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Sample records for fission track detector

  1. The fission track detector revisited: application to individual neutron dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Prêtre, S; Aroua, A; Boschung, M; Grecescu, M; Valley, J F; Wernli, C

    1996-08-01

    A system based on fission fragment tracks had previously been developed for individual neutron dosimetry. The dosimeter detects both fast neutrons by means of the 232Th(n,f) reaction, and thermal and albedo neutrons by means of the 235U(n,f) reaction. The fission tracks produced in a plastic foil are chemically etched and counted by spark discharges. The response of the dosimeter has recently been re-investigated in 36 different neutron fields: monoenergetic beams, reference fields near isotopic sources, and radiation fields encountered in a variety of situations inside nuclear power plants. The results obtained have been compared to those computed by convolution of the neutron spectra with the energy response functions of the dosimeters. In practical situations, it is essential to know the shape of the neutron spectrum, approximately at least, in order to perform an acceptably accurate dose evaluation. For that purpose, the neutron fields encountered inside nuclear power plants have been grouped into four categories, for which algorithms for dose evaluation have been developed. Concerning the neutron equivalent dose, the error associated with this approach does not exceed a factor of 2, a performance which is comparable to other detection systems used in the field of individual neutron dosimetry. PMID:8690594

  2. Apatite fission track dating by LA-ICP-MS and External Detector Method: How do they stack up?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, C.; Gleadow, A. J.; Kohn, B. P.

    2013-12-01

    Analysis of trace element compositions by laser ablation ICP-MS has become a widely used tool to determine in-situ ages in geochronology. Although used primarily for U-Pb dating, LA-ICP-MS has been successfully adapted to other dating techniques such as apatite fission track (Hasebe et al., 2004) or (U-Th)/He (Boyce et al., 2006), making it an ideal tool for multi-system thermochronological studies. LA-ICP-MS fission track dating has several important advantages over the traditional external detector method (EDM), particularly in terms of sample turn-around time and the fact that neutron irradiations (and the handling of radioactive materials) are no longer necessary, while providing a similar level of in-situ information. Perhaps the most important benefits of LA-ICP-MS fission track dating is that it could potentially be used as an absolute dating technique with no Zeta-calibration necessary. However, beyond the initial study of Hasebe et al. (2004), little work has been done to compare results obtained by LA-ICP-MS with those from EDM analysis, and it remains unclear whether the two methods yield equivalent results. We present an extensive dataset of fission track results that were analysed using both LA-ICP-MS and EDM dating. The samples were selected to represent a variety of compositions, with single grain ages ranging from a few million to over a billion years. Both techniques were applied on identical grains, thereby eliminating uncertainties associated with natural variability. The comparison shows that, with a few exceptions, single grain fission track ages from LA-ICP-MS and EDM are concordant within analytical uncertainties and scatter symmetrically around the 1:1 correlation line. Although the relative difference in single grain ages varies significantly in either direction (up to 70%), there are no systematic variations between the two methods suggesting that this variation is simply due to random sampling effects. However, we did find systematic

  3. Whole-rock uranium analysis by fission track activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, J. R.; Haines, E. L.

    1974-01-01

    We report a whole-rock uranium method in which the polished sample and track detector are separated in a vacuum chamber. Irradiation with thermal neutrons induces uranium fission in the sample, and the detector records the integrated fission track density. Detection efficiency and geometric factors are calculated and compared with calibration experiments.

  4. Etching fission tracks in zircons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, C.W.

    1969-01-01

    A new technique has been developed whereby fission tracks can be etched in zircon with a solution of sodium hydroxide at 220??C. Etching time varied between 15 minutes and 5 hours. Colored zircon required less etching time than the colorless varieties.

  5. Fission foil detector calibrations with high energy protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    Fission foil detectors (FFD's) are passive devices composed of heavy metal foils in contact with muscovite mica films. The heavy metal nuclei have significant cross sections for fission when irradiated with neutrons and protons. Each isotope is characterized by threshold energies for the fission reactions and particular energy-dependent cross sections. In the FFD's, fission fragments produced by the reactions are emitted from the foils and create latent particle tracks in the adjacent mica films. When the films are processed surface tracks are formed which can be optically counted. The track densities are indications of the fluences and spectra of neutrons and/or protons. In the past, detection efficiencies have been calculated using the low energy neutron calibrated dosimeters and published fission cross sections for neutrons and protons. The problem is that the addition of a large kinetic energy to the (n,nucleus) or (p,nucleus) reaction could increase the energies and ranges of emitted fission fragments and increase the detector sensitivity as compared with lower energy neutron calibrations. High energy calibrations are the only method of resolving the uncertainties in detector efficiencies. At high energies, either proton or neutron calibrations are sufficient since the cross section data show that the proton and neutron fission cross sections are approximately equal. High energy proton beams have been utilized (1.8 and 4.9 GeV, 80 and 140 MeV) for measuring the tracks of fission fragments emitted backward and forward.

  6. Results of interlaboratory comparison of fission track ages for 1992 fission track workshop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, D.S.; Crowley, K.D.; Dokka, R.K.; Galbraith, R.F.; Kowallis, B.J.; Naeser, C.W.

    1993-01-01

    Two apatites and one sphene were made available to the fission track research community for analysis prior to the 1992 Fission Track Workshop held in Philadelphia, U.S.A., 13-17 July. Eighteen laboratories throughout the world received aliquots of apatite and sphene. To date, analyses by 33 different scientists have been representing 15 different laboratories. With respect to the previous two interlaboratory comparisons, there is a noticeable improvement in the accuracy of the age results (Naeser and Cebula, 1978; Naeser et al., 1981; Miller et al., 1985;Miller et al.1990). Ninety-four percent of the analysis used the external detector method (EDM) combined with the zeta technique while the remaining individuals used the population method (POP). Track length measurements (requested for the first time in the interlaboratory comparison studies) were in relatively good agreement. ?? 1993.

  7. Fission track dating of kimberlitic zircons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haggerty, S.E.; Raber, E.; Naeser, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    The only reliable method for dating kimberlites at present is the lengthy and specialized hydrothermal procedure that extracts 206Pb and 238U from low-uranium zircons. This paper describes a second successful method by fission track dating of large single-crystal zircons, 1.0-1.5 cm in dimension. The use of large crystals overcomes the limitations imposed in conventional fission track analysis which utilizes crushed fragments. Low track densities, optical track dispersion, and the random orientation of polished surfaces in the etch and irradiation cycle are effectively overcome. Fission track ages of zircons from five African kimberlites are reported, from the Kimberley Pool (90.3 ?? 6.5 m.y.), Orapa (87.4 ?? 5.7 and 92.4 ?? 6.1 m.y.), Nzega (51.1 ?? 3.8 m.y.), Koffiefontein (90.0 ?? 8.2 m.y.), and Val do Queve (133.4 ?? 11.5 m.y.). In addition we report the first radiometric ages (707.9 ?? 59.6 and 705.5 ?? 61.0 m.y.) of crustal zircons from kimberlites in northwest Liberia. The fission track ages agree well with earlier age estimates. Most of the zircons examined in this study are zoned with respect to uranium but linear correlations are established (by regression analysis) between zones of variable uranium content, and within zones of constant uranium content (by analysis of variance). Concordance between the fission track method and the U/Pb technique is established and we concluded that track fading from thermal annealing has not taken place. Kimberlitic zircons dated in this study, therefore, record the time of eruption. ?? 1983.

  8. Fission track age of Transantarctic Mountain microtektites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folco, L.; Bigazzi, G.; D'Orazio, M.; Balestrieri, M. L.

    2011-05-01

    We determined the fission track age of Transantarctic Mountain microtektites. The plateau method yielded a formation age of 0.85 ± 0.17 Ma. This age overlaps within error with that of the catastrophic impact that produced the Australasian tektite-microtektite strewn field ca. 0.8 Ma ago. This provides further evidence that Transantarctic Mountain microtektites belong to the Australasian tektite-microtektite strewn field, as previously suggested on the basis of geochemical evidence, Sr-Nd isotope systematics and poorly resolved radiometric data.

  9. Simulated fissioning of uranium and testing of the fission-track dating method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, V.E.; Johnson, N.M.; Naeser, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    A computer program (FTD-SIM) faithfully simulates the fissioning of 238U with time and 235U with neutron dose. The simulation is based on first principles of physics where the fissioning of 238U with the flux of time is described by Ns = ??f 238Ut and the fissioning of 235U with the fluence of neutrons is described by Ni = ??235U??. The Poisson law is used to set the stochastic variation of fissioning within the uranium population. The life history of a given crystal can thus be traced under an infinite variety of age and irradiation conditions. A single dating attempt or up to 500 dating attempts on a given crystal population can be simulated by specifying the age of the crystal population, the size and variation in the areas to be counted, the amount and distribution of uranium, the neutron dose to be used and its variation, and the desired ratio of 238U to 235U. A variety of probability distributions can be applied to uranium and counting-area. The Price and Walker age equation is used to estimate age. The output of FTD-SIM includes the tabulated results of each individual dating attempt (sample) on demand and/or the summary statistics and histograms for multiple dating attempts (samples) including the sampling age. An analysis of the results from FTD-SIM shows that: (1) The external detector method is intrinsically more precise than the population method. (2) For the external detector method a correlation between spontaneous track count, Ns, and induced track count, Ni, results when the population of grains has a stochastic uranium content and/or when the counting areas between grains are stochastic. For the population method no correlation can exist. (3) In the external detector method the sampling distribution of age is independent of the number of grains counted. In the population method the sampling distribution of age is highly dependent on the number of grains counted. (4) Grains with zero-track counts, either in Ns or Ni, are in integral part of

  10. Fission-track ages from the Precambrian of Shropshire.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, C.W.; Toghill, P.; Ross, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    Four samples of Longmyndian and Uriconian strata from S of Shrewsbury, England have been processed for apatite and/or zircon fission-track ages. The resultant ages illustrate how depth of burial may affect fission-track ages. The analytical procedures followed were as described in Naeser (1979).-from Authors

  11. New fission-fragment detector for experiments at DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusev, G.; Roman, A. R.; Daum, J. K.; Springs, R. K.; Bond, E. M.; Jandel, M.; Baramsai, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Favalli, A.; Ianakiev, K. D.; Iliev, M. L.; Mosby, S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.

    2015-10-01

    A fission-fragment detector based on thin scintillating films has been built to serve as a veto/trigger detector in neutron-induced fission measurements at DANCE. The fissile material is surrounded by scintillating films providing a 4 π detection of the fission fragments. The scintillation events caused by the fission fragment interactions in the films are registered with silicon photomultipliers. Design of the detector and test measurements are described. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy through the LANL/LDRD Program and the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Nuclear Physics under the Early Career Award No. LANL20135009.

  12. Geochemical Investigations for Uranium in Some Areas of Jharkhand State Using Fission Track Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, B. P.; Pandit, B.; Bhardwaj, V. N.

    Human population is always exposed to ionizing radiations from natural sources present in the earth crust. Hence the analysis of uranium in soil sample has great significance due to health hazards to human beings. For the purpose, some different soil samples collected from some area of Jharkhand have been analysed for trace uranium concentration using the fission track technique. Lexan polycarbonate was used as detector for recording fission tracks. As reactor neutron spectra is associated with both thermal and fast neutron fluxes; correction to the present uranium data due to fast neutron fission of 232Th was also applied. The uranium contents were estimated by comparing the track densities detectors immersed in the sample and the standard uranium solutions, irradiated along with the samples under the same irradiation conditions. The uranium in the soil samples were found to vary from 209 ng/g to 991 ng/g.

  13. Results of interlaboratory comparison of fission-track age standards: Fission-track workshop-1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, D.S.; Duddy, I.R.; Green, P.F.; Hurford, A.J.; Naeser, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    Five samples were made available as standards for the 1984 Fission Track Workshop held in the summer of 1984 (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York). Two zircons, two apatites and a sphene were distributed prior to the meeting to 40 different laboratories. To date, 24 different analysts have reported results. The isotopic ages of the standards ranged from 16.8 to 98.7 Myr. Only the statement that the age of each sample was less than 200 Myr was provided with the set of standards distributed. Consequently, each laboratory was required to use their laboratory's accepted treatment (irradiation level, etching conditions, counting conditions, etc.) for these samples. The results show that some workers have serious problems in achieving accurate age determinations. This emphasizes the need to calibrate experimental techniques and counting procedures against age standards before unknown ages are determined. Any fission-track age determination published or submitted for publication can only be considered reliable if it is supported by evidence of consistent determinations on age standards. Only this can provide the scientific community with the background to build up confidence concerning the validity of the fission-track method. ?? 1985.

  14. On particle track detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Gruhn, T. A.; Andrus, C. H.

    1973-01-01

    Aqueous sodium hydroxide is widely used to develop charged particle tracks in polycarbonate film, particularly Lexan. The chemical nature of the etching process for this system has been determined. A method employing ultra-violet absorbance was developed for monitoring the concentration of the etch products in solution. Using this method it was possible to study the formation of the etching solution saturated in etch products. It was found that the system super-saturates to a significant extent before precipitation occurs. It was also learned that the system approaches its equilibrium state rather slowly. It is felt that both these phenomena may be due to the presence of surfactant in the solution. In light of these findings, suggestions are given regarding the preparation and maintenance of the saturated etch solution. Two additional research projects, involving automated techniques for particle track analysis and particle identification using AgCl crystals, are briefly summarized.

  15. A compensated fission detector based on photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, M.; Ethvignot, T.; Granier, T.; Haight, R. C.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rochman, D.; Wender, S. A.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Danon, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Standard techniques of event-by-event detection of fission may fail when operated in high γ-ray or particle radiation environments. This is the case within the 800 MeV proton-driven lead slowing-down neutron spectrometer at LANSCE where standard fission detectors are found to be inoperable for microseconds to milliseconds after each proton pulse. To overcome this problem, a simple fission fragment detector based on compensated photovoltaic cells has been developed. The compensated detector has lower susceptibility to the strong γ-flash and can recover much faster than an uncompensated detector. This detector is well adapted to applications involving the detection of fission in regions where high intensity γ-ray and/or particle radiation fields exist.

  16. Fission-track dating applied to mineral exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, C.W.

    1984-01-01

    The partial to total resetting of fission-track ages of minerals in country rock near a mineralized area can be used to (1) locate a thermal anomaly, and (2) date the mineralizing event. Two mining districts in Colorado have been studied - Rico and Gilman. Rico is a precious- and base-metal mining district. Initial fission-track dating of a sill located about 6 km from the center of the district gave ages of 20 Myr and 65 Myr for apatite and zircon, respectively. The Eagle Mine in the Gilman District is the largest producer of zinc in the state of Colorado. Fission-track dating of zircon from a 70 Myr-old sill shows partial resetting of the zircon (45 Myr). The thermal anomaly identified by fission-track dating is seen in both districts far outside the area affected by obvious alteration. Based on the results of these two pilot studies, fission-track dating can be a useful exploration method for thermal anomalies associated with buried or otherwise poorly expressed mineral deposits.

  17. Low-mass fission detector for the fission neutron spectrum measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C Y; Henderson, R; Gostic, J; Haight, R C; Lee, H Y

    2010-10-20

    For the fission neutron spectrum measurement, the neutron energy is determined in a time-of-flight experiment by the time difference between the fission event and detection of the neutron. Therefore, the neutron energy resolution is directly determined by the time resolution of both neutron and fission detectors. For the fission detection, the detector needs not only a good timing response but also the tolerance of radiation damage and high {alpha}-decay rate. A parallel-plate avalanche counter (PPAC) has many advantages for the detection of heavy charged particles such as fission fragments. These include fast timing, resistance to radiation damage, and tolerance of high counting rate. A PPAC also can be tuned to be insensitive to particles, which is important for experiments with - emitting actinides. Therefore, a PPAC is an ideal detector for experiments requiring a fast and clean trigger for fission. In the following sections, the description will be given for the design and performance of a new low-mass PPAC for the fission-neutron spectrum measurements at LANL.

  18. Novel Scintillation Detectors for Prompt Fission γ-Ray Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billnert, R.; Andreotti, E.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Hult, M.; Karlsson, J.; Marissens, G.; Oberstedt, A.; Oberstedt, S.

    In this work we present first results from measurements of prompt fission γ-rays from the spontaneous fission in 252Cf. New and accurate data on corresponding γ-rays from the reactions 235U(nth,f) and 239Pu(nth,f) are highly demanded for the modeling of new Generation-IV nuclear reactor systems. For these experiments we employed scintillation detectors made out of new materials (LaBr3, LaCl3 and CeBr3), whose properties were necessary to know in order to obtain reliable results. Hence, we have characterized these detectors. In all the important properties these detectors outshine sodium-iodine detectors that where used in the 1970s, when the existing data had been acquired. Our finding is that the new generation of scintillation detectors is indeed promising, as far as an improved precision of the demanded data is concerned.

  19. A new design of fission detector for prompt fission neutron investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeynalov, Sh.; Zeynalova, O.; Nazarenko, M. A.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.

    2012-10-01

    In this work we report recent achievements in design of twin back-to-back ionization chamber (TIC) for fission fragment (FF) mass and kinetic energy spectroscopy. Correlated FF kinetic energies, their masses and the angle of the fission axes in 3D Cartesian coordinates can be determined from analysis of the heights and shapes of the pulses induced by the fission fragments on the anodes of TIC. Anodes of TIC were designed as consisting of isolated strips each having independent electronic circuitry and special multi-channel pulse processing apparatus. Mathematical algorithms were provided along with formulae derived for fission axis angles determination. It was shown how the point of fission fragments origin on the target plane may be determined using the same measured data. The last feature made the TIC a rather powerful tool for prompt fission neutron (PFN) emission investigation in event by event analysis of individual fission reactions from non point fissile source. Position sensitive neutron induced fission detector for neutron imaging applications with both thermal and low energy neutrons was found as another possible implementation of the designed TIC.

  20. Apatite fission-track thermochronology of the Pennsylvania Appalachian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, Mary K.; Miller, Donald S.

    1989-09-01

    Thirty-four apatite fission-track apparent ages and twenty-four track length distributions for ash bed samples from the Valley and Ridge Province and Upper Devonian to Upper Pennsylvania sedimentary samples from the Allegheny Front and Allegheny Plateau of Pennsylvania suggest that these regions represent different thermal (uplift) regimes as well as different structural provinces. The Valley and Ridge Province Tioga and Kalkberg ash bed samples yield apatite fission-track apparent ages and track length distributions that indicate early post-Alleghanian (285-270 Ma) cooling and unroofing that began at ˜250 Ma. Assuming a geothermal gradient of 25°C km -1, a burial depth of at least 3.4 km can be estimated for all the Pennsylvania samples. At the Allegheny structural front and on the western Allegheny Plateau, the apatite fission-track apparent ages (<150 Ma) and track length measurements indicate a Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous thermal event for these samples possibly resulting from a higher geothermal gradient coinciding with kimberlite intrusion at this time along the Greene-Potter Fault Zone. In northeast Pennsylvania on the Allegheny Plateau, the Upper Paleozoic sedimentary samples yield apatite fission-track apparent ages ≤180 Ma. Narrow track length distributions with long mean lengths (13-14 μm) and small standard deviations (1.3 μm) suggest rapid cooling from temperatures >110°C during the Middle Jurassic-Early Cretaceous for this part of Pennsylvania. This is consistent with the suggested uplift history of the Catskill Mountain region in adjacent New York State.

  1. A scintillating fission detector for neutron flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Stange, Sy; Esch, Ernst I; Burgett, Eric A; May, Iain; Muenchausen, Ross E; Taw, Felicia; Tovesson, Fredrik K

    2010-01-01

    Neutron flux monitors are commonly used for a variety of nuclear physics applications. A scintillating neutron detector, consisting of a liquid scintillator loaded with fissionable material, has been developed, characterized, and tested in the beam line at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, and shows a significant improvement in neutron sensitivity compared with a conventional fission chamber. Recent research on nanocomposite-based scintillators for gamma-ray detection indicates that this approach can be extended to load nanoparticles of fissionable material into a scintillating matrix, with up to three orders of magnitude higher loading than typical fission chambers. This will result in a rugged, cost-efficient detector with high efficiency, a short signal rise time, and the ability to be used in low neutron-flux environments. Initial efforts to utilize the luminescence of uranyl oxide to eliminate the need for wavelength-shifting dyes were unsuccessful. Excitation of uranyl compounds has been reported at wavelengths ranging from 266 nm to 532 nm. However, neither the 300 nm emission of toluene, nor the 350 nm emission of PPO, nor the 410 nm emission of POPOP resulted in significant excitation of and emission by uranyl oxide. As indicated by UV/visible spectroscopy, light emitted at these wavelengths was absorbed by the colored solution. {sup 235}U remains the most attractive candidate for a fissionable scintillator, due to its high fission cross-section and lack of a threshold fission energy, but all solutions containing molecular uranium compounds will be colored, most more highly than the U{sup 6+} compounds used here. Research is therefore continuing toward the fabrication of uranium nanoparticles, in which, due to Rayleigh scattering, the coloration should be less pronounced. The characterization of the thorium-loaded liquid scintillator and the fabrication of the 100 mL detectors for use at LANSCE demonstrated the feasibility of loading fissionable

  2. Fission track length distributions in multi-system thermochronology (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleadow, A. J.; Seiler, C.

    2013-12-01

    Fission track length distributions contain a unique record of past temperature variations and therefore play a key role in low-temperature thermochronology, for which there is no exact equivalent in any other method. Confined track lengths closely approximate the true etchable ranges of latent fission tracks [1] and are therefore favoured for fission track studies, but they still have a number of practical limitations. These include small numbers of suitable tracks, especially when only horizontal confined tracks are measured. Using only track-in-track events for measurement further limits the sample size. These restrictions become acute for low track-density samples, where length measurements may be impossible. Irradiating the surface with 252Cf tracks [2] can substantially increase the number of confined tracks, but many researchers do not have access to a Cf source. An even more significant issue has emerged from inter-laboratory comparison experiments that demonstrate a disturbingly poor reproducibility of length measurements between observers [3], a problem compounded by a lack of standardisation in measurement techniques. As a result, individual observers may measure different positions for the end of a track, contributing significantly to variability, and consequently blurring the thermal histories obtained. New digital microscopes open up important opportunities for improved track length measurements by reducing restrictions on sample size, and eliminating some sources of inter-observer bias. We have developed a track length measurement system that enables precise determination of vertical as well as horizontal track dimensions, allowing 3D lengths to be obtained. Lengths are measured on captured image stacks that can be analysed easily and may also be shared, for greater standardisation between laboratories. Length measurements are highly reproducible between different observers using this system, suggesting that at least one source of variability can be

  3. Radiometric dating of sediments using fission tracks in conodonts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sachs, H.M.; Denkinger, M.; Bennett, C.L.; Harris, A.G.

    1980-01-01

    Conodonts are microfossils which are commonly found in marine rocks of Cambrian to Triassic age. Although their biological affinities are difficult to assess, conodonts are valuable stratigraphical indices for much of their geological range1. Recent work has also established that conodont colour alteration indices (CAI) are useful guides to diagenetic temperatures and hence burial depth2. Fission tracks3 in conodonts allow measurement of uranium concentrations and estimates of 'age' to be made using isotopic methods4. We report here that fission tracks counted in irradiated, thermally unaltered (as indicated by CAI) middle Palaeozoic conodonts indicate typical uranium concentrations of ???1 part in 10 9, with some samples higher. A single specimen of Siphonodella from the Lower Mississippian yielded an age estimate of 380??140 Myr consistent with conventional interpolations. This method may also allow the unroofing of deeply buried sediments to be dated. ?? 1980 Nature Publishing Group.

  4. Dating thermal events at Cerro Prieto using fission track annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, S.J.; Elders, W..

    1981-01-01

    Data from laboratory experiments and geologic fading studies were compiled from published sources to produce lines of iso-annealing for apatite in time-temperature space. Fission track ages were calculated for samples from two wells at Cerro Prieto, one with an apparently simple and one with an apparently complex thermal history. Temperatures were estimated by empirical vitrinite reflectance geothermometry, fluid inclusion homogenization and oxygen isotope equilibrium. These estimates were compared with logs of measured borehole temperatures.

  5. Fission track thermochronology: Methods and applications in tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    Time, temperature and the kinetics of reactions are the basic ingredients in this study of thermal history analysis. Unraveling the timing of geological events using absolute dating systems based on radioactive decay is not a trivial task, ages given by most radiometric dating techniques (e.g. fission track analysis) are apparent ages, related to cooling through some characteristic temperature range. Regional thermal history is fundamentally linked with tectonic history. The Dora Maira massif in the Western Alps provides an example of a pressure-temperature-time history well constrained by metamorphic petrology and radiometric dating. Simple models of conductive cooling and erosion are used to successfully model the thermal history of these ultra-high pressure rocks and shed light on possible tectonic scenarios for their origin. Numerical modeling suggests that continued refrigeration of the Dora Maira rocks by subducting lithosphere is not required to produce the observed metamorphic mineral assemblages. Fission track analysis, synthesis of results from other dating techniques, thermal modeling and metamorphic petrology are used to constrain the magnitude of cooling during extension in the Mojave Desert, California. Cooling paths constructed using fission track ages on apatite, zircon and sphene and {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages on biotite, hornblende and phlogopite reveal the contrast in modes of cooling between upper and lower plate rocks. Upper plate rocks show no evidence for the rapid cooling that affected lower plate rocks during the Miocene extension in the region.

  6. Properties of TNF-1 track etch detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogura, K.; Asano, M.; Yasuda, N.; Yoshida, M.

    2001-12-01

    We have developed a new plastic track etch detector labeled TNF-1, which is the copolymer of CR-39 monomer with N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm). It was found that copoly(CR-39/NIPAAm/ antioxidant) composed in weight ratio of 99/1/0.01 is highly sensitive to low linear energy transfer (LET) particles in the region below 10 keV/μm of LET 200 eV. TNF-1 is the most sensitive plastic track etch detector reported so far and is able to record normally incident protons up to the energy of 27 MeV. This paper gives results of our studies on the track responses of TNF-1 as well as the brief results obtained by the performance tests of TNF-1 in various dosimetric experiments such as space radiation dosimetry, dosimetry for heavy ion cancer therapy and neutron dosimetry. These results are compared with the results obtained for CR-39 track detectors.

  7. Low-temperature tracking detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niinikoski, T. O.; Abreu, M.; Anbinderis, P.; Anbinderis, T.; D'Ambrosio, N.; de Boer, W.; Borchi, E.; Borer, K.; Bruzzi, M.; Buontempo, S.; Chen, W.; Cindro, V.; Dezillie, B.; Dierlamm, A.; Eremin, V.; Gaubas, E.; Gorbatenko, V.; Granata, V.; Grigoriev, E.; Grohmann, S.; Hauler, F.; Heijne, E.; Heising, S.; Hempel, O.; Herzog, R.; Härkönen, J.; Ilyashenko, I.; Janos, S.; Jungermann, L.; Kalesinskas, V.; Kapturauskas, J.; Laiho, R.; Li, Z.; Luukka, P.; Mandic, I.; De Masi, R.; Menichelli, D.; Mikuz, M.; Militaru, O.; Nuessle, G.; O'Shea, V.; Pagano, S.; Paul, S.; Perea Solano, B.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pirollo, S.; Pretzl, K.; Rahman, M.; Rato Mendes, P.; Rouby, X.; Ruggiero, G.; Smith, K.; Sousa, P.; Tuominen, E.; Tuovinen, E.; Vaitkus, J.; Verbitskaya, E.; da Viá, C.; Vlasenko, L.; Vlasenko, M.; Wobst, E.; Zavrtanik, M.; CERN RD39 Collaboration

    2004-03-01

    RD39 collaboration develops new detector techniques for particle trackers, which have to withstand fluences up to 1016 cm-2 of high-energy particles. The work focuses on the optimization of silicon detectors and their readout electronics while keeping the temperature as a free parameter. Our results so far suggest that the best operating temperature is around 130 K. We shall also describe in this paper how the current-injected mode of operation reduces the polarization of the bulk silicon at low temperatures, and how the engineering and materials problems related with vacuum and low temperature can be solved.

  8. Characterisation of a track structure imaging detector.

    PubMed

    Casiraghi, M; Bashkirov, V A; Hurley, R F; Schulte, R W

    2015-09-01

    The spatial distribution of radiation-induced ionisations in sub-cellular structures plays an important role in the initial formation of radiation damage to biological tissues. Using the nanodosimetry approach, physical characteristics of the track structure can be measured and correlated to DNA damage. In this work, a novel nanodosimeter is presented, which detects positive ions produced by radiation interacting with a gas-sensitive volume in order to obtain a high resolution image of the radiation track structure. The characterisation of the detector prototype was performed and different configurations of the device were tested by varying the detector cathode material and the working gas. Preliminary results show that the ionisation cluster size distribution can be obtained with this approach. Further work is planned to improve the detector efficiency in order to register the complete three-dimensional track structure of ionising radiation.

  9. Fission track ages and ages of deposition of deep-sea microtektites.

    PubMed

    Gentner, W; Glass, B P; Storzer, D; Wagner, G A

    1970-04-17

    The Australasian and Ivory Coast deep-sea microtektites have fission track ages of 0.71 and 1.09 million years, respectively. These ages are in good agreement with the ages of deposition of the microtektites determined from paleomagnetic data. Both the fission track ages and ages of deposition of the microtektites agree with the potassium/ argon and fission track ages of tektites from the respective tektite strewn fields.

  10. Fission track ages and ages of deposition of deep-sea microtektites.

    PubMed

    Gentner, W; Glass, B P; Storzer, D; Wagner, G A

    1970-04-17

    The Australasian and Ivory Coast deep-sea microtektites have fission track ages of 0.71 and 1.09 million years, respectively. These ages are in good agreement with the ages of deposition of the microtektites determined from paleomagnetic data. Both the fission track ages and ages of deposition of the microtektites agree with the potassium/ argon and fission track ages of tektites from the respective tektite strewn fields. PMID:17809131

  11. Fission track studies of xenolithic chondrites - Implications regarding brecciation and metamorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kothari, B. K.; Rajan, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    Fission tracks in phosphates from one gas-poor chondrite and three gas-rich ones are studied to determine their thermal history and brecciation time scales. Model fission track ages are calculated for given track densities due to Pu-244 and U-238; track densities and uranium measurements for whitlockite are shown, and possible sources of the tracks are mentioned. Details of track density and uranium measurements are discussed for each meteorite separately. Whitlockites from all the meteorites give model fission track ages of 4.4 Gyr assuming a Pu/U ratio at 4.55 Gyr of 0.045. The final brecciation event definitely did not reset the track clock in phosphates of one meteor and probably not in another two. It is concluded that the observed fission track ages date the end of metamorphic cooling in the meteorite parent bodies and support the planetesimal model for the formation of xenolithic chondrites.

  12. Monopole track characteristics in plastic detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlen, S. P.

    1975-01-01

    Total and restricted energy loss rates were calculated for magnetic monopoles of charge g = 137 e in Lexan polycarbonate. Range-energy curves are also presented. The restricted energy loss model is used to estimate the appearance of a monopole track in plastic detectors. These results should be useful for the design and analysis of monopole experiments.

  13. Divergence detectors for multitarget tracking algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler, Ronald

    2013-05-01

    Single-target tracking filters will typically diverge when their internal measurement or motion models deviate too much from the actual models. Niu, Varshney, Alford, Bubalo, Jones, and Scalzo have proposed a metric-- the normalized innovation squared (NIS)--that recursively estimates the degree of nonlinearity in a single-target tracking problem by detecting filter divergence. This paper establishes the following: (1) NIS can be extended to generalized NIS (GNIS), which addresses more general nonlinearities; (2) NIS and GNIS are actually anomaly detectors, rather than filter-divergence detectors; (3) NIS can be heuristically generalized to a multitarget NIS (MNIS) metric; (4) GNIS also can be rigorously extended to multitarget problems via the multitarget GNIS (MGNIS); (5) explicit, computationally tractable formulas for MGNIS can be derived for use with CPHD and PHD filters; and thus (6) these formulas can be employed as anomaly detectors for use with these filters.

  14. NEET Micro-Pocket Fission Detector -- FY 2012 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Unruh; Joy Rempe; Douglas McGregor; Philip Ugorowski; Michael Reichenberger

    2012-09-01

    A research program has been initiated by the NEET program for developing and testing compact miniature fission chambers capable of simultaneously measuring thermal neutron flux, fast neutron flux and temperature within a single package. When implemented, these sensors will significantly advance flux detection capabilities for irradiation tests in US Materials Test Reactors (MTRs).Ultimately, evaluations may lead to a more compact, more accurate, and longer lifetime flux sensor for critical mock-ups, high performance reactors and commercial nuclear power plants. Deployment of Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFDs) in US DOE-NE program irradiation tests will address several challenges: Current fission chamber technologies do not offer the ability to measure fast flux, thermal flux and temperature within a single compact probe, MPFDs offer this option. MPFD construction is very different then current fission chamber construction; the use of high temperature materials allow MPFDs to be specifically tailored to survive harsh conditions in typical high performance MTR irradiation tests. New high-fidelity reactor physics codes will need a small, accurate, multipurpose in-core sensor to validate the codes without perturbing the validation experiment; MPFDs fill this requirement. MPFDs can be built with variable sensitivities to survive the lifetime of an experiment or fuel assembly in some MTRs; allowing for more efficient and cost effective power monitoring. The small size of the MPFDs allows multiple sensors to be simultaneously deployed; obtaining data required to visualize the reactor flux and temperature profiles. This report summarizes the research progress for year 1 of this 3 year project. An updated design of the MPFD has been developed, materials and tools to support the new design have been procured, construction methods to support the new design have been initiated at INL’s HTTL and KSU’s SMART Laboratory, plating methods are being updated at KSU, new

  15. Experimental studies of annealing of etched fission tracks in fluorapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, K. d.; Cameron, M.; Schaefer, R. l.

    1991-05-01

    Annealing of etchable fission-track damage in fluorapatite (Ca 4.96Fe 0.01Na 0.02Sr 0.01REE 0.01) 5.01-(P 2.98Si 0.02) 3.00O 12(F 1.00Cl 0.02) 1.02 and Sr fluorapatite (Ca 4.68Na 0.04Sr 0.02REE 0.03) 4.97(P 2.98Si 0.03) 3.01O 12F 1.03was investigated in laboratory heating experiments at 1, 10, 100, and 1000 h at temperatures ranging from 40 to 360°C. For each of the approximately 105 heating experiments, annealing was characterized by measuring the lengths of confined tracks in mineral sections oriented parallel to the c axis and the acute angles between azimuths of the tracks and the c axis. Annealing is characterized by the monotonic decrease in etched track length with increasing temperature or heating time. Track shortening is anisotropic at all stages of fading: tracks parallel to c are most resistant to shortening, tracks perpendicular to c are at least resistant to shortening, and tracks at intermediate angles have intermediate annealing resistances. The relationship between mean track length and track length parallel or perpendicular to c is approximately linear. The decrease in normalized mean track length ( r) with increasing temperature ( T) or heating time ( t) for the fluorapatite and Sr fluorapatite data presented here, as well as the annealing data of GREEN et al. (1986) from Durango apatite, is best described by the equation g(r; α, β) = C 0 + [C 1 ln t + C 2] /[( {1/T} ) - C 3] , where g( r; α, β) is a power transform of r, and α, β, C0, C1, C2, and C3 are parameters. On the Arrhenius diagram, the fading contours (contours of constant r) for this model equation plot as a series of straight lines that intersect at a single point termed the "crossover point." For the fluorapatite and Sr-fluorapatite data presented here, the crossover points occur within the interval 523° C ≤ T≤957° C, 10 -5≤ t ≤ 10 -2s. This point is interpreted to represent the limit of stability of tracks in apatite. Activation energies, which are proportional to

  16. Fission-fragment detector for DANCE based on thin scintillating films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusev, G.; Roman, A. R.; Daum, J. K.; Springs, R. K.; Bond, E. M.; Jandel, M.; Baramsai, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Favalli, A.; Ianakiev, K. D.; Iliev, M. L.; Mosby, S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    A fission-fragment detector based on thin scintillating films has been built to serve as a trigger/veto detector in neutron-induced fission measurements at DANCE. The fissile material is surrounded by scintillating films providing 4 π detection of the fission fragments. The scintillation photons were registered with silicon photomultipliers. A measurement of the 235U (n , f) reaction with this detector at DANCE revealed a correct time-of-flight spectrum and provided an estimate for the efficiency of the prototype detector of 11.6(7)%. Design and test measurements with the detector are described.

  17. Preliminary Apatite Fission Track Thermochronology of Wrangel Island, Arctic Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitru, T. A.; Miller, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    Wrangel Island is part of a regional structural high that forms the continuation of the offshore Herald Arch and Chukchi Platform of Alaska. It is flanked on the north by the deep North Chukchi Basin, which in addition to Paleozoic strata, is inferred to contain up to 12 km of Beaufortian and Brookian (Late Jurassic to Tertiary) sediments (Dinkelman et al., 2008). To the south, ~E-W trending faults bound the Longa Basin that separates Wrangel from mainland Chukotka. This basin lies along strike of the early Tertiary Hope Basin in the Alaskan offshore. Wrangel Island itself exposes a broad, doubly-plunging anticlinorium-like structure cored by Neoproterozoic basement and flanked by Paleozoic shelf successions and a thick section of Triassic turbidites, representing about 5-7 km of structural section. The structural geology of Wrangel Island has been interpreted to represent a north-vergent Mesozoic fold and thrust belt linked by seismic reflection to the Herald Arch and then to the Lisburne Hills and the Brooks Range foreland fold and thrust belt (e.g. Kos’ko et al., 1993). However, deformation differs considerably from typical foreland fold-thrust structures of the Brooks Range as it is penetrative, involves large strains, and occurred under greenschist facies metamorphic conditions. Parts of the sequence exhibit mylonitic fabrics. Apatite fission track thermochronology of rocks from Wrangel Island can establishes the age of cooling to temperatures below ~ 100° C, providing temporal constraints on the uplift and erosional history of rocks that form this regional structural high. We analyzed seven fission track samples from a 9-km long N-S transect along the Kishchnikov River, from Triassic strata on the southern flank of the anticlinal structure to Devonian(?)-Mississippian feldspathic grits, conglomerates, and underlying Neoproterozoic igneous basement rocks in its core. All samples yielded statistically indistinguishable fission track ages averaging about 95

  18. Effect of α-damage on fission-track annealing in zircon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasuya, Masao; Naeser, Charles W.

    1988-01-01

    The thermal stability of confined fission-track lengths in four zircon samples having different spontaneous track densities (i.e., different amounts of ??-damage) has been studied by one-hour isochronal annealing experiments. The thermal stability of spontaneous track lengths is independent of initial spontaneous track density. The thermal stability of induced track lengths in pre-annealed zircon, however, is significantly higher than that of spontaneous track lengths. The results indicate that the presence of ??-damage lowers the thermal stability of fission-tracks in zircon.

  19. The effect of α-damage on fission-track annealing in zircon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasuya, M.; Naeser, C.W.

    1988-01-01

    The thermal stability of confined fission-track lengths in four zircon samples having different spontaneous track densities (i.e. different amounts of ??-damage) has been studied by one hour isochronal annealing experiments. The thermal stability of spontaneous track lengths is independent of initial spontaneous track density. The thermal stability of induced track lengths in pre-annealed zircon, however, is significantly higher than that of spontaneous track lengths. The results indicate that the presence of ??-damage lowers the thermal stability of fission-tracks in zircon. ?? 1988.

  20. SONTRAC: A solar neutron track chamber detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frye, G. M., Jr.; Jenkins, T. L.; Owens, A.

    1985-01-01

    The recent detection on the solar maximum mission (SMM) satellite of high energy neutrons emitted during large solar flares has provided renewed incentive to design a neutron detector which has the sensitivity, energy resolution, and time resolution to measure the neutron time and energy spectra with sufficient precision to improve our understanding of the basic flare processes. Over the past two decades a variety of neutron detectors has been flown to measure the atmospheric neutron intensity above 10 MeV and to search for solar neutrons. The SONTRAC (Solar Neutron Track Chamber) detector, a new type of neutron detector which utilizes n-p scattering and has a sensitivity 1-3 orders of magnitude greater than previous instruments in the 20-200 MeV range is described. The energy resolution is 1% for neutron kinetic energy, T sub n 50 MeV. When used with a coded aperture mask at 50 m (as would be possible on the space station) an angular resolution of approx. 4 arc sec could be achieved, thereby locating the sites of high energy nuclear interactions with an angular precision comparable to the existing x-ray experiments on SMM. The scintillation chamber is investigated as a track chamber for high energy physics, either by using arrays of scintillating optical fibers or by optical imaging of particle trajectories in a block of scintillator.

  1. NEET Micro-Pocket Fission Detector. Final Project report

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, T.; Rempe, Joy; McGregor, Douglas; Ugorowski, Philip; Reichenberger, Michael; Ito, Takashi; Villard, J.-F.

    2014-09-01

    A collaboration between the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the Kansas State University (KSU), and the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission, Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, (CEA), is funded by the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program to develop and test Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFDs), which are compact fission chambers capable of simultaneously measuring thermal neutron flux, fast neutron flux and temperature within a single package. When deployed, these sensors will significantly advance flux detection capabilities for irradiation tests in US Material Test Reactors (MTRs). Ultimately, evaluations may lead to a more compact, more accurate, and longer lifetime flux sensor for critical mock-ups, and high performance reactors, allowing several Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs to obtain higher accuracy/higher resolution data from irradiation tests of candidate new fuels and materials. Specifically, deployment of MPFDs will address several challenges faced in irradiations performed at MTRs: Current fission chamber technologies do not offer the ability to measure fast flux, thermal flux and temperature within a single compact probe; MPFDs offer this option. MPFD construction is very different than current fission chamber construction; the use of high temperature materials allow MPFDs to be specifically tailored to survive harsh conditions encountered in-core of high performance MTRs. The higher accuracy, high fidelity data available from the compact MPFD will significantly enhance efforts to validate new high-fidelity reactor physics codes and new multi-scale, multi-physics codes. MPFDs can be built with variable sensitivities to survive the lifetime of an experiment or fuel assembly in some MTRs, allowing for more efficient and cost effective power monitoring. The small size of the MPFDs allows multiple sensors to be deployed, offering the potential to accurately

  2. Development of a thin scintillation films fission-fragment detector and a novel neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusev, G.; Jandel, M.; Baramsai, B.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Daum, J. K.; Favalli, A.; Ianakiev, K. D.; Iliev, M. L.; Mosby, S.; Roman, A. R.; Springs, R. K.; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.

    2015-08-01

    Investigation of prompt fission and neutron-capture Υ rays from fissile actinide samples at the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) requires use of a fission-fragment detector to provide a trigger or a veto signal. A fission-fragment detector based on thin scintillating films and silicon photomultipliers has been built to serve as a trigger/veto detector in neutron-induced fission measurements at DANCE. The fissile material is surrounded by scintillating films providing a 4π detection of the fission fragments. The scintillations were registered with silicon photomultipliers. A measurement of the 235U(n,f) reaction with this detector at DANCE revealed a correct time-of-flight spectrum and provided an estimate for the efficiency of the prototype detector of 11.6(7)%. Design and test measurements with the detector are described. A neutron source with fast timing has been built to help with detector-response measurements. The source is based on the neutron emission from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf and the same type of scintillating films and silicon photomultipliers. Overall time resolution of the source is 0.3 ns. Design of the source and test measurements with it are described. An example application of the source for determining the neutron/gamma pulse-shape discrimination by a stilbene crystal is given.

  3. Development of a thin scintillation films fission-fragment detector and a novel neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Rusev, Gencho Yordanov; Jandel, Marian; Baramsai, Bayarbadrakh; Bond, Evelyn M.; Bredeweg, Todd Allen; Couture, Aaron Joseph; Daum, Jaimie Kay; Favalli, Andrea; Ianakiev, Kiril Dimitrov; Iliev, Metodi L.; Mosby, Shea Morgan; Roman, Audrey Rae; Springs, Rebecca Kristien; Ullmann, John Leonard; Walker, Carrie Lynn

    2015-08-26

    Here, investigation of prompt fission and neutron-capture Υ rays from fissile actinide samples at the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) requires use of a fission-fragment detector to provide a trigger or a veto signal. A fission-fragment detector based on thin scintillating films and silicon photomultipliers has been built to serve as a trigger/veto detector in neutron-induced fission measurements at DANCE. The fissile material is surrounded by scintillating films providing a 4π detection of the fission fragments. The scintillations were registered with silicon photomultipliers. A measurement of the 235U(n,f) reaction with this detector at DANCE revealed a correct time-of-flight spectrum and provided an estimate for the efficiency of the prototype detector of 11.6(7)%. Design and test measurements with the detector are described. A neutron source with fast timing has been built to help with detector-response measurements. The source is based on the neutron emission from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf and the same type of scintillating films and silicon photomultipliers. Overall time resolution of the source is 0.3 ns. Design of the source and test measurements with it are described. An example application of the source for determining the neutron/gamma pulse-shape discrimination by a stilbene crystal is given.

  4. Development of a thin scintillation films fission-fragment detector and a novel neutron source

    DOE PAGES

    Rusev, Gencho Yordanov; Jandel, Marian; Baramsai, Bayarbadrakh; Bond, Evelyn M.; Bredeweg, Todd Allen; Couture, Aaron Joseph; Daum, Jaimie Kay; Favalli, Andrea; Ianakiev, Kiril Dimitrov; Iliev, Metodi L.; et al

    2015-08-26

    Here, investigation of prompt fission and neutron-capture Υ rays from fissile actinide samples at the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) requires use of a fission-fragment detector to provide a trigger or a veto signal. A fission-fragment detector based on thin scintillating films and silicon photomultipliers has been built to serve as a trigger/veto detector in neutron-induced fission measurements at DANCE. The fissile material is surrounded by scintillating films providing a 4π detection of the fission fragments. The scintillations were registered with silicon photomultipliers. A measurement of the 235U(n,f) reaction with this detector at DANCE revealed a correct time-of-flightmore » spectrum and provided an estimate for the efficiency of the prototype detector of 11.6(7)%. Design and test measurements with the detector are described. A neutron source with fast timing has been built to help with detector-response measurements. The source is based on the neutron emission from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf and the same type of scintillating films and silicon photomultipliers. Overall time resolution of the source is 0.3 ns. Design of the source and test measurements with it are described. An example application of the source for determining the neutron/gamma pulse-shape discrimination by a stilbene crystal is given.« less

  5. Identifying and quantifying short-lived fission products from thermal fission of HEU using portable HPGe detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, Bruce D.; Finn, Erin C.; Friese, Judah I.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kephart, Rosara F.; Metz, Lori A.

    2013-03-01

    Due to the emerging potential for trafficking of special nuclear material, research programs are investigating current capabilities of commercially available portable gamma ray detection systems. Presented in this paper are the results of three different portable high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors used to identify short-lived fission products generated from thermal neutron interrogation of small samples of highly enriched uranium. Samples were irradiated at the Washington State University (WSU) Nuclear Radiation Center’s 1MW TRIGA reactor. The three portable, HPGe detectors used were the ORTEC MicroDetective, the ORTEC Detective, and the Canberra Falcon. Canberra’s GENIE-2000 software was used to analyze the spectral data collected from each detector. Ultimately, these three portable detectors were able to identify a large range of fission products showing potential for material discrimination.

  6. Monopole-track characteristics in plastic detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlen, S. P.

    1976-01-01

    Total and restricted energy loss rates are calculated for magnetic monopoles of charge g = 137 e in Lexan polycarbonate. Range-energy curves are also presented. The restricted-energy-loss model is used to estimate the appearance of a monopole track in plastic detectors. The results are applied to the event observed by Price et al. and identified by them as a monopole. It is found that the observed etch rate is consistent with what one would expect for a slow magnetic monopole. These results should also be of use to other investigators for both the design and analysis of monopole experiments.

  7. Fission measurements with PPAC detectors using a coincidence technique

    SciTech Connect

    Paradela, C.; Duran, I.; Tarrio, D.; Audouin, L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Stephan, C.

    2011-07-01

    A fission detection setup based on Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters (PPAC) has been constructed and used at the CERN n-TOF facility. The setup takes advantage of the coincidence detection of both fission fragments to discriminate the background reactions produced by high energy neutrons and it allows obtaining neutron-induced fission cross section up to 1 GeV. (authors)

  8. Fission-track dating of volcanically derived sedimentary rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Kowallis, B.J.; Heaton, J.S.; Bringhurst, K.

    1986-01-01

    Depositional ages of sedimentary rocks can be determined using fission-track single grain ages on zircons from layers of volcanic ash or bentonite, even when the layers have been contaminated by older grains. This is done by compiling an age probability distribution or age spectrum for a sample from individual grain ages. An age spectrum is a simple and unambiguous way of testing for contamination and extracting useful age information. The youngest peak in the age spectrum approximates the time of deposition. In most contaminated samples, 30 or more grains should be counted to produce a reliable spectrum. However, useful, reproducible ages can be obtained by counting less than 10 grains in samples where most of the older, contaminating grains can be removed. The few older grains that remain after removing the obviously abraded ones may then be eliminated by examining the age spectrum. Although ages determined in this way are probably not precise enough for use in defining stratigraphic boundaries, they still provide a means of obtaining an isotopic age in sediments that cannot be dated by other radiometric methods. 18 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  9. Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFD) For Fuel Assembly Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Unruh; Michael Reichenberger; Phillip Ugorowski

    2013-09-01

    Neutron sensors capable of real-time measurement of thermal flux, fast flux, and temperature in a single miniaturized probe are needed in irradiation tests required to demonstrate the performance of candidate new fuels, and cladding materials. In-core ceramic-based miniature neutron detectors or “Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors” (MPFDs) have been studied at Kansas State University (KSU). The first MPFD prototypes were tested in various neutron fields at the KSU TRIGA research reactor with successful results. Currently, a United States Department of Energy-sponsored joint KSU/Idaho National Laboratory (INL) effort is underway to develop a high-temperature, high-pressure version of the MPFD using radiation-resistant, high temperature materials, which would be capable of withstanding irradiation test conditions in high performance material and test reactors (MTRs). Ultimately, this more compact, more accurate, and longer lifetime flux sensor for critical mock-ups, existing and advanced reactor designs, high performance MTRs, and transient test reactors has the potential to lead to higher accuracy and resolution data from irradiation testing, more detailed core flux measurements and enhanced fuel assembly processing. Prior evaluations by KSU indicate that these sensors could also be used to monitor burn-up of nuclear fuel. If integrated into nuclear fuel assemblies, MPFDs offer several advantages to current spent fuel management systems.

  10. Combined apatite fission track and U-Pb dating by LA-ICPMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, D. M.; Donelick, R. A.

    2012-04-01

    Apatite is a common accessory mineral in igneous, metamorphic and clastic sedimentary rocks. It is a nearly ubiquitous accessory phase in igneous rocks, is common in metamorphic rocks of pelitic, carbonate, basaltic, and ultramafic composition and is virtually ubiquitous in clastic sedimentary rocks. In contrast to the polycyclic behavior of the stable heavy mineral zircon, apatite is unstable in acidic groundwaters and has limited mechanical stability in sedimentary transport systems. Apatite has many potential applications in provenance studies, particularly as it likely represents first-cycle detritus. Fission track and U-Pb dating are very powerful techniques in apatite provenance studies. They yield complementary information, with the apatite fission-track system yielding low-temperature exhumation ages and the U-Pb system yielding high-temperature cooling ages which constrain the timing of apatite crystallization. This study focuses on integrating apatite fission track and U-Pb dating by the LA-ICPMS method. Our approach is intentionally broad in scope, and is applicable to any quadrupole or rapid-scanning magnetic-sector LA-ICPMS system. Calculating uranium concentrations in fission-track dating by LA-ICPMS increases the speed of analysis and sample throughput compared to the conventional external detector method and avoids the need for neutron irradiation (Hasebe et al., 2004). LA-ICPMS-based uranium measurements in apatite are measured relative to an internal concentration standard (typically 43Ca). Ca in apatite is not always stochiometric as minor cations (Mn2+, Sr2+, Ba2+ and Fe2+) and REE can substitute with Ca2+. These substitutions must be quantified by multi-elemental LA-ICPMS analyses. Such data are also useful for discriminating between different apatite populations in sedimentary or volcaniclastic rocks based on their trace-element chemistry. Low U, Th and radiogenic Pb concentrations, elevated common Pb / radiogenic Pb ratios and U-Pb elemental

  11. Plutonium-244 fission tracks - Evidence in a lunar rock 3.95 billion years old.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheon, I. D.; Price, P. B.

    1972-01-01

    Tracks attributed to the spontaneous fission of plutonium-244 and of uranium-238 were detected in a large whitlockite crystal in the lunar breccia 14321 from the Fra Mauro formation. For a track-retention age of 3.95 b.y., the number of plutonium tracks relative to the number of uranium tracks is 0.51 plus or minus 0.15, provided that the rock was not heavily neutron-irradiated 3.95 b.y. ago.

  12. Neutron spectrometry using CR-39 track etch detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, G. W.; Spann, J. E.; Moscovitch, M.; Bogard, J. S.; VoDinh, T.; Emfietzoglou, D.; Devine, R. T.

    2004-01-01

    Track-size distributions were measured for chemically etched CR-39 foils exposed to monoenergetic neutrons with energies ranging from 0.144 to 19 MeV and to various broad spectrum neutron sources including spontaneous fission neutrons from {sup 238}Pu. These tracks are due to energetic charged particles resulting from interactions of the neutrons with the CR-39. After etching the tracks are visible with an optical microscope and vary in size and configuration depending on the particle, energy and angle of incidence. The foils were analyzed using an automatic analysis system that scans the foils, identifies valid tracks and records the track-size parameters. The track-size distributions vary with neutron energy and with the hardness of the broad spectrum sources. The distribution from the {sup 238}Pu fission source is readily distinguishable from the other sources measured and from distributions due to background.

  13. Neutron spectrometry using CR-39 track etch detectors.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Gary W; Spann, Jerrette E; Bogard, James S; VoDinh, Tuan; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris; Devine, Robert T; Moscovitch, Marko

    2006-01-01

    Track-size distributions were measured for chemically etched CR-39 foils exposed to monoenergetic neutrons with energies ranging from 0.144 to 19 MeV and to various broad-spectrum neutron sources including spontaneous fission neutrons from (238)Pu. These tracks are due to energetic charged particles resulting from interactions of the neutrons with the CR-39. The tracks are visible with an optical microscope after chemical etching and vary in size and configuration depending on the particle, energy and angle of incidence. The foils were analysed using an automatic analysis system that scans the foils, identifies valid tracks and records the track-size parameters. The track-size distributions vary with neutron energy for the monoenergetic sources and with the hardness of the broad-spectrum sources. The distribution from the (238)Pu fission source is readily distinguishable from the other sources measured and from distributions owing to the background. PMID:16735559

  14. Novel calibration for LA-ICP-MS-based fission-track thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, C. J.; Guedes, S.; Hadler, J. C.; Mertz-Kraus, R.; Zack, T.; Iunes, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel age-equation calibration for fission-track age determinations by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. This new calibration incorporates the efficiency factor of an internal surface, [ ηq]is, which is obtained by measuring the projected fission-track length, allowing the determination of FT ages directly using the recommended spontaneous fission decay constant. Also, the uranium concentrations in apatite samples are determined using a Durango (Dur-2, 7.44 μg/g U) crystal and a Mud Tank (MT-7, 6.88 μg/g U) crystal as uranium reference materials. The use of matrix-matched reference materials allows a reduction in the uncertainty of the uranium measurements to those related to counting statistics, which are ca. 1 % taking into account that no extra source of uncertainty has to be considered. The equations as well as the matrix-matched reference materials are evaluated using well-dated samples from Durango, Fish Canyon Tuff, and Limberg as unknown samples. The results compare well with their respective published ages determined through other dating methods. Additionally, the results agree with traditional fission-track ages using both the zeta approach and the absolute approach, suggesting that the calibration presented in this work can be robustly applied in geological context. Furthermore, considering that fission-track ages can be determined without an age standard sample, the fission-track thermochronology approach presented here is assumed to be a valuable dating tool.

  15. Fission track analysis, rift shoulder uplift, and tectonic modeling of the Norwegian Continental Margin

    SciTech Connect

    Andriessen, P.; Van Der Beek, P.; Cloetingh, S.; Rohrman, M. )

    1993-09-01

    Apatite fission track analysis from southern Norway and Sweden, across the Permian Carboniferous Oslo rift, are presented and discussed in relation to different rifting scenarios. Vertical and horizontal apatite fission tack profiles in middle and southern Norway unravel the post-Carboniferous history of the Fennoscandian shield. Fission track apatite ages range from 240 Ma in the south to 160 Ma in the north, and according to spontaneous fission track length measurements, they must be interpreted as mixed ages, indicating minor amounts of Paleozoic-Mesozoic sedimentary cover. Apatite fission track length and age modeling suggest rapid cooling and uplift in the Tertiary for the southernmost part of Norway, suggesting a differential uplift of the basement. the obtained data are important for the reconstruction of burial and thermal histories of Cenozoic sedimentary basins of the Norwegian continental margin in the northern North Sea, where diverse rifting events, intraplate stress regimes, and inversion tectonics are involved. Fission track analysis puts constraints on tectonic modeling of uplift of rift flanks and the Norwegian continental margin and yields information for these assessment of hydrocarbon potentials of the sedimentary basins.

  16. Spacecraft Doppler Tracking as a Xylophone Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinto, Massimo

    1996-01-01

    We discuss spacecraft Doppler tracking in which Doppler data recorded on the ground are linearly combined with Doppler measurements made on board a spacecraft. By using the four-link radio system first proposed by Vessot and Levine, we derive a new method for removing from the combined data the frequency fluctuations due to the Earth troposphere, ionosphere, and mechanical vibrations of the antenna on the ground. Our method provides also for reducing by several orders of magnitude, at selected Fourier components, the frequency fluctuations due to other noise sources, such as the clock on board the spacecraft or the antenna and buffeting of the probe by non-gravitational forces. In this respect spacecraft Doppler tracking can be regarded as a xylophone detector. Estimates of the sensitivities achievable by this xylophone are presented for two tests of Einstein's theory of relativity: searches for gravitational waves and measurements of the gravitational red shift. This experimental technique could be extended to other tests of the theory of relativity, and to radio science experiments that rely on high-precision Doppler measurements.

  17. Novel Electron-Bubble Tracking Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, William J.

    2008-08-08

    Our Columbia group, in collaboration with Brookhaven and SMU, has been carrying out R&D on tracking detectors in cryogenic liquids, including neon and helium. A cryostat purchased by this Grant capable of working temperatures down to 1 K and pressures above the critical point of neon and helium has been operated with a variety of noble fluids. Gaseous Electron Multipliers (GEM) with hydrogen additives have been operated with tracks of radioactive sources read out both by electrical charge detecting electronics, and an optical camera purchased by this Grant, measuring mobility, charge yield, transitions through phase boundaries, gain limitations, and other properties. The goal is very high resolution in large volumes. The scope of the project is the provision of a high performance camera and its installation in a cryogenic facility providing pressure up to 40 atmospheres and a temperature from ambient down to about 1 K. In this section we will address the goals and results having to do with this project and particularly the performance of the camera, and provide a summary of the status of the detector project. The technical development of digital cameras has been dominated for the last forty years by the Charge-Coupled Device technology (CCD). This allows photon recording on very small pixels on silicon planes that provide high quantum efficiency in the visible spectrum, recording the charge generated by a single photon stored on one pixel with an area of order ten microns square. The area can be up to several centimeters squared, containing a million pixels or more. The stores charge is usually read out by manipulating voltage biases to shift the charge in each pixel over to the next, and eventually out of the array and sent to an external processor and memory. Mass production has brought the cost per channel down to very small values and allowed cameras to be integrated to many consumer products. Thermal noise becomes larger than one photon on a single pixel at

  18. Fission-track age (400,000 yr) of the Rockland tephra, based on inclusion of zirco grains lacking fossil fission tracks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, C.E.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Hillhouse, J.W.; Woodward, M.J.; Slate, J.L.; Sorg, D.H.

    1991-01-01

    A zircon fission-track age of about 400,000 yr B.P. has been determined for the Rockland tephra, a widespread pyroclastic layer in northern California and western Nevada. New ages of zircon separates from both proximal and distal exposures of this layer range from 370,000 to 460,000 yr; ages of the best material provide a narrower range, from 370,000 yr for unwelded ash-flow tuff to 420,000 yr for distal air-fall ash that appears to be uncontaminated by clastic detritus or xenocrysts. Detrital or xenocrystic grains in the ash-flow tuff may have been annealed during emplacement and cooling of the tuff. Detrital and xenocrystic zircons are identified on the basis of their physical characteristics and distinctly older ages. Independent stratigraphic and magnetostratigraphic data constrain the age of the Rockland tephra between 300,000 and 600,000 yr, a range that is compatible with the fission-track age. Zircon grains containing no spontaneous (fossil) tracks are regarded as part of the normal population of comagmatic grains because maximum ages calculated for these grains form a population that mimics the distribution of ages of individual zircon grains that contain fossil tracks; modal ages of both groups fall between 250,000 and 500,000 yr. Induced fission tracks from grains that lack fossil tracks are included in the age calculations, resulting in significantly younger and more coherent dates than would result if these tracks had been omitted, especially those of the finer-grained distal samples. ?? 1991.

  19. A practical method of estimating standard error of age in the fission track dating method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, N.M.; McGee, V.E.; Naeser, C.W.

    1979-01-01

    A first-order approximation formula for the propagation of error in the fission track age equation is given by PA = C[P2s+P2i+P2??-2rPsPi] 1 2, where PA, Ps, Pi and P?? are the percentage error of age, of spontaneous track density, of induced track density, and of neutron dose, respectively, and C is a constant. The correlation, r, between spontaneous are induced track densities is a crucial element in the error analysis, acting generally to improve the standard error of age. In addition, the correlation parameter r is instrumental is specifying the level of neutron dose, a controlled variable, which will minimize the standard error of age. The results from the approximation equation agree closely with the results from an independent statistical model for the propagation of errors in the fission-track dating method. ?? 1979.

  20. Scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1983-01-01

    A scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector has been developed using a bundle of square cross-section plastic scintillator fiber optics, proximity focused onto an image intensified Charge Injection Device (CID) camera. Detector to beams of 15 MeV protons and relativistic Neon, Manganese, and Gold nuclei have been exposed and images of their tracks are obtained. This paper presents details of the detector technique, properties of the tracks obtained, and range measurements of 15 MeV protons stopping in the fiber bundle.

  1. Fission-track dating: application to the thermal history of mountains and basins

    SciTech Connect

    Naeser, C.W.; Naeser, N.D.

    1985-01-01

    Fission tracks are cylindrical zones of structural damage found in minerals and glasses. They are formed by the passage of a massive highly-charged ion produced from the spontaneous fission of incorporated /sup 238/U. Fission tracks are stable in most minerals at temperatures <50/sup 0/C, but if a mineral is heated above its track stability zone, the track will fade or anneal. Each mineral species has a characteristic temperature zone over which track annealing takes place, and the extent of this annealing is related to both the temperature and the length of time at that temperature. A short heating event at high temperature will produce the same observed annealing as low temperature heating of long duration. For times greater than approx. =10/sup 6/ years, the temperature range, depending on duration of heating, for total annealing in the three minerals most commonly dated by fission tracks are: apatite 105/sup 0/ to 135/sup 0/C, zircon approx.160/sup 0/ to approx.240/sup 0/C, and sphene approx.250/sup 0/ +/- ./sup 0/C. By looking at the pattern of ages of one or more of these minerals, as a function of depth or elevation, it is possible to determine the paleotemperature history, and the burial or uplift/erosion history, of sedimentary basins and mountain ranges. The distribution of fission-track ages of detrital apatite from Upper Cretaceous and lower Tertiary sedimentary rocks in the Wagon Wheel no. 1 well in the northern Green River basin indicates that these rocks have cooled by at least 20/sup 0/C since the beginning of the Pliocene. Likewise, anomalously young apatite ages from Precambrian rocks at the base of the Wasatch Mountains in Utah show that this range has been uplifted and cooled by at least 100/sup 0/C in the last 5 Ma.

  2. Thermal history determined by fission-track dating for three sedimentary basins in California and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, Nancy D.

    1984-01-01

    The use of fission-tracks is demonstrated in studies of time-temperature relationships in three sedimentary basins in the western United States; in the Tejon Oil Field area of the southern San Joaquin Valley, California; in the northeastern Green River basin, Wyoming, and in drill holes in the southern Powder River Basin, Wyoming.

  3. Dating thermal events at Cerro Prieto using fission-track annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, S.J.; Elders, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    The duration of heating in the Cerro Prieto reservoir was estimated by relating the fading of spontaneous fission tracks in detrital apatite to observed temperatures. The rate of fading is a function of both time and temperature. The apparent fission track age of the detrital apatites then, is a function of both their source age and their time-temperature history. Data from laboratory experiments and geologic fading studies were compiled from published sources to produce lines of iso-annealing for apatite in time-temperature space. Fission track ages were calculated for samples from two wells at Cerro Prieto, one with an apparently simple and one with an apparently complex thermal history. Temperatures were estimated by empirical vitrinite reflectance geothermometry, fluid inclusion homogenization and oxygen isotope equilibrium. These estimates were compared with logs of measured borehole temperatures. The temperature in well T-366, where complete annealing first occurs, was estimated to be between 160 and 180{sup 0}C. Complete annealing at these temperatures requires 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 3} years, respectively. Well M-94 has an apparently complex thermal history. Geothermometers in this well indicate temperatures some 50 to 100{sup 0}C higher than those measured directly in the borehole. Fission tracks are partially preserved in M-94 where paleotemperatures were as high as 200{sup 0}C and are erased where geothermometers indicate temperatures of 250{sup 0}C. This implies a thermal event less than 10{sup 1} years and greater than 10{sup 0} years in duration.

  4. A new method of imaging particle tracks in solid state nuclear track detectors.

    PubMed

    Wertheim, D; Gillmore, G; Brown, L; Petford, N

    2010-01-01

    Solid state nuclear track detectors are used to determine the concentration of alpha particles in the environment. The standard method for assessing exposed detectors involves 2D image analysis. However 3D imaging has the potential to provide additional information relating to angle as well as to differentiate clustered hit sequences and possibly energy of alpha particles but this could be time consuming. Here we describe a new method for rapid high-resolution 3D imaging of solid state nuclear track detectors. A 'LEXT' OLS3100 confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) was used in confocal mode to successfully obtain 3D image data on four CR-39 plastic detectors. Three-dimensional visualization and image analysis enabled characterization of track features. This method may provide a means of rapid and detailed 3D analysis of solid state nuclear track detectors.

  5. Robust track fitting in the Belle II inner tracking detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadler, Moritz; Frühwirth, Rudolf

    2012-12-01

    Track fitting in the new inner tracker of the Belle II experiment uses the GENFIT package. In the latter both a standard Kalman filter and a robust extension, the deterministic annealing filter (DAF), are implemented. This contribution presents the results of a simulation experiment which examines the performance of the DAF in the inner tracker, in terms of outlier detection ability and of the impact of different kinds of background on the quality of the fitted tracks.

  6. Fission track astrology of three Apollo 14 gas-rich breccias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, H.; Shirck, J.; Sun, S.; Walker, R.

    1973-01-01

    The three Apollo 14 breccias 14301, 14313, and 14318 all show fission xenon due to the decay of Pu-244. To investigate possible in situ production of the fission gas, an analysis was made of the U-distribution in these three breccias. The major amount of the U lies in glass clasts and in matrix material and no more than 25% occurs in distinct high-U minerals. The U-distribution of each breccia is discussed in detail. Whitlockite grains in breccias 14301 and 14318 found with the U-mapping were etched and analyzed for fission tracks. The excess track densities are much smaller than indicated by the Xe-excess. Because of a preirradiation history documented by very high track densities in feldspar grains, however, it is impossible to attribute the excess tracks to the decay of Pu-244. A modified track method has been developed for measuring average U-concentrations in samples containing a heterogeneous distribution of U in the form of small high-U minerals. The method is briefly discussed, and results for the rocks 14301, 14313, 14318, 68815, 15595, and the soil 64421 are given.

  7. Scintillator-fiber charged particle track-imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1983-01-01

    A scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector was developed using a bundle of square cross section plastic scintillator fiber optics, proximity focused onto an image intensified charge injection device (CID) camera. The tracks of charged particle penetrating into the scintillator fiber bundle are projected onto the CID camera and the imaging information is read out in video format. The detector was exposed to beams of 15 MeV protons and relativistic Neon, Manganese, and Gold nuclei and images of their tracks were obtained. Details of the detector technique, properties of the tracks obtained, and preliminary range measurements of 15 MeV protons stopping in the fiber bundle are presented.

  8. Fission-track ages of late Cenozoic distal tephra beds in the Yukon Territory and Alaska.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, N.D.; Westgate, J.A.; Hughes, O.L.; Pewe, T.L.

    1982-01-01

    Six distal tephra beds from the Yukon Territory and Alaska were dated by the fission-track method. Assuming that no track fading has occurred in the glass, Old Crow and Dawson tephra beds are <120 000 and <52 000 yr old, respectively. Mosquito Gulch tephra is 1.22 m.y. old, Fort Selkirk tephra is approx 1 m.y. old, the Ester ash bed is 0.45 m.y. old, and the best estimate of the age of Lost Chicken tephra is in the range 1.7-2.6 m.y. It is concluded that application of the fission-track method to distal tephra, in conjunction with detailed characterization studies, offers great potential for elucidation of the Late Cainozoic geological history of Alaska and the Yukon Territory. -P.Br.

  9. Fission-track dating of apatite and zircon: An interlaboratory comparison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, C.W.; Zimmermann, R.A.; Cebula, G.T.

