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Sample records for fixed-bed anaerobic sequencing

  1. Kinetics of thermophilic anaerobes in fixed-bed reactors.

    PubMed

    Perez, M; Romero, L I; Sales, D

    2001-08-01

    The main objective of this study is to estimate growth kinetic constants and the concentration of "active" attached biomass in two anaerobic thermophilic reactors which contain different initial sizes of immobilized anaerobic mixed cultures and decompose distillery wastewater. This paper studies the substrate decomposition in two lab-scale fixed-bed reactors operating at batch conditions with corrugated tubes as support media. It can be demonstrated that high micro-organisms-substrate ratios favor the degradation activity of the different anaerobic cultures, allowing the stable operation without lag-phases and giving better quality in effluent. The kinetic parameters obtained--maximum specific growth rates (mu(max)), non-biodegradable substrate (S(NB)) and "active or viable biomass" concentrations (X(V0))--were obtained by applying the Romero kinetic model [L.I. Romero, 1991. Desarrollo de un modelo matemático general para los procesos fermentativos, Cinética de la degradación anaerobia, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Cádiz (Spain), Serv. Pub. Univ. Cádiz], with COD as substrate and methane (CH4) as the main product of the anaerobic process. This method is suitable to calculate and to differentiate the main kinetic parameters of both the total anaerobic mixed culture and the methanogenic population. Comparison of experimental measured concentration of volatile attached solids (VS(att)) in both reactors with the estimated "active" biomass concentrations obtained by applying Romero kinetic model [L.I. Romero, 1991. Desarrollo de un modelo matemático general para los procesos fermentativos, Cinética de la degradación anaerobia, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Cádiz (Spain), Serv. Pub. Univ. Cádiz] shows that a large amount of inert matter is present in the fixed-bed reactor. PMID:11513409

  2. Evaluation of integrated anaerobic/aerobic fixed-bed sequencing batch biofilm reactor for decolorization and biodegradation of azo dye acid red 18: comparison of using two types of packing media.

    PubMed

    Hosseini Koupaie, E; Alavi Moghaddam, M R; Hashemi, S H

    2013-01-01

    Two integrated anaerobic/aerobic fixed-bed sequencing batch biofilm reactor (FB-SBBR) were operated to evaluate decolorization and biodegradation of azo dye Acid Red 18 (AR18). Volcanic pumice stones and a type of plastic media made of polyethylene were used as packing media in FB-SBBR1 and FB-SBBR2, respectively. Decolorization of AR18 in both reactors followed first-order kinetic with respect to dye concentration. More than 63.7% and 71.3% of anaerobically formed 1-naphthylamine-4-sulfonate (1N-4S), as one of the main sulfonated aromatic constituents of AR18 was removed during the aerobic reaction phase in FB-SBBR1 and FB-SBBR2, respectively. Based on statistical analysis, performance of FB-SBBR2 in terms of COD removal as well as biodegradation of 1N-4S was significantly higher than that of FB-SBBR1. Spherical and rod shaped bacteria were the dominant species of bacteria in the biofilm grown on the pumice stones surfaces, while, the biofilm grown on surfaces of the polyethylene media had a fluffy structure.

  3. Modeling for Anaerobic Fixed-Bed Biofilm Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B. Y. M.; Pfeffer, J. T.

    1989-06-01

    The specific objectives of this research were: 1. to develop an equilibrium model for chemical aspects of anaerobic reactors; 2. to modify the equilibrium model for non-equilibrium conditions; 3. to incorporate the existing biofilm models into the models above to study the biological and chemical behavior of the fixed-film anaerobic reactors; 4. to experimentally verify the validity of these models; 5. to investigate the biomass-holding ability of difference packing materials for establishing reactor design criteria.

  4. Anaerobic degradation of landfill leachate using an upflow anaerobic fixed-bed reactor with microbial sulfate reduction.

    PubMed

    Thabet, Olfa Ben Dhia; Bouallagui, Hassib; Cayol, Jean-luc; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Hamdi, Moktar

    2009-08-15

    This study evaluated the anaerobic degradation of landfill leachate and sulfate reduction as a function of COD/(SO(4)(2-)) ratio in an upflow anaerobic fixed-bed reactor. The reactor, which was inoculated with a mixed consortium, was operated under a constant hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 5 days. We investigated the effect of COD/(SO(4)(2-)) ratio variation on the sulfate reduction efficiency, hydrogen sulfide production, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, conductivity, and pH variation. The best reactor performance, with significant sulfate reduction efficiency and COD removal efficiency of 91% and 87%, respectively, was reached under a COD/(SO(4)(2-)) ratio of 1.17. Under these conditions, microscopic analysis showed the abundance of vibrios and rod-shaped bacterial cells. Two anaerobic bacteria were isolated from the reactor sludge. Phylogenetic studies performed on these strains identified strain A1 as affiliated to Clostridium genus and strain H1 as a new species of sulfate-reducing bacteria affiliated to the Desulfovibrio genus. The closest phylogenetic relative of strain H1 was Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, at 96% similarity for partial 16S RNA gene sequence data. Physiological and metabolic characterization was performed for this strain.

  5. Dynamic evaluation of a fixed bed anaerobic digestion process in response to organic overloads and toxicant shock loads.

    PubMed

    Dupla, M; Conte, T; Bouvier, J C; Bernet, N; Steyer, J P

    2004-01-01

    This paper details a dynamic evaluation of a 1 m3 fixed bed anaerobic digestion reactor in response to organic overloads and toxicant shock loads. Raw industrial wine distillery wastewater was used as a reference substrate and several disturbances were applied to the process: (i) organic overloads with and without pH regulation in the feeding line, (ii) adding of ammonia in the input wastewater. The purpose of this study was to assess, using on-line instrumentation, the robustness of a fixed bed anaerobic digester. Anaerobic digestion processes have the reputation of being difficult to operate and prone to process instability due to external disturbances and the objective of this study was to demonstrate the possibility of such a reactor configuration for industrial use.

  6. Electrical conductivity as a state indicator for the start-up period of anaerobic fixed-bed reactors.

    PubMed

    Robles, A; Latrille, E; Ribes, J; Bernet, N; Steyer, J P

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to analyse the applicability of electrical conductivity sensors for on-line monitoring the start-up period of an anaerobic fixed-bed reactor. The evolution of bicarbonate concentration and methane production rate was analysed. Strong linear relationships between electrical conductivity and both bicarbonate concentration and methane production rate were observed. On-line estimations of the studied parameters were carried out in a new start-up period by applying simple linear regression models, which resulted in a good concordance between both observed and predicted values. Electrical conductivity sensors were therefore identified as an interesting method for monitoring the start-up period of anaerobic fixed-bed reactors due to its reliability, robustness, easy operation, low cost, and minimum maintenance compared with the currently used sensors.

  7. Electrical conductivity as a state indicator for the start-up period of anaerobic fixed-bed reactors.

    PubMed

    Robles, A; Latrille, E; Ribes, J; Bernet, N; Steyer, J P

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to analyse the applicability of electrical conductivity sensors for on-line monitoring the start-up period of an anaerobic fixed-bed reactor. The evolution of bicarbonate concentration and methane production rate was analysed. Strong linear relationships between electrical conductivity and both bicarbonate concentration and methane production rate were observed. On-line estimations of the studied parameters were carried out in a new start-up period by applying simple linear regression models, which resulted in a good concordance between both observed and predicted values. Electrical conductivity sensors were therefore identified as an interesting method for monitoring the start-up period of anaerobic fixed-bed reactors due to its reliability, robustness, easy operation, low cost, and minimum maintenance compared with the currently used sensors. PMID:27148733

  8. Evaluation of ammonium adsorption in biochar-fixed beds for treatment of anaerobically digested swine slurry: Experimental optimization and modeling.

    PubMed

    Kizito, Simon; Wu, Shubiao; Wandera, Simon Mdondo; Guo, Luchen; Dong, Renjie

    2016-09-01

    Fixed-bed column experiments were performed to investigate the effect of influent concentration, flow rate, and adsorbent bed depth on ammonium adsorption from anaerobically digested swine slurry using three types of biochar made from corncobs (MCB), hardwood (WB), and mixed sawdust pellets (MSB). WB performed better than the other two biochar types with a maximum sorption capacity of 67-114mg/g due to its superior surface area and larger pore volume. Ammonium adsorption kinetics and dynamics depended on the influent NH4(+)-N concentration, applied inflow flow rate, and the depth of the fixed bed. Maximum sorption capacities under influent NH4(+)-N concentration of 500mg/L, were identified to be 114.2mg/g, 108.9mg/g, and 24.7mg/g at inflow rate of 15mL/min for WB, MCB, and MSB, respectively. The data shows that using deeper beds and applying lower flow rates could be a better strategy to increase ammonium adsorption in biochar-fixed beds. Moreover, three kinetic models (Thomas, Adams-Bohart (BDST), and Yoon-Nelson) were applied to the experimental data to predict breakthrough curves and determine characteristic adsorption parameters for process design. The applied models fitted data in the order: Thomas (R(2)=0.971)>BDST (R(2)=0.960)>Yoon-Nelson (R(2)=0.940). It was concluded that ammonium adsorption in biochar-fixed beds could be an effective method for routine cyclic treatment of slurry. However, further effluent polishing is required to meet discharge requirements. PMID:27241205

  9. Evaluation of ammonium adsorption in biochar-fixed beds for treatment of anaerobically digested swine slurry: Experimental optimization and modeling.

    PubMed

    Kizito, Simon; Wu, Shubiao; Wandera, Simon Mdondo; Guo, Luchen; Dong, Renjie

    2016-09-01

    Fixed-bed column experiments were performed to investigate the effect of influent concentration, flow rate, and adsorbent bed depth on ammonium adsorption from anaerobically digested swine slurry using three types of biochar made from corncobs (MCB), hardwood (WB), and mixed sawdust pellets (MSB). WB performed better than the other two biochar types with a maximum sorption capacity of 67-114mg/g due to its superior surface area and larger pore volume. Ammonium adsorption kinetics and dynamics depended on the influent NH4(+)-N concentration, applied inflow flow rate, and the depth of the fixed bed. Maximum sorption capacities under influent NH4(+)-N concentration of 500mg/L, were identified to be 114.2mg/g, 108.9mg/g, and 24.7mg/g at inflow rate of 15mL/min for WB, MCB, and MSB, respectively. The data shows that using deeper beds and applying lower flow rates could be a better strategy to increase ammonium adsorption in biochar-fixed beds. Moreover, three kinetic models (Thomas, Adams-Bohart (BDST), and Yoon-Nelson) were applied to the experimental data to predict breakthrough curves and determine characteristic adsorption parameters for process design. The applied models fitted data in the order: Thomas (R(2)=0.971)>BDST (R(2)=0.960)>Yoon-Nelson (R(2)=0.940). It was concluded that ammonium adsorption in biochar-fixed beds could be an effective method for routine cyclic treatment of slurry. However, further effluent polishing is required to meet discharge requirements.

  10. Treatment of wastewater from coffee bean processing in anaerobic fixed bed reactors with different support materials: performance and kinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Fia, Fátima R L; Matos, Antonio T; Borges, Alisson C; Fia, Ronaldo; Cecon, Paulo R

    2012-10-15

    An evaluation was performed of three upflow anaerobic fixed bed reactors for the treatment of wastewater from coffee bean processing (WCP). The supports used were: blast furnace cinders, polyurethane foam and crushed stone with porosities of 53, 95 and 48%, respectively. The testing of these 139.5 L reactors consisted of increasing the COD of the influent (978; 2401 and 4545 mg L(-1)), while maintaining the retention time of 1.3 days. For the maximum COD applied, the reactor filled with foam presented removals of 80% (non-filtered samples) and 83% (filtered samples). The greater performance of the reactor filled with foam is attributed to its porosity, which promoted greater collection of biomass. From the results, it could be concluded that the reactors presented satisfactory performance, especially when using the foam as a support. Furthermore, the modified Stover-Kincannon and second order for multicomponent substrate degradation models were successfully used to develop a model of the experimental data.

  11. Analysis of the syntrophic anaerobic digestion of volatile fatty acids using enriched cultures in a fixed-bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Amani, T; Nosrati, M; Mousavi, S M; Kermanshahi, R K

    2012-05-01

    Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) are key intermediates in anaerobic digestion. Enriched acetogenic and methanogenic cultures were used for the syntrophic anaerobic digestion of VFAs in a continuous fixed-bed reactor at mesophilic conditions. The interactive effects of propionic (HPr), butyric (HBu), and acetic (HAc) acids were analyzed. Furthermore, hydraulic retention time (HRT) and methanogen-to-acetogen ratios (M/As) were investigated as the key microbiological and operating variables of VFA anaerobic degradations. Experiments were carried out based on central composite design (CCD) and results were analyzed using response surface methodology (RSM). Effluent concentrations of HPr, HBu, HAc, and biogas production rate (BPR) were directly measured as responses. The optimum conditions were found to be HPr = 1122.9 mg/L, HBu = 1792.4 mg/L, HAc = 1735.4 mg/L, HRT = 21 hours, and M/A = 2.4 (corresponding to the maximum VFA removal and BPR). The results of verification experiments and predicted values from fitted correlations were in close agreement at a 95% confidence interval. PMID:22852432

  12. Treatment of ammonium-rich swine waste in modified porphyritic andesite fixed-bed anaerobic bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qinghong; Yang, Yingnan; Li, Dawei; Feng, Chuanping; Zhang, Zhenya

    2012-05-01

    In this study, a modified porphyritic andesite (WRS) was developed as ammonium adsorbent and bed material for the anaerobic digestion of ammonium-rich swine waste. The performance in bioreactors with modified WRS, natural WRS, calcium chloride and no additives was investigated. The bioreactor with modified WRS exhibited the best performance, with start-up time on the 7th day, methane yield of 359.71 ml/g-VS, and COD removal of 67.99% during all 44 days of the experiment at 35°C. The effective ammonium adsorption and essential ions dissociation for microorganisms by modified WRS, as well as the immobilization of microbial on the surface of the modified WRS play a great role on the high efficiency anaerobic digestion of ammonium-rich swine waste.

  13. Treatment of ammonium-rich swine waste in modified porphyritic andesite fixed-bed anaerobic bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qinghong; Yang, Yingnan; Li, Dawei; Feng, Chuanping; Zhang, Zhenya

    2012-05-01

    In this study, a modified porphyritic andesite (WRS) was developed as ammonium adsorbent and bed material for the anaerobic digestion of ammonium-rich swine waste. The performance in bioreactors with modified WRS, natural WRS, calcium chloride and no additives was investigated. The bioreactor with modified WRS exhibited the best performance, with start-up time on the 7th day, methane yield of 359.71 ml/g-VS, and COD removal of 67.99% during all 44 days of the experiment at 35°C. The effective ammonium adsorption and essential ions dissociation for microorganisms by modified WRS, as well as the immobilization of microbial on the surface of the modified WRS play a great role on the high efficiency anaerobic digestion of ammonium-rich swine waste. PMID:22366608

  14. Production of biohythane from food waste via an integrated system of continuously stirred tank and anaerobic fixed bed reactors.

    PubMed

    Yeshanew, Martha M; Frunzo, Luigi; Pirozzi, Francesco; Lens, Piet N L; Esposito, Giovanni

    2016-11-01

    The continuous production of biohythane (mixture of biohydrogen and methane) from food waste using an integrated system of a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and anaerobic fixed bed reactor (AFBR) was carried out in this study. The system performance was evaluated for an operation period of 200days, by stepwise shortening the hydraulic retention time (HRT). An increasing trend of biohydrogen in the CSTR and methane production rate in the AFBR was observed regardless of the HRT shortening. The highest biohydrogen yield in the CSTR and methane yield in the AFBR were 115.2 (±5.3)L H2/kgVSadded and 334.7 (±18.6)L CH4/kgCODadded, respectively. The AFBR presented a stable operation and excellent performance, indicated by the increased methane production rate at each shortened HRT. Besides, recirculation of the AFBR effluent to the CSTR was effective in providing alkalinity, maintaining the pH in optimal ranges (5.0-5.3) for the hydrogen producing bacteria. PMID:27591517

  15. Kinetics of anaerobic degradation of screened dairy manure by upflow fixed bed digesters: effect of natural zeolite addition.

    PubMed

    Nikolaeva, S; Sánchez, E; Borja, R; Raposo, F; Colmenarejo, M F; Montalvo, S; Jiménez-Rodríguez, A M

    2009-02-01

    The effect of the hydraulic retention time (HRT) on the performance of two up-flow anaerobic fixed bed digesters (UFAFBDs) packed with waste tire rubber (D1) and waste tire rubber and zeolite (D2) as micro-organism immobilization supports was studied. It was found that a first-order kinetic model described well the experimental results obtained. The kinetic constants for COD, BOD5, total solids (TS) and volatile solids (VS) removal were determined to be higher in digester D2 than in digester D1 or control. Specifically, they were 0.28 +/- 0.01, 0.32 +/- 0.02, 0.16 +/- 0.01 and 0.24 +/- 0.01 d(- 1) respectively for D1 and 0.33 +/- 0.02, 0.40 +/- 0.02, 0.21 +/- 0.01 and 0.28 +/- 0.01 d(- 1) respectively for D2. This was significant at the 95% confidence level. In addition, the first-order model was also adequate for assessing the effect of the HRT on the removal efficiency and methane production. Maximum methane yield and the first-order constant for methane production were determined and the results obtained were comparable with those obtained by other authors but operating at higher HRTs. Maximum methane yields and the kinetic constant for methane production were 11.1% and 29.4% higher in digester D2 than in D1.

  16. Production of biohythane from food waste via an integrated system of continuously stirred tank and anaerobic fixed bed reactors.

    PubMed

    Yeshanew, Martha M; Frunzo, Luigi; Pirozzi, Francesco; Lens, Piet N L; Esposito, Giovanni

    2016-11-01

    The continuous production of biohythane (mixture of biohydrogen and methane) from food waste using an integrated system of a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and anaerobic fixed bed reactor (AFBR) was carried out in this study. The system performance was evaluated for an operation period of 200days, by stepwise shortening the hydraulic retention time (HRT). An increasing trend of biohydrogen in the CSTR and methane production rate in the AFBR was observed regardless of the HRT shortening. The highest biohydrogen yield in the CSTR and methane yield in the AFBR were 115.2 (±5.3)L H2/kgVSadded and 334.7 (±18.6)L CH4/kgCODadded, respectively. The AFBR presented a stable operation and excellent performance, indicated by the increased methane production rate at each shortened HRT. Besides, recirculation of the AFBR effluent to the CSTR was effective in providing alkalinity, maintaining the pH in optimal ranges (5.0-5.3) for the hydrogen producing bacteria.

  17. Anaerobic co-digestion of vegetable waste and swine wastewater in high-rate horizontal reactors with fixed bed.

    PubMed

    Mazareli, Raissa Cristina da Silva; Duda, Rose Maria; Leite, Valderi Duarte; Oliveira, Roberto Alves de

    2016-06-01

    Considering the high waste generation that comes from agriculture and livestock farming, as well as the demand for natural gas, it is necessary to develop sustainable technologies which can reduce environmental impact. There is no available literature on the use of high-rate horizontal anaerobic reactors with fixed bed (HARFB) and continuous feed for the co-digestion of vegetable wastes (VW) and swine wastewater (SW). The aim of this work was to evaluate the reactor performance in terms of methane production, organic matter consumption, and removal of total and thermotolerant coliforms under different proportions of SW and VW, and organic loading rates (OLR) of 4.0, 5.2 and 11.0g COD (Ld)(-)(1). The mixture of SW and VW in the proportions of 90:10, 80:20 and 70:30 (SW:VW) with those OLRs provided great buffering capacity, with partial alkalinity reaching 3552mgL(-1), thereby avoiding the inhibition of methane production by volatile fatty acids produced during the fermentation process. Higher proportions of VW and higher OLR improved volumetric methane production with a maximum value of 1.08LCH4 (Ld)(-)(1), organic matter removal rates up to 98% and total and thermotolerant coliform removal rates of 99% were also observed. PMID:27055364

  18. Anaerobic co-digestion of vegetable waste and swine wastewater in high-rate horizontal reactors with fixed bed.

    PubMed

    Mazareli, Raissa Cristina da Silva; Duda, Rose Maria; Leite, Valderi Duarte; Oliveira, Roberto Alves de

    2016-06-01

    Considering the high waste generation that comes from agriculture and livestock farming, as well as the demand for natural gas, it is necessary to develop sustainable technologies which can reduce environmental impact. There is no available literature on the use of high-rate horizontal anaerobic reactors with fixed bed (HARFB) and continuous feed for the co-digestion of vegetable wastes (VW) and swine wastewater (SW). The aim of this work was to evaluate the reactor performance in terms of methane production, organic matter consumption, and removal of total and thermotolerant coliforms under different proportions of SW and VW, and organic loading rates (OLR) of 4.0, 5.2 and 11.0g COD (Ld)(-)(1). The mixture of SW and VW in the proportions of 90:10, 80:20 and 70:30 (SW:VW) with those OLRs provided great buffering capacity, with partial alkalinity reaching 3552mgL(-1), thereby avoiding the inhibition of methane production by volatile fatty acids produced during the fermentation process. Higher proportions of VW and higher OLR improved volumetric methane production with a maximum value of 1.08LCH4 (Ld)(-)(1), organic matter removal rates up to 98% and total and thermotolerant coliform removal rates of 99% were also observed.

  19. Bioreactor performance and methanogenic population dynamics in a low-temperature (5-18 °C) anaerobic fixed-bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongdong; Zhu, Wanbin; Tang, Can; Suo, Yali; Gao, Lijuan; Yuan, Xufeng; Wang, Xiaofen; Cui, Zongjun

    2012-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the functionality of microbial community structure in a low temperature, anaerobic fixed-bed reactor was studied by decreasing the operating temperature from 18 °C to 5 °C. The reactor was productive within 20 days and produced stable methane content in biogas (above 77%) throughout the trial period. At 17 °C and 15 °C, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency and biogas production of reactor were significantly reduced. These might be temperature thresholds when fixed-bed reactors are operated under low temperatures. The methanogen community composition was analyzed using 16S rRNA gene clone library screening and quantitative PCR. At low ambient temperatures, Methanomicrobiales were dominant methanogens, and they preferentially adhered to the carbon fiber carrier. The results indicated that 16S rRNA levels of Methanomicrobiales and Methanosaetaceae in adhering sludge were higher than in deposited sludge, and they all contributed to the efficient performance of the fixed-bed reactor at low operating temperatures. PMID:22137750

  20. Performance of up-flow anaerobic fixed bed reactor of the treatment of sugar beet pulp lixiviation in a thermophilic range.

    PubMed

    Montañés Alonso, Rocío; Pérez García, Montserrat; Solera del Río, Rosario

    2014-02-01

    The acclimatization and performance study of lixiviation of sugar beet pulp are carried out in upflow anaerobic fixed bed reactor in thermophilic range of temperature (55°C). Several hydraulic retention time is conducted (11, 8, 6, 4, 2, and 1.5 days). The performance study showed that Chemical Oxygen Demand removal efficiency is 90% for 6 days-HRT. While COD removal efficiency was reduced within the range of 74.3% and 59.4% in others HRT. Organic loading rates greater than 10 kg COD/m(3)d in influent, (2 days-HRT), produces a destabilization of the process due to total acidity accumulation in reactors although is the HRT with highest methane production. The results showed that an increase in OLR was directly correlated with active biomass inside reactor but not with the amount in microbial community. The bacterial concentration inside the reactor is strongly influenced by the content of microorganisms in the lixiviation of sugar beet pulp.

  1. Effect of air-assisted backwashing on the performance of an anaerobic fixed-bed bioreactor that simultaneously removes nitrate and arsenic from drinking water sources.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Giridhar; Clancy, Tara M; Snyder, Kathryn V; Brown, Jess; Hayes, Kim F; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2012-03-15

    Contaminant removal from drinking water sources under reducing conditions conducive for the growth of denitrifying, arsenate reducing, and sulfate reducing microbes using a fixed-bed bioreactor may require oxygen-free gas (e.g., N2 gas) during backwashing. However, the use of air-assisted backwashing has practical advantages, including simpler operation, improved safety, and lower cost. A study was conducted to evaluate whether replacing N2 gas with air during backwashing would impact performance in a nitrate and arsenic removing anaerobic bioreactor system that consisted of two biologically active carbon reactors in series. Gas-assisted backwashing, comprised of 2 min of gas injection to fluidize the bed and dislodge biomass and solid phase products, was performed in the first reactor (reactor A) every two days. The second reactor (reactor B) was subjected to N2 gas-assisted backwashing every 3-4 months. Complete removal of 50 mg/L NO3- was achieved in reactor A before and after the switch from N2-assisted backwashing (NAB) to air-assisted backwashing (AAB). Substantial sulfate removal was achieved with both backwashing strategies. Prolonged practice of AAB (more than two months), however, diminished sulfate reduction in reactor B somewhat. Arsenic removal in reactor A was impacted slightly by long-term use of AAB, but arsenic removals achieved by the entire system during NAB and AAB periods were not significantly different (p>0.05) and arsenic concentrations were reduced from approximately 200 μg/L to below 20 μg/L. These results indicate that AAB can be implemented in anaerobic nitrate and arsenic removal systems.

  2. A combined upflow anaerobic sludge bed, aerobic, and anoxic fixed-bed reactor system for removing tetramethylammonium hydroxide and nitrogen from light-emitting diode wastewater.

    PubMed

    Lin, Han-Lin; Chen, Sheng-Kun; Huang, Yu-Wen; Chen, Wei-Cheng; Chien, Wei-Cheng; Cheng, Sheng-Shung

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory study using a combined upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) and aerobic and anoxic fixed-bed reactor system was undertaken to explore its capability for removing tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) and nitrogen from light-emitting diode wastewater. When the organic loading rate was maintained at 0.26-0.65 kg TMAH m(-3 )d(-1), the UASB reactor removed 70-100% of TMAH through methanogenesis. When the [Formula: see text] -N loading rate was maintained at 0.73-1.4 kg [Formula: see text]-N m(-3 )d(-1), the aerobic reactor oxidized 31-59% of [Formula: see text]-N to [Formula: see text]-N through nitritation. When the nitrogen loading rate was maintained at 0.42-0.75 kg N m(-3 )d(-1), the anoxic reactor removed 27-63% of nitrogen through anammox. The performance data of the combined reactor system agreed well with the stoichiometric relationships of methanogenesis, nitritation, and anammox. The batch studies showed that a higher initial TMAH concentration of up to 2520 mg L(-1) gave a higher methanogenic activity of up to 16 mL CH4 g(-1) VSS d(-1). An increase in the initial TMAH concentration of up to 500 mg L(-1) gradually decreased the activity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria; whereas an increase in the initial TMAH concentration of up to 47 mg L(-1) imposed a marked inhibiting effect on the activity of anammox bacteria.

  3. Treatment of screened dairy manure by upflow anaerobic fixed bed reactors packed with waste tyre rubber and a combination of waste tyre rubber and zeolite: effect of the hydraulic retention time.

    PubMed

    Umaña, Oscar; Nikolaeva, Svetlana; Sánchez, Enrique; Borja, Rafael; Raposo, Francisco

    2008-10-01

    Two laboratory-scale anaerobic fixed bed reactors were evaluated while treating dairy manure at upflow mode and semicontinuous feeding. One reactor was packed with a combination of waste tyre rubber and zeolite (R1) while the other had only waste tyre rubber as a microorganism immobilization support (R2). Effluent quality improved when the hydraulic retention time (HRT) increased from 1.0 to 5.5 days. Higher COD, BOD5, total and volatile solids removal efficiencies were always achieved in the reactor R1. No clogging was observed during the operation period. Methane yield was also a function of the HRT and of the type of support used, and was 12.5% and 40% higher in reactor R1 than in R2 for HRTs of 5.5 and 1.0 days, respectively. The results obtained demonstrated that this type of reactor is capable of operating with dairy manure at a HRT 5 times lower than that used in a conventional reactor.

  4. Updraft Fixed Bed Gasification Aspen Plus Model

    SciTech Connect

    2007-09-27

    The updraft fixed bed gasification model provides predictive modeling capabilities for updraft fixed bed gasifiers, when devolatilization data is available. The fixed bed model is constructed using Aspen Plus, process modeling software, coupled with a FORTRAN user kinetic subroutine. Current updraft gasification models created in Aspen Plus have limited predictive capabilities and must be "tuned" to reflect a generalized gas composition as specified in literature or by the gasifier manufacturer. This limits the applicability of the process model.

  5. Updraft Fixed Bed Gasification Aspen Plus Model

    2007-09-27

    The updraft fixed bed gasification model provides predictive modeling capabilities for updraft fixed bed gasifiers, when devolatilization data is available. The fixed bed model is constructed using Aspen Plus, process modeling software, coupled with a FORTRAN user kinetic subroutine. Current updraft gasification models created in Aspen Plus have limited predictive capabilities and must be "tuned" to reflect a generalized gas composition as specified in literature or by the gasifier manufacturer. This limits the applicability ofmore » the process model.« less

  6. Upflow fixed bed bioelectrochemical reactor for wastewater treatment applications.

    PubMed

    González-Gutiérrez, Linda; Frontana, Carlos; Martínez, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    A cylindrical Upflow Fixed Bed Reactor (UFB-BER) with granular activated carbon, steel mesh electrodes and anaerobic microorganisms, was constructed for analyzing how hydrodynamic parameters affect the reactions involved during wastewater treatment processes for azo dye degradation. Dye removal percentage was not compromised by decreasing HRTm (99-90% upon changing HRTm from 4 to 1h in single pass mode). Using the residence time distribution method for hydrodynamic characterization, it was found that a higher dispersion in the reactor occurs for HRTm=1h, than for HRTm=4h. A kinetic analysis suggests that this dispersion effect could be associated to a higher specific reaction rate dependent on the azo dye concentration. PMID:25465794

  7. Apparatus for fixed bed coal gasification

    DOEpatents

    Sadowski, Richard S.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for fixed-bed coal gasification is described in which coal such as caking coal is continuously pyrolyzed with clump formation inhibited, by combining the coal with a combustible gas and an oxidant, and then continually feeding the pyrolyzed coal under pressure and elevated temperature into the gasification region of a pressure vessel. The materials in the pressure vessel are allowed to react with the gasifying agents in order to allow the carbon contents of the pyrolyzed coal to be completely oxidized. The combustion of gas produced from the combination of coal pyrolysis and gasification involves combining a combustible gas coal and an oxidant in a pyrolysis chamber and heating the components to a temperature of at least 1600.degree. F. The products of coal pyrolysis are dispersed from the pyrolyzer directly into the high temperature gasification region of a pressure vessel. Steam and air needed for gasification are introduced in the pressure vessel and the materials exiting the pyrolyzer flow down through the pressure vessel by gravity with sufficient residence time to allow any carbon to form carbon monoxide. Gas produced from these reactions are then released from the pressure vessel and ash is disposed of.

  8. Arsenic removal in a sulfidogenic fixed-bed column bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Altun, Muslum; Sahinkaya, Erkan; Durukan, Ilknur; Bektas, Sema; Komnitsas, Kostas

    2014-03-30

    In the present study, the bioremoval of arsenic from synthetic acidic wastewater containing arsenate (As(5+)) (0.5-20mg/L), ferrous iron (Fe(2+)) (100-200mg/L) and sulfate (2,000 mg/L) was investigated in an ethanol fed (780-1,560 mg/L chemical oxygen demand (COD)) anaerobic up-flow fixed bed column bioreactor at constant hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 9.6h. Arsenic removal efficiency was low and averaged 8% in case iron was not supplemented to the synthetic wastewater. Neutral to slightly alkaline pH and high sulfide concentration in the bioreactor retarded the precipitation of arsenic. Addition of 100mg/L Fe(2+) increased arsenic removal efficiency to 63%. Further increase of influent Fe(2+) concentration to 200mg/L improved arsenic removal to 85%. Decrease of influent COD concentration to its half, 780 mg/L, resulted in further increase of As removal to 96% when Fe(2+) and As(5+) concentrations remained at 200mg/L and 20mg/L, respectively. As a result of the sulfidogenic activity in the bioreactor the effluent pH and alkalinity concentration averaged 7.4 ± 0.2 and 1,736 ± 239 mg CaCO3/L respectively. Electron flow from ethanol to sulfate averaged 72 ± 10%. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses were carried out to identify the nature of the precipitate generated by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) activity. Precipitation of arsenic in the form of As2S3 (orpiment) and co-precipitation with ferrous sulfide (FeS), pyrite (FeS2) or arsenopyrite (FeAsS) were the main arsenic removal mechanisms.

  9. Isolated thermocouple amplifier system for stirred fixed-bed gasifier

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1992-01-01

    A sensing system is provided for determining the bed temperature profile of the bed of a stirred, fixed-bed gasifier including a plurality of temperature sensors for sensing the bed temperature at different levels, a transmitter for transmitting data based on the outputs of the sensors to a remote operator's station, and a battery-based power supply. The system includes an isolation amplifier system comprising a plurality of isolation amplifier circuits for amplifying the outputs of the individual sensors. The isolation amplifier circuits each comprise an isolation operational amplifier connected to a sensor; a first "flying capacitor" circuit for, in operation, controlling the application of power from the power supply to the isolation amplifier; an output sample and hold circuit connected to the transmitter; a second "flying capacitor" circuit for, in operation, controlling the transfer of the output of the isolation amplifier to the sample and hold circuit; and a timing and control circuit for activating the first and second capacitor circuits in a predetermined timed sequence.

  10. Biological treatment of mining wastewaters by fixed-bed bioreactors at high organic loading.

    PubMed

    Bratkova, Svetlana; Koumanova, Bogdana; Beschkov, Venko

    2013-06-01

    Acid wastewaters contaminated with Fe - 1000 mg L(-1) and Cu - 100 mg L(-1) were remediated by microbial sulfate-reduction at high organic loading (theoretical TOC/SO4(2-) ratio 1.1) in a laboratory installation. The installation design includes a fixed-bed anaerobic bioreactor for sulfate-reduction, a chemical reactor, a settler and a three-sectional bioreactor for residual organic compounds and hydrogen sulfide removal. Sulfate-reducing bacteria are immobilized on saturated zeolite in the fixed-bed bioreactor. The source of carbon and energy for bacteria was concentrated solution, containing ethanol, glycerol, lactate and citrate. Heavy metals removal was achieved by produced H2S at sulfate loading rate 88 mg L(-1)h(-1). The effluent of the anaerobic bioreactor was characterized with high concentrations of acetate and ethanol. The design of the second bioreactor (presence of two aerobic and an anoxic zones) makes possible the occurrence of nitrification and denitrification as well as the efficiently removal of residual organic compounds and H2S.

  11. Industrial wastewater treatment in fixed-bed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsatiris, Dimitris; Sidiras, Dimitris

    2012-12-01

    Fixed-bed column kinetics of methylene blue adsorption on sulfuric acid hydrolyzed pine sawdust were simulated, using untreated pine sawdust as control, in order to explore its potential use as low-cost adsorbent for wastewater dye removal in fixed-bed systems. A Severity Factor X was used to incorporate the effect of the pretreatment time and the acid concentration on the pine sawdust adsorption properties. X is an independent variable for identifying biomass adsorption parameters as affected by the acid-treatment. The estimated values of the Bohart-Adams adsorption capacity coefficient indicate that acid treatment enhanced the adsorption properties of the original material. These parameters, representing the adsorption properties improvement, exhibited a satisfactory non-linear correlation when plotted vs. X.

  12. Grate assembly for fixed-bed coal gasifier

    DOEpatents

    Notestein, John E.

    1993-01-01

    A grate assembly for a coal gasifier of a moving-bed or fixed-bed type is provided for crushing agglomerates of solid material such as clinkers, tailoring the radial distribution of reactant gases entering the gasification reaction zone, and control of the radial distribution of downwardly moving solid velocities in the gasification and combustion zone. The clinker crushing is provided by pinching clinkers between vertically oriented stationary bars and angled bars supported on the upper surface of a rotating conical grate. The distribution of the reactant gases is provided by the selective positioning of horizontally oriented passageways extending through the grate. The radial distribution of the solids is provided by mounting a vertically and generally radially extending scoop mechanism on the upper surface of the grate near the apex thereof.

  13. Heterogeneous decomposition of silane in a fixed bed reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iya, S. K.; Flagella, R. N.; Dipaolo, F. S.

    1982-01-01

    Heterogeneous decomposition of silane in a fluidized bed offers an attractive route for the low-cost production of silicon for photovoltaic application. To obtain design data for a fluid bed silane pyrolysis reactor, deposition experiments were conducted in a small-scale fixed bed apparatus. Data on the decomposition mode, plating rate, and deposition morphology were obtained in the temperature range 600-900 C. Conditions favorable for heterogeneous decomposition with good deposition morphology were identified. The kinetic rate data showed the reaction to be first order with an activation energy of 38.8 kcal/mol, which agrees well with work done by others. The results are promising for the development of an economically attractive fluid bed process.

  14. Heterogeneous decomposition of silane in a fixed bed reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iya, S. K.; Flagella, R. N.; Dipaolo, F. S.

    1981-01-01

    Heterogeneous decomposition of silane in a fluidized bed offers an attractive route for the low-cost production of silicon for photovoltaic application. To obtain design data for a fluid bed silane pyrolysis reactor, deposition experiments were conducted in a small-scale fixed bed apparatus. Data on the decomposition mode, plating rate, and deposition morphology were obtained in the temperature range 600 900 C. Conditions favorable for heterogenous decomposition with good deposition morphology were identified. The kinetic rate data showed the reaction to be first order with an activation energy of 38.8 kcal/mole, which agrees well with work done by others. The results are promising for the development of an economically attractive fluid bed process.

  15. Fixed-bed bioreactor system for the microbial solubilization of coal

    DOEpatents

    Scott, C.D.; Strandberg, G.W.

    1987-09-14

    A fixed-bed bioreactor system for the conversion of coal into microbially solubilized coal products. The fixed-bed bioreactor continuously or periodically receives coal and bio-reactants and provides for the large scale production of microbially solubilized coal products in an economical and efficient manner. An oxidation pretreatment process for rendering coal uniformly and more readily susceptible to microbial solubilization may be employed with the fixed-bed bioreactor. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. Biohydrogen production from tequila vinasses using a fixed bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Buitrón, Germán; Prato-Garcia, Dorian; Zhang, Axue

    2014-01-01

    In Mexico, the industrial production of tequila leads to the discharge of more than 31.2 million of m(3) of vinasse, which causes serious environmental issues because of its acidity, high organic load and the presence of recalcitrant compounds. The aim of this research was to study the feasibility of a fixed bed reactor for the production of biohydrogen by using tequila vinasse as substrate. The experiments were carried out in a continuous mode under mesophilic and acidic conditions. The maximum hydrogen yield and hydrogen production rate were 1.3 mol H2 mol/mol glucose and 72 ± 9 mL H2/(Lreactor h), respectively. Biogas consisted of carbon dioxide (36%) and hydrogen (64%); moreover methane was not observed. The electron-equivalent mass balance fitted satisfactorily (sink of electrons from 0.8 to 7.6%). For vinasses, hydrogen production accounted for 10.9% of the total available electron-equivalents. In the liquid phase, the principal metabolites identified were acetic, butyric and iso-butyric acids, which indicated a butyrate-acetate type fermentation. Tequila vinasses did not result in potential inhibition of the fermentative process. Considering the process as a water treatment system, only 20% of the original carbon was removed (as carbon dioxide and biomass) when the tequila vinasses are used. PMID:25521125

  17. Pressurised pyrolysis of Miscanthus using a fixed bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Melligan, F; Auccaise, R; Novotny, E H; Leahy, J J; Hayes, M H B; Kwapinski, W

    2011-02-01

    Miscanthus x giganteus was pyrolysed, in a fixed bed reactor in a constant flow of dinitrogen gas, at a rate of 13°C/min from ambient to 550°C, then held for 25 min at this temperature. The pressures employed ranged from atmospheric to 26 bar. The major compounds identified in the bio-oil were water, phenol, and phenol derivatives. The water contents impact on the usefulness of the bio-oil as a fuel. However, the phenols could provide useful platform chemicals and products. The properties of the char were determined using elemental analyses, surface area measurements using the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller equation, a calorimetric bomb, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and solid state (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The chars were highly carbonised, especially at the higher pressures, and provided thermally stable materials. Pressure impacted greatly on the surface area. Char formed at atmospheric pressure had a surface area of 162 m(2)/g, whereas that from the highest pressure applied was only 0.137 m(2)/g. PMID:21094043

  18. Ash level meter for a fixed-bed coal gasifier

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1984-01-01

    An ash level meter for a fixed-bed coal gasifier is provided which utilizes the known ash level temperature profile to monitor the ash bed level. A bed stirrer which travels up and down through the extent of the bed ash level is modified by installing thermocouples to measure the bed temperature as the stirrer travels through the stirring cycle. The temperature measurement signals are transmitted to an electronic signal process system by an FM/FM telemetry system. The processing system uses the temperature signals together with an analog stirrer position signal, taken from a position transducer disposed to measure the stirrer position to compute the vertical location of the ash zone upper boundary. The circuit determines the fraction of each total stirrer cycle time the stirrer-derived bed temperature is below a selected set point, multiplies this fraction by the average stirrer signal level, multiplies this result by an appropriate constant and adds another constant such that a 1 to 5 volt signal from the processor corresponds to a 0 to 30 inch span of the ash upper boundary level. Three individual counters in the processor store clock counts that are representative of: (1) the time the stirrer temperature is below the set point (500.degree. F.), (2) the time duration of the corresponding stirrer travel cycle, and (3) the corresponding average stirrer vertical position. The inputs to all three counters are disconnected during any period that the stirrer is stopped, eliminating corruption of the measurement by stirrer stoppage.

  19. Countercurrent fixed-bed gasification of biomass at laboratory scale

    SciTech Connect

    Di Blasi, C.; Signorelli, G.; Portoricco, G.

    1999-07-01

    A laboratory-scale countercurrent fixed-bed gasification plant has been designed and constructed to produce data for process modeling and to compare the gasification characteristics of several biomasses (beechwood, nutshells, olive husks, and grape residues). The composition of producer gas and spatial temperature profiles have been measured for biomass gasification at different air flow rates. The gas-heating value always attains a maximum as a function of this operating variable, associated with a decrease of the air-to-fuel ratio. Optical gasification conditions of wood and agricultural residues give rise to comparable gas-heating values, comprised in the range 5--5.5 MJ/Nm{sup 3} with 28--30% CO, 5--7% CO{sub 2}, 6--8% H{sub 2}, 1--2% CH{sub 4}, and small amounts of C{sub 2}- hydrocarbons (apart from nitrogen). However, gasification of agricultural residues is more difficult because of bed transport, partial ash sintering, nonuniform flow distribution, and the presence of a muddy phase in the effluents, so that proper pretreatments are needed for largescale applications.

  20. Biohydrogen production from tequila vinasses using a fixed bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Buitrón, Germán; Prato-Garcia, Dorian; Zhang, Axue

    2014-01-01

    In Mexico, the industrial production of tequila leads to the discharge of more than 31.2 million of m(3) of vinasse, which causes serious environmental issues because of its acidity, high organic load and the presence of recalcitrant compounds. The aim of this research was to study the feasibility of a fixed bed reactor for the production of biohydrogen by using tequila vinasse as substrate. The experiments were carried out in a continuous mode under mesophilic and acidic conditions. The maximum hydrogen yield and hydrogen production rate were 1.3 mol H2 mol/mol glucose and 72 ± 9 mL H2/(Lreactor h), respectively. Biogas consisted of carbon dioxide (36%) and hydrogen (64%); moreover methane was not observed. The electron-equivalent mass balance fitted satisfactorily (sink of electrons from 0.8 to 7.6%). For vinasses, hydrogen production accounted for 10.9% of the total available electron-equivalents. In the liquid phase, the principal metabolites identified were acetic, butyric and iso-butyric acids, which indicated a butyrate-acetate type fermentation. Tequila vinasses did not result in potential inhibition of the fermentative process. Considering the process as a water treatment system, only 20% of the original carbon was removed (as carbon dioxide and biomass) when the tequila vinasses are used.

  1. Kinetics studies of uranium sorption by powdered corn cob in batch and fixed bed system

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Mohamed A.

    2015-01-01

    Sorption of uranium (VI) from aqueous solution onto powdered corn cob has been carried out using batch and fixed-bed technique. The experimental results in batch technique were fitted well with pseudo second-order kinetics model. In the fixed bed technique, Thomas and Bohart–Adams models were evaluated by linear regression analysis for U(VI) uptake in different flow rates, bed heights and initial concentrations. The column experimental data were fitted well with Thomas mode (r2 = 0.999), but the Bohart–Adams model (r2 = 0.911), predicted poor performance of fixed-bed column. PMID:26843973

  2. Kinetics studies of uranium sorption by powdered corn cob in batch and fixed bed system.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Mohamed A

    2016-01-01

    Sorption of uranium (VI) from aqueous solution onto powdered corn cob has been carried out using batch and fixed-bed technique. The experimental results in batch technique were fitted well with pseudo second-order kinetics model. In the fixed bed technique, Thomas and Bohart-Adams models were evaluated by linear regression analysis for U(VI) uptake in different flow rates, bed heights and initial concentrations. The column experimental data were fitted well with Thomas mode (r (2) = 0.999), but the Bohart-Adams model (r (2) = 0.911), predicted poor performance of fixed-bed column. PMID:26843973

  3. Anaerobic sequencing batch reactor treatment of coal conversion wastewaters

    SciTech Connect

    Ketchum, L.H. Jr.; Earley, J.P.; Shen, Yutao.

    1989-09-01

    The work proposed is a laboratory investigation of the AnSBR (Anaerobic Sequencing Batch Reactors) for treatment of a synthetic coal conversion wastewater. Two different strategies will be pursued. First, an AnSBR will be operated to simulate the Anaerobic Up-flow Sludge Blanket Reactor in an attempt to develop a readily settleable granular sludge. Second, operating strategies will be sought to optimize treatment, without attempting to develop settleable granular sludge. These systems will require development of more elaborate decanting mechanisms, probably including use of tube settler technology. We will use: (1) screening tests to identify compounds which are amenable to anaerobic degradation; (2) to determine those which are toxic or have an inhibitory effect; and (3) to identify the dilution required to achieve anaerobic degradation of the synthetic waste water; acclimation tests of organisms collected from different sources to the synthetic coal conversion wastewater; and Automatic Laboratory AnSBR studies. A 4-liter reactor will be operated to maintain a settleable granular anaerobic sludge when treating the synthetic coal conversion wastewater. 72 refs., 238 figs., 22 tabs.

  4. Degradation of formaldehyde in anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor (ASBBR).

    PubMed

    Pereira, N S; Zaiat, M

    2009-04-30

    The present study evaluated the degradation of formaldehyde in a bench-scale anaerobic sequencing batch reactor, which contained biomass immobilized in polyurethane foam matrices. The reactor was operated for 212 days at 35 degrees C with 8h sequential cycles, under different affluent formaldehyde concentrations ranging from 31.6 to 1104.4 mg/L (formaldehyde loading rates from 0.08 to 2.78 kg/m(3)day). The results indicate excellent reactor stability and over 99% efficiency in formaldehyde removal, with average effluent formaldehyde concentration of 3.6+/-1.7 mg/L. Formaldehyde degradation rates increased from 204.9 to 698.3mg/Lh as the initial concentration of formaldehyde was increased from around 100 to around 1100 mg/L. However, accumulation of organic matter was observed in the effluent (chemical oxygen demand (COD) values above 500 mg/L) due to the presence of non-degraded organic acids, especially acetic and propionic acids. This observation poses an important question regarding the anaerobic route of formaldehyde degradation, which might differ substantially from that reported in the literature. The anaerobic degradation pathway can be associated with the formation of long-chain oligomers from formaldehyde. Such long- or short-chain polymers are probably the precursors of organic acid formation by means of acidogenic anaerobic microorganisms. PMID:18715712

  5. Modelling of turbulent flow in a radial reactor with fixed bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhapbasbayev, U. K.; Ramazanova, G. I.; Kenzhaliev, O. B.

    2015-03-01

    The data of the computation of turbulent flow in the CF- π and CP- π configurations of the radial reactor with a fixed bed are presented. The Reynolds motion equations have been solved jointly with the k- ɛ turbulence model. To couple the parameters of flows at the interface free part-fixed bed the classical continuity equations were used. The computational data are obtained for the averaged and turbulent characteristics, and it is shown that the flow in the fixed bed causes the generation of the turbulence kinetic energy and its dissipation rate; the flow in the CF- π configuration is distributed more uniformly as compared to the CP- π configuration of the radial reactor. Computed data are compared with the experimental ones.

  6. Treatment of cyanide-containing wastewater from the food industry in a laboratory-scale fixed-bed methanogenic reactor.

    PubMed

    Siller, H; Winter, J

    1998-02-01

    During the process of producing cassava starch from Manihot esculenta roots, large amounts of cyanoglycosides were released, which rapidly decayed to CN- following enzymatic hydrolysis. Depending on the varying cyanoglycoside content of the cassava varieties, the cyanide concentration in the wastewater was as high as 200 mg/l. To simulate anaerobic stabilization, a wastewater with a chemical oxygen demand (COD) of about 20 g/l was prepared from cassava roots and was fermented in a fixed-bed methanogenic reactor. The start-up phase for a 99% degradation of low concentrations of cyanide (10 mg/l) required about 6 months. After establishment of the biofilm, a cyanide concentration of up to 150 mg CN-/l in the fresh wastewater was degraded during anaerobic treatment at a hydraulic retention time of 3 days. All nitrogen from the degraded cyanide was converted to organic nitrogen by the biomass of the effluent. The cyanide-degrading biocoenosis of the anaerobic reactor could tolerate shock concentrations of cyanide up to 240 mg CN-/l for a short time. Up to 5 mmol/l NH4Cl (i.e. 70 mg N/l = 265 mg NH4Cl/l) in the fresh wastewater did not affect cyanide degradation. The bleaching agent sulphite, however, had a negative effect on COD and cyanide removal. For anaerobic treatment, the maximum COD space loading was 12 g l-1 day-1, equivalent to a hydraulic retention time of 1.8 days. The COD removal efficiency was around 90%. The maximum permanent cyanide space loading was 50 mg CN- l-1 day-1, with tolerable shock loadings up to 75 mg CN- l-1 day-1. Under steady-state conditions, the cyanide concentration of the effluent was lower than 0.5 mg/l.

  7. Flow, turbulence, and drag associated with engineered log jams in a fixed-bed experimental channel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Engineered log jams (ELJs) have become attractive alternatives for river restoration and bank stabilization programs. Yet the effects of ELJs on turbulent flow and the fluid forces acting on the ELJs are not well known, and such information could inform design criteria. In this study, a fixed-bed ph...

  8. APPARATUS FOR SHORT TIME MEASUREMENTS IN A FIXED-BED, GAS/SOLID REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    An apparatus for exposure of a solid to reactive process gas is described which makes possible short time (≥ 0.3 to 15 s) exposures in a fixed-bed reactor. Operating conditions for differential reaction with respect to the gas concentration and rapid quench for arresting hi...

  9. FIXED-BED HYDROGENATION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE. (R826034)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The Pd/C hydrogenation of cyclohexene to cyclohexane was performed in a continuous fixed-bed reactor employing CO2 to solubilize the reaction mixture in a single supercritical (sc) phase surrounding the solid catalyst. Employing an equimolar feed of...

  10. Copper removal using a heavy-metal resistant microbial consortium in a fixed-bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Carpio, Isis E Mejias; Machado-Santelli, Glaucia; Sakata, Solange Kazumi; Ferreira Filho, Sidney Seckler; Rodrigues, Debora Frigi

    2014-10-01

    A heavy-metal resistant bacterial consortium was obtained from a contaminated river in São Paulo, Brazil and utilized for the design of a fixed-bed column for the removal of copper. Prior to the design of the fixed-bed bioreactor, the copper removal capacity by the live consortium and the effects of copper in the consortium biofilm formation were investigated. The Langmuir model indicated that the sorption capacity of the consortium for copper was 450.0 mg/g dry cells. The biosorption of copper into the microbial biomass was attributed to carboxyl and hydroxyl groups present in the microbial biomass. The effect of copper in planktonic cells to form biofilm under copper rich conditions was investigated with confocal microscopy. The results revealed that biofilm formed after 72 h exposure to copper presented a reduced thickness by 57% when compared to the control; however 84% of the total cells were still alive. The fixed-bed bioreactor was set up by growing the consortium biofilm on granular activated carbon (GAC) and analyzed for copper removal. The biofilm-GAC (BGAC) column retained 45% of the copper mass present in the influent, as opposed to 17% in the control column that contained GAC only. These findings suggest that native microbial communities in sites contaminated with heavy metals can be immobilized in fixed-bed bioreactors and used to treat metal contaminated water. PMID:24952346

  11. Sequencing mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digesters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    This project employed two laboratory bench scale, complete-mix anaerobic sludge digesters arranged in a series configuration. The first digester was operated at 35/sup 0/C (mesophilic) and the second at 50/sup 0/C (thermophilic). A portion of the thermophilic sludge was recycled through an aeration basin. As a comparison to the mesophilic-thermophilic sequencing, a mesophilic-mesophilic digester sequence, without sludge recycle to the aeration basin, was operated in parallel to the test units and loaded at an equivalent rate. Conclusions of this study are as follows: in establishing a thermophilic anaerobic digester, a slow-start procedure, in which the temperature is increased at a rate of 0.6/sup 0/C per day with loading, appears to produce a more stable thermophilic digester in a shorter period of time than a quick-start procedure, in which the temperature is increased rapidly with no loading. Even after a year, the slow-start thermophilic digester proved to be unstable once sequencing began. A greater volatile solids, COD, BOD, and grease reduction with a higher gas production was achieved using a mesophilic-mesophilic sequence, probably, in part, due to the instability (volatile acids in the effluent) of the thermophilic digester in the mesophilic-thermophilic sequence. A greater total kjeldahl N (TKN) and total coliform destruction was achieved in the thermophilic digester, however, poor dewatering characteristics, as indicated by the capillary suction time (CST), and an obnoxious odor were also evident. Other than an increase in effluent suspended solids, the recycle of thermophilic sludge to an aeration basin produced no discernable effect. 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 4. Gasification of Leucite Hills subbituminous coal

    SciTech Connect

    Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Pooler, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittelson, D.

    1985-03-31

    A single-staged, fixed-bed Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scrubber has been used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a cooperative effort by private industrial participants and governmental agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas (MIFGa) Group. This report is the fourth volume in a series of reports describing the atmospheric pressure, fixed-bed gasification of US coals. This specific report describes the gasification of Leucite Hills subbituminous coal from Sweetwater County, Wyoming. The period of the gasification test was April 11-30, 1983. 4 refs., 23 figs., 27 tabs.

  13. Effect of ash content on the combustion process of simulated MSW in the fixed bed.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rui; Ismail, Tamer M; Ren, Xiaohan; Abd El-Salam, M

    2016-02-01

    This paper experimentally and numerically investigates the effects of ash content on the combustion process of simulated Municipal Solid Waste (MSW). A fixed-bed experimental reactor was utilized to reveal the combustion characteristics. Temperature distributions, ignition front velocity, and the characteristics of gas species' release were measured and simulated during the combustion process. In the present work, the two-dimensional unsteady mathematical heterogeneous model was developed to simulate the combustion process in the bed, including the process rate model as well as NOx production model. The simulation results in the bed are accordant with the experimental results. The results show that as ash content increases, the lower burning rate of fuel results in char particles leaving the grate without being fully burned, causing a loss of combustible material in the MSW in a fixed bed and therefore reducing the combustion efficiency and increasing the burning time of the MSW.

  14. Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 5. Gasification of Stahlman Stoker bituminous coal

    SciTech Connect

    Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Pooler, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittelson, D.

    1985-03-31

    A single-staged, fixed-bed Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scrubber has been used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a cooperative effort by private industrial participants and governmental agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas (MIFGa) Group. This report is the fifth volume in a series of reports describing the atmospheric pressure, fixed-bed gasification of US coals. This specific report describes the gasification of Stahlman Stoker bituminous coal from Clarion County, PA. The period of the gasification test was April 30 to May 4, 1983. 4 refs., 16 figs., 10 tabs.

  15. Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 9. Gasification of Elkhorn bituminous coal

    SciTech Connect

    Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Pooler, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittelson, D.

    1985-05-01

    A single-staged, fixed-bed Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scrubber has been used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a cooperative effort by private industrial participants and governmental agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas (MIFGa) group. This report is the ninth volume in a series of reports describing the atmospheric pressure, fixed-bed gasification of US coals. This specific report describes the gasification of Elkhorn bituminous coal. The period of gasificastion test was September 13 to October 12, 1983. 9 refs., 24 figs., 35 tabs.

  16. Evaluation of fructooligosaccharides separation using a fixed-bed column packed with activated charcoal.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Raquel Cristine; Mazutti, Marcio A; Albertini, Lilian Buoro; Filho, Francisco Maugeri

    2014-05-25

    Recent studies have shown that the chromatographic separation of mixtures of saccharides may be improved by making use of activated charcoal, a promising low cost material for the separation of sugars, including fructooligosaccharides. In this work, the development of a methodology to separate fructooligosaccharides from glucose, fructose and sucrose, using a fixed bed column packed with activated charcoal is proposed. The influence of temperature, eluant concentration and step gradients were evaluated to increase the separation efficiency and fructooligosaccharide purity. The final degree of fructooligosaccharide purification and separation efficiency were about 94% and 3.03 respectively, using ethanol gradient concentration ranging from 3.5% to 15% (v/v) at 40°C. The fixed bed column packed with the activated charcoal was shown to be a promising alternative for sugar separation, mainly those rich in fructooligosaccharides, leading to solutions of acceptable degrees of purification.

  17. Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 7. Gasification of Piney Tipple bituminous coal

    SciTech Connect

    Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Pooler, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittelson, D.

    1985-05-01

    A single-staged, fixed-bed Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scrubber has been used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a cooperative effort by private industrial participants and governmental agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas (MIFGa) Group. This report is the seventh volume in a series of reports describing the atmospheric pressure, fixed-bed gasification of US coals. This specific report describes the gasification of Piney Tipple bituminous coal. The period of the gasification test was July 18-24, 1983. 6 refs., 20 figs., 17 tabs.

  18. Treatment of winery wastewater by an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Ruíz, C; Torrijos, M; Sousbie, P; Lebrato Martínez, J; Moletta, R; Delgenès, J P

    2002-01-01

    Treatment of winery wastewater was investigated using an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR). Biogas production rate was monitored and permitted the automation of the bioreactor by a simple control system. The reactor was operated at an organic loading rate (ORL) around 8.6 gCOD/L.d with soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency greater than 98%, hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 2.2 d and a specific organic loading rate (SOLR) of 0.96 gCOD/gVSS.d. The kinetics of COD and VFA removal were investigated for winery wastewater and for simple compounds such as ethanol, which is a major component of winery effluent, and acetate, which is the main volatile fatty acid (VFA) produced. The comparison of the profiles obtained with the 3 substrates shows that, overall, the acidification of the organic matter and the methanisation of the VFA follow zero order reactions, in the operating conditions of our study. The effect on the gas production rate resulted in two level periods separated by a sharp break when the acidification stage was finished and only the breaking down of the VFA continued.

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Finegoldia magna, an Anaerobic Opportunistic Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Takatsugu; Yamashita, Atsushi; Hirakawa, Hideki; Matsutani, Minenosuke; Todo, Kozo; Ohshima, Kenshiro; Toh, Hidehiro; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Kuhara, Satoru; Hattori, Masahira; Shimizu, Tohru; Akimoto, Shigeru

    2008-01-01

    Finegoldia magna (formerly Peptostreptococcus magnus), a member of the Gram-positive anaerobic cocci (GPAC), is a commensal bacterium colonizing human skin and mucous membranes. Moreover, it is also recognized as an opportunistic pathogen responsible for various infectious diseases. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of F. magna ATCC 29328. The genome consists of a 1 797 577 bp circular chromosome and an 189 163 bp plasmid (pPEP1). The metabolic maps constructed based on the genome information confirmed that most F. magna strains cannot ferment most sugars, except fructose, and have various aminopeptidase activities. Three homologs of albumin-binding protein, a known virulence factor useful for antiphagocytosis, are encoded on the chromosome, and one albumin-binding protein homolog is encoded on the plasmid. A unique feature of the genome is that F. magna encodes many sortase genes, of which substrates may be involved in bacterial pathogenesis, such as antiphagocytosis and adherence to the host cell. The plasmid pPEP1 encodes seven sortase and seven substrate genes, whereas the chromosome encodes four sortase and 19 substrate genes. These plasmid-encoded sortases may play important roles in the pathogenesis of F. magna by enriching the variety of cell wall anchored surface proteins. PMID:18263572

  20. Treatment of winery wastewater by an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Ruíz, C; Torrijos, M; Sousbie, P; Lebrato Martínez, J; Moletta, R; Delgenès, J P

    2002-01-01

    Treatment of winery wastewater was investigated using an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR). Biogas production rate was monitored and permitted the automation of the bioreactor by a simple control system. The reactor was operated at an organic loading rate (ORL) around 8.6 gCOD/L.d with soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency greater than 98%, hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 2.2 d and a specific organic loading rate (SOLR) of 0.96 gCOD/gVSS.d. The kinetics of COD and VFA removal were investigated for winery wastewater and for simple compounds such as ethanol, which is a major component of winery effluent, and acetate, which is the main volatile fatty acid (VFA) produced. The comparison of the profiles obtained with the 3 substrates shows that, overall, the acidification of the organic matter and the methanisation of the VFA follow zero order reactions, in the operating conditions of our study. The effect on the gas production rate resulted in two level periods separated by a sharp break when the acidification stage was finished and only the breaking down of the VFA continued. PMID:12188548

  1. Fixed-bed adsorption study of methylene blue onto pyrolytic tire char

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makrigianni, Vassiliki; Giannakas, Aris; Papadaki, Maria; Albanis, Triantafyllos; Konstantinou, Ioannis

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the adsorption efficiency of acid treated pyrolytic tire char to cationic methylene blue (MB) dye adsorption from aqueous solutions was investigated by fixed-bed adsorption column experiments. The effects of the initial dye concentration (10 - 40 mg L-1) and feed flow rate (50 - 150 mL min -1) with a fixed bed height (15 cm) were studied in order to determine the breakthrough characteristics of the adsorption system. The Adams-Bohart, Yoon-Nelson and Thomas model were applied to the adsorption of MB onto char at different operational conditions to predict the breakthrough curves and to determine the characteristic parameters of the column. The results showed that the maximum adsorbed quantities decreased with increasing flow rate and increased with increasing initial MB concentration. Breakthrough time and exhaustion time increased with decreasing inlet dye concentration and flow rate. In contrast with Adams-Bohart model, Yoon-Nelson model followed by Thomas model were found more suitable to describe the fixed-bed adsorption of methylene blue by char. The correlation coefficient values R2 for both models at different operating conditions are higher than 0.9 and the low average relative error values provided very good fittings of experimental data at different operating conditions. Higher adsorption capacity of 3.85 mg g -1 was obtained at 15 cm of adsorbent bed height, flow rate of 100 mL min -1and initial MB concentration of 40 mg L-1. Although that activated carbons exhibited higher adsorption capacities in the literature, acid-treated pyrolytic tire char was found to be considerably efficient adsorbent for the removal of MB dye column taking into account the advantages of the simpler production process compared to activated carbons, as well as, the availability of waste tire feedstock and concurrent waste tire management.

  2. Large-scale clinical-grade retroviral vector production in a fixed-bed bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuyan; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Qu, Jinrong; Wasielewska, Teresa; Bartido, Shirley; Hermetet, Gregory; Sadelain, Michel; Rivière, Isabelle

    2015-04-01

    The successful genetic engineering of patient T cells with γ-retroviral vectors expressing chimeric antigen receptors or T-cell receptors for phase II clinical trials and beyond requires the large-scale manufacture of high-titer vector stocks. The production of retroviral vectors from stable packaging cell lines using roller bottles or 10- to 40-layer cell factories is limited by a narrow harvest window, labor intensity, open-system operations, and the requirement for significant incubator space. To circumvent these shortcomings, we optimized the production of vector stocks in a disposable fixed-bed bioreactor using good manufacturing practice-grade packaging cell lines. High-titer vector stocks were harvested over 10 days, representing a much broader harvest window than the 3-day harvest afforded by cell factories. For PG13 and 293Vec packaging cells, the average vector titer and the vector stocks' yield in the bioreactor were higher by 3.2- to 7.3-fold, and 5.6- to 13.1-fold, respectively, than those obtained in cell factories. The vector production was 10.4 and 18.6 times more efficient than in cell factories for PG13 and 293Vec cells, respectively. Furthermore, the vectors produced from the fixed-bed bioreactors passed the release test assays for clinical applications. Therefore, a single vector lot derived from 293Vec is suitable to transduce up to 500 patients cell doses in the context of large clinical trials using chimeric antigen receptors or T-cell receptors. These findings demonstrate for the first time that a robust fixed-bed bioreactor process can be used to produce γ-retroviral vector stocks scalable up to the commercialization phase.

  3. Large-scale Clinical-grade Retroviral Vector Production in a Fixed-Bed Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiuyan; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Qu, Jinrong; Wasielewska, Teresa; Bartido, Shirley; Hermetet, Gregory; Sadelain, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The successful genetic engineering of patient T cells with γ-retroviral vectors expressing chimeric antigen receptors or T-cell receptors for phase II clinical trials and beyond requires the large-scale manufacture of high-titer vector stocks. The production of retroviral vectors from stable packaging cell lines using roller bottles or 10- to 40-layer cell factories is limited by a narrow harvest window, labor intensity, open-system operations, and the requirement for significant incubator space. To circumvent these shortcomings, we optimized the production of vector stocks in a disposable fixed-bed bioreactor using good manufacturing practice–grade packaging cell lines. High-titer vector stocks were harvested over 10 days, representing a much broader harvest window than the 3-day harvest afforded by cell factories. For PG13 and 293Vec packaging cells, the average vector titer and the vector stocks’ yield in the bioreactor were higher by 3.2- to 7.3-fold, and 5.6- to 13.1-fold, respectively, than those obtained in cell factories. The vector production was 10.4 and 18.6 times more efficient than in cell factories for PG13 and 293Vec cells, respectively. Furthermore, the vectors produced from the fixed-bed bioreactors passed the release test assays for clinical applications. Therefore, a single vector lot derived from 293Vec is suitable to transduce up to 500 patients cell doses in the context of large clinical trials using chimeric antigen receptors or T-cell receptors. These findings demonstrate for the first time that a robust fixed-bed bioreactor process can be used to produce γ-retroviral vector stocks scalable up to the commercialization phase. PMID:25751502

  4. Modeling and Experimental Studies of Mercury Oxidation and Adsorption in a Fixed-Bed Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Buitrago, Paula A.; Morrill, Mike; Lighty, JoAnn S.; Silcox, Geoffrey D.

    2009-06-15

    This report presents experimental and modeling mercury oxidation and adsorption data. Fixed-bed and single-particle models of mercury adsorption were developed. The experimental data were obtained with two reactors: a 300-W, methane-fired, tubular, quartz-lined reactor for studying homogeneous oxidation reactions and a fixed-bed reactor, also of quartz, for studying heterogeneous reactions. The latter was attached to the exit of the former to provide realistic combustion gases. The fixed-bed reactor contained one gram of coconut-shell carbon and remained at a temperature of 150°C. All methane, air, SO2, and halogen species were introduced through the burner to produce a radical pool representative of real combustion systems. A Tekran 2537A Analyzer coupled with a wet conditioning system provided speciated mercury concentrations. At 150°C and in the absence of HCl or HBr, the mercury uptake was about 20%. The addition of 50 ppm HCl caused complete capture of all elemental and oxidized mercury species. In the absence of halogens, SO2 increased the mercury adsorption efficiency to up to 30 percent. The extent of adsorption decreased with increasing SO2 concentration when halogens were present. Increasing the HCl concentration to 100 ppm lessened the effect of SO2. The fixed-bed model incorporates Langmuir adsorption kinetics and was developed to predict adsorption of elemental mercury and the effect of multiple flue gas components. This model neglects intraparticle diffusional resistances and is only applicable to pulverized carbon sorbents. It roughly describes experimental data from the literature. The current version includes the ability to account for competitive adsorption between mercury, SO2, and NO2. The single particle model simulates in-flight sorbent capture of elemental mercury. This model was developed to include Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, rate equations, sorbent feed rate, and

  5. Fixed-bed gasifier and cleanup system engineering summary report through Test Run No. 100

    SciTech Connect

    Pater, K. Jr.; Headley, L.; Kovach, J.; Stopek, D.

    1984-06-01

    The state-of-the-art of high-pressure, fixed-bed gasification has been advanced by the many refinements developed over the last 5 years. A novel full-flow gas cleanup system has been installed and tested to clean coal-derived gases. This report summarizes the results of tests conducted on the gasifier and cleanup system from its inception through 1982. Selected process summary data are presented along with results from complementary programs in the areas of environmental research, process simulation, analytical methods development, and component testing. 20 references, 32 figures, 42 tables.

  6. Fixed-bed pyrolysis of cottonseed cake: Product yields and compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Puetuen, A.E.; Oezbay, N.; Kockar, O.M.; Puetuen, E.

    1997-11-01

    Fixed-bed pyrolysis experiments have been conducted on a sample of cottonseed cake to determine the possibility of being a potential source of renewable fuels and chemical feedstocks. The effects of heating rate, pyrolysis atmosphere, and pyrolysis temperature on the pyrolysis product yields and chemical compositions have been investigated. The maximum oil yield of 27% was obtained in N{sub 2} atmosphere at pyrolysis temperature of 550 C and heating rate of 7 C/min. The chemical characterization has shown that the oil obtained from cottonseed cake was quite similar to the crude oil and shale oil.

  7. Kinetics and fixed-bed reactor modeling of butane oxidation to maleic anhydride

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R.K.; Cresswell, D.L. ); Newson, E.J. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on selective oxidation kinetics of n-butane to maleic anhydride in air studied over a commercial, fixed-bed vanadium-phosphor oxide catalyst. The temperature range was 573-653 K with butane concentrations up to 3 mol % in the feed, which is within flammability limits but below ignition temperatures. The rate data were modeled using power law kinetics with product inhibition and included total oxidation and decomposition reactions. Kinetic parameters were estimated using a multiresponse, nonlinear regression algorithm showing intercorrelation effects. The kinetics were combined with independent measurements of catalyst diffusivity and reactor heat transfer using a one- dimensional heterogeneous reactor model.

  8. Two-stage fixed-bed gasifier with selectable middle gas off-take point

    DOEpatents

    Strickland, Larry D.; Bissett, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    A two-stage fixed bed coal gasifier wherein an annular region is in registry with a gasification zone underlying a devolatilization zone for extracting a side stream of high temperature substantially tar-free gas from the gasifier. A vertically displaceable skirt means is positioned within the gasifier to define the lower portion of the annular region so that vertical displacement of the skirt means positions the inlet into the annular region in a selected location within or in close proximity to the gasification zone for providing a positive control over the composition of the side stream gas.

  9. Modeling the microbial growth and temperature profile in a fixed-bed bioreactor.

    PubMed

    da Silveira, Christian L; Mazutti, Marcio A; Salau, Nina P G

    2014-10-01

    Aiming to scale up and apply control and optimization strategies, currently is required the development of accurate plant models to forecast the process nonlinear dynamics. In this work, a mathematical model to predict the growth of the Kluyveromyces marxianus and temperature profile in a fixed-bed bioreactor for solid-state fermentation using sugarcane bagasse as substrate was built up. A parameter estimation technique was performed to fit the mathematical model to the experimental data. The estimated parameters and the model fitness were evaluated with statistical analyses. The results have shown the estimated parameters significance, with 95 % confidence intervals, and the good quality of process model to reproduce the experimental data.

