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Sample records for fission yeast dna

  1. A Discrete Class of Intergenic DNA Dictates Meiotic DNA Break Hotspots in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cam, Hugh P; Farah, Joseph A; Grewal, Shiv I. S; Smith, Gerald R

    2007-01-01

    Meiotic recombination is initiated by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) made by Spo11 (Rec12 in fission yeast), which becomes covalently linked to the DSB ends. Like recombination events, DSBs occur at hotspots in the genome, but the genetic factors responsible for most hotspots have remained elusive. Here we describe in fission yeast the genome-wide distribution of meiosis-specific Rec12-DNA linkages, which closely parallel DSBs measured by conventional Southern blot hybridization. Prominent DSB hotspots are located ∼65 kb apart, separated by intervals with little or no detectable breakage. Most hotspots lie within exceptionally large intergenic regions. Thus, the chromosomal architecture responsible for hotspots in fission yeast is markedly different from that of budding yeast, in which DSB hotspots are much more closely spaced and, in many regions of the genome, occur at each promoter. Our analysis in fission yeast reveals a clearly identifiable chromosomal feature that can predict the majority of recombination hotspots across a whole genome and provides a basis for searching for the chromosomal features that dictate hotspots of meiotic recombination in other organisms, including humans. PMID:17722984

  2. Specific replication origins promote DNA amplification in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Kiang, Lee; Heichinger, Christian; Watt, Stephen; Bähler, Jürg; Nurse, Paul

    2010-09-15

    To ensure equal replication of the genome in every eukaryotic cell cycle, replication origins fire only once each S phase and do not fire after passive replication. Failure in these controls can lead to local amplification, contributing to genome instability and the development of cancer. To identify features of replication origins important for such amplification, we have investigated origin firing and local genome amplification in the presence of excess helicase loaders Cdc18 and Cdt1 in fission yeast. We find that S phase controls are attenuated and coordination of origin firing is lost, resulting in local amplification. Specific origins are necessary for amplification but act only within a permissive chromosomal context. Origins associated with amplification are highly AT-rich, fire efficiently and early during mitotic S phase, and are located in large intergenic regions. We propose that these features predispose replication origins to re-fire within a single S phase, or to remain active after passive replication.

  3. DNA replication and damage checkpoints and meiotic cell cycle controls in the fission and budding yeasts.

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, H; Nurse, P

    2000-01-01

    The cell cycle checkpoint mechanisms ensure the order of cell cycle events to preserve genomic integrity. Among these, the DNA-replication and DNA-damage checkpoints prevent chromosome segregation when DNA replication is inhibited or DNA is damaged. Recent studies have identified an outline of the regulatory networks for both of these controls, which apparently operate in all eukaryotes. In addition, it appears that these checkpoints have two arrest points, one is just before entry into mitosis and the other is prior to chromosome separation. The former point requires the central cell-cycle regulator Cdc2 kinase, whereas the latter involves several key regulators and substrates of the ubiquitin ligase called the anaphase promoting complex. Linkages between these cell-cycle regulators and several key checkpoint proteins are beginning to emerge. Recent findings on post-translational modifications and protein-protein interactions of the checkpoint proteins provide new insights into the checkpoint responses, although the functional significance of these biochemical properties often remains unclear. We have reviewed the molecular mechanisms acting at the DNA-replication and DNA-damage checkpoints in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and the modifications of these controls during the meiotic cell cycle. We have made comparisons with the controls in fission yeast and other organisms, mainly the distantly related budding yeast. PMID:10861204

  4. Centromeric chromatin in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Partridge, Janet F

    2008-05-01

    A fundamental requirement for life is the ability of cells to divide properly and to pass on to their daughters a full complement of genetic material. The centromere of the chromosome is essential for this process, as it provides the DNA sequences on which the kinetochore (the proteinaceous structure that links centromeric DNA to the spindle microtubules) assembles to allow segregation of the chromosomes during mitosis. It has long been recognized that kinetochore assembly is subject to epigenetic control, and deciphering how centromeres promote faithful chromosome segregation provides a fascinating intellectual challenge. This challenge is made more difficult by the scale and complexity of DNA sequences in metazoan centromeres, thus much research has focused on dissecting centromere function in the single celled eukaryotic yeasts. Interestingly, in spite of similarities in the genome size of budding and fission yeasts, they seem to have adopted some striking differences in their strategy for passing on their chromosomes. Budding yeast have "point" centromeres, where a 125 base sequence is sufficient for mitotic propagation, whereas fission yeast centromeres are more reminiscent of the large repetitive centromeres of metazoans. In addition, the centromeric heterochromatin which coats centromeric domains of fission yeast and metazoan centromeres and is critical for their function, is largely absent from budding yeast centromeres. This review focuses on the assembly and maintenance of centromeric chromatin in the fission yeast.

  5. Multiple Orientation-Dependent, Synergistically Interacting, Similar Domains in the Ribosomal DNA Replication Origin of the Fission Yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Mi; Huberman, Joel A.

    1998-01-01

    Previous investigations have shown that the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, has DNA replication origins (500 to 1500 bp) that are larger than those in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (100 to 150 bp). Deletion and linker substitution analyses of two fission yeast origins revealed that they contain multiple important regions with AT-rich asymmetric (abundant A residues in one strand and T residues in the complementary strand) sequence motifs. In this work we present the characterization of a third fission yeast replication origin, ars3001, which is relatively small (∼570 bp) and responsible for replication of ribosomal DNA. Like previously studied fission yeast origins, ars3001 contains multiple important regions. The three most important of these regions resemble each other in several ways: each region is essential for origin function and is at least partially orientation dependent, each region contains similar clusters of A+T-rich asymmetric sequences, and the regions can partially substitute for each other. These observations suggest that ars3001 function requires synergistic interactions between domains binding similar proteins. It is likely that this requirement extends to other fission yeast origins, explaining why such origins are larger than those of budding yeast. PMID:9819416

  6. Specification of DNA replication origins and genomic base composition in fission yeasts.

    PubMed

    Mojardín, Laura; Vázquez, Enrique; Antequera, Francisco

    2013-11-29

    In the "Replicon Theory", Jacob, Brenner and Cuzin proposed the existence of replicators and initiators as the two major actors in DNA replication. Over the years, many protein components of initiators have been shown to be conserved in different organisms during evolution. By contrast, replicator DNA sequences (often referred to as replication origins) have diverged beyond possible comparison between eukaryotic genomes. Replication origins in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe are made up of A+T-rich sequences that do not share any consensus elements. The information encoded in these replicators is interpreted by the Orc4 subunit of the ORC (origin recognition complex), which is unique among eukaryotes in that it contains a large domain harboring nine AT-hook subdomains that target ORC to a great variety of A+T-rich sequences along the chromosomes. Recently, the genomes of other Schizosaccharomyces species have been sequenced and the regions encompassing their replication origins have been identified. DNA sequence analysis and comparison of the organization of their Orc4 proteins have revealed species-specific differences that contribute to our understanding of how the specification of replication origins has evolved during the phylogenetic divergence of fission yeasts.

  7. Monitoring DNA replication in fission yeast by incorporation of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine.

    PubMed

    Hua, Hui; Kearsey, Stephen E

    2011-05-01

    We report procedures to allow incorporation and detection of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) in fission yeast, a thymidine analogue which has some technical advantages over use of bromodeoxyuridine. Low concentrations of EdU (1 µM) are sufficient to allow detection of incorporation in cells expressing thymidine kinase and human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1). However EdU is toxic and activates the rad3-dependent checkpoint, resulting in cell cycle arrest, potentially limiting its applications for procedures which require labelling over more than one cell cycle. Limited DNA synthesis, when elongation is largely blocked by hydroxyurea, can be readily detected by EdU incorporation using fluorescence microscopy. Thus EdU should be useful for detecting early stages of S phase, or DNA synthesis associated with DNA repair and recombination.

  8. The fission yeast CENP-B protein Abp1 prevents pervasive transcription of repetitive DNA elements.

    PubMed

    Daulny, Anne; Mejía-Ramírez, Eva; Reina, Oscar; Rosado-Lugo, Jesus; Aguilar-Arnal, Lorena; Auer, Herbert; Zaratiegui, Mikel; Azorin, Fernando

    2016-10-01

    It is well established that eukaryotic genomes are pervasively transcribed producing cryptic unstable transcripts (CUTs). However, the mechanisms regulating pervasive transcription are not well understood. Here, we report that the fission yeast CENP-B homolog Abp1 plays an important role in preventing pervasive transcription. We show that loss of abp1 results in the accumulation of CUTs, which are targeted for degradation by the exosome pathway. These CUTs originate from different types of genomic features, but the highest increase corresponds to Tf2 retrotransposons and rDNA repeats, where they map along the entire elements. In the absence of abp1, increased RNAPII-Ser5P occupancy is observed throughout the Tf2 coding region and, unexpectedly, RNAPII-Ser5P is enriched at rDNA repeats. Loss of abp1 also results in Tf2 derepression and increased nucleolus size. Altogether these results suggest that Abp1 prevents pervasive RNAPII transcription of repetitive DNA elements (i.e., Tf2 and rDNA repeats) from internal cryptic sites.

  9. Identification of S-phase DNA damage-response targets in fission yeast reveals conservation of damage-response networks

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Nicholas A.; Zhou, Chunshui; Elia, Andrew E. H.; Murray, Johanne M.; Carr, Antony M.; Elledge, Stephen J.; Rhind, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The cellular response to DNA damage during S-phase regulates a complicated network of processes, including cell-cycle progression, gene expression, DNA replication kinetics, and DNA repair. In fission yeast, this S-phase DNA damage response (DDR) is coordinated by two protein kinases: Rad3, the ortholog of mammalian ATR, and Cds1, the ortholog of mammalian Chk2. Although several critical downstream targets of Rad3 and Cds1 have been identified, most of their presumed targets are unknown, including the targets responsible for regulating replication kinetics and coordinating replication and repair. To characterize targets of the S-phase DDR, we identified proteins phosphorylated in response to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)-induced S-phase DNA damage in wild-type, rad3∆, and cds1∆ cells by proteome-wide mass spectrometry. We found a broad range of S-phase–specific DDR targets involved in gene expression, stress response, regulation of mitosis and cytokinesis, and DNA replication and repair. These targets are highly enriched for proteins required for viability in response to MMS, indicating their biological significance. Furthermore, the regulation of these proteins is similar in fission and budding yeast, across 300 My of evolution, demonstrating a deep conservation of S-phase DDR targets and suggesting that these targets may be critical for maintaining genome stability in response to S-phase DNA damage across eukaryotes. PMID:27298342

  10. Genotoxicity study with special reference to DNA damage by comet assay in fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe exposed to drinking water.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Pamela; Talapatra, Soumendra N; Mandal, Nivedita; Sundaram, Geetanjali; Mukhopadhyay, Aniruddha; Chattopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Banerjee, Sudip K

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate genotoxicity, especially DNA damage, in drinking water samples collected from tap by using fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as a model organism. Generally raw water potabolization is done by treatment with polymeric coagulant, alum, chlorine, etc. In the comet test, highly significant (P<0.001) effects of DNA damage were detected in treated water (tap water) when compared to negative control (raw water) as well as laboratory control (distilled water) samples for both 1 h and 2 h exposure. In the water treatment plant, raw water treatment is done by the process of prechlorination, alum and polymeric coagulant (CatflocT) dosing, postchlorination, filtration and final discharge for consumption. In conclusion it can be stated from the results that chlorinated disinfectant, alum and polymeric coagulant (CatflocT) mixture used in drinking water has a potent cumulative genotoxic effect in the eukaryotic cells and may pose potential genotoxic risk for human health following long-term consumption.

  11. Condensin HEAT Subunits Required for DNA Repair, Kinetochore/Centromere Function and Ploidy Maintenance in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xingya; Nakazawa, Norihiko; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Condensin, a central player in eukaryotic chromosomal dynamics, contains five evolutionarily-conserved subunits. Two SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes) subunits contain ATPase, hinge, and coiled-coil domains. One non-SMC subunit is similar to bacterial kleisin, and two other non-SMC subunits contain HEAT (similar to armadillo) repeats. Here we report isolation and characterization of 21 fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) mutants for three non-SMC subunits, created using error-prone mutagenesis that resulted in single-amino acid substitutions. Beside condensation, segregation, and DNA repair defects, similar to those observed in previously isolated SMC and cnd2 mutants, novel phenotypes were observed for mutants of HEAT-repeats containing Cnd1 and Cnd3 subunits. cnd3-L269P is hypersensitive to the microtubule poison, thiabendazole, revealing defects in kinetochore/centromere and spindle assembly checkpoints. Three cnd1 and three cnd3 mutants increased cell size and doubled DNA content, thereby eliminating the haploid state. Five of these mutations reside in helix B of HEAT repeats. Two non-SMC condensin subunits, Cnd1 and Cnd3, are thus implicated in ploidy maintenance. PMID:25764183

  12. Indistinguishable Landscapes of Meiotic DNA Breaks in rad50+ and rad50S Strains of Fission Yeast Revealed by a Novel rad50+ Recombination Intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Hyppa, Randy W.; Cromie, Gareth A.; Smith, Gerald R.

    2008-01-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe Rec12 protein, the homolog of Spo11 in other organisms, initiates meiotic recombination by creating DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and becoming covalently linked to the DNA ends of the break. This protein–DNA linkage has previously been detected only in mutants such as rad50S in which break repair is impeded and DSBs accumulate. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the DSB distribution in a rad50S mutant is markedly different from that in wild-type (RAD50) meiosis, and it was suggested that this might also be true for other organisms. Here, we show that we can detect Rec12-DNA linkages in Sc. pombe rad50+ cells, which are proficient for DSB repair. In contrast to the results from Sa. cerevisiae, genome-wide microarray analysis of Rec12-DNA reveals indistinguishable meiotic DSB distributions in rad50+ and rad50S strains of Sc. pombe. These results confirm our earlier findings describing the occurrence of widely spaced DSBs primarily in large intergenic regions of DNA and demonstrate the relevance and usefulness of fission yeast studies employing rad50S. We propose that the differential behavior of rad50S strains reflects a major difference in DSB regulation between the two species—specifically, the requirement for the Rad50-containing complex for DSB formation in budding yeast but not in fission yeast. Use of rad50S and related mutations may be a useful method for DSB analysis in other species. PMID:19023408

  13. Transcription Termination Factor reb1p Causes Two Replication Fork Barriers at Its Cognate Sites in Fission Yeast Ribosomal DNA In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Gorostiaga, Alicia; López-Estraño, Carlos; Krimer, Dora B.; Schvartzman, Jorge B.; Hernández, Pablo

    2004-01-01

    Polar replication fork barriers (RFBs) near the 3′ end of the rRNA transcriptional unit are a conserved feature of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) replication in eukaryotes. In the mouse, in vivo studies indicate that the cis-acting Sal boxes required for rRNA transcription termination are also involved in replication fork blockage. On the contrary, in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the rRNA transcription termination factors are not required for RFBs. Here we characterized the rDNA RFBs in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. S. pombe rDNA contains three closely spaced polar replication barriers named RFB1, RFB2, and RFB3 in the 3′ to 5′ order. The transcription termination protein reb1 and its two binding sites, present at the 3′ end of the coding region, were required for fork arrest at RFB2 and RFB3 in vivo. On the other hand, fork arrest at the strongest RFB1 barrier was independent of the above transcription termination factors. Therefore, RFB2 and RFB3 resemble the barriers present in the mouse rDNA, whereas RFB1 is similar to the budding yeast RFBs. These results suggest that during evolution, cis- and trans-acting factors required for rRNA transcription termination became involved in replication fork blockage also. S. pombe is suggested to be a transitional species in which both mechanisms coexist. PMID:14673172

  14. Nuclear size control in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Frank R; Nurse, Paul

    2007-11-19

    A long-standing biological question is how a eukaryotic cell controls the size of its nucleus. We report here that in fission yeast, nuclear size is proportional to cell size over a 35-fold range, and use mutants to show that a 16-fold change in nuclear DNA content does not influence the relative size of the nucleus. Multi-nucleated cells with unevenly distributed nuclei reveal that nuclei surrounded by a greater volume of cytoplasm grow more rapidly. During interphase of the cell cycle nuclear growth is proportional to cell growth, and during mitosis there is a rapid expansion of the nuclear envelope. When the nuclear/cell (N/C) volume ratio is increased by centrifugation or genetic manipulation, nuclear growth is arrested while the cell continues to grow; in contrast, low N/C ratios are rapidly corrected by nuclear growth. We propose that there is a general cellular control linking nuclear growth to cell size.

  15. Molecular control of fission yeast cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Rincon, Sergio A; Paoletti, Anne

    2016-05-01

    Cytokinesis gives rise to two independent daughter cells at the end of the cell division cycle. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has emerged as one of the most powerful systems to understand how cytokinesis is controlled molecularly. Like in most eukaryotes, fission yeast cytokinesis depends on an acto-myosin based contractile ring that assembles at the division site under the control of spatial cues that integrate information on cell geometry and the position of the mitotic apparatus. Cytokinetic events are also tightly coordinated with nuclear division by the cell cycle machinery. These spatial and temporal regulations ensure an equal cleavage of the cytoplasm and an accurate segregation of the genetic material in daughter cells. Although this model system has specificities, the basic mechanisms of contractile ring assembly and function deciphered in fission yeast are highly valuable to understand how cytokinesis is controlled in other organisms that rely on a contractile ring for cell division.

  16. Predicting the fission yeast protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Pancaldi, Vera; Saraç, Omer S; Rallis, Charalampos; McLean, Janel R; Převorovský, Martin; Gould, Kathleen; Beyer, Andreas; Bähler, Jürg

    2012-04-01

    A systems-level understanding of biological processes and information flow requires the mapping of cellular component interactions, among which protein-protein interactions are particularly important. Fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) is a valuable model organism for which no systematic protein-interaction data are available. We exploited gene and protein properties, global genome regulation datasets, and conservation of interactions between budding and fission yeast to predict fission yeast protein interactions in silico. We have extensively tested our method in three ways: first, by predicting with 70-80% accuracy a selected high-confidence test set; second, by recapitulating interactions between members of the well-characterized SAGA co-activator complex; and third, by verifying predicted interactions of the Cbf11 transcription factor using mass spectrometry of TAP-purified protein complexes. Given the importance of the pathway in cell physiology and human disease, we explore the predicted sub-networks centered on the Tor1/2 kinases. Moreover, we predict the histidine kinases Mak1/2/3 to be vital hubs in the fission yeast stress response network, and we suggest interactors of argonaute 1, the principal component of the siRNA-mediated gene silencing pathway, lost in budding yeast but preserved in S. pombe. Of the new high-quality interactions that were discovered after we started this work, 73% were found in our predictions. Even though any predicted interactome is imperfect, the protein network presented here can provide a valuable basis to explore biological processes and to guide wet-lab experiments in fission yeast and beyond. Our predicted protein interactions are freely available through PInt, an online resource on our website (www.bahlerlab.info/PInt).

  17. Predicting the Fission Yeast Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Pancaldi, Vera; Saraç, Ömer S.; Rallis, Charalampos; McLean, Janel R.; Převorovský, Martin; Gould, Kathleen; Beyer, Andreas; Bähler, Jürg

    2012-01-01

    A systems-level understanding of biological processes and information flow requires the mapping of cellular component interactions, among which protein–protein interactions are particularly important. Fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) is a valuable model organism for which no systematic protein-interaction data are available. We exploited gene and protein properties, global genome regulation datasets, and conservation of interactions between budding and fission yeast to predict fission yeast protein interactions in silico. We have extensively tested our method in three ways: first, by predicting with 70–80% accuracy a selected high-confidence test set; second, by recapitulating interactions between members of the well-characterized SAGA co-activator complex; and third, by verifying predicted interactions of the Cbf11 transcription factor using mass spectrometry of TAP-purified protein complexes. Given the importance of the pathway in cell physiology and human disease, we explore the predicted sub-networks centered on the Tor1/2 kinases. Moreover, we predict the histidine kinases Mak1/2/3 to be vital hubs in the fission yeast stress response network, and we suggest interactors of argonaute 1, the principal component of the siRNA-mediated gene silencing pathway, lost in budding yeast but preserved in S. pombe. Of the new high-quality interactions that were discovered after we started this work, 73% were found in our predictions. Even though any predicted interactome is imperfect, the protein network presented here can provide a valuable basis to explore biological processes and to guide wet-lab experiments in fission yeast and beyond. Our predicted protein interactions are freely available through PInt, an online resource on our website (www.bahlerlab.info/PInt). PMID:22540037

  18. Fission yeast meets a legend in Kobe: report of the Eighth International Fission Yeast Meeting.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Haruhiko; Yamamoto, Takaharu G; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2015-12-01

    The Eighth International Fission Yeast Meeting, which was held at Ikuta Shrine Hall in Kobe, Japan, from 21 to 26 June 2015, was attended by 327 fission yeast researchers from 25 countries (190 overseas and 137 domestic participants). At this meeting, 124 talks were held and 145 posters were presented. In addition, newly developed database tools were introduced to the community during a workshop. Researchers shared cutting-edge knowledge across broad fields of study, ranging from molecules to evolution, derived from the superior model organism commonly used within the fission yeast community. Intensive discussions and constructive suggestions generated in this meeting will surely advance the understanding of complex biological systems in fission yeast, extending to general eukaryotes.

  19. The fission yeast Cdc1 protein, a homologue of the small subunit of DNA polymerase delta, binds to Pol3 and Cdc27.

    PubMed Central

    MacNeill, S A; Moreno, S; Reynolds, N; Nurse, P; Fantes, P A

    1996-01-01

    cdc1+ is required for cell cycle progression in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Cells carrying temperature-sensitive cdc1 mutants undergo cell cycle arrest when shifted to the restrictive temperature, becoming highly elongated. Here we describe the cloning and sequencing of cdc1+, which is shown to encode a 462 residue protein that displays significant sequence similarity to the small subunit of mammalian DNA polymerase delta. cdc1+ interacts genetically with pol3+, which encodes the large subunit of DNA polymerase delta in fission yeast, and the Cdc1 protein binds to Pol3 in vitro, strongly suggesting that Cdc1 is likely to be the small subunit of Pol delta. In addition, we show that cdc1+ overexpression is sufficient to rescue cells carrying temperature-sensitive cdc27 alleles and that the Cdc1 and Cdc27 proteins interact in vivo and in vitro. Deletion of either cdc1+ or cdc27+ results in cell cycle arrest with the arrested cells having a single nucleus with 2C DNA content. No evidence was obtained for a cut phenotype, indicating that neither cdc1+ nor cdc27+ is required for checkpoint function. cdc1 mutant cells are supersensitive to the DNA synthesis inhibitor hydroxyurea and to the DNA damaging agent MMS, display increased frequency of mini-chromosome loss and have an extended S phase. Images PMID:8887553

  20. Fission Yeast CSL Proteins Function as Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Oravcová, Martina; Teska, Mikoláš; Půta, František; Folk, Petr; Převorovský, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background Transcription factors of the CSL (CBF1/RBP-Jk/Suppressor of Hairless/LAG-1) family are key regulators of metazoan development and function as the effector components of the Notch receptor signalling pathway implicated in various cell fate decisions. CSL proteins recognize specifically the GTG[G/A]AA sequence motif and several mutants compromised in their ability to bind DNA have been reported. In our previous studies we have identified a number of novel putative CSL family members in fungi, organisms lacking the Notch pathway. It is not clear whether these represent genuine CSL family members. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches we characterized the DNA binding properties of Cbf11 and Cbf12, the antagonistic CSL paralogs from the fission yeast, important for the proper coordination of cell cycle events and the regulation of cell adhesion. We have shown that a mutation of a conserved arginine residue abolishes DNA binding in both CSL paralogs, similar to the situation in mouse. We have also demonstrated the ability of Cbf11 and Cbf12 to activate gene expression in an autologous fission yeast reporter system. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that the fission yeast CSL proteins are indeed genuine family members capable of functioning as transcription factors, and provide support for the ancient evolutionary origin of this important protein family. PMID:23555033

  1. Nuclear organisation and RNAi in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Woolcock, Katrina J; Bühler, Marc

    2013-06-01

    Over the last decade, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has been used extensively for investigating RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated heterochromatin assembly. However, only recently have studies begun to shed light on the 3D organisation of chromatin and the RNAi machinery in the fission yeast nucleus. These studies indicate association of repressive and active chromatin with different regions of the nuclear periphery, similar to other model organisms, and clustering of functionally related genomic features. Unexpectedly, RNAi factors were shown to associate with nuclear pores and were implicated in the regulation of genomic features outside of the well-studied heterochromatic regions. Nuclear organisation is likely to contribute to substrate specificity of the RNAi pathway. However, further studies are required to elucidate the exact mechanisms and functional importance of this nuclear organisation.

  2. N-Termini of Fungal CSL Transcription Factors Are Disordered, Enriched in Regulatory Motifs and Inhibit DNA Binding in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Převorovský, Martin; Atkinson, Sophie R.; Ptáčková, Martina; McLean, Janel R.; Gould, Kathleen; Folk, Petr; Půta, František; Bähler, Jürg

    2011-01-01

    Background CSL (CBF1/RBP-Jκ/Suppressor of Hairless/LAG-1) transcription factors are the effector components of the Notch receptor signalling pathway, which is critical for metazoan development. The metazoan CSL proteins (class M) can also function in a Notch-independent manner. Recently, two novel classes of CSL proteins, designated F1 and F2, have been identified in fungi. The role of the fungal CSL proteins is unclear, because the Notch pathway is not present in fungi. In fission yeast, the Cbf11 and Cbf12 CSL paralogs play antagonistic roles in cell adhesion and the coordination of cell and nuclear division. Unusually long N-terminal extensions are typical for fungal and invertebrate CSL family members. In this study, we investigate the functional significance of these extended N-termini of CSL proteins. Methodology/Principal Findings We identify 15 novel CSL family members from 7 fungal species and conduct bioinformatic analyses of a combined dataset containing 34 fungal and 11 metazoan CSL protein sequences. We show that the long, non-conserved N-terminal tails of fungal CSL proteins are likely disordered and enriched in phosphorylation sites and PEST motifs. In a case study of Cbf12 (class F2), we provide experimental evidence that the protein is proteolytically processed and that the N-terminus inhibits the Cbf12-dependent DNA binding activity in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Conclusions/Significance This study provides insight into the characteristics of the long N-terminal tails of fungal CSL proteins that may be crucial for controlling DNA-binding and CSL function. We propose that the regulation of DNA binding by Cbf12 via its N-terminal region represents an important means by which fission yeast strikes a balance between the class F1 and class F2 paralog activities. This mode of regulation might be shared with other CSL-positive fungi, some of which are relevant to human disease and biotechnology. PMID:21858190

  3. The Spontaneous Mutation Rate in the Fission Yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Farlow, Ashley; Long, Hongan; Arnoux, Stéphanie; Sung, Way; Doak, Thomas G.; Nordborg, Magnus; Lynch, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The rate at which new mutations arise in the genome is a key factor in the evolution and adaptation of species. Here we describe the rate and spectrum of spontaneous mutations for the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, a key model organism with many similarities to higher eukaryotes. We undertook an ∼1700-generation mutation accumulation (MA) experiment with a haploid S. pombe, generating 422 single-base substitutions and 119 insertion-deletion mutations (indels) across the 96 replicates. This equates to a base-substitution mutation rate of 2.00 × 10−10 mutations per site per generation, similar to that reported for the distantly related budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, these two yeast species differ dramatically in their spectrum of base substitutions, the types of indels (S. pombe is more prone to insertions), and the pattern of selection required to counteract a strong AT-biased mutation rate. Overall, our results indicate that GC-biased gene conversion does not play a major role in shaping the nucleotide composition of the S. pombe genome and suggest that the mechanisms of DNA maintenance may have diverged significantly between fission and budding yeasts. Unexpectedly, CpG sites appear to be excessively liable to mutation in both species despite the likely absence of DNA methylation. PMID:26265703

  4. Molecular Genetic Tools and Techniques in Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Murray, Johanne M; Watson, Adam T; Carr, Antony M

    2016-05-02

    The molecular genetic tools used in fission yeast have generally been adapted from methods and approaches developed for use in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Initially, the molecular genetics of Schizosaccharomyces pombe was developed to aid gene identification, but it is now applied extensively to the analysis of gene function and the manipulation of noncoding sequences that affect chromosome dynamics. Much current research using fission yeast thus relies on the basic processes of introducing DNA into the organism and the extraction of DNA for subsequent analysis. Targeted integration into specific genomic loci is often used to create site-specific mutants or changes to noncoding regulatory elements for subsequent phenotypic analysis. It is also regularly used to introduce additional sequences that generate tagged proteins or to create strains in which the levels of wild-type protein can be manipulated through transcriptional regulation and/or protein degradation. Here, we draw together a collection of core molecular genetic techniques that underpin much of modern research using S. pombe We summarize the most useful methods that are routinely used and provide guidance, learned from experience, for the successful application of these methods.

  5. Divergence of mitotic strategies in fission yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ying; Yam, Candice; Oliferenko, Snezhana

    2012-01-01

    The aim of mitosis is to produce two daughter nuclei, each containing a chromosome complement identical to that of the mother nucleus. This can be accomplished through a variety of strategies, with “open” and “closed” modes of mitosis positioned at the opposite ends of the spectrum and a range of intermediate patterns in between. In the “closed” mitosis, the nuclear envelope remains intact throughout the nuclear division. In the “open” division type, the envelope of the original nucleus breaks down early in mitosis and reassembles around the segregated daughter genomes. In any case, the nuclear membrane has to remodel to accommodate the mitotic spindle assembly, chromosome segregation and formation of the daughter nuclei. We have recently shown that within the fission yeast clade, the mitotic control of the nuclear surface area may determine the choice between the nuclear envelope breakdown and a fully “closed” division. Here we discuss our data and argue that comparative cell biology studies using two fission yeast species, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Schizosaccharomyces japonicus, could provide unprecedented insights into physiology and evolution of mitosis. PMID:22572960

  6. Yeast DNA plasmids.

    PubMed

    Gunge, N

    1983-01-01

    The study of yeast DNA plasmids has been initiated with the discovery of the 2-micron DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This multiple copy plasmid, organized into chromatin structure in vivo, probably exists in the nucleus and provides a good system to obtain information on eukaryotic DNA replication. Yeast transformation with the 2-micron DNA or artificially constructed chimeric plasmids had contributed significantly to the study of the molecular biology of yeast and eukaryotes, allowing the isolation and characterization of various genes, ars, centromeres, and telomeres, and also serving as a tool to study the expression of various heterologous genes. Encouraged by these fruitful results, new yeast plasmids have been screened among phylogenetically distant yeasts. The linear DNA plasmids (pGKl1 and pGKl2) from Kluyveromyces lactis are the first case of yeast plasmids associated with biological function (killer phenotype). This plasmid system would be ideal as a model to study the structure and function of eukaryotic linear chromosomes. The extracellular secretion of protein toxin suggests the plasmids to be an excellent candidate for a secretion vector. The importance of yeasts as suitable materials for the study of eukaryotic cell biology would be much enhanced by the advent of new transformation systems with diverse host yeasts of genetically and phylogenetically distinct properties.

  7. Cell-cycle analyses using thymidine analogues in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Anda, Silje; Boye, Erik; Grallert, Beata

    2014-01-01

    Thymidine analogues are powerful tools when studying DNA synthesis including DNA replication, repair and recombination. However, these analogues have been reported to have severe effects on cell-cycle progression and growth, the very processes being investigated in most of these studies. Here, we have analyzed the effects of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) and 5-Chloro-2'-deoxyuridine (CldU) using fission yeast cells and optimized the labelling procedure. We find that both analogues affect the cell cycle, but that the effects can be mitigated by using the appropriate analogue, short pulses of labelling and low concentrations. In addition, we report sequential labelling of two consecutive S phases using EdU and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). Furthermore, we show that detection of replicative DNA synthesis is much more sensitive than DNA-measurements by flow cytometry.

  8. Preparation of Total RNA from Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Bähler, Jürg; Wise, Jo Ann

    2017-04-03

    Treatment with hot phenol breaks open fission yeast cells and begins to strip away bound proteins from RNA. Deproteinization is completed by multiple extractions with chloroform/isoamyl alcohol and separation of the aqueous and organic phases using MaXtract gel, an inert material that acts as a physical barrier between the phases. The final step is concentration of the RNA by ethanol precipitation. The protocol can be used to prepare RNA from several cultures grown in parallel, but it is important not to process too many samples at once because delays can be detrimental to RNA quality. A reasonable number of samples to process at once would be three to four for microarray or RNA sequencing analyses and six for preliminary investigations of mutants implicated in RNA metabolism.

  9. The 3' ends of mature transcripts are generated by a processosome complex in fission yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Bastian; Nickel, Jens; Speer, Falk; Schafer, Bernd

    2008-04-04

    In this article, we report on the genetic analysis of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe open reading frames SPCC1322.01 and SPAC637.11, respectively, which encode proteins that are similar to the exoribonuclease Dss1p and the RNA helicase Suv3p, respectively, forming the mitochondrial degradosome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. While the helicase Suv3p is exchangeable between S. cerevisiae and S. pombe, the functions of Dss1p and the putative fission yeast RNase protein are specific for each species. Unlike S. cerevisiae mutants lacking a functional degradosome, the major defect of fission yeast knock-out strains is their inability to perform downstream processing of transcripts. In addition, the lack of pah1 results in instability of mitochondrial RNA ends. Overexpression of par1 and pah1 has no significant effect on the steady-state levels of mitochondrial RNAs. The Pet127p-stimulated RNA degradation activity is independent of Par1p/Pah1p in fission yeast mitochondria. The results presented herein indicate that both fission yeast proteins play only a minor role (if at all) in mitochondrial RNA degradation. We assume that the RNA-degrading function was taken over by other enzymes in fission yeast mitochondria, while the former degradosome proteins were recruited to new cellular pathways, for example, RNA processing in fission yeast (as discussed in this article) or mitochondrial DNA replication, apoptosis, or chromatin maintenance in eukaryotes, during evolution.

  10. Nuclear membrane: nuclear envelope PORosity in fission yeast meiosis.

    PubMed

    Sazer, Shelley

    2010-11-09

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergoes closed mitosis but 'virtual nuclear envelope breakdown' at anaphase of meiosis II, in which the nuclear envelope is structurally closed but functionally open.

  11. An Analysis of Interference in the Fission Yeast Schizosaccharomyces Pombe

    PubMed Central

    Munz, P.

    1994-01-01

    The evaluation of three-point crosses at the tetrad and random spore level leads to the conclusion that both chiasma and chromatid interference are absent in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. PMID:8088515

  12. Inner Kinetochore Protein Interactions with Regional Centromeres of Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Jitendra; Talbert, Paul B.; Henikoff, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Centromeres of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe lack the highly repetitive sequences that make most other "regional" centromeres refractory to analysis. To map fission yeast centromeres, we applied H4S47C-anchored cleavage mapping and native and cross-linked chromatin immunoprecipitation with paired-end sequencing. H3 nucleosomes are nearly absent from the central domain, which is occupied by centromere-specific H3 (cenH3 or CENP-A) nucleosomes with two H4s per particle that are mostly unpositioned and are more widely spaced than nucleosomes elsewhere. Inner kinetochore proteins CENP-A, CENP-C, CENP-T, CENP-I, and Scm3 are highly enriched throughout the central domain except at tRNA genes, with no evidence for preferred kinetochore assembly sites. These proteins are weakly enriched and less stably incorporated in H3-rich heterochromatin. CENP-A nucleosomes protect less DNA from nuclease digestion than H3 nucleosomes, while CENP-T protects a range of fragment sizes. Our results suggest that CENP-T particles occupy linkers between CENP-A nucleosomes and that classical regional centromeres differ from other centromeres by the absence of CENP-A nucleosome positioning. PMID:26275423

  13. Inhibition of peroxisome fission, but not mitochondrial fission, increases yeast chronological lifespan.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, Sophie D; Kumar, Sanjeev; van der Klei, Ida J

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are key players in aging and cell death. It has been suggested that mitochondrial fragmentation, mediated by the Dnm1/Fis1 organelle fission machinery, stimulates aging and cell death. This was based on the observation that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Δdnm1 and Δfis1 mutants show an enhanced lifespan and increased resistance to cell death inducers. However, the Dnm1/Fis1 fission machinery is also required for peroxisome division. Here we analyzed the significance of peroxisome fission in yeast chronological lifespan, using yeast strains in which fission of mitochondria was selectively blocked. Our data indicate that the lifespan extension caused by deletion of FIS1 is mainly due to a defect in peroxisome fission and not caused by a block in mitochondrial fragmentation. These observations are underlined by our observation that deletion of FIS1 does not lead to lifespan extension in yeast peroxisome deficient mutant cells.

  14. High Confidence Fission Yeast SUMO Conjugates Identified by Tandem Denaturing Affinity Purification.

    PubMed

    Nie, Minghua; Vashisht, Ajay A; Wohlschlegel, James A; Boddy, Michael N

    2015-09-25

    Covalent attachment of the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) to key targets in the proteome critically regulates the evolutionarily conserved processes of cell cycle control, transcription, DNA replication and maintenance of genome stability. The proteome-wide identification of SUMO conjugates in budding yeast has been invaluable in helping to define roles of SUMO in these processes. Like budding yeast, fission yeast is an important and popular model organism; however, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe community currently lacks proteome-wide knowledge of SUMO pathway targets. To begin to address this deficiency, we adapted and used a highly stringent Tandem Denaturing Affinity Purification (TDAP) method, coupled with mass spectrometry, to identify fission yeast SUMO conjugates. Comparison of our data with that compiled in budding yeast reveals conservation of SUMO target enrichment in nuclear and chromatin-associated processes. Moreover, the SUMO "cloud" phenomenon, whereby multiple components of a single protein complex are SUMOylated, is also conserved. Overall, SUMO TDAP provides both a key resource of high confidence SUMO-modified target proteins in fission yeast, and a robust method for future analyses of SUMO function.

  15. Big data mining powers fungal research: recent advances in fission yeast systems biology approaches.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe

    2016-10-11

    Biology research has entered into big data era. Systems biology approaches therefore become the powerful tools to obtain the whole landscape of how cell separate, grow, and resist the stresses. Fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is wonderful unicellular eukaryote model, especially studying its division and metabolism can facilitate to understanding the molecular mechanism of cancer and discovering anticancer agents. In this perspective, we discuss the recent advanced fission yeast systems biology tools, mainly focus on metabolomics profiling and metabolic modeling, protein-protein interactome and genetic interaction network, DNA sequencing and applications, and high-throughput phenotypic screening. We therefore hope this review can be useful for interested fungal researchers as well as bioformaticians.

  16. Dielectric modelling of cell division for budding and fission yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asami, Koji; Sekine, Katsuhisa

    2007-02-01

    The frequency dependence of complex permittivity or the dielectric spectrum of a system including a cell in cell division has been simulated by a numerical technique based on the three-dimensional finite difference method. Two different types of cell division characteristic of budding and fission yeast were examined. The yeast cells are both regarded as a body of rotation, and thus have anisotropic polarization, i.e. the effective permittivity of the cell depends on the orientation of the cell to the direction of an applied electric field. In the perpendicular orientation, where the rotational axis of the cell is perpendicular to the electric field direction, the dielectric spectra for both yeast cells included one dielectric relaxation and its intensity depended on the cell volume. In the parallel orientation, on the other hand, two dielectric relaxations appeared with bud growth for budding yeast and with septum formation for fission yeast. The low-frequency relaxation was shifted to a lower frequency region by narrowing the neck between the bud and the mother cell for budding yeast and by increasing the degree of septum formation for fission yeast. After cell separation, the low-frequency relaxation disappeared. The simulations well interpreted the oscillation of the relative permittivity of culture broth found for synchronous cell growth of budding yeast.

  17. Fission Yeast Model Study for Dissection of TSC Pathway

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    have also generated two mutants, rhb1-DA4 and rhb1-DA8. In fission yeast, two events, induction of a meiosis initiating gene mei2+ and cell division... meiosis are less induced. Under the same condition, retrotransposons, G1-cyclin (pas1+) and inv1+ are more induced. We have also demonstrated that...responsible for rhb1-DA4, and Q52R I76F within the switch II domain for rhb1-DA8. In fission yeast, two events, induction of a meiosis initiating

  18. Quantitative analysis of chromosome condensation in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Boryana; Dehler, Sascha; Kruitwagen, Tom; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Miura, Kota; Haering, Christian H

    2013-03-01

    Chromosomes undergo extensive conformational rearrangements in preparation for their segregation during cell divisions. Insights into the molecular mechanisms behind this still poorly understood condensation process require the development of new approaches to quantitatively assess chromosome formation in vivo. In this study, we present a live-cell microscopy-based chromosome condensation assay in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. By automatically tracking the three-dimensional distance changes between fluorescently marked chromosome loci at high temporal and spatial resolution, we analyze chromosome condensation during mitosis and meiosis and deduct defined parameters to describe condensation dynamics. We demonstrate that this method can determine the contributions of condensin, topoisomerase II, and Aurora kinase to mitotic chromosome condensation. We furthermore show that the assay can identify proteins required for mitotic chromosome formation de novo by isolating mutants in condensin, DNA polymerase ε, and F-box DNA helicase I that are specifically defective in pro-/metaphase condensation. Thus, the chromosome condensation assay provides a direct and sensitive system for the discovery and characterization of components of the chromosome condensation machinery in a genetically tractable eukaryote.

  19. Rad4 Mainly Functions in Chk1-Mediated DNA Damage Checkpoint Pathway as a Scaffold Protein in the Fission Yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Ming; Zeng, Li; Singh, Amanpreet; Xu, Yongjie

    2014-01-01

    Rad4/Cut5 is a scaffold protein in the Chk1-mediated DNA damage checkpoint in S. pombe. However, whether it contains a robust ATR-activation domain (AAD) required for checkpoint signaling like its orthologs TopBP1 in humans and Dpb11 in budding yeast has been incompletely clear. To identify the putative AAD in Rad4, we carried out an extensive genetic screen looking for novel mutants with an enhanced sensitivity to replication stress or DNA damage in which the function of the AAD can be eliminated by the mutations. Two new mutations near the N-terminus were identified that caused significantly higher sensitivities to DNA damage or chronic replication stress than all previously reported mutants, suggesting that most of the checkpoint function of the protein is eliminated. However, these mutations did not affect the activation of Rad3 (ATR in humans) yet eliminated the scaffolding function of the protein required for the activation of Chk1. Several mutations were also identified in or near the recently reported AAD in the C-terminus of Rad4. However, all mutations in the C-terminus only slightly sensitized the cells to DNA damage. Interestingly, a mutant lacking the whole C-terminus was found resistant to DNA damage and replication stress almost like the wild type cells. Consistent with the resistance, all known Rad3 dependent phosphorylations of checkpoint proteins remained intact in the C-terminal deletion mutant, indicating that unlike that in Dpb11, the C-terminus of Rad4 does not contain a robust AAD. These results, together with those from the biochemical studies, show that Rad4 mainly functions as a scaffold protein in the Chk1, not the Cds1(CHK2 in humans), checkpoint pathway. It plays a minor role or is functionally redundant with an unknown factor in Rad3 activation. PMID:24663817

  20. Oxidative stress response pathways: Fission yeast as archetype.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Manos A; Workman, Christopher T

    2015-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe is a popular model eukaryotic organism to study diverse aspects of mammalian biology, including responses to cellular stress triggered by redox imbalances within its compartments. The review considers the current knowledge on the signaling pathways that govern the transcriptional response of fission yeast cells to elevated levels of hydrogen peroxide. Particular attention is paid to the mechanisms that yeast cells employ to promote cell survival in conditions of intermediate and acute oxidative stress. The role of the Sty1/Spc1/Phh1 mitogen-activated protein kinase in regulating gene expression at multiple levels is discussed in detail.

  1. Identifying genes required for respiratory growth of fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We have used both auxotroph and prototroph versions of the latest deletion-mutant library to identify genes required for respiratory growth on solid glycerol medium in fission yeast. This data set complements and enhances our recent study on functional and regulatory aspects of energy metabolism by providing additional proteins that are involved in respiration. Most proteins identified in this mutant screen have not been implicated in respiration in budding yeast. We also provide a protocol to generate a prototrophic mutant library, and data on technical and biological reproducibility of colony-based high-throughput screens. PMID:27918601

  2. Meiotic chromosome mobility in fission yeast is resistant to environmental stress

    PubMed Central

    Illner, Doris; Lorenz, Alexander; Scherthan, Harry

    2016-01-01

    The formation of healthy gametes requires pairing of homologous chromosomes (homologs) as a prerequisite for their correct segregation during meiosis. Initially, homolog alignment is promoted by meiotic chromosome movements feeding into intimate homolog pairing by homologous recombination and/or synaptonemal complex formation. Meiotic chromosome movements in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, depend on astral microtubule dynamics that drag the nucleus through the zygote; known as horsetail movement. The response of microtubule-led meiotic chromosome movements to environmental stresses such as ionizing irradiation (IR) and associated reactive oxygen species (ROS) is not known. Here, we show that, in contrast to budding yeast, the horsetail movement is largely radiation-resistant, which is likely mediated by a potent antioxidant defense. IR exposure of sporulating S. pombe cells induced misrepair and irreparable DNA double strand breaks causing chromosome fragmentation, missegregation and gamete death. Comparing radiation outcome in fission and budding yeast, and studying meiosis with poisoned microtubules indicates that the increased gamete death after IR is innate to fission yeast. Inhibition of meiotic chromosome mobility in the face of IR failed to influence the course of DSB repair, indicating that paralysis of meiotic chromosome mobility in a genotoxic environment is not a universal response among species. PMID:27074839

  3. Fission Yeast Scp3 Potentially Maintains Microtubule Orientation through Bundling

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, Kanako; Chikashige, Yuji; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Matsumoto, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules play important roles in organelle transport, the maintenance of cell polarity and chromosome segregation and generally form bundles during these processes. The fission yeast gene scp3+ was identified as a multicopy suppressor of the cps3-81 mutant, which is hypersensitive to isopropyl N-3-chlorophenylcarbamate (CIPC), a poison that induces abnormal multipolar spindle formation in higher eukaryotes. In this study, we investigated the function of Scp3 along with the effect of CIPC in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Microscopic observation revealed that treatment with CIPC, cps3-81 mutation and scp3+ gene deletion disturbed the orientation of microtubules in interphase cells. Overexpression of scp3+ suppressed the abnormal orientation of microtubules by promoting bundling. Functional analysis suggested that Scp3 functions independently from Ase1, a protein largely required for the bundling of the mitotic spindle. A strain lacking the ase1+ gene was more sensitive to CIPC, with the drug affecting the integrity of the mitotic spindle, indicating that CIPC has a mitotic target that has a role redundant with Ase1. These results suggested that multiple systems are independently involved to ensure microtubule orientation by bundling in fission yeast. PMID:25767875

  4. The price of independence: cell separation in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Martín-García, Rebeca; Santos, Beatriz

    2016-04-01

    The ultimate goal of cell division is to give rise to two viable independent daughter cells. A tight spatial and temporal regulation between chromosome segregation and cytokinesis ensures the viability of the daughter cells. Schizosaccharomyces pombe, commonly known as fission yeast, has become a leading model organism for studying essential and conserved mechanisms of the eukaryotic cell division process. Like many other eukaryotic cells it divides by binary fission and the cleavage furrow undergoes ingression due to the contraction of an actomyosin ring. In contrast to mammalian cells, yeasts as cell-walled organisms, also need to form a division septum made of cell wall material to complete the process of cytokinesis. The division septum is deposited behind the constricting ring and it will constitute the new ends of the daughter cells. Cell separation also involves cell wall degradation and this process should be precisely regulated to avoid cell lysis. In this review, we will give a brief overview of the whole cytokinesis process in fission yeast, from the positioning and assembly of the contractile ring to the final step of cell separation, and the problems generated when these processes are not precise.

  5. Schizosaccharomyces japonicus: the fission yeast is a fusion of yeast and hyphae.

    PubMed

    Niki, Hironori

    2014-03-01

    The clade of Schizosaccharomyces includes 4 species: S. pombe, S. octosporus, S. cryophilus, and S. japonicus. Although all 4 species exhibit unicellular growth with a binary fission mode of cell division, S. japonicus alone is dimorphic yeast, which can transit from unicellular yeast to long filamentous hyphae. Recently it was found that the hyphal cells response to light and then synchronously activate cytokinesis of hyphae. In addition to hyphal growth, S. japonicas has many properties that aren't shared with other fission yeast. Mitosis of S. japonicas is referred to as semi-open mitosis because dynamics of nuclear membrane is an intermediate mode between open mitosis and closed mitosis. Novel genetic tools and the whole genomic sequencing of S. japonicas now provide us with an opportunity for revealing unique characters of the dimorphic yeast.

  6. pREPORT: a multi-readout transcription reporter vector for fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Převorovský, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Transcription factors are prominent regulators of gene expression that execute responses to various intracellular and extracellular stimuli. Recombinant transcription reporter systems can be conveniently used to study the DNA binding preferences and regulatory activity of a transcription factor under a range of conditions. Several reporter genes have been used to study transcription regulation in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Each of these reporters has distinct advantages, such as high sensitivity or ease of use, and limitations, such as prohibitive costs or use of hazardous substances. To combine the strengths and mitigate the weaknesses of individual reporter genes, we have created pREPORT, a flexible multi-readout transcription reporter vector for fission yeast that employs an enhanced GFP-lacZ fusion and a customizable minimal promoter. With pREPORT, gene expression driven by the transcription factor of interest can be quantified in a number of ways, both in live cells and in vitro, using a single reporter construct.

  7. G-rich telomeric and ribosomal DNA sequences from the fission yeast genome form stable G-quadruplex DNA structures in vitro and are unwound by the Pfh1 DNA helicase.

    PubMed

    Wallgren, Marcus; Mohammad, Jani B; Yan, Kok-Phen; Pourbozorgi-Langroudi, Parham; Ebrahimi, Mahsa; Sabouri, Nasim

    2016-07-27

    Certain guanine-rich sequences have an inherent propensity to form G-quadruplex (G4) structures. G4 structures are e.g. involved in telomere protection and gene regulation. However, they also constitute obstacles during replication if they remain unresolved. To overcome these threats to genome integrity, organisms harbor specialized G4 unwinding helicases. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, one such candidate helicase is Pfh1, an evolutionarily conserved Pif1 homolog. Here, we addressed whether putative G4 sequences in S. pombe can adopt G4 structures and, if so, whether Pfh1 can resolve them. We tested two G4 sequences, derived from S. pombe ribosomal and telomeric DNA regions, and demonstrated that they form inter- and intramolecular G4 structures, respectively. Also, Pfh1 was enriched in vivo at the ribosomal G4 DNA and telomeric sites. The nuclear isoform of Pfh1 (nPfh1) unwound both types of structure, and although the G4-stabilizing compound Phen-DC3 significantly enhanced their stability, nPfh1 still resolved them efficiently. However, stable G4 structures significantly inhibited adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis by nPfh1. Because ribosomal and telomeric DNA contain putative G4 regions conserved from yeasts to humans, our studies support the important role of G4 structure formation in these regions and provide further evidence for a conserved role for Pif1 helicases in resolving G4 structures.

  8. Fission Yeast CSL Transcription Factors: Mapping Their Target Genes and Biological Roles

    PubMed Central

    Převorovský, Martin; Oravcová, Martina; Tvarůžková, Jarmila; Zach, Róbert; Folk, Petr; Půta, František; Bähler, Jürg

    2015-01-01

    Background Cbf11 and Cbf12, the fission yeast CSL transcription factors, have been implicated in the regulation of cell-cycle progression, but no specific roles have been described and their target genes have been only partially mapped. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a combination of transcriptome profiling under various conditions and genome-wide analysis of CSL-DNA interactions, we identify genes regulated directly and indirectly by CSL proteins in fission yeast. We show that the expression of stress-response genes and genes that are expressed periodically during the cell cycle is deregulated upon genetic manipulation of cbf11 and/or cbf12. Accordingly, the coordination of mitosis and cytokinesis is perturbed in cells with genetically manipulated CSL protein levels, together with other specific defects in cell-cycle progression. Cbf11 activity is nutrient-dependent and Δcbf11-associated defects are mitigated by inactivation of the protein kinase A (Pka1) and stress-activated MAP kinase (Sty1p38) pathways. Furthermore, Cbf11 directly regulates a set of lipid metabolism genes and Δcbf11 cells feature a stark decrease in the number of storage lipid droplets. Conclusions/Significance Our results provide a framework for a more detailed understanding of the role of CSL proteins in the regulation of cell-cycle progression in fission yeast. PMID:26366556

  9. Nuclear envelope fission is linked to cytokinesis in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Lippincott, J; Li, R

    2000-11-01

    We have investigated the relationship between nuclear envelope fission and cytokinesis during mitotic cell division in budding yeast. By carrying out time-lapse and optical sectioning video microscopy analysis of cells that express green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged nuclear envelope and actomyosin ring components, we found that nuclear division is temporally coupled to cytokinesis. Light and electron microscopy analysis also showed that nuclear envelope fission and the division of the nucleoplasm are severely delayed in cytokinesis mutants, resulting in discoupling between the nuclear division cycle and the budding cycle. These results suggest that homotypic membrane fusion may be activated by components or the mechanical action of cytokinetic structures and presents a mechanism for the equal partitioning of the nucleus and the temporal coordination of this event with chromosome segregation during mitosis.

  10. MCM-GINS and MCM-MCM interactions in vivo visualised by bimolecular fluorescence complementation in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Akman, Gökhan; MacNeill, Stuart A

    2009-01-01

    Background Each of the three individual components of the CMG complex (Cdc45, MCM and GINS) is essential for chromosomal DNA replication in eukaryotic cells, both for the initiation of replication at origins and also for normal replication fork progression. The MCM complex is a DNA helicase that most likely functions as the catalytic core of the replicative helicase, unwinding the parental duplex DNA ahead of the moving replication fork, whereas Cdc45 and the GINS complex are believed to act as accessory factors for MCM. Results To investigate interactions between components of the CMG complex, we have used bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe for the first time, to analyse protein-protein interactions between GINS and MCM subunits expressed from their native chromosomal loci. We demonstrate interactions between GINS and MCM in the nuclei of exponentially-growing fission yeast cells and on chromatin in binucleate S-phase cells. In addition we present evidence of MCM-MCM interactions in diploid fission yeast cells. As with GINS-MCM interactions, MCM-MCM interactions also occur on chromatin in S-phase cells. Conclusion Bimolecular fluorescence complementation can be used in fission yeast to visualise interactions between two of the three components of the CMG complex, offering the prospect that this technique could in the future be used to allow studies on replication protein dynamics in living S. pombe cells. PMID:19228417

  11. The fission yeast MRN complex tethers dysfunctional telomeres for NHEJ repair

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Clara Correia; Batista, Sílvia; Ferreira, Miguel Godinho

    2012-01-01

    Telomeres protect the natural ends of chromosomes from being repaired as deleterious DNA breaks. In fission yeast, absence of Taz1 (homologue of human TRF1 and TRF2) renders telomeres vulnerable to DNA repair. During the G1 phase, when non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is upregulated, taz1Δ cells undergo telomere fusions with consequent loss of viability. Here, we show that disruption of the fission yeast MRN (Rad23MRE11-Rad50-Nbs1) complex prevents NHEJ at telomeres and, as a result, rescues taz1Δ lethality in G1. Neither Tel1ATM activation nor 5′-end resection was required for telomere fusion. Nuclease activity of Rad32MRE11 was also dispensable for NHEJ. Mutants unable to coordinate metal ions required for nuclease activity were proficient in NHEJ repair. In contrast, Rad32MRE11 mutations that affect binding and/or positioning of DNA ends leaving the nuclease function largely unaffected also impaired NHEJ at telomeres and restored the viability of taz1Δ in G1. Consistently, MRN structural integrity but not nuclease function is also required for NHEJ of independent DNA ends in a novel split-molecule plasmid assay. Thus, MRN acts to tether unlinked DNA ends, allowing for efficient NHEJ. PMID:23188080

  12. A Proteome-wide Fission Yeast Interactome Reveals Network Evolution Principles from Yeasts to Human.

    PubMed

    Vo, Tommy V; Das, Jishnu; Meyer, Michael J; Cordero, Nicolas A; Akturk, Nurten; Wei, Xiaomu; Fair, Benjamin J; Degatano, Andrew G; Fragoza, Robert; Liu, Lisa G; Matsuyama, Akihisa; Trickey, Michelle; Horibata, Sachi; Grimson, Andrew; Yamano, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Minoru; Roth, Frederick P; Pleiss, Jeffrey A; Xia, Yu; Yu, Haiyuan

    2016-01-14

    Here, we present FissionNet, a proteome-wide binary protein interactome for S. pombe, comprising 2,278 high-quality interactions, of which ∼ 50% were previously not reported in any species. FissionNet unravels previously unreported interactions implicated in processes such as gene silencing and pre-mRNA splicing. We developed a rigorous network comparison framework that accounts for assay sensitivity and specificity, revealing extensive species-specific network rewiring between fission yeast, budding yeast, and human. Surprisingly, although genes are better conserved between the yeasts, S. pombe interactions are significantly better conserved in human than in S. cerevisiae. Our framework also reveals that different modes of gene duplication influence the extent to which paralogous proteins are functionally repurposed. Finally, cross-species interactome mapping demonstrates that coevolution of interacting proteins is remarkably prevalent, a result with important implications for studying human disease in model organisms. Overall, FissionNet is a valuable resource for understanding protein functions and their evolution.

  13. A proteome-wide fission yeast interactome reveals network evolution principles from yeasts to human

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Tommy V.; Das, Jishnu; Meyer, Michael J.; Cordero, Nicolas A.; Akturk, Nurten; Wei, Xiaomu; Fair, Benjamin J.; Degatano, Andrew G.; Fragoza, Robert; Liu, Lisa G.; Matsuyama, Akihisa; Trickey, Michelle; Horibata, Sachi; Grimson, Andrew; Yamano, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Minoru; Roth, Frederick P.; Pleiss, Jeffrey A.; Xia, Yu; Yu, Haiyuan

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Here, we present FissionNet, a proteome-wide binary protein interactome for S. pombe, comprising 2,278 high-quality interactions, of which ~50% were previously not reported in any species. FissionNet unravels previously unreported interactions implicated in processes such as gene silencing and pre-mRNA splicing. We developed a rigorous network comparison framework that accounts for assay sensitivity and specificity, revealing extensive species-specific network rewiring between fission yeast, budding yeast, and human. Surprisingly, although genes are better conserved between the yeasts, S. pombe interactions are significantly better conserved in human than in S. cerevisiae. Our framework also reveals that different modes of gene duplication influence the extent to which paralogous proteins are functionally repurposed. Finally, cross-species interactome mapping demonstrates that coevolution of interacting proteins is remarkably prevalent, a result with important implications for studying human disease in model organisms. Overall, FissionNet is a valuable resource for understanding protein functions and their evolution. PMID:26771498

  14. Fission yeast Lem2 and Man1 perform fundamental functions of the animal cell nuclear lamina.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Yanira; Saito, Akira; Sazer, Shelley

    2012-01-01

    In animal cells the nuclear lamina, which consists of lamins and lamin-associated proteins, serves several functions: it provides a structural scaffold for the nuclear envelope and tethers proteins and heterochromatin to the nuclear periphery. In yeast, proteins and large heterochromatic domains including telomeres are also peripherally localized, but there is no evidence that yeast have lamins or a fibrous nuclear envelope scaffold. Nonetheless, we found that the Lem2 and Man1 proteins of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, evolutionarily distant relatives of the Lap2/Emerin/Man1 (LEM) sub-family of animal cell lamin-associated proteins, perform fundamental functions of the animal cell lamina. These integral inner nuclear membrane localized proteins, with nuclear localized DNA binding Helix-Extension-Helix (HEH) domains, impact nuclear envelope structure and integrity, are essential for the enrichment of telomeres at the nuclear periphery and by means of their HEH domains anchor chromatin, most likely transcriptionally repressed heterochromatin, to the nuclear periphery. These data indicate that the core functions of the nuclear lamina are conserved between fungi and animal cells and can be performed in fission yeast, without lamins or other intermediate filament proteins.

  15. Model of Exploratory Search for Mating Partners by Fission Yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, Daniel; Bendezu, Felipe; Martin, Sophie; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2014-03-01

    During conditions of nitrogen starvation, the model eukaryote S. pombe (fission yeast) undergoes sexual sporulation. Because fission yeast are non-motile, contact between opposite mating types during spore formation is accomplished by polarizing growth, via the Rho GTP-ase Cdc42, in each mating type towards the selected mate, a process known as shmooing. Recent findings showed that cells pick one of their neighboring compatible mates by randomizing the position of the Cdc42 complex about the cell membrane, such that the complex is stabilized near areas of high concentration of the opposite mating type pheromone. We developed Monte Carlo simulations to model partner finding in populations of mating cells and in small cell clusters. We assume that pheromones are secreted at the site of Cdc42 accumulation and that the Cdc42 dwell time increases in response to increasing pheromone concentration. We measured the number of cells that succeed in successful reciprocal pairing, the number of cells that were unable to find a partner, and the number of cells that picked a partner already engaged with another cell. For optimal cell pairing, we find the pheromone concentration decay length is around 1 micron, of order the cell size. We show that non-linear response of Cdc42 dwell time to pheromone concentration improves the number of successful pairs for a given spatial cell distribution. We discuss how these results compare to non-exploratory pairing mechanisms.

  16. Bidirectional motility of the fission yeast kinesin-5, Cut7

    SciTech Connect

    Edamatsu, Masaki

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Motile properties of Cut7 (fission yeast kinesin-5) were studied for the first time. • Half-length Cut7 moved toward plus-end direction of microtubule. • Full-length Cut7 moved toward minus-end direction of microtubule. • N- and C-terminal microtubule binding sites did not switch the motile direction. - Abstract: Kinesin-5 is a homotetrameric motor with its motor domain at the N-terminus. Kinesin-5 crosslinks microtubules and functions in separating spindle poles during mitosis. In this study, the motile properties of Cut7, fission yeast kinesin-5, were examined for the first time. In in vitro motility assays, full-length Cut7 moved toward minus-end of microtubules, but the N-terminal half of Cut7 moved toward the opposite direction. Furthermore, additional truncated constructs lacking the N-terminal or C-terminal regions, but still contained the motor domain, did not switch the motile direction. These indicated that Cut7 was a bidirectional motor, and microtubule binding regions at the N-terminus and C-terminus were not involved in its directionality.

  17. The essential function of Rrs1 in ribosome biogenesis is conserved in budding and fission yeasts.

    PubMed

    Wan, Kun; Kawara, Haruka; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki; Kume, Kazunori; Yabuki, Yukari; Goshima, Tetsuya; Kitamura, Kenji; Ueno, Masaru; Kanai, Muneyoshi; Hirata, Dai; Funato, Kouichi; Mizuta, Keiko

    2015-09-01

    The Rrs1 protein plays an essential role in the biogenesis of 60S ribosomal subunits in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Here, we examined whether the fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) homologue of Rrs1 also plays a role in ribosome biogenesis. To this end, we constructed two temperature-sensitive fission yeast strains, rrs1-D14/22G and rrs1-L51P, which had amino acid substitutions corresponding to those of the previously characterized budding yeast rrs1-84 (D22/30G) and rrs1-124 (L61P) strains, respectively. The fission yeast mutants exhibited severe defects in growth and 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis at high temperatures. In addition, expression of the Rrs1 protein of fission yeast suppressed the growth defects of the budding yeast rrs1 mutants at high temperatures. Yeast two-hybrid analyses revealed that the interactions of Rrs1 with the Rfp2 and Ebp2 proteins were conserved in budding and fission yeasts. These results suggest that the essential function of Rrs1 in ribosome biogenesis may be conserved in budding and fission yeasts.

  18. Module-based construction of plasmids for chromosomal integration of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Kakui, Yasutaka; Sunaga, Tomonari; Arai, Kunio; Dodgson, James; Ji, Liang; Csikász-Nagy, Attila; Carazo-Salas, Rafael; Sato, Masamitsu

    2015-06-01

    Integration of an external gene into a fission yeast chromosome is useful to investigate the effect of the gene product. An easy way to knock-in a gene construct is use of an integration plasmid, which can be targeted and inserted to a chromosome through homologous recombination. Despite the advantage of integration, construction of integration plasmids is energy- and time-consuming, because there is no systematic library of integration plasmids with various promoters, fluorescent protein tags, terminators and selection markers; therefore, researchers are often forced to make appropriate ones through multiple rounds of cloning procedures. Here, we establish materials and methods to easily construct integration plasmids. We introduce a convenient cloning system based on Golden Gate DNA shuffling, which enables the connection of multiple DNA fragments at once: any kind of promoters and terminators, the gene of interest, in combination with any fluorescent protein tag genes and any selection markers. Each of those DNA fragments, called a 'module', can be tandemly ligated in the order we desire in a single reaction, which yields a circular plasmid in a one-step manner. The resulting plasmids can be integrated through standard methods for transformation. Thus, these materials and methods help easy construction of knock-in strains, and this will further increase the value of fission yeast as a model organism.

  19. Activated levels of rRNA synthesis in fission yeast are driven by an intergenic rDNA region positioned over 2500 nucleotides upstream of the initiation site.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Z; Zhao, A; Chen, L; Pape, L

    1997-01-01

    RNA polymerase I-catalyzed synthesis of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe approximately 37S pre-rRNAs was shown to be sensitive to regulatory sequences located several kilobases upstream of the initiation site for the rRNA gene. An in vitro transcription system for RNA polymerase I-catalyzed RNA synthesis was established that supports correct and activated transcription from templates bearing a full S. pombe rRNA gene promoter. A 780 bp region starting at -2560 significantly stimulates transcription of ac is-located rDNA promoter and competes with an rDNA promoter in trans, thus displaying some of the activities of rDNA transcriptional enhancers in vitro. Deletion of a 30 bp enhancer-homologous domain in this 780 bp far upstream region blocked its cis-stimulatory effect. The sequence of the S. pombe 3.5 kb intergenic spacer was determined and its organization differs from that of vertebrate, Drosophila, Acanthamoeba and plant intergenic rDNA spacers: it does not contain multiple, imperfect copies of the rRNA gene promoter nor repetitive elements of 140 bp, as are found in vertebrate rDNA enhancers. PMID:9016610

  20. Conservation and rewiring of functional modules revealed by an epistasis map in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Roguev, Assen; Bandyopadhyay, Sourav; Zofall, Martin; Zhang, Ke; Fischer, Tamas; Collins, Sean R; Qu, Hongjing; Shales, Michael; Park, Han-Oh; Hayles, Jacqueline; Hoe, Kwang-Lae; Kim, Dong-Uk; Ideker, Trey; Grewal, Shiv I; Weissman, Jonathan S; Krogan, Nevan J

    2008-10-17

    An epistasis map (E-MAP) was constructed in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, by systematically measuring the phenotypes associated with pairs of mutations. This high-density, quantitative genetic interaction map focused on various aspects of chromosome function, including transcription regulation and DNA repair/replication. The E-MAP uncovered a previously unidentified component of the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery (rsh1) and linked the RNAi pathway to several other biological processes. Comparison of the S. pombe E-MAP to an analogous genetic map from the budding yeast revealed that, whereas negative interactions were conserved between genes involved in similar biological processes, positive interactions and overall genetic profiles between pairs of genes coding for physically associated proteins were even more conserved. Hence, conservation occurs at the level of the functional module (protein complex), but the genetic cross talk between modules can differ substantially.

  1. Brownian dynamics simulation of fission yeast mitotic spindle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelmaier, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    The mitotic spindle segregates chromosomes during mitosis. The dynamics that establish bipolar spindle formation are not well understood. We have developed a computational model of fission-yeast mitotic spindle formation using Brownian dynamics and kinetic Monte Carlo methods. Our model includes rigid, dynamic microtubules, a spherical nuclear envelope, spindle pole bodies anchored in the nuclear envelope, and crosslinkers and crosslinking motor proteins. Crosslinkers and crosslinking motor proteins attach and detach in a grand canonical ensemble, and exert forces and torques on the attached microtubules. We have modeled increased affinity for crosslinking motor attachment to antiparallel microtubule pairs, and stabilization of microtubules in the interpolar bundle. We study parameters controlling the stability of the interpolar bundle and assembly of a bipolar spindle from initially adjacent spindle-pole bodies.

  2. Construction of the first compendium of chemical-genetic profiles in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and comparative compendium approach

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Sangjo; Lee, Minho; Chang, Hyeshik; Nam, Miyoung; Park, Han-Oh; Kwak, Youn-Sig; Ha, Hye-jeong; Kim, Dongsup; Hwang, Sung-Ook; Hoe, Kwang-Lae; Kim, Dong-Uk

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •The first compendium of chemical-genetic profiles form fission yeast was generated. •The first HTS of drug mode-of-action in fission yeast was performed. •The first comparative chemical genetic analysis between two yeasts was conducted. -- Abstract: Genome-wide chemical genetic profiles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae since the budding yeast deletion library construction have been successfully used to reveal unknown mode-of-actions of drugs. Here, we introduce comparative approach to infer drug target proteins more accurately using two compendiums of chemical-genetic profiles from the budding yeast S. cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. For the first time, we established DNA-chip based growth defect measurement of genome-wide deletion strains of S. pombe, and then applied 47 drugs to the pooled heterozygous deletion strains to generate chemical-genetic profiles in S. pombe. In our approach, putative drug targets were inferred from strains hypersensitive to given drugs by analyzing S. pombe and S. cerevisiae compendiums. Notably, many evidences in the literature revealed that the inferred target genes of fungicide and bactericide identified by such comparative approach are in fact the direct targets. Furthermore, by filtering out the genes with no essentiality, the multi-drug sensitivity genes, and the genes with less eukaryotic conservation, we created a set of drug target gene candidates that are expected to be directly affected by a given drug in human cells. Our study demonstrated that it is highly beneficial to construct the multiple compendiums of chemical genetic profiles using many different species. The fission yeast chemical-genetic compendium is available at (http://pombe.kaist.ac.kr/compendium)

  3. Methylations of histone H3 lysine 9 and lysine 36 are functionally linked to DNA replication checkpoint control in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Rhee, Dong Keun; Jang, Yeun Kyu

    2008-04-04

    Recently, histone H4 lysine 20 and H3 lysine 79 methylations were functionally linked to DNA damage checkpoint. The crosstalk between histone methylation and the S-M checkpoint, however, has remained unclear. Here, we show that H3 lysine 9 (K9) and lysine 36 (K36) methylations catalyzed by two histone methyltransferases Clr4 and Set2 are involved in hydroxyurea (HU)-induced replication checkpoint. The clr4-set2 double mutants besides histone H3-K9 and K36 double mutants exhibited HU-sensitivity, a defective HU-induced S-M checkpoint, and a significant reduction of HU-induced phosphorylation of Cdc2. Intriguingly, the clr4-set2 double mutations impaired the HU-induced accumulation of a mitotic inhibitor Mik1. Double mutants in Alp13 and Swi6, which can specifically bind to H3-K36 and K9 methylations, exhibited phenotypes similar to those of the clr4-set2 mutants. Together, these findings suggest that methylations of histone H3-K9 and K36 by Clr4 and Set2 are functionally linked to DNA replication checkpoint via accumulation of Mik1.

  4. Activation of an alternative, rec12 (spo11)-independent pathway of fission yeast meiotic recombination in the absence of a DNA flap endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Farah, Joseph A; Cromie, Gareth; Davis, Luther; Steiner, Walter W; Smith, Gerald R

    2005-12-01

    Spo11 or a homologous protein appears to be essential for meiotic DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation and recombination in all organisms tested. We report here the first example of an alternative, mutationally activated pathway for meiotic recombination in the absence of Rec12, the Spo11 homolog of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Rad2, a FEN-1 flap endonuclease homolog, is involved in processing Okazaki fragments. In its absence, meiotic recombination and proper segregation of chromosomes were restored in rec12Delta mutants to nearly wild-type levels. Although readily detectable in wild-type strains, meiosis-specific DSBs were undetectable in recombination-proficient rad2Delta rec12Delta strains. On the basis of the biochemical properties of Rad2, we propose that meiotic recombination by this alternative (Rec*) pathway can be initiated by non-DSB lesions, such as nicks and gaps, which accumulate during premeiotic DNA replication in the absence of Okazaki fragment processing. We compare the Rec* pathway to alternative pathways of homologous recombination in other organisms.

  5. Nuclear compartmentalization is abolished during fission yeast meiosis.

    PubMed

    Arai, Kunio; Sato, Masamitsu; Tanaka, Kayoko; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2010-11-09

    In eukaryotic cells, the nuclear envelope partitions the nucleus from the cytoplasm. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergoes closed mitosis in which the nuclear envelope persists rather than being broken down, as in higher eukaryotic cells. It is therefore assumed that nucleocytoplasmic transport continues during the cell cycle. Here we show that nuclear transport is, in fact, abolished specifically during anaphase of the second meiotic nuclear division. During that time, both nucleoplasmic and cytoplasmic proteins disperse throughout the cell, reminiscent of the open mitosis of higher eukaryotes, but the architecture of the S. pombe nuclear envelope itself persists. This functional alteration of the nucleocytoplasmic barrier is likely induced by spore wall formation, because ectopic induction of sporulation signaling leads to premature dispersion of nucleoplasmic proteins. A photobleaching assay demonstrated that nuclear envelope permeability increases abruptly at the onset of anaphase of the second meiotic division. The permeability was not altered when sporulation was inhibited by blocking the trafficking of forespore-membrane vesicles from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi. The evidence indicates that yeast gametogenesis produces vesicle transport-mediated forespore membranes by inducing nuclear envelope permeabilization.

