding the evolution of sexual dimorphism.

  1. Gastric duplication cyst: A cause of rectal bleeding in a young child.

    PubMed

    Surridge, Clare A; Goodier, Matthew D

    2014-01-01

    Gastric duplication cysts are an uncommon congenital anomaly and rectal bleeding is a rare presentation of a complicated gastric duplication cyst. This case report describes the radiological findings in a child with a complicated gastric duplication cyst.

  2. Robust Duplication with Comparison Methods in Microcontrollers

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Heather Marie; Baker, Zachary Kent; Fairbanks, Thomas D.; Tripp, Justin Leonard; Duran Il, Melvin George

    2016-01-01

    Commercial microprocessors could be useful computational platforms in space systems, as long as the risk is bound. Many spacecraft are computationally constrained because all of the computation is done on a single radiation-hardened microprocessor. It is possible that a commercial microprocessor could be used for configuration, monitoring and background tasks that are not mission critical. Most commercial microprocessors are affected by radiation, including single-event effects (SEEs) that could be destructive to the component or corrupt the data. Part screening can help designers avoid components with destructive failure modes, and mitigation can suppress data corruption. We have been experimenting with a method for masking radiation-induced faults through the software executing on the microprocessor. While triple-modular redundancy (TMR) techniques are very effective at masking faults in software, the increased amount of execution time to complete the computation is not desirable. Here in this article we present a technique for combining duplication with compare (DWC) with TMR that decreases observable errors by as much as 145 times with only a 2.35 time decrease in performance.

  3. Robust Duplication with Comparison Methods in Microcontrollers

    DOE PAGES

    Quinn, Heather Marie; Baker, Zachary Kent; Fairbanks, Thomas D.; ...

    2016-01-01

    Commercial microprocessors could be useful computational platforms in space systems, as long as the risk is bound. Many spacecraft are computationally constrained because all of the computation is done on a single radiation-hardened microprocessor. It is possible that a commercial microprocessor could be used for configuration, monitoring and background tasks that are not mission critical. Most commercial microprocessors are affected by radiation, including single-event effects (SEEs) that could be destructive to the component or corrupt the data. Part screening can help designers avoid components with destructive failure modes, and mitigation can suppress data corruption. We have been experimenting with amore » method for masking radiation-induced faults through the software executing on the microprocessor. While triple-modular redundancy (TMR) techniques are very effective at masking faults in software, the increased amount of execution time to complete the computation is not desirable. Here in this article we present a technique for combining duplication with compare (DWC) with TMR that decreases observable errors by as much as 145 times with only a 2.35 time decrease in performance.« less

  4. Novel Duplicate Address Detection with Hash Function

    PubMed Central

    Song, GuangJia; Ji, ZhenZhou

    2016-01-01

    Duplicate address detection (DAD) is an important component of the address resolution protocol (ARP) and the neighbor discovery protocol (NDP). DAD determines whether an IP address is in conflict with other nodes. In traditional DAD, the target address to be detected is broadcast through the network, which provides convenience for malicious nodes to attack. A malicious node can send a spoofing reply to prevent the address configuration of a normal node, and thus, a denial-of-service attack is launched. This study proposes a hash method to hide the target address in DAD, which prevents an attack node from launching destination attacks. If the address of a normal node is identical to the detection address, then its hash value should be the same as the “Hash_64” field in the neighboring solicitation message. Consequently, DAD can be successfully completed. This process is called DAD-h. Simulation results indicate that address configuration using DAD-h has a considerably higher success rate when under attack compared with traditional DAD. Comparative analysis shows that DAD-h does not require third-party devices and considerable computing resources; it also provides a lightweight security resolution. PMID:26991901

  5. The "Bilhaut-Cloquet" technique for treatment of thumb duplication.

    PubMed

    Samson, P; Salazard, B; Magalon, G

    2004-01-01

    The presentation of thumb duplication is variable depending on the level of bifurcation, the relative sizes of the two thumbs and their possible symmetry along a longitudinal axis. Resection of the supernumerary thumb often leads to disappointing results when both thumbs are hypoplastic. The principle of the "Bilhaut-Cloquet" procedure involves central resection of the duplication followed by fusion of the remaining lateral portions, in order to obtain a thumb of satisfactory volume. Thirteen children with unilateral thumb duplication were treated using the "Bilhaut-Cloquet" procedure. Nine cases involved duplication of the distal phalanx (Wassel type II). Five of these duplications were symmetrical and four were asymmetrical with an associated proximal delta phalanx. In these cases, a corrective osteotomy of the delta phalanx was performed at the same time. Four cases involved symmetrical duplications of both proximal and distal phalanges (Wassel type IV). The mean age at time of surgery was 11.5 months. Patients were reviewed with a mean follow-up of four years. The aesthetic aspect of the nail was judged as good in 12 cases. In one case, the aesthetic aspect of the nail was judged as fair due to a prominent longitudinal ridge. Bony fusion was obtained in all cases but one. The alignment was corrected in all cases but four, involving asymmetrical duplications. Joint mobility was limited in all patients. The "Bilhaut-Cloquet" technique leads to a satisfactory volume of the thumb in selected cases. Good correction of preoperative angular deformity is obtained in symmetrical cases. A precise technique of bone and nail approximation yields good functional and aesthetic results. The "Bilhaut-Cloquet" technique is indicated in balanced and symmetrical duplications, when the two thumbs are severely hypoplastic. It can be used either in the distal or proximal phalangeal types of thumb duplication.

  6. The probability of preservation of a newly arisen gene duplicate.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, M; O'Hely, M; Walsh, B; Force, A

    2001-01-01

    Newly emerging data from genome sequencing projects suggest that gene duplication, often accompanied by genetic map changes, is a common and ongoing feature of all genomes. This raises the possibility that differential expansion/contraction of various genomic sequences may be just as important a mechanism of phenotypic evolution as changes at the nucleotide level. However, the population-genetic mechanisms responsible for the success vs. failure of newly arisen gene duplicates are poorly understood. We examine the influence of various aspects of gene structure, mutation rates, degree of linkage, and population size (N) on the joint fate of a newly arisen duplicate gene and its ancestral locus. Unless there is active selection against duplicate genes, the probability of permanent establishment of such genes is usually no less than 1/(4N) (half of the neutral expectation), and it can be orders of magnitude greater if neofunctionalizing mutations are common. The probability of a map change (reassignment of a key function of an ancestral locus to a new chromosomal location) induced by a newly arisen duplicate is also generally >1/(4N) for unlinked duplicates, suggesting that recurrent gene duplication and alternative silencing may be a common mechanism for generating microchromosomal rearrangements responsible for postreproductive isolating barriers among species. Relative to subfunctionalization, neofunctionalization is expected to become a progressively more important mechanism of duplicate-gene preservation in populations with increasing size. However, even in large populations, the probability of neofunctionalization scales only with the square of the selective advantage. Tight linkage also influences the probability of duplicate-gene preservation, increasing the probability of subfunctionalization but decreasing the probability of neofunctionalization. PMID:11779815

  7. The probability of preservation of a newly arisen gene duplicate.

    PubMed

    Lynch, M; O'Hely, M; Walsh, B; Force, A

    2001-12-01

    Newly emerging data from genome sequencing projects suggest that gene duplication, often accompanied by genetic map changes, is a common and ongoing feature of all genomes. This raises the possibility that differential expansion/contraction of various genomic sequences may be just as important a mechanism of phenotypic evolution as changes at the nucleotide level. However, the population-genetic mechanisms responsible for the success vs. failure of newly arisen gene duplicates are poorly understood. We examine the influence of various aspects of gene structure, mutation rates, degree of linkage, and population size (N) on the joint fate of a newly arisen duplicate gene and its ancestral locus. Unless there is active selection against duplicate genes, the probability of permanent establishment of such genes is usually no less than 1/(4N) (half of the neutral expectation), and it can be orders of magnitude greater if neofunctionalizing mutations are common. The probability of a map change (reassignment of a key function of an ancestral locus to a new chromosomal location) induced by a newly arisen duplicate is also generally >1/(4N) for unlinked duplicates, suggesting that recurrent gene duplication and alternative silencing may be a common mechanism for generating microchromosomal rearrangements responsible for postreproductive isolating barriers among species. Relative to subfunctionalization, neofunctionalization is expected to become a progressively more important mechanism of duplicate-gene preservation in populations with increasing size. However, even in large populations, the probability of neofunctionalization scales only with the square of the selective advantage. Tight linkage also influences the probability of duplicate-gene preservation, increasing the probability of subfunctionalization but decreasing the probability of neofunctionalization.

  8. Benchmarks for measurement of duplicate detection methods in nucleotide databases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingyu; Zobel, Justin; Verspoor, Karin

    2017-01-08

    Duplication of information in databases is a major data quality challenge. The presence of duplicates, implying either redundancy or inconsistency, can have a range of impacts on the quality of analyses that use the data. To provide a sound basis for research on this issue in databases of nucleotide sequences, we have developed new, large-scale validated collections of duplicates, which can be used to test the effectiveness of duplicate detection methods. Previous collections were either designed primarily to test efficiency, or contained only a limited number of duplicates of limited kinds. To date, duplicate detection methods have been evaluated on separate, inconsistent benchmarks, leading to results that cannot be compared and, due to limitations of the benchmarks, of questionable generality. In this study, we present three nucleotide sequence database benchmarks, based on information drawn from a range of resources, including information derived from mapping to two data sections within the UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB), UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot and UniProtKB/TrEMBL. Each benchmark has distinct characteristics. We quantify these characteristics and argue for their complementary value in evaluation. The benchmarks collectively contain a vast number of validated biological duplicates; the largest has nearly half a billion duplicate pairs (although this is probably only a tiny fraction of the total that is present). They are also the first benchmarks targeting the primary nucleotide databases. The records include the 21 most heavily studied organisms in molecular biology research. Our quantitative analysis shows that duplicates in the different benchmarks, and in different organisms, have different characteristics. It is thus unreliable to evaluate duplicate detection methods against any single benchmark. For example, the benchmark derived from UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot mappings identifies more diverse types of duplicates, showing the importance of expert curation, but

  9. Methods, apparatus and system for selective duplication of subtasks

    DOEpatents

    Andrade Costa, Carlos H.; Cher, Chen-Yong; Park, Yoonho; Rosenburg, Bryan S.; Ryu, Kyung D.

    2016-03-29

    A method for selective duplication of subtasks in a high-performance computing system includes: monitoring a health status of one or more nodes in a high-performance computing system, where one or more subtasks of a parallel task execute on the one or more nodes; identifying one or more nodes as having a likelihood of failure which exceeds a first prescribed threshold; selectively duplicating the one or more subtasks that execute on the one or more nodes having a likelihood of failure which exceeds the first prescribed threshold; and notifying a messaging library that one or more subtasks were duplicated.

  10. 7 CFR 91.29 - Issuance of duplicate certificates or reissuance of an analysis report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... initial analysis report shall be shown on the duplicate form. (e) Duplicate certificates or...

  11. 40 CFR 25.13 - Coordination and non-duplication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS UNDER THE RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND RECOVERY ACT, THE SAFE DRINKING WATER ACT, AND THE CLEAN WATER ACT § 25.13 Coordination and non-duplication. The public participation activities and materials...

  12. 40 CFR 25.13 - Coordination and non-duplication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS UNDER THE RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND RECOVERY ACT, THE SAFE DRINKING WATER ACT, AND THE CLEAN WATER ACT § 25.13 Coordination and non-duplication. The public participation activities and materials...

  13. Dietary intakes of pesticides based on community duplicate diet samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    The calculation of dietary intake of selected pesticides was accomplished using food samples collected from individual representatives of a defined demographic community using a community duplicate diet approach. A community of nine participants was identified in Apopka, FL from...

  14. Tessier 30 Facial Cleft with Duplication of Tongue

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Jayanta Kumar

    2017-01-01

    A case of midline cleft of the lower lip, mandible, and the neck with complete duplication of the tongue repaired at neonatal period is reported here. Median cleft of the lower lip, mandible, and bifid tongue with ankyloglossia is reported in the literature, but cleft of the neck with complete duplication of the tongue as a part of the Tessier 30 cleft is very rare. We could not find such report in the available English literature. PMID:28082778

  15. Sibs lacking characteristic features of duplication of distal 17q.

    PubMed Central

    Ohdo, S; Madokoro, H; Sonoda, T; Ohba, K

    1989-01-01

    Two brothers with karyotype 46,XY,-16,+der(16),t(16;17)(q24.3;q25.1)pat are presented. It is commonly thought that duplication of distal 17q results in a clinically recognisable syndrome. Although our cases had several features often seen in patients with autosomal chromosome aberrations, they did not have any of the specific features found in other patients with this duplication. Images PMID:2664178

  16. Duplication of 10q confirmed by DNA in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, V.P.; Sutliff, W.C.

    1994-08-15

    Partial duplication of 10q is a recognizable clinical entity. In most of the reported cases, the trisomic segment is identified by a balanced translocation state in a parent. Verification remains a problem in de novo cases. However, the recent availability of whole chromosome probes allows for confirmatory diagnosis of suspected cases. We describe a case of de novo duplication (10q) with verification using DNA is situ hybridization. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  17. [Intestinal cystic duplication in infants and the etiology of intussusception].

    PubMed

    Kasis, A; Sabo, E; Mogilner, J G; Boss, J

    1993-11-15

    2 infants, 3 months old and 8 months, respectively, with restlessness and vomiting were each found to have ileocolic intussusception with barium filling defects. Laparotomy disclosed in each a dome-shaped structure, 2 cm and 0.6 cm in greatest diameter, respectively, on the antimesenteric side of the ileal wall. Histological examination showed cystic duplication of the ileum. It is suggested that manual reduction generally fails when cystic duplication is an etiological factor, and surgery is then mandatory.

  18. A novel duplicate images detection method based on PLSA model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Xiaofeng; Wang, Yongji; Ding, Liping; Gu, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Web image search results usually contain duplicate copies. This paper considers the problem of detecting and clustering duplicate images contained in web image search results. Detecting and clustering the duplicate images together facilitates users' viewing. A novel method is presented in this paper to detect and cluster duplicate images by measuring similarity between their topics. More specifically, images are viewed as documents consisting of visual words formed by vector quantizing the affine invariant visual features. Then a statistical model widely used in text domain, the PLSA(Probabilistic Latent Semantic Analysis) model, is utilized to map images into a probabilistic latent semantic space. Because the main content remains unchanged despite small digital alteration, duplicate images will be close to each other in the derived semantic space. Based on this, a simple clustering process can successfully detect duplicate images and cluster them together. Comparing to those methods based on comparison between hash value of visual words, this method is more robust to the visual feature level alteration posed on the images. Experiments demonstrates the effectiveness of this method.

  19. A novel duplicate images detection method based on PLSA model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Xiaofeng; Wang, Yongji; Ding, Liping; Gu, Jian

    2011-12-01

    Web image search results usually contain duplicate copies. This paper considers the problem of detecting and clustering duplicate images contained in web image search results. Detecting and clustering the duplicate images together facilitates users' viewing. A novel method is presented in this paper to detect and cluster duplicate images by measuring similarity between their topics. More specifically, images are viewed as documents consisting of visual words formed by vector quantizing the affine invariant visual features. Then a statistical model widely used in text domain, the PLSA(Probabilistic Latent Semantic Analysis) model, is utilized to map images into a probabilistic latent semantic space. Because the main content remains unchanged despite small digital alteration, duplicate images will be close to each other in the derived semantic space. Based on this, a simple clustering process can successfully detect duplicate images and cluster them together. Comparing to those methods based on comparison between hash value of visual words, this method is more robust to the visual feature level alteration posed on the images. Experiments demonstrates the effectiveness of this method.

  20. Efficient edit distance with duplications and contractions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We propose three algorithms for string edit distance with duplications and contractions. These include an efficient general algorithm and two improvements which apply under certain constraints on the cost function. The new algorithms solve a more general problem variant and obtain better time complexities with respect to previous algorithms. Our general algorithm is based on min-plus multiplication of square matrices and has time and space complexities of O (|Σ|MP (n)) and O (|Σ|n2), respectively, where |Σ| is the alphabet size, n is the length of the strings, and MP (n) is the time bound for the computation of min-plus matrix multiplication of two n × n matrices (currently, MP(n)=On3log3lognlog2n due to an algorithm by Chan). For integer cost functions, the running time is further improved to O|Σ|n3log2n. In addition, this variant of the algorithm is online, in the sense that the input strings may be given letter by letter, and its time complexity bounds the processing time of the first n given letters. This acceleration is based on our efficient matrix-vector min-plus multiplication algorithm, intended for matrices and vectors for which differences between adjacent entries are from a finite integer interval D. Choosing a constant 1log|D|n<λ<1, the algorithm preprocesses an n × n matrix in On2+λ|D| time and On2+λ|D|λ2log|D|2n space. Then, it may multiply the matrix with any given n-length vector in On2λ2log|D|2n time. Under some discreteness assumptions, this matrix-vector min-plus multiplication algorithm applies to several problems from the domains of context-free grammar parsing and RNA folding and, in particular, implies the asymptotically fastest On3log2n time algorithm for single-strand RNA folding with discrete cost functions. Finally, assuming a different constraint on the cost function, we present another version of the algorithm that exploits the run-length encoding of the strings and runs in O|Σ|nMP(ñ)ñ time and O

  1. High fitness costs and instability of gene duplications reduce rates of evolution of new genes by duplication-divergence mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Adler, Marlen; Anjum, Mehreen; Berg, Otto G; Andersson, Dan I; Sandegren, Linus

    2014-06-01

    An important mechanism for generation of new genes is by duplication-divergence of existing genes. Duplication-divergence includes several different submodels, such as subfunctionalization where after accumulation of neutral mutations the original function is distributed between two partially functional and complementary genes, and neofunctionalization where a new function evolves in one of the duplicated copies while the old function is maintained in another copy. The likelihood of these mechanisms depends on the longevity of the duplicated state, which in turn depends on the fitness cost and genetic stability of the duplications. Here, we determined the fitness cost and stability of defined gene duplications/amplifications on a low copy number plasmid. Our experimental results show that the costs of carrying extra gene copies are substantial and that each additional kilo base pairs of DNA reduces fitness by approximately 0.15%. Furthermore, gene amplifications are highly unstable and rapidly segregate to lower copy numbers in absence of selection. Mathematical modeling shows that the fitness costs and instability strongly reduces the likelihood of both sub- and neofunctionalization, but that these effects can be offset by positive selection for novel beneficial functions.

  2. Sequencing of Pax6 Loci from the Elephant Shark Reveals a Family of Pax6 Genes in Vertebrate Genomes, Forged by Ancient Duplications and Divergences

    PubMed Central

    Gautier, Philippe; Loosli, Felix; Tay, Boon-Hui; Tay, Alice; Murdoch, Emma; Coutinho, Pedro; van Heyningen, Veronica; Brenner, Sydney; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Kleinjan, Dirk A.

    2013-01-01

    Pax6 is a developmental control gene essential for eye development throughout the animal kingdom. In addition, Pax6 plays key roles in other parts of the CNS, olfactory system, and pancreas. In mammals a single Pax6 gene encoding multiple isoforms delivers these pleiotropic functions. Here we provide evidence that the genomes of many other vertebrate species contain multiple Pax6 loci. We sequenced Pax6-containing BACs from the cartilaginous elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii) and found two distinct Pax6 loci. Pax6.1 is highly similar to mammalian Pax6, while Pax6.2 encodes a paired-less Pax6. Using synteny relationships, we identify homologs of this novel paired-less Pax6.2 gene in lizard and in frog, as well as in zebrafish and in other teleosts. In zebrafish two full-length Pax6 duplicates were known previously, originating from the fish-specific genome duplication (FSGD) and expressed in divergent patterns due to paralog-specific loss of cis-elements. We show that teleosts other than zebrafish also maintain duplicate full-length Pax6 loci, but differences in gene and regulatory domain structure suggest that these Pax6 paralogs originate from a more ancient duplication event and are hence renamed as Pax6.3. Sequence comparisons between mammalian and elephant shark Pax6.1 loci highlight the presence of short- and long-range conserved noncoding elements (CNEs). Functional analysis demonstrates the ancient role of long-range enhancers for Pax6 transcription. We show that the paired-less Pax6.2 ortholog in zebrafish is expressed specifically in the developing retina. Transgenic analysis of elephant shark and zebrafish Pax6.2 CNEs with homology to the mouse NRE/Pα internal promoter revealed highly specific retinal expression. Finally, morpholino depletion of zebrafish Pax6.2 resulted in a “small eye” phenotype, supporting a role in retinal development. In summary, our study reveals that the pleiotropic functions of Pax6 in vertebrates are served by a divergent

  3. TECHNIQUES OF TAPE PREPARATION AND DUPLICATION, WITH SUGGESTIONS FOR A LANGUAGE LABORATORY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Dept. of Public Instruction, Topeka.

    PART ONE OF THIS BULLETIN PROVIDES HELP IN THE TWO CRITICAL AREAS OF MASTER TAPE PREPARATION AND DUPLICATION. SUPPLEMENTED BY NUMEROUS PHOTOGRAPHS AND DIAGRAMS OF EQUIPMENT AND DUPLICATION TECHNIQUES, THE BULLETIN DESCRIBES MASTER PROGRAM DUPLICATION USING LANGUAGE LABORATORY EQUIPMENT, A PROFESSIONAL MASS DUPLICATOR, A TAPE RECORDER, A RECORD…

  4. Duplication and maintenance of the Myb genes of vertebrate animals.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Colin J; Guthrie, Erin E; Lipsick, Joseph S

    2013-02-15

    Gene duplication is an important means of generating new genes. The major mechanisms by which duplicated genes are preserved in the face of purifying selection are thought to be neofunctionalization, subfunctionalization, and increased gene dosage. However, very few duplicated gene families in vertebrate species have been analyzed by functional tests in vivo. We have therefore examined the three vertebrate Myb genes (c-Myb, A-Myb, and B-Myb) by cytogenetic map analysis, by sequence analysis, and by ectopic expression in Drosophila. We provide evidence that the vertebrate Myb genes arose by two rounds of regional genomic duplication. We found that ubiquitous expression of c-Myb and A-Myb, but not of B-Myb or Drosophila Myb, was lethal in Drosophila. Expression of any of these genes during early larval eye development was well tolerated. However, expression of c-Myb and A-Myb, but not of B-Myb or Drosophila Myb, during late larval eye development caused drastic alterations in adult eye morphology. Mosaic analysis implied that this eye phenotype was cell-autonomous. Interestingly, some of the eye phenotypes caused by the retroviral v-Myb oncogene and the normal c-Myb proto-oncogene from which v-Myb arose were quite distinct. Finally, we found that post-translational modifications of c-Myb by the GSK-3 protein kinase and by the Ubc9 SUMO-conjugating enzyme that normally occur in vertebrate cells can modify the eye phenotype caused by c-Myb in Drosophila. These results support a model in which the three Myb genes of vertebrates arose by two sequential duplications. The first duplication was followed by a subfunctionalization of gene expression, then neofunctionalization of protein function to yield a c/A-Myb progenitor. The duplication of this progenitor was followed by subfunctionalization of gene expression to give rise to tissue-specific c-Myb and A-Myb genes.

  5. Investigating the root causes of duplicate publication in research articles

    PubMed Central

    Adibi, Payman; Kianpour, Maryam; Shirani, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    Duplicate publication is the republication of an article in which a lot of important parts overlap with the published copy. This issue is nearly at the top of the list of subjects, which medical journal editors discuss. this study was conducted with the purpose of investigating the publication patterns and determining it's root causes in research articles in the Isfahan University of Medical Science and to find a solution to prevent it. In a cross sectional study, All the discovered cases of duplicate publication, which were referred to the ethics committee of the Isfahan University of Medical Science during 2005–2008 were selected to be investigated through a descriptive method. After confirmation about the case of a duplicate publication, the requisite investigation was conducted through interviews and review of the correspondence and documentaries, and then, a radical line was charted. After investigating the cases and classifying the radical causes and incidents, categorization and definition of duplicate publication are presented. Eight out of nine republished articles belonged to the first category of Baily's index (copy publication) and one was in the third category (minimum publishable unit: Salami slicing). The results of the present article indicate that, the scientific community of the country is not yet familiar with the professional principles of scientific and research affairs. According to the results of this investigation, it is recommended to take official action against duplicate publication cases, violation of copyright, and also to have strict instructions against this unethical practice. PMID:25861659

  6. PGDD: a database of gene and genome duplication in plants

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae-Ho; Tang, Haibao; Wang, Xiyin; Paterson, Andrew H.

    2013-01-01

    Genome duplication (GD) has permanently shaped the architecture and function of many higher eukaryotic genomes. The angiosperms (flowering plants) are outstanding models in which to elucidate consequences of GD for higher eukaryotes, owing to their propensity for chromosomal duplication or even triplication in a few cases. Duplicated genome structures often require both intra- and inter-genome alignments to unravel their evolutionary history, also providing the means to deduce both obvious and otherwise-cryptic orthology, paralogy and other relationships among genes. The burgeoning sets of angiosperm genome sequences provide the foundation for a host of investigations into the functional and evolutionary consequences of gene and GD. To provide genome alignments from a single resource based on uniform standards that have been validated by empirical studies, we built the Plant Genome Duplication Database (PGDD; freely available at http://chibba.agtec.uga.edu/duplication/), a web service providing synteny information in terms of colinearity between chromosomes. At present, PGDD contains data for 26 plants including bryophytes and chlorophyta, as well as angiosperms with draft genome sequences. In addition to the inclusion of new genomes as they become available, we are preparing new functions to enhance PGDD. PMID:23180799

  7. Formation of Regulatory Modules by Local Sequence Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Nourmohammad, Armita; Lässig, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Turnover of regulatory sequence and function is an important part of molecular evolution. But what are the modes of sequence evolution leading to rapid formation and loss of regulatory sites? Here we show that a large fraction of neighboring transcription factor binding sites in the fly genome have formed from a common sequence origin by local duplications. This mode of evolution is found to produce regulatory information: duplications can seed new sites in the neighborhood of existing sites. Duplicate seeds evolve subsequently by point mutations, often towards binding a different factor than their ancestral neighbor sites. These results are based on a statistical analysis of 346 cis-regulatory modules in the Drosophila melanogaster genome, and a comparison set of intergenic regulatory sequence in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In fly regulatory modules, pairs of binding sites show significantly enhanced sequence similarity up to distances of about 50 bp. We analyze these data in terms of an evolutionary model with two distinct modes of site formation: (i) evolution from independent sequence origin and (ii) divergent evolution following duplication of a common ancestor sequence. Our results suggest that pervasive formation of binding sites by local sequence duplications distinguishes the complex regulatory architecture of higher eukaryotes from the simpler architecture of unicellular organisms. PMID:21998564

  8. Retrotransposon "Qian" mediated segmental duplication in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunmin; Jiang, Ning; Zou, Ziliang; Tu, Zhijian; Chen, Anli; Zhao, Qiaoling; Xiang, Zhonghuai; He, Ningjia

    2014-03-01

    Transposable elements constitute a large fraction of the eukaryotic genomes. They have the potential to alter genome structure and play a major role in genome evolution. Here, we report a segmental duplication mediated by a novel long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposon as the cause of an egg-shell recessive lethal mutant (l-em mutant) in silkworm (Bombyx mori). The segmental duplication resulted in the duplication of six genes and the disruption of two genes. Disruption of BmEP80 (B. mori egg protein 80), a gene encoding a major egg-shell structure protein, is likely responsible for the lethal water-loss phenotype in the l-em/l-em mutant. Our data revealed that BmEP80 is present in the inner egg-shell layer and plays important roles in resistance to water efflux form eggs. A novel LTR retrotransposon (named as "Qian") was identified and the model for the Qian-mediated chromosomal segmental duplication was proposed. Detail biochemical and genomic analyses on the l-em mutant offer an opportunity to demonstrate that an LTR retrotransposon could trigger duplication of a chromosomal segment (∼96.3 kb) and confer novel phenotype.

  9. Paralogue Interference Affects the Dynamics after Gene Duplication.

    PubMed

    Kaltenegger, Elisabeth; Ober, Dietrich

    2015-12-01

    Proteins tend to form homomeric complexes of identical subunits, which act as functional units. By definition, the subunits are encoded from a single genetic locus. When such a gene is duplicated, the gene products are suggested initially to cross-interact when coexpressed, thus resulting in the phenomenon of paralogue interference. In this opinion article, we explore how paralogue interference can shape the fate of a duplicated gene. One important outcome is a prolonged time window in which both copies remain under selection increasing the chance to accumulate mutations and to develop new properties. Thereby, paralogue interference can mediate the coevolution of duplicates and here we illustrate the potential of this phenomenon in light of recent new studies.

  10. The Sequence and Analysis of Duplication Rich Human Chromosome 16

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Martin, Joel; Han, Cliff; Gordon, Laurie A.; Terry, Astrid; Prabhakar, Shyam; She, Xinwei; Xie, Gary; Hellsten, Uffe; Man Chan, Yee; Altherr, Michael; Couronne, Olivier; Aerts, Andrea; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Blumer, Heather; Branscomb, Elbert; Brown, Nancy C.; Bruno, William J.; Buckingham, Judith M.; Callen, David F.; Campbell, Connie S.; Campbell, Mary L.; Campbell, Evelyn W.; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chasteen, Leslie A.; Chertkov, Olga; Chi, Han C.; Christensen, Mari; Clark, Lynn M.; Cohn, Judith D.; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Dickson, Mark; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, Mira; Escobar, Julio; Fawcett, Joseph J.; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Grady, Deborah L.; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Hildebrand, Carl E.; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Jewett, Phillip E.; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Krawczyk, Marie-Claude; Leyba, Tina; Longmire, Jonathan L.; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Ludeman, Thom; Mark, Graham A.; Mcmurray, Kimberly L.; Meincke, Linda J.; Morgan, Jenna; Moyzis, Robert K.; Mundt, Mark O.; Munk, A. Christine; Nandkeshwar, Richard D.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Parson-Quintana, Beverly; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Ricke, Darryl O.; Robinson, Donna L.; Rodriguez, Alex; Salamov, Asaf; Saunders, Elizabeth H.; Scott, Duncan; Shough, Timothy; Stallings, Raymond L.; Stalvey, Malinda; Sutherland, Robert D.; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G.; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S.; Tice, Hope; Torney, David C.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Tsai, Ming; Ulanovsky, Levy E.; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; White, P. Scott; Williams, Albert L.; Wills, Patricia L.; Wu, Jung-Rung; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; DeJong, Pieter; Bruce, David; Doggett, Norman; Deaven, Larry; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Richardson, Paul; et al.

    2004-01-01

    We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished human chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9 percent of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobasepairs were identified and result in gene content differences across humans. One of the unique features of chromosome 16 is its high level of segmental duplication, ranked among the highest of the human autosomes. While the segmental duplications are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events which are likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  11. CT and ultrasound of gastric and duodenal duplications

    SciTech Connect

    Guibaud, L.; Genin, G.; Fouque, P.

    1996-05-01

    We present the radiological findings of gastric and duodenal duplications in four adults, in whom abdominal ultrasound, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), and CT were primarily used for diagnosis. The diagnosis was surgically confirmed in all cases. Preoperative diagnosis of duplications was possible with ultrasound in three patients, in whom CT showed a nonspecific cystic structure. Ultrasound demonstrated a pathognomonic multilayered wall appearance suggestive of a digestive origin, including an echogenic inner mucosal layer and a hypoechoic muscular layer, better appreciated using EUS in one patient. In one case, digestive origin was confirmed by direct visualization of a peristaltic activity within the cystic wall after water ingestion. In the last patient, a non-specific heterogeneous mainly solid mass of the esophagogastric junction was found to be an adenocarcinoma arising from a duplication on the histological analysis of the surgical specimen. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  12. The sequence and analysis of duplication rich human chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J; Han, C; Gordon, L A; Terry, A; Prabhakar, S; She, X; Xie, G; Hellsten, U; Chan, Y M; Altherr, M; Couronne, O; Aerts, A; Bajorek, E; Black, S; Blumer, H; Branscomb, E; Brown, N; Bruno, W J; Buckingham, J; Callen, D F; Campbell, C S; Campbell, M L; Campbell, E W; Caoile, C; Challacombe, J F; Chasteen, L A; Chertkov, O; Chi, H C; Christensen, M; Clark, L M; Cohn, J D; Denys, M; Detter, J C; Dickson, M; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, M; Escobar, J; Fawcett, J J; Flowers, D; Fotopulos, D; Glavina, T; Gomez, M; Gonzales, E; Goodstein, D; Goodwin, L A; Grady, D L; Grigoriev, I; Groza, M; Hammon, N; Hawkins, T; Haydu, L; Hildebrand, C E; Huang, W; Israni, S; Jett, J; Jewett, P B; Kadner, K; Kimball, H; Kobayashi, A; Krawczyk, M; Leyba, T; Longmire, J L; Lopez, F; Lou, Y; Lowry, S; Ludeman, T; Manohar, C F; Mark, G A; McMurray, K L; Meincke, L J; Morgan, J; Moyzis, R K; Mundt, M O; Munk, A C; Nandkeshwar, R D; Pitluck, S; Pollard, M; Predki, P; Parson-Quintana, B; Ramirez, L; Rash, S; Retterer, J; Ricke, D O; Robinson, D; Rodriguez, A; Salamov, A; Saunders, E H; Scott, D; Shough, T; Stallings, R L; Stalvey, M; Sutherland, R D; Tapia, R; Tesmer, J G; Thayer, N; Thompson, L S; Tice, H; Torney, D C; Tran-Gyamfi, M; Tsai, M; Ulanovsky, L E; Ustaszewska, A; Vo, N; White, P S; Williams, A L; Wills, P L; Wu, J; Wu, K; Yang, J; DeJong, P; Bruce, D; Doggett, N A; Deaven, L; Schmutz, J; Grimwood, J; Richardson, P; Rokhsar, D S; Eichler, E E; Gilna, P; Lucas, S M; Myers, R M; Rubin, E M; Pennacchio, L A

    2005-04-06

    Human chromosome 16 features one of the highest levels of segmentally duplicated sequence among the human autosomes. We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9% of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein-coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes, and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin, and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobase pairs were identified and result in gene content differences among humans. While the segmental duplications of chromosome 16 are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  13. The sequence and analysis of duplication rich human chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Joel; Han, Cliff; Gordon, Laurie A.; Terry, Astrid; Prabhakar, Shyam; She, Xinwei; Xie, Gary; Hellsten, Uffe; Man Chan, Yee; Altherr, Michael; Couronne, Olivier; Aerts, Andrea; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Blumer, Heather; Branscomb, Elbert; Brown, Nancy C.; Bruno, William J.; Buckingham, Judith M.; Callen, David F.; Campbell, Connie S.; Campbell, Mary L.; Campbell, Evelyn W.; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chasteen, Leslie A.; Chertkov, Olga; Chi, Han C.; Christensen, Mari; Clark, Lynn M.; Cohn, Judith D.; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Dickson, Mark; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, Mira; Escobar, Julio; Fawcett, Joseph J.; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Grady, Deborah L.; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Hildebrand, Carl E.; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Jewett, Phillip E.; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Krawczyk, Marie-Claude; Leyba, Tina; Longmire, Jonathan L.; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Ludeman, Thom; Mark, Graham A.; Mcmurray, Kimberly L.; Meincke, Linda J.; Morgan, Jenna; Moyzis, Robert K.; Mundt, Mark O.; Munk, A. Christine; Nandkeshwar, Richard D.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Parson-Quintana, Beverly; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Ricke, Darryl O.; Robinson, Donna L.; Rodriguez, Alex; Salamov, Asaf; Saunders, Elizabeth H.; Scott, Duncan; Shough, Timothy; Stallings, Raymond L.; Stalvey, Malinda; Sutherland, Robert D.; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G.; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S.; Tice, Hope; Torney, David C.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Tsai, Ming; Ulanovsky, Levy E.; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; White, P. Scott; Williams, Albert L.; Wills, Patricia L.; Wu, Jung-Rung; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; DeJong, Pieter; Bruce, David; Doggett, Norman; Deaven, Larry; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Richardson, Paul; et al.

    2004-08-01

    We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished human chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9 percent of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobasepairs were identified and result in gene content differences across humans. One of the unique features of chromosome 16 is its high level of segmental duplication, ranked among the highest of the human autosomes. While the segmental duplications are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events which are likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  14. The origins and impact of primate segmental duplications

    PubMed Central

    Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Girirajan, Santhosh; Eichler, Evan E.

    2009-01-01

    Duplicated sequences are substrates for the emergence of new genes and are an important source of genetic instability associated with rare and common diseases. Analyses of primate genomes have shown an increase in the proportion of interspersed segmental duplications (SDs) within the genomes of humans and great apes. This contrasts with other mammalian genomes that seem to have their recently duplicated sequences organized in a tandem configuration. In this review, we focus on the mechanistic origin and impact of this difference with respect to evolution, genetic diversity and primate phenotype. Although many genomes will be sequenced in the future, resolution of this aspect of genomic architecture still requires high quality sequences and detailed analyses. PMID:19796838

  15. Content-based network model with duplication and divergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şengün, Yasemin; Erzan, Ayşe

    2006-06-01

    We construct a minimal content-based realization of the duplication and divergence model of genomic networks introduced by Wagner [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 91 (1994) 4387] and investigate the scaling properties of the directed degree distribution and clustering coefficient. We find that the content-based network exhibits crossover between two scaling regimes, with log-periodic oscillations for large degrees. These features are not present in the original gene duplication model, but inherent in the content-based model of Balcan and Erzan. The scaling form of the degree distribution of the content-based model turns out to be robust under duplication and divergence, with some re-adjustment of the scaling exponents, while the out-clustering coefficient goes over from a weak power-law dependence on the degree, to an exponential decay under mutations which include splitting and merging of strings.

  16. Opsin gene duplication and divergence in ray-finned fish.

    PubMed

    Rennison, Diana J; Owens, Gregory L; Taylor, John S

    2012-03-01

    Opsin gene sequences were first reported in the 1980s. The goal of that research was to test the hypothesis that human opsins were members of a single gene family and that variation in human color vision was mediated by mutations in these genes. While the new data supported both hypotheses, the greatest contribution of this work was, arguably, that it provided the data necessary for PCR-based surveys in a diversity of other species. Such studies, and recent whole genome sequencing projects, have uncovered exceptionally large opsin gene repertoires in ray-finned fishes (taxon, Actinopterygii). Guppies and zebrafish, for example, have 10 visual opsin genes each. Here we review the duplication and divergence events that have generated these gene collections. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that large opsin gene repertories in fish have been generated by gene duplication and divergence events that span the age of the ray-finned fishes. Data from whole genome sequencing projects and from large-insert clones show that tandem duplication is the primary mode of opsin gene family expansion in fishes. In some instances gene conversion between tandem duplicates has obscured evolutionary relationships among genes and generated unique key-site haplotypes. We mapped amino acid substitutions at so-called key-sites onto phylogenies and this exposed many examples of convergence. We found that dN/dS values were higher on the branches of our trees that followed gene duplication than on branches that followed speciation events, suggesting that duplication relaxes constraints on opsin sequence evolution. Though the focus of the review is opsin sequence evolution, we also note that there are few clear connections between opsin gene repertoires and variation in spectral environment, morphological traits, or life history traits.

  17. Urethral Duplication with Two Hypospadic Meati—An Unusual Variant

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Joseph Rutherford; Wright, Naomi Jane; Garriboli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Duplication of the urethra is a rare congenital anomaly, with approximately 300 cases reported in the literature. We report a unique case of this condition in a male infant. This case differs from the classical Effman type II-A2 duplication because of the presence of two hypospadic urethral meati, as opposed to a ventral or dorsal accessory meatus with a normally positioned distal urethra. The patient underwent a single-stage repair consisting of a proximal urethra-urethral anastomosis and distal urethral tubularization at 21 months of age with excellent results in terms of both function and cosmesis. PMID:28018807

  18. Foreign Body in Duodenum Mimicking a Duplication Cyst on Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Vinay; Tanger, Ramesh; Gupta, Arun; Kumar, Ayush

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric age group is most vulnerable for the accidental foreign body (FB) ingestion which may go unnoticed. These patients present with symptoms or complications as a result of FB and may mimic other conditions on various investigations. We describe a 9-month old infant who ingested crystal gel ball and presented with vomiting for a month. On radiological imaging it was interpreted as duplication cyst of the duodenum. At operation, crystal gel ball was retrieved. Our case vindicates importance of keeping various possibilities in mind as differential diagnoses during evaluation and management of surgical ailments such as the duplication cyst of duodenum. PMID:27900276

  19. Urethral duplication with unusual cause of bladder outlet obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Venkatramani, Vivek; George, Arun Jacob Philip; Chandrasingh, J.; Panda, Arabind; Devasia, Antony

    2016-01-01

    A 12-year-old boy presented with poor flow and recurrent urinary tract infections following hypospadias repair at the age of 3 years. The evaluation revealed urethral duplication with a hypoplastic dorsal urethra and patent ventral urethra. He also had duplication of the bladder neck, and on voiding cystourethrogram the ventral bladder neck appeared hypoplastic and compressed by the dorsal bladder neck during voiding. The possibility of functional obstruction of the ventral urethra by the occluded dorsal urethra was suspected, and he underwent a successful urethro-urethrostomy. PMID:27127361

  20. Urethral duplication with unusual cause of bladder outlet obstruction.

    PubMed

    Venkatramani, Vivek; George, Arun Jacob Philip; Chandrasingh, J; Panda, Arabind; Devasia, Antony

    2016-01-01

    A 12-year-old boy presented with poor flow and recurrent urinary tract infections following hypospadias repair at the age of 3 years. The evaluation revealed urethral duplication with a hypoplastic dorsal urethra and patent ventral urethra. He also had duplication of the bladder neck, and on voiding cystourethrogram the ventral bladder neck appeared hypoplastic and compressed by the dorsal bladder neck during voiding. The possibility of functional obstruction of the ventral urethra by the occluded dorsal urethra was suspected, and he underwent a successful urethro-urethrostomy.

  1. The Phenotypic Plasticity of Duplicated Genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the Origin of Adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Mattenberger, Florian; Sabater-Muñoz, Beatriz; Toft, Christina; Fares, Mario A.

    2016-01-01

    Gene and genome duplication are the major sources of biological innovations in plants and animals. Functional and transcriptional divergence between the copies after gene duplication has been considered the main driver of innovations . However, here we show that increased phenotypic plasticity after duplication plays a more major role than thought before in the origin of adaptations. We perform an exhaustive analysis of the transcriptional alterations of duplicated genes in the unicellular eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae when challenged with five different environmental stresses. Analysis of the transcriptomes of yeast shows that gene duplication increases the transcriptional response to environmental changes, with duplicated genes exhibiting signatures of adaptive transcriptional patterns in response to stress. The mechanism of duplication matters, with whole-genome duplicates being more transcriptionally altered than small-scale duplicates. The predominant transcriptional pattern follows the classic theory of evolution by gene duplication; with one gene copy remaining unaltered under stress, while its sister copy presents large transcriptional plasticity and a prominent role in adaptation. Moreover, we find additional transcriptional profiles that are suggestive of neo- and subfunctionalization of duplicate gene copies. These patterns are strongly correlated with the functional dependencies and sequence divergence profiles of gene copies. We show that, unlike singletons, duplicates respond more specifically to stress, supporting the role of natural selection in the transcriptional plasticity of duplicates. Our results reveal the underlying transcriptional complexity of duplicated genes and its role in the origin of adaptations. PMID:27799339

  2. The Phenotypic Plasticity of Duplicated Genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the Origin of Adaptations.

    PubMed

    Mattenberger, Florian; Sabater-Muñoz, Beatriz; Toft, Christina; Fares, Mario A

    2017-01-05

    Gene and genome duplication are the major sources of biological innovations in plants and animals. Functional and transcriptional divergence between the copies after gene duplication has been considered the main driver of innovations . However, here we show that increased phenotypic plasticity after duplication plays a more major role than thought before in the origin of adaptations. We perform an exhaustive analysis of the transcriptional alterations of duplicated genes in the unicellular eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae when challenged with five different environmental stresses. Analysis of the transcriptomes of yeast shows that gene duplication increases the transcriptional response to environmental changes, with duplicated genes exhibiting signatures of adaptive transcriptional patterns in response to stress. The mechanism of duplication matters, with whole-genome duplicates being more transcriptionally altered than small-scale duplicates. The predominant transcriptional pattern follows the classic theory of evolution by gene duplication; with one gene copy remaining unaltered under stress, while its sister copy presents large transcriptional plasticity and a prominent role in adaptation. Moreover, we find additional transcriptional profiles that are suggestive of neo- and subfunctionalization of duplicate gene copies. These patterns are strongly correlated with the functional dependencies and sequence divergence profiles of gene copies. We show that, unlike singletons, duplicates respond more specifically to stress, supporting the role of natural selection in the transcriptional plasticity of duplicates. Our results reveal the underlying transcriptional complexity of duplicated genes and its role in the origin of adaptations.

  3. 42 CFR 495.208 - Avoiding duplicate payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Avoiding duplicate payment. 495.208 Section 495.208 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION STANDARDS FOR THE ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD TECHNOLOGY...

  4. 47 CFR 76.1508 - Network non-duplication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Open Video Systems § 76.1508 Network non-duplication. (a) Sections 76.92 through 76.97 shall apply to open video systems in accordance with the provisions contained... unit” shall apply to an open video system or that portion of an open video system that operates or...

  5. 47 CFR 76.1508 - Network non-duplication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Open Video Systems § 76.1508 Network non-duplication. (a) Sections 76.92 through 76.97 shall apply to open video systems in accordance with the provisions contained... unit” shall apply to an open video system or that portion of an open video system that operates or...

  6. 47 CFR 76.1508 - Network non-duplication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Open Video Systems § 76.1508 Network non-duplication. (a) Sections 76.92 through 76.97 shall apply to open video systems in accordance with the provisions contained... unit” shall apply to an open video system or that portion of an open video system that operates or...

  7. 47 CFR 76.1508 - Network non-duplication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Open Video Systems § 76.1508 Network non-duplication. (a) Sections 76.92 through 76.97 shall apply to open video systems in accordance with the provisions contained... unit” shall apply to an open video system or that portion of an open video system that operates or...

  8. 47 CFR 76.1508 - Network non-duplication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Open Video Systems § 76.1508 Network non-duplication. (a) Sections 76.92 through 76.97 shall apply to open video systems in accordance with the provisions contained... unit” shall apply to an open video system or that portion of an open video system that operates or...

  9. Acute abdomen secondary to complete tubular colonic duplication

    PubMed Central

    Castejón-Casado, Javier; Muñoz Miguelsanz, MA; Diaz, E. Moreno; Gomez, M. Garcia; Garcia, MA Padilla; Valade, R. Fernandez

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 6-month-old infant who presented with a complete duplication of the large intestine, debuting clinically with acute abdomen and severe metabolic disorders. We discuss the pathogenesis and morphology of the lesions, diagnostic difficulties and peculiarities of surgical treatment. PMID:25197196

  10. Cryptorchidism due to chromosome 5q inversion duplication.

    PubMed

    Dutta, M K; Gundgurthi, A; Garg, M K; Pakhetr, R

    2013-12-01

    We present a 15 year old boy who was born out of a non consanguineous marriage, and presented with bilateral cryptorchidism, mental retardation, facial dysmorphism, hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism with failure of anatomical and biochemical localisation of testes. Karyotype analysis showed 46 XY with inverted duplication on chromosome 5q22-31.

  11. 7 CFR 27.41 - Lost certificate; duplicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Cotton Class Certificates § 27.41 Lost certificate; duplicate. Upon the written request of the last holder of a valid cotton class... cotton and without a new Micronaire determination for the cotton. Such new certificate shall bear...

  12. 7 CFR 27.41 - Lost certificate; duplicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Cotton Class Certificates § 27.41 Lost certificate; duplicate. Upon the written request of the last holder of a valid cotton class... cotton and without a new Micronaire determination for the cotton. Such new certificate shall bear...

  13. 7 CFR 27.41 - Lost certificate; duplicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Cotton Class Certificates § 27.41 Lost certificate; duplicate. Upon the written request of the last holder of a valid cotton class... cotton and without a new Micronaire determination for the cotton. Such new certificate shall bear...

  14. Defects arising from whole-genome duplications in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Andalis, Alex A; Storchova, Zuzana; Styles, Cora; Galitski, Timothy; Pellman, David; Fink, Gerald R

    2004-01-01

    Comparisons among closely related species have led to the proposal that the duplications found in many extant genomes are the remnants of an ancient polyploidization event, rather than a result of successive duplications of individual chromosomal segments. If this interpretation is correct, it would support Ohno's proposal that polyploidization drives evolution by generating the genetic material necessary for the creation of new genes. Paradoxically, analysis of contemporary polyploids suggests that increased ploidy is an inherently unstable state. To shed light on this apparent contradiction and to determine the effects of nascent duplications of the entire genome, we generated isogenic polyploid strains of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our data show that an increase in ploidy results in a marked decrease in a cell's ability to survive during stationary phase in growth medium. Tetraploid cells die rapidly, whereas isogenic haploids remain viable for weeks. Unlike haploid cells, which arrest growth as unbudded cells, tetraploid cells continue to bud and form mitotic spindles in stationary phase. The stationary-phase death of tetraploids can be prevented by mutations or conditions that result in growth arrest. These data show that whole-genome duplications are accompanied by defects that affect viability and subsequent survival of the new organism. PMID:15280227

  15. Genetics Home Reference: 7q11.23 duplication syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome dup(7)(q11.23) Somerville-Van der Aa syndrome trisomy 7q11.23 WBS duplication syndrome Williams- ... or Free article on PubMed Central Van der Aa N, Rooms L, Vandeweyer G, van den Ende ...