  10. High temperature CO2 capture using calcium oxide sorbent in a fixed-bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Dou, Binlin; Song, Yongchen; Liu, Yingguang; Feng, Cong

    2010-11-15

    The gas-solid reaction and breakthrough curve of CO(2) capture using calcium oxide sorbent at high temperature in a fixed-bed reactor are of great importance, and being influenced by a number of factors makes the characterization and prediction of these a difficult problem. In this study, the operating parameters on reaction between solid sorbent and CO(2) gas at high temperature were investigated. The results of the breakthrough curves showed that calcium oxide sorbent in the fixed-bed reactor was capable of reducing the CO(2) level to near zero level with the steam of 10 vol%, and the sorbent in CaO mixed with MgO of 40 wt% had extremely low capacity for CO(2) capture at 550°C. Calcium oxide sorbent after reaction can be easily regenerated at 900°C by pure N(2) flow. The experimental data were analyzed by shrinking core model, and the results showed reaction rates of both fresh and regeneration sorbents with CO(2) were controlled by a combination of the surface chemical reaction and diffusion of product layer.

  11. Racemization of undesired enantiomers: Immobilization of mandelate racemase and application in a fixed bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Wrzosek, Katarzyna; Rivera, Mariel A García; Bettenbrock, Katja; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Production of optically pure products can be based on simple unselective synthesis of racemic mixtures combined with a subsequent separation of the enantiomers; however, this approach suffers from a 50% yield limitation which can be overcome by racemization of the undesired enantiomer and recycling. Application of biocatalyst for the racemization steps offers an attractive option for high-yield manufacturing of commercially valuable compounds. Our work focuses on exploiting the potential of racemization with immobilized mandelate racemase. Immobilization of crude mandelate racemase via covalent attachment was optimized for two supports: Eupergit(®) CM and CNBr-activated Sepharose 4 Fast Flow. To allow coupling of enzymatic reaction with enantioselective chromatography, a mobile phase composition compatible with both processes was used in enzymatic reactor. Kinetic parameters obtained analyzing experiments carried out in a batch reactor could be successfully used to predict fixed-bed reactor performance. The applicability of the immobilized enzyme and the determined kinetic parameters were validated in transient experiments recording responses to pulse injections of R-mandelic acid. The approach investigated can be used for futher design and optimization of high yield combined resolution processes. The characterized fixed-bed enzymatic reactor can be integrated e.g. with chromatographic single- or multicolumn steps in various configurations.

  12. Remediation of trichloroethylene by bio-precipitated and encapsulated palladium nanoparticles in a fixed bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Hennebel, Tom; Verhagen, Pieter; Simoen, Henri; De Gusseme, Bart; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E; Boon, Nico; Verstraete, Willy

    2009-08-01

    Trichloroethylene is a toxic and recalcitrant groundwater pollutant. Palladium nanoparticles bio-precipitated on Shewanella oneidensis were encapsulated in polyurethane, polyacrylamide, alginate, silica or coated on zeolites. The reactivity of these bio-Pd beads and zeolites was tested in batch experiments and trichloroethylene dechlorination followed first order reaction kinetics. The calculated k-values of the encapsulated catalysts were a factor of six lower compared to non-encapsulated bio-Pd. Bio-Pd, used as a catalyst, was able to dechlorinate 100 mgL(-1) trichloroethylene within a time period of 1h. The main reaction product was ethane; yet small levels of chlorinated intermediates were detected. Subsequently polyurethane cubes empowered with bio-Pd were implemented in a fixed bed reactor for the treatment of water containing trichloroethylene. The influent recycle configuration resulted in a cumulative removal of 98% after 22 h. The same reactor in a flow through configuration achieved removal rates up to 1059 mg trichloroethylene g Pd(-1)d(-1). This work showed that fixed bed reactors with bio-Pd polyurethane cubes can be instrumental for remediation of water contaminated with trichloroethylene. PMID:19560796

  13. Partial oxidation of sewage sludge briquettes in a updraft fixed bed.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minsu; Lee, Yongwoon; Park, Jinje; Ryu, Chankook; Ohm, Tae-In

    2016-03-01

    The fixed bed reaction of sewage sludge briquettes was investigated to evaluate the potential applications to gasification, combustion, or production of biochar as soil ameliorator. The reaction had two distinctive stages: ignition propagation and char oxidation. The ignition front of the sludge briquettes propagated at a lower speed, which significantly increased the stoichiometric ratio of overall combustion reaction and peak temperatures. The ignition front also had irregular shapes due to the channeling effects. During the char oxidation stage, the sludge ash agglomerated because of the slow reaction rate and increased CO2 formation. Because of low energy content in the product gas, the large briquettes were not favorable for syngas production. In addition, the low burning rates and ash agglomeration could cause problems in the operation of a grate-type furnace for combustion. However, the char accumulated above the ignition front had similar properties with that from pyrolysis under inert atmosphere. Therefore, the fixed bed reaction under partial oxidation conditions can be applied to produce biochar as soil ameliorator from the sludge briquettes without external heat supply. PMID:26860426

  14. Quantifying temperature and flow rate effects on the performance of a fixed-bed chromatographic reactor.

    PubMed

    Vu, Tien D; Seidel-Morgenstern, A

    2011-11-01

    Chromatographic reactors are based on coupling chemical reactions with chromatographic separation in fixed-beds. Temperature and flow rate are important parameters for the performance of such reactors. Temperature affects mainly adsorption, chemical equilibria, mass transfer and reaction kinetics, whereas flow rate influences residence time and dispersion. In order to evaluate the mentioned effects, the hydrolysis reactions of methyl formate (MF) and methyl acetate (MA) were chosen as case studies. These reactions were performed experimentally in a lab-scale fixed-bed chromatographic reactor packed with a strong acidic ion exchange resin. The chosen reactions can be considered to represent a relative fast (MF) and a relative slow (MA) reaction. The processes which take place inside the reactor were described and simulated using an isothermal equilibrium dispersive model. The essential model parameters were determined experimentally at different temperatures and flow rates. The performance of the chromatographic reactor was evaluated at several discrete constant temperature levels by quantifying product purity, productivity and yield. The work provides insight regarding the influence of temperature and flow rate on values of the model parameters and the performance criteria.

  15. Remediation of trichloroethylene by bio-precipitated and encapsulated palladium nanoparticles in a fixed bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Hennebel, Tom; Verhagen, Pieter; Simoen, Henri; De Gusseme, Bart; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E; Boon, Nico; Verstraete, Willy

    2009-08-01

    Trichloroethylene is a toxic and recalcitrant groundwater pollutant. Palladium nanoparticles bio-precipitated on Shewanella oneidensis were encapsulated in polyurethane, polyacrylamide, alginate, silica or coated on zeolites. The reactivity of these bio-Pd beads and zeolites was tested in batch experiments and trichloroethylene dechlorination followed first order reaction kinetics. The calculated k-values of the encapsulated catalysts were a factor of six lower compared to non-encapsulated bio-Pd. Bio-Pd, used as a catalyst, was able to dechlorinate 100 mgL(-1) trichloroethylene within a time period of 1h. The main reaction product was ethane; yet small levels of chlorinated intermediates were detected. Subsequently polyurethane cubes empowered with bio-Pd were implemented in a fixed bed reactor for the treatment of water containing trichloroethylene. The influent recycle configuration resulted in a cumulative removal of 98% after 22 h. The same reactor in a flow through configuration achieved removal rates up to 1059 mg trichloroethylene g Pd(-1)d(-1). This work showed that fixed bed reactors with bio-Pd polyurethane cubes can be instrumental for remediation of water contaminated with trichloroethylene.

  16. Production of polygalacturonases by Aspergillus section Nigri strains in a fixed bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Marília; Ottoni, Cristiane; Santos, Cledir; Lima, Nelson; Moreira, Keila; Souza-Motta, Cristina

    2013-01-28

    Polygalacturonases (PG) are pectinolytic enzymes that have technological, functional and biological applications in food processing, fruit ripening and plant-fungus interactions, respectively. In the present, a microtitre plate methodology was used for rapid screening of 61 isolates of fungi from Aspergillus section Nigri to assess production of endo- and exo-PG. Studies of scale-up were carried out in a fixed bed reactor operated under different parameters using the best producer strain immobilised in orange peels. Four experiments were conducted under the following conditions: the immobilised cells without aeration; immobilised cells with aeration; immobilised cells with aeration and added pectin; and free cells with aeration. The fermentation was performed for 168 h with removal of sample every 24 h. Aspergillus niger strain URM 5162 showed the highest PG production. The results obtained indicated that the maximum endo- and exo-PG activities (1.18 U · mL-1 and 4.11 U · mL-1, respectively) were obtained when the reactor was operating without aeration. The microtitre plate method is a simple way to screen fungal isolates for PG activity detection. The fixed bed reactor with orange peel support and using A. niger URM 5162 is a promising process for PG production at the industrial level.

  17. The use of fixed bed absorbents for flexible operation on the SAGE gas processing plant

    SciTech Connect

    Carnell, P.J.H.; Joslin, K.W.; Woodham, P.R.

    1995-11-01

    Mobil North Sea Ltd. operates the SAGE Gas Terminal at St. Fergus, Scotland on behalf of the SAGE partners. This terminal is capable of processing 1,150 MMscfd of sour gas with the sales gas being delivered into the British Gas distribution network and NGL`s exported by pipelines to Shell`s NGL fractionation plant at Mossmorran and BP`s fractionation plant at Kinneil. In order to meet the specifications for the sales gas and NGL produced while processing different mixtures of three separate feed gases produced by three independently operated production platforms the SAGE Gas Terminal has utilized ICI Katalco`s PURASPEC{trademark} processes to provide flexibility and reduce cost. This paper discusses how and where these fixed bed processes are utilized.

  18. Influence of particle size on performance of a pilot-scale fixed-bed gasification system.

    PubMed

    Yin, Renzhan; Liu, Ronghou; Wu, Jinkai; Wu, Xiaowu; Sun, Chen; Wu, Ceng

    2012-09-01

    The effect of particle size on the gasification performance of a pilot-scale (25 kg/h) downdraft fixed bed gasification system was investigated using prunings from peach trees at five different size fractions (below 1, 1-2, 2-4, 4-6 and 6-8 cm). The gas and hydrocarbon compositions were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS), respectively. With increasing particle size, gas yield increased while tar and dust content decreased. The lower heating value of the gas decreased slightly with particle size. At a smaller particle size, more hydrocarbons were detected in the producer gas. Hydrogen and carbon dioxide contents increased with the decrease in particle size, reaching 16.09% and 14.36% at particle size below 1cm, respectively. Prunings with a particle size of 1-2 cm were favorable for gasification in the downdraft gasifier used in this study.

  19. Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 2. Gasification of Jetson bituminous coal

    SciTech Connect

    Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Pooler, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittelson, D.

    1985-03-31

    A single-staged, fixed-bed Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scrubber has been used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a cooperative effort by private industrial participants and governmental agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas (MIFGa) Group. This report describes the gasification testing of Jetson bituminous coal. This Western Kentucky coal was gasified during an initial 8-day and subsequent 5-day period. Material flows and compositions are reported along with material and energy balances. Operational experience is also described. 4 refs., 24 figs., 17 tabs.

  20. Fixed bed adsorption of 2-naphthalenesulfonic acid from aqueous solution by composite resin.

    PubMed

    Jia, Dong M; Li, Ya P; Li, Yue J; Li, Yong G; Li, Chang H

    2014-02-01

    Adsorption behavior of the iron impregnated, weakly basic resin D301 (Fe-D301) for removal of 2-naphthalenesulfonic acid (2-NSA) from aqueous solution was studied by using a fixed-bed column. The effects of process variables such as bed height, flow rate, and coexisting ions were investigated. The results indicated that the breakpoint and exhaustion point increased with increasing bed height and decreased with increasing 2-NSA flowrate. Experimental data showed a strong fit to the Bed Depth Service Time model. The coexisting ions in the 2-NSA solution had a clear effect on the breakthrough volume. The high extent of recovery of 2-NSA with good reproducibility provided an effective method for the separation of 2-NSA by the adsorbent Fe-D301.

  1. Biocatalytic methanation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide in a fixed bed bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Alitalo, Anni; Niskanen, Marko; Aura, Erkki

    2015-11-01

    Biocatalytic methanation of H2 and CO2 was studied in a fixed bed reactor system consisting of two solid state bioreactors in series connected to a recirculation system. Bioreactors were packed with a mixture of vermiculite shales and granular perlite material as a support material. A maximal methane productivity of 6.35l/lreactord was achieved at a hydrogen feed rate of 25.2l/lreactord, while hydrogen conversion rate was 100%. However, stable operation of the reactor at this efficiency remains to be achieved. Very simple reactor design, constructed from low cost materials, and the idea of exploiting waste material as a robust source of nutrients for methanogens makes this study very interesting regarding the overall usability and suitability of the system as part of a decentralized energy system. PMID:26298404

  2. Visualization of the exothermal VOC adsorption in a fixed-bed activated carbon adsorber.

    PubMed

    Le Cloirec, P; Pré, P; Delage, F; Giraudet, S

    2012-01-01

    Activated carbon fixed beds are classically used to remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present in gaseous emissions. In such use, an increase of local temperature due to exothermal adsorption has been reported; some accidental fires in the carbon bed due to the removal of high concentrations of ketones have been published. In this work, removal of VOCs was performed in a laboratory-scale pilot unit. In order to visualize the increase in local temperature, the adsorption front was tracked with a flame ionization detector and the thermal wave was simultaneously visualized with an infrared camera. In extreme conditions, fire in the adsorber and the combustion of activated carbon was achieved during ketone adsorption. Data have been extracted from these experiments, including local temperature, front velocity and carbon bed combustion conditions.

  3. A catalytic multistage fixed-bed tower bioreactor in an industrial-scale pilot plant for alcohol production

    SciTech Connect

    Bakoyianis, V.; Koutinas, A.A.

    1996-01-20

    This article describes the development of an industrial-scale, multistage fixed-bed tower (MFBT) bioreactor using the promoter mineral kissiris for industrial alcohol producing using free cells. Specifically, the authors examined the parameters needed to maintain operational stability from batch to batch for long periods. Pilot plant operations used one- and two-stage fixed-bed, 7,000-L bioreactors. Likewise a 100,000-L, multistage fixed-bed tower system containing layered kissiris confirmed the laboratory results. Compared with a continuous stirred tank fermentor (CSTF) with recycle, a 30% reduction of energy demand and 10%--20% of the production costs are obtained. The latter are attributed to the increased ethanol concentration and alcohol productivity.

  4. Comprehensive kinetic studies of acidic oil continuous esterification by cation-exchange resin in fixed bed reactors.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu; Feng, Yaohui; Ren, Yanbiao; Liu, Xuan; Gao, Aoran; He, Benqiao; Yan, Feng; Li, Jianxin

    2012-06-01

    Biodiesel produced by esterification from molar ratio of methanol to free fatty acid (FFA) as 25:1 in presence of triglyceride was carried out with cation-exchange resin as a heterogeneous catalyst in three different scales of fixed bed reactors from minireactor (6.8 mm × 110 mm) to pilot scale reactor (70 mm × 1260 mm) at 338 K. The kinetic study of esterification was undertaken in terms of pseudo-homogeneous mechanism and performed as a first order reaction with elimination of the solid-liquid internal and external mass transfer resistances. Moreover, a kinetic model of FFA esterification was developed to illustrate the relationship between the FFA conversion and the catalyst bed height of fixed bed reactor. The model was also suitable for various resins in fixed bed reactor. The theoretical predictions were in agreement with the experimental data with root mean square (RMS) errors <10.

  5. Arsenic removal via ZVI in a hybrid spouted vessel/fixed bed filter system

    PubMed Central

    Calo, Joseph M.; Madhavan, Lakshmi; Kirchner, Johannes; Bain, Euan J.

    2012-01-01

    The description and operation of a novel, hybrid spouted vessel/fixed bed filter system for the removal of arsenic from water are presented. The system utilizes zero-valent iron (ZVI) particles circulating in a spouted vessel that continuously generates active colloidal iron corrosion products via the “self-polishing” action between ZVI source particles rolling in the moving bed that forms on the conical bottom of the spouted vessel. This action also serves as a “surface renewal” mechanism for the particles that provides for maximum utilization of the ZVI material. (Results of batch experiments conducted to examine this mechanism are also presented.) The colloidal material produced in this fashion is continuously captured and concentrated in a fixed bed filter located within the spouted vessel reservoir wherein arsenic complexation occurs. It is demonstrated that this system is very effective for arsenic removal in the microgram per liter arsenic concentration (i.e., drinking water treatment) range, reducing 100 μg/L of arsenic to below detectable levels (≪10 μg/L) in less than an hour. A mechanistic analysis of arsenic behavior in the system is presented, identifying the principal components of the population of active colloidal material for arsenic removal that explains the experimental observations and working principles of the system. It is concluded that the apparent kinetic behavior of arsenic in systems where colloidal (i.e., micro/nano) iron corrosion products are dominant can be complex and may not be explained by simple first or zeroth order kinetics. PMID:22539917

  6. Catalytic stepwise nitrate hydrogenation in batch-recycle fixed-bed reactors.

    PubMed

    Pintar, Albin; Batista, Jurka

    2007-10-22

    Pd (1.0 wt.%)-Cu (0.3 wt.%) bimetallic and Pd (1.0 wt.%) monometallic catalysts were synthesized by means of incipient-wetness impregnation technique and deposited on alumina spheres (dp=1.7 mm). The prepared catalysts were tested at T=298 K and p(H2)=1.0 bar in the integrated process of catalytic liquid-phase hydrogenation of aqueous nitrate solutions, in which the denitration step was carried out consecutively in separate, single-flow fixed-bed reactor units operating in a batch-recycle mode. In the first reactor packed with a Pd-Cu bimetallic catalyst, nitrate ions were transformed to nitrites at pH 12.5 with a selectivity as high as 93%; the rest was found in the form of ammonium ions. Liquid-phase nitrite hydrogenation to nitrogen in the second reactor unit packed with a Pd monometallic catalyst was conducted at low pH values of 3.7 and 4.5, respectively. Although these values are well below the pHpzc of examined catalyst (6.1), which assured that the nitrite reduction was carried out over a positively charged catalyst surface, up to 15% (23% in the presence of 5.0 g/l NaCl in the solution) of initial nitrite content was converted to undesired ammonium ions. Since a negligible amount of these species (below 0.5mg/l) was produced at identical operating conditions over a powdered Pd/gamma-Al2O3 catalyst, it is believed that the enhanced production of ammonium ions observed in the second fixed-bed reactor is due to the build-up of pH gradients in liquid-filled pores of spherical catalyst particles. Both Pd-Cu bimetallic and Pd monometallic catalysts were chemically resistant in the investigated range of pH values. PMID:17478039

  7. Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 11. Gasification of Minnesota peat. [Peat pellets and peat sods

    SciTech Connect

    Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Pooler, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittelson, D.

    1985-05-01

    A single-staged, fixed-bed Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scrubber has been used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a coooperative effort by private industrial participants and governmental agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas (MIFGa) Group. This report is the eleventh volume in a series of reports describing the atmospheric pressure, fixed-bed gasification of US coals. This specific report describes the gasification of peat pellets and peat sods during 3 different test periods. 2 refs., 20 figs., 13 tabs.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of an Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing Bacterium, “Candidatus Brocadia sinica”

    PubMed Central

    Oshiki, Mamoru; Shinyako-Hata, Kaori; Satoh, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    A draft genome sequence of an anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacterium, “Candidatus Brocadia sinica,” was determined by pyrosequencing and by screening a fosmid library. A 4.07-Mb genome sequence comprising 3 contigs was assembled, in which 3,912 gene-coding regions, 47 tRNAs, and a single rrn operon were annotated. PMID:25883286

  9. Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Topical report No.3, Zirconia promotion of Fischer-Tropsch cobalt catalysts: Behavior in fixed-bed and slurry bubble column reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Oukaci, R.; Marcelin, G.; Goodwin, J.G. Jr.

    1995-01-17

    A series of cobalt-based F-T catalysts supported on alumina and silica were prepared with different loadings of Zr and different sequences of impregnation of Co and Zr. All catalysts were extensively characterized by different methods. The catalysts were evaluated in terms of their activity and selectivity both in fixed bed and slurry bubble column reactors. Addition of ZrO{sub 2} to both Co/SiO{sub 2} and Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts resulted in at least a twofold increase in the catalyst activity for F-T synthesis in the fixed bed reactor. In the slurry bubble column reactor, a similar promotion effect was observed for the SiO{sub 2}-supported catalysts, while the addition of Zr to a cobalt/alumina catalyst had a less significant effect.

  10. Thin-film fixed-bed reactor (TFFBR) for solar photocatalytic inactivation of aquaculture pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Outbreaks of infectious diseases by microbial pathogens can cause substantial losses of stock in aquaculture systems. There are several ways to eliminate these pathogens including the use of antibiotics, biocides and conventional disinfectants, but these leave undesirable chemical residues. Conversely, using sunlight for disinfection has the advantage of leaving no chemical residue and is particularly suited to countries with sunny climates. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is a photocatalyst that increases the effectiveness of solar disinfection. In recent years, several different types of solar photocatalytic reactors coated with TiO2 have been developed for waste water and drinking water treatment. In this study a thin-film fixed-bed reactor (TFFBR), designed as a sloping flat plate reactor coated with P25 DEGUSSA TiO2, was used. Results The level of inactivation of the aquaculture pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila ATCC 35654 was determined after travelling across the TFFBR under various natural sunlight conditions (300-1200 W m-2), at 3 different flow rates (4.8, 8.4 and 16.8 L h-1). Bacterial numbers were determined by conventional plate counting using selective agar media, cultured (i) under conventional aerobic conditions to detect healthy cells and (ii) under conditions designed to neutralise reactive oxygen species (agar medium supplemented with the peroxide scavenger sodium pyruvate at 0.05% w/v, incubated under anaerobic conditions), to detect both healthy and sub-lethally injured (oxygen-sensitive) cells. The results clearly demonstrate that high sunlight intensities (≥ 600 W m-2) and low flow rates (4.8 L h-1) provided optimum conditions for inactivation of A. hydrophila ATCC 3564, with greater overall inactivation and fewer sub-lethally injured cells than at low sunlight intensities or high flow rates. Low sunlight intensities resulted in reduced overall inactivation and greater sub-lethal injury at all flow rates. Conclusions This is the first

  11. Anaerobic sequencing batch reactor in pilot scale for treatment of tofu industry wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Rahayu, Suparni Setyowati; Purwanto, Budiyono

    2015-12-29

    The small industry of tofu production process releases the waste water without being processed first, and the wastewater is directly discharged into water. In this study, Anaerobic Sequencing Batch Reactor in Pilot Scale for Treatment of Tofu Industry was developed through an anaerobic process to produce biogas as one kind of environmentally friendly renewable energy which can be developed into the countryside. The purpose of this study was to examine the fundamental characteristics of organic matter elimination of industrial wastewater with small tofu effective method and utilize anaerobic active sludge with Anaerobic Sequencing Bath Reactor (ASBR) to get rural biogas as an energy source. The first factor is the amount of the active sludge concentration which functions as the decomposers of organic matter and controlling selectivity allowance to degrade organic matter. The second factor is that HRT is the average period required substrate to react with the bacteria in the Anaerobic Sequencing Bath Reactor (ASBR).The results of processing the waste of tofu production industry using ASBR reactor with active sludge additions as starter generates cumulative volume of 5814.4 mL at HRT 5 days so that in this study it is obtained the conversion 0.16 L of CH{sub 4}/g COD and produce biogas containing of CH{sub 4}: 81.23% and CO{sub 2}: 16.12%. The wastewater treatment of tofu production using ASBR reactor is able to produce renewable energy that has economic value as well as environmentally friendly by nature.

  12. Anaerobic sequencing batch reactor in pilot scale for treatment of tofu industry wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahayu, Suparni Setyowati; Purwanto, Budiyono

    2015-12-01

    The small industry of tofu production process releases the waste water without being processed first, and the wastewater is directly discharged into water. In this study, Anaerobic Sequencing Batch Reactor in Pilot Scale for Treatment of Tofu Industry was developed through an anaerobic process to produce biogas as one kind of environmentally friendly renewable energy which can be developed into the countryside. The purpose of this study was to examine the fundamental characteristics of organic matter elimination of industrial wastewater with small tofu effective method and utilize anaerobic active sludge with Anaerobic Sequencing Bath Reactor (ASBR) to get rural biogas as an energy source. The first factor is the amount of the active sludge concentration which functions as the decomposers of organic matter and controlling selectivity allowance to degrade organic matter. The second factor is that HRT is the average period required substrate to react with the bacteria in the Anaerobic Sequencing Bath Reactor (ASBR).The results of processing the waste of tofu production industry using ASBR reactor with active sludge additions as starter generates cumulative volume of 5814.4 mL at HRT 5 days so that in this study it is obtained the conversion 0.16 L of CH4/g COD and produce biogas containing of CH4: 81.23% and CO2: 16.12%. The wastewater treatment of tofu production using ASBR reactor is able to produce renewable energy that has economic value as well as environmentally friendly by nature.

  13. Study of Cr (III) biosorption in a fixed-bed column.

    PubMed

    Calero, M; Hernáinz, F; Blázquez, G; Tenorio, G; Martín-Lara, M A

    2009-11-15

    This research analyzes the potential use of the olive stone as a low-cost biosorbent for Cr (III) from aqueous solutions in a continuous system. First, experiments were carried out in fixed-bed column to test the influence of various parameters on breakthrough and saturation time. The breakthrough and saturation time increase with the decrease of the flow rate. The same effect is shown when the bed depth is increased. The olive stone sorption capacity, q(e), increases as the inlet Cr (III) concentration increases until a value close to 0.800 mg/g is reached, then q(e) remains constant. Column data obtained at different conditions were described using the Adams-Bohart, Thomas, Yoon and Nelson, and Dose-Response models. The breakthrough curve prediction by the Adams-Bohart and Dose-Response models were found to be very satisfactory. In particular, the Adams-Bohart model can be used to represent the initial region of breakthrough curve, whereas the Dose-Response model is the one which best reproduces the whole curve for all the inlet Cr (III) concentrations used. Finally, a study of pH evolution was carried out. The pH increases at the beginning, subsequently decreasing as time passes until practically reaching the initial value. PMID:19616378

  14. Performance of a fixed-bed biofilm reactor with microbubble aeration in aerobic wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Liu, Junliang; Liu, Chun; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Jingliang

    2016-01-01

    Microbubble aeration is supposed to be highly efficient for oxygen supply in aerobic wastewater treatment. In the present study, the performance of a fixed-bed biofilm reactor microbubble-aerated using a Shirasu porous glass (SPG) membrane system was investigated when treating synthetic municipal wastewater. The biofilm formation on the carriers was enhanced with microbubble aeration due to the strong adhesion of microbubbles to the solid surface. The dissolved oxygen concentration, the removals of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and nitrogen, and the oxygen utilization efficiency were influenced by the organic loading rate at a certain oxygen supply capacity. The relatively optimal organic loading rate was determined as 0.82 kgCOD/(m(3)d) when the oxygen supply capacity was 0.93 kgO(2)/(m(3)d), where COD and ammonia removal efficiencies were 91.7% and 53.9%, respectively. The corresponding SPG membrane area-based COD removal capacity was 6.88 kgCOD/(m(2)d). The oxygen utilization efficiency of microbubble aeration was obviously higher compared to conventional bubble aeration. The simultaneous nitrification and denitrification occurred in the biofilm reactor and the total nitrogen removal efficiency of 50.4% was achieved under these conditions. In addition, the increase in air supply capacity of the SPG membrane system was suggested to improve its energy utilization efficiency. PMID:27386991

  15. Numerical simulation of gas concentration and dioxin formation for MSW combustion in a fixed bed.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rui; Ismail, Tamer M; Ren, Xiaohan; Abd El-Salam, M

    2015-07-01

    A numerical model was employed to simulate the combustion process in a fixed porous bed of municipal solid waste (MSW). Mass, momentum, energy and species conservation equations of the waste bed were set up to describe the incineration process. The rate of moisture evaporation, volatile matter devolatilization, char combustion, NOx production, and reduction and dioxin formation were calculated and established according to the local thermal conditions and waste property characteristics. Changes in the bed volume during incineration were calculated according to the reaction rate of the process. The simulation results were compared with experimental data, which shows that the incineration process of waste in the fixed bed was reasonably simulated. The simulation results of weight loss and solid temperature in the bed agree with the experimental data, which shows that the waste combustion rate is nearly constant in the middle of the incineration process, and that moisture evaporation takes up most of the time for the overall incineration experiment. The emission of gas species from the bed surface is also agreeably simulated, with O2, CO2, and CO concentrations in flue gas agreeing with the experimental data. The simulation results benefit the understanding of the combustion process in the waste bed as well as the design of incinerator grates.

  16. Catalytic hydrolysis of urea from wastewater using different aluminas by a fixed bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shuguang; Li, Meina; Li, Binbin; Zhao, Zhijun

    2014-11-01

    In order to find an effective method for treating urea wastewater, the experiments on the hydrolysis of urea in wastewater were conducted in a fixed bed reactor with different aluminas (α-Al2O3, γ-Al2O3, and η-Al2O3) as catalysts respectively in contrast with inert ceramic particle. The results indicate that the three alumina catalysts show obvious catalytic activity for urea hydrolysis at 125 °C. The order of activity is η-Al2O3 > γ-Al2O3 > α-Al2O3, and the activity difference increases with increasing temperature. According to the characterization results, surface acidity has little impact on the activity of catalyst. However, it was found that surface basicity of alumina catalyst plays an important role in catalytic hydrolysis of urea, and the activity of catalyst may be also influenced by the basic strength. With η-Al2O3 as catalyst, the urea concentration in wastewater is reduced to 4.96 mg/L at a temperature of 165 °C. Moreover, the η-Al2O3 shows a good stability for urea hydrolysis. The hydrolysis of urea over η-Al2O3 catalyst can evidently reduce the reaction temperature and is promising to replace industrial thermal hydrolysis process.

  17. Treatment of winery wastewater in a full-scale fixed bed biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Andreottola, G; Foladori, P; Nardelli, P; Denicolo, A

    2005-01-01

    The treatment of winery wastewater was performed at full-scale applying a two-stage fixed bed biofilm reactor (FBBR) system for the discharge in the sewerage. The results of the first year of operation at the full-scale plant are presented. Values of removed organic loads and effluent concentrations were interpreted on the basis of the COD fractionation of influent wastewater assessed through respirometric tests. The average removal efficiency of total COD was 91 %. It was not possible to reach an higher efficiency because of the unbiodegradable soluble fraction of COD (about 10% of total COD on average during the whole year), that cannot be removed by biological process or settling. Due to the high empty space offered by the plastic carriers, FBBRs did not require backwashing during the seasonal operationing period of the plant (September-March). In comparison with other treatment systems the FBBR configuration allows one to ensure a simple management, to obtain high efficiency also in the case of higher fluctuations of flow and loads and to guarantee a good settleability of the sludge, without bulking problems.

  18. Color removal from textile wastewater by using treated flute reed in a fixed bed column.

    PubMed

    Inthorn, Duangrat; Tipprasertsin, Kannika; Thiravetyan, Paitip; Khan, Eakalak

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of acid treated flute reed to adsorb color (dye) from synthetic reactive dye solutions, and actual dyeing and printing textile wastewaters in a laboratory scale fixed bed column. The effects of particle size, initial reactive dye concentration, bed depth and flow rate on adsorption performances were examined. The results from experiments with synthetic reactive dye solutions showed that the volume treated (until the breakthrough occurred) increased with decreasing particle size, influent reactive dye concentration and flow rate, and increasing bed depth. The bed depth service time model was suitable for describing the experimental data. The treated flute reed was able to reduce color efficiently, 99% for dyeing textile wastewater with ten adsorption columns in series and 78% for printing textile wastewater with a single adsorption column. The difference in the numbers of columns used for the two types of actual textile wastewater led to a substantial discrepancy in suspended solids removal, 99% for dyeing wastewater and 12% for printing wastewater. Similar pH and chemical oxygen demand (COD) results were obtained for the two types of textile wastewater. The acid pretreatment of flute reed resulted in dramatic decreases in pH after the adsorption and very acidic effluents (pH 3). Increases of COD after the adsorption due to organic leaching from the treated flute reed were observed. A different pretreatment method to solve these pH and COD problems is needed before flute reed can be used in practice. PMID:20390911

  19. Combustion tests of a turbine simulator burning low Btu fuel from a fixed bed gasifier

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, C.S.; Abuaf, N.; Feitelberg, A.S.; Hung, S.L.; Najewicz, D.J.; Samuels, M.S.

    1993-11-01

    One of the most efficient and environmentally compatible coal fueled power generation technologies is the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) concept. Commercialization of the IGCC/HGCU concept requires successful development of combustion systems for high temperature low Btu fuel in gas turbines. Toward this goal, a turbine combustion system simulator has been designed, constructed, and fired with high temperature low Btu fuel. Fuel is supplied by a pilot scale fixed bed gasifier and hot gas desulfurization system. The primary objectives of this project are: (1) demonstration of long term operability of the turbine simulator with high temperature low Btu fuel; (2) measurement of NO{sub x}, CO, and particulate emissions; and (3) characterization of particulates in the fuel as well as deposits in the fuel nozzle, combustor, and first stage nozzle. In a related project, a reduced scale rich-quench-lean (RQL) gas turbine combustor has been designed, constructed, and fired with simulated low Btu fuel. The overall objective of this project is to develop an RQL combustor with lower conversion of fuel bound nitrogen (FBN) to NO{sub x} than a conventional combustor.

  20. Combined production and purification of hydrogen from methanol using steam iron process in fixed bed reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, R.; Durán, P.; Plou, J.; Herguido, J.; Peña, J. A.

    2013-11-01

    A research work is being conducted to study the combined production and purification of hydrogen by means of redox processes departing from biomass fast pyrolysis oils (bio-oils). To achieve that goal, methanol has been used as featured material because it is the most representative compound of the alcoholic fraction of bio-oils. The study has been carried out in a fixed bed reactor where methanol decomposes in H2 and CO when gets in contact with a reactive solid based in an iron oxide at temperatures above 600 °C. During the first stage of the “steam-iron” process, reactive gases reduce the iron oxide to metallic iron. Afterward, in a following step, the previously reduced iron is reoxidized by steam producing a high purity hydrogen stream. Although coke deposition does exist during the reducing stage, this behaves as inert during the reoxidation process. Coke inert role has been corroborated by GC, SEM and TEM techniques, showing that carbon deposits were constituted by ordered structures (carbon nanotubes). The determination of the hydrogen production along successive cycles allowed the evaluation of the effect of temperature and alternating reactive atmospheres on the stability of the solid, as well as the optimum conditions for such purpose.

  1. Process Development of Adenoviral Vector Production in Fixed Bed Bioreactor: From Bench to Commercial Scale.

    PubMed

    Lesch, Hanna P; Heikkilä, Kati M; Lipponen, Eevi M; Valonen, Piia; Müller, Achim; Räsänen, Eva; Tuunanen, Tarja; Hassinen, Minna M; Parker, Nigel; Karhinen, Minna; Shaw, Robert; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2015-08-01

    Large-scale vector manufacturing for phase III and beyond has proven to be challenging. Upscaling the process with suspension cells is increasingly feasible, but many viral production applications are still applicable only in adherent settings. Scaling up the adherent system has proven to be troublesome. The iCELLis(®) disposable fixed-bed bioreactors offer a possible option for viral vector manufacturing in large quantities in an adherent environment. In this study, we have optimized adenovirus serotype 5 manufacturing using iCELLis Nano with a cultivation area up to 4 m(2). HEK293 cell cultivation, infection, and harvest of the virus (by lysing the cells inside the bioreactor) proved possible, reaching total yield of up to 1.6×10(14) viral particles (vp)/batch. The iCELLis 500 is designed to satisfy demand for large-scale requirements. Inoculating a large quantity of cell mass into the iCELLis 500 was achieved by first expanding the cell mass in suspension. Upscaling the process into an iCELLis 500/100 m(2) cultivation area cassette was practical and produced up to 6.1×10(15) vp. Flask productivity per cm(2) in iCELLis Nano and iCELLis 500 was in the same range. As a conclusion, we showed for the first time that iCELLis 500 equipment has provided an effective way to manufacture large batches of adenoviral vectors. PMID:26176404

  2. Co-pyrolysis of corn cob and waste cooking oil in a fixed bed.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guanyi; Liu, Cong; Ma, Wenchao; Zhang, Xiaoxiong; Li, Yanbin; Yan, Beibei; Zhou, Weihong

    2014-08-01

    Corn cob (CC) and waste cooking oil (WCO) were co-pyrolyzed in a fixed bed. The effects of various temperatures of 500 °C, 550 °C, 600 °C and CC/WCO mass ratios of 1:0, 1:0.1, 1:0.5, 1:1 and 0:1 were investigated, respectively. Results show that co-pyrolysis of CC/WCO produce more liquid and less bio-char than pyrolysis of CC individually. Bio-oil and bio-char yields were found to be largely dependent on temperature and CC/WCO ratios. GC/MS of bio-oil show it consists of different classes and amounts of organic compounds other than that from CC pyrolysis. Temperature of 550 °C and CC/WCO ratio of 1:1 seem to be the optimum considering high bio-oil yields (68.6 wt.%) and good bio-oil properties (HHV of 32.78 MJ/kg). In this case, bio-char of 24.96 MJ/kg appears attractive as a renewable source, while gas with LHV of 16.06 MJ/Nm(3) can be directly used in boilers as fuel.

  3. Color removal from textile wastewater by using treated flute reed in a fixed bed column.

    PubMed

    Inthorn, Duangrat; Tipprasertsin, Kannika; Thiravetyan, Paitip; Khan, Eakalak

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of acid treated flute reed to adsorb color (dye) from synthetic reactive dye solutions, and actual dyeing and printing textile wastewaters in a laboratory scale fixed bed column. The effects of particle size, initial reactive dye concentration, bed depth and flow rate on adsorption performances were examined. The results from experiments with synthetic reactive dye solutions showed that the volume treated (until the breakthrough occurred) increased with decreasing particle size, influent reactive dye concentration and flow rate, and increasing bed depth. The bed depth service time model was suitable for describing the experimental data. The treated flute reed was able to reduce color efficiently, 99% for dyeing textile wastewater with ten adsorption columns in series and 78% for printing textile wastewater with a single adsorption column. The difference in the numbers of columns used for the two types of actual textile wastewater led to a substantial discrepancy in suspended solids removal, 99% for dyeing wastewater and 12% for printing wastewater. Similar pH and chemical oxygen demand (COD) results were obtained for the two types of textile wastewater. The acid pretreatment of flute reed resulted in dramatic decreases in pH after the adsorption and very acidic effluents (pH 3). Increases of COD after the adsorption due to organic leaching from the treated flute reed were observed. A different pretreatment method to solve these pH and COD problems is needed before flute reed can be used in practice.

  4. Modeling cesium ion exchange on fixed-bed columns of crystalline silicotitanate granules

    SciTech Connect

    Latheef, I.M.; Huckman, M.E.; Anthony, R.G.

    2000-05-01

    A mathematical model is presented to simulate Cs exchange in fixed-bed columns of a novel crystalline silicotitanate (CST) material, UOP IONSIV IE-911. A local equilibrium is assumed between the macropores and the solid crystals for the particle material balance. Axial dispersed flow and film mass-transfer resistance are incorporated into the column model. Cs equilibrium isotherms and diffusion coefficients were measured experimentally, and dispersion and film mass-transfer coefficients were estimated from correlations. Cs exchange column experiments were conducted in 5--5.7 M Na solutions and simulated using the proposed model. Best-fit diffusion coefficients from column simulations were compared with previously reported batch values of Gu et al. and Huckman. Cs diffusion coefficients for the column were between 2.5 and 5.0 x 10{sup {minus}11} m{sup 2}/s for 5--5.7 M Na solutions. The effect of the isotherm shape on the Cs diffusion coefficient was investigated. The proposed model provides good fits to experimental data and may be utilized in designing commercial-scale units.

  5. A novel fixed-bed reactor design incorporating an electrospun PVA/chitosan nanofiber membrane.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili, Akbar; Beni, Ali Aghababai

    2014-09-15

    In this research, a novel fixed-bed reactor was designed with a nanofiber membrane composed of a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/chitosan nanofiber blend prepared using an electrospinning technique. The applied voltage, tip-collector distance, and solution flow rate of the electrospinning process were 18 kV, 14.5 cm, and 0.5 mL h(-1), respectively. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) theory, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) were employed to characterize and analyze the nanofiber membranes. Homogeneous electrospun nanofibers with an average diameter of 99.47 nm and surface area of 214.12 m(2)g(-1) were obtained. Adsorption experiments were carried out in a batch system to investigate the effect of different adsorption parameters such as pH, adsorbent dose, biomass dose, contact time, and temperature. The kinetic data, obtained at the optimal pH of 6, were analyzed by pseudo first-order and pseudo second-order kinetic models. Three isotherm models and thermodynamic parameters (ΔG°, ΔH°, and ΔS°) were applied to describe the equilibrium data of the metal ions adsorbed onto the PVA/chitosan nanofiber membrane.

  6. [Synthesis of diacylglycerol using immoblized regiospecific lipase in continuously operated fixed bed reactors].

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiang-He; Sun, Pei-Long; Yang, Kai; He, Rong-Jun; Mao, Zhong-Gui

    2005-05-01

    Diacylglycerol, DAG, because of its multifunctional and nutritional properties, attracted considerable attention recently. Enzymatic synthesis of diacylglycerols from linoleic acid was investigated in a solvent-free reaction in a continuously operated fixed bed reactors containing Lipozyme RM IM. By appropriate manipulation of the fluid-residence time, the relative proportions of the various acylglycerols in the effluent stream can be controlled. In addition, the presence of excess glycerol is effective for the removal of water produced during the esterification reactions. Under the conditions of molar ratio of linoleic acid to glycerol of 0.5, the immoblized enzyme maintained high stability and allowed the reaction to continue for 10 days without significant deterioration in enzyme activity. It was determined that the conversion of fatty acid, content of 1,3-DAG and volume efficiency of reactor reached optima under the conditions: a packaged-bed reactor(with a ratio of packed length to inner diameter of 7.8), reacting temperature at 65 degrees C, molar ratio of linoleic acid to glycerol of 0.5, and feeding flow rate of 1.2 mL/min.

  7. Fixed bed testing of a molybdenum-promoted zinc titanate for hot gas desulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    Gasper-Galvin, L.D.; Mei, J.S.; Everitt, C.E.; Katta, S.

    1993-09-01

    The following conclusions were made, based upon this study of T-2535 molybdenum-promoted zinc titanate: (1) Results of the half-cycle sulfidation experiments showed that sorbent efficiency and capacity of this formulation of zinc titanate were weak functions of operating-bed temperature. Evidence of diffusion limitations on the sulfidation reaction were observed, particularly at superficial velocities greater than 30 cm/s (1 ft/s). Sorbent performance appeared to be affected by the concentration of reducing gases and/or water content of the simulated coal gas mixtures. Sorbent capacity and efficiency deteriorated during the first three cycles, but stabilized thereafter. (2) Sorbent spalling was observed and appeared to increase with sulfur loading. Possible causes of spalling may be attributed to the induced crystal lattice stresses due to the formation of ZnS and especially ZnSO{sub 4}, which have relative molar volumes that are approximately 1-1/2 and 3 times larger, respectively, than that of the original ZnO. (3) Based on these results, it is apparent that the molybdenum-promoted zinc titanate with Zn/Ti molar ratio of 1.91 may not be a suitable sorbent for hot gas desulfurization in the fixed bed reactor for the Pinon Pine project, due to problems with spalling and loss of reactivity during sulfidation/regeneration cycling.

  8. Efficient expansion of mesenchymal stromal cells in a disposable fixed bed culture system.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Amanda; Orellana, Maristela D; Caruso, Sâmia R; de Lima Prata, Karen; Covas, Dimas T; Swiech, Kamilla

    2013-01-01

    The need for efficient and reliable technologies for clinical-scale expansion of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) has led to the use of disposable bioreactors and culture systems. Here, we evaluate the expansion of cord blood-derived MSC in a disposable fixed bed culture system. Starting from an initial cell density of 6.0 × 10(7) cells, after 7 days of culture, it was possible to produce of 4.2(±0.8) × 10(8) cells, which represents a fold increase of 7.0 (±1.4). After enzymatic retrieval from Fibra-Cell disks, the cells were able to maintain their potential for differentiation into adipocytes and osteocytes and were positive for many markers common to MSC (CD73, CD90, and CD105). The results obtained in this study demonstrate that MSC can be efficiently expanded in the culture system. This novel approach presents several advantages over the current expansion systems, based on culture flasks or microcarrier-based spinner flasks and represents a key element for MSC cellular therapy according to GMP compliant clinical-scale production system.

  9. Impact of feedstock properties and operating conditions on sewage sludge gasification in a fixed bed gasifier.

    PubMed

    Werle, Sebastian

    2014-10-01

    This work presents results of experimental studies on the gasification process of granulated sewage sludge in a laboratory fixed bed gasifier. Nowadays, there is a large and pressing need for the development of thermal methods for sewage sludge disposal. Gasification is an example of thermal method that has several advantages over the traditional combustion. Gasification leads to a combustible gas, which can be used for the generation of useful forms of final energy. It can also be used in processes, such as the drying of sewage sludge directly in waste treatment plant. In the present work, the operating parameters were varied over a wide range. Parameters, such as air ratio λ = 0.12 to 0.27 and the temperature of air preheating t = 50 °C to 250 °C, were found to influence temperature distribution and syngas properties. The results indicate that the syngas heating value decreases with rising air ratio for all analysed cases: i.e. for both cold and preheated air. The increase in the concentration of the main combustible components was accompanied by a decrease in the concentration of carbon dioxide. Preheating of the gasification agent supports the endothermic gasification and increases hydrogen and carbon monoxide production.

  10. Co-pyrolysis of corn cob and waste cooking oil in a fixed bed.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guanyi; Liu, Cong; Ma, Wenchao; Zhang, Xiaoxiong; Li, Yanbin; Yan, Beibei; Zhou, Weihong

    2014-08-01

    Corn cob (CC) and waste cooking oil (WCO) were co-pyrolyzed in a fixed bed. The effects of various temperatures of 500 °C, 550 °C, 600 °C and CC/WCO mass ratios of 1:0, 1:0.1, 1:0.5, 1:1 and 0:1 were investigated, respectively. Results show that co-pyrolysis of CC/WCO produce more liquid and less bio-char than pyrolysis of CC individually. Bio-oil and bio-char yields were found to be largely dependent on temperature and CC/WCO ratios. GC/MS of bio-oil show it consists of different classes and amounts of organic compounds other than that from CC pyrolysis. Temperature of 550 °C and CC/WCO ratio of 1:1 seem to be the optimum considering high bio-oil yields (68.6 wt.%) and good bio-oil properties (HHV of 32.78 MJ/kg). In this case, bio-char of 24.96 MJ/kg appears attractive as a renewable source, while gas with LHV of 16.06 MJ/Nm(3) can be directly used in boilers as fuel. PMID:24951937

  11. Numerical simulation of gas concentration and dioxin formation for MSW combustion in a fixed bed.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rui; Ismail, Tamer M; Ren, Xiaohan; Abd El-Salam, M

    2015-07-01

    A numerical model was employed to simulate the combustion process in a fixed porous bed of municipal solid waste (MSW). Mass, momentum, energy and species conservation equations of the waste bed were set up to describe the incineration process. The rate of moisture evaporation, volatile matter devolatilization, char combustion, NOx production, and reduction and dioxin formation were calculated and established according to the local thermal conditions and waste property characteristics. Changes in the bed volume during incineration were calculated according to the reaction rate of the process. The simulation results were compared with experimental data, which shows that the incineration process of waste in the fixed bed was reasonably simulated. The simulation results of weight loss and solid temperature in the bed agree with the experimental data, which shows that the waste combustion rate is nearly constant in the middle of the incineration process, and that moisture evaporation takes up most of the time for the overall incineration experiment. The emission of gas species from the bed surface is also agreeably simulated, with O2, CO2, and CO concentrations in flue gas agreeing with the experimental data. The simulation results benefit the understanding of the combustion process in the waste bed as well as the design of incinerator grates. PMID:25897505

  12. Genome Sequence of the Facultative Anaerobe Oerskovia enterophila DFA-19 (DSM 43852T)

    PubMed Central

    Jag, Vanessa; Bengelsdorf, Frank R.; Daniel, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Oerskovia enterophila DFA-19 (DSM 43852T), a facultative anaerobe soil bacterium, which was originally isolated from millipede feces and first described as Promicromonospora enterophila. The genome consists of a circular chromosome comprising approximately 4.65 Mb and 4,044 predicted protein-encoding genes. PMID:27634998

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Leptolinea tardivitalis YMTK-2, a Mesophilic Anaerobe from the Chloroflexi Class Anaerolineae.

    PubMed

    Ward, Lewis M; Hemp, James; Pace, Laura A; Fischer, Woodward W

    2015-01-01

    We present the draft genome sequence of Leptolinea tardivitalis YMTK-2, a member of the Chloroflexi phylum. This organism was initially characterized as a strictly anaerobic nonmotile fermenter; however, genome analysis demonstrates that it encodes for a flagella and might be capable of aerobic respiration. PMID:26586893

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of the Anaerobic Halophilic Alkalithermophile Natranaerobius thermophilus JW/NM-WN-LFT

    SciTech Connect

    Mesbah, Noha; Dalin, Eileen; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Nolan, Matt; Pitluck, Sam; Chertkov, Olga; Han, James; Larimer, Frank W; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Wiegel, Juergen

    2011-01-01

    The genome of the anaerobic halophilic alkalithermophile Natranaerobius thermophiles consists of one chromosome and two plasmids.The present study is the first to report the completely sequenced genome of polyextremophile and the harboring genes harboring genes associated with roles in regulation of intracellular osmotic pressure, pH homeostasis, and thermophilic stability.

  15. Genome Sequence of the Facultative Anaerobe Oerskovia enterophila DFA-19 (DSM 43852T).

    PubMed

    Jag, Vanessa; Poehlein, Anja; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Daniel, Rolf; Dürre, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Oerskovia enterophila DFA-19 (DSM 43852(T)), a facultative anaerobe soil bacterium, which was originally isolated from millipede feces and first described as Promicromonospora enterophila The genome consists of a circular chromosome comprising approximately 4.65 Mb and 4,044 predicted protein-encoding genes. PMID:27634998

  16. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of the anaerobically regulated pepT gene of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, C G; Miller, J L; Bagga, D A

    1991-01-01

    The anaerobically regulated pepT gene of Salmonella typhimurium has been cloned in pBR328. Strains carrying the pepT plasmid, pJG17, overproduce peptidase T by approximately 70-fold. The nucleotide sequence of a 2.5-kb region including pepT has been determined. The sequence codes for a protein of 44,855 Da, consistent with a molecular weight of approximately 46,000 for peptidase T (as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel filtration). The N-terminal amino acid sequence of peptidase T purified from a pJG17-containing strain matches that predicted by the nucleotide sequence. A plasmid carrying an anaerobically regulated pepT::lacZ transcriptional fusion contains only 165 bp 5' to the start of translation. This region contains a sequence highly homologous to that identified in Escherichia coli as the site of action of the FNR protein, a positive regulator of anaerobic gene expression. A region of the deduced amino acid sequence of peptidase T is similar to segments of Pseudomonas carboxypeptidase G2, the E. coli peptidase encoded by the iap gene, and E. coli peptidase D. PMID:1904438

  17. Emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from fluidized and fixed bed incinerators disposing petrochemical industrial biological sludge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin-Chi; Lin, Long-Full; Lai, Soon-Onn

    2009-08-30

    This study investigated the emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from two fluidized bed incinerators (FLBI_A and FLBI_B) and one fixed bed incinerator (FIBI) disposing biological sludge generated from the petrochemical industries in Taiwan. The results of 21 individual PAHs (including low (LM-PAHs), middle (MM-PAHs) and high molecular weight PAHs (HM-PAHs)) were reported. The LM-PAHs mainly dominated the total-PAHs in the stack flue gases, whereas the LM- and HM-PAHs dominated the total-PAHs in the bottom fly, fly ash and WSB effluent. Due to high carcinogenic potencies (=total-BaP(eq) concentrations) in the bottom ash (195 ng g(-1)) and WSB effluent (20,600 ng L(-1)) of the FIBI, cautious should be taken in treating them to avoid second contamination. Lower combustion efficiency and elevated fuel/feedstock (F/W) ratio for the FIBI led to the highest total emission factor of total-PAHs (38,400 microg kg(-1)). Lower total-PAH removal efficiencies of wet scrubber (WSB) (0.837-5.89%), cyclone (0.109-0.255%) and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) (0.032%) than those reported elsewhere resulted in high fraction in PAH contributions from the stack flue gases. Lower total-PAH emission factor was found for FLBI_A (2380 microg kg(-1) biological sludge) with higher combustion efficiency compared to those for FLBI_B (11,500 microg kg(-1)) and FIBI (38,400 microg kg(-1) biological sludge), implying that combustion efficiency plays a vital role in PAH emissions. PMID:19272707

  18. Porous filtering media comparison through wet and dry sampling of fixed bed gasification products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allesina, G.; Pedrazzi, S.; Montermini, L.; Giorgini, L.; Bortolani, G.; Tartarini, P.

    2014-11-01

    The syngas produced by fixed bed gasifiers contains high quantities of particulate and tars. This issue, together with its high temperature, avoids its direct exploitation without a proper cleaning and cooling process. In fact, when the syngas produced by gasification is used in an Internal Combustion engine (IC), the higher the content of tars and particulate, the higher the risk to damage the engine is. If these compounds are not properly removed, the engine may fail to run. A way to avoid engine fails is to intensify the maintenance schedule, but these stops will reduce the system profitability. From a clean syngas does not only follow higher performance of the generator, but also less pollutants in the atmosphere. When is not possible to work on the gasification reactions, the filter plays the most important role in the engine safeguard process. This work is aimed at developing and comparing different porous filters for biomass gasifiers power plants. A drum filter was developed and tested filling it with different filtering media available on the market. As a starting point, the filter was implemented in a Power Pallet 10 kW gasifier produced by the California-based company "ALL Power Labs". The original filter was replaced with different porous biomasses, such as woodchips and corn cobs. Finally, a synthetic zeolites medium was tested and compared with the biological media previously used. The Tar Sampling Protocol (TSP) and a modified "dry" method using the Silica Gel material were applied to evaluate the tars, particulate and water amount in the syngas after the filtration process. Advantages and disadvantages of every filtering media chosen were reported and discussed.

  19. Flow, turbulence, and drag associated with engineered log jams in a fixed-bed experimental channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Sean J.; Ghaneeizad, S. Mohammad; Gallisdorfer, Michael S.; Cai, Donghua; Atkinson, Joseph F.; Simon, Andrew; Langendoen, Eddy J.

    2015-11-01

    Engineered log jams (ELJs) have become attractive alternatives for river restoration and bank stabilization programs. Yet the effects of ELJs on turbulent flow and the fluid forces acting on the ELJs are not well known, and such information could inform design criteria. In this study, a fixed-bed physical model was constructed to assess the introduction of ELJs along the Big Sioux River, SD. Two ELJ types were examined, referred to as ELJ-1 and ELJ-2. Both types were deflector jams, where ELJ-1 was rectangular and ELJ-2 was triangular, and oriented with one side attached to the channel bank. They were deployed either as single structures or in groups of two or three on the same side of the channel and at different separation distances. Results show that (1) time-mean and turbulent velocities and bed shear stresses were measurably altered near the ELJ, but spatially averaged flow just upstream and downstream of the structure was unaffected; (2) streamwise drag forces measured for the ELJs were significantly larger than the transverse forces, and the derived drag coefficients for the single structures were 2.72 ± 0.19 for ELJ-1 and 1.60 ± 0.37 for ELJ-2; and (3) the presence of an upstream structure created a near-bank wake region that extended a distance of more than 30 flow depths downstream, which greatly reduced drag forces and drag coefficients observed for the downstream structure by as much as 80%. These observations are further evidence of the efficacy of ELJs in providing near-structure scour pool development and bank protection downstream, and they can be used to inform and assess the design of ELJs for use in river restoration and bank stabilization projects.

  20. Adsorptive control of water in esterification with immobilized enzymes: II. fixed-bed reactor behavior.

    PubMed

    Mensah, P; Gainer, J L; Carta, G

    1998-11-20

    Experimental and theoretical studies are conducted to understand the dynamic behavior of a continuous-flow fixed-bed reactor in which an esterification is catalyzed by an immobilized enzyme in an organic solvent medium. The experimental system consists of a commercial immobilized lipase preparation known as Lipozyme as the biocatalyst, with propionic acid and isoamyl alcohol (dissolved in hexane) as the reaction substrates. A complex dynamic behavior is observed experimentally as a result of the simultaneous occurrence of reaction and adsorption phenomena. Both propionic acid and water are adsorbed by the biocatalyst resulting in lower reaction rates. In addition, an excessive accumulation of water in the reactor leads to a rapid irreversible inactivation of the enzyme. A model based on previously-obtained adsorption isotherms and kinetic expressions, as well as on adsorption rate measurements obtained in this work, is used to predict the concentration and thermodynamic activity of water along the reactor length. The model successfully predicts the dynamic behavior of the reactor and shows that a maximum thermodynamic activity of water occurs at a point at some distance from the reactor entrance. A cation exchange resin in sodium form, packed in the reactor as a selective water adsorbent together with the catalyst particles, is shown to be an effective means for preventing an excessive accumulation of water formed in the reaction. Its use results in longer cycle times and greater productivity. As predicted by the model, the experimental results show that the water adsorbed on the catalyst and on the ion exchange resin can be removed with isoamyl alcohol with no apparent loss in enzyme activity.

  1. Production of phenol-rich bio-oil during catalytic fixed-bed and microwave pyrolysis of palm kernel shell.

    PubMed

    Omoriyekomwan, Joy Esohe; Tahmasebi, Arash; Yu, Jianglong

    2016-05-01

    Catalytic fixed-bed and microwave pyrolysis of palm kernel shell using activated carbon (AC) and lignite char (LC) as catalysts and microwave receptors are investigated. The effects of process parameters including temperature and biomass:catalyst ratio on the yield and composition of pyrolysis products were studied. The addition of catalyst increased the bio-oil yield, but decreased the selectivity of phenol in fixed-bed. Catalytic microwave pyrolysis of PKS significantly enhanced the selectivity of phenol production. The highest concentration of phenol in bio-oil of 64.58 %(area) and total phenolics concentration of 71.24 %(area) were obtained at 500°C using AC. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results indicated that concentration of OH, CH, CO and CO functional groups in char samples decreased after pyrolysis. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis clearly indicated the development of liquid phase in biomass particles during microwave pyrolysis, and the mechanism is also discussed.

  2. Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 12. Gasification of Absaloka/Robinson subbituminous coal

    SciTech Connect

    Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Pooler, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittelson, D.

    1985-05-01

    A single-staged, fixed-bed Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scrubber has been used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a cooperative effort by private industrial particpants and governmental agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas (MIFGa) Group. This report is the twelfth volume in a series of reports describing the atmospheric pressure, fixed-bed gasification of US coals. this specific reports describes the gasification of Absaloka/Robinson subbituminous coal. This volume covers the test period June 18, 1984 to June 30, 1984. 4 refs., 20 figs., 18 tabs.

  3. Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 8. Gasification of River King Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal

    SciTech Connect

    Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Pooler, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittelson, D.

    1985-05-01

    A single-staged, fixed-bed Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scrubber has been used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a cooperative effort by private industrial participants and governmental agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas (MIFGa) Group. This report is the eighth volume in a series of reports describing the atmospheric pressure, fixed-bed gasification of US coals. This specific report describes the gasification of River King Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal. The period of gasification test was July 28 to August 19, 1983. 6 refs., 23 figs., 25 tabs.

  4. Comparison of Pb(II) uptake by coir and dye loaded coir fibres in a fixed bed column.

    PubMed

    Shukla, S R; Pai, Roshan S

    2005-10-17

    The possibility of adsorbing Pb(II) from solution using coir, a cheap lignocellulosic fibre, was assessed in a fixed bed column. The coir fibres were also chemically modified by covalent loading of a reactive dye, C.I. Reactive Orange 13, and used as adsorbent. Column adsorption studies were carried out at different initial Pb(II) concentrations and it was observed that the breakthrough time decreased with increase in the initial Pb(II) concentration. The column packed with dye loaded coir fibres was operated for longer duration than the one packed with unmodified coir fibres. The total Pb(II) adsorbed was also higher in a column packed with dye loaded coir fibres. The desorption level in the fixed bed column packed with coir fibres was of the order of 85%, whereas the one packed with dye loaded coir fibres was more than 90%. Both the columns were regenerated and used upto five cycles. PMID:16019143

  5. Mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion of abattoir wastewater and fruit and vegetable waste in anaerobic sequencing batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Bouallagui, Hassib; Rachdi, Boutheina; Gannoun, Hana; Hamdi, Moktar

    2009-06-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of fruit and vegetable waste (FVW) and abattoir wastewater (AW) was investigated using anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (ASBRs). The effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and temperature variations on digesters performances were examined. At both 20 and 10 days biogas production for co-digestion was greater thanks to the improved balance of nutrients. The high specific gas productions for the different digestion processes were 0.56, 0.61 and 0.85 l g(-1) total volatile solids (TVS) removal for digesters treating AW, FVW and AW + FVW, respectively. At an HRT of 20 days, biogas production rates from thermophilic digesters were higher on average than from mesophilic AW, FVW and AW + FVW digestion by 28.5, 44.5 and 25%, respectively. However, at 10 days of HRT results showed a decrease of biogas production rate for AW and AW + FVW digestion processes due to the high amount of free ammonia at high organic loading rate (OLR).

  6. Fixed bed sorption of phosphorus from wastewater using iron oxide-based media derived from acid mine drainage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sibrell, Philip L.; Tucker, T.W.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) releases to the environment have been implicated in the eutrophication of important water bodies worldwide. Current technology for the removal of P from wastewaters consists of treatment with aluminum (Al) or iron (Fe) salts, but is expensive. The neutralization of acid mine drainage (AMD) generates sludge rich in Fe and Al oxides that has hitherto been considered a waste product, but these sludges could serve as an economical adsorption media for the removal of P from wastewaters. Therefore, we have evaluated an AMD-derived media as a sorbent for P in fixed bed sorption systems. The homogenous surface diffusion model (HSDM) was used to analyze fixed bed test data and to determine the value of related sorption parameters. The surface diffusion modulus Ed was found to be a useful predictor of sorption kinetics. Values of Ed < 0.2 were associated with early breakthrough of P, while more desirable S-shaped breakthrough curves resulted when 0.2 < Ed < 0.5. Computer simulations of the fixed bed process with the HSDM confirmed that if Ed was known, the shape of the breakthrough curve could be calculated. The surface diffusion coefficient D s was a critical factor in the calculation of Ed and could be estimated based on the sorption test conditions such as media characteristics, and influent flow rate and concentration. Optimal test results were obtained with a relatively small media particle size (average particle radius 0.028 cm) and resulted in 96 % removal of P from the influent over 46 days of continuous operation. These results indicate that fixed bed sorption of P would be a feasible option for the utilization of AMD residues, thus helping to decrease AMD treatment costs while at the same time ameliorating the impacts of P contamination.

  7. Enhanced removal of sulfonamide antibiotics by KOH-activated anthracite coal: Batch and fixed-bed studies.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Linzi; Ai, Jing; Fu, Heyun; Chen, Wei; Zheng, Shourong; Xu, Zhaoyi; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2016-04-01

    The presence of sulfonamide antibiotics in aquatic environments poses potential risks to human health and ecosystems. In the present study, a highly porous activated carbon was prepared by KOH activation of an anthracite coal (Anth-KOH), and its adsorption properties toward two sulfonamides (sulfamethoxazole and sulfapyridine) and three smaller-sized monoaromatics (phenol, 4-nitrophenol and 1,3-dinitrobenzene) were examined in both batch and fixed-bed adsorption experiments to probe the interplay between adsorbate molecular size and adsorbent pore structure. A commercial powder microporous activated carbon (PAC) and a commercial mesoporous carbon (CMK-3) possessing distinct pore properties were included as comparative adsorbents. Among the three adsorbents Anth-KOH exhibited the largest adsorption capacities for all test adsorbates (especially the two sulfonamides) in both batch mode and fixed-bed mode. After being normalized by the adsorbent surface area, the batch adsorption isotherms of sulfonamides on PAC and Anth-KOH were displaced upward relative to the isotherms on CMK-3, likely due to the micropore-filling effect facilitated by the microporosity of adsorbents. In the fixed-bed mode, the surface area-normalized adsorption capacities of Anth-KOH for sulfonamides were close to that of CMK-3, and higher than that of PAC. The irregular, closed micropores of PAC might impede the diffusion of the relatively large-sized sulfonamide molecules and in turn led to lowered fixed-bed adsorption capacities. The overall superior adsorption of sulfonamides on Anth-KOH can be attributed to its large specific surface area (2514 m(2)/g), high pore volume (1.23 cm(3)/g) and large micropore sizes (centered at 2.0 nm). These findings imply that KOH-activated anthracite coal is a promising adsorbent for the removal of sulfonamide antibiotics from aqueous solution.

  8. Biodegradation of Phenol in Synthetic Wastewater Using a Fixed Bed Reactor With up Flow Sludge Blanket Filtration (FUSBF)

    PubMed Central

    Ghannadzadeh, Mohammad-Javad; Jonidi-Jafari, Ahmad; Rezaee, Abbas; Soltani, Reza Darvishi Cheshmeh

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the removal of phenol from synthetic wastewater was evaluated in a fixed bed reactor with up flow sludge blanket filtration (FUSBF) in comparison with a typical USBF system. At hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 24 hours and solid retention time (SRT) of 20 day, the effect of initial concentration of phenol (260-1020 mg/L) on phenol and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency (%) was investigated in both systems. The effect of the presence of fixed bed was determined throughout the operational period. The results showed that the FUSBF system had a better ability than the typical USBF system in terms of phenol and COD removal. The average phenol and COD removal at phenol concentration of 312 mg/L was 97.52% and 92.82% for the FUSBF system and 92.80% and 82.18% for the typical USBF system, respectively. At HRT of 24 h and organic loading rate (OLR) of 30 g/m-3.h-1, the amount of phenol removal was 82.1%. At OLR of 30 g/m-3.h-1, role of fixed bed in phenol and COD removal was 25.01% and 29.3%, respectively, overall, the FUSBF system has a higher efficiency and ability than that of typical USBF and can be used for the purification of industrial wastewater containing refractory organic compounds such as phenol. PMID:26153212

  9. Esterification of oleic acid in a three-phase, fixed-bed reactor packed with a cation exchange resin catalyst.

    PubMed

    Son, Sung Mo; Kimura, Hiroko; Kusakabe, Katsuki

    2011-01-01

    Esterification of oleic acid was performed in a three-phase fixed-bed reactor with a cation exchange resin catalyst (Amberlyst-15) at high temperature, which was varied from 80 to 120 °C. The fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) yields in the fixed-bed reactor were increased with increases in the reaction temperature, methanol flow rate and bed height. Moreover, the FAME yields were higher than those obtained using a batch reactor due to an equilibrium shift toward the product that resulted from continuous evaporation of the produced water. In addition, there was no catalyst deactivation during the esterification of oleic acid. However, addition of sunflower oil to the oleic acid reduced the FAME yield obtained from simultaneous esterification and transesterification. The FAME yield was 97.5% at a reaction temperature of 100 °C in the fixed-bed with a height of 5 cm when the methanol and oleic acid feed rates were 8.6 and 9.0 mL/h, respectively.

  10. Anaerobic treatment of textile dyeing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Stern, S R; Szpyrkowicz, L; Rodighiero, I

    2003-01-01

    Aerobic treatment commonly applied to textile wastewater results in good or even excellent removal of organic load. This is not, however, accompanied by an equally good removal of colour. Traditional or advanced chemical methods of decolourisation are costly and not always reliable in justifying an interest in microbial decolourisation. Among several processes anaerobic methods seem most promising. In this paper, the results of a study conducted in two pilot-scale plants comprising anaerobic fixed bed biofilters of 15 L and 5 m3 operating as continuous reactors are presented, along with evaluation of the microbial kinetics. As is shown the process proved efficient in a long-term study with no stability problems of the biofilters. The six-month performance of the pilot plant confirmed also that the pre-treated wastewater could be applied in the operation of dyeing. For the majority of the colours applied in the factory no problems were encountered when the dyeing baths were prepared by substituting 90% of fresh water to the effluent treated by a sequence of activated sludge processes: anaerobic-aerobic.

  11. Effect of bone on the pyrolysis product distribution and composition in a fixed bed reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhassan, M.; Andresen, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    Co-pyrolysis of Biomass including Pistachio shell (PS), Pine wood (PW) and Wheat Straw (WS) with Bone matter (BM) have been investigated to determine the effect of bone on the quality of bio-char and bio-oil produced. The aim of this study is to generate stable and nitrogen enriched bio-char that can act as fertilizer while at the same time optimizes the chemical stability of the char to act as a Carbon Capture and Storage system (CCS) and co-produce high quality oils for renewable energy generation. To achieve this, the present study has focused on the influence of bone matter addition from 0wt% to 25wt% to the biomasses in a fixed bed pyrolysis reactor at 3000C. The analysis of the char products shows that the addition of bone to the biomass increased their char yields up to 10wt% addition. Higher addition was found to reduce the overall char yield from the biomass. At 10wt% bone addition, the carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen content, and the gross calorific value of the chars were increased by 7wt%, 29wt%, 163wt% and 19Mj/kg, for Wheat straw, 62wt%, 46wt%, 135wt%, 110Mj/kg for Pine wood and 7wt%, 76wt%, 42wt% and 33Mj/kg for Pistachio shells. The oxygen content of the Wheat straw, Pistachio shells and pine wood mixed with 10wt% BM decreased by 28wt%, 21wt%, and 93wt%, respectively. The bio-oil yield increased for the bone addition up to 5%wt% for all the samples, its energy value and concentration of its major chemical components was improved for fuel and pharmaceutical use. Port experiment has shown that plant grown on soil amended with the bio-char produced gave higher yield as compared to that from un-amended soil. Comparison between the three biomasses investigated showed similar pattern of change. Hence it can be concluded that at optimum addition of bone to the biomass, bio-chars and oil yield could be optimized for soil amendment, energy production, while retaining carbon for sequestration.