  6. An Imaging Flow Cytometry-based approach to analyse the fission yeast cell cycle in fixed cells.

    PubMed

    Patterson, James O; Swaffer, Matthew; Filby, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    Fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) is an excellent model organism for studying eukaryotic cell division because many of the underlying principles and key regulators of cell cycle biology are conserved from yeast to humans. As such it can be employed as tool for understanding complex human diseases that arise from dis-regulation in cell cycle controls, including cancers. Conventional Flow Cytometry (CFC) is a high-throughput, multi-parameter, fluorescence-based single cell analysis technology. It is widely used for studying the mammalian cell cycle both in the context of the normal and disease states by measuring changes in DNA content during the transition through G1, S and G2/M using fluorescent DNA-binding dyes. Unfortunately analysis of the fission yeast cell cycle by CFC is not straightforward because, unlike mammalian cells, cytokinesis occurs after S-phase meaning that bi-nucleated G1 cells have the same DNA content as mono-nucleated G2 cells and cannot be distinguished using total integrated fluorescence (pulse area). It has been elegantly shown that the width of the DNA pulse can be used to distinguish G2 cells with a single 2C foci versus G1 cells with two 1C foci, however the accuracy of this measurement is dependent on the orientation of the cell as it traverses the laser beam. To this end we sought to improve the accuracy of the fission yeast cell cycle analysis and have developed an Imaging Flow Cytometry (IFC)-based method that is able to preserve the high throughput, objective analysis afforded by CFC in combination with the spatial and morphometric information provide by microscopy. We have been able to derive an analysis framework for subdividing the yeast cell cycle that is based on intensiometric and morphometric measurements and is thus robust against orientation-based miss-classification. In addition we can employ image-based metrics to define populations of septated/bi-nucleated cells and measure cellular dimensions. To our knowledge

  7. Yeast mitochondrial fission proteins induce antagonistic Gaussian membrane curvatures to regulate apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Michelle; Hwee Lai, Ghee; Schmidt, Nathan; Xian, Wujing; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2013-03-01

    Mitochondria form a dynamic and interconnected network, which disintegrates during apoptosis to generate numerous smaller mitochondrial fragments. This process is at present not well understood. Yeast mitochondrial fission machinery proteins, Dnm1 and Fis1, are believed to regulate programmed cell death in yeast. Yeast Dnm1 has been previously shown to promote mitochondrial fragmentation and degradation characteristic of apoptotic cells, while yeast Fis1 inhibits cell death by limiting the mitochondrial fission induced by Dnm1 [Fannjiang et al, Genes & Dev. 2004. 18: 2785-2797]. To better understand the mechanisms of these antagonistic fission proteins, we use synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) to investigate their interaction with model cell membranes. The relationship between each protein, Dnm1 and Fis1, and protein-induced changes in membrane curvature and topology is examined. Through the comparison of the membrane rearrangement and phase behavior induced by each protein, we will discuss their respective roles in the regulation of mitochondrial fission.

  8. Mapping of ure1, ure2 and ure3 markers in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Lubbers, M W; Thornton, R J; Honey, N K

    1997-09-30

    The following urease genes of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe have been mapped by induced haploidization and tetrad analysis--ure1: chromosome are III-L; ure2 and ure3: chromosome are I-R. The previously determined tps19-rad1 interval (11-12 cM) has been increased to 18 cM. A convenient medium for rapidly scoring the ure gene markers of fission yeast was developed.

  9. Evaluation of a novel method for measurement of intracellular calcium ion concentration in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Fumihiko; Satoh, Ryosuke; Kita, Ayako; Sugiura, Reiko; Kawasaki, Naohito

    2017-01-01

    The distribution of metal and metalloid species in each of the cell compartments is termed as "metallome". It is important to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the beneficial or toxic effects exerted by a given metal or metalloid on human health. Therefore, we developed a method to measure intracellular metal ion concentration (particularly, intracellular calcium ion) in fission yeast. We evaluated the effects of nitric acid (HNO3), zymolyase, and westase treatment on cytolysis in fission yeast. Moreover, we evaluated the changes in the intracellular calcium ion concentration in fission yeast in response to treatment with/without micafungin. The fission yeast undergoes lysis when treated with 60% HNO3, which is simpler and cheaper compared to the other treatments. Additionally, the intracellular calcium ion concentration in 60% HNO3-treated fission yeast was determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. This study yields significant information pertaining to measurement of the intracellular calcium ion concentration in fission yeast, which is useful for elucidating the physiological or pathological functions of calcium ion in the biological systems. This study is the first step to obtain perspective view on the effect of the metallome in biological systems.

  10. Sterol-Rich Membrane Domains Define Fission Yeast Cell Polarity.

    PubMed

    Makushok, Tatyana; Alves, Paulo; Huisman, Stephen Michiel; Kijowski, Adam Rafal; Brunner, Damian

    2016-05-19

    Cell polarization is crucial for the functioning of all organisms. The cytoskeleton is central to the process but its role in symmetry breaking is poorly understood. We study cell polarization when fission yeast cells exit starvation. We show that the basis of polarity generation is de novo sterol biosynthesis, cell surface delivery of sterols, and their recruitment to the cell poles. This involves four phases occurring independent of the polarity factor cdc42p. Initially, multiple, randomly distributed sterol-rich membrane (SRM) domains form at the plasma membrane, independent of the cytoskeleton and cell growth. These domains provide platforms on which the growth and polarity machinery assembles. SRM domains are then polarized by the microtubule-dependent polarity factor tea1p, which prepares for monopolar growth initiation and later switching to bipolar growth. SRM polarization requires F-actin but not the F-actin organizing polarity factors for3p and bud6p. We conclude that SRMs are key to cell polarization.

  11. Virtual breakdown of the nuclear envelope in fission yeast meiosis.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Haruhiko; Kojidani, Tomoko; Mori, Chie; Osakada, Hiroko; Sato, Mamiko; Ding, Da-Qiao; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2010-11-09

    Asymmetric localization of Ran regulators (RanGAP1 and RanGEF/RCC1) produces a gradient of RanGTP across the nuclear envelope. In higher eukaryotes, the nuclear envelope breaks down as the cell enters mitosis (designated "open" mitosis). This nuclear envelope breakdown (NEBD) leads to collapse of the RanGTP gradient and the diffusion of nuclear and cytoplasmic macromolecules in the cell, resulting in irreversible progression of the cell cycle. On the other hand, in many fungi, chromosome segregation takes place without NEBD (designated "closed" mitosis). Here we report that in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, despite the nuclear envelope and the nuclear pore complex remaining intact throughout both the meiotic and mitotic cell cycles, nuclear proteins diffuse into the cytoplasm transiently for a few minutes at the onset of anaphase of meiosis II. We also found that nuclear protein diffusion into the cytoplasm occurred coincidently with nuclear localization of Rna1, an S. pombe RanGAP1 homolog that is usually localized in the cytoplasm. These results suggest that nuclear localization of RanGAP1 and depression of RanGTP activity in the nucleus may be mechanistically tied to meiosis-specific diffusion of nuclear proteins into the cytoplasm. This nucleocytoplasmic shuffling of RanGAP1 and nuclear proteins represents virtual breakdown of the nuclear envelope.

  12. Fission yeast kinesin-8 controls chromosome congression independently of oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Mary, Hadrien; Fouchard, Jonathan; Gay, Guillaume; Reyes, Céline; Gauthier, Tiphaine; Gruget, Clémence; Pécréaux, Jacques; Tournier, Sylvie; Gachet, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In higher eukaryotes, efficient chromosome congression relies, among other players, on the activity of chromokinesins. Here, we provide a quantitative analysis of kinetochore oscillations and positioning in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, a model organism lacking chromokinesins. In wild-type cells, chromosomes align during prophase and, while oscillating, maintain this alignment throughout metaphase. Chromosome oscillations are dispensable both for kinetochore congression and stable kinetochore alignment during metaphase. In higher eukaryotes, kinesin-8 family members control chromosome congression by regulating their oscillations. By contrast, here, we demonstrate that fission yeast kinesin-8 controls chromosome congression by an alternative mechanism. We propose that kinesin-8 aligns chromosomes by controlling pulling forces in a length-dependent manner. A coarse-grained model of chromosome segregation implemented with a length-dependent process that controls the force at kinetochores is necessary and sufficient to mimic kinetochore alignment, and prevents the appearance of lagging chromosomes. Taken together, these data illustrate how the local action of a motor protein at kinetochores provides spatial cues within the spindle to align chromosomes and to prevent aneuploidy. PMID:26359299

  13. Regulation of wee1(+) expression during meiosis in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Murakami-Tonami, Yuko; Ohtsuka, Hokuto; Aiba, Hirofumi; Murakami, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk1p (Cdc2p) plays a central role in entry into and progression through nuclear division during mitosis and meiosis. Cdk1p is activated during meiotic nuclear divisions by dephosphorylation of its tyrosine-15 residue. The phosphorylation status of this residue is largely determined by the Wee1p kinase and the Cdc25p phosphatase. In fission yeast, the forkhead-type transcription factor Mei4p is essential for entry into the first meiotic nuclear division. We recently identified cdc25(+) as an essential target of Mei4p in the control of entry into meiosis I. Here, we show that wee1(+) is another important target of Mei4p in the control of entry into meiosis I. Mei4p bound to the upstream region of wee1(+) in vivo and in vitro and inhibited expression of wee1(+), whereas Mei4p positively regulated expression of the adjacent pseudogene. Overexpression of Mei4p inhibited expression of wee1(+) and induced that of the pseudogene. Conversely, deletion of Mei4p did not decrease expression of wee1(+) but inhibited that of the pseudogene. In addition, deletion of Mei4p-binding regions delayed repression of wee1(+) expression as well as induction of expression of the pseudogene. These results suggest that repression of wee1(+) expression is primarily owing to Mei4p-mediated transcriptional interference.

  14. Spatial segregation of Ras signaling: new evidence from fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Chang, Eric C; Philips, Mark R

    2006-09-01

    The Ras GTPases act as binary switches for signal transduction pathways that are important for growth regulation and tumorigenesis. Despite the biochemical simplicity of this switch, Ras proteins control multiple pathways, and the functions of the four mammalian Ras proteins are not overlapping. This raises an important question--how does a Ras protein selectively regulate a particular activity? One recently emerging model suggests that a single Ras protein can control different functions by acting in distinct cellular compartments. A critical test of this model is to identify pathways that are selectively controlled by Ras when it is localized to a particular compartment. A recent study has examined Ras signaling in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which expresses only one Ras protein that controls two separate evolutionarily conserved pathways. This study demonstrates that whereas Ras localized to the plasma membrane selectively regulates a MAP kinase pathway to mediate mating pheromone signaling, Ras localized to the endomembrane activates a Cdc42 pathway to mediate cell polarity and protein trafficking. This study has provided unambiguous evidence for compartmentalized signaling of Ras.

  15. Fission yeast RNA triphosphatase reads an Spt5 CTD code.

    PubMed

    Doamekpor, Selom K; Schwer, Beate; Sanchez, Ana M; Shuman, Stewart; Lima, Christopher D

    2015-01-01

    mRNA capping enzymes are directed to nascent RNA polymerase II (Pol2) transcripts via interactions with the carboxy-terminal domains (CTDs) of Pol2 and transcription elongation factor Spt5. Fission yeast RNA triphosphatase binds to the Spt5 CTD, comprising a tandem repeat of nonapeptide motif TPAWNSGSK. Here we report the crystal structure of a Pct1·Spt5-CTD complex, which revealed two CTD docking sites on the Pct1 homodimer that engage TPAWN segments of the motif. Each Spt5 CTD interface, composed of elements from both subunits of the homodimer, is dominated by van der Waals contacts from Pct1 to the tryptophan of the CTD. The bound CTD adopts a distinctive conformation in which the peptide backbone makes a tight U-turn so that the proline stacks over the tryptophan. We show that Pct1 binding to Spt5 CTD is antagonized by threonine phosphorylation. Our results fortify an emerging concept of an "Spt5 CTD code" in which (i) the Spt5 CTD is structurally plastic and can adopt different conformations that are templated by particular cellular Spt5 CTD receptor proteins; and (ii) threonine phosphorylation of the Spt5 CTD repeat inscribes a binary on-off switch that is read by diverse CTD receptors, each in its own distinctive manner.

  16. Modeling Intracellular Oscillations and Polarity Transition in Fission Yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Tyler; Das, Maitreyi; Verde, Fulvia; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2011-03-01

    Fission yeast, a pill-shaped model organism, restricts growth to its tips. These cells maintain an asymmetric growth state, growing at only one tip, until they meet length and cell-cycle requirements. With these met, they grow at both. The mechanism of this transition, new-end take-off (NETO), remains unclear. We find that NETO occurs due to long-range competition for fast-diffusing signaling protein Cdc42 between the old and new tips. From experimental results, we suppose that symmetric tips compete for Cdc42, which triggers growth. We describe a symmetric growth model based on competition between tips. This model restricts short cells to monopolar states while allowing longer cells to be bipolar. Autocatalytic Cdc42 recruiting at both cells tips leads to broken symmetry, and the recruiting cuts off as tip Cdc42 levels saturate. Non-linear differential equations describe the model, with stable attractors indicating valid distributions. Linear stability analysis and numerical methods identify stable fixed points over a twofold increase in cell length. The model reproduces qualitative behavior of the organism. We show that observed pole-to-pole Cdc42 oscillations may facilitate the polarity transition and discuss their relationship to the Min system in E. Coli.

  17. Theoretical Description of Microtubule Dynamics in Fission Yeast During Interphase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oei, Yung-Chin; Jiménez-Dalmaroni, Andrea; Vilfan, Andrej; Duke, Thomas

    2009-03-01

    Fission yeast (S. pombe) is a unicellular organism with a characteristic cylindrical shape. Cell growth during interphase is strongly influenced by microtubule self-organization - a process that has been experimentally well characterised. The microtubules are organized in 3 to 4 bundles, called ``interphase microtubule assemblies'' (IMAs). Each IMA is composed of several microtubules, arranged with their dynamic ``plus'' ends facing the cell tips and their ``minus'' ends overlapping at the cell middle. Although the main protein factors involved in interphase microtubule organization have been identified, an understanding of how their collective interaction with microtubules leads to the organization and structures observed in vivo is lacking. We present a physical model of microtubule dynamics that aims to provide a quantitative description of the self-organization process. First, we solve equations for the microtubule length distribution in steady-state, taking into account the way that a limited tubulin pool affects the nucleation, growth and shrinkage of microtubules. Then we incorporate passive and active crosslinkers (the bundling factor Ase1 and molecular motor Klp2) and investigate the formation of IMA structures. Analytical results are complemented by a 3D stochastic simulation.

  18. Fission yeast RNA triphosphatase reads an Spt5 CTD code

    SciTech Connect

    Doamekpor, Selom K.; Schwer, Beate; Sanchez, Ana M.; Shuman, Stewart; Lima, Christopher D.

    2014-11-20

    mRNA capping enzymes are directed to nascent RNA polymerase II (Pol2) transcripts via interactions with the carboxy-terminal domains (CTDs) of Pol2 and transcription elongation factor Spt5. Fission yeast RNA triphosphatase binds to the Spt5 CTD, comprising a tandem repeat of nonapeptide motif TPAWNSGSK. Here we report the crystal structure of a Pct1·Spt5-CTD complex, which revealed two CTD docking sites on the Pct1 homodimer that engage TPAWN segments of the motif. Each Spt5 CTD interface, composed of elements from both subunits of the homodimer, is dominated by van der Waals contacts from Pct1 to the tryptophan of the CTD. The bound CTD adopts a distinctive conformation in which the peptide backbone makes a tight U-turn so that the proline stacks over the tryptophan. We show that Pct1 binding to Spt5 CTD is antagonized by threonine phosphorylation. Our results fortify an emerging concept of an “Spt5 CTD code” in which (i) the Spt5 CTD is structurally plastic and can adopt different conformations that are templated by particular cellular Spt5 CTD receptor proteins; and (ii) threonine phosphorylation of the Spt5 CTD repeat inscribes a binary on–off switch that is read by diverse CTD receptors, each in its own distinctive manner.

  19. Fission yeast RNA triphosphatase reads an Spt5 CTD code

    DOE PAGES

    Doamekpor, Selom K.; Schwer, Beate; Sanchez, Ana M.; ...

    2014-11-20

    mRNA capping enzymes are directed to nascent RNA polymerase II (Pol2) transcripts via interactions with the carboxy-terminal domains (CTDs) of Pol2 and transcription elongation factor Spt5. Fission yeast RNA triphosphatase binds to the Spt5 CTD, comprising a tandem repeat of nonapeptide motif TPAWNSGSK. Here we report the crystal structure of a Pct1·Spt5-CTD complex, which revealed two CTD docking sites on the Pct1 homodimer that engage TPAWN segments of the motif. Each Spt5 CTD interface, composed of elements from both subunits of the homodimer, is dominated by van der Waals contacts from Pct1 to the tryptophan of the CTD. The boundmore » CTD adopts a distinctive conformation in which the peptide backbone makes a tight U-turn so that the proline stacks over the tryptophan. We show that Pct1 binding to Spt5 CTD is antagonized by threonine phosphorylation. Our results fortify an emerging concept of an “Spt5 CTD code” in which (i) the Spt5 CTD is structurally plastic and can adopt different conformations that are templated by particular cellular Spt5 CTD receptor proteins; and (ii) threonine phosphorylation of the Spt5 CTD repeat inscribes a binary on–off switch that is read by diverse CTD receptors, each in its own distinctive manner.« less

  20. De Novo Biosynthesis of Vanillin in Fission Yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and Baker's Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Esben H.; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Kock, Gertrud R.; Bünner, Camilla M.; Kristensen, Charlotte; Jensen, Ole R.; Okkels, Finn T.; Olsen, Carl E.; Motawia, Mohammed S.; Hansen, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Vanillin is one of the world's most important flavor compounds, with a global market of 180 million dollars. Natural vanillin is derived from the cured seed pods of the vanilla orchid (Vanilla planifolia), but most of the world's vanillin is synthesized from petrochemicals or wood pulp lignins. We have established a true de novo biosynthetic pathway for vanillin production from glucose in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, also known as fission yeast or African beer yeast, as well as in baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Productivities were 65 and 45 mg/liter, after introduction of three and four heterologous genes, respectively. The engineered pathways involve incorporation of 3-dehydroshikimate dehydratase from the dung mold Podospora pauciseta, an aromatic carboxylic acid reductase (ACAR) from a bacterium of the Nocardia genus, and an O-methyltransferase from Homo sapiens. In S. cerevisiae, the ACAR enzyme required activation by phosphopantetheinylation, and this was achieved by coexpression of a Corynebacterium glutamicum phosphopantetheinyl transferase. Prevention of reduction of vanillin to vanillyl alcohol was achieved by knockout of the host alcohol dehydrogenase ADH6. In S. pombe, the biosynthesis was further improved by introduction of an Arabidopsis thaliana family 1 UDP-glycosyltransferase, converting vanillin into vanillin β-d-glucoside, which is not toxic to the yeast cells and thus may be accumulated in larger amounts. These de novo pathways represent the first examples of one-cell microbial generation of these valuable compounds from glucose. S. pombe yeast has not previously been metabolically engineered to produce any valuable, industrially scalable, white biotech commodity. PMID:19286778

  1. Enzymatic initiation of DNA synthesis by yeast DNA polymerases.

    PubMed Central

    Plevani, P; Chang, L M

    1977-01-01

    Partially purified yeast RNA polymerases (RNA nucleotidyltransferases) initiate DNA synthesis by yeast DNA polymerase (DNA nucleotidyltransferase) I and to a lesser extent yeast DNA polymerase II in the replication of single-stranded DNA. The enzymatic initiation of DNA synthesis on phage fd DNA template occurs with dNTPs alone and is further stimulated by the presence of rNTPs in DNA polymerase I reactions. The presence of rNTPs has no effect on the RNA polymerase initiation of the DNA polymerase II reaction. RNA polymerases I and III are more efficient in initiation of DNA synthesis than RNA polymerase II. Analyses of the products of fd DNA replication show noncovalent linkage between the newly synthesized DNA and the template DNA, and covalent linkage between the newly synthesized RNA and DNA. PMID:325562

  2. The dynamin-related protein Vps1 regulates vacuole fission, fusion and tubulation in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Röthlisberger, Sarah; Jourdain, Isabelle; Johnson, Chad; Takegawa, Kaoru; Hyams, Jeremy S

    2009-12-01

    Fission yeast cells lacking the dynamin-related protein (DRP) Vps1 had smaller vacuoles with reduced capacity for both fusion and fission in response to hypotonic and hypertonic conditions respectively. vps1Delta cells showed normal vacuolar protein sorting, actin organisation and endocytosis. Over-expression of vps1 transformed vacuoles from spherical to tubular. Tubule formation was enhanced in fission conditions and required the Rab protein Ypt7. Vacuole tubulation by Vps1 was more extensive in the absence of a second DRP, Dnm1. Both dnm1Delta and the double mutant vps1Delta dnm1Delta showed vacuole fission defects similar to that of vps1Delta. Over-expression of vps1 in dnm1Delta, or of dnm1 in vps1Delta failed to rescue this phenotype. Over-expression of dnm1 in wild-type cells, on the other hand, induced vacuole fission. Our results are consistent with a model of vacuole fission in which Vps1 creates a tubule of an appropriate diameter for subsequent scission by Dnm1.

  3. Advancing our understanding of functional genome organisation through studies in the fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Ida; Bjerling, Pernilla

    2011-02-01

    Significant progress has been made in understanding the functional organisation of the cell nucleus. Still many questions remain to be answered about the relationship between the spatial organisation of the nucleus and the regulation of the genome function. There are many conflicting data in the field making it very difficult to merge published results on mammalian cells into one model on subnuclear chromatin organisation. The fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, over the last decades has emerged as a valuable model organism in understanding basic biological mechanisms, especially the cell cycle and chromosome biology. In this review we describe and compare the nuclear organisation in mammalian and fission yeast cells. We believe that fission yeast is a good tool to resolve at least some of the contradictions and unanswered questions concerning functional nuclear architecture, since S. pombe has chromosomes structurally similar to that of human. S. pombe also has the advantage over higher eukaryotes in that the genome can easily be manipulated via homologous recombination making it possible to integrate the tools needed for visualisation of chromosomes using live-cell microscopy. Classical genetic experiments can be used to elucidate what factors are involved in a certain mechanism. The knowledge we have gained during the last few years indicates similarities between the genome organisation in fission yeast and mammalian cells. We therefore propose the use of fission yeast for further advancement of our understanding of functional nuclear organisation.

  4. Cell cycle-dependent specific positioning and clustering of centromeres and telomeres in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) shows that fission yeast centromeres and telomeres make up specific spatial arrangements in the nucleus. Their positioning and clustering are cell cycle regulated. In G2, centromeres cluster adjacent to the spindle pole body (SPB), while in mitosis, their association with each other and with the SPB is disrupted. Similarly, telomeres cluster at the nuclear periphery in G2 and their associations are disrupted in mitosis. Mitotic centromeres interact with the spindle. They remain undivided until the spindle reaches a critical length, then separate and move towards the poles. This demonstrated, for the first time, that anaphase A occurs in fission yeast. The mode of anaphase A and B is similar to that of higher eukaryotes. In nda3 and cut7 mutants defective in tubulin of a kinesin-related motor, cells are blocked in early stages of mitosis due to the absence of the spindle, and centromeres dissociate but remain close to the SPB, whereas in a metaphase-arrested nuc2 mutant, they reside at the middle of the spindle. FISH is therefore a powerful tool for analyzing mitotic chromosome movement and disjunction using various mutants. Surprisingly, in top2 defective in DNA topoisomerase II, while most chromatid DNAs remain undivided, sister centromeres are separated. Significance of this finding is discussed. In contrast, most chromatid DNAs are separated but telomeric DNAs are not in cut1 mutant. In cut1, the dependence of SPB duplication on the completion of mitosis is abolished. In crm1 mutant cells defective in higher-order chromosome organization, the interphase arrangements of centromeres and telomeres are disrupted. PMID:8388878

  5. Multiple modes of chromatin configuration at natural meiotic recombination hot spots in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Kouji; Steiner, Walter W; Shibata, Takehiko; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2007-11-01

    The ade6-M26 meiotic recombination hot spot of fission yeast is defined by a cyclic AMP-responsive element (CRE)-like heptanucleotide sequence, 5'-ATGACGT-3', which acts as a binding site for the Atf1/Pcr1 heterodimeric transcription factor required for hot spot activation. We previously demonstrated that the local chromatin around the M26 sequence motif alters to exhibit higher sensitivity to micrococcal nuclease before the initiation of meiotic recombination. In this study, we have examined whether or not such alterations in chromatin occur at natural meiotic DNA double-strand break (DSB) sites in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. At one of the most prominent DSB sites, mbs1 (meiotic break site 1), the chromatin structure has a constitutively accessible configuration at or near the DSB sites. The establishment of the open chromatin state and DSB formation are independent of the CRE-binding transcription factor, Atf1. Analysis of the chromatin configuration at CRE-dependent DSB sites revealed both differences from and similarities to mbs1. For example, the tdh1+ locus, which harbors a CRE consensus sequence near the DSB site, shows a meiotically induced open chromatin configuration, similar to ade6-M26. In contrast, the cds1+ locus is similar to mbs1 in that it exhibits a constitutive open configuration. Importantly, Atf1 is required for the open chromatin formation in both tdh1+ and cds1+. These results suggest that CRE-dependent meiotic chromatin changes are intrinsic processes related to DSB formation in fission yeast meiosis. In addition, the results suggest that the chromatin configuration in natural meiotic recombination hot spots can be classified into at least three distinct categories: (i) an Atf1-CRE-independent constitutively open chromatin configuration, (ii) an Atf1-CRE-dependent meiotically induced open chromatin configuration, and (iii) an Atf1-CRE-dependent constitutively open chromatin configuration.

  6. A stochastic model of kinetochore-microtubule attachment accurately describes fission yeast chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Gay, Guillaume; Courtheoux, Thibault; Reyes, Céline; Tournier, Sylvie; Gachet, Yannick

    2012-03-19

    In fission yeast, erroneous attachments of spindle microtubules to kinetochores are frequent in early mitosis. Most are corrected before anaphase onset by a mechanism involving the protein kinase Aurora B, which destabilizes kinetochore microtubules (ktMTs) in the absence of tension between sister chromatids. In this paper, we describe a minimal mathematical model of fission yeast chromosome segregation based on the stochastic attachment and detachment of ktMTs. The model accurately reproduces the timing of correct chromosome biorientation and segregation seen in fission yeast. Prevention of attachment defects requires both appropriate kinetochore orientation and an Aurora B-like activity. The model also reproduces abnormal chromosome segregation behavior (caused by, for example, inhibition of Aurora B). It predicts that, in metaphase, merotelic attachment is prevented by a kinetochore orientation effect and corrected by an Aurora B-like activity, whereas in anaphase, it is corrected through unbalanced forces applied to the kinetochore. These unbalanced forces are sufficient to prevent aneuploidy.

  7. A series of promoters for constitutive expression of heterologous genes in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Akihisa; Shirai, Atsuko; Yoshida, Minoru

    2008-05-01

    Inducible/repressible promoters are useful for the maintenance of toxic genes or timely expression. For ectopic expression of cloned genes in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the thiamine-regulatable nmt1 promoter has been widely used, since the transcriptional activity of this promoter can be controlled by thiamine. However, this property sometimes limits a certain type of research, since the expression inevitably requires cells to be cultivated under the conditions that induce promoter activation. To allow constitutive expression of heterologous genes, we cloned three promoters of cam1+, tif51+ and ef1a-c+. Construction of a series of vectors comprising these promoters and their introduction into the fission yeast cells demonstrated that the activity was different among these promoters but was not affected by cultured media commonly used in fission yeast. Therefore, a promoter with appropriate strength would be selectable from these promoters, depending on the genes to be expressed.

  8. Properties of African Cassava Mosaic Virus Capsid Protein Expressed in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Hipp, Katharina; Schäfer, Benjamin; Kepp, Gabi; Jeske, Holger

    2016-01-01

    The capsid proteins (CPs) of geminiviruses combine multiple functions for packaging the single-stranded viral genome, insect transmission and shuttling between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) CP was expressed in fission yeast, and purified by SDS gel electrophoresis. After tryptic digestion of this protein, mass spectrometry covered 85% of the amino acid sequence and detected three N-terminal phosphorylation sites (threonine 12, serines 25 and 62). Differential centrifugation of cell extracts separated the CP into two fractions, the supernatant and pellet. Upon isopycnic centrifugation of the supernatant, most of the CP accumulated at densities typical for free proteins, whereas the CP in the pellet fraction showed a partial binding to nucleic acids. Size-exclusion chromatography of the supernatant CP indicated high order complexes. In DNA binding assays, supernatant CP accelerated the migration of ssDNA in agarose gels, which is a first hint for particle formation. Correspondingly, CP shifted ssDNA to the expected densities of virus particles upon isopycnic centrifugation. Nevertheless, electron microscopy did not reveal any twin particles, which are characteristic for geminiviruses. PMID:27399762

  9. Comparative 3D genome structure analysis of the fission and the budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ke; Tjong, Harianto; Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine; Alber, Frank

    2015-01-01

    We studied the 3D structural organization of the fission yeast genome, which emerges from the tethering of heterochromatic regions in otherwise randomly configured chromosomes represented as flexible polymer chains in an nuclear environment. This model is sufficient to explain in a statistical manner many experimentally determined distinctive features of the fission yeast genome, including chromatin interaction patterns from Hi-C experiments and the co-locations of functionally related and co-expressed genes, such as genes expressed by Pol-III. Our findings demonstrate that some previously described structure-function correlations can be explained as a consequence of random chromatin collisions driven by a few geometric constraints (mainly due to centromere-SPB and telomere-NE tethering) combined with the specific gene locations in the chromosome sequence. We also performed a comparative analysis between the fission and budding yeast genome structures, for which we previously detected a similar organizing principle. However, due to the different chromosome sizes and numbers, substantial differences are observed in the 3D structural genome organization between the two species, most notably in the nuclear locations of orthologous genes, and the extent of nuclear territories for genes and chromosomes. However, despite those differences, remarkably, functional similarities are maintained, which is evident when comparing spatial clustering of functionally related genes in both yeasts. Functionally related genes show a similar spatial clustering behavior in both yeasts, even though their nuclear locations are largely different between the yeast species.

  10. Rhn1, a nuclear protein, is required for suppression of meiotic mRNAs in mitotically dividing fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Tomoyasu; Sugioka-Sugiyama, Rie; Hada, Kazumasa; Niwa, Ryusuke

    2012-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, many meiotic mRNAs are transcribed during mitosis and meiosis and selectively eliminated in mitotic cells. However, this pathway for mRNA decay, called the determinant of selective removal (DSR)-Mmi1 system, targets only some of the numerous meiotic mRNAs that are transcribed in mitotic cells. Here we describe Rhn1, a nuclear protein involved in meiotic mRNA suppression in vegetative fission yeast. Rhn1 is homologous to budding yeast Rtt103 and localizes to one or a few discrete nuclear dots in growing vegetative cells. Rhn1 colocalizes with a pre-mRNA 3'-end processing factor, Pcf11, and with the 5'-3' exoribonuclease, Dhp1; moreover, Rhn1 coimmunoprecipitates with Pcf11. Loss of rhn1 results in elevated sensitivity to high temperature, to thiabendazole (TBZ), and to UV. Interestingly, meiotic mRNAs--including moa1(+), mcp5(+), and mug96(+)--accumulate in mitotic rhn1Δ cells. Accumulation of meiotic mRNAs also occurs in strains lacking Lsk1, a kinase that phosphorylates serine 2 (Ser-2) in the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (Pol II), and in strains lacking Sen1, an ATP-dependent 5'-3' RNA/DNA helicase: notably, both Lsk1 and Sen1 have been implicated in termination of Pol II-dependent transcription. Furthermore, RNAi knockdown of cids-2, a Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of rhn1(+), leads to elevated expression of a germline-specific gene, pgl-1, in somatic cells. These results indicate that Rhn1 contributes to the suppression of meiotic mRNAs in vegetative fission yeast and that the mechanism by which Rhn1 downregulates germline-specific transcripts may be conserved in unicellular and multicellular organisms.

  11. Ctp1 and the MRN-complex are required for endonucleolytic Rec12 removal with release of a single class of oligonucleotides in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, Maja; Kohli, Jürg; Ludin, Katja

    2009-11-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are formed during meiosis by the action of the topoisomerase-like Spo11/Rec12 protein, which remains covalently bound to the 5' ends of the broken DNA. Spo11/Rec12 removal is required for resection and initiation of strand invasion for DSB repair. It was previously shown that budding yeast Spo11, the homolog of fission yeast Rec12, is removed from DNA by endonucleolytic cleavage. The release of two Spo11 bound oligonucleotide classes, heterogeneous in length, led to the conjecture of asymmetric cleavage. In fission yeast, we found only one class of oligonucleotides bound to Rec12 ranging in length from 17 to 27 nucleotides. Ctp1, Rad50, and the nuclease activity of Rad32, the fission yeast homolog of Mre11, are required for endonucleolytic Rec12 removal. Further, we detected no Rec12 removal in a rad50S mutant. However, strains with additional loss of components localizing to the linear elements, Hop1 or Mek1, showed some Rec12 removal, a restoration depending on Ctp1 and Rad32 nuclease activity. But, deletion of hop1 or mek1 did not suppress the phenotypes of ctp1Delta and the nuclease dead mutant (rad32-D65N). We discuss what consequences for subsequent repair a single class of Rec12-oligonucleotides may have during meiotic recombination in fission yeast in comparison to two classes of Spo11-oligonucleotides in budding yeast. Furthermore, we hypothesize on the participation of Hop1 and Mek1 in Rec12 removal.

  12. rqh1+, a fission yeast gene related to the Bloom's and Werner's syndrome genes, is required for reversible S phase arrest.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, E; Chapman, C R; Al-Khodairy, F; Carr, A M; Enoch, T

    1997-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, S phase can be reversibly arrested by drugs that inhibit DNA synthesis or DNA damage. Here we show that recovery from such treatments is under genetic control and is defective in fission yeast rqh1 mutants. rqh1+, previously known as hus2+, encodes a putative DNA helicase related to the Escherichia coli RecQ helicase, with particular homology to the gene products of the human BLM and WRN genes and the Saccharomyces cerevisiae SGS1 gene. BLM and WRN are mutated in patients with Bloom's syndrome and Werner's syndrome respectively. Both syndromes are associated with genomic instability and cancer susceptibility. We show that, like BLM and SGS1, rqh1+ is required to prevent recombination and that in fission yeast suppression of inappropriate recombination is essential for reversible S phase arrest. PMID:9184215

  13. Purification, folding, and characterization of Rec12 (Spo11) meiotic recombinase of fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Wu, Heng; Gao, Jun; Sharif, Wallace D; Davidson, Mari K; Wahls, Wayne P

    2004-11-01

    Meiotic recombination is initiated by controlled dsDNA breaks (DSBs). Rec12 (Spo11) protein of fission yeast is essential for the formation of meiotic DSBs in vivo, for meiotic recombination, and for segregation of chromosomes during meiosis I. Rec12 is orthologous to Top6A topoisomerase of Archaea and is likely the catalytic subunit of a meiotic recombinase that introduces recombinogenic DSBs. However, despite intensive effort, it has not been possible to produce Rec12 protein in a soluble form required to permit biochemical analyses of function. To obtain purified Rec12 protein for in vitro studies, a rec12(+) cDNA was generated, cloned into vector pET15b(+), and expressed in Escherichia coli. Rec12 protein was produced at moderate levels and it partitioned into insoluble fractions of whole-cell extracts. The protein was enriched based upon its differential solubility in two different denaturants and was further purified by column chromatography. A combinatorial, fractional, factorial approach was used to identify conditions under which Rec12 protein could be refolded. Four parameters were most important and, following optimization, soluble Rec12 protein was obtained. Gel filtration demonstrated that refolded Rec12 protein exists as a monomer in solution, suggesting that additional proteins may be required to assemble biologically-active Rec12 dimers, as inferred previously from genetic data [Cell Chromosome 1 (2002) 1]. The production of refolded Rec12 in a soluble form will allow for characterization in vitro of this key meiotic recombination enzyme.

  14. Mechanical and molecular basis for the symmetrical division of the fission yeast nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Castagnetti, Stefania; Božič, Bojan; Svetina, Saša

    2015-06-28

    In fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the nuclear envelope remains intact throughout mitosis and undergoes a series of symmetrical morphological changes when the spindle pole bodies (SPBs), embedded in the nuclear envelope, are pushed apart by elongating spindle microtubules. These symmetrical membrane shape transformations do not correspond to the shape behavior of an analogous system based on lipid vesicles. Here we report that the symmetry of the dividing fission yeast nucleus is ensured by SPB-chromosome attachments, as loss of kinetochore clustering in the vicinity of SPBs results in the formation of abnormal asymmetric shapes with long membrane tethers. We integrated these findings in a biophysical model, which explains the symmetry of the nuclear shapes on the basis of forces exerted by chromosomes clustered at SPBs on the extending nuclear envelope. Based on this analysis we conclude that the fission yeast nuclear envelope exhibits the same mechanical properties as simple lipid vesicles, but interactions with other cellular components, such as chromosomes, influence the nuclear shape during mitosis, allowing the formation of otherwise energetically unfavorable symmetrical dumbbell structures upon spindle elongation. The model allows us to explain the appearance of abnormal asymmetric shapes in fission yeast mutants with mis-segregated chromosomes as well as with altered nuclear membrane composition.

  15. Analysis of Mcm2-7 chromatin binding during anaphase and in the transition to quiescence in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Namdar, Mandana; Kearsey, Stephen E. . E-mail: stephen.kearsey@zoo.ox.ac.uk

    2006-10-15

    Mcm2-7 proteins are generally considered to function as a heterohexameric complex, providing helicase activity for the elongation step of DNA replication. These proteins are loaded onto replication origins in M-G1 phase in a process termed licensing or pre-replicative complex formation. It is likely that Mcm2-7 proteins are loaded onto chromatin simultaneously as a pre-formed hexamer although some studies suggest that subcomplexes are recruited sequentially. To analyze this process in fission yeast, we have compared the levels and chromatin binding of Mcm2-7 proteins during the fission yeast cell cycle. Mcm subunits are present at approximately 1 x 10{sup 4} molecules/cell and are bound with approximately equal stoichiometry on chromatin in G1/S phase cells. Using a single cell assay, we have correlated the timing of chromatin association of individual Mcm subunits with progression through mitosis. This showed that Mcm2, 4 and 7 associate with chromatin at about the same stage of anaphase, suggesting that licensing involves the simultaneous binding of these subunits. We also examined Mcm2-7 chromatin association when cells enter a G0-like quiescent state. Chromatin binding is lost in this transition in a process that does not require DNA replication or the selective degradation of specific subunits.

  16. Single site suppressors of a fission yeast temperature-sensitive mutant in cdc48 identified by whole genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Marinova, Irina N; Engelbrecht, Jacob; Ewald, Adrian; Langholm, Lasse L; Holmberg, Christian; Kragelund, Birthe B; Gordon, Colin; Nielsen, Olaf; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    The protein called p97 in mammals and Cdc48 in budding and fission yeast is a homo-hexameric, ring-shaped, ubiquitin-dependent ATPase complex involved in a range of cellular functions, including protein degradation, vesicle fusion, DNA repair, and cell division. The cdc48+ gene is essential for viability in fission yeast, and point mutations in the human orthologue have been linked to disease. To analyze the function of p97/Cdc48 further, we performed a screen for cold-sensitive suppressors of the temperature-sensitive cdc48-353 fission yeast strain. In total, 29 independent pseudo revertants that had lost the temperature-sensitive growth defect of the cdc48-353 strain were isolated. Of these, 28 had instead acquired a cold-sensitive phenotype. Since the suppressors were all spontaneous mutants, and not the result of mutagenesis induced by chemicals or UV irradiation, we reasoned that the genome sequences of the 29 independent cdc48-353 suppressors were most likely identical with the exception of the acquired suppressor mutations. This prompted us to test if a whole genome sequencing approach would allow us to map the mutations. Indeed genome sequencing unambiguously revealed that the cold-sensitive suppressors were all second site intragenic cdc48 mutants. Projecting these onto the Cdc48 structure revealed that while the original temperature-sensitive G338D mutation is positioned near the central pore in the hexameric ring, the suppressor mutations locate to subunit-subunit and inter-domain boundaries. This suggests that Cdc48-353 is structurally compromized at the restrictive temperature, but re-established in the suppressor mutants. The last suppressor was an extragenic frame shift mutation in the ufd1 gene, which encodes a known Cdc48 co-factor. In conclusion, we show, using a novel whole genome sequencing approach, that Cdc48-353 is structurally compromized at the restrictive temperature, but stabilized in the suppressors.

  17. Functional redundancies, distinct localizations and interactions among three fission yeast homologs of centromere protein-B.

    PubMed Central

    Irelan, J T; Gutkin, G I; Clarke, L

    2001-01-01

    Several members of protein families that are conserved in higher eukaryotes are known to play a role in centromere function in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, including two homologs of the mammalian centromere protein CENP-B, Abp1p and Cbh1p. Here we characterize a third S. pombe CENP-B homolog, Cbh2p (CENP-B homolog 2). cbh2Delta strains exhibited a modest elevation in minichromosome loss, similar to cbh1Delta or abp1Delta strains. cbh2Delta cbh1Delta strains showed little difference in growth or minichromosome loss rate when compared to single deletion strains. In contrast, cbh2Delta abp1Delta strains displayed dramatic morphological and chromosome segregation defects, as well as enhancement of the slow-growth phenotype of abp1Delta strains, indicating partial functional redundancy between these proteins. Both cbh2Delta abp1Delta and cbh1Delta abp1Delta strains also showed strongly enhanced sensitivity to a microtubule-destabilizing drug, consistent with a mitotic function for these proteins. Cbh2p was localized to the central core and core-associated repeat regions of centromeric heterochromatin, but not at several other centromeric and arm locations tested. Thus, like its mammalian counterpart, Cbh2p appeared to be localized exclusively to a portion of centromeric heterochromatin. In contrast, Abp1p was detected in both centromeric heterochromatin and in chromatin at two of three replication origins tested. Cbh2p and Abp1p homodimerized in the budding yeast two-hybrid assay, but did not interact with each other. These results suggest that indirect cooperation between different CENP-B-like DNA binding proteins with partially overlapping chromatin distributions helps to establish a functional centromere. PMID:11238404

  18. ATP analog-sensitive Pat1 protein kinase for synchronous fission yeast meiosis at physiological temperature

    PubMed Central

    Cipak, Lubos; Hyppa, Randy; Smith, Gerald; Gregan, Juraj

    2012-01-01

    To study meiosis, synchronous cultures are often indispensable, especially for physical analyses of DNA and proteins. A temperature-sensitive allele of the Pat1 protein kinase (pat1-114) has been widely used to induce synchronous meiosis in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, but pat1-114-induced meiosis differs from wild-type meiosis, and some of these abnormalities might be due to higher temperature needed to inactivate the Pat1 kinase. Here, we report an ATP analog-sensitive allele of Pat1 [Pat1(L95A), designated pat1-as2] that can be used to generate synchronous meiotic cultures at physiological temperature. In pat1-as2 meiosis, chromosomes segregate with higher fidelity, and spore viability is higher than in pat1-114 meiosis, although recombination is lower by a factor of 2–3 in these mutants than in starvation-induced pat1+ meiosis. Addition of the mat-Pc gene improved chromosome segregation and spore viability to nearly the level of starvation-induced meiosis. We conclude that pat1-as2 mat-Pc cells offer synchronous meiosis with most tested properties similar to those of wild-type meiosis. PMID:22487684

  19. Rapid, efficient and precise allele replacement in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun; Kan, Fengling; Wagnon, Jacy L.; Storey, Aaron J.; Protacio, Reine M.; Davidson, Mari K.; Wahls, Wayne P.

    2013-01-01

    Gene targeting provides a powerful tool to modify endogenous loci to contain specific mutations, insertions and deletions. Precise allele replacement, with no other chromosomal changes (e.g., insertion of selectable markers or heterologous promoters), maintains physiologically relevant context. Established methods for precise allele replacement in fission yeast employ two successive rounds of transformation and homologous recombination and require genotyping at each step. The relative efficiency of homologous recombination is low and a high rate of false positives during the second round of gene targeting further complicates matters. We report that pop-in, pop-out allele replacement circumvents these problems. We present data for 39 different allele replacements, involving simple and complex modifications at seven different target loci, that illustrate the power and utility of the approach. We also developed and validated a rapid, efficient process for precise allele replacement that requires only one round each of transformation and genotyping. We show that this process can be applied in population scale to an individual target locus, without genotyping, to identify clones with an altered phenotype (targeted forward genetics). It is therefore suitable for saturating, in situ, locus-specific mutation screens (e.g., of essential or non-essential genes and regulatory DNA elements) within normal chromosomal context. PMID:24026504

  20. Failed gene conversion leads to extensive end processing and chromosomal rearrangements in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Tinline-Purvis, Helen; Savory, Andrew P; Cullen, Jason K; Davé, Anoushka; Moss, Jennifer; Bridge, Wendy L; Marguerat, Samuel; Bähler, Jürg; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Mott, Richard; A Walker, Carol; Humphrey, Timothy C

    2009-01-01

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH), a causal event in cancer and human genetic diseases, frequently encompasses multiple genetic loci and whole chromosome arms. However, the mechanisms by which such extensive LOH arises, and how it is suppressed in normal cells is poorly understood. We have developed a genetic system to investigate the mechanisms of DNA double-strand break (DSB)-induced extensive LOH, and its suppression, using a non-essential minichromosome, Ch16, in fission yeast. We find extensive LOH to arise from a new break-induced mechanism of isochromosome formation. Our data support a model in which Rqh1 and Exo1-dependent end processing from an unrepaired DSB leads to removal of the broken chromosome arm and to break-induced replication of the intact arm from the centromere, a considerable distance from the initial lesion. This process also promotes genome-wide copy number variation. A genetic screen revealed Rhp51, Rhp55, Rhp57 and the MRN complex to suppress both isochromosome formation and chromosome loss, in accordance with these events resulting from extensive end processing associated with failed homologous recombination repair. PMID:19798055

  1. The cdc7 protein kinase is a dosage dependent regulator of septum formation in fission yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Fankhauser, C; Simanis, V

    1994-01-01

    Mutation of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe cdc7 gene prevents formation of the division septum and cytokinesis. We have cloned the cdc7 gene and show that it encodes a protein kinase which is essential for cell division. In the absence of cdc7 function, spore germination, DNA synthesis and mitosis are unaffected, but cells are unable to initiate formation of the division septum. Overexpression of p120cdc7 causes cell cycle arrest; cells complete mitosis and then undergo multiple rounds of septum formation without cell cleavage. This phenotype, which is similar to that resulting from inactivation of cdc16 protein, requires the kinase activity of p120cdc7. Mutations inactivating the early septation gene, cdc11, suppress the formation of multiple septa and allow cells to proliferate normally. If formation of the division septum is prevented by inactivation of either cdc14 or cdc15, p120cdc7 overproduction does not interfere with other events in the mitotic cell cycle. Septation is not induced by overexpression of p120cdc7 in G2 arrested cells, indicating that it does not bypass the normal dependency of septation upon initiation of mitosis. These findings indicate that the p120cdc7 protein kinase plays a key role in initiation of septum formation and cytokinesis in fission yeast and suggest that p120cdc7 interacts with the cdc11 protein in the control of septation. Images PMID:8039497

  2. Fission yeast profilin is tailored to facilitate actin assembly by the cytokinesis formin Cdc12.

    PubMed

    Bestul, Andrew J; Christensen, Jenna R; Grzegorzewska, Agnieszka P; Burke, Thomas A; Sees, Jennifer A; Carroll, Robert T; Sirotkin, Vladimir; Keenan, Robert J; Kovar, David R

    2015-01-15

    The evolutionarily conserved small actin-monomer binding protein profilin is believed to be a housekeeping factor that maintains a general pool of unassembled actin. However, despite similar primary sequences, structural folds, and affinities for G-actin and poly-L-proline, budding yeast profilin ScPFY fails to complement fission yeast profilin SpPRF temperature-sensitive mutant cdc3-124 cells. To identify profilin's essential properties, we built a combinatorial library of ScPFY variants containing either WT or SpPRF residues at multiple positions and carried out a genetic selection to isolate variants that support life in fission yeast. We subsequently engineered ScPFY(9-Mut), a variant containing nine substitutions in the actin-binding region, which complements cdc3-124 cells. ScPFY(9-Mut), but not WT ScPFY, suppresses severe cytokinesis defects in cdc3-124 cells. Furthermore, the major activity rescued by ScPFY(9-Mut) is the ability to enhance cytokinesis formin Cdc12-mediated actin assembly in vitro, which allows cells to assemble functional contractile rings. Therefore an essential role of profilin is to specifically facilitate formin-mediated actin assembly for cytokinesis in fission yeast.

  3. Controlling septation in fission yeast: finding the middle, and timing it right.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, X; Utzig, S; Simanis, V

    1999-07-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe provides a simple eukaryotic model for the study of cytokinesis. S. pombe cells are rod-shaped, grow mainly by elongation at their tips, and divide by binary fission after forming a centrally placed division septum. Analysis of mutants has begun to shed light upon how septum formation and cytokinesis are regulated both spatially and temporally. Some of the proteins involved in these events have been functionally conserved throughout eukaryotic evolution, suggesting that aspects of this control will be common to all eukaryotic cells.

  4. Mutation of histone H3 serine 86 disrupts GATA factor Ams2 expression and precise chromosome segregation in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kim Kiat; Ong, Terenze Yao Rui; Tan, Yue Rong; Yang, Eugene Guorong; Ren, Bingbing; Seah, Kwi Shan; Yang, Zhe; Tan, Tsu Soo; Dymock, Brian W; Chen, Ee Sin

    2015-09-15

    Eukaryotic genomes are packed into discrete units, referred to as nucleosomes, by organizing around scaffolding histone proteins. The interplay between these histones and the DNA can dynamically regulate the function of the chromosomal domain. Here, we interrogated the function of a pair of juxtaposing serine residues (S86 and S87) that reside within the histone fold of histone H3. We show that fission yeast cells expressing a mutant histone H3 disrupted at S86 and S87 (hht2-S86AS87A) exhibited unequal chromosome segregation, disrupted transcriptional silencing of centromeric chromatin, and reduced expression of Ams2, a GATA-factor that regulates localization of the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A. We found that overexpression of ams2(+) could suppress the chromosome missegregation phenotype that arose in the hht2-S86AS87A mutant. We further demonstrate that centromeric localization of SpCENP-A(cnp1-1) was significantly compromised in hht2-S86AS87A, suggesting synergism between histone H3 and the centromere-targeting domain of SpCENP-A. Taken together, our work presents evidence for an uncharacterized serine residue in fission yeast histone H3 that affects centromeric integrity via regulating the expression of the SpCENP-A-localizing Ams2 protein. [173/200 words].

  5. Mechanisms of Contractile-Ring Assembly in Fission Yeast and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Laporte, Damien; Zhao, Ran; Wu, Jian-Qiu

    2010-01-01

    Most eukaryotes including fungi, amoebas, and animal cells assemble an actin/myosin-based contractile ring during cytokinesis. The majority of proteins implied in ring formation, maturation, and constriction are evolutionarily conserved, suggesting that common mechanisms exist among these divergent eukaryotes. Here, we review the recent advances in positioning and assembly of the actomyosin ring in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and animal cells. In particular, major findings have been made recently in understanding ring formation in genetically tractable S. pombe, revealing a dynamic and robust search, capture, pull, and release mechanism. PMID:20708088

  6. Boolean Network Model Predicts Knockout Mutant Phenotypes of Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Davidich, Maria I.; Bornholdt, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Boolean networks (or: networks of switches) are extremely simple mathematical models of biochemical signaling networks. Under certain circumstances, Boolean networks, despite their simplicity, are capable of predicting dynamical activation patterns of gene regulatory networks in living cells. For example, the temporal sequence of cell cycle activation patterns in yeasts S. pombe and S. cerevisiae are faithfully reproduced by Boolean network models. An interesting question is whether this simple model class could also predict a more complex cellular phenomenology as, for example, the cell cycle dynamics under various knockout mutants instead of the wild type dynamics, only. Here we show that a Boolean network model for the cell cycle control network of yeast S. pombe correctly predicts viability of a large number of known mutants. So far this had been left to the more detailed differential equation models of the biochemical kinetics of the yeast cell cycle network and was commonly thought to be out of reach for models as simplistic as Boolean networks. The new results support our vision that Boolean networks may complement other mathematical models in systems biology to a larger extent than expected so far, and may fill a gap where simplicity of the model and a preference for an overall dynamical blueprint of cellular regulation, instead of biochemical details, are in the focus. PMID:24069138

  7. An IF-FISH Approach for Covisualization of Gene Loci and Nuclear Architecture in Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Kim, K-D; Iwasaki, O; Noma, K

    2016-01-01

    Recent genomic studies have revealed that chromosomal structures are formed by a hierarchy of organizing processes ranging from gene associations, including interactions among enhancers and promoters, to topologically associating domain formations. Gene associations identified by these studies can be characterized by microscopic analyses. Fission yeast is a model organism, in which gene associations have been broadly mapped across the genome, although many of those associations have not been further examined by cell biological approaches. To address the technically challenging process of the visualization of associating gene loci in the fission yeast nuclei, we provide, in detail, an IF-FISH procedure that allows for covisualizing both gene loci and nuclear structural markers such as the nuclear membrane and nucleolus.

  8. Measurements of Myosin-II Motor Activity During Cytokinesis in Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qing; Pollard, Luther W; Lord, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Fission yeast myosin-II (Myo2p) represents the critical actin-based motor protein that drives actomyosin ring assembly and constriction during cytokinesis. We detail three different methods to measure Myo2p motor function. Actin-activated ATPases provide a readout of actomyosin ATPase motor activity in a bulk assay; actin filament motility assays reveal the speed and efficiency of myosin-driven actin filament gliding (when motors are anchored); myosin-bead motility assays reveal the speed and efficiency of myosin ensembles traveling along actin filaments (when actin is anchored). Collectively, these methods allow us to combine the standard in vivo approaches common to fission yeast with in vitro biochemical methods to learn more about the mechanistic action of myosin-II during cytokinesis.

  9. Chromosome and mitotic spindle dynamics in fission yeast kinesin-8 mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crapo, Ammon M.; Gergley, Zachary R.; McIntosh, J. Richard; Betterton, M. D.

    2014-03-01

    Fission yeast proteins Klp5p and Klp6p are plus-end directed motors of the kinesin-8 family which promote microtubule (MT) depolymerization and also affect chromosome segregation, but the mechanism of these activities is not well understood. Using live-cell time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of fission yeast wild-type (WT) and klp5/6 mutant strains, we quantify and compare the dynamics of kinetochore motion and mitotic spindle length in 3D. In WT cells, the spindle, once formed, remains a consistent size and chromosomes are correctly organized and segregated. In kinesin-8 mutants, spindles undergo large length fluctuations of several microns. Kinetochore motions are also highly fluctuating, with kinetochores frequently moving away from the spindle rather than toward it. We observe transient pushing of chromosomes away from the spindle by as much as 10 microns in distance.

  10. Mitotic entry in the presence of DNA damage is a widespread property of aneuploidy in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Heidi M.; Sheltzer, Jason M.; Meehl, Colleen M.; Amon, Angelika

    2015-01-01

    Genetic instability is a hallmark of aneuploidy in budding and fission yeast. All aneuploid yeast strains analyzed to date harbor elevated levels of Rad52-GFP foci, a sign of DNA damage. Here we investigate how continuously elevated levels of DNA damage affect aneuploid cells. We show that Rad52-GFP foci form during S phase, consistent with the observation that DNA replication initiation and elongation are impaired in some aneuploid yeast strains. We furthermore find that although DNA damage is low in aneuploid cells, it nevertheless has dramatic consequences. Many aneuploid yeast strains adapt to DNA damage and undergo mitosis despite the presence of unrepaired DNA leading to cell death. Wild-type cells exposed to low levels of DNA damage exhibit a similar phenotype, indicating that adaptation to low levels of unrepaired DNA is a general property of the cell's response to DNA damage. Our results indicate that by causing low levels of DNA damage, whole-chromosome aneuploidies lead to DNA breaks that persist into mitosis. Such breaks provide the substrate for translocations and deletions that are a hallmark of cancer. PMID:25694455

  11. Abundance of prereplicative complexes (Pre-RCs) facilitates recombinational repair under replication stress in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Maki, Kentaro; Inoue, Takahiro; Onaka, Atsushi; Hashizume, Hiroko; Somete, Naoko; Kobayashi, Yuko; Murakami, Shigefumi; Shigaki, Chikako; Takahashi, Tatsuro S; Masukata, Hisao; Nakagawa, Takuro

    2011-12-02

    Mcm2-7 complexes are loaded onto chromatin with the aid of Cdt1 and Cdc18/Cdc6 and form prereplicative complexes (pre-RCs) at multiple sites on each chromosome. Pre-RCs are essential for DNA replication and surviving replication stress. However, the mechanism by which pre-RCs contribute to surviving replication stress is largely unknown. Here, we isolated the fission yeast mcm6-S1 mutant that was hypersensitive to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and camptothecin (CPT), both of which cause forks to collapse. The mcm6-S1 mutation impaired the interaction with Cdt1 and decreased the binding of minichromosome maintenance (MCM) proteins to replication origins. Overexpression of Cdt1 restored MCM binding and suppressed the sensitivity to MMS and CPT, suggesting that the Cdt1-Mcm6 interaction is important for the assembly of pre-RCs and the repair of collapsed forks. MMS-induced Chk1 phosphorylation and Rad22/Rad52 focus formation occurred normally, whereas cells containing Rhp54/Rad54 foci, which are involved in DNA strand exchange and dissociation of the joint molecules, were increased. Remarkably, G(1) phase extension through deletion of an S phase cyclin, Cig2, as well as Cdt1 overexpression restored pre-RC assembly and suppressed Rhp54 accumulation. A cdc18 mutation also caused hypersensitivity to MMS and CPT and accumulation of Rhp54 foci. These data suggest that an abundance of pre-RCs facilitates a late step in the recombinational repair of collapsed forks in the following S phase.

  12. Meiotic Recombination Hotspots of Fission Yeast Are Directed to Loci that Express Non-Coding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Wahls, Wayne P.; Siegel, Eric R.; Davidson, Mari K.

    2008-01-01

    Background Polyadenylated, mRNA-like transcripts with no coding potential are abundant in eukaryotes, but the functions of these long non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are enigmatic. In meiosis, Rec12 (Spo11) catalyzes the formation of dsDNA breaks (DSBs) that initiate homologous recombination. Most meiotic recombination is positioned at hotspots, but knowledge of the mechanisms is nebulous. In the fission yeast genome DSBs are located within 194 prominent peaks separated on average by 65-kbp intervals of DNA that are largely free of DSBs. Methodology/Principal Findings We compared the genome-wide distribution of DSB peaks to that of polyadenylated ncRNA molecules of the prl class. DSB peaks map to ncRNA loci that may be situated within ORFs, near the boundaries of ORFs and intergenic regions, or most often within intergenic regions. Unconditional statistical tests revealed that this colocalization is non-random and robust (P≤5.5×10−8). Furthermore, we tested and rejected the hypothesis that the ncRNA loci and DSB peaks localize preferentially, but independently, to a third entity on the chromosomes. Conclusions/Significance Meiotic DSB hotspots are directed to loci that express polyadenylated ncRNAs. This reveals an unexpected, possibly unitary mechanism for what directs meiotic recombination to hotspots. It also reveals a likely biological function for enigmatic ncRNAs. We propose specific mechanisms by which ncRNA molecules, or some aspect of RNA metabolism associated with ncRNA loci, help to position recombination protein complexes at DSB hotspots within chromosomes. PMID:18682829

  13. Vesicle-like biomechanics governs important aspects of nuclear geometry in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Lim H W, Gerald; Huber, Greg; Torii, Yoshihiro; Hirata, Aiko; Miller, Jonathan; Sazer, Shelley

    2007-09-26

    It has long been known that during the closed mitosis of many unicellular eukaryotes, including the fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), the nuclear envelope remains intact while the nucleus undergoes a remarkable sequence of shape transformations driven by elongation of an intranuclear mitotic spindle whose ends are capped by spindle pole bodies embedded in the nuclear envelope. However, the mechanical basis of these normal cell cycle transformations, and abnormal nuclear shapes caused by intranuclear elongation of microtubules lacking spindle pole bodies, remain unknown. Although there are models describing the shapes of lipid vesicles deformed by elongation of microtubule bundles, there are no models describing normal or abnormal shape changes in the nucleus. We describe here a novel biophysical model of interphase nuclear geometry in fission yeast that accounts for critical aspects of the mechanics of the fission yeast nucleus, including the biophysical properties of lipid bilayers, forces exerted on the nuclear envelope by elongating microtubules, and access to a lipid reservoir, essential for the large increase in nuclear surface area during the cell cycle. We present experimental confirmation of the novel and non-trivial geometries predicted by our model, which has no free parameters. We also use the model to provide insight into the mechanical basis of previously described defects in nuclear division, including abnormal nuclear shapes and loss of nuclear envelope integrity. The model predicts that (i) despite differences in structure and composition, fission yeast nuclei and vesicles with fluid lipid bilayers have common mechanical properties; (ii) the S. pombe nucleus is not lined with any structure with shear resistance, comparable to the nuclear lamina of higher eukaryotes. We validate the model and its predictions by analyzing wild type cells in which ned1 gene overexpression causes elongation of an intranuclear microtubule bundle that deforms the

  14. Fission yeast cells undergo nuclear division in the absence of spindle microtubules.

    PubMed

    Castagnetti, Stefania; Oliferenko, Snezhana; Nurse, Paul

    2010-10-12

    Mitosis in eukaryotic cells employs spindle microtubules to drive accurate chromosome segregation at cell division. Cells lacking spindle microtubules arrest in mitosis due to a spindle checkpoint that delays mitotic progression until all chromosomes have achieved stable bipolar attachment to spindle microtubules. In fission yeast, mitosis occurs within an intact nuclear membrane with the mitotic spindle elongating between the spindle pole bodies. We show here that in fission yeast interference with mitotic spindle formation delays mitosis only briefly and cells proceed to an unusual nuclear division process we term nuclear fission, during which cells perform some chromosome segregation and efficiently enter S-phase of the next cell cycle. Nuclear fission is blocked if spindle pole body maturation or sister chromatid separation cannot take place or if actin polymerization is inhibited. We suggest that this process exhibits vestiges of a primitive nuclear division process independent of spindle microtubules, possibly reflecting an evolutionary intermediate state between bacterial and Archeal chromosome segregation where the nucleoid divides without a spindle and a microtubule spindle-based eukaryotic mitosis.

  15. The fission yeast meiotic checkpoint kinase Mek1 regulates nuclear localization of Cdc25 by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Hidalgo, Livia; Moreno, Sergio; San-Segundo, Pedro A

    2008-12-01

    In eukaryotic cells, fidelity in transmission of genetic information during cell division is ensured by the action of cell cycle checkpoints. Checkpoints are surveillance mechanisms that arrest or delay cell cycle progression when critical cellular processes are defective or when the genome is damaged. During meiosis, the so-called meiotic recombination checkpoint blocks entry into meiosis I until recombination has been completed, thus avoiding aberrant chromosome segregation and the formation of aneuploid gametes. One of the key components of the meiotic recombination checkpoint is the meiosis-specific Mek1 kinase, which belongs to the family of Rad53/Cds1/Chk2 checkpoint kinases containing forkhead-associated domains. In fission yeast, several lines of evidence suggest that Mek1 targets the critical cell cycle regulator Cdc25 to delay meiotic cell cycle progression. Here, we investigate in more detail the molecular mechanism of action of the fission yeast Mek1 protein. We demonstrate that Mek1 acts independently of Cds1 to phosphorylate Cdc25, and this phosphorylation is required to trigger cell cycle arrest. Using ectopic overexpression of mek1(+) as a tool to induce in vivo activation of Mek1, we find that Mek1 promotes cytoplasmic accumulation of Cdc25 and results in prolonged phosphorylation of Cdc2 at tyrosine 15. We propose that at least one of the mechanisms contributing to the cell cycle delay when the meiotic recombination checkpoint is activated in fission yeast is the nuclear exclusion of the Cdc25 phosphatase by Mek1-dependent phosphorylation.

  16. Fission yeast mitochondria are distributed by dynamic microtubules in a motor-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianpeng; Zheng, Fan; Cheung, Martin; Wang, Fengsong; Fu, Chuanhai

    2015-06-05

    The cytoskeleton plays a critical role in regulating mitochondria distribution. Similar to axonal mitochondria, the fission yeast mitochondria are distributed by the microtubule cytoskeleton, but this is regulated by a motor-independent mechanism depending on the microtubule associated protein mmb1p as the absence of mmb1p causes mitochondria aggregation. In this study, using a series of chimeric proteins to control the subcellular localization and motility of mitochondria, we show that a chimeric molecule containing a microtubule binding domain and the mitochondria outer membrane protein tom22p can restore the normal interconnected mitochondria network in mmb1-deletion (mmb1∆) cells. In contrast, increasing the motility of mitochondria by using a chimeric molecule containing a kinesin motor domain and tom22p cannot rescue mitochondria aggregation defects in mmb1∆ cells. Intriguingly a chimeric molecule carrying an actin binding domain and tom22p results in mitochondria associated with actin filaments at the actomyosin ring during mitosis, leading to cytokinesis defects. These findings suggest that the passive motor-independent microtubule-based mechanism is the major contributor to mitochondria distribution in wild type fission yeast cells. Hence, we establish that attachment to microtubules, but not kinesin-dependent movement and the actin cytoskeleton, is required and crucial for proper mitochondria distribution in fission yeast.

  17. Mechanisms of Intron Loss and Gain in the Fission Yeast Schizosaccharomyces

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Tao; Niu, Deng-Ke

    2013-01-01

    The fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, is an important model species with a low intron density. Previous studies showed extensive intron losses during its evolution. To test the models of intron loss and gain in fission yeasts, we conducted a comparative genomic analysis in four Schizosaccharomyces species. Both intronization and de-intronization were observed, although both were at a low frequency. A de-intronization event was caused by a degenerative mutation in the branch site. Four cases of imprecise intron losses were identified, indicating that genomic deletion is not a negligible mechanism of intron loss. Most intron losses were precise deletions of introns, and were significantly biased to the 3′ sides of genes. Adjacent introns tended to be lost simultaneously. These observations indicated that the main force shaping the exon-intron structures of fission yeasts was precise intron losses mediated by reverse transcriptase. We found two cases of intron gains caused by tandem genomic duplication, but failed to identify the mechanisms for the majority of the intron gain events observed. In addition, we found that intron-lost and intron-gained genes had certain similar features, such as similar Gene Ontology categories and expression levels. PMID:23613904

  18. A logical circuit for the regulation of fission yeast growth modes.

    PubMed

    Bähler, Jürg; Svetina, Sasa

    2005-11-21

    Growth of fission yeast at the ends of its cylindrical cells switches from a monopolar to a bipolar mode, before it ceases during mitosis and cell division. Here we assume that these growth modes correspond to three stable states of an underlying regulatory circuit, which is a relatively simple and to a large degree autonomous subsystem of an otherwise complex cellular control system. We develop a switch-like logical circuit based on three elements defined as binary variables. Effects of circuit variables on each other are expressed in terms of logical operations. We analyse this circuit for its behavior ("phenotypes") after removing single or multiple operations ("mutants"). Known fission yeast polarity mutants such as those defective in the switch to bipolar growth can be classified based on these predicted 'phenotypes'. Differences in growth patterns between daughter cells in different bipolar growth mutants are also predicted by the circuit model. The model presented here should provide a useful framework to guide future experiments into mechanisms of cellular polarity. This paper illustrates the usefulness of simple logical circuits to describe and dissect features of complex regulatory processes such as the fission yeast growth patterns in both wild type and mutant cells.

  19. Contractile-Ring Assembly in Fission Yeast Cytokinesis: Recent Advances and New Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lee, I-Ju; Coffman, Valerie C.; Wu, Jian-Qiu

    2017-01-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is an excellent model organism to study cytokinesis. Here, we review recent advances on contractile-ring assembly in fission yeast. First, we summarize the assembly of cytokinesis nodes, the precursors of a normal contractile ring. IQGAP Rng2 and myosin essential light chain Cdc4 are recruited by the anillin-like protein Mid1, followed by the addition of other cytokinesis node proteins. Mid1 localization on the plasma membrane is stabilized by interphase node proteins. Second, we discuss proteins and processes that contribute to the search, capture, pull, and release mechanism of contractile-ring assembly. Actin filaments nucleated by formin Cdc12, the motor activity of myosin-II, the stiffness of the actin network, and severing of actin filaments by cofilin all play essential roles in contractile-ring assembly. Finally, we discuss the Mid1-independent pathway for ring assembly, and the possible mechanisms underlying the ring maturation and constriction. Collectively, we provide an overview of the current understanding of contractile-ring assembly and uncover future directions in studying cytokinesis in fission yeast. PMID:22887981

  20. Visualization of yeast chromosomal DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubega, Seth

    1990-01-01

    The DNA molecule is the most significant life molecule since it codes the blue print for other structural and functional molecules of all living organisms. Agarose gel electrophoresis is now being widely used to separate DNA of virus, bacteria, and lower eukaryotes. The task was undertaken of reviewing the existing methods of DNA fractionation and microscopic visualization of individual chromosonal DNA molecules by gel electrophoresis as a basis for a proposed study to investigate the feasibility of separating DNA molecules in free fluids as an alternative to gel electrophoresis. Various techniques were studied. On the molecular level, agarose gel electrophoresis is being widely used to separate chromosomal DNA according to molecular weight. Carl and Olson separate and characterized the entire karyotype of a lab strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Smith et al. and Schwartz and Koval independently reported the visualization of individual DNA molecules migrating through agarose gel matrix during electrophoresis. The techniques used by these researchers are being reviewed in the lab as a basis for the proposed studies.

  1. Trk1 and Trk2 Define the Major K+ Transport System in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Calero, Fernando; Gómez, Néstor; Ariño, Joaquín; Ramos, José

    2000-01-01

    The trk1+ gene has been proposed as a component of the K+ influx system in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Previous work from our laboratories revealed that trk1 mutants do not show significantly altered content or influx of K+, although they are more sensitive to Na+. Genome database searches revealed that S. pombe encodes a putative gene (designated here trk2+) that shows significant identity to trk1+. We have analyzed the characteristics of potassium influx in S. pombe by using trk1 trk2 mutants. Unlike budding yeast, fission yeast displays a biphasic transport kinetics. trk2 mutants do not show altered K+ transport and exhibit only a slightly reduced Na+ tolerance. However, trk1 trk2 double mutants fail to grow at low K+ concentrations and show a dramatic decrease in Rb+ influx, as a result of loss of the high-affinity transport component. Furthermore, trk1 trk2 cells are very sensitive to Na+, as would be expected for a strain showing defective potassium transport. When trk1 trk2 cells are maintained in K+-free medium, the potassium content remains higher than that of the wild type or trk single mutants. In addition, the trk1 trk2 strain displays increased sensitivity to hygromycin B. These results are consistent with a hyperpolarized state of the plasma membrane. An additional phenotype of cells lacking both Trk components is a failure to grow at acidic pH. In conclusion, the Trk1 and Trk2 proteins define the major K+ transport system in fission yeast, and in contrast to what is known for budding yeast, the presence of any of these two proteins is sufficient to allow growth at normal potassium levels. PMID:10629185

  2. DNA replication in yeast is stochastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng-Hsin Yang, Scott; Rhind, Nicholas; Bechhoefer, John

    2010-03-01

    Largely on the basis of a simple --- perhaps too simple --- analysis of microarray-chip experiments, people have concluded that DNA replication in budding yeast (S. cerevisiae) is a nearly deterministic process, in which the position and activation time of each origin of replication is pre-determined. In this talk, we introduce a more quantitative approach to the analysis of microarray data. Applying our new methods to budding yeast, we show that the microarray data imply a picture of replication where the timing of origin activation is highly stochastic. We then propose a physical model (the ``multiple-initiator model") to account for the observed probability distributions of origin- activation timing.

  3. Fission Yeast Scm3: A CENP-A Receptor Required for Integrity of Subkinetochore Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Pidoux, Alison L.; Choi, Eun Shik; Abbott, Johanna K.R.; Liu, Xingkun; Kagansky, Alexander; Castillo, Araceli G.; Hamilton, Georgina L.; Richardson, William; Rappsilber, Juri; He, Xiangwei; Allshire, Robin C.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms ensuring specific incorporation of CENP-A at centromeres are poorly understood. Mis16 and Mis18 are required for CENP-A localization at centromeres and form a complex that is conserved from fission yeast to human. Fission yeast sim1 mutants that alleviate kinetochore domain silencing are defective in Scm3Sp, the ortholog of budding yeast Scm3Sc. Scm3Sp depends on Mis16/18 for its centromere localization and like them is recruited to centromeres in late anaphase. Importantly, Scm3Sp coaffinity purifies with CENP-ACnp1 and associates with CENP-ACnp1 in vitro, yet localizes independently of intact CENP-ACnp1 chromatin and is differentially released from chromatin. While Scm3Sc has been proposed to form a unique hexameric nucleosome with CENP-ACse4 and histone H4 at budding yeast point centromeres, we favor a model in which Scm3Sp acts as a CENP-ACnp1 receptor/assembly factor, cooperating with Mis16 and Mis18 to receive CENP-ACnp1 from the Sim3 escort and mediate assembly of CENP-ACnp1 into subkinetochore chromatin. PMID:19217404

  4. RITS- connecting transcription, RNAi and heterochromatin assembly in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Creamer, Kevin M.; Partridge, Janet F.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years a bevy of evidence has been unearthed indicating that ‘silent’ heterochromatin is not as transcriptionally inert as once thought. In the unicellular yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, processing of transcripts derived from centromeric repeats into homologous small interfering RNA (siRNA) is essential for the formation of centromeric heterochromatin. Deletion of genes required for siRNA biogenesis revealed that core components of the canonical RNAi pathway are essential for centromeric heterochromatin assembly as well as for centromere function. Subsequent purification of the RITS (RNA-induced initiation of transcriptional gene silencing) complex provided the critical link between siRNAs and heterochromatin assembly, with RITS acting as a physical bridge between non-coding RNA scaffolds and chromatin. Here, we review current understanding of how RITS promotes heterochromatin formation and how it participates in transcription coupled silencing. PMID:21823226

  5. Definition of transcriptional pause elements in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Aranda, A; Proudfoot, N J

    1999-02-01

    Downstream elements (DSEs) with transcriptional pausing activity play an important role in transcription termination of RNA polymerase II. We have defined two such DSEs in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, one for the ura4 gene and a new one in the 3'-end region of the nmt2 gene. Although these DSEs do not have sequence homology, both are orientation specific and are composed of multiple and redundant sequence elements that work together to achieve full pausing activity. Previous studies on the nmt1 and nmt2 genes revealed that transcription extends several kilobases past the genes' poly(A) sites. We show that the insertion of either DSE immediately downstream of the nmt1 poly(A) site induces more immediate termination. nmt2 termination efficiency can be increased by moving the DSE closer to the poly(A) site. These results suggest that DSEs may be a common feature in yeast genes.

