Science.gov

Sample records for flame photometry

  1. Iontophoresis and Flame Photometry: A Hybrid Interdisciplinary Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Duncan; Cottam, Linzi; Bradley, Sarah; Brannigan, Jeanie; Davis, James

    2010-01-01

    The combination of reverse iontophoresis and flame photometry provides an engaging analytical experiment that gives first-year undergraduate students a flavor of modern drug delivery and analyte extraction techniques while reinforcing core analytical concepts. The experiment provides a highly visual demonstration of the iontophoresis technique and…

  2. [Determination of lithium content in human biological objects (liver, kidney) by the method of flame photometry].

    PubMed

    Luzanova, I S; Voznesenskaia, T V; Menitskaia, V I; Pushchinskaia, E V

    2007-01-01

    The authors give a method of determination of the content of lithium in biological objects (liver, kidney) by the method of flame photometry. It is possible to use this method in forensic medicine in cases of acute intoxication.

  3. Monitoring of brain potassium with rubidium flame photometry and MRI.

    PubMed

    Yushmanov, Victor E; Kharlamov, Alexander; Boada, Fernando E; Jones, Stephen C

    2007-03-01

    An animal model was developed to monitor [K(+)] in the brain using partial K(+) replacement with Rb(+) and (87)Rb MRI. Fifty-one rats were given 0-80 mM of RbCl in the drinking water for up to 90 days. Focal cerebral ischemia was produced in 15 of the animals. Na, K, and Rb content in precision-guided submilligram samples of cortical brain were determined by emission flame photometry. Multinuclear (87)Rb/(23)Na/(1)H MRI was performed on phantoms and rats at 3T using a twisted projection imaging (TPI) scheme for (87)Rb/(23)Na, and custom-built surface or parallel cosine transmit/receive coils. Brain [Rb(+)] was safely brought up to 17-25 mEq/kg within 2-3 weeks of feeding. The characteristic patterns of [K(+)] decrease (with a sharp drop at 3-4 hr of ischemia) and [Na(+)] increase (at a rate of 31%/hr) observed previously in animals without Rb/K substitution were reproduced in ischemic cortex. The Rb/(Rb+K) ratio increased over time in ischemic areas (R = 0.91, P < 0.001), suggesting an additional index of ischemia progression. Preliminary (87)Rb MRI gave an estimate of 20-25 mEq Rb/kg brain weight (N = 2). In conclusion, brain Rb(+) is detectable by (87)Rb MRI and does not significantly interfere with ion dynamics in ischemic brain, which enables (87)Rb MRI studies of K(+) in ischemia.

  4. Total cellular Ca2+ measurements in yeast using flame photometry.

    PubMed

    Tisi, Renata; Martegani, Enzo; Brandão, Rogelio L

    2015-02-02

    A photoelectric flame photometer is a device used in inorganic chemical analysis for determining the concentrations of certain metals in solution. It does this by measuring the intensity of the light emitted by the metal when the solution is sprayed under controlled conditions into a nonluminous flame. This protocol describes how to measure total cellular calcium (maximal emission at 622 nm, orange flame) in yeast using this technique.

  5. Releasing effects in flame photometry: Determination of calcium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinnin, J.I.

    1960-01-01

    Strontium, lanthanum, neodymium, samarium, and yttrium completely release the flame emission of calcium from the depressive effects of sulfate, phosphate, and aluminate. Magnesium, beryllium, barium, and scandium release most of the calcium emission. These cations, when present in high concentration, preferentially form compounds with the depressing anions when the solution is evaporated rapidly in the flame. The mechanism of the interference and releasing effects is explained on the basis of the chemical equilibria in the evaporating droplets of solution and is shown to depend upon the nature of the compounds present in the aqueous phase of the solution. The need for background correction techniques is stressed. The releasing effect is used in the determination of calcium in silicate rocks without the need for separations.

  6. Quantification of minerals and trace elements in raw caprine milk using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry and flame photometry.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mahavir; Yadav, Poonam; Garg, V K; Sharma, Anshu; Singh, Balvinder; Sharma, Himanshu

    2015-08-01

    This study reports minerals and trace elements quantification in raw caprine milk of Beetal breed, reared in Northern India and their feed, fodder & water using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry and flame photometry. The mineral and trace elements' concentration in the milk was in the order: K > Ca > Na > Fe > Zn > Cu. The results showed that minerals concentration in caprine milk was lesser than reference values. But trace elements concentration (Fe and Zn) was higher than reference values. Multivariate statistical techniques, viz., Pearsons' correlation, Cluster analysis (CA) and Principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to analyze the interdependences within studied variables in caprine milk. Significantly positive correlations were observed between Fe - Zn, Zn - K, Ca - Na and Ca - pH. The results of correlation matrix were further supported by Cluster analysis and Principal component analysis as primary cluster pairs were found for Ca - pH, Ca - Na and Fe - Zn in the raw milk. No correlation was found between mineral & trace elements content of the milk and feed. PMID:26243956

  7. Quantification of minerals and trace elements in raw caprine milk using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry and flame photometry.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mahavir; Yadav, Poonam; Garg, V K; Sharma, Anshu; Singh, Balvinder; Sharma, Himanshu

    2015-08-01

    This study reports minerals and trace elements quantification in raw caprine milk of Beetal breed, reared in Northern India and their feed, fodder & water using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry and flame photometry. The mineral and trace elements' concentration in the milk was in the order: K > Ca > Na > Fe > Zn > Cu. The results showed that minerals concentration in caprine milk was lesser than reference values. But trace elements concentration (Fe and Zn) was higher than reference values. Multivariate statistical techniques, viz., Pearsons' correlation, Cluster analysis (CA) and Principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to analyze the interdependences within studied variables in caprine milk. Significantly positive correlations were observed between Fe - Zn, Zn - K, Ca - Na and Ca - pH. The results of correlation matrix were further supported by Cluster analysis and Principal component analysis as primary cluster pairs were found for Ca - pH, Ca - Na and Fe - Zn in the raw milk. No correlation was found between mineral & trace elements content of the milk and feed.

  8. A new principle applied to the determination of calcium in biological materials by flame photometry.

    PubMed

    FAWCETT, J K; WYNN, V

    1961-09-01

    The effect of magnesium sulphate in releasing calcium emission from interference by phosphate and sulphate has been investigated. Samples were diluted in 10 mM MgSO(4), 2 mM NaCl, giving final calcium concentrations of about 0.05 to 0.10 mM. In this diluent, galvanometer readings were proportional to calcium concentrations up to 0.4 mM. The magnesium sulphate released calcium emission from depression by phosphate and sulphate. The excess sodium chloride eliminated enhancement of calcium emission by added sodium and potassium in the sample. Subtraction of background readings excluded direct interference.A 3% correction was made for the effect of the viscosity of 1: 50 plasma dilutions. Satisfactory recoveries of added calcium were obtained from plasma, urine, and faeces using the diluent described above. Results on urine and faeces correlated closely with those obtained by an EDTA titration method. Results on plasma were consistently 2% higher by flame photometry than by EDTA titration. Other methods of calcium determination, depending on the use of radiation buffers or standard addition, were found to be unsatisfactory because of variable interference by phosphate at different calcium levels. PMID:13891877

  9. FLame

    1995-03-03

    FLAME is data processing software explicitly written to support the ACAP software of DSP Technologies, Inc., of Fremont, CA. ACAP acquires and processes in-cylinder pressure data for reciprocating engines. However, it also has the capability to acquire data for two Sandia-developed technologies, ionization-probe instrumented head gaskets and fiber-optic instrumented spark plugs. FLAME post processes measurements of flame arrival from data files aquired with ACAP. Flame arrival time is determined from analog ionization-probe or visible-emission signals.more » The resulting data files are integrated with the standard ACAP files, providing a common data base for engine development.« less

  10. Astronomical photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henden, Arne A.; Kaitchuck, Ronald H.

    A handbook of astronomical photometry is presented in a format amenable to both professional and amateur use. The fundamental equipment, procedures, theory, and applications of photometry are described. Photometric systems such as the UBV, M-K, and Stromgren classification methods are explained, together with statistical treatments of photometric data. Data reduction techniques and applications in air-mass calculations, the determination of first-order extinction, and for computing zero-point values are defined. Baseline standards such as solar, universal,and sidereal time, and dating methods are provided. Instructions for constructing photometer heads are given, and the operational principles and techniques for using pulse-counting and dc electronics are explored. Finally, observational techniques and applications of photoelectric photometry are suggested and targets are indicated. A review is also offered of the theoretical basis and computational tools involved in the science of astronomical photometry.

  11. Applicability of cloud point extraction coupled with microwave-assisted back-extraction to the determination of organophosphorous pesticides in human urine by gas chromatography with flame photometry detection.

    PubMed

    Jia, Guifang; Lv, Chunguang; Zhu, Wentao; Qiu, Jing; Wang, Xinquan; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2008-11-30

    A procedure for the determination of organophosphorous pesticides (OPPs) - phorate, diazinon, parathion-methyl, fenthion and quinalphos - in human urine was developed using the cloud point extraction of nonionic surfactant (Triton X-114) coupled with microwave-assisted back-extraction prior to gas chromatography with flame photometry detection (GC-FPD) analysis. The upper organic solution obtained from back-extraction was centrifugated simply for further cleanup for the sake of automatic injection. A preconcentration factor of 50 was obtained for these five OPPs extracted from only 10 mL of a sample. The limits of detection (LODs) were 0.07 ng mL(-1) for phorate, fenthion and quinalphos, 0.04 ng mL(-1) for diazinon and 0.08 ng mL(-1) for parathion-methyl. The limits of quantification (LOQs) were 0.21, 0.12, 0.24, 0.21 and 0.21 ng mL(-1), respectively. Accuracy of the method was evaluated by bias, which ranged from +6.85 to -14.68%. Precision was also good; the relative standard deviations (R.S.D.s) were less than 9%. The method showed to be potential for biological monitoring.

  12. Simultaneous determination of organotin compounds in textiles by gas chromatography-flame photometry following liquid/liquid partitioning with tert-butyl ethyl ether after reflux-extraction.

    PubMed

    Hamasaki, Tetsuo

    2013-10-15

    A rapid and relatively clean method for determining six organotin compounds (OtC) in textile goods with a gas chromatograph equipped with a conventional flame photometric detector (GC-FPD) has been developed. After the reflux-extraction to use methanol containing 1% (v/v) of hydrochloric acid, five hydrophobic OtC (e.g. tributyltin: TBT) and slightly less hydrophobic dibutyltin (DBT) could be drawn out through partitioning between the methanolic buffer solution and tert-butyl ethyl ether instead of hazardous dichloromethane, of which usage is provided by the official-methods notified in Japan, and following the ethylation procedure to use sodium tetraethylborate, the OtC were determined with the GC-FPD. The recoveries of DBT, TBT, tetrabutyltin, triphenyltin, dioctyltin, and trioctyltin from textile products (cloth diaper, socks, and undershirt) were 60-77, 89-98, 86-94, 71-78, 85-109, and 70-79% respectively, and their coefficients of variation were 2.5-16.5%. Calibration curves for OtC were linear (0.01-0.20 μg as Sn mL(-1)), and the correlation coefficients were 0.9922-1.0000. Their detection limits were estimated to be 2.7-9.7 n gas Sn g(-1). These data suggested that this method would be applicable to their simultaneous determination. Five retailed textile goods were analyzed by this proposed method, and 0.013-0.65 µg as Sn g(-1) of OtC (e.g. DBT) were determined in three. Moreover, a possibility that various OtC including non-targeted species in textile would be specifically detected by applying the studying speciation-technique of controlling signal intensity-flame fuel gas pressures of the GC-FPD was found.

  13. Triple flames and flame stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broadwell, James E.

    1994-01-01

    It is now well established that when turbulent jet flames are lifted, combustion begins, i.e., the flame is stabilized, at an axial station where the fuel and air are partially premixed. One might expect, therefore, that the beginning of the combustion zone would be a triple flame. Such flames have been described; however, other experiments provide data that are difficult to reconcile with the presence of triple flames. In particular, laser images of CH and OH, marking combustion zones, do not exhibit shapes typical of triple flames, and, more significantly, the lifted flame appears to have a propagation speed that is an order of magnitude higher than the laminar flame speed. The speed of triple flames studied thus far exceeds the laminar value by a factor less than two. The objective of the present task is the resolution of the apparent conflict between the experiments and the triple flame characteristics, and the clarification of the mechanisms controlling flame stability. Being investigated are the resolution achieved in the experiments, the flow field in the neighborhood of the stabilization point, propagation speeds of triple flames, laboratory flame unsteadiness, and the importance of flame ignition limits in the calculation of triple flames that resemble lifted flames.

  14. Photutils: Photometry tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Larry; Sipocz, Brigitta; Robitaille, Thomas; Tollerud, Erik; Deil, Christoph; Vinícius, Zè; Barbary, Kyle; Günther, Hans Moritz; Bostroem, Azalee; Droettboom, Michael; Bray, Erik; Bratholm, Lars Andersen; Pickering, T. E.; Craig, Matt; Pascual, Sergio; Greco, Johnny; Donath, Axel; Kerzendorf, Wolfgang; Littlefair, Stuart; Barentsen, Geert; D'Eugenio, Francesco; Weaver, Benjamin Alan

    2016-09-01

    Photutils provides tools for detecting and performing photometry of astronomical sources. It can estimate the background and background rms in astronomical images, detect sources in astronomical images, estimate morphological parameters of those sources (e.g., centroid and shape parameters), and perform aperture and PSF photometry. Written in Python, it is an affiliated package of Astropy (ascl:1304.002).

  15. eta Carinae: physical information from photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Genderen, A. M.; de Groot, M.; Sterken, C.

    2001-06-01

    The very first physical information one can get from optical photometry is that eta Car is variable. Figure 1 shows the light curve from 1600 to 2000. Most reseachers agree with the main interpretations of the various features as shown by the light curve. The eruptive phases are called S Dor- (SD-) eruptions as opposed to the S Dor- (SD-) phases, which are responsible for the oscillating light variations (due to slow pulsations) with a time-scale of years (van Genderen 2001). The rising trend after 1935 is called the 'secular rise' and is mainly due to a decrease of circumstellar extinction, i.e. a decrease of self-extinction by the expanding Homunculus. A model for the trend of the decrease fits the time interval 1935-2000 satisfactorily (van Genderen et al. 1994, and see dotted curve in Figure 1 presented here). The optical (and near-IR) photometry of eta Car is hampered by the fact that only integrated photometry of the whole bipolar nebula is possible. However, we have luck: the nebula is mainly a reflection nebula. Thus, in analogy with a Chinese lantern: if the flame flickers, the integrated light flickers as well. Therefore, it is still possible to extract from the integrated photometry, important physical characteristics of the variable star, although heavily veiled by dust and gas. The effect of smearing out by reflections in the homunculus is presumably small, see discussion in van Genderen et al. (1999).

  16. APT: Aperture Photometry Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laher, Russ

    2012-08-01

    Aperture Photometry Tool (APT) is software for astronomers and students interested in manually exploring the photometric qualities of astronomical images. It has a graphical user interface (GUI) which allows the image data associated with aperture photometry calculations for point and extended sources to be visualized and, therefore, more effectively analyzed. Mouse-clicking on a source in the displayed image draws a circular or elliptical aperture and sky annulus around the source and computes the source intensity and its uncertainty, along with several commonly used measures of the local sky background and its variability. The results are displayed and can be optionally saved to an aperture-photometry-table file and plotted on graphs in various ways using functions available in the software. APT is geared toward processing sources in a small number of images and is not suitable for bulk processing a large number of images, unlike other aperture photometry packages (e.g., SExtractor). However, APT does have a convenient source-list tool that enables calculations for a large number of detections in a given image. The source-list tool can be run either in automatic mode to generate an aperture photometry table quickly or in manual mode to permit inspection and adjustment of the calculation for each individual detection. APT displays a variety of useful graphs, including image histogram, and aperture slices, source scatter plot, sky scatter plot, sky histogram, radial profile, curve of growth, and aperture-photometry-table scatter plots and histograms. APT has functions for customizing calculations, including outlier rejection, pixel “picking” and “zapping,” and a selection of source and sky models. The radial-profile-interpolation source model, accessed via the radial-profile-plot panel, allows recovery of source intensity from pixels with missing data and can be especially beneficial in crowded fields.

  17. Flame Spectra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromer, Alan

    1983-01-01

    When salt (NaCl) is introduced into a colorless flame, a bright yellow light (characteristic of sodium) is produced. Why doesn't the chlorine produce a characteristic color of light? The answer to this question is provided, indicating that the flame does not excite the appropriate energy levels in chlorine. (JN)

  18. Aperture Photometry Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laher, Russ R.; Gorjian, Varoujan; Rebull, Luisa M.; Masci, Frank J.; Fowler, John W.; Helou, George; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Law, Nicholas M.

    2012-07-01

    Aperture Photometry Tool (APT) is software for astronomers and students interested in manually exploring the photometric qualities of astronomical images. It is a graphical user interface (GUI) designed to allow the image data associated with aperture photometry calculations for point and extended sources to be visualized and, therefore, more effectively analyzed. The finely tuned layout of the GUI, along with judicious use of color-coding and alerting, is intended to give maximal user utility and convenience. Simply mouse-clicking on a source in the displayed image will instantly draw a circular or elliptical aperture and sky annulus around the source and will compute the source intensity and its uncertainty, along with several commonly used measures of the local sky background and its variability. The results are displayed and can be optionally saved to an aperture-photometry-table file and plotted on graphs in various ways using functions available in the software. APT is geared toward processing sources in a small number of images and is not suitable for bulk processing a large number of images, unlike other aperture photometry packages (e.g., SExtractor). However, APT does have a convenient source-list tool that enables calculations for a large number of detections in a given image. The source-list tool can be run either in automatic mode to generate an aperture photometry table quickly or in manual mode to permit inspection and adjustment of the calculation for each individual detection. APT displays a variety of useful graphs with just the push of a button, including image histogram, x and y aperture slices, source scatter plot, sky scatter plot, sky histogram, radial profile, curve of growth, and aperture-photometry-table scatter plots and histograms. APT has many functions for customizing the calculations, including outlier rejection, pixel "picking" and "zapping," and a selection of source and sky models. The radial-profile-interpolation source model

  19. DOLPHOT: Stellar photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolphin, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    DOLPHOT is a stellar photometry package that was adapted from HSTphot for general use. It supports two modes; the first is a generic PSF-fitting package, which uses analytic PSF models and can be used for any camera. The second mode uses ACS PSFs and calibrations, and is effectively an ACS adaptation of HSTphot. A number of utility programs are also included with the DOLPHOT distribution, including basic image reduction routines.

  20. Third Workshop on Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William J. (Editor); Lasher, Lawrence E. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    The discoveries of extrasolar planets by Wolszczan, Mayor and Queloz, Butler et al., and others have stimulated a widespread effort to obtain a body of data sufficient to understand their occurrence and characteristics. Doppler velocity techniques have found dozens of extrasolar planets with masses similar to that of Jupiter. Approximately ten percent of the stars that show planets with orbital periods of a few days to a week are expected to show transits. With the mass obtained from Doppler velocity measurements and the size from transit photometry, the densities of the planets can be determined. Theoretical models of the structure of "hot Jupiters" (i.e., those planets within a tenth of an astronomical unit (AU) of the parent star) indicate that these planets should be substantially larger in size and lower in density than Jupiter. Thus the combination of transit and Doppler velocity measurements provide a critical test of the theories of planetary structure. Furthermore, because photometry can be done with small-aperture telescopes rather than requiring the use of much larger telescopes, transit photometry should also reduce the cost of discovering extrasolar planets.

  1. Flame Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Scientific Instruments, Inc. has now developed a second generation, commercially available instrument to detect flames in hazardous environments, typically refineries, chemical plants and offshore drilling platforms. The Model 74000 detector incorporates a sensing circuit that detects UV radiation in a 100 degree conical field of view extending as far as 250 feet from the instrument. It operates in a bandwidth that makes it virtually 'blind' to solar radiation while affording extremely high sensitivity to ultraviolet flame detection. A 'windowing' technique accurately discriminates between background UV radiation and ultraviolet emitted from an actual flame, hence the user is assured of no false alarms. Model 7410CP is a combination controller and annunciator panel designed to monitor and control as many as 24 flame detectors. *Model 74000 is no longer being manufactured.

  2. Flame Hair

    PubMed Central

    Miteva, Mariya; Tosti, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Background ‘Flame hairs’ is a trichoscopic feature described as hair residue from pulling anagen hairs in trichotillomania. Objective: To detect whether flame hairs are present in other hair loss disorders. Methods We retrospectively, independently and blindly reviewed the trichoscopic images of 454 consecutive patients with alopecia areata (99 cases), trichotillomania (n = 20), acute chemotherapy-induced alopecia (n = 6), acute radiotherapy-induced alopecia (n = 2), tinea capitis (n = 13), lichen planopilaris (n = 33), frontal fibrosing alopecia (n = 60), discoid lupus erythematosus (n = 30), dissecting cellulitis (n = 11), central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (n = 94) and traction alopecia (n = 86) for the presence of flame hairs. We prospectively obtained trichoscopy-guided scalp biopsies from flame hairs in trichotillomania, alopecia areata, traction alopecia and central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (1 case each). Results Flame hairs were detected in 100% of the acute chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-induced alopecias, where they were the predominant hair abnormality. They were also found in trichotillomania (55%), alopecia areata (21%), traction alopecia (4%) and central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (3%). On pathology, they corresponded to distorted hair shafts. Conclusion The flame hair is a type of broken hair which can be seen in various hair loss disorders. It results from traumatic pulling of anagen hairs or from anagen arrest due to inflammation or drugs. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel PMID:27171360

  3. Sparse field stellar photometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, N.

    The past few years have seen substantial developments in the capability of high speed measuring machines in the field of automated stellar photometry. In this review, after describing some of the limitations on photometric precision, empirical results are used to demonstrate the sort of accuracies that are possible with the UK Schmidt plate plus COSMOS/APM images-scan combination. The astronomical results obtained to date from these machines are discussed, and some consideration is given to the future role of measuring machines in stellar astronomy.

  4. Flame retardants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troitzsch, J.

    1988-01-01

    The use of flame retardants in plastics has grown only slightly in recent years and will probably grow slowly in the future. The reasons for this are slow economic growth and the absence of fundamentally new requirements for future fire prevention. The trends are toward the increasing use of easily handled, dust-free and well-dispersed flame retardant compounds and master batches; there are no spectacular new developments. In the future, questions of smoke evolution, toxicity and corrosiveness of combustion gases will become increasingly important, especially due to new regulations and rising requirements for environmental protection.

  5. Sparse field stellar photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, N.

    The past few years have seen substantial developments in the capability of high speed measuring machines in the field of automated stellar photometry. However, it is only very recently that these machines have started to make any impact on stellar astronomy, and even now their potential is scarcely being exploited. In this review, after describing some of the limitations on photometric precision, empirical results are used to demonstrate the sort of accuracies that are possible with the UK Schmidt plate plus COSMOS/APM images-scan combination. The astronomical results obtained to date from these machines are discussed, and some consideration is given to the future role of measuring machines in stellar astronomy.

  6. Flames in vortices & tulip-flame inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dold, J. W.

    This article summarises two areas of research regarding the propagation of flames in flows which involve significant fluid-dynamical motion [1]-[3]. The major difference between the two is that in the first study the fluid motion is present before the arrival of any flame and remains unaffected by the flame [1, 2] while, in the second study it is the flame that is responsible for all of the fluid dynamical effects [3]. It is currently very difficult to study flame-motion in which the medium is both highly disturbed before the arrival of a flame and is further influenced by the passage of the flame.

  7. Triple flame structure and diffusion flame stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veynante, D.; Vervisch, L.; Poinsot, T.; Linan, A.; Ruetsch, G.

    1994-01-01

    The stabilization of diffusion flames is studied using asymptotic techniques and numerical tools. The configuration studied corresponds to parallel streams of cold oxidizer and fuel initially separated by a splitter plate. It is shown that stabilization of a diffusion flame may only occur in this situation by two processes. First, the flame may be stabilized behind the flame holder in the wake of the splitter plate. For this case, numerical simulations confirm scalings previously predicted by asymptotic analysis. Second, the flame may be lifted. In this case a triple flame is found at longer distances downstream of the flame holder. The structure and propagation speed of this flame are studied by using an actively controlled numerical technique in which the triple flame is tracked in its own reference frame. It is then possible to investigate the triple flame structure and velocity. It is shown, as suggested from asymptotic analysis, that heat release may induce displacement speeds of the triple flame larger than the laminar flame speed corresponding to the stoichiometric conditions prevailing in the mixture approaching the triple flame. In addition to studying the characteristics of triple flames in a uniform flow, their resistance to turbulence is investigated by subjecting triple flames to different vortical configurations.

  8. k2photometry: Read, reduce and detrend K2 photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Eylen, Vincent; Nowak, Grzegorz; Albrecht, Simon; Palle, Enric; Ribas, Ignasi; Bruntt, Hans; Perger, Manuel; Gandolfi, Davide; Hirano, Teriyuki; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Kiilerich, Amanda; Arranz, Jorge P.; Badenas, Mariona; Dai, Fei; Deeg, Hans J.; Guenther, Eike W.; Montanes-Rodriguez, Pilar; Narita, Norio; Rogers, Leslie A.; Bejar, Victor J. S.; Shrotriya, Tushar S.; Winn, Joshua N.; Sebastian, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    k2photometry reads, reduces and detrends K2 photometry and searches for transiting planets. MAST database pixel files are used as input; the output includes raw lightcurves, detrended lightcurves and a transit search can be performed as well. Stellar variability is not typically well-preserved but parameters can be tweaked to change that. The BLS algorithm used to detect periodic events is a Python implementation by Ruth Angus and Dan Foreman-Mackey (https://github.com/dfm/python-bls).

  9. Cool flame quench distances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryason, P. R.; Hirsch, E.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a brief experimental investigation are presented which confirm the expectation that cool flame quenching distances should be larger than hot flame quenching distances. It is also discovered that whereas quenching distances for hot flames reach their minimum values near stoichiometric conditions, cool flame quenching distances are least under rich conditions. Rich conditions are well known to favor cool flame formation.

  10. CCD Photometry of Variables Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, E. J.; Reed, M. D.

    2001-12-01

    With recent advances in Charged Coupled Devices (CCDs), it is now possible to do high speed CCD photometry. Though photelectric photometry has a rich history and many years of software development, CCDs have several advantages over photometers: They have a higher quantum efficiency and eliminate many of the problems associated with the requirement of a fixed aperture in photoelectric photometry. However, CCD photometry has yet to develop the necessary tools to efficiently reduce and analyze the quantities of time-series data produced. Two other areas where advancement is needed are in decreasing the CCD readout times and producing real time light curves. We present steps taken to address these two issues. Dead times were shortened by examining various CCD geometries and scripts were written to process the data more efficiently. Our work has produced efficient methods for obtaining and reducing high speed CCD observations and brings us a step closer to producing real time light curves.

  11. Heterochromatic flicker photometry.

    PubMed

    Bone, Richard A; Landrum, John T

    2004-10-15

    Measurement of the macular pigment optical density (MPOD) by heterochromatic flicker photometry (HFP) is accomplished by viewing a small circular stimulus that alternates between a test wavelength that is absorbed by the MP (typically--blue, 460 nm) and a reference wavelength that is not absorbed (typically-green, 540 nm). Flicker observed by the subject is reduced to a null point by adjusting the intensity of the former while viewing the stimulus centrally, and then peripherally. A higher intensity, I, of the blue component of the stimulus is needed under central viewing conditions owing to attenuation by the MP. The MPOD at the test wavelength is given by log (Icentral/Iperipheral). Variation of the test wavelength has been used to measure the MPOD spectrum. This in vitro MPOD spectrum matches that of the carotenoids present in the macular region of the retina and demonstrates the validity and specificity of this methodology. The distribution of MPOD in the retina can be determined with HFP using a series of annular stimuli of different diameters.

  12. Photometry from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, M. J.; Bless, R. C.; Percival, J. W.; White, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    A brief description of the High Speed Photometer (HSP) of the Hubble Space Telescope is given, in particular the HSP light path, detectors, entrance apertures, and filters. The status of HSP testing to date is reported, and problems encountered with the bright earth and the telescope pointing system are described. The calibration effort for the HSP is well under way. Results of internal (instrument coordinate) aperture locations good to 0.05 arcsec and external (telescope coordinate) locations good to 0.02 arcsec are shown. The effects of spacecraft pointing and jitter on HSP photometry are detailed, and a preliminary measurement of spacecraft jitter with HSP is shown. The aperture calibration effort is verified by accurate pointing of a star to different HSP 1.0 arcsec entrance apertures, and photometric performance of the instrument is shown to be accurate to the 2 percent photon noise of the observations. Future science verification and guaranteed observing time programs are listed. Suggestions are made for future space-based photometers.

  13. Interpreting Flux from Broadband Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Peter J.; Breeveld, Alice; Roming, Peter W. A.; Siegel, Michael

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the transformation of observed photometry into flux for the creation of spectral energy distributions (SED) and the computation of bolometric luminosities. We do this in the context of supernova studies, particularly as observed with the Swift spacecraft, but the concepts and techniques should be applicable to many other types of sources and wavelength regimes. Traditional methods of converting observed magnitudes to flux densities are not very accurate when applied to UV photometry. Common methods for extinction and the integration of pseudo-bolometric fluxes can also lead to inaccurate results. The sources of inaccuracy, though, also apply to other wavelengths. Because of the complicated nature of translating broadband photometry into monochromatic flux densities, comparison between observed photometry and a spectroscopic model is best done by forward modeling the spectrum into the count rates or magnitudes of the observations. We recommend that integrated flux measurements be made using a spectrum or SED which is consistent with the multi-band photometry rather than converting individual photometric measurements to flux densities, linearly interpolating between the points, and integrating. We also highlight some specific areas where the UV flux can be mischaracterized.

  14. Detection by Transit Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Jenkins, Jon M.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A periodic sequence of planetary transits provides a valid detection of an orbiting planet and provides the relative size of the planet and its orbital period. Ancillary measurements of the stellar spectrum and the variations of the star's radial velocity or position combined with stellar models allow the absolute size of the planet and its mass to be obtained. The results of this approach have already shown that the planet orbiting HD209458 has only 70% of the mass of Jupiter, but is nearly 50% larger in radius. Based on models of planetary structure, these results imply that the planet must have spent most of its lifetime so close to the star that it has not been able to cool and contract as have the giant planets in our Solar System. Thus its density is much less than Jupiter and Saturn and is actually less than that of water; i.e., about 0.4 gr/cu cm. If more sensitive measurements of the light curve of stars with closely orbiting planets can be made that provide the varying amplitude of the light reflected by the planet at various phases in its orbit, then characteristics of the planetary atmosphere can be obtained. Potentially, these data can identify major molecular species present in the atmosphere and tell us if clouds are present and yield the phase function of the aerosols. Although such detail cannot be obtained for Earth-size planets because their signal amplitudes are too small, it is possible to get data critical to the determination of the structure of extrasolar planetary systems. In particular, the size distributions and their orbital distributions can be measured by the transit photometry missions now in development. The COROT mission should be able to find large terrestrial planets in short-period orbits while the more ambitious Kepler and Eddington missions should be able to detect planets even smaller than the Earth and at orbital distances that place them in the habitable zone of their stars.

  15. Second Workshop on Improvements to Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William J. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The papers in these proceedings show that a major effort is under way to improve all aspects of photometry. Astronomical multichannel photometry, photodiodes, analog-to-digital converters, data reduction techniques, interference filters and optical fibers are discussed.

  16. Aerodynamics of Laminar Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Chung K.

    2000-11-01

    The presentation will review recent advances in the understanding of the structure, dynamics, and geometry of stretched, nonequidiffusive, laminar premixed flames, as exemplified by the unsteady propagation of wrinkled flames in nonuniform flow fields. It is first shown that by considering the effects of aerodynamic stretch on the flame structure, and by allowing for mixture nonequidiffusion, the flame responses, especially the flame propagation speed, can be quantitatively as well as qualitatively modified from the idealized planar limit. Subsequently, by treating the flame as a level surface propagating with the stretch-affected flame speed, problems of increasing complexity are presented to illustrate various features of flame propagation. The illustration first treats the flame as a structureless surface propagating into a constant-density combustible with a constant velocity * the laminar flame speed, and demonstrates the phenomena of cusp formation and volumetric burning rate augmentation through flame wrinkling. By using the stretch-affected flame speed, we then describe the phenomena of cusp broadening as well as tip opening of the Bunsen flame. Finally, by allowing for the density jump across the flame surface, a unified dispersion relation is derived for the intrinsic hydrodynamic, body-force, and nonequidiffusive modes of flame

  17. Understanding flame rods

    SciTech Connect

    McAuley, J.A. Jr.

    1995-11-01

    The flame rod is probably the least understood method of flame detection. Although it is not recommended for oilfired equipment, it is very common on atmospheric, or {open_quotes}in-shot,{close_quotes} gas burners. It is also possible, although not common, to have an application with a constant gas pilot, monitored by a flame rod, and maintaining an oil main flame. Regardless of the application, chances are that flame rods will be encountered during the course of servicing. The technician today must be versatile and able to work on many different types of equipment. One must understand the basic principles of flame rods, and how to correct potential problems. The purpose of a flame detection system is two-fold: (1) to prove there is no flame when there shouldn`t be one, and (2) to prove there is a flame when there should be one. Flame failure response time is very important. This is the amount of time it takes to realize there is a loss of flame, two to four seconds is typical today. Prior to flame rods, either bi-metal or thermocouple type flame detectors were common. The response time for these detectors was up to three minutes, seldom less than one minute.

  18. The Science of Flames.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornia, Ray

    1991-01-01

    Describes an exercise using flames that allows students to explore the complexities of a seemingly simple phenomenon, the lighting of a candle. Contains a foldout that provides facts about natural gas flames and suggestions for classroom use. (ZWH)

  19. Far-Ultraviolet Stellar Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, E. G.; Carruthers, G. R.

    1993-12-01

    During a shuttle flight in May, 1991, wide field images were obtained for 12 star fields with the NRL far-ultraviolet cameras. These cameras provide sensitivity bands with effective wavelengths of lambda eff = 1367 Angstroms and lambda eff = 1702 Angstroms. The properties of the resulting magnitude system will be described and compared with previous photometry from the OAO2, ANS and TD1 satellites. Results from several fields in the vicinity of the galactic center will be discussed.

  20. An old flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Frank

    2014-07-01

    Flames are seen more often in chemistry than in physics laboratories. However, as a continuation of the previous colourful demonstration of a levitating Bunsen flame described recently in this journal (De Carvalho 2012 Phys Educ. 47 517), two short experiments are reported. Firstly, flame rectification is investigated and secondly, the electrical potential around a charged object is measured.

  1. Flame front configuration of turbulent premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Junichi; Maruta, Kaoru; Hirano, Toshisuke

    1998-02-01

    The present study is performed to explore dependence of the wrinkle scale of propane-air turbulent premixed flames on the characteristics of turbulence in the nonreacting flow, burner size, and mixture ratio. The wrinkle scales are examined and expressed in the frequency distribution of the radii of flame front curvatures. The average wrinkle scale depends not only on the characteristics of turbulence in the nonreacting flow but also on burner diameter and mixture ratio. The average wrinkle scale of a lean propane-air flame is larger than those of the near stoichiometric and rich flames. The smallest wrinkle scale of turbulent premixed flame is in the range of 0.75--1.0 mm, which is much larger than the Kolmogorov scale of turbulence in the nonreacting flow.

  2. Candle Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, Daniel L.; Ross, Howard D.; Frate, David T.; Tien, James S.; Shu, Yong

    1997-01-01

    This work is a study of a candle flame in a microgravity environment. The purpose of the work is to determine if a steady (or quasi-steady) flame can exist in a microgravity environment, study the characteristics of the steady flame, investigate the pre-extinction flame oscillations observed in a previous experiment in more detail, and finally, determine the nature of the interactions between two closely spaced candle flames. The candle flame is used as a model combustion system, in that in microgravity it is one of the only examples of a non-propagating, steady-state, pure diffusion flame. Others have used the candle to study a number of combustion phenomena including flame flicker, flame oscillations, electric field effects and enhanced and reduced gravitational effects in flames. The present work is a continuation of a small-scale Shuttle experiment on candle flames. That study showed that the candle flame lifetimes were on the order of 40 seconds, the flames were dim blue after a transient ignition period, and that just prior to extinction the flames oscillated spontaneously for about five seconds at a frequency of 1 Hz. The authors postulated that the gas phase in the immediate vicinity of the flame was quasi-steady. Further away from the flame, however, the assertion of a quasi-steady flame was less certain, thus the authors did not prove that a steady flame could exist. They also speculated that the short lifetime of the candle flame was due to the presence of the small, weakly perforated box that surrounded the candle. The Candle Flames in Microgravity (CFM) experiment, with revised hardware, was recently flown aboard the Mir orbiting station, and conducted inside the glovebox facility by Dr. Shannon Lucid. In addition to the purposes described above, the experiments were NASA's first ability to ascertain the merits of the Mir environment for combustion science studies. In this article, we present the results of that experiment. We are also in the process

  3. Flame Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Heidi L. (Inventor); Smith, Harvey S. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A system for imaging a flame and the background scene is discussed. The flame imaging system consists of two charge-coupled-device (CCD) cameras. One camera uses a 800 nm long pass filter which during overcast conditions blocks sufficient background light so the hydrogen flame is brighter than the background light, and the second CCD camera uses a 1100 nm long pass filter, which blocks the solar background in full sunshine conditions such that the hydrogen flame is brighter than the solar background. Two electronic viewfinders convert the signal from the cameras into a visible image. The operator can select the appropriate filtered camera to use depending on the current light conditions. In addition, a narrow band pass filtered InGaAs sensor at 1360 nm triggers an audible alarm and a flashing LED if the sensor detects a flame, providing additional flame detection so the operator does not overlook a small flame.

  4. Prediction of flame velocities of hydrocarbon flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugger, Gordon L; Simon, Dorothy M

    1954-01-01

    The laminar-flame-velocity data previously reported by the Lewis Laboratory are surveyed with respect to the correspondence between experimental flame velocities and values predicted by semitheoretical and empirical methods. The combustible mixture variables covered are hydrocarbon structure (56 hydrocarbons), equivalence ratio of fuel-air mixture, mole fraction of oxygen in the primary oxygen-nitrogen mixture (0.17 to 0.50), and initial mixture temperature (200 degrees to 615 degrees k). The semitheoretical method of prediction considered are based on three approximate theoretical equations for flame velocity: the Semenov equation, the Tanford-Pease equation, and the Manson equation.

  5. Stellar photometry with big pixels

    SciTech Connect

    Buonanno, R.; Iannicola, G.; European Southern Observatory, Garching )

    1989-03-01

    A new software for stellar photometry in crowded fields is presented. This software overcomes the limitations present in a traditional package like ROMAFOT when the pixel size of the detector is comparable to the scale length of point images. This is the case, for instance, with the Hubble Space Telescope-Wide Field Camera and, partially, with the Planetary Camera. The numerical solution presented here is compared to the technical solution of obtaining more exposures of the same field, each shifted by a fraction of pixel. This software will be available in MIDAS. 11 refs.

  6. Differential photometry of magnetic faculae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foukal, P.; Duvall, T., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    New observations extending the differential continuum photometry technique to the near-infrared are presented which demonstrate that the main factor determining the facular visibility near the solar disk center is the difference in H(-) opacity (and thus in penetration depth) between the continuum passbands. It is shown how the difference signal obtained depends on the temperature gradient difference between the two faculae and photosphere. The measured facular temperature gradient is compared with that given by empirical facular models based on Fraunhofer line observations, and with theoretical predictions. An explanation for the enhanced visibility of faculae against granular noise in the difference signal is suggested.

  7. UBV photometry of ER Vulpeculae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, R. K.; Padalia, T. D.; Srivastava, J. B.

    1991-08-01

    UBV photometry of the RS CVn-type eclipsing binary system ER Vulpeculae has been presented. The period comes out to be 0.698093d. The average depths of primary and secondary minima are, respectively, 0.21 and 0.12m. The colors at various phases have been given. A dip is seen around phase 0.73P as was seen in the observations of Arevalo et al. (1988). Large scatter is present in the observations as noticed earlier, and may be due to activity of the components.

  8. Candle flames in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, D. L.; Ross, H. D.; Tien, J. S.

    1995-01-01

    The candle flame in both normal and microgravity is non-propagating. In microgravity, however, the candle flame is also non-convective where (excepting Stefan flow) pure diffusion is the only transport mode. It also shares many characteristics with another classical problem, that of isolated droplet combustion. Given their qualitatively similar flame shapes and the required heat feedback to condensed-phase fuels, the gas-phase flow and temperature fields should be relatively similar for a droplet and a candle in reduced gravity. Unless the droplet diameter is maintained somehow through non-intrusive replenishment of fuel, the quasi-steady burning characteristics of a droplet can be maintained for only a few seconds. In contrast, the candle flame in microgravity may achieve a nearly steady state over a much longer time and is therefore ideal for examining a number of combustion-related phenomena. In this paper, we examine candle flame behavior in both short-duration and long-duration, quiescent, microgravity environments. Interest in this type of flame, especially 'candle flames in weightlessness', is demonstrated by very frequent public inquiries. The question is usually posed as 'will a candle flame burn in zero gravity', or, 'will a candle burn indefinitely (or steadily) in zero gravity in a large volume of quiescent air'. Intuitive speculation suggests to some that, in the absence of buoyancy, the accumulation of products in the vicinity of the flame will cause flame extinction. The classical theory for droplet combustion with its spherically-shaped diffusion flame, however, shows that steady combustion is possible in the absence of buoyancy if the chemical kinetics are fast enough. Previous experimental studies of candle flames in reduced and microgravity environments showed the flame could survive for at least 5 seconds, but did not reach a steady state in the available test time.

  9. Asteroid Analysis Using Lightcurve Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Jessica

    2011-10-01

    During the summer of 2011 data was taken of asteroid 3807 Pagels, a mid-sized asteroid located in the main asteroid belt in order to identify its rotational period. The asteroid 3807 Pagels is a poorly studied main belt asteroid that has little information recorded about its physical features. Time-series photometry of 3807 Pagels was obtained with a 16-inch telescope connected to a CCD camera located at the Texas A&M University - Commerce Observatory. CCD images were taken continuously with five minute exposure times through the standard broadband V filter. The data was then analyzed using the MPO Canopus program which utilized comparison stars within each CCD image to determine differential photometry and then generate a lightcurve for the asteroid. The final lightcurve did not show a complete rotational period for the asteroid. Thus, additional observations are needed in order to precisely determine 3807 Pagels rotational period. This research is the first steps of a long process of determining more information about the many mid-sized asteroids located in the asteroid belt for the potential of being able to classify these asteroids by their physical characteristics.

  10. Flame front geometry in premixed turbulent flames

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, I.G. ); Ashurst, W.T. )

    1991-12-01

    Experimental and numerical determinations of flame front curvature and orientation in premixed turbulent flames are presented. The experimental data is obtained from planar, cross sectional images of stagnation point flames at high Damkoehler number. A direct numerical simulation of a constant energy flow is combined with a zero-thickness, constant density flame model to provide the numerical results. The computational domain is a 32{sup 3} cube with periodic boundary conditions. The two-dimensional curvature distributions of the experiments and numerical simulations compare well at similar q{prime}/S{sub L} values with means close to zero and marked negative skewness. At higher turbulence levels the simulations show that the distributions become symmetric about zero. These features are also found in the three dimensional distributions of curvature. The simulations support assumptions which make it possible to determine the mean direction cosines from the experimental data. This leads to a reduction of 12% in the estimated flame surface area density in the middle of the flame brush. 18 refs.

  11. Flame Holder System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskin, Henry H. (Inventor); Vasquez, Peter (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A flame holder system includes a modified torch body and a ceramic flame holder. Catch pin(s) are coupled to and extend radially out from the torch body. The ceramic flame holder has groove(s) formed in its inner wall that correspond in number and positioning to the catch pin(s). Each groove starts at one end of the flame holder and can be shaped to define at least two 90.degree.turns. Each groove is sized to receive one catch pin therein when the flame holder is fitted over the end of the torch body. The flame holder is then manipulated until the catch pin(s) butt up against the end of the groove(s).

  12. Diffusion Flame Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, V. R.

    2006-01-01

    Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated. A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

  13. Diffusion Flame Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, Viswanath R.

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm) (Fig. 1, left). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated (Fig. 1, right). A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

  14. High Speed Photometry for BUSCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, O.; Reif, K.

    The camera BUSCA (Bonn University Simultaneous CAmera) is a standard instrument at the 2.2m telescope at Calar Alto Observatory (Spain) since 2001. At the moment some modifications of BUSCA are planned and partially realised. One major goal is the replacement of the old thick CCDs in the blue, yellow-green, and near-infrared channels. The newer CCDs have better cosmetics and performance in sensitivity. The other goal is to replace the old "Heidelberg"-style controller with a newly designed controller with the main focus on high-speed readout and on an advanced windowing mechanism. We present a theoretical analysis of the new controller design and its advantage in high speed photometry of rapidly pulsating stars. As an example PG1605+072 was chosen which was observed with BUSCA before in 2001 and 2002.

  15. Photometry of late type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, L. R.

    1972-01-01

    Broad band filter photometry for 57 bright stars of spectral type A2 discussed with peak instrument responses at 3320, 2980, 2460 and 1910 A. The data include nearly all usable filter observations of G, K and M types. Sampling is nearly complete for A and F giants and supergiants, with the exception of Cepheid variables. The basic results presented are relative digital counting rates obtained with a field-stop aperture of 10 minutes of arc. Characteristics of the four filter-photometer combinations and errors are discussed. Some observations require substantial correction if they are to represent the visually brightest star in the field. These corrections and the effects of interstellar reddening are discussed. The adjusted counts are then used to construct color-color diagrams and are compared to the recent SAO grid of model atmospheres.

  16. The Flame Tree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Lewis's own experiences living in Indonesia are fertile ground for telling "a ripping good story," one found in "The Flame Tree." He hopes people will enjoy the tale and appreciate the differences of an unfamiliar culture. The excerpt from "The Flame Tree" will reel readers in quickly.

  17. Premixed turbulent flame calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Tahry, S.; Rutland, C. J.; Ferziger, J. H.; Rogers, M. M.

    1987-01-01

    The importance of turbulent premixed flames in a variety of applications has led to a substantial amount of effort towards improving the understanding of these flames. Although these efforts have increased the understanding, many questions still remain. The use of direct numerical simulation (DNS) in solving these questions is examined.

  18. Flame-Test Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental chamber provides controlled environment for observation and measurement of flames propagating in expanding plume of flammable air/fuel mixture under atmospheric conditions. Designed to evaluate quenching capability of screen-type flame arresters in atmospheric vents of fuel cargo tanks aboard marine cargo vessels.

  19. Brominated Flame Retardants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) belong to a large class of compounds known as organohalogens. BFRs are currently the largest marketed flame retardant group due to their high performance efficiency and low cost. In the commercial market, more than 75 different BFRs are recogniz...

  20. Candle Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, D. L.; Ross, H. D.; Chang, P.; T'ien, J. S.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this work is to study both experimentally and numerically the behavior of a candle flame burning in a microgravity environment. Two space experiments (Shuttle and Mir) have shown the candle flame in microgravity to be small (approximately 1.5 cm diameter), dim blue, and hemispherical. Near steady flames with very long flame lifetimes (up to 45 minutes in some tests) existed for many of the tests. Most of the flames spontaneously oscillated with a period of approximately 1 Hz just prior to extinction). In a previous model of candle flame in microgravity, a porous sphere wetted with liquid fuel simulated the evaporating wick. The sphere, with a temperature equal to the boiling temperature of the fuel, was at the end of an inert cone that had a prescribed temperature. This inert cone produces the quenching effect of the candle wax in the real configuration. Although the computed flame shape resembled that observed in the microgravity experiment, the model was not able to differentiate the effect of wick geometry, e.g., a long vs. a short wick. This paper presents recent developments in the numerical model of the candle flame. The primary focus has been to more realistically account for the actual shape of the candle.

  1. Flame Shapes of Nonbuoyant Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Dai, Z.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z. G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The shapes (flame-sheet and luminous-flame boundaries) of steady nonbuoyant round hydrocarbon-fueled laminar-jet diffusion flames in still and coflowing air were studied both experimentally and theoretically. Flame-sheet shapes were measured from photographs using a CH optical filter to distinguish flame-sheet boundaries in the presence of blue CO2 and OH emissions and yellow continuum radiation from soot. Present experimental conditions included acetylene-, methane-, propane-, and ethylene-fueled flames having initial reactant temperatures of 300 K, ambient pressures of 4-50 kPa, jet exit Reynolds number of 3-54, initial air/fuel velocity ratios of 0-9 and luminous flame lengths of 5-55 mm; earlier measurements for propylene- and 1,3-butadiene-fueled flames for similar conditions were considered as well. Nonbuoyant flames in still air were observed at micro-gravity conditions; essentially nonbuoyant flames in coflowing air were observed at small pressures to control effects of buoyancy. Predictions of luminous flame boundaries from soot luminosity were limited to laminar smokepoint conditions, whereas predictions of flame-sheet boundaries ranged from soot-free to smokepoint conditions. Flame-shape predictions were based on simplified analyses using the boundary layer approximations along with empirical parameters to distinguish flame-sheet and luminous flame (at the laminar smoke point) boundaries. The comparison between measurements and predictions was remarkably good and showed that both flame-sheet and luminous-flame lengths are primarily controlled by fuel flow rates with lengths in coflowing air approaching 2/3 lengths in still air as coflowing air velocities are increased. Finally, luminous flame lengths at laminar smoke-point conditions were roughly twice as long as flame-sheet lengths at comparable conditions due to the presence of luminous soot particles in the fuel-lean region of the flames.

  2. Flame Shapes of Nonbuoyant Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames. Appendix K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The shapes (flame-sheet and luminous-flame boundaries) of steady nonbuoyant round hydrocarbon-fueled laminar-jet diffusion flames in still and coflowing air were studied both experimentally and theoretically. Flame-sheet shapes were measured from photographs using a CH optical filter to distinguish flame-sheet boundaries in the presence of blue C02 and OH emissions and yellow continuum radiation from soot. Present experimental conditions included acetylene-, methane-, propane-, and ethylene-fueled flames having initial reactant temperatures of 300 K, ambient pressures of 4-50 kPa, jet exit Reynolds number of 3-54, initial air/fuel velocity ratios of 0-9 and luminous flame lengths of 5-55 mm; earlier measurements for propylene- and 1,3-butadiene-fueled flames for similar conditions were considered as well. Nonbuoyant flames in still air were observed at micro-gravity conditions; essentially nonbuoyant flames in coflowing air were observed at small pressures to control effects of buoyancy. Predictions of luminous flame boundaries from soot luminosity were limited to laminar smoke-point conditions, whereas predictions of flame-sheet boundaries ranged from soot-free to smoke-point conditions. Flame-shape predictions were based on simplified analyses using the boundary layer approximations along with empirical parameters to distinguish flame-sheet and luminous-flame (at the laminar smoke point) boundaries. The comparison between measurements and predictions was remarkably good and showed that both flame-sheet and luminous-flame lengths are primarily controlled by fuel flow rates with lengths in coflowing air approaching 2/3 lengths in still air as coflowing air velocities are increased. Finally, luminous flame lengths at laminar smoke-point conditions were roughly twice as long as flame-sheet lengths at comparable conditions due to the presence of luminous soot particles in the fuel-lean region of the flames.