  16. Duplicated right crus of the diaphragm: a cadaveric case report.

    PubMed

    Sirasanagandla, Srinivasa Rao; Nayak, Satheesha B; Bhat, Kumar Mr; Surendran, Sudarshan; Regunathan, Deepthinath; Kumar, Naveen; Shetty, Surekha D; Patil, Jyothsna

    2014-03-01

    The lumbar part of the diaphragm arises from the lumbar vertebrae by right and left crura. The duplication of crura of the diaphragm is rarely reported in the past. During regular dissection classes to the medical students, we came across a case of duplicated right crus of the diaphragm. The right crus of the diaphragm was duplicated completely and presented two separate crura; medial right crus & lateral right crus. The medial right crus was attached to the anterolateral surfaces of the superior three lumbar vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs and merged with the anterior longitudinal ligament. The lateral right crus attached only to the intervertebral disc between the third and fourth lumbar vertebrae. These two crura bordered a retrocrural space in the inferior posterior mediastinum. The greater and lesser splanchnic nerves entered the abdomen by passing through this space. No duplication was observed in the left crus. The muscle fibres of medial right crus contributed to the formation of the esophageal opening. Knowledge of variations in the diaphragmatic crural anatomy is useful in the diagnosis of disease processes in the retrocrural space and also might help while performing the surgical repair of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

  17. 24. Duplicate negative of an historic negative. 'AERIAL VIEW OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Duplicate negative of an historic negative. 'AERIAL VIEW OF AREA 'B' HOLSTON ORDNANCE WORKS.' 1944. #OCMH 4-12.2ASAV3 in Super Explosives Program RDX and Its Composition A, B, & C, Record Group No. 319, National Archives, Washington, D.C. - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, RDX-and-Composition-B Manufacturing Line 9, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  18. Exposing region duplication through local geometrical color invariant features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jiachang; Guo, Jichang

    2015-05-01

    Many advanced image-processing softwares are available for tampering images. How to determine the authenticity of an image has become an urgent problem. Copy-move is one of the most common image forgery operations. Many methods have been proposed for copy-move forgery detection (CMFD). However, most of these methods are designed for grayscale images without any color information used. They are usually not suitable when the duplicated regions have little structure or have undergone various transforms. We propose a CMFD method using local geometrical color invariant features to detect duplicated regions. The method starts by calculating the color gradient of the inspected image. Then, we directly take the color gradient as the input for scale invariant features transform (SIFT) to extract color-SIFT descriptors. Finally, keypoints are matched and clustered before their geometrical relationship is estimated to expose the duplicated regions. We evaluate the detection performance and computational complexity of the proposed method together with several popular CMFD methods on a public database. Experimental results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed method in detecting duplicated regions with various transforms and poor structure.

  19. 29 CFR 18.1003 - Admissibility of duplicates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Admissibility of duplicates. 18.1003 Section 18.1003 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE FOR ADMINISTRATIVE HEARINGS BEFORE THE OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES Rules of Evidence Contents of Writings, Recordings, and...

  20. Autistic disorder and 22q11.2 duplication.

    PubMed

    Mukaddes, Nahit Motavalli; Herguner, Sabri

    2007-01-01

    Although several reports have described the co-occurrence of autism in subjects with chromosome 22 abnormalities including trisomy 22, translocation 20/22, 22q11.2 deletion, ring chromosome 22, and 22q13.3 deletion, there is no report with 22q11.2 duplication. We report a 9-year-old girl, referred to our department for her behavioural problems and language delay. She was diagnosed with autistic disorder according to DSM-IV criteria. Because of her dysmorphic characteristics comprising narrow face, narrow forehead, mandibular prognathism, synophrys, and operated cleft palate and cardiac problems, she had gone under cytogenetic analysis. Although she was ascertained as suspected velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), the duplication of 22q11.2 was detected by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization. Previous reports on the psychiatric aspects of 22q11.2 duplication have shown the existence of hyperactivity, learning disability, speech problems, and aggressive behaviours but not autism. Moreover, the lack of reports of co-occurrence of autism and 22q11.2 duplication may be related to paucity as a result of technical problems.

  1. Urethral duplication: a rare cause of urinary incontinence in a female child

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sanjay; Tiwari, Rajesh; Kumar, Vijoy; Singh, Mahendra

    2012-01-01

    Female urethral duplication is a rare congenital anomaly. We report a case of complete urethral duplication along with horseshoe kidney in a four-years-old female child presenting with incontinence since childhood. PMID:24578937

  2. Coregulation of tandem duplicate genes slows evolution of subfunctionalization in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Xun; Pritchard, Jonathan K.

    2016-01-01

    Gene duplication is a fundamental process in genome evolution. However, most young duplicates are degraded by loss-of-function mutations, and the factors that allow some duplicate pairs to survive long-term remain controversial. One class of models to explain duplicate retention invokes sub- or neofunctionalization, whereas others focus on sharing of gene dosage. RNA-sequencing data from 46 human and 26 mouse tissues indicate that subfunctionalization of expression evolves slowly and is rare among duplicates that arose within the placental mammals, possibly because tandem duplicates are coregulated by shared genomic elements. Instead, consistent with the dosage-sharing hypothesis, most young duplicates are down-regulated to match expression levels of single-copy genes. Thus, dosage sharing of expression allows for the initial survival of mammalian duplicates, followed by slower functional adaptation enabling long-term preservation. PMID:27199432

  3. The comparative landscape of duplications in Heliconius melpomene and Heliconius cydno

    PubMed Central

    Pinharanda, A; Martin, S H; Barker, S L; Davey, J W; Jiggins, C D

    2017-01-01

    Gene duplications can facilitate adaptation and may lead to interpopulation divergence, causing reproductive isolation. We used whole-genome resequencing data from 34 butterflies to detect duplications in two Heliconius species, Heliconius cydno and Heliconius melpomene. Taking advantage of three distinctive signals of duplication in short-read sequencing data, we identified 744 duplicated loci in H. cydno and H. melpomene and evaluated the accuracy of our approach using single-molecule sequencing. We have found that duplications overlap genes significantly less than expected at random in H. melpomene, consistent with the action of background selection against duplicates in functional regions of the genome. Duplicate loci that are highly differentiated between H. melpomene and H. cydno map to four different chromosomes. Four duplications were identified with a strong signal of divergent selection, including an odorant binding protein and another in close proximity with a known wing colour pattern locus that differs between the two species. PMID:27925618

  4. [Duplication of DNA--a mechanism for the development of new functionality of genes].

    PubMed

    Maślanka, Roman; Zadrąg-Tęcza, Renata

    2015-01-01

    The amplification of DNA is considered as a mechanism for rapid evolution of organisms. Duplication can be especially advantageous in the case of changing environmental conditions. Whole genome duplication maintains the proper balance between gene expression. This seems to be the main reason why WGD is more favorable than duplication of the fragments of DNA. The polyploidy status disappear as a result of the loss of the majority of duplicated genes. The preservation of duplicated genes is associated with the development of their new functions. Polyploidization is often noted for plants. However due to sequencing technique, the duplications episodes are more frequently reports also for the other systematic taxa, including animals. The occurrence of ancient genome duplication is also considered for yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The existence of two active copies of ribosomal protein genes can be a confirmation of this process. Development of the fermentation process might be one of the probable causes of the yeast genome duplication.

  5. 46 CFR 58.25-60 - Non-duplicated hydraulic rudder actuators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Non-duplicated hydraulic rudder actuators. 58.25-60... AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-60 Non-duplicated hydraulic rudder actuators. Non-duplicated hydraulic rudder actuators may be installed in the steering-gear control...

  6. 46 CFR 58.25-60 - Non-duplicated hydraulic rudder actuators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Non-duplicated hydraulic rudder actuators. 58.25-60... AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-60 Non-duplicated hydraulic rudder actuators. Non-duplicated hydraulic rudder actuators may be installed in the steering-gear control...

  7. 46 CFR 58.25-60 - Non-duplicated hydraulic rudder actuators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Non-duplicated hydraulic rudder actuators. 58.25-60... AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-60 Non-duplicated hydraulic rudder actuators. Non-duplicated hydraulic rudder actuators may be installed in the steering-gear control...

  8. 47 CFR 76.92 - Cable network non-duplication; extent of protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Network Non-duplication Protection, Syndicated Exclusivity and Sports Blackout § 76.92 Cable network non-duplication; extent of protection. (a... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cable network non-duplication; extent...

  9. The structure and early evolution of recently arisen gene duplicates in the Caenorhabditis elegans genome.

    PubMed Central

    Katju, Vaishali; Lynch, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The significance of gene duplication in provisioning raw materials for the evolution of genomic diversity is widely recognized, but the early evolutionary dynamics of duplicate genes remain obscure. To elucidate the structural characteristics of newly arisen gene duplicates at infancy and their subsequent evolutionary properties, we analyzed gene pairs with < or =10% divergence at synonymous sites within the genome of Caenorhabditis elegans. Structural heterogeneity between duplicate copies is present very early in their evolutionary history and is maintained over longer evolutionary timescales, suggesting that duplications across gene boundaries in conjunction with shuffling events have at least as much potential to contribute to long-term evolution as do fully redundant (complete) duplicates. The median duplication span of 1.4 kb falls short of the average gene length in C. elegans (2.5 kb), suggesting that partial gene duplications are frequent. Most gene duplicates reside close to the parent copy at inception, often as tandem inverted loci, and appear to disperse in the genome as they age, as a result of reduced survivorship of duplicates located in proximity to the ancestral copy. We propose that illegitimate recombination events leading to inverted duplications play a disproportionately large role in gene duplication within this genome in comparison with other mechanisms. PMID:14704166

  10. 7 CFR 27.23 - Duplicate sets of samples of cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Duplicate sets of samples of cotton. 27.23 Section 27... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Inspection and Samples § 27.23 Duplicate sets of samples of cotton. The duplicate sets of samples shall be inclosed in wrappers...

  11. 7 CFR 27.23 - Duplicate sets of samples of cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Duplicate sets of samples of cotton. 27.23 Section 27... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Inspection and Samples § 27.23 Duplicate sets of samples of cotton. The duplicate sets of samples shall be inclosed in wrappers...

  12. 7 CFR 27.23 - Duplicate sets of samples of cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Duplicate sets of samples of cotton. 27.23 Section 27... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Inspection and Samples § 27.23 Duplicate sets of samples of cotton. The duplicate sets of samples shall be inclosed in wrappers...

  13. 7 CFR 27.23 - Duplicate sets of samples of cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Duplicate sets of samples of cotton. 27.23 Section 27... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Inspection and Samples § 27.23 Duplicate sets of samples of cotton. The duplicate sets of samples shall be inclosed in wrappers...

  14. 7 CFR 27.23 - Duplicate sets of samples of cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Duplicate sets of samples of cotton. 27.23 Section 27... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Inspection and Samples § 27.23 Duplicate sets of samples of cotton. The duplicate sets of samples shall be inclosed in wrappers...

  15. Design and Construction of a High-Speed Magnetic Tape Duplicator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoskin, Richard K.

    Engineering procedures used in the design and construction of a high-speed, multichannel magnetic tape duplicator are described. The completed duplicator, a common mandrel duplicator, in which a single drive motor turns a common capstan shaft at high speeds and moves both master and copy tapes simultaneously, performs satisfactorily yet suggests…

  16. Selection for Higher Gene Copy Number after Different Types of Plant Gene Duplications

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Corey M.; Puckett, Emily E.; Bekaert, Michaël; Pires, J. Chris; Conant, Gavin C.

    2011-01-01

    The evolutionary origins of the multitude of duplicate genes in the plant genomes are still incompletely understood. To gain an appreciation of the potential selective forces acting on these duplicates, we phylogenetically inferred the set of metabolic gene families from 10 flowering plant (angiosperm) genomes. We then compared the metabolic fluxes for these families, predicted using the Arabidopsis thaliana and Sorghum bicolor metabolic networks, with the families' duplication propensities. For duplications produced by both small scale (small-scale duplications) and genome duplication (whole-genome duplications), there is a significant association between the flux and the tendency to duplicate. Following this global analysis, we made a more fine-scale study of the selective constraints observed on plant sodium and phosphate transporters. We find that the different duplication mechanisms give rise to differing selective constraints. However, the exact nature of this pattern varies between the gene families, and we argue that the duplication mechanism alone does not define a duplicated gene's subsequent evolutionary trajectory. Collectively, our results argue for the interplay of history, function, and selection in shaping the duplicate gene evolution in plants. PMID:22056313

  17. The structure and early evolution of recently arisen gene duplicates in the Caenorhabditis elegans genome.

    PubMed

    Katju, Vaishali; Lynch, Michael

    2003-12-01

    The significance of gene duplication in provisioning raw materials for the evolution of genomic diversity is widely recognized, but the early evolutionary dynamics of duplicate genes remain obscure. To elucidate the structural characteristics of newly arisen gene duplicates at infancy and their subsequent evolutionary properties, we analyzed gene pairs with < or =10% divergence at synonymous sites within the genome of Caenorhabditis elegans. Structural heterogeneity between duplicate copies is present very early in their evolutionary history and is maintained over longer evolutionary timescales, suggesting that duplications across gene boundaries in conjunction with shuffling events have at least as much potential to contribute to long-term evolution as do fully redundant (complete) duplicates. The median duplication span of 1.4 kb falls short of the average gene length in C. elegans (2.5 kb), suggesting that partial gene duplications are frequent. Most gene duplicates reside close to the parent copy at inception, often as tandem inverted loci, and appear to disperse in the genome as they age, as a result of reduced survivorship of duplicates located in proximity to the ancestral copy. We propose that illegitimate recombination events leading to inverted duplications play a disproportionately large role in gene duplication within this genome in comparison with other mechanisms.

  18. Evidence for the fixation of gene duplications by positive selection in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso-Moreira, Margarida; Arguello, J. Roman; Gottipati, Srikanth; Harshman, L.G.; Grenier, Jennifer K.; Clark, Andrew G.

    2016-01-01

    Gene duplications play a key role in the emergence of novel traits and in adaptation. But despite their centrality to evolutionary processes, it is still largely unknown how new gene duplicates are initially fixed within populations and later maintained in genomes. Long-standing debates on the evolution of gene duplications could be settled by determining the relative importance of genetic drift vs. positive selection in the fixation of new gene duplicates. Using the Drosophila Global Diversity Lines (GDL), we have combined genome-wide SNP polymorphism data with a novel set of copy number variant calls and gene expression profiles to characterize the polymorphic phase of new genes. We found that approximately half of the roughly 500 new complete gene duplications segregating in the GDL lead to significant increases in the expression levels of the duplicated genes and that these duplications are more likely to be found at lower frequencies, suggesting a negative impact on fitness. However, we also found that six of the nine gene duplications that are fixed or close to fixation in at least one of the five populations in our study show signs of being under positive selection, and that these duplications are likely beneficial because of dosage effects, with a possible role for additional mutations in two duplications. Our work suggests that in Drosophila, theoretical models that posit that gene duplications are immediately beneficial and fixed by positive selection are most relevant to explain the long-term evolution of gene duplications in this species. PMID:27197209

  19. 46 CFR 58.25-60 - Non-duplicated hydraulic rudder actuators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-60 Non-duplicated hydraulic rudder actuators. Non-duplicated hydraulic rudder actuators may be installed in the steering-gear control systems... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Non-duplicated hydraulic rudder actuators....

  20. 46 CFR 58.25-60 - Non-duplicated hydraulic rudder actuators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-60 Non-duplicated hydraulic rudder actuators. Non-duplicated hydraulic rudder actuators may be installed in the steering-gear control systems... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Non-duplicated hydraulic rudder actuators....

  1. Complete tubular duplication of colon in an adult: a rare cause of colovaginal fistula

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hae Il; Lee, Hyoung Uk; Ahn, Tae Sung; Lee, Jong Eun; Lee, Hyun Yong; Mun, Seong Taek; Baek, Moo-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Alimentary tract duplications are uncommon congenital anomalies that usually present during the first decade of life. Complete duplication of the colon in adults is very rare and difficult to diagnose preoperatively. We report a case of a 40-year-old female with complete tubular duplication which was initially misdiagnosed as a salpingeal abscess due to colovaginal fistula. PMID:27757399

  2. The HOPA Gene Dodecamer Duplication Is Not a Significant Etiological Factor in Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaelis, Ron C.; Copeland-Yates, Susan A.; Sossey-Alaoui, Khalid; Skinner, Cindy; Friez, Michael J.; Longshore, John W.; Simensen, Richard J.; Schroer, Richard J.; Stevenson, Roger E.

    2000-01-01

    A study of 202 patients with autism found the incidence of a dodecamer duplication in the HOPA gene was not significantly different between patients and controls. Three female patients inherited the duplication from nonautistic fathers. Also, there was no systematic skewing of X inactivation in female patients with the duplication. (Contains…

  3. 36 CFR 1010.17 - Actions to eliminate duplication with State and local procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... duplication with State and local procedures. 1010.17 Section 1010.17 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY § 1010.17 Actions to eliminate duplication with State and local... fullest extent possible to reduce duplication between NEPA and State and local requirements....

  4. Partial craniofacial duplication: a review of the literature and case report.

    PubMed

    Costa, Melinda A; Borzabadi-Farahani, Ali; Lara-Sanchez, Pedro A; Schweitzer, Daniela; Jacobson, Lia; Clarke, Noreen; Hammoudeh, Jeffery; Urata, Mark M; Magee, William P

    2014-06-01

    Diprosopus (Greek; di-, "two" + prosopon, "face"), or craniofacial duplication, is a rare craniofacial anomaly referring to the complete duplication of facial structures. Partial craniofacial duplication describes a broad spectrum of congenital anomalies, including duplications of the oral cavity. This paper describes a 15 month-old female with a duplicated oral cavity, mandible, and maxilla. A Tessier type 7 cleft, midline meningocele, and duplicated hypophysis were also present. The preoperative evaluation, surgical approach, postoperative results, and a review of the literature are presented. The surgical approach was designed to preserve facial nerve innervation to the reconstructed cheek and mouth. The duplicated mandible and maxilla were excised and the remaining left maxilla was bone grafted. Soft tissue repair included closure of the Tessier type VII cleft. Craniofacial duplication remains a rare entity that is more common in females. The pathophysiology remains incompletely characterized, but is postulated to be due to duplication of the notochord, as well as duplication of mandibular growth centres. While diprosopus is a severe deformity often associated with anencephaly, patients with partial duplication typically benefit from surgical treatment. Managing craniofacial duplication requires a detailed preoperative evaluation as well as a comprehensive, staged treatment plan. Long-term follow up is needed appropriately to address ongoing craniofacial deformity.

  5. Bilateral Second Carpal Row Duplication Associated with Multiple Epiphyseal Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Cladiere-Nassif, Victoire; Delaroche, Caroline; Pottier, Edwige; Feron, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 75-year-old woman presenting a hitherto undescribed condition of bilateral second carpal row duplication. She was diagnosed in childhood with both Marfan and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes, with no clear evidence and no further medical follow-up. She presented throughout her life with various articular symptoms, which appeared to be compatible with a diagnosis of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, and underwent several surgical procedures on her knees and hips. Most recently, she was reporting pain at the base of the fifth metacarpal bone of the left hand. X-ray images and computed tomography (CT) were obtained for exploration and showed a total second row duplication in both carpi, with a total number of 18 carpal bones in each wrist. PMID:26649258

  6. Philadelphia chromosome duplication as a ring-shaped chromosome.

    PubMed

    Borjas-Gutierrez, Cesar; Gonzalez-Garcia, Juan Ramon

    2016-01-01

    The gain of a second copy of the Philadelphia chromosome is one of the main secondary chromosomal changes related to the clonal evolution of cells with t(9;22) in chronic myelogenous leukemia. This gain causes the acquisition of another copy of the BCR/ABL1 fusion gene. Isochromosomes of the der(22) chromosome or double minute chromosomes are well known to lead an increased copy number of BCR/ABL1 gene. There is no antecedent of Philadelphia chromosome duplication as a ring chromosome. A recent published report contains evidence that strongly suggests that the Philadelphia chromosome was duplicated as a ring chromosome, observation that was overlooked by the authors. The instability inherent to the ring chromosome increases the risk of emergence of clones containing more and more BCR/ABL1 gene copies, which would produce increased fitness for clonal selection, resulting in worsening of the patient's prognosis.

  7. A Family Harboring CMT1A Duplication and HNPP Deletion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Hwa; Kang, Hee Jin; Song, Hyunseok; Hwang, Su Jin; Cho, Sun-Young; Kim, Sang-Beom; Kim, Joonki; Chung, Ki Wha; Choi, Byung-Ok

    2007-06-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is associated with duplication of chromosome 17p11.2-p12, whereas hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), which is an autosomal dominant neuropathy showing characteristics of recurrent pressure palsies, is associated with 17p11.2-p12 deletion. An altered gene dosage of PMP22 is believed to the main cause underlying the CMT1A and HNPP phenotypes. Although CMT1A and HNPP are associated with the same locus, there has been no report of these two mutations within a single family. We report a rare family harboring CMT1A duplication and HNPP deletion.

  8. Use of FISH for determining duplication of segments of chromosomes: Analysis of a chromosome 9q34 duplication in Tuberous sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bengtsson, U.; Williams, L.; Flodman, K.P.

    1994-09-01

    FISH analysis of interphase nuclei has facilitated identification of segments of DNA duplication. In equating the presence of 3 signals for a particular DNA probe in interphase nuclei to the presence of a duplication, duplication events must be distinguished from replication. Frequency of replication events is reduced by synchronizing cell cultures to obtain a very high percentage of G1 nuclei. We demonstrated that although it is possible to synchronize fibroblast cultures, it is very difficult to totally synchronize lymphoblastoid cells. An appropriate control to distinguish duplication and replication events is the use of a second DNA probe close to the duplication region but outside of the duplication. In analyzing the chromosome 9q34 duplication in a sporadic case of Tuberous sclerosis we examined interphase nuclei using one fluorescein labelled probe from within the duplicated region, and a second rhodamine labelled probe which mapped outside the duplication. Nuclei were scored as having 2 or 3 red signals and 2 or 3 yellow signals. We used as a test statistic McNemar`s chi square for matched observations (one tailed test). Using this form of analysis we were able to demonstrate that lymphoblasts from the patient showed 3 D9S66 signals significantly more often than 3 DBH signals (p<.005). Three signals were demonstrated significantly more frequently using a D9S66 contiguous cosmid than with the CEL locus cosmid in patient`s lymphoblasts (p<.005) and in patient`s fibroblasts.

  9. Impact of covert duplicate publication on meta-analysis: a case study.

    PubMed Central

    Tramèr, M. R.; Reynolds, D. J.; Moore, R. A.; McQuay, H. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify the impact of duplicate data on estimates of efficacy. DESIGN: Systematic search for published full reports of randomised controlled trials investigating ondansetron's effect on postoperative emesis. Abstracts were not considered. DATA SOURCES: Eighty four trials (11,980 patients receiving ondansetron) published between 1991 and September 1996. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Percentage of duplicated trials and patient data. Estimation of antiemetic efficacy (prevention of emesis) of the most duplicated ondansetron regimen. Comparison between the efficacy of non-duplicated and duplicated data. RESULTS: Data from nine trials had been published in 14 further reports, duplicating data from 3335 patients receiving ondansetron; none used a clear cross reference. Intravenous ondansetron 4 mg versus placebo was investigated in 16 reports not subject to duplicate publication, three reports subject to duplicate publication, and six duplicates of those three reports. The number needed to treat to prevent vomiting within 24 hours was 9.5 (95% confidence interval 6.9 to 15) in the 16 non-duplicated reports and 3.9 (3.3 to 4.8) in the three reports which were duplicated (P < 0.00001). When these 19 were combined the number needed to treat was 6.4 (5.3 to 7.9). When all original and duplicate reports were combined (n = 25) the apparent number needed to treat improved to 4.9 (4.4 to 5.6). CONCLUSIONS: By searching systematically we found 17% of published full reports of randomised trials and 28% of the patient data were duplicated. Trials reporting greater treatment effect were significantly more likely to be duplicated. Inclusion of duplicated data in meta-analysis led to a 23% overestimation of ondansetron's antiemetic efficacy. PMID:9310564

  10. Duplicates, redundancies and inconsistencies in the primary nucleotide databases: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingyu; Zobel, Justin; Verspoor, Karin

    2017-01-01

    GenBank, the EMBL European Nucleotide Archive and the DNA DataBank of Japan, known collectively as the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration or INSDC, are the three most significant nucleotide sequence databases. Their records are derived from laboratory work undertaken by different individuals, by different teams, with a range of technologies and assumptions and over a period of decades. As a consequence, they contain a great many duplicates, redundancies and inconsistencies, but neither the prevalence nor the characteristics of various types of duplicates have been rigorously assessed. Existing duplicate detection methods in bioinformatics only address specific duplicate types, with inconsistent assumptions; and the impact of duplicates in bioinformatics databases has not been carefully assessed, making it difficult to judge the value of such methods. Our goal is to assess the scale, kinds and impact of duplicates in bioinformatics databases, through a retrospective analysis of merged groups in INSDC databases. Our outcomes are threefold: (1) We analyse a benchmark dataset consisting of duplicates manually identified in INSDC-a dataset of 67 888 merged groups with 111 823 duplicate pairs across 21 organisms from INSDC databases - in terms of the prevalence, types and impacts of duplicates. (2) We categorize duplicates at both sequence and annotation level, with supporting quantitative statistics, showing that different organisms have different prevalence of distinct kinds of duplicate. (3) We show that the presence of duplicates has practical impact via a simple case study on duplicates, in terms of GC content and melting temperature. We demonstrate that duplicates not only introduce redundancy, but can lead to inconsistent results for certain tasks. Our findings lead to a better understanding of the problem of duplication in biological databases.Database URL: the merged records are available at https

  11. Duplicates, redundancies and inconsistencies in the primary nucleotide databases: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qingyu; Zobel, Justin; Verspoor, Karin

    2017-01-01

    GenBank, the EMBL European Nucleotide Archive and the DNA DataBank of Japan, known collectively as the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration or INSDC, are the three most significant nucleotide sequence databases. Their records are derived from laboratory work undertaken by different individuals, by different teams, with a range of technologies and assumptions and over a period of decades. As a consequence, they contain a great many duplicates, redundancies and inconsistencies, but neither the prevalence nor the characteristics of various types of duplicates have been rigorously assessed. Existing duplicate detection methods in bioinformatics only address specific duplicate types, with inconsistent assumptions; and the impact of duplicates in bioinformatics databases has not been carefully assessed, making it difficult to judge the value of such methods. Our goal is to assess the scale, kinds and impact of duplicates in bioinformatics databases, through a retrospective analysis of merged groups in INSDC databases. Our outcomes are threefold: (1) We analyse a benchmark dataset consisting of duplicates manually identified in INSDC—a dataset of 67 888 merged groups with 111 823 duplicate pairs across 21 organisms from INSDC databases – in terms of the prevalence, types and impacts of duplicates. (2) We categorize duplicates at both sequence and annotation level, with supporting quantitative statistics, showing that different organisms have different prevalence of distinct kinds of duplicate. (3) We show that the presence of duplicates has practical impact via a simple case study on duplicates, in terms of GC content and melting temperature. We demonstrate that duplicates not only introduce redundancy, but can lead to inconsistent results for certain tasks. Our findings lead to a better understanding of the problem of duplication in biological databases. Database URL: the merged records are available at https

  12. Genome duplication improves rice root resistance to salt stress

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Salinity is a stressful environmental factor that limits the productivity of crop plants, and roots form the major interface between plants and various abiotic stresses. Rice is a salt-sensitive crop and its polyploid shows advantages in terms of stress resistance. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of genome duplication on rice root resistance to salt stress. Results Both diploid rice (HN2026-2x and Nipponbare-2x) and their corresponding tetraploid rice (HN2026-4x and Nipponbare-4x) were cultured in half-strength Murashige and Skoog medium with 150 mM NaCl for 3 and 5 days. Accumulations of proline, soluble sugar, malondialdehyde (MDA), Na+ content, H+ (proton) flux at root tips, and the microstructure and ultrastructure in rice roots were examined. We found that tetraploid rice showed less root growth inhibition, accumulated higher proline content and lower MDA content, and exhibited a higher frequency of normal epidermal cells than diploid rice. In addition, a protective gap appeared between the cortex and pericycle cells in tetraploid rice. Next, ultrastructural analysis showed that genome duplication improved membrane, organelle, and nuclei stability. Furthermore, Na+ in tetraploid rice roots significantly decreased while root tip H+ efflux in tetraploid rice significantly increased. Conclusions Our results suggest that genome duplication improves root resistance to salt stress, and that enhanced proton transport to the root surface may play a role in reducing Na+ entrance into the roots. PMID:25184027

  13. Prevalent RNA recognition motif duplication in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yihsuan S; Gomez, Shawn M; Wang, Zefeng

    2014-05-01

    The sequence-specific recognition of RNA by proteins is mediated through various RNA binding domains, with the RNA recognition motif (RRM) being the most frequent and present in >50% of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Many RBPs contain multiple RRMs, and it is unclear how each RRM contributes to the binding specificity of the entire protein. We found that RRMs within the same RBP (i.e., sibling RRMs) tend to have significantly higher similarity than expected by chance. Sibling RRM pairs from RBPs shared by multiple species tend to have lower similarity than those found only in a single species, suggesting that multiple RRMs within the same protein might arise from domain duplication followed by divergence through random mutations. This finding is exemplified by a recent RRM domain duplication in DAZ proteins and an ancient duplication in PABP proteins. Additionally, we found that different similarities between sibling RRMs are associated with distinct functions of an RBP and that the RBPs tend to contain repetitive sequences with low complexity. Taken together, this study suggests that the number of RBPs with multiple RRMs has expanded in mammals and that the multiple sibling RRMs may recognize similar target motifs in a cooperative manner.

  14. Williams Syndrome and 15q Duplication: Coincidence versus Association.

    PubMed

    Khokhar, Aditi; Agarwal, Swashti; Perez-Colon, Sheila

    2017-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a multisystem disorder caused by contiguous gene deletion in 7q11.23, commonly associated with distinctive facial features, supravalvular aortic stenosis, short stature, idiopathic hypercalcemia, developmental delay, joint laxity, and a friendly personality. The clinical features of 15q11q13 duplication syndrome include autism, mental retardation, ataxia, seizures, developmental delay, and behavioral problems. We report a rare case of a girl with genetically confirmed Williams syndrome and coexisting 15q duplication syndrome. The patient underwent treatment for central precocious puberty and later presented with primary amenorrhea. The karyotype revealed 47,XX,+mar. FISH analysis for the marker chromosome showed partial trisomy/tetrasomy for proximal chromosome 15q (15p13q13). FISH using an ELN-specific probe demonstrated a deletion in the Williams syndrome critical region in 7q11.23. To our knowledge, a coexistence of Williams syndrome and 15q duplication syndrome has not been reported in the literature. Our patient had early pubertal development, which has been described in some patients with Williams syndrome. However, years later after discontinuing gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue treatment, she developed primary amenorrhea.

  15. IMAGING DIAGNOSIS--URINARY BLADDER DUPLICATION IN A CAT.

    PubMed

    Cook, Alysa B; Langston, Cathy E; Fischetti, Anthony J; Donovan, Taryn A

    2015-01-01

    A female kitten presented for chronic, intermittent, antibiotic-responsive urinary incontinence and chronic kidney disease. Abdominal ultrasound identified bilateral pelvic/ureteral dilation and three closely apposed thin-walled fluid-filled structures in the caudal abdomen, extending toward the pelvic inlet. Excretory urography and negative contrast cystography identified contrast medium accumulation from the dilated ureters into two tubular soft tissue masses of the caudal abdomen, with subsequent gradual filling of a more cranially located urinary bladder. A retrograde vaginocystourethrogram identified a normal uterus, normal vagina, and a single urethra continuous with the cranially located urinary bladder. Antemortem diagnosis was suspicious for bilateral ectopic ureteroceles. Postmortem diagnosis, 35 months following initial presentation, determined the fluid-filled masses to have abundant smooth muscle in the wall, including a muscularis mucosa connected by a common ostium, consistent with urinary bladder duplication. Urinary bladder duplication should be included as a differential diagnosis in cats with these clinical and imaging characteristics. In this case, differentiation of ectopic ureterocele from urinary bladder duplication required histological confirmation.

  16. Using sea urchin gametes and zygotes to investigate centrosome duplication.

    PubMed

    Sluder, Greenfield

    2016-01-01

    Centriole structure and function in the sea urchin zygote parallel those in mammalian somatic cells. Here, I briefly introduce the properties and attributes of the sea urchin system that make it an attractive platform for the study of centrosome and centriole duplication. These attributes apply to all echinoderms readily available from commercial suppliers: sea urchins, sand dollars, and starfish. I list some of the practical aspects of the system that make it a cost- and time-effective system for experimental work and then list properties that are a "tool kit" that can be used to conduct studies that would not be practical, or in some cases not possible, with mammalian somatic cells. Since centrioles organize and localize the pericentriolar material that nucleates the astral arrays of microtubules (Bobinnec et al. in J Cell Biol 143(6):1575-1589, 1998), the pattern of aster duplication over several cell cycles can be used as a reliable measure for centriole duplication (Sluder and Rieder in J Cell Biol 100(3):887-896, 1985). Descriptions of the methods my laboratory has used to handle and image echinoderm zygotes are reviewed in Sluder et al. (Methods Cell Biol 61:439-472, 1999). Also included is a bibliography of papers that describe additional methods.

  17. Gastric duplication cyst in adult: Challenge for surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Namdaroglu, Ozan Barıs; Argon, Asuman; Aydogan, Serdar; Ozturk, Ahmet Mucteba; Yakan, Savas; Yildirim, Mehmet; Erkan, Nazif

    2017-01-01

    Gastric duplication cysts (GDCs) are uncommon developmental anomalies found primarily in children, being rarely seen in adults. Duplications can occur anywhere in the intestinal tract from the mouth to the anus. Accurate diagnosis of cysts before resection is difficult even using the most advanced imaging techniques. In this report, we present and discuss a case of GDC in a 25-year-old man treated laparoscopically. Patient admitted to our department with complaints of epigastric pain and swelling. Magnetic resonance imaging performed for accurate characterisation showed a 4 cm × 4.5 cm cystic lesion, with heterogeneous signal intensity on T2-weighted images, located in the posterior wall of the stomach. Pre-operative differential diagnosis including gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) was made according to radiological findings. Patient underwent surgery and cyst resected laparoscopically. Histopathological examination suggesting duplication cyst. GDC can easily be mistaken for a GIST, and the clinician as well as radiologist must maintain a high degree of suspicion. PMID:27251837

  18. Duplication: a Mechanism Producing Disassortative Mixing Networks in Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dan; Liu, Zeng-Rong; Wang, Jia-Zeng

    2007-10-01

    Assortative/disassortative mixing is an important topological property of a network. A network is called assortative mixing if the nodes in the network tend to connect to their connectivity peers, or disassortative mixing if nodes with low degrees are more likely to connect with high-degree nodes. We have known that biological networks such as protein-protein interaction networks (PPI), gene regulatory networks, and metabolic networks tend to be disassortative. On the other hand, in biological evolution, duplication and divergence are two fundamental processes. In order to make the relationship between the property of disassortative mixing and the two basic biological principles clear and to study the cause of the disassortative mixing property in biological networks, we present a random duplication model and an anti-preference duplication model. Our results show that disassortative mixing networks can be obtained by both kinds of models from uncorrelated initial networks. Moreover, with the growth of the network size, the disassortative mixing property becomes more obvious.

  19. Multiple Isolated Enteric Duplication Cysts in an Infant - A Diagnostic Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Udiya, Alok Kumar; Shetty, Gurucharan S; Chauhan, Udit; Singhal, Shweta; Prabhu, Shailesh M

    2016-01-01

    Completely isolated enteric duplication cysts are a rare variety of enteric duplication cysts having an independent blood supply with no communication with any part of the adjacent bowel segment. We report a case showing two completely isolated enteric duplication cysts originating in the greater omentum and transverse mesocolon in an infant. Multiple isolated enteric duplication cysts involving non-contiguous bowel segments have not been previously reported in the literature. In addition the transverse mesocolon duplication cyst was infected showing septations and loss of double wall sign resulting in difficulty in imaging diagnosis. Both the cysts were excised and confirmed on histopathology.

  20. A salmonid EST genomic study: genes, duplications, phylogeny and microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Koop, Ben F; von Schalburg, Kristian R; Leong, Jong; Walker, Neil; Lieph, Ryan; Cooper, Glenn A; Robb, Adrienne; Beetz-Sargent, Marianne; Holt, Robert A; Moore, Richard; Brahmbhatt, Sonal; Rosner, Jamie; Rexroad, Caird E; McGowan, Colin R; Davidson, William S

    2008-01-01

    Background Salmonids are of interest because of their relatively recent genome duplication, and their extensive use in wild fisheries and aquaculture. A comprehensive gene list and a comparison of genes in some of the different species provide valuable genomic information for one of the most widely studied groups of fish. Results 298,304 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from Atlantic salmon (69% of the total), 11,664 chinook, 10,813 sockeye, 10,051 brook trout, 10,975 grayling, 8,630 lake whitefish, and 3,624 northern pike ESTs were obtained in this study and have been deposited into the public databases. Contigs were built and putative full-length Atlantic salmon clones have been identified. A database containing ESTs, assemblies, consensus sequences, open reading frames, gene predictions and putative annotation is available. The overall similarity between Atlantic salmon ESTs and those of rainbow trout, chinook, sockeye, brook trout, grayling, lake whitefish, northern pike and rainbow smelt is 93.4, 94.2, 94.6, 94.4, 92.5, 91.7, 89.6, and 86.2% respectively. An analysis of 78 transcript sets show Salmo as a sister group to Oncorhynchus and Salvelinus within Salmoninae, and Thymallinae as a sister group to Salmoninae and Coregoninae within Salmonidae. Extensive gene duplication is consistent with a genome duplication in the common ancestor of salmonids. Using all of the available EST data, a new expanded salmonid cDNA microarray of 32,000 features was created. Cross-species hybridizations to this cDNA microarray indicate that this resource will be useful for studies of all 68 salmonid species. Conclusion An extensive collection and analysis of salmonid RNA putative transcripts indicate that Pacific salmon, Atlantic salmon and charr are 94–96% similar while the more distant whitefish, grayling, pike and smelt are 93, 92, 89 and 86% similar to salmon. The salmonid transcriptome reveals a complex history of gene duplication that is consistent with an ancestral

  1. Prevalent role of gene features in determining evolutionary fates of whole-genome duplication duplicated genes in flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen-kai; Liu, Yun-long; Xia, En-hua; Gao, Li-zhi

    2013-04-01

    The evolution of genes and genomes after polyploidization has been the subject of extensive studies in evolutionary biology and plant sciences. While a significant number of duplicated genes are rapidly removed during a process called fractionation, which operates after the whole-genome duplication (WGD), another considerable number of genes are retained preferentially, leading to the phenomenon of biased gene retention. However, the evolutionary mechanisms underlying gene retention after WGD remain largely unknown. Through genome-wide analyses of sequence and functional data, we comprehensively investigated the relationships between gene features and the retention probability of duplicated genes after WGDs in six plant genomes, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), poplar (Populus trichocarpa), soybean (Glycine max), rice (Oryza sativa), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), and maize (Zea mays). The results showed that multiple gene features were correlated with the probability of gene retention. Using a logistic regression model based on principal component analysis, we resolved evolutionary rate, structural complexity, and GC3 content as the three major contributors to gene retention. Cluster analysis of these features further classified retained genes into three distinct groups in terms of gene features and evolutionary behaviors. Type I genes are more prone to be selected by dosage balance; type II genes are possibly subject to subfunctionalization; and type III genes may serve as potential targets for neofunctionalization. This study highlights that gene features are able to act jointly as primary forces when determining the retention and evolution of WGD-derived duplicated genes in flowering plants. These findings thus may help to provide a resolution to the debate on different evolutionary models of gene fates after WGDs.

  2. Imbalanced positive selection maintains the functional divergence of duplicated DIHYDROKAEMPFEROL 4-REDUCTASE genes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bing-Hong; Chen, Yi-Wen; Huang, Chia-Lung; Gao, Jian; Liao, Pei-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Gene duplication could be beneficial by functional division but might increase the risk of genetic load. The dynamics of duplicated paralogs number could involve recombination, positive selection, and functional divergence. Duplication of DIHYDROFLAVONOL 4-REDUCTASE (DFR) has been reported in several organisms and may have been retained by escape from adaptive conflict (EAC). In this study, we screened the angiosperm DFR gene focusing on a diversified genus Scutellaria to investigate how these duplicated genes are retained. We deduced that gene duplication involved multiple independent events in angiosperms, but the duplication of DFR was before the divergence of Scutellaria. Asymmetric positive selective pressures resulted in different evolutionary rates between the duplicates. Different numbers of regulatory elements, differential codon usages, radical amino acid changes, and differential gene expressions provide evidences of functional divergence between the two DFR duplicates in Scutellaria, implying adaptive subfunctionalization between duplicates. The discovery of pseudogenes accompanying a reduced replacement rate in one DFR paralogous gene suggested possibly leading to “loss of function” due to dosage imbalance after the transient adaptive subfunctionalization in the early stage of duplication. Notwithstanding, episodic gene duplication and functional divergence may be relevant to the diversification of ecological function of DFR gene in Scutellaria. PMID:27966614

  3. De Novo duplication in Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 1A

    SciTech Connect

    Mandich, P.; Bellone, E.; Ajmar, F.

    1996-09-01

    We read with interest the paper on {open_quotes}Prevalence and Origin of De Novo Duplications in Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease Type 1A: First Report of a De Novo Duplication with a Maternal Origin,{close_quotes}. They reported their experience with 10 sporadic cases of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A) in which it was demonstrated that the disease had arisen as the result of a de novo duplication. They analyzed the de novo-duplication families by using microsatellite markers and identified the parental origin of the duplication in eight cases. In one family the duplication was of maternal origin, whereas in the remaining seven cases it was of paternal origin. The authors concluded that their report was the first evidence of a de novo duplication of maternal origin, suggesting that this is not a phenomenon associated solely with male meiosis. 7 refs.

  4. The Roles of Whole-Genome and Small-Scale Duplications in the Functional Specialization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Genes

    PubMed Central

    Fares, Mario A.; Keane, Orla M.; Toft, Christina; Carretero-Paulet, Lorenzo; Jones, Gary W.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have long been enthralled with the idea that gene duplication can generate novel functions, crediting this process with great evolutionary importance. Empirical data shows that whole-genome duplications (WGDs) are more likely to be retained than small-scale duplications (SSDs), though their relative contribution to the functional fate of duplicates remains unexplored. Using the map of genetic interactions and the re-sequencing of 27 Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomes evolving for 2,200 generations we show that SSD-duplicates lead to neo-functionalization while WGD-duplicates partition ancestral functions. This conclusion is supported by: (a) SSD-duplicates establish more genetic interactions than singletons and WGD-duplicates; (b) SSD-duplicates copies share more interaction-partners than WGD-duplicates copies; (c) WGD-duplicates interaction partners are more functionally related than SSD-duplicates partners; (d) SSD-duplicates gene copies are more functionally divergent from one another, while keeping more overlapping functions, and diverge in their sub-cellular locations more than WGD-duplicates copies; and (e) SSD-duplicates complement their functions to a greater extent than WGD–duplicates. We propose a novel model that uncovers the complexity of evolution after gene duplication. PMID:23300483

  5. Dietary intakes of pesticides based on community duplicate diet samples.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Lisa Jo; Xue, Jianping; Brown, G Gordon; McCombs, Michelle; Nishioka, Marcia; Michael, Larry C

    2014-01-15

    The calculation of dietary intake of selected pesticides was accomplished using food samples collected from individual representatives of a defined demographic community using a community duplicate diet approach. A community of nine participants was identified in Apopka, FL from which intake assessments of organophosphate (OP) and pyrethroid pesticides were made. From these nine participants, sixty-seven individual samples were collected and subsequently analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Measured concentrations were used to estimate dietary intakes for individuals and for the community. Individual intakes of total OP and pyrethroid pesticides ranged from 6.7 to 996 ng and 1.2 to 16,000 ng, respectively. The community intake was 256 ng for OPs and 3430 ng for pyrethroid pesticides. The most commonly detected pesticide was permethrin, but the highest overall intake was of bifenthrin followed by esfenvalerate. These data indicate that the community in Apopka, FL, as represented by the nine individuals, was potentially exposed to both OP and pyrethroid pesticides at levels consistent with a dietary model and other field studies in which standard duplicate diet samples were collected. Higher levels of pyrethroid pesticides were measured than OPs, which is consistent with decreased usage of OPs. The diversity of pyrethroid pesticides detected in food samples was greater than expected. Continually changing pesticide usage patterns need to be considered when determining analytes of interest for large scale epidemiology studies. The Community Duplicate Diet Methodology is a tool for researchers to meet emerging exposure measurement needs that will lead to more accurate assessments of intake which may enhance decisions for chemical regulation. Successfully determining the intake of pesticides through the dietary route will allow for accurate assessments of pesticide exposures to a community of individuals, thereby significantly enhancing the research benefit

  6. Escape from Preferential Retention Following Repeated Whole Genome Duplications in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Schnable, James C.; Wang, Xiaowu; Pires, J. Chris; Freeling, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The well supported gene dosage hypothesis predicts that genes encoding proteins engaged in dose–sensitive interactions cannot be reduced back to single copies once all interacting partners are simultaneously duplicated in a whole genome duplication. The genomes of extant flowering plants are the result of many sequential rounds of whole genome duplication, yet the fraction of genomes devoted to encoding complex molecular machines does not increase as fast as expected through multiple rounds of whole genome duplications. Using parallel interspecies genomic comparisons in the grasses and crucifers, we demonstrate that genes retained as duplicates following a whole genome duplication have only a 50% chance of being retained as duplicates in a second whole genome duplication. Genes which fractionated to a single copy following a second whole genome duplication tend to be the member of a gene pair with less complex promoters, lower levels of expression, and to be under lower levels of purifying selection. We suggest the copy with lower levels of expression and less purifying selection contributes less to effective gene-product dosage and therefore is under less dosage constraint in future whole genome duplications, providing an explanation for why flowering plant genomes are not overrun with subunits of large dose–sensitive protein complexes. PMID:22639677

  7. The first exon duplication mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: A tool for therapeutic development.

    PubMed

    Vulin, Adeline; Wein, Nicolas; Simmons, Tabatha R; Rutherford, Andrea M; Findlay, Andrew R; Yurkoski, Jacqueline A; Kaminoh, Yuuki; Flanigan, Kevin M

    2015-11-01

    Exon duplication mutations account for up to 11% of all cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), and a duplication of exon 2 is the most common duplication in patients. For use as a platform for testing of duplication-specific therapies, we developed a mouse model that carries a Dmd exon 2 duplication. By using homologous recombination we duplicated exon 2 within intron 2 at a location consistent with a human duplication hotspot. mRNA analysis confirms the inclusion of a duplicated exon 2 in mouse muscle. Dystrophin expression is essentially absent by immunofluorescent and immunoblot analysis, although some muscle specimens show very low-level trace dystrophin expression. Phenotypically, the mouse shows similarities to mdx, the standard laboratory model of DMD. In skeletal muscle, areas of necrosis and phagocytosis are seen at 3 weeks, with central nucleation prominent by four weeks, recapitulating the "crisis" period in mdx. Marked diaphragm fibrosis is noted by 6 months, and remains unchanged at 12 months. Our results show that the Dup2 mouse is both pathologically (in degree and distribution) and physiologically similar to mdx. As it recapitulates the most common single exon duplication found in DMD patients, this new model will be a useful tool to assess the potential of duplicated exon skipping.

  8. Targeted tandem duplication of a large chromosomal segment in Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tadashi; Sato, Atsushi; Ogawa, Masahiro; Hanya, Yoshiki; Oguma, Tetsuya

    2014-08-01

    We describe here the first successful construction of a targeted tandem duplication of a large chromosomal segment in Aspergillus oryzae. The targeted tandem chromosomal duplication was achieved by using strains that had a 5'-deleted pyrG upstream of the region targeted for tandem chromosomal duplication and a 3'-deleted pyrG downstream of the target region. Consequently,strains bearing a 210-kb targeted tandem chromosomal duplication near the centromeric region of chromosome 8 and strains bearing a targeted tandem chromosomal duplication of a 700-kb region of chromosome 2 were successfully constructed. The strains bearing the tandem chromosomal duplication were efficiently obtained from the regenerated protoplast of the parental strains. However, the generation of the chromosomal duplication did not depend on the introduction of double-stranded breaks(DSBs) by I-SceI. The chromosomal duplications of these strains were stably maintained after five generations of culture under nonselective conditions. The strains bearing the tandem chromosomal duplication in the 700-kb region of chromosome 2 showed highly increased protease activity in solid-state culture, indicating that the duplication of large chromosomal segments could be a useful new breeding technology and gene analysis method.

  9. Accelerated evolution after gene duplication: a time-dependent process affecting just one copy.

    PubMed

    Pegueroles, Cinta; Laurie, Steve; Albà, M Mar

    2013-08-01

    Gene duplication is widely regarded as a major mechanism modeling genome evolution and function. However, the mechanisms that drive the evolution of the two, initially redundant, gene copies are still ill defined. Many gene duplicates experience evolutionary rate acceleration, but the relative contribution of positive selection and random drift to the retention and subsequent evolution of gene duplicates, and for how long the molecular clock may be distorted by these processes, remains unclear. Focusing on rodent genes that duplicated before and after the mouse and rat split, we find significantly increased sequence divergence after duplication in only one of the copies, which in nearly all cases corresponds to the novel daughter copy, independent of the mechanism of duplication. We observe that the evolutionary rate of the accelerated copy, measured as the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions, is on average 5-fold higher in the period spanning 4-12 My after the duplication than it was before the duplication. This increase can be explained, at least in part, by the action of positive selection according to the results of the maximum likelihood-based branch-site test. Subsequently, the rate decelerates until purifying selection completely returns to preduplication levels. Reversion to the original rates has already been accomplished 40.5 My after the duplication event, corresponding to a genetic distance of about 0.28 synonymous substitutions per site. Differences in tissue gene expression patterns parallel those of substitution rates, reinforcing the role of neofunctionalization in explaining the evolution of young gene duplicates.