  6. Conserved and Diverged Functions of the Calcineurin-Activated Prz1 Transcription Factor in Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Chatfield-Reed, Kate; Vachon, Lianne; Kwon, Eun-Joo Gina; Chua, Gordon

    2016-04-01

    Gene regulation in response to intracellular calcium is mediated by the calcineurin-activated transcription factor Prz1 in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe Genome-wide studies of the Crz1 and CrzA fungal orthologs have uncovered numerous target genes involved in conserved and species-specific cellular processes. In contrast, very few target genes of Prz1 have been published. This article identifies an extensive list of genes using transcriptome and ChIP-chip analyses under inducing conditions of Prz1, including CaCl2 and tunicamycin treatment, as well as a ∆pmr1 genetic background. We identified 165 upregulated putative target genes of Prz1 in which the majority contained a calcium-dependent response element in their promoters, similar to that of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ortholog Crz1 These genes were functionally enriched for Crz1-conserved processes such as cell-wall biosynthesis. Overexpression of prz1(+)increased resistance to the cell-wall degradation enzyme zymolyase, likely from upregulation of theO-mannosyltransferase encoding gene omh1(+) Loss of omh1(+)abrogates this phenotype. We uncovered a novel inhibitory role in flocculation for Prz1. Loss of prz1(+)resulted in constitutive flocculation and upregulation of genes encoding the flocculins Gsf2 and Pfl3, as well as the transcription factor Cbf12. The constitutive flocculation of the ∆prz1 strain was abrogated by the loss of gsf2(+) or cbf12(+) This study reveals that Prz1 functions as a positive and negative transcriptional regulator of genes involved in cell-wall biosynthesis and flocculation, respectively. Moreover, comparison of target genes between Crz1/CrzA and Prz1 indicate some conservation in DNA-binding specificity, but also substantial rewiring of the calcineurin-mediated transcriptional regulatory network.

  7. Conserved and Diverged Functions of the Calcineurin-Activated Prz1 Transcription Factor in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Chatfield-Reed, Kate; Vachon, Lianne; Kwon, Eun-Joo Gina; Chua, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Gene regulation in response to intracellular calcium is mediated by the calcineurin-activated transcription factor Prz1 in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Genome-wide studies of the Crz1 and CrzA fungal orthologs have uncovered numerous target genes involved in conserved and species-specific cellular processes. In contrast, very few target genes of Prz1 have been published. This article identifies an extensive list of genes using transcriptome and ChIP-chip analyses under inducing conditions of Prz1, including CaCl2 and tunicamycin treatment, as well as a ∆pmr1 genetic background. We identified 165 upregulated putative target genes of Prz1 in which the majority contained a calcium-dependent response element in their promoters, similar to that of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ortholog Crz1. These genes were functionally enriched for Crz1-conserved processes such as cell-wall biosynthesis. Overexpression of prz1+ increased resistance to the cell-wall degradation enzyme zymolyase, likely from upregulation of the O-mannosyltransferase encoding gene omh1+. Loss of omh1+ abrogates this phenotype. We uncovered a novel inhibitory role in flocculation for Prz1. Loss of prz1+ resulted in constitutive flocculation and upregulation of genes encoding the flocculins Gsf2 and Pfl3, as well as the transcription factor Cbf12. The constitutive flocculation of the ∆prz1 strain was abrogated by the loss of gsf2+ or cbf12+. This study reveals that Prz1 functions as a positive and negative transcriptional regulator of genes involved in cell-wall biosynthesis and flocculation, respectively. Moreover, comparison of target genes between Crz1/CrzA and Prz1 indicate some conservation in DNA-binding specificity, but also substantial rewiring of the calcineurin-mediated transcriptional regulatory network. PMID:26896331

  8. Fission yeast APC/C activators Slp1 and Fzr1 sequentially trigger two consecutive nuclear divisions during meiosis.

    PubMed

    Chikashige, Yuji; Yamane, Miho; Okamasa, Kasumi; Osakada, Hiroko; Tsutsumi, Chihiro; Nagahama, Yuki; Fukuta, Noriko; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2017-02-28

    In meiosis, two rounds of nuclear division occur consecutively without DNA replication between the divisions. We isolated a fission yeast mutant in which the nucleus divides only once to generate two spores, as opposed to four, in meiosis. In this mutant, we found that the initiation codon of the slp1(+) gene is converted to ATA, producing a reduced amount of Slp1. As a member of the Fizzy family of APC/C activators, Slp1 is essential for vegetative growth; however, the mutant allele shows a phenotype only in meiosis. Slp1 insufficiency delays degradation of maturation-promoting factor (MPF) at the first meiotic division, and another APC/C activator, Fzr1, which acts late in meiosis, terminates meiosis immediately after the delayed first division to produce two viable spores. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Imp2, the PSTPIP homolog in fission yeast, affects sensitivity to the immunosuppressant FK506 and membrane trafficking in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Kita, Ayako; Higa, Mari; Doi, Akira; Satoh, Ryosuke; Sugiura, Reiko

    2015-02-13

    Cytokinesis is a highly ordered process that divides one cell into two cells, which is functionally linked to the dynamic remodeling of the plasma membrane coordinately with various events such as membrane trafficking. Calcineurin is a highly conserved serine/threonine protein phosphatase, which regulates multiple biological functions, such as membrane trafficking and cytokinesis. Here, we isolated imp2-c3, a mutant allele of the imp2{sup +} gene, encoding a homolog of the mouse PSTPIP1 (proline-serine-threonine phosphatase interacting protein 1), using a genetic screen for mutations that are synthetically lethal with calcineurin deletion in fission yeast. The imp2-c3 mutants showed a defect in cytokinesis with multi-septated phenotypes, which was further enhanced upon treatment with the calcineurin inhibitor FK506. Notably, electron micrographs revealed that the imp2-c3 mutant cells accumulated aberrant multi-lamella Golgi structures and putative post-Golgi secretory vesicles, and exhibited fragmented vacuoles in addition to thickened septa. Consistently, imp2-c3 mutants showed a reduced secretion of acid phosphatase and defects in vacuole fusion. The imp2-c3 mutant cells exhibited a weakened cell wall, similar to the membrane trafficking mutants identified in the same genetic screen such as ypt3-i5. These findings implicate the PSTPIP1 homolog Imp2 in Golgi/vacuole function, thereby affecting various cellular processes, including cytokinesis and cell integrity. - Highlights: • We isolated imp2-c3, in a synthetic lethal screen with calcineurin in fission yeast. • The imp2{sup +} gene encodes a component of the actin contractile ring similar to Cdc15. • The imp2-c3 mutants showed defects in cytokinesis, which were exacerbated by FK506. • The imp2-c3 mutants were defective in membrane trafficking and cell wall integrity. • Our study revealed a novel role for Imp2 in the Golgi/vacuolar membrane trafficking.

  10. The selective elimination of messenger RNA underlies the mitosis-meiosis switch in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    The cellular programs for meiosis and mitosis must be strictly distinguished but the mechanisms controlling the entry to meiosis remain largely elusive in higher organisms. In contrast, recent analyses in yeast have shed new light on the mechanisms underlying the mitosis-meiosis switch. In this review, the current understanding of these mechanisms in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is discussed. Meiosis-inducing signals in this microbe emanating from environmental conditions including the nutrient status converge on the activity of an RRM-type RNA-binding protein, Mei2. This protein plays pivotal roles in both the induction and progression of meiosis and has now been found to govern the meiotic program in a quite unexpected manner. Fission yeast contains an RNA degradation system that selectively eliminates meiosis-specific mRNAs during the mitotic cell cycle. Mmi1, a novel RNA-binding protein of the YTH-family, is essential for this process. Mei2 tethers Mmi1 and thereby stabilizes the transcripts necessary for the progression of meiosis.

  11. The fission yeast MTREC and EJC orthologs ensure the maturation of meiotic transcripts during meiosis.

    PubMed

    Marayati, Bahjat Fadi; Hoskins, Victoria; Boger, Robert W; Tucker, James F; Fishman, Emily S; Bray, Andrew S; Zhang, Ke

    2016-09-01

    Meiosis is a highly regulated process by which genetic information is transmitted through sexual reproduction. It encompasses unique mechanisms that do not occur in vegetative cells, producing a distinct, well-regulated meiotic transcriptome. During vegetative growth, many meiotic genes are constitutively transcribed, but most of the resulting mRNAs are rapidly eliminated by the Mmi1-MTREC (Mtl1-Red1 core) complex. While Mmi1-MTREC targets premature meiotic RNAs for degradation by the nuclear 3'-5' exoribonuclease exosome during mitotic growth, its role in meiotic gene expression during meiosis is not known. Here, we report that Red5, an essential MTREC component, interacts with pFal1, an ortholog of eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4aIII in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe In mammals, together with MAGO (Mnh1), Rnps1, and Y14, elF4AIII (pFal1) forms the core of the exon junction complex (EJC), which is essential for transcriptional surveillance and localization of mature mRNAs. In fission yeast, two EJC orthologs, pFal1 and Mnh1, are functionally connected with MTREC, specifically in the process of meiotic gene expression during meiosis. Although pFal1 interacts with Mnh1, Y14, and Rnps1, its association with Mnh1 is not disrupted upon loss of Y14 or Rnps1. Mutations of Red1, Red5, pFal1, or Mnh1 produce severe meiotic defects; the abundance of meiotic transcripts during meiosis decreases; and mRNA maturation processes such as splicing are impaired. Since studying meiosis in mammalian germline cells is difficult, our findings in fission yeast may help to define the general mechanisms involved in accurate meiotic gene expression in higher eukaryotes.

  12. The fission yeast MTREC and EJC orthologs ensure the maturation of meiotic transcripts during meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Marayati, Bahjat Fadi; Hoskins, Victoria; Boger, Robert W.; Tucker, James F.; Fishman, Emily S.; Bray, Andrew S.; Zhang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis is a highly regulated process by which genetic information is transmitted through sexual reproduction. It encompasses unique mechanisms that do not occur in vegetative cells, producing a distinct, well-regulated meiotic transcriptome. During vegetative growth, many meiotic genes are constitutively transcribed, but most of the resulting mRNAs are rapidly eliminated by the Mmi1-MTREC (Mtl1-Red1 core) complex. While Mmi1-MTREC targets premature meiotic RNAs for degradation by the nuclear 3′–5′ exoribonuclease exosome during mitotic growth, its role in meiotic gene expression during meiosis is not known. Here, we report that Red5, an essential MTREC component, interacts with pFal1, an ortholog of eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4aIII in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In mammals, together with MAGO (Mnh1), Rnps1, and Y14, elF4AIII (pFal1) forms the core of the exon junction complex (EJC), which is essential for transcriptional surveillance and localization of mature mRNAs. In fission yeast, two EJC orthologs, pFal1 and Mnh1, are functionally connected with MTREC, specifically in the process of meiotic gene expression during meiosis. Although pFal1 interacts with Mnh1, Y14, and Rnps1, its association with Mnh1 is not disrupted upon loss of Y14 or Rnps1. Mutations of Red1, Red5, pFal1, or Mnh1 produce severe meiotic defects; the abundance of meiotic transcripts during meiosis decreases; and mRNA maturation processes such as splicing are impaired. Since studying meiosis in mammalian germline cells is difficult, our findings in fission yeast may help to define the general mechanisms involved in accurate meiotic gene expression in higher eukaryotes. PMID:27365210

  13. Bulk Segregant Analysis Reveals the Genetic Basis of a Natural Trait Variation in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wen; Suo, Fang; Du, Li-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Although the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is a well-established model organism, studies of natural trait variations in this species remain limited. To assess the feasibility of segregant-pool-based mapping of phenotype-causing genes in natural strains of fission yeast, we investigated the cause of a maltose utilization defect (Mal-) of the S. pombe strain CBS5557 (originally known as Schizosaccharomyces malidevorans). Analyzing the genome sequence of CBS5557 revealed 955 nonconservative missense substitutions, and 61 potential loss-of-function variants including 47 frameshift indels, 13 early stop codons, and 1 splice site mutation. As a side benefit, our analysis confirmed 146 sequence errors in the reference genome and improved annotations of 27 genes. We applied bulk segregant analysis to map the causal locus of the Mal- phenotype. Through sequencing the segregant pools derived from a cross between CBS5557 and the laboratory strain, we located the locus to within a 2.23-Mb chromosome I inversion found in most S. pombe isolates including CBS5557. To map genes within the inversion region that occupies 18% of the genome, we created a laboratory strain containing the same inversion. Analyzing segregants from a cross between CBS5557 and the inversion-containing laboratory strain narrowed down the locus to a 200-kb interval and led us to identify agl1, which suffers a 5-bp deletion in CBS5557, as the causal gene. Interestingly, loss of agl1 through a 34-kb deletion underlies the Mal- phenotype of another S. pombe strain CGMCC2.1628. This work adapts and validates the bulk segregant analysis method for uncovering trait-gene relationship in natural fission yeast strains. PMID:26615217

  14. Nile red fluorescence screening facilitating neutral lipid phenotype determination in budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Rostron, Kerry A; Rolph, Carole E; Lawrence, Clare L

    2015-07-01

    Investigation of yeast neutral lipid accumulation is important for biotechnology and also for modelling aberrant lipid metabolism in human disease. The Nile red (NR) method has been extensively utilised to determine lipid phenotypes of yeast cells via microscopic means. NR assays have been used to differentiate lipid accumulation and relative amounts of lipid in oleaginous species but have not been thoroughly validated for phenotype determination arising from genetic modification. A modified NR assay, first described by Sitepu et al. (J Microbiol Methods 91:321-328, 2012), was able to detect neutral lipid changes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion mutants with sensitivity similar to more advanced methodology. We have also be able to, for the first time, successfully apply the NR assay to the well characterised fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, an increasingly important organism in biotechnology. The described NR fluorescence assay is suitable for increased throughput and rapid screening of genetically modified strains in both the biotechnology industry and for modelling ectopic lipid production for a variety of human diseases. This ultimately negates the need for labour intensive and time consuming lipid analyses of samples that may not yield a desirable lipid phenotype, whilst genetic modifications impacting significantly on the cellular lipid phenotype can be further promoted for more in depth analyses.

  15. Stimulation of fission yeast and mouse Hop2-Mnd1 of the Dmc1 and Rad51 recombinases

    PubMed Central

    Ploquin, Mickaël; Petukhova, Galina V.; Morneau, Dany; Déry, Ugo; Bransi, Ali; Stasiak, Andrzej; Camerini-Otero, R. Daniel; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2007-01-01

    Genetic analysis of fission yeast suggests a role for the spHop2–Mnd1 proteins in the Rad51 and Dmc1-dependent meiotic recombination pathways. In order to gain biochemical insights into this process, we purified Schizosaccharomyces pombe Hop2-Mnd1 to homogeneity. spHop2 and spMnd1 interact by co-immunoprecipitation and two-hybrid analysis. Electron microscopy reveals that S. pombe Hop2–Mnd1 binds single-strand DNA ends of 3′-tailed DNA. Interestingly, spHop2-Mnd1 promotes the renaturation of complementary single-strand DNA and catalyses strand exchange reactions with short oligonucleotides. Importantly, we show that spHop2-Mnd1 stimulates spDmc1-dependent strand exchange and strand invasion. Ca2+ alleviate the requirement for the order of addition of the proteins on DNA. We also demonstrate that while spHop2-Mnd1 affects spDmc1 specifically, mHop2 or mHop2-Mnd1 stimulates both the hRad51 and hDmc1 recombinases in strand exchange assays. Thus, our results suggest a crucial role for S. pombe and mouse Hop2-Mnd1 in homologous pairing and strand exchange and reveal evolutionary divergence in their specificity for the Dmc1 and Rad51 recombinases. PMID:17426123

  16. Systematic genetic analysis of transcription factors to map the fission yeast transcription-regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Chua, Gordon

    2013-12-01

    Mapping transcriptional-regulatory networks requires the identification of target genes, binding specificities and signalling pathways of transcription factors. However, the characterization of each transcription factor sufficiently for deciphering such networks remains laborious. The recent availability of overexpression and deletion strains for almost all of the transcription factor genes in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe provides a valuable resource to better investigate transcription factors using systematic genetics. In the present paper, I review and discuss the utility of these strain collections combined with transcriptome profiling and genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation to identify the target genes of transcription factors.

  17. Uncleavable Nup98-Nup96 is functional in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Haruhiko; Mori, Chie; Ohtsuki, Chizuru; Iwamoto, Masaaki; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2015-01-01

    Essential nucleoporins Nup98 and Nup96 are coded by a single open reading frame, and produced by autopeptidase cleavage. The autocleavage site of Nup98-Nup96 is highly conserved in a wide range of organisms. To understand the importance of autocleavage, we examined a mutant that produces the Nup98-Nup96 joint molecule as a sole protein product of the nup189 (+) gene in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Cells expressing only the joint molecule were found to be viable. This result indicates that autocleavage of Nup98-Nup96 is dispensable for cell growth, at least under normal culture conditions in S. pombe.

  18. Crystal Structures of the Adenylate Sensor from Fission Yeast AMP-Activated Protein Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Townley,R.; Shapiro, L.

    2007-01-01

    The 5'-AMP (adenosine monophosphate)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) coordinates metabolic function with energy availability by responding to changes in intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and AMP levels. Here we report crystal structures at 2.6 and 2.9 Angstrom resolution for ATP- and AMP-bound forms of a core {alpha}{beta}{gamma} adenylate-binding domain from the fission yeast AMPK homologue. ATP and AMP bind competitively to a single site in the {gamma} subunit, with their respective phosphate groups positioned near function-impairing mutants. Surprisingly, ATP binds without counter ions, amplifying its electrostatic effects on a critical regulatory region where all three subunits converge.

  19. Noninvasive characterization of the fission yeast cell cycle by monitoring dry mass with digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappaz, Benjamin; Cano, Elena; Colomb, Tristan; Kühn, Jonas; Depeursinge, Christian; Simanis, Viesturs; Magistretti, Pierre J.; Marquet, Pierre

    2009-05-01

    Digital holography microscopy (DHM) is an optical technique which provides phase images yielding quantitative information about cell structure and cellular dynamics. Furthermore, the quantitative phase images allow the derivation of other parameters, including dry mass production, density, and spatial distribution. We have applied DHM to study the dry mass production rate and the dry mass surface density in wild-type and mutant fission yeast cells. Our study demonstrates the applicability of DHM as a tool for label-free quantitative analysis of the cell cycle and opens the possibility for its use in high-throughput screening.

  20. Organellar mechanosensitive channels involved in hypo-osmoregulation in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yoshitaka; Iida, Hidetoshi

    2014-12-01

    MscS and MscL, bacterial mechanosensitive channels, play crucial roles in the hypo-osmotic shock response. However, only MscS has homologs in eukaryotes. These homologs are called MscS-like proteins or MSL proteins. MSL proteins have changed both structurally and functionally during evolution and are now localized not only to the membrane of the chloroplast, which is thought to be a descendant of an ancient, free-living bacterium, but also the cell membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, suggesting that the role of MSL proteins has diverged. In this brief review, we mainly focus on two MSL proteins in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe that are localized in the ER membrane and protect cells from hypo-osmotic shock-induced death by regulating intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations. We also discuss Arabidopsis thaliana MSL proteins and other yeast ion channels in terms of osmoregulation in eukaryotes.

  1. Functional interactions of Rec24, the fission yeast ortholog of mouse Mei4, with the meiotic recombination–initiation complex

    PubMed Central

    Bonfils, Sandrine; Rozalén, Ana E.; Smith, Gerald R.; Moreno, Sergio; Martín-Castellanos, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    A physical connection between each pair of homologous chromosomes is crucial for reductional chromosome segregation during the first meiotic division and therefore for successful meiosis. Connection is provided by recombination (crossing over) initiated by programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Although the topoisomerase-like protein Spo11 makes DSBs and is evolutionarily conserved, how Spo11 (Rec12 in fission yeast) is regulated to form DSBs at the proper time and place is poorly understood. Several additional (accessory) proteins for DSB formation have been inferred in different species from yeast to mice. Here, we show that Rec24 is a bona fide accessory protein in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Rec24 is required genome-wide for crossing-over and is recruited to meiotic chromosomes during prophase in a Rec12-independent manner forming foci on linear elements (LinEs), structurally related to the synaptonemal complex of other eukaryotes. Stabilization of Rec24 on LinEs depends on another accessory protein, Rec7, with which Rec24 forms complexes in vivo. We propose that Rec24 marks LinE-associated recombination sites, that stabilization of its binding by Rec7 facilitates the loading or activation of Rec12, and that only stabilized complexes containing Rec24 and Rec7 promote DSB formation. Based on the recent report of Rec24 and Rec7 conservation, interaction between Rec24 and Rec7 might be widely conserved in DSB formation. PMID:21429938

  2. Visualizing single rod-shaped fission yeast vertically in micro-sized holes on agarose pad made by soft lithography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Tran, Phong T

    2014-01-01

    Fission yeast cells are rod-shaped unicellular organism that is normally imaged horizontally with its long axis parallel to image plane. This orientation, while practical, limits the imaging resolution of biological structures which are oriented perpendicular to the long axis of the cell. We present here a method to prepare agarose pads with micro-sized holes to load single fission yeast cell vertically and image cell with its long axis perpendicular to the image plane. As a demonstration, actomyosin ring contraction is shown with this new imaging device.

  3. Physical determinants of bipolar mitotic spindle assembly and stability in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Blackwell, Robert; Edelmaier, Christopher; Sweezy-Schindler, Oliver; Lamson, Adam; Gergely, Zachary R.; O’Toole, Eileen; Crapo, Ammon; Hough, Loren E.; McIntosh, J. Richard; Glaser, Matthew A.; Betterton, Meredith D.

    2017-01-01

    Mitotic spindles use an elegant bipolar architecture to segregate duplicated chromosomes with high fidelity. Bipolar spindles form from a monopolar initial condition; this is the most fundamental construction problem that the spindle must solve. Microtubules, motors, and cross-linkers are important for bipolarity, but the mechanisms necessary and sufficient for spindle assembly remain unknown. We describe a physical model that exhibits de novo bipolar spindle formation. We began with physical properties of fission-yeast spindle pole body size and microtubule number, kinesin-5 motors, kinesin-14 motors, and passive cross-linkers. Our model results agree quantitatively with our experiments in fission yeast, thereby establishing a minimal system with which to interrogate collective self-assembly. By varying the features of our model, we identify a set of functions essential for the generation and stability of spindle bipolarity. When kinesin-5 motors are present, their bidirectionality is essential, but spindles can form in the presence of passive cross-linkers alone. We also identify characteristic failed states of spindle assembly—the persistent monopole, X spindle, separated asters, and short spindle, which are avoided by the creation and maintenance of antiparallel microtubule overlaps. Our model can guide the identification of new, multifaceted strategies to induce mitotic catastrophes; these would constitute novel strategies for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:28116355

  4. Coupling of double-stranded RNA synthesis and siRNA generation in fission yeast RNAi.

    PubMed

    Colmenares, Serafin U; Buker, Shane M; Buhler, Marc; Dlakić, Mensur; Moazed, Danesh

    2007-08-03

    The fission yeast centromeric repeats are transcribed and ultimately processed into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that are required for heterochromatin formation. siRNA generation requires dsRNA synthesis by the RNA-directed RNA polymerase complex (RDRC) and processing by the Dicer ribonuclease. Here we show that Dcr1, the fission yeast Dicer, is physically associated with RDRC. Dcr1 generates siRNAs in an ATP-dependent manner that requires its conserved N-terminal helicase domain. Furthermore, C-terminal truncations of Dcr1 that abolish its interaction with RDRC, but can generate siRNA in vitro, abolish siRNA generation and heterochromatic gene silencing in vivo. Finally, reconstitution experiments show that the association of Dcr1 with RDRC strongly stimulates the dsRNA synthesis activity of RDRC. Our results suggest that heterochromatic dsRNA synthesis and siRNA generation are physically coupled processes. This coupling has implications for cis-restriction of siRNA-mediated heterochromatin assembly and for mechanisms that give rise to siRNA strand polarity.

  5. Dynamin-dependent biogenesis, cell cycle regulation and mitochondrial association of peroxisomes in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Jourdain, Isabelle; Sontam, Dharani; Johnson, Chad; Dillies, Clément; Hyams, Jeremy S

    2008-03-01

    Peroxisomes were visualized for the first time in living fission yeast cells. In small, newly divided cells, the number of peroxisomes was low but increased in parallel with the increase in cell length/volume that accompanies cell cycle progression. In cells grown in oleic acid, both the size and the number of peroxisomes increased. The peroxisomal inventory of cells lacking the dynamin-related proteins Dnm1 or Vps1 was similar to that in wild type. By contrast, cells of the double mutant dnm1Delta vps1Delta contained either no peroxisomes at all or a small number of morphologically aberrant organelles. Peroxisomes exhibited either local Brownian movement or longer-range linear displacements, which continued in the absence of either microtubules or actin filaments. On the contrary, directed peroxisome motility appeared to occur in association with mitochondria and may be an indirect function of intrinsic mitochondrial dynamics. We conclude that peroxisomes are present in fission yeast and that Dnm1 and Vps1 act redundantly in peroxisome biogenesis, which is under cell cycle control. Peroxisome movement is independent of the cytoskeleton but is coupled to mitochondrial dynamics.

  6. Fission yeast Ryh1 GTPase activates TOR Complex 2 in response to glucose.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Tomoyuki; Morigasaki, Susumu; Tatebe, Hisashi; Ikeda, Kyoko; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The Target Of Rapamycin (TOR) is an evolutionarily conserved protein kinase that forms 2 distinct protein complexes referred to as TOR complex 1 (TORC1) and 2 (TORC2). Recent extensive studies have demonstrated that TORC1 is under the control of the small GTPases Rheb and Rag that funnel multiple input signals including those derived from nutritional sources; however, information is scarce as to the regulation of TORC2. A previous study using the model system provided by the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe identified Ryh1, a Rab-family GTPase, as an activator of TORC2. Here, we show that the nucleotide-binding state of Ryh1 is regulated in response to glucose, mediating this major nutrient signal to TORC2. In glucose-rich growth media, the GTP-bound form of Ryh1 induces TORC2-dependent phosphorylation of Gad8, a downstream target of TORC2 in fission yeast. Upon glucose deprivation, Ryh1 becomes inactive, which turns off the TORC2-Gad8 pathway. During glucose starvation, however, Gad8 phosphorylation by TORC2 gradually recovers independently of Ryh1, implying an additional TORC2 activator that is regulated negatively by glucose. The paired positive and negative regulatory mechanisms may allow fine-tuning of the TORC2-Gad8 pathway, which is essential for growth under glucose-limited environment.

  7. Regulation of Rho-GEF Rgf3 by the arrestin Art1 in fission yeast cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Reshma; Laporte, Damien; Wu, Jian-Qiu

    2015-01-01

    Rho GTPases, activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), are essential regulators of polarized cell growth, cytokinesis, and many other cellular processes. However, the regulation of Rho-GEFs themselves is not well understood. Rgf3 is an essential GEF for Rho1 GTPase in fission yeast. We show that Rgf3 protein levels and localization are regulated by arrestin-related protein Art1. art1∆ cells lyse during cell separation with a thinner and defective septum. As does Rgf3, Art1 concentrates to the contractile ring starting at early anaphase and spreads to the septum during and after ring constriction. Art1 localization depends on its C-terminus, and Art1 is important for maintaining Rgf3 protein levels. Biochemical experiments reveal that the Rgf3 C-terminus binds to Art1. Using an Rgf3 conditional mutant and mislocalization experiments, we found that Art1 and Rgf3 are interdependent for localization to the division site. As expected, active Rho1 levels at the division site are reduced in art1∆ and rgf3 mutant cells. Taken together, these data reveal that the arrestin family protein Art1 regulates the protein levels and localization of the Rho-GEF Rgf3, which in turn modulates active Rho1 levels during fission yeast cytokinesis. PMID:25473118

  8. The Actomyosin Ring Recruits Early Secretory Compartments to the Division Site in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Vjestica, Aleksandar; Tang, Xin-Zi

    2008-01-01

    The ultimate goal of cytokinesis is to establish a membrane barrier between daughter cells. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe utilizes an actomyosin-based division ring that is thought to provide physical force for the plasma membrane invagination. Ring constriction occurs concomitantly with the assembly of a division septum that is eventually cleaved. Membrane trafficking events such as targeting of secretory vesicles to the division site require a functional actomyosin ring suggesting that it serves as a spatial landmark. However, the extent of polarization of the secretion apparatus to the division site is presently unknown. We performed a survey of dynamics of several fluorophore-tagged proteins that served as markers for various compartments of the secretory pathway. These included markers for the endoplasmic reticulum, the COPII sites, and the early and late Golgi. The secretion machinery exhibited a marked polarization to the division site. Specifically, we observed an enrichment of the transitional endoplasmic reticulum (tER) accompanied by Golgi cisternae biogenesis. These processes required actomyosin ring assembly and the function of the EFC-domain protein Cdc15p. Cdc15p overexpression was sufficient to induce tER polarization in interphase. Thus, fission yeast polarizes its entire secretory machinery to the cell division site by utilizing molecular cues provided by the actomyosin ring. PMID:18184749

  9. RNAi mediates post-transcriptional repression of gene expression in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Smialowska, Agata; Djupedal, Ingela; Wang, Jingwen; Kylsten, Per; Swoboda, Peter; Ekwall, Karl

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Protein coding genes accumulate anti-sense sRNAs in fission yeast S. pombe. • RNAi represses protein-coding genes in S. pombe. • RNAi-mediated gene repression is post-transcriptional. - Abstract: RNA interference (RNAi) is a gene silencing mechanism conserved from fungi to mammals. Small interfering RNAs are products and mediators of the RNAi pathway and act as specificity factors in recruiting effector complexes. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome encodes one of each of the core RNAi proteins, Dicer, Argonaute and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (dcr1, ago1, rdp1). Even though the function of RNAi in heterochromatin assembly in S. pombe is established, its role in controlling gene expression is elusive. Here, we report the identification of small RNAs mapped anti-sense to protein coding genes in fission yeast. We demonstrate that these genes are up-regulated at the protein level in RNAi mutants, while their mRNA levels are not significantly changed. We show that the repression by RNAi is not a result of heterochromatin formation. Thus, we conclude that RNAi is involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing in S. pombe.

  10. CSL protein regulates transcription of genes required to prevent catastrophic mitosis in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Převorovský, Martin; Oravcová, Martina; Zach, Róbert; Jordáková, Anna; Bähler, Jürg; Půta, František; Folk, Petr

    2016-11-16

    For every eukaryotic cell to grow and divide, intricately coordinated action of numerous proteins is required to ensure proper cell-cycle progression. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has been instrumental in elucidating the fundamental principles of cell-cycle control. Mutations in S. pombe 'cut' (cell untimely torn) genes cause failed coordination between cell and nuclear division, resulting in catastrophic mitosis. Deletion of cbf11, a fission yeast CSL transcription factor gene, triggers a 'cut' phenotype, but the precise role of Cbf11 in promoting mitotic fidelity is not known. We report that Cbf11 directly activates the transcription of the acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase gene cut6, and the biotin uptake/biosynthesis genes vht1 and bio2, with the former 2 implicated in mitotic fidelity. Cbf11 binds to a canonical, metazoan-like CSL response element (GTGGGAA) in the cut6 promoter. Expression of Cbf11 target genes shows apparent oscillations during the cell cycle using temperature-sensitive cdc25-22 and cdc10-M17 block-release experiments, but not with other synchronization methods. The penetrance of catastrophic mitosis in cbf11 and cut6 mutants is nutrient-dependent. We also show that drastic decrease in biotin availability arrests cell proliferation but does not cause mitotic defects. Taken together, our results raise the possibility that CSL proteins play conserved roles in regulating cell-cycle progression, and they could guide experiments into mitotic CSL functions in mammals.

  11. Stress-induced nuclear-to-cytoplasmic translocation of cyclin C promotes mitochondrial fission in yeast.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Katrina F; Khakhina, Svetlana; Kim, Stephen K; Strich, Randy

    2014-01-27

    Mitochondrial morphology is maintained by the opposing activities of dynamin-based fission and fusion machines. In response to stress, this balance is dramatically shifted toward fission. This study reveals that the yeast transcriptional repressor cyclin C is both necessary and sufficient for stress-induced hyperfission. In response to oxidative stress, cyclin C translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, where it is destroyed. Prior to its destruction, cyclin C both genetically and physically interacts with Mdv1p, an adaptor that links the GTPase Dnm1p to the mitochondrial receptor Fis1p. Cyclin C is required for stress-induced Mdv1p mitochondrial recruitment and the efficient formation of functional Dnm1p filaments. Finally, coimmunoprecipitation studies and fluorescence microscopy revealed an elevated association between Mdv1p and Dnm1p in stressed cells that is dependent on cyclin C. This study provides a mechanism by which stress-induced gene induction and mitochondrial fission are coordinated through translocation of cyclin C.

  12. Mechanism for priming DNA synthesis by yeast DNA Polymerase α

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Rajika L; Torella, Rubben; Klinge, Sebastian; Kilkenny, Mairi L; Maman, Joseph D; Pellegrini, Luca

    2013-01-01

    The DNA Polymerase α (Pol α)/primase complex initiates DNA synthesis in eukaryotic replication. In the complex, Pol α and primase cooperate in the production of RNA-DNA oligonucleotides that prime synthesis of new DNA. Here we report crystal structures of the catalytic core of yeast Pol α in unliganded form, bound to an RNA primer/DNA template and extending an RNA primer with deoxynucleotides. We combine the structural analysis with biochemical and computational data to demonstrate that Pol α specifically recognizes the A-form RNA/DNA helix and that the ensuing synthesis of B-form DNA terminates primer synthesis. The spontaneous release of the completed RNA-DNA primer by the Pol α/primase complex simplifies current models of primer transfer to leading- and lagging strand polymerases. The proposed mechanism of nucleotide polymerization by Pol α might contribute to genomic stability by limiting the amount of inaccurate DNA to be corrected at the start of each Okazaki fragment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00482.001 PMID:23599895

  13. Convergent domestication of pogo-like transposases into centromere-binding proteins in fission yeast and mammals

    PubMed Central

    Casola, Claudio; Hucks, Donald; Feschotte, Cédric

    2007-01-01

    The mammalian centromeric protein CENP-B shares significant sequence similarity with three proteins in fission yeast (Abp1, Cbh1 and Cbh2) that also bind centromeres and have essential function for chromosome segregation and centromeric heterochromatin formation. Each of these proteins displays extensive sequence similarity with pogo-like transposases, which have been previously identified in the genomes of various insects and vertebrates, in the protozoan Entamoeba and in plants. Based on this distribution, it has been proposed that the mammalian and fission yeast centromeric proteins are derived from ‘domesticated’ pogo-like transposons. Here we took advantage of the vast amount of sequence information that has become recently available for a wide range of fungal and animal species to investigate the origin of the mammalian CENP-B and yeast CENP-B-like genes. A highly conserved ortholog of CENP-B was detected in 31 species of mammals, including opossum and platypus, but was absent from all non-mammalian species represented in the databases. Similarly, no ortholog of the fission yeast centromeric proteins was identified in any of the various fungal genomes currently available. In contrast, we discovered a plethora of novel pogo-like transposons in diverse invertebrates and vertebrates and in several filamentous fungi. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the mammalian and fission yeast CENP-B proteins fall into two distinct monophyletic clades, each of which includes a different set of pogo-like transposons. These results are most parsimoniously explained by independent domestication events of pogo-like transposases into centromeric proteins in the mammalian and fission yeast lineages, a case of ‘convergent domestication’. These findings highlight the propensity of transposases to give rise to new host proteins and the potential of transposons as sources of genetic innovation. PMID:17940212

  14. Integrity of the yeast mitochondrial genome, but not its distribution and inheritance, relies on mitochondrial fission and fusion.

    PubMed

    Osman, Christof; Noriega, Thomas R; Okreglak, Voytek; Fung, Jennifer C; Walter, Peter

    2015-03-03

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is essential for mitochondrial and cellular function. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mtDNA is organized in nucleoprotein structures termed nucleoids, which are distributed throughout the mitochondrial network and are faithfully inherited during the cell cycle. How the cell distributes and inherits mtDNA is incompletely understood although an involvement of mitochondrial fission and fusion has been suggested. We developed a LacO-LacI system to noninvasively image mtDNA dynamics in living cells. Using this system, we found that nucleoids are nonrandomly spaced within the mitochondrial network and observed the spatiotemporal events involved in mtDNA inheritance. Surprisingly, cells deficient in mitochondrial fusion and fission distributed and inherited mtDNA normally, pointing to alternative pathways involved in these processes. We identified such a mechanism, where we observed fission-independent, but F-actin-dependent, tip generation that was linked to the positioning of mtDNA to the newly generated tip. Although mitochondrial fusion and fission were dispensable for mtDNA distribution and inheritance, we show through a combination of genetics and next-generation sequencing that their absence leads to an accumulation of mitochondrial genomes harboring deleterious structural variations that cluster at the origins of mtDNA replication, thus revealing crucial roles for mitochondrial fusion and fission in maintaining the integrity of the mitochondrial genome.

  15. The MAP kinase Pmk1 and protein kinase A are required for rotenone resistance in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yiwei; Gulis, Galina; Buckner, Scott; Johnson, P. Connor; Sullivan, Daniel; Busenlehner, Laura; Marcus, Stevan

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Rotenone induces generation of ROS and mitochondrial fragmentation in fission yeast. {yields} The MAPK Pmk1 and PKA are required for rotenone resistance in fission yeast. {yields} Pmk1 and PKA are required for ROS clearance in rotenone treated fission yeast cells. {yields} PKA plays a role in ROS clearance under normal growth conditions in fission yeast. -- Abstract: Rotenone is a widely used pesticide that induces Parkinson's disease-like symptoms in rats and death of dopaminergic neurons in culture. Although rotenone is a potent inhibitor of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, it can induce death of dopaminergic neurons independently of complex I inhibition. Here we describe effects of rotenone in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which lacks complex I and carries out rotenone-insensitive cellular respiration. We show that rotenone induces generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as fragmentation of mitochondrial networks in treated S. pombe cells. While rotenone is only modestly inhibitory to growth of wild type S. pombe cells, it is strongly inhibitory to growth of mutants lacking the ERK-type MAP kinase, Pmk1, or protein kinase A (PKA). In contrast, cells lacking the p38 MAP kinase, Spc1, exhibit modest resistance to rotenone. Consistent with these findings, we provide evidence that Pmk1 and PKA, but not Spc1, are required for clearance of ROS in rotenone treated S. pombe cells. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of S. pombe for elucidating complex I-independent molecular targets of rotenone as well as mechanisms conferring resistance to the toxin.

  16. Fission yeast IQGAP arranges actin filaments into the cytokinetic contractile ring

    PubMed Central

    Takaine, Masak; Numata, Osamu; Nakano, Kentaro

    2009-01-01

    The contractile ring (CR) consists of bundled actin filaments and myosin II; however, the actin-bundling factor remains elusive. We show that the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe IQGAP Rng2 is involved in the generation of CR F-actin and required for its arrangement into a ring. An N-terminal fragment of Rng2 is necessary for the function of Rng2 and is localized to CR F-actin. In vitro the fragment promotes actin polymerization and forms linear arrays of F-actin, which are resistant to the depolymerization induced by the actin-depolymerizing factor Adf1. Our findings indicate that Rng2 is involved in the generation of CR F-actin and simultaneously bundles the filaments and regulates its dynamics by counteracting the effects of Adf1, thus enabling the reconstruction of CR F-actin bundles, which provides an insight into the physical properties of the building blocks that comprise the CR. PMID:19713940

  17. Synchronized fission yeast meiosis using an ATP analog-sensitive Pat1 protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Cipak, Lubos; Polakova, Silvia; Hyppa, Randy W.; Smith, Gerald R.; Gregan, Juraj

    2014-01-01

    Synchronous cultures are often indispensable for studying meiosis. Here, we present an optimized protocol for induction of synchronous meiosis in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Chemical inactivation of an ATP analog-sensitive form of the Pat1 kinase (pat1-as2) by adding the ATP-analog 1-NM-PP1 in G1-arrested cells allows induction of synchronous meiosis at optimal temperature (25 °C). Importantly, this protocol eliminates detrimental effects of elevated temperature (34 °C) which is required to inactivate the commonly used temperature-sensitive Pat1 kinase mutant (pat1-114). Addition of the mat-Pc gene to a mat1-M strain further improves chromosome segregation and spore viability. Thus, our protocol offers highly synchronous meiosis at optimal temperature with most characteristics similar to those of wild-type meiosis. The synchronization protocol can be completed in 5 days. PMID:24385151

  18. The fission yeast spore is coated by a proteinaceous surface layer comprising mainly Isp3

    PubMed Central

    Fukunishi, Kana; Miyakubi, Kana; Hatanaka, Mitsuko; Otsuru, Natsumi; Hirata, Aiko; Shimoda, Chikashi; Nakamura, Taro

    2014-01-01

    The spore is a dormant cell that is resistant to various environmental stresses. As compared with the vegetative cell wall, the spore wall has a more extensive structure that confers resistance on spores. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the polysaccharides glucan and chitosan are major components of the spore wall; however, the structure of the spore surface remains unknown. We identify the spore coat protein Isp3/Meu4. The isp3 disruptant is viable and executes meiotic nuclear divisions as efficiently as the wild type, but isp3∆ spores show decreased tolerance to heat, digestive enzymes, and ethanol. Electron microscopy shows that an electron-dense layer is formed at the outermost region of the wild-type spore wall. This layer is not observed in isp3∆ spores. Furthermore, Isp3 is abundantly detected in this layer by immunoelectron microscopy. Thus Isp3 constitutes the spore coat, thereby conferring resistance to various environmental stresses. PMID:24623719

  19. Nuclear retention of fission yeast dicer is a prerequisite for RNAi-mediated heterochromatin assembly.

    PubMed

    Emmerth, Stephan; Schober, Heiko; Gaidatzis, Dimos; Roloff, Tim; Jacobeit, Kirsten; Bühler, Marc

    2010-01-19

    RNaseIII ribonucleases act at the heart of RNA silencing pathways by processing precursor RNAs into mature microRNAs and siRNAs. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, siRNAs are generated by the RNaseIII enzyme Dcr1 and are required for heterochromatin formation at centromeres. In this study, we have analyzed the subcellular localization of Dcr1 and found that it accumulates in the nucleus and is enriched at the nuclear periphery. Nuclear accumulation of Dcr1 depends on a short motif that impedes nuclear export promoted by the double-stranded RNA binding domain of Dcr1. Absence of this motif renders Dcr1 mainly cytoplasmic and is accompanied by remarkable changes in gene expression and failure to assemble heterochromatin. Our findings suggest that Dicer proteins are shuttling proteins and that the steady-state subcellular levels can be shifted toward either compartment.

  20. A formin-nucleated actin aster concentrates cell wall hydrolases for cell fusion in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Dudin, Omaya; Bendezú, Felipe O.; Groux, Raphael; Laroche, Thierry; Seitz, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Cell–cell fusion is essential for fertilization. For fusion of walled cells, the cell wall must be degraded at a precise location but maintained in surrounding regions to protect against lysis. In fission yeast cells, the formin Fus1, which nucleates linear actin filaments, is essential for this process. In this paper, we show that this formin organizes a specific actin structure—the actin fusion focus. Structured illumination microscopy and live-cell imaging of Fus1, actin, and type V myosins revealed an aster of actin filaments whose barbed ends are focalized near the plasma membrane. Focalization requires Fus1 and type V myosins and happens asynchronously always in the M cell first. Type V myosins are essential for fusion and concentrate cell wall hydrolases, but not cell wall synthases, at the fusion focus. Thus, the fusion focus focalizes cell wall dissolution within a broader cell wall synthesis zone to shift from cell growth to cell fusion. PMID:25825517

  1. Gradients of phosphatidylserine contribute to plasma membrane charge localization and cell polarity in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Haupt, Armin; Minc, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Surface charges at the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane may contribute to regulate the surface recruitment of key signaling factors. Phosphatidylserine (PS) is an abundant charged lipid that may regulate charge distribution in different cell types. Here we characterize the subcellular distribution and function of PS in the rod-shaped, polarized fission yeast. We find that PS preferably accumulates at cell tips and defines a gradient of negative charges along the cell surface. This polarization depends on actin-mediated endocytosis and contributes to the subcellular partitioning of charged polarity-regulating Rho GTPases like Rho1 or Cdc42 in a protein charge–dependent manner. Cells depleted of PS have altered cell dimensions and fail to properly regulate growth from the second end, suggesting a role for PS and membrane charge in polarized cell growth. PMID:27852900

  2. Force- and length-dependent catastrophe activities explain interphase microtubule organization in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Foethke, Dietrich; Makushok, Tatyana; Brunner, Damian; Nédélec, François

    2009-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is essential for the maintenance of cell morphology in eukaryotes. In fission yeast, for example, polarized growth sites are organized by actin, whereas microtubules (MTs) acting upstream control where growth occurs. Growth is limited to the cell poles when MTs undergo catastrophes there and not elsewhere on the cortex. Here, we report that the modulation of MT dynamics by forces as observed in vitro can quantitatively explain the localization of MT catastrophes in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. However, we found that it is necessary to add length-dependent catastrophe rates to make the model fully consistent with other previously measured traits of MTs. We explain the measured statistical distribution of MT-cortex contact times and re-examine the curling behavior of MTs in unbranched straight tea1Delta cells. Importantly, the model demonstrates that MTs together with associated proteins such as depolymerizing kinesins are, in principle, sufficient to mark the cell poles.

  3. Transcription factors mediate condensin recruitment and global chromosomal organization in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Dong; Tanizawa, Hideki; Iwasaki, Osamu; Noma, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming clear that Structural Maintenance of Chromosomes (SMC) complexes, such as condensin and cohesin, are involved in the three-dimensional genome organization, yet the exact roles of these complexes in the functional organization remain unclear. This study employs the ChIA-PET approach to comprehensively identify genome-wide associations mediated by condensin and cohesin in fission yeast. We find that although cohesin and condensin often bind to the same loci, they direct different association networks and generate small and larger chromatin domains, respectively. Cohesin mediates local associations between loci positioned within 100 kb; condensin can drive longer-range associations. Moreover, condensin, but not cohesin, connects cell cycle-regulated genes bound by mitotic transcription factors. This study describes the different functions of condensin and cohesin in genome organization and how specific transcription factors function in condensin loading, cell cycle-dependent genome organization, and mitotic chromosome organization to support faithful chromosome segregation. PMID:27548313

  4. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the histone chaperone cia1 from fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Umehara, Takashi; Otta, Yumi; Tsuganezawa, Keiko; Matsumoto, Takehisa; Tanaka, Akiko; Horikoshi, Masami; Padmanabhan, Balasundaram; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2005-11-01

    The histone chaperone cia1 from fission yeast has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized using the vapour-diffusion method. In fission yeast, cia1{sup +} is an essential gene that encodes a histone chaperone, a homologue of human CIA (CCG1-interacting factor A) and budding yeast Asf1p (anti-silencing function-1), which both facilitate nucleosome assembly by interacting with the core histones H3/H4. The conserved domain (residues 1–161) of the cia1{sup +}-encoded protein was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified to near-homogeneity and crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The protein was crystallized in the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 79.16, b = 40.53, c = 69.79 Å, β = 115.93° and one molecule per asymmetric unit. The crystal diffracted to beyond 2.10 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation.

  5. Involvement of fission yeast Pdc2 in RNA degradation and P-body function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Yu; Wang, Yi-Ting; Hsiao, Wan-Yi; Wang, Shao-Win

    2017-04-01

    In this study we identified Pdc2, the fission yeast ortholog of human Pat1b protein, which forms a complex with Lsm1-7 and plays a role in coupling deadenylation and decapping. The involvement of Pdc2 in RNA degradation and P-body function was also determined. We found that Pdc2 interacts with Dcp2 and is required for decapping in vivo. Although not absolutely essential for P-body assembly, overexpression of Pdc2 enhanced P-body formation even in the absence of Pdc1, the fission yeast functional homolog of human Edc4 protein, indicating that Pdc2 also plays a role in P-body formation. Intriguingly, in the absence of Pdc2, Lsm1 was found to accumulate in the nucleus, suggesting that Pdc2 shuttling between nucleus and cytoplasm plays a role in decreasing the nuclear concentration of Lsm1 to increase Lsm1 in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, unlike other components of P-bodies, the deadenylase Ccr4 did not accumulate in P-bodies in cells growing under favorable conditions and was only recruited to P-bodies after deprivation of glucose in a Pdc2-Lsm1-dependent manner, indicating a function of Pdc2 in cellular response to environmental stress. In supporting this idea, pdc2 mutants are defective in recovery from glucose starvation with a much longer time to re-enter the cell cycle. In keeping with the notion that Pat1 is a nucleocytoplasmic protein, functioning also in the nucleus, we found that Pdc2 physically and genetically interacts with the nuclear 5'-3' exonuclease Dhp1. A function of Pdc2-Lsm1, in concert with Dhp1, regulating RNA by promoting its decapping/destruction in the nucleus was suggested.

  6. The spindle pole bodies facilitate nuclear envelope division during closed mitosis in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Liling; Schwartz, Cindi; Magidson, Valentin; Khodjakov, Alexey; Oliferenko, Snezhana

    2007-07-01

    Many organisms divide chromosomes within the confines of the nuclear envelope (NE) in a process known as closed mitosis. Thus, they must ensure coordination between segregation of the genetic material and division of the NE itself. Although many years of work have led to a reasonably clear understanding of mitotic spindle function in chromosome segregation, the NE division mechanism remains obscure. Here, we show that fission yeast cells overexpressing the transforming acid coiled coil (TACC)-related protein, Mia1p/Alp7p, failed to separate the spindle pole bodies (SPBs) at the onset of mitosis, but could assemble acentrosomal bipolar and antiparallel spindle structures. Most of these cells arrested in anaphase with fully extended spindles and nonsegregated chromosomes. Spindle poles that lacked the SPBs did not lead the division of the NE during spindle elongation, but deformed it, trapping the chromosomes within. When the SPBs were severed by laser microsurgery in wild-type cells, we observed analogous deformations of the NE by elongating spindle remnants, resulting in NE division failure. Analysis of dis1Delta cells that elongate spindles despite unattached kinetochores indicated that the SPBs were required for maintaining nuclear shape at anaphase onset. Strikingly, when the NE was disassembled by utilizing a temperature-sensitive allele of the Ran GEF, Pim1p, the abnormal spindles induced by Mia1p overexpression were capable of segregating sister chromatids to daughter cells, suggesting that the failure to divide the NE prevents chromosome partitioning. Our results imply that the SPBs preclude deformation of the NE during spindle elongation and thus serve as specialized structures enabling nuclear division during closed mitosis in fission yeast.

  7. A mutation of the fission yeast EB1 overcomes negative regulation by phosphorylation and stabilizes microtubules

    SciTech Connect

    Iimori, Makoto; Ozaki, Kanako; Chikashige, Yuji; Habu, Toshiyuki; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Maki, Takahisa; Hayashi, Ikuko; Obuse, Chikashi; Matsumoto, Tomohiro

    2012-02-01

    Mal3 is a fission yeast homolog of EB1, a plus-end tracking protein (+ TIP). We have generated a mutation (89R) replacing glutamine with arginine in the calponin homology (CH) domain of Mal3. Analysis of the 89R mutant in vitro has revealed that the mutation confers a higher affinity to microtubules and enhances the intrinsic activity to promote the microtubule-assembly. The mutant Mal3 is no longer a + TIP, but binds strongly the microtubule lattice. Live cell imaging has revealed that while the wild type Mal3 proteins dissociate from the tip of the growing microtubules before the onset of shrinkage, the mutant Mal3 proteins persist on microtubules and reduces a rate of shrinkage after a longer pausing period. Consequently, the mutant Mal3 proteins cause abnormal elongation of microtubules composing the spindle and aster. Mal3 is phosphorylated at a cluster of serine/threonine residues in the linker connecting the CH and EB1-like C-terminal motif domains. The phosphorylation occurs in a microtubule-dependent manner and reduces the affinity of Mal3 to microtubules. We propose that because the 89R mutation is resistant to the effect of phosphorylation, it can associate persistently with microtubules and confers a stronger stability of microtubules likely by reinforcing the cylindrical structure. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We characterize a mutation (mal3-89R) in fission yeast homolog of EB1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mutation enhances the activity to assemble microtubules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mal3 is phosphorylated in a microtubule-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phosphorylation negatively regulates the Mal3 activity.

  8. A Genetic and Pharmacological Analysis of Isoprenoid Pathway by LC-MS/MS in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Takami, Tomonori; Fang, Yue; Zhou, Xin; Jaiseng, Wurentuya; Ma, Yan; Kuno, Takayoshi

    2012-01-01

    Currently, statins are the only drugs acting on the mammalian isoprenoid pathway. The mammalian genes in this pathway are not easily amenable to genetic manipulation. Thus, it is difficult to study the effects of the inhibition of various enzymes on the intermediate and final products in the isoprenoid pathway. In fission yeast, antifungal compounds such as azoles and terbinafine are available as inhibitors of the pathway in addition to statins, and various isoprenoid pathway mutants are also available. Here in these mutants, treated with statins or antifungals, we quantified the final and intermediate products of the fission yeast isoprenoid pathway using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. In hmg1-1, a mutant of the gene encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR), ergosterol (a final sterol product), and squalene (an intermediate pathway product), were decreased to approximately 80% and 10%, respectively, compared with that of wild-type cells. Consistently in wild-type cells, pravastatin, an HMGR inhibitor decreased ergosterol and squalene, and the effect was more pronounced on squalene. In hmg1-1 mutant and in wild-type cells treated with pravastatin, the decrease in the levels of farnesyl pyrophosphate and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate respectively was larger than that of ergosterol but was smaller than that of squalene. In Δerg6 or Δsts1 cells, mutants of the genes involved in the last step of the pathway, ergosterol was not detected, and the changes of intermediate product levels were distinct from that of hmg1-1 mutant. Notably, in wild-type cells miconazole and terbinafine only slightly decreased ergosterol level. Altogether, these studies suggest that the pleiotropic phenotypes caused by the hmg1-1 mutation and pravastatin might be due to decreased levels of isoprenoid pyrophosphates or other isoprenoid pathway intermediate products rather than due to a decreased ergosterol level. PMID:23145048

  9. A Genetic Screen for Fission Yeast Gene Deletion Mutants Exhibiting Hypersensitivity to Latrunculin A

    PubMed Central

    Asadi, Farzad; Michalski, Dorothy; Karagiannis, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Fission yeast cells treated with low doses of the actin depolymerizing drug, latrunculin A (LatA), delay entry into mitosis via a mechanism that is dependent on both the Clp1p and Rad24p proteins. During this delay, cells remain in a cytokinesis-competent state that is characterized by continuous repair and/or reestablishment of the actomyosin ring. In this manner, cells ensure the faithful completion of the preceding cytokinesis in response to perturbation of the cell division machinery. To uncover other genes with a role in this response, or simply genes with roles in adapting to LatA-induced stress, we carried out a genome-wide screen and identified a group of 38 gene deletion mutants that are hyper-sensitive to the drug. As expected, we found genes affecting cytokinesis and/or the actin cytoskeleton within this set (ain1, acp2, imp2). We also identified genes with roles in histone modification (tra1, ngg1), intracellular transport (apl5, aps3), and glucose-mediated signaling (git3, git5, git11, pka1, cgs2). Importantly, while the identified gene deletion mutants are prone to cytokinesis failure in the presence of LatA, they are nevertheless fully capable of cell division in the absence of the drug. These results indicate that fission yeast cells make use of a diverse set of regulatory modules to counter abnormal cytoskeletal perturbations, and furthermore, that these modules act redundantly to ensure cell survival and proliferation. PMID:27466272

  10. SUMOylation regulates telomere length by targeting the shelterin subunit Tpz1Tpp1 to modulate shelterin–Stn1 interaction in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Miyagawa, Keisuke; Low, Ross S.; Santosa, Venny; Tsuji, Hiroki; Moser, Bettina A.; Fujisawa, Shiho; Harland, Jennifer L.; Raguimova, Olga N.; Go, Andrew; Ueno, Masaru; Matsuyama, Akihisa; Yoshida, Minoru; Nakamura, Toru M.; Tanaka, Katsunori

    2014-01-01

    Telomeres protect DNA ends of linear eukaryotic chromosomes from degradation and fusion, and ensure complete replication of the terminal DNA through recruitment of telomerase. The regulation of telomerase is a critical area of telomere research and includes cis regulation by the shelterin complex in mammals and fission yeast. We have identified a key component of this regulatory pathway as the SUMOylation [the covalent attachment of a small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) to target proteins] of a shelterin subunit in fission yeast. SUMOylation is known to be involved in the negative regulation of telomere extension by telomerase; however, how SUMOylation limits the action of telomerase was unknown until now. We show that SUMOylation of the shelterin subunit TPP1 homolog in Schizosaccharomyces pombe (Tpz1) on lysine 242 is important for telomere length homeostasis. Furthermore, we establish that Tpz1 SUMOylation prevents telomerase accumulation at telomeres by promoting recruitment of Stn1-Ten1 to telomeres. Our findings provide major mechanistic insights into how the SUMOylation pathway collaborates with shelterin and Stn1-Ten1 complexes to regulate telomere length. PMID:24711392

  11. Mathematical modeling of the role of mitochondrial fusion and fission in mitochondrial DNA maintenance.

    PubMed

    Tam, Zhi Yang; Gruber, Jan; Halliwell, Barry; Gunawan, Rudiyanto

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations has been implicated in a wide range of human pathologies, including neurodegenerative diseases, sarcopenia, and the aging process itself. In cells, mtDNA molecules are constantly turned over (i.e. replicated and degraded) and are also exchanged among mitochondria during the fusion and fission of these organelles. While the expansion of a mutant mtDNA population is believed to occur by random segregation of these molecules during turnover, the role of mitochondrial fusion-fission in this context is currently not well understood. In this study, an in silico modeling approach is taken to investigate the effects of mitochondrial fusion and fission dynamics on mutant mtDNA accumulation. Here we report model simulations suggesting that when mitochondrial fusion-fission rate is low, the slow mtDNA mixing can lead to an uneven distribution of mutant mtDNA among mitochondria in between two mitochondrial autophagic events leading to more stochasticity in the outcomes from a single random autophagic event. Consequently, slower mitochondrial fusion-fission results in higher variability in the mtDNA mutation burden among cells in a tissue over time, and mtDNA mutations have a higher propensity to clonally expand due to the increased stochasticity. When these mutations affect cellular energetics, nuclear retrograde signalling can upregulate mtDNA replication, which is expected to slow clonal expansion of these mutant mtDNA. However, our simulations suggest that the protective ability of retrograde signalling depends on the efficiency of fusion-fission process. Our results thus shed light on the interplay between mitochondrial fusion-fission and mtDNA turnover and may explain the mechanism underlying the experimentally observed increase in the accumulation of mtDNA mutations when either mitochondrial fusion or fission is inhibited.

  12. A new specific DNA endonuclease activity in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Sargueil, B; Delahodde, A; Hatat, D; Tian, G L; Lazowska, J; Jacq, C

    1991-02-01

    Two group I intron-encoded proteins from the yeast mitochondrial genome have already been shown to have a specific DNA endonuclease activity. This activity mediates intron insertion by cleaving the DNA sequence corresponding to the splice junction of an intronless strain. We have discovered in mitochondrial extracts from the yeast strain 777-3A a new DNA endonuclease activity which cleaves the fused exon A3-exon A4 junction sequence of the CO XI gene.

  13. Monothiol glutaredoxin Grx5 interacts with Fe-S scaffold proteins Isa1 and Isa2 and supports Fe-S assembly and DNA integrity in mitochondria of fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyoung-Dong; Chung, Woo-Hyun; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Kyung-Chang; Roe, Jung-Hye

    2010-02-12

    Mitochondrial monothiol glutaredoxins that bind Fe-S cluster are known to participate in Fe-S cluster assembly. However, their precise role has not been well understood. Among three monothiol glutaredoxins (Grx3, 4, and 5) in Schizosaccharomyces pombe only Grx5 resides in mitochondria. The {Delta}grx5 mutant requires cysteine on minimal media, and does not grow on non-fermentable carbon source such as glycerol. We found that the mutant is low in the activity of Fe-S enzymes in mitochondria as well as in the cytoplasm. Screening of multi-copy suppressor of growth defects of the mutant identified isa1{sup +} gene encoding a putative A-type Fe-S scaffold, in addition to mas5{sup +} and hsc1{sup +} genes encoding putative chaperones for Fe-S assembly process. Examination of other scaffold and chaperone genes revealed that isa2{sup +}, but not isu1{sup +} and ssc1{sup +}, complemented the growth phenotype of {Delta}grx5 mutant as isa1{sup +} did, partly through restoration of Fe-S enzyme activities. The mutant also showed a significant decrease in the amount of mitochondrial DNA. We demonstrated that Grx5 interacts in vivo with Isa1 and Isa2 proteins in mitochondria by observing bimolecular fluorescence complementation. These results indicate that Grx5 plays a central role in Fe-S assembly process through interaction with A-type Fe-S scaffold proteins Isa1 and Isa2, each of which is an essential protein in S. pombe, and supports mitochondrial genome integrity as well as Fe-S assembly.

  14. Enzyme activities of D-glucose metabolism in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C S; Shi, J L; Beehler, B W; Beck, B

    1992-12-01

    The activities of key enzymes that are members of D-glucose metabolic pathways in Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergoing respirative, respirofermentative, and fermentative metabolisms are monitored. The steady-state activities of glycolytic enzymes, except phosphofructokinase, decrease with a reduced efficiency in D-glucose utilization by yeast continuous culture. On the other hand, the enzymic activities of pentose monophosphate pathway reach the maximum when the cell mass production of the cultures is optimum. Enzymes of tricarboxylate cycle exhibit the maximum activities at approximately the washout rate. The steady-state activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex increases rapidly when D-glucose is efficiently utilized. By comparison, the activity of pyruvate decarboxylase begins to increase only when ethanol production occurs. Depletion of dissolved oxygen suppresses the activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex but facilitates that of pyruvate decarboxylase. Acetate greatly enhances the acetyl CoA synthetase activity. Similarly, ethanol stimulates alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities. Evidence for the existence of alcohol dehydrogenase isozymes in the fission yeast is presented.

  15. Virtual Nuclear Envelope Breakdown and Its Regulators in Fission Yeast Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Haruhiko; Yang, Hui-Ju; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2016-01-01

    Ran, a small GTPase, is required for the spindle formation and nuclear envelope (NE) formation. After NE breakdown (NEBD) during mitosis in metazoan cells, the Ran-GTP gradient across the NE is lost and Ran-GTP becomes concentrated around chromatin, thus affecting the stability of microtubules and promoting the assembly of spindle microtubules and segregation of chromosomes. Mitosis in which chromosomes are segregated subsequent to NEBD is called "open mitosis." In contrast, many fungi undergo a process termed "closed mitosis" in which chromosome segregation and spindle formation occur without NEBD. Although the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergoes a closed mitosis, it exhibits a short period during meiosis (anaphase of the second meiosis; called "anaphase II") when nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins are mixed in the presence of intact NE and nuclear pore complexes (NPC). This "virtual" nuclear envelope breakdown (vNEBD) involves changes in the localization of RanGAP1, an activator of Ran-GTP hydrolysis. Recently, Nup132, a component of the structural core Nup107-160 subcomplex of the NPC, has been shown to be involved in the maintenance of the nuclear cytoplasmic barrier in yeast meiosis. In this review, we highlight the possible roles of RanGAP1 and Nup132 in vNEBD and discuss the biological significance of vNEBD in S. pombe meiosis.

  16. Autophagy is required for efficient meiosis progression and proper meiotic chromosome segregation in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Matsuhara, Hirotada; Yamamoto, Ayumu

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a conserved intracellular degradation system, which contributes to development and differentiation of various organisms. Yeast cells undergo meiosis under nitrogen-starved conditions and require autophagy for meiosis initiation. However, the precise roles of autophagy in meiosis remain unclear. Here, we show that autophagy is required for efficient meiosis progression and proper meiotic chromosome segregation in fission yeast. Autophagy-defective strains bearing a mutation in the autophagy core factor gene atg1, atg7, or atg14 exhibit deformed nuclear structures during meiosis. These mutant cells require an extracellular nitrogen supply for meiosis progression following their entry into meiosis and show delayed meiosis progression even with a nitrogen supply. In addition, they show frequent chromosome dissociation from the spindle together with spindle overextension, forming extra nuclei. Furthermore, Aurora kinase, which regulates chromosome segregation and spindle elongation, is significantly increased at the centromere and spindle in the mutant cells. Aurora kinase down-regulation eliminated delayed initiation of meiosis I and II, chromosome dissociation, and spindle overextension, indicating that increased Aurora kinase activity may cause these aberrances in the mutant cells. Our findings show a hitherto unrecognized relationship of autophagy with the nuclear structure, regulation of cell cycle progression, and chromosome segregation in meiosis.

  17. Multifaceted effects of antimetabolite and anticancer drug, 2-deoxyglucose on eukaryotic cancer models budding and fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Vishwanatha, Akshay; D'Souza, Cletus Joseph Michael

    2017-03-01

    Glycolytic inhibitors are of interest therapeutically as they are effective against cancers that display increased glycolytic rate and mitochondrial defects. 2-Deoxyglucose (2-DG) is one such glycolytic inhibitor and was identified to be a competitive inhibitor of glucose. Studies from past few decades have shown that the mechanism of action of 2-DG is complex involving several metabolic and signaling pathways. Budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe are two important models for studying metabolism, cell cycle and cell signaling. These two unicellular eukaryotes are Crabtree positive yeasts exhibiting a metabolism similar to that of cancer cells. Effects of 2-DG in yeast is of interest owing to these similarities and hence yeasts have emerged as ideal model organisms to study the mode of action and resistance to 2-DG. In this review, we summarize the studies on biological effect and resistance to 2-DG in budding and fission yeasts and give an insight into its possible mechanism of action as models for understanding cancer metabolism and drugs affecting cancer progression. © 2017 IUBMB Life, 69(3):137-147, 2017.

  18. The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome controls repair and recombination by ubiquitylating Rhp54 in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Trickey, Michelle; Grimaldi, Margaret; Yamano, Hiroyuki

    2008-06-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is important for maintaining genome integrity and for the process of meiotic chromosome segregation and the generation of variation. HR is regulated throughout the cell cycle, being prevalent in the S and G2 phases and suppressed in the G1 phase. Here we show that the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) regulates homologous recombination in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe by ubiquitylating Rhp54 (an ortholog of Rad54). We show that Rhp54 is a novel APC/C substrate that is destroyed in G1 phase in a KEN-box- and Ste9/Fizzy-related manner. The biological consequences of failing to temporally regulate HR via Rhp54 degradation are seen in haploid cells only in the absence of antirecombinase Srs2 function and are more extensive in diploid cells, which become sensitive to a range of DNA-damaging agents, including hydroxyurea, methyl methanesulfonate, bleomycin, and UV. During meiosis, expression of nondegradable Rhp54 inhibits interhomolog recombination and stimulates sister chromatid recombination. We thus propose that it is critical to control levels of Rhp54 in G1 to suppress HR repair of double-strand breaks and during meiosis to coordinate interhomolog recombination.

  19. Drosophila Wee1 kinase rescues fission yeast from mitotic catastrophe and phosphorylates Drosophila Cdc2 in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, S D; Sprenger, F; Edgar, B A; O'Farrell, P H

    1995-01-01

    Cdc2 kinase activity is required for triggering entry into mitosis in all known eukaryotes. Elaborate mechanisms have evolved for regulating Cdc2 activity so that mitosis occurs in a timely manner, when preparations for its execution are complete. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Wee1 and a related Mik1 kinase are Cdc2-inhibitory kinases that are required for preventing premature activation of the mitotic program. To identify Cdc2-inhibitory kinases in Drosophila, we screened for cDNA clones that rescue S. pombe wee1- mik1- mutants from lethal mitotic catastrophe. One of the genes identified in this screen, Drosophila wee1 (Dwee1), encodes a new Wee1 homologue. Dwee1 kinase is closely related to human and Xenopus Wee1 homologues, and can inhibit Cdc2 activity by phosphorylating a critical tyrosine residue. Dwee1 mRNA is maternally provided to embryos, and is zygotically expressed during the postblastoderm divisions of embryogenesis. Expression remains high in the proliferating cells of the central nervous system well after cells in the rest of the embryo have ceased dividing. The loss of zygotically expressed Dwee1 does not lead to mitotic catastrophe during postblastoderm cycles 14 to 16. This result may indicate that maternally provided Dwee1 is sufficient for regulating Cdc2 during embryogenesis, or it may reflect the presence of a redundant Cdc2 inhibitory kinase, as in fission yeast. Images PMID:8573790

  20. TORC1 signaling inhibition by rapamycin and caffeine affect lifespan, global gene expression, and cell proliferation of fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Rallis, Charalampos; Codlin, Sandra; Bähler, Jürg

    2013-08-01

    Target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) is implicated in growth control and aging from yeast to humans. Fission yeast is emerging as a popular model organism to study TOR signaling, although rapamycin has been thought to not affect cell growth in this organism. Here, we analyzed the effects of rapamycin and caffeine, singly and combined, on multiple cellular processes in fission yeast. The two drugs led to diverse and specific phenotypes that depended on TORC1 inhibition, including prolonged chronological lifespan, inhibition of global translation, inhibition of cell growth and division, and reprograming of global gene expression mimicking nitrogen starvation. Rapamycin and caffeine differentially affected these various TORC1-dependent processes. Combined drug treatment augmented most phenotypes and effectively blocked cell growth. Rapamycin showed a much more subtle effect on global translation than did caffeine, while both drugs were effective in prolonging chronological lifespan. Rapamycin and caffeine did not affect the lifespan via the pH of the growth media. Rapamycin prolonged the lifespan of nongrowing cells only when applied during the growth phase but not when applied after cells had stopped proliferation. The doses of rapamycin and caffeine strongly correlated with growth inhibition and with lifespan extension. This comprehensive analysis will inform future studies into TORC1 function and cellular aging in fission yeast and beyond.

  1. Recent advances in yeast molecular biology: recombinant DNA. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 25 papers presented at a workshop focusing on chromosomal structure, gene regulation, recombination, DNA repair, and cell type control, that have been obtained by experimental approaches incorporating the new technologies of yeast DNA transformation, molecular cloning, and DNA sequence analysis. (KRM)

  2. The small GTPase Rab5 homologue Ypt5 regulates cell morphology, sexual development, ion-stress response and vacuolar formation in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukamoto, Yuta; Katayama, Chisako; Shinohara, Miki; Shinohara, Akira; Maekawa, Shohei; Miyamoto, Masaaki

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Multiple functions of Rab5 GTPase in fission yeast were found. •Roles of Rab5 in fission yeast were discussed. •Relation between Rab5 and actin cytoskeleton were discussed. -- Abstract: Inner-membrane transport is critical to cell function. Rab family GTPases play an important role in vesicle transport. In mammalian cells, Rab5 is reported to be involved in the regulation of endosome formation, phagocytosis and chromosome alignment. Here, we examined the role of the fission yeast Rab5 homologue Ypt5 using a point mutant allele. Mutant cells displayed abnormal cell morphology, mating, sporulation, endocytosis, vacuole fusion and responses to ion stress. Our data strongly suggest that fission yeast Rab5 is involved in the regulation of various types of cellular functions.

  3. Acetylated Histone H3K9 is associated with meiotic recombination hotspots, and plays a role in recombination redundantly with other factors including the H3K4 methylase Set1 in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shintaro; Ohta, Kunihiro; Yamada, Takatomi

    2013-04-01

    Histone modifications are associated with meiotic recombination hotspots, discrete sites with augmented recombination frequency. For example, trimethylation of histone H3 lysine4 (H3K4me3) marks most hotspots in budding yeast and mouse. Modified histones are known to regulate meiotic recombination partly by promoting DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation at hotspots, but the role and precise landscape of involved modifications remain unclear. Here, we studied hotspot-associated modifications in fission yeast and found general features: acetylation of H3 lysine9 (H3K9ac) is elevated, and H3K4me3 is not significantly enriched. Mutating H3K9 to non-acetylatable alanine mildly reduced levels of the DSB-inducing protein Rec12 (the fission yeast homologue of Spo11) and DSB at hotspots, indicating that H3K9ac may be involved in DSB formation by enhancing the interaction between Rec12 and hotspots. In addition, we found that the lack of the H3K4 methyltransferase Set1 generally increased Rec12 binding to chromatin but partially reduced DSB formation at some loci, suggesting that Set1 is also involved in DSB formation. These results suggest that meiotic DSB formation is redundantly regulated by multiple chromatin-related factors including H3K9ac and Set1 in fission yeast.