  12. Drop Breakup in Fixed Bed Flows as Model Stochastic Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.; Mosler, Alisa B.; Patel, Prateek

    1999-01-01

    We examine drop breakup in a class of stochastic flow fields as a model for the flow through fixed fiber beds and to elucidate the general mechanisms whereby drops breakup in disordered, Lagrangian unsteady flows. Our study consists of two parallel streams of investigation. First, large scale numerical simulations of drop breakup in a class of anisotropic Gaussian fields will be presented. These fields are generated spectrally and have been shown in a previous publication to be exact representations of the flow in a dilute disordered bed of fibers if close interactions between the fibers and the drops are dynamically unimportant. In these simulations the drop shape is represented by second and third order small deformation theories which have been shown to be excellent for the prediction of drop breakup in steady strong flows. We show via these simulations that the mechanisms of drop breakup in these flows are quite different than in steady flows. The predominant mechanism of breakup appears to be very short lived twist breakups. Moreover, the occurrence of breakup events is poorly predicted by either the strength of the local flow in which the drop finds itself at breakup, or the degree of deformation that the drop achieves prior to breakup. It is suggested that a correlation function of both is necessary to be predictive of breakup events. In the second part of our research experiments are presented where the drop deformation and breakup in PDMS/polyisobutylene emulsions is considered. We consider very dilute emulsions such that coalescence is unimportant. The flows considered are simple shear and the flow through fixed fiber beds. Turbidity, small angle light scattering, dichroism and microscopy are used to interrogate the drop deformation process in both flows. It is demonstrated that breakup at very low capillary numbers occurs in both flows but larger drop deformation occurs in the fixed bed flow. Moreover, it is witnessed that breakup in the bed occurs

  13. A Proposed Taxonomy of Anaerobic Fungi (Class Neocallimastigomycetes) Suitable for Large-Scale Sequence-Based Community Structure Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kittelmann, Sandra; Naylor, Graham E.; Koolaard, John P.; Janssen, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    Anaerobic fungi are key players in the breakdown of fibrous plant material in the rumen, but not much is known about the composition and stability of fungal communities in ruminants. We analyzed anaerobic fungi in 53 rumen samples from farmed sheep (4 different flocks), cattle, and deer feeding on a variety of diets. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting of the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) region of the rrn operon revealed a high diversity of anaerobic fungal phylotypes across all samples. Clone libraries of the ITS1 region were constructed from DNA from 11 rumen samples that had distinctly different fungal communities. A total of 417 new sequences were generated to expand the number and diversity of ITS1 sequences available. Major phylogenetic groups of anaerobic fungi in New Zealand ruminants belonged to the genera Piromyces, Neocallimastix, Caecomyces and Orpinomyces. In addition, sequences forming four novel clades were obtained, which may represent so far undetected genera or species of anaerobic fungi. We propose a revised phylogeny and pragmatic taxonomy for anaerobic fungi, which was tested and proved suitable for analysis of datasets stemming from high-throughput next-generation sequencing methods. Comparing our revised taxonomy to the taxonomic assignment of sequences deposited in the GenBank database, we believe that >29% of ITS1 sequences derived from anaerobic fungal isolates or clones are misnamed at the genus level. PMID:22615827

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of a Strictly Anaerobic Dichloromethane-Degrading Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Kleindienst, Sara; Higgins, Steven A; Tsementzi, Despina; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T; Mack, E Erin; Löffler, Frank E

    2016-01-01

    An anaerobic, dichloromethane-degrading bacterium affiliated with novel Peptococcaceae was maintained in a microbial consortium. The organism originated from pristine freshwater sediment collected from Rio Mameyes in Luquillo, Puerto Rico, in October 2009 (latitude 18°21'43.9″, longitude -65°46'8.4″). The draft genome sequence is 2.1 Mb and has a G+C content of 43.5%. PMID:26941136

  15. Draft genome sequence of a strictly anaerobic dichloromethane-degrading bacterium

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kleindienst, Sara; Higgins, Steven A.; Tsementzi, Despina; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T.; Mack, E. Erin; Loffler, Frank E.

    2016-03-03

    Here, an anaerobic, dichloromethane-degrading bacterium affiliated with novel Peptococcaceae was maintained in a microbial consortium. The organism originated from pristine freshwater sediment collected from Rio Mameyes in Luquillo, Puerto Rico, in October 2009 (latitude 18°21'43.9", longitude –65°46'8.4"). The draft genome sequence is 2.1 Mb and has a G+C content of 43.5%.

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of a Strictly Anaerobic Dichloromethane-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Steven A.; Tsementzi, Despina; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T.; Mack, E. Erin

    2016-01-01

    An anaerobic, dichloromethane-degrading bacterium affiliated with novel Peptococcaceae was maintained in a microbial consortium. The organism originated from pristine freshwater sediment collected from Rio Mameyes in Luquillo, Puerto Rico, in October 2009 (latitude 18°21′43.9″, longitude −65°46′8.4″). The draft genome sequence is 2.1 Mb and has a G+C content of 43.5%. PMID:26941136

  17. Microbial community analysis of swine wastewater anaerobic lagoons by next-generation DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ducey, Thomas F; Hunt, Patrick G

    2013-06-01

    Anaerobic lagoons are a standard practice for the treatment of swine wastewater. This practice relies heavily on microbiological processes to reduce concentrated organic material and nutrients. Despite this reliance on microbiological processes, research has only recently begun to identify and enumerate the myriad and complex interactions that occur in this microbial ecosystem. To further this line of study, we utilized a next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology to gain a deeper insight into the microbial communities along the water column of four anaerobic swine wastewater lagoons. Analysis of roughly one million 16S rDNA sequences revealed a predominance of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) classified as belonging to the phyla Firmicutes (54.1%) and Proteobacteria (15.8%). At the family level, 33 bacterial families were found in all 12 lagoon sites and accounted for between 30% and 50% of each lagoon's OTUs. Analysis by nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMS) revealed that TKN, COD, ORP, TSS, and DO were the major environmental variables in affecting microbial community structure. Overall, 839 individual genera were classified, with 223 found in all four lagoons. An additional 321 genera were identified in sole lagoons. The top 25 genera accounted for approximately 20% of the OTUs identified in the study, and the low abundances of most of the genera suggests that most OTUs are present at low levels. Overall, these results demonstrate that anaerobic lagoons have distinct microbial communities which are strongly controlled by the environmental conditions present in each individual lagoon.

  18. Analysis of fixed bed data for the extraction of a rate mechanism for the reaction of hematite with methane

    SciTech Connect

    Breault, Ronald W.; Monazam, Esmail R.

    2015-04-01

    In this study, chemical looping combustion is a promising technology for the capture of CO2 involving redox materials as oxygen carriers. The effects of reduction conditions, namely, temperature and fuel partial pressure on the conversion products are investigated. The experiments were conducted in a laboratory fixed-bed reactor that was operated cyclically with alternating reduction and oxidation periods. Reactions are assumed to occur in the shell surrounding the particle grains with diffusion of oxygen to the surface from the grain core. Activation energies for the shell and core reactions range from 9 to 209 kJ/mol depending on the reaction step.

  19. Modeling and Experimental Studies of Mercury Oxidation and Adsorption in a Fixed-Bed and Entrained-Flow Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Buitrago, Paula A.; Morrill, Mike; Lighty, JoAnn S.; Silcox, Geoffrey D.

    2009-06-01

    This report presents experimental and modeling mercury oxidation and adsorption data. Fixed-bed and single-particle models of mercury adsorption were developed. The experimental data were obtained with two reactors: a 300-W, methane-fired, tubular, quartz-lined reactor for studying homogeneous oxidation reactions and a fixed-bed reactor, also of quartz, for studying heterogeneous reactions. The latter was attached to the exit of the former to provide realistic combustion gases. The fixed-bed reactor contained one gram of coconut-shell carbon and remained at a temperature of 150°C. All methane, air, SO2, and halogen species were introduced through the burner to produce a radical pool representative of real combustion systems. A Tekran 2537A Analyzer coupled with a wet conditioning system provided speciated mercury concentrations. At 150°C and in the absence of HCl or HBr, the mercury uptake was about 20%. The addition of 50 ppm HCl caused complete capture of all elemental and oxidized mercury species. In the absence of halogens, SO2 increased the mercury adsorption efficiency to up to 30 percent. The extent of adsorption decreased with increasing SO2 concentration when halogens were present. Increasing the HCl concentration to 100 ppm lessened the effect of SO2. The fixed-bed model incorporates Langmuir adsorption kinetics and was developed to predict adsorption of elemental mercury and the effect of multiple flue gas components. This model neglects intraparticle diffusional resistances and is only applicable to pulverized carbon sorbents. It roughly describes experimental data from the literature. The current version includes the ability to account for competitive adsorption between mercury, SO2, and NO2. The single particle model simulates in-flight sorbent capture of elemental mercury. This model was developed to include Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, rate equations, sorbent feed rate, and

  20. Ammoniacal nitrogen and COD removal from semi-aerobic landfill leachate using a composite adsorbent: fixed bed column adsorption performance.

    PubMed

    Halim, Azhar Abdul; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Johari, Megat Azmi Megat; Ariffin, Kamar Shah; Adlan, Mohd Nordin

    2010-03-15

    The performance of a carbon-mineral composite adsorbent used in a fixed bed column for the removal of ammoniacal nitrogen and aggregate organic pollutant (COD), which are commonly found in landfill leachate, was evaluated. The breakthrough capacities for ammoniacal nitrogen and COD adsorption were 4.46 and 3.23 mg/g, respectively. Additionally, the optimum empty bed contact time (EBCT) was 75 min. The column efficiency for ammoniacal nitrogen and COD adsorption using fresh adsorbent was 86.4% and 92.6%, respectively, and these values increased to 90.0% and 93.7%, respectively, after the regeneration process. PMID:19945216

  1. Analysis of fixed bed data for the extraction of a rate mechanism for the reaction of hematite with methane

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Breault, Ronald W.; Monazam, Esmail R.

    2015-04-01

    In this study, chemical looping combustion is a promising technology for the capture of CO2 involving redox materials as oxygen carriers. The effects of reduction conditions, namely, temperature and fuel partial pressure on the conversion products are investigated. The experiments were conducted in a laboratory fixed-bed reactor that was operated cyclically with alternating reduction and oxidation periods. Reactions are assumed to occur in the shell surrounding the particle grains with diffusion of oxygen to the surface from the grain core. Activation energies for the shell and core reactions range from 9 to 209 kJ/mol depending on the reaction step.

  2. A fixed-bed column for phosphate removal from aqueous solutions using an andosol-bagasse mixture.

    PubMed

    Woumfo, Emmanuel Djoufac; Siéwé, Jean Mermoz; Njopwouo, Daniel

    2015-03-15

    It is difficult to eliminate phosphate from large volumes of water in batch mode using an adsorbent such as andosol. In a fixed-bed column, andosol has a very low permeability. In this study, andosol was mixed with bagasse to increase permeability. The mixture was then applied for the adsorption of phosphate in a fixed-bed column. Optimum and stable permeability was obtained with a 50/50 mixture of andosol and bagasse. The maximum adsorption capacity obtained was 4.18 mg/g for a column with a bed depth of 1.8 cm and a flow rate of 4 mL/min. The experimental data fit best to Thomas and Adam-Bohart models. These experimental results were applied in the treatment of natural phosphate-containing water from Yaoundé Municipal Lake in Cameroon. Column performance increased by 60% due to the presence of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) in the natural water. These cations form complexes with phosphate at the andosol surface. The standard enthalpy 15.964 kj/mol indicated that phosphate adsorption on andosol-bagasse mixture was an endothermic process. Kinetic experiments demonstrated that phosphate adsorption fitted better with a pseudo-second-order model.

  3. Batch and continuous (fixed-bed column) biosorption of crystal violet by Artocarpus heterophyllus (jackfruit) leaf powder.

    PubMed

    Saha, Papita Das; Chakraborty, Sagnik; Chowdhury, Shamik

    2012-04-01

    In this study, batch and fixed-bed column experiments were performed to investigate the biosorption potential of Artocarpus heterophyllus (jackfruit) leaf powder (JLP) to remove crystal violet (CV) from aqueous solutions. Batch biosorption studies were carried out as a function of solution pH, contact time, initial dye concentration and temperature. The biosorption equilibrium data showed excellent fit to the Langmuir isotherm model with maximum monolayer biosorption capacity of 43.39 mg g(-1) at pH 7.0, initial dye concentration=50 mg L(-1), temperature=293 K and contact time=120 min. According to Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm model, biosorption of CV by JLP was chemisorption. The biosorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Thermodynamic analysis revealed that biosorption of CV from aqueous solution by JLP was a spontaneous and exothermic process. In order to ascertain the practical applicability of the biosorbent, fixed-bed column studies were also performed. The breakthrough time increased with increasing bed height and decreased with increasing flow rate. The Thomas model as well as the BDST model showed good agreement with the experimental results at all the process parameters studied. It can be concluded that JLP is a promising biosorbent for removal of CV from aqueous solutions.

  4. [Adsorption of the TiO2 @ yeast composite microspheres for adsorbing Fluorescent Whitening Agent-VBL in fixed bed].

    PubMed

    Wu, Fei; Zhang, Kai-Qiang; Bai, Bo; Wang, Hong-Lun; Suo, You-Rui

    2015-02-01

    In this work, the adsorption potential of TiO2@ yeast composite microspheres to remove Fluorescent Whitening Agent-VBL (FWA-VBL) from aqueous solution was investigated using fixed-bed adsorption column. The effects of pH(2.0-8.0), bed height (1-3 cm), inlet concentration (20-80 mg x L(-1)) and feed flow rate (5-11 mL x min(-1)) on the breakthrough characteristics of the adsorption system were determined. The results showed that the highest bed capacity of 223.80 mg x g(-1) was obtained under the condition of pH 2.0, 80 mg x L(-1) inlet dye concentration, 1.0 cm bed height and 5 mL x min(-1) flow rate. The adsorption data were fitted to three well-established fixed-bed adsorption models, namely, BDST model, Thomas model and Yoon-Nelson model. The results fitted well to the three models with coefficients of correlation R2 > 0.980 in different conditions. The TiO2 @ yeast composite microspheres have desired regeneration ability and could be reused for four times. PMID:26031081

  5. The genome sequence of the obligately chemolithoautotrophic, facultatively anaerobic bacterium Thiobacillus denitfificans.

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, H R; Larimer, Frank W

    2006-02-01

    The complete genome sequence of Thiobacillus denitrificans ATCC 25259 is the first to become available for an obligately chemolithoautotrophic, sulfur-compound-oxidizing, {beta}-proteobacterium. Analysis of the 2,909,809-bp genome will facilitate our molecular and biochemical understanding of the unusual metabolic repertoire of this bacterium, including its ability to couple denitrification to sulfur-compound oxidation, to catalyze anaerobic, nitrate-dependent oxidation of Fe(II) and U(IV), and to oxidize mineral electron donors. Notable genomic features include (i) genes encoding c-type cytochromes totaling 1 to 2 percent of the genome, which is a proportion greater than for almost all bacterial and archaeal species sequenced to date, (ii) genes encoding two [NiFe]hydrogenases, which is particularly significant because no information on hydrogenases has previously been reported for T. denitrificans and hydrogen oxidation appears to be critical for anaerobic U(IV) oxidation by this species, (iii) a diverse complement of more than 50 genes associated with sulfur-compound oxidation (including sox genes, dsr genes, and genes associated with the AMP-dependent oxidation of sulfite to sulfate), some of which occur in multiple (up to eight) copies, (iv) a relatively large number of genes associated with inorganic ion transport and heavy metal resistance, and (v) a paucity of genes encoding organic-compound transporters, commensurate with obligate chemolithoautotrophy. Ultimately, the genome sequence of T. denitrificans will enable elucidation of the mechanisms of aerobic and anaerobic sulfur-compound oxidation by {beta}-proteobacteria and will help reveal the molecular basis of this organism's role in major biogeochemical cycles (i.e., those involving sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon) and groundwater restoration.

  6. The genome sequence of the obligately chemolithoautotrophic, facultatively anaerobic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Beller, Harry R; Chain, Patrick S G; Letain, Tracy E; Chakicherla, Anu; Larimer, Frank W; Richardson, Paul M; Coleman, Matthew A; Wood, Ann P; Kelly, Donovan P

    2006-02-01

    The complete genome sequence of Thiobacillus denitrificans ATCC 25259 is the first to become available for an obligately chemolithoautotrophic, sulfur-compound-oxidizing, beta-proteobacterium. Analysis of the 2,909,809-bp genome will facilitate our molecular and biochemical understanding of the unusual metabolic repertoire of this bacterium, including its ability to couple denitrification to sulfur-compound oxidation, to catalyze anaerobic, nitrate-dependent oxidation of Fe(II) and U(IV), and to oxidize mineral electron donors. Notable genomic features include (i) genes encoding c-type cytochromes totaling 1 to 2 percent of the genome, which is a proportion greater than for almost all bacterial and archaeal species sequenced to date, (ii) genes encoding two [NiFe]hydrogenases, which is particularly significant because no information on hydrogenases has previously been reported for T. denitrificans and hydrogen oxidation appears to be critical for anaerobic U(IV) oxidation by this species, (iii) a diverse complement of more than 50 genes associated with sulfur-compound oxidation (including sox genes, dsr genes, and genes associated with the AMP-dependent oxidation of sulfite to sulfate), some of which occur in multiple (up to eight) copies, (iv) a relatively large number of genes associated with inorganic ion transport and heavy metal resistance, and (v) a paucity of genes encoding organic-compound transporters, commensurate with obligate chemolithoautotrophy. Ultimately, the genome sequence of T. denitrificans will enable elucidation of the mechanisms of aerobic and anaerobic sulfur-compound oxidation by beta-proteobacteria and will help reveal the molecular basis of this organism's role in major biogeochemical cycles (i.e., those involving sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon) and groundwater restoration.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas putida JLR11, a Facultative Anaerobic 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene Biotransforming Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Javier; Udaondo, Zulema; Molina, Lazaro; Segura, Ana; Esteve-Núñez, Abraham; Caballero, Antonio; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan Luis; van Dillewijn, Pieter

    2015-09-03

    We report the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas putida JLR11, a facultative anaerobic bacterium that has been studied in detail for its capacity to use the explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) as a nitrogen source. The sequence confirms the mechanisms used by this versatile strain to reduce and assimilate nitrogen from TNT.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas putida JLR11, a Facultative Anaerobic 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene Biotransforming Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Javier; Udaondo, Zulema; Molina, Lazaro; Segura, Ana; Esteve-Núñez, Abraham; Caballero, Antonio; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas putida JLR11, a facultative anaerobic bacterium that has been studied in detail for its capacity to use the explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) as a nitrogen source. The sequence confirms the mechanisms used by this versatile strain to reduce and assimilate nitrogen from TNT. PMID:26337875

  9. The genome sequence of an anaerobic aromatic-degrading denitrifying bacterium, strain EbN1.

    PubMed

    Rabus, Ralf; Kube, Michael; Heider, Johann; Beck, Alfred; Heitmann, Katja; Widdel, Friedrich; Reinhardt, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Recent research on microbial degradation of aromatic and other refractory compounds in anoxic waters and soils has revealed that nitrate-reducing bacteria belonging to the Betaproteobacteria contribute substantially to this process. Here we present the first complete genome of a metabolically versatile representative, strain EbN1, which metabolizes various aromatic compounds, including hydrocarbons. A circular chromosome (4.3 Mb) and two plasmids (0.21 and 0.22 Mb) encode 4603 predicted proteins. Ten anaerobic and four aerobic aromatic degradation pathways were recognized, with the encoding genes mostly forming clusters. The presence of paralogous gene clusters (e.g., for anaerobic phenylacetate oxidation), high sequence similarities to orthologs from other strains (e.g., for anaerobic phenol metabolism) and frequent mobile genetic elements (e.g., more than 200 genes for transposases) suggest high genome plasticity and extensive lateral gene transfer during metabolic evolution of strain EbN1. Metabolic versatility is also reflected by the presence of multiple respiratory complexes. A large number of regulators, including more than 30 two-component and several FNR-type regulators, indicate a finely tuned regulatory network able to respond to the fluctuating availability of organic substrates and electron acceptors in the environment. The absence of genes required for nitrogen fixation and specific interaction with plants separates strain EbN1 ecophysiologically from the closely related nitrogen-fixing plant symbionts of the Azoarcus cluster. Supplementary material on sequence and annotation are provided at the Web page http://www.micro-genomes.mpg.de/ebn1/.

  10. Influence of simulated MSW sizes on the combustion process in a fixed bed: CFD and experimental approaches.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rui; Ismail, Tamer M; Ren, Xiaohan; Abd El-Salam, M

    2016-03-01

    This work presents the effect of the simulated sizes of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) on the combustion process in a fixed bed experimentally and numerically. The effect of temperature, gas emissions, flame front velocity and process rate are discussed for three different sizes of MSW: 10, 30, and 50 mm. The study found that for the operating conditions of the current model, when the diameter of particles is decreased, the bulk density of the material is increased, resulting in a decrease of convective heat transfer as well as combustion speed. As the diameter size of the material particles increase, the height of the post-combustion zone is increased, while the temperature in a high temperature area is decreased, due to the decrease in the material's bulk density and the excessive increase in porosity. Results also show that the average emission concentration of CO and CO2 decreases gradually with an increase in the particle diameter size.

  11. Continuous flow adsorption of methylene blue by cellulose nanocrystal-alginate hydrogel beads in fixed bed columns.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Nishil; Grishkewich, Nathan; Waeijen, Herman Ambrose; Berry, Richard M; Tam, Kam Chiu

    2016-01-20

    The adsorption behavior of methylene blue by cellulose nanocrystal-alginate (CNC-ALG) hydrogel beads in a fixed bed column was studied by varying the initial dye concentrations, bed depths and flow rates. An unusual phenomenon was observed in the early phase of the adsorption, and the phenomenon was elucidated by varying other critical design parameters, such as the flow direction, diameter of column and composition of adsorbent. The swelling and shrinkage of hydrogel beads during the adsorption was responsible for the anomalous concentration versus time profile of the adsorption process. The maximum adsorption capacity of the column was 255.5mg/g, which is in agreement with the batch study determined from the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. A comprehensive understanding on the adsorption mechanism of CNC-ALG hydrogel beads during the early stages of adsorption was derived from this study.

  12. Influence of simulated MSW sizes on the combustion process in a fixed bed: CFD and experimental approaches.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rui; Ismail, Tamer M; Ren, Xiaohan; Abd El-Salam, M

    2016-03-01

    This work presents the effect of the simulated sizes of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) on the combustion process in a fixed bed experimentally and numerically. The effect of temperature, gas emissions, flame front velocity and process rate are discussed for three different sizes of MSW: 10, 30, and 50 mm. The study found that for the operating conditions of the current model, when the diameter of particles is decreased, the bulk density of the material is increased, resulting in a decrease of convective heat transfer as well as combustion speed. As the diameter size of the material particles increase, the height of the post-combustion zone is increased, while the temperature in a high temperature area is decreased, due to the decrease in the material's bulk density and the excessive increase in porosity. Results also show that the average emission concentration of CO and CO2 decreases gradually with an increase in the particle diameter size. PMID:26750870

  13. Continuous fixed bed adsorption of Cu(II) by halloysite nanotube-alginate hybrid beads: an experimental and modelling study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanyan; Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Qiuru; Zhang, Bing; Liu, Jindun

    2014-01-01

    We used natural resources of halloysite nanotubes and alginate to prepare a novel porous adsorption material of organic-inorganic hybrid beads. The adsorption behaviour of Cu(II) onto the hybrid beads was examined by a continuous fixed bed column adsorption experiment. Meanwhile, the factors affecting the adsorption capacity such as bed height, influent concentration and flow rate were investigated. The adsorption capacity (Q0) reached 74.13 mg/g when the initial inlet concentration was 100 mg/L with a bed height of 12 cm and flow rate of 3 ml/min. The Thomas model and bed-depth service time fitted well with the experimental data. In the regeneration experiment, the hybrid beads retained high adsorption capacity after three adsorption-desorption cycles. Over the whole study, the new hybrid beads showed excellent adsorption and regeneration properties as well as favourable stability. PMID:25051464

  14. Catalytic steam gasification of pig compost for hydrogen-rich gas production in a fixed bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingbo; Xiao, Bo; Liu, Shiming; Hu, Zhiquan; He, Piwen; Guo, Dabin; Hu, Mian; Qi, Fangjie; Luo, Siyi

    2013-04-01

    The catalytic steam gasification of pig compost (PC) for hydrogen-rich gas production was experimentally investigated in a fixed bed reactor using the developed NiO on modified dolomite (NiO/MD) catalyst. A series of experiments have been performed to explore the effects of catalyst, catalytic temperature, steam to PC ratio and PC particle size on the gas quality and yield. The results indicate that the NiO/MD catalyst could significantly eliminate the tar in the gas production and increase the hydrogen yield, and the catalyst lives a long lifetime in the PC steam gasification. Moreover, the higher catalytic temperature and smaller PC particle size can contribute to more hydrogen production and gas yield. Meanwhile, the optimal ratio of steam to PC (S/P) is found to be 1.24.

  15. Fixed-bed column studies on a modified chitosan hydrogel for detoxification of aqueous solutions from copper (II).

    PubMed

    Kavianinia, Iman; Plieger, Paul G; Kandile, Nadia G; Harding, David R K

    2012-10-01

    A new efficient, low cost chitosan based biosorbent was successfully prepared and employed for the biosorption of copper ions from an aqueous solution using a fixed bed column. Pyromellitic dianhydride crosslinked chitosan as the new adsorbent was characterized by SEM, FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and solid state (13)C NMR analysis. Scanning electron microscopy coupled with an X-ray energy dispersed analysis for the copper-equilibrated biomass confirmed the presence of Cu(II) ions on the surface of the hydrogel. Thermogravimetric analysis showed a significant improvement in the thermal stability of the new hydrogel compared to pure chitosan. Kinetic models were applied to predict the breakthrough curves. This study shows that the prepared hydrogel based on modified chitosan could be utilized as an efficient bioadsorbent for the removal of copper ions from wastewater.

  16. Studies on the Role of Nitrogen in the Feed for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Under Fixed-Bed Reactor System.

    PubMed

    Hong, Gi Hoon; Jung, Jae-Sun; Kim, Na-Young; Lee, Sang Yong; Moon, Dong Ju

    2016-02-01

    In this study, Co/Al203 catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis was prepared via slurry impregnation method and the catalyst was characterized by various techniques such as TPR, XRD, TGA and N2 physisorption. To dissolve the wax, after-reaction catalyst was dewaxed using n-Hexane at 60 *C. The experiments were performed in a bench-scale fixed-bed reactor, under the reaction condition of 230 degrees C, 20 bar and feed volume ratio of H2:CO:N2 = 2:1:0.5-1.5. The methane selectivity and the ratio of olefin to paraffin among C2-C4 hydrocarbons were increased with higher contents of nitrogen in feed gas which result in higher partial pressure ratio of H2 to CO, and also affect methane selectivity which has a significant role in increased CO conversion. PMID:27433695

  17. Environmental implications of small fixed-bed gasifiers for industry. [Assumes 500 small gasifiers in 1990 and 2500 in 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, J.E.; Cushman, R.M.; Walsh, P.J.

    1981-05-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory is responsible for an assessment of the environmental implications of small fixed-bed coal gasifiers for industry. The assessment focuses on the industrial utilization of low energy gas (often called low-Btu gas) in the range of 3708 to 7416 kJ/m/sup 3/ manufactured on-site or nearby in a coal-air-steam reaction process. The major risk is in occupational health due to potential exposure to toxic substances. This risk to workers is considerably greater than the risk to the public at large. The major sources of occupational exposure will be process steam leaks, accidental spills, and maintenance operations. The composition of the process stream produced during low-Btu gasification is not well know at present.

  18. Effect of small-scale biomass gasification at the state of refractory lining the fixed bed reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janša, Jan; Peer, Vaclav; Pavloková, Petra

    2016-06-01

    The article deals with the influence of biomass gasification on the condition of the refractory lining of a fixed bed reactor. The refractory lining of the gasifier is one part of the device, which significantly affects the operational reliability and durability. After removing the refractory lining of the gasifier from the experimental reactor, there was done an assessment how gasification of different kinds of biomass reflected on its condition in terms of the main factors affecting its life. Gasification of biomass is reflected on the lining, especially through sticking at the bottom of the reactor. Measures for prolonging the life of lining consist in the reduction of temperature in the reactor, in this case, in order to avoid ash fusion biomass which it is difficult for this type of gasifier.

  19. Adsorptive removal of fluoride from aqueous medium using a fixed bed column packed with Zr(IV) loaded dried orange juice residue.

    PubMed

    Paudyal, Hari; Pangeni, Bimala; Inoue, Katsutoshi; Kawakita, Hidetaka; Ohto, Keisuke; Alam, Shafiq

    2013-10-01

    The potential of the adsorbent prepared from DOJR marketed as cattle food in Japan was identified as an efficient and low cost adsorbent for fluoride using fixed bed column. DOJR was loaded with Zr(IV) ions to develop active adsorption sites for fluoride. Fluoride adsorption performance of column packed with Zr(IV) loaded DOJR was assessed under variable operating conditions such as Zr(IV) loading temperature, initial fluoride concentration, bed depth, initial pH, and flow rate. Breakthrough curve modeling showed that Thomas and bed depth service time (BDST) models were in good agreement with the experimental data. Application of adsorbent investigated in this study to the treatment of actual waste plating solution containing fluoride ion showed successful removal below acceptable standard in Japan using a fixed bed column, hence, Zr(IV)-DOJR can be expected to be a promising candidate for the treatment waste water containing trace amount of fluoride ion in fixed bed column. PMID:23916190

  20. Microbial sequencing methods for monitoring of anaerobic treatment of antibiotics to optimize performance and prevent system failure.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Sevcan

    2016-06-01

    As a result of developments in molecular technologies and the use of sequencing technologies, the analyses of the anaerobic microbial community in biological treatment process has become increasingly prevalent. This review examines the ways in which microbial sequencing methods can be applied to achieve an extensive understanding of the phylogenetic and functional characteristics of microbial assemblages in anaerobic reactor if the substrate is contaminated by antibiotics which is one of the most important toxic compounds. It will discuss some of the advantages and disadvantages associated with microbial sequencing techniques that are more commonly employed and will assess how a combination of the existing methods may be applied to develop a more comprehensive understanding of microbial communities and improve the validity and depth of the results for the enhancement of the stability of anaerobic reactors. PMID:27138203

  1. Microbial sequencing methods for monitoring of anaerobic treatment of antibiotics to optimize performance and prevent system failure.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Sevcan

    2016-06-01

    As a result of developments in molecular technologies and the use of sequencing technologies, the analyses of the anaerobic microbial community in biological treatment process has become increasingly prevalent. This review examines the ways in which microbial sequencing methods can be applied to achieve an extensive understanding of the phylogenetic and functional characteristics of microbial assemblages in anaerobic reactor if the substrate is contaminated by antibiotics which is one of the most important toxic compounds. It will discuss some of the advantages and disadvantages associated with microbial sequencing techniques that are more commonly employed and will assess how a combination of the existing methods may be applied to develop a more comprehensive understanding of microbial communities and improve the validity and depth of the results for the enhancement of the stability of anaerobic reactors.

  2. Development and Optimization of AAV hFIX Particles by Transient Transfection in an iCELLis(®) Fixed-Bed Bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Powers, Alicia D; Piras, Bryan A; Clark, Robert K; Lockey, Timothy D; Meagher, Michael M

    2016-06-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are increasingly popular in gene therapy because they are unassociated with human disease, replication dependent, and less immunogenic than other viral vectors and can infect a variety of cell types. These vectors have been used in over 130 clinical trials, and one AAV product has been approved for treatment of lipoprotein lipase deficiency in Europe. To meet the demand for the increasing quantities of AAV required for clinical trials and treatment, a scalable high-capacity technology is required. Bioreactors meet these requirements but limited options are available for adherent HEK 293T/17 cells. Here we optimize the transient transfection of HEK293T/17 cells for the production of AAV human factor IX in a disposable fixed-bed bioreactor, the iCELLis(®) Nano (PALL Corporation). A fixed bed in the center of the iCELLis bioreactor is surrounded by culture medium that is pumped through the bed from the bottom of the bioreactor so that a thin film of the medium overflows the bed and is replenished with oxygen and depleted of CO2 as it returns to the surrounding medium reservoir. We show that this fixed-bed bioreactor can support as many as 2.5 × 10(8) cells/ml of fixed bed (1.9 × 10(6) cells/cm(2)). By optimizing culture and transfection parameters such as the concentration of DNA for transfection, day of harvest, size of PEI/DNA particles, and transfection medium, and adding an additional medium change to the process, we increased our yield to as high as 9.0 × 10(14) viral particles per square meter of fixed bed. We also show an average GFP transfection of 97% of cells throughout the fixed bed. These yields make the iCELLis a promising scalable technology for the clinical production of AAV gene therapy products.

  3. Insect cell entrapment, growth and recovering using a single-use fixed-bed bioreactor. Scaling up and recombinant protein production.

    PubMed

    Ventini-Monteiro, D; Dubois, S; Astray, R M; Castillo, J; Pereira, C A

    2015-12-20

    Insect cells are largely used for industrial production of vaccines, viral vectors and recombinant proteins as well as in research and development as an important tool for biology and bioprocess studies. They grow in suspension and are semi-adherent cells. Among the cell culture systems enabling scalable bioprocess the single-use fixed-bed iCELLis(®) bioreactors offer great advantages. We have established the conditions for Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 (S2) and Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells entrapment into the fixed-bed, cell growth and recover from the fixed-bed once high cell densities were attained. Our established protocol allowed these cells, at a cell seeding of 2×1E5 cells/microfiber carriers (MC) (3.5×1E6cells/mL; 1.7×1E4cells/cm(2)), to grow inside a 4m(2)/200mL fixed-bed attaining a concentration of 5.3×1E6 cells/MC (9.5×1E7cells/mL; 4.7×1E5 cells/cm(2)) for S2 cells or 4.6×1E6 cells/MC (8×1E7cells/mL; 4.1×1E5cells/cm(2)) for Sf9 cells. By washing the fixed-bed, entrapped cells could then be recovered from the fixed-bed at a high rate (>85%) with high viability (>95%) by increasing the agitation to 1200/1500rpm. Although the cell yields in the fixed-bed bioreactor were comparable to those obtained in a stirred tank (respectively, 1.3×1E10 and 2.5×1E10 total cells), S2 cells stably transfected with a cDNA coding for the rabies virus glycoprotein (RVGP) showed a 30% higher preserved rRVGP production (2.5±0.1 and 1.9±0.1μg/1E7 cells), as evidenced by a conformational ELISA evaluation. These findings demonstrate not only the possibility to entrap, cultivate to high densities and recover insect cells using a single-use fixed-bed bioreactor, but also that this system provides suitable physiological conditions for the entrapped cells to produce a cell membrane associated recombinant protein with higher specific biological activity as compared to classical suspension cell cultures.

  4. Insect cell entrapment, growth and recovering using a single-use fixed-bed bioreactor. Scaling up and recombinant protein production.

    PubMed

    Ventini-Monteiro, D; Dubois, S; Astray, R M; Castillo, J; Pereira, C A

    2015-12-20

    Insect cells are largely used for industrial production of vaccines, viral vectors and recombinant proteins as well as in research and development as an important tool for biology and bioprocess studies. They grow in suspension and are semi-adherent cells. Among the cell culture systems enabling scalable bioprocess the single-use fixed-bed iCELLis(®) bioreactors offer great advantages. We have established the conditions for Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 (S2) and Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells entrapment into the fixed-bed, cell growth and recover from the fixed-bed once high cell densities were attained. Our established protocol allowed these cells, at a cell seeding of 2×1E5 cells/microfiber carriers (MC) (3.5×1E6cells/mL; 1.7×1E4cells/cm(2)), to grow inside a 4m(2)/200mL fixed-bed attaining a concentration of 5.3×1E6 cells/MC (9.5×1E7cells/mL; 4.7×1E5 cells/cm(2)) for S2 cells or 4.6×1E6 cells/MC (8×1E7cells/mL; 4.1×1E5cells/cm(2)) for Sf9 cells. By washing the fixed-bed, entrapped cells could then be recovered from the fixed-bed at a high rate (>85%) with high viability (>95%) by increasing the agitation to 1200/1500rpm. Although the cell yields in the fixed-bed bioreactor were comparable to those obtained in a stirred tank (respectively, 1.3×1E10 and 2.5×1E10 total cells), S2 cells stably transfected with a cDNA coding for the rabies virus glycoprotein (RVGP) showed a 30% higher preserved rRVGP production (2.5±0.1 and 1.9±0.1μg/1E7 cells), as evidenced by a conformational ELISA evaluation. These findings demonstrate not only the possibility to entrap, cultivate to high densities and recover insect cells using a single-use fixed-bed bioreactor, but also that this system provides suitable physiological conditions for the entrapped cells to produce a cell membrane associated recombinant protein with higher specific biological activity as compared to classical suspension cell cultures. PMID:26481831

  5. [Characteristics of anaerobic sequencing batch reactor for the treatment of high-solids-content waste].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-jun; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xi-hui

    2006-06-01

    Based on the experiments of digestion of thermo-hydrolyzed sewage sludge in both mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (ASBRs) with 20, 10, 7.5, 5d hydraulic retention time (HRT), operating characteristics of ASBR for treatment of high-solids-content waste were investigated. ASBR can efficiently accumulates suspended solids and keep high concentration solids, however there exists a "critical point" of ASBR, which means the maximum capability to accumulate suspended solids without negative effects on ASBR stability, and beyond which the performance deteriorates. Under steady condition, ASBR can sustains high solid retention time (SRT) and mean cell retention time (MCRT), the SRT and MCRT is 2.53 approximately 3.73 and 2.03 approximately 3.14 times of hydraulic retention time (HRT) when treating thermo-hydrolyzed sludge, respectively. Therefore, compared to traditional continuous-flow stirred tank reactor (CSTR), the efficiency of ASBR enhances about 7.13% approximately 34.68%.

  6. Treatment of anaerobic digester supernatant and filter press filtrate sidestreams with a sequencing batch reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, R.B.; Ketchum, L.H. Jr.

    1998-07-01

    The Elkhart, Indiana publicly owned treatment works (POTW) occasionally experiences periods of high effluent ammonia. The POTW currently treats 61,000 m{sup 3}/d (16 MGD), which includes a large industrial component of 15,000 m{sup 3}/d (4 MGD). This industrial component includes frequent periods of high ammonia levels resulting in plant influent ammonia concentrations exceeding 40 mg/L as nitrogen which can upset plant nitrification. The anaerobic digester supernatant and filter press filtrate are returned to the head of the plant. These recycled streams also contain high ammonia, 475 mg/L as nitrogen, and contribute to the influent ammonia problem. This study is an investigation of the use of a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) to biologically nitrify these recycle streams to help mitigate the problem of high effluent ammonia.

  7. Kinetics of psychrophilic anaerobic sequencing batch reactor treating flushed dairy manure.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jingwei; Yu, Liang; Frear, Craig; Zhao, Quanbao; Li, Xiujin; Chen, Shulin

    2013-03-01

    In this study, a new strategy, improving biomass retention with fiber material present within the dairy manure as biofilm carriers, was evaluated for treating flushed dairy manure in a psychrophilic anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR). A kinetic study was carried out for process control and design by comparing four microbial growth kinetic models, i.e. first order, Grau, Monod and Chen and Hashimoto models. A volumetric methane production rate of 0.24L/L/d of and a specific methane productivity of 0.19L/gVSloaded were achieved at 6days HRT. It was proved that an ASBR using manure fiber as support media not only improved methane production but also reduced the necessary HRT and temperature to achieve a similar treating efficiency compared with current technologies. The kinetic model can be used for design and optimization of the process.

  8. Enhanced mercury removal from fix-bed reactor by lamella manganese oxide sorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, H. W.; Yu, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) is an extremely hazardous metal and attracted more concern because of its high toxicity and bioaccumulation. Several manganese-oxide-containing sorbents prepared by co-precipitation method could exhibit the mercury removal activities toward Hg0. The mercury removal test at the temperature of 300°C has the highest removal efficiency. Under this temperature, the maximum absorption equivalent of Mg-Al-Mn and Mn-Al were up to 90.9 and 247 μg/g, then gradually decreased at 400°C. The mercury removal efficiency declined in the following sequence: Mn-Al > Mg-Al-Mn > Mg-Al-Mn/ACA = Mn/AC(p)> Mn/AC(g), due to the manganese-oxide content formed on the sorbents.

  9. Numerical and experimental studies on effects of moisture content on combustion characteristics of simulated municipal solid wastes in a fixed bed.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rui; Ismail, Tamer M; Ren, Xiaohan; Abd El-Salam, M

    2015-05-01

    In order to reveal the features of the combustion process in the porous bed of a waste incinerator, a two-dimensional unsteady state model and experimental study were employed to investigate the combustion process in a fixed bed of municipal solid waste (MSW) on the combustion process in a fixed bed reactor. Conservation equations of the waste bed were implemented to describe the incineration process. The gas phase turbulence was modeled using the k-ε turbulent model and the particle phase was modeled using the kinetic theory of granular flow. The rate of moisture evaporation, devolatilization rate, and char burnout was calculated according to the waste property characters. The simulation results were then compared with experimental data for different moisture content of MSW, which shows that the incineration process of waste in the fixed bed is reasonably simulated. The simulation results of solid temperature, gas species and process rate in the bed are accordant with experimental data. Due to the high moisture content of fuel, moisture evaporation consumes a vast amount of heat, and the evaporation takes up most of the combustion time (about 2/3 of the whole combustion process). The whole bed combustion process reduces greatly as MSW moisture content increases. The experimental and simulation results provide direction for design and optimization of the fixed bed of MSW.

  10. Numerical and experimental studies on effects of moisture content on combustion characteristics of simulated municipal solid wastes in a fixed bed.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rui; Ismail, Tamer M; Ren, Xiaohan; Abd El-Salam, M

    2015-05-01

    In order to reveal the features of the combustion process in the porous bed of a waste incinerator, a two-dimensional unsteady state model and experimental study were employed to investigate the combustion process in a fixed bed of municipal solid waste (MSW) on the combustion process in a fixed bed reactor. Conservation equations of the waste bed were implemented to describe the incineration process. The gas phase turbulence was modeled using the k-ε turbulent model and the particle phase was modeled using the kinetic theory of granular flow. The rate of moisture evaporation, devolatilization rate, and char burnout was calculated according to the waste property characters. The simulation results were then compared with experimental data for different moisture content of MSW, which shows that the incineration process of waste in the fixed bed is reasonably simulated. The simulation results of solid temperature, gas species and process rate in the bed are accordant with experimental data. Due to the high moisture content of fuel, moisture evaporation consumes a vast amount of heat, and the evaporation takes up most of the combustion time (about 2/3 of the whole combustion process). The whole bed combustion process reduces greatly as MSW moisture content increases. The experimental and simulation results provide direction for design and optimization of the fixed bed of MSW. PMID:25746177

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of an Anaerobic and Extremophilic Bacterium, Caldanaerobacter yonseiensis, Isolated from a Geothermal Hot Stream

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Jae; Lee, Yong-Jik; Park, Gun-Seok; Kim, Byoung-Chan; Lee, Sang Jun; Shin, Jae-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Caldanaerobacter yonseiensis is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, spore-forming bacterium, which was isolated from a geothermal hot stream in Indonesia. This bacterium utilizes xylose and produces a variety of proteases. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of C. yonseiensis, which reveals insights into the pentose phosphate pathway and protein degradation metabolism in thermophilic microorganisms. PMID:24201201

  12. Performance of anaerobic sequencing batch reactor in the treatment of pharmaceutical wastewater containing erythromycin and sulfamethoxazole mixture.

    PubMed

    Aydin, S; Ince, B; Cetecioglu, Z; Ozbayram, E G; Shahi, A; Okay, O; Arikan, O; Ince, O

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the joint effects of erythromycin-sulfamethoxazole (ES) combinations on anaerobic treatment efficiency and the potential for antibiotic degradation during anaerobic sequencing batch reactor operation. The experiments involved two identical anaerobic sequencing batch reactors. One reactor, as control unit, was fed with synthetic wastewater while the other reactor (ES) was fed with a synthetic substrate mixture including ES antibiotic combinations. The influence of ES antibiotic mixtures on chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, volatile fatty acid production, antibiotic degradation, biogas production, and composition were investigated. The influent antibiotic concentration was gradually increased over 10 stages, until the metabolic collapse of the reactors, which occurred at 360 days for the ES reactor. The results suggest that substrate/COD utilization and biogas/methane generation affect performance of the anaerobic reactors at higher concentration. In addition, an average of 40% erythromycin and 37% sulfamethoxazole reduction was achieved in the ES reactor. These results indicated that these antibiotics were partly biodegradable in the anaerobic reactor system.

  13. A highly efficient polyampholyte hydrogel sorbent based fixed-bed process for heavy metal removal in actual industrial effluent.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guiyin; Luo, Jinming; Liu, Chengbin; Chu, Lin; Ma, Jianhong; Tang, Yanhong; Zeng, Zebing; Luo, Shenglian

    2016-02-01

    High sorption capacity, high sorption rate, and fast separation and regeneration for qualified sorbents used in removing heavy metals from wastewater are urgently needed. In this study, a polyampholyte hydrogel was well designed and prepared via a simple radical polymerization procedure. Due to the remarkable mechanical strength, the three-dimensional polyampholyte hydrogel could be fast separated, easily regenerated and highly reused. The sorption capacities were as high as 216.1 mg/g for Pb(II) and 153.8 mg/g for Cd(II) owing to the existence of the large number of active groups. The adsorption could be conducted in a wide pH range of 3-6 and the equilibrium fast reached in 30 min due to its excellent water penetration for highly accessible to metal ions. The fixed-bed column sorption results indicated that the polyampholyte hydrogel was particularly effective in removing Pb(II) and Cd(II) from actual industrial effluent to meet the regulatory requirements. The treatment volumes of actual smelting effluent using one fixed bed column were as high as 684 bed volumes (BV) (7736 mL) for Pb(II) and 200 BV (2262 mL) for Cd(II). Furthermore, the treatment volumes of actual smelting effluent using tandem three columns reached 924 BV (31,351 mL) for Pb(II) and 250 BV (8483 mL) for Cd(II), producing only 4 BV (136 mL) eluent. Compared with the traditional high density slurry (HDS) process with large amount of sludge, the proposed process would be expected to produce only a small amount of sludge. When the treatment volume was controlled below 209.3 BV (7103 mL), all metal ions in the actual industrial effluent could be effectively removed (<0.01 mg/L). This wok develops a highly practical process based on polyampholyte hydrogel sorbents for the removal of heavy metal ions from practical wastewater.

  14. Aqueous phase adsorption of cephalexin by walnut shell-based activated carbon: A fixed-bed column study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazari, Ghadir; Abolghasemi, Hossein; Esmaieli, Mohamad; Sadeghi Pouya, Ehsan

    2016-07-01

    The walnut shell was used as a low cost adsorbent to produce activated carbon (AC) for the removal of cephalexin (CFX) from aqueous solution. A fixed-bed column adsorption was carried out using the walnut shell AC. The effect of various parameters like bed height (1.5, 2 and 2.5 cm), flow rate (4.5, 6 and 7.5 mL/min) and initial CFX concentration (50, 100 and 150 mg/L) on the breakthrough characteristics of the adsorption system was investigated at optimum pH 6.5. The highest bed capacity of 211.78 mg/g was obtained using 100 mg/L inlet drug concentration, 2 cm bed height and 4.5 mL/min flow rate. Three kinetic models, namely Adam's-Bohart, Thomas and Yoon-Nelson were applied for analysis of experimental data. The Thomas and Yoon-Nelson models were appropriate for walnut shell AC column design under various conditions. The experimental adsorption capacity values were fitted to the Bangham and intra-particle diffusion models in order to propose adsorption mechanisms. The effect of temperature on the degradation of CFX was also studied.

  15. Application of an isothermal, three-phase catalytic reactor model to predict unsteady-state fixed-bed performance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji; Hand, David W; Hokanson, David R; Crittenden, John C

    2003-01-15

    CatReac, a three-phase catalytic mathematical model, was developed for analysis and optimization of the volatile reactor assembly used in International Space Station water processor. This wet oxidation process is used to remove low molecular weight contaminants such as acetic acid, acetone, ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, and propionic acid, which are not removed by the other treatment processes. The Langmuir-Hinshelwood (Hinshelwood, C. N. The Kinetics of Chemical Change in Gaseous Systems, 3rd ed.; Oxford: London, 1933; pp 301-347) isothermal adsorption expression was successfully used to describe the reaction kinetics of compounds on the catalyst surface for the compounds mentioned above. Small-column experiments combined with the use of the Arrhenius equation were successfully used to predict the Langmuir-Hinshelwood parameters under different temperatures for a temperature range from 93 to 149 degrees C. Full-scale and small-column experiments were successfully used to validate the model predictions for unsteady-state fixed-bed operations. PMID:12564919

  16. Adsorption of phosphate from aqueous solutions and sewage using zirconium loaded okara (ZLO): Fixed-bed column study.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T A H; Ngo, H H; Guo, W S; Pham, T Q; Li, F M; Nguyen, T V; Bui, X T

    2015-08-01

    This study explores the potential of removing phosphorus from aqueous solutions and sewage by Zr(IV)-loaded okara (ZLO) in the fixed-bed column. Soybean residue (okara) was impregnated with 0.25M Zr(IV) solution to prepare active binding sites for phosphate. The effect of several factors, including flow rate, bed height, initial phosphorus concentration, pH and adsorbent particle size on the performance of ZLO was examined. The maximum dynamic adsorption capacity of ZLO for phosphorus was estimated to be 16.43mg/g. Breakthrough curve modeling indicated that Adams-Bohart model and Thomas model fitted the experimental data better than Yoon-Nelson model. After treatment with ZLO packed bed column, the effluent could meet the discharge standard for phosphorus in Australia. Successful desorption and regeneration were achieved with 0.2 NaOH and 0.1 HCl, respectively. The results prove that ZLO can be used as a promising phosphorus adsorbent in the dynamic adsorption system.

  17. Effect of temperature and salinity on the wastewater treatment performance of aerobic submerged fixed bed biofilm reactors.

    PubMed

    Chapanova, G; Jank, M; Schlegel, S; Koeser, H

    2007-01-01

    The influence of temperature (5-35 C) and salinity (up to 20 g/l NaCl) on the wastewater purification process in completely mixed and aerated submerged fixed bed biofilm reactors (SFBBRs) was studied. C- and N-conversion in SFBBRs designed according to the DWA (German Association for Water, Wastewater and Waste) rules for carbon removal was investigated for several months on synthetic wastewater. The DOC degradation rate was even at, according to the DWA, high DOC/BOD loading rates not much affected by temperatures between 5-35 degrees C and salt contents up to 20 g/L NaCl. At these high DOC loadings an appreciable ammonium conversion could also be observed. The ammonium conversion proved to be sensitive to temperature and salinity. At 5 degrees C the ammonium removal rate decreased by a factor of five compared to 25-35 degrees C. Under many operation conditions investigated more than 50% of the converted ammonium was transformed into gaseous nitrogen. The addition of 20 g/L NaCl caused a strong inhibition of the ammonium removal rate over the whole temperature range investigated.

  18. Adsorptive removal of heavy metals from water using sodium titanate nanofibres loaded onto GAC in fixed-bed columns.

    PubMed

    Sounthararajah, D P; Loganathan, P; Kandasamy, J; Vigneswaran, S

    2015-04-28

    Heavy metals are serious pollutants in aquatic environments. A study was undertaken to remove Cu, Cd, Ni, Pb and Zn individually (single metal system) and together (mixed metals system) from water by adsorption onto a sodium titanate nanofibrous material. Langmuir adsorption capacities (mg/g) at 10(-3)M NaNO3 ionic strength in the single metal system were 60, 83, 115 and 149 for Ni, Zn, Cu, and Cd, respectively, at pH 6.5 and 250 for Pb at pH 4.0. In the mixed metals system they decreased at high metals concentrations. In column experiments with 4% titanate material and 96% granular activated carbon (w/w) mixture at pH 5.0, the metals breakthrough times and adsorption capacities (for both single and mixed metals systems) decreased in the order Pb>Cd, Cu>Zn>Ni within 266 bed volumes. The amounts adsorbed were up to 82 times higher depending on the metal in the granular activated carbon+titanate column than in the granular activated carbon column. The study showed that the titanate material has high potential for removing heavy metals from polluted water when used with granular activated carbon at a very low proportion in fixed-bed columns.

  19. Activation of Canadian coals in a fixed-bed reactor: effect of the particle size on product quality

    SciTech Connect

    Ajay K. Dalai; Narayan C. Pradhan; Jian Liu; Amitabha Majumdar; Eric L. Tollefson

    2008-07-15

    Three Canadian coals, namely, Bienfait lignite, Montgomery sub-bituminous C, and Coal Valley high volatile bituminous C were activated in a fixed-bed reactor. For each coal, two different sizes of particles in the ranges of 0-1.25 mm (fines) and 1.25-2.5 mm (granules) along with cylindrical pellets of 3.18 mm in diameter and 7{+-}2 mm long were activated. The qualities of the products were determined by measuring iodine and methylene blue numbers, specific Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas, bulk densities, and ash contents. The specific surface areas and iodine and methylene blue numbers of bituminous coal products were lower than the values obtained with the lignite and sub-bituminous coals, although the product yields were higher. Products obtained from pellets were found to have superior quality compared to that obtained from fines. The ash content of the feed coal influences the quality of the product activated carbon. It was established that a first-order reaction between steam and coal pellets occurred in the process. The activation energies for the process were also determined. 17 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Fixed-bed column study for hexavalent chromium removal and recovery by short-chain polyaniline synthesized on jute fiber.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Potsangbam Albino; Chakraborty, Saswati

    2009-03-15

    Fixed-bed column studies were conducted to evaluate performance of a short-chain polymer, polyaniline, synthesized on the surface of jute fiber (PANI-jute) for the removal of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in aqueous environment. Influent pH, column bed depth, influent Cr(VI) concentrations and influent flow rate were variable parameters for the present study. Optimum pH for total chromium removal was observed as 3 by electrostatic attraction of acid chromate ion (HCrO(4)(-)) with protonated amine group (NH(3)(+)) of PANI-jute. With increase in column bed depth from 40 to 60 cm, total chromium uptake by PANI-jute increased from 4.14 to 4.66 mg/g with subsequent increase in throughput volume from 9.84 to 12.6L at exhaustion point. The data obtained for total chromium removal were well described by BDST equation till 10% breakthrough. Adsorption rate constant and dynamic bed capacity at 10% breakthrough were observed as 0.01 L/mgh and 1069.46 mg/L, respectively. Adsorbed total chromium was recovered back from PANI-jute as non-toxic Cr(III) after ignition with more than 97% reduction in weight, minimizing the problem of solid waste disposal.

  1. Batch and fixed-bed assessment of sulphate removal by the weak base ion exchange resin Amberlyst A21.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Damaris; Leão, Versiane A

    2014-09-15

    This paper investigated sulphate removal from aqueous solutions by Amberlyst A21, a polystyrene weak base ion exchange resin. Both the pH and initial sulphate concentration were observed to strongly affect sorption yields, which were largest in acidic environments. Working under optimum operational conditions, sulphate sorption by Amberlyst A21 was relatively fast and reached equilibrium after 45 min of contact between the solid and liquid phases. Sorption kinetics could be described by either the pseudo-first order (k1=3.05 × 10(-5)s(-1)) or pseudo-second order model (k2=1.67 × 10(-4)s(-1)), and both the Freundlich and Langmuir models successfully fitted the equilibrium data. Sulphate uptake by Amberlyst A21 was a physisorption process (ΔH=-25.06 kJ mol(-1)) that occurred with entropy reduction (ΔS=-0.042 kJ mol(-1)K(-1)). Elution experiments showed that sulphate is easily desorbed (∼ 100%) from the resin by sodium hydroxide solutions at pH 10 or pH 12. Fixed-bed experiments assessed the effects of the initial sulphate concentration, bed height and flow rate on the breakthrough curves and the efficiency of the Amberlyst A21 in the treatment of a real effluent. In all studied conditions, the maximum sulphate loading resin varied between 8 and 40 mg(SO4(2-))mL(resin)(-1).

  2. Pressurized pyrolysis of dried distillers grains with solubles and canola seed press cake in a fixed-bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Ateş, Funda; Miskolczi, Norbert; Saricaoğlu, Beyza

    2015-02-01

    Pressurized pyrolysis of biomasses was carried in a fixed bed reactor to obtain gases, bio-oils and chars at elevated temperatures. The products were characterized by GC-MS, FTIR, viscometer, SEM, BET and EDXRFS methods. Experiments were performed at 1, 5 and 10 bar pressure and 400, 500 and 600°C temperatures. The experimental results show that in all the experimental condition the yield of bio-oil from DDGS as higher than that of canola. Yield of non-condensable gases and chars increased, while that of liquid products decreased by pressure. Increasing pressure favoured the formation of low molecular weight gas, such as H2. Maximum surface area of chars was obtained at atmospheric pressure and the surface areas decreased rapidly with increasing pressure. GC/MS results shows that the amount of fatty acids in bio-oils was increased by increasing pressure and bio-oils showed non-Newtonian behavior. Based on EDXRFS results, bio-oils and char contained lots of elements. PMID:25484126

  3. The effect of Jatropha torrified biomass and coal preparation on steam co-gasification in a fixed bed reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloqaili, Mashal Mohammed

    Coal fired power stations produce vast amounts of harmful products that may affect our health and environment. Co-gasification of coal and biomass could be a solution to this issue as an emerging technology. Biomass may reduce emissions significantly and it may contribute to reducing capital operational cost while providing high gas yields. This research tests the co-gasification of coal and biomass blended chars. Coal and biomass were both prepared. Coal Illinois No #6 was prepared as coal semi-char and coal-char while Jatropha biomass was torrefied at six different temperatures ranging from [200-300] ºC. The co-gasification experiments was conducted in a fixed-bed reactor. A gasification temperature was 900 ºC and a constant flow rate of 100 mL/min. Carbon conversion, maximum char reactivity, products yield and amount of hydrogen produced were evaluated and studied based on data obtained from the G.C. Additionally, weight of bed material and ash leftover weight from gasification process were significantly contributed in calculating the carbon conversion percentages.

  4. GC/MS characterization of condensable tars in the output stream of a stirred fixed-bed gasifier

    SciTech Connect

    Lamey, S.C.; McCaskill, K.B.; Smith, R.R.

    1981-12-01

    The output stream of the stirred fixed-bed gasifier at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center was sampled for total entrained material. A major portion of the entrained material, in addition to particles, is condensable tar that is subsequently removed from the process gas by wet scrubbing. Characterization of the entrained materials, specifically the tar, is important to establish contaminant levels and to evaluate performance of downstream cleanup units. Samples of tars were collected from the process unit in a combined ice, dry ice, and liquid nitrogen sampler and stored in a refrigerator. The tar samples were then separated into asphaltene, neutral oil, tar acid, and base fractions by solvent extraction using toluene, pentane, sulfuric acid, and potassium hydroxide extraction. Characterization of the fractions obtained from these tars include IR, UV, GC, and GC/MS analysis. The mass spectrometer analysis of the various isolates shows that many individual peaks in the gas chromatograph are in fact mixtures that can be readily identified by the mass spectrometer. It was found that many of the species identified in these fractions were members of aromatic homologous series consisting of parent, mono, di, and tri substituted compounds. Compound identification was made by comparison of the data system library and standard reference spectra. This paper will discuss the instrumental approach and limitation of the GC/MS and the results of the characterization studies of entrained hydrocarbons collected from the gasifier stream.

  5. Selective CO 2 Capture from Flue Gas Using Metal–Organic Frameworks-A Fixed Bed Study

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jian; Tian, Jian; Thallapally, Praveen K.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2012-05-03

    It is important to capture carbon dioxide from flue gas which is considered to be the main reason to cause global warming. CO2/N2 separation by novel adsorbents is a promising method to reduce CO2 emission but effect of water and CO2/N2 selectivity is critical to apply the adsorbents into practical applications. A very well known, Metal Organic Framework, NiDOBDC (Ni-MOF-74 or CPO-27-Ni) was synthesized through a solvothermal reaction and the sample (500 to 800 microns) was used in a fixed bed CO2/N2 breakthrough study with and without H2O. The Ni/DOBDC pellet has a high CO2 capacity of 3.74 mol/kg at 0.15 bar and a high CO2/N2 selectivity of 38, which is much higher than those of reported MOFs and zeolites under dry condition. Trace amount of water can impact CO2 adsorption capacity as well as CO2/N2 selectivity for the Ni/DOBDC. However, Ni/DOBDC can retain a significant CO2 capacity and CO2/N2 selectivity at 0.15 bar CO2 with 3% RH water. These results indicate a promising future to use the Ni/DOBDC in CO2 capture from flue gas.

  6. Catalytic pyrolysis of Alcea pallida stems in a fixed-bed reactor for production of liquid bio-fuels.

    PubMed

    Aysu, Tevfik

    2015-09-01

    Pyrolysis of Alcea pallida stems was performed in a fixed-bed tubular reactor with and without catalyst at three different temperatures. The effects of pyrolysis parameters including temperature and catalyst on the product yields were investigated. It was found that higher temperature resulted in lower liquid (bio-oil) and solid (bio-char) yields and higher gas yields. Catalysts had different effects on product yields and composition of bio-oils. Liquid yields were increased in the presence of zinc chloride and alumina but decreased with calcium hydroxide, tincal and ulexite. The highest bio-oil yield (39.35%) by weight including aqueous phase was produced with alumina catalyst at 500 °C. The yields of bio-char, bio-oil and gas produced, as well as the compositions of the resulting bio-oils were determined by elemental analysis, TGA, FT-IR and GC-MS. 160 different compounds were identified by GC-MS in the bio-oils obtained at 500 °C.

  7. Adsorption of phosphate from aqueous solutions and sewage using zirconium loaded okara (ZLO): Fixed-bed column study.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T A H; Ngo, H H; Guo, W S; Pham, T Q; Li, F M; Nguyen, T V; Bui, X T

    2015-08-01

    This study explores the potential of removing phosphorus from aqueous solutions and sewage by Zr(IV)-loaded okara (ZLO) in the fixed-bed column. Soybean residue (okara) was impregnated with 0.25M Zr(IV) solution to prepare active binding sites for phosphate. The effect of several factors, including flow rate, bed height, initial phosphorus concentration, pH and adsorbent particle size on the performance of ZLO was examined. The maximum dynamic adsorption capacity of ZLO for phosphorus was estimated to be 16.43mg/g. Breakthrough curve modeling indicated that Adams-Bohart model and Thomas model fitted the experimental data better than Yoon-Nelson model. After treatment with ZLO packed bed column, the effluent could meet the discharge standard for phosphorus in Australia. Successful desorption and regeneration were achieved with 0.2 NaOH and 0.1 HCl, respectively. The results prove that ZLO can be used as a promising phosphorus adsorbent in the dynamic adsorption system. PMID:25847314

  8. Start-up performance of Anammox process in a fixed bed reactor (FBR) filled with honeycomb-like polypropylene carriers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Shen, Boxiong; Zhang, Sha; Wang, Zhiqiang; Tian, Li

    2016-01-01

    Novel honeycomb-like carriers, made of polypropylene, were applied to enhance biomass retention capacity so as to improve Anammox start-up performance in a fixed bed reactor (FBR). The reactor was operated for 3 months. On day 45, Anammox activity appeared. After 61 days' operation, the removal efficiencies of ammonium and nitrite were both over 91% based on 70 mg N L(-1) of the influent ammonium and influent nitrite, indicating that a remarkable Anammox activity was attained. A final specific Anammox activity of 0.12 g NH4(+)-N gVSS(-1) d(-1) was reached (VSS: volatile suspended solids). The FBR showed a good capacity for resisting shock loading and was more able to resist shock loading of nitrogen concentration than resist hydraulic shock loading. Phylogenetic analysis showed that Candidatus Brocadia anammoxidans' and Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis' were detected in the mature biofilm, and Candidatus Brocadia anammoxidans' was the dominant Anammox strain. Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis' played a positive role in the reactor performance, as it could consumed nitrite quickly and efficiently so as to avoid an adverse effect of temporary nitrite accumulation. The results showed that the honeycomb-like carriers were suitable for start-up of Anammox. PMID:27120639

  9. Batch and fixed-bed assessment of sulphate removal by the weak base ion exchange resin Amberlyst A21.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Damaris; Leão, Versiane A

    2014-09-15

    This paper investigated sulphate removal from aqueous solutions by Amberlyst A21, a polystyrene weak base ion exchange resin. Both the pH and initial sulphate concentration were observed to strongly affect sorption yields, which were largest in acidic environments. Working under optimum operational conditions, sulphate sorption by Amberlyst A21 was relatively fast and reached equilibrium after 45 min of contact between the solid and liquid phases. Sorption kinetics could be described by either the pseudo-first order (k1=3.05 × 10(-5)s(-1)) or pseudo-second order model (k2=1.67 × 10(-4)s(-1)), and both the Freundlich and Langmuir models successfully fitted the equilibrium data. Sulphate uptake by Amberlyst A21 was a physisorption process (ΔH=-25.06 kJ mol(-1)) that occurred with entropy reduction (ΔS=-0.042 kJ mol(-1)K(-1)). Elution experiments showed that sulphate is easily desorbed (∼ 100%) from the resin by sodium hydroxide solutions at pH 10 or pH 12. Fixed-bed experiments assessed the effects of the initial sulphate concentration, bed height and flow rate on the breakthrough curves and the efficiency of the Amberlyst A21 in the treatment of a real effluent. In all studied conditions, the maximum sulphate loading resin varied between 8 and 40 mg(SO4(2-))mL(resin)(-1). PMID:25151243

  10. Coalesced chitosan activated carbon composite for batch and fixed-bed adsorption of cationic and anionic dyes.

    PubMed

    Auta, M; Hameed, B H

    2013-05-01

    A renewable waste tea activated carbon (WTAC) was coalesced with chitosan to form composite adsorbent used for waste water treatment. Adsorptive capacities of crosslinked chitosan beads (CCB) and its composite (WTAC-CCB) for Methylene blue dye (MB) and Acid blue 29 (AB29) were evaluated through batch and fixed-bed studies. Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin adsorption isotherms were tested for the adsorption process and the experimental data were best fitted by Langmuir model and least by Freundlich model; the suitability of fitness was adjudged by the Chi-square (χ(2)) and Marquadt's percent standard deviation error functions. Judging by the values of χ(2), pseudo-second-order reaction model best described the adsorption process than pseudo-first-order kinetic model for MB/AB29 on both adsorbents. After five cycles of adsorbents desorption test, more than 50% WTAC-CCB adsorption efficiency was retained while CCB had <20% adsorption efficiency. The results of this study revealed that WTAC-CCB composite is a promising adsorbent for treatment of anionic and cationic dyes in effluent wastewaters.

  11. Influence of particle size on pyrolysis and gasification performance of municipal solid waste in a fixed bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Luo, Siyi; Xiao, Bo; Hu, Zhiquan; Liu, Shiming; Guan, Yanwen; Cai, Lei

    2010-08-01

    Pyrolysis and gasification of municipal solid waste (MSW) were carried out in a lab-scale fixed bed reactor in order to evaluate the effects of particle size at different bed temperatures on product yield and composition. The bed temperature was varied from 600 to 900 degrees C and the MSW was separated into three different size fractions (below 5 mm, 50-10 mm and above 10 mm). Particle size and temperature had integrated effects on product yield and composition: higher temperature resulted in higher gas yield with less tar and char, and, at the same temperature, dry gas yield increased with a decrease in particle size, and char and tar yield decreased. The differences due to particle sizes in pyrolysis and gasification performance practically disappeared at the highest temperatures tested. Smaller particle sizes resulted in higher H(2) and CO contents for both pyrolysis and gasification of MSW. Minimizing the size of raw materials is an alternative method to improve the gas quality of MSW pyrolysis and gasification. PMID:20363619

  12. Cobalt (II) removal from aqueous solutions by natural hemp fibers: Batch and fixed-bed column studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofan, Lavinia; Teodosiu, Carmen; Paduraru, Carmen; Wenkert, Rodica

    2013-11-01

    Natural hemp fibers were explored as sorbent for the removal of Co(II) ions from aqueous solutions in batch and dynamic conditions. The batch Co(II) sorption capacity increased up to pH 5, reached the maximum (7.5-7.8 mg/g) over the initial pH of 4.5-5. As the initial concentration of metal ion increased (in the range of 25-200 mg/L), the cobalt uptake was enhanced, but the Co(II) removal efficiency decreased. The batch sorption of Co(II) on the tested hemp follows a pseudo-second order model, which relies on the assumption that the chemisorptions may be the rate-controlling step. The Langmuir model better described the Co(II) sorption process on the natural hemp fibers in comparison with the Freundlich model. This finding complies with the results of fixed-bed studies which emphasize that the optimal solution for describing the behavior of the investigated hemp bed column is provided by the Thomas model. The sorption capacity of the hemp fibers column (15.44 mg/g) performed better than that of the Co(II)-hemp batch system (13.58 mg/g). The possibility to use hemp fibers as an alternative in the Co(II) wastewater treatment should be studied under pilot scale applications, so as to complete the studies concerning the removal efficiencies with technical and economic factors that influence process scale-up.

  13. Chemisorption of oxygen onto activated carbon can enhance the stability of biological perchlorate reduction in fixed bed biofilm reactors.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Chul; Li, Xu; Raskin, Lutgarde; Morgenroth, Eberhard

    2008-07-01

    Fixed bed biofilm reactors with granular activated carbon (GAC) or glass beads as support media were used to evaluate the influence of short-term (12h) and long-term (23 days) increases of influent dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations on biological perchlorate removal. The goal was to evaluate the extent by which chemisorption of oxygen to GAC can enhance the stability of biological perchlorate reduction. Baseline influent concentrations were 50 microg/L of perchlorate, 2 mg/L of acetate as C, and 1mg/L of DO. Perchlorate removal in the glass bead reactor seized immediately after increasing influent DO concentrations from 1 to 4 mg/L since glass beads have no sorptive capacity. In the biologically active carbon (BAC) reactor, chemisorption of oxygen to GAC removed a substantial fraction of the influent DO, and perchlorate removal was maintained during short-term increases of influent DO levels up to 8 mg/L. During long-term exposure to influent DO concentrations of 8.5mg/L, effluent perchlorate and DO concentrations increased slowly. Subsequent exposure of the BAC reactor bed to low DO concentrations partially regenerated the capacity for oxygen chemisorption. Microbial analyses indicated similar microbial communities in both reactors, which confirmed that the differences in reactor performance during dynamic loading conditions could be attributed to the sorptive properties of GAC. Using a sorptive biofilm support medium can enhance biological perchlorate removal under dynamic loading conditions.

  14. Continuous methane fermentation and the production of vitamin B12 in a fixed-bed reactor packed with loofah.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yingnan; Zhang, Zhenya; Lu, Jun; Maekawa, Takaaki

    2004-05-01

    A fixed-bed reactor with acclimated methanogens immobilized on a loofah support was studied on a laboratory scale to evaluate the system producing methane from the mixture of CO(2) and H(2) gas, with the production of vitamin B(12) as a by-product. Fermentation using CO(2)/H(2) acclimated methanogens was conducted in a jar fermentor with hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of three and six days. The performance of the reactor was mainly dependent on the HRT. With an HRT of three days, the methane production rate and the vitamin B(12) concentration in the culture broth were 6.18 l/l-reactor/h and 2.88 mg/l-culture liquid; these values were 11.96 l/l-reactor/h and 37.54 mg/l-culture liquid for an HRT of six days. A higher total cell mass of methanogens retained 42.5 g dry cell/l-culture liquid was achieved in the HRT of six days. The loofah carrier immobilized almost 95% of the methanogens, which led to a more effective bio-reaction. It was also observed that the fermentation system had a better ability to buffer pH, especially for an HRT of six days.