    1981-01-01

    Apatite and zircon separates from the Fish Canyon Tuff (K-Ar age, 27.9??0.7 Myr), San Juan Mtns., Colorado, have been given to over 50 laboratories for fission-track dating. Nineteen laboratories have reported fission-track ages that they have determined for apatites. Nine laboratories have reported their analysis of the zircons. The principal difference between the results reported by the laboratories reflects their choice of the decay constant. The laboratories which use a value of ??f ??? 7.0 ?? 10-17 yr-1 for the spontaneous-fission decay constant of 238U, report an average age for the apatite of 28.5??0.7 Myr, and those using ??f ??? = 8.4 ?? 10-17 yr-1 report an average age of 23.6??1.0 Myr. The average fission-track age for the zircons is 28.4??0.7 Myr. Only laboratories which use ??f ??? 7.0 ?? 10-17 yr-1 reported zircon data. ?? 1981.

  10. Determination of nuclear tracks parameters on sequentially etched PADC detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwacik, Tomasz; Bilski, Pawel; Koerner, Christine; Facius, Rainer; Berger, Thomas; Nowak, Tomasz; Reitz, Guenther; Olko, Pawel

    Polyallyl Diglycol Carbonate (PADC) detectors find many applications in radiation protection. One of them is the cosmic radiation dosimetry, where PADC detectors measure the linear energy transfer (LET) spectra of charged particles (from protons to heavy ions), supplementing TLD detectors in the role of passive dosemeter. Calibration exposures to ions of known LET are required to establish a relation between parameters of track observed on the detector and LET of particle creating this track. PADC TASTRAK nuclear track detectors were exposed to 12 C and 56 Fe ions of LET in H2 O between 10 and 544 keV/µm. The exposures took place at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) in Chiba, Japan in the frame of the HIMAC research project "Space Radiation Dosimetry-Ground Based Verification of the MATROSHKA Facility" (20P-240). Detectors were etched in water solution of NaOH with three different temperatures and for various etching times to observe the appearance of etched tracks, the evolution of their parameters and the stability of the etching process. The applied etching times (and the solution's concentrations and temperatures) were: 48, 72, 96, 120 hours (6.25 N NaOH, 50 O C), 20, 40, 60, 80 hours (6.25 N NaOH, 60 O C) and 8, 12, 16, 20 hours (7N NaOH, 70 O C). The analysis of the detectors involved planimetric (2D) measurements of tracks' entrance ellipses and mechanical measurements of bulk layer thickness. Further track parameters, like angle of incidence, track length and etch rate ratio were then calculated. For certain tracks, results of planimetric measurements and calculations were also compared with results of optical track profile (3D) measurements, where not only the track's entrance ellipse but also the location of the track's tip could be directly measured. All these measurements have been performed with the 2D/3D measurement system at DLR. The collected data allow to create sets of V(LET in H2 O) calibration curves suitable for short, intermediate and

  11. 3D visualisation and analysis of single and coalescing tracks in Solid state Nuclear Track Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertheim, David; Gillmore, Gavin; Brown, Louise; Petford, Nick

    2010-05-01

    Exposure to radon gas (222Rn) and associated ionising decay products can cause lung cancer in humans (1). Solid state Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs) can be used to monitor radon concentrations (2). Radon particles form tracks in the detectors and these tracks can be etched in order to enable 2D surface image analysis. We have previously shown that confocal microscopy can be used for 3D visualisation of etched SSNTDs (3). The aim of the study was to further investigate track angles and patterns in SSNTDs. A 'LEXT' confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Japan) was used to acquire 3D image datasets of five CR-39 plastic SSNTD's. The resultant 3D visualisations were analysed by eye and inclination angles assessed on selected tracks. From visual assessment, single isolated tracks as well as coalescing tracks were observed on the etched detectors. In addition varying track inclination angles were observed. Several different patterns of track formation were seen such as single isolated and double coalescing tracks. The observed track angles of inclination may help to assess the angle at which alpha particles hit the detector. Darby, S et al. Radon in homes and risk of lung cancer : collaborative analysis of individual data from 13 European case-control studies. British Medical Journal 2005; 330, 223-226. Phillips, P.S., Denman, A.R., Crockett, R.G.M., Gillmore, G., Groves-Kirkby, C.J., Woolridge, A., Comparative Analysis of Weekly vs. Three monthly radon measurements in dwellings. DEFRA Report No., DEFRA/RAS/03.006. (2004). Wertheim D, Gillmore G, Brown L, and Petford N. A new method of imaging particle tracks in Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors. Journal of Microscopy 2010; 237: 1-6.

  12. Uplift and subsidence of the Suez rift: Constraints from fission-track analysis and sediment backstripping

    SciTech Connect

    Steckler, M.S.; Omar, G.I.; Buck, W.R. )

    1988-08-01

    The Gulf of Suez is a Neogene rift that has evolved as one arm of the Sinai triple junction. The basement uplifts flanking the rift are larger than can be explained by uniform lithospheric extension. The timing of the regional heating required by the uplift has important implications for hydrocarbon maturation for the Gulf of Suez and rifts in general. The local geology indicates that the uplift did not predate rifting. Therefore, a regional subsidence and two-dimensional backstripping of the rift sediments were undertaken in conjunction with fission track analyses of the basement uplift. The initial rift deposits (Nukhul Formation) indicate slow extension during the earliest Miocene. The extension rate increased at the beginning of the deposition of the Rudeis Formation at approximately 19 Ma as the Gulf of Suez entered its main phase of rifting. By the end of the deposition of the Kareem Formation (approximately 14-15 Ma), most of the Africa-Arabia separation had transferred to the Gulf of Aqaba-Dead Sea transform. In order to determine the onset of the rift flank uplift relative to the rift history, 55 apatite fission track analyses were performed on samples from the basement of the eastern desert, on the western side of the rift. Apatite fission tracks record the thermal history of the samples for temperatures up to 125{degree}c. Apparent ages range from 382 to 11 Ma representing samples that have undergone various degrees of track annealing. Track length distributions clearly show the fading of tracks acquired prior to uplift in more deeply buried samples and the accumulation of long unannealed tracks subsequent to unroofing. The pattern of the track length vs. age distribution indicates that major uplift began simultaneously with the main phase of rifting at 19-20 Ma.

  13. A re-evaluation of geological timescale benchmarks and temperature sensitivity of fission-track annealing in apatites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luijendijk, Elco; Andriessen, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Current models of the temperature sensitivity of fission track annealing in apatites have been calibrated using fission track data from boreholes, with the assumption that these samples are currently at maximum burial depth and temperatures. The most detailed data-set comes from boreholes located in the Otway basin, Australia. However, several lines of evidence suggest that these samples are not at their maximum burial depth and temperature and consequently the cooling temperature of the apatite fission track thermochronometer would then be higher than previously assumed. Significant late Cenozoic exhumation in the Otway Basin was suggested by earlier studies that document a major late-Miocene erosional unconformity, folding and trusting of underlying sediments and elevated strandlines along the coast. In addition, anomalously young apatite (U-Th)/He ages in several boreholes in the basin suggest that the basin's sediments have been exhumed and cooled in the late Cenozoic. We explore the effects of late Cenozoic exhumation on fission track data in the Otway basin using a 1D model of burial and thermal history. We show that simulating several 100s of meters of exhumation in the basin results in significant misfit between current annealing models and observed fission track data. The additional exhumation reconciles the Otway basin data with a second detailed fission track dataset from boreholes in Southern Texas with a well-constrained thermal and burial history. We combine vitrinite reflectance data and U-Th/He data from the Otway basin to recalibrate the burial history of the Otway basin. Subsequently we combine the new thermal history of the Otway basin with the Southern Texas dataset to recalibrate the fission track annealing algorithm. The results suggest that fission-track annealing in apatites is underestimated by approximately 20°C by current annealing models, with significant implications for studies that use apatite fission track thermochronology to

  14. Fission signal detection using helium-4 gas fast neutron scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J. M. Kelley, R. P.; Jordan, K. A.; Murer, D.

    2014-07-07

    We demonstrate the unambiguous detection of the fission neutron signal produced in natural uranium during active neutron interrogation using a deuterium-deuterium fusion neutron generator and a high pressure {sup 4}He gas fast neutron scintillation detector. The energy deposition by individual neutrons is quantified, and energy discrimination is used to differentiate the induced fission neutrons from the mono-energetic interrogation neutrons. The detector can discriminate between different incident neutron energies using pulse height discrimination of the slow scintillation component of the elastic scattering interaction between a neutron and the {sup 4}He atom. Energy histograms resulting from this data show the buildup of a detected fission neutron signal at higher energies. The detector is shown here to detect a unique fission neutron signal from a natural uranium sample during active interrogation with a (d, d) neutron generator. This signal path has a direct application to the detection of shielded nuclear material in cargo and air containers. It allows for continuous interrogation and detection while greatly minimizing the potential for false alarms.

  15. Registration of alpha particles in Makrofol-E nuclear track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rammah, Y. S.; Abdalla, Ayman M.; Ashraf, O.; Ashry, A. H.

    2016-06-01

    Fast detection of alpha particles in the range from 1 to 5 MeV in Makrofol-E polycarbonate nuclear track detectors (PCTDs) using a new chemical etchant was investigated. 252Cf and 241Am-thin open sources were used for irradiating Makrofol-E detectors with fission fragments and alpha particles in air at normal pressure and temperature (NPT). A chain of experimental work has been carried out using new etchants to register alpha particle in short time in Makrofol-E polycarbonate detectors. The etching efficiency were exhibited a clear dependence on the amount of methanol in the etching solution and etching time. The optimized chemical condition obtained at this stage of development for 200 μm Makrofol-E detectors are (8 ml of 10 N NaOH + 2 ml CH3OH) etching solutions at 60 °C for 3 h. In this study; it is possible to observe energy detection windows for Makrofol-E detectors according to applied etching duration. Makrofol-E introduced the characteristic Bragg peak, which indicates the advantages of this detector as alpha spectrometer. Consequently, the suggested new etchant can be developed for heavy ions detection and monitoring radon levels and its daughters.

  16. Diffraction pattern by rotated conical tracks in solid state nuclear track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevanovic, N.; Markovic, V. M.

    2016-06-01

    The method for determination of diffraction pattern for irregular 3D objects with application on rotated conical tracks in solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) wasdescribed in this paper. The model can be applied for different types of the diffraction (Fresnel, Fraunhofer) and arbitrary shapes of the obstacle. By applying the developed model on conical tracks it was fond that diffraction pattern strongly depends from radius, length and rotation angle of the conical tracks. These dependences were investigated in this paper and results can be applied for determination of inner tracks structure via diffraction pattern.

  17. Research on application of several tracking detectors in APT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi

    2005-01-01

    APT system is the key technology in free space optical communication system, and acquisition and tracking detector is the key component in PAT system. There are several candidate detectors that can be used in PAT system, such as CCD, QAPD and CMOS Imager etc. The characteristics of these detectors are quite different, i.e., the structures and the working schemes. This paper gives thoroughly compare of the usage and working principle of CCD and CMOS imager, and discusses the key parameters like tracking error, noise analyses, power analyses etc. Conclusion is given at the end of this paper that CMOS imager is a good candidate detector for PAT system in free space optical communication system.

  18. Provenance studies by fission-track dating of zircon-etching and counting procedures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, Nancy D.; Zeitler, Peter K.; Naeser, Charles W.; Cerveny, Philip F.

    1987-01-01

    In sedimentary rocks that have not been heated to high enough temperatures to anneal fission tracks in zircon (greater than approximately equals 160 degree C), fission-track ages of individual detrital zircon grains provide valuable information about the source rocks eroded to form the sediments. The success of such studies depends, however, on the degree to which the ages determined from the detrital suite accurately portray the range of grain ages that are present in the suite. This in turn depends to a large extent on using counting and, in particular, etching procedures that permit proper sampling of grains with a wide range of age and uranium concentrations. Results are reported here of an experimental study of a 'detrital' zircon suite manufactured from several zircon populations of known age. This study suggests that multiple etches are required when a complete spectrum of ages in a zircon suite is desired.

  19. Provenance studies by fission-track dating of zircon-etching and counting procedures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, N.D.; Zeitler, P.K.; Naeser, C.W.; Cerveny, P.F.

    1987-01-01

    In sedimentary rocks that have not been heated to high enough temperatures to anneal fission tracks in zircon (greater than ≈ 160°C), fission-track ages of individual detrital zircon grains provide valuable information about the source rocks eroded to form the sediments. The success of such studies depends, however, on the degree to which the ages determined from the detrital suite accurately portray the range of grain ages that are present in the suite. This in turn depends to a large extent on using counting and, in particular, etching procedures that permit proper sampling of grains with a wide range of age and uranium concentrations. Results are reported here of an experimental study of a ‘detrital’ zircon suite manufactured from several zircon populations of known age. This study suggests that multiple etches are required when a complete spectrum of ages in a zircon suite is desired.

  20. A new method for internal calibration of nuclear track detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oda, K.; Csige, I.; Henke, R. P.; Benton, E. V.

    1992-01-01

    A new technique is proposed for an internal calibration of a two-layer detector assembly. Spatially coincident pairs of conical tracks on one surface and overetched tracks on the adjacent surface are selected for measurement. Both the etch rate ratio and the particle range can be obtained from the minor and major diameters of the elliptical track and the radii of the circular tracks for two etching steps. This technique was applied to CR-39 detectors exposed to fast neutrons and those flown on a high altitude balloon in order to evaluate the proton response. An improvement by using multi-step etching was also carried out. It was found that not only a single set of the etch rate ratio and the range but also the response curve could be estimated in an extended region by analyzing combined growth curves.

  1. A new method for internal calibration of nuclear track detectors.

    PubMed

    Oda, K; Csige, I; Henke, R P; Benton, E V

    1992-07-01

    A new technique is proposed for an internal calibration of a two-layer detector assembly. Spatially coincident pairs of conical tracks on one surface and overetched tracks on the adjacent surface are selected for measurement. Both the etch rate ratio and the particle range can be obtained from the minor and major diameters of the elliptical track and the radii of the circular tracks for two etching steps. This technique was applied to CR-39 detectors exposed to fast neutrons and those flown on a high altitude balloon in order to evaluate the proton response. An improvement by using multi-step etching was also carried out. It was found that not only a single set of the etch rate ratio and the range but also the response curve could be estimated in an extended region by analyzing combined growth curves. PMID:11537536

  2. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Tracking and Vertexing (2/4)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-02-15

    Efficient and precise determination of the flavour of partons in multi-hadron final states is essential to the anticipated LC physics program. This makes tracking in the vicinity of the interaction region of great importance. Tracking extrapolation and momentum resolution are specified by precise physics requirements. The R&D; towards detectors able to meet these specifications will be discussed, together with some of their application beyond particle physics.

  3. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Tracking and Vertexing (2/4)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Efficient and precise determination of the flavour of partons in multi-hadron final states is essential to the anticipated LC physics program. This makes tracking in the vicinity of the interaction region of great importance. Tracking extrapolation and momentum resolution are specified by precise physics requirements. The R&D; towards detectors able to meet these specifications will be discussed, together with some of their application beyond particle physics.

  4. 3-D imaging of particle tracks in solid state nuclear track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertheim, D.; Gillmore, G.; Brown, L.; Petford, N.

    2010-05-01

    It has been suggested that 3 to 5% of total lung cancer deaths in the UK may be associated with elevated radon concentration. Radon gas levels can be assessed using CR-39 plastic detectors which are often assessed by 2-D image analysis of surface images. 3-D analysis has the potential to provide information relating to the angle at which alpha particles impinge on the detector. In this study we used a "LEXT" OLS3100 confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) to image tracks on five CR-39 detectors. We were able to identify several patterns of single and coalescing tracks from 3-D visualisation. Thus this method may provide a means of detailed 3-D analysis of Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors.

  5. Effects of etching time on alpha tracks in Solid state Nuclear Track Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmore, Gavin; Wertheim, David; Crust, Simon

    2013-04-01

    Inhalation of radon gas is thought to be the cause of about 1100 lung cancer related deaths each year in the UK (1). Radon concentrations can be monitored using Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs) as the natural decay of radon results in alpha particles which form tracks in the detectors and these tracks can be etched in order to enable microscopic analysis. We have previously shown that confocal microscopy can be used for 3D visualisation of etched SSNTDs (2, 3). The aim of the study was to examine the effect of etching time on the appearance of alpha tracks in SSNTDs. Six SSNTDs were placed in a chamber with a luminous dial watch for a fixed period. The detectors were etched for between 30 minutes and 4.5 hours using 6M NaOH at a temperature of 90oC. A 'LEXT' OLS4000 confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Japan) was used to acquire 2D and 3D image datasets of CR-39 plastic SSNTDs. Confocal microscope 3D images were acquired using a x50 or x100 objective lens. Data were saved as images and also spreadsheet files with height measurements. Software was written using MATLAB (The MathWorks Inc., USA) to analyse the height data. Comparing the 30 minute and 4 hour etching time detectors, we observed that there were marked differences in track area; the lower the etching time the smaller the track area. The degree to which etching may prevent visualising adjacent tracks also requires further study as it is possible that etching could result in some tracks being subsumed in other tracks. On the other hand if there is too little etching, track sizes would be reduced and hence could be more difficult to image; thus there is a balance required to obtain suitable measurement accuracy. (1) Gray A, Read S, McGale P and Darby S. Lung cancer deaths from indoor radon and the cost effectiveness and potential of policies to reduce them. BMJ 2009; 338: a3110. (2) Wertheim D, Gillmore G, Brown L, and Petford N. A new method of imaging particle tracks in

  6. Combining apatite fission track and He thermochronology to constrain thermal histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persano, C.; Stuart, F.; Bishop, P.

    2003-04-01

    Apatite fission track thermochronometry (AFTT) has proved an invaluable tool for determining the cooling histories of rocks in the shallow crust. Quantitative models for the time and temperature dependence of the fission track annealing process in apatite demostrate that the combination of fission track apparent age and track length distribution provides a continuous record of the thermal history of the samples from 120 to 60^oC, and possibly, to lower temperatures. However the sensitivity of the technique is poorly constrained below 70-80^oC because annealing rates are slow. The apatite (U-Th)/He system is sensitive to temperatures between 80 and 40^oC irrespective of apatite chemistry, and presents a way to test the ability of AFTT to determine thermal histories below 80^oC. Here we present a novel way of combining apatite fission track and (U-Th)/He data that narrows the number of possible thermal histories and provides better constraints on the landscape evolution of a particular region. We use as an example the southeastern Australia passive margin in NSW, an area where post break-up landscape evolution is poorly resolved despite an extensive fission track database. Fission track and (U-Th)/He ages have been measured on 16 apatite samples from two coast perpendicular traverses across the coastal plain, up the escarpment onto the plateau. The fission track data are modelled using AFTSolve and the individual thermal histories which fit the data are used as parameters for forward modelling the apatite He ages. Only the thermal histories that produce the measured He age, within uncertainty, are considered. For each sample, the choosen time-temperature paths show the same peculiar characteristics, narrowing considerably the number of possible cooling scenarios. This combination shows that the AFT/derived thermal histories for temperatures between 60 to 40^oC may be inconsistent with the (U-Th)/He ages, suggesting that the annealing process at this temperatures

  7. a High Resolution Ionization Chamber for the SPIDER Fission Fragment Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierbachtol, K.; Tovesson, F.; Arnold, C. W.; Laptev, A. B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Jandel, M.; Nelson, R. O.; White, M. C.; Hecht, A. A.; Mader, D.

    2014-09-01

    An ionization chamber for measuring the energy loss and kinetic energy of fragments produced through neutron-induced fission at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has been designed as a component of the the new SPIDER detector. Design criteria included energy resolutions of <1% for high energy resolution and increased charge resolution. The ionization chamber will be combined with a high resolution time-of-flight detector to achieve fragment yield measurements with mass and nuclear charge resolutions of 1 amu and Z=1. The present status of the ionization chamber will be presented.

  8. Alignment of the ATLAS inner detector tracking system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollár, Daniel; ATLAS Collaboration

    2010-04-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is the world's largest particle accelerator. ATLAS is one of the two general purpose experiments. The inner tracking system of ATLAS, the Inner Detector, is built on two technologies: silicon detectors and drift tube based detectors. The required precision for the alignment of the most sensitive coordinates of the Silicon sensors is just a few microns. Therefore the alignment of the ATLAS Inner Detector is performed using complex algorithms requiring extensive CPU and memory usage. The proposed alignment algorithms were exercised on several applications. This proceedings present the outline of the alignment approach and results from Cosmic Ray runs and large scale computing simulation of physics samples mimicking the ATLAS operation during real data-taking. The full alignment chain was tested using these samples and alignment constants were produced and validated within 24 hours. Early alignment of the ATLAS Inner Detector is provided even before the LHC start up by analysing Cosmic Ray data.

  9. Engineering cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The lack of sensitive biocompatible particle track detectors has so far limited parallel detection of physical energy deposition and biological response. Fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) based on Al2O3:C,Mg single crystals combined with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) provide 3D information on ion tracks with a resolution limited by light diffraction. Here we report the development of next generation cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors (Cell-Fit-HD). Methods The biocompatibility of FNTDs was tested using six different cell lines, i.e. human non-small cell lung carcinoma (A549), glioblastoma (U87), androgen independent prostate cancer (PC3), epidermoid cancer (A431) and murine (VmDk) glioma SMA-560. To evaluate cell adherence, viability and conformal coverage of the crystals different seeding densities and alternative coating with extracellular matrix (fibronectin) was tested. Carbon irradiation was performed in Bragg peak (initial 270.55 MeV u−1). A series of cell compartment specific fluorescence stains including nuclear (HOECHST), membrane (Glut-1), cytoplasm (Calcein AM, CM-DiI) were tested on Cell-Fit-HDs and a single CLSM was employed to co-detect the physical (crystal) as well as the biological (cell layer) information. Results The FNTD provides a biocompatible surface. Among the cells tested, A549 cells formed the most uniform, viable, tightly packed epithelial like monolayer. The ion track information was not compromised in Cell-Fit-HD as compared to the FNTD alone. Neither cell coating and culturing, nor additional staining procedures affected the properties of the FNTD surface to detect ion tracks. Standard immunofluorescence and live staining procedures could be employed to co-register cell biology and ion track information. Conclusions The Cell-Fit-Hybrid Detector system is a promising platform for a multitude of studies linking biological response to energy deposition at high level of optical microscopy

  10. Apatite fission-track thermochronology of the central and southern Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, M.K.

    1989-01-01

    Samples were collected in west to east transects across the Appalachian Basin of Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, and Virginia. These samples locations were chosen to test the concept of increasing paleotemperature due to increasing burial from west to east across the Appalachian Basin and to detect any thermal anomalies that exist. Calculated time-temperature (tT) paths based on apatite fission-track apparent ages and confined track length distributions for samples from this study indicate that both the Pennsylvania and southern Appalachian had complex uplift and cooling histories. In Pennsylvania, the Tioga and Kalkberg ash bed samples from central Pennsylvania yield modelled tT paths that indicate early post-Alleghanian (285-270 Ma) cooling with uplift estimated at beginning at {approx}251 {plus minus} 25 Ma. Samples from the western Allegheny Plateau and Allegheny Front contain apatites which have reset to give fission-track ages and track lengths consistent with tT histories beginning at <200 Ma. In northeastern Pennsylvania on the Allegheny Plateau, the modelled tT paths show rapid cooling from temperatures in the range of 110{degree}-120{degree} C at 170-160 Ma. In the southern Appalachian Basin, calculated tT paths indicate that uplift in the northern section was immediately post-Alleghanian folding with uplift beginning first in the northwestern section on the Cumberland Plateau at {approx}226 {plus minus} 23 Ma and progressing to the eastern Valley and Ridge Province of Virginia at {approx}119 {plus minus} 12 Ma. The samples from southwestern Virginia yield a mean apatite fission-track apparent age of 175 {plus minus} 11 Ma which may be the result of a higher heat flow, higher paleogeothermal gradient during the Upper Jurassic-Early Cretaceous extension along the Atlantic Coast.

  11. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: BESIII track fitting algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji-Ke; Mao, Ze-Pu; Bian, Jian-Ming; Cao, Guo-Fu; Cao, Xue-Xiang; Chen, Shen-Jian; Deng, Zi-Yan; Fu, Cheng-Dong; Gao, Yuan-Ning; He, Kang-Lin; He, Miao; Hua, Chun-Fei; Huang, Bin; Huang, Xing-Tao; Ji, Xiao-Bin; Li, Fei; Li, Bai-Bo; Li, Wei-Dong; Liang, Yu-Tie; Liu, Chun-Xiu; Liu, Huai-Min; Liu, Suo; Liu, Ying-Jie; Ma, Qiu-Mei; Ma, Xiang; Mao, Ya-Jun; Mo, Xiao-Hu; Pan, Ming-Hua; Pang, Cai-Ying; Ping, Rong-Gang; Qin, Ya-Hong; Qiu, Jin-Fa; Sun, Sheng-Sen; Sun, Yong-Zhao; Wang, Liang-Liang; Wen, Shuo-Pin; Wu, Ling-Hui; Xie, Yu-Guang; Xu, Min; Yan, Liang; You, Zheng-Yun; Yuan, Chang-Zheng; Yuan, Ye; Zhang, Bing-Yun; Zhang, Chang-Chun; Zhang, Jian-Yong; Zhang, Xue-Yao; Zhang, Yao; Zheng, Yang-Heng; Zhu, Ke-Jun; Zhu, Yong-Sheng; Zhu, Zhi-Li; Zou, Jia-Heng

    2009-10-01

    A track fitting algorithm based on the Kalman filter method has been developed for BESIII of BEPCII. The effects of multiple scattering and energy loss when the charged particles go through the detector, non-uniformity of magnetic field (NUMF) and wire sag, etc., have been carefully handled. This algorithm works well and the performance satisfies the physical requirements tested by the simulation data.

  12. Calculation of track and vertex errors for detector design studies

    SciTech Connect

    Harr, R.

    1995-06-01

    The Kalman Filter technique has come into wide use for charged track reconstruction in high-energy physics experiments. It is also well suited for detector design studies, allowing for the efficient estimation of optimal track covariance matrices without the need of a hit level Monte Carlo simulation. Although much has been published about the Kalman filter equations, there is a lack of previous literature explaining how to implement the equations. In this paper, the operators necessary to implement the Kalman filter equations for two common detector configurations are worked out: a central detector in a uniform solenoidal magnetic field, and a fixed-target detector with no magnetic field in the region of the interactions. With the track covariance matrices in hand, vertex and invariant mass errors are readily calculable. These quantities are particularly interesting for evaluating experiments designed to study weakly decaying particles which give rise to displaced vertices. The optimal vertex errors are obtained via a constrained vertex fit. Solutions are presented to the constrained vertex problem with and without kinematic constraints. Invariant mass errors are obtained via propagation of errors; the use of vertex constrained track parameters is discussed. Many of the derivations are new or previously unpublished.

  13. Improved zircon fission-track annealing model based on reevaluation of annealing data

    SciTech Connect

    Guedes, S.; Moreira, Pedro; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Weber, William J.; Hadler, J. C.

    2012-11-10

    The thermal recovery (annealing) of mineral structure modified by the passage of fission fragments has long been studied by the etching technique. In minerals like apatite and zircon, the annealing kinetics are fairly well constrained from the hour to the million-year timescale and have been described by empirical and semi-empirical equations. On the other hand, laboratory experiments, in which ion beams interact with minerals and synthetic ceramics, have shown that there is a threshold temperature beyond which thermal recovery impedes ion-induced amorphization. In this work, it is assumed that this behavior can be extended to the annealing of fission tracks in minerals. It is proposed that there is a threshold temperature, T 0, beyond which fission tracks are erased within a time t 0, which is independent of the current state of lattice deformation. This implies that iso-annealing curves should converge to a fanning point in the Arrhenius pseudo-space (ln t vs. 1/T). Based on the proposed hypothesis, and laboratory and geological data, annealing equations are reevaluated. The geological timescale estimations of a model arising from this study are discussed through the calculation of partial annealing zone and closure temperature, and comparison with geological sample constraints found in literature. It is shown that the predictions given by this model are closer to field data on closure temperature and partial annealing zone than predictions given by previous models.

  14. Improved zircon fission-track annealing model based on reevaluation of annealing data

    SciTech Connect

    Guedes, Sandro; Moreira, Pedro A.F.P.; Devanathan, Ram; Weber, William J; Hadler, Julio C

    2013-01-01

    The thermal recovery (annealing) of mineral structure modified by the passage of fission fragments has long been studied by the etching technique. In minerals like apatite and zircon, the annealing kinetics are fairly well constrained from the hour to the million-year timescale and have been described by empirical and semi-empirical equations. On the other hand, laboratory experiments, in which ion beams interact with minerals and synthetic ceramics, have shown that there is a threshold temperature beyond which thermal recovery impedes ion-induced amorphization. In this work, it is assumed that this behavior can be extended to the annealing of fission tracks in minerals. It is proposed that there is a threshold temperature, T0, beyond which fission tracks are erased within a time t0, which is independent of the current state of lattice deformation. This implies that iso-annealing curves should converge to a fanning point in the Arrhenius pseudo-space (ln t vs. 1/T). Based on the proposed hypothesis, and laboratory and geological data, annealing equations are reevaluated. The geological timescale estimations of a model arising from this study are discussed through the calculation of partial annealing zone and closure temperature, and comparison with geological sample constraints found in literature. It is shown that the predictions given by this model are closer to field data on closure temperature and partial annealing zone than predictions given by previous models.

  15. Optimizing moderation of He-3 neutron detectors for shielded fission sources

    DOE PAGES

    Rees, Lawrence B.; Czirr, J. Bart

    2012-07-10

    Abstract: The response of 3-He neutron detectors is highly dependent on the amount of moderator incorporated into the detector system. If there is too little moderation, neutrons will not react with the 3-He. If there is too much moderation, neutrons will not reach the 3-He. In applications for portal or border monitors where 3He detectors are used to interdict illicit Importation of plutonium, the fission source is always shielded to some extent. Since the energy distribution of neutrons emitted from the source depends on the amount and type of shielding present, the optimum placement of moderating material around 3-He tubesmore » is a function of shielding. In this paper, we use Monte Carlo techniques to model the response of 3-He tubes placed in polyethylene boxes for moderation. To model the shielded fission neutron source, we use a 252-Cf source placed in the center of spheres of water of varying radius. Detector efficiency as a function of box geometry and shielding are explored. We find that increasing the amount of moderator behind and to the sides of the detector generally improves the detector response, but that benefits are limited if the thickness of the polyethylene moderator is greater than about 5-7 cm. The thickness of the moderator in front of the 3He tubes, however, is very important. For bare sources, about 5-6 cm of moderator is optimum, but as the shielding increases, the optimum thickness of this moderator decreases to 0-1 cm. A two-tube box with a moderator thickness of 5 cm in front of the first tube and a thickness of 1 cm in front of the second tube is proposed to improve the detector's sensitivity to lower-energy neutrons.« less

  16. Preliminary fission track ages for samples from western Maine: Implications for the low temperature thermal history of the region

    SciTech Connect

    Lux, D.R. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Johnson, K. )

    1992-01-01

    In order to elucidate the low temperature cooling history of the region, 12 preliminary samples from a N-S traverse from the central Sebago batholith to the Chain of Ponds pluton were selected for fission track dating. The range of Ar-40/Ar-39 ages from the selected samples is 140 Ma (371--231 Ma) for biotites, 63 Ma (304--241 Ma) for muscovites and 61 Ma (375--304 Ma) for hornblendes. Twelve samples were dated by the external detector method and yield ages between 114 and 79 Ma. The southern most samples from the Sebago batholith and Songo pluton, within the highest metamorphic zones, are the youngest and range from 101 to 79 Ma. Those from the Mooselookmeguntic and Chain of Ponds plutons, within lower metamorphic zones, vary between 114 and 92 Ma. This general discordance trend is similar but of much smaller magnitude than the regional pattern of Ar-40/Ar-39 cooling ages. The much smaller range of apatite ages than biotite ages suggests that large differences in the thermal regime across of the region during Late Paleozoic time had largely been erased by the Early Cretaceous. The new fission track ages are interpreted to represent regional cooling through the apatite closure temperature, assumed to be ca 100 C. Young apatite ages may be the result of a regional thermal disturbance related to the intrusion of magmas of the White Mountains Plutonic Suite, as the youngest plutons are similar in age to the apatites. Alternatively, they could be the result of regional exhumation of the Acadian orogen. The authors conclude that the latter interpretation is more consistent with their data and attribute the ages to time of regional exhumation and uplift through the apatite closure temperature.

  17. A Bayesian approach to calibrating apatite fission track annealing models for laboratory and geological timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, John; Gallagher, Kerry; Holmes, Chris

    2006-10-01

    We present a new approach for modelling annealing of fission tracks in apatite, aiming to address various problems with existing models. We cast the model in a fully Bayesian context, which allows us explicitly to deal with data and parameter uncertainties and correlations, and also to deal with the predictive uncertainties. We focus on a well-known annealing algorithm [Laslett, G.M., Green, P.F., Duddy, I.R., Gleadow. A.J.W., 1987. Thermal annealing of fission tracks in apatite. 2. A quantitative-analysis. Chem. Geol., 65 (1), 1-13], and build a hierachical Bayesian model to incorporate both laboratory and geological timescale data as direct constraints. Relative to the original model calibration, we find a better (in terms of likelihood) model conditioned just on the reported laboratory data. We then include the uncertainty on the temperatures recorded during the laboratory annealing experiments. We again find a better model, but the predictive uncertainty when extrapolated to geological timescales is increased due to the uncertainty on the laboratory temperatures. Finally, we explictly include a data set [Vrolijk, P., Donelick, R.A., Quenq, J., Cloos. M., 1992. Testing models of fission track annealing in apatite in a simple thermal setting: site 800, leg 129. In: Larson, R., Lancelet, Y. (Eds.), Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results, vol. 129, pp. 169-176] which provides low-temperature geological timescale constraints for the model calibration. When combined with the laboratory data, we find a model which satisfies both the low-temperature and high-temperature geological timescale benchmarks, although the fit to the original laboratory data is degraded. However, when extrapolated to geological timescales, this combined model significantly reduces the well-known rapid recent cooling artifact found in many published thermal models for geological samples.

  18. Re-collection of Fish Canyon Tuff for fission-track standardization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, C.W.; Cebula, G.T.

    1984-01-01

    The PURPOSE of this note is to announce the availability of apatite and zircon from a third collection of the Oligocene Fish Canyon Tuff (FC-3). Apatite and zircon separated from the Fish Canyon Tuff have prove to be a useful standard for fission-track dating, both for interlaboratory comparisons and for checking procedures within a laboratory. In May 1981, about 540 kg of Fish Canyon Tuff were collected for mineral separation. Approximately 7. 5 g of apatite, 6. 5 g of zircon, and 89 g of sphene were recovered from this collection. This new material is now ready for distribution.

  19. Computer program TRACK_VISION for simulating optical appearance of etched tracks in CR-39 nuclear track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikezic, D.; Yu, K. N.

    2008-04-01

    A computer program called TRACK_VISION for determining the optical appearances of tracks in nuclear track materials resulted from light-ion irradiation and subsequent chemical etching was described. A previously published software, TRACK_TEST, was the starting point for the present software TRACK_VISION, which contained TRACK_TEST as its subset. The programming steps were outlined. Descriptions of the program were given, including the built-in V functions for the commonly employed nuclear track material commercially known as CR-39 (polyallyldiglycol carbonate) irradiated by alpha particles. Program summaryProgram title: TRACK_VISION Catalogue identifier: AEAF_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEAF_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4084 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 71 117 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90 Computer: Pentium PC Operating system: Windows 95+ RAM: 256 MB Classification: 17.5, 18 External routines: The entire code must be linked with the MSFLIB library. MSFLib is a collection of C and C++ modules which provides a general framework for processing IBM's AFP datastream. MSFLIB is specific to Visual Fortran (Digital, Compaq or Intel flavors). Nature of problem: Nuclear track detectors are commonly used for radon measurements through studying the tracks generated by the incident alpha particles. Optical microscopes are often used for this purpose but the process is relatively tedious and time consuming. Several automatic and semi-automatic systems have been developed in order to facilitate determination of track densities. In all these automatic systems, the optical appearance of the tracks is important. However, not much has been done so far to obtaining the

  20. Data acqusition for the Zeus central tracking detector

    SciTech Connect

    Quinton, S.

    1989-04-01

    The Zeus experiment is being installed on the Hera electron-proton collider being built at the Desy laboratory in Hamburg. The high beam crossover rate of the Hera machine will provide experience in data acquisition and triggering relevant to the SSC environment. This paper describes the Transputer based data acquisition for the Zeus Central Tracking Detector, and outlines some proposed development work on the use of parallel processing techniques in this field.

  1. Search for anomalons using plastic nuclear track detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinrich, W.; Drechsel, H.; Brechtmann, C.; Dreute, J.

    1985-01-01

    A stack of CR39 track detectors containing Ag foils was exposed to 1.7 GeV/nucleon Fe-56 beam and the anomalous mean free path effect investigated. Neither the whole set of 7517 nor a subset of 2542 interacting fragments produced probably in the Ag target show an effect. By combining the data of this and an earlier experiment we can also exclude an effect for 3219 interacting fragments produced in delta Z=1 collisions.

  2. A 3D diamond detector for particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bergonzo, P.; Caylar, B.; Forcolin, G.; Haughton, I.; Hits, D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Li, L.; Oh, A.; Phan, S.; Pomorski, M.; Smith, D. S.; Tyzhnevyi, V.; Wallny, R.; Whitehead, D.

    2015-06-01

    A novel device using single-crystal chemical vapour deposited diamond and resistive electrodes in the bulk forming a 3D diamond detector is presented. The electrodes of the device were fabricated with laser assisted phase change of diamond into a combination of diamond-like carbon, amorphous carbon and graphite. The connections to the electrodes of the device were made using a photo-lithographic process. The electrical and particle detection properties of the device were investigated. A prototype detector system consisting of the 3D device connected to a multi-channel readout was successfully tested with 120 GeV protons proving the feasibility of the 3D diamond detector concept for particle tracking applications for the first time.

  3. [Dosimetry of fast neutrons in 1W nuclear reactor with plastic nuclear-track detectors].

    PubMed

    Yasubuchi, S; Hoshi, M; Itoh, T; Hisanaga, S; Niwa, T; Miki, R; Kondo, S

    1989-09-01

    A nuclear reactor at Kinki University is operated at the maximum of 1W. It produces fission neutrons as much as gamma-rays. To facilitate its use for neutron radiobiology, fast neutrons inside the reactor were measured with nuclear-track detectors TS 16 N and a pair of ion chambers. The angular dependence of TS 16 N response, an anisotropy of fast neutron fluxes in the reactor and misuse of the kerma factor assumed for radiation protection business are the major causes of discrepancy is measured doses by the two methods. Correction factors for the three causes are proposed. After correction, neutron doses estimated with TS 16 N and chambers agree within 5%. The dose-rate at the reactor's center is about 20 tissue-cGy/h. This is the first in situ dosimetry of fast neutrons in a reactor with track detectors attached to biologic samples. Our routine usage has demonstrated that, if used with caution, TS 16 N elements are handy, reliable monitors for fast neutron dosimetry as they are insensitive to contaminated gamma-rays and small enough to be attached to biologic samples.

  4. Precision tracking with a single gaseous pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsigaridas, S.; van Bakel, N.; Bilevych, Y.; Gromov, V.; Hartjes, F.; Hessey, N. P.; de Jong, P.; Kluit, R.

    2015-09-01

    The importance of micro-pattern gaseous detectors has grown over the past few years after successful usage in a large number of applications in physics experiments and medicine. We develop gaseous pixel detectors using micromegas-based amplification structures on top of CMOS pixel readout chips. Using wafer post-processing we add a spark-protection layer and a grid to create an amplification region above the chip, allowing individual electrons released above the grid by the passage of ionising radiation to be recorded. The electron creation point is measured in 3D, using the pixel position for (x, y) and the drift time for z. The track can be reconstructed by fitting a straight line to these points. In this work we have used a pixel-readout-chip which is a small-scale prototype of Timepix3 chip (designed for both silicon and gaseous detection media). This prototype chip has several advantages over the existing Timepix chip, including a faster front-end (pre-amplifier and discriminator) and a faster TDC which reduce timewalk's contribution to the z position error. Although the chip is very small (sensitive area of 0.88 × 0.88mm2), we have built it into a detector with a short drift gap (1.3 mm), and measured its tracking performance in an electron beam at DESY. We present the results obtained, which lead to a significant improvement for the resolutions with respect to Timepix-based detectors.

  5. Ion track reconstruction in 3D using alumina-based fluorescent nuclear track detectors.

    PubMed

    Niklas, M; Bartz, J A; Akselrod, M S; Abollahi, A; Jäkel, O; Greilich, S

    2013-09-21

    Fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) based on Al2O3: C, Mg single crystal combined with confocal microscopy provide 3D information on ion tracks with a resolution only limited by light diffraction. FNTDs are also ideal substrates to be coated with cells to engineer cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors (Cell-Fit-HD). This radiobiological tool enables a novel platform linking cell responses to physical dose deposition on a sub-cellular level in proton and heavy ion therapies. To achieve spatial correlation between single ion hits in the cell coating and its biological response the ion traversals have to be reconstructed in 3D using the depth information gained by the FNTD read-out. FNTDs were coated with a confluent human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial (A549) cell layer. Carbon ion irradiation of the hybrid detector was performed perpendicular and angular to the detector surface. In situ imaging of the fluorescently labeled cell layer and the FNTD was performed in a sequential read-out. Making use of the trajectory information provided by the FNTD the accuracy of 3D track reconstruction of single particles traversing the hybrid detector was studied. The accuracy is strongly influenced by the irradiation angle and therefore by complexity of the FNTD signal. Perpendicular irradiation results in highest accuracy with error of smaller than 0.10°. The ability of FNTD technology to provide accurate 3D ion track reconstruction makes it a powerful tool for radiobiological investigations in clinical ion beams, either being used as a substrate to be coated with living tissue or being implanted in vivo. PMID:23965401

  6. Ion track reconstruction in 3D using alumina-based fluorescent nuclear track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niklas, M.; Bartz, J. A.; Akselrod, M. S.; Abollahi, A.; Jäkel, O.; Greilich, S.

    2013-09-01

    Fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) based on Al2O3: C, Mg single crystal combined with confocal microscopy provide 3D information on ion tracks with a resolution only limited by light diffraction. FNTDs are also ideal substrates to be coated with cells to engineer cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors (Cell-Fit-HD). This radiobiological tool enables a novel platform linking cell responses to physical dose deposition on a sub-cellular level in proton and heavy ion therapies. To achieve spatial correlation between single ion hits in the cell coating and its biological response the ion traversals have to be reconstructed in 3D using the depth information gained by the FNTD read-out. FNTDs were coated with a confluent human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial (A549) cell layer. Carbon ion irradiation of the hybrid detector was performed perpendicular and angular to the detector surface. In situ imaging of the fluorescently labeled cell layer and the FNTD was performed in a sequential read-out. Making use of the trajectory information provided by the FNTD the accuracy of 3D track reconstruction of single particles traversing the hybrid detector was studied. The accuracy is strongly influenced by the irradiation angle and therefore by complexity of the FNTD signal. Perpendicular irradiation results in highest accuracy with error of smaller than 0.10°. The ability of FNTD technology to provide accurate 3D ion track reconstruction makes it a powerful tool for radiobiological investigations in clinical ion beams, either being used as a substrate to be coated with living tissue or being implanted in vivo.

  7. High-Resolution Compton-Suppressed CZT Detector for Fission Products Identification

    SciTech Connect

    R. Aryaeinejd; J. K. Hartwell; Wade W. Scates

    2004-10-01

    Room temperature semiconductor CdZnTe (CZT) detectors are currently limited to total detector volumes of 1-2 cm3, which is dictated by the poor charge transport characteristics. Because of this size limitation one of the problems in accurately determining isotope identification is the enormous background from the Compton scattering events. Eliminating this background will not only increase the sensitivity and accuracy of measurements but also help us to resolve peaks buried under the background and peaks in close vicinity of others. We are currently developing a fission products detection system based on the Compton-suppressed CZT detector. In this application, the detection system is required to operate in high radiation fields. Therefore, a small 10x10x5 mm3 CZT detector is placed inside the center of a well-shielded 3" in diameter by 3" long Nal detector. So far we have been able to successfully reduce the Compton background by a factor of 5.4 for a 137Cs spectrum. This reduction of background will definitely enhance the quality of the gamma-ray spectrum in the information-rich energy range below 1 MeV, which consequently increases the detection sensitivity. In this work, we will discuss the performance of this detection system as well as its applications.

  8. Tectonic significance of precambrian apatite fission-track ages from the midcontinent United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowley, K.D.; Naeser, C.W.; Babel, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    Apparent apatite fission-track ages from drill core penetrating basement on the flank of the Transcontinental Arch in northwestern Iowa range from 934 ?? 86 to 641 ?? 90 Ma. These ages, the oldest reported in North America, record at least two thermal events. The 934 Ma age, which is synchronous with KAr ages in the Grenville Province and many KAr whole-rock and RbSr isochron ages from the Lake Superior region, may document basement cooling caused by regional uplift and erosion of the crust. The remaining fission-track ages are products of a more recent thermal event, relative to the age of the samples, which raised temperatures into the zone of partial annealing. Heating may have occurred between the Middle Ordovician and Middle Cretaceous by burial of the basement with additional sediment. It is estimated that burial raised temperatures in the part of the basement sampled by the core to between 50 and 75??C. These temperature estimates imply paleogeothermal gradients of about 20??C/km, approximately two and one-half times present-day values, and burial of the basement by an additional 2-3 km of sediment. ?? 1986.

  9. Recent rapid uplift in the Bolivian Andes: evidence from fission-track dating

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, M.T.; Johnson, N.M.; Naeser, C.W.

    1987-07-01

    Apatite and zircon fission-track cooling ages constrain the Tertiary cooling and uplift history of the eastern Cordillera and Altiplano of Bolivia. Fission-track data are from two Triassic plutons and surrounding Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks in the eastern Andes north of La Paz. Zircon cooling ages indicate that the roof of the Huayna Potosi pluton was emplaced in the zircon partial annealing zone and that the Zongo pluton was emplaced entirely in the zircon total annealing zone. Apatite cooling ages for both plutons record uplift in the past 5-15 m.y., and zircon cooling ages from the Zongo pluton reflect uplift in the past 25-45 m.y. Uplift rates calculated by these apatite and zircon cooling ages suggest that uplift rates were 0.1-0.2 mm/yr between 20 and 40 Ma and increased significantly between 10 and 15 Ma. By 3 Ma, uplift rates may have been as high as 0.7 mm/yr.

  10. Fission-track tectonic studies of the Transantarctic Mountains, Beardmore Glacier area

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    The Transantarctic Mountains are a major transcontinental range stretching for some 4000 kilometers, varying from 200-400 kilometers in width, and having elevations up to 4500 meters. The uplift and formation of the Transantarctic Mountains have always been something of an enigma, but recent apatite fission-track analysis is providing important new information not only about their uplift history but also about the implications of that uplift history for the glacial history of Antarctica as a whole. The main field objective of this project was to collect samples for fission-track analysis to determine the timing and rate of uplift of the Transantarctic Mountains and measure relative vertical displacements across faults within the range. Results from southern Victoria Land indicate that uplift of the Transantarctic Mountains was initiated at about 50 million years ago and since that time the mountains have undergone some 5 kilometers of uplift at an average rate of 100 meters per million years. It is important to realize, however, that this is an average rate and may well conceal pulses of faster and slower uplift or even periods of subsidence. The amount of uplift across the mountain range is differential; from the axis of maximum uplift about 30 kilometers inland of the Victoria Land coast, the mountains dip gently westward under the polar ice cap. The study was extended to the Beardmore Glacier area to see whether the uplift history and tectonics varies from that observed in southern Victoria Land.

  11. Zircon fission-track ages from the Gasherbrum Diorite, Karakoram Range, northern Pakistan

    SciTech Connect

    Cerveny, P.F. ); Naeser, C.W. ); Kelemen, P.B. ); Lieberman, J.E. ); Zeitler, P.K. )

    1989-11-01

    The Gasherbrum Peaks, in the Himalaya of Pakistan, reach elevations of >8000 m. The relief between the peaks and the adjacent valley (Baltoro Glacier) is in excess of 3000 m. Eight samples of the Early Cretaceous Gasherbrum Diorite at elevations between 4880 and 7165 m on Gasherbrum IV were collected for fission-track dating. Zircon fission-track ages from the Gasherbrum Diorite vary from Early Cretaceous to middle Tertiary in age. There is no consistent pattern between age and elevation. The Cretaceous ages indicate that these rocks were never deeply buried, i.e., heated to temperatures in excess of 175 C, to reset the zircons during Cenozoic time. These results also indicate that the uplift of this part of the Himalaya has been either very rapid and recent, or very slow since Early Cretaceous time. This latter possibility is not consistent with the high relief at Gasherbrum and what is known about regional tectonics. Gasherbrum IV zircons, currently at {approximately}4880 m, have never been at depths greater than 6 km, and less than 3 km of material has been removed from the top of the range by erosion since the Early Cretaceous. Rapid uplift has occurred very recently, and erosion rates have not been able to keep pace with this uplift.

  12. Alignment of the ATLAS inner detector tracking system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moles-Valls, Regina

    2010-05-01

    The CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the world largest particle accelerator. ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS) is one of the two general purpose experiments equipped with a charged particle tracking system built on two technologies: silicon and drift tube based detectors, composing the ATLAS Inner Detector (ID). The alignment of the tracking system poses a challenge as one should solve a linear equation with almost 36 000 degrees of freedom. The required precision for the alignment of the most sensitive coordinates of the silicon sensors is just few microns. This limit comes from the requirement that the misalignment should not worsen the resolution of the track parameter measurements by more than 20%. Therefore the alignment of the ATLAS ID requires complex algorithms with extensive CPU and memory usage. So far the proposed alignment algorithms are exercised on several applications. We will present the outline of the alignment approach and results from Cosmic Ray runs and large scale computing simulation of physics samples mimicking the ATLAS operation during real data taking. For the later application the trigger of the experiment is simulated and the event filter is applied in order to produce an alignment input data stream. The full alignment chain is tested using that stream and alignment constants are produced and validated within 24 h. Cosmic ray data serves to produce an early alignment of the real ATLAS Inner Detector even before the LHC start up. Beyond all tracking information, the assembly survey database contains essential information in order to determine the relative position of one module with respect to its neighbors. Finally a hardware system measuring an array of grid lines in the modules support structure with a Frequency Scan Interferometer monitors short time system deformations.

  13. Search for {beta}-delayed fission of {sup 228}Ac

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Yanbing; Ding Huajie; Yuan Shuanggui; Yang Weifan; Niu Yanning; Li Yingjun; Xiao Yonghou; Zhang Shengdong; Lu Xiting

    2006-10-15

    Radium was radiochemically separated from natural thorium. Thin {sup 228}Ra{yields}{beta}{sup -228}Ac sources were prepared and exposed to mica fission track detectors, and measured by an HPGe {gamma}-ray detector. The {beta}-delayed fission events of {sup 228}Ac were observed and its {beta}-delayed fission probability was found to be (5{+-}2)x10{sup -12}.

  14. Apatite fission-track thermochronology of the Appalachian foreland basin from the Virginia Piedmont to eastern Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, M.K. . Dept. of Earth and Environmental Science); Cerveny, P.F.; Bergman, S.C. . Research and Technical Services)

    1992-01-01

    Apatite fission-track ages have been determined for 29 samples from two transects in the southern Appalachians. The northern transect extends from the VA Piedmont northwest through the Valley and Ridge Province, Cumberland Plateau, and into the Appalachian foreland of southeastern OH. An additional transect was collected from the Pine Mountain thrust in southeastern KY extending northwest to the Cincinnati Arch. Precambrian gneisses and granites from the VA Piedmont yield reset apatite fission-track ages ranging from 103 [+-] 6 to 138 [+-] 11 Ma. Ordovician through Mississippian sedimentary rocks from the Valley and Ridge Province of VA-WV also yield reset apatite fission-track ages ranging from 120 [+-] 8 to 144 [+-] 20 Ma. The cooling histories for the Piedmont and Valley and Ridge rocks of VA and WV thus appear similar, having cooled rapidly between about 103 and 144 Ma. Pennsylvanian samples from the Cumberland Plateau of WV yield rest apatite fission-track ages of 112 [+-] 7 to 169 [+-] 13 MA in the southeast which grade into partially reset (mixed ages) northwest of Charlestown (133 [+-] 13 to 156 [+-] 10 Ma). The Permian Dunkard Formation from the OH-WV border yielded a mixed age of 197 [+-] 13 Ma, suggesting that the Permian has not been subjected to temperatures > 100 C for times greater than 1 Ma, since it was deposited. Mississippian--Pennsylvanian samples from eastern KY yield reset apatite fission-track ages which decrease from the Pine Mt. Thrust (186 [+-] 16 Ma) to Mozelle, KY (136 [+-] 12 Ma), then increase toward the Cincinnati Arch (166 [+-] 18 [minus] 186 [+-] 21 Ma). This is consistent with older apatite fission-track ages (200 Ma) from Ordovician K-bentonites in the vicinity of the Cincinnati Arch.

  15. Feasibility studies for a wireless 60 GHz tracking detector readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmeier, S.; Schöning, A.; Soltveit, H. K.; Wiedner, D.

    2016-09-01

    The amount of data produced by highly granular silicon tracking detectors in high energy physics experiments poses a major challenge to readout systems. At high collision rates, e.g. at LHC experiments, only a small fraction of data can be read out with currently used technologies. To cope with the requirements of future or upgraded experiments new data transfer techniques are required which offer high data rates at low power and low material budget. Wireless technologies operating in the 60 GHz band or at higher frequencies offer high data rates and are thus a promising upcoming alternative to conventional data transmission via electrical cables or optical fibers. Using wireless technology, the amount of cables and connectors in detectors can be significantly reduced. Tracking detectors profit most from a reduced material budget as fewer secondary particle interactions (multiple Coulomb scattering, energy loss, etc.) improve the tracking performance in general. We present feasibility studies regarding the integration of the wireless technology at 60 GHz into a silicon tracking detector. We use spare silicon strip modules of the ATLAS experiment as test samples which are measured to be opaque in the 60 GHz range. The reduction of cross talk between links and the attenuation of reflections is studied. An estimate of the maximum achievable link density is given. It is shown that wireless links can be placed as close as 2 cm next to each other for a layer distance of 10 cm by exploiting one or several of the following measures: highly directive antennas, absorbers like graphite foam, linear polarization and frequency channeling. Combining these measures, a data rate area density of up to 11 Tb/(s·m2) seems feasible. In addition, two types of silicon sensors are tested under mm-wave irradiation in order to determine the influence of 60 GHz data transmission on the detector performance: an ATLAS silicon strip sensor module and an HV-MAPS prototype for the Mu3e

  16. Radon Emanation from Zircon as a Function of Grain Size, Temperature and Fission Track Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakin, M.; Barbero, L.; Brownlee, S. J.; Baskaran, M. M.

    2012-12-01

    Radon emanation from rocks and minerals is ubiquitous. Quantification of radon emanation rates from zircon is critical to assess the reliability of U-Pb ages of zircon bearing rocks. The 238U decay chain includes 222Rn, a noble gas, which can readily escape the crystal structure if sufficient escape pathways in lattice structure exist, ultimately leading to a deficiency of 206Pb in the parent crystal. Few studies have directly investigated the link between track density and 222Rn emanation rates, and none have done this for zircon. In order to evaluate the factors affecting radon emanation from the mineral zircon under different conditions, a series of experiments were performed on a large, crushed Mud Tank zircon crystal. Five different grain sizes (500 μm, 250-500 μm, 125-250 μm, 63 - 125 μm, and < 63 μm) were separated and sealed in closed glass jars and radon emanation rates were measured at 25 C. These aliquots are then subjected to a range of temperatures (100 C, 200 C, 400 C, and 600 C) for six hours and the radon emanation rates are measured after each heating step. Fission track densities are measured after the same annealing temperature steps allowing quantification of 222Rn emanation rate as a function of fission track density. The concentration of 210Pb, 234Th, 212Pb, 226Ra and 228Ra in these fractions are also measured using gamma spectroscopy. The results of these experiments will have implications for U-Pb dating (i.e., explanation of discordant ages), and noble gas escape systematics in zircon (i.e., volume diffusion or fast pathway escape). The possibility also exists for using 222Rn, or other noble gasses, as a measure of defect density within crystals.

  17. Silicon sensors for HL-LHC tracking detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandić, Igor

    2013-12-01

    It is foreseen to significantly increase the luminosity of the LHC by upgrading towards the HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) in 2021 in order to harvest the maximum physics potential. After the upgrade, unprecedented levels of radiation will require the experiments to upgrade their tracking detectors to withstand hadron fluences equivalent to over 1016 1 MeV neutrons per cm2. Within the RD50 Collaboration, a massive R&D program is underway to develop silicon sensors with sufficient radiation tolerance. Recent defect characterization and Edge-TCT measurement results improved the understanding of irradiated detector performance. RD50 results show that sensors with n-side readout, easiest made with p-type silicon, have a superior radiation hardness due to the high overlap of electric and weighting field after irradiation, larger contribution of electrons to the total signal and finally due to charge multiplication which may enhance the collected charge at high bias voltages in this type of detector. A further area of activity is the development of advanced sensor types like 3D silicon and thin pixel detectors designed for the extreme radiation levels expected for the inner layers.

  18. Optimization of detector positioning in the radioactive particle tracking technique.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Olivier; Dubé, David; Chaouki, Jamal; Bertrand, François

    2014-07-01

    The radioactive particle tracking (RPT) technique is a non-intrusive experimental velocimetry and tomography technique extensively applied to the study of hydrodynamics in a great variety of systems. In this technique, arrays of scintillation detector are used to track the motion of a single radioactive tracer particle emitting isotropic γ-rays. This work describes and applies an optimization strategy developed to find an optimal set of positions for the scintillation detectors used in the RPT technique. This strategy employs the overall resolution of the detectors as the objective function and a mesh adaptive direct search (MADS) algorithm to solve the optimization problem. More precisely, NOMAD, a C++ implementation of the MADS algorithm is used. First, the optimization strategy is validated using simple cases with known optimal detector configurations. Next, it is applied to a three-dimensional axisymmetric system (i.e. a vertical cylinder, which could represent a fluidized bed, bubble column, riser or else). The results obtained using the optimization strategy are in agreement with what was previously recommended by Roy et al. (2002) for a similar system. Finally, the optimization strategy is used for a system consisting of a partially filled cylindrical tumbler. The application of insights gained by the optimization strategy is shown to lead to a significant reduction in the error made when reconstructing the position of a tracer particle. The results of this work show that the optimization strategy developed is sensitive to both the type of objective function used and the experimental conditions. The limitations and drawbacks of the optimization strategy are also discussed.

  19. A parameterization of nuclear track profiles in CR-39 detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azooz, A. A.; Al-Nia'emi, S. H.; Al-Jubbori, M. A.

    2012-11-01

    In this work, the empirical parameterization describing the alpha particles’ track depth in CR-39 detectors is extended to describe longitudinal track profiles against etching time for protons and alpha particles. MATLAB based software is developed for this purpose. The software calculates and plots the depth, diameter, range, residual range, saturation time, and etch rate versus etching time. The software predictions are compared with other experimental data and with results of calculations using the original software, TRACK_TEST, developed for alpha track calculations. The software related to this work is freely downloadable and performs calculations for protons in addition to alpha particles. Program summary Program title: CR39 Catalog identifier: AENA_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENA_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Copyright (c) 2011, Aasim Azooz Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions are met • Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer. • Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution This software is provided by the copyright holders and contributors “as is” and any express or implied warranties, including, but not limited to, the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose are disclaimed. In no event shall the copyright owner or contributors be liable for any direct, indirect, incidental, special, exemplary, or consequential damages (including, but not limited to, procurement of substitute goods or services; loss of use, data, or profits; or business interruption) however caused and

  20. 3D imaging of particle tracks in Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertheim, D.; Gillmore, G.; Brown, L.; Petford, N.

    2009-04-01

    Inhalation of radon gas (222Rn) and associated ionizing decay products is known to cause lung cancer in human. In the U.K., it has been suggested that 3 to 5 % of total lung cancer deaths can be linked to elevated radon concentrations in the home and/or workplace. Radon monitoring in buildings is therefore routinely undertaken in areas of known risk. Indeed, some organisations such as the Radon Council in the UK and the Environmental Protection Agency in the USA, advocate a ‘to test is best' policy. Radon gas occurs naturally, emanating from the decay of 238U in rock and soils. Its concentration can be measured using CR?39 plastic detectors which conventionally are assessed by 2D image analysis of the surface; however there can be some variation in outcomes / readings even in closely spaced detectors. A number of radon measurement methods are currently in use (for examples, activated carbon and electrets) but the most widely used are CR?39 solid state nuclear track?etch detectors (SSNTDs). In this technique, heavily ionizing alpha particles leave tracks in the form of radiation damage (via interaction between alpha particles and the atoms making up the CR?39 polymer). 3D imaging of the tracks has the potential to provide information relating to angle and energy of alpha particles but this could be time consuming. Here we describe a new method for rapid high resolution 3D imaging of SSNTDs. A ‘LEXT' OLS3100 confocal laser scanning microscope was used in confocal mode to successfully obtain 3D image data on four CR?39 plastic detectors. 3D visualisation and image analysis enabled characterisation of track features. This method may provide a means of rapid and detailed 3D analysis of SSNTDs. Keywords: Radon; SSNTDs; confocal laser scanning microscope; 3D imaging; LEXT

  1. Determination of Nuclear Charge Distributions of Fission Fragments from ^{235}U (n_th, f) with Calorimetric Low Temperature Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabitz, P.; Andrianov, V.; Bishop, S.; Blanc, A.; Dubey, S.; Echler, A.; Egelhof, P.; Faust, H.; Gönnenwein, F.; Gomez-Guzman, J. M.; Köster, U.; Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Mutterer, M.; Scholz, P.; Stolte, S.

    2016-08-01

    Calorimetric low temperature detectors (CLTD's) for heavy-ion detection have been combined with the LOHENGRIN recoil separator at the ILL Grenoble for the determination of nuclear charge distributions of fission fragments produced by thermal neutron-induced fission of ^{235}U. The LOHENGRIN spectrometer separates fission fragments according to their mass-to-ionic-charge ratio and their kinetic energy, but has no selectivity with respect to nuclear charges Z. For the separation of the nuclear charges, one can exploit the nuclear charge-dependent energy loss of the fragments passing through an energy degrader foil (absorber method). This separation requires detector systems with high energy resolution and negligible pulse height defect, as well as degrader foils which are optimized with respect to thickness, homogeneity, and energy loss straggling. In the present, contribution results of test measurements at the Maier Leibnitz tandem accelerator facility in Munich with ^{109}Ag and ^{127}I beams with the aim to determine the most suitable degrader material, as well as measurements at the Institut Laue-Langevin will be presented. These include a systematic study of the quality of Z-separation of fission fragments in the mass range 82le A le 132 and a systematic measurement of ^{92}Rb fission yields, as well as investigations of fission yields toward the symmetry region.

  2. NEET Enhanced Micro Pocket Fission Detector for High Temperature Reactors - FY15 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, Troy; McGregor, Douglas; Ugorowski, Phil; Reichenberger, Michael; Ito, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    A new project, that is a collaboration between the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the Kansas State University (KSU), and the French Atomic Energy Agency, Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, (CEA), has been initiated by the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation (ASI) program for developing and testing High Temperature Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (HT MPFD), which are compact fission chambers capable of simultaneously measuring thermal neutron flux, fast neutron flux and temperature within a single package for temperatures up to 800 °C. The MPFD technology utilizes a small, multi-purpose, robust, in-core parallel plate fission chamber and thermocouple. As discussed within this report, the small size, variable sensitivity, and increased accuracy of the MPFD technology represent a revolutionary improvement over current methods used to support irradiations in US Material Test Reactors (MTRs). Previous research conducted through NEET ASI1-3 has shown that the MPFD technology could be made robust and was successfully tested in a reactor core. This new project will further the MPFD technology for higher temperature regimes and other reactor applications by developing a HT MPFD suitable for temperatures up to 800 °C. This report summarizes the research progress for year one of this three year project. Highlights from research accomplishments include: A joint collaboration was initiated between INL, KSU, and CEA. Note that CEA is participating at their own expense because of interest in this unique new sensor. An updated HT MPFD design was developed. New high temperature-compatible materials for HT MPFD construction were procured. Construction methods to support the new design were evaluated at INL. Laboratory evaluations of HT MPFD were initiated. Electrical contact and fissile material plating has been performed at KSU. Updated detector electronics are undergoing evaluations at KSU. A project

  3. Fission-track dating of pumice from the KBS Tuff, East Rudolf, Kenya

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurford, A.J.; Gleadow, A.J.W.; Naeser, C.W.

    1976-01-01

    Fission-track dating of zircon separated from two pumice samples from the KBS Tuff in the Koobi Fora Formation, in Area 131, East Rudolf, Kenya, gives an age of 2.44??0.08 Myr for the eruption of the pumice. This result is compatible with the previously published K-Ar and 40Ar/ 39Ar age spectrum estimate of 2.61??0.26 Myr for the KBS Tuff in Area 105, but differs from the more recently published K-Ar date of 1.82??0.04 Myr for the KBS Tuff in Area 131. This study does not support the suggestion that pumice cobbles of different ages occur in the KBS Tuff. ?? 1976 Nature Publishing Group.

  4. Determination of U in Japanese human tissues by the fission track method

    SciTech Connect

    Igarashi, Y.; Yamakawa, A.; Seki, R.; Ikeda, N.

    1985-11-01

    Uranium in several human tissues (lung, liver, kidney, muscle, spleen, heart, cerebrum and bones) from Japanese in the Tokyo area was determined by the fission track method. The average U content was the highest in lung with 1.70 ppb wet, and decreased in the order of lung greater than bones greater than heart and muscle greater than kidney greater than liver and spleen, showing markedly different tendencies from the description in the 1982 UNSCEAR Report (UNSCEAR82). Correlations were observed between U content in lung and in other tissues. These data suggest that the contribution of inhalation of U to its total intake is not negligible. The total body burden of U for the ICRP Reference Man (ICRP74) was estimated to be about 40 micrograms, which is rather small compared with the average normal burden of 90 micrograms currently accepted by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP79).

  5. Measurement of fallout {sup 239}Pu levels in urine samples by fission track analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Moorthy, A.R.; Doty, R.M.

    1996-11-01

    A Fission Track Analysis (FTA) method for assessing 239Pu in urine samples was first developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in 1988; it then had a detection limit of 100 aCi (3.7 {micro}Bq). Since that time, several steps were introduced that increased chemical recovery and lowered the detection limit to less than 1O aCi per sample. These improvements include a process of micro-column separation of plutonium in the final stages. The improved FTA method was applied to 22 urine samples from male staff at BNL. The results showed that 239Pu from fallout excreted in urine was 33 +/- 11 aCi (1.2 {micro}Bq) per day.

  6. Evaluation of the spectrometric and dose characteristics of neutron fields inside the Russian segment of the ISS by fission detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shurshakov, V. A.; Vorob'ev, I. B.; Nikolaev, V. A.; Lyagushin, V. I.; Akatov, Yu. A.; Kushin, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    The results of measuring the dose and the energy spectrum of neutrons inside the Russian segment of the International Space Station (ISS) from March 21 until November 10, 2002 are presented. Statistically reliable results of measurement are obtained by using thorium- and uranium-based fission detectors with cadmium and boron filters. The kits of the detectors with filters have been arranged in three compartments within assembled passive detectors in the BRADOS space experiment. The ambient dose rate H* = 139 μSv day and an energy spectrum of neutrons in the range of 10-2-104 MeV is obtained as average for the ISS compartments and is compared with the measurements carried out inside the compartments of the MIR space station. Recommendations on how to improve the procedure for using the fission detectors to measure the characteristics of neutron fields inside the compartments of space stations are formulated.

  7. Development of an Ionization Chamber for the SPIDER Fission Fragment Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierbachtol, K.; Tovesson, F.; Arnold, C. W.; Laptev, A. B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Jandel, M.; Nelson, R. O.; White, M. C.

    2014-05-01

    The ionization chamber component of the SPIDER detector has been designed to measure energy loss and kinetic energy of fragments produced through neutron-induced fission with energy resolutions of <1% and a time-dependent signal collection. Important design elements implemented are an axial configuration of the electrodes for improved energy loss and measurement and a thin silicon nitride entrance window to minimize both energy loss and energy straggling of the incoming fragments. High energy resolution and improved charge resolution from the ionization chamber are combined with the high precision of the upstream time-of-flight component of SPIDER to achieve resolutions in mass and nuclear charge of 1 AMU and Z=1. A discussion of the present resolution capabilities of the ionization chamber will be presented.

  8. Recognition of an episode of post-collisional normal faulting in North West Pakistan: Constraints from fission-track analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khattak, N. U.; Ali, N.; Khan, M. Asif

    2013-03-01

    The Sillai Patti carbonatite has been intruded along a NNE-SSW striking, southward dipping Sillai Patti Fault at the contact of the metasediments with the granitic gneiss. Both, time of emplacement and the sense of movement of the blocks on either side of this fault are under considerable dispute. Fission-track analysis on apatite from five carbonatite samples yielded an emplacement age of 29.3 ± 1.2 Ma. Comparison of the textures and cooling rates indicates that the granitic gneiss on the southern side of the fault has been uplifted at a faster rate than the carbonatite itself located on the northern side. The abrupt jump from lower fission-track ages in the south to higher fission-track ages in the north across the fault has also been noticed. Moreover, a faster total exhumation of 6.67 km during the past 24.4 ± 2.9 Ma for the southern hanging wall of the fault has been noticed based on fission-track analysis of zircon as compared to the slower maximum possible total exhumation of ≤ 1.67 km derived from the fission-track analysis of apatite during the past 29.3 ± 1.2 Ma for the northern footwall. These facts reveal that the Sillai Patti Fault, a southward extension of the Main Mantle Thrust (MMT), showing an apparently thrust sense of movement on local scale at Sillai Patti, has behaved as a normal fault on regional scale further to the north at the contact of the Indian Plate with the Kohistan Island Arc. During this episode of normal faulting the Kohistan Island Arc slid down and to the north along the MMT relative to the Indian Plate. Recognition of an episode of normal faulting during Oligocene on the basis of this study clearly demonstrates that carbonatitic magmatism took place in the region in a post collisional extensional environment along normal fault(s).