  10. Duplicate casts in fabrication of temporary removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Nelson, D R; Palik, J F

    1985-03-01

    The use of blocked-out duplicate casts in the fabrication of temporary removable partial dentures has been described. Temporary removable partial dentures produced in this controlled manner fit properly and aid in minimizing intraoral damage. Accuracy of fit is assured because all relief is accomplished by block out on the surveyor during the laboratory phase rather than by random grinding of the prosthesis at insertion. In addition, the original cast is salvaged and can be used as a meaningful reference during the finishing process in the laboratory (Fig. 5).

  11. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Arising From a Gastric Duplication Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Machicado, Jorge; Davogustto, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Gastric duplication cysts (GDC) are rarely diagnosed in adults, but previous cases have been associated with malignancy. We present a case of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) arising from a GDC in a 71-year-old woman who presented with 3 years of early satiety, anorexia, abdominal distention, and weight loss. Abdominal CT showed a 9.3 x 5.2 x 9.5-cm well-circumscribed cystic mass arising 3 cm above the gastroduodenal junction. The cyst was resected, and histopathology was consistent with GDC. Future studies are needed to clarify the malignant potential of GDC and the molecular pathways for its development. PMID:27144196

  12. Photon number amplification/duplication through parametric conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dariano, G. M.; Macchiavello, C.; Paris, M.

    1993-01-01

    The performance of parametric conversion in achieving number amplification and duplication is analyzed. It is shown that the effective maximum gains G(sub *) remain well below their integer ideal values, even for large signals. Correspondingly, one has output Fano factors F(sub *) which are increasing functions of the input photon number. On the other hand, in the inverse (deamplifier/recombiner) operating mode quasi-ideal gains G(sub *) and small factors F(sub *) approximately equal to 10 percent are obtained. Output noise and non-ideal gains are ascribed to spontaneous parametric emission.

  13. 10p Duplication characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Wiktor, A.; Feldman, G.L.; Van Dyke, D.L.; Kratkoczki, P.; Ditmars, D.M. Jr.

    1994-09-01

    We describe a patient with severe failure to thrive, mild-moderate developmental delay, cleft lip and palate, and other anomalies. Routine cytogenetic analysis documented a de novo chromosome rearrangement involving chromosome 4, but the origin of the derived material was unknown. Using chromosome specific painting probes, the karyotype was defined as 46,XY,der(4)t(4;10)(q35;p11.23). Characterization of the dup(10p) by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis provides another example of the usefulness of this technology in identifying small deletions, duplications, or supernumerary marker chromosomes. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  14. A segmental genomic duplication generates a functional intron

    PubMed Central

    Hellsten, Uffe; Aspden, Julie L.; Rio, Donald C.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.

    2011-01-01

    An intron is an extended genomic feature whose function requires multiple constrained positions—donor and acceptor splice sites, a branch point, a polypyrimidine tract and suitable splicing enhancers—that may be distributed over hundreds or thousands of nucleotides. New introns are therefore unlikely to emerge by incremental accumulation of functional sub-elements. Here we demonstrate that a functional intron can be created de novo in a single step by a segmental genomic duplication. This experiment recapitulates in vivo the birth of an intron that arose in the ancestral jawed vertebrate lineage nearly half-a-billion years ago. PMID:21878908

  15. The programme of DNA replication: beyond genome duplication.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Escoda, Blanca; Wu, Pei-Yun Jenny

    2013-12-01

    The accurate duplication and transmission of genetic information is critical for cell growth and proliferation, and this is ensured in part by the multi-layered regulation of DNA synthesis. One of the key steps in this process is the selection and activation of the sites of replication initiation, or origins, across the genome. Interestingly, origin usage changes during development and in different pathologies, suggesting an integral interplay between the establishment of replication initiation along the chromosomes and cellular function. The present review discusses how the spatiotemporal organization of replication origin activation may play crucial roles in the control of biological events.

  16. A limited role for gene duplications in the evolution of platypus venom.

    PubMed

    Wong, Emily S W; Papenfuss, Anthony T; Whittington, Camilla M; Warren, Wesley C; Belov, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Gene duplication followed by adaptive selection is believed to be the primary driver of venom evolution. However, to date, no studies have evaluated the importance of gene duplications for venom evolution using a genomic approach. The availability of a sequenced genome and a venom gland transcriptome for the enigmatic platypus provides a unique opportunity to explore the role that gene duplication plays in venom evolution. Here, we identify gene duplication events and correlate them with expressed transcripts in an in-season venom gland. Gene duplicates (1,508) were identified. These duplicated pairs (421), including genes that have undergone multiple rounds of gene duplications, were expressed in the venom gland. The majority of these genes are involved in metabolism and protein synthesis not toxin functions. Twelve secretory genes including serine proteases, metalloproteinases, and protease inhibitors likely to produce symptoms of envenomation such as vasodilation and pain were detected. Only 16 of 107 platypus genes with high similarity to known toxins evolved through gene duplication. Platypus venom C-type natriuretic peptides and nerve growth factor do not possess lineage-specific gene duplicates. Extensive duplications, believed to increase the potency of toxic content and promote toxin diversification, were not found. This is the first study to take a genome-wide approach in order to examine the impact of gene duplication on venom evolution. Our findings support the idea that adaptive selection acts on gene duplicates to drive the independent evolution and functional diversification of similar venom genes in venomous species. However, gene duplications alone do not explain the "venome" of the platypus. Other mechanisms, such as alternative splicing and mutation, may be important in venom innovation.

  17. Gene Duplicability of Core Genes Is Highly Consistent across All Angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Defoort, Jonas; Tasdighian, Setareh; Maere, Steven; Van de Peer, Yves; De Smet, Riet

    2016-02-01

    Gene duplication is an important mechanism for adding to genomic novelty. Hence, which genes undergo duplication and are preserved following duplication is an important question. It has been observed that gene duplicability, or the ability of genes to be retained following duplication, is a nonrandom process, with certain genes being more amenable to survive duplication events than others. Primarily, gene essentiality and the type of duplication (small-scale versus large-scale) have been shown in different species to influence the (long-term) survival of novel genes. However, an overarching view of "gene duplicability" is lacking, mainly due to the fact that previous studies usually focused on individual species and did not account for the influence of genomic context and the time of duplication. Here, we present a large-scale study in which we investigated duplicate retention for 9178 gene families shared between 37 flowering plant species, referred to as angiosperm core gene families. For most gene families, we observe a strikingly consistent pattern of gene duplicability across species, with gene families being either primarily single-copy or multicopy in all species. An intermediate class contains gene families that are often retained in duplicate for periods extending to tens of millions of years after whole-genome duplication, but ultimately appear to be largely restored to singleton status, suggesting that these genes may be dosage balance sensitive. The distinction between single-copy and multicopy gene families is reflected in their functional annotation, with single-copy genes being mainly involved in the maintenance of genome stability and organelle function and multicopy genes in signaling, transport, and metabolism. The intermediate class was overrepresented in regulatory genes, further suggesting that these represent putative dosage-balance-sensitive genes.

  18. Gastric Duplication: A Rare Cause of Recurrent Vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Koduri, Brahmananda; Yost, Christina; Goodman, Michael H.; Hoelzer, Dennis

    2017-01-01

    Vomiting is a physical finding that can occur at any age but presents the greatest challenge when it is recurrent in a child. The etiology is varied (Sieunarine and Manmohansingh, 1989; Suzuki, 1982), and recurrent vomiting can be a symptom of life threatening medical or surgical emergencies. Early recognition is mandatory for preventing delay in management and potential complications. Gastric duplication is rare and mostly diagnosed in infancy with only a few cases documented in the medical literature presenting in childhood. We present a three-year-old Vietnamese female with recurrent vomiting. Obstruction and sepsis were ruled out as a cause of the recurrent vomiting by history and appropriate tests. Persistent vomiting and paucity of air on the plain abdominal films provided a clue to the diagnosis. A CT scan of the abdomen with contrast revealed a uniformly thin walled fluid attenuation mass in the epigastric region which did not opacify with contrast. An abdominal ultrasound confirmed gastric duplication cyst and the patient was taken to the operating room for excision of the cyst. PMID:28337353

  19. Hox gene duplications correlate with posterior heteronomy in scorpions

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Prashant P.; Schwager, Evelyn E.; Extavour, Cassandra G.; Wheeler, Ward C.

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary success of the largest animal phylum, Arthropoda, has been attributed to tagmatization, the coordinated evolution of adjacent metameres to form morphologically and functionally distinct segmental regions called tagmata. Specification of regional identity is regulated by the Hox genes, of which 10 are inferred to be present in the ancestor of arthropods. With six different posterior segmental identities divided into two tagmata, the bauplan of scorpions is the most heteronomous within Chelicerata. Expression domains of the anterior eight Hox genes are conserved in previously surveyed chelicerates, but it is unknown how Hox genes regionalize the three tagmata of scorpions. Here, we show that the scorpion Centruroides sculpturatus has two paralogues of all Hox genes except Hox3, suggesting cluster and/or whole genome duplication in this arachnid order. Embryonic anterior expression domain boundaries of each of the last four pairs of Hox genes (two paralogues each of Antp, Ubx, abd-A and Abd-B) are unique and distinguish segmental groups, such as pectines, book lungs and the characteristic tail, while maintaining spatial collinearity. These distinct expression domains suggest neofunctionalization of Hox gene paralogues subsequent to duplication. Our data reconcile previous understanding of Hox gene function across arthropods with the extreme heteronomy of scorpions. PMID:25122224

  20. Intragenic duplication: a novel mutational mechanism in hereditary pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Joergensen, Maiken T.; Geisz, Andrea; Brusgaard, Klaus; de Muckadell, Ove B. Schaffalitzky; Hegyi, Péter; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós

    2011-01-01

    Objectives In a hereditary pancreatitis family from Denmark we identified a novel intragenic duplication of 9 nucleotides in exon-2 of the human cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene (c.63_71dup) which at the amino-acid level resulted in the insertion of three amino acids within the activation peptide of cationic trypsinogen (p.K23_I24insIDK). The aim of the present study was to characterize the effect of this unique genetic alteration on the function of human cationic trypsinogen. Methods Wild-type and mutant cationic trypsinogens were produced recombinantly and purified to homogeneity. Trypsinogen activation was followed by enzymatic assays and SDS-PAGE. Trypsinogen secretion was measured from transfected HEK 293T cells. Results Recombinant cationic trypsinogen carrying the p.K23_I24insIDK mutation exhibited >10-fold increased autoactivation. Activation by human cathepsin B was also accelerated by 10-fold. Secretion of the p.K23_I24insIDK mutant from transfected cells was diminished, consistent with intracellular autoactivation. Conclusions This is the first report of an intragenic duplication within the PRSS1 gene causing hereditary pancreatitis. The accelerated activation of p.K23_I24insIDK by cathepsin B is a unique biochemical property not found in any other pancreatitis-associated trypsinogen mutant. In contrast, the robust autoactivation of the novel mutant confirms the notion that increased autoactivation is a disease-relevant mechanism in hereditary pancreatitis. PMID:21499207

  1. Inhibiting translation elongation can aid genome duplication in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Myka, Kamila K; Hawkins, Michelle; Syeda, Aisha H; Gupta, Milind K; Meharg, Caroline; Dillingham, Mark S; Savery, Nigel J; Lloyd, Robert G; McGlynn, Peter

    2016-12-11

    Conflicts between replication and transcription challenge chromosome duplication. Escherichia coli replisome movement along transcribed DNA is promoted by Rep and UvrD accessory helicases with Δrep ΔuvrD cells being inviable under rapid growth conditions. We have discovered that mutations in a tRNA gene, aspT, in an aminoacyl tRNA synthetase, AspRS, and in a translation factor needed for efficient proline-proline bond formation, EF-P, suppress Δrep ΔuvrD lethality. Thus replication-transcription conflicts can be alleviated by the partial sacrifice of a mechanism that reduces replicative barriers, namely translating ribosomes that reduce RNA polymerase backtracking. Suppression depends on RelA-directed synthesis of (p)ppGpp, a signalling molecule that reduces replication-transcription conflicts, with RelA activation requiring ribosomal pausing. Levels of (p)ppGpp in these suppressors also correlate inversely with the need for Rho activity, an RNA translocase that can bind to emerging transcripts and displace transcription complexes. These data illustrate the fine balance between different mechanisms in facilitating gene expression and genome duplication and demonstrate that accessory helicases are a major determinant of this balance. This balance is also critical for other aspects of bacterial survival: the mutations identified here increase persistence indicating that similar mutations could arise in naturally occurring bacterial populations facing antibiotic challenge.

  2. Hox gene duplications correlate with posterior heteronomy in scorpions.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prashant P; Schwager, Evelyn E; Extavour, Cassandra G; Wheeler, Ward C

    2014-10-07

    The evolutionary success of the largest animal phylum, Arthropoda, has been attributed to tagmatization, the coordinated evolution of adjacent metameres to form morphologically and functionally distinct segmental regions called tagmata. Specification of regional identity is regulated by the Hox genes, of which 10 are inferred to be present in the ancestor of arthropods. With six different posterior segmental identities divided into two tagmata, the bauplan of scorpions is the most heteronomous within Chelicerata. Expression domains of the anterior eight Hox genes are conserved in previously surveyed chelicerates, but it is unknown how Hox genes regionalize the three tagmata of scorpions. Here, we show that the scorpion Centruroides sculpturatus has two paralogues of all Hox genes except Hox3, suggesting cluster and/or whole genome duplication in this arachnid order. Embryonic anterior expression domain boundaries of each of the last four pairs of Hox genes (two paralogues each of Antp, Ubx, abd-A and Abd-B) are unique and distinguish segmental groups, such as pectines, book lungs and the characteristic tail, while maintaining spatial collinearity. These distinct expression domains suggest neofunctionalization of Hox gene paralogues subsequent to duplication. Our data reconcile previous understanding of Hox gene function across arthropods with the extreme heteronomy of scorpions.

  3. Matrix Gla protein and osteocalcin: from gene duplication to neofunctionalization.

    PubMed

    Cancela, M Leonor; Laizé, Vincent; Conceição, Natércia

    2014-11-01

    Osteocalcin (OC or bone Gla protein, BGP) and matrix Gla protein (MGP) are two members of the growing family of vitamin K-dependent (VKD) proteins. They were the first VKD proteins found not to be involved in coagulation and synthesized outside the liver. Both proteins were isolated from bone although it is now known that only OC is synthesized by bone cells under normal physiological conditions, but since both proteins can bind calcium and hydroxyapatite, they can also accumulate in bone. Both OC and MGP share similar structural features, both in terms of protein domains and gene organization. OC gene is likely to have appeared from MGP through a tandem gene duplication that occurred concomitantly with the appearance of the bony vertebrates. Despite their relatively close relationship and the fact that both can bind calcium and affect mineralization, their functions are not redundant and they also have other unrelated functions. Interestingly, these two proteins appear to have followed quite different evolutionary strategies in order to acquire novel functionalities, with OC following a gene duplication strategy while MGP variability was obtained mostly by the use of multiple promoters and alternative splicing, leading to proteins with additional functional characteristics and alternative gene regulatory pathways.

  4. Motion analysis for duplicate frame removal in wireless capsule endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun-Gyu; Choi, Min-Kook; Lee, Sang-Chul

    2011-03-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) has been intensively researched recently due to its convenience for diagnosis and extended detection coverage of some diseases. Typically, a full recording covering entire human digestive system requires about 8 to 12 hours for a patient carrying a capsule endoscope and a portable image receiver/recorder unit, which produces 120,000 image frames on average. In spite of the benefits of close examination, WCE based test has a barrier for quick diagnosis such that a trained diagnostician must examine a huge amount of images for close investigation, normally over 2 hours. The main purpose of our work is to present a novel machine vision approach to reduce diagnosis time by automatically detecting duplicated recordings caused by backward camera movement, typically containing redundant information, in small intestine. The developed technique could be integrated with a visualization tool which supports intelligent inspection method, such as automatic play speed control. Our experimental result shows high accuracy of the technique by detecting 989 duplicate image frames out of 10,000, equivalently to 9.9% data reduction, in a WCE video from a real human subject. With some selected parameters, we achieved the correct detection ratio of 92.85% and the false detection ratio of 13.57%.

  5. Duplicate Publication and Related Problems in the Pediatrics Literature

    PubMed Central

    Haworth, Rebecca; Anderson, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to (a) determine the rate of redundant publication in the pediatrics literature and (b) to characterize these articles. Methods. Index articles in JAMA Pediatrics, Pediatrics, and the Journal of Pediatrics from 2010 were identified using PubMed. Possible redundant material from 2008 to 2012 were searched using the authors’ names. Suspected duplicates were categorized into “duplicate publication” or “salami-slicing” (part of the index article repeated or continued). Results. Of the 1838 index articles, 39 (2.1%) were found to have some form of redundancy. Specifically, 45 articles were identified as salami-sliced, which corresponded to the 39 index articles. Fifteen salami-sliced articles did not reference the corresponding index article, 2 vaguely referenced the index article, and 28 had clear references to the respective index article. Conclusion. Salami-slicing was a common practice. Salami-slicing may be acceptable in certain cases but authors should clearly reference the index article. PMID:27335929

  6. Early genome duplications in conifers and other seed plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Baniaga, Anthony E; Sessa, Emily B; Scascitelli, Moira; Graham, Sean W; Rieseberg, Loren H; Barker, Michael S

    2015-11-01

    Polyploidy is a common mode of speciation and evolution in angiosperms (flowering plants). In contrast, there is little evidence to date that whole genome duplication (WGD) has played a significant role in the evolution of their putative extant sister lineage, the gymnosperms. Recent analyses of the spruce genome, the first published conifer genome, failed to detect evidence of WGDs in gene age distributions and attributed many aspects of conifer biology to a lack of WGDs. We present evidence for three ancient genome duplications during the evolution of gymnosperms, based on phylogenomic analyses of transcriptomes from 24 gymnosperms and 3 outgroups. We use a new algorithm to place these WGD events in phylogenetic context: two in the ancestry of major conifer clades (Pinaceae and cupressophyte conifers) and one in Welwitschia (Gnetales). We also confirm that a WGD hypothesized to be restricted to seed plants is indeed not shared with ferns and relatives (monilophytes), a result that was unclear in earlier studies. Contrary to previous genomic research that reported an absence of polyploidy in the ancestry of contemporary gymnosperms, our analyses indicate that polyploidy has contributed to the evolution of conifers and other gymnosperms. As in the flowering plants, the evolution of the large genome sizes of gymnosperms involved both polyploidy and repetitive element activity.

  7. Early genome duplications in conifers and other seed plants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zheng; Baniaga, Anthony E.; Sessa, Emily B.; Scascitelli, Moira; Graham, Sean W.; Rieseberg, Loren H.; Barker, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Polyploidy is a common mode of speciation and evolution in angiosperms (flowering plants). In contrast, there is little evidence to date that whole genome duplication (WGD) has played a significant role in the evolution of their putative extant sister lineage, the gymnosperms. Recent analyses of the spruce genome, the first published conifer genome, failed to detect evidence of WGDs in gene age distributions and attributed many aspects of conifer biology to a lack of WGDs. We present evidence for three ancient genome duplications during the evolution of gymnosperms, based on phylogenomic analyses of transcriptomes from 24 gymnosperms and 3 outgroups. We use a new algorithm to place these WGD events in phylogenetic context: two in the ancestry of major conifer clades (Pinaceae and cupressophyte conifers) and one in Welwitschia (Gnetales). We also confirm that a WGD hypothesized to be restricted to seed plants is indeed not shared with ferns and relatives (monilophytes), a result that was unclear in earlier studies. Contrary to previous genomic research that reported an absence of polyploidy in the ancestry of contemporary gymnosperms, our analyses indicate that polyploidy has contributed to the evolution of conifers and other gymnosperms. As in the flowering plants, the evolution of the large genome sizes of gymnosperms involved both polyploidy and repetitive element activity. PMID:26702445

  8. Gene duplication and speciation in Drosophila: evidence from the Odysseus locus.

    PubMed

    Ting, Chau-Ti; Tsaur, Shun-Chern; Sun, Sha; Browne, William E; Chen, Yung-Chia; Patel, Nipam H; Wu, Chung-I

    2004-08-17

    The importance of gene duplication in evolution has long been recognized. Because duplicated genes are prone to diverge in function, gene duplication could plausibly play a role in species differentiation. However, experimental evidence linking gene duplication with speciation is scarce. Here, we show that a hybrid-male sterility gene, Odysseus (OdsH), arose by gene duplication in the Drosophila genome. OdsH has evolved at a very high rate, whereas its most immediate paralog, unc-4, is nearly identical among species in the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup. The disparity in their sequence evolution is echoed by the divergence in their expression patterns in both soma and reproductive tissues. We suggest that duplicated genes that have yet to evolve a stable function at the time of speciation may be candidates for "speciation genes," which is broadly defined as genes that contribute to differential adaptation between species.

  9. Gene Duplicability of Core Genes Is Highly Consistent across All Angiosperms[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Van de Peer, Yves; De Smet, Riet

    2016-01-01

    Gene duplication is an important mechanism for adding to genomic novelty. Hence, which genes undergo duplication and are preserved following duplication is an important question. It has been observed that gene duplicability, or the ability of genes to be retained following duplication, is a nonrandom process, with certain genes being more amenable to survive duplication events than others. Primarily, gene essentiality and the type of duplication (small-scale versus large-scale) have been shown in different species to influence the (long-term) survival of novel genes. However, an overarching view of “gene duplicability” is lacking, mainly due to the fact that previous studies usually focused on individual species and did not account for the influence of genomic context and the time of duplication. Here, we present a large-scale study in which we investigated duplicate retention for 9178 gene families shared between 37 flowering plant species, referred to as angiosperm core gene families. For most gene families, we observe a strikingly consistent pattern of gene duplicability across species, with gene families being either primarily single-copy or multicopy in all species. An intermediate class contains gene families that are often retained in duplicate for periods extending to tens of millions of years after whole-genome duplication, but ultimately appear to be largely restored to singleton status, suggesting that these genes may be dosage balance sensitive. The distinction between single-copy and multicopy gene families is reflected in their functional annotation, with single-copy genes being mainly involved in the maintenance of genome stability and organelle function and multicopy genes in signaling, transport, and metabolism. The intermediate class was overrepresented in regulatory genes, further suggesting that these represent putative dosage-balance-sensitive genes. PMID:26744215

  10. On the retention of gene duplicates prone to dominant deleterious mutations.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, Giulia; Singh, Param Priya; Isambert, Hervé

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that gene families from different functional categories have been preferentially expanded either by small scale duplication (SSD) or by whole-genome duplication (WGD). In particular, gene families prone to dominant deleterious mutations and implicated in cancers and other genetic diseases in human have been greatly expanded through two rounds of WGD dating back from early vertebrates. Here, we strengthen this intriguing observation, showing that human oncogenes involved in different primary tumors have retained many WGD duplicates compared to other human genes. In order to rationalize this evolutionary outcome, we propose a consistent population genetics model to analyze the retention of SSD and WGD duplicates taking into account their propensity to acquire dominant deleterious mutations. We solve a deterministic haploid model including initial duplicated loci, their retention through sub-functionalization or their neutral loss-of-function or deleterious gain-of-function at one locus. Extensions to diploid genotypes are presented and population size effects are analyzed using stochastic simulations. The only difference between the SSD and WGD scenarios is the initial number of individuals with duplicated loci. While SSD duplicates need to spread through the entire population from a single individual to reach fixation, WGD duplicates are de facto fixed in the small initial post-WGD population arising through the ploidy incompatibility between post-WGD individuals and the rest of the pre-WGD population. WGD duplicates prone to dominant deleterious mutations are then shown to be indirectly selected through purifying selection in post-WGD species, whereas SSD duplicates typically require positive selection. These results highlight the long-term evolution mechanisms behind the surprising accumulation of WGD duplicates prone to dominant deleterious mutations and are shown to be consistent with cancer genome data on the prevalence of human

  11. Unusual duplicate bladder exstrophy in a female newborn: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bouali, Ourdia; Mouttalib, Sofia; Abbo, Olivier; Lemasson, Frédérique; Moscovici, Jacques; Galinier, Philippe

    2012-08-01

    The authors report a rare variant of exstrophy-epispadias complex, a duplicate bladder with normal bladder communicating with an exstrophic bladder by a fistula, in a girl with no genital malformation except for a duplicated clitoris. This variant could be a hybrid form of duplicate bladder exstrophy and superior vesical fistula. It seems easier to repair and has a better prognosis than classic bladder exstrophy.

  12. The birth of new genes by RNA- and DNA-mediated duplication during mammalian evolution.

    PubMed

    Jun, Jin; Ryvkin, Paul; Hemphill, Edward; Mandoiu, Ion; Nelson, Craig

    2009-10-01

    Gene duplication has long been recognized as a major force in genome evolution and has recently been recognized as an important source of individual variation. For many years, the origin of functional gene duplicates was assumed to be whole or partial genome duplication events, but recently retrotransposition has also been shown to contribute new functional protein coding genes and siRNA's. In this study, we utilize pseudogenes to recreate more complete gene family histories, and compare the rates of RNA and DNA-mediated duplication and new functional gene formation in five mammalian genomes. We find that RNA-mediated duplication occurs at a much higher and more variable rate than DNA-mediated duplication, and gives rise to many more duplicated sequences over time. We show that, while the chance of RNA-mediated duplicates becoming functional is much lower than that of their DNA-mediated counterparts, the higher rate of retrotransposition leads to nearly equal contributions of new genes by each mechanism. We also find that functional RNA-mediated duplicates are closer to neighboring genes than non-functional RNA-mediated copies, consistent with co-option of regulatory elements at the site of insertion. Overall, new genes derived from DNA and RNA-mediated duplication mechanisms are under similar levels of purifying selective pressure, but have broadly different functions. RNA-mediated duplication gives rise to a diversity of genes but is dominated by the highly expressed genes of RNA metabolic pathways. DNA-mediated duplication can copy regulatory material along with the protein coding region of the gene and often gives rise to classes of genes whose function are dependent on complex regulatory information. This mechanistic difference may in part explain why we find that mammalian protein families tend to evolve by either one mechanism or the other, but rarely by both. Supplementary Material has been provided (see online Supplementary Material at www.liebertonline.com ).

  13. Adaptive evolution of genes duplicated from the Drosophila pseudoobscura neo-X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Richard P; Hilldorfer, Benedict B; Koch, Jessica L; Lockton, Steven; Schaeffer, Stephen W

    2010-08-01

    Drosophila X chromosomes are disproportionate sources of duplicated genes, and these duplications are usually the result of retrotransposition of X-linked genes to the autosomes. The excess duplication is thought to be driven by natural selection for two reasons: X chromosomes are inactivated during spermatogenesis, and the derived copies of retroposed duplications tend to be testis expressed. Therefore, autosomal derived copies of retroposed genes provide a mechanism for their X-linked paralogs to "escape" X inactivation. Once these duplications have fixed, they may then be selected for male-specific functions. Throughout the evolution of the Drosophila genus, autosomes have fused with X chromosomes along multiple lineages giving rise to neo-X chromosomes. There has also been excess duplication from the two independent neo-X chromosomes that have been examined--one that occurred prior to the common ancestor of the willistoni species group and another that occurred along the lineage leading to Drosophila pseudoobscura. To determine what role natural selection plays in the evolution of genes duplicated from the D. pseudoobscura neo-X chromosome, we analyzed DNA sequence divergence between paralogs, polymorphism within each copy, and the expression profiles of these duplicated genes. We found that the derived copies of all duplicated genes have elevated nonsynonymous polymorphism, suggesting that they are under relaxed selective constraints. The derived copies also tend to have testis- or male-biased expression profiles regardless of their chromosome of origin. Genes duplicated from the neo-X chromosome appear to be under less constraints than those duplicated from other chromosome arms. We also find more evidence for historical adaptive evolution in genes duplicated from the neo-X chromosome, suggesting that they are under a unique selection regime in which elevated nonsynonymous polymorphism provides a large reservoir of functional variants, some of which are fixed

  14. Prevalence and origin of de novo duplications in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A: first report of a de novo duplication with a maternal origin.

    PubMed Central

    Blair, I. P.; Nash, J.; Gordon, M. J.; Nicholson, G. A.

    1996-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy. Sporadic cases of CMT have been described since the earliest reports of the disease. The most frequent form of the disorder, CMT1A, is associated with a 1.5-Mb DNA duplication on chromosome 17p11.2, which segregates with the disease. In order to investigate the prevalence of de novo CMT1A duplications, this study examined 118 duplication-positive CMT1A families. In 10 of these families it was demonstrated that the disease had arisen as the result of a de novo mutation. By taking into account the ascertainment of families, it can be estimated that > or = 10% of autosomal dominant CMT1 families are due to de novo duplications. The CMT1A duplication is thought to be the product of unequal crossing over between parental chromosome 17 homologues during meiosis. Polymorphic markers from within the duplicated region were used to determine the parental origin of these de novo duplications in eight informative families. Seven were of paternal and one of maternal origin. This study represents the first report of a de novo duplication with a maternal origin and indicates that it is not a phenomenon associated solely with male meioses. Recombination fractions for the region duplicated in CMT1A are larger in females than in males. That suggests that oogenesis may be afforded greater protection from misalignment during synapsis, and/or that there may be lower activity of those factors or mechanisms that lead to unequal crossing over at the CMT1A locus. Images Figure 2 PMID:8644705

  15. Prevalence and origin of De Novo duplications in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A: First report of a De Novo duplication with a maternal origin

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, I.P.; Nash, J.; Gordon, M.J.; Nicholson, G.A.

    1996-03-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy. Sporadic cases of CMT have been described since the earliest reports of the disease. The most frequent form of the disorder, CMT1A, is associated with a 1.5-Mb DNA duplication on chromosome 17p11.2, which segregates with the disease. In order to investigate the prevalence of de novo CMT1A duplications, this study examined 118 duplication-positive CMT1A families. In 10 of these families it was demonstrated that the disease had arisen as the result of a de novo mutation. By taking into account the ascertainment of families, it can be estimated that {>=}10% of autosomal dominant CMT1 families are due to de novo duplications. The CMT1A duplication is thought to be the product of unequal crossing over between parental chromosome 17 homologues during meiosis. Polymorphic markers from within the duplicated region were used to determine the parental origin of these de novo duplications in eight informative families. Seven were of paternal and one of maternal origin. This study represents the first report of a de novo duplication with a maternal origin and indicates that it is not a phenomenon associated solely with male meioses. Recombination fractions for the region duplicated in CMT1A are larger in females than in males. That suggests that oogenesis may be afforded greater protection from misalignment during synapsis, and/or that there may be lower activity of those factors or mechanisms that lead to unequal crossing over at the CMT1A locus. 41 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Autism or atypical autism in maternally but not paternally derived proximal 15q duplication.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, E H; Lindgren, V; Leventhal, B L; Courchesne, R; Lincoln, A; Shulman, C; Lord, C; Courchesne, E

    1997-01-01

    Duplications of proximal 15q have been found in individuals with autistic disorder (AD) and varying degrees of mental retardation. Often these abnormalities take the form of a supernumerary inverted duplicated chromosome 15, more properly described as an isodicentric chromosome 15, or idic(15). However, intrachromosomal duplications also have been reported. In a few cases, unaffected mothers, as well as their affected children, carry the same duplications. During the course of the genotyping of trios of affected probands with AD and their parents, at the positional candidate locus D15S122, an intrachromosomal duplication of proximal 15q was detected by microsatellite analysis in a phenotypically normal mother. Microsatellite and methylation analyses of the pedigree in the following report show that, among three children, the two with autism or atypical autism have maternal inheritance of a 15q11-q13 duplication whereas the third child, who is unaffected, did not inherit this duplication. Their mother's 15q11-q13 duplication arose de novo from her father's chromosomes 15. This finding documents, for the first time, the significance of parental origin for duplications of 15q11-q13. In this family, paternal inheritance leads to a normal phenotype, and maternal inheritance leads to autism or atypical autism. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:9106540

  17. Phylogenetic dating and characterization of gene duplications in vertebrates: the cartilaginous fish reference.

    PubMed

    Robinson-Rechavi, Marc; Boussau, Bastien; Laudet, Vincent

    2004-03-01

    Vertebrates originated in the lower Cambrian. Their diversification and morphological innovations have been attributed to large-scale gene or genome duplications at the origin of the group. These duplications are predicted to have occurred in two rounds, the "2R" hypothesis, or they may have occurred in one genome duplication plus many segmental duplications, although these hypotheses are disputed. Under such models, most genes that are duplicated in all vertebrates should have originated during the same period. Previous work has shown that indeed duplications started after the speciation between vertebrates and the closest invertebrate, amphioxus, but have not set a clear ending. Consideration of chordate phylogeny immediately shows the key position of cartilaginous vertebrates (Chondrichthyes) to answer this question. Did gene duplications occur as frequently during the 45 Myr between the cartilaginous/bony vertebrate split and the fish/tetrapode split as in the previous approximately 100 Myr? Although the time interval is relatively short, it is crucial to understanding the events at the origin of vertebrates. By a systematic appraisal of gene phylogenies, we show that significantly more duplications occurred before than after the cartilaginous/bony vertebrate split. Our results support rounds of gene or genome duplications during a limited period of early vertebrate evolution and allow a better characterization of these events.

  18. Tempo and Mode of Gene Duplication in Mammalian Ribosomal Protein Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gajdosik, Matthew D.; Simon, Amanda; Nelson, Craig E.

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplication has been widely recognized as a major driver of evolutionary change and organismal complexity through the generation of multi-gene families. Therefore, understanding the forces that govern the evolution of gene families through the retention or loss of duplicated genes is fundamentally important in our efforts to study genome evolution. Previous work from our lab has shown that ribosomal protein (RP) genes constitute one of the largest classes of conserved duplicated genes in mammals. This result was surprising due to the fact that ribosomal protein genes evolve slowly and transcript levels are very tightly regulated. In our present study, we identified and characterized all RP duplicates in eight mammalian genomes in order to investigate the tempo and mode of ribosomal protein family evolution. We show that a sizable number of duplicates are transcriptionally active and are very highly conserved. Furthermore, we conclude that existing gene duplication models do not readily account for the preservation of a very large number of intact retroduplicated ribosomal protein (RT-RP) genes observed in mammalian genomes. We suggest that selection against dominant-negative mutations may underlie the unexpected retention and conservation of duplicated RP genes, and may shape the fate of newly duplicated genes, regardless of duplication mechanism. PMID:25369106

  19. The ethics of scholarly publishing: exploring differences in plagiarism and duplicate publication across nations.

    PubMed

    Amos, Kathleen A

    2014-04-01

    This study explored national differences in plagiarism and duplicate publication in retracted biomedical literature. The national affiliations of authors and reasons for retraction of papers accessible through PubMed that were published from 2008 to 2012 and subsequently retracted were determined in order to identify countries with the largest numbers and highest rates of retraction due to plagiarism and duplicate publication. Authors from more than fifty countries retracted papers. While the United States retracted the most papers, China retracted the most papers for plagiarism and duplicate publication. Rates of plagiarism and duplicate publication were highest in Italy and Finland, respectively. Unethical publishing practices cut across nations.

  20. Error analysis of filtering operations in pixel-duplicated images of diabetic retinopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrubeoglu, Mehrube; McLauchlan, Lifford

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, diabetic retinopathy is chosen for a sample target image to demonstrate the effectiveness of image enlargement through pixel duplication in identifying regions of interest. Pixel duplication is presented as a simpler alternative to data interpolation techniques for detecting small structures in the images. A comparative analysis is performed on different image processing schemes applied to both original and pixel-duplicated images. Structures of interest are detected and and classification parameters optimized for minimum false positive detection in the original and enlarged retinal pictures. The error analysis demonstrates the advantages as well as shortcomings of pixel duplication in image enhancement when spatial averaging operations (smoothing filters) are also applied.

  1. Tempo and mode of gene duplication in mammalian ribosomal protein evolution.

    PubMed

    Dharia, Asav P; Obla, Ajay; Gajdosik, Matthew D; Simon, Amanda; Nelson, Craig E

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplication has been widely recognized as a major driver of evolutionary change and organismal complexity through the generation of multi-gene families. Therefore, understanding the forces that govern the evolution of gene families through the retention or loss of duplicated genes is fundamentally important in our efforts to study genome evolution. Previous work from our lab has shown that ribosomal protein (RP) genes constitute one of the largest classes of conserved duplicated genes in mammals. This result was surprising due to the fact that ribosomal protein genes evolve slowly and transcript levels are very tightly regulated. In our present study, we identified and characterized all RP duplicates in eight mammalian genomes in order to investigate the tempo and mode of ribosomal protein family evolution. We show that a sizable number of duplicates are transcriptionally active and are very highly conserved. Furthermore, we conclude that existing gene duplication models do not readily account for the preservation of a very large number of intact retroduplicated ribosomal protein (RT-RP) genes observed in mammalian genomes. We suggest that selection against dominant-negative mutations may underlie the unexpected retention and conservation of duplicated RP genes, and may shape the fate of newly duplicated genes, regardless of duplication mechanism.

  2. Tandem duplication PCR: an ultra-sensitive assay for the detection of internal tandem duplications of the FLT3 gene

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ming-Tseh; Tseng, Li-Hui; Beierl, Katie; Hsieh, Antony; Thiess, Michele; Chase, Nadine; Stafford, Amanda; Levis, Mark J.; Eshleman, James R.; Gocke, Christopher D.

    2013-01-01

    Internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations of the FLT3 gene have been associated with a poor prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Detection of ITD-positive minor clones at the initial diagnosis and during the minimal residual disease (MRD) stage may be essential. We previously designed a delta-PCR strategy to improve the sensitivity to 0.1% ITD-positive leukemia cells and showed that minor mutants with an allele burden of less than 1% can be clinically significant. In this study, we report on tandem duplication PCR (TD-PCR), a modified inverse PCR assay, and demonstrate a limit of detection of a few molecules of ITD mutants. The TD-PCR was initially designed to confirm ITD mutation of an amplicon which was undetectable by capillary electrophoresis and was incidentally isolated by a molecular fraction collecting tool. Subsequently, TD-PCR detected ITD mutation in 2 of 77 patients previously reported as negative for ITD mutation by a standard PCR assay. TD-PCR can also potentially be applied to monitor MRD with high analytic sensitivity in a portion of ITD-positive AML patients. Further studies using TD-PCR to detect ITD mutants at diagnosis may clarify the clinical significance of those ITD mutants with extremely low allele burden. PMID:23846441

  3. Identifying duplicate crystal structures: XTALCOMP, an open-source solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonie, David C.; Zurek, Eva

    2012-03-01

    We describe the implementation of XTALCOMP, an efficient, reliable, and open-source library that tests if two crystal descriptions describe the same underlying structure. The algorithm has been tested and found to correctly identify duplicate structures in spite of the "real-world" difficulties that arise from working with numeric crystal representations: degenerate unit cell lattices, numerical noise, periodic boundaries, and the lack of a canonical coordinate origin. The library is portable, open, and not dependent on any external packages. A web interface to the algorithm is publicly accessible at http://xtalopt.openmolecules.net/xtalcomp/xtalcomp.html. Program summaryProgram title: XtalComp Catalogue identifier: AEKV_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKV_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: "New" (3-clause) BSD [1] No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3148 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 21 860 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: No restrictions Operating system: All operating systems with a compliant C++ compiler. Classification: 7.8 Nature of problem: Computationally identifying duplicate crystal structures taken from the output of modern solid state calculations is a non-trivial exercise for many reasons. The translation vectors in the description are not unique — they may be transformed into linear combinations of themselves and continue to describe the same extended structure. The coordinates and cell parameters contain numerical noise. The periodic boundary conditions at the unit cell faces, edges, and corners can cause very small displacements of atomic coordinates to result in very different representations. The positions of all atoms may be uniformly translated by an arbitrary vector without modifying the underlying structure. Additionally, certain

  4. Evolution of Chaperonin Gene Duplication in Stigonematalean Cyanobacteria (Subsection V)

    PubMed Central

    Weissenbach, Julia; Ilhan, Judith; Hülter, Nils; Stucken, Karina; Dagan, Tal

    2017-01-01

    Chaperonins promote protein folding and are known to play a role in the maintenance of cellular stability under stress conditions. The group I bacterial chaperonin complex comprises GroEL, that forms a barrel-like oligomer, and GroES that forms the lid. In most eubacteria the GroES/GroEL chaperonin is encoded by a single-copy bicistronic operon, whereas in cyanobacteria up to three groES/groEL paralogs have been documented. Here we study the evolution and functional diversification of chaperonin paralogs in the heterocystous, multi-seriate filament forming cyanobacterium Chlorogloeopsis fritschii PCC 6912. The genome of C. fritschii encodes two groES/groEL operons (groESL1, groESL1.2) and a monocistronic groEL gene (groEL2). A phylogenetic reconstruction reveals that the groEL2 duplication is as ancient as cyanobacteria, whereas the groESL1.2 duplication occurred at the ancestor of heterocystous cyanobacteria. A comparison of the groEL paralogs transcription levels under different growth conditions shows that they have adapted distinct transcriptional regulation. Our results reveal that groEL1 and groEL1.2 are upregulated during diazotrophic conditions and the localization of their promoter activity points towards a role in heterocyst differentiation. Furthermore, protein–protein interaction assays suggest that paralogs encoded in the two operons assemble into hybrid complexes. The monocistronic encoded GroEL2 is not forming oligomers nor does it interact with the co-chaperonins. Interaction between GroES1.2 and GroEL1.2 could not be documented, suggesting that the groESL1.2 operon does not encode a functional chaperonin complex. Functional complementation experiments in Escherichia coli show that only GroES1/GroEL1 and GroES1/GroEL1.2 can substitute the native operon. In summary, the evolutionary consequences of chaperonin duplication in cyanobacteria include the retention of groESL1 as a housekeeping gene, subfunctionalization of groESL1.2 and

  5. Evolution of Chaperonin Gene Duplication in Stigonematalean Cyanobacteria (Subsection V).

    PubMed

    Weissenbach, Julia; Ilhan, Judith; Bogumil, David; Hülter, Nils; Stucken, Karina; Dagan, Tal

    2017-01-12

    Chaperonins promote protein folding and are known to play a role in the maintenance of cellular stability under stress conditions. The group I bacterial chaperonin complex comprises GroEL, that forms a barrel-like oligomer, and GroES that forms the lid. In most eubacteria the GroES/GroEL chaperonin is encoded by a single-copy bicistronic operon, whereas in cyanobacteria up to three groES/groEL paralogs have been documented. Here we study the evolution and functional diversification of chaperonin paralogs in the heterocystous, multi-seriate filament forming cyanobacterium Chlorogloeopsis fritschii PCC 6912. The genome of C. fritschii encodes two groES/groEL operons (groESL1, groESL1.2) and a monocistronic groEL gene (groEL2). A phylogenetic reconstruction reveals that the groEL2 duplication is as ancient as cyanobacteria, whereas the groESL1.2 duplication occurred at the ancestor of heterocystous cyanobacteria. A comparison of the groEL paralogs transcription levels under different growth conditions shows that they have adapted distinct transcriptional regulation. Our results reveal that groEL1 and groEL1.2 are upregulated during diazotrophic conditions and the localization of their promoter activity points towards a role in heterocyst differentiation. Furthermore, protein-protein interaction assays suggest that paralogs encoded in the two operons assemble into hybrid complexes. The monocistronic GroEL2 is not forming oligomers nor does it interact with the co-chaperonins. Interaction between GroES1.2 and GroEL1.2 could not be documented, suggesting that the groESL1.2 operon does not encode a functional chaperonin complex. Functional complementation experiments in Escherichia coli show that only GroES1/GroEL1 and GroES1/GroEL1.2 can substitute the native operon. In summary, the evolutionary consequences of chaperonin duplication in cyanobacteria include the retention of groESL1 as a housekeeping gene, subfunctionalization of groESL1.2 and neofunctionalization of the

  6. Pulse Duplicator Hydrodynamic Testing of Bioengineered Biological Heart Valves.

    PubMed

    Buse, Eric E; Hilbert, Stephen L; Hopkins, Richard A; Converse, Gabriel L

    2016-12-01

    There are many heart valve replacements currently available on the market; however, these devices are not ideal for pediatric patients with congenital heart valve defects. Decellularized valve substitutes offer potential for improved clinical outcomes and require pre-clinical testing guidelines and testing systems suitable for non-crosslinked, biological heart valves. The objective of this study was to assess the hydrodynamic performance of intact, bioengineered pulmonary valves using a custom pulse duplicator capable of testing intact biological valved conduits. The mechanical behavior of valve associated sinus and arterial tissue was also evaluated under biaxial loading. Cryopreserved, decellularized, extracellular matrix (ECM) conditioned and glutaraldehyde fixed valves showed reduced pressure gradients and increased effective orifice area for decellularized and ECM conditioned valves. ECM conditioning resulted in increased elastic modulus but decreased stretch in circumferential and longitudinal directions under biaxial loading. Overall, decellularization and ECM conditioning did not compromise the scaffolds, which exhibited satisfactory bench top performance.

  7. The structural color of red rose petals and their duplicates.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lin; Zhang, Yanan; Li, Mingzhu; Zheng, Yongmei; Shen, Weizhi; Jiang, Lei

    2010-09-21

    The observation of the surface of a red rose petal indicates that there are micropapillae on the surface and many nanofolders exist on each papilla. Here, much tinier nanorods with periodic pattern on the nanofolders can be seen by in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). Angle-resolved UV-vis spectral measurement and reflectance UV-vis spectra by immersion red rose petal in solvents with different refractive indices demonstrate that such periodic nanostructures can induce structural color. The combination of structural color, driven by the nanostructures, and chemical color, driven by pigments, provide flowers bright color and special functions for human and animals' visual system. Biomimic polymer films, that fabricated by duplicating the petal's hierarchical micro/nano structures, exhibit only structural color by UV-vis spectra since there is no pigment introduced.

  8. The Prevalence of Inappropriate Image Duplication in Biomedical Research Publications.

    PubMed

    Bik, Elisabeth M; Casadevall, Arturo; Fang, Ferric C

    2016-06-07

    Inaccurate data in scientific papers can result from honest error or intentional falsification. This study attempted to determine the percentage of published papers that contain inappropriate image duplication, a specific type of inaccurate data. The images from a total of 20,621 papers published in 40 scientific journals from 1995 to 2014 were visually screened. Overall, 3.8% of published papers contained problematic figures, with at least half exhibiting features suggestive of deliberate manipulation. The prevalence of papers with problematic images has risen markedly during the past decade. Additional papers written by authors of papers with problematic images had an increased likelihood of containing problematic images as well. As this analysis focused only on one type of data, it is likely that the actual prevalence of inaccurate data in the published literature is higher. The marked variation in the frequency of problematic images among journals suggests that journal practices, such as prepublication image screening, influence the quality of the scientific literature.

  9. Region duplication forgery detection technique based on SURF and HAC.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Parul; Mishra, Nishchol; Sharma, Sanjeev; Patel, Ravindra

    2013-01-01

    Region duplication forgery detection is a special type of forgery detection approach and widely used research topic under digital image forensics. In copy move forgery, a specific area is copied and then pasted into any other region of the image. Due to the availability of sophisticated image processing tools, it becomes very hard to detect forgery with naked eyes. From the forged region of an image no visual clues are often detected. For making the tampering more robust, various transformations like scaling, rotation, illumination changes, JPEG compression, noise addition, gamma correction, and blurring are applied. So there is a need for a method which performs efficiently in the presence of all such attacks. This paper presents a detection method based on speeded up robust features (SURF) and hierarchical agglomerative clustering (HAC). SURF detects the keypoints and their corresponding features. From these sets of keypoints, grouping is performed on the matched keypoints by HAC that shows copied and pasted regions.

  10. Region Duplication Forgery Detection Technique Based on SURF and HAC

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Parul; Sharma, Sanjeev; Patel, Ravindra

    2013-01-01

    Region duplication forgery detection is a special type of forgery detection approach and widely used research topic under digital image forensics. In copy move forgery, a specific area is copied and then pasted into any other region of the image. Due to the availability of sophisticated image processing tools, it becomes very hard to detect forgery with naked eyes. From the forged region of an image no visual clues are often detected. For making the tampering more robust, various transformations like scaling, rotation, illumination changes, JPEG compression, noise addition, gamma correction, and blurring are applied. So there is a need for a method which performs efficiently in the presence of all such attacks. This paper presents a detection method based on speeded up robust features (SURF) and hierarchical agglomerative clustering (HAC). SURF detects the keypoints and their corresponding features. From these sets of keypoints, grouping is performed on the matched keypoints by HAC that shows copied and pasted regions. PMID:24311972

  11. Potential pitfall of DMSA scintigraphy in patients with ureteral duplication

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, F.; Snow, B.; Taylor, A. Jr.