  15. Development and Optimization of AAV hFIX Particles by Transient Transfection in an iCELLis(®) Fixed-Bed Bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Powers, Alicia D; Piras, Bryan A; Clark, Robert K; Lockey, Timothy D; Meagher, Michael M

    2016-06-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are increasingly popular in gene therapy because they are unassociated with human disease, replication dependent, and less immunogenic than other viral vectors and can infect a variety of cell types. These vectors have been used in over 130 clinical trials, and one AAV product has been approved for treatment of lipoprotein lipase deficiency in Europe. To meet the demand for the increasing quantities of AAV required for clinical trials and treatment, a scalable high-capacity technology is required. Bioreactors meet these requirements but limited options are available for adherent HEK 293T/17 cells. Here we optimize the transient transfection of HEK293T/17 cells for the production of AAV human factor IX in a disposable fixed-bed bioreactor, the iCELLis(®) Nano (PALL Corporation). A fixed bed in the center of the iCELLis bioreactor is surrounded by culture medium that is pumped through the bed from the bottom of the bioreactor so that a thin film of the medium overflows the bed and is replenished with oxygen and depleted of CO2 as it returns to the surrounding medium reservoir. We show that this fixed-bed bioreactor can support as many as 2.5 × 10(8) cells/ml of fixed bed (1.9 × 10(6) cells/cm(2)). By optimizing culture and transfection parameters such as the concentration of DNA for transfection, day of harvest, size of PEI/DNA particles, and transfection medium, and adding an additional medium change to the process, we increased our yield to as high as 9.0 × 10(14) viral particles per square meter of fixed bed. We also show an average GFP transfection of 97% of cells throughout the fixed bed. These yields make the iCELLis a promising scalable technology for the clinical production of AAV gene therapy products. PMID:27229773

  16. Fixed Bed Biomass Gasifier

    SciTech Connect

    Carl Bielenberg

    2006-03-31

    The report details work performed by Gazogen to develop a novel biomass gasifier for producimg electricity from commercially available hardwood chips. The research conducted by Gazogen under this grant was intended to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new means of producing electricity from wood chips and other biomass and carbonaceous fuels. The technical feasibility of the technology has been furthered as a result of the DOE grant, and work is expected to continue. The economic feasibility can only be shown when all operational problems have been overocme. The technology could eventually provide a means of producing electricity on a decentralized basis from sustainably cultivated plants or plant by-products.

  17. Study of Indonesia low rank coal utilization on modified fixed bed gasification for combined cycle power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardianto, T.; Amalia, A. R.; Suwono, A.; Riauwindu, P.

    2015-09-01

    Gasification is a conversion process converting carbon-based solid fuel into gaseous products that have considerable amount of calorific value. One of the carbon-based solid fuel that serves as feed for gasification is coal. Gasification gaseous product is termed as syngas (synthetic gas) that is composed of several different gases. Syngas produced from gasification vary from one process to another, this is due to several factors which are: feed characteristics, operation condition, gasified fluid condition, and gasification method or technology. One of the utilization of syngas is for combined cycle power plant fuel. In order to meet the need to convert carbon-based solid fuel into gaseous fuel for combined cycle power plant, engineering adjustment for gasification was done using related software to create the syngas with characteristics of natural gas that serve as fuel for combined cycle power plant in Indonesia. Feed used for the gasification process in this paper was Indonesian Low Rank Coal and the method used to obtain syngas was Modified Fixed Bed Gasifier. From the engineering adjustment process, the yielded syngas possessed lower heating value as much as 31828.32 kJ/kg in gasification condition of 600°C, 3.5 bar, and steam to feed ratio was 1 kg/kg. Syngas characteristics obtained from the process was used as a reference for the adjustment of the fuel system modification in combined cycle power plant that will have the same capacity with the conversion of the system's fuel from natural gas to syngas.

  18. Incorporation of alpha-Ketoglutaric Acid as a Fixed Bed Scrubber Media for the Neutralization of Hydrazine Family Hypergolic Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeVor, R. W.; Santiago-Maldonado, E.; Parkerson, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    A candidate scrubber media, alpha-ketoglutaric acid (aKGA) adsorbed onto a silica-based substrate was examined as a potential alternative to the hydrazine-family hypergolic fuel neutralization techniques currently utilized at NASA/Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Helvenson et. al. has indicated that aKGA will react with hydrazines to produce non-hazardous, possibly biodegradable products. Furthermore, the authors have previously tested and demonstrated the use of aKGA aqueous solutions as a replacement neutralizing agent for citric acid, which is currently used as a scrubbing agent in liquid scrubbers at KSC. Specific properties examined include reaction efficiency, the loading capacity of aKGA onto various silica substrates, and the comparison of aKGA media performance to that of the citric acid vapor scrubber systems at KSC and a commercial vapor scrubber media. Preliminary investigations showed hydrophobic aerogel particles to be an ideal substrate for the deposition of the aKGA. Current studies have shown that the laboratory produced aKGA-Aerogel absorbent media are more efficient and cost effective than a commercially available fixed bed scrubber media, although much less cost effective than liquid-based citric acid scrubbers (although possibly safer and less labor intensive). A comparison of all three alternative scrubber technologies (liquid aKGA, solid-phase aKGA, and commercially available sorbent materials) is given considering both hypergolic neutralization capabilities and relative costs (as compared to the current citric acid scrubbing technology in use at NASA/KSC).

  19. Batch and fixed-bed adsorption of tartrazine azo-dye onto activated carbon prepared from apricot stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albroomi, H. I.; Elsayed, M. A.; Baraka, A.; Abdelmaged, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    This work describes the potential of utilizing prepared activated carbon from apricot stones as an efficient adsorbent material for tartrazine (TZ) azo-dye removal in a batch and dynamic adsorption system. The results revealed that activated carbons with well-developed surface area (774 m2/g) and pore volume (1.26 cm3/g) can be manufactured from apricot stones by H3PO4 activation. In batch experiments, effects of the parameters such as initial dye concentration and temperature on the removal of the dye were studied. Equilibrium was achieved in 120 min. Adsorption capacity was found to be dependent on the initial concentration of dye solution, and maximum adsorption was found to be 76 mg/g at 100 mg/L of TZ. The adsorption capacity at equilibrium (q e) increased from 22.6 to 76 mg/g with an increase in the initial dye concentrations from 25 to 100 mg/L. The thermodynamic parameters such as change in free energy (ΔG 0), enthalpy (ΔH 0) and entropy (ΔS 0) were determined and the positive value of (ΔH) 78.1 (K J mol-1) revealed that adsorption efficiency increased with an increase in the process temperature. In fixed-bed column experiments, the effect of selected operating parameters such as bed depth, flow rate and initial dye concentration on the adsorption capacity was evaluated. Increase in bed height of adsorption columns leads to an extension of breakthrough point as well as the exhaustion time of adsorbent. However, the maximum adsorption capacities decrease with increases of flow rate. The breakthrough data fitted well to bed depth service time and Thomas models with high coefficient of determination, R 2 ≥ 94.

  20. Continuous adsorption of Pb(II) and methylene blue by engineered graphite oxide coated sand in fixed-bed column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Ji-Lai; Zhang, Yong-Liang; Jiang, Yan; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Cui, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Ke; Deng, Can-Hui; Niu, Qiu-Ya; Deng, Jiu-Hua; Huan, Shuang-Yan

    2015-03-01

    The mixture of several effluents, caused by the improper handling and management of effluents, generated multi-component wastewater containing both metals and dyes, leading to the complicated treatment process. In this study, a continuous adsorption of Pb(II) and methylene blue (MB) has been studied in single and binary solutions by using graphite oxide coated sand (GO-sand) as an adsorbent in a fixed-bed column. GO-sand was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy before and after analyte adsorption. Compared with sand filter, adsorption quantity and capacity for Pb(II) and MB by GO-sand filter were greatly increased. In Pb(II) and MB single solutions, the experimental parameters were investigated in detail including initial concentration, flow rate, bed depth and pH. Exhaustion time decreased with increasing initial concentration and flow rate, and increased with increasing bed depth and pH. In the Pb(II)-MB binary solution, exhaustion time significantly decreased for Pb(II) adsorption, but increased for MB adsorption. The reason was explained that the more favorable adsorption for MB onto the surface of GO-sand than that for Pb(II), which was derived from π-π interaction between MB and GO on sand surface in packed filter. The Yoon-Nelson model was applied at different concentration of Pb(II) and MB to predict the breakthrough curves. The experimental data were well fit with the model indicating that it was suitable for this column design.

  1. Treatment of petroleum refinery wastewater containing heavily polluting substances in an aerobic submerged fixed-bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Vendramel, S; Bassin, J P; Dezotti, M; Sant'Anna, G L

    2015-01-01

    Petroleum refineries produce large amount of wastewaters, which often contain a wide range of different compounds. Some of these constituents may be recalcitrant and therefore difficult to be treated biologically. This study evaluated the capability of an aerobic submerged fixed-bed reactor (ASFBR) containing a corrugated PVC support material for biofilm attachment to treat a complex and high-strength organic wastewater coming from a petroleum refinery. The reactor operation was divided into five experimental runs which lasted more than 250 days. During the reactor operation, the applied volumetric organic load was varied within the range of 0.5-2.4 kgCOD.m(-3).d(-1). Despite the inherent fluctuations on the characteristics of the complex wastewater and the slight decrease in the reactor performance when the influent organic load was increased, the ASFBR showed good stability and allowed to reach chemical oxygen demand, dissolved organic carbon and total suspended solids removals up to 91%, 90% and 92%, respectively. Appreciable ammonium removal was obtained (around 90%). Some challenging aspects of reactor operation such as biofilm quantification and important biofilm constituents (e.g. polysaccharides (PS) and proteins (PT)) were also addressed in this work. Average PS/volatile attached solids (VAS) and PT/VAS ratios were around 6% and 50%, respectively. The support material promoted biofilm attachment without appreciable loss of solids and allowed long-term operation without clogging. Microscopic observations of the microbial community revealed great diversity of higher organisms, such as protozoa and rotifers, suggesting that toxic compounds found in the wastewater were possibly removed in the biofilm.

  2. The use of protonated Sargassum muticum as biosorbent for cadmium removal in a fixed-bed column.

    PubMed

    Lodeiro, P; Herrero, R; de Vicente, M E Sastre

    2006-09-01

    The protonated Sargassum muticum seaweed was studied as a possible biosorbent for cadmium removal in a fixed-bed column. The experiments were conducted in order to determine the effect of flow rate (0.42, 5, 10 and 20 mL min(-1)) and bed height (0.6 and 15.3 cm for the lowest flow rate or 7.4, 13 and 16.6 cm for the others) on breakthrough curves behaviour. The determined breakthrough and exhaustion times increased with the diminution in flow rate and with the increase in bed height. The maximum cadmium uptake capacity, obtained from the area below adsorbed cadmium concentration versus time curves, was found to remain practically constant with bed depth and flow rate. The bed depth service time (BDST) model was applied to analyse experimental data, determining the characteristic process parameters. The optimal lowest sorbent usage rate was evaluated at 2 min contact time and the minimum bed height values necessary to prevent the effluent solution concentration from exceeding 0.02 mg L(-1) at zero time were 5.3, 6.9 and 7.5 cm for flow rates of 5, 10 and 20 mL min(-1), respectively. Several empirical models proposed in the literature (Bohart-Adams, Yan, Belter and Chu models) were investigated in order to obtain the best fit of column data, describing in a simple manner the breakthrough curves. A correlation between model parameters and the variables implied in the process was attempted. PMID:16519998

  3. Selecting metal oxide nanomaterials for arsenic removal in fixed bed columns: from nanopowders to aggregated nanoparticle media.

    PubMed

    Hristovski, Kiril; Baumgardner, Andrew; Westerhoff, Paul

    2007-08-17

    This paper investigates the feasibility of arsenate removal by aggregated metal oxide nanoparticle media in packed bed columns. Batch experiments conducted with 16 commercial nanopowders in four water matrices were used to select a metal oxide nanoparticle that both amply removes arsenate and can be aggregated using an inert binder. TiO2, Fe(2)O(3), ZrO2 and NiO nanopowders, which exhibited the highest arsenate removal in all water matrices, were characterized with fitted Freundlich adsorption isotherm (q=KC(e)(1/n)) parameters. In 10 mM NaHCO3 buffered nanopure water and at both pH approximately 6.7 and 8.4, K ranged from 1.3 to 12.09(mg As/g(media))(L/mg As)(1/n), and 1/n ranged from 0.21 to 0.52. Under these conditions, the fitted Freundlich isotherm parameters for TiO2 nanoparticles aggregated with inorganic and organic binders (K of 4.75-28.45(mg As/g(media))(L/mg As)(1/n) and 1/n of 0.37-0.97) suggested favorable arsenate adsorption. To demonstrate that aggregated nanoparticle media would allow rapid mass transport of arsenate in a fixed bed adsorber setting, short bed adsorber (SBA) tests were conducted on TiO2 nanoparticle aggregates at empty bed contact times (EBCT) of 0.1-0.5 min and Re x Sc=1000 and 2000. These SBA tests suggested that the binder has a negligible role in adsorbing arsenic and that mass transport is controlled by rapid intraparticle diffusion rather than external film diffusion. PMID:17254707

  4. Thin-film fixed-bed reactor for solar photocatalytic inactivation of Aeromonas hydrophila: influence of water quality

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Controlling fish disease is one of the major concerns in contemporary aquaculture. The use of antibiotics or chemical disinfection cannot provide a healthy aquaculture system without residual effects. Water quality is also important in determining the success or failure of fish production. Several solar photocatalytic reactors have been used to treat drinking water or waste water without leaving chemical residues. This study has investigated the impact of several key aspects of water quality on the inactivation of the pathogenic bacterium Aeromonas hydrophila using a pilot-scale thin-film fixed-bed reactor (TFFBR) system. Results The level of inactivation of Aeromonas hydrophila ATCC 35654 was determined using a TFFBR with a photocatalytic area of 0.47 m2 under the influence of various water quality variables (pH, conductivity, turbidity and colour) under high solar irradiance conditions (980–1100 W m-2), at a flow rate of 4.8 L h-1 through the reactor. Bacterial enumeration were obtained through conventional plate count using trypticase soy agar media, cultured in conventional aerobic conditions to detect healthy cells and under ROS-neutralised conditions to detect both healthy and sub-lethally injured (oxygen-sensitive) cells. The results showed that turbidity has a major influence on solar photocatalytic inactivation of A. hydrophila. Humic acids appear to decrease TiO2 effectiveness under full sunlight and reduce microbial inactivation. pH in the range 7–9 and salinity both have no major effect on the extent of photoinactivation or sub-lethal injury. Conclusions This study demonstrates the effectiveness of the TFFBR in the inactivation of Aeromonas hydrophila under the influence of several water quality variables at high solar irradiance, providing an opportunity for the application of solar photocatalysis in aquaculture systems, as long as turbidity remains low. PMID:23194331

  5. Adsorption of methylene blue from aqueous solution by jackfruit (Artocarpus heteropyllus) leaf powder: A fixed-bed column study.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Md Tamez; Rukanuzzaman, Md; Khan, Md Maksudur Rahman; Islam, Md Akhtarul

    2009-08-01

    Continuous fixed-bed studies were undertaken to evaluate the efficiency of jackfruit leaf powder (JLP) as an adsorbent for the removal of methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solution under the effect of various process parameters like bed depth (5-10cm), flow rate (30-50mL/min) and initial MB concentrations (100-300mg/L). The pH at point of zero charge (pH(PZC)) of the adsorbent was determined by the titration method and a value of 3.9 was obtained. A FTIR of the adsorbent was done before and after the adsorption to find the potential adsorption sites for interaction with methylene blue molecules. The results showed that the total adsorbed quantities and equilibrium uptake decreased with increasing flow rate and increased with increasing initial MB concentration. The longest breakthrough time and maximum MB adsorption were obtained at pH 10. The results showed that the column performed well at low flow rate. Also, breakthrough time and exhaustion time increased with increasing bed depth. The bed-depth service time (BDST) model and the Thomas model were applied to the adsorption of MB at different bed depths, flow rates, influent concentrations and pH to predict the breakthrough curves and to determine the characteristic parameters of the column that are useful for process design. The two model predictions were in very good agreement with the experimental results at all the process parameters studied indicating that they were very suitable for JLP column design.

  6. Fixed-bed fermentation of rice straw and chicken manure using a mixed culture of marine mesophilic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Agbogbo, Frank K; Holtzapple, Mark T

    2007-05-01

    A mixture of rice straw (80%) and chicken manure (20%) was pretreated and fermented to carboxylic acids by using a mixed culture of marine mesophilic microorganisms. Two sets of four fermentors, built from PVC pipes, were used for both biomass pretreatment and fermentation. Four 1L fermentors (F1-F4) were arranged in series, where liquid fermentation products were transferred from one fermentor to the other, to form a train. A liquid volume of 10mL and 15mL were transferred every four days for Trains A and B, respectively. The maximum total acid concentration for F1 in Train A was 34.2g/L and the maximum acid concentration in F2-F4 was approximately 44g/L. The maximum total acid concentration in F1 in Train B was 30.5g/L and the maximum acid concentration in F2-F4 was approximately 48g/L. The conversion in each of the fermentors in Train A varied from 0.821 to 0.879g VS digested/g VS fed and the yield was in the range 0.489-0.609g total acids/g VS fed. The conversion and yield in Train B were 0.741-0.914g VS digested/g VS fed and 0.563-0.669g total acids/g VS fed, respectively. The continuum particle distribution model (CPDM) predicted acid concentrations and retention times in the fixed-bed fermentation system with R(2) of 0.67-0.84 in Trains A and B.

  7. Genome sequence and description of the anaerobic lignin-degrading bacterium Tolumonas lignolytica sp. nov.

    SciTech Connect

    Billings, Andrew F.; Fortney, Julian L.; Hazen, Terry C.; Simmons, Blake; Davenport, Karen W.; Goodwin, Lynne; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Woyke, Tanja; DeAngelis, Kristen M.

    2015-11-19

    Tolumonas lignolytica BRL6-1T sp. nov. is the type strain of T. lignolytica sp. nov., a proposed novel species of the Tolumonas genus. This strain was isolated from tropical rainforest soils based on its ability to utilize lignin as a sole carbon source. Cells of Tolumonas lignolytica BRL6-1T are mesophilic, non-spore forming, Gram-negative rods that are oxidase and catalase negative. The genome for this isolate was sequenced and returned in seven unique contigs totaling 3.6Mbp, enabling the characterization of several putative pathways for lignin breakdown. Particularly, we found an extracellular peroxidase involved in lignin depolymerization, as well as several enzymes involved in β-aryl ether bond cleavage, which is the most abundant linkage between lignin monomers. We also found genes for enzymes involved in ferulic acid metabolism, which is a common product of lignin breakdown. Finally, by characterizing pathways and enzymes employed in the bacterial breakdown of lignin in anaerobic environments, this work should assist in the efficient engineering of biofuel production from lignocellulosic material.

  8. Genome sequence and description of the anaerobic lignin-degrading bacterium Tolumonas lignolytica sp. nov.

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Billings, Andrew F.; Fortney, Julian L.; Hazen, Terry C.; Simmons, Blake; Davenport, Karen W.; Goodwin, Lynne; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Woyke, Tanja; et al

    2015-11-19

    Tolumonas lignolytica BRL6-1T sp. nov. is the type strain of T. lignolytica sp. nov., a proposed novel species of the Tolumonas genus. This strain was isolated from tropical rainforest soils based on its ability to utilize lignin as a sole carbon source. Cells of Tolumonas lignolytica BRL6-1T are mesophilic, non-spore forming, Gram-negative rods that are oxidase and catalase negative. The genome for this isolate was sequenced and returned in seven unique contigs totaling 3.6Mbp, enabling the characterization of several putative pathways for lignin breakdown. Particularly, we found an extracellular peroxidase involved in lignin depolymerization, as well as several enzymes involvedmore » in β-aryl ether bond cleavage, which is the most abundant linkage between lignin monomers. We also found genes for enzymes involved in ferulic acid metabolism, which is a common product of lignin breakdown. Finally, by characterizing pathways and enzymes employed in the bacterial breakdown of lignin in anaerobic environments, this work should assist in the efficient engineering of biofuel production from lignocellulosic material.« less

  9. Lactic acid production from potato peel waste by anaerobic sequencing batch fermentation using undefined mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shaobo; McDonald, Armando G; Coats, Erik R

    2015-11-01

    Lactic acid (LA) is a necessary industrial feedstock for producing the bioplastic, polylactic acid (PLA), which is currently produced by pure culture fermentation of food carbohydrates. This work presents an alternative to produce LA from potato peel waste (PPW) by anaerobic fermentation in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) inoculated with undefined mixed culture from a municipal wastewater treatment plant. A statistical design of experiments approach was employed using set of 0.8L SBRs using gelatinized PPW at a solids content range from 30 to 50 g L(-1), solids retention time of 2-4 days for yield and productivity optimization. The maximum LA production yield of 0.25 g g(-1) PPW and highest productivity of 125 mg g(-1) d(-1) were achieved. A scale-up SBR trial using neat gelatinized PPW (at 80 g L(-1) solids content) at the 3 L scale was employed and the highest LA yield of 0.14 g g(-1) PPW and a productivity of 138 mg g(-1) d(-1) were achieved with a 1 d SRT.

  10. Lactic acid production from potato peel waste by anaerobic sequencing batch fermentation using undefined mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shaobo; McDonald, Armando G; Coats, Erik R

    2015-11-01

    Lactic acid (LA) is a necessary industrial feedstock for producing the bioplastic, polylactic acid (PLA), which is currently produced by pure culture fermentation of food carbohydrates. This work presents an alternative to produce LA from potato peel waste (PPW) by anaerobic fermentation in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) inoculated with undefined mixed culture from a municipal wastewater treatment plant. A statistical design of experiments approach was employed using set of 0.8L SBRs using gelatinized PPW at a solids content range from 30 to 50 g L(-1), solids retention time of 2-4 days for yield and productivity optimization. The maximum LA production yield of 0.25 g g(-1) PPW and highest productivity of 125 mg g(-1) d(-1) were achieved. A scale-up SBR trial using neat gelatinized PPW (at 80 g L(-1) solids content) at the 3 L scale was employed and the highest LA yield of 0.14 g g(-1) PPW and a productivity of 138 mg g(-1) d(-1) were achieved with a 1 d SRT. PMID:25708409

  11. Removal of furan and phenolic compounds from simulated biomass hydrolysates by batch adsorption and continuous fixed-bed column adsorption methods.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Cheol; Park, Sunkyu

    2016-09-01

    It has been proposed to remove all potential inhibitors and sulfuric acid in biomass hydrolysates generated from dilute-acid pretreatment of biomass, based on three steps of sugar purification process. This study focused on its first step in which furan and phenolic compounds were selectively removed from the simulated hydrolysates using activated charcoal. Batch adsorption experiments demonstrated that the affinity of activated charcoal for each component was highest in the order of vanillic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, furfural, acetic acid, sulfuric acid, and xylose. The affinity of activated charcoal for furan and phenolic compounds proved to be significantly higher than that of the other three components. Four separation strategies were conducted with a combination of batch adsorption and continuous fixed-bed column adsorption methods. It was observed that xylose loss was negligible with near complete removal of furan and phenolic compounds, when at least one fixed-bed column adsorption was implemented in the strategy. PMID:27289057

  12. Propagated fixed-bed mixed-acid fermentation: Part I: Effect of volatile solid loading rate and agitation at high pH.

    PubMed

    Golub, Kristina W; Forrest, Andrea K; Mercy, Kevin L; Holtzapple, Mark T

    2011-11-01

    Countercurrent fermentation is a high performing process design for mixed-acid fermentation. However, there are high operating costs associated with moving solids, which is an integral component of this configuration. This study investigated the effect of volatile solid loading rate (VSLR) and agitation in propagated fixed-bed fermentation, a configuration which may be more commercially viable. To evaluate the role of agitation on fixed-bed configuration performance, continuous mixing was compared with periodic mixing. VSLR was also varied and not found to affect acid yields. However, increased VSLR and liquid retention time did result in higher conversions, productivity, acid concentrations, but lower selectivities. Agitation was demonstrated to be important for this fermentor configuration, the periodically-mixed fermentation had the lowest conversion and yields. Operating at a high pH (∼9) contributed to the high selectivity to acetic acid, which might be industrially desirable but at the cost of lower yield compared to a neutral pH.

  13. Numerical and experimental studies on effects of moisture content on combustion characteristics of simulated municipal solid wastes in a fixed bed

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Rui; Ismail, Tamer M.; Ren, Xiaohan; Abd El-Salam, M.

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • The effects of moisture content on the burning process of MSW are investigated. • A two-dimensional mathematical model was built to simulate the combustion process. • Temperature distributions, process rates, gas species were measured and simulated. • The The conversion ratio of C/CO and N/NO in MSW are inverse to moisture content. - Abstract: In order to reveal the features of the combustion process in the porous bed of a waste incinerator, a two-dimensional unsteady state model and experimental study were employed to investigate the combustion process in a fixed bed of municipal solid waste (MSW) on the combustion process in a fixed bed reactor. Conservation equations of the waste bed were implemented to describe the incineration process. The gas phase turbulence was modeled using the k–ε turbulent model and the particle phase was modeled using the kinetic theory of granular flow. The rate of moisture evaporation, devolatilization rate, and char burnout was calculated according to the waste property characters. The simulation results were then compared with experimental data for different moisture content of MSW, which shows that the incineration process of waste in the fixed bed is reasonably simulated. The simulation results of solid temperature, gas species and process rate in the bed are accordant with experimental data. Due to the high moisture content of fuel, moisture evaporation consumes a vast amount of heat, and the evaporation takes up most of the combustion time (about 2/3 of the whole combustion process). The whole bed combustion process reduces greatly as MSW moisture content increases. The experimental and simulation results provide direction for design and optimization of the fixed bed of MSW.

  14. Mussel-inspired Functionalization of Cotton for Nano-catalyst Support and Its Application in a Fixed-bed System with High Performance

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Jiangbo; Xiao, Junwu; Xiao, Fei; Jin, Yunxia; Dong, Yue; Jing, Feng; Wang, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by the composition of adhesive and reductive proteins secreted by marine mussels, polydopamine (PDA) was used to coat cotton microfiber (CMF), and then acted as reducing agent for the growth of Pd nanoparticles on PDA coated CMF (PDA@CMF) composites. The resultant CMF@PDA/Pd composites were then packed in a column for the further use in fixed-bed system. For the catalysis of the reduction of 4-nitrophenol, the flow rate of the 4-aminophenol solution (0.5 mM) was as high as 60 mL/min. The obtained fixed-bed system even exhibited superior performance to conventional batch reaction process because it greatly facilitated the efficiency of the catalytic fibers. Consequently, its turnover frequency (TOF) was up to 1.587 min−1, while the TOF in the conventional batch reaction was 0.643 min−1. The catalytic fibers also showed good recyclability, which can be recycled for nine successive cycles without a loss of activity. Furthermore, the catalytic system based on CMF@PDA/Pd can also be applied for Suzuki coupling reaction with the iodobenzene conversion up to 96.7%. The strategy to prepare CMF@PDA/Pd catalytic fixed bed was simple, economical and scalable, which can also be applied for coating different microfibers and loading other noble metal nanoparticles, was amenable for automated industrial processes. PMID:26902657

  15. Artificial neural network (ANN) modeling of adsorption of methylene blue by NaOH-modified rice husk in a fixed-bed column system.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Shamik; Saha, Papita Das

    2013-02-01

    In this study, rice husk was modified with NaOH and used as adsorbent for dynamic adsorption of methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solutions. Continuous removal of MB from aqueous solutions was studied in a laboratory scale fixed-bed column packed with NaOH-modified rice husk (NMRH). Effect of different flow rates and bed heights on the column breakthrough performance was investigated. In order to determine the most suitable model for describing the adsorption kinetics of MB in the fixed-bed column system, the bed depth service time (BDST) model as well as the Thomas model was fitted to the experimental data. An artificial neural network (ANN)-based model was also developed for describing the dynamic dye adsorption process. An extensive error analysis was carried out between experimental data and data predicted by the models by using the following error functions: correlation coefficient (R(2)), average relative error, sum of the absolute error and Chi-square statistic test (χ(2)). Results show that with increasing bed height and decreasing flow rate, the breakthrough time was delayed. All the error functions yielded minimum values for the ANN model than the traditional models (BDST and Thomas), suggesting that the ANN model is the most suitable model to describe the fixed-bed adsorption of MB by NMRH. It is also more rational and reliable to interpret dynamic dye adsorption data through a process of ANN architecture.

  16. Mussel-inspired Functionalization of Cotton for Nano-catalyst Support and Its Application in a Fixed-bed System with High Performance.

    PubMed

    Xi, Jiangbo; Xiao, Junwu; Xiao, Fei; Jin, Yunxia; Dong, Yue; Jing, Feng; Wang, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by the composition of adhesive and reductive proteins secreted by marine mussels, polydopamine (PDA) was used to coat cotton microfiber (CMF), and then acted as reducing agent for the growth of Pd nanoparticles on PDA coated CMF (PDA@CMF) composites. The resultant CMF@PDA/Pd composites were then packed in a column for the further use in fixed-bed system. For the catalysis of the reduction of 4-nitrophenol, the flow rate of the 4-aminophenol solution (0.5 mM) was as high as 60 mL/min. The obtained fixed-bed system even exhibited superior performance to conventional batch reaction process because it greatly facilitated the efficiency of the catalytic fibers. Consequently, its turnover frequency (TOF) was up to 1.587 min(-1), while the TOF in the conventional batch reaction was 0.643 min(-1). The catalytic fibers also showed good recyclability, which can be recycled for nine successive cycles without a loss of activity. Furthermore, the catalytic system based on CMF@PDA/Pd can also be applied for Suzuki coupling reaction with the iodobenzene conversion up to 96.7%. The strategy to prepare CMF@PDA/Pd catalytic fixed bed was simple, economical and scalable, which can also be applied for coating different microfibers and loading other noble metal nanoparticles, was amenable for automated industrial processes. PMID:26902657

  17. Mussel-inspired Functionalization of Cotton for Nano-catalyst Support and Its Application in a Fixed-bed System with High Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Jiangbo; Xiao, Junwu; Xiao, Fei; Jin, Yunxia; Dong, Yue; Jing, Feng; Wang, Shuai

    2016-02-01

    Inspired by the composition of adhesive and reductive proteins secreted by marine mussels, polydopamine (PDA) was used to coat cotton microfiber (CMF), and then acted as reducing agent for the growth of Pd nanoparticles on PDA coated CMF (PDA@CMF) composites. The resultant CMF@PDA/Pd composites were then packed in a column for the further use in fixed-bed system. For the catalysis of the reduction of 4-nitrophenol, the flow rate of the 4-aminophenol solution (0.5 mM) was as high as 60 mL/min. The obtained fixed-bed system even exhibited superior performance to conventional batch reaction process because it greatly facilitated the efficiency of the catalytic fibers. Consequently, its turnover frequency (TOF) was up to 1.587 min‑1, while the TOF in the conventional batch reaction was 0.643 min‑1. The catalytic fibers also showed good recyclability, which can be recycled for nine successive cycles without a loss of activity. Furthermore, the catalytic system based on CMF@PDA/Pd can also be applied for Suzuki coupling reaction with the iodobenzene conversion up to 96.7%. The strategy to prepare CMF@PDA/Pd catalytic fixed bed was simple, economical and scalable, which can also be applied for coating different microfibers and loading other noble metal nanoparticles, was amenable for automated industrial processes.

  18. Mussel-inspired Functionalization of Cotton for Nano-catalyst Support and Its Application in a Fixed-bed System with High Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Jiangbo; Xiao, Junwu; Xiao, Fei; Jin, Yunxia; Dong, Yue; Jing, Feng; Wang, Shuai

    2016-02-01

    Inspired by the composition of adhesive and reductive proteins secreted by marine mussels, polydopamine (PDA) was used to coat cotton microfiber (CMF), and then acted as reducing agent for the growth of Pd nanoparticles on PDA coated CMF (PDA@CMF) composites. The resultant CMF@PDA/Pd composites were then packed in a column for the further use in fixed-bed system. For the catalysis of the reduction of 4-nitrophenol, the flow rate of the 4-aminophenol solution (0.5 mM) was as high as 60 mL/min. The obtained fixed-bed system even exhibited superior performance to conventional batch reaction process because it greatly facilitated the efficiency of the catalytic fibers. Consequently, its turnover frequency (TOF) was up to 1.587 min-1, while the TOF in the conventional batch reaction was 0.643 min-1. The catalytic fibers also showed good recyclability, which can be recycled for nine successive cycles without a loss of activity. Furthermore, the catalytic system based on CMF@PDA/Pd can also be applied for Suzuki coupling reaction with the iodobenzene conversion up to 96.7%. The strategy to prepare CMF@PDA/Pd catalytic fixed bed was simple, economical and scalable, which can also be applied for coating different microfibers and loading other noble metal nanoparticles, was amenable for automated industrial processes.

  19. Genome sequence of the anaerobic bacterium Bacillus sp. strain ZYK, a selenite and nitrate reducer from paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Bao, Peng; Su, Jian-Qiang; Hu, Zheng-Yi; Häggblom, Max M; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2014-06-15

    Bacillus sp. strain ZYK, a member of the phylum Firmicutes, is of interest for its ability to reduce nitrate and selenite and for its resistance to arsenic under anaerobic conditions. Here we describe some key features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 3,575,797 bp long chromosome with its 3,454 protein-coding and 70 RNA genes, and the information gained from its sequence will be relevant to the elucidation of microbially-mediated transformations of nitrogen, selenium and arsenic in paddy soil. PMID:25197451

  20. CO-FIRING COAL: FEEDLOT AND LITTER BIOMASS (CFB AND CLB) FUELS IN PULVERIZED FUEL AND FIXED BED BURNERS

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyan Annamalai; John Sweeten; Saqib Mukhtar; Ben Thein; Gengsheng Wei; Soyuz Priyadarsan; Senthil Arumugam; Kevin Heflin

    2003-08-28

    Intensive animal feeding operations create large amounts of animal waste that must be safely disposed of in order to avoid environmental degradation. Cattle feedlots and chicken houses are two examples. In feedlots, cattle are confined to small pens and fed a high calorie grain-diet diet in preparation for slaughter. In chicken houses, thousands of chickens are kept in close proximity. In both of these operations, millions of tons of manure are produced every year. The manure could be used as a fuel by mixing it with coal in a 90:10 blend and firing it in an existing coal suspension fired combustion systems. This technique is known as co-firing, and the high temperatures produced by the coal will allow the biomass to be completely combusted. Reburn is a process where a small percentage of fuel called reburn fuel is injected above the NO{sub x} producing, conventional coal fired burners in order to reduce NO{sub x}. The manure could also be used as reburn fuel for reducing NO{sub x} in coal fired plants. An alternate approach of using animal waste is to adopt the gasification process using a fixed bed gasifier and then use the gases for firing in gas turbine combustors. In this report, the cattle manure is referred to as feedlot biomass (FB) and chicken manure as litter biomass (LB). The report generates data on FB and LB fuel characteristics. Co-firing, reburn, and gasification tests of coal, FB, LB, coal: FB blends, and coal: LB blends and modeling on cofiring, reburn systems and economics of use of FB and LB have also been conducted. The biomass fuels are higher in ash, lower in heat content, higher in moisture, and higher in nitrogen and sulfur (which can cause air pollution) compared to coal. Small-scale cofiring experiments revealed that the biomass blends can be successfully fired, and NO{sub x} emissions will be similar to or lower than pollutant emissions when firing coal. Further experiments showed that biomass is twice or more effective than coal when

  1. The effect of temperature on slaughterhouse wastewater treatment in anaerobic sequencing batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Massé, D I; Masse, L

    2001-01-01

    High strength slaughterhouse wastewater was treated in four 42 l anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (ASBRs) operated at 30 degrees C, 25 degrees C and 20 degrees C. The wastewater contained between 30% and 53% of its chemical oxygen demand (COD) as suspended solids (SS). The ASBRs could easily support volumetric organic loading rates (OLRs) of 4.93, 2.94 and 2.75 kg/m3/d (biomass OLRs of 0.44, 0.42 and 0.14 g/g volatile SS (VSS)/d) at 30 degrees C, 25 degrees C, and 20 degrees C, respectively. At all operating temperatures, the total COD (TCOD) and soluble COD (SCOD) were reduced by over 92%, while average SS removal varied between 80% and 96%. Over the experimental period, 90.8%, 88.7% and 84.2% of the COD removed was transformed into methane at 30 degrees C, 25 degrees C and 20 degrees C, respectively. The decrease in the conversion of the COD removed into methane as operating temperature was lowered, may be partly explained by a lower degradation of influent SS as temperature was reduced. The reactors showed a high average methanogenic activity of 0.37, 0.34 and 0.12 g CH4-COD/gVSS/d (22.4, 12.7 and 11.8 l/d) at 30 degrees C, 25 degrees C and 20 degrees C, respectively. The average methane content in the biogas increased from 74.7% to 78.2% as temperature was lowered from 30 degrees C to 20 degrees C.

  2. Intermediary Metabolism in Protists: a Sequence-based View of Facultative Anaerobic Metabolism in Evolutionarily Diverse Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Ginger, Michael L.; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian K.; Fulton, Chandler; Cande, W. Zacheus; Dawson, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Protists account for the bulk of eukaryotic diversity. Through studies of gene and especially genome sequences the molecular basis for this diversity can be determined. Evident from genome sequencing are examples of versatile metabolism that go far beyond the canonical pathways described for eukaryotes in textbooks. In the last 2–3 years, genome sequencing and transcript profiling has unveiled several examples of heterotrophic and phototrophic protists that are unexpectedly well-equipped for ATP production using a facultative anaerobic metabolism, including some protists that can (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii) or are predicted (Naegleria gruberi, Acanthamoeba castellanii, Amoebidium parasiticum) to produce H2 in their metabolism. It is possible that some enzymes of anaerobic metabolism were acquired and distributed among eukaryotes by lateral transfer, but it is also likely that the common ancestor of eukaryotes already had far more metabolic versatility than was widely thought a few years ago. The discussion of core energy metabolism in unicellular eukaryotes is the subject of this review. Since genomic sequencing has so far only touched the surface of protist diversity, it is anticipated that sequences of additional protists may reveal an even wider range of metabolic capabilities, while simultaneously enriching our understanding of the early evolution of eukaryotes. PMID:21036663

  3. Intermediary metabolism in protists: a sequence-based view of facultative anaerobic metabolism in evolutionarily diverse eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Ginger, Michael L; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian K; Fulton, Chandler; Cande, W Zacheus; Dawson, Scott C

    2010-12-01

    Protists account for the bulk of eukaryotic diversity. Through studies of gene and especially genome sequences the molecular basis for this diversity can be determined. Evident from genome sequencing are examples of versatile metabolism that go far beyond the canonical pathways described for eukaryotes in textbooks. In the last 2-3 years, genome sequencing and transcript profiling has unveiled several examples of heterotrophic and phototrophic protists that are unexpectedly well-equipped for ATP production using a facultative anaerobic metabolism, including some protists that can (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii) or are predicted (Naegleria gruberi, Acanthamoeba castellanii, Amoebidium parasiticum) to produce H(2) in their metabolism. It is possible that some enzymes of anaerobic metabolism were acquired and distributed among eukaryotes by lateral transfer, but it is also likely that the common ancestor of eukaryotes already had far more metabolic versatility than was widely thought a few years ago. The discussion of core energy metabolism in unicellular eukaryotes is the subject of this review. Since genomic sequencing has so far only touched the surface of protist diversity, it is anticipated that sequences of additional protists may reveal an even wider range of metabolic capabilities, while simultaneously enriching our understanding of the early evolution of eukaryotes.

  4. The performance of an anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor treating domestic sewage colonized by anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sarti, A; Pozzi, E; Chinalia, F A; Zaiat, M; Foresti, E

    2006-03-01

    There are few reports on morphological characterization of microbial population colonizing anaerobic bioreactors and the aim of this work was to access such variable in an anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor treating the University of Sao Paulo (Sao Carlos city, Brazil) domestic sewage. This pilot-scale reactor (1.2m3) has been treating 0.65 m3 of liquid waste under cycles of 8h. The ASBBR has the distinct characteristics of being filled with support material for biomass attachment with the aim of skipping the sedimentation phase during the operational cycles, as it is commonly observed in anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (ASBR). Physical, chemical and physico-chemical variables were accessed in the influent and in the effluent for performance evaluation. Microbial characterization was made by means of direct microscopy and samples were taken over 150 d with a 25 d period interval. The ASBBR attained approximately 60% of COD removal efficiency. Microscopic analysis of biomass showed the presence of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria probably influencing the ASBBR performance in the domestic sewage treatment. It is very likely that the exclusion of phototrophic sulfur bacteria by efficiently restraining the light would enhance the bioreactor efficiency.

  5. Fermentative hydrogen production from liquid swine manure with glucose supplement using an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiao

    2009-12-01

    The idea of coupling renewable energy production and agricultural waste management inspired this thesis. The production of an important future fuel---hydrogen gas---from high strength waste stream-liquid swine manure---using anaerobic treatment processes makes the most sustainable sense for both wastewater utilization and energy generation. The objectives of this thesis were to develop a fermentation process for converting liquid swine manure to hydrogen and to maximize hydrogen productivity. Anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) systems were constructed to carry out this fermentation process, and seed sludge obtained from a dairy manure anaerobic digester and pretreated by nutrient acclimation, heat and pH treatment was used as inoculum. High system stability was indicated by a short startup period of 12 days followed by stable hydrogen production, and successful sludge granulation occurred within 23 days of startup at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 24 hours. Operation at a progressively decreasing HRT from 24 to 8h gave rise to an increasing biogas production rate from 15.2-34.4L/d, while good linear relationships were observed between both total biogas and hydrogen production rates correlated to HRT, with R2 values of 0.993 and 0.997, respectively. The maximum hydrogen yield of 1.63 mol-H 2/mol-hexose-feed occurred at HRT of 16h, while the HRT of 12h was highly suggested to achieve both high production rate and efficient yield. Hexose utilization efficiencies over 98%, considerable hydrogen production rate up to 14.3 L/d and hydrogen percentage of off-gas up to 43% (i.e., a CO 2/H2 ratio of 1.2) with the absence of CH4 production throughout the whole course of experiment at a pH of 5.0 strongly validated the feasibility of the fermentative H2 production from liquid swine manure using an ASBR system. Ethanol as well as acetic, butyric and valeric acids were produced in the system accompanying the hydrogen production, with acetic acid being the dominant

  6. Fermentative hydrogen production from liquid swine manure with glucose supplement using an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiao

    2009-12-01

    The idea of coupling renewable energy production and agricultural waste management inspired this thesis. The production of an important future fuel---hydrogen gas---from high strength waste stream-liquid swine manure---using anaerobic treatment processes makes the most sustainable sense for both wastewater utilization and energy generation. The objectives of this thesis were to develop a fermentation process for converting liquid swine manure to hydrogen and to maximize hydrogen productivity. Anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) systems were constructed to carry out this fermentation process, and seed sludge obtained from a dairy manure anaerobic digester and pretreated by nutrient acclimation, heat and pH treatment was used as inoculum. High system stability was indicated by a short startup period of 12 days followed by stable hydrogen production, and successful sludge granulation occurred within 23 days of startup at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 24 hours. Operation at a progressively decreasing HRT from 24 to 8h gave rise to an increasing biogas production rate from 15.2-34.4L/d, while good linear relationships were observed between both total biogas and hydrogen production rates correlated to HRT, with R2 values of 0.993 and 0.997, respectively. The maximum hydrogen yield of 1.63 mol-H 2/mol-hexose-feed occurred at HRT of 16h, while the HRT of 12h was highly suggested to achieve both high production rate and efficient yield. Hexose utilization efficiencies over 98%, considerable hydrogen production rate up to 14.3 L/d and hydrogen percentage of off-gas up to 43% (i.e., a CO 2/H2 ratio of 1.2) with the absence of CH4 production throughout the whole course of experiment at a pH of 5.0 strongly validated the feasibility of the fermentative H2 production from liquid swine manure using an ASBR system. Ethanol as well as acetic, butyric and valeric acids were produced in the system accompanying the hydrogen production, with acetic acid being the dominant

  7. Reduction of the hydraulic retention time at constant high organic loading rate to reach the microbial limits of anaerobic digestion in various reactor systems.

    PubMed

    Ziganshin, Ayrat M; Schmidt, Thomas; Lv, Zuopeng; Liebetrau, Jan; Richnow, Hans Hermann; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Nikolausz, Marcell

    2016-10-01

    The effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) reduction at constant high organic loading rate on the activity of hydrogen-producing bacteria and methanogens were investigated in reactors digesting thin stillage. Stable isotope fingerprinting was additionally applied to assess methanogenic pathways. Based on hydA gene transcripts, Clostridiales was the most active hydrogen-producing order in continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), fixed-bed reactor (FBR) and anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR), but shorter HRT stimulated the activity of Spirochaetales. Further decreasing HRT diminished Spirochaetales activity in systems with biomass retention. Based on mcrA gene transcripts, Methanoculleus and Methanosarcina were the predominantly active in CSTR and ASBR, whereas Methanosaeta and Methanospirillum activity was more significant in stably performing FBR. Isotope values indicated the predominance of aceticlastic pathway in FBR. Interestingly, an increased activity of Methanosaeta was observed during shortening HRT in CSTR and ASBR despite high organic acids concentrations, what was supported by stable isotope data.

  8. Reduction of the hydraulic retention time at constant high organic loading rate to reach the microbial limits of anaerobic digestion in various reactor systems.

    PubMed

    Ziganshin, Ayrat M; Schmidt, Thomas; Lv, Zuopeng; Liebetrau, Jan; Richnow, Hans Hermann; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Nikolausz, Marcell

    2016-10-01

    The effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) reduction at constant high organic loading rate on the activity of hydrogen-producing bacteria and methanogens were investigated in reactors digesting thin stillage. Stable isotope fingerprinting was additionally applied to assess methanogenic pathways. Based on hydA gene transcripts, Clostridiales was the most active hydrogen-producing order in continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), fixed-bed reactor (FBR) and anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR), but shorter HRT stimulated the activity of Spirochaetales. Further decreasing HRT diminished Spirochaetales activity in systems with biomass retention. Based on mcrA gene transcripts, Methanoculleus and Methanosarcina were the predominantly active in CSTR and ASBR, whereas Methanosaeta and Methanospirillum activity was more significant in stably performing FBR. Isotope values indicated the predominance of aceticlastic pathway in FBR. Interestingly, an increased activity of Methanosaeta was observed during shortening HRT in CSTR and ASBR despite high organic acids concentrations, what was supported by stable isotope data. PMID:26853042

  9. CO-FIRING COAL, FEEDLOT, AND LITTER BIOMASS (CFB AND LFB) FUELS IN PULVERIZED FUEL AND FIXED BED BURNERS

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyan Annamalai; John Sweeten; Saqib Mukhtar; Ben Thien; Gengsheng Wei; Soyuz Priyadarsan

    2002-01-15

    result as the levels of N are higher in the biomass fuel than in coal. Further experiments showed that biomass is twice or more effective than coal when used in a reburning process to reduce NO{sub x} emissions. Since crushing costs of biomass fuels may be prohibitive, stoker firing may be cost effective; in order simulate such a firing, future work will investigate the performance of a gasifier when fired with larger sized coal and biomass. It will be a fixed bed gasifier, and will evaluate blends, coal, and biomass. Computer simulations were performed using the PCGC-2 code supplied by BYU and modified by A&M with three mixture fractions for handling animal based biomass fuels in order to include an improved moisture model for handling wet fuels and phosphorus oxidation. Finally the results of the economic analysis show that considerable savings can be achieved with the use of biomass. In the case of higher ash and moisture biomass, the fuel cost savings will be reduced, due to increased transportation costs. A spreadsheet program was created to analyze the fuel savings for a variety of different moisture levels, ash levels, and power plant operating parameters.

  10. First-order kinetics of landfill leachate treatment in a pilot-scale anaerobic sequence batch biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Contrera, Ronan Cleber; da Cruz Silva, Katia Cristina; Morita, Dione Mari; Domingues Rodrigues, José Alberto; Zaiat, Marcelo; Schalch, Valdir

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports the kinetics evaluation of landfill leachate anaerobic treatment in a pilot-scale Anaerobic Sequence Batch Biofilm Reactor (AnSBBR). The experiment was carried out at room temperature (23.8 ± 2.1 °C) in the landfill area in São Carlos-SP, Brazil. Biomass from the bottom of a local landfill leachate stabilization pond was used as inoculum. After acclimated and utilizing leachate directly from the landfill, the AnSBBR presented efficiency over 70%, in terms of COD removal, with influent COD ranging from 4825 mg L(-1) to 12,330 mg L(-1). To evaluate the kinetics of landfill leachate treatment, temporal profiles of CODFilt. concentration were performed and a first-order kinetics model was adjusted for substrate consumption, obtaining an average k1 = 4.40 × 10(-5) L mgTVS(-1) d(-1), corrected to 25 °C. Considering the temperature variations, a temperature-activity coefficient θ = 1.07 was obtained. Statistical "Randomness" and "F" tests were used to successfully validate the model considered. Thus, the results demonstrate that the first-order kinetic model is adequate to model the anaerobic treatment of the landfill leachate in the AnSBBR. PMID:25127066

  11. Effect of agitation on the performance of an anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor in the treatment of dairy effluents.

    PubMed

    Penteado, T Z; Santana, R S S; Dibiazi, A L B; de Pinho, S C; Ribeiro, R; Tommaso, G

    2011-01-01

    Agitation rate is an important parameter in the operation of Anaerobic Sequencing Biofilm Batch Reactors (ASBBRs), and a proper agitation rate guarantees good mixing, improves mass transfer, and enhances the solubility of the particulate organic matter. Dairy effluents have a high amount of particulate organic matter, and their anaerobic digestion presents inhibitory intermediates (e.g., long-chain fatty acids). The importance of studying agitation in such batch systems is clear. The present study aimed to evaluate how agitation frequency influences the anaerobic treatment of dairy effluents. The ASBBR was fed with wastewater from milk pasteurisation process and cheese manufacture with no whey segregation. The organic matter concentration, measured as chemical oxygen demand (COD), was maintained at approximately 8,000 mg/L. The reactor was operated with four agitation frequencies: 500 rpm, 350 rpm, 200 rpm, and no agitation. In terms of COD removal efficiency, similar results were observed for 500 rpm and 350 rpm (around 90%) and for 200 rpm and no agitation (around 80%). Increasing the system's agitation thus not only improved the global efficiency of organic matter removal but also influenced volatile acid production and consumption and clearly modified this balance in each experimental condition. PMID:21411951

  12. First-order kinetics of landfill leachate treatment in a pilot-scale anaerobic sequence batch biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Contrera, Ronan Cleber; da Cruz Silva, Katia Cristina; Morita, Dione Mari; Domingues Rodrigues, José Alberto; Zaiat, Marcelo; Schalch, Valdir

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports the kinetics evaluation of landfill leachate anaerobic treatment in a pilot-scale Anaerobic Sequence Batch Biofilm Reactor (AnSBBR). The experiment was carried out at room temperature (23.8 ± 2.1 °C) in the landfill area in São Carlos-SP, Brazil. Biomass from the bottom of a local landfill leachate stabilization pond was used as inoculum. After acclimated and utilizing leachate directly from the landfill, the AnSBBR presented efficiency over 70%, in terms of COD removal, with influent COD ranging from 4825 mg L(-1) to 12,330 mg L(-1). To evaluate the kinetics of landfill leachate treatment, temporal profiles of CODFilt. concentration were performed and a first-order kinetics model was adjusted for substrate consumption, obtaining an average k1 = 4.40 × 10(-5) L mgTVS(-1) d(-1), corrected to 25 °C. Considering the temperature variations, a temperature-activity coefficient θ = 1.07 was obtained. Statistical "Randomness" and "F" tests were used to successfully validate the model considered. Thus, the results demonstrate that the first-order kinetic model is adequate to model the anaerobic treatment of the landfill leachate in the AnSBBR.

  13. Effect of agitation on the performance of an anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor in the treatment of dairy effluents.

    PubMed

    Penteado, T Z; Santana, R S S; Dibiazi, A L B; de Pinho, S C; Ribeiro, R; Tommaso, G

    2011-01-01

    Agitation rate is an important parameter in the operation of Anaerobic Sequencing Biofilm Batch Reactors (ASBBRs), and a proper agitation rate guarantees good mixing, improves mass transfer, and enhances the solubility of the particulate organic matter. Dairy effluents have a high amount of particulate organic matter, and their anaerobic digestion presents inhibitory intermediates (e.g., long-chain fatty acids). The importance of studying agitation in such batch systems is clear. The present study aimed to evaluate how agitation frequency influences the anaerobic treatment of dairy effluents. The ASBBR was fed with wastewater from milk pasteurisation process and cheese manufacture with no whey segregation. The organic matter concentration, measured as chemical oxygen demand (COD), was maintained at approximately 8,000 mg/L. The reactor was operated with four agitation frequencies: 500 rpm, 350 rpm, 200 rpm, and no agitation. In terms of COD removal efficiency, similar results were observed for 500 rpm and 350 rpm (around 90%) and for 200 rpm and no agitation (around 80%). Increasing the system's agitation thus not only improved the global efficiency of organic matter removal but also influenced volatile acid production and consumption and clearly modified this balance in each experimental condition.

  14. Conceptual process design and techno-economic assessment of ex situ catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass: A fixed bed reactor implementation scenario for future feasibility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dutta, Abhijit; Schaidle, Joshua A.; Humbird, David; Baddour, Frederick G.; Sahir, Asad

    2015-10-06

    Ex situ catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass is a promising route for the production of fungible liquid biofuels. There is significant ongoing research on the design and development of catalysts for this process. However, there are a limited number of studies investigating process configurations and their effects on biorefinery economics. Herein we present a conceptual process design with techno-economic assessment; it includes the production of upgraded bio-oil via fixed bed ex situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by final hydroprocessing to hydrocarbon fuel blendstocks. This study builds upon previous work using fluidized bed systems, as detailed in a recent design reportmore » led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL/TP-5100-62455); overall yields are assumed to be similar, and are based on enabling future feasibility. Assuming similar yields provides a basis for easy comparison and for studying the impacts of areas of focus in this study, namely, fixed bed reactor configurations and their catalyst development requirements, and the impacts of an inline hot gas filter. A comparison with the fluidized bed system shows that there is potential for higher capital costs and lower catalyst costs in the fixed bed system, leading to comparable overall costs. The key catalyst requirement is to enable the effective transformation of highly oxygenated biomass into hydrocarbons products with properties suitable for blending into current fuels. Potential catalyst materials are discussed, along with their suitability for deoxygenation, hydrogenation and C–C coupling chemistry. This chemistry is necessary during pyrolysis vapor upgrading for improved bio-oil quality, which enables efficient downstream hydroprocessing; C–C coupling helps increase the proportion of diesel/jet fuel range product. One potential benefit of fixed bed upgrading over fluidized bed upgrading is catalyst flexibility, providing greater control over chemistry and product composition

  15. Conceptual process design and techno-economic assessment of ex situ catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass: A fixed bed reactor implementation scenario for future feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Abhijit; Schaidle, Joshua A.; Humbird, David; Baddour, Frederick G.; Sahir, Asad

    2015-10-06

    Ex situ catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass is a promising route for the production of fungible liquid biofuels. There is significant ongoing research on the design and development of catalysts for this process. However, there are a limited number of studies investigating process configurations and their effects on biorefinery economics. Herein we present a conceptual process design with techno-economic assessment; it includes the production of upgraded bio-oil via fixed bed ex situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by final hydroprocessing to hydrocarbon fuel blendstocks. This study builds upon previous work using fluidized bed systems, as detailed in a recent design report led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL/TP-5100-62455); overall yields are assumed to be similar, and are based on enabling future feasibility. Assuming similar yields provides a basis for easy comparison and for studying the impacts of areas of focus in this study, namely, fixed bed reactor configurations and their catalyst development requirements, and the impacts of an inline hot gas filter. A comparison with the fluidized bed system shows that there is potential for higher capital costs and lower catalyst costs in the fixed bed system, leading to comparable overall costs. The key catalyst requirement is to enable the effective transformation of highly oxygenated biomass into hydrocarbons products with properties suitable for blending into current fuels. Potential catalyst materials are discussed, along with their suitability for deoxygenation, hydrogenation and C–C coupling chemistry. This chemistry is necessary during pyrolysis vapor upgrading for improved bio-oil quality, which enables efficient downstream hydroprocessing; C–C coupling helps increase the proportion of diesel/jet fuel range product. One potential benefit of fixed bed upgrading over fluidized bed upgrading is catalyst flexibility, providing greater control over chemistry and product composition. Since this

  16. Application Sequence and soil biology influence anaerobic soil disinfestation induced disease suppression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) and mustard seed meal (MSM) soil amendments can yield significant control of a diversity of soil-borne pests and pathogens. The mechanisms functional in disease suppression are diverse and with regard to MSM amendment, soil biology has been shown to have a signif...

  17. Microbial community analysis of swine wastewater anaerobic lagoons by next-generation DNA sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic lagoons are a standard practice for the treatment of swine wastewater. This practice relies heavily on microbiological processes to reduce concentrated organic material and nutrients. Despite this reliance on microbiological processes, research has only recently begun to identify and enume...

  18. Capture and recovery of indole from methylnaphthalene oil in a continuous supercritical CO{sub 2} extraction apparatus over a fixed bed of anion-exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Sakanishi, Kinya; Obata, Hiroaki; Mochida, Isao; Sakaki, Tsuyoshi

    1996-01-01

    Capture and recovery of nonbasic aromatic nitrogen compounds such as indole from crude methylnaphthalene oil in coal tar fractions were examined using a continuous supercritical CO{sub 2} extraction apparatus with the fixed bed of an anion-exchange resin. A model feed consisting of 10 wt% indole with 10 wt% quinoline in 1-methylnaphthalene and crude methylnaphthalene oil (CMNO) was used for the supercritical CO{sub 2} separation procedures. Indole was selectively adsorbed on an anion-exchange resin (Amberlite IRA-904) for the first 120 min, with quinoline and 1-methylnaphthalene being eluted under the supercritical CO{sub 2} (323 K, 80 atm) conditions. After the resin was saturated with indole, the feed was stopped and the adsorbed indole was recovered. Preextraction of the resin with supercritical CO{sub 2} before the recovery of indole from the adsorbent improved the concentration of recovered indole through the selective elution of quinoline and 1-methylnaphthalene remaining in the dead space in the flow line and fixed bed. Indole in CMNO was also effectively separated by the same procedures as described above. The adsorption and desorption mechanisms of indole are briefly discussed based on the above results.

  19. A mass transfer model for the fixed-bed adsorption of ferulic acid onto a polymeric resin: axial dispersion and intraparticle diffusion.

    PubMed

    Davila-Guzman, Nancy E; Cerino-Córdova, Felipe J; Soto-Regalado, Eduardo; Loredo-Cancino, Margarita; Loredo-Medrano, José A; García-Reyes, Refugio B

    2016-08-01

    In this study, amberlite XAD-16 (XAD-16) bed column system was used to remove ferulic acid (FA) from aqueous solutions. Laboratory-scale column experiments were conducted in downflow fixed bed at initial FA concentration of 1 g/L, initial pH 3, and 25°C. The performance of the adsorbent bed under different flow rates (1.3-7.7 mL/min) was studied. The bed utilization efficiency was in the range of 64.64-72.21% at the studied flow rates. A mass transfer model considering both axial dispersion and intraparticle diffusion was developed to predict the breakthrough curves of FA adsorption on XAD-16. This model predicted the experimental data better than Bohart-Adams model and Thomas model, based on the low deviation between predicted and experimental data. The axial dispersion coefficient value varied from 6.45 × 10(-6) to 1.10 × 10(-6) m(2)/s at flow rate from 1.3 to 7.7 mL/min, whereas the intraparticle diffusion coefficient was 1.04 × 10(-10) m(2)/s, being this last resistance the rate-limiting step. In conclusion, axial dispersion and intraparticle diffusion phenomena play the major role in predicting the adsorption of FA onto XAD-16 in fixed-bed columns.

  20. Numerical investigation of flow and heat transfer in a novel configuration multi-tubular fixed bed reactor for propylene to acrolein process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bin; Hao, Li; Zhang, Luhong; Sun, Yongli; Xiao, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    In the present contribution, a numerical study of fluid flow and heat transfer performance in a pilot-scale multi-tubular fixed bed reactor for propylene to acrolein oxidation reaction is presented using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method. Firstly, a two-dimensional CFD model is developed to simulate flow behaviors, catalytic oxidation reaction, heat and mass transfer adopting porous medium model on tube side to achieve the temperature distribution and investigate the effect of operation parameters on hot spot temperature. Secondly, based on the conclusions of tube-side, a novel configuration multi-tubular fixed-bed reactor comprising 790 tubes design with disk-and-doughnut baffles is proposed by comparing with segmental baffles reactor and their performance of fluid flow and heat transfer is analyzed to ensure the uniformity condition using molten salt as heat carrier medium on shell-side by three-dimensional CFD method. The results reveal that comprehensive performance of the reactor with disk-and-doughnut baffles is better than that of with segmental baffles. Finally, the effects of operating conditions to control the hot spots are investigated. The results show that the flow velocity range about 0.65 m/s is applicable and the co-current cooling system flow direction is better than counter-current flow to control the hottest temperature.

  1. Pyrolysis of oil-plant wastes in a TGA and a fixed-bed reactor: Thermochemical behaviors, kinetics, and products characterization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianbiao; Fan, Xiaotian; Jiang, Bo; Mu, Lin; Yao, Pikai; Yin, Hongchao; Song, Xigeng

    2015-09-01

    Pyrolysis characteristics of four distinct oil-plant wastes were investigated using TGA and fixed-bed reactor coupled with GC. TGA experiments showed that the pyrolysis behaviors were related to biomass species and heating rates. As the heating rate increased, TG and DTG curves shifted to the higher temperatures, and the comprehensive devolatilization index obviously increased. The remaining chars from TGA experiments were higher than those obtained from the fixed-bed experiments. The crack of tars at high temperatures enhanced the formation of non-condensable gases. During the pyrolysis, C-O and CO2 were the major gases. Chars FTIR showed that the functional groups of O-H, C-H(n), C=O, C-O, and C-C gradually disappeared from 400 °C on. The kinetic parameters were calculated by Coats-Redfern approach. The results manifested that the most appropriate pyrolysis mechanisms were the order reaction models. The existence of kinetic compensation effect was evident. PMID:26093253

  2. Propagated fixed-bed mixed-acid fermentation: Part I: Effect of volatile solid loading rate and agitation at high pH.

    PubMed

    Golub, Kristina W; Forrest, Andrea K; Mercy, Kevin L; Holtzapple, Mark T

    2011-11-01

    Countercurrent fermentation is a high performing process design for mixed-acid fermentation. However, there are high operating costs associated with moving solids, which is an integral component of this configuration. This study investigated the effect of volatile solid loading rate (VSLR) and agitation in propagated fixed-bed fermentation, a configuration which may be more commercially viable. To evaluate the role of agitation on fixed-bed configuration performance, continuous mixing was compared with periodic mixing. VSLR was also varied and not found to affect acid yields. However, increased VSLR and liquid retention time did result in higher conversions, productivity, acid concentrations, but lower selectivities. Agitation was demonstrated to be important for this fermentor configuration, the periodically-mixed fermentation had the lowest conversion and yields. Operating at a high pH (∼9) contributed to the high selectivity to acetic acid, which might be industrially desirable but at the cost of lower yield compared to a neutral pH. PMID:21963249

  3. Propagated fixed-bed mixed-acid fermentation: effect of volatile solid loading rate and agitation at near-neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Golub, Kristina W; Golub, Stacey R; Meysing, Daniel M; Holtzapple, Mark T

    2012-11-01

    To increase conversion and product concentration, mixed-acid fermentation can use a countercurrent strategy where solids and liquids pass in opposite directions through a series of fermentors. To limit the requirement for moving solids, this study employed a propagated fixed-bed fermentation, where solids were stationary and only liquid was transferred. To evaluate the role of agitation, continuous mixing was compared with periodic mixing. The periodically mixed fermentation had similar conversion, but lower yield and selectivity. Increasing volatile solid loading rate from 1.5 to 5.1g non-acid volatile solids/(L(liq)·d) and increasing liquid retention time decreased yield, conversion, selectivity, but increased product concentrations. Compared to a previous study at high pH (~9), this study achieved higher performance at near neutral pH (~6.5) and optimal C-N ratios. Compared to countercurrent fermentation, propagated fixed-bed fermentations have similar selectivities and produce similar proportions of acetic acid, but have lower yields, conversion, productivities, and acid concentrations. PMID:22995159

  4. Pyrolysis of oil-plant wastes in a TGA and a fixed-bed reactor: Thermochemical behaviors, kinetics, and products characterization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianbiao; Fan, Xiaotian; Jiang, Bo; Mu, Lin; Yao, Pikai; Yin, Hongchao; Song, Xigeng

    2015-09-01

    Pyrolysis characteristics of four distinct oil-plant wastes were investigated using TGA and fixed-bed reactor coupled with GC. TGA experiments showed that the pyrolysis behaviors were related to biomass species and heating rates. As the heating rate increased, TG and DTG curves shifted to the higher temperatures, and the comprehensive devolatilization index obviously increased. The remaining chars from TGA experiments were higher than those obtained from the fixed-bed experiments. The crack of tars at high temperatures enhanced the formation of non-condensable gases. During the pyrolysis, C-O and CO2 were the major gases. Chars FTIR showed that the functional groups of O-H, C-H(n), C=O, C-O, and C-C gradually disappeared from 400 °C on. The kinetic parameters were calculated by Coats-Redfern approach. The results manifested that the most appropriate pyrolysis mechanisms were the order reaction models. The existence of kinetic compensation effect was evident.

  5. Performance of a membrane-dialysis bioreactor with a radial-flow fixed bed for the cultivation of a hybridoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Bohmann, A; Pörtner, R; Märkl, H

    1995-10-01

    A bioreactor system for the continuous cultivation of animal cells with a high potential for scale-up is presented. This reactor system consists of radial-flow fixed-bed units coupled with a dialysis module The dialysis membrane enables the supply of low-molecular-weight nutrients and removal of toxic metabolites, while high-molecular-weight nutrients and products (e.g., monoclonal antibodies) are retained and accumulated. This concept was investigated on the laboratory scale in a bioreactor with an integrated dialysis membrane. The efficiency of the reactor system and the reproducibility of the cell activity (hybridoma cells) under certain process conditions could be demonstrated in fermentations up to 77 days. Based on model calculations, an optimized fermentation strategy was formulated and experimentally confirmed. Compared to chemostat cultures with suspended cells, a ten-times higher mAb concentration (383 mg1(-1)) could be obtained. The highest volumetric specific mAb production rate determined was 6.1 mg mAb (1 fixed bed)-1h-1.

  6. Propagated fixed-bed mixed-acid fermentation: effect of volatile solid loading rate and agitation at near-neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Golub, Kristina W; Golub, Stacey R; Meysing, Daniel M; Holtzapple, Mark T

    2012-11-01

    To increase conversion and product concentration, mixed-acid fermentation can use a countercurrent strategy where solids and liquids pass in opposite directions through a series of fermentors. To limit the requirement for moving solids, this study employed a propagated fixed-bed fermentation, where solids were stationary and only liquid was transferred. To evaluate the role of agitation, continuous mixing was compared with periodic mixing. The periodically mixed fermentation had similar conversion, but lower yield and selectivity. Increasing volatile solid loading rate from 1.5 to 5.1g non-acid volatile solids/(L(liq)·d) and increasing liquid retention time decreased yield, conversion, selectivity, but increased product concentrations. Compared to a previous study at high pH (~9), this study achieved higher performance at near neutral pH (~6.5) and optimal C-N ratios. Compared to countercurrent fermentation, propagated fixed-bed fermentations have similar selectivities and produce similar proportions of acetic acid, but have lower yields, conversion, productivities, and acid concentrations.

  7. Complete genome sequence of the bile-resistant pigment- producing anaerobe Alistipes finegoldii type strain (AHN2437T)

    SciTech Connect

    Mavromatis, K; Stackebrandt, Erko; Munk, Christine; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mikhailova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Rohde, Manfred; Gronow, Sabine; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    Alistipes finegoldii Rautio et al. 2003 is one of five species of Alistipes with a validly pub- lished name: family Rikenellaceae, order Bacteroidetes, class Bacteroidia, phylum Bacteroidetes. This rod-shaped and strictly anaerobic organism has been isolated mostly from human tissues. Here we describe the features of the type strain of this species, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. A. finegoldii is the first member of the genus Alistipes for which the complete genome sequence of its type strain is now available. The 3,734,239 bp long single replicon genome with its 3,302 protein-coding and 68 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  8. Complete genome sequence of the bile-resistant pigment-producing anaerobe Alistipes finegoldii type strain (AHN2437T)

    PubMed Central

    Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Stackebrandt, Erko; Munk, Christine; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Rohde, Manfred; Gronow, Sabine; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C.; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    Alistipes finegoldii Rautio et al. 2003 is one of five species of Alistipes with a validly published name: family Rikenellaceae, order Bacteroidetes, class Bacteroidia, phylum Bacteroidetes. This rod-shaped and strictly anaerobic organism has been isolated mostly from human tissues. Here we describe the features of the type strain of this species, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. A. finegoldii is the first member of the genus Alistipes for which the complete genome sequence of its type strain is now available. The 3,734,239 bp long single replicon genome with its 3,302 protein-coding and 68 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:23961309

  9. Ecological significance of Synergistetes in the biological treatment of tuna cooking wastewater by an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Militon, Cécile; Hamdi, Olfa; Michotey, Valerie; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Ollivier, Bernard; Bouallagui, Hassib; Hamdi, Moktar; Bonin, Patricia

    2015-11-01

    Lab-scale 2L-anaerobic sequencing batch reactor was operated under mesothermic conditions. The degradation of protein-rich organic matter was determined by chemical oxygen demand, biogas production, and protein-removal activity over the operation. The structure of the microbial community was determined by qPCR and next-generation sequencing on 16S rRNA genes. At the steady state, a very efficient removal of protein (92%) was observed. Our results demonstrate a decrease of archaeal and bacterial abundance over time. Members of the phylum Synergistetes, with a peculiar emphasis for those pertaining to families Dethiosulfovibrionaceae and Aminiphilaceae, are of major ecological significance regarding the treatment of this industrial wastewater. The prominent role to be played by members of the phylum Synergistetes regarding protein and/or amino acid degradation is discussed.

  10. Ecological significance of Synergistetes in the biological treatment of tuna cooking wastewater by an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Militon, Cécile; Hamdi, Olfa; Michotey, Valerie; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Ollivier, Bernard; Bouallagui, Hassib; Hamdi, Moktar; Bonin, Patricia

    2015-11-01

    Lab-scale 2L-anaerobic sequencing batch reactor was operated under mesothermic conditions. The degradation of protein-rich organic matter was determined by chemical oxygen demand, biogas production, and protein-removal activity over the operation. The structure of the microbial community was determined by qPCR and next-generation sequencing on 16S rRNA genes. At the steady state, a very efficient removal of protein (92%) was observed. Our results demonstrate a decrease of archaeal and bacterial abundance over time. Members of the phylum Synergistetes, with a peculiar emphasis for those pertaining to families Dethiosulfovibrionaceae and Aminiphilaceae, are of major ecological significance regarding the treatment of this industrial wastewater. The prominent role to be played by members of the phylum Synergistetes regarding protein and/or amino acid degradation is discussed. PMID:26194235

  11. Biogas production in an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor by using tequila vinasses: effect of pH and temperature.

    PubMed

    Arreola-Vargas, J; Jaramillo-Gante, N E; Celis, L B; Corona-González, R I; González-Álvarez, V; Méndez-Acosta, H O

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, anaerobic digestion has been recognized as a suitable alternative for tequila vinasses treatment due to its high energy recovery and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency. However, key factors such as the lack of suitable monitoring schemes and the presence of load disturbances, which may induce unstable operating conditions in continuous systems, have limited its application at full scale. Therefore, the aim of this work was to evaluate the anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (AnSBR) configuration in order to provide a low cost and easy operation alternative for the treatment of these complex effluents. In particular, the AnSBR was evaluated under different pH-temperature combinations: 7 and 32 °C; 7 and 38 °C; 8 and 32 °C and 8 and 38 °C. Results showed that the AnSBR configuration was able to achieve high COD removal efficiencies (around 85%) for all the tested conditions, while the highest methane yield was obtained at pH 7 and 38 °C (0.29 L/g COD added). Furthermore, high robustness was found in all the AnSBR experiments. Therefore, the full-scale application of the AnSBR technology for the treatment of tequila vinasses is quite encouraging, in particular for small and medium size tequila industries that operate under seasonal conditions.