  4. Acetylated Histone H3K9 is associated with meiotic recombination hotspots, and plays a role in recombination redundantly with other factors including the H3K4 methylase Set1 in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Shintaro; Ohta, Kunihiro; Yamada, Takatomi

    2013-01-01

    Histone modifications are associated with meiotic recombination hotspots, discrete sites with augmented recombination frequency. For example, trimethylation of histone H3 lysine4 (H3K4me3) marks most hotspots in budding yeast and mouse. Modified histones are known to regulate meiotic recombination partly by promoting DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation at hotspots, but the role and precise landscape of involved modifications remain unclear. Here, we studied hotspot-associated modifications in fission yeast and found general features: acetylation of H3 lysine9 (H3K9ac) is elevated, and H3K4me3 is not significantly enriched. Mutating H3K9 to non-acetylatable alanine mildly reduced levels of the DSB-inducing protein Rec12 (the fission yeast homologue of Spo11) and DSB at hotspots, indicating that H3K9ac may be involved in DSB formation by enhancing the interaction between Rec12 and hotspots. In addition, we found that the lack of the H3K4 methyltransferase Set1 generally increased Rec12 binding to chromatin but partially reduced DSB formation at some loci, suggesting that Set1 is also involved in DSB formation. These results suggest that meiotic DSB formation is redundantly regulated by multiple chromatin-related factors including H3K9ac and Set1 in fission yeast. PMID:23382177

  5. Heavy metal tolerance in the fission yeast requires an ATP-binding cassette-type vacuolar membrane transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, D F; Kreppel, L; Speiser, D M; Scheel, G; McDonald, G; Ow, D W

    1992-01-01

    In response to heavy metal stress, plants and certain fungi, such as the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, synthesize small metal-binding peptides known as phytochelatins. We have identified a cadmium sensitive S. pombe mutant deficient in the accumulation of a sulfide-containing phytochelatin-cadmium complex, and have isolated the gene, designated hmt1, that complements this mutant. The deduced protein sequence of the hmt1 gene product shares sequence identity with the family of ABC (ATP-binding cassette)-type transport proteins which includes the mammalian P-glycoproteins and CFTR, suggesting that the encoded product is an integral membrane protein. Analysis of fractionated fission yeast cell components indicates that the HMT1 polypeptide is associated with the vacuolar membrane. Additionally, fission yeast strains harboring an hmt1-expressing multicopy plasmid exhibit enhanced metal tolerance along with a higher intracellular level of cadmium, implying a relationship between HMT1 mediated transport and compartmentalization of heavy metals. This suggests that tissue-specific overproduction of a functional hmt1 product in transgenic plants might be a means to alter the tissue localization of these elements, such as for sequestering heavy metals away from consumable parts of crop plants. Images PMID:1396551

  6. Chimera proteins with affinity for membranes and microtubule tips polarize in the membrane of fission yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Recouvreux, Pierre; Sokolowski, Thomas R; Grammoustianou, Aristea; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Dogterom, Marileen

    2016-02-16

    Cell polarity refers to a functional spatial organization of proteins that is crucial for the control of essential cellular processes such as growth and division. To establish polarity, cells rely on elaborate regulation networks that control the distribution of proteins at the cell membrane. In fission yeast cells, a microtubule-dependent network has been identified that polarizes the distribution of signaling proteins that restricts growth to cell ends and targets the cytokinetic machinery to the middle of the cell. Although many molecular components have been shown to play a role in this network, it remains unknown which molecular functionalities are minimally required to establish a polarized protein distribution in this system. Here we show that a membrane-binding protein fragment, which distributes homogeneously in wild-type fission yeast cells, can be made to concentrate at cell ends by attaching it to a cytoplasmic microtubule end-binding protein. This concentration results in a polarized pattern of chimera proteins with a spatial extension that is very reminiscent of natural polarity patterns in fission yeast. However, chimera levels fluctuate in response to microtubule dynamics, and disruption of microtubules leads to disappearance of the pattern. Numerical simulations confirm that the combined functionality of membrane anchoring and microtubule tip affinity is in principle sufficient to create polarized patterns. Our chimera protein may thus represent a simple molecular functionality that is able to polarize the membrane, onto which additional layers of molecular complexity may be built to provide the temporal robustness that is typical of natural polarity patterns.

  7. Fission Yeast Receptor of Activated C Kinase (RACK1) Ortholog Cpc2 Regulates Mitotic Commitment through Wee1 Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Núñez, Andrés; Franco, Alejandro; Soto, Teresa; Vicente, Jero; Gacto, Mariano; Cansado, José

    2010-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Wee1-dependent inhibitory phosphorylation of the highly conserved Cdc2/Cdk1 kinase determines the mitotic onset when cells have reached a defined size. The receptor of activated C kinase (RACK1) is a scaffolding protein strongly conserved among eukaryotes which binds to other proteins to regulate multiple processes in mammalian cells, including the modulation of cell cycle progression during G1/S transition. We have recently described that Cpc2, the fission yeast ortholog to RACK1, controls from the ribosome the activation of MAPK cascades and the cellular defense against oxidative stress by positively regulating the translation of specific genes whose products participate in the above processes. Intriguingly, mutants lacking Cpc2 display an increased cell size at division, suggesting the existence of a specific cell cycle defect at the G2/M transition. In this work we show that protein levels of Wee1 mitotic inhibitor are increased in cells devoid of Cpc2, whereas the levels of Cdr2, a Wee1 inhibitor, are down-regulated in the above mutant. On the contrary, the kinetics of G1/S transition was virtually identical both in control and Cpc2-less strains. Thus, our results suggest that in fission yeast Cpc2/RACK1 positively regulates from the ribosome the mitotic onset by modulating both the protein levels and the activity of Wee1. This novel mechanism of translational control of cell cycle progression might be conserved in higher eukaryotes. PMID:20974849

  8. Degradation of HMG-CoA reductase-induced membranes in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Elevated levels of certain membrane proteins, including the sterol biosynthetic enzyme HMG-CoA reductase, induce proliferation of the endoplasmic reticulum. When the amounts of these proteins return to basal levels, the proliferated membranes are degraded, but the molecular details of this degradation remain unknown. We have examined the degradation of HMG-CoA reductase-induced membranes in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In this yeast, increased levels of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HMG-CoA reductase isozyme encoded by HMG1 induced several types of membranes, including karmellae, which formed a cap of stacked membranes that partially surrounded the nucleus. When expression of HMG1 was repressed, the karmellae detached from the nucleus and formed concentric, multilayered membrane whorls that were then degraded. During the degradation process, CDCFDA-stained compartments distinct from preexisting vacuoles formed within the interior of the whorls. In addition to these compartments, particles that contained neutral lipids also formed within the whorl. As the thickness of the whorl decreased, the lipid particle became larger. When degradation was complete, only the lipid particle remained. Cycloheximide treatment did not prevent the formation of whorls. Thus, new protein synthesis was not needed for the initial stages of karmellae degradation. On the contrary, cycloheximide promoted the detachment of karmellae to form whorls, suggesting that a short lived protein may be involved in maintaining karmellae integrity. Taken together, these results demonstrate that karmellae membranes differentiated into self-degradative organelles. This process may be a common pathway by which ER membranes are turned over in cells. PMID:7559789

  9. Mitochondrial localization of fission yeast manganese superoxide dismutase is required for its lysine acetylation and for cellular stress resistance and respiratory growth

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hidekazu; Shirai, Atsuko; Matsuyama, Akihisa; Yoshida, Minoru

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Fission yeast manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is acetylated. {yields} The mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS) is required for the acetylation of MnSOD. {yields} The MTS is not crucial for MnSOD activity, but is important for respiratory growth. {yields} Posttranslational regulation of MnSOD differs between budding and fission yeast. -- Abstract: Manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is localized in the mitochondria and is important for oxidative stress resistance. Although transcriptional regulation of MnSOD has been relatively well studied, much less is known about the protein's posttranslational regulation. In budding yeast, MnSOD is activated after mitochondrial import by manganese ion incorporation. Here we characterize posttranslational modification of MnSOD in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Fission yeast MnSOD is acetylated at the 25th lysine residue. This acetylation was diminished by deletion of N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence, suggesting that MnSOD is acetylated after import into mitochondria. Mitochondrial localization of MnSOD is not essential for the enzyme activity, but is crucial for oxidative stress resistance and growth under respiratory conditions of fission yeast. These results suggest that, unlike the situation in budding yeast, S. pombe MnSOD is already active even before mitochondrial localization; nonetheless, mitochondrial localization is critical to allow the cell to cope with reactive oxygen species generated inside or outside of mitochondria.

  10. Kinesin-8 effects on mitotic microtubule dynamics contribute to spindle function in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Gergely, Zachary R.; Crapo, Ammon; Hough, Loren E.; McIntosh, J. Richard; Betterton, Meredith D.

    2016-01-01

    Kinesin-8 motor proteins destabilize microtubules. Their absence during cell division is associated with disorganized mitotic chromosome movements and chromosome loss. Despite recent work studying effects of kinesin-8s on microtubule dynamics, it remains unclear whether the kinesin-8 mitotic phenotypes are consequences of their effect on microtubule dynamics, their well-established motor activity, or additional, unknown functions. To better understand the role of kinesin-8 proteins in mitosis, we studied the effects of deletion of the fission yeast kinesin-8 proteins Klp5 and Klp6 on chromosome movements and spindle length dynamics. Aberrant microtubule-driven kinetochore pushing movements and tripolar mitotic spindles occurred in cells lacking Klp5 but not Klp6. Kinesin-8–deletion strains showed large fluctuations in metaphase spindle length, suggesting a disruption of spindle length stabilization. Comparison of our results from light microscopy with a mathematical model suggests that kinesin-8–induced effects on microtubule dynamics, kinetochore attachment stability, and sliding force in the spindle can explain the aberrant chromosome movements and spindle length fluctuations seen. PMID:27146110

  11. Cellular economy in fission yeast cells continuously cultured with limited nitrogen resources

    PubMed Central

    Chikashige, Yuji; Arakawa, Shin'ichi; Leibnitz, Kenji; Tsutsumi, Chihiro; Mori, Chie; Osakada, Hiroko; Murata, Masayuki; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    In ribosome biogenesis, a large fraction of ribosomes is used for producing ribosomal proteins themselves. Here, we applied simulation and experimentation to determine what fraction of ribosomes should be allocated for the synthesis of ribosomal proteins to optimize cellular economy for growth. We define the “r-fraction” as the fraction of mRNA of the ribosomal protein genes out of the total mRNA, and we simulated the effect of the r-fraction on the number of ribosomes. We then empirically measured the amount of protein and RNA in fission yeast cells cultured with high and low nitrogen sources. In the cells cultured with a low nitrogen source, the r-fraction decreased from 0.46 to 0.42 with a 40% reduction of rRNA, but the reduction of the total protein was smaller at 30%. These results indicate that the r-fraction is internally controlled to optimize the efficiency of protein synthesis at a limited cellular cost. PMID:26486373

  12. Ultrastructure and behavior of actin cytoskeleton during cell wall formation in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Tomoko; Ishijima, Sanae A; Ochi, Hisako; Osumi, Masako

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy has shown that F-actin of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe forms patch, cable and ring structures. To study the relationship between cell wall formation and the actin cytoskeleton, the process of cell wall regeneration from the protoplast was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), immunoelectron microscopy (IEM) and three-dimensional reconstruction analysis. During cell wall regeneration from the protoplast, localization of F-actin patches was similar to that of the newly synthesized cell wall materials, as shown by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). In serial sectioned TEM images, filasomes were spherical, 100-300 nm in diameter and consisted of a single microvesicle (35-70 nm diameter) surrounded by fine filaments. Filasomes were adjacent to the newly formed glucan fibrils in single, cluster or rosary forms. By IEM analysis, we found that colloidal gold particles indicating actin molecules were present in the filamentous area of filasomes. Three-dimensional reconstruction images of serial sections clarified that the distribution of filasomes corresponded to the distribution of F-actin patches revealed by CLSM. Thus, a filasome is one of the F-actin patch structures appearing in the cytoplasm at the site of the initial formation of the cell wall and it may play an important role in this action.

  13. Multiple crosstalk between TOR and the cell integrity MAPK signaling pathway in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Madrid, Marisa; Vázquez-Marín, Beatriz; Franco, Alejandro; Soto, Teresa; Vicente-Soler, Jero; Gacto, Mariano; Cansado, José

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the highly conserved Target of Rapamycin (TOR) and the Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways elicit adaptive responses to extra- and intracellular conditions by regulating essential cellular functions. However, the nature of the functional relationships between both pathways is not fully understood. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe the cell integrity MAPK pathway (CIP) regulates morphogenesis, cell wall structure and ionic homeostasis. We show that the Rab GTPase Ryh1, a TORC2 complex activator, cross-activates the CIP and its core member, the MAPK Pmk1, by two distinct mechanisms. The first one involves TORC2 and its downstream effector, Akt ortholog Gad8, which together with TORC1 target Psk1 increase protein levels of the PKC ortholog Pck2 during cell wall stress or glucose starvation. Also, Ryh1 activates Pmk1 in a TORC2-independent fashion by prompting plasma membrane trafficking and stabilization of upstream activators of the MAPK cascade, including PDK ortholog Ksg1 or Rho1 GEF Rgf1. Besides, stress-activated Pmk1 cross-inhibits Ryh1 signaling by decreasing the GTPase activation cycle, and this ensures cell growth during alterations in phosphoinositide metabolism. Our results reveal a highly intricate cross-regulatory relationship between both pathways that warrants adequate cell adaptation and survival in response to environmental changes. PMID:27876895

  14. Wall mechanics and exocytosis define the shape of growth domains in fission yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abenza, Juan F.; Couturier, Etienne; Dodgson, James; Dickmann, Johanna; Chessel, Anatole; Dumais, Jacques; Salas, Rafael E. Carazo

    2015-10-01

    The amazing structural variety of cells is matched only by their functional diversity, and reflects the complex interplay between biochemical and mechanical regulation. How both regulatory layers generate specifically shaped cellular domains is not fully understood. Here, we report how cell growth domains are shaped in fission yeast. Based on quantitative analysis of cell wall expansion and elasticity, we develop a model for how mechanics and cell wall assembly interact and use it to look for factors underpinning growth domain morphogenesis. Surprisingly, we find that neither the global cell shape regulators Cdc42-Scd1-Scd2 nor the major cell wall synthesis regulators Bgs1-Bgs4-Rgf1 are reliable predictors of growth domain geometry. Instead, their geometry can be defined by cell wall mechanics and the cortical localization pattern of the exocytic factors Sec6-Syb1-Exo70. Forceful re-directioning of exocytic vesicle fusion to broader cortical areas induces proportional shape changes to growth domains, demonstrating that both features are causally linked.

  15. Lipid Droplets Form from Distinct Regions of the Cell in the Fission Yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Alex; Del Rio, Zuania P; Beaver, Rachael A; Morris, Ryan M; Weiskittel, Taylor M; Alshibli, Amany K; Mannik, Jaana; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer; Dalhaimer, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Eukaryotic cells store cholesterol/sterol esters (SEs) and triacylglycerols (TAGs) in lipid droplets, which form from the contiguous endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network. However, it is not known if droplets preferentially form from certain regions of the ER over others. Here, we used fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells where the nuclear and cortical/peripheral ER domains are distinguishable by light microscopy to show that SE-enriched lipid droplets form away from the nucleus at the cell tips, whereas TAG-enriched lipid droplets form around the nucleus. Sterols localize to the regions of the cells where droplets enriched in SEs are observed. TAG droplet formation around the nucleus appears to be a strong function of diacylglycerol (DAG) homeostasis with Cpt1p, which coverts DAG into phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine localized exclusively to the nuclear ER. Also, Dgk1p, which converts DAG into phosphatidic acid localized strongly to the nuclear ER over the cortical/peripheral ER. We also show that TAG more readily translocates from the ER to lipid droplets than do SEs. The results augment the standard lipid droplet formation model, which has SEs and TAGs flowing into the same nascent lipid droplet regardless of its biogenesis point in the cell.

  16. Nuclear envelope attachment is not necessary for telomere function in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Chikashige, Yuji; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2010-01-01

    Inner nuclear membrane (INM) proteins can be important for positioning chromosomes within the nucleus. Little is known about INM proteins in the fission yeast Schizossacharomayces pombe. Telomeres are the most obvious chromosomal sites that are anchored to the nuclear envelope in this organism. A group of proteins that tether telomeres to the spindle-pole body (SPB) during meiotic prophase, such as Bqt1, Bqt2 and Sad1, has been identified previously, but proteins for anchoring telomeres to the nuclear envelope in vegetative cells have not been identified until recently. A recent report demonstrates that Bqt3 and Bqt4 are INM proteins that affect nuclear positioning of telomeres in vegetative cells, and consequently affect the telomere clustering in meiotic prophase. Interestingly, in the absence of Bqt4, telomeres are separated from the nuclear envelope but telomere silencing and telomere length are properly regulated. An important implication of these results is that the functional integrity of telomeres is maintained independently of their connection to the nuclear envelope.

  17. Biological significance of nuclear localization of mitogen-activated protein kinase Pmk1 in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Mir, Laura; Franco, Alejandro; Madrid, Marisa; Vicente-Soler, Jero; Villar-Tajadura, M Antonia; Soto, Teresa; Pérez, Pilar; Gacto, Mariano; Cansado, José

    2012-07-27

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways play a fundamental role in the response of eukaryotic cells to environmental changes. Also, much evidence shows that the stimulus-dependent nuclear targeting of this class of regulatory kinases is crucial for adequate regulation of distinct cellular events. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the cell integrity MAPK pathway, whose central element is the MAPK Pmk1, regulates multiple processes such as cell wall integrity, vacuole fusion, cytokinesis, and ionic homeostasis. In non-stressed cells Pmk1 is constitutively localized in both cytoplasm and nucleus, and its localization pattern appears unaffected by its activation status or in response to stress, thus questioning the biological significance of the presence of this MAPK into the nucleus. We have addressed this issue by characterizing mutants expressing Pmk1 versions excluded from the cell nucleus and anchored to the plasma membrane in different genetic backgrounds. Although nuclear Pmk1 partially regulates cell wall integrity at a transcriptional level, membrane-tethered Pmk1 performs many of the biological functions assigned to wild type MAPK like regulation of chloride homeostasis, vacuole fusion, and cellular separation. However, we found that down-regulation of nuclear Pmk1 by MAPK phosphatases induced by the stress activated protein kinase pathway is important for the fine modulation of extranuclear Pmk1 activity. These results highlight the importance of the control of MAPK activity at subcellular level.

  18. Fission yeast Vps1 and Atg8 contribute to oxidative stress resistance.

    PubMed

    Mikawa, Takumi; Kanoh, Junko; Ishikawa, Fuyuki

    2010-03-01

    Organisms have evolved diverse means to protect themselves from oxidative stress. To better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in oxidative stress resistance, we screened fission yeast mutants sensitive to paraquat, a reagent acting on the mitochondria to generate reactive oxygen species. Among the mutants we isolated, we focused on a mutant defective in the vps1(+) (vacuolar protein sorting 1) gene that encodes a dynamin-related protein family member. vps1Δ exhibited aberrant mitochondrial and vacuolar morphology on treatment with paraquat. vps1Δ was sensitive to osmotic stress, high concentrations of Ca(2+) and Fe(2+). Interestingly, the deletion of atg8(+), a gene essential for the autophagy pathway, exhibited strong genetic interactions with vps1Δ. The vps1Δatg8Δ double mutant was additively sensitive to oxidative stress, osmotic stress and Ca(2+). The deletion of vps1(+) rescued the bizarre vacuolar morphology shown by atg8Δ. Such genetic interactions were not observed with other atg mutants. Furthermore, the atg8-G116A mutant did not show abnormal vacuolar morphology while being sensitive to nitrogen starvation, an autophagy-related phenotype. Taken together, we conclude that atg8(+) regulates vacuolar functions independently of its role in autophagy. We propose that Vps1 and Atg8 cooperatively participate in vacuolar function, thereby contributing to oxidative stress resistance.

  19. Shape and Size of the Fission Yeast Nucleus are governed by Equilibrium Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Gerald; Huber, Greg; Miller, Jonathan; Sazer, Shelley

    2006-03-01

    Nuclear morphogenesis in the asexual reproduction of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast) consists of two stages: (i) volume-doubling growth, in which a round nucleus inflates uniformly, and (ii) division, in which the nucleus undergoes shape changes from round to oblong to peanut to dumbbell before it resolves into two smaller, round daughter nuclei, driven by the formation and elongation of a microtubule-based spindle within the nucleus. The combined volume of the daughter nuclei immediately after division is the same as the volume of the single nucleus at the onset of division. Consequently, the nuclear envelope (NE) area must increase by 26% during division. We are developing a model in order to determine the mechanics governing these shape and size changes. It is based on current knowledge of the nuclear structure, insight from normal and abnormal nuclei, and concepts from the mechanics governing lipid-bilayer membranes. We predict that (a) the NE prefers to be flat, (b) the NE is under tension, (c) the nucleus has an internal pressure, (d) nuclear growth is governed by the Law of Laplace, and (e) some abnormal nuclei behave like vesicles with encapsulated microtubules.

  20. Nup132 modulates meiotic spindle attachment in fission yeast by regulating kinetochore assembly

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hui-Ju; Asakawa, Haruhiko; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2015-01-01

    During meiosis, the kinetochore undergoes substantial reorganization to establish monopolar spindle attachment. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the KNL1–Spc7-Mis12-Nuf2 (KMN) complex, which constitutes the outer kinetochore, is disassembled during meiotic prophase and is reassembled before meiosis I. Here, we show that the nucleoporin Nup132 is required for timely assembly of the KMN proteins: In the absence of Nup132, Mis12 and Spc7 are precociously assembled at the centromeres during meiotic prophase. In contrast, Nuf2 shows timely dissociation and reappearance at the meiotic centromeres. We further demonstrate that depletion of Nup132 activates the spindle assembly checkpoint in meiosis I, possibly because of the increased incidence of erroneous spindle attachment at sister chromatids. These results suggest that precocious assembly of the kinetochores leads to the meiosis I defects observed in the nup132-disrupted mutant. Thus, we propose that Nup132 plays an important role in establishing monopolar spindle attachment at meiosis I through outer kinetochore reorganization at meiotic prophase. PMID:26483559

  1. Synchronized fission yeast meiosis using an ATP analog-sensitive Pat1 protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Cipak, Lubos; Polakova, Silvia; Hyppa, Randy W; Smith, Gerald R; Gregan, Juraj

    2014-01-01

    Synchronous cultures are often indispensable for studying meiosis. Here we present an optimized protocol for induction of synchronous meiosis in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Chemical inactivation of an ATP analog-sensitive form of the Pat1 kinase (pat1-as2) by adding the ATP analog 1-NM-PP1 in G1-arrested cells allows the induction of synchronous meiosis at optimal temperature (25°C). Importantly, this protocol eliminates detrimental effects of elevated temperature (34°C), which is required to inactivate the commonly used temperature-sensitive Pat1 kinase mutant (pat1-114). The addition of the mat-Pc gene to a mat1-M strain further improves chromosome segregation and spore viability. Thus, our protocol offers highly synchronous meiosis at optimal temperature, with most characteristics similar to those of wild-type meiosis. The synchronization protocol can be completed in 5 d (not including strain production, which may take as long as 2 or 3 months).

  2. Dynamic transition of transcription and chromatin landscape during fission yeast adaptation to glucose starvation.

    PubMed

    Oda, Arisa; Takemata, Naomichi; Hirata, Yoshito; Miyoshi, Tomoichiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2015-05-01

    Shortage of glucose, the primary energy source for all organisms, is one of the most critical stresses influencing cell viability. Glucose starvation promptly induces changes in mRNA and noncoding RNA (ncRNA) transcription. We previously reported that glucose starvation induces long ncRNA (lncRNA) transcription in the 5' segment of a fission yeast gluconeogenesis gene (fbp1+), which leads to stepwise chromatin alteration around the fbp1+ promoter and to subsequent robust gene activation. Here, we analyzed genomewide transcription by strand-specific RNA sequencing, together with chromatin landscape by immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq). Clustering analysis showed that distinct mRNAs and ncRNAs are induced at the early, middle and later stages of cellular response to glucose starvation. The starvation-induced transcription depends substantially on the stress-responsive transcription factor Atf1. Using a new computer program that examines dynamic changes in expression patterns, we identified ncRNAs with similar behavior to the fbp1+ lncRNA. We confirmed that there are continuous lncRNAs associated with local reduction of histone density. Overlapping with the regions for transcription of these lncRNAs, antisense RNAs are antagonistically transcribed under glucose-rich conditions. These results suggest that Atf1-dependent integrated networks of mRNA and lncRNA govern drastic changes in cell physiology in response to glucose starvation.

  3. Genome rearrangements and pervasive meiotic drive cause hybrid infertility in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Zanders, Sarah E; Eickbush, Michael T; Yu, Jonathan S; Kang, Ji-Won; Fowler, Kyle R; Smith, Gerald R; Malik, Harmit Singh

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid sterility is one of the earliest postzygotic isolating mechanisms to evolve between two recently diverged species. Here we identify causes underlying hybrid infertility of two recently diverged fission yeast species Schizosaccharomyces pombe and S. kambucha, which mate to form viable hybrid diploids that efficiently complete meiosis, but generate few viable gametes. We find that chromosomal rearrangements and related recombination defects are major but not sole causes of hybrid infertility. At least three distinct meiotic drive alleles, one on each S. kambucha chromosome, independently contribute to hybrid infertility by causing nonrandom spore death. Two of these driving loci are linked by a chromosomal translocation and thus constitute a novel type of paired meiotic drive complex. Our study reveals how quickly multiple barriers to fertility can arise. In addition, it provides further support for models in which genetic conflicts, such as those caused by meiotic drive alleles, can drive speciation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02630.001 PMID:24963140

  4. Minishelterins separate telomere length regulation and end protection in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lili; Hildebrand, Katie; Stutz, Cian; Thomä, Nicolas; Baumann, Peter

    2015-06-01

    The conserved shelterin complex is critical for chromosome capping and maintaining telomere length homeostasis. In fission yeast, shelterin is comprised of five proteins. Taz1, Rap1, and Poz1 function as negative regulators of telomere elongation, whereas Pot1 and Tpz1 are critical for end capping and telomerase recruitment. How the five proteins work together to safeguard chromosome ends and promote telomere length homeostasis is a matter of great interest. Using a combination of deletions, fusions, and tethers, we define key elements of shelterin important for telomere length regulation. Surprisingly, deletion of the entire Rap1 and Poz1 proteins does not impair telomere length regulation as long as a static bridge is provided between Taz1 and Tpz1. Cells harboring minishelterin display wild-type telomere length and intact subtelomeric silencing. However, protection against end fusions in G1 is compromised in the absence of Rap1. Our data reveal a remarkable plasticity in shelterin architecture and separate functions in length regulation and end protection.

  5. Two Portable Recombination Enhancers Direct Donor Choice in Fission Yeast Heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Jakočiūnas, Tadas; Holm, Lærke Rebekka; Verhein-Hansen, Janne; Trusina, Ala; Thon, Geneviève

    2013-01-01

    Mating-type switching in fission yeast results from gene conversions of the active mat1 locus by heterochromatic donors. mat1 is preferentially converted by mat2-P in M cells and by mat3-M in P cells. Here, we report that donor choice is governed by two portable recombination enhancers capable of promoting use of their adjacent cassette even when they are transposed to an ectopic location within the mat2-mat3 heterochromatic domain. Cells whose silent cassettes are swapped to mat2-M mat3-P switch mating-type poorly due to a defect in directionality but cells whose recombination enhancers were transposed together with the cassette contents switched like wild type. Trans-acting mutations that impair directionality affected the wild-type and swapped cassettes in identical ways when the recombination enhancers were transposed together with their cognate cassette, showing essential regulatory steps occur through the recombination enhancers. Our observations lead to a model where heterochromatin biases competitions between the two recombination enhancers to achieve directionality. PMID:24204285

  6. A single-headed fission yeast myosin V transports actin in a tropomyosin-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qing; Krementsova, Elena B.; Bookwalter, Carol S.; Lord, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Myo51, a class V myosin in fission yeast, localizes to and assists in the assembly of the contractile ring, a conserved eukaryotic actomyosin structure that facilitates cytokinesis. Rng8 and Rng9 are binding partners that dictate the cellular localization and function of Myo51. Myo51 was expressed in insect cells in the presence or absence of Rng8/9. Surprisingly, electron microscopy of negatively stained images and hydrodynamic measurements showed that Myo51 is single headed, unlike most class V myosins. When Myo51–Rng8/9 was bound to actin-tropomyosin, two attachment sites were observed: the typical ATP-dependent motor domain attachment and a novel ATP-independent binding of the tail mediated by Rng8/9. A modified motility assay showed that this additional binding site anchors Myo51–Rng8/9 so that it can cross-link and slide actin-tropomyosin filaments relative to one another, functions that may explain the role of this motor in contractile ring assembly. PMID:27432898

  7. Biological Significance of Nuclear Localization of Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Pmk1 in Fission Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Mir, Laura; Franco, Alejandro; Madrid, Marisa; Vicente-Soler, Jero; Villar-Tajadura, M. Antonia; Soto, Teresa; Pérez, Pilar; Gacto, Mariano; Cansado, José

    2012-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways play a fundamental role in the response of eukaryotic cells to environmental changes. Also, much evidence shows that the stimulus-dependent nuclear targeting of this class of regulatory kinases is crucial for adequate regulation of distinct cellular events. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the cell integrity MAPK pathway, whose central element is the MAPK Pmk1, regulates multiple processes such as cell wall integrity, vacuole fusion, cytokinesis, and ionic homeostasis. In non-stressed cells Pmk1 is constitutively localized in both cytoplasm and nucleus, and its localization pattern appears unaffected by its activation status or in response to stress, thus questioning the biological significance of the presence of this MAPK into the nucleus. We have addressed this issue by characterizing mutants expressing Pmk1 versions excluded from the cell nucleus and anchored to the plasma membrane in different genetic backgrounds. Although nuclear Pmk1 partially regulates cell wall integrity at a transcriptional level, membrane-tethered Pmk1 performs many of the biological functions assigned to wild type MAPK like regulation of chloride homeostasis, vacuole fusion, and cellular separation. However, we found that down-regulation of nuclear Pmk1 by MAPK phosphatases induced by the stress activated protein kinase pathway is important for the fine modulation of extranuclear Pmk1 activity. These results highlight the importance of the control of MAPK activity at subcellular level. PMID:22685296

  8. Lipid droplets form from distinct regions of the cell in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    DOE PAGES

    Meyers, Alex; del Rio, Zuania P.; Beaver, Rachael A.; ...

    2016-04-29

    Eukaryotic cells store cholesterol/sterol esters (SEs) and triacylglycerols (TAGs) in lipid droplets, which form from the contiguous endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network. However, it is not known if droplets preferentially form from certain regions of the ER over others. Here, we used fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells where the nuclear and cortical/peripheral ER domains are distinguishable by light microscopy to show that SE-enriched lipid droplets form away from the nucleus at the cell tips, whereas TAG-enriched lipid droplets form around the nucleus. Sterols localize to the regions of the cells where droplets enriched in SEs are observed. TAG droplet formation aroundmore » the nucleus appears to be a strong function of diacylglycerol (DAG) homeostasis with Cpt1p, which coverts DAG into phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine localized exclusively to the nuclear ER. Also, Dgk1p, which converts DAG into phosphatidic acid localized strongly to the nuclear ER over the cortical/peripheral ER. We also show that TAG more readily translocates from the ER to lipid droplets than do SEs. Lastly, the results augment the standard lipid droplet formation model, which has SEs and TAGs flowing into the same nascent lipid droplet regardless of its biogenesis point in the cell.« less

  9. Complex structure of the fission yeast SREBP-SCAP binding domains reveals an oligomeric organization

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xin; Qian, Hongwu; Shao, Wei; Li, Jingxian; Wu, Jianping; Liu, Jun-Jie; Li, Wenqi; Wang, Hong-Wei; Espenshade, Peter; Yan, Nieng

    2016-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors are master regulators of cellular lipid homeostasis in mammals and oxygen-responsive regulators of hypoxic adaptation in fungi. SREBP C-terminus binds to the WD40 domain of SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP), which confers sterol regulation by controlling the ER-to-Golgi transport of the SREBP-SCAP complex and access to the activating proteases in the Golgi. Here, we biochemically and structurally show that the carboxyl terminal domains (CTD) of Sre1 and Scp1, the fission yeast SREBP and SCAP, form a functional 4:4 oligomer and Sre1-CTD forms a dimer of dimers. The crystal structure of Sre1-CTD at 3.5 Å and cryo-EM structure of the complex at 5.4 Å together with in vitro biochemical evidence elucidate three distinct regions in Sre1-CTD required for Scp1 binding, Sre1-CTD dimerization and tetrameric formation. Finally, these structurally identified domains are validated in a cellular context, demonstrating that the proper 4:4 oligomeric complex formation is required for Sre1 activation. PMID:27811944

  10. High level constitutive expression of luciferase reporter by lsd90 promoter in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Verma, Hemant Kumar; Shukla, Poonam; Alfatah, Md; Khare, Asheesh Kumar; Upadhyay, Udita; Ganesan, Kaliannan; Singh, Jagmohan

    2014-01-01

    Because of a large number of molecular similarities with higher eukaryotes, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has been considered a potentially ideal host for expressing human proteins having therapeutic and pharmaceutical applications. However, efforts in this direction are hampered by lack of a strong promoter. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a strong, constitutive promoter from S. pombe. A new expression vector was constructed by cloning the putative promoter region of the lsd90 gene (earlier reported to be strongly induced by heat stress) into a previously reported high copy number vector pJH5, which contained an ARS element corresponding to the mat2P flanking region and a truncated URA3m selectable marker. The resulting vector was used to study and compare the level of expression of the luciferase reporter with that achieved with the known vectors containing regulatable promoter nmt1 and the strong constitutive promoter adh1 in S. pombe and the methanol-inducible AOX1 promoter in Pichia pastoris. Following growth in standard media the new vector containing the putative lsd90 promoter provided constitutive expression of luciferase, at a level, which was 19-, 39- and 10-fold higher than that achieved with nmt1, adh1 and AOX1 promoters, respectively. These results indicate a great potential of the new lsd90 promoter-based vector for commercial scale expression of therapeutic proteins in S. pombe.

  11. The contractile ring coordinates curvature-dependent septum assembly during fission yeast cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhou; Munteanu, Emilia Laura; He, Jun; Ursell, Tristan; Bathe, Mark; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Chang, Fred

    2015-01-01

    The functions of the actin-myosin–based contractile ring in cytokinesis remain to be elucidated. Recent findings show that in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cleavage furrow ingression is driven by polymerization of cell wall fibers outside the plasma membrane, not by the contractile ring. Here we show that one function of the ring is to spatially coordinate septum cell wall assembly. We develop an improved method for live-cell imaging of the division apparatus by orienting the rod-shaped cells vertically using microfabricated wells. We observe that the septum hole and ring are circular and centered in wild-type cells and that in the absence of a functional ring, the septum continues to ingress but in a disorganized and asymmetric manner. By manipulating the cleavage furrow into different shapes, we show that the ring promotes local septum growth in a curvature-dependent manner, allowing even a misshapen septum to grow into a more regular shape. This curvature-dependent growth suggests a model in which contractile forces of the ring shape the septum cell wall by stimulating the cell wall machinery in a mechanosensitive manner. Mechanical regulation of the cell wall assembly may have general relevance to the morphogenesis of walled cells. PMID:25355954

  12. In vivo direct patulin-induced fluidization of the plasma membrane of fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Eszter; Papp, Gábor; Belágyi, József; Gazdag, Zoltán; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Pesti, Miklós

    2010-07-01

    Patulin is a toxic metabolite produced by various species of Penicillium, Aspergillus and Byssochlamys. In the present study, its effects on the plasma membrane of fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe were investigated. The phase-transition temperature (G) of untreated cells, measured by electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometry proved to be 14.1 degrees C. Treatment of cells for 20 min with 50, 500, or 1000 microM patulin resulted in a decrease of the G value of the plasma membrane to 13.9, 10.1 or 8.7 degrees C, respectively. This change in the transition temperature was accompanied by the loss of compounds absorbing light at 260 nm. Treatment of cells with 50, 500 or 1000 microM patulin for 20 min induced the efflux of 25%, 30.5% or 34%, respectively, of these compounds. Besides its cytotoxic effects an adaptation process was observed. This is the first study to describe the direct interaction of patulin with the plasma membrane, a process which could definitely contribute to the adverse toxic effects induced by patulin.

  13. Wall mechanics and exocytosis define the shape of growth domains in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Abenza, Juan F; Couturier, Etienne; Dodgson, James; Dickmann, Johanna; Chessel, Anatole; Dumais, Jacques; Carazo Salas, Rafael E

    2015-10-12

    The amazing structural variety of cells is matched only by their functional diversity, and reflects the complex interplay between biochemical and mechanical regulation. How both regulatory layers generate specifically shaped cellular domains is not fully understood. Here, we report how cell growth domains are shaped in fission yeast. Based on quantitative analysis of cell wall expansion and elasticity, we develop a model for how mechanics and cell wall assembly interact and use it to look for factors underpinning growth domain morphogenesis. Surprisingly, we find that neither the global cell shape regulators Cdc42-Scd1-Scd2 nor the major cell wall synthesis regulators Bgs1-Bgs4-Rgf1 are reliable predictors of growth domain geometry. Instead, their geometry can be defined by cell wall mechanics and the cortical localization pattern of the exocytic factors Sec6-Syb1-Exo70. Forceful re-directioning of exocytic vesicle fusion to broader cortical areas induces proportional shape changes to growth domains, demonstrating that both features are causally linked.

  14. Role for RACK1 Orthologue Cpc2 in the Modulation of Stress Response in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Núñez, Andrés; Franco, Alejandro; Madrid, Marisa; Soto, Teresa; Vicente, Jero; Cansado, José

    2009-01-01

    The receptor of activated C kinase (RACK1) is a protein highly conserved among eukaryotes. In mammalian cells, RACK1 functions as an adaptor to favor protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated phosphorylation and subsequent activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase. Cpc2, the RACK1 orthologue in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, is involved in the control of G2/M transition and interacts with Pck2, a PKC-type protein member of the cell integrity Pmk1 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Both RACK1 and Cpc2 are structural components of the 40S ribosomal subunit, and recent data suggest that they might be involved in the control of translation. In this work, we present data supporting that Cpc2 negatively regulates the cell integrity transduction pathway by favoring translation of the tyrosine-phosphatases Pyp1 and Pyp2 that deactivate Pmk1. In addition, Cpc2 positively regulates the synthesis of the stress-responsive transcription factor Atf1 and the cytoplasmic catalase, a detoxificant enzyme induced by treatment with hydrogen peroxide. These results provide for the first time strong evidence that the RACK1-type Cpc2 protein controls from the ribosome the extent of the activation of MAPK cascades, the cellular defense against oxidative stress, and the progression of the cell cycle by regulating positively the translation of specific gene products involved in key biological processes. PMID:19625445

  15. Fission yeast Pot1 and RecQ helicase are required for efficient chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Katsunori; Imano, Ryota; Kibe, Tatsuya; Seimiya, Hiroyuki; Muramatsu, Yukiko; Kawabata, Naoki; Tanaka, Genki; Matsumoto, Yoshitake; Hiromoto, Taisuke; Koizumi, Yuka; Nakazawa, Norihiko; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro; Yukawa, Masashi; Tsuchiya, Eiko; Ueno, Masaru

    2011-02-01

    Pot1 is a single-stranded telomere-binding protein that is conserved from fission yeast to mammals. Deletion of Schizosaccharomyces pombe pot1(+) causes immediate telomere loss. S. pombe Rqh1 is a homolog of the human RecQ helicase WRN, which plays essential roles in the maintenance of genomic stability. Here, we demonstrate that a pot1Δ rqh1-hd (helicase-dead) double mutant maintains telomeres that are dependent on Rad51-mediated homologous recombination. Interestingly, the pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant displays a "cut" (cell untimely torn) phenotype and is sensitive to the antimicrotubule drug thiabendazole (TBZ). Moreover, the chromosome ends of the double mutant do not enter the pulsed-field electrophoresis gel. These results suggest that the entangled chromosome ends in the pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant inhibit chromosome segregation, signifying that Pot1 and Rqh1 are required for efficient chromosome segregation. We also found that POT1 knockdown, WRN-deficient human cells are sensitive to the antimicrotubule drug vinblastine, implying that some of the functions of S. pombe Pot1 and Rqh1 may be conserved in their respective human counterparts POT1 and WRN.

  16. Fission yeast RecQ helicase Rqh1 is required for the maintenance of circular chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Nanbu, Tomoko; Takahashi, Katsunori; Murray, Johanne M; Hirata, Naoya; Ukimori, Shinobu; Kanke, Mai; Masukata, Hisao; Yukawa, Masashi; Tsuchiya, Eiko; Ueno, Masaru

    2013-03-01

    Protection of telomeres protein 1 (Pot1) binds to single-stranded telomere overhangs and protects chromosome ends. RecQ helicases regulate homologous recombination at multiple stages, including resection, strand displacement, and resolution. Fission yeast pot1 and RecQ helicase rqh1 double mutants are synthetically lethal, but the mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we show that the synthetic lethality of pot1Δ rqh1Δ double mutants is due to inappropriate homologous recombination, as it is suppressed by the deletion of rad51(+). The expression of Rad51 in the pot1Δ rqh1Δ rad51Δ triple mutant, which has circular chromosomes, is lethal. Reduction of the expression of Rqh1 in a pot1 disruptant with circular chromosomes caused chromosome missegregation, and this defect was partially suppressed by the deletion of rad51(+). Taken together, our results suggest that Rqh1 is required for the maintenance of circular chromosomes when homologous recombination is active. Crossovers between circular monomeric chromosomes generate dimers that cannot segregate properly in Escherichia coli. We propose that Rqh1 inhibits crossovers between circular monomeric chromosomes to suppress the generation of circular dimers.

  17. The RXL motif of the African cassava mosaic virus Rep protein is necessary for rereplication of yeast DNA and viral infection in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Hipp, Katharina; Rau, Peter; Schäfer, Benjamin; Gronenborn, Bruno; Jeske, Holger

    2014-08-15

    Geminiviruses, single-stranded DNA plant viruses, encode a replication-initiator protein (Rep) that is indispensable for virus replication. A potential cyclin interaction motif (RXL) in the sequence of African cassava mosaic virus Rep may be an alternative link to cell cycle controls to the known interaction with plant homologs of retinoblastoma protein (pRBR). Mutation of this motif abrogated rereplication in fission yeast induced by expression of wildtype Rep suggesting that Rep interacts via its RXL motif with one or several yeast proteins. The RXL motif is essential for viral infection of Nicotiana benthamiana plants, since mutation of this motif in infectious clones prevented any symptomatic infection. The cell-cycle link (Clink) protein of a nanovirus (faba bean necrotic yellows virus) was investigated that activates the cell cycle by binding via its LXCXE motif to pRBR. Expression of wildtype Clink and a Clink mutant deficient in pRBR-binding did not trigger rereplication in fission yeast. - Highlights: • A potential cyclin interaction motif is conserved in geminivirus Rep proteins. • In ACMV Rep, this motif (RXL) is essential for rereplication of fission yeast DNA. • Mutating RXL abrogated viral infection completely in Nicotiana benthamiana. • Expression of a nanovirus Clink protein in yeast did not induce rereplication. • Plant viruses may have evolved multiple routes to exploit host DNA synthesis.

  18. Peroxide Sensors for the Fission Yeast Stress-activated Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Vicky; Quinn, Janet; Pino, Teresa Soto; Martin, Humberto; Saldanha, Jose; Makino, Kozo; Morgan, Brian A.; Millar, Jonathan B.A.

    2001-01-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe stress-activated Sty1p/Spc1p mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase regulates gene expression through the Atf1p and Pap1p transcription factors, homologs of human ATF2 and c-Jun, respectively. Mcs4p, a response regulator protein, acts upstream of Sty1p by binding the Wak1p/Wis4p MAP kinase kinase kinase. We show that phosphorylation of Mcs4p on a conserved aspartic acid residue is required for activation of Sty1p only in response to peroxide stress. Mcs4p acts in a conserved phospho-relay system initiated by two PAS/PAC domain-containing histidine kinases, Mak2p and Mak3p. In the absence of Mak2p or Mak3p, Sty1p fails to phosphorylate the Atf1p transcription factor or induce Atf1p-dependent gene expression. As a consequence, cells lacking Mak2p and Mak3p are sensitive to peroxide attack in the absence of Prr1p, a distinct response regulator protein that functions in association with Pap1p. The Mak1p histidine kinase, which also contains PAS/PAC repeats, does not regulate Sty1p or Atf1p but is partially required for Pap1p- and Prr1p-dependent transcription. We conclude that the transcriptional response to free radical attack is initiated by at least two distinct phospho-relay pathways in fission yeast. PMID:11179424

  19. Widespread exon skipping triggers degradation by nuclear RNA surveillance in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Bitton, Danny A; Atkinson, Sophie R; Rallis, Charalampos; Smith, Graeme C; Ellis, David A; Chen, Yuan Y C; Malecki, Michal; Codlin, Sandra; Lemay, Jean-François; Cotobal, Cristina; Bachand, François; Marguerat, Samuel; Mata, Juan; Bähler, Jürg

    2015-06-01

    Exon skipping is considered a principal mechanism by which eukaryotic cells expand their transcriptome and proteome repertoires, creating different splice variants with distinct cellular functions. Here we analyze RNA-seq data from 116 transcriptomes in fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), covering multiple physiological conditions as well as transcriptional and RNA processing mutants. We applied brute-force algorithms to detect all possible exon-skipping events, which were widespread but rare compared to normal splicing events. Exon-skipping events increased in cells deficient for the nuclear exosome or the 5'-3' exonuclease Dhp1, and also at late stages of meiotic differentiation when nuclear-exosome transcripts decreased. The pervasive exon-skipping transcripts were stochastic, did not increase in specific physiological conditions, and were mostly present at less than one copy per cell, even in the absence of nuclear RNA surveillance and during late meiosis. These exon-skipping transcripts are therefore unlikely to be functional and may reflect splicing errors that are actively removed by nuclear RNA surveillance. The average splicing rate by exon skipping was ∼ 0.24% in wild type and ∼ 1.75% in nuclear exonuclease mutants. We also detected approximately 250 circular RNAs derived from single or multiple exons. These circular RNAs were rare and stochastic, although a few became stabilized during quiescence and in splicing mutants. Using an exhaustive search algorithm, we also uncovered thousands of previously unknown splice sites, indicating pervasive splicing; yet most of these splicing variants were cryptic and increased in nuclear degradation mutants. This study highlights widespread but low frequency alternative or aberrant splicing events that are targeted by nuclear RNA surveillance.

  20. Activation of the cell integrity pathway is channelled through diverse signalling elements in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Barba, Gregorio; Soto, Teresa; Madrid, Marisa; Núñez, Andrés; Vicente, Jeronima; Gacto, Mariano; Cansado, José

    2008-04-01

    MAPK Pmk1p is the central element of a cascade involved in the maintenance of cell integrity and other functions in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Pmk1p becomes activated by multiple stressing situations and also during cell separation. GTPase Rho2p acts upstream of the protein kinase C homolog Pck2p to activate the Pmk1 signalling pathway through direct interaction with MAPKKK Mkh1p. In this work we analyzed the functional significance of both Rho2p and Pck2p in the transduction of various stress signals by the cell integrity pathway. The results indicate that basal Pmk1p activity can be positively regulated by alternative mechanisms which are independent on the control by Rho2p and/or Pck2p. Unexpectedly, Pck1p, another protein kinase C homolog, negatively modulates Pmk1p basal activity by an unknown mechanism. Moreover, different elements appear to regulate the stress-induced activation of Pmk1p depending on the nature of the triggering stimuli. Whereas Pmk1p activation induced by hyper- or hypotonic stresses is channeled through Rho2p-Pck2p, other stressors, like glucose deprivation or cell wall disturbance, are transduced via other pathways in addition to that of Rho2p-Pck2p. On the contrary, Pmk1p activation observed during cell separation or after treatment with hydrogen peroxide does not involve Rho2p-Pck2p. Finally, Pck2p function is critical to maintain a Pmk1p basal activity that allows Pmk1p activation induced by heat stress. These data demonstrate the existence of a complex signalling network modulating Pmk1p activation in response to a variety of stresses in fission yeast.

  1. A Targeted Mutation Identified through pKa Measurements Indicates a Postrecruitment Role for Fis1 in Yeast Mitochondrial Fission.

    PubMed

    Koppenol-Raab, Marijke; Harwig, Megan Cleland; Posey, Ammon E; Egner, John M; MacKenzie, Kevin R; Hill, R Blake

    2016-09-23

    The tail-anchored protein Fis1 is implicated as a passive tether in yeast mitochondrial fission. We probed the functional role of Fis1 Glu-78, whose elevated side chain pKa suggests participation in protein interactions. Fis1 binds partners Mdv1 or Dnm1 tightly, but mutation E78A weakens Fis1 interaction with Mdv1, alters mitochondrial morphology, and abolishes fission in a growth assay. In fis1Δ rescue experiments, Fis1-E78A causes a novel localization pattern in which Dnm1 uniformly coats the mitochondria. By contrast, Fis1-E78A at lower expression levels recruits Dnm1 into mitochondrial punctate structures but fails to support normal fission. Thus, Fis1 makes multiple interactions that support Dnm1 puncta formation and may be essential after this step, supporting a revised model for assembly of the mitochondrial fission machinery. The insights gained by mutating a residue with a perturbed pKa suggest that side chain pKa values inferred from routine NMR sample pH optimization could provide useful leads for functional investigations.

  2. The puc1 Cyclin Regulates the G1 Phase of the Fission Yeast Cell Cycle in Response to Cell Size

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Castellanos, Cristina; Blanco, Miguel A.; de Prada, José M.; Moreno, Sergio

    2000-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells coordinate cell size with cell division by regulating the length of the G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle. In fission yeast, the length of the G1 phase depends on a precise balance between levels of positive (cig1, cig2, puc1, and cdc13 cyclins) and negative (rum1 and ste9-APC) regulators of cdc2. Early in G1, cyclin proteolysis and rum1 inhibition keep the cdc2/cyclin complexes inactive. At the end of G1, the balance is reversed and cdc2/cyclin activity down-regulates both rum1 and the cyclin-degrading activity of the APC. Here we present data showing that the puc1 cyclin, a close relative of the Cln cyclins in budding yeast, plays an important role in regulating the length of G1. Fission yeast cells lacking cig1 and cig2 have a cell cycle distribution similar to that of wild-type cells, with a short G1 and a long G2. However, when the puc1+ gene is deleted in this genetic background, the length of G1 is extended and these cells undergo S phase with a greater cell size than wild-type cells. This G1 delay is completely abolished in cells lacking rum1. Cdc2/puc1 function may be important to down-regulate the rum1 Cdk inhibitor at the end of G1. PMID:10679013

  3. Fission yeast Tor2 links nitrogen signals to cell proliferation and acts downstream of the Rheb GTPase.

    PubMed

    Uritani, Masahiro; Hidaka, Hidetoshi; Hotta, Yukari; Ueno, Masaru; Ushimaru, Takashi; Toda, Takashi

    2006-12-01

    The target of rapamycin (Tor) plays a pivotal role in cell growth and metabolism. Yeast contains two related proteins, Tor1 and Tor2. In fission yeast, Tor1 is dispensable for normal growth but is involved in amino acid uptake and cell survival under various stress conditions. In contrast, Tor2 is essential for cell proliferation; however, its physiological function remains unknown. Here we characterize the roles of fission yeast Tor2 by creating temperature sensitive (tor2(ts)) mutants. Remarkably, we have found that tor2(ts) mimics nitrogen starvation responses, because the mutant displays a number of phenotypes that are normally induced only on nitrogen deprivation. These include G1 cell-cycle arrest with a small cell size, induction of autophagy and commitment to sexual differentiation. By contrast, tor1Deltator2(ts) double mutant cells show distinct phenotypes, as the cells cease division with normal cell size in the absence of G1 arrest. Tor2 physically interacts with the conserved Rhb1/GTPase. Intriguingly, over-expression of rhb1(+) or deletion of Rhb1-GAP-encoding tsc2(+) is capable of rescuing stress-sensitive phenotypes of the tor1 mutant, implying that Tor1 and Tor2 also share functions in cell survival under adverse environment. We propose that Tor1 and Tor2 are involved in both corroborative and independent roles in nutrient sensing and stress response pathways.

  4. The Fission Yeast FANCM Ortholog Directs Non-Crossover Recombination During Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Alexander; Osman, Fekret; Sun, Weili; Nandi, Saikat; Steinacher, Roland; Whitby, Matthew C.

    2012-01-01

    The formation of healthy gametes depends on programmed DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), which are each repaired as a crossover (CO) or non-crossover (NCO) from a homologous template. Although most of these DSBs are repaired without giving COs, little is known about the genetic requirements of NCO-specific recombination. We show that Fml1, the Fanconi anemia complementation group M (FANCM)-ortholog of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, directs the formation of NCOs during meiosis in competition with the Mus81-dependent pro-CO pathway. We also define the Rad51/Dmc1-mediator Swi5-Sfr1 as a major determinant in biasing the recombination process in favour of Mus81, to ensure the appropriate amount of COs to guide meiotic chromosome segregation. The conservation of these proteins from yeast to Humans suggests that this interplay may be a general feature of meiotic recombination. PMID:22723423

  5. Chemical genetic screen in fission yeast reveals roles for vacuolar acidification, mitochondrial fission, and cellular GMP levels in lifespan extension.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Jessica; Franke, Jacqueline; Ehrenhofer-Murray, Ann E

    2013-08-01

    The discovery that genetic mutations in several cellular pathways can increase lifespan has lent support to the notion that pharmacological inhibition of aging pathways can be used to extend lifespan and to slow the onset of age-related diseases. However, so far, only few compounds with such activities have been described. Here, we have conducted a chemical genetic screen for compounds that cause the extension of chronological lifespan of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We have characterized eight natural products with such activities, which has allowed us to uncover so far unknown anti-aging pathways in S. pombe. The ionophores monensin and nigericin extended lifespan by affecting vacuolar acidification, and this effect depended on the presence of the vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase) subunits Vma1 and Vma3. Furthermore, prostaglandin J₂ displayed anti-aging properties due to the inhibition of mitochondrial fission, and its effect on longevity required the mitochondrial fission protein Dnm1 as well as the G-protein-coupled glucose receptor Git3. Also, two compounds that inhibit guanosine monophosphate (GMP) synthesis, mycophenolic acid (MPA) and acivicin, caused lifespan extension, indicating that an imbalance in guanine nucleotide levels impinges upon longevity. We furthermore have identified diindolylmethane (DIM), tschimganine, and the compound mixture mangosteen as inhibiting aging. Taken together, these results reveal unanticipated anti-aging activities for several phytochemicals and open up opportunities for the development of novel anti-aging therapies.

  6. Contrasting effects of Elg1-RFC and Ctf18-RFC inactivation in the absence of fully functional RFC in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyoung; Robertson, Kathryn; Mylonas, Katie J L; Gray, Fiona C; Charapitsa, Iryna; MacNeill, Stuart A

    2005-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen loading onto DNA by replication factor C (RFC) is a key step in eukaryotic DNA replication and repair processes. In this study, the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the large subunit of fission yeast RFC is shown to be essential for its function in vivo. Cells carrying a temperature-sensitive mutation in the CTD, rfc1-44, arrest with incompletely replicated chromosomes, are sensitive to DNA damaging agents, are synthetically lethal with other DNA replication mutants, and can be suppressed by mutations in rfc5. To assess the contribution of the RFC-like complexes Elg1-RFC and Ctf18-RFC to the viability of rfc1-44, genes encoding the large subunits of these complexes have been deleted and overexpressed. Inactivation of Ctf18-RFC by the deletion of ctf18+, dcc1+ or ctf8+ is lethal in an rfc1-44 background showing that full Ctf18-RFC function is required in the absence of fully functional RFC. In contrast, rfc1-44 elg1Delta cells are viable and overproduction of Elg1 in rfc1-44 is lethal, suggesting that Elg1-RFC plays a negative role when RFC function is inhibited. Consistent with this, the deletion of elg1+ is shown to restore viability to rfc1-44 ctf18Delta cells.

  7. Protein Affinity Chromatography with Purified Yeast DNA Polymerase α Detects Proteins that Bind to DNA Polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Jeff; Formosa, Tim

    1992-02-01

    We have overexpressed the POL1 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and purified the resulting DNA polymerase α polypeptide in an apparently intact form. We attached the purified DNA polymerase covalently to an agarose matrix and used this matrix to chromatograph extracts prepared from yeast cells. At least six proteins bound to the yeast DNA polymerase α matrix that did not bind to a control matrix. We speculate that these proteins might be DNA polymerase α accessory proteins. Consistent with this interpretation, one of the binding proteins, which we have named POB1 (polymerase one binding), is required for normal chromosome transmission. Mutations in this gene cause increased chromosome loss and an abnormal cell morphology, phenotypes that also occur in the presence of mutations in the yeast α or δ polymerase genes. These results suggest that the interactions detected by polymerase affinity chromatography are biologically relevant and may help to illuminate the architecture of the eukaryotic DNA replication machinery.

  8. Fission yeast nucleolar protein Dnt1 regulates G2/M transition and cytokinesis by downregulating Wee1 kinase.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Yong; Zhang, Meng-Ting; Wang, Gao-Yuan; Xu, Dan; Keifenheim, Daniel; Franco, Alejandro; Cansado, Jose; Masuda, Hirohisa; Rhind, Nick; Wang, Yamei; Jin, Quan-Wen

    2013-11-01

    Cytokinesis involves temporally and spatially coordinated action of the cell cycle, cytoskeletal and membrane systems to achieve separation of daughter cells. The septation initiation network (SIN) and mitotic exit network (MEN) signaling pathways regulate cytokinesis and mitotic exit in the yeasts Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, respectively. Previously, we have shown that in fission yeast, the nucleolar protein Dnt1 negatively regulates the SIN pathway in a manner that is independent of the Cdc14-family phosphatase Clp1/Flp1, but how Dnt1 modulates this pathway has remained elusive. By contrast, it is clear that its budding yeast relative, Net1/Cfi1, regulates the homologous MEN signaling pathway by sequestering Cdc14 phosphatase in the nucleolus before mitotic exit. In this study, we show that dnt1(+) positively regulates G2/M transition during the cell cycle. By conducting epistasis analyses to measure cell length at septation in double mutant (for dnt1 and genes involved in G2/M control) cells, we found a link between dnt1(+) and wee1(+). Furthermore, we showed that elevated protein levels of the mitotic inhibitor Wee1 kinase and the corresponding attenuation in Cdk1 activity is responsible for the rescuing effect of dnt1Δ on SIN mutants. Finally, our data also suggest that Dnt1 modulates Wee1 activity in parallel with SCF-mediated Wee1 degradation. Therefore, this study reveals an unexpected missing link between the nucleolar protein Dnt1 and the SIN signaling pathway, which is mediated by the Cdk1 regulator Wee1 kinase. Our findings also define a novel mode of regulation of Wee1 and Cdk1, which is important for integration of the signals controlling the SIN pathway in fission yeast.

  9. Fission yeast nucleolar protein Dnt1 regulates G2/M transition and cytokinesis by downregulating Wee1 kinase

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhi-yong; Zhang, Meng-ting; Wang, Gao-yuan; Xu, Dan; Keifenheim, Daniel; Franco, Alejandro; Cansado, Jose; Masuda, Hirohisa; Rhind, Nick; Wang, Yamei; Jin, Quan-wen

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cytokinesis involves temporally and spatially coordinated action of the cell cycle, cytoskeletal and membrane systems to achieve separation of daughter cells. The septation initiation network (SIN) and mitotic exit network (MEN) signaling pathways regulate cytokinesis and mitotic exit in the yeasts Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, respectively. Previously, we have shown that in fission yeast, the nucleolar protein Dnt1 negatively regulates the SIN pathway in a manner that is independent of the Cdc14-family phosphatase Clp1/Flp1, but how Dnt1 modulates this pathway has remained elusive. By contrast, it is clear that its budding yeast relative, Net1/Cfi1, regulates the homologous MEN signaling pathway by sequestering Cdc14 phosphatase in the nucleolus before mitotic exit. In this study, we show that dnt1+ positively regulates G2/M transition during the cell cycle. By conducting epistasis analyses to measure cell length at septation in double mutant (for dnt1 and genes involved in G2/M control) cells, we found a link between dnt1+ and wee1+. Furthermore, we showed that elevated protein levels of the mitotic inhibitor Wee1 kinase and the corresponding attenuation in Cdk1 activity is responsible for the rescuing effect of dnt1Δ on SIN mutants. Finally, our data also suggest that Dnt1 modulates Wee1 activity in parallel with SCF-mediated Wee1 degradation. Therefore, this study reveals an unexpected missing link between the nucleolar protein Dnt1 and the SIN signaling pathway, which is mediated by the Cdk1 regulator Wee1 kinase. Our findings also define a novel mode of regulation of Wee1 and Cdk1, which is important for integration of the signals controlling the SIN pathway in fission yeast. PMID:24006256

  10. The Yeast Copper Response Is Regulated by DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Kangzhen; Addinall, Stephen G.; Lydall, David

    2013-01-01

    Copper is an essential but potentially toxic redox-active metal, so the levels and distribution of this metal are carefully regulated to ensure that it binds to the correct proteins. Previous studies of copper-dependent transcription in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have focused on the response of genes to changes in the exogenous levels of copper. We now report that yeast copper genes are regulated in response to the DNA-damaging agents methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and hydroxyurea by a mechanism(s) that requires the copper-responsive transcription factors Mac1 and AceI, copper superoxide dismutase (Sod1) activity, and the Rad53 checkpoint kinase. Furthermore, in copper-starved yeast, the response of the Rad53 pathway to MMS is compromised due to a loss of Sod1 activity, consistent with the model that yeast imports copper to ensure Sod1 activity and Rad53 signaling. Crucially, the Mac1 transcription factor undergoes changes in its redox state in response to changing levels of copper or MMS. This study has therefore identified a novel regulatory relationship between cellular redox, copper homeostasis, and the DNA damage response in yeast. PMID:23959798

  11. Meiotic nuclear movements in fission yeast are regulated by the transcription factor Mei4 downstream of a Cds1-dependent replication checkpoint pathway.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Kun; Yamamoto, Takaharu G; Asakawa, Haruhiko; Chikashige, Yuji; Masukata, Hisao; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2015-03-01

    In meiosis, the fission yeast nucleus displays an elongated morphology, moving back and forth within the cell; these nuclear movements continue for approximately 2 h before meiotic nuclear divisions. Meiotic DNA replication occurs in an early phase of the nuclear movements and is followed by meiotic prophase. Here we report that in mutants deficient in meiotic DNA replication, the duration of nuclear movements is strikingly prolonged to four to 5 h. We found that this prolongation was caused by the Cds1-dependent replication checkpoint, which represses expression of the mei4(+) gene encoding a meiosis-specific transcription factor. In the absence of Mei4, nuclear movements persisted for more than 8 h. In contrast, overproduction of Mei4 accelerated termination of nuclear movements to approximately 30 min. These results show that Mei4 is involved in the termination of nuclear movements and that Mei4-mediated regulatory pathways link a DNA replication checkpoint to the termination of nuclear movements.

  12. A genome–wide screen to identify genes controlling the rate of entry into mitosis in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Moris, Naomi; Nurse, Paul

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have carried out a haploinsufficiency (HI) screen in fission yeast using heterozygous deletion diploid mutants of a genome-wide set of cell cycle genes to identify genes encoding products whose level determines the rate of progression through the cell cycle. Cell size at division was used as a measure of advancement or delay of the G2-M transition of rod-shaped fission yeast cells. We found that 13 mutants were significantly longer or shorter (greater than 10%) than control cells at cell division. These included mutants of the cdc2, cdc25, wee1 and pom1 genes, which have previously been shown to play a role in the timing of entry into mitosis, and which validate this approach. Seven of these genes are involved in regulation of the G2-M transition, 5 for nuclear transport and one for nucleotide metabolism. In addition we identified 4 more genes that were 8–10% longer or shorter than the control that also had roles in regulation of the G2-M transition or in nuclear transport. The genes identified here are all conserved in human cells, suggesting that this dataset will be useful as a basis for further studies to identify rate-limiting steps for progression through the cell cycle in other eukaryotes. PMID:27736299

  13. Roles of the novel coiled-coil protein Rng10 in septum formation during fission yeast cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yajun; Lee, I-Ju; Sun, Mingzhai; Lower, Casey A.; Runge, Kurt W.; Ma, Jianjie; Wu, Jian-Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Rho GAPs are important regulators of Rho GTPases, which are involved in various steps of cytokinesis and other processes. However, regulation of Rho-GAP cellular localization and function is not fully understood. Here we report the characterization of a novel coiled-coil protein Rng10 and its relationship with the Rho-GAP Rga7 in fission yeast. Both rng10Δ and rga7Δ result in defective septum and cell lysis during cytokinesis. Rng10 and Rga7 colocalize on the plasma membrane at the cell tips during interphase and at the division site during cell division. Rng10 physically interacts with Rga7 in affinity purification and coimmunoprecipitation. Of interest, Rga7 localization is nearly abolished without Rng10. Moreover, Rng10 and Rga7 work together to regulate the accumulation and dynamics of glucan synthases for successful septum formation in cytokinesis. Our results show that cellular localization and function of the Rho-GAP Rga7 are regulated by a novel protein, Rng10, during cytokinesis in fission yeast. PMID:27385337

  14. A Two-step Protein Quality Control Pathway for a Misfolded DJ-1 Variant in Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Mathiassen, Søs G; Larsen, Ida B; Poulsen, Esben G; Madsen, Christian T; Papaleo, Elena; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Kragelund, Birthe B; Nielsen, Michael L; Kriegenburg, Franziska; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2015-08-21

    A mutation, L166P, in the cytosolic protein, PARK7/DJ-1, causes protein misfolding and is linked to Parkinson disease. Here, we identify the fission yeast protein Sdj1 as the orthologue of DJ-1 and calculate by in silico saturation mutagenesis the effects of point mutants on its structural stability. We also map the degradation pathways for Sdj1-L169P, the fission yeast orthologue of the disease-causing DJ-1 L166P protein. Sdj1-L169P forms inclusions, which are enriched for the Hsp104 disaggregase. Hsp104 and Hsp70-type chaperones are required for efficient degradation of Sdj1-L169P. This also depends on the ribosome-associated E3 ligase Ltn1 and its co-factor Rqc1. Although Hsp104 is absolutely required for proteasomal degradation of Sdj1-L169P aggregates, the degradation of already aggregated Sdj1-L169P occurs independently of Ltn1 and Rqc1. Thus, our data point to soluble Sdj1-L169P being targeted early by Ltn1 and Rqc1. The fraction of Sdj1-L169P that escapes this first inspection then forms aggregates that are subsequently cleared via an Hsp104- and proteasome-dependent pathway.

  15. A genome-wide screen to identify genes controlling the rate of entry into mitosis in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Moris, Naomi; Shrivastava, Jaya; Jeffery, Linda; Li, Juan-Juan; Hayles, Jacqueline; Nurse, Paul

    2016-11-16

    We have carried out a haploinsufficiency (HI) screen in fission yeast using heterozygous deletion diploid mutants of a genome-wide set of cell cycle genes to identify genes encoding products whose level determines the rate of progression through the cell cycle. Cell size at division was used as a measure of advancement or delay of the G2-M transition of rod-shaped fission yeast cells. We found that 13 mutants were significantly longer or shorter (greater than 10%) than control cells at cell division. These included mutants of the cdc2, cdc25, wee1 and pom1 genes, which have previously been shown to play a role in the timing of entry into mitosis, and which validate this approach. Seven of these genes are involved in regulation of the G2-M transition, 5 for nuclear transport and one for nucleotide metabolism. In addition we identified 4 more genes that were 8-10% longer or shorter than the control that also had roles in regulation of the G2-M transition or in nuclear transport. The genes identified here are all conserved in human cells, suggesting that this dataset will be useful as a basis for further studies to identify rate-limiting steps for progression through the cell cycle in other eukaryotes.

  16. Tts1, the fission yeast homologue of the TMEM33 family, functions in NE remodeling during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan; Oliferenko, Snezhana

    2014-10-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergoes "closed" mitosis in which the nuclear envelope (NE) stays intact throughout chromosome segregation. Here we show that Tts1, the fission yeast TMEM33 protein that was previously implicated in organizing the peripheral endoplasmic reticulum (ER), also functions in remodeling the NE during mitosis. Tts1 promotes insertion of spindle pole bodies (SPBs) in the NE at the onset of mitosis and modulates distribution of the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) during mitotic NE expansion. Structural features that drive partitioning of Tts1 to the high-curvature ER domains are crucial for both aspects of its function. An amphipathic helix located at the C-terminus of Tts1 is important for ER shaping and modulating the mitotic NPC distribution. Of interest, the evolutionarily conserved residues at the luminal interface of the third transmembrane region function specifically in promoting SPB-NE insertion. Our data illuminate cellular requirements for remodeling the NE during "closed" nuclear division and provide insight into the structure and functions of the eukaryotic TMEM33 family.

  17. Long non-coding RNA-mediated transcriptional interference of a permease gene confers drug tolerance in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Ard, Ryan; Tong, Pin; Allshire, Robin C

    2014-11-27

    Most long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) encoded by eukaryotic genomes remain uncharacterized. Here we focus on a set of intergenic lncRNAs in fission yeast. Deleting one of these lncRNAs exhibited a clear phenotype: drug sensitivity. Detailed analyses of the affected locus revealed that transcription of the nc-tgp1 lncRNA regulates drug tolerance by repressing the adjacent phosphate-responsive permease gene transporter for glycerophosphodiester 1 (tgp1(+)). We demonstrate that the act of transcribing nc-tgp1 over the tgp1(+) promoter increases nucleosome density, prevents transcription factor access and thus represses tgp1(+) without the need for RNA interference or heterochromatin components. We therefore conclude that tgp1(+) is regulated by transcriptional interference. Accordingly, decreased nc-tgp1 transcription permits tgp1(+) expression upon phosphate starvation. Furthermore, nc-tgp1 loss induces tgp1(+) even in repressive conditions. Notably, drug sensitivity results directly from tgp1(+) expression in the absence of the nc-tgp1 RNA. Thus, transcription of an lncRNA governs drug tolerance in fission yeast.

  18. Genetic Interaction Mapping Reveals a Role for the SWI/SNF Nucleosome Remodeler in Spliceosome Activation in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Kristin L.; Ryan, Colm J.; Xu, Jiewei; Lipp, Jesse J.; Nissen, Kelly E.; Roguev, Assen; Shales, Michael; Krogan, Nevan J.; Guthrie, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous regulatory connections between pre-mRNA splicing and chromatin have been demonstrated, the precise mechanisms by which chromatin factors influence spliceosome assembly and/or catalysis remain unclear. To probe the genetic network of pre-mRNA splicing in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we constructed an epistatic mini-array profile (E-MAP) and discovered many new connections between chromatin and splicing. Notably, the nucleosome remodeler SWI/SNF had strong genetic interactions with components of the U2 snRNP SF3 complex. Overexpression of SF3 components in ΔSWI/SNF cells led to inefficient splicing of many fission yeast introns, predominantly those with non-consensus splice sites. Deletion of SWI/SNF decreased recruitment of the splicing ATPase Prp2, suggesting that SWI/SNF promotes co-transcriptional spliceosome assembly prior to first step catalysis. Importantly, defects in SWI/SNF as well as SF3 overexpression each altered nucleosome occupancy along intron-containing genes, illustrating that the chromatin landscape both affects—and is affected by—co-transcriptional splicing. PMID:25825871

  19. UCS protein Rng3p is essential for myosin-II motor activity during cytokinesis in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Stark, Benjamin C; James, Michael L; Pollard, Luther W; Sirotkin, Vladimir; Lord, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    UCS proteins have been proposed to operate as co-chaperones that work with Hsp90 in the de novo folding of myosin motors. The fission yeast UCS protein Rng3p is essential for actomyosin ring assembly and cytokinesis. Here we investigated the role of Rng3p in fission yeast myosin-II (Myo2p) motor activity. Myo2p isolated from an arrested rng3-65 mutant was capable of binding actin, yet lacked stability and activity based on its expression levels and inactivity in ATPase and actin filament gliding assays. Myo2p isolated from a myo2-E1 mutant (a mutant hyper-sensitive to perturbation of Rng3p function) showed similar behavior in the same assays and exhibited an altered motor conformation based on limited proteolysis experiments. We propose that Rng3p is not required for the folding of motors per se, but instead works to ensure the activity of intrinsically unstable myosin-II motors. Rng3p is specific to conventional myosin-II and the actomyosin ring, and is not required for unconventional myosin motor function at other actin structures. However, artificial destabilization of myosin-I motors at endocytic actin patches (using a myo1-E1 mutant) led to recruitment of Rng3p to patches. Thus, while Rng3p is specific to myosin-II, UCS proteins are adaptable and can respond to changes in the stability of other myosin motors.

  20. Cooperation between Rho-GEF Gef2 and its binding partner Nod1 in the regulation of fission yeast cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yi-Hua; Ye, Yanfang; Wu, Zhengrong; Wu, Jian-Qiu

    2013-01-01

    Cytokinesis is the last step of the cell-division cycle, which requires precise spatial and temporal regulation to ensure genetic stability. Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (Rho GEFs) and Rho GTPases are among the key regulators of cytokinesis. We previously found that putative Rho-GEF Gef2 coordinates with Polo kinase Plo1 to control the medial cortical localization of anillin-like protein Mid1 in fission yeast. Here we show that an adaptor protein, Nod1, colocalizes with Gef2 in the contractile ring and its precursor cortical nodes. Like gef2∆, nod1∆ has strong genetic interactions with various cytokinesis mutants involved in division-site positioning, suggesting a role of Nod1 in early cytokinesis. We find that Nod1 and Gef2 interact through the C-termini, which is important for their localization. The contractile-ring localization of Nod1 and Gef2 also depends on the interaction between Nod1 and the F-BAR protein Cdc15, where the Nod1/Gef2 complex plays a role in contractile-ring maintenance and affects the septation initiation network. Moreover, Gef2 binds to purified GTPases Rho1, Rho4, and Rho5 in vitro. Taken together, our data indicate that Nod1 and Gef2 function cooperatively in a protein complex to regulate fission yeast cytokinesis. PMID:23966468

  1. Local and global analysis of endocytic patch dynamics in fission yeast using a new “temporal superresolution” realignment method

    PubMed Central

    Berro, Julien; Pollard, Thomas D.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative microscopy is a valuable tool for inferring molecular mechanisms of cellular processes such as clathrin-mediated endocytosis, but, for quantitative microscopy to reach its potential, both data collection and analysis needed improvement. We introduce new tools to track and count endocytic patches in fission yeast to increase the quality of the data extracted from quantitative microscopy movies. We present a universal method to achieve “temporal superresolution” by aligning temporal data sets with higher temporal resolution than the measurement intervals. These methods allowed us to extract new information about endocytic actin patches in wild-type cells from measurements of the fluorescence of fimbrin-mEGFP. We show that the time course of actin assembly and disassembly varies <600 ms between patches. Actin polymerizes during vesicle formation, but we show that polymerization does not participate in vesicle movement other than to limit the complex diffusive motions of newly formed endocytic vesicles, which move faster as the surrounding actin meshwork decreases in size over time. Our methods also show that the number of patches in fission yeast is proportional to cell length and that the variability in the repartition of patches between the tips of interphase cells has been underestimated. PMID:25143395

  2. The RNA-binding protein Spo5 promotes meiosis II by regulating cyclin Cdc13 in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Arata, Mayumi; Sato, Masamitsu; Yamashita, Akira; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2014-03-01

    Meiosis comprises two consecutive nuclear divisions, meiosis I and II. Despite this unique progression through the cell cycle, little is known about the mechanisms controlling the sequential divisions. In this study, we carried out a genetic screen to identify factors that regulate the initiation of meiosis II in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We identified mutants deficient in meiosis II progression and repeatedly isolated mutants defective in spo5, which encodes an RNA-binding protein. Using fluorescence microscopy to visualize YFP-tagged protein, we found that spo5 mutant cells precociously lost Cdc13, the major B-type cyclin in fission yeast, before meiosis II. Importantly, the defect in meiosis II was rescued by increasing CDK activity. In wild-type cells, cdc13 transcripts increased during meiosis II, but this increase in cdc13 expression was weaker in spo5 mutants. Thus, Spo5 is a novel regulator of meiosis II that controls the level of cdc13 expression and promotes de novo synthesis of Cdc13. We previously reported that inhibition of Cdc13 degradation is necessary to initiate meiosis II; together with the previous information, the current findings indicate that the dual control of Cdc13 by de novo synthesis and suppression of proteolysis ensures the progression of meiosis II.