  3. WFPC2 Stellar Photometry with HSTphot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolphin, Andrew E.

    2000-01-01

    HSTphot, a photometry package designed to handle the undersampled PSFs found in WFPC2 images, is introduced and described, as well as some of the considerations that have to be made in order to obtain accurate PSF-fitting stellar photometry with WFPC2 data. Tests of HSTphot's internal reliability are made using multiple observations of the same field, and tests of external reliability are made by comparing with DoPHOT reductions of the same data. Subject headz'ngs: techniques: photometric

  4. Flame Spread Across Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Howard D.; Miller, Fletcher J.; Sirignano, William A.; Schiller, David

    1997-01-01

    The principal goal of our recent research on flame spread across liquid pools is the detailed identification of the mechanisms that control the rate and nature of flame spread when the liquid pool is initially at an isothermal bulk temperature that is below the fuel's flash point temperature. In our project, we specialize the subject to highlight the roles of buoyancy-related processes regarding the mechanisms of flame spread, an area of research cited recently by Linan and Williams as one that needs further attention and which microgravity (micro-g) experiments could help to resolve. Toward resolving the effects of buoyancy on this flame spread problem, comparisons - between 1-g and micro-g experimental observations, and between model predictions and experimental data at each of these gravitational levels - are extensively utilized. The present experimental and computational foundation is presented to support identification of the mechanisms that control flame spread in the pulsating flame spread regime for which long-duration, micro-g flame spread experiments have been conducted aboard a sounding rocket.

  5. CCD photometry of NGC 2419

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, C. A.; Heasley, J. N.

    1988-05-01

    CCD photometry of NGC 2419 has been compared to similar data for other metal-poor galactic globular clusters. Although NGC 2419 shares many characteristics with other outer-halo clusters (large tidal and core radius, low central surface brightness), the cluster is atypical of that population in other respects. The object appears to be a close analogy to metal-poor globulars located closer to the galactic center, and in particular the comparison to M15 shows that the color-magnitude diagrams of the two clusters are very similar. The two clusters are very similar in age and metallicity. The predominant difference between M15 and NGC 2419 is that the number of RR Lyraes is significantly smaller in the latter cluster, as well as a lack of an extreme blue tail to the horizontal branch. The observed distance modulus to NGC 2419 appears to be (m-M)V = 20.0±0.15, with a reddening E(B-V) = 0.11±0.05. Comparison to theoretical isochrones suggest the age of the cluster is 16 Gyr and supports the distance modulus found empirically. Oxygen-rich models (Fahlman, Richer, and VanderBerg 1985) and the new Yale models (Green, Demarque, and King 1987) were also examined.

  6. Meteor44 Video Meteor Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Wesley R.; Suggs, Robert M.; Cooke, William J.

    2004-01-01

    Meteor44 is a software system developed at MSFC for the calibration and analysis of video meteor data. The dynamic range of the (8bit) video data is extended by approximately 4 magnitudes for both meteors and stellar images using saturation compensation. Camera and lens specific saturation compensation coefficients are derived from artificial variable star laboratory measurements. Saturation compensation significantly increases the number of meteors with measured intensity and improves the estimation of meteoroid mass distribution. Astrometry is automated to determine each image's plate coefficient using appropriate star catalogs. The images are simultaneously intensity calibrated from the contained stars to determine the photon sensitivity and the saturation level referenced above the atmosphere. The camera s spectral response is used to compensate for stellar color index and typical meteor spectra in order to report meteor light curves in traditional visual magnitude units. Recent efforts include improved camera calibration procedures, long focal length 'streak' meteor photometry and two-station track determination. Meteor44 has been used to analyze data from the 2001, 2002 and 2003 MSFC Leonid observational campaigns as well as several lesser showers. The software is interactive and can be demonstrated using data from recent Leonid campaigns.

  7. Extremely weak hydrogen flames

    SciTech Connect

    Lecoustre, V.R.; Sunderland, P.B.; Chao, B.H.; Axelbaum, R.L.

    2010-11-15

    Hydrogen jet diffusion flames were observed near their quenching limits. These involved downward laminar flow of hydrogen from a stainless steel hypodermic tube with an inside diameter of 0.15 mm. Near their quenching limits these flames had hydrogen flow rates of 3.9 and 2.1 {mu}g/s in air and oxygen, respectively. Assuming complete combustion, the associated heat release rates are 0.46 and 0.25 W. To the authors' knowledge, these are the weakest self-sustaining steady flames ever observed. (author)

  8. Flame-resistant textiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogg, L. C.; Stringham, R. S.; Toy, M. S.

    1980-01-01

    Flame resistance treatment for acid resistant polyamide fibers involving photoaddition of fluorocarbons to surface has been scaled up to treat 10 yards of commercial width (41 in.) fabric. Process may be applicable to other low cost polyamides, polyesters, and textiles.

  9. Flame spread across liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Howard D.; Miller, Fletcher; Schiller, David; Sirignano, William

    1995-01-01

    Recent reviews of our understanding of flame spread across liquids show that there are many unresolved issues regarding the phenomenology and causal mechanisms affecting ignition susceptibility, flame spread characteristics, and flame spread rates. One area of discrepancy is the effect of buoyancy in both the uniform and pulsating spread regimes. The approach we have taken to resolving the importance of buoyancy for these flames is: (1) normal gravity (1g) and microgravity (micro g) experiments; and (2) numerical modeling at different gravitational levels. Of special interest to this work, as discussed at the previous workshop, is the determination of whether, and under what conditions, pulsating spread occurs in micro g. Microgravity offers a unique ability to modify and control the gas-phase flow pattern by utilizing a forced air flow over the pool surface.

  10. Differential Photometry at 1612 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, B. Murray

    2009-01-01

    The 1612 MHz light curves of high latitude OH/IR stars have been observed for several years with the Arecibo 305m telescope, to derive the light-travel time diameter of their shells from the phase difference between their red and blue shifted peaks, and to look for secular evolution of their masers. However, direct intensity measurements are always limited by the extent to which the telescope's characteristics can be removed. These, in Arecibo's case, are subject to changes in the weight distribution about the structure over time, to the functioning of the vertical tie-down system, which can be interrupted by thunder storms, and by temperature-related zenith angle effects during daytime observations. Nevertheless, all of these limitations are neutralized when the ratio of the two peaks is used as the observed parameter. This form of differential photometry often results in clean light curves, though the ratio may still be perturbed by RFI, by interstellar scintillation, and more predictably by noise. The increased sensitivity of this observing mode readily detects (1) any differential evolution of the two masers, as well as (2) highlighting changes in masing gain between the two peaks around the pulsation cycle, that in turn are indicative of the operation of partially rather than fully saturated masers. In many of our light-curves there are abrupt changes in the ratio of the peak intensities at a constant pulsation phase. These are interpreted as being due to the onset of dust formation at that phase of the pulsation cycle, with a consequent abrupt change in the reprocessing of the stellar SED, and hence to an abrupt change in the maser pump. This is a feature of the Gray, Howe & Lewis (MN 364, 783 (2005)) maser model. Examples of these effects will be shown.

  11. Oscillating edge-flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckmaster, J.; Zhang, Yi

    1999-09-01

    It has been known for some years that when a near-limit flame spreads over a liquid pool of fuel, the edge of the flame can oscillate. It is also known that when a near-asphyxiated candle-flame burns in zero gravity, the edge of the (hemispherical) flame can oscillate violently prior to extinction. We propose that these oscillations are nothing more than a manifestation of the large Lewis number instability well known in chemical reactor studies and in combustion studies, one that is exacerbated by heat losses. As evidence of this we examine an edge-flame confined within a fuel-supply boundary and an oxygen-supply boundary, anchored by a discontinuity in data at the fuel-supply boundary. We show that when the Lewis number of the fuel is 2, and the Lewis number of the oxidizer is 1, oscillations of the edge occur when the Damköhler number is reduced below a critical value. During a single oscillation period there is a short premixed propagation stage and a long diffusion stage, behaviour that has been observed in flame spread experiments. Oscillations do not occur when both Lewis numbers are equal to 1.

  12. Triple flames in microgravity flame spread

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichman, Indrek S.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to examine in detail the influence of the triple flame structure on the flame spread problem. It is with an eye to the practical implications that this fundamental research project must be carried out. The microgravity configuration is preferable because buoyancy-induced stratification and vorticity generation are suppressed. A more convincing case can be made for comparing our predictions, which are zero-g, and any projected experiments. Our research into the basic aspects will employ two models. In one, flows of fuel and oxidizer from the lower wall are not considered. In the other, a convective flow is allowed. The non-flow model allows us to develop combined analytical and numerical solution methods that may be used in the more complicated convective-flow model.

  13. Flame hole dynamics simulation of Sandia Flame F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaus, Robert; Hewson, John; Domino, Stefan; Pantano, Carlos

    2014-11-01

    The Sandia Flame ``F'' is a piloted methane/air diffusion flame containing high levels of local extinction. These regions of local extinction reduce the efficiency of combustion and can increase the production of certain pollutants (e.g. carbon monoxide) as well as limit the overall stability of the flame. We present a flame hole dynamics model describing evolution of local extinction zones (flame holes) in a turbulent diffusion flame and apply it to perform a direct numerical simulation of the Sandia Flame F using Sandia's ``SIERRA low Mach Module, Nalu.'' The flame hole dynamics model is a phase-field model that describes the state of the flame (burning or extinguished) through a surface partial differential equation modeling extinction, reignition and advection of the flame state on the moving stoichiometric surface using edge flame properties. The solution of the surface equation is then extended away from the surface and used for state evaluations using a flamelet library with steady flamelets in the burning region and a transient solution in the quenched regions. The flame hole dynamics approach allows tracking extinction and reignition in turbulent diffusion flames without using the computationally costly detailed chemistry explicitly.

  14. DETAIL VIEW IN THE FLAME TRENCH LOOKING NORTH, FLAME DEFLECTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW IN THE FLAME TRENCH LOOKING NORTH, FLAME DEFLECTOR IN THE FOREGROUND, WATER PIPES AND VALVE ASSEMBLIES ON THE FOREGROUND. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  15. Flame height measurement of laminar inverse diffusion flames.

    SciTech Connect

    Shaddix, Christopher R.; Williams, Timothy C.; Blevins, Linda Gail; Mikofski, Mark A.

    2005-09-01

    Flame heights of co-flowing cylindrical ethylene-air and methane-air laminar inverse diffusion flames were measured. The luminous flame height was found to be greater than the height of the reaction zone determined by planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of hydroxyl radicals (OH) because of luminous soot above the reaction zone. However, the location of the peak luminous signals along the centerline agreed very well with the OH flame height. Flame height predictions using Roper's analysis for circular port burners agreed with measured reaction zone heights when using values for the characteristic diffusion coefficient and/or diffusion temperature somewhat different from those recommended by Roper. The fact that Roper's analysis applies to inverse diffusion flames is evidence that inverse diffusion flames are similar in structure to normal diffusion flames.

  16. Flame height measurement of laminar inverse diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Mikofski, Mark A.; Williams, Timothy C.; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Blevins, Linda G.

    2006-07-15

    Flame heights of co-flowing cylindrical ethylene-air and methane-air laminar inverse diffusion flames were measured. The luminous flame height was found to be greater than the height of the reaction zone determined by planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of hydroxyl radicals (OH) because of luminous soot above the reaction zone. However, the location of the peak luminous signals along the centerline agreed very well with the OH flame height. Flame height predictions using Roper's analysis for circular port burners agreed with measured reaction zone heights when using values for the characteristic diffusion coefficient and/or diffusion temperature somewhat different from those recommended by Roper. The fact that Roper's analysis applies to inverse diffusion flames is evidence that inverse diffusion flames are similar in structure to normal diffusion flames. (author)

  17. Detection of Terrestrial Planets Using Transit Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, David; Witteborn, Fred; Jenkins, Jon; Dunham, Edward; Boruci, William; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Transit photometry detection of planets offers many advantages: an ability to detect terrestrial size planets, direct determination of the planet's size, applicability to all main-sequence stars, and a differential brightness change of the periodic signature being independent of stellar distance or planetary orbital semi-major axis. Ground and space based photometry have already been successful in detecting transits of the giant planet HD209458b. However, photometry 100 times better is required to detect terrestrial planets. We present results of laboratory measurements of an end-to-end photometric system incorporating all of the important confounding noise features of both the sky and a space based photometer including spacecraft jitter. In addition to demonstrating an instrumental noise of less than 10 ppm (an Earth transit of a solar-like star is 80 ppm), the brightnesses of individual stars were dimmed to simulate Earth-size transit signals. These 'transits' were reliably detected as part of the tests.

  18. Dynamics of Swirling Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candel, Sébastien; Durox, Daniel; Schuller, Thierry; Bourgouin, Jean-François; Moeck, Jonas P.

    2014-01-01

    In many continuous combustion processes, such as those found in aeroengines or gas turbines, the flame is stabilized by a swirling flow formed by aerodynamic swirlers. The dynamics of such swirling flames is of technical and fundamental interest. This article reviews progress in this field and begins with a discussion of the swirl number, a parameter that plays a central role in the definition of the flow structure and its response to incoming disturbances. Interaction between the swirler response and incoming acoustic perturbations generates a vorticity wave convected by the flow, which is accompanied by azimuthal velocity fluctuations. Axial and azimuthal velocities in turn define the flame response in terms of heat--release rate fluctuations. The nonlinear response of swirling flames to incoming disturbances is conveniently represented with a flame describing function (FDF), in other words, with a family of transfer functions depending on frequency and incident axial velocity amplitudes. The FDF, however, does not reflect all possible nonlinear interactions in swirling flows. This aspect is illustrated with experimental data and some theoretical arguments in the last part of this article, which concerns the interaction of incident acoustic disturbances with the precessing vortex core, giving rise to nonlinear fluctuations at the frequency difference.

  19. Photometry of eight magnetic peculiar A stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, Saul J.; Dukes, Robert J., Jr.; Pyper, Diane M.

    1992-07-01

    The paper presents the photometry of eight magnetic Ap stars 63 And, CU Vir, Beta CrB, Chi Ser, 52 Her, HD 111133, HD 147010, and HD 173650, most of which was obtained with the Phoenix 10-in. Automated Photoelectric Telescope of the Fairborn Observatory. Special attention is given to the results of period determinations, showing that the failure to establish better periods is often due to inaccuracies and gaps in the photometry. The data obtained for HD 147010 validates North's (1984) period of 3.9210 days.

  20. TRIPPy: Python-based Trailed Source Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Wesley C.; Alexandersen, Mike; Schwamb, Megan E.; Marsset, Michael E.; Pike, Rosemary E.; Kavelaars, JJ; Bannister, Michele T.; Benecchi, Susan; Delsanti, Audrey

    2016-05-01

    TRIPPy (TRailed Image Photometry in Python) uses a pill-shaped aperture, a rectangle described by three parameters (trail length, angle, and radius) to improve photometry of moving sources over that done with circular apertures. It can generate accurate model and trailed point-spread functions from stationary background sources in sidereally tracked images. Appropriate aperture correction provides accurate, unbiased flux measurement. TRIPPy requires numpy, scipy, matplotlib, Astropy (ascl:1304.002), and stsci.numdisplay; emcee (ascl:1303.002) and SExtractor (ascl:1010.064) are optional.

  1. Direct imaging photometry with the MOST satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, J. F.; Matthews, J. M.; Kuschnig, R.; Guenther, D. B.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Rucinski, S. M. R.; Sasselov, D.; Walker, G. A. H.; Weiss, W. W.

    Canada's first space telescope, MOST (Microvariablity and Oscillations of Stars) was successfully launched on June 30, 2003 with a primary mission to perform ultra-high-precision photometry to detect acoustic oscillations in solar-like stars. MOST has the ability to observe single fields for uninterrupted periods of up to two months and targets can be observed either through Fabry lens imaging or Direct imaging. This report reviews the Direct imaging capabilities of the MOST satellite and the extraction of accurate stellar photometry. MOST is a Canadian Space Agency mission, operated jointly by Dynacon, Inc., and the Universities of Toronto and British Columbia, with assistance from the University of Vienna.

  2. Flame resistant elastic elastomeric fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howarth, J. T.; Massucco, A. A.

    1972-01-01

    Development of materials to improve flame resistance of elastic elastomeric fibers is discussed. Two approaches, synthesis of polyether based urethanes and modification of synthesized urethanes with flame ratardant additives, are described. Specific applications of both techniques are presented.

  3. Bigger and Brighter Flame Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalby, David K.; Mosher, Melvyn M.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a method for flame test demonstrations that provides a way to set up quickly, clean up, and produce a large and very intense flame that can be seen easily in a 300-seat lecture auditorium. (JRH)

  4. A Dramatic Flame Test Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kristin A.; Schreiner, Rodney

    2001-01-01

    Flame tests are used for demonstration of atomic structure. Describes a demonstration that uses spray bottles filled with methanol and a variety of salts to produce a brilliantly colored flame. (Contains 11 references.) (ASK)

  5. Rubens Flame-Tube Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ficken, George W.; Stephenson, Francis C.

    1979-01-01

    Investigates and explains the phenomenon associated with Rubens flame-tube demonstration, specifically the persistance of flames at regular intervals along the tube for few minutes after the gas is turned off. (GA)

  6. Flame retardant spandex type polyurethanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howarth, J. T.; Sheth, S.; Sidman, K. R.; Massucco, A. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Flame retardant elastomeric compositions were developed, comprised of: (1) spandex type polyurethane having incorporated into the polymer chain, halogen containing polyols; (2) conventional spandex type polyurethanes in physical admixture flame retardant additives; and (3) fluoroelastomeric resins in physical admixture with flame retardant additives. Methods of preparing fibers of the flame retardant elastomeric materials are presented and articles of manufacture comprised of the elastomeric materials are mentioned.

  7. Bunsen flame hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, T.C.; Ferguson, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation into the structure of premixed Bunsen flames was performed to determine whether by using laser velocimetry an unambiguous means of measuring laminar flame speed could be devised and to provide data by which theoreticians could critically evaluate their predictions. Data presented for the former include the axisymmetric flow field and a comparison of cone angles obtained from direct and schlieren photographs of the flame. Data presented for the latter include, for varying equivalence ratios and cone angles, the radius of curvature of the tip and change in velocity through the tip. The centerline velocity was found to decay as a function of axial distance, and a noncoincidence of schlieren and luminous surfaces was observed. When normalized by a preheat thickness (based on the harmonic mean of the thermal conductivity), the behavior of the radius of curvature of the tip compared well with a recent theoretical prediction. 13 references, 5 figures.

  8. Turbulent forced diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Arpaci, V.S.; Li, C.Y.

    1995-07-01

    It is the purpose of this study to introduce a turbulent microscale appropriate for forced diffusion flames and to propose models for fuel consumption and skin friction in terms of this scale. The study consists of four sections. Following the introduction, Section 2 recapitulates the laminar theories of reacting boundary layers in terms of dimensional arguments and proposes models for fuel consumption and skin friction. Section 3 extends these arguments by introducing a microscale appropriate for turbulent flames and, in terms of this scale, develops models for fuel consumption and skin friction, correlates the experimental data on skin friction, and Section 4 concludes the study.

  9. OAUNI photometry of ASASSN-16hw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereyra, A.; Ricra, J.; Zevallos, M.

    2016-09-01

    We report optical photometry of Type Ia SN ASASSN-16hw (=SN 2016ekt, ATel #9278, ATel #9289, ATel #9300) on 2016-08-06 (UT) gathered with the OAUNI 51cm telescope (Pereyra et al. 2015;arXiv:1512.03104) at Huancayo Observatory, Peru.

  10. Photometry of Faint Wide Doubles in Hydra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Wilfried; Thuemen, Chris; Gould, Ross

    2015-11-01

    Images of several double stars in Hydra published on the "Double Star Imaging Project" Yahoo Group page suggest magnitude issues compared with the corresponding WDS catalog data per end of 2014. Taking additional images with V and B filters enabled photometry for these pairs, suggesting significant corrections to the old data in WDS.

  11. Triaxial Burke-Schumann Flames with Applications to Flame Synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. H.; Axelbaum, R. L.; Gokoglu, Suleyman (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The problem of a flame generated by three coaxial flows is solved by extending the Burke-Schumann methodology to include a third stream. The solution is particularly relevant to flame synthesis wherein multiple tubes are often employed either to introduce inert as a diffusion barrier or to introduce more than two reactants. The general problem is solved where the inner and outer tubes contain reactants and the middle tube contains either an inert or a third reactant. Relevant examples are considered and the results show that the triaxial Burke-Schumann flame can be substantially more complicated than the traditional Burke-Schumann flame. When the middle flow is inert the flame temperature is no longer constant but increases axially, reaching a maximum at the flame centerline. At the exit the flame does not sit on the tube exit but instead resides between the inner and outer tubes, resulting in an effective barrier for particle build-up on the burner rim. For the case of a third reactant in the middle flow, synthesis chemistry where the inner reaction is endothermic and the outer reaction is exothermic is considered. In addition to showing the flame temperature and flame shape, the results identify conditions wherein reaction is not possible due to insufficient heat transfer from the outer flame to support the inner flame reaction.

  12. PHOTOMETRYPIPELINE - An Automated Pipeline for Calibrated Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mommert, Michael; Moskovitz, Nicholas; Trilling, David E.

    2016-10-01

    Telescopes acquire massive amounts of imaging data every night. The goal of a large fraction of these observations is to obtain calibrated photometry for point sources - stars or moving Solar System targets - in different filters.We present PHOTOMETRYPIPELINE (PP, github.com/mommermi/photometrypipeline), an automated pipeline to obtain calibrated photometry from imaging data. PP is an open-source Python 2.7 software suite that provides image registration, aperture photometry, photometric calibration, and target identification with only minimal human interaction. For image registration, PP utilizes Source Extractor (Bertin & Arnouts 1996, A&AS, 117) and SWARP (Bertin et al. 2002, ASP Conf. S., 228) to find a plate solution for each frame, providing accurate target astrometry. Circular aperture photometry is performed using Source Extractor; an optimum aperture radius is identified using a curve-of-growth analysis. Photometric calibration is obtained through matching the background source catalog with star catalogs with reliable photometry (e.g., SDSS, URAT-1) in an iterative process; magnitude zeropoint accuracies are usually of the order of 0.03 mag, or better. Final calibrated photometry for each field source is written into a queriable database; target photometry is extracted from this database. Moving targets are identified using JPL Horizons (Giorgini et al. 1996, BAAS, 28) ephemerides. Image combination capabilities (using SWARP, Bertin 2006, ASP Conf. S., 112) are also available to improve the target's signal.PP is well-suited for data covering a few square arcminutes of the sky due to its dependence on background sources for registration and calibration. PP can be run on Unix-based systems on a simple desktop machine and is capable of realtime data analysis. PP has been developed for observations of moving targets, but can also be used on other observations. Efforts to improve the sky coverage for phometric calibration are in progress. Also, a module will be

  13. Precision Multiband Photometry with a DSLR Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Bakos, G. Á.; Penev, K.; Csubry, Z.; Hartman, J. D.; Bhatti, W.; de Val-Borro, M.

    2016-03-01

    Ground-based exoplanet surveys such as SuperWASP, HAT Network of Telescopes (HATNet), and KELT have discovered close to two hundred transiting extrasolar planets in the past several years. The strategy of these surveys is to look at a large field of view and measure the brightnesses of its bright stars to around half a percent per point precision, which is adequate for detecting hot Jupiters. Typically, these surveys use CCD detectors to achieve high precision photometry. These CCDS, however, are expensive relative to other consumer-grade optical imaging devices, such as digital single-lens reflex cameras (DSLRs). We look at the possibility of using a DSLR camera for precision photometry. Specifically, we used a Canon EOS 60D camera that records light in three colors simultaneously. The DSLR was integrated into the HATNet survey and collected observations for a month, after which photometry was extracted for 6600 stars in a selected stellar field. We found that the DSLR achieves a best-case median absolute deviation of 4.6 mmag per 180 s exposure when the DSLR color channels are combined, and 1000 stars are measured to better than 10 mmag (1%). Also, we achieve 10 mmag or better photometry in the individual colors. This is good enough to detect transiting hot Jupiters. We performed a candidate search on all stars and found four candidates, one of which is KELT-3b, the only known transiting hot Jupiter in our selected field. We conclude that the Canon 60D is a cheap, lightweight device capable of useful photometry in multiple colors.

  14. Modeling turbulent flame propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Ashurst, W.T.

    1994-08-01

    Laser diagnostics and flow simulation techniques axe now providing information that if available fifty years ago, would have allowed Damkoehler to show how turbulence generates flame area. In the absence of this information, many turbulent flame speed models have been created, most based on Kolmogorov concepts which ignore the turbulence vortical structure, Over the last twenty years, the vorticity structure in mixing layers and jets has been shown to determine the entrainment and mixing behavior and these effects need to be duplicated by combustion models. Turbulence simulations reveal the intense vorticity structure as filaments and simulations of passive flamelet propagation show how this vorticity Creates flame area and defines the shape of the expected chemical reaction surface. Understanding how volume expansion interacts with flow structure should improve experimental methods for determining turbulent flame speed. Since the last decade has given us such powerful new tools to create and see turbulent combustion microscopic behavior, it seems that a solution of turbulent combustion within the next decade would not be surprising in the hindsight of 2004.

  15. Direct Flame Impingement

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-01

    During the DFI process, high velocity flame jets impinge upon the material being heated, creating a high heat transfer rate. As a result, refractory walls and exhaust gases are cooler, which increases thermal efficiency and lowers NOx emissions. Because the jet nozzles are located a few inches from the load, furnace size can be reduced significantly.

  16. Flame Radiation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, R. W.; Humenik, F. M.; Neely, G. M.

    1983-01-01

    Spectral and total flame radiation measurements exhibited: (1) that radiant heat flux increases with vision combustor inlet air pressure; (2) the effect of fuel atomization characteristics on radiant heat flux; and (3) that a reduction in fuel hydrogen content produces a significant increase in radiant heat flux primarily at low combustor pressures.

  17. "Magic Eraser" Flame Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landis, Arthur M.; Davies, Malonne I.; Landis, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Cleaning erasers are used to support methanol-fueled flame tests. This safe demonstration technique requires only small quantities of materials, provides clean colors for up to 45 seconds, and can be used in the classroom or the auditorium. (Contains 1 note.)

  18. Visible emission of hydrogen flames

    SciTech Connect

    Schefer, R.W.; Kulatilaka, W.D.; Patterson, B.D.; Settersten, T.B.

    2009-06-15

    The common misconception that hydrogen flames are not visible is examined. Examples are presented of clearly visible emissions from typical hydrogen flames. It is shown that while visible emissions from these flames are considerably weaker than those from comparable hydrocarbon flames, they are indeed visible, albeit at reduced light levels in most cases. Detailed flame spectra are presented to characterize flame emission bands in the ultraviolet, visible and infrared regions of the spectrum that result in a visible hydrogen flame. The visible blue emission is emphasized, and recorded spectra indicate that fine spectral structure is superimposed on a broadband continuum extending from the ultraviolet into the visible region. Tests were performed to show that this emission does not arise from carbon or nitrogen chemistry resulting from carbon-containing impurities (hydrocarbons) in the hydrogen fuel or from CO{sub 2} or N{sub 2} entrainment from the surrounding air. The spectral structure, however, is also observed in methane flames. The magnitude of the broadband emission increases with flame temperature in a highly nonlinear manner while the finer spectral structure is insensitive to temperature. A comparison of diffusion and premixed H{sub 2} flames shows that the fine scale structure is comparable in both flames. (author)

  19. Graphene based multifunctional flame sensor.

    PubMed

    Ferry, Darim B; Pavan Kumar, R; Reddy, Siva K; Mukherjee, Anwesha; Misra, Abha

    2015-05-15

    Recently, graphene has attracted much attention due to its unique electrical and thermal properties along with its high surface area, and hence presents an ideal sensing material. We report a novel configuration of a graphene based flame sensor by exploiting the response of few layer graphene to a flame along two different directions, where flame detection results from a difference in heat transfer mechanisms. A complete sensor module was developed with a signal conditioning circuit that compensates for any drift in the baseline of the sensor, along with a flame detection algorithm implemented in a microcontroller to detect the flame. A pre-defined threshold for either of the sensors is tunable, which can be varied based on the nature of the flame, hence presenting a system that can be used for detection of any kind of flame. This finding also presents a scalable method that opens avenues to modify complicated sensing schemes.

  20. Graphene based multifunctional flame sensor.

    PubMed

    Ferry, Darim B; Pavan Kumar, R; Reddy, Siva K; Mukherjee, Anwesha; Misra, Abha

    2015-05-15

    Recently, graphene has attracted much attention due to its unique electrical and thermal properties along with its high surface area, and hence presents an ideal sensing material. We report a novel configuration of a graphene based flame sensor by exploiting the response of few layer graphene to a flame along two different directions, where flame detection results from a difference in heat transfer mechanisms. A complete sensor module was developed with a signal conditioning circuit that compensates for any drift in the baseline of the sensor, along with a flame detection algorithm implemented in a microcontroller to detect the flame. A pre-defined threshold for either of the sensors is tunable, which can be varied based on the nature of the flame, hence presenting a system that can be used for detection of any kind of flame. This finding also presents a scalable method that opens avenues to modify complicated sensing schemes. PMID:25900408

  1. Graphene based multifunctional flame sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, Darim B.; Pavan Kumar, R.; Reddy, Siva K.; Mukherjee, Anwesha; Misra, Abha

    2015-05-01

    Recently, graphene has attracted much attention due to its unique electrical and thermal properties along with its high surface area, and hence presents an ideal sensing material. We report a novel configuration of a graphene based flame sensor by exploiting the response of few layer graphene to a flame along two different directions, where flame detection results from a difference in heat transfer mechanisms. A complete sensor module was developed with a signal conditioning circuit that compensates for any drift in the baseline of the sensor, along with a flame detection algorithm implemented in a microcontroller to detect the flame. A pre-defined threshold for either of the sensors is tunable, which can be varied based on the nature of the flame, hence presenting a system that can be used for detection of any kind of flame. This finding also presents a scalable method that opens avenues to modify complicated sensing schemes.

  2. Lifted turbulent jet flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Jay A.

    Experiments were conducted on lifted, turbulent jet diffusion flames. An automated technique using a linear photodiode array was implemented to measure the temporal history of the liftoff height h. The measurements enabled accurate determination of the mean liftoff height [...] under a wide range of flow conditions, including several fuels, nozzle diameters, and exit velocities [...]. The results showed an approximately linear relationship between [...] and [...], with a slight dependence on Reynolds number. A strain-rate model for liftoff, based on far-field scaling of turbulent jets, provides an explanation for the linear dependence of [...] on [...]. Measurements were also made in which the nozzle fluid contained varying amounts of air, where it was found that the slope of the [...] vs. [...] line increases faster than predicted by far-field scaling of turbulent jets. The discrepancy is attributed to near-field effects.The amplitudes of the fluctuations in h were found to be of the order of the local large scale of the jet. There is a slight increase in normalized fluctuation level [...] with [...], and there is some variation of [...] with fuel type. The time scales of the fluctuations of h were found to be considerably longer than the local large-scale time of the turbulence [...]. By using fuels of different chemical times to vary [...], the measured correlation time [...] normalized by [...] was found to collapse with Richardson number [...]. Experiments in which the nozzles were oriented horizontally showed no change in [...], however. Additional experiments were conducted to investigate alternative explanations for the variation of [...] with [...]. These experiments included measuring the flame length L simultaneously with h, and measuring the visible radiation I simultaneously with h. L(t) was found to be nearly uncorrelated with h(t), dismissing the possibility that a feedback mechanism from L to h controls the fluctuations of h. Although I(t) is highly

  3. Candle Flames in Microgravity Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This video of a candle flame burning in space was taken by the Candle Flames in Microgravity (CFM) experiment on the Russian Mir space station. It is actually a composite of still photos from a 35mm camera since the video images were too dim. The images show a hemispherically shaped flame, primarily blue in color, with some yellow early int the flame lifetime. The actual flame is quite dim and difficult to see with the naked eye. Nearly 80 candles were burned in this experiment aboard Mir. NASA scientists have also studied how flames spread in space and how to detect fire in microgravity. Researchers hope that what they learn about fire and combustion from the flame ball experiments will help out here on Earth. Their research could help create things such as better engines for cars and airplanes. Since they use very weak flames, flame balls require little fuel. By studying how this works, engineers may be able to design engines that use far less fuel. In addition, microgravity flame research is an important step in creating new safety precautions for astronauts living in space. By understanding how fire works in space, the astronauts can be better prepared to fight it.

  4. Incomplete combustion in nonadiabatic premixed gas flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, L.; Sivashinsky, G.

    1996-06-01

    The inward propagating spherical flame and burner stabilized Bunsen-type flame of low-Lewis-number premixtures are studied numerically. It is shown that reduction of the reaction rate induced by the flame stretch makes the flame vulnerable to the radiative heat losses which may well result in a partial or complete extinction of the flame.

  5. Lightcurve Photometry Opportunities: 2016 October-December

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Brian D.; Harris, Alan W.; Durech, Josef; Benner, Lance A. M.

    2016-10-01

    We present lists of asteroid photometry opportunities for objects reaching a favorable apparition and having either none or poorly-defined lightcurve parameters. Additional data on these objects will help with shape and spin axis modeling via lightcurve inversion. We also include lists of objects that will be the target of radar observations. Lightcurves for these objects can help constrain pole solutions and/or remove rotation period ambiguities that might not come from using radar data alone.

  6. WISE Photometry for 400 Million SDSS Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Dustin; Hogg, David W.; Schlegel, David J.

    2016-02-01

    We present photometry of images from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) of over 400 million sources detected by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We use a “forced photometry” technique, using measured SDSS source positions, star-galaxy classification, and galaxy profiles to define the sources whose fluxes are to be measured in the WISE images. We perform photometry with The Tractor image modeling code, working on our “unWISE” coaddds and taking account of the WISE point-spread function and a noise model. The result is a measurement of the flux of each SDSS source in each WISE band. Many sources have little flux in the WISE bands, so often the measurements we report are consistent with zero given our uncertainties. However, for many sources we get 3σ or 4σ measurements; these sources would not be reported by the “official” WISE pipeline and will not appear in the WISE catalog, yet they can be highly informative for some scientific questions. In addition, these small-signal measurements can be used in stacking analyses at the catalog level. The forced photometry approach has the advantage that we measure a consistent set of sources between SDSS and WISE, taking advantage of the resolution and depth of the SDSS images to interpret the WISE images; objects that are resolved in SDSS but blended together in WISE still have accurate measurements in our photometry. Our results, and the code used to produce them, are publicly available at http://unwise.me.

  7. Lightcurve Photometry Opportunities: 2016 July-September

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Brian D.; Harris, Alan W.; Durech, Josef; Benner, Lance A. M.

    2016-07-01

    We present lists of asteroid photometry opportunities for objects reaching a favorable apparition and having either none or poorly-defined lightcurve parameters. Additional data on these objects will help with shape and spin axis modeling via lightcurve inversion. We also include lists of objects that will be the target of radar observations. Lightcurves for these objects can help constrain pole solutions and/or remove rotation period ambiguities that might not come from using radar data alone.

  8. Optical photometry using Bradford robotic telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seal Braun, P.; Baruch, J. E. F.

    2009-06-01

    The Bradford Robotic Telescope (BRT) is located on Mount Teide at Tenerife and is working, taking observations since 2003. It is a fully automated telescope. The hardware and software used for the working of the telescope are described here. Twenty four BL Lac objects are observed since 2005 and magnitudes of the objects are calculated. We describe in this paper the working of BRT and optical BVR photometry of BL Lac objects, observed during 2005-2007.

  9. Variable Star Photometry at West Challow Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, D.

    2007-05-01

    This paper describes the facilities and observing programme of a small personal observatory set up in the UK for CCD photometry of variable stars. Its development has been driven by the belief that committed amateurs can make a valuable scientific contribution to the study of variable stars. Observing projects carried out at WCO are described including examples of Pro-Am collaboration and contributions to the observing programmes of the BAAVSS, AAVSO and CBA.

  10. 100 years of photometry and radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardis, Jonathan E.

    2001-06-01

    Measurement of light is an old subject, though the past 100 years have seen significant advances. 100 years ago, photometry - the art and science of measuring light as it is perceived by people - had the greater technological importance. Even today SI (the metric system) retains a base unit for photometry, the candela. However, early work at NBS included pivotal projects in the field of radiometry - the measurement of the physical characteristics of light. These included the validation of Planck's newly-minted theory of blackbody radiation, determining the radiation constants with good accuracy, and the definitive analysis of the spectral responsivity of human vision, so as to relate photometry to radiometry. This latter work has only increased in importance over the past 75 years as the definition of the candela has changed and improved. Today, NIST makes radiometric, and hence photometric measurements, with unprecedented precision. Cryogenic radiometers based on the principle of electrical substitution measure optical flux with uncertainties of 0.02%. Additional facilities enable measurement of spectral responsivity, spectral radiance, and spectral irradiance. Novel detectors, such as light-traps, allow the best accuracy to be transferred from the primary standards to routinely-used instruments and to calibration customers. Filtered detectors are used to realize photometric scales, radiation temperature scales, and other specialized measurements. Indeed, the story of the metrology of light is the story of continuous improvement, both driven by and enabled by advances in technology. We touch upon some of these as a prelude to the other talks in this Conference.

  11. Flame Retardant Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Lyon, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial aircraft, flame retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured epoxies were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis and microscale combustion calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness of plaques of several cured formulations was determined on single-edge notched bend specimens. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  12. Solid propellant flame structure

    SciTech Connect

    Parr, T.P.; Hanson-Parr, D.M.

    1996-07-01

    Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF), UV/Vis Absorption, and thermocouple measurements were done for HNF, RDX, HMX, and XM39 deflagration with and without CO{sub 2} laser-support. RDX and especially HNF have very short self-deflagration flame length scales. HMX and XM39 have taller self-deflagration flames. XM39 has a marked dark zone with plateau temperature about 1,400 K. RDX`s dark zone, present under laser supported deflagration, collapses when the external laser flux is removed. PLIF was used to measure the 2D NH, OH, and CN species profiles for these materials and OH temperature profile for RDX and HNF under non-laser supported conditions. The best spatial resolution for the RDX PLIF was about 4 {micro}m. Sandwiches of HNF and various binders were studied with PLIF and while obvious diffusion flames were present at low pressure, they are weak and are not expected to be burn rate controlling. 34 refs., 18 figs.

  13. Combustor flame flashback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, M. P.; Tien, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    A stainless steel, two-dimensional (rectangular), center-dump, premixed-prevaporized combustor with quartz window sidewalls for visual access was designed, built, and used to study flashback. A parametric study revealed that the flashback equivalence ratio decreased slightly as the inlet air temperature increased. It also indicated that the average premixer velocity and premixer wall temperature were not governing parameters of flashback. The steady-state velocity balance concept as the flashback mechanism was not supported. From visual observation several stages of burning were identified. High speed photography verified upstream flame propagation with the leading edge of the flame front near the premixer wall. Combustion instabilities (spontaneous pressure oscillations) were discovered during combustion at the dump plane and during flashback. The pressure oscillation frequency ranged from 40 to 80 Hz. The peak-to-peak amplitude (up to 1.4 psi) increased as the fuel/air equivalence ratio was increased attaining a maximum value just before flashback. The amplitude suddenly decreased when the flame stabilized in the premixer. The pressure oscillations were large enough to cause a local flow reversal. A simple test using ceramic fiber tufts indicated flow reversals existed at the premixer exit during flickering. It is suspected that flashback occurs through the premixer wall boundary layer flow reversal caused by combustion instability. A theoretical analysis of periodic flow in the premixing channel has been made. The theory supports the flow reversal mechanism.

  14. Candle Flames in Non-Buoyant Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, D. L.; Ross, H. D.; Shu, Y.; Tien, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses the behavior of a candle flame in a long-duration, quiescent microgravity environment both on the space Shuttle and the Mir Orbiting Station (OS). On the Shuttle, the flames became dim blue after an initial transient where there was significant yellow (presumably soot) in the flame. The flame lifetimes were typically less than 60 seconds. The safety-mandated candlebox that contained the candle flame inhibited oxygen transport to the flame and thus limited the flame lifetime. 'Me flames on the Mir OS were similar, except that the yellow luminosity persisted longer into the flame lifetime because of a higher initial oxygen concentration. The Mir flames burned for as long as 45 minutes. The difference in the flame lifetime between the Shuttle and Mir flames was primarily the redesigned candlebox that did not inhibit oxygen transport to the flame. In both environments, the flame intensity and the height-to-width ratio gradually decreased as the ambient oxygen content in the sealed chamber slowly decreased. Both sets of experiments showed spontaneous, axisymmetric flame oscillations just prior to extinction. The paper also presents a numerical model of candle flame. The model is detailed in the gas-phase, but uses a simplified liquid/wick phase. 'Me model predicts a steady flame with a shape and size quantitatively similar to the Shuttle and Mir flames. ne model also predicts pre-extinction flame oscillations if the decrease in ambient oxygen is small enough.

  15. Surface photometry of WINGS galaxies with GASPHOT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Onofrio, M.; Bindoni, D.; Fasano, G.; Bettoni, D.; Cava, A.; Fritz, J.; Gullieuszik, M.; Kjærgaard, P.; Moretti, A.; Moles, M.; Omizzolo, A.; Poggianti, B. M.; Valentinuzzi, T.; Varela, J.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: We present the B, V, and K band surface photometry catalogs obtained by running the automatic software GASPHOT on galaxies from the WINGS cluster survey with isophotal areas larger than 200 pixels. The catalogs can be downloaded at the Centre de Données Astronomiques de Strasbourg. Methods: The luminosity growth curves of stars and galaxies in a given catalog relative to a given cluster image were obtained simultaneously by slicing the image with a fixed surface brightness step in several SExtractor runs. Then, using a single Sersic law convolved with a space-varying point spread function (PSF), GASPHOT performed a simultaneous χ2 best-fit of the major- and minor-axis luminosity growth curves of galaxies. We outline the GASPHOT performances and compare our surface photometry with that obtained by SExtractor, GALFIT, and GIM2D. This analysis is aimed at providing statistical information about the accuracy that is generally achieved by the softwares for automatic surface photometry of galaxies. Results: The GASPHOT catalogs provide the parameters of the Sersic law that fit the luminosity profiles for each galaxy and for each photometric band. They are the sky coordinates of the galaxy center (RA, Dec), the total magnitude (m), the semi-major axis of the effective isophote (Re), the Sersic index (n), the axis ratio (b/a), and a flag parameter (QFLAG) that generally indicates the fit quality. The WINGS-GASPHOT database includes 41 463 galaxies in the B band, 42 275 in the V band, and 71 687 in the K band. The bright early-type galaxies have higher Sersic indices and larger effective radii, as well as redder colors in their center. In general, the effective radii increase systematically from the K to the V and B band. Conclusions: The GASPHOT photometry agrees well with the surface photometry obtained by GALFIT and GIM2D, and with the aperture photometry provided by SExtractor. In particular, the direct comparison of structural parameters derived by different

  16. NCN detection in atmospheric flames

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Z.W.; Li, Z.S.; Alden, M.; Dam, N.J.

    2010-04-15

    The first extensive spectra of NCN in atmospheric pressure flames are reported, as well as qualitative planar LIF images of its spatial distribution. The spectra have been recorded by LIF in lifted, fuel-rich CH4/N2O/N2 and CH4/air flames, and are compared to simulations. In the CH4/air flames, the NCN LIF signal peaks around {phi} = 1.2. Planar LIF imaging illustrates the very confined NCN distribution in the CH4/N2O/N2 flame.

  17. Effects of Flame Structure and Hydrodynamics on Soot Particle Inception and Flame Extinction in Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelbaum, R. L.; Chen, R.; Sunderland, P. B.; Urban, D. L.; Liu, S.; Chao, B. H.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes recent studies of the effects of stoichiometric mixture fraction (structure) and hydrodynamics on soot particle inception and flame extinction in diffusion flames. Microgravity experiments are uniquely suited for these studies because, unlike normal gravity experiments, they allow structural and hydrodynamic effects to be independently studied. As part of this recent flight definition program, microgravity studies have been performed in the 2.2 second drop tower. Normal gravity counterflow studies also have been employed and analytical and numerical models have been developed. A goal of this program is to develop sufficient understanding of the effects of flame structure that flames can be "designed" to specifications - consequently, the program name Flame Design. In other words, if a soot-free, strong, low temperature flame is required, can one produce such a flame by designing its structure? Certainly, as in any design, there will be constraints imposed by the properties of the available "materials." For hydrocarbon combustion, the base materials are fuel and air. Additives could be considered, but for this work only fuel, oxygen and nitrogen are considered. Also, the structure of these flames is "designed" by varying the stoichiometric mixture fraction. Following this line of reasoning, the studies described are aimed at developing the understanding of flame structure that is needed to allow for optimum design.

  18. Statistics of premixed flame cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1991-01-01

    The statistics of random cellular patterns in premixed flames are analyzed. Agreement is found with a variety of topological relations previously found for other networks, namely, Lewis's law and Aboav's law. Despite the diverse underlying physics, flame cells are shown to share a broad class of geometric properties with other random networks-metal grains, soap foams, bioconvection, and Langmuir monolayers.

  19. Flame retarded asphalt blend composition

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, R.B.

    1987-04-21

    This patent describes a flame retarded asphalt composition consisting essentially of a blend of: (a) thermoplastic elastomer modified bitumen; (b) 20-30 wt % inert filler; (c) 1-20 wt % of at least one halogenated flame retardant; and (d) 1-5 wt % of at least one inorganic phosphorus containing compound selected from the group consisting of ammonium phosphate compounds and red phosphorus.

  20. Statistics of premixed flame cells

    SciTech Connect

    Noever, D.A. )

    1991-07-15

    The statistics of random cellular patterns in premixed flames are analyzed. Agreement is found with a variety of topological relations previously found for other networks, namely, Lewis's law and Aboav's law. Despite the diverse underlying physics, flame cells are shown to share a broad class of geometric properties with other random networks---metal grains, soap foams, bioconvection, and Langmuir monolayers.

  1. Flame Resistant Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Solimide manufactured by Imi-Tech Corporation, is a lightweight fire resistant material produced under a manufacturing process that allows it to be uniformly foamed. Can be produced in a variety of densities and structural configurations and remains resilient under exposure to temperatures ranging from minus 300 to plus 500 degrees Fahrenheit. Is resistant to open flame and generates virtually no smoke or toxic by-products. Used in aircraft for its superior damping characteristics, lighter weight and fire barrier properties, it's also applicable to ships and surface transportation systems such as transit cars, trains, buses and automobiles.

  2. Photometry and polarimetry of V 1057 Cygni.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieke, G.; Lee, T.; Coyne, G.

    1972-01-01

    Evaluation of extensive photometric and polarimetric data over a six-month interval for V 1057 Cyg. The polarization appears to be constant and of interstellar origin; the photometry, which extends nearly six octaves from the ultraviolet to 22 microns in the infrared, indicates that the total observed luminosity is decreasing - having now declined about 10% from its earlier level. A model characterized by two circumstellar shells which absorb and reradiate short-wavelength stellar flux from an underlying A1-type star provides the best fit to the observational data. The present variability, however, cannot be due to circumstellar activity, but appears to originate in the star itself.

  3. V photometry of Titania, Oberon, and Triton

    SciTech Connect

    Goguen, J.D.; Hammel, H.B.; Brown, R.H.

    1989-02-01

    The phase angle and orbital brightness variations of Titania, Oberon, and Triton are presently obtained through analysis of V filter photometry obtained at Mauna Kea in 1982-1983. While Titania and Oberon exhibit magnitude variations with phase angle comparable to those of low-to-moderate albedo asteroids observed within several deg of opposition, Triton's phase variation is distinctly different from these and has a phase coefficient consistent with either a high-albedo regolith or an optically thick nonparticulate scattering layer (perhaps an atmosphere, or an ocean). A low-albedo regolith cannot on the strength of these data be ruled out, however. 39 references.

  4. The RINGS Survey: Optical Broadband Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Mitchell, Carl; Spekkens, Kristine; Sellwood, Jerry; Williams, Ted

    2016-01-01

    We have targeted a sample of 19 nearby spiral galaxies, the RSS Imaging and Spectroscopy Nearby Galaxy Survey (RINGS), for detailed study of their mass distributions. We have obtained Fabry-Perot Halpha velocity fields using the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT), 21-cm HI observations using the Very Large Array (VLA), and optical broadband BVRI photometry using the CTIO 0.9m and KPNO 2.1m telescopes. We present the results of the photometric component of the survey including multicolor images, surface brightness profiles, and DiskFit structural models.

  5. New BVR Photometry of BL Camelopardalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joner, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    New BVR photometry of the SX Phe star BL Camelopardalis has been secured with the 0.9 m reflector at the BYU West Mountain Observatory. The new data have been used to determine times of maximum light, standardize light curves in each of the three filters, and examine the frequencies that are currently detectable in the light curves from a single location.We acknowledge the Brigham Young University College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences as well as the Department of Physics and Astronomy for continued support of this and other research efforts currently being done at the West Mountain Observatory.

  6. Time Series Photometry of KZ Lacertae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joner, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    We present BVRI time series photometry of the high amplitude delta Scuti star KZ Lacertae secured using the 0.9-meter telescope located at the Brigham Young University West Mountain Observatory. In addition to the multicolor light curves that are presented, the V data from the last six years of observations are used to plot an O-C diagram in order to determine the ephemeris and evaluate evidence for period change. We wish to thank the Brigham Young University College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences as well as the Department of Physics and Astronomy for their continued support of the research activities at the West Mountain Observatory.

  7. Near Infrared Photometry of Nova Del 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cass, C. A.; Carlon, L. R.; Corgan, T. D.; Dykhoff, A. D.; Gehrz, D. R.; Shenoy, P. D.