    1986-07-01

    A 5-wk-old male presented with radiographic findings of a duplicated collecting system. A (/sup 99m/Tc)DMSA scan was requested to evaluate cortical function. Images obtained immediately. postinjection showed activity restricted to the upper poles; in contrast, delayed images at 4 hr showed activity in the bladder and throughout both kidneys. Catheterizing the patient drained the activity from the bladder but had little effect on the refluxed renal activity. The early (/sup 99m/Tc)DMSA images were critical in making the proper interpretation. Technetium-99m DMSA is excreted into the urine and this fact needs to be considered when interpreting scans of patients with possible reflux or obstruction. When DMSA scans are obtained in pediatric patients with possible reflux, catheterization prior to the study and early images prior to the appearance of DMSA in the collecting system are recommended.

  12. Relaxation of yeast mitochondrial functions after whole-genome duplication

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Huifeng; Guan, Wenjun; Pinney, David; Wang, Wen; Gu, Zhenglong

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential for cellular energy production in most eukaryotic organisms. However, when glucose is abundant, yeast species that underwent whole-genome duplication (WGD) mostly conduct fermentation even under aerobic conditions, and most can survive without a functional mitochondrial genome. In this study, we show that the rate of evolution for the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes was greater in post-WGD species than pre-WGD species. Furthermore, codon usage bias was relaxed for these genes in post-WGD yeast species. The codon usage pattern and the distribution of a particular transcription regulatory element suggest that the change to an efficient aerobic fermentation lifestyle in this lineage might have emerged after WGD between the divergence of Kluyveromyces polysporus and Saccharomyces castellii from their common ancestor. This new energy production strategy could have led to the relaxation of mitochondrial function in the relevant yeast species. PMID:18669479

  13. Exon duplications in the ATP7A gene: Frequency and Transcriptional Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Menkes disease (MD) is an X-linked, fatal neurodegenerative disorder of copper metabolism, caused by mutations in the ATP7A gene. Thirty-three Menkes patients in whom no mutation had been detected with standard diagnostic tools were screened for exon duplications in the ATP7A gene. Methods The ATP7A gene was screened for exon duplications using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). The expression level of ATP7A was investigated by real-time PCR and detailed analysis of the ATP7A mRNA was performed by RT-PCR followed by sequencing. In order to investigate whether the identified duplicated fragments originated from a single or from two different X-chromosomes, polymorphic markers located in the duplicated fragments were analyzed. Results Partial ATP7A gene duplication was identified in 20 unrelated patients including one patient with Occipital Horn Syndrome (OHS). Duplications in the ATP7A gene are estimated from our material to be the disease causing mutation in 4% of the Menkes disease patients. The duplicated regions consist of between 2 and 15 exons. In at least one of the cases, the duplication was due to an intra-chromosomal event. Characterization of the ATP7A mRNA transcripts in 11 patients revealed that the duplications were organized in tandem, in a head to tail direction. The reading frame was disrupted in all 11 cases. Small amounts of wild-type transcript were found in all patients as a result of exon-skipping events occurring in the duplicated regions. In the OHS patient with a duplication of exon 3 and 4, the duplicated out-of-frame transcript coexists with an almost equally represented wild-type transcript, presumably leading to the milder phenotype. Conclusions In general, patients with duplication of only 2 exons exhibit a milder phenotype as compared to patients with duplication of more than 2 exons. This study provides insight into exon duplications in the ATP7A gene. PMID:22074552

  14. Genome duplication and gene loss affect the evolution of heat shock transcription factor genes in legumes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yongxiang; Cheng, Ying; Jin, Jing; Jin, Xiaolei; Jiang, Haiyang; Yan, Hanwei; Cheng, Beijiu

    2014-01-01

    Whole-genome duplication events (polyploidy events) and gene loss events have played important roles in the evolution of legumes. Here we show that the vast majority of Hsf gene duplications resulted from whole genome duplication events rather than tandem duplication, and significant differences in gene retention exist between species. By searching for intraspecies gene colinearity (microsynteny) and dating the age distributions of duplicated genes, we found that genome duplications accounted for 42 of 46 Hsf-containing segments in Glycine max, while paired segments were rarely identified in Lotus japonicas, Medicago truncatula and Cajanus cajan. However, by comparing interspecies microsynteny, we determined that the great majority of Hsf-containing segments in Lotus japonicas, Medicago truncatula and Cajanus cajan show extensive conservation with the duplicated regions of Glycine max. These segments formed 17 groups of orthologous segments. These results suggest that these regions shared ancient genome duplication with Hsf genes in Glycine max, but more than half of the copies of these genes were lost. On the other hand, the Glycine max Hsf gene family retained approximately 75% and 84% of duplicated genes produced from the ancient genome duplication and recent Glycine-specific genome duplication, respectively. Continuous purifying selection has played a key role in the maintenance of Hsf genes in Glycine max. Expression analysis of the Hsf genes in Lotus japonicus revealed their putative involvement in multiple tissue-/developmental stages and responses to various abiotic stimuli. This study traces the evolution of Hsf genes in legume species and demonstrates that the rates of gene gain and loss are far from equilibrium in different species.

  15. Divergent origins and concerted expansion of two segmental duplications on chromosome 16.

    PubMed

    Eichler, E E; Johnson, M E; Alkan, C; Tuzun, E; Sahinalp, C; Misceo, D; Archidiacono, N; Rocchi, M

    2001-01-01

    An unexpected finding of the human genome was the large fraction of the genome organized as blocks of interspersed duplicated sequence. We provide a comparative and phylogenetic analysis of a highly duplicated region of 16p12.2, which is composed of at least four different segmental duplications spanning in excess of 160 kb. We contrast the dispersal of two different segmental duplications (LCR16a and LCR16u). LCR16a, a 20 kb low-copy repeat sequence A from chromosome 16, was shown previously to contain a rapidly evolving novel hominoid gene family (morpheus) that had expanded within the last 10 million years of great ape/human evolution. We compare the dispersal of this genomic segment with a second adjacent duplication called LCR16u. The duplication contains a second putative gene family (KIAA0220/SMG1) that is represented approximately eight times within the human genome. A high degree of sequence identity (approximately 98%) was observed among the various copies of LCR16u. Comparative analyses with Old World monkey species show that LCR16a and LCR16u originated from two distinct ancestral loci. Within the human genome, at least 70% of the LCR16u copies were duplicated in concert with the LCR16a duplication. In contrast, only 30% of the chimpanzee loci show an association between LCR16a and LCR16u duplications. The data suggest that the two copies of genomic sequence were brought together during the chimpanzee/human divergence and were subsequently duplicated as a larger cassette specifically within the human lineage. The evolutionary history of these two chromosome-specific duplications supports a model of rapid expansion and evolutionary turnover among the genomes of man and the great apes.

  16. Structural Divergence in Vertebrate Phylogeny of a Duplicated Prototype Galectin

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, R.; Chakraborty, M.; Mian, I. S.; Newman, S. A.

    2014-09-25

    Prototype galectins, endogenously expressed animal lectins with a single carbohydrate recognition domain, are well-known regulators of tissue properties such as growth and adhesion. The earliest discovered and best studied of the prototype galectins is Galectin-1 (Gal-1). In the Gallus gallus (chicken) genome, Gal-1 is represented by two homologs: Gal-1A and Gal-1B, with distinct biochemical properties, tissue expression, and developmental functions. We investigated the origin of the Gal-1A/Gal-1B divergence to gain insight into when their developmental functions originated and how they could have contributed to vertebrate phenotypic evolution. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree construction showed that the Gal-1A/Gal-1B divergence can be traced back to the origin of the sauropsid lineage (consisting of extinct and extant reptiles and birds) although lineage-specific duplications also occurred in the amphibian and actinopterygian genomes. Gene synteny analysis showed that sauropsid gal-1b (the gene for Gal-1B) and its frog and actinopterygian gal-1 homologs share a similar chromosomal location, whereas sauropsid gal-1a has translocated to a new position. Surprisingly, we found that chicken Gal-1A, encoded by the translocated gal-1a, was more similar in its tertiary folding pattern than Gal-1B, encoded by the untranslocated gal-1b, to experimentally determined and predicted folds of nonsauropsid Gal-1s. This inference is consistent with our finding of a lower proportion of conserved residues in sauropsid Gal-1Bs, and evidence for positive selection of sauropsid gal-1b, but not gal-1a genes. We propose that the duplication and structural divergence of Gal-1B away from Gal-1A led to specialization in both expression and function in the sauropsid lineage.

  17. Structural Divergence in Vertebrate Phylogeny of a Duplicated Prototype Galectin

    DOE PAGES

    Bhat, R.; Chakraborty, M.; Mian, I. S.; ...

    2014-09-25

    Prototype galectins, endogenously expressed animal lectins with a single carbohydrate recognition domain, are well-known regulators of tissue properties such as growth and adhesion. The earliest discovered and best studied of the prototype galectins is Galectin-1 (Gal-1). In the Gallus gallus (chicken) genome, Gal-1 is represented by two homologs: Gal-1A and Gal-1B, with distinct biochemical properties, tissue expression, and developmental functions. We investigated the origin of the Gal-1A/Gal-1B divergence to gain insight into when their developmental functions originated and how they could have contributed to vertebrate phenotypic evolution. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree construction showed that the Gal-1A/Gal-1B divergence can bemore » traced back to the origin of the sauropsid lineage (consisting of extinct and extant reptiles and birds) although lineage-specific duplications also occurred in the amphibian and actinopterygian genomes. Gene synteny analysis showed that sauropsid gal-1b (the gene for Gal-1B) and its frog and actinopterygian gal-1 homologs share a similar chromosomal location, whereas sauropsid gal-1a has translocated to a new position. Surprisingly, we found that chicken Gal-1A, encoded by the translocated gal-1a, was more similar in its tertiary folding pattern than Gal-1B, encoded by the untranslocated gal-1b, to experimentally determined and predicted folds of nonsauropsid Gal-1s. This inference is consistent with our finding of a lower proportion of conserved residues in sauropsid Gal-1Bs, and evidence for positive selection of sauropsid gal-1b, but not gal-1a genes. We propose that the duplication and structural divergence of Gal-1B away from Gal-1A led to specialization in both expression and function in the sauropsid lineage.« less

  18. Doublet Production in the Development of Medieval and Modern Spanish: New Approaches to Phonolexical Duplication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haney, Darren W.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation offers new approaches to an old and well-known problem in the study of the development of Romance varieties: duplicate lexis or doublets. Traditional analyses of duplication are narrow in scope both in what qualifies as a doublet (the popular/learned opposition has dominated, to the exclusion of other pairs) and in channels of…

  19. Xq28 duplication presenting with intestinal and bladder dysfunction and a distinctive facial appearance

    PubMed Central

    Clayton-Smith, Jill; Walters, Sarah; Hobson, Emma; Burkitt-Wright, Emma; Smith, Rupert; Toutain, Annick; Amiel, Jeanne; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Mansour, Sahar; Fitzpatrick, David; Ciccone, Roberto; Ricca, Ivana; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Donnai, Dian

    2009-01-01

    Xq28 duplications encompassing MECP2 have been described in male patients with a severe neurodevelopmental disorder associated with hypotonia and spasticity, severe learning disability and recurrent pneumonia. We identified an Xq28 duplication in three families where several male patients had presented with intestinal pseudo-obstruction or bladder distension. The affected boys had similar dysmorphic facial appearances. Subsequently, we ascertained seven further families where the proband presented with similar features. We demonstrated duplications of the Xq28 region in five of these additional families. In addition to MECP2, these duplications encompassed several other genes already known to be associated with diseases including SLC6A8, L1CAM and Filamin A (FLNA). The two remaining families were shown to have intragenic duplications of FLNA only. We discuss which elements of the Xq28 duplication phenotype may be associated with the various genes in the duplication. We propose that duplication of FLNA may contribute to the bowel and bladder phenotype seen in these seven families. PMID:18854860

  20. Community duplicate diet methodology: A new tool for estimating dietary exposure to pesticides

    EPA Science Inventory

    An observational field study was conducted to assess the feasibility of a community duplicate diet collection method; a dietary monitoring procedure that is population-based. The purpose was to establish an alternative procedure to duplicate diet sampling that would be more effi...

  1. 47 CFR 76.93 - Parties entitled to network non-duplication protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Network Non-duplication Protection, Syndicated Exclusivity and Sports Blackout § 76.93 Parties entitled to network non-duplication protection... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Parties entitled to network...

  2. 47 CFR 76.1609 - Non-duplication and syndicated exclusivity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Non-duplication and syndicated exclusivity. 76.1609 Section 76.1609 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1609 Non-duplication and...

  3. 47 CFR 76.1609 - Non-duplication and syndicated exclusivity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Non-duplication and syndicated exclusivity. 76.1609 Section 76.1609 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1609 Non-duplication and...

  4. 47 CFR 76.1609 - Non-duplication and syndicated exclusivity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Non-duplication and syndicated exclusivity. 76.1609 Section 76.1609 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1609 Non-duplication and...

  5. 47 CFR 76.1609 - Non-duplication and syndicated exclusivity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Non-duplication and syndicated exclusivity. 76.1609 Section 76.1609 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1609 Non-duplication and...

  6. 47 CFR 76.1609 - Non-duplication and syndicated exclusivity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Non-duplication and syndicated exclusivity. 76.1609 Section 76.1609 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1609 Non-duplication and...

  7. 10 CFR 9.39 - Search and duplication provided without charge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Search and duplication provided without charge. 9.39... § 9.39 Search and duplication provided without charge. (a) The NRC will search for agency records... the news media. (b) The NRC will search for agency records requested under § 9.23(b) without...

  8. 26 CFR 301.6223(f)-1 - Duplicate copy of final partnership administrative adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Duplicate copy of final partnership... In General § 301.6223(f)-1 Duplicate copy of final partnership administrative adjustment. (a) In... the notice of final partnership administrative adjustment (for example, in the event the...

  9. 26 CFR 301.6223(f)-1 - Duplicate copy of final partnership administrative adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Duplicate copy of final partnership... In General § 301.6223(f)-1 Duplicate copy of final partnership administrative adjustment. (a) In... the notice of final partnership administrative adjustment (for example, in the event the...

  10. 26 CFR 301.6223(f)-1 - Duplicate copy of final partnership administrative adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Duplicate copy of final partnership... In General § 301.6223(f)-1 Duplicate copy of final partnership administrative adjustment. (a) In... the notice of final partnership administrative adjustment (for example, in the event the...

  11. 26 CFR 301.6223(f)-1 - Duplicate copy of final partnership administrative adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Duplicate copy of final partnership... In General § 301.6223(f)-1 Duplicate copy of final partnership administrative adjustment. (a) In... the notice of final partnership administrative adjustment (for example, in the event the...

  12. 26 CFR 301.6223(f)-1 - Duplicate copy of final partnership administrative adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Duplicate copy of final partnership... In General § 301.6223(f)-1 Duplicate copy of final partnership administrative adjustment. (a) In... the notice of final partnership administrative adjustment (for example, in the event the...

  13. Antero-posterior Duplicate Exstrophy with a Wet Bladder Plate: A Diagnostic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Thakkar, Nirali Chirag; Raj, Prince; Sarin, Yogesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Variants of exstrophy are rare anomalies seen in the spectrum of bladder exstrophy-epispadias complex. We present a rare case of duplicate exstrophy with a wet bladder plate. This is a deviation from the classical description of antero-posterior duplicate exstrophy that is associated with a dry bladder plate. PMID:27433455

  14. Extensive Local Gene Duplication and Functional Divergence among Paralogs in Atlantic Salmon

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Ian A.; Ciborowski, Kate L.; Casadei, Elisa; Hazlerigg, David G.; Martin, Sam; Jordan, William C.; Sumner, Seirian

    2014-01-01

    Many organisms can generate alternative phenotypes from the same genome, enabling individuals to exploit diverse and variable environments. A prevailing hypothesis is that such adaptation has been favored by gene duplication events, which generate redundant genomic material that may evolve divergent functions. Vertebrate examples of recent whole-genome duplications are sparse although one example is the salmonids, which have undergone a whole-genome duplication event within the last 100 Myr. The life-cycle of the Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, depends on the ability to produce alternating phenotypes from the same genome, to facilitate migration and maintain its anadromous life history. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that genome-wide and local gene duplication events have contributed to the salmonid adaptation. We used high-throughput sequencing to characterize the transcriptomes of three key organs involved in regulating migration in S. salar: Brain, pituitary, and olfactory epithelium. We identified over 10,000 undescribed S. salar sequences and designed an analytic workflow to distinguish between paralogs originating from local gene duplication events or from whole-genome duplication events. These data reveal that substantial local gene duplications took place shortly after the whole-genome duplication event. Many of the identified paralog pairs have either diverged in function or become noncoding. Future functional genomics studies will reveal to what extent this rich source of divergence in genetic sequence is likely to have facilitated the evolution of extreme phenotypic plasticity required for an anadromous life-cycle. PMID:24951567

  15. Units of Instruction for Office Duplication Practices. Volume I. [Teacher's Guide]. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East Texas State Univ., Commerce. Occupational Curriculum Lab.

    Eighteen units on office duplication practices are presented in this teacher's guide. The unit topics include the following: classroom safety; human relations in the office setting; grooming and hygiene; telephone communications; computing routine math transactions; stencil, fluid, and offset duplication; operating business machines; indexing,…

  16. Government Efficiency and Effectiveness: Opportunities to Reduce Fragmentation, Overlap, and Duplication and Achieve Other Financial Benefits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-14

    Other Financial Benefits Statement of Gene L. Dodaro Comptroller General of the United States Testimony Before the Committee on Oversight and...Efficiency and Effectiveness: Opportunities to Reduce Fragmentation, Overlap, and Duplication and Achieve Other Financial Benefits 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...GOVERNMENT EFFICIENCY AND EFFECTIVENESS Opportunities to Reduce Fragmentation, Overlap, and Duplication and Achieve Other Financial Benefits Why

  17. Spider Transcriptomes Identify Ancient Large-Scale Gene Duplication Event Potentially Important in Silk Gland Evolution.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Thomas H; Garb, Jessica E; Hayashi, Cheryl Y; Arensburger, Peter; Ayoub, Nadia A

    2015-06-08

    The evolution of specialized tissues with novel functions, such as the silk synthesizing glands in spiders, is likely an influential driver of adaptive success. Large-scale gene duplication events and subsequent paralog divergence are thought to be required for generating evolutionary novelty. Such an event has been proposed for spiders, but not tested. We de novo assembled transcriptomes from three cobweb weaving spider species. Based on phylogenetic analyses of gene families with representatives from each of the three species, we found numerous duplication events indicative of a whole genome or segmental duplication. We estimated the age of the gene duplications relative to several speciation events within spiders and arachnids and found that the duplications likely occurred after the divergence of scorpions (order Scorpionida) and spiders (order Araneae), but before the divergence of the spider suborders Mygalomorphae and Araneomorphae, near the evolutionary origin of spider silk glands. Transcripts that are expressed exclusively or primarily within black widow silk glands are more likely to have a paralog descended from the ancient duplication event and have elevated amino acid replacement rates compared with other transcripts. Thus, an ancient large-scale gene duplication event within the spider lineage was likely an important source of molecular novelty during the evolution of silk gland-specific expression. This duplication event may have provided genetic material for subsequent silk gland diversification in the true spiders (Araneomorphae).

  18. Novel duplication pattern of the mitochondrial control region in Cantor's Giant softshell turtle Pelochelys cantorii.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin-Cheng; Li, Wei; Zhao, Jian; Chen, Hai-Gang; Zhu, Xin-Ping

    2016-11-15

    Cantor's Giant Softshell Turtle, Pelochelys cantorii has become one of the most critically endangered species in the world. When comparative analyses of the P. cantorii complete mitochondrial genome sequences were conducted, we discovered a duplication of a segment of the control region in the mitochondrial genome of P. cantorii. The duplication is characterized by two copies of conserved sequence box 2 (CSB2) and CSB3 in a single control region. In contrast to previous reports of duplications involving the control regions of other animals, this particular pattern of duplications appears to be unique to P. cantorii. Copies of the CSB2 and CSB3 show many of the conserved sequence features typically found in mitochondrial control regions, and rare differences were found between the paralogous copies. Using the primer design principle of simple sequence repeats (SSR) and the reference sequence of the duplicated CSBs, specific primers were designed to amplify the duplicated CSBs. These primers were validated among different individuals and populations of P. cantorii. This unique duplication structure suggests the two copies of the CSB2 and CSB3 may have arisen through occasional tandem duplication and subsequent concerted evolution.

  19. 47 CFR 73.3556 - Duplication of programming on commonly owned or time brokered stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Duplication of programming on commonly owned or time brokered stations. 73.3556 Section 73.3556 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION....3556 Duplication of programming on commonly owned or time brokered stations. (a) No commercial AM or...

  20. 47 CFR 73.3556 - Duplication of programming on commonly owned or time brokered stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Duplication of programming on commonly owned or time brokered stations. 73.3556 Section 73.3556 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION....3556 Duplication of programming on commonly owned or time brokered stations. (a) No commercial AM or...

  1. 47 CFR 73.3556 - Duplication of programming on commonly owned or time brokered stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Duplication of programming on commonly owned or time brokered stations. 73.3556 Section 73.3556 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION....3556 Duplication of programming on commonly owned or time brokered stations. (a) No commercial AM or...

  2. 47 CFR 73.3556 - Duplication of programming on commonly owned or time brokered stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Duplication of programming on commonly owned or time brokered stations. 73.3556 Section 73.3556 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION....3556 Duplication of programming on commonly owned or time brokered stations. (a) No commercial AM or...

  3. 47 CFR 73.3556 - Duplication of programming on commonly owned or time brokered stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Duplication of programming on commonly owned or time brokered stations. 73.3556 Section 73.3556 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION....3556 Duplication of programming on commonly owned or time brokered stations. (a) No commercial AM or...

  4. Identification of large NF1 duplications reciprocal to NAHR-mediated type-1 NF1 deletions.

    PubMed

    Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard; Bengesser, Kathrin; Callens, Tom; Mikhail, Fady; Fu, Chuanhua; Hillmer, Morten; Walker, Martha E; Saal, Howard M; Lacassie, Yves; Cooper, David N; Messiaen, Ludwine

    2014-12-01

    Approximately 5% of all patients with neurofibromatosis type-1 (NF1) exhibit large deletions of the NF1 gene region. To date, only nine unrelated cases of large NF1 duplications have been reported, with none of the affected patients exhibiting multiple café au lait spots (CALS), Lisch nodules, freckling, or neurofibromas, the hallmark signs of NF1. Here, we have characterized two novel NF1 duplications, one sporadic and one familial. Both index patients with NF1 duplications exhibited learning disabilities and atypical CALS. Additionally, patient R609021 had Lisch nodules, whereas patient R653070 exhibited two inguinal freckles. The mother and sister of patient R609021 also harbored the NF1 duplication and exhibited cognitive dysfunction but no CALS. The breakpoints of the nine NF1 duplications reported previously have not been identified and hence their underlying generative mechanisms have remained unclear. In this study, we performed high-resolution breakpoint analysis that indicated that the two duplications studied were mediated by nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) and that the duplication breakpoints were located within the NAHR hotspot paralogous recombination site 2 (PRS2), which also harbors the type-1 NF1 deletion breakpoints. Hence, our study indicates for the first time that NF1 duplications are reciprocal to type-1 NF1 deletions and originate from the same NAHR events.

  5. Duplicate publications and related problems in published papers on oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Le, A; Moran, C M P; Bezuhly, M; Hong, P

    2015-07-01

    As duplicate publication is unethical, our aim was to find out how common it is among published papers on oral and maxillofacial surgery. We used PubMed to identify index articles published in 2010 in the Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, the British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, and the European Journal of Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery, and searched for possible duplicate publications from 2008 to 2012 using the first or second and last authors' names. Suspected duplicates were categorised into "non-duplicate" (no overlap), "duplicate" (identical results and conclusions), or "salami-sliced" publications (part of the index article repeated or continued). Of the 589 index articles, 17 (3%) had some form of duplication, but specifically, we found 3 duplicate, and 15 salami-sliced publications. Most redundant articles originated from China (n=4), followed by Italy, Japan, and Germany (3 from each) and the United States and Denmark (2 each). Of the 18 redundant publications, 9 did not reference the related index article. Duplicate material is still being published, and salami-slicing is relatively common among publications on oral and maxillofacial surgery. Further research is required into the extent and impact of this finding.

  6. Expansion of stochastic expression repertoire by tandem duplication in mouse Protocadherin-α cluster.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Ryosuke; Abe, Manabu; Hirabayashi, Takahiro; Uchimura, Arikuni; Sakimura, Kenji; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Yagi, Takeshi

    2014-09-02

    Tandem duplications are concentrated within the Pcdh cluster throughout vertebrate evolution and as copy number variations (CNVs) in human populations, but the effects of tandem duplication in the Pcdh cluster remain elusive. To investigate the effects of tandem duplication in the Pcdh cluster, here we generated and analyzed a new line of the Pcdh cluster mutant mice. In the mutant allele, a 218-kb region containing the Pcdh-α2 to Pcdh-αc2 variable exons with their promoters was duplicated and the individual duplicated Pcdh isoforms can be disctinguished. The individual duplicated Pcdh-α isoforms showed diverse expression level with stochastic expression manner, even though those have an identical promoter sequence. Interestingly, the 5'-located duplicated Pcdh-αc2, which is constitutively expressed in the wild-type brain, shifted to stochastic expression accompanied by increased DNA methylation. These results demonstrate that tandem duplication in the Pcdh cluster expands the stochastic expression repertoire irrespective of sequence divergence.

  7. Spider Transcriptomes Identify Ancient Large-Scale Gene Duplication Event Potentially Important in Silk Gland Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Thomas H.; Garb, Jessica E.; Hayashi, Cheryl Y.; Arensburger, Peter; Ayoub, Nadia A.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of specialized tissues with novel functions, such as the silk synthesizing glands in spiders, is likely an influential driver of adaptive success. Large-scale gene duplication events and subsequent paralog divergence are thought to be required for generating evolutionary novelty. Such an event has been proposed for spiders, but not tested. We de novo assembled transcriptomes from three cobweb weaving spider species. Based on phylogenetic analyses of gene families with representatives from each of the three species, we found numerous duplication events indicative of a whole genome or segmental duplication. We estimated the age of the gene duplications relative to several speciation events within spiders and arachnids and found that the duplications likely occurred after the divergence of scorpions (order Scorpionida) and spiders (order Araneae), but before the divergence of the spider suborders Mygalomorphae and Araneomorphae, near the evolutionary origin of spider silk glands. Transcripts that are expressed exclusively or primarily within black widow silk glands are more likely to have a paralog descended from the ancient duplication event and have elevated amino acid replacement rates compared with other transcripts. Thus, an ancient large-scale gene duplication event within the spider lineage was likely an important source of molecular novelty during the evolution of silk gland-specific expression. This duplication event may have provided genetic material for subsequent silk gland diversification in the true spiders (Araneomorphae). PMID:26058392

  8. Gene duplication, tissue-specific gene expression and sexual conflict in stalk-eyed flies (Diopsidae).

    PubMed

    Baker, Richard H; Narechania, Apurva; Johns, Philip M; Wilkinson, Gerald S

    2012-08-19

    Gene duplication provides an essential source of novel genetic material to facilitate rapid morphological evolution. Traits involved in reproduction and sexual dimorphism represent some of the fastest evolving traits in nature, and gene duplication is intricately involved in the origin and evolution of these traits. Here, we review genomic research on stalk-eyed flies (Diopsidae) that has been used to examine the extent of gene duplication and its role in the genetic architecture of sexual dimorphism. Stalk-eyed flies are remarkable because of the elongation of the head into long stalks, with the eyes and antenna laterally displaced at the ends of these stalks. Many species are strongly sexually dimorphic for eyespan, and these flies have become a model system for studying sexual selection. Using both expressed sequence tag and next-generation sequencing, we have established an extensive database of gene expression in the developing eye-antennal imaginal disc, the adult head and testes. Duplicated genes exhibit narrower expression patterns than non-duplicated genes, and the testes, in particular, provide an abundant source of gene duplication. Within somatic tissue, duplicated genes are more likely to be differentially expressed between the sexes, suggesting gene duplication may provide a mechanism for resolving sexual conflict.

  9. Expansion of stochastic expression repertoire by tandem duplication in mouse Protocadherin-α cluster

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Ryosuke; Abe, Manabu; Hirabayashi, Takahiro; Uchimura, Arikuni; Sakimura, Kenji; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Yagi, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Tandem duplications are concentrated within the Pcdh cluster throughout vertebrate evolution and as copy number variations (CNVs) in human populations, but the effects of tandem duplication in the Pcdh cluster remain elusive. To investigate the effects of tandem duplication in the Pcdh cluster, here we generated and analyzed a new line of the Pcdh cluster mutant mice. In the mutant allele, a 218-kb region containing the Pcdh-α2 to Pcdh-αc2 variable exons with their promoters was duplicated and the individual duplicated Pcdh isoforms can be disctinguished. The individual duplicated Pcdh-α isoforms showed diverse expression level with stochastic expression manner, even though those have an identical promoter sequence. Interestingly, the 5′-located duplicated Pcdh-αc2, which is constitutively expressed in the wild-type brain, shifted to stochastic expression accompanied by increased DNA methylation. These results demonstrate that tandem duplication in the Pcdh cluster expands the stochastic expression repertoire irrespective of sequence divergence. PMID:25179445

  10. 7 CFR 3430.36 - Procedures to minimize or eliminate duplication of effort.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures to minimize or eliminate duplication of effort. 3430.36 Section 3430.36 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued...: Application Review and Evaluation § 3430.36 Procedures to minimize or eliminate duplication of effort....

  11. 41 CFR 302-2.20 - What is a duplicate reimbursement disclosure statement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What is a duplicate reimbursement disclosure statement? 302-2.20 Section 302-2.20 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... knowledge, no third party has accepted duplicate reimbursement for your relocation expenses. The...

  12. 76 FR 71060 - Clarification of Duplication of Benefits Requirements Under the Stafford Act for Community...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ... regard to all steps taken to prevent fraud, abuse of funds, and duplication of benefits. Even in the... fraud, abuse, and duplication of benefits. However, HUD has neither designed nor mandated a specific... fraud and ineligible uses of taxpayers' funds. The President makes major disaster declarations only...

  13. Comparison of the segmental duplication pattern on two cattle genome assemblies using FISH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously estimated that 3.1% (94.4 Mb) of the bovine genome consists of recently duplicated sequences (>= 1kb in length, >= 90% sequence identity) using two distinct computational analyses (WGAC and WSSD). In this study, we further validated selected large duplications and compared their distri...

  14. 43 CFR 46.440 - Eliminating duplication with State and local procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eliminating duplication with State and... IMPLEMENTATION OF THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT OF 1969 Environmental Impact Statements § 46.440 Eliminating duplication with State and local procedures. A bureau must incorporate in its...

  15. Extensive local gene duplication and functional divergence among paralogs in Atlantic salmon.

    PubMed

    Warren, Ian A; Ciborowski, Kate L; Casadei, Elisa; Hazlerigg, David G; Martin, Sam; Jordan, William C; Sumner, Seirian

    2014-06-19

    Many organisms can generate alternative phenotypes from the same genome, enabling individuals to exploit diverse and variable environments. A prevailing hypothesis is that such adaptation has been favored by gene duplication events, which generate redundant genomic material that may evolve divergent functions. Vertebrate examples of recent whole-genome duplications are sparse although one example is the salmonids, which have undergone a whole-genome duplication event within the last 100 Myr. The life-cycle of the Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, depends on the ability to produce alternating phenotypes from the same genome, to facilitate migration and maintain its anadromous life history. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that genome-wide and local gene duplication events have contributed to the salmonid adaptation. We used high-throughput sequencing to characterize the transcriptomes of three key organs involved in regulating migration in S. salar: Brain, pituitary, and olfactory epithelium. We identified over 10,000 undescribed S. salar sequences and designed an analytic workflow to distinguish between paralogs originating from local gene duplication events or from whole-genome duplication events. These data reveal that substantial local gene duplications took place shortly after the whole-genome duplication event. Many of the identified paralog pairs have either diverged in function or become noncoding. Future functional genomics studies will reveal to what extent this rich source of divergence in genetic sequence is likely to have facilitated the evolution of extreme phenotypic plasticity required for an anadromous life-cycle.

  16. 10 CFR 9.39 - Search and duplication provided without charge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Search and duplication provided without charge. 9.39 Section 9.39 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PUBLIC RECORDS Freedom of Information Act Regulations § 9.39 Search and duplication provided without charge. (a) The NRC will search for agency...

  17. 40 CFR 1506.2 - Elimination of duplication with State and local procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Elimination of duplication with State... OTHER REQUIREMENTS OF NEPA § 1506.2 Elimination of duplication with State and local procedures. (a... 102(2)(D) of the Act may do so. (b) Agencies shall cooperate with State and local agencies to...

  18. Interstitial duplication of proximal 22q: Phenotypic overlap with cat eye syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, J.H.M.; Asamoah, A.; Wagstaff, J.

    1995-01-16

    We describe a child with downslanting palpebral fissures, preauricular malfunctions, congenital heart defect (total anomalous pulmonary venous return), unilateral absence of a kidney, and developmental delay with an apparent interstitial duplication of proximal 22q. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis showed duplication of the IGLC locus, and C-banding of the duplicated region was negative. The duplication appears to involve 22q11.2-q12. Although the child has neither colobomas nor microphthalmia, he shows phenotypic overlap with with the cat eye syndrome, which is caused by a supernumerary bisatellited chromosome arising from inverted duplication of the short arm and proximal long arm of chromosome 22. Further molecular studies of this patient should help to define the regions responsible for the manifestations of cat eye syndrome. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Interstitial duplication of proximal 22q: phenotypic overlap with cat eye syndrome.

    PubMed

    Knoll, J H; Asamoah, A; Pletcher, B A; Wagstaff, J

    1995-01-16

    We describe a child with downslanting palpebral fissures, preauricular malfunctions, congenital heart defect (total anomalous pulmonary venous return), unilateral absence of a kidney, and developmental delay with an apparent interstitial duplication of proximal 22q. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis showed duplication of the IGLC locus, and C-banding of the duplicated region was negative. The duplication appears to involve 22q11.2-q12. Although the child has neither colobomas nor microphthalmia, he shows phenotypic overlap with the cat eye syndrome, which is caused by a supernumerary bisatellited chromosome arising from inverted duplication of the short arm and proximal long arm of chromosome 22. Further molecular studies of this patient should help to define the regions responsible for the manifestations of cat eye syndrome.

  20. High incidence of ace-1 duplicated haplotypes in resistant Culex pipiens mosquitoes from Algeria.

    PubMed

    Alout, Haoues; Labbé, Pierrick; Pasteur, Nicole; Weill, Mylène

    2011-01-01

    The status of genes conferring resistance to organophosphate and carbamate insecticides has been examined in Culex pipiens pipiens mosquitoes sampled in Algeria. Presence of overproduced esterases was sporadic, but acetylcholinesterase-1 resistant alleles were observed in almost all samples. We focused our study on the AChE1 G119S substitution characterized in almost all samples, mostly at the heterozygous state. A genetic test revealed the presence of ace-1 duplication associating a susceptible and a resistant ace-1 copy. Molecular characterization showed a high occurrence of ace-1 duplication with six distinct duplicated alleles out of four samples. The inferred frequency of duplicated allele suggests that it is replacing the single resistant G119S allele. Finally, we discuss the mechanism at the origin of these duplicated haplotypes and their consequences on the management of insecticide resistance.

  1. Gene duplication, silencing and expression alteration govern the molecular evolution of PRC2 genes in plants.

    PubMed

    Furihata, Hazuka Y; Suenaga, Kazuya; Kawanabe, Takahiro; Yoshida, Takanori; Kawabe, Akira

    2016-10-13

    PRC2 genes were analyzed for their number of gene duplications, dN/dS ratios and expression patterns among Brassicaceae and Gramineae species. Although both amino acid sequences and copy number of the PRC2 genes were generally well conserved in both Brassicaceae and Gramineae species, we observed that some rapidly evolving genes experienced duplications and expression pattern changes. After multiple duplication events, all but one or two of the duplicated copies tend to be silenced. Silenced copies were reactivated in the endosperm and showed ectopic expression in developing seeds. The results indicated that rapid evolution of some PRC2 genes is initially caused by a relaxation of selective constraint following the gene duplication events. Several loci could become maternally expressed imprinted genes and acquired functional roles in the endosperm.

  2. Atypical Case of Congenital Maxillomandibular Fusion with Duplication of the Craniofacial Midline

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Lorena Pingarrón; Pérez, Mercedes Martín; García, Elena Gómez; Martín-Moro, Javier González; González, Jose Ignacio Rodríguez; García, Miguel Burgueño

    2011-01-01

    We report the first case of syngnathia with hypophyseal duplication and describe the central nervous system (CNS) and craniofacial anomalies associated with hypophyseal duplication in the reported autopsy case. We studied clinical reports, scanner images, and autopsy results of a 2-months-old female baby. The propositus had frontonasal dysmorphism, retrognathia, and bifid tongue. She also presented maxillomandibular bony fusion (syngnathia) and an intraoral hairy polyp. In the cranium, the sella turcica was broadened, with two complete hypophyses and two infundibulums. The CNS had both olfactory bulbs and corpus callosum agenesis. There are 27 previous cases of maxillomandibular fusion and seven previous autopsy cases of hypophyseal duplication associated with other frontonasal malformations. As far as the authors know, this is the first case reported in the literature that associates syngnathia with duplication of the craniofacial midline including hypophyseal duplication. PMID:22655122

  3. Gene duplication followed by exon structure divergence substitutes for alternative splicing in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Matthew J; Olsen, Kyle G; Cooper, Cynthia D

    2014-08-10

    In this study we report novel findings regarding the evolutionary relationship between gene duplication and alternative splicing, two processes that increase proteomic diversity. By studying teleost fish, we find that gene duplication followed by exon structure divergence between paralogs, but not gene duplication alone, leads to a significant reduction in alternative splicing, as measured by both the proportion of genes that undergo alternative splicing as well as mean number of transcripts per gene. Additionally, we show that this effect is independent of gene family size and gene function. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the reduction in alternative splicing may be due to the partitioning of ancestral splice forms among the duplicate genes - a form of subfunctionalization. Taken together these results indicate that exon structure evolution subsequent to gene duplication may be a common substitute for alternative splicing.

  4. Gene duplication, population genomics, and species-level differentiation within a tropical mountain shrub.

    PubMed

    Mastretta-Yanes, Alicia; Zamudio, Sergio; Jorgensen, Tove H; Arrigo, Nils; Alvarez, Nadir; Piñero, Daniel; Emerson, Brent C

    2014-09-14

    Gene duplication leads to paralogy, which complicates the de novo assembly of genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) data. The issue of paralogous genes is exacerbated in plants, because they are particularly prone to gene duplication events. Paralogs are normally filtered from GBS data before undertaking population genomics or phylogenetic analyses. However, gene duplication plays an important role in the functional diversification of genes and it can also lead to the formation of postzygotic barriers. Using populations and closely related species of a tropical mountain shrub, we examine 1) the genomic differentiation produced by putative orthologs, and 2) the distribution of recent gene duplication among lineages and geography. We find high differentiation among populations from isolated mountain peaks and species-level differentiation within what is morphologically described as a single species. The inferred distribution of paralogs among populations is congruent with taxonomy and shows that GBS could be used to examine recent gene duplication as a source of genomic differentiation of nonmodel species.

  5. Form of 15q proximal duplication appears to be a normal euchromatic variant

    SciTech Connect

    Jalal, S.M.; Persons, D.L.; DeWald, G.W.; Lindor, N.M.

    1994-10-01

    Deletions involving often leads to either Prader-Willi or Angelman syndrome, depending on the hereditary path of the deletion (paternal or maternal). A number of cases have been reported in which duplications involving 15q11.2-q13 have not been associated with any detectable phenotypic abnormalities. Ludowese et al. (1991) have summarized 25 such cases that include 10 of their own cases from 5 unrelated families. They conclude that duplication of 15q12-13 does not have an adverse phenotypic effect, though they do not completely rule out the possibility that, instead of 15q12-13 duplication, the extra material could be an insertion from another chromosome. Thus, the dilemma is when duplication of 15q11.2-q13 is clinically significant. We suggest that certain kinds of amplification or duplication involving distal 15q12 and 15q13 may represent a normal variant. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Distinct Defects in Spine Formation or Pruning in Two Gene Duplication Mouse Models of Autism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Miao; Li, Huiping; Takumi, Toru; Qiu, Zilong; Xu, Xiu; Yu, Xiang; Bian, Wen-Jie

    2017-04-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) encompasses a complex set of developmental neurological disorders, characterized by deficits in social communication and excessive repetitive behaviors. In recent years, ASD is increasingly being considered as a disease of the synapse. One main type of genetic aberration leading to ASD is gene duplication, and several mouse models have been generated mimicking these mutations. Here, we studied the effects of MECP2 duplication and human chromosome 15q11-13 duplication on synaptic development and neural circuit wiring in the mouse sensory cortices. We showed that mice carrying MECP2 duplication had specific defects in spine pruning, while the 15q11-13 duplication mouse model had impaired spine formation. Our results demonstrate that spine pathology varies significantly between autism models and that distinct aspects of neural circuit development may be targeted in different ASD mutations. Our results further underscore the importance of gene dosage in normal development and function of the brain.

  7. DNA motifs determining the accuracy of repeat duplication during CRISPR adaptation in Haloarcula hispanica

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Li, Ming; Gong, Luyao; Hu, Songnian; Xiang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) acquire new spacers to generate adaptive immunity in prokaryotes. During spacer integration, the leader-preceded repeat is always accurately duplicated, leading to speculations of a repeat-length ruler. Here in Haloarcula hispanica, we demonstrate that the accurate duplication of its 30-bp repeat requires two conserved mid-repeat motifs, AACCC and GTGGG. The AACCC motif was essential and needed to be ∼10 bp downstream from the leader-repeat junction site, where duplication consistently started. Interestingly, repeat duplication terminated sequence-independently and usually with a specific distance from the GTGGG motif, which seemingly served as an anchor site for a molecular ruler. Accordingly, altering the spacing between the two motifs led to an aberrant duplication size (29, 31, 32 or 33 bp). We propose the adaptation complex may recognize these mid-repeat elements to enable measuring the repeat DNA for spacer integration. PMID:27085805

  8. Independent Origin and Global Distribution of Distinct Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein Gene Duplications

    PubMed Central

    Hostetler, Jessica B.; Lo, Eugenia; Kanjee, Usheer; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Suon, Seila; Sreng, Sokunthea; Mao, Sivanna; Yewhalaw, Delenasaw; Mascarenhas, Anjali; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; Ferreira, Marcelo U.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.; Yan, Guiyun; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Duraisingh, Manoj T.; Rayner, Julian C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Plasmodium vivax causes the majority of malaria episodes outside Africa, but remains a relatively understudied pathogen. The pathology of P. vivax infection depends critically on the parasite’s ability to recognize and invade human erythrocytes. This invasion process involves an interaction between P. vivax Duffy Binding Protein (PvDBP) in merozoites and the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) on the erythrocyte surface. Whole-genome sequencing of clinical isolates recently established that some P. vivax genomes contain two copies of the PvDBP gene. The frequency of this duplication is particularly high in Madagascar, where there is also evidence for P. vivax infection in DARC-negative individuals. The functional significance and global prevalence of this duplication, and whether there are other copy number variations at the PvDBP locus, is unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings Using whole-genome sequencing and PCR to study the PvDBP locus in P. vivax clinical isolates, we found that PvDBP duplication is widespread in Cambodia. The boundaries of the Cambodian PvDBP duplication differ from those previously identified in Madagascar, meaning that current molecular assays were unable to detect it. The Cambodian PvDBP duplication did not associate with parasite density or DARC genotype, and ranged in prevalence from 20% to 38% over four annual transmission seasons in Cambodia. This duplication was also present in P. vivax isolates from Brazil and Ethiopia, but not India. Conclusions/Significance PvDBP duplications are much more widespread and complex than previously thought, and at least two distinct duplications are circulating globally. The same duplication boundaries were identified in parasites from three continents, and were found at high prevalence in human populations where DARC-negativity is essentially absent. It is therefore unlikely that PvDBP duplication is associated with infection of DARC-negative individuals, but functional tests

  9. Duplicate gene divergence by changes in microRNA binding sites in Arabidopsis and Brassica.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sishuo; Adams, Keith L

    2015-02-02

    Gene duplication provides large numbers of new genes that can lead to the evolution of new functions. Duplicated genes can diverge by changes in sequences, expression patterns, and functions. MicroRNAs play an important role in the regulation of gene expression in many eukaryotes. After duplication, two paralogs may diverge in their microRNA binding sites, which might impact their expression and function. Little is known about conservation and divergence of microRNA binding sites in duplicated genes in plants. We analyzed microRNA binding sites in duplicated genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa. We found that duplicates are more often targeted by microRNAs than singletons. The vast majority of duplicated genes in A. thaliana with microRNA binding sites show divergence in those sites between paralogs. Analysis of microRNA binding sites in genes derived from the ancient whole-genome triplication in B. rapa also revealed extensive divergence. Paralog pairs with divergent microRNA binding sites show more divergence in expression patterns compared with paralog pairs with the same microRNA binding sites in Arabidopsis. Close to half of the cases of binding site divergence are caused by microRNAs that are specific to the Arabidopsis genus, indicating evolutionarily recent gain of binding sites after target gene duplication. We also show rapid evolution of microRNA binding sites in a jacalin gene family. Our analyses reveal a dynamic process of changes in microRNA binding sites after gene duplication in Arabidopsis and highlight the role of microRNA regulation in the divergence and contrasting evolutionary fates of duplicated genes.

  10. Duplicate Gene Divergence by Changes in MicroRNA Binding Sites in Arabidopsis and Brassica

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sishuo; Adams, Keith L.

    2015-01-01

    Gene duplication provides large numbers of new genes that can lead to the evolution of new functions. Duplicated genes can diverge by changes in sequences, expression patterns, and functions. MicroRNAs play an important role in the regulation of gene expression in many eukaryotes. After duplication, two paralogs may diverge in their microRNA binding sites, which might impact their expression and function. Little is known about conservation and divergence of microRNA binding sites in duplicated genes in plants. We analyzed microRNA binding sites in duplicated genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa. We found that duplicates are more often targeted by microRNAs than singletons. The vast majority of duplicated genes in A. thaliana with microRNA binding sites show divergence in those sites between paralogs. Analysis of microRNA binding sites in genes derived from the ancient whole-genome triplication in B. rapa also revealed extensive divergence. Paralog pairs with divergent microRNA binding sites show more divergence in expression patterns compared with paralog pairs with the same microRNA binding sites in Arabidopsis. Close to half of the cases of binding site divergence are caused by microRNAs that are specific to the Arabidopsis genus, indicating evolutionarily recent gain of binding sites after target gene duplication. We also show rapid evolution of microRNA binding sites in a jacalin gene family. Our analyses reveal a dynamic process of changes in microRNA binding sites after gene duplication in Arabidopsis and highlight the role of microRNA regulation in the divergence and contrasting evolutionary fates of duplicated genes. PMID:25644246

  11. Altered patterns of gene duplication and differential gene gain and loss in fungal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Amy J; Conant, Gavin C; Brown, Douglas E; Carbone, Ignazio; Dean, Ralph A

    2008-01-01

    Background Duplication, followed by fixation or random loss of novel genes, contributes to genome evolution. Particular outcomes of duplication events are possibly associated with pathogenic life histories in fungi. To date, differential gene gain and loss have not been studied at genomic scales in fungal pathogens, despite this phenomenon's known importance in virulence in bacteria and viruses. Results To determine if patterns of gene duplication differed between pathogens and non-pathogens, we identified gene families across nine euascomycete and two basidiomycete species. Gene family size distributions were fit to power laws to compare gene duplication trends in pathogens versus non-pathogens. Fungal phytopathogens showed globally altered patterns of gene duplication, as indicated by differences in gene family size distribution. We also identified sixteen examples of gene family expansion and five instances of gene family contraction in pathogenic lineages. Expanded gene families included those predicted to be important in melanin biosynthesis, host cell wall degradation and transport functions. Contracted families included those encoding genes involved in toxin production, genes with oxidoreductase activity, as well as subunits of the vacuolar ATPase complex. Surveys of the functional distribution of gene duplicates indicated that pathogens show enrichment for gene duplicates associated with receptor and hydrolase activities, while euascomycete pathogens appeared to have not only these differences, but also significantly more duplicates associated with regulatory and carbohydrate binding functions. Conclusion Differences in the overall levels of gene duplication in phytopathogenic species versus non-pathogenic relatives implicate gene inventory flux as an important virulence-associated process in fungi. We hypothesize that the observed patterns of gene duplicate enrichment, gene family expansion and contraction reflect adaptation within pathogenic life

  12. On the origins of Mendelian disease genes in man: the impact of gene duplication.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Jonathan E; Robertson, David L

    2012-01-01

    Over 3,000 human diseases are known to be linked to heritable genetic variation, mapping to over 1,700 unique genes. Dating of the evolutionary age of these disease-associated genes has suggested that they have a tendency to be ancient, specifically coming into existence with early metazoa. The approach taken by past studies, however, assumes that the age of a disease is the same as the age of its common ancestor, ignoring the fundamental contribution of duplication events in the evolution of new genes and function. Here, we date both the common ancestor and the duplication history of known human disease-associated genes. We find that the majority of disease genes (80%) are genes that have been duplicated in their evolutionary history. Periods for which there are more disease-associated genes, for example, at the origins of bony vertebrates, are explained by the emergence of more genes at that time, and the majority of these are duplicates inferred to have arisen by whole-genome duplication. These relationships are similar for different disease types and the disease-associated gene's cellular function. This indicates that the emergence of duplication-associated diseases has been ongoing and approximately constant (relative to the retention of duplicate genes) throughout the evolution of life. This continued until approximately 390 Ma from which time relatively fewer novel genes came into existence on the human lineage, let alone disease genes. For single-copy genes associated with disease, we find that the numbers of disease genes decreases with recency. For the majority of duplicates, the disease-associated mutation is associated with just one of the duplicate copies. A universal explanation for heritable disease is, thus, that it is merely a by-product of the evolutionary process; the evolution of new genes (de novo or by duplication) results in the potential for new diseases to emerge.