  3. Anillin-related protein Mid1 regulates timely formation of the contractile ring in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces japonicus.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Tsuyoshi; Takaine, Masak; Numata, Osamu; Nakano, Kentaro

    2016-06-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe (Sp), Mid1/Dmf1 plays an important role in positioning the division site by inducing formation of the contractile ring (CR). Mid1, emanating from the nucleus located in the cell center, forms a dozen of nodes in the middle cell cortex ahead of mitosis, and actin filaments and myosin II accumulated at each node interact and assemble the CR in metaphase. Curiously, in another fission yeast S. japonicus (Sj), CR formation begins after nuclear segregation in late anaphase. Here, we investigated the role of S. japonicus Mid1 during mitosis to compare the molecular mechanisms that determine the cell division site in Schizosaccharomyces. Similar to Sp Mid1, Sj Mid1 often accumulated in the nucleus of interphase cells. Moreover, Sj Mid1 localized to cortical dots with myosin II in the future division site and formed a medial ring in mitotic cells. However, S. japonicus cells without Mid1 function still carried out symmetrical binary division. Therefore, the Mid1 dependency for positional control of the cell division site is possibly different between the two species. Meanwhile, we found that Sj Mid1 enhanced CR formation, in a manner possibly similar to that by Sp Mid1.

  4. Mdm12p, a component required for mitochondrial inheritance that is conserved between budding and fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Berger, K H; Sogo, L F; Yaffe, M P

    1997-02-10

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells lacking the MDM12 gene product display temperature-sensitive growth and possess abnormally large, round mitochondria that are defective for inheritance by daughter buds. Analysis of the wild-type MDM12 gene revealed its product to be a 31-kD polypeptide that is homologous to a protein of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. When expressed in S. cerevisiae, the S. pombe Mdm12p homolog conferred a dominant-negative phenotype of giant mitochondria and aberrant mitochondrial distribution, suggesting partial functional conservation of Mdm12p activity between budding and fission yeast. The S. cerevisiae Mdm12p was localized by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy and by subcellular fractionation and immunodetection to the mitochondrial outer membrane and displayed biochemical properties of an integral membrane protein. Mdm12p is the third mitochondrial outer membrane protein required for normal mitochondrial morphology and distribution to be identified in S. cerevisiae and the first such mitochondrial component that is conserved between two different species.

  5. Genetic interaction mapping reveals a role for the SWI/SNF nucleosome remodeler in spliceosome activation in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Kristin L; Ryan, Colm J; Xu, Jiewei; Lipp, Jesse J; Nissen, Kelly E; Roguev, Assen; Shales, Michael; Krogan, Nevan J; Guthrie, Christine

    2015-03-01

    Although numerous regulatory connections between pre-mRNA splicing and chromatin have been demonstrated, the precise mechanisms by which chromatin factors influence spliceosome assembly and/or catalysis remain unclear. To probe the genetic network of pre-mRNA splicing in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we constructed an epistatic mini-array profile (E-MAP) and discovered many new connections between chromatin and splicing. Notably, the nucleosome remodeler SWI/SNF had strong genetic interactions with components of the U2 snRNP SF3 complex. Overexpression of SF3 components in ΔSWI/SNF cells led to inefficient splicing of many fission yeast introns, predominantly those with non-consensus splice sites. Deletion of SWI/SNF decreased recruitment of the splicing ATPase Prp2, suggesting that SWI/SNF promotes co-transcriptional spliceosome assembly prior to first step catalysis. Importantly, defects in SWI/SNF as well as SF3 overexpression each altered nucleosome occupancy along intron-containing genes, illustrating that the chromatin landscape both affects--and is affected by--co-transcriptional splicing.

  6. DNA Compaction by Yeast Mitochondrial Protein ABF2p

    SciTech Connect

    Friddle, R W; Klare, J E; Noy, A; Corzett, M; Balhorn, R; Baskin, R J; Martin, S S; Baldwin, E P

    2003-05-09

    We used high resolution Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to image compaction of linear and circular DNA by the yeast mitochondrial protein ABF2p , which plays a major role in maintaining mitochondrial DNA. AFM images show that protein binding induces drastic bends in the DNA backbone for both linear and circular DNA. At high concentration of ABF2p DNA collapses into a tight globular structure. We quantified the compaction of linear DNA by measuring the end-to-end distance of the DNA molecule at increasing concentrations of ABF2p. We also derived a polymer statistical mechanics model that gives quantitative description of compaction observed in our experiments. This model shows that a number of sharp bends in the DNA backbone is often sufficient to cause DNA compaction. Comparison of our model with the experimental data showed excellent quantitative correlation and allowed us to determine binding characteristics for ABF2. Our studies indicate that ABF2 compacts DNA through a novel mechanism that involves bending of DNA backbone. We discuss the implications of such a mechanism for mitochondrial DNA maintenance.

  7. Global Fitness Profiling Identifies Arsenic and Cadmium Tolerance Mechanisms in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lan; Ganguly, Abantika; Sun, Lingling; Suo, Fang; Du, Li-Lin; Russell, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Heavy metals and metalloids such as cadmium [Cd(II)] and arsenic [As(III)] are widespread environmental toxicants responsible for multiple adverse health effects in humans. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying metal-induced cytotoxicity and carcinogenesis, as well as the detoxification and tolerance pathways, are incompletely understood. Here, we use global fitness profiling by barcode sequencing to quantitatively survey the Schizosaccharomyces pombe haploid deletome for genes that confer tolerance of cadmium or arsenic. We identified 106 genes required for cadmium resistance and 110 genes required for arsenic resistance, with a highly significant overlap of 36 genes. A subset of these 36 genes account for almost all proteins required for incorporating sulfur into the cysteine-rich glutathione and phytochelatin peptides that chelate cadmium and arsenic. A requirement for Mms19 is explained by its role in directing iron–sulfur cluster assembly into sulfite reductase as opposed to promoting DNA repair, as DNA damage response genes were not enriched among those required for cadmium or arsenic tolerance. Ubiquinone, siroheme, and pyridoxal 5′-phosphate biosynthesis were also identified as critical for Cd/As tolerance. Arsenic-specific pathways included prefoldin-mediated assembly of unfolded proteins and protein targeting to the peroxisome, whereas cadmium-specific pathways included plasma membrane and vacuolar transporters, as well as Spt–Ada–Gcn5-acetyltransferase (SAGA) transcriptional coactivator that controls expression of key genes required for cadmium tolerance. Notable differences are apparent with corresponding screens in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, underscoring the utility of analyzing toxic metal defense mechanisms in both organisms. PMID:27558664

  8. Fission yeast Cdk7 controls gene expression through both its CAK and C-terminal domain kinase activities.

    PubMed

    Devos, Maxime; Mommaerts, Elise; Migeot, Valerie; van Bakel, Harm; Hermand, Damien

    2015-05-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) activation and RNA polymerase II transcription are linked by the Cdk7 kinase, which phosphorylates Cdks as a trimeric Cdk-activating kinase (CAK) complex, and serine 5 within the polymerase II (Pol II) C-terminal domain (CTD) as transcription factor TFIIH-bound CAK. However, the physiological importance of integrating these processes is not understood. Besides the Cdk7 ortholog Mcs6, fission yeast possesses a second CAK, Csk1. The two enzymes have been proposed to act redundantly to activate Cdc2. Using an improved analogue-sensitive Mcs6-as kinase, we show that Csk1 is not a relevant CAK for Cdc2. Further analyses revealed that Csk1 lacks a 20-amino-acid sequence required for its budding yeast counterpart, Cak1, to bind Cdc2. Transcriptome profiling of the Mcs6-as mutant in the presence or absence of the budding yeast Cak1 kinase, in order to uncouple the CTD kinase and CAK activities of Mcs6, revealed an unanticipated role of the CAK branch in the transcriptional control of the cluster of genes implicated in ribosome biogenesis and cell growth. The analysis of a Cdc2 CAK site mutant confirmed these data. Our data show that the Cdk7 kinase modulates transcription through its well-described RNA Pol II CTD kinase activity and also through the Cdc2-activating kinase activity.

  9. Fission Yeast Cdk7 Controls Gene Expression through both Its CAK and C-Terminal Domain Kinase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Devos, Maxime; Mommaerts, Elise; Migeot, Valerie; van Bakel, Harm

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) activation and RNA polymerase II transcription are linked by the Cdk7 kinase, which phosphorylates Cdks as a trimeric Cdk-activating kinase (CAK) complex, and serine 5 within the polymerase II (Pol II) C-terminal domain (CTD) as transcription factor TFIIH-bound CAK. However, the physiological importance of integrating these processes is not understood. Besides the Cdk7 ortholog Mcs6, fission yeast possesses a second CAK, Csk1. The two enzymes have been proposed to act redundantly to activate Cdc2. Using an improved analogue-sensitive Mcs6-as kinase, we show that Csk1 is not a relevant CAK for Cdc2. Further analyses revealed that Csk1 lacks a 20-amino-acid sequence required for its budding yeast counterpart, Cak1, to bind Cdc2. Transcriptome profiling of the Mcs6-as mutant in the presence or absence of the budding yeast Cak1 kinase, in order to uncouple the CTD kinase and CAK activities of Mcs6, revealed an unanticipated role of the CAK branch in the transcriptional control of the cluster of genes implicated in ribosome biogenesis and cell growth. The analysis of a Cdc2 CAK site mutant confirmed these data. Our data show that the Cdk7 kinase modulates transcription through its well-described RNA Pol II CTD kinase activity and also through the Cdc2-activating kinase activity. PMID:25691663

  10. Structural Basis of High-Fidelity DNA Synthesis by Yeast DNA Polymerase δ

    SciTech Connect

    Swan, M.; Johnson, R; Prakash, L; Prakash, S; Aggarwal, A

    2009-01-01

    DNA polymerase ? (Pol ?) has a crucial role in eukaryotic replication. Now the crystal structure of the yeast DNA Pol ? catalytic subunit in complex with template primer and incoming nucleotide is presented at 2.0-A resolution, providing insight into its high fidelity and a framework to understand the effects of mutations involved in tumorigenesis.

  11. Dynamics of telomeric DNA turnover in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    McEachern, Michael J; Underwood, Dana Hager; Blackburn, Elizabeth H

    2002-01-01

    Telomerase adds telomeric DNA repeats to telomeric termini using a sequence within its RNA subunit as a template. We characterized two mutations in the Kluyveromyces lactis telomerase RNA gene (TER1) template. Each initially produced normally regulated telomeres. One mutation, ter1-AA, had a cryptic defect in length regulation that was apparent only if the mutant gene was transformed into a TER1 deletion strain to permit extensive replacement of basal wild-type repeats with mutant repeats. This mutant differs from previously studied delayed elongation mutants in a number of properties. The second mutation, TER1-Bcl, which generates a BclI restriction site in newly synthesized telomeric repeats, was indistinguishable from wild type in all phenotypes assayed: cell growth, telomere length, and in vivo telomerase fidelity. TER1-Bcl cells demonstrated that the outer halves of the telomeric repeat tracts turn over within a few hundred cell divisions, while the innermost few repeats typically resisted turnover for at least 3000 cell divisions. Similarly deep but incomplete turnover was also observed in two other TER1 template mutants with highly elongated telomeres. These results indicate that most DNA turnover in functionally normal telomeres is due to gradual replicative sequence loss and additions by telomerase but that there are other processes that also contribute to turnover. PMID:11805045

  12. The Fun30 chromatin remodeler Fft3 controls nuclear organization and chromatin structure of insulators and subtelomeres in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Steglich, Babett; Strålfors, Annelie; Khorosjutina, Olga; Persson, Jenna; Smialowska, Agata; Javerzat, Jean-Paul; Ekwall, Karl

    2015-03-01

    In eukaryotic cells, local chromatin structure and chromatin organization in the nucleus both influence transcriptional regulation. At the local level, the Fun30 chromatin remodeler Fft3 is essential for maintaining proper chromatin structure at centromeres and subtelomeres in fission yeast. Using genome-wide mapping and live cell imaging, we show that this role is linked to controlling nuclear organization of its targets. In fft3∆ cells, subtelomeres lose their association with the LEM domain protein Man1 at the nuclear periphery and move to the interior of the nucleus. Furthermore, genes in these domains are upregulated and active chromatin marks increase. Fft3 is also enriched at retrotransposon-derived long terminal repeat (LTR) elements and at tRNA genes. In cells lacking Fft3, these sites lose their peripheral positioning and show reduced nucleosome occupancy. We propose that Fft3 has a global role in mediating association between specific chromatin domains and the nuclear envelope.

  13. Nuclear displacement and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) assays to study division site placement and cytokinesis in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Ullal, P; Bhatia, P; Martin, S G

    2017-01-01

    Cytokinesis is an essential cellular event that completes the cell division cycle. It begins with the assembly of an actomyosin contractile ring that undergoes constriction concomitant with the septum formation to divide the cell in two. Placement of the septum at the right position is important to ensure fidelity of the division process. In fission yeast, the medially placed nucleus is a major spatial cue to position the site of division. In this chapter, we describe a simple synthetic biology-based approach to displace the nucleus and study the consequence on division site positioning. We also describe how to perform fluorescence recovery after photobleaching to follow the dynamics of cytokinetic proteins at defined time points by live-cell microscopy.

  14. Interaction between Pheromone and Its Receptor of the Fission Yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe Examined by a Force Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Sasuga, Shintaro; Abe, Ryohei; Nikaido, Osamu; Kiyosaki, Shoichi; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Ikai, Atsushi; Osada, Toshiya

    2012-01-01

    Interaction between P-factor, a peptide pheromone composed of 23 amino acid residues, and its pheromone receptor, Mam2, on the cell surface of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe was examined by an atomic force microscope (AFM). An AFM tip was modified with P-factor derivatives to perform force curve measurements. The specific interaction force between P-factor and Mam2 was calculated to be around 120 pN at a probe speed of 1.74 μm/s. When the AFM tip was modified with truncated P-factor derivative lacking C-terminal Leu, the specific interaction between the tip and the cell surface was not observed. These results were also confirmed with an assay system using a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene to monitor the activation level of signal transduction following the interaction of Mam2 with P-factor. PMID:22500108

  15. Interaction between pheromone and its receptor of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe examined by a force spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Sasuga, Shintaro; Abe, Ryohei; Nikaido, Osamu; Kiyosaki, Shoichi; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Ikai, Atsushi; Osada, Toshiya

    2012-01-01

    Interaction between P-factor, a peptide pheromone composed of 23 amino acid residues, and its pheromone receptor, Mam2, on the cell surface of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe was examined by an atomic force microscope (AFM). An AFM tip was modified with P-factor derivatives to perform force curve measurements. The specific interaction force between P-factor and Mam2 was calculated to be around 120 pN at a probe speed of 1.74 μm/s. When the AFM tip was modified with truncated P-factor derivative lacking C-terminal Leu, the specific interaction between the tip and the cell surface was not observed. These results were also confirmed with an assay system using a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene to monitor the activation level of signal transduction following the interaction of Mam2 with P-factor.

  16. Inhibition of splicing and nuclear retention of pre-mRNA by spliceostatin A in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Chor-Wai; Kaida, Daisuke; Nishimura, Shinichi; Matsuyama, Akihisa; Yashiroda, Yoko; Taoka, Hiroshi; Ishigami, Ken; Watanabe, Hidenori; Nakajima, Hidenori; Tani, Tokio; Horinouchi, Sueharu; Yoshida, Minoru

    2007-12-21

    Nuclear retention of pre-mRNAs is tightly regulated by several security mechanisms that prevent pre-mRNA export into the cytoplasm. Recently, spliceostatin A, a methylated derivative of a potent antitumor microbial metabolite FR901464, was found to cause pre-mRNA accumulation and translation in mammalian cells. Here we report that spliceostatin A also inhibits splicing and nuclear retention of pre-mRNA in a fission yeast strain that lacks the multidrug resistance protein Pmd1. As observed in mammalian cells, spliceostatin A is bound to components of the SF3b complex in the spliceosome. Furthermore, overexpression of nup211, a homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae MLP1, suppresses translation of pre-mRNAs accumulated by spliceostatin A. These results suggest that the SF3b complex has a conserved role in pre-mRNA retention, which is independent of the Mlp1 function.

  17. Casein kinase II is required for the spindle assembly checkpoint by regulating Mad2p in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Midori; Yamamoto, Ayumu; Murakami-Tonami, Yuko; Nakanishi, Makoto; Yoshida, Takashi; Aiba, Hirofumi; Murakami, Hiroshi

    2009-10-23

    The spindle checkpoint is a surveillance mechanism that ensures the fidelity of chromosome segregation in mitosis. Here we show that fission yeast casein kinase II (CK2) is required for this checkpoint function. In the CK2 mutants mitosis occurs in the presence of a spindle defect, and the spindle checkpoint protein Mad2p fails to localize to unattached kinetochores. The CK2 mutants are sensitive to the microtubule depolymerising drug thiabendazole, which is counteracted by ectopic expression of mad2{sup +}. The level of Mad2p is low in the CK2 mutants. These results suggest that CK2 has a role in the spindle checkpoint by regulating Mad2p.

  18. The fission yeast homologue of CENP-B, Abp1, regulates directionality of mating-type switching.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Arnal, Lorena; Marsellach, Francesc-Xavier; Azorín, Fernando

    2008-04-09

    In fission yeast, mating-type switching involves replacing genetic information contained at the expressed mat1 locus by that of either the mat2P or mat3M donor loci. Donor selection is nonrandom, as mat1P cells preferentially use mat3M for switching, whereas mat1M cells use mat2P. Switching directionality is determined by the cell-type-specific distribution of the Swi2-Swi5 complex that, in mat1P cells, localises to mat3M and, only in mat1M cells, spreads to mat2P in a heterochromatin-dependent manner. Mechanisms regulating spreading of Swi2-Swi5 across heterochromatin are not fully understood. Here, we show that the fission yeast homologue of CENP-B, Abp1, binds to the silent domain of the mating-type locus and regulates directionality of switching. Deletion of abp1 prevents utilisation of mat2P, as when heterochromatin is disrupted and spreading of Swi2-Swi5 is impaired. Our results show that, indeed, deletion of abp1 abolishes spreading of Swi2-Swi5 to mat2P. However, in abp1Delta cells, heterochromatin organisation at the mating-type locus is preserved, indicating that Abp1 is actually required for efficient spreading of Swi2-Swi5 through heterochromatin. Cbh1 and Cbh2, which are also homologous to CENP-B, have only a minor contribution to the regulation of directionality of switching, which is in contrast with the strong effects observed for Abp1.

  19. RNA interference regulates the cell cycle checkpoint through the RNA export factor, Ptr1, in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Iida, Tetsushi; Iida, Naoko; Tsutsui, Yasuhiro; Yamao, Fumiaki; Kobayashi, Takehiko

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RNAi is linked to the cell cycle checkpoint in fission yeast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ptr1 co-purifies with Ago1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ptr1-1 mutation impairs the checkpoint but does not affect gene silencing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ago1{sup +} and ptr1{sup +} regulate the cell cycle checkpoint via the same pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutations in ago1{sup +} and ptr1{sup +} lead to the nuclear accumulation of poly(A){sup +} RNAs. -- Abstract: Ago1, an effector protein of RNA interference (RNAi), regulates heterochromatin silencing and cell cycle arrest in fission yeast. However, the mechanism by which Ago1 controls cell cycle checkpoint following hydroxyurea (HU) treatment has not been elucidated. In this study, we show that Ago1 and other RNAi factors control cell cycle checkpoint following HU treatment via a mechanism independent of silencing. While silencing requires dcr1{sup +}, the overexpression of ago1{sup +} alleviated the cell cycle defect in dcr1{Delta}. Ago1 interacted with the mRNA export factor, Ptr1. The ptr1-1 mutation impaired cell cycle checkpoint but gene silencing was unaffected. Genetic analysis revealed that the regulation of cell cycle checkpoint by ago1{sup +} is dependent on ptr1{sup +}. Nuclear accumulation of poly(A){sup +} RNAs was detected in mutants of ago1{sup +} and ptr1{sup +}, suggesting there is a functional link between the cell cycle checkpoint and RNAi-mediated RNA quality control.

  20. Roles of a Fimbrin and an α-Actinin-like Protein in Fission Yeast Cell Polarization and Cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian-Qiu; Bähler, Jürg; Pringle, John R.

    2001-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells contain many actin-interacting proteins, including the α-actinins and the fimbrins, both of which have actin cross-linking activity in vitro. We report here the identification and characterization of both an α-actinin-like protein (Ain1p) and a fimbrin (Fim1p) in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Ain1p localizes to the actomyosin-containing medial ring in an F-actin–dependent manner, and the Ain1p ring contracts during cytokinesis. ain1 deletion cells have no obvious defects under normal growth conditions but display severe cytokinesis defects, associated with defects in medial-ring and septum formation, under certain stress conditions. Overexpression of Ain1p also causes cytokinesis defects, and the ain1 deletion shows synthetic effects with other mutations known to affect medial-ring positioning and/or organization. Fim1p localizes both to the cortical actin patches and to the medial ring in an F-actin–dependent manner, and several lines of evidence suggest that Fim1p is involved in polarization of the actin cytoskeleton. Although a fim1 deletion strain has no detectable defect in cytokinesis, overexpression of Fim1p causes a lethal cytokinesis defect associated with a failure to form the medial ring and concentrate actin patches at the cell middle. Moreover, an ain1 fim1 double mutant has a synthetical-lethal defect in medial-ring assembly and cell division. Thus, Ain1p and Fim1p appear to have an overlapping and essential function in fission yeast cytokinesis. In addition, protein-localization and mutant-phenotype data suggest that Fim1p, but not Ain1p, plays important roles in mating and in spore formation. PMID:11294907

  1. Inner nuclear membrane protein Lem2 facilitates Rad3-mediated checkpoint signaling under replication stress induced by nucleotide depletion in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong-Jie

    2016-04-01

    DNA replication checkpoint is a highly conserved cellular signaling pathway critical for maintaining genome integrity in eukaryotes. It is activated when DNA replication is perturbed. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, perturbed replication forks activate the sensor kinase Rad3 (ATR/Mec1), which works cooperatively with mediator Mrc1 and the 9-1-1 checkpoint clamp to phosphorylate the effector kinase Cds1 (CHK2/Rad53). Phosphorylation of Cds1 promotes autoactivation of the kinase. Activated Cds1 diffuses away from the forks and stimulates most of the checkpoint responses under replication stress. Although this signaling pathway has been well understood in fission yeast, how the signaling is initiated and thus regulated remains incompletely understood. Previous studies have shown that deletion of lem2(+) sensitizes cells to the inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase, hydroxyurea. However, the underlying mechanism is still not well understood. This study shows that in the presence of hydroxyurea, Lem2 facilitates Rad3-mediated checkpoint signaling for Cds1 activation. Without Lem2, all known Rad3-dependent phosphorylations critical for replication checkpoint signaling are seriously compromised, which likely causes the aberrant mitosis and drug sensitivity observed in this mutant. Interestingly, the mutant is not very sensitive to DNA damage and the DNA damage checkpoint remains largely intact, suggesting that the main function of Lem2 is to facilitate checkpoint signaling in response to replication stress. Since Lem2 is an inner nuclear membrane protein, these results also suggest that the replication checkpoint may be spatially regulated inside the nucleus, a previously unknown mechanism.

  2. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as a model to understand how peroxiredoxins influence cell responses to hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Veal, Elizabeth A; Tomalin, Lewis E; Morgan, Brian A; Day, Alison M

    2014-08-01

    As a more selectively reactive oxygen species, H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide) has been co-opted as a signalling molecule, but high levels can still lead to lethal amounts of cell damage. 2-Cys Prxs (peroxiredoxins) are ubiquitous thioredoxin peroxidases which utilize reversibly oxidized catalytic cysteine residues to reduce peroxides. As such, Prxs potentially make an important contribution to the repertoire of cell defences against oxidative damage. Although the abundance of eukaryotic 2-Cys Prxs suggests an important role in maintaining cell redox, the surprising sensitivity of their thioredoxin peroxidase activity to inactivation by H2O2 has raised questions as to their role as an oxidative stress defence. Indeed, work in model yeast has led the way in revealing that Prxs do much more than simply remove peroxides and have even uncovered circumstances where their thioredoxin peroxidase activity is detrimental. In the present paper, we focus on what we have learned from studies in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe about the different roles of 2-Cys Prxs in responses to H2O2 and discuss the general implications of these findings for other systems.

  3. The meiosis-specific nuclear passenger protein is required for proper assembly of forespore membrane in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Takaine, Masak; Imada, Kazuki; Numata, Osamu; Nakamura, Taro; Nakano, Kentaro

    2014-10-15

    Sporulation, gametogenesis in yeast, consists of meiotic nuclear division and spore morphogenesis. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the four haploid nuclei produced after meiosis II are encapsulated by the forespore membrane (FSM), which is newly synthesized from spindle pole bodies (SPBs) in the cytoplasm of the mother cell as spore precursors. Although the coordination between meiosis and FSM assembly is vital for proper sporulation, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we identified a new meiosis-specific protein Npg1, and found that it was involved in the efficient formation of spores and spore viability. The accumulation and organization of the FSM was compromised in npg1-null cells, leading to the error-prone envelopment of nuclei. Npg1 was first seen as internuclear dots and translocated to the SPBs before the FSM assembled. Genetic analysis revealed that Npg1 worked in conjunction with the FSM proteins Spo3 and Meu14. These results suggest a possible signaling link from the nucleus to the meiotic SPBs in order to associate the onset of FSM assembly with meiosis II, which ensures the successful partitioning of gametic nuclei.

  4. Genetic interactions and functional analyses of the fission yeast gsk3 and amk2 single and double mutants defective in TORC1-dependent processes

    PubMed Central

    Rallis, Charalampos; Townsend, StJohn; Bähler, Jürg

    2017-01-01

    The Target of Rapamycin (TOR) signalling network plays important roles in aging and disease. The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and the Gsk3 kinase inhibit TOR during stress. We performed genetic interaction screens using synthetic genetic arrays (SGA) with gsk3 and amk2 as query mutants, the latter encoding the regulatory subunit of AMPK. We identified 69 negative and 82 positive common genetic interactors, with functions related to cellular growth and stress. The 120 gsk3-specific negative interactors included genes functioning in translation and ribosomes. The 215 amk2-specific negative interactors included genes functioning in chromatin silencing and DNA damage repair. Both amk2- and gsk3-specific interactors were enriched in phenotype categories related to abnormal cell size and shape. We also performed SGA screen with the amk2 gsk3 double mutant as a query. Mutants sensitive to 5-fluorouracil, an anticancer drug are under-represented within the 305 positive interactors specific for the amk2 gsk3 query. The triple-mutant SGA screen showed higher number of negative interactions than the double mutant SGA screens and uncovered additional genetic network information. These results reveal common and specialized roles of AMPK and Gsk3 in mediating TOR-dependent processes, indicating that AMPK and Gsk3 act in parallel to inhibit TOR function in fission yeast. PMID:28281664

  5. Preferential recombination between GC clusters in yeast mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Dieckmann, C L; Gandy, B

    1987-01-01

    Yeast mitochondrial DNA molecules have long, AT-rich intergenic spacers punctuated by short GC clusters. GC-rich elements have previously been characterized by others as preferred sites for intramolecular recombination leading to the formation of subgenomic petite molecules. In the present study we show that GC clusters are favored sites for intermolecular recombination between a petite and the wild-type grande genome. The petite studied retains 6.5 kb of mitochondrial DNA reiterated tandemly to form molecules consisting of repeated units. Genetic selection for integration of tandem 6.5 kb repeats of the petite into the grande genome yielded a novel recombination event. One of two crossovers in a double exchange event occurred as expected in the 6.5 kb of matching sequence between the genomes, whereas the second exchange involved a 44 bp GC cluster in the petite and another 44 bp GC cluster in the grande genome 700 bp proximal to the region of homology. Creation of a mitochondrial DNA molecule with a repetitive region led to secondary recombination events that generated a family of molecules with zero to several petite units. The finding that 44 bp GC clusters are preferred as sites for intermolecular exchange adds to the data on petite excision implicating these elements as recombinational hotspots in the yeast mitochondrial genome. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3327690

  6. [Molecular cloning of some components of the translation apparatus of fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and a list of its cytoplasm ic proteins genes].

    PubMed

    Shpakovskiĭ, G V; Baranova, G M; Wood, V; Gwilliam, R G; Shematorova, E K; Korol'chuk, O L; Lebedenko, E N

    1999-06-01

    Full-length cDNAs of four new genes encoding cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins L14 and L20 (large ribosomal subunit) and S1 and S27 (small ribosomal subunit) were isolated and sequenced during the analysis of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome. One of the Sz. pombe genes encoding translation elongation factor EF-2 was also cloned and its precise position on chromosome I established. A unified nomenclature was proposed, and the list of all known genetic determinants encoding cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins of Sz. pombe was compiled. By now, 76 genes/cDNAs encoding different ribosomal proteins have been identified in the fission yeast genome. Among them, 35 genes are duplicated and three homologous genes are identified for each of the ribosomal proteins L2, L16, P1, and P2.

  7. Ribosomal DNA polymorphisms in the yeast Geotrichum candidum.

    PubMed

    Alper, Iraz; Frenette, Michel; Labrie, Steve

    2011-12-01

    The dimorphic yeast Geotrichum candidum (teleomorph: Galactomyces candidus) is commonly used to inoculate washed-rind and bloomy-rind cheeses. However, little is known about the phylogenetic lineage of this microorganism. We have sequenced the complete 18S, 5.8S, 26S ribosomal RNA genes and their internal transcribed spacers (ITS1) and ITS2 regions (5126 nucleotides) from 18 G. candidum strains from various environmental niches, with a focus on dairy strains. Multiple sequence alignments revealed the presence of 60 polymorphic sites, which is generally unusual for ribosomal DNA (rDNA) within a given species because of the concerted evolution mechanism. This mechanism drives genetic homogenization to prevent the divergent evolution of rDNA copies within individuals. While the polymorphisms observed were mainly substitutions, one insertion/deletion (indel) polymorphism was detected in ITS1. No polymorphic sites were detected downstream from this indel site, that is, in 5.8S and ITS2. More surprisingly, many sequence electrophoregrams generated during the sequencing of the rDNA had dual peaks, suggesting that many individuals exhibited intragenomic rDNA variability. The ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 regions of four strains were cloned. The sequence analysis of 68 clones revealed 32 different ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 variants within these four strains. Depending on the strain, from four to twelve variants were detected, indicating that multiple rDNA copies were present in the genomes of these G. candidum strains. These results contribute to the debate concerning the use of the ITS region for barcoding fungi and suggest that community profiling techniques based on rDNA should be used with caution.

  8. Genetic analysis of cell morphogenesis in fission yeast--a role for casein kinase II in the establishment of polarized growth.

    PubMed Central

    Snell, V; Nurse, P

    1994-01-01

    We have initiated a study to identify genes regulating cell morphogenesis in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Five genes have been identified, orb1-orb5, whose mutation gives rise to spherical cells, indicative of an inability to polarize growth. Two further genes have been identified, tea1 and ban1, whose mutant alleles have disturbed patterns of tip growth, leading to T-shaped and curved cells. In fission yeast, sites of cell wall deposition are defined by actin localization, with actin distributions and therefore growth patterns undergoing cell cycle stage-specific reorganization. Studies of double mutants constructed between orb5-19 and various cdc mutants blocked before and after cell division show that orb5 is required for the re-establishment of polar growth following cytokinesis. This indicates that the mutant allele orb5-19 is defective in the reinitiation of polarized growth, even though actin reorganization to the cell tips occurs normally. orb5 encodes a fission yeast homologue of casein kinase II alpha. We propose that this kinase plays a role in the translation of cell polarity into polarized growth, but not in the establishment of polarity itself. Images PMID:8187760

  9. LEM2 recruits CHMP7 for ESCRT-mediated nuclear envelope closure in fission yeast and human cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Mingyu; LaJoie, Dollie; Chen, Opal S; von Appen, Alexander; Ladinsky, Mark S; Redd, Michael J; Nikolova, Linda; Bjorkman, Pamela J; Sundquist, Wesley I; Ullman, Katharine S; Frost, Adam

    2017-03-14

    Endosomal sorting complexes required for transport III (ESCRT-III) proteins have been implicated in sealing the nuclear envelope in mammals, spindle pole body dynamics in fission yeast, and surveillance of defective nuclear pore complexes in budding yeast. Here, we report that Lem2p (LEM2), a member of the LEM (Lap2-Emerin-Man1) family of inner nuclear membrane proteins, and the ESCRT-II/ESCRT-III hybrid protein Cmp7p (CHMP7), work together to recruit additional ESCRT-III proteins to holes in the nuclear membrane. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, deletion of the ATPase vps4 leads to severe defects in nuclear morphology and integrity. These phenotypes are suppressed by loss-of-function mutations that arise spontaneously in lem2 or cmp7, implying that these proteins may function upstream in the same pathway. Building on these genetic interactions, we explored the role of LEM2 during nuclear envelope reformation in human cells. We found that CHMP7 and LEM2 enrich at the same region of the chromatin disk periphery during this window of cell division and that CHMP7 can bind directly to the C-terminal domain of LEM2 in vitro. We further found that, during nuclear envelope formation, recruitment of the ESCRT factors CHMP7, CHMP2A, and IST1/CHMP8 all depend on LEM2 in human cells. We conclude that Lem2p/LEM2 is a conserved nuclear site-specific adaptor that recruits Cmp7p/CHMP7 and downstream ESCRT factors to the nuclear envelope.

  10. A New Membrane Protein Sbg1 Links the Contractile Ring Apparatus and Septum Synthesis Machinery in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Kriti; Palani, Saravanan; Cortés, Juan C. G.; Sato, Mamiko; Sevugan, Mayalagu; Ramos, Mariona; Vijaykumar, Shruthi; Osumi, Masako; Naqvi, Naweed I.; Ribas, Juan Carlos; Balasubramanian, Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinesis in many organisms requires a plasma membrane anchored actomyosin ring, whose contraction facilitates cell division. In yeast and fungi, actomyosin ring constriction is also coordinated with division septum assembly. How the actomyosin ring interacts with the plasma membrane and the plasma membrane-localized septum synthesizing machinery remains poorly understood. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, an attractive model organism to study cytokinesis, the β-1,3-glucan synthase Cps1p / Bgs1p, an integral membrane protein, localizes to the plasma membrane overlying the actomyosin ring and is required for primary septum synthesis. Through a high-dosage suppressor screen we identified an essential gene, sbg1+ (suppressor of beta glucan synthase 1), which suppressed the colony formation defect of Bgs1-defective cps1-191 mutant at higher temperatures. Sbg1p, an integral membrane protein, localizes to the cell ends and to the division site. Sbg1p and Bgs1p physically interact and are dependent on each other to localize to the division site. Loss of Sbg1p results in an unstable actomyosin ring that unravels and slides, leading to an inability to deposit a single contiguous division septum and an important reduction of the β-1,3-glucan proportion in the cell wall, coincident with that observed in the cps1-191 mutant. Sbg1p shows genetic and / or physical interaction with Rga7p, Imp2p, Cdc15p, and Pxl1p, proteins known to be required for actomyosin ring integrity and efficient septum synthesis. This study establishes Sbg1p as a key member of a group of proteins that link the plasma membrane, the actomyosin ring, and the division septum assembly machinery in fission yeast. PMID:27749909

  11. A role for calcium in the regulation of neutral trehalase activity in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Alejandro; Soto, Teresa; Vicente-Soler, Jero; Paredes, Vanessa; Madrid, Marisa; Gacto, Mariano; Cansado, José

    2003-01-01

    Neutral trehalases mobilize trehalose accumulated by fungal cells as a protective and storage carbohydrate. A structural feature of these enzymes is the presence of an EF-like motif similar to that shown by many Ca2+-binding proteins. In this study we provide direct evidence for physical binding of Ca2+ to neutral trehalase (Ntp1p) of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and show that aspartic residues at positions 97 and 108 in the conserved putative Ca2+-binding motif of Ntp1p appear to be responsible for this interaction. Mutations in these residues do not interfere with the ability of Ntp1p to associate in vivo with trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, but prevent activation of neutral trehalase triggered by the addition of glucose or by subjecting cells to stressing conditions. Strains expressing Ntp1p variants that are unable to bind Ca2+ partially resemble those devoid of the ntp1+ gene in terms of trehalose hyperaccumulation. Gel filtration of cell extracts from wild-type cells after EDTA treatment or from cells containing Ntp1p with mutations in aspartic acid residues within the Ca2+-binding site revealed that Ntp1p eluted mainly in an inactive conformation instead of the dimeric or trimeric active form of the enzyme. These results suggest that activation of S. pombe Ntp1p under different conditions depends upon Ca2+ binding through the Ca2+-binding motif as a prerequisite for correct enzyme oligomerization to its active form. Given the high degree of conservation of the Ca2+ accommodation site, this might be a general mechanism regulating neutral trehalase activity in other yeasts and filamentous fungi. PMID:12943532

  12. Nitrogen depletion in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe causes nucleosome loss in both promoters and coding regions of activated genes

    PubMed Central

    Kristell, Carolina; Orzechowski Westholm, Jakub; Olsson, Ida; Ronne, Hans; Komorowski, Jan; Bjerling, Pernilla

    2010-01-01

    Gene transcription is associated with local changes in chromatin, both in nucleosome positions and in chemical modifications of the histones. Chromatin dynamics has mostly been studied on a single-gene basis. Those genome-wide studies that have been made primarily investigated steady-state transcription. However, three studies of genome-wide changes in chromatin during the transcriptional response to heat shock in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed nucleosome eviction in promoter regions but only minor effects in coding regions. Here, we describe the short-term response to nitrogen starvation in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Nitrogen depletion leads to a fast induction of a large number of genes in S. pombe and is thus suitable for genome-wide studies of chromatin dynamics during gene regulation. After 20 min of nitrogen removal, 118 transcripts were up-regulated. The distribution of regulated genes throughout the genome was not random; many up-regulated genes were found in clusters, while large parts of the genome were devoid of up-regulated genes. Surprisingly, this up-regulation was associated with nucleosome eviction of equal magnitudes in the promoters and in the coding regions. The nucleosome loss was not limited to induction by nitrogen depletion but also occurred during cadmium treatment. Furthermore, the lower nucleosome density persisted for at least 60 min after induction. Two highly induced genes, urg1+ and urg2+, displayed a substantial nucleosome loss, with only 20% of the nucleosomes being left in the coding region. We conclude that nucleosome loss during transcriptional activation is not necessarily limited to promoter regions. PMID:20086243

  13. LEM2 recruits CHMP7 for ESCRT-mediated nuclear envelope closure in fission yeast and human cells

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Mingyu; LaJoie, Dollie; Chen, Opal S.; von Appen, Alexander; Ladinsky, Mark S.; Redd, Michael J.; Nikolova, Linda; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Sundquist, Wesley I.; Ullman, Katharine S.; Frost, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Endosomal sorting complexes required for transport III (ESCRT-III) proteins have been implicated in sealing the nuclear envelope in mammals, spindle pole body dynamics in fission yeast, and surveillance of defective nuclear pore complexes in budding yeast. Here, we report that Lem2p (LEM2), a member of the LEM (Lap2-Emerin-Man1) family of inner nuclear membrane proteins, and the ESCRT-II/ESCRT-III hybrid protein Cmp7p (CHMP7), work together to recruit additional ESCRT-III proteins to holes in the nuclear membrane. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, deletion of the ATPase vps4 leads to severe defects in nuclear morphology and integrity. These phenotypes are suppressed by loss-of-function mutations that arise spontaneously in lem2 or cmp7, implying that these proteins may function upstream in the same pathway. Building on these genetic interactions, we explored the role of LEM2 during nuclear envelope reformation in human cells. We found that CHMP7 and LEM2 enrich at the same region of the chromatin disk periphery during this window of cell division and that CHMP7 can bind directly to the C-terminal domain of LEM2 in vitro. We further found that, during nuclear envelope formation, recruitment of the ESCRT factors CHMP7, CHMP2A, and IST1/CHMP8 all depend on LEM2 in human cells. We conclude that Lem2p/LEM2 is a conserved nuclear site-specific adaptor that recruits Cmp7p/CHMP7 and downstream ESCRT factors to the nuclear envelope. PMID:28242692

  14. Coexpression of redox partners increases the hydrocortisone (cortisol) production efficiency in CYP11B1 expressing fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Hakki, Tarek; Zearo, Silvia; Drăgan, Călin-Aurel; Bureik, Matthias; Bernhardt, Rita

    2008-02-01

    Cytochromes P450 play a vital role in the steroid biosynthesis pathway of the adrenal gland. An example of an essential P450 cytochrome is the steroid 11beta-hydroxylase CYP11B1, which catalyses the conversion of 11-deoxycorticol to hydrocortisone. However, despite its high biotechnological potential, this enzyme has so far been unsuccessfully employed in present-day biotechnology due to a poor expression yield and inherent protein instability. In this study, CYP11B1 was biotransformed into various strains of the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, all of which also expressed the electron transfer proteins adrenodoxin and/or adrenodoxin reductase - central components of the mitochondrial P450 system - in order to maximise hydrocortisone production efficiency in our proposed model system. Site-directed mutagenesis of CYP11B1 at positions 52 and 78 was performed in order to evaluate the impact of altering the amino acids at these sites. It was found that the presence of an isoleucine at position 78 conferred the highest 11beta-hydroxylation activity of CYP11B1. Coexpression of adrenodoxin and adrenodoxin reductase appeared to further increase the 11beta-hydroxylase activity of the enzyme (3.4 fold). Adrenodoxin mutants which were found to significantly enhance enzyme efficiency in other cytochromes in previous studies were also tested in our system. It was found that, in this case, the wild type adrenodoxin was more efficient. The new fission yeast strain TH75 coexpressing the wild type Adx and AdR displays high hydrocortisone production efficiency at an average of 1mM hydrocortisone over a period of 72h, the highest value published to date for this biotransformation. Finally, our research shows that pTH2 is an ideal plasmid for the coexpression of the mitochondrial electron transfer counterparts, adrenodoxin and adrenodoxin reductase, in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and so could serve as a convenient tool for future biotechnological applications.

  15. Rapid regulation of nuclear proteins by rapamycin-induced translocation in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lin; Laor, Dana; Weisman, Ronit; Forsburg, Susan L

    2014-07-01

    Genetic analysis of protein function requires a rapid means of inactivating the gene under study. Typically, this exploits temperature-sensitive mutations or promoter shut-off techniques. We report the adaptation to Schizosaccharomyces pombe of the anchor-away technique, originally designed in budding yeast by Laemmli lab. This method relies on a rapamycin-mediated interaction between the FRB- and FKBP12-binding domains to relocalize nuclear proteins of interest to the cytoplasm. We demonstrate a rapid nuclear depletion of abundant proteins as proof of principle.

  16. Neuronal Calcium Sensor-1 (Ncs1p) Is Up-regulated by Calcineurin to Promote Ca2+ Tolerance in Fission Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Hamasaki-Katagiri, Nobuko; Ames, James B.

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal calcium sensor (NCS) proteins regulate signal transduction and are highly conserved from yeast to humans. NCS homolog in fission yeast (Ncs1p) is essential for cell growth under extreme Ca2+ conditions. Ncs1p expression increases ∼100-fold when fission yeast grows in high extracellular Ca2+ (>0.1 m). Here, we show that Ca2+-induced expression of Ncs1p is controlled at the level of transcription. Transcriptional reporter assays show that ncs1 promoter activity increased 30-fold when extracellular Ca2+ was raised to 0.1 m and was highly Ca2+-specific. Ca2+-dependent transcription of ncs1 is abolished by the calcineurin inhibitor (FK506) and by knocking out the calcineurin target, prz1. Thus, Ca2+-induced expression of Ncs1p is linked to the calcineurin/prz1 stress response. The Ca2+-responsive ncs1 promoter region consists of 130 nucleotides directly upstream from the start codon and contains tandem repeats of the sequence, 5′-caact-3′, that binds to Prz1p. The Ca2+-sensitive ncs1Δ phenotype is rescued by a yam8 null mutation, suggesting a possible interaction between Ncs1p and the Ca2+ channel, Yam8p. Ca2+ uptake and Ncs1p binding to yeast membranes are both decreased in yam8Δ, suggesting Ca2+-induced binding of Ncs1p to Yam8p results in channel closure. We propose that Ncs1p promotes Ca2+ tolerance in fission yeast, in part by cytosolic Ca2+ buffering and perhaps by negatively regulating the Yam8p Ca2+ channel. PMID:20018864

  17. Sbg1 Is a Novel Regulator for the Localization of the β-Glucan Synthase Bgs1 in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Reshma; Pontasch, Josef A.; Wu, Jian-Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Glucan synthases synthesize glucans, complex polysaccharides that are the major components in fungal cell walls and division septa. Studying regulation of glucan synthases is important as they are essential for fungal cell survival and thus popular targets for anti-fungal drugs. Linear 1,3-β-glucan is the main component of primary septum and is synthesized by the conserved β-glucan synthase Bgs1 in fission yeast cytokinesis. It is known that Rho1 GTPase regulates Bgs1 catalytic activity and the F-BAR protein Cdc15 plays a role in Bgs1 delivery to the plasma membrane. Here we characterize a novel protein Sbg1 that is present in a complex with Bgs1 and regulates its protein levels and localization. Sbg1 is essential for contractile-ring constriction and septum formation during cytokinesis. Sbg1 and Bgs1 physically interact and are interdependent for localization to the plasma membrane. Bgs1 is less stable and/or mis-targeted to vacuoles in sbg1 mutants. Moreover, Sbg1 plays an earlier and more important role in Bgs1 trafficking and localization than Cdc15. Together, our data reveal a new mode of regulation for the essential β-glucan synthase Bgs1 by the novel protein Sbg1. PMID:27898700

  18. A genetic approach to study H2O2 scavenging in fission yeast--distinct roles of peroxiredoxin and catalase.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Esther; García-Santamarina, Sarela; Calvo, Isabel A; Carmona, Mercè; Boronat, Susanna; Domènech, Alba; Ayté, José; Hidalgo, Elena

    2014-04-01

    The main peroxiredoxin in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Tpx1, is important to sustain aerobic growth, and cells lacking this protein are only able to grow on solid plates under anaerobic conditions. We have found that deletion of the gene coding for thioredoxin reductase, trr1, is a suppressor of the sensitivity to aerobic growth of Δtpx1 cells, so that cells lacking both proteins are able to grow on solid plates in the presence of oxygen. We have investigated this suppression effect, and determined that it depends on the presence of catalase, which is constitutively expressed in Δtrr1 cells in a transcription factor Pap1-dependent manner. A complete characterization of the repertoire of hydrogen peroxide scavenging activities in fission yeast suggests that Tpx1 is the only enzyme with sufficient sensitivity for peroxides and cellular abundance as to control the low levels produced during aerobic growth, catalase being the next barrier of detoxification when the steady-state levels of peroxides are increased in Δtpx1 cells. Gpx1, the only glutathione peroxidase encoded by the S. pombe genome, only has a minor secondary role when extracellular peroxides are added. Our study proposes non-overlapping roles for the different hydrogen peroxide scavenging activities of this eukaryotic organism.

  19. Two Related Kinesins, klp5+ and klp6+, Foster Microtubule Disassembly and Are Required for Meiosis in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    West, Robert R.; Malmstrom, Terra; Troxell, Cynthia L.; McIntosh, J. Richard

    2001-01-01

    The kinesin superfamily of microtubule motor proteins is important in many cellular processes, including mitosis and meiosis, vesicle transport, and the establishment and maintenance of cell polarity. We have characterized two related kinesins in fission yeast, klp5+ and klp6+, that are amino-terminal motors of the KIP3 subfamily. Analysis of null mutants demonstrates that neither klp5+ nor klp6+, individually or together, is essential for vegetative growth, although these mutants have altered microtubule behavior. klp5Δ and klp6Δ are resistant to high concentrations of the microtubule poison thiabendazole and have abnormally long cytoplasmic microtubules that can curl around the ends of the cell. This phenotype is greatly enhanced in the cell cycle mutant cdc25–22, leading to a bent, asymmetric cell morphology as cells elongate during cell cycle arrest. Klp5p-GFP and Klp6p-GFP both localize to cytoplasmic microtubules throughout the cell cycle and to spindles in mitosis, but their localizations are not interdependent. During the meiotic phase of the life cycle, both of these kinesins are essential. Spore viability is low in homozygous crosses of either null mutant. Heterozygous crosses of klp5Δ with klp6Δ have an intermediate viability, suggesting cooperation between these proteins in meiosis. PMID:11739790

  20. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Reveals Pathways for Coordination of Cell Growth and Division by the Conserved Fission Yeast Kinase Pom1*

    PubMed Central

    Kettenbach, Arminja N.; Deng, Lin; Wu, Youjun; Baldissard, Suzanne; Adamo, Mark E.; Gerber, Scott A.; Moseley, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Complex phosphorylation-dependent signaling networks underlie the coordination of cellular growth and division. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the Dual specificity tyrosine-(Y)-phosphorylation regulated kinase (DYRK) family protein kinase Pom1 regulates cell cycle progression through the mitotic inducer Cdr2 and controls cell polarity through unknown targets. Here, we sought to determine the phosphorylation targets of Pom1 kinase activity by SILAC-based phosphoproteomics. We defined a set of high-confidence Pom1 targets that were enriched for cytoskeletal and cell growth functions. Cdr2 was the only cell cycle target of Pom1 kinase activity that we identified in cells. Mutation of Pom1-dependent phosphorylation sites in the C terminus of Cdr2 inhibited mitotic entry but did not impair Cdr2 localization. In addition, we found that Pom1 phosphorylated multiple substrates that function in polarized cell growth, including Tea4, Mod5, Pal1, the Rho GAP Rga7, and the Arf GEF Syt22. Purified Pom1 phosphorylated these cell polarity targets in vitro, confirming that they are direct substrates of Pom1 kinase activity and likely contribute to regulation of polarized growth by Pom1. Our study demonstrates that Pom1 acts in a linear pathway to control cell cycle progression while regulating a complex network of cell growth targets. PMID:25720772

  1. Gene amplification at a locus encoding a putative Na+/H+ antiporter confers sodium and lithium tolerance in fission yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Z P; McCullough, N; Martel, R; Hemmingsen, S; Young, P G

    1992-01-01

    We have identified a new locus, sodium 2 (sod2) based on selection for increased LiCl tolerance in fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Tolerant strains have enhanced pH-dependent Na+ export capacity and sodium transport experiments suggest that the gene encodes an Na+/H+ antiport. The predicted sod2 gene product can be placed in the broad class of transporters which possess 12 hydrophobic transmembrane domains. The protein shows some sequence similarity to the human and bacterial Na+/H+ antiporters. Overexpression of sod2 increased Na+ export capacity and conferred sodium tolerance. Osmotolerance was not affected and sod2 cells were unaffected for growth in K+. In a sod2 disruption strain cells were incapable of exporting sodium. They were hypersensitive to Na+ or Li+ and could not grow under conditions that approximate pH7. The sod2 gene amplification could be selected stepwise and the degree of such amplification correlated with the level of Na+ or Li+ tolerance. Images PMID:1314171

  2. Lipid droplets form from distinct regions of the cell in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, Alex; del Rio, Zuania P.; Beaver, Rachael A.; Morris, Ryan M.; Weiskittel, Taylor M.; Alshibli, Amany K.; Mannik, Jaana; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer; Dalhaimer, Paul

    2016-04-29

    Eukaryotic cells store cholesterol/sterol esters (SEs) and triacylglycerols (TAGs) in lipid droplets, which form from the contiguous endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network. However, it is not known if droplets preferentially form from certain regions of the ER over others. Here, we used fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells where the nuclear and cortical/peripheral ER domains are distinguishable by light microscopy to show that SE-enriched lipid droplets form away from the nucleus at the cell tips, whereas TAG-enriched lipid droplets form around the nucleus. Sterols localize to the regions of the cells where droplets enriched in SEs are observed. TAG droplet formation around the nucleus appears to be a strong function of diacylglycerol (DAG) homeostasis with Cpt1p, which coverts DAG into phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine localized exclusively to the nuclear ER. Also, Dgk1p, which converts DAG into phosphatidic acid localized strongly to the nuclear ER over the cortical/peripheral ER. We also show that TAG more readily translocates from the ER to lipid droplets than do SEs. Lastly, the results augment the standard lipid droplet formation model, which has SEs and TAGs flowing into the same nascent lipid droplet regardless of its biogenesis point in the cell.

  3. Med13p prevents mitochondrial fission and programmed cell death in yeast through nuclear retention of cyclin C.

    PubMed

    Khakhina, Svetlana; Cooper, Katrina F; Strich, Randy

    2014-09-15

    The yeast cyclin C-Cdk8 kinase forms a complex with Med13p to repress the transcription of genes involved in the stress response and meiosis. In response to oxidative stress, cyclin C displays nuclear to cytoplasmic relocalization that triggers mitochondrial fission and promotes programmed cell death. In this report, we demonstrate that Med13p mediates cyclin C nuclear retention in unstressed cells. Deleting MED13 allows aberrant cytoplasmic cyclin C localization and extensive mitochondrial fragmentation. Loss of Med13p function resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction and hypersensitivity to oxidative stress-induced programmed cell death that were dependent on cyclin C. The regulatory system controlling cyclin C-Med13p interaction is complex. First, a previous study found that cyclin C phosphorylation by the stress-activated MAP kinase Slt2p is required for nuclear to cytoplasmic translocation. This study found that cyclin C-Med13p association is impaired when the Slt2p target residue is substituted with a phosphomimetic amino acid. The second step involves Med13p destruction mediated by the 26S proteasome and cyclin C-Cdk8p kinase activity. In conclusion, Med13p maintains mitochondrial structure, function, and normal oxidative stress sensitivity through cyclin C nuclear retention. Releasing cyclin C from the nucleus involves both its phosphorylation by Slt2p coupled with Med13p destruction.

  4. Negative regulation of meiotic gene expression by the nuclear poly(a)-binding protein in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    St-André, Olivier; Lemieux, Caroline; Perreault, Audrey; Lackner, Daniel H; Bähler, Jürg; Bachand, François

    2010-09-03

    Meiosis is a cellular differentiation process in which hundreds of genes are temporally induced. Because the expression of meiotic genes during mitosis is detrimental to proliferation, meiotic genes must be negatively regulated in the mitotic cell cycle. Yet, little is known about mechanisms used by mitotic cells to repress meiosis-specific genes. Here we show that the poly(A)-binding protein Pab2, the fission yeast homolog of mammalian PABPN1, controls the expression of several meiotic transcripts during mitotic division. Our results from chromatin immunoprecipitation and promoter-swapping experiments indicate that Pab2 controls meiotic genes post-transcriptionally. Consistently, we show that the nuclear exosome complex cooperates with Pab2 in the negative regulation of meiotic genes. We also found that Pab2 plays a role in the RNA decay pathway orchestrated by Mmi1, a previously described factor that functions in the post-transcriptional elimination of meiotic transcripts. Our results support a model in which Mmi1 selectively targets meiotic transcripts for degradation via Pab2 and the exosome. Our findings have therefore uncovered a mode of gene regulation whereby a poly(A)-binding protein promotes RNA degradation in the nucleus to prevent untimely expression.

  5. Characterization of cytopathic factors through genome-wide analysis of the Zika viral proteins in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ge; Poulsen, Melissa; Fenyvuesvolgyi, Csaba; Yashiroda, Yoko; Yoshida, Minoru; Simard, J. Marc; Gallo, Robert C.; Zhao, Richard Y.

    2017-01-01

    The Zika virus (ZIKV) causes microcephaly and the Guillain-Barré syndrome. Little is known about how ZIKV causes these conditions or which ZIKV viral protein(s) is responsible for the associated ZIKV-induced cytopathic effects, including cell hypertrophy, growth restriction, cell-cycle dysregulation, and cell death. We used fission yeast for the rapid, global functional analysis of the ZIKV genome. All 14 proteins or small peptides were produced under an inducible promoter, and we measured the intracellular localization and the specific effects on ZIKV-associated cytopathic activities of each protein. The subcellular localization of each ZIKV protein was in overall agreement with its predicted protein structure. Five structural and two nonstructural ZIKV proteins showed various levels of cytopathic effects. The expression of these ZIKV proteins restricted cell proliferation, induced hypertrophy, or triggered cellular oxidative stress leading to cell death. The expression of premembrane protein (prM) resulted in cell-cycle G1 accumulation, whereas membrane-anchored capsid (anaC), membrane protein (M), envelope protein (E), and nonstructural protein 4A (NS4A) caused cell-cycle G2/M accumulation. A mechanistic study revealed that NS4A-induced cellular hypertrophy and growth restriction were mediated specifically through the target of rapamycin (TOR) cellular stress pathway involving Tor1 and type 2A phosphatase activator Tip41. These findings should provide a reference for future research on the prevention and treatment of ZIKV diseases. PMID:28049830

  6. Structure and Biochemical Properties of Fission Yeast Arp2/3 Complex Lacking the Arp2 Subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Nolen, B.; Pollard, T

    2008-01-01

    Arp2/3 (actin-related protein 2/3) complex is a seven-subunit complex that nucleates branched actin filaments in response to cellular signals. Nucleation-promoting factors such as WASp/Scar family proteins activate the complex by facilitating the activating conformational change and recruiting the first actin monomer for the daughter branch. Here we address the role of the Arp2 subunit in the function of Arp2/3 complex by isolating a version of the complex lacking Arp2 (Arp2? Arp2/3 complex) from fission yeast. An x-ray crystal structure of the ?Arp2 Arp2/3 complex showed that the rest of the complex is unperturbed by the loss of Arp2. However, the Arp2? Arp2/3 complex was inactive in actin nucleation assays, indicating that Arp2 is essential to form a branch. A fluorescence anisotropy assay showed that Arp2 does not contribute to the affinity of the complex for Wsp1-VCA, a Schizosaccharomyces pombe nucleation-promoting factor protein. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments showed that the loss of Arp2 does not prevent VCA from recruiting an actin monomer to the complex. Truncation of the N terminus of ARPC5, the smallest subunit in the complex, increased the yield of Arp2? Arp2/3 complex during purification but did not compromise nucleation activity of the full Arp2/3 complex.

  7. Cell length growth in fission yeast: an analysis of its bilinear character and the nature of its rate change transition.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Anna; Rácz-Mónus, Anna; Buchwald, Peter; Sveiczer, Ákos

    2013-11-01

    During their mitotic cycle, cylindrical fission yeast cells grow exclusively at their tips. Length growth starts at birth and halts at mitotic onset when the cells begin to prepare for division. While the growth pattern was initially considered to be exponential, during the last three decades an increasing amount of evidence indicated that it is rather a bilinear function [two linear segments separated by a rate change point (RCP)]. The main focus of this work was to clarify this and to elucidate the further question of whether the rate change occurs abruptly at the RCP or more smoothly during a transition period around it. We have analyzed the individual growth patterns obtained by time-lapse microscopy of 60 wild-type cells separately as well as that of the 'average' cell generated from their superposition. Linear, exponential, and bilinear functions were fitted to the data, and their suitability was compared using objective model selection criteria. This analysis found the overwhelming majority of the cells (70%) to have a bilinear growth pattern with close to half of them showing a smooth and not an abrupt transition. The growth pattern of the average cell was also found to be bilinear with a smooth transition.

  8. Roles of the TRAPP-II Complex and the Exocyst in Membrane Deposition during Fission Yeast Cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Lee, I-Ju; Rask, Galen; Wu, Jian-Qiu

    2016-01-01

    The cleavage-furrow tip adjacent to the actomyosin contractile ring is believed to be the predominant site for plasma-membrane insertion through exocyst-tethered vesicles during cytokinesis. Here we found that most secretory vesicles are delivered by myosin-V on linear actin cables in fission yeast cytokinesis. Surprisingly, by tracking individual exocytic and endocytic events, we found that vesicles with new membrane are deposited to the cleavage furrow relatively evenly during contractile-ring constriction, but the rim of the cleavage furrow is the main site for endocytosis. Fusion of vesicles with the plasma membrane requires vesicle tethers. Our data suggest that the transport particle protein II (TRAPP-II) complex and Rab11 GTPase Ypt3 help to tether secretory vesicles or tubulovesicular structures along the cleavage furrow while the exocyst tethers vesicles at the rim of the division plane. We conclude that the exocyst and TRAPP-II complex have distinct localizations at the division site, but both are important for membrane expansion and exocytosis during cytokinesis. PMID:27082518

  9. The Scw1 RNA-binding domain protein regulates septation and cell-wall structure in fission yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Karagiannis, Jim; Oulton, Rena; Young, Paul G

    2002-01-01

    Loss of the nonessential RNA-binding domain protein, Scw1, increases resistance to cell-wall-degrading enzymes in fission yeast. Surprisingly, scw1 null mutations also suppress the lethality of mutations (cdc11-136, cdc7-24, cdc14-118, sid1-239, sid2-250, sid3-106, sid4-A1, and mob1-1) at all levels of the sid pathway. This pathway forms part of the septation initiation network (SIN), which regulates the onset of septum formation and ensures the proper coupling of mitosis to cytokinesis. In contrast, scw1(-) mutations do not suppress ts alleles of the rng genes, cdc12 or cdc15. These mutations also prevent the formation of a septum and in addition block assembly and/or function of the contractile acto-myosin ring. sid mutants exhibit a hyper-sensitivity to cell-wall-degrading enzymes that is suppressed by loss of Scw1. Furthermore, scw1(-)-mediated rescue of sid mutants is abolished in the presence of calcofluor white, a compound that interferes with cell-wall synthesis. These data suggest that Scw1 acts in opposition to the SIN as a negative regulator of cell-wall/septum deposition. Unlike components of the SIN, Scw1 is predominantly a cytoplasmic protein and is not localized to the spindle pole body. PMID:12242222

  10. Molecular organization of cytokinesis nodes and contractile rings by super-resolution fluorescence microscopy of live fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Laplante, Caroline; Huang, Fang; Tebbs, Irene R.; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Pollard, Thomas D.

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinesis in animals, fungi, and amoebas depends on the constriction of a contractile ring built from a common set of conserved proteins. Many fundamental questions remain about how these proteins organize to generate the necessary tension for cytokinesis. Using quantitative high-speed fluorescence photoactivation localization microscopy (FPALM), we probed this question in live fission yeast cells at unprecedented resolution. We show that nodes, protein assembly precursors to the contractile ring, are discrete structural units with stoichiometric ratios and distinct distributions of constituent proteins. Anillin Mid1p, Fes/CIP4 homology-Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (F-BAR) Cdc15p, IQ motif containing GTPase-activating protein (IQGAP) Rng2p, and formin Cdc12p form the base of the node that anchors the ends of myosin II tails to the plasma membrane, with myosin II heads extending into the cytoplasm. This general node organization persists in the contractile ring where nodes move bidirectionally during constriction. We observed the dynamics of the actin network during cytokinesis, starting with the extension of short actin strands from nodes, which sometimes connected neighboring nodes. Later in cytokinesis, a broad network of thick bundles coalesced into a tight ring around the equator of the cell. The actin ring was ∼125 nm wide and ∼125 nm thick. These observations establish the organization of the proteins in the functional units of a cytokinetic contractile ring. PMID:27647921

  11. Constriction model of actomyosin ring for cytokinesis by fission yeast using a two-state sliding filament mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Yong-Woon; Mascagni, Michael

    2014-09-01

    We developed a model describing the structure and contractile mechanism of the actomyosin ring in fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The proposed ring includes actin, myosin, and α-actinin, and is organized into a structure similar to that of muscle sarcomeres. This structure justifies the use of the sliding-filament mechanism developed by Huxley and Hill, but it is probably less organized relative to that of muscle sarcomeres. Ring contraction tension was generated via the same fundamental mechanism used to generate muscle tension, but some physicochemical parameters were adjusted to be consistent with the proposed ring structure. Simulations allowed an estimate of ring constriction tension that reproduced the observed ring constriction velocity using a physiologically possible, self-consistent set of parameters. Proposed molecular-level properties responsible for the thousand-fold slower constriction velocity of the ring relative to that of muscle sarcomeres include fewer myosin molecules involved, a less organized contractile configuration, a low α-actinin concentration, and a high resistance membrane tension. Ring constriction velocity is demonstrated as an exponential function of time despite a near linear appearance. We proposed a hypothesis to explain why excess myosin heads inhibit constriction velocity rather than enhance it. The model revealed how myosin concentration and elastic resistance tension are balanced during cytokinesis in S. pombe.

  12. The fission yeast pleckstrin homology domain protein Spo7 is essential for initiation of forespore membrane assembly and spore morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura-Kubo, Michiko; Hirata, Aiko; Shimoda, Chikashi; Nakamura, Taro

    2011-01-01

    Sporulation in fission yeast represents a unique mode of cell division in which a new cell is formed within the cytoplasm of a mother cell. This event is accompanied by formation of the forespore membrane (FSM), which becomes the plasma membrane of spores. At prophase II, the spindle pole body (SPB) forms an outer plaque, from which formation of the FSM is initiated. Several components of the SPB play an indispensable role in SPB modification, and therefore in sporulation. In this paper, we report the identification of a novel SPB component, Spo7, which has a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. We found that Spo7 was essential for initiation of FSM assembly, but not for SPB modification. Spo7 directly bound to Meu14, a component of the leading edge of the FSM, and was essential for proper localization of Meu14. The PH domain of Spo7 had affinity for phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI3P). spo7 mutants lacking the PH domain showed aberrant spore morphology, similar to that of meu14 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (pik3) mutants. Our study suggests that Spo7 coordinates formation of the leading edge and initiation of FSM assembly, thereby accomplishing accurate formation of the FSM. PMID:21775631

  13. The novel proteins Rng8 and Rng9 regulate the myosin-V Myo51 during fission yeast cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Lo Presti, Libera; Zhu, Yi-Hua; Kang, Minhee; Martin, Sophie G.

    2014-01-01

    The myosin-V family of molecular motors is known to be under sophisticated regulation, but our knowledge of the roles and regulation of myosin-Vs in cytokinesis is limited. Here, we report that the myosin-V Myo51 affects contractile ring assembly and stability during fission yeast cytokinesis, and is regulated by two novel coiled-coil proteins, Rng8 and Rng9. Both rng8Δ and rng9Δ cells display similar defects as myo51Δ in cytokinesis. Rng8 and Rng9 are required for Myo51’s localizations to cytoplasmic puncta, actin cables, and the contractile ring. Myo51 puncta contain multiple Myo51 molecules and walk continuously on actin filaments in rng8+ cells, whereas Myo51 forms speckles containing only one dimer and does not move efficiently on actin tracks in rng8Δ. Consistently, Myo51 transports artificial cargos efficiently in vivo, and this activity is regulated by Rng8. Purified Rng8 and Rng9 form stable higher-order complexes. Collectively, we propose that Rng8 and Rng9 form oligomers and cluster multiple Myo51 dimers to regulate Myo51 localization and functions. PMID:24798735

  14. Natural genetic variation impacts expression levels of coding, non-coding, and antisense transcripts in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Clément-Ziza, Mathieu; Marsellach, Francesc X; Codlin, Sandra; Papadakis, Manos A; Reinhardt, Susanne; Rodríguez-López, María; Martin, Stuart; Marguerat, Samuel; Schmidt, Alexander; Lee, Eunhye; Workman, Christopher T; Bähler, Jürg; Beyer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Our current understanding of how natural genetic variation affects gene expression beyond well-annotated coding genes is still limited. The use of deep sequencing technologies for the study of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) has the potential to close this gap. Here, we generated the first recombinant strain library for fission yeast and conducted an RNA-seq-based QTL study of the coding, non-coding, and antisense transcriptomes. We show that the frequency of distal effects (trans-eQTLs) greatly exceeds the number of local effects (cis-eQTLs) and that non-coding RNAs are as likely to be affected by eQTLs as protein-coding RNAs. We identified a genetic variation of swc5 that modifies the levels of 871 RNAs, with effects on both sense and antisense transcription, and show that this effect most likely goes through a compromised deposition of the histone variant H2A.Z. The strains, methods, and datasets generated here provide a rich resource for future studies. PMID:25432776

  15. A mutual inhibition between APC/C and its substrate Mes1 required for meiotic progression in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Yuu; Trickey, Michelle; Izawa, Daisuke; Gannon, Julian; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yamano, Hiroyuki

    2008-03-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is a cell-cycle-regulated essential E3 ubiquitin ligase; however, very little is known about its meiotic regulation. Here we show that fission yeast Mes1 is a substrate of the APC/C as well as an inhibitor, allowing autoregulation of the APC/C in meiosis. Both traits require a functional destruction box (D box) and KEN box. We show that Mes1 directly binds the WD40 domain of the Fizzy family of APC/C activators. Intriguingly, expression of nonubiquitylatable Mes1 blocks cells in metaphase I with high levels of APC/C substrates, suggesting that ubiquitylation of Mes1 is required for partial degradation of cyclin B in meiosis I by alleviating Mes1 inhibitory function. Consistently, a ternary complex, APC/C-Fizzy/Cdc20-Mes1, is stabilized by inhibiting Mes1 ubiquitylation. These results demonstrate that the fine-tuning of the APC/C activity, by a substrate that is also an inhibitor, is required for the precise coordination and transition through meiosis.

  16. Two fission yeast B-type cyclins, cig2 and Cdc13, have different functions in mitosis.

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, A; Russell, P

    1993-01-01

    Cyclin B interacts with Cdc2 kinase to induce cell cycle events, particularly those of mitosis. The existence of cyclin B subtypes in several species has been known for some time, leading to speculation that key events of mitosis may be carried out by distinct functional classes of Cdc2/cyclin B. We report the discovery of cig2, a third B-type cyclin gene in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Disruption of cig2 delays the onset of mitosis, to the degree that a cig2 null allele rescues mitotic catastrophe mutants, including those that are unable to carry out the inhibitory tyrosyl phosphorylation of Cdc2 kinase. Consistent with this, a cig2 null allele exhibits synthetic lethal interactions with cdc25ts and cdc2ts mutations. Mitotic phenotypes caused by disruption of cig2 are not reversed by increased production of Cdc13, the other fission yeast B-type cyclin that functions in mitosis. Likewise, a cdc13ts mutation is not rescued by increased gene dosage of cig2+. These data indicate that Cdc13 and Cig2 interact with Cdc2 to carry out different functions in mitosis. We suggest that some cyclin B subtypes found in other species, including humans, are also likely to have distinct, nonoverlapping functions in mitosis. Images PMID:8455610

  17. Interaction of a small heat shock protein of the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, with a denatured protein at elevated temperature.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Maya; Tohda, Hideki; Giga-Hama, Yuko; Tsushima, Reiko; Zako, Tamotsu; Iizuka, Ryo; Pack, Changi; Kinjo, Masataka; Ishii, Noriyuki; Yohda, Masafumi

    2005-09-23

    We have expressed, purified, and characterized one small heat shock protein of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, SpHsp16.0. SpHsp16.0 was able to protect citrate synthase from thermal aggregation at 45 degrees C with high efficiency. It existed as a hexadecameric globular oligomer near the physiological growth temperature. At elevated temperatures, the oligomer dissociated into small species, probably dimers. The dissociation was completely reversible, and the original oligomer reformed immediately after the temperature dropped. Large complexes of SpHsp16.0 and denatured citrate synthase were observed by size exclusion chromatography and electron microscopy following incubation at 45 degrees C and then cooling. However, such large complexes did not elute from the size exclusion column incubated at 45 degrees C. The denatured citrate synthase protected from aggregation was trapped by a GroEL trap mutant at 45 degrees C. These results suggest that the complex of SpHsp16.0 and denatured citrate synthase at elevated temperatures is in the transient state and has a hydrophobic nature. Analyses of the interaction between SpHsp16.0 and denatured citrate synthase by fluorescence cross-correlation spectrometry have also shown that the characteristics of SpHsp16.0-denatured citrate synthase complex at the elevated temperature are different from those of the large complex obtained after the shift to lowered temperatures.

  18. Identification of a Sgo2-Dependent but Mad2-Independent Pathway Controlling Anaphase Onset in Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Meadows, John C; Lancaster, Theresa C; Buttrick, Graham J; Sochaj, Alicja M; Messin, Liam J; Del Mar Mora-Santos, Maria; Hardwick, Kevin G; Millar, Jonathan B A

    2017-02-07

    The onset of anaphase is triggered by activation of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) following silencing of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). APC/C triggers ubiquitination of Securin and Cyclin B, which leads to loss of sister chromatid cohesion and inactivation of Cyclin B/Cdk1, respectively. This promotes relocalization of Aurora B kinase and other components of the chromosome passenger complex (CPC) from centromeres to the spindle midzone. In fission yeast, this is mediated by Clp1 phosphatase-dependent interaction of CPC with Klp9/MKLP2 (kinesin-6). When this interaction is disrupted, kinetochores bi-orient normally, but APC/C activation is delayed via a mechanism that requires Sgo2 and some (Bub1, Mph1/Mps1, and Mad3), but not all (Mad1 and Mad2), components of the SAC and the first, but not second, lysine, glutamic acid, glutamine (KEN) box in Mad3. These data indicate that interaction of CPC with Klp9 terminates a Sgo2-dependent, but Mad2-independent, APC/C-inhibitory pathway that is distinct from the canonical SAC.