  12. Biogas production in an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor by using tequila vinasses: effect of pH and temperature.

    PubMed

    Arreola-Vargas, J; Jaramillo-Gante, N E; Celis, L B; Corona-González, R I; González-Álvarez, V; Méndez-Acosta, H O

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, anaerobic digestion has been recognized as a suitable alternative for tequila vinasses treatment due to its high energy recovery and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency. However, key factors such as the lack of suitable monitoring schemes and the presence of load disturbances, which may induce unstable operating conditions in continuous systems, have limited its application at full scale. Therefore, the aim of this work was to evaluate the anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (AnSBR) configuration in order to provide a low cost and easy operation alternative for the treatment of these complex effluents. In particular, the AnSBR was evaluated under different pH-temperature combinations: 7 and 32 °C; 7 and 38 °C; 8 and 32 °C and 8 and 38 °C. Results showed that the AnSBR configuration was able to achieve high COD removal efficiencies (around 85%) for all the tested conditions, while the highest methane yield was obtained at pH 7 and 38 °C (0.29 L/g COD added). Furthermore, high robustness was found in all the AnSBR experiments. Therefore, the full-scale application of the AnSBR technology for the treatment of tequila vinasses is quite encouraging, in particular for small and medium size tequila industries that operate under seasonal conditions. PMID:26877037

  13. Anaerobic-fed and sequencing-batch treatment of sugar-beet processing wastes: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Alkaya, Emrah; Demirer, Göksel N

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare a batch-fed continuously mixed anaerobic reactor (FCMR) with an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR), in terms of waste stabilization and methane production treating sugar-beet processing wastewater and beet-pulp simultaneously. A reactor was operated as FCMR, which then was operated as an ASBR by changing operational conditions after the steady-state was reached. Although the hydraulic retention time value of the ASBR configuration was lower (8 days) than that of the FCMR (15 days) and the corresponding organic loading rate (OLR) was higher (0.71 to 1.33 g COD/L x d), increased biomass retention enabled a significant increase in biomethanation for the ASBR configuration. So, methane production yield of 255 +/- 11 mL/g COD-added was increased to 337 +/- 15 mL/g COD-added (32.2% increase in methane yield) when the configuration was changed from FCMR to ASBR. The experimental results indicated that the ASBR configuration, which was applied to sugar-beet processing wastes for the first time, was superior to the FCMR configuration.

  14. Thermolysis of microalgae and duckweed in a CO₂-swept fixed-bed reactor: bio-oil yield and compositional effects.

    PubMed

    Campanella, Alejandrina; Muncrief, Rachel; Harold, Michael P; Griffith, David C; Whitton, Norman M; Weber, Robert S

    2012-04-01

    Microalgae and duckweed were grown and harvested over a three-month period in CO(2)-sparged helioreactors and open earthen ponds, respectively. The biomass feedstocks were thermolyzed in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and fixed-bed reactor to produce a fuel precursor coined "bioleum". Analysis of the thermolysis kinetics revealed an increase in the activation energy with heating rate for both aquatic species. Activation energies were lower than literature-reported values for lignocellulosics, corroborated by TGA thermolysis of pinewood. Thermolysis of microalgae resulted in higher bioleum and energy yields than for duckweed, reflecting differences in the biomass composition. The algal bioleum properties resemble those of crude petroleum except for higher nitrogen and oxygen content and acid number. Speciation identified 300+ compounds in the oil phase, with similar amounts of hydrocarbons and oxygenates, while acetic acid was the major species in the aqueous phase. The compounds were classified according to their degree of aromaticity, oxygenation, and nitrogenation. PMID:22285294

  15. Thermolysis of microalgae and duckweed in a CO₂-swept fixed-bed reactor: bio-oil yield and compositional effects.

    PubMed

    Campanella, Alejandrina; Muncrief, Rachel; Harold, Michael P; Griffith, David C; Whitton, Norman M; Weber, Robert S

    2012-04-01

    Microalgae and duckweed were grown and harvested over a three-month period in CO(2)-sparged helioreactors and open earthen ponds, respectively. The biomass feedstocks were thermolyzed in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and fixed-bed reactor to produce a fuel precursor coined "bioleum". Analysis of the thermolysis kinetics revealed an increase in the activation energy with heating rate for both aquatic species. Activation energies were lower than literature-reported values for lignocellulosics, corroborated by TGA thermolysis of pinewood. Thermolysis of microalgae resulted in higher bioleum and energy yields than for duckweed, reflecting differences in the biomass composition. The algal bioleum properties resemble those of crude petroleum except for higher nitrogen and oxygen content and acid number. Speciation identified 300+ compounds in the oil phase, with similar amounts of hydrocarbons and oxygenates, while acetic acid was the major species in the aqueous phase. The compounds were classified according to their degree of aromaticity, oxygenation, and nitrogenation.

  16. Study on product distributions and char morphology during rapid co-pyrolysis of platanus wood and lignite in a drop tube fixed-bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Meng, Haiyu; Wang, Shuzhong; Chen, Lin; Wu, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Jun

    2016-06-01

    The rapid co-pyrolytic behavior of platanus wood and Pingzhuang lignite was explored in a drop tube fixed-bed reactor under nitrogen atmosphere. Synergistic effects were evaluated using the deviations between experimental and predicted values of product yields and gas components. Surface morphology of residual chars were also investigated applying the scanning electron microscopy technique (SEM). This study found that the experimental values of gas volume yields were greater than the predicted, and the maximum gas volume yield exhibited with 50% biomass blending ratio at 1000°C. Positive or negative synergistic effects happened in gas components at different blending ratios and temperatures. The SEM results indicated that the differences of char surface morphology were evident. The fractal dimensions of residual chars increased with increasing biomass blending ratio, which may improve their gasification or combustion reactivity. The change in product yields and gas components was attributed to the secondary reactions and tar cracking. PMID:26985627

  17. Exceptional arsenic (III,V) removal performance of highly porous, nanostructured ZrO2 spheres for fixed bed reactors and the full-scale system modeling.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hang; Su, Yu; Li, Qi; Gao, Shian; Shang, Jian Ku

    2013-10-15

    Highly porous, nanostructured zirconium oxide spheres were fabricated from ZrO2 nanoparticles with the assistance of agar powder to form spheres with size at millimeter level followed with a heat treatment at 450 °C to remove agar network, which provided a simple, low-cost, and safe process for the synthesis of ZrO2 spheres. These ZrO2 spheres had a dual-pore structure, in which interconnected macropores were beneficial for liquid transport and the mesopores could largely increase their surface area (about 98 m(2)/g) for effective contact with arsenic species in water. These ZrO2 spheres demonstrated an even better arsenic removal performance on both As(III) and As(V) than ZrO2 nanoparticles, and could be readily applied to commonly used fixed-bed adsorption reactors in the industry. A short bed adsorbent test was conducted to validate the calculated external mass transport coefficient and the pore diffusion coefficient. The performance of full-scale fixed bed systems with these ZrO2 spheres as the adsorber was estimated by the validated pore surface diffusion modeling. With the empty bed contact time (EBCT) at 10 min and the initial arsenic concentration at 30 ppb, the number of bed volumes that could be treated by these dry ZrO2 spheres reached ~255,000 BVs and ~271,000 BVs for As(III) and As(V), respectively, until the maximum contaminant level of 10 ppb was reached. These ZrO2 spheres are non-toxic, highly stable, and resistant to acid and alkali, have a high arsenic adsorption capacity, and could be easily adapted for various arsenic removal apparatus. Thus, these ZrO2 spheres may have a promising potential for their application in water treatment practice. PMID:23978657

  18. Biodegradation of isopropanol in a three phase fixed bed bioreactor: start up and acclimation using a previously-enriched microbial culture.

    PubMed

    Bustard, M T; Meeyoo, V; Wright, P C

    2001-10-01

    The aerobic biodegradation of high liquid phase concentrations of 2-propanol (IPA) by a previously enriched solvent-tolerant bacterial consortium within a 1.9 l fed-batch three phase fixed bed bioreactor was investigated. Solvent concentrations of up to 7.9 g l(-1) were investigated. Previously enriched solvent-tolerant bacterial cells were immobilised onto porous glass cylinders as a means obioprocess intensification. Bioreactor start-up and acclimation was studied anacetone concentration tracked as an indicator of IPA utilization, as the sole carbon source within a minimal salts medium (MSM). The initial batch treatment of IPA exhibited a biodegradation rate of 0.11 g l(-1) h(-1) prior to biofilm formation Biofilm growth during the second batch treatment was consistent with an increase in metabolic activity and an IPA biodegradation rate of 0.34 g l(-1), followed by a reduction of biodegradation rate to a constant value of 0.078 g l(-1) h(-1) after 650 h. A maximum acetone generation rate of 1.3 g l(-1) h(-1) was obtained during the fourth IPA addition although the maximum acetone biodegradation rate of 0.38 g l(-1) h(-1) was observed during the initial IPA addition. It is proposed that the metabolic lag resulting from switching from alcohol dehydrogenase to acetone carboxylase is a major rate-limiting step in the deep oxidation of IPA to acetone. The results demonstrate the potential of a previously enriched solvent-tolerant bacterial consortium in fixed bed bioreactor systems, for the aerobic treatment of concentrated solvent-containing wastestreams. PMID:11766041

  19. Biodegradation of isopropanol in a three phase fixed bed bioreactor: start up and acclimation using a previously-enriched microbial culture.

    PubMed

    Bustard, M T; Meeyoo, V; Wright, P C

    2001-10-01

    The aerobic biodegradation of high liquid phase concentrations of 2-propanol (IPA) by a previously enriched solvent-tolerant bacterial consortium within a 1.9 l fed-batch three phase fixed bed bioreactor was investigated. Solvent concentrations of up to 7.9 g l(-1) were investigated. Previously enriched solvent-tolerant bacterial cells were immobilised onto porous glass cylinders as a means obioprocess intensification. Bioreactor start-up and acclimation was studied anacetone concentration tracked as an indicator of IPA utilization, as the sole carbon source within a minimal salts medium (MSM). The initial batch treatment of IPA exhibited a biodegradation rate of 0.11 g l(-1) h(-1) prior to biofilm formation Biofilm growth during the second batch treatment was consistent with an increase in metabolic activity and an IPA biodegradation rate of 0.34 g l(-1), followed by a reduction of biodegradation rate to a constant value of 0.078 g l(-1) h(-1) after 650 h. A maximum acetone generation rate of 1.3 g l(-1) h(-1) was obtained during the fourth IPA addition although the maximum acetone biodegradation rate of 0.38 g l(-1) h(-1) was observed during the initial IPA addition. It is proposed that the metabolic lag resulting from switching from alcohol dehydrogenase to acetone carboxylase is a major rate-limiting step in the deep oxidation of IPA to acetone. The results demonstrate the potential of a previously enriched solvent-tolerant bacterial consortium in fixed bed bioreactor systems, for the aerobic treatment of concentrated solvent-containing wastestreams.

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of the Intracellular Bacterial Symbiont TC1 in the Anaerobic Ciliate Trimyema compressum

    PubMed Central

    Aoyama, Hiroaki; Saitoh, Seikoh; Nikoh, Naruo; Shimoji, Makiko; Shinzato, Misuzu; Teruya, Kuniko; Hirano, Takashi; Yamada, Takanori; Nobu, Masaru K.; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Shirai, Yumi; Park, Sanghwa; Narihiro, Takashi; Liu, Wen-Tso; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    A free-living ciliate, Trimyema compressum, found in anoxic freshwater environments harbors methanogenic archaea and a bacterial symbiont named TC1 in its cytoplasm. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the TC1 symbiont, consisting of a 1.59-Mb chromosome and a 35.8-kb plasmid, which was determined using the PacBio RSII sequencer. PMID:27660797

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of the Intracellular Bacterial Symbiont TC1 in the Anaerobic Ciliate Trimyema compressum.

    PubMed

    Shinzato, Naoya; Aoyama, Hiroaki; Saitoh, Seikoh; Nikoh, Naruo; Nakano, Kazuma; Shimoji, Makiko; Shinzato, Misuzu; Satou, Kazuhito; Teruya, Kuniko; Hirano, Takashi; Yamada, Takanori; Nobu, Masaru K; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Shirai, Yumi; Park, Sanghwa; Narihiro, Takashi; Liu, Wen-Tso; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    A free-living ciliate, Trimyema compressum, found in anoxic freshwater environments harbors methanogenic archaea and a bacterial symbiont named TC1 in its cytoplasm. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the TC1 symbiont, consisting of a 1.59-Mb chromosome and a 35.8-kb plasmid, which was determined using the PacBio RSII sequencer. PMID:27660797

  2. Massively parallel tag sequencing reveals the complexity of anaerobic marine protistan communities

    PubMed Central

    Stoeck, Thorsten; Behnke, Anke; Christen, Richard; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Rodriguez-Mora, Maria J; Chistoserdov, Andrei; Orsi, William; Edgcomb, Virginia P

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent advances in sequencing strategies make possible unprecedented depth and scale of sampling for molecular detection of microbial diversity. Two major paradigm-shifting discoveries include the detection of bacterial diversity that is one to two orders of magnitude greater than previous estimates, and the discovery of an exciting 'rare biosphere' of molecular signatures ('species') of poorly understood ecological significance. We applied a high-throughput parallel tag sequencing (454 sequencing) protocol adopted for eukaryotes to investigate protistan community complexity in two contrasting anoxic marine ecosystems (Framvaren Fjord, Norway; Cariaco deep-sea basin, Venezuela). Both sampling sites have previously been scrutinized for protistan diversity by traditional clone library construction and Sanger sequencing. By comparing these clone library data with 454 amplicon library data, we assess the efficiency of high-throughput tag sequencing strategies. We here present a novel, highly conservative bioinformatic analysis pipeline for the processing of large tag sequence data sets. Results The analyses of ca. 250,000 sequence reads revealed that the number of detected Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) far exceeded previous richness estimates from the same sites based on clone libraries and Sanger sequencing. More than 90% of this diversity was represented by OTUs with less than 10 sequence tags. We detected a substantial number of taxonomic groups like Apusozoa, Chrysomerophytes, Centroheliozoa, Eustigmatophytes, hyphochytriomycetes, Ichthyosporea, Oikomonads, Phaeothamniophytes, and rhodophytes which remained undetected by previous clone library-based diversity surveys of the sampling sites. The most important innovations in our newly developed bioinformatics pipeline employ (i) BLASTN with query parameters adjusted for highly variable domains and a complete database of public ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences for taxonomic assignments of tags; (ii

  3. High rate psychrophilic anaerobic digestion of high solids (35%) dairy manure in sequence batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Saady, Noori M Cata; Massé, Daniel I

    2015-06-01

    Zero liquid discharge is increasingly adopted as an objective for waste treatment process. The objective of this study was to increase the feed total solids (TS) and the organic loading rate (OLR) fed to a novel psychrophilic (20°C) dry anaerobic digestion (PDAD). Duplicate laboratory-scale bioreactors were fed cow feces and wheat straw (35% TS in feed) at OLR of 6.0 g TCOD kg(-1) inoculum d(-1) during long-term operation (147 days consisting of 7 successive cycles). An overall average specific methane yield (SMY) of 151.8±7.9 N L CH4 kg(-1) VS fed with an averaged volatile solids removal of 42.4±4.3% were obtained at a volatile solids-based inoculum-to-substrate ratio (ISR) of 2.13±0.2. The operation was stable as indicated by biogas and VFAs profiles and the results were reproducible in successive cycles; a maximum SMY of 163.3±5.7 N L CH4 kg(-1) VS fed was obtained. Hydrolysis was the reaction limiting step. High rate PDAD of 35% TS dairy manure is possible in sequential batch reactor within 21 days treatment cycle length.

  4. Production of bio-hydrogen by mesophilic anaerobic fermentation in an acid-phase sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Dae-Yeol; Hansen, Conly L; Stevens, David K

    2007-02-15

    The pH and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) were varied to optimize the conversion of carbohydrate-rich synthetic wastewater into bio-hydrogen. A full factorial design using evolutionary operation (EVOP) was used to determine the effect of the factors and to find the optimum condition of each factor required for high hydrogen production rate. Experimental results from 20 runs indicate that a maximum hydrogen production rate of 4,460-5,540 mL/L/day under the volumetric organic loading rate (VOLR) of 75 g-COD/L/day obtained at an observed design point of HRT = 8 h and pH = 5.7. The hydrogen production rate was strongly dependent on the HRT, and the effect was statistically significant (P < 0.05). However, no significant effect (P > 0.05) was found for the pH on the hydrogen production rate. When the ASBR conditions were set for a maximum hydrogen production rate, the hydrogen production yield and specific hydrogen production rate were 60-74 mL/g-COD and 330-360 mL/g-VSS/day, respectively. The hydrogen composition was 43-51%, and no methanogenesis was observed. Acetate, propionate, butyrate, valerate, caproate, and ethanol were major liquid intermediate metabolites during runs of this ASBR. The dominant fermentative types were butyrate-acetate or ethanol-acetate, representing the typical anaerobic pathway of Clostridium species. This hydrogen-producing ASBR had a higher hydrogen production rate, compared with that produced using continuous-flow stirred tank reactors (CSTRs). This study suggests that the hydrogen-producing ASBR is a promising bio-system for prolonged and stable hydrogen production.

  5. Dynamics of a microbial community exposed to several concentrations of 2-chlorophenol in an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Beristain-Montiel, Lizeth; Martínez-Hernández, Sergio; de María Cuervo-López, Flor; Ramírez-Vives, Florina

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to contribute to the knowledge on the dynamic of the microbial community involved in anaerobic degradation of different concentrations of 2-chlorophenol (2CP, from 28 to 196 mg 2CP-C/L) and a mixture of 2CP and phenol (from 28 to 196 mg phenol-C/L) and its relationship with the respiratory process in two anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (ASBR). The dynamic of the microbial community was evaluated by denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and ecological indices (S and J indices). The respiratory process was evaluated by means of substrate consumption efficiency, biogas yield, and specific consumption rates as response variables. The high consumption efficiency (90%) and the constant biogas yields obtained at concentrations up to 140 mg C/L may be related with the evenness of microbial populations (J index=0.97±0.2) present in both reactors. Pseudomonas genus was present in all concentrations tested, suggesting a possible relationship with the dehalogenation observed in both reactors. The decrease in specific consumption rate and biogas yield as well as the accumulation of phenol and volatile fatty acids observed in both reactors at 196 mg 2CP-C/L might be associated with the disappearance of the bands related to Caulobacter and Bacillus. At these conditions, the disappearance of fermentative or acetogenic bacteria resulted in reduction of substrates required to carry out methanogenesis, which eventually might cause the declination in methanogenic populations present in the reactors.

  6. Treatment of anaerobic digester effluents of nylon wastewater through chemical precipitation and a sequencing batch reactor process.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiming; Song, Qianwu; Wang, Wenjun; Wu, Shaowei; Dai, Jiankun

    2012-06-30

    Chemical precipitation, in combination with a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) process, was employed to remove pollutants from anaerobic digester effluents of nylon wastewater. The effects of the chemicals along with various Mg:N:P ratios on the chemical precipitation (struvite precipitation) were investigated. When brucite and H(3)PO(4) were applied at an Mg:N:P molar ratio of 3:1:1, an ammonia-removal rate of 81% was achieved, which was slightly more than that (80%) obtained with MgSO(4)·7H(2)O and Na(2)HPO(4)·12H(2)O at Mg:N:P molar ratios greater than the stoichiometric ratio. To further reduce the ammonia loads of the successive biotreatment, an overdose of phosphate with brucite and H(3)PO(4) was applied during chemical precipitation. The ammonia-removal rate at the Mg:N:P molar ratio of 3.5:1:1.05 reached 88%, with a residual PO(4)-P concentration of 16 mg/L. The economic analysis showed that the chemical cost of chemical precipitation could be reduced by about 41% when brucite and H(3)PO(4) were used instead of MgSO(4)·7H(2)O and Na(2)HPO(4)·12H(2)O. The subsequent biological process that used a sequencing batch reactor showed high removal rates of contaminants. The quality of the final effluent met the requisite effluent-discharging standards.

  7. Fundamental aspects related to batch and fixed-bed sulfate sorption by the macroporous type 1 strong base ion exchange resin Purolite A500.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Damaris; Leão, Versiane A

    2014-12-01

    Acid mine drainage is a natural process occurring when sulfide minerals such as pyrite are exposed to water and oxygen. The bacterially catalyzed oxidation of pyrite is particularly common in coal mining operations and usually results in a low-pH water polluted with toxic metals and sulfate. Although high sulfate concentrations can be reduced by gypsum precipitation, removing lower concentrations (below 1200 mg/L) remains a challenge. Therefore, this work sought to investigate the application of ion exchange resins for sulfate sorption. The macroporous type 1 strong base IX resin Purolite A500 was selected for bath and fixed-bed sorption experiments using synthetic sulfate solutions. Equilibrium experiments showed that sulfate loading on the resin can be described by the Langmuir isotherm with a maximum uptake of 59 mg mL-resin(-1). The enthalpy of sorption was determined as +2.83 kJ mol(-1), implying an endothermic physisorption process that occurred with decreasing entropy (-15.5 J mol(-1).K(-1)). Fixed-bed experiments were performed at different bed depths, flow rates, and initial sulfate concentrations. The Miura and Hashimoto model predicted a maximum bed loading of 25-30 g L-bed(-1) and indicated that both film diffusion (3.2 × 10(-3) cm s(-1) to 22.6 × 10(-3) cm s(-1)) and surface diffusion (1.46 × 10(-7) cm(2) s(-1) to 5.64 × 10(-7) cm(2) s(-1)) resistances control the sorption process. It was shown that IX resins are an alternative for the removal of sulfate from mine waters; they ensure very low residual concentrations, particularly in effluents where the sulfate concentration is below the gypsum solubility threshold. PMID:25014887

  8. Complete genome sequence of the facultatively anaerobic, appendaged bacterium Muricauda ruestringensis type strain (B1T)

    PubMed Central

    Huntemann, Marcel; Teshima, Hazuki; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Pan, Chongle; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C.; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Muricauda ruestringensis Bruns et al. 2001 is the type species of the genus Muricauda, which belongs to the family Flavobacteriaceae in the phylum Bacteroidetes. The species is of interest because of its isolated position in the genomically unexplored genus Muricauda, which is located in a part of the tree of life containing not many organisms with sequenced genomes. The genome, which consists of a circular chromosome of 3,842,422 bp length with a total of 3,478 protein-coding and 47 RNA genes, is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:22768362

  9. Complete genome sequence of the facultatively anaerobic, appendaged bacterium Muricauda ruestringensis type strain (B1T)

    SciTech Connect

    Huntemann, Marcel; Teshima, Hazuki; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Pan, Chongle; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Muricauda ruestringensis Bruns et al. 2001 is the type species of the genus Muricauda, which belongs to the family Flavobacteriaceae in the phylum Bacteroidetes. The species is of interest because of its isolated position in the genomically unexplored genus Muricauda, which is located in a part of the tree of life containing not many organisms with sequenced genomes. The genome, which consists of a circular chromosome of 3,842,422 bp length with a total of 3,478 protein-coding and 47 RNA genes, is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  10. Stirred anaerobic sequencing batch reactor containing immobilized biomass: a behavior study when submitted to different fill times.

    PubMed

    Borges, A C; Siman, R R; Rodrigues, J A D; Ratusznei, S M; Zaiat, M; Foresti, E; Borzani, W

    2004-01-01

    The effect of the filling stage on the behavior of a mechanically stirred anaerobic sequencing batch reactor containing biomass immobilized on 1 cm polyurethane foam cubes was investigated. The reactor was made of acrylic with a capacity of 6.3 L, treating per cycle 2.5 L synthetic low-strength wastewater with a concentration of 500 mgCOD/L, at 30+/-1 degrees C. Eight-hour cycles (tC) and agitation of 500 rpm were utilized. At the beginning of each cycle 60% of the wastewater volume was treated, sufficient to completely cover the bed. The remaining volume was added at different fill times (tF) of 10, 120, 240, 260 and 480 min. The results obtained showed that ratios of tF/tC < or = 0.5 enabled organic matter removal higher than 75% and 70% for filtered and non-filtered samples, respectively. Ratios of tF/tC > 0.5, despite operation stability, resulted in loss of efficiency and formation of viscous material, similar to extra-cellular polymeric substances. PMID:15303756

  11. Optimization of continuous hydrogen production from co-fermenting molasses with liquid swine manure in an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao; Lin, Hongjian; Zhu, Jun

    2013-05-01

    This study investigated and optimized the operational conditions for continuous hydrogen production from sugar beet molasses, co-fermented with liquid swine manure in an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor. Results indicated that pH, HRT and total solids content in the swine manure (TS) had significant impact on all the responses such as biogas production rate (BPR), hydrogen content (HC), hydrogen production rate (HPR), and hydrogen yield (HY), although the highest level of each response was achieved at different combination of the three variables. The maximum BPR, HC, HPR and HY of 32.21 L/d, 30.51%, 2.23 L/d/L and 1.57 mol-H2/mol-sugar were estimated at the optimal pH, HRT, and TS of 5.55, 15.78 h, and 0.71% for BPR; 5.22, 12.04, and 0.69 for HC; 5.32, 15.62, and 0.78% for HPR; and 5.36, 17.56, and 0.74% for HY, respectively. Good linear relationships of the predicted and tested results for all the parameters were observed.

  12. Enhanced treatment efficiency of an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) for cassava stillage with high solids content.

    PubMed

    Luo, Gang; Xie, Li; Zhou, Qi

    2009-06-01

    Cassava stillage is a high strength organic wastewater with high suspended solids (SS) content. The efficiency of cassava stillage treatment using an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) was significantly enhanced by discharging settled sludge to maintain a lower sludge concentration (about 30 g/L) in the reactor. Three hydraulic retention times (HRTs), namely 10 d, 7.5 d, 5 d, were evaluated at this condition. The study demonstrated that at an HRT of 5 d and an organic loading rate (OLR) of 11.3 kg COD/(m(3) d), the total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) and soluble COD (SCOD) removal efficiency can still be maintained at above 80%. The settleability of digested cassava stillage was improved significantly, and thus only a small amount of settled sludge needed to be discharged to maintain the sludge concentration in the reactor. Furthermore, the performance of ASBR operated at low and high sludge concentration (about 79.5 g/L without sludge discharged) was evaluated at an HRT of 5 d. The TCOD removal efficiency and SS in the effluent were 61% and 21.9 g/L respectively at high sludge concentration, while the values were 85.1% and 2.4 g/L at low sludge concentration. Therefore, low sludge concentration is recommended for ASBR treating cassava stillage at an HRT 5 d due to lower TCOD and SS in the effluent, which could facilitate post-treatment.

  13. Technical application of a fixed bed coal gasifier as a secondary fuel source for a cupola designed for the village level in the Philippines

    SciTech Connect

    Chalmers, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    The technical application of a fixed bed coal gasifier as a secondary fuel source for a cupola, designed for the village level in the Philippines, is discussed. The purposes of the study were: 1) to determine if a small-scale cupola could be used as an essential tool in the development process of a less developed nation, 2) to determine if a coal gasifier would make the process more resource efficient, 3) to determine if a low cost-efficient way for the LDC's to create a foundry industry was identifiable, and 4) to determine if a cupola-gasifier combination which was structurally simple was feasible. The procedure involved the construction and testing of the cupola-gasifer system. The results indicated that the use of a gasifier as a secondary fuel source in a cupola increased the melting efficiency by 31%. The gasifier did function minimally but the gasifier hearth diameter, grate and the bottom lid seal require further design modifications. The cupola tuyere area, the size of the individual pieces of metal charged and the length of the heat exchanger also need modification. The manpower allocation was one skilled person and two unskilled laborers for the operation of the cupola-gasifier. The payback period for the gasifier was calculated to be four months.

  14. Pyrolysis of waste animal fats in a fixed-bed reactor: Production and characterization of bio-oil and bio-char

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Hassen-Trabelsi, A.; Kraiem, T.; Naoui, S.; Belayouni, H.

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Produced bio-fuels (bio-oil and bio-char) from some animal fatty wastes. • Investigated the effects of main parameters on pyrolysis products distribution. • Determined the suitable conditions for the production of the maximum of bio-oil. • Characterized bio-oils and bio-chars obtained from several animal fatty wastes. - Abstract: Several animal (lamb, poultry and swine) fatty wastes were pyrolyzed under nitrogen, in a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor and the main products (liquid bio-oil, solid bio-char and syngas) were obtained. The purpose of this study is to produce and characterize bio-oil and bio-char obtained from pyrolysis of animal fatty wastes. The maximum production of bio-oil was achieved at a pyrolysis temperature of 500 °C and a heating rate of 5 °C/min. The chemical (GC–MS analyses) and spectroscopic analyses (FTIR analyses) of bio-oil showed that it is a complex mixture consisting of different classes of organic compounds, i.e., hydrocarbons (alkanes, alkenes, cyclic compounds…etc.), carboxylic acids, aldehydes, ketones, esters,…etc. According to fuel properties, produced bio-oils showed good properties, suitable for its use as an engine fuel or as a potential source for synthetic fuels and chemical feedstock. Obtained bio-chars had low carbon content and high ash content which make them unattractive for as renewable source energy.

  15. Characteristics and potential values of bio-oil, syngas and biochar derived from Salsola collina Pall. in a fixed bed slow pyrolysis system.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yan; Lin, Qimei; Irfan, Muhammad; Chen, Qun; Zhao, Xiaorong

    2016-11-01

    Salsola collina Pall. as a typical euhalophyte was slowly pyrolyzed at 300°C, 500°C and 700°C in a fixed-bed system. The physiochemical properties of syngas, bio-oil and biochar were assayed to understand the impact of pyrolysis temperature on these parameters and then to evaluate their potential values. The results showed that syngas yield (26.07-46.37%) increased with pyrolysis temperature, while biochar yield (47.54-26.83%) decreased. Bio-oil yield (26-30%) was hardly affected by pyrolysis temperature. Both syngas and bio-oil had poor values as direct fuel. The euhalophyte-derived biochar had higher aromaticity (H/C 0.16-0.85, O/C 0.06-0.26), higher cation exchange capacity (198.82-435.74cmolkg(-1)), and higher K(+) (59.35-80.42gkg(-1)) and Na(+) (37.56-53.26gkg(-1)) compared with glycophyte-derived biochars. Our findings imply that halophyte biochar may be more suitable to use as a soil conditioner, which is worthy of further study.

  16. Treatment of naphthalene-2-sulfonic acid from tannery wastewater by a granular activated carbon fixed bed inoculated with bacterial isolates Arthrobacter globiformis and Comamonas testosteroni.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhi; Edwards, Suzanne R; Burns, Richard G

    2006-02-01

    The kinetics of naphthalene-2-sulfonic acid (2-NSA) adsorption by granular activated carbon (GAC) were measured and the relationships between adsorption, desorption, bioavailability and biodegradation assessed. The conventional Langmuir model fitted the experimental sorption isotherm data and introduced 2-NSA degrading bacteria, established on the surface of the GAC, did not interfere with adsorption. The potential value of GAC as a microbial support in the aerobic degradation of 2-NSA by Arthrobacter globiformis and Comamonas testosteroni was investigated. Using both virgin and microbially colonised GAC, adsorption removed 2-NSA from the liquid phase up to its saturation capacity of 140 mg/g GAC within 48 h. However, between 83.2% and 93.3% of the adsorbed 2-NSA was bioavailable to both bacterial species as a source of carbon for growth. In comparison to the non-inoculated GAC, the combination of rapid adsorption and biodegradation increased the amount (by 70-93%) of 2-NSA removal from the influent phase as well as the bed-life of the GAC (from 40 to >120 d). A microbially conditioned GAC fixed-bed reactor containing 15 g GAC removed 100% 2-NSA (100 mg/l) from tannery wastewater at an empty bed contact time of 22 min for a minimum of 120 d without the need for GAC reconditioning or replacement. This suggests that small volume GAC bioreactors could be used for tannery wastewater recycling.

  17. Effects of temperature, pressure, and carrier gas on the cracking of coal tar over a char-dolomite mixtures and calcined dolomite in a fixed-bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Seshadri, K.; Shamsi, A.

    1998-10-01

    A distillation fraction of a coal-derived liquid (tar) was cracked over a char-dolomite mixture, calcined dolomite, and silicon carbide in a fixed-bed reactor. The char-dolomite mixture (FWC) was produced from Pittsburgh No. 8 coal and dolomite in a Foster Wheeler carbonizer. The experiments were conducted under nitrogen and simulated coal gas (SCG), which was a mixture of CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}, and steam, at 1 and 17 atm. The conversion over these materials under nitrogen was much higher at 17 atm than at 1 atm. At higher pressures, tar molecules were trapped in the pores of the bed material and underwent secondary reactions, resulting in the formation of excess char. However, when nitrogen was replaced by SCG, the reactions that induce char formation were suppressed, thus increasing the yield of gaseous products. The analysis of the gaseous products and the spent bed materials for organic and inorganic carbons suggested that the product distribution can be altered by changing the carrier gas, temperature, and pressure.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of organic-inorganic core-shell structure nanocomposite and application for Zn ions removal from aqueous solution in a fixed-bed column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, Shokoofeh; Ghorbani, Mohsen; Ghazi, Mohsen Mehdipour

    2015-12-01

    An organic-inorganic core/shell structure, γ-Fe2O3/polyrhodanine nanocomposite with γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticle as core with average diameter of 15 nm and polyrhodanine as shell with thickness of 1.5 nm, has been synthesized via chemical oxidation polymerization and applied for adsorption of Zn ions from aqueous solution in a fixed-bed column. The properties of nanocomposite were characterized with transmission electron microscope (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The performance of the column was assessed under variable bed heights (10, 15 and 20 cm) and influent Zn concentrations (50, 100 and 150 ppm) at a constant flow rate (0.5 mL/min). The results demonstrated that the breakthrough curves are S-shaped and the breakthrough time increases with increasing bed height and decreases with increasing influent concentration. Moreover, the dynamics of the adsorption process were evaluated by using Adams-Bohart, bed depth service time (BDST), Thomas and Yoon-Nelson kinetic models. The models were nearly in good agreement with the experimental data.

  19. Batch desorption studies and multiple sorption-regeneration cycles in a fixed-bed column for Cd(II) elimination by protonated Sargassum muticum.

    PubMed

    Lodeiro, P; Herrero, R; Sastre de Vicente, M E

    2006-10-11

    The protonated alga Sargassum muticum was employed in batch desorption studies to find the most appropriate eluting agent for Cd(II)-laden biomass regeneration. Eleven types of eluting solutions at different concentrations were tested, finding elution efficiencies higher than 90% for most of the desorbents studied. Total organic carbon and biomass weight loss measurements were made. The reusability of the protonated alga was also studied using a fixed-bed column. Eleven consecutive sorption-regeneration cycles at a flow rate of 10 mL min(-1) were carried out for the removal of 50 mg L(-1) Cd(II) solution. A 0.1M HNO(3) solution was employed as desorbing agent. The column was operated during 605 h for sorption and 66 h for desorption, equivalent to a continuous use during 28 days, with no apparent loss of sorption performance. In these cycles, no diminution of the breakthrough time was found; although, a relative loss of sorption capacity, regarding the found in the first cycle, was observed. The slope of the breakthrough curves experiments a gradual increase reaching its maximum value for the last cycle tested (40% greater than for the first one). The maximum Cd(II) concentration elution peak was achieved in 5 min or less, and the metal effluent concentration was always lower than 0.9 mg L(-1) after 1 h of elution. The maximum concentration factor was determined to be between 55 and 109. PMID:16759799

  20. Field application of a planted fixed bed reactor (PFR) for support media and rhizosphere investigation using undisturbed samples from full-scale constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Barreto, A B; Vasconcellos, G R; von Sperling, M; Kuschk, P; Kappelmeyer, U; Vasel, J L

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a novel method for investigations on undisturbed samples from full-scale horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetlands (HSSFCW). The planted fixed bed reactor (PFR), developed at the Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research (UFZ), is a universal test unit for planted soil filters that reproduces the operational conditions of a constructed wetland (CW) system in laboratory scale. The present research proposes modifications on the PFR original configuration in order to allow its operation in field conditions. A mobile device to obtain undisturbed samples from real-scale HSSFCW was also developed. The experimental setting is presented with two possible operational configurations. The first allows the removal and replacement of undisturbed samples in the CW bed for laboratory investigations, guaranteeing sample integrity with a mobile device. The second allows the continuous operation of the PFR and undisturbed samples as a fraction of the support media, reproducing the same environmental conditions outside the real-scale system. Investigations on the hydrodynamics of the adapted PFR were carried out with saline tracer tests, validating the proposed adaptation. Six adapted PFR units were installed next to full-scale HSSFCW beds and fed with interstitial liquid pumped from two regions of planted and unplanted support media. Fourteen points were monitored along the system, covering carbon fractions, nitrogen and sulfate. The results indicate the method as a promising tool for investigations on CW support media, rhizosphere and open space for studies on CW modeling, respirometry, kinetic parameters, microbial communities, redox potential and plant influence on HSSFCW. PMID:26247753

  1. The contrast study of anammox-denitrifying system in two non-woven fixed-bed bioreactors (NFBR) treating different low C/N ratio sewage.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fan; Zhang, Hanmin; Yang, Fenglin; Qiang, Hong; Zhang, Guangyi

    2012-06-01

    Two non-woven fixed-bed bioreactors (NFBR) based on different substrates (nitrite and nitrate) were constructed to study the environmental adaptability for temperature and organic matter of anammox-denitrifying system and nitrogen removal performance. The two reactors were successfully operated for 200 days. The average removal rates of nitrogen and COD of R2 were 81% and 93%, respectively. Besides, the nitrogen removal rate of R1 was 95% under not more than 105 mg/l of COD. The experimental results indicated that the R2 based on nitrate had a good nitrogen removal performance at room temperature (25 °C). Additionally, the analysis results of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) showed that the percentage compositions of anammox in R1 and R2 were 84% and 65% on day 189. Finally, the possible nitrogen removal model of anammox-denitrifying system was constructed. According to nitrogen balance and C/N ratios of denitrification, the nitrogen removal approaches of R1 and R2 were obtained.

  2. Biosorption and desorption of lanthanum(III) and neodymium(III) in fixed-bed columns with Sargassum sp.: perspectives for separation of rare earth metals.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Robson C; Guibal, Eric; Garcia, Oswaldo

    2012-01-01

    Rare earth (RE) metals are essentials for the manufacturing of high-technology products. The separation of RE is complex and expensive; biosorption is an alternative to conventional processes. This work focuses on the biosorption of monocomponent and bicomponent solutions of lanthanum(III) and neodymium(III) in fixed-bed columns using Sargassum sp. biomass. The desorption of metals with HCl 0.10 mol L(-1) from loaded biomass is also carried out with the objective of increasing the efficiency of metal separation. Simple models have been successfully used to model breakthrough curves (i.e., Thomas, Bohart-Adams, and Yoon-Nelson equations) for the biosorption of monocomponent solutions. From biosorption and desorption experiments in both monocomponent and bicomponent solutions, a slight selectivity of the biomass for Nd(III) over La(III) is observed. The experiments did not find an effective separation of the RE studied, but their results indicate a possible partition between the metals, which is the fundamental condition for separation perspectives.

  3. Pressurized pyrolysis of rice husk in an inert gas sweeping fixed-bed reactor with a focus on bio-oil deoxygenation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yangyang; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Jie

    2014-12-01

    The pyrolysis of rice husk was conducted in a fixed-bed reactor with a sweeping nitrogen gas to investigate the effects of pressure on the pyrolytic behaviors. The release rates of main gases during the pyrolysis, the distributions of four products (char, bio-oil, water and gas), the elemental compositions of char, bio-oil and gas, and the typical compounds in bio-oil were determined. It was found that the elevation of pressure from 0.1MPa to 5.0MPa facilitated the dehydration and decarboxylation of bio-oil, and the bio-oils obtained under the elevated pressures had significantly less oxygen and higher calorific value than those obtained under atmospheric pressure. The former bio-oils embraced more acetic acid, phenols and guaiacols. The elevation of pressure increased the formation of CH4 partially via the gas-phase reactions. An attempt is made in this study to clarify "the pure pressure effect" and "the combined effect with residence time".

  4. Enhanced adsorption of cesium on PVA-alginate encapsulated Prussian blue-graphene oxide hydrogel beads in a fixed-bed column system.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jiseon; Lee, Dae Sung

    2016-10-01

    A continuous fixed-bed column study was performed using PVA-alginate encapsulated Prussian blue-graphene oxide (PB-GO) hydrogel beads as a novel adsorbent for the removal of cesium from aqueous solutions. The effects of different operating parameters, such as initial cesium concentration, pH, bed height, flow rate, and bead size, were investigated. The maximum adsorption capacity of the PB-GO hydrogel beads was 164.5mg/g at an initial cesium concentration of 5mM, bed height of 20cm, and flow rate of 0.83mL/min at pH 7. The Thomas, Adams-Bohart, and Yoon-Nelson models were applied to the experimental data to predict the breakthrough curves using non-linear regression. Although both the Thomas and Yoon-Nelson models showed good agreement with the experimental data, the Yoon-Nelson model was found to provide the best representation for cesium adsorption on the adsorbent, based on the χ(2) analysis. PMID:27372009

  5. Characteristics and potential values of bio-oil, syngas and biochar derived from Salsola collina Pall. in a fixed bed slow pyrolysis system.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yan; Lin, Qimei; Irfan, Muhammad; Chen, Qun; Zhao, Xiaorong

    2016-11-01

    Salsola collina Pall. as a typical euhalophyte was slowly pyrolyzed at 300°C, 500°C and 700°C in a fixed-bed system. The physiochemical properties of syngas, bio-oil and biochar were assayed to understand the impact of pyrolysis temperature on these parameters and then to evaluate their potential values. The results showed that syngas yield (26.07-46.37%) increased with pyrolysis temperature, while biochar yield (47.54-26.83%) decreased. Bio-oil yield (26-30%) was hardly affected by pyrolysis temperature. Both syngas and bio-oil had poor values as direct fuel. The euhalophyte-derived biochar had higher aromaticity (H/C 0.16-0.85, O/C 0.06-0.26), higher cation exchange capacity (198.82-435.74cmolkg(-1)), and higher K(+) (59.35-80.42gkg(-1)) and Na(+) (37.56-53.26gkg(-1)) compared with glycophyte-derived biochars. Our findings imply that halophyte biochar may be more suitable to use as a soil conditioner, which is worthy of further study. PMID:27595703

  6. Validation of the catalytic properties of Cu-Os/13X using single fixed bed reactor in selective catalytic reduction of NO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Kwang Seok; Woo, Seong Ihl

    2007-11-01

    Catalytic decomposition of NO over Cu-Os/13X has been carried out in a tubular fixed bed reactor at atmospheric pressure and the results were compared with literature data performed by high-throughput screening (HTS). The activity and durability of Cu-Os/13X prepared by conventional ion-exchange method have been investigated in the presence of H 2O and SO 2. It was found that Cu-Os/13X prepared by ion-exchange shows a high activity in a wide temperature range in selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with C 3H 6 compared to Cu/13X, proving the existence of more NO adsorption site on Cu-Os/13X. However, Cu-Os/13X exhibited low activity in the presence of water, and was quite different from the result reported in literature. SO 2 resistance is also low and does not recover its original activity when the SO 2 was blocked in the feed gas stream. This result suggested that catalytic activity between combinatorial screening and conventional testing should be compared to confirm the validity of high-throughput screening.

  7. Pyrolysis of waste animal fats in a fixed-bed reactor: production and characterization of bio-oil and bio-char.

    PubMed

    Ben Hassen-Trabelsi, A; Kraiem, T; Naoui, S; Belayouni, H

    2014-01-01

    Several animal (lamb, poultry and swine) fatty wastes were pyrolyzed under nitrogen, in a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor and the main products (liquid bio-oil, solid bio-char and syngas) were obtained. The purpose of this study is to produce and characterize bio-oil and bio-char obtained from pyrolysis of animal fatty wastes. The maximum production of bio-oil was achieved at a pyrolysis temperature of 500 °C and a heating rate of 5 °C/min. The chemical (GC-MS analyses) and spectroscopic analyses (FTIR analyses) of bio-oil showed that it is a complex mixture consisting of different classes of organic compounds, i.e., hydrocarbons (alkanes, alkenes, cyclic compounds...etc.), carboxylic acids, aldehydes, ketones, esters,...etc. According to fuel properties, produced bio-oils showed good properties, suitable for its use as an engine fuel or as a potential source for synthetic fuels and chemical feedstock. Obtained bio-chars had low carbon content and high ash content which make them unattractive for as renewable source energy.

  8. Bimodal porous silica microspheres decorated with polydopamine nano-particles for the adsorption of methylene blue in fixed-bed columns.

    PubMed

    Ataei-Germi, Taher; Nematollahzadeh, Ali

    2016-05-15

    Bimodal meso/macro-porous silica microspheres (MSM) were synthesized by a modified sol-emulsion-gel method and then the surface was coated with polydopamine (PDA) nano-particles of 39nm in size. Focusing on the encouraging properties of the synthesized adsorbent, such as high specific surface area (612.3m(2)g(-1), because of mesopores), fast mass transfer (0.9-2.67×10(-3)mLmin(-1)mg, because of macropores), and abundant "adhesive" functional groups of PDA, it was used for the removal of methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solution in a fixed-bed column. The effect of different parameters such as pH, initial concentration, and flow rate was studied. The results revealed that an appropriate sorption condition is an alkaline solution of MB (e.g., pH 10) at low flow rate (less than 5mLmin(-1)). Furthermore, the compatibility of the experimental data with mathematical models such as Thomas and Adams-Bohart was investigated. Both of the models showed a good agreement with the experimental data (R(2)=0.9954-0.9994), and could be applied for the prediction of the column properties and breakthrough curves. Regeneration of the column was performed by using HCl solution with a concentration of 0.1M as an eluent. PMID:26943002

  9. Adsorption in a Fixed-Bed Column and Stability of the Antibiotic Oxytetracycline Supported on Zn(II)-[2-Methylimidazolate] Frameworks in Aqueous Media

    PubMed Central

    Anceski Bataglion, Giovana; Nogueira Eberlin, Marcos; Machado Ronconi, Célia

    2015-01-01

    A metal-organic framework, Zn-[2-methylimidazolate] frameworks (ZIF-8), was used as adsorbent material to remove different concentrations of oxytetracycline (OTC) antibiotic in a fixed-bed column. The OTC was studied at concentrations of 10, 25 and 40 mg L-1. At 40 mg L-1, the breakthrough point was reached after approximately 10 minutes, while at 10 and 25 mg L-1 this point was reached in about 30 minutes. The highest removal rate of 60% for the 10 mg L-1 concentration was reached after 200 minutes. The highest adsorption capacity (28.3 mg g-1) was attained for 25 mg L-1 of OTC. After the adsorption process, a band shift was observed in the UV-Vis spectrum of the eluate. Additional studies were carried out to determine the cause of this band shift, involving a mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of the supernatant liquid during the process. This investigation revealed that the main route of adsorption consisted of the coordination of OTC with the metallic zinc centers of ZIF-8. The materials were characterized by thermal analysis (TA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and infrared spectroscopy (IR) before and after adsorption, confirming the presence of OTC in the ZIF-8 and the latter’s structural stability after the adsorption process. PMID:26057121

  10. Structural characterisation of pretreated solids from flow-through liquid hot water treatment of sugarcane bagasse in a fixed-bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Prashant; Lekha, Prabashni; Reynolds, Wienke; Kirsch, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Untreated sugarcane bagasse and sugarcane bagasse pretreated with flow-through liquid hot water (LHW) treatment (170-207°C and 204-250 ml/min) in a fixed-bed reactor have been structurally characterised. Field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to investigate changes in the residues, in particular due to the fate of lignin. FEG-SEM results show that the LHW treatment modified the surface morphology of the pretreated bagasse with lignin droplets being observed on the fibre surface. TEM showed an increase in the plant cell wall porosity and lignin migration across the plant cell wall. Increases in pretreatment temperature were observed to increase the average size and density of lignin droplets on the fibre surface. The results provide evidence that for LHW flow-through treatment, just as for batch treatment, lignin repolymerisation and deposition on the surface of pretreated sugarcane bagasse is an important consideration.

  11. Effects of cycle-frequency and temperature on the performance of anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (ASBRs) treating swine waste.

    PubMed

    Ndegwa, P M; Hamilton, D W; Lalman, J A; Cumba, H J

    2008-04-01

    Anaerobic digestion of animal waste is a technically viable process for the abatement of adverse environmental impacts caused by animal wastes; however, widespread acceptance has been plagued by poor economics. This situation is dismal if the technology is adapted for treating low strength animal slurries because of large digester-volume requirements and a corresponding high energy input. A possible technology to address these constraints is the anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR). The ASBR technology has demonstrated remarkable potential to improve the economics of treating dilute animal waste effluents. This paper presents preliminary data on the effects of temperature and frequency-cycle on the operation of an ASBR at a fixed hydraulic retention time (HRT). The results suggest that within the parameter range under consideration, temperature did not affect the biogas yield significantly, however, higher cycle-frequency had a negative effect. The biogas quality (%CH(4)) was not significantly affected by temperature nor by the cycle-frequency. The operating principle of the ASBR follows four phases: feed, react, settle, and decant in a cyclic mode. To improve the biogas production in an ASBR, one long react-phase was preferable compared to three shorter react-phases. Treatment of dilute manure slurries in an ASBR at 20 degrees C was more effective than at 35 degrees C; similarly more bio-stable effluents were obtained at low cycle-frequency. The treatment of dilute swine slurries in an ASBR at the lower temperature (20 degrees C) and lower cycle-frequency is, therefore, recommended for the bio-stabilization of dilute swine wastewaters. The results also indicate that significantly higher VFA degradation occurred at 20 degrees C than at 35 degrees C, suggesting that the treatment of dilute swine slurries in ASBRs for odor control might be more favorable at the lower than at the higher temperatures examined in this study. Volatile fatty acid reduction at the two

  12. ANAMMOX-like performances for nitrogen removal from ammonium-sulfate-rich wastewater in an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Prachakittikul, Pensiri; Wantawin, Chalermraj; Noophan, Pongsak Lek; Boonapatcharoen, Nimaradee

    2016-01-01

    Ammonium removal by the ANaerobic AMonium OXidation (ANAMMOX) process was observed through the Sulfate-Reducing Ammonium Oxidation (SRAO) process. The same concentration of ammonium (100 mg N L(-1)) was applied to two anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (AnSBRs) that were inoculated with the same activated sludge from the Vermicelli wastewater treatment process, while nitrite was fed in ANAMMOX and sulfate in SRAO reactors. In SRAO-AnSBR, in substrates that were fed with a ratio of NH4(+)/SO4(2-) at 1:0.4 ± 0.03, a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 48 h and without sludge draining, the Ammonium Removal Rate (ARR) was 0.02 ± 0.01 kg N m(-3).d(-1). Adding specific ANAMMOX substrates to SRAO-AnSBR sludge in batch tests results in specific ammonium and nitrite removal rates of 0.198 and 0.139 g N g(-1) VSS.d, respectively, indicating that the ANAMMOX activity contributes to the removal of ammonium in the SRAO process using the nitrite that is produced from SRAO. Nevertheless, the inability of ANAMMOX to utilize sulfate to oxidize ammonium was also investigated in batch tests by augmenting enriched ANAMMOX culture in SRAO-AnSBR sludge and without nitrite supply. The time course of sulfate in a 24-hour cycle of SRAO-AnSBR showed an increase in sulfate after 6 h. For enriched SRAO culture, the uptake molar ratio of NH4(+)/SO4(2-) at 8 hours in a batch test was 1:0.82 lower than the value of 1:0.20 ± 0.09 as obtained in an SRAO-AnSBR effluent, while the stoichiometric ratio of 1:0.5 that includes the ANAMMOX reaction was in this range. After a longer operation of more than 2 years without sludge draining, the accumulation of sulfate and the reduction of ammonium removal were observed, probably due to the gradual increase in the sulfur denitrification rate and the competitive use of nitrite with ANAMMOX. The 16S rRNA gene PCR-DGGE (polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) and PCR cloning analyses resulted in the detection of the ANAMMOX

  13. ANAMMOX-like performances for nitrogen removal from ammonium-sulfate-rich wastewater in an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Prachakittikul, Pensiri; Wantawin, Chalermraj; Noophan, Pongsak Lek; Boonapatcharoen, Nimaradee

    2016-01-01

    Ammonium removal by the ANaerobic AMonium OXidation (ANAMMOX) process was observed through the Sulfate-Reducing Ammonium Oxidation (SRAO) process. The same concentration of ammonium (100 mg N L(-1)) was applied to two anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (AnSBRs) that were inoculated with the same activated sludge from the Vermicelli wastewater treatment process, while nitrite was fed in ANAMMOX and sulfate in SRAO reactors. In SRAO-AnSBR, in substrates that were fed with a ratio of NH4(+)/SO4(2-) at 1:0.4 ± 0.03, a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 48 h and without sludge draining, the Ammonium Removal Rate (ARR) was 0.02 ± 0.01 kg N m(-3).d(-1). Adding specific ANAMMOX substrates to SRAO-AnSBR sludge in batch tests results in specific ammonium and nitrite removal rates of 0.198 and 0.139 g N g(-1) VSS.d, respectively, indicating that the ANAMMOX activity contributes to the removal of ammonium in the SRAO process using the nitrite that is produced from SRAO. Nevertheless, the inability of ANAMMOX to utilize sulfate to oxidize ammonium was also investigated in batch tests by augmenting enriched ANAMMOX culture in SRAO-AnSBR sludge and without nitrite supply. The time course of sulfate in a 24-hour cycle of SRAO-AnSBR showed an increase in sulfate after 6 h. For enriched SRAO culture, the uptake molar ratio of NH4(+)/SO4(2-) at 8 hours in a batch test was 1:0.82 lower than the value of 1:0.20 ± 0.09 as obtained in an SRAO-AnSBR effluent, while the stoichiometric ratio of 1:0.5 that includes the ANAMMOX reaction was in this range. After a longer operation of more than 2 years without sludge draining, the accumulation of sulfate and the reduction of ammonium removal were observed, probably due to the gradual increase in the sulfur denitrification rate and the competitive use of nitrite with ANAMMOX. The 16S rRNA gene PCR-DGGE (polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) and PCR cloning analyses resulted in the detection of the ANAMMOX

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Thermodesulfovibrio aggregans TGE-P1T, an Obligately Anaerobic, Thermophilic, Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium in the Phylum Nitrospirae.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Norihisa; Ohashi, Akiko; Tourlousse, Dieter M; Sekiguchi, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    We report a high-quality draft genome sequence of the type strain (TGE-P1(T)) of Thermodesulfovibrio aggregans, an obligately anaerobic, thermophilic, sulfate-reducing bacterium in the phylum Nitrospirae. The genome comprises 2.00 Mb in 16 contigs (3 scaffolds), has a G+C content of 34.5%, and contains 1,998 predicted protein-encoding genes.

  15. Nutrient removal in a sequencing batch reactor operated with short anaerobic/aerobic cycles.

    PubMed

    Freitas, F; Temudo, M; Almeida, J S; Reis, M A M

    2003-01-01

    A single sequencing batch reactor operated with short intermittent aeration cycles was used to simultaneously remove carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus. The complete cycle, comprising feeding, anaerobiosis, aerobiosis, settling and decanting, was only 36 minutes long. The system has shown high and stable nutrient removal at 30 degrees C with acetate as carbon source and it has proved to be rather robust and dynamic, efficiently adapting to most of the changes in operating parameters tested: presence of nitrate in the feeding medium, different substrates (propionate and butyrate), temperature and nutrient shock loads. For the optimum conditions used, a removal efficiency of over 90% was obtained for each nutrient. Description of the population kinetics was obtained for each operating condition, by performing batch tests. Kinetic and stoichiometric parameters were used to infer the relative contribution of each group of microorganisms on SBR performance. Compared to the traditional SBR operated with cycles of 6 hours, the use of short intermittent aeration cycles of 36 minutes corresponds to a 40% reduction on aeration time.

  16. Performance evaluation of the sulfur-redox-reaction-activated up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket and down-flow hanging sponge anaerobic/anoxic sequencing batch reactor system for municipal sewage treatment.

    PubMed

    Hatamoto, Masashi; Ohtsuki, Kota; Maharjan, Namita; Ono, Shinya; Dehama, Kazuya; Sakamoto, Kenichi; Takahashi, Masanobu; Yamaguchi, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    A sulfur-redox-reaction-activated up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) and down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) system, combined with an anaerobic/anoxic sequencing batch reactor (A2SBR), has been used for municipal sewage treatment for over 2 years. The present system achieved a removal rate of 95±14% for BOD, 74±22% for total nitrogen, and 78±25% for total phosphorus, including low water temperature conditions. Sludge conversion rates during the operational period were 0.016 and 0.218 g-VSS g-COD-removed(-1) for the UASB, and DHS, respectively, which are similar to a conventional UASB-DHS system, which is not used of sulfur-redox-reaction, for sewage treatment. Using the sulfur-redox reaction made advanced treatment of municipal wastewater with minimal sludge generation possible, even in winter. Furthermore, the occurrence of a unique phenomenon, known as the anaerobic sulfur oxidation reaction, was confirmed in the UASB reactor under the winter season. PMID:26773951

  17. Performance evaluation of the sulfur-redox-reaction-activated up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket and down-flow hanging sponge anaerobic/anoxic sequencing batch reactor system for municipal sewage treatment.

    PubMed

    Hatamoto, Masashi; Ohtsuki, Kota; Maharjan, Namita; Ono, Shinya; Dehama, Kazuya; Sakamoto, Kenichi; Takahashi, Masanobu; Yamaguchi, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    A sulfur-redox-reaction-activated up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) and down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) system, combined with an anaerobic/anoxic sequencing batch reactor (A2SBR), has been used for municipal sewage treatment for over 2 years. The present system achieved a removal rate of 95±14% for BOD, 74±22% for total nitrogen, and 78±25% for total phosphorus, including low water temperature conditions. Sludge conversion rates during the operational period were 0.016 and 0.218 g-VSS g-COD-removed(-1) for the UASB, and DHS, respectively, which are similar to a conventional UASB-DHS system, which is not used of sulfur-redox-reaction, for sewage treatment. Using the sulfur-redox reaction made advanced treatment of municipal wastewater with minimal sludge generation possible, even in winter. Furthermore, the occurrence of a unique phenomenon, known as the anaerobic sulfur oxidation reaction, was confirmed in the UASB reactor under the winter season.

  18. Biodegradation of industrial-strength 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid wastewaters in the presence of glucose in aerobic and anaerobic sequencing batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Elefsiniotis, Panagiotis; Wareham, David G

    2013-01-01

    This research explored the biodegradability of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in two laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) that operated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The potential limit of 2,4-D degradation was investigated at a hydraulic retention time of 48 h, using glucose as a supplemental substrate and increasing feed concentrations of 2,4-D; namely 100 to 700 mg/L (i.e. industrial strength) for the aerobic system and 100 to 300 mg/L for the anaerobic SBR. The results revealed that 100 mg/L of 2,4-D was completely degraded following an acclimation period of 29 d (aerobic SBR) and 70 d (anaerobic SBR). The aerobic system achieved total 2,4-D removal at feed concentrations up to 600 mg/L which appeared to be a practical limit, since a further increase to 700 mg/L impaired glucose degradation while 2,4-D biodegradation was non-existent. In all cases, glucose was consumed before the onset of 2,4-D degradation. In the anaerobic SBR, 2,4-D degradation was limited to 120 mg/L.

  19. Treatment of leachate from the anaerobic fermentation of solid wastes using two biofilm support media.

    PubMed

    Comett, I; González-Martinez, S; Wilderer, P

    2004-01-01

    Biofilms growing on different carrier media have a different response to the nutrients contained in wastewater. Biofilms have proven to be an alternative to the treatment of wastewater containing higher concentrations of contaminants. The main objective of this research was to compare two biofilm support media for the treatment of leachate from the anaerobic fermentation of solid wastes. The removal of organic matter and ammonia was achieved in two fixed bed biofilm reactors containing Kaldnes and Linpor support materials with specific surface areas of 490 and 270 m2/m3, respectively, and operating under the sequencing batch procedure during 204 days. The Linpor reactor achieved higher total COD removal than the Kaldnes reactor (47% and 39%, respectively). Linpor was shown to be less sensitive to influent COD changes than Kaldnes. The effluent total COD values of Kaldnes were higher than Linpor. The dissolved COD removal was 21% for both reactors. The average ammonia removal for Linpor was 72% and 42% for Kaldnes. The matrix of Linpor allows higher concentrations of microorganisms (as dry mass) than Kaldnes. The dry mass concentration was related to the "active" exposed surface area of the biofilm. This is considered to be the cause for the better performance of Linpor when compared with Kaldnes.

  20. Effects of manipulating cyclic duration and pH on fermentative hydrogen production in an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Won, Seung-Gun; Lau, Anthony K

    2015-01-01

    The effects of cyclic duration and pH on biological hydrogen production were investigated in an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor. Experiments were conducted using cyclic duration of (4, 8, and 12 h) in combination with pH (4, 5, and 6) in a 3 × 3 factorial design, while hydraulic retention time and organic loading rate were maintained at 24 h and 10.3 g COD L(-1).d(-1), respectively. At pH 4, the effect of cyclic duration on hydrogen production was found to be insignificant. However, in runs with pH 5 and 6, a shorter cyclic duration of 4 h led to lower hydrogen productivity. The operational condition (pH 6, cyclic duration 12 h) induced higher hydrogen production rate of 2.3 ± 0.6 L H2/L reactor.d, whereas higher hydrogen yield of 2.2 ± 0.4 mol H2/mol sucrose was achieved at pH 5 and the same 12 h cyclic duration. The differences in hydrogen production were not statistically significant between 8 h and 12 h cyclic duration. Higher hydrogen production rates were associated with biomass (mixed liquor volatile suspended solids) concentration ranging from 8-13 g L(-1), but further increase in biomass growth was not accompanied by increased hydrogen production. Furthermore, a food-to-microorganism ratio of 0.84 was found to result in higher hydrogen production rate.

  1. Effects of bed materials on the performance of an anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor treating domestic sewage.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M L; Lapa, K R; Foresti, E; Zaiat, M

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the best performance of an anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor (AnSBBR) based on the use of four different bed materials as support for biomass immobilization. The bed materials utilized were polyurethane foam (PU), vegetal carbon (VC), synthetic pumice (SP), and recycled low-density polyethylene (PE). The AnSBBR, with a total volume of 7.2L, was operated in 8-h batch cycles over 10 months, and fed with domestic sewage with an average influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 358+/-110 mg/L. The average effluent COD values were 121+/-31, 208+/-54, 233+/-52, and 227+/-51 mg/L, for PU, VC, SP, and PE, respectively. A modified first-order kinetic model was adjusted to temporal profiles of COD during a batch cycle, and the apparent kinetic constants were 0.52+/-0.05, 0.37+/-0.05, 0.80+/-0.04, and 0.30+/-0.02 h(-1) for PU, VC, SP, and PE, respectively. Specific substrate utilization rates of 1.08, 0.11, and 0.86 mg COD/mg VS day were obtained for PU, VC, and PE, respectively. Although SP yielded the highest kinetic coefficient, PU was considered the best support, since SP presented loss of chemical constituents during the reactor's operational phase. In addition, findings on the microbial community were associated with the reactor's performance data. Although PE did not show a satisfactory performance, an interesting microbial diversity was found on its surface. Based on the morphology and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) results, PE showed the best capacity for promoting the attachment of methanogenic organisms, and is therefore a material that merits further analysis. PU was considered the most suitable material showing the best performance in terms of efficiency of solids and COD removal.

  2. Optimization of the pyrolysis process of empty fruit bunch (EFB) in a fixed-bed reactor through a central composite design (CCD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Alina Rahayu; Hamzah, Zainab; Daud, Mohamed Zulkali Mohamed

    2014-07-01

    The production of crude palm oil from the processing of palm fresh fruit bunches in the palm oil mills in Malaysia hs resulted in a huge quantity of empty fruit bunch (EFB) accumulated. The EFB was used as a feedstock in the pyrolysis process using a fixed-bed reactor in the present study. The optimization of process parameters such as pyrolysis temperature (factor A), biomass particle size (factor B) and holding time (factor C) were investigated through Central Composite Design (CCD) using Stat-Ease Design Expert software version 7 with bio-oil yield considered as the response. Twenty experimental runs were conducted. The results were completely analyzed by Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). The model was statistically significant. All factors studied were significant with p-values < 0.05. The pyrolysis temperature (factor A) was considered as the most significant parameter because its F-value of 116.29 was the highest. The value of R2 was 0.9564 which indicated that the selected factors and its levels showed high correlation to the production of bio-oil from EFB pyrolysis process. A quadratic model equation was developed and employed to predict the highest theoretical bio-oil yield. The maximum bio-oil yield of 46.2 % was achieved at pyrolysis temperature of 442.15 °C using the EFB particle size of 866 μm which corresponded to the EFB particle size in the range of 710-1000 μm and holding time of 483 seconds.

  3. Optimization of the pyrolysis process of empty fruit bunch (EFB) in a fixed-bed reactor through a central composite design (CCD)

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, Alina Rahayu; Hamzah, Zainab; Daud, Mohamed Zulkali Mohamed

    2014-07-10

    The production of crude palm oil from the processing of palm fresh fruit bunches in the palm oil mills in Malaysia hs resulted in a huge quantity of empty fruit bunch (EFB) accumulated. The EFB was used as a feedstock in the pyrolysis process using a fixed-bed reactor in the present study. The optimization of process parameters such as pyrolysis temperature (factor A), biomass particle size (factor B) and holding time (factor C) were investigated through Central Composite Design (CCD) using Stat-Ease Design Expert software version 7 with bio-oil yield considered as the response. Twenty experimental runs were conducted. The results were completely analyzed by Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). The model was statistically significant. All factors studied were significant with p-values < 0.05. The pyrolysis temperature (factor A) was considered as the most significant parameter because its F-value of 116.29 was the highest. The value of R{sup 2} was 0.9564 which indicated that the selected factors and its levels showed high correlation to the production of bio-oil from EFB pyrolysis process. A quadratic model equation was developed and employed to predict the highest theoretical bio-oil yield. The maximum bio-oil yield of 46.2 % was achieved at pyrolysis temperature of 442.15 °C using the EFB particle size of 866 μm which corresponded to the EFB particle size in the range of 710–1000 μm and holding time of 483 seconds.

  4. Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems. Volume 2, Appendix A: Fixed bed gasifier and sulfur sorbent regeneration subsystem computer model development: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Blough, E.; Russell, W.; Leach, J.W.

    1990-08-01

    Computer models have been developed for evaluating conceptual designs of integrated coal gasification combined cycle power plants. An overall system model was developed for performing thermodynamic cycle analyses, and detailed models were developed for predicting performance characteristics of fixed bed coal gasifiers and hot gas clean up subsystem components. The overall system model performs mass and energy balances and does chemical equilibrium analyses to determine the effects of changes in operating conditions, or to evaluate proposed design changes. An existing plug flow model for fixed bed gasifiers known as the Wen II model was revised and updated. Also, a spread sheet model of zinc ferrite sulfur sorbent regeneration subsystem was developed. Parametric analyses were performed to determine how performance depends on variables in the system design. The work was done to support CRS Sirrine Incorporated in their study of standardized air blown coal gasifier gas turbine concepts.

  5. Genome Sequence of the Deltaproteobacterial Strain NaphS2 and Analysis of Differential Gene Expression during Anaerobic Growth on Naphthalene

    SciTech Connect

    DiDonato, Raymond J.; Young, Nelson D.; Butler, Jessica; Chin, Kuk-Jeong; Hixson, Kim K.; Mouser, Paula; Lipton, Mary S.; DeBoy, Robert; Methe, Barbara

    2010-11-19

    Anaerobic polycyclic hydrocarbon (PAH) degradation coupled to sulfate reduction may be an important mechanism for in situ remediation of contaminated sediments. Steps involved in the anaerobic degradation of 2-methylnaphthalene have been described in the sulfate reducing strains NaphS3, NaphS6 and N47. Evidence from N47 suggests that naphthalene degradation involves 2-methylnaphthalene as an intermediate, whereas evidence in NaphS2, NaphS3 and NaphS6 suggests a mechanism for naphthalene degradation that does not involve 2-methylnaphthalene. To further characterize pathways involved in naphthalene degradation in NaphS2, the draft genome was sequenced, and gene and protein expression examined.

  6. Study of the diversity of microbial communities in a sequencing batch reactor oxic-settling-anaerobic process and its modified process.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lianpeng; Chen, Jianfan; Wei, Xiange; Guo, Wuzhen; Lin, Meishan; Yu, Xiaoyu

    2016-05-01

    To further reveal the mechanism of sludge reduction in the oxic-settling-anaerobic (OSA) process, the polymerase chain reaction - denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis protocol was used to study the possible difference in the microbial communities between a sequencing batch reactor (SBR)-OSA process and its modified process, by analyzing the change in the diversity of the microbial communities in each reactor of both systems. The results indicated that the structure of the microbial communities in aerobic reactors of the 2 processes was very different, but the predominant microbial populations in anaerobic reactors were similar. The predominant microbial population in the aerobic reactor of the SBR-OSA belonged to Burkholderia cepacia, class Betaproteobacteria, while those of the modified process belonged to the classes Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria. These 3 types of microbes had a cryptic growth characteristic, which was the main cause of a greater sludge reduction efficiency achieved by the modified process. PMID:27021584

  7. Design of a fixed-bed ion-exchange process for the treatment of rinse waters generated in the galvanization process using Laminaria hyperborea as natural cation exchanger.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Luciana P; Pozdniakova, Tatiana A; Mayer, Diego A; Boaventura, Rui A R; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the removal of zinc from galvanization wastewaters was performed in a fixed bed column packed with brown macro-algae Laminaria hyperborea, acting as a natural cation exchanger (resin). The rinse wastewater presents a zinc concentration between 9 and 22 mg/L, a high concentration of light metals (mainly Na and Ca), a high conductivity (0.5-1.5 mS/cm) and a low organic content (DOC = 7-15 mg C/L). The zinc speciation diagram showed that approximately 80% of zinc is in the form of Zn(2+) and ≅20% as ZnSO4, considering the effluent matrix. From all operational conditions tested for zinc uptake (17 < bed height<27 cm, 4.5 < flow rate<18.2 BV/h, 0.8 < particle equivalent diameter<2.0 mm), the highest useful capacity (7.1 mg Zn/g algae) was obtained for D/dp = 31, L/D = 11, 9.1 BV/h, τ = 6.4 min, corresponding to a service capacity of 124 BV (endpoint of 2 mg Zn/L). Elution was faster and near to 100% effective using 10 BV of HCl (1 M, 3.0%, 363 g HCl/L of resin), for flow rates higher than 4.5 BV/h. Calcium chloride solution (0.1 M) was selected as the best regenerant, allowing the reuse of the natural resin for more than 3 saturation/elution/regeneration cycles. The best operation conditions were scaled-up and tested in a pre-pilot plant. The scale-up design of the cation exchange process was proposed for the treatment of 2.4 m(3)/day of galvanization wastewater, resulting in an estimated reactants cost of 2.44 €/m(3).