  9. A parameterization of nuclear track profiles in CR-39 detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azooz, A. A.; Al-Nia'emi, S. H.; Al-Jubbori, M. A.

    2012-11-01

    In this work, the empirical parameterization describing the alpha particles’ track depth in CR-39 detectors is extended to describe longitudinal track profiles against etching time for protons and alpha particles. MATLAB based software is developed for this purpose. The software calculates and plots the depth, diameter, range, residual range, saturation time, and etch rate versus etching time. The software predictions are compared with other experimental data and with results of calculations using the original software, TRACK_TEST, developed for alpha track calculations. The software related to this work is freely downloadable and performs calculations for protons in addition to alpha particles. Program summary Program title: CR39 Catalog identifier: AENA_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENA_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Copyright (c) 2011, Aasim Azooz Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions are met • Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer. • Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution This software is provided by the copyright holders and contributors “as is” and any express or implied warranties, including, but not limited to, the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose are disclaimed. In no event shall the copyright owner or contributors be liable for any direct, indirect, incidental, special, exemplary, or consequential damages (including, but not limited to, procurement of substitute goods or services; loss of use, data, or profits; or business interruption) however caused and

  10. HIBRA: A computer code for heavy ion binary reaction analysis employing ion track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, Khalid; Ahmad, Siraj-ul-Islam; Manzoor, Shahid

    2016-01-01

    Collisions of heavy ions many times result in production of only two reaction products. Study of heavy ions using ion track detectors allows experimentalists to observe the track length in the plane of the detector, depth of the tracks in the volume of the detector and angles between the tracks on the detector surface, all known as track parameters. How to convert these into useful physics parameters such as masses, energies, momenta of the reaction products and the Q-values of the reaction? This paper describes the (a) model used to analyze binary reactions in terms of measured etched track parameters of the reaction products recorded in ion track detectors, and (b) the code developed for computing useful physics parameters for fast and accurate analysis of a large number of binary events. A computer code, HIBRA (Heavy Ion Binary Reaction Analysis) has been developed both in C++ and FORTRAN programming languages. It has been tested on the binary reactions from 12.5 MeV/u 84Kr ions incident upon U (natural) target deposited on mica ion track detector. The HIBRA code can be employed with any ion track detector for which range-velocity relation is available including the widely used CR-39 ion track detectors. This paper provides the source code of HIBRA in C++ language along with input and output data to test the program.

  11. Fast-neutron spectroscopy studies using induced-proton tracks in PADC track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sersy, A. R.; Eman, S. A.

    2010-06-01

    In this work, a simple and adequate method for fast-neutron spectroscopy is proposed. This method was performed by free-in-air fast-neutron irradiation of CR-39 Nuclear Track Detectors (NTD) using an Am-Be source. Detectors were then chemically etched to remove few layers up to a thickness of 6.25 μm. By using an automatic image analyzer system for studying the registration of the induced-proton tracks in the NTD, the obtained data were analyzed via two tracks shapes. In the first one, the elliptical tracks were eliminated from the calculation and only the circular ones were considered in developing the response function. In the second method all registered tracks were considered and the corresponding response function was obtained. The rate of energy loss of the protons as a function of V[(d E/d X) - V] was calculated using the Monte Carlo simulation. The induced-proton energy was extracted from the corresponding d E/d X in NTD using a computer program based on the Bethe-Bloch function. The energy of the incident particles was up to few hundred MeV/nucleon. The energy of the interacting neutrons was then estimated by means of the extracted induced-proton energies and the scattering angle. It was found that the present resulting energy distribution of the fast-neutron spectrum from the Am-Be source was similar to that given in the literature where an average neutron energy of 4.6MeV was obtained.

  12. Long-term exhumation history of the Inner Mongolian Plateau constrained by apatite fission track analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ke; Jolivet, Marc; Zhang, Zhicheng; Li, Jianfeng; Tang, Wenhao

    2016-01-01

    The Inner Mongolian Plateau, along the southeastern flank of the wider Mongolian Plateau, is a vast undulating surface ranging in elevation between 900 and 1500 m above sea level. The peculiar topography of this area is assumed to be closely related to its complex tectono-thermal evolution since Late Paleozoic. The lithospheric structure of the Plateau includes three continental blocks: the Mandula and the Bart Obo blocks form the southern margin of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt in that area, and to the south, the Plateau includes the northern margin of the North China Craton. Apatite fission track (AFT) ages and track length distributions from 13 basement outcrops situated in the main tectonic blocks forming the Inner Mongolian Plateau were determined in order to reconstruct its denudation history. The thermal histories inferred from these data imply multi-phased, differential exhumation/burying processes from the Late Paleozoic to the Early Cretaceous. This complex thermal history is largely related to the Early/Middle Triassic closure of the Paleo-Asian Ocean, the Jurassic closure of the Mongol-Okhotsk Ocean, and the Early Cretaceous orogenic collapse of the Mongol-Okhotsk belt. Finally, since Late Cretaceous, no further major tectonic movement occurred and the Inner Mongolian Plateau has been largely peneplained.

  13. Thermal history of the Maramureş area (Northern Romania) constrained by zircon fission track analysis: Cretaceous metamorphism and Late Cretaceous to Paleocene exhumation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröger, Heike R.; Tischler, Matthias; Fügenschuh, Bernhard; Schmid, Stefan M.

    2013-10-01

    This study presents zircon fission track data from the Bucovinian nappe stack (northern part of the Inner Eastern Carpathians, Rodna Mountains) and a neighbouring part of the Biharia nappe system (Preluca massif) in order to unravel the thermal history of the area and its structural evolution by integrating the fission track data with published data on the tectonic and sedimentary evolution of the area. The increase of metamorphic temperatures towards the SW detected by the zircon fission track data suggests SW-wards increasing tectonic overburden (up to at least 15 km) and hence top NE thrusting. Sub-greenschist facies conditions during the Alpine metamorphic overprint only caused partial annealing of fission tracks in zircon in the external main chain of the Central Eastern Carpathians. Full annealing of zircon points to at least 300 °C in the more internal elements (Rodna Mountains and Preluca massif). The zircon fission track central and single grain ages largely reflect Late Cretaceous cooling and exhumation. A combination of fission track data and stratigraphic constraints points to predominantly tectonic differential exhumation by some 7-11 km, connected to massive Late Cretaceous extension not yet detected in the area. Later events such as the latest Cretaceous ("Laramian") juxtaposition of the nappe pile with the internal Moldavides, causing exhumation by erosion, re-burial by sedimentation and tectonic loading during the Cenozoic had no impact on the zircon fission track data; unfortunately it prevented a study of the low temperature part of the Late Cretaceous exhumation history.

  14. A new fission-fragment detector to complement the CACTUS-SiRi setup at the Oslo Cyclotron Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornyi, T. G.; Görgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Siem, S.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Csige, L.

    2014-02-01

    An array of Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters (PPAC) for the detection of heavy ions has been developed. The new device, NIFF (Nuclear Instrument for Fission Fragments), consists of four individual detectors and covers 60% of 2π. It was designed to be used in conjunction with the SiRi array of ΔE-E silicon telescopes for light charged particles and fits into the CACTUS array of 28 large-volume NaI scintillation detectors at the Oslo Cyclotron Laboratory. The low-pressure gas-filled PPACs are sensitive for the detection of fission fragments, but are insensitive to scattered beam particles of light ions or light-ion ejectiles. The PPAC detectors of NIFF have good time resolution and can be used either to select or to veto fission events in in-beam experiments with light-ion beams and actinide targets. The powerful combination of SiRi, CACTUS, and NIFF provides new research opportunities for the study of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions in the actinide region. The new setup is particularly well suited to study the competition of fission and γ decay as a function of excitation energy.

  15. Etched track detectors and the low dose problem.

    PubMed

    Pálfalvi, J; Dám, A M; Bogdándi, E N; Polonyi, I; Szabó, J; Balásházy, I; Farkas, A

    2003-01-01

    The risk to human health of exposure to low-level radiation is not precisely known yet. One way of studying this is to carry out in vitro biological experiments with cell cultures and to extend the conclusions to biological models. To relate the macroscopically deteminable 'low dose' to the damage of cells caused by a certain type of ionising particle is nearly impossible. therefore the number of hits and the imparted energy are the significant quantities. They can be estimated by particle transport calculations and by direct measurements. The effect of low dose was investigated in radio-adaptation experiments when mono-layers of different unsynchronised cell cultures were irradiated by neutrons produced in the filtered beam of the Budapest Research Reactor (BRR). The energy deposition was investigated by replacing the mono-layers with etched track detectors of the CR-39 type. PMID:12678384

  16. Fission track ages and Exhumation mechanisms of the Tauern Window, Eastern Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Audrey; Rosenberg, Claudio; Garcia, Sebastian

    2010-05-01

    The Tauern Window (TW) is a thermal and structural dome which exposes Penninic basement, its cover units as well as parts of the overlying Austroalpine basement in the central part of the Eastern Alps. The peak of metamorphism was attained approximately at 30Ma (Selverstone et .al, 1992), followed by cooling and exhumation throughout Miocene time. Most of the tertiary exhumation of the Eastern Alps was localized in the TW, from Early Oligocene to late Miocene time. A current debate centers on the exhumation mechanisms of Penninic rocks in the core of the TW, namely to assess whether orogen-parallel extension (e.g., Selverstone, 1988) or a combination of folding and erosion (eg., Rosenberg et al., 2004) with subordinate extension were the controlling processes. E-W extension is well documented at the western (Brenner Fault) and eastern (Katschberg Fault) margins of the window (e.g., Behrmann, 1988; Selverstone, 1988; Genser and Neubauer, 1989). In contrast, upright folding dominates the internal structure of the dome, and in particular along its western part, where fold amplitudes, mostly eroded during folding, attained up to 10 km. This study attempts to assess the relative importance of folding and erosion and of orogen-parallel extension during exhumation by analyzing the spatial and temporal cooling patterns of apatite and zircon fission track ages. The compilation of published apatite and zircon fission track ages indicates a concentric younging of both the apatite and zircon ages toward the core of the TW. The concentric isochrones follow the map trace of the axial planes of the upright folds of the western and eastern TW. This cooling pattern is in contrast to the one expected by a process of extensional unroofing, which in map view would results in isochrons parallel to the extensional faults and progressively younging towards them (e.g., Foster et al., 2001). We therefore propose that folding and erosion were primarily responsible for exhuming the Penninic

  17. Thorium-uranium fission radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, E. L.; Weiss, J. R.; Burnett, D. S.; Woolum, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    Results are described for studies designed to develop routine methods for in-situ measurement of the abundance of Th and U on a microscale in heterogeneous samples, especially rocks, using the secondary high-energy neutron flux developed when the 650 MeV proton beam of an accelerator is stopped in a 42 x 42 cm diam Cu cylinder. Irradiations were performed at three different locations in a rabbit tube in the beam stop area, and thick metal foils of Bi, Th, and natural U as well as polished silicate glasses of known U and Th contents were used as targets and were placed in contact with mica which served as a fission track detector. In many cases both bare and Cd-covered detectors were exposed. The exposed mica samples were etched in 48% HF and the fission tracks counted by conventional transmitted light microscopy. Relative fission cross sections are examined, along with absolute Th track production rates, interaction tracks, and a comparison of measured and calculated fission rates. The practicality of fast neutron radiography revealed by experiments to data is discussed primarily for Th/U measurements, and mixtures of other fissionable nuclei are briefly considered.

  18. Neutron dosimetry: Spectrometry with CR 39 polymer solid state nuclear track detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurny, F.

    1991-05-01

    Studies were performed with two commercial CR-39 etch track materials to enhance their application to neutron dosimetry and spectrometry. The work included: (1) Validation and optimization of the etching procedures used to process selected CR-39 plastic track etch detectors for measurement of fast neutrons; (2) Design of a multi-sample etch chamber capable of processing up to 100 track detectors; (3) Verification of uniform bulk etching homogeneity for the selected materials studied; (4) Evaluation of two commercial image analysis systems for measurement of neutron induced etch track densities in plastic track detectors; (5) Confirmation of the dose equivalent response of selected CR-39 track detectors for 3 benchmark neutron spectra (Cf-252, (241)AmBe, and 14 MeV); (6) Test and evaluation of a method for passive neutron spectrometry using a variety of etch track detectors with different energy responses; and (7) Determination of the dose equivalent response of selected CR-39 track detectors in two high energy accelerator fields. The conclusions drawn by the chief investigator include: (1) The signal-to-noise ratio of the CR-39 track detectors can be improved by removing some of the surface layer, either by chemical etching or mechanical brushing; (2) Reproducibility is highly dependent on the time profile of the etch chamber temperature; and (3) Use of a multi-sample etching chamber simplifies manipulation and solves some important problems such as etchant break through.

  19. Rise and fall of the southern Santa Cruz Mountains, California, from fission tracks, geomorphology, and geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgmann, Roland; Arrowsmith, Ramon; Dumitru, Trevor; McLaughlin, Robert

    1994-10-01

    The Santa Cruz Mountains are closely associated with a left bend along the right-lateral San Andreas fault. The Loma Prieta area on the northeast side of the San Andreas consists of fault-bonded blocks that rise along active, deeply rooted, reverse and oblique-slip faults. Six samples from a transect across this area yield concordant apatite fission track ages averaging 4.6 +/- 0.5 Ma. These ages date the time of cooling below approximately 110 C and suggest that about 3 km of unroofing has occurred over the last 4.6 m.y. Allowing for current elevations of about 1 km, this suggests an average uplift rate of the order of 0.8 mm/yr over the last 4.6 m.y. To further define the extent and distribution of this young uplift, we used morphometric analyses of the youthful topography of the area. Steep drainage slopes and high local relief indicate that the area northeast of the San Andreas forms a well-defined zone of high uplift. In contrast, the region on the southwest side of the San Andreas is characterized by broad upwarping and folding, more subdude topography, old fussion track ages, and mean Quaternary uplift rates of 0.1-0.4 mm/yr. Geodetic data show that the Southern Santa Cruz Mountains repeatedly rise and subside through a complex sequence of bay area deformation events. An additional deformation element that involves reverse slip averaging 2-3 m/yr along the Foothills thrust system must occur to explain the longer-term uplift pattern in the Loma Prieta area since the late Pliocene. The asymmetry in deformation on opposite sides of the San Andreas probably reflects the contrasting rock types on opposite sides of the fault, the influence of preexisting structures, and the interaction with neighboring faults of the San Andreas system.

  20. The occurrence and fission-track ages of late neogene and quaternary volcanic sediments, Siwalik group, Northern Pakistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, G.D.; Zeitler, P.; Naeser, C.W.; Johnson, N.M.; Summers, D.M.; Frost, C.D.; Opdyke, N.D.; Tahirkheli, R.A.K.

    1982-01-01

    Volcanic sediments, now mostly bentonites and bentonitic mudstones, occur throughout the Late Neogene and Quaternary Siwalik Group of northern Pakistan. A number of these deposits have been dated by the fission-track method, utilizing zircon phenocrysts from these deposits, and provide the chronometric constraints upon which a paleomagnetic stratigraphy is developed for the Siwalik Group. Notable in the occurrence of these altered tuff horizons is an apparent mode in their stratigraphic development from approximately 3.0 to 1.5 m.y. B.P. which coincides with the period of activity of the Dacht-e-Nawar volcanic complex of east-central Afghanistan. Fission-track ages of certain tuffs for critical areas of northern Pakistan are reported herein. ?? 1982.

  1. Fission-track dating of the tectonic development of the San Juan Islands, Washington.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, S.Y.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Naeser, C.W.; Whetten, J.T.

    1986-01-01

    Previous geological studies have indicated that the major thrusting event in the San Juan Islands was of late-early to late Cretaceous age. Geochronological data are consistent with these prior inferences and confirm that thrusting occurred between approx 105 and 75 m.y. Reset zircon fission-track dates indicate the possible presence of a reversed geothermal gradient in the Decatur terrain, the uppermost preserved thrust plate. If present, this gradient was probably produced by conductive heating, and possibly by shear heating associated with a now-eroded overlying thrust plate and thrust fault. Thrusting in the southern San Juan Islands was accompanied by uplift and resetting of apatite dates. The Haro formation, the Spieden group, and their basement (probably the Wrangellia terrain) did not experience this uplift and probably acted as a 'backstop' to thrusting. Uplift of the southern San Juan Islands was, therefore, probably mainly accommodated on the Haro fault. The Nanaimo basin formed in the foreland of this advancing thrust system, probably as a response to thrust-related loading. Eastern exposures of the Nanaimo group were uplifted prior to deposition of the Middle and Upper Eocene Padden member of the Chucknaut formation, perhaps along a reactivated Haro fault system. -J.M.H.

  2. Thermal history of Michigan Basin and Southern Canadian Shield from apatite fission track analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, Kevin D.

    1991-01-01

    Apatite fission track ages and confined-length distributions were collected from 38 basement outcrop and 5 basement drillcore samples in order to reconstruct the Phanerozoic thermal history of the Michigan Basin and southern Canadian Shield. The apatite data indicate two periods of thermal activity in the region: Triassic heating/cooling that affected the basin and adjacent shield and Cretaceous or post-Cretaceous heating/cooling that primarily affected the basin. The magnitude, timing, and cause of Cretaceous thermal activity cannot be identified with the present data. Model calculations suggest that some of the shield samples and probably all of the basin samples were heated to temperatures of at least 90°C just prior to relatively rapid cooling in the Triassic. Available stratigraphic and geochemical constraints suggest that these elevated temperatures were the result of burial by an additional 2-5 km of late Paleozoic (probably Pennsylvanian and Permian) sediments. It is likely that the basin was buried during the Alleghenian Orogeny as observed for the adjacent Appalachian Basin.

  3. Thermal history of Michigan Basin and southern Canadian Shield from apatite fission track analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, K.D. )

    1991-01-10

    Apatite fission track ages and confined-length distributions were collected from 38 basement outcrop and 5 basement drillcore samples in order to reconstruct the Phanerozoic thermal history of the Michigan Basin and southern Canadian Shield. The apatite data indicate two periods of thermal activity in the region: Triassic heating/cooling that affected the basin and adjacent shield and Cretaceous or post-Cretaceous heating/cooling that primarily affected the basin. The magnitude, timing, and cause of Cretaceous thermal activity cannot be identified with the present data. Model calculations suggest that some of the shield samples and probably all of the basin samples were heated to temperatures of at least 90C just prior to relatively rapid cooling in the Triassic. Available stratigraphic and geochemical constraints suggest that these elevated temperatures were the result of burial by an additional 2-5 km of late Paleozoic (probably Pennsylvanian and Permian) sediments. It is likely that the basin was buried during the Alleghenian Orogeny as observed for the adjacent Appalachian Basin.

  4. Tertiary fission-track ages from the Bagua syncline (northern Peru): Stratigraphic and tectonic implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, C.W.; Crochet, J.-Y.; Jaillard, E.; Laubacher, G.; Mourier, T.; Sige, B.

    1991-01-01

    The results of five zircon fission-track ages of volcanic tuffs intercalated within the continental deposits of the Bagua syncline (northern Peru) are reported. These 2500-meter-thick deposits overlie mid-Campanian to lower Maastrichtian fine-grained red beds (Fundo El Triunfo Formation). The disconformable fluvial conglomerates of the Rentema Formation are associated with a 54 Ma tuff (upper Paleocene-lower Eocene?) and would reflect the Inca-1 tectonic phase. The Sambimera Formation (Eocene to mid-Miocene) is a coarsening-upward sequence (from lacustrine to fluvial) that contains three volcanic tuffs of 31, 29, and 12 Ma, respectively. A probable stratigraphic gap, upper Eocene-lower Oligocene, would be related to the late Eocene Inca-2 phase. Neither deformation nor sedimentary discontinuity has been recognized so far. However, the lacustrine to fluvial transition could relate to the late Oligocene Aymara tectonic phase. The unconformable fanglomerates and fluvial deposits of the San Antonio Formation contain in their upper part a 9 Ma tuff (mid-to upper Miocene), and thier base records a major tectonic event (Quechua-2 phase?). The unconformable fanglomerates of the Tambopara Formation date the folding of the Bagua syncline, which could be ascribed to the latest Miocene Quechua-3 tectonics. These formations are correlative with comparable deposits in the sub-Andean basins, suggesting that these eastern areas underwent strong tectonic subsidence of the foreland basin type since mid-Miocene times. ?? 1991.

  5. Evidence of post-Gondwana breakup in Southern Brazilian Shield: Insights from apatite and zircon fission track thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Christie Helouise Engelmann de; Jelinek, Andréa Ritter; Chemale, Farid; Bernet, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Apatite and zircon fission track thermochronology studies are applied to basement and sedimentary rocks from the Sul-Rio-Grandense Shield to unravel the tectonic history of the onshore southernmost Brazilian margin. The Sul-Rio-Grandense Shield is a major geotectonic feature of southernmost Brazil that includes Paleoproterozoic basement areas and Neoproterozoic fold belts linked to the Brasiliano/Pan-African orogeny. Crustal reworking and juvenile accretion events related to this cycle were dated in the region between 900 and 500 Ma and were responsible for the assembly of southwestern Gondwana in southeastern South America. Apatite fission track (AFT) ages range from 340 ± 33 to 77 ± 6 Ma and zircon fission track (ZFT) ages range from ca. 386 to 210 Ma. Based on thermal history modeling, the most part of the samples record an early cooling event during the Carboniferous, which reflect the main tectonic activity of the final stages of the Gondwanides at the Pacific margin of West Gondwana. Subsequently, the Permo-Triassic cooling event is related to the last stages of the Gondwanides, with convergence along the southern border of Western Gondwana and consequent reactivation of N-S and NE-SW trending basement structures. The onset of initial breakup of southwestern Gondwana with opening of the South Atlantic Ocean is mostly recorded in the eastern terrain and ZFT ages show that the temperature during this period was high enough for total or at least partial resetting of fission tracks in zircon. The last cooling event of the Sul-Rio-Grandense Shield records the final breakup between South America and Africa, which began during the Late Cretaceous. However, the Cenozoic rapid cooling episode probably is a result of plate adjustment after breakup and neotectonic reactivation of faults associated with South Atlantic rift evolution.

  6. Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors--I: Track Characteristics and Formation Mechanisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lal, Nand

    1991-01-01

    Heavily ionizing charged particles produce radiation damage tracks in a wide variety of insulating materials. The experimental properties of these tracks and track recorders are described. The mechanisms by which the tracks are produced are discussed. (Author/KR)

  7. Possible secondary apatite fission track age standard from altered volcanic ash beds in the middle Jurassic Carmel Formation, Southwestern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kowallis, B.J.; Christiansen, E.H.; Everett, B.H.; Crowley, K.D.; Naeser, C.W.; Miller, D.S.; Deino, A.L.

    1993-01-01

    Secondary age standards are valuable in intra- and interlaboratory calibration. At present very few such standards are available for fission track dating that is older than Tertiary. Several altered volcanic ash beds occur in the Middle Jurassic Carmel Formation in southwestern Utah. The formation was deposited in a shallow marine/sabhka environment. Near Gunlock, Utah, eight ash beds have been identified. Sanidines from one of the ash beds (GUN-F) give a single-crystal laser-probe 40Ar/39Ar age of 166.3??0.8 Ma (2??). Apatite and zircon fission track ages range from 152-185 Ma with typically 15-20 Ma errors (2??). Track densities in zircons are high and most grains are not countable. Apatites are fairly common in most of the ash beds and have reasonable track densities ranging between 1.2-1.5 ?? 106 tracks/cm2. Track length distributions in apatites are unimodal, have standard deviations <1??m, and mean track lengths of about 14-14.5 ??m. High Cl apatites (F:Cl:OH ratio of 39:33:28) are particularly abundant and large in ash GUN-F, and are fairly easy to concentrate, but the concentrates contain some siderite, most of which can be removed by sieving. GUN-F shows evidence of some reworking and detriaal contamination based on older single grain 40Ar/39Ar analyses and some rounding of grains, but the apatite population appears to be largely uncontaminated. At present BJK has approximately 12 of apatite separate from GUN-F. ?? 1993.

  8. High temperature annealing of fission tracks in fluorapatite, Santa Fe Springs oil field, Los Angeles Basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, Nancy D.; Crowley, Kevin D.; McCulloh, Thane H.; Reaves, Chris M.; ,

    1990-01-01

    Annealing of fission tracks is a kinetic process dependent primarily on temperature and to a laser extent on time. Several kinetic models of apatite annealing have been proposed. The predictive capabilities of these models for long-term geologic annealing have been limited to qualitative or semiquantitative at best, because of uncertainties associated with (1) the extrapolation of laboratory observations to geologic conditions, (2) the thermal histories of field samples, and (3) to some extent, the effect of apatite composition on reported annealing temperatures. Thermal history in the Santa Fe Springs oil field, Los Angeles Basin, California, is constrained by an exceptionally well known burial history and present-day temperature gradient. Sediment burial histories are continuous and tightly constrained from about 9 Ma to present, with an important tie at 3.4 Ma. No surface erosion and virtually no uplift were recorded during or since deposition of these sediments, so the burial history is simple and uniquely defined. Temperature gradient (???40??C km-1) is well established from oil-field operations. Fission-track data from the Santa Fe Springs area should thus provide one critical field test of kinetic annealing models for apatite. Fission-track analysis has been performed on apatites from sandstones of Pliocene to Miocene age from a deep drill hole at Santa Fe Springs. Apatite composition, determined by electron microprobe, is fluorapatite [average composition (F1.78Cl0.01OH0.21)] with very low chlorine content [less than Durango apatite; sample means range from 0.0 to 0.04 Cl atoms, calculated on the basis of 26(O, F, Cl, OH)], suggesting that the apatite is not unusually resistant to annealing. Fission tracks are preserved in these apatites at exceptionally high present-day temperatures. Track loss is not complete until temperatures reach the extreme of 167-178??C (at 3795-4090 m depth). The temperature-time annealing relationships indicated by the new data

  9. Image processing analysis of nuclear track parameters for CR-39 detector irradiated by thermal neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Jobouri, Hussain A.; Rajab, Mustafa Y.

    2016-03-01

    CR-39 detector which covered with boric acid (H3Bo3) pellet was irradiated by thermal neutrons from (241Am - 9Be) source with activity 12Ci and neutron flux 105 n. cm-2. s-1. The irradiation times -TD for detector were 4h, 8h, 16h and 24h. Chemical etching solution for detector was sodium hydroxide NaOH, 6.25N with 45 min etching time and 60 C˚ temperature. Images of CR-39 detector after chemical etching were taken from digital camera which connected from optical microscope. MATLAB software version 7.0 was used to image processing. The outputs of image processing of MATLAB software were analyzed and found the following relationships: (a) The irradiation time -TD has behavior linear relationships with following nuclear track parameters: i) total track number - NT ii) maximum track number - MRD (relative to track diameter - DT) at response region range 2.5 µm to 4 µm iii) maximum track number - MD (without depending on track diameter - DT). (b) The irradiation time -TD has behavior logarithmic relationship with maximum track number - MA (without depending on track area - AT). The image processing technique principally track diameter - DT can be take into account to classification of α-particle emitters, In addition to the contribution of these technique in preparation of nano- filters and nano-membrane in nanotechnology fields.

  10. Zircon and apatite fission-track evidence for an Early Permian thermal peak and relatively rapid Late Permian cooling in the Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, M.K. . Dept. of Earth and Environmental Science); Wintsch, R.P. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    New zircon fission-track ages compliment published apatite fission-track ages in the Appalachian Basin to narrowly constrain its thermal history. Geologic evidence can only constrain timing of the thermal peak to be younger than late Pennsylvanian sediments ([approximately] 300 Ma) and older than Mesozoic sediments in the Newark and Gettysburg Basins ([approximately] 210 Ma). Apatite fission-track ages as old as 246 Ma require the Alleghanian thermal peak to have been pre-Triassic. Preliminary data on reset zircon fission-track ages from middle Paleozoic sediments range from 255 to 290 Ma. Zircon fission-track apparent ages from samples younger and structurally higher than these are not reset. Thus, the oldest reset zircon fission-track age constraints the time of the Alleghanian thermal peak to be earliest Permian. Rates of post-Alleghanian cooling have not been well-constrained by geologic data and could be very slow. The difference between apatite and zircon fission-track ages for most of the samples range from 100--120 m.y. reflecting Permo-Triassic cooling of only 1 C/m.y. However, one sample with one of the oldest apatite ages, 245 Ma, yields one of the younger zircon ages of 255 Ma. This requires cooling rates of 10 C/m.y. and uplift rates of [approximately] 0.5 mm/yr. Collectively, these data support an early Permian thermal peak and a two-stage cooling history, consisting of > 100 C cooling (> 8 km denundation) in the Permian followed by relatively slow cooling and exhumation throughout the Mesozoic.

  11. Novel Al2O3:C,Mg fluorescent nuclear track detectors for passive neutron dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Sykora, G Jeff; Akselrod, Mark S; Salasky, M; Marino, Stephen A

    2007-01-01

    The latest advances in the development of a fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD) for neutron and heavy charged particle dosimetry are described and compared with CR-39 plastic nuclear etched track detectors (PNTDs). The technique combines a new luminescent aluminium oxide single crystal detector (Al(2)O(3):C,Mg) with an imaging technique based on laser scanning and confocal fluorescence detection. Detection efficiency was obtained after irradiations with monoenergetic neutron and proton beams. Dose dependences were measured for different configurations of the detectors exposed in fast- and thermal-neutron fields. A specially developed image processing technique allows for fast fluorescent track identification and counting. The readout method is non-destructive, and detectors can be reused after thermal annealing. PMID:17522030

  12. Tracking the Oman Ophiolite to the surface - New fission track and (U-Th)/He data from the Aswad and Khor Fakkan Blocks, United Arab Emirates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Joachim; Thomas, Robert J.; Ksienzyk, Anna K.; Dunkl, István

    2015-03-01

    The Oman Ophiolite in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) was formed in a supra-subduction zone environment at about 95 Ma and was almost immediately obducted onto the eastern margin of Arabia. The timing of obduction is well constrained, but the post-obduction tectonic, uplift and exhumation history of the ophiolite and associated rocks are less well understood. We present twenty-one new fission track and (U-Th)/He analyses of apatite and zircon from the Hajar Mountains. The data show that the Oman Ophiolite had a complex exhumation history to present exposure levels in the Khor Fakkan and Aswad Blocks, resulting from at least three distinct exhumation events: 1) initial ophiolite obduction between ca. 93 and 83 Ma is characterised by tectonic exhumation and rapid cooling, as revealed by zircon (U-Th)/He and apatite fission-track data, but it is not associated with major erosional exhumation; 2) data from the lower part of the ophiolite and the metamorphic sole document a second exhumation event at ca. 45-35 Ma, interpreted to represent an early phase of the Zagros orogeny that led to reactivation of pre-existing structures and the differential exhumation of the Khor Fakkan Block along the Wadi Ham Shear Zone. This event led to significant erosional exhumation and deposition of a thick sedimentary succession in the Ras Al Khaimah foreland basin; and 3) Neogene exhumation is recorded by ca. 20-15 Ma apatite (U-Th)/He data and a single apatite fission track date from the lowermost part of the metamorphic sole. This event can be linked to the main phase of the Zagros orogeny, which is manifested in large fans with ophiolite-derived debris (Barzaman Formation conglomerates). During this period, the metamorphic sole of the Masafi window stayed at temperatures in excess of ca. 120 °C, corresponding to ca. 4 km of overburden, only later to be eroded to present day levels.

  13. Cenozoic thermo-tectonic evolution of the northeastern Pamir revealed by zircon and apatite fission-track thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Kai; Wang, Guo-Can; van der Beek, Peter; Bernet, Matthias; Zhang, Ke-Xin

    2013-03-01

    The northeastern Pamir is a key location to explore Asian intracontinental tectonic processes during the Cenozoic. New zircon fission-track (ZFT) data show a 20- to 50-km-wide region of partially reset ages on the northeastern margin of the Pamir salient, interpreted as an exhumed and tilted partial annealing zone (PAZ). Widespread ZFT age peaks at ~ 50 Ma within the ZFT PAZ likely date early motion of the Kashgar-Yecheng transfer system (KYTS), but suggest this fault system was narrower in the Early Cenozoic than it is today. Apatite fission-track (AFT) ages of ~ 10-6 Ma, combined with field observations across the KYTS, hint at an episode of strong thrusting-related exhumational cooling, which indicates that the modern fault system probably formed at this time. To the southwest of the KYTS, the combination of new fission-track and existing thermochronology data allows establishing temperature-time trajectories that present diachronous rapid cooling from ~ 450 to 120 °C in the Sares (> 13-10 Ma), Muztagata (~ 10-7 Ma) and Kongur Shan (~ 3-1 Ma) domes. Rapid cooling in the eastern Sares and southern Muztagata massifs is driven by doming, as supported by kinematic analyses of the Shen-ti fault. Successive rapid cooling of these massifs confirms eastward propagation of doming processes, shortly postdating magma emplacement at ~ 11 Ma. We propose that the synchronicity of regional tectonism, magmatism and metamorphism implies that strong crustal thickening and contraction occurred beneath the northeastern Pamir during the Middle-Late Miocene, possibly associated with initial collision between the Pamir and Tian Shan.

  14. Nuclear Track Detector Characterization via Alpha-Spectrometry for Radioprotection Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, D.; Immè, G.; Aranzulla, M.; Tazzer, A. L. Rosselli; Catalano, R.; Mangano, G.

    2011-12-01

    Solid Nuclear Track Detectors (SNTDs), CR-39 type, are usually adopted to monitor radon gas concentrations. In order to characterize the detectors according to track geometrical parameters, detectors were irradiated inside a vacuum chamber by alpha particles at twelve energy values, obtained by different Mylar foils in front of a 241Am source. The alpha energy values were verified using a Si detector. After the exposure to the alpha particles, the detectors were chemically etched to enlarge the tracks, which were then analyzed by means of a semiautomatic system composed of an optical microscope equipped with a CCD camera connected to a personal computer to store images. A suitable routine analyzed the track parameters: major and minor axis length and mean grey level, allowing us to differentiate tracks according to the incident alpha energy and then to individuate the discrimination factors for radon alpha tracks. The combined use of geometrical and optical parameters allows one to overcome the ambiguity in the alpha energy determination due to the non-monotonicity of each parameter versus energy. After track parameter determination, a calibration procedure was performed by means of a radon chamber. The calibration was verified through an inter-comparing survey.

  15. Nuclear Track Detector Characterization via Alpha-Spectrometry for Radioprotection Use

    SciTech Connect

    Morelli, D.; Imme, G.; Catalano, R.; Aranzulla, M.; Tazzer, A. L. Rosselli; Mangano, G.

    2011-12-13

    Solid Nuclear Track Detectors (SNTDs), CR-39 type, are usually adopted to monitor radon gas concentrations. In order to characterize the detectors according to track geometrical parameters, detectors were irradiated inside a vacuum chamber by alpha particles at twelve energy values, obtained by different Mylar foils in front of a {sup 241}Am source. The alpha energy values were verified using a Si detector. After the exposure to the alpha particles, the detectors were chemically etched to enlarge the tracks, which were then analyzed by means of a semiautomatic system composed of an optical microscope equipped with a CCD camera connected to a personal computer to store images. A suitable routine analyzed the track parameters: major and minor axis length and mean grey level, allowing us to differentiate tracks according to the incident alpha energy and then to individuate the discrimination factors for radon alpha tracks. The combined use of geometrical and optical parameters allows one to overcome the ambiguity in the alpha energy determination due to the non-monotonicity of each parameter versus energy. After track parameter determination, a calibration procedure was performed by means of a radon chamber. The calibration was verified through an inter-comparing survey.

  16. A novel generic framework for track fitting in complex detector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höppner, C.; Neubert, S.; Ketzer, B.; Paul, S.

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents a novel framework for track fitting which is usable in a wide range of experiments, independent of the specific event topology, detector setup, or magnetic field arrangement. This goal is achieved through a completely modular design. Fitting algorithms are implemented as interchangeable modules. At present, the framework contains a validated Kalman filter. Track parameterizations and the routines required to extrapolate the track parameters and their covariance matrices through the experiment are also implemented as interchangeable modules. Different track parameterizations and extrapolation routines can be used simultaneously for fitting of the same physical track. Representations of detector hits are the third modular ingredient to the framework. The hit dimensionality and orientation of planar tracking detectors are not restricted. Tracking information from detectors which do not measure the passage of particles in a fixed physical detector plane, e.g. drift chambers or TPCs, is used without any simplification. The concept is implemented in a light-weight C++ library called GENFIT, which is available as free software.

  17. Ultrasensitive detection and dose reconstruction for plutonium-239 through fission track analysis of urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krahenbuhl, Melinda Pearl

    1998-12-01

    This dissertation addresses a number of deficiencies in currently used Fission Track Analysis (FTA) methodology and introduces improvements to make FTA a more reliable research tool. The refined methodology, described herein, includes a chemically-induced precipitation phase followed by anion exchange chromatography and employs a chemical tracer, Plutonium236 (Pu236). An inverse correlation between Pu recovery and sample volume has been established, and tests confirm that larger sample volumes do not result in higher accuracy or lower detection limits. Subsequently, the optimal sample volume is determined to be approximately 2 liters and the detection limit for this volume is established at 2.8 muBq/L (76 aCi/L). In comparison, the detection limits of two alternate methodologies are 2 muBq (at Brookhaven National Lab) and 3.2 muBq (at the University Hospital in Lund, Sweden). A comparative review evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of these methodologies by comparing pivotal aspects of each laboratory's process. The obvious strength of FTA is the low detection limit for fissile materials. The greatest weakness is the lack of independent confirmation for the results of the three respective methodologies. Additionally, each laboratory's unique nomenclature has made comparison and evaluation problematic and has lead to occasional misinterpretation of numeric data. Addressing the scientific and engineering community's lack of confidence in FTA will require more complete disclosure of techniques and protocols, including documentation of experimental failures. In experiments detailed in this dissertation, the refined FTA methodology was used to determine the Pu236 concentration in urine for two unique populations, radiation workers and the general population. The results of this analysis were used to predict dose according to several different interpretations of the ICRP recommendations. These predictions focused on the liver, lung and skeletal systems. Predicted

  18. Heat Generation and Strength of Seismogenic Faults Constrained by Fission-Track Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschner, D. L.; Cuevas-Miranda, D. N.; El-Shafei, M.; Garver, J. I.

    2003-12-01

    There has been a longstanding debate regarding the strength of the San Andreas fault and other large faults in the San Andreas system. Some field- and laboratory-derived data are consistent with these faults being anomalously weak, while other data are consistent with these faults having normal strength. One of the most widely accepted and oft-quoted data in support of weak faults is the absence of anomalously high heat flow in the vicinity of these faults. Friction in a normal-strength fault should produce significant amounts of heat, resulting in elevated heat flow in and adjacent to the fault. There is no uniformly high heat-flow along the San Andreas fault, resulting in the well-known "stress / heat-flow" paradox. To provide new data directly related to resolving the stress / heat-flow paradox, we have obtained fission-track data for 41 apatite samples and 8 zircon samples from two inactive strike-slip faults in the San Andreas system (the San Gabriel and Punchbowl faults) that have been exhumed ~2 to 5 kilometers. San Gabriel fault samples were collected in traverses near Whitaker Peak, the "Earthquake locality", and along Bear Creek. Samples were also collected from one traverse in the Devil's Punchbowl County Park. Apatite FT dates are between 51 to 25 Ma from Whitaker Peak, 54 to 24 Ma from the Earthquake locality, and 44 to 6 Ma from Bear Creek. Zircon FT dates from Bear Creek range between 61 and 40 Ma. Apatite FT dates from the Punchbowl fault range between 15 and 7 Ma. FT dates vary systematically with distance from the fault cores along individual traverses. The dates do not, however, young monotonically towards the faults, which would be expected if there had been sustained elevated temperature along the faults. More thermochronologic data (U-Th/He) from the same samples will help resolve factor(s) responsible for the variations in FT dates, and ultimately the strength of these faults when they were active.

  19. Apatite Fission-Track Analysis of the Middle Jurassic Todos Santos Formation from Chiapas, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullin, Fanis; Solé, Jesús; Shchepetilnikova, Valentina; Solari, Luigi; Ortega-Obregón, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    The Sierra de Chiapas (SCH), located in the south of Mexico, is a complex geological province that can be divided on four different lithological or tectonic areas: (1) the Chiapas Massif Complex (CMC); (2) the Central Depression; (3) the Strike-slip Fault Province, and (4) the Chiapas Fold-and-thrust Belt. The CMC mostly consists of Permian granitoids and meta-granitoids, and represents the basement of the SCH. During the Jurassic period red beds and salt were deposited on this territory, related to the main pulse of rifting and opening of the Gulf of Mexico. Most of the Cretaceous stratigraphy contains limestones and dolomites deposited on a marine platform setting during the postrift stage of the Gulf of Mexico rift. During the Cenozoic Era took place the major clastic sedimentation along the SCH. According the published low-temperature geochronology data (Witt et al., 2012), SCH has three main phases of thermo-tectonic history: (1) slow exhumation between 35 and 25 Ma, that affected mainly the basement (CMC) and is probably related to the migration of the Chortís block; (2) fast exhumation during the Middle-Late Miocene caused by strike-slip deformation that affects almost all Chiapas territory; (3) period of rapid cooling from 6 to 5 Ma, that affects the Chiapas Fold-and-thrust Belt, coincident with the landward migration of the Caribbean-North America plate boundaries. The two last events were the most significant on the formation of the present-day topography of the SCH. However, the stratigraphy of the SCH shows traces of the existence of earlier tectonic events. This study presents preliminary results of apatite fission-track (AFT) dating of sandstones from the Todos Santos Formation (Middle Jurassic). The analyses are performed with in situ uranium determination using LA-ICP-MS (e.g., Hasebe et al., 2004). The AFT data indicate that this Formation has suffered high-grade diagenesis (probably over 150 ºC) and the obtained cooling ages, about 70-60 Ma

  20. Relation between denudation history and sediment supply from apatite fission track thermochronology in the northeast Brazilian Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinek, Andrea; Chemale, Farid; Bueno, Gilmar

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a quantitative overview of Mesozoic-Cenozoic morphotectonic evolution and sediment supply to the northeast Brazilian margin. Landscape evolution and denudation histories for the northeastern Brazilian continental margin (Sergipe, Alagoas, Bahia, and Espírito Santo states) were detailed by apatite fission track thermochronology and thermal-history modeling and related with the sedimentological record of the offshore basins of the passive margin for a comparison with their denudational history. Approximately one hundred basement samples were analyzed from the coast to the inland of the Brazilian margin. The apparent fission track ages vary from 360 to 61 Ma and confined fission track lengths vary between 10 and 14.6 µm, indicating that not all of the samples recorded the same cooling events. The results of apatite fission track ages indicate that the area has been eroded regionally since the Mesozoic (< 250 Ma) and suggest that at less 4 km of overburden has been eroded regionally since the late Cretaceous (< 120 Ma) at a rate of 120 to 15 m/Ma. Two-stage of erosion process is deduced from simulated cooling histories for each sector. The Permian-Early Jurassic exhumation is restricted to the area of the Sertaneja Depression, besides the Diamantina Plateau. During this time, denudation rates are generally <20 m My-1 and record up to 1.5 km of denudation. Pre-rift sedimentation is recorded in the Camamu-Almada, Recôncavo, and Sergipe-Alagoas basins. Samples from the Conquista and Borborema Plateaus, and Mantiqueira Range record a Cretaceous-Paleogene onset of exhumation. This timing is consistent with the offshore sedimentary record, wherein a large clastic wedge started forming in the northeastern Sergipe-Alagoas basin, which suggests Sergipe-Alagoas basin records drainage reorganization and extension of the São Francisco River catchment. Interestingly, the Camamu basin, adjacent to the section of the margin does not record syn

  1. Cosmic ray positron research and silicon track detector development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. Vernon; Wefel, John P.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose was to conduct research on: (1) position sensing detector systems, particularly those based upon silicon detectors, for use in future balloon and satellite experiments; and (2) positrons, electrons, proton, anti-protons, and helium particles as measured by the NASA NMSU Balloon Magnet Facility.

  2. Enhanced trigger for the NIFFTE fissionTPC in presence of high-rate alpha backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundgaard, Jeremy; Niffte Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear physics and nuclear energy communities call for new, high precision measurements to improve existing fission models and design next generation reactors. The Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking experiment (NIFFTE) has developed the fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) to measure neutron induced fission with unrivaled precision. The fissionTPC is annually deployed to the Weapons Neutron Research facility at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center where it operates with a neutron beam passing axially through the drift volume, irradiating heavy actinide targets to induce fission. The fissionTPC was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's TPC lab, where it measures spontaneous fission from radioactive sources to characterize detector response, improve performance, and evolve the design. To measure 244Cm, we've developed a fission trigger to reduce the data rate from alpha tracks while maintaining a high fission detection efficiency. In beam, alphas from 239Pu are a large background when detecting fission fragments; implementing the fission trigger will greatly reduce this background. The implementation of the cathode fission trigger in the fissionTPC will be presented along with a detailed study of its efficiency.

  3. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Monte Carlo studies of micromegas as a neutron detector and its track reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Wen-Xin; Yang, He-Run; Yang, Zheng-Cai; Hu, Bi-Tao

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a two dimensional readout micromegas detector with a polyethylene foil as converter was simulated on GEANT4 toolkit and GARFIELD for fast neutron detection. A new track reconstruction method based on time coincidence technology was developed in the simulation to obtain the incident neutron position. The results showed that with this reconstruction method higher spatial resolution was achieved.

  4. Late Jurassic--Early Cretaceous cooling for Late Proterozoic through Early Devonian crystalline rocks from the Bronson Hill anticlinorium, MA--VT: Evidence from apatite fission track analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, M.K. . Dept. of Earth and Environmental Science)

    1993-03-01

    Ten samples of crystalline rocks from the Bronson Hill anticlinorium in north central Massachusetts--south central Vermont yield Mesozoic apatite fission track cooling ages ranging from 98 [+-] 8 to 158 [+-] 24 Ma. Compositionally, the samples include a quartz-phyric rhyolite from the Ammonoosuc Volcanics, a pegmatite from the Kempfield Anticline, a gabbro from the Prescott Intrusive Complex, the Dry Hill and Fourmile Gneisses from the Pelham Dome, Swanzey Gneiss from the Keene Dome, Pauchaug Gneiss from the Warwick Dome, and the Monson Gneiss. Published U-Pb zircon analyses for the same samples yield ages of 613 [+-] 3 Ma for the Dry Hill Gneiss; 454--442 [+-] 3 Ma for the Swanzey, Pauchaug, Monson and Fourmile Gneisses; 453 [+-] 2 Ma for the Ammonoosuc Volcanics; and 407 [+-] 3/[minus]2 Ma for the Prescott Intrusive Complex gabbro (Tucker and Robinson, 1990). Apatite fission track ages are all reset and increase in apparent age eastward from the edge of the Deerfield-Hartford Basin, consistent with published apatite fission track ages from Jurassic sedimentary units within the Deerfield and Northern Hartford Basins. Mean track lengths ranged from 13.4 to 14.4 [mu]m with moderately large standard deviations. These track length distributions suggest relatively slow cooling through the track annealing range of 70--90 C and are consistent with track length distributions for sedimentary samples within the Deerfield and Northern Hartford Basins. The trend of increasing apatite fission track apparent age eastward from the basin margin suggests several interpretations: (1) differential uplift; (2) deeper burial in the basin and adjacent areas; (3) higher heat flow along the basin margin. Zircon fission track analyses are in progress to constrain maximum burial depths and should help differentiate between these models.

  5. Effect of environmental conditions on radon concentration-track density calibration factor of solid-state nuclear track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sersy, A.; Mansy, M.; Hussein, A.

    2004-04-01

    In this work, the effect of environmental conditions viz., temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) on the track density--radon concentrations calibration factor (K) has been studied for CR-39 and LR-115 track detectors. The factor K was determined using a reference radon chamber in the National Institute for Standards (NIS) in Egypt. Track detectors were etched at the recommended optimum etching conditions. It is found that, the calibration factor K varies with both T and RH, so they should be considered for the sake of uncertainty reduction. Good agreement is found between the calculated and measured values of K and the compatibility between them is in the range of experimental uncertainty.

  6. Calibrations for Charged Particle Tracking with the GlueX Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staib, Michael; GlueX Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Two gas detectors comprise the tracking system for the GlueX experiment, the Central Drift Chamber (CDC) and the Forward Drift Chamber (FDC). The CDC is a cylindrical straw-tube detector covering polar angles between 6° and 168°, delivering spatial resolution of ~150 μm. The FDC is a Cathode Strip Chamber consisting of four packages, each with six alternating layers of anode wires and cathode strips. The FDC is designed to track forward-going charged particles with polar angles between 1° and 20° with a spatial resolution of ~200 μm. Both tracking detectors record timing information and energy loss measurements useful for particle identification. During Fall 2014 and Spring 2015, the first photon beam was delivered on target for commissioning of the GlueX detector in Hall-D at Jefferson Lab. These data are currently being used in a large effort to calibrate the individual detector subsystems to achieve design performance. Methods and results for calibrations of each of the tracking detectors are presented. Techniques for alignment of the tracking system using a combination of cosmic rays and beam data is discussed. Finally, some early results of physics measurements including charged final-state particles are presented. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under Contract DE-AC05-06OR23177.

  7. Identifying uranium particles using fission tracks and microsampling individual particles for analysis using thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Esaka, Fumitaka; Suzuki, Daisuke; Magara, Masaaki

    2015-03-01

    The analysis of isotope ratios in individual particles found in the environment is important to clarify the origins of the particles. In particular, the analysis of uranium particles in environmental samples from nuclear facilities is useful for detecting undeclared nuclear activities related to the production of nuclear weapons. Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) combined with a fission track technique is an efficient method for determining the isotope ratios of individual uranium particles, but has a drawback called "particle-mixing". When some uranium particles are measured as a single particle and an average isotope ratio for the particles is obtained, it is called "particle mixing". This may lead to erroneous conclusions in terms of the particle sources that are identified. In the present study, microsampling using a scanning electron microscope was added to the fission track-TIMS procedure. The analysis of a mixture of SRM 950a and CRM U100 reference materials containing uranium particles indicated that particle mixing was almost completely avoided using the proposed technique. The performance of the proposed method was sufficient for obtaining reliable data for the sources of individual particles to be identified reliably. PMID:25680068

  8. Identifying uranium particles using fission tracks and microsampling individual particles for analysis using thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Esaka, Fumitaka; Suzuki, Daisuke; Magara, Masaaki

    2015-03-01

    The analysis of isotope ratios in individual particles found in the environment is important to clarify the origins of the particles. In particular, the analysis of uranium particles in environmental samples from nuclear facilities is useful for detecting undeclared nuclear activities related to the production of nuclear weapons. Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) combined with a fission track technique is an efficient method for determining the isotope ratios of individual uranium particles, but has a drawback called "particle-mixing". When some uranium particles are measured as a single particle and an average isotope ratio for the particles is obtained, it is called "particle mixing". This may lead to erroneous conclusions in terms of the particle sources that are identified. In the present study, microsampling using a scanning electron microscope was added to the fission track-TIMS procedure. The analysis of a mixture of SRM 950a and CRM U100 reference materials containing uranium particles indicated that particle mixing was almost completely avoided using the proposed technique. The performance of the proposed method was sufficient for obtaining reliable data for the sources of individual particles to be identified reliably.

  9. Multiple cooling episodes in the Central Tarim (Northwest China) revealed by apatite fission track analysis and vitrinite reflectance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jian; Qiu, Nansheng; Song, Xinying; Li, Huili

    2016-06-01

    Apatite fission track and vitrinite reflectance are integrated for the first time to study the cooling history in the Central Tarim, northwest China. The paleo-temperature profiles from vitrinite reflectance data of the Z1 and Z11 wells showed a linear relationship with depth, suggesting an approximately 24.8 °C/km paleo-geothermal gradient and 2700-3900 m of erosion during the Early Mesozoic. The measured apatite fission track ages from well Z2 in the Central Tarim range from 39 to 159 Ma and effectively record the Meso-Cenozoic cooling events that occurred in Central Tarim. Moreover, two cooling events at 190-140 Ma in the Early Jurassic-Early Cretaceous and 80-45 Ma in the Late Cretaceous-Paleocene revealed by measured AFT data and thermal modeling results are related to the collisions of the Qiangtang-Lhasa terranes and the Greater India Plate with the southern margin of the Eurasian Plate, respectively. This study provides new insights into the tectonic evolution of the Tarim Basin (and more broadly Central Asia) and for hydrocarbon generation and exploration in the Central Tarim.

  10. Radon loss from zircon: emanation and diffusion as a function of grain size, temperature and fission track density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakin, M.; Brownlee, S. J.; Baskaran, M. M.; Barbero, L.; Walsh, C. N.

    2013-12-01

    Radon emanation from rocks and minerals is ubiquitous, but the mechanisms of radon loss are not well understood. Quantification of radon emanation rates from zircon has potential bearing on the reliability of U-Pb ages of zircon bearing rocks. The 238U decay chain includes 222Rn, a noble gas, which has a half-life of 3.82 days and can escape from the crystal structure of zircon if sufficient pathways exist, or by recoil if the parent 238U was very near the outer edge of the crystal. Loss of 222Rn ultimately leads to a deficiency of 206Pb, resulting in discordance between 238U-206Pb, 235U-207Pb, and 232Th-208Pb ages. In order to evaluate the factors affecting radon loss from zircon, we performed two experiments: one focused on the effect of microstructure on room temperature 222Rn emanation, and the other to investigate 222Rn loss by high temperature diffusion. Large (~100 g) single crystal zircon samples from each of three localities were selected for this study: Mud Tank, Malawi, and Bancroft. The zircons were pulverized and five grain sizes (500 μm, 250-500 μm, 125-250 μm, 63 - 125 μm, and < 63 μm) were separated from each. Room temperature radon emanation rates were measured for an aliquot of each grain size. To investigate the effects of microstructure, in particular fission track density, separate aliquots were heated to temperatures of 200C, 300C, 400C, 600C, and 800C for six hours after which they were cooled to room temperature and radon emanation rates were measured. Fission track densities were measured after the same annealing steps in the Mud Tank zircon, allowing quantification of 222Rn emanation rate as a function of fission track density. In general, radon emanation rates decrease with decreasing fission track density, but increase when all fission tracks are annealed, suggesting the possibility of using 222Rn to assess defect density within crystals. To investigate diffusive loss of 222Rn, we heated separate aliquots of each grain size of the

  11. Influence of high temperature on solid state nuclear track detector parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowska, A.; Szydlowski, A.; Jaskola, M.; Korman, A.

    2012-09-15

    This work concerns the influence of high temperatures on tracks induced in solid state nuclear track detectors of the CR-39/PM-355 type. In order to investigate this effect some samples of the detectors were irradiated with energetic protons and {alpha} particles and subsequently heated under controlled temperatures for different periods of time. After heating the samples were etched and the track evolution was analyzed using an optical microscope. The bulk etch rate V{sub B} of the PM-355 material was also determined as a function of heating temperature. The track etch rate V{sub T} values were estimated for craters induced by protons and {alpha} particles from track diameter measurement as a function of heating temperature.

  12. Performance of silicon pixel detectors at small track incidence angles for the ATLAS Inner Tracker upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viel, Simon; Banerjee, Swagato; Brandt, Gerhard; Carney, Rebecca; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Hard, Andrew Straiton; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kashif, Lashkar; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Rieger, Julia; Wolf, Julian; Wu, Sau Lan; Yang, Hongtao

    2016-09-01

    In order to enable the ATLAS experiment to successfully track charged particles produced in high-energy collisions at the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider, the current ATLAS Inner Detector will be replaced by the Inner Tracker (ITk), entirely composed of silicon pixel and strip detectors. An extension of the tracking coverage of the ITk to very forward pseudorapidity values is proposed, using pixel modules placed in a long cylindrical layer around the beam pipe. The measurement of long pixel clusters, detected when charged particles cross the silicon sensor at small incidence angles, has potential to significantly improve the tracking efficiency, fake track rejection, and resolution of the ITk in the very forward region. The performance of state-of-the-art pixel modules at small track incidence angles is studied using test beam data collected at SLAC and CERN.

  13. Quantifying glacial erosion in the European Alps using apatite fission track dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wangenheim, Cornelia; Glotzbach, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the impact of glacial erosion on landscape evolution during the Quaternary, problems may occur in choosing the best method, because many methods only reflect parts of the era. Erosion rate calculations based on cosmogenic nuclides only cover the Holocene and erosion rate calculations based on river load gauging reflect even shorter timescales (e.g. von Blanckenburg 2005). In this study we investigate the potential of thermochronological methods, especially apatite fission track dating (AFT) to quantify glacial erosion in the European Alps. The topography of the European Alps is strongly influenced by Quaternary glaciations, as it formed characteristic features like overdeepened and hanging valleys. The study area is located in the Central Alps of Switzerland, which is a high mountain area. At ~0.9 Ma glacial erosion has led to a considerable increase in valley incision rates in this area (Haeuselmann et al. 2007) and therefore it is ideally suited to study the glacial impact on landscape evolution. The advantage of using AFT dating, while studying changes in erosional processes, is that possibly arising nonsteady-state erosion will be recorded within the spatial distribution of thermochronological ages. In this study we applied AFT dating on both bedrock and sediments. The bedrock samples derive from different elevations to figure out whether or not spatial differences and elevation dependencies exist. Combined with already published data we have a relatively high sample density distributed throughout the whole study area. The detrital samples originate from stream sediments and from glacial deposits in the form of late glacial moraines and cave sediments from the last ~0.5 Ma in order to obtain possible lateral variations in erosion. The AFT ages of the bedrocks vary between ~4 Ma and ~9 Ma, resulting in an average long-term exhumation rate of ~0.5 km/Ma. Most of the ages range between 7 and 9 Ma, confirmed by prevailing ages of stream sediment

  14. The software peculiarities of pattern recognition in track detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Starkov, N.

    2015-12-31

    The different kinds of nuclear track recognition algorithms are represented. Several complicated samples of use them in physical experiments are considered. The some processing methods of complicated images are described.

  15. Development of a silicon micro-strip detector for tracking high intensity secondary beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiuchi, R.; Asano, H.; Hasegawa, S.; Honda, R.; Ichikawa, Y.; Imai, K.; Joo, C. W.; Nakazawa, K.; Sako, H.; Sato, S.; Shirotori, K.; Sugimura, H.; Tanida, K.; Watabe, T.

    2014-11-01

    A single-sided silicon micro-strip detector (SSD) has been developed as a tracking detector for hadron experiments at J-PARC where secondary meson beams with intensities of up to 108 Hz are available. The performance of the detector has been investigated and verified in a series of test beam experiments in the years 2009-2011. The hole mobility was deduced from the analysis of cluster events. The beam rate dependence was measured in terms of timing resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, and hit efficiency. This paper describes the detector with its read-out system, details of the test experiments, and discusses the performance achieved.

  16. Study of the fission spectrum of less than 1 MeV neutrons using a Lithium-glass detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastola, Suraj; Rees, Lawrence; Bart, Czirr

    2011-10-01

    The fission spectrum of neutrons with kinetic energies less than 1 MeV is of considerable practical importance for the design of nuclear reactors. However, it is not as precisely known as that for higher energy neutrons. One of the major problems scientists have previously encountered is room return neutrons. These are neutrons that reflect from the walls, ceiling or floor of the lab. Another problem is finding a way to measure accurately the neutron time of flight. This is the time neutrons take to travel from a fission event to the detector. Time of flight is used to measure the neutron energy. To avoid the room return, I am going to perform an experiment about 45 feet above the ground in the BYU Indoor Practice Facility, so that neutrons from the source will not scatter from nearby surfaces and return to the detector. To find the time of flight to a greater accuracy, I have been using a Time to Amplitude Converter (TAC). A TAC has a capacitor that charges linearly as the voltage builds up. With a 12-bit digitizer system, we can measure the time to 0.1 nanoseconds, whereas the same digitizer can only measure time in steps of 4 nanoseconds. So, we will get a more accurate measurement of time of flight with the TAC.

  17. Mineralogy, 40Ar/ 39Ar dating and apatite fission track dating of rocks along the Castle Mountain fault, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, W. T.; Bunds, M. P.; Bruhn, R. L.; Hall, C. M.; Murphy, J. M.

    2001-07-01

    The Castle Mountain fault is a 200-km-long, right-lateral fault that forms the northern boundary of the Cook Inlet basin and Matanuska Valley, Alaska. Fault gouge and fault rock at six localities contain the clay minerals illite, smectite, chlorite, and interstratified illite/smectite. At one locality, gouge contains deformed illite/smectite with very little wall rock chlorite contamination. Fine (<0.03 μm), medium (0.03-0.2 μm), and coarse (0.2-2.0 μm) illite/smectite from this site were dated using 40Ar/ 39Ar micro-encapsulation and laser microprobe methods. Total gas ages for the three size fractions are 28.21±0.12, 32.42±0.11 and 36.24±0.08 Ma for fine to coarse sizes respectively. Argon retention ages obtained from 40Ar and 39Ar retained in the three size fractions of illite at room temperature during neutron irradiation are 37.36±0.15, 42.11±0.14 and 47.20±0.10 respectively. Apatite fission track ages were measured in arkose at a locality on the fault 60 km west of the gouge locality. Three samples of arkose were dated: one within 10 m of the fault core, one 170 m from the fault, and one 335 m from the fault. The sample nearest to the fault yielded an age of 29.3±2.8 Ma, but it only had four track lengths at 10-13 μm. Two apatite grains from the intermediate sample yielded a pooled age of 34.3±6.1 Ma. The distant sample (25 grains counted, 101 track lengths) yielded an age of 32.0±2.9 Ma. This sample has a broad distribution of track lengths and a broad distribution of individual grain ages ranging from 14.8±5.1 to 67.8±8.8 Ma. Monte Carlo modeling of the apatite age and track length data is consistent with hydrothermal mineralization at 37-39 Ma followed by rapid uplift and cooling after 10 Ma. The 40Ar/ 39Ar total gas ages (K-Ar) are minimum ages, and the argon retention ages are maximum ages. The thermal model derived from the fission track data, and the argon retention age for the finest illite fraction of ˜37 Ma date a hydrothermal

  18. Denudation history and landscape evolution of the northern East-Brazilian continental margin from apatite fission-track thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinek, A. R.; Chemale, F.; van der Beek, P. A.; Guadagnin, F.; Cupertino, J. A.; Viana, A.

    2014-10-01

    We reconstruct the history of denudation and landscape evolution of the northern East- Brazilian continental margin using apatite fission-track thermochronology and thermal history modeling. This part of the Brazilian Atlantic margin is morphologically characterized by inland and coastal plateaus surrounding a wide low-lying inland region, the Sertaneja Depression. The apatite fission track ages and mean track lengths vary from 39 ± 4 to 350 ± 57 Ma and from 10.0 ± 0.3 to 14.2 ± 0.2 μm, respectively, implying a protracted history of spatially variable denudation since the Permian at relatively low rates (<50 m My-1). The Sertaneja Depression and inland plateaus record Permian-Early Jurassic (300-180 Ma) denudation that precedes rifting of the margin by > 60 Myrs. In contrast, the coastal regions record up to 2.5 km of Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous (150-120 Ma) denudation, coeval with rifting of the margin. The samples from elevated coastal regions, the Borborema Plateau and the Mantiqueira Range, record cooling from temperatures above 120 °C since the Late Cretaceous extending to the Cenozoic. We interpret this denudation as related to post-rift uplift of these parts of the margin, possibly resulting from compressional stresses transmitted from the Andes and/or magmatism at that time. Several samples from these areas also record accelerated Neogene (<30 Ma) cooling, which may record landscape response to a change from a tropical to a more erosive semi-arid climate during this time. The inferred denudation history is consistent with the offshore sedimentary record, but not with evolutionary scenarios inferred from the recognition of “planation surfaces” on the margin. The denudation history of the northeastern Brazilian margin implies a control of pre-, syn- and post-rift tectonic and climatic events on landscape evolution.

  19. Apatite fission track evidence for Miocene extensional faulting east-central Nevada, northern Basin and Range province

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, E.L.; Dumitru, T.A. . Geology Dept.); Gans, P.B. . Geological Sciences Dept.); Brown, R.W. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    Apatite fission track ages indicates that a large component of motion along many of the present range-bounding faults occurred in the Early to Middle Miocene, tilting and uplifting rocks through the apatite annealing zone (120--60 C) between 18--13 Ma (n = 20, Deep Creeks), 18--15 Ma (northern Snake Range, n = 20), 25--17 Ma (n = 7, southern Snake Range), 24--15 Ma (Egan Range, n = 6), 23--18 Ma (Kern Mts., n = 2) and 28--16 ma (Schell Creek Range, n = 2). Long track length distributions indicate rapid cooling through the 120--60 C interval followed by residence at low, near surface temperatures. The data set also indicates that the combined Deep Creek-Kern Mountains-northern and southern Snake Range constitutes a single coherent footwall crustal block beneath a > 150 km-long system of east-dipping Miocene faults which includes at least the eastern portions of faults that have been mapped as the Snake Range decollement (NSRD). Conglomerates deposited in hanging wall basins along this fault system contain metamorphic and granitic boulders whose FT ages are coeval with footwall unroofing. The deposits themselves are now known to be younger than previously reported (Oligocene) as ages from boulders are Miocene. The thick (> 2 km) sequences of synorogenic conglomerate indicates rapid unroofing; large slide blocks attest to generation of steep, fault-controlled topography. Faults that cut this sequence are now known to be younger than 15 Ma. Thus, protracted extensional faulting affected the region, beginning in the Early Oligocene and continuing to the Recent, but a significant part of this extension, including a large component of the slip on the NSRD, was accomplished in the Early to Middle Miocene. Data from this region is compatible with a growing base of apatite fission track data from elsewhere in the northern Basin and Range, which, together with geologic relationships, suggest an important episode of Miocene extension and Basin and Range development.

  20. Track segment finding with CGEM-IT and matching to outer drift chamber tracks in the BESIII detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xin-Hua; Wang, Liang-Liang; Wu, Ling-Hui; Ju, Xu-Dong; Xiu, Qing-Lei; Dong, Liao-Yuan; Dong, Ming-Yi; Li, Wei-Dong; Li, Wei-Guo; Liu, Huai-Min; Ou-Yang, Qun; Yuan, Ye; Zhang, Yao

    2016-09-01

    The relative differences in coordinates of Cylindrical Gas Electron Multiplier Detector-based Inner Tracker (CGEM-IT) clusters are studied to search for track segments in CGEM-IT for the BESIII experiment. With the full simulation of single muon track samples, clear patterns are found and parameterized for the correct cluster combinations. The cluster combinations satisfying the patterns are selected as track segment candidates in CGEM-IT with an efficiency higher than 99%. The parameters of the track segments are obtained by a helix fitting. Some χ2 quantities, evaluating the differences in track parameters between the track segments in CGEM-IT and the tracks found in the outer drift chamber, are calculated and used to match them. Proper χ2 requirements are determined as a function of transverse momentum and the matching efficiency is found to be reasonable. Supported by National Key Basic Research Program of China (2015CB856706), National Natural Science Foundation of China (11575222, 11205184, 11205182, 11121092, 11475185) and Joint Funds of National Natural Science Foundation of China (U1232201)

  1. Investigations of protons passing through the CR-39/PM-355 type of solid state nuclear track detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowska, A.; Szydłowski, A.; Jaskóła, M.; Korman, A.; Kuk, M.; Sartowska, B.; Kuehn, T.

    2013-07-15

    Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors of the CR-39/PM-355 type were irradiated with protons with energies in the range from 0.2 to 8.5 MeV. Their intensities and energies were controlled by a Si surface barrier detector located in an accelerator scattering chamber. The ranges of protons with energies of 6–7 MeV were comparable to the thickness of the PM-355 track detectors. Latent tracks in the polymeric detectors were chemically etched under standard conditions to develop the tracks. Standard optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used for surface morphology characterization.

  2. Photon energy absorption coefficients for nuclear track detectors using Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vishwanath P.; Medhat, M. E.; Badiger, N. M.

    2015-01-01

    Geant4 Monte Carlo code simulations were used to solve experimental and theoretical complications for calculation of mass energy-absorption coefficients of elements, air, and compounds. The mass energy-absorption coefficients for nuclear track detectors were computed first time using Geant4 Monte Carlo code for energy 1 keV-20 MeV. Very good agreements for simulated results of mass energy-absorption coefficients for carbon, nitrogen, silicon, sodium iodide and nuclear track detectors were observed on comparison with the values reported in the literatures. Kerma relative to air for energy 1 keV-20 MeV and energy absorption buildup factors for energy 50 keV-10 MeV up to 10 mfp penetration depths of the selected nuclear track detectors were also calculated to evaluate the absorption of the gamma photons. Geant4 simulation can be utilized for estimation of mass energy-absorption coefficients in elements and composite materials.