  19. Constriction model of actomyosin ring for cytokinesis by fission yeast using a two-state sliding filament mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Yong-Woon; Mascagni, Michael

    2014-09-28

    We developed a model describing the structure and contractile mechanism of the actomyosin ring in fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The proposed ring includes actin, myosin, and α-actinin, and is organized into a structure similar to that of muscle sarcomeres. This structure justifies the use of the sliding-filament mechanism developed by Huxley and Hill, but it is probably less organized relative to that of muscle sarcomeres. Ring contraction tension was generated via the same fundamental mechanism used to generate muscle tension, but some physicochemical parameters were adjusted to be consistent with the proposed ring structure. Simulations allowed an estimate of ring constriction tension that reproduced the observed ring constriction velocity using a physiologically possible, self-consistent set of parameters. Proposed molecular-level properties responsible for the thousand-fold slower constriction velocity of the ring relative to that of muscle sarcomeres include fewer myosin molecules involved, a less organized contractile configuration, a low α-actinin concentration, and a high resistance membrane tension. Ring constriction velocity is demonstrated as an exponential function of time despite a near linear appearance. We proposed a hypothesis to explain why excess myosin heads inhibit constriction velocity rather than enhance it. The model revealed how myosin concentration and elastic resistance tension are balanced during cytokinesis in S. pombe.

  20. Transient structural variations have strong effects on quantitative traits and reproductive isolation in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Jeffares, Daniel C.; Jolly, Clemency; Hoti, Mimoza; Speed, Doug; Shaw, Liam; Rallis, Charalampos; Balloux, Francois; Dessimoz, Christophe; Bähler, Jürg; Sedlazeck, Fritz J.

    2017-01-01

    Large structural variations (SVs) within genomes are more challenging to identify than smaller genetic variants but may substantially contribute to phenotypic diversity and evolution. We analyse the effects of SVs on gene expression, quantitative traits and intrinsic reproductive isolation in the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We establish a high-quality curated catalogue of SVs in the genomes of a worldwide library of S. pombe strains, including duplications, deletions, inversions and translocations. We show that copy number variants (CNVs) show a variety of genetic signals consistent with rapid turnover. These transient CNVs produce stoichiometric effects on gene expression both within and outside the duplicated regions. CNVs make substantial contributions to quantitative traits, most notably intracellular amino acid concentrations, growth under stress and sugar utilization in winemaking, whereas rearrangements are strongly associated with reproductive isolation. Collectively, these findings have broad implications for evolution and for our understanding of quantitative traits including complex human diseases. PMID:28117401

  1. Structural basis of high-fidelity DNA synthesis by yeast DNA polymerase [delta

    SciTech Connect

    Swan, Michael K.; Johnson, Robert E.; Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya; Aggarwal, Aneel K.

    2009-09-25

    DNA polymerase {delta} (Pol {delta}) is a high-fidelity polymerase that has a central role in replication from yeast to humans. We present the crystal structure of the catalytic subunit of yeast Pol {delta} in ternary complex with a template primer and an incoming nucleotide. The structure, determined at 2.0-{angstrom} resolution, catches the enzyme in the act of replication, revealing how the polymerase and exonuclease domains are juxtaposed relative to each other and how a correct nucleotide is selected and incorporated. The structure also reveals the 'sensing' interactions near the primer terminus, which signal a switch from the polymerizing to the editing mode. Taken together, the structure provides a chemical basis for the bulk of DNA synthesis in eukaryotic cells and a framework for understanding the effects of cancer-causing mutations in Pol {delta}.

  2. A comparative hybridization analysis of yeast DNA with Paramecium parafusin- and different phosphoglucomutase-specific probes.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, E; Satir, B H

    2000-01-01

    Molecular probes designed for the parafusin (PFUS), the Paramecium exocytic-sensitive phosphoglycoprotein, gave distinct hybridization patterns in Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomic DNA when compared with different phosphoglucomutase specific probes. These include two probes identical to segments of yeast phosphoglucomutase (PGM) genes 1 and 2. Neither of the PGM probes revealed the 7.4 and 5.9 kb fragments in Bgl II-cut yeast DNA digest detected with the 1.6 kb cloned PFUS cDNA and oligonucleotide constructed to the PFUS region (insertion 3--I-3) not found in other species. PCR amplification with PFUS-specific primers generated yeast DNA-species of the predicted molecular size which hybridized to the I-3 probe. A search of the yeast genome database produced an unassigned nucleotide sequence that showed 55% identity to parafusin gene and 37% identity to PGM2 (the major isoform of yeast phosphoglucomutase) within the amplified region.

  3. Citrinin-induced fluidization of the plasma membrane of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Blaskó, Ágnes; Mike, Nóra; Gróf, Pál; Gazdag, Zoltán; Czibulya, Zsuzsanna; Nagy, Lívia; Kunsági-Máté, Sándor; Pesti, Miklós

    2013-09-01

    Citrinin (CTN) is a toxic fungal metabolite that is a hazardous contaminant of foods and feeds. In the present study, its acute toxicity and effects on the plasma membrane of Schizosaccharomyces pombe were investigated. The minimum inhibitory concentration of CTN against the yeast cells proved to be 500 μM. Treatment with 0, 250, 500 or 1000 μM CTN for 60 min resulted in a 0%, 2%, 21% or 100% decrease, respectively, in the survival rate of the cell population. Treatment of cells with 0, 100, 500 or 1000 μM CTN for 20 min induced decrease in the phase-transition temperature of the 5-doxylstearic acid-labeled plasma membrane to 16.51, 16.04, 14.18 or 13.98°C, respectively as measured by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. This perturbation was accompanied by the efflux of essential K⁺ from the cells. The existence of an interaction between CTN and glutathione was detected for the first time by spectrofluorometry. Our observations may suggest a direct interaction of CTN with the free sulfhydryl groups of the integral proteins of the plasma membrane, leading to dose-dependent membrane fluidization. The change in fluidity disturbed the ionic homeostasis, contributing to the death of the cells, which is a novel aspect of CTN cytotoxicity.

  4. Characterization of the ptr5+ gene involved in nuclear mRNA export in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Nobuyoshi; Ikeda, Terumasa; Mizuki, Fumitaka; Tani, Tokio

    2012-02-03

    To analyze the mechanisms of mRNA export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, we have isolated eleven mutants, ptr [poly(A)(+) RNA transport] 1 to 11, which accumulate poly(A)(+) RNA in the nucleus at a nonpermissive temperature in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Of those, the ptr5-1 mutant shows dots- or a ring-like accumulation of poly(A)(+) RNA at the nuclear periphery after shifting to the nonpermissive temperature. We cloned the ptr5(+) gene and found that it encodes a component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), nucleoporin 85 (Nup85). The ptr5-1 mutant shows no defects in protein transport, suggesting the specific involvement of Ptr5p/Nup85p in nuclear mRNA export in S. pombe. We identified Seh1p, a nucleoporin interacting with Nup85p, an mRNA-binding protein Mlo3p, and Sac3p, a component of the TREX-2 complex involved in coupling of nuclear mRNA export with transcription, as multi-copy suppressors for the ptr5-1 mutation. In addition, we found that the ptr5-1 mutation is synthetically lethal with a mutation of the mRNA export factor Rae1p, and that the double mutant exaggerates defective nuclear mRNA export, suggesting that Ptr5p/Nup85p is involved in nuclear mRNA export through Rae1p. Interestingly, the ptr5-1 mutation also showed synthetic effects with several prp pre-mRNA splicing mutations, suggesting a functional linkage between the NPCs and the splicing apparatus in the yeast nucleus.

  5. Characterization of the ptr5{sup +} gene involved in nuclear mRNA export in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Nobuyoshi; Ikeda, Terumasa; Mizuki, Fumitaka; Tani, Tokio

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We cloned the ptr5{sup +} gene involved in nuclear mRNA export in fission yeast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ptr5{sup +} gene was found to encode nucleoporin 85 (Nup85). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Seh1p and Mlo3p are multi-copy suppressors for the ptr5 mutation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ptr5p/Nup85p functions in nuclear mRNA export through the mRNA export factor Rae1p. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ptr5p/Nup85p interacts genetically with pre-mRNA splicing factors. -- Abstract: To analyze the mechanisms of mRNA export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, we have isolated eleven mutants, ptr [poly(A){sup +} RNA transport] 1 to 11, which accumulate poly(A){sup +} RNA in the nucleus at a nonpermissive temperature in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Of those, the ptr5-1 mutant shows dots- or a ring-like accumulation of poly(A){sup +} RNA at the nuclear periphery after shifting to the nonpermissive temperature. We cloned the ptr5{sup +} gene and found that it encodes a component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), nucleoporin 85 (Nup85). The ptr5-1 mutant shows no defects in protein transport, suggesting the specific involvement of Ptr5p/Nup85p in nuclear mRNA export in S. pombe. We identified Seh1p, a nucleoporin interacting with Nup85p, an mRNA-binding protein Mlo3p, and Sac3p, a component of the TREX-2 complex involved in coupling of nuclear mRNA export with transcription, as multi-copy suppressors for the ptr5-1 mutation. In addition, we found that the ptr5-1 mutation is synthetically lethal with a mutation of the mRNA export factor Rae1p, and that the double mutant exaggerates defective nuclear mRNA export, suggesting that Ptr5p/Nup85p is involved in nuclear mRNA export through Rae1p. Interestingly, the ptr5-1 mutation also showed synthetic effects with several prp pre-mRNA splicing mutations, suggesting a functional linkage between the NPCs and the splicing apparatus in the yeast nucleus.

  6. Individual letters of the RNA polymerase II CTD code govern distinct gene expression programs in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Schwer, Beate; Bitton, Danny Asher; Sanchez, Ana M.; Bähler, Jürg; Shuman, Stewart

    2014-01-01

    The primary structure and phosphorylation pattern of the tandem Y1S2P3T4S5P6S7 repeats of the RNA polymerase II carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) comprise an informational code that coordinates transcription, chromatin modification, and RNA processing. To gauge the contributions of individual CTD coding “letters” to gene expression, we analyzed the poly(A)+ transcriptomes of fission yeast mutants that lack each of the four inessential CTD phosphoacceptors: Tyr1, Ser2, Thr4, and Ser7. There was a hierarchy of CTD mutational effects with respect to the number of dysregulated protein-coding RNAs, with S2A (n = 227) >> Y1F (n = 71) > S7A (n = 58) >> T4A (n = 7). The majority of the protein-coding RNAs affected in Y1F cells were coordinately affected by S2A, suggesting that Tyr1-Ser2 constitutes a two-letter code “word.” Y1F and S2A elicited increased expression of genes encoding proteins involved in iron uptake (Frp1, Fip1, Fio1, Str3, Str1, Sib1), without affecting the expression of the genes that repress the iron regulon, implying that Tyr1-Ser2 transduces a repressive signal. Y1F and S2A cells had increased levels of ferric reductase activity and were hypersensitive to phleomycin, indicative of elevated intracellular iron. The T4A and S7A mutations had opposing effects on the phosphate response pathway. T4A reduced the expression of two genes encoding proteins involved in phosphate acquisition (the Pho1 acid phosphatase and the phosphate transporter SPBC8E4.01c), without affecting the expression of known genes that regulate the phosphate response pathway, whereas S7A increased pho1+ expression. These results highlight specific cellular gene expression programs that are responsive to distinct CTD cues. PMID:24591591

  7. Rho1 GTPase and PKC ortholog Pck1 are upstream activators of the cell integrity MAPK pathway in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Mir, Laura; Soto, Teresa; Franco, Alejandro; Madrid, Marisa; Viana, Raúl A; Vicente, Jero; Gacto, Mariano; Pérez, Pilar; Cansado, José

    2014-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe the cell integrity pathway (CIP) orchestrates multiple biological processes like cell wall maintenance and ionic homeostasis by fine tuning activation of MAPK Pmk1 in response to various environmental conditions. The small GTPase Rho2 positively regulates the CIP through protein kinase C ortholog Pck2. However, Pmk1 retains some function in mutants lacking either Rho2 or Pck2, suggesting the existence of additional upstream regulatory elements to modulate its activity depending on the nature of the environmental stimulus. The essential GTPase Rho1 is a candidate to control the activity of the CIP by acting upstream of Pck2, whereas Pck1, a second PKC ortholog, appears to negatively regulate Pmk1 activity. However, the exact regulatory nature of these two proteins within the CIP has remained elusive. By exhaustive characterization of strains expressing a hypomorphic Rho1 allele (rho1-596) in different genetic backgrounds we show that both Rho1 and Pck1 are positive upstream regulatory members of the CIP in addition to Rho2 and Pck2. In this new model Rho1 and Rho2 control Pmk1 basal activity during vegetative growth mainly through Pck2. Notably, whereas Rho2-Pck2 elicit Pmk1 activation in response to most environmental stimuli, Rho1 drives Pmk1 activation through either Pck2 or Pck1 exclusively in response to cell wall damage. Our study reveals the intricate and complex functional architecture of the upstream elements participating in this signaling pathway as compared to similar routes from other simple eukaryotic organisms.

  8. Involvement of the spliceosomal U4 small nuclear RNA in heterochromatic gene silencing at fission yeast centromeres.

    PubMed

    Chinen, Madoka; Morita, Misato; Fukumura, Kazuhiro; Tani, Tokio

    2010-02-19

    prp13-1 is one of the mutants isolated in a screen for defective pre-mRNA splicing at a nonpermissive temperature in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We cloned the prp13(+) gene and found that it encodes U4 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) involved in the assembly of the spliceosome. The prp13-1 mutant produced elongated cells, a phenotype similar to cell division cycle mutants, and displays a high incidence of lagging chromosomes on anaphase spindles. The mutant is hypersensitive to the microtubule-destabilizing drug thiabendazole, supporting that prp13-1 has a defect in chromosomal segregation. We found that the prp13-1 mutation resulted in expression of the ura4(+) gene inserted in the pericentromeric heterochromatin region and reduced recruitment of the heterochromatin protein Swi6p to that region, indicating defects in the formation of pericentromeric heterochromatin, which is essential for the segregation of chromosomes, in prp13-1. The formation of centromeric heterochromatin is induced by the RNA interference (RNAi) system in S. pombe. In prp13-1, the processing of centromeric noncoding RNAs to siRNAs, which direct the heterochromatin formation, was impaired and unprocessed noncoding RNAs were accumulated. These results suggest that U4 snRNA is required for the RNAi-directed heterochromatic gene silencing at the centromeres. In relation to the linkage between the spliceosomal U4 snRNA and the RNAi-directed formation of heterochromatin, we identified a mRNA-type intron in the centromeric noncoding RNAs. We propose a model in which the assembly of the spliceosome or a sub-spliceosome complex on the intron-containing centromeric noncoding RNAs facilitates the RNAi-directed formation of heterochromatin at centromeres, through interaction with the RNA-directed RNA polymerase complex.

  9. Role of the protein kinase Kin1 and nuclear centering in actomyosin ring formation in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Cadou, Angela; La Carbona, Stéphanie; Couturier, Anne; Le Goff, Cathy; Le Goff, Xavier

    2009-08-01

    Cytokinesis is the last step of the cell cycle, producing two daughter cells inheriting equal genetic information. This process involves the assembly of an actomyosin ring during mitosis. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cytokinesis occurs at the geometric cell centre, a position which is defined by the interphase nucleus and the anilin-related Mid1 protein. The pom1Delta, tea1Delta and tea4Delta mutants are defective in restricting Mid1 as a band around the nucleus and misplace the division site. We previously reported that inhibition of the protein kinase Kin1 promoted failure of cytokinesis in pom1Delta and tea1Delta cells but the mechanism involving Kin1 remained elusive. Here we investigated the contribution of Kin1 in cytokinesis. We show that Kin1-GFP has a dynamic cell cycle regulated distribution. Like pom1Delta and tea1Delta, tea4Delta exhibits a strong genetic interaction with kin1Delta. Using a conditional repressible kin1 allele that only alters interphase nuclear centering, we observed that Kin1 downregulation severely compromised actomyosin ring formation and septum synthesis in tea4Delta cells. In addition, nuclear displacement induced either by overexpression of a putative catalytically inactive Kin1 mutant, by chemically mediated microtubule depolymerization or by mutation in the par1Delta gene impaired cytokinesis in tea4Delta but not tea4(+) cells. We propose that nuclear mispositioning exacerbates the tea4Delta, pom1Delta and tea1Delta cell division phenotype. Our work reveal that nuclear centering becomes essential when Pom1/Tea1/Tea4 function is compromised and that Kin1 expression level is a key regulatory element in this situation. Our results suggest the existence of distinct overlapping control mechanisms to ensure efficient cell division.

  10. Widespread Use of TATA Elements in the Core Promoters for RNA Polymerases III, II, and I in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Mitsuhiro; Huang, Ying; Lowe, Todd M.; Maraia, Richard J.

    2001-01-01

    In addition to directing transcription initiation, core promoters integrate input from distal regulatory elements. Except for rare exceptions, it has been generally found that eukaryotic tRNA and rRNA genes do not contain TATA promoter elements and instead use protein-protein interactions to bring the TATA-binding protein (TBP), to the core promoter. Genomewide analysis revealed TATA elements in the core promoters of tRNA and 5S rRNA (Pol III), U1 to U5 snRNA (Pol II), and 37S rRNA (Pol I) genes in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Using tRNA-dependent suppression and other in vivo assays, as well as in vitro transcription, we demonstrated an obligatory requirement for upstream TATA elements for tRNA and 5S rRNA expression in S. pombe. The Pol III initiation factor Brf is found in complexes with TFIIIC and Pol III in S. pombe, while TBP is not, consistent with independent recruitment of TBP by TATA. Template commitment assays are consistent with this and confirm that the mechanisms of transcription complex assembly and initiation by Pol III in S. pombe differ substantially from those in other model organisms. The results were extended to large-rRNA synthesis, as mutation of the TATA element in the Pol I promoter also abolishes rRNA expression in fission yeast. A survey of other organisms' genomes reveals that a substantial number of eukaryotes may use widespread TATAs for transcription. These results indicate the presence of TATA-unified transcription systems in contemporary eukaryotes and provide insight into the residual need for TBP by all three Pols in other eukaryotes despite a lack of TATA elements in their promoters. PMID:11564871

  11. Involvement of the Spliceosomal U4 Small Nuclear RNA in Heterochromatic Gene Silencing at Fission Yeast Centromeres*

    PubMed Central

    Chinen, Madoka; Morita, Misato; Fukumura, Kazuhiro; Tani, Tokio

    2010-01-01

    prp13-1 is one of the mutants isolated in a screen for defective pre-mRNA splicing at a nonpermissive temperature in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We cloned the prp13+ gene and found that it encodes U4 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) involved in the assembly of the spliceosome. The prp13-1 mutant produced elongated cells, a phenotype similar to cell division cycle mutants, and displays a high incidence of lagging chromosomes on anaphase spindles. The mutant is hypersensitive to the microtubule-destabilizing drug thiabendazole, supporting that prp13-1 has a defect in chromosomal segregation. We found that the prp13-1 mutation resulted in expression of the ura4+ gene inserted in the pericentromeric heterochromatin region and reduced recruitment of the heterochromatin protein Swi6p to that region, indicating defects in the formation of pericentromeric heterochromatin, which is essential for the segregation of chromosomes, in prp13-1. The formation of centromeric heterochromatin is induced by the RNA interference (RNAi) system in S. pombe. In prp13-1, the processing of centromeric noncoding RNAs to siRNAs, which direct the heterochromatin formation, was impaired and unprocessed noncoding RNAs were accumulated. These results suggest that U4 snRNA is required for the RNAi-directed heterochromatic gene silencing at the centromeres. In relation to the linkage between the spliceosomal U4 snRNA and the RNAi-directed formation of heterochromatin, we identified a mRNA-type intron in the centromeric noncoding RNAs. We propose a model in which the assembly of the spliceosome or a sub-spliceosome complex on the intron-containing centromeric noncoding RNAs facilitates the RNAi-directed formation of heterochromatin at centromeres, through interaction with the RNA-directed RNA polymerase complex. PMID:20018856

  12. Hsp90 interaction with Cdc2 and Plo1 kinases contributes to actomyosin ring condensation in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Santino, Andrea; Tallada, Victor A; Jimenez, Juan; Garzón, Andrés

    2012-08-01

    In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cytokinesis occurs by ordered recruitment of actomyosin components at the division site, followed by lateral condensation to produce a ring-like structure early in anaphase, which eventually matures and contracts at the end of mitosis. We found that in temperature-sensitive hsp90-w1 mutant cells, encoding an Hsp90 mutant protein, ring components were recruited to form a cortical network at the division site, but this network failed to condense into a compact ring, suggesting a role for Hsp90 in this particular step. hsp90-w1 mutant shows strong genetic interaction with specific mutant alleles of the fission yeast cdc2, such as cdc2-33. Interestingly, actomyosin ring defects in hsp90-w1 cdc2-33 mutant cells resembled that of hsp90-w1 single mutant at restrictive temperature. Noteworthy, similar genetic interaction was found with a mutant allele of polo-like kinase, plo1-ts4, suggesting that Hsp90 collaborates with Cdc2 and Plo1 cell cycle kinases to condense medial ring components. In vitro analyses suggested that Cdc2 and Plo1 physically interact with Hsp90. Association of Cdc2 to Hsp90 was ATP independent, while Plo1 binds to this chaperone in an ATP-dependent manner, indicating that these two kinases interact with different Hsp90 complexes. Overall, our analyses of hsp90-w1 reveal a possible role for this chaperone in medial ring condensation in association with Cdc2 and Plo1 kinases.

  13. Fission yeast LAMMER kinase Lkh1 regulates the cell cycle by phosphorylating the CDK-inhibitor Rum1

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Eun-Young; Lee, Ju-Hee; Kang, Won-Hwa; Park, Yun-Hee; Kim, Lila; Park, Hee-Moon

    2013-03-01

    Highlights: ► Deletion of lkh1{sup +} made cells pass the G1/S phase faster than the wild type. ► Lkh1 can interact with a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CKI) Rum1. ► Lkh1 can phosphorylate Rum1 to activate its CKI activity. ► Thr110 was confirmed as the Lkh1-dependent phosphorylation site of Rum1. ► Positive acting mechanism for the Rum1 activation is reported for the first time. - Abstract: In eukaryotes, LAMMER kinases are involved in various cellular events, including the cell cycle. However, no attempt has been made to investigate the mechanisms that underlie the involvement of LAMMER kinase. In this study, we performed a functional analysis of LAMMER kinase using the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. FACS analyses revealed that deletion of the gene that encodes the LAMMER kinase Lkh1 made mutant cells pass through the G1/S phase faster than their wild-type counterparts. Co-immunoprecipitation and an in vitro kinase assay also revealed that Lkh1 can interact with and phosphorylate Rum1 to activate this molecule as a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, which blocks cell cycle progression from the G1 phase to the S phase. Peptide mass fingerprinting and kinase assay with Rum1{sup T110A} confirmed T110 as the Lkh1-dependent phosphorylation residue. In this report we present for the first time a positive acting mechanism that is responsible for the CKI activity of Rum1, in which the LAMMER kinase-mediated phosphorylation of Rum1 is involved.

  14. C-terminal region of Mad2 plays an important role during mitotic spindle checkpoint in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gaurav Kumar; Karade, Sharanbasappa Shrimant; Ranjan, Rajeev; Ahamad, Nafees; Ahmed, Shakil

    2017-02-01

    The mitotic arrest deficiency 2 (Mad2) protein is an essential component of the spindle assembly checkpoint that interacts with Cdc20/Slp1 and inhibit its ability to activate anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). In bladder cancer cell line the C-terminal residue of the mad2 gene has been found to be deleted. In this study we tried to understand the role of the C-terminal region of mad2 on the spindle checkpoint function. To envisage the role of C-terminal region of Mad2, we truncated 25 residues of Mad2 C-terminal region in fission yeast S.pombe and characterized its effect on spindle assembly checkpoint function. The cells containing C-terminal truncation of Mad2 exhibit sensitivity towards microtubule destabilizing agent suggesting perturbation of spindle assembly checkpoint. Further, the C-terminal truncation of Mad2 exhibit reduced viability in the nda3-KM311 mutant background at non-permissive temperature. Truncation in mad2 gene also affects its foci forming ability at unattached kinetochore suggesting that the mad2-∆CT mutant is unable to maintain spindle checkpoint activation. However, in response to the defective microtubule, only brief delay of mitotic progression was observed in Mad2 C-terminal truncation mutant. In addition we have shown that the deletion of two β strands of Mad2 protein abolishes its ability to interact with APC activator protein Slp1/Cdc20. We purpose that the truncation of two β strands (β7 and β8) of Mad2 destabilize the safety belt and affect the Cdc20-Mad2 interaction leading to defects in the spindle checkpoint activation.

  15. Mitochondrial superoxide dismutase deficiency accelerates chronological aging in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Toshiya; Senoo, Takanori; Kawano, Shinji; Ikeda, Shogo

    2016-01-01

    A mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (SOD2) is the first line of antioxidant defense against mitochondrial superoxide. Even though the involvement of SOD2 in lifespan has been studied extensively in several organisms, characterization of the aging process has not been performed for the sod2 mutant (sod2Δ) of a prominent model Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In this study, we measured the chronological lifespan of sod2Δ cells by their ability to survive in long-term culture. SOD2 deficiency drastically decreased cell viability in the stationary phase. The mutation frequency of nuclear DNA in sod2Δ was elevated in the stationary phase, and cellular proteins and nuclear DNA were extensively degraded, concurrent with cell death. The sod2 gene in wild-type cells could be induced by an increase in endogenous oxidative stresses, after which, SOD2 activity was substantially elevated during the stationary phase. Culture in a lower glucose concentration (calorie restriction) prominently extended the sod2Δ lifespan. Therefore, S. pombe SOD2 plays a critical role in longevity through its upregulation in the non-dividing phase.

  16. Fission yeast pak1+ encodes a protein kinase that interacts with Cdc42p and is involved in the control of cell polarity and mating.

    PubMed Central

    Ottilie, S; Miller, P J; Johnson, D I; Creasy, C L; Sells, M A; Bagrodia, S; Forsburg, S L; Chernoff, J

    1995-01-01

    A STE20/p65pak homolog was isolated from fission yeast by PCR. The pak1+ gene encodes a 72 kDa protein containing a putative p21-binding domain near its amino-terminus and a serine/threonine kinase domain near its carboxyl-terminus. The Pak1 protein autophosphorylates on serine residues and preferentially binds to activated Cdc42p both in vitro and in vivo. This binding is mediated through the p21 binding domain on Pak1p and the effector domain on Cdc42p. Overexpression of an inactive mutant form of pak1 gives rise to cells with markedly abnormal shape with mislocalized actin staining. Pak1 overexpression does not, however, suppress lethality associated with cdc42-null cells or the morphologic defeat caused by overexpression of mutant cdc42 alleles. Gene disruption of pak1+ establishes that, like cdc42+, pak1+ function is required for cell viability. In budding yeast, pak1+ expression restores mating function to STE20-null cells and, in fission yeast, overexpression of an inactive form of Pak inhibits mating. These results indicate that the Pak1 protein is likely to be an effector for Cdc42p or a related GTPase, and suggest that Pak1p is involved in the maintenance of cell polarity and in mating. Images PMID:8846783

  17. Amplification of a Zygosaccharomyces bailii DNA segment in wine yeast genomes by extrachromosomal circular DNA formation.

    PubMed

    Galeote, Virginie; Bigey, Frédéric; Beyne, Emmanuelle; Novo, Maite; Legras, Jean-Luc; Casaregola, Serge; Dequin, Sylvie

    2011-03-10

    We recently described the presence of large chromosomal segments resulting from independent horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, mostly of wine origin. We report here evidence for the amplification of one of these segments, a 17 kb DNA segment from Zygosaccharomyces bailii, in the genome of S. cerevisiae strains. The copy number, organization and location of this region differ considerably between strains, indicating that the insertions are independent and that they are post-HGT events. We identified eight different forms in 28 S. cerevisiae strains, mostly of wine origin, with up to four different copies in a single strain. The organization of these forms and the identification of an autonomously replicating sequence functional in S. cerevisiae, strongly suggest that an extrachromosomal circular DNA (eccDNA) molecule serves as an intermediate in the amplification of the Z. bailii region in yeast genomes. We found little or no sequence similarity at the breakpoint regions, suggesting that the insertions may be mediated by nonhomologous recombination. The diversity between these regions in S. cerevisiae represents roughly one third the divergence among the genomes of wine strains, which confirms the recent origin of this event, posterior to the start of wine strain expansion. This is the first report of a circle-based mechanism for the expansion of a DNA segment, mediated by nonhomologous recombination, in natural yeast populations.

  18. Repair of uv damaged DNA: Genes and proteins of yeast and human

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, L.

    1992-04-01

    Our objectives are to determine the molecular mechanism of the incision step of excision repair of ultraviolet (UV) light damaged DNA in eukaryotic organisms, using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, and to study the human homologs of yeast excision repair and postreplication repair proteins progress is described.

  19. A proline-tyrosine nuclear localization signal (PY-NLS) is required for the nuclear import of fission yeast PAB2, but not of human PABPN1.

    PubMed

    Mallet, Pierre-Luc; Bachand, François

    2013-03-01

    Nuclear poly(A)-binding proteins (PABPs) are evolutionarily conserved proteins that play key roles in eukaryotic gene expression. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the major nuclear PABP, Pab2, functions in the maturation of small nucleolar RNAs as well as in nuclear RNA decay. Despite knowledge about its nuclear functions, nothing is known about how Pab2 is imported into the nucleus. Here, we show that Pab2 contains a proline-tyrosine nuclear localization signal (PY-NLS) that is necessary and sufficient for its nuclear localization and function. Consistent with the role of karyopherin β2 (Kapβ2)-type receptors in the import of PY-NLS cargoes, we show that the fission yeast ortholog of human Kapβ2, Kap104, binds to recombinant Pab2 and is required for Pab2 nuclear localization. The absence of arginine methylation in a basic region N-terminal to the PY-core motif of Pab2 did not affect its nuclear localization. However, in the context of a sub-optimal PY-NLS, we found that Pab2 was more efficiently targeted to the nucleus in the absence of arginine methylation, suggesting that this modification can affect the import kinetics of a PY-NLS cargo. Although a sequence resembling a PY-NLS motif can be found in the human Pab2 ortholog, PABPN1, our results indicate that neither a functional PY-NLS nor Kapβ2 activity are required to promote entry of PABPN1 into the nucleus of human cells. Our findings describe the mechanism by which Pab2 is imported into the nucleus, providing the first example of a PY-NLS import system in fission yeast. In addition, this study suggests the existence of alternative or redundant nuclear import pathways for human PABPN1.

  20. The stress granule protein Vgl1 and poly(A)-binding protein Pab1 are required for doxorubicin resistance in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Takahiro; Satoh, Ryosuke; Umeda, Nanae; Kita, Ayako; Sugiura, Reiko

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stress granules (SGs) as a mechanism of doxorubicin tolerance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We characterize the role of stress granules in doxorubicin tolerance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deletion of components of SGs enhances doxorubicin sensitivity in fission yeast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doxorubicin promotes SG formation when combined with heat shock. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doxorubicin regulates stress granule assembly independent of eIF2{alpha} phosphorylation. -- Abstract: Doxorubicin is an anthracycline antibiotic widely used for chemotherapy. Although doxorubicin is effective in the treatment of several cancers, including solid tumors and leukemias, the basis of its mechanism of action is not completely understood. Here, we describe the effects of doxorubicin and its relationship with stress granules formation in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show that disruption of genes encoding the components of stress granules, including vgl1{sup +}, which encodes a multi-KH type RNA-binding protein, and pab1{sup +}, which encodes a poly(A)-binding protein, resulted in greater sensitivity to doxorubicin than seen in wild-type cells. Disruption of the vgl1{sup +} and pab1{sup +} genes did not confer sensitivity to other anti-cancer drugs such as cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and paclitaxel. We also showed that doxorubicin treatment promoted stress granule formation when combined with heat shock. Notably, doxorubicin treatment did not induce hyperphosphorylation of eIF2{alpha}, suggesting that doxorubicin is involved in stress granule assembly independent of eIF2{alpha} phosphorylation. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of fission yeast for elucidating the molecular targets of doxorubicin toxicity and suggest a novel drug-resistance mechanism involving stress granule assembly.

  1. p63cdc13, a B-type cyclin, is associated with both the nucleolar and chromatin domains of the fission yeast nucleus.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, I M; Alfa, C E; Hyams, J S

    1993-11-01

    The cellular distribution of the fission yeast mitotic cyclin B, p63cdc13, was investigated by a combination of indirect immunofluorescence light microscopy, immunogold electron microscopy, and nuclear isolation and fractionation. Immunofluorescence microscopy of wild-type cells and the cold-sensitive mutant dis2.11 with a monospecific anti-p63cdc13 antiserum was consistent with the association of a major subpopulation of fission yeast M-phase protein kinase with the nucleolus. Immunogold electron microscopy of freeze-substituted wild-type cells identified two nuclear populations of p63cdc13, one associated with the nucleolus, the other with the chromatin domain. To investigate the cell cycle regulation of nuclear labeling, the mutant cdc25.22 was synchronized through mitosis by temperature arrest and release. Immunogold labeling of cells arrested at G2M revealed gold particles present abundantly over the nucleolus and less densely over the chromatin region of the nucleus. Small vesicles around the nucleus were also labeled by anti-p63cdc13, but few gold particles were detected over the cytoplasm. Labeling of all cell compartments declined to zero through mitosis. Cell fractionation confirmed that p63cdc13 was substantially enriched in both isolated nuclei and in a fraction containing small vesicles and organelles. p63cdc13 was not extracted from nuclei by treatment with RNase A, Nonidet P40 (NP-40), Triton X-100, and 0.1 M NaCl, although partial solubilization was observed with DNase I and 1 M NaCl. A known nucleolar protein NOP1, partitioned in a similar manner to p63cdc13, as did p34cdc2, the other subunit of the M-phase protein kinase. We conclude that a major subpopulation of the fission yeast mitotic cyclin B is targeted to structural elements of the nucleus and nucleolus.

  2. Ca(2+) and H+ homeostasis in fission yeast: a role of Ca(2+)/H+ exchange and distinct V-H+-ATPases of the secretory pathway organelles.

    PubMed

    Okorokov, L A; Silva, F E; Okorokova Façanha, A L

    2001-09-14

    We determined the H+ and Ca(2+) uptake by fission yeast membranes separated on sucrose gradient and found that (i) Ca(2+) sequestering is due to Ca(2+)/H+ antiporter(s) localized to secretory pathway organelles while Ca(2+)-ATPase activity is not detectable in their membranes; (ii) immunochemically distinct V-H+-ATPases acidify the lumen of the secretory pathway organelles. The data indicate that the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi and vacuole form a network of Ca(2+) and H+ stores in the single cell, providing favorable conditions for such key processes as protein folding/sorting, membrane fusion, ion homeostasis and Ca(2+) signaling in a differential and local manner.

  3. Strategy for the extraction of yeast DNA from artisan agave must for quantitative PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Kirchmayr, Manuel Reinhart; Segura-Garcia, Luis Eduardo; Flores-Berrios, Ericka Patricia; Gschaedler, Anne

    2011-11-01

    An efficient method for the direct extraction of yeast genomic DNA from agave must was developed. The optimized protocol, which was based on silica-adsorption of DNA on microcolumns, included an enzymatic cell wall degradation step followed by prolonged lysis with hot detergent. The resulting extracts were suitable templates for subsequent qPCR assays that quantified mixed yeast populations in artisan Mexican mezcal fermentations.

  4. Modulation of Spc1 stress-activated protein kinase activity by methylglyoxal through inhibition of protein phosphatase in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Takatsume, Yoshifumi; Izawa, Shingo; Inoue, Yoshiharu

    2007-11-30

    Methylglyoxal, a ubiquitous metabolite derived from glycolysis has diverse physiological functions in yeast cells. Previously, we have reported that extracellularly added methylglyoxal activates Spc1, a stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK), in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe [Y. Takatsume, S. Izawa, Y. Inoue, J. Biol. Chem. 281 (2006) 9086-9092]. Phosphorylation of Spc1 by treatment with methylglyoxal in S. pombe cells defective in glyoxalase I, an enzyme crucial for the metabolism of methylglyoxal, continues for a longer period than in wild-type cells. Here we show that methylglyoxal inhibits the activity of the protein phosphatase responsible for the dephosphorylation of Spc1 in vitro. In addition, we found that methylglyoxal inhibits human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) also. We propose a model for the regulation of the activity of the Spc1-SAPK signaling pathway by methylglyoxal in S. pombe.

  5. The Fission Yeast Homeodomain Protein Yox1p Binds to MBF and Confines MBF-Dependent Cell-Cycle Transcription to G1-S via Negative Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Aligianni, Sofia; Lackner, Daniel H.; Klier, Steffi; Rustici, Gabriella; Wilhelm, Brian T.; Marguerat, Samuel; Codlin, Sandra; Brazma, Alvis; de Bruin, Robertus A. M.; Bähler, Jürg

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of the G1- to S-phase transition is critical for cell-cycle progression. This transition is driven by a transient transcriptional wave regulated by transcription factor complexes termed MBF/SBF in yeast and E2F-DP in mammals. Here we apply genomic, genetic, and biochemical approaches to show that the Yox1p homeodomain protein of fission yeast plays a critical role in confining MBF-dependent transcription to the G1/S transition of the cell cycle. The yox1 gene is an MBF target, and Yox1p accumulates and preferentially binds to MBF-regulated promoters, via the MBF components Res2p and Nrm1p, when they are transcriptionally repressed during the cell cycle. Deletion of yox1 results in constitutively high transcription of MBF target genes and loss of their cell cycle–regulated expression, similar to deletion of nrm1. Genome-wide location analyses of Yox1p and the MBF component Cdc10p reveal dozens of genes whose promoters are bound by both factors, including their own genes and histone genes. In addition, Cdc10p shows promiscuous binding to other sites, most notably close to replication origins. This study establishes Yox1p as a new regulatory MBF component in fission yeast, which is transcriptionally induced by MBF and in turn inhibits MBF-dependent transcription. Yox1p may function together with Nrm1p to confine MBF-dependent transcription to the G1/S transition of the cell cycle via negative feedback. Compared to the orthologous budding yeast Yox1p, which indirectly functions in a negative feedback loop for cell-cycle transcription, similarities but also notable differences in the wiring of the regulatory circuits are evident. PMID:19714215

  6. B-type cyclins regulate G1 progression in fission yeast in opposition to the p25rum1 cdk inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Castellanos, C; Labib, K; Moreno, S

    1996-01-01

    The onset of S phase in fission yeast is regulated at Start, the point of commitment to the mitotic cell cycle. The p34cdc2 kinase is essential for G1 progression past Start, but until now its regulation has been poorly understood. Here we show that the cig2/cyc17 B-type cyclin has an important role in G1 progression, and demonstrate that p34cdc2 kinase activity is periodically associated with cig2 in G1. Cells lacking cig2 are defective in G1 progression, and this is particularly clear in small cells that must regulate Start with respect to cell size. We also find that the cig1 B-type cyclin can promote G1 progression. Whilst p25rum1 can inhibit cig2/cdc2 activity in vitro, and may transiently inhibit this complex in vivo, cig1 is regulated independently of p25rum1. Since cig1/cdc2 kinase activity peaks in mitotic cells, and decreases after mitosis with similar kinetics to cdc13-associated kinase activity, we suggest that cig2 is likely to be the principal fission yeast G1 cyclin. cig2 protein levels accumulate in G1 cells, and we propose that p25rum1 may transiently inhibit cig2-associated p34cdc2 activity until the critical cell size required for Start is reached. Images PMID:8631305

  7. Rga4 modulates the activity of the fission yeast cell integrity MAPK pathway by acting as a Rho2 GTPase-activating protein.

    PubMed

    Soto, Teresa; Villar-Tajadura, Maria Antonia; Madrid, Marisa; Vicente, Jero; Gacto, Mariano; Pérez, Pilar; Cansado, José

    2010-04-09

    Rho GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) are responsible for the inactivation of Rho GTPases, which are involved in the regulation of critical biological responses in eukaryotic cells, ranging from cell cycle control to cellular morphogenesis. The genome of fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe contains six genes coding for putative Rho GTPases, whereas nine genes code for predicted Rho GAPs (Rga1 to Rga9). One of them, Rga4, has been recently described as a Cdc42 GAP, involved in the control of cell diameter and symmetry in fission yeast. In this work we show that Rga4 is also a Rho2 GAP that negatively modulates the activity of the cell integrity pathway and its main effector, MAPK Pmk1. The DYRK-type protein kinase Pom1, which regulates both the localization and phosphorylation state of Rga4, is also a negative regulator of the Pmk1 pathway, but this control is not dependent upon the Rga4 role as a Rho2-GAP. Hence, two subsets of Rga4 negatively regulate Cdc42 and Rho2 functions in a specific and unrelated way. Finally, we show that Rga7, another Rho2 GAP, down-regulates the Pmk1 pathway in addition to Rga4. These results reinforce the notion of the existence of complex mechanisms determining the selectivity of Rho GAPs toward Rho GTPases and their functions.

  8. Mechanisms of expression and translocation of major fission yeast glucose transporters regulated by CaMKK/phosphatases, nuclear shuttling, and TOR.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Shigeaki; Mori, Ayaka; Uehara, Lisa; Masuda, Fumie; Soejima, Saeko; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-15

    Hexose transporters are required for cellular glucose uptake; thus they play a pivotal role in glucose homeostasis in multicellular organisms. Using fission yeast, we explored hexose transporter regulation in response to extracellular glucose concentrations. The high-affinity transporter Ght5 is regulated with regard to transcription and localization, much like the human GLUT transporters, which are implicated in diabetes. When restricted to a glucose concentration equivalent to that of human blood, the fission yeast transcriptional regulator Scr1, which represses Ght5 transcription in the presence of high glucose, is displaced from the nucleus. Its displacement is dependent on Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase, Ssp1, and Sds23 inhibition of PP2A/PP6-like protein phosphatases. Newly synthesized Ght5 locates preferentially at the cell tips with the aid of the target of rapamycin (TOR) complex 2 signaling. These results clarify the evolutionarily conserved molecular mechanisms underlying glucose homeostasis, which are essential for preventing hyperglycemia in humans.

  9. Chemical shift assignments of the first and second RRMs of Nrd1, a fission yeast MAPK-target RNA binding protein.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ayaho; Kanaba, Teppei; Satoh, Ryosuke; Ito, Yutaka; Sugiura, Reiko; Mishima, Masaki

    2017-03-11

    Negative regulator differentiation 1 (Nrd1), a fission yeast RNA binding protein, modulates cytokinesis and sexual development and contributes to stress granule formation in response to environmental stresses. Nrd1 comprises four RRM domains and binds and stabilizes Cdc4 mRNA that encodes the myosin II light chain. Nrd1 binds the Cpc2 fission-yeast RACK1 homolog, and the interaction promotes Nrd1 localization to stress granules. Interestingly, Pmk1 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylates Thr40 in the unstructured N-terminal region and Thr126 in the first RRM domain of Nrd1. Phosphorylation significantly reduces RNA-binding activity and likely modulates Nrd1 function. To reveal the relationship between the structure and function of Nrd1 and how phosphorylation affects structure, we used heteronuclear NMR techniques to investigate the three-dimensional structure of Nrd1. Here we report the (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N resonance assignments of RRM1-RRM2 (residues 108-284) comprising the first and second RRMs obtained using heteronuclear NMR techniques. Secondary structures derived from the chemical shifts are reported. These data should contribute to the understanding of the three-dimensional structure of the RRM1-RRM2 region of Nrd1 and the perturbation caused by phosphorylation.

  10. An unconventional interaction between Dis1/TOG and Mal3/EB1 in fission yeast promotes the fidelity of chromosome segregation

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Yuzy; Maurer, Sebastian P.; Yukawa, Masashi; Zakian, Silva; Singleton, Martin R.; Surrey, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dynamic microtubule plus-ends interact with various intracellular target regions such as the cell cortex and the kinetochore. Two conserved families of microtubule plus-end-tracking proteins, the XMAP215, ch-TOG or CKAP5 family and the end-binding 1 (EB1, also known as MAPRE1) family, play pivotal roles in regulating microtubule dynamics. Here, we study the functional interplay between fission yeast Dis1, a member of the XMAP215/TOG family, and Mal3, an EB1 protein. Using an in vitro microscopy assay, we find that purified Dis1 autonomously tracks growing microtubule ends and is a bona fide microtubule polymerase. Mal3 recruits additional Dis1 to microtubule ends, explaining the synergistic enhancement of microtubule dynamicity by these proteins. A non-canonical binding motif in Dis1 mediates the interaction with Mal3. X-ray crystallography shows that this new motif interacts in an unconventional configuration with the conserved hydrophobic cavity formed within the Mal3 C-terminal region that typically interacts with the canonical SXIP motif. Selectively perturbing the Mal3–Dis1 interaction in living cells demonstrates that it is important for accurate chromosome segregation. Whereas, in some metazoans, the interaction between EB1 and the XMAP215/TOG family members requires an additional binding partner, fission yeast relies on a direct interaction, indicating evolutionary plasticity of this critical interaction module. PMID:27872152

  11. The Msd1–Wdr8–Pkl1 complex anchors microtubule minus ends to fission yeast spindle pole bodies

    PubMed Central

    Yukawa, Masashi; Ikebe, Chiho

    2015-01-01

    The minus ends of spindle microtubules are anchored to a microtubule-organizing center. The conserved Msd1/SSX2IP proteins are localized to the spindle pole body (SPB) and the centrosome in fission yeast and humans, respectively, and play a critical role in microtubule anchoring. In this paper, we show that fission yeast Msd1 forms a ternary complex with another conserved protein, Wdr8, and the minus end–directed Pkl1/kinesin-14. Individual deletion mutants displayed the identical spindle-protrusion phenotypes. Msd1 and Wdr8 were delivered by Pkl1 to mitotic SPBs, where Pkl1 was tethered through Msd1–Wdr8. The spindle-anchoring defect imposed by msd1/wdr8/pkl1 deletions was suppressed by a mutation of the plus end–directed Cut7/kinesin-5, which was shown to be mutual. Intriguingly, Pkl1 motor activity was not required for its anchoring role once targeted to the SPB. Therefore, spindle anchoring through Msd1–Wdr8–Pkl1 is crucial for balancing the Cut7/kinesin-5–mediated outward force at the SPB. Our analysis provides mechanistic insight into the spatiotemporal regulation of two opposing kinesins to ensure mitotic spindle bipolarity. PMID:25987607

  12. Rho1-GEFs Rgf1 and Rgf2 are involved in formation of cell wall and septum, while Rgf3 is involved in cytokinesis in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Mutoh, Tadashi; Nakano, Kentaro; Mabuchi, Issei

    2005-12-01

    The Rho GTPase acts as a binary molecular switch by converting between a GDP-bound inactive and a GTP-bound active conformational state. The guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) are critical activators of Rho. Rho1 has been shown to regulate actin cytoskeleton and cell wall synthesis in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Here we studied function of fission yeast RhoGEFs, Rgf1, Rgf2, and Rgf3. It was shown that these proteins have similar molecular structures, and function as GEFs for Rho1. Disruption of either rgf1 or rgf2 did not show a serious effect on the cell. On the other hand, disruption of rgf3 caused severe defects in contractile ring formation, F-actin patch localization, and septation during cytokinesis. Rgf1 and Rgf2 were localized to the cell ends during interphase and the septum. Rgf3 formed a ring at the division site, which was located outside the contractile ring and inside the septum where Rho1 was accumulated. In summary, Rgf1 and Rgf2 show functional redundancy, and roles of these RhoGEFs are likely to be different from that of Rgf3. Rho1 is likely to be activated by Rgf3 at the division site, and involved in contractile ring formation and/or maintenance and septation.

  13. ADP-ribosylation factor arf6p may function as a molecular switch of new end take off in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Atsushi

    2008-02-01

    Small GTPases act as molecular switches in a wide variety of cellular processes. In fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the directions of cell growth change from a monopolar manner to a bipolar manner, which is known as 'New End Take Off' (NETO). Here I report the identification of a gene, arf6{sup +}, encoding an ADP-ribosylation factor small GTPase, that may be essential for NETO. arf6{delta} cells completely fail to undergo NETO. arf6p localizes at both cell ends and presumptive septa in a cell-cycle dependent manner. And its polarized localization is not dependent on microtubules, actin cytoskeletons and some NETO factors (bud6p, for3p, tea1p, tea3p, and tea4p). Notably, overexpression of a fast GDP/GTP-cycling mutant of arf6p can advance the timing of NETO. These findings suggest that arf6p functions as a molecular switch for the activation of NETO in fission yeast.

  14. Yeast general transcription factor GFI: sequence requirements for binding to DNA and evolutionary conservation.

    PubMed Central

    Dorsman, J C; van Heeswijk, W C; Grivell, L A

    1990-01-01

    GFI is an abundant DNA binding protein in the yeast S. cerevisiae. The protein binds to specific sequences in both ARS elements and the upstream regions of a large number of genes and is likely to play an important role in yeast cell growth. To get insight into the relative strength of the various GFI-DNA binding sites within the yeast genome, we have determined dissociation rates for several GFI-DNA complexes and found them to vary over a 70-fold range. Strong binding sites for GFI are present in the upstream activating sequences of the gene encoding the 40 kDa subunit II of the QH2:cytochrome c reductase, the gene encoding ribosomal protein S33 and in the intron of the actin gene. The binding site in the ARS1-TRP1 region is of intermediate strength. All strong binding sites conform to the sequence 5' RTCRYYYNNNACG-3'. Modification interference experiments and studies with mutant binding sites indicate that critical bases for GFI recognition are within the two elements of the consensus DNA recognition sequence. Proteins with the DNA binding specificities of GFI and GFII can also be detected in the yeast K. lactis, suggesting evolutionary conservation of at least the respective DNA-binding domains in both yeasts. Images PMID:2187179

  15. Counteractive roles of protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) and a MAP kinase kinase homolog in the osmoregulation of fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Shiozaki, K; Russell, P

    1995-02-01

    With the goal of discovering the cellular functions of type 2C protein phosphatases, we have cloned and analyzed two ptc (phosphatase two C) genes, ptc2+ and ptc3+, from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Together with the previously identified ptc1+ gene, the enzymes encoded by these genes account for approximately 90% of the measurable PP2C activity in fission yeast cells. No obvious growth defects result from individual disruptions of ptc genes, but a delta ptc1 delta ptc3 double mutant displays aberrant cell morphology and temperature-sensitive cell lysis that is further accentuated in a delta ptc1 delta ptc2 delta ptc3 triple mutant. These phenotypes are almost completely suppressed by the presence of osmotic stabilizers, strongly indicating that PP2C has an important role in osmoregulation. Genetic suppression of delta ptc1 delta ptc3 lethality identified two loci, mutations of which render cells hypersensitive to high-osmolarity media. One locus is identical to wis1+, encoding a MAP kinase kinase (MEK) homolog. The Wis1 sequence is most closely related to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae MEK encoded by PBS2, which is required for osmoregulation. These data indicate that divergent yeasts have functionally conserved MAP kinase pathways, which are required to increase intracellular osmotic concentrations in response to osmotic stress. Moreover, our observations implicate PP2C enzymes as also having an important role in signal transduction processes involved in osmoregulation, probably acting to negatively regulate the osmosensing signal that is transmitted through Wis1 MAP kinase kinase.

  16. Identification of Protein Components of Yeast Telomerase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-01

    for forming telomeres at sites with stretches of telomere- like DNA. The pifl mutants also exhibit increased loss and decreased recombination of...like DNA. The pifl mutants also exhibit increased loss 6 and decreased recombination of mitochondrial DNA and thus have a high fraction of...the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe that was predicted to encode a 805 amino acid protein. The S. pombe gene was called rphl+ (RRM3/PIF1

  17. Problem-Solving Test: Analysis of DNA Damage Recognizing Proteins in Yeast and Human Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2013-01-01

    The experiment described in this test was aimed at identifying DNA repair proteins in human and yeast cells. Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: DNA repair, germline mutation, somatic mutation, inherited disease, cancer, restriction endonuclease, radioactive labeling, [alpha-[superscript 32]P]ATP, [gamma-[superscript…

  18. Functional Analyses of Human DNA Repair Proteins Important for Aging and Genomic Stability Using Yeast Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Monika; Brosh, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Model systems have been extremely useful for studying various theories of aging. Studies of yeast have been particularly helpful to explore the molecular mechanisms and pathways that affect aging at the cellular level in the simple eukaryote. Although genetic analysis has been useful to interrogate the aging process, there has been both interest and debate over how functionally conserved the mechanisms of aging are between yeast and higher eukaryotes, especially mammalian cells. One area of interest has been the importance of genomic stability for age-related processes, and the potential conservation of proteins and pathways between yeast and human. Translational genetics have been employed to examine the functional roles of mammalian proteins using yeast as a pliable model system. In the current review recent advancements made in this area are discussed, highlighting work which shows that the cellular functions of human proteins in DNA repair and maintenance of genomic stability can be elucidated by genetic rescue experiments performed in yeast. PMID:22349084

  19. Structural Basis for Error-free Replication of Oxidatively Damaged DNA by Yeast DNA Polymerase eta

    SciTech Connect

    T Silverstein; R Jain; R Johnson; L Prakash; S Prakash; A Aggarwal

    2011-12-31

    7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) adducts are formed frequently by the attack of oxygen-free radicals on DNA. They are among the most mutagenic lesions in cells because of their dual coding potential, where, in addition to normal base-pairing of 8-oxoG(anti) with dCTP, 8-oxoG in the syn conformation can base pair with dATP, causing G to T transversions. We provide here for the first time a structural basis for the error-free replication of 8-oxoG lesions by yeast DNA polymerase {eta} (Pol{eta}). We show that the open active site cleft of Pol{eta} can accommodate an 8-oxoG lesion in the anti conformation with only minimal changes to the polymerase and the bound DNA: at both the insertion and post-insertion steps of lesion bypass. Importantly, the active site geometry remains the same as in the undamaged complex and provides a basis for the ability of Pol to prevent the mutagenic replication of 8-oxoG lesions in cells.

  20. Comparative Analysis of Interaction of Human and Yeast DNA Damage Recognition Complexes with Damaged DNA in Nucleotide Excision Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Krasikova, Yuliya S.; Rechkunova, Nadejda I.; Maltseva, Ekaterina A.; Pestryakov, Pavel E.; Petruseva, Irina O.; Sugasawa, Kaoru; Chen, Xuejing; Min, Jung-Hyun; Lavrik, Olga I.

    2013-01-01

    The human XPC-RAD23B complex and its yeast ortholog, Rad4-Rad23, are the primary initiators of global genome nucleotide excision repair. The interaction of these proteins with damaged DNA was analyzed using model DNA duplexes containing a single fluorescein-substituted dUMP analog as a lesion. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed similarity between human and yeast proteins in DNA binding. Quantitative analyses of XPC/Rad4 binding to the model DNA structures were performed by fluorescent depolarization measurements. XPC-RAD23B and Rad4-Rad23 proteins demonstrate approximately equal binding affinity to the damaged DNA duplex (KD ∼ (0.5 ± 0.1) and (0.6 ± 0.3) nm, respectively). Using photoreactive DNA containing 5-iodo-dUMP in defined positions, XPC/Rad4 location on damaged DNA was shown. Under conditions of equimolar binding to DNA both proteins exhibited the highest level of cross-links to 5I-dUMP located exactly opposite the damaged nucleotide. The positioning of the XPC and Rad4 proteins on damaged DNA by photocross-linking footprinting is consistent with x-ray analysis of the Rad4-DNA crystal complex. The identity of the XPC and Rad4 location illustrates the common principles of structure organization of DNA damage-scanning proteins from different Eukarya organisms. PMID:23443653

  1. Optimization of yeast surface-displayed cDNA library screening for low abundance targets.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juh-Yung; Kim, Hyung Kyu; Jang, Hye Jeong; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Moon Kyu

    2015-04-01

    The yeast surface-displayed cDNA library has been used to identify unknown antigens. However, when unknown target antigens show moderate-to-low abundance, some modifications are needed in the screening process. In this study, a directional random-primed cDNA library was used to increase the number of candidates for the unknown antigen. To avoid the loss of target yeast clones that express proteins at a low frequency in the cDNA library, a comprehensive monitoring system based on magnetic-activated cell sorting, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and immunofluorescence was established, and a small number of target yeast cells was successfully enriched. These results showed that our optimized method has potential application for identifying rare unknown antigens of the human monoclonal antibody.

  2. Yeast one-hybrid screens for detection of transcription factor DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Ouwerkerk, Pieter B F; Meijer, Annemarie H

    2011-01-01

    The yeast one-hybrid system is widely recognized as a valuable and straightforward technique to study interactions between transcription factors and DNA. By means of one-hybrid screens, transcription factors or other DNA-binding proteins, expressed from cDNA expression libraries, can be identified due to the interactions with a DNA sequence-of-interest that is linked to a reporter gene, such as the yeast HIS3 gene. Usually, the library is constructed in an E. coli-yeast shuttle vector designed for production of hybrid proteins consisting of a library protein and the trans-activating domain (AD) from the yeast GAL4 transcription factor. Here, we describe an optimized system of vectors for one-hybrid screenings together with detailed step-wise protocols, an elaborate trouble-shooting guide and many technical tips to conduct successful screenings. This system and other yeast genetic selection procedures derived from one-hybrid methodology proved highly useful to help understanding the regulatory networks controlling expression of the genome.

  3. Development of large DNA methods for plants: molecular cloning of large segments of Arabidopsis and carrot DNA into yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán, P; Ecker, J R

    1988-01-01

    Procedures for the preparation, analysis and cloning of large DNA molecules from two different plant species are described. Arabidopsis and carrot protoplasts were used for the preparation of large DNA molecules in agarose "plugs" or in solution. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of large plant DNA preparations using a contour-clamped homogeneous field (CHEF) apparatus indicated that the size of the DNA was at least 12 Mb. Large DNA preparations were shown to be useful for restriction enzyme analysis of the Arabidopsis genome using both frequent and infrequent cutting enzymes and for the molecular cloning of large segments of DNA into yeast using artificial chromosome (YAC) vectors. PFGE and blot hybridization analysis of Arabidopsis and carrot DNA-containing YACs indicated that both unique and highly repeated DNA sequences were represented in these libraries. Images PMID:3060856

  4. The fission yeast Chs2 protein interacts with the type-II myosin Myo3p and is required for the integrity of the actomyosin ring.

    PubMed

    Martín-García, Rebeca; Valdivieso, M-Henar

    2006-07-01

    In Schizosaccharomyces pombe cytokinesis requires the function of a contractile actomyosin ring. Fission yeast Chs2p is a transmembrane protein structurally similar to chitin synthases that lacks such enzymatic activity. Chs2p localisation and assembly into a ring that contracts during division requires the general system for polarised secretion, some components of the actomyosin ring, and an active septation initiation network. Chs2p interacts physically with the type-II myosin Myo3p revealing a physical link between the plasma membrane and the ring. In chs2Delta mutants, actomyosin ring integrity is compromised during the last stages of contraction and it remains longer in the midzone. In synchronous cultures, chs2Delta cells exhibit a delay in septation with respect to the control strain. All these results show that Chs2p participates in the correct functioning of the medial ring.

  5. The effect of coenzyme Q10 included by γ-cyclodextrin on the growth of fission yeast studied by microscope Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Tatsuro; Kaino, Tomohiro; Ikarashi, Ryo; Nakata, Daisuke; Terao, Keiji; Ando, Masahiro; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o.; Kawamukai, Makoto; Yamamoto, Tatsuyuki

    2013-09-01

    The inclusion complex of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) by γ-cyclodextrin (γ-CD), CoQ10-CD complex, was recently developed. The addition of the CoQ10-CD complex recovered the growth of a fission yeast mutant strain, Δdps1, which otherwise cannot grow well due to the lack of coenzyme Q producing ability. However, the oxygen consumption rate of this strain was not restored by the addition of the CoQ10-CD complex. The addition of two other anti-oxidative reagents, glutathione and ascorbic acid, also recovered the growth of the Δdps1 strain as well. These results indicated that the recovery of the growth of Δdps1 was brought about by the anti-oxidative property of CoQ10. The intensity of Raman spectra of Δdps1 at 1602 cm-1, which is prominently observed for the wild type of the fission yeast, was compared between before and after addition of the CoQ10-CD complex. The signal was very weakly observed for Δdps1 and did not increase in intensity by the addition of the CoQ10-CD complex. These results suggested the recovery of the growth of Δdps1 was brought about not by the restoration of respiration function of Δdps1 but by the anti-oxidative property of CoQ10 to result in the decrease in the oxidative stress.

  6. Nuclear protein quality is regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system through the activity of Ubc4 and San1 in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Yuzy; Kishimoto, Hayafumi; Tanae, Katsuhiro; Kitamura, Kenji; Katayama, Satoshi; Kawamukai, Makoto

    2011-04-15

    Eukaryotic cells monitor and maintain protein quality through a set of protein quality control (PQC) systems whose role is to minimize the harmful effects of the accumulation of aberrant proteins. Although these PQC systems have been extensively studied in the cytoplasm, nuclear PQC systems are not well understood. The present work shows the existence of a nuclear PQC system mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Asf1-30, a mutant form of the histone chaperone Asf1, was used as a model substrate for the study of the nuclear PQC. A temperature-sensitive Asf1-30 protein localized to the nucleus was selectively degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The Asf1-30 mutant protein was highly ubiquitinated at higher temperatures, and it remained stable in an mts2-1 mutant, which lacks proteasome activity. The E2 enzyme Ubc4 was identified among 11 candidate proteins as the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme in this system, and San1 was selected among 100 candidates as the ubiquitin ligase (E3) targeting Asf1-30 for degradation. San1, but not other nuclear E3s, showed specificity for the mutant nuclear Asf1-30, but did not show activity against wild-type Asf1. These data clearly showed that the aberrant nuclear protein was degraded by a defined set of E1-E2-E3 enzymes through the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The data also show, for the first time, the presence of a nuclear PQC system in fission yeast.

  7. Microtubule-driven nuclear movements and linear elements as meiosis-specific characteristics of the fission yeasts Schizosaccharomyces versatilis and Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Svoboda, A; Bähler, J; Kohli, J

    1995-11-01

    Meiotic prophase in Schizosaccharomyces pombe is characterized by striking nuclear movements and the formation of linear elements along chromosomes instead of tripartite synaptonemal complexes. We analysed the organization of nuclei and microtubules in cells of fission yeasts undergoing sexual differentiation. S. japonicus var. versatilis and S. pombe cells were studied in parallel, taking advantage of the better cytology in S. versatilis. During conjugation, microtubules were directed towards the mating projection. These microtubules seem to lead the haploid nuclei together in the zygote by interaction with the spindle pole bodies at the nuclear periphery. After karyogamy, arrays of microtubules emanating from the spindle pole body of the diploid nucleus extended to both cell poles. The same differentiated microtubule configuration was elaborated upon induction of azygotic meiosis in S. pombe. The cyclic movements of the elongated nuclei between the cell poles is reflected by a dynamic and coordinated shortening and lengthening of the two microtubule arrays. When the nucleus was at a cell end, one array was short while the other bridged the whole cell length. Experiments with inhibitors showed that microtubules are required for karyogamy and for the elongated shape and movement of nuclei during meiotic prophase. In both fission yeasts the SPBs and nucleoli are at the leading ends of the moving nuclei. Astral and cytoplasmic microtubules were also prominent during meiotic divisions and sporulation. We further show that in S. versatilis the linear elements formed during meiotic prophase are similar to those in S. pombe. Tripartite synaptonemal complexes were never detected. Taken together, these findings suggest that S. pombe and S. versatilis share basic characteristics in the organization of microtubules and the structure and behaviour of nuclei during their meiotic cell cycle. The prominent differentiations of microtubules and nuclei may be involved in the

  8. Remodeling of the Fission Yeast Cdc42 Cell-Polarity Module via the Sty1 p38 Stress-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway.

    PubMed

    Mutavchiev, Delyan R; Leda, Marcin; Sawin, Kenneth E

    2016-11-07

    The Rho family GTPase Cdc42 is a key regulator of eukaryotic cellular organization and cell polarity [1]. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, active Cdc42 and associated effectors and regulators (the "Cdc42 polarity module") coordinate polarized growth at cell tips by controlling the actin cytoskeleton and exocytosis [2-4]. Localization of the Cdc42 polarity module to cell tips is thus critical for its function. Here we show that the fission yeast stress-activated protein kinase Sty1, a homolog of mammalian p38 MAP kinase, regulates localization of the Cdc42 polarity module. In wild-type cells, treatment with latrunculin A, a drug that leads to actin depolymerization, induces dispersal of the Cdc42 module from cell tips and cessation of polarized growth [5, 6]. We show that latrunculin A treatment also activates the Sty1 MAP kinase pathway and, strikingly, we find that loss of Sty1 MAP kinase signaling prevents latrunculin A-induced dispersal of the Cdc42 module, allowing polarized growth even in complete absence of the actin cytoskeleton. Regulation of the Cdc42 module by Sty1 is independent of Sty1's role in stress-induced gene expression. We also describe a system for activation of Sty1 kinase "on demand" in the absence of any external stress, and use this to show that Sty1 activation alone is sufficient to disperse the Cdc42 module from cell tips in otherwise unperturbed cells. During nitrogen-starvation-induced quiescence, inhibition of Sty1 converts non-growing, depolarized cells into growing, polarized cells. Our results place MAP kinase Sty1 as an important physiological regulator of the Cdc42 polarity module.

  9. Fission Yeast Myosin-I, Myo1p, Stimulates Actin Assembly by Arp2/3 Complex and Shares Functions with Wasp

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei-Lih; Bezanilla, Magdalena; Pollard, Thomas D.

    2000-01-01

    Fission yeast myo1+ encodes a myosin-I with all three tail homology domains (TH1, 2, 3) found in typical long-tailed myosin-Is. Myo1p tail also contains a COOH-terminal acidic region similar to the A-domain of WASp/Scar proteins and other fungal myosin-Is. Our analysis shows that Myo1p and Wsp1p, the fission yeast WASp-like protein, share functions and cooperate in controlling actin assembly. First, Myo1p localizes to cortical patches enriched at tips of growing cells and at sites of cell division. Myo1p patches partially colocalize with actin patches and are dependent on an intact actin cytoskeleton. Second, although deletion of myo1+ is not lethal, Δmyo1 cells have actin cytoskeletal defects, including loss of polarized cell growth, delocalized actin patches, and mating defects. Third, additional disruption of wsp1+ is synthetically lethal, suggesting that these genes may share functions. In mapping the domains of Myo1p tail that share function with Wsp1p, we discovered that a Myo1p construct with just the head and TH1 domains is sufficient for cortical localization and to rescue all Δmyo1 defects. However, it fails to rescue the Δmyo1 Δwsp1 lethality. Additional tail domains, TH2 and TH3, are required to complement the double mutant. Fourth, we show that a recombinant Myo1p tail binds to Arp2/3 complex and activates its actin nucleation activity. PMID:11076964

  10. The yeast telomere length regulator TEL2 encodes a protein that binds to telomeric DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kota, R S; Runge, K W

    1998-01-01

    TEL2 is required for telomere length regulation and viability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To investigate the mechanism by which Tel2p regulates telomere length, the majority (65%) of the TEL2 ORF was fused to the 3'-end of the gene for maltose binding protein, expressed in bacteria and the purified protein used in DNA binding studies. Rap1p, the major yeast telomere binding protein, recognizes a 13 bp duplex site 5'-GGTGTGTGGGTGT-3' in yeast telomeric DNA with high affinity. Gel shift experiments revealed that the MBP-Tel2p fusion binds the double-stranded yeast telomeric Rap1p site in a sequence-specific manner. Analysis of mutated sites showed that MBP-Tel2p could bind 5'-GTGTGTGG-3' within this 13 bp site. Methylation interference analysis revealed that Tel2p contacts the 5'-terminal guanine in the major groove. MBP-Tel2p did not bind duplex telomeric DNA repeats from vertebrates, Tetrahymena or Oxytricha. These results suggest that Tel2p is a DNA binding protein that recognizes yeast telomeric DNA. PMID:9490802

  11. DNA polymerase γ and disease: what we have learned from yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lodi, Tiziana; Dallabona, Cristina; Nolli, Cecilia; Goffrini, Paola; Donnini, Claudia; Baruffini, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Mip1 is the Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA polymerase γ (Pol γ), which is responsible for the replication of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). It belongs to the family A of the DNA polymerases and it is orthologs to human POLGA. In humans, mutations in POLG(1) cause many mitochondrial pathologies, such as progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO), Alpers' syndrome, and ataxia-neuropathy syndrome, all of which present instability of mtDNA, which results in impaired mitochondrial function in several tissues with variable degrees of severity. In this review, we summarize the genetic and biochemical knowledge published on yeast mitochondrial DNA polymerase from 1989, when the MIP1 gene was first cloned, up until now. The role of yeast is particularly emphasized in (i) validating the pathological mutations found in human POLG and modeled in MIP1, (ii) determining the molecular defects caused by these mutations and (iii) finding the correlation between mutations/polymorphisms in POLGA and mtDNA toxicity induced by specific drugs. We also describe recent findings regarding the discovery of molecules able to rescue the phenotypic defects caused by pathological mutations in Mip1, and the construction of a model system in which the human Pol γ holoenzyme is expressed in yeast and complements the loss of Mip1. PMID:25852747

  12. The Yeast Mitochondrial RNA Polymerase and Transcription Factor Complex Catalyzes Efficient Priming of DNA Synthesis on Single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Aparna; Nandakumar, Divya; Deshpande, Aishwarya P; Lucas, Thomas P; R-Bhojappa, Ramanagouda; Tang, Guo-Qing; Raney, Kevin; Yin, Y Whitney; Patel, Smita S

    2016-08-05

    Primases use single-stranded (ss) DNAs as templates to synthesize short oligoribonucleotide primers that initiate lagging strand DNA synthesis or reprime DNA synthesis after replication fork collapse, but the origin of this activity in the mitochondria remains unclear. Herein, we show that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial RNA polymerase (Rpo41) and its transcription factor (Mtf1) is an efficient primase that initiates DNA synthesis on ssDNA coated with the yeast mitochondrial ssDNA-binding protein, Rim1. Both Rpo41 and Rpo41-Mtf1 can synthesize short and long RNAs on ssDNA template and prime DNA synthesis by the yeast mitochondrial DNA polymerase Mip1. However, the ssDNA-binding protein Rim1 severely inhibits the RNA synthesis activity of Rpo41, but not the Rpo41-Mtf1 complex, which continues to prime DNA synthesis efficiently in the presence of Rim1. We show that RNAs as short as 10-12 nt serve as primers for DNA synthesis. Characterization of the RNA-DNA products shows that Rpo41 and Rpo41-Mtf1 have slightly different priming specificity. However, both prefer to initiate with ATP from short priming sequences such as 3'-TCC, TTC, and TTT, and the consensus sequence is 3'-Pu(Py)2-3 Based on our studies, we propose that Rpo41-Mtf1 is an attractive candidate for serving as the primase to initiate lagging strand DNA synthesis during normal replication and/or to restart stalled replication from downstream ssDNA.

  13. EdU Incorporation for FACS and Microscopy Analysis of DNA Replication in Budding Yeast.

    PubMed

    Talarek, Nicolas; Petit, Julie; Gueydon, Elisabeth; Schwob, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication is a key determinant of chromosome segregation and stability in eukaryotes. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been extensively used for cell cycle studies, yet simple but key parameters such as the fraction of cells in S phase in a population or the subnuclear localization of DNA synthesis have been difficult to gather for this organism. 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) is a thymidine analogue that can be incorporated in vivo and later detected using copper-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition (Click reaction) without prior DNA denaturation. This chapter describes a budding yeast strain and conditions that allow rapid EdU incorporation at moderate extracellular concentrations, followed by its efficient detection for the analysis of DNA replication in single cells by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy.

  14. Heavy ion induced DNA-DSB in yeast and mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loebrich, M.; Ikpeme, S.; Kiefer, J.

    1994-01-01

    Molecular changes at the DNA are assumed to be the main cause for radiation effects in a number of organisms. During the course of the last decades techniques have been developed for measuring DNA double-strand breaks (dsb), generally assumed to be the most critical DNA lesions. The outcome of all those different approaches portrays a collection of data useful for a theoretical description of radiation action mechanisms. However, in the case of heavy ion induced DNA dsb the picture is not quite clear yet and further projects and strategies have to be developed. The biological systems studied in our group are yeast and mammalian cells. While in the case of yeast cells technical and methodical reasons highlight these organisms mammalian cells reach greater importance when dsb repair studies are performed. In both types of organisms the technique of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) is applied, although with different modifications and evaluation procedures mainly due to the different genome sizes.

  15. DNA typing methods for differentiation of yeasts related to dry-cured meat products.

    PubMed

    Andrade, M J; Rodríguez, M; Sánchez, B; Aranda, E; Córdoba, J J

    2006-03-01

    RFLP analysis of the ITS and 18S rDNA, RAPD-PCR using mini- and microsatellite primers and RFLP analysis of mitochondrial DNA were examined to discriminate yeasts related to dry-cured meat products at species and strain level. Seven species and 35 strains of yeasts usually found in dry-cured meat products were tested. RFLP analysis of the ITS1-5.8S rDNA-ITS2 and 18S rDNA did not allow the separation at species level of all of the species tested. RAPD with a M13 primer was found to be useful for differentiation of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Candida zeylanoides, Yarrowia lipolytica, Debaryomyces hansenii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, no differences were observed between Debaryomyces polymorphus and Pichia carsonii. RAPD analysis with microsatellite primers (GACA)(4), (GTG)(5) and (GAC)(5) enabled discrimination at species and strain level. However, the degree of discrimination by means of RAPD-PCR depends highly on the primers used. Thus, the PCR fingerprinting with primer (GACA)(4) enabled a higher level of discrimination than primers (GAC)(5) and (GTG)(5). The RFLP analysis of mtDNA allowed the discrimination at the species and strain level except for R. mucilaginosa, where no polymorphisms were observed in the strains tested. RAPD analysis with primer (GACA)(4) and the restriction analysis of mtDNA used in the present work are useful for the differentiation at species and strain level of yeasts related to dry-cured meat products.