    2013-08-01

    Subjects: Infra-Red, Nova We report RIJHKLM photometry of Nova Del 2013 taken on August 28.13 UT using an As:Si bolometer mounted on the 0.76-m infrared telescope of the University of Minnesota's O'Brien Observatory (Marine on St. Croix, Minnesota, USA). Vega (alpha Lyrae) was used as the standard star. On this date we find: R = 5.6 +/- 0.1, I = 5.2 +/- 0.1, J = 4.5 +/- 0.1, H = 4.7 +/- 0.1, K = 4.7 +/- 0.1, L = 3.3 +/- 0.2, M = +1.8 +/- 0.3.

  8. Dynamics and structure of stretched flames

    SciTech Connect

    Law, C.K.

    1993-12-01

    This program aims to gain fundamental understanding on the structure, geometry, and dynamics of laminar premixed flames, and relate these understanding to the practical issues of flame extinction and stabilization. The underlying fundamental interest here is the recent recognition that the response of premixed flames can be profoundly affected by flame stretch, as manifested by flow nonuniformity, flame curvature, and flame/flow unsteadiness. As such, many of the existing understanding on the behavior of premixed flames need to be qualitatively revised. The research program consists of three major thrusts: (1) detailed experimental and computational mapping of the structure of aerodynamically-strained planar flames, with emphasis on the effects of heat loss, nonequidiffusion, and finite residence time on the flame thickness, extent of incomplete reaction, and the state of extinction. (2) Analytical study of the geometry and dynamics of stretch-affected wrinkled flame sheets in simple configurations, as exemplified by the Bunsen flame and the spatially-periodic flame, with emphasis on the effects of nonlinear stretch, the phenomena of flame cusping, smoothing, and tip opening, and their implications on the structure and burning rate of turbulent flames. (3) Stabilization and blowoff of two-dimensional inverted premixed and stabilization and determining the criteria governing flame blowoff. The research is synergistically conducted through the use of laser-based diagnostics, computational simulation of the flame structure with detailed chemistry and transport, and mathematical analysis of the flame dynamics.

  9. Flame retardant polyphosphazenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. L.; Karle, D. W.; Kratzer, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    Six polyphosphazene compositions were prepared by reaction of three bis-tertiary phosphines with two phenyl-s-triazine derived diazides. All six polyphosphazenes produced were completely characterized, four of them were furthermore subjected to isothermal gravimetric analysis, smoke density measurements, flammability and oxidative thermal degradation testing. The results of the characterization studies indicate that only low molecular weight oligomers, possibly of a cyclic structure, were obtained in the polymerization reactions. Despite this, however, two of the materials showed no weight loss after 96 hr at 200 C, one did not autoignite at 500 C in air, and all four self extinguished when exposed to a flame as soon as contact between flame and resin was lost. The only toxic decomposition products to be concerned about were found to be hydrogen cyanide and benzene. Under the conditions employed it was proven, however, that the quantities of toxic products are greatly reduced if no ignition takes place, e.g., if thermal decomposition proceeds at a sufficiently low rate.

  10. Turbulent Flame Processes Via Diffusion Flame-Vortex Ring Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahm, Werner J. A.; Chen, Shin-Juh; Silver, Joel A.; Piltch, Nancy D.; VanderWal, Randall L.

    2001-01-01

    Flame-vortex interactions are canonical configurations that can be used to study the underlying processes occurring in turbulent reacting flows. This configuration contains many of the fundamental aspects of the coupling between fluid dynamics and combustion that could be investigated with more controllable conditions than are possible under direct investigations of turbulent flames. Diffusion flame-vortex ring interaction contains many of the fundamental elements of flow, transport, combustion, and soot processes found in turbulent diffusion flames. Some of these elements include concentrated vorticity, entrainment and mixing, strain and nonequilibrium phenomena, diffusion and differential diffusion, partial premixing and diluent effects, soot formation and oxidation, and heat release effects. Such simplified flowfield allows the complex processes to be examined more closely and yet preserving the physical processes present in turbulent reacting flows. Furthermore, experimental results from the study of flame-vortex interactions are useful for the validation of numerical simulations and more importantly to deepen our understanding of the fundamental processes present in reacting flows. Experimental and numerical results obtained under microgravity conditions of the diffusion flame-vortex ring interaction are summarized in this paper. Results are obtained using techniques that include Flame Luminosity Imaging (FLI), Laser Soot-Mie Scattering (LSMS), Computational Fluid Dynamics and Combustion (CFDC), and Diode Laser Spectroscopy/Iterative Temperature with Assumed Chemistry (DLS/ITAC).

  11. The Cool Flames Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Howard; Chapek, Richard; Neville, Donna; Sheredy, William; Wu, Ming-Shin; Tornabene, Robert

    2001-01-01

    A space-based experiment is currently under development to study diffusion-controlled, gas-phase, low temperature oxidation reactions, cool flames and auto-ignition in an unstirred, static reactor. At Earth's gravity (1g), natural convection due to self-heating during the course of slow reaction dominates diffusive transport and produces spatio-temporal variations in the thermal and thus species concentration profiles via the Arrhenius temperature dependence of the reaction rates. Natural convection is important in all terrestrial cool flame and auto-ignition studies, except for select low pressure, highly dilute (small temperature excess) studies in small vessels (i.e., small Rayleigh number). On Earth, natural convection occurs when the Rayleigh number (Ra) exceeds a critical value of approximately 600. Typical values of the Ra, associated with cool flames and auto-ignitions, range from 104-105 (or larger), a regime where both natural convection and conduction heat transport are important. When natural convection occurs, it alters the temperature, hydrodynamic, and species concentration fields, thus generating a multi-dimensional field that is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to be modeled analytically. This point has been emphasized recently by Kagan and co-workers who have shown that explosion limits can shift depending on the characteristic length scale associated with the natural convection. Moreover, natural convection in unstirred reactors is never "sufficiently strong to generate a spatially uniform temperature distribution throughout the reacting gas." Thus, an unstirred, nonisothermal reaction on Earth does not reduce to that generated in a mechanically, well-stirred system. Interestingly, however, thermal ignition theories and thermokinetic models neglect natural convection and assume a heat transfer correlation of the form: q=h(S/V)(T(bar) - Tw) where q is the heat loss per unit volume, h is the heat transfer coefficient, S/V is the surface to

  12. SPHOTOM - Package for an Automatic Multicolour Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parimucha, Š.; Vaňko, M.; Mikloš, P.

    2012-04-01

    We present basic information about package SPHOTOM for an automatic multicolour photometry. This package is in development for the creation of a photometric pipe-line, which we plan to use in the near future with our new instruments. It could operate in two independent modes, (i) GUI mode, in which the user can select images and control functions of package through interface and (ii) command line mode, in which all processes are controlled using a main parameter file. SPHOTOM is developed as a universal package for Linux based systems with easy implementation for different observatories. The photometric part of the package is based on the Sextractor code, which allows us to detect all objects on the images and perform their photometry with different apertures. We can also perform astrometric solutions for all images for a correct cross-identification of the stars on the images. The result is a catalogue of all objects with their instrumental photometric measurements which are consequently used for a differential magnitudes calculations with one or more comparison stars, transformations to an international system, and determinations of colour indices.

  13. TRIPPy: Trailed Image Photometry in Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Wesley; Alexandersen, Mike; Schwamb, Megan E.; Marsset, Michaël; Pike, Rosemary E.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Bannister, Michele T.; Benecchi, Susan; Delsanti, Audrey

    2016-06-01

    Photometry of moving sources typically suffers from a reduced signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) or flux measurements biased to incorrect low values through the use of circular apertures. To address this issue, we present the software package, TRIPPy: TRailed Image Photometry in Python. TRIPPy introduces the pill aperture, which is the natural extension of the circular aperture appropriate for linearly trailed sources. The pill shape is a rectangle with two semicircular end-caps and is described by three parameters, the trail length and angle, and the radius. The TRIPPy software package also includes a new technique to generate accurate model point-spread functions (PSFs) and trailed PSFs (TSFs) from stationary background sources in sidereally tracked images. The TSF is merely the convolution of the model PSF, which consists of a moffat profile, and super-sampled lookup table. From the TSF, accurate pill aperture corrections can be estimated as a function of pill radius with an accuracy of 10 mmag for highly trailed sources. Analogous to the use of small circular apertures and associated aperture corrections, small radius pill apertures can be used to preserve S/Ns of low flux sources, with appropriate aperture correction applied to provide an accurate, unbiased flux measurement at all S/Ns.

  14. Computational Studies of Flame Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Vaishali

    This thesis is concerned with computational studies of laminar flame structures using detailed and skeletal chemical kinetic mechanisms. Elementary reactions in these mechanisms control the observable combustion properties such as flame speed, autoignition temperature, ignition delay time, and extinction characteristics in nonpremixed and premixed flame phenomena. First part of thesis deals with computational investigations of influence of carbon monoxide and hydrogen addition on methane flames stabilized in counterflow configuration. Computations were performed employing detailed chemical kinetic mechanism---the San Diego mechanism. In case of nonpremixed flames, effect of carbon xvi monoxide addition on structure and critical condition of extinction were examined. Differences between addition on fuel and oxidizer sides were investigated and plausible explanation given for the differences. For premixed flames, effect of addition of hydrogen and carbon monoxide to reactant mixture was studied. Critical conditions of extinction were predicted using computations for various compositions. Rates of production and consumption of various species were calculated and flame structure was analyzed for nonpremixed and premixed flames. It was found that moderate amount of carbon monoxide addition to methane enhances flame reactivity. However, with large amount of carbon monoxide addition, additive chemistry dominates. Addition of increasing amounts of hydrogen in premixed reactant stream enhances methane flame reactivity. In second part of thesis, kinetic modeling was performed to elucidate the structure and mechanism of extinction and autoignition of nonpremixed toluene flames in counterflow configuration. Computations were performed using detailed chemistry to determine flame structure and to obtain values for critical conditions of extinction and autoignition. Sensitivity analysis of rate parameters, reaction pathway analysis, and spatial reaction rate profiles were used to

  15. JHK photometry of selected Trojan and Hilda asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Dale W.; Johnson, Paul E.; Buckingham, William L.; Shorthill, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    No entirely satisfactory match has been established between the present JHK photometry of selected Hilda and Trojan asteroids and photometry for both main belt asteroids and laboratory samples. It is noted that while the leading Trojans and Hildas exhibit similar and homogeneous JHK colors, the trailing Trojans appear to be more heterogeneous. Charcoal and magnetite provide the best match in terms of JHK colors.

  16. Flame spraying of polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Zeek, D.P.; Couch, K.W.; Benson, D.M.; Kirk, S.M.

    1997-08-01

    Statistical design-of-experiment studies of the thermal spraying of polymer powders are presented. Studies of the subsonic combustion (i.e., Flame) process were conducted in order to determine the quality and economics of polyester and urethane coatings. Thermally sprayed polymer coatings are of interest to several industries for anticorrosion applications, including the chemical, automotive, and aircraft industries. In this study, the coating design has been optimized for a site-specific application using Taguchi-type fractional-factorial experiments. Optimized coating designs are presented for the two powder systems. A substantial range of thermal processing conditions and their effect on the resultant polymer coatings is presented. The coatings were characterized by optical metallography, hardness testing, tensile testing, and compositional analysis. Characterization of the coatings yielded the thickness, bond strength, Knoop microhardness, roughness, deposition efficiency, and porosity. Confirmation testing was accomplished to verify the coating designs.

  17. Invisible Flame Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Stennis Space Center uses more than one million gallons of liquid hydrogen per month in its rocket testing program. Firefighters responding to a hydrogen fire had to give the area "the broom test" to determine the presence and location of a fire. This technique has significant safety and accuracy shortfalls. Stennis then developed technology to visually assess the presence, location and extent of hydrogen fires. SafetyScan, LLC. is now manufacturing FIRESCAPE, the first affordable commercial product for invisible (or ashless) fire imaging based on the original technology, to aid firefighters in seeing the invisible flames from alcohol and hydrogen fires during the day and even through smoke. The hand-held device weighs five pounds, is used like a pair of binoculars and can run for up to two hours before recharging.

  18. Electrical Aspects of Impinging Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Yu-Chien

    This dissertation examines the use of electric fields as one mechanism for controlling combustion as flames are partially extinguished when impinging on nearby surfaces. Electrical aspects of flames, specifically, the production of chemi-ions in hydrocarbon flames and the use of convective flows driven by these ions, have been investigated in a wide range of applications in prior work but despite this fairly comprehensive effort to study electrical aspects of combustion, relatively little research has focused on electrical phenomena near flame extinguishment, nor for flames near impingement surfaces. Electrical impinging flames have complex properties under global influences of ion-driven winds and flow field disturbances from the impingement surface. Challenges of measurements when an electric field is applied in the system have limited an understanding of changes to the flame behavior and species concentrations caused by the field. This research initially characterizes the ability of high voltage power supplies to respond on sufficiently short time scales to permit real time electrical flame actuation. The study then characterizes the influence of an electric field on the impinging flame shape, ion current and flow field of the thermal plume associated with the flame. The more significant further examinations can be separated into two parts: 1) the potential for using electric fields to control the release of carbon monoxide (CO) from surface-impinging flames, and 2) an investigation of controlling electrically the heat transfer to a plate on which the flame impinges. Carbon monoxide (CO) results from the incomplete oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels and, while CO can be desirable in some syngas processes, it is usually a dangerous emission from forest fires, gas heaters, gas stoves, or furnaces where insufficient oxygen in the core reaction does not fully oxidize the fuel to carbon dioxide and water. Determining how carbon monoxide is released and how heat transfer

  19. Selecting M-giants with WISE photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing

    2015-08-01

    We use M-giants, M-dwarfs and QSOs identified by LAMOST to assess how well WISE & 2MASS colour-cuts can separate these populations through photometry. We find that the WISE bands are very efficient to separate M-giants from M-dwarfs, especially for the early-type stars. We derive a new photometric relation to estimate [Fe/H] for M-giants. We show that previous photometric distance relations may be biased and devise a new empirical distance relation. We detect M-giants in the Sagittarius stream from the ALLWISE Source Archive. Our detection shows good agreement with the bright stream, although the leading tail appears to be misaligned by a couple of degrees. We have measured the metallicity distribution at four locations along the stream, finding a clear metallicity offset between the leading and trailing tails.

  20. TERMS PHOTOMETRY OF KNOWN TRANSITING EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Dragomir, Diana; Kane, Stephen R.; Ciardi, David R.; Gelino, Dawn M.; Payne, Alan; Ramirez, Solange V.; Von Braun, Kaspar; Wyatt, Pamela; Pilyavsky, Genady; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Wright, Jason T.; Zachary Gazak, J.; Rabus, Markus

    2011-10-15

    The Transit Ephemeris Refinement and Monitoring Survey conducts radial velocity and photometric monitoring of known exoplanets in order to refine planetary orbits and predictions of possible transit times. This effort is primarily directed toward planets not known to transit, but a small sample of our targets consists of known transiting systems. Here we present precision photometry for six WASP (Wide Angle Search for Planets) planets acquired during their transit windows. We perform a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis for each planet and combine these data with previous measurements to redetermine the period and ephemerides for these planets. These observations provide recent mid-transit times which are useful for scheduling future observations. Our results improve the ephemerides of WASP-4b, WASP-5b, and WASP-6b and reduce the uncertainties on the mid-transit time for WASP-29b. We also confirm the orbital, stellar, and planetary parameters of all six systems.

  1. Photoelectric photometry of comet Kohoutek (1973f)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohoutek, L.

    1976-01-01

    Comet Kohoutek was observed with the 50 cm (f/15) reflecting telescope of the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile, on fourteen nights between January 16 and 30, when the heliocentric and geocentric distances of the comet were r=0.66 - 1.00 A.U. and delta=0.81 - 0.96 A.U., respectively. The 40 inch and 80 inch diaphragms were used for the photometry of the cometary head in the UBV system and with six interference filters. The atmospheric conditions were good but the accuracy of observations was low due to large extinction and twilight. The mean error of one measurement of log F in all but Na 5893 A filters can be estimated at plus or minus 0.02, whereas the accuracy through the Na filter was substantially lower.

  2. Multicolour Optical Photometry of Active Geostationary Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolley, A.; Wade, G.; Bedard, D.

    Although broadband photometry has been used to infer information about artificial satellites since soon after the launch of Sputnik 1, the development of photometric techniques for non-resolved space object identification or characterisation has been hampered by the large number of variables involved. Many individual studies, and some long ongoing experiments, have used costly metre-class telescopes to obtain data despite other experiments demonstrating that much more flexible and affordable small aperture telescopes may be suitable for the task. In addition, due to the highly time consuming and weather dependent nature of obtaining photometric observations, many studies have suffered from data sets of limited size, or relied upon simulations to support their claims. With this in mind, an experiment was conducted with the aim of determining the utility of small aperture telescopes for conducting broadband photometry of satellites for the purpose of non-resolved space object identification and characterisation. A 14 inch Celestron CG-14 telescope was used to gain multiple night-long, high temporal resolution data sets of six active geostationary satellites. The results of the experiment cast doubt on the efficacy of some of the previous approaches to obtaining and analysing photometric data. It was discovered that geostationary satellite lightcurves can vary to a greater degree than has generally been recognised, and colour ratios vary considerably with changes in the illumination/observation geometry, making it difficult to use colour for satellite discrimination. Evidence was also detected of variations in the spectral energy distribution of sunlight reflected off satellite surface materials, which could have implications for surface material characterisation and techniques that aim to separate satellite body and solar panel contributions to the total observed spectra.

  3. Laser speckle photometry: contactless nondestructive testing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cikalova, Ulana; Nicolai, Juergen; Bendjus, Beatrice; Schreiber, Juergen

    2012-10-01

    Laser Speckle Photometry (LSP) is a newly developed contactless, fast and completely optical nondestructive testing method based on the detection and analysis of thermally or mechanically activated characteristic speckle dynamics. The heat propagation or tension process causes locally different degrees of thermal/mechanical expansion, which generates local and time-dependent strain fields, resulting in a local displacement of material surface. During this process, the normal surface slope and absolute height of the microscopic and mesoscopic surface segments, especially at rough sample surfaces, is transformed. These spatiotemporal changes include information about the material structure and conditions. Therefore, the proposed measurement technique includes a pulsed heating source for sample activation, a temperature detection of the sample at the measurement location in a distance from the heading point, a continuous wave laser for sample irradiation and activation of speckle patterns at the measurement point, and in addition, a fast CCD camera for the detection of the speckle movement during heat propagation at the measurement location. Laser Speckle Photometry can be used for evaluating material properties, such as hardness and porosity. The approach is based on the estimation of the "Speckle Thermal Diffusivity" parameter K, that can be determined using the thermal diffusion equation and the modified correlation function from the pixel intensity of the speckle image variations during thermal activation. After testing, the correlation between parameter K and hardness, and porosity respectively, was found. Furthermore, mechanical material stress changes, also at elevated operating temperatures, can be estimated by the presented technique using the calculated parameter K. In this case, the thermal excitation will be partially replaced by mechanical activation, such as the tension process. The technique of LSP and the results of calibration experiments are

  4. Neurotoxicity of brominated flame retardants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been commonly used as commercial flame retardants in a variety of products including plastics and textiles. Despite their decreasing usage worldwide, congeners continue to accumulate in the environment, including soil, dust, food, anima...

  5. INTRODUCTION TO BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are a large and diverse class of major industrial products used to provide fire safety. Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), Hexabromocylocodecane (HBCD), and Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) are the major commercial compounds. TBBPA is a react...

  6. On the critical flame radius and minimum ignition energy for spherical flame initiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zheng; Burke, M. P.; Ju, Yiguang

    2011-01-01

    Spherical flame initiation from an ignition kernel is studied theoretically and numerically using different fuel/oxygen/helium/argon mixtures (fuel: hydrogen, methane, and propane). The emphasis is placed on investigating the critical flame radius controlling spherical flame initiation and its correlation with the minimum ignition energy. It is found that the critical flame radius is different from the flame thickness and the flame ball radius and that their relationship depends strongly on the Lewis number. Three different flame regimes in terms of the Lewis number are observed and a new criterion for the critical flame radius is introduced. For mixtures with Lewis number larger than a critical Lewis number above unity, the critical flame radius is smaller than the flame ball radius but larger than the flame thickness. As a result, the minimum ignition energy can be substantially over-predicted (under-predicted) based on the flame ball radius (the flame thickness). The results also show that the minimum ignition energy for successful spherical flame initiation is proportional to the cube of the critical flame radius. Furthermore, preferential diffusion of heat and mass (i.e. the Lewis number effect) is found to play an important role in both spherical flame initiation and flame kernel evolution after ignition. It is shown that the critical flame radius and the minimum ignition energy increase significantly with the Lewis number. Therefore, for transportation fuels with large Lewis numbers, blending of small molecule fuels or thermal and catalytic cracking will significantly reduce the minimum ignition energy.

  7. Flame spread across liquid pools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Howard; Miller, Fletcher; Schiller, David; Sirignano, William A.

    1993-01-01

    For flame spread over liquid fuel pools, the existing literature suggests three gravitational influences: (1) liquid phase buoyant convection, delaying ignition and assisting flame spread; (2) hydrostatic pressure variation, due to variation in the liquid pool height caused by thermocapillary-induced convection; and (3) gas-phase buoyant convection in the opposite direction to the liquid phase motion. No current model accounts for all three influences. In fact, prior to this work, there was no ability to determine whether ignition delay times and flame spread rates would be greater or lesser in low gravity. Flame spread over liquid fuel pools is most commonly characterized by the relationship of the initial pool temperature to the fuel's idealized flash point temperature, with four or five separate characteristic regimes having been identified. In the uniform spread regime, control has been attributed to: (1) gas-phase conduction and radiation; (2) gas-phase conduction only; (3) gas-phase convection and liquid conduction, and most recently (4) liquid convection ahead of the flame. Suggestions were made that the liquid convection was owed to both vuoyancy and thermocapillarity. Of special interest to this work is the determination of whether, and under what conditions, pulsating spread can and will occur in microgravity in the absence of buoyant flows in both phases. The approach we have taken to resolving the importance of buoyancy for these flames is: (1) normal gravity experiments and advanced diagnostics; (2) microgravity experiments; and (3) numerical modelling at arbitrary gravitational level.

  8. TURBULENT OXYGEN FLAMES IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Aspden, A. J.; Bell, J. B.; Woosley, S. E.

    2011-04-01

    In previous studies, we examined turbulence-flame interactions in carbon-burning thermonuclear flames in Type Ia supernovae. In this study, we consider turbulence-flame interactions in the trailing oxygen flames. The two aims of the paper are to examine the response of the inductive oxygen flame to intense levels of turbulence, and to explore the possibility of transition to detonation in the oxygen flame. Scaling arguments analogous to the carbon flames are presented and then compared against three-dimensional simulations for a range of Damkoehler numbers (Da{sub 16}) at a fixed Karlovitz number. The simulations suggest that turbulence does not significantly affect the oxygen flame when Da{sub 16} < 1, and the flame burns inductively some distance behind the carbon flame. However, for Da{sub 16}>1, turbulence enhances heat transfer and drives the propagation of a flame that is narrower than the corresponding inductive flame would be. Furthermore, burning under these conditions appears to occur as part of a combined carbon-oxygen turbulent flame with complex compound structure. The simulations do not appear to support the possibility of a transition to detonation in the oxygen flame, but do not preclude it either.

  9. Automated surface photometry for the Coma Cluster galaxies: The catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doi, M.; Fukugita, M.; Okamura, S.; Tarusawa, K.

    1995-01-01

    A homogeneous photometry catalog is presented for 450 galaxies with B(sub 25.5) less than or equal to 16 mag located in the 9.8 deg x 9.8 deg region centered on the Coma Cluster. The catalog is based on photographic photometry using an automated surface photometry software for data reduction applied to B-band Schmidt plates. The catalog provides accurate positions, isophotal and total magnitudes, major and minor axes, and a few other photometric parameters including rudimentary morphology (early of late type).

  10. Stratified turbulent Bunsen flames: flame surface analysis and flame surface density modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaekers, W. J. S.; van Oijen, J. A.; de Goey, L. P. H.

    2012-12-01

    In this paper it is investigated whether the Flame Surface Density (FSD) model, developed for turbulent premixed combustion, is also applicable to stratified flames. Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of turbulent stratified Bunsen flames have been carried out, using the Flamelet Generated Manifold (FGM) reduction method for reaction kinetics. Before examining the suitability of the FSD model, flame surfaces are characterized in terms of thickness, curvature and stratification. All flames are in the Thin Reaction Zones regime, and the maximum equivalence ratio range covers 0.1⩽φ⩽1.3. For all flames, local flame thicknesses correspond very well to those observed in stretchless, steady premixed flamelets. Extracted curvature radii and mixing length scales are significantly larger than the flame thickness, implying that the stratified flames all burn in a premixed mode. The remaining challenge is accounting for the large variation in (subfilter) mass burning rate. In this contribution, the FSD model is proven to be applicable for Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of stratified flames for the equivalence ratio range 0.1⩽φ⩽1.3. Subfilter mass burning rate variations are taken into account by a subfilter Probability Density Function (PDF) for the mixture fraction, on which the mass burning rate directly depends. A priori analysis point out that for small stratifications (0.4⩽φ⩽1.0), the replacement of the subfilter PDF (obtained from DNS data) by the corresponding Dirac function is appropriate. Integration of the Dirac function with the mass burning rate m=m(φ), can then adequately model the filtered mass burning rate obtained from filtered DNS data. For a larger stratification (0.1⩽φ⩽1.3), and filter widths up to ten flame thicknesses, a β-function for the subfilter PDF yields substantially better predictions than a Dirac function. Finally, inclusion of a simple algebraic model for the FSD resulted only in small additional deviations from DNS data

  11. HST Photometry of Uranus 1994-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkoschka, Erich

    2016-10-01

    Images of Uranus by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) provide a useful tool in studying seasonal and other physical changes on Uranus. HST gives spatial resolution on the disk of Uranus, wide spectral coverage, temporal coverage over more than 20 years, and stable photometric properties. We selected 1368 images in 81 filters of four cameras between 240 and 1130 nm wavelength taken between August 1994 and October 2015.We started with analyzing the photometry of the whole disk of Uranus. We divided the total light of Uranus into the light from "quiet" Uranus and the light from active storms, which can contribute as much as 2.3 % to the total light, although their median contribution is only 0.14 %. The statistical analysis of the light from storms as function of wavelength and time gives clues about their temporal distribution and altitude distribution since different filters probe different altitudes.The photometry of quiet Uranus shows three main variations: a smooth seasonal variation, a small deviation from this on time scales of 1-2 years, and a small variation with phase angle. The latter variation is 0.15 % for each degree of phase angle between 0 and 3 degrees. This may be the first such measurement for Uranus. The deviations from the smooth curve are about 0.2 %, which is significant since most data otherwise fit to the 0.1 % level.The seasonal variation has the same shape at all wavelengths, except that the amplitude differs. The shape is roughly a parabola with a minimum brightness in 2009, two years after the equinox of Uranus. The amplitude is negligible at wavelengths probing high altitudes but goes up to a factor of 2.1 in wavelengths probing the 1-2 bar level. The seasonal variation is a combined effect of physical change in the atmosphere and the geometric change due to variable sub-solar and sub-Earth latitudes. The physical change is further divided into darkening of high southern latitudes and brightening of high northern latitudes. The

  12. Detection of Extrasolar Planets by Transit Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William; Koch, David; Webster, Larry; Dunham, Edward; Witteborn, Fred; Jenkins, Jon; Caldwell, Douglas; Showen, Robert; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A knowledge of other planetary systems that includes information on the number, size, mass, and spacing of the planets around a variety of star types is needed to deepen our understanding of planetary system formation and processes that give rise to their final configurations. Recent discoveries show that many planetary systems are quite different from the solar system in that they often possess giant planets in short period orbits. The inferred evolution of these planets and their orbital characteristics imply the absence of Earth-like planets near the habitable zone. Information on the properties of the giant-inner planets is now being obtained by both the Doppler velocity and the transit photometry techniques. The combination of the two techniques provides the mass, size, and density of the planets. For the planet orbiting star HD209458, transit photometry provided the first independent confirmation and measurement of the diameter of an extrasolar planet. The observations indicate a planet 1.27 the diameter of Jupiter with 0.63 of its mass (Charbonneau et al. 1999). The results are in excellent agreement with the theory of planetary atmospheres for a planet of the indicated mass and distance from a solar-like star. The observation of the November 23, 1999 transit of that planet made by the Ames Vulcan photometer at Lick Observatory is presented. In the future, the combination of the two techniques will greatly increase the number of discoveries and the richness of the science yield. Small rocky planets at orbital distances from 0.9 to 1.2 AU are more likely to harbor life than the gas giant planets that are now being discovered. However, new technology is needed to find smaller, Earth-like planets, which are about three hundred times less massive than Jupiter-like planets. The Kepler project is a space craft mission designed to discover hundreds of Earth-size planets in and near the habitable zone around a wide variety of stars. To demonstrate that the

  13. L' AND M' Photometry Of Ultracool Dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, M. S.; Tsvetanov, Z. I.; Vrba, F. J.; Henden, A. A.; Luginbuhl, C. B.

    2004-01-01

    We have compiled L' (3.4-4.1 microns) and M' (4.6- 4.8 microns) photometry of 63 single and binary M, L, and T dwarfs obtained at the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope using the Mauna Kea Observatory filter set. This compilation includes new L' measurements of eight L dwarfs and 13 T dwarfs and new M' measurements of seven L dwarfs, five T dwarfs, and the M1 dwarf Gl 229A. These new data increase by factors of 0. 6 and 1.6, respectively, the numbers of ultracool dwarfs T (sub eff) photometry, and trigonometric parallaxes are available, and we estimate these quantities for nine other dwarfs whose parallaxes and flux-calibrated spectra have been obtained. BC(SUB K) is a well-behaved function of near-infrared spectral type with a dispersion of approx. 0.1 mag for types M6-T5 it is significantly more scattered for types T5-T9. T (sub eff) declines steeply and monotonically for types M6-L7 and T4-T9, but it is nearly constant at approx. 1450 K for types L7-T4 with assumed ages of approx. 3 Gyr. This constant T(sub eff) is evidenced by nearly unchanging values of L'-M' between types L6 and T3. It also supports recent models that attribute the changing near-infrared luminosities and spectral features across the L-T transition to the rapid migration, disruption, and/or thinning of condensate clouds over a narrow range of T(sub eff). The L' and M' luminosities of early-T dwarfs do not exhibit the pronounced humps or inflections previously noted in l through K bands, but insufficient data exist for types L6-T5 to assert that M(Sub L') and M(sub M') are strictly monotonic within this range of typew. We compare the observed K, L', and M' luminosities of L and T dwarfs in our sample with those predicted by precipitation-cloud-free models for varying surface gravities and sedimentation efficiencies.

  14. Effects of buoyancy on premixed flame stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Bedat, B.; Cheng, R.K.

    1995-10-01

    The stabilization limits of v-flame and conical flames are investigated in normal gravity (+g) and reversed gravity (up-side-down burner, -g) to compare with observations of flame stabilization during microgravity experiments. The results show that buoyancy has most influence on the stabilization of laminar V-flames. Under turbulent conditions, the effects are less significant. For conical flames stabilized with a ring, the stabilization domain of the +g and -g cases are not significantly different. Under reversed gravity, both laminar v-flames and conical flames show flame behaviors that were also found in microgravity. The v-flames reattached to the rim and the conical flame assumed a top-hat shape. One of the special cases of -g conical flame is the buoyancy stabilized laminar flat flame that is detached from the burner. These flame implies a balance between the flow momentum and buoyant forces. The stretch rates of these flames are sufficiently low (< 20 s{sup -1}) such that the displacement speeds S{sub L} are almost equal to the laminar burning speed S{sub L}{sup 0}. An analysis based on evaluating the Richardson number is used to determine the relevant parameters that describe the buoyancy/momentum balance. A perfect balance i.e. Ri = l can be attained when the effect of heat loss from the flame zone is low. For the weaker lean cases, our assumption of adiabaticity tends to overestimate the real flame temperature. This interesting low stretch laminar flame configuration can be useful for fundamental studies of combustion chemistry.

  15. WIYN Open Cluster Study: UBVRI Photometry of NGC 2158

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taverne, Luke T.; Steinhauer, Aaron J.; Deliyannis, Constantine P.

    2015-01-01

    We present WIYN 0.9m HDI UBVRI photometry of NGC 2158, a very rich, intermediate-aged, open cluster located near the galactic anti-center. We report derived values for the cluster age, distance, reddening.

  16. CCD Photometry of Seven Asteroids at the Belgrade Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benishek, Vladimir

    2008-03-01

    CCD photometry of seven asteroids was performed at the Belgrade Astronomical Observatory from July 2006 to August 2007: 78 Diana, 125 Liberatrix, 702 Alauda, 888 Parysatis, 1095 Tulipa, 1293 Sonja, and 2006 VV2.

  17. Essentials of photometry for clinical electrophysiology of vision.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Daphne L; Hamilton, Ruth

    2010-08-01

    Electrophysiological testing of the visual system requires familiarity with photometry. This technical note outlines the concepts of photometry with a focus on information relevant to clinical ERG and VEP testing. Topics include photometric quantities, consideration of pupil size, specification of brief extended flash stimuli, and the influence of the spectral composition of visual stimuli. Standard units and terms are explained in the context of the ISCEV standards and guidelines for clinical electrophysiology of vision.

  18. BINARY STAR SYNTHETIC PHOTOMETRY AND DISTANCE DETERMINATION USING BINSYN

    SciTech Connect

    Linnell, Albert P.; DeStefano, Paul; Hubeny, Ivan E-mail: pdestefa@uw.edu

    2013-09-15

    This paper extends synthetic photometry to components of binary star systems. The paper demonstrates accurate recovery of single star photometric properties for four photometric standards, Vega, Sirius, GD153, and HD209458, ranging over the HR diagram, when their model synthetic spectra are placed in fictitious binary systems and subjected to synthetic photometry processing. Techniques for photometric distance determination have been validated for all four photometric standards.

  19. Binary Star Synthetic Photometry and Distance Determination Using BINSYN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnell, Albert P.; DeStefano, Paul; Hubeny, Ivan

    2013-09-01

    This paper extends synthetic photometry to components of binary star systems. The paper demonstrates accurate recovery of single star photometric properties for four photometric standards, Vega, Sirius, GD153, and HD209458, ranging over the HR diagram, when their model synthetic spectra are placed in fictitious binary systems and subjected to synthetic photometry processing. Techniques for photometric distance determination have been validated for all four photometric standards.

  20. Studies of Premixed Laminar and Turbulent Flames at Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abid, M.; Aung, K.; Ronney, P. D.; Sharif, J. A.; Wu, M.-S.

    1999-01-01

    Several topics relating to combustion limits in premixed flames at reduced gravity have been studied. These topics include: (1) flame balls; (2) numerical simulation of flame ball and planar flame structure and stability; (3) experimental simulation of buoyancy effects in premixed flames using aqueous autocatalytic reactions; and (4) premixed flame propagation in Hele-Shaw cells.

  1. Macular pigment assessment by motion photometry.

    PubMed

    Moreland, J D

    2004-10-15

    A Moreland anomaloscope was modified to measure macular pigment optical density (MPOD) profiles by motion photometry. A grating (spatial frequency 0.38 c deg(-1)), whose alternate bars were filled, respectively, with 460 nm (maximum MP absorption) and 580 nm (zero MP absorption) lights, drifted steadily at 37 degrees s(-1). The subject adjusted the 580 nm radiance to minimise perceived motion (equiluminance between 460 and 580 nm). Five or more settings were made for two foveal fields (0.9 degrees and 2.2 degrees diameter) and 11 extrafoveal annular fields (0.8 degrees -7.5 degrees eccentricity). Twenty subjects made measurements for both eyes: some with replications. MPOD profiles varied in scale (0.18-0.75 for the 0.9 degrees foveal field) and in shape. A mean profile was derived. Foveal data were optimally aligned with annular data in that profile when plotted at 0.71 of the foveal field radius. Factors that limit precision were identified, such as fixation errors foveally and Troxler's effect parafoveally.

  2. BVRI PHOTOMETRY OF 53 UNUSUAL ASTEROIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Q.-Z.

    2011-02-15

    We present the results of BVRI photometry and classification of 53 unusual asteroids, including 35 near-Earth asteroids (NEAs), 6 high eccentricity/inclination asteroids, and 12 recently identified asteroid-pair candidates. Most of these asteroids were not classified prior to this work. For the few asteroids that have been previously studied, the results are generally in agreement. In addition to observing and classifying these objects, we merge the results from severalphotometric/spectroscopic surveys to create the largest-ever sample with 449 spectrally classified NEAs for statistical analysis. We identify a 'transition point' of the relative number of C/X-like and S-like NEAs at H {approx} 18 {r_reversible} D {approx} 1 km with confidence level at {approx}95% or higher. We find that the C/X-like:S-like ratio for 18 {<=} H < 22 is about twice as high as that of H < 18 (0.33 {+-} 0.04 versus 0.17 {+-} 0.02), virtually supporting the hypothesis that smaller NEAs generally have less weathered surfaces (therefore less reddish appearance) due to younger collision ages.

  3. BVRI photometry of DQ Herculis in 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrienko, E. S.; Ibragimov, M. A.; Savanov, I. S.; Satovskii, B. L.; Egamberdiev, Sh. A.; Burkhanov, O. A.

    2015-09-01

    The results of BV RI photometry of the nova DQ Her 1934 performed at the Maidanak Observatory of the Astronomical Institute of the Uzbek Academy of Sciences in October 2014 are presented. The system's brightness, the out-of-eclipse color indices, and the shape of the minima in the BV RI light curves, which are due to eclipses of the white dwarf with its accreting disk-like envelope by the red dwarf, correspond to one of the lowest activity levels observed during the system's deepest relaxation after a nova outburst. The orbital-phase variations of the color indices indicate the presence of a considerably non-uniform brightness distribution for light coming from the disk-like envelope and other gaseous structures of DQ Her, which are observed at orbital phases of 0.85-1.15. The results can be qualitatively interpreted in a picture in which the gas flow structure is formed during mass exchange in an intermediate polar. The behavior found for the color indices could be due, for example, to the visibility in this phase interval of the passage of regions of shocks (tidal shocks, a hot line, and/or a detached shock) through the line of sight.

  4. BVI CCD photometry of 47 Tucanae

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaino, G.; Liller, W.

    1987-08-01

    CCD BVI main-sequence photometry of 47 Tuc is presented, matched to the recent BVI isochrones of VandenBerg and Bell (1985). The main-sequence turnoffs are found to be at V = 17.60 + or - 0.1, B-V = 0.56 + or - 0.02; V-I = 0.68 + or - 0.02, and B-I = 1.24 + or - 0.02. The magnitude difference between the main-sequence turnoff and the horizontal branch is 3.55 + or - 0.15 for all three color indices. A consistent age for 47 Tuc of 17 Gyr and a consistent distance modulus of (m-M)v = 13.2 are obtained for all three indices, and an absolute magnitude of Mv = 0.85 is determined for the horizontal branch stars. The results also favor the adoption of (Fe/H) near -0.5 as the best abundance value for 47 Tuc. 38 references.

  5. The HST Milky Way Stellar Photometry Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radburn-Smith, David

    2012-10-01

    The Hubble Legacy Archive has invested a significant effort into automatically generating photometry for point sources in all HST observations regardless of the target. We estimate that this archive contains up to 800,000 Milky Way {MW} stars, distributed across the whole sky, complete to some three magnitudes fainter than SDSS. Approximately half of these stars have color information, which is required for stellar population analysis. This considerable archive is thus in need of collation, analysis, and publication.Here we propose to compile such a catalog for public access and to use it for two science goals: 1} A test of existing MW stellar models, where we will in particular constrain the fainter and more distant stellar populations; and 2} Probe the shape and structure of the MW stellar halo with a deeper star catalog than is currently available. These science cases will be used to fully define the catalog, in particular by assessing the different populations present in the observations, and by assessing the level of noise from contaminants and the completeness of the survey

  6. Recent Advances in Video Meteor Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Wesley R.; Suggs, Robert M.; Meachem, Terry; Cooke, William J.

    2003-01-01

    One of the most common (and obvious) problems with video meteor data involves the saturation of the output signal produced by bright meteors, resulting in the elimination of such meteors from photometric determinations. It is important to realize that a "bright" meteor recorded by intensified meteor camera is not what would be considered "bright" by a visual observer - indeed, many Generation II or III camera systems are saturated by meteors with a visual magnitude of 3, barely even noticeable to the untrained eye. As the relatively small fields of view (approx.30 ) of the camera systems captures at best modest numbers of meteors, even during storm peaks, the loss of meteors brighter than +3 renders the determination of shower population indices from video observations even more difficult. Considerable effort has been devoted by the authors to the study of the meteor camera systems employed during the Marshall Space Flight Center s Leonid ground-based campaigns, and a calibration scheme has been devised which can extend the useful dynamic range of such systems by approximately 4 magnitudes. The calibration setup involves only simple equipment, available to amateur and professional, and it is hoped that use of this technique will make for better meteor photometry, and move video meteor analysis beyond the realm of simple counts.

  7. NEW UBVRI PHOTOMETRY OF 234 M33 STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Jun

    2013-04-15

    This is the second paper of our series. In this paper, we present UBVRI photometry for 234 star clusters in the field of M33. For most of these star clusters, there is photometry in only two bands in previous studies. The photometry of these star clusters is performed using archival images from the Local Group Galaxies Survey, which covers 0.8 deg{sup 2} along the major axis of M33. Detailed comparisons show that, in general, our photometry is consistent with previous measurements, and in particular that our photometry is in good agreement with that of Zloczewski and Kaluzny. Combined with star cluster photometry in previous studies, we present some results: none of the M33 youngest clusters ({approx}10{sup 7} yr) have masses approaching 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }, and comparisons with models of simple stellar populations suggest a large range of ages for M33 star clusters and some as old as the Galactic globular clusters.

  8. FIXING THE U-BAND PHOTOMETRY OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Krisciunas, Kevin; Bastola, Deepak; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Espinoza, Juan; Gonzalez, David; Gonzalez, Luis; Gonzalez, Sergio; Hsiao, Eric Y.; Morrell, Nidia; Phillips, Mark M.; Hamuy, Mario E-mail: suntzeff@physics.tamu.edu E-mail: hsiao@lco.cl E-mail: mmp@lco.cl

    2013-01-01

    We present previously unpublished photometry of supernovae 2003gs and 2003hv. Using spectroscopically derived corrections to the U-band photometry, we reconcile U-band light curves made from imagery with the Cerro Tololo 0.9 m, 1.3 m, and Las Campanas 1 m telescopes. Previously, such light curves showed a 0.4 mag spread at one month after maximum light. This gives us hope that a set of corrected ultraviolet light curves of nearby objects can contribute to the full utilization of rest-frame U-band data of supernovae at redshift {approx}0.3-0.8. As pointed out recently by Kessler et al. in the context of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey supernova search, if we take the published U-band photometry of nearby Type Ia supernovae at face value, there is a 0.12 mag U-band anomaly in the distance moduli of higher redshift objects. This anomaly led the Sloan survey to eliminate from their analyses all photometry obtained in the rest-frame U-band. The Supernova Legacy Survey eliminated observer frame U-band photometry, which is to say nearby objects observed in the U-band, but they used photometry of high-redshift objects no matter in which band the photons were emitted.

  9. 33 CFR 154.822 - Detonation arresters, flame arresters, and flame screens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Detonation arresters, flame arresters, and flame screens. 154.822 Section 154.822 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... BULK Vapor Control Systems § 154.822 Detonation arresters, flame arresters, and flame screens. (a)...

  10. 33 CFR 154.822 - Detonation arresters, flame arresters, and flame screens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Detonation arresters, flame arresters, and flame screens. 154.822 Section 154.822 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... BULK Vapor Control Systems § 154.822 Detonation arresters, flame arresters, and flame screens. (a)...

  11. Radiant Extinction of Gaseous Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berhan, Sean; Atreya, Arvind; Everest, David; Sacksteder, Kurt R.

    1999-01-01

    The absence of buoyancy-induced flows in microgravity (mu-g) and the resulting increase in the reactant residence time significantly alters the fundamentals of many combustion processes. Substantial differences between normal gravity (ng) and mu-g flames have been reported in experiments on candle flames, flame spread over solids, droplet combustion, and others. These differences are more basic than just in the visible flame shape. Longer residence times and higher concentration of combustion products in the flame zone create a thermochemical environment that changes the flame chemistry and the heat and mass transfer processes. Processes such as flame radiation, that are often ignored in ng, become very important and sometimes even controlling. Furthermore, microgravity conditions considerably enhance flame radiation by: (1) the build-up of combustion products in the high-temperature reaction zone which increases the gas radiation; and (2) longer residence times make conditions appropriate for substantial amounts of soot to form which is also responsible for radiative heat loss. Thus, it is anticipated that radiative heat loss may eventually extinguish the "weak" (low burning rate per unit flame area) mu-g diffusion flame. Yet, space shuttle experiments on candle flames show that in an infinite ambient atmosphere, the hemispherical candle flame in mu-g will burn indefinitely. This may be because of the coupling between the fuel production rate and the flame via the heat-feedback mechanism for candle flames, flames over solids and fuel droplet flames. Thus, to focus only on the gas-phase phenomena leading to radiative extinction, aerodynamically stabilized gaseous diffusion flames are examined. This enables independent control of the fuel flow rate to help identify conditions under which radiative extinction occurs. Also, spherical geometry is chosen for the mu-g experiments and modeling because: (1) It reduces the complexity by making the problem one

  12. Unsteady Spherical Diffusion Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atreya, Arvind; Berhan, S.; Chernovsky, M.; Sacksteder, Kurt R.

    2001-01-01

    The absence of buoyancy-induced flows in microgravity (mu-g) and the resulting increase in the reactant residence time significantly alters the fundamentals of many combustion processes. Substantial differences between normal gravity (ng) and (mu-g) flames have been reported in experiments on candle flames, flame spread over solids, droplet combustion, and others. These differences are more basic than just in the visible flame shape. Longer residence times and higher concentration of combustion products in the flame zone create a thermochemical environment that changes the flame chemistry and the heat and mass transfer processes. Processes such as flame radiation, that are often ignored in ng, become very important and sometimes even controlling. Furthermore, microgravity conditions considerably enhance flame radiation by: (i) the build-up of combustion products in the high-temperature reaction zone which increases the gas radiation, and (ii) longer residence times make conditions appropriate for substantial amounts of soot to form which is also responsible for radiative heat loss. Thus, it is anticipated that radiative heat loss may eventually extinguish the "weak" (low burning rate per unit flame area) mu-g diffusion flame. Yet, space shuttle experiments on candle flames show that in an infinite ambient atmosphere, the hemispherical candle flame in mu-g will burn indefinitely. This may be because of the coupling between the fuel production rate and the flame via the heat-feedback mechanism for candle flames, flames over solids and fuel droplet flames. Thus, to focus only on the gas-phase phenomena leading to radiative extinction, aerodynamically stabilized gaseous diffusion flames are examined. This enables independent control of the fuel flow rate to help identify conditions under which radiative extinction occurs. Also, spherical geometry is chosen for the mu-g experiments and modeling because: (i) It reduces the complexity by making the problem one

  13. Radiant Extinction Of Gaseous Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berhan, S.; Chernovsky, M.; Atreya, A.; Baum, Howard R.; Sacksteder, Kurt R.

    2003-01-01

    The absence of buoyancy-induced flows in microgravity (mu:g) and the resulting increase in the reactant residence time significantly alters the fundamentals of many combustion processes. Substantial differences between normal gravity (ng) and :g flames have been reported in experiments on candle flames [1, 2], flame spread over solids [3, 4], droplet combustion [5,6], and others. These differences are more basic than just in the visible flame shape. Longer residence times and higher concentration of combustion products in the flame zone create a thermochemical environment that changes the flame chemistry and the heat and mass transfer processes. Processes such as flame radiation, that are often ignored in ng, become very important and sometimes even controlling. Furthermore, microgravity conditions considerably enhance flame radiation by: (i) the build-up of combustion products in the high-temperature reaction zone which increases the gas radiation, and (ii) longer residence times make conditions appropriate for substantial amounts of soot to form which is also responsible for radiative heat loss. Thus, it is anticipated that radiative heat loss may eventually extinguish the Aweak@ (low burning rate per unit flame area) :g diffusion flame. Yet, space shuttle experiments on candle flames show that in an infinite ambient atmosphere, the hemispherical candle flame in :g will burn indefinitely [1]. This may be because of the coupling between the fuel production rate and the flame via the heat-feedback mechanism for candle flames, flames over solids and fuel droplet flames. Thus, to focus only on the gas-phase phenomena leading to radiative extinction, aerodynamically stabilized gaseous diffusion flames are examined. This enables independent control of the fuel flow rate to help identify conditions under which radiative extinction occurs. Also, spherical geometry is chosen for the :g experiments and modeling because: (i) It reduces the complexity by making the problem

  14. Atomic absorption spectroscopy with high temperature flames.

    PubMed

    Willis, J B

    1968-07-01

    An account is given of the history of the development of high temperature flames for the atomic absorption measurement of metals forming refractory oxides. The principles governing the design of premix burners for such flames, and the relative merits of different types of nebulizer burner systems are described. After a brief account of the structure and emission characteristics of the premixed oxygen-acetylene and nitrous oxide-acetylene flames, the scope and limitations of the latter flame in chemical analysis are discussed.

  15. Lifted Partially Premixed Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lock, Andrew J.; Ganguly, Ranjan; Puri, Ishwar K.; Aggarwal, Suesh K.; Hegde, Uday

    2004-01-01

    Lifted Double and Triple flames are established in the UIC-NASA Partially Premixed microgravity rig. The flames examined in this paper are established above a coannular burner because its axisymmetric geometry allows for future implementation of other non-intrusive optical diagnostic techniques easily. Both burner-attached stable flames and lifted flames are established at normal and microgravity conditions in the drop tower facility.

  16. Production Of Fullerenic Soot In Flames

    DOEpatents

    Howard, Jack B.; Vander Sande, John B.; Chowdhury, K. Das

    2000-12-19

    A method for the production of fullerenic nanostructures is described in which unsaturated hydrocarbon fuel and oxygen are combusted in a burner chamber at a sub-atmospheric pressure, thereby establishing a flame. The condensibles of the flame are collected at a post-flame location. The condensibles contain fullerenic nanostructures, such as single and nested nanotubes, single and nested nanoparticles and giant fullerenes. The method of producing fullerenic soot from flames is also described.