  3. Operational comparison of TLD albedo dosemeters and solid state nuclear tracks detectors in fuel fabrication facilities.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, N; Takada, C; Yoshida, T; Momose, T

    2007-01-01

    The authors carried out an operational study that compared the use of TLD albedo dosemeters and solid state nuclear tracks detector in plutonium environments of Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Tokai Works. A selected group of workers engaged in the fabrication process of MOX (Plutonium-Uranium mixed oxide) fuel wore both TLD albedo dosemeters and solid state nuclear tracks detectors. The TL readings were generally proportional to the counted etch-pits, and thus the dose equivalent results obtained from TLD albedo dosemeter agreed with those from solid state nuclear tracks detector within a factor of 1.5. This result indicates that, in the workplaces of the MOX fuel plants, the neutron spectrum remained almost constant in terms of time and space, and the appropriate range of field-specific correction with spectrum variations was small in albedo dosimetry. PMID:17337735

  4. Spatiotemporal variation in exhumation of the Crystallines in the NW-Himalaya, India: Constraints from fission track dating analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, R. C.; Adlakha, Vikas; Lal, Nand; Singh, Paramjeet; Kumar, Y.

    2011-05-01

    During Himalayan orogeny, coeval thrusting along the Main Central/Munsiari Thrust (MCT/MT) and extension along the South Tibetan-Detachment System (STDS) are widely responsible for rapid exhumation of the Higher Himalayan Crystalline (HHC) zone. Apatite and zircon fission-track data along the Kaliganga and Darma valleys in the Kumaon Himalaya serve to document the shallow bedrock exhumation history of the HHC. Taking into account sample location within the HHC with respect to the MCT/MT, the apatite fission track (AFT) data-sets along the Darma (1.0 ± 0.1 to 2.8 ± 0.3 Ma) and Kaliganga (1.4 ± 0.2 to 2.4 ± 0.3 Ma) which are sharing same structural setting and rock types and being separated by 40 km, show very similar patterns of exhumation histories since Plio-Quaternary in the Kumaon Himalaya. Data sets along Darma and Kaliganga are very similar to data set of adjacent traverse (50 km away) along the Goriganga valley studied by Patel and Carter (2009). Whole data sets within the HHC in Kumaon Himalaya provide clear evidence for Plio-Quaternary tectonic activity along the Vaikrita Thrust (VT). Precipitation in this region exerts a strong influence on erosional surface processes. Fluvial erosional unloading along the Himalaya is focused on the high mountainous region of the HHC, where the orographic barrier forces out the maximum percentage of annual rainfall. FT cooling ages reveal coincidence between rapid erosion and exhumation that is focused in a ~ 25-30 km wide sector of the HHC, rather than covering the entire orogen. Similarity of AFT age pattern and exhumation rates along all three major traverses (Goriganga, Darma and Kaliganga) indicates that the region has been experiencing constant rate of crustal uplift and erosion since long time. Comparison of fission track ages from the Kumaon Himalaya with other segments of the NW-Himalaya shows spatiotemporal variation in exhumation. It is described due to the development of local structures such as dome

  5. WE-D-BRF-01: FEATURED PRESENTATION - Investigating Particle Track Structures Using Fluorescent Nuclear Track Detectors and Monte Carlo Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dowdell, S; Paganetti, H; Schuemann, J; Greilich, S; Zimmerman, F; Evans, C

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To report on the efforts funded by the AAPM seed funding grant to develop the basis for fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD) based radiobiological experiments in combination with dedicated Monte Carlo simulations (MCS) on the nanometer scale. Methods: Two confocal microscopes were utilized in this study. Two FNTD samples were used to find the optimal microscope settings, one FNTD irradiated with 11.1 MeV/u Gold ions and one irradiated with 428.77 MeV/u Carbon ions. The first sample provided a brightly luminescent central track while the latter is used to test the capabilities to observe secondary electrons. MCS were performed using TOPAS beta9 version, layered on top of Geant4.9.6p02. Two sets of simulations were performed, one with the Geant4-DNA physics list and approximating the FNTDs by water, a second set using the Penelope physics list in a water-approximated FNTD and a aluminum-oxide FNTD. Results: Within the first half of the funding period, we have successfully established readout capabilities of FNTDs at our institute. Due to technical limitations, our microscope setup is significantly different from the approach implemented at the DKFZ, Germany. However, we can clearly reconstruct Carbon tracks in 3D with electron track resolution of 200 nm. A second microscope with superior readout capabilities will be tested in the second half of the funding period, we expect an improvement in signal to background ratio with the same the resolution.We have successfully simulated tracks in FNTDs. The more accurate Geant4-DNA track simulations can be used to reconstruct the track energy from the size and brightness of the observed tracks. Conclusion: We have achieved the goals set in the seed funding proposal: the setup of FNTD readout and simulation capabilities. We will work on improving the readout resolution to validate our MCS track structures down to the nanometer scales.

  6. Combined application of alpha-track and fission-track techniques for detection of plutonium particles in environmental samples prior to isotopic measurement using thermo-ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Gyu; Suzuki, Daisuke; Esaka, Fumitaka; Magara, Masaaki; Kimura, Takaumi

    2011-07-15

    The fission track technique is a sensitive detection method for particles which contain radio-nuclides like (235)U or (239)Pu. However, when the sample is a mixture of plutonium and uranium, discrimination between uranium particles and plutonium particles is difficult using this technique. In this study, we developed a method for detecting plutonium particles in a sample mixture of plutonium and uranium particles using alpha track and fission track techniques. The specific radioactivity (Bq/g) for alpha decay of plutonium is several orders of magnitude higher than that of uranium, indicating that the formation of the alpha track due to alpha decay of uranium can be disregarded under suitable conditions. While alpha tracks in addition to fission tracks were detected in a plutonium particle, only fission tracks were detected in a uranium particle, thereby making the alpha tracks an indicator for detecting particles containing plutonium. In addition, it was confirmed that there is a linear relationship between the numbers of alpha tracks produced by plutonium particles made of plutonium certified standard material and the ion intensities of the various plutonium isotopes measured by thermo-ionization mass spectrometry. Using this correlation, the accuracy in isotope ratios, signal intensity and measurement errors is presumable from the number of alpha tracks prior to the isotope ratio measurements by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. It is expected that this method will become an effective tool for plutonium particle analysis. The particles used in this study had sizes between 0.3 and 2.0 μm.

  7. Modeling of the internal tracking system of the NICA/MPD detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinchenko, A. I.; Murin, Yu. A.; Kondrat'ev, V. P.; Prokof'ev, N. A.

    2016-07-01

    The internal tracking system of the NICA/MPD detector is aimed at efficiently detecting the short-lived products of nucleus-nucleus collisions. We consider various geometries of the internal tracking system based on microstrip silicon sensors and simulate its identification power in reconstructing the Λ0 hyperons formed in central Au + Au collisions at √ {{S_{NN}}} = 9GeV.

  8. Use of fission track dates as constraints on the tectonic evolution of the Rio Grande rift. [Abstract only

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, S.A.; Duncan, I.J.; Blackwell, D.D.

    1983-03-01

    Apatite fission track dates have been determined for Precambrian and Tertiary granitic rocks collected from four ranges on the eastern margin of the Rio Grande rift. The ages at lower elevation in these areas are, in general, younger than those at higher elevation because of cooling as uplift occurs. Thus apparent uplift rates can be calculated from this relation between elevation and age, assuming that the geothermal gradient remained constant during uplift and erosion. Age dates on samples from the Wheeler Peak area north of Taos and the Sandia Mountains near Albuquerque indicate that the rocks at the higher elevations in these areas cooled to approx. 105/sup 0/C 30 to 35 Ma ago. The dates suggest that Precambrian rocks in the Wheeler Peak area were heated by a thermal event related to the Questa Caldera. Dates for the Tertiary intrusions in this area imply that uplift at an apparent rate of 0.1 mm/a has occurred since the intrusions cooled (20 Ma). The uplift of Sandia block, which does not seem to be directly associated with igneous activity, occurred at an average rate of .055 mm/a. Dates from the Organ batholith in southern New Mexico do not show a clear relation with elevation. The fission track dates (16 to 36 Ma) are consistent with shallow emplacement and subsequent rapid uplift of the batholith followed by formation of small geothermal systems sometime later in the Tertiary. In contrast to the other three areas where Tertiary tectonic activity affects the ages, dates from the Sangre de Cristo Mountains east of Sante Fe are related to Laramide uplift about 65 to 70 Ma ago. The apparent uplift rate is 0.072 mm/a. The data on the rate and timing of uplift imply that the heat sources that have caused the Tertiary tectonic and igneous features observed in the rift are not continuous along the rift's length, but are localized phenomena.

  9. A novel Al 2O 3 fluorescent nuclear track detector for heavy charged particles and neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akselrod, G. M.; Akselrod, M. S.; Benton, E. R.; Yasuda, N.

    2006-06-01

    A novel Al2O3 fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD), recently developed by Landauer, Inc., has demonstrated sensitivity and functionality superior to that of existing nuclear track detectors. The FNTD is based on single crystals of aluminum oxide doped with carbon and magnesium, and having aggregate oxygen vacancy defects (Al2O3:C,Mg). Radiation-induced color centers in the new material have an absorption band at 620 nm and produce fluorescence at 750 nm with a high quantum yield and a short, 75 ± 5 ns, fluorescence lifetime. Non-destructive readout of the detector is performed using a confocal fluorescence microscope. Scanning of the three-dimensional spatial distribution of fluorescence intensity along the track of a heavy charged particle (HCP) permits reconstruction of particle trajectories through the crystal and the LET can be determined as a function of distance along the trajectory based on the fluorescence intensity. Major advantages of Al2O3:C,Mg FNTD over conventionally processed CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector include superior spatial resolution, a wider range of LET sensitivity, no need for post-irradiation chemical processing of the detector and the capability to anneal and reuse the detector. Preliminary experiments have demonstrated that the material possesses a low-LET threshold of <1 keV/μm, does not saturate at LET in water as high as 1800 keV/μm, and is capable of irradiation to fluences in excess of 106 cm-2 without saturation (track overlap).

  10. Phanerozoic polycyclic evolution of the southwestern Angola margin: New insights for apatite fission track and (U-Th)/He methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venancio da Silva, Bruno; Hackspacher, Peter; Carina Siqueira Ribeiro, Marli; Glasmacher, Ulrich Anton

    2016-04-01

    The low-temperature thermochronology has been an important tool to quantify geological process in passive continental margins. In this context, the Angolan margin shows evidence of a polycyclic post-rift evolution marked by different events of uplift, basin inversion and changes in sedimentation rates to the marginal basins, which have controlled the salt tectonics and the hydrocarbon deposits (1,2,3,4). To understand the post break-up evolution of the southwestern Angola margin, it were collected outcrop samples for apatite fission track (AFT) and (U-Th)/He analysis ranging in elevation from 79 m to 1675 m from the coast toward the interior plateau in a profile between Namibe and Lubango cities. The area lies on the edge of Central and Southern Atlantic segments a few kilometers northward the Walvis ridge and encompasses the Archean and Proterozoic basement rocks of the Congo craton. The AFT ages ranging from 120.6 ± 8.9 Ma to 328.8 ± 28.5 Ma and they show a trend of increasing age toward the Great Escarpment with some exceptions. The partial mean track lengths (MTLs) vary between 11.77 ± 1.82 μm to 12.34 ± 1.13 μm with unimodal track length distributions (TDLs). The partial (U-Th)/He ages ranging from 104.85 ± 3.15 Ma to 146.95 ± 4.41 Ma and show the same trend of increasing ages landward, little younger than the AFT ages, which could be interpreted as a fast exhumation episode in Late Jurassic - Early Cretaceous times. The thermal histories modelling has been constrained with the kinetic parameters Dpar (5) and c-axis angle (6) by the software Hefty (7). Both AFT and (U-Th)/He thermal histories modelling indicate three episodes of denudation/uplift driven cooling: (a) from Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, (b) a smallest one in the Late Cretaceous and (c) from Oligocene-Miocene to recent, which are compatible with geophysical data of the offshore Namibe basin that estimate the greater thickness of sediments formed in the first and third episodes

  11. Large Silver Halide Single Crystals as Charged Particle Track Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusmiss, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    The trajectory of the particle is made visible under a microscope by the accumulation of metallic silver at regions of the lattice damaged by the particle. This decoration of the particle track is accomplished by exposure of the crystal to light. The decoration of normally present lattice imperfections such as dislocations can be suppressed by the addition to the crystal of less than ten parts per million of a suitable polyvalent metal impurity. An account of some preliminary attempts to grow thin single crystals of AgCl is given also, and suggestions for a more refined technique are offered.

  12. Inverted Apatite (U-Th)/He and Fission-track Dates from the Rae craton, Baffin Island, Canada and Implications for Apatite Radiation Damage-He Diffusivity Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, A. K.; Reiners, P. W.; Thomson, S. N.; Miller, G. H.

    2015-12-01

    Coupled apatite (U-Th)/He and fission-track (AFT) thermochronology data from the same sample can be used to decipher complex low temperature thermal histories and evaluate compatibility between these two methods. Existing apatite He damage-diffusivity models parameterize radiation damage annealing as fission-track annealing and yield inverted apatite He and AFT dates for samples with prolonged residence in the He partial retention zone. Apatite chemistry also impacts radiation damage and fission-track annealing, temperature sensitivity, and dates in both systems. We present inverted apatite He and AFT dates from the Rae craton, Baffin Island, Canada, that cannot be explained by apatite chemistry or existing damage-diffusivity and fission track models. Apatite He dates from 34 individual analyses from 6 samples range from 237 ± 44 Ma to 511 ± 25 Ma and collectively define a positive date-eU relationship. AFT dates from these same samples are 238 ± 15 Ma to 350 ± 20 Ma. These dates and associated track length data are inversely correlated and define the left segment of a boomerang diagram. Three of the six samples with 20-90 ppm eU apatite grains yield apatite He and AFT dates inverted by 300 million years. These samples have average apatite Cl chemistry of ≤0.02 wt.%, with no correlation between Cl content and Dpar. Thermal history simulations using geologic constraints, an apatite He radiation damage accumulation and annealing model, apatite He dates with the range of eU values, and AFT date and track length data, do not yield any viable time-temperature paths. Apatite He and AFT data modeled separately predict thermal histories with Paleozoic-Mesozoic peaks reheating temperatures differing by ≥15 °C. By modifying the parameter controlling damage annealing (Rmr0) from the canonical 0.83 to 0.5-0.6, forward models reproduce the apatite He date-eU correlation and AFT dates with a common thermal history. Results imply apatite radiation damage anneals at

  13. Fast track-finding processor based on RAM look-up table for the VENUS detector at KEK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsugi, T.; Chiba, Y.; Hayashibara, I.; Taketani, A.; Yasuishi, S.; Arai, Y.; Sakamoto, H.; Uehara, S.

    1988-06-01

    We have developed a fast track-finding processor using signals from the central tracking chamber of the VENUS detector in the TRISTAN experiments. Particle tracks are recognized by a look-up table made with a high-speed static RAM. This method enables us to implement the track finder in the first level triggering. The track finder has been working excellently under heavy background due to synchrotron radiation. A processing time of 110 ns is attained.

  14. Atomic force microscopy methods for the analysis of high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Carl E., Jr.

    Scope and Method of Study. Proton- and neutron-induced target fragmentation reactions generate short-range (˜1-10 mum), high-linear energy transfer (LET) heavy nuclear recoil (HNR) particles that contribute to total radiation dose deposited in healthy tissue in patients undergoing proton cancer therapy and to astronauts during spaceflight. Conventional detection using CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy fails because the required bulk etch, B ≈ 40 mum removes short-range tracks. We have developed a method based on Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to directly measure HNR particle tracks in CR-39 PNTD. Novel algorithms using least squares ellipse fitting and estimation of fitting in an iterative process were developed to enable the analysis of nuclear tracks in AFM data. In irradiations conducted at the Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) Proton Therapy Facility and the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), targets of varying composition, including a number of elemental targets of high Z, were exposed in contact with layers of CR-39 PNTD to beams of 60 MeV, 230 MeV, and 1 GeV protons at doses between 2 and 10 Gy. Chemical etching of the CR-39 PNTD was performed under standard conditions (50°C, 6.25 N NaOH) for 2-4 hours (removed layer B = 0.5-1.0 mum). Findings and Conclusions. The use of a short duration chemical etch yielded densities of secondary tracks of 105-10 6 cm-2 using the analysis methods presented in this work for accelerator-based experiments. LET spectra were obtained with good statistics between 200 and 1500 keV/mum and the results were consistent with nonelastic nuclear cross sections. Absorbed dose measurements were also completed for selected detectors, ˜7 x 10-10 Gy ion -1 was measured for 230 MeV protons. Additionally our data are consistent with an isotropic HNR particle production mechanism. The semi

  15. A transition radiation detector for RHIC featuring accurate tracking and dE/dx particle identification

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, E.; Lissauer, D.; McCorkle, S.; Polychronakos, V.; Takai, H.; Chi, C.Y.; Nagamiya, S.; Sippach, W.; Toy, M.; Wang, D.; Wang, Y.F.; Wiggins, C.; Willis, W.; Cherniatin, V.; Dolgoshein, B.; Bennett, M.; Chikanian, A.; Kumar, S.; Mitchell, J.T.; Pope, K.

    1991-12-31

    We describe the results of a test ran involving a Transition Radiation Detector that can both distinguish electrons from pions which momenta greater titan 0.7 GeV/c and simultaneously track particles passing through the detector. The particle identification is accomplished through a combination of the detection of Transition Radiation from the electron and the differences in electron and pion energy loss (dE/dx) in the detector. The dE/dx particle separation is most, efficient below 2 GeV/c while particle ID utilizing Transition Radiation effective above 1.5 GeV/c. Combined, the electron-pion separation is-better than 5 {times} 10{sup 2}. The single-wire, track-position resolution for the TRD is {approximately}230 {mu}m.

  16. Cenozoic denudation of Corsica in response to Ligurian and Tyrrhenian extension: Results from apatite fission track thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarki-Jakni, Bouchra; van der Beek, Peter; Poupeau, GéRard; Sosson, Marc; Labrin, Erika; Rossi, Philippe; Ferrandini, Jean

    2004-02-01

    The island of Corsica (France) occupies a unique position in the western Mediterranean, since it has recorded both the Cenozoic Alpine orogenic history of the area as well as subsequent extensional collapse and oceanic basin formation. We present 41 new apatite fission track (AFT) ages and 23 measurements of track length distributions from Corsica, in order to elucidate its Cenozoic thermal and morphological evolution. AFT ages vary from 10.5 ± 0.8 Ma to 53.8 ± 4.1 Ma and form a clear spatial pattern: oldest ages are encountered in the southwest of the island, with a broad band of ages between 20 and 30 Ma running across the mountainous central area and ages <20 Ma confined to the eastern half of the island. Samples along the western and northwestern coasts record kilometer-scale erosional denudation linked to rifting in the Ligurian-Provençal basin, whereas samples from close to the extensionally inverted Alpine deformation front record a later cooling phase related to Tyrrhenian extension. The eastward younging pattern of AFT ages suggests the migration of a "wave" of erosional denudation from west to east across the island, apparently controlled by the migrating locus of extension. Our AFT data therefore support models of Mediterranean extension controlled by slab roll-back.

  17. Development of pixel detectors for SSC vertex tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, G. . Electro-Optical and Data Systems Group); Atlas, E.L.; Augustine, F.; Barken, O.; Collins, T.; Marking, W.L.; Worley, S.; Yacoub, G.Y. ) Shapiro, S.L. ); Arens, J.F.; Jernigan, J.G. . Space Sciences Lab.); Nygren,

    1991-04-01

    A description of hybrid PIN diode arrays and a readout architecture for their use as a vertex detector in the SSC environment is presented. Test results obtained with arrays having 256 {times} 256 pixels, each 30 {mu}m square, are also presented. The development of a custom readout for the SSC will be discussed, which supports a mechanism for time stamping hit pixels, storing their xy coordinates, and storing the analog information within the pixel. The peripheral logic located on the array, permits the selection of those pixels containing interesting data and their coordinates to be selectively read out. This same logic also resolves ambiguous pixel ghost locations and controls the pixel neighbor read out necessary to achieve high spatial resolution. The thermal design of the vertex tracker and the proposed signal processing architecture will also be discussed. 5 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. A simple apparatus for quick qualitative analysis of CR39 nuclear track detectors.

    PubMed

    Gautier, D C; Kline, J L; Flippo, K A; Gaillard, S A; Letzring, S A; Hegelich, B M

    2008-10-01

    Quantifying the ion pits in Columbia Resin 39 (CR39) nuclear track detector from Thomson parabolas is a time consuming and tedious process using conventional microscope based techniques. A simple inventive apparatus for fast screening and qualitative analysis of CR39 detectors has been developed, enabling efficient selection of data for a more detailed analysis. The system consists simply of a green He-Ne laser and a high-resolution digital single-lens reflex camera. The laser illuminates the edge of the CR39 at grazing incidence and couples into the plastic, acting as a light pipe. Subsequently, the laser illuminates all ion tracks on the surface. A high-resolution digital camera is used to photograph the scattered light from the ion tracks, enabling one to quickly determine charge states and energies measured by the Thomson parabola. PMID:19044517

  19. A simple apparatus for quick qualitative analysis of CR39 nuclear track detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Gautier, D. C.; Kline, J. L.; Flippo, K. A.; Gaillard, S. A.; Letzring, S. A.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2008-10-15

    Quantifying the ion pits in Columbia Resin 39 (CR39) nuclear track detector from Thomson parabolas is a time consuming and tedious process using conventional microscope based techniques. A simple inventive apparatus for fast screening and qualitative analysis of CR39 detectors has been developed, enabling efficient selection of data for a more detailed analysis. The system consists simply of a green He-Ne laser and a high-resolution digital single-lens reflex camera. The laser illuminates the edge of the CR39 at grazing incidence and couples into the plastic, acting as a light pipe. Subsequently, the laser illuminates all ion tracks on the surface. A high-resolution digital camera is used to photograph the scattered light from the ion tracks, enabling one to quickly determine charge states and energies measured by the Thomson parabola.

  20. Energy spectrum of iron nuclei measured inside the MIR space craft using CR-39 track detectors.

    PubMed

    Gunther, W; Leugner, D; Becker, E; Flesch, F; Heinrich, W; Huntrup, G; Reitz, G; Rocher, H; Streibel, T

    1999-06-01

    We have exposed stacks of CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors inside the MIR space craft during the EUROMIR95 space mission for almost 6 months. Over this long period a large number of tracks of high LET events was accumulated in the detector foils. The etching and measuring conditions for this experiment were optimized to detect tracks of stopping iron nuclei. We found 185 stopping iron nuclei inside the stack and identified their trajectories through the material of the experiment. Based on the energy-range relation the energy at the surface of the stack was determined. These particles allow the determination of the low energy part of the spectrum of iron nuclei behind shielding material inside the MIR station.

  1. Apatite Fission Track Thermochronology of Khibina Massif (Kola Peninsula, Russia): Implications for post-Devonian Tectonics of the NE Fennoscandia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselovskiy, R. V.; Thomson, S. N.; Arzamastsev, A.

    2015-12-01

    The thermal history of the Kola Peninsula area of NE Fennoscandia remains almost fully unknown because of absence of any thermochronological data such as apatite and/or zircon fission track or (U-Th)/He ages. In order to fill this gap and to constrain the post-Devonian erosion and exhumation history of this region, we present the results of apatite fission track (AFT) dating of eleven samples selected from the cores taken from different depths of the northern part of the Khibina intrusive massif. This alkaline magmatic complex is located at the center of Kola Peninsula and formed at about 370 Ma (Kramm and Kogarko, 1994). Samples were analyzed from depths between +520 to -950 meters and yielded AFT ages between 290-268 Ma with an average age uncertainty (1σ) of ±30 Ma. Mean track lengths (MTL) lie between 12.5-14.4 μm. We used the most reliable AFT ages and distribution of MTL in two samples, corresponding to depths of +280 and -920 m, to conduct inverse time-temperature modelling of the Khibina massif. Thermal histories that best predict the measured data show three stages: (1) 290-250 Ma - rapid cooling from >110°C to 70°C/50°C for lower/upper sample correspondingly; (2) 250-50 Ma - a stable temperature stage; (3) 50-0 Ma - slightly increased cooling rates down to modern temperatures. We propose that the first cooling stage is related to late-Hercynian orogenesis; the second cooling stage may be associated with tectonics accompanying with opening of Arctic oceanic basin. The obtained data show that geothermal gradient at the center of Kola Peninsula has remained close to the modern value of 20°C/km for at least the last 250 Myr. AFT data show that the Khibina massif has been exhumed not more then 5-6 km in the last 290 Myr. This study was funded by grants 15-35-20599, 15-05-02116, 15-05-01860 and 13-05-01033 from the Russian Foundation of Basic Research, grant 3.38.224.2015 from the St. Petersburg State University, grant 14.Z50.31.0017 from the Government

  2. Integrated Vitrinite Reflectance and Apatite Fission Track Thermocronology of the Lower Karoo rocks in the Moatize Basin, Tete Province, Mozambique.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Paulo; Cogné, Nathan; Rodrigues, Bruno; Jorge, Raul; Marques, João

    2014-05-01

    The Karoo in Mozambique is represented by Late Carboniferous to Late Triassic sediments that were deposited in rift basins that fringe or developed between Proterozoic cratons. In Tete Province, central-west Mozambique, the Karoo is well represented along the Zambezi river valley forming several intra-cratonic basins separated by horsts consisting of igneous and high grade metamorphic Proterozoic rocks. One of the main horst blocks is located between the Cahora Bassa region and Tete city, separating the Middle Zambezi Basin and the Lower Zambezi Basin. The area of study is located in the Moatize Basin, one of many small basins that form the Lower Zambezi Basin. The stratigraphy of this basin consists of several sedimentary formations that record changes in depositional environment and palaeoclimate from glacial (Vúzi Formation - Lower Permian) at the base, through wet to temperate in the middle (Moatize Formation - Lower Permian), to warm arid at the top of the succession (Matinde and Cádzi formations - Middle to Upper Permian). The Upper Karoo volcanics of Early Jurassic age do not crop out in the Moatize Basin. One of the most remarkable characteristics of the Moatize Basin is the richness of coal deposits present in the Lower Permian Moatize Formation. Two coal exploration boreholes (DW123 - T.D. 489 m and DW132 - T.D. 516 m) drilled in the Moatize Basin were studied by means of vitrinite reflectance (VR) and apatite fission track analysis (AFTA), in order to assess their burial and uplift histories. The two boreholes intersected only Moatize Formation lithologies. VR increases in the two borehole sections from ca. 1.30-1.32 % Ro at the top to ca. 1.52-1.69 % Ro at the bottom, indicating medium to low volatile coal rank. Modelled VR data from the two boreholes indicate palaeogeothermal gradients between 40 and 56ºC/km, possible related to basin forming processes. Fission track ages increase from 84 Ma and 102 Ma at the bottom to 138 Ma and 146 Ma at the top

  3. Silicon strip tracking detector development and prototyping for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, S.

    2016-07-01

    In about ten years from now, the Phase-II upgrade of the LHC will be carried out. Due to increased luminosity, a severe radiation dose and high particle rates will occur for the experiments. In consequence, several detector components will have to be upgraded. In the ATLAS experiment, the current inner detector will be replaced by an all-silicon tracking detector with the goal of at least delivering the present detector performance also in the harsh Phase-II LHC conditions. This report presents the current planning and results from first prototype measurements of the upgrade silicon strip tracking detector.

  4. Laboratory-Scale Bismuth Phosphate Extraction Process Simulation To Track Fate of Fission Products

    SciTech Connect

    Serne, R. JEFFREY; Lindberg, Michael J.; Jones, Thomas E.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Krupka, Kenneth M.

    2007-02-28

    Recent field investigation that collected and characterized vadose zone sediments from beneath inactive liquid disposal facilities at the Hanford 200 Areas show lower than expected concentrations of a long-term risk driver, Tc-99. Therefore laboratory studies were performed to re-create one of the three processes that were used to separate the plutonium from spent fuel and that created most of the wastes disposed or currently stored in tanks at Hanford. The laboratory simulations were used to compare with current estimates based mainly on flow sheet estimates and spotty historical data. Three simulations of the bismuth phosphate precipitation process show that less that 1% of the Tc-99, Cs-135/137, Sr-90, I-129 carry down with the Pu product and thus these isotopes should have remained within the metals waste streams that after neutralization were sent to single shell tanks. Conversely, these isotopes should not be expected to be found in the first and subsequent cycle waste streams that went to cribs. Measurable quantities (~20 to 30%) of the lanthanides, yttrium, and trivalent actinides (Am and Cm) do precipitate with the Pu product, which is higher than the 10% estimate made for current inventory projections. Surprisingly, Se (added as selenate form) also shows about 10% association with the Pu/bismuth phosphate solids. We speculate that the incorporation of some Se into the bismuth phosphate precipitate is caused by selenate substitution into crystal lattice sites for the phosphate. The bulk of the U daughter product Th-234 and Np-237 daughter product Pa-233 also associate with the solids. We suspect that the Pa daughter products of U (Pa-234 and Pa-231) would also co-precipitate with the bismuth phosphate induced solids. No more than 1 % of the Sr-90 and Sb-125 should carry down with the Pu product that ultimately was purified. Thus the current scheme used to estimate where fission products end up being disposed overestimates by one order of magnitude the

  5. Design and performance of the SLD Vertex Detector, a 120 Mpixel tracking system

    SciTech Connect

    Agnew, G.D.; Cotton, R.; Damerell, C.J.S.

    1992-03-01

    This paper describes the design, construction, and initial operation of the SLD Vertex Detector, the first device to employ charge coupled devices (CCDs) on a large scale in a high energy physics experiment. The Vertex Detector comprises 480 CCDs, with a total of 120 Mpixels. Each pixel functions as an independent particle detecting element, providing space point measurements of charged particle tracks with a typical precision of 5 {mu}m in each co-ordinate. The CCDs are arranged in four concentric cylinders just outside the beam pipe which surrounds the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collision point of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). The Vertex Detector is a powerful tool for distinguishing secondary vertex tracks, produced by decay in flight of heavy flavour hadrons or tau leptons, from tracks produced at the primary event vertex. Because the colliding beam environment imposes severe constraints on the design of such a detector, a six year R&D programme was needed to develop solutions to a number of problems. The requirements include a low-mass structure (to minimise multiple scattering) both for mechanical support and to provide signal paths for the CCDS; operation at low temperature with a high degree of mechanical stability; and relatively high speed CCD readout, signal processing, and data sparsification. The lessons learned through the long R&D period should be useful for the construction of large arrays of CCDs or smart pixel devices in the future, in a number of areas of science and technology.

  6. Fluence-based dosimetry of proton and heavier ion beams using single track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimpki, G.; Mescher, H.; Akselrod, M. S.; Jäkel, O.; Greilich, S.

    2016-02-01

    Due to their superior spatial resolution, small and biocompatible fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) open up the possibility of characterizing swift heavy charged particle fields on a single track level. Permanently stored spectroscopic information such as energy deposition and particle field composition is of particular importance in heavy ion radiotherapy, since radiation quality is one of the decisive predictors for clinical outcome. Findings presented within this paper aim towards single track reconstruction and fluence-based dosimetry of proton and heavier ion fields. Three-dimensional information on individual ion trajectories through the detector volume is obtained using fully automated image processing software. Angular distributions of multidirectional fields can be measured accurately within  ±2° uncertainty. This translates into less than 5% overall fluence deviation from the chosen irradiation reference. The combination of single ion tracking with an improved energy loss calibration curve based on 90 FNTD irradiations with protons as well as helium, carbon and oxygen ions enables spectroscopic analysis of a detector irradiated in Bragg peak proximity of a 270 MeV u-1 carbon ion field. Fluence-based dosimetry results agree with treatment planning software reference.

  7. Characteristic response of plastic track detectors to 40-80 MeV neutrons.

    PubMed

    Oda, K; Saito, Y; Miyawaki, N; Yamauchi, T; el-Rahmany, A; Nakane, Y; Yamaguchi, Y

    2002-01-01

    This paper investigates the characteristic response of plastic track detectors to high-energy neutrons. Three types of plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD), Baryotrak made of pure CR-39, TD-1 made of CR-39 containing an antioxidant and TNF-1 made of a copolymer of CR-39/N-isopropylacrylamide, were exposed in quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields generated by p-Li reactions. The total efficiencies for TD-1 and TNF-1 were more than double and triple that of Baryotrak respectively. In addition, the species of particles were classitied into three groups, i.e. proton relatives, alpha particles and heavy ions, by analysing the etch-pit growth curve obtained by step-by-step etching. In a 65 MeV neutron field about half of the tracks recorded in pure CR-39 were due to heavy ions, whereas the TNF-1 detector could effectively register the protons, accounting for 70% of the tracks. The results could be explained by the difference in the sensitivity to high-energy protons. PMID:12382814

  8. Lateral Variations of Fission-Track Cooling Ages along the Southern Peruvian Coast Reveal Coast-Parallel Extension during the Eocene and Oligocene.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noury, M.; Bernet, M.; Jaillard, E.; Sempere, T.

    2014-12-01

    Proterozoic metamorphic rocks largely crop out between ~14 and ~17°S along the coast of southern Peru. Previous thermochronological studies in this belt focused on the Late Neogene cooling history and yielded Late Paleozoic to mid-Cretaceous zircon U-Th/He and fission-track ages, and Late Cretaceous to Early Paleocene apatite fission-track ages. Our study aims at extending the fission-track database in the ~300 km-long, high-grade metamorphic Atico-Mollendo Block (AMB; 15.8-17.1°S), in order to understand the lateral variations of thermochronologic ages along the Pacific coast of southern Peru. We present new apatite and zircon fission-track ages from the AMB and interpret them along with the previously published dates from this block and its surrounding areas. The apatite fission-track data show a longitudinal variation pattern with two localized shifts from younger (60 Ma) to older (~90 Ma) dates, corresponding to the northwestern and southeastern borders of the AMB. These shifts coincide in the field with two major normal fault zones that strike perpendicular to the coast and bound the AMB, and had been understated until now. Given the offsetted ages, the faults were active after 60 Ma, and tilted the AMB down to the NW. This interpretation is consistent with the fact that the metamorphic grade of the basement increases towards the SE, and with the deposition between ~55 and 30 Ma of forearc continental deposits (Lower Moquegua Group) that exhibit numerous synsedimentary extensional features. The zircon fission-track age pattern is more complicated but can be interpreted either as (i) reflecting a partial reset of the whole area due to burial during the Jurassic and Early Cretaceous, or (ii) as the reactivation of an important Carboniferous detachment fault during the ~100-80 Ma interval. We suggest that this coast-parallel Eocene-Oligocene extension accommodated the counterclockwise block rotation of the southern Peruvian forearc that accompanied the

  9. Three-Dimensional Spatial Characteristics and Contents of Zircon Crystals from High Resolution Optical Imagery for the Fission Track, (U-Th-Sm)/He, and U-Th-Pb Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donelick, R.; Donelick, M. B.; O Sullivan, P. B.; McMillan, J.; Hourigan, J. K.; Juel, E.

    2013-12-01

    We will present a progress report on the use of high resolution optical images of zircon crystals for the measurement and interpretation of fission track, (U-Th-Sm)/He, and U-Th-Pb data. Each zircon crystal studied is mounted in FEP teflon (if the fission track method is to be applied) or epoxy and polished to expose an internal crystal surface. Unlike a typical external crystal surface, the typical polished internal crystal surface provides a clear window through which most of the preserved crystal volume and any inclusions within the volume may be viewed optically and through which the preserved external crystal surfaces may be viewed and precisely located in space. For the fission track method, optical imagery permits: 1) determining a session-specific zeta calibration factor; when LA-ICP-MS data are used to measure relative [U], the fission tracks ablated by the laser may be isolated and counted relative to those outside of the ablated area; 2) assigning uncertainties to each fission track counted; unlike conventional fission track statistics which assume a probability of one for counted fission tracks and a probability of zero for uncounted fission tracks, collecting, processing, and archiving of optical imagery permits each candidate fission track to be scored and assigned a relative probability; 3) calculating ages based on: a) only fission tracks within the ablated area, b) only fission tracks having a statistically equal density to those within the ablated area, c) all fission tracks, d) multiple individual domains from multiple laser ablation pits. For the (U-Th-Sm)/He method, optical imagery permits: 1) calculating the crystal volume and constructing a realistic 3D crystal model for He diffusion calculation; constructing a more realistic 3D model of [U], [Th], and [Sm] distributions using the zoning profiles from one or more laser ablation pits; 2) calculating the age using the calculated crystal volume, calculated He deficit due to laser ablation, and

  10. Neogene tectonic evolution and exhumation of the southern Ecuadorian Andes: a combined stratigraphy and fission-track approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmann, Michael; Hungerbühler, Dominik; Seward, Diane; Winkler, Wilfried

    1999-06-01

    Coastal marine and continental sedimentary facies of Middle to Late Miocene age are exposed in the Andes of southern Ecuador (Cuenca, Girón-Santa Isabel, Loja, Malacatos-Vilcabamba and Catamayo-Gonzanamá Basins). The chronostratigraphy of the basin series was established by zircon fission-track dating on a total of 120 tephra layers. Subsequently, the timing of tectonic events was estimated through the well-dated stratigraphic sequences and intervening unconformities. Sedimentation from ≈15 to 9 Ma (termed Pacific Coastal Stage) was dominantly of coastal marine type, extending over an area far greater than the present basin perimeters. It ended when a period of east-west-oriented compression at ≈9.5-8 Ma exhumed the region, and sedimentation was then restricted to smaller basins (termed Intermontane Stage). These Late Miocene continental sediments were for the first time sourced from the west in the rising Western Cordillera. Apatite fission-track analysis was applied to some of the tephras in the Cuenca Basin and also to the older (Eocene, 42-35 Ma) Quingeo Basin series in order to quantify the basin histories with respect to timing and amount of burial and later exhumation. In the Quingeo Basin burial of the oldest sediments reached temperatures of ˜100°C at 18 Ma, when they started to cool down during a period of exhumation. This process preceded the Pacific Coastal Stage development of the other basins. In the Cuenca Basin, the oldest sediments were buried to temperatures of ca. 120°C by 9 Ma, when a period of inversion began and a phase of erosion was dominant. This timing correlates well with that estimated from structural evidence. At ca. 6 Ma the cooling rate slowed down and maybe even reverted to a small increase in temperature until 3 Ma, when the final stages of exhumation took place. Assuming a geothermal gradient of 35°C/km, total uplift for this part for Ecuador is about 6100 m over the last 9 million years. Assuming a steady state

  11. Evaluating methods used for fission track dating of tephras: examples from the Afar Depression, Ethiopia, and the Denali fault zone, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blythe, A. E.; Warfel, T. S.; Phillips, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Although fission track geochronology has been successfully used to date volcanic glasses and tephras in several studies, a variety of approaches have been used (see Westgate et al., 2013), and no consensus for a standardized methodology has emerged. As a result, this technique is rarely employed, despite having the potential to date tephras and glasses that cannot be dated by other methods, such as K-Ar dating. We have been evaluating the various approaches used to address the technical issues in fission track dating of tephras, by applying them to standards of known ages, including Moldavite tektite, and Huckleberry and Bishop Tuffs. Some of these issues include track etching and counting protocol, and corrections for the effects of track fading at low temperatures. Track etching is generally done in 24% HF for 75 or more seconds, but the time necessary for optimal etching appears to vary according to sample composition and grain size. To correct for track fading, we are using the diameter correction technique of Sandhu and Westgate (1995). We have obtained tephra samples from two regions, the Afar Depression in Ethiopia, an area with significant early hominid fossils, and the Denali fault zone in Alaska, an area with a complicated tectonic evolution. For both of these regions, we have samples that have been dated by other methods for calibration purposes, and we will explore the application of a Zeta correction to the technique. This underutilized technique can provide powerful constraints on studies of timing in diverse geologic environments.

  12. Use of track detectors for the evaluation of emanating radium content of soil samples.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landa, E.R.; Nielson, K.K.

    1987-01-01

    The emanating Ra contents of background and contaminated soils were measured using commercial alpha-track detectors sealed with samples in glass Mason jars for a 179-day period. The observed track densities were linearly correlated with independently measured emanating Ra contents using gamma assays for total Ra and Rn emanation measurements. The simple new jar test exhibits high sensitivity and requires minimal equipment and user's training. It has applications in indoor Rn and building material studies as well as geochemical exploration.-Authors

  13. Incident angle dependence of proton response of CR-39 (TS-16) track detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oda, K.; Csige, I.; Yamauchi, T.; Miyake, H.; Benton, E. V.

    1993-01-01

    The proton response of the TS-16 type of CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector has been studied with accelerated and fast neutron induced protons in vacuum and in air. The diameters of etched tracks were measured as a function of etching time and the etch rate ratio and the etch induction layer were determined from the growth curve of the diameter using a variable etch rate ratio model. In the case of the accelerated protons in vacuum an anomalous incident angle dependence of the response is observed.

  14. Alpha particles energy estimation from track diameter development in a CR-39 detector.

    PubMed

    Azooz, Aassim A; Al-Jubbori, Mushtaq A

    2016-09-01

    The slight nonlinearity in temporal development of tracks diameter in CR-39 nuclear track detectors is examined with the aim of attempting to find if such nonlinearity can be directly related to the charged particle energy. Narrowly spaced etching time-diameter experimental data for alpha particles at five energy values and for one additional energy value etched at five different temperatures are obtained. Initial results show good indication that measuring such time-diameter relationship can form a useful energy estimation tool. Good consistency with other independent published results is obtained.

  15. Alpha particles energy estimation from track diameter development in a CR-39 detector.

    PubMed

    Azooz, Aassim A; Al-Jubbori, Mushtaq A

    2016-09-01

    The slight nonlinearity in temporal development of tracks diameter in CR-39 nuclear track detectors is examined with the aim of attempting to find if such nonlinearity can be directly related to the charged particle energy. Narrowly spaced etching time-diameter experimental data for alpha particles at five energy values and for one additional energy value etched at five different temperatures are obtained. Initial results show good indication that measuring such time-diameter relationship can form a useful energy estimation tool. Good consistency with other independent published results is obtained. PMID:27341133

  16. A review of the use of CR-39 track detector in personnel neutron dosimetry and spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matiullah; Ahmad, N.; Durrani, S. A.; Kudo, K.

    1990-07-01

    The application of CR-39, a polymeric nuclear track detector, in personnel neutron dosimetry and spectrometry is reviewed. The mechanism of charged particle track formation in polymers is briefly described. The main thrust of this paper is centered upon the achievement of a flat dose-equivalent response over the neutron energy range of 0.1 MeV to 19 MeV. The methods developed for minimizing the direction dependence of the CR-39-based neutron dosimeter are discussed and limitations in the use of CR-39 are outlined.

  17. A double-Bragg detector with digital signal processing for the event-by-event study of fission in actinide nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, R. J. W.; Smith, A. G.

    2016-09-01

    In the current paper, a windowless double-Bragg chamber incorporating full signal digitisation has been developed for the purpose of studying the energy (E), mass (A), charge (Z) and angular distributions (θ, Φ) of nuclei generated by fission. This device measures E for each fission fragment by collection of the charge produced during ionisation of the fill gas. Subsequent digitisation of the signals from each of two anodes yields information on dE/dx, as well as electron collection time, which can be further used for polar angle (θ) determination. Frisch-grid and cathode signals are also digitised and are used both for anode signal correction and to produce further information on θ. To verify the operation of this detector, three angular determination techniques from the literature were implemented, and the results were found to be consistent with the referenced paper. Current results from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf are presented.

  18. Fission-track thermochronology of the Wind River Range and other basement-cored uplifts in the Rocky Mountain foreland

    SciTech Connect

    Cerveny, P.F. III.

    1990-01-01

    Fission-track analysis of apatites from basement rocks of the Laramide foreland provides information about the timing, magnitude, and apparent rate of uplift of the mountain ranges in this area. One hundred thirty-five samples were collected from various mountain ranges in the Wyoming and northern Colorado foreland, with special emphasis on the Wind River Range. Apatite ages from the flanks of the range indicate that uplift may have initiated in the Wind Rivers by about 85 Ma, but was definitely occurring by 75 Ma. Weaker evidence suggests that uplift had commenced by 100 Ma. Data from Green River Lakes and Fremont Peak in the northern part of the range indicate that uplift/cooling was occurring around 62 Ma, and was most rapid between 60 and 57 Ma. Apparent uplift rates vary from 94 m/m.y. to 246 m/m.y. in this section of the Wind Rivers. Samples from a drill hole in the central Wind Rivers have apatite ages ranging from 37 Ma to 86 Ma, confirm the rapid uplift event at 60 Ma, and suggest a significant cooling event at approximately 42 Ma involving nearly 2 km of the rock column. Ages from the Medicine Bow and bighorn ranges suggest possible uplift as early as 100 Ma. Evidence confirm that uplift was definitely occurring by 75 Ma throughout the foreland, and continued through at least 58 Ma. Data from the Beartooth Range, Park Range, and Laramie Range suggest a rapid uplift/cooling event at about 62 Ma. Data collected from Precambrian/Cambrian boundary localities throughout Wyoming indicate that the basement surface was largely within a zone of partial track annealing prior to the Laramide orogeny, and has been uplifted no more than about 5-6 km relative to the present day surface.

  19. Fission track evidence for widespread early to Middle miocene extension in the northern Basin and Range province

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitru, T.; Miller, E.; Savage, C. . Geological Dept.); Gans, P. . Geological Science Dept.); Brown, R. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    The northern Basin and Range province has experienced multiple periods of extension but the precise timing and relative importance of the various periods is poorly known. Geologic data in many areas suggest inception of extension was closely tied with the southward sweep in earliest magmatism, which is Eocene in southern Idaho, Oligocene in east-central Nevada, and Miocene in southern Nevada. Ar/Ar ages suggest that extension continued into the Early Miocene in areas such as the Raft River, Albion, Ruby, and Snake Range metamorphic core complexes. Youthful topography and recent faulting have been taken as indicating that faulting leading to present physiography is commonly younger than [approximately]10 Ma. New apatite fission track cooling age and track length data, supplemented by other information, point to the Early to Middle Miocene as an additional time of very significant extension-induced uplift and range formation. Many ranges in a 700-km-long north-south corridor from the Utah-Nevada-Idaho border to southernmost Nevada experience extension and major exhumation in Early to Middle Miocene time. Whether extension of Early to Middle Miocene age is restricted to this corridor or is more widespread is unclear due to the paucity of similar data to the east and west. Reconnaissance apatite ages from the Toiyabe Range and environs (NV) are [approximately]15 Ma and geologic data indicate Early to Middle Miocene extension at Yerington NV (Proffet and Dillis, 1984). Thus, it appears from the available data that the Early to Middle Miocene was an important, and previously little recognized, period of major extension over broad areas of the northern Basin and Range.

  20. Apatite fission-track evidence of widespread Eocene heating and exhumation in the Yukon-Tanana Upland, interior Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dusel-Bacon, C.; Murphy, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    We present an apatite fission-track (AFT) study of five plutonic rocks and seven metamorphic rocks across 310 km of the Yukon-Tanana Upland in east-central Alaska. Samples yielding ???40 Ma AFT ages and mean confined track lengths > 14 ??m with low standard deviations cooled rapidly from >120??C to 40 Ma suggest partial annealing and, therefore, lower maximum temperatures (???90-105??C). A few samples with single-grain ages of ???20 Ma apparently remained above ???50??C after initial cooling. Although the present geothermal gradient in the western Yukon-Tanana Upland is ???32??C/km, it could have been as high as 45??C/km during a widespread Eocene intraplate magmatic episode. Prior to rapid exhumation, samples with ???40 Ma AFT ages were >3.8-2.7 km deep and samples with >50 Ma AFT ages were >3.3-2.0 km deep. We calculate a 440-320 m/Ma minimum rate for exhumation of all samples during rapid cooling. Our AFT data, and data from rocks north of Fairbanks and from the Eielson deep test hole, indicate up to 3 km of post-40 Ma vertical displacement along known and inferred northeast-trending high-angle faults. The predominance of 40-50 Ma AFT ages throughout the Yukon-Tanana Upland indicates that, prior to the post-40 Ma relative uplift along some northeast-trending faults, rapid regional cooling and exhumation closely followed the Eocene extensional magmatism. We propose that Eocene magmatism and exhumation were somehow related to plate movements that produced regional-scale oroclinal rotation, northward translation of outboard terranes, major dextral strike-slip faulting, and subduction of an oceanic spreading ridge along the southern margin of Alaska.

  1. Mapping of the thermal neutron distribution in the lead block assembly of the PS-211 experiment at CERN, using thermoluminescence and nuclear track detectors.

    PubMed

    Savvidis, E; Eleftheriadis, C A; Kitis, G

    2002-01-01

    The main purpose of the TARC (Transmutation by Adiabatic Resonance Crossing) experiment (PS-211), was to demonstrate the possibility to destroy efficiently Long-Lived Fission Fragments (LLFF) in Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS). The experimental set-up which consisted of a lead block with dimensions 3.3 x 3.3 x 3 m3, was installed in a CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) beam line. The proton beam at 2.5 GeV/c and 3.5 GeV/c, was incident in the centre of the lead block assembly producing neutrons via spallation reactions. In this study, neutron flux measurements are presented in the lead block assembly using thermoluminescence and nuclear track detectors. The results are in good agreement with Monte Carlo calculations as well as with the results of the other methods used in the framework of the TARC experiment.

  2. Interpolating cathode pad readout in gas proportional detectors for high multiplicity particle tracks

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, B.; Radeka, V.; Smith, G.C.; O`Brien, E.

    1992-02-01

    Experiments which are planned for the Superconducting Super Collider and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider will involve interactions in which detectors will need to identify and localize hundreds or even thousands of particle tracks simultaneously. Most types of conventional position sensitive, proportional detectors with projective geometry are not able to unravel the individual tracks in these environments. We have been investigating several forms of sub-divided cathode readout to address this problem. We report here on geometric charge division using chevron shaped cathode pads which lie in rows underneath each anode wire. Investigations have quantified the non-linear effects due to avalanche angular localization, and how these become negligible with proper design of the pad. Differential nm-linearity of {plus_minus}5%, and position resolution in the region of 50{mu}m rms, have been achieved.

  3. Interpolating cathode pad readout in gas proportional detectors for high multiplicity particle tracks

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, B.; Radeka, V.; Smith, G.C.; O'Brien, E.

    1992-02-01

    Experiments which are planned for the Superconducting Super Collider and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider will involve interactions in which detectors will need to identify and localize hundreds or even thousands of particle tracks simultaneously. Most types of conventional position sensitive, proportional detectors with projective geometry are not able to unravel the individual tracks in these environments. We have been investigating several forms of sub-divided cathode readout to address this problem. We report here on geometric charge division using chevron shaped cathode pads which lie in rows underneath each anode wire. Investigations have quantified the non-linear effects due to avalanche angular localization, and how these become negligible with proper design of the pad. Differential nm-linearity of {plus minus}5%, and position resolution in the region of 50{mu}m rms, have been achieved.

  4. Experimental test of the superheavy fission hypothesis in acid residues from the allende meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, G.J.

    1982-01-01

    A description of a series of experiments to find evidence to confirm or contradict the hypothesis that isotopically anomalous Xe (called CCF-Xe) in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites results from the fission decay of a superheavy element is given. The first two experiments were searches for fossil evidence - fission tracks and isotopic anomalies - of superheavy fission decay in the Allende carbonaceous chondrite. It was demonstrated that chromite, a mineral rich in CCF-Xe, records fission tracks, and a search for such tracks in Allende chromite was performed with negative results. It was also demonstrated in certain CCF-XE rich phases of Allende, isotopic anomalies like those seen in Xe should be detectable in Ba and the light rare earths. Preliminary results from a collaborative measurement (with the University of Paris) show the Ba isotopic ratios to be normal in a CCF-Xe rich Allende sample. The third experiment was motivated by reports of the detection of a live, fissioning superheavy element, using a neutron counting technique, in bulk Allende (Flerov, 1978). Since almost all of the allegedly fissiogenic Xe in Allende is concentrated in certain acid insoluble phases, we developed a technique to detect low-level fission activity in these phases. Allende acid insoluble residue (provided by the University of Chicago) was dispersed in a 1 mg/cm/sup 2/ layer, between two track recording detectors. An automatic track locating system was developed to allow large detector areas to be scanned for rate fission events.

  5. Thermal history of the Krishna-Godavari basin, India: Constraints from apatite fission track thermochronology and organic maturity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Himansu S.; Raab, Matthias J.; Kohn, Barry P.; Gleadow, Andrew J. W.; Bal, Kiron D.

    2013-09-01

    The Krishna-Godavari (KG) basin, a passive margin Late Carboniferous to Holocene basin along the rifted east coast of India, includes the deltaic and inter-deltaic regions of the Krishna and Godavari rivers onshore and extends into the offshore. It is one of India's premier hydrocarbon-bearing basins. In an attempt to better understand the thermal history of the basin, apatite fission track (AFT) data has been obtained from six exploration wells (five onshore and one offshore). AFT thermal history models as well as other thermal indicators e.g. vitrinite reflectance (VR), Rock-Eval Tmax data reveal that the host rocks are currently at their maximum post-depositional temperatures and that any possible heating related to small-scale tectonism or rifting episodes in the basin bears little significance on the maturation of the sediments. In the case of one borehole (M-1) however, the organic maturity data reveals a period of Oligocene cooling across an unconformity when ∼1000 m of section was eroded due to falling sea-level. This information offers the potential for improved basin modeling of the KG basin.

  6. Fission-track dating of the punta de vacas glaciation in the Rı´o Mendoza valley, Argentina.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espizua, L. E.; Bigazzi, G.

    Fission-track dating of three tephra samples related to mappable drifts and non-glacial sediments, including alluvium, in the Rı´o Mendoza valley, Argentina, places limiting ages on the oldest two glacial events. A tephra-layer interstratified with fan alluvium that surrounds and cuts the outermost Uspallata moraine has an age of 170,000±50,000 yr, implying that the drift predates marine oxygen isotope stage (OIS) 6. A tephra dated at 134,000±32,000 yr, that was deposited on alluvial fan sediments, underlies Punta de Vacas drift, which is inferred to equate with Isotope Stage 6. The Punta de Vacas outwash, which likely correlates with the Rı´o Colorado drift, overlies another tephra unit that dates to 260,000±150,000 yr. Although the error limits of the dates preclude definitive correlations, all three tephra units may have been deposited during an interval prior to the maximum advance of the Punta de Vacas glaciation during OIS 6 or maybe in the Stage 7 interglacial period.

  7. A thermal history of the Proterozoic East Alligator River Terrain, N.T., Australia: a fission track study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koul, Sohan L.; Wilde, A. R.; Tickoo, Awtar K.

    1988-01-01

    Radiometric data indicate a major thermal event in Proterozoic rocks of the East Alligator River Terrain, at 1870 Ma. These data, together with metamorphic mineral assemblages, demonstrate peak temperatures in excess of 600 ° C, close to the melting temperature of more deeply buried rocks. A cooling rate following peak metamorphism of 3°C/Ma is suggested. Fission-track dates of peak metamorphic phases, however, reveal a thermal event (or events), after 1650 Ma, rather than the peak metamorphic event. This rise in temperature was the result of thermal blanketing of the metamorphic basement by Carpentarian sediments and anomalous radiogenic heat flow from underlying granitoid gneiss. The temperatures so generated (≥ 175 ° C) were insufficient to reset Rb-Sr and K-Ar systems, but are clearly in excess of F.T. annealing temperatures for all the phases investigated. A cooling history, extending over 1000 m.y. and reflecting gradual erosion of the sedimentary cover, is revealed. This history is consistent with the extraordinary tectonic stability of the region. The importance of F.T. studies in establishing a thermal history is underscored, particularly when maximum temperatures experienced were less than those required to reset Rb-Sr and K-Ar systems.

  8. Exhumation history of the NW Indian Himalaya revealed by fission track and 40Ar/39Ar ages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schlup, M.; Steck, A.; Carter, A.; Cosca, M.; Epard, J.-L.; Hunziker, J.

    2011-01-01

    New fission track and Ar/Ar geochronological data provide time constraints on the exhumation history of the Himalayan nappes in the Mandi (Beas valley) - Tso Morari transect of the NW Indian Himalaya. Results from this and previous studies suggest that the SW-directed North Himalayan nappes were emplaced by detachment from the underthrusted upper Indian crust by 55. Ma and metamorphosed by ca. 48-40. Ma. The nappe stack was subsequently exhumed to shallow upper crustal depths (<10. km) by 40-30. Ma in the Tso Morari dome (northern section of the transect) and by 30-20. Ma close to frontal thrusts in the Baralacha La region. From the Oligocene to the present, exhumation continued slowly.Metamorphism started in the High Himalayan nappe prior to the Late Oligocene. High temperatures and anatexis of the subducting upper Indian crust engendered the buoyancy-driven ductile detachment and extrusion of the High Himalayan nappe in the zone of continental collision. Late extrusion of the High Himalayan nappe started about 26. Ma ago, accompanied by ductile extensional shearing in the Zanskar shear zone in its roof between 22 and 19. Ma concomitant with thrusting along the basal Main Central Thrust to the south. The northern part of the nappe was then rapidly exhumed to shallow depth (<10. km) between 20 and 6. Ma, while its southern front reached this depth at 10-5. Ma. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Apatite fission track and (U-Th)/He ages from the Higher Himalayan Crystallines, Kaghan Valley, Pakistan: Implications for an Eocene Plateau and Oligocene to Pliocene exhumation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilke, Franziska D. H.; Sobel, Edward R.; O'Brien, Patrick J.; Stockli, Daniel F.

    2012-10-01

    Apatite fission track and apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He ages were obtained from high- and ultra high-pressure rocks from the Kaghan Valley, Pakistan. Four samples from the high altitude northern parts of the valley yielded apatite fission track ages between 24.5 ± 3.7 and 15.6 ± 2.1 Ma and apatite (U-Th)/He ages between 21.0 ± 0.6 and 5.3 ± 0.2 Ma. These data record cooling of the formerly deeply-subducted high-grade metamorphic rocks induced by denudation and exhumation consistent with extension and back sliding along the reactivated, normal-acting Main Mantle Thrust. Overlap at around 10 Ma between fission track and (U-Th)/He ages is recognised at one location (Besal) showing that fast cooling occurred due to brittle reactivation of a former thrust fault. Widespread Miocene cooling is also evident in adjacent areas to the west (Deosai Plateau, Tso Morari), most likely related to uplift and unroofing linked to continued underplating of the Indian lower crust beneath Ladakh and Kohistan in the Late Eocene to Oligocene. In the southernmost part of the study area, near Naran, two significantly younger Late Miocene to Pliocene apatite fission track ages of 7.6 ± 2.1 to 4.0 ± 0.5 Ma suggest a spatial and temporal separation of exhumation processes. These younger ages are best explained by enhanced Late Miocene uplift and erosion driven by thrusting along the Main Boundary Thrust.

  10. Recent technological developments on LGAD and iLGAD detectors for tracking and timing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, G.; Baselga, M.; Carulla, M.; Fadeyev, V.; Fernández-Martínez, P.; García, M. Fernández; Flores, D.; Galloway, Z.; Gallrapp, C.; Hidalgo, S.; Liang, Z.; Merlos, A.; Moll, M.; Quirion, D.; Sadrozinski, H.; Stricker, M.; Vila, I.

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports the latest technological development on the Low Gain Avalanche Detector (LGAD) and introduces a new architecture of these detectors called inverse-LGAD (iLGAD). Both approaches are based on the standard Avalanche Photo Diodes (APD) concept, commonly used in optical and X-ray detection applications, including an internal multiplication of the charge generated by radiation. The multiplication is inherent to the basic n++-p+-p structure, where the doping profile of the p+ layer is optimized to achieve high field and high impact ionization at the junction. The LGAD structures are optimized for applications such as tracking or timing detectors for high energy physics experiments or medical applications where time resolution lower than 30 ps is required. Detailed TCAD device simulations together with the electrical and charge collection measurements are presented through this work.

  11. Phanerozoic polycyclic evolution of the southwestern Angola margin: New insights for apatite fission track and (U-Th)/He methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venancio da Silva, Bruno; Hackspacher, Peter; Carina Siqueira Ribeiro, Marli; Glasmacher, Ulrich Anton

    2016-04-01

    The low-temperature thermochronology has been an important tool to quantify geological process in passive continental margins. In this context, the Angolan margin shows evidence of a polycyclic post-rift evolution marked by different events of uplift, basin inversion and changes in sedimentation rates to the marginal basins, which have controlled the salt tectonics and the hydrocarbon deposits (1,2,3,4). To understand the post break-up evolution of the southwestern Angola margin, it were collected outcrop samples for apatite fission track (AFT) and (U-Th)/He analysis ranging in elevation from 79 m to 1675 m from the coast toward the interior plateau in a profile between Namibe and Lubango cities. The area lies on the edge of Central and Southern Atlantic segments a few kilometers northward the Walvis ridge and encompasses the Archean and Proterozoic basement rocks of the Congo craton. The AFT ages ranging from 120.6 ± 8.9 Ma to 328.8 ± 28.5 Ma and they show a trend of increasing age toward the Great Escarpment with some exceptions. The partial mean track lengths (MTLs) vary between 11.77 ± 1.82 μm to 12.34 ± 1.13 μm with unimodal track length distributions (TDLs). The partial (U-Th)/He ages ranging from 104.85 ± 3.15 Ma to 146.95 ± 4.41 Ma and show the same trend of increasing ages landward, little younger than the AFT ages, which could be interpreted as a fast exhumation episode in Late Jurassic - Early Cretaceous times. The thermal histories modelling has been constrained with the kinetic parameters Dpar (5) and c-axis angle (6) by the software Hefty (7). Both AFT and (U-Th)/He thermal histories modelling indicate three episodes of denudation/uplift driven cooling: (a) from Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, (b) a smallest one in the Late Cretaceous and (c) from Oligocene-Miocene to recent, which are compatible with geophysical data of the offshore Namibe basin that estimate the greater thickness of sediments formed in the first and third episodes

  12. Automatic neutron dosimetry system based on fluorescent nuclear track detector technology.

    PubMed

    Akselrod, M S; Fomenko, V V; Bartz, J A; Haslett, T L

    2014-10-01

    For the first time, the authors are describing an automatic fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD) reader for neutron dosimetry. FNTD is a luminescent integrating type of detector made of aluminium oxide crystals that does not require electronics or batteries during irradiation. Non-destructive optical readout of the detector is performed using a confocal laser scanning fluorescence imaging with near-diffraction limited resolution. The fully automatic table-top reader allows one to load up to 216 detectors on a tray, read their engraved IDs using a CCD camera and optical character recognition, scan and process simultaneously two types of images in fluorescent and reflected laser light contrast to eliminate false-positive tracks related to surface and volume crystal imperfections. The FNTD dosimetry system allows one to measure neutron doses from 0.1 mSv to 20 Sv and covers neutron energies from thermal to 20 MeV. The reader is characterised by a robust, compact optical design, fast data processing electronics and user-friendly software.

  13. Multiple, discrete inversion episodes revealed by apatite fission track analysis along the southernmost Atlantic margin of South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildman, M.; Brown, R. W.; Persano, C.; Stuart, F. M.

    2013-12-01

    The morpho-tectonic history of the western South African continental margin and interior plateau remains enigmatic. Recent investigations of offshore sediment accumulation and interpretations of onshore structural and geomorphological observations have highlighted the complex geological evolution of South Africa throughout the Mesozoic and Cenozoic. Moreover, advances in geodynamic modelling approaches have explored the crustal response to varying styles of rifting and the influence of mantle upwelling beneath the African plate. These geological observations and models, however, require validation from quantitative constraints on the surface response (i.e. uplift and erosion) to syn- and post rift thermal and tectonic processes Over the last two decades, low temperature thermochronometry, particularly apatite fission track analysis (AFTA) and apatite (U-Th)/He, have been effective tools in providing these constraints by tracking the time-temperature history of rocks through c. 60 - 110°C and 80 - 40°C, respectively. The unique ability of AFTA to constrain both the timing and nature of sample cooling rests largely on the sensitivity of fission track annealing to temperature. Here, we present new AFT data from a suite of samples across the entire western continental margin of South Africa which contributes to a now extensive AFT dataset spanning the entire sub-continent. This dataset broadly invokes at least two discrete episodes of cooling driven by km scale denudation at c. 130 Ma, following rifting and break up of West Gondwana, and 90 Ma as a response to renewed tectonic uplift. However, the apparent lack of correlation of AFT age with elevation or with distance from the coast highlight the spatial and temporal variability of post-rift cooling that may be related to Mid-Cretaceous structural reactivation along the margin. We also present thermal history modelling using the Bayesian transdimensional inverse modelling approach of QTQt (Gallagher, 2012). Modelling

  14. Thermochronologic evaluation of the Arabia-Anatolia collision: new results from Apatite (U-Th)He and Fission Track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, Côme; Thomson, Stuart N.; Reiners, Peter W.; Whitney, Donna L.; Teyssier, Christian

    2015-04-01

    To better understand the driving mechanisms behind the transition from collision to escape in a convergent plate tectonic setting, multiple low-temperature thermochronometers were used from the Arabia-Anatolia collisional belt. Within the accreted terranes of the Anatolian plate, Late Cretaceous and Eocene metamorphic and intrusive rocks were targeted to track regional and/or local exhumation patterns that may have occurred since collision initiated ~35-20 Ma. Forty-eight samples were collected in a ~200 km wide swath from the main Arabia-Anatolia suture, along and across three major fault zones: the East Anatolian Fault Zone (EAFZ), the Sürgü Fault, and the Central Anatolian Fault Zone (CAFZ). We report here both Apatite (U-Th)He (AHe) and Apatite Fission Track (AFT) analyses performed on the same samples. (1) From the EAFZ, two ~1200 m high vertical transects were sampled north and south of the main fault strand within the low-grade metamorphic rocks of the Pütürge Massif. Although a majority of apatite grains had extremely low uranium contents preventing acquisition of meaningful AHe ages, results from the few uranium-rich samples indicate ages ranging from 14 to 9 Ma in the northern flank of the EAFZ while the southern flank recorded younger exhumation around 5-3 Ma suggesting differential vertical displacement along the fault since ~10 Ma. In contrast, Zircon (U-Th)He results from both sides of the fault show comparable ages around 25-18 Ma. (2) Exposed in the vicinity of the dextral Sürgü Fault, Eocene granitic bodies from the Berit Mountains were sampled within 5 km south of the fault and over 500 m elevation. AHe results yield ages between 27 and 14 Ma. (3) Along the Ecemiş segment of the CAFZ, the Late Cretaceous Niğde metamorphic complex and its deformed Paleocene-Eocene sedimentary cover show AFT and AHe ages confined between 20 and 15 Ma implying fast cooling and exhumation at this time. Further south, the Eocene Horoz pluton that intruded the

  15. Correlation of Particle Traversals with Clonogenic Survival Using Cell-Fluorescent Ion Track Hybrid Detector.

    PubMed

    Dokic, Ivana; Niklas, Martin; Zimmermann, Ferdinand; Mairani, Andrea; Seidel, Philipp; Krunic, Damir; Jäkel, Oliver; Debus, Jürgen; Greilich, Steffen; Abdollahi, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Development of novel approaches linking the physical characteristics of particles with biological responses are of high relevance for the field of particle therapy. In radiobiology, the clonogenic survival of cells is considered the gold standard assay for the assessment of cellular sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Toward further development of next generation biodosimeters in particle therapy, cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detector (Cell-FIT-HD) was recently engineered by our group and successfully employed to study physical particle track information in correlation with irradiation-induced DNA damage in cell nuclei. In this work, we investigated the feasibility of Cell-FIT-HD as a tool to study the effects of clinical beams on cellular clonogenic survival. Tumor cells were grown on the fluorescent nuclear track detector as cell culture, mimicking the standard procedures for clonogenic assay. Cell-FIT-HD was used to detect the spatial distribution of particle tracks within colony-initiating cells. The physical data were associated with radiation-induced foci as surrogates for DNA double-strand breaks, the hallmark of radiation-induced cell lethality. Long-term cell fate was monitored to determine the ability of cells to form colonies. We report the first successful detection of particle traversal within colony-initiating cells at subcellular resolution using Cell-FIT-HD.

  16. The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector to 1-9 MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Manuel, M.; McDuffee, S. C.; Casey, D. T.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2011-10-28

    The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector (TasTrak®) to protons in the energy range of 0.92-9.28 MeV has been studied. Previous studies of the CR-39 response to protons have been extended by examining the piece-to-piece variability in addition to the effects of etch time and etchant temperature; it is shown that the shape of the CR-39 response curve to protons can vary from piece-to-piece. The effects due to the age of CR-39 have also been studied using 5.5 MeV alpha particles over a 5-year period. Track diameters were found to degrade with the age of the CR-39 itself rather than the age of the tracks, consistent with previous studies utilizing different CR-39 over shorter time periods.

  17. The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector to 1-9 MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Manuel, M.; McDuffee, S. C.; Casey, D. T.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2011-10-15

    The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector (TasTrak) to protons in the energy range of 0.92-9.28 MeV has been studied. Previous studies of the CR-39 response to protons have been extended by examining the piece-to-piece variability in addition to the effects of etch time and etchant temperature; it is shown that the shape of the CR-39 response curve to protons can vary from piece-to-piece. Effects due to the age of CR-39 have also been studied using 5.5 MeV alpha particles over a 5-year period. Track diameters were found to degrade with the age of the CR-39 itself rather than the age of the tracks, consistent with previous studies utilizing different CR-39 over shorter time periods.