  16. Proficient Replication of the Yeast Genome by a Viral DNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Stodola, Joseph L; Stith, Carrie M; Burgers, Peter M

    2016-05-27

    DNA replication in eukaryotic cells requires minimally three B-family DNA polymerases: Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ϵ. Pol δ replicates and matures Okazaki fragments on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pol δ is a three-subunit enzyme (Pol3-Pol31-Pol32). A small C-terminal domain of the catalytic subunit Pol3 carries both iron-sulfur cluster and zinc-binding motifs, which mediate interactions with Pol31, and processive replication with the replication clamp proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), respectively. We show that the entire N-terminal domain of Pol3, containing polymerase and proofreading activities, could be effectively replaced by those from bacteriophage RB69, and could carry out chromosomal DNA replication in yeast with remarkable high fidelity, provided that adaptive mutations in the replication clamp PCNA were introduced. This result is consistent with the model that all essential interactions for DNA replication in yeast are mediated through the small C-terminal domain of Pol3. The chimeric polymerase carries out processive replication with PCNA in vitro; however, in yeast, it requires an increased involvement of the mutagenic translesion DNA polymerase ζ during DNA replication.

  17. Processing of DNA damage after exposure to a single dose of fission spectrum neutrons takes 40 hours to complete

    SciTech Connect

    Peak, J.G.; Peak, M.J.

    1996-11-01

    We have examined the time course over a period of days of repair of chromosomal single-strand breaks (SSB) induced by a single dose of JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons in the DNA of human P3 epithelial teratocarcinoma cells. When the cells are allowed a period of repair incubation the breaks are totally sealed by 7 hours. But then following these initial repair the DNA is dismantled as evidenced by the reappearance of SSBs. This secondary breakage is almost as extensive as that caused by the original neutron exposure, with a maximum at 16-18 hours. Finally, the DNA is rejoined, regaining its original size by 40 hours after irradiation. The secondary repair phenomenon may have an editing function, or it many represent the processing of residual damage left unrepaired during the initial rejoining of the backbone breaks.

  18. Strand displacement synthesis by yeast DNA polymerase ε

    PubMed Central

    Ganai, Rais A.; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich; Johansson, Erik

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) is a replicative DNA polymerase with an associated 3′–5′ exonuclease activity. Here, we explored the capacity of Pol ε to perform strand displacement synthesis, a process that influences many DNA transactions in vivo. We found that Pol ε is unable to carry out extended strand displacement synthesis unless its 3′–5′ exonuclease activity is removed. However, the wild-type Pol ε holoenzyme efficiently displaced one nucleotide when encountering double-stranded DNA after filling a gap or nicked DNA. A flap, mimicking a D-loop or a hairpin structure, on the 5′ end of the blocking primer inhibited Pol ε from synthesizing DNA up to the fork junction. This inhibition was observed for Pol ε but not with Pol δ, RB69 gp43 or Pol η. Neither was Pol ε able to extend a D-loop in reconstitution experiments. Finally, we show that the observed strand displacement synthesis by exonuclease-deficient Pol ε is distributive. Our results suggest that Pol ε is unable to extend the invading strand in D-loops during homologous recombination or to add more than two nucleotides during long-patch base excision repair. Our results support the hypothesis that Pol ε participates in short-patch base excision repair and ribonucleotide excision repair. PMID:27325747

  19. Unique regulation of glyoxalase I activity during osmotic stress response in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe: neither the mRNA nor the protein level of glyoxalase I increase under conditions that enhance its activity.

    PubMed

    Takatsume, Yoshifumi; Izawa, Shingo; Inoue, Yoshiharu

    2005-03-01

    Glyoxalase I is a ubiquitous enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of methylglyoxal, a toxic 2-oxoaldehyde derived from glycolysis, to S-D-lactoylglutathione. The activity of glyoxalase I in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe was increased by osmotic stress induced by sorbitol. However, neither the mRNA levels of its structural gene nor its protein levels increased under the same conditions. Cycloheximide blocked the induction of glyoxalase I activity in cells exposed to osmotic stress. In addition, glyoxalase I activity was increased in stress-activated protein kinase-deficient mutants (wis1 and spc1). We present evidence for the post-translational regulation of glyoxalase I by osmotic stress in the fission yeast.

  20. Identification of a human cDNA with high homology to yeast omnipotent suppressor 45.

    PubMed

    Grenett, H E; Bounelis, P; Fuller, G M

    1992-01-15

    Omnipotent suppression is a well-established phenomenon in yeast and bacteria in which nonsense mutations are misread. Wild-type (wt) suppressors are presumed to be involved in ensuring the fidelity of translation. We report a human homolog to wt yeast omnipotent suppressor 45 which shares 63% identity at the nucleotide level in the area of open reading frame (ORF) and 73% similarity at the amino acid (aa) level. The aa sequence of the human protein was deduced from a 2.3-kb cDNA (TB3-1) isolated from an adenocarcinoma T84 cell line cDNA library. The cDNA contains an ORF of 1284 bp which encodes a 47.8-kDa protein. Two transcripts for the clone were identified (2.6 and 4.0 kb) in a variety of human cell types. The strong structural similarity to yeast omnipotent suppressor 45, and its widespread expression suggest that this cDNA may play a role in the accurate recognition of nonsense codons in mammalian cells.

  1. Profiling DNA damage-induced phosphorylation in budding yeast reveals diverse signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chunshui; Elia, Andrew E H; Naylor, Maria L; Dephoure, Noah; Ballif, Bryan A; Goel, Gautam; Xu, Qikai; Ng, Aylwin; Chou, Danny M; Xavier, Ramnik J; Gygi, Steven P; Elledge, Stephen J

    2016-06-28

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is regulated by a protein kinase signaling cascade that orchestrates DNA repair and other processes. Identifying the substrate effectors of these kinases is critical for understanding the underlying physiology and mechanism of the response. We have used quantitative mass spectrometry to profile DDR-dependent phosphorylation in budding yeast and genetically explored the dependency of these phosphorylation events on the DDR kinases MEC1, RAD53, CHK1, and DUN1. Based on these screens, a database containing many novel DDR-regulated phosphorylation events has been established. Phosphorylation of many of these proteins has been validated by quantitative peptide phospho-immunoprecipitation and examined for functional relevance to the DDR through large-scale analysis of sensitivity to DNA damage in yeast deletion strains. We reveal a link between DDR signaling and the metabolic pathways of inositol phosphate and phosphatidyl inositol synthesis, which are required for resistance to DNA damage. We also uncover links between the DDR and TOR signaling as well as translation regulation. Taken together, these data shed new light on the organization of DDR signaling in budding yeast.

  2. Profiling DNA damage-induced phosphorylation in budding yeast reveals diverse signaling networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chunshui; Elia, Andrew E. H.; Naylor, Maria L.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Goel, Gautam; Xu, Qikai; Ng, Aylwin; Chou, Danny M.; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Gygi, Steven P.; Elledge, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is regulated by a protein kinase signaling cascade that orchestrates DNA repair and other processes. Identifying the substrate effectors of these kinases is critical for understanding the underlying physiology and mechanism of the response. We have used quantitative mass spectrometry to profile DDR-dependent phosphorylation in budding yeast and genetically explored the dependency of these phosphorylation events on the DDR kinases MEC1, RAD53, CHK1, and DUN1. Based on these screens, a database containing many novel DDR-regulated phosphorylation events has been established. Phosphorylation of many of these proteins has been validated by quantitative peptide phospho-immunoprecipitation and examined for functional relevance to the DDR through large-scale analysis of sensitivity to DNA damage in yeast deletion strains. We reveal a link between DDR signaling and the metabolic pathways of inositol phosphate and phosphatidyl inositol synthesis, which are required for resistance to DNA damage. We also uncover links between the DDR and TOR signaling as well as translation regulation. Taken together, these data shed new light on the organization of DDR signaling in budding yeast. PMID:27298372

  3. Transposon tools for recombinant DNA manipulation: characterization of transcriptional regulators from yeast, Xenopus, and mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, B A; Conlon, F L; Manzanares, M; Millar, J B; Kanuga, N; Sharpe, J; Krumlauf, R; Smith, J C; Sedgwick, S G

    1996-01-01

    Transposon Tn1000 has been adapted to deliver novel DNA sequences for manipulating recombinant DNA. The transposition procedure for these "tagged" Tn1000s is simple and applicable to most plasmids in current use. For yeast molecular biology, tagged Tn1000s introduce a variety of yeast selective markers and replication origins into plasmids and cosmids. In addition, the beta-globin minimal promoter and lacZ gene of Tn(beta)lac serve as a mobile reporter of eukaryotic enhancer activity. In this paper, Tn(beta)lac was used to localize a mouse HoxB-complex enhancer in transgenic mice. Other tagged transposons create Gal4 DNA-binding-domain fusions, in either Escherichia coli or yeast plasmids, for use in one- and two-hybrid tests of transcriptional activation and protein-protein interaction, respectively. With such fusions, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Swi6 G1/S-phase transcription factor and the Xenopus laevis Pintallavis developmental regulator are shown to activate transcription. Furthermore, the same transposon insertions also facilitated mapping of the Swi6 and Pintallavis domains responsible for transcriptional activation. Thus, as well as introducing novel sequences, tagged transposons share the numerous other applications of transposition such as producing insertional mutations, creating deletion series, or serving as mobile primer sites for DNA sequencing. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8610121

  4. Subunit architecture of the Golgi Dsc E3 ligase required for sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) cleavage in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, S Julie-Ann; Raychaudhuri, Sumana; Espenshade, Peter J

    2013-07-19

    The membrane-bound sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors regulate lipogenesis in mammalian cells and are activated through sequential cleavage by the Golgi-localized Site-1 and Site-2 proteases. The mechanism of fission yeast SREBP cleavage is less well defined and, in contrast, requires the Golgi-localized Dsc E3 ligase complex. The Dsc E3 ligase consists of five integral membrane subunits, Dsc1 through Dsc5, and resembles membrane E3 ligases that function in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation. Using immunoprecipitation assays and blue native electrophoresis, we determined the subunit architecture for the complex of Dsc1 through Dsc5, showing that the Dsc proteins form subcomplexes and display defined connectivity. Dsc2 is a rhomboid pseudoprotease family member homologous to mammalian UBAC2 and a central component of the Dsc E3 ligase. We identified conservation in the architecture of the Dsc E3 ligase and the multisubunit E3 ligase gp78 in mammals. Specifically, Dsc1-Dsc2-Dsc5 forms a complex resembling gp78-UBAC2-UBXD8. Further characterization of Dsc2 revealed that its C-terminal UBA domain can bind to ubiquitin chains but that the Dsc2 UBA domain is not essential for yeast SREBP cleavage. Based on the ability of rhomboid superfamily members to bind transmembrane proteins, we speculate that Dsc2 functions in SREBP recognition and binding. Homologs of Dsc1 through Dsc4 are required for SREBP cleavage and virulence in the human opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. Thus, these studies advance our organizational understanding of multisubunit E3 ligases involved in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation and fungal pathogenesis.

  5. Identification of a 14-3-3 protein from Lentinus edodes that interacts with CAP (adenylyl cyclase-associated protein), and conservation of this interaction in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Zhou, G L; Yamamoto, T; Ozoe, F; Yano, D; Tanaka, K; Matsuda, H; Kawamukai, M

    2000-01-01

    We previously identified a gene encoding a CAP (adenylyl cyclase-associated protein) homologue from the edible Basidiomycete Lentinus edodes. To further discover the cellular functions of the CAP protein, we searched for CAP-interacting proteins using a yeast two-hybrid system. Among the candidates thus obtained, many clones encoded the C-terminal half of an L. edodes 14-3-3 homologue (designated cip3). Southern blot analysis indicated that L. edodes contains only one 14-3-3 gene. Overexpression of the L. edodes 14-3-3 protein in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe rad24 null cells complemented the loss of endogenous 14-3-3 protein functions in cell morphology and UV sensitivity, suggesting functional conservation of 14-3-3 proteins between L. edodes and S. pombe. The interaction between L. edodes CAP and 14-3-3 protein was restricted to the N-terminal domain of CAP and was confirmed by in vitro co-precipitation. Results from both the two-hybrid system and in vivo co-precipitation experiments showed the conservation of this interaction in S. pombe. The observation that a 14-3-3 protein interacts with the N-terminal portion of CAP but not with full-length CAP in L. edodes and S. pombe suggests that the C-terminal region of CAP may have a negative effect on the interaction between CAP and 14-3-3 proteins, and 14-3-3 proteins may play a role in regulation of CAP function.

  6. Coordinated regulation by two VPS9 domain-containing guanine nucleotide exchange factors in small GTPase Rab5 signaling pathways in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukamoto, Yuta; Kagiwada, Satoshi; Shimazu, Sayuri; Takegawa, Kaoru; Noguchi, Tetsuko; Miyamoto, Masaaki

    2015-03-20

    The small GTPase Rab5 is reported to regulate various cellular functions, such as vesicular transport and endocytosis. VPS9 domain-containing proteins are thought to activate Rab5(s) by their guanine-nucleotide exchange activities. Numerous VPS9 proteins have been identified and are structurally conserved from yeast to mammalian cells. However, the functional relationships among VPS9 proteins in cells remain unclear. Only one Rab5 and two VPS9 proteins were identified in the Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome. Here, we examined the cellular function of two VPS9 proteins and the relationship between these proteins in cellular functions. Vps901-GFP and Vps902-GFP exhibited dotted signals in vegetative and differentiated cells. vps901 deletion mutant (Δvps901) cells exhibited a phenotype deficient in the mating process and responses to high concentrations of ions, such as calcium and metals, and Δvps901Δvps902 double mutant cells exhibited round cell shapes similar to ypt5-909 (Rab5 mutant allele) cells. Deletion of both vps901 and vps902 genes completely abolished the mating process and responses to various stresses. A lack of vacuole formation and aberrant inner cell membrane structures were also observed in Δvps901Δvps902 cells by electron microscopy. These data strongly suggest that Vps901 and Vps902 are cooperatively involved in the regulation of cellular functions, such as cell morphology, sexual development, response to ion stresses, and vacuole formation, via Rab5 signaling pathways in fission yeast cells. - Highlights: • Roles of Rab5 activator VPS9 proteins in cellular functions. • Cooperation between VPS9 proteins in Rab5 signaling pathway. • Roles of each VPS9 protein in Rab5 signaling pathway are discussed.

  7. Repair of uv damaged DNA: Genes and proteins of yeast and human. Progress report, November 1, 1991--April 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, L.

    1992-04-01

    Our objectives are to determine the molecular mechanism of the incision step of excision repair of ultraviolet (UV) light damaged DNA in eukaryotic organisms, using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, and to study the human homologs of yeast excision repair and postreplication repair proteins progress is described.

  8. Efficient yeast ChIP-Seq using multiplex short-read DNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lefrançois, Philippe; Euskirchen, Ghia M; Auerbach, Raymond K; Rozowsky, Joel; Gibson, Theodore; Yellman, Christopher M; Gerstein, Mark; Snyder, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background Short-read high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies provide new tools to answer biological questions. However, high cost and low throughput limit their widespread use, particularly in organisms with smaller genomes such as S. cerevisiae. Although ChIP-Seq in mammalian cell lines is replacing array-based ChIP-chip as the standard for transcription factor binding studies, ChIP-Seq in yeast is still underutilized compared to ChIP-chip. We developed a multiplex barcoding system that allows simultaneous sequencing and analysis of multiple samples using Illumina's platform. We applied this method to analyze the chromosomal distributions of three yeast DNA binding proteins (Ste12, Cse4 and RNA PolII) and a reference sample (input DNA) in a single experiment and demonstrate its utility for rapid and accurate results at reduced costs. Results We developed a barcoding ChIP-Seq method for the concurrent analysis of transcription factor binding sites in yeast. Our multiplex strategy generated high quality data that was indistinguishable from data obtained with non-barcoded libraries. None of the barcoded adapters induced differences relative to a non-barcoded adapter when applied to the same DNA sample. We used this method to map the binding sites for Cse4, Ste12 and Pol II throughout the yeast genome and we found 148 binding targets for Cse4, 823 targets for Ste12 and 2508 targets for PolII. Cse4 was strongly bound to all yeast centromeres as expected and the remaining non-centromeric targets correspond to highly expressed genes in rich media. The presence of Cse4 non-centromeric binding sites was not reported previously. Conclusion We designed a multiplex short-read DNA sequencing method to perform efficient ChIP-Seq in yeast and other small genome model organisms. This method produces accurate results with higher throughput and reduced cost. Given constant improvements in high-throughput sequencing technologies, increasing multiplexing will be possible to

  9. Cloning and sequencing of the PIF gene involved in repair and recombination of yeast mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Foury, F; Lahaye, A

    1987-01-01

    The nuclear gene PIF of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for both repair of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and recognition of a recombinogenic signal characterized by a 26-bp palindromic AT sequence in the ery region of mtDNA. This gene has been cloned in yeast by genetic complementation of pif mutants. Its chromosomal disruption does not destroy the genetic function of mitochondria. The nucleotide sequence of the 3.5-kb insert from a complementing plasmid reveals an open reading frame encoding a potential protein of 857 amino acids and Mr = 97,500. An ATP-binding domain is present in the central part of the gene and in the carboxy-terminal region a putative DNA-binding site is present. Its alpha helix-turn-alpha helix motif is found in DNA-binding proteins such as lambda and lactose repressors which recognize symmetric sequences. Significant amino acid homology is observed with yeast RAD3 and E. coli UvrD (helicase II) proteins which are required for excision repair of damaged DNA. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:3038524

  10. Suppressors of cdc25p overexpression identify two pathways that influence the G2/M checkpoint in fission yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, K C; Humphrey, T; Enoch, T

    1998-01-01

    Checkpoints maintain the order of cell-cycle events. At G2/M, a checkpoint blocks mitosis in response to damaged or unreplicated DNA. There are significant differences in the checkpoint responses to damaged DNA and unreplicated DNA, although many of the same genes are involved in both responses. To identify new genes that function specifically in the DNA replication checkpoint pathway, we searched for high-copy suppressors of overproducer of Cdc25p (OPcdc25(+)), which lacks a DNA replication checkpoint. Two classes of suppressors were isolated. One class includes a new gene encoding a putative DEAD box helicase, suppressor of uncontrolled mitosis (sum3(+)). This gene negatively regulates the cell-cycle response to stress when overexpressed and restores the checkpoint response by a mechanism that is independent of Cdc2p tyrosine phosphorylation. The second class includes chk1(+) and the two Schizosaccharomyces pombe 14-3-3 genes, rad24(+) and rad25(+), which appear to suppress the checkpoint defect by inhibiting Cdc25p. We show that rad24Delta mutants are defective in the checkpoint response to the DNA replication inhibitor hydroxyurea at 37 degrees and that cds1Delta rad24Delta mutants, like cds1Delta chk1Delta mutants, are entirely checkpoint deficient at 29 degrees. These results suggest that chk1(+) and rad24(+) may function redundantly with cds1(+) in the checkpoint response to unreplicated DNA. PMID:9832516

  11. Structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1, a fission yeast MAPK target RNA binding protein, and implication for its RNA recognition and regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Ayaho; Kanaba, Teppei; Satoh, Ryosuke; Fujiwara, Toshinobu; Ito, Yutaka; Sugiura, Reiko; Mishima, Masaki

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •Solution structure of the second RRM of Nrd1 was determined. •RNA binding site of the second RRM was estimated. •Regulatory mechanism of RNA binding by phosphorylation is discussed. -- Abstract: Negative regulator of differentiation 1 (Nrd1) is known as a negative regulator of sexual differentiation in fission yeast. Recently, it has been revealed that Nrd1 also regulates cytokinesis, in which physical separation of the cell is achieved by a contractile ring comprising many proteins including actin and myosin. Cdc4, a myosin II light chain, is known to be required for cytokinesis. Nrd1 binds and stabilizes Cdc4 mRNA, and thereby suppressing the cytokinesis defects of the cdc4 mutants. Interestingly, Pmk1 MAPK phosphorylates Nrd1, resulting in markedly reduced RNA binding activity. Furthermore, Nrd1 localizes to stress granules in response to various stresses, and Pmk1 phosphorylation enhances the localization. Nrd1 consists of four RRM domains, although the mechanism by which Pmk1 regulates the RNA binding activity of Nrd1 is unknown. In an effort to delineate the relationship between Nrd1 structure and function, we prepared each RNA binding domain of Nrd1 and examined RNA binding to chemically synthesized oligo RNA using NMR. The structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1 was determined and the RNA binding site on the second RRM domain was mapped by NMR. A plausible mechanism pertaining to the regulation of RNA binding activity by phosphorylation is also discussed.

  12. The dual role of fission yeast Tbc1/cofactor C orchestrates microtubule homeostasis in tubulin folding and acts as a GAP for GTPase Alp41/Arl2

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Risa; Toda, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Supplying the appropriate amount of correctly folded α/β-tubulin heterodimers is critical for microtubule dynamics. Formation of assembly-competent heterodimers is remarkably elaborate at the molecular level, in which the α- and β-tubulins are separately processed in a chaperone-dependent manner. This sequential step is performed by the tubulin-folding cofactor pathway, comprising a specific set of regulatory proteins: cofactors A–E. We identified the fission yeast cofactor: the orthologue of cofactor C, Tbc1. In addition to its roles in tubulin folding, Tbc1 acts as a GAP in regulating Alp41/Arl2, a highly conserved small GTPase. Of interest, the expression of GDP- or GTP-bound Alp41 showed the identical microtubule loss phenotype, suggesting that continuous cycling between these forms is important for its functions. In addition, we found that Alp41 interacts with Alp1D, the orthologue of cofactor D, specifically when in the GDP-bound form. Intriguingly, Alp1D colocalizes with microtubules when in excess, eventually leading to depolymerization, which is sequestered by co-overproducing GDP-bound Alp41. We present a model of the final stages of the tubulin cofactor pathway that includes a dual role for both Tbc1 and Alp1D in opposing regulation of the microtubule. PMID:23576550

  13. Fission yeast kinesin-8 Klp5 and Klp6 are interdependent for mitotic nuclear retention and required for proper microtubule dynamics.

    PubMed

    Unsworth, Amy; Masuda, Hirohisa; Dhut, Susheela; Toda, Takashi

    2008-12-01

    Fission yeast has two kinesin-8s, Klp5 and Klp6, which associate to form a heterocomplex. Here, we show that Klp5 and Klp6 are mutually dependent on each other for nuclear mitotic localization. During interphase, they are exported to the cytoplasm. In sharp contrast, during mitosis, Klp5 and Klp6 remain in the nucleus, which requires the existence of each counterpart. Canonical nuclear localization signal (NLS) is identified in the nonkinesin C-terminal regions. Intriguingly individual NLS mutants (NLSmut) exhibit loss-of-function phenotypes, suggesting that Klp5 and Klp6 enter the nucleus separately. Indeed, although neither Klp5-NLSmut nor Klp6-NLSmut enters the nucleus, wild-type Klp6 or Klp5, respectively, does so with different kinetics. In the absence of Klp5/6, microtubule catastrophe/rescue frequency and dynamicity are suppressed, whereas growth and shrinkage rates are least affected. Remarkably, chimera strains containing only the N-terminal Klp5 kinesin domains cannot disassemble interphase microtubules during mitosis, leading to the coexistence of cytoplasmic microtubules and nuclear spindles with massive chromosome missegregation. In this strain, a marked reduction of microtubule dynamism, even higher than in klp5/6 deletions, is evident. We propose that Klp5 and Klp6 play a vital role in promoting microtubule dynamics, which is essential for the spatiotemporal control of microtubule morphogenesis.

  14. Red5 and three nuclear pore components are essential for efficient suppression of specific mRNAs during vegetative growth of fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Tomoyasu; Wanatabe, Nobuyoshi; Kitahata, Eri; Tani, Tokio; Sugioka-Sugiyama, Rie

    2013-07-01

    Zinc-finger domains are found in many nucleic acid-binding proteins in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Proteins carrying zinc-finger domains have important roles in various nuclear transactions, including transcription, mRNA processing and mRNA export; however, for many individual zinc-finger proteins in eukaryotes, the exact function of the protein is not fully understood. Here, we report that Red5 is involved in efficient suppression of specific mRNAs during vegetative growth of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Red5, which contains five C3H1-type zinc-finger domains, localizes to the nucleus where it forms discrete dots. A red5 point mutation, red5-2, results in the upregulation of specific meiotic mRNAs in vegetative mutant red5-2 cells; northern blot data indicated that these meiotic mRNAs in red5-2 cells have elongated poly(A) tails. RNA-fluorescence in situ hybridization results demonstrate that poly(A)(+) RNA species accumulate in the nucleolar regions of red5-deficient cells. Moreover, Red5 genetically interacts with several mRNA export factors. Unexpectedly, three components of the nuclear pore complex also suppress a specific set of meiotic mRNAs. These results indicate that Red5 function is important to meiotic mRNA degradation; they also suggest possible connections among selective mRNA decay, mRNA export and the nuclear pore complex in vegetative fission yeast.

  15. Nuclear shape, growth and integrity in the closed mitosis of fission yeast depend on the Ran-GTPase system, the spindle pole body and the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Yanira; Meerbrey, Kristen; Chong, Jennifer; Torii, Yoshihiro; Padte, Neal N; Sazer, Shelley

    2009-07-15

    The double lipid bilayer of the nuclear envelope (NE) remains intact during closed mitosis. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the intranuclear mitotic spindle has envelope-embedded spindle pole bodies (SPB) at its ends. As the spindle elongates and the nucleus divides symmetrically, nuclear volume remains constant but nuclear area rapidly increases by 26%. When Ran-GTPase function is compromised in S. pombe, nuclear division is strikingly asymmetrical and the newly synthesized SPB is preferentially associated with the smaller nucleus, indicative of a Ran-dependent SPB defect that interferes with symmetrical nuclear division. A second defect, which specifically influences the NE, results in breakage of the NE upon spindle elongation. This defect, but not asymmetric nuclear division, is partially rescued by slowing spindle elongation, stimulating endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proliferation or changing conformation of the ER membrane. We propose that redistribution of lipid within the ER-NE network is crucial for mitosis-specific NE changes in both open and closed mitosis.

  16. A novel function of the mitochondrial transcription factor Mtf1 in fission yeast; Mtf1 regulates the nuclear transcription of srk1.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenxia; Wang, Zhe; Jiang, Hengyi; Zhang, Jing; Bähler, Jürg; Chen, Dongrong; Murchie, Alastair I H

    2011-04-01

    In eukaryotic cells, Mtf1 and its homologues function as mitochondrial transcription factors for the mitochondrial RNA polymerase in the mitochondrion. Here we show that in fission yeast Mtf1 exerts a non-mitochondrial function as a nuclear factor that regulates transcription of srk1, which is a kinase involved in the stress response and cell cycle progression. We first found Mtf1 expression in the nucleus. A ChIP-chip approach identified srk1 as a putative Mtf1 target gene. Over expression of Mtf1 induced transcription of the srk1 gene and Mtf1 deletion led to a reduction in transcription of the srk1 gene in vivo. Mtf1 overexpression causes cell elongation in a srk1 dependent manner. Mtf1 overexpression can cause cytoplasmic accumulation of Cdc25. We also provide biochemical evidence that Mtf1 binds to the upstream sequence of srk1. This is the first evidence that a mitochondrial transcription factor Mtf1 can regulate a nuclear gene. Mtf1 may also have a role in cell cycle progression.

  17. Targeting of SUMO substrates to a Cdc48–Ufd1–Npl4 segregase and STUbL pathway in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Køhler, Julie Bonne; Tammsalu, Triin; Jørgensen, Maria Mønster; Steen, Nana; Hay, Ronald Thomas; Thon, Geneviève

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the conjugation of proteins to the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) regulates numerous cellular functions. A proportion of SUMO conjugates are targeted for degradation by SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases (STUbLs) and it has been proposed that the ubiquitin-selective chaperone Cdc48/p97-Ufd1-Npl4 facilitates this process. However, the extent to which the two pathways overlap, and how substrates are selected, remains unknown. Here we address these questions in fission yeast through proteome-wide analyses of SUMO modification sites. We identify over a thousand sumoylated lysines in a total of 468 proteins and quantify changes occurring in the SUMO modification status when the STUbL or Ufd1 pathways are compromised by mutations. The data suggest the coordinated processing of several classes of SUMO conjugates, many dynamically associated with centromeres or telomeres. They provide new insights into subnuclear organization and chromosome biology, and, altogether, constitute an extensive resource for the molecular characterization of SUMO function and dynamics. PMID:26537787

  18. Mutation of a conserved residue enhances the sensitivity of analogue-sensitised kinases to generate a novel approach to the study of mitosis in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Tay, Ye-Dee; Patel, Avinash; Kaemena, Daniel F; Hagan, Iain M

    2013-11-01

    The chemical genetic strategy in which mutational enlargement of the ATP-binding site sensitises of a protein kinase to bulky ATP analogues has proved to be an elegant tool for the generation of conditional analogue-sensitive kinase alleles in a variety of model organisms. Here, we describe a novel substitution mutation in the kinase domain that can enhance the sensitivity of analogue-sensitive kinases. Substitution of a methionine residue to phenylalanine in the +2 position after HRDLKxxN motif of the subdomain VIb within the kinase domain markedly increased the sensitivities of the analogue-sensitive kinases to ATP analogues in three out of five S. pombe kinases (i.e. Plo1, Orb5 and Wee1) that harbor this conserved methionine residue. Kinome alignment established that a methionine residue is found at this site in 5-9% of kinases in key model organisms, suggesting that a broader application of this structural modification may enhance ATP analogue sensitivity of analogue-sensitive kinases in future studies. We also show that the enhanced sensitivity of the wee1.as8 allele in a cdc25.22 background can be exploited to generate highly synchronised mitotic and S phase progression at 36°C. Proof-of-principle experiments show how this novel synchronisation technique will prove of great use in the interrogation of the mitotic or S-phase functions through temperature sensitivity mutation of molecules of interest in fission yeast.

  19. A metabolic strategy to enhance long-term survival by Phx1 through stationary phase-specific pyruvate decarboxylases in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Yoon; Kim, Eun-Jung; Lopez-Maury, Luis; Bähler, Jürg; Roe, Jung-Hye

    2014-07-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the stationary phase-specific transcription factor Phx1 contributes to long-term survival, stress tolerance, and meiosis. We identified Phx1-dependent genes through transcriptome analysis, and further analyzed those related with carbohydrate and thiamine metabolism, whose expression decreased in ∆phx1. Consistent with mRNA changes, the level of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) and TPP-utilizing pyruvate decarboxylase activity that converts pyruvate to acetaldehyde were also reduced in the mutant. Therefore, Phx1 appears to shift metabolic flux by diverting pyruvate from the TCA cycle and respiration to ethanol fermentation. Among the four predicted genes for pyruvate decarboxylase, only the Phx1-dependent genes (pdc201+ and pdc202+) contributed to long-term survival as judged by mutation and overexpression studies. These findings indicate that the Phx1-mediated long-term survival is achieved primarily through increasing the synthesis and activity of pyruvate decarboxylase. Consistent with this hypothesis, we observed that Phx1 curtailed respiration when cells entered stationary phase. Introduction of Δphx1 mutation compromised the long-lived phenotypes of Δpka1 and Δsck2 mutants that are devoid of pro-aging kinases of nutrient-signalling pathways, and of the Δpyp1 mutant with constitutively activated stress-responsive kinase Sty1. Therefore, achievement of long-term viability through both nutrient limitation and anti-stress response appears to be dependent on Phx1.

  20. The F-actin bundler α-actinin Ain1 is tailored for ring assembly and constriction during cytokinesis in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yujie; Christensen, Jenna R.; Homa, Kaitlin E.; Hocky, Glen M.; Fok, Alice; Sees, Jennifer A.; Voth, Gregory A.; Kovar, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The actomyosin contractile ring is a network of cross-linked actin filaments that facilitates cytokinesis in dividing cells. Contractile ring formation has been well characterized in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, in which the cross-linking protein α-actinin SpAin1 bundles the actin filament network. However, the specific biochemical properties of SpAin1 and whether they are tailored for cytokinesis are not known. Therefore we purified SpAin1 and quantified its ability to dynamically bind and bundle actin filaments in vitro using a combination of bulk sedimentation assays and direct visualization by two-color total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We found that, while SpAin1 bundles actin filaments of mixed polarity like other α-actinins, SpAin1 has lower bundling activity and is more dynamic than human α-actinin HsACTN4. To determine whether dynamic bundling is important for cytokinesis in fission yeast, we created the less dynamic bundling mutant SpAin1(R216E). We found that dynamic bundling is critical for cytokinesis, as cells expressing SpAin1(R216E) display disorganized ring material and delays in both ring formation and constriction. Furthermore, computer simulations of initial actin filament elongation and alignment revealed that an intermediate level of cross-linking best facilitates filament alignment. Together our results demonstrate that dynamic bundling by SpAin1 is important for proper contractile ring formation and constriction. PMID:27075176

  1. The exocytic Rabs Ypt3 and Ypt2 regulate the early step of biogenesis of the spore plasma membrane in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Imada, Kazuki; Nakamura, Taro

    2016-01-01

    During fission yeast sporulation, a membrane compartment called the forespore membrane (FSM) is newly formed on the spindle pole body (SPB). The FSM expands by membrane vesicle fusion, encapsulates the daughter nucleus resulting from meiosis, and eventually matures into the plasma membrane of the spore. Although many of the genes involved in FSM formation have been identified, its molecular mechanism is not fully understood. Here a genetic screen for sporulation-deficient mutations identified Ypt3, a Rab-family small GTPase known to function in the exocytic pathway. The ypt3-ki8 mutant showed defects in both the initiation of FSM biogenesis and FSM expansion. We also show that a mutation in Ypt2, another Rab protein that may function in the same pathway as Ypt3, compromises the initiation of FSM formation. As meiosis proceeds, both GFP-Ypt3 and GFP-Ypt2 are observed at the SPB and then relocalize to the FSM. Their localizations at the SPB precede FSM formation and depend on the meiotic SPB component Spo13, a putative GDP/GTP exchange factor for Ypt2. Given that Spo13 is essential for initiating FSM formation, these results suggest that two exocytic Rabs, Ypt3 and Ypt2, regulate the initiation of FSM formation on the SPB in concert with Spo13. PMID:27630265

  2. Accumulation of Trehalose by Overexpression of tps1, Coding for Trehalose-6-Phosphate Synthase, Causes Increased Resistance to Multiple Stresses in the Fission Yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Teresa; Fernández, Juana; Vicente-Soler, Jero; Cansado, Jose; Gacto, Mariano

    1999-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that heat shock proteins and trehalose synthesis are important factors in the thermotolerance of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We examined the effects of trehalose-6-phosphate (trehalose-6P) synthase overexpression on resistance to several stresses in cells of S. pombe transformed with a plasmid bearing the tps1 gene, which codes for trehalose-6P synthase, under the control of the strong thiamine-repressible promoter. Upon induction of trehalose-6P synthase, the elevated levels of intracellular trehalose correlated not only with increased tolerance to heat shock but also with resistance to freezing and thawing, dehydration, osmostress, and toxic levels of ethanol, indicating that trehalose may be the stress metabolite underlying the overlap in induced tolerance to these stresses. Among the isogenic strains transformed with this construct, one in which the gene coding for the trehalose-hydrolyzing enzyme, neutral trehalase, was disrupted accumulated trehalose to a greater extent and was more resistant to the above stresses. Increased trehalose concentration is thus a major determinant of the general stress protection response in S. pombe. PMID:10223994

  3. The Putative Exchange Factor Gef3p Interacts with Rho3p GTPase and the Septin Ring during Cytokinesis in Fission Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Sofía; Manjón, Elvira; Sánchez, Yolanda

    2014-01-01

    The small GTP-binding proteins of the Rho family and its regulatory proteins play a central role in cytokinetic actomyosin ring assembly and cytokinesis. Here we show that the fission yeast guanine nucleotide exchange factor Gef3p interacts with Rho3p at the division site. Gef3p contains a putative DH homology domain and a BAR/IMD-like domain. The protein localized to the division site late in mitosis, where it formed a ring that did not constrict with actomyosin ring (cytokinetic actomyosin ring) invagination; instead, it split into a double ring that resembled the septin ring. Gef3p co-localized with septins and Mid2p and required septins and Mid2p for its localization. Gef3p interacts physically with the GTP-bound form of Rho3p. Although Gef3p is not essential for cell separation, the simultaneous disruption of gef3+ and Rho3p-interacting proteins, such as Sec8p, an exocyst component, Apm1p, a subunit of the clathrin adaptor complex or For3p, an actin-polymerizing protein, yielded cells with strong defects in septation and polarity respectively. Our results suggest that interactions between septins and Rho-GEFs provide a new targeting mechanism for GTPases in cytokinesis, in this case probably contributing to Rho3p function in vesicle tethering and vesicle trafficking in the later steps of cell separation. PMID:24947517

  4. Set3 contributes to heterochromatin integrity by promoting transcription of subunits of Clr4-Rik1-Cul4 histone methyltransferase complex in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yao; Zhou, Huan; Deng, Xiaolong; Wang, Wenchao; Lu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Heterochromatin formation in fission yeast depends on RNAi machinery and histone-modifying enzymes. One of the key histone-modifying complexes is Clr4-Rik1-Cul4 methyltransferase complex (CLRC), which mediates histone H3K9 methylation, a hallmark for heterochromatin. CLRC is composed of the Clr4 histone methyltransferase, Rik1, Raf1, Raf2 and Pcu4. However, transcriptional regulation of the CLRC subunits is not well understood. In this study, we identified Set3, a core subunit of the Set3/Hos2 histone deacetylase complex (Set3C), as a contributor to the integrity and silencing of heterochromatin at centromeres, telomeres and silent mating-type locus. This novel role of Set3 relies on its PHD finger, but is independent of deacetylase activity or structural integrity of Set3C. Set3 is not located to the centromeric region. Instead, Set3 is targeted to the promoters of clr4+ and rik1+, probably through its PHD finger. Set3 promotes transcription of clr4+ and rik1+. Consistently, the protein levels of Clr4 and Rik1 were reduced in the set3Δ mutant. The heterochromatin silencing defect in the set3Δ mutant could be rescued by overexpressing of clr4+ or rik1+. Our study suggests transcriptional activation of essential heterochromatin factors underlies the tight regulation of heterochromatin integrity. PMID:27538348

  5. Rho2 Palmitoylation Is Required for Plasma Membrane Localization and Proper Signaling to the Fission Yeast Cell Integrity Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Mir, Laura; Franco, Alejandro; Martín-García, Rebeca; Madrid, Marisa; Vicente-Soler, Jero; Soto, Teresa; Gacto, Mariano; Pérez, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    The fission yeast small GTPase Rho2 regulates morphogenesis and is an upstream activator of the cell integrity pathway, whose key element, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) Pmk1, becomes activated by multiple environmental stimuli and controls several cellular functions. Here we demonstrate that farnesylated Rho2 becomes palmitoylated in vivo at cysteine-196 within its carboxyl end and that this modification allows its specific targeting to the plasma membrane. Unlike that of other palmitoylated and prenylated GTPases, the Rho2 control of morphogenesis and Pmk1 activity is strictly dependent upon plasma membrane localization and is not found in other cellular membranes. Indeed, artificial plasma membrane targeting bypassed the Rho2 need for palmitoylation in order to signal. Detailed functional analysis of Rho2 chimeras fused to the carboxyl end from the essential GTPase Rho1 showed that GTPase palmitoylation is partially dependent on the prenylation context and confirmed that Rho2 signaling is independent of Rho GTP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) function. We further demonstrate that Rho2 is an in vivo substrate for DHHC family acyltransferase Erf2 palmitoyltransferase. Remarkably, Rho3, another Erf2 target, negatively regulates Pmk1 activity in a Rho2-independent fashion, thus revealing the existence of cross talk whereby both GTPases antagonistically modulate the activity of this MAPK cascade. PMID:24820419

  6. The fission yeast RNA binding protein Mmi1 regulates meiotic genes by controlling intron specific splicing and polyadenylation coupled RNA turnover.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Futcher, Bruce; Leatherwood, Janet

    2011-01-01

    The polyA tails of mRNAs are monitored by the exosome as a quality control mechanism. We find that fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, adopts this RNA quality control mechanism to regulate a group of 30 or more meiotic genes at the level of both splicing and RNA turnover. In vegetative cells the RNA binding protein Mmi1 binds to the primary transcripts of these genes. We find the novel motif U(U/C/G)AAAC highly over-represented in targets of Mmi1. Mmi1 can specifically regulate the splicing of particular introns in a transcript: it inhibits the splicing of introns that are in the vicinity of putative Mmi1 binding sites, while allowing the splicing of other introns that are far from such sites. In addition, binding of Mmi1, particularly near the 3' end, alters 3' processing to promote extremely long polyA tails of up to a kilobase. The hyperadenylated transcripts are then targeted for degradation by the nuclear exonuclease Rrp6. The nuclear polyA binding protein Pab2 assists this hyperadenylation-mediated RNA decay. Rrp6 also targets other hyperadenylated transcripts, which become hyperadenylated in an unknown, but Mmi1-independent way. Thus, hyperadenylation may be a general signal for RNA degradation. In addition, binding of Mmi1 can affect the efficiency of 3' cleavage. Inactivation of Mmi1 in meiosis allows meiotic expression, through splicing and RNA stabilization, of at least 29 target genes, which are apparently constitutively transcribed.

  7. The spliceosome-associated protein Nrl1 suppresses homologous recombination-dependent R-loop formation in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Aronica, Lucia; Kasparek, Torben; Ruchman, David; Marquez, Yamile; Cipak, Lubos; Cipakova, Ingrid; Anrather, Dorothea; Mikolaskova, Barbora; Radtke, Maximilian; Sarkar, Sovan; Pai, Chen-Chun; Blaikley, Elizabeth; Walker, Carol; Shen, Kuo-Fang; Schroeder, Renee; Barta, Andrea; Forsburg, Susan L.; Humphrey, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    The formation of RNA–DNA hybrids, referred to as R-loops, can promote genome instability and cancer development. Yet the mechanisms by which R-loops compromise genome instability are poorly understood. Here, we establish roles for the evolutionarily conserved Nrl1 protein in pre-mRNA splicing regulation, R-loop suppression and in maintaining genome stability. nrl1Δ mutants exhibit endogenous DNA damage, are sensitive to exogenous DNA damage, and have defects in homologous recombination (HR) repair. Concomitantly, nrl1Δ cells display significant changes in gene expression, similar to those induced by DNA damage in wild-type cells. Further, we find that nrl1Δ cells accumulate high levels of R-loops, which co-localize with HR repair factors and require Rad51 and Rad52 for their formation. Together, our findings support a model in which R-loop accumulation and subsequent DNA damage sequesters HR factors, thereby compromising HR repair at endogenously or exogenously induced DNA damage sites, leading to genome instability. PMID:26682798

  8. How cells recognize damaged DNA: Clues from xeroderma pigmentosum and yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, G.; Chang, E.; Patterson, M. )

    1990-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by the defective excision repair of DNA damaged by many agents, including ultraviolet radiation (UV) and cisplatin. We have identified a factor in human cells that recognizes multiple forms of DNA damage and is absent in XP complementation group E. Denoted XPE binding factor, it is expressed at five-fold higher levels in tumor cell lines resistant to the antitumor drug cisplatin. Finally, although it does not have photoreactivating activity, XPE binding factor shares multiple binding characteristics with yeast photolyase, suggesting that it is the human homolog of photolyase.

  9. Nucleosome organization of the yeast 2-micrometer DNA plasmid: a eukaryotic minichromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, R G; Fangman, W L

    1979-01-01

    The eukaryotic microorganism Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains 50-100 copies per cell of a circular plasmid called 2-micrometer DNA. The intracellular structure of these molecules, which represent about 4% of the total DNA, was examined by digestion of total cellular chromatin with micrococcal nuclease (nucleate 3'-oligonucleotidohydrolase, EC 3.1.31.1). Nuclease-resistant DNA fragments were fractionated by gel electrophoresis and 2-micrometer DNA sequences were detected by hybridization. The 2-micrometer and chromosomal DNA digestion patterns were very similar indicating that both types of DNA are condensed into nucleosomes. An analysis of these digestion patterns showed that the kinetics of digestion of 2-micrometer chromatin and total chromatin are similar and that both have the same nucleosome repeat length of about 165 base pairs. Native 2-micrometer plasmids were examined by zone sedimentation in sucrose gradients containing 0.15 M NaCl and were found to have a sedimentation constant of 75 S, about 3 times the sedimentation constant of protein-free 2-micrometer DNA. This sedimentation property is what would be expected for a 2-micrometer DNA minichromosome. We conclude that within the cell 2-micrometer DNA molecules are organized in a chromatin structure very similar to that of the yeast chromosomes. Images PMID:392520

  10. Situation-dependent repair of DNA damage in yeast

    SciTech Connect

    von Borstel, R.C.; Hastings, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    The concept of channelling of lesions in DNA into defined repair systems has been used to explain many aspects of induced and spontaneous mutation. The channelling hypothesis states that lesions excluded from one repair process will be taken up by another repair process. This is a simplification. The three known modes of repair of damage induced by radiation are not equivalent modes of repair; they are, instead, different solutions to the problem of replacement of damaged molecules with new molecules which have the same informational content as those that were damaged. The mode of repair that is used is the result of the response to the situation in which the damage takes place. Thus, when the most likely mode of repair does not take place, then the situation changes with respect to the repair of the lesion; the lesion may enter the replication fork and be reparable by another route.

  11. Identification of food and beverage spoilage yeasts from DNA sequence analyses.

    PubMed

    Kurtzman, Cletus P

    2015-11-20

    Detection, identification and classification of yeasts have undergone major changes in the last decade and a half following application of gene sequence analyses and genome comparisons. Development of a database (barcode) of easily determined DNA sequences from domains 1 and 2 (D1/D2) of the nuclear large subunit rRNA gene and from ITS now permits many laboratories to identify species quickly and accurately, thus replacing the laborious and often inaccurate phenotypic tests previously used. Phylogenetic analysis of gene sequences has resulted in a major revision of yeast systematics resulting in redefinition of nearly all genera. This new understanding of species relationships has prompted a change of rules for naming and classifying yeasts and other fungi, and these new rules are presented in the recently implemented International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants (Melbourne Code). The use of molecular methods for species identification and the impact of Code changes on classification will be discussed, especially in the context of food and beverage spoilage yeasts.

  12. Meiotic chromosome synapsis in yeast can occur without spo11-induced DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, Hasanuzzaman; Schmekel, Karin

    2004-10-01

    Proper chromosome segregation and formation of viable gametes depend on synapsis and recombination between homologous chromosomes during meiosis. Previous reports have shown that the synaptic structures, the synaptonemal complexes (SCs), do not occur in yeast cells with the SPO11 gene removed. The Spo11 enzyme makes double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the DNA and thereby initiates recombination. The view has thus developed that synapsis in yeast strictly depends on the initiation of recombination. Synapsis in some other species (Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans) is independent of recombination events, and SCs are found in spo11 mutants. This difference between species led us to reexamine spo11 deletion mutants of yeast. Using antibodies against Zip1, a SC component, we found that a small fraction (1%) of the spo11 null mutant cells can indeed form wild-type-like SCs. We further looked for synapsis in a spo11 mutant strain that accumulates pachytene cells (spo11Delta ndt80Delta), and found that the frequency of cells with apparently complete SC formation was 10%. Other phenotypic criteria, such as spore viability and homologous chromosome juxtaposition measured by FISH labeling of chromosomal markers, agree with several previous reports of the spo11 mutant. Our results demonstrate that although the Spo11-induced DSBs obviously promote synapsis in yeast, the presence of Spo11 is not an absolute requirement for synapsis.

  13. Transcription of lncRNA prt, clustered prt RNA sites for Mmi1 binding, and RNA polymerase II CTD phospho-sites govern the repression of pho1 gene expression under phosphate-replete conditions in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Debashree; Sanchez, Ana M; Goldgur, Yehuda; Shuman, Stewart; Schwer, Beate

    2016-07-01

    Expression of fission yeast Pho1 acid phosphatase is repressed during growth in phosphate-rich medium. Repression is mediated by transcription of the prt locus upstream of pho1 to produce a long noncoding (lnc) prt RNA. Repression is also governed by RNA polymerase II CTD phosphorylation status, whereby inability to place a Ser7-PO4 mark (as in S7A) derepresses Pho1 expression, and inability to place a Thr4-PO4 mark (as in T4A) hyper-represses Pho1 in phosphate replete cells. Here we find that basal pho1 expression from the prt-pho1 locus is inversely correlated with the activity of the prt promoter, which resides in a 110-nucleotide DNA segment preceding the prt transcription start site. CTD mutations S7A and T4A had no effect on the activity of the prt promoter or the pho1 promoter, suggesting that S7A and T4A affect post-initiation events in prt lncRNA synthesis that make it less and more repressive of pho1, respectively. prt lncRNA contains clusters of DSR (determinant of selective removal) sequences recognized by the YTH-domain-containing protein Mmi1. Altering the nucleobase sequence of two DSR clusters in the prt lncRNA caused hyper-repression of pho1 in phosphate replete cells, concomitant with increased levels of the prt transcript. The isolated Mmi1 YTH domain binds to RNAs with single or tandem DSR elements, to the latter in a noncooperative fashion. We report the 1.75 Å crystal structure of the Mmi1 YTH domain and provide evidence that Mmi1 recognizes DSR RNA via a binding mode distinct from that of structurally homologous YTH proteins that recognize m(6)A-modified RNA.

  14. Genome-wide profiling of yeast DNA:RNA hybrid prone sites with DRIP-chip.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yujia A; Aristizabal, Maria J; Lu, Phoebe Y T; Luo, Zongli; Hamza, Akil; Kobor, Michael S; Stirling, Peter C; Hieter, Philip

    2014-04-01

    DNA:RNA hybrid formation is emerging as a significant cause of genome instability in biological systems ranging from bacteria to mammals. Here we describe the genome-wide distribution of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by DNA:RNA immunoprecipitation (DRIP) followed by hybridization on tiling microarray. These profiles show that DNA:RNA hybrids preferentially accumulated at rDNA, Ty1 and Ty2 transposons, telomeric repeat regions and a subset of open reading frames (ORFs). The latter are generally highly transcribed and have high GC content. Interestingly, significant DNA:RNA hybrid enrichment was also detected at genes associated with antisense transcripts. The expression of antisense-associated genes was also significantly altered upon overexpression of RNase H, which degrades the RNA in hybrids. Finally, we uncover mutant-specific differences in the DRIP profiles of a Sen1 helicase mutant, RNase H deletion mutant and Hpr1 THO complex mutant compared to wild type, suggesting different roles for these proteins in DNA:RNA hybrid biology. Our profiles of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci provide a resource for understanding the properties of hybrid-forming regions in vivo, extend our knowledge of hybrid-mitigating enzymes, and contribute to models of antisense-mediated gene regulation. A summary of this paper was presented at the 26th International Conference on Yeast Genetics and Molecular Biology, August 2013.

  15. Ribosomal DNA spacer probes for yeast identification: studies in the genus Metschnikowia.

    PubMed

    Henriques, M; Sá-Nogueira, I; Giménez-Jurado, G; van Uden, N

    1991-02-01

    To test whether DNA probes derived from ribosomal DNA spacer sequences are suitable for rapid and species-specific yeast identification, a pilot study was undertaken. A 7.7 kb entire ribosomal DNA unit of the type strain of Metschnikowia reukaufii was isolated, cloned and mapped. A 0.65 kb BamHI-HpaI fragment containing non-transcribed spacer sequences was amplified and selected for testing as a 32P hybridization probe with total DNA from the type strains of M. reukaufii, M. pulcherrima, M. lunata, M. bicuspidata, M. australis, M. zobellii, M. krissii, five other strains identified as M. reukaufii and strains of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Hansenula canadensis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Yarrowia lipolytica. The probe hybridized exclusively with DNA from the type strain and four other strains of M. reukaufii. DNA from one strain labelled M. reukaufii did not hybridize with the probe. Subsequent % G + C comparison and DNA-DNA reassociation with the type strain revealed that the non-hybridizing strain does not belong to the species M. reukaufii.

  16. Activation of polyomavirus DNA replication by yeast GAL4 is dependent on its transcriptional activation domains.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett-Cook, E R; Hassell, J A

    1991-01-01

    The polyomavirus replication origin contains transcriptional regulatory sequences. To determine how these elements function in DNA replication, and to learn whether a common mechanism underlies the activation of transcription and DNA replication, we tested whether a well-characterized transcriptional activator, yeast GAL4, was capable of stimulating DNA replication and transcription in the same mammalian cell line. We observed that GAL4 activated polyomavirus DNA replication in mouse cells when its binding site was juxtaposed to the late border of the polyomavirus origin core. Synergistic activation of DNA replication was achieved by multimerization of the GAL4 binding site. Analysis of GAL4 mutant proteins, GAL4 hybrid proteins and mutants of the latter revealed that the activation domains of these transcriptional activators were required to stimulate DNA replication. In agreement with previously published data, the activation domains of GAL4 were also required to enhance transcription in the same mouse cell line. These observations implicate transcriptional activators in Py DNA replication and suggest that similar mechanisms govern the activation of transcription and DNA replication. Images PMID:1849079

  17. Delineating Rearrangements in Single Yeast Artificial Chromosomes by Quantitative DNA Fiber Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Wu, Jenny; Duell, Thomas

    2009-09-18

    Cloning of large chunks of human genomic DNA in recombinant systems such as yeast or bacterial artificial chromosomes has greatly facilitated the construction of physical maps, the positional cloning of disease genes or the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes for diagnostic purposes. For this process to work efficiently, the DNA cloning process and subsequent clone propagation need to maintain stable inserts that are neither deleted nor otherwise rearranged. Some regions of the human genome; however, appear to have a higher propensity than others to rearrange in any host system. Thus, techniques to detect and accurately characterize such rearrangements need to be developed. We developed a technique termed 'Quantitative DNA Fiber Mapping (QDFM)' that allows accurate tagging of sequence elements of interest with near kilobase accuracy and optimized it for delineation of rearrangements in recombinant DNA clones. This paper demonstrates the power of this microscopic approach by investigating YAC rearrangements. In our examples, high-resolution physical maps for regions within the immunoglobulin lambda variant gene cluster were constructed for three different YAC clones carrying deletions of 95 kb and more. Rearrangements within YACs could be demonstrated unambiguously by pairwise mapping of cosmids along YAC DNA molecules. When coverage by YAC clones was not available, distances between cosmid clones were estimated by hybridization of cosmids onto DNA fibers prepared from human genomic DNA. In addition, the QDFM technology provides essential information about clone stability facilitating closure of the maps of the human genome as well as those of model organisms.

  18. An extended dsRBD with a novel zinc-binding motif mediates nuclear retention of fission yeast Dicer.

    PubMed

    Barraud, Pierre; Emmerth, Stephan; Shimada, Yukiko; Hotz, Hans-Rudolf; Allain, Frédéric H-T; Bühler, Marc

    2011-08-16

    Dicer proteins function in RNA interference (RNAi) pathways by generating small RNAs (sRNAs). Here, we report the solution structure of the C-terminal domain of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Dicer (Dcr1). The structure reveals an unusual double-stranded RNA binding domain (dsRBD) fold embedding a novel zinc-binding motif that is conserved among dicers in yeast. Although the C-terminal domain of Dcr1 still binds nucleic acids, this property is dispensable for proper functioning of Dcr1. In contrast, disruption of zinc coordination renders Dcr1 mainly cytoplasmic and leads to remarkable changes in gene expression and loss of heterochromatin assembly. In summary, our results reveal novel insights into the mechanism of nuclear retention of Dcr1 and raise the possibility that this new class of dsRBDs might generally function in nucleocytoplasmic trafficking and not substrate binding. The C-terminal domain of Dcr1 constitutes a novel regulatory module that might represent a potential target for therapeutic intervention with fungal diseases.

  19. Dynamics of mitochondrial DNA nucleoids regulated by mitochondrial fission is essential for maintenance of homogeneously active mitochondria during neonatal heart development.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Takaya; Ban-Ishihara, Reiko; Maeda, Maki; Matsunaga, Yui; Ichimura, Ayaka; Kyogoku, Sachiko; Aoki, Hiroki; Katada, Shun; Nakada, Kazuto; Nomura, Masatoshi; Mizushima, Noboru; Mihara, Katsuyoshi; Ishihara, Naotada

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles, and their fusion and fission regulate cellular signaling, development, and mitochondrial homeostasis, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) distribution. Cardiac myocytes have a specialized cytoplasmic structure where large mitochondria are aligned into tightly packed myofibril bundles; however, recent studies have revealed that mitochondrial dynamics also plays an important role in the formation and maintenance of cardiomyocytes. Here, we precisely analyzed the role of mitochondrial fission in vivo. The mitochondrial fission GTPase, Drp1, is highly expressed in the developing neonatal heart, and muscle-specific Drp1 knockout (Drp1-KO) mice showed neonatal lethality due to dilated cardiomyopathy. The Drp1 ablation in heart and primary cultured cardiomyocytes resulted in severe mtDNA nucleoid clustering and led to mosaic deficiency of mitochondrial respiration. The functional and structural alteration of mitochondria also led to immature myofibril assembly and defective cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Thus, the dynamics of mtDNA nucleoids regulated by mitochondrial fission is required for neonatal cardiomyocyte development by promoting homogeneous distribution of active mitochondria throughout the cardiomyocytes.

  20. Repair of DNA damaged by ionizing radiation and other oxidative agents in yeast and human

    SciTech Connect

    Louise Prakash

    2000-01-15

    Treatment of cells with oxidative DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation and hydrogen peroxide produces .OH radicals which attack DNA, producing single strand breaks and double strand breaks that have a 3'-blocked terminus with a phosphoglycolate or a phosphate group attached to the 3'-terminus. While DNA strand breaks with 3'-blocked termini are the hallmark of oxidative DNA damage, the mechanisms by which such blocked 3'-termini are removed in eukaryotes remain poorly understood. The goals of this project were to identify the various genes that function in cleaning the blocked 3'-ends from DNA strand breaks generated by treatments with ionizing radiation and hydrogen peroxide, to purify the proteins encoded by these genes and to characterize their biochemical activities, and to determine the biological consequences when such damage is not repaired. Because of the high degree of conservation of DNA repair proteins between yeast and humans, and because of the ease of genetic manipulations, initial studies were to be carried out in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The homologous genes and proteins would then be studied in humans. One aspect of our proposed research was to purify the Apn2 protein from yeast cells and to examine its AP endonuclease and 3'-phosphodiesterase activities. Apn2-like proteins have been identified in eukaryotes other than yeast, including humans, and these proteins form a distinct subfamily within the ExoIII/Ape1/Apn2 family of proteins. We purified the Apn2 protein from yeast and showed that it is a class II AP endonuclease. (Class II AP endonucleases cleave the phosphodiester backbone on the 5'-side of the AP site and produce a 3'-OH group and a 5'-baseless deoxyribose 5'-phosphate residue). Yeast Apn2 and its orthologs in higher eukaryotes differ from E. coli ExoIII and human Ape1 in possessing a C terminus that is absent from the ExoIII/Ape1 subfamily. We found that deletion of the carboxyl-terminus of yeast Apn2 protein does not affect

  1. Repair of DNA damaged by ionizing radiation and other oxidative agents in yeast and human

    SciTech Connect

    Louisek Prakash

    2000-01-15

    OAK B202 Treatment of cells with oxidative DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation and hydrogen peroxide produces .OH radicals which attack DNA, producing single strand breaks and double strand breaks that have a 3'-blocked terminus with a phosphoglycolate or a phosphate group attached to the 3'-terminus. While DNA strand breaks with 3'-blocked termini are the hallmark of oxidative DNA damage, the mechanisms by which such blocked 3'-termini are removed in eukaryotes remain poorly understood. The goals of this project were to identify the various genes that function in cleaning the blocked 3'ends from DNA strand breaks generated by treatments with ionizing radiation and hydrogen peroxide, to purify the proteins encoded by these genes and to characterize their biochemical activities, and to determine the biological consequences when such damage is not repaired. Because of the high degree of conservation of DNA repair proteins between yeast and humans, and because of the ease of genetic manipulations, initial studies were to be carried out in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The homologous genes and proteins would then be studied in humans. One aspect of our proposed research was to purify the Apn2 protein from yeast cells and to examine its AP endonuclease and 3'-phosphodiesterase activities. Apn2-like proteins have been identified in eukaryotes other than yeast, including humans, and these proteins form a distinct subfamily within the ExoIII/Ape1/Apn2 family of proteins. We purified the Apn2 protein from yeast and showed that it is a class II AP endonuclease. (Class II AP endonucleases cleave the phosphodiester backbone on the 5'-side of the AP site and produce a 3'-OH group and a 5'-baseless deoxyribose 5'-phosphate residue). Yeast Apn2 and its orthologs in higher eukaryotes differ from E. coli ExoIII and human Ape1 in possessing a C terminus that is absent from the ExoIII/Ape1 subfamily. We found that deletion of the carboxyl-terminus of yeast Apn2 protein does

  2. Surface Etching and DNA Damage Induced by Low-Energy Ion Irradiation in Yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuelan; Xu, An; Dai, Yin; Yuan, Hang; Yu, Zengliang

    2011-06-01

    Bio-effects of survival and etching damage on cell surface and DNA strand breaks were investigated in the yeast saccharomyces cerevisiae after exposure by nitrogen ion with an energy below 40 keV. The result showed that 16% of trehalose provided definite protection for cells against vacuum stress compared with glycerol. In contrast to vacuum control, significant morphological damage and DNA strand breaks were observed, in yeast cells bombarded with low-energy nitrogen, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) immunofluorescence assays. Moreover, PI (propidium iodide) fluorescent staining indicated that cell integrity could be destroyed by ion irradiation. Cell damage eventually affected cell viability and free radicals were involved in cell damage as shown by DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide) rescue experiment. Our primary experiments demonstrated that yeast cells can be used as an optional experimental model to study the biological effects of low energy ions and be applied to further investigate the mechanism(s) underlying the bio-effects of eukaryotic cells.

  3. Chromatin structures and transcription of rDNA in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Dammann, R; Lucchini, R; Koller, T; Sogo, J M

    1993-01-01

    The chromatin structure of yeast ribosomal DNA was analyzed in vivo by crosslinking intact cells with psoralen. We found that in exponentially growing cultures the regions coding for the 35S rRNA precursor fall into two distinct classes. One class was highly accessible to psoralen and associated with nascent RNAs, characteristic for transcriptionally active rRNA genes devoid of nucleosomes, whereas the other class showed a crosslinking pattern indistinguishable from that of bulk chromatin and was interpreted to represent the inactive rRNA gene copies. By crosslinking the same strain growing in complex or minimal medium, we have shown that yeast cells can modulate the proportion of active (non-nucleosomal) and inactive (nucleosomal) rRNA gene copies in response to variations in environmental conditions which suggests that yeast can regulate rRNA synthesis by varying the number of active gene copies, in contrast to the vertebrate cells studied so far. Whereas intergenic spacers flanking inactive rRNA gene copies are packaged in a regular nucleosomal array, spacers flanking active genes show an unusual crosslinking pattern suggesting a complex interaction of regulatory factors and histones with DNA. Images PMID:8506130

  4. Replication protein A binds to regulatory elements in yeast DNA repair and DNA metabolism genes.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, K K; Samson, L

    1995-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae responds to DNA damage by arresting cell cycle progression (thereby preventing the replication and segregation of damaged chromosomes) and by inducing the expression of numerous genes, some of which are involved in DNA repair, DNA replication, and DNA metabolism. Induction of the S. cerevisiae 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase repair gene (MAG) by DNA-damaging agents requires one upstream activating sequence (UAS) and two upstream repressing sequences (URS1 and URS2) in the MAG promoter. Sequences similar to the MAG URS elements are present in at least 11 other S. cerevisiae DNA repair and metabolism genes. Replication protein A (Rpa) is known as a single-stranded-DNA-binding protein that is involved in the initiation and elongation steps of DNA replication, nucleotide excision repair, and homologous recombination. We now show that the MAG URS1 and URS2 elements form similar double-stranded, sequence-specific, DNA-protein complexes and that both complexes contain Rpa. Moreover, Rpa appears to bind the MAG URS1-like elements found upstream of 11 other DNA repair and DNA metabolism genes. These results lead us to hypothesize that Rpa may be involved in the regulation of a number of DNA repair and DNA metabolism genes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7761422

  5. Site-specific DNA repair at the nucleosome level in a yeast minichromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Smerdon, M.J.; Thoma, F. )

    1990-05-18

    The rate of excision repair of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers (PDs) was measured at specific sites in each strand of a yeast minichromosome containing an active gene (URA3), a replication origin (ARS1), and positioned nucleosomes. All six PD sites analyzed in the transcribed URA3 strand were repaired more rapidly (greater than 5-fold on average) than any of the nine PD sites analyzed in the nontranscribed strand. Efficient repair also occurred in both strands of a disrupted TRP1 gene (ten PD sites), containing four unstable nucleosomes, and in a nucleosome gap at the 5' end of URA3 (two PD sites). Conversely, slow repair occurred in both strands immediately downstream of the URA3 gene (12 of 14 PD sites). This region contains the ARS1 consensus sequence, a nucleosome gap, and two stable nucleosomes. Thus, modulation of DNA repair occurs in a simple yeast minichromosome and correlates with gene expression, nucleosome stability, and (possibly) control of replication.

  6. Salt stress causes cell wall damage in yeast cells lacking mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qiuqiang; Liou, Liang-Chun; Ren, Qun; Bao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Zhaojie

    2014-01-01

    The yeast cell wall plays an important role in maintaining cell morphology, cell integrity and response to environmental stresses. Here, we report that salt stress causes cell wall damage in yeast cells lacking mitochondrial DNA (ρ0). Upon salt treatment, the cell wall is thickened, broken and becomes more sensitive to the cell wall-perturbing agent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Also, SCW11 mRNA levels are elevated in ρ0 cells. Deletion of SCW11 significantly decreases the sensitivity of ρ0 cells to SDS after salt treatment, while overexpression of SCW11 results in higher sensitivity. In addition, salt stress in ρ0 cells induces high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which further damages the cell wall, causing cells to become more sensitive towards the cell wall-perturbing agent. PMID:28357227

  7. Genetic analysis of yeast RPA1 reveals its multiple functions in DNA metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Umezu, K; Sugawara, N; Chen, C; Haber, J E; Kolodner, R D

    1998-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a single-stranded DNA-binding protein identified as an essential factor for SV40 DNA replication in vitro. To understand the in vivo functions of RPA, we mutagenized the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RFA1 gene and identified 19 ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation- and methyl methane sulfonate (MMS)-sensitive mutants and 5 temperature-sensitive mutants. The UV- and MMS-sensitive mutants showed up to 10(4) to 10(5) times increased sensitivity to these agents. Some of the UV- and MMS-sensitive mutants were killed by an HO-induced double-strand break at MAT. Physical analysis of recombination in one UV- and MMS-sensitive rfa1 mutant demonstrated that it was defective for mating type switching and single-strand annealing recombination. Two temperature-sensitive mutants were characterized in detail, and at the restrictive temperature were found to have an arrest phenotype and DNA content indicative of incomplete DNA replication. DNA sequence analysis indicated that most of the mutations altered amino acids that were conserved between yeast, human, and Xenopus RPA1. Taken together, we conclude that RPA1 has multiple roles in vivo and functions in DNA replication, repair, and recombination, like the single-stranded DNA-binding proteins of bacteria and phages. PMID:9539419

  8. Interactions among a Fimbrin, a Capping Protein, and an Actin-depolymerizing Factor in Organization of the Fission Yeast Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Kentaro; Satoh, Kazuomi; Morimatsu, Akeshi; Ohnuma, Masaaki; Mabuchi, Issei

    2001-01-01

    We report studies of the fission yeast fimbrin-like protein Fim1, which contains two EF-hand domains and two actin-binding domains (ABD1 and ABD2). Fim1 is a component of both F-actin patches and the F-actin ring, but not of F-actin cables. Fim1 cross-links F-actin in vitro, but a Fim1 protein lacking either EF-hand domains (Fim1A12) or both the EF-hand domains and ABD1 (Fim1A2) has no actin cross-linking activity. Overexpression of Fim1 induced the formation of F-actin patches throughout the cell cortex, whereas the F-actin patches disappear in cells overexpressing Fim1A12 or Fim1A2. Thus, the actin cross-linking activity of Fim1 is probably important for the formation of F-actin patches. The overexpression of Fim1 also excluded the actin-depolymerizing factor Adf1 from the F-actin patches and inhibited the turnover of actin in these structures. Thus, Fim1 may function in stabilizing the F-actin patches. We also isolated the gene encoding Acp1, a subunit of the heterodimeric F-actin capping protein. fim1 acp1 double null cells showed more severe defects in the organization of the actin cytoskeleton than those seen in each single mutant. Thus, Fim1 and Acp1 may function in a similar manner in the organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Finally, genetic studies suggested that Fim1 may function in cytokinesis in cooperation with Cdc15 (PSTPIP) and Rng2 (IQGAP), respectively. PMID:11694585

  9. Expression of the fission yeast cell cycle regulator cdc25 induces de novo shoot formation in tobacco: evidence of a cytokinin-like effect by this mitotic activator.

    PubMed

    Suchomelová, Petra; Velgová, Denisa; Masek, Tomás; Francis, Dennis; Rogers, Hilary J; Marchbank, Angela M; Lipavská, Helena

    2004-01-01

    During the last decade, the cell cycle and its control by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) has been extensively studied in eukaryotes. The regulation of CDK activity includes, among others, its activation by Cdc25 phosphatase at G2/M. However, within the plant kingdom studies of this regulation have lagged behind and a plant cdc25 homologue has not been identified yet. Here, we report on the effects of transformation of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L., cv. Samsun) with fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) cdc25 (Spcdc25) on de novo plant organ formation, a process dependent on rate and orientation of cell division. On shoot-inducing medium (low 1-naphthylacetic acid (NAA), high 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP)) the number of shoots formed on internode segments cultured from transgenic plants was substantially higher than in the non-transformed controls. Anatomical observations indicated that the shoot formation process was accelerated but with no changes in the quality and sequence of shoot development. Surprisingly, and in contrast to the controls, when on root-inducing medium (high NAA, low BAP) cultured segments from transgenic plants failed to initiate hardly any roots. Instead, they continued to form shoots at low frequencies. Moreover, in marked contrast to the controls, stem segments from transgenic plants were able to form shoots even without the addition of exogenous growth regulators to the medium. The results indicate that Spcdc25 expression in culture tobacco stem segments mimicked the developmental effects caused by an exogenous hormone balance shifted towards cytokinins. The observed cytokinin-like effects of Spcdc25 transformation are consistent with the concept of an interaction between cell cycle regulators and phytohormones during plant development.

  10. Processing of DNA damage after exposure to a single dose of fission spectrum neutrons takes 40 hours to complete

    SciTech Connect

    Peak, J.G.; Peak, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    The authors have examined the long-term (days) fate of breaks induced in the DNA of human P3 epithelial teratocarcinoma cells by a single dose of JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons (mean energy 0.85 MeV). We used alkaline-filter elution methods that assay totality of single- and double-strand breaks, generally referred to as single-strand breaks (SSBs). When the cells are allowed a period of repair incubation, these breaks are totally sealed by 7 hours after the original exposure, but following the initial repair the DNA is dismantled, as revealed by the reappearance of SSBS. This secondary breakage is almost as extensive as that caused by the original neutron exposure, with a maximum at 16-18 hours after irradiation. Finally, the DNA is once again rejoined, regaining its original size by 40 hours after irradiation. The secondary repair phenomenon may have an editing function, or it may represent the processing of residual damage left unrepaired during the initial rejoining of the backbone breaks.

  11. Direct evidence for SIR2 modulation of chromatin structure in yeast rDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Fritze, C E; Verschueren, K; Strich, R; Easton Esposito, R

    1997-01-01

    The yeast SIR2 gene maintains inactive chromatin domains required for transcriptional repression at the silent mating-type loci and telomeres. We previously demonstrated that SIR2 also acts to repress mitotic and meiotic recombination between the tandem ribosomal RNA gene array (rDNA). Here we address whether rDNA chromatin structure is altered by loss of SIR2 function by in vitro and in vivo assays of sensitivity to micrococcal nuclease and dam methyltransferase, respectively, and present the first chromatin study that maps sites of SIR2 action within the rDNA locus. Control studies at the MAT alpha locus also revealed a previously undetected MNase-sensitive site at the a1-alpha 2 divergent promoter which is protected in sir2 mutant cells by the derepressed a1-alpha 2 regulator. In rDNA, SIR2 is required for a more closed chromatin structure in two regions: SRR1, the major SIR-Responsive Region in the non-transcribed spacer, and SRR2, in the 18S rRNA coding region. None of the changes in rDNA detected in sir2 mutants are due to the presence of the a1-alpha 2 repressor. Reduced recombination in the rDNA correlates with a small, reproducible transcriptional silencing position effect. Deletion and overexpression studies demonstrate that SIR2, but not SIR1, SIR3 or SIR4, is required for this rDNA position effect. Significantly, rDNA transcriptional silencing and rDNA chromatin accessibility respond to SIR2 dosage, indicating that SIR2 is a limiting component required for chromatin modeling in rDNA. PMID:9351831

  12. A pathway of targeted autophagy is induced by DNA damage in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Eapen, Vinay V.; Waterman, David P.; Bernard, Amélie; Schiffmann, Nathan; Sayas, Enrich; Kamber, Roarke; Lemos, Brenda; Memisoglu, Gonen; Ang, Jessie; Mazella, Allison; Chuartzman, Silvia G.; Loewith, Robbie J.; Schuldiner, Maya; Denic, Vladimir; Klionsky, Daniel J.; Haber, James E.