  17. Production of fullerenic nanostructures in flames

    DOEpatents

    Howard, Jack B.; Vander Sande, John B.; Chowdhury, K. Das

    1999-01-01

    A method for the production of fullerenic nanostructures is described in which unsaturated hydrocarbon fuel and oxygen are combusted in a burner chamber at a sub-atmospheric pressure, thereby establishing a flame. The condensibles of the flame are collected at a post-flame location. The condensibles contain fullerenic nanostructures, such as single and nested nanotubes, single and nested nanoparticles and giant fullerenes. The method of producing fullerenic soot from flames is also described.

  18. Oscillatory Extinction Of Spherical Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, C. K.; Yoo, S. W.; Christianson, E. W.

    2003-01-01

    Since extinction has been observed in an oscillatory manner in Le greater than 1 premixed flames, it is not unreasonable to expect that extinction could occur in an unsteady manner for diffusion flames. Indeed, near-limit oscillations have been observed experimentally under microgravity conditions for both candle flames and droplet flames. Furthermore, the analysis of Cheatham and Matalon on the unsteady behavior of diffusion flames with heat loss, identified an oscillatory regime which could be triggered by either a sufficiently large Lewis number (even without heat loss) or an appreciable heat loss (even for Le=1). In light of these recent understanding, the present investigation aims to provide a well-controlled experiment that can unambiguously demonstrate the oscillation of diffusion flames near both the transport- and radiation-induced limits. That is, since candle and jet flames are stabilized through flame segments that are fundamentally premixed in nature, and since premixed flames are prone to oscillate, there is the possibility that the observed oscillation of these bulk diffusion flames could be triggered and sustained by the oscillation of the premixed flame segments. Concerning the observed oscillatory droplet extinction, it is well-known that gas-phase oscillation in heterogeneous burning can be induced by and is thereby coupled with condensed-phase unsteadiness. Consequently, a convincing experiment on diffusion flame oscillation must exclude any ingredients of premixed flames and other sources that may either oscillate themselves or promote the oscillation of the diffusion flame. The present experiment on burner-generated spherical flames with a constant reactant supply endeavored to accomplish this goal. The results are further compared with those from computational simulation for further understanding and quantification of the flame dynamics and extinction.

  19. Displacement speeds in turbulent premixed flame simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Marcus S.; Shepherd, Ian G.; Bell, J.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Lijewski, Michael J.

    2007-07-01

    The theory of turbulent premixed flames is based on acharacterization of the flame as a discontinuous surface propagatingthrough the fluid. The displacement speed, defined as the local speed ofthe flame front normal to itself, relative to the unburned fluid,provides one characterization of the burning velocity. In this paper, weintroduce a geometric approach to computing displacement speed anddiscuss the efficacy of the displacement speed for characterizing aturbulent flame.

  20. An evaluation of different contributions to flame stretch for stationary premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Goey, L.P.H. de; Mallens, R.M.M.; Thije Boonkkamp, J.H.M. ten

    1997-07-01

    The concept of flame stretch is extended to study stationary premixed flames with a finite thickness. It is shown that the analysis results in additional contributions to the stretch rate due to changes in the flame thickness and due to density variations along the flame. Extended expressions are derived that describe the effect of stretch on variations in scalar quantities, such as the enthalpy. These expressions are used to determine local variations in the flame temperature, and it is shown that known results are recovered when a number of approximations are introduced. The extended stretch formalism might be useful to analyze and quantify the different flame stretch contributions and their effects in numerical flame studies. Finally, the different contributions to the total stretch rate and the effects thereof on the flame stabilization are numerically computed for the flame tip of a two-dimensional Bunsen flame as illustration.

  1. Firefighters and flame retardant activism.

    PubMed

    Cordner, Alissa; Rodgers, Kathryn M; Brown, Phil; Morello-Frosch, Rachel

    2015-02-01

    In the past decade, exposure to flame retardant chemicals has become a pressing health concern and widely discussed topic of public safety for firefighters in the United States. Working through local, state, and national unions and independent health and advocacy organizations, firefighters have made important contributions to efforts to restrict the use of certain flame retardants. Firefighters are key members in advocacy coalitions dedicated to developing new environmental health regulations and reforming flammability standards to reflect the best available fire science. Their involvement has been motivated by substantiated health concerns and critiques of deceptive lobbying practices by the chemical industry. Drawing on observations and interviews with firefighters, fire safety experts, and other involved stakeholders, this article describes why firefighters are increasingly concerned about their exposure to flame retardant chemicals in consumer products, and analyzes their involvement in state and national environmental health coalitions. PMID:25816168

  2. Firefighters and flame retardant activism.

    PubMed

    Cordner, Alissa; Rodgers, Kathryn M; Brown, Phil; Morello-Frosch, Rachel

    2015-02-01

    In the past decade, exposure to flame retardant chemicals has become a pressing health concern and widely discussed topic of public safety for firefighters in the United States. Working through local, state, and national unions and independent health and advocacy organizations, firefighters have made important contributions to efforts to restrict the use of certain flame retardants. Firefighters are key members in advocacy coalitions dedicated to developing new environmental health regulations and reforming flammability standards to reflect the best available fire science. Their involvement has been motivated by substantiated health concerns and critiques of deceptive lobbying practices by the chemical industry. Drawing on observations and interviews with firefighters, fire safety experts, and other involved stakeholders, this article describes why firefighters are increasingly concerned about their exposure to flame retardant chemicals in consumer products, and analyzes their involvement in state and national environmental health coalitions.

  3. Soot Formation in Purely-Curved Premixed Flames and Laminar Flame Speeds of Soot-Forming Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, Thomas; Wang, Hai

    2005-01-01

    The research addressed here is a collaborative project between University of Delaware and Case Western Reserve University. There are two basic and related scientific objectives. First, we wish to demonstrate the suitability of spherical/cylindrical, laminar, premixed flames in the fundamental study of the chemical and physical processes of soot formation. Our reasoning is that the flame standoff distance in spherical/cylindrical flames under microgravity can be substantially larger than that in a flat burner-stabilized flame. Therefore the spherical/cylindrical flame is expected to give better spatial resolution to probe the soot inception and growth chemistry than flat flames. Second, we wish to examine the feasibility of determining the laminar flame speed of soot forming flames. Our basic assumption is that under the adiabatic condition (in the absence of conductive heat loss), the amount and dynamics of soot formed in the flame is unique for a given fuel/air mixture. The laminar flame speed can be rigorously defined as long as the radiative heat loss can be determined. This laminar flame speed characterizes the flame soot formation and dynamics in addition to the heat release rate. The research involves two integral parts: experiments of spherical and cylindrical sooting flames in microgravity (CWRU), and the computational counterpart (UD) that aims to simulate sooting laminar flames, and the sooting limits of near adiabatic flames. The computations work is described in this report, followed by a summary of the accomplishments achieved to date. Details of the microgra+ experiments will be discussed in a separate, final report prepared by the co-PI, Professor C-J. Sung of CWRU. Here only a brief discussion of these experiments will be given.

  4. Environmental Considerations for Flame Resistant Textiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virtually all common textiles will ignite and burn. There are mandatory and voluntary cigarette and open-flame ignition regulations to address unreasonable fire risks associated with textile products that require them to be treated with and/or contain flame retardant chemicals to make them flame res...

  5. Studies of Flame Structure in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, C. K.; Sung, C. J.; Zhu, D. L.

    1997-01-01

    The present research endeavor is concerned with gaining fundamental understanding of the configuration, structure, and dynamics of laminar premixed and diffusion flames under conditions of negligible effects of gravity. Of particular interest is the potential to establish and hence study the properties of spherically- and cylindrically-symmetric flames and their response to external forces not related to gravity. For example, in an earlier experimental study of the burner-stabilized cylindrical premixed flames, the possibility of flame stabilization through flow divergence was established, while the resulting one-dimensional, adiabatic, stretchless flame also allowed an accurate means of determining the laminar flame speeds of combustible mixtures. We have recently extended our studies of the flame structure in microgravity along the following directions: (1) Analysis of the dynamics of spherical premixed flames; (2) Analysis of the spreading of cylindrical diffusion flames; (3) Experimental observation of an interesting dual luminous zone structure of a steady-state, microbuoyancy, spherical diffusion flame of air burning in a hydrogen/methane mixture environment, and its subsequent quantification through computational simulation with detailed chemistry and transport; (4) Experimental quantification of the unsteady growth of a spherical diffusion flame; and (5) Computational simulation of stretched, diffusionally-imbalanced premixed flames near and beyond the conventional limits of flammability, and the substantiation of the concept of extended limits of flammability. Motivation and results of these investigations are individually discussed.

  6. Premixed flame propagation in vertical tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, Kirill A.

    2016-04-01

    Analytical treatment of the premixed flame propagation in vertical tubes with smooth walls is given. Using the on-shell flame description, equations for a quasi-steady flame with a small but finite front thickness are obtained and solved numerically. It is found that near the limits of inflammability, solutions describing upward flame propagation come in pairs having close propagation speeds and that the effect of gravity is to reverse the burnt gas velocity profile generated by the flame. On the basis of these results, a theory of partial flame propagation driven by a strong gravitational field is developed. A complete explanation is given of the intricate observed behavior of limit flames, including dependence of the inflammability range on the size of the combustion domain, the large distances of partial flame propagation, and the progression of flame extinction. The role of the finite front-thickness effects is discussed in detail. Also, various mechanisms governing flame acceleration in smooth tubes are identified. Acceleration of methane-air flames in open tubes is shown to be a combined effect of the hydrostatic pressure difference produced by the ambient cold air and the difference of dynamic gas pressure at the tube ends. On the other hand, a strong spontaneous acceleration of the fast methane-oxygen flames at the initial stage of their evolution in open-closed tubes is conditioned by metastability of the quasi-steady propagation regimes. An extensive comparison of the obtained results with the experimental data is made.

  7. Flame and Soot Boundaries of Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames. Appendix A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Dai, Z.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The shapes (flame-sheet and luminous-flame boundaries) or steady weakly buoyant round hydrocarbon-fueled laminar-jet diffusion flames in still and coflowing air were studied both experimentally and theoretically. Flame-sheet shapes were measured from photographs using a CH optical filter to distinguish flame-sheet boundaries in the presence of blue CO2 and OH emissions and yellow continuum radiation from soot. Present experimental conditions included acetylene-, methane-, propane-, and ethylene-fueled flames having initial reactant temperatures of 300 K. ambient pressures of 4-50 kPa, jet-exit Reynolds numbers of 3-54, initial air/fuel velocity ratios of 0-9, and luminous flame lengths of 5-55 mm; earlier measurements for propylene- and 1,3-butadiene-fueled flames for similar conditions were considered as well. Nonbuoyant flames in still air were observed at microgravity conditions; essentially nonbuoyant flames in coflowing air were observed at small pressures to control effects of buoyancy. Predictions of luminous flame boundaries from soot luminosity were limited to laminar smoke-point conditions, whereas predictions of flame-sheet boundaries ranged from soot-free to smoke-point conditions. Flame-shape predictions were based on simplified analyses using the boundary-layer approximations along with empirical parameters to distinguish flame-sheet and luminous-flame (at the laminar smoke point) boundaries. The comparison between measurements and predictions was remarkably good and showed that both flame-sheet and luminous-flame lengths are primarily controlled by fuel flow rates with lengths in coflowing air approaching 2/3 of the lengths in still air as coflowing air velocities are increased. Finally, luminous flame lengths at laminar smoke-point conditions were roughly twice as long as flame-sheet lengths at comparable conditions because of the presence of luminous soot particles in the fuel-lean region of the flames.

  8. Flame Speed and Spark Intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randolph, D W; Silsbee, F B

    1925-01-01

    This report describes a series of experiments undertaken to determine whether or not the electrical characteristics of the igniting spark have any effect on the rapidity of flame spread in the explosive gas mixtures which it ignites. The results show very clearly that no such effect exists. The flame velocity in carbon-monoxide oxygen, acetylene oxygen, and gasoline-air mixtures was found to be unaffected by changes in spark intensity from sparks which were barely able to ignite the mixture up to intense condenser discharge sparks having fifty time this energy. (author)

  9. Mesopic luminance assessed with minimum motion photometry.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Sabine; MacLeod, Donald I A

    2011-08-25

    We measured the relative contribution of rods and cones to luminance across a range of photopic, mesopic, and scotopic adaptation levels and at various retinal eccentricities. We isolated the luminance channel by setting motion-based luminance nulls (minimum motion photometry) using annular stimuli. Luminance nulls between differently colored stimuli require equality in a weighted sum of rod and cone excitations. The relative cone weight increases smoothly from the scotopic range, where rods dominate, to photopic levels, where rod influence becomes negligible. The change from rod to cone vision does not occur uniformly over the visual field. The more peripheral the stimulus location, the higher is the light level required for cones to participate strongly. The relative cone contribution can be described by a sigmoid function of intensity, with two parameters that each depend on the eccentricity and spatial frequency of the stimulus. One parameter determines the "meso-mesopic" luminance--the center of the mesopic range, at which rod and cone contributions are balanced. This increases with eccentricity, reflecting an increase in the meso-mesopic luminance from 0.04 scotopic cd/m(2) at 2° eccentricity to 0.44 scotopic cd/m(2) at 18°. The second parameter represents the slope of the log-log threshold-versus-intensity curve (TVI curve) for rod vision. This parameter inversely scales the width of the mesopic range and increases only slightly with eccentricity (from 0.73 at 2° to 0.78 for vision at 18° off-axis).

  10. Multicolor surface photometry of powerful radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    CCD images of 72 powerful radio galaxies have been obtained with the KPNO 2.1m, 4m and CTIO 4m telescopes utilizing B, V, and R filters to study the colors and other photometric properties of these large systems. The GASP software package was used for the data reduction and detailed 2-d surface photometry. In addition, image modeling techniques were employed to investigate the contributions to galaxy properties by point-like nuclear sources seen in some of these galaxies. It was found that powerful radio galaxies show a much higher frequency than normal bright ellipticals of having optical morphologies which deviate from elliptical symmetry. Approximately 50% of the sample exhibit non-elliptically symmetric isophotes. These prominent distortions are present at surface brightness levels of {le} 25 V mag/(arc sec){sup 2}. In addition, a large fraction ({approximately}50%) of the remaining radio galaxies without the aforementioned morphological peculiarities have large isophotal twists ({Delta}P.A. {ge} 10{degree}) or ellipticity gradients. Significantly {approximately}50% of the galaxies with strong optical emission lines in their spectra display optically peculiar structures very similar to those found by Toomre and Toomre (1972) in their simulations of interacting disk galaxies. The galaxies with weak emission lines in their spectra are less frequently ({approximately}10%) distorted from elliptical shape. Those that are exhibit features like isophote twists, double nuclei and close companion galaxies embedded in the radio galaxy optical isophotes. The (B-V) colors of many of the powerful radio galaxies with strong emission lines are blue relative to normal giant ellipticals at the same redshift.

  11. HST BVI photometry of Triton and Proteus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascu, Dan; Storrs, Alex D.; Wells, Eddie N.; Hershey, John L.; Rohde, James R.; Seidelmann, P. Kenneth; Currie, Douglas G.

    2006-12-01

    BVI photometry of Triton and Proteus was derived from HST images taken in 1997. The VEGAMAG photometric technique was used. Triton was found to be brighter by a few percent than observations of the 1970's and 1980's, as expected due to the increasingly greater exposure of the bright south polar region. The leading side was also found to be brighter than the trailing side by 0.09 mag in all filters—50% larger than reported by Franz [Franz, O.G., 1981. Icarus 45, 602-606]. Contrary to our previous results [Pascu, D., et al., 1998. Bull. Am. Astron. Soc. 30, 1101], we found no episodic reddening. Our previous conclusions were based on an inaccurate early version of the Charge Transfer Efficiency (CTE) correction. The present result limits the start of the reddening event reported by Hicks and Buratti [Hicks, M.D., Buratti, B.J., 2004. Icarus 171, 210-218]. Our ( B- V) result of 0.70±0.01 supports the global blueing described by Buratti et al. [Buratti, B.J., Goguen, J.D., Gibson, J., Mosher, J., 1994. Icarus 110, 303-314]. Our observations of July 1997 agree with the Voyager results and are among the bluest colors seen. We found Proteus somewhat brighter than earlier studies, but in good agreement with the recent value given by Karkoschka [Karkoschka, E., 2003. Icarus 162, 400-407]. A leading/trailing brightness asymmetry was detected for Proteus, with the leading side 0.1 mag brighter. The unique differences in action of the endogenic and exogenic processes on Triton and Proteus provides an opportunity to separate the endogenic and exogenic effects on Triton.

  12. Dithering Strategies and Point-Source Photometry

    SciTech Connect

    Samsing, Johan; Kim, Alex G

    2011-02-22

    The accuracy in the photometry of a point source depends on the point-spread function (PSF), detector pixelization, and observing strategy. The PSF and pixel response describe the spatial blurring of the source, the pixel scale describes the spatial sampling of a single exposure, and the observing strategy determines the set of dithered exposures with pointing offsets from which the source flux is inferred. In a wide-field imaging survey, sources of interest are randomly distributed within the field of view and hence are centered randomly within a pixel. A given hardware configuration and observing strategy therefore have a distribution of photometric uncertainty for sources of fixed flux that fall in the field. In this article we explore the ensemble behavior of photometric and position accuracies for different PSFs, pixel scales, and dithering patterns. We find that the average uncertainty in the flux determination depends slightly on dither strategy, whereas the position determination can be strongly dependent on the dithering. For cases with pixels much larger than the PSF, the uncertainty distributions can be non-Gaussian, with rms values that are particularly sensitive to the dither strategy. We also find that for these configurations with large pixels, pointings dithered by a fractional pixel amount do not always give minimal average uncertainties; this is in contrast to image reconstruction for which fractional dithers are optimal. When fractional pixel dithering is favored, a pointing accuracy of better than {approx}0.15 {approx}0.15 pixel width is required to maintain half the advantage over random dithers.

  13. Laser flare-cell photometry: methodology and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Ladas, John G; Wheeler, Noel C; Morhun, Patrick J; Rimmer, Steven O; Holland, Gary N

    2005-01-01

    Diagnosis and management of intraocular inflammation involves the assessment of cells and protein levels ("flare") in the aqueous humor. These factors are difficult to quantify precisely on clinical examination alone. Laser flare-cell photometry provides an automated technique to quantify these factors objectively, and it has been used in a variety of research and clinical situations to assess anterior segment inflammation. Any new technique requires evaluation to determine accuracy and reproducibility of measured values, and initial applications require critical appraisal to assess the value of the technique. Both in vitro and in vivo studies of laser flare-cell photometry have been performed to determine its validity and utility as a research and clinical tool. This article reviews published studies that describe the technique of laser flare-cell photometry; it provides new in vitro data that supplements information on the capabilities of this technique and factors that influence photometry results, and it reviews representative publications that have used laser flare-cell photometry for study of specific disease entities. This information can help clinicians and researchers to become familiar with the strengths and limitations of laser flare-cell photometry, to identify appropriate future uses for this technique, and to use it and interpret its results appropriately. Laser flare-cell photometry offers an opportunity to improve upon current techniques of inflammation assessment and should not be considered simply an objective surrogate for clinical grading of cells and flare at the slit-lamp biomicroscope. Its research applications and utility for monitoring patients with uveitis have not yet been fully explored.

  14. Flame stabilizer for stagnation flow reactor

    DOEpatents

    Hahn, David W.; Edwards, Christopher F.

    1999-01-01

    A method of stabilizing a strained flame in a stagnation flow reactor. By causing a highly strained flame to be divided into a large number of equal size segments it is possible to stablize a highly strained flame that is on the verge of extinction, thereby providing for higher film growth rates. The flame stabilizer is an annular ring mounted coaxially and coplanar with the substrate upon which the film is growing and having a number of vertical pillars mounted on the top surface, thereby increasing the number of azimuthal nodes into which the flame is divided and preserving an axisymmetric structure necessary for stability.

  15. KSC Launch Pad Flame Trench Environment Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Hintze, Paul E.; Parlier, Christopher R.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.; Sampson, Jeffrey W.

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes conditions in the Launch Complex 39 (LC-39) flame trenches during a Space Shuttle Launch, as they have been measured to date. Instrumentation of the flame trench has been carried out by NASA and United Space Alliance for four Shuttle launches. Measurements in the flame trench are planned to continue for the duration of the Shuttle Program. The assessment of the launch environment is intended to provide guidance in selecting appropriate test methods for refractory materials used in the flame trench and to provide data used to improve models of the launch environment in the flame trench.

  16. Burning Laminar Jet Diffusion Flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Study of the downlink data from the Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment quickly resulted in discovery of a new mechanism of flame extinction caused by radiation of soot. Scientists found that the flames emit soot sooner than expected. These findings have direct impact on spacecraft fire safety, as well as the theories predicting the formation of soot -- which is a major factor as a pollutant and in the spread of unwanted fires. This sequence was taken July 15, 1997, MET:14/10:34 (approximate) and shows the ignition and extinction of this flame. LSP investigated fundamental questions regarding soot, a solid byproduct of the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. The experiment was performed using a laminar jet diffusion flame, which is created by simply flowing fuel -- like ethylene or propane -- through a nozzle and igniting it, much like a butane cigarette lighter. The LSP principal investigator was Gerard Faeth, University of Michigan, Arn Arbor. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). LSP results led to a reflight for extended investigations on the STS-107 research mission in January 2003. Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations planned for the International Space Station. (518KB, 20-second MPEG, screen 160 x 120 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300182.html.

  17. An Improved Calcium Flame Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Robert S.

    1985-01-01

    Indicates that the true red color of calcium can be obtained (using the procedure described by Sorm and Logowski) if the calcium ion solution is mixed with an equal volume of saturated ammonium bromide solution. Suggestions for flame tests of other elements are also noted. (JN)

  18. Pulsed Turbulent Diffusion Flames in a Coflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usowicz, James E.; Hermanson, James C.; Johari, Hamid

    2000-11-01

    Fully modulated diffusion flames were studied experimentally in a co-flow combustor using unheated ethylene fuel at atmospheric pressure. A fast solenoid valve was used to fully modulate (completely shut-off) the fuel flow. The fuel was released from a 2 mm diameter nozzle with injection times ranging from 2 to 750 ms. The jet exit Reynolds number was 2000 to 10,000 with a co-flow air velocity of up to 0.02 times the jet exit velocity. Establishing the effects of co-flow for the small nozzle and short injection times is required for future tests of pulsed flames under microgravity conditions. The very short injection times resulted in compact, burning puffs. The compact puffs had a mean flame length as little as 20flame for the same Reynolds number. As the injection time and fuel volume increased, elongated flames resembling starting jets resulted with a flame length comparable to that of a steady flame. For short injection times, the addition of an air co-flow resulted in an increase in flame length of nearly 50flames with longer injection times was correspondingly smaller. The effects of interaction of successive pulses on the flame length were most pronounced for the compact puffs. The emissions of unburned hydrocarbon and NOx from the pulsed flames were examined.

  19. Hysteresis and transition in swirling nonpremixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Tummers, M.J.; Huebner, A.W.; van Veen, E.H.; Hanjalic, K.; van der Meer, T.H.

    2009-02-15

    Strongly swirling nonpremixed flames are known to exhibit a hysteresis when transiting from an attached long, sooty, yellow flame to a short lifted blue flame, and vice versa. The upward transition (by increasing the air and fuel flow rates) corresponds to a vortex breakdown, i.e. an abrupt change from an attached swirling flame (unidirectional or with a weak bluff-body recirculation), to a lifted flame with a strong toroidal vortex occupying the bulk of the flame. Despite dramatic differences in their structures, mixing intensities and combustion performance, both flame types can be realised at identical flow rates, equivalence ratio and swirl intensity. We report here on comprehensive investigations of the two flame regimes at the same conditions in a well-controlled experiment in which the swirl was generated by the rotating outer pipe of the annular burner air passage. Fluid velocity measured with PIV (particle image velocimetry), the qualitative detection of reaction zones from OH PLIF (planar laser-induced fluorescence) and the temperature measured by CARS (coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy) revealed major differences in vortical structures, turbulence, mixing and reaction intensities in the two flames. We discuss the transition mechanism and arguments for the improved mixing, compact size and a broader stability range of the blue flame in comparison to the long yellow flame. (author)

  20. Soot Formation in Laminar Premixed Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Krishnan, S. S.; Faeth, G. M.

    1999-01-01

    Soot processes within hydrocarbon-fueled flames affect emissions of pollutant soot, thermal loads on combustors, hazards of unwanted fires and capabilities for computational combustion. In view of these observations, the present study is considering processes of soot formation in both burner-stabilized and freely-propagating laminar premixed flames. These flames are being studied in order to simplify the interpretation of measurements and to enhance computational tractability compared to the diffusion flame environments of greatest interest for soot processes. In addition, earlier studies of soot formation in laminar premixed flames used approximations of soot optical and structure properties that have not been effective during recent evaluations, as well as questionable estimates of flow residence times). The objective of present work was to exploit methods of avoiding these difficulties developed for laminar diffusion flames to study soot growth in laminar premixed flames. The following description of these studies is brief.

  1. Flex-flame burner and combustion method

    DOEpatents

    Soupos, Vasilios; Zelepouga, Serguei; Rue, David M.; Abbasi, Hamid A.

    2010-08-24

    A combustion method and apparatus which produce a hybrid flame for heating metals and metal alloys, which hybrid flame has the characteristic of having an oxidant-lean portion proximate the metal or metal alloy and having an oxidant-rich portion disposed above the oxidant lean portion. This hybrid flame is produced by introducing fuel and primary combustion oxidant into the furnace chamber containing the metal or metal alloy in a substoichiometric ratio to produce a fuel-rich flame and by introducing a secondary combustion oxidant into the furnace chamber above the fuel-rich flame in a manner whereby mixing of the secondary combustion oxidant with the fuel-rich flame is delayed for a portion of the length of the flame.

  2. Revised Filter Profiles and Zero Points for Broadband Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Andrew W.; von Braun, Kaspar

    2015-02-01

    Estimating accurate bolometric fluxes for stars requires reliable photometry to absolutely flux calibrate the spectra. This is a significant problem for studies of very bright stars, which are generally saturated in modern photometric surveys. Instead we must rely on photometry with less precise calibration. We utilize precisely flux-calibrated spectra to derive improved filter bandpasses and zero points for the most common sources of photometry for bright stars. In total, we test 39 different filters in the General Catalog of Photometric Data as well as those from Tycho-2 and Hipparcos. We show that utilizing inaccurate filter profiles from the literature can create significant color terms resulting in fluxes that deviate by gsim10% from actual values. To remedy this we employ an empirical approach; we iteratively adjust the literature filter profile and zero point, convolve it with catalog spectra, and compare to the corresponding flux from the photometry. We adopt the passband values that produce the best agreement between photometry and spectroscopy and are independent of stellar color. We find that while most zero points change by < 5%, a few systems change by 10-15%. Our final profiles and zero points are similar to recent estimates from the literature. Based on determinations of systematic errors in our selected spectroscopic libraries, we estimate that most of our improved zero points are accurate to 0.5-1%.

  3. Correlating Total Visual Magnitude Estimates and CCD Photometry for Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidger, Mark Richard

    2015-08-01

    A key facet of understanding the activity of comets is coverage of their light curve. For some comets such as 2P/Encke there is good light curve coverage from visual observers extending back over many returns over more than 2 centuries. However, in recent years, CCD photometry by amateur astronomers has become the dominant data source and the number of total visual magnitude estimates has reduced sharply, making comparison of recent and historical photometric data for comets increasingly difficult. The relationship between total visual magnitude estimates - dominated by the emission from the Swan bands of C2 - and CCD aperture photometry - dominated by the dust continuum - has been far from clear.This paper compares CCD aperture photometry and total visual magnitude for several recent well-observed bright comets, including C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy), C/2012 S1 (ISON) and C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS) using a consistent and homogeneous database of observations from (mainly) Spanish observers. For comets with a 1/r radial coma profile, good agreement is found between CCD aperture photometry and total visual magnitude estimates for a CCD aperture corresponding to a physical coma diameter of ≈105km.The relationship between the coma radial brightness slope and the equivalent physical aperture for CCD photometry to obtain agreement with total visual magnitude estimates is investigated.

  4. Simulation of flame surface density and burning rate of a premixed turbulent flame using contour advection

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, B.H.Y.; Chan, C.K.

    2006-10-15

    In this paper, a 2-dimensional rod-stabilized V-shaped flame is simulated using contour advection with surgery as well as the random vortex method. Effects of turbulence on various quantities, such as flame brush thickness and flame surface density, are investigated. The flame surface density S is estimated using the Bray-Moss-Libby formulation, which involves the use of a mean orientation factor {sigma}{sub c}. As a comparison, values of S are also obtained using Shepherd's model, which employs the values of mean flame surface area and mean flame length. Local flame structure is characterized in terms of turbulent flame brush, orientation factor, and flame surface density. Profiles of S obtained using the two different models are compared and show that discrepancy is more evident with increasing turbulence intensity. (author)

  5. Nonlinear effects in the extraction of laminar flame speeds from expanding spherical flames

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, A.P.; Law, C.K.

    2009-09-15

    Various factors affecting the determination of laminar flames speeds from outwardly propagating spherical flames in a constant-pressure combustion chamber were considered, with emphasis on the nonlinear variation of the stretched flame speed to the flame stretch rate, and the associated need to nonlinearly extrapolate the stretched flame speed to yield an accurate determination of the laminar flame speed and Markstein length. Experiments were conducted for lean and rich n-butane/air flames at 1atm initial pressure, demonstrating the complex and nonlinear nature of the dynamics of flame evolution, and the strong influences of the ignition transient and chamber confinement during the initial and final periods of the flame propagation, respectively. These experimental data were analyzed using the nonlinear relation between the stretched flame speed and stretch rate, yielding laminar flame speeds that agree well with data determined from alternate flame configurations. It is further suggested that the fidelity in the extraction of the laminar flame speed from expanding spherical flames can be facilitated by using small ignition energy and a large combustion chamber. (author)

  6. Experimental study of turbulent flame kernel propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Mansour, Mohy; Peters, Norbert; Schrader, Lars-Uve

    2008-07-15

    Flame kernels in spark ignited combustion systems dominate the flame propagation and combustion stability and performance. They are likely controlled by the spark energy, flow field and mixing field. The aim of the present work is to experimentally investigate the structure and propagation of the flame kernel in turbulent premixed methane flow using advanced laser-based techniques. The spark is generated using pulsed Nd:YAG laser with 20 mJ pulse energy in order to avoid the effect of the electrodes on the flame kernel structure and the variation of spark energy from shot-to-shot. Four flames have been investigated at equivalence ratios, {phi}{sub j}, of 0.8 and 1.0 and jet velocities, U{sub j}, of 6 and 12 m/s. A combined two-dimensional Rayleigh and LIPF-OH technique has been applied. The flame kernel structure has been collected at several time intervals from the laser ignition between 10 {mu}s and 2 ms. The data show that the flame kernel structure starts with spherical shape and changes gradually to peanut-like, then to mushroom-like and finally disturbed by the turbulence. The mushroom-like structure lasts longer in the stoichiometric and slower jet velocity. The growth rate of the average flame kernel radius is divided into two linear relations; the first one during the first 100 {mu}s is almost three times faster than that at the later stage between 100 and 2000 {mu}s. The flame propagation is slightly faster in leaner flames. The trends of the flame propagation, flame radius, flame cross-sectional area and mean flame temperature are related to the jet velocity and equivalence ratio. The relations obtained in the present work allow the prediction of any of these parameters at different conditions. (author)

  7. The discrete regime of flame propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Francois-David; Goroshin, Samuel; Higgins, Andrew

    The propagation of laminar dust flames in iron dust clouds was studied in a low-gravity envi-ronment on-board a parabolic flight aircraft. The elimination of buoyancy-induced convection and particle settling permitted measurements of fundamental combustion parameters such as the burning velocity and the flame quenching distance over a wide range of particle sizes and in different gaseous mixtures. The discrete regime of flame propagation was observed by substitut-ing nitrogen present in air with xenon, an inert gas with a significantly lower heat conductivity. Flame propagation in the discrete regime is controlled by the heat transfer between neighbor-ing particles, rather than by the particle burning rate used by traditional continuum models of heterogeneous flames. The propagation mechanism of discrete flames depends on the spa-tial distribution of particles, and thus such flames are strongly influenced by local fluctuations in the fuel concentration. Constant pressure laminar dust flames were observed inside 70 cm long, 5 cm diameter Pyrex tubes. Equally-spaced plate assemblies forming rectangular chan-nels were placed inside each tube to determine the quenching distance defined as the minimum channel width through which a flame can successfully propagate. High-speed video cameras were used to measure the flame speed and a fiber optic spectrometer was used to measure the flame temperature. Experimental results were compared with predictions obtained from a numerical model of a three-dimensional flame developed to capture both the discrete nature and the random distribution of particles in the flame. Though good qualitative agreement was obtained between model predictions and experimental observations, residual g-jitters and the short reduced-gravity periods prevented further investigations of propagation limits in the dis-crete regime. The full exploration of the discrete flame phenomenon would require high-quality, long duration reduced gravity environment

  8. Radiant extinction of gaseous diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atreya, Arvind; Agrawal, Sanjay; Shamim, Tariq; Pickett, Kent; Sacksteder, Kurt R.; Baum, Howard R.

    1995-01-01

    The absence of buoyancy-induced flows in microgravity significantly alters the fundamentals of many combustion processes. Substantial differences between normal-gravity and microgravity flames have been reported during droplet combustion, flame spread over solids, candle flames, and others. These differences are more basic than just in the visible flame shape. Longer residence time and higher concentration of combustion products create a thermochemical environment which changes the flame chemistry. Processes such as flame radiation, that are often ignored under normal gravity, become very important and sometimes even controlling. This is particularly true for conditions at extinction of a microgravity diffusion flame. Under normal-gravity, the buoyant flow, which may be characterized by the strain rate, assists the diffusion process to transport the fuel and oxidizer to the combustion zone and remove the hot combustion products from it. These are essential functions for the survival of the flame which needs fuel and oxidizer. Thus, as the strain rate is increased, the diffusion flame which is 'weak' (reduced burning rate per unit flame area) at low strain rates is initially 'strengthened' and eventually it may be 'blown-out'. Most of the previous research on diffusion flame extinction has been conducted at the high strain rate 'blow-off' limit. The literature substantially lacks information on low strain rate, radiation-induced, extinction of diffusion flames. At the low strain rates encountered in microgravity, flame radiation is enhanced due to: (1) build-up of combustion products in the flame zone which increases the gas radiation, and (2) low strain rates provide sufficient residence time for substantial amounts of soot to form which further increases the flame radiation. It is expected that this radiative heat loss will extinguish the already 'weak' diffusion flame under certain conditions. Identifying these conditions (ambient atmosphere, fuel flow rate, fuel

  9. CCD Photometry of bright stars using objective wire mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiński, Krzysztof; Zgórz, Marika; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, Aleksander

    2014-06-01

    Obtaining accurate photometry of bright stars from the ground remains problematic due to the danger of overexposing the target and/or the lack of suitable nearby comparison stars. The century-old method of using objective wire mesh to produce multiple stellar images seems promising for the precise CCD photometry of such stars. Furthermore, our tests on β Cep and its comparison star, differing by 5 mag, are very encouraging. Using a CCD camera and a 20 cm telescope with the objective covered by a plastic wire mesh, in poor weather conditions, we obtained differential photometry with a precision of 4.5 mmag per two minute exposure. Our technique is flexible and may be tuned to cover a range as big as 6-8 mag. We discuss the possibility of installing a wire mesh directly in the filter wheel.

  10. Near-IR Photometry of Nova Del 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cass, C. A.; Carlon, L. R.; Corgan, T. D.; Dykhoff, A. D.; Gehrz, D. R.; Shenoy, P. D.

    2013-08-01

    Subjects: Infra-Red, Nova We report Near-IR photometry of Nova Del 2013 taken with the 0.76-m infrared telescope at the University of Minnesota's O'Brien Observatory (Marine on St. Croix, Minnesota, USA). RIJHKLM photometry were obtained on August 21.17 and 23.13 UT using an AsSi bolometer. Vega (alpha Lyrae) was used as the standard star. Our photometry show: August 21.17 UT: R = 5.1 +/- 0.1, I = 4.6 +/- 0.1, J = 4.6 +/- 0.1, H = 4.1 +/- 0.1, K = 3.9 +/- 0.1, L = 2.7 +/- 0.2, M = +2.2 +/- 0.2.

  11. The initial development of a tulip flame

    SciTech Connect

    Matalon, M.; Mcgreevy, J.L.

    1994-12-31

    The initial development of a ``tulip flame``, often observed during flame propagation in closed tubes, is attributed to a combustion instability. The roles of hydrodynamic and of the diffusional-thermal processes on the onset of instability are investigated through a linear stability analysis in which the growth or decay of small disturbances, superimposed on an otherwise smooth and planar flame front, are followed. A range of the Markstein parameter, related to the mixture composition through an appropriately defined Lewis number, has been identified where a tulip flame could be observed. For a given value of the Markstein parameter within this range, a critical wavelength is identified as the most unstable mode. This wavelength is directly related to the minimal aspect ratio of the tube where a tulip flame could be observed. The time of onset of instability is identified as the time when the most unstable disturbance, associated with the critical wavelength, grows at a faster rate than the flame front itself and exceeds a certain threshold. This occurs after the flame has propagated a certain distance down the tube: a value which has been explicitly determined in terms of the relevant parameters. Experimental records on the tulip flame phenomenon support the finding of the analysis. That is, the tulip flame forms after the flame has traveled half the tube`s length, it does not form in short tubes, and its formation depends on the mixture composition and on the initial pressure in the tube.

  12. Numerical simulation of tulip flame dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.

    1991-11-30

    A finite difference reactive flow hydrodynamics program based on the full Navier-Stokes equations was used to simulate the combustion process in a homogeneous-charge, constant-volume combustion bomb in which an oddly shaped flame, known as a tulip flame'' in the literature, occurred. The tulip flame'' was readily reproduced in the numerical simulations, producing good agreement with the experimental flame shapes and positions at various times. The calculations provide sufficient detail about the dynamics of the experiment to provide some insight into the physical mechanisms responsible for the peculiar flame shape. Several factors seem to contribute to the tulip formation. The most important process is the baroclinic production of vorticity by the flame front, and this rate of production appears to be dramatically increased by the nonaxial flow generated when the initial semicircular flame front burns out along the sides of the chamber. The vorticity produces a pair of vortices behind the flame that advects the flame into the tulip shape. Boundary layer effects contribute to the details of the flame shape next to the walls of the chamber, but are otherwise not important. 24 refs.

  13. A numerical study of thin flame representations

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.A.; Pindera, M.Z.

    1989-08-11

    In studies of reacting flows, the flame may be viewed as a moving discontinuity endowed with certain properties; notably, it acts as a source of velocity and vorticity. Asymptotic analysis shows this to be justified provided that the flame curvature is small compared to the flame thickness. Such an approach is useful when one is interested in the hydrodynamic effects of the flame on the surrounding flowfield. In numerical models of this kind it is customary to treat the discontinuity as a collection of discrete velocity blobs. In this study, we show that the velocities associated with such a representation can be very non-smooth, particularly very near to the flame surface. As an alternative, we propose the use of a finite line source as the basic flame element. Comparisons of the two flame representations are made for several simple test cases as well as for a flame propagating through an enclosure forming the tulip shape. The results show that the use of line sources eliminates spurious fluctuations in nearfield velocities thus allowing for a more accurate calculation of flame propagation and flame-flowfield interactions. 7 refs., 15 figs.

  14. Numerical simulation of tulip flame dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.

    1991-11-30

    A finite difference reactive flow hydrodynamics program based on the full Navier-Stokes equations was used to simulate the combustion process in a homogeneous-charge, constant-volume combustion bomb in which an oddly shaped flame, known as a ``tulip flame`` in the literature, occurred. The ``tulip flame`` was readily reproduced in the numerical simulations, producing good agreement with the experimental flame shapes and positions at various times. The calculations provide sufficient detail about the dynamics of the experiment to provide some insight into the physical mechanisms responsible for the peculiar flame shape. Several factors seem to contribute to the tulip formation. The most important process is the baroclinic production of vorticity by the flame front, and this rate of production appears to be dramatically increased by the nonaxial flow generated when the initial semicircular flame front burns out along the sides of the chamber. The vorticity produces a pair of vortices behind the flame that advects the flame into the tulip shape. Boundary layer effects contribute to the details of the flame shape next to the walls of the chamber, but are otherwise not important. 24 refs.

  15. Structure of laminar sooting inverse diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Mikofski, Mark A.; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; Williams, Timothy C.; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Blevins, Linda G.

    2007-06-15

    The flame structure of laminar inverse diffusion flames (IDFs) was studied to gain insight into soot formation and growth in underventilated combustion. Both ethylene-air and methane-air IDFs were examined, fuel flow rates were kept constant for all flames of each fuel type, and airflow rates were varied to observe the effect on flame structure and soot formation. Planar laser-induced fluorescence of hydroxyl radicals (OH PLIF) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH PLIF), planar laser-induced incandescence of soot (soot PLII), and thermocouple-determined gas temperatures were used to draw conclusions about flame structure and soot formation. Flickering, caused by buoyancy-induced vortices, was evident above and outside the flames. The distances between the OH, PAH, and soot zones were similar in IDFs and normal diffusion flames (NDFs), but the locations of those zones were inverted in IDFs relative to NDFs. Peak OH PLIF coincided with peak temperature and marked the flame front. Soot appeared outside the flame front, corresponding to temperatures around the minimum soot formation temperature of 1300 K. PAHs appeared outside the soot layer, with characteristic temperature depending on the wavelength detection band. PAHs and soot began to appear at a constant axial position for each fuel, independent of the rate of air flow. PAH formation either preceded or coincided with soot formation, indicating that PAHs are important components in soot formation. Soot growth continued for some time downstream of the flame, at temperatures below the inception temperature, probably through reaction with PAHs. (author)

  16. A Study of Dust Cloud Parameters by Vilnius Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smriglio, F.; Dasgupta, A. K.; Boyle, R. P.

    Three-dimensional classification of stars based on their seven-color CCD photometry in the Vilnius system has been succesfully applied to study the small scale structure of interstellar dust clouds. In the present paper the statistical equations of Munch are modified and applied to stars located beyond the galactic absorbing layer. This particular use of Munch's statistics and the properties of CCD photometry in the Vilnius system offer a better possibility of probing the small scale structure of interstellar medium outside of the solar vicinity. This new technique and the first results are discussed.

  17. New Asteroid Models Based on Combined Dense and Sparse Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanuš, Josef; Durech, J.

    2010-10-01

    For thousands of asteroids we investigated several ten thousands of sparse photometric data from astrometric projects. These data are available on AstDyS server (Asteroids -- Dynamic Site, http://hamilton.dm.unipi.it). We picked 7 astrometric surveys and used their calibrated photometry in lightcurve inversion method for determination of asteroid's convex shapes and rotational states. We present nearly 100 new asteroid models derived from combined dense and sparse data sets, where sparse photometry is taken from AstDyS server and dense lightcurves are from the Uppsala Asteroid Photometric Catalogue (UAPC) and from several individual observers.

  18. Effects of Buoyancy on Lean Premixed V-Flames Part I: Laminar and Turblent Flame Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Robert K.; Bedat, Benoit; Kostiuk, Larry W.

    1998-01-01

    Laser schlieren and planar laser-induced fluorescence techniques have been used to investigate laminar and turbulent v-flames in +g, -g, and micro g under flow conditions that span the regimes of momentum domination (Ri < 0. 1) and buoyancy domination (Ri > 0.1). Overall flame features shown by schlieren indicate that buoyancy dominates the entire flow field for conditions close to Ri = 1. With decreasing Ri, buoyancy effects are observed only in the far-field regions. Analyses of the mean flame angles demonstrate that laminar and turbulent flames do not have similar responses to buoyancy. Difference in the laminar +g and -g flame angles decrease with Ri (i.e., increasing Re) and converge to the microgravity flame angle at the momentum limit (Ri - 0). This is consistent with the notion that the effects of buoyancy diminish with increasing flow momentum. The +g and -g turbulent flame angles, however, do not converge at Ri = 0. As shown by OH-PLIF images, the inconsistency in +g and -g turbulent flame angles is associated with the differences in flame wrinkles. Turbulent flame wrinkles evolve more slowly in +g than in -g. The difference in flame wrinkle structures, however, cannot be explained in terms of buoyancy effects on flame instability mechanisms. It seems to be associated with the field effects of buoyancy that stretches the turbulent flame brushes in +g and compresses the flame brush in -g. Flame wrinkling offers a mechanism through which the flame responds to the field effects of buoyancy despite increasing flow momentum. These observations point to the need to include both upstream and downstream contributions in theoretical analysis of flame turbulence interactions.

  19. Bifurcation characteristics and flame dynamics of a ducted non-premixed flame with finite rate chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Subhas Chandra; Sujith, Raman

    2015-09-01

    The influence of system parameters such as the flame location, Peclet number and Damköhler number on the bifurcation characteristics and flame dynamics of a ducted non-premixed flame with finite rate chemistry is presented in this paper. In the bifurcation plot with flame location as the bifurcation parameter, subcritical Hopf bifurcation is found for lower values of flame location and supercritical Hopf bifurcation for higher values of flame location, for all the Damköhler numbers used in this study. The flame shapes are captured at eight different phases of a cycle of time series data of acoustic velocity at both the fold and Hopf points for bifurcation with flame location as the parameter. We find that the range of flame height variations at the Hopf point is more than the range of flame height variations obtained at the fold point. We also find that the flame oscillates in the same phase as pressure fluctuation but in a phase different from both velocity and heat release rate fluctuations in the region of hysteresis for bifurcation with flame location. The non-dimensional hysteresis width is plotted as a function of Damköhler number for variation of flame location in the subcritical region. An inverse power law relation is found between the non-dimensional hysteresis width and the Damköhler number. The bifurcation plot with Peclet number as parameter shows a subcritical Hopf bifurcation.

  20. Galileo Photometry of Asteroid 951 Gaspra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helfenstein, P.; Veverka, J.; Thomas, P.C.; Simonelli, D.P.; Lee, P.; Klaasen, K.; Johnson, T.V.; Breneman, H.; Head, J.W.; Murchie, S.; Fanale, F.; Robinson, M.; Clark, B.; Granahan, J.; Garbeil, H.; McEwen, A.S.; Kirk, R.L.; Davies, M.; Neukum, G.; Mottola, S.; Wagner, R.; Belton, M.; Chapman, C.; Pilcher, C.

    1994-01-01

    Galileo images of Gaspra make it possible for the first time to determine a main-belt asteroid's photometric properties accurately by providing surface-resolved coverage over a wide range of incidence and emission angles and by extending the phase angle coverage to phases not observable from Earth. We combine Earth-based telescopic photometry over phase angles 2?? ??? ?? ??? 25?? with Galileo whole-disk and disk-resolved data at 33?? ??? ?? ??? 51?? to derive average global photometric properties in terms of Hapke's photometric model. The microscopic texture and particle phase-function behavior of Gaspra's surface are remarkably like those of other airless rocky bodies such as the Moon. The macroscopic surface roughness parameter, ??̄ = 29??, is slightly larger than that reported for typical lunar materials. The particle single scattering albedo, ??́0 = 0.36 ?? 0.07, is significantly larger than for lunar materials, and the opposition surge amplitude, B0 = 1.63 ?? 0.07, is correspondingly smaller. We determine a visual geometric albedo pv = 0.22 ?? 0.06 for Gaspra, in close agreement with pv = 0.22 ?? 0.03 estimated from Earth-based observations. Gaspra's phase integral is 0.47, and the bolometric Bond albedo is estimated to be 0.12 ?? 0.03. An albedo map derived by correcting Galileo images with our average global photometric function reveals subdued albedo contrasts of ??10% or less over Gaspra's northern hemisphere. Several independent classification algorithms confirm the subtle spectral heterogeneity reported earlier (S. Mottola, M. DiMartino, M. Gonano-Beurer, H. Hoffman, and G. Neukum, 1993, Asteroids, Comets, Meteors, pp. 421-424; M. J. S. Belton et al., 1992, Science 257, 1647-1652). Whole-disk colors (0.41 ??? ?? ??? 0.99 ??m) vary systematically with longitude by about ??5%, but color differences as large as 30% occur locally. Colors vary continuously between end-member materials whose areal distribution correlates with regional topography. Infrared

  1. Numerical investigations of gaseous spherical diffusion flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoustre, Vivien R.

    Spherical diffusion flames have several unique characteristics that make them attractive from experimental and theoretical perspectives. They can be modeled with one spatial dimension, which frees computational resources for detailed chemistry, transport, and radiative loss models. This dissertation is a numerical study of two classes of spherical diffusion flames: hydrogen micro-diffusion flames, emphasizing kinetic extinction, and ethylene diffusion flames, emphasizing sooting limits. The flames were modeled using a one-dimensional, time-accurate diffusion flame code with detailed chemistry and transport. Radiative losses from products were modeled using a detailed absorption/emission statistical narrow band model and the discrete ordinates method. During this work the code has been enhanced by the implementation of a soot formation/oxidation model using the method of moments. Hydrogen micro-diffusion flames were studied experimentally and numerically. The experiments involved gas jets of hydrogen. At their quenching limits, these flames had heat release rates of 0.46 and 0.25 W in air and in oxygen, respectively. These are the weakest flames ever observed. The modeling results confirmed the quenching limits and revealed high rates of reactant leakage near the limits. The effects of the burner size and mass flow rate were predicted to have a significant impact on the flame chemistry and species distribution profiles, favoring kinetic extinction. Spherical ethylene diffusion flames at their sooting limits were also examined. Seventeen normal and inverse spherical flames were considered. Initially sooty, these flames were experimentally observed to reach their sooting limits 2 s after ignition. Structure of the flames at 2 s was considered, with an emphasis on the relationships among local temperature, carbon to oxygen atom ratio (C/O), and scalar dissipation rate. A critical C/O ratio was identified, along with two different sooting limit regimes. Diffusion flames

  2. Violent Folding of a Flame Front in a Flame-Acoustic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petchenko, Arkady; Bychkov, Vitaly; Akkerman, V.'Yacheslav; Eriksson, Lars-Erik

    2006-10-01

    The first direct numerical simulations of violent flame folding because of the flame-acoustic resonance are performed. Flame propagates in a tube from an open end to a closed one. Acoustic amplitude becomes extremely large when the acoustic mode between the flame and the closed tube end comes in resonance with intrinsic flame oscillations. The acoustic oscillations produce an effective acceleration field at the flame front leading to a strong Rayleigh-Taylor instability during every second half period of the oscillations. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability makes the flame front strongly corrugated with elongated jets of heavy fuel mixture penetrating the burnt gas and even with pockets of unburned matter separated from the flame front.