  18. The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector to 1-9 MeV protons

    DOE PAGES

    Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Manuel, M.; McDuffee, S. C.; Casey, D. T.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; et al

    2011-10-28

    The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector (TasTrak®) to protons in the energy range of 0.92-9.28 MeV has been studied. Previous studies of the CR-39 response to protons have been extended by examining the piece-to-piece variability in addition to the effects of etch time and etchant temperature; it is shown that the shape of the CR-39 response curve to protons can vary from piece-to-piece. The effects due to the age of CR-39 have also been studied using 5.5 MeV alpha particles over a 5-year period. Track diameters were found to degrade with the age of the CR-39 itself rather thanmore » the age of the tracks, consistent with previous studies utilizing different CR-39 over shorter time periods.« less

  19. Replication dynamics in fission and budding yeasts through DNA polymerase tracking

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of eukaryotic DNA polymerases has been difficult to establish because of the difficulty of tracking them along the chromosomes during DNA replication. Recent work has addressed this problem in the yeasts Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Saccharomyces cerevisiae through the engineering of replicative polymerases to render them prone to incorporating ribonucleotides at high rates. Their use as tracers of the passage of each polymerase has provided a picture of unprecedented resolution of the organization of replicons and replication origins in the two yeasts and has uncovered important differences between them. Additional studies have found an overlapping distribution of DNA polymorphisms and the junctions of Okazaki fragments along mononucleosomal DNA. This sequence instability is caused by the premature release of polymerase δ and the retention of non proof‐read DNA tracts replicated by polymerase α. The possible implementation of these new experimental approaches in multicellular organisms opens the door to the analysis of replication dynamics under a broad range of genetic backgrounds and physiological or pathological conditions. PMID:26293347

  20. tkLayout: a design tool for innovative silicon tracking detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, G.

    2014-03-01

    A new CMS tracker is scheduled to become operational for the LHC Phase 2 upgrade in the early 2020's. tkLayout is a software package developed to create 3d models for the design of the CMS tracker and to evaluate its fundamental performance figures. The new tracker will have to cope with much higher luminosity conditions, resulting in increased track density, harsher radiation exposure and, especially, much higher data acquisition bandwidth, such that equipping the tracker with triggering capabilities is envisaged. The design of an innovative detector involves deciding on an architecture offering the best trade-off among many figures of merit, such as tracking resolution, power dissipation, bandwidth, cost and so on. Quantitatively evaluating these figures of merit as early as possible in the design phase is of capital importance and it is best done with the aid of software models. tkLayout is a flexible modeling tool: new performance estimates and support for different detector geometries can be quickly added, thanks to its modular structure. Besides, the software executes very quickly (about two minutes), so that many possible architectural variations can be rapidly modeled and compared, to help in the choice of a viable detector layout and then to optimize it. A tracker geometry is generated from simple configuration files, defining the module types, layout and materials. Support structures are automatically added and services routed to provide a realistic tracker description. The tracker geometries thus generated can be exported to the standard CMS simulation framework (CMSSW) for full Monte Carlo studies. tkLayout has proven essential in giving guidance to CMS in studying different detector layouts and exploring the feasibility of innovative solutions for tracking detectors, in terms of design, performance and projected costs. This tool has been one of the keys to making important design decisions for over five years now and has also enabled project engineers

  1. Seminar on Fission VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagemans, Cyriel; Wagemans, Jan; D'Hondt, Pierre

    2008-04-01

    Topical reviews. Angular momentum in fission / F. Gönnenwein ... [et al.]. The processes of fusion-fission and quasi-fission of heavy and super-heavy nuclei / M. G. Itkis ... [et al.] -- Fission cross sections and fragment properties. Minor-actinides fission cross sections and fission fragment mass yields via the surrogate reaction technique / B. Jurado ... [et al.]. Proton-induced fission on actinide nuclei at medium energy / S. Isaev ... [et al.]. Fission cross sections of minor actinides and application in transmutation studies / A. Letourneau ... [et al.]. Systematics on even-odd effects in fission fragments yields: comparison between symmetric and asymmetric splits / F. Rejmund, M Caamano. Measurement of kinetic energy distributions, mass and isotopic yields in the heavy fission products region at Lohengrin / A. Bail ... [et al.] -- Ternary fission. On the Ternary [symbol] spectrum in [symbol]Cf(sf) / M. Mutterer ... [et al.]. Energy degrader technique for light-charged particle spectroscopy at LOHENGRIN / A. Oberstedt, S. Oberstedt, D. Rochman. Ternary fission of Cf isotopes / S. Vermote ... [et al.]. Systematics of the triton and alpha particle emission in ternary fission / C. Wagemans, S. Vermote, O. Serot -- Neutron emission in fission. Scission neutron emission in fission / F.-J. Hambsch ... [et al.]. At and beyond the Scission point: what can we learn from Scission and prompt neutrons? / P. Talou. Fission prompt neutron and gamma multiplicity by statistical decay of fragments / S. Perez-Martin, S. Hilaire, E. Bauge -- Fission theory. Structure and fission properties of actinides with the Gogny force / H. Goutte ... [et al.]. Fission fragment properties from a microscopic approach / N. Dubray, H. Goutte, J.-P. Delaroche. Smoker and non-smoker neutron-induced fission rates / I. Korneev ... [et al.] -- Facilities and detectors. A novel 2v2E spectrometer in Manchester: new development in identification of fission fragments / I. Tsekhanovich ... [et al

  2. Wireless data transfer with mm-waves for future tracking detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelikan, D.; Bingefors, N.; Brenner, R.; Dancila, D.; Gustafsson, L.

    2014-11-01

    Wireless data transfer has revolutionized the consumer market for the last decade generating many products equipped with transmitters and receivers for wireless data transfer. Wireless technology opens attractive possibilities for data transfer in future tracking detectors. The reduction of wires and connectors for data links is certainly beneficial both for the material budget and the reliability of the system. An advantage of wireless data transfer is the freedom of routing signals which today is particularly complicated when bringing the data the first 50 cm out of the tracker. With wireless links intelligence can be built into a tracker by introducing communication between tracking layers within a region of interest which would allow the construction of track primitives in real time. The wireless technology used in consumer products is however not suitable for tracker readouts. The low data transfer capacity of current 5 GHz transceivers and the relatively large feature sizes of the components is a disadvantage.Due to the requirement of high data rates in tracking detectors high bandwidth is required. The frequency band around 60 GHz turns out to be a very promising candidate for data transfer in a detector system. The high baseband frequency allows for data transfer in the order of several Gbit/s. Due to the small wavelength in the mm range only small structures are needed for the transmitting and receiving electronics. The 60 GHz frequency band is a strong candidate for future WLAN applications hence components are already starting to be available on the market.Patch antennas produced on flexible Printed Circuit Board substrate that can be used for wireless communication in future trackers are presented in this article. The antennas can be connected to transceivers for data transmission/reception or be connected by wave-guides to structures capable of bringing the 60 GHz signal behind boundaries. Results on simulation and fabrication of these antennas are

  3. Fission meter

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark S.; Snyderman, Neal J.

    2012-04-10

    A neutron detector system for discriminating fissile material from non-fissile material wherein a digital data acquisition unit collects data at high rate, and in real-time processes large volumes of data directly into information that a first responder can use to discriminate materials. The system comprises counting neutrons from the unknown source and detecting excess grouped neutrons to identify fission in the unknown source.

  4. Conditions for veining in the Barrandian Basin (Lower Palaeozoic), Czech Republic: evidence from fluid inclusion and apatite fission track analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchy, V.; Dobes, P.; Filip, J.; Stejskal, M.; Zeman, A.

    2002-04-01

    The interplay between fracture propagation and fluid composition and circulation has been examined by deciphering vein sequences in Silurian and Devonian limestones and shales at Kosov quarry in the Barrandian Basin. Three successive vein generations were recognised that can be attributed to different stages of a basinal cycle. Almost all generations of fracture cements host abundant liquid hydrocarbon inclusions that indicate repeated episodes of petroleum migration through the strata during burial, tectonic compression and uplift. The earliest veins that propagated prior to folding were displacive fibrous "beef" calcite veins occurring parallel to the bedding of some shale beds. Hydrocarbon inclusions within calcite possess homogenisation temperatures between 58 and 68 °C and show that the "beef" calcites originated in the deeper burial environment, during early petroleum migration from overpressured shales. E-W-striking extension veins that postdate "beef" calcite formed in response to Variscan orogenic deformations. Based on apatite fission track analysis (AFTA) data and other geological evidence, the veins probably formed 380-315 Ma ago, roughly coinciding with peak burial heating of the strata, folding and the intrusion of Variscan synorogenic granites. The veins that crosscut diagenetic cements and low-amplitude stylolites in host limestones are oriented semi-vertically to the bedding plane and are filled with cloudy, twinned calcite, idiomorphic smoky quartz and residues of hardened bitumen. Calcite and quartz cements contain abundant blue and blue-green-fluorescing primary inclusions of liquid hydrocarbons that homogenise between 50 and 110 °C. Geochemical characteristics of the fluids as revealed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, particularly the presence of olefins and parent aromatic hydrocarbons (phenonthrene), suggest that the oil entrapped in the inclusions experienced intense but geologically fast heating that resulted in thermal pyrolysis

  5. Phanerozoic burial and exhumation history of southernmost Norway estimated from apatite fission-track analysis data and geological observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Japsen, Peter; Green, Paul F.; Bonow, Johan M.; Chalmers, James A.; Rasmussen, Erik S.

    2016-04-01

    We present new apatite fission-track analysis (AFTA) data from 27 basement samples from Norway south of ~60°N. The data define three events of cooling and exhumation that overlap in time with events defined from AFTA in southern Sweden (Japsen et al. 2015). The samples cooled below palaeotemperatures of >100°C in a major episode of Triassic cooling as also reported by previous studies (Rohrman et al. 1995). Our study area is just south of the Hardangervidda where Cambrian sediments and Caledonian nappes are present. We thus infer that these palaeotemperatures reflect heating below a cover that accumulated during the Palaeozoic and Triassic. By Late Triassic, this cover had been removed from the Utsira High, off SW Norway, resulting in deep weathering of a granitic landscape (Fredin et al. 2014). Our samples were therefore at or close to the surface at this time. Palaeotemperatures reached ~80°C prior to a second phase of cooling and exhumation in the Jurassic, following a phase of Late Triassic - Jurassic burial. Upper Jurassic sandstones rest on basement near Bergen, NW of our study area (Fossen et al. 1997), and we infer that the Jurassic event led to complete removal of any remaining Phanerozoic cover in the region adjacent to the evolving rift system prior to Late Jurassic subsidence and burial. The data reveal a third phase of cooling in the early Miocene when samples that are now near sea level cooled below palaeotemperatures of ~60°C. For likely values of the palaeogeothermal gradient, such palaeotemperatures correspond to burial below rock columns that reach well above the present-day landscape where elevations rarely exceed 1 km above sea level. This implies that the present-day landscape was shaped by Neogene erosion. This is in agreement with the suggestion of Lidmar-Bergström et al. (2013) that the near-horizontal Palaeic surfaces of southern Norway are the result of Cenozoic erosion to sea level followed by uplift to their present elevations in a

  6. Exhumation of Basement-cored Uplifts: Example of the Kyrgyz Range Quantified with Apatite Fission-track Thermochronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobel, Edward R.; Oskin, Michael; Burbank, Douglas; Mikolaichuk, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    The Kyrgyz Range, the northernmost portion of the Kyrgyzstan Tien Shan, displays topographic evidence for lateral propagation of surface uplift and exhumation. The highest and most deeply dissected segment lies in the center of the range. To the east, topography and relief decrease, and preserved remnants of a Cretaceous regional erosion surface imply minimal amounts of bedrock exhumation. The timing of exhumation of range segments defines the lateral propagation rate of the range-bounding reverse fault and quantifies the time and erosion depth needed to transform a mountain range from a juvenile to a mature morphology. New apatite fission-track (AFT) data from three transects from the eastern Kyrgyz Range, combined with published AFT data, demonstrate that the range has propagated over 110 km eastwards over the last 7-11 Myr. Based on the thermal and topographic evolutionary history, we present a model for a time-varying exhumation rate driven by rock uplift and changes in erodability and the time scale of geomorphic adjustment to surface uplift. Easily eroded, Cenozoic sedimentary rocks overlying resistant basement control early, rapid exhumation and slow surface upliftrates. As increasing amounts of resistant basement are exposed, exhumation rates decrease while surface uplift rates are sustained or increase, thereby growing topography. As the range becomes high enough to cause ice accumulation and develop steep river valleys, fluvial and glacial erosion become more powerful and exhumation rates once again increase. Independently determined range-noma1 shortening rates have also varied over time, suggesting a feedback between erosional efficiency and shortening rate.

  7. Uplift and denudation history of the eastern Dead Sea rift flank, SW Jordan: Evidence from apatite fission track thermochronometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinstein, S.; Eyal, M.; Kohn, B. P.; Steckler, M. S.; Ibrahim, K. M.; Moh'd, B. K.; Tian, Y.

    2013-09-01

    Dead Sea rift (DSR), developed along the Dead Sea transform plate boundary, is characterized by salient flanks and morphotectonic asymmetry. Apatite fission track thermochronology (AFT) along ~1200 m high vertical profiles in Neoproterozoic basement and overlying Cambrian sandstone in southwestern Jordan is used to reconstruct timing, magnitude, and rate of uplift and denudation of the eastern DSR flank and examine its relationship to rift development and its flank landscape. Time-temperature models based on AFT data suggest three major Phanerozoic heating and cooling episodes, Late Paleozoic, Early Cretaceous, and Oligocene. The latest episode, on which this study focuses, indicates uplift of ~3.8±0.3 km under a moderate paleogeothermal gradient. About 40% of the uplift was tectonically driven with the remainder attributed to isostatic rebound in response to denudation and erosion. Models suggest that uplift commenced in the Oligocene with a considerable part occurring prior to development of the DSR, despite being ~200 km from the Red Sea-Gulf of Suez rift margin. Uplift is probably part of a regional rearrangement along the western Arabian platform margin occurring at the time of Red Sea rift initiation. Transition from primarily sedimentary layer stripping, most likely by scarp retreat, to one of dominantly incision of the underlying crystalline basement occurred in Late Miocene-Pliocene time following enhanced subsidence and development of a low base level in the DSR. Consequently, the magnitude of uplift by isostatic rebound due to incision exceeded lowering by surface truncation and increased summit elevation and riftward flexing of the flank.

  8. Radon measurements by nuclear track detectors in secondary schools in Oke-Ogun region, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Obed, R I; Ademola, A K; Vascotto, M; Giannini, G

    2011-11-01

    Radon measurements were performed in secondary schools in the Oke-Ogun area, South-west, Nigeria, by solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs). About seventy CR-39 detectors were distributed in 35 high schools of the Oke-Ogun area. The CR-39 detectors were exposed in the schools for 3 months and then etched in NaOH 6 N solution at 90 °C for 3 h. The tracks were counted manually at the microscope and the radon concentration was determined at the Radioactivity Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy. The overall average radon concentration in the surveyed area was 45 ± 27 Bq m(-3). The results indicate no radiological health hazard. The research also focused on parameters affecting radon concentrations such as the age of the building in relation to building materials and floor number of the classrooms. The results show that radon concentrations in ground floors are higher than in upper floors.

  9. LET spectrometry of 14 MeV (D-T) neutrons using CR-39 track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, G. S.; Tripathy, S. P.; Sunil, C.; Sarkar, P. K.

    2013-04-01

    Linear energy transfer (LET) spectrum in water in the range of 12 keV/μm to 382 keV/μm due to 14 MeV (D-T) neutrons is estimated using the track size parameters in two different types of CR-39 track detectors, viz. Intercast (1.5 mm) and Pershore (0.5 mm). Another set of CR-39s (Intercast) combined with 1 mm polyethylene (PE) radiators is exposed to study the effect of enhanced recoils on the LET spectrum. The detection efficiencies for all these cases and the enhancement ratio due to PE radiator are determined. Using this LET spectrum, the microdosimetric spectra of absorbed doses and dose equivalents are estimated based on the Q-L conversion factors as given in ICRP 60. The shape of the LET spectra are found to be similar in all the cases, however, the dose equivalents obtained with the CR-39+PE radiator is about 20% more than the other detectors without PE. The ratios of dose equivalents obtained from LET spectra (HLET) and the ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) obtained from fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors (ICRP 74) for 14 MeV neutrons are used to estimate the dose response of the detectors. H*(10) is also measured using a neutron rem meter, the response of which is found to be about 23% less than the actual dose.

  10. Evaluation of solid state nuclear track detector stacks exposed on the international space station.

    PubMed

    Pálfalvi, J K; Akatov, Yu; Szabó, J; Sajó-Bohus, L; Eördögh, I

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the contribution of secondary neutrons to the total dose inside the International Space Station (ISS). For this purpose solid-state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) stacks were used. Each stack consisted of three CR-39 sheets. The first and second sheets were separated by a Ti plate, and the second and third sheets sandwiched a Lexan polycarbonate foil. The neutron and proton responses of each sheet were studied through MC calculations and experimentally, utilising monoenergetic protons. Seven stacks were exposed in 2001 for 249 days at different locations of the Russian segment 'Zvezda'. The total storage time before and after the exposure onboard was estimated to be seven months. Another eight stacks were exposed at the CERF high-energy neutron field for calibration purposes. The CR-39 detectors were evaluated in four steps: after 2, 6, 12 and 20 h etching in 6 N NaOH at 70 degrees C (VB = 1.34 microm h(-1)). All the individual tracks were investigated and recorded using an image analyser. The stacks provided the averaged neutron ambient dose equivalent (H*) between 200 keV and 20 MeV, and the values varied from 39 to 73 microSv d(-1), depending on the location. The Lexan detectors were used to detect the dose originating from high-charge and high-energy (HZE) particles. These results will be published elsewhere.

  11. Comparison of Pd/D Co-Deposition and DT Neutron Generated Triple Tracks Observed in CR-39 Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    P.A. Mosier-Boss, J.Y. Dea, L.P.G. Forsley, M.S. Morey, J.R. Tinsley, J.P. Hurley, F.E. Gordon

    2010-08-01

    Solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs), such as CR-39, have been used to detect energetic charged particles and neutrons. Of the neutron and charged particle interactions that can occur in CR-39, the one that is the most easily identifiable is the carbon breakup reaction. The observation of a triple track, which appears as three alpha particle tracks breaking away from a center point, is diagnostic of the 12C(n, n')3α carbon breakup reaction. Such triple tracks have been observed in CR-39 detectors that have been used in Pd/D co-deposition experiments. In this communication, triple tracks in CR-39 detectors observed in Pd/D co-deposition experiments are compared with those generated upon exposure to a DT neutron source. It was found that both sets of tracks were indistinguishable. Both symmetric and asymmetric tracks were observed. Using linear energy transfer (LET) curves and track modeling, the energy of the neutron that created the triple track can be estimated.

  12. Development of high-resolution muon tracking systems based on micro-pattern detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bortfeldt, J.; Biebel, O.; Heereman, D.; Hertenberger, R.

    2011-07-01

    A muon tracking system consisting of four 9 cm x 10 cm sized bulk Micromegas detectors with 128 {mu}m amplification-gap and two 10 cm x 10 cm triple GEM detectors is foreseen for high-precision tracking of 140 GeV muons at the H8 beamline at CERN with a rate of up to 10 kHz and an overall resolution below 40 {mu}m. Larger detectors with an active area of 0.5 m{sup 2} and more are under development for detector studies in high neutron or gamma ray background environments at the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN and the Munich tandem accelerator. Signal studies of both detector types have been performed by recording cosmic muon and 5.9 keV X-ray signals with a single charge-sensitive preamplifier using several gas-mixtures of Ar:CO{sub 2}. The signals were digitized using 1 GHz VME based flashADCs with 2520 sampling points. The analysis of the complete signal-cycles allows for the determination of rise times, pulse heights, timing fluctuations and discrimination of background, resulting in a FWHM energy resolution of about 20% and detection efficiencies of 99% and more. Models for signal formation in both detector types will be presented. The single detector spatial resolution of 80 {mu}m was measured using a fast Gassiplex based strip readout with readout strips of 150 {mu}m width and a pitch of 250 {mu}m. The Gassiplex readout, formerly used at the HERMES experiment, had to be substantially adapted. No more crosstalk or non-linearities were observed after reconfiguration of the multiplexing amplifier on the front-end boards. The observed spatial resolution is limited by multiple scattering of the cosmic muons used in the laboratory. We also report on the sensitivity to gamma- and neutron background and on the behaviour of spatial resolution as a function of background rates. (authors)

  13. Comparison of imaging plates with track detectors for fast-neutron dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Belafrites, A; Nourreddine, A; Mouhssine, D; Nachab, A; Pape, A; Boucenna, A; Fernández, F

    2004-01-01

    Imaging plate (IP) radiation detectors are widely used in industrial radiography, medical imagery and autoradiography. When an IP is exposed to ionising radiation, some of the energy is absorbed to form a latent image. The energy stored, which is proportional to the dose received, can be liberated by a selective optical stimulation and collected to reconstitute the distribution of the ionising radiation on the IP. In this work, IPs for use in fast-neutron measurements are characterised. The response of our IP dosemeters in conjunction with their reading system was found to be linear in dose between 75 microSv and 10 mSv. This performance is compared with those of dosemeters based on the plastic track detectors PN3 and CR-39.

  14. Theoretical determination of the neuron detection efficiency of plastic track detectors. I. Theoretical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pretzsch, Gunter

    A theoretical model to determine the neutron detection efficiency of organic solid state nuclear track detectors without external radiator is described. The model involves the following calculation steps: production of heavy charged particles within the detector volume, characterization of the charged particles by appropriate physical quantities, application of suitable registration criteria, formation of etch pits. The etch pits formed are described by means of a distribution function which is doubly differential in both diameter and depth of the etch pits. The distribution function serves as the input value for the calculation of the detection efficiency. The detection efficiency is defined as the measured effect per neutron fluence. Hence it depends on the evaluation technique considered. The calculation of the distribution function is carried out for cellulose triacetate. The determination of the concrete detection efficiency using the light microscope and light transmission measurements as the evaluation technique will be described in further publications.

  15. Comparison of imaging plates with track detectors for fast-neutron dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Belafrites, A; Nourreddine, A; Mouhssine, D; Nachab, A; Pape, A; Boucenna, A; Fernández, F

    2004-01-01

    Imaging plate (IP) radiation detectors are widely used in industrial radiography, medical imagery and autoradiography. When an IP is exposed to ionising radiation, some of the energy is absorbed to form a latent image. The energy stored, which is proportional to the dose received, can be liberated by a selective optical stimulation and collected to reconstitute the distribution of the ionising radiation on the IP. In this work, IPs for use in fast-neutron measurements are characterised. The response of our IP dosemeters in conjunction with their reading system was found to be linear in dose between 75 microSv and 10 mSv. This performance is compared with those of dosemeters based on the plastic track detectors PN3 and CR-39. PMID:15353669

  16. A passive neutron dosemeter based on a CR-39 track detector with multi-field evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savvidis, E.; Alberts, W. G.; Luszik-Bhadra, M.; Zamani, M.

    1994-11-01

    A passive neutron personal dosemeter is proposed which is based on a single CR-39 track detector, covered at four positions with different converters and absorbers. Its dose equivalent response has been investigated with respect to its energy and angle dependence, covering energies from thermal up to 15 MeV and angles of incidence up to 85°. A position-related readout of the electrochemically etched CR-39 detector resulted in four response functions with significant differences for thermal, intermediate and fast neutrons. By an appropriate linear combination of the readings a dose equivalent response has been achieved which varies only within a factor of 2 for thermal neutrons and in the energy range from 20 keV to 15 MeV and shows an acceptable over-response of a factor of 4 for intermediate energy neutrons.

  17. Proposal for Research and Development: Vertexing, Tracking, and Data Acquisition for the Bottom Collider Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, H.; Gomez, B.; Rivera, F.; Sanabria, J.-C.; Yager, P.; Barsotti, E.; Bowden, M.; Childress, S.; Lebrun, P.; Morfin, J.; Roberts, L.A.; /Fermilab /Florida U. /Houston U. /IIT /Iowa U. /Northeastern U. /Northern Illinois U. /Ohio State U. /Oklahoma U. /Pennsylvania U.

    1989-01-01

    The authors propose a program of research and development into the detector systems needed for a B-physics experiment at the Fermilab p-{bar p} Collider. The initial emphasis is on the critical issues of vertexting, tracking, and data acquisition in the high-multiplicity, high-rate collider environment. R and D for the particle-identification systems (RICH counters, TRD's, and EM calorimeter) will be covered in a subsequent proposal. To help focus their efforts in a timely manner, they propose the first phase of the R and D should culminate in a system test at the C0 collider intersect during the 1990-1991 run: a small fraction of the eventual vertex detector would be used to demonstrate that secondary-decay vertices can be found at a hadron collider. The proposed budget for the r and D program is $800k in 1989, $1.5M in 1990, and $1.6M in 1991.

  18. Color changes in CR-39 nuclear track detector by gamma and laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouh, S. A.; Said, A. F.; Atta, M. R.; El-Melleegy, W. M.; El-Meniawy, S.

    2006-07-01

    A study of the effect of gamma and laser irradiation on the color changes of polyallyl diglycol (CR-39) solid-state nuclear track detector was performed. CR-39 detector samples were classified into two main groups. The first group was irradiated with gamma doses at levels between 20 and 300 kGy, whereas the second group was exposed to infrared laser radiation with energy fluences at levels between 0.71 and 8.53 J/cm(2) . The transmission of these samples in the wavelength range 300-2500 nm, as well as any color changes, was studied. Using the transmission data, both the tristimulus and the coordinate values of the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) LAB were calculated. Also, the color differences between the non-irradiated samples and those irradiated with different gamma or laser doses were calculated. The results indicate that the CR-39 detector acquires color changes under gamma or laser irradiation, but it has more response to color changes by gamma irradiation. In addition, structural property studies using infrared spectroscopy were performed. The results indicate that the irradiation of a CR-39 detector with gamma or laser radiations causes the cleavage of the carbonate linkage that can be attributed to the H abstraction from the backbone of the polymer, associated with the formation of CO 2 and OH with varying intensities.

  19. Study of absolute fast neutron dosimetry using CR-39 track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sersy, A. R.

    2010-06-01

    In this work, CR-39 track detectors have extensively been used in the determination of fast neutron fluence-to-dose factor. The registration efficiency, ɛ, of CR-39 detectors for fast neutrons was calculated using different theoretical approaches according to each mode of neutron interaction with the constituent atoms (H, C and O) of the detector material. The induced proton-recoiled showed the most common interaction among the others. The dependence of ɛ on both neutron energy and etching time was also studied. In addition, the neutron dose was calculated as a function of neutron energy in the range from 0.5 to 14 MeV using the values of (d E/d X) for each recoil particle in CR-39 detector. Results showed that the values of ɛ were obviously affected by both neutron energy and etching time where the contribution in ɛ from proton recoil was the most. The contribution from carbon and oxygen recoils in dose calculation was pronounced due to their higher corresponding values of d E/d X in comparison to those from proton recoils. The present calculated fluence-to-dose factor was in agreement with that either from ICRP no. 74 or from TRS no. 285 of IAEA, which reflected the importance of using CR-39 in absolute fast neutron dosimetry.

  20. History of the bubble chamber and related active- and internal-target nuclear tracking detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becchetti, F. D.

    2015-06-01

    Donald Glaser, 1960 Nobel laureate in Physics, recently passed away (2013), as have many of his colleagues who were involved with the early development of bubble chambers at the University of Michigan. In this paper I will review those early years and the subsequent wide-spread application of active-target (AT) bubble chambers that dominated high-energy physics (HEP) research for over thirty years. Some of the related, but more modern nuclear tracking detectors being used in HEP, neutrino astrophysics and dark-matter searches also will be discussed.

  1. The SOUDAN 2 detector The operation and performance of the tracking calorimeter modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, W. W. M.; Alner, G. J.; Ambats, I.; Ayres, D. S.; Balka, L. J.; Barr, G. D.; Barrett, W. L.; Benjamin, D.; Bode, C.; Border, P. M.; Brooks, C. B.; Cobb, J. H.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coover, K.; Cotton, R. J.; Courant, H.; Dahlin, B. B.; DasGupta, U.; Dawson, J. W.; Demuth, D. M.; Edwards, V. W.; Ewen, B.; Fields, T. H.; Garcia-Garcia, C.; Gallagher, H. M.; Giles, R. H.; Giller, G. L.; Goodman, M. C.; Gray, R. N.; Heppelmann, S.; Hill, N.; Hoftiezer, J. H.; Jankowski, D. J.; Johns, K.; Joyce, T.; Kafka, T.; Kasahara, S. M. S.; Kirby-Gallagher, L. M.; Kochocki, J.; Leeson, W.; Litchfield, P. J.; Longley, N. P.; Lopez, F. V.; Lowe, M. J.; Mann, W. A.; Marshak, M. L.; May, E. N.; Maxam, D.; McMaster, L.; Milburn, R.; Miller, W. H.; Minor, C. P.; Mondal, N.; Mualem, L.; Napier, A.; Nelson, E. M.; Nickson, R.; Oliver, W.; Pearce, G. F.; Perkins, D. H.; Peterson, E. A.; Price, L. E.; Roback, D. M.; Rosen, D. B.; Ruddick, K.; Saitta, B.; Schmid, D. J.; Schlereth, J.; Schneps, J.; Schub, M. H.; Seidlein, R. V.; Shield, P. D.; Shupe, M. A.; Spear, S.; Stassinakis, A.; Sundaralingam, N.; Thomson, M. A.; Thron, J. L.; Vassiliev, V.; Villaume, G.; Wakely, S. P.; Wall, D.; Wallis, E. W. G.; Weems, L.; Werkema, S. J.; West, N.; Wielgosz, U.; Woods, C. A.; Yarker, S.

    1996-02-01

    SOUDAN 2 is a 960-ton tracking calorimeter which has been constructed to search for nucleon decay and other phenomena. The full detector consists of 224 calorimeter modules each weighing 4.3 tons. The modules consist of finely segmented iron instrumented with 1 m long drift tubes of 15 mm internal diameter. The tubes enable three spatial coordinates and {dE }/{dx } to be recorded for charged particles traversing the tubes. The spatial resolution is 0.38 cm in the x- y plane and 0.65 cm in the z, or drift, direction. The operation and performance of the modules are discussed.

  2. Gamma-ray tracking: Characterisation of the AGATA symmetric prototype detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Cresswell, J. R.; Dimmock, M. R.; Nelson, L.; Nolan, P. J.; Rigby, S.; Lazarus, I.; Simpson, J.; Medina, P.; Santos, C.; Parisel, C.; AGATA Collaboration

    2007-08-01

    Each major technical advance in gamma-ray detection devices has resulted in significant new insights into the structure of atomic nuclei. The next major step in gamma-ray spectroscopy involves achieving the goal of a 4pi ball of Germanium detectors by using the technique of gamma-ray energy tracking in electrically segmented Germanium crystals. The resulting spectrometer will have an unparalleled level of detection power for nuclear electromagnetic radiation. Collaborations have been established in Europe (AGATA) [J. Simpson, Acta Phys. Pol. B 36 (2005) 1383. [1

  3. Object tracking with adaptive HOG detector and adaptive Rao-Blackwellised particle filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Stefano; Paleari, Marco; Ariano, Paolo; Bona, Basilio

    2012-01-01

    Scenarios for a manned mission to the Moon or Mars call for astronaut teams to be accompanied by semiautonomous robots. A prerequisite for human-robot interaction is the capability of successfully tracking humans and objects in the environment. In this paper we present a system for real-time visual object tracking in 2D images for mobile robotic systems. The proposed algorithm is able to specialize to individual objects and to adapt to substantial changes in illumination and object appearance during tracking. The algorithm is composed by two main blocks: a detector based on Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG) descriptors and linear Support Vector Machines (SVM), and a tracker which is implemented by an adaptive Rao-Blackwellised particle filter (RBPF). The SVM is re-trained online on new samples taken from previous predicted positions. We use the effective sample size to decide when the classifier needs to be re-trained. Position hypotheses for the tracked object are the result of a clustering procedure applied on the set of particles. The algorithm has been tested on challenging video sequences presenting strong changes in object appearance, illumination, and occlusion. Experimental tests show that the presented method is able to achieve near real-time performances with a precision of about 7 pixels on standard video sequences of dimensions 320 × 240.

  4. Fission-track analysis of apatite and zircon defines a burial depth of 4 to 7 km for lowermost Upper Devonian, Catskill Mountains, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakatos, Stephen; Miller, Donald S.

    1983-02-01

    Apatite and zircon grains separated from a sandstone layer of earliest Late Devonian age, Catskill Mountains, have been subjected to fission-track analysis. A 125-m.y. age, obtained on the apatite grains, requires a temperature for the sediment of less than 120 °C during the past 125 m.y. At some time prior to 125 m.y. ago, temperatures were above 120 °C long enough to cause complete fading of tracks. Analysis of zircon grains resulted in a fission-track age of 320 m.y. Zircon data indicate that the temperature of the sediment layer enclosing the grains did not exceed 175 to 200 °C over a 235-rn.y. period (time between sedimentation and 125 m.y. ago). If one assumes a typical geothermal gradient of 25 °C/km, a burial depth of between 4 and 7 km is indicated for the lowermost Upper Devonian, atskill Mountains. *Present address: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12181

  5. Theoretical feasibility study on neutron spectrometry with the polyallyldiglycol carbonate (PADC) solid-state nuclear track detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikezic, D.; Yu, K. N.

    2015-01-01

    Neutron spectrometry with the polyallyldiglycol carbonate (PADC) film detector was analyzed in detail. The computer codes TRACK_TEST and TRACK_VISION, which were originally developed for studies on alpha-particle tracks, were modified to compute parameters of etched proton tracks developed in the PADC film detector and to simulate their appearance under an optical microscope in the transmission mode. It was shown that protons with same energy and recoil angle could produce different etched tracks with various size and shape, depending on the point of their creation. As such, it was necessary to employ multiple etching, and to measure the removed layer thickness and to record the track appearance after each etching step. A new variable, namely, the effective removed layer heff, was introduced as the difference between the total removed layer and the depth where the proton was created in the detector. A program modified from the TRACK_VISION code was used to plot the appearance of a number of representative etched proton tracks. For proton energies larger than 2 MeV, the V function for protons in PADC was found to be almost constant, so the simple formulas for major and minor axes of proton track openings could be used to determine the proton energy, recoiled angle as well as the energy of the neutron which caused the proton recoil. For lower proton energies, a databank of various proton tracks showing the track opening appearances and the track profiles should be created for comparison to facilitate the determination of the proton energy.

  6. Evolution of the Chos Malal and Agrio fold and thrust belts, Andes of Neuquén: Insights from structural analysis and apatite fission track dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas Vera, E. A.; Mescua, J.; Folguera, A.; Becker, T. P.; Sagripanti, L.; Fennell, L.; Orts, D.; Ramos, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Chos Malal and Agrio fold and thrust belts are located in the western part of the Neuquén basin, an Andean retroarc basin of central-western Argentina. Both belts show evidence of tectonic inversion at the western part during Late Cretaceous times. The eastern part is dominated by late Miocene deformation which also partially reactivated the western structures. This work focuses on the study of the regional structure and the deformational event that shaped the relief of this part of the Andes. Based on new field work and structural data and previously published works a detailed map of the central part of the Neuquén basin is presented. Three regional structural cross sections were surveyed and balanced using the 2d Move™ software. In order to define a more accurate uplift history, new apatite fission track analyses were carried on selected structures. These data was used for new thermal history modeling of the inner part of the Agrio and Chos Malal fold and thrust belts. The results of the fission track analyses improve the knowledge of how these fold and thrust belts have grown trough time. Two main deformational events are defined in Late Cretaceous to Paleocene and Late Miocene times. Based on this regional structural analysis and the fission track data the precise location of the orogenic front for the Late Cretaceous-Paleocene times is reconstructed and it is proposed a structural evolution of this segment of the Andes. This new exhumation data show how the Late Cretaceous to Paleocene event was a continuous and uninterrupted deformational event.

  7. Apatite fission track dating and long-term landscape evolution of the South Atlantic passive continental margin in the region of the Sierras Septentrionales in eastern Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfister, S.; Glasmacher, P. A.; Kollenz, S.

    2013-12-01

    To understand the evolution of the passive continental margin in Argentina apatite fission track dating is an appropriate method, which will lead to new conclusions in this area. The Tandilia System, also called Sierras Septentrionales, is located south of the Río de la Plato Craton in eastern Argentina in the state of Buenos Aires. North of the hills Salado basin is orientated whereas the Claromeó basin is located south of the mountain range. In contrary to most basins along the southamerican passive continental margin the Tandilia-System and the neighbouring basins trend perpendicular to the coast line. The topography ranges between 50 and 250m within the study area and is therefore fairly flat. The igneous-metamorphic basement is pre-proterozoic in age build up of mainly granitic-tonalitic gneisses, migmatites, amphibolites, some ultramafic rocks and granitoid plutons and is overlain by a series of Neoproterozoic to early Paleozoic sediments (Cingolani, 2010). The aim of the study is to evaluate the long-term landscape evolution of the passive continental margin in eastern Argentina in terms of thermal history and exhumation. For that purpose samples were taken from the Sierra Septentrionales basement analyzed for the apatite-FT method. The results so far indicate apatite fission track ages between 146.2 (10.1) Ma and 200.4 (12.7) Ma, which shows all samples have been reseted. Still ongoing length measurements will lead to 2D thermo kinematic Hefty (Ketcham, 2005; Ketcham et al., 2009; Ketcham, 2007) models. This will leads to further more insights on the cooling history and tectonic activities in the research area. References: Cingolani C. A. (2010): The Tandilia System of Argentina as a southern extension of the Río de la Plata craton: an overview. Int. J. Earth Sci. (Geol. Rundsch.) (2011) 100:221-242, doi 10.1007/s00531-010-0611-5. Ketcham, R. A. (2005): Forward and inverse modeling of low-temperature thermochronometry data, in Low

  8. Fast front-end electronics for semiconductor tracking detectors: Trends and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivetti, Angelo

    2014-11-01

    In the past few years, extensive research efforts pursued by both the industry and the academia have lead to major improvements in the performance of Analog to Digital Converters (ADCs) and Time to Digital Converters (TDCs). ADCs achieving 8-10 bit resolution, 50-100 MHz conversion frequency and less than 1 mW power consumption are the today's standard, while TDCs have reached sub-picosecond time resolution. These results have been made possible by architectural upgrades combined with the use of ultra deep submicron CMOS technologies with minimum feature size of 130 nm or smaller. Front-end ASICs in which a prompt digitization is followed by signal conditioning in the digital domain can now be envisaged also within the tight power budget typically available in high density tracking systems. Furthermore, tracking detectors embedding high resolution timing capabilities are gaining interest. In the paper, ADC's and TDC's developments which are of particular relevance for the design front-end electronics for semiconductor trackers are discussed along with the benefits and challenges of exploiting such high performance building blocks in implementing the next generation of ASICs for high granularity particle detectors.

  9. Data Analysis of Tracks of Heavy Ion Particles in Timepix Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, S.; Vilalta, R.; Pinsky, L.; Kroupa, M.; Stoffle, N.; Idarraga, J.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we describe some of the computational challenges that need to be addressed when developing active Space Radiation Monitors and Dosimeters using the Timepix detectors developed by the Medipix2 Collaboration at CERN. Measurement of the Linear Energy Transfer (LET), the source and velocity of incident ionizing radiation, are of initial interest when developing such operational devices because they provide the capability to calculate the Dose-equivalent, and to characterize the radiation field for the design of radiation protective devices. In order to facilitate the LET measurement, we first propose a new method for calculating azimuth direction and polar angle of individual tracks of penetrating charged particles based on the pixel clusters they produce. We then describe an energy compensation method for heavy ion tracks suffering from saturation and plasma effects. Finally, we identify interactions within the detector that need to be excluded from the total effective Dose-Equivalent assessment. We make use of data taken at the HIMAC (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator Center) facility in Chiba, Japan and NSRL (NASA Space Radiation Laboratory) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York, USA for evaluation purposes.

  10. Tracking brachytherapy sources using emission imaging with one flat panel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Song Haijun; Bowsher, James; Das, Shiva; Yin Fangfang

    2009-04-15

    This work proposes to use the radiation from brachytherapy sources to track their dwell positions in three-dimensional (3D) space. The prototype device uses a single flat panel detector and a BB tray. The BBs are arranged in a defined pattern. The shadow of the BBs on the flat panel is analyzed to derive the 3D coordinates of the illumination source, i.e., the dwell position of the brachytherapy source. A kilovoltage x-ray source located 3.3 m away was used to align the center BB with the center pixel on the flat panel detector. For a test plan of 11 dwell positions, with an Ir-192 high dose rate unit, one projection was taken for each dwell point, and locations of the BB shadows were manually identified on the projection images. The 3D coordinates for the 11 dwell positions were reconstructed based on two BBs. The distances between dwell points were compared with the expected values. The average difference was 0.07 cm with a standard deviation of 0.15 cm. With automated BB shadow recognition in the future, this technique possesses the potential of tracking the 3D trajectory and the dwell times of a brachytherapy source in real time, enabling real time source position verification.

  11. Fission-detector determination of D-D triton burnup fraction in beam-heated TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jassby, D.L.; Hendel, H.W.; Barnes, C.W.; Bosch, S.; Cecil, F.E.; McCune, D.C.; Nieschmidt, E.B.; Strachan, J.D.

    1987-06-01

    After the end of a neutral-beam injection pulse into a low-density TFTR plasma, once the beam-injected deuterons have thermalized, the neutron emission is dominated by the 14-MeV neutron production from D-D triton burnup. Ordinary fission detectors can measure the 14-MeV emission rate, which can be extrapolated back in time to estimate the equilibrium triton burnup fraction. The fractional burnup determined by this method is in the range of 0.3 to 1.5% for TFTR discharges to date, and is consistent with classical confinement and slowing down. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Effects of atmospheric parameters on radon measurements using alpha-track detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, C.; Zhuo, W. Fan, D.; Yi, Y.; Chen, B.

    2014-02-15

    The calibration factors of alpha-track radon detectors (ATDs) are essential for accurate determination of indoor radon concentrations. In this paper, the effects of atmospheric parameters on the calibration factors were theoretically studied and partially testified. Based on the atmospheric thermodynamics theory and detection characteristics of the allyl diglycol carbonate (CR-39), the calibration factors for 5 types of ATDs were calculated through Monte Carlo simulations under different atmospheric conditions. Simulation results showed that the calibration factor increased by up to 31% for the ATDs with a decrease of air pressure by 35.5 kPa (equivalent to an altitude increase of 3500 m), and it also increased by up to 12% with a temperature increase from 5 °C to 35 °C, but it was hardly affected by the relative humidity unless the water-vapor condensation occurs inside the detectors. Furthermore, it was also found that the effects on calibration factors also depended on the dimensions of ATDs. It indicated that variations of the calibration factor with air pressure and temperature should be considered for an accurate radon measurement with a large dimensional ATD, and water-vapor condensation inside the detector should be avoided in field measurements.

  13. Effects of atmospheric parameters on radon measurements using alpha-track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, C.; Zhuo, W.; Fan, D.; Yi, Y.; Chen, B.

    2014-02-01

    The calibration factors of alpha-track radon detectors (ATDs) are essential for accurate determination of indoor radon concentrations. In this paper, the effects of atmospheric parameters on the calibration factors were theoretically studied and partially testified. Based on the atmospheric thermodynamics theory and detection characteristics of the allyl diglycol carbonate (CR-39), the calibration factors for 5 types of ATDs were calculated through Monte Carlo simulations under different atmospheric conditions. Simulation results showed that the calibration factor increased by up to 31% for the ATDs with a decrease of air pressure by 35.5 kPa (equivalent to an altitude increase of 3500 m), and it also increased by up to 12% with a temperature increase from 5 °C to 35 °C, but it was hardly affected by the relative humidity unless the water-vapor condensation occurs inside the detectors. Furthermore, it was also found that the effects on calibration factors also depended on the dimensions of ATDs. It indicated that variations of the calibration factor with air pressure and temperature should be considered for an accurate radon measurement with a large dimensional ATD, and water-vapor condensation inside the detector should be avoided in field measurements.

  14. Effects of atmospheric parameters on radon measurements using alpha-track detectors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, C; Zhuo, W; Fan, D; Yi, Y; Chen, B

    2014-02-01

    The calibration factors of alpha-track radon detectors (ATDs) are essential for accurate determination of indoor radon concentrations. In this paper, the effects of atmospheric parameters on the calibration factors were theoretically studied and partially testified. Based on the atmospheric thermodynamics theory and detection characteristics of the allyl diglycol carbonate (CR-39), the calibration factors for 5 types of ATDs were calculated through Monte Carlo simulations under different atmospheric conditions. Simulation results showed that the calibration factor increased by up to 31% for the ATDs with a decrease of air pressure by 35.5 kPa (equivalent to an altitude increase of 3500 m), and it also increased by up to 12% with a temperature increase from 5 °C to 35 °C, but it was hardly affected by the relative humidity unless the water-vapor condensation occurs inside the detectors. Furthermore, it was also found that the effects on calibration factors also depended on the dimensions of ATDs. It indicated that variations of the calibration factor with air pressure and temperature should be considered for an accurate radon measurement with a large dimensional ATD, and water-vapor condensation inside the detector should be avoided in field measurements. PMID:24593337

  15. Exhumation and erosion rates in southern Africa from apatite fission track and (U-Th)/He analysis: state of research, ongoing work and future perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildman, M.; Beucher, R.; Brown, R. W.; Persano, C.; Stuart, F.

    2011-12-01

    The high elevation of the south-African plateau is now commonly associated with evidence of an active upward flow within the mantle. The southern part of Africa is then interpreted as an example of dynamically sustained topography represented by a high inland plateau surrounded by significantly less-elevated and higher relief areas. So far, the lack of tight constraints on the viscosity and density structure of the mantle have prevented reliable constraints on the timing of uplift using theoretical geodynamic models. The question of the origin of the plateau remains debated, the crux of the debate being whether the present day topography represents an eroded remnant of a Cretaceous elevated interior or if it is much younger and has been uplifted during the Miocene. Low-temperature thermochronology methods which allow us to constrain the time-temperature history of rocks and provide constraints on denudation chronologies, landscape evolution and tectonic histories of geological terrains are powerful tools to resolve this question. Many studies have been carried out during the past decades to sample and date the south-African plateau using mainly the fission-track method. The spatial analysis of these data have revealed a pattern of old ages in the central part of the plateau with ages getting younger toward the border. Modeling of fission track data tend to indicate a dominant uplift event during the Cretaceous (circa 90 Ma) with an estimated 3.5 km of erosion (although this varies spatially) in the central part of the plateau. However, the range of temperature covered by the fission-track system does not provide enough constraints on the late Tertiary history and additional data are required to resolve this part of the history. A major effort by the low-temperature thermochronology team at the University of Glasgow has been to extend the sampling and dating across southern Africa to a series of 8 deep boreholes across south-Africa, with bottom depths ranging from 0

  16. Fission Measurements with Dance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandel, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Bond, E. M.; Chadwick, M. B.; Clement, R. R.; Couture, A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Haight, R. C.; Keksis, A. L.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Dashdorj, D.; Macri, R. A.; Parker, W. E.; Wilk, P. A.; Wu, C. Y.; Becker, J. A.; Angell, C. T.; Tonchev, A. P.; Baker, J. D.

    2008-08-01

    Neutron capture cross section measurements on actinides are complicated by the presence of neutron-induced fission. An efficient fission tagging detector used in coincidence with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) provides a powerful tool in undertaking simultaneous measurements of (n,γ) and (n,f) cross sections. Preliminary results on 235U(n,γ) and (n,f) and 242mAm(n,f) cross sections measured with DANCE and a custom fission-tagging parallel plate avalanche counter (PPAC) are presented. Additional measurements of γ-ray cluster multiplicity distributions for neutron-induced fission of 235U and 242mAm and spontaneous fission of 252Cf are shown, as well as γ-ray energy and average γ-ray energy distributions.

  17. Thermotectonic history of the southeastern Brazilian margin: Evidence from apatite fission track data of the offshore Santos Basin and continental basement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelmann de Oliveira, Christie Helouise; Jelinek, Andréa Ritter; Chemale, Farid; Cupertino, José Antônio

    2016-08-01

    The Santos Basin is the largest offshore sedimentary basin in the southeastern Brazilian margin and originated by breakup of West Gondwana in the Early Cretaceous. We carried out a new thermochronological study by apatite fission track analysis from borehole samples of the Santos Basin and its continental basement to constrain the tectonic history of the southeastern Brazilian margin. Apatite fission track central ages of the basement and borehole samples vary from 21.0 ± 1.8 to 157.0 ± 35.0 Ma and from 6.5 ± 1.1 to 208.0 ± 11.0 Ma, respectively. From thermal modeling, the basement samples reached the maximum paleotemperatures during the final breakup of South America and Africa. The onshore basement and offshore basin record an early thermotectonic event during the Late Cretaceous linked to the uplift and denudation of the Serra do Mar and Serra da Mantiqueira. Maturation of the organic matter in the offshore basin is related with the progressive increase of the geothermal gradient due to burial. The thermal modeling indicates that the oil generation window started at 55-25 Ma. The basement samples experienced the final cooling during the Cenozoic, with an estimated amount of denudation linked to the sedimentary influx in the offshore basin. A rapid cooling during the Neogene becomes evident and it is linked to the reactivation along Precambrian shear zones and change of the Paraíba do Sul drainage system.

  18. Cenozoic tectonic evolution of Liaodong dome, Northeast Liaodong Bay, Bohai, offshore China, constraints from seismic stratigraphy, vitrinite reflectance and apatite fission track data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yanjun; Wu, Zhiping; Yan, Shiyong; Xu, Changgui; Li, Wei; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, ShaoChen; Ren, Jian; Su, Wen; Zhang, JiangTao

    2015-09-01

    The Liaodong dome is a region of localized uplift and deformation within the Liaodong Bay, Bohai, offshore China. 3-D seismic dataset, vitrinite reflectance and apatite fission track data provide an exceptional opportunity to document the evolution of the Liaodong dome which developed coeval with the Tan-Lu strike-slip fault zone with a rift system. The 3-D seismic data demonstrates that the dome formed before the deposition stage of EsM sequence (40 Ma), and it uplifted again during or after the depositional stage of Ed sequence (32-24 Ma). Apatite fission track and vitrinite reflectance data indicate that the dome experienced two stages of cooling episodes, Paleocene to Early/Middle Eocene (65-40 Ma) and Late Oligocene to Late Miocene (30-11.5 Ma), usually indicating uplifting. Both the seismic stratigraphy and thermal history analysis show that: 1) the Liaodong dome is part of the Jiaoliao terrane; 2) regional continental rifting climaxed during 65-40 Ma, as it did the rift-shoulder uplift of the dome; 3) the reactivation of the Tan-Lu fault caused a second uplift processes of the Liaodong dome during 30-11.5 Ma; 4) the Liaodong dome uplifted independently and separated from the Jiaoliao terrane. Our results also suggest that it is important to take uplifting evolution into consideration to target a potential petroleum reservoir.

  19. Note: Application of CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors for quality assurance of mixed oxide fuel pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Kodaira, S. Kurano, M.; Hosogane, T.; Ishikawa, F.; Kageyama, T.; Sato, M.; Kayano, M.; Yasuda, N.

    2015-05-15

    A CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector was used for quality assurance of mixed oxide fuel pellets for next-generation nuclear power plants. Plutonium (Pu) spot sizes and concentrations in the pellets are significant parameters for safe use in the plants. We developed an automatic Pu detection system based on dense α-radiation tracks in the CR-39 detectors. This system would greatly improve image processing time and measurement accuracy, and will be a powerful tool for rapid pellet quality assurance screening.

  20. Note: Application of CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors for quality assurance of mixed oxide fuel pellets.

    PubMed

    Kodaira, S; Kurano, M; Hosogane, T; Ishikawa, F; Kageyama, T; Sato, M; Kayano, M; Yasuda, N

    2015-05-01

    A CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector was used for quality assurance of mixed oxide fuel pellets for next-generation nuclear power plants. Plutonium (Pu) spot sizes and concentrations in the pellets are significant parameters for safe use in the plants. We developed an automatic Pu detection system based on dense α-radiation tracks in the CR-39 detectors. This system would greatly improve image processing time and measurement accuracy, and will be a powerful tool for rapid pellet quality assurance screening.

  1. Note: Application of CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors for quality assurance of mixed oxide fuel pellets.

    PubMed

    Kodaira, S; Kurano, M; Hosogane, T; Ishikawa, F; Kageyama, T; Sato, M; Kayano, M; Yasuda, N

    2015-05-01

    A CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector was used for quality assurance of mixed oxide fuel pellets for next-generation nuclear power plants. Plutonium (Pu) spot sizes and concentrations in the pellets are significant parameters for safe use in the plants. We developed an automatic Pu detection system based on dense α-radiation tracks in the CR-39 detectors. This system would greatly improve image processing time and measurement accuracy, and will be a powerful tool for rapid pellet quality assurance screening. PMID:26026564

  2. Note: Application of CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors for quality assurance of mixed oxide fuel pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodaira, S.; Kurano, M.; Hosogane, T.; Ishikawa, F.; Kageyama, T.; Sato, M.; Kayano, M.; Yasuda, N.

    2015-05-01

    A CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector was used for quality assurance of mixed oxide fuel pellets for next-generation nuclear power plants. Plutonium (Pu) spot sizes and concentrations in the pellets are significant parameters for safe use in the plants. We developed an automatic Pu detection system based on dense α-radiation tracks in the CR-39 detectors. This system would greatly improve image processing time and measurement accuracy, and will be a powerful tool for rapid pellet quality assurance screening.

  3. Long-term landscape evolution of the South Atlantic "passive" continental margin in Eastern Argentina using apatite fission-track thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfister, Sabrina; Kollenz, Sebastian; Glasmacher, Ulrich A.

    2015-04-01

    To understand the evolution of the "passive" continental margin in Argentina low temperature thermochronology is an appropriate method, which might lead to new insights in this area. The Tandilia System, also called Sierras Septentrionales, is located south of the Río de la Plato Craton in eastern Argentina in the state of Buenos Aires. North of the hills the Salado basin is located whereas the Claromecó basin is situated south of the mountain range. In contrary to most basins along the South American "passive" continental margin, the Tandilia-System and the neighbouring basins trend perpendicular to the coast line. The topography is fairly flat with altitudes up to 350 m. The igneous-metamorphic basement is pre-Proterozoic in age and build up of mainly granitic-tonalitic gneisses, migmatites, amphibolites, some ultramafic rocks and granitoid plutons. It is overlain by a series of Neoproterozoic to early Paleozoic sedimentary rocks (Cingolani 2011), like siliciclastic rocks, dolostones, shales and limestones (Demoulin 2005). The aim of the study is to quantify the long-term landscape evolution of the "passive" continental margin in eastern Argentina in terms of thermal, exhumation and tectonic evolution. For that purpose, samples were taken from the basement of the Sierra Septentrionales and analyzed with the apatite fission-track method. Further 2-D thermokinematic modeling was conducted with the computer code HeFTy (Ketcham 2005; Ketcham 2007; Ketcham et al. 2009). Because there are different hypotheses in literature regarding the geological evolution of this area two different models were generated, one after Demoulin et al. (2005) and another after Zalba et al.(2007). All samples were taken from the Neoproterozoic igneous-metamorphic basement. Apatite fission-track ages range from 101.6 (9.4) to 228.9 (22.3) Ma, and, therefore, are younger than their formation age, indicating all samples have been thermally reset. Six samples accomplished enough confined

  4. A massively parallel track-finding system for the LEVEL 2 trigger in the CLAS detector at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, D.C. Jr.; Collins, P.; Lemon, S. ); Bonneau, P. )

    1994-02-01

    The track segment finding subsystem of the LEVEL 2 trigger in the CLAS detector has been designed and prototyped. Track segments will be found in the 35,076 wires of the drift chambers using a massively parallel array of 768 Xilinx XC-4005 FPGA's. These FPGA's are located on daughter cards attached to the front-end boards distributed around the detector. Each chip is responsible for finding tracks passing through a 4 x 6 slice of an axial superlayer, and reports two segment found bits, one for each pair of cells. The algorithm used finds segments even when one or two layers or cells along the track is missing (this number is programmable), while being highly resistant to false segments arising from noise hits. Adjacent chips share data to find tracks crossing cell and board boundaries. For maximum speed, fully combinatorial logic is used inside each chip, with the result that all segments in the detector are found within 150 ns. Segment collection boards gather track segments from each axial superlayer and pass them via a high speed link to the segment linking subsystem in an additional 400 ns for typical events. The Xilinx chips are ram-based and therefore reprogrammable, allowing for future upgrades and algorithm enhancements.

  5. The morphotectonic history of the Atlantic continental margin of South Africa: insights from combined (U-Th)/He and fission track thermochronometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildman, M.; Beucher, R.; Brown, R.; Persano, C.; Stuart, F.; Roelofse, F.

    2012-04-01

    The morphotectonic evolution of the South African continental margins and the interior plateau remains unresolved, with the crux of the debate being whether the present day topography represents an eroded remnant of a Cretaceous elevated interior or if the topography is much younger, developed as a result of Miocene epeirogenic-style uplift. In recent years, advances in the understanding of mantle dynamics have led to an appreciation of its importance as a major controlling factor on the evolution of the South African plateau since the break-up of Gondwana. However, constraints on the timing and amount of uplift derived from geodynamical models are still controversial due to a lack of tight constraints on mantle viscosity and density structure and because of differences in the way the plate motions at the surface are incorporated into the different models. It is therefore essential to obtain more directly relevant empirical observations that can be used to test these models. Low temperature thermochronology (LTT) is a powerful tool well able to address this question by providing constraints on the time-temperature history of rocks, denudation, landscape evolution and tectonic history. Over the past two decades, the main focus of LTT analysis in South Africa has been on Apatite Fission Track Analysis (AFTA) which generally supports a dominant Cretaceous (c. 90Ma) uplift event with km-scale erosion, but spatially as well as temporally variable, in the interior of the plateau. However, AFTA data is unable to provide robust constraints on the Tertiary cooling history due to the temperature range covered by the fission track system (e.g. 60-110°C). The (U-Th)/He method with a lower temperature range (c. 40-75°C) will therefore be more sensitive to more recent and smaller amounts of erosion offers a new opportunity to evaluate the magnitude of Cenozoic denudation in southern Africa. Here we present the first (U-Th)/He ages from SW South Africa, obtained from a transect

  6. Neutron angular distribution in a plasma focus obtained using nuclear track detectors.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Mejía, F; Herrera, J J E; Rangel, J; Golzarri, J I; Espinosa, G

    2002-01-01

    The dense plasma focus (DPF) is a coaxial plasma gun in which a high-density, high-temperature plasma is obtained in a focused column for a few nanoseconds. When the filling gas is deuterium, neutrons can be obtained from fusion reactions. These are partially due to a beam of deuterons which are accelerated against the background hot plasma by large electric fields originating from plasma instabilities. Due to a beam-target effect, the angular distribution of the neutron emission is anisotropic, peaked in the forward direction along the axis of the gun. The purpose of this work is to illustrate the use of CR-39 nuclear track detectors as a diagnostic tool in the determination of the time-integrated neutron angular distribution. For the case studied in this work, neutron emission is found to have a 70% contribution from isotropic radiation and a 30% contribution from anisotropic radiation.

  7. Copper Nano- and Micro Wires Electrodeposited in Etched Cellulose Nitrate and Makrofol KG Nuclear Track Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jooybari, B. Shakeri; Afarideh, H.; Lamehi-Racti, M.; Moghimi, R.; Ghergherehchi, M.

    Cellulose Nitrate and Makrofol KG nuclear track detector foils of 96 μm and 20 μm thicknesses were irradiated with 238U ions (kinetic energy 17.7 MeV/u, fluence 105 ion/cm2) and 208Pd (kinetic energy 14.0MeV/u, fluence 105 ion/cm2), respectively. By etching of damage trail caused by the ion, templates containing conical pore were prepared. By electrochemical deposition of copper in homemade design electrolytic cell, conical wires were obtained. The electric current recorded during electrodeposition reflects the geometry of the pore. The lengths of wires were 96 μm and 20 μm, corresponding to the thickness of membranes. X-Ray Diffraction analysis indicated that texture and orientation of Cu wire were polycrystalline.

  8. Thermal and tectonic history in the steamboat hills geothermal field: Determination of the age of active hydrothermal activity by application of AFTA{sup {trademark}} (apatite fission track analysis)

    SciTech Connect

    Duddy, I.R.; Green, P.F.; Kamp, P.C. van de

    1995-12-31

    This study, in the Steamboat Hills area of the Carson segment of the northern Walker Lane Belt, was initiated to provide a regional thermal history framework and to investigate the age of the active local hydrothermal system. Seven outcrop samples, representing ?Cretaceous granodiorite and ?Triassic Peavine sequence metamorphosed volcanic flow and volcaniclastic rocks plus six samples of Peavine rocks in vertical sequence from an 0.8 km deep geothermal corehole have been analyzed using AFTA (apatite fission track analysis) and zircon fission track analysis.

  9. Cosmic radiation dose in aircraft--a neutron track etch detector.

    PubMed

    Vuković, B; Radolić, V; Miklavcić, I; Poje, M; Varga, M; Planinić, J

    2007-01-01

    Cosmic radiation bombards us at high altitude by ionizing particles. The radiation environment is a complex mixture of charged particles of solar and galactic origin, as well as of secondary particles produced in interaction of the galactic cosmic particles with the nuclei of atmosphere of the Earth. The radiation field at aircraft altitude consists of different types of particles, mainly photons, electrons, positrons and neutrons, with a large energy range. The non-neutron component of cosmic radiation dose aboard ATR 42 and A 320 aircrafts (flight level of 8 and 11 km, respectively) was measured with TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) detectors and the Mini 6100 semiconductor dosimeter. The estimated occupational effective dose for the aircraft crew (A 320) working 500 h per year was 1.64 mSv. Other experiments, or dose rate measurements with the neutron dosimeter, consisting of LR-115 track detector and boron foil BN-1 or 10B converter, were performed on five intercontinental flights. Comparison of the dose rates of the non-neutron component (low LET) and the neutron one (high LET) of the radiation field at the aircraft flight level showed that the neutron component carried about 50% of the total dose. The dose rate measurements on the flights from the Middle Europe to the South and Middle America, then to Korea and Japan, showed that the flights over or near the equator region carried less dose rate; this was in accordance with the known geomagnetic latitude effect.

  10. A neutron track etch detector for electron linear accelerators in radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vukovic, Branko; Faj, Dario; Poje, Marina; Varga, Maja; Radolic, Vanja; Miklavcic, Igor; Ivkovic, Ana; Planinic, Josip

    2010-01-01

    Background Electron linear accelerators in medical radiotherapy have replaced cobalt and caesium sources of radiation. However, medical accelerators with photon energies over 10 MeV generate undesired fast neutron contamination in a therapeutic X-ray photon beam. Photons with energies above 10 MeV can interact with the atomic nucleus of a high-Z material, of which the target and the head of an accelerator consist, and lead to the neutron ejection. Results and conclusions. Our neutron dosimeter, composed of the LR-115 track etch detector and boron foil BN-1 converter, was calibrated on thermal neutrons generated in the nuclear reactor of the Josef Stefan Institute (Slovenia), and applied to dosimetry of undesirable neutrons in photon radiotherapy by the linear accelerator 15 MV Siemens Mevatron. Having considered a high dependence of a cross-section between neutron and boron on neutron energy, and broad neutron spectrum in a photon beam, as well as outside the entrance door to maze of the Mevatron, we developed a method for determining the effective neutron detector response. A neutron dose rate in the photon beam was measured to be 1.96 Sv/h. Outside the Mevatron room the neutron dose rate was 0.62 μSv/h. PACS: 87.52. Ga; 87.53.St; 29.40.Wk. PMID:22933893

  11. Combined effects of frequency and layer removal on background track characteristics of ECE polycarbonate detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabi, Mehdi; Soltani, Zahra; Hakimi, Amir

    2016-02-01

    Polycarbonate track detectors (PCTD) when electrochemically etched (ECE) provide excellent characteristics for registering relatively lower-LET charged particles (e.g. alphas, fast-neutron-induced recoils) for many health physics and ion detection applications.The layer removal method of PCTDs by ethylenediamine (EDA) developed in our laboratory reduces the background track (BGT) density significantly. The frequency of the applied electric field strongly affects the BGT density and diameter and thus affects the minimum detection limit (MDL). In order to study the combined effects of the frequency and layer removal on the BGT density and thus on the MDL, this research was conducted. The BGT density versus the layer thickness removed at frequencies up to 12 kHz decrease rapidly to about 10-20 μm above which they reach a minimum constant level, while the mean BGT diameter verses layer removed at all frequencies are constant with flat responses. On the other hand the BGT density and diameter versus frequency at different layers removed up to ~50 μm increase till 4 kHz above which they reach plateaus. The PCTDs with ~20 μm layer removal at frequencies up 1 to 2 kHz showed the lowest MDL. The results are presented and discussed.

  12. High rate particle tracking and ultra-fast timing with a thin hybrid silicon pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Carassiti, V.; Ceccucci, A.; Cortina Gil, E.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dellacasa, G.; Garbolino, S.; Jarron, P.; Kaplon, J.; Kluge, A.; Marchetto, F.; Mapelli, A.; Martin, E.; Mazza, G.; Morel, M.; Noy, M.; Nuessle, G.; Perktold, L.; Petagna, P.; Petrucci, F.; Poltorak, K.; Riedler, P.; Rivetti, A.; Statera, M.; Velghe, B.

    2013-08-01

    The Gigatracker (GTK) is a hybrid silicon pixel detector designed for the NA62 experiment at CERN. The beam spectrometer, made of three GTK stations, has to sustain high and non-uniform particle rate (∼ 1 GHz in total) and measure momentum and angles of each beam track with a combined time resolution of 150 ps. In order to reduce multiple scattering and hadronic interactions of beam particles, the material budget of a single GTK station has been fixed to 0.5% X0. The expected fluence for 100 days of running is 2 ×1014 1 MeV neq /cm2, comparable to the one foreseen in the inner trackers of LHC detectors during 10 years of operation. To comply with these requirements, an efficient and very low-mass (< 0.15 %X0) cooling system is being constructed, using a novel microchannel cooling silicon plate. Two complementary read-out architectures have been produced as small-scale prototypes: one is based on a Time-over-Threshold circuit followed by a TDC shared by a group of pixels, while the other makes use of a constant-fraction discriminator followed by an on-pixel TDC. The read-out ASICs are produced in 130 nm IBM CMOS technology and will be thinned down to 100 μm or less. An overview of the Gigatracker detector system will be presented. Experimental results from laboratory and beam tests of prototype bump-bonded assemblies will be described as well. These results show a time resolution of about 170 ps for single hits from minimum ionizing particles, using 200 μm thick silicon sensors.

  13. FIssion Product Prompt γ-ray spectrometer: Development of an instrumented gas-filled magnetic spectrometer at the ILL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, A.; Chebboubi, A.; Faust, H.; Jentschel, M.; Kessedjian, G.; Köster, U.; Materna, T.; Panebianco, S.; Sage, C.; Urban, W.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate thermal neutron-induced fission data are important for applications in reactor physics as well as for fundamental nuclear physics. FIPPS is the new FIssion Product Prompt γ-ray Spectrometer being developed at the Institut Laue Langevin for neutron-induced fission studies. FIPPS is based on the combination of a large Germanium detector array surrounding a fission target, a Time-Of-Flight detector and a Gas-Filled Magnet (GFM) to identify mass, nuclear charge and kinetic energy of one of the fission fragments. The GFM will be instrumented with a Time-Projection Chamber (TPC) for individual 3D tracking of the fragments. A conceptual design study of the new spectrometer is presented.

  14. Constraints on the thermal history of Taylorsville Basin, Virginia, U.S.A., from fluid-inclusion and fission-track analyses: Implications for subsurface geomicrobiology experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tseng, H.-Y.; Onstott, T.C.; Burruss, R.C.; Miller, D.S.