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy plays a central role in the DNA damage response (DDR) by controlling the levels of various DNA repair and checkpoint proteins; however, how the DDR communicates with the autophagy pathway remains unknown. Using budding yeast, we demonstrate that global genotoxic damage or even a single unrepaired double-strand break (DSB) initiates a previously undescribed and selective pathway of autophagy that we term genotoxin-induced targeted autophagy (GTA). GTA requires the action primarily of Mec1/ATR and Rad53/CHEK2 checkpoint kinases, in part via transcriptional up-regulation of central autophagy proteins. GTA is distinct from starvation-induced autophagy. GTA requires Atg11, a central component of the selective autophagy machinery, but is different from previously described autophagy pathways. By screening a collection of ∼6,000 yeast mutants, we identified genes that control GTA but do not significantly affect rapamycin-induced autophagy. Overall, our findings establish a pathway of autophagy specific to the DNA damage response. PMID:28154131

  13. A pathway of targeted autophagy is induced by DNA damage in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Eapen, Vinay V; Waterman, David P; Bernard, Amélie; Schiffmann, Nathan; Sayas, Enrich; Kamber, Roarke; Lemos, Brenda; Memisoglu, Gonen; Ang, Jessie; Mazella, Allison; Chuartzman, Silvia G; Loewith, Robbie J; Schuldiner, Maya; Denic, Vladimir; Klionsky, Daniel J; Haber, James E

    2017-02-14

    Autophagy plays a central role in the DNA damage response (DDR) by controlling the levels of various DNA repair and checkpoint proteins; however, how the DDR communicates with the autophagy pathway remains unknown. Using budding yeast, we demonstrate that global genotoxic damage or even a single unrepaired double-strand break (DSB) initiates a previously undescribed and selective pathway of autophagy that we term genotoxin-induced targeted autophagy (GTA). GTA requires the action primarily of Mec1/ATR and Rad53/CHEK2 checkpoint kinases, in part via transcriptional up-regulation of central autophagy proteins. GTA is distinct from starvation-induced autophagy. GTA requires Atg11, a central component of the selective autophagy machinery, but is different from previously described autophagy pathways. By screening a collection of ∼6,000 yeast mutants, we identified genes that control GTA but do not significantly affect rapamycin-induced autophagy. Overall, our findings establish a pathway of autophagy specific to the DNA damage response.

  14. Yeast DNA-repair gene RAD14 encodes a zinc metalloprotein with affinity for ultraviolet-damaged DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Guzder, S.N.; Sung, P.; Prakash, S. ); Prakash, L. )

    1993-06-15

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients suffer from a high incidence of skin cancers due to a defect in excision repair of UV light-damaged DNA. Of the seven XP complementation groups, A--G, group A represents a severe and frequent form of the disease. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD14 gene is a homolog of the XP-A correcting (XPAC) gene. Like XP-A cells, rad14-null mutants are defective in the incision step of excision repair of UV-damaged DNA. The authors have purified RAD14 protein to homogeneity from extract of a yeast strain genetically tailored to overexpress RAD14. As determined by atomic emission spectroscopy, RAD14 contains one zinc atom. They also show in vitro that RAD14 binds zinc but does not bind other divalent metal ions. In DNA mobility-shift assays, RAD14 binds specifically to UV-damaged DNA. Removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers from damaged DNA by enzymatic photoreactivation has no effect on binding, strongly suggesting that RAD14 recognizes pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photoproduct sites. These findings indicate that RAD14 functions in damage recognition during excision repair. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  15. A genome-wide map of mitochondrial DNA recombination in yeast.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Emilie S; Chabbert, Christophe D; Klaus, Bernd; Steinmetz, Lars M

    2014-10-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the production of cellular energy requires close interplay between nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. The mitochondrial genome is essential in that it encodes several genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation. Each cell contains several mitochondrial genome copies and mitochondrial DNA recombination is a widespread process occurring in plants, fungi, protists, and invertebrates. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proved to be an excellent model to dissect mitochondrial biology. Several studies have focused on DNA recombination in this organelle, yet mostly relied on reporter genes or artificial systems. However, no complete mitochondrial recombination map has been released for any eukaryote so far. In the present work, we sequenced pools of diploids originating from a cross between two different S. cerevisiae strains to detect recombination events. This strategy allowed us to generate the first genome-wide map of recombination for yeast mitochondrial DNA. We demonstrated that recombination events are enriched in specific hotspots preferentially localized in non-protein-coding regions. Additionally, comparison of the recombination profiles of two different crosses showed that the genetic background affects hotspot localization and recombination rates. Finally, to gain insights into the mechanisms involved in mitochondrial recombination, we assessed the impact of individual depletion of four genes previously associated with this process. Deletion of NTG1 and MGT1 did not substantially influence the recombination landscape, alluding to the potential presence of additional regulatory factors. Our findings also revealed the loss of large mitochondrial DNA regions in the absence of MHR1, suggesting a pivotal role for Mhr1 in mitochondrial genome maintenance during mating. This study provides a comprehensive overview of mitochondrial DNA recombination in yeast and thus paves the way for future mechanistic studies of mitochondrial recombination and genome

  16. A direct droplet digital PCR method for quantification of residual DNA in protein drugs produced in yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Musaddeq; Fantuzzo, Rebecca; Mercorelli, Suzanne; Cullen, Constance

    2016-05-10

    Yeast cells, in particular Pichia pastoris, are the host cell of choice for manufacturing several protein therapeutic agents in the biopharmaceutical industry. Host cell DNA is an impurity of such manufacturing process and the residual DNA after the purification process of the drug must be monitored to ensure drug purity and safety. Currently, real-time PCR (qPCR) based methods are widely employed for quantification of host residual DNA. At the same time the digital PCR technology is coming into prominence with promise of higher sensitivity. Here we report a method where the protein drug is directly added to the droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) reaction including yeast-specific primers and fluorescent-tagged probe and nanoliter-sized droplets are generated. The droplets are then subjected to PCR followed by analysis for fluorescence. This Pichia residual DNA direct ddPCR method for yeast can be used to test higher amount of drug compared to the corresponding qPCR method thereby increasing sensitivity, retaining high precision and accuracy and has a wide linear range of determination. The method has been successfully tested with three batches of a recombinant human IgG1-Fc-based drug (RP-1) and with commercially available human insulin, both manufactured in yeast cells. This method simplifies the residual DNA quantification protocol by eliminating DNA extraction or protease digestion and eliminates use of DNA standards in day-to-day running of the method.

  17. Stable yeast transformants that secrete functional. cap alpha. -amylase encoded by cloned mouse pancreatic cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Filho, S.A.; Galembeck, E.V.; Faria, J.B.; Frascino, A.C.S.

    1986-04-01

    Mouse pancreatic ..cap alpha..-amylase complementary DNA was inserted into a yeast shuttle vector after the Saccharomyces cerevisiae MF..cap alpha..1 promoter and secretion signals coding sequences. When transformed with the recombinant plasmid, S. cerevisiae cells were able to synthesize and secrete functional ..cap alpha..-amylase, efficiently hydrolyzing starch present in the culture medium. Stable amylolytic cells were obtained from different yeast strains. This work represents a significant step towards producing yeast that can convert starchy materials directly to ethanol.

  18. Identification and Functional Analysis of the erh1+ Gene Encoding Enhancer of Rudimentary Homolog from the Fission Yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzanowski, Marek K.; Kozlowska, Ewa; Kozlowski, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    The ERH gene encodes a highly conserved small nuclear protein with a unique amino acid sequence and three-dimensional structure but unknown function. The gene is present in animals, plants, and protists but to date has only been found in few fungi. Here we report that ERH homologs are also present in all four species from the genus Schizosaccharomyces, S. pombe, S. octosporus, S. cryophilus, and S. japonicus, which, however, are an exception in this respect among Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. The ERH protein sequence is moderately conserved within the genus (58% identity between S. pombe and S. japonicus), but the intron-rich genes have almost identical intron-exon organizations in all four species. In S. pombe, erh1+ is expressed at a roughly constant level during vegetative growth and adaptation to unfavorable conditions such as nutrient limitation and hyperosmotic stress caused by sorbitol. Erh1p localizes preferentially to the nucleus with the exception of the nucleolus, but is also present in the cytoplasm. Cells lacking erh1+ have an aberrant cell morphology and a comma-like shape when cultured to the stationary phase, and exhibit a delayed recovery from this phase followed by slower growth. Loss of erh1+ in an auxotrophic background results in enhanced arrest in the G1 phase following nutritional stress, and also leads to hypersensitivity to agents inducing hyperosmotic stress (sorbitol), inhibiting DNA replication (hydroxyurea), and destabilizing the plasma membrane (SDS); this hypersensitivity can be abolished by expression of S. pombe erh1+ and, to a lesser extent, S. japonicus erh1+ or human ERH. Erh1p fails to interact with the human Ciz1 and PDIP46/SKAR proteins, known molecular partners of human ERH. Our data suggest that in Schizosaccharomyces sp. erh1+ is non-essential for normal growth and Erh1p could play a role in response to adverse environmental conditions and in cell cycle regulation. PMID:23145069

  19. DNA microarray analysis suggests that zinc pyrithione causes iron starvation to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yasokawa, Daisuke; Murata, Satomi; Iwahashi, Yumiko; Kitagawa, Emiko; Kishi, Katsuyuki; Okumura, Yukihiro; Iwahashi, Hitoshi

    2010-05-01

    Zinc pyrithione has been used in anti-dandruff shampoos and in anti-fouling paint on ships. However, little is known of its mode of action. We characterized the effects of sub-lethal concentrations of zinc pyrithione (Zpt) on Saccharomyces cerevisiae using DNA microarrays. The majority of the strongly upregulated genes are related to iron transport, and many of the strongly downregulated genes are related to the biosynthesis of cytochrome (heme). These data suggest that Zpt induces severe iron starvation. To confirm the DNA microarray data, we supplemented cultures containing Zpt with iron, and the growth of the yeast was restored significantly. From these results, we propose that the principal toxicity of zinc pyrithione arises from iron starvation.

  20. Using RFLP-mtDNA for the rapid monitoring of the dominant inoculated yeast strain in industrial wine fermentations.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, María Esther; Infante, Juan José; Molina, Montse; Rebordinos, Laureana; Cantoral, Jesús Manuel

    2011-01-31

    The analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA-RFLP) has been applied as a test to monitor the abundance of the starter yeast strain during industrial wine fermentations without previous isolation of yeast colonies. For white wine fermentations, we performed a rapid assay consisting in taking a sample of fermenting must, purifying the DNA from harvested cells, and obtaining the restriction patterns by digestion with the endonuclease HinfI. The same protocol, but adding an overnight cultivation step before DNA purification, was also applied to red wine fermentations. The results were compared with those obtained from the subsequent characterisation of strains, for the same samples, by analysis of the electrophoretic karyotype of isolated yeast colonies. In all cases, when the inoculated strain was dominant within the yeast population, the rapid assay anticipated the result by showing the coincidence between the restriction profiles obtained from both total cells and the inoculated strain. The results were obtained at 11 or 23 h after sampling for white- or red-wine fermentations respectively. This method allows a rapid intervention of the wine-producer if the presence of the inoculated yeasts has suffered a sudden decrease in any phase of the fermentation process.

  1. Budding Yeast Rif1 Controls Genome Integrity by Inhibiting rDNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Benjamin; Hafner, Lukas; Lezaja, Aleksandra; Costanzo, Michael; Boone, Charlie; Shore, David

    2016-01-01

    The Rif1 protein is a negative regulator of DNA replication initiation in eukaryotes. Here we show that budding yeast Rif1 inhibits DNA replication initiation at the rDNA locus. Absence of Rif1, or disruption of its interaction with PP1/Glc7 phosphatase, leads to more intensive rDNA replication. The effect of Rif1-Glc7 on rDNA replication is similar to that of the Sir2 deacetylase, and the two would appear to act in the same pathway, since the rif1Δ sir2Δ double mutant shows no further increase in rDNA replication. Loss of Rif1-Glc7 activity is also accompanied by an increase in rDNA repeat instability that again is not additive with the effect of sir2Δ. We find, in addition, that the viability of rif1Δ cells is severely compromised in combination with disruption of the MRX or Ctf4-Mms22 complexes, both of which are implicated in stabilization of stalled replication forks. Significantly, we show that removal of the rDNA replication fork barrier (RFB) protein Fob1, alleviation of replisome pausing by deletion of the Tof1/Csm3 complex, or a large deletion of the rDNA repeat array all rescue this synthetic growth defect of rif1Δ cells lacking in addition either MRX or Ctf4-Mms22 activity. These data suggest that the repression of origin activation by Rif1-Glc7 is important to avoid the deleterious accumulation of stalled replication forks at the rDNA RFB, which become lethal when fork stability is compromised. Finally, we show that Rif1-Glc7, unlike Sir2, has an important effect on origin firing outside of the rDNA locus that serves to prevent activation of the DNA replication checkpoint. Our results thus provide insights into a mechanism of replication control within a large repetitive chromosomal domain and its importance for the maintenance of genome stability. These findings may have important implications for metazoans, where large blocks of repetitive sequences are much more common. PMID:27820830

  2. A Positive Feedback Loop Links Opposing Functions of P-TEFb/Cdk9 and Histone H2B Ubiquitylation to Regulate Transcript Elongation in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, Pierre-Étienne; Pagé, Viviane; Nagy, Stephen; Racine, Ariane; St. Amour, Courtney V.; Zhang, Chao; Shokat, Kevan M.; Schwer, Beate; Robert, François; Fisher, Robert P.; Tanny, Jason C.

    2012-01-01

    Transcript elongation by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) is accompanied by conserved patterns of histone modification. Whereas histone modifications have established roles in transcription initiation, their functions during elongation are not understood. Mono-ubiquitylation of histone H2B (H2Bub1) plays a key role in coordinating co-transcriptional histone modification by promoting site-specific methylation of histone H3. H2Bub1 also regulates gene expression through an unidentified, methylation-independent mechanism. Here we reveal bidirectional communication between H2Bub1 and Cdk9, the ortholog of metazoan positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Chemical and classical genetic analyses indicate that lowering Cdk9 activity or preventing phosphorylation of its substrate, the transcription processivity factor Spt5, reduces H2Bub1 in vivo. Conversely, mutations in the H2Bub1 pathway impair Cdk9 recruitment to chromatin and decrease Spt5 phosphorylation. Moreover, an Spt5 phosphorylation-site mutation, combined with deletion of the histone H3 Lys4 methyltransferase Set1, phenocopies morphologic and growth defects due to H2Bub1 loss, suggesting independent, partially redundant roles for Cdk9 and Set1 downstream of H2Bub1. Surprisingly, mutation of the histone H2B ubiquitin-acceptor residue relaxes the Cdk9 activity requirement in vivo, and cdk9 mutations suppress cell-morphology defects in H2Bub1-deficient strains. Genome-wide analyses by chromatin immunoprecipitation also demonstrate opposing effects of Cdk9 and H2Bub1 on distribution of transcribing RNAPII. Therefore, whereas mutual dependence of H2Bub1 and Spt5 phosphorylation indicates positive feedback, mutual suppression by cdk9 and H2Bub1-pathway mutations suggests antagonistic functions that must be kept in balance to regulate elongation. Loss of H2Bub1 disrupts that balance and leads to deranged gene expression and aberrant cell morphologies, revealing a

  3. Differential chromatin proteomics of the MMS-induced DNA damage response in yeast

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Protein enrichment by sub-cellular fractionation was combined with differential-in-gel-electrophoresis (DIGE) to address the detection of the low abundance chromatin proteins in the budding yeast proteome. Comparisons of whole-cell extracts and chromatin fractions were used to provide a measure of the degree of chromatin association for individual proteins, which could be compared across sample treatments. The method was applied to analyze the effect of the DNA damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) on levels of chromatin-associated proteins. Results Up-regulation of several previously characterized DNA damage checkpoint-regulated proteins, such as Rnr4, Rpa1 and Rpa2, was observed. In addition, several novel DNA damage responsive proteins were identified and assessed for genotoxic sensitivity using either DAmP (decreased abundance by mRNA perturbation) or knockout strains, including Acf2, Arp3, Bmh1, Hsp31, Lsp1, Pst2, Rnr4, Rpa1, Rpa2, Ste4, Ycp4 and Yrb1. A strain in which the expression of the Ran-GTPase binding protein Yrb1 was reduced was found to be hypersensitive to genotoxic stress. Conclusion The described method was effective at unveiling chromatin-associated proteins that are less likely to be detected in the absence of fractionation. Several novel proteins with altered chromatin abundance were identified including Yrb1, pointing to a role for this nuclear import associated protein in DNA damage response. PMID:21967861

  4. Characterization of a DNA uptake reaction through the nuclear membrane of isolated yeast nuclei. [Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, E.; Shakuto, S.; Miyakawa, T.; Fukui, S.

    1988-02-01

    Isolated yeast nuclei were able to incorporate /sup 3/H-labeled pJDB219 DNA in vitro in the presence of ATP and Mg/sup 2 +/. The number of plasmid molecules incorporated into each nucleus was calculated to be 60 under the conditions we used. Enzyme-histochemical staining of the incorporated biotinylated pJDB219 with streptavidin-biotinylated-peroxidase complex indicated a uniform distribution of the incorporated plasmids within each nucleus. After intranuclear incorporation, substrate pJDB219 DNAs (open and closed circular forms) were changed to the linear form and were weakly digested over the longer incubation period (over 60 min). Facile release of the once-incorporated plasmid DNA was never observable; discharge of the incorporated (/sup 3/H)pJDB219 during a 60-min incubation was less than 5%. The addition of adenylyl-imidodiphosphate, N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), or quercetin inhibited in vitro DNA uptake reaction. DCCD and quercetin inhibited the nuclear ATPase and apparent protein kinase, respectively; hence, the involvement of these enzymes in the nuclear DNA transport system was suggested.

  5. Yeast Cells Expressing the Human Mitochondrial DNA Polymerase Reveal Correlations between Polymerase Fidelity and Human Disease Progression*

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yufeng; Kachroo, Aashiq H.; Yellman, Christopher M.; Marcotte, Edward M.; Johnson, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the human mitochondrial polymerase (polymerase-γ (Pol-γ)) are associated with various mitochondrial disorders, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome, Alpers syndrome, and progressive external opthamalplegia. To correlate biochemically quantifiable defects resulting from point mutations in Pol-γ with their physiological consequences, we created “humanized” yeast, replacing the yeast mtDNA polymerase (MIP1) with human Pol-γ. Despite differences in the replication and repair mechanism, we show that the human polymerase efficiently complements the yeast mip1 knockouts, suggesting common fundamental mechanisms of replication and conserved interactions between the human polymerase and other components of the replisome. We also examined the effects of four disease-related point mutations (S305R, H932Y, Y951N, and Y955C) and an exonuclease-deficient mutant (D198A/E200A). In haploid cells, each mutant results in rapid mtDNA depletion, increased mutation frequency, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mutation frequencies measured in vivo equal those measured with purified enzyme in vitro. In heterozygous diploid cells, wild-type Pol-γ suppresses mutation-associated growth defects, but continuous growth eventually leads to aerobic respiration defects, reduced mtDNA content, and depolarized mitochondrial membranes. The severity of the Pol-γ mutant phenotype in heterozygous diploid humanized yeast correlates with the approximate age of disease onset and the severity of symptoms observed in humans. PMID:24398692

  6. Kinetic analysis of bypass of abasic site by the catalytic core of yeast DNA polymerase eta.

    PubMed

    Yang, Juntang; Wang, Rong; Liu, Binyan; Xue, Qizhen; Zhong, Mengyu; Zeng, Hao; Zhang, Huidong

    2015-09-01

    Abasic sites (Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites), produced ∼ 50,000 times/cell/day, are very blocking and miscoding. To better understand miscoding mechanisms of abasic site for yeast DNA polymerase η, pre-steady-state nucleotide incorporation and LC-MS/MS sequence analysis of extension product were studied using pol η(core) (catalytic core, residues 1-513), which can completely eliminate the potential effects of the C-terminal C2H2 motif of pol η on dNTP incorporation. The extension beyond the abasic site was very inefficient. Compared with incorporation of dCTP opposite G, the incorporation efficiencies opposite abasic site were greatly reduced according to the order of dGTP > dATP > dCTP and dTTP. Pol η(core) showed no fast burst phase for any incorporation opposite G or abasic site, suggesting that the catalytic step is not faster than the dissociation of polymerase from DNA. LC-MS/MS sequence analysis of extension products showed that 53% products were dGTP misincorporation, 33% were dATP and 14% were -1 frameshift, indicating that Pol η(core) bypasses abasic site by a combined G-rule, A-rule and -1 frameshift deletions. Compared with full-length pol η, pol η(core) relatively reduced the efficiency of incorporation of dCTP opposite G, increased the efficiencies of dNTP incorporation opposite abasic site and the exclusive incorporation of dGTP opposite abasic site, but inhibited the extension beyond abasic site, and increased the priority in extension of A: abasic site relative to G: abasic site. This study provides further understanding in the mutation mechanism of abasic sites for yeast DNA polymerase η.

  7. Assessing Genetic Diversity among Brettanomyces Yeasts by DNA Fingerprinting and Whole-Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Crauwels, Sam; Zhu, Bo; Steensels, Jan; Busschaert, Pieter; De Samblanx, Gorik; Marchal, Kathleen; Willems, Kris A.

    2014-01-01

    Brettanomyces yeasts, with the species Brettanomyces (Dekkera) bruxellensis being the most important one, are generally reported to be spoilage yeasts in the beer and wine industry due to the production of phenolic off flavors. However, B. bruxellensis is also known to be a beneficial contributor in certain fermentation processes, such as the production of certain specialty beers. Nevertheless, despite its economic importance, Brettanomyces yeasts remain poorly understood at the genetic and genomic levels. In this study, the genetic relationship between more than 50 Brettanomyces strains from all presently known species and from several sources was studied using a combination of DNA fingerprinting techniques. This revealed an intriguing correlation between the B. bruxellensis fingerprints and the respective isolation source. To further explore this relationship, we sequenced a (beneficial) beer isolate of B. bruxellensis (VIB X9085; ST05.12/22) and compared its genome sequence with the genome sequences of two wine spoilage strains (AWRI 1499 and CBS 2499). ST05.12/22 was found to be substantially different from both wine strains, especially at the level of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In addition, there were major differences in the genome structures between the strains investigated, including the presence of large duplications and deletions. Gene content analysis revealed the presence of 20 genes which were present in both wine strains but absent in the beer strain, including many genes involved in carbon and nitrogen metabolism, and vice versa, no genes that were missing in both AWRI 1499 and CBS 2499 were found in ST05.12/22. Together, this study provides tools to discriminate Brettanomyces strains and provides a first glimpse at the genetic diversity and genome plasticity of B. bruxellensis. PMID:24814796

  8. Assessing genetic diversity among Brettanomyces yeasts by DNA fingerprinting and whole-genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Crauwels, Sam; Zhu, Bo; Steensels, Jan; Busschaert, Pieter; De Samblanx, Gorik; Marchal, Kathleen; Willems, Kris A; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Lievens, Bart

    2014-07-01

    Brettanomyces yeasts, with the species Brettanomyces (Dekkera) bruxellensis being the most important one, are generally reported to be spoilage yeasts in the beer and wine industry due to the production of phenolic off flavors. However, B. bruxellensis is also known to be a beneficial contributor in certain fermentation processes, such as the production of certain specialty beers. Nevertheless, despite its economic importance, Brettanomyces yeasts remain poorly understood at the genetic and genomic levels. In this study, the genetic relationship between more than 50 Brettanomyces strains from all presently known species and from several sources was studied using a combination of DNA fingerprinting techniques. This revealed an intriguing correlation between the B. bruxellensis fingerprints and the respective isolation source. To further explore this relationship, we sequenced a (beneficial) beer isolate of B. bruxellensis (VIB X9085; ST05.12/22) and compared its genome sequence with the genome sequences of two wine spoilage strains (AWRI 1499 and CBS 2499). ST05.12/22 was found to be substantially different from both wine strains, especially at the level of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In addition, there were major differences in the genome structures between the strains investigated, including the presence of large duplications and deletions. Gene content analysis revealed the presence of 20 genes which were present in both wine strains but absent in the beer strain, including many genes involved in carbon and nitrogen metabolism, and vice versa, no genes that were missing in both AWRI 1499 and CBS 2499 were found in ST05.12/22. Together, this study provides tools to discriminate Brettanomyces strains and provides a first glimpse at the genetic diversity and genome plasticity of B. bruxellensis.

  9. Physical properties of naked DNA influence nucleosome positioning and correlate with transcription start and termination sites in yeast

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In eukaryotic organisms, DNA is packaged into chromatin structure, where most of DNA is wrapped into nucleosomes. DNA compaction and nucleosome positioning have clear functional implications, since they modulate the accessibility of genomic regions to regulatory proteins. Despite the intensive research effort focused in this area, the rules defining nucleosome positioning and the location of DNA regulatory regions still remain elusive. Results Naked (histone-free) and nucleosomal DNA from yeast were digested by microccocal nuclease (MNase) and sequenced genome-wide. MNase cutting preferences were determined for both naked and nucleosomal DNAs. Integration of their sequencing profiles with DNA conformational descriptors derived from atomistic molecular dynamic simulations enabled us to extract the physical properties of DNA on a genomic scale and to correlate them with chromatin structure and gene regulation. The local structure of DNA around regulatory regions was found to be unusually flexible and to display a unique pattern of nucleosome positioning. Ab initio physical descriptors derived from molecular dynamics were used to develop a computational method that accurately predicts nucleosome enriched and depleted regions. Conclusions Our experimental and computational analyses jointly demonstrate a clear correlation between sequence-dependent physical properties of naked DNA and regulatory signals in the chromatin structure. These results demonstrate that nucleosome positioning around TSS (Transcription Start Site) and TTS (Transcription Termination Site) (at least in yeast) is strongly dependent on DNA physical properties, which can define a basal regulatory mechanism of gene expression. PMID:21981773

  10. Human DNA-Damage-Inducible 2 Protein Is Structurally and Functionally Distinct from Its Yeast Ortholog

    PubMed Central

    Sivá, Monika; Svoboda, Michal; Veverka, Václav; Trempe, Jean-François; Hofmann, Kay; Kožíšek, Milan; Hexnerová, Rozálie; Sedlák, František; Belza, Jan; Brynda, Jiří; Šácha, Pavel; Hubálek, Martin; Starková, Jana; Flaisigová, Iva; Konvalinka, Jan; Šašková, Klára Grantz

    2016-01-01

    Although Ddi1-like proteins are conserved among eukaryotes, their biological functions remain poorly characterized. Yeast Ddi1 has been implicated in cell cycle regulation, DNA-damage response, and exocytosis. By virtue of its ubiquitin-like (UBL) and ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domains, it has been proposed to serve as a proteasomal shuttle factor. All Ddi1-like family members also contain a highly conserved retroviral protease-like (RVP) domain with unknown substrate specificity. While the structure and biological function of yeast Ddi1 have been investigated, no such analysis is available for the human homologs. To address this, we solved the 3D structures of the human Ddi2 UBL and RVP domains and identified a new helical domain that extends on either side of the RVP dimer. While Ddi1-like proteins from all vertebrates lack a UBA domain, we identify a novel ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM) located at the C-terminus of the protein. The UIM showed a weak yet specific affinity towards ubiquitin, as did the Ddi2 UBL domain. However, the full-length Ddi2 protein is unable to bind to di-ubiquitin chains. While proteomic analysis revealed no activity, implying that the protease requires other factors for activation, our structural characterization of all domains of human Ddi2 sets the stage for further characterization. PMID:27461074

  11. Replication intermediates of the linear mitochondrial DNA of Candida parapsilosis suggest a common recombination based mechanism for yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Gerhold, Joachim M; Sedman, Tiina; Visacka, Katarina; Slezakova, Judita; Tomaska, Lubomir; Nosek, Jozef; Sedman, Juhan

    2014-08-15

    Variation in the topology of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in eukaryotes evokes the question if differently structured DNAs are replicated by a common mechanism. RNA-primed DNA synthesis has been established as a mechanism for replicating the circular animal/mammalian mtDNA. In yeasts, circular mtDNA molecules were assumed to be templates for rolling circle DNA-replication. We recently showed that in Candida albicans, which has circular mapping mtDNA, recombination driven replication is a major mechanism for replicating a complex branched mtDNA network. Careful analyses of C. albicans-mtDNA did not reveal detectable amounts of circular DNA molecules. In the present study we addressed the question of how the unit sized linear mtDNA of Candida parapsilosis terminating at both ends with arrays of tandem repeats (mitochondrial telomeres) is replicated. Originally, we expected to find replication intermediates diagnostic of canonical bi-directional replication initiation at the centrally located bi-directional promoter region. However, we found that the linear mtDNA of Candida parapsilosis also employs recombination for replication initiation. The most striking findings were that the mitochondrial telomeres appear to be hot spots for recombination driven replication, and that stable RNA:DNA hybrids, with a potential role in mtDNA replication, are also present in the mtDNA preparations.

  12. Nuclear Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denschlag, J. O.

    This chapter first gives a survey on the history of the discovery of nuclear fission. It briefly presents the liquid-drop and shell models and their application to the fission process. The most important quantities accessible to experimental determination such as mass yields, nuclear charge distribution, prompt neutron emission, kinetic energy distribution, ternary fragment yields, angular distributions, and properties of fission isomers are presented as well as the instrumentation and techniques used for their measurement. The contribution concentrates on the fundamental aspects of nuclear fission. The practical aspects of nuclear fission are discussed in http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0720-2_57 of Vol. 6.

  13. Lack of DNA helicase Pif1 disrupts zinc and iron homoeostasis in yeast.

    PubMed

    Guirola, María; Barreto, Lina; Pagani, Ayelen; Romagosa, Miriam; Casamayor, Antonio; Atrian, Silvia; Ariño, Joaquín

    2010-12-15

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene PIF1 encodes a conserved eukaryotic DNA helicase required for both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA integrity. Our previous work revealed that a pif1Δ strain is tolerant to zinc overload. In the present study we demonstrate that this effect is independent of the Pif1 helicase activity and is only observed when the protein is absent from the mitochondria. pif1Δ cells accumulate abnormal amounts of mitochondrial zinc and iron. Transcriptional profiling reveals that pif1Δ cells under standard growth conditions overexpress aconitase-related genes. When exposed to zinc, pif1Δ cells show lower induction of genes encoding iron (siderophores) transporters and higher expression of genes related to oxidative stress responses than wild-type cells. Coincidently, pif1Δ mutants are less prone to zinc-induced oxidative stress and display a higher reduced/oxidized glutathione ratio. Strikingly, although pif1Δ cells contain normal amounts of the Aco1 (yeast aconitase) protein, they completely lack aconitase activity. Loss of Aco1 activity is also observed when the cell expresses a non-mitochondrially targeted form of Pif1. We postulate that lack of Pif1 forces aconitase to play its DNA protective role as a nucleoid protein and that this triggers a domino effect on iron homoeostasis resulting in increased zinc tolerance.

  14. Sequencing Spo11 Oligonucleotides for Mapping Meiotic DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Lam, Isabel; Mohibullah, Neeman; Keeney, Scott

    2017-01-01

    Meiosis is a specialized form of cell division resulting in reproductive cells with a reduced, usually haploid, genome complement. A key step after premeiotic DNA replication is the occurrence of homologous recombination at multiple places throughout the genome, initiated with the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) catalyzed by the topoisomerase-like protein Spo11. DSBs are distributed non-randomly in genomes, and understanding the mechanisms that shape this distribution is important for understanding how meiotic recombination influences heredity and genome evolution. Several methods exist for mapping where Spo11 acts. Of these, sequencing of Spo11-associated oligonucleotides (Spo11 oligos) is the most precise, specifying the locations of DNA breaks to the base pair. In this chapter we detail the steps involved in Spo11-oligo mapping in the SK1 strain of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, from harvesting cells of highly synchronous meiotic cultures, through preparation of sequencing libraries, to the mapping pipeline used for processing the data.

  15. Comparing protocols for preparation of DNA-free total yeast RNA suitable for RT-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Del Aguila, Eduardo M; Dutra, Marcio B; Silva, Joab T; Paschoalin, Vânia MF

    2005-01-01

    Background Preparation of RNA free from DNA is a critical step before performing RT-PCR assay. Total RNA isolated from several sources, including those obtained from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using routine methodologies are frequently contaminated with DNA, which can give rise to amplification products that mimic the amplicons expected from the RNA target. Results We investigated the efficiency of two DNase I based protocols for eliminating DNA contaminations from RNA samples obtained from yeast cells. Both procedures are very efficient in eliminating DNA contamination from RNA samples and entail three main steps, which involve treating of RNA samples with DNase I, inhibition of the enzyme by EDTA and its subsequent inactivation at 65°C. The DNase I treated samples were further purified with phenol: chloroform followed by precipitation with ice-cold ethanol (protocol I) or, alternatively, they were directly used in RT-PCR reactions (protocol II). Transcripts from ACT1, PDA1, CNA1, CNA2, TPS1 and TPS2 analyzed after each treatment showed that all mRNAs tested can be amplified if total RNA was extracted and purified after DNase I treatment, however, only TPS1, TPS2 and ACT1 mRNAs were amplified without extraction/purification step. Conclusion Although more laborious and requiring a higher initial amount of material, the inclusion of an extraction and purification step allows to prepare RNA samples that are free from DNA and from low molecular contaminants and can be applied to amplify any Saccharomyces cerevisiae mRNA by RT-PCR. PMID:15833107

  16. Mutations on the DNA binding surface of TBP discriminate between yeast TATA and TATA-less gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Kamenova, Ivanka; Warfield, Linda; Hahn, Steven

    2014-08-01

    Most RNA polymerase (Pol) II promoters lack a TATA element, yet nearly all Pol II transcription requires TATA binding protein (TBP). While the TBP-TATA interaction is critical for transcription at TATA-containing promoters, it has been unclear whether TBP sequence-specific DNA contacts are required for transcription at TATA-less genes. Transcription factor IID (TFIID), the TBP-containing coactivator that functions at most TATA-less genes, recognizes short sequence-specific promoter elements in metazoans, but analogous promoter elements have not been identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We generated a set of mutations in the yeast TBP DNA binding surface and found that most support growth of yeast. Both in vivo and in vitro, many of these mutations are specifically defective for transcription of two TATA-containing genes with only minor defects in transcription of two TATA-less, TFIID-dependent genes. TBP binds several TATA-less promoters with apparent high affinity, but our results suggest that this binding is not important for transcription activity. Our results are consistent with the model that sequence-specific TBP-DNA contacts are not important at yeast TATA-less genes and suggest that other general transcription factors or coactivator subunits are responsible for recognition of TATA-less promoters. Our results also explain why yeast TBP derivatives defective for TATA binding appear defective in activated transcription.

  17. The Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex is required for yeast DNA postreplication repair.

    PubMed

    Ball, Lindsay G; Hanna, Michelle D; Lambrecht, Amanda D; Mitchell, Bryan A; Ziola, Barry; Cobb, Jennifer A; Xiao, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Yeast DNA postreplication repair (PRR) bypasses replication-blocking lesions to prevent damage-induced cell death. PRR employs two different mechanisms to bypass damaged DNA, namely translesion synthesis (TLS) and error-free PRR, which are regulated via sequential ubiquitination of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). We previously demonstrated that error-free PRR utilizes homologous recombination to facilitate template switching. To our surprise, genes encoding the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 (MRX) complex, which are also required for homologous recombination, are epistatic to TLS mutations. Further genetic analyses indicated that two other nucleases involved in double-strand end resection, Sae2 and Exo1, are also variably required for efficient lesion bypass. The involvement of the above genes in TLS and/or error-free PRR could be distinguished by the mutagenesis assay and their differential effects on PCNA ubiquitination. Consistent with the observation that the MRX complex is required for both branches of PRR, the MRX complex was found to physically interact with Rad18 in vivo. In light of the distinct and overlapping activities of the above nucleases in the resection of double-strand breaks, we propose that the interplay between distinct single-strand nucleases dictate the preference between TLS and error-free PRR for lesion bypass.

  18. Purification and staining of intact yeast DNA chromosomes and real-time observation of their migration during gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Gurrieri, S; Bustamante, C

    1997-01-01

    In the past few years, fluorescence microscopy has been used successfully to characterize the motion of intermediate-size DNA molecules (50-500 kbp) during steady- and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. However, experimental difficulties had prevented the application of this technique to the direct observation of longer DNA chromosomes (1-2 Mbp). In the present study a particular procedure was followed for the purification and staining of chromosomal yeast DNA to protect it from shear forces. Also, a new highly fluorescent DNA-labelling dye, YOYO-1, was employed to improve brightness and contrast. Finally, the motion of such long DNA molecules (1-2 Mbp) was characterized under steady-field electrophoresis conditions. An accurate description of the molecular mechanisms of motion of such long molecules should provide the basis for a detailed analysis of the mechanisms responsible for DNA trapping. PMID:9337860

  19. Efficiency of mitochondrial DNA restriction analysis and RAPD-PCR to characterize yeasts growing on dry-cured Iberian ham at the different geographic areas of ripening.

    PubMed

    Andrade, María J; Rodríguez, Mar; Casado, Eva; Córdoba, Juan J

    2010-03-01

    The efficiency of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) restriction analysis and random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR to characterize yeasts growing on dry-cured Iberian ham was evaluated. Besides, the distribution of the main species and biotypes of yeasts in the different ripening areas of this product was investigated. MtDNA restriction analysis allowed yeast characterization at species and strain level. RAPD-PCR with the primers (GACA)(4) and (GAC)(5) was inappropriate for characterization at species level. Most of the mtDNA restriction patterns detected in dry-cured Iberian ham were consistent with Debaryomyces hansenii. Several yeasts biotypes were associated to specific geographic areas of dry-cured Iberian ham ripening.

  20. Specific targeted integration of kanamycin resistance-associated nonselectable DNA in the genome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Waghmare, Sanjeev K; Caputo, Valentina; Radovic, Slobodanka; Bruschi, Carlo V

    2003-05-01

    Sophisticated genome manipulation requires the possibility to modify any intergenic or intragenic DNA sequence at will, without leaving large amounts of undesired vector DNA at the site of alteration. To this end, a series of vectors was developed from a previous gene knockout plasmid system to integrate nonselectable foreign DNA at any desired genomic location in yeast, with a minimum amount of residual plasmid DNA. These vectors have two mutated Flp recognition targets (FRT) sequences flanking the KanMX4 gene and multiple sites for subcloning the DNA fragment to be integrated. The selectable marker can be recycled by Flp site-specific excision between the identical FRTs, thereby allowing the integration of further DNA fragments. With this system, the NLS-tetR-GFP and DsRed genes were successfully integrated at the thr1 locus, and the RVB1 gene was tagged at the C-terminus with the V5-epitope-6-histidine tag. This plasmid system provides for a new molecular tool to integrate any DNA fragment at any genome location in [cir+] yeast strains. Moreover, the system can be extrapolated to other eukaryotic cells in which the FLP/FRT system functions efficiently.

  1. Prevalence and Dynamics of Ribosomal DNA Micro-heterogeneity Are Linked to Population History in Two Contrasting Yeast Species

    PubMed Central

    James, Stephen A.; West, Claire; Davey, Robert P.; Dicks, Jo; Roberts, Ian N.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the considerable number and taxonomic breadth of past and current genome sequencing projects, many of which necessarily encompass the ribosomal DNA, detailed information on the prevalence and evolutionary significance of sequence variation in this ubiquitous genomic region are severely lacking. Here, we attempt to address this issue in two closely related yet contrasting yeast species, the baker’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the wild yeast Saccharomyces paradoxus. By drawing on existing datasets from the Saccharomyces Genome Resequencing Project, we identify a rich seam of ribosomal DNA sequence variation, characterising 1,068 and 970 polymorphisms in 34 S. cerevisiae and 26 S. paradoxus strains respectively. We discover the two species sets exhibit distinct mutational profiles. Furthermore, we show for the first time that unresolved rDNA sequence variation resulting from imperfect concerted evolution of the ribosomal DNA region follows a U-shaped allele frequency distribution in each species, similar to loci that evolve under non-concerted mechanisms but arising through rather different evolutionary processes. Finally, we link differences between the shapes of these allele frequency distributions to the two species’ contrasting population histories. PMID:27345953

  2. Yeast mitochondrial HMG proteins: DNA-binding properties of the most evolutionarily divergent component of mitochondrial nucleoids

    PubMed Central

    Bakkaiova, Jana; Marini, Victoria; Willcox, Smaranda; Nosek, Jozef; Griffith, Jack D.; Krejci, Lumir; Tomaska, Lubomir

    2015-01-01

    Yeast mtDNA is compacted into nucleoprotein structures called mitochondrial nucleoids (mt-nucleoids). The principal mediators of nucleoid formation are mitochondrial high-mobility group (HMG)-box containing (mtHMG) proteins. Although these proteins are some of the fastest evolving components of mt-nucleoids, it is not known whether the divergence of mtHMG proteins on the level of their amino acid sequences is accompanied by diversification of their biochemical properties. In the present study we performed a comparative biochemical analysis of yeast mtHMG proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ScAbf2p), Yarrowia lipolytica (YlMhb1p) and Candida parapsilosis (CpGcf1p). We found that all three proteins exhibit relatively weak binding to intact dsDNA. In fact, ScAbf2p and YlMhb1p bind quantitatively to this substrate only at very high protein to DNA ratios and CpGcf1p shows only negligible binding to dsDNA. In contrast, the proteins exhibit much higher preference for recombination intermediates such as Holliday junctions (HJ) and replication forks (RF). Therefore, we hypothesize that the roles of the yeast mtHMG proteins in maintenance and compaction of mtDNA in vivo are in large part mediated by their binding to recombination/replication intermediates. We also speculate that the distinct biochemical properties of CpGcf1p may represent one of the prerequisites for frequent evolutionary tinkering with the form of the mitochondrial genome in the CTG-clade of hemiascomycetous yeast species. PMID:26647378

  3. The expression of the open reading frame of "Arabidopsis" CAX1, but not its cDNA, confers metal tolerance in yeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The biochemical properties and regulation of several plant CAX (CAtion eXchanger)-type vacuolar Ca (2+)/H (+) exchangers have been extensively analyzed in yeast expression assays. In the present study, we compare and contrast the phenotypes of yeast cells expressing the CAX1 cDNA and open reading fr...

  4. Staying in aerobic shape: how the structural integrity of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA is maintained.

    PubMed

    Scott, Sidney V; Cassidy-Stone, Ann; Meeusen, Shelly L; Nunnari, Jodi

    2003-08-01

    The structure and integrity of the mitochondrial compartment are features essential for it to function efficiently. The maintenance of mitochondrial structure in cells ranging from yeast to humans has been shown to require both ongoing fission and fusion. Recent characterization of many of the molecular components that direct mitochondrial fission and fusion events have led to a more complete understanding of how these processes take place. Further, mitochondrial fragmentation observed when cells undergo apoptosis requires mitochondrial fission, underlying the importance of mitochondrial dynamics in cellular homeostasis. Mitochondrial structure also impacts mitochondrial DNA inheritance. Recent studies suggest that faithful transmission of mitochondrial DNA to daughter cells might require a mitochondrial membrane tethering apparatus.

  5. Spontaneous Fission

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Segre, Emilio

    1950-11-22

    The first attempt to discover spontaneous fission in uranium was made by [Willard] Libby, who, however, failed to detect it on account of the smallness of effect. In 1940, [K. A.] Petrzhak and [G. N.] Flerov, using more sensitive methods, discovered spontaneous fission in uranium and gave some rough estimates of the spontaneous fission decay constant of this substance. Subsequently, extensive experimental work on the subject has been performed by several investigators and will be quoted in the various sections. [N.] Bohr and [A.] Wheeler have given a theory of the effect based on the usual ideas of penetration of potential barriers. On this project spontaneous fission has been studied for the past several years in an effort to obtain a complete picture of the phenomenon. For this purpose the spontaneous fission decay constants {lambda} have been measured for separated isotopes of the heavy elements wherever possible. Moreover, the number {nu} of neutrons emitted per fission has been measured wherever feasible, and other characteristics of the spontaneous fission process have been studied. This report summarizes the spontaneous fission work done at Los Alamos up to January 1, 1945. A chronological record of the work is contained in the Los Alamos monthly reports.

  6. Investigations on hydrolytic activities from Stachybotrys microspora and their use as an alternative in yeast DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Abdeljalil, Salma; Ben Hmad, Ines; Saibi, Walid; Amouri, Bahia; Maalej, Wiem; Kaaniche, Marwa; Koubaa, Aida; Gargouri, Ali

    2014-02-01

    Stachybotrys microspora is a filamentous fungus characterized by the secretion of multiple hydrolytic activities (cellulolytic and non-cellulolytic enzymes). The production of these biocatalysts was studied under submerged culture using glucose, cellulose, and wheat bran as carbon sources. Endoglucanases, pectinases, xylanases, β-glucanases, chitinases, and proteases were induced on cellulose-based medium and repressed on glucose in both strains with higher amounts produced by the mutant. β-glucosidases were roughly equally produced by both strains under glucose and cellulose conditions. The yield of chitinases, β-glucanases, and proteases produced by Stachybotrys strains was as much higher than the commercialized lysing enzyme called "zymolyase," currently used in yeast DNA extraction. In this context, we showed that S. microspora hydrolases can be successfully applied in the extraction of yeast DNA.

  7. Mining Enzyme Diversity of Transcriptome Libraries through DNA Synthesis for Benzylisoquinoline Alkaloid Pathway Optimization in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Narcross, Lauren; Bourgeois, Leanne; Fossati, Elena; Burton, Euan; Martin, Vincent J J

    2016-12-16

    The ever-increasing quantity of data deposited to GenBank is a valuable resource for mining new enzyme activities. Falling costs of DNA synthesis enables metabolic engineers to take advantage of this resource for identifying superior or novel enzymes for pathway optimization. Previously, we reported synthesis of the benzylisoquinoline alkaloid dihydrosanguinarine in yeast from norlaudanosoline at a molar conversion of 1.5%. Molar conversion could be improved by reduction of the side-product N-methylcheilanthifoline, a key bottleneck in dihydrosanguinarine biosynthesis. Two pathway enzymes, an N-methyltransferase and a cytochrome P450 of the CYP719A subfamily, were implicated in the synthesis of the side-product. Here, we conducted an extensive screen to identify enzyme homologues whose coexpression reduces side-product synthesis. Phylogenetic trees were generated from multiple sources of sequence data to identify a library of candidate enzymes that were purchased codon-optimized and precloned into expression vectors designed to facilitate high-throughput analysis of gene expression as well as activity assay. Simple in vivo assays were sufficient to guide the selection of superior enzyme homologues that ablated the synthesis of the side-product, and improved molar conversion of norlaudanosoline to dihydrosanguinarine to 10%.

  8. The homologous putative GTPases Grn1p from fission yeast and the human GNL3L are required for growth and play a role in processing of nucleolar pre-rRNA.

    PubMed

    Du, Xianming; Rao, Malireddi R K Subba; Chen, Xue Qin; Wu, Wei; Mahalingam, Sundarasamy; Balasundaram, David

    2006-01-01

    Grn1p from fission yeast and GNL3L from human cells, two putative GTPases from the novel HSR1_MMR1 GTP-binding protein subfamily with circularly permuted G-motifs play a critical role in maintaining normal cell growth. Deletion of Grn1 resulted in a severe growth defect, a marked reduction in mature rRNA species with a concomitant accumulation of the 35S pre-rRNA transcript, and failure to export the ribosomal protein Rpl25a from the nucleolus. Deleting any of the Grn1p G-domain motifs resulted in a null phenotype and nuclear/nucleolar localization consistent with the lack of nucleolar export of preribosomes accompanied by a distortion of nucleolar structure. Heterologous expression of GNL3L in a Deltagrn1 mutant restored processing of 35S pre-rRNA, nuclear export of Rpl25a and cell growth to wild-type levels. Genetic complementation in yeast and siRNA knockdown in HeLa cells confirmed the homologous proteins Grn1p and GNL3L are required for growth. Failure of two similar HSR1_MMR1 putative nucleolar GTPases, Nucleostemin (NS), or the dose-dependent response of breast tumor autoantigen NGP-1, to rescue deltagrn1 implied the highly specific roles of Grn1p or GNL3L in nucleolar events. Our analysis uncovers an important role for Grn1p/GNL3L within this unique group of nucleolar GTPases.

  9. Designed construction of recombinant DNA at the ura3Δ0 locus in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Tomoaki; Cha-Aim, Kamonchai; Hirakawa, Yuki; Sakai, Ryota; Kitagawa, Takao; Nakamura, Mikiko; Nonklang, Sanom; Hoshida, Hisashi; Akada, Rinji

    2013-06-01

    Recombinant DNAs are traditionally constructed using Escherichia coli plasmids. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, chromosomal gene targeting is a common technique, implying that the yeast homologous recombination system could be applied for recombinant DNA construction. In an attempt to use a S. cerevisiae chromosome for recombinant DNA construction, we selected the single ura3Δ0 locus as a gene targeting site. By selecting this single locus, repeated recombination using the surrounding URA3 sequences can be performed. The recombination system described here has several advantages over the conventional plasmid system, as it provides a method to confirm the selection of correct recombinants because transformation of the same locus replaces the pre-existing selection marker, resulting in the loss of the marker in successful recombinations. In addition, the constructed strains can serve as both PCR templates and hosts for preparing subsequent recombinant strains. Using this method, several yeast strains that contained selection markers, promoters, terminators and target genes at the ura3Δ0 locus were successfully generated. The system described here can potentially be applied for the construction of any recombinant DNA without the requirement for manipulations in E. coli. Interestingly, we unexpectedly found that several G/C-rich sequences used for fusion PCR lowered gene expression when located adjacent to the start codon.

  10. Non-homologous end joining-mediated functional marker selection for DNA cloning in the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus.

    PubMed

    Hoshida, Hisashi; Murakami, Nobutada; Suzuki, Ayako; Tamura, Ryoko; Asakawa, Jun; Abdel-Banat, Babiker M A; Nonklang, Sanom; Nakamura, Mikiko; Akada, Rinji

    2014-01-01

    The cloning of DNA fragments into vectors or host genomes has traditionally been performed using Escherichia coli with restriction enzymes and DNA ligase or homologous recombination-based reactions. We report here a novel DNA cloning method that does not require DNA end processing or homologous recombination, but that ensures highly accurate cloning. The method exploits the efficient non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) activity of the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus and consists of a novel functional marker selection system. First, to demonstrate the applicability of NHEJ to DNA cloning, a C-terminal-truncated non-functional ura3 selection marker and the truncated region were PCR-amplified separately, mixed and directly used for the transformation. URA3(+) transformants appeared on the selection plates, indicating that the two DNA fragments were correctly joined by NHEJ to generate a functional URA3 gene that had inserted into the yeast chromosome. To develop the cloning system, the shortest URA3 C-terminal encoding sequence that could restore the function of a truncated non-functional ura3 was determined by deletion analysis, and was included in the primers to amplify target DNAs for cloning. Transformation with PCR-amplified target DNAs and C-terminal truncated ura3 produced numerous transformant colonies, in which a functional URA3 gene was generated and was integrated into the chromosome with the target DNAs. Several K. marxianus circular plasmids with different selection markers were also developed for NHEJ-based cloning and recombinant DNA construction. The one-step DNA cloning method developed here is a relatively simple and reliable procedure among the DNA cloning systems developed to date.

  11. An Ancient Yeast for Young Geneticists: A Primer on the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Model System

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Charles S.; Wood, Valerie; Fantes, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is an important model organism for the study of eukaryotic molecular and cellular biology. Studies of S. pombe, together with studies of its distant cousin, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have led to the discovery of genes involved in fundamental mechanisms of transcription, translation, DNA replication, cell cycle control, and signal transduction, to name but a few processes. However, since the divergence of the two species approximately 350 million years ago, S. pombe appears to have evolved less rapidly than S. cerevisiae so that it retains more characteristics of the common ancient yeast ancestor, causing it to share more features with metazoan cells. This Primer introduces S. pombe by describing the yeast itself, providing a brief description of the origins of fission yeast research, and illustrating some genetic and bioinformatics tools used to study protein function in fission yeast. In addition, a section on some key differences between S. pombe and S. cerevisiae is included for readers with some familiarity with budding yeast research but who may have an interest in developing research projects using S. pombe. PMID:26447128

  12. An Ancient Yeast for Young Geneticists: A Primer on the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Model System.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Charles S; Wood, Valerie; Fantes, Peter A

    2015-10-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is an important model organism for the study of eukaryotic molecular and cellular biology. Studies of S. pombe, together with studies of its distant cousin, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have led to the discovery of genes involved in fundamental mechanisms of transcription, translation, DNA replication, cell cycle control, and signal transduction, to name but a few processes. However, since the divergence of the two species approximately 350 million years ago, S. pombe appears to have evolved less rapidly than S. cerevisiae so that it retains more characteristics of the common ancient yeast ancestor, causing it to share more features with metazoan cells. This Primer introduces S. pombe by describing the yeast itself, providing a brief description of the origins of fission yeast research, and illustrating some genetic and bioinformatics tools used to study protein function in fission yeast. In addition, a section on some key differences between S. pombe and S. cerevisiae is included for readers with some familiarity with budding yeast research but who may have an interest in developing research projects using S. pombe.

  13. Comparative molecular dynamics studies of heterozygous open reading frames of DNA polymerase eta (η) in pathogenic yeast Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Satpati, Suresh; Manohar, Kodavati; Acharya, Narottam; Dixit, Anshuman

    2017-01-01

    Genomic instability in Candida albicans is believed to play a crucial role in fungal pathogenesis. DNA polymerases contribute significantly to stability of any genome. Although Candida Genome database predicts presence of S. cerevisiae DNA polymerase orthologs; functional and structural characterizations of Candida DNA polymerases are still unexplored. DNA polymerase eta (Polη) is unique as it promotes efficient bypass of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. Interestingly, C. albicans is heterozygous in carrying two Polη genes and the nucleotide substitutions were found only in the ORFs. As allelic differences often result in functional differences of the encoded proteins, comparative analyses of structural models and molecular dynamic simulations were performed to characterize these orthologs of DNA Polη. Overall structures of both the ORFs remain conserved except subtle differences in the palm and PAD domains. The complementation analysis showed that both the ORFs equally suppressed UV sensitivity of yeast rad30 deletion strain. Our study has predicted two novel molecular interactions, a highly conserved molecular tetrad of salt bridges and a series of π–π interactions spanning from thumb to PAD. This study suggests these ORFs as the homologues of yeast Polη, and due to its heterogeneity in C. albicans they may play a significant role in pathogenicity. PMID:28120914

  14. Comparative molecular dynamics studies of heterozygous open reading frames of DNA polymerase eta (η) in pathogenic yeast Candida albicans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satpati, Suresh; Manohar, Kodavati; Acharya, Narottam; Dixit, Anshuman

    2017-01-01

    Genomic instability in Candida albicans is believed to play a crucial role in fungal pathogenesis. DNA polymerases contribute significantly to stability of any genome. Although Candida Genome database predicts presence of S. cerevisiae DNA polymerase orthologs; functional and structural characterizations of Candida DNA polymerases are still unexplored. DNA polymerase eta (Polη) is unique as it promotes efficient bypass of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. Interestingly, C. albicans is heterozygous in carrying two Polη genes and the nucleotide substitutions were found only in the ORFs. As allelic differences often result in functional differences of the encoded proteins, comparative analyses of structural models and molecular dynamic simulations were performed to characterize these orthologs of DNA Polη. Overall structures of both the ORFs remain conserved except subtle differences in the palm and PAD domains. The complementation analysis showed that both the ORFs equally suppressed UV sensitivity of yeast rad30 deletion strain. Our study has predicted two novel molecular interactions, a highly conserved molecular tetrad of salt bridges and a series of π–π interactions spanning from thumb to PAD. This study suggests these ORFs as the homologues of yeast Polη, and due to its heterogeneity in C. albicans they may play a significant role in pathogenicity.

  15. Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields do not affect DNA damage and gene expression profiles of yeast and human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Luceri, Cristina; De Filippo, Carlotta; Giovannelli, Lisa; Blangiardo, Marta; Cavalieri, Duccio; Aglietti, Filippo; Pampaloni, Monica; Andreuccetti, Daniele; Pieri, Lapo; Bambi, Franco; Biggeri, Annibale; Dolara, Piero

    2005-09-01

    We studied the effects of extremely low-frequency (50 Hz) electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on peripheral human blood lymphocytes and DBY747 Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Graded exposure to 50 Hz magnetic flux density was obtained with a Helmholtz coil system set at 1, 10 or 100 microT for 18 h. The effects of EMFs on DNA damage were studied with the single-cell gel electrophoresis assay (comet assay) in lymphocytes. Gene expression profiles of EMF-exposed human and yeast cells were evaluated with DNA microarrays containing 13,971 and 6,212 oligonucleotides, respectively. After exposure to the EMF, we did not observe an increase in the amount of strand breaks or oxidated DNA bases relative to controls or a variation in gene expression profiles. The results suggest that extremely low-frequency EMFs do not induce DNA damage or affect gene expression in these two different eukaryotic cell systems.

  16. Links between nucleolar activity, rDNA stability, aneuploidy and chronological aging in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lewinska, Anna; Miedziak, Beata; Kulak, Klaudia; Molon, Mateusz; Wnuk, Maciej

    2014-06-01

    The nucleolus is speculated to be a regulator of cellular senescence in numerous biological systems (Guarente, Genes Dev 11(19):2449-2455, 1997; Johnson et al., Curr Opin Cell Biol 10(3):332-338, 1998). In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, alterations in nucleolar architecture, the redistribution of nucleolar protein and the accumulation of extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA circles (ERCs) during replicative aging have been reported. However, little is known regarding rDNA stability and changes in nucleolar activity during chronological aging (CA), which is another yeast aging model used. In the present study, the impact of aberrant cell cycle checkpoint control (knock-out of BUB1, BUB2, MAD1 and TEL1 genes in haploid and diploid hemizygous states) on CA-mediated changes in the nucleolus was studied. Nucleolus fragmentation, changes in the nucleolus size and the nucleolus/nucleus ratio, ERC accumulation, expression pattern changes and the relocation of protein involved in transcriptional silencing during CA were revealed. All strains examined were affected by oxidative stress, aneuploidy (numerical rather than structural aberrations) and DNA damage. However, the bub1 cells were the most prone to aneuploidy events, which may contribute to observed decrease in chronological lifespan. We postulate that chronological aging may be affected by redox imbalance-mediated chromosome XII instability leading to both rDNA instability and whole chromosome aneuploidy. CA-mediated nucleolus fragmentation may be a consequence of nucleolus enlargement and/or Nop2p upregulation. Moreover, the rDNA content of chronologically aging cells may be a factor determining the subsequent replicative lifespan. Taken together, we demonstrated that the nucleolus state is also affected during CA in yeast.

  17. A novel plant vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter gene evolved by DNA shuffling confers improved salt tolerance in yeast.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kai; Zhang, Hui; Blumwald, Eduardo; Xia, Tao

    2010-07-23

    Plant vacuolar Na(+)/H(+) antiporters play important roles in maintaining cellular ion homeostasis and mediating the transport of Na(+) out of the cytosol and into the vacuole. Vacuolar antiporters have been shown to play significant roles in salt tolerance; however the relatively low V(max) of the Na(+)/H(+) exchange of the Na(+)/H(+) antiporters identified could limit its application in the molecular breeding of salt tolerant crops. In this study, we applied DNA shuffling methodology to generate and recombine the mutations of Arabidopsis thaliana vacuolar Na(+)/H(+) antiporter gene AtNHX1. Screening using a large scale yeast complementation system identified AtNHXS1, a novel Na(+)/H(+) antiporter. Expression of AtNHXS1 in yeast showed that the antiporter localized to the vacuolar membrane and that its expression improved the tolerance of yeast to NaCl, KCl, LiCl, and hygromycin B. Measurements of the ion transport activity across the intact yeast vacuole demonstrated that the AtNHXS1 protein showed higher Na(+)/H(+) exchange activity and a slightly improved K(+)/H(+) exchange activity.

  18. Differentiation of yeasts growing on dry-cured Iberian ham by mitochondrial DNA restriction analysis, RAPD-PCR and their volatile compounds production.

    PubMed

    Andrade, M J; Rodríguez, M; Casado, E M; Bermúdez, E; Córdoba, J J

    2009-09-01

    The efficiency of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) restriction analysis, RAPD-PCR and volatile compounds analysis to differentiate yeast biotypes involved in flavour development of dry-cured Iberian ham throughout the ripening process is evaluated. For this purpose, 86 yeasts isolated from Iberian hams in the main ripening stages at different industries of the four Protected Designations of Origin of this product, were used. The combination of mtDNA restriction analysis and RAPD-PCR using the primer (GACA)4 showed a higher variability in the yeast species detected than obtained using only mtDNA restriction analysis. Only two species, Debaryomyces hansenii and Candida zeylanoides, were identified throughout the whole ripening process and a wide diversity of biotypes was found in these two species, with those of D. hansenii predominating. Clear differences between biotypes were detected in the generation of volatile compounds, with the biotype C2-2 of D. hansenii showing the highest concentrations of volatiles. The combined use of mtDNA restriction analysis and RAPD-PCR distinguishes yeast biotypes with different production of volatile compounds. In addition, analysis of the production profile of volatile compounds is needed to differentiate yeast strains of the same biotype recovered at different stages of ripening. Thus, the combination of these three methods could be very useful to select or monitor yeasts as starter cultures in dry-cured meat products.

  19. The use of anonymous DNA markers in assessing worldwide relatedness in the yeast species Pichia kluyveri Bedford and Kudrjavzev.

    PubMed

    Ganter, P F; de Barros Lopes, M

    2000-11-01

    Pichia kluyveri, a sexual ascomycetous yeast from cactus necroses and acidic fruit, is divided into three varieties. We used physiological, RAPD, and AFLP data to compare 46 P. kluyveri strains collected worldwide to investigate relationships among varieties. Physiology did not place all strains into described varieties. Although the combined AFLP and RAPD data produced a single most parsimonious tree, separate analysis of AFLP and RAPD data resulted in significantly different trees (by the partition homogeneity test). We then compared the distribution of strains per band to an expected distribution. This suggested we could separate both the AFLP and RAPD datasets into bands from rapidly and slowly changing DNA regions. When only bands from slowly changing regions (from each dataset) were included in the analysis, both the RAPD and AFLP datasets supported a single tree. This second tree did not differ significantly from the cladogram based on all of the DNA data, which we accepted as the best estimate of the phylogeny of these yeast strains. Based on this phylogeny, we were able to demonstrate the strong influence of geography on the population structure of this yeast, confirm the monophyly of one variety, question the utility of maintaining another variety, and demonstrate that the physiological differences used to separate the varieties did not do so in all cases.

  20. Chl1p, a DNA helicase-like protein in budding yeast, functions in sister-chromatid cohesion.

    PubMed Central

    Skibbens, Robert V

    2004-01-01

    From the time of DNA replication until anaphase onset, sister chromatids remain tightly paired along their length. Ctf7p/Eco1p is essential to establish sister-chromatid pairing during S-phase and associates with DNA replication components. DNA helicases precede the DNA replication fork and thus will first encounter chromatin sites destined for cohesion. In this study, I provide the first evidence that a DNA helicase is required for proper sister-chromatid cohesion. Characterizations of chl1 mutant cells reveal that CHL1 interacts genetically with both CTF7/ECO1 and CTF18/CHL12, two genes that function in sister-chromatid cohesion. Consistent with genetic interactions, Chl1p physically associates with Ctf7p/Eco1p both in vivo and in vitro. Finally, a functional assay reveals that Chl1p is critical for sister-chromatid cohesion. Within the budding yeast genome, Chl1p exhibits the highest degree of sequence similarity to human CHL1 isoforms and BACH1. Previous studies revealed that human CHLR1 exhibits DNA helicase-like activities and that BACH1 is a helicase-like protein that associates with the tumor suppressor BRCA1 to maintain genome integrity. Our findings document a novel role for Chl1p in sister-chromatid cohesion and provide new insights into the possible mechanisms through which DNA helicases may contribute to cancer progression when mutated. PMID:15020404

  1. Deletion of the cruciform binding domain in CBP/14-3-3 displays reduced origin binding and initiation of DNA replication in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Yahyaoui, Wafaa; Callejo, Mario; Price, Gerald B; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Background Initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication involves many protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. We have previously shown that 14-3-3 proteins bind cruciform DNA and associate with mammalian and yeast replication origins in a cell cycle dependent manner. Results By expressing the human 14-3-3ε, as the sole member of 14-3-3 proteins family in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we show that 14-3-3ε complements the S. cerevisiae Bmh1/Bmh2 double knockout, conserves its cruciform binding activity, and associates in vivo with the yeast replication origins ARS307. Deletion of the α5-helix, the potential cruciform binding domain of 14-3-3, decreased the cruciform binding activity of the protein as well as its association with the yeast replication origins ARS307 and ARS1. Furthermore, the mutant cells had a reduced ability to stably maintain plasmids bearing one or multiple origins. Conclusion 14-3-3, a cruciform DNA binding protein, associates with yeast origins of replication and functions as an initiator of DNA replication, presumably through binding to cruciform DNA forming at yeast replicators. PMID:17430600

  2. Papulacandin B resistance in budding and fission yeasts: isolation and characterization of a gene involved in (1,3)beta-D-glucan synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Castro, C; Ribas, J C; Valdivieso, M H; Varona, R; del Rey, F; Duran, A

    1995-01-01

    Papulacandin B, an antifungal agent that interferes with the synthesis of yeast cell wall (1,3)beta-D-glucan, was used to isolate resistant mutants in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The resistance to papulacandin B always segregated as a recessive character that defines a single complementation group in both yeasts (pbr1+ and PBR1, respectively). Determination of several kinetic parameters of (1,3)beta-D-glucan synthase activity revealed no differences between S. pombe wild-type and pbr1 mutant strains except in the 50% inhibitory concentration for papulacandin B of the synthases (about a 50-fold increase in mutant activity). Inactivation of the synthase activity of both yeasts after in vivo treatment with the antifungal agent showed that mutant synthases were more resistant than the corresponding wild-type ones. Detergent dissociation of the S. pombe synthase into soluble and particulate fractions and subsequent reconstitution indicated that the resistance character of pbr1 mutants resides in the particulate fraction of the enzyme. Cloning and sequencing of PBR1 from S. cerevisiae revealed a gene identical to others recently reported (FKS1, ETG1, CWH53, and CND1). Its disruption leads to reduced levels of both (1,3)beta-D-glucan synthase activity and the alkali-insoluble cell wall fraction. Transformants containing the PBR1 gene reverse the defect in (1,3)beta-D-glucan synthase. It is concluded that Pbr1p is probably part of the (1,3)beta-D-glucan synthase complex. PMID:7592316

  3. Molecular Combing of Single DNA Molecules on the 10 Megabase Scale

    PubMed Central

    Kaykov, Atanas; Taillefumier, Thibaud; Bensimon, Aaron; Nurse, Paul

    2016-01-01

    DNA combing allows the investigation of DNA replication on genomic single DNA molecules, but the lengths that can be analysed have been restricted to molecules of 200–500 kb. We have improved the DNA combing procedure so that DNA molecules can be analysed up to the length of entire chromosomes in fission yeast and up to 12 Mb fragments in human cells. Combing multi-Mb-scale DNA molecules revealed previously undetected origin clusters in fission yeast and shows that in human cells replication origins fire stochastically forming clusters of fired origins with an average size of 370 kb. We estimate that a single human cell forms around 3200 clusters at mid S-phase and fires approximately 100,000 origins to complete genome duplication. The procedure presented here will be adaptable to other organisms and experimental conditions. PMID:26781994

  4. Complete DNA sequence of Kuraishia capsulata illustrates novel genomic features among budding yeasts (Saccharomycotina).

    PubMed

    Morales, Lucia; Noel, Benjamin; Porcel, Betina; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Hullo, Marie-Francoise; Sacerdot, Christine; Tekaia, Fredj; Leh-Louis, Véronique; Despons, Laurence; Khanna, Varun; Aury, Jean-Marc; Barbe, Valérie; Couloux, Arnaud; Labadie, Karen; Pelletier, Eric; Souciet, Jean-Luc; Boekhout, Teun; Gabaldon, Toni; Wincker, Patrick; Dujon, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    The numerous yeast genome sequences presently available provide a rich source of information for functional as well as evolutionary genomics but unequally cover the large phylogenetic diversity of extant yeasts. We present here the complete sequence of the nuclear genome of the haploid-type strain of Kuraishia capsulata (CBS1993(T)), a nitrate-assimilating Saccharomycetales of uncertain taxonomy, isolated from tunnels of insect larvae underneath coniferous barks and characterized by its copious production of extracellular polysaccharides. The sequence is composed of seven scaffolds, one per chromosome, totaling 11.4 Mb and containing 6,029 protein-coding genes, ~13.5% of which being interrupted by introns. This GC-rich yeast genome (45.7%) appears phylogenetically related with the few other nitrate-assimilating yeasts sequenced so far, Ogataea polymorpha, O. parapolymorpha, and Dekkera bruxellensis, with which it shares a very reduced number of tRNA genes, a novel tRNA sparing strategy, and a common nitrate assimilation cluster, three specific features to this group of yeasts. Centromeres were recognized in GC-poor troughs of each scaffold. The strain bears MAT alpha genes at a single MAT locus and presents a significant degree of conservation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes, suggesting that it can perform sexual cycles in nature, although genes involved in meiosis were not all recognized. The complete absence of conservation of synteny between K. capsulata and any other yeast genome described so far, including the three other nitrate-assimilating species, validates the interest of this species for long-range evolutionary genomic studies among Saccharomycotina yeasts.

  5. Benchmarking nuclear fission theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsch, G. F.; Loveland, W.; Nazarewicz, W.; Talou, P.

    2015-05-14

    We suggest a small set of fission observables to be used as test cases for validation of theoretical calculations. Thus, the purpose is to provide common data to facilitate the comparison of different fission theories and models. The proposed observables are chosen from fission barriers, spontaneous fission lifetimes, fission yield characteristics, and fission isomer excitation energies.

  6. Deletion of btn1, an orthologue of CLN3, increases glycolysis and perturbs amino acid metabolism in the fission yeast model of Batten disease.

    PubMed

    Pears, Michael R; Codlin, Sandra; Haines, Rebecca L; White, Ian J; Mortishire-Smith, Russell J; Mole, Sara E; Griffin, Julian L

    2010-06-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs) constitute a group of autosomal recessive neurodegenerative diseases affecting children. To date, the disease pathogenesis remains unknown, although the role of lysosomal impairment is widely recognized across the different diseases. Recently, the creation of simple models of juvenile NCL (Batten disease) has provided additional insights into the disease mechanism at the molecular level. We report defects in metabolism identified in the Schizosacchromyces pombe yeast model, where btn1, the orthologue of CLN3, has been deleted, using a metabolomics approach based on high resolution 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Such changes represent the first documented metabolic changes associated with deletion of btn1. A decrease in extracellular glucose and increases in the concentration of extracellular ethanol and alanine labelling demonstrate increased glycolytic flux that may arise from vacuolar impairment, whilst amino acid changes were detected which were also in accordance with defective vacuolar functionality. That these changes were detected using a metabolomic based approach advocates its use to further analyse other yeast models of human disease to better understand the function of orthologue genes.

  7. Multiple Conserved Domains of the Nucleoporin Nup124p and Its Orthologs Nup1p and Nup153 Are Critical for Nuclear Import and Activity of the Fission Yeast Tf1 Retrotransposon

    PubMed Central

    Sistla, Srivani; Pang, Junxiong Vincent; Wang, Cui Xia

    2007-01-01

    The nucleoporin Nup124p is a host protein required for the nuclear import of both, retrotransposon Tf1-Gag as well as the retroviral HIV-1 Vpr in fission yeast. The human nucleoporin Nup153 and the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nup1p were identified as orthologs of Nup124p. In this study, we show that all three nucleoporins share a large FG/FXFG-repeat domain and a C-terminal peptide sequence, GRKIxxxxxRRKx, that are absolutely essential for Tf1 retrotransposition. Though the FXFG domain was essential, the FXFG repeats themselves could be eliminated without loss of retrotransposon activity, suggesting the existence of a common element unrelated to FG/FXFG motifs. The Nup124p C-terminal peptide, GRKIAVPRSRRKR, was extremely sensitive to certain single amino acid changes within stretches of the basic residues. On the basis of our comparative study of Nup124p, Nup1p, and Nup153 domains, we have developed peptides that specifically knockdown retrotransposon activity by disengaging the Tf1-Gag from its host nuclear transport machinery without any harmful consequence to the host itself. Our results imply that those domains challenged a specific pathway affecting Tf1 transposition. Although full-length Nup1p or Nup153 does not complement Nup124p, the functionality of their conserved domains with reference to Tf1 activity suggests that these three proteins evolved from a common ancestor. PMID:17615301

  8. Identification of clinically important ascomycetous yeasts based on nucleotide divergence in the 5' end of the large-subunit (26S) ribosomal DNA gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kurtzman, C P; Robnett, C J

    1997-01-01

    Clinically important species of Candida and related organisms were compared for extent of nucleotide divergence in the 5' end of the large-subunit (26S) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) gene. This rDNA region is sufficiently variable to allow reliable separation of all known clinically significant yeast species. Of the 204 described species examined, 21 appeared to be synonyms of previously described organisms. Phylogenetic relationships among the species are presented. PMID:9114410

  9. The conserved bromo-adjacent homology domain of yeast Orc1 functions in the selection of DNA replication origins within chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Philipp; Park, Sookhee; Shor, Erika; Huebert, Dana J.; Warren, Christopher L.; Ansari, Aseem Z.; Weinreich, Michael; Eaton, Matthew L.; MacAlpine, David M.; Fox, Catherine A.

    2010-01-01

    The origin recognition complex (ORC) binds to the specific positions on chromosomes that serve as DNA replication origins. Although ORC is conserved from yeast to humans, the DNA sequence elements that specify ORC binding are not. In particular, metazoan ORC shows no obvious DNA sequence specificity, whereas yeast ORC binds to a specific DNA sequence within all yeast origins. Thus, whereas chromatin must play an important role in metazoan ORC's ability to recognize origins, it is unclear whether chromatin plays a role in yeast ORC's recognition of origins. This study focused on the role of the conserved N-terminal bromo-adjacent homology domain of yeast Orc1 (Orc1BAH). Recent studies indicate that BAH domains are chromatin-binding modules. We show that the Orc1BAH domain was necessary for ORC's stable association with yeast chromosomes, and was physiologically relevant to DNA replication in vivo. This replication role was separable from the Orc1BAH domain's previously defined role in transcriptional silencing. Genome-wide analyses of ORC binding in ORC1 and orc1bahΔ cells revealed that the Orc1BAH domain contributed to ORC's association with most yeast origins, including a class of origins highly dependent on the Orc1BAH domain for ORC association (orc1bahΔ-sensitive origins). Orc1bahΔ-sensitive