  8. Design of a fixed-bed ion-exchange process for the treatment of rinse waters generated in the galvanization process using Laminaria hyperborea as natural cation exchanger.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Luciana P; Pozdniakova, Tatiana A; Mayer, Diego A; Boaventura, Rui A R; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the removal of zinc from galvanization wastewaters was performed in a fixed bed column packed with brown macro-algae Laminaria hyperborea, acting as a natural cation exchanger (resin). The rinse wastewater presents a zinc concentration between 9 and 22 mg/L, a high concentration of light metals (mainly Na and Ca), a high conductivity (0.5-1.5 mS/cm) and a low organic content (DOC = 7-15 mg C/L). The zinc speciation diagram showed that approximately 80% of zinc is in the form of Zn(2+) and ≅20% as ZnSO4, considering the effluent matrix. From all operational conditions tested for zinc uptake (17 < bed height<27 cm, 4.5 < flow rate<18.2 BV/h, 0.8 < particle equivalent diameter<2.0 mm), the highest useful capacity (7.1 mg Zn/g algae) was obtained for D/dp = 31, L/D = 11, 9.1 BV/h, τ = 6.4 min, corresponding to a service capacity of 124 BV (endpoint of 2 mg Zn/L). Elution was faster and near to 100% effective using 10 BV of HCl (1 M, 3.0%, 363 g HCl/L of resin), for flow rates higher than 4.5 BV/h. Calcium chloride solution (0.1 M) was selected as the best regenerant, allowing the reuse of the natural resin for more than 3 saturation/elution/regeneration cycles. The best operation conditions were scaled-up and tested in a pre-pilot plant. The scale-up design of the cation exchange process was proposed for the treatment of 2.4 m(3)/day of galvanization wastewater, resulting in an estimated reactants cost of 2.44 €/m(3). PMID:26766159

  9. Anaerobic biodegradation of cyanide under methanogenic conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Fallon, R D; Cooper, D A; Speece, R; Henson, M

    1991-01-01

    Upflow, anaerobic, fixed-bed, activated charcoal biotreatment columns capable of operating at free cyanide concentrations of greater than 100 mg liter-1 with a hydraulic retention time of less than 48 h were developed. Methanogenesis was maintained under a variety of feed medium conditions which included ethanol, phenol, or methanol as the primary reduced carbon source. Under optimal conditions, greater than 70% of the inflow free cyanide was removed in the first 30% of the column height. Strongly complexed cyanides were resistant to removal. Ammonia was the nitrogen end product of cyanide transformation. In cell material removed from the charcoal columns, [14C]bicarbonate was the major carbon end product of [14C]cyanide transformation. PMID:1872600

  10. A start-up of psychrophilic anaerobic sequence batch reactor digesting a 35 % total solids feed of dairy manure and wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Saady, Noori M Cata; Massé, Daniel I

    2015-12-01

    Zero liquid discharge is currently an objective in livestock manure management to minimize water pollution. This paper reports the start-up phase of a novel psychrophilic (20 °C) dry anaerobic digestion of dairy manure with bedding fed at 35 % total solids and an organic loading rate of 3.0 g total chemical oxygen demand kg(-1) inoculum day(-1) in anaerobic sequence batch reactors. The specific methane (CH4) yield ranged from 165.4 ± 9.8 to 213.9 ± 13.6 NL CH4 kg(-1) volatile solids (VS) with an overall average of 188 ± 17 NL CH4 kg(-1) VS during 11 successive start-up cycles (231 days) and a maximum CH4 production rate of 10.2 ± 0.6 NL CH4 kg(-1) VS day(-1). The inoculum-to-substrate (VS-based) ratio ranged from 4.06 to 4.47. Although methanogenesis proceeded fairly well the hydrolysis seemed to be the rate limiting step. It is possible start up psychrophilic dry anaerobic digestion of cow feces and wheat straw at feed TS of 35 % within 7-10 successive cycles (147-210 days). PMID:26289773

  11. Application of a variable structure model in observation and control of an anaerobic digestor.

    PubMed

    Tartakovsky, B; Morel, E; Steyer, J P; Guiot, S R

    2002-01-01

    In this work, a variable structure model (VSM) of an anaerobic digestion process was developed. The anaerobic biodegradation process was described by four nonlinear submodels representing methanogenic, chemical oxygen demand overload, acidogenic, and hydrogen-inhibited states of the anaerobic process. At any instant, process dynamics was modeled only by one of the submodels, while the others were considered trailing. The choice of a leading submodel was handled by a knowledge-based system, which analyzed available process variables, such as off-gas composition and reactor pH. The feasibility of the proposed method was demonstrated both by using the VSM to predict the outputs of a comprehensive process model, and the experimental results obtained in a pilot scale anaerobic fixed-bed bioreactor.

  12. The anaerobic responsive element contains two GC-rich sequences essential for binding a nuclear protein and hypoxic activation of the maize Adh1 promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Olive, M R; Peacock, W J; Dennis, E S

    1991-01-01

    We have identified a protein (GCBP-1) in nuclear extracts from maize suspension cell cultures that binds to specific sequences within the Anaerobic Responsive Element (ARE) of the maize Adh1 promoter. Competition analyses show that the GCBP-1 binding activity distinguishes ARE sequence motifs from other enhancer elements or pUC19 sequences. The binding activities of several mutant ARE sequences define two regions of the ARE important for GCBP-1 binding in vitro, between nucleotides -135 to -131 and nucleotides -120 to -112 of the maize Adh1 promoter. Both regions are required for efficient GCBP-1 binding to occur in vitro. The minimum consensus binding site for GCBP-1 is 5'-GC(G/C)CC-3'. This sequence is similar to a part of the binding site of the human transcription factor Sp1 (1). We demonstrate that maize GCBP-1 and human Sp1 have similar recognition properties. Using ARE mutants in a transient assay in maize protoplasts we have shown that mutation of the GCBP-1 binding sites prevents significant hypoxic activation of the maize Adh1 promoter. These results suggest a direct role for GCBP-1 in the hypoxic activation of Adh1 gene expression. GCBP-1 is present in both uninduced and induced nuclei, indicating that inducible gene expression is not dependent upon synthesis of GCBP-1 and suggesting that post-translational modification of bound GCBP-1 may be important for enhanced transcription to occur. Images PMID:1766868

  13. Anaerobic bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    Anaerobic bacteria are bacteria that do not live or grow when oxygen is present. In humans, these ... Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's ...

  14. Performance comparison of a continuous-flow stirred-tank reactor and an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor for fermentative hydrogen production depending on substrate concentration.

    PubMed

    Kim, S-H; Han, S-K; Shin, H-S

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare the performance of a continuous-flow stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) and an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) for fermentative hydrogen production at various substrate concentrations. Heat-treated anaerobic sludge was utilized as an inoculum, and hydraulic retention time (HRT) for each reactor was maintained at 12 h. At the influent sucrose concentration of 5 g COD/L, start-up was not successful in both reactors. The CSTR, which was started-up at 10 g COD/L, showed stable hydrogen production at the influent sucrose concentrations of 10-60 g COD/L during 203 days. Hydrogen production was dependent on substrate concentration, resulting in the highest performance at 30 g COD/L. At the lower substrate concentration, the hydrogen yield (based on hexose consumed) decreased with biomass reduction and changes in fermentation products. At the higher substrate concentration, substrate inhibition on biomass growth caused the decrease of carbohydrate degradation and hydrogen yield (based on hexose added). The ASBR showed higher biomass concentration and carbohydrate degradation efficiency than the CSTR, but hydrogen production in the ASBR was less effective than that in the CSTR at all the substrate concentrations.

  15. Genome sequence of Phaeobacter daeponensis type strain (DSM 23529T), a facultatively anaerobic bacterium isolated from marine sediment, and emendation of Phaeobacter daeponensis

    PubMed Central

    Dogs, Marco; Teshima, Hazuki; Petersen, Jörn; Fiebig, Anne; Chertkov, Olga; Dalingault, Hajnalka; Chen, Amy; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Chain, Patrick; Detter, John C.; Ivanova, Natalia; Lapidus, Alla; Rohde, Manfred; Gronow, Sabine; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Woyke, Tanja; Simon, Meinhard; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Brinkhoff, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    TF-218T is the type strain of the species Phaeobacter daeponensis Yoon et al. 2007, a facultatively anaerobic Phaeobacter species isolated from tidal flats. Here we describe the draft genome sequence and annotation of this bacterium together with previously unreported aspects of its phenotype. We analyzed the genome for genes involved in secondary metabolite production and its anaerobic lifestyle, which have also been described for its closest relative Phaeobacter caeruleus. The 4,642,596 bp long genome of strain TF-218T contains 4,310 protein-coding genes and 78 RNA genes including four rRNA operons and consists of five replicons: one chromosome and four extrachromosomal elements with sizes of 276 kb, 174 kb, 117 kb and 90 kb. Genome analysis showed that TF-218T possesses all of the genes for indigoidine biosynthesis, and on specific media the strain showed a blue pigmentation. We also found genes for dissimilatory nitrate reduction, gene-transfer agents, NRPS/ PKS genes and signaling systems homologous to the LuxR/I system. PMID:24501652

  16. Influence of carbon sources and C/N ratio on EPS production in anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactors for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Miqueleto, A P; Dolosic, C C; Pozzi, E; Foresti, E; Zaiat, M

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the influence of different carbon sources and the carbon/nitrogen ratio (C/N) on the production and main composition of insoluble extracellular polymers (EPS) produced in an anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor (ASBBR) with immobilized biomass in polyurethane foam. The yield of EPS was 23.6 mg/g carbon, 13.3 mg/g carbon, 9.0 mg/g carbon and 1.4 mg/g carbon when the reactor was fed with glucose, soybean oil, fat acids, and meat extract, respectively. The yield of EPS decreased from 23.6 to 2.6 mg/g carbon as the C/N ratio was decreased from 13.6 to 3.4 gC/gN, using glucose as carbon source. EPS production was not observed under strict anaerobic conditions. The results suggest that the carbon source, microaerophilic conditions and high C/N ratio favor EPS production in the ASBBR used for wastewater treatment. Cellulose was the main exopolysaccharide observed in all experimental conditions. PMID:19783138

  17. Bacterial community dynamics in a swine wastewater anaerobic reactor revealed by 16S rDNA sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, An-Chi; Chou, Chu-Yang; Chen, Ling-Ling; Kuo, Chih-Horng

    2015-01-20

    Anaerobic digestion is a microbiological process of converting organic wastes into digestate and biogas in the absence of oxygen. In practice, disturbance to the system (e.g., organic shock loading) may cause imbalance of the microbial community and lead to digester failure. To examine the bacterial community dynamics after a disturbance, this study simulated an organic shock loading that doubled the chemical oxygen demand (COD) loading using a 4.5L swine wastewater anaerobic completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Before the shock (loading rate=0.65gCOD/L/day), biogas production rate was about 1-2L/L/day. After the shock, three periods representing increased biogas production rates were observed during days 1-7 (∼4.0L/L/day), 13 (3.3L/L/day), and 21-23 (∼6.1L/L/day). For culture-independent assessments of the bacterial community composition, the 454 pyrosequencing results indicated that the community contained >2500 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and was dominated by three phyla: Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria. The shock induced dynamic changes in the community composition, which was re-stabilized after approximately threefold hydraulic retention time (HRT). Intriguingly, upon restabilization, the community composition became similar to that observed before the shock, rather than reaching a new equilibrium.

  18. Hybrid neural modelling of an anaerobic digester with respect to biological constraints.

    PubMed

    Karama, A; Bernard, O; Gouzé, J L; Benhammou, A; Dochain, D

    2001-01-01

    A hybrid model for an anaerobic digestion process is proposed. The fermentation is assumed to be performed in two steps, acidogenesis and methanogenesis, by two bacterial populations. The model is based on mass balance equations, and the bacterial growth rates are represented by neural networks. In order to guarantee the biological meaning of the hybrid model (positivity of the concentrations, boundedness, saturation or inhibition of the growth rates) outside the training data set, a method that imposes constraints in the neural network is proposed. The method is applied to experimental data from a fixed bed reactor.

  19. Extremum-seeking with variable gain control for intensifying biogas production in anaerobic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Olsson, G; Mattiasson, B

    2006-01-01

    A state-dependent variable-gain control system is implemented to follow the characteristics of a laboratory-scale up-flow anaerobic fixed-bed reactor dynamically. The transition from one state to another is determined on an hourly basis, depending on difference between the setpoint of the reactor pH and its true value. Considerable improvement of the process stability--reduction of oscillation in both the reactor pH and biogas production rate during high-rate operation, has been achieved, although the control structure is simple and intuitive.

  20. Biochemical reaction engineering and process development in anaerobic wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Aivasidis, Alexander; Diamantis, Vasileios

    2005-01-01

    Developments in production technology have frequently resulted in the concentrated local accumulation of highly organic-laden wastewaters. Anaerobic wastewater treatment, in industrial applications, constitutes an advanced method of synthesis by which inexpensive substrates are converted into valuable disproportionate products. A critical discussion of certain fundamental principles of biochemical reaction engineering relevant to the anaerobic mode of operation is made here, with special emphasis on the roles of thermodynamics, kinetics, mass and heat transfer, reactor design, biomass retention and recycling. The applications of the anaerobic processes are discussed, introducing the principles of an upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactor and a fixed-bed loop reactor. The merits of staging reactor systems are presented using selected examples based on two decades of research in the field of anaerobic fermentation and wastewater treatment at the Forschungszentrum Julich (Julich Research Center, Germany). Wastewater treatment is an industrial process associated with one of the largest levels of mass throughput known, and for this reason it provides a major impetus to further developments in bioprocess technology in general.

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Caloranaerobacter sp. TR13, an Anaerobic Thermophilic Bacterium Isolated from a Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yunbiao; Dong, Binbin; Liu, Qing; Chen, Xiaoyao

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the draft 2,261,881-bp genome sequence of Caloranaerobacter sp. TR13, isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent on the East Pacific Rise. The sequence will be helpful for understanding the genetic and metabolic features, as well as potential biotechnological application in the genus Caloranaerobacter. PMID:26679595

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Caloranaerobacter sp. TR13, an Anaerobic Thermophilic Bacterium Isolated from a Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Meixian; Xie, Yunbiao; Dong, Binbin; Liu, Qing; Chen, Xiaoyao

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the draft 2,261,881-bp genome sequence of Caloranaerobacter sp. TR13, isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent on the East Pacific Rise. The sequence will be helpful for understanding the genetic and metabolic features, as well as potential biotechnological application in the genus Caloranaerobacter. PMID:26679595

  3. Development of an energy-saving anaerobic hybrid membrane bioreactors for 2-chlorophenol-contained wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun-Kun; Pan, Xin-Rong; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Li, Wen-Wei; Shi, Bing-Jing; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-12-01

    A novel energy-saving anaerobic hybrid membrane bioreactor (AnHMBR) with mesh filter, which takes advantage of anaerobic membrane bioreactor and fixed-bed biofilm reactor, is developed for low-strength 2-chlorophenol (2-CP)-contained wastewater treatment. In this system, the anaerobic membrane bioreactor is stuffed with granular activated carbon to construct an anaerobic hybrid fixed-bed biofilm membrane bioreactor. The effluent turbidity from the AnHMBR system was low during most of the operation period, and the chemical oxygen demand and 2-CP removal efficiencies averaged 82.3% and 92.6%, respectively. Furthermore, a low membrane fouling rate was achieved during the operation. During the AnHMBR operation, the only energy consumption was for feed pump. And a low energy demand of 0.0045-0.0063kWhm(-3) was estimated under the current operation conditions. All these results demonstrated that this novel AnHMBR is a sustainable technology for treating 2-CP-contained wastewater.

  4. Complete Genomic Sequence of “Thermofilum adornatus” Strain 1910bT, a Hyperthermophilic Anaerobic Organotrophic Crenarchaeon

    PubMed Central

    Dominova, I. N.; Kublanov, I. V.; Podosokorskaya, O. A.; Derbikova, K. S.; Patrushev, M. V.

    2013-01-01

    The complete genomic sequence of a novel hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon, strain 1910bT, was determined. The genome comprises a 1,750,259-bp circular chromosome containing single copies of 3 rRNA genes, 43 tRNA genes, and 1,896 protein-coding sequences. In silico genome-genome hybridization suggests the proposal of a novel species, “Thermofilum adornatus” strain 1910bT. PMID:24029764

  5. Effect of a hydrolytic/acidogenic pre-stage on the organic matter content of wastewater treated in a sequencing batch reactor for biological phosphorous removal.

    PubMed

    Colmenarejo, M F; Bustos, A; Garcia, G; Borja, R

    2001-01-01

    An increase of 52.7% in acetate concentration was observed when urban wastewater was used to feed a pilot-scale upflow-type, fixed-bed fermentor under a hydraulic retention time of 0.78 h. The fermentor influent and effluent were successively used to feed a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) using similar operational variables of wastewater volume, sludge purging volume and retention times during the anaerobic and aerobic phase, giving a nominal 4 h hydraulic retention time. The fermentor effluent contained an organic substrate, with a volatile fatty acid content higher than 50mg L(-1), which was appropriate for the growth of the type of microorganisms characteristically found in biological phosphorous removal (BPR) systems, and showed the behaviour of an easily and rapidly biodegradable wastewater. The specific rate of phosphorous release at the anaerobic stage was found to be higher than 0.04mg Pr g VSS(-1) min(-1), when the fermentor effluent is used as feed of the SBR, which demonstrated its favourable conditions for an efficient processing in this type of systems.

  6. Sequence and Genetic Characterization of etrA, an fnr Analog that Regulates Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saffarini, Daad A.; Nelson, Kenneth H.

    1993-01-01

    An electron transport regulatory gene, etrA, has been isolated and characterized from the obligate respiratory bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens MR-l. The deduced amino acid sequence of etrA (EtrA) shows a high degree of identity to both the Fnr of Escherichia coli (73.6%) and the analogous protein (ANR) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (50.8%). The four active cysteine residues of Fnr are conserved in EtrA, and the amino acid sequence of the DNA-binding domains of the two proteins are identical. Further, S.putrefaciens etrA is able to complement an fnr mutant of E.coli. In contrast to fnr, there is no recognizable Fnr box upstream of the etrA sequence. Gene replacement etr.A mutants of MR-1 were deficient in growth on nitrite, thiosulfate, sulfite, trimethylamine-N-oxide, dimethyl sulfoxide, Fe(III), and fumarate, suggesting that EtrA is involved in the regulation of the corresponding reductase genes. However, the mutants were all positive for reduction of and growth on nitrate and Mn(IV), indicating that EtrA is not involved in the regulation of these two systems. Southern blots of S.putrefaciens DNA with use of etrA as a probe revealed the expected etrA bands and a second set of hybridization signals whose genetic and functional properties remain to be determined.

  7. Characterization of bacterial communities exposed to Cr(III) and Pb(II) in submerged fixed-bed biofilms for groundwater treatment.

    PubMed

    Vílchez, R; Gómez-Silván, C; Purswani, J; González-López, J; Rodelas, B

    2011-06-01

    Two pilot-scale submerged-bed microbial biofilms were set up for the removal of Cr(III) and Pb(II) from groundwater, and the biological activities and structure of the bacterial communities developed in the presence of the heavy metals were analyzed. Artesian groundwater was polluted with Cr(III) or Pb(II) (15 mg/l) and amended with sucrose (250 mg/l) as carbon source. While Pb(II) was over 99% removed from groundwater during long-term operation (130 days), the efficiency of the removal of Cr(III) significantly decreased in time (95-73% after 60 days). Cr(III)-amended biofilms displayed significant lower sucrose consumption, ATP cell contents and alkaline phosphatase activity, compared to biofilms formed in the presence of Pb(II), while analysis of exopolymers demonstrated significant differences in their composition (content of carbohydrates and acetyl groups) in response to each heavy metal. According to transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), Cr(III) bioaccumulated in the exopolymeric matrix without entering bacterial cells, while Pb(II) was detected both extra and intracellularly, associated to P and Si. Temperature-gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) profiling based on partial amplification of 16S rRNA genes was used to analyze the differences in the structure of the biofilm bacterial communities developed under exposure to each heavy metal. Prevalent populations in the biofilms were further identified by reamplification and sequencing of isolated TGGE bands. 75% of the sequences in the Pb(II) biofilter were evolutively close to the Rhodobacterales, while in the Cr(III) biofilter 43% of the sequences were found affiliated to the Rhizobiales and Sphingomonadales, and 57% to Betaproteobacteria.

  8. Evaluation of Anaerobic Biofilm Reactor Kinetic Parameters Using Ant Colony Optimization.

    PubMed

    Satya, Eswari Jujjavarapu; Venkateswarlu, Chimmiri

    2013-09-01

    Fixed bed reactors with naturally attached biofilms are increasingly used for anaerobic treatment of industry wastewaters due their effective treatment performance. The complex nature of biological reactions in biofilm processes often poses difficulty in analyzing them experimentally, and mathematical models could be very useful for their design and analysis. However, effective application of biofilm reactor models to practical problems suffers due to the lack of knowledge of accurate kinetic models and uncertainty in model parameters. In this work, an inverse modeling approach based on ant colony optimization is proposed and applied to estimate the kinetic and film thickness model parameters of wastewater treatment process in an anaerobic fixed bed biofilm reactor. Experimental data of pharmaceutical industry wastewater treatment process are used to determine the model parameters as a consequence of the solution of the rigorous mathematical models of the process. Results were evaluated for different modeling configurations derived from the combination of mathematical models, kinetic expressions, and optimization algorithms. Analysis of results showed that the two-dimensional mathematical model with Haldane kinetics better represents the pharmaceutical wastewater treatment in the biofilm reactor. The mathematical and kinetic modeling of this work forms a useful basis for the design and optimization of industry wastewater treating biofilm reactors.

  9. Evaluation of Anaerobic Biofilm Reactor Kinetic Parameters Using Ant Colony Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Satya, Eswari Jujjavarapu; Venkateswarlu, Chimmiri

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Fixed bed reactors with naturally attached biofilms are increasingly used for anaerobic treatment of industry wastewaters due their effective treatment performance. The complex nature of biological reactions in biofilm processes often poses difficulty in analyzing them experimentally, and mathematical models could be very useful for their design and analysis. However, effective application of biofilm reactor models to practical problems suffers due to the lack of knowledge of accurate kinetic models and uncertainty in model parameters. In this work, an inverse modeling approach based on ant colony optimization is proposed and applied to estimate the kinetic and film thickness model parameters of wastewater treatment process in an anaerobic fixed bed biofilm reactor. Experimental data of pharmaceutical industry wastewater treatment process are used to determine the model parameters as a consequence of the solution of the rigorous mathematical models of the process. Results were evaluated for different modeling configurations derived from the combination of mathematical models, kinetic expressions, and optimization algorithms. Analysis of results showed that the two-dimensional mathematical model with Haldane kinetics better represents the pharmaceutical wastewater treatment in the biofilm reactor. The mathematical and kinetic modeling of this work forms a useful basis for the design and optimization of industry wastewater treating biofilm reactors. PMID:24065871

  10. Biogenic Hydrogen Conversion of De-Oiled Jatropha Waste via Anaerobic Sequencing Batch Reactor Operation: Process Performance, Microbial Insights, and CO2 Reduction Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chiu-Yue

    2014-01-01

    We report the semicontinuous, direct (anaerobic sequencing batch reactor operation) hydrogen fermentation of de-oiled jatropha waste (DJW). The effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT) was studied and results show that the stable and peak hydrogen production rate of 1.48 L/L∗d and hydrogen yield of 8.7 mL H2/g volatile solid added were attained when the reactor was operated at HRT 2 days (d) with a DJW concentration of 200 g/L, temperature 55°C, and pH 6.5. Reduced HRT enhanced the production performance until 1.75 d. Further reduction has lowered the process efficiency in terms of biogas production and hydrogen gas content. The effluent from hydrogen fermentor was utilized for methane fermentation in batch reactors using pig slurry and cow dung as seed sources. The results revealed that pig slurry was a feasible seed source for methane generation. Peak methane production rate of 0.43 L CH4/L∗d and methane yield of 20.5 mL CH4/g COD were observed at substrate concentration of 10 g COD/L, temperature 30°C, and pH 7.0. PCR-DGGE analysis revealed that combination of celluloytic and fermentative bacteria were present in the hydrogen producing ASBR. PMID:24672398

  11. Treatment of fatty solid waste from the meat industry in an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor: start-up period and establishment of the design criteria.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Sosa, D; Torrijos, M; Buitron, G; Sousbie, P; Devillers, P H; Delgenès, J P

    2009-01-01

    An anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (AnSBR) was used to treat the dissolved air flotation skimmings from a cooked pork meat plant. During the start-up period, the reactor was operated in fed-batch mode for 25 days and 7 batches were treated. The SBR was inoculated with sludge taken from a reactor treating distillery vinasse. The results showed that this kind of sludge is a very good source of inoculum for digesters treating residues with a high content in fats and long-chain fatty acids because it was able to adapt very rapidly to the new substrate and, from the second batch on, the sludge was already able to metabolize the fatty residue at quite high rates. The AnSBR was then operated with 5 batches per week for 110 days and the quantity of VS added per batch was regularly increased until the maximum treatment capacity of the reactor (i.e. maximum loading rate) was reached. The maximum organic loading rates were found to be 0.16 g VS/g VSS d, or 0.224 g VS/g VSS.batch when the reactor is fed 5 times a week. The biodegradability of the skimmings was very high, with more than 97% of TS removal, and the methane production was 880+/-90 mL of methane/g of VS(added).

  12. Quantitative detection of previously characterized syntrophic bacteria in anaerobic wastewater treatment systems by sequence-specific rRNA cleavage method.

    PubMed

    Narihiro, Takashi; Terada, Takeshi; Ohashi, Akiko; Kamagata, Yoichi; Nakamura, Kazunori; Sekiguchi, Yuji

    2012-05-01

    Quantitative monitoring method of two important trophic groups of bacteria in methanogenic communities was established and applied to six different anaerobic processes. The method we employed was based upon our previous sequence-specific rRNA cleavage method that allows quantification of rRNA of target groups so that the populations reflecting in situ activity could be determined. We constructed a set of scissor probes targeting the Chloroflexi group known as 'semi-syntrophic' heterotrophic bacteria and fatty acid-oxidizing syntrophs to determine their relative abundance in the processes. By using the method, we found that several reactors harbored a large amount of organisms belonging to the phylum Chloroflexi accounting for up to 20% of the total prokaryotic populations. Propionate-oxidizing syntrophs, Syntrophobacter, Smithella and Pelotomaculum were also found to be significant comprising up to 3.9% of the total populations, but their distribution is highly dependent on the process examined. This is the first clear, non-PCR based quantitative evidence that those organisms play active roles under in situ methanogenic conditions.

  13. The first metagenome of activated sludge from full-scale anaerobic/anoxic/oxic (A2O) nitrogen and phosphorus removal reactor using Illumina sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tian, Mei; Zhao, Fangqing; Shen, Xin; Chu, Kahou; Wang, Jinfeng; Chen, Shuai; Guo, Yan; Liu, Hanhu

    2015-09-01

    The anaerobic/anoxic/oxic (A2O) process is globally one of the widely used biological sewage treatment processes. This is the first report of a metagenomic analysis using Illumina sequencing of full-scale A2O sludge from a municipal sewage treatment plant. With more than 530,000 clean reads from different taxa and metabolic categories, the metagenome results allow us to gain insight into the functioning of the biological community of the A2O sludge. There are 51 phyla and nearly 900 genera identified from the A2O activated sludge ecosystem. Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Nitrospirae and Chloroflexi are predominant phyla in the activated sludge, suggesting that these organisms play key roles in the biodegradation processes in the A2O sewage treatment system. Nitrospira, Thauera, Dechloromonas and Ignavibacterium, which have abilities to metabolize nitrogen and aromatic compounds, are most prevalent genera. The percent of nitrogen and phosphorus metabolism in the A2O sludge is 2.72% and 1.48%, respectively. In the current A2O sludge, the proportion of Candidatus Accumulibacter is 1.37%, which is several times more than that reported in a recent study of A2O sludge. Among the four processes of nitrogen metabolism, denitrification related genes had the highest number of sequences (76.74%), followed by ammonification (15.77%), nitrogen fixation (3.88%) and nitrification (3.61%). In phylum Planctomycetes, four genera (Planctomyces, Pirellula, Gemmata and Singulisphaera) are included in the top 30 abundant genera, suggesting the key role of ANAMMOX in nitrogen metabolism in the A2O sludge. PMID:26354707

  14. Treatment of fruit-juice industry wastewater in a two-stage anaerobic hybrid (AH) reactor system followed by a sequencing batch reactor (SBR).

    PubMed

    Tawfik, A; El-Kamah, H

    2012-01-01

    This study has been carried out to assess the performance of a combined system consisting of an anaerobic hybrid (AH) reactor followed by a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) for treatment of fruit-juice industry wastewater at a temperature of 26 degrees C. Three experimental runs were conducted in this investigation. In the first experiment, a single-stage AH reactor was operated at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 10.2 h and organic loading rate (OLR) of 11.8 kg COD m(-3) d(-1). The reactor achieved a removal efficiency of 42% for chemical oxygen demand (COD), 50.8% for biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), 50.3% for volatile fatty acids (VFA) and 56.4% for total suspended solids (TSS). In the second experiment, two AH reactors connected in series achieved a higher removal efficiency for COD (67.4%), BOD5 (77%), and TSS (71.5%) at a total HRT of 20 h and an OLR of 5.9 kg COD m(-3) d(-1). For removal of the remaining portions of COD, BOD5 and TSS from the effluent of the two-stage AH system, a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was investigated as a post-treatment unit. The reactor achieved a substantial reduction in total COD, resulting in an average effluent concentration of 50 mg L(-1) at an HRT of 11 h and OLR of 5.3 kg COD m(-3) d(-1). Almost complete removal of total BOD5 and oil and grease was achieved, i.e. 10 mg L(-1) and 1.2 mg L(-1), respectively, remained in the final effluent of the SBR.

  15. The first metagenome of activated sludge from full-scale anaerobic/anoxic/oxic (A2O) nitrogen and phosphorus removal reactor using Illumina sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tian, Mei; Zhao, Fangqing; Shen, Xin; Chu, Kahou; Wang, Jinfeng; Chen, Shuai; Guo, Yan; Liu, Hanhu

    2015-09-01

    The anaerobic/anoxic/oxic (A2O) process is globally one of the widely used biological sewage treatment processes. This is the first report of a metagenomic analysis using Illumina sequencing of full-scale A2O sludge from a municipal sewage treatment plant. With more than 530,000 clean reads from different taxa and metabolic categories, the metagenome results allow us to gain insight into the functioning of the biological community of the A2O sludge. There are 51 phyla and nearly 900 genera identified from the A2O activated sludge ecosystem. Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Nitrospirae and Chloroflexi are predominant phyla in the activated sludge, suggesting that these organisms play key roles in the biodegradation processes in the A2O sewage treatment system. Nitrospira, Thauera, Dechloromonas and Ignavibacterium, which have abilities to metabolize nitrogen and aromatic compounds, are most prevalent genera. The percent of nitrogen and phosphorus metabolism in the A2O sludge is 2.72% and 1.48%, respectively. In the current A2O sludge, the proportion of Candidatus Accumulibacter is 1.37%, which is several times more than that reported in a recent study of A2O sludge. Among the four processes of nitrogen metabolism, denitrification related genes had the highest number of sequences (76.74%), followed by ammonification (15.77%), nitrogen fixation (3.88%) and nitrification (3.61%). In phylum Planctomycetes, four genera (Planctomyces, Pirellula, Gemmata and Singulisphaera) are included in the top 30 abundant genera, suggesting the key role of ANAMMOX in nitrogen metabolism in the A2O sludge.

  16. Denitrifying capability and community dynamics of glycogen accumulating organisms during sludge granulation in an anaerobic-aerobic sequencing batch reactor

    PubMed Central

    Bin, Zhang; Bin, Xue; Zhigang, Qiu; Zhiqiang, Chen; Junwen, Li; Taishi, Gong; Wenci, Zou; Jingfeng, Wang

    2015-01-01

    Denitrifying capability of glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) has received great attention in environmental science and microbial ecology. Combining this ability with granule processes would be an interesting attempt. Here, a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was operated to enrich GAOs and enable sludge granulation. The results showed that the GAO granules were cultivated successfully and the granules had denitrifying capability. The batch experiments demonstrated that all NO3−-N could be removed or reduced, some amount of NO2−-N were accumulated in the reactor, and N2 was the main gaseous product. SEM analysis suggested that the granules were tightly packed with a large amount of tetrad-forming organisms (TFOs); filamentous bacteria served as the supporting structures for the granules. The microbial community structure of GAO granules was differed substantially from the inoculant conventional activated sludge. Most of the bacteria in the seed sludge grouped with members of Proteobacterium. FISH analysis confirmed that GAOs were the predominant members in the granules and were distributed evenly throughout the granular space. In contrast, PAOs were severely inhibited. Overall, cultivation of the GAO granules and utilizing their denitrifying capability can provide us with a new approach of nitrogen removal and saving more energy. PMID:26257096

  17. Denitrifying capability and community dynamics of glycogen accumulating organisms during sludge granulation in an anaerobic-aerobic sequencing batch reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bin, Zhang; Bin, Xue; Zhigang, Qiu; Zhiqiang, Chen; Junwen, Li; Taishi, Gong; Wenci, Zou; Jingfeng, Wang

    2015-08-01

    Denitrifying capability of glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) has received great attention in environmental science and microbial ecology. Combining this ability with granule processes would be an interesting attempt. Here, a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was operated to enrich GAOs and enable sludge granulation. The results showed that the GAO granules were cultivated successfully and the granules had denitrifying capability. The batch experiments demonstrated that all NO3--N could be removed or reduced, some amount of NO2--N were accumulated in the reactor, and N2 was the main gaseous product. SEM analysis suggested that the granules were tightly packed with a large amount of tetrad-forming organisms (TFOs); filamentous bacteria served as the supporting structures for the granules. The microbial community structure of GAO granules was differed substantially from the inoculant conventional activated sludge. Most of the bacteria in the seed sludge grouped with members of Proteobacterium. FISH analysis confirmed that GAOs were the predominant members in the granules and were distributed evenly throughout the granular space. In contrast, PAOs were severely inhibited. Overall, cultivation of the GAO granules and utilizing their denitrifying capability can provide us with a new approach of nitrogen removal and saving more energy.

  18. Anaerobic Process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Ju, Mei-Ting; Li, Wei-Zun; Liu, Le; Wang, Yan-Nan; Chang, Chein-Chi

    2016-10-01

    A review of the literature published in 2015 on the focus of Anaerobic Process. It is divided into the following sections. Pretreatment Organic waste Multiple-stage co-digestion Process Methodology and Technology. PMID:27620085

  19. Characterization study and five-cycle tests in a fixed-bed reactor of titania-supported nickel oxide as oxygen carriers for the chemical-looping combustion of methane.

    PubMed

    Corbella, Beatriz M; de Diego, Luis F; García-Labiano, Francisco; Adánez, Juan; Palaciost, José M

    2005-08-01

    Recent investigations have shown that in the combustion of carbonaceous compounds CO2 and NOx emissions to the atmosphere can be substantially reduced by using a two stage chemical-looping process. In this process, the reduction stage is undertaken in a first reactor in which the framework oxygen of a reducible inorganic oxide is used, instead of the usual atmospheric oxygen, for the combustion of a carbonaceous compound, for instance, methane. The outlet gas from this reactor is mostly composed of CO2 and steam as reaction products and further separation of these two components can be carried out easily by simple condensation of steam. Then, the oxygen carrier found in a reduced state is transported to a second reactor in which carrier regeneration with air takes place at relatively low temperatures, consequently preventing the formation of thermal NOx. Afterward, the regenerated carrier is carried to the first reactor to reinitiate a new cycle and so on for a number of repetitive cycles, while the carrier is able to withstand the severe chemical and thermal stresses involved in every cycle. In this paper, the performance of titania-supported nickel oxides has been investigated in a fixed-bed reactor as oxygen carriers for chemical-looping combustion of methane. Samples with different nickel oxide contents were prepared by successive incipient wet impregnations, and their performance as oxygen carriers was investigated at 900 degrees C and atmospheric pressure in five-cycle fixed-bed reactor tests using pure methane and pure air for the respective reduction and regeneration stages. The evolution of the outlet gas composition in each stage was followed by gas chromatography, and the involved chemical, structural, and textural changes of the carrier in the reactor bed were studied by using different characterization techniques. From the study, it is deduced that the reactivity of these nickel-based oxygen carriers is in the two involved stages and almost independent

  20. Microbial fuel cell based biosensor for in situ monitoring of anaerobic digestion process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhidan; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Songping; Xing, Xin-Hui; Su, Zhiguo

    2011-11-01

    A wall-jet microbial fuel cell (MFC) was developed for the monitoring of anaerobic digestion (AD). This biofilm based MFC biosensor had a character of being portable, short hydraulic retention time (HRT) for sample flow through and convenient for continuous operation. The MFC was installed in the recirculation loop of an upflow anaerobic fixed-bed (UAFB) reactor in bench-scale where pH of the fermentation broth and biogas flow were monitored in real time. External disturbances to the AD were added on purpose by changing feedstock concentration, as well as process configuration. MFC signals had good correlations with online measurements (i.e. pH, gas flow rate) and offline analysis (i.e. COD) over 6-month operation. These results suggest that the MFC signal can reflect the dynamic variation of AD and can potentially be a valuable tool for monitoring and control of bioprocess.

  1. The Genome Sequences of Cellulomonas fimi and “Cellvibrio gilvus” Reveal the Cellulolytic Strategies of Two Facultative Anaerobes, Transfer of “Cellvibrio gilvus” to the Genus Cellulomonas, and Proposal of Cellulomonas gilvus sp. nov

    PubMed Central

    Bramhacharya, Shanti; Jewell, Kelsea A.; Aylward, Frank O.; Mead, David; Brumm, Phillip J.

    2013-01-01

    Actinobacteria in the genus Cellulomonas are the only known and reported cellulolytic facultative anaerobes. To better understand the cellulolytic strategy employed by these bacteria, we sequenced the genome of the Cellulomonas fimi ATCC 484T. For comparative purposes, we also sequenced the genome of the aerobic cellulolytic “Cellvibrio gilvus” ATCC 13127T. An initial analysis of these genomes using phylogenetic and whole-genome comparison revealed that “Cellvibrio gilvus” belongs to the genus Cellulomonas. We thus propose to assign “Cellvibrio gilvus” to the genus Cellulomonas. A comparative genomics analysis between these two Cellulomonas genome sequences and the recently completed genome for Cellulomonas flavigena ATCC 482T showed that these cellulomonads do not encode cellulosomes but appear to degrade cellulose by secreting multi-domain glycoside hydrolases. Despite the minimal number of carbohydrate-active enzymes encoded by these genomes, as compared to other known cellulolytic organisms, these bacteria were found to be proficient at degrading and utilizing a diverse set of carbohydrates, including crystalline cellulose. Moreover, they also encode for proteins required for the fermentation of hexose and xylose sugars into products such as ethanol. Finally, we found relatively few significant differences between the predicted carbohydrate-active enzymes encoded by these Cellulomonas genomes, in contrast to previous studies reporting differences in physiological approaches for carbohydrate degradation. Our sequencing and analysis of these genomes sheds light onto the mechanism through which these facultative anaerobes degrade cellulose, suggesting that the sequenced cellulomonads use secreted, multidomain enzymes to degrade cellulose in a way that is distinct from known anaerobic cellulolytic strategies. PMID:23342046

  2. The genome sequences of Cellulomonas fimi and "Cellvibrio gilvus" reveal the cellulolytic strategies of two facultative anaerobes, transfer of "Cellvibrio gilvus" to the genus Cellulomonas, and proposal of Cellulomonas gilvus sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Christopherson, Melissa R; Suen, Garret; Bramhacharya, Shanti; Jewell, Kelsea A; Aylward, Frank O; Mead, David; Brumm, Phillip J

    2013-01-01

    Actinobacteria in the genus Cellulomonas are the only known and reported cellulolytic facultative anaerobes. To better understand the cellulolytic strategy employed by these bacteria, we sequenced the genome of the Cellulomonas fimi ATCC 484(T). For comparative purposes, we also sequenced the genome of the aerobic cellulolytic "Cellvibrio gilvus" ATCC 13127(T). An initial analysis of these genomes using phylogenetic and whole-genome comparison revealed that "Cellvibrio gilvus" belongs to the genus Cellulomonas. We thus propose to assign "Cellvibrio gilvus" to the genus Cellulomonas. A comparative genomics analysis between these two Cellulomonas genome sequences and the recently completed genome for Cellulomonas flavigena ATCC 482(T) showed that these cellulomonads do not encode cellulosomes but appear to degrade cellulose by secreting multi-domain glycoside hydrolases. Despite the minimal number of carbohydrate-active enzymes encoded by these genomes, as compared to other known cellulolytic organisms, these bacteria were found to be proficient at degrading and utilizing a diverse set of carbohydrates, including crystalline cellulose. Moreover, they also encode for proteins required for the fermentation of hexose and xylose sugars into products such as ethanol. Finally, we found relatively few significant differences between the predicted carbohydrate-active enzymes encoded by these Cellulomonas genomes, in contrast to previous studies reporting differences in physiological approaches for carbohydrate degradation. Our sequencing and analysis of these genomes sheds light onto the mechanism through which these facultative anaerobes degrade cellulose, suggesting that the sequenced cellulomonads use secreted, multidomain enzymes to degrade cellulose in a way that is distinct from known anaerobic cellulolytic strategies.

  3. Anaerobic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, E.R.; Humphrey, W.J.; Cave, J.P.

    1982-12-28

    This invention provides for the anaerobic treatment of acidic petrochemical wastes in an anaerobic filter at high loadings and high recycle rates. The effluent from the top of the filter passes into a gas-disengaging/solids-settling zone containing a quiescent body of the effluent liquid. The settled solids are withdrawn and recycled to the base of the filter together with fresh acidic waste and an inorganic alkaline material (preferably magnesium oxide or carbonate) to maintain a neutral pH. The liquid portion of the effluent is sent to an aerobic digester to remove the rest of the organic material, which is used to support the growth of bacteria and fed back to the anaerobic system.

  4. Process for fixed bed coal gasification

    DOEpatents

    Sadowski, Richard S.

    1992-01-01

    The combustion of gas produced from the combination of coal pyrolysis and gasification involves combining a combustible gas coal and an oxidant in a pyrolysis chamber and heating the components to a temperature of at least 1600.degree. F. The products of coal pyrolysis are dispersed from the pyrolyzer directly into the high temperature gasification region of a pressure vessel. Steam and air needed for gasification are introduced in the pressure vessel and the materials exiting the pyrolyzer flow down through the pressure vessel by gravity with sufficient residence time to allow any carbon to form carbon monoxide. Gas produced from these reactions are then released from the pressure vessel and ash is disposed of.

  5. Kinetics, mass transfer and hydrodynamics in a packed bed aerobic reactor fed with anaerobically treated domestic sewage.

    PubMed

    Fazolo, A; Pasotto, M B; Foresti, E; Zaiat, M

    2006-10-01

    This study presents an assessment of the kinetic, mass transfer and hydrodynamic parameters of a pilot-scale fixed bed reactor containing immobilized biomass in polyurethane matrices and fed with the effluent of a horizontal-flow fixed bed anaerobic reactor, which was used to treat domestic sewage. It was found that the liquid-solid and intra-particle mass transfer resistances significantly affected the overall oxygen consumption rate and that mechanical agitation could minimize such resistances. The volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (kLa) values for superficial air velocities between 8.4 cm min(-1) and 57.0 cm min(-1) varied from 20.8 h(-1) to 58.8 h(-1) for tap water, and 16.8 h(-1) to 53.0 h(-1) for the anaerobic pre-treated effluent. The intrinsic oxygen uptake rate was estimated to be 19.9 mgO2 gVSS(-1) h(-1). A first-order kinetic model with residual concentration was considered to adequately represent the COD removal rate, whereas nitrogen conversion was considered to be well represented by a model of pseudo-first-order reaction in series. It was also found that the ammonium conversion to nitrite was the limiting step of the overall nitrogen conversion rate. The hydrodynamic behavior of the reactor was represented by three to four completely mixed reactors in series.

  6. Partial nitrification and nutrient removal in intermittently aerated sequencing batch reactors treating separated digestate liquid after anaerobic digestion of pig manure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingchuan; Lawlor, Peadar G; Wu, Guangxue; Lynch, Brendan; Zhan, Xinmin

    2011-11-01

    The performance of an intermittently aerated sequencing batch reactor (IASBR) technology was investigated in achieving partial nitrification, organic matter removal and nitrogen removal from separated digestate liquid after anaerobic digestion of pig manure. The wastewater had chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentrations of 11,540 ± 860 mg/L, 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD(5)) concentrations of 2,900 ± 200 mg/L and total nitrogen (TN) concentrations of 4,041 ± 59 mg/L, with low COD:N ratios (2.9) and BOD(5):COD ratios (0.25). Synthetic wastewater, simulating the separated digestate liquid with similar COD and nitrogen concentrations but BOD(5) of 11,500 ± 100 mg/L, was also treated using the IASBR technology. At a mean organic loading rate of 1.15 kg COD/(m(3) d) and a nitrogen loading rate of 0.38 kg N/(m(3) d), the COD removal efficiency was 89.8% in the IASBR (IASBR-1) treating digestate liquid and 99% in the IASBR (IASBR-2) treating synthetic wastewater. The IASBR-1 effluent COD was mainly due to inert organic matter and can be further reduced to less than 40 mg/L through coagulation. The partial nitrification efficiency of 71-79% was achieved in the two IASBRs and one cause for the stable long-term partial nitrification was the intermittent aeration strategy. Nitrogen removal efficiencies were 76.5 and 97% in IASBR-1 and IASBR-2, respectively. The high nitrogen removal efficiencies show that the IASBR technology is a promising technology for nitrogen removal from low COD:N ratio wastewaters. The nitrogen balance analysis shows that 59.4 and 74.3% of nitrogen removed was via heterotrophic denitrification in the non-aeration periods in IASBR-1 and IASBR-2, respectively.

  7. Genome sequence of Victivallis vadensis ATCC BAA-548, an anaerobic bacterium from the phylum Lentisphaerae, isolated from the human gastro-intestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Van Passel, Mark W.J.; Kant, Ravi; Palva, Airi; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, A; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Davenport, Karen W.; Sims, David; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Larimer, Frank W; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Richardson, Paul; De Vos, Willem M.; Smidt, Hauke; Zoetendal, Erwin G.

    2011-01-01

    Victivallis vadensis ATCC BAA-548 represents the first cultured representative from the novel phylum Lentisphaerae, a deep-branching bacterial lineage. Few cultured bacteria from this phylum are known, and V. vadensis therefore represents an important organism for evolutionary studies. V. vadensis is a strictly anaerobic sugar-fermenting isolate from the human gastro-intestinal tract.

  8. Application of real-time PCR to determination of combined effect of antibiotics on Bacteria, Methanogenic Archaea, Archaea in anaerobic sequencing batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Sevcan; Ince, Bahar; Ince, Orhan

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated the long-term effects of erythromycin-tetracycline-sulfamethoxazole (ETS) and sulfamethoxazole-tetracycline (ST) antibiotic combinations on the microbial community and examined the ways in which these antimicrobials impact the performance of anaerobic reactors. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to determine the effect that different antibiotic combinations had on the total and active Bacteria, Archae and Methanogenic Archae. Three primer sets that targeted metabolic genes encoding formylterahydrofolate synthetase, methyl-coenzyme M reductase and acetyl-coA synthetase were also used to determine the inhibition level on the mRNA expression of the homoacetogens, methanogens and specifically acetoclastic methanogens, respectively. These microorganisms play a vital role in the anaerobic degradation of organic waste and targeting these gene expressions offers operators or someone at a treatment plant the potential to control and the improve the anaerobic system. The results of the investigation revealed that acetogens have a competitive advantage over Archaea in the presence of ETS and ST combinations. Although the efficiency with which methane production takes place and the quantification of microbial populations in both the ETS and ST reactors decreased as antibiotic concentrations increased, the ETS batch reactor performed better than the ST batch reactor. According to the expression of genes results, the syntrophic interaction of acetogens and methanogens is critical to the performance of the ETS and ST reactors. Failure to maintain the stability of these microorganisms resulted in a decrease in the performance and stability of the anaerobic reactors.

  9. Successful treatment of high azo dye concentration wastewater using combined anaerobic/aerobic granular activated carbon-sequencing batch biofilm reactor (GAC-SBBR): simultaneous adsorption and biodegradation processes.

    PubMed

    Hosseini Koupaie, E; Alavi Moghaddam, M R; Hashemi, S H

    2013-01-01

    The application of a granular activated carbon-sequencing batch biofilm reactor (GAC-SBBR) for treatment of wastewater containing 1,000 mg/L Acid Red 18 (AR18) was investigated in this research. The treatment system consisted of a sequencing batch reactor equipped with moving GAC as biofilm support. Each treatment cycle consisted of two successive anaerobic (14 h) and aerobic (8 h) reaction phases. Removal of more than 91% chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 97% AR18 was achieved in this study. Investigation of dye decolorization kinetics showed that the dye removal was stimulated by the adsorption capacity of the GAC at the beginning of the anaerobic phase and then progressed following a first-order reaction. Based on COD analysis results, at least 77.8% of the dye total metabolites were mineralized during the applied treatment system. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that more than 97% of 1-naphthyalamine-4-sulfonate as one of the main sulfonated aromatic constituents of AR18 was removed during the aerobic reaction phase. According to the scanning electron microscopic analysis, the microbial biofilms grew in most cavities and pores of the GAC, but not on the external surfaces of the GAC.

  10. Maize Adh-1 promoter sequences control anaerobic regulation: addition of upstream promoter elements from constitutive genes is necessary for expression in tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, J.G.; Llewellyn, D.J.; Dennis, E.S.; Peacock, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    The promoter region of a maize alcohol dehydrogenase gene (Adh-1) was linked to a reporter gene encoding chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) and transformed stably into tobacco cells using T-DNA vectors. No CAT enzyme activity could be detected in transgenic tobacco plants unless upstream promoter elements from the octopine synthase gene or the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter were supplied in addition to the maize promoter region. CAT enzyme activity and transcription of the chimaeric gene were then readily detected after anaerobic induction. The first 247 bp upstream of the translation initiation codon of the maize Adh-1 gene were sufficient to impose anaerobic regulation on the hybrid gene and S1 nuclease mapping confirmed mRNA initiation is from the normal maize Adh-1 transcription start point. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6. PMID:15981329

  11. Individual and combined effects of water quality and empty bed contact time on As(V) removal by a fixed-bed iron oxide adsorber: implication for silicate precoating.

    PubMed

    Kanematsu, Masakazu; Young, Thomas M; Fukushi, Keisuke; Green, Peter G; Darby, Jeannie L

    2012-10-15

    The individual and combined effects of changes in water quality (i.e. pH, initial concentrations of arsenate (As(V)) and competing ions) and empty bed contact time (EBCT) on As(V) removal performance of a fixed-bed adsorber (FBA) packed with a nanostructured goethite-based granular porous adsorbent were systematically studied under environmentally relevant conditions. Rapid small scale column tests (RSSCTs) were extensively conducted at different EBCTs with synthetic waters in which pH and the concentrations of competing ions (phosphate, silicate, and vanadate) were controlled. In the absence of the competing ions, the effects of initial As(V) concentration, pH, and EBCT on As(V) breakthrough curves were successfully predicted by the homogeneous surface diffusion model (HSDM) with adsorption isotherms predicted by the extended triple layer model (ETLM). The interference effects of silicate and phosphate on As(V) removal were strongly influenced by pH, their concentrations, and EBCT. In the presence of silicate (≤21 mg/L as Si), a longer EBCT surprisingly resulted in worse As(V) removal performance. We suggest this is because silicate, which normally exists at much higher concentration and moves more quickly through the bed than As(V), occupies or blocks adsorption sites on the media and interferes with later As(V) adsorption. Here, an alternative operating scheme of a FBA for As(V) removal is proposed to mitigate the silicate preloading. Silicate showed a strong competing effect to As(V) under the tested conditions. However, as the phosphate concentration increased, its interference effect dominated that of silicate. High phosphate concentration (>100 μg/L as P), as experienced in some regions, resulted in immediate As(V) breakthrough. In contrast to the observation in the presence of silicate, longer EBCT resulted in improved As(V) removal performance in the presence of phosphate. Vanadate was found to compete with As(V) as strongly as phosphate. This study

  12. Anaerobic Thermophiles

    PubMed Central

    Canganella, Francesco; Wiegel, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    The term “extremophile” was introduced to describe any organism capable of living and growing under extreme conditions. With the further development of studies on microbial ecology and taxonomy, a variety of “extreme” environments have been found and an increasing number of extremophiles are being described. Extremophiles have also been investigated as far as regarding the search for life on other planets and even evaluating the hypothesis that life on Earth originally came from space. The first extreme environments to be largely investigated were those characterized by elevated temperatures. The naturally “hot environments” on Earth range from solar heated surface soils and water with temperatures up to 65 °C, subterranean sites such as oil reserves and terrestrial geothermal with temperatures ranging from slightly above ambient to above 100 °C, to submarine hydrothermal systems with temperatures exceeding 300 °C. There are also human-made environments with elevated temperatures such as compost piles, slag heaps, industrial processes and water heaters. Thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms have been known for a long time, but scientists have often resisted the belief that some organisms do not only survive at high temperatures, but actually thrive under those hot conditions. They are perhaps one of the most interesting varieties of extremophilic organisms. These microorganisms can thrive at temperatures over 50 °C and, based on their optimal temperature, anaerobic thermophiles can be subdivided into three main groups: thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 50 °C and 64 °C and a maximum at 70 °C, extreme thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 65 °C and 80 °C, and finally hyperthermophiles with an optimal temperature above 80 °C and a maximum above 90 °C. The finding of novel extremely thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacteria in recent years, and the fact that a large fraction of them belong to the Archaea has

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Tepidibacillus decaturensis Strain Z9, an Anaerobic, Moderately Thermophilic, and Heterotrophic Bacterium from the Deep Subsurface of the Illinois Basin, USA

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yun-Juan; Sanford, Robert A.; Fouke, Bruce W.

    2016-01-01

    The genome of the moderately thermophilic and halotolerant bacterium Tepidibacillus decaturensis strain Z9 was sequenced. The draft genome comprises three scaffolds, for a total of 2.95 Mb. As the first sequenced genome within the genus Tepidibacillus, 2,895 protein-coding genes, 52 tRNA genes, and 3 rRNA operons were predicted. PMID:27056217

  14. Complete genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, an Anaerobic, Metal-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from a Contaminated Subsurface Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, C.; Copeland, A.; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla; Barry, Kerrie W.; Glavina del Rio, T.; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, S.; Sims, David R.; Brettin, T.; Bruce, David; Detter, J. C.; Han, Cliff F.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Larimer, F.; Land, M.; Hauser, L.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Lykidis, Athanasios; Richardson, P. M.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Sanford, Robert A.; Loeffler, Frank E.; Fields, Matthew W.

    2015-01-22

    We report the genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, isolated from nitrate- and uranium-contaminated subsurface sediment of the Oak Ridge Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) site, Oak Ridge Reservation, TN. The bacterium’s genome sequence will elucidate its physiological potential in subsurface sediments undergoing in situ uranium bioremediation and natural attenuation.

  15. Comparative study on toxicity evaluation of anaerobically treated parboiled rice manufacturing wastewater through fish bioassay.

    PubMed

    Giri, Dipti Ramesh; Singh, Ekta; Satyanarayan, Shanta

    2016-01-01

    Short term aquatic bioassay has been developed into a useful tool in water quality management. These tests give information on comparative toxicity of several compounds. The objective of this study was to evaluate the acute toxicity of raw and anaerobically treated effluents of the parboiled rice manufacturing industry. The acute toxicity test was carried out by using the fish Lebistes reticulatus under laboratory conditions. LC50 values for 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours ranged between 4.6 and 7.0% for the raw parboiled rice manufacturing wastewater. Two anaerobic fixed film fixed bed reactors and two different media matrices, i.e. UV stabilized Biopac media and Fugino spirals, were used for the treatment of parboiled rice mill wastewater. Effluents from these two reactors depicted LC50 values in the range of 68-88% and 62-78% for Biopac and Fugino spiral packed reactors, respectively. From the results, it is evident that anaerobically treated effluents from Biopac packed reactor is marginally better than Fugino spiral packed reactor. Results subjected to statistical evaluation depicted regression coefficient of more than 0.9 indicating good correlation between the mortality and effluent concentration.

  16. Incorporation of an anaerobic digestion step in a multistage treatment system for sanitary landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Zayen, Amal; Schories, Gerhard; Sayadi, Sami

    2016-07-01

    A combined process of anaerobic digestion (AD), lime precipitation (P), microfiltration (MF) and reverse osmosis (RO) was developed for the treatment of landfill leachate (LFL). The raw LFL contained high amount of organic matter with an elevated humic acids concentration. During the anaerobic digestion step, the organic loading rate was increased progressively up to 3.3gCODL(-1)d(-1). The upflow anaerobic fixed bed reactor showed a great performance in terms of COD removal efficiency and biogas production. During precipitation experiments, lime dose was optimized to obtain the maximum reduction of conductivity to prevent the fouling of RO membranes. This process was compared to a second one in which the AD step was eliminated. Both treatment plans achieved similar removal efficiencies. However, AD step significantly improved the process by reducing the needed lime dose by 50%. It has also increased MF and RO fluxes by 35% and 40% at a steady state, respectively. The dominant fouling mechanism was cake layer formation during both MF tests. This process seems to be a promising approach for the treatment of LFL and its industrial application should be further investigated. PMID:27177466

  17. Comparative study on toxicity evaluation of anaerobically treated parboiled rice manufacturing wastewater through fish bioassay.

    PubMed

    Giri, Dipti Ramesh; Singh, Ekta; Satyanarayan, Shanta

    2016-01-01

    Short term aquatic bioassay has been developed into a useful tool in water quality management. These tests give information on comparative toxicity of several compounds. The objective of this study was to evaluate the acute toxicity of raw and anaerobically treated effluents of the parboiled rice manufacturing industry. The acute toxicity test was carried out by using the fish Lebistes reticulatus under laboratory conditions. LC50 values for 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours ranged between 4.6 and 7.0% for the raw parboiled rice manufacturing wastewater. Two anaerobic fixed film fixed bed reactors and two different media matrices, i.e. UV stabilized Biopac media and Fugino spirals, were used for the treatment of parboiled rice mill wastewater. Effluents from these two reactors depicted LC50 values in the range of 68-88% and 62-78% for Biopac and Fugino spiral packed reactors, respectively. From the results, it is evident that anaerobically treated effluents from Biopac packed reactor is marginally better than Fugino spiral packed reactor. Results subjected to statistical evaluation depicted regression coefficient of more than 0.9 indicating good correlation between the mortality and effluent concentration. PMID:27120636

  18. Incorporation of an anaerobic digestion step in a multistage treatment system for sanitary landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Zayen, Amal; Schories, Gerhard; Sayadi, Sami

    2016-07-01

    A combined process of anaerobic digestion (AD), lime precipitation (P), microfiltration (MF) and reverse osmosis (RO) was developed for the treatment of landfill leachate (LFL). The raw LFL contained high amount of organic matter with an elevated humic acids concentration. During the anaerobic digestion step, the organic loading rate was increased progressively up to 3.3gCODL(-1)d(-1). The upflow anaerobic fixed bed reactor showed a great performance in terms of COD removal efficiency and biogas production. During precipitation experiments, lime dose was optimized to obtain the maximum reduction of conductivity to prevent the fouling of RO membranes. This process was compared to a second one in which the AD step was eliminated. Both treatment plans achieved similar removal efficiencies. However, AD step significantly improved the process by reducing the needed lime dose by 50%. It has also increased MF and RO fluxes by 35% and 40% at a steady state, respectively. The dominant fouling mechanism was cake layer formation during both MF tests. This process seems to be a promising approach for the treatment of LFL and its industrial application should be further investigated.

  19. Anaerobic treatment of olive mill wastewater and piggery effluents fermented with Candida tropicalis.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Garcia, Gregorio; Johnson, Anbu Clemensis; Bachmann, Robert T; Williams, Ceri J; Burgoyne, Andrea; Edyvean, Robert G J

    2009-05-30

    Olive mill wastewater (OMW) contains high concentrations of phenolic compounds that are inhibitory to many microorganisms making it difficult to treat biologically prior to discharge in waterways. The total mono-cyclic phenol reduction in OMW in this study was carried out by aerobic pre-treatment using the yeast Candida tropicalis in a 18 L batch reactor at 30 degrees C for 12 days followed by anaerobic co-digestion. A COD removal of 62% and a reduction in the total mono-cyclic phenol content by 51% of the mixture was achieved in the aerobic pre-treatment. Pig slurry was added as co-substrate to supplement the low nitrogen levels in the olive mill wastewater. Subsequent anaerobic treatment was carried out in a 20L fixed-bed reactor at 37 degrees C and HRT between 11 and 45 days. After a long start-up period, the OLR was increased from 1.25 to 5 kg COD m(-3)day(-1) during the last 30 days, resulting in subsequent increase in overall COD removal and biogas production, up to maximum values of 85% and 29 L(biogas)L(reactor)(-1)day(-1), respectively. Methane content of the biogas produced from the anaerobic digestion ranged between 65% and 74%.

  20. Complete genome sequences for the anaerobic, extremely thermophilic plant biomass-degrading bacteria Caldicellulosiruptor hydrothermalis, Caldicellulosiruptor kristjanssonii, Caldicellulosiruptor kronotskyensis, Caldicellulosiruptor owensenis, and Caldicellulosiruptor lactoaceticus

    SciTech Connect

    Blumer-Schuette, Sara E.; Ozdemir, Inci; Mistry, Dhaval; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Woyke, Tanja; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, N; Detter, J. Chris; Walston Davenport, Karen; Han, Cliff; Adams, Michael W. W.; Kelly, Robert M

    2011-01-01

    The genus Caldicellulosiruptor contains the most thermophilic, plant biomass-degrading bacteria isolated to date. Previously, genome sequences from three cellulolytic members of this genus were reported (C. saccharolyticus, C. bescii, and C. obsidiansis). To further explore the physiological and biochemical basis for polysaccharide degradation within this genus, five additional genomes were sequenced: C. hydrothermalis, C. kristjanssonii, C. kronotskyensis, C. lactoaceticus, and C. owensensis. Taken together, the seven completed and one draft-phase Caldicellulosiruptor genomes suggest that, while central metabolism is highly conserved, significant differences in glycoside hydrolase inventories and numbers of carbohydrate transporters exist, a finding which likely relates to variability observed in plant biomass degradation capacity.

  1. Performance of a full-scale modified anaerobic/anoxic/oxic process: High-throughput sequence analysis of its microbial structures and their community functions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yasong; Zhao, Zheng; Peng, Yuke; Li, Jie; Xiao, Lin; Yang, Liuyan

    2016-11-01

    The average COD, TN, TP, and NH4(+)-N elimination rates in a new wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) based on a modified A2/O process were 83%, 72.4%, 93.5%, and 98.6%, respectively, even under conditions of a low C/N ratio and low temperature. Among the four potential denitrifying units, the post-anoxic unit was the least efficient with respect to the removal efficiency. However, the structures of the bacterial community among samples obtained from the treatment units were similar, as demonstrated using Illumina Miseq high-throughput sequencing. Genera with nitrifying, denitrifying, hydrolyzing, and glycogen-accumulating activities were identified in all units, indicating that functional groups were highly enriched in the active sludges and thus enabled nitrogen removal. The key functional microorganisms responsible for nitrification-denitrification in the WWTP were species belonging to the genera Nitrospira, Hydrogenophilaceae, Comamonas, Dechloromonas, Thauera, Haliangium, and Halomonas. PMID:27573476

  2. Biohydrogen production from Tequila vinasses in an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor: effect of initial substrate concentration, temperature and hydraulic retention time.

    PubMed

    Buitrón, Germán; Carvajal, Carolina

    2010-12-01

    The effect of the temperature (25 and 35 degrees C), the hydraulic retention time, HRT, (12 and 24 h) and initial substrate concentration on hydrogen production from Tequila vinasse was studied using a sequencing batch reactor. When 25 degrees C and 12-h HRT were applied, only insignificant biogas quantities were produced; however, using 24 h of HRT and temperatures of 25 and 35 degrees C, biogas containing hydrogen was produced. A maximum volumetric hydrogen production rate of 50.5 mL H(2) L(-1) h(-1) (48 mmol H(2) L(reactor)(-1) d(-1)) and an average hydrogen content in the biogas of 29.2+/-8.8% were obtained when the reactor was fed with 3 g COD L(-1), at 35 degrees C and 12-h HRT. Methane formation was observed when the longer HRT was applied. Results demonstrated the feasibility to produce hydrogen from this waste without a previous pre-treatment.

  3. Biodegradation of azo dyes in a sequential anaerobic-aerobic system.

    PubMed

    Rajaguru, P; Kalaiselvi, K; Palanivel, M; Subburam, V

    2000-08-01

    A sequential anaerobic aerobic treatment process based on mixed culture of bacteria isolated from textile dye effluent-contaminated soil was used to degrade sulfonated azo dyes Orange G (OG), Amido black 10B (AB), Direct red 4BS (DR) and Congo red (CR). Under anaerobic conditions in a fixed-bed column using glucose as co-substrate, the azo dyes were reduced and amines were released by the bacterial biomass. The amines were completely mineralized in a subsequent aerobic treatment using the same isolates. The maximum degradation rate observed in the treatment system for OG was 60.9 mg/l per day (16.99 mg/g glucose utilized), for AB 571.3 mg/l per day (14.46 mg/g glucose utilized), for DR 112.5 mg/l per day (32.02 mg/g glucose utilized) and for CR 134.9 mg/l per day (38.9 mg/g glucose utilized).

  4. An integrated anaerobic digestion and UV photocatalytic treatment of distillery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Apollo, Seth; Onyango, Maurice S; Ochieng, Aoyi

    2013-10-15

    Anaerobic up-flow fixed bed reactor and annular photocatalytic reactor were used to study the efficiency of integrated anaerobic digestion (AD) and ultraviolet (UV) photodegradation of real distillery effluent and raw molasses wastewater (MWW). It was found that UV photodegradation as a stand-alone technique achieved colour removal of 54% and 69% for the distillery and MWW, respectively, with a COD reduction of <20% and a negligible BOD reduction. On the other hand, AD as a single treatment technique was found to be effective in COD and BOD reduction with efficiencies of above 75% and 85%, respectively, for both wastewater samples. However, the AD achieved low colour removal efficiency, with an increase in colour intensity of 13% recorded when treating MWW while a colour removal of 51% was achieved for the distillery effluent. The application of UV photodegradation as a pre-treatment method to the AD process reduced the COD removal and biogas production efficiency. However, an integration in which UV photodegradation was employed as a post-treatment to the AD process achieved high COD removal of above 85% for both wastewater samples, and colour removal of 88% for the distillery effluent. Thus, photodegradation can be employed as a post-treatment technique to an AD system treating distillery effluent for complete removal of the biorecalcitrant and colour imparting compounds. PMID:23974530

  5. Automatic control of volatile fatty acids in anaerobic digestion using a fuzzy logic based approach.

    PubMed

    Puñal, A; Palazzotto, L; Bouvier, J C; Conte, T; Steyer, J P

    2003-01-01

    A control law based on fuzzy logic was developed and validated for an anaerobic wastewater treatment process. The controlled variable was the concentration of volatile fatty acids (VFA) in the reactor and the manipulated variable was the input flow rate. In order to use it as the input of the fuzzy sets, the controlled variable was treated using an algorithm of interpolation, extrapolation and filtering. The treatment of VFA values attempted to anticipate the behaviour of the variable and to avoid the inherent delay of the response, associated to the time constant of the system. Furthermore, the controlled variable derivative was used as a second input of the fuzzy sets to increase or decrease the speed of the control action. The control law was applied to a 0.948 m3 fixed-bed anaerobic reactor treating raw and diluted (1:2) industrial distillery vinasses. The validation was performed establishing different transient states between different set points in the range of 0.8 and 1.8 g VFA/l and different concentrations of the influent. The control law proved to be reliable supplying an adequate control action in terms of amplitude and velocity to achieve the desired set point for different types of perturbation and control purposes.

  6. An integrated anaerobic digestion and UV photocatalytic treatment of distillery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Apollo, Seth; Onyango, Maurice S; Ochieng, Aoyi

    2013-10-15

    Anaerobic up-flow fixed bed reactor and annular photocatalytic reactor were used to study the efficiency of integrated anaerobic digestion (AD) and ultraviolet (UV) photodegradation of real distillery effluent and raw molasses wastewater (MWW). It was found that UV photodegradation as a stand-alone technique achieved colour removal of 54% and 69% for the distillery and MWW, respectively, with a COD reduction of <20% and a negligible BOD reduction. On the other hand, AD as a single treatment technique was found to be effective in COD and BOD reduction with efficiencies of above 75% and 85%, respectively, for both wastewater samples. However, the AD achieved low colour removal efficiency, with an increase in colour intensity of 13% recorded when treating MWW while a colour removal of 51% was achieved for the distillery effluent. The application of UV photodegradation as a pre-treatment method to the AD process reduced the COD removal and biogas production efficiency. However, an integration in which UV photodegradation was employed as a post-treatment to the AD process achieved high COD removal of above 85% for both wastewater samples, and colour removal of 88% for the distillery effluent. Thus, photodegradation can be employed as a post-treatment technique to an AD system treating distillery effluent for complete removal of the biorecalcitrant and colour imparting compounds.

  7. Anaerobic digestion of ice-cream wastewater: A comparison of single and two-phase reactor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Borja, R.; Banks, C.J.

    1995-03-01

    The anaerobic digestion of ice-cream wastewater, a complex substrate which includes milk proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids, has received little attention. Work using an aerobic contact system showed that at a 7.5-d hydraulic retention time (HRT), with an organic loading rate of 1.7 g COD/Ld and influent TSS (total suspended solids) of 5870 mg/L, the effluent COD was 628 mg/L, BOD was 91 mg/L and TSS was 674. Anaerobic filters have also been used at organic loadings of 6 kg COD/m{sup 3}d applied at a HRT of 0.42 day, with COD removals of 80%. Goodwing showed that this waste was capable of being treated by the UASB process with granulation commencing after 60-70 days, and gas production ranging between 0.73 and 0.93 L CH{sub 4}/g COD removed with loading rates between 0.7 and 3.0 g TOC/Ld. Two-phase anaerobic digestion is an innovative fermentation mode that has recently received increased attention. The kinetically dissimilar fermentation phases, hydrolysis-acidification and acetogenesis-methanation are operated in two separate reactors; the first of which is maintained at a very short HRT. The effluent from the first, acid-forming, phase is used as the substrate for the methane-phase reactor which has a longer HRT or cell immobilization. The aim of this work was to compare the methane production capability and performance of a single-phase upflow fixed bed reactor with a two-phase digestion system. The two-phase digestion system consists of a completely mixed reactor for the acidogenic reaction and an upflow fixed bed reactor for the methanogenic reaction. Because of the high lipid content and COD of ice cream wastewater off site disposal has proved to be both expensive and poses problems to the receiving effluent treatment plant. For this reason the potential for a rapid anaerobic stabilization of the waste, with energy recovery in the form of methane gas, has been investigated in an attempt to minimize plant size and maximize gas production. 9 refs., 2 tabs.