  3. Transitional Gas Jet Diffusion Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Ajay K.; Alammar, Khalid; Gollahalli, S. R.; Griffin, DeVon (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Drop tower experiments were performed to identify buoyancy effects in transitional hydrogen gas jet diffusion flames. Quantitative rainbow schlieren deflectometry was utilized to optically visualize the flame and to measure oxygen concentration in the laminar portion of the flame. Test conditions consisted of atmospheric pressure flames burning in quiescent air. Fuel from a 0.3mm inside diameter tube injector was issued at jet exit Reynolds numbers (Re) of 1300 to 1700. Helium mole percentage in the fuel was varied from 0 to 40%. Significant effects of buoyancy were observed in near field of the flame even-though the fuel jets were momentum-dominated. Results show an increase of breakpoint length in microgravity. Data suggest that transitional flames in earth-gravity at Re<1300 might become laminar in microgravity.

  4. Premixed flames in closed cylindrical tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzener, Philippe; Matalon, Moshe

    2001-09-01

    We consider the propagation of a premixed flame, as a two-dimensional sheet separating unburned gas from burned products, in a closed cylindrical tube. A nonlinear evolution equation, that describes the motion of the flame front as a function of its mean position, is derived. The equation contains a destabilizing term that results from the gas motion induced by thermal expansion and has a memory term associated with vorticity generation. Numerical solutions of this equation indicate that, when diffusion is stabilizing, the flame evolves into a non-planar form whose shape, and its associated symmetry properties, are determined by the Markstein parameter, and by the initial data. In particular, we observe the development of convex axisymmetric or non-axisymmetric flames, tulip flames and cellular flames.

  5. Heat and mass transfer in flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1986-01-01

    Heat- and mass-transfer processes in turbulent diffusion flames are discussed, considering turbulent mixing and the structure of single-phase flames, drop processes in spray flames, and nonluminous and luminous flame radiation. Interactions between turbulence and other phenomena are emphasized, concentrating on past work of the author and his associates. The conserved-scalar formalism, along with the laminar-flamelet approximation, is shown to provide reasonable estimates of the structure of gas flames, with modest levels of empiricism. Extending this approach to spray flames has highlighted the importance of drop/turbulence interactions; e.g., turbulent dispersion of drops, modification of turbulence by drops, etc. Stochastic methods being developed to treat these phenomena are yielding encouraging results.

  6. Infrared space observatory photometry of circumstellar dust in Vega-type systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fajardo-Acosta, S. B.; Stencel, R. E.; Backman, D. E.; Thakur, N.

    1998-01-01

    The ISOPHOT (Infrared Space Observatory Photometry) instrument onboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) was used to obtain 3.6-90 micron photometry of Vega-type systems. Photometric data were calibrated with the ISOPHOT fine calibration source 1 (FCS1). Linear regression was used to derive transformations to make comparisons to ground-based and IRAS photometry systems possible. These transformations were applied to the photometry of 14 main-sequence stars. Details of these results are reported on.

  7. Laminar Jet Diffusion Flame Burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Study of the downlink data from the Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment quickly resulted in discovery of a new mechanism of flame extinction caused by radiation of soot. Scientists found that the flames emit soot sooner than expected. These findings have direct impact on spacecraft fire safety, as well as the theories predicting the formation of soot -- which is a major factor as a pollutant and in the spread of unwanted fires. This sequence, using propane fuel, was taken STS-94, July 4 1997, MET:2/05:30 (approximate). LSP investigated fundamental questions regarding soot, a solid byproduct of the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. The experiment was performed using a laminar jet diffusion flame, which is created by simply flowing fuel-like ethylene or propane -- through a nozzle and igniting it, much like a butane cigarette lighter. The LSP principal investigator was Gerard Faeth, University of Michigan, Arn Arbor. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). LSP results led to a reflight for extended investigations on the STS-107 research mission in January 2003. Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations planned for the International Space Station. (983KB, 9-second MPEG, screen 320 x 240 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300184.html.

  8. The role of shock-flame interactions on flame acceleration in an obstacle laden channel

    SciTech Connect

    Ciccarelli, Gaby; Johansen, Craig T.; Parravani, Michael

    2010-11-15

    Flame acceleration was investigated in an obstructed, square-cross-section channel. Flame acceleration was promoted by an array of top and bottom surface mounted obstacles that were distributed along the entire channel length at an equal spacing corresponding to one channel height. This work is based on a previous investigation of the effects of blockage ratio on the early stage of flame acceleration. This study is focused on the later stage of flame acceleration when compression waves, and eventually a shock wave, form ahead of the flame. The objective of the study is to investigate the effect of obstacle blockage on the rate of flame acceleration and on the final quasi-steady flame-tip velocity. Schlieren photography was used to track the development of the shock-flame complex. It was determined that the interaction between the flame front and the reflected shock waves produced from contact of the lead shock wave with the channel top, channel bottom, and obstacle surfaces govern the late stage of flame acceleration process. The shock-flame interactions produce oscillations in the flame-tip velocity similar to that observed in the early stage of flame acceleration, but only much larger in magnitude. Eventually the flame achieves a globally quasi-steady velocity. For the lowest blockage obstacles, the velocity approaches the speed of sound of the combustion products. The final quasi-steady flame velocity was lower in tests with the higher obstacle blockage. In the quasi-steady propagation regime with the lowest blockage obstacles, burning pockets of gas extended only a few obstacles back from the flame-tip, whereas burning pockets were observed further back in tests with the higher obstacle blockage. (author)

  9. Kinetics of Chemical Reactions in Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeldovich, Y.; Semenov, N.

    1946-01-01

    In part I of the paper the theory of flame propagation is developed along the lines followed by Frank-Kamenetsky and one of the writers. The development of chain processes in flames is considered. A basis is given for the application of the method of stationary concentrations to reactions in flames; reactions with branching chains are analyzed. The case of a diffusion coefficient different from the coefficient of temperature conductivity is considered.

  10. Radiation-affected laminar flame quenching

    SciTech Connect

    Arpaci, V.S.; Tabaczynski, R.J.

    1984-08-01

    A radiation number describing all effects of radiation (emission, absorption, and scattering) near a wall is introduced. The increase in the Peclet number characterizing the flame quench distance and the decrease in flame temperature are shown in terms of this radiation number. Finally, the above considerations have made it possible to qualitatively show that the contribution of radiation to the heat transfer and the laminar flame quenching in small diesel engines can be as much as 35 percent. 27 references.

  11. Flame Suppression Agent, System and Uses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous droplets encapsulated in a flame retardant polymer are useful in suppressing combustion. Upon exposure to a flame, the encapsulated aqueous droplets rupture and vaporize, removing heat and displacing oxygen to retard the combustion process. The polymer encapsulant, through decomposition, may further add free radicals to the combustion atmosphere, thereby further retarding the combustion process. The encapsulated aqueous droplets may be used as a replacement to halon, water mist and dry powder flame suppression systems.

  12. NIR photometry of the flaring Blazar PKS2320-035

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, L.; Recillas, E.; Porras, A.; Chavushyan, V.; Carraminana, A.

    2015-12-01

    Following the report by L. Pacciani (ATEL#8323) on the flaring state of the FSRQ PKS2320-035 a high redshift QSO (z=1.411) also known as BZQJ 2323-0317, associated with the Gamma-ray Source 2GGLJ2323.6-0316, We carried out NIR photometry of this object on December 5th,2015 (MJD2457361.662).

  13. Photometry requested for three "Vestoid" Near-Earth Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, Matthew R.

    2011-01-01

    Dr. Michael David Hicks (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) contacted the AAVSO requesting precision photometry of three solar system objects in support of NASA's DAWN mission to Vesta. These "Vestoids" are near-Earth objects with reflectance spectra similar to Vesta itself, suggesting they may be fragments of that larger body. Broad-band photometry may help constrain object sizes and compositions. The objects are 1981 Midas (1973 EA), 4688 (1980 WF), and 137052 (1998 VO33). Hicks and collaborators are hoping to obtain photometry at the 0.1-magnitude level or better of all three objects during some or all of the first four months of 2011. All are fainter than 16th magnitude throughout their apparitions during this time frame. Multiple exposures will likely be required to reach the required signal to noise for most observers, and 4688 (1980 WF) will likely be beyond the capabilities of most telescopes by early March 2011. The Alert Notice includes ephemerides computed from known orbital parameters computed in intervals of five days beginning 2011 January 07 (JD 2455568). Magnitudes in the tables are V. Observations are requested using Rc filter if possible; V filter observations are also acceptable. We note that since these are solar system objects, they are not included in the AAVSO International Database. Observers are asked to communicate their photometry directly to the PI, and to email Elizabeth Waagen at AAVSO Headquarters so we know that you have participated.

  14. Follow-up photometry of iPTF16geu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.-H.

    2016-10-01

    We report follow-up photometry of the strongly lensed SNIa iPTF16geu (ATel #9603, #9626). We observed iPTF16geu on 2016/10/17 with the 2.5-m Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) + WFC at La Palma, under ~0.9" seeing condition.

  15. Characterization of Transiting Exoplanets by Way of Differential Photometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowley, Michael; Hughes, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a simple activity for plotting and characterizing the light curve from an exoplanet transit event by way of differential photometry analysis. Using free digital imaging software, participants analyse a series of telescope images with the goal of calculating various exoplanet parameters, including size, orbital radius and…

  16. Photometry of Faint and Wide Doubles in Vulpecula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Wilfried; Thuemen, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Images of several double stars in Vulpecula published on the "Double Star Imaging Project" Yahoo Group page suggest magnitude issues compared with the corresponding WDS catalog data per April 2015. Taking additional images with V-filter enabled photometry for these pairs, providing confirming results.

  17. Photometry of Faint and Wide Doubles in Sagitta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Wilfried; Thuemen, Chris

    2016-02-01

    Images of several double stars in Sagitta published on the "Double Star Imaging Project" Yahoo Group page suggest magnitude issues compared with the corresponding WDS catalog data per April 2015. Taking additional images with V-filter enabled photometry for these pairs, provided confirming results.

  18. Photometry and Measurement of Faint and Wide Doubles in Eridanus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Wilfried; Thuemen, Chris

    2015-07-01

    Images of several double stars in Eridanus published on the "Double Star Imaging Project" Yahoo Group page suggest magnitude issues compared with the corresponding WDS catalog data per 2014.12. Taking additional images with V-filter enabled photometry for these pairs with confirming results.

  19. JCMT COADD: UKT14 continuum and photometry data reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, David; Oliveira, Firmin J.; Tilanus, Remo P. J.; Jenness, Tim

    2014-11-01

    COADD was used to reduce photometry and continuum data from the UKT14 instrument on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope in the 1990s. The software can co-add multiple observations and perform sigma clipping and Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistical analysis. Additional information on the software is available in the JCMT Spring 1993 newsletter (large PDF).

  20. The interaction of high-speed turbulence with flames: Global properties and internal flame structure

    SciTech Connect

    Poludnenko, A.Y.; Oran, E.S.

    2010-05-15

    We study the dynamics and properties of a turbulent flame, formed in the presence of subsonic, high-speed, homogeneous, isotropic Kolmogorov-type turbulence in an unconfined system. Direct numerical simulations are performed with Athena-RFX, a massively parallel, fully compressible, high-order, dimensionally unsplit, reactive flow code. A simplified reaction-diffusion model represents a stoichiometric H{sub 2}-air mixture. The system being modeled represents turbulent combustion with the Damkoehler number Da=0.05 and with the turbulent velocity at the energy injection scale 30 times larger than the laminar flame speed. The simulations show that flame interaction with high-speed turbulence forms a steadily propagating turbulent flame with a flame brush width approximately twice the energy injection scale and a speed four times the laminar flame speed. A method for reconstructing the internal flame structure is described and used to show that the turbulent flame consists of tightly folded flamelets. The reaction zone structure of these is virtually identical to that of the planar laminar flame, while the preheat zone is broadened by approximately a factor of two. Consequently, the system evolution represents turbulent combustion in the thin reaction zone regime. The turbulent cascade fails to penetrate the internal flame structure, and thus the action of small-scale turbulence is suppressed throughout most of the flame. Finally, our results suggest that for stoichiometric H{sub 2}-air mixtures, any substantial flame broadening by the action of turbulence cannot be expected in all subsonic regimes. (author)

  1. Flow/Soot-Formation Interactions in Nonbuoyant Laminar Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z.; Lin, K.-C.; Sunderland, P. B.; Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.

    2002-01-01

    This is the final report of a research program considering interactions between flow and soot properties within laminar diffusion flames. Laminar diffusion flames were considered because they provide model flame systems that are far more tractable for theoretical and experimental studies than more practical turbulent diffusion flames. In particular, understanding the transport and chemical reaction processes of laminar flames is a necessary precursor to understanding these processes in practical turbulent flames and many aspects of laminar diffusion flames have direct relevance to turbulent diffusion flames through application of the widely recognized laminar flamelet concept of turbulent diffusion flames. The investigation was divided into three phases, considering the shapes of nonbuoyant round laminar jet diffusion flames in still air, the shapes of nonbuoyant round laminar jet diffusion flames in coflowing air, and the hydrodynamic suppression of soot formation in laminar diffusion flames.

  2. Conditions for a split diffusion flame

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzberg, J.R.

    1997-05-01

    An unusual phenomenon has been observed in a methane jet diffusion flame subjected to axial acoustic forcing. At specific excitation frequencies and amplitudes, the driven flame splits into a central jet and one or two side jets. The splitting is accompanied by a partial detachment of the flame from the nozzle exit, a shortening of the flame by a factor of 2, and a change from the common yellow color of soot radiation to a clear blue flame. Such a phenomenon may be useful for the control of soot production or product species. The splitting is intermittent in time, bifurcating between the split flame and an ordinary single jet diffusion flame. The experiment consists of an unconfined axisymmetric methane jet formed by a short length of 0.4 cm diameter pipe. The pipe is connected to a large plenum surrounding a bass reflex loudspeaker enclosure that provides the excitation. Conditions producing split and bifurcated flames are presented. The drive frequencies required to cause bifurcation correspond to the first two peaks in the system`s frequency response curve. Bifurcating behavior was observed at a wide range of flow rates, ranging from very small flames of Reynolds number 240 up to turbulent lift-off, at Re = 1,000, based on the inner pipe diameter. It was not sensitive to nozzle length, but the details of the nozzle tip, such as orifice or pipe geometry, can affect the frequency range.

  3. Mechanisms and enhancement of flame stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Law, C.K.

    1993-01-01

    During the reporting period, useful contributions have been made in understanding the structure of laminar premixed and diffusion flames, with emphasis on the influence of aerodynamics and chemical kinetics. These contributions include (1) derivation of the missing closure condition for the activation energy asymptotic analysis of premixed flames, (2) identification of a dual extinction mode for radiation-affected flames, (3) formulation of a unified theory of fundamental flammability limits, and (4) demonstration that flame stabilization can be achieved in the absence of heat loss. These investigations have been conducted via experimental, analytical and computational approaches, with strong coupling between the individual components.

  4. Gravitational Effects on Cellular Flame Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunsky, C. M.; Fernandez-Pello, A. C.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted of the effect of gravity on the structure of downwardly propagating, cellular premixed propane-oxygen-nitrogen flames anchored on a water-cooled porous-plug burner. The flame is subjected to microgravity conditions in the NASA Lewis 2.2-second drop tower, and flame characteristics are recorded on high-speed film. These are compared to flames at normal gravity conditions with the same equivalence ratio, dilution index, mixture flow rate, and ambient pressure. The results show that the cellular instability band, which is located in the rich mixture region, changes little under the absence of gravity. Lifted normal-gravity flames near the cellular/lifted limits, however, are observed to become cellular when gravity is reduced. Observations of a transient cell growth period following ignition point to heat loss as being an important mechanism in the overall flame stability, dominating the stabilizing effect of buoyancy for these downwardly-propagating burner-anchored flames. The pulsations that are observed in the plume and diffusion flame generated downstream of the premixed flame in the fuel rich cases disappear in microgravity, verifying that these fluctuations are gravity related.

  5. Unsteady planar diffusion flames: Ignition, travel, burnout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fendell, F.; Wu, F.

    1995-01-01

    In microgravity, a thin planar diffusion flame is created and thenceforth travels so that the flame is situated at all times at an interface at which the hydrogen and oxygen meet in stoichiometric proportion. If the initial amount of hydrogen is deficient relative to the initial amount of oxygen, then the planar flame will travel further and further into the half volume initially containing hydrogen, until the hydrogen is (virtually) fully depleted. Of course, when the amount of residual hydrogen becomes small, the diffusion flame is neither vigorous nor thin; in practice, the flame is extinguished before the hydrogen is fully depleted, owing to the finite rate of the actual chemical-kinetic mechanism. The rate of travel of the hydrogen-air diffusion flame is much slower than the rate of laminar flame propagation through a hydrogen-air mixture. This slow travel facilitates diagnostic detection of the flame position as a function of time, but the slow travel also means that the time to burnout (extinction) probably far exceeds the testing time (typically, a few seconds) available in earth-sited facilities for microgravity-environment experiments. We undertake an analysis to predict (1) the position and temperature of the diffusion flame as a function of time, (2) the time at which extinction of the diffusion flame occurs, and (3) the thickness of quench layers formed on side walls (i.e., on lateral boundaries, with normal vectors parallel to the diffusion-flame plane), and whether, prior to extinction, water vapor formed by burning will condense on these cold walls.

  6. Flame acceleration studies in the MINIFLAME facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.; Sherman, M.P.; Benedick, W.B.

    1989-07-01

    Flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) studies have been conducted in a 19.4-cm high, 14.5-cm wide, and 2. 242-m long channel (MINIFLAME) that is a 1:12.6 scale model of the 136-m{sup 3} FLAME facility. Tests were conducted with two levels of hydrogen concentration -- 20% and 30%, with and without obstacles in the channel, and with three levels of transverse top venting -- 0%, 13%, and 50%. The flame acceleration results in MINIFLAME are qualitatively similar to those in FLAME; however, the small-scale results are more benign quantitatively. The results show that insufficient venting, 13% venting in this case, can promote flame acceleration due to turbulence produced by the flow through the vents in smooth channels. However, with obstacle-generated turbulence in the channel, 13% top venting was found to be beneficial. Flame acceleration resulting in DDT was shown to occur in as little as 35 liters of mixture. Comparison of the DDT data with obstacles in MINIFLAME and FLAME supports d/{lambda} scaling of DDT, where {lambda} is the detonation cell width of the mixture and d is the characteristic open diameter of the channel. In the MINIFLAME and FLAME tests, DDT occurred for d/{lambda} greater than approximately three. Comparison with other experiments shows that the value of d/{lambda} for DDT is not constant but depends on the obstacle type, spacing, and channel geometry. The comparison of MINIFLAME and FLAME experiments extends the use of d/{lambda} scaling to different geometries and larger scales than previous studies. Small-scale-model testing of flame acceleration and DDT with the same combustible mixture as the full-scale prototype underpredicts flame speeds, overpressures, and the possibility of DDT. 18 refs., 16 figs.

  7. Tulip flames: changes in shape of premixed flames propagating in closed tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn-Rankin, D.; Sawyer, R. F.

    The experimental results that are the subject of this communication provide high-speed schlieren images of the closed-tube flame shape that has come to be known as the tulip flame. The schlieren images, along with in-chamber pressure records, help demonstrate the effects of chamber length, equivalence ratio, and igniter geometry on formation of the tulip flame. The pressure/time records show distinct features which correlate with flame shape changes during the transition to tulip. The measurements indicate that the basic tulip flame formation is a robust phenomenon that depends on little except the overall geometry of the combustion vessel.

  8. Effect of Reynolds Number in Turbulent-Flow Range on Flame Speeds of Bunsen Burner Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bollinger, Lowell M; Williams, David T

    1949-01-01

    The effect of flow conditions on the geometry of the turbulent Bunsen flame was investigated. Turbulent flame speed is defined in terms of flame geometry and data are presented showing the effect of Reynolds number of flow in the range of 3000 to 35,000 on flame speed for burner diameters from 1/4 to 1 1/8 inches and three fuels -- acetylene, ethylene, and propane. The normal flame speed of an explosive mixture was shown to be an important factor in determining its turbulent flame speed, and it was deduced from the data that turbulent flame speed is a function of both the Reynolds number of the turbulent flow in the burner tube and of the tube diameter.

  9. 30 CFR 14.20 - Flame resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... test determined by MSHA to be equivalent under 30 CFR §§ 6.20 and 14.4(e). ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Flame resistance. 14.20 Section 14.20 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE APPROVAL OF FLAME-RESISTANT CONVEYOR BELTS Technical...

  10. 30 CFR 14.20 - Flame resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... test determined by MSHA to be equivalent under 30 CFR §§ 6.20 and 14.4(e). ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Flame resistance. 14.20 Section 14.20 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE APPROVAL OF FLAME-RESISTANT CONVEYOR BELTS Technical...

  11. 30 CFR 14.20 - Flame resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... test determined by MSHA to be equivalent under 30 CFR §§ 6.20 and 14.4(e). ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flame resistance. 14.20 Section 14.20 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE APPROVAL OF FLAME-RESISTANT CONVEYOR BELTS Technical...

  12. 30 CFR 14.20 - Flame resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... test determined by MSHA to be equivalent under 30 CFR §§ 6.20 and 14.4(e). ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Flame resistance. 14.20 Section 14.20 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE APPROVAL OF FLAME-RESISTANT CONVEYOR BELTS Technical...

  13. 30 CFR 14.20 - Flame resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... test determined by MSHA to be equivalent under 30 CFR §§ 6.20 and 14.4(e). ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Flame resistance. 14.20 Section 14.20 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE APPROVAL OF FLAME-RESISTANT CONVEYOR BELTS Technical...

  14. Development of PIV for Microgravity Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.; Wernet, Mark P.; Yanis, William; Urban, David L.; Sunderland, Peter B.

    2003-01-01

    Results are presented from the application of Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV) to the overfire region of a laminar gas jet diffusion flame in normal gravity. A methane flame burning in air at 0.98 bar was considered. The apparatus demonstrated here is packaged in a drop rig designed for use in the 2.2 second drop tower.

  15. Analysis of Stabilization Mechanisms in Lifted Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Martinez, S.; Kronenburg, A.

    2009-12-01

    Flame stabilization and the mechanisms that govern the dynamics at the flame base have been subject to numerous studies in recent years. Recent results using a combined Large Eddy Simulation-Conditional Moment Closure (LES-CMC) approach to model the turbulent flow field and the turbulence-chemistry interactions has been successful in predicting flame ignition and stabilization by auto-ignition, but LES-CMCs capability of the accurate modelling of the competition between turbulent quenching and laminar and turbulent flame propagation at the anchor point has not been resolved. This paper will consolidate LES-CMC results by analysing a wide range of lifted flame geometries with different prevailing stabilization mechanisms. The simulations allow a clear distinction of the prevailing stabilization mechanisms for the different flames, LES-CMC accurately predicts the competition between turbulence and chemistry during the auto-ignition process, however, the dynamics of the extinction process and turbulent flame propagation are not well captured. The averaging process inherent in the CMC methods does not allow for an instant response of the transported conditionally averaged reactive species to the changes in the flow conditions and any response of the scalars will therefore be delayed. Stationary or quasi-stationary conditions, however, can be well predicted for all flame configurations.

  16. Active control for turbulent premixed flame simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Lijewski, Michael J.

    2004-03-26

    Many turbulent premixed flames of practical interest are statistically stationary. They occur in combustors that have anchoring mechanisms to prevent blow-off and flashback. The stabilization devices often introduce a level of geometric complexity that is prohibitive for detailed computational studies of turbulent flame dynamics. As a result, typical detailed simulations are performed in simplified model configurations such as decaying isotropic turbulence or inflowing turbulence. In these configurations, the turbulence seen by the flame either decays or, in the latter case, increases as the flame accelerates toward the turbulent inflow. This limits the duration of the eddy evolutions experienced by the flame at a given level of turbulent intensity, so that statistically valid observations cannot be made. In this paper, we apply a feedback control to computationally stabilize an otherwise unstable turbulent premixed flame in two dimensions. For the simulations, we specify turbulent in flow conditions and dynamically adjust the integrated fueling rate to control the mean location of the flame in the domain. We outline the numerical procedure, and illustrate the behavior of the control algorithm. We use the simulations to study the propagation and the local chemical variability of turbulent flame chemistry.

  17. Simple Flame Test Techniques Using Cotton Swabs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanger, Michael J.; Phelps, Amy J.; Banks, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    Three alternative methods for performing flame tests using cheaply and easily available cotton swabs are described. These flame tests are useful for chemical demonstrations or laboratory experiments because they are quick and easy to perform with easy cleanup and disposal methods.

  18. Flaming in CMC: Prometheus' Fire or Inferno's?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrams, Zsuzsanna Ittzes

    2003-01-01

    Reports on a descriptive study with 75 intermediate college learners of German participating in two sessions of synchronous computer mediated communication during the course of a semester that investigated students' flaming behavior--aggressive interpersonal language and rude behavior. Shows that not only is flaming a very infrequent occurrence,…

  19. Jet flames of a refuse derived fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Roman; Kupka, Tomasz; Zajac, Krzysztof

    2009-04-15

    This paper is concerned with combustion of a refuse derived fuel in a small-scale flame. The objective is to provide a direct comparison of the RDF flame properties with properties of pulverized coal flames fired under similar boundary conditions. Measurements of temperature, gas composition (O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CO, NO) and burnout have demonstrated fundamental differences between the coal flames and the RDF flames. The pulverized coals ignite in the close vicinity of the burner and most of the combustion is completed within the first 300 ms. Despite the high volatile content of the RDF, its combustion extends far into the furnace and after 1.8 s residence time only a 94% burnout has been achieved. This effect has been attributed not only to the larger particle size of fluffy RDF particles but also to differences in RDF volatiles if compared to coal volatiles. Substantial amounts of oily tars have been observed in the RDF flames even though the flame temperatures exceeded 1300 C. The presence of these tars has enhanced the slagging propensity of RDF flames and rapidly growing deposits of high carbon content have been observed. (author)

  20. Public health implications of components of plastics manufacture. Flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Pearce, E M; Liepins, R

    1975-06-01

    The four processes involved in the flammability of materials are described and related to the various flame retardance mechanisms that may operate. Following this the four practical approaches used in improving flame retardance of materials are described. Each approach is illustrated with a number of typical examples of flame retardants or synthetic procedures used. This overview of flammability, flame retardance, and flame retardants used is followed by a more detailed examination of most of the plastics manufactured in the United States during 1973, their consumption patterns, and the primary types of flame retardants used in the flame retardance of the most used plastics. The main types of flame retardants are illustrated with a number of typical commercial examples. Statistical data on flame retardant market size, flame retardant growth in plastics, and price ranges of common flame retardants are presented.

  1. Public health implications of components of plastics manufacture. Flame retardants.

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, E M; Liepins, R

    1975-01-01

    The four processes involved in the flammability of materials are described and related to the various flame retardance mechanisms that may operate. Following this the four practical approaches used in improving flame retardance of materials are described. Each approach is illustrated with a number of typical examples of flame retardants or synthetic procedures used. This overview of flammability, flame retardance, and flame retardants used is followed by a more detailed examination of most of the plastics manufactured in the United States during 1973, their consumption patterns, and the primary types of flame retardants used in the flame retardance of the most used plastics. The main types of flame retardants are illustrated with a number of typical commercial examples. Statistical data on flame retardant market size, flame retardant growth in plastics, and price ranges of common flame retardants are presented. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. PMID:1175568

  2. Propagation of a Free Flame in a Turbulent Gas Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickelsen, William R; Ernstein, Norman E

    1956-01-01

    Effective flame speeds of free turbulent flames were measured by photographic, ionization-gap, and photomultiplier-tube methods, and were found to have a statistical distribution attributed to the nature of the turbulent field. The effective turbulent flame speeds for the free flame were less than those previously measured for flames stabilized on nozzle burners, Bunsen burners, and bluff bodies. The statistical spread of the effective turbulent flame speeds was markedly wider in the lean and rich fuel-air-ratio regions, which might be attributed to the greater sensitivity of laminar flame speed to flame temperature in those regions. Values calculated from the turbulent free-flame-speed analysis proposed by Tucker apparently form upper limits for the statistical spread of free-flame-speed data. Hot-wire anemometer measurements of the longitudinal velocity fluctuation intensity and longitudinal correlation coefficient were made and were employed in the comparison of data and in the theoretical calculation of turbulent flame speed.

  3. On adiabatic stabilization and geometry of Bunsen flames

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, C.J.; Sung, C.J.; Law, C.K.

    1994-12-31

    Two aspects of stretched flame dynamics are investigated via the model problem of the stabilization and geometry of Bunsen flames. Specifically, the possibility of stabilizing a Bunsen flame without heat loss to the burner rim is experimentally investigated by examining the temperature of the rim, the temperature gradient between the rim and the flame base, and the standoff distance of the flame base in relation to the flame thickness. Results show that, while heat loss is still the dominant stabilization mechanism for flames in uniform flows and for strong flames in parabolic flow, adiabatic stabilization and, subsequently, blowoff are indeed possible for weak flames in parabolic flows. The adiabatically stabilized flame is then modeled by using the scalar field formulation and by allowing for the effects of curvature and aerodynamic straining on the local flame speed. The calculated flame configuration agrees well with the experiment for the adiabatically stabilized flame but not for the nonadiabatic flame. Results further show that active modification of the flame curvature is the dominant cause for the flame to maintain adiabatic stabilization. Implications of the present results on turbulent flame modeling are discussed.

  4. Rayleigh-Taylor Unstable Flames -- Fast or Faster?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, E. P.

    2015-04-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable flames play a key role in the explosions of supernovae Ia. However, the dynamics of these flames are still not well understood. RT unstable flames are affected by both the RT instability of the flame front and by RT-generated turbulence. The coexistence of these factors complicates the choice of flame speed subgrid models for full-star Type Ia simulations. Both processes can stretch and wrinkle the flame surface, increasing its area and, therefore, the burning rate. In past research, subgrid models have been based on either the RT instability or turbulence setting the flame speed. We evaluate both models, checking their assumptions and their ability to correctly predict the turbulent flame speed. Specifically, we analyze a large parameter study of 3D direct numerical simulations of RT unstable model flames. This study varies both the simulation domain width and the gravity in order to probe a wide range of flame behaviors. We show that RT unstable flames are different from traditional turbulent flames: they are thinner rather than thicker when turbulence is stronger. We also show that none of the several different types of turbulent flame speed models accurately predicts measured flame speeds. In addition, we find that the RT flame speed model only correctly predicts the measured flame speed in a certain parameter regime. Finally, we propose that the formation of cusps may be the factor causing the flame to propagate more quickly than predicted by the RT model.

  5. Propagation Regime of Iron Dust Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Francois-David; Goroshin, Samuel; Higgins, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    A flame propagating through an iron-dust mixture can propagate in two asymptotic regimes. When the characteristic time of heat transfer between particles is much smaller than the characteristic time of particle combustion, the flame propagates in the continuum regime where the heat released by reacting particles can be modelled as a space-averaged function. In contrast, when the characteristic time of heat transfer is much larger than the particle reaction time, the flame can no longer be treated as a continuum due to dominating effects associated with the discrete nature of the particle reaction. The discrete regime is characterized by weak dependence of the flame speed on the oxygen concentration compared to the continuum regime. The discrete regime is observed in flames propagating through an iron dust cloud within a gas mixture containing xenon, while the continuum regime is obtained when xenon is substituted with helium.

  6. Flame propagation in partially premixed conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruetsch, G.; Poinsot, T.; Veynante, D.; Trouvé, A.

    1996-11-01

    Turbulent flame propagation is studied under inhomogenously premixed conditions via data from direct numerical simulations. Departures from the premixed case are studied using four different configurations, ranging from one dimensional unsteady flames to turbulent three-dimensional simulations. Simulations are performed in these cases with various values of the mean equivalence ratio, fluctuations about the mean equivlalence ratio, correlation length scales, and probability denisty functions of the mixture composition. Propagation characteristics are described in terms of the flamelet approach, where the the main contribution of partial premixing on flame propagation is due to flame wrinkling relative to modification of the mean flamelet structure. This behavior is consistent over a broad range of conditions, with the exception being extreme departures from stoichiometric conditions where flamability limits are exceeded and flame quenching is observed.

  7. Outwardly Propagating Flames at Elevated Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, C. K.; Rozenchan, G.; Tse, S. D.; Zhu, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    Spherical, outwardly-propagating flames of CH4-O2-inert and H2-O2-inert mixtures were experimentally studied in a high pressure apparatus. Stretch-free flame speeds and Markstein lengths were extracted for a wide range of pressures and equivalence ratios for spherically-symmetric, smooth flamefronts and compared to numerical computations with detailed chemistry and transport, as well as existing data in the literature. Wrinkle development was examined for propagating flames that were unstable under our experimental conditions. Hydrodynamic cells developed for most H2-air and CH4-air flames at elevated pressures, while thermal-diffusive instabilities were also observed for lean and near-stoichiometric hydrogen flames at pressures above atmospheric. Strategies in suppressing or delaying the onset of cell formation have been assessed. Buoyancy effects affected sufficiently off-stoichiometric CH4 mixtures at high pressures.

  8. Edge Diffusion Flame Propagation and Stabilization Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, Viswanath R.

    2004-01-01

    In most practical combustion systems or fires, fuel and air are initially unmixed, thus forming diffusion flames. As a result of flame-surface interactions, the diffusion flame often forms an edge, which may attach to burner walls, spread over condensed fuel surfaces, jump to another location through the fuel-air mixture formed, or extinguish by destabilization (blowoff). Flame holding in combustors is necessary to achieve design performance and safe operation of the system. Fires aboard spacecraft behave differently from those on Earth because of the absence of buoyancy in microgravity. This ongoing in-house flame-stability research at the NASA Glenn Research Center is important in spacecraft fire safety and Earth-bound combustion systems.

  9. Interaction Between Flames and Electric Fields Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Zeng-Guang; Hegde, Uday

    2003-01-01

    The interaction between flames and electric fields has long been an interesting research subject that has theoretical importance as well as practical significance. Many of the reactions in a flame follow an ionic pathway: that is, positive and negative ions are formed during the intermediate steps of the reaction. When an external electric field is applied, the ions move according to the electric force (the Coulomb force) exerted on them. The motion of the ions modifies the chemistry because the reacting species are altered, it changes the velocity field of the flame, and it alters the electric field distribution. As a result, the flame will change its shape and location to meet all thermal, chemical, and electrical constraints. In normal gravity, the strong buoyant effect often makes the flame multidimensional and, thus, hinders the detailed study of the problem.

  10. The Structure and Stability of Laminar Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckmaster, John

    1993-01-01

    This review paper on the structure and stability of laminar flames considers such phenomena as heterogeneous mixtures, acoustic instabilities, flame balls and related phenomena, radiation effects, the iodate oxidation of arsenous acid and 'liquid flame fronts', approximate kinetic mechanisms and asymptotic approximations, and tribrachial or triple flames. The topics examined here indicate three themes that may play an important role in laminar flame theory in the coming years: microgravity experiments, kinetic modeling, and turbulence modeling. In the discussion of microgravity experiments it is pointed out that access to drop towers, the Space Shuttle and, in due course, the Space Station Freedom will encourage the development of experiments well designed to isolate the fundamental physics of combustion.

  11. Particle Cloud Flames in Acoustic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berlad, A. L.; Tangirala, V.; Ross, H.; Facca, L.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on a study of flames supported by clouds of particles suspended in air, at pressures about 100 times lower than normal. In the experiment, an acoustic driver (4-in speaker) placed at one end of a closed tube, 0.75-m long and 0.05 m in diameter, disperses a cloud of lycopodium particles during a 0.5-sec powerful acoustic burst. Properties of the particle cloud and the flame were recorded by high-speed motion pictures and optical transmission detectors. Novel flame structures were observed, which owe their features to partial confinement, which encourages flame-acoustic interactions, segregation of particle clouds into laminae, and penetration of the flame's radiative flux density into the unburned particle-cloud regimes. Results of these experiments imply that, for particles in confined spaces, uncontrolled fire and explosion may be a threat even if the Phi(0) values are below some apparent lean limit.

  12. Flame-vortex interactions imaged in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driscoll, James F.; Dahm, Werner J. A.; Sichel, Martin

    1995-01-01

    The scientific objective is to obtain high quality color-enhanced digital images of a vortex exerting aerodynamic strain on premixed and nonpremixed flames with the complicating effects of buoyancy removed. The images will provide universal (buoyancy free) scaling relations that are required to improve several types of models of turbulent combustion, including KIVA-3, discrete vortex, and large-eddy simulations. The images will be used to help quantify several source terms in the models, including those due to flame stretch, flame-generated vorticity, flame curvature, and preferential diffusion, for a range of vortex sizes and flame conditions. The experiment is an ideal way to study turbulence-chemistry interactions and isolate the effect of vortices of different sizes and strengths in a repeatable manner. A parallel computational effort is being conducted which considers full chemistry and preferential diffusion.

  13. Laminar flame propagation in a stratified charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ra, Youngchul

    The propagation of laminar flame from a rich or stoichiometric mixture to a lean mixture in a stratified methane-air charge was investigated experimentally and numerically. Emphasis was on the understanding of the flame behavior in the transition region; in particular, on the mechanism of burning velocity enhancement in this region. In the experimental setup, mixtures of two different equivalence ratios were separated by a soap bubble in a spherical constant volume combustion vessel. The richer mixture inside the bubble was ignited by a focused laser beam. The flame development was observed by Schlieren technique and flame speeds were measured by heat release analysis of the pressure data. An one-dimensional, time- dependant numerical simulation of the flame propagation in a charge with step-stratification was used to interpret the experimental results. Both the experimental and numerical studies showed that the instantaneous flame speed depended on the previous flame history. Thus a `strong' (with mixture equivalence ratio close to stoichiometric) flame can sustain propagation into finite regions of substantially lean equivalence ratio. Both thermal and chemical effects were crucial for explaining the mechanism of the flame speed enhancement in the transition period. Because of the presence of this `back- support' effect, the usual concept of specifying the burning velocity as a function of the end gas state is inadequate for a stratified charge. A simple correlation for instantaneous flame velocity based on the local burned gas temperature is developed. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253- 1690.)

  14. J, H, K photometry of 433 Eros and other asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, C. R.; Morrison, D.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for IR photometry of nine bright asteroids, including 433 Eros, which was conducted in the J, H, K, and (for Eros) L bands with an InSb photometer on the 1.3-m Kitt Peak telescope. It is found that the J-H and H-K color indices of all nine asteroids are slightly redder than those of the sun and that three C-type objects are somewhat redder in the same color indices than four S-types and an E-type. Eros is shown to have an unusually red J-K index; the shape of its IR spectral reflectance curve is attributed in part to the presence of the weak 2-micron pyroxene absorption band in the spectrum. The results show that JHK photometry is less diagnostic of asteroidal composition than higher-resolution IR spectrophotometry.

  15. Copernicus spectra and infrared photometry of 42 Orionis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. M.; Snow, T. P., Jr.; Gehrz, R. D.; Hackwell, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The Orion sword star 42 Ori is embedded in a nebula north of and separated from the Orion nebula. The B1 V star is probably normal. Other members of the multiple remain poorly defined, and the nebula may exhibit some peculiarities that may depend on them. Copernicus ultraviolet spectra of the star are described here, especially in the form of tables of wavelength identifications. The properties of the interstellar material in the line of sight are also discussed. Infrared photometry is presented which suggests that the ratio of total to selective extinction ranges from 3 to 3.5 for the interstellar matter in the direction of 42 Ori. The IR photometry provides no evidence for companion stellar or circumstellar components.

  16. Absolute stellar photometry on moderate-resolution FPA images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, T.C.

    2009-01-01

    An extensive database of star (and Moon) images has been collected by the ground-based RObotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) as part of the US Geological Survey program for lunar calibration. The stellar data are used to derive nightly atmospheric corrections for the observations from extinction measurements, and absolute calibration of the ROLO sensors is based on observations of Vega and published reference flux and spectrum data. The ROLO telescopes were designed for imaging the Moon at moderate resolution, thus imposing some limitations for the stellar photometry. Attaining accurate stellar photometry with the ROLO image data has required development of specialized processing techniques. A key consideration is consistency in discriminating the star core signal from the off-axis point spread function. The analysis and processing methods applied to the ROLO stellar image database are described. ?? 2009 BIPM and IOP Publishing Ltd.

  17. An Aperture Photometry Pipeline for K2 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzasi, Derek L.; Carboneau, Lindsey; Lezcano, Andy; Vydra, Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    As part of an ongoing research program with undergraduate students at Florida Gulf Coast University, we have constructed an aperture photometry pipeline for K2 data. The pipeline performs dynamic automated aperture mask definition for all targets in the K2 fields, followed by aperture photometry and detrending. Our pipeline is currently used to support a number of projects, including studies of stellar rotation and activity, red giant asteroseismology, gyrochronology, and exoplanet searches. In addition, output is used to support an undergraduate class on exoplanets aimed at a student audience of both majors and non-majors. The pipeline is designed for both batch and single-target use, and is easily extensible to data from other missions, and pipeline output is available to the community. This paper will describe our pipeline and its capabilities and illustrate the quality of the results, drawing on all of the applications for which it is currently used.

  18. The flaming gypsy skirt injury.

    PubMed

    Leong, S C L; Emecheta, I E; James, M I

    2007-01-01

    On review of admissions over a 12-month period, we noted a significant number of women presenting with gypsy skirt burns. We describe all six cases to highlight the unique distribution of the wounds and the circumstances in which the accidents occurred. Four skirts were ignited by open fire heaters: two skirts ignited whilst the women were standing nearby, distracted with a telephone conversation; one brushed over the flame as she was walking past the heater; other whilst dancing in the lounge. One skirt was ignited by decorative candles placed on the floor during a social gathering. Another skirt was set alight by cigarette ember, whilst smoking in the toilet. Percentage surface area burned, estimated according to the rule of nines, showed that gypsy skirt burns were significant ranging from 7 to 14% total body surface area (TBSA) and averaging 9% TBSA. Two patients required allogenic split-skin grafts. Common sense care with proximity to naked flame is all that is needed to prevent this injury. PMID:17081546

  19. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey. XVI. The optical and NIR extinction laws in 30 Doradus and the photometric determination of the effective temperatures of OB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maíz Apellániz, J.; Evans, C. J.; Barbá, R. H.; Gräfener, G.; Bestenlehner, J. M.; Crowther, P. A.; García, M.; Herrero, A.; Sana, H.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Taylor, W. D.; van Loon, J. Th.; Vink, J. S.; Walborn, N. R.

    2014-04-01

    Context. The commonly used extinction laws of Cardelli et al. (1989, ApJ, 345, 245) have limitations that, among other issues, hamper the determination of the effective temperatures of O and early B stars from optical and near-infrared (NIR) photometry. Aims: We aim to develop a new family of extinction laws for 30 Doradus, check their general applicability within that region and elsewhere, and apply them to test the feasibility of using optical and NIR photometry to determine the effective temperature of OB stars. Methods: We use spectroscopy and NIR photometry from the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey and optical photometry from HST/WFC3 of 30 Doradus and we analyze them with the software code CHORIZOS using different assumptions, such as the family of extinction laws. Results: We derive a new family of optical and NIR extinction laws for 30 Doradus and confirm its applicability to extinguished Galactic O-type systems. We conclude that by using the new extinction laws it is possible to measure the effective temperatures of OB stars with moderate uncertainties and only a small bias, at least up to E(4405-5495) ~ 1.5 mag. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. Flame Structure and Emissions of Strongly-Pulsed Turbulent Diffusion Flames with Swirl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ying-Hao

    This work studies the turbulent flame structure, the reaction-zone structure and the exhaust emissions of strongly-pulsed, non-premixed flames with co-flow swirl. The fuel injection is controlled by strongly-pulsing the fuel flow by a fast-response solenoid valve such that the fuel flow is completely shut off between pulses. This control strategy allows the fuel injection to be controlled over a wide range of operating conditions, allowing the flame structure to range from isolated fully-modulated puffs to interacting puffs to steady flames. The swirl level is controlled by varying the ratio of the volumetric flow rate of the tangential air to that of the axial air. For strongly-pulsed flames, both with and without swirl, the flame geometry is strongly impacted by the injection time. Flames appear to exhibit compact, puff-like structures for short injection times, while elongated flames, similar in behaviors to steady flames, occur for long injection times. The flames with swirl are found to be shorter for the same fuel injection conditions. The separation/interaction level between flame puffs in these flames is essentially governed by the jet-off time. The separation between flame puffs decreases as swirl is imposed, consistent with the decrease in flame puff celerity due to swirl. The decreased flame length and flame puff celerity are consistent with an increased rate of air entrainment due to swirl. The highest levels of CO emissions are generally found for compact, isolated flame puffs, consistent with the rapid quenching due to rapid dilution with excess air. The imposition of swirl generally results in a decrease in CO levels, suggesting more rapid and complete fuel/air mixing by imposing swirl in the co-flow stream. The levels of NO emissions for most cases are generally below the steady-flame value. The NO levels become comparable to the steady-flame value for sufficiently short jet-off time. The swirled co-flow air can, in some cases, increase the NO

  1. One Percent Strömvil Photometry in M 67

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, A. G. D.; Boyle, R. P.; Janusz, R.

    2005-05-01

    The Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope on Mt. Graham is being used in a program of CCD photometry of open and globular clusters. We are using the Ströomvil System (Straižys et al. 1996), a combination of the Strömgren and Vilnius Systems. This system allows stars to be classified as to temperature, surface gravity, metallicity and reddening from the photometric measures alone. However, to make accurate estimates of the stellar parameters the photometry should be accurate to 1 or 1.5 percent. In our initial runs on the VATT we did not achieve this accuracy. The problem turned out to be scattered light in the telescope and this has now been reduced so we can do accurate photometry. Boyle has written a routine in IRAF which allows us to correct the flats for any differences. We take rotated frames and also frames which are offset in position by one third of a frame, east-west and north-south. Measures of the offset stars give us the corrections that need to be made to the flat. Robert Janusz has written a program, the CommandLog, which allows us to paste IRAF commands in the correct order to reduce measures made on a given observing run. There is an automatic version where one can test various parameters and get a set of solutions. Now we have a set of Strömvil frames in the open cluster, M 67 and we compare our color-magnitude diagram with those of BATC (Fan et al. 1996) and Vilnius (Boyle et al. 1998). A preliminary report of the M 67 photometry will be found in Laugalys et al. (2004). Here we report on a selected set of stars in the M 67 frames, those with errors 1 percent or less.

  2. On the extraction of laminar flame speed and Markstein length from outwardly propagating spherical flames

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zheng

    2011-02-15

    Large discrepancies among the laminar flame speeds and Markstein lengths of methane/air mixtures measured by different researchers using the same constant-pressure spherical flame method are observed. As an effort to reduce these discrepancies, one linear model (LM, the stretched flame speed changes linearly with the stretch rate) and two non-linear models (NM I and NM II, the stretched flame speed changes non-linearly with the stretch rate) for extracting the laminar flame speed and Markstein length from propagating spherical flames are investigated. The accuracy and performance of the LM, NM I, and NM II are found to strongly depend on the Lewis number. It is demonstrated that NM I is the most accurate for mixtures with large Lewis number (positive Markstein length) while NM II is the most accurate for mixtures with small Lewis number (negative Markstein length). Therefore, in order to get accurate laminar flame speed and Markstein length from spherical flame experiments, different non-linear models should be used for different mixtures. The validity of the theoretical results is further demonstrated by numerical and experimental studies. The results of this study can be used directly in spherical flame experiments measuring the laminar flame speed and Markstein length. (author)

  3. Scaling of turbulent flame speed for expanding flames with Markstein diffusion considerations.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Wu, Fujia; Law, Chung K

    2013-09-01

    In this paper we clarify the role of Markstein diffusivity, which is the product of the planar laminar flame speed and the Markstein length, on the turbulent flame speed and its scaling, based on experimental measurements on constant-pressure expanding turbulent flames. Turbulent flame propagation data are presented for premixed flames of mixtures of hydrogen, methane, ethylene, n-butane, and dimethyl ether with air, in near-isotropic turbulence in a dual-chamber, fan-stirred vessel. For each individual fuel-air mixture presented in this work and the recently published iso-octane data from Leeds, normalized turbulent flame speed data of individual fuel-air mixtures approximately follow a Re_{T,f}^{0.5} scaling, for which the average radius is the length scale and thermal diffusivity is the transport property of the turbulence Reynolds number. At a given Re_{T,f}^{}, it is experimentally observed that the normalized turbulent flame speed decreases with increasing Markstein number, which could be explained by considering Markstein diffusivity as the leading dissipation mechanism for the large wave number flame surface fluctuations. Consequently, by replacing thermal diffusivity with the Markstein diffusivity in the turbulence Reynolds number definition above, it is found that normalized turbulent flame speeds could be scaled by Re_{T,M}^{0.5} irrespective of the fuel, equivalence ratio, pressure, and turbulence intensity for positive Markstein number flames. PMID:24125342

  4. Turbulent Deflagrated Flame Interaction with a Fluidic Jet Flow for Deflagration-to-Detonation Flame Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Jessica; McGarry, Joseph; Ahmed, Kareem

    2015-11-01

    Detonation is a high energetic mode of pressure gain combustion. Detonation combustion exploits the pressure rise to augment high flow momentum and thermodynamic cycle efficiencies. The driving mechanism of deflagrated flame acceleration to detonation is turbulence generation and induction. A fluidic jet is an innovative method for the production of turbulence intensities and flame acceleration. Compared to traditional obstacles, the jet reduces the pressure losses and heat soak effects while providing turbulence generation control. The investigation characterizes the turbulent flame-flow interactions. The focus of the study is on classifying the turbulent flame dynamics and the temporal evolution of turbulent flame regime. The turbulent flame-flow interactions are experimentally studied using a LEGO Detonation facility. Advanced high-speed laser diagnostics, particle image velocimetry (PIV), planar laser induced florescence (PLIF), and Schlieren imaging are used in analyzing the physics of the interaction and flame acceleration. Higher turbulence induction is observed within the turbulent flame after contact with the jet, leading to increased flame burning rates. The interaction with the fluidic jet results in turbulent flame transition from the thin reaction zones to the broken reaction regime.