  13. Case of duplication of the urethra in an adult male, presenting with symptoms of bladder outlet obstruction.

    PubMed

    Slavov, Chavdar; Donkov, Ivo; Popov, Elenko

    2007-10-01

    Duplication of the urethra is a rare congenital anomaly, usually found in children and adolescents. The authors present a rare case of urethral duplication, presenting in a 58-yr-old man, with symptoms of bladder outlet obstruction.

  14. Are duplicated genes responsible for anthracnose resistance in common bean?

    PubMed

    Costa, Larissa Carvalho; Nalin, Rafael Storto; Ramalho, Magno Antonio Patto; de Souza, Elaine Aparecida

    2017-01-01

    The race 65 of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, etiologic agent of anthracnose in common bean, is distributed worldwide, having great importance in breeding programs for anthracnose resistance. Several resistance alleles have been identified promoting resistance to this race. However, the variability that has been detected within race has made it difficult to obtain cultivars with durable resistance, because cultivars may have different reactions to each strain of race 65. Thus, this work aimed at studying the resistance inheritance of common bean lines to different strains of C. lindemuthianum, race 65. We used six C. lindemuthianum strains previously characterized as belonging to the race 65 through the international set of differential cultivars of anthracnose and nine commercial cultivars, adapted to the Brazilian growing conditions and with potential ability to discriminate the variability within this race. To obtain information on the resistance inheritance related to nine commercial cultivars to six strains of race 65, these cultivars were crossed two by two in all possible combinations, resulting in 36 hybrids. Segregation in the F2 generations revealed that the resistance to each strain is conditioned by two independent genes with the same function, suggesting that they are duplicated genes, where the dominant allele promotes resistance. These results indicate that the specificity between host resistance genes and pathogen avirulence genes is not limited to races, it also occurs within strains of the same race. Further research may be carried out in order to establish if the alleles identified in these cultivars are different from those described in the literature.

  15. The Evolutionary Relationship between Alternative Splicing and Gene Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Iñiguez, Luis P.; Hernández, Georgina

    2017-01-01

    The protein diversity that exists today has resulted from various evolutionary processes. It is well known that gene duplication (GD) along with the accumulation of mutations are responsible, among other factors, for an increase in the number of different proteins. The gene structure in eukaryotes requires the removal of non-coding sequences, introns, to produce mature mRNAs. This process, known as cis-splicing, referred to here as splicing, is regulated by several factors which can lead to numerous splicing arrangements, commonly designated as alternative splicing (AS). AS, producing several transcripts isoforms form a single gene, also increases the protein diversity. However, the evolution and manner for increasing protein variation differs between AS and GD. An important question is how are patterns of AS affected after a GD event. Here, we review the current knowledge of AS and GD, focusing on their evolutionary relationship. These two processes are now considered the main contributors to the increasing protein diversity and therefore their relationship is a relevant, yet understudied, area of evolutionary study. PMID:28261262

  16. Functional divergence in tandemly duplicated Arabidopsis thaliana trypsin inhibitor genes.

    PubMed Central

    Clauss, M J; Mitchell-Olds, T

    2004-01-01

    In multigene families, variation among loci and alleles can contribute to trait evolution. We explored patterns of functional and genetic variation in six duplicated Arabidopsis thaliana trypsin inhibitor (ATTI) loci. We demonstrate significant variation in constitutive and herbivore-induced transcription among ATTI loci that show, on average, 65% sequence divergence. Significant variation in ATTI expression was also found between two molecularly defined haplotype classes. Population genetic analyses for 17 accessions of A. thaliana showed that six ATTI loci arranged in tandem within 10 kb varied 10-fold in nucleotide diversity, from 0.0009 to 0.0110, and identified a minimum of six recombination events throughout the tandem array. We observed a significant peak in nucleotide and indel polymorphism spanning ATTI loci in the interior of the array, due primarily to divergence between the two haplotype classes. Significant deviation from the neutral equilibrium model for individual genes was interpreted within the context of intergene linkage disequilibrium and correlated patterns of functional differentiation. In contrast to the outcrosser Arabidopsis lyrata for which recombination is observed even within ATTI loci, our data suggest that response to selection was slowed in the inbreeding, annual A. thaliana because of interference among functionally divergent ATTI loci. PMID:15082560

  17. Duplicate Address Detection Table in IPv6 Mobile Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alisherov, Farkhod; Kim, Taihoon

    In IP networks, each computer or communication equipment needs an IP address. To supply enough IP addresses, the new Internet protocol IPv6 is used in next generatoion mobile communication. Although IPv6 improves the existing IPv4 Internet protocol, Duplicate Address Detection (DAD) mechanism may consume resources and suffer from long delay. DAD is used to ensure whether the IP address is unique or not. When a mobile node performs an inter-domain handoff, it will first generate a new IP and perform a DAD procedure. The DAD procedure not only wastes time but also increases the signaling load on Internet. In this paper, the author proposes a new DAD mechanism to speed up the DAD procedure. A DAD table is created in access or mobility routers in IP networks and record all IP addresses of the area. When a new IP address needs to perform DAD, it can just search in the DAD table to confirm the uniqueness of the address.

  18. Are duplicated genes responsible for anthracnose resistance in common bean?

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The race 65 of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, etiologic agent of anthracnose in common bean, is distributed worldwide, having great importance in breeding programs for anthracnose resistance. Several resistance alleles have been identified promoting resistance to this race. However, the variability that has been detected within race has made it difficult to obtain cultivars with durable resistance, because cultivars may have different reactions to each strain of race 65. Thus, this work aimed at studying the resistance inheritance of common bean lines to different strains of C. lindemuthianum, race 65. We used six C. lindemuthianum strains previously characterized as belonging to the race 65 through the international set of differential cultivars of anthracnose and nine commercial cultivars, adapted to the Brazilian growing conditions and with potential ability to discriminate the variability within this race. To obtain information on the resistance inheritance related to nine commercial cultivars to six strains of race 65, these cultivars were crossed two by two in all possible combinations, resulting in 36 hybrids. Segregation in the F2 generations revealed that the resistance to each strain is conditioned by two independent genes with the same function, suggesting that they are duplicated genes, where the dominant allele promotes resistance. These results indicate that the specificity between host resistance genes and pathogen avirulence genes is not limited to races, it also occurs within strains of the same race. Further research may be carried out in order to establish if the alleles identified in these cultivars are different from those described in the literature. PMID:28296933

  19. Impact of recurrent gene duplication on adaptation of plant genomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recurrent gene duplication and retention played an important role in angiosperm genome evolution. It has been hypothesized that these processes contribute significantly to plant adaptation but so far this hypothesis has not been tested at the genome scale. Results We studied available sequenced angiosperm genomes to assess the frequency of positive selection footprints in lineage specific expanded (LSE) gene families compared to single-copy genes using a dN/dS-based test in a phylogenetic framework. We found 5.38% of alignments in LSE genes with codons under positive selection. In contrast, we found no evidence for codons under positive selection in the single-copy reference set. An analysis at the branch level shows that purifying selection acted more strongly on single-copy genes than on LSE gene clusters. Moreover we detect significantly more branches indicating evolution under positive selection and/or relaxed constraint in LSE genes than in single-copy genes. Conclusions In this – to our knowledge –first genome-scale study we provide strong empirical support for the hypothesis that LSE genes fuel adaptation in angiosperms. Our conservative approach for detecting selection footprints as well as our results can be of interest for further studies on (plant) gene family evolution. PMID:24884640

  20. Engineering microdeletions and microduplications by targeting segmental duplications with CRISPR.

    PubMed

    Tai, Derek J C; Ragavendran, Ashok; Manavalan, Poornima; Stortchevoi, Alexei; Seabra, Catarina M; Erdin, Serkan; Collins, Ryan L; Blumenthal, Ian; Chen, Xiaoli; Shen, Yiping; Sahin, Mustafa; Zhang, Chengsheng; Lee, Charles; Gusella, James F; Talkowski, Michael E

    2016-03-01

    Recurrent, reciprocal genomic disorders resulting from non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) between near-identical segmental duplications (SDs) are a major cause of human disease, often producing phenotypically distinct syndromes. The genomic architecture of flanking SDs presents a challenge for modeling these syndromes; however, the capability to efficiently generate reciprocal copy number variants (CNVs) that mimic NAHR would represent a valuable modeling tool. We describe here a CRISPR/Cas9 genome engineering method, single-guide CRISPR/Cas targeting of repetitive elements (SCORE), to model reciprocal genomic disorders and demonstrate its capabilities by generating reciprocal CNVs of 16p11.2 and 15q13.3, including alteration of one copy-equivalent of the SDs that mediate NAHR in vivo. The method is reproducible, and RNA sequencing reliably clusters transcriptional signatures from human subjects with in vivo CNVs and their corresponding in vitro models. This new approach will provide broad applicability for the study of genomic disorders and, with further development, may also permit efficient correction of these defects.

  1. Duplication of the genome in normal and cancer cell cycles.

    PubMed

    Bandura, Jennifer L; Calvi, Brian R

    2002-01-01

    It is critical to discover the mechanisms of normal cell cycle regulation if we are to fully understand what goes awry in cancer cells. The normal eukaryotic cell tightly regulates the activity of origins of DNA replication so that the genome is duplicated exactly once per cell cycle. Over the last ten years much has been learned concerning the cell cycle regulation of origin activity. It is now clear that the proteins and cell cycle mechanisms that control origin activity are largely conserved from yeast to humans. Despite this conservation, the composition of origins of DNA replication in higher eukaryotes remains ill defined. A DNA consensus for predicting origins has yet to emerge, and it is of some debate whether primary DNA sequence determines where replication initiates. In this review we outline what is known about origin structure and the mechanism of once per cell cycle DNA replication with an emphasis on recent advances in mammalian cells. We discuss the possible relevance of these regulatory pathways for cancer biology and therapy.

  2. Gene duplication and divergence affecting drug content in Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    Weiblen, George D; Wenger, Jonathan P; Craft, Kathleen J; ElSohly, Mahmoud A; Mehmedic, Zlatko; Treiber, Erin L; Marks, M David

    2015-12-01

    Cannabis sativa is an economically important source of durable fibers, nutritious seeds, and psychoactive drugs but few economic plants are so poorly understood genetically. Marijuana and hemp were crossed to evaluate competing models of cannabinoid inheritance and to explain the predominance of tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) in marijuana compared with cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) in hemp. Individuals in the resulting F2 population were assessed for differential expression of cannabinoid synthase genes and were used in linkage mapping. Genetic markers associated with divergent cannabinoid phenotypes were identified. Although phenotypic segregation and a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) for the THCA/CBDA ratio were consistent with a simple model of codominant alleles at a single locus, the diversity of THCA and CBDA synthase sequences observed in the mapping population, the position of enzyme coding loci on the map, and patterns of expression suggest multiple linked loci. Phylogenetic analysis further suggests a history of duplication and divergence affecting drug content. Marijuana is distinguished from hemp by a nonfunctional CBDA synthase that appears to have been positively selected to enhance psychoactivity. An unlinked QTL for cannabinoid quantity may also have played a role in the recent escalation of drug potency.

  3. The Prevalence of Inappropriate Image Duplication in Biomedical Research Publications

    PubMed Central

    Casadevall, Arturo; Fang, Ferric C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Inaccurate data in scientific papers can result from honest error or intentional falsification. This study attempted to determine the percentage of published papers that contain inappropriate image duplication, a specific type of inaccurate data. The images from a total of 20,621 papers published in 40 scientific journals from 1995 to 2014 were visually screened. Overall, 3.8% of published papers contained problematic figures, with at least half exhibiting features suggestive of deliberate manipulation. The prevalence of papers with problematic images has risen markedly during the past decade. Additional papers written by authors of papers with problematic images had an increased likelihood of containing problematic images as well. As this analysis focused only on one type of data, it is likely that the actual prevalence of inaccurate data in the published literature is higher. The marked variation in the frequency of problematic images among journals suggests that journal practices, such as prepublication image screening, influence the quality of the scientific literature. PMID:27273827

  4. Molecular mechanisms for CMT1A duplication and HNPP deletion.

    PubMed

    Boerkoel, C F; Inoue, K; Reiter, L T; Warner, L E; Lupski, J R

    1999-09-14

    As the best characterized human genomic disorders, CMT1A and HNPP illustrate several common mechanistic features of genomic rearrangements. These features include the following: (1) Recombination occurs between homologous sequences flanking the duplicated/deleted genomic segment. (2) The evolution of the mammalian genome may result in an architecture consisting of region-specific low-copy repeats that predispose to rearrangement secondary to providing homologous regions as substrate for recombination. (3) Strand exchange occurs preferentially in a region of perfect sequence identity within the flanking repeat sequences. (4) Double-strand breaks likely initiate recombination between the flanking repeats. (5) The mechanism and rate of homologous recombination resulting in DNA rearrangement may differ for male and female gametogenesis. (6) Homologous recombination resulting in DNA rearrangement occurs with high frequency in the human genome. (7) Genomic disorders result from structural features of the human genome and not population specific alleles or founder effects; therefore, genomic disorders appear to occur with equal frequencies in different world populations.

  5. Regulatory evolution of a duplicated heterodimer across species and tissues of allopolyploid clawed frogs (Xenopus).

    PubMed

    Anderson, Dave W; Evans, Ben J

    2009-03-01

    Changes in gene expression contribute to reproductive isolation of species, adaptation, and development and may impact the genetic fate of duplicated genes. African clawed frogs (genus Xenopus) offer a useful model for examining regulatory evolution, particularly after gene duplication, because species in this genus are polyploid. Additionally, these species can produce viable hybrids, and expression divergence between coexpressed species-specific alleles in hybrids can be attributed exclusively to cis-acting mechanisms. Here we have explored expression divergence of a duplicated heterodimer composed of the recombination activating genes 1 and 2 (RAG1 and RAG2). Previous work identified a phylogenetically biased pattern of pseudogenization of RAG1 wherein one duplicate--RAG1beta--was more likely to become a pseudogene than the other one--RAG1alpha. In this study we show that ancestral expression divergence between these duplicates could account for this. Using comparative data we demonstrate that regulatory divergence between species and between duplicated genes varies significantly across tissue types. These results have implications for understanding of variables that influence pseudogenization of duplicated genes generated by polyploidization, and for interpretation of the relative contributions of cis versus trans mechanisms to expression divergence at the cellular level.

  6. Gene duplication of type-B ARR transcription factors systematically extends transcriptional regulatory structures in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seung Hee; Hyeon, Do Young; Lee, ll Hwan; Park, Su Jin; Han, Seungmin; Lee, In Chul; Hwang, Daehee; Nam, Hong Gil

    2014-01-01

    Many of duplicated genes are enriched in signaling pathways. Recently, gene duplication of kinases has been shown to provide genetic buffering and functional diversification in cellular signaling. Transcription factors (TFs) are also often duplicated. However, how duplication of TFs affects their regulatory structures and functions of target genes has not been explored at the systems level. Here, we examined regulatory and functional roles of duplication of three major ARR TFs (ARR1, 10, and 12) in Arabidopsis cytokinin signaling using wild-type and single, double, and triple deletion mutants of the TFs. Comparative analysis of gene expression profiles obtained from Arabidopsis roots in wild-type and these mutants showed that duplication of ARR TFs systematically extended their transcriptional regulatory structures, leading to enhanced robustness and diversification in functions of target genes, as well as in regulation of cellular networks of target genes. Therefore, our results suggest that duplication of TFs contributes to robustness and diversification in functions of target genes by extending transcriptional regulatory structures. PMID:25425016

  7. Human-specific evolution of novel SRGAP2 genes by incomplete segmental duplication

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Megan Y.; Nuttle, Xander; Sudmant, Peter H.; Antonacci, Francesca; Graves, Tina A.; Nefedov, Mikhail; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Sajjadian, Saba; Malig, Maika; Kotkiewicz, Holland; Curry, Cynthia J.; Shafer, Susan; Shaffer, Lisa G.; de Jong, Pieter J.; Wilson, Richard K.; Eichler, Evan E.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Gene duplication is an important source of phenotypic change and adaptive evolution. We use a novel genomic approach to identify highly identical sequence missing from the reference genome, confirming the cortical development gene Slit-Robo Rho GTPase activating protein 2 (SRGAP2) duplicated three times in humans. We show that the promoter and first nine exons of SRGAP2 duplicated from 1q32.1 (SRGAP2A) to 1q21.1 (SRGAP2B) ~3.4 million years ago (mya). Two larger duplications later copied SRGAP2B to chromosome 1p12 (SRGAP2C) and to proximal 1q21.1 (SRGAP2D), ~2.4 and ~1 mya, respectively. Sequence and expression analysis shows SRGAP2C is the most likely duplicate to encode a functional protein and among the most fixed human-specific duplicate genes. Our data suggest a mechanism where incomplete duplication created a novel function —at birth, antagonizing parental SRGAP2 function 2–3 mya a time corresponding to the transition from Australopithecus to Homo and the beginning of neocortex expansion. PMID:22559943

  8. Use of Diagnostic Imaging in the Evaluation of Gastrointestinal Tract Duplications

    PubMed Central

    Laskowska, Katarzyna; Gałązka, Przemysław; Daniluk-Matraś, Irena; Leszczyński, Waldemar; Serafin, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Gastrointestinal tract duplication is a rare malformation associated with the presence of additional segment of the fetal gut. The aim of this study was to retrospectively review clinical features and imaging findings in intraoperatively confirmed cases of gastrointestinal tract duplication in children. Material/Methods The analysis included own material from the years 2002–2012. The analyzed group included 14 children, among them 8 boys and 6 girls. The youngest patient was diagnosed at the age of three weeks, and the oldest at 12 years of age. Results The duplication cysts were identified in the esophagus (n=2), stomach (n=5), duodenum (n=1), terminal ileum (n=5), and rectum (n=1). In four cases, the duplication coexisted with other anomalies, such as patent urachus, Meckel’s diverticulum, mesenteric cyst, and accessory pancreas. Clinical manifestation of gastrointestinal duplication cysts was variable, and some of them were detected accidently. Thin- or thick-walled cystic structures adjacent to the wall of neighboring gastrointestinal segment were documented on diagnostic imaging. Conclusions Ultrasound and computed tomography are the methods of choice in the evaluation of gastrointestinal duplication cysts. Apart from the diagnosis of the duplication cyst, an important issue is the detection of concomitant developmental pathologies, including pancreatic heterotopy. PMID:25114725

  9. Copy number gain at Xp22.31 includes complex duplication rearrangements and recurrent triplications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengfei; Erez, Ayelet; Nagamani, Sandesh C Sreenath; Bi, Weimin; Carvalho, Claudia M B; Simmons, Alexandra D; Wiszniewska, Joanna; Fang, Ping; Eng, Patricia A; Cooper, M Lance; Sutton, V Reid; Roeder, Elizabeth R; Bodensteiner, John B; Delgado, Mauricio R; Prakash, Siddharth K; Belmont, John W; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Berg, Jonathan S; Shinawi, Marwan; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lupski, James R

    2011-05-15

    Genomic instability is a feature of the human Xp22.31 region wherein deletions are associated with X-linked ichthyosis, mental retardation and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. A putative homologous recombination hotspot motif is enriched in low copy repeats that mediate recurrent deletion at this locus. To date, few efforts have focused on copy number gain at Xp22.31. However, clinical testing revealed a high incidence of duplication of Xp22.31 in subjects ascertained and referred with neurobehavioral phenotypes. We systematically studied 61 unrelated subjects with rearrangements revealing gain in copy number, using multiple molecular assays. We detected not only the anticipated recurrent and simple nonrecurrent duplications, but also unexpectedly identified recurrent triplications and other complex rearrangements. Breakpoint analyses enabled us to surmise the mechanisms for many of these rearrangements. The clinical significance of the recurrent duplications and triplications were assessed using different approaches. We cannot find any evidence to support pathogenicity of the Xp22.31 duplication. However, our data suggest that the Xp22.31 duplication may serve as a risk factor for abnormal phenotypes. Our findings highlight the need for more robust Xp22.31 triplication detection in that such further gain may be more penetrant than the duplications. Our findings reveal the distribution of different mechanisms for genomic duplication rearrangements at a given locus, and provide insights into aspects of strand exchange events between paralogous sequences in the human genome.

  10. Gastrointestinal Duplication Presenting as Neonatal Intestinal Obstruction: An Experience of 15 Years at Tertiary Care Centre

    PubMed Central

    Rattan, Kamal Nain; Bansal, Shruti; Dhamija, Aastha

    2017-01-01

    Background: Gastrointestinal tract (GIT) duplications are one of the rare congenital anomalies and can occur in any portion of the gastrointestinal tract but are more commonly encountered in small intestine. The duplication cysts cause symptoms like abdominal mass and intestinal obstruction requiring surgery or may remain asymptomatic. We are reporting our 15 years’ experience duplication cysts presenting in neonates. Methods: It is a retrospective study undertaken in the department of pediatric surgery between 2001 and 2015 for GIT duplications in neonates. Patients were analyzed for their antenatal diagnosis, age, sex, clinical diagnosis, investigatory approach, operative management and surgical outcomes. Results: Total number of neonates, diagnosed with gastrointestinal duplication in the last 15 years, was 17. Male to female ratio was 3.3:1. The most common location was found to be the ileum occurring in 71% of cases. Apart from ileum, 2 cases of duodenal and 1 case each of gastric, colonic and cecal duplication cyst were encountered. Majority cases presented with sub-acute intestinal obstruction and were managed successfully by resection and end to end anastomosis. Associated gut atresia was found in 4 cases while 1 case was found to be associated with perforation of gut. Conclusion: Gastrointestinal tract duplications often present with typical symptoms of gastrointestinal tract obstruction. Early diagnosis and management is required to prevent postoperative morbidity and mortality. PMID:28083491

  11. Gene duplication in the major insecticide target site, Rdl, in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Remnant, Emily J; Good, Robert T; Schmidt, Joshua M; Lumb, Christopher; Robin, Charles; Daborn, Phillip J; Batterham, Philip

    2013-09-03

    The Resistance to Dieldrin gene, Rdl, encodes a GABA-gated chloride channel subunit that is targeted by cyclodiene and phenylpyrazole insecticides. The gene was first characterized in Drosophila melanogaster by genetic mapping of resistance to the cyclodiene dieldrin. The 4,000-fold resistance observed was due to a single amino acid replacement, Ala(301) to Ser. The equivalent change was subsequently identified in Rdl orthologs of a large range of resistant insect species. Here, we report identification of a duplication at the Rdl locus in D. melanogaster. The 113-kb duplication contains one WT copy of Rdl and a second copy with two point mutations: an Ala(301) to Ser resistance mutation and Met(360) to Ile replacement. Individuals with this duplication exhibit intermediate dieldrin resistance compared with single copy Ser(301) homozygotes, reduced temperature sensitivity, and altered RNA editing associated with the resistant allele. Ectopic recombination between Roo transposable elements is involved in generating this genomic rearrangement. The duplication phenotypes were confirmed by construction of a transgenic, artificial duplication integrating the 55.7-kb Rdl locus with a Ser(301) change into an Ala(301) background. Gene duplications can contribute significantly to the evolution of insecticide resistance, most commonly by increasing the amount of gene product produced. Here however, duplication of the Rdl target site creates permanent heterozygosity, providing unique potential for adaptive mutations to accrue in one copy, without abolishing the endogenous role of an essential gene.

  12. Gene duplication is infrequent in the recent evolutionary history of RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Holmes, Edward C

    2013-06-01

    Gene duplication generates genetic novelty and redundancy and is a major mechanism of evolutionary change in bacteria and eukaryotes. To date, however, gene duplication has been reported only rarely in RNA viruses. Using a conservative BLAST approach we systematically screened for the presence of duplicated (i.e., paralogous) proteins in all RNA viruses for which full genome sequences are publicly available. Strikingly, we found only nine significantly supported cases of gene duplication, two of which are newly described here--in the 25 and 26 kDa proteins of Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (genus Benyvirus) and in the U1 and U2 proteins of Wongabel virus (family Rhabdoviridae). Hence, gene duplication has occurred at a far lower frequency in the recent evolutionary history of RNA viruses than in other organisms. Although the rapidity of RNA virus evolution means that older gene duplication events will be difficult to detect through sequence-based analyses alone, it is likely that specific features of RNA virus biology, and particularly intrinsic constraints on genome size, reduce the likelihood of the fixation and maintenance of duplicated genes.

  13. Gene duplication of type-B ARR transcription factors systematically extends transcriptional regulatory structures in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Hee; Hyeon, Do Young; Lee, Ll Hwan; Park, Su Jin; Han, Seungmin; Lee, In Chul; Hwang, Daehee; Nam, Hong Gil

    2014-11-26

    Many of duplicated genes are enriched in signaling pathways. Recently, gene duplication of kinases has been shown to provide genetic buffering and functional diversification in cellular signaling. Transcription factors (TFs) are also often duplicated. However, how duplication of TFs affects their regulatory structures and functions of target genes has not been explored at the systems level. Here, we examined regulatory and functional roles of duplication of three major ARR TFs (ARR1, 10, and 12) in Arabidopsis cytokinin signaling using wild-type and single, double, and triple deletion mutants of the TFs. Comparative analysis of gene expression profiles obtained from Arabidopsis roots in wild-type and these mutants showed that duplication of ARR TFs systematically extended their transcriptional regulatory structures, leading to enhanced robustness and diversification in functions of target genes, as well as in regulation of cellular networks of target genes. Therefore, our results suggest that duplication of TFs contributes to robustness and diversification in functions of target genes by extending transcriptional regulatory structures.

  14. Effect of Incomplete Lineage Sorting On Tree-Reconciliation-Based Inference of Gene Duplication.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Zhang, Louxin

    2014-01-01

    In the tree reconciliation approach to infer the duplication history of a gene family, the gene (family) tree is compared to the corresponding species tree. Incomplete lineage sorting (ILS) gives rise to stochastic variation in the topology of a gene tree and hence likely introduces false duplication events when a tree reconciliation method is used. We quantify the effect of ILS on gene duplication inference in a species tree in terms of the expected number of false duplication events inferred from reconciling a random gene tree, which occurs with a probability predicted in coalescent theory, and the species tree. We computationally examine the relationship between the effect of ILS on duplication inference in a species tree and its topological parameters. Our findings suggest that ILS may cause non-negligible bias on duplication inference, particularly on an asymmetric species tree. Hence, when gene duplication is inferred via tree reconciliation or any other approach that takes gene tree topology into account, the ILS-induced bias should be examined cautiously.

  15. Patients with isolated oligo/hypodontia caused by RUNX2 duplication.

    PubMed

    Molin, Arnaud; Lopez-Cazaux, Serena; Pichon, Olivier; Vincent, Marie; Isidor, Bertrand; Le Caignec, Cédric

    2015-06-01

    Loss-of-function mutations of RUNX2 are responsible for cleidocranial dysplasia, an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by delayed closure of cranial sutures, aplastic or hypoplastic clavicles, moderate short stature and supernumerary teeth. By contrast, an increased gene dosage is expected for duplication of the entire RUNX2 sequence and thus, a phenotype different from cleidocranial dysplasia. To date, two cousins with a duplication including the entire RUNX2 sequence in addition to MIR586, CLIC5 and the 5' half of SUPT3H have been reported. These patients presented with metopic synostosis and hypodontia. Here, we report on a family with an affected mother and three affected children. The four patients carried a 285 kb duplication identified by array comparative genomic hybridization. The duplication includes the entire sequence of RUNX2 and the 5' half of SUPT3H. We confirmed the duplication by real-time quantitative PCR in the four patients. Two children presented with the association of metopic craniosynostosis and oligo/hypodontia previously described, confirming the phenotype caused by RUNX2 duplication. Interestingly, the mother and one child had isolated hypodontia without craniosynostosis, broadening the phenotype observed in patients with such duplications.

  16. Consensus properties and their large-scale applications for the gene duplication problem.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jucheol; Lin, Harris T; Eulenstein, Oliver

    2016-06-01

    Solving the gene duplication problem is a classical approach for species tree inference from gene trees that are confounded by gene duplications. This problem takes a collection of gene trees and seeks a species tree that implies the minimum number of gene duplications. Wilkinson et al. posed the conjecture that the gene duplication problem satisfies the desirable Pareto property for clusters. That is, for every instance of the problem, all clusters that are commonly present in the input gene trees of this instance, called strict consensus, will also be found in every solution to this instance. We prove that this conjecture does not generally hold. Despite this negative result we show that the gene duplication problem satisfies a weaker version of the Pareto property where the strict consensus is found in at least one solution (rather than all solutions). This weaker property contributes to our design of an efficient scalable algorithm for the gene duplication problem. We demonstrate the performance of our algorithm in analyzing large-scale empirical datasets. Finally, we utilize the algorithm to evaluate the accuracy of standard heuristics for the gene duplication problem using simulated datasets.

  17. Report on 3 patients with 12p duplication including GRIN2B.

    PubMed

    Poirsier, Celine; Landais, Emilie; Bednarek, Nathalie; Nobecourt, Jean-Marie; Khoury, Maroun; Schmidt, Pascal; Morville, Patrice; Gruson, Nadine; Clomes, Sandrine; Michel, Nicole; Riot, Anita; Manjeongean, Christelle; Gaillard, Dominique; Doco-Fenzy, Martine

    2014-04-01

    The duplication of the short arm (p) of chromosome 12 is a rare chromosomal abnormality, and most reported cases result from malsegregation of a balanced parental translocation associated with other chromosomal imbalances. Of the reported cases, only 15 involve a pure and complete 12p duplication and only 10 involve a pure and partial duplication overlapping the 12p12.3p13.1 region, including a single instance of an inherited duplication in two related individuals. Here, we report three new patients with a pure 12p duplication, detected by conventional cytogenetic studies and characterized by array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The first patient was a child carrying a de novo inverted duplication of the short arm of chromosome 12. His phenotype was similar to that of the "trisomy 12p syndrome", characterized by developmental delays and craniofacial abnormalities including a high forehead, a short nose with anteverted nostrils and an everted lower lip. The second and third patients were a mother and son with a direct 12p12.3p13.1 duplication, exhibiting a milder phenotype characterized by moderate developmental delays, dysmorphic facial features, behavioral problems and obesity. The present data, including the rarity of the familial cases, should contribute to our knowledge of the genotype/phenotype correlation in trisomy 12p patients.

  18. Duplication of 20qter and deletion of 20pter due to paternal pericentric inversion: patient report and review of 20qter duplications.

    PubMed

    Starr, Lois J; Truemper, Edward J; Pickering, Diane L; Sanger, Warren G; Olney, Ann Haskins

    2014-08-01

    Duplications of the terminal long arm of chromosome 20 are rare chromosomal anomalies. We report a male infant found on array comparative genomic hybridization analysis to have a 19.5 Mb duplication of chromosome 20q13.12-13.33, as well as an 886 kb deletion of 20p13 at 18,580-904,299 bp. This anomaly occurred as the recombinant product of a paternal pericentric inversion. There have been 23 reported clinical cases involving 20qter duplications; however, to our knowledge this is only the second reported patient with a paternal pericentric inversion resulting in 46,XY,rec(20)dup(20q). This patient shares many characteristics with previously described patients with 20qter duplications, including microphthalmia, anteverted nares, long ears, cleft palate, small chin, dimpled chin, cardiac malformations, and normal intrauterine growth. While there is variable morbidity in patients with terminal duplications of 20q, a review of previously reported patients and comparison to our patient's findings shows significant phenotypic similarity.

  19. Dynamics of gene duplication in the genomes of chlorophyll d-producing cyanobacteria: implications for the ecological niche.

    PubMed

    Miller, Scott R; Wood, A Michelle; Blankenship, Robert E; Kim, Maria; Ferriera, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Gene duplication may be an important mechanism for the evolution of new functions and for the adaptive modulation of gene expression via dosage effects. Here, we analyzed the fate of gene duplicates for two strains of a novel group of cyanobacteria (genus Acaryochloris) that produces the far-red light absorbing chlorophyll d as its main photosynthetic pigment. The genomes of both strains contain an unusually high number of gene duplicates for bacteria. As has been observed for eukaryotic genomes, we find that the demography of gene duplicates can be well modeled by a birth-death process. Most duplicated Acaryochloris genes are of comparatively recent origin, are strain-specific, and tend to be located on different genetic elements. Analyses of selection on duplicates of different divergence classes suggest that a minority of paralogs exhibit near neutral evolutionary dynamics immediately following duplication but that most duplicate pairs (including those which have been retained for long periods) are under strong purifying selection against amino acid change. The likelihood of duplicate retention varied among gene functional classes, and the pronounced differences between strains in the pool of retained recent duplicates likely reflects differences in the nutrient status and other characteristics of their respective environments. We conclude that most duplicates are quickly purged from Acaryochloris genomes and that those which are retained likely make important contributions to organism ecology by conferring fitness benefits via gene dosage effects. The mechanism of enhanced duplication may involve homologous recombination between genetic elements mediated by paralogous copies of recA.

  20. Analyses of transcriptome sequences reveal multiple ancient large-scale duplication events in the ancestor of Sphagnopsida (Bryophyta)

    SciTech Connect

    Devos, Nicolas; Szövényi, Péter; Weston, David J.; Rothfels, Carl J.; Johnson, Matthew G.; Shaw, A. Jonathan

    2016-02-22

    In this study, the goal of this research was to investigate whether there has been a whole-genome duplication (WGD) in the ancestry of Sphagnum (peatmoss) or the class Sphagnopsida, and to determine if the timing of any such duplication(s) and patterns of paralog retention could help explain the rapid radiation and current ecological dominance of peatmosses.

  1. Analyses of transcriptome sequences reveal multiple ancient large-scale duplication events in the ancestor of Sphagnopsida (Bryophyta)

    DOE PAGES

    Devos, Nicolas; Szövényi, Péter; Weston, David J.; ...

    2016-02-22

    In this study, the goal of this research was to investigate whether there has been a whole-genome duplication (WGD) in the ancestry of Sphagnum (peatmoss) or the class Sphagnopsida, and to determine if the timing of any such duplication(s) and patterns of paralog retention could help explain the rapid radiation and current ecological dominance of peatmosses.

  2. Tandem Duplications and the Limits of Natural Selection in Drosophila yakuba and Drosophila simulans.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Rebekah L; Cridland, Julie M; Shao, Ling; Hu, Tina T; Andolfatto, Peter; Thornton, Kevin R

    2015-01-01

    Tandem duplications are an essential source of genetic novelty, and their variation in natural populations is expected to influence adaptive walks. Here, we describe evolutionary impacts of recently-derived, segregating tandem duplications in Drosophila yakuba and Drosophila simulans. We observe an excess of duplicated genes involved in defense against pathogens, insecticide resistance, chorion development, cuticular peptides, and lipases or endopeptidases associated with the accessory glands across both species. The observed agreement is greater than expectations on chance alone, suggesting large amounts of convergence across functional categories. We document evidence of widespread selection on the D. simulans X, suggesting adaptation through duplication is common on the X. Despite the evidence for positive selection, duplicates display an excess of low frequency variants consistent with largely detrimental impacts, limiting the variation that can effectively facilitate adaptation. Standing variation for tandem duplications spans less than 25% of the genome in D. yakuba and D. simulans, indicating that evolution will be strictly limited by mutation, even in organisms with large population sizes. Effective whole gene duplication rates are low at 1.17 × 10-9 per gene per generation in D. yakuba and 6.03 × 10-10 per gene per generation in D. simulans, suggesting long wait times for new mutations on the order of thousands of years for the establishment of sweeps. Hence, in cases where adaptation depends on individual tandem duplications, evolution will be severely limited by mutation. We observe low levels of parallel recruitment of the same duplicated gene in different species, suggesting that the span of standing variation will define evolutionary outcomes in spite of convergence across gene ontologies consistent with rapidly evolving phenotypes.

  3. Comparative study of human mitochondrial proteome reveals extensive protein subcellular relocalization after gene duplications

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Gene and genome duplication is the principle creative force in evolution. Recently, protein subcellular relocalization, or neolocalization was proposed as one of the mechanisms responsible for the retention of duplicated genes. This hypothesis received support from the analysis of yeast genomes, but has not been tested thoroughly on animal genomes. In order to evaluate the importance of subcellular relocalizations for retention of duplicated genes in animal genomes, we systematically analyzed nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins in the human genome by reconstructing phylogenies of mitochondrial multigene families. Results The 456 human mitochondrial proteins selected for this study were clustered into 305 gene families including 92 multigene families. Among the multigene families, 59 (64%) consisted of both mitochondrial and cytosolic (non-mitochondrial) proteins (mt-cy families) while the remaining 33 (36%) were composed of mitochondrial proteins (mt-mt families). Phylogenetic analyses of mt-cy families revealed three different scenarios of their neolocalization following gene duplication: 1) relocalization from mitochondria to cytosol, 2) from cytosol to mitochondria and 3) multiple subcellular relocalizations. The neolocalizations were most commonly enabled by the gain or loss of N-terminal mitochondrial targeting signals. The majority of detected subcellular relocalization events occurred early in animal evolution, preceding the evolution of tetrapods. Mt-mt protein families showed a somewhat different pattern, where gene duplication occurred more evenly in time. However, for both types of protein families, most duplication events appear to roughly coincide with two rounds of genome duplications early in vertebrate evolution. Finally, we evaluated the effects of inaccurate and incomplete annotation of mitochondrial proteins and found that our conclusion of the importance of subcellular relocalization after gene duplication on the genomic scale was

  4. Tandem Duplications and the Limits of Natural Selection in Drosophila yakuba and Drosophila simulans

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Rebekah L.; Cridland, Julie M.; Shao, Ling; Hu, Tina T.; Andolfatto, Peter; Thornton, Kevin R.

    2015-01-01

    Tandem duplications are an essential source of genetic novelty, and their variation in natural populations is expected to influence adaptive walks. Here, we describe evolutionary impacts of recently-derived, segregating tandem duplications in Drosophila yakuba and Drosophila simulans. We observe an excess of duplicated genes involved in defense against pathogens, insecticide resistance, chorion development, cuticular peptides, and lipases or endopeptidases associated with the accessory glands across both species. The observed agreement is greater than expectations on chance alone, suggesting large amounts of convergence across functional categories. We document evidence of widespread selection on the D. simulans X, suggesting adaptation through duplication is common on the X. Despite the evidence for positive selection, duplicates display an excess of low frequency variants consistent with largely detrimental impacts, limiting the variation that can effectively facilitate adaptation. Standing variation for tandem duplications spans less than 25% of the genome in D. yakuba and D. simulans, indicating that evolution will be strictly limited by mutation, even in organisms with large population sizes. Effective whole gene duplication rates are low at 1.17 × 10−9 per gene per generation in D. yakuba and 6.03 × 10−10 per gene per generation in D. simulans, suggesting long wait times for new mutations on the order of thousands of years for the establishment of sweeps. Hence, in cases where adaptation depends on individual tandem duplications, evolution will be severely limited by mutation. We observe low levels of parallel recruitment of the same duplicated gene in different species, suggesting that the span of standing variation will define evolutionary outcomes in spite of convergence across gene ontologies consistent with rapidly evolving phenotypes. PMID:26176952

  5. Recurrent Chromosome 16p13.1 Duplications Are a Risk Factor for Aortic Dissections

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Merry-Lynn N.; Johnson, Ralph J.; Wang, Min; Regalado, Ellen S.; Russell, Ludivine; Cao, Jiu-Mei; Kwartler, Callie; Fraivillig, Kurt; Coselli, Joseph S.; Safi, Hazim J.; Estrera, Anthony L.; Leal, Suzanne M.; LeMaire, Scott A.; Belmont, John W.; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal deletions or reciprocal duplications of the 16p13.1 region have been implicated in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism, schizophrenia, epilepsies, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In this study, we investigated the association of recurrent genomic copy number variants (CNVs) with thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD). By using SNP arrays to screen and comparative genomic hybridization microarrays to validate, we identified 16p13.1 duplications in 8 out of 765 patients of European descent with adult-onset TAAD compared with 4 of 4,569 controls matched for ethnicity (P = 5.0×10−5, OR = 12.2). The findings were replicated in an independent cohort of 467 patients of European descent with TAAD (P = 0.005, OR = 14.7). Patients with 16p13.1 duplications were more likely to harbor a second rare CNV (P = 0.012) and to present with aortic dissections (P = 0.010) than patients without duplications. Duplications of 16p13.1 were identified in 2 of 130 patients with familial TAAD, but the duplications did not segregate with TAAD in the families. MYH11, a gene known to predispose to TAAD, lies in the duplicated region of 16p13.1, and increased MYH11 expression was found in aortic tissues from TAAD patients with 16p13.1 duplications compared with control aortas. These data suggest chromosome 16p13.1 duplications confer a risk for TAAD in addition to the established risk for neuropsychiatric disorders. It also indicates that recurrent CNVs may predispose to disorders involving more than one organ system, an observation critical to the understanding of the role of recurrent CNVs in human disease and a finding that may be common to other recurrent CNVs involving multiple genes. PMID:21698135

  6. The Use of Duplication-Generating Rearrangements for Studying Heterokaryon Incompatibility Genes in Neurospora

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, David D.

    1975-01-01

    Heterokaryon (vegetative) incompatibility, governing the fusion of somatic hyphal filaments to form stable heterokaryons, is of interest because of its widespread occurrence in fungi and its bearing on cellular recognition. Conventional investigations of the genetic basis of heterokaryon incompatibility in N. crassa are difficult because in commonly used stocks differences are present at several het loci, all with similar incompatibility phenotypes. This difficulty is overcome by using duplications (partial diploids) that are unlikely to contain more than one het locus. A phenotypically expressed incompatibility reaction occurs when unlike het alleles are present within the same somatic nucleus, and this parallels the heterokaryon incompatibility reaction that occurs when unlike alleles in different haploid nuclei are introduced into the same somatic hypha by mycelial fusion.—Nontandem duplications were used to confirm that the incompatibility reactions in heterokaryons and in duplications are alternate expressions of the same genes. This was demonstrated for three loci which had previously been established by conventional heterokaryon tests—het-e, het-c and mt. These were each obtained in duplications as recombinant meiotic segregants from crosses heterozygous for duplication-generating chromosome rearrangements. The particular method of producing the duplications is irrelevant so long as the incompatibility alleles are heterozygous.—The duplication technique has made it possible to determine easily the het-e and het-c genotypes of numerous laboratory and wild strains of unknown constitution. In laboratory strains both loci are represented simply by two alleles. Analysis of het-c is more complicated in some wild strains, where differences have been demonstrated at one or more additional het loci within the duplication used and multiple allelism is also possible.—The results show that the duplication method can be used to identify and map additional

  7. [Complete lower urinary tract duplication with true diphallia associated to anorrectal and neural malformations].

    PubMed

    Guirao, M J; Zambudio, G; Nortes, L; Jiménez, J I Ruiz

    2008-10-01

    We report a case of complete urinary tract duplication with true diphallia associated to intestinal and neural anomalies. Complete penile duplication with hypospadias and bifidum scrotum were showed. Moreover, he had got anorrectal disease (anterior anus) and neural tube defects (myelomeningocele). Radiological and functional studies were performed and complete duplication lower urinary tract with coordinate miction were found. Combined surgical approach were used: perineal to remove lateralized and hypospadic penile and abdominal for cystoplasty. We report a case due to the extremely low prevalence. Only 15 cases have been described in the literature.

  8. [Chromosome 7q11.23 duplication syndrome. First reported case in Latin America].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Botero, Felipe; Saldarriaga Gil, Wilmar; Isaza de Lourido, Carolina

    2016-02-01

    7q11.23 duplication syndrome is a disease caused by duplication of a region of chromosome 7 comprising 26 genes. The first case described in the literature was reported by Somerville et al. in 2005, who described a patient with dolichocephaly, high and narrow forehead, long eyelashes, high and wide nose, short philtrum, high arched palate, dental malocclusion, retrognathia, and severe language delay. We report the case of a Colombian patient with 7q11.23 duplication by comparative genomic hybridization techniques, and classical clinical findings, this being the first reported case in Colombia and Latin America.

  9. Four new cases of inverted terminal duplication: A modified hypothesis of mechanism of origin

    SciTech Connect

    Hoo, J.J.; Chao, M.; Szego, K.

    1995-09-25

    We present 4 recently diagnosed cases of inverted tandem duplication with involvement of the respective terminal band. Based on these 4 cases and review of the literature, the term {open_quotes}inverted terminal duplication{close_quotes} is proposed to designate specifically the type of inverted tandem duplication which involves the terminal band. A modification of the previous hypothesis of mechanism of origin is advanced. It is speculated further that a telomeric deletion of a meiotic chromosome followed by a U-type reunion of the chromatids, considered to be the first steps of the proposed mechanism of origin, may not be a rare gonadal event. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  10. beta. amyloid gene duplication in Alzheimer's disease and karyotypically normal Down syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Delabar, J.; Goldgaber, D.; Lamour, Y.; Nicole, A.; Huret, J.; De Groucy, J.; Brown, P.; Gajdusek, D.C.; Sinet, P.

    1987-03-13

    With the recently cloned complementary DNA probe, lambdaAm4 for the chromosome 21 gene encoding brain amyloid polypeptide (..beta.. amyloid protein) of Alzheimer's disease, leukocyte DNA from three patients with sporadic Alzheimer's disease and two patients with karyotypically normal Down syndrome was found to contain three copies of this bene. Because a small region of chromosome 21 containing the ets-2 gene is duplicated in patients with Alzheimer's disease, as well as in karyotypically normal Down syndrome, duplication of a subsection of the critical segment of chromosome 21 that is duplicated in Down syndrome may be the genetic defect in Alzeimer's disease.

  11. Caudal Duplication Syndrome: the Vital Role of a Multidisciplinary Approach and Staged Correction

    PubMed Central

    Samuk, Inbal; Levitt, Marc; Dlugy, Elena; Kravarusic, Dragan; Ben-Meir, David; Rajz, Gustavo; Konen, Osnat; Freud, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Caudal duplication syndrome is a rare entity that describes the association between congenital anomalies involving caudal structures and may have a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. A full-term male presented with combination of anomalies including anorectal malformation, duplication of the colon and lower urinary tract, split of the lower spine, and lipomyelomeningocele with tethering of the cord. We report this exceptional case of caudal duplication syndrome with special emphasis on surgical strategy and approach combining all disciplines involved. The purpose of this report is to present the pathology, assessment, and management strategy of this complex case. PMID:28018799

  12. Enteric duplication cyst of the pancreas associated with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Alexander S; Bluhm, David; Xiao, Shu-Yan; Waxman, Irving; Matthews, Jeffrey B

    2014-05-01

    Pancreas-associated enteric duplication cysts are rare developmental anomalies that communicate with the main pancreatic duct and may be associated with recurrent acute and chronic abdominal pain in children. In adults, these lesions may masquerade as pancreatic pseudocysts or pancreatic cystic neoplasms. An adult patient with a pancreas-associated enteric duplication is described which represents the first reported instance of association with both chronic calcific pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. The clinical spectrum of pancreas-associated enteric duplication cyst, including diagnostic and therapeutic options, is reviewed.

  13. An Approximation Algorithm for Computing a Parsimonious First Speciation in the Gene Duplication Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouangraoua, Aïda; Swenson, Krister M.; Chauve, Cedric

    We consider the following problem: given a forest of gene family trees on a set of genomes, find a first speciation which splits these genomes into two subsets and minimizes the number of gene duplications that happened before this speciation. We call this problem the Minimum Duplication Bipartition Problem. Using a generalization of the Minimum Edge-Cut Problem, known as Submodular Function Minimization, we propose a polynomial time and space 2-approximation algorithm for the Minimum Duplication Bipartition Problem. We illustrate the potential of this algorithm on both synthetic and real data.

  14. Caudal Duplication Syndrome: the Vital Role of a Multidisciplinary Approach and Staged Correction.

    PubMed

    Samuk, Inbal; Levitt, Marc; Dlugy, Elena; Kravarusic, Dragan; Ben-Meir, David; Rajz, Gustavo; Konen, Osnat; Freud, Enrique

    2016-12-01

    Caudal duplication syndrome is a rare entity that describes the association between congenital anomalies involving caudal structures and may have a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. A full-term male presented with combination of anomalies including anorectal malformation, duplication of the colon and lower urinary tract, split of the lower spine, and lipomyelomeningocele with tethering of the cord. We report this exceptional case of caudal duplication syndrome with special emphasis on surgical strategy and approach combining all disciplines involved. The purpose of this report is to present the pathology, assessment, and management strategy of this complex case.