  8. Anaerobic bag culture method.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, J E; Stewart, P R

    1975-06-01

    In a new method of anaerobic culture, a transparent, gas-impermeable bag is used and the anaerobic environment is established with copper sulfate-saturated steel wool. An Alka-Seltzer tablet generates carbon dioxide. The agar plate surface can be inspected through the bag at any time without interrupting the anaerobic atmosphere or disturbing other specimens. Methylene blue indicator strips are completely reduced by 4 h after the bag is set up and have remained reduced for as long as 3 weeks. Growth of 16 different stock culture anaerobes was generally equivalent by the bag and GasPak jar methods. Yield and growth of anaerobic isolates also were equivalent with 7 of 10 clinical specimens; from the other 3 specimens, 13 isolates were recovered, 5 by both the bag and jar methods and the rest by one method or the other. No consistent differences were found between the anaerobic bag and GasPak jar methods in the yield of anaerobes from clinical specimens. Early growth (24 h of incubation) of anaerobes from one specimen was detected with the bag method. PMID:1100671

  9. Anaerobic bag culture method.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblatt, J E; Stewart, P R

    1975-01-01

    In a new method of anaerobic culture, a transparent, gas-impermeable bag is used and the anaerobic environment is established with copper sulfate-saturated steel wool. An Alka-Seltzer tablet generates carbon dioxide. The agar plate surface can be inspected through the bag at any time without interrupting the anaerobic atmosphere or disturbing other specimens. Methylene blue indicator strips are completely reduced by 4 h after the bag is set up and have remained reduced for as long as 3 weeks. Growth of 16 different stock culture anaerobes was generally equivalent by the bag and GasPak jar methods. Yield and growth of anaerobic isolates also were equivalent with 7 of 10 clinical specimens; from the other 3 specimens, 13 isolates were recovered, 5 by both the bag and jar methods and the rest by one method or the other. No consistent differences were found between the anaerobic bag and GasPak jar methods in the yield of anaerobes from clinical specimens. Early growth (24 h of incubation) of anaerobes from one specimen was detected with the bag method. Images PMID:1100671

  10. Anaerobic thermophilic culture

    DOEpatents

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Wiegel, Jurgen K. W.

    1981-01-01

    A newly discovered thermophilic anaerobe is described that was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC 3/550. T. Ethanolicus is cultured in aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions and is used in a novel process for producing ethanol by subjecting carbohydrates, particularly the saccharides, to fermentation action of the new microorganism in a biologically pure culture.

  11. Anaerobic energy metabolism in unicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Atteia, Ariane; van Lis, Robert; Tielens, Aloysius G M; Martin, William F

    2013-02-01

    Anaerobic metabolic pathways allow unicellular organisms to tolerate or colonize anoxic environments. Over the past ten years, genome sequencing projects have brought a new light on the extent of anaerobic metabolism in eukaryotes. A surprising development has been that free-living unicellular algae capable of photoautotrophic lifestyle are, in terms of their enzymatic repertoire, among the best equipped eukaryotes known when it comes to anaerobic energy metabolism. Some of these algae are marine organisms, common in the oceans, others are more typically soil inhabitants. All these species are important from the ecological (O(2)/CO(2) budget), biotechnological, and evolutionary perspectives. In the unicellular algae surveyed here, mixed-acid type fermentations are widespread while anaerobic respiration, which is more typical of eukaryotic heterotrophs, appears to be rare. The presence of a core anaerobic metabolism among the algae provides insights into its evolutionary origin, which traces to the eukaryote common ancestor. The predicted fermentative enzymes often exhibit an amino acid extension at the N-terminus, suggesting that these proteins might be compartmentalized in the cell, likely in the chloroplast or the mitochondrion. The green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlorella NC64 have the most extended set of fermentative enzymes reported so far. Among the eukaryotes with secondary plastids, the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana has the most pronounced anaerobic capabilities as yet. From the standpoints of genomic, transcriptomic, and biochemical studies, anaerobic energy metabolism in C. reinhardtii remains the best characterized among photosynthetic protists. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The evolutionary aspects of bioenergetic systems.

  12. Anaerobic Digestion and its Applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anaerobic digestion is a natural biological process. The initials "AD" may refer to the process of anaerobic digestion, or the built systems of anaerobic digesters. While there are many kinds of digesters, the biology is basically the same for all. Anaerobic digesters are built...

  13. Staged anaerobic reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.A.

    1986-02-04

    This patent describes an anaerobic biological reactor for digesting organic substances, particularly high strength industrial and municipal sewage, and producing commercial quality methane. The reactor consists of: a unitary vessel for containing liquid carrying the organic substances to be digested and has a liquid inlet and a liquid outlet; a device for maintaining the liquid in the vessel at a desired level; the capability of dividing the vessel into separate environmentally isolated compartments, adapted to contain a level of liquid having a gas space located above. Each of the compartments is primarily dedicated to the digestion of organic substances by a respectively different microorganism. At least one of the organisms is an acid forming type that digests organic substances and in so doing evolves CO/sub 2/ gas. At least one other of the microorganisms is a type that digests organic substances and in so doing evolves a relatively high quality methane gas; a method for establishing and maintaining the optimum environmental conditions within each of the respective compartments to promote the unique biological activity within that compartment; a way to regulate the pH level; a set of gas operated mixers in each compartment of the vessel for mixing the liquid contained therein to maintain a homogenous mixture; a way for delivering the CO/sub 2/ gas from one compartment to the mixer in the other compartment; a way for flowing and agitating the liquid from the inlet through the environmentally isolated compartments in a predetermined sequence to the outlet; and a method for collecting and removing methane gas evolved in the vessel.

  14. Improvement of hydrogen production via ethanol-type fermentation in an anaerobic down-flow structured bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Anzola-Rojas, Mélida del Pilar; Zaiat, Marcelo; De Wever, Heleen

    2016-02-01

    Although a novel anaerobic down-flow structured bed reactor has shown feasibility and stable performance for a long-term compared to other anaerobic fixed bed systems for continuous hydrogen production, the volumetric rates and yields have so far been too low. In order to improve the performance, an operation strategy was applied by organic loading rate (OLR) variation (12-96 g COD L(-1) d(-1)). Different volumetric hydrogen rates, and yields at the same OLR indicated that the system was mainly driven by the specific organic load (SOL). When SOL was kept between 3.8 and 6.2 g sucrose g(-1) VSS d(-1), the volumetric rates raised from 0.1 to 8.9 L H2 L(-1) d(-1), and the yields were stable around 2.0 mol H2 mol(-1) converted sucrose. Furthermore, hydrogen was produced mainly via ethanol-type fermentation, reaching a total energy conversion rate of 23.40 kJ h(-1) L(-1) based on both hydrogen and ethanol production.

  15. Anaerobic Catabolism of Aromatic Compounds: a Genetic and Genomic View

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Manuel; Zamarro, María Teresa; Blázquez, Blas; Durante-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Juárez, Javier F.; Valderrama, J. Andrés; Barragán, María J. L.; García, José Luis; Díaz, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Aromatic compounds belong to one of the most widely distributed classes of organic compounds in nature, and a significant number of xenobiotics belong to this family of compounds. Since many habitats containing large amounts of aromatic compounds are often anoxic, the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds by microorganisms becomes crucial in biogeochemical cycles and in the sustainable development of the biosphere. The mineralization of aromatic compounds by facultative or obligate anaerobic bacteria can be coupled to anaerobic respiration with a variety of electron acceptors as well as to fermentation and anoxygenic photosynthesis. Since the redox potential of the electron-accepting system dictates the degradative strategy, there is wide biochemical diversity among anaerobic aromatic degraders. However, the genetic determinants of all these processes and the mechanisms involved in their regulation are much less studied. This review focuses on the recent findings that standard molecular biology approaches together with new high-throughput technologies (e.g., genome sequencing, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metagenomics) have provided regarding the genetics, regulation, ecophysiology, and evolution of anaerobic aromatic degradation pathways. These studies revealed that the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds is more diverse and widespread than previously thought, and the complex metabolic and stress programs associated with the use of aromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions are starting to be unraveled. Anaerobic biotransformation processes based on unprecedented enzymes and pathways with novel metabolic capabilities, as well as the design of novel regulatory circuits and catabolic networks of great biotechnological potential in synthetic biology, are now feasible to approach. PMID:19258534

  16. Anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds: a genetic and genomic view.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Manuel; Zamarro, María Teresa; Blázquez, Blas; Durante-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Juárez, Javier F; Valderrama, J Andrés; Barragán, María J L; García, José Luis; Díaz, Eduardo

    2009-03-01

    Aromatic compounds belong to one of the most widely distributed classes of organic compounds in nature, and a significant number of xenobiotics belong to this family of compounds. Since many habitats containing large amounts of aromatic compounds are often anoxic, the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds by microorganisms becomes crucial in biogeochemical cycles and in the sustainable development of the biosphere. The mineralization of aromatic compounds by facultative or obligate anaerobic bacteria can be coupled to anaerobic respiration with a variety of electron acceptors as well as to fermentation and anoxygenic photosynthesis. Since the redox potential of the electron-accepting system dictates the degradative strategy, there is wide biochemical diversity among anaerobic aromatic degraders. However, the genetic determinants of all these processes and the mechanisms involved in their regulation are much less studied. This review focuses on the recent findings that standard molecular biology approaches together with new high-throughput technologies (e.g., genome sequencing, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metagenomics) have provided regarding the genetics, regulation, ecophysiology, and evolution of anaerobic aromatic degradation pathways. These studies revealed that the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds is more diverse and widespread than previously thought, and the complex metabolic and stress programs associated with the use of aromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions are starting to be unraveled. Anaerobic biotransformation processes based on unprecedented enzymes and pathways with novel metabolic capabilities, as well as the design of novel regulatory circuits and catabolic networks of great biotechnological potential in synthetic biology, are now feasible to approach.

  17. Anaerobic prosthetic joint infection.

    PubMed

    Shah, Neel B; Tande, Aaron J; Patel, Robin; Berbari, Elie F

    2015-12-01

    In an effort to improve mobility and alleviate pain from degenerative and connective tissue joint disease, an increasing number of individuals are undergoing prosthetic joint replacement in the United States. Joint replacement is a highly effective intervention, resulting in improved quality of life and increased independence [1]. By 2030, it is predicted that approximately 4 million total hip and knee arthroplasties will be performed yearly in the United States [2]. One of the major complications associated with this procedure is prosthetic joint infection (PJI), occurring at a rate of 1-2% [3-7]. In 2011, the Musculoskeletal Infectious Society created a unifying definition for prosthetic joint infection [8]. The following year, the Infectious Disease Society of America published practice guidelines that focused on the diagnosis and management of PJI. These guidelines focused on the management of commonly encountered organisms associated with PJI, including staphylococci, streptococci and select aerobic Gram-negative bacteria. However, with the exception of Propionibacterium acnes, management of other anaerobic organisms was not addressed in these guidelines [1]. Although making up approximately 3-6% of PJI [9,10], anaerobic microorganisms cause devastating complications, and similar to the more common organisms associated with PJI, these bacteria also result in significant morbidity, poor outcomes and increased health-care costs. Data on diagnosis and management of anaerobic PJI is mostly derived from case reports, along with a few cohort studies [3]. There is a paucity of published data outlining factors associated with risks, diagnosis and management of anaerobic PJI. We therefore reviewed available literature on anaerobic PJI by systematically searching the PubMed database, and collected data from secondary searches to determine information on pathogenesis, demographic data, clinical features, diagnosis and management. We focused our search on five commonly

  18. Diversity Profile of Microbes Associated with Anaerobic Sulfur Oxidation in an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Reactor Treating Municipal Sewage.

    PubMed

    Aida, Azrina A; Kuroda, Kyohei; Yamamoto, Masamitsu; Nakamura, Akinobu; Hatamoto, Masashi; Yamaguchi, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We herein analyzed the diversity of microbes involved in anaerobic sulfur oxidation in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor used for treating municipal sewage under low-temperature conditions. Anaerobic sulfur oxidation occurred in the absence of oxygen, with nitrite and nitrate as electron acceptors; however, reactor performance parameters demonstrated that anaerobic conditions were maintained. In order to gain insights into the underlying basis of anaerobic sulfur oxidation, the microbial diversity that exists in the UASB sludge was analyzed comprehensively to determine their identities and contribution to sulfur oxidation. Sludge samples were collected from the UASB reactor over a period of 2 years and used for bacterial 16S rRNA gene-based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and next-generation sequencing analyses. T-RFLP and sequencing results both showed that microbial community patterns changed markedly from day 537 onwards. Bacteria belonging to the genus Desulforhabdus within the phylum Proteobacteria and uncultured bacteria within the phylum Fusobacteria were the main groups observed during the period of anaerobic sulfur oxidation. Their abundance correlated with temperature, suggesting that these bacterial groups played roles in anaerobic sulfur oxidation in UASB reactors.

  19. Anaerobic digestion from residue of industrial cassava industrialization with acidogenic and methanogenic physical separation phases.

    PubMed

    Paixão, M A; Tavares, C R; Bergamasco, R; Bonifácio, A L; Costa, R T

    2000-01-01

    A trial was carried out in a continuous regimen, using a completely stirred tank reactor, at acidogenic phase, and a hybrid reactor (upflow anaerobic sludge blanket + fixed bed) at methanogenic phase at room temperature. The residue to be treated came from a flour and cassava meal industry, and the reactors operated for 300 d with affluent chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentrations of 7500, 9000, 11,000, and 14,000 mg/L. The final results showed a biogas production with a content of 80% methane and an average reduction of COD and free cyanide of nearly 96 and 98%, respectively. The separation of phases selected bacterial groups. At acidogenic phase, a predominance of propionic, n-butyric, and n-valeric acids, as well as a biomass composed of 95% fermentative bacilli, which were responsible for a 90% reduction in free cyanide concentration, was observed. At methanogenic phase, a predominance of methanogenic bacteria that came only from the Methanothrix genus was observed. The bacteria were responsible for high levels of organic matter removal and methane production.

  20. Treatment of Mixed Wastes via Fixed Bed Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-28

    This report outlines the details of research performed under USDOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-96MC33258 to evaluate the ChemChar hazardous waste system for the destruction of mixed wastes, defined as those that contain both RCRA-regulated haz- ardous constituents and radionuclides. The ChemChar gasification system uses a granular carbonaceous char matrix to immobilize wastes and feed them into the gasifier. In the gasifier wastes are subjected to high temperature reducing conditions, which destroy the organic constituents and immobilize radionuclides on the regenerated char. Only about 10 percent of the char is consumed on each pass through the gasifier, and the regenerated char can be used to treat additional wastes. When tested on a 4-inch diameter scale with a continuous feed unit as part of this research, the ChemChar gasification system was found to be effective in destroying RCRA surrogate organic wastes (chlorobenzene, dichloroben- zene, and napht.halene) while retaining on the char RCRA heavy metals (chromium, nickel, lead, and cadmium) as well as a fission product surrogate (cesium) and a plutonium surrogate (cerium). No generation of harmful byproducts was observed. This report describes the design and testing of the ChemChar gasification system and gives the operating procedures to be followed in using the system safely and effectively for mixed waste treatment.

  1. Designing fixed-bed adsorbers to remove mixtures of organics

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, D.W.; Crittenden, J.C.; Arora, H.; Miller, J.M.; Lykins, B.W.

    1989-01-01

    A liquid-phase granular activated carbon (GAC) pilot plant and a full-scale GAC adsorber were designed, built, and operated in order to evaluate their performance for treating a groundwater contaminated with several volatile and synthetic organic chemicals. Several empty bed contact times (EBCTs) ranging from 1 to 30 min were used during the pilot-plant study, and a simple method for evaluating the GAC use rate as a function of the EBCT was developed and demonstrated for dichloroethene and trichloroethene (TCE). Pilot-plant data were compared with the pore surface diffusion model, which considers external and internal mass transfer mechanisms of pore and surface diffusion. Natural organic matter in the water was found to decrease GAC capacity and kinetics for TCE.

  2. DESIGNING FIXED-BED ADSORBERS TO REMOVE MIXTURES OF ORGANICS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A liquid-phase granular activated carbon (GAC) pilot plant and a full-scale GAC adsorber were designed, built, and operated in order to evaluate their performance for treating a groundwater contaminated with several volatile and synthetic organic chemicals. Several empty bed con...

  3. Developments of anaerobic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, D.; Jones, L.M.

    1984-01-01

    Two modifications of anaerobic fermentation of biomass were studied: separation of acid and CH4 phases of the anaerobic process used in CH4 production from the biomass and the use of attached growth methanogenesis. A continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was used for the acid phase. Effluent from the acid reactor was fed simultaneously to a conventional CSTR and an anaerobic rotating biological contactor (ARBC) operating in parallel for the CH4 phase. The temperature of all the reactors was 35 plus or minus 1 degree, the pH of the acid phase was 4.3, and the CH4 phase was studied at pH 7.5. The retention time for the acid phase CSTR was 4.5 h, and that for the ARBC and CSTR in the CH4 phase was 36 h.

  4. Biochemistry and Evolution of Anaerobic Energy Metabolism in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Miklós; Mentel, Marek; van Hellemond, Jaap J.; Henze, Katrin; Woehle, Christian; Gould, Sven B.; Yu, Re-Young; van der Giezen, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Major insights into the phylogenetic distribution, biochemistry, and evolutionary significance of organelles involved in ATP synthesis (energy metabolism) in eukaryotes that thrive in anaerobic environments for all or part of their life cycles have accrued in recent years. All known eukaryotic groups possess an organelle of mitochondrial origin, mapping the origin of mitochondria to the eukaryotic common ancestor, and genome sequence data are rapidly accumulating for eukaryotes that possess anaerobic mitochondria, hydrogenosomes, or mitosomes. Here we review the available biochemical data on the enzymes and pathways that eukaryotes use in anaerobic energy metabolism and summarize the metabolic end products that they generate in their anaerobic habitats, focusing on the biochemical roles that their mitochondria play in anaerobic ATP synthesis. We present metabolic maps of compartmentalized energy metabolism for 16 well-studied species. There are currently no enzymes of core anaerobic energy metabolism that are specific to any of the six eukaryotic supergroup lineages; genes present in one supergroup are also found in at least one other supergroup. The gene distribution across lineages thus reflects the presence of anaerobic energy metabolism in the eukaryote common ancestor and differential loss during the specialization of some lineages to oxic niches, just as oxphos capabilities have been differentially lost in specialization to anoxic niches and the parasitic life-style. Some facultative anaerobes have retained both aerobic and anaerobic pathways. Diversified eukaryotic lineages have retained the same enzymes of anaerobic ATP synthesis, in line with geochemical data indicating low environmental oxygen levels while eukaryotes arose and diversified. PMID:22688819

  5. Anaerobic transformations and bioremediation of chlorinated solvents.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, J F; Pietari, J M

    2000-02-01

    Chlorinated aliphatic compounds, notably the chlorinated solvents, are common contaminants in soil and groundwater at hazardous waste sites. While these compounds are often recalcitrant, under favorable conditions they can be transformed and degraded through microbially mediated processes. There is great interest in understanding the transformations that are observed at contaminated sites and in manipulating these systems to achieve remediation. An important class of transformations occurs in anaerobic environments. Many of the transformations are reductive, and many yield useful energy to specific anaerobic bacteria. They include reductive dechlorination, dehydrochlorination and dichloroelemination. Of these, reductive dechlorination is often a growth-supporting reaction, while the others may be abiological or catalyzed by biological molecules. The reactions may result in chlorinated products, but there are often reaction sequences leading to completely dechlorinated products. The behavior of carbon tetrachloride (CT), 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (TeCA) and the chloroethenes, perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), illustrate the range of anaerobic transformations that are possible, as well as the limited transformation that often is seen in the environment. CT undergoes reductive and substitutive reactions that are catalyzed by biological molecules but do not support bacterial growth. The anaerobic degradation of TeCA, which is a major contaminant at a site near Tacoma, WA, USA, provides examples of each type of transformation, and the products formed are consistent with the chlorinated compounds that are found in groundwater extraction wells. A laboratory study, using anaerobic sludge that had been fed chlorinated compounds, a cell-free extract from the sludge, and killed controls, showed that TeCA was transformed to four products and that these were further transformed, suggesting that it might be possible to degrade TeCA to innocuous products

  6. Anaerobic bacteria in otitis media.

    PubMed

    Fulghum, R S; Daniel, H J; Yarborough, J G

    1977-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria, Peptostrepotococcus intermedius and Propionibacterium acnes, were found in mixed culture specimens from four to ten tested cases of chronic secretory otitis media. These anaerobic bacteria were in a mixed infection flora with aerobic bacteria most often Staphylococcus epidermidis and Cornybacterium sp. which do not fit any established species. The findings of anaerobic bacteria in otitis media is consistent with the sporadic report of the involvement of anaerobic bacteria in otitis media in the literature since 1898.

  7. Hemicellulases from anaerobic thermophiles. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegel, J.

    1994-05-01

    The longterm goal of this research effort is to obtain an anaerobic thermophilic bacterium that efficiently converts various hemicellulose-containing biomass to ethanol over a broad pH range. The strategy is to modify the outfit and regulation of the rate-limiting xylanases, glycosidases and xylan esterases in the ethanologenic, anaerobic thermophile Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus, which grows between pH 4.5 and 9.5. Although it utilizes xylans, the xylanase, acetyl(xylan) esterase and O-methylglucuronidase activities in T. ethanolicus are barely measurable and regarded as the rate limiting steps in its xylan utilization. Thus, and also due to the presently limited knowledge of hemicellulases in anaerobic thermophiles, we characterize the hemicellulolytic enzymes from this and other anaerobic thermophiles as enzyme donors. Beside the active xylosidase/arabinosidase from T. ethanolicus, exhibiting the two different activities, we characterized 2 xylosidases, two acetyl(xylan) esterases, and an O-methylglucuronidase from Thermoanaerobacterium spec. We will continue with the characterization of xylanases from novel isolated slightly acidophilic, neutrophilic and slightly alkalophilic thermophiles. We have cloned, subcloned and partially sequenced the 165,000 Da (2 x 85,000) xylosidase/arabinosidase from T. ethanolicus and started with the cloning of the esterases from Thermoanaerobacterium spec. Consequently, we will develop a shuttle vector and continue to apply electroporation of autoplasts as a method for cloning into T. ethanolicus.

  8. Effects of metal cations present naturally in coal on the fate of coal-bound nitrogen in the fixed-bed pyrolysis of 25 coals with different ranks: correlation between inherent Fe cations and N{sub 2} formation from low-rank coals

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuo Ohtsuka; Zhiheng Wu

    2009-09-15

    The fate of coal-N in the fixed-bed pyrolysis of 25 coals with 62-81 wt % (daf) C has been studied with a quartz reactor at 1000 C under ambient pressure to examine the effects of metal cations present naturally in these coals on the partitioning of coal-N into N{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, HCN, tar-N, and char-N. Nitrogen mass balances for all runs fall within the reasonable range of 100 {+-} 5%, and N{sub 2} is the predominant product for all of the coals. As the N{sub 2} yield increases, the sum of NH{sub 3}, HCN, and tar-N is unchanged significantly, whereas the char-N yield decreases almost linearly, showing that most of N{sub 2} originates from char-N. When eight kinds of inherent metals, such as Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Fe, and Ti, are determined by the conventional method and related with the N{sub 2} yield, there exists a strong, direct correlation between the Fe content and N{sub 2} formation for low-rank coals with less than 75 wt % (daf) C. Transmission electron microscopy coupled with an energy-dispersive analysis of X-rays (TEM-EDAX) measurements after pyrolysis at 1000{sup o}C of a German brown coal, which provides the highest N{sub 2} yield of about 60%, reveal the existence of lamella structures because of graphitized carbon as well as nanoscale Fe particles with different sizes and shapes. The mechanism for conversion reactions of char-N to N{sub 2} is discussed in terms of the catalysis by nanoparticles of metallic Fe formed from inherent Fe cations. 34 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Anaerobic thermophilic culture system

    DOEpatents

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Wiegel, Jurgen K. W.

    1981-01-01

    A mixed culture system of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC31550 and the microorganism Clostridium thermocellum ATCC31549 is described. In a mixed nutrient culture medium that contains cellulose, these microorganisms have been coupled and cultivated to efficiently ferment cellulose to produce recoverable quantities of ethanol under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions.

  10. The anaerobic digestion process

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, C.J.; Boone, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    The microbial process of converting organic matter into methane and carbon dioxide is so complex that anaerobic digesters have long been treated as {open_quotes}black boxes.{close_quotes} Research into this process during the past few decades has gradually unraveled this complexity, but many questions remain. The major biochemical reactions for forming methane by methanogens are largely understood, and evolutionary studies indicate that these microbes are as different from bacteria as they are from plants and animals. In anaerobic digesters, methanogens are at the terminus of a metabolic web, in which the reactions of myriads of other microbes produce a very limited range of compounds - mainly acetate, hydrogen, and formate - on which the methanogens grow and from which they form methane. {open_quotes}Interspecies hydrogen-transfer{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}interspecies formate-transfer{close_quotes} are major mechanisms by which methanogens obtain their substrates and by which volatile fatty acids are degraded. Present understanding of these reactions and other complex interactions among the bacteria involved in anaerobic digestion is only now to the point where anaerobic digesters need no longer be treated as black boxes.

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of an anaerobic, trichlorobenzene-transforming microbial consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Wintzingerode, F. von; Goebel, U.B.; Selent, B.; Hegemann, W.

    1999-01-01

    A culture-independent phylogenetic survey for an anaerobic trichlorobenzene-transforming microbial community was carried out. Small-subunit rRNA genes were PCR amplified from community DNA by using primers specific for Bacteria or Euryarchaeota and were subsequently cloned. Application of a new hybridization-based screening approach revealed 51 bacterial clone families, one of which was closely related to dechlorinating Dehalobacter species. Several clone sequences clustered to rDNA sequences obtained from a molecular study of an anaerobic aquifer contaminated with hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents.

  12. Genotypic diversity of anaerobic isolates from bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Simmon, Keith E; Mirrett, Stanley; Reller, L Barth; Petti, Cathy A

    2008-05-01

    Accurate species determination for anaerobes from blood culture bottles has become increasingly important with the reemergence of anaerobic bacteremia and prevalence of multiple-drug-resistant microorganisms. Our knowledge of the taxonomical diversity of anaerobes that cause bloodstream infections is extremely limited, because identification historically has relied on conventional methods. Over a 5-year period, we profiled anaerobic bacteremia at a large tertiary care hospital with 16S rRNA gene sequencing to gain a better understanding of the taxonomical diversity of the bacteria. Of 316 isolates, 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis identified 316 (100%) to the genus or taxonomical group level and 289 (91%) to the species level. Conventional methods identified 279 (88%) to the genus level and 208 (66%) to the species level; 75 (24%) were misidentified at the species level, and 33 (10%) results were inconclusive. High intragenus variability was observed for Bacteroides and Clostridium species, and high intraspecies variability was observed for Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Sequence-based identification has potential benefits in comparison to conventional methods, because it more accurately characterizes anaerobes within taxonomically related clusters and thereby may enable better correlation with specific clinical syndromes and antibiotic resistance patterns.

  13. Anaerobic transformation of TNT

    SciTech Connect

    Kulpa, C.F.; Roopathy, R.

    1995-12-31

    Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds have used aerobic tempts to degrade nitroaromatics under aerobic microorganisms. In many cases attempts to degrade nitroaromatics under aerobic conditions results in no mineralization and only superficial modifications of the structure. However, under anaerobic sulfate-reducing conditions, the nitroaromatic compounds undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. Trinitrotoluene under sulfate-reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene presumably by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of nitrate from trinitrotoluene is achieved by a series of reductive reactions with the production of ammonia and toluene by Desulfovibrio sp. (B strain). Similar metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. This presentation will review the data supporting the anaerobic transformation of TNT and other nitroaromatics.

  14. Early anaerobic metabolisms

    PubMed Central

    Canfield, Don E; Rosing, Minik T; Bjerrum, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Before the advent of oxygenic photosynthesis, the biosphere was driven by anaerobic metabolisms. We catalogue and quantify the source strengths of the most probable electron donors and electron acceptors that would have been available to fuel early-Earth ecosystems. The most active ecosystems were probably driven by the cycling of H2 and Fe2+ through primary production conducted by anoxygenic phototrophs. Interesting and dynamic ecosystems would have also been driven by the microbial cycling of sulphur and nitrogen species, but their activity levels were probably not so great. Despite the diversity of potential early ecosystems, rates of primary production in the early-Earth anaerobic biosphere were probably well below those rates observed in the marine environment. We shift our attention to the Earth environment at 3.8 Gyr ago, where the earliest marine sediments are preserved. We calculate, consistent with the carbon isotope record and other considerations of the carbon cycle, that marine rates of primary production at this time were probably an order of magnitude (or more) less than today. We conclude that the flux of reduced species to the Earth surface at this time may have been sufficient to drive anaerobic ecosystems of sufficient activity to be consistent with the carbon isotope record. Conversely, an ecosystem based on oxygenic photosynthesis was also possible with complete removal of the oxygen by reaction with reduced species from the mantle. PMID:17008221

  15. Diversity of anaerobic microbes in spacecraft assembly clean rooms.

    PubMed

    Probst, Alexander; Vaishampayan, Parag; Osman, Shariff; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Andersen, Gary L; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2010-05-01

    Although the cultivable and noncultivable microbial diversity of spacecraft assembly clean rooms has been previously documented using conventional and state-of-the-art molecular techniques, the occurrence of obligate anaerobes within these clean rooms is still uncertain. Therefore, anaerobic bacterial communities of three clean-room facilities were analyzed during assembly of the Mars Science Laboratory rover. Anaerobic bacteria were cultured on several media, and DNA was extracted from suitable anaerobic enrichments and examined with conventional 16S rRNA gene clone library, as well as high-density phylogenetic 16S rRNA gene microarray (PhyloChip) technologies. The culture-dependent analyses predominantly showed the presence of clostridial and propionibacterial strains. The 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved from clone libraries revealed distinct microbial populations associated with each clean-room facility, clustered exclusively within gram-positive organisms. PhyloChip analysis detected a greater microbial diversity, spanning many phyla of bacteria, and provided a deeper insight into the microbial community structure of the clean-room facilities. This study presents an integrated approach for assessing the anaerobic microbial population within clean-room facilities, using both molecular and cultivation-based analyses. The results reveal that highly diverse anaerobic bacterial populations persist in the clean rooms even after the imposition of rigorous maintenance programs and will pose a challenge to planetary protection implementation activities.

  16. Potential of hydrolysis of particulate COD in extended anaerobic conditions to enhance biological phosphorous removal.

    PubMed

    Jabari, P; Yuan, Q; Oleszkiewicz, J A

    2016-11-01

    The effect of anaerobic hydrolysis of particulate COD (pCOD) on biological phosphorous removal in extended anaerobic condition was investigated through (i) sequencing batch reactors (SBR)s with anaerobic hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 0.8, 2, and 4 h; (ii) batch tests using biomass from a full scale biological nutrient removal (BNR) plant; and (iii) activated sludge modeling (BioWin 4.1 simulation). The results from long-term SBRs operation showed that phosphorus removal was correlated to the ratio of filtered COD (FCOD) to total phosphorus (TP) in the influent. Under conditions with low FCOD/TP ratio (average of 20) in the influent, extending anaerobic HRT to 4 h in the presence of pCOD did not significantly improve overall phosphorous removal. During the period with high FCOD/TP ratio (average of 37) in the influent, all SBRs removed phosphorous completely, and the long anaerobic HRT did not have negative effect on overall phosphorous removal. The batch tests also showed that pCOD at different concentration during 4 h test did not affect the rate of anaerobic phosphorus release. The rate of anaerobic hydrolysis of pCOD was significantly low and extending the anaerobic HRT was ineffective. The simulation (BioWin 4.1) of SBRs with low influent FCOD/TP ratio showed that the default kinetics of anaerobic hydrolysis in ASM2d overestimated phosphorous removal in the SBRs (high anaerobic hydrolysis of pCOD). The default anaerobic hydrolysis rate in BioWin 4.1 (ten times lower) could produce similar phosphorous removal to that in the experiment. Results showed that the current kinetics of anaerobic hydrolysis in ASM2d could lead to considerable error in predicting phosphorus removal in processes with extended anaerobic HRT. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2377-2385. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Anaerobic wastewater treatment using anaerobic baffled bioreactor: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Siti; Dahlan, Irvan

    2013-09-01

    Anaerobic wastewater treatment is receiving renewed interest because it offers a means to treat wastewater with lower energy investment. Because the microorganisms involved grow more slowly, such systems require clever design so that the microbes have sufficient time with the substrate to complete treatment without requiring enormous reactor volumes. The anaerobic baffled reactor has inherent advantages over single compartment reactors due to its circulation pattern that approaches a plug flow reactor. The physical configuration of the anaerobic baffled reactor enables significant modifications to be made; resulting in a reactor which is proficient of treating complex wastewaters which presently require only one unit, ultimately significant reducing capital costs. This paper also concerns about mechanism, kinetic and hydrodynamic studies of anaerobic digestion for future application of the anaerobic baffled reactor for wastewater treatment.

  18. Draft genome sequence of Actinomyces massiliensis strain 4401292T.

    PubMed

    Roux, Véronique; Robert, Catherine; Gimenez, Grégory; Gharbi, Reem; Raoult, Didier

    2012-09-01

    A draft genome sequence of Actinomyces massiliensis, an anaerobic bacterium isolated from a patient's blood culture, is described here. CRISPR-associated proteins, insertion sequences, and toxin-antitoxin loci were found on the genome.

  19. Economic viability of anaerobic digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Wellinger, A.

    1996-01-01

    The industrial application of anaerobic digestion is a relatively new, yet proven waste treatment technology. Anaerobic digestion reduces and upgrades organic waste, and is a good way to control air pollution as it reduces methane and nitrous gas emissions. For environmental and energy considerations, anaerobic digestion is a nearly perfect waste treatment process. However, its economic viability is still in question. A number of parameters - type of waste (solid or liquid), digester system, facility size, product quality and end use, environmental requirements, cost of alternative treatments (including labor), and interest rates - define the investment and operating costs of an anaerobic digestion facility. Therefore, identical facilities that treat the same amount and type of waste may, depending on location, legislation, and end product characteristics, reveal radically different costs. A good approach for evaluating the economics of anaerobic digestion is to compare it to treatment techniques such as aeration or conventional sewage treatment (for industrial wastewater), or composting and incineration (for solid organic waste). For example, the cost (per ton of waste) of in-vessel composting with biofilters is somewhat higher than that of anaerobic digestion, but the investment costs 1 1/2 to 2 times more than either composting or anaerobic digestion. Two distinct advantages of anaerobic digestion are: (1) it requires less land than either composting or incinerating, which translates into lower costs and milder environmental and community impacts (especially in densely populated areas); and (2) it produces net energy, which can be used to operate the facility or sold to nearby industries.

  20. Quantitative Microbiological Analysis of Bacterial Community Shifts in a High-Rate Anaerobic Bioreactor Treating Sulfite Evaporator Condensate

    PubMed Central

    Ney, U.; Macario, A. J. L.; de Macario, E. Conway; Aivasidis, A.; Schoberth, S. M.; Sahm, H.

    1990-01-01

    The bacterial population of a high-rate, anaerobic, fixed-bed loop reactor treating sulfite evaporator condensate from the pulp industry was studied over a 14-month period. This period was divided into seven cycles that included a startup at the beginning of each cycle. Some 82% of the total biomass was immobilized on and between the porous glass rings filling the reactor. The range of the total number of microorganisms in these biofilms was 2 × 109 to 7 × 109 cells per ml. Enumeration and characterization by microbiological methods and by phase-contrast, epifluorescence, and electron microscopy showed that the samples consisted mainly of the following methanogens: a Methanobacterium sp., a Methanosarcina sp., a Methanobrevibacter sp., and a Methanothrix sp., as well as furfural-degrading sulfate-reducing bacteria resembling Desulfovibrio furfuralis. Viable counts of hydrogenotrophic methanogens were relatively stable (mostly within the range of 3.2 × 108 to 7.5 × 108 cells per ml), but Methanobrevibacter cells increased from <5 to 30% of the total hydrogenotrophic count after transfer of the fixed bed into a second reactor vessel. Acetotrophic methanogens reached their highest numbers of 1.3 × 108 to 2.6 × 108 cells per ml in the last fermentation cycles. They showed a morphological shift from sarcinalike packets in early samples to single coccoid forms in later phases of the fermentation. Furfural-degrading sulfate reducers reached counts of 1 × 107 to 5.8 × 107 cells per ml. The distribution of the chief metabolic groups between free fluid and biofilms was analyzed in the fifth fermentation cycle: 4.5 times more furfural degraders were found in the free fluid than in the biofilms. In contrast, 5.8 times more acetotrophic and 16.6 times more hydrogenotrophic methanogens were found in the biofilms than in the free liquid. The data concerning time shifts of morphotypes among the trophic groups of methanogens corroborated the trends observed by using

  1. Quantitative microbiological analysis of bacterial community shifts in a high-rate anaerobic bioreactor treating sulfite evaporator condensate.

    PubMed

    Ney, U; Macario, A J; Conway de Macario, E; Aivasidis, A; Schoberth, S M; Sahm, H

    1990-08-01

    The bacterial population of a high-rate, anaerobic, fixed-bed loop reactor treating sulfite evaporator condensate from the pulp industry was studied over a 14-month period. This period was divided into seven cycles that included a startup at the beginning of each cycle. Some 82% of the total biomass was immobilized on and between the porous glass rings filling the reactor. The range of the total number of microorganisms in these biofilms was 2 x 10 to 7 x 10 cells per ml. Enumeration and characterization by microbiological methods and by phase-contrast, epifluorescence, and electron microscopy showed that the samples consisted mainly of the following methanogens: a Methanobacterium sp., a Methanosarcina sp., a Methanobrevibacter sp., and a Methanothrix sp., as well as furfural-degrading sulfate-reducing bacteria resembling Desulfovibrio furfuralis. Viable counts of hydrogenotrophic methanogens were relatively stable (mostly within the range of 3.2 x 10 to 7.5 x 10 cells per ml), but Methanobrevibacter cells increased from <5 to 30% of the total hydrogenotrophic count after transfer of the fixed bed into a second reactor vessel. Acetotrophic methanogens reached their highest numbers of 1.3 x 10 to 2.6 x 10 cells per ml in the last fermentation cycles. They showed a morphological shift from sarcinalike packets in early samples to single coccoid forms in later phases of the fermentation. Furfural-degrading sulfate reducers reached counts of 1 x 10 to 5.8 x 10 cells per ml. The distribution of the chief metabolic groups between free fluid and biofilms was analyzed in the fifth fermentation cycle: 4.5 times more furfural degraders were found in the free fluid than in the biofilms. In contrast, 5.8 times more acetotrophic and 16.6 times more hydrogenotrophic methanogens were found in the biofilms than in the free liquid. The data concerning time shifts of morphotypes among the trophic groups of methanogens corroborated the trends observed by using immunological assays on

  2. Diversity of anaerobic halophilic microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oren, Aharon; Oremland, Roland S.

    2000-12-01

    Life in the presence of high salt concentrations is compatible with life in the absence of oxygen. Halophilic and halotolerant anaerobic prokaryotes are found both in the archaeal and in the bacterial domain, and they display a great metabolic diversity. Many of the representatives of the Halobacteriales (Archaea), which are generally considered aerobes, have the potential of anaerobic growth. Some can use alternative electron acceptors such as nitrate, fumarate, dimethylsulfoxide or trimethylamine-N-oxide Halobacterium salinarum can also grow fermentatively on L-arginine, and bacteriorhodopsin-containing cells may even grow anaerobically, energized by light. Obligatory anaerobic halophilic methanogenic Archaea also exist. The bacterial domain contains many anaerobic halophiles, including sulfate reducers. There is also a group of specialized obligatory anaerobic Bacteria, phylogenetically clustering in the low G + C branch of the Firmicutes. Most representatives of this group (order Haloanaerobiales, families Haloanaerobiaceae and Halobacteroidaceae) are fermentative, using a variety of carbohydrates and amino acids. One species combines the potential for anaerobic growth at high salt concentrations with a preference for high temperatures. Others are homoacetogens; Acetohalobium arabaticum can grow anaerobically as a chemolithotroph, producing acetate from hydrogen and CO2. The Haloanaerobiales accumulate high concentrations of K+ and Cl- in their cytoplasm, thereby showing a strategy of salt adaptation similar to that used by the Halobacteriales. Recently a new representative of the Haloanaerobiales was isolated from bottom sediments of the Dead Sea (strain DSSe1), which grows anaerobically by oxidation of glycerol to acetate and CO2 while reducing selenate to selenite and elementary selenium. Other electron acceptors supporting anaerobic growth of this strain are nitrate and trimethylamine-N-oxide. The versatility of life at high salt concentrations with respect

  3. An aerobic fixed-phase biofilm reactor system for the degradation of the low-molecular weight aromatic compounds occurring in the effluents of anaerobic digestors treating olive mill wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Bertin, L; Majone, M; Di Gioia, D; Fava, F

    2001-05-01

    An aerobic co-culture, prepared by combining Ralstonia sp. LD35 and Pseudomonas putida DSM1868, was recently found to be capable of extensively degrading many of the hydroxylated and/or methoxylated benzoic, phenylacetic and 3-phenyl-2-propenoic acids occurring in the olive mill wastewaters (OMWs). In the perspective of developing a biotechnological process for the degradation of low-molecular weight (MW) aromatic compounds occurring in the effluents of anaerobic digestors treating OMWs, the capability of this bacterial co-culture of biodegrading a synthetic mix of the above mentioned compounds and the aromatic compounds of an anaerobic OMW-treatment plant effluent in the physiological state of immobilised cells was investigated. Two aerobic fixed-bed biofilm reactors were developed by immobilising the co-culture cells on Manville silica beads and on polyurethane foam cubes. Both supports were found to give rise to a microbiologically stable and biologically active biofilm. The two biofilm reactors were found to be similarly capable of rapidly and completely biodegrading the components of a synthetic mix of nine monocyclic aromatic acids typically present in OMWs and the low-MW aromatic compounds occurring in the anaerobic effluent in batch conditions. However, in the same conditions, the silica bead-packed reactor was found to be more effective in the removal of high-MW phenolic compounds from the anaerobic effluent with respect to the polyurethane cube-packed reactor. These results are encouraging in the perspective of using the co-culture as immobilized cells for developing a continuous biotechnological process for the post-treatment of effluents with low-MW aromatic compounds produced by anaerobic digestors treating OMWs.

  4. Anaerobic Metabolism of Indoleacetate

    PubMed Central

    Ebenau-Jehle, Christa; Thomas, Markus; Scharf, Gernot; Kockelkorn, Daniel; Knapp, Bettina; Schühle, Karola; Heider, Johann

    2012-01-01

    The anaerobic metabolism of indoleacetate (indole-3-acetic acid [IAA]) in the denitrifying betaproteobacterium Azoarcus evansii was studied. The strain oxidized IAA completely and grew with a generation time of 10 h. Enzyme activities that transformed IAA were present in the soluble cell fraction of IAA-grown cells but were 10-fold downregulated in cells grown on 2-aminobenzoate or benzoate. The transformation of IAA did not require molecular oxygen but required electron acceptors like NAD+ or artificial dyes. The first products identified were the enol and keto forms of 2-oxo-IAA. Later, polar products were observed, which could not yet be identified. The first steps likely consist of the anaerobic hydroxylation of the N-heterocyclic pyrrole ring to the enol form of 2-oxo-IAA, which is catalyzed by a molybdenum cofactor-containing dehydrogenase. This step is probably followed by the hydrolytic ring opening of the keto form, which is catalyzed by a hydantoinase-like enzyme. A comparison of the proteome of IAA- and benzoate-grown cells identified IAA-induced proteins. Owing to the high similarity of A. evansii with strain EbN1, whose genome is known, we identified a cluster of 14 genes that code for IAA-induced proteins involved in the early steps of IAA metabolism. These genes include a molybdenum cofactor-dependent dehydrogenase of the xanthine oxidase/aldehyde dehydrogenase family, a hydantoinase, a coenzyme A (CoA) ligase, a CoA transferase, a coenzyme B12-dependent mutase, an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, a fusion protein of an enoyl-CoA hydratase and a 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, a beta-ketothiolase, and a periplasmic substrate binding protein for ABC transport as well as a transcriptional regulator of the GntR family. Five predicted enzymes form or act on CoA thioesters, indicating that soon after the initial oxidation of IAA and possibly ring opening, CoA thioesters are formed, and the carbon skeleton is rearranged, followed by a CoA-dependent thiolytic

  5. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Autotrophy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.

    2008-12-01

    That microbes have resistance to the toxic arsenic oxyanions arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)] has been recognized for some time. More recently it was shown that certain prokaryotes can demonstrate As- dependent growth by conserving the energy gained from the aerobic oxidation of As(III) to As(V), or from the reduction of As(V) to As(III) under anaerobic conditions. During the course of our field studies of two alkaline, hypersaline soda lakes (Mono Lake and Searles Lake, CA) we have discovered several new anaerobic chemo- and photo-autotrophic bacteria that can center their energy gain around the redox reactions between As(III) and As(V). Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii, isolated from the water column of Mono Lake is a nitrate-respiring, As(III)-oxidizing chemoautotroph of the gamma-proteobacteria that has a highly flexible metabolism. It can function either as a facultative anaerobe or as a chemo-autotroph, or as a heterotroph (Hoeft et al., 2007). In contrast, strain MLMS-1 of the delta-proteobacteria was also isolated from Mono Lake, but to date is the first example of an obligate As(V)-respirer that is also an obligate chemo-autotroph, gaining its energy via the oxidation of sulfide to sulfate (Hoeft et al., 2004). Strain SLAS-1, isolated from salt-saturated Searles Lake is a member of the Halananerobiales, and can either grow as a heterotroph (lactate e-donor) or chemo- autotroph (sulfide e-donor) while respiring As(V). The fact that it can achieve this feat at salt-saturation (~ 340 g/L) makes it a true extremophile (Oremland et. al., 2005). Finally, strain PHS-1 isolated from a hot spring on Paoha island in Mono Lake is the first example of a photosynthetic bacterium of the gamma- proteobacteria able to link its growth to As(III)-dependent anoxygenic photosynthesis (Kulp et al., 2008). These novel microbes give us new insights into the evolution of arsenic-based metabolism and their role in the biogeochemical cycling of this toxic element. Hoeft, S.E., et

  6. Energy positive domestic wastewater treatment: the roles of anaerobic and phototrophic technologies.

    PubMed

    Shoener, B D; Bradley, I M; Cusick, R D; Guest, J S

    2014-05-01

    The negative energy balance of wastewater treatment could be reversed if anaerobic technologies were implemented for organic carbon oxidation and phototrophic technologies were utilized for nutrient recovery. To characterize the potential for energy positive wastewater treatment by anaerobic and phototrophic biotechnologies we performed a comprehensive literature review and analysis, focusing on energy production (as kJ per capita per day and as kJ m(-3) of wastewater treated), energy consumption, and treatment efficacy. Anaerobic technologies included in this review were the anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR), anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR), anaerobic fluidized bed reactor (AFB), upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB), anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR), microbial electrolysis cell (MEC), and microbial fuel cell (MFC). Phototrophic technologies included were the high rate algal pond (HRAP), photobioreactor (PBR), stirred tank reactor, waste stabilization pond (WSP), and algal turf scrubber (ATS). Average energy recovery efficiencies for anaerobic technologies ranged from 1.6% (MFC) to 47.5% (ABR). When including typical percent chemical oxygen demand (COD) removals by each technology, this range would equate to roughly 40-1200 kJ per capita per day or 110-3300 kJ m(-3) of treated wastewater. The average bioenergy feedstock production by phototrophic technologies ranged from 1200-4700 kJ per capita per day or 3400-13 000 kJ m(-3) (exceeding anaerobic technologies and, at times, the energetic content of the influent organic carbon), with usable energy production dependent upon downstream conversion to fuels. Energy consumption analysis showed that energy positive anaerobic wastewater treatment by emerging technologies would require significant reductions of parasitic losses from mechanical mixing and gas sparging. Technology targets and critical barriers for energy-producing technologies are identified, and the role of integrated anaerobic and

  7. PCB breakdown by anaerobic microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    Recently, altered PCB cogener distribution patterns observed in anaerobic sediment samples from the upper Hudson River are being attributed to biologically mediated reductive dechlorination. The authors report their successful demonstration of biologically mediated reductive dechlorination of an Aroclor mixture. In their investigation, they assessed the ability of microorganisms from PCB-contaminated Hudson River sediments (60-562 ppm PCBs) to dechlorinate Aroclor 1242 under anaerobic conditions by eluting microorganisms from the PCB- contaminated sediments and transferring them to a slurry of reduced anaerobic mineral medium and PCB-free sediments in tightly stoppered bottles. They observed dechlorination to be the most rapid at the highest PCB concentration tried by them.

  8. Dance--Aerobic and Anaerobic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arlette

    1984-01-01

    This article defines and explains aerobic exercise and its effects on the cardiovascular system. Various studies on dancers are cited indicating that dance is an anaerobic activity with some small degree of aerobic benefit. (DF)

  9. Bioenergy from anaerobically treated wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, E.A.

    1981-01-01

    Breweries and other processing plants including dairy cooperatives, sugar plants, grain mills, gasohol plants, etc., produce wastewater containing complex organic matter, either in solution or as volatile suspended solids, which can be treated anaerobically to effectively reduce the pollutants by 85-95% and generate a CH4 containing gas. An example anaerobic plant to serve a 10 to the power of 6-bbl brewery is discussed.

  10. Euglena gracilis rhodoquinone:ubiquinone ratio and mitochondrial proteome differ under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Hoffmeister, Meike; van der Klei, Anita; Rotte, Carmen; van Grinsven, Koen W A; van Hellemond, Jaap J; Henze, Katrin; Tielens, Aloysius G M; Martin, William

    2004-05-21

    Euglena gracilis cells grown under aerobic and anaerobic conditions were compared for their whole cell rhodoquinone and ubiquinone content and for major protein spots contained in isolated mitochondria as assayed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry sequencing. Anaerobically grown cells had higher rhodoquinone levels than aerobically grown cells in agreement with earlier findings indicating the need for fumarate reductase activity in anaerobic wax ester fermentation in Euglena. Microsequencing revealed components of complex III and complex IV of the respiratory chain and the E1beta subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase to be present in mitochondria of aerobically grown cells but lacking in mitochondria from anaerobically grown cells. No proteins were identified as specific to mitochondria from anaerobically grown cells. cDNAs for the E1alpha, E2, and E3 subunits of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase were cloned and shown to be differentially expressed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Their expression patterns differed from that of mitochondrial pyruvate:NADP(+) oxidoreductase, the N-terminal domain of which is pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, an enzyme otherwise typical of hydrogenosomes, hydrogen-producing forms of mitochondria found among anaerobic protists. The Euglena mitochondrion is thus a long sought intermediate that unites biochemical properties of aerobic and anaerobic mitochondria and hydrogenosomes because it contains both pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and rhodoquinone typical of hydrogenosomes and anaerobic mitochondria as well as pyruvate dehydrogenase and ubiquinone typical of aerobic mitochondria. Our data show that under aerobic conditions Euglena mitochondria are prepared for anaerobic function and furthermore suggest that the ancestor of mitochondria was a facultative anaerobe, segments of whose physiology have been preserved in the Euglena lineage.

  11. The effect of cyclic anaerobic-aerobic conditions on biodegradation of azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Yaşar, Semra; Cirik, Kevser; Cinar, Ozer

    2012-03-01

    The effect of cyclic anaerobic-aerobic conditions on the biodegradative capability of the mixed microbial culture for the azo dye Remazol Brilliant Violet 5R (RBV-5R) was investigated in the sequencing batch reactor (SBR) fed with a synthetic textile wastewater. The SBR had a 12-h cycle time with anaerobic-aerobic periods of 3/9, 6/6 and 9/3 h. General SBR performance was assessed by measurement of catabolic enzymes (catechol 2,3-dioxygenase, azo reductase), chemical oxygen demand (COD), color and amount of aromatic amines. In this study, under steady-state conditions, the anaerobic period of the cyclic SBR was found to allow the reductive decolorization of azo dye. Longer anaerobic periods resulted in higher color removal efficiencies, approximately 71% for the 3-h, 87% for 6-h and 92% for the 9-h duration. Total COD removal efficiencies were over 84% under each of the cyclic conditions and increased as the length of the anaerobic period was increased; however, the highest color removal rate was attained for the cycle with the shortest anaerobic period of 3 h. During the decolorization of RBV-5R, two sulfonated aromatic amines (benzene based and naphthalene based) were formed. Additionally, anaerobic azo reductase enzyme was found to be positively affected with the increasing duration of the anaerobic period; however; it was vice versa for the aerobic catechol 2,3-dioxygenase (C23DO) enzyme.

  12. One step beyond a ribosome: The ancient anaerobic core.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Filipa L; Nelson-Sathi, Shijulal; Martin, William F

    2016-08-01

    Life arose in a world without oxygen and the first organisms were anaerobes. Here we investigate the gene repertoire of the prokaryote common ancestor, estimating which genes it contained and to which lineages of modern prokaryotes it was most similar in terms of gene content. Using a phylogenetic approach we found that among trees for all 8779 protein families shared between 134 archaea and 1847 bacterial genomes, only 1045 have sequences from at least two bacterial and two archaeal groups and retain the ancestral archaeal-bacterial split. Among those, the genes shared by anaerobes were identified as candidate genes for the prokaryote common ancestor, which lived in anaerobic environments. We find that these anaerobic prokaryote common ancestor genes are today most frequently distributed among methanogens and clostridia, strict anaerobes that live from low free energy changes near the thermodynamic limit of life. The anaerobic families encompass genes for bifunctional acetyl-CoA-synthase/CO-dehydrogenase, heterodisulfide reductase subunits C and A, ferredoxins, and several subunits of the Mrp-antiporter/hydrogenase family, in addition to numerous S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) dependent methyltransferases. The data indicate a major role for methyl groups in the metabolism of the prokaryote common ancestor. The data furthermore indicate that the prokaryote ancestor possessed a rotor stator ATP synthase, but lacked cytochromes and quinones as well as identifiable redox-dependent ion pumping complexes. The prokaryote ancestor did possess, however, an Mrp-type H(+)/Na(+) antiporter complex, capable of transducing geochemical pH gradients into biologically more stable Na(+)-gradients. The findings implicate a hydrothermal, autotrophic, and methyl-dependent origin of life. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27150504

  13. Anaerobic bacteria in the gut of terrestrial isopod Crustacean Porcellio scaber.

    PubMed

    Kostanjsek, R; Lapanje, A; Rupnik, M; Strus, J; Drobne, D; Avgustin, G

    2004-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria from Porcellio scaber hindgut were identified and, subsequently, isolated using molecular approach. Phylogenetic affiliation of bacteria associated with the hindgut wall was determined by analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences which were retrieved directly from washed hindguts of P. scaber. Sequences from bacteria related to obligate anaerobic bacteria from genera Bacteroides and Enterococcus were retrieved, as well as sequences from 'A1 subcluster' of the wall-less mollicutes. Bacteria from the genus Desulfotomaculum were isolated from gut wall and cultivated under anaerobic conditions. In contrast to previous reports which suggested the absence of anaerobic bacteria in the isopod digestive system due to short retention time of the food in the tube-like hindgut, frequent renewal of the gut cuticle during the moulting process, and unsuccessful attempts to isolate anaerobic bacteria from this environment our results indicate the presence of resident anaerobic bacteria in the gut of P. scaber, in spite of apparently unsuitable, i.e. predominantly oxic, conditions.

  14. Obligate anaerobes in clinical veterinary practice.

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, D C; Biberstein, E L; Jang, S S

    1979-01-01

    Clinical specimens obtained from domestic animals were examined to determine the relative prevalence of obligate anaerobic bacteria and the species represented. Of 3,167 samples cultured anaerobically as well as aerobically, 2,234 were bacteriologically positive. Of these positive samples, 583 (26%) contained species of obligate anaerobic bacteria in a total of 641 isolates. Most positive samples contained anaerobes admixed with aerobic species, although 6% of such samples yielded pure cultures of obligate anaerobes. The most common sites from which anaerobes were isolated were abscesses (32% of abscesses cultured contained species of obligate anaerobes), peritoneal exudates (24%), and pleural effusions (20%). Bacteroides melaninogenicus, Bacteroides spp., Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, and Bacteroides ruminicola accounted in the aggregate for approximately 50% of all anaerobic isolates. Bacteroides fragilis accounted for 1% of all the isolates, and members of the genus Clostridium accounted for 8%. PMID:511987

  15. The Transition from Aerobic to Anaerobic Metabolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, James S.; McLellan, Thomas H.

    1980-01-01

    The transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism is discussed. More research is needed on different kinds of athletes and athletic activities and how they may affect aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms. (CJ)

  16. Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and Pu-EDTA

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, H., Jr.; Bailey, V.L.; Plymale, A.E.; Rai, D.; Xun, L.

    2006-04-05

    begun to enrich and isolate bacteria capable of aerobic and anaerobic degradation of EDTA. Environmental samples (e.g., sludges, river sediments) were incubated aerobically and anaerobically with EDTA or NTA as the sole carbon and energy source. Aerobic enrichment with EDTA has not resulted in any cultures, but NTA has provided several isolates. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequence and sequence comparison identified four separate strains closely related to Microbacterium oxydans, Aminobacter sp., Achromobacter sp., Aminobacter sp., respectively. Anaerobic enrichments with either EDTA or NTA are still in progress since metabolism and growth is relatively slow. In addition to the biotransformation experiments, studies are underway to determine/validate complexation constants of Pu(III) with EDTA and the influence of competing ions on Pu(III)-EDTA complexes. These data are being obtained through solubility studies of PuPO{sub 4}(s) and Pu(OH){sub 3}(s) as a function of time, pH, and EDTA and competing ion concentrations. These results have begun to fill-in knowledge gaps of how anaerobic conditions will influence Pu and Pu-EDTA fate and transport to assess, model, and design approaches to stop Pu transport in groundwater at DOE sites.

  17. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolz, J. F.; Oremland, R. S.; Switzer Blum, J.; Hoeft, S. E.; Baesman, S. M.; Bennett, S.; Miller, L. G.; Kulp, T. R.; Saltikov, C.

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic is an element best known for its highly poisonous nature, so it is not something one would associate with being a well-spring for life. Yet discoveries made over the past two decades have delineated that not only are some microbes resistant to arsenic, but that this element's primary redox states can be exploited to conserve energy and support prokaryotic growth ('arsenotrophy') in the absence of oxygen. Hence, arsenite [As(III)] can serve as an electron donor for chemo- or photo-autotrophy while arsenate [As(V)] will serve as an electron acceptor for chemo-heterotrophs and chemo-autotrophs. The phylogenetic diversity of these microbes is broad, encompassing many individual species from diverse taxonomic groups in the Domain Bacteria, with fewer representatives in the Domain Archaea. Speculation with regard to the evolutionary origins of the key functional genes in anaerobic arsenic transformations (arrA and arxA) and aerobic oxidation (aioB) has led to a disputation as to which gene and function is the most ancient and whether arsenic metabolism extended back into the Archaean. Regardless of its origin, robust arsenic metabolism has been documented in extreme environments that are rich in their arsenic content, such as hot springs and especially hypersaline soda lakes associated with volcanic regions. Searles Lake, CA is an extreme, salt-saturated end member where vigorous arsenic metabolism occurs, but there is no detectable sulfate-reduction or methanogenesis. The latter processes are too weak bio-energetically to survive as compared with arsenotrophy, and are also highly sensitive to the abundance of borate ions present in these locales. These observations have implications with respect to the search for microbial life elsewhere in the Solar System where volcanic-like processes have been operative. Hence, because of the likelihood of encountering dense brines in the regolith of Mars (formed by evapo-concentration) or beneath the ice layers of Europa

  18. Comparison of two different anaerobic feeding strategies to establish a stable aerobic granulated sludge bed.

    PubMed

    Rocktäschel, T; Klarmann, C; Helmreich, B; Ochoa, J; Boisson, P; Sørensen, K H; Horn, H

    2013-11-01

    Two different anaerobic feeding strategies were compared to optimize the development and performance of aerobic granules. A stable aerobic granulation of activated sludge was achieved with an anaerobic plug flow operation (PI) and a fast influent step followed by an anaerobic mixing phase (PII). Two lab scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) were operated to test the different operation modes. PI with plug flow and a reactor H/D (height/diameter) ratio of 9 achieved a biomass concentration of 20 g(TSS)/L and an effluent TSS concentration of 0.10 g(TSS)/L. PII with the mixed anaerobic phase directly after feeding and a reactor H/D ratio of 2 achieved a biomass concentration of 9 g(TSS)/L and an effluent quality of 0.05 g(TSS)/L. Furthermore, it is shown that the plug flow regime during anaerobic feeding together with the lower H/D ratio of 2 led to channeling effects, which resulted in lower storage of organic carbon and a general destabilization of the granulation process. Compared to the plug flow regime (PI), the anaerobic mixing (PII) provided lower substrate gradients within the biofilm. However, these disadvantages could be compensated by higher mass transfer coefficients in PII (k(L) = 0.3 m/d for PI; k(L) = 86 m/d for PII) during the anaerobic phase. PMID:24103394

  19. Determining anaerobic capacity in sporting activities.

    PubMed

    Noordhof, Dionne A; Skiba, Philip F; de Koning, Jos J

    2013-09-01

    Anaerobic capacity/anaerobically attributable power is an important parameter for athletic performance, not only for short high-intensity activities but also for breakaway efforts and end spurts during endurance events. Unlike aerobic capacity, anaerobic capacity cannot be easily quantified. The 3 most commonly used methodologies to quantify anaerobic capacity are the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit method, the critical power concept, and the gross efficiency method. This review describes these methods, evaluates if they result in similar estimates of anaerobic capacity, and highlights how anaerobic capacity is used during sporting activities. All 3 methods have their own strengths and weaknesses and result in more or less similar estimates of anaerobic capacity but cannot be used interchangeably. The method of choice depends on the research question or practical goal.

  20. [Anaerobic bacteria 150 years after their discovery by Pasteur].

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, José Elías; García-Sánchez, Enrique; Martín-Del-Rey, Ángel; García-Merino, Enrique

    2015-02-01

    In 2011 we celebrated the 150th anniversary of the discovery of anaerobic bacteria by Louis Pasteur. The interest of the biomedical community on such bacteria is still maintained, and is particularly focused on Clostridium difficile. In the past few years important advances in taxonomy have been made due to the genetic, technological and computing developments. Thus, a significant number of new species related to human infections have been characterised, and some already known have been reclassified. At pathogenic level some specimens of anaerobic microflora, that had not been isolated from human infections, have been now isolated in some clinical conditions. There was emergence (or re-emergence) of some species and clinical conditions. Certain anaerobic bacteria have been associated with established infectious syndromes. The virulence of certain strains has increased, and some hypotheses on their participation in certain diseases have been given. In terms of diagnosis, the routine use of MALDI-TOF has led to a shortening of time and a cost reduction in the identification, with an improvement directly related to the improvement of data bases. The application of real-time PCR has been another major progress, and the sequencing of 16srRNA gene and others is currently a reality for several laboratories. Anaerobes have increased their resistance to antimicrobial agents, and the emergence of resistance to carbapenems and metronidazole, and multi-resistance is a current reality. In this situation, linezolid could be an effective alternative for Bacteroides. Fidaxomicin is the only anti-anaerobic agent introduced in the recent years, specifically for the diarrhoea caused by C.difficile. Moreover, some mathematical models have also been proposed in relation with this species.

  1. Processing anaerobic sludge for extended storage as anaerobic digester inoculum.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiajia; Zicari, Steven M; Cui, Zongjun; Zhang, Ruihong

    2014-08-01

    Thermophilic anaerobic sludge was processed to reduce the volume and moisture content in order to reduce costs for storing and transporting the sludge as microbial inoculum for anaerobic digester startup. The moisture content of the sludge was reduced from 98.7% to 82.0% via centrifugation and further to 71.5% via vacuum evaporation. The processed sludge was stored for 2 and 4 months and compared with the fresh sludge for the biogas and methane production using food waste and non-fat dry milk as substrates. It was found that fresh unprocessed sludge had the highest methane yield and the yields of both unprocessed and processed sludges decreased during storage by 1-34%, however processed sludges seemed to regain some activity after 4 months of storage as compared to samples stored for only 2 months. Maximum methane production rates obtained from modified Gompertz model application also increased between the 2-month and 4-month processed samples.

  2. Acclimation strategy to increase phenol tolerance of an anaerobic microbiota.

    PubMed

    Madigou, Céline; Poirier, Simon; Bureau, Chrystelle; Chapleur, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    A wide variety of inhibitory substances can induce anaerobic digester upset or failure. In this work the possibility to improve the resistance of an anaerobic microbiota to a common pollutant, the phenol, was evaluated in a lab-scale semi-continuous bioreactor. An acclimation strategy, consisting in a regular step-wise adaptation of the microbiota to stressful condition was employed. Degradation performances were monitored and molecular tools (16S sequencing and ARISA fingerprinting technique) were used to track changes in the microbial community. The acclimation strategy progressively minimized the effect of phenol on degradation performances. After 3 successive disturbance episodes, microbiota resistance was considerably developed and total inhibition threshold increased from 895 to 1942mg/L of phenol. Microbiota adaptation was characterized by the selection of the most resistant Archaea OTU from Methanobacterium genus and an important elasticity of Bacteria, especially within Clostridiales and Bacteroidales orders, that probably enabled the adaptation to more and more stressful conditions. PMID:27233100

  3. Anaerobic conditions improve germination of a gibberellic acid deficient rice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frantz, Jonathan M.; Bugbee, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Dwarf plants are useful in research because multiple plants can be grown in a small area. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is especially important since its relatively simple genome has recently been sequenced. We are characterizing a gibberellic acid (GA) mutant of rice (japonica cv 'Shiokari,' line N-71) that is extremely dwarf (20 cm tall). Unfortunately, this GA mutation is associated with poor germination (70%) under aerobic conditions. Neither exogenous GA nor a dormancy-breaking heat treatment improved germination. However, 95% germination was achieved by germinating the seeds anaerobically, either in a pure N2 environment or submerged in unstirred tap water. The anaerobic conditions appear to break a mild post-harvest dormancy in this rice cultivar. Copyright 2002 Crop Science Society of America.

  4. Sediment bacterial communities associated with anaerobic biodegradation of bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuyin; Wang, Zhao; He, Tao; Dai, Yu; Xie, Shuguang

    2015-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is one of the endocrine-disrupting chemicals that are ubiquitous in aquatic environments. Biodegradation is a major way to clean up the BPA pollution in sediments. However, information on the effective BPA biodegradation in anaerobic sediments is still lacking. The present study investigated the biodegradation potential of BPA in river sediment under nitrate- or sulfate-reducing conditions. After 120-day incubation, a high removal of BPA (93 or 89%) was found in sediment microcosms (amended with 50 mg kg(-1) BPA) under these two anaerobic conditions. Illumina MiSeq sequencing analysis indicated that Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, and Actinobacteria were the major bacterial groups in BPA-degrading sediments. The shift in bacterial community structure could occur with BPA biodegradation.

  5. Assessment of anaerobic bacterial diversity and its effects on anaerobic system stability and the occurrence of antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Sevcan; Ince, Bahar; Ince, Orhan

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated the link between anaerobic bacterial diversity and, the biodegradation of antibiotic combinations and assessed how amending antibiotic combination and increasing concentration of antibiotics in a stepwise fashion influences the development of resistance genes in anaerobic reactors. The biodegradation, sorption and occurrence of the known antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) of erythromycin and tetracycline were investigated using the processes of UV-HPLC and qPCR analysis respectively. Ion Torrent sequencing was used to detect microbial community changes in response to the addition of antibiotics. The overall results indicated that changes in the structure of a microbial community lead to changes in biodegradation capacity, sorption of antibiotics combinations and occurrence of ARGs. The enhanced biodegradation efficiency appeared to generate variations in the structure of the bacterial community. The results suggested that controlling the ultimate Gram-negative bacterial community, especially Acinetobacter-related populations, may promote the successful biodegradation of antibiotic combinations and reduce the occurrence of ARGs.

  6. Anaerobic digestion of brewery byproducts

    SciTech Connect

    Keenan, J.D.; Kormi, I.

    1981-01-01

    Energy recovery in the brewery industry by mesophilic anaerobic digesion of process by-products is technically feasible. The maximum achievable loading rate is 6g dry substrate/L-day. CH4 gas production declines as the loading rate increases in the range 2-6 g/L day. CH4 production increases in the range 8-15 days; optimal design criteria are a 10-day detention time with a loading rate of 6 g dry substrate/L day.

  7. Biogeochemical and Molecular Signatures of Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in a Marine Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Trine R.; Finster, Kai; Ramsing, Niels B.

    2001-01-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation was investigated in 6-m-long cores of marine sediment from Aarhus Bay, Denmark. Measured concentration profiles for methane and sulfate, as well as in situ rates determined with isotope tracers, indicated that there was a narrow zone of anaerobic methane oxidation about 150 cm below the sediment surface. Methane could account for 52% of the electron donor requirement for the peak sulfate reduction rate detected in the sulfate-methane transition zone. Molecular signatures of organisms present in the transition zone were detected by using selective PCR primers for sulfate-reducing bacteria and for Archaea. One primer pair amplified the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DSR) gene of sulfate-reducing bacteria, whereas another primer (ANME) was designed to amplify archaeal sequences found in a recent study of sediments from the Eel River Basin, as these bacteria have been suggested to be anaerobic methane oxidizers (K. U. Hinrichs, J. M. Hayes, S. P. Sylva, P. G. Brewer, and E. F. DeLong, Nature 398:802–805, 1999). Amplification with the primer pairs produced more amplificate of both target genes with samples from the sulfate-methane transition zone than with samples from the surrounding sediment. Phylogenetic analysis of the DSR gene sequences retrieved from the transition zone revealed that they all belonged to a novel deeply branching lineage of diverse DSR gene sequences not related to any previously described DSR gene sequence. In contrast, DSR gene sequences found in the top sediment were related to environmental sequences from other estuarine sediments and to sequences of members of the genera Desulfonema, Desulfococcus, and Desulfosarcina. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA sequences obtained with the primers targeting the archaeal group of possible anaerobic methane oxidizers revealed two clusters of ANME sequences, both of which were affiliated with sequences from the Eel River Basin. PMID:11282617

  8. Anaerobic digestion of aliphatic polyesters.

    PubMed

    Šmejkalová, Pavla; Kužníková, Veronika; Merna, Jan; Hermanová, Soňa

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic processes for the treatment of plastic materials waste represent versatile and effective approach in environmental protection and solid waste management. In this work, anaerobic biodegradability of model aliphatic polyesters, poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA), and poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), in the form of powder and melt-pressed films with varying molar mass, was studied. Biogas production was explored in batch laboratory trials at 55 ± 1°C under a nitrogen atmosphere. The inoculum used was thermophilic digested sludge (total solids concentration of 2.9%) from operating digesters at the Central Waste Water Treatment Plant in Prague, Czech Republic. Methanogenic biodegradation of PCLs typically yielded from 54 to 60% of the theoretical biogas yield. The biodegradability of PLAs achieved from 56 to 84% of the theoretical value. High biogas yield (up to 677 mL/g TS) with high methane content (more than 60%), comparable with conventionally processed materials, confirmed the potential of polyester samples for anaerobic treatment in the case of their exploitation in agriculture or as a packaging material in the food industry.