  5. Scaling of turbulent flame speed for expanding flames with Markstein diffusion considerations.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Wu, Fujia; Law, Chung K

    2013-09-01

    In this paper we clarify the role of Markstein diffusivity, which is the product of the planar laminar flame speed and the Markstein length, on the turbulent flame speed and its scaling, based on experimental measurements on constant-pressure expanding turbulent flames. Turbulent flame propagation data are presented for premixed flames of mixtures of hydrogen, methane, ethylene, n-butane, and dimethyl ether with air, in near-isotropic turbulence in a dual-chamber, fan-stirred vessel. For each individual fuel-air mixture presented in this work and the recently published iso-octane data from Leeds, normalized turbulent flame speed data of individual fuel-air mixtures approximately follow a Re_{T,f}^{0.5} scaling, for which the average radius is the length scale and thermal diffusivity is the transport property of the turbulence Reynolds number. At a given Re_{T,f}^{}, it is experimentally observed that the normalized turbulent flame speed decreases with increasing Markstein number, which could be explained by considering Markstein diffusivity as the leading dissipation mechanism for the large wave number flame surface fluctuations. Consequently, by replacing thermal diffusivity with the Markstein diffusivity in the turbulence Reynolds number definition above, it is found that normalized turbulent flame speeds could be scaled by Re_{T,M}^{0.5} irrespective of the fuel, equivalence ratio, pressure, and turbulence intensity for positive Markstein number flames.

  6. Scaling of turbulent flame speed for expanding flames with Markstein diffusion considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Wu, Fujia; Law, Chung K.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper we clarify the role of Markstein diffusivity, which is the product of the planar laminar flame speed and the Markstein length, on the turbulent flame speed and its scaling, based on experimental measurements on constant-pressure expanding turbulent flames. Turbulent flame propagation data are presented for premixed flames of mixtures of hydrogen, methane, ethylene, n-butane, and dimethyl ether with air, in near-isotropic turbulence in a dual-chamber, fan-stirred vessel. For each individual fuel-air mixture presented in this work and the recently published iso-octane data from Leeds, normalized turbulent flame speed data of individual fuel-air mixtures approximately follow a ReT,f0.5 scaling, for which the average radius is the length scale and thermal diffusivity is the transport property of the turbulence Reynolds number. At a given ReT,f, it is experimentally observed that the normalized turbulent flame speed decreases with increasing Markstein number, which could be explained by considering Markstein diffusivity as the leading dissipation mechanism for the large wave number flame surface fluctuations. Consequently, by replacing thermal diffusivity with the Markstein diffusivity in the turbulence Reynolds number definition above, it is found that normalized turbulent flame speeds could be scaled by ReT,M0.5 irrespective of the fuel, equivalence ratio, pressure, and turbulence intensity for positive Markstein number flames.

  7. The Effects of Flame Structure on Extinction of CH4-O2-N2 Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du, J.; Axelbaum, R. L.; Gokoglu, S. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The effects of flame structure on the extinction limits of CH4-O2-N2 counterflow diffusion flames were investigated experimentally and numerically by varying the stoichiometric mixture fraction Z(sub st), Z(sub st) was varied by varying free-stream concentrations, while the adiabatic flame temperature T(sub ad) was held fixed by maintaining a fixed amount of nitrogen at the flame. Z(sub st) was varied between 0.055 (methane-air flame) and 0.78 (diluted- methane-oxygen flame). The experimental results yielded an extinction strain rate K(sub ext) of 375/s for the methane-air flame, increasing monotonically to 1042/s for the diluted-methane-oxygen flame. Numerical results with a 58-step Cl mechanism yielded 494/s and 1488/s, respectively. The increase in K(sub ext) with Z(sub st) for a fixed T(sub ad) is explained by the shift in the O2 profile toward the region of maximum temperature and the subsequent increase in rates for chain-branching reactions. The flame temperature at extinction reached a minimum at Z(sub st) = 0.65, where it was 200 C lower than that of the methane-air flame. This significant increase in resistance to extinction is seen to correspond to the condition in which the OH and O production zones are centered on the location of maximum temperature.

  8. Theory of wide-angle photometry from standard stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usher, Peter D.

    1989-01-01

    Wide angle celestial structures, such as bright comet tails and nearby galaxies and clusters of galaxies, rely on photographic methods for quantified morphology and photometry, primarily because electronic devices with comparable resolution and sky coverage are beyond current technological capability. The problem of the photometry of extended structures and of how this problem may be overcome through calibration by photometric standard stars is examined. The perfect properties of the ideal field of view are stated in the guise of a radiometric paraxial approximation, in the hope that fields of view of actual telescopes will conform. Fundamental radiometric concepts are worked through before the issue of atmospheric attenuation is addressed. The independence of observed atmospheric extinction and surface brightness leads off the quest for formal solutions to the problem of surface photometry. Methods and problems of solution are discussed. The spectre is confronted in the spirit of standard stars and shown to be chimerical in that light, provided certain rituals are adopted. After a brief discussion of Baker-Sampson polynomials and the vexing issue of saturation, a pursuit is made of actual numbers to be expected in real cases. While the numbers crunched are gathered ex nihilo, they demonstrate the feasibility of Newton's method in the solution of this overdetermined, nonlinear, least square, multiparametric, photometric problem.

  9. Multi-channel fiber photometry for population neuronal activity recording.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qingchun; Zhou, Jingfeng; Feng, Qiru; Lin, Rui; Gong, Hui; Luo, Qingming; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Minmin; Fu, Ling

    2015-10-01

    Fiber photometry has become increasingly popular among neuroscientists as a convenient tool for the recording of genetically defined neuronal population in behaving animals. Here, we report the development of the multi-channel fiber photometry system to simultaneously monitor neural activities in several brain areas of an animal or in different animals. In this system, a galvano-mirror modulates and cyclically couples the excitation light to individual multimode optical fiber bundles. A single photodetector collects excited light and the configuration of fiber bundle assembly and the scanner determines the total channel number. We demonstrated that the system exhibited negligible crosstalk between channels and optical signals could be sampled simultaneously with a sample rate of at least 100 Hz for each channel, which is sufficient for recording calcium signals. Using this system, we successfully recorded GCaMP6 fluorescent signals from the bilateral barrel cortices of a head-restrained mouse in a dual-channel mode, and the orbitofrontal cortices of multiple freely moving mice in a triple-channel mode. The multi-channel fiber photometry system would be a valuable tool for simultaneous recordings of population activities in different brain areas of a given animal and different interacting individuals.

  10. High speed low noise multiplexed three color absorbance photometry.

    PubMed

    Dadesh, Khaled M; Kurup, G K; Basu, Amar S

    2011-01-01

    Multispectral photometry is often required to distinguish samples in flow injection analysis and flow cytometry; however, the cost of multiple light detectors, filters, and optical paths contribute to the high cost of multicolor and spectral detection systems. This paper describes frequency division multiplexing (FDM), a simple approach for performing multi-wavelength absorbance photometry with a single light detector and a single interrogation window. In previous efforts, modulation frequencies were <10 KHz, resulting in a detector bandwidth of <20 Hz. This paper presents a high frequency FDM circuit which can increase the oscillation frequencies to several 100 KHz, improving the detection bandwidth by a factor of 10 while still maintaining low cost. Light from 3 different LED sources are encoded into unique frequency channels, passed through the detection cell, and later demodulated using phase-sensitive electronics. Electronic multiplexing couples all light sources into a single optical train without spectral filters. Theory and high frequency considerations are demonstrated. Simultaneous three color absorbance detection is demonstrated in solutions and in flowing droplet microreactors. This technique can potentially reduce the cost of multicolor photometry by replacing expensive optical components with low-cost electronics.

  11. Theory of wide-angle photometry from standard stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, Peter D.

    1989-10-01

    Wide angle celestial structures, such as bright comet tails and nearby galaxies and clusters of galaxies, rely on photographic methods for quantified morphology and photometry, primarily because electronic devices with comparable resolution and sky coverage are beyond current technological capability. The problem of the photometry of extended structures and of how this problem may be overcome through calibration by photometric standard stars is examined. The perfect properties of the ideal field of view are stated in the guise of a radiometric paraxial approximation, in the hope that fields of view of actual telescopes will conform. Fundamental radiometric concepts are worked through before the issue of atmospheric attenuation is addressed. The independence of observed atmospheric extinction and surface brightness leads off the quest for formal solutions to the problem of surface photometry. Methods and problems of solution are discussed. The spectre is confronted in the spirit of standard stars and shown to be chimerical in that light, provided certain rituals are adopted. After a brief discussion of Baker-Sampson polynomials and the vexing issue of saturation, a pursuit is made of actual numbers to be expected in real cases. While the numbers crunched are gathered ex nihilo, they demonstrate the feasibility of Newton's method in the solution of this overdetermined, nonlinear, least square, multiparametric, photometric problem.

  12. Improved Asteroid Astrometry and Photometry with Trail Fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereš, Peter; Jedicke, Robert; Denneau, Larry; Wainscoat, Richard; Holman, Matthew J.; Lin, Hsing-Wen

    2012-11-01

    Asteroid detections in astronomical images may appear as trails due to a combination of their apparent rate of motion and exposure duration. Nearby asteroids in particular typically have high apparent rates of motion and acceleration. Their recovery, especially on their discovery apparition, depends upon obtaining good astrometry from the trailed detections. We present an analytic function describing a trailed detection under the assumption of a Gaussian point spread function (PSF) and constant rate of motion. We have fit the function to both synthetic and real trailed asteroid detections from the Pan-STARRS1 survey telescope to obtain accurate astrometry and photometry. For short trails our trailing function yields the same astrometric and photometry accuracy as a functionally simpler two-dimensional Gaussian but the latter underestimates the length of the trail—a parameter that can be important for measuring the object's rate of motion and assessing its cometary activity. For trails longer than about 10 pixels (~3× PSF) our trail fitting provides ~3× better astrometric accuracy and up to two magnitudes improvement in the photometry. The trail fitting algorithm can be implemented at the source detection level for all detections to provide trail length and position angle that can be used to reduce the false tracklet rate.

  13. Night sky photometry with amateur-grade digital cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrozek, Tomasz; Gronkiewicz, Dominik; Kolomanski, Sylwester; Steslicki, Marek

    2015-08-01

    Measurements of night sky brightness can give us valuable information on light pollution. The more the measurements we have the better is our knowledge on the spatial distribution of the pollution on local and global scale.High accuracy professional photometry of night sky can be performed with dedicated instruments. The main drawbacks of this method are high price and low mobility. This limits an amount of observers and therefore amount of photometric data that can be collected. In order to overcome the problem of limited amount of data we can involve amateur astronomers in photometry of night sky. However, to achieve this goal we need a method that utilizes equipment which is usually used by amateur astronomers, e.g digital cameras.We propose a method that enables good accuracy photometry of night sky with a use of digital compact or DSLR cameras. In the method reduction of observations and standarization to Johnson UBV system are performed. We tested several cameras and compared results to Sky Quality Meter (SQM) measurements. The overall consistency for results is within 0.2 mag.

  14. M2K Planet Search: Spectroscopic Screening and Transit Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Andrew; Gaidos, E.; Fischer, D.; Lepine, S.

    2010-10-01

    The M2K project is a search for planets orbiting nearby early M and late K dwarf drawn from the SUPERBLINK catalog. M and K dwarfs are highly attractive targets for finding low-mass and habitable planets because (1) close-in planets are more likely to orbit within their habitable zone, (2) planets orbiting them induce a larger Doppler signal and have deeper transits than similar planets around F, G, and early K type stars, (3) planet formation models predict they hold an abundance of super-Earth sized planets, and (4) they represent the vast majority of the stars close enough for direct imaging techniques. In spite of this, only 10% of late K and early M dwarfs are being monitored by current Doppler surveys. As part of the M2K project we have obtained low-resolution spectra for more than 2000 of our sample of 10,000 M and K dwarfs. We vet our sample by screening these stars for high metallicity and low chromospheric activity. We search for transits on targets showing high RMS Doppler signal and photometry candidates provided by SuperWASP project. By using "snapshot” photometry have been able to achieve sub-millimag photometry on numerous transit targets in the same night. With further follow-up observations we will be able to detect planets smaller than 10 Earth masses.

  15. Flame Design: A Novel Approach Developed to Produce Clean, Efficient Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelbaum, Richard L.; Urban, David L.; Sunderland, Peter B.; Chao, Beei-Huan

    2000-01-01

    Soot formation and flame extinction are vital concerns in the combustion of fossil fuels. In particular, soot is responsible for pollutant emissions, and extinction can cause inefficient or unstable burning. Normal-gravity experiments have demonstrated that flames can be designed to improve both characteristics by redirecting some or all of the nitrogen from the oxidizer into the fuel. Such nitrogen exchange can produce permanently blue flames, which are soot free under all possible flame conditions. Furthermore, this approach can lead to stronger, extinction-resistant flames. Past investigations of nitrogen exchange were unable to identify the physical mechanisms responsible for its benefits because these mechanisms cannot be isolated when normal-gravity flames are studied. In contrast, the Diffusion Flame Extinction and Soot Inception (DESI) experiment considers spherical flames, where nearly perfect spherical symmetry affords new levels of control. Because of buoyancy, spherical flames cannot be created in Earth s gravity. DESI was conceived by principal investigator Professor R.L. Axelbaum of Washington University in St. Louis. Tests to date have utilized the 2.2-Second Drop Tower at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. The experiment is slated for testing aboard the International Space Station in a few years. Two mechanisms have been proposed to explain the connection between nitrogen exchange and permanently blue flames. These are the structure (chemical effects) and hydrodynamics (flow direction and speed). In normal-gravity flames, the structure and hydrodynamics are coupled, since nitrogen exchange simultaneously modifies both. Spherical microgravity flames, on the other hand, allow independent control of these factors. Specifically, structure can be modified via nitrogen exchange, and flow direction can be reversed by swapping the ambient and burner-feed gases. In DESI, these variations can be accomplished without changing the theoretical flame

  16. Laminar Soot Processes Experiment Shedding Light on Flame Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David L.

    1998-01-01

    The Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment investigated soot processes in nonturbulent, round gas jet diffusion flames in still air. The soot processes within these flames are relevant to practical combustion in aircraft propulsion systems, diesel engines, and furnaces. However, for the LSP experiment, the flames were slowed and spread out to allow measurements that are not tractable for practical, Earth-bound flames.

  17. Flame Oscillations In Non-Premixed Systems Diffusion Flames and Edge-Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matalon, Moshe

    2003-01-01

    Diffusive-thermal instabilities are well known features of premixed and diffusion flames. In one of its form the instability appears as spontaneous oscillations. In premixed systems oscillations are predicted to occur when the effective Lewis number, defined as the ratio of the thermal diffusivity of the mixture to the mass diffusivity of the deficient component, is sufficiently larger than one. Oscillations would therefore occur in mixtures that are deficient in the less mobile reactant, namely in lean hydrocarbon-air or rich hydrogen-air mixtures. The theoretical predictions summarized above are in general agreement with experimental results; see for example [5] where a jet configuration was used and experiments were conducted for various inert-diluted propane and methane flames burning in inert-diluted oxygen. Nitrogen, argon and SF6 were used as inert in order to produce conditions of substantially different Lewis numbers and mixture strength. In accord with the predicted trend, it was found that oscillations arise at near extinction conditions, that for oscillations to occur it suffices that one of the two Lewis numbers be sufficiently large, and that oscillations are more likely to be observed when is relatively large.

  18. Structure of Propagating and Attached Hydrocarbon Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, Viswanath

    2004-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations with C3-chemistry and radiative heat-loss models have been performed to reveal the internal structure of propagating and attached flames in an axisymmetric fuel jet of methane, ethane, ethylene, acetylene, or propane in air under normal and zero gravity. Observations of the flames were also made at the NASA Glenn 2.2-Second Drop Tower. In computations, the fuel issued into quasi-quiescent air for a fixed mixing time before it was ignited along the centerline at stoichiometry. The edge of the flame propagated through a flammable layer at the laminar flame speed of the stoichiometric fuel-air mixture independent of gravity. For all cases, a peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, was formed in the flame base, thereby holding a trailing diffusion flame. The location of the reaction kernel in the attached flames depended inversely on the reactivity. The reaction-kernel correlations between the reactivity and the velocity were developed further using variables related to local Damkahler and Peclet numbers.

  19. Premixed turbulent flame propagation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, S.; Jagoda, J.; Sujith, R.

    1995-01-01

    To reduce pollutant formation there is, at present, an increased interest in employing premixed fuel/air mixture in combustion devices. It is well known that greater control over local temperature can be achieved with premixed flames and with lean premixed mixtures, significant reduction of pollutants such as NO(x) can be achieved. However, an issue that is still unresolved is the predictability of the flame propagation speed in turbulent premixed mixtures, especially in lean mixtures. Although substantial progress has been made in recent years, there is still no direct verification that flame speeds in turbulent premixed flows are highly predictable in complex flow fields found in realistic combustors. One of the problems associated with experimental verification is the difficulty in obtaining access to all scales of motion in typical high Reynolds number flows, since, such flows contain scales of motion that range from the size of the device to the smallest Kolmogorov scale. The overall objective of this study is to characterize the behavior of turbulent premixed flames at reasonable high Reynolds number, Re(sub L). Of particular interest here is the thin flame limit where the laminar flame thickness is much smaller than the Kolmogorov scale. Thin flames occur in many practical combustion devices and will be numerically studied using a recently developed new formulation that is briefly described.

  20. Manipulating Flames with AC Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Kyle

    2013-11-01

    Time-oscillating electric fields applied to plasmas present in flames create steady flows of gas capable of shaping, directing, enhancing, or even extinguishing flames. Interestingly, electric winds induced by AC electric fields can be stronger that those due to static fields of comparable magnitude. Furthermore, unlike static fields, the electric force due to AC fields is localized near the surface of the flame. Consequently, the AC response depends only on the local field at the surface of the flame - not on the position of the electrodes used to generate the field. These results suggest that oscillating electric fields can be used to manipulate and control combustion processes at a distance. To characterize and explain these effects, we investigate a simple experimental system comprising a laminar methane-air flame positioned between two parallel-plate electrodes. We quantify both the electric and hydrodynamic response of the flame as a function of frequency and magnitude of the applied field. A theoretical model shows how steady gas flows emerge from the time-averaged electrical force due to the field-induced motion of ions generated within the flame and by their disappearance by recombination. These results provide useful insights into the application of AC fields to direct combustion processes.

  1. Progress and challenges in swirling flame dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candel, Sébastien; Durox, Daniel; Schuller, Thierry; Palies, Paul; Bourgouin, Jean-François; Moeck, Jonas P.

    2012-11-01

    In many continuous combustion processes the flame is stabilized by swirling the injected flow. This is the case for example in aeroengine combustors or in gas turbines where aerodynamic injectors impart a rotating component to the flow to create a central recirculation zone which anchors the flame. Swirling flame dynamics is of technical interest and also gives rise to interesting scientific issues. Some of the recent progress in this field will be reviewed. It is first shown that the swirler response to incident acoustic perturbations generates a vorticity wave which is convected by the flow. A result of this process is that the swirl number fluctuates. It is then shown that the flame response is defined by a combination of heat release rate fluctuations induced by the incoming acoustic and convective perturbations. This is confirmed by experimental measurements and by large eddy simulations of the reactive flow. Measured flame describing functions (FDFs) are then used to characterize the nonlinear response of swirling flames to incident perturbations and determine the regimes of instability of a generic system comprising an upstream manifold, an injector equipped with a swirler and a combustion chamber confining the flame. The last part of this article is concerned with interactions of the precessing vortex core (PVC) with incoming acoustic perturbations. The PVC is formed at high swirl number and this hydrodynamic helical instability gives rise to some interesting nonlinear interactions between the acoustic frequency, the PVC frequency and their difference frequency.

  2. Role of compressibility in moderating flame acceleration in tubes.

    PubMed

    Bychkov, Vitaly; Akkerman, V'yacheslav; Valiev, Damir; Law, Chung K

    2010-02-01

    The effect of gas compression on spontaneous flame acceleration leading to deflagration-to-detonation transition is studied theoretically for small Reynolds number flame propagation from the closed end of a tube. The theory assumes weak compressibility through expansion in small Mach number. Results show that the flame front accelerates exponentially during the initial stage of propagation when the Mach number is negligible. With continuous increase in the flame velocity with respect to the tube wall, the flame-generated compression waves subsequently moderate the acceleration process by affecting the flame shape and velocity, as well as the flow driven by the flame. PMID:20365653

  3. Role of compressibility in moderating flame acceleration in tubes.

    PubMed

    Bychkov, Vitaly; Akkerman, V'yacheslav; Valiev, Damir; Law, Chung K

    2010-02-01

    The effect of gas compression on spontaneous flame acceleration leading to deflagration-to-detonation transition is studied theoretically for small Reynolds number flame propagation from the closed end of a tube. The theory assumes weak compressibility through expansion in small Mach number. Results show that the flame front accelerates exponentially during the initial stage of propagation when the Mach number is negligible. With continuous increase in the flame velocity with respect to the tube wall, the flame-generated compression waves subsequently moderate the acceleration process by affecting the flame shape and velocity, as well as the flow driven by the flame.

  4. Turbulent premixed combustion in V-shaped flames: Characteristics of flame front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheirkhah, S.; Gülder, Ö. L.

    2013-05-01

    Flame front characteristics of turbulent premixed V-shaped flames were investigated experimentally using the Mie scattering and the particle image velocimetry techniques. The experiments were performed at mean streamwise exit velocities of 4.0, 6.2, and 8.6 m/s, along with fuel-air equivalence ratios of 0.7, 0.8, and 0.9. Effects of vertical distance from the flame-holder, mean streamwise exit velocity, and fuel-air equivalence ratio on statistics of the distance between the flame front and the vertical axis, flame brush thickness, flame front curvature, and angle between tangent to the flame front and the horizontal axis were studied. The results show that increasing the vertical distance from the flame-holder and the fuel-air equivalence ratio increase the mean and root-mean-square (RMS) of the distance between the flame front and the vertical axis; however, increasing the mean streamwise exit velocity decreases these statistics. Spectral analysis of the fluctuations of the flame front position depicts that the normalized and averaged power-spectrum-densities collapse and show a power-law relation with the normalized wave number. The flame brush thickness is linearly correlated with RMS of the distance between the flame front and the vertical axis. Analysis of the curvature of the flame front data shows that the mean curvature is independent of the experimental conditions tested and equals to zero. Values of the inverse of the RMS of flame front curvature are similar to those of the integral length scale, suggesting that the large eddies in the flow make a significant contribution in wrinkling of the flame front. Spectral analyses of the flame front curvature as well as the angle between tangent to the flame front and the horizontal axis show that the power-spectrum-densities feature a peak. Value of the inverse of the wave number pertaining to the peak is larger than that of the integral length scale.

  5. Improving Kepler Pipeline Sensitivity with Pixel Response Function Photometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Robert L.; Bryson, Steve; Jenkins, Jon Michael; Smith, Jeffrey C

    2014-06-01

    We present the results of our investigation into the feasibility and expected benefits of implementing PRF-fitting photometry in the Kepler Science Processing Pipeline. The Kepler Pixel Response Function (PRF) describes the expected system response to a point source at infinity and includes the effects of the optical point spread function, the CCD detector responsivity function, and spacecraft pointing jitter. Planet detection in the Kepler pipeline is currently based on simple aperture photometry (SAP), which is most effective when applied to uncrowded bright stars. Its effectiveness diminishes rapidly as target brightness decreases relative to the effects of noise sources such as detector electronics, background stars, and image motion. In contrast, PRF photometry is based on fitting an explicit model of image formation to the data and naturally accounts for image motion and contributions of background stars. The key to obtaining high-quality photometry from PRF fitting is a high-quality model of the system's PRF, while the key to efficiently processing the large number of Kepler targets is an accurate catalog and accurate mapping of celestial coordinates onto the focal plane. If the CCD coordinates of stellar centroids are known a priori then the problem of PRF fitting becomes linear. A model of the Kepler PRF was constructed at the time of spacecraft commissioning by fitting piecewise polynomial surfaces to data from dithered full frame images. While this model accurately captured the initial state of the system, the PRF has evolved dynamically since then and has been seen to deviate significantly from the initial (static) model. We construct a dynamic PRF model which is then used to recover photometry for all targets of interest. Both simulation tests and results from Kepler flight data demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach. Kepler was selected as the 10th mission of the Discovery Program. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA’s Science

  6. Laminar Premixed and Diffusion Flames (Ground-Based Study)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Lin, K.-C.; Sunderland, P. B.; Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Ground-based studies of soot processes in laminar flames proceeded in two phases, considering laminar premixed flames and laminar diffusion flames, in turn. The test arrangement for laminar premixed flames involved round flat flame burners directed vertically upward at atmospheric pressure. The test arrangement for laminar jet diffusion flames involved a round fuel port directed vertically upward with various hydrocarbon fuels burning at atmospheric pressure in air. In both cases, coflow was used to prevent flame oscillations and measurements were limited to the flame axes. The measurements were sufficient to resolve soot nucleation, growth and oxidation rates, as well as the properties of the environment needed to evaluate mechanisms of these processes. The experimental methods used were also designed to maintain capabilities for experimental methods used in corresponding space-based experiments. This section of the report will be limited to consideration of flame structure for both premixed and diffusion flames.

  7. Biodegradation of brominated and organophosphorus flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Waaijers, Susanne L; Parsons, John R

    2016-04-01

    Brominated flame retardants account for about 21% of the total production of flame retardants and many of these have been identified as persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic. Nevertheless, debromination of these chemicals under anaerobic conditions is well established, although this can increase their toxicity. Consequently, the production and use of these chemicals has been restricted and alternative products have been developed. Many of these are brominated compounds and share some of the disadvantages of the chemicals they are meant to replace. Therefore, other, nonbrominated, flame retardants such as organophosphorus compounds are also being used in increasing quantities, despite the fact that knowledge of their biodegradation and environmental fate is often lacking.

  8. Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, J.B.; Pope, C.J.; Shandross, R.A.; Yadav, T.

    1993-12-01

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The scope includes detailed measurements of profiles of stable and radical species concentrations in low-pressure one-dimensional premixed flames. Intermediate species identifications and mole fractions, fluxes, and net reaction rates calculated from the measured profiles are used to test postulated reaction mechanisms. Particular objectives are to identify and to determine or confirm rate constants for the main benzene oxidation reactions in flames, and to characterize fullerenes and their formation mechanisms and kinetics.

  9. Modeling of hydrogen-air diffusion flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isaac, K. M.

    1989-01-01

    An analytical and computational study of opposed jet diffusion flame for the purpose of understanding the effects of contaminants in the reactants and thermal diffusion of light species on extinction and reignition of diffusion flames is in progress. The methodologies that have been attempted so far are described. Results using a simple, one-step reaction for the hydrogen-air counterflow diffusion flame are presented. These results show the correct trends in the profiles of chemical species and temperature. The extinction limit can be clearly seen in the plot of temperature vs. Damkohler number.

  10. Studies of Premixed Laminar and Turbulent Flames at Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwon, O. C.; Abid, M.; Porres, J.; Liu, J. B.; Ronney, P. D.; Struk, P. M.; Weiland, K. J.

    2003-01-01

    Several topics relating to premixed flame behavior at reduced gravity have been studied. These topics include: (1) flame balls; (2) flame structure and stability at low Lewis number; (3) experimental simulation of buoyancy effects in premixed flames using aqueous autocatalytic reactions; and (4) premixed flame propagation in Hele-Shaw cells. Because of space limitations, only topic (1) is discussed here, emphasizing results from experiments on the recent STS-107 Space Shuttle mission, along with numerical modeling efforts.

  11. Flame tolerant secondary fuel nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Abdul Rafey; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Wu, Chunyang; Zuo, Baifang; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2015-02-24

    A combustor for a gas turbine engine includes a plurality of primary nozzles configured to diffuse or premix fuel into an air flow through the combustor; and a secondary nozzle configured to premix fuel with the air flow. Each premixing nozzle includes a center body, at least one vane, a burner tube provided around the center body, at least two cooling passages, a fuel cooling passage to cool surfaces of the center body and the at least one vane, and an air cooling passage to cool a wall of the burner tube. The cooling passages prevent the walls of the center body, the vane(s), and the burner tube from overheating during flame holding events.

  12. Flame resistant nontoxic polymer development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. L.; Karle, D. W.; Kratzer, R. H.

    1975-01-01

    A number of homopolymers, copolymers, and terpolymers were synthesized employing styrene and four derivatives of diphenyl-p-styrylphosphine. The various polymeric compositions were prepared by two processes, (1) monomer bulk polymerizations and (2) substitution of preformed polydiphenyl-p-styrylphosphine. Results indicate that the majority of the compositions exhibit superior melting and flame retardant characteristics as compared to polystyrene, but are inferior in molding and film forming capability. Terpolymerization appears to result in the materials with the best overall combination of properties. Toxicological evaluation of three representative basic compositions in the form of molded washers showed that no mortalities occurred among the test animals exposed to the products of the oxidative thermal decomposition of the three materials.

  13. The interaction of high-speed turbulence with flames: Turbulent flame speed

    SciTech Connect

    Poludnenko, A.Y.; Oran, E.S.

    2011-02-15

    Direct numerical simulations of the interaction of a premixed flame with driven, subsonic, homogeneous, isotropic, Kolmogorov-type turbulence in an unconfined system are used to study the mechanisms determining the turbulent flame speed, S{sub T}, in the thin reaction zone regime. High intensity turbulence is considered with the r.m.s. velocity 35 times the laminar flame speed, S{sub L}, resulting in the Damkoehler number Da=0.05. The simulations were performed with Athena-RFX, a massively parallel, fully compressible, high-order, dimensionally unsplit, reactive-flow code. A simplified reaction-diffusion model, based on the one-step Arrhenius kinetics, represents a stoichiometric H{sub 2}-air mixture under the assumption of the Lewis number Le=1. Global properties and the internal structure of the flame were analyzed in an earlier paper, which showed that this system represents turbulent combustion in the thin reaction zone regime. This paper demonstrates that: (1) The flame brush has a complex internal structure, in which the isosurfaces of higher fuel mass fractions are folded on progressively smaller scales. (2) Global properties of the turbulent flame are best represented by the structure of the region of peak reaction rate, which defines the flame surface. (3) In the thin reaction zone regime, S{sub T} is predominantly determined by the increase of the flame surface area, A{sub T}, caused by turbulence. (4) The observed increase of S{sub T} relative to S{sub L} exceeds the corresponding increase of A{sub T} relative to the surface area of the planar laminar flame, on average, by {approx}14%, varying from only a few percent to as high as {approx}30%. (5) This exaggerated response is the result of tight flame packing by turbulence, which causes frequent flame collisions and formation of regions of high flame curvature >or similar 1/{delta}{sub L}, or ''cusps,'' where {delta}{sub L} is the thermal width of the laminar flame. (6) The local flame speed in the cusps

  14. Partially premixed flames in stagnating turbulence: The merging of planar triple flames

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, Ken; Champion, Michel; Libby, Paul A.

    2008-07-15

    The aim of this work, which takes a RANS perspective, is to consider the prospect of establishing a planar turbulent triple flame whose mean consists of two parallel premixed flame brushes separated by a nonpremixed flame brush. Experiments involving a counterflow between fuel-rich and fuel-lean turbulent streams are considered. A correlation of published experimental data is used to estimate premixed turbulent flame brush locations and brush thicknesses. Previously validated model calculations then allow an estimate to be made of the thickness of a central nonpremixed flame or mixing layer, a thickness which is shown to be strongly influenced by flame-turbulence interactions in the premixed flames. This thickness turns out to be orders-of-magnitude greater than the width of the hot burned gas region between the two premixed flames strongly suggesting that the three reacting flow regions will merge with each other. It is concluded that unlike the corresponding laminar counterflow planar turbulent triple flames will be difficult to establish in laboratory scale experiments. (author)

  15. High pressure flame system for pollution studies with results for methane-air diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, I. M.; Maahs, H. G.

    1977-01-01

    A high pressure flame system was designed and constructed for studying nitrogen oxide formation in fuel air combustion. Its advantages and limitations were demonstrated by tests with a confined laminar methane air diffusion flame over the pressure range from 1 to 50 atm. The methane issued from a 3.06 mm diameter port concentrically into a stream of air contained within a 20.5 mm diameter chimney. As the combustion pressure is increased, the flame changes in shape from wide and convex to slender and concave, and there is a marked increase in the amount of luminous carbon. The height of the flame changes only moderately with pressure.

  16. Effect of cylindrical confinement on the determination of laminar flame speeds using outwardly propagating flames

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Michael P.; Chen, Zheng; Ju, Yiguang; Dryer, Frederick L.

    2009-04-15

    The effect of nonspherical (i.e. cylindrical) bomb geometry on the evolution of outwardly propagating flames and the determination of laminar flame speeds using the conventional constant-pressure technique is investigated experimentally and theoretically. The cylindrical chamber boundary modifies the propagation rate through the interaction of the wall with the flow induced by thermal expansion across the flame (even with constant pressure), which leads to significant distortion of the flame surface for large flame radii. These departures from the unconfined case, especially the resulting nonzero burned gas velocities, can lead to significant errors in flame speeds calculated using the conventional assumptions, especially for large flame radii. For example, at a flame radius of 0.5 times the wall radius, the flame speed calculated neglecting confinement effects can be low by {proportional_to}15% (even with constant pressure). A methodology to estimate the effect of nonzero burned gas velocities on the measured flame speed in cylindrical chambers is presented. Modeling and experiments indicate that the effect of confinement can be neglected for flame radii less than 0.3 times the wall radius while still achieving acceptable accuracy (within 3%). The methodology is applied to correct the flame speed for nonzero burned gas speeds, in order to extend the range of flame radii useful for flame speed measurements. Under the proposed scaling, the burned gas speed can be well approximated as a function of only flame radius for a given chamber geometry - i.e. the correction function need only be determined once for an apparatus and then it can be used for any mixture. Results indicate that the flow correction can be used to extract flame speeds for flame radii up to 0.5 times the wall radius with somewhat larger, yet still acceptable uncertainties for the cases studied. Flow-corrected burning velocities are measured for hydrogen and syngas mixtures at atmospheric and

  17. Laminar Diffusion Flame Studies (Ground- and Space-Based Studies)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Lin, K.-C.; Sunderland, P. B.; Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Laminar diffusion flames are of interest because they provide model flame systems that are far more tractable for analysis and experiments than more practical turbulent diffusion flames. Certainly, understanding flame processes within laminar diffusion flames must precede understanding these processes in more complex turbulent diffusion flames. In addition, many properties of laminar diffusion flames are directly relevant to turbulent diffusion flames using laminar flamelet concepts. Laminar jet diffusion flame shapes (luminous flame boundaries) have been of particular interest since the classical study of Burke and Schumann because they are a simple nonintrusive measurement that is convenient for evaluating flame structure predictions. Thus, consideration of laminar flame shapes is undertaken in the following, emphasizing conditions where effects of gravity are small, due to the importance of such conditions to practical applications. Another class of interesting properties of laminar diffusion flames are their laminar soot and smoke point properties (i.e., the flame length, fuel flow rate, characteristic residence time, etc., at the onset of soot appearance in the flame (the soot point) and the onset of soot emissions from the flame (the smoke point)). These are useful observable soot properties of nonpremixed flames because they provide a convenient means to rate several aspects of flame sooting properties: the relative propensity of various fuels to produce soot in flames; the relative effects of fuel structure, fuel dilution, flame temperature and ambient pressure on the soot appearance and emission properties of flames; the relative levels of continuum radiation from soot in flames; and effects of the intrusion of gravity (or buoyant motion) on emissions of soot from flames. An important motivation to define conditions for soot emissions is that observations of laminar jet diffusion flames in critical environments, e.g., space shuttle and space station

  18. Photographic surface photometry of the Milky Way. III - Photometry of the central area of the Galaxy in the ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proell, H. J.; Schmidt-Kaler, T.; Schlosser, W.

    1983-01-01

    6 photographic plates, taken at La Silla, Chile, with the spherical mirror super-wide-angle camera of the Astronomisches Institut der Ruhr Universität Bochum (see paper I: Schmidt-Kaler, Th. et al., 1982) were measured to study the surface brightness distribution in the area around the centre of the Milky Way, between galactic longitudes 297° and 27°, and latitudes - 30° to + 30°, with an angular resolution of 0.°3 × 0.°3 (Fig. 5). In section 2 the plate material and details of the reductions are presented, so far as not already given in paper I. During the photometric scanning of the plates all stars brighter than a limiting magnitude mlim were marked by hand, and the corresponding data points were replaced by an average from neighbouring points (section 3). Defined at the level of 50% elimination, mlim ≌ 8.m0 (in U). Figure 4 shows the effect of various methods of eliminating bright stars. The errors of the surface photometry are discussed in section 4. The internal mean error of the intensity of one data point, as determined from the scatter from the 6 plates, is ± 9.4%. This error is split into an additive component ± 8 S10U (S10 = intensity of a star of 10m), mostly due to the contributions of airglow and scattered light, and a multiplicative component of ± 7.5%, mostly due to the uncertainty of the photographic characteristic curve. Possible systematic errors are estimated and upper limits for these are given in table II. Section 5 presents the results of the photometry. For the sake of clear representation in the isophote map (Fig 5) data with intermediate intensities 110 < Igal ≦ 250 S10U were smoothed over 0.°9 × 0.°9, data with Igal ≦ 110 S10U were smoothed over 1.°2 × 1.°2. The mean error of the isophotes is about ± 6%. We then compare our photometry with existing ultraviolet surface photometries. Apart from the area l = 320° to 330°, b = -25° to -20° where our intensities are probably vitiated by some remaining airglow

  19. Comparison of ozone determinations by ultraviolet photometry and gas-phase titration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demore, W. B.; Patapoff, M.

    1976-01-01

    A comparison of ozone determinations based on ultraviolet absorption photometry and gas-phase titration (GPT) shows good agreement between the two methods. Together with other results, these findings indicate that three candidate reference methods for ozone, UV photometry, IR photometry, and GPT are in substantial agreement. However, the GPT method is not recommended for routine use by air pollution agencies for calibration of ozone monitors because of susceptibility to experimental error.

  20. PCBs, PBBs and Brominated Flame Retardants

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter introduces selected organohalogen chemicals such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB5), polychiorinated biphenyls (PBBs), and brominated flame retardants (BFRs) with emphasis on the background, physicochemical properties, environmental levels, health effects and possib...

  1. Flame Spread across Surfaces of PBX 9501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, S. F.; Berghout, H. L.

    2006-07-01

    We report the results of flame-spread experiments of PBX 9501 (HMX-based explosive). The horizontal flame spread rate, Vf, for PBX 9501 is curve-fit with a power law function of pressure from 0.077 to 17.3 MPa, specifically, Sf = 0.259 P0.538(cm/s) where P is the dimensionless pressure p/p0 with p0 = 0.1 MPa. Vf is of the same order of magnitude as normal deflagration and varies nearly as the square root of pressure, as scaling estimates predict. In the vertical orientation, the flame propagation downward was observed to be slightly faster than horizontal flame spread presumably because of the melt layer flowing downward on the sample.

  2. Brominated Flame Retardants and Perfluorinated Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) belong to a large class of chemicals known as organohalogens. It is believed that both BFRs and PFCs saved lives by reducing flammability of materials commonly used and bactericidal (biocidal) properties. Thes...

  3. Dynamics and structure of turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilger, R. W.; Swaminathan, N.; Ruetsch, G. R.; Smith, N. S. A.

    1995-01-01

    In earlier work (Mantel & Bilger, 1994) the structure of the turbulent premixed flame was investigated using statistics based on conditional averaging with the reaction progress variable as the conditioning variable. The DNS data base of Trouve and Poinsot (1994) was used in this investigation. Attention was focused on the conditional dissipation and conditional axial velocity in the flame with a view to modeling these quantities for use in the conditional moment closure (CMC) approach to analysis of kinetics in premixed flames (Bilger, 1993). Two remarkable findings were made: there was almost no acceleration of the axial velocity in the flame front itself; and the conditional scalar dissipation remained as high, or higher, than that found in laminar premixed flames. The first finding was surprising since in laminar flames all the fluid acceleration occurs through the flame front, and this could be expected also for turbulent premixed flames at the flamelet limit. The finding gave hope of inventing a new approach to the dynamics of turbulent premixed flames through use of rapid distortion theory or an unsteady Bernoulli equation. This could lead to a new second order closure for turbulent premixed flames. The second finding was contrary to our measurements with laser diagnostics in lean hydrocarbon flames where it is found that conditional scalar dissipation drops dramatically below that for laminar flamelets when the turbulence intensity becomes high. Such behavior was not explainable with a one-step kinetic model, even at non-unity Lewis number. It could be due to depletion of H2 from the reaction zone by preferential diffusion. The capacity of the flame to generate radicals is critically dependent on the levels of H2 present (Bilger, et al., 1991). It seemed that a DNS computation with a multistep reduced mechanism would be worthwhile if a way could be found to make this feasible. Truly innovative approaches to complex problems often come only when there is the

  4. Light collection device for flame emission detectors

    DOEpatents

    Woodruff, Stephen D.; Logan, Ronald G.; Pineault, Richard L.

    1990-01-01

    A light collection device for use in a flame emission detection system such as an on-line, real-time alkali concentration process stream monitor is disclosed which comprises a sphere coated on its interior with a highly diffuse reflective paint which is positioned over a flame emission source, and one or more fiber optic cables which transfer the light generated at the interior of the sphere to a detecting device. The diffuse scattering of the light emitted by the flame uniformly distributes the light in the sphere, and the collection efficiency of the device is greater than that obtainable in the prior art. The device of the present invention thus provides enhanced sensitivity and reduces the noise associated with flame emission detectors, and can achieve substantial improvements in alkali detection levels.

  5. Asymptotic flame theory with complex chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Fife, P.C.; Nicolaenko, B.

    1982-01-01

    We investigate the structure of laminar flames with general complex chemistry networks in the limit of high activation energy asymptotics. Depending on the specific reaction network and other given thermomechanical data, a wide variety of flame configurations are possible. Here we present a first version of a systematic asymptotic reduction of complex chemistry networks and give practical criteria to determine the dominant reactions when transport and chemistry are coupled.

  6. Modeling of hydrogen-air diffusion flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isaac, K. M.

    1988-01-01

    Work performed during the first six months of the project duration for NASA Grant (NAG-1-861) is reported. An analytical and computational study of opposed jet diffusion flame for the purpose of understanding the effects of contaminants in the reactants and thermal diffusion of light species on extinction and reignition of diffusion flames is in progress. The methodologies attempted so far are described.

  7. Flame resistant fibrous materials. [developed from chlorofluoropolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Four chlorofluoropolymer systems were developed that satisfactorily met the criteria for classification as self-extinguishing. Three of these systems consisted of Halar (a copolymer of chlorotrifluoroethylene and ethylene) and tin-based flame retardants. The fourth system was a copolymer of chlorotrifluoroethylene and tetrafluoroethylene with no flame retardants added. Production of fibers from all four candidates, by melt extrusion, was demonstrated. Fibers produced from the chlorotrifluoroethylene tetrafluoroethylene copolymer showed the most promise.

  8. Photometry and spectroscopy of the central star of the Trifid nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohoutek, L.; Mayer, P.; Lorenz, R.

    1999-01-01

    UBV photometry of the central star of the Trifid nebula - HD 164492, which has so far been suspected of photometric as well as of radial velocity variability - is presented. The results of our photometry do not confirm any variability. Moreover, based on new high resolution CCD spectra any radial velocity variability can be discarded. Photometry of several other members of the multiple stellar system is included; according to this photometry, the system is a physical one. Equivalent widths for the main component of HD 164492 are given. Positions measured on CCD exposures are presented too. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile.

  9. Polydisperse spray diffusion flames in oscillating flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, Jerrold Barry; Katoshevski, David

    2016-03-01

    The phenomenon of droplet clustering or grouping found when a spray of droplets is moving in an oscillating host flow field is investigated for the case of a polydisperse spray that fuels a laminar co-flow diffusion flame. A mathematical solution is developed for the liquid phase based on use of small Stokes numbers for size sections into which the polydisperse spray size distribution is divided. Droplet clustering in the oscillatory flow field is accounted for by constructing a special model for the sectional vaporization Damkohler numbers in accordance with droplet size. Combining this with a formal solution for a gas phase Schvab-Zel'dovich variable yields the means whereby flame dynamics can be described. Results calculated from this solution demonstrate that preferential droplet size behaviour (with smaller droplets tending to cluster to a greater extent and reduce the vaporization Damkohler number more than larger ones) can have a major impact on the flame dynamics through local droplet enrichment with attendant consequences on the production of fuel vapour. The dynamics of the sort of flame (over- or under-ventilated) and the occurrence of flame pinching leading to multiple flame sheets are altered under these circumstances. However, potential control of the actual initial spray polydispersity may reduce the intensity of such effects.

  10. NO concentration imaging in turbulent nonpremixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Schefer, R.W.

    1993-12-01

    The importance of NO as a pollutant species is well known. An understanding of the formation characteristics of NO in turbulent hydrocarbon flames is important to both the desired reduction of pollutant emissions and the validation of proposed models for turbulent reacting flows. Of particular interest is the relationship between NO formation and the local flame zone, in which the fuel is oxidized and primary heat release occurs. Planar imaging of NO provides the multipoint statistics needed to relate NO formation to the both the flame zone and the local turbulence characteristics. Planar imaging of NO has been demonstrated in turbulent flames where NO was seeded into the flow at high concentrations (2000 ppm) to determine the gas temperature distribution. The NO concentrations in these experiments were significantly higher than those expected in typical hydrocarbon-air flames, which require a much lower detectability limit for NO measurements. An imaging technique based on laser-induced fluorescence with sufficient sensitivity to study the NO formation mechanism in the stabilization region of turbulent lifted-jet methane flames.

  11. Sensing flame structure by process tomography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Liu, Shi; Zhou, Wanting; Qi, Xin; Lei, Jing; Mu, Huaiping

    2016-06-28

    Non-intrusive visualization of the structure of flames can offer us many advantages in studying the reaction mechanisms of combustion and observing special distributions of the parameters required for the development of equipment such as jet engines and gas turbines. Process tomography is a relatively new technique for such a task, but is useful owing to its fast speed and capability of detecting signals related to ionizations caused by chemical reactions and thermal effects. Electric capacitance tomography (ECT) is one of the process tomographic techniques. ECT usually comprises a sensor array of electrodes that detect permittivity variations in the measuring zone, a data-logging device and a computer that controls data acquisition and carries out image reconstruction. There have been studies on ECT imaging of flames; however, ECT has not been exploited sufficiently to reveal the inner structure of the flames. In this study, a sensor with planar electrodes is created, and the associated three-dimensional sensitivity map is generated by the finite-element method to detect flame structure. A series of experiments are carried out covering a range of feed rates of fuel and air. Data are collected by the ECT sensor and hardware. The results of the ECT reconstruction show good agreement with actual features, and the structure of the flame is found. This opens up a new route for the study of flames. This article is part of the themed issue 'Supersensing through industrial process tomography'. PMID:27185962

  12. An elementary discussion of propellant flame geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Buckmaster, J.; Jackson, T.L.; Yao, J.

    1999-05-01

    The authors examine the geometry of diffusion flames generated by the burning of a heterogeneous solid propellant, using a simple model designed to provide qualitative insights. In the fast chemistry limit a strategy is used which has its roots in Burke and Schumann`s 1928 study of diffusion flames, albeit with different boundary conditions. This shows that the stoichiometric level surface (SLS) intersects the propellant surface at a point displaced from the fuel/oxidizer interface, and the variations of this displacement with Peclet number are discussed. The authors show that for model sandwich propellants, or their axisymmetric counterpart, the geometry of the SLS when the core is oxidizer is quite different from the geometry of the SLS when the core is fuel. Also, it is much easier to quench the flame on an oxidizer core, by reducing the Peclet number, than it is to quench the flame on a fuel core. When finite chemistry effects are accounted for, the flame only occupies a portion of the SLS, and there is a leading edge structure in which premixing plays a role. Enhancement of the burning rate due to premixing is identified, but a well-defined tribrachial structure is not observed. The authors show how a sharp reduction in pressure can lead to a detachment of the flame from the SLS, with subsequent quenching as it is swept downstream.

  13. Quantitative Species Measurements in Microgravity Combustion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silver, Joel A.; Wood, William R.; Chen, Shin-Juh; Dahm, Werner J. A.; Piltch, Nancy D.

    2001-01-01

    Flame-vortex interactions are canonical configurations that can be used to study the underlying processes occurring in complicated turbulent reacting flows. The elegant simplicity of the flame-vortex interaction permits the study of these complex interactions under relatively controllable experimental configurations, in contrast to direct measurements in turbulent flames. The ability to measure and model the fundamental phenomena that occur in a turbulent flame, but with time and spatial scales which are amenable to our diagnostics, permits significant improvements in the understanding of turbulent combustion under both normal and reduced gravity conditions. In this paper, we report absolute mole fraction measurements of methane in a reacting vortex ring. These microgravity experiments are performed in the 2.2-sec drop tower at NASA Glenn Research Center. In collaboration with Drs. Chen and Dahm at the University of Michigan, measured methane absorbances are incorporated into a new model from which the temperature and concentrations of all major gases in the flame can be determined at all positions and times in the development of the vortex ring. This is the first demonstration of the ITAC (Iterative Temperature with Assumed Chemistry) approach, and the results of these computations and analyses are presented in a companion paper by Dahm and Chen at this Workshop. We believe that the ITAC approach will become a powerful tool in understanding a wide variety of combustion flames under both equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions.

  14. Premixed Turbulent Flame Propagation in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Suresh

    1999-01-01

    A combined numerical-experimental study has been carried out to investigate the structure and propagation characteristics of turbulent premixed flames with and without the influence of buoyancy. Experimentally, the premixed flame characteristics are studied in the wrinkled regime using a Couette flow facility and an isotropic flow facility in order to resolve the scale of flame wrinkling. Both facilities were chosen for their ability to achieve sustained turbulence at low Reynolds number. This implies that conventional diagnostics can be employed to resolve the smallest scales of wrinkling. The Couette facility was also built keeping in mind the constraints imposed by the drop tower requirements. Results showed that the flow in this Couette flow facility achieves full-developed turbulence at low Re and all turbulence statistics are in good agreement with past measurements on large-scale facilities. Premixed flame propagation studies were then carried out both using the isotropic box and the Couette facility. Flame imaging showed that fine scales of wrinkling occurs during flame propagation. Both cases in Ig showed significant buoyancy effect. To demonstrate that micro-g can remove this buoyancy effect, a small drop tower was built and drop experiments were conducted using the isotropic box. Results using the Couette facility confirmed the ability to carry out these unique reacting flow experiments at least in 1g. Drop experiments at NASA GRC were planned but were not completed due to termination of this project.

  15. Quantitative Species Measurements In Microgravity Combustion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shin-Juh; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Silver, Joel A.; Piltch, Nancy D.