  15. Generating new prions by targeted mutation or segment duplication

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Kacy R.; Hendrich, Connor G.; Waechter, Aubrey; Harman, Madison R.; Ross, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    Yeasts contain various protein-based genetic elements, termed prions, that result from the structural conversion of proteins into self-propagating amyloid forms. Most yeast prion proteins contain glutamine/asparagine (Q/N)-rich prion domains that drive prion activity. Here, we explore two mechanisms by which new prion domains could evolve. First, it has been proposed that mutation and natural selection will tend to result in proteins with aggregation propensities just low enough to function under physiological conditions and thus that a small number of mutations are often sufficient to cause aggregation. We hypothesized that if the ability to form prion aggregates was a sufficiently generic feature of Q/N-rich domains, many nonprion Q/N-rich domains might similarly have aggregation propensities on the edge of prion formation. Indeed, we tested four yeast Q/N-rich domains that had no detectable aggregation activity; in each case, a small number of rationally designed mutations were sufficient to cause the proteins to aggregate and, for two of the domains, to create prion activity. Second, oligopeptide repeats are found in multiple prion proteins, and expansion of these repeats increases prion activity. However, it is unclear whether the effects of repeat expansion are unique to these specific sequences or are a generic result of adding additional aggregation-prone segments into a protein domain. We found that within nonprion Q/N-rich domains, repeating aggregation-prone segments in tandem was sufficient to create prion activity. Duplication of DNA elements is a common source of genetic variation and may provide a simple mechanism to rapidly evolve prion activity. PMID:26100899

  16. Internal duplication in human alpha 1 and beta 1 interferons.

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, B W; May, L T; Sehgal, P B

    1984-01-01

    Metric analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the intron-free human interferon beta 1 (IFN-beta 1) gene by using the Sellers TT algorithm revealed that this gene contains two major repeated segments, which span the entire coding region. These repeats are each approximately 300 nucleotides in length and have 45% identical aligned nucleotides (common bases). When these metrically aligned DNA repeats were translated into amino acids, 9 (19%) of the 47 in-phase amino acid residues were identical (common acids). This internal duplication was also apparent on visual inspection of the amino acid sequence of IFN-beta 1. In addition, metric analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the intron-free IFN-alpha 1 gene showed that this gene also contains two repeats, each approximately 300 nucleotides long, having 47% common bases and 19% common acids. Since the IFN-alpha 1 and -beta 1 genes are known to be related (by the present metric analysis they contain 53% common bases and 45% common acids), a consensus DNA sequence was derived from all four of these repeats. Manual alignment of the separate metric alignments corresponding to the two halves of the IFN-alpha 1 and -beta 1 genes provided a composite alignment with 58% of the alignment positions having the same nucleotide in at least three of the four repeats. When this composite nucleotide alignment was translated to define a composite alignment of the four protein segments, 10 (31%) of the 32 in-phase amino acid residues contained the same amino acid in at least three of the four segments. These sequences relationships provide insight into the origin of the IFN-alpha 1 and -beta 1 genes and furnish an additional basis for comparing them with other related genes. PMID:6594689

  17. Comparing genomes with duplications: a computational complexity point of view.

    PubMed

    Blin, Guillaume; Chauve, Cedric; Fertin, Guillaume; Rizzi, Romeo; Vialette, Stéphane

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we are interested in the computational complexity of computing (dis)similarity measures between two genomes when they contain duplicated genes or genomic markers, a problem that happens frequently when comparing whole nuclear genomes. Recently, several methods ( [1], [2]) have been proposed that are based on two steps to compute a given (dis)similarity measure M between two genomes G_1 and G_2: first, one establishes a oneto- one correspondence between genes of G_1 and genes of G_2 ; second, once this correspondence is established, it defines explicitly a permutation and it is then possible to quantify their similarity using classical measures defined for permutations, like the number of breakpoints. Hence these methods rely on two elements: a way to establish a one-to-one correspondence between genes of a pair of genomes, and a (dis)similarity measure for permutations. The problem is then, given a (dis)similarity measure for permutations, to compute a correspondence that defines an optimal permutation for this measure. We are interested here in two models to compute a one-to-one correspondence: the exemplar model, where all but one copy are deleted in both genomes for each gene family, and the matching model, that computes a maximal correspondence for each gene family. We show that for these two models, and for three (dis)similarity measures on permutations, namely the number of common intervals, the maximum adjacency disruption (MAD) number and the summed adjacency disruption (SAD) number, the problem of computing an optimal correspondence is NP-complete, and even APXhard for the MAD number and SAD number.

  18. Did homeobox gene duplications contribute to the Cambrian explosion?

    PubMed

    Holland, Peter W H

    2015-01-01

    The Cambrian explosion describes an apparently rapid increase in the diversity of bilaterian animals around 540-515 million years ago. Bilaterian animals explore the world in three-dimensions deploying forward-facing sense organs, a brain, and an anterior mouth; they possess muscle blocks enabling efficient crawling and burrowing in sediments, and they typically have an efficient 'through-gut' with separate mouth and anus to process bulk food and eject waste, even when burrowing in sediment. A variety of ecological, environmental, genetic, and developmental factors have been proposed as possible triggers and correlates of the Cambrian explosion, and it is likely that a combination of factors were involved. Here, I focus on a set of developmental genetic changes and propose these are part of the mix of permissive factors. I describe how ANTP-class homeobox genes, which encode transcription factors involved in body patterning, increased in number in the bilaterian stem lineage and earlier. These gene duplications generated a large array of ANTP class genes, including three distinct gene clusters called NK, Hox, and ParaHox. Comparative data supports the idea that NK genes were deployed primarily to pattern the bilaterian mesoderm, Hox genes coded position along the central nervous system, and ParaHox genes most likely originally specified the mouth, midgut, and anus of the newly evolved through-gut. It is proposed that diversification of ANTP class genes played a role in the Cambrian explosion by contributing to the patterning systems used to build animal bodies capable of high-energy directed locomotion, including active burrowing.

  19. A Postaxial Polydactyly with a Partial Duplication of the Fifth Metatarsal Without a Supernumerary Digit. Is Excision of the Duplicated Metatarsal Necessary?

    PubMed

    Choi, Gi Won; Yoon, Jung Ro; Kim, Youngbae B; Yu, Jung Jin; Seo, Hyo Seong; Kim, Taik Seon

    2015-05-01

    Postaxial polydactyly of the foot is one of the most common congenital malformations. Only a few cases of postaxial polydactyly with a partial duplication of the fifth metatarsal without a supernumerary digit have been reported, and both metatarsal heads were united to form a common joint with the proximal phalanx in all of those cases. We present a rare case of postaxial polydactyly with a partial duplication of the fifth metatarsal characterized by dual metatarsal heads and an extra proximal phalanx bud, without a supernumerary digit.

  20. Duplicate Vas Deferens Encountered during Inguinal Hernia Repair: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Roszkowski, Evan H.; Bauermeister, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    Duplication of the vas deferens is a rare anomaly, defined as the presence of two distinct vasa deferentia within one spermatic cord, with only 28 cases reported worldwide since 1959. We report the case of a 63-year-old man with a duplicate vas deferens, presenting with abdominal pain from bowel obstruction secondary to incarcerated inguinal hernia. Spermatic cord dissection during hernioplasty revealed duplication of the vas deferens within the right spermatic cord. Doppler ultrasonography confirmed absence of waveforms in both vasa deferentia with arterial signal in the accompanying vessel. The hernia was repaired without complication. This report emphasizes recognition of duplicate vas deferens in avoiding iatrogenic injury and optimizing surgical outcome. PMID:27840763

  1. 7 CFR 3430.36 - Procedures to minimize or eliminate duplication of effort.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Procedures to minimize or eliminate duplication of effort. NIFA may implement appropriate business processes.... Business processes may include the review of the Current and Pending Support Form; documented CRIS...

  2. 7 CFR 3430.36 - Procedures to minimize or eliminate duplication of effort.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Procedures to minimize or eliminate duplication of effort. NIFA may implement appropriate business processes.... Business processes may include the review of the Current and Pending Support Form; documented CRIS...

  3. 7 CFR 3430.36 - Procedures to minimize or eliminate duplication of effort.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Procedures to minimize or eliminate duplication of effort. NIFA may implement appropriate business processes.... Business processes may include the review of the Current and Pending Support Form; documented CRIS...

  4. [Septate uterus with cervical duplication and vaginal partition: a rare malformation].

    PubMed

    García-León, F; Kably-Ambe, A; Von-der-Meden, W; Dosal, M; Escarcega, H

    1998-12-01

    It presents three cases of Mullerian anomalies with septate uterus and cervical duplication and longitudinal vaginal septum. There are a few previous cases reported. The cases are discussed and the literature is revised.

  5. An ancient genome duplication contributed to the abundance of metabolic genes in the moss Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    Rensing, Stefan A; Ick, Julia; Fawcett, Jeffrey A; Lang, Daniel; Zimmer, Andreas; Van de Peer, Yves; Reski, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    Background: Analyses of complete genomes and large collections of gene transcripts have shown that most, if not all seed plants have undergone one or more genome duplications in their evolutionary past. Results: In this study, based on a large collection of EST sequences, we provide evidence that the haploid moss Physcomitrella patens is a paleopolyploid as well. Based on the construction of linearized phylogenetic trees we infer the genome duplication to have occurred between 30 and 60 million years ago. Gene Ontology and pathway association of the duplicated genes in P. patens reveal different biases of gene retention compared with seed plants. Conclusion: Metabolic genes seem to have been retained in excess following the genome duplication in P. patens. This might, at least partly, explain the versatility of metabolism, as described for P. patens and other mosses, in comparison to other land plants. PMID:17683536

  6. Duplication of Inferior Vena Cava with Associated Anomalies: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shaha, Pramod; Sahoo, Kulamani; Kothari, Nupoor; Garg, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    Duplication of inferior vena cava is an uncommon abnormality and is important in daily today practice for vascular surgeons, radiologist and urologist especially during retroperitoneal surgeries and treatment of thromboembolic disease. Radiologically, Duplicated IVC can be mistaken for lymphadenopathy or left pyeloureteric dilatation. Crossed fused kidney with a single ureter defy the embryological theory of ureteric bud crossing the opposite side and induce nephron formation associated anomaly of Duplication of inferior vena cava and malrotation of gut are not reported in a same patient. On meticulous search of literature no such combination of abnormalities has been reported. In this case report we bring forward this rare type of combination of three congenital malformations that is Duplication of IVC, crossed fused kidney and malrotation of gut. PMID:27134964

  7. Retention of duplicated ITAM-containing transmembrane signaling subunits in the tetraploid amphibian species Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Guselnikov, S V; Grayfer, L; De Jesús Andino, F; Rogozin, I B; Robert, J; Taranin, A V

    2015-11-01

    The ITAM-bearing transmembrane signaling subunits (TSS) are indispensable components of activating leukocyte receptor complexes. The TSS-encoding genes map to paralogous chromosomal regions, which are thought to arise from ancient genome tetraploidization(s). To assess a possible role of tetraploidization in the TSS evolution, we studied TSS and other functionally linked genes in the amphibian species Xenopus laevis whose genome was duplicated about 40 MYR ago. We found that X. laevis has retained a duplicated set of sixteen TSS genes, all except one being transcribed. Furthermore, duplicated TCRα loci and genes encoding TSS-coupling protein kinases have also been retained. No clear evidence for functional divergence of the TSS paralogs was obtained from gene expression and sequence analyses. We suggest that the main factor of maintenance of duplicated TSS genes in X. laevis was a protein dosage effect and that this effect might have facilitated the TSS set expansion in early vertebrates.

  8. A case of duplication 17p13.1p13.3 confirmed by FISH

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, C.F.; Berger, C.S.; Bull, R.M.

    1994-09-01

    There are many reports in the literature of deletions of the p arm of chromosome 17 in the region of p13.3 due to the association with Miller-Dieker Syndrome. However, very little is known about duplications of 17p. We report a duplication of part of 17p in an 8-year-old girl with attention deficit disorder and mild mental retardation. Cytogenetically, the duplicated region appears to include 17p13.1 to p13.3. FISH with a cosmid probe to the Miller-Dieker region at 17p13.3 shows a double hybridization signal, confirming that the duplicated material does indeed include 17q13.3.

  9. Image region duplication detection based on circular window expansion and phase correlation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hong; Yu, Tianshu; Xu, Mengjia; Cui, Wencheng

    2012-10-10

    Region duplication forgery is one of the tampering techniques that are frequently used, where a part of an image is copied and pasted into another part of the same image. In this paper, a phase correlation method based on polar expansion and adaptive band limitation is proposed for region duplication forgery detection. Our method starts by calculating the Fourier transform of the polar expansion on overlapping windows pair, and then an adaptive band limitation procedure is implemented to obtain a correlation matrix in which the peak is effectively enhanced. After estimating the rotation angle of the forgery region, a searching algorithm in the sense of seed filling is executed to display the whole duplicated region. Experimental results show that the proposed approach can detect duplicated region with high accuracy and robustness to rotation, illumination adjustment, blur and JPEG compression while rotation angle is estimated precisely for further calculation.

  10. 77 FR 36479 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; License Transfer and Duplicate License Services

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; License Transfer and Duplicate License Services AGENCY: Bureau of Industry and Security, Commerce. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY:...

  11. Image degradation in aerial imagery duplicates. [photographic processing of photographic film and reproduction (copying)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    A series of Earth Resources Aircraft Program data flights were made over an aerial test range in Arizona for the evaluation of large cameras. Specifically, both medium altitude and high altitude flights were made to test and evaluate a series of color as well as black-and-white films. Image degradation, inherent in duplication processing, was studied. Resolution losses resulting from resolution characteristics of the film types are given. Color duplicates, in general, are shown to be degraded more than black-and-white films because of the limitations imposed by available aerial color duplicating stock. Results indicate that a greater resolution loss may be expected when the original has higher resolution. Photographs of the duplications are shown.

  12. The fate of the duplicated androgen receptor in fishes: a late neofunctionalization event?

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Based on the observation of an increased number of paralogous genes in teleost fishes compared with other vertebrates and on the conserved synteny between duplicated copies, it has been shown that a whole genome duplication (WGD) occurred during the evolution of Actinopterygian fish. Comparative phylogenetic dating of this duplication event suggests that it occurred early on, specifically in teleosts. It has been proposed that this event might have facilitated the evolutionary radiation and the phenotypic diversification of the teleost fish, notably by allowing the sub- or neo-functionalization of many duplicated genes. Results In this paper, we studied in a wide range of Actinopterygians the duplication and fate of the androgen receptor (AR, NR3C4), a nuclear receptor known to play a key role in sex-determination in vertebrates. The pattern of AR gene duplication is consistent with an early WGD event: it has been duplicated into two genes AR-A and AR-B after the split of the Acipenseriformes from the lineage leading to teleost fish but before the divergence of Osteoglossiformes. Genomic and syntenic analyses in addition to lack of PCR amplification show that one of the duplicated copies, AR-B, was lost in several basal Clupeocephala such as Cypriniformes (including the model species zebrafish), Siluriformes, Characiformes and Salmoniformes. Interestingly, we also found that, in basal teleost fish (Osteoglossiformes and Anguilliformes), the two copies remain very similar, whereas, specifically in Percomorphs, one of the copies, AR-B, has accumulated substitutions in both the ligand binding domain (LBD) and the DNA binding domain (DBD). Conclusion The comparison of the mutations present in these divergent AR-B with those known in human to be implicated in complete, partial or mild androgen insensitivity syndrome suggests that the existence of two distinct AR duplicates may be correlated to specific functional differences that may be connected to the well

  13. The rates of de novo meiotic deletions and duplications causing several genomic disorders in the male germline

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Daniel J.; Miretti, Marcos; Rajan, Diana; Fiegler, Heike; Carter, Nigel P.; Blayney, Martyn L; Beck, Stephan; Hurles, Matthew E.

    2009-01-01

    Meiotic recombination between highly-similar duplicated sequences (non-allelic homologous recombination, NAHR) generates deletions, duplications, inversions, and translocations, and is responsible for genetic diseases known as ‘genomic disorders’, most of which are caused by altered copy number of dosage sensitive genes. NAHR Hotspots have been identified within some duplicated sequences. We have developed sperm-based assays to measure the de novo rate of reciprocal deletions and duplications at 4 NAHR hotspots. We used these assays to dissect the relative rates of NAHR between different pairs of duplicated sequences. We show that: (i) these NAHR hotspots are specific to meiosis, (ii) deletions are generated at a higher rate than their reciprocal duplications in the male germline and (iii) some of these genomic disorders are likely to have been under-ascertained clinically, most notably the duplication of 7q11, the reciprocal of the Williams-Beuren Syndrome deletion. PMID:18059269

  14. Predicting the Stability of Homologous Gene Duplications in a Plant RNA Virus.

    PubMed

    Willemsen, Anouk; Zwart, Mark P; Higueras, Pablo; Sardanyés, Josep; Elena, Santiago F

    2016-10-12

    One of the striking features of many eukaryotes is the apparent amount of redundancy in coding and non-coding elements of their genomes. Despite the possible evolutionary advantages, there are fewer examples of redundant sequences in viral genomes, particularly those with RNA genomes. The factors constraining the maintenance of redundant sequences in present-day RNA virus genomes are not well known. Here, we use Tobacco etch virus, a plant RNA virus, to investigate the stability of genetically redundant sequences by generating viruses with potentially beneficial gene duplications. Subsequently, we tested the viability of these viruses and performed experimental evolution. We found that all gene duplication events resulted in a loss of viability or in a significant reduction in viral fitness. Moreover, upon analyzing the genomes of the evolved viruses, we always observed the deletion of the duplicated gene copy and maintenance of the ancestral copy. Interestingly, there were clear differences in the deletion dynamics of the duplicated gene associated with the passage duration and the size and position of the duplicated copy. Based on the experimental data, we developed a mathematical model to characterize the stability of genetically redundant sequences, and showed that fitness effects are not enough to predict genomic stability. A context-dependent recombination rate is also required, with the context being the duplicated gene and its position. Our results therefore demonstrate experimentally the deleterious nature of gene duplications in RNA viruses. Beside previously described constraints on genome size, we identified additional factors that reduce the likelihood of the maintenance of duplicated genes.

  15. A Retroperitoneal Isolated Enteric Duplication Cyst Mimicking a Teratoma: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Momosaka, Daichi; Ushijima, Yasuhiro; Asayama, Yoshiki; Ishigami, Kousei; Takayama, Yukihisa; Okamoto, Daisuke; Fujita, Nobuhiro; Ikeda, Tetsuo; Uchida, Keiichiro; Sugimoto, Masaaki; Kohashi, Kenichi; Honda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Enteric duplication cysts lacking anatomic association with the gastrointestinal tract are called isolated enteric duplication cysts (IEDCs). We present an atypical case of a retroperitoneal IEDC with a tortuous tubular complex shape that enfolded the surrounding retroperitoneal fat and mimicked a retroperitoneal teratoma. Multiplanar reconstruction images should be used to evaluate such a lesion correctly. A tortuous tubular complex shape could be a key finding to differentiate from other retroperitoneal cysts. PMID:28083153

  16. Gene duplication within the Green Lineage: the case of TEL genes.

    PubMed

    Charon, Céline; Bruggeman, Quentin; Thareau, Vincent; Henry, Yves

    2012-09-01

    Recent years have witnessed a breathtaking increase in the availability of genome sequence data, providing evidence of the highly duplicate nature of eukaryotic genomes. Plants are exceptional among eukaryotic organisms in that duplicate loci compose a large fraction of their genomes, partly because of the frequent occurrence of polyploidy (or whole-genome duplication) events. Tandem gene duplication and transposition have also contributed to the large number of duplicated genes in plant genomes. Evolutionary analyses allowed the dynamics of duplicate gene evolution to be studied and several models were proposed. It seems that, over time, many duplicated genes were lost and some of those that were retained gained new functions and/or expression patterns (neofunctionalization) or subdivided their functions and/or expression patterns between them (subfunctionalization). Recent studies have provided examples of genes that originated by duplication with successive diversification within plants. In this review, we focused on the TEL (TERMINAL EAR1-like) genes to illustrate such mechanisms. Emerged from the mei2 gene family, these TEL genes are likely to be land plant-specific. Phylogenetic analyses revealed one or two TEL copies per diploid genome. TEL gene degeneration and loss in several Angiosperm species such as in poplar and maize seem to have occurred. In Arabidopsis thaliana, whose genome experienced at least three polyploidy events followed by massive gene loss and genomic reorganization, two TEL genes were retained and two new shorter TEL-like (MCT) genes emerged. Molecular and expression analyses suggest for these genes sub- and neofunctionalization events, but confirmation will come from their functional characterization.

  17. Detecting Functional Divergence after Gene Duplication through Evolutionary Changes in Posttranslational Regulatory Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen Ba, Alex N.; Strome, Bob; Hua, Jun Jie; Desmond, Jonathan; Gagnon-Arsenault, Isabelle; Weiss, Eric L.; Landry, Christian R.; Moses, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplication is an important evolutionary mechanism that can result in functional divergence in paralogs due to neo-functionalization or sub-functionalization. Consistent with functional divergence after gene duplication, recent studies have shown accelerated evolution in retained paralogs. However, little is known in general about the impact of this accelerated evolution on the molecular functions of retained paralogs. For example, do new functions typically involve changes in enzymatic activities, or changes in protein regulation? Here we study the evolution of posttranslational regulation by examining the evolution of important regulatory sequences (short linear motifs) in retained duplicates created by the whole-genome duplication in budding yeast. To do so, we identified short linear motifs whose evolutionary constraint has relaxed after gene duplication with a likelihood-ratio test that can account for heterogeneity in the evolutionary process by using a non-central chi-squared null distribution. We find that short linear motifs are more likely to show changes in evolutionary constraints in retained duplicates compared to single-copy genes. We examine changes in constraints on known regulatory sequences and show that for the Rck1/Rck2, Fkh1/Fkh2, Ace2/Swi5 paralogs, they are associated with previously characterized differences in posttranslational regulation. Finally, we experimentally confirm our prediction that for the Ace2/Swi5 paralogs, Cbk1 regulated localization was lost along the lineage leading to SWI5 after gene duplication. Our analysis suggests that changes in posttranslational regulation mediated by short regulatory motifs systematically contribute to functional divergence after gene duplication. PMID:25474245

  18. Prader-Willi, Angelman, and 15q11-q13 Duplication Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Kalsner, Louisa; Chamberlain, Stormy J

    2015-06-01

    Three distinct neurodevelopmental disorders arise primarily from deletions or duplications that occur at the 15q11-q13 locus: Prader-Willi syndrome, Angelman syndrome, and 15q11-q13 duplication syndrome. Each of these disorders results from the loss of function or overexpression of at least 1 imprinted gene. This article discusses the clinical background, genetic cause, diagnostic strategy, and management of each of these 3 disorders.

  19. Prader-Willi, Angelman, and 15q11-q13 duplication syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Three distinct neurodevelopmental disorders arise primarily from deletions or duplications that occur at the 15q11-q13 locus: Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), Angelman syndrome (AS), and 15q11-q13 duplication syndrome (Dup15q syndrome). Each of these disorders results from the loss of function or over-expression of at least one imprinted gene. Here we discuss the clinical background, genetic etiology, diagnostic strategy, and management for each of these three disorders. PMID:26022164

  20. Neuroblastoma in a boy with MCA/MR syndrome, deletion 11q, and duplication 12q

    SciTech Connect

    Koiffmann, C.P.; Vianna-Morgante, A.M.; Wajntal, A.

    1995-07-31

    Deletion 11q23{r_arrow}qter and duplication 12q23{r_arrow}qter are described in a boy with neuroblastoma, multiple congenital anomalies, and mental retardation. The patient has clinical manifestations of 11q deletion and 12q duplication syndromes. The possible involvement of the segment 11q23{r_arrow}24 in the cause of the neuroblastoma is discussed. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Duplication of the ZIC2 gene is not associated with holoprosencephaly.

    PubMed

    Jobanputra, Vaidehi; Burke, Alanna; Kwame, Anyane-Yeboa; Shanmugham, Anita; Shirazi, Maryam; Brown, Stephen; Warburton, Peter E; Levy, Brynn; Warburton, Dorothy

    2012-01-01

    Cytogenetic testing using genomic microarrays presents a clinical challenge when data regarding the phenotypic consequences of the genomic alteration are not available. We describe a chromosome 13q32.3 duplication discovered by microarray testing in a fetus with a prenatally detected apparently balanced de novo translocation 46,XY,t(2;13)(q37;q32). Microarray analysis on the fetal DNA showed duplications of 384 and 564 kb at the breakpoint regions on chromosomes 2q37.3 and 13q32.3, respectively. There were no disease-associated genes in the duplicated region on chromosome 2q37. The duplicated region on chromosome 13q contains the ZIC2 gene. Haploinsufficiency of ZIC2 is known to cause holoprosencephaly and other brain malformations. Studies in the mouse models have suggested that over expression of ZIC2 may also lead to brain malformations. Fetal MRI of the brain was normal and the family elected to continue the pregnancy. An apparently normal baby was born at term. At 3 months of age a physical exam showed no abnormalities and no developmental delay. This report shows that duplication of ZIC2 is not necessarily associated with brain malformations. We also describe the phenotype from four additional patients with duplications of the region of chromosome 13 containing ZIC2 and three previously described patients with supernumerary marker chromosomes derived from distal chromosome 13. None of the eight patients had holoprosencephaly or brain malformations, indicating that duplication of ZIC2 is not associated with brain anomalies. This information will be useful for counseling in other occurrences of this duplication identified by microarray.

  2. “Partial duplication of lower lip and hemimandible” A rare case

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Bibhuti Bhusan; Mohanty, Nilamani

    2012-01-01

    Duplication of mandible and lower lip is a very rare congenital entity. We report an extremely uncommon case of Congenital Duplication of Lower lip and Mandible in a 3 year old girl, who was treated surgically in a single stage for correction of both lip and mandible. This was a commissure preserving single staged procedure. The Surgical procedure, the problems related to this anomaly and the embryology are discussed. PMID:23450337

  3. Detecting functional divergence after gene duplication through evolutionary changes in posttranslational regulatory sequences.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Ba, Alex N; Strome, Bob; Hua, Jun Jie; Desmond, Jonathan; Gagnon-Arsenault, Isabelle; Weiss, Eric L; Landry, Christian R; Moses, Alan M

    2014-12-01

    Gene duplication is an important evolutionary mechanism that can result in functional divergence in paralogs due to neo-functionalization or sub-functionalization. Consistent with functional divergence after gene duplication, recent studies have shown accelerated evolution in retained paralogs. However, little is known in general about the impact of this accelerated evolution on the molecular functions of retained paralogs. For example, do new functions typically involve changes in enzymatic activities, or changes in protein regulation? Here we study the evolution of posttranslational regulation by examining the evolution of important regulatory sequences (short linear motifs) in retained duplicates created by the whole-genome duplication in budding yeast. To do so, we identified short linear motifs whose evolutionary constraint has relaxed after gene duplication with a likelihood-ratio test that can account for heterogeneity in the evolutionary process by using a non-central chi-squared null distribution. We find that short linear motifs are more likely to show changes in evolutionary constraints in retained duplicates compared to single-copy genes. We examine changes in constraints on known regulatory sequences and show that for the Rck1/Rck2, Fkh1/Fkh2, Ace2/Swi5 paralogs, they are associated with previously characterized differences in posttranslational regulation. Finally, we experimentally confirm our prediction that for the Ace2/Swi5 paralogs, Cbk1 regulated localization was lost along the lineage leading to SWI5 after gene duplication. Our analysis suggests that changes in posttranslational regulation mediated by short regulatory motifs systematically contribute to functional divergence after gene duplication.

  4. The behavioral phenotype in MECP2 duplication syndrome: A comparison to idiopathic autism

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Sarika U.; Hundley, R. J.; Wilson, A.K.; Warren, Z.; Vehorn, A.; Carvalho, C.; Lupski, J.R.; Ramocki, M.B.

    2012-01-01

    Alterations in the X-linked gene MECP2 encoding the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) have been linked to autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Most recently, data suggest that overexpression of MECP2 may be related to ASD. To better characterize the relevance of MECP2 overexpression to ASD-related behaviors, we compared the core symptoms of ASD in MECP2 duplication syndrome to nonverbal-mental-age-matched boys with idiopathic ASD. Within the MECP2 duplication group we further delineated aspects of the behavioral phenotype, and also examined how duplication size and gene content corresponded to clinical severity. We compared 10 males with MECP2 duplication syndrome (ages 3–10) to a chronological and mental age-matched sample of 9 nonverbal males with idiopathic ASD. Our results indicate that boys with MECP2 duplication syndrome share the core behavioral features of ASD (e.g. social affect, restricted/repetitive behaviors). Direct comparisons of ASD profiles revealed that a majority of boys with MECP2 duplication syndrome are similar to idiopathic ASD; they have impairments in social affect (albeit to a lesser degree than idiopathic ASD) and similar severity in restricted/repetitive behaviors. Nonverbal mental age did not correlate with severity of social impairment or repetitive behaviors. Within the MECP2 duplication group, breakpoint size does not predict differences in clinical severity. In addition to social withdrawal and stereotyped behaviors, we also found that hyposensitivity to pain/temperature are part of the behavioral phenotype of MECP2 duplication syndrome. Our results illustrate that overexpression/increased dosage of MECP2 is related to core features of ASD. PMID:23169761

  5. Insertion of the IL1RAPL1 gene into the duplication junction of the dystrophin gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhujun; Yagi, Mariko; Okizuka, Yo; Awano, Hiroyuki; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Matsuo, Masafumi

    2009-08-01

    Duplications of one or more exons of the dystrophin gene are the second most common mutation in dystrophinopathies. Even though duplications are suggested to occur with greater complexity than thought earlier, they have been considered an intragenic event. Here, we report the insertion of a part of the IL1RAPL1 (interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein-like 1) gene into the duplication junction site. When the actual exon junction was examined in 15 duplication mutations in the dystrophin gene by analyzing dystrophin mRNA, one patient was found to have an unknown 621 bp insertion at the junction of duplication of exons from 56 to 62. Unexpectedly, the inserted sequence was found completely identical to sequences of exons 3-5 of the IL1RAPL1 gene that is nearly 100 kb distal from the dystrophin gene. Accordingly, the insertion of IL1RAPL1 exons 3-5 between dystrophin exons 62 and 56 was confirmed at the genomic sequence level. One junction between the IL1RAPL1 intron 5 and dystrophin intron 55 was localized within an Alu sequence. These results showed that a fragment of the IL1RAPL1 gene was inserted into the duplication junction of the dystrophin gene in the same direction as the dystrophin gene. This suggests the novel possibility of co-occurrence of complex genomic rearrangements in dystrophinopathy.

  6. New genes from old: asymmetric divergence of gene duplicates and the evolution of development.

    PubMed

    Holland, Peter W H; Marlétaz, Ferdinand; Maeso, Ignacio; Dunwell, Thomas L; Paps, Jordi

    2017-02-05

    Gene duplications and gene losses have been frequent events in the evolution of animal genomes, with the balance between these two dynamic processes contributing to major differences in gene number between species. After gene duplication, it is common for both daughter genes to accumulate sequence change at approximately equal rates. In some cases, however, the accumulation of sequence change is highly uneven with one copy radically diverging from its paralogue. Such 'asymmetric evolution' seems commoner after tandem gene duplication than after whole-genome duplication, and can generate substantially novel genes. We describe examples of asymmetric evolution in duplicated homeobox genes of moths, molluscs and mammals, in each case generating new homeobox genes that were recruited to novel developmental roles. The prevalence of asymmetric divergence of gene duplicates has been underappreciated, in part, because the origin of highly divergent genes can be difficult to resolve using standard phylogenetic methods.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evo-devo in the genomics era, and the origins of morphological diversity'.

  7. Restriction and Recruitment—Gene Duplication and the Origin and Evolution of Snake Venom Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Adam D.; Swain, Martin T.; Hegarty, Matthew J.; Logan, Darren W.; Mulley, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Snake venom has been hypothesized to have originated and diversified through a process that involves duplication of genes encoding body proteins with subsequent recruitment of the copy to the venom gland, where natural selection acts to develop or increase toxicity. However, gene duplication is known to be a rare event in vertebrate genomes, and the recruitment of duplicated genes to a novel expression domain (neofunctionalization) is an even rarer process that requires the evolution of novel combinations of transcription factor binding sites in upstream regulatory regions. Therefore, although this hypothesis concerning the evolution of snake venom is very unlikely and should be regarded with caution, it is nonetheless often assumed to be established fact, hindering research into the true origins of snake venom toxins. To critically evaluate this hypothesis, we have generated transcriptomic data for body tissues and salivary and venom glands from five species of venomous and nonvenomous reptiles. Our comparative transcriptomic analysis of these data reveals that snake venom does not evolve through the hypothesized process of duplication and recruitment of genes encoding body proteins. Indeed, our results show that many proposed venom toxins are in fact expressed in a wide variety of body tissues, including the salivary gland of nonvenomous reptiles and that these genes have therefore been restricted to the venom gland following duplication, not recruited. Thus, snake venom evolves through the duplication and subfunctionalization of genes encoding existing salivary proteins. These results highlight the danger of the elegant and intuitive “just-so story” in evolutionary biology. PMID:25079342

  8. Detection of age-related duplications in mtDNA from human muscles and bones.

    PubMed

    Lacan, Marie; Thèves, Catherine; Keyser, Christine; Farrugia, Audrey; Baraybar, Jose-Pablo; Crubézy, Eric; Ludes, Bertrand

    2011-03-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the age-related accumulation of duplications in the D-loop of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) extracted from skeletal muscle. This kind of mutation had not yet been studied in bone. The detection of age-related mutations in bone tissue could help to estimate age at death within the context of legal medicine or/and anthropological identification procedures, when traditional osteological markers studied are absent or inefficient. As we detected an accumulation of a point mutation in mtDNA from an older individual's bones in a previous study, we tried here to identify if three reported duplications (150, 190, 260 bp) accumulate in this type of tissue. We developed a sensitive method which consists in the use of back-to-back primers during amplification followed by an electrophoresis capillary analysis. The aim of this study was to confirm that at least one duplication appears systematically in muscle tissue after the age of 20 and to evaluate the duplication age appearance in bones extracted from the same individuals. We found that the number of duplications increase from 38 years and that at least one duplicated fragment is present in 50% of cases after 70 years in this tissue. These results confirm that several age-related mutations can be detected in the D-loop of mtDNA and open the way for the use of molecular markers for age estimation in forensic and/or anthropological identification.

  9. Compensatory Drift and the Evolutionary Dynamics of Dosage-Sensitive Duplicate Genes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Ammon; Zakon, Harold H; Kirkpatrick, Mark

    2016-02-01

    Dosage-balance selection preserves functionally redundant duplicates (paralogs) at the optimum for their combined expression. Here we present a model of the dynamics of duplicate genes coevolving under dosage-balance selection. We call this the compensatory drift model. Results show that even when strong dosage-balance selection constrains total expression to the optimum, expression of each duplicate can diverge by drift from its original level. The rate of divergence slows as the strength of stabilizing selection, the size of the mutation effect, and/or the size of the population increases. We show that dosage-balance selection impedes neofunctionalization early after duplication but can later facilitate it. We fit this model to data from sodium channel duplicates in 10 families of teleost fish; these include two convergent lineages of electric fish in which one of the duplicates neofunctionalized. Using the model, we estimated the strength of dosage-balance selection for these genes. The results indicate that functionally redundant paralogs still may undergo radical functional changes after a prolonged period of compensatory drift.

  10. Restriction and recruitment-gene duplication and the origin and evolution of snake venom toxins.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, Adam D; Swain, Martin T; Hegarty, Matthew J; Logan, Darren W; Mulley, John F

    2014-08-01

    Snake venom has been hypothesized to have originated and diversified through a process that involves duplication of genes encoding body proteins with subsequent recruitment of the copy to the venom gland, where natural selection acts to develop or increase toxicity. However, gene duplication is known to be a rare event in vertebrate genomes, and the recruitment of duplicated genes to a novel expression domain (neofunctionalization) is an even rarer process that requires the evolution of novel combinations of transcription factor binding sites in upstream regulatory regions. Therefore, although this hypothesis concerning the evolution of snake venom is very unlikely and should be regarded with caution, it is nonetheless often assumed to be established fact, hindering research into the true origins of snake venom toxins. To critically evaluate this hypothesis, we have generated transcriptomic data for body tissues and salivary and venom glands from five species of venomous and nonvenomous reptiles. Our comparative transcriptomic analysis of these data reveals that snake venom does not evolve through the hypothesized process of duplication and recruitment of genes encoding body proteins. Indeed, our results show that many proposed venom toxins are in fact expressed in a wide variety of body tissues, including the salivary gland of nonvenomous reptiles and that these genes have therefore been restricted to the venom gland following duplication, not recruited. Thus, snake venom evolves through the duplication and subfunctionalization of genes encoding existing salivary proteins. These results highlight the danger of the elegant and intuitive "just-so story" in evolutionary biology.

  11. Analysis of filtering techniques and image quality in pixel duplicated images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrubeoglu, Mehrube; McLauchlan, Lifford

    2009-08-01

    When images undergo filtering operations, valuable information can be lost besides the intended noise or frequencies due to averaging of neighboring pixels. When the image is enlarged by duplicating pixels, such filtering effects can be reduced and more information retained, which could be critical when analyzing image content automatically. Analysis of retinal images could reveal many diseases at early stage as long as minor changes that depart from a normal retinal scan can be identified and enhanced. In this paper, typical filtering techniques are applied to an early stage diabetic retinopathy image which has undergone digital pixel duplication. The same techniques are applied to the original images for comparison. The effects of filtering are then demonstrated for both pixel duplicated and original images to show the information retention capability of pixel duplication. Image quality is computed based on published metrics. Our analysis shows that pixel duplication is effective in retaining information on smoothing operations such as mean filtering in the spatial domain, as well as lowpass and highpass filtering in the frequency domain, based on the filter window size. Blocking effects due to image compression and pixel duplication become apparent in frequency analysis.

  12. Prenatal diagnosis of foetuses with congenital abnormalities and duplication of the MECP2 region.

    PubMed

    Fu, Fang; Liu, Huan-ling; Li, Ru; Han, Jin; Yang, Xin; Min, Pan; Zhen, Li; Zhang, Yong-ling; Xie, Gui-e; Lei, Ting-ying; Li, Yan; Li, Jian; Li, Dong-zhi; Liao, Can

    2014-08-10

    MECP2 duplication results in a well-recognised syndrome in 100% of affected male children; this syndrome is characterised by severe neurodevelopmental disabilities and recurrent infections. However, no sonographic findings have been reported for affected foetuses, and prenatal molecular diagnosis has not been possible for this disease due to lack of prenatal clinical presentation. In this study, we identified a small duplication comprising the MECP2 and L1CAM genes in the Xq28 region in a patient from a family with severe X-linked mental retardation and in a prenatal foetus with brain structural abnormalities. Using high-resolution chromosome microarray analysis (CMA) to screen 108 foetuses with congenital structural abnormalities, we identified additional three foetuses with the MECP2 duplication. Our study indicates that ventriculomegaly, hydrocephalus, agenesis of the corpus callosum, choroid plexus cysts, foetal growth restriction and hydronephrosis might be common ultrasound findings in prenatal foetuses with the MECP2 duplication and provides the first set of prenatal cases with MECP2 duplication, the ultrasonographic phenotype described in these patients will help to recognise the foetuses with possible MECP2 duplication and prompt the appropriate molecular testing.

  13. Investigating different duplication pattern of essential genes in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Debarun; Mukherjee, Dola; Podder, Soumita; Ghosh, Tapash C

    2015-01-01

    Gene duplication is one of the major driving forces shaping genome and organism evolution and thought to be itself regulated by some intrinsic properties of the gene. Comparing the essential genes among mouse and human, we observed that the essential genes avoid duplication in mouse while prefer to remain duplicated in humans. In this study, we wanted to explore the reasons behind such differences in gene essentiality by cross-species comparison of human and mouse. Moreover, we examined essential genes that are duplicated in humans are functionally more redundant than that in mouse. The proportion of paralog pseudogenization of essential genes is higher in mouse than that of humans. These duplicates of essential genes are under stringent dosage regulation in human than in mouse. We also observed slower evolutionary rate in the paralogs of human essential genes than the mouse counterpart. Together, these results clearly indicate that human essential genes are retained as duplicates to serve as backed up copies that may shield themselves from harmful mutations.

  14. Processes of fungal proteome evolution and gain of function: gene duplication and domain rearrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen-Gihon, Inbar; Sharan, Roded; Nussinov, Ruth

    2011-06-01

    During evolution, organisms have gained functional complexity mainly by modifying and improving existing functioning systems rather than creating new ones ab initio. Here we explore the interplay between two processes which during evolution have had major roles in the acquisition of new functions: gene duplication and protein domain rearrangements. We consider four possible evolutionary scenarios: gene families that have undergone none of these event types; only gene duplication; only domain rearrangement, or both events. We characterize each of the four evolutionary scenarios by functional attributes. Our analysis of ten fungal genomes indicates that at least for the fungi clade, species significantly appear to gain complexity by gene duplication accompanied by the expansion of existing domain architectures via rearrangements. We show that paralogs gaining new domain architectures via duplication tend to adopt new functions compared to paralogs that preserve their domain architectures. We conclude that evolution of protein families through gene duplication and domain rearrangement is correlated with their functional properties. We suggest that in general, new functions are acquired via the integration of gene duplication and domain rearrangements rather than each process acting independently.

  15. A Burst of Segmental Duplications in the African Great Ape Ancestor

    PubMed Central

    Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Ventura, Mario; Graves, Tina A.; Cheng, Ze; Hillier, LaDeanna W.; Jiang, Zhaoshi; Baker, Carl; Malfavon-Borja, Ray; Fulton, Lucinda A.; Alkan, Can; Aksay, Gozde; Girirajan, Santhosh; Siswara, Priscillia; Chen, Lin; Cardone, Maria Francesca; Navarro, Arcadi; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Eichler, Evan E.

    2009-01-01

    Wilson and King were among the first to recognize that the extent of phenotypic change between humans and great apes was dissonant with the rate of molecular change. Proteins are virtually identical1,2; cytogenetically there are few rearrangements that distinguish ape-human chromosomes3; rates of single-basepair change4-7 and retroposon activity8-10 have slowed particularly within hominid lineages when compared to rodents or monkeys. Here, we perform a systematic analysis of duplication content of four primate genomes (macaque, orangutan, chimpanzee and human) in an effort to understand the pattern and rates of genomic duplication during hominid evolution. We find that the ancestral branch leading to human and African great apes shows the most significant increase in duplication activity both in terms of basepairs and in terms of events. This duplication acceleration within the ancestral species is significant when compared to lineage-specific rate estimates even after accounting for copy-number polymorphism and homoplasy. We discover striking examples of recurrent and independent gene-containing duplications within the gorilla and chimpanzee that are absent in the human lineage. Our results suggest that the evolutionary properties of copy-number mutation differ significantly from other forms of genetic mutation and, in contrast to the hominid slowdown of single basepair mutations, there has been a genomic burst of duplication activity at this period during human evolution. PMID:19212409

  16. Duplicate Publications in Korean medical journals indexed in KoreaMed.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Young; Hahm, Chang Kok; Bae, Chong-Woo; Cho, Hye Min

    2008-02-01

    Duplicate publication is considered unethical. It has several negative impacts. To estimate the frequency and characteristics of duplicate publications in Korean medical journals, we reviewed some portion of Korean journal articles. Among 9,030 articles that are original articles indexed in KoreaMed from January to December 2004, 455 articles (5%) were chosen by random sampling. PubMed, Google scholar, KMbase, and KoreaMed were searched by two librarians. Three authors reviewed titles, abstracts, and full text of index articles and suspected articles independently. Point of disagreement were reconciled by discussion. Criteria for a duplicate publication defined by editors of cardiothoracic journals and International Committee of Medical Journal Editors were used. A total of 455 articles were evaluated, of which 27 (5.93%) index articles were identified with 29 duplicate articles. Among 27 index articles, 1 was quadruple publication and 26 were double publications. Of 29 duplicated articles, 19 were classified as copy, 4 as fragmentation, and 6 as disaggregation. The proportion of duplicate publications in Korean medical journals appears to be higher than expected. Education on publication ethics to researchers is needed.

  17. Multiple independent origins of mitochondrial control region duplications in the order Psittaciformes

    PubMed Central

    Schirtzinger, Erin E.; Tavares, Erika S.; Gonzales, Lauren A.; Eberhard, Jessica R.; Miyaki, Cristina Y.; Sanchez, Juan J.; Hernandez, Alexis; Müeller, Heinrich; Graves, Gary R.; Fleischer, Robert C.; Wright, Timothy F.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are generally thought to be under selection for compactness, due to their small size, consistent gene content, and a lack of introns or intergenic spacers. As more animal mitochondrial genomes are fully sequenced, rearrangements and partial duplications are being identified with increasing frequency, particularly in birds (Class Aves). In this study, we investigate the evolutionary history of mitochondrial control region states within the avian order Psittaciformes (parrots and cockatoos). To this aim, we reconstructed a comprehensive multi-locus phylogeny of parrots, used PCR of three diagnostic fragments to classify the mitochondrial control region state as single or duplicated, and mapped these states onto the phylogeny. We further sequenced 44 selected species to validate these inferences of control region state. Ancestral state reconstruction using a range of weighting schemes identified six independent origins of mitochondrial control region duplications within Psittaciformes. Analysis of sequence data showed that varying levels of mitochondrial gene and tRNA homology and degradation were present within a given clade exhibiting duplications. Levels of divergence between control regions within an individual varied from 0–10.9% with the differences occurring mainly between 51 and 225 nucleotides 3′ of the goose hairpin in domain I. Further investigations into the fates of duplicated mitochondrial genes, the potential costs and benefits of having a second control region, and the complex relationship between evolutionary rates, selection, and time since duplication are needed to fully explain these patterns in the mitochondrial genome. PMID:22543055

  18. Duplication of OsHAP family genes and their association with heading date in rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiuping; Yan, Wenhao; Chen, Huaxia; Tan, Cong; Han, Zhongmin; Yao, Wen; Li, Guangwei; Yuan, Mengqi; Xing, Yongzhong

    2016-03-01

    Heterotrimeric Heme Activator Protein (HAP) family genes are involved in the regulation of flowering in plants. It is not clear how many HAP genes regulate heading date in rice. In this study, we identified 35 HAP genes, including seven newly identified genes, and performed gene duplication and candidate gene-based association analyses. Analyses showed that segmental duplication and tandem duplication are the main mechanisms of HAP gene duplication. Expression profiling and functional identification indicated that duplication probably diversifies the functions of HAP genes. A nucleotide diversity analysis revealed that 13 HAP genes underwent selection. A candidate gene-based association analysis detected four HAP genes related to heading date. An investigation of transgenic plants or mutants of 23 HAP genes confirmed that overexpression of at least four genes delayed heading date under long-day conditions, including the previously cloned Ghd8/OsHAP3H. Our results indicate that the large number of HAP genes in rice was mainly produced by gene duplication, and a few HAP genes function to regulate heading date. Selection of HAP genes is probably caused by their diverse functions rather than regulation of heading.

  19. The evolutionary fate of alternatively spliced homologous exons after gene duplication.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Federico; Tress, Michael L; Valencia, Alfonso

    2015-04-29

    Alternative splicing and gene duplication are the two main processes responsible for expanding protein functional diversity. Although gene duplication can generate new genes and alternative splicing can introduce variation through alternative gene products, the interplay between the two processes is complex and poorly understood. Here, we have carried out a study of the evolution of alternatively spliced exons after gene duplication to better understand the interaction between the two processes. We created a manually curated set of 97 human genes with mutually exclusively spliced homologous exons and analyzed the evolution of these exons across five distantly related vertebrates (lamprey, spotted gar, zebrafish, fugu, and coelacanth). Most of these exons had an ancient origin (more than 400 Ma). We found examples supporting two extreme evolutionary models for the behaviour of homologous axons after gene duplication. We observed 11 events in which gene duplication was accompanied by splice isoform separation, that is, each paralog specifically conserved just one distinct ancestral homologous exon. At other extreme, we identified genes in which the homologous exons were always conserved within paralogs, suggesting that the alternative splicing event cannot easily be separated from the function in these genes. That many homologous exons fall in between these two extremes highlights the diversity of biological systems and suggests that the subtle balance between alternative splicing and gene duplication is adjusted to the specific cellular context of each gene.

  20. Genome duplication and multiple evolutionary origins of complex migratory behavior in Salmonidae.

    PubMed

    Alexandrou, Markos A; Swartz, Brian A; Matzke, Nicholas J; Oakley, Todd H

    2013-12-01

    Multiple rounds of whole genome duplication have repeatedly marked the evolution of vertebrates, and correlate strongly with morphological innovation. However, less is known about the behavioral, physiological and ecological consequences of genome duplication, and whether these events coincide with major transitions in vertebrate complexity. The complex behavior of anadromy - where adult fishes migrate up rivers from the sea to their natal site to spawn - is well known in salmonid fishes. Some hypotheses suggest that migratory behavior evolved as a consequence of an ancestral genome duplication event, which permitted salinity tolerance and osmoregulatory plasticity. Here we test whether anadromy evolved multiple times within salmonids, and whether genome duplication coincided with the evolution of anadromy. We present a method that uses ancestral character simulation data to plot the frequency of character transitions over a time calibrated phylogenetic tree to provide estimates of the absolute timing of character state transitions. Furthermore, we incorporate extinct and extant taxa to improve on previous estimates of divergence times. We present the first phylogenetic evidence indicating that anadromy evolved at least twice from freshwater salmonid ancestors. Results suggest that genome duplication did not coincide in time with changes in migratory behavior, but preceded a transition to anadromy by 55-50 million years. Our study represents the first attempt to estimate the absolute timing of a complex behavioral trait in relation to a genome duplication event.