  9. Anaerobic digestion of aliphatic polyesters.

    PubMed

    Šmejkalová, Pavla; Kužníková, Veronika; Merna, Jan; Hermanová, Soňa

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic processes for the treatment of plastic materials waste represent versatile and effective approach in environmental protection and solid waste management. In this work, anaerobic biodegradability of model aliphatic polyesters, poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA), and poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), in the form of powder and melt-pressed films with varying molar mass, was studied. Biogas production was explored in batch laboratory trials at 55 ± 1°C under a nitrogen atmosphere. The inoculum used was thermophilic digested sludge (total solids concentration of 2.9%) from operating digesters at the Central Waste Water Treatment Plant in Prague, Czech Republic. Methanogenic biodegradation of PCLs typically yielded from 54 to 60% of the theoretical biogas yield. The biodegradability of PLAs achieved from 56 to 84% of the theoretical value. High biogas yield (up to 677 mL/g TS) with high methane content (more than 60%), comparable with conventionally processed materials, confirmed the potential of polyester samples for anaerobic treatment in the case of their exploitation in agriculture or as a packaging material in the food industry. PMID:27191559

  10. Hydrogenispora ethanolica gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic carbohydrate-fermenting bacterium from anaerobic sludge.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Qiao, Jiang-Tao; Yuan, Xian-Zheng; Guo, Rong-Bo; Qiu, Yan-Ling

    2014-05-01

    An anaerobic, spore-forming, ethanol-hydrogen-coproducing bacterium, designated LX-BT, was isolated from an anaerobic sludge treating herbicide wastewater. Cells of strain LX-BT were non-motile rods (0.3-0.5×3.0-18.0 µm). Spores were terminal with a bulged sporangium. Growth occurred at 20-50 °C (optimum 37-45 °C), pH 5.0-8.0 (optimum pH 6.0-7.7) and 0-2.5% (w/v) NaCl. The strain could grow fermentatively on glucose, maltose, arabinose, fructose, xylose, ribose, galactose, mannose, raffinose, sucrose, pectin, starch, glycerol, fumarate, tryptone and yeast extract. The major end-products of glucose fermentation were acetate, ethanol and hydrogen. Yeast extract was not required but stimulated growth. Nitrate, sulfate, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfite, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate, fumarate and Fe (III) nitrilotriacetate were not used as terminal electron acceptors. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 56.1 mol%. The major cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C15:0, iso-C14:0 and C16:0. The most abundant polar lipids of strain LX-BT were diphosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that it belongs to an as-yet-unidentified taxon at the order- or class-level (OPB54) within the phylum Firmicutes, showing 86.5% sequence similarity to previously described species of the Desulfotomaculum cluster. The name Hydrogenispora ethanolica gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate strain LX-BT (=DSM 25471T=JCM 18117T=CGMCC 1.5175T) as the type strain.

  11. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal from wastewater by biomass with different phosphorus contents, Part III: Anaerobic sources of reducing equivalents.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Andrew J; Jenkins, David

    2003-01-01

    Laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactors exhibiting enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) operated at different influent phosphorus/chemical oxygen demand (COD) ratios were analyzed to evaluate possible anaerobic sources of reducing equivalents. Assuming anaerobic glycogen degradation was the sole anaerobic reducing equivalent source, an anaerobic phase carbon balance showed that glycogen-accumulating metabolism (GAM)-dominated systems were nearly carbon-balanced, but that polyphosphate-accumulating metabolism (PAM)-dominated systems had end-anaerobic phase carbon deficits. An anaerobic-phase reducing equivalent balance showed a reducing equivalent excess for the GAM-dominated systems and a deficit for the PAM-dominated systems, suggesting that glycogen degradation was not the sole reducing equivalent source for PAM. Reducing equivalent balances showed that metabolic models including complete anaerobic tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle activity, partial TCA cycle activity, and the glyoxylate bypass could provide the reducing equivalents required in PAM. Metabolic precursors produced in glycolysis, the TCA cycle, or modified versions of the TCA cycle could allow anaerobic growth and account for the PAM carbon deficits. The importance of considering both PAM and GAM activity in evaluating EBPR metabolic models was illustrated.

  12. Physiologically anaerobic microorganisms of the deep subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, S.E. Jr.; Chung, K.T.

    1991-06-01

    This study seeks to determine numbers, diversity, and morphology of anaerobic microorganisms in 15 samples of subsurface material from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, in 18 samples from the Hanford Reservation and in 1 rock sample from the Nevada Test Site; set up long term experiments on the chemical activities of anaerobic microorganisms based on these same samples; work to improve methods for the micro-scale determination of in situ anaerobic microbial activity;and to begin to isolate anaerobes from these samples into axenic culture with identification of the axenic isolates.

  13. Basic Laboratory Culture Methods for Anaerobic Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobel, Herbert J.

    Oxygen is either limiting or absent in many ecosystems. Anaerobic bacteria are often key players in such environments and these organisms have important roles in geo-elemental cycling, agriculture, and medicine. The metabolic versatility of anaerobes is exploited in a variety of industrial processes including fermented food production, biochemical synthesis, and bioremediation. There has been recent considerable interest in developing and enhancing technologies that employ anaerobes as biocatalysts. The study of anaerobic bacteria requires specialized techniques, and specific methods are described for the culture and manipulation of these microbes.

  14. Diversity of Anaerobic Microbes in Spacecraft Assembly Clean Rooms ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Alexander; Vaishampayan, Parag; Osman, Shariff; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Andersen, Gary L.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2010-01-01

    Although the cultivable and noncultivable microbial diversity of spacecraft assembly clean rooms has been previously documented using conventional and state-of-the-art molecular techniques, the occurrence of obligate anaerobes within these clean rooms is still uncertain. Therefore, anaerobic bacterial communities of three clean-room facilities were analyzed during assembly of the Mars Science Laboratory rover. Anaerobic bacteria were cultured on several media, and DNA was extracted from suitable anaerobic enrichments and examined with conventional 16S rRNA gene clone library, as well as high-density phylogenetic 16S rRNA gene microarray (PhyloChip) technologies. The culture-dependent analyses predominantly showed the presence of clostridial and propionibacterial strains. The 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved from clone libraries revealed distinct microbial populations associated with each clean-room facility, clustered exclusively within gram-positive organisms. PhyloChip analysis detected a greater microbial diversity, spanning many phyla of bacteria, and provided a deeper insight into the microbial community structure of the clean-room facilities. This study presents an integrated approach for assessing the anaerobic microbial population within clean-room facilities, using both molecular and cultivation-based analyses. The results reveal that highly diverse anaerobic bacterial populations persist in the clean rooms even after the imposition of rigorous maintenance programs and will pose a challenge to planetary protection implementation activities. PMID:20228115

  15. Unexpected Microbial Diversity in Anaerobically Methane-oxidizing Mats of the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, M. W.; Pommerenke, B.; Seifert, R.; Krueger, M.

    2007-12-01

    Sediments of the Black Sea harbour consortia of anaerobically methane-oxidizing microorganisms in dense microbial mats, incrusted in large chimney structures consisting of carbonate precipitate. A number of convincing facts collected previously suggests that anaerobically methane-oxidizing Archaea (ANME) as well as delta- proteobacterial sulphate-reducing bacteria are the key players in anaerobic methane oxidation in Black Sea Mats: their presence has been shown by fluorescent-in-situ hybridization (FISH) with 16S rRNA-targeting probes, lipid biomarkers have typical, low delta13C ratios in archaeal and bacterial lipids, a methyl coenzyme M reductase-like protein was purified from the mat, and mat samples exhibit anaerobic methane oxidation. Here, we show that the diversity of Bacteria in both, pink and black mat samples, is larger than previously known. T-RFLP analysis of 16S rRNA and 16S rRNA genes and cloning and sequencing of randomly selected clones revealed the presence of taxa hitherto unknown to be present in anaerobically methane-oxidizing consortia. Besides the previously known delta-proteobacterial sulphate reducers, clones fell into 7 and 5 different phyla in pink and black coloured mats, respectively. Our findings suggest that the turnover of carbon in anaerobically methane-oxidizing communities might involve a larger diversity of microorganisms than was previously assumed.

  16. Start-up phase of an anaerobic full-scale farm reactor - Appearance of mesophilic anaerobic conditions and establishment of the methanogenic microbial community.

    PubMed

    Goux, Xavier; Calusinska, Magdalena; Fossépré, Marie; Benizri, Emile; Delfosse, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate how the microbial community structure establishes during the start-up phase of a full-scale farm anaerobic reactor inoculated with stale and cold cattle slurry. The 16S/18S high-throughput amplicon sequencing results showed an increase of the bacterial, archaeal and eukaryotic diversity, evenness and richness during the settlement of the mesophilic anaerobic conditions. When a steady performing digestion process was reached, the microbial diversity, evenness and richness decreased, indicating the establishment of a few dominant microbial populations, best adapted to biogas production. Interestingly, among the environmental parameters, the temperature, alkalinity, free-NH3, total solids and O2 content were found to be the main drivers of microbial dynamics. Interactions between eukaryotes, characterized by a high number of unknown organisms, and the bacterial and archaeal communities were also evidenced, suggesting that eukaryotes might play important roles in the anaerobic digestion process. PMID:27099947

  17. A genomic view of methane oxidation by aerobic bacteria and anaerobic archaea

    PubMed Central

    Chistoserdova, Ludmila; Vorholt, Julia A; Lidstrom, Mary E

    2005-01-01

    Recent sequencing of the genome and proteomic analysis of a model aerobic methanotrophic bacterium, Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) has revealed a highly versatile metabolic potential. In parallel, environmental genomics has provided glimpses into anaerobic methane oxidation by certain archaea, further supporting the hypothesis of reverse methanogenesis. PMID:15693955

  18. Internal transcribed spacer 1 secondary structure analysis reveals a common core throughout the anaerobic fungi (Neocallimastigomycota).

    PubMed

    Koetschan, Christian; Kittelmann, Sandra; Lu, Jingli; Al-Halbouni, Djamila; Jarvis, Graeme N; Müller, Tobias; Wolf, Matthias; Janssen, Peter H

    2014-01-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) is a popular barcode marker for fungi and in particular the ITS1 has been widely used for the anaerobic fungi (phylum Neocallimastigomycota). A good number of validated reference sequences of isolates as well as a large number of environmental sequences are available in public databases. Its highly variable nature predisposes the ITS1 for low level phylogenetics; however, it complicates the establishment of reproducible alignments and the reconstruction of stable phylogenetic trees at higher taxonomic levels (genus and above). Here, we overcame these problems by proposing a common core secondary structure of the ITS1 of the anaerobic fungi employing a Hidden Markov Model-based ITS1 sequence annotation and a helix-wise folding approach. We integrated the additional structural information into phylogenetic analyses and present for the first time an automated sequence-structure-based taxonomy of the ITS1 of the anaerobic fungi. The methodology developed is transferable to the ITS1 of other fungal groups, and the robust taxonomy will facilitate and improve high-throughput anaerobic fungal community structure analysis of samples from various environments.

  19. Noncatalytic Docking Domains of Cellulosomes of Anaerobic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Steenbakkers, Peter J. M.; Li, Xin-Liang; Ximenes, Eduardo A.; Arts, Jorik G.; Chen, Huizhong; Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Op den Camp, Huub J. M.

    2001-01-01

    A method is presented for the specific isolation of genes encoding cellulosome components from anaerobic fungi. The catalytic components of the cellulosome of anaerobic fungi typically contain, besides the catalytic domain, mostly two copies of a 40-amino-acid cysteine-rich, noncatalytic docking domain (NCDD) interspaced by short linkers. Degenerate primers were designed to anneal to the highly conserved region within the NCDDs of the monocentric fungus Piromyces sp. strain E2 and the polycentric fungus Orpinomyces sp. strain PC-2. Through PCR using cDNA from Orpinomyces sp. and genomic DNA from Piromyces sp. as templates, respectively, 9 and 19 PCR products were isolated encoding novel NCDD linker sequences. Screening of an Orpinomyces sp. cDNA library with four of these PCR products resulted in the isolation of new genes encoding cellulosome components. An alignment of the partial NCDD sequence information obtained and an alignment of database-accessible NCDD sequences, focusing on the number and position of cysteine residues, indicated the presence of three structural subfamilies within fungal NCDDs. Furthermore, evidence is presented that the NCDDs in CelC from the polycentric fungus Orpinomyces sp. strain PC-2 specifically recognize four proteins in a cellulosome preparation, indicating the presence of multiple scaffoldins. PMID:11514516

  20. [Municipal biowaste thermal-hydrolysis and ASBR anaerobic digestion].

    PubMed

    Hou, Hua-hua; Wang, Wei; Hu, Song; Xu, Yi-xian

    2010-02-01

    Thermal-hydrolysis can remarkably improve the solid organics dissolving efficiency of urban biomass waste, and anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) was used to improve the efficiency of urban biomass waste anaerobic digestion. The optimum thermal-hydrolysis temperature and holding time was 175 degrees C and 60 min, the volatile suspended solid (VSS) dissolving ratio of kitchen waste, fruit-and-vegetable waste and sludge were 31.3%, 31.9% and 49.7%, respectively. Two ASBR and one continuous-flow stirred tank reactor (CSTR) were started at hydraulic retention time (HRT) = 20 d, COD organic loading rate (OLR) = 3.2-3.6 kg/(m3 x d). The biogas production volumes were 5656 mL/d(A1), 6335 mL/d(A2) and 3 103 mL/d(CSTR), respectively; VSS degradation ratios were 45.3% (A1), 50.87% (A2), 20.81% (CSTR), and the total COD (TCOD) removal rates were 88.1% (A1), 90% (A2), 72.6% (CSTR). In ASBR, organic solid and anaerobic microorganism were remained in the reactor during settling period. When HRT was 20 d, the solid retention time (SRT) was over 130 d, which made ASBR higher efficiency than CSTR.

  1. A novel mode of lactate metabolism in strictly anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Weghoff, Marie Charlotte; Bertsch, Johannes; Müller, Volker

    2015-03-01

    Lactate is a common substrate for major groups of strictly anaerobic bacteria, but the biochemistry and bioenergetics of lactate oxidation is obscure. The high redox potential of the pyruvate/lactate pair of E0 ' = -190 mV excludes direct NAD(+) reduction (E0 ' = -320 mV). To identify the hitherto unknown electron acceptor, we have purified the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from the strictly anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii. The LDH forms a stable complex with an electron-transferring flavoprotein (Etf) that exhibited NAD(+) reduction only when reduced ferredoxin (Fd(2-) ) was present. Biochemical analyses revealed that the LDH/Etf complex of A. woodii uses flavin-based electron confurcation to drive endergonic lactate oxidation with NAD(+) as oxidant at the expense of simultaneous exergonic electron flow from reduced ferredoxin (E0 ' ≈ -500 mV) to NAD(+) according to: lactate + Fd(2-)  + 2 NAD(+)  → pyruvate + Fd + 2 NADH. The reduced Fd(2-) is regenerated from NADH by a sequence of events that involves conversion of chemical (ATP) to electrochemical ( Δ μ ˜ Na + ) and finally redox energy (Fd(2-) from NADH) via reversed electron transport catalysed by the Rnf complex. Inspection of genomes revealed that this metabolic scenario for lactate oxidation may also apply to many other anaerobes.

  2. Modeling and Application of a Rapid Fluorescence-Based Assay for Biotoxicity in Anaerobic Digestion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian Lin; Steele, Terry W J; Stuckey, David C

    2015-11-17

    The sensitivity of anaerobic digestion metabolism to a wide range of solutes makes it important to be able to monitor toxicants in the feed to anaerobic digesters to optimize their operation. In this study, a rapid fluorescence measurement technique based on resazurin reduction using a microplate reader was developed and applied for the detection of toxicants and/or inhibitors to digesters. A kinetic model was developed to describe the process of resazurin reduced to resorufin, and eventually to dihydroresorufin under anaerobic conditions. By modeling the assay results of resazurin (0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mM) reduction by a pure facultative anaerobic strain, Enterococcus faecalis, and fresh mixed anaerobic sludge, with or without 10 mg L(-1) spiked pentachlorophenol (PCP), we found it was clear that the pseudo-first-order rate constant for the reduction of resazurin to resorufin, k1, was a good measure of "toxicity". With lower biomass density and the optimal resazurin addition (0.1 mM), the toxicity of 10 mg L(-1) PCP for E. faecalis and fresh anaerobic sludge was detected in 10 min. By using this model, the toxicity differences among seven chlorophenols to E. faecalis and fresh mixed anaerobic sludge were elucidated within 30 min. The toxicity differences determined by this assay were comparable to toxicity sequences of various chlorophenols reported in the literature. These results suggest that the assay developed in this study not only can quickly detect toxicants for anaerobic digestion but also can efficiently detect the toxicity differences among a variety of similar toxicants.

  3. Diversity of Cultured Thermophilic Anaerobes in Hot Springs of Yunnan Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L.; Lu, Y.; Dong, X.; Liu, X.; Wei, Y.; Ji, X.; Zhang, C.

    2010-12-01

    Thermophilic anaerobes including Archaea and Bacteria refer to those growing optimally at temperatures above 50°C and do not use oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor for growth. Study on thermophilic anaerobes will help to understand how life thrives under extreme conditions. Meanwhile thermophilic anaerobes are of importance in potential application and development of thermophilic biotechnology. We have surveyed culturable thermophilic anaerobes in hot springs (pH6.5-7.5; 70 - 94°C) in Rehai of Tengchong, Bangnazhang of Longlin, Eryuan of Dali,Yunnan, China. 50 strains in total were cultured from the hot springs water using Hungate anaerobic technique, and 30 strains were selected based on phenotypic diversity for analysis of 16S rDNA sequences. Phylogenetic analysis showed that 28 strains belonged to the members of five genera: Caldanaerobacter, Calaramator, Thermoanaerobacter, Dictyoglomus and Fervidobacterium, which formed five branches on the phylogenetic tree. Besides, 2 strains of methanogenic archaea were obtained. The majority of the isolates were the known species, however, seven strains were identified as novel species affiliated to the five genera based on the lower 16S rDNA sequence similarities (less than 93 - 97%) with the described species. This work would provide the future study on their diversity, distribution among different regions and the potential application of thermophilic enzyme. Supported by State Key Laboratory of Microbial Resources, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences(SKLMR-080605)and the Foundation of State Natural Science (30660009, 30960022, 31081220175).

  4. Functional dissection of a small anaerobically induced bZIP transcription factor from tomato.

    PubMed

    Sell, Simone; Hehl, Reinhard

    2004-11-01

    A small anaerobically induced tomato transcription factor was isolated from a subtractive library. This factor, designated ABZ1 (anaerobic basic leucine zipper), is anaerobically induced in fruits, leaves and roots and encodes a nuclear localized protein. ABZ1 shares close structural and sequence homology with the S-family of small basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors that are implicated in stress response. Nuclear localization of ABZ1 is mediated by the basic region and occurs under normoxic conditions. ABZ1 binds to G-box-like target sites as a dimer. Binding can be abolished by heterodimerization with a truncated protein retaining the leucine zipper but lacking the DNA binding domain. The protein binds in a sequence specific manner to the CaMV 35S promoter which is down regulated when ABZ1 is coexpressed. This correlates with the anaerobic down regulation of the 35S promoter in tomato and tobacco. These results may suggest that small bZIP proteins are involved in the negative regulation of gene expression under anaerobic conditions. PMID:15560794

  5. Anaerobic and aerobic/anaerobic treatment for tetrachloroethylene (PCE)

    SciTech Connect

    Guiot, S.R.; Kuang, X.; Beaulieu, C.; Corriveau, A.; Hawari, J.

    1995-12-31

    The reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) was studied in a laboratory-scale upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor using sucrose, lactic acid, propionic acid, and methanol as cosubstrates. Parallel experiments were performed to compare the novel coupled anaerobic/aerobic reactor with the conventional UASB. More than 95% of PCE was transformed in both reactors. Complete dechlorination in the UASB reactor decreased with increased PCE loading, declining from 45 to 19%. Minor concentrations of trichloroethylene and of undegraded PCE were detected in the liquid effluent throughout the experiment. Dichloroethylene was the dominant metabolite of all PCE loads, while vinyl chloride was not detected in the liquid effluent. For both reactor types, increased PCE loading led to lower chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rates caused by a decrease in the specific acetate utilization rate. This, combined with a decline of the specific total PCE dechlorination activity, may cause long-term stability problems in the UASB reactor. The coupled reactor demonstrated higher specific PCE degradation rates at all PCE loading levels and a higher specific total dechlorination rate at the highest PCE loading. These characteristics may promote long-term stability of the coupled reactor system.

  6. Anaerobic Digestion Facility : Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Office of Engineering and Construction.

    1984-08-09

    Beneficial and adverse environmental impacts associated with the proposed Anaerobic Digestion Facility located near the South Fork Chehalis River, in Boistfort Prairie, Lewis County, Washington, were evaluated. The proposed process would eliminate some animal waste pollution within the area, and also use methane created during the process to power an engine/generator. In addition, the process will permit dairy operators to recycle currently underutilized resources, namely fiber for bedding solids and nutrients for fertilizers. The impacts examined include air quality, water resources, soils, vegetation and wildfire, land use, noise, cultural resources, visual impacts, recreation, and wastes and polychlorinated biphenyls. (ACR)

  7. Biological nutrients removal from the supernatant originating from the anaerobic digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Malamis, S; Katsou, E; Di Fabio, S; Bolzonella, D; Fatone, F

    2014-09-01

    This study critically evaluates the biological processes and techniques applied to remove nitrogen and phosphorus from the anaerobic supernatant produced from the treatment of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) and from its co-digestion with other biodegradable organic waste (BOW) streams. The wide application of anaerobic digestion for the treatment of several organic waste streams results in the production of high quantities of anaerobic effluents. Such effluents are characterized by high nutrient content, because organic and particulate nitrogen and phosphorus are hydrolyzed in the anaerobic digestion process. Consequently, adequate post-treatment is required in order to comply with the existing land application and discharge legislation in the European Union countries. This may include physicochemical and biological processes, with the latter being more advantageous due to their lower cost. Nitrogen removal is accomplished through the conventional nitrification/denitrification, nitritation/denitritation and the complete autotrophic nitrogen removal process; the latter is accomplished by nitritation coupled with the anoxic ammonium oxidation process. As anaerobic digestion effluents are characterized by low COD/TKN ratio, conventional denitrification/nitrification is not an attractive option; short-cut nitrogen removal processes are more promising. Both suspended and attached growth processes have been employed to treat the anaerobic supernatant. Specifically, the sequencing batch reactor, the membrane bioreactor, the conventional activated sludge and the moving bed biofilm reactor processes have been investigated. Physicochemical phosphorus removal via struvite precipitation has been extensively examined. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal from the anaerobic supernatant can take place through the sequencing anaerobic/aerobic process. More recently, denitrifying phosphorus removal via nitrite or nitrate has been explored. The removal of

  8. Biological nutrients removal from the supernatant originating from the anaerobic digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Malamis, S; Katsou, E; Di Fabio, S; Bolzonella, D; Fatone, F

    2014-09-01

    This study critically evaluates the biological processes and techniques applied to remove nitrogen and phosphorus from the anaerobic supernatant produced from the treatment of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) and from its co-digestion with other biodegradable organic waste (BOW) streams. The wide application of anaerobic digestion for the treatment of several organic waste streams results in the production of high quantities of anaerobic effluents. Such effluents are characterized by high nutrient content, because organic and particulate nitrogen and phosphorus are hydrolyzed in the anaerobic digestion process. Consequently, adequate post-treatment is required in order to comply with the existing land application and discharge legislation in the European Union countries. This may include physicochemical and biological processes, with the latter being more advantageous due to their lower cost. Nitrogen removal is accomplished through the conventional nitrification/denitrification, nitritation/denitritation and the complete autotrophic nitrogen removal process; the latter is accomplished by nitritation coupled with the anoxic ammonium oxidation process. As anaerobic digestion effluents are characterized by low COD/TKN ratio, conventional denitrification/nitrification is not an attractive option; short-cut nitrogen removal processes are more promising. Both suspended and attached growth processes have been employed to treat the anaerobic supernatant. Specifically, the sequencing batch reactor, the membrane bioreactor, the conventional activated sludge and the moving bed biofilm reactor processes have been investigated. Physicochemical phosphorus removal via struvite precipitation has been extensively examined. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal from the anaerobic supernatant can take place through the sequencing anaerobic/aerobic process. More recently, denitrifying phosphorus removal via nitrite or nitrate has been explored. The removal of

  9. Inhibition of anaerobic digestion process: a review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ye; Cheng, Jay J; Creamer, Kurt S

    2008-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion is an attractive waste treatment practice in which both pollution control and energy recovery can be achieved. Many agricultural and industrial wastes are ideal candidates for anaerobic digestion because they contain high levels of easily biodegradable materials. Problems such as low methane yield and process instability are often encountered in anaerobic digestion, preventing this technique from being widely applied. A wide variety of inhibitory substances are the primary cause of anaerobic digester upset or failure since they are present in substantial concentrations in wastes. Considerable research efforts have been made to identify the mechanism and the controlling factors of inhibition. This review provides a detailed summary of the research conducted on the inhibition of anaerobic processes. The inhibitors commonly present in anaerobic digesters include ammonia, sulfide, light metal ions, heavy metals, and organics. Due to the difference in anaerobic inocula, waste composition, and experimental methods and conditions, literature results on inhibition caused by specific toxicants vary widely. Co-digestion with other waste, adaptation of microorganisms to inhibitory substances, and incorporation of methods to remove or counteract toxicants before anaerobic digestion can significantly improve the waste treatment efficiency.

  10. Anaerobic critical velocity in four swimming techniques.

    PubMed

    Neiva, H P; Fernandes, R J; Vilas-Boas, J P

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess critical velocity in order to control and evaluate anaerobic swimming training. 51 highly trained male swimmers performed maximal 15, 25, 37.5 and 50 m in the 4 swimming techniques to determine critical velocity from the distance-time relationship. Anaerobic critical velocity was compared with 100 m swimming performance and corresponding partials. Complementarily, 9 swimmers performed a 6×50 m (4 min interval) training series at front crawl individual anaerobic critical velocity, capillary blood lactate concentrations being assessed after each repetition. The mean±SD values of anaerobic critical velocity and its relationship with the 100 m event were: 1.61±0.07 (r=0.60, p=0.037), 1.53±0.05 (r=0.81, p=0.015), 1.33±0.05 (r=0.83, p=0.002), and 1.75±0.05 (r=0.74, p=0.001), for butterfly, backstroke, breaststroke and front crawl, respectively. However, differences between anaerobic critical velocity and performance were observed (with exception of the second half of the 100 m swimming events in breaststroke and butterfly). Lactate concentration values at the end of the series were 14.52±1.06 mmol.l (-1), which suggests that it was indeed an anaerobic training set. In this sense, anaerobic critical velocity can be used to prescribe anaerobic training intensities.

  11. Anaerobic critical velocity in four swimming techniques.

    PubMed

    Neiva, H P; Fernandes, R J; Vilas-Boas, J P

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess critical velocity in order to control and evaluate anaerobic swimming training. 51 highly trained male swimmers performed maximal 15, 25, 37.5 and 50 m in the 4 swimming techniques to determine critical velocity from the distance-time relationship. Anaerobic critical velocity was compared with 100 m swimming performance and corresponding partials. Complementarily, 9 swimmers performed a 6×50 m (4 min interval) training series at front crawl individual anaerobic critical velocity, capillary blood lactate concentrations being assessed after each repetition. The mean±SD values of anaerobic critical velocity and its relationship with the 100 m event were: 1.61±0.07 (r=0.60, p=0.037), 1.53±0.05 (r=0.81, p=0.015), 1.33±0.05 (r=0.83, p=0.002), and 1.75±0.05 (r=0.74, p=0.001), for butterfly, backstroke, breaststroke and front crawl, respectively. However, differences between anaerobic critical velocity and performance were observed (with exception of the second half of the 100 m swimming events in breaststroke and butterfly). Lactate concentration values at the end of the series were 14.52±1.06 mmol.l (-1), which suggests that it was indeed an anaerobic training set. In this sense, anaerobic critical velocity can be used to prescribe anaerobic training intensities. PMID:21165797

  12. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  13. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  14. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  15. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  16. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  17. Factor Analysis of Various Anaerobic Power Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, James M.; And Others

    A study investigated the relationship between selected anthropometric variables and of numerous anaerobic power tests with measures obtained on an isokinetic dynamometer. Thirty-one male college students performed several anaerobic power tests, including: the vertical jump using the Lewis formula; the Margaria-Kalamen stair climb test; the Wingate…

  18. Anaerobic Infections in Children with Neurological Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brook, Itzhak

    1995-01-01

    Children with neurological impairments are prone to develop serious infection with anaerobic bacteria. The most common anaerobic infections are decubitus ulcers; gastrostomy site wound infections; pulmonary infections (aspiration pneumonia, lung abscesses, and tracheitis); and chronic suppurative otitis media. The unique microbiology of each of…

  19. Anaerobic acidogenesis of dairy manure

    SciTech Connect

    Krones, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine if high rate acidogenic fermentation of dairy manure was possible, Whole dairy manure was ground and diluted to 4% total solids and fed to a 10 L anaerobic chemostat operating at 35C and with hydraulic retention times varying between 6 and 50 hours. Several physical and organic parameters of the influent and effluent were measured and compared. The results indicated that the manure was too refractory for high rate liquefaction and hydrolysis. A second experiment was conducted using the same techniques and substrate but varying the substrate pH between 5 and 7. The objectives were to further investigate the pH sensitivity of the acidogenic process and to determine if, by introducing a substrate with a low pH, acidogenesis might proceed more efficiently. The primary result of decreasing the pH was a smaller proportion of methane and an increased proportion of hydrogen in the gas. Liquefaction and hydrolysis continued to be rate limiting and appeared to be a major impediment to two phase anaerobic treatment of dairy manure.

  20. Anaerobic digestion for household organics

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, R.; Kelleher, M.

    1995-04-01

    Considerable success in using anaerobic technology for processing household organics is being reported by several recently constructed facilities in Europe. Organic residuals collected separately in a Belgian town are processed to produce biogas and a compost-like material in less than one month. The dry anaerobic conversion process (DRANCO) was developed by Organic Waste Systems (OWS) in the 1980s, with the collaboration of Professor Willy Verstraete at the University of Ghent`s Laboratory of Applied Microbial Ecology. The patented process converts solid and semisolid organic residuals into biogas (for energy recovery) and a stable humus like product. The plant has competing odor sources such as the active landfill and the surrounding farmland - in fact, the smell of livestock manure is quite prevalent in this heavily agricultural area. Addition of the nonrecyclable paper fraction to the feedstock improves the carbon/nitrogen ratio, soaks up moisture, and absorbs odor. The entire Brecht facility does not occupy much space and total material retention time at the site is one month, compared to a number of months for aerobic systems. It also has a low staffing requirement, provides energy self-sufficiency, and the final soil enhancement product meets established quality standards.

  1. Toxicants inhibiting anaerobic digestion: a review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian Lin; Ortiz, Raphael; Steele, Terry W J; Stuckey, David C

    2014-12-01

    Anaerobic digestion is increasingly being used to treat wastes from many sources because of its manifold advantages over aerobic treatment, e.g. low sludge production and low energy requirements. However, anaerobic digestion is sensitive to toxicants, and a wide range of compounds can inhibit the process and cause upset or failure. Substantial research has been carried out over the years to identify specific inhibitors/toxicants, and their mechanism of toxicity in anaerobic digestion. In this review we present a detailed and critical summary of research on the inhibition of anaerobic processes by specific organic toxicants (e.g., chlorophenols, halogenated aliphatics and long chain fatty acids), inorganic toxicants (e.g., ammonia, sulfide and heavy metals) and in particular, nanomaterials, focusing on the mechanism of their inhibition/toxicity. A better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms behind inhibition/toxicity will enhance the wider application of anaerobic digestion. PMID:25457225

  2. Toxicants inhibiting anaerobic digestion: a review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian Lin; Ortiz, Raphael; Steele, Terry W J; Stuckey, David C

    2014-12-01

    Anaerobic digestion is increasingly being used to treat wastes from many sources because of its manifold advantages over aerobic treatment, e.g. low sludge production and low energy requirements. However, anaerobic digestion is sensitive to toxicants, and a wide range of compounds can inhibit the process and cause upset or failure. Substantial research has been carried out over the years to identify specific inhibitors/toxicants, and their mechanism of toxicity in anaerobic digestion. In this review we present a detailed and critical summary of research on the inhibition of anaerobic processes by specific organic toxicants (e.g., chlorophenols, halogenated aliphatics and long chain fatty acids), inorganic toxicants (e.g., ammonia, sulfide and heavy metals) and in particular, nanomaterials, focusing on the mechanism of their inhibition/toxicity. A better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms behind inhibition/toxicity will enhance the wider application of anaerobic digestion.

  3. Spectrum and treatment of anaerobic infections.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobes are the most predominant components of the normal human skin and mucous membranes bacterial flora, and are a frequent cause of endogenous bacterial infections. Anaerobic infections can occur in all body locations: the central nervous system, oral cavity, head and neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis, skin, and soft tissues. Treatment of anaerobic infection is complicated by their slow growth in culture, by their polymicrobial nature and by their growing resistance to antimicrobials. Antimicrobial therapy is frequently the only form of therapy needed, whereas in others it is an important adjunct to drainage and surgery. Because anaerobes generally are isolated mixed with aerobes, the antimicrobial chosen should provide for adequate coverage of both. The most effective antimicrobials against anaerobes are: metronidazole, the carbapenems (imipenem, meropenem, doripenem, ertapenem), chloramphenicol, the combinations of a penicillin and a beta-lactamase inhibitors (ampicillin or ticarcillin plus clavulanate, amoxicillin plus sulbactam, piperacillin plus tazobactam), tigecycline, cefoxitin and clindamycin. PMID:26620376

  4. Anaerobic bioprocessing of low-rank coals

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, M.K.; Narayan, R.; Han, O.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to find biological methods to remove carboxylic functionalities from low rank coals under ambient conditions and to assess the properties of these modified coals towards coal decarboxylation. The microbial consortia will be developed using a fermentor system first under batch and then in a continuous system. The main objectives for this quarter were to develop microbial consortia that would decarboxylate coal and isolate potential anaerobic microorganisms with decarboxylating, ability from these enriched microbial consortia, to continue to compare the known cultures with reward to their ability to decarboxylate coal, and to characterize the anaerobically biotreated coal using FTIR to confirm decarboxylation of coal. Significant achievements during the period include: coal decarboxylation was possible only under anaerobic conditions. microbial consortia that can anaerobically decarboxylate coal have been developed using anaerobic vials and batch fermentor system, and loss of carboxyl groups in biotreated coal has been confirmed by FT-IR.

  5. Anaerobic biorefinery: Current status, challenges, and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Sawatdeenarunat, Chayanon; Nguyen, Duc; Surendra, K C; Shrestha, Shilva; Rajendran, Karthik; Oechsner, Hans; Xie, Li; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) has been in use for many decades. To date, it has been primarily aimed at treating organic wastes, mainly manures and wastewater sludge, and industrial wastewaters. However, with the current advancements, a more open mind is required to look beyond these somewhat restricted original applications of AD. Biorefineries are such concepts, where multiple products including chemicals, fuels, polymers etc. are produced from organic feedstocks. The anaerobic biorefinery concept is now gaining increased attention, utilizing AD as the final disposal step. This review aims at evaluating the potential significance of anaerobic biorefineries, including types of feedstocks, uses for the produced energy, as well as sustainable applications of the generated residual digestate. A comprehensive analysis of various types of anaerobic biorefineries has been developed, including both large-scale and household level applications. Finally, future directives are highlighted showing how anaerobic biorefinery concept could impact the bioeconomy in the near future.

  6. Anaerobic biorefinery: Current status, challenges, and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Sawatdeenarunat, Chayanon; Nguyen, Duc; Surendra, K C; Shrestha, Shilva; Rajendran, Karthik; Oechsner, Hans; Xie, Li; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) has been in use for many decades. To date, it has been primarily aimed at treating organic wastes, mainly manures and wastewater sludge, and industrial wastewaters. However, with the current advancements, a more open mind is required to look beyond these somewhat restricted original applications of AD. Biorefineries are such concepts, where multiple products including chemicals, fuels, polymers etc. are produced from organic feedstocks. The anaerobic biorefinery concept is now gaining increased attention, utilizing AD as the final disposal step. This review aims at evaluating the potential significance of anaerobic biorefineries, including types of feedstocks, uses for the produced energy, as well as sustainable applications of the generated residual digestate. A comprehensive analysis of various types of anaerobic biorefineries has been developed, including both large-scale and household level applications. Finally, future directives are highlighted showing how anaerobic biorefinery concept could impact the bioeconomy in the near future. PMID:27005786

  7. Draft genome sequence of Virgibacillus halodenitrificans 1806.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Jae; Lee, Yong-Jik; Jeong, Haeyoung; Lee, Sang Jun; Lee, Han-Seung; Pan, Jae-Gu; Kim, Byoung-Chan; Lee, Dong-Woo

    2012-11-01

    Virgibacillus halodenitrificans 1806 is an endospore-forming halophilic bacterium isolated from salterns in Korea. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of V. halodenitrificans 1806, which may reveal the molecular basis of osmoadaptation and insights into carbon and anaerobic metabolism in moderate halophiles. PMID:23105070

  8. Anaerobic/aerobic treatment of selected azo dyes in wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Seshadri, S.; Bishop, P.L. . Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering); Agha, A.M. . Faculty of Civil Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    Azo dyes represent the largest class of dyes in use today. Current environmental concern with these dyes revolves around the potential carcinogenic health risk presented by these dyes or their intermediate biodegradation products when exposed to microflora in the human digestive tract. These dyes may build up in the environment, since many wastewater treatment plants allow these dyes to pass through the system virtually untreated. The initial step in the degradation of these dyes is the cleavage of the Azo bond. This cleavage is often impossible under aerobic conditions, but has been readily demonstrated under anaerobic conditions. The focus of the study was to determine the feasibility of using an anaerobic fluidized-bed reactor to accomplish this cleavage. The effects of typical process variables such as hydraulic retention time (HRT), influent dye concentration levels, and degree of bed fluidization on removal efficiencies were also studied. The four dyes selected for this study were Acid-Orange 7, Acid-Orange 8, Acid-Orange 10, and Acid-Red 14. The effectiveness of using a bench-scale-activated sludge reactor as a sequenced second stage was also examined. Results indicate that nearly complete cleavage of the Azo bond is easily accomplished for each of the four dyes under hydraulic retention times of either 12 or 24 h. Initial results indicate, though, that aromatic amine by-products remain. The sequenced second stage was able to remove the remaining Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) load to acceptable levels. Work is presently underway to determine the face of the anaerobic by-products in the aerobic second stage.

  9. Prevalence of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Moore, Tara A; Xing, Yangping; Lazenby, Brent; Lynch, Michael D J; Schiff, Sherry; Robertson, William D; Timlin, Robert; Lanza, Sadia; Ryan, M Cathryn; Aravena, Ramon; Fortin, Danielle; Clark, Ian D; Neufeld, Josh D

    2011-09-01

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria perform an important step in the global nitrogen cycle: anaerobic oxidation of ammonium and reduction of nitrite to form dinitrogen gas (N(2)). Anammox organisms appear to be widely distributed in natural and artificial environments. However, their roles in groundwater ammonium attenuation remain unclear and only limited biomarker-based data confirmed their presence prior to this study. We used complementary molecular and isotope-based methods to assess anammox diversity and activity occurring at three ammonium-contaminated groundwater sites: quantitative PCR, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, sequencing of 16S rRNA genes, and (15)N-tracer incubations. Here we show that anammox performing organisms were abundant bacterial community members. Although all sites were dominated by Candidatus Brocadia-like sequences, the community at one site was particularly diverse, possessing four of five known genera of anammox bacteria. Isotope data showed that anammox produced up to 18 and 36% of N(2) at these sites. By combining molecular and isotopic results we have demonstrated the diversity, abundance, and activity of these autotrophic bacteria. Our results provide strong evidence for their important biogeochemical role in attenuating groundwater ammonium contamination.

  10. Bacterial and archaeal phylogenetic diversity associated with swine sludge from an anaerobic treatment lagoon.

    PubMed

    Cardinali-Rezende, Juliana; Pereira, Zelina L; Sanz, José L; Chartone-Souza, Edmar; Nascimento, Andréa M A

    2012-11-01

    Over the last decades, the demand for pork products has increased significantly, along with concern about suitable waste management. Anaerobic-lagoon fermentation for swine-sludge stabilization is a good strategy, although little is known about the microbial communities in the lagoons. Here, we employed a cloning- and sequencing-based analysis of the 16S rRNA gene to characterize and quantify the prokaryotic community composition in a swine-waste-sludge anaerobic lagoon (SAL). DNA sequence analysis revealed that the SAL library harbored 15 bacterial phyla: Bacteroidetes, Cloroflexi, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Deinococcus-Thermus, Synergystetes, Gemmatimonadetes, Chlorobi, Fibrobacteres, Verrucomicrobia and candidates division OP5, OP8, WWE1, KSB1, WS6. The SAL library was generally dominated by carbohydrate-oxidizing bacteria. The archaeal sequences were related to the Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota phyla. Crenarchaeota predominated in the library, demonstrating that it is not restricted to high-temperature environments, being also responsible for ammonium oxidation in the anaerobic lagoon. Euryarchaeota sequences were associated with the hydrogenotrophic methanogens (Methanomicrobiales and Methanobacteriales). Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the number of bacterial cells was at least three orders of magnitude higher than the number of archaeal cells in the SAL. The identified prokaryotic diversity was ecologically significant, particularly the archaeal community of hydrogenotrophic methanogens, which was responsible for methane production in the anaerobic lagoon. This study provided insight into the archaeal involvement in the overall oxidation of organic matter and the production of methane. Therefore, the treatment of swine waste in the sludge anaerobic lagoon could represent a potential inoculum for the start-up of municipal solid-waste digesters. PMID:22828793

  11. Effect of music on anaerobic exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Atan, T

    2013-03-01

    For years, mostly the effects of music on cardiorespiratory exercise performance have been studied, but a few studies have examined the effect of music on anaerobic exercise. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of listening to music and its rhythm on anaerobic exercise: on power output, heart rate and the concentration of blood lactate. 28 male subjects were required to visit the laboratory on 6 occasions, each separated by 48 hours. Firstly, each subject performed the Running-based Anaerobic Sprint Test (RAST) under 3 conditions on separate days: while listening to "slow rhythm music", "fast rhythm music" or "no music". 48 hours after the subjects completed RAST under 3 conditions, Wingate Anaerobic Power (WAN) tests were performed under 3 music conditions. The order of the 3 conditions (slow music, fast music and no music) was selected randomly to prevent an order effect. Results showed no significant differences between 3 conditions in anaerobic power assessments, heart rate or blood lactate (p > 0.05). On the basis of these results it can be said that music cannot improve anaerobic performance. The type of music had no impact on power outputs during RAST and WAN exercise. As a conclusion, listening to music and its rhythm cannot enhance anaerobic performance and cannot change the physiological response to supramaximal exercise. PMID:24744463

  12. Genome sequence of Clostridium tunisiense TJ, isolated from drain sediment from a pesticide factory.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lili; Wang, Yu; Yu, Chunyan; Zhao, Yongqin; Gan, Yinbo

    2012-12-01

    Clostridium tunisiense is a Gram-positive, obligate anaerobe that was first isolated in an anaerobic environment under eutrophication. Here we report the first genome sequence of the Clostridium tunisiense TJ isolated from drain sediment of a pesticide factory in Tianjin, China. The genome is of great importance for both basic and application research. PMID:23209212

  13. Genome sequence of Clostridium tunisiense TJ, isolated from drain sediment from a pesticide factory.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lili; Wang, Yu; Yu, Chunyan; Zhao, Yongqin; Gan, Yinbo

    2012-12-01

    Clostridium tunisiense is a Gram-positive, obligate anaerobe that was first isolated in an anaerobic environment under eutrophication. Here we report the first genome sequence of the Clostridium tunisiense TJ isolated from drain sediment of a pesticide factory in Tianjin, China. The genome is of great importance for both basic and application research.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Levilinea saccharolytica KIBI-1, a Member of the Chloroflexi Class Anaerolineae.

    PubMed

    Hemp, James; Ward, Lewis M; Pace, Laura A; Fischer, Woodward W

    2015-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Levilinea saccharolytica KIBI-1, a facultative anaerobic member of the Chloroflexi class Anaerolineae. While L. saccharolytica was characterized as an obligate anaerobe, genome analysis provides evidence for the presence of both aerobic respiration and partial denitrification pathways. PMID:26586894

  15. Diversity and origins of anaerobic metabolism in mitochondria and related organelles

    PubMed Central

    Stairs, Courtney W.; Leger, Michelle M.; Roger, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Across the diversity of life, organisms have evolved different strategies to thrive in hypoxic environments, and microbial eukaryotes (protists) are no exception. Protists that experience hypoxia often possess metabolically distinct mitochondria called mitochondrion-related organelles (MROs). While there are some common metabolic features shared between the MROs of distantly related protists, these organelles have evolved independently multiple times across the breadth of eukaryotic diversity. Until recently, much of our knowledge regarding the metabolic potential of different MROs was limited to studies in parasitic lineages. Over the past decade, deep-sequencing studies of free-living anaerobic protists have revealed novel configurations of metabolic pathways that have been co-opted for life in low oxygen environments. Here, we provide recent examples of anaerobic metabolism in the MROs of free-living protists and their parasitic relatives. Additionally, we outline evolutionary scenarios to explain the origins of these anaerobic pathways in eukaryotes. PMID:26323757

  16. Diversity and origins of anaerobic metabolism in mitochondria and related organelles.

    PubMed

    Stairs, Courtney W; Leger, Michelle M; Roger, Andrew J

    2015-09-26

    Across the diversity of life, organisms have evolved different strategies to thrive in hypoxic environments, and microbial eukaryotes (protists) are no exception. Protists that experience hypoxia often possess metabolically distinct mitochondria called mitochondrion-related organelles (MROs). While there are some common metabolic features shared between the MROs of distantly related protists, these organelles have evolved independently multiple times across the breadth of eukaryotic diversity. Until recently, much of our knowledge regarding the metabolic potential of different MROs was limited to studies in parasitic lineages. Over the past decade, deep-sequencing studies of free-living anaerobic protists have revealed novel configurations of metabolic pathways that have been co-opted for life in low oxygen environments. Here, we provide recent examples of anaerobic metabolism in the MROs of free-living protists and their parasitic relatives. Additionally, we outline evolutionary scenarios to explain the origins of these anaerobic pathways in eukaryotes.

  17. Anaerobic filter for biogas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavadej, S.

    1980-01-01

    A laboratory study evaluated the performance of an anaerobic filter in producing biogas from pig waste with 30,000 mg/l of COD. The filter packing was bamboo rings of 1 and 1/2 in. diameter, 1 in. long; the bamboo-bed filter operated satisfactorily in a wide COD loading range of 3.74-15.65 kg/cu m/d which corresponds to the hydraulic retention of 8.47 to 1.68 days. At the optimum loading of 7.299 kg COD/cu m/d, the largest gas rate of 0.212 cu m/kg of COD was produced. The required volume of the digester for 1.2 cu m/d of gas production would be only 1.5 cu m; in practical applications, consideration should be given to the gas collecting system and clogging problems.

  18. Anaerobic Degradation of Phenolic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schink, B.; Philipp, B.; Müller, J.

    Mononuclear aromatic compounds are degraded anaerobically through three main pathways, the benzoyl-CoA pathway, the resorcinol pathway, and the phloroglucinol pathway. Various modification reactions channel a broad variety of mononuclear aromatics including aromatic hydrocarbons into either one of these three pathways. Recently, a further pathway was discovered with hydroxyhydroquinone as central intermediate through which especially nitrate-reducing bacteria degrade phenolic compounds and some hydroxylated benzoates. Comparison of the various strategies taken for the degradation of aromatics in the absence of oxygen demonstrates that the biochemistry of breakdown of these compounds is determined largely by the overall reaction energetics and, more precisely, by the redox potentials of the electron acceptor systems used. Nitrate reducers differ in their strategies significantly from those used by sulfate-reducing or fermenting bacteria.

  19. Sleep Deprivation Induced Anxiety and Anaerobic Performance

    PubMed Central

    Vardar, Selma Arzu; Öztürk, Levent; Kurt, Cem; Bulut, Erdogan; Sut, Necdet; Vardar, Erdal

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of sleep deprivation induced anxiety on anaerobic performance. Thirteen volunteer male physical education students completed the Turkish version of State Anxiety Inventory and performed Wingate anaerobic test for three times: (1) following a full-night of habitual sleep (baseline measurements), (2) following 30 hours of sleep deprivation, and (3) following partial-night sleep deprivation. Baseline measurements were performed the day before total sleep deprivation. Measurements following partial sleep deprivation were made 2 weeks later than total sleep deprivation measurements. State anxiety was measured prior to each Wingate test. The mean state anxiety following total sleep deprivation was higher than the baseline measurement (44.9 ± 12.9 vs. 27.6 ± 4.2, respectively, p = 0.02) whereas anaerobic performance parameters remained unchanged. Neither anaerobic parameters nor state anxiety levels were affected by one night partial sleep deprivation. Our results suggest that 30 hours continuous wakefulness may increase anxiety level without impairing anaerobic performance, whereas one night of partial sleep deprivation was ineffective on both state anxiety and anaerobic performance. Key pointsShort time total sleep deprivation (30 hours) increases state anxiety without any competition stress.Anaerobic performance parameters such as peak power, mean power and minimum power may not show a distinctive difference from anaerobic performance in a normal sleep day despite the high anxiety level induced by short time sleep deprivation.Partial sleep deprivation does not affect anxiety level and anaerobic performance of the next day. PMID:24149488

  20. Ammonia and temperature determine potential clustering in the anaerobic digestion microbiome.

    PubMed

    De Vrieze, Jo; Saunders, Aaron Marc; He, Ying; Fang, Jing; Nielsen, Per Halkjaer; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2015-05-15

    Anaerobic digestion is regarded as a key environmental technology in the present and future bio-based economy. The microbial community completing the anaerobic digestion process is considered complex, and several attempts already have been carried out to determine the key microbial populations. However, the key differences in the anaerobic digestion microbiomes, and the environmental/process parameters that drive these differences, remain poorly understood. In this research, we hypothesized that differences in operational parameters lead to a particular composition and organization of microbial communities in full-scale installations. A total of 38 samples were collected from 29 different full-scale anaerobic digestion installations, showing constant biogas production in function of time. Microbial community analysis was carried out by means of amplicon sequencing and real-time PCR. The bacterial community in all samples was dominated by representatives of the Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria, covering 86.1 ± 10.7% of the total bacterial community. Acetoclastic methanogenesis was dominated by Methanosaetaceae, yet, only the hydrogenotrophic Methanobacteriales correlated with biogas production, confirming their importance in high-rate anaerobic digestion systems. In-depth analysis of operational and environmental parameters and bacterial community structure indicated the presence of three potential clusters in anaerobic digestion. These clusters were determined by total ammonia concentration, free ammonia concentration and temperature, and characterized by an increased relative abundance of Bacteroidales, Clostridiales and Lactobacillales, respectively. None of the methanogenic populations, however, could be significantly attributed to any of the three clusters. Nonetheless, further experimental research will be required to validate the existence of these different clusters, and to which extent the presence of these clusters relates to stable or sub

  1. Multi-centre evaluation of mass spectrometric identification of anaerobic bacteria using the VITEK® MS system.

    PubMed

    Garner, O; Mochon, A; Branda, J; Burnham, C-A; Bythrow, M; Ferraro, M; Ginocchio, C; Jennemann, R; Manji, R; Procop, G W; Richter, S; Rychert, J; Sercia, L; Westblade, L; Lewinski, M

    2014-04-01

    Accurate and timely identification of anaerobic bacteria is critical to successful treatment. Classic phenotypic methods for identification require long turnaround times and can exhibit poor species level identification. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is an identification method that can provide rapid identification of anaerobes. We present a multi-centre study assessing the clinical performance of the VITEK(®) MS in the identification of anaerobic bacteria. Five different test sites analysed a collection of 651 unique anaerobic isolates comprising 11 different genera. Multiple species were included for several of the genera. Briefly, anaerobic isolates were applied directly to a well of a target plate. Matrix solution (α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid) was added and allowed to dry. Mass spectra results were generated with the VITEK(®) MS, and the comparative spectral analysis and organism identification were determined using the VITEK(®) MS database 2.0. Results were confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Of the 651 isolates analysed, 91.2% (594/651) exhibited the correct species identification. An additional eight isolates were correctly identified to genus level, raising the rate of identification to 92.5%. Genus-level identification consisted of Actinomyces, Bacteroides and Prevotella species. Fusobacterium nucleatum, Actinomyces neuii and Bacteroides uniformis were notable for an increased percentage of no-identification results compared with the other anaerobes tested. VITEK(®) MS identification of clinically relevant anaerobes is highly accurate and represents a dramatic improvement over other phenotypic methods in accuracy and turnaround time.

  2. Anaerobic digestion technology in poultry and livestock waste treatment--a literature review.

    PubMed

    Sakar, Suleyman; Yetilmezsoy, Kaan; Kocak, Emel

    2009-02-01

    3 CH4 month(- 1) were found for the corresponding reactor volumes of 120 mL and 1300 m3, respectively. In anaerobic processing of swine manure, OLR ranged from 0.9 to 15.42 g VS L(-1) day(- 1) at mesophilic conditions (25-35 degrees C). The reactor volumes varied between 125 mL and 380 L. Temperature and retention times ranged from 25 to 60 degrees C, and 0.9 to 113 days, respectively. COD and VS reductions achieved were between 57 and 78% and between 34.5 and 61%, respectively. Moreover, methane yields were obtained between 22 and 360 mL CH4 g(-1) VS added. The results showed that UASB, anaerobic baffled reactors, CSTR, and anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) were successfully utilized in anaerobic processing of swine manure at both mesophilic and thermophilic conditions.

  3. Energy from anaerobic methane production. [Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-02-01

    Since 1970 Swedish researchers have been testing the ANAMET (anaerobic-aerobic-methane) process, which involves converting industrial wastewaters via an initial anaerobic microbiological step followed by an aerobic one. Recycling the biomass material in each step allows shorter hydraulic retention times without decreasing stability or solids reduction. Since the first ANAMET plants began operating at a Swedish sugar factory in 1972, 17 more plants have started up or are under construction. Moreover, the ANAMET process has engendered to offshoot BIOMET (biomass-methane) process, a thermophilic anaerobic scheme that can handle sugar-beet pulp as well as grass and other soft, fast-growing biomasses.

  4. Fate of Trace Metals in Anaerobic Digestion.

    PubMed

    Fermoso, F G; van Hullebusch, E D; Guibaud, G; Collins, G; Svensson, B H; Carliell-Marquet, C; Vink, J P M; Esposito, G; Frunzo, L

    2015-01-01

    A challenging, and largely uncharted, area of research in the field of anaerobic digestion science and technology is in understanding the roles of trace metals in enabling biogas production. This is a major knowledge gap and a multifaceted problem involving metal chemistry; physical interactions of metal and solids; microbiology; and technology optimization. Moreover, the fate of trace metals, and the chemical speciation and transport of trace metals in environments--often agricultural lands receiving discharge waters from anaerobic digestion processes--simultaneously represents challenges for environmental protection and opportunities to close process loops in anaerobic digestion.

  5. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Proteome during Anaerobic Growth‡

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Manhong; Guina, Tina; Brittnacher, Mitchell; Nguyen, Hai; Eng, Jimmy; Miller, Samuel I.

    2005-01-01

    Isotope-coded affinity tag analysis and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by tandem mass spectrometry were used to identify Pseudomonas aeruginosa proteins expressed during anaerobic growth. Out of the 617 proteins identified, 158 were changed in abundance during anaerobic growth compared to during aerobic growth, including proteins whose increased expression was expected based on their role in anaerobic metabolism. These results form the basis for future analyses of alterations in bacterial protein content during growth in various environments, including the cystic fibrosis airway. PMID:16291692

  6. Anaerobic microbial transformations in subsurface environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bollag, J.M.; Berry, D.F.; Chanmugathas, P.

    1985-04-01

    The first draft of a literature review article entitled, ''Metabolism of Homocyclic (Benzenoid) and Heterocyclic Aromatic Compounds by Microorganisms Under Anaerobic Conditions'' is completed. The article covers biodegradation of both heterocyclic and homocyclic aromatic compounds under a variety of conditions including nitrate reducing, fermentation, sulfate reducing, and methanogensis. Laboratory experiments have been designed to study the anaerobic biotransformation processes involving organic substance derived from energy residual wastes. The test compounds selected for the initial anaerobic biodegradation experiments include aniline, indole, and pyridine. A Hungate apparatus is presently in operation.

  7. Cholera Toxin Production Induced upon Anaerobic Respiration is Suppressed by Glucose Fermentation in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Oh, Young Taek; Lee, Kang-Mu; Bari, Wasimul; Kim, Hwa Young; Kim, Hye Jin; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2016-03-01

    The causative agent of pandemic cholera, Vibrio cholerae, infects the anaerobic environment of the human intestine. Production of cholera toxin (CT), a major virulence factor of V. cholerae, is highly induced during anaerobic respiration with trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) as an alternative electron acceptor. However, the molecular mechanism of TMAO-stimulated CT production is not fully understood. Herein, we reveal that CT production during anaerobic TMAO respiration is affected by glucose fermentation. When the seventh pandemic V. cholerae O1 strain N16961 was grown with TMAO and additional glucose, CT production was markedly reduced. Furthermore, an N16961 Δcrp mutant, devoid of cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP), was defective in CT production during growth by anaerobic TMAO respiration, further suggesting a role of glucose metabolism in regulating TMAO-mediated CT production. TMAO reductase activity was noticeably decreased when grown together with glucose or by mutation of the crp gene. A CRP binding region was identified in the promoter region of the torD gene, which encodes a structural subunit of the TMAO reductase. Gel shift assays further confirmed the binding of purified CRP to the torD promoter sequence. Together, our results suggest that the bacterial ability to respire using TMAO is controlled by CRP, whose activity is dependent on glucose availability. Our results reveal a novel mechanism for the regulation of major virulence factor production by V. cholerae under anaerobic growth conditions.

  8. Cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid as external carbon sources in biological nutrient removal*

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Fan; Hu, Xiang; Xie, Li; Zhou, Qi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of one kind of food industry effluent, cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid, on biological nutrient removal (BNR) from municipal wastewater in anaerobic-anoxic-aerobic sequencing batch reactors (SBRs). Experiments were carried out with cassava stillage supernatant and its anaerobic fermentation liquid, and one pure compound (sodium acetate) served as an external carbon source. Cyclic studies indicated that the cassava by-products not only affected the transformation of nitrogen, phosphorus, poly-β-hydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), and glycogen in the BNR process, but also resulted in higher removal efficiencies for phosphorus and nitrogen compared with sodium acetate. Furthermore, assays for phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs) and denitrifying phosphorus accumulating organisms (DPAOs) demonstrated that the proportion of DPAOs to PAOs reached 62.6% (Day 86) and 61.8% (Day 65) when using cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid, respectively, as the external carbon source. In addition, the nitrate utilization rates (NURs) of the cassava by-products were in the range of 5.49–5.99 g N/(kg MLVSS∙h) (MLVSS is mixed liquor volatile suspended solids) and 6.63–6.81 g N/(kg MLVSS∙h), respectively. The improvement in BNR performance and the reduction in the amount of cassava stillage to be treated in-situ make cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid attractive alternatives to sodium acetate as external carbon sources for BNR processes. PMID:25845364

  9. Cholera Toxin Production Induced upon Anaerobic Respiration is Suppressed by Glucose Fermentation in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Oh, Young Taek; Lee, Kang-Mu; Bari, Wasimul; Kim, Hwa Young; Kim, Hye Jin; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2016-03-01

    The causative agent of pandemic cholera, Vibrio cholerae, infects the anaerobic environment of the human intestine. Production of cholera toxin (CT), a major virulence factor of V. cholerae, is highly induced during anaerobic respiration with trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) as an alternative electron acceptor. However, the molecular mechanism of TMAO-stimulated CT production is not fully understood. Herein, we reveal that CT production during anaerobic TMAO respiration is affected by glucose fermentation. When the seventh pandemic V. cholerae O1 strain N16961 was grown with TMAO and additional glucose, CT production was markedly reduced. Furthermore, an N16961 Δcrp mutant, devoid of cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP), was defective in CT production during growth by anaerobic TMAO respiration, further suggesting a role of glucose metabolism in regulating TMAO-mediated CT production. TMAO reductase activity was noticeably decreased when grown together with glucose or by mutation of the crp gene. A CRP binding region was identified in the promoter region of the torD gene, which encodes a structural subunit of the TMAO reductase. Gel shift assays further confirmed the binding of purified CRP to the torD promoter sequence. Together, our results suggest that the bacterial ability to respire using TMAO is controlled by CRP, whose activity is dependent on glucose availability. Our results reveal a novel mechanism for the regulation of major virulence factor production by V. cholerae under anaerobic growth conditions. PMID:26718467

  10. Properties of anaerobic fungi isolated from several habitats: complexity of phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Zelená, Viera; Birošová, Lucia; Olejníková, Petra; Polák, Martin; Lakatoš, Boris; Varečka, Ľudovít

    2016-01-01

    Isolates of anaerobic fungi from rumen, animal faeces and compost displayed morphological similarity with known anaerobic fungi. According to their ITS sequences, species were related to Neocallimastix and Piromyces. Rumen fungi tolerated exposure to an aerobic atmosphere for at least four days. Under anaerobic conditions, they could grow on both, defined or complex substrates. Growth in liquid media was monitored by the continuous measurement of metabolic gases (O2, CO2, H2, CO, H2S, CH4). Monitored metabolism was complex, showed that both CO2 and H2 were produced and subsequently consumed by yet unknown metabolic pathway(s). CO and H2S were evolved similarly, but not identically with the generation of CO2 and H2 suggesting their connection with energetic metabolism. Anaerobic fungi from snail faeces and compost produced concentrations of H2S, H2, CO near the lower limit of detection. The rumen isolates produced cellulases and xylanases with similar pH and temperature optima. Proteolytic enzymes were secreted as well. Activities of some enzymes of the main catabolic pathways were found in cell-free homogenates of mycelia. The results indicate the presence of the pentose cycle, the glyoxylate cycle and an incomplete citrate cycle in these fungi. Differences between isolates indicate phenotypic variability between anaerobic fungi.

  11. Cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid as external carbon sources in biological nutrient removal.

    PubMed

    Bu, Fan; Hu, Xiang; Xie, Li; Zhou, Qi

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of one kind of food industry effluent, cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid, on biological nutrient removal (BNR) from municipal wastewater in anaerobic-anoxic-aerobic sequencing batch reactors (SBRs). Experiments were carried out with cassava stillage supernatant and its anaerobic fermentation liquid, and one pure compound (sodium acetate) served as an external carbon source. Cyclic studies indicated that the cassava by-products not only affected the transformation of nitrogen, phosphorus, poly-β-hydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), and glycogen in the BNR process, but also resulted in higher removal efficiencies for phosphorus and nitrogen compared with sodium acetate. Furthermore, assays for phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs) and denitrifying phosphorus accumulating organisms (DPAOs) demonstrated that the proportion of DPAOs to PAOs reached 62.6% (Day 86) and 61.8% (Day 65) when using cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid, respectively, as the external carbon source. In addition, the nitrate utilization rates (NURs) of the cassava by-products were in the range of 5.49-5.99 g N/(kg MLVSS⋅h) (MLVSS is mixed liquor volatile suspended solids) and 6.63-6.81 g N/(kg MLVSS⋅h), respectively. The improvement in BNR performance and the reduction in the amount of cassava stillage to be treated in-situ make cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid attractive alternatives to sodium acetate as external carbon sources for BNR processes. PMID:25845364

  12. Cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid as external carbon sources in biological nutrient removal.

    PubMed

    Bu, Fan; Hu, Xiang; Xie, Li; Zhou, Qi

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of one kind of food industry effluent, cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid, on biological nutrient removal (BNR) from municipal wastewater in anaerobic-anoxic-aerobic sequencing batch reactors (SBRs). Experiments were carried out with cassava stillage supernatant and its anaerobic fermentation liquid, and one pure compound (sodium acetate) served as an external carbon source. Cyclic studies indicated that the cassava by-products not only affected the transformation of nitrogen, phosphorus, poly-β-hydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), and glycogen in the BNR process, but also resulted in higher removal efficiencies for phosphorus and nitrogen compared with sodium acetate. Furthermore, assays for phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs) and denitrifying phosphorus accumulating organisms (DPAOs) demonstrated that the proportion of DPAOs to PAOs reached 62.6% (Day 86) and 61.8% (Day 65) when using cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid, respectively, as the external carbon source. In addition, the nitrate utilization rates (NURs) of the cassava by-products were in the range of 5.49-5.99 g N/(kg MLVSS⋅h) (MLVSS is mixed liquor volatile suspended solids) and 6.63-6.81 g N/(kg MLVSS⋅h), respectively. The improvement in BNR performance and the reduction in the amount of cassava stillage to be treated in-situ make cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid attractive alternatives to sodium acetate as external carbon sources for BNR processes.

  13. Eukaryotic diversity in an anaerobic aquifer polluted with landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Brad, Traian; Braster, Martin; van Breukelen, Boris M; van Straalen, Nico M; Röling, Wilfred F M

    2008-07-01

    Eukaryotes may influence pollutant degradation processes in groundwater ecosystems by activities such as predation on bacteria and recycling of nutrients. Culture-independent community profiling and phylogenetic analysis of 18S rRNA gene fragments, as well as culturing, were employed to obtain insight into the sediment-associated eukaryotic community composition in an anaerobic sandy aquifer polluted with landfill leachate (Banisveld, The Netherlands). The microeukaryotic community at a depth of 1 to 5 m below the surface along a transect downgradient (21 to 68 m) from the landfill and at a clean reference location was diverse. Fungal sequences dominated most clone libraries. The fungal diversity was high, and most sequences were sequences of yeasts of the Basidiomycota. Sequences of green algae (Chlorophyta) were detected in parts of the aquifer close (<30 m) to the landfill. The bacterium-predating nanoflagellate Heteromita globosa (Cercozoa) was retrieved in enrichments, and its sequences dominated the clone library derived from the polluted aquifer at a depth of 5 m at a location 21 m downgradient from the landfill. The number of culturable eukaryotes ranged from 10(2) to 10(3) cells/g sediment. Culture-independent quantification revealed slightly higher numbers. Groundwater mesofauna was not detected. We concluded that the food chain in this polluted aquifer is short and consists of prokaryotes and fungi as decomposers of organic matter and protists as primary consumers of the prokaryotes.

  14. Antimicrobial resistance and susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Schuetz, Audrey N

    2014-09-01

    Infections due to anaerobic bacteria can be severe and life-threatening. Susceptibility testing of anaerobes is not frequently performed in laboratories, but such testing is important to direct appropriate therapy. Anaerobic resistance is increasing globally, and resistance trends vary by geographic region. An overview of a variety of susceptibility testing methods for anaerobes is provided, and the advantages and disadvantages of each method are reviewed. Specific clinical situations warranting anaerobic susceptibility testing are discussed.

  15. The Energetics of Aerobic versus Anaerobic Respiration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champion, Timothy D.; Schwenz, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    Background information, laboratory procedures, and a discussion of the results of an experiment designed to investigate the difference in energy gained from the aerobic and anaerobic oxidation of glucose are presented. Sample experimental and calculated data are included. (CW)

  16. Anaerobic bioprocessing of low rank coals

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, M.K.; Narayan, R.; Han, O.

    1991-01-01

    significant achievements were: (1) Coal decarboxylation was achieved by batch bioreactor systems using adapted anaerobic microbial consortium. (2) Two new isolates with coal decarboxylation potential were obtained from adapted microbial consortia. (3) CHN and TG anaysis of anaerobically biotreated coals have shown an increase in the H/C ratio and evolution rate of volatile carbon which could be a better feedstock for the liquefaction process.

  17. Phospholipid biosynthesis in some anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Silber, P; Borie, R P; Mikowski, E J; Goldfine, H

    1981-01-01

    We have identified and characterized enzymes of phospholipid synthesis in two plasmalogen-rich anaerobes. Megasphaera elsdenii and Veillonella parvula, and one anaerobe lacking plasmalogens. Desulfovibrio vulgaris. All three species contained phosphatidate cytidylyltransferase and phosphatidylserine synthase. Phosphatidylglycerophosphate synthesis was detected only D. vulgaris extracts. Phosphatidylserine (diacyl form) was the major product of the phosphatidylserine synthase assay with particles from M. elsdenii or V. parvula. The amounts of phosphatidylethanolamine formed were very low. Only D. vulgaris particles had an active phosphatidylserine decarboxylase. PMID:6263870

  18. Selenihalanaerobacter shriftii gen. nov., sp. nov., a halophilic anaerobe from Dead Sea sediments that respires selenate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Switzer, Blum J.; Stolz, J.F.; Oren, A.; Oremland, R.S.

    2001-01-01

    We isolated an obligately anaerobic halophilic bacterium from the Dead Sea that grew by respiration of selenate. The isolate, designated strain DSSe-1, was a gram-negative, non-motile rod. It oxidized glycerol or glucose to acetate+CO2 with concomitant reduction of selenate to selenite plus elemental selenium. Other electron acceptors that supported anaerobic growth on glycerol were nitrate and trimethylamine-N-oxide; nitrite, arsenate, fumarate, dimethylsulfoxide, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfite or sulfate could not serve as electron acceptors. Growth on glycerol in the presence of nitrate occurred over a salinity range from 100 to 240 g/l, with an optimum at 210 g/l. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence suggests that strain DSSe-1 belongs to the order Halanaerobiales, an order of halophilic anaerobes with a fermentative or homoacetogenic metabolism, in which anaerobic respiratory metabolism has never been documented. The highest 16S rRNA sequence similarity (90%) was found with Acetohalobium arabaticum (X89077). On the basis of physiological properties as well as the relatively low homology of 16S rRNA from strain DSSe-1 with known genera, classification in a new genus within the order Halanaerobiales, family Halobacteroidaceae is warranted. We propose the name Selenihalanaerobacter shriftii. Type strain is strain DSSe-1 (ATCC accession number BAA-73).

  19. Anaerobic electron acceptor chemotaxis in Shewanella putrefaciens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealson, K. H.; Moser, D. P.; Saffarini, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 can grow either aerobically or anaerobically at the expense of many different electron acceptors and is often found in abundance at redox interfaces in nature. Such redox interfaces are often characterized by very strong gradients of electron acceptors resulting from rapid microbial metabolism. The coincidence of S. putrefaciens abundance with environmental gradients prompted an examination of the ability of MR-1 to sense and respond to electron acceptor gradients in the laboratory. In these experiments, taxis to the majority of the electron acceptors that S. putrefaciens utilizes for anaerobic growth was seen. All anaerobic electron acceptor taxis was eliminated by the presence of oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, elemental sulfur, or dimethyl sulfoxide, even though taxis to the latter was very weak and nitrate and nitrite respiration was normal in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide. Studies with respiratory mutants of MR-1 revealed that several electron acceptors that could not be used for anaerobic growth nevertheless elicited normal anaerobic taxis. Mutant M56, which was unable to respire nitrite, showed normal taxis to nitrite, as well as the inhibition of taxis to other electron acceptors by nitrite. These results indicate that electron acceptor taxis in S. putrefaciens does not conform to the paradigm established for Escherichia coli and several other bacteria. Carbon chemo-taxis was also unusual in this organism: of all carbon compounds tested, the only positive response observed was to formate under anaerobic conditions.

  20. PCR-based diagnostics for anaerobic infections.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuli

    2005-01-01

    Conventional methods to identify anaerobic bacteria have often relied on unique clinical findings, isolation of organisms, and laboratory identification by morphology and biochemical tests (phenotypic tests). Although these methods are still fundamental, there is an increasing move toward molecular diagnostics of anaerobes. In this review, some of the molecular approaches to anaerobic diagnostics based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are discussed. This includes several technological advances in PCR-based methods for the detection, identification, and quantitation of anaerobes including real-time PCR which has been successfully used to provide rapid, quantitative data on anaerobic species on clinical samples. Since its introduction in the mid-1980s, PCR has provided many molecular diagnostic tools, some of which are discussed within this review. With the advances in micro-array technology and real-time PCR methods, the future is bright for the development of accurate, quantitative diagnostic tools that can provide information not only on individual anaerobic species but also on whole communities.