    2003-01-01

    The capability of models and theories to accurately predict and describe the behavior of low gravity flames can only be verified by quantitative measurements. Although video imaging, simple temperature measurements, and velocimetry methods have provided useful information in many cases, there is still a need for quantitative species measurements. Over the past decade, we have been developing high sensitivity optical absorption techniques to permit in situ, non-intrusive, absolute concentration measurements for both major and minor flames species using diode lasers. This work has helped to establish wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) as an important method for species detection within the restrictions of microgravity-based measurements. More recently, in collaboration with Prof. Dahm at the University of Michigan, a new methodology combining computed flame libraries with a single experimental measurement has allowed us to determine the concentration profiles for all species in a flame. This method, termed ITAC (Iterative Temperature with Assumed Chemistry) was demonstrated for a simple laminar nonpremixed methane-air flame at both 1-g and at 0-g in a vortex ring flame. In this paper, we report additional normal and microgravity experiments which further confirm the usefulness of this approach. We also present the development of a new type of laser. This is an external cavity diode laser (ECDL) which has the unique capability of high frequency modulation as well as a very wide tuning range. This will permit the detection of multiple species with one laser while using WMS detection.

  16. A Method to Measure Flame Index in Turbulent Partially-Premixed Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, David Ari

    This dissertation describes the development of a diagnostic technique and data processing routine to measure the flame index in partially-premixed flames, called the Flame Index Measurement Method. Many modern combustion applications involve conditions in which the fuel and oxidizer are only partially mixed prior to entering the flame. These partially-premixed flames contain some regions of premixed and some regions of non-premixed flamelets. New computational approaches use the flame index concept: premixed regions are identified and a premixed model is applied; non-premixed regions are also identified and a non-premixed model is applied. The flame index is defined as the normalized dot product of the gradients of the fuel and oxidizer mass fractions; it is +1 in premixed flamelets and is -1 in non-premixed flamelets. Previously there had been no experimentally measured values of flame index available to assess the modeling approaches. A new method has been developed to measure the flame index using planar laser-induced fluorescence tracers to indicate the sign and direction of the fuel and oxygen gradients. Through the modeling of premixed and non-premixed flamelets, acetone was selected as a fuel tracer and nitrogen dioxide was selected as an oxygen tracer. The fluorescence properties of both acetone and nitrogen dioxide were studied. With acetone seeded into the fuel, and nitrogen dioxide seeded into the air, the Flame Index Measurement Method was evaluated in laminar premixed and non-premixed methane/acetone/air flames, as well as in a well-defined turbulent partially-premixed burner, the Gas Turbine Model Combustor (GTMC). The flame index was measured in the GTMC with methane, propane, and syngas flames. Statistics (mean, variance, and probability mass functions) of the flame index are reported for the highly-turbulent partially-premixed GTMC flames. Two new statistical quantities were developed that describe the probability for the occurrence of premixed

  17. Flame Inhibition by Phosphorus-Containing Compounds in Lean and Rich Propane Flames

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, H; Korobeinichev, O P; Shvartsberg, V M; Shmakov, A G; Bolshova, T A; Jayaweera, T M; Melius, C F; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2003-12-19

    Chemical inhibition of laminar propane flames by organophosphorus compounds has been studied experimentally, using a laboratory Mache Hebra nozzle burner and a flat flame burner with molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS), and with a computational flame model using a detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism. Both fuel-lean and fuel-rich propane flames were studied to examine the role of equivalence ratio in flame inhibition. The experiments examined a wide variety of organophosphorus compounds. We report on the experimental species flame profiles for tri-methyl phosphate (TMP) and compare them with the species flame profile results from modeling of TMP and di-methyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP). Both the experiments and kinetic modeling support and illustrate previous experimental studies in both premixed and non-premixed flames that inhibition efficiency is effectively the same for all of the organophosphorus compounds examined, independent of the molecular structure of the initial inhibitor molecule. The chemical inhibition is due to reactions involving the small P-bearing species HOPO{sub 2} and HOPO that are produced by the organophosphorus compounds (OPCs). The ratios of the HOPO{sub 2} and HOPO concentrations differ between the lean and rich flames, with HOPO{sub 2} dominant in lean flames while HOPO dominates in rich flames. The resulting HOPO{sub 2} and HOPO species profiles do not depend significantly on the initial source of the HOPO{sub 2} and HOPO and thus are relatively insensitive to the initial OPC inhibitor. A more generalized form of the original Twarowski mechanism for hydrocarbon radical recombination is developed to account for the results observed, and new theoretical values have been determined for heats of formation of the important P-containing species, using the BAC-G2 method.

  18. High-precision photometry for K2 Campaign 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. X.; Penev, K.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Bhatti, W.; Domsa, I.; de Val-Borro, M.

    2015-12-01

    The two reaction wheel K2 mission promises and has delivered new discoveries in the stellar and exoplanet fields. However, due to the loss of accurate pointing, it also brings new challenges for the data reduction processes. In this paper, we describe a new reduction pipeline for extracting high-precision photometry from the K2 data set, and present public light curves for the K2 Campaign 1 target pixel data set. Key to our reduction is the derivation of global astrometric solutions from the target stamps, from which accurate centroids are passed on for high-precision photometry extraction. We extract target light curves for sources from a combined UCAC4 and EPIC catalogue - this includes not only primary targets of the K2 campaign 1, but also any other stars that happen to fall on the pixel stamps. We provide the raw light curves, and the products of various detrending processes aimed at removing different types of systematics. Our astrometric solutions achieve a median residual of ˜0.127 arcsec. For bright stars, our best 6.5 h precision for raw light curves is ˜20 parts per million (ppm). For our detrended light curves, the best 6.5 h precision achieved is ˜15 ppm. We show that our detrended light curves have fewer systematic effects (or trends, or red-noise) than light curves produced by other groups from the same observations. Example light curves of transiting planets and a Cepheid variable candidate, are also presented. We make all light curves public, including the raw and detrended photometry, at http://k2.hatsurveys.org.

  19. MOST photometry of the enigmatic PMS pulsator HD 142666

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwintz, K.; Kallinger, T.; Guenther, D. B.; Gruberbauer, M.; Huber, D.; Rowe, J.; Kuschnig, R.; Weiss, W. W.; Matthews, J. M.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Rucinski, S. M.; Sasselov, D.; Walker, G. A. H.; Casey, M. P.

    2009-02-01

    Context: Modeling of pre-main sequence (PMS) stars through asteroseismology of PMS p-mode pulsators has only recently become possible, and spacebased photometry is one of the important sources of data for these efforts. We present precise photometry of the pulsating Herbig Ae star HD 142666 obtained in two consecutive years with the MOST (Microvariability & Oscilations of STars) satellite. Aims: Previously, only a single pulsation period was known for HD 142666. The MOST photometry reveals that HD 142666 is multi-periodic. However, the unique identification of pulsation frequencies is complicated by the presence of irregular variability caused by the star's circumstellar dust disk. The two light curves obtained with MOST in 2006 and 2007 provided data of unprecedented quality to study the pulsations in HD 142666 and also to monitor the circumstellar variability. Methods: Frequency analysis was performed using the routine sigspec and the results from the 2006 and 2007 campaigns were then compared to each other with the software cinderella to identify frequencies common to both light curves. The correlated frequencies were then submitted to an asteroseismic analysis. Results: We attribute 12 frequencies to pulsation. Model fits to the three frequencies with the highest amplitudes lie well outside the uncertainty box for the star's position in the HR diagram based on published values. Some of the frequencies appear to be rotationally split modes. Conclusions: The models suggest that either (1) the published estimate of the luminosity of HD 142666, based on a relation between circumstellar disk radius and stellar luminosity, is too high and/or (2) additional physics such as mass accretion may be needed in our models to accurately fit both the observed frequencies and HD 142666's position in the HR diagram. Based on data from the MOST satellite, a Canadian Space Agency mission, jointly operated by Dynacon Inc., the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies

  20. Preliminary results on interstellar reddening as deduced from filter photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laget, M.

    1972-01-01

    Filter photometry has been used to derive the interstellar reddening law from stars through the study of a single spectral type, B0. The deficiency in the far ultraviolet flux of a supergiant relative to a main sequence star is compared with the difference in the flux distribution due to a change of one spectral class. Individual interstellar reddening curves show the general feature reported by Stecher (1969) and by Bless and Savage (1970). There is a large amount of scatter in the far ultraviolet which may be partially due to a real difference in interstellar extinction and partially due to observational inaccuracy.

  1. Refined flicker photometry technique to measure ocular lens density.

    PubMed

    Teikari, Petteri; Najjar, Raymond P; Knoblauch, Kenneth; Dumortier, Dominique; Cornut, Pierre-Loïc; Denis, Philippe; Cooper, Howard M; Gronfier, Claude

    2012-11-01

    Many physiological and pathological conditions are associated with a change in the crystalline lens transmittance. Estimates of lens opacification, however, generally rely on subjective rather than objective measures in clinical practice. The goal of our study was to develop an improved psychophysical heterochromatic flicker photometry technique combined with existing mathematical models to evaluate the spectral transmittance of the human ocular media noninvasively. Our results show that it is possible to accurately estimate ocular media density in vivo in humans. Potential applications of our approach include basic research and clinical settings on visual and nonimage-forming visual systems.

  2. Photometry of Multiple Stellar Populations in Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milone, Antonino

    2012-05-01

    An increasing number of observations over the last years have shown the existence of distinct sub-populations in many (maybe all) globular clusters and shattered the paradigm of globulars hosting single, simple stellar populations. These multiple populations manifest themselves in a split of different evolutionary sequences in the cluster color-magnitude diagrams. Using filters covering an appropriate range of wavelengths, photometry splits the main sequence into two or more branches, and in many cases this bimodality is repeated in the subgiant and red giant regions, and on the horizontal branch. In this talk I will summarize the main results from photometric studies.

  3. U-band photometry of 17 WINGS clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omizzolo, A.; Fasano, G.; Reverte Paya, D.; De Santis, C.; Grado, A.; Bettoni, D.; Poggianti, B.; D'Onofrio, M.; Moretti, A.; Varela, J.; Fritz, J.; Gullieuszik, M.; Cava, A.; Grazian, A.; Moles, M.

    2014-01-01

    Context. This paper belongs to a series presenting the WIde Field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS). The WINGS project has collected wide-field, optical (B, V), and near-infrared (J, K) imaging as well as medium resolution spectroscopy of galaxies in a sample of 76 X-ray selected nearby clusters (0.04 photometry of galaxies and stars in the fields of 17 clusters of the WINGS sample. We also extend the original B- and V-band photometry (WINGS-OPT) for 9 and 6 WINGS clusters to a larger field of view. Methods: We used both the new and already existing B-band photometry to obtain reliable (U - B) colors of galaxies within three fixed apertures in kpc. To this aim, we took particular care with the astrometric precision in the reduction procedure. Since not all the observations were taken in good transparency conditions, the photometric calibration was partly obtained by relying on the SDSS and WINGS-OPT photometry for the U- and optical bands, respectively. Results: We provide U-band (also B- and V-band, where possible) total magnitudes of stars and galaxies in the fields of clusters. For galaxies only, the catalogs also provide geometrical parameters and carefully centered aperture magnitudes. The internal consistency of magnitudes was checked for clusters imaged with different cameras, while the external photometric consistency was obtained by comparison with the WINGS-OPT and SDSS surveys. Conclusions: The photometric catalogs presented here add the U-band information to the WINGS database for extending the spectral energy distribution of the galaxies, in particular in the ultraviolet wavelengths which are fundamental for deriving the star formation rate properties. Photometric catalogs are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  4. UBV photometry of ten southern hemisphere active-chromosphere stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bopp, Bernard W.; Africano, John; Quigley, Robert

    1986-01-01

    High-precision UBV photometry of ten southern hemisphere active-chromosphere stars with strong Ca II H and K and/or H-alpha emission has been obtained. Eight of these stars showed variability during June 1985. Complete or partial light curves are presented for the stars, and these data, as well as mean V magnitudes and colors, are compared with the results of other investigators. In a number of cases, significant changes in photometric amplitude are found, which may serve to track the formation and evolution of active regions on these stars.

  5. CCD-photometry of comets at large heliocentric distances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Beatrice E. A.

    1992-01-01

    CCD imaging and time series photometry are used to determine the state of activity, nuclear properties and eventually the rotational motion of cometary nuclei. Cometary activity at large heliocentric distances and mantle evolution are not yet fully understood. Results of observations carried out at the 2.1 telescope on Kitt Peak April 10-12 and May 15-16, 1991 are discussed. Color values and color-color diagrams are presented for several comets and asteroids. Estimations of nuclear radii and shapes are given.

  6. Coordinates and RI photometry of Large Magellanic Cloud carbon stars

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, E. )

    1990-07-01

    Coordinates and photoelectric RI magnitudes are given for 86 carbon stars discovered by Blanco et al. in four selected 0.12 deg sq areas of the LMC. A comparison with the photometry of Blanco et al. for carbon stars in three different fields of the LMC suggests that the luminosity distribution of the carbon stars may change from center to center in the LMC. This possibility is supported by the differences in the mean I magnitude of the carbon stars detected between the four areas studied. 16 refs.

  7. MYRaf: An Easy Aperture Photometry GUI for IRAF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niaei, M. S.; KiliÇ, Y.; Özeren, F. F.

    2015-07-01

    We describe the design and development of MYRaf, a GUI (Graphical User Interface) that aims to be completely open-source under General Public License (GPL). MYRaf is an easy to use, reliable, and a fast IRAF aperture photometry GUI tool for those who are conversant with text-based software and command-line procedures in GNU/Linux OSs. MYRaf uses IRAF, PyRAF, matplotlib, ginga, alipy, and SExtractor with the general-purpose and high-level programming language Python, and uses the Qt framework.

  8. EUVE photometry of SS Cygni: Dwarf nova outbursts and oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, C.W.

    1995-05-15

    The authors present EUVE Deep Survey photometry and AAVSO optical measurements of the 1993 August and 1994 June/July outbursts of the dwarf nova SS Cygni. The EUV and optical light curves are used to illustrate the different response of the accretion disk to outbursts which begin at the inner edge and propagate outward, and those which begin at the outer edge and propagate inward. Furthermore, the authors describe the properties of the quasi-coherent 7--9 s sinusoidal oscillations in the EUV flux detected during the rise and plateau stages of these outbursts.

  9. LEMON: an (almost) completely automated differential-photometry pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrón, V.; Fernández, M.

    2011-11-01

    We present LEMON, the CCD differential-photometry pipeline, written in Python, developed at the Institute of Astrophysics of Andalusia (CSIC) and originally designed for its use at the 1.23 m CAHA telescope for automated variable stars detection and analysis. The aim of our tool is to make it possible to completely reduce thousands of images of time series in a matter of hours and with minimal user interaction, if not none at all, automatically detecting variable stars and presenting the results to the astronomer.

  10. (abstract) Reddening Measurements using CCD uvby (Stromgren) Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersson, B-G.; Pettersson, B.; Wannier, P. G.

    1993-01-01

    Reddening measurements for interstellar clouds have usually relied on one of two techniques: Star counts or spectro-photometric measurements. We present preliminary results for a technique to determine the extinction using CCD uvby (Stromgren) photometry, without the need to perform special classification of the stars. The method relies on the fact that the uvby system allows two independent measurements of the reddening through the m(sub 1)and c(sub 1) indices to select the true intrensic colors for each star. Using observations from the Burrell Schmidt on Kitt Peak, we find that the technique allows reliable reddening measurements to be made down to at least V=15&supm;.

  11. New Release of the BSM Epoch Photometry Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henden, A.

    2016-06-01

    (Abstract only) The Bright Star Monitor (BSM) Epoch Photometry Database (EPD) is a searchable catalog of all observations made by one of the AAVSO's five BSM systems. The newest release of this database contains some 100 million datasets, from both northern and southern hemispheres, taken over the last six years. These have been calibrated by both nightly visits to Landolt standard fields as well as through the use of the Tycho2 photometric catalog. The paper will describe how the observations were made, how to access the catalog, and the limitations to the photometric accuracy. Some examples of well-studied fields will be shown.

  12. Optical photometry and spectroscopy of Nova Del 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomov, T.; Ilkiewicz, K.; Swierczynski, E.; Belcheva, M.; Dimitrov, D.

    2013-08-01

    We report optical BV photometry and spectroscopy of Nova Del 2013, carried out between August 14.88 UT and August 15.08 UT. Using a 60 cm Cassegrain telescope at the Nicolaus Copernicus University Observatory (Torun, Poland) we estimated the V brightness of the Nova to be 6.31+/-0.02 mag and 6.18+/-0.03 mag on Aug. 14.94 UT and Aug. 15.02 UT respectively. HD 194113 (F2, V=8.00 mag) was used as a comparison star.

  13. uvby photometry in McCormick proper motion fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degewij, J.

    1982-01-01

    The Danish 50 cm telescope at the European Southern Observatory was used to obtain high-precision uvby photometry for 50 F2 to G2 stars, with V values in the 9.4-12.3 mag range, which were selected in the southern galactic polar regions of the McCormick proper motion fields and measured on six different nights. The brighter stars are found to systematically exhibit smaller m(1) indices, of about 0.02 mag, upon comparison with the earlier data of Blaauw et al (1976). Single measurements are given for 98 stars in eight McCormick fields at intermediate southern galactic latitudes.

  14. A Computational Investigation of Sooting Limits of Spherical Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecoustre, V. R.; Chao, B. H.; Sunderland, P. B.; Urban, D. L.; Stocker, D. P.; Axelbaum, R. L.

    2007-01-01

    Limiting conditions for soot particle inception in spherical diffusion flames were investigated numerically. The flames were modeled using a one-dimensional, time accurate diffusion flame code with detailed chemistry and transport and an optically thick radiation model. Seventeen normal and inverse flames were considered, covering a wide range of stoichiometric mixture fraction, adiabatic flame temperature, and residence time. These flames were previously observed to reach their sooting limits after 2 s of microgravity. Sooting-limit diffusion flames with residence times longer than 200 ms were found to have temperatures near 1190 K where C/O = 0.6, whereas flames with shorter residence times required increased temperatures. Acetylene was found to be a reasonable surrogate for soot precursor species in these flames, having peak mole fractions of about 0.01.

  15. Characterisation of an oxy-coal flame through digital imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Smart, John; Riley, Gerry; Lu, Gang; Yan, Yong

    2010-06-15

    This paper presents investigations into the impact of oxy-fuel combustion on flame characteristics through the application of digital imaging and image processing techniques. The characteristic parameters of the flame are derived from flame images that are captured using a vision-based flame monitoring system. Experiments were carried out on a 0.5 MW{sub th} coal combustion test facility. Different flue gas recycle ratios and furnace oxygen levels were created for two different coals. The characteristics of the flame and the correlation between the measured flame parameters and corresponding combustion conditions are described and discussed. The results show that the flame temperature decreases with the recycle ratio for both test coals, suggesting that the flame temperature is effectively controlled by the flue gas recycle ratio. The presence of high levels of CO{sub 2} at high flue gas recycle ratios may result in delayed combustion and thus has a detrimental effect on the flame stability. (author)

  16. Propagation and stability of expanding spherical flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jomaas, Grunde

    High-fidelity experiments were conducted to determine the laminar flame speeds of various fuels, to define the transition boundaries of both cellular and spiral flame front instabilities that develop over the flame surface, and to determine the cellular flame acceleration constants for outwardly propagating spherical flames in a near-constant pressure environment up to 60 atmospheres. The flame front movement was monitored using schlieren cinematography and recorded with a high-speed digital camera. Experiments were conducted for a wide range of pressures and equivalence ratios to yield flame speed data for acetylene, ethylene, ethane, propylene, propane, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen/carbon monoxide in air. These data were post-processed in order to account for stretch effects, yielding laminar, unstretched flame speeds and Markstein lengths. The results were compared with existing chemical kinetics mechanisms and used to suggest improvements. The instant of transition to cellularity was experimentally determined for various fuels and fuel mixtures and subsequently interpreted on the basis of hydrodynamic and diffusional-thermal instabilities. Experimental results show that the transition Peclet number, Pec = Rc/ℓL, assumes an almost constant value for the near-equidiffusive acetylene and ethylene flames with wide ranges in the mixture stoichiometry, oxygen concentration, and pressure, where Rc is the flame radius at transition and ℓL the laminar flame thickness. However, for the non-equidiffusive hydrogen and propane flames, Pec respectively increases and decreases somewhat linearly with the mixture equivalence ratio. Evaluation of Pec using the theory of Bechtold and Matalon show complete qualitative agreement and satisfactory quantitative agreement, demonstrating the insensitivity of Pec to all system parameters for equidiffusive mixtures, and the dominance of the Markstein number, Ze(Le-1), in destabilization for non-equidiffusive mixtures, where Ze is the

  17. Flame attenuation effects on surface temperature measurements using IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Jaap; Tabinowski, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Long-wave infrared (LWIR) cameras provide the unique ability to see through smoke and condensed water vapor. However, soot generated inside the flame does attenuate the LWIR signal. This work focuses on gas flame attenuation effects of LWIR signals originating from a blackbody. The experimental setup consists of time averaged, laboratory-scale turbulent diffusion flames with heat release rates set at 5 kW, 10 kW, and 15 kW. Propylene and ethylene were used as fuel, providing two different soot yields. A 30 cm by 30 cm blackbody was used with maximum surface temperatures set to 600°C. Both instantaneous and time-averaged blackbody temperature profiles through the flame were measured using a LWIR microbolometer camera (7.5-14 μm). Flame intermittency was quantified by color segmenting visible images. The experiments showed that low blackbody temperatures were significantly affected by the presence of the flame. At 600°C, the effect of flame absorption matches the emitted radiation from the flame itself. Using data obtained at various blackbody temperatures, the flame transmittance was obtained using a Generalized Reduced Gradient optimization method. The transmittance was lower for propylene flames compared to ethylene flames. Ethylene flames were shown to have higher temperatures. Using the values for flame radiance and transmissivity, the total averaged radiance of the flame plus the blackbody could be reproduced with 1% accuracy.

  18. Blowoff dynamics of bluff body stabilized turbulent premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Kostka, Stanislav; Renfro, Michael W.; Cetegen, Baki M.

    2010-04-15

    This article concerns the flame dynamics of a bluff body stabilized turbulent premixed flame as it approaches lean blowoff. Time resolved chemiluminescence imaging along with simultaneous particle image velocimetry and OH planar laser-induced fluorescence were utilized in an axisymmetric bluff body stabilized, propane-air flame to determine the sequence of events leading to blowoff and provide a quantitative analysis of the experimental results. It was found that as lean blowoff is approached by reduction of equivalence ratio, flame speed decreases and the flame shape progressively changes from a conical to a columnar shape. For a stably burning conical flame away from blowoff, the flame front envelopes the shear layer vortices. Near blowoff, the columnar flame front and shear layer vortices overlap to induce high local stretch rates that exceed the extinction stretch rates instantaneously and in the mean, resulting in local flame extinction along the shear layers. Following shear layer extinction, fresh reactants can pass through the shear layers to react within the recirculation zone with all other parts of the flame extinguished. This flame kernel within the recirculation zone may survive for a few milliseconds and can reignite the shear layers such that the entire flame is reestablished for a short period. This extinction and reignition event can happen several times before final blowoff which occurs when the flame kernel fails to reignite the shear layers and ultimately leads to total flame extinguishment. (author)

  19. Characteristics of Non-Premixed Turbulent Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegde, U.; Yuan, Z. G.; Stocker, D. P.; Bahadori, M. Y.

    2001-01-01

    This project is concerned with the characteristics of turbulent hydrocarbon (primarily propane) gas-jet diffusion flames in microgravity. A microgravity environment provides the opportunity to study the structure of turbulent diffusion flames under momentum-dominated conditions (large Froude number) at moderate Reynolds number which is a combination not achievable in normal gravity. This paper summarizes progress made since the last workshop. Primarily, the features of flame radiation from microgravity turbulent jet diffusion flames in a reduced gravity environment are described. Tests were conducted for non-premixed, nitrogen diluted propane flames burning in quiescent air in the NASA Glenn 5.18 Second Zero Gravity Facility. Measured flame radiation from wedge-shaped, axial slices of the flame are compared for microgravity and normal gravity flames. Results from numerical computations of the flame using a k-e model for the turbulence are also presented to show the effects of flame radiation on the thermal field. Flame radiation is an important quantity that is impacted by buoyancy as has been shown in previous studies by the authors and also by Urban et al. It was found that jet diffusion flames burning under microgravity conditions have significantly higher radiative loss (about five to seven times higher) compared to their normal gravity counterparts because of larger flame size in microgravity and larger convective heat loss fraction from the flame in normal gravity. These studies, however, were confined to laminar flames. For the case of turbulent flames, the flame radiation is a function of time and both the time-averaged and time-dependent components are of interest. In this paper, attention is focused primarily on the time-averaged level of the radiation but the turbulent structure of the flame is also assessed from considerations of the radiation power spectra.

  20. On the dynamics of flame edges in diffusion-flame/vortex interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hermanns, Miguel; Linan, Amable; Vera, Marcos

    2007-04-15

    We analyze the local flame extinction and reignition of a counterflow diffusion flame perturbed by a laminar vortex ring. Local flame extinction leads to the appearance of flame edges separating the burning and extinguished regions of the distorted mixing layer. The dynamics of these edges is modeled based on previous numerical results, with heat release effects fully taken into account, which provide the propagation velocity of triple and edge flames in terms of the upstream unperturbed value of the scalar dissipation. The temporal evolution of the mixing layer is determined using the classical mixture fraction approach, with both unsteady and curvature effects taken into account. Although variable density effects play an important role in exothermic reacting mixing layers, in this paper the description of the mixing layer is carried out using the constant density approximation, leading to a simplified analytical description of the flow field. The mathematical model reveals the relevant nondimensional parameters governing diffusion-flame/vortex interactions and provides the parameter range for the more relevant regime of local flame extinction followed by reignition via flame edges. Despite the simplicity of the model, the results show very good agreement with previously published experimental results. (author)

  1. Modeling Candle Flame Behavior In Variable Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alsairafi, A.; Tien, J. S.; Lee, S. T.; Dietrich, D. L.; Ross, H. D.

    2003-01-01

    The burning of a candle, as typical non-propagating diffusion flame, has been used by a number of researchers to study the effects of electric fields on flame, spontaneous flame oscillation and flickering phenomena, and flame extinction. In normal gravity, the heat released from combustion creates buoyant convection that draws oxygen into the flame. The strength of the buoyant flow depends on the gravitational level and it is expected that the flame shape, size and candle burning rate will vary with gravity. Experimentally, there exist studies of candle burning in enhanced gravity (i.e. higher than normal earth gravity, g(sub e)), and in microgravity in drop towers and space-based facilities. There are, however, no reported experimental data on candle burning in partial gravity (g < g(sub e)). In a previous numerical model of the candle flame, buoyant forces were neglected. The treatment of momentum equation was simplified using a potential flow approximation. Although the predicted flame characteristics agreed well with the experimental results, the model cannot be extended to cases with buoyant flows. In addition, because of the use of potential flow, no-slip boundary condition is not satisfied on the wick surface. So there is some uncertainty on the accuracy of the predicted flow field. In the present modeling effort, the full Navier-Stokes momentum equations with body force term is included. This enables us to study the effect of gravity on candle flames (with zero gravity as the limiting case). In addition, we consider radiation effects in more detail by solving the radiation transfer equation. In the previous study, flame radiation is treated as a simple loss term in the energy equation. Emphasis of the present model is on the gas-phase processes. Therefore, the detailed heat and mass transfer phenomena inside the porous wick are not treated. Instead, it is assumed that a thin layer of liquid fuel coated the entire wick surface during the burning process

  2. Turbulence-flame interactions in DNS of a laboratory high Karlovitz premixed turbulent jet flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haiou; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a laboratory premixed turbulent jet flame was performed to study turbulence-flame interactions. The turbulent flame features moderate Reynolds number and high Karlovitz number (Ka). The orientations of the flame normal vector n, the vorticity vector ω and the principal strain rate eigenvectors ei are examined. The in-plane and out-of-plane angles are introduced to quantify the vector orientations, which also measure the flame geometry and the vortical structures. A general observation is that the distributions of these angles are more isotropic downstream as the flame and the flow become more developed. The out-of-plane angle of the flame normal vector, β, is a key parameter in developing the correction of 2D measurements to estimate the corresponding 3D quantities. The DNS results show that the correction factor is unity at the inlet and approaches its theoretical value of an isotropic distribution downstream. The alignment characteristics of n, ω and ei, which reflect the interactions of turbulence and flame, are also studied. Similar to a passive scalar gradient in non-reacting flows, the flame normal has a tendency to align with the most compressive strain rate, e3, in the flame, indicating that turbulence contributes to the production of scalar gradient. The vorticity dynamics are examined via the vortex stretching term, which was found to be the predominant source of vorticity generation balanced by dissipation, in the enstrophy transport equation. It is found that although the vorticity preferentially aligns with the intermediate strain rate, e2, the contribution of the most extensive strain rate, e1, to vortex stretching is comparable with that of the intermediate strain rate, e2. This is because the eigenvalue of the most extensive strain rate, λ1, is always large and positive. It is confirmed that the vorticity vector is preferentially positioned along the flame tangential plane, contributing

  3. Flame Propagation in Low-Intensity Turbulence under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldredge, R. C.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of the research is to understand the influences of the hydrodynamic instability on premixed-flame propagation. It is known that coupling between flame and flow-field dynamics in association with the hydrodynamic instability may lead to flame-generated turbulence, flame acceleration and enhancement of burning rates. As a result of such hydrodynamic coupling the transition from initially planar or wrinkled laminar flames to fast turbulent flames or detonations is possible, even when diffusive-thermal effects associated with non-unity reactant Lewis numbers are not destabilizing. It is important to identify methods of suppressing the hydrodynamic instability so as to insure fire safety, particularly in space.

  4. Structure of Flame Balls at Low Lewis-Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiland, Karen J.; Ronney, Paul

    1998-01-01

    The Structure of Flame Balls at Low Lewis-Number (SOFBALL) experiment explored the behavior of a newly discovered flame phenomena called "flame balls." These spherical, stable, stationary flame structures, observed only in microgravity, provide a unique opportunity to study the interactions of the two most important processes necessary for combustion (chemical reaction and heat and mass transport) in the simplest possible configuration. The previously unobtainable experimental data provided a comparison with models of flame stability and flame propagation limits that are crucial both in assessing fire safety and in designing efficient, clean-burning combustion engines.

  5. Engineering Flame Retardant Biodegradable Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shan; Yang, Kai; Guo, Yichen; Zhang, Linxi; Pack, Seongchan; Davis, Rachel; Lewin, Menahem; Ade, Harald; Korach, Chad; Kashiwagi, Takashi; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2013-03-01

    Cellulose-based PLA/PBAT polymer blends can potentially be a promising class of biodegradable nanocomposites. Adding cellulose fiber reinforcement can improve mechanical properties of biodegradable plastics, but homogeneously dispersing hydrophilic cellulose in the hydrophobic polymer matrix poses a significant challenge. We here show that resorcinol diphenyl phosphates (RDP) can be used to modify the surface energy, not only reducing phase separation between two polymer kinds but also allowing the cellulose particles and the Halloysite clay to be easily dispersed within polymer matrices to achieve synergy effect using melt blending. Here in this study we describe the use of cellulose fiber and Halloysite clay, coated with RDP surfactant, in producing the flame retardant polymer blends of PBAT(Ecoflex) and PLA which can pass the stringent UL-94 V0 test. We also utilized FTIR, SEM and AFM nanoindentation to elucidate the role RDP plays in improving the compatibility of biodegradable polymers, and to determine structure property of chars that resulted in composites that could have optimized mechanical and thermal properties. Supported by Garcia Polymer Center and NSF Foundation.

  6. Turbulent Premixed Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Suresh

    1996-01-01

    The experimental cold-flow facility is now full operational and is currently being used to obtain baseline turbulence data in a Couette flow. The baseline turbulence data is necessary to confirm the capability of the chosen device to generate and maintain the required turbulence intensity. Subsequent reacting flow studies will assume that a similar turbulent flow field exists ahead of the premixed flame. Some modifications and refinements had to be made to enable accurate measurements. It consists of two rollers, one (driven by a motor) which drives a continuous belt and four smaller rollers used to set the belt spacing and tension to minimize belt flutter. The entire assemble is enclosed in a structure that has the dimensions to enable future drop tower experiments of the hot facility. All critical dimensions are the same as the original plans except for the pulley ratio which has been changed to enable a wider operating regime in terms of the Reynolds number. With the current setup, Reynolds numbers as low as 100 and as high as 14,000 can be achieved. This is because the in-between belt spacing can be varied from 1 cm to 7.6 cm, and the belt speed can be accurately varied from .15 m/sec to 3.1 m/sec.

  7. Multicolor photometry of triple system b Per requested

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Bob Zavala (U.S. Naval Observatory, Flagstaff) has requested AAVSO assistance in obtaining multicolor photometry of the bright triple system b Per in order to prepare for and detect a possible eclipse of the AB components by the C component predicted for 2013 January 23. Multi-color photometric observations of 4.5V b Per are requested 2013 January 23 through February 04. Based on a revised period of 702.45 ± 0.05 days, the next time of minimum light is predicted for HJD = 2456321.35 ± 0.05 (UT 2013 January 28 20:24UT ± 1.5 hours). The eclipse may last for up to four days, so the coverage requested will provide both a baseline out-of-eclipse light curve and a multi-color eclipse light curve for analysis. Photometry is needed at the level of 0.02-0.03 magnitude or better, as the eclipse may be as deep as 0.1 magnitude. For PEP observers, V coverage, and B if possible, is requested. DSLR observers should use whatever band(s) are available to them. Finder charts may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details and links.

  8. A new look at photometry of the Moon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goguen, J.D.; Stone, T.C.; Kieffer, H.H.; Buratti, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    We use ROLO photometry (Kieffer, H.H., Stone, T.C. [2005]. Astron. J. 129, 2887-2901) to characterize the before and after full Moon radiance variation for a typical highlands site and a typical mare site. Focusing on the phase angle range 45??. ) to calculate the scattering matrix and solve the radiative transfer equation for I/. F. The mean single scattering albedo is ??=0.808, the asymmetry parameter is ???cos. ?????=0.77 and the phase function is very strongly peaked in both the forward and backward scattering directions. The fit to the observations for the highland site is excellent and multiply scattered photons contribute 80% of I/. F. We conclude that either model, roughness or multiple scattering, can match the observations, but that the strongly anisotropic phase functions of realistic particles require rigorous calculation of many orders of scattering or spurious photometric roughness estimates are guaranteed. Our multiple scattering calculation is the first to combine: (1) a regolith model matched to the measured particle size distribution and index of refraction of the lunar soil, (2) a rigorous calculation of the particle phase function and solution of the radiative transfer equation, and (3) application to lunar photometry with absolute radiance calibration. ?? 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  9. Deep photometry and integral magnitudes of 8 nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Ts. B.

    2016-02-01

    We estimated integral magnitudes of galaxies trying to include the contribution of the brightest part of their halos. We performed surface photometry based on (i) concentric elliptical rims, corresponding to the peripheral ellipticity of the image, (ii) median estimation of the mean value of the rim pixels, (iii) apparent radial brightness profiles, corresponding to the rim medians, and (iv) magnitude curves of growth, derived by numerical integrations of the apparent rim profiles, without preliminary background estimation and removal. Furthermore, we used the magnitude curves of growth to determine the integral magnitudes (limited by size and deepness of our frames) and compared them with the total magnitudes in the data base HyperLeda. Also, we used the rim-profiles to estimate the background level far enough from the galaxy center and we build (here—only for trial) the intrinsic radial profiles (with background removal). We apply this photometry on 8 nearby galaxies, observed with CCD in the system BVRC IC by the 50 cm Schmidt telescope of the Rozhen NAO in 2003-2004. We build radial profiles which occur to be as average 1.8 times (1.2-2.5 times) larger than in data base NED and of integral brightness that occurs to be about 1.4 times (1.2-1.7 times) higher than in data base HyperLeda. The relative brightness additions, found here, correlate with the color index and anti-correlate with the luminosity of the galaxy.

  10. Far-ultraviolet stellar photometry: Fields in Sagittarius and Scorpius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Edward G.; Carruthers, George R.

    1995-02-01

    Far-ultraviolet photometry for 741 objects in a field in Sagittarius centered near M8 and 541 objects in a field centered near sigma Scorpii is presented. These data were extracted from electographic images obtained with two cameras during a shuttle flight in 1991 April/May. The cameras provided band passes with lambdaeff = 1375 A and lambdaeff = 1781 A. Synthetic colors show that these bands are sensitive to effective temperature for hot stars. Our measurements were placed on a quantitative far-ultraviolet magnitude scale by convolving the spectra of stars observed by IUE with our cameras' spectral response functions. Fifty-eight percent of the ultraviolet objects were identified with visible stars using the SIMBAD database while another 40% of the objects are blends of early type stars too close together to separate with our resolution. Our photometry is compared with that from the TD-1, OAO 2, and ANS satellites and the S201 (Apollo 16) far-ultraviolet camera and found to agree at the level of a few tenths of a magnitude. Unlike previous studies, almost half of the identified visual counterparts to the ultraviolet objects are early B stars. A plot of distance modulus against ultraviolet color excess reveals a significant population of stars with strong ultraviolet excess.

  11. Spectroscopy and photometry campaign on three bright Wolf Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2013-06-01

    Dr. Noel Richardson (Universite de Montreal) and colleagues have invited AAVSO observers to participate in an international professional-amateur spectroscopy and photometry campaign on the Wof Rayet stars WR 134, WR 135, and WR 137 (HD 191765, HD 192103, and HD 192641). The campaign has begun and runs through September 17, 2013. The purpose of the campaign is to study clumping aspects of the strong winds and changes present in large structures in the stellar winds in these WR stars. Spectroscopy and UBVRI time-series observations are requested. Supplemental targets to be observed if time permits are V905 Sco (HD 160529) and V4375 Sgr (HD 316285). Finder charts with sequences may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Photometry should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. Details of the campaign are given at: http://www.stsci.de/wr134/index.htm. Instructions for sending spectroscopy data to Dr. Richardson are given at http! ://www.stsci.de/wr134/pdf/data_transfer.pdf.

  12. Optimal addition of images for detection and photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Philippe; Kochanski, Greg P.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we describe weighting techniques used for the optimal coaddition of charge coupled devices (CCD) frames with differing characteristics. Optimal means maximum signal to noise (S/N) for stellar objects. We derive formulas for four applications: (1) object detection via matched filter, (2) object detection identical to DAOFIND, (3) aperture photometry, and (4) ALLSTAR profile-fitting photometry. We have included examples involving 21 frames for which either the sky brightness or image resolution varied by a factor of 3. The gains in S/N were modest for most of the examples, except for DAOFIND detection with varying image resolution which exhibited a substantial S/N increase. Even though the only consideration was maximizing S/N, the image resolution was seen to improve for most of the variable resolution examples. Also discussed are empirical fits for the weighting and the availability of the program, WEIGHT, used to generate the weighting for the individual frames. Finally, we include appendices describing the effects of clipping algorithms and a scheme for star/galaxy and cosmic-ray/star discrimination. scheme for star/galaxy and cosmic-ray/star discrimination.

  13. UBV Photometry of the young open cluster Berkely 87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinyemi, Abolaji; Eskridge, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    We obtained UBV imaging of a field in the young open cluster Berkeley 87. From these images, we measured the brightness of ~180 stars in the cluster. Our photometry was calibrated using published photometry (Turner & Forbes 1982 PASP 94, 789) of a subset of stars in our field. The cluster is in a region of the sky with strongly varying extinction. Therefore we made a (U-B)-(B-V) color-color diagram of the field and used this to de-redden the stars on a case by case basis. We de-reddened the stars using the unreddened supergiant and main sequence colors from Astrophysical Quantities (Cox 2000).The color-magnitude diagrams of the de-reddened stars are compared to the Padova isochrones(Marigo et al 2008 A&A 482 883). The isochrones are generated for a range of ages, with solar metalicity and no α enhancement. The best fit for the isochrones was the main sequence de-reddened stars from which the age of the cluster is estimated to be 20 million years. This is older than previous age estimates (1-5 million years) from earlier studies of the cluster. This may indicate age variation in the cluster.We acknowledge the support of the Physics and Astronomy department, and the College of Science and Engineering, Minnesota State University, Mankato.

  14. PHOTOMETRY OF VARIABLE STARS FROM DOME A, ANTARCTICA

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Lingzhi; Macri, Lucas M.; Krisciunas, Kevin; Wang Lifan; Ashley, Michael C. B.; Lawrence, Jon S.; Luong-Van, Daniel; Storey, John W. V.; Cui Xiangqun; Gong Xuefei; Yuan Xiangyan; Feng Longlong; Yang Ji; Zhu Zhenxi; Liu Qiang; Zhou Xu; Pennypacker, Carl R.; Shang Zhaohui; Yang Huigen; York, Donald G.

    2011-11-15

    Dome A on the Antarctic plateau is likely one of the best observing sites on Earth thanks to the excellent atmospheric conditions present at the site during the long polar winter night. We present high-cadence time-series aperture photometry of 10,000 stars with i < 14.5 mag located in a 23 deg{sup 2} region centered on the south celestial pole. The photometry was obtained with one of the CSTAR telescopes during 128 days of the 2008 Antarctic winter. We used this photometric data set to derive site statistics for Dome A and to search for variable stars. Thanks to the nearly uninterrupted synoptic coverage, we found six times as many variables as previous surveys with similar magnitude limits. We detected 157 variable stars, of which 55% were unclassified, 27% were likely binaries, and 17% were likely pulsating stars. The latter category includes {delta} Scuti, {gamma} Doradus, and RR Lyrae variables. One variable may be a transiting exoplanet.

  15. The MOST Asteroseismology Mission: Ultraprecise Photometry from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Gordon; Matthews, Jaymie; Kuschnig, Rainer; Johnson, Ron; Rucinski, Slavek; Pazder, John; Burley, Gregory; Walker, Andrew; Skaret, Kristina; Zee, Robert; Grocott, Simon; Carroll, Kieran; Sinclair, Peter; Sturgeon, Don; Harron, John

    2003-09-01

    The Microvariablity and Oscillations of Stars (MOST) mission is a low-cost microsatellite designed to detect low-degree acoustic oscillations (periods of minutes) with micromagnitude precision in solar-type stars and metal-poor subdwarfs. There are also plans to detect light reflected from giant, short-period, extrasolar planets and the oscillations of roAp stars and the turbulent variability in the dense winds of Wolf-Rayet stars. This paper describes the experiment and how we met the challenge of ultraprecise photometry despite severe constraints on the mass, volume, and power available for the instrument. A side-viewing, 150 mm aperture Rumak-Maksutov telescope feeds two frame-transfer CCDs, one for tracking and the other for science. There is a single 300 nm wide filter centered at 525 nm. Microlenses project Fabry images of the brighter (V<=10) target stars onto the science CCD. Fainter target stars will be focused directly elsewhere on the CCD. MOST was launched on 2003 June 30 into a low-Earth, Sun-synchronous, polar orbit allowing stars between -19° and +36° declination to be viewed continuously for up to 60 days. Attitude is controlled by reaction wheels and magnetotorquers. A solar safety shutter over the telescope diagonal is the only other moving part. Accumulated photometry will be used to calibrate response across the target field stop, and data will be compressed and downloaded to three dedicated ground stations.

  16. Can we characterize turbulence in premixed flames?

    SciTech Connect

    Lipatnikov, A.N.

    2009-06-15

    Modeling of premixed turbulent combustion involves averaging reaction rates in turbulent flows. The focus of most approaches to resolving this problem has been placed on determining the dependence of the mean rate w of product creation on the laminar flame speed S{sub L}, the rms turbulence velocity u', etc. The goal of the present work is to draw attention to another issue: May the input quantity u{sup '} for a model of w= w(u'/S{sub L},..) be considered to be known? The point is that heat release substantially affects turbulence and, hence, turbulence characteristics in premixed flames should be modeled. However, standard moment methods for numerically simulating turbulent flows do not allow us to evaluate the true turbulence characteristics in a flame. For instance, the Reynolds stresses in premixed flames are affected not only by turbulence itself, but also by velocity jump across flamelets. A common way to resolving this problem consists of considering the Reynolds stresses conditioned on unburned (or burned) mixture to be the true turbulence characteristics. In the present paper, this widely accepted but never proved hypothesis is put into question, first, by considering simple model constant-density problems (flame motion in an oscillating one-dimensional laminar flow; flame stabilized in a periodic shear, one-dimensional, laminar flow; turbulent mixing). In all the cases, the magnitude of velocity fluctuations, calculated using the conditioned Reynolds stresses, is affected by the intermittency of reactants and products and, hence, is not the true rms velocity. Second, the above claim is further supported by comparing balance equations for the mean and conditioned Reynolds stresses. The conditioned Reynolds stresses do not characterize the true turbulence in flames, because conditional averaging cuts off flow regions characterized by either high or low velocities. (author)

  17. Gravity Effects Observed In Partially Premixed Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puri, Ishwar K.; Aggarwal, Suresh K.; Lock, Andrew J.; Gauguly, Ranjan; Hegde, Uday

    2003-01-01

    Partially premixed flames (PPFs) contain a rich premixed fuel air mixture in a pocket or stream, and, for complete combustion to occur, they require the transport of oxidizer from an appropriately oxidizer-rich (or fuel-lean) mixture that is present in another pocket or stream. Partial oxidation reactions occur in fuel-rich portions of the mixture and any remaining unburned fuel and/or intermediate species are consumed in the oxidizer-rich portions. Partial premixing, therefore, represents that condition when the equivalence ratio (phi) in one portion of the flowfield is greater than unity, and in another section its value is less than unity. In general, for combustion to occur efficiently, the global equivalence ratio is in the range fuel-lean to stoichiometric. These flames can be established by design by placing a fuel-rich mixture in contact with a fuel-lean mixture, but they also occur otherwise in many practical systems, which include nonpremixed lifted flames, turbulent nonpremixed combustion, spray flames, and unwanted fires. Other practical applications of PPFs are reported elsewhere. Although extensive experimental studies have been conducted on premixed and nonpremixed flames under microgravity, there is a absence of previous experimental work on burner stabilized PPFs in this regard. Previous numerical studies by our group employing a detailed numerical model showed gravity effects to be significant on the PPF structure. We report on the results of microgravity experiments conducted on two-dimensional (established on a Wolfhard-Parker slot burner) and axisymmetric flames (on a coannular burner) that were investigated in a self-contained multipurpose rig. Thermocouple and radiometer data were also used to characterize the thermal transport in the flame.

  18. Laminar flame speeds of moist syngas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Apurba K.; Kumar, Kamal; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2011-02-15

    This work experimentally investigates the effect of the presence of water vapor on the laminar flame speeds of moist syngas/air mixtures using the counterflow twin-flame configuration. The experimental results presented here are for fuel lean syngas mixtures with molar percentage of hydrogen in the hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixture varying from 5% to 100%, for an unburned mixture temperature of 323 K, and under atmospheric pressure. At a given equivalence ratio, the effect of varying amount of water vapor addition on the measured laminar flame speed is demonstrated. The experimental laminar flame speeds are also compared with computed values using chemical kinetic mechanisms reported in the literature. It is found that laminar flame speed varies non-monotonically with addition of water for the carbon monoxide rich mixtures. It first increases with increasing amount of water addition, reaches a maximum value, and then decreases. An integrated reaction path analysis is further conducted to understand the controlling mechanism responsible for the non-monotonic variation in laminar flame speed due to water addition. On the other hand, for higher values of H{sub 2}/CO ratio the laminar flame speed monotonically decreases with increasing water addition. It is shown that the competition between the chemical and thermal effects of water addition leads to the observed response. Furthermore, reaction rate sensitivity analysis as well as binary diffusion coefficient sensitivity analysis are conducted to identify the possible sources of discrepancy between the experimental and predicted values. The sensitivity results indicate that the reaction rate constant of H{sub 2}+OH = H{sub 2}O+H is worth revisiting and refinement of binary diffusion coefficient data of N{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O, N{sub 2}-H{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O pairs can be considered. (author)

  19. A high-pressure premixed flat-flame burner for chemical process studies. [of pollutant formation in hydrocarbon flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, I. M.

    1978-01-01

    A premixed flat-flame burner was designed and tested with methane-air mixtures at pressures from 1.1 to 20 atm and equivalence ratios from 0.7 to 1.1. Reactant velocity in the burner mixing chamber was used to characterize the range of stable flames at each pressure-equivalence-ratio condition. Color photographs of the flames were used to determine flame zone thickness and flame height. The results show that this burner can be used for chemical process studies in premixed high pressure methane-air flames up to 20 atm.

  20. Surface photometry of a sample of elliptical and S0 galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    De carvalho, R.R.; Da costa, L.N.; Djorgovski, S. California Institute of Technology, Pasadena )

    1991-08-01

    The results are reported of surface photometry of 38 early-type galaxies, located mainly in the Fornax Cluster. Detailed comparisons with previously published work are given along with internal and external error estimates for all quantities, and some serious systematic discrepancies in the older aperture photometry of some of the galaxies in the present sample are pointed out. 15 refs.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Metallicity calibrations for UBV photometry (Karatas+, 2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatas, Y.; Schuster, W. J.

    2007-05-01

    UBV photometry [V, (B-V), (U-B)] has been collected from large data bases in conjunction with the derivation of intrinsic-colour, metallicity and absolute magnitude calibrations of F-, G- and early-K-type stars for uvby-beta photometry being derived by Karata & Schuster (in preparation). (2 data files).

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: [Fe/H] & VMAG calibrations for UBV photometry (Karatas+, 2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatas, Y.; Schuster, W. J.

    2007-05-01

    UBV photometry [V, (B-V), (U-B)] has been collected from large data bases in conjunction with the derivation of intrinsic-colour, metallicity and absolute magnitude calibrations of F-, G- and early-K-type stars for uvby-beta photometry being derived by Karata & Schuster (in preparation). (2 data files).