  1. Extensive divergence in alternative splicing patterns after gene and genome duplication during the evolutionary history of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peter G; Huang, Suzanne Z; Pin, Anne-Laure; Adams, Keith L

    2010-07-01

    Gene duplication at various scales, from single gene duplication to whole-genome (WG) duplication, has occurred throughout eukaryotic evolution and contributed greatly to the large number of duplicated genes in the genomes of many eukaryotes. Previous studies have shown divergence in expression patterns of many duplicated genes at various evolutionary time scales and cases of gain of a new function or expression pattern by one duplicate or partitioning of functions or expression patterns between duplicates. Alternative splicing (AS) is a fundamental aspect of the expression of many genes that can increase gene product diversity and affect gene regulation. However, the evolution of AS patterns of genes duplicated by polyploidy, as well as in a sizable number of duplicated gene pairs in plants, has not been examined. Here, we have characterized conservation and divergence in AS patterns in genes duplicated by a polyploidy event during the evolutionary history of Arabidopsis thaliana. We used reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to assay 104 WG duplicates in six organ types and in plants grown under three abiotic stress treatments to detect organ- and stress-specific patterns of AS. Differences in splicing patterns in one or more organs, or under stress conditions, were found between the genes in a large majority of the duplicated pairs. In a few cases, AS patterns were the same between duplicates only under one or more abiotic stress treatments and not under normal growing conditions or vice versa. We also examined AS in 42 tandem duplicates and we found patterns of AS roughly comparable with the genes duplicated by polyploidy. The alternatively spliced forms in some of the genes created premature stop codons that would result in missing or partial functional domains if the transcripts are translated, which could affect gene function and cause functional divergence between duplicates. Our results indicate that AS patterns have diverged considerably after

  2. Co-Circulation of 72bp Duplication Group A and 60bp Duplication Group B Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Strains in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia during 2014.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Anwar; Haider, Shakir H; Parveen, Shama; Arshad, Mohammed; Alsenaidy, Hytham A; Baaboud, Alawi Omar; Mobaireek, Khalid Fahad; AlSaadi, Muslim Mohammed; Alsenaidy, Abdulrahman M; Sullender, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important viral pathogen of acute respiratory tract infection (ARI). Limited data are available on molecular epidemiology of RSV from Saudi Arabia. A total of 130 nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from children less than 5 years of age with ARI symptoms attending the Emergency Department at King Khalid University Hospital and King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia between October and December, 2014. RSV was identified in the 26% of the hospitalized children by reverse transcriptase PCR. Group A RSV (77%) predominated during the study as compared to group B RSV (23%). The phylogenetic analysis of 28 study strains clustered group A RSV in NA1 and ON1 genotypes and group B viruses in BA (BA9) genotype. Interestingly, 26% of the positive samples clustered in genotypes with duplication in the G protein gene (ON1 for group A and BA for group B). Both the genotypes showed enhanced O-linked glycosylation in the duplicated region, with 10 and 2 additional sites in ON1 and BA respectively. Selection pressure analysis revealed purifying selection in both the ON1 and BA genotypes. One codon each in the ON1 (position 274) and BA genotypes (position 219) were positively selected and had high entropy values indicating variations at these amino acid positions. This is the first report describing the presence of ON1 genotype and the first report on co-circulation of two different genotypes of RSV with duplication in the G protein gene from Saudi Arabia. The clinical implications of the simultaneous occurrence of genotypes with duplication in G protein gene in a given population especially in the concurrent infections should be investigated in future. Further, the ongoing surveillance of RSV in this region will reveal the evolutionary trajectory of these two genotypes with duplication in G protein gene from largest country in the Middle East.

  3. Co-Circulation of 72bp Duplication Group A and 60bp Duplication Group B Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Strains in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia during 2014

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Anwar; Haider, Shakir H.; Parveen, Shama; Arshad, Mohammed; Alsenaidy, Hytham A.; Baaboud, Alawi Omar; Mobaireek, Khalid Fahad; AlSaadi, Muslim Mohammed; Alsenaidy, Abdulrahman M.; Sullender, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important viral pathogen of acute respiratory tract infection (ARI). Limited data are available on molecular epidemiology of RSV from Saudi Arabia. A total of 130 nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from children less than 5 years of age with ARI symptoms attending the Emergency Department at King Khalid University Hospital and King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia between October and December, 2014. RSV was identified in the 26% of the hospitalized children by reverse transcriptase PCR. Group A RSV (77%) predominated during the study as compared to group B RSV (23%). The phylogenetic analysis of 28 study strains clustered group A RSV in NA1 and ON1 genotypes and group B viruses in BA (BA9) genotype. Interestingly, 26% of the positive samples clustered in genotypes with duplication in the G protein gene (ON1 for group A and BA for group B). Both the genotypes showed enhanced O-linked glycosylation in the duplicated region, with 10 and 2 additional sites in ON1 and BA respectively. Selection pressure analysis revealed purifying selection in both the ON1 and BA genotypes. One codon each in the ON1 (position 274) and BA genotypes (position 219) were positively selected and had high entropy values indicating variations at these amino acid positions. This is the first report describing the presence of ON1 genotype and the first report on co-circulation of two different genotypes of RSV with duplication in the G protein gene from Saudi Arabia. The clinical implications of the simultaneous occurrence of genotypes with duplication in G protein gene in a given population especially in the concurrent infections should be investigated in future. Further, the ongoing surveillance of RSV in this region will reveal the evolutionary trajectory of these two genotypes with duplication in G protein gene from largest country in the Middle East. PMID:27835664

  4. Enhanced fixation and preservation of a newly arisen duplicate gene by masking deleterious loss-of-function mutations.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kentaro M; Takahasi, K Ryo; Takano-Shimizu, Toshiyuki

    2009-08-01

    Segmental duplications are enriched within many eukaryote genomes, and their potential consequence is gene duplication. While previous theoretical studies of gene duplication have mainly focused on the gene silencing process after fixation, the process leading to fixation is even more important for segmental duplications, because the majority of duplications would be lost before reaching a significant frequency in a population. Here, by a series of computer simulations, we show that purifying selection against loss-of-function mutations increases the fixation probability of a new duplicate gene, especially when the gene is haplo-insufficient. Theoretically, the probability of simultaneous preservation of both duplicate genes becomes twice the loss-of-function mutation rate (u(c)) when the population size (N), the degree of dominance of mutations (h) and the recombination rate between the duplicate genes (c) are all sufficiently large (Nu(c)>1, h>0.1 and c>u(c)). The preservation probability declines rapidly with h and becomes 0 when h=0 (haplo-sufficiency). We infer that masking deleterious loss-of-function mutations give duplicate genes an immediate selective advantage and, together with effects of increased gene dosage, would predominantly determine the fates of the duplicate genes in the early phase of their evolution.

  5. Age distribution of human gene families shows significant roles of both large- and small-scale duplications in vertebrate evolution.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xun; Wang, Yufeng; Gu, Jianying

    2002-06-01

    The classical (two-round) hypothesis of vertebrate genome duplication proposes two successive whole-genome duplication(s) (polyploidizations) predating the origin of fishes, a view now being seriously challenged. As the debate largely concerns the relative merits of the 'big-bang mode' theory (large-scale duplication) and the 'continuous mode' theory (constant creation by small-scale duplications), we tested whether a significant proportion of paralogous genes in the contemporary human genome was indeed generated in the early stage of vertebrate evolution. After an extensive search of major databases, we dated 1,739 gene duplication events from the phylogenetic analysis of 749 vertebrate gene families. We found a pattern characterized by two waves (I, II) and an ancient component. Wave I represents a recent gene family expansion by tandem or segmental duplications, whereas wave II, a rapid paralogous gene increase in the early stage of vertebrate evolution, supports the idea of genome duplication(s) (the big-bang mode). Further analysis indicated that large- and small-scale gene duplications both make a significant contribution during the early stage of vertebrate evolution to build the current hierarchy of the human proteome.

  6. The ace-1 Locus Is Amplified in All Resistant Anopheles gambiae Mosquitoes: Fitness Consequences of Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Duplications

    PubMed Central

    Djogbénou, Luc S.; Berthomieu, Arnaud; Makoundou, Patrick; Baba-Moussa, Lamine S.; Fiston-Lavier, Anna-Sophie; Belkhir, Khalid; Labbé, Pierrick; Weill, Mylène

    2016-01-01

    Gene copy-number variations are widespread in natural populations, but investigating their phenotypic consequences requires contemporary duplications under selection. Such duplications have been found at the ace-1 locus (encoding the organophosphate and carbamate insecticides’ target) in the mosquito Anopheles gambiae (the major malaria vector); recent studies have revealed their intriguing complexity, consistent with the involvement of various numbers and types (susceptible or resistant to insecticide) of copies. We used an integrative approach, from genome to phenotype level, to investigate the influence of duplication architecture and gene-dosage on mosquito fitness. We found that both heterogeneous (i.e., one susceptible and one resistant ace-1 copy) and homogeneous (i.e., identical resistant copies) duplications segregated in field populations. The number of copies in homogeneous duplications was variable and positively correlated with acetylcholinesterase activity and resistance level. Determining the genomic structure of the duplicated region revealed that, in both types of duplication, ace-1 and 11 other genes formed tandem 203kb amplicons. We developed a diagnostic test for duplications, which showed that ace-1 was amplified in all 173 resistant mosquitoes analyzed (field-collected in several African countries), in heterogeneous or homogeneous duplications. Each type was associated with different fitness trade-offs: heterogeneous duplications conferred an intermediate phenotype (lower resistance and fitness costs), whereas homogeneous duplications tended to increase both resistance and fitness cost, in a complex manner. The type of duplication selected seemed thus to depend on the intensity and distribution of selection pressures. This versatility of trade-offs available through gene duplication highlights the importance of large mutation events in adaptation to environmental variation. This impressive adaptability could have a major impact on vector

  7. Cyclin E in centrosome duplication and reduplication in sea urchin zygotes.

    PubMed

    Schnackenberg, Bradley J; Marzluff, William F; Sluder, Greenfield

    2008-12-01

    When protein synthesis is completely blocked from before fertilization, the sea urchin zygote arrests in first S phase and the paternal centrosome reduplicates multiple times. However, when protein synthesis is blocked starting in prophase of first mitosis, the zygote divides and the blastomeres arrest in a G1-like state. The centrosome inherited from this mitosis duplicates only once in each blastomere for reasons that are not understood. The late G1 rise in cyclin E/cdk2 kinase activity initiates centrosome duplication in mammalian cells and its activity is needed for centrosome duplication in Xenopus egg extracts. Since the half-time for cyclin E turnover is normally approximately 1 h in sea urchin zygotes, the different behaviors of centrosomes during G1 and S phase arrests could be due to differential losses of cyclin E and its associated kinase activities at these two arrest points. To better understand the mechanisms that limit centrosome duplication, we characterize the levels of cyclin E and its associated kinase activity at the S phase and G1 arrest points. We first demonstrate that cyclin E/cdk2 kinase activity is required for centrosome duplication and reduplication in sea urchin zygotes. Next we find that cyclin E levels and cyclin E/cdk2 kinase activities are both constitutively and equivalently elevated during both the S phase and G1 arrests. This indicates that centrosome duplication during the G1 arrest is limited by a block to reduplication under conditions permissive for duplication. The cytoplasmic conditions of S phase, however, abrogate this block to reduplication.

  8. Whole genome duplication events in plant evolution reconstructed and predicted using myosin motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The evolution of land plants is characterized by whole genome duplications (WGD), which drove species diversification and evolutionary novelties. Detecting these events is especially difficult if they date back to the origin of the plant kingdom. Established methods for reconstructing WGDs include intra- and inter-genome comparisons, KS age distribution analyses, and phylogenetic tree constructions. Results By analysing 67 completely sequenced plant genomes 775 myosins were identified and manually assembled. Phylogenetic trees of the myosin motor domains revealed orthologous and paralogous relationships and were consistent with recent species trees. Based on the myosin inventories and the phylogenetic trees, we have identified duplications of the entire myosin motor protein family at timings consistent with 23 WGDs, that had been reported before. We also predict 6 WGDs based on further protein family duplications. Notably, the myosin data support the two recently reported WGDs in the common ancestor of all extant angiosperms. We predict single WGDs in the Manihot esculenta and Nicotiana benthamiana lineages, two WGDs for Linum usitatissimum and Phoenix dactylifera, and a triplication or two WGDs for Gossypium raimondii. Our data show another myosin duplication in the ancestor of the angiosperms that could be either the result of a single gene duplication or a remnant of a WGD. Conclusions We have shown that the myosin inventories in angiosperms retain evidence of numerous WGDs that happened throughout plant evolution. In contrast to other protein families, many myosins are still present in extant species. They are closely related and have similar domain architectures, and their phylogenetic grouping follows the genome duplications. Because of its broad taxonomic sampling the dataset provides the basis for reliable future identification of further whole genome duplications. PMID:24053117

  9. NASAwide electronic publishing system: Electronic printing and duplicating, stage-2 evaluation report (GSFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuey, Richard C.; Lane, Robert; Hart, Susan V.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Scientific and Technical Information Office was assigned the responsibility to continue with the expansion of the NASAwide networked electronic duplicating effort by including the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) as an additional node to the existing configuration of networked electronic duplicating systems within NASA. The subject of this report is the evaluation of a networked electronic duplicating system which meets the duplicating requirements and expands electronic publishing capabilities without increasing current operating costs. This report continues the evaluation reported in 'NASA Electronic Publishing System - Electronic Printing and Duplicating Evaluation Report' (NASA TM-106242) and 'NASA Electronic Publishing System - Stage 1 Evaluation Report' (NASA TM-106510). This report differs from the previous reports through the inclusion of an external networked desktop editing, archival, and publishing functionality which did not exist with the previous networked electronic duplicating system. Additionally, a two-phase approach to the evaluation was undertaken; the first was a paper study justifying a 90-day, on-site evaluation, and the second phase was to validate, during the 90-day evaluation, the cost benefits and productivity increases that could be achieved in an operational mode. A benchmark of the functionality of the networked electronic publishing system and external networked desktop editing, archival, and publishing system was performed under a simulated daily production environment. This report can be used to guide others in determining the most cost effective duplicating/publishing alternative through the use of cost/benefit analysis and return on investment techniques. A treatise on the use of these techniques can be found by referring to 'NASA Electronic Publishing System -Cost/Benefit Methodology' (NASA TM-106662).

  10. Chromosome 17 Centromere Duplication and Responsiveness to Anthracycline-Based Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Breast Cancer12

    PubMed Central

    Tibau, Ariadna; López-Vilaró, Laura; Pérez-Olabarria, Maitane; Vázquez, Tania; Pons, Cristina; Gich, Ignasi; Alonso, Carmen; Ojeda, Belén; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Lerma, Enrique; Barnadas, Agustí; Escuin, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2A) genes have been proposed as predictive biomarkers of sensitivity to anthracycline chemotherapy. Recently, chromosome 17 centromere enumeration probe (CEP17) duplication has also been associated with increased responsiveness to anthracyclines. However, reports are conflicting and none of these tumor markers can yet be considered a clinically reliable predictor of response to anthracyclines. We studied the association of TOP2A gene alterations, HER2 gene amplification, and CEP17 duplication with response to anthracycline-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy in 140 patients with operable or locally advanced breast cancer. HER2 was tested by fluorescence in situ hybridization and TOP2A and CEP17 by chromogenic in situ hybridization. Thirteen patients (9.3%) achieved pathologic complete response (pCR). HER2 amplification was present in 24 (17.5%) of the tumors. TOP2A amplification occurred in seven tumors (5.1%). CEP17 duplication was detected in 13 patients (9.5%). CEP17 duplication correlated with a higher rate of pCR [odds ratio (OR) 6.55, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.25-34.29, P = .026], and analysis of TOP2A amplification showed a trend bordering on statistical significance (OR 6.97, 95% CI 0.96-50.12, P = .054). TOP2A amplification and CEP17 duplication combined were strongly associated with pCR (OR 6.71, 95% CI 1.66-27.01, P = .007). HER2 amplification did not correlate with pCR. Our results suggest that CEP17 duplication predicts pCR to primary anthracycline-based chemotherapy. CEP17 duplication, TOP2A amplifications, and HER2 amplifications were not associated with prognosis. PMID:25379022

  11. Interaction between ROCK II and nucleophosmin/B23 in the regulation of centrosome duplication.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiyong; Kanai, Masayuki; Kawamura, Kenji; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Ye, Keqiang; Fukasawa, Kenji

    2006-12-01

    Nucleophosmin (NPM)/B23 has been implicated in the regulation of centrosome duplication. NPM/B23 localizes between two centrioles in the unduplicated centrosome. Upon phosphorylation on Thr(199) by cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2)/cyclin E, the majority of centrosomal NPM/B23 dissociates from centrosomes, but some NPM/B23 phosphorylated on Thr(199) remains at centrosomes. It has been shown that Thr(199) phosphorylation of NPM/B23 is critical for the physical separation of the paired centrioles, an initial event of the centrosome duplication process. Here, we identified ROCK II kinase, an effector of Rho small GTPase, as a protein that localizes to centrosomes and physically interacts with NPM/B23. Expression of the constitutively active form of ROCK II promotes centrosome duplication, while down-regulation of ROCK II expression results in the suppression of centrosome duplication, especially delaying the initiation of centrosome duplication during the cell cycle. Moreover, ROCK II regulates centrosome duplication in its kinase and centrosome localization activity-dependent manner. We further found that ROCK II kinase activity is significantly enhanced by binding to NPM/B23 and that NPM/B23 acquires a higher binding affinity to ROCK II upon phosphorylation on Thr(199). Moreover, physical interaction between ROCK II and NPM/B23 in vivo occurs in association with CDK2/cyclin E activation and the emergence of Thr(199)-phosphorylated NPM/B23. All these findings point to ROCK II as the effector of the CDK2/cyclin E-NPM/B23 pathway in the regulation of centrosome duplication.

  12. Comparative analysis of teleost fish genomes reveals preservation of different ancient clock duplicates in different fishes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han

    2008-06-01

    Clock (Circadian locomotor output cycle kaput) was the first vertebrate circadian clock gene identified in a mouse forward genetics mutagenesis screen. It encodes a bHLH-PAS protein that is highly conserved throughout evolution. Tetrapods also have the second Clock gene, Clock2 or Npas2 (Neuronal PAS domain protein 2). Conversely, the fruit fly, an invertebrate, has only one clock gene. Interrogation of the five teleost fish genome databases revealed that the zebrafish and the Japanese pufferfish (fugu) each have three clock genes, whereas the green spotted pufferfish (tetraodon), the Japanese medaka fish and the three-spine stickleback each have two clock genes. Phylogenetic and splice site analyses indicated that zebrafish and fugu each have two clock1 genes, clock1a and clock1b and one clock2; tetraodon also have clock1a and clock1b but do not have clock2; and medaka and stickleback each have clock1b and one clock2. Genome neighborhood analysis further showed that clock1a/clock1b in zebrafish, fugu and tetraodon is an ancient duplicate. While the dN/dS ratios of these three fish clock duplicates are all <1, indicating that purifying selection has acted upon them; the Tajima relative rate test showed that all three fish clock duplicates have asymmetric evolutionary rates, implicating that one of these duplicates have been under positive selection or relaxed functional constraint. These results support the view that teleost fish clock genes were generated from an ancient genome-wide duplication, and differential gene loss after the duplication resulted in retention of different ancient duplicates in different teleost fishes, which could have contributed to the evolution of the distinct fish circadian clock mechanisms.

  13. Chromosome 17 centromere duplication and responsiveness to anthracycline-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tibau, Ariadna; López-Vilaró, Laura; Pérez-Olabarria, Maitane; Vázquez, Tania; Pons, Cristina; Gich, Ignasi; Alonso, Carmen; Ojeda, Belén; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Lerma, Enrique; Barnadas, Agustí; Escuin, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2A) genes have been proposed as predictive biomarkers of sensitivity to anthracycline chemotherapy. Recently, chromosome 17 centromere enumeration probe (CEP17) duplication has also been associated with increased responsiveness to anthracyclines. However, reports are conflicting and none of these tumor markers can yet be considered a clinically reliable predictor of response to anthracyclines. We studied the association of TOP2A gene alterations, HER2 gene amplification, and CEP17 duplication with response to anthracycline-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy in 140 patients with operable or locally advanced breast cancer. HER2 was tested by fluorescence in situ hybridization and TOP2A and CEP17 by chromogenic in situ hybridization. Thirteen patients (9.3%) achieved pathologic complete response (pCR). HER2 amplification was present in 24 (17.5%) of the tumors. TOP2A amplification occurred in seven tumors (5.1%). CEP17 duplication was detected in 13 patients (9.5%). CEP17 duplication correlated with a higher rate of pCR [odds ratio (OR) 6.55, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.25-34.29, P = .026], and analysis of TOP2A amplification showed a trend bordering on statistical significance (OR 6.97, 95% CI 0.96-50.12, P = .054). TOP2A amplification and CEP17 duplication combined were strongly associated with pCR (OR 6.71, 95% CI 1.66-27.01, P = .007). HER2 amplification did not correlate with pCR. Our results suggest that CEP17 duplication predicts pCR to primary anthracycline-based chemotherapy. CEP17 duplication, TOP2A amplifications, and HER2 amplifications were not associated with prognosis.

  14. Case report of individual with cutaneous immunodeficiency and novel 1p36 duplication

    PubMed Central

    Hatter, Alyn D; Soler, David C; Curtis, Christine; Cooper, Kevin D; McCormick, Thomas S

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Crusted or Norwegian scabies is an infectious skin dermatopathology usually associated with an underlying immunodeficiency condition. It is caused when the mite Sarcoptes scabiei infects the skin, and the immune system is unable to control its spread, leading to a massive hyperinfestation with a simultaneous inflammatory and hyperkeratotic reaction. This is the first report of a novel 1p36 duplication associated with a recurrent infection of crusted scabies. Case report We describe a 34-year-old patient with a cutaneous immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent crusted scabies infestation, diffuse tinea, and recurrent staphylococcal cellulitis, who we suspected had an undiagnosed syndrome. The patient also suffered from mental retardation, renal failure, and premature senescence. A cytogenetic fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis revealed a 9.34 Mb duplication within the short (p) arm of chromosome 1, precisely from 1p36.11 to 1p36.21, with an adjacent 193 kb copy gain entirely within 1p36.11. In addition, chromosome 4 had a 906 kb gain in 4p16.1 and chromosome 9 had a 81 kb copy gain in 9p24.3. Over 100 genes localized within these duplicated regions. Gene expression array revealed 82 genes whose expression changed >1.5-fold compared to a healthy age-matched skin control, but among them only the lipolytic enzyme arylacetamide deacetylase-like 3 was found within the duplicated 1p36 region of chromosome 1. Discussion Although genetic duplications in the 1p36 region have been previously described, our report describes a novel duplicative variant within the 1p36 region. The patient did not have a past history of immunosuppression but was afflicted by a recurrent case of crusted scabies, raising the possibility that the recurrent infection was associated with the 1p36 genetic duplication. Conclusion To our knowledge, the specific duplicated sequence between 1p36.11 and p36.21 found in our patient has never been previously reported. We reviewed and

  15. Exhaustive computation of exact duplications via super and non-nested local maximal repeats.

    PubMed

    Taillefer, Eddy; Miller, Jonathan

    2014-02-01

    We propose and implement a method to obtain all duplicated sequences (repeats) from a chromosome or whole genome. Unlike existing approaches our method makes it possible to simultaneously identify and classify repeats into super, local, and non-nested local maximal repeats. Computation verification demonstrates that maximal repeats for a genome of several gigabases can be identified in a reasonable time, enabling us to identified these maximal repeats for any sequenced genome. The algorithm used for the identification relies on enhanced suffix array data structure to achieve practical space and time efficiency, to identify and classify the maximal repeats, and to perform further post-processing on the identified duplicated sequences. The simplicity and effectiveness of the implementation makes the method readily extendible to more sophisticated computations. Maxmers can be exhaustively accounted for in few minutes for genome sequences of dozen megabases in length and in less than a day or two for genome sequences of few gigabases in length. One application of duplicated sequence identification is to the study of duplicated sequence length distributions, which our found to exhibit for large lengths a persistent power-law behavior. Variation of estimated exponents of this power law are studied among different species and successive assembly release versions of the same species. This makes the characterization of the power-law regime of sequenced genomes via maximal repeats identification and classification, an important task for the derivation of models that would help us to elucidate sequence duplication and genome evolution.

  16. Mosaic gene conversion after a tandem duplication of mtDNA sequence in Diomedeidae (albatrosses).

    PubMed

    Eda, Masaki; Kuro-o, Masaki; Higuchi, Hiroyoshi; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Koike, Hiroko

    2010-04-01

    Although the tandem duplication of mitochondrial (mt) sequences, especially those of the control region (CR), has been detected in metazoan species, few studies have focused on the features of the duplicated sequence itself, such as the gene conversion rate, distribution patterns of the variation, and relative rates of evolution between the copies. To investigate the features of duplicated mt sequences, we partially sequenced the mt genome of 16 Phoebastria albatrosses belonging to three species (P. albatrus, P. nigripes, and P. immutabilis). More than 2,300 base pairs of tandemly-duplicated sequence were shared by all three species. The observed gene arrangement was shared in the three Phoebastria albatrosses and suggests that the duplication event occurred in the common ancestor of the three species. Most of the copies in each individual were identical or nearly identical, and were maintained through frequent gene conversions. By contrast, portions of CR domains I and III had different phylogenetic signals, suggesting that gene conversion had not occurred in those sections after the speciation of the three species. Several lines of data, including the heterogeneity of the rate of molecular evolution, nucleotide differences, and putative secondary structures, suggests that the two sequences in CR domain I are maintained through selection; however, additional studies into the mechanisms of gene conversion and mtDNA synthesis are required to confirm this hypothesis.

  17. The Doppelgänger Effect: Hidden Duplicates in Databases of Transcriptome Profiles.

    PubMed

    Waldron, Levi; Riester, Markus; Ramos, Marcel; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Birrer, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Whole-genome analysis of cancer specimens is commonplace, and investigators frequently share or re-use specimens in later studies. Duplicate expression profiles in public databases will impact re-analysis if left undetected, a so-called "doppelgänger" effect. We propose a method that should be routine practice to accurately match duplicate cancer transcriptomes when nucleotide-level sequence data are unavailable, even for samples profiled by different microarray technologies or by both microarray and RNA sequencing. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method in databases containing dozens of datasets and thousands of ovarian, breast, bladder, and colorectal cancer microarray profiles and of matching microarray and RNA sequencing expression profiles from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We identified probable duplicates among more than 50% of studies, originating in different continents, using different technologies, published years apart, and even within the TCGA itself. Finally, we provide the doppelgangR Bioconductor package for screening transcriptome databases for duplicates. Given the potential for unrecognized duplication to falsely inflate prediction accuracy and confidence in differential expression, doppelgänger-checking should be a part of standard procedure for combining multiple genomic datasets.

  18. The E2F-DP1 Transcription Factor Complex Regulates Centriole Duplication in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jacqueline G.; Liu, Yan; Williams, Christopher W.; Smith, Harold E.; O’Connell, Kevin F.

    2016-01-01

    Centrioles play critical roles in the organization of microtubule-based structures, from the mitotic spindle to cilia and flagella. In order to properly execute their various functions, centrioles are subjected to stringent copy number control. Central to this control mechanism is a precise duplication event that takes place during S phase of the cell cycle and involves the assembly of a single daughter centriole in association with each mother centriole . Recent studies have revealed that posttranslational control of the master regulator Plk4/ZYG-1 kinase and its downstream effector SAS-6 is key to ensuring production of a single daughter centriole. In contrast, relatively little is known about how centriole duplication is regulated at a transcriptional level. Here we show that the transcription factor complex EFL-1-DPL-1 both positively and negatively controls centriole duplication in the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo. Specifically, we find that down regulation of EFL-1-DPL-1 can restore centriole duplication in a zyg-1 hypomorphic mutant and that suppression of the zyg-1 mutant phenotype is accompanied by an increase in SAS-6 protein levels. Further, we find evidence that EFL-1-DPL-1 promotes the transcription of zyg-1 and other centriole duplication genes. Our results provide evidence that in a single tissue type, EFL-1-DPL-1 sets the balance between positive and negative regulators of centriole assembly and thus may be part of a homeostatic mechanism that governs centriole assembly. PMID:26772748

  19. The E2F-DP1 Transcription Factor Complex Regulates Centriole Duplication in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jacqueline G; Liu, Yan; Williams, Christopher W; Smith, Harold E; O'Connell, Kevin F

    2016-01-15

    Centrioles play critical roles in the organization of microtubule-based structures, from the mitotic spindle to cilia and flagella. In order to properly execute their various functions, centrioles are subjected to stringent copy number control. Central to this control mechanism is a precise duplication event that takes place during S phase of the cell cycle and involves the assembly of a single daughter centriole in association with each mother centriole . Recent studies have revealed that posttranslational control of the master regulator Plk4/ZYG-1 kinase and its downstream effector SAS-6 is key to ensuring production of a single daughter centriole. In contrast, relatively little is known about how centriole duplication is regulated at a transcriptional level. Here we show that the transcription factor complex EFL-1-DPL-1 both positively and negatively controls centriole duplication in the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo. Specifically, we find that down regulation of EFL-1-DPL-1 can restore centriole duplication in a zyg-1 hypomorphic mutant and that suppression of the zyg-1 mutant phenotype is accompanied by an increase in SAS-6 protein levels. Further, we find evidence that EFL-1-DPL-1 promotes the transcription of zyg-1 and other centriole duplication genes. Our results provide evidence that in a single tissue type, EFL-1-DPL-1 sets the balance between positive and negative regulators of centriole assembly and thus may be part of a homeostatic mechanism that governs centriole assembly.

  20. Trans-oligomerization of duplicated aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases maintains genetic code fidelity under stress

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Miguel Ángel; Napolitano, Mauro; Ochoa de Alda, Jesús A. G.; Santamaría-Gómez, Javier; Patterson, Carl J.; Foster, Andrew W.; Bru-Martínez, Roque; Robinson, Nigel J.; Luque, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) play a key role in deciphering the genetic message by producing charged tRNAs and are equipped with proofreading mechanisms to ensure correct pairing of tRNAs with their cognate amino acid. Duplicated aaRSs are very frequent in Nature, with 25,913 cases observed in 26,837 genomes. The oligomeric nature of many aaRSs raises the question of how the functioning and oligomerization of duplicated enzymes is organized. We characterized this issue in a model prokaryotic organism that expresses two different threonyl-tRNA synthetases, responsible for Thr-tRNAThr synthesis: one accurate and constitutively expressed (T1) and another (T2) with impaired proofreading activity that also generates mischarged Ser-tRNAThr. Low zinc promotes dissociation of dimeric T1 into monomers deprived of aminoacylation activity and simultaneous induction of T2, which is active for aminoacylation under low zinc. T2 either forms homodimers or heterodimerizes with T1 subunits that provide essential proofreading activity in trans. These findings evidence that in organisms with duplicated genes, cells can orchestrate the assemblage of aaRSs oligomers that meet the necessities of the cell in each situation. We propose that controlled oligomerization of duplicated aaRSs is an adaptive mechanism that can potentially be expanded to the plethora of organisms with duplicated oligomeric aaRSs. PMID:26464444

  1. Opposing Brain Differences in 16p11.2 Deletion and Duplication Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Abid Y.; Mueller, Sophia; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Mukherjee, Pratik; Berman, Jeffrey I.; Roberts, Timothy P.L.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.; Spiro, John E.; Chung, Wendy K.; Sherr, Elliott H.

    2014-01-01

    Deletions and duplications of the recurrent ∼600 kb chromosomal BP4–BP5 region of 16p11.2 are associated with a broad variety of neurodevelopmental outcomes including autism spectrum disorder. A clue to the pathogenesis of the copy number variant (CNV)'s effect on the brain is that the deletion is associated with a head size increase, whereas the duplication is associated with a decrease. Here we analyzed brain structure in a clinically ascertained group of human deletion (N = 25) and duplication (N = 17) carriers from the Simons Variation in Individuals Project compared with age-matched controls (N = 29 and 33, respectively). Multiple brain measures showed increased size in deletion carriers and reduced size in duplication carriers. The effects spanned global measures of intracranial volume, brain size, compartmental measures of gray matter and white matter, subcortical structures, and the cerebellum. Quantitatively, the largest effect was on the thalamus, but the collective results suggest a pervasive rather than a selective effect on the brain. Detailed analysis of cortical gray matter revealed that cortical surface area displays a strong dose-dependent effect of CNV (deletion > control > duplication), whereas average cortical thickness is less affected. These results suggest that the CNV may exert its opposing influences through mechanisms that influence early stages of embryonic brain development. PMID:25143601

  2. A Wandering Abdominal Mass in a Neonate: An Enteric Duplication Cyst Mimicking an Ovarian Cyst

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Enteric duplication cysts are rare congenital anomalies that are prenatally diagnosed through antenatal ultrasonography (US). In female patients, however, attention must be paid since these formations might be confused with ovarian cysts. Herein, we present a case of a low birth weight female infant with an enteric duplication cyst. A cystic lesion was detected in the right abdomen of the fetus on antenatal US and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Serial US and MRI examinations performed after birth showed a single cyst that wandered from side to side in the abdomen; the initial diagnosis was thought to be an ovarian cyst. During laparotomy, however, it was found to be an enteric duplication cyst with volvulus. To our knowledge, there has been no report of an enteric duplication cyst presenting as a wandering abdominal mass. Our experience indicates that early intervention is necessary for patients who have a wandering abdominal mass to avoid complications and urgent surgery, whether it is an ovarian cyst or an enteric duplication cyst. PMID:28348910

  3. Gene Duplication, Population Genomics, and Species-Level Differentiation within a Tropical Mountain Shrub

    PubMed Central

    Mastretta-Yanes, Alicia; Zamudio, Sergio; Jorgensen, Tove H.; Arrigo, Nils; Alvarez, Nadir; Piñero, Daniel; Emerson, Brent C.

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplication leads to paralogy, which complicates the de novo assembly of genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) data. The issue of paralogous genes is exacerbated in plants, because they are particularly prone to gene duplication events. Paralogs are normally filtered from GBS data before undertaking population genomics or phylogenetic analyses. However, gene duplication plays an important role in the functional diversification of genes and it can also lead to the formation of postzygotic barriers. Using populations and closely related species of a tropical mountain shrub, we examine 1) the genomic differentiation produced by putative orthologs, and 2) the distribution of recent gene duplication among lineages and geography. We find high differentiation among populations from isolated mountain peaks and species-level differentiation within what is morphologically described as a single species. The inferred distribution of paralogs among populations is congruent with taxonomy and shows that GBS could be used to examine recent gene duplication as a source of genomic differentiation of nonmodel species. PMID:25223767

  4. Trans-oligomerization of duplicated aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases maintains genetic code fidelity under stress.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Miguel Ángel; Napolitano, Mauro; Ochoa de Alda, Jesús A G; Santamaría-Gómez, Javier; Patterson, Carl J; Foster, Andrew W; Bru-Martínez, Roque; Robinson, Nigel J; Luque, Ignacio

    2015-11-16

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) play a key role in deciphering the genetic message by producing charged tRNAs and are equipped with proofreading mechanisms to ensure correct pairing of tRNAs with their cognate amino acid. Duplicated aaRSs are very frequent in Nature, with 25,913 cases observed in 26,837 genomes. The oligomeric nature of many aaRSs raises the question of how the functioning and oligomerization of duplicated enzymes is organized. We characterized this issue in a model prokaryotic organism that expresses two different threonyl-tRNA synthetases, responsible for Thr-tRNA(Thr) synthesis: one accurate and constitutively expressed (T1) and another (T2) with impaired proofreading activity that also generates mischarged Ser-tRNA(Thr). Low zinc promotes dissociation of dimeric T1 into monomers deprived of aminoacylation activity and simultaneous induction of T2, which is active for aminoacylation under low zinc. T2 either forms homodimers or heterodimerizes with T1 subunits that provide essential proofreading activity in trans. These findings evidence that in organisms with duplicated genes, cells can orchestrate the assemblage of aaRSs oligomers that meet the necessities of the cell in each situation. We propose that controlled oligomerization of duplicated aaRSs is an adaptive mechanism that can potentially be expanded to the plethora of organisms with duplicated oligomeric aaRSs.

  5. The SCF ubiquitin ligase protein slimb regulates centrosome duplication in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, E J; Glover, D M; Hays, T S

    2000-09-21

    The duplication of the centrosome is a key event in the cell-division cycle. Although defects in centrosome duplication are thought to contribute to genomic instability [1-3] and are a hallmark of certain transformed cells and human cancer [4-6], the mechanism responsible for centrosome duplication is not understood. Recent experiments have established that centrosome duplication requires the activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) and cyclins E and A [7-9]. The stability of cyclin E is regulated by the ubiquitin ligase SCF, which is a protein complex composed of Skp1, Cdc53 (Cullin) and F-box proteins [10-12]. The Skp1 and Cullin components have been detected on mammalian centrosomes, and shown to be essential for centrosome duplication and separation in Xenopus [13]. Here, we report that Slimb, an F-box protein that targets proteins to the SCFcomplex [14,15], plays a role in limiting centrosome replication. We found that, in the fruit fly Drosophila, the hypomorphic mutation slimb(crd) causes the appearance of additional centrosomes and mitotic defects in mutant larval neuroblasts.

  6. The Balance between Recombination Enzymes and Accessory Replicative Helicases in Facilitating Genome Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Syeda, Aisha H.; Atkinson, John; Lloyd, Robert G.; McGlynn, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Accessory replicative helicases aid the primary replicative helicase in duplicating protein-bound DNA, especially transcribed DNA. Recombination enzymes also aid genome duplication by facilitating the repair of DNA lesions via strand exchange and also processing of blocked fork DNA to generate structures onto which the replisome can be reloaded. There is significant interplay between accessory helicases and recombination enzymes in both bacteria and lower eukaryotes but how these replication repair systems interact to ensure efficient genome duplication remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the DNA content defects of Escherichia coli cells lacking the strand exchange protein RecA are driven primarily by conflicts between replication and transcription, as is the case in cells lacking the accessory helicase Rep. However, in contrast to Rep, neither RecA nor RecBCD, the helicase/exonuclease that loads RecA onto dsDNA ends, is important for maintaining rapid chromosome duplication. Furthermore, RecA and RecBCD together can sustain viability in the absence of accessory replicative helicases but only when transcriptional barriers to replication are suppressed by an RNA polymerase mutation. Our data indicate that the minimisation of replisome pausing by accessory helicases has a more significant impact on successful completion of chromosome duplication than recombination-directed fork repair. PMID:27483323

  7. Two Rounds of Whole Genome Duplication in the AncestralVertebrate

    SciTech Connect

    Dehal, Paramvir; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-04-12

    The hypothesis that the relatively large and complex vertebrate genome was created by two ancient, whole genome duplications has been hotly debated, but remains unresolved. We reconstructed the evolutionary relationships of all gene families from the complete gene sets of a tunicate, fish, mouse, and human, then determined when each gene duplicated relative to the evolutionary tree of the organisms. We confirmed the results of earlier studies that there remains little signal of these events in numbers of duplicated genes, gene tree topology, or the number of genes per multigene family. However, when we plotted the genomic map positions of only the subset of paralogous genes that were duplicated prior to the fish-tetrapod split, their global physical organization provides unmistakable evidence of two distinct genome duplication events early in vertebrate evolution indicated by clear patterns of 4-way paralogous regions covering a large part of the human genome. Our results highlight the potential for these large-scale genomic events to have driven the evolutionary success of the vertebrate lineage.

  8. Convergent gene loss following gene and genome duplications creates single-copy families in flowering plants.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Riet; Adams, Keith L; Vandepoele, Klaas; Van Montagu, Marc C E; Maere, Steven; Van de Peer, Yves

    2013-02-19

    The importance of gene gain through duplication has long been appreciated. In contrast, the importance of gene loss has only recently attracted attention. Indeed, studies in organisms ranging from plants to worms and humans suggest that duplication of some genes might be better tolerated than that of others. Here we have undertaken a large-scale study to investigate the existence of duplication-resistant genes in the sequenced genomes of 20 flowering plants. We demonstrate that there is a large set of genes that is convergently restored to single-copy status following multiple genome-wide and smaller scale duplication events. We rule out the possibility that such a pattern could be explained by random gene loss only and therefore propose that there is selection pressure to preserve such genes as singletons. This is further substantiated by the observation that angiosperm single-copy genes do not comprise a random fraction of the genome, but instead are often involved in essential housekeeping functions that are highly conserved across all eukaryotes. Furthermore, single-copy genes are generally expressed more highly and in more tissues than non-single-copy genes, and they exhibit higher sequence conservation. Finally, we propose different hypotheses to explain their resistance against duplication.

  9. Two complementary recessive genes in duplicated segments control etiolation in rice.

    PubMed

    Mao, Donghai; Yu, Huihui; Liu, Touming; Yang, Gaiyu; Xing, Yongzhong

    2011-02-01

    The main objective of this study was to identify the genes causing etiolation in a rice mutant, the thylakoids of which were scattered. Three populations were employed to map the genes for etiolation using bulked segregant analysis. Genetic analysis confirmed that etiolation was controlled by two recessive genes, et11 and et12, which were fine mapped to an approximately 147-kb region and an approximately 209-kb region on the short arms of chromosomes 11 and 12, respectively. Both regions were within the duplicated segments on chromosomes 11 and 12. They possessed a highly similar sequence of 38 kb at the locations of a pair of duplicated genes with protein sequences very similar to that of HCF152 in Arabidopsis that are required for the processing of chloroplast RNA. These genes are likely the candidates for et11 and et12. Expression profiling was used to compare the expression patterns of paralogs in the duplicated segments. Expression profiling indicated that the duplicated segments had been undergone concerted evolution, and a large number of the paralogs within the duplicated segments were functionally redundant like et11 and et12.

  10. Actin evolution in ciliates (Protist, Alveolata) is characterized by high diversity and three duplication events.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhenzhen; Huang, Lijuan; Yang, Ran; Lin, Xiaofeng; Song, Weibo

    2016-03-01

    Ciliates possess two distinct nuclear genomes and unique genomic features, including highly fragmented chromosomes and extensive chromosomal rearrangements. Recent transcriptomic surveys have revealed that ciliates have several multi-copy genes providing an ideal template to study gene family evolution. Nonetheless, this process remains little studied in ciliated protozoa and consequently, the evolutionary patterns that govern it are not well understood. In this study, we focused on obtaining fine-scale information relative to ciliate species divergence for the first time. A total of 230 actin gene sequences were derived from this study, among which 217 were from four closely related Pseudokeronopsis species and 13 from other hypotrichous ciliates. Our investigation shows that: (1) At least three duplication events occurred in ciliates: diversification of three actin genes (Actin I, II, III) happened after the divergence of ciliate classes but before that of subclasses. And several recent and genus-specific duplications were followed within Actin I (Sterkiella, Oxytricha, Uroleptus, etc.), Actin II (Sterkiella), respectively. (2) Within the genus Pseudokeronopsis, Actin I gene duplication events happened after P. carnea and P. erythrina diverged. In contrast, in the morphologically similar species P. flava and P. rubra, the duplication event preceded diversification of the two species. The Actin II gene duplication events preceded divergence of the genus Pseudokeronopsis. (3) Phylogenetic analyses revealed that actin is suitable for resolving ciliate classes, but may not be used to infer lower taxon relationships.

  11. The enrichment of TATA box and the scarcity of depleted proximal nucleosome in the promoters of duplicated yeast genes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yuseob; Lee, Jang H; Babbitt, Gregory A

    2010-01-01

    Population genetic theory of gene duplication suggests that the preservation of duplicate copies requires functional divergence upon duplication. Genes that can be readily modified to produce new gene expression patterns may thus be duplicated often. In yeast, genes exhibit dichotomous expression patterns based on their promoter architectures. The expression of genes that contain TATA box or occupied proximal nucleosome (OPN) tends to be variable and respond to external signals. On the other hand, genes without TATA box or with depleted proximal nucleosome (DPN) are expressed constitutively. We find that recent duplicates in the yeast genome are heavily biased to be TATA box containing genes and not to be DPN genes. This suggests that variably expressed genes, due to the functional organization in their promoters, have higher duplicability than constitutively expressed genes.

  12. Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease: identification of Xq22 proteolipid-protein duplications and characterization of breakpoints by interphase FISH.

    PubMed

    Woodward, K; Kendall, E; Vetrie, D; Malcolm, S

    1998-07-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is an X-linked, dysmyelinating disorder of the CNS. Duplications of the proteolipid protein (PLP) gene have been found in a proportion of patients, suggesting that, in addition to coding-region or splice-site mutations, overdosage of the gene can cause PMD. We show that the duplication can be detected by interphase FISH, using a PLP probe in five patients and their four asymptomatic carrier mothers. The extent of the duplication was analyzed in each family by interphase FISH, with probes from a 1. 7-Mb region surrounding the PLP gene between markers DXS83 and DXS94. A large duplication >=500 kb was detected, with breakpoints that differed, between families, at the proximal end. Distinct separation of the duplicated PLP signals could be seen only on metaphase chromosomes in one family, providing further evidence that different duplication events are involved. Quantitative fluorescent multiplex PCR was used to confirm the duplication in patients, by the detection of increased copy number of the PLP gene. Multiallelic markers from the duplicated region were analyzed, since the identification of two alleles in an affected boy would indicate a duplication. The majority of boys were homozygous for all four markers, compared with their mothers, who were heterozygous for one to three of the markers. These results suggest that intrachromosomal rearrangements may be a common mechanism by which duplications arise in PMD. One boy was heterozygous for the PLP marker, indicating a duplication and suggesting that interchromosomal rearrangements of maternal origin also can be involved. Since duplications are a major cause of PMD, we propose that interphase FISH is a reliable method for diagnosis and identification of female carriers.

  13. Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease: identification of Xq22 proteolipid-protein duplications and characterization of breakpoints by interphase FISH.

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, K; Kendall, E; Vetrie, D; Malcolm, S

    1998-01-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is an X-linked, dysmyelinating disorder of the CNS. Duplications of the proteolipid protein (PLP) gene have been found in a proportion of patients, suggesting that, in addition to coding-region or splice-site mutations, overdosage of the gene can cause PMD. We show that the duplication can be detected by interphase FISH, using a PLP probe in five patients and their four asymptomatic carrier mothers. The extent of the duplication was analyzed in each family by interphase FISH, with probes from a 1. 7-Mb region surrounding the PLP gene between markers DXS83 and DXS94. A large duplication >=500 kb was detected, with breakpoints that differed, between families, at the proximal end. Distinct separation of the duplicated PLP signals could be seen only on metaphase chromosomes in one family, providing further evidence that different duplication events are involved. Quantitative fluorescent multiplex PCR was used to confirm the duplication in patients, by the detection of increased copy number of the PLP gene. Multiallelic markers from the duplicated region were analyzed, since the identification of two alleles in an affected boy would indicate a duplication. The majority of boys were homozygous for all four markers, compared with their mothers, who were heterozygous for one to three of the markers. These results suggest that intrachromosomal rearrangements may be a common mechanism by which duplications arise in PMD. One boy was heterozygous for the PLP marker, indicating a duplication and suggesting that interchromosomal rearrangements of maternal origin also can be involved. Since duplications are a major cause of PMD, we propose that interphase FISH is a reliable method for diagnosis and identification of female carriers. PMID:9634530

  14. A rare case of plastid protein-coding gene duplication in the chloroplast genome of Euglena archaeoplastidiata (Euglenophyta).

    PubMed

    Bennett, Matthew S; Shiu, Shin-Han; Triemer, Richard E

    2017-03-12

    Gene duplication is an important evolutionary process that allows duplicate functions to diverge, or, in some cases, allows for new functional gains. However, in contrast to the nuclear genome, gene duplications within the chloroplast are extremely rare. Here, we present the chloroplast genome of the photosynthetic protist Euglena archaeoplastidiata. Upon annotation, it was found that the chloroplast genome contained a novel tandem direct duplication that encoded a portion of RuBisCO large subunit (rbcL) followed by a complete copy of ribosomal protein L32 (rpl32), as well as the associated intergenic sequences. Analyses of the duplicated rpl32 were inconclusive regarding selective pressures, although it was found that substitutions in the duplicated region, all non-synonymous, likely had a neutral functional effect. The duplicated region did not exhibit patterns consistent with previously described mechanisms for tandem direct duplications, and demonstrated an unknown mechanism of duplication. In addition, a comparison of this chloroplast genome to other previously characterized chloroplast genomes from the same family revealed characteristics that indicated E. archaeoplastidiata was probably more closely related to taxa in the genera Monomorphina, Cryptoglena, and Euglenaria than it was to other Euglena taxa. Taken together, the chloroplast genome of E. archaeoplastidiata demonstrated multiple characteristics unique to the euglenoid world, and has justified the longstanding curiosity regarding this enigmatic taxon.

  15. Analyses of nuclearly encoded mitochondrial genes suggest gene duplication as a mechanism for resolving intralocus sexually antagonistic conflict in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Gallach, Miguel; Chandrasekaran, Chitra; Betrán, Esther

    2010-01-01

    Gene duplication is probably the most important mechanism for generating new gene functions. However, gene duplication has been overlooked as a potentially effective way to resolve genetic conflicts. Here, we analyze the entire set of Drosophila melanogaster nuclearly encoded mitochondrial duplicate genes and show that both RNA- and DNA-mediated mitochondrial gene duplications exhibit an unexpectedly high rate of relocation (change in location between parental and duplicated gene) as well as an extreme tendency to avoid the X chromosome. These trends are likely related to our observation that relocated genes tend to have testis-specific expression. We also infer that these trends hold across the entire Drosophila genus. Importantly, analyses of gene ontology and functional interaction networks show that there is an overrepresentation of energy production-related functions in these mitochondrial duplicates. We discuss different hypotheses to explain our results and conclude that our findings substantiate the hypothesis that gene duplication for male germline function is likely a mechanism to resolve intralocus sexually antagonistic conflicts that we propose are common in testis. In the case of nuclearly encoded mitochondrial duplicates, our hypothesis is that past sexually antagonistic conflict related to mitochondrial energy function in Drosophila was resolved by gene duplication.

  16. NASA wide electronic publishing system: Electronic printing and duplicating. Stage 3 evaluation report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuey, Richard C.; Moore, Fred W.; Ryan, Christine A.