    1996-01-01

    Microbial populations have been found at the depth of 2621-2804 m in a borehole near the center of Triassic Taylorsville Basin, Virginia. To constrain possible scenarios for long-term survival in or introduction of these microbial populations to the deep subsurface, we attempted to refine models of thermal and burial history of the basin by analyzing aqueous and gaseous fluid inclusions in calcite/quartz veins or cements in cuttings from the same borehole. These results are complemented by fission-track data from the adjacent boreholes. Homogenization temperatures of secondary aqueous fluid inclusions range from 120?? to 210??C between 2027- and 3069-m depth, with highest temperatures in the deepest samples. The salinities of these aqueous inclusions range from 0 to ??? 4.3 eq wt% NaCl. Four samples from the depth between 2413 and 2931 m contain both two-phase aqueous and one-phase methane-rich inclusions in healed microcracks. The relative CH4 and CO2 contents of these gaseous inclusions was estimated by microthermometry and laser Raman spectroscopy. If both types of inclusions in sample 2931 m were trapped simultaneously, the density of the methane-rich inclusions calculated from the Peng - Robinson equation of state implies an entrapment pressure of 360 ?? 20 bar at the homogenization temperature (162.5 ?? 12.5??C) of the aqueous inclusions. This pressure falls between the hydrostatic and lithostatic pressures at the present depth 2931 m of burial. If we assume that the pressure regime was hydrostatic at the time of trapping, then the inclusions were trapped at 3.6 km in a thermal gradient of ??? 40??C/km. The high temperatures recorded by the secondary aqueous inclusions are consistent with the pervasive resetting of zircon and apatite fission-track dates. In order to fit the fission-track length distributions of the apatite data, however, a cooling rate of 1-2??C/Ma following the thermal maximum is required. To match the integrated dates, the thermal maximum

  15. The thermal history of the Karoo Moatize-Minjova Basin, Tete Province, Mozambique: An integrated vitrinite reflectance and apatite fission track thermochronology study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Paulo; Cogné, Nathan; Chew, David M.; Rodrigues, Bruno; Jorge, Raul C. G. S.; Marques, João; Jamal, Daud; Vasconcelos, Lopo

    2015-12-01

    The Moatize-Minjova Basin is a Karoo-aged rift basin located in the Tete Province of central Mozambique along the present-day Zambezi River valley. In this basin the Permian Moatize and Matinde formations consist of interbedded carbonaceous mudstones and sandstones with coal seams. The thermal history has been determined using rock samples from two coal exploration boreholes (ca. 500 m depth) to constrain the burial and exhumation history of the basin. Organic maturation levels were determined using vitrinite reflectance and spore fluorescence/colour. Ages and rates of tectonic uplift and denudation have been assessed by apatite fission track analysis. The thermal history was modelled by inverse modelling of the fission track and vitrinite reflectance data. The Moatize Formation attained a coal rank of bituminous coals with low to medium volatiles (1.3-1.7%Rr). Organic maturation levels increase in a linear fashion downhole in the two boreholes, indicating that burial was the main process controlling peak temperature maturation. Calculated palaeogeothermal gradients range from 59 °C/km to 40 °C/km. According to the models, peak burial temperatures were attained shortly (3-10 Ma) after deposition. Apatite fission track ages [146 to 84 Ma (Cretaceous)] are younger than the stratigraphic age. Thermal modelling indicates two episodes of cooling and exhumation: a first period of rapid cooling between 240 and 230 Ma (Middle - Upper Triassic boundary) implying 2500-3000 m of denudation; and a second period, also of rapid cooling, from 6 Ma (late Miocene) onwards implying 1000-1500 m of denudation. The first episode is related to the main compressional deformation event within the Cape Fold Belt in South Africa, which transferred stress northwards on pre-existing transtensional fault systems within the Karoo rift basins, causing tectonic inversion and uplift. During the Mesozoic and most of the Cenozoic the basin is characterized by very slow cooling. The second period

  16. Contrasting tectonothermal domains and faulting in the Potomac terrane, Virginia-Maryland - Discrimination by 40Ar/39Ar and fission-track thermochronology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kunk, M.J.; Wintsch, R.P.; Naeser, C.W.; Naeser, N.D.; Southworth, C.S.; Drake, A.A.; Becker, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar data reveal ages and thermal discontinuities that identify mapped and unmapped fault boundaries in the Potomac terrane in northern Virginia, thus confirming previous interpretations that it is a composite terrane. The rocks of the Potomac terrane were examined along the Potomac River, where it has been previously subdivided into three units: the Mather Gorge, Sykesville, and Laurel Formations. In the Mather Gorge Formation, at least two metamorphic thermal domains were identified, the Blockhouse Point and Bear Island domains, separated by a fault active in the late Devonian. Early Ordovician (ca. 475 Ma) cooling ages of amphibole in the Bear Island domain reflect cooling from Taconic metamorphism, whereas the Blockhouse Point domain was first metamorphosed in the Devonian. The 40Ar/39Ar data from muscovites in a third (eastern) domain within the Mather Gorge Formation, the Stubblefield Falls domain, record thrusting of the Sykesville Formation over the Mather Gorge Formation on the Plummers Island fault in the Devonian. The existence of two distinctly different thermal domains separated by a tectonic boundary within the Mather Gorge argues against its status as a formation. Hornblende cooling ages in the Sykesville Formation are Early Devonian (ca. 400 Ma), reflecting cooling from Taconic and Acadian metamorphism. The ages of retrograde and overprinting muscovite in phyllonites from domain-bounding faults are late Devonian (Acadian) and late Pennsylvanian (Alleghanian), marking the time of assembly of these domains and subsequent movement on the Plummers Island fault. Our data indicate that net vertical motion between the Bear Island domain of the Mather Gorge complex and the Sykesville Formation across the Plummers Island fault is east-side-up. Zircon fission-track cooling ages demonstrate thermal equillbrium across the Potomac terrane in the early Permian, and apatite fission-track cooling ages record tilting of the Potomac terrane in the Cretaceous

  17. The Nagoya cosmic-ray muon spectrometer 3, part 2: Track detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibata, S.; Iijima, K.; Kamiya, Y.; Iida, S.

    1985-01-01

    The twelve wide gap spark chambers were utilized as the track detectors of the Nagoya cosmic-ray muon spectrometer not only to obtain the precise locations of particles, but also to get some information about the correspondences between segments of trajectories. The area of each chamber is 150 x 70 sq cm and the width of a gap is 5 cm. The gas used is He at the atmospheric pressure. Each three pairs of them are placed on both sides of the deflection magnet. All images of sparks for each event are projected through the mirror system and recorded by two cameras stereoscopically. The mean detection efficiency of each chamber is 95 + or - 2% and the spacial resolution (jitter and drift) obtained from the prototype-experiment is 0.12 mm. Maximum detectable momentum of the spectrometer is estimated at about 10 TeV/c taking into account these characteristics together with the effects of the energy loss and multiple Coulomb scattering of muons in the iron magnet.

  18. CO2 evaporative cooling: The future for tracking detector thermal management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tropea, P.; Daguin, J.; Petagna, P.; Postema, H.; Verlaat, B.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-07-01

    In the last few years, CO2 evaporative cooling has been one of the favourite technologies chosen for the thermal management of tracking detectors at LHC. ATLAS Insertable B-Layer and CMS Pixel phase 1 upgrade have adopted it and their systems are now operational or under commissioning. The CERN PH-DT team is now merging the lessons learnt on these two systems in order to prepare the design and construction of the cooling systems for the new Upstream Tracker and the Velo upgrade in LHCb, due by 2018. Meanwhile, the preliminary design of the ATLAS and CMS full tracker upgrades is started, and both concepts heavily rely on CO2 evaporative cooling. This paper highlights the performances of the systems now in operation and the challenges to overcome in order to scale them up to the requirements of the future generations of trackers. In particular, it focuses on the conceptual design of a new cooling system suited for the large phase 2 upgrade programmes, which will be validated with the construction of a common prototype in the next years.

  19. Track-etched detectors for the dosimetry of the radiation of cosmic origin.

    PubMed

    Spurný, F; Turek, K

    2004-01-01

    Cosmic rays contribute to the exposure on the Earth's surface as well as in its surroundings. At the surface and/or at aviation altitudes, there are mostly secondary particles created through the cosmic rays interaction in the atmosphere, which contribute to this type of exposure. Onboard a spacecraft, the exposure comes mostly from primary cosmic rays. Track-etched detectors (TED) are able to characterise both these types of exposure. The contribution of neutrons, of cosmic origin, on the Earth's surface was studied at altitudes from few hundreds to 3000 m using TED in a moderator sphere. The results obtained are compared with other data on this type of natural radiation background. The results of studies performed onboard aircraft and/or spacecraft are presented afterwards. We used TED-based neutron dosemeter, as well as a spectrometer of linear energy transfer based on a chemically etched TED. The results of studies performed onboard aircraft, as well as spacecraft, are presented and discussed, including an attempt to estimate a neutron component onboard the spacecraft. It was found that they correlate with the results of other independent investigations.

  20. Evaluation of a personal and environmental dosemeter based on CR-39 track detectors in quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields.

    PubMed

    Caresana, M; Ferrarini, M; Parravicini, A; Sashala Naik, A

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, the evaluation of the dosimetric capability of a detector based on a CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detector coupled to a 1 cm thickness of PMMA radiator was made with the aim of understanding the applicability of this technique to personal and environmental neutron dosimetry. The dosemeter has been exposed to monoenergetic and quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams at PTB in Braunschweig, Germany and at Ithemba Laboratories, in Faure, South Africa, with peak energies ranging from 0.565 to 100 MeV. The results showed a response that is almost independent of the neutron energy in the whole energy range.

  1. Evaluation of a personal and environmental dosemeter based on CR-39 track detectors in quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields.

    PubMed

    Caresana, M; Ferrarini, M; Parravicini, A; Sashala Naik, A

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, the evaluation of the dosimetric capability of a detector based on a CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detector coupled to a 1 cm thickness of PMMA radiator was made with the aim of understanding the applicability of this technique to personal and environmental neutron dosimetry. The dosemeter has been exposed to monoenergetic and quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams at PTB in Braunschweig, Germany and at Ithemba Laboratories, in Faure, South Africa, with peak energies ranging from 0.565 to 100 MeV. The results showed a response that is almost independent of the neutron energy in the whole energy range. PMID:24324248

  2. Unravelling a long-term multi-event thermal record in the cratonic interior of southern Finland through apatite fission track thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murrell, G. R.; Andriessen, P. A. M.

    Apatite fission track thermochronology (AFTT) has been applied to the Precambrian basement rocks of southern Finland in an attempt to detect within the long-term thermal history, thermal manifestations in the cratonic interior of tectonic events at the craton margin. The likely subtle magnitude of these manifestations means that AFTT is a useful technique for such a study due to its low temperature sensitivity. A total of 10 samples have been analysed, generating AFTT ages, length statistics and thermal models. Ages range from 313 ± 22 to 848 ± 60 Ma and mean track lengths range from 11.0 ± 1.6 to 13.3 ± 1.8 μm. The data suggests the presence of thermal overprinting of an earlier cooling event. Thermal modelling produces similar results for all samples and typically contains the following major events: (1) two phases of Late-Proterozoic cooling, (2) Late-Silurian re-heating, (3) Cenozoic cooling. The first phase of Late-Proterozoic cooling is interpreted to be due to aulacogen inversion as a result of stress propagation from the collisional tectonics of the Sveconorwegian orogeny. The second phase is discussed in relation to passive margin formation and possible asthenospheric diaper induced relief and exhumation. The Late-Silurian re-heating coincides in time with a proposed Caledonian foreland basin. The Cenozoic cooling is interpreted to represent the latest exposure resulting from North Atlantic Margin formation induced uplift and associated denudation.

  3. Low-temperature exhumation history of Variscan-age rocks in the western Cantabrian Mountains (NW Spain) recorded by apatite fission-track data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobe, René W.; Alvarez-Marrón, Joaquina; Glasmacher, Ulrich A.; Menéndez-Duarte, Rosana

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents the first regional study of apatite fission-track (AFT) thermochronology to be undertaken in the western termination of the Cantabrian Mountains (NW Spain). The mountains reach elevations of over 2600 m along the northern coast of Spain and are comprised of a Variscan crustal section uplifted due to Cenozoic shortening along the northern Iberian Plate. The study constrains the pattern and history of exhumation within the Paleozoic bedrock over the past c. 240 Ma. Twenty-one apatite fission-track samples range in age from 246.7 (± 26.9) Ma to 78.1 (± 3.7) Ma, with mean track lengths between 10.4 (± 1.8) µm and 12.4 (± 1.4) µm. Time-temperature path modelling of the data indicates that different rates of continuous cooling took place during the three main tectonic events that affected the area. A rapid cooling event that ended by the Late Jurassic corresponds to topographic decay during unroofing of the Variscan orogen and the break-up of Pangea, and is responsible for the largest amount of exhumation. Westernmost samples cooled coinciding with rifting in the North Atlantic and Bay of Biscay during the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous. By about 100-80 Ma most samples had reached, or passed through, the upper boundary of the apatite partial annealing zone, which indicate that regional denudation has not exceeded c. 1.7 km since then, for geothermal gradients ≥ 27 °C/km and a surface temperature of 15 °C. Only three samples next to fault escarpments in the west cooled below 70 °C since 80 Ma, reaching below 65 °C before initiation of incipient subduction along the northern Iberian Margin by 46 Ma. An average cooling rate of ≤ 1 °C/Ma reflects latest denudation as the new mountainous relief developed since then due to shortening and incipient subduction associated with convergence along the northern Iberian Plate. The Cantabrian Mountains are one of the few natural examples of a coastal orogen in a juvenile stage of evolution.

  4. Application of a single area array detector for acquistion, tracking and point-ahead in space optical communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, D. L.; Cosgrove, M.; Vanvranken, R.; Park, H.; Fitzmaurice, M.

    1989-01-01

    Functions of acquisition, tracking, and point-ahead in space optical communications are being combined into a single system utilizing an area array detector. An analysis is presented of the feasibility concept. The key parameters are: optical power less than 1 pW at 0.86 micrometer, acquisition in less than 30 seconds in an acquisition field of view (FOV) of 1 mrad, tracking with 0.5 microrad rms noise at 1000 Hz update rate, and point ahead transfer function precision of 0.25 microrad over a region of 150 microrad. Currently available array detectors were examined. The most demanding specifications are low output noise, a high detection efficiency, a large number of pixels, and frame rates over 1kHz. A proof of concept (POC) demonstration system is currently being built utilizing the Kodak HS-40 detector (a 128 x 128 photodiode array with a 64 channel CCD readout architecture which can be operated at frame rates as high as 40,000/sec). The POC system implements a windowing scheme and special purpose digital signal processing electronic for matched filter acquisition and tracking algorithms.

  5. Accuracy of the geometric-mean method for determining spatial resolutions of tracking detectors in the presence of multiple Coulomb scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, A.; Hohlmann, M.

    2016-06-01

    The geometric-mean method is often used to estimate the spatial resolution of a position-sensitive detector probed by tracks. It calculates the resolution solely from measured track data without using a detailed tracking simulation and without considering multiple Coulomb scattering effects. Two separate linear track fits are performed on the same data, one excluding and the other including the hit from the probed detector. The geometric mean of the widths of the corresponding exclusive and inclusive residual distributions for the probed detector is then taken as a measure of the intrinsic spatial resolution of the probed detector: σ=√σex·σin. The validity of this method is examined for a range of resolutions with a stand-alone Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation that specifically takes multiple Coulomb scattering in the tracking detector materials into account. Using simulated as well as actual tracking data from a representative beam test scenario, we find that the geometric-mean method gives systematically inaccurate spatial resolution results. Good resolutions are estimated as poor and vice versa. The more the resolutions of reference detectors and probed detector differ, the larger the systematic bias. An attempt to correct this inaccuracy by statistically subtracting multiple-scattering effects from geometric-mean results leads to resolutions that are typically too optimistic by 10-50%. This supports an earlier critique of this method based on simulation studies that did not take multiple scattering into account.

  6. Alpha particle energy response of 1-mm-thick polycarbonate track detectors by 50 Hz-HV electrochemical etching method.

    PubMed

    Sohrabi, M; Ramezani, V

    2015-04-01

    The electrochemical etching (ECE) method enlarges charged particle tracks to enhance its applications in particular in health physics and radiation dosimetry. The ECE method is usually based on using a high frequency-high voltage (HF-HV) generator with 250-µm-thick polycarbonate track detectors (PCTDs). The authors' recent studies on nitrogen and helium ions and alpha tracks in 1-mm-thick large-size PCTDs under a 50 Hz-HV ECE process provided promising results. In this study, alpha track efficiency and mean track diameter versus energy responses and registration energy range as well as alpha and background track shapes under three sets of 50 Hz-4, 5 and 6 kV applied field conditions have been studied and are reported. The efficiency versus alpha energy has a Bragg-type response from ∼15 keV to ∼4.5 MeV for the field conditions applied with an efficiency value of 40-50% at the Bragg peak. The results are presented and discussed.

  7. Optimization of microwave-induced chemical etching for rapid development of neutron-induced recoil tracks in CR-39 detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, G. S.; Tripathy, S. P.; Bandyopadhyay, T.

    2014-03-01

    A systematic investigation is carried out to optimize the recently established microwave-induced chemical etching (MICE) parameters for rapid development of neutron-induced recoil tracks in CR-39 detectors. Several combinations of all available microwave powers with different etching durations were analysed to determine the most suitable etching condition. The etching duration was found to reduce with increasing microwave power and the tracks were observed at about 18, 15, 12, and 6 min for 300, 450, 600 and 900 W of microwave powers respectively compared to a few hours in chemical etching (CE) method. However, for complete development of tracks the etching duration of 30, 40, 50 and 60 min were found to be suitable for the microwave powers of 900, 600, 450 and 300 W, respectively. Temperature profiles of the etchant for all the available microwave powers at different etching durations were generated to regulate the etching process in a controlled manner. The bulk etch rates at different microwave powers were determined by 2 methods, viz., gravimetric and removed thickness methods. A logarithmic expression was used to fit the variation of bulk etch rate with microwave power. Neutron detection efficiencies were obtained for all the cases and the results on track parameters obtained with MICE technique were compared with those obtained from another detector processed with chemical etching.

  8. Modifications induced by gamma irradiation to Makrofol polymer nuclear track detector

    PubMed Central

    Tayel, A.; Zaki, M.F.; El Basaty, A.B.; Hegazy, Tarek M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was extended from obtaining information about the interaction of gamma rays with Makrofol DE 7-2 track detector to introduce the basis that can be used in concerning simple sensor for gamma irradiation and bio-engineering applications. Makrofol polymer samples were irradiated with 1.25 MeV 60Co gamma radiations at doses ranging from 20 to 1000 kG y. The modifications of irradiated samples so induced were analyzed using UV–vis spectrometry, photoluminescence spectroscopy, and the measurements of Vickers’ hardness. Moreover, the change in wettability of irradiated Makrofol was investigated by the contact angle determination of the distilled water. UV–vis spectroscopy shows a noticeable decrease in the energy band gap due to gamma irradiation. This decrease could be attributed to the appearance of a shift to UV spectra toward higher wavelength region after irradiation. Photoluminescence spectra reveal a remarkable change in the integrated photoluminescence intensity with increasing gamma doses, which may be resulted from some matrix disorder through the creation of some defected states in the irradiated polymer. The hardness was found to increase from 4.78 MPa for the unirradiated sample to 23.67 MPa for the highest gamma dose. The contact angle investigations show that the wettability of the modified samples increases with increasing the gamma doses. The result obtained from present investigation furnishes evidence that the gamma irradiations are a successful technique to modify the Makrofol DE 7-2 polymer properties to use it in suitable applications. PMID:25750755

  9. Fission-track Evidence for the Source of Brahmaputra River Sands Within the Eastern Himalayan Syntaxis: a Large Flux from a Tiny Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, R. J.; Hallet, B.; Zeitler, P. K.

    2006-12-01

    We present new zircon and apatite fission-track results from river sands of the Brahmaputra system; they complement our prior results and add to diverse lines of evidence indicating that erosion in the core of the eastern Himalayan syntaxis has been and is exceptionally rapid. These new results improve definition of the bedrock source area for very young grains: a source of uncertainty in our original data set stemmed from our key downstream sampling site being at Pashigat, on the floodplain of the Brahmaputra, permitting drainages other than the Tsangpo/Siang (local names for the upper Brahmaputra) from being potential contributors of young grains. One important new sample was collected near Medoc, in the lower reaches of the Tsangpo gorge, allowing us to tightly bracket detrital contributions from this deep gorge through the geologically active Nanche Barwa-Gyala Peri massif, the likely source of very young cooling ages of less than 2 Ma. The second sample was collected from a small river draining the cirque glacier incising the NW side of Namche Barwa. We report analyses of 37 zircon grains and 66 apatite grains from the Medoc sample and 80 zircon grains from the cirque sample. Our new results are as follows (previous results from Pashigat are shown in parentheses). The youngest peak identified by BINOMFIT in detrital zircons from Medoc is 0.6 Ma (0.6 Ma), and significantly, it includes 51% (47%) of the entire sand-sized population. The youngest grains are ~ 0.1 Ma (0.1 Ma), and a significant subset has a peak age of 0.3 to 0.4 Ma (0.4 Ma). The youngest peak in apatite fission-track ages from the same samples is 0.5 Ma (0.4 Ma) and includes 58% (39%) of the grains. Zircons from the Namche Barwa cirque also yield a population of extremely young ages having a number of peaks, the youngest of which is 0.3 Ma and accounts for 35% of the grains; the oldest grain in this entire sample is 3.3 Ma. The age distributions from Medoc and Pasighat are very similar, giving us

  10. Cenozoic tectonics in the Buruanga Peninsula, Panay Island, Central Philippines, as constrained by U-Pb, 40Ar/39Ar and fission track thermochronometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walia, M.; Yang, T. F.; Knittel, U.; Liu, T.-K.; Lo, C.-H.; Chung, S.-L.; Teng, L. S.; Dimalanta, C. B.; Yumul, G. P.; Yuan, W. M.

    2013-01-01

    Buruanga Peninsula forms the westernmost part of Panay Island, Central Philippines and is a part of the Palawan Continental Terrane (PCT), which was formerly attached to south-eastern China. It acted as the leading edge of the continental fragment and collided with the Philippine Mobile Belt (PMB) followed by convergence beneath the latter. Dating of the collision is crucial for understanding the evolution of the archipelago. Samples collected from Buruanga Peninsula were dated using U-Pb, 40Ar/39Ar and fission track dating (FTD) techniques to constrain the timing of the tectonic events related to the collision of the PMB with the PCT. These techniques have enabled us to obtain ages over a range of closure temperatures from about 700 °C to about 110 °C. Paleoproterozoic and Permian zircon U-Pb ages from Saboncogon Formation emphasize derivation of the western part of Buruanga Peninsula from SE China; zircon and apatite fission track ages of 51 Ma and 16 Ma, respectively, constrain the exhumation of this formation. The age data suggest tectonic events at ~ 14 Ma, ~ 11-12 Ma and about 7-8 Ma following intrusive activity at about 18 Ma. Uplift and exhumation at ~ 14 Ma are thought to be the result of subduction of low-density crustal rocks, at 11 Ma to be the result of isostatic uplift as a consequence of crustal thickening and at ~ 8 Ma to be due to the isostatic re-equilibration of the sediments overlying the former suture. Hence, collision is constrained to have started at about 14-15 Ma and to have ended before 8 Ma. Multi-element patterns of the 18 Ma Patria-Diorite from Buruanga Peninsula show enrichment in LILE (Rb, Sr, and K) and LREE and depletion in HFSE elements (Ti, Nb, and Ta) similar to those from Luzon volcanics and the volcanic rocks of Negros Island. These arc-signatures indicate a subduction related environment for the emplacement of this intrusive body and show that the diorite belongs to the PMB. The age constraints of the present study neither

  11. Multi-dating single detrital mineral grains (U-Pb, (U-Th)/He, and fission track): a key to reconstructing East Antarctic subglacial landscape evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, S. N.; Reiners, P. W.; Gehrels, G. E.

    2014-12-01

    Dating of single detrital mineral grains (typically zircon and apatite) using geochronology and low-temperature (LT) thermochronology is now an established tool in the investigation of a range of geologic processes and problems. For example, detrital zircon U-Pb (DZ) geochronology can be applied to derive maximum depositional age, reconstruct sediment provenance and routing systems, correlate isolated stratigraphic horizons, and characterize remote source terrane geology. Detrital LT thermochronology (fission track and (U-Th)/He dating) can be applied additionally to reconstruct source region cooling and exhumation history through use of lag-time - the time taken between a mineral grain cooling below its closure temperature and its time of deposition. While each of these methods in isolation are very valuable tools, they do have some limitations. For example, DZ geochronology cannot differentiate different sources with the same crystallization age, the youngest DZ age population may be older than depositional age, large orogenic or metamorphic episodes may not produce much primary zircon, and recycling of zircon grains can lead to incorrect interpretation of syn-depositional versus primary sediment source. Detrital LT thermochronology has additional problems such as syn-depositional age volcanic grains leading to erroneous lag-time interpretation. Many of these issues can be overcome by obtaining combining multiple dating techniques on single grains, with the bonus of acquiring higher resolution provenance information. While multi-dating does present analytical challenges, a number of studies have explored this approach in recent years. Here we show how detrital apatite and zircon double- and triple-dating of sediments of varying age (Cretaceous to Holocene) from offshore Antarctica provides a novel new approach to reconstructing the pre-glacial and glacial landscape evolution of this hidden continent over the last few hundred million years. In addition it provided

  12. Fast-digitizing and track-finding electronics for the vertex detector in the Opal experiment at the Large Electron Positron Collider (LEP) at Cern

    SciTech Connect

    Jaroslawski, S.; Jeffs, M.; Matson, R.; Milborrow, R.; White, D. )

    1990-10-01

    The vertex front-end electronics is described. It comprises fast analog-to-digital conversion circuits and a fast programmable track trigger processor. The function of the electronics is to examine, within one LEP beam crossing (22 {mu}s), data generated in the detector for the evidence of charged particle tracks. Measurements of ionization drift times are based on a gated 93-MHz oscillator synchronized to a precision crystal clock and give points in space. The axial positions of these points along the detector are found by analyzing the difference in time of arrivals of signals at the ends of the detector ({ital z} by timing). Particle tracks are found by 36 track finders operating in parallel and are matched by semicuston coincidence chips. The track information is used in the first stage of data reduction in Opal (the first-level trigger).

  13. The fissionTPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffner, Mike

    2014-03-01

    A new instument to study fission, called the fission TPC, has been constructed to make high accuracy measurements of neutron induced fission cross-sections of the major actinides. Most of the cross sections have been measured over the last 60 years, although improvements in the accuracy of the data appear unlikely with the current technology. A potential breakthrough is the deployment of the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) which was developed within the particle physics community. The NIFFTE collaboration, a group of 7 universities and 4 national laboratories, has undertaken the task of building the first TPC for this purpose. In this talk I will present the fission TPC design, challenges that had to be addressed, and the performance of the detector.

  14. Detectors

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore; Bounds, John Alan; Allander, Krag

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques through which both alpha and beta emission determinations can be made simultaneously using a simple detector structure. The technique uses a beta detector covered in an electrically conducting material, the electrically conducting material discharging ions generated by alpha emissions, and as a consequence providing a measure of those alpha emissions. The technique also offers improved mountings for alpha detectors and other forms of detectors against vibration and the consequential effects vibration has on measurement accuracy.

  15. Thermal history of the Sabero Coalfield (Southern Cantabrian Zone, NW Spain) as revealed by apatite fission track analyses from tonstein horizons: implications for timing of coalification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botor, Dariusz; Anczkiewicz, Aneta A.

    2015-10-01

    Apatite fission track (AFT) central ages from Carboniferous (Stephanian) tonsteins of the Sabero Coalfield, NW Spain, range from 140.8 ± 7.5 to 65.8 ± 8.1 Ma (Cretaceous), with mean c-axis projected track length values ranging from 12.5 to 13.4 μm. Mean random vitrinite reflectance ( R r) of these samples ranges from 0.91 to 1.20 %, which can be translated into maximum palaeotemperatures of ca. 130 to 180 °C. All analysed samples experienced substantial post-depositional annealing. The considerably younger AFT ages compared to the depositional ages of the samples and R r data indicate the certainty of the occurrence of at least one heating event after the deposition of strata. The unimodal track length distributions, the relatively short mean track length, and the rather low standard deviation (SD) (1.0-1.6 μm) indicate a relatively simple thermal history that could be related to the post-Late Variscan heating event followed by prolonged residence in the apatite partial annealing zone (APAZ). Geological data combined with thermal models of AFT data indicate that Stephanian strata reached the maximum palaeotemperatures in the Permian period, which was therefore the major time of the coalification processes. The Permian magmatic activity was responsible for a high heat flow, which, with the added effect of sedimentary burial, could account for the resetting of the AFT system. It appears that the fault-related hydrothermal activity could have redistributed heat in areas of significant subsidence. Cooling occurred in the Triassic-Cretaceous times after a high heat flow Permian regime. A post-Permian maturation of the Stephanian organic matter is not very likely, since there is no evidence of a high Mesozoic burial that was sufficient to cause a significant increase in the palaeotemperatures. Finally, exhumation and associated erosion rates may possibly have been faster in the Tertiary, causing the present exposure of the studied rocks.

  16. Track based software package for measurement of the energy deposited by muons in the calorimeters of the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachas, K.; Hassani, S.

    2008-07-01

    The measurement of the muon energy deposition in the calorimeters is an integral part of muon identification, track isolation and correction for catastrophic muon energy losses, which are the prerequisites to the ultimate goal of refitting the muon track using calorimeter information as well. To this end, an accurate energy loss measurement method in the calorimeters is developed which uses only Event Data Model tools and is used by the muon isolation tool in the official ATLAS software, in order to provide isolation related variables at the Event Summary Data level. The strategy of the energy deposition measurement by the track in the calorimeters is described. Inner Detector, or Muon Spectrometer tracks are extrapolated to each calorimeter compartment using existing tools, which take into account multiple scattering and bending due to the magnetic field. The energy deposited in each compartment is measured by summing-up cells, corrected for noise, inside a cone of desired size around the track. The results of the measured energy loss in the calorimeters with this method are validated with Monte Carlo single muon samples.

  17. Mesozoic exhumation history and palaeolandscape of the Iberian Massif in eastern Galicia from apatite fission-track and (U+Th)/He data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobe, R. W.; Alvarez-Marrón, J.; Glasmacher, U. A.; Stuart, F. M.

    2014-03-01

    Apatite fission-track (AFT) and (U+Th)/He (AHe) data, combined with time-temperature inverse modelling, reveal the cooling and exhumation history of the Iberian Massif in eastern Galicia since the Mesozoic. The continuous cooling at various rates correlates with variation of tectonic boundary conditions in the adjacent continental margins. The data provide constraints on the 107 timescale longevity of a relict paleolandscape. AFT ages range from 68 to 174 Ma with mean track lengths of 10.7 ± 2.6 to 12.6 ± 1.8 μm, and AHe ages range from 73 to 147 Ma. Fastest exhumation (≈0.25 km/Ma) occurred during the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous main episode of rifting in the adjacent western and northern margins. Exhumation rates have decreased since then and have been approximately one order of magnitude lower. Across inland Galicia, the AFT data are consistent with Early Cretaceous movement on post-Variscan NE trending faults. This is coeval with an extensional episode offshore. The AHe data in this region indicate less than 1.7 km of denudation in the last 100 Ma. This low exhumation suggests the attainment of a mature landscape during Late Cretaceous post-rift tectonic stability, whose remains are still preserved. The low and steady rate of denudation prevailed across inland Galicia despite minor N-S shortening in the northern margin since ≈45 Ma ago. In north Galicia, rock uplift in response to NW strike-slip faulting since Early Oligocene to Early Miocene has caused insufficient exhumation (<3 km) to remove the Mesozoic cooling signal recorded by the AFT data.

  18. Eocene-Pliocene stratigraphy along the southern margin of the Wind River Range, Wyoming: revisions and implications from field and fission-track studies

    SciTech Connect

    Steidtmann, J.R.; Middleton, L.T.

    1986-01-01

    The established mid-Tertiary stratigraphy along the southern margin of the Wind River Range is of questionable chronologic validity because of the difficulty in discriminating among the several tuffaceous units and because lithologic criteria have been used as chronostratigraphic indicators. Field observations and zircon fission-track ages suggest certain revisions of, and additions to, this stratigraphy. These include: (1) recognition of the Cathedral Bluffs Tongue of the Wasatch Formation at Reds Cabin monocline, (2) establishment of a late Oligocene or early Miocene age for the South Pass Formation and (3) recognition that there are middle Miocene deposits previously mapped as Arikaree that consist of reworked Arikaree shed off the upthrown side of the Continental fault. The implications of these findings are that the Continental fault, now a collapse feature, was a tear fault during the early Eocene, that there are most likely Oligocene rocks north of the Continental fault, that there was late Oligocene or early Miocene uplift in the core of the Wind River Range and that the range collapsed in the middle Miocene.

  19. Denudation and uplift of the Mawson Escarpment (eastern Lambert Graben, Antarctica) as indicated by apatite fission track data and geomorphological observation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lisker, F.; Gibson, H.; Wilson, C.J.; Läufer, A.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of three vertical profiles from the southern Mawson Escarpment (Lambert Graben) reveals apatite fission track (AFT) ages ranging from 102±20 to 287±23 Ma and mean lengths of 12.2 to 13.0 μm. Quantitative thermal histories derived from these data consistently indicate onset of slow cooling below 110°C began sometime prior to 300 Ma, and a second stage of rapid cooling from paleotemperatures up to ≤100°C to surface temperatures occurred in the Late Cretaceous – Paleocene. The first cooling phase refers to Carboniferous – Jurassic basement denudation up to 5 km associated with the initial rifting of the Lambert Graben. The presence of the ancient East Antarctic Erosion Surface and rapid Late Cretaceous – Paleocene cooling indicate a second denudational episode during which up to 4.5 km of sedimentary cover rocks were removed, and that is likely linked to the Cretaceous Gondwana breakup between Antarctica and India and subsequent passive continental margin formation.

  20. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS Study of low momentum track reconstruction for the BESIII main drift chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Lu-Kui; Mao, Ze-Pu; Li, Wei-Dong; Cao, Guo-Fu; Cao, Xue-Xiang; Deng, Zi-Yan; He, Kang-Lin; Liu, Chun-Yan; Liu, Huai-Min; Liu, Qiu-Guang; Ma, Qiu-Mei; Ma, Xiang; Qiu, Jin-Fa; Tian, Hao-Lai; Wang, Ji-Ke; Wu, Ling-Hui; Yuan, Ye; Zang, Shi-Lei; Zhang, Chang-Chun; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Yao; Zhu, Kai; Zou, Jia-Heng

    2010-12-01

    In order to overcome the difficulty brought by the circling charged tracks with transverse momentum less than 120 MeV in the BESIII Main Drift Chamber (MDC), a specialized method called TCurlFinder was developed. This tracking method focuses on the charged track reconstruction under 120 MeV and possesses a special mechanism to reject background noise hits. The performance of the package has been carefully checked and tuned by both Monte Carlo data and real data. The study shows that this tracking method could obviously enhance the reconstruction efficiency in the low transverse momentum region, providing physics analysis with more and reliable data.

  1. Applicability of Polyimide Films as Etched-Track Detectors for Ultra-Heavy Cosmic Ray Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Tomoya; Matsukawa, Kenya; Mori, Yutaka; Kanasaki, Masato; Hattori, Atsuto; Matai, Yuri; Kusumoto, Tamon; Tao, Akira; Oda, Keiji; Kodaira, Satoshi; Konishi, Teruaki; Kitamura, Hisashi; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Barillon, Rémi

    2013-04-01

    The track registration property in polyimide Kapton has been examined for heavy ions, including 2.3 GeV Fe and 24 GeV Xe ions. Conventional track formation criteria fail to predict the thresholds of etch pit formation, while a chemical criterion stating that etchable tracks are formed when two adjacent diphenyl ethers are broken in the vicinity of the ion's trajectory should be more appropriate. Discriminative detections of ultra-heavy components in cosmic rays, such as Bi, Th, and U ions, are possible by measuring the recorded track length.

  2. Deployment of a three-dimensional array of Micro-Pocket Fission Detector triads (MPFD3) for real-time, in-core neutron flux measurements in the Kansas State University TRIGA Mark-II Nuclear Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmes, Martin Francis

    A Micro-Pocket Fission Detector (MPFD) is a miniaturized type of fission chamber developed for use inside a nuclear reactor. Their unique design allows them to be located between or even inside fuel pins while being built from materials which give them an operational lifetime comparable to or exceeding the life of the fuel. While other types of neutron detectors have been made for use inside a nuclear reactor, the MPFD is the first neutron detector which can survive sustained use inside a nuclear reactor while providing a real-time measurement of the neutron flux. This dissertation covers the deployment of MPFDs as a large three-dimensional array inside the Kansas State University TRIGA Mark-II Nuclear Reactor for real-time neutron flux measurements. This entails advancements in the design, construction, and packaging of the Micro-Pocket Fission Detector Triads with incorporated Thermocouple, or MPFD3-T. Specialized electronics and software also had to be designed and built in order to make a functional system capable of collecting real-time data from up to 60 MPFD3-Ts, or 180 individual MPFDs and 60 thermocouples. Design of the electronics required the development of detailed simulations and analysis for determining the theoretical response of the detectors and determination of their size. The results of this research shows that MPFDs can operate for extended times inside a nuclear reactor and can be utilized toward the use as distributed neutron detector arrays for advanced reactor control systems and power mapping. These functions are critical for continued gains in efficiency of nuclear power reactors while also improving safety through relatively inexpensive redundancy.

  3. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Track reconstruction in the BESIII muon counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yu-Tie; Liu, Kun; You, Zheng-Yun; Mao, Ya-Jun; Li, Wei-Dong; Bian, Jian-Ming; Cao, Guo-Fu; Cao, Xue-Xiang; Chen, Shen-Jian; Deng, Zi-Yan; Fu, Cheng-Dong; Gao, Yuan-Ning; Han, Lei; Han, Shao-Qing; He, Kang-Lin; He, Miao; Hu, Ji-Feng; Hu, Xiao-Wei; Huang, Bin; Huang, Xing-Tao; Jia, Lu-Kui; Ji, Xiao-Bin; Li, Hai-Bo; Liu, Bei-Jiang; Liu, Chun-Xiu; Liu, Huai-Min; Liu, Ying; Liu, Yong; Luo, Tao; Lu, Qi-Wen; Ma, Qiu-Mei; Ma, Xiang; Mao, Ze-Pu; Mo, Xiao-Hu; Ning, Fei-Peng; Ping, Rong-Gang; Qiu, Jin-Fa; Song, Wen-Bo; Sun, Sheng-Sen; Sun, Xiao-Dong; Sun, Yong-Zhao; Tian, Hao-Lai; Wang, Ji-Ke; Wang, Liang-Liang; Wen, Shuo-Pin; Wu, Ling-Hui; Wu, Zhi; Xie, Yu-Guang; Xu, Min; Yan, Jie; Yan, Liang; Yao, Jian; Yuan, Chang-Zheng; Yuan, Ye; Zhang, Chang-Chun; Zhang, Jian-Yong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xue-Yao; Zhang, Yao; Zheng, Yang-Heng; Zhu, Yong-Sheng; Zou, Jia-Heng

    2009-08-01

    The reconstruction algorithm for BESIII Muon Counter, MucRecAlg, is developed with the object-oriented language C++ in BESIII offline software environment. MucRecAlg consists of the following functions: to find track seeds either from extrapolation of tracks in the main drift chamber or from the fired strips in muon counter, to select fired strips associated to the candidate tracks, to fit the candidate tracks with a linear or quadratic function and to calculate other parameters of the tracks for muon identification. Monte Carlo samples are generated to check the performance of the reconstruction package, such as reconstruction efficiency, muon remaining rate and pion rejection rate, etc. The preliminary results show that the pion rejection rate is around 3%-4% while the muon remaining rate is better than 90% in 0.4-1.6 GeV/c momentum region, which meets the requirement as shown in the design report.

  4. Measurements of High-energy Excited States and γ-rays of Fission Products with a 4π Clover Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Shima, Y.; Kojima, Y.; Hayashi, H.; Taniguchi, A.; Shibata, M.

    2014-06-15

    Gamma-rays in the β-decay of {sup 147}La and {sup 145}Ba were measured using a 4π clover detector to identify high-energy excited levels and γ-rays. In order to determine γ-ray intensities, an efficiency calibration was carried out using single and multiple γ-ray emitters. Applying appropriate coincidence summing corrections, the peak efficiency was experimentally determined from 50 to 3200 keV with 3% accuracy. Through analyses of sum peaks and cascade relations of γ-rays, we newly identified 170 levels between 924 and 3568 keV, and more than 930 γ-rays in the decay of {sup 147}La, and 70 levels between 973 and 3703 keV, and 250 γ-rays in the decay of {sup 145}Ba.

  5. BMAP dipole magnetic field analysis and orbit tracking/calculations of energy deposition in GaAs WHEBY detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, S., Jr.; Baltrusaitis, R. M.; Ekdahl, C.; Young, C.; Warn, C.

    This report contains two separate papers. The first paper discusses BMAP which is a versatile program for field analysis and orbit tracking in dipole magnets. The program was created to aid the design of charged-particle magnetic spectrometers. BMAP is written in Pascal and runs on any IBM-PC computer or compatible. The second paper covers a study on energy deposition in GaAS WHEBY detectors. The study was done for two purposes: (1) to set up a three-dimensional electron-photon transport problem using the ACCEPT computer code; and (2) to calculate energy deposition in GaAs detectors in the WHEBY for a given flux of electrons.

  6. Prompt Fission Neutron Emission in Resonance Fission of 239Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Oberstedt, Stephan; Varapai, Natallia; Serot, Olivier

    2005-05-24

    The prompt neutron emission probability from neutron-induced fission in the resonance region is being investigated at the time-of-flight facility GELINA of the IRMM. A double Frisch-gridded ionization chamber is used as a fission-fragment detector. For the data acquisition of both the fission-fragment signals as well as the neutron detector signals the fast digitization technique has been applied. For the neutron detection, large-volume liquid scintillation detectors from the DEMON collaboration are used. A specialized data analysis program taking advantage of the digital filtering technique has been developed to treat the acquired data.Neutron multiplicity investigations for actinides, especially in resonance neutron-induced fission, are rather scarce. They are, however, important for reactor control and safety issues as well as for understanding the basic physics of the fission process. Fission yield measurements on both 235U and 239Pu without prompt neutron emission coincidence have shown that fluctuation of the fission-fragment mass distribution exists from resonance to resonance, larger in the case of 235U. To possibly explain these observations, the question now is whether the prompt neutron multiplicity shows similar fluctuations with resonance energy.

  7. A new parameter in the electrochemical etching of polymer track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabi, M.; Katouzi, M.

    1993-08-01

    It was discovered that the pressure applied to the electrochemical etching (ECE) chamber system and in turn to washers holding the detector tight in place between two semi-chambers has a direct effect on the internal heating and time to breakdown of the polymer detector. The effect was found to be dependent on the type, material, shape and size of the washers holding the detector in place under pressure. To verify such parameters, a pressure ECE chamber (PECE) with measurable and reproducible pressure was designed and constructed. Three types of rubber washers, such as "O" rings, flat rings and sheets as well as polycarbonate (PC) detectors glued directly between two semi-syringes, were used. Flat rubber sheets were shown to have relatively minor effects on the internal heating rate and are recommended. The effect seems to be due to forced vibrations of the detector under an electric field, the frequency of which depends on the degree to which the detector is stretched under pressure, like winding the strings of a musical instrument. The results of the above studies are presented and discussed.

  8. Paleocene-Early Eocene uplift of the Altyn Tagh Mountain: Evidence from detrital zircon fission track analysis and seismic sections in the northwestern Qaidam basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yadong; Zheng, Jianjing; Zheng, Youwei; Liu, Xingwang; Sun, Guoqiang

    2015-12-01

    Most existing tectonic models suggest that the deformation and uplift of the northern Tibetan Plateau is the latest crustal response to the collision of the India Plate and Eurasian Plate. The tectonic evolution of Altyn Tagh Mountain (hereafter called simply the "Altyn Tagh"), on the northern margin of the Tibetan Plateau, has attracted considerable scientific attention. In this study, we use fission track age dates of detrital zircons from the northwestern Qaidam basin together with sedimentary observations to understand more fully the Cenozoic tectonic uplift of the Altyn Tagh. Detrital zircons from five borehole samples distributed in different folds in the northwestern Qaidam basin yielded ages mainly ranging from 88.5 to 49.2 Ma, older than their sedimentary deposition ages (43.8-22 Ma). The binomial distribution in grain age fitted peaks was generally dominated by one young peak, P1, which varied from 73.6 to 47.2 Ma. A thinning of the Cenozoic Lulehe Formation (53.5-43.8 Ma) stretched from the inner Qaidam basin to the slopes of the Altyn Tagh in the seismic sections of the northwestern Qaidam basin. Based on magnetostratigraphic dating, there was a hiatus in sedimentation in the Qaidam basin between 65 Ma and 54 Ma; this was confirmed by seismic profiles and borehole data, which show an unconformity between the Mesozoic Quanyagou Formation and the Lulehe Formation. Combined with an analysis of provenance, the detrital zircon young peak age and the sedimentary record revealed that the most significant regional uplift of the Altyn Tagh occurred during the Paleogene-Early Eocene, almost coinciding with the collision of the Indian and Eurasian plates between 65 Ma and 44 Ma.

  9. Multi-phase Uplift of the Indo-Burman Ranges and Western Thrust Belt of Minbu Sub-basin (West Myanmar): Constraints from Apatite Fission Track Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, P.; Qiu, H.; Mei, L.

    2015-12-01

    The forearc regions in active continental margins are important keys to analysis geodynamic processes such as oceanic crust oblique subduction, mechanism of subduction zone, and sediments recycling. The West Myanmar, interpreted as forearc silver, is the archetype example of such forearc regions subordinate to Sunda arc-trench system, and is widely debated when and how its forearc regions formed. A total of twenty-two samples were obtained from the Indo-Burman Ranges and western thrust belt of Minbu Sub-basin along Taungup-Prome Road in Southwestern Myanmar (Figure 1), and five sandstone samples of them were performed at Apatite to Zircon, Inc. Three samples (M3, M5, and M11) collected from Eocene flysch and metamorphic core at the Indo-Burman Ranges revealed apatite fission track (AFT) ages ranging from 19 to 9 Ma and 6.5 to 2 Ma. Two samples (M20 and M21) acquired from the western thrust belt of Minbu Sub-basin yielded AFT ages ranging from 28 to 13.5 Ma and 7.5 to 3.5 Ma. Time-temperature models based on AFT data suggest four major Cenozoic cooling episodes, Late Oligocene, Early to Middle Miocene, Late Miocene, and Pliocene to Pleistocene. The first to third episode, models suggest the metamorphic core of the Indo-Burman Ranges has experienced multi-phase rapidly uplifted during the early construction of the forearc regions. The latest episode, on which this study focused, indicated a fast westward growth of the Palaeogene accretionary wedge and a eastward propagation deformation of folding and thrusting of the western thrust belt of Minbu Sub-basin. We argued that above multi-phase uplifted and deformation of the forearc regions were results of India/West Burma plate's faster oblique convergence and faster sedimentation along the India/Eurasia suture zone.

  10. Present, past and potential denudation rates: is there a link? Tentative evidence from fission-track data, river sediment loads and terrain analysis in the South Indian shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunnell, Y.

    1998-10-01

    Ahnert [Ahnert, F., 1970. Functional relationships between denudation, relief and uplift in large mid-latitude drainage basins. Am. J. Sci. 268, 243-263] proposed that a denudation rate D could be predicted by the relation D=0.1535 h, where h is local relief, a substitute for mean slope. The present study seeks to explore the value of this simple equation as a normative geomorphological tool. In two successive and complementary stages, its principles are applied to the Western Dharwar Craton of South India. First, the robustness of local relief as a reliable substitute for mean slope is examined. Following the demonstration that the equation can successfully be used in the region of interest pending correction factors for rock resistance, a potential denudation map of the Western Dharwar Craton is established. The pattern of potential denudation values is compared with known measurements of both long-term (˜10 2 Ma) denudation rates inferred from apatite fission track data and modern (˜10 -5 Ma) denudation rates derived from available sediment load measurements in relevant river basins. Unexpectedly close similarities between long-term, short-term and potential denudation rates prompt a discussion on the merits of potential denudation as a possible standard in the appraisal of measured rates and as a tool for establishing permissible denudation rates when assessing the impact of man-induced erosion. A landscape-specific basal metabolic rate of erosion is defined as a new concept. The methodological pitfalls in extrapolating denudation rates from the measurement of sediment loads in rivers are reviewed and suggestions for tighter investigation are made.

  11. Constraints On The Last Stage Of The Exhumation History Of Dabie Shan (china): A Combined Fluid-inclusion And Apatite Fission-track Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Bin; Andriessen, Paul A. M.

    Numerous published geochronological studies have been focused on rapid subduction and exhumation models for Dabie Shan, one of the largest high- to ultrahigh-pressure (HP UHP) terranes, but the last stage of the exhumation and denudation history is still unknown. A preliminary combined fluid-inclusion and apatite fission-track (AFT) study has been carried out. At least two generations of fluid flow within the UHP eclogites and associated paragneiss and orthogneiss were constrained by early highly saline brines (Ca2+ and/or Na+-rich) and minor pure CO2, and late nearly pure water in quartz veins, consistent with our previous results for host eclogites. All mean AFT ages of host eclogites and gneisses as well as granites are younger than 60 Ma. A granitic mylonite, which is believed to be a boundary between the South UHP Unit and the North Orthogneiss Unit (NOU), gave a relatively young mean AFT age of 36.3 s´ Ma. Combined with published Ar/Ar dating, the AFT ages prove that the last reheating event above 120 zC in Dabie Shan took place in pre-Tertiary. From AFT analysis (ages and lengths, unimodal) and fluid- inclusion homogenization temperature data (Th, all above 120 zC), it is obvious that the Triassic UHP eclogites and gneisses, as well as Cretaceous granite intrusions in NOU, underwent a rapid but differential uplift history. Rapid cooling, for most of the samples, with cooling rates of at least 10 zC/Ma, is observed for the period between 60 and 40 Ma, indicating that the UHP rocks reached near surface temperatures at around 40 Ma. The fast cooling rates support a tectonic uplift event that has brought the samples to the near surface. What is interesting, although not very well constrained by the AFT analysis, is the possibility of a Late Neogene denudation which may tentatively be related to the Himalaya collision and related to Tibet uplift.

  12. Uplift and cooling history of the NW Himalaya, northern Pakistan - evidence from fission-track and /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar cooling ages

    SciTech Connect

    Zeitler, P.K.

    1983-01-01

    This study reports 145 fission-track and 21 /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar cooling ages from the Himalaya of northern Pakistan. Studies of the Himalaya are important because they provide geologists with an opportunity to test models of orogenesis in an active tectonic setting. As the Himalaya become better known and models become more quantitative, information about thermal histories and rates of uplift and erosion will be needed. The cooling ages suggest, and thermal modelling confirms, that throughout the Tertiary, the cooling history of northern Pakistan was controlled by the effects of accelerating uplift and erosion. On average, from 30 Ma to the present, uplift rates increased from less than 0.1 mm/yr to 0.4 mm/yr. This uplift and erosion, however, has been variable in space as well as time. The association of the Nanga Parbat-Haramosh Massif and Hunza with very young cooling ages and with rapid uplift maintained for a period of several million years is the most striking discovery made by this study. The location of these two areas at the heart of the Pamir-Himalaya Arc suggests that their anomalous behavior is linked in some way to a locally vigorous collision of India and Eurasia, possibly due to a promontory of Indian crust. Several of the cooling ages reported help constrain the emplacement ages of intrusives located in northern Pakistan. In addition, cooling ages from the southern Swat-Hazara region can be interpreted to give the time of final southward thrusting of the Kohistan Arc along the Main Mantle Thrust, at about 30 Ma.

  13. A refinement of the chronology of rift-related faulting in the Broadly Rifted Zone, southern Ethiopia, through apatite fission-track analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balestrieri, Maria Laura; Bonini, Marco; Corti, Giacomo; Sani, Federico; Philippon, Melody

    2016-03-01

    To reconstruct the timing of rift inception in the Broadly Rifted Zone in southern Ethiopia, we applied the fission-track method to basement rocks collected along the scarp of the main normal faults bounding (i) the Amaro Horst in the southern Main Ethiopian Rift and (ii) the Beto Basin in the Gofa Province. At the Amaro Horst, a vertical traverse along the major eastern scarp yielded pre-rift ages ranging between 121.4 ± 15.3 Ma and 69.5 ± 7.2 Ma, similarly to two other samples, one from the western scarp and one at the southern termination of the horst (103.4 ± 24.5 Ma and 65.5 ± 4.2 Ma, respectively). More interestingly, a second traverse at the Amaro northeastern terminus released rift-related ages spanning between 12.3 ± 2.7 and 6.8 ± 0.7 Ma. In the Beto Basin, the ages determined along the base of the main (northwestern) fault scarp vary between 22.8 ± 3.3 Ma and 7.0 ± 0.7 Ma. We ascertain through thermal modeling that rift-related exhumation along the northwestern fault scarp of the Beto Basin started at 12 ± 2 Ma while in the eastern margin of the Amaro Horst faulting took place later than 10 Ma, possibly at about 8 Ma. These results suggest a reconsideration of previous models on timing of rift activation in the different sectors of the Ethiopian Rift. Extensional basin formation initiated more or less contemporaneously in the Gofa Province (~ 12 Ma) and Northern Main Ethiopian Rift (~ 10-12 Ma) at the time of a major reorganization of the Nubia-Somalia plate boundary (i.e., 11 ± 2 Ma). Afterwards, rift-related faulting involved the Southern MER (Amaro Horst) at ~ 8 Ma, and only later rifting seemingly affected the Central MER (after ~ 7 Ma).

  14. Constraining the age and magnitude of uplift in the northern National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA)-apatite fission-track analysis of samples from three wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houseknecht, David W.; Bird, Kenneth J.; O'Sullivan, Paul

    2011-01-01

    A broad, post-mid-Cretaceous uplift is defined in the northern National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA) by regional truncation of Cretaceous strata, thermal maturity patterns, and amounts of exhumation estimated from sonic logs. Apatite fission-track (AFT) analysis of samples from three wells (South Meade No. 1, Topagoruk No. 1, and Ikpikpuk No. 1) across the eastern flank of the uplift indicates Tertiary cooling followed by Quaternary heating. Results from all three wells indicate that cooling, presumably caused by uplift and erosion, started about 75-65 Ma (latest Cretaceous-earliest Tertiary) and continued through the Tertiary Period. Data from South Meade indicate more rapid cooling after about 35-15 Ma (latest Eocene-middle Miocene) followed by a significant increase in subsurface temperature during the Quaternary, probably the result of increased heat flow. Data from Topagoruk and Ikpikpuk include subtle evidence of accelerated cooling starting in the latest Eocene-middle Miocene and possible evidence of increased temperature during the Quaternary. Subsurface temperature perturbations related to the insulating effect of permafrost may have been responsible for the Quaternary temperature increase at Topagoruk and Ikpikpuk and may have been a contributing factor at South Meade. Multiple lines of geologic evidence suggest that the magnitude of exhumation resulting from uplift and erosion is 5,000-6,500 ft at South Meade, 4,000-5,500 ft at Topagoruk, and 2,500-4,000 ft at Ikpikpuk. The results from these wells help to define the broad geometry of the uplift, which increases in magnitude from less than 1,000 ft at the Colville River delta to perhaps more than 7,000 ft along the northwestern coast of NPRA, between Point Barrow and Peard Bay. Neither the origin nor the offshore extent of the uplift, west and north of the NPRA coast, have been determined.

  15. Double dating of detrital zircon by fission-track and LA-ICPMS U/Pb analysis: new perspectives in decomposing mixed provenance signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikes, Tamás.; Jeffries, Teresa E.; Dunkl, István.; Tolosana-Delgado, Raimon; von Eynatten, Hilmar

    2010-05-01

    A novel approach combining fission track (FT) and in-situ LA-ICPMS U/Pb isotopic analyses in single detrital zircon grains is used to trace the exhumed sources of Tertiary synorogenic sediments in the Dinarides. Grains were dated by the FT method, and their interiors were imaged by SEM-CL to avoid ablation of inherited or other unsuitable domains. U/Pb isotopic compositions were determined by an instrument setup of a 213 nm Nd:YAG laser source coupled to a quadrupole-based ICP-MS, and an analytical protocol providing a cost-effective sample throughput (70-100 grains per day) while maintaining high analytical precision and accuracy. CL-control and a good spatial resolution helped suppressing age bias, as justified by a notably high proportion (>90%) of concordant (±5%) grain ages. Finally, the FT and U/Pb ages were integrated for each grain using a bivariate statistical algorithm that takes the different precisions permitted by the two dating techniques into account. The zircon double dating approach yields valuable insights into the thermal history of source terrains of synorogenic sediments both in the Outer Dinaride foreland basin and in the Dinarides-Tisza collisional zone. We can isolate several clusters of characteristic pairs of crystallization/cooling ages, which pin-point Alpine tectonostratigraphic units with a confidence that could not be achieved by using the two dating techniques separately. The Adriatic basement of the Dinarides affected by the major Jurassic-Early Cretaceous cooling event was not the exclusive source for the siliciclastic fill of these Tertiary basins. The distributary systems involved much detritus from Ordovician and Late Permian magmatic units affected by a Late Cretaceous thermal event; such units are not typical in the Dinarides. A major sediment input from the Austroalpine, Tisza and Pelagonian Units in the Tertiary is the most likely scenario for the evolution of the Dinaride basins.

  16. Post break-up tectonic inversion across the southwestern cape of South Africa: New insights from apatite and zircon fission track thermochronometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildman, Mark; Brown, Roderick; Watkins, Ron; Carter, Andrew; Gleadow, Andrew; Summerfield, Michael

    2015-07-01

    The south-west African margin is regarded as an example of a passive continental margin formed by continental rifting following a phase of lithospheric extension and thinning. Recent attention focused on this margin has included theoretical modelling studies of rift processes, plate kinematic studies of the opening geometry and timing, and empirical studies focused on documenting the crustal structure and offshore sedimentary record. Here, we examine the onshore geomorphic and tectonic response to rifting and breakup, with a specific focus on the SW Cape of South Africa. We present 75 new apatite and 8 new zircon fission track analyses from outcrop samples and onshore borehole profiles along the western margin of South Africa. The data are used to derive robust thermal histories that record two discrete phases of accelerated erosional cooling during the Early Cretaceous (150-130 Ma) and Late Cretaceous (100-80 Ma), respectively. Both periods of enhanced erosion are regional in extent, involved km-scale erosion, and extend well inland of the current escarpment zone, albeit with spatially variable intensity and style. The Late Cretaceous episode is also expressed more locally by tectonic reactivation and inversion of major faults causing km-scale differential displacement and erosion. The new AFT data do not exclude the possibility of modest surface uplift occurring during the Cenozoic, but they restrict the depth of regional Cenozoic erosion on the western margin to less than c. 1 km. The inferred pattern and chronology of erosion onshore is consistent with the key features and sediment accumulation patterns within the offshore Orange and Bredasdorp basins. It is suggested that the Late Cretaceous event was triggered by a combination of regional dynamic uplift augmented along the western margin and in the SW Cape by local tectonic forces arising from dextral displacement of the Falkland Plateau along the Falkland-Agulhas Fracture Zone.

  17. Apatite fission-track evidence for regional exhumation in the subtropical Eocene, block faulting, and localized fluid flow in east-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Bacon, Charles R.; O'Sullivan, Paul B.; Day, Warren C.

    2016-01-01

    The origin and antiquity of the subdued topography of the Yukon–Tanana Upland (YTU), the physiographic province between the Denali and Tintina faults, are unresolved questions in the geologic history of interior Alaska and adjacent Yukon. We present apatite fission-track (AFT) results for 33 samples from the 2300 km2 western Fortymile district in the YTU in Alaska and propose an exhumation model that is consistent with preservation of volcanic rocks in valleys that requires base level stability of several drainages since latest Cretaceous–Paleocene time. AFT thermochronology indicates widespread cooling below ∼110 °C at ∼56–47 Ma (early Eocene) and ∼44–36 Ma (middle Eocene). Samples with ∼33–27, ∼19, and ∼10 Ma AFT ages, obtained near a major northeast-trending fault zone, apparently reflect hydrothermal fluid flow. Uplift and erosion following ∼107 Ma magmatism exposed plutonic rocks to different extents in various crustal blocks by latest Cretaceous time. We interpret the Eocene AFT ages to suggest that higher elevations were eroded during the Paleogene subtropical climate of the subarctic, while base level remained essentially stable. Tertiary basins outboard of the YTU contain sediment that may account for the required >2 km of removed overburden that was not carried to the sea by the ancestral Yukon River system. We consider a climate driven explanation for the Eocene AFT ages to be most consistent with geologic constraints in concert with block faulting related to translation on the Denali and Tintina faults resulting from oblique subduction along the southern margin of Alaska.

  18. Cretaceous and Cenozoic episodic denudation of the Transantarctic Mountains, Antarctica: New constraints from apatite fission track thermochronology in the Scott Glacier region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, Paul G.; Stump, Edmund

    1997-04-01

    Apatite fission track thermochronology utilizing vertical sampling profiles, with results interpreted using the concept of exhumed partial annealing zones, is applied in the Scott Glacier area (86°S) of the Transantarctic Mountains (TAM). Patterns in age profiles indicate that episodes of denudation in the Early Cretaceous, Late Cretaceous, and Cenozoic were separated by periods of relative tectonic stability. Thermal modeling of time-temperature histories compared to observed data indicates that denudation episodes commenced at ˜125 Ma, ˜95 Ma, and 50-45 Ma. Magnitude of denudation is constrained only as >700 m for the Early Cretaceous and from barely detectable to 1.5 km for the Late Cretaceous. Since the early Cenozoic, denudation within the TAM Front was similar in magnitude to other localities along the TAM (˜4-6 km), decreasing inland. Rock uplift was also a maximum at the coast, decreasing inland. Patterns of rock uplift and denudation are complicated by Cenozoic faulting, mostly by faults oriented ˜45° to the TAM Front. Along the length of the TAM there is an apparent systematic variation in the angle of these Cenozoic faults to the TAM Front, possibly reflecting greater components of dextral transtension southward along the TAM. The three denudation episodes correspond to regional tectonic events: Early Cretaceous southward translation of the Ellsworth-Whitmore Mountains block of West Antarctica relative to East Antarctica; Late Cretaceous extension in the Ross Embayment between East and West Antarctica; and Cenozoic rejuvenated faulting, magmatism, and deformation within the Victoria Land Basin and its presumed southward extension under the Ross Ice Sheet.

  19. Determination of the characteristic limits and responses of nuclear track detectors in mixed radon and thoron atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Röttger, Annette; Honig, Anja; Schrammel, Dieter; Strauss, Heinrich F

    2016-03-01

    Closed nuclear track detectors are widely used for the determination of Rn-222 exposures. There are also partial open systems available, which are specially designed for the determination of the exposure to Rn-220, which is a relevant exposure in special workplaces or in specific regions of the world. This paper presents data and a detail analysis of how to determine the cross-correlation by calibration in pure Rn-222 and pure Rn-220 atm. By these means calibration coefficients for the analysis of real mixed atmospheres can be obtained. The respective decision threshold, detection limit and limits of the confidence interval were determined according to ISO 11929 (ISO 11929:2010, 2010). The exposure of detectors was performed at the radon reference chamber and the thoron progeny chamber of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). The analysis of track response was done at Parc RGM, while the analytical routines were developed in the Leibniz University Hanover, Institute Radioökologie und Strahlenschutz IRS at the working Group AK SIGMA (Arbeitskreis Nachweisgrenzen).

  20. Post pan-african denudation history of southwestern Madagascar during the complex rift-drift evolution of the island: new aspects from titanite and apatite fission track analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmel, B.; Jacobs, J.

    2003-04-01

    Titanite and apatite fission track (FT) thermochronology from 53 basement outcrops in southwest Madagascar reveal a protracted post Pan-African history of extensional tectonism, denudation and sedimentation. The titanite FT ages range between 276 ± 14 Ma and 379 ± 38 Ma. Apatite FT ages vary between 117 ± 26 Ma and 379 ± 19 Ma with mean track length scattering between 11.7 ± 0.59 μm and 13.74 ± 0.21 μm. Combined titanite and apatite FT data were used to calculate denudation rates. Samples from the paleo western margin of Madagascar along the N-S striking Pan-African Ejeda shear zone give above-average denudation rates (100-205 mMa-1) during Carboniferous times. The shear zone was probably reactivated during this times. In contrast the calculated denudation rates for samples from the interior of the island are moderate (25-120 mMa-1). Vitrinite reflectance data from the Sakoa coal area as well as titanite and apatite FT data imply that during the Permo-Triassic rifting, the areas along the paleo western margin that previously underwent fast denudation were buried by a sedimentary cover of up to ˜4.5 km. At this time, a graben developed further inland along the NW-SE striking transcontinental Bongolava-Ranotsara shear zone (BRSZ). Modelled time-temperature paths indicate that the area within the BRSZ remained cool and unaffected since Carboniferous times whereas the samples northeast and southwest of the BRSZ suggest phases of differential cooling during Permian-Triassic times. Seismic data from the Morondava basin indicate that during the Middle Jurassic drift between Madagascar and East-Africa a rift jump towards the west occurred. Modelled time-temperature histories of basement units from the paleo western margin, buried during Permo Triassic times, were exhumed during Jurassic times. This is most probably related with the modified rift kinematics and the associated southwest migration of the margin. Modelled time-temperature paths of all samples from

  1. Roter Kamm Impact Crater, Namibia: Age Constraints from K-Ar, Rb-Sr, Fission Track, 10Be-26Al Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeberl, C.; Klein, J.; Matsuda, J.; Nagao, K.; Reimold, W. U.; Storzer, D.

    1992-07-01

    INTRODUCTION. The Roter Kamm impact crater is located in the Namib Desert in Namibia. The impact occurred in Precambrian granitic-granodioritic orthogneisses of the 1200-900-Ma-old Namaqualand Metamorphic Complex. The granites are invaded by quartz veins and quartz-feldspar-pegmatites. Gariep metasediments probably overlaid the Namaqualand complex at the time of the impact (Reimold and Miller, 1989). Previous estimates for the crater age are not well constrained: regional geology suggests an age of 5-10 Ma, while the only available ^40Ar-^39Ar age (Hartung et al., 1991) is 3.7 Ma. Fission tracks measured in apatites from granites found on or near the crater rim were not completely reset by the impact and suggest an uplift event around 20 Ma ago (Storzer et al., 1990). We are using several approaches to bracket the age of the crater: we have measured melt breccia and pseudotachylite K-Ar ages, and apatite fission track ages in several rim granites. We are comparing Rb-Sr isotope data for rim granites with known ages of regional resetting events (Allsopp et al., 1979). Finally, we are using ^10Be-^26Al measured by accelerator mass spectrometry to determine surface exposure ages for quartz excavated during the impact event. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION. The target rock composition and stratigraphy at Roter Kamm is relatively complicated. Melt breccias formed from pegmatites, gneisses, or schists, while pseudotachylites probably formed from gneissic basement or quartz-feldspar-pegmatites (Reimold and Miller, 1989). Whole rock Rb-Sr data for several granites yield 1498 Ma, and mineral separates from sample URK-M indicate an "age" of 466 Ma; these ages are similar to those of country rocks from the general area of the northwestern Cape/southern Namibia (Allsopp et al., 1979) which indicate two widespread regional resetting events at ca. 700 Ma (related to the Pan-African orogenic deformation), and ca. 500 Ma, related to a subsequent metamorphic event. For K-Ar ages, we

  2. Dose-equivalent response CR-39 track detector for personnel neutron dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, K.; Ito, M.; Yoneda, H.; Miyake, H.; Yamamoto, J.; Tsuruta, T.

    1991-09-01

    A dose-equivalent response detector based on CR-39 has been designed to be applied for personnel neutron dosimetry. The intrinsic detection efficiency of bare CR-39 was first evaluated from irradiation experiments with monoenergetic neutrons and theoretical calculations. In the second step, the radiator effect was investigated for the purpose of sensitization to fast neutrons. A two-layer radiator consisting of deuterized dotriacontane (C 32D 66) and polyethylene (CH 2) was designed. Finally, we made the CR-39 detector sensitive to thermal neutrons by doping with orthocarborane (B 10H 122C 2), and also estimated the contribution of albedo neutrons. It was found that the new detector — boron-doped CR-39 with the two-layer radiator — would have a flat response with an error of about 70% in a wide energy region, ranging from thermal to 15 MeV.

  3. Calibration of solid state nuclear track detectors at high energy ion beams for cosmic radiation measurements: HAMLET results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, J.; Pálfalvi, J. K.

    2012-12-01

    The MATROSHKA experiments and the related HAMLET project funded by the European Commission aimed to study the dose burden of the crew working on the International Space Station (ISS). During these experiments a human phantom equipped with several thousands of radiation detectors was exposed to cosmic rays inside and outside the ISS. Besides the measurements realized in Earth orbit, the HAMLET project included also a ground-based program of calibration and intercomparison of the different detectors applied by the participating groups using high-energy ion beams. The Space Dosimetry Group of the Centre for Energy Research (formerly Atomic Energy Research Institute) participated in these experiments with passive solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs). The paper presents the results of the calibration experiments performed in the years 2008-2011 at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. The data obtained serve as update and improvement for the previous calibration curves which are necessary for the evaluation of the SSNTDs exposed in unknown space radiation fields.

  4. Development of Pattern Recognition Software for Tracks of Ionizing Radiation In Medipix2-Based (TimePix) Pixel Detector Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilalta, R.; Kuchibhotla, S.; Valerio, R.; Pinsky, L.

    2011-12-01

    The principal aim of our project is to develop an efficient pattern recognition tool for the automated identification and classification of tracks of ionizing radiation as measured by a TimePix version of the hybrid semiconductor Medipix2 pixel detector system. Such a software tool would have a number of applications including dosimeters to assess the risk of human exposure to radiation, and area monitors to characterize the general background radiation environment harmful to humans and electronic equipment. We are particularly interested in the development of the real-time analysis software needed to support an operational dosimeter that can assess the radiation environment during space missions. Our software development project makes use of data taken in beams of heavy ions at HIMAC (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator Facility) in Chiba, Japan, including data from several different heavy ions with similar Linear Energy Transfers (LETs) for calibration purposes. We describe two modules of our pattern recognition tool: feature generation and classification. Our first module builds on a segmentation algorithm that identifies tracks from the pixel image assuming an approximately elliptical form that varies in size and degree of elongation based on multiple factors, including the particle species and angle of incidence. Determining the charge and energy of the particles creating each track is a particularly challenging task because different energy and charge incident particles can produce very similar patterns. Our classification module invokes different algorithms such as decision trees, support vector machines, and Bayesian classifiers.

  5. A personal neutron monitoring system based on CR-39 recoil proton track detectors: assessment of Hp(10) using image process algorithms.

    PubMed

    Bedogni, R; Fantuzzi, E

    2002-01-01

    At the Individual Monitoring Service (IMS) of the ENEA Institute for Radiation Protection (IRP), the Hp(10) fast neutron dosemeter consists of a CR-39 (PADC, poly allyl diglycol carbonate) recoil protons track detector. The tracks across the detector surface are magnified through a chemical etching procedure and counted by a semi-automated system which consists of a microscope, a camera and a PC. A new analysis system, based on the National Instruments vision tools, was developed. The track area distribution for each reading field is recorded and numerical algorithms were developed in order to correct the energy dependence of the response and to recognise the tracks due to the background. This improves the dose evaluation system in terms of accuracy and discrimination or the background. PMID:12382731

  6. Spontaneous Fission

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Segre, Emilio

    1950-11-22

    The first attempt to discover spontaneous fission in uranium was made by [Willard] Libby, who, however, failed to detect it on account of the smallness of effect. In 1940, [K. A.] Petrzhak and [G. N.] Flerov, using more sensitive methods, discovered spontaneous fission in uranium and gave some rough estimates of the spontaneous fission decay constant of this substance. Subsequently, extensive experimental work on the subject has been performed by several investigators and will be quoted in the various sections. [N.] Bohr and [A.] Wheeler have given a theory of the effect based on the usual ideas of penetration of potential barriers. On this project spontaneous fission has been studied for the past several years in an effort to obtain a complete picture of the phenomenon. For this purpose the spontaneous fission decay constants {lambda} have been measured for separated isotopes of the heavy elements wherever possible. Moreover, the number {nu} of neutrons emitted per fission has been measured wherever feasible, and other characteristics of the spontaneous fission process have been studied. This report summarizes the spontaneous fission work done at Los Alamos up to January 1, 1945. A chronological record of the work is contained in the Los Alamos monthly reports.

  7. Development of a scintillation-fiber detector for real-time particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Presti, D.; Bonanno, D. L.; Longhitano, F.; Pugliatti, C.; Russo, G. V.; Aiello, S.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Giordano, V.; Leonora, E.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Russo, M.; Sipala, V.; Stancampiano, C.; Reito, S.

    2013-04-01

    The prototype of the OFFSET (Optical Fiber Folded Scintillating Extended Tracker) tracker is presented. It exploits a novel system for particle tracking, designed to achieve real-time imaging, large detection areas, and a high spatial resolution especially suitable for use in medical diagnostics. The main results regarding the system architecture have been used as a demonstration of the technique which has been patented by the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN). The prototype of this tracker, presented in this paper, has a 20 × 20 cm2 sensitive area, consisting of two crossed ribbons of 500 micron square scintillating fibers. The track position information is extracted in real time in an innovative way, using a reduced number of read-out channels to obtain very large detection area with moderate enough costs and complexity. The performance of the tracker was investigated using beta sources, cosmic rays, and a 62 MeV proton beam.

  8. Late Mesozoic and Cenozoic thermotectonic evolution of the central Brooks Range and adjacent North Slope foreland basin, Alaska: Including fission track results from the Trans-Alaska Crustal Transect (TACT)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Sullivan, P. B.; Murphy, J.M.; Blythe, A.E.

    1997-01-01

    Apatite fission track data are used to evaluate the thermal and tectonic history of the central Brooks Range and the North Slope foreland basin in northern Alaska along the northern leg of the Trans-Alaska Crustal Transect (TACT). Fission track analyses of the detrital apatite grains in most sedimentary units resolve the timing of structures and denudation within the Brooks Range, ranging in scale from the entire mountain range to relatively small-scale folds and faults. Interpretation of the results indicates that rocks exposed within the central Brooks Range cooled rapidly from paleotemperatures 110?? to 50??C during discrete episodes at ???100??5 Ma, ???60??4 Ma, and ???24??3 Ma, probably in response to kilometer-scale denudation. North of the mountain front, rocks in the southern half of the foreland basin were exposed to maximum paleotemperatures 110??C in the Late Cretaceous to early Paleocene as a result of burial by Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks. Rapid cooling from these elevated paleotemperatures also occurred due to distinct episodes of kilometer-scale denudation at ???60??4 Ma, 46??3 Ma, 35??2 Ma, and ???24??3 Ma. Combined, the apatite analyses indicate that rocks exposed along the TACT line through the central Brooks Range and foreland basin experienced episodic rapid cooling throughout the Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic in response to at least three distinct kilometer-scale denudation events. Future models explaining orogenic events in northern Alaska must consider these new constraints from fission track thermochronology. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Tectonic and thermal history of the western Serrania del Interior foreland fold and thrust belt and Guarico Basin, north central Venezuela: Implications of new apatite fission track analysis and seismic interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez de Armas, Jaime Gonzalo

    Structural analysis, interpretation of seismic reflection lines, and apatite fission-track analysis in the Western Serrania del Interior fold and thrust belt and in the Guarico basin of north-central Venezuela indicate that the area underwent Mesozoic and Tertiary-to-Recent deformation. Mesozoic deformation, related to the breakup of Pangea, resulted in the formation of the Espino graben in the southernmost portion of the Guarico basin and in the formation of the Proto-Caribbean lithosphere between the diverging North and South American plates. The northern margin of Venezuela became a northward facing passive margin. Minor normal faults formed in the Guarico basin. The most intense deformation took place in the Neogene when the Leeward Antilles volcanic island arc collided obliquely with South America. The inception of the basal foredeep unconformity in the Late Eocene-Early Oligocene marks the formation of a perisutural basin on top of a buried graben system. It is coeval with minor extension and possible reactivation of Cretaceous normal faults in the Guarico basin. It marks the deepening of the foredeep. Cooling ages derived from apatite fission-tracks suggest that the obduction of the fold and thrust belt in the study area occurred in the Late Oligocene through the Middle Miocene. Field data and seismic interpretations suggest also that contractional deformation began during the Neogene, and specifically during the Miocene. The most surprising results of the detrital apatite fission-track study are the ages acquired in the sedimentary rocks of the easternmost part of the study area in the foreland fold and thrust belt. They indicate an Eocene thermal event. This event may be related to the Eocene NW-SE convergence of the North and South American plates that must have caused the Proto-Caribbean lithosphere to be shortened. This event is not related to the collision of the arc with South America, as the arc was far to the west during the Eocene.

  10. Neutron Multiplicity At Spontaneous Fission Of 246Fm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svirikhin, A. I.; Yeremin, A. V.; Chelnokov, M. L.; Chepigin, V. I.; Izosimov, I. V.; Katrasev, D. E.; Malyshev, O. N.; Minkova, A.; Popeko, A. G.; Sokol, E. A.

    2010-04-01

    For experiments aimed at the study of spontaneous fission of transfermium nuclei improvements in the focal plane detector system of recoil separa tor VASSILISSA have been made. The neutron detector consisting of 54 3He -filled counters has been mounted around the focal plane detector chamber. The multiplicity of prompt neutrons emitted in spontaneous fission of 246 Fm was measured.

  11. Fast TracKer: A fast hardware track trigger for the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandini, Carlo

    2016-07-01

    The trigger system at the ATLAS experiment is designed to lower the event rate occurring from the nominal bunch crossing rate of 40 MHz to about 1 kHz for a LHC luminosity of the order of 1034cm-2s-1. To achieve high background rejection while maintaining good efficiency for interesting physics signals, sophisticated algorithms are needed which require an extensive use of tracking information. The Fast TracKer (FTK) trigger system, part of the ATLAS trigger upgrade program, is a highly parallel hardware device designed to perform track-finding at 100 kHz. Modern, powerful Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) form an important part of the system architecture, and the combinatorial problem of pattern recognition is solved by 8000 standard-cell ASICs used to implement an Associative Memory architecture. The availability of the tracking and subsequent vertex information within a short latency ensures robust selections and allows improved trigger performance for the most difficult signatures, such as b-jets and τ leptons.

  12. Detrital fission-track-compositional signature of an orogenic chain-hinterland basin system: The case of the late Neogene Quaternary Valdelsa basin (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balestrieri, M. L.; Benvenuti, M.; Tangocci, F.

    2013-05-01

    Detrital thermochronological data collected in syn-tectonic basin deposits are a promising tool for deciphering time and processes of the evolution of orogenic belts. Our study deals with the Valdelsa basin, one of the wider basins of central Tuscany, Italy. The Valdelsa basin is located at the rear of the Northern Apennines, a collisional orogen whose late Neogene Quaternary development is alternatively attributed to extensional and compressional regimes. These contrasting interpretations mostly rely on different reconstructions of the tectono-sedimentary evolution of several basins formed at the rear of the chain since the late Tortonian. Here, we explore the detrital thermochronological-compositional signature of tectonic and surface processes during the Valdelsa basin development. For this aim, detrital apatite fission-track analysis of 21 sand samples from the latest Messinian Gelasian fluvial to shallow marine basin deposits, has been accompanied by a clast composition analysis of 7 representative outcrops of the conglomerate facies. The grain-age distributions of the sediment samples are generally characterized by two distinct components, one younger peak (P1) varying between 5.5 ± 2.8 and 9.5 ± 1.0 Ma and one older peak (P2) varying from 15.0 ± 8.0 to 41.0 ± 10 Ma. By comparison with some bedrock ages obtained from the E-NE basin shoulder, we attributed the P2 peak to the Ligurian Units and the P1 peak to the Macigno Formation (Tuscan Units). These units are arranged one upon the other in the complex nappe pile forming the Northern Apennines orogen. While the gravel composition indicates a predominant feeding from the Ligurian units all along the sedimentary succession with a subordinate occurrence of Macigno pebbles slightly increasing upsection, the P1 peak is present even in the oldest collected sandy sediments. The early P1 occurrence reveals that the Macigno was exposed in the E-NE basin shoulder since at least the latest Messinian-early Zanclean

  13. Constraints on heat generation along two (paleo)seismogenic faults in California from U-Th/He and fission-track data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschner, D. L.; Garver, J.; Reiners, P.; El-Shafei, M.; Cuevas, D.

    2004-12-01

    Although the stress / heat-flow paradox of the San Andreas fault has been debated for several decades, there is yet no widely accepted resolution to the problem. New results from the SAFOD drilling project on the San Andreas and similar drilling projects of other active faults around the world will help resolve this paradox. Similarly, our study and other detailed structural and thermochronologic studies of exhumed faults are providing important constraints on the evolution, thermal history, and strength of (paleo)seismogenic faults. We have obtained U-Th/He data for zircons from one inactive strike-slip fault in the San Andreas system (the San Gabriel) that has been exhumed approximately 2 to 5 kilometers. This data complements our current fission-track data set of 41 apatite and 8 zircon samples. The San Gabriel fault samples were collected in traverses near Whitaker Peak, the "Earthquake locality", and along Bear Creek. Samples were also collected from one traverse across the associated Punchbowl fault. Six zircon U-Th/He dates from the Bear Creek locality range from 18 to 23 Ma on the north side of the fault and from 36 to 51 Ma on south side of fault. Zircon FT dates from the same locality range from 39 to 46 Ma on the north side and 42 to 61 Ma on south side of the fault. Apatite FT dates from the same locality range from 9 to 22 Ma and 18 to 44 Ma (excluding one sample) from the north and south side of the fault, respectively. These data are consistent with an approximately 20 Ma offset in U-Th/He and FT dates across the fault and "cooling" rates between 3 and 6 oC / Ma. Apatite FT dates are between 51 and 25 Ma from Whitaker Peak, 54 and 24 Ma from the Earthquake locality, and 15 and 7 Ma at the Punchbowl fault. U-Th/He and FT dates vary systematically with distance from the fault cores along individual traverses; though, they do not young monotonically towards the faults, which would be expected if there had been sustained elevated temperature along the

  14. Plio-Pleistocene exhumation of the Main Central Trust footwall based on new apatite fission track data (NW-Himalaya/India).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiede, R. C.; Bookhagen, B.; Sobel, E.; Strecker, M. R.; Grasemann, B.; Janda, C.

    2002-12-01

    The cause of Plio-Pleistocene apatite fission track (AFT) cooling ages in the footwall of the Miocene Main Central Trust (MCT) remains controversial. The Sutlej River (N32°/E78°) in the northwestern Indian Himalaya is part of one of the three largest drainages traversing the Himalaya. It has incised a deep gorge exposing the crystalline core of the orogen in a natural cross-section, which contains two extruded metamorphic crustal wedges: The High Himalayan Crystalline Sequence (HHCS) and the Lesser Himalayan Crystalline Sequence (LHCS). The HHCS was tectonically extruded between Early and Middle Miocene time by combined thrusting along the Main Central Thrust (MCT) with coeval extension along the Southern Tibetan Detachment System (STDS). The LHCS forms the footwall of the MCT and has been cooling very rapidly since the Late Miocene, as a consequence of the still ongoing extrusion. This process is controlled by thrusting along the Munsiari Thrust in the footwall and extension in the MCT hanging wall. Active tectonics is further indicated by seismicity, knickpoints in the river profile and hydrothermal circulation, probably linked to elevated near-surface geothermal gradients in the LHCS. New AFT cooling ages obtained from sub-vertical transects starting in the LHCS and crossing the Miocene MCT and STDS (perpendicular to the Sutlej-Valley) indicate fast Plio-Pleistocene cooling and exhumation of the LHCS and the lower parts of the HHCS. Along the Sutlej River, the LHCS and the lower part of the HHCS are characterized by very young ages between 1.5 +/- 0.4 and <1 +/- 0.4 (2σ ) Ma at elevations of 1500-2000m asl. The AFT ages increase systematically with increasing age-elevation; the trend does not vary when crossing the MCT and STDS mylonitic zones, respectively. At elevations between 4400 to 4600 m asl the ages are between 2.8 +/- 0.6 and 3.7 +/- 1.2 (2σ ). A mean Pliocene to Pleistocene exhumation rate in the central part of LHCS is estimated to be 1.3 +/- 0

  15. A Modern Analog to the Depositional Age Problem: Zircon and Apatite Fission Track and U-Pb Age Distributions by LA-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donelick, H. M.; Donelick, M. B.; Donelick, R. A.

    2012-12-01

    Sand from three river systems in North Idaho (Snake River near Lewiston, Clearwater River near Lewiston and the Salmon River near White Bird) and two regional ash fall events (Mt. Mazama and Mt. St. Helens) were collected for zircon U-Pb detrital age analysis. Up to 120 grains of zircon per sample were ablated using a Resonetics M-50 193 nm ArF Excimer laser ablation (LA) system and the Pb, Th, and U isotopic signals were quantified using an Agilent 7700x quadrupole inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Isotopic signals for major, minor, and trace elements, including all REEs, were also monitored. The youngest zircon U-Pb ages from the river samples were approximately 44 Ma; Cenozoic Idaho Batholith and Precambrian Belt Supergroup ages were well represented. Significant common Pb contamination of the Clearwater River sample (e.g., placer native Cu was observed in the sample) precluded detailed analysis of the zircon U-Pb ages but no interpretable ages <44 Ma were observed. Interestingly, not one of the river samples yielded zircon U-Pb ages near 0 Ma, despite all three catchment areas having received significant ash from Mt. St. Helens in 1980, and Mount Mazama 7,700 years ago, and no doubt other events during the Quaternary. Work currently in progress seeks to address bias against near 0 Ma ages in the catchment areas due to: a) small, local ash fall grain sizes and b) overwhelming number of older grains relative to the ash fall grains. Data from Mt. St. Helens ash from several localities near the mountain (Toutle River and Maple Flats, WA) and several far from the mountain (Spokane, WA; Princeton, ID; Kalispell, MT) and Mt. Mazama ash fall deposits near Lewiston, ID and Spokane, WA will be presented to address these possibilities. Additionally, fission track and U-Pb ages from apatites collected from these river and ash fall samples will also be shown to help constrain the problem.

  16. Burial and exhumation history of southern Sweden estimated from apatite fission-track data, stratigraphic landform analysis and the geological record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Japsen, Peter; Green, Paul F.; Lidmar-Bergström, Karna; Bonow, Johan M.; Erlström, Mikael

    2014-05-01

    We present new apatite fission-track analysis (AFTA) data from 87 samples of basement and sediment from southern Sweden, including samples from a 1.7 km deep borehole. The new AFTA data allow us to confirm the development of the South Swedish Dome as inferred from stratigraphic landform analysis (e.g. Lidmar-Bergström et al., 2013) and also to define the timing and magnitude of the events of burial and exhumation that shaped this prominent feature. Southern Sweden underwent a complex Palaeozoic - early Triassic history of burial and exhumation, but after a mid-Triassic event of uplift and exhumation, rocks on the Sub-Cambrian Peneplain cooled from palaeotemperatures ≥100°C. This event, that also affected southern Norway, West and East Greenland, marks an important phase in the breakup of Pangea. A second, regional phase of cooling and exhumation affected the area in the mid-Jurassic and eventually lead to stripping of the basement along the western and southern flanks of the South Swedish Dome prior to Late Cretaceous subsidence and burial and thus to formation of the sub-Cretaceous hilly relief. This event affected much of NW Europe as well as West and East Greenland, and it is coeval with the initial opening of the central Atlantic. A third, regional phase of cooling and exhumation from palaeotemperatures of 50-60°C took place in the Miocene and lead to the formation of the South Småland Peneplain. This phase affected southern Scandinavia but has no counterpart in Greenland. A final uplift phase that raised the South Småland Peneplain to its present elevation and lead to re-exposure of sub-Cretaceous hilly relief is not resolved in the AFTA data. The results underline the importance of epeirogenic movements (both uplift and subsidence) in regions that are often considered as stable cratons (cf. Green et al., 2013). Green, P.F., Lidmar-Bergström, K., Japsen, P., Bonow, J.M., Chalmers, J.A., 2013. Stratigraphic landscape analysis, thermochronology and the

  17. Using star tracks to determine the absolute pointing of the Fluorescence Detector telescopes of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    De Donato, Cinzia; Sanchez, Federico; Santander, Marcos; Natl.Tech.U., San Rafael; Camin, Daniel; Garcia, Beatriz; Grassi, Valerio; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

    2005-05-01

    To accurately reconstruct a shower axis from the Fluorescence Detector data it is essential to establish with high precision the absolute pointing of the telescopes. To d that they calculate the absolute pointing of a telescope using sky background data acquired during regular data taking periods. The method is based on the knowledge of bright star's coordinates that provide a reliable and stable coordinate system. it can be used to check the absolute telescope's pointing and its long-term stability during the whole life of the project, estimated in 20 years. They have analyzed background data taken from January to October 2004 to determine the absolute pointing of the 12 telescopes installed both in Los Leones and Coihueco. The method is based on the determination of the mean-time of the variance signal left by a star traversing a PMT's photocathode which is compared with the mean-time obtained by simulating the track of that star on the same pixel.

  18. Fission track analysis of plutonium in small specimens of biological material: Ultrasensitive analysis for sup 239 Pu in 50 urine samples from the Marshall Islands furnished by Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Wrenn, M.E.; Singh, N.P.; Xue, Ying-Hua.

    1990-11-20

    A neutron induced fission track method was successfully developed for assaying {sup 239}Pu in human urine. The technique involves means to remove potentially interfering natural uranium from the sample and reagents. The method was applied to 50 urine samples including an unknown number of spikes and controls from the Marshall Islands. 49 samples were successfully analyzed. The mean activity for the 47 samples which were not positive for {sup 239}Pu did not differ significantly from the mean for our control samples, which consisted of urines collected from six young adult Utah residents. 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  19. Measurement of Fission Product Yields from Fast-Neutron Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, C. W.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Moody, W. A.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Becker, J. A.; Henderson, R.; Kenneally, J.; Macri, R.; McNabb, D.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S.; Stoyer, M. A.; Tonchev, A. P.; Bhatia, C.; Bhike, M.; Fallin, B.; Gooden, M. E.; Howell, C. R.; Kelley, J. H.; Tornow, W.

    2014-09-01

    One of the aims of the Stockpile Stewardship Program is a reduction of the uncertainties on fission data used for analyzing nuclear test data [1,2]. Fission products such as 147Nd are convenient for determining fission yields because of their relatively high yield per fission (about 2%) and long half-life (10.98 days). A scientific program for measuring fission product yields from 235U,238U and 239Pu targets as a function of bombarding neutron energy (0.1 to 15 MeV) is currently underway using monoenergetic neutron beams produced at the 10 MV Tandem Accelerator at TUNL. Dual-fission chambers are used to determine the rate of fission in targets during activation. Activated targets are counted in highly shielded HPGe detectors over a period of several weeks to identify decaying fission products. To date, data have been collected at neutron bombarding energies 4.6, 9.0, 14.5 and 14.8 MeV. Experimental methods and data reduction techniques are discussed, and some preliminary results are presented.

  20. The SPIDER fission fragment spectrometer for fission product yield measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Meierbachtol, K.; Tovesson, F.; Shields, D.; Arnold, C.; Blakeley, R.; Bredeweg, T.; Devlin, M.; Hecht, A. A.; Heffern, L. E.; Jorgenson, J.; Laptev, A.; Mader, D.; O׳Donnell, J. M.; Sierk, A.; White, M.

    2015-04-01

    The SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research (SPIDER) developed for measuring mass yield distributions of fission products from spontaneous and neutron-induced fission. The 2E–2v method of measuring the kinetic energy (E) and velocity (v) of both outgoing fission products utilized, with the goal of measuring the mass of the fission products with an average resolution of 1 atomic mass unit (amu). The SPIDER instrument, consisting of detector components for time-of-flight, trajectory, and energy measurements, assembled and tested using 229Th and 252Cf radioactive decay sources. For commissioning, the fully assembled system measured fission products from spontaneous fission of 252Cf. Finally, individual measurement resolutions were met for time-of-flight (250 ps FWHM), spacial resolution (2 mm FHWM), and energy (92 keV FWHM for 8.376 MeV). These mass yield results measured from 252Cf spontaneous fission products are reported from an E–v measurement.

  1. The SPIDER fission fragment spectrometer for fission product yield measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Meierbachtol, K.; Tovesson, F.; Shields, D.; Arnold, C.; Blakeley, R.; Bredeweg, T.; Devlin, M.; Hecht, A. A.; Heffern, L. E.; Jorgenson, J.; et al

    2015-04-01

    The SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research (SPIDER) developed for measuring mass yield distributions of fission products from spontaneous and neutron-induced fission. The 2E–2v method of measuring the kinetic energy (E) and velocity (v) of both outgoing fission products utilized, with the goal of measuring the mass of the fission products with an average resolution of 1 atomic mass unit (amu). The SPIDER instrument, consisting of detector components for time-of-flight, trajectory, and energy measurements, assembled and tested using 229Th and 252Cf radioactive decay sources. For commissioning, the fully assembled system measured fission products from spontaneous fission of 252Cf. Finally,more » individual measurement resolutions were met for time-of-flight (250 ps FWHM), spacial resolution (2 mm FHWM), and energy (92 keV FWHM for 8.376 MeV). These mass yield results measured from 252Cf spontaneous fission products are reported from an E–v measurement.« less

  2. Transmutation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viererbl, L.; Lahodová, Z.; Klupák, V.; Sus, F.; Kučera, J.; Kůs, P.; Marek, M.

    2011-03-01

    We have designed a new type of detectors, called transmutation detectors, which can be used primarily for neutron fluence measurement. The transmutation detector method differs from the commonly used activation detector method in evaluation of detector response after irradiation. Instead of radionuclide activity measurement using radiometric methods, the concentration of stable non-gaseous nuclides generated by transmutation in the detector is measured using analytical methods like mass spectrometry. Prospective elements and nuclear reactions for transmutation detectors are listed and initial experimental results are given. The transmutation detector method could be used primarily for long-term measurement of neutron fluence in fission nuclear reactors, but in principle it could be used for any type of radiation that can cause transmutation of nuclides in detectors. This method could also be used for measurement in accelerators or fusion reactors.

  3. A new MCNPX PTRAC coincidence capture file capability: a tool for neutron detector design

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Louise G; Schear, Melissa A; Hendricks, John S; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Tobin, Stephen J; Croft, Stephen

    2011-02-16

    The existing Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNPX) particle tracking (PTRAC) coincidence capture file allows a full list of neutron capture events to be recorded in any simulated detection medium. The originating event history number (e.g. spontaneous fission events), capture time, location and source particle number are tracked and output to file for post-processing. We have developed a new MCNPX PTRAC coincidence capture file capability to aid detector design studies. New features include the ability to track the nuclides that emitted the detected neutrons as well as induced fission chains in mixed samples before detection (both generation number and nuclide that underwent induced fission). Here, the power of this tool is demonstrated using a detector design developed for the non-destructive assay (NDA) of spent nuclear fuel. Individual capture time distributions have been generated for neutrons originating from Curium-244 source spontaneous fission events and induced fission events in fissile nuclides of interest: namely Plutonium-239, Plutonium-241, and Uranium-235. Through this capability, a full picture for the attribution of neutron capture events in the detector can be simulated.

  4. A new NCNPX PTRAC coincidence capture file capability: a tool for neutron detector design

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Louise G; Schear, Melissa A; Hendricks, John S; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Tobin, Stephen J; Croft, Stephen

    2011-01-13

    The existing Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNPX) particle tracking (PTRAC) coincidence capture file allows a full list of neutron capture events to be recorded in any simulated detection medium. The originating event history number (e.g. spontaneous fission events), capture time, location and source particle number are tracked and output to file for post-processing. We have developed a new MCNPX PTRAC coincidence capture file capability to aid detector design studies. New features include the ability to track the nuclides that emitted the detected neutrons as well as induced fission chains in mixed samples before detection (both generation number and nuclide that underwent induced fission). Here, the power of this tool is demonstrated using a detector design developed for the non-destructive assay (NDA) of spent nuclear fuel. Individual capture time distributions have been generated for neutrons originating from Curium-244 source spontaneous fission events and induced fission events in fissile nuclides of interest: namely Plutonium-239, Plutonium-241, and Uranium-235. Through this capability, a full picture for the attribution of neutron capture events in the detector can be simulated.

  5. Two neutron correlations in photo-fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, D. S.; Kosinov, O.; Forest, T.; Burggraf, J.; Stave, S.; Warren, G.; Starovoitova, V.

    2016-09-01

    A large body of experimental work has established the strong kinematical correlation between fission fragments and fission neutrons. Here, we report on the progress of investigations of the potential for strong two neutron correlations arising from the nearly back-to-back nature of the two fission fragments that emit these neutrons in the photo-fission process. In initial measurements, a pulsed electron linear accelerator was used to generate bremsstrahlung photons that impinged upon an actinide target, and the energy and opening angle distributions of coincident neutrons were measured using a large acceptance neutron detector array. A planned comprehensive set of measurements of two neutron correlations in the photo-fission of actinides is expected to shed light on several fundamental aspects of the fission process including the multiplicity distributions associated with the light and heavy fission fragments, the nuclear temperatures of the fission fragments, and the mass distribution of the fission fragments as a function of energy released. In addition to these measurements providing important nuclear data, the unique kinematics of fission and the resulting two neutron correlations have the potential to be the basis for a new tool to detect fissionable materials. A key technical challenge of this program arises from the need to perform coincidence measurements with a low duty factor, pulsed electron accelerator. This has motivated the construction of a large acceptance neutron detector array, and the development of data analysis techniques to directly measure uncorrelated two neutron backgrounds.

  6. Co-visualization of DNA damage and ion traversals in live mammalian cells using a fluorescent nuclear track detector.

    PubMed

    Kodaira, Satoshi; Konishi, Teruaki; Kobayashi, Alisa; Maeda, Takeshi; Ahmad, Tengku Ahbrizal Farizal Tengku; Yang, Gen; Akselrod, Mark S; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Uchihori, Yukio

    2015-03-01

    The geometric locations of ion traversals in mammalian cells constitute important information in the study of heavy ion-induced biological effect. Single ion traversal through a cellular nucleus produces complex and massive DNA damage at a nanometer level, leading to cell inactivation, mutations and transformation. We present a novel approach that uses a fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD) for the simultaneous detection of the geometrical images of ion traversals and DNA damage in single cells using confocal microscopy. HT1080 or HT1080-53BP1-GFP cells were cultured on the surface of a FNTD and exposed to 5.1-MeV/n neon ions. The positions of the ion traversals were obtained as fluorescent images of a FNTD. Localized DNA damage in cells was identified as fluorescent spots of γ-H2AX or 53BP1-GFP. These track images and images of damaged DNA were obtained in a short time using a confocal laser scanning microscope. The geometrical distribution of DNA damage indicated by fluorescent γ-H2AX spots in fixed cells or fluorescent 53BP1-GFP spots in living cells was found to correlate well with the distribution of the ion traversals. This method will be useful for evaluating the number of ion hits on individual cells, not only for micro-beam but also for random-beam experiments.

  7. Co-visualization of DNA damage and ion traversals in live mammalian cells using a fluorescent nuclear track detector.

    PubMed

    Kodaira, Satoshi; Konishi, Teruaki; Kobayashi, Alisa; Maeda, Takeshi; Ahmad, Tengku Ahbrizal Farizal Tengku; Yang, Gen; Akselrod, Mark S; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Uchihori, Yukio

    2015-03-01

    The geometric locations of ion traversals in mammalian cells constitute important information in the study of heavy ion-induced biological effect. Single ion traversal through a cellular nucleus produces complex and massive DNA damage at a nanometer level, leading to cell inactivation, mutations and transformation. We present a novel approach that uses a fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD) for the simultaneous detection of the geometrical images of ion traversals and DNA damage in single cells using confocal microscopy. HT1080 or HT1080-53BP1-GFP cells were cultured on the surface of a FNTD and exposed to 5.1-MeV/n neon ions. The positions of the ion traversals were obtained as fluorescent images of a FNTD. Localized DNA damage in cells was identified as fluorescent spots of γ-H2AX or 53BP1-GFP. These track images and images of damaged DNA were obtained in a short time using a confocal laser scanning microscope. The geometrical distribution of DNA damage indicated by fluorescent γ-H2AX spots in fixed cells or fluorescent 53BP1-GFP spots in living cells was found to correlate well with the distribution of the ion traversals. This method will be useful for evaluating the number of ion hits on individual cells, not only for micro-beam but also for random-beam experiments. PMID:25324538

  8. Co-visualization of DNA damage and ion traversals in live mammalian cells using a fluorescent nuclear track detector

    PubMed Central

    Kodaira, Satoshi; Konishi, Teruaki; Kobayashi, Alisa; Maeda, Takeshi; Ahmad, Tengku Ahbrizal Farizal Tengku; Yang, Gen; Akselrod, Mark S.; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Uchihori, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    The geometric locations of ion traversals in mammalian cells constitute important information in the study of heavy ion-induced biological effect. Single ion traversal through a cellular nucleus produces complex and massive DNA damage at a nanometer level, leading to cell inactivation, mutations and transformation. We present a novel approach that uses a fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD) for the simultaneous detection of the geometrical images of ion traversals and DNA damage in single cells using confocal microscopy. HT1080 or HT1080–53BP1-GFP cells were cultured on the surface of a FNTD and exposed to 5.1-MeV/n neon ions. The positions of the ion traversals were obtained as fluorescent images of a FNTD. Localized DNA damage in cells was identified as fluorescent spots of γ-H2AX or 53BP1-GFP. These track images and images of damaged DNA were obtained in a short time using a confocal laser scanning microscope. The geometrical distribution of DNA damage indicated by fluorescent γ-H2AX spots in fixed cells or fluorescent 53BP1-GFP spots in living cells was found to correlate well with the distribution of the ion traversals. This method will be useful for evaluating the number of ion hits on individual cells, not only for micro-beam but also for random-beam experiments. PMID:25324538

  9. Single charged-particle damage to living cells: a new method based on track-etch detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Pugliese, M.; Manti, L.; Nappo, M.; Gialanella, G.

    1994-11-01

    Biological effects of ionizing radiation are usually expressed as a function of the absorbed dose. Low doses of high-LET radiation correspond to one or few particle traversals through the cell. In order to study the biological effectiveness of single charged particles, we have developed a new method based on solid state nuclear track detectors. Cells are seeded on mylar and a LR-115 film is stuck below the mylar base. After irradiation, the LR-115 film is etched and cells observed at a phase contrast microscope connected to a video camera and an image analyzer. In this way, it is possible to measure the number of traversals through the cell nucleus or cytoplasm. Coordinates of each cell on the microscope bench are saved. After incubation for about one week, cells are fixed and stained and the colonies observed at the microscope. The fate of each irradiated cell is therefore correlated to the number of traversals. We have tested this method with two different rodent embryo fibroblast cell lines, C3H 10T1/2 and V79, exposed to 3.2 MeV accelerated α-particles (LET=124 keV/ μm). The studied endpoint was cell killing. Preliminary biological results suggest that few α-particle tracks in V79 hamster cells are sufficient to reduce surviving fraction.

  10. Calibration of a solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) with high detection threshold to search for rare events in cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, S.; Gupta, D.; Maulik, A.; Raha, Sibaji; Saha, Swapan K.; Syam, D.; Pakarinen, J.; Voulot, D.; Wenander, F.

    2011-06-01

    We have investigated a commercially available polymer for its suitability as a solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD). We identified that polymer to be polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and found that it has a higher detection threshold compared to many other widely used SSNTDs which makes this detector particularly suitable for rare event search in cosmic rays as it eliminates the dominant low Z background. Systematic studies were carried out to determine its charge response which is essential before any new material can be used as an SSNTD. In this paper we describe the charge response of PET to 129Xe, 78Kr and 49Ti ions from the REX-ISOLDE facility at CERN, present the calibration curve for PET and characterize it as a nuclear track detector.

  11. SALT, a dedicated readout chip for high precision tracking silicon strip detectors at the LHCb Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugiel, Sz.; Dasgupta, R.; Firlej, M.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Kuczynska, M.; Moron, J.; Swientek, K.; Szumlak, T.

    2016-02-01

    The Upstream Tracker (UT) silicon strip detector, one of the central parts of the tracker system of the modernised LHCb experiment, will use a new 128-channel readout ASIC called SALT. It will extract and digitise analogue signals from the UT sensors, perform digital signal processing and transmit a serial output data. The SALT is being designed in CMOS 130 nm process and uses a novel architecture comprising of analog front-end and fast (40 MSps) ultra-low power (<0.5 mW) 6-bit ADC in each channel. The prototype ASICs of important functional blocks, like analogue front-end, 6-bit SAR ADC, PLL, and DLL, were designed, fabricated and tested. A prototype of an 8-channel version of the SALT chip, comprising all important functionalities was also designed and fabricated. The architecture and design of the SALT, together with the selected preliminary tests results, are presented.

  12. The complex post-rift evolution of the South Atlantic margin, South Africa: new insights from joint inversion of apatite (U-Th)/He and fission track thermochronometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildman, Mark; Brown, Roderick; Persano, Cristina; Beucher, Romain; Stuart, Finlay

    2013-04-01

    The continental edge of southwestern Africa has long been seen as a type example of a high elevation passive margin, with its characteristic topography forming during or shortly after rifting (c. 130 Ma). Recent work along the South Atlantic passive margin has highlighted the importance of interactions between rift-tectonics, mantle flow and dynamic topography on controlling margin evolution, however, the temporal relationship between these processes is still poorly understood. There is now increasing evidence from satellite imagery, onshore field observations (e.g. Viola et al., 2012) and offshore sedimentary basin analysis (e.g. Hirsch et al., 2010) that suggests that these processes have resulted in a much more complex structural and thermal history along the margin than previously thought. A critical step towards developing a better understanding of the post-rift evolution of this margin is to quantify the surface response (i.e. uplift and erosion) to these major structural and thermal events. Apatite fission track analysis (AFTA) has been used world-wide as a powerful means of extracting quantitative constraints on the timing and rate of major episodes of onshore denudation. Previous AFTA studies in SW Africa have identified two distinct cooling events occurred during early and late Cretaceous, respectively. However, in places AFT ages vary significantly over relatively short distances and this has been interpreted to indicate local differential erosion levels controlled by tectonic displacements related to fault reactivation. A limitation of the AFT system is that it is sensitive to a temperature range of c. 120-60°C and therefore is unable to evaluate the magnitude of denudation episodes where the amounts are less than c. 1.5-2 km. So while the Cretaceous history of erosion is well established from existing AFTA data, the details of the timing and amount of erosion occurring during the Cenozoic remain relatively poorly constrained. The apatite (U

  13. SPIDER Progress Towards High Resolution Correlated Fission Product Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Dan; Meierbachtol, Krista; Tovesson, Fredrik; Arnold, Charles; Blackeley, Rick; Bredeweg, Todd; Devlin, Matt; Hecht, Adam; Jandel, Marian; Jorgenson, Justin; Nelson, Ron; White, Morgan; Spider Team

    2014-09-01

    The SPIDER detector (SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research) is under development with the goal of obtaining high-resolution, high-efficiency, correlated fission product data needed for many applications including the modeling of next generation nuclear reactors, stockpile stewardship, and the fundamental understanding of the fission process. SPIDER simultaneously measures velocity and energy of both fission products to calculate fission product yields (FPYs), neutron multiplicity (ν), and total kinetic energy (TKE). A detailed description of the prototype SPIDER detector components will be presented. Characterization measurements with alpha and spontaneous fission sources will also be discussed. LA-UR-14-24875. The SPIDER detector (SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research) is under development with the goal of obtaining high-resolution, high-efficiency, correlated fission product data needed for many applications including the modeling of next generation nuclear reactors, stockpile stewardship, and the fundamental understanding of the fission process. SPIDER simultaneously measures velocity and energy of both fission products to calculate fission product yields (FPYs), neutron multiplicity (ν), and total kinetic energy (TKE). A detailed description of the prototype SPIDER detector components will be presented. Characterization measurements with alpha and spontaneous fission sources will also be discussed. LA-UR-14-24875. This work is in part supported by LANL Laboratory Directed Research and Development Projects 20110037DR and 20120077DR.

  14. Contribution of plated-out 218Po and 214Po to measurements of airborne 222Rn and daughters with plastic (CR-39) nuclear track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, Bernd; Wang, Zuoyuan; Sensistaffar, Edwin

    1984-01-01

    The fraction of alpha-particle tracks due to radioactivity plated out on its surface was measured for CR-39 nuclear track detector foils used to determine working level values in air. Bare foils were exposed to known concentrations of airborne 222Rn and its short-lived daughters in a calibration chamber. The amounts of 218Po and 214Po on the foil surface were measured with a calibrated diffused junction detector-spectrometer system immediately after the foils were removed from the chamber. Deposition was mostly by 218Po, with some 214Pb but essentially no 214Bi. The track density due to the plated-out radionuclides and the 222Rn, 218Po, and 214Po in chamber air was calculated and compared to the value measured by electrochemical etching. The calculated values generally were slightly above the measured values. On the basis of these calculations, the deposited radioactivity contributed slightly less than one-half of the total tracks in one test and slightly more than two-thirds in another. This effect complicates calibration of the detector relative to airborne radon daughters.

  15. Characterization of solid state nuclear track detectors of the polyallyl-diglycol-carbonate (CR-39/PM-355) type for light charged particle spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowska, A. Jaskóła, M.; Korman, A.; Kuk, M.; Szydłowski, A.

    2014-12-15

    This paper presents a method which uses the characteristics of the etch pits induced in a polyallyl-diglycol-carbonate (PADC) detector of the CR-39/PM-355 type to estimate particle energy. This method is based on the data provided by a semiautomatic system that selects tracks according to two parameters, crater diameters, and mean gray level values. In this paper we used the results of the calibration measurements that were obtained in our laboratory in the period 2000–2014. Combining the information on the two parameters it is possible to determine unambiguously the incident projectile energy values. The paper presents the results of an attempt to estimate the energy resolution of the method when analyzing the tracks produced in the CR-39/PM-355 detector by energetic ions such as alpha particles, protons, and deuterons. We discuss the energy resolution of the measurement of light charged particle energy which is based on the parameters (crater diameter and mean gray level value) of tracks induced in solid state nuclear track detectors of the PADC type.

  16. The chronology and tectonic style of landscape evolution along the elevated Atlantic continental margin of South Africa resolved by joint apatite fission track and (U-Th-Sm)/He thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildman, Mark; Brown, Roderick; Beucher, Romain; Persano, Cristina; Stuart, Fin; Gallagher, Kerry; Schwanethal, James; Carter, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Atlantic-type continental margins have long been considered "passive" tectonic settings throughout the entire postrift phase. Recent studies question the long-term stability of these margins and have shown that postrift uplift and reactivation of preexisting structures may be a common feature of a continental margin's evolution. The Namaqualand sector of the western continental margin of South Africa is characterized by a ubiquitously faulted basement but lacks preservation of younger geological strata to constrain postrift tectonic fault activity. Here we present the first systematic study using joint apatite fission track and apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He thermochronology to achieve a better understanding on the chronology and tectonic style of landscape evolution across this region. Apatite fission track ages range from 58.3 ± 2.6 to 132.2 ± 3.6 Ma, with mean track lengths between 10.9 ± 0.19 and 14.35 ± 0.22 µm, and mean (U-Th-Sm)/He sample ages range from 55.8 ± 31.3 to 120.6 ± 31.4 Ma. Joint inverse modeling of these data reveals two distinct episodes of cooling at approximately 150-130 Ma and 110-90 Ma with limited cooling during the Cenozoic. Estimates of denudation based on these thermal histories predict approximately 1-3 km of denudation coinciding with two major tectonic events. The first event, during the Early Cretaceous, was driven by continental rifting and the development and removal of synrift topography. The second event, during the Late Cretaceous, includes localized reactivation of basement structures as well as regional mantle-driven uplift. Relative tectonic stability prevailed during the Cenozoic, and regional denudation over this time is constrained to be less than 1 km.

  17. Study of Anomalous Nuclear Projectile Fragments in CR-39 Etched Track Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tincknell, Mark Leslie

    This report describes three years of experimental investigation into the phenomenon of anomalously short mean free paths (mfp's) of relativistic nuclear projectile fragments (Anomalous Projectile Fragments, or "Anomalons"). The experimental data were obtained through manual microscopic measurements of etched nuclear tracks in CR-39 plastic. There are five chapters in this report. The first introduces the subject, and extensively reviews and evaluates the experimental history of the effect. The second chapter describes the background physics and methods used. The third chapter examines in detail the statistical techniques used by almost all modern anomalon experiments. Many useful expressions are given and several mfp estimators are compared. The conventional methods are shown to have acceptably small biases. The fourth chapter discusses several experiments performed and analyzed in 1982-1983, mostly with an Ar beam exposure. These experiments found the mfp's of several primary nuclei, established that fragment nuclei are integrally charged, and confirmed the anomalon effect in a medium other than nuclear emulsion. The secondary mfp's were found to be depressed by (TURN)15% in the first 2 cm after the primary interactions, at the (TURN)95-99% confidence level (C.L.). The parameterized abundance of anomalons was (TURN)3.6%, with an anomalous mfp of (TURN)1 cm. The fifth chapter presents the results from experiments conducted in 1983-1984 with an Fe beam. A larger and more sophisticated repeat experiment obtained a weak and oddly-behaved anomalon effect, and was marginally consistent with a null result. The secondary mfp's in the 0.6 (LESSTHEQ) x (LESSTHEQ) 1.1 cm interval beyond the primary interactions were (TURN)2.5(sigma) low; all other points, including 0.1 (LESSTHEQ) x (LESSTHEQ) 0.6cm, were consistent with normal. The total mfp depression in the first cm was (TURN)10%, significant at the (TURN)90 -95% C.L. The tertiary mfp's were consistent with the secondaries

  18. A study of indoor radon levels in rural dwellings of Ezine (Canakkale, Turkey) using solid-state nuclear track detectors.

    PubMed

    Orgün, Y; Altinsoy, N; Sahin, S Y; Ataksor, B; Celebi, N

    2008-01-01

    Indoor radon activity level and radon effective dose (ED) rate have been carried out in the rural dwellings of Ezine (Canakkale) during the summer season using Radosys-2000, a complete set suitable to radon concentration measurements with CR-39 plastic alpha track detectors. The range of radon concentration varied between 9 and 300 Bq m(-3), with an average of 67.9 (39.9 SD) Bq m(-3). Assuming an indoor occupancy factor of 0.8 and 0.4 for the equilibrium factor of radon indoors, it has been found that the 222Rn ED rate in the dwellings studied ranges from 0.4 to 5.2 mSv y(-1), with an average value of 1.7 (1.0) mSv y(-1). There is a possibility that low radon concentrations exist indoors during the summer season in the study area because of relatively high ventilation rates in the dwellings. A winter survey will be needed for future estimation of the annual ED.

  19. Assessment of radium and radon exhalation rate in soil and building material samples using LR-115 plastic track detectors.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Rohit; Badhan, Komal; Bala, Pankaj

    2013-04-01

    Solid state nuclear track detectors (LR-115 TYPE-II) were used to determine the concentration of radium and radon exhalation rate in soil samples collected from the different areas of Dharamshala,Himachal Pradesh (India) and in building material samples :" viz. cement, bricks and white marble collected from different locations of India. The radium concentration for the soil samples and building materials variedfrom 16.22Bqkg-1 to 25.44Bqkg-1 and 32.33 Bqkg-1 to 52.26Bqkg-1 with an average value of 22.03 Bqkg-1 and 39.12 Bqkg-1 respectively. The calculated average values of radon exhalation rate in terms of mass (E.) and area (E.) for soil samples and building material samples are (8.59mBqkg-1h-1 and 310.6 mBqm-1h-1) and (15.26mBqkg-1h-1and 551.6 mBqm-2h-1) respectively.

  20. A novel approach for long-term determination of indoor 222Rn progeny equilibrium factor using nuclear track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amgarou, K.; Font, Ll.; Baixeras, C.

    2003-06-01

    A detailed study of the measurement principles of airborne 222Rn decay products by means of nuclear track detectors (NTDs), taking into account the range of variation of the parameters influencing their concentration indoors, has shown that it is not possible for the existing methods to obtain the associated long-term equilibrium factor with an appropriate accuracy. For this reason, we have established a novel approach based on the new concept of reduced equilibrium factor, which can be obtained from the only measurement of airborne 222Rn and its α-emitter daughter ( 218Po and 214Po) concentrations using a passive, integrating and multi-component system of NTDs. We have found that the equilibrium factor has a linear dependence on the reduced equilibrium factor regardless the values taken for the rates of ventilation, of aerosol attachment and of surface deposition. By using well-controlled exposures in a reference laboratory, we have shown that the equilibrium factor values determined with our system agree with those obtained by active monitors. Finally, as a pilot test, several dosimeters were exposed in an inhabited Swedish single-family house. The results of this exposure suggest the usefulness of this method to perform routine surveys in private homes and in workplaces in order to estimate the annual effective dose received by the general public and the workers due to the presence of 222Rn daughters.

  1. Precision muon tracking detectors and read-out electronics for operation at very high background rates at future colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortner, O.; Kroha, H.; Nowak, S.; Richter, R.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K.; Schwegler, Ph.

    2016-07-01

    The experience of the ATLAS MDT muon spectrometer shows that drift-tube chambers provide highly reliable precision muon tracking over large areas. The ATLAS muon chambers are exposed to unprecedentedly high background of photons and neutrons induced by the proton collisions. Still higher background rates are expected at future high-energy and high-luminosity colliders beyond HL-LHC. Therefore, drift-tube detectors with 15 mm tube diameter (30 mm in ATLAS), optimised for high rate operation, have been developed for such conditions. Several such full-scale sMDT chambers have been constructed with unprecedentedly high sense wire positioning accuracy of better than 10 μm. The chamber design and assembly methods have been optimised for large-scale production, reducing considerably cost and construction time while maintaining the high mechanical accuracy and reliability. Tests at the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN showed that the rate capability of sMDT chambers is improved by more than an order of magnitude compared to the MDT chambers. By using read-out electronics optimised for high counting rates, the rate capability can be further increased.

  2. Spontaneous fission

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1993-09-01

    The spontaneous fission (SF) of the heaviest actinides and the transactinides is of particular interest because of the dramatic changes in properties observed in the region of the heavy fermion isotopes and for still heavier elements. The existing experimental information on SF properties including half-life systematics, fragment kinetic-energy and mass-yield distributions, prompt neutron emission, and gamma emission will be reviewed. Possibility for extending studies of SF properties to other regions are considered and the potential for obtaining additional information about low-energy fission properties is discussed.

  3. Search for plutonium-244 tracks in mountain pass bastnaesite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleischer, R.L.; Naeser, C.W.

    1972-01-01

    WE have found that bastnaesite, a rare earth fluorocarbonate, from the Precambrian Mountain Pass deposit has an apparent Cretaceous fission track age, and hence does not reveal any anomalous fission tracks due to 244Pu. ?? 1972 Nature Publishing Group.

  4. Evolution of the South Atlantic passive continental margin and lithosphere dynamic movement in Southern Brazil derived from zircon and apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He and fission-track data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krob, Florian; Stippich, Christian; Glasmacher, Ulrich A.; Hackspacher, Peter C.

    2016-04-01

    Passive continental margins are important geoarchives related to mantle dynamics, the breakup of continents, lithospheric dynamics, and other processes. The main concern yields the quantifying long-term lithospheric evolution of the continental margin between São Paulo and Laguna in southeastern Brazil since the Neoproterozoic. We put special emphasis on the reactivation of old fracture zones running into the continent and their constrains on the landscape evolution. In this contribution, we represent already consisting thermochronological data attained by fission-track and (U-Th-Sm)/He analysis on apatites and zircons. The zircon fission-track ages range between 108.4 (15.0) and 539.9 (68.4) Ma, the zircon (U-Th-Sm)/He ages between 72.9 (5.8) and 427.6 (1.8) Ma whereas the apatite fission-track ages range between 40.0 (5.3) and 134.7 (8.0) Ma, and the apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He ages between 32.1 (1.52) and 92.0 (1.86) Ma. These thermochronological ages from metamorphic, sedimentary and intrusive rocks show six distinct blocks (Laguna, Florianópolis, Curitiba, Ilha Comprida, Peruibe and Santos) with different evolution cut by old fracture zones. Furthermore, models of time-temperature evolution illustrate the differences in Pre- to post-rift exhumation histories of these blocks. The presented data will provide an insight into the complex exhumation history of the continental margin based on the existing literature data on the evolution of the Paraná basin in Brazil and the latest thermochronological data. We used the geological model of the Paraná basin supersequences (Rio Ivaí, Paraná, Gondwana I-III and Bauru) to remodel the subsidence and exhumation history of our consisting thermochronological sample data. First indications include a fast exhumation during the early Paleozoic, a slow shallow (northern blocks) to fast and deep (Laguna block) subduction from middle Paleozoic to Mesozoic time and a extremely fast exhumation during the opening of the South Atlantic

  5. Benchmarking nuclear fission theory

    DOE PAGES

    Bertsch, G. F.; Loveland, W.; Nazarewicz, W.; Talou, P.

    2015-05-14

    We suggest a small set of fission observables to be used as test cases for validation of theoretical calculations. Thus, the purpose is to provide common data to facilitate the comparison of different fission theories and models. The proposed observables are chosen from fission barriers, spontaneous fission lifetimes, fission yield characteristics, and fission isomer excitation energies.

  6. A Monte Carlo Study of the Momentum Dependence on the Results of Tracking Unknown Particle Species in the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sewerynek, Stephen; /British Columbia U.

    2007-04-06

    The BABAR experiment is composed of an international collaboration that will test the Standard Model prediction of CP violation. To accomplish this a new detector was constructed at the asymmetric B Factory, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The tests will shed some light on the origins of CP violation, which is an important aspect in explaining the matter/antimatter asymmetry in the universe. In particular, the BABAR experiment will measure CP violation in the neutral B meson system. In order to succeed, the BABAR experiment requires excellent track fitting and particle species identification. Prior to the current study, track fitting was done using only one particle species--the pion. But given the momentum dependence on the accuracy of the results from this choice of particle species, a better algorithm needed to be developed. Monte Carlo simulations were carried out and a new algorithm utilizing all five particle species present in the BABAR detector was created.

  7. Methods for the assessment of long-lived radionuclides in humans resulting from nuclear activities or accidents: Fission track analysis of trace amounts plutonium-239 and a copper hexacyanoferrate kit for monitoring radiocaesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Lena Camilla

    Fission track analysis (FTA) was developed to be applied to ultra-low levels of 239Pu in bioassay samples. An analytical protocol was established for the FTA processing. The detection limit was determined to 1.5 μBq and the calibration constant was 24 fission fragments per μBq 239Pu. Naturally occurring nuclides of thorium and uranium, present in biological and environmental samples, did not interfere in the determination of 239Pu. Self-absorption of fission fragments was shown to be insignificant. The study included the determination of 239Pu in urine samples from twenty Chernobyl clean-up workers. All urine samples contained activities below the detection limit for radioanalytical analysis using alpha spectrometry (0.5 mBq). Seven of the samples were further investigated using a thermal ionization mass spectrometer with a sensitivity of 106 atoms 239Pu. The content of 239Pu in the samples showed to be below 1μBq (106 atoms), with only one exception. It was not possible to draw any major conclusions from the 239Pu results, regarding the clean-up workers' exposure from radionuclides released by the Chernobyl accident. A kit was designed for selective adsorption of radiocaesium in urine samples to be used in situ by contaminated subjects. The kit consisted of copper hexacyanoferrate impregnated cotton filters held by filter holders for sample flow-through. After use, the adsorbed fraction of caesium was >=90% in urine samples. The kit facilitates the screening of a population exposed to radiocaesium. Parameters influencing the adsorption efficiency, such as potassium, sodium and calcium concentration of the sample and the sample pH, were investigated and shown to be insignificant for urine samples.

  8. Fission Spectrum

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Bloch, F.; Staub, H.

    1943-08-18

    Measurements of the spectrum of the fission neutrons of 25 are described, in which the energy of the neutrons is determined from the ionization produced by individual hydrogen recoils. The slow neutrons producing fission are obtained by slowing down the fast neutrons from the Be-D reaction of the Stanford cyclotron. In order to distinguish between fission neutrons and the remaining fast cyclotron neutrons both the cyclotron current and the pusle amplifier are modulated. A hollow neutron container, in which slow neutrons have a lifetime of about 2 milliseconds, avoids the use of large distances. This method results in much higher intensities than the usual modulation arrangement. The results show a continuous distribution of neutrons with a rather wide maximum at about 0.8 MV falling off to half of its maximum value at 2.0 MV. The total number of netrons is determined by comparison with the number of fission fragments. The result seems to indicate that only about 30% of the neutrons have energies below .8 MV. Various tests are described which were performed in order to rule out modification of the spectrum by inelastic scattering. Decl. May 4, 1951

  9. Bimodal fission

    SciTech Connect

    Hulet, E.K.

    1989-04-19

    In recent years, we have measured the mass and kinetic-energy distributions from the spontaneous fission of /sup 258/Fm, /sup 259/Md, /sup 260/Md, /sup 258/No, /sup 262/No, and /sup 260/(104). All are observed to fission with a symmetrical division of mass, whereas the total-kinetic-energy (TKE) distributions strongly deviated from the Gaussian shape characteristically found in the fission of all other actinides. When the TKE distributions are resolved into two Gaussians the constituent peaks lie near 200 and near 233 MeV. We conclude two modes or bimodal fission is occurring in five of the six nuclides studied. Both modes are possible in the same nuclides, but one generally predominates. We also conclude the low-energy but mass-symmetrical mode is likely to extend to far heavier nuclei; while the high-energy mode will be restricted to a smaller region, a region of nuclei defined by the proximity of the fragments to the strong neutron and proton shells in /sup 132/Sn. 16 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Compact fission counter for DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C Y; Chyzh, A; Kwan, E; Henderson, R; Gostic, J; Carter, D; Bredeweg, T; Couture, A; Jandel, M; Ullmann, J

    2010-11-06

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) consists of 160 BF{sub 2} crystals with equal solid-angle coverage. DANCE is a 4{pi} {gamma}-ray calorimeter and designed to study the neutron-capture reactions on small quantities of radioactive and rare stable nuclei. These reactions are important for the radiochemistry applications and modeling the element production in stars. The recognition of capture event is made by the summed {gamma}-ray energy which is equivalent of the reaction Q-value and unique for a given capture reaction. For a selective group of actinides, where the neutron-induced fission reaction competes favorably with the neutron capture reaction, additional signature is needed to distinguish between fission and capture {gamma} rays for the DANCE measurement. This can be accomplished by introducing a detector system to tag fission fragments and thus establish a unique signature for the fission event. Once this system is implemented, one has the opportunity to study not only the capture but also fission reactions. A parallel-plate avalanche counter (PPAC) has many advantages for the detection of heavy charged particles such as fission fragments. These include fast timing, resistance to radiation damage, and tolerance of high counting rate. A PPAC also can be tuned to be insensitive to {alpha} particles, which is important for experiments with {alpha}-emitting actinides. Therefore, a PPAC is an ideal detector for experiments requiring a fast and clean trigger for fission. A PPAC with an ingenious design was fabricated in 2006 by integrating amplifiers into the target assembly. However, this counter was proved to be unsuitable for this application because of issues related to the stability of amplifiers and the ability to separate fission fragments from {alpha}'s. Therefore, a new design is needed. A LLNL proposal to develop a new PPAC for DANCE was funded by NA22 in FY09. The design goal is to minimize the mass for the proposed counter

  11. Results from the characterisation of Advanced GAmma Tracking Array prototype detectors and their consequences for the next-generation nuclear physics spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimmock, M. R.; Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Cresswell, J. R.; Nelson, L.; Nolan, P.; Rigby, S.; Unsworth, C.; Lazarus, I.; Simpson, J.; Medina, P.; Parisel, C.; Santos, C.

    2007-09-01

    The Advanced GAmma Tracking Array (AGATA) is a European project that is aiming to construct a complete 4π High Purity Germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometer for nuclear structure studies at future Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) Facilities. The proposed array will utilise digital electronics, Pulse Shape Analysis (PSA) and Gamma-Ray Tracking (GRT) algorithms, to overcome the limited efficiencies encountered by current Escape Suppressed Spectrometers (ESS), whilst maintaining the high Peak-to-Total ratio. Two AGATA symmetrical segmented Canberra Eurisys (CE) prototype HPGe detectors have been tested at the University of Liverpool. A highly collimated Cs-137 (662keV) beam was raster scanned across each detector and data were collected in both singles and coincidence modes. The charge sensitive preamplifier output pulse shapes from all 37 channels (one for each of the 36 segments and one for the centre contact) were digitised and stored for offline analysis. The shapes of the real charge and image charge pulses have been studied to give detailed information on the position dependent response of each detector. 1mm position sensitivity has been achieved with the parameterisation of average pulse shapes, calculated from data collected with each of the detectors. The coincidence data has also been utilised to validate the electric field simulation code Multi Geometry Simulation (MGS). The precisely determined 3D interaction positions allow the comparison of experimental pulse shapes from single site interactions with those generated by the simulation. It is intended that the validated software will be used to calculate a basis data set of pulse shapes for the array, from which any interaction site can be determined through a χ2 minimisation of the digitized pulse with linear combinations of basis pulseshapes. The results from this partial validation, along with those from the investigation into the position sensitivity of each detector are presented.

  12. Some more new etchants for CR-39 detector.

    PubMed

    Matiullah; Rehman, S; Rehman, S; Mati, N; Ahmad, S

    2005-10-01

    Recently, several new etchants have been reported for CR-39 detector (Molten Ba(OH)2. 8H2O as an etchant for CR-39 detector, Radiat. Meas. 37 (2003) 205; Discovery of new etchants for CR-39 detector, Radiat. Meas. (2004)). We have made further progress in this direction and have unveiled two more new etchants which are reported in this article. CR-39 detectors were irradiated with fission fragments and alpha particles from a thin 252Cf disc source. The irradiated detectors were then etched in our newly introduced etching solutions as well as in conventionally used 6 M NaOH aqueous solution at 70 degrees C. The newly prepared etching solutions included NaOH dissolved in methanol and NaOH dissolved in methanol + water. Optimum values of NaOH concentration in methanol as well as in methanol + water were determined. Optimum etching temperatures were also determined for both the above-mentioned etchants. From fission and alpha track diameters, bulk etching rate (VB), track etching rate (VT) and etching efficiency (eta) were determined and compared with that obtained for 6 M NaOH at 70 degrees C. Both the newly introduced etchants were found more efficient than the conventionally used 6 M aqueous NaOH (64%) at 70 degrees C and have relatively much smaller etching time.

  13. A new MCNPX PTRAC coincidence capture file capability: a tool for neutron detector design

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Louise G; Schear, Melissa A; Hendricks, John S; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Tobin, Stephen J; Croft, Stephen

    2010-12-14

    The existing MCNPX{trademark} PTRAC coincidence capture file allows a full list of neutron capture events to be recorded in any simulated detection medium. The originating event history number (e.g. spontaneous fission events), capture time, location and source particle number are tracked and output to file for post-processing. We have developed a new MCNPX PTRAC coincidence capture file capability to aid detector design studies. New features include the ability to track the isotopes that emitted the detected neutrons as well as induced fission chains in mixed samples before detection (both generation number and isotope). Here, the power of this tool is demonstrated using a detector design that has been developed for the non-destructive assay (NDA) of spent nuclear fuel. Individual capture time distributions have been generated for neutrons originating from Curium-244 source spontaneous fission events and induced fission events in fissile isotopes of interest: namely Plutonium-239, Plutonium-241, and Uranium-235. Through this capability, a full picture for the attribution of neutron capture events in the detector can be simulated.

  14. Registration procedure for spatial correlation of physical energy deposition of particle irradiation and cellular response utilizing cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors.

    PubMed

    Niklas, M; Zimmermann, F; Schlegel, J; Schwager, C; Debus, J; Jäkel, O; Abdollahi, A; Greilich, S

    2016-09-01

    The hybrid technology cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detector (Cell-Fit-HD) enables the investigation of radiation-related cellular events along single ion tracks on the subcellular scale in clinical ion beams. The Cell-Fit-HD comprises a fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD, the physical compartment), a device for individual particle detection and a substrate for viable cell-coating, i.e. the biological compartment. To date both compartments have been imaged sequentially in situ by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). This is yet in conflict with a functional read-out of the Cell-Fit-HD utilizing a fast live-cell imaging of the biological compartment with low phototoxicity on greater time scales. The read-out of the biological from the physical compartment was uncoupled. A read-out procedure was developed to image the cell layer by conventional widefield microscopy whereas the FNTD was imaged by CLSM. Point mapping registration of the confocal and widefield imaging data was performed. Non-fluorescent crystal defects (spinels) visible in both read-outs were used as control point pairs. The accuracy achieved was on the sub-µm scale. The read-out procedure by widefield microscopy does not impair the unique ability of spatial correlation by the Cell-Fit-HD. The uncoupling will enlarge the application potential of the hybrid technology significantly. The registration allows for an ultimate correlation of microscopic physical beam parameters and cell kinetics on greater time scales. The method reported herein will be instrumental for the introduction of a novel generation of compact detectors facilitating biodosimetric research towards high-throughput analysis.

  15. Registration procedure for spatial correlation of physical energy deposition of particle irradiation and cellular response utilizing cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niklas, M.; Zimmermann, F.; Schlegel, J.; Schwager, C.; Debus, J.; Jäkel, O.; Abdollahi, A.; Greilich, S.

    2016-09-01

    The hybrid technology cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detector (Cell-Fit-HD) enables the investigation of radiation-related cellular events along single ion tracks on the subcellular scale in clinical ion beams. The Cell-Fit-HD comprises a fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD, the physical compartment), a device for individual particle detection and a substrate for viable cell-coating, i.e. the biological compartment. To date both compartments have been imaged sequentially in situ by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). This is yet in conflict with a functional read-out of the Cell-Fit-HD utilizing a fast live-cell imaging of the biological compartment with low phototoxicity on greater time scales. The read-out of the biological from the physical compartment was uncoupled. A read-out procedure was developed to image the cell layer by conventional widefield microscopy whereas the FNTD was imaged by CLSM. Point mapping registration of the confocal and widefield imaging data was performed. Non-fluorescent crystal defects (spinels) visible in both read-outs were used as control point pairs. The accuracy achieved was on the sub-µm scale. The read-out procedure by widefield microscopy does not impair the unique ability of spatial correlation by the Cell-Fit-HD. The uncoupling will enlarge the application potential of the hybrid technology significantly. The registration allows for an ultimate correlation of microscopic physical beam parameters and cell kinetics on greater time scales. The method reported herein will be instrumental for the introduction of a novel generation of compact detectors facilitating biodosimetric research towards high-throughput analysis.

  16. Registration procedure for spatial correlation of physical energy deposition of particle irradiation and cellular response utilizing cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors.

    PubMed

    Niklas, M; Zimmermann, F; Schlegel, J; Schwager, C; Debus, J; Jäkel, O; Abdollahi, A; Greilich, S

    2016-09-01

    The hybrid technology cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detector (Cell-Fit-HD) enables the investigation of radiation-related cellular events along single ion tracks on the subcellular scale in clinical ion beams. The Cell-Fit-HD comprises a fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD, the physical compartment), a device for individual particle detection and a substrate for viable cell-coating, i.e. the biological compartment. To date both compartments have been imaged sequentially in situ by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). This is yet in conflict with a functional read-out of the Cell-Fit-HD utilizing a fast live-cell imaging of the biological compartment with low phototoxicity on greater time scales. The read-out of the biological from the physical compartment was uncoupled. A read-out procedure was developed to image the cell layer by conventional widefield microscopy whereas the FNTD was imaged by CLSM. Point mapping registration of the confocal and widefield imaging data was performed. Non-fluorescent crystal defects (spinels) visible in both read-outs were used as control point pairs. The accuracy achieved was on the sub-µm scale. The read-out procedure by widefield microscopy does not impair the unique ability of spatial correlation by the Cell-Fit-HD. The uncoupling will enlarge the application potential of the hybrid technology significantly. The registration allows for an ultimate correlation of microscopic physical beam parameters and cell kinetics on greater time scales. The method reported herein will be instrumental for the introduction of a novel generation of compact detectors facilitating biodosimetric research towards high-throughput analysis. PMID:27499388

  17. Charge, energy and LET spectra of high LET primary and secondary particles in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors of the P0006 experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csige, I.; Frigo, L. A.; Benton, E. V.; Oda, K.

    1995-01-01

    We have measured the charge, energy and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra of about 800 high LET (LET(sub infinity) H2O greater than 50 keV/micron) particles in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors in the P0006 experiment of LDEF. Primary particles with residual range at the reference surface greater than about 2 microns and secondary particles produced in the detector material with total range greater than about 4 microns were measured. We have used a multi-etch technique and an internal calibration to identify and measure the energy of the particles at the reference surface. The LET spectrum was obtained from the charge and energy distribution of the particles.

  18. Characterization of the Oum Er Rbia (Morocco) high basin karstic water sources by using solid state nuclear track detectors and radon as a natural tracer.

    PubMed

    Khalil, N; Misdaq, M A; Berrazzouk, S; Mania, J

    2002-06-01

    Uranium and thorium contents as well as radon alpha-activities per unit volume were evaluated inside different water samples by using a method based on calculating the CR-39 and LR-115 type II solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) detection efficiencies for the emitted alpha-particles and measuring the resulting track density rates. The validity of the SSNTD technique utilized was checked by analysing uranyl nitrate (UO2(NO3)26H2O) standard solutions. A relationship between water radon concentration and water transmission of different water sources belonging to two regions of the Middle Atlas (Morocco) water reservoir was found. The influence of the water flow rate as well as the permeability and fracture system of the host rocks of the sources studied was investigated.

  19. Search for microscopic black holes in a like-sign dimuon final state using large track multiplicity with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmadov, F.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Astbury, A.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, S.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O. L.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia, O.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Bittner, B.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boek, T. T.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Branchini, P.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Brendlinger, K.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brost, E.; Brown, G.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Bunse, M.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Byszewski, M.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Caso, C.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Cataldi, G.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, K.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Cirkovic, P.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coelli, S.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Colas, J.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Cuciuc, C.-M.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Damiani, D. S.; Daniells, A. C.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J. A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davignon, O.; Davison, A. R.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De La Taille, C.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; De Zorzi, G.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dechenaux, B.; Dedovich, D. V.; Degenhardt, J.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delemontex, T.; Deliot, F.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Demirkoz, B.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; DeWilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Doan, T. K. O.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dodd, J.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Dohmae, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Dube, S.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Dwuznik, M.; Ebke, J.; Edson, W.; Edwards, C. A.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienne, F.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evangelakou, D.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Ferencei, J.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, M. J.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Florez Bustos, A. C.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Fonseca Martin, T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; Fratina, S.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, C.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadfort, T.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Gemmell, A.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gillman, A. R.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giovannini, P.; Giraud, P. F.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giunta, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glazov, A.; Glonti, G. L.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godfrey, J.; Godlewski, J.; Goeringer, C.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gomez Fajardo, L. S.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez Silva, M. L.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodson, J. J.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Gough Eschrich, I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M. P.; Goussiou, A. G.; Goy, C.; Gozpinar, S.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K.-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Gray, J. A.; Graziani, E.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grishkevich, Y. V.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Grout, Z. 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L.; Pingel, A.; Pinto, B.; Pizio, C.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Poddar, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Pohl, M.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pomeroy, D.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Portell Bueso, X.; Pospelov, G. E.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Prabhu, R.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Pravahan, R.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, J.; Price, L. E.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Prudent, X.; Przybycien, M.; Przysiezniak, H.; Psoroulas, S.; Ptacek, E.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Quilty, D.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radloff, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rammes, M.; Randle-Conde, A. S.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rao, K.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, T. C.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Reinsch, A.; Reisinger, I.; Relich, M.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z. L.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Rios, R. R.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rivoltella, G.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Rocha de Lima, J. G.; Roda, C.; Roda Dos Santos, D.; Rodrigues, L.; Roe, A.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romeo, G.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, A.; Rose, M.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rumyantsev, L.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ruzicka, P.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Saddique, A.; Sadeh, I.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B. M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, T.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarrazin, B.; Sarri, F.; Sartisohn, G.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Sauvan, J. B.; Savard, P.; Savinov, V.; Savu, D. O.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaelicke, A.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scott, W. G.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellers, G.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Sherwood, P.; Shimizu, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simoniello, R.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K. Yu.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Stupak, J.; Sturm, P.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Subramania, HS.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonoyan, A.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tran, H. L.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuggle, J. M.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urquijo, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Berg, R.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watanabe, I.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wittig, T.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wraight, K.; Wright, M.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimin, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2013-10-01

    A search is presented for microscopic black holes in a like-sign dimuon final state in proton-proton collisions at s=8TeV. The data were collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in 2012 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 20.3fb-1. Using a high track multiplicity requirement, 0.6±0.2 background events from Standard Model processes are predicted and none observed. This result is interpreted in the context of low-scale gravity models and 95% C.L. lower limits on microscopic black hole masses are set for different model assumptions.