    1995-01-01

    The report is presented in four sections: The Introduction describes the duplicating configuration under evaluation and the Background contains a chronological description of the evaluation segmented by phases 1 and 2. This section includes the evaluation schedule, printing and duplicating requirements, storage and communication requirements, electronic publishing system configuration, existing processes and proposed processes, billing rates, costs and productivity analysis, and the return on investment based upon the data gathered to date. The third section contains the phase 1 comparative cost and productivity analysis. This analysis demonstrated that LaRC should proceed with a 90-day evaluation of the DocuTech and follow with a phase 2 cycle to actually demonstrate that the proposed system would meet the needs of LaRC's printing and duplicating requirements, benchmark results, cost comparisons, benchmark observations, and recommendations. These are documented after the recommendations.

  17. Three-Phase Scheme for Supporting Time-Constrained Data with Duplication in Wireless Broadcast Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao-Chun; Lin, Lien-Fa; Wang, Shih-Chia

    The wireless data broadcast techniques raised in 1990s. Since the wireless data dissemination techniques are emerged, more and more data services are proposed based on the wireless data broadcast techniques in these years. Among the new services, the time-constraint data broadcast service is critical for many real-time related applications, and has been studied in the recent years. However, the related works did not consider the duplicate pages of requests on data scheduling. Hence, in this paper, we consider the duplicate pages in the multi-page time-constraint data broadcast service. We first proposed a duplication page-optimized architecture for supporting the multi-page time-constraint data broadcast service. We then proposed a three-phase scheme for the time-slot sharing optimizer to improve the bandwidth utility of the TDA-based program. The experiments reveal that our proposed indeed significantly reduce the number of used channels for a data broadcast server.

  18. The PLK4–STIL–SAS-6 module at the core of centriole duplication

    PubMed Central

    Arquint, Christian; Nigg, Erich A.

    2016-01-01

    Centrioles are microtubule-based core components of centrosomes and cilia. They are duplicated exactly once during S-phase progression. Central to formation of each new (daughter) centriole is the formation of a nine-fold symmetrical cartwheel structure onto which microtubule triplets are deposited. In recent years, a module comprising the protein kinase polo-like kinase 4 (PLK4) and the two proteins STIL and SAS-6 have been shown to stay at the core of centriole duplication. Depletion of any one of these three proteins blocks centriole duplication and, conversely, overexpression causes centriole amplification. In this short review article, we summarize recent insights into how PLK4, STIL and SAS-6 co-operate in space and time to form a new centriole. These advances begin to shed light on the very first steps of centriole biogenesis. PMID:27911707

  19. Promotion and Suppression of Centriole Duplication Are Catalytically Coupled through PLK4 to Ensure Centriole Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minhee; O'Rourke, Brian P; Soni, Rajesh Kumar; Jallepalli, Prasad V; Hendrickson, Ronald C; Tsou, Meng-Fu Bryan

    2016-08-02

    PLK4 is the major kinase driving centriole duplication. Duplication occurs only once per cell cycle, forming one new (or daughter) centriole that is tightly engaged to the preexisting (or mother) centriole. Centriole engagement is known to block the reduplication of mother centrioles, but the molecular identity responsible for the block remains unclear. Here, we show that the centriolar cartwheel, the geometric scaffold for centriole assembly, forms the identity of daughter centrioles essential for the block, ceasing further duplication of the mother centriole to which it is engaged. To ensure a steady block, we found that the cartwheel requires constant maintenance by PLK4 through phosphorylation of the same substrate that drives centriole assembly, revealing a parsimonious control in which "assembly" and "block for new assembly" are linked through the same catalytic reaction to achieve homeostasis. Our results support a recently deduced model that the cartwheel-bound PLK4 directly suppresses centriole reduplication.

  20. The PLK4-STIL-SAS-6 module at the core of centriole duplication.

    PubMed

    Arquint, Christian; Nigg, Erich A

    2016-10-15

    Centrioles are microtubule-based core components of centrosomes and cilia. They are duplicated exactly once during S-phase progression. Central to formation of each new (daughter) centriole is the formation of a nine-fold symmetrical cartwheel structure onto which microtubule triplets are deposited. In recent years, a module comprising the protein kinase polo-like kinase 4 (PLK4) and the two proteins STIL and SAS-6 have been shown to stay at the core of centriole duplication. Depletion of any one of these three proteins blocks centriole duplication and, conversely, overexpression causes centriole amplification. In this short review article, we summarize recent insights into how PLK4, STIL and SAS-6 co-operate in space and time to form a new centriole. These advances begin to shed light on the very first steps of centriole biogenesis.

  1. Duodenal Duplication Cyst: A Rare Differential Diagnosis in a Neonate with Bilious Vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Župančić, Božidar; Gliha, Andro; Fuenzalida, Jose Varas; Višnjić, Stjepan

    2015-01-01

    Bilious vomiting is a relevant sign in neonates that requires immediate evaluation and diagnosis. A duplication of the intestinal tract is a possible cause of obstruction if located distally to the major duodenal papilla of Vater and most of them involve the jejunum, stomach, or colon. Duodenal duplications are very rare and can have an endoscopic or surgical treatment after diagnosis. We present a case of a 16-day-old term newborn that consulted because of bilious vomiting and after evaluation with imaging and upper endoscopy, a duodenal duplication cyst was found at the level of the third portion causing compression of the intestinal lumen that required surgical resolution with duodenocystostomy. PMID:26788454

  2. Autism Spectrum Disorder, Developmental and Psychiatric Features in 16p11.2 Duplication.

    PubMed

    Green Snyder, LeeAnne; D'Angelo, Debra; Chen, Qixuan; Bernier, Raphael; Goin-Kochel, Robin P; Wallace, Arianne Stevens; Gerdts, Jennifer; Kanne, Stephen; Berry, Leandra; Blaskey, Lisa; Kuschner, Emily; Roberts, Timothy; Sherr, Elliot; Martin, Christa L; Ledbetter, David H; Spiro, John E; Chung, Wendy K; Hanson, Ellen

    2016-08-01

    The 16p11.2 duplication (BP4-BP5) is associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), although significant heterogeneity exists. Quantitative ASD, behavioral and neuropsychological measures and DSM-IV diagnoses in child and adult carriers were compared with familial non-carrier controls, and to published results from deletion carriers. The 16p11.2 duplication phenotype ranges widely from asymptomatic presentation to significant disability. The most common diagnoses were intellectual disability, motor delays and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in children, and anxiety in adults. ASD occurred in nearly 20 % of child cases, but a majority of carriers did not show the unique social features of ASD. The 16p11.2 duplication phenotype is characterized by wider variability than the reciprocal deletion, likely reflecting contributions from additional risk factors.

  3. The sequence and analysis of duplication-rich human chromosome 16.

    PubMed

    Martin, Joel; Han, Cliff; Gordon, Laurie A; Terry, Astrid; Prabhakar, Shyam; She, Xinwei; Xie, Gary; Hellsten, Uffe; Chan, Yee Man; Altherr, Michael; Couronne, Olivier; Aerts, Andrea; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Blumer, Heather; Branscomb, Elbert; Brown, Nancy C; Bruno, William J; Buckingham, Judith M; Callen, David F; Campbell, Connie S; Campbell, Mary L; Campbell, Evelyn W; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F; Chasteen, Leslie A; Chertkov, Olga; Chi, Han C; Christensen, Mari; Clark, Lynn M; Cohn, Judith D; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C; Dickson, Mark; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, Mira; Escobar, Julio; Fawcett, Joseph J; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Goodwin, Lynne A; Grady, Deborah L; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Hildebrand, Carl E; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Jewett, Phillip B; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Krawczyk, Marie-Claude; Leyba, Tina; Longmire, Jonathan L; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Ludeman, Thom; Manohar, Chitra F; Mark, Graham A; McMurray, Kimberly L; Meincke, Linda J; Morgan, Jenna; Moyzis, Robert K; Mundt, Mark O; Munk, A Christine; Nandkeshwar, Richard D; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Parson-Quintana, Beverly; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Ricke, Darryl O; Robinson, Donna L; Rodriguez, Alex; Salamov, Asaf; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Scott, Duncan; Shough, Timothy; Stallings, Raymond L; Stalvey, Malinda; Sutherland, Robert D; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S; Tice, Hope; Torney, David C; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Tsai, Ming; Ulanovsky, Levy E; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; White, P Scott; Williams, Albert L; Wills, Patricia L; Wu, Jung-Rung; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; Dejong, Pieter; Bruce, David; Doggett, Norman A; Deaven, Larry; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Richardson, Paul; Rokhsar, Daniel S; Eichler, Evan E; Gilna, Paul; Lucas, Susan M; Myers, Richard M; Rubin, Edward M; Pennacchio, Len A

    2004-12-23

    Human chromosome 16 features one of the highest levels of segmentally duplicated sequence among the human autosomes. We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9% of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein-coding genes confirmed by 1,670 aligned transcripts, 19 transfer RNA genes, 341 pseudogenes and three RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukaemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobase pairs were identified and result in gene content differences among humans. Whereas the segmental duplications of chromosome 16 are enriched in the relatively gene-poor pericentromere of the p arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events that are likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  4. Origin, duplication and reshuffling of plasmid genes: Insights from Burkholderia vietnamiensis G4 genome.

    PubMed

    Maida, Isabel; Fondi, Marco; Orlandini, Valerio; Emiliani, Giovanni; Papaleo, Maria Cristiana; Perrin, Elena; Fani, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Using a computational pipeline based on similarity networks reconstruction we analysed the 1133 genes of the Burkholderia vietnamiensis (Bv) G4 five plasmids, showing that gene and operon duplication played an important role in shaping the plasmid architecture. Several single/multiple duplications occurring at intra- and/or interplasmids level involving 253 paralogous genes (stand-alone, clustered or operons) were detected. An extensive gene/operon exchange between plasmids and chromosomes was also disclosed. The larger the plasmid, the higher the number and size of paralogous fragments. Many paralogs encoded mobile genetic elements and duplicated very recently, suggesting that the rearrangement of the Bv plastic genome is ongoing. Concerning the "molecular habitat" and the "taxonomical status" (the Preferential Organismal Sharing) of Bv plasmid genes, most of them have been exchanged with other plasmids of bacteria belonging (or phylogenetically very close) to Burkholderia, suggesting that taxonomical proximity of bacterial strains is a crucial issue in plasmid-mediated gene exchange.

  5. Light-guided hysteroscopic resection of complete septate uterus with preservation of duplicated cervix.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jehn-Hsiahn; Chen, Mei-Jou; Shih, Jin-Chung; Chen, Chin-Der; Chen, Shee-Uan; Yang, Yu-Shih

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study, performed at a tertiary university hospital, was to propose a novel method of hysteroscopic resection of complete septate uterus with preservation of duplicated cervix. The retrospective study included 5 women with complete septate uterus and cervical duplication and who also experienced infertility with or without pregnancy loss. All patients underwent bougie-guided or light-guided hysteroscopic perforation of the uterine septum above the endocervix, followed by septum resection. The success rate of complete uterine septum perforation under bougie guidance was 60% (3 of 5 procedures), and of light guidance was 100% (2 procedures). After hysteroscopic septum resection, 2 of 5 women achieved pregnancy within 3 months and delivered uneventfully at term. It is concluded that light guidance is superior to bougie guidance for hysteroscopic perforation of complete septate uterus with preservation of the duplicated cervix.

  6. Cdc14B depletion leads to centriole amplification and its overexpression prevents unscheduled centriole duplication

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jun; Plumley, Hyekyung; Rhee, David; Johnson, Dabney K; Dunlap, John; Liu, Yie; Wang, Yisong

    2008-01-01

    Centrosome duplication is tightly controlled in coordination with DNA replication. The molecular mechanism of centrosome duplication remains unclear. Previous studies found that a fraction of human proline-directed phosphatase Cdc14B associates with centrosomes. However, Cdc14B's involvement in centrosome cycle control has never been explored. Here, we show that depletion of Cdc14B by RNA interference leads to centriole amplification in both HeLa and normal human fibroblast BJ and MRC-5 cells. Induction of Cdc14B expression through a regulatable promoter significantly attenuates centriole amplification in prolonged S-phase arrested cells and proteasome inhibitor Z-L3VS-treated cells. This inhibitory function requires centriole-associated Cdc14B catalytic activity. Together, these results suggest a potential function for Cdc14B phosphatase in maintaining the fidelity of centrosome duplication cycle.

  7. Characterization of the duplicate L-SIGN and DC-SIGN genes in miiuy croaker and evolutionary analysis of L-SIGN in fishes.

    PubMed

    Shu, Chang; Wang, Shanchen; Xu, Tianjun

    2015-05-01

    Dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN/CD209) and liver/lymph node-specific ICAM-grabbing non-integrin (L-SIGN/CD299) which are homologues of DC-SIGN are important members in C-type lectin receptors family as key molecules to recognize and eliminate pathogens in the innate immune system. DC-SIGN and L-SIGN have become hot topics in recent studies which both served as cell adhesion and phagocytic pathogen recognition receptors in mammals. However, there have been almost no studies of DC-SIGN and L-SIGN structure and characters in fish, only DC-SIGN in the zebrafish had been studied. In our study, we identified and characterized the full-length miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy) DC-SIGN (mmDC-SIGN) and L-SIGN (mmL-SIGN) genes. The sequence analysis results showed that mmDC-SIGN and mmL-SIGN have the same domains with other vertebrates except primates, and share some conserved motifs in CRD among all the vertebrates which play a crucial role in interacting with Ca(2+) and for recognizing mannose-containing motifs. Gene synteny of DC-SIGN and L-SIGN were analyzed for the first time and gene synteny of L-SIGN was conserved among the five fishes. Interestingly, one gene next to L-SIGN from gene synteny had high similarity with L-SIGN gene that was described as L-SIGN-like in fish species. While only one L-SIGN gene existed in other vertebrates, two L-SIGN in fish may be in consequence of the fish-specific genome duplication to adapt the specific environment. The evolutionary analysis showed that the ancestral lineages of L-SIGN gene in fishes experienced purifying selection and the current lineages of L-SIGN gene in fishes underwent positive selection, indicating that the ancestral lineages and current lineages of L-SIGN gene in fishes underwent different evolutionary patterns. Both mmDC-SIGN and mmL-SIGN were expressed in all tested tissues and ubiquitously up-regulated in infected liver, spleen and kidney at different sampling time points

  8. Recurrent duplications of the annexin A1 gene (ANXA1) in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Validating the potential pathogenicity of copy number variants (CNVs) identified in genome-wide studies of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) requires detailed assessment of case/control frequencies, inheritance patterns, clinical correlations, and functional impact. Here, we characterize a small recurrent duplication in the annexin A1 (ANXA1) gene, identified by the Autism Genome Project (AGP) study. Methods From the AGP CNV genomic screen in 2,147 ASD individuals, we selected for characterization an ANXA1 gene duplication that was absent in 4,964 population-based controls. We further screened the duplication in a follow-up sample including 1,496 patients and 410 controls, and evaluated clinical correlations and family segregation. Sequencing of exonic/downstream ANXA1 regions was performed in 490 ASD patients for identification of additional variants. Results The ANXA1 duplication, overlapping the last four exons and 3’UTR region, had an overall prevalence of 11/3,643 (0.30%) in unrelated ASD patients but was not identified in 5,374 controls. Duplication carriers presented no distinctive clinical phenotype. Family analysis showed neuropsychiatric deficits and ASD traits in multiple relatives carrying the duplication, suggestive of a complex genetic inheritance. Sequencing of exonic regions and the 3’UTR identified 11 novel changes, but no obvious variants with clinical significance. Conclusions We provide multilevel evidence for a role of ANXA1 in ASD etiology. Given its important role as mediator of glucocorticoid function in a wide variety of brain processes, including neuroprotection, apoptosis, and control of the neuroendocrine system, the results add ANXA1 to the growing list of rare candidate genetic etiological factors for ASD. PMID:24720851

  9. Copy number expansion of the STX17 duplication in melanoma tissue from Grey horses

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Greying with age in horses is an autosomal dominant trait, associated with loss of hair pigmentation, melanoma and vitiligo-like depigmentation. We recently identified a 4.6 kb duplication in STX17 to be associated with the phenotype. The aims of this study were to investigate if the duplication in Grey horses shows copy number variation and to exclude that any other polymorphism is uniquely associated with the Grey mutation. Results We found little evidence for copy number expansion of the duplicated sequence in blood DNA from Grey horses. In contrast, clear evidence for copy number expansions was indicated in five out of eight tested melanoma tissues or melanoma cell lines. A tendency of a higher copy number in aggressive tumours was also found. Massively parallel resequencing of the ~350 kb Grey haplotype did not reveal any additional mutations perfectly associated with the phenotype, confirming the duplication as the true causative mutation. We identified three SNP alleles that were present in a subset of Grey haplotypes within the 350 kb region that shows complete linkage disequilibrium with the causative mutation. Thus, these three nucleotide substitutions must have occurred subsequent to the duplication, consistent with our interpretation that the Grey mutation arose more than 2,000 years before present. Conclusions These results suggest that the mutation acts as a melanoma-driving regulatory element. The elucidation of the mechanistic features of the duplication will be of considerable interest for the characterization of these horse melanomas as well as for the field of human melanoma research. PMID:22857264

  10. Demonstration of the Coexistence of Duplicated LH Receptors in Teleosts, and Their Origin in Ancestral Actinopterygians

    PubMed Central

    Maugars, Gersende; Dufour, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary gonadotropins, FSH and LH, control gonad activity in vertebrates, via binding to their respective receptors, FSHR and LHR, members of GPCR superfamily. Until recently, it was accepted that gnathostomes possess a single FSHR and a single LHR, encoded by fshr and lhcgr genes. We reinvestigated this question, focusing on vertebrate species of key-phylogenetical positions. Genome analyses supported the presence of a single fshr and a single lhcgr in chondrichthyans, and in sarcopterygians including mammals, birds, amphibians and coelacanth. In contrast, we identified a single fshr but two lhgcr in basal teleosts, the eels. We further showed the coexistence of duplicated lhgcr in other actinopterygians, including a non-teleost, the gar, and other teleosts, e.g. Mexican tetra, platyfish, or tilapia. Phylogeny and synteny analyses supported the existence in actinopterygians of two lhgcr paralogs (lhgcr1/ lhgcr2), which do not result from the teleost-specific whole-genome duplication (3R), but likely from a local gene duplication that occurred early in the actinopterygian lineage. Due to gene losses, there was no impact of 3R on the number of gonadotropin receptors in extant teleosts. Additional gene losses during teleost radiation, led to a single lhgcr (lhgcr1 or lhgcr2) in some species, e.g. medaka and zebrafish. Sequence comparison highlighted divergences in the extracellular and intracellular domains of the duplicated lhgcr, suggesting differential properties such as ligand binding and activation mechanisms. Comparison of tissue distribution in the European eel, revealed that fshr and both lhgcr transcripts are expressed in the ovary and testis, but are differentially expressed in non-gonadal tissues such as brain or eye. Differences in structure-activity relationships and tissue expression may have contributed as selective drives in the conservation of the duplicated lhgcr. This study revises the evolutionary scenario and nomenclature of gonadotropin

  11. Divergence of recently duplicated M{gamma}-type MADS-box genes in Petunia.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Marian; Gordon, Jonathan; Weterings, Koen; Angenent, Gerco C

    2010-02-01

    The MADS-box transcription factor family has expanded considerably in plants via gene and genome duplications and can be subdivided into type I and MIKC-type genes. The two gene classes show a different evolutionary history. Whereas the MIKC-type genes originated during ancient genome duplications, as well as during more recent events, the type I loci appear to experience high turnover with many recent duplications. This different mode of origin also suggests a different fate for the type I duplicates, which are thought to have a higher chance to become silenced or lost from the genome. To get more insight into the evolution of the type I MADS-box genes, we isolated nine type I genes from Petunia, which belong to the Mgamma subclass, and investigated the divergence of their coding and regulatory regions. The isolated genes could be subdivided into two categories: two genes were highly similar to Arabidopsis Mgamma-type genes, whereas the other seven genes showed less similarity to Arabidopsis genes and originated more recently. Two of the recently duplicated genes were found to contain deleterious mutations in their coding regions, and expression analysis revealed that a third paralog was silenced by mutations in its regulatory region. However, in addition to the three genes that were subjected to nonfunctionalization, we also found evidence for neofunctionalization of one of the Petunia Mgamma-type genes. Our study shows a rapid divergence of recently duplicated Mgamma-type MADS-box genes and suggests that redundancy among type I paralogs may be less common than expected.

  12. Incidence of Data Duplications in a Randomly Selected Pool of Life Science Publications.

    PubMed

    Oksvold, Morten P

    2016-04-01

    Since the solution to many public health problems depends on research, it is critical for the progress and well-being for the patients that we can trust the scientific literature. Misconduct and poor laboratory practice in science threatens the scientific progress, leads to loss of productivity and increased healthcare costs, and endangers lives of patients. Data duplication may represent one of challenges related to these problems. In order to estimate the frequency of data duplication in life science literature, a systematic screen through 120 original scientific articles published in three different cancer related journals [journal impact factor (IF) <5, 5-10 and >20] was completed. The study revealed a surprisingly high proportion of articles containing data duplication. For the IF < 5 and IF > 20 journals, 25% of the articles were found to contain data duplications. The IF 5-10 journal showed a comparable proportion (22.5%). The proportion of articles containing duplicated data was comparable between the three journals and no significant correlation to journal IF was found. The editorial offices representing the journals included in this study and the individual authors of the detected articles were contacted to clarify the individual cases. The editorial offices did not reply and only 1 out of 29 cases were apparently clarified by the authors, although no supporting data was supplied. This study questions the reliability of life science literature, it illustrates that data duplications are widespread and independent of journal impact factor and call for a reform of the current peer review and retraction process of scientific publishing.

  13. Evolution of duplicated IgH loci in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) locus possesses two parallel IgH isoloci (IGH-A and IGH-B), that are related to the genomic duplication event in the family Salmonidae. These duplicated IgH loci in Atlantic salmon provide a unique opportunity to examine the mechanisms of genome diversity and genome evolution of the IgH loci in vertebrates. In this study, we defined the structure of these loci in Atlantic salmon, and sequenced 24 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones that were assembled into the IGH-A (1.1 Mb) and IGH-B (0.9 Mb) loci. In addition, over 7,000 cDNA clones from the IgH variable (VH) region have been sequenced and analyzed. Results The present study shows that the genomic organization of the duplicated IgH loci in Atlantic salmon differs from that in other teleosts and other vertebrates. The loci possess multiple Cτ genes upstream of the Cμ region, with three of the Cτ genes being functional. Moreover, the duplicated loci possess over 300 VH segments which could be classified into 18 families. This is the largest number of VH families currently defined in any vertebrate. There were significant structural differences between the two loci, indicating that both IGH-A and -B loci have evolved independently in the short time after the recent genome duplication approximately 60 mya. Conclusions Our results indicate that the duplication of the IgH loci in Atlantic salmon significantly contributes to the increased diversity of the antibody repertoire, as compared with the single IgH locus in other vertebrates. PMID:20813058

  14. Recurrent tandem gene duplication gave rise to functionally divergent genes in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chuanzhu; Chen, Ying; Long, Manyuan

    2008-07-01

    Tandem gene duplication is one of the major gene duplication mechanisms in eukaryotes, as illustrated by the prevalence of gene family clusters. Tandem duplicated paralogs usually share the same regulatory element, and as a consequence, they are likely to perform similar biological functions. Here, we provide an example of a newly evolved tandem duplicate acquiring novel functions, which were driven by positive selection. CG32708, CG32706, and CG6999 are 3 clustered genes residing in the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. CG6999 and CG32708 have been examined for their molecular population genetic properties (Thornton and Long 2005). We further investigated the evolutionary forces acting on these genes with greater sample sizes and a broader approach that incorporate between-species divergence, using more variety of statistical methods. We explored the possible functional implications by characterizing the tissue-specific and developmental expression patterns of these genes. Sequence comparison of species within D. melanogaster subgroup reveals that this 3-gene cluster was created by 2 rounds of tandem gene duplication in the last 5 Myr. Based on phylogenetic analysis, CG32708 is clearly the parental copy that is shared by all species. CG32706 appears to have originated in the ancestor of Drosophila simulans and D. melanogaster about 5 Mya, and CG6999 is the newest duplicate that is unique to D. melanogaster. All 3 genes have different expression profiles, and CG6999 has in addition acquired a novel transcript. Biased polymorphism frequency spectrum, linkage disequilibrium, nucleotide substitution, and McDonald-Kreitman analyses suggested that the evolution of CG6999 and CG32706 were driven by positive Darwinian selection.

  15. Multiple bursts of pancreatic ribonuclease gene duplication in insect-eating bats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huihui; Liu, Yang; Meng, Fanxing; He, Beibei; Han, Naijian; Li, Gang; Rossiter, Stephen J; Zhang, Shuyi

    2013-09-10

    Pancreatic ribonuclease gene (RNASE1) was previously shown to have undergone duplication and adaptive evolution related to digestive efficiency in several mammalian groups that have evolved foregut fermentation, including ruminants and some primates. RNASE1 gene duplications thought to be linked to diet have also been recorded in some carnivores. Of all mammals, bats have evolved the most diverse dietary specializations, mainly including frugivory and insectivory. Here we cloned, sequenced and analyzed RNASE1 gene sequences from a range of bat species to determine whether their dietary adaptation is mirrored by molecular adaptation. We found that seven insect-eating members of the families Vespertilionidae and Molossidae possessed two or more duplicates, and we also detected three pseudogenes. Reconstructed RNASE1 gene trees based on both Bayesian and maximum likelihood methods supported independent duplication events in these two families. Selection tests revealed that RNASE1 gene duplicates have undergone episodes of positive selection indicative of functional modification, and lineage-specific tests revealed strong adaptive evolution in the Tadarida β clade. However, unlike the RNASE1 duplicates that function in digestion in some mammals, the bat RNASE1 sequences were found to be characterized by relatively high isoelectric points, a feature previously suggested to promote defense against viruses via the breakdown of double-stranded RNA. Taken together, our findings point to an adaptive diversification of RNASE1 in these two bat families, although we find no clear evidence that this was driven by diet. Future experimental assays are needed to resolve the functions of these enzymes in bats.

  16. Genome-Wide Signatures of ‘Rearrangement Hotspots’ within Segmental Duplications in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Mohammed; Sturge, Mitch; Peddle, Lynette; O'Rielly, Darren D.; Rahman, Proton

    2011-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to create a genome-wide high resolution map (i.e., >100 bp) of ‘rearrangement hotspots’ which can facilitate the identification of regions capable of mediating de novo deletions or duplications in humans. A hierarchical method was employed to fragment segmental duplications (SDs) into multiple smaller SD units. Combining an end space free pairwise alignment algorithm with a ‘seed and extend’ approach, we have exhaustively searched 409 million alignments to detect complex structural rearrangements within the reference-guided assembly of the NA18507 human genome (18× coverage), including the previously identified novel 4.8 Mb sequence from de novo assembly within this genome. We have identified 1,963 rearrangement hotspots within SDs which encompass 166 genes and display an enrichment of duplicated gene nucleotide variants (DNVs). These regions are correlated with increased non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) event frequency which presumably represents the origin of copy number variations (CNVs) and pathogenic duplications/deletions. Analysis revealed that 20% of the detected hotspots are clustered within the proximal and distal SD breakpoints flanked by the pathogenic deletions/duplications that have been mapped for 24 NAHR-mediated genomic disorders. FISH Validation of selected complex regions revealed 94% concordance with in silico localization of the highly homologous derivatives. Other results from this study indicate that intra-chromosomal recombination is enhanced in genic compared with agenic duplicated regions, and that gene desert regions comprising SDs may represent reservoirs for creation of novel genes. The generation of genome-wide signatures of ‘rearrangement hotspots’, which likely serve as templates for NAHR, may provide a powerful approach towards understanding the underlying mutational mechanism(s) for development of constitutional and acquired diseases. PMID:22194928

  17. Analysis of DuPont and Kodak duplicating films and chemistries in a Fultron spray processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, M. S.

    1972-01-01

    A test program was conducted with duPont duplicating film type SR 112 and SCOLOR developer and Kodak duplicating film types 2430, 2422, and FE 2628 (SO-467) and MX-641 developer to determine sensitometric and image quality characteristics of these materials when used with a fultron spray processor. The test results show that the SCOLOR developer foams excessively in the fultron processor when used with or without the addition of an antifoaming agent. The Kodak type FE 2628 film with MX-641 chemistry had the longest linear Log E range at a 1.0 gamma. Sensitometric curves and granularity traces for all film process combinations tested are included.

  18. A rare case of unilateral postaxial duplicated foot in a developmentally normal child.

    PubMed

    Sahdi, Haniza; Hoong, Chan Wai; Rasit, Ahmad Hata; Arianto, Fredy; Siong, Lau Kiew; Abdullah, Nur Alyana Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Diplopodia, being a rare congenital disorder, is infrequently discussed in published texts. Most reported cases have accounted the involvement of duplicated preaxial digits with other associated organ system and physical deformities. Here, we present an unusual case of isolated diplopodia involving postaxial toes in a child with no other organ and physical abnormalities. Radiological studies revealed a set of 10-digit-duplicated foot over the lateral aspect of the native foot, complete with phalanges and its corresponding metatarsals as well as tarsals, supplied by an anomalous posterior branch of the popliteal artery. Definitive surgery was performed just before the child was learning to walk.

  19. Autism spectrum disorder, Klinefelter syndrome, and chromosome 3p21.31 duplication: a case report.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Scott W; King, Casey H; Pai, G Shashidar

    2007-12-18

    Autism spectrum disorders are heterogeneous in nature with idiopathic and genetic origins. We present a 7-year-old boy with a long history of multiple behavioral concerns, poor school performance, repetitive/compulsive tendencies, poor social skills, and language delays. A multidisciplinary evaluation concluded that the patient met full criteria for autism. A genetic evaluation demonstrated Klinefelter syndrome 47, XXY karyotype with concurrent duplication of 3p21.31 by microarray analysis. Maternal genetic analysis demonstrated the same 3p21.31 duplication. The potential implication with regard to autism spectrum disorders has not been previously discussed in the literature.

  20. Inverted duplication of histone genes in chicken and disposition of regulatory sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S W; Robins, A J; d'Andrea, R; Wells, J R

    1985-01-01

    Sequence analysis of an 8.4 kb fragment containing five chicken histone genes shows that an H4-H2A gene pair is duplicated and inverted around a central H3 gene. A left and right region, each of 2.1 kb are 97% homologous and the boundaries of homology coincide with ten base pair repeats. These boundary regions also contain highly conserved gene promoter elements, suggesting that interaction of transcriptional machinery with histone genes may be connected with recombination in promoter regions, resulting in the inverted duplication structure seen in this cluster. PMID:4000938

  1. Thalamic Massa Intermedia Duplication in a Dysmorphic 14 month-old Toddler

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Matthew T

    2015-01-01

    The massa intermedia is an inconstant parenchymal band connecting the medial thalami. It may be thickened in various disease processes such as Chiari II malformation or absent in other disease states. However, the massa intermedia may also be absent in up to 30% of normal human brains. To the best of my knowledge, detailed imaging findings of massa intermedia duplication have only been described in a single case report. An additional case of thalamic massa intermedia duplication discovered on a routine brain MR performed for dysmorphic facial features is reported herein. PMID:26622932

  2. Duplication of distal 17q from a maternal translocation: an additional case with some unique features.

    PubMed Central

    Caine, A; Knapton, D M; Mueller, R F; Congdon, P J; Haigh, D

    1989-01-01

    A female with multiple dysmorphic features was found to have an unbalanced karyotype with duplication of the distal long arm of chromosome 17 and deletion of the terminal region of the short arm of chromosome 12. This was derived from a reciprocal translocation in the mother, 46,XX,t(12;17)(p13.3;q23). Clinical findings are presented and comparison with other reported cases of distal 17q duplication shows several unique features in our case. Images PMID:2810342

  3. Gene duplication can impart fragility, not robustness, in the yeast protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Diss, Guillaume; Gagnon-Arsenault, Isabelle; Dion-Coté, Anne-Marie; Vignaud, Hélène; Ascencio, Diana I; Berger, Caroline M; Landry, Christian R

    2017-02-10

    The maintenance of duplicated genes is thought to protect cells from genetic perturbations, but the molecular basis of this robustness is largely unknown. By measuring the interaction of yeast proteins with their partners in wild-type cells and in cells lacking a paralog, we found that 22 out of 56 paralog pairs compensate for the lost interactions. An equivalent number of pairs exhibit the opposite behavior and require each other's presence for maintaining their interactions. These dependent paralogs generally interact physically, regulate each other's abundance, and derive from ancestral self-interacting proteins. This reveals that gene duplication may actually increase mutational fragility instead of robustness in a large number of cases.

  4. Duplicated Pelvic Floor Musculature and Diastematomyelia in a Cloacal Exstrophy Patient

    PubMed Central

    Inouye, Brian M; Tourchi, Ali; Massanyi, Eric Z; Gearhart, John P; Tekes, Aylin

    2014-01-01

    Cloacal exstrophy is the most severe and rare form of the exstrophy-epispadias complex, presenting with exposed bladder halves extruding through an abdominal wall defect and variable genitourinary, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, and neurological defects. The authors report magnetic resonance imaging findings of a neurologically-intact, 24-month-old female with cloacal exstrophy who presented with anterior spinal dysraphism and diastematomyelia and duplicate pelvic floor musculature. The constellation of defects suggests a common genetic, biochemical, and embryological origin for duplication of the bladder, spinal cord, and pelvic floor muscles occurring in the fourth week of gestation. PMID:25426220

  5. An Efficient Algorithm for Gene/Species Trees Parsimonious Reconciliation with Losses, Duplications and Transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyon, Jean-Philippe; Scornavacca, Celine; Gorbunov, K. Yu.; Szöllősi, Gergely J.; Ranwez, Vincent; Berry, Vincent

    Tree reconciliation methods aim at estimating the evolutionary events that cause discrepancy between gene trees and species trees. We provide a discrete computational model that considers duplications, transfers and losses of genes. The model yields a fast and exact algorithm to infer time consistent and most parsimonious reconciliations. Then we study the conditions under which parsimony is able to accurately infer such events. Overall, it performs well even under realistic rates, transfers being in general less accurately recovered than duplications. An implementation is freely available at http://www.atgc-montpellier.fr/MPR.

  6. Predictions of Gene Family Distributions in Microbial Genomes: Evolution by Gene Duplication and Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanai, Itai; Camacho, Carlos J.; Delisi, Charles

    2000-09-01

    A universal property of microbial genomes is the considerable fraction of genes that are homologous to other genes within the same genome. The process by which these homologues are generated is not well understood, but sequence analysis of 20 microbial genomes unveils a recurrent distribution of gene family sizes. We show that a simple evolutionary model based on random gene duplication and point mutations fully accounts for these distributions and permits predictions for the number of gene families in genomes not yet complete. Our findings are consistent with the notion that a genome evolves from a set of precursor genes to a mature size by gene duplications and increasing modifications.

  7. Autism Spectrum Disorder, Klinefelter Syndrome, and Chromosome 3p21.31 Duplication: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Scott W.; King, Casey H.; Pai, G. Shashidar

    2007-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders are heterogeneous in nature with idiopathic and genetic origins. We present a 7-year-old boy with a long history of multiple behavioral concerns, poor school performance, repetitive/compulsive tendencies, poor social skills, and language delays. A multidisciplinary evaluation concluded that the patient met full criteria for autism. A genetic evaluation demonstrated Klinefelter syndrome 47, XXY karyotype with concurrent duplication of 3p21.31 by microarray analysis. Maternal genetic analysis demonstrated the same 3p21.31 duplication. The potential implication with regard to autism spectrum disorders has not been previously discussed in the literature. PMID:18311409

  8. Rapid Diversification of FoxP2 in Teleosts through Gene Duplication in the Teleost-Specific Whole Genome Duplication Event

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiaowei; Wang, Yajun; Tang, Yezhong

    2013-01-01

    As one of the most conserved genes in vertebrates, FoxP2 is widely involved in a number of important physiological and developmental processes. We systematically studied the evolutionary history and functional adaptations of FoxP2 in teleosts. The duplicated FoxP2 genes (FoxP2a and FoxP2b), which were identified in teleosts using synteny and paralogon analysis on genome databases of eight organisms, were probably generated in the teleost-specific whole genome duplication event. A credible classification with FoxP2, FoxP2a and FoxP2b in phylogenetic reconstructions confirmed the teleost-specific FoxP2 duplication. The unavailability of FoxP2b in Danio rerio suggests that the gene was deleted through nonfunctionalization of the redundant copy after the Otocephala-Euteleostei split. Heterogeneity in evolutionary rates among clusters consisting of FoxP2 in Sarcopterygii (Cluster 1), FoxP2a in Teleostei (Cluster 2) and FoxP2b in Teleostei (Cluster 3), particularly between Clusters 2 and 3, reveals asymmetric functional divergence after the gene duplication. Hierarchical cluster analyses of hydrophobicity profiles demonstrated significant structural divergence among the three clusters with verification of subsequent stepwise discriminant analysis, in which FoxP2 of Leucoraja erinacea and Lepisosteus oculatus were classified into Cluster 1, whereas FoxP2b of Salmo salar was grouped into Cluster 2 rather than Cluster 3. The simulated thermodynamic stability variations of the forkhead box domain (monomer and homodimer) showed remarkable divergence in FoxP2, FoxP2a and FoxP2b clusters. Relaxed purifying selection and positive Darwinian selection probably were complementary driving forces for the accelerated evolution of FoxP2 in ray-finned fishes, especially for the adaptive evolution of FoxP2a and FoxP2b in teleosts subsequent to the teleost-specific gene duplication. PMID:24349554

  9. Parental Origin of Interstitial Duplications at 15q11.2-q13.3 in Schizophrenia and Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Isles, Anthony R.; Ingason, Andrés; Lowther, Chelsea; Gawlick, Micha; Stöber, Gerald; Potter, Harry; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Pizzo, Lucilla; Ozaki, Norio; Kushima, Itaru; Ikeda, Masashi; Iwata, Nakao; Levinson, Douglas F.; Gejman, Pablo V.; Shi, Jianxin; Sanders, Alan R.; Duan, Jubao; Sisodiya, Sanjay; Costain, Gregory; Degenhardt, Franziska; Giegling, Ina; Rujescu, Dan; Hreidarsson, Stefan J.; Saemundsen, Evald; Ahn, Joo Wook; Ogilvie, Caroline; Stefansson, Hreinn; Stefansson, Kari; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Owen, Michael J.; Bassett, Anne; Kirov, George

    2016-01-01

    Duplications at 15q11.2-q13.3 overlapping the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome (PWS/AS) region have been associated with developmental delay (DD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and schizophrenia (SZ). Due to presence of imprinted genes within the region, the parental origin of these duplications may be key to the pathogenicity. Duplications of maternal origin are associated with disease, whereas the pathogenicity of paternal ones is unclear. To clarify the role of maternal and paternal duplications, we conducted the largest and most detailed study to date of parental origin of 15q11.2-q13.3 interstitial duplications in DD, ASD and SZ cohorts. We show, for the first time, that paternal duplications lead to an increased risk of developing DD/ASD/multiple congenital anomalies (MCA), but do not appear to increase risk for SZ. The importance of the epigenetic status of 15q11.2-q13.3 duplications was further underlined by analysis of a number of families, in which the duplication was paternally derived in the mother, who was unaffected, whereas her offspring, who inherited a maternally derived duplication, suffered from psychotic illness. Interestingly, the most consistent clinical characteristics of SZ patients with 15q11.2-q13.3 duplications were learning or developmental problems, found in 76% of carriers. Despite their lower pathogenicity, paternal duplications are less frequent in the general population with a general population prevalence of 0.0033% compared to 0.0069% for maternal duplications. This may be due to lower fecundity of male carriers and differential survival of embryos, something echoed in the findings that both types of duplications are de novo in just over 50% of cases. Isodicentric chromosome 15 (idic15) or interstitial triplications were not observed in SZ patients or in controls. Overall, this study refines the distinct roles of maternal and paternal interstitial duplications at 15q11.2-q13.3, underlining the critical importance of maternally

  10. Comparative genomic analysis of duplicated homoeologous regions involved in the resistance of Brassica napus to stem canker.

    PubMed

    Fopa Fomeju, Berline; Falentin, Cyril; Lassalle, Gilles; Manzanares-Dauleux, Maria J; Delourme, Régine

    2015-01-01

    All crop species are current or ancient polyploids. Following whole genome duplication, structural and functional modifications result in differential gene content or regulation in the duplicated regions, which can play a fundamental role in the diversification of genes underlying complex traits. We have investigated this issue in Brassica napus, a species with a highly duplicated genome, with the aim of studying the structural and functional organization of duplicated regions involved in quantitative resistance to stem canker, a disease caused by the fungal pathogen Leptosphaeria maculans. Genome-wide association analysis on two oilseed rape panels confirmed that duplicated regions of ancestral blocks E, J, R, U, and W were involved in resistance to stem canker. The structural analysis of the duplicated genomic regions showed a higher gene density on the A genome than on the C genome and a better collinearity between homoeologous regions than paralogous regions, as overall in the whole B. napus genome. The three ancestral sub-genomes were involved in the resistance to stem canker and the fractionation profile of the duplicated regions corresponded to what was expected from results on the B. napus progenitors. About 60% of the genes identified in these duplicated regions were single-copy genes while less than 5% were retained in all the duplicated copies of a given ancestral block. Genes retained in several copies were mainly involved in response to stress, signaling, or transcription regulation. Genes with resistance-associated markers were mainly retained in more than two copies. These results suggested that some genes underlying quantitative resistance to stem canker might be duplicated genes. Genes with a hydrolase activity that were retained in one copy or R-like genes might also account for resistance in some regions. Further analyses need to be conducted to indicate to what extent duplicated genes contribute to the expression of the resistance phenotype.

  11. Divergence of the Dof gene families in poplar, Arabidopsis, and rice suggests multiple modes of gene evolution after duplication.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaohan; Tuskan, Gerald A; Cheng, Max Zong-Ming

    2006-11-01

    It is widely accepted that gene duplication is a primary source of genetic novelty. However, the evolutionary fate of duplicated genes remains largely unresolved. The classical Ohno's Duplication-Retention-Non/Neofunctionalization theory, and the recently proposed alternatives such as subfunctionalization or duplication-degeneration-complementation, and subneofunctionalization, each can explain one or more aspects of gene fate after duplication. Duplicated genes are also affected by epigenetic changes. We constructed a phylogenetic tree using Dof (DNA binding with one finger) protein sequences from poplar (Populus trichocarpa) Torr. & Gray ex Brayshaw, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and rice (Oryza sativa). From the phylogenetic tree, we identified 27 pairs of paralogous Dof genes in the terminal nodes. Analysis of protein motif structure of the Dof paralogs and their ancestors revealed six different gene fates after gene duplication. Differential protein methylation was revealed between a pair of duplicated poplar Dof genes, which have identical motif structure and similar expression pattern, indicating that epigenetics is involved in evolution. Analysis of reverse transcription-PCR, massively parallel signature sequencing, and microarray data revealed that the paralogs differ in expression pattern. Furthermore, analysis of nonsynonymous and synonymous substitution rates indicated that divergence of the duplicated genes was driven by positive selection. About one-half of the motifs in Dof proteins were shared by non-Dof proteins in the three plants species, indicating that motif co-option may be one of the forces driving gene diversification. We provided evidence that the Ohno's Duplication-Retention-Non/Neofunctionalization, subfunctionalization/duplication-degeneration-complementation, and subneofunctionalization hypotheses are complementary with, not alternative to, each other.

  12. Tandem configurations of variably duplicated segments of 22q11.2 confirmed by fiber-FISH analysis.

    PubMed

    Shimojima, Keiko; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Inazu, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2011-11-01

    22q11.2 duplication syndrome has recently been established as a new syndrome manifesting broad clinical phenotypes including mental retardation. It is reciprocal to DiGeorge (DGS)/velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS), in which the same portion of the chromosome is hemizygously deleted. Deletions and duplications of the 22q11.2 region are facilitated by the low-copy repeats (LCRs) flanking this region. In this study, we aimed to identify the directions of the duplicated segments of 22q11.2 to better understand the mechanism of chromosomal duplication. To achieve this aim, we accumulated samples from four patients with 22q11.2 duplications. One of the patients had an atypically small (741 kb) duplication of 22q11.2. The centromeric end of the breakpoint was on LCR22A, but the telomeric end was between LCR22A and B. Therefore, the duplicated segment did not include T-box 1 gene (TBX1), the gene primarily responsible for the DGS/VCFS. As this duplication was shared by the patient's healthy mother, this appears to be a benign copy-number variation rather than a disease-causing alteration. The other three patients showed 3.0 or 4.0 Mb duplications flanked by LCRs. The directions of the duplicated segments were investigated by fiber-fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. All samples showed tandem configurations. These results support the hypothesized mechanism of non-allelic homologous recombination with flanking LCRs and add additional evidence that many interstitial duplications are aligned as tandem configurations.

  13. Thoraco-Abdominal Duplication Cyst- Role Tc-99m Pertechnetate SPECT-CT Scintigraphy in Localising Ectopic Gastric Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Ravina, Mudalsha; Datta, Deepanksha; Rangan, Kasturi; Suraj, Ajay Singh; Gambhir, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    Thoraco-abdominal duplication cyst, a congenital malformation of the posterior primitive foregut rarely presents with anaemia. Ectopic gastric mucosa is seen in around 20%-30% of the enteric duplication cysts. We report the scintigraphic findings of one such case which helped in final diagnosis and management of the patient. PMID:28242991

  14. Segmental duplication and copy number variation of the patched domain containing 3 (PTCHD3) locus on pig chromosome 10

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammalian genomes contain numerous blocks of highly homologous duplicated regions that can vary in copy number. We identified a segmental duplication encompassing the PTCHD3 gene, which has predicted hedgehog receptor activity, in a QTL region for nipple number on SSC10. A 3-fold coverage BAC screen...

  15. The transformer genes in the fig wasp Ceratosolen solmsi provide new evidence for duplications independent of complementary sex determination.

    PubMed

    Jia, L-Y; Xiao, J-H; Xiong, T-L; Niu, L-M; Huang, D-W

    2016-06-01

    Transformer (tra) is the key gene that turns on the sex-determination cascade in Drosophila melanogaster and in some other insects. The honeybee Apis mellifera has two duplicates of tra, one of which (complementary sex determiner, csd) is the primary signal for complementary sex-determination (CSD), regulating the other duplicate (feminizer). Two tra duplicates have been found in some other hymenopteran species, resulting in the assumption that a single ancestral duplication of tra took place in the Hymenoptera. Here, we searched for tra homologues and pseudogenes in the Hymenoptera, focusing on five newly published hymenopteran genomes. We found three tra copies in the fig wasp Ceratosolen solmsi. Further evolutionary and expression analyses also showed that the two duplicates (Csoltra-B and Csoltra-C) are under positive selection, and have female-specific expression, suggesting possible sex-related functions. Moreover, Aculeata species exhibit many pseudogenes generated by lineage-specific duplications. We conclude that phylogenetic reconstruction and pseudogene screening provide novel evidence supporting the hypothesis of independent duplications rather an ancestral origin of multiple tra paralogues in the Hymenoptera. The case of C. solmsi is the first example of a non-CSD species with duplicated tra, contrary to the previous assumption that derived tra paralogues function as the CSD locus.

  16. 47 CFR 76.120 - Network non-duplication protection, syndicated exclusivity and sports blackout rules for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Network Non-duplication Protection, Syndicated Exclusivity and Sports Blackout... that service. (e) Zone of protection. The term “zone of protection” means— (1) With respect to network... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Network non-duplication protection,...

  17. The impact of a growing minority population on identification of duplicate records in an enterprise data warehouse.

    PubMed

    Duvall, Scott L; Fraser, Alison M; Kerber, Richard A; Mineau, Geraldine P; Thomas, Alun

    2010-01-01

    Patient medical records are often fragmented across disparate healthcare databases, potentially resulting in duplicate records that may be detrimental to health care services. These duplicate records can be found through a process called record linkage. This paper describes a set of duplicate records in a medical data warehouse found by linking to an external resource containing family history and vital records. Our objective was to investigate the impact database characteristics and linkage methods have on identifying duplicate records using an external resource. Frequency counts were made for demographic field values and compared between the set of duplicate records, the data warehouse, and the external resource. Considerations for understanding the relationship that records labeled as duplicates have with dataset characteristics and linkage methods were identified. Several noticeable patterns were identified where frequency counts between sets deviated from what was expected including how the growth of a minority population affected which records were identified as duplicates. Record linkage is a complex process where results can be affected by subtleties in data characteristics, changes in data trends, and reliance on external data sources. These changes should be taken into account to ensure any anomalies in results describe real effects and are not artifacts caused by datasets or linkage methods. This paper describes how frequency count analysis can be an effective way to detect and resolve anomalies in linkage results and how external resources that provide additional contextual information can prove useful in discovering duplicate records.

  18. 47 CFR 76.120 - Network non-duplication protection, syndicated exclusivity and sports blackout rules for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... network non-duplication protection shall be that geographic area agreed upon between the network and the... area agreed upon between the non-network program supplier, producer or distributor and the television... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Network non-duplication protection,...

  19. 47 CFR 76.120 - Network non-duplication protection, syndicated exclusivity and sports blackout rules for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... network non-duplication protection shall be that geographic area agreed upon between the network and the... area agreed upon between the non-network program supplier, producer or distributor and the television... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Network non-duplication protection,...

  20. 47 CFR 76.120 - Network non-duplication protection, syndicated exclusivity and sports blackout rules for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... network non-duplication protection shall be that geographic area agreed upon between the network and the... area agreed upon between the non-network program supplier, producer or distributor and the television... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Network non-duplication protection,...