  20. Evidence for the Heavy Baryon Resonance State Lambda b*0 Observed with the CDF II Detector, and Studies of New Particle Tracking Technologies Using the LANSCE Proton Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palni, Prabhakar

    To discover and probe the properties of new particles, we need to collide highly energetic particles. The Tevatron at Fermilab has collided protons and anti-protons at very high energies. These collisions produce short lived and stable particles, some known and some previously unknown. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions and discover new elementary particles. To study the interaction between high energy charged particles and the detector materials often requires development of new instruments. Thus this dissertation involves a measurement at a contemporary experiment and development of technologies for related future experiments that will build on the contemporary one. Using data from proton-antiproton collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96TeV recorded by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron, evidence for the excited resonance state Lambda_b. *0 is presented in its Lambda_b. 0 pi. + pi. - decay,followed by the Lambda_b. 0 -> Lambda_c. + pi. - and Lambda_c. + -> p K. - pi. +decays. The analysis is based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.6 fb. -1 collected by an online event selection process basedon charged particle tracks displaced from the proton-antiproton interaction point. The significance of the observed signal is 3.5sigma The mass of the observed state is found to be 5919.22 +/- 0.76 MeV/c 2 in agreement with similar findings in proton-proton collision experiments. To predict the radiation damage to the components of new particle tracking detectors, prototype devices are irradiated at test beam facilities that reproduce the radiation conditions expected. The profile of the test beam and the fluence applied per unit time must be known. We have developed a technique to monitor in real time the beam profile and fluence using an array of pin semiconductor diodes whose forward voltage is linear with fluence over the fluence regime relevant to, for example, silicon tracking detectors in the LHC upgrade era

  1. Rb-Sr, K-Ar and fission track ages for granites from Penang Island, West Malaysia: an interpretation model for Rb-Sr whole-rock and for actual and experimental mica data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, T. S.; Krähenbühl, R.; Jager, E.

    1992-09-01

    Penang Island represents the northwestern extension of the western magmatic belt of Peninsular Malaysia. Thirty-one samples of highly evolved biotite-and biotite-muscovite granites were used in an integrated study to unravel the complex magmatic, tectonic and cooling histories of these rocks. Highly distorted Rb-Sr whole-rock age patterns are evident. These are attributed to the partial post-magmatic Sr homogenization within the granite batholith which led to the rotation of isochrons towards younger ages and higher (87/86)Sr intercepts. The recognition of this mechanism allowed the establishment of a new Rb-Sr interpretation model. The intrusion ages of the granites can be extrapolated based on the evolutionary trend of the initial (87/86)Sr. Including the data of Bignell and Snelling, three episodes of granite emplacement at 307±8 Ma, 251±7 Ma and 211±2 Ma are suggested for Penang and the NW Main Range. The late-Triassic intrusive induced a hydrothermal conductive convection system which affected all the granites. It is considered to be responsible for the Rb-Sr whole-rock age distortion, the Rb-Sr and K-Ar biotite age resetting and the textural and mineralogical changes in the granites. The duration of the hydrothermal convections, deduced from the Rb-Sr whole rock ages, is about 6 Ma and 20 Ma in the northern and southern parts of Penang respectively. Fast regional cooling to 350±50°C within a time span of 1 3 Ma is recognized for the late-Triassic Feringgi intrusive from the mica ages, followed by a generally slow cooling rate of about 1°C/Ma. Fission track ages, in addition, indicate blockwise uplift along the N-S and NW-SE tending faults, thus resulting in the exposure of deeper crustal levels in southern and eastern Penang. A change in the tensional regime since Oligocene/Miocene, accompanied by a southwest tilting of the island, is indicated by the fission track apatite ages. Variable sometimes younger K-Ar, respectively Rb-Sr biotite ages mainly

  2. Detectors/Dosemeters of galactic and solar cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Tommasino, L

    2004-01-01

    Different passive multidetector stacks have been developed at the Italian National Agency for Environmental Protection (ANPA-stack), which makes it possible to measure directly ionising radiations, low-energy and high-energy neutrons, and high-energy charged (HZE) particles. The stack consists of several types of passive devices, namely recoil-track and fission-track detectors, bubble detectors, thermoluminescence dosemeters and an electronic personal dosemeter. Most of these detectors have been used on earth for the assessment of the occupational exposure, or in outer space for cosmic ray physics and/or for the assessment of the dose received by astronauts. A great deal of efforts and new developments have been required to make these detectors useful for in-flight measurements. As outcome of these extensive efforts, different new detectors have been developed, which exploit some of the most successful principles of radiation detection, such as the use of avalanche processes to facilitate the registration of nuclear tracks and the use of coincidence-counting to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. On the basis of these new detectors, different systems (generally referred to as ANPA-stack) have been obtained, which have been successfully applied for a variety of different measurements of cosmic ray radiation fields and doses. PMID:15273355

  3. Reconstruction of fault zone evolution from 40Ar/39Ar white mica, zircon and apatite fission track, and apatite U/Th-He thermochronology: 65 million years of fault activity along the Lavanttal Fault Zone (Eastern Alps)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, Walter; Woelfler, Andreas; Rabitsch, Robert; Genser, Johann

    2010-05-01

    By applying distinct thermochronological methods with closure temperatures ranging from ~450° to ~40°C we reveal the thermochronological evolution of the Lavanttal Fault Zone (LFZ) and the adjacent Koralm Complex (Eastern Alps).The LFZ is generally described to be related to Miocene orogen-parallel escape tectonics in the Eastern Alps. 40Ar/39Ar dating on white mica, zircon and apatite fission track, and apatite U/Th-He thermochronology were carried out on host rocks and fault- related rocks (cataclasites and fault gouges) directly adjacent to the undeformed host rock. The main part of 40Ar/39Ar muscovite ages provided in this study is in accordance to the ages described from the adjacent Koralm Complex. The related plateau ages are therefore interpreted to represent the cooling of the host rocks during Late Cretaceous times (80-90 Ma). Muscovites derived from cataclastic shear zones show Argon release spectra characterized by reduced incremental ages for the first heating steps. This probably indicates Argon loss along the grain boundaries during shearing and lattice distortion. Samples from fault-related catclasites are characterized by a plateau age of ca. 78 Ma and highly reduced incremental ages, respectively, far below the protolith cooling ages described above. This indicates lattice distortion and related Argon loss during cataclastic shearing, and incomplete subsequent resetting. As the incremental ages are in parts highly erratic statements about the timing of shearing remain speculative. Zircon fission track ages range between 77.6±5.5 and 64.8±4.6 Ma both within fault- and host rocks. Although all four fault/host rock sample-pair ages do overlap within the 1σ error, there is a clear trend of descending ages to the fault rocks. Apatite fission track protolith ages range between 51.1±2.3 in the central Koralm massif, and 37.7±4.3 Ma along its western margin, ages from fault- related rocks vary between 46.6 ± 4.7 and 43.3 ± 4.2 in the central part

  4. Calibration of the Politrack® system based on CR39 solid-state nuclear track detectors for passive indoor radon concentration measurements.

    PubMed

    Kropat, G; Baechler, S; Bailat, C; Barazza, F; Bochud, F; Damet, J; Meyer, N; Palacios Gruson, M; Butterweck, G

    2015-11-01

    Swiss national requirements for measuring radon gas exposures demand a lower detection limit of 50 kBq h m(-3), representing the Swiss concentration average of 70 Bq m(-3) over a 1-month period. A solid-state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) system (Politrack, Mi.am s.r.l., Italy) has been acquired to fulfil these requirements. This work was aimed at the calibration of the Politrack system with traceability to international standards and the development of a procedure to check the stability of the system. A total of 275 SSNTDs was exposed to 11 different radon exposures in the radon chamber of the Secondary Calibration Laboratory at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. The exposures ranged from 50 to 15000 kBq h m(-3). For each exposure of 20 detectors, 5 SSNTDs were used to monitor possible background exposures during transport and storage. The response curve and the calibration factor of the whole system were determined using a Monte Carlo fitting procedure. A device to produce CR39 samples with a reference number of tracks using a (241)Am source was developed for checking the long-term stability of the Politrack system. The characteristic limits for the detection of a possible system drift were determined following ISO Standard 11929.

  5. Performance of timing RPC detectors for relativistic ions and design of a time-of-flight detector (iToF) for the R3B-FAIR experiment for fission and spallation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Casarejos, E.; Ayyad, Y.; Benlliure, J.; Duran, I.; Paradela, C.; Lopez-Lago, M.; Segade, A.; Vilan, J. A.

    2011-07-01

    Resistive-plate-chambers (RPCs) were proposed to be used to build a time-of-flight detector for relativist heavy ions of the R3B-FAIR experiment, as well as other applications. State-of-the-art reaction codes allow for evaluating the requirements of the detector. The specific needs that working with heavy ions impose about material thicknesses are solved with new design concepts. We built prototypes and investigated the behaviour of RPCs tested with relativistic heavy ions. We measured the efficiency and streamer presence for ions with atomic numbers up to 38. Electron beams were used to study the timing capabilities of the prototypes. (authors)

  6. Apatite fission track evidence for the Cretaceous-Cenozoic cooling history of the Qilian Shan (NW China) and for stepwise northeastward growth of the northeastern Tibetan Plateau since early Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Bangshen; Hu, Daogong; Yang, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Yaoling; Tan, Chengxuan; Zhang, Peng; Feng, Chengjun

    2016-07-01

    Apatite fission track (AFT) data from hinterland of the Qilian Shan at the northeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau suggest this range has experienced northeastward propagation of surface uplift since early Eocene and that crustal shortening occurred in the Qilian Shan before the late Miocene. Thermochronometry data indicate that the Qilian Shan experienced a three-stage cooling history, including: (1) rapid initial cooling during Cretaceous; (2) a stage of slow cooling during late Cretaceous-early Eocene; and (3) rapid stepwise cooling in a southwestern-northeastern orientation since early Eocene. Cretaceous rapid cooling may be a record of the Lhasa block and Eurasian collision. Early Cretaceous denudation was followed by tectonic and quasi-isothermal quiescence that continued until early Eocene. Early Eocene rapid cooling in the South Qilian Shan may be the first far-field response in the Qilian Shan to the collision and convergence of the Indian and Eurasian continents. From late Eocene to middle Miocene, crustal shortening propagated into the Central Qilian Shan and North Qilian Shan and produced surface uplift of the entire Qilian Shan region before the late Miocene. This study provides a better understanding of the tectonic evolution of the Qilian Shan and when the far-field stress from the India-Eurasia collision into the northeastern Tibetan Plateau began.

  7. Neutron flux profile monitor for use in a fission reactor

    DOEpatents

    Kopp, Manfred K.; Valentine, Kenneth H.

    1983-01-01

    A neutron flux monitor is provided which consists of a plurality of fission counters arranged as spaced-apart point detectors along a delay line. As a fission event occurs in any one of the counters, two delayed current pulses are generated at the output of the delay line. The time separation of the pulses identifies the counter in which the particular fission event occured. Neutron flux profiles of reactor cores can be more accurately measured as a result.

  8. Development of a custom on-line ultrasonic vapour analyzer/flowmeter for the ATLAS inner detector, with application to gaseous tracking and Cherenkov detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, R.; Battistin, M.; Berry, S.; Berthoud, J.; Bitadze, A.; Bonneau, P.; Botelho-Direito, J.; Bousson, N.; Boyd, G.; Bozza, G.; Da Riva, E.; Degeorge, C.; DiGirolamo, B.; Doubek, M.; Godlewski, J.; Hallewell, G.; Katunin, S.; Lombard, D.; Mathieu, M.; McMahon, S.; Nagai, K.; Perez-Rodriguez, E.; Rossi, C.; Rozanov, A.; Vacek, V.; Vitek, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2013-01-01

    Precision sound velocity measurements can simultaneously determine binary gas composition and flow. We have developed an analyzer with custom electronics, currently in use in the ATLAS inner detector, with numerous potential applications. The instrument has demonstrated ~ 0.3% mixture precision for C3F8/C2F6 mixtures and < 10-4 resolution for N2/C3F8 mixtures. Moderate and high flow versions of the instrument have demonstrated flow resolutions of ± 2% of full scale for flows up to 250 l min-1, and ± 1.9% of full scale for linear flow velocities up to 15 m s-1 the latter flow approaching that expected in the vapour return of the thermosiphon fluorocarbon coolant recirculator being built for the ATLAS silicon tracker.

  9. Coincident measurements of prompt fission γ rays and fission fragments at DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, C. L.; Baramsai, B.; Jandel, M.; Rusev, G.; Couture, A.; Mosby, S.; Ullmann, J.; Kawano, T.; Stetcu, I.; Talou, P.

    2015-10-01

    Modern statistical approaches to modeling fission involve the calculation of not only average quantities but also fully correlated distributions of all fission products. Applications such as those involving the detection of special nuclear materials also rely on fully correlated data of fission products. Experimental measurements of correlated data are thus critical to the validation of theory and the development of important applications. The goal of this experiment was to measure properties of prompt fission gamma-ray emission as a function of fission fragments' total kinetic energy in the spontaneous fission of 252Cf. The measurement was carried out at the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE), a 4 π γ-ray calorimeter. A prototype design consisting of two silicon detectors was installed in the center of DANCE, allowing simultaneous measurement of fission fragments and γ rays. Effort has been taken to simulate fragment kinetic energy losses as well as γ-ray attenuation in DANCE using such tools as GEANT4 and SRIM. Theoretical predictions generated by the code CGMF were also incorporated as input for these simulations. Results from the experiment and simulations will be presented, along with plans for future measurements.

  10. Search for Charged Particle Tracks Using CR-39 Detectors to Replicate the SPAWAR Pd/D External Field Co-Deposition Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Winthrop

    2007-03-01

    A solution of 0.031 M PdCl2 and 0.30 M LiCl in D2O was electrolyzed between Pt anode and Ag cathode wires at currents ranging from 100 microamps to 100 milliamps in two similar series-connected plastic butyrate cells. Pd and D were co- deposited onto the Ag cathodes. CR-39 detectors adjacent to the Ag cathode wires were used to search for charged particle tracks in each cell. An external magnetic field was applied to one of the two cells.Throughout the experiment, ambient temperature, current through and voltage across each cell were monitored. Current was applied in a stepped fashion, starting at 0.1mA increasing by factors of 2 to 5 up to 100mA.

  11. Changes in the thermal properties of PADC film-based nuclear track detectors produced by high doses of γ-radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, A. F.; Saad, Noura; Abdalla, Y. K.

    2014-04-01

    Irradiation effects on the thermal properties of poly allyl diglycol carbonate (PADC) polymer-based nuclear track detectors (in the form of CR-39) have been investigated. PADC films were exposed to γ-rays at high doses ranging from 5.0 × 105 to 1.0 × 106 Gy. The induced modifications were analyzed by means of thermogravimetric analysis, which indicated that the PADC film decomposed in three main stages. The activation energy for thermal decomposition was determined using a type of Arrhenius equation based on the TGA experimental results. This study presents quantitative results showing that the exposed PADC films do not undergo continual further degradation from high-energy γ-photons with increase in dose. The experimental results also provide insight into the specific property changes induced by γ-rays, which may be of use for industrial applications.

  12. Multistage Tectonic Block Movements In The Catalan Coastal Ranges (ne Spain) Since Late Paleozoic Assessed By Apatite And Zircon Fission Track, And (u-th)/he Analyses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juez-Larré, J.; Andriessen, P. A. M.

    The Catalan Coastal Ranges (CCR) are located in the northeastern passive margin of the Iberian Plate and stretch out ~200 km in an ENE-WSW direction subparallel to the coastline. They can be defined as a complex system of asymmetric horsts and grabens. The horst domains are essentially composed of Paleozoic basement and a discordantly overlying Mesozoic cover. All graben domains, however, are infilled by up to 4 km of Miocene and younger sediments. Three major tectonic phases effected the CCR after the Hercynian orogeny: a Late Permian-Late Cretaceous double rift - postrift phase, the Late Cretaceous-Middle Oligocene Pyrenean orogeny, and a Late Oligocene-Middle Miocene rift phase [Salas and Casas, 1993]. Carboniferous metasediments, the oldest lithologies dated by FT, yield apparent AFT and ZFT ages much younger than their sedimentation age pointing to total thermal resetting. The intrusion of important Late Hercynian magmatic bodies is known to have increased the temperature of the adjacent Carboniferous rocks high above the ZFT closure temperature (240+/-50°C) around 290 Ma. The apatites and zircons apparent ages, therefore, would only record the post-Hercynian thermal history. Nonetheless, ZFT ages and AFT thermal models in Paleozoic basement hardly display any thermal history prior to Late Triassic (200 Ma). This suggests the existence of a second event of partial to total thermal resetting around this time. Thermal resetting is correlated to the first Mesozoic rift in which mechanical stretching of the lithosphere was followed by ascent of hot asthenospheric material to shallower crustal depth, initiating volcanism and considerable hydrothermal activity. AFT ages and Mean Track Length (MTL) between 198 and 145 Ma and 12.85 and 11.93 µm, respectively, record the subsequent Jurassic thermal crustal relaxation. New episodes of rift -related thermal activity are once again detected during the second Mesozoic rift phase when substantial fault activity created

  13. Titanite and apatite fission track analyses on basement rocks of central-southern Madagascar: constraints on exhumation and denudation rates along the eastern rift shoulder of the Morondava basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmel, B.; Jacobs, J.; Razakamanana, T.

    2004-03-01

    Titanite and apatite fission-track (FT) thermochronology from basement rocks in central-southern Madagascar reveals a protracted post Late Neoproterozoic/Early Cambrian history of extensional tectonism, denudation and sedimentation. Titanite FT ages range between 379 ± 38 and 276 ± 17 Ma and apatite FT ages vary between 379 ± 19 and 150 ± 8 Ma. Combined titanite and apatite FT data from the western palaeo margin of Madagascar suggest denudation rates of ˜200-100 mMa -1 during Carboniferous times. The Late Neoproterozoic/Early Cambrian Ejeda shear zone was probably reactivated during this time. In contrast, for the same period denudation rates inland are ˜110-25 mMa -1. During Permo-Triassic rifting, areas that previously underwent fast denudation were buried by sedimentary cover up to ˜4.5 km. At this time, a graben developed along the transcontinental Bongolava-Ranotsara shear zone (BRSZ). Graben faults are exposed at the northeastern graben shoulder. Identical titanite and apatite FT ages close to the BRSZ indicate rapid cooling associated with fluid circulation during Early Permian times. The initial Gondwana break-up during Middle Jurassic times and the drift of Madagascar along the Davie transform fault did not significantly influence the FT data and had only minor geomorphic impact in the study area. Only the far southwestern part of the island is characterised by a higher degree of denudation (max. ˜3.5 km) during Early Jurassic times. Early Cretaceous and Cenozoic volcanic activity affected the apatite FT data from southern Madagascar. Modelled time-temperature ( T- t) paths argue for a reheating of samples from southern Madagascar to temperatures of ˜60-80 °C during the times of magmatism, before final cooling to surface temperatures.

  14. Geometry of membrane fission.

    PubMed

    Frolov, Vadim A; Escalada, Artur; Akimov, Sergey A; Shnyrova, Anna V

    2015-01-01

    Cellular membranes define the functional geometry of intracellular space. Formation of new membrane compartments and maintenance of complex organelles require division and disconnection of cellular membranes, a process termed membrane fission. Peripheral membrane proteins generally control membrane remodeling during fission. Local membrane stresses, reflecting molecular geometry of membrane-interacting parts of these proteins, sum up to produce the key membrane geometries of fission: the saddle-shaped neck and hour-glass hemifission intermediate. Here, we review the fundamental principles behind the translation of molecular geometry into membrane shape and topology during fission. We emphasize the central role the membrane insertion of specialized protein domains plays in orchestrating fission in vitro and in cells. We further compare individual to synergistic action of the membrane insertion during fission mediated by individual protein species, proteins complexes or membrane domains. Finally, we describe how local geometry of fission intermediates defines the functional design of the protein complexes catalyzing fission of cellular membranes. PMID:25062896

  15. A performance test of a new high-surface-quality and high-sensitivity CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector - TechnoTrak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodaira, S.; Morishige, K.; Kawashima, H.; Kitamura, H.; Kurano, M.; Hasebe, N.; Koguchi, Y.; Shinozaki, W.; Ogura, K.

    2016-09-01

    We have studied the performance of a newly-commercialized CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD), "TechnoTrak", in energetic heavy ion measurements. The advantages of TechnoTrak are derived from its use of a purified CR-39 monomer to improve surface quality combined with an antioxidant to improve sensitivity to low-linear-energy-transfer (LET) particles. We irradiated these detectors with various heavy ions (from protons to krypton) with various energies (30-500 MeV/u) at the heavy ion accelerator facilities in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The surface roughness after chemical etching was improved to be 59% of that of the conventional high-sensitivity CR-39 detector (HARZLAS/TD-1). The detectable dynamic range of LET was found to be 3.5-600 keV/μm. The LET and charge resolutions for three ions tested ranged from 5.1% to 1.5% and 0.14 to 0.22 c.u. (charge unit), respectively, in the LET range of 17-230 keV/μm, which represents an improvement over conventional products (HARZLAS/TD-1 and BARYOTRAK). A correction factor for the angular dependence was determined for correcting the LET spectrum in an isotropic radiation field. We have demonstrated the potential of TechnoTrak, with its two key features of high surface quality and high sensitivity to low-LET particles, to improve automatic analysis protocols in radiation dosimetry and various other radiological applications.

  16. FREYA-a new Monte Carlo code for improved modeling of fission chains

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, C A; Randrup, J; Vogt, R L

    2012-06-12

    A new simulation capability for modeling of individual fission events and chains and the transport of fission products in materials is presented. FREYA ( Fission Yield Event Yield Algorithm ) is a Monte Carlo code for generating fission events providing correlated kinematic information for prompt neutrons, gammas, and fragments. As a standalone code, FREYA calculates quantities such as multiplicity-energy, angular, and gamma-neutron energy sharing correlations. To study materials with multiplication, shielding effects, and detectors, we have integrated FREYA into the general purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP. This new tool will allow more accurate modeling of detector responses including correlations and the development of SNM detectors with increased sensitivity.

  17. Radon measurements by nuclear track detectors in dwellings in Oke-Ogun area, South-Western, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Obed, R I; Ademola, A K; Ogundare, F O

    2012-03-01

    An indoor radon survey of a total of 77 dwellings randomly selected in 10 districts in Oke-Ogun area of Oyo state, South-western Nigeria was carried out using CR-39 detectors. The CR-39 detectors were placed in the bedrooms and living rooms and exposed for 6 months and then etched in NaOH 6.25 N solution at 90 °C for 3 h. Mean concentrations amount to 255 ± 47 and 259 ± 67 Bq m(-3) in the living rooms and bedrooms, respectively. The lowest radon concentration (77 ± 29 Bq m(-3)) was found in Igbeti, whereas the highest was found in Okeho (627 ± 125 Bq m(-3)). The annual exposure of dwellers was estimated to fall <10 mSv (6.4 and 6.5 mSv y(-1) n living rooms and bedrooms, respectively), which is the upper range of action levels recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The average excess lung cancer risk was estimated 24.8 and 25.2 per million person-years in both living rooms and bedrooms. It is believed that the high radon level in this part of the country may be attributed to its geographic location. The data presented here will serve as a baseline survey for radon concentration in dwellings in the area.

  18. Fission neutron spectra measurements at LANSCE - status and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, Robert C; Noda, Shusaku; Nelson, Ronald O; O' Donnell, John M; Devlin, Matt; Chatillon, Audrey; Granier, Thierry; Taieb, Julien; Laurent, Benoit; Belier, Gilbert; Becker, John A; Wu, Ching - Yen

    2009-01-01

    A program to measure fission neutron spectra from neutron-induced fission of actinides is underway at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in a collaboration among the CEA laboratory at Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The spallation source of fast neutrons at LANSCE is used to provide incident neutron energies from less than 1 MeV to 100 MeV or higher. The fission events take place in a gas-ionization fission chamber, and the time of flight from the neutron source to that chamber gives the energy of the incident neutron. Outgoing neutrons are detected by an array of organic liquid scintillator neutron detectors, and their energies are deduced from the time of flight from the fission chamber to the neutron detector. Measurements have been made of the fission neutrons from fission of {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu. The range of outgoing energies measured so far is from 1 MeV to approximately 8 MeV. These partial spectra and average fission neutron energies are compared with evaluated data and with models of fission neutron emission. Results to date will be presented and a discussion of uncertainties will be given in this presentation. Future plans are to make significant improvements in the fission chambers, neutron detectors, signal processing, data acquisition and the experimental environment to provide high fidelity data including mea urements of fission neutrons below 1 MeV and improvements in the data above 8 MeV.

  19. Prompt Fission Gamma-ray Studies at DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandel, M.; Rusev, G.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Chadwick, M. B.; Couture, A.; Fowler, M. M.; Haight, R. C.; Kawano, T.; Keksis, A. L.; Mosby, S. M.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Stetcu, I.; Talou, P.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Stoyer, M. A.; Haslett, R. J.; Henderson, R. A.; Becker, J. A.; Wu, C. Y.

    Measurements of correlated data on prompt-fission γ-rays (PFG) have been carried out for various actinide isotopes in recent years using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). We have developed a model that conveniently parametrizes the correlated data of γ-ray multiplicity and energy. New results on two- dimensional prompt-fission γ-ray multiplicity versus energy distributions from spontaneous fission on 252Cf and neutron-induced fission on 242mAm are presented together with previously obtained results on 233,235U and 239Pu. Correlated PFG data from 252Cf are also compared to results of the detailed theoretical model developed at LANL, for different thresholds of PFG energies. Future plans to measure correlated data on fission fragments, prompt fission neutrons and γ-rays at DANCE are presented.

  20. Prompt fission gamma-ray studies at DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Jandel, M.; Rusev, G.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Chadwick, M. B.; Couture, A.; Fowler, M.. M; Haight, R. C.; Kawano, T.; Keksis, A. L.; Mosby, S. M.; O’Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Stetcu, I.; Talou, P.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Stoyer, M. A.; Haslett, R. J.; Henderson, R. A.; Becker, J. A.; Wu, C. Y.

    2014-11-26

    Measurements of correlated data on prompt-fission γ-rays (PFG) have been carried out for various actinide isotopes in recent years using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). We have developed a model that conveniently parametrizes the correlated data of γ-ray multiplicity and energy. New results on two- dimensional prompt-fission γ-ray multiplicity versus energy distributions from spontaneous fission on ²⁵²Cf and neutron-induced fission on 242mAm are presented together with previously obtained results on 233,235U and ²³⁹Pu. Correlated PFG data from ²⁵²Cf are also compared to results of the detailed theoretical model developed at LANL, for different thresholds of PFG energies. Future plans to measure correlated data on fission fragments, prompt fission neutrons and γ-rays at DANCE are presented.

  1. Improved Direct Measurement of Ab with the SLD Detector Using a Mass Tag and Momentum-Weighted Track Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Serbo, Victor V.

    2002-08-27

    We present an improved direct measurement of the parity-violation parameter A{sub b} in the Z boson-b quark coupling using a self-calibrating track-charge technique applied to a sample enriched in Z {yields} b{bar b} events via the topological reconstruction of the B hadron mass. Manipulation of the SLC electron-beam polarization permits the measurement of A{sub b} to be made independently of other Z-pole coupling parameters. From the 1996-98 sample of 400,000 hadronic Z decays,produced with an average beam polarization of 73.4%, we find A{sub b} = 0.906 {+-} 0.022(stat.) {+-} 0.023(syst.).

  2. Fission of actinide nuclei using multi-nucleon transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léguillon, Romain; Nishio, Katsuhisa; Hirose, Kentaro; Orlandi, Riccardo; Makii, Hiroyuki; Nishinaka, Ichiro; Ishii, Tetsuro; Tsukada, Kazuaki; Asai, Masato; Chiba, Satoshi; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu; Araki, Shohei; Watanabe, Yukinobu; Tatsuzawa, Ryotaro; Takaki, Naoyuki

    2014-09-01

    We are promoting a campaign to measure fission-fragment mass distributions for neutron-rich actinide nuclei populated by transfer reactions from their ground state up to an excitation energy of several tens MeV. We thus obtain the excitation energy dependence of the mass distribution. The experiment was carried out at the 20 MV JAEA tandem facility at Tokai. We report on the data obtained in the direct reaction 18 O + 232 Th . Transfer-channels and excitation energies of the fissioning nuclei were identified using silicon dE-E detectors located at forward angle. Two fission fragments were detected in coincidence using multi-wire proportional counters. Fission fragment masses were determined by kinematic consideration. We obtained the fission fragment mass distributions for 13 nuclei from actinium to uranium and some fission barrier heights. We are promoting a campaign to measure fission-fragment mass distributions for neutron-rich actinide nuclei populated by transfer reactions from their ground state up to an excitation energy of several tens MeV. We thus obtain the excitation energy dependence of the mass distribution. The experiment was carried out at the 20 MV JAEA tandem facility at Tokai. We report on the data obtained in the direct reaction 18 O + 232 Th . Transfer-channels and excitation energies of the fissioning nuclei were identified using silicon dE-E detectors located at forward angle. Two fission fragments were detected in coincidence using multi-wire proportional counters. Fission fragment masses were determined by kinematic consideration. We obtained the fission fragment mass distributions for 13 nuclei from actinium to uranium and some fission barrier heights. Present study is supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.

  3. Insights into nuclear structure and the fission process from spontaneous fission

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, J.H.; Butler-Moore, K.; Ramayya, A.V.

    1993-12-31

    The {gamma}-rays emitted following spontaneous and induced fission are rich sources of information about the structure of neutron-rich nuclei and about the fission process itself. The study of spontaneous fissioning isotopes with large Ge detector arrays are providing a wealth of such information as seen, for example, in recent reports. In this paper we present some of our most recent results on nuclear structure studies and conclusions on the fission process itself. In our work, we have employed in spontaneous fission, a triple gamma coincidence study for the first time and a high resolution, X-ray detector-{gamma}-coincidence study. These data provide powerful ways of separating the gamma rays which belong to a particular nucleus. The triple coincidence technique was used to uniquely identify the levels in {sup 136}Te and higher spin states in its N=84 isotones, {sup 138}Xe and {sup 140}Ba{sup 171}. Some other examples of the level structures observed in the low and high mass partners are presented, including a detailed analysis of the backbending of the moment of inertia in {sup 112,114,116}Pd. Finally, we present the first examples of how our analysis allows one to extract a detailed picture of the dependence of the angular momentum on the mass and atomic numbers of the fission fragments and of the long-sought neutron multiplicity distribution from zero-n to ten-n as a function of the charge and mass asymmetry.

  4. High resolution track etch autoradiography

    DOEpatents

    Solares, Guido; Zamenhof, Robert G.

    1994-01-01

    A detector assembly for use in obtaining alpha-track autoradiographs, the detector assembly including a substantially boron-free substrate; a detector layer deposited on the substantially boron-free substrate, the detector layer being capable of recording alpha particle tracks and exhibiting evidence of the alpha tracks in response to being exposed to an etchant, the detector layer being less than about 2 microns thick; and a protective layer deposited on the detector layer, the protective layer being resistant to the etchant and having a thickness of about 0.5 to 1 microns.

  5. High resolution track etch autoradiography

    DOEpatents

    Solares, G.; Zamenhof, R.G.

    1994-12-27

    A detector assembly is disclosed for use in obtaining alpha-track autoradiographs, the detector assembly including a substantially boron-free substrate; a detector layer deposited on the substantially boron-free substrate, the detector layer being capable of recording alpha particle tracks and exhibiting evidence of the alpha tracks in response to being exposed to an etchant, the detector layer being less than about 2 microns thick; and a protective layer deposited on the detector layer, the protective layer being resistant to the etchant and having a thickness of about 0.5 to 1 microns. 13 figures.

  6. Ionization Chamber for Prompt Fission Neutron Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeynalov, Sh.; Zeynalova, O.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Sedyshev, P.; Shvetsov, V.

    In this work we report recent achievements in design of twin back-to-back ionization chamber (TIC) for fission fragment (FF) mass and kinetic energy measurement. Correlated FF kinetic energies, their masses and the angle of FF in respect to the axes in 3D Cartesian coordinates can be determined from analysis of the heights and shapes of the pulses induced by the fission fragments on the anodes of TIC. Anodes of TIC were designed as consisting of isolated strips each having independent electronic circuitry and special multi-channel pulse processing apparatus. Mathematical formulae provided for FF angles measured in respect to the coordinate axes. It was shown how the point of fission fragments origin on the target plane may be determined using the same measured data. The last feature made the TIC a rather powerful tool for prompt fission neutron (PFN) emission investigation in event-by-event analysis of individual fission reactions from non- point fissile source. Position sensitive neutron induced fission detector for neutron-imaging applications with both thermal and low energy neutrons was found as another possible implementation of the designed TIC.

  7. Novel roles for actin in mitochondrial fission

    PubMed Central

    Hatch, Anna L.; Gurel, Pinar S.; Higgs, Henry N.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitochondrial dynamics, including fusion, fission and translocation, are crucial to cellular homeostasis, with roles in cellular polarity, stress response and apoptosis. Mitochondrial fission has received particular attention, owing to links with several neurodegenerative diseases. A central player in fission is the cytoplasmic dynamin-related GTPase Drp1, which oligomerizes at the fission site and hydrolyzes GTP to drive membrane ingression. Drp1 recruitment to the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) is a key regulatory event, which appears to require a pre-constriction step in which the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrion interact extensively, a process termed ERMD (ER-associated mitochondrial division). It is unclear how ER–mitochondrial contact generates the force required for pre-constriction or why pre-constriction leads to Drp1 recruitment. Recent results, however, show that ERMD might be an actin-based process in mammals that requires the ER-associated formin INF2 upstream of Drp1, and that myosin II and other actin-binding proteins might be involved. In this Commentary, we present a mechanistic model for mitochondrial fission in which actin and myosin contribute in two ways; firstly, by supplying the force for pre-constriction and secondly, by serving as a coincidence detector for Drp1 binding. In addition, we discuss the possibility that multiple fission mechanisms exist in mammals. PMID:25217628

  8. Spontaneous fission of the heaviest elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1989-04-01

    Although spontaneous fission was discovered in /sup 238/U in 1940, detailed studies of the process were first made possible in the 1960's with the availability of milligram quantities of /sup 252/Cf. The advent of solid-state detectors made it possible to perform measurements of coincident fission fragments from even very short-lived spontaneous fission activities or those available in only very small quantities. Until 1971 it was believed that the main features of the mass and kinetic-energy distributions were essentially the same as those for thermal neutron-induced fission and that all low-energy fission proceeded via asymmetric mass division with total kinetic energies which could be derived by linear extrapolation from those of lighter elements. In 1971, measurements of /sup 257/Fm showed an increase in symmetric mass division with anomalously high TKE's. Subsequent experiments showed that in /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Fm, the most probable mass split was symmetric with very high total kinetic energy. Measurements for the heavier elements have shown symmetric mass distributions with both high and low total kinetic energies. Recent results for spontaneous fission properties of the heaviest elements are reviewed and compared with theory. 31 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  9. An instrument for measuring equilibrium-equivalent 222Rn and 220Rn concentrations with etched track detectors.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, W; Iida, T

    1999-11-01

    To simultaneously measure both 222Rn and 220Rn progeny concentrations, a new type of portable integrating monitor with allyl diglycol carbonate (CR-39) plastic detectors was developed. The monitor gives the average equilibrium-equivalent 222Rn and 220Rn concentrations (EEC(RN) and EEC(Tn)) during sampling intervals. The detection efficiencies of the alpha particles were calculated by Monte Carlo method. The lower limits of detection for EEC(Rn) and EEC(Tn) are estimated to be 0.57 Bq m(-3) and 0.07 Bq m(-3) for 24 h continuously sampling at a flow rate of 0.8 L min(-1). The measuring results with the new type monitors were confirmed through intercomparison experiments. In a small survey, a rather high 220Rn progeny concentration with an average of 1.73 Bq m(-3) was observed in traditional Japanese dwellings with soil/mud plastered walls. On the other hand, a very high 232Th concentration in soil was reported in China. They suggested that there is a possibility of high 220Rn progeny concentration in both Japan and China.

  10. Timing of detachment faulting in the Bullfrog Hills and Bare Mountain area, southwest Nevada: Inferences from40Ar/39Ar, K-Ar, U-Pb, and fission track thermochronology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoisch, T.D.; Heizler, M.T.; Zartman, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    Crustal extension in the Bullfrog Hills and Bare Mountain area of southwest Nevada is associated with movement along a regional detachment fault. Normal faulting in the upper plate and rapid cooling (denudation) of the lower plate were coeval with Miocene silicic volcanism and with west-northwest transport along the detachment fault. A west-northwest progression of tilting along upper plate normal faults is indicated by ages of the volcanic rocks in relation to angular unconformities. Near the breakaway, tilting in the upper plate occurred between 12.7 and 11.6 Ma, continued less strongly past 10.7 Ma, and was over by 8.2 Ma. Ten to 20 km west of the breakaway, tilting occurred between 10.7 and 10.33 Ma, continued less strongly after 10.33 Ma, and was over by 8.1 Ma. The cooling histories of the lower plate metamorphic rocks were determined by thermochronologic dating methods: K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar on muscovite, biotite, and hornblende, 40Ar/39Ar on K-feldspar, U-Pb on apatite, zircon, and sphene, and fission track on apatite, zircon, and sphene. Lower plate rocks 10 km west of the breakaway cooled slowly from Early Cretaceous lower-amphibolite facies conditions through 350??50?? to 300??50??C between 57 and 38 Ma, then cooled rapidly from 205??50?? to 120??50??C between 12.6??1.6 and 11.1??1.9 Ma. Lower plate rocks 20 km west of the breakaway cooled slowly from Early Cretaceous upper-amphibolite facies conditions through 500??50??C at 78-67 Ma, passed through 350??50?? to 300??50??C between 16.3??0.4 and 10.5??0.3 Ma, then cooled rapidly from 285??50?? to 120??50??C between 10.2 and 8.6 Ma. Upper plate tilting and rapid cooling (denudation) of the lower plate occurred simultaneously in the respective areas. The early slow-cooling part of the lower plate thermal histories was probably related to erosion at the Earth's surface, which stripped off about 9 km of material in 50 to 100 m.y. The results indicate an initial fault dip ???30?? and a 12 mm yr-1 west

  11. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei

    2010-09-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  12. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, Justin

    2013-10-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  13. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, Justin

    2012-10-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  14. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2011-10-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  15. Measurement of gamma and neutron radiations inside spent fuel assemblies with passive detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viererbl, L.; Lahodová, Z.; Voljanskij, A.; Klupák, V.; Koleška, M.; Cabalka, M.; Turek, K.

    2011-10-01

    During operation of a fission nuclear reactor, many radionuclides are generated in fuel by fission and activation of 235U, 238U and other nuclides present in the assembly. After removal of a fuel assembly from the core, these radionuclides are sources of different types of radiation. Gamma and neutron radiation emitted from an assembly can be non-destructively detected with different types of detectors. In this paper, a new method of measurement of radiation from a spent fuel assembly is presented. It is based on usage of passive detectors, such as alanine dosimeters for gamma radiation and track detectors for neutron radiation. Measurements are made on the IRT-2M spent fuel assemblies used in the LVR-15 research reactor. During irradiation of detectors, the fuel assembly is located in a water storage pool at a depth of 6 m. Detectors are inserted into central hole of the assembly, irradiated for a defined time interval, and after the detectors removed from the assembly, gamma dose or neutron fluence are evaluated. Measured profiles of gamma dose rate and neutron fluence rate inside of the spent fuel assembly are presented. This measurement can be used to evaluate relative fuel burn-up.

  16. Method to calibrate fission chambers in Campbelling mode

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit Geslot; Troy C. Unruh; Philippe Filliatre; Christian Jammes; Jacques Di Salvo; Stéphane Bréaud; Jean-François Villard

    2011-06-01

    Fission chambers are neutron detectors which are widely used to instrument experimental reactors such as material testing reactors or zero power reactors. In the presence of a high level mixed gamma and neutron flux, fission chambers can be operated in Campbelling mode (also known as 'fluctuation mode' or 'mean square voltage mode') to provide reliable and precise neutron related measurements. Fission chamber calibration in Campbelling mode (in terms of neutron flux) is usually done empirically using a calibrated reference detector. A major drawback of this method is that calibration measurements have to be performed in a neutron environment very similar to the one in which the calibrated detector will be used afterwards. What we propose here is a different approach based on characterizing the fission chamber response in terms of fission rate. This way, the detector calibration coefficient is independent from the neutron spectrum and can be determined prior to the experiment. The fissile deposit response to the neutron spectrum can then be assessed independently by other means (experimental or numerical). In this paper, the response of CEA made miniature fission chambers in Campbelling mode is studied. We use a theoretical model of the signal to calculate the calibration coefficient. Input parameters of the model come from statistical distribution of individual pulses. Supporting measurements have been made in the CEA Cadarache zero power reactor MINERVE. Results are compared to an empirical Campbelling mode calibration.

  17. Neutron angular distribution in plutonium-240 spontaneous fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcath, Matthew J.; Shin, Tony H.; Clarke, Shaun D.; Peerani, Paolo; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear safeguards applications require accurate fission models that exhibit prompt neutron anisotropy. In the laboratory reference frame, an anisotropic neutron angular distribution is observed because prompt fission neutrons carry momentum from fully accelerated fission fragments. A liquid organic scintillation detector array was used with pulse shape discrimination techniques to produce neutron-neutron cross-correlation time distributions and angular distributions from spontaneous fission in a 252Cf, a 0.84 g 240Pueff metal, and a 1.63 g 240Pueff metal sample. The effect of cross-talk, estimated with MCNPX-PoliMi simulations, is removed from neutron-neutron coincidences as a function of the angle between detector pairs. Fewer coincidences were observed at detector angles near 90°, relative to higher and lower detector angles. As light output threshold increases, the observed anisotropy increases due to spectral effects arising from fission fragment momentum transfer to emitted neutrons. Stronger anisotropy was observed in Cf-252 spontaneous fission prompt neutrons than in Pu-240 neutrons.

  18. Comparison of fission modes in {sup 252}Cf, {sup 257}Fm, and {sup 260}Md

    SciTech Connect

    Aarle, J. van; Siemon, K.; Patzelt, P.; Wild, J. F.; Lougheed, R. W.; Westmeier, W.

    1998-10-26

    Although the spontaneous-fission properties of heavy actinides have been studied for well over 35 years, many interesting and informative details continue to come into light. During the last decade, the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf, {sup 257}Fm and {sup 260}Md has been extensively investigated at the Philipps University of Marburg, by means of a gadolinium-doped liquid scintillation tank for neutron counting and surface barrier detectors for fission fragment detection. The three nuclides represent the transition from the well-known asymmetric fission yield distribution, as it is characteristic for {sup 252}Cf, to a much more symmetrical one, found in the fission of {sup 260}Md. Therefore, trends in the dynamical changes of fission properties have been derived from these studies. For the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf and {sup 260}Md, it was already shown that different fission modes, as proposed by theoretical calculations of Brosa et al. (5), could be separated, using the correlation between the neutrons emitted in a fission event and both the observed fission-fragment mass and the total kinetic energy (1, 2). In the case of {sup 257}Fm, no theoretical calculations for fission modes exist. However, from the fission properties of the two surrounding actinides, one can expect at least three different fission modes, namely two 'standard' and the 'supershort' mode. In this paper, results from the recent {sup 257}Fm experiment will be presented and compared to systematics extracted from the fission properties of other heavy actinides.

  19. Basic Physics Data: Measurement of Neutron Multiplicity from Induced Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Pozzi, Sara; Haight, Robert

    2015-05-04

    From October 1 to October 17 a team of researchers from UM visited the LANSCE facility for an experiment during beam-time allotted from October 4 to October 17. A total of 24 detectors were used at LANSCE including liquid organic scintillation detectors (EJ-309), NaI scintillation detectors, and Li-6 enriched glass detectors. It is a double time-offlight (TOF) measurement using spallation neutrons generated by a target bombarded with pulsed high-energy protons. The neutrons travel to an LLNL-manufactured parallel plate avalanche chamber (PPAC) loaded with thin U-235 foils in which fission events are induced. The generated fission neutrons and photons are then detected in a detector array designed and built at UM and shipped to LANSCE. Preparations were made at UM, where setup and proposed detectors were tested. The UM equipment was then shipped to LANSCE for use at the 15L beam of the weapons neutron research (WNR) facility.

  20. High Dynamics and Precision Optical Measurement Using a Position Sensitive Detector (PSD) in Reflection-Mode: Application to 2D Object Tracking over a Smart Surface

    PubMed Central

    Ivan, Ioan Alexandru; Ardeleanu, Mihai; Laurent, Guillaume J.

    2012-01-01

    When related to a single and good contrast object or a laser spot, position sensing, or sensitive, detectors (PSDs) have a series of advantages over the classical camera sensors, including a good positioning accuracy for a fast response time and very simple signal conditioning circuits. To test the performance of this kind of sensor for microrobotics, we have made a comparative analysis between a precise but slow video camera and a custom-made fast PSD system applied to the tracking of a diffuse-reflectivity object transported by a pneumatic microconveyor called Smart-Surface. Until now, the fast system dynamics prevented the full control of the smart surface by visual servoing, unless using a very expensive high frame rate camera. We have built and tested a custom and low cost PSD-based embedded circuit, optically connected with a camera to a single objective by means of a beam splitter. A stroboscopic light source enhanced the resolution. The obtained results showed a good linearity and a fast (over 500 frames per second) response time which will enable future closed-loop control by using PSD. PMID:23223078

  1. High dynamics and precision optical measurement using a position sensitive detector (PSD) in reflection-mode: application to 2D object tracking over a Smart Surface.

    PubMed

    Ivan, Ioan Alexandru; Ardeleanu, Mihai; Laurent, Guillaume J

    2012-01-01

    When related to a single and good contrast object or a laser spot, position sensing, or sensitive, detectors (PSDs) have a series of advantages over the classical camera sensors, including a good positioning accuracy for a fast response time and very simple signal conditioning circuits. To test the performance of this kind of sensor for microrobotics, we have made a comparative analysis between a precise but slow video camera and a custom-made fast PSD system applied to the tracking of a diffuse-reflectivity object transported by a pneumatic microconveyor called Smart-Surface. Until now, the fast system dynamics prevented the full control of the smart surface by visual servoing, unless using a very expensive high frame rate camera. We have built and tested a custom and low cost PSD-based embedded circuit, optically connected with a camera to a single objective by means of a beam splitter. A stroboscopic light source enhanced the resolution. The obtained results showed a good linearity and a fast (over 500 frames per second) response time which will enable future closed-loop control by using PSD. PMID:23223078

  2. Vertex detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lueth, V.

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of a vertex detector is to measure position and angles of charged particle tracks to sufficient precision so as to be able to separate tracks originating from decay vertices from those produced at the interaction vertex. Such measurements are interesting because they permit the detection of weakly decaying particles with lifetimes down to 10{sup {minus}13} s, among them the {tau} lepton and charm and beauty hadrons. These two lectures are intended to introduce the reader to the different techniques for the detection of secondary vertices that have been developed over the past decades. The first lecture includes a brief introduction to the methods used to detect secondary vertices and to estimate particle lifetimes. It describes the traditional technologies, based on photographic recording in emulsions and on film of bubble chambers, and introduces fast electronic registration of signals derived from scintillating fibers, drift chambers and gaseous micro-strip chambers. The second lecture is devoted to solid state detectors. It begins with a brief introduction into semiconductor devices, and then describes the application of large arrays of strip and pixel diodes for charged particle tracking. These lectures can only serve as an introduction the topic of vertex detectors. Time and space do not allow for an in-depth coverage of many of the interesting aspects of vertex detector design and operation.

  3. Muon Tracking to Detect Special Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schwellenbach, D.; Dreesen, W.; Green, J. A.; Tibbitts, A.; Schotik, G.; Borozdin, K.; Bacon, J.; Midera, H.; Milner, C.; Morris, C.; Perry, J.; Barrett, S.; Perry, K.; Scott, A.; Wright, C.; Aberle, D.

    2013-03-18

    Previous experiments have proven that nuclear assemblies can be imaged and identified inside of shipping containers using vertical trajectory cosmic-ray muons with two-sided imaging. These experiments have further demonstrated that nuclear assemblies can be identified by detecting fission products in coincidence with tracked muons. By developing these technologies, advanced sensors can be designed for a variety of warhead monitoring and detection applications. The focus of this project is to develop tomographic-mode imaging using near-horizontal trajectory muons in conjunction with secondary particle detectors. This will allow imaging in-situ without the need to relocate the objects and will enable differentiation of special nuclear material (SNM) from other high-Z materials.

  4. Neutron Induced Fission Measurements of ^242mAm at DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyzh, A.; Wu, C. Y.; Macri, R. A.; Agvaanlusan, U.; Parker, W. E.; Wilk, P. A.; Becker, J. A.; Jandel, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Bond, E. M.; Chadwick, M. B.; Clement, R. R.; Couture, A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Haight, R. C.; Keksis, A. L.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.

    2010-11-01

    Neutron capture and fission reactions on actinieds often present challenges in measuring each of the reaction. Fission tagging detector used along with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) provides a way to measure (n,f) and (n,γ) reactions simultaneously. DANCE was used to measure ^242mAm(n,f) reaction along with a custom made fission-tagging parallel plate avalanche counter (PPAC). The results on fission related γ-ray multiplicity distribution, the ^242mAm(n,f) cross section, and the average γ-ray energy distribution are presented.

  5. Neutron detector using sol-gel absorber

    DOEpatents

    Hiller, John M.; Wallace, Steven A.; Dai, Sheng

    1999-01-01

    An neutron detector composed of fissionable material having ions of lithium, uranium, thorium, plutonium, or neptunium, contained within a glass film fabricated using a sol-gel method combined with a particle detector is disclosed. When the glass film is bombarded with neutrons, the fissionable material emits fission particles and electrons. Prompt emitting activated elements yielding a high energy electron contained within a sol-gel glass film in combination with a particle detector is also disclosed. The emissions resulting from neutron bombardment can then be detected using standard UV and particle detection methods well known in the art, such as microchannel plates, channeltrons, and silicon avalanche photodiodes.

  6. A Time Projection Chamber for High Accuracy and Precision Fission Cross-Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    T. Hill; K. Jewell; M. Heffner; D. Carter; M. Cunningham; V. Riot; J. Ruz; S. Sangiorgio; B. Seilhan; L. Snyder; D. M. Asner; S. Stave; G. Tatishvili; L. Wood; R. G. Baker; J. L. Klay; R. Kudo; S. Barrett; J. King; M. Leonard; W. Loveland; L. Yao; C. Brune; S. Grimes; N. Kornilov; T. N. Massey; J. Bundgaard; D. L. Duke; U. Greife; U. Hager; E. Burgett; J. Deaven; V. Kleinrath; C. McGrath; B. Wendt; N. Hertel; D. Isenhower; N. Pickle; H. Qu; S. Sharma; R. T. Thornton; D. Tovwell; R. S. Towell; S.

    2014-09-01

    The fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) is a compact (15 cm diameter) two-chamber MICROMEGAS TPC designed to make precision cross-section measurements of neutron-induced fission. The actinide targets are placed on the central cathode and irradiated with a neutron beam that passes axially through the TPC inducing fission in the target. The 4p acceptance for fission fragments and complete charged particle track reconstruction are powerful features of the fissionTPC which will be used to measure fission cross-sections and examine the associated systematic errors. This paper provides a detailed description of the design requirements, the design solutions, and the initial performance of the fissionTPC.

  7. Applications of Event-by-Event Fission Modeling with FREYA

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R; Randrup, J

    2011-09-16

    The recently developed code FREYA (Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm) generates large samples of complete fission events, consisting of two receding product nuclei as well as a number of neutrons and photons, all with complete kinematic information. Thus it is possible to calculate arbitrary correlation observables whose behavior may provide unique insight into the fission process. We first discuss the present status of FREYA, which has now been extended to include spontaneous fission. Concentrating on {sup 239}Pu(n{sub th},f), {sup 240}Pu(sf) and {sup 252}Cf(sf), we discuss the neutron multiplicity correlations, the dependence of the neutron energy spectrum on the neutron multiplicity, and the relationship between the fragment kinetic energy and the number of neutrons and their energies. We also suggest novel fission observables that could be measured with modern detectors.

  8. The Fission Barrier Landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Phair, L.; Moretto, L. G.

    2008-04-17

    Fission excitation functions have been measured for a chain of neighboring compound nuclei from {sup 207}Po to {sup 212}Po. We present a new analysis which provides a determination of the fission barriers and ground state shell effects with nearly spectroscopic accuracy. The accuracy achieved in this analysis may lead to a future detailed exploration of the saddle mass surface and its spectroscopy.

  9. Fission Spectrum Related Uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    G. Aliberti; I. Kodeli; G. Palmiotti; M. Salvatores

    2007-10-01

    The paper presents a preliminary uncertainty analysis related to potential uncertainties on the fission spectrum data. Consistent results are shown for a reference fast reactor design configuration and for experimental thermal configurations. However the results obtained indicate the need for further analysis, in particular in terms of fission spectrum uncertainty data assessment.

  10. Fission gas detection system

    DOEpatents

    Colburn, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A device for collecting fission gas released by a failed fuel rod which device uses a filter to pass coolant but which filter blocks fission gas bubbles which cannot pass through the filter due to the surface tension of the bubble.

  11. Neutron capture and fission in /sup 254g/ Es

    SciTech Connect

    Halperin, J.; Bigelow, J.E.; O'Kelley, G.D.; Oliver, J.H.; Wiggins, J.T.

    1985-07-01

    Integral neutron capture and neutron fission cross sections have been measured for the 276-day /sup 254g/ Es. Thermal cross sections and resonance integrals were evaluated using a cadmium filter technique. Capture cross sections were determined from alpha-particle spectrum measurements following neutron irradiations with cobalt flux monitors. Fission cross sections were measured using fission track detection techniques with STTU monitors. The fission cross-section values compared favorably with an absorption cross-section determination from a burnout experiment of SVTEs-SVUEs. The integral neutron capture and fission cross sections determined for /sup 254g/ Es are: sigma /sub c/ /sup th/ = 28.3 + or - 2.5 and I /sub c/ = 18.2 + or - 1.5 b, and sigma /sub F/ /sup th/ = 1970 + or - 200 and I /sub F/ = 1200 + or - 250 b.

  12. Microscopic modeling of mass and charge distributions in the spontaneous fission of 240Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Nazarewicz, Witold; Schunck, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    We propose a methodology to calculate microscopically the mass and charge distributions of spontaneous fission yields. We combine the multidimensional minimization of collective action for fission with stochastic Langevin dynamics to track the relevant fission paths from the ground-state configuration up to scission. The nuclear potential energy and collective inertia governing the tunneling motion are obtained with nuclear density functional theory in the collective space of shape deformations and pairing. We obtain a quantitative agreement with experimental data and find that both the charge and mass distributions in the spontaneous fission of 240Pu are sensitive both to the dissipation in collective motion and to adiabatic fission characteristics.

  13. Biomodal spontaneous fission

    SciTech Connect

    Hulet, E.K. )

    1989-09-26

    Investigations of mass and kinetic-energy distributions from spontaneous fission have been extended in recent years to an isotope of element 104 and, for half-lives, to an isotope of element 108. The results have been surprising in that spontaneous fission half-lives have turned out to be much longer than expected and mass and kinetic- energy distributions were found to abruptly shift away from those of the lighter actinides, showing two modes of fission. These new developments have caused a re-evaluation of our understanding of the fission process, bringing an even deeper appreciation of the role played by nuclear shell effects upon spontaneous fission properties. 16 refs., 10 figs.

  14. CR-39 track detector calibration for H, He, and C ions from 0.1-0.5 MeV up to 5 MeV for laser-induced nuclear fusion product identification

    SciTech Connect

    Baccou, C. Yahia, V.; Labaune, C.; Depierreux, S.; Neuville, C.; Goyon, C.; Consoli, F.; De Angelis, R.; Ducret, J. E.; Boutoux, G.; Rafelski, J.

    2015-08-15

    Laser-accelerated ion beams can be used in many applications and, especially, to initiate nuclear reactions out of thermal equilibrium. We have experimentally studied aneutronic fusion reactions induced by protons accelerated by the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism, colliding with a boron target. Such experiments require a rigorous method to identify the reaction products (alpha particles) collected in detectors among a few other ion species such as protons or carbon ions, for example. CR-39 track detectors are widely used because they are mostly sensitive to ions and their efficiency is near 100%. We present a complete calibration of CR-39 track detector for protons, alpha particles, and carbon ions. We give measurements of their track diameters for energy ranging from hundreds of keV to a few MeV and for etching times between 1 and 8 h. We used these results to identify alpha particles in our experiments on proton-boron fusion reactions initiated by laser-accelerated protons. We show that their number clearly increases when the boron fuel is preformed in a plasma state.

  15. CR-39 track detector calibration for H, He, and C ions from 0.1-0.5 MeV up to 5 MeV for laser-induced nuclear fusion product identification.

    PubMed

    Baccou, C; Yahia, V; Depierreux, S; Neuville, C; Goyon, C; Consoli, F; De Angelis, R; Ducret, J E; Boutoux, G; Rafelski, J; Labaune, C

    2015-08-01

    Laser-accelerated ion beams can be used in many applications and, especially, to initiate nuclear reactions out of thermal equilibrium. We have experimentally studied aneutronic fusion reactions induced by protons accelerated by the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism, colliding with a boron target. Such experiments require a rigorous method to identify the reaction products (alpha particles) collected in detectors among a few other ion species such as protons or carbon ions, for example. CR-39 track detectors are widely used because they are mostly sensitive to ions and their efficiency is near 100%. We present a complete calibration of CR-39 track detector for protons, alpha particles, and carbon ions. We give measurements of their track diameters for energy ranging from hundreds of keV to a few MeV and for etching times between 1 and 8 h. We used these results to identify alpha particles in our experiments on proton-boron fusion reactions initiated by laser-accelerated protons. We show that their number clearly increases when the boron fuel is preformed in a plasma state.

  16. CR-39 track detector calibration for H, He, and C ions from 0.1-0.5 MeV up to 5 MeV for laser-induced nuclear fusion product identification.

    PubMed

    Baccou, C; Yahia, V; Depierreux, S; Neuville, C; Goyon, C; Consoli, F; De Angelis, R; Ducret, J E; Boutoux, G; Rafelski, J; Labaune, C

    2015-08-01

    Laser-accelerated ion beams can be used in many applications and, especially, to initiate nuclear reactions out of thermal equilibrium. We have experimentally studied aneutronic fusion reactions induced by protons accelerated by the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism, colliding with a boron target. Such experiments require a rigorous method to identify the reaction products (alpha particles) collected in detectors among a few other ion species such as protons or carbon ions, for example. CR-39 track detectors are widely used because they are mostly sensitive to ions and their efficiency is near 100%. We present a complete calibration of CR-39 track detector for protons, alpha particles, and carbon ions. We give measurements of their track diameters for energy ranging from hundreds of keV to a few MeV and for etching times between 1 and 8 h. We used these results to identify alpha particles in our experiments on proton-boron fusion reactions initiated by laser-accelerated protons. We show that their number clearly increases when the boron fuel is preformed in a plasma state. PMID:26329181

  17. Improved Fission Neutron Data Base for Active Interrogation of Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Pozzi, Sara; Czirr, J. Bart; Haight, Robert; Kovash, Michael; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2013-11-06

    This project will develop an innovative neutron detection system for active interrogation measurements. Many active interrogation methods to detect fissionable material are based on the detection of neutrons from fission induced by fast neutrons or high-energy gamma rays. The energy spectrum of the fission neutrons provides data to identify the fissionable isotopes and materials such as shielding between the fissionable material and the detector. The proposed path for the project is as follows. First, the team will develop new neutron detection systems and algorithms by Monte Carlo simulations and bench-top experiments. Next, They will characterize and calibrate detection systems both with monoenergetic and white neutron sources. Finally, high-fidelity measurements of neutron emission from fissions induced by fast neutrons will be performed. Several existing fission chambers containing U-235, Pu-239, U-238, or Th-232 will be used to measure the neutron-induced fission neutron emission spectra. The challenge for making confident measurements is the detection of neutrons in the energy ranges of 0.01 – 1 MeV and above 8 MeV, regions where the basic data on the neutron energy spectrum emitted from fission is least well known. In addition, improvements in the specificity of neutron detectors are required throughout the complete energy range: they must be able to clearly distinguish neutrons from other radiations, in particular gamma rays and cosmic rays. The team believes that all of these challenges can be addressed successfully with emerging technologies under development by this collaboration. In particular, the collaboration will address the area of fission neutron emission spectra for isotopes of interest in the advanced fuel cycle initiative (AFCI).

  18. Recent fission cross section standards measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wasson, O.A.

    1985-01-01

    The /sup 235/U(n,f) reaction is the standard by which most neutron induced fission cross sections are determined. Most of these cross sections are derived from relatively easy ratio measurements to /sup 235/U. However, the more difficult /sup 235/U(n,f) cross section measurements require the use of advanced neutron detectors for the determination of the incident neutron fluence. Examples of recent standard cross section measurements are discussed, various neutron detectors are described, and the status of the /sup 235/U(n,f) cross section standard is assessed. 23 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Capture and fission with DANCE and NEUANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandel, M.; Baramsai, B.; Bond, E.; Rusev, G.; Walker, C.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Chadwick, M. B.; Couture, A.; Fowler, M. M.; Hayes, A.; Kawano, T.; Mosby, S.; Stetcu, I.; Taddeucci, T. N.; Talou, P.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    A summary of the current and future experimental program at DANCE is presented. Measurements of neutron capture cross sections are planned for many actinide isotopes with the goal to reduce the present uncertainties in nuclear data libraries. Detailed studies of capture gamma rays in the neutron resonance region will be performed in order to derive correlated data on the de-excitation of the compound nucleus. New approaches on how to remove the DANCE detector response from experimental data and retain the correlations between the cascade gamma rays are presented. Studies on 235U are focused on quantifying the population of short-lived isomeric states in 236U after neutron capture. For this purpose, a new neutron detector array NEUANCE is under construction. It will be installed in the central cavity of the DANCE array and enable the highly efficient tagging of fission and capture events. In addition, developments of fission fragment detectors are also underway to expand DANCE capabilities to measurements of fully correlated data on fission observables.

  20. Capture and fission with DANCE and NEUANCE

    DOE PAGES

    Jandel, M.; Baramsai, B.; Bond, E.; Rusev, G.; Walker, C.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Chadwick, M. B.; Couture, A.; Fowler, M. M.; Hayes, A.; et al

    2015-12-23

    A summary of the current and future experimental program at DANCE is presented. Measurements of neutron capture cross sections are planned for many actinide isotopes with the goal to reduce the present uncertainties in nuclear data libraries. Detailed studies of capture gamma rays in the neutron resonance region will be performed in order to derive correlated data on the de-excitation of the compound nucleus. New approaches on how to remove the DANCE detector response from experimental data and retain the correlations between the cascade gamma rays are presented. Studies on 235U are focused on quantifying the population of short-lived isomericmore » states in 236U after neutron capture. For this purpose, a new neutron detector array NEUANCE is under construction. It will be installed in the central cavity of the DANCE array and enable the highly efficient tagging of fission and capture events. In addition, developments of fission fragment detectors are also underway to expand DANCE capabilities to measurements of fully correlated data on fission observables.« less

  1. Capture and fission with DANCE and NEUANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Jandel, M.; Baramsai, B.; Bond, E.; Rusev, G.; Walker, C.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Chadwick, M. B.; Couture, A.; Fowler, M. M.; Hayes, A.; Kawano, T.; Mosby, S.; Stetcu, I.; Taddeucci, T. N.; Talou, P.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2015-12-23

    A summary of the current and future experimental program at DANCE is presented. Measurements of neutron capture cross sections are planned for many actinide isotopes with the goal to reduce the present uncertainties in nuclear data libraries. Detailed studies of capture gamma rays in the neutron resonance region will be performed in order to derive correlated data on the de-excitation of the compound nucleus. New approaches on how to remove the DANCE detector response from experimental data and retain the correlations between the cascade gamma rays are presented. Studies on 235U are focused on quantifying the population of short-lived isomeric states in 236U after neutron capture. For this purpose, a new neutron detector array NEUANCE is under construction. It will be installed in the central cavity of the DANCE array and enable the highly efficient tagging of fission and capture events. In addition, developments of fission fragment detectors are also underway to expand DANCE capabilities to measurements of fully correlated data on fission observables.

  2. Fission induced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility of creating a plasma from fission fragments was investigated, as well as the probability of utilizing the energy of these particles to create population inversion leading to laser action. Eventually, it is hoped that the same medium could be used for both fissioning and lasing, thus avoiding inefficiences in converting one form of energy to the other. A central problem in understanding a fission induced plasma is to obtain an accurate model of the electron behavior; some calculations are presented to this end. The calculations are simple, providing a compendium of processes for reference.

  3. Nuclear fission of Fm isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, T.; Wada, T.; Ohta, M.; Chiba, S.

    2010-06-01

    Multi-modal fission has been systematically investigated for the series of isotopes of Fm and Cf. The multi-dimensional Langevin-type stochastic differential equation is used for the dynamical calculation. The primary fission mode changes from mass-asymmetric fission to mass-symmetric fission with the increase of neutron numbers for both Fm and Cf cases.

  4. Explaining cloud chamber tracks

    SciTech Connect

    Broyles, A.A.

    1992-06-16

    The operation of many detection devices is usually explained in terms of the ionization tracks produced by particles despite the fact that the corresponding incident wave functions extended over the entire sensitive regions of the detectors. The mechanisms by which the wave function appears to collapse to a track is analyzed here.

  5. Neutron-flux profile monitor for use in a fission reactor

    DOEpatents

    Kopp, M.K.; Valentine, K.H.

    1981-09-15

    A neutron flux monitor is provided which consists of a plurality of fission counters arranged as spaced-apart point detectors along a delay line. As a fission event occurs in any one of the counters, two delayed current pulses are generated at the output of the delay line. The time separation of the pulses identifies the counter in which the particular fission event occurred. Neutron flux profiles of reactor cores can be more accurately measured as a result.

  6. True ternary fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayaraghavan, K. R.; Balasubramaniam, M.; von Oertzen, W.

    2015-04-01

    The study of the ternary fission of nuclei has received new interest recently. It is of general interest for nuclear dynamics, although the process is very rare. In the present work, we discuss the possibilities of true ternary fission (fragment masses A >30 ) in 252Cf for different mass splits. These mass splits are strongly favored in a collinear geometry. Based on the three cluster model (TCM), it is shown that the true ternary fission into fragments with almost equal masses is one of the possible fission modes in 252Cf . For general decays it is shown that the formation of the lightest fragment at the center has the highest probability. Further the formation of tin isotopes and/or other closed shell fragments are favored. For the decay products the presence of closed shell nuclei among the three fragments enhances the decay probabilities.

  7. Fission Systems for Mars Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.; Kim, T.; Dorney, D. J.; Swint, Marion Shayne

    2012-01-01

    Fission systems are used extensively on earth, and 34 such systems have flown in space. The energy density of fission is over 10 million times that of chemical reactions, giving fission the potential to eliminate energy density constraints for many space missions. Potential safety and operational concerns with fission systems are well understood, and strategies exist for affordably developing such systems. By enabling a power-rich environment and highly efficient propulsion, fission systems could enable affordable, sustainable exploration of Mars.

  8. Search for charginos nearly mass degenerate with the lightest neutralino based on a disappearing-track signature in pp collisions at (s)=8TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmadov, F.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Astbury, A.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, S.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O. L.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia, O.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Bittner, B.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boek, T. T.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Branchini, P.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Brendlinger, K.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, G.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Bunse, M.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Byszewski, M.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Caso, C.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, K.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Charfeddine, D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christidi, I. A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Cirkovic, P.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coelli, S.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Colas, J.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Cuciuc, C.-M.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Damiani, D. S.; Daniells, A. C.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J. A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davignon, O.; Davison, A. R.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De La Taille, C.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; De Zorzi, G.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dechenaux, B.; Dedovich, D. V.; Degenhardt, J.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delemontex, T.; Deliot, F.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Demirkoz, B.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; DeWilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Doan, T. K. O.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dodd, J.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Dohmae, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Dube, S.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Dwuznik, M.; Ebke, J.; Edson, W.; Edwards, C. A.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Engelmann, R.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienne, F.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evangelakou, D.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, M. J.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Florez Bustos, A. C.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Fonseca Martin, T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; Fratina, S.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, C.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadfort, T.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Gemmell, A.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gillman, A. R.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giovannini, P.; Giraud, P. F.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giunta, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glazov, A.; Glonti, G. L.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godfrey, J.; Godlewski, J.; Goeringer, C.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gomez Fajardo, L. S.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez Silva, M. L.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodson, J. J.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Gough Eschrich, I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M. P.; Goussiou, A. G.; Goy, C.; Gozpinar, S.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K.-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Gray, J. A.; Graziani, E.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grishkevich, Y. V.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Grout, Z. J.; Grybel, K.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guicheney, C.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Gunther, J.; Guo, J.; Gupta, S.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guttman, N.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haefner, P.; Hageboeck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamer, M.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Handel, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hansson, P.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Harkusha, S.; Harper, D.; Harrington, R. D.; Harris, O. M.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Harvey, A.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauschild, M.; Hauser, R.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. 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