  3. Launch Pad Flame Trench Refractory Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.; Hintze, Paul E.; Parlier, Christopher R.; Bucherl, Cori; Sampson, Jeffrey W.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark; Perusich, Steve; Whitten, Mary

    2010-01-01

    The launch complexes at NASA's John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) are critical support facilities for the successful launch of space-based vehicles. These facilities include a flame trench that bisects the pad at ground level. This trench includes a flame deflector system that consists of an inverted, V-shaped steel structure covered with a high temperature concrete material five inches thick that extends across the center of the flame trench. One side of the "V11 receives and deflects the flames from the orbiter main engines; the opposite side deflects the flames from the solid rocket boosters. There are also two movable deflectors at the top of the trench to provide additional protection to shuttle hardware from the solid rocket booster flames. These facilities are over 40 years old and are experiencing constant deterioration from launch heat/blast effects and environmental exposure. The refractory material currently used in launch pad flame deflectors has become susceptible to failure, resulting in large sections of the material breaking away from the steel base structure and creating high-speed projectiles during launch. These projectiles jeopardize the safety of the launch complex, crew, and vehicle. Post launch inspections have revealed that the number and frequency of repairs, as well as the area and size of the damage, is increasing with the number of launches. The Space Shuttle Program has accepted the extensive ground processing costs for post launch repair of damaged areas and investigations of future launch related failures for the remainder of the program. There currently are no long term solutions available for Constellation Program ground operations to address the poor performance and subsequent failures of the refractory materials. Over the last three years, significant liberation of refractory material in the flame trench and fire bricks along the adjacent trench walls following Space Shuttle launches have resulted in extensive investigations of

  4. A Theory of Oscillating Edge Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckmaster, J.; Zhang, Yi

    1999-01-01

    It has been known for some years that when a near-limit flame spreads over a liquid pool of fuel, the edge of the flame can oscillate relative to a frame moving with the mean speed. Each period of oscillation is characterized by long intervals of modest motion during which the edge gases radiate like those of a diffusion flame, punctuated by bursts of rapid advance during which the edge gases radiate like those in a deflagration. Substantial resources have been brought to bear on this issue within the microgravity program, both experimental and numerical. It is also known that when a near-asphyxiated candle-flame burns at zero gravity, the edge of the (hemispherical) flame can oscillate violently prior to extinction. Thus a web-surfer, turning to the NASA web-site at http://microgravity.msfc.nasa.gov, and following the trail combustion science/experiments/experimental results/candle flame, will find photographs and a description of candle burning experiments carried out on board both the Space-shuttle and the Russian space station Mir. A brief report can also be found in the proceedings of the Fourth Workshop. And recently, in a third microgravity program, the leading edge of the flame supported by injection of ethane through the porous surface of a plate over which air is blown has been found to oscillate when conditions are close to blow-off. A number of important points can be made with respect to these observations: It is the edge itself which oscillates, advancing and retreating, not the diffusion flame that trails behind the edge; oscillations only occur under near limit conditions; in each case the Lewis number of the fuel is significantly larger than 1; and because of the edge curvature, the heat losses from the reacting edge structure are larger than those from the trailing diffusion flame. We propose a general theory for these oscillations, invoking Occam's 'Law of Parsimony' in an expanded form, to wit: The same mechanism is responsible for the

  5. On Soot Inception in Nonpremixed Flames and the Effects of Flame Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. H.; Liu, S.; Axelbaum, R. L.; Gokoglu, Suleyman (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A simplified three-step model of soot inception has been employed with high activation energy asymptotics to study soot inception in nonpremixed counterflow systems with emphasis on understanding the effects of hydrodynamics and transport. The resulting scheme yields three zones: (1) a fuel oxidation zone wherein the fuel and oxidizer react to form product as well as a radical R, (e.g., H), (2) a soot/precursor formation zone where the radical R reacts with fuel to form "soot/precursor" S, and (3) a soot/precursor consumption zone where S reacts with the oxidizer to form product. The kinetic scheme, although greatly simplified, allows the coupling between soot inception and flame structure to be assessed. The results yield flame temperature, flame location, and a soot/precursor index S(sub I) as functions of Damkohler number for S formation. The soot/precursor index indicates the amount of S at the boundary of the formation region. The flame temperature indirectly indicates the total amount of S integrated over the formation region because as S is formed less heat release is available. The results show that unlike oxidation reactions, an extinction turning-point behavior does not exist for soot. Instead, the total amount of S slowly decreases with decreasing Damkohler number (increasing strain rate), which is consistent with counterflow flame experiments. When the Lewis number of the radical is decreased from unity, the total S reduces due to reduced residence time for the radical in the soot formation region. Similarly, when the Lewis number of the soot/precursor is increased from unity the amount of S increases for all Damkohler numbers. In addition to studying fuel-air (low stoichiometric mixture fraction) flames, the air-side nitrogen was substituted into the fuel, yielding diluted fuel-oxygen (high stoichiometric mixture fraction) flames with the same flame temperature as the fuel - air flames. The relative flame locations were different however, and

  6. Constraints on the Bulk Composition of Uranus from Herschel PACS and ISO LWS Photometry, SOFIA FORCAST Photometry and Spectroscopy, and Ground-Based Photometry of its Thermal Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, Glenn; Mueller, Thomas; Burgdorf, Martin; Fletcher, Leigh; de Pater, Imke; Atreya, Sushil; Adams, Joseph; Herter, Terry; Keller, Luke; Sidher, Sunil; Sinclair, James; Fujiyoshi, Takuya

    2016-04-01

    We present thermal infrared observations of the disk of Uranus at 17-200 μm to deduce its global thermal structure and bulk composition. We combine 17-200 μm filtered photometric measurements by the Herschel PACS and ISO LWS instruments and 19-35 μm filtered photometry and spectroscopy by the SOFIA FORCAST instrument, supplemented by 17-25 μm ground-based photometric filtered imaging of Uranus. Previous analysis of infrared spectroscopic measurements of the disk of Uranus made by the Spitzer IRS instrument yielded a model for the disk-averaged temperature profile and stratospheric composition (Orton et al. 2014a Icarus 243,494; 2014b Icarus 243, 471) that were consistent with submillimeter spectroscopy by the Herschel SPIRE instrument (Swinyard et al. 2014, MNRAS 440, 3658). Our motivation to observe the 17-35 μm spectrum was to place more stringent constraints on the global para-H2 / ortho-H2 ratio in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere than the ISO SWS results of Fouchet et al. (2003, Icarus 161, 127), who examined H2 quadrupole lines. We will discuss the consistency of these observations with a higher para-H2 fraction than implied by local thermal equilibrium, which would resolve a discrepancy between the Spitzer-based model and observations of HD lines by the Herschel PACS experiment (Feuchtgruber et al. 2013 Astron. & Astrophys. 551, A126). Constraints on the global para-H2 fraction allow for more precise analysis of the far-infrared spectrum, which is sensitive to the He:H2 ratio, a quantity that was not constrained by the Spitzer IRS spectra. The derived model, which assumed the ratio derived by the Voyager-2 IRIS/radio-science occultation experiment (Conrath et al. 1987 J. Geophys. Res. 92, 15003), is inconsistent with 70-200 μm PACS photometry (Mueller et al. 2016 Astron. & Astrophys. submittted) and ISO LWS photometric measurements. However, the model can be made consistent with the observations if the fraction of He relative to H2 were

  7. Acoustic flame detector for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Thurbide, K B; Wentzell, P D; Aue, W A

    1996-09-01

    A novel gas chromatography detector is described that uses acoustic signals from a partly premixed hydrogen-air flame burning on top of a capillary. The device, referred to as the acoustic flame detector (AFD), is based on the measurement of the frequency of acoustic transients generated at the burner under a range of operating conditions. The presence of trace amounts of analyte in the flame was found to increase the frequency of these sonic bursts from the baseline level of ∼100 Hz. The response of the AFD for n-dodecane, measured as the shift in frequency, was determined to be linear over ∼3 orders of magnitude, with a minimum detectable level of about 1-5 ng C/s using the current system. The sensitivity correlates roughly with carbon content, except for certain organometallics (Sn, Mn), which gave substantially enhanced signals. Some tailing was observed but became serious only for particular types of organometallics. The noise of the system was predominantly of the 1/f type. The effects of flow conditions, burner geometry, and flame gas constituents were investigated. The oscillations could be followed by acoustic, visual, electrical, and optical means. The AFD mechanism is shown to involve oscillatory chemical kinetics, in which the flame front (the inner cone) temporarily enters a few millimeters into the capillary during each cycle, thereby creating the acoustic signal.

  8. Premixed silane-oxygen-nitrogen flames

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuhashi, K.; Horiguchi, S.; Uranco, Y.; Iwasaka, M.; Ohtani, H.; Kondo, S. )

    1990-10-01

    The burning velocities of lean premised silane-oxygen-nitrogen flames were measured in the silane and oxygen concentration ranges from 1.6% to 2.9% and from 4% to 24%, respectively. Combustion product analyses and flame temperature measurements were also carried out. The burning velocity of a silane-air flame is around 55 cm/ at a silane concentration of 2%. For lean mixtures, when the oxygen concentration is reduced, dependence of burning velocity upon silane concentration decreases but does not significantly affect the flame temperature. For extremely lean flames, the degree of hydrogen production increase with decreasing silane, although silane is consumed almost completely. On the other hand, if the silane concentration exceeds stoichiometric, the burning velocity increases gradually with increasing silane concentration. In that case, silane as well as oxygen are consumed completely and, at the same time, hydrogen rather than water production becomes dominant. The mechanism of silane combustion is discussed, based on numerical calculations, where the mechanism used in the calculation is assembled by analogy of silane to methane combustion.

  9. Flame-vortex interaction and mixing behaviors of turbulent non-premixed jet flames under acoustic forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Munki; Choi, Youngil; Oh, Jeongseog; Yoon, Youngbin

    2009-12-15

    This study examines the effect of acoustic excitation using forced coaxial air on the flame characteristics of turbulent hydrogen non-premixed flames. A resonance frequency was selected to acoustically excite the coaxial air jet due to its ability to effectively amplify the acoustic amplitude and reduce flame length and NO{sub x} emissions. Acoustic excitation causes the flame length to decrease by 15% and consequently, a 25% reduction in EINO{sub x} is achieved, compared to coaxial air flames without acoustic excitation at the same coaxial air to fuel velocity ratio. Moreover, acoustic excitation induces periodical fluctuation of the coaxial air velocity, thus resulting in slight fluctuation of the fuel velocity. From phase-lock PIV and OH PLIF measurement, the local flow properties at the flame surface were investigated under acoustic forcing. During flame-vortex interaction in the near field region, the entrainment velocity and the flame surface area increased locally near the vortex. This increase in flame surface area and entrainment velocity is believed to be a crucial factor in reducing flame length and NO{sub x} emission in coaxial jet flames with acoustic excitation. Local flame extinction occurred frequently when subjected to an excessive strain rate, indicating that intense mass transfer of fuel and air occurs radially inward at the flame surface. (author)

  10. 39. View looking down on torch and flame from top ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. View looking down on torch and flame from top of scaffolding; ventilator cap has been removed from flame prior to removal of torch on July 4, 1984. July 1984. - Statue of Liberty, Liberty Island, Manhattan, New York County, NY

  11. 41. HISTORIC VIEW LOOKING SOUTH FROM THE FLAME TRENCH AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. HISTORIC VIEW LOOKING SOUTH FROM THE FLAME TRENCH AT THE TEST STAND AND LOOKING INTO THE FLAME DEFLECTOR. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  12. Development of video processing based on coal flame detector system

    SciTech Connect

    He Wanqing; Yu Yuefeng; Xu Weiyong; Ma Liqun

    1999-07-01

    The principle and development of a set of pulverized coal combustion flame detection system, which is called intelligent image flame detector device based on digital video processing, is addressed in this paper. The system realizes multi-burner flame detection and processing using a distributive structure of engineering workstation and flame detectors via multi-serial-port communication. The software can deal with multi-tasks in a parallel way based on multi-thread mechanism. Streaming video capture and storage is provided to safe and playback the accidental Audio and Visual Interfaces (AVI) clips. The layer flame detectors can give the flame on/off signal through image processing. Pseudo-color visualization of flame temperature calculated from chromatic CCD signal is integrated into the system. The image flame detector system has been successfully used in thermal power generation units in China.

  13. EFFECT OF ORGANOPHOSPHORUS FLAME RETARDANTS ON NEURONAL DEVELOPMENT IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increased use of organophosphorus compounds as alternatives to brominated flame retardants (BFRs) has led to widespread human exposure, There is, however, limited information on their potential health effects. This study compared the effects of nii ne organophosphorus flame...

  14. Flame acceleration in the early stages of burning in tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Bychkov, Vitaly; Fru, Gordon; Petchenko, Arkady; Akkerman, V'yacheslav; Eriksson, Lars-Erik

    2007-09-15

    Acceleration of premixed laminar flames in the early stages of burning in long tubes is considered. The acceleration mechanism was suggested earlier by Clanet and Searby [Combust. Flame 105 (1996) 225]. Acceleration happens due to the initial ignition geometry at the tube axis when a flame develops to a finger-shaped front, with surface area growing exponentially in time. Flame surface area grows quite fast but only for a short time. The analytical theory of flame acceleration is developed, which determines the growth rate, the total acceleration time, and the maximal increase of the flame surface area. Direct numerical simulations of the process are performed for the complete set of combustion equations. The simulations results and the theory are in good agreement with the previous experiments. The numerical simulations also demonstrate flame deceleration, which follows acceleration, and the so-called ''tulip flames''. (author)

  15. Flashback flame arrester devices for fuel cargo tank vapor vents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, R. A.; Kushida, R. O.

    1981-01-01

    The flame quenching capability of four types of flame arresting devices suitable for installation on fuel cargo tank vents of marine transport vessels is evaluated. A single 30 mesh screen, a dual 20 mesh screen, a spiral wound crimped metal ribbon, and a packed bed of ballast rings were tested. Flame speed and flame penetration of the test arresters were determined. Eight fuels representative of bulk cargoes were tested. The test arresters quenched a minimum of three flashback flames from all eight fuels, with one exception: high speed ethylene flames penetrated the dual 20 mesh screen on three tests. The arresters withstood the sustained flame from a propane/air mixture for 30 minutes. None of the arresters withstood the sustained flame from an ethylene/air mixture for more than 7 minutes.

  16. Fundamental mechanisms in premixed flame propagation via vortex-flame interactions: Numerical simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantel, Thierry

    1994-01-01

    The goal of the present study is to assess numerically the ability of single-step and two-step chemical models to describe the main features encountered during the interaction between a two-dimensional vortex pair and a premixed laminar flame. In the two-step mechanism, the reaction kinetics are represented by a first chain branching reaction A + X yields 2X and a second chain termination reaction X + X yields P. This paper presents the fundamental mechanisms occurring during vortex-flame interactions and the relative impact of the major parameters encountered in turbulent premixed flames and suspected of playing a role in quenching mechanism: (1) Influence of stretch is investigated by analyzing the contribution of curvature and tangential strain on the local structure of the flame. The effect of Lewis number on the flame response to a strained field is analyzed. (2) Radiative heat losses which are suspected to be partially or totally responsible for quenching are also investigated. (3) The effect of the diffusion of the radicals is studied using a two-step mechanism in which an intermediate species is present. The parameters of the two-step mechanism are entirely determined from physical arguments. (4) Precise quantitative comparisons between the DNS and the experimental results of Samaniego et al are performed. These comparisons concern the evolution of the minimum heat release rate found along the flame front during the interaction and the distribution of the heat release rate along the flame front.

  17. Flame-Vortex Studies to Quantify Markstein Numbers Needed to Model Flame Extinction Limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driscoll, James F.; Feikema, Douglas A.

    2003-01-01

    This has quantified a database of Markstein numbers for unsteady flames; future work will quantify a database of flame extinction limits for unsteady conditions. Unsteady extinction limits have not been documented previously; both a stretch rate and a residence time must be measured, since extinction requires that the stretch rate be sufficiently large for a sufficiently long residence time. Ma was measured for an inwardly-propagating flame (IPF) that is negatively-stretched under microgravity conditions. Computations also were performed using RUN-1DL to explain the measurements. The Markstein number of an inwardly-propagating flame, for both the microgravity experiment and the computations, is significantly larger than that of an outwardy-propagating flame. The computed profiles of the various species within the flame suggest reasons. Computed hydrogen concentrations build up ahead of the IPF but not the OPF. Understanding was gained by running the computations for both simplified and full-chemistry conditions. Numerical Simulations. To explain the experimental findings, numerical simulations of both inwardly and outwardly propagating spherical flames (with complex chemistry) were generated using the RUN-1DL code, which includes 16 species and 46 reactions.

  18. Time series photometry of faint cataclysmic variables with a CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Timothy Mark Cameron

    1992-08-01

    I describe a new hardware and software environment for the practice of time-series stellar photometry with the CCD systems available at McDonald Observatory. This instrument runs suitable CCD's in frame transfer mode and permits windowing on the CCD image to maximize the duty cycle of the photometer. Light curves may be extracted and analyzed in real time at the telescope and image data are stored for later, more thorough analysis. I describe a star tracking algorithm, which is optimized for a timeseries of images of the same stellar field. I explore the extraction of stellar brightness measures from these images using circular software apertures and develop a complete description of the noise properties of this technique. I show that scintillation and pixelization noise have a significant effect on high quality observations. I demonstrate that optimal sampling and profile fitting techniques are unnecessarily complex or detrimental methods of obtaining stellar brightness measures under conditions commonly encountered in timeseries CCD photometry. I compare CCD's and photomultiplier tubes as detectors for timeseries photometry using light curves of a variety of stars obtained simultaneously with both detectors and under equivalent conditions. A CCD can produce useful data under conditions when a photomultiplier tube cannot, and a CCD will often produce more reliable results even under photometric conditions. I prevent studies of the cataclysmic variables (CV's) AL Com, CP Eri, V Per, and DO Leo made using the time series CCD photometer. AL Com is a very faint CV at high Galactic latitude and a bona fide Population II CV. Some of the properties of AL Com are similar to the dwarf nova WZ Sge and others are similar to the intermediate polar EX Hya, but overall AL Com is unlike any other well-studied cataclysmic variable. CP Eri is shown to be the fifth known interacting binary white dwarf. V Per was the first CV found to have an orbital period near the middle of the

  19. Studies of Premixed Laminar and Turbulent Flames at Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronney, Paul D.

    1993-01-01

    The work of the Principal Investigator (PI) has encompassed four topics related to the experimental and theoretical study of combustion limits in premixed flames at microgravity, as discussed in the following sections. These topics include: (1) radiation effects on premixed gas flames; (2) flame structure and stability at low Lewis number; (3) flame propagation and extinction is cylindrical tubes; and (4) experimental simulation of combustion processes using autocatalytic chemical reactions.

  20. The detailed flame structure of highly stretched turbulent premixed methane-air flames

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.C.; Peters, N.; Schneemann, G.A.; Wruck, N.; Renz, U.; Mansour, M.S.

    1996-11-01

    The premixed stoichiometric turbulent methane flames are investigated on a piloted Bunsen burner with mean nozzle exit velocities of 65, 50, and 30 m/s. Advanced laser diagnostics of the flow field using two-component and two-point laser Doppler anemometer, as well as of the scalar fields with 2-D Rayleigh thermometry and line Raman/Rayleigh laser-induced predissociation fluorescence techniques, are applied to obtain both the instantaneous and mean flame structure in terms of velocity, temperature, and major species concentrations, as well as turbulent kinetic energy and length scales. The three flames cover the entire range of the distributed-reaction-zones regime from the borderline to the well-stirred reactor regime to the flamelet regime. Measurements were from X/D = 2.5 above the nozzle exit plane to X/D = 12.5 downstream. Thus, a complete database is established for comparison with the numerical predictions. Within the mixing layer between the unburnt gas and the pilot flame, the instantaneous temperatures are much lower than the adiabatic flame temperature due to the short residence time and heat loss to the burner. With increasing residence time the mean flame temperature increases in the axial direction. The radial mixing of the turbulence generated with the shear layers between the nozzle jet stream and surrounding pilot stream is suppressed, such that the turbulence kinetic energy remains nearly constant on the centerline. From the two-dimensional temperature fields instantaneous iso-temperature contours are plotted showing broad regions where burnt and unburnt gas are partially mixed. These regions are interpreted in terms of the quench scale {ell}{sub q} = ({epsilon}{tau}{sub c}{sup 3}){sup 1/2}. The measured values of the flame brush thickness are proportional to the quench scale for the two high-velocity flames, whereas the low-velocity flame exhibits essential flamelet behavior.

  1. The Flame Challenge and Communicating Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ames, Ben

    2013-04-01

    When famed actor and science enthusiast Alan Alda was 11 years-old he was itching to know the science behind a flame. He asked his science teacher but her blunt response didn't exactly satisfy his curiosity. ``It's oxidation,'' she said. 65 years later, Alan Alda launched ``The Flame Challenge,'' an annual contest encouraging scientists to improve their communication to the general public. In this talk, last year's winner discusses his approach to successfully explaining the science behind a flame to a wide audience. Because communicating science is a pillar of the scientific method, he shares key elements of successful communication important for engaging funders, policy-makers, students, the general public, and even other scientists.

  2. White Flame Energy switches to backhoes

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2005-06-01

    The mountaintop coal operator, White Flame Energy has switched to different truck-shovel arrangement. Along with many surface mining operations throughout central Appalachia, the company is using hoe-configured hydraulic excavators as opposed to the traditional front-shovel arrangements. Located in Varney, WV, White Flame Energy uses two Terex O & K mining shovels, an RH170 and an RH 200, which have the capacity to move 2 million cu yards per month from five seams, primarily the Coalburg, Stockton, and No 5 Block and associated rider seams. The article records conversations on the operations with Mike Vines, the general manager, and Don Nicewonder, the owner of White Flame Energy. 2 photos.

  3. Pentan isomers compound flame front structure

    SciTech Connect

    Mansurov, Z.A.; Mironenko, A.W.; Bodikov, D.U.; Rachmetkaliev, K.N.

    1995-08-13

    The fuels (hexane, pentane, diethyl ether) and conditions investigated in this study are relevant to engine knock in spark- ignition engines. A review is provided of the field of low temperature hydrocarbon oxidation. Studies were made of radical and stable intermediate distribution in the front of cool flames: Maximum concentrations of H atoms and peroxy radicals were observed in the luminous zone of the cool flame front. Peroxy radicals appear before the luminous zone at 430 K due to diffusion. H atoms were found in cool flames of butane and hexane. H atoms diffuses from the luminous zone to the side of the fresh mixture, and they penetrate into the fresh mixture to a small depth. Extension of action sphear of peroxy radicals in the fresh mixture is much greater than that of H atoms due to their small activity and high concentrations.

  4. Fatal rhabdomyolysis in a flame burn patient.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, D; Hudson, D A

    1997-08-01

    Rhabdomyolysis due to flame burns is not well described. A case of fatal rhabdomyolysis in an epileptic patient who sustained 65 per cent body surface area, very deep, flame burns is described. It appears as if the sustained muscle compression from the restrictive, circumferential eschar was the major factor in the aetiology of the rhabdomyolysis. Despite aggressive fluid management, the patient died of acute renal failure and adult respiratory distress syndrome. We have subsequently identified three other cases of pigmenturia occurring following burns. It would seem as if rhabdomyolysis following extensive full thickness burns may be more common than previously suggested. Fluid requirements are in excess of those proposed by traditional protocols. Rhabdomyolysis in flame burn patients indicates a poor prognosis. PMID:9426917

  5. Flame trench analysis of NLS vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeytinoglu, Nuri

    1993-01-01

    The present study takes the initial steps of establishing a better flame trench design criteria for future National Launch System vehicles. A three-dimensional finite element computer model for predicting the transient thermal and structural behavior of the flame trench walls was developed using both I-DEAS and MSC/NASTRAN software packages. The results of JANNAF Standardized Plume flowfield calculations of sea-level exhaust plume of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), Space Transportation Main Engine (STME), and Advanced Solid Rocket Motors (ASRM) were analyzed for different axial distances. The results of sample calculations, using the developed finite element model, are included. The further suggestions are also reported for enhancing the overall analysis of the flame trench model.

  6. Different spreading regimes of spray-flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suard, Sylvain; Haldenwang, Pierre; Nicoli, Colette

    2004-05-01

    We present a minimal model of spray combustion to investigate a flame front propagating through a fuel-lean mixture of fuel vapor, droplets and air. The model relies on a main control parameter, Da, named the Damkoehler number, which allows us to take into account a large variety of fuel sprays. Numerical results reveal, as a function of Da, a wide range of spray-flame structures, including the classical gaseous premixed flame, a specific regime controlled by vaporisation, and a pulsating mode of propagation. The latter appears when the vaporisation is smaller than (or equal to) the reaction time, and it occurs even with a unit Lewis number. To cite this article: S. Suard et al., C. R. Mecanique 332 (2004).

  7. Aerothermodynamic properties of stretched flames in enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotman, D. A.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    Flames are stretched by being pulled along their frontal surface by the flow field in which they reside. Their trajectories tend to approach particle paths, acquiring eventually the role of contact boundaries, -interfaces between the burnt and unburnt medium that may broaden solely as a consequence of diffusion. Fundamental properties of flow fields governing such flames are determined here on the basis of the zero Mach number model, providng a rational method of approach to the computational analysis of combustion fields in enclosures where, besides the aerodynamic properties flow, the thermodynamic process of compression must be taken into account. To illustrate its application, the method is used to reveal the mechanism of formation of a tulip-shape flame in a rectangular enclosure under nonturbulent flow conditions.

  8. Liquid flame spraying for glass coloring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, K. A.; Tikkanen, J.; Keskinen, J.; Pitkänen, V.; Eerola, M.; Siikamaki, R.; Rajala, M.

    1999-12-01

    The liquid flame spraying process has been developed to uniformly color hot glass objects. A solution consisting of a metal nitrate dissolved in alcohol or water is fed to an oxyfuel torch and atomized in the flame. The liquid evaporates from the droplet, and subsequent reactions produce metals or metallic oxides that impact the hot glass surface. Flame spraying of Co, Cu, and Ag solutions onto soda-lime silica glass at 900 to 1000 °C have produced blue, blue-green, and yellow colors. Typical spraying times are 5 to 20 s. Other colors have been produced by using a combination of transition metal ions. This method has found application in studio production and in volume manufacturing of glassware.

  9. Numerical modelling of ion transport in flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jie; Belhi, Memdouh; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Mani Sarathy, S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a modelling framework to compute the diffusivity and mobility of ions in flames. The (n, 6, 4) interaction potential is adopted to model collisions between neutral and charged species. All required parameters in the potential are related to the polarizability of the species pair via semi-empirical formulas, which are derived using the most recently published data or best estimates. The resulting framework permits computation of the transport coefficients of any ion found in a hydrocarbon flame. The accuracy of the proposed method is evaluated by comparing its predictions with experimental data on the mobility of selected ions in single-component neutral gases. Based on this analysis, the value of a model constant available in the literature is modified in order to improve the model's predictions. The newly determined ion transport coefficients are used as part of a previously developed numerical approach to compute the distribution of charged species in a freely propagating premixed lean CH4/O2 flame. Since a significant scatter of polarizability data exists in the literature, the effects of changes in polarizability on ion transport properties and the spatial distribution of ions in flames are explored. Our analysis shows that changes in polarizability propagate with decreasing effect from binary transport coefficients to species number densities. We conclude that the chosen polarizability value has a limited effect on the ion distribution in freely propagating flames. We expect that the modelling framework proposed here will benefit future efforts in modelling the effect of external voltages on flames. Supplemental data for this article can be accessed at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13647830.2015.1090018.

  10. Large Scale Flame Spread Environmental Characterization Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayman, Lauren K.; Olson, Sandra L.; Gokoghi, Suleyman A.; Brooker, John E.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Kacher, Henry F.

    2013-01-01

    Under the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Spacecraft Fire Safety Demonstration Project (SFSDP), as a risk mitigation activity in support of the development of a large-scale fire demonstration experiment in microgravity, flame-spread tests were conducted in normal gravity on thin, cellulose-based fuels in a sealed chamber. The primary objective of the tests was to measure pressure rise in a chamber as sample material, burning direction (upward/downward), total heat release, heat release rate, and heat loss mechanisms were varied between tests. A Design of Experiments (DOE) method was imposed to produce an array of tests from a fixed set of constraints and a coupled response model was developed. Supplementary tests were run without experimental design to additionally vary select parameters such as initial chamber pressure. The starting chamber pressure for each test was set below atmospheric to prevent chamber overpressure. Bottom ignition, or upward propagating burns, produced rapid acceleratory turbulent flame spread. Pressure rise in the chamber increases as the amount of fuel burned increases mainly because of the larger amount of heat generation and, to a much smaller extent, due to the increase in gaseous number of moles. Top ignition, or downward propagating burns, produced a steady flame spread with a very small flat flame across the burning edge. Steady-state pressure is achieved during downward flame spread as the pressure rises and plateaus. This indicates that the heat generation by the flame matches the heat loss to surroundings during the longer, slower downward burns. One heat loss mechanism included mounting a heat exchanger directly above the burning sample in the path of the plume to act as a heat sink and more efficiently dissipate the heat due to the combustion event. This proved an effective means for chamber overpressure mitigation for those tests producing the most total heat release and thusly was determined to be a feasible mitigation

  11. Quenching of flames by magnetic fields (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, S.

    1988-11-01

    The effects of magnetic fields on combustion of alcohol with the aid of platinum catalysis have been studied to simulate in part the oxidation of organic matter in the living body, and it has been found that the combustion reactions are influenced by magnetic fields. It has also been observed that candle flames are pressed down by magnetic fields of higher intensities when flames are exposed to gradient magnetic fields in a range 20-200 T/m under 0.5-1.4 T. Apart from the combustion experiments, flows of carbon dioxide, oxygen, nitrogen, and argon gases were exposed to magnetic fields up to 2.2 T and 300 T/m. The flows of these gases were blocked or disturbed by the magnetic fields. The purpose of the present study is to clarify the mechanisms for the phenomena observed in the experiments of magnetic effects on combustion and gas flow. An electromagnet with a pair of columnar magnetic poles of which inner sidepieces were hollowed out was used. The magnetic fields of 1.5 T at the brim gave a gradient of 50-100 T/m in the direction perpendicular to the pole axis when the distance of the airgap was in a range 5-10 mm. A candle was burned in the hollowed space between magnetic poles, and candle flames were exposed to magnetic fields. The flames were quenched in a few seconds after the onset of field exposures. Oxygen gas as a paramagnetic molecule can be attracted to the magnetic fields of higher intensities. However, under the intensities of magnetic fields concerned, oxygen gases are not concentrated but are aligned so as to make a ``wall of oxygen'' or an ``air curtain.'' The air curtain, which is also called the ``magnetic curtain,'' blocks air flow into and out of the hollowed space. The interception of oxygen by magnetic curtain quenches flames. The magnetic curtain also presses back flames and other gases.

  12. The dynamics of turbulent premixed flames: Mechanisms and models for turbulence-flame interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Adam M.

    The use of turbulent premixed combustion in engines has been garnering renewed interest due to its potential to reduce NOx emissions. However there are many aspects of turbulence-flame interaction that must be better understood before such flames can be accurately modeled. The focus of this dissertation is to develop an improved understanding for the manner in which turbulence interacts with a premixed flame in the 'thin flamelet regime'. To do so, two new diagnostics were developed and employed in a turbulent slot Bunsen flame. These diagnostics, Cinema-Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry and Orthogonal-Plane Cinema-Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry, provided temporally resolved velocity and flame surface measurements in two- and three-dimensions with rates of up to 3 kHz and spatial resolutions as low as 280 mum. Using these measurements, the mechanisms with which turbulence generates flame surface area were studied. It was found that the previous concept that flame stretch is characterized by counter-rotating vortex pairs does not accurately describe real turbulence-flame interactions. Analysis of the experimental data showed that the straining of the flame surface is determined by coherent structures of fluid dynamic strain rate, while the wrinkling is caused by vortical structures. Furthermore, it was shown that the canonical vortex pair configuration is not an accurate reflection of the real interaction geometry. Hence, models developed based on this geometry are unlikely to be accurate. Previous models for the strain rate, curvature stretch rate, and turbulent burning velocity were evaluated. It was found that the previous models did not accurately predict the measured data for a variety of reasons: the assumed interaction geometries did not encompass enough possibilities to describe the possible effects of real turbulence, the turbulence was not properly characterized, and the transport of flame surface area was not always considered. New models

  13. Flame-in-gas-shield and miniature diffusion flame hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: optimization and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschner, Karel; Musil, Stanislav; Dědina, Jiří

    2015-07-01

    A detailed optimization of relevant experimental parameters of two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: flame-in-gas-shield atomizer with a two-channel shielding unit and a standard atomizer for atomic fluorescence spectrometry, miniature diffusion flame, was performed. Arsine, generated by the reaction with NaBH4 in a flow injection arrangement, was chosen as the model hydride. Analytical characteristics of both the atomizers (sensitivity, noise, limits of detection) were compared. Under optimum conditions sensitivity obtained with flame-in-gas-shield atomizer was approximately twice higher than with miniature diffusion flame. The additional advantage of flame-in-gas-shield atomizer is significantly lower flame emission resulting in a better signal to noise ratio. The resulting arsenic limits of detection for miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-gas-shield atomizer were 3.8 ng l- 1 and 1.0 ng l- 1, respectively.

  14. 30 CFR 75.600 - Trailing cables; flame resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Trailing cables; flame resistance. 75.600... cables; flame resistance. Trailing cables used in coal mines shall meet the requirements established by the Secretary for flame-resistant cables....

  15. 30 CFR 75.600-1 - Approved cables; flame resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Approved cables; flame resistance. 75.600-1 Section 75.600-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE... cables; flame resistance. Cables shall be accepted or approved by MSHA as flame resistant....

  16. 46 CFR 151.03-23 - Flame arrestor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Flame arrestor. 151.03-23 Section 151.03-23 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-23 Flame arrestor. Any device or assembly of cellular, tubular, pressure or other type used for preventing the passage of flames into...

  17. 49 CFR 392.25 - Flame producing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Flame producing devices. 392.25 Section 392.25... VEHICLES Stopped Commercial Motor Vehicles § 392.25 Flame producing devices. No driver shall use or permit the use of any flame-producing emergency signal for protecting any commercial motor...

  18. 49 CFR 392.25 - Flame producing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flame producing devices. 392.25 Section 392.25... VEHICLES Stopped Commercial Motor Vehicles § 392.25 Flame producing devices. No driver shall use or permit the use of any flame-producing emergency signal for protecting any commercial motor...

  19. 49 CFR 392.24 - Emergency signals; flame-producing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emergency signals; flame-producing. 392.24 Section... COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES Stopped Commercial Motor Vehicles § 392.24 Emergency signals; flame-producing. No driver shall attach or permit any person to attach a lighted fusee or other flame-producing...

  20. 49 CFR 392.24 - Emergency signals; flame-producing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emergency signals; flame-producing. 392.24 Section... COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES Stopped Commercial Motor Vehicles § 392.24 Emergency signals; flame-producing. No driver shall attach or permit any person to attach a lighted fusee or other flame-producing...

  1. 49 CFR 392.24 - Emergency signals; flame-producing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency signals; flame-producing. 392.24 Section... COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES Stopped Commercial Motor Vehicles § 392.24 Emergency signals; flame-producing. No driver shall attach or permit any person to attach a lighted fusee or other flame-producing...

  2. 46 CFR 151.03-23 - Flame arrestor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Flame arrestor. 151.03-23 Section 151.03-23 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-23 Flame arrestor. Any device or assembly of cellular, tubular, pressure or other type used for preventing the passage of flames into...

  3. 30 CFR 7.26 - Flame test apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Flame test apparatus. 7.26 Section 7.26 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Brattice Cloth and Ventilation Tubing § 7.26 Flame test apparatus. The principal parts of the apparatus used to test for flame-resistance of...

  4. FLAME DENITRATION AND REDUCTION OF URANIUM NITRATE TO URANIUM DIOXIDE

    DOEpatents

    Hedley, W.H.; Roehrs, R.J.; Henderson, C.M.

    1962-06-26

    A process is given for converting uranyl nitrate solution to uranium dioxide. The process comprises spraying fine droplets of aqueous uranyl nitrate solution into a hightemperature hydrocarbon flame, said flame being deficient in oxygen approximately 30%, retaining the feed in the flame for a sufficient length of time to reduce the nitrate to the dioxide, and recovering uranium dioxide. (AEC)

  5. 49 CFR 392.25 - Flame producing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Flame producing devices. 392.25 Section 392.25... VEHICLES Stopped Commercial Motor Vehicles § 392.25 Flame producing devices. No driver shall use or permit the use of any flame-producing emergency signal for protecting any commercial motor...

  6. 30 CFR 75.600 - Trailing cables; flame resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Trailing cables; flame resistance. 75.600... cables; flame resistance. Trailing cables used in coal mines shall meet the requirements established by the Secretary for flame-resistant cables....

  7. 30 CFR 75.600-1 - Approved cables; flame resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Approved cables; flame resistance. 75.600-1 Section 75.600-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE... cables; flame resistance. Cables shall be accepted or approved by MSHA as flame resistant....

  8. 30 CFR 75.600-1 - Approved cables; flame resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Approved cables; flame resistance. 75.600-1 Section 75.600-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE... cables; flame resistance. Cables shall be accepted or approved by MSHA as flame resistant....

  9. 49 CFR 392.25 - Flame producing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Flame producing devices. 392.25 Section 392.25... VEHICLES Stopped Commercial Motor Vehicles § 392.25 Flame producing devices. No driver shall use or permit the use of any flame-producing emergency signal for protecting any commercial motor...

  10. 30 CFR 75.600 - Trailing cables; flame resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Trailing cables; flame resistance. 75.600... cables; flame resistance. Trailing cables used in coal mines shall meet the requirements established by the Secretary for flame-resistant cables....

  11. 46 CFR 151.03-23 - Flame arrestor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flame arrestor. 151.03-23 Section 151.03-23 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-23 Flame arrestor. Any device or assembly of cellular, tubular, pressure or other type used for preventing the passage of flames into...

  12. 49 CFR 392.25 - Flame producing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flame producing devices. 392.25 Section 392.25... VEHICLES Stopped Commercial Motor Vehicles § 392.25 Flame producing devices. No driver shall use or permit the use of any flame-producing emergency signal for protecting any commercial motor...

  13. 30 CFR 75.600 - Trailing cables; flame resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Trailing cables; flame resistance. 75.600... cables; flame resistance. Trailing cables used in coal mines shall meet the requirements established by the Secretary for flame-resistant cables....

  14. 30 CFR 75.600-1 - Approved cables; flame resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Approved cables; flame resistance. 75.600-1 Section 75.600-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE... cables; flame resistance. Cables shall be accepted or approved by MSHA as flame resistant....

  15. 46 CFR 151.03-23 - Flame arrestor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flame arrestor. 151.03-23 Section 151.03-23 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-23 Flame arrestor. Any device or assembly of cellular, tubular, pressure or other type used for preventing the passage of flames into...

  16. 49 CFR 392.24 - Emergency signals; flame-producing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emergency signals; flame-producing. 392.24 Section... COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES Stopped Commercial Motor Vehicles § 392.24 Emergency signals; flame-producing. No driver shall attach or permit any person to attach a lighted fusee or other flame-producing...

  17. 46 CFR 151.03-23 - Flame arrestor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Flame arrestor. 151.03-23 Section 151.03-23 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-23 Flame arrestor. Any device or assembly of cellular, tubular, pressure or other type used for preventing the passage of flames into...

  18. 49 CFR 392.24 - Emergency signals; flame-producing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emergency signals; flame-producing. 392.24 Section... COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES Stopped Commercial Motor Vehicles § 392.24 Emergency signals; flame-producing. No driver shall attach or permit any person to attach a lighted fusee or other flame-producing...

  19. 30 CFR 75.600-1 - Approved cables; flame resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approved cables; flame resistance. 75.600-1... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.600-1 Approved cables; flame resistance. Cables shall be accepted or approved by MSHA as flame resistant....

  20. 27 CFR 555.212 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Smoking and open flames..., AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE EXPLOSIVES COMMERCE IN EXPLOSIVES Storage § 555.212 Smoking and open flames. Smoking, matches, open flames, and spark producing devices are not permitted: (a) In...

  1. 27 CFR 555.212 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2012-04-01 2010-04-01 true Smoking and open flames..., AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE EXPLOSIVES COMMERCE IN EXPLOSIVES Storage § 555.212 Smoking and open flames. Smoking, matches, open flames, and spark producing devices are not permitted: (a) In...

  2. 30 CFR 56.6904 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 56.6904 Section 56.6904 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Requirements § 56.6904 Smoking and open flames. Smoking and use of open flames shall not be permitted within...

  3. 30 CFR 56.6904 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 56.6904 Section 56.6904 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Requirements § 56.6904 Smoking and open flames. Smoking and use of open flames shall not be permitted within...

  4. 30 CFR 56.7805 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 56.7805 Section 56... Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7805 Smoking and open flames. Persons shall not smoke and open... smoking and open flames shall be posted in these areas....

  5. 30 CFR 57.7805 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 57.7805 Section 57... Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7805 Smoking and open flames. Persons shall not... warning against smoking and open flames shall be posted in these areas....

  6. 30 CFR 56.7805 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 56.7805 Section 56... Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7805 Smoking and open flames. Persons shall not smoke and open... smoking and open flames shall be posted in these areas....

  7. 27 CFR 555.212 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Smoking and open flames..., AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE EXPLOSIVES COMMERCE IN EXPLOSIVES Storage § 555.212 Smoking and open flames. Smoking, matches, open flames, and spark producing devices are not permitted: (a) In...

  8. 30 CFR 56.7805 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 56.7805 Section 56... Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7805 Smoking and open flames. Persons shall not smoke and open... smoking and open flames shall be posted in these areas....

  9. 27 CFR 555.212 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Smoking and open flames..., AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE EXPLOSIVES COMMERCE IN EXPLOSIVES Storage § 555.212 Smoking and open flames. Smoking, matches, open flames, and spark producing devices are not permitted: (a) In...

  10. 27 CFR 555.212 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Smoking and open flames..., AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE EXPLOSIVES COMMERCE IN EXPLOSIVES Storage § 555.212 Smoking and open flames. Smoking, matches, open flames, and spark producing devices are not permitted: (a) In...

  11. 30 CFR 56.6904 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 56.6904 Section 56.6904 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Requirements § 56.6904 Smoking and open flames. Smoking and use of open flames shall not be permitted within...

  12. 30 CFR 57.7805 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 57.7805 Section 57... Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7805 Smoking and open flames. Persons shall not... warning against smoking and open flames shall be posted in these areas....

  13. 30 CFR 57.7805 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 57.7805 Section 57... Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7805 Smoking and open flames. Persons shall not... warning against smoking and open flames shall be posted in these areas....

  14. 30 CFR 57.7805 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 57.7805 Section 57... Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7805 Smoking and open flames. Persons shall not... warning against smoking and open flames shall be posted in these areas....

  15. 30 CFR 56.6904 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 56.6904 Section 56.6904 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Requirements § 56.6904 Smoking and open flames. Smoking and use of open flames shall not be permitted within...

  16. 30 CFR 56.6904 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 56.6904 Section 56.6904 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Requirements § 56.6904 Smoking and open flames. Smoking and use of open flames shall not be permitted within...

  17. 30 CFR 57.7805 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 57.7805 Section 57... Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7805 Smoking and open flames. Persons shall not... warning against smoking and open flames shall be posted in these areas....

  18. 30 CFR 56.7805 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 56.7805 Section 56... Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7805 Smoking and open flames. Persons shall not smoke and open... smoking and open flames shall be posted in these areas....

  19. 30 CFR 56.7805 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 56.7805 Section 56... Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7805 Smoking and open flames. Persons shall not smoke and open... smoking and open flames shall be posted in these areas....

  20. 63. VIEW OF FLAME BUCKET AND LAUNCHER FROM SOUTHEAST. TRICHLOROETHENE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. VIEW OF FLAME BUCKET AND LAUNCHER FROM SOUTHEAST. TRICHLOROETHENE RECOVERY TANK LEFT OF FLAME BUCKET; LIQUID OXYGEN CATCH TANK RIGHT OF FLAME BUCKET. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  1. Effect of microgravity on flame spread over a thin fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, S.L.

    1987-12-01

    A flame spreading over a thermally thin cellulose fuel was studied in a quiescent microgravity environment. Flame spread over two different fuel thicknesses was studied in ambient oxygen-nitrogen environments from the limiting oxygen concentration to 100 percent oxygen at 1 atm pressure. Comparative normal-gravity tests were also conducted. Gravity was found to play an important role in the mechanism of flame spread. In lower oxygen environments, the buoyant flow induced in normal gravity was found to accelerate the flame spread rate as compared to the microgravity flame spread rates. It was also found to stabilize the flame in oxidizer environments, where microgravity flames in a quiescent environment extinguish. In oxygen-rich environments, however, it was determined that gravity does not play an important role in the flame spread mechanism. Fuel thickness influences the flame spread rate in both normal gravity and microgravity. The flame spread rate varies inversely with fuel thickness in both normal gravity and in an oxygen-rich microgravity environment. In lower oxygen microgravity environments, however, the inverse relationship breaks down because finite-rate kinetics and heat losses become important. Two different extinction limits were found in microgravity for the two thicknesses of fuel. This is in contrast to the normal-gravity extinction limit, which was found to be independent of fuel thickness. In microgravity the flame is quenched because of excessive thermal losses, whereas in normal gravity the flame is extinguished by blowoff.

  2. Adaptive Optics Photometry and Astrometry of Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Lewis C., Jr.; Turner, Nils H.; Bradford, L. William; ten Brummelaar, Theo A.; Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Kuhn, Jeff R.; Whitman, Kathryn; Perrin, Marshall D.; Graham, James R.

    2005-11-01

    We present astrometric and photometric measurements of 39 binary stars made with the adaptive optics system on the 3.6 m Advanced Electro-Optical System (AEOS) telescope, taken from 2002 November to 2003 March. The binaries have separations ranging from 0.08" to 5.11" and differential magnitudes ranging from 0.096 to 7.9. Also, we include a list of observations of 23 known binaries that we were unable to resolve. In the process of these measurements, we discovered three new companions to two previously known binary stars. We also discuss the effects of scintillation and anisoplanatism on measurements of binary star photometry in adaptive optics images. Suggestions on how to minimize these effects are then given. Based on observations made at the Maui Space Surveillance System operated by Detachment 15 of the US Air Force Research Laboratory's Directed Energy Directorate.

  3. Towards photometry pipeline of the Indonesian space surveillance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyatikanto, Rhorom; Religia, Bahar; Rachman, Abdul; Dani, Tiar

    2015-09-01

    Optical observation through sub-meter telescope equipped with CCD camera becomes alternative method for increasing orbital debris detection and surveillance. This observational mode is expected to eye medium-sized objects in higher orbits (e.g. MEO, GTO, GSO & GEO), beyond the reach of usual radar system. However, such observation of fast moving objects demands special treatment and analysis technique. In this study, we performed photometric analysis of the satellite track images photographed using rehabilitated Schmidt Bima Sakti telescope in Bosscha Observatory. The Hough transformation was implemented to automatically detect linear streak from the images. From this analysis and comparison to USSPACECOM catalog, two satellites were identified and associated with inactive Thuraya-3 satellite and Satcom-3 debris which are located at geostationary orbit. Further aperture photometry analysis revealed the periodicity of tumbling Satcom-3 debris. In the near future, it is not impossible to apply similar scheme to establish an analysis pipeline for optical space surveillance system hosted in Indonesia.

  4. Asteroid models from photometry and complementary data sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaasalainen, Mikko

    2016-05-01

    I discuss inversion methods for asteroid shape and spin reconstruction with photometry (lightcurves) and complementary data sources such as adaptive optics or other images, occultation timings, interferometry, and range-Doppler radar data. These are essentially different sampling modes (generalized projections) of plane-of-sky images. An important concept in this approach is the optimal weighting of the various data modes. The maximum compatibility estimate, a multi-modal generalization of the maximum likelihood estimate, can be used for this purpose. I discuss the fundamental properties of lightcurve inversion by examining the two-dimensional case that, though not usable in our three-dimensional world, is simple to analyze, and it shares essentially the same uniqueness and stability properties as the 3-D case. After this, I review the main aspects of 3-D shape representations, lightcurve inversion, and the inclusion of complementary data.

  5. Macular pigment and the edge hypothesis of flicker photometry.

    PubMed

    Bone, Richard A; Landrum, John T; Gibert, Jorge C

    2004-12-01

    Heterochromatic flicker photometry is commonly used to measure macular pigment optical density (MPOD) in the human retina. It has been proposed, and accepted by many, that the MPOD so measured represents the value at a retinal location corresponding to the edge of the flickering, circular stimulus. We have investigated this proposal by using a series of annular stimuli to determine the MPOD distribution in the central 1.5 degrees of the retina for both eyes of 10 subjects. The MPOD obtained using a 1.5 degrees circular stimulus matched the MPOD distribution at a retinal eccentricity that was always less than the stimulus radius, and averaged, for the 10 subjects, 51% of the stimulus radius. Similar results were obtained using a 1 degrees stimulus. Thus the edge hypothesis is inconsistent with our data. We suggest that involuntary eye movements may be responsible for an apparent edge effect.

  6. Astrometry and photometry in the globular cluster M2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cudworth, Kyle M.; Rauscher, Bernard J.

    1987-04-01

    Proper motions and photometry have been obtained for 301 stars down to V = about 16 in the region of the globular cluster M2. Membership probabilities derived from the proper motions show that over 200 of these stars are highly probable cluster members, including a number of UV-bright stars. A few stars suspected of being field stars in a recent dynamical study of the cluster of Pryor et al. (1986) are confirmed to be nonmembers. The internal proper-motion dispersion has been detected and is clearly isotropic out to about 3 arcmin from the cluster center. The proper-motion and radial-velocity dispersions have been equated to yield a distance of 11.0 + or - 1.7 kpc independent of any standard-candle assumptions. An accurate position of the cluster center has been measured that differs markedly from that found by Shawl and White (1986). A large space velocity has been derived for the cluster.

  7. Photometry of stars in the Cas OB5 Associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanriver, Mehmet; Keskin, Ahmet

    2016-07-01

    OB associations are a grouping of very young associations, contain 10-100 very hot massive stars, spectral types O and B. Also, the OB associations contain low and intermediate mass stars, too. Association members are believed to form within the same small volume inside a giant molecular cloud. Once the surrounding dust and gas is blown away, the remaining stars become not tied up and begin to drift separately. It is believed that the majority of all stars in the Milky Way were formed in OB associations. O type stars are short-lived, and will be at an end as supernovae after roundly a million years. OB associations are generally only a few million years in age or less. In this study, the photometry of UU Cas and field star which been Cas OB5 association member was carried out. Light curves and color diagrams are given in the study.

  8. Deep CCD photometry in globular clusters. VIII - M12

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, T.; Richer, H.B.; Fahlman, G.G. )

    1989-10-01

    Results are presented on UBV photometry, obtained using the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, for a single field (2.2 x 3.5 arcmin) located 3.5 arcmin from the center of the galactic globular cluster M12 (NGC 6218). The color-magnitude diagram (CMD) indicated a possible existence of a sequence of binary stars. The fundamental cluster parameters for M12 derived from the present data are E(B-V) = 0.23 + or - 0.04 and (m-M)V = 14.25 + or - 0.20. An overlay of the isochrones and the CMD yields a best-estimate age of 17 Gyr. 49 refs.

  9. SPITZER IRAC PHOTOMETRY FOR TIME SERIES IN CROWDED FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Novati, S. Calchi; Beichman, C.; Gould, A.; Fausnaugh, M.; Gaudi, B. S.; Pogge, R. W.; Wibking, B.; Zhu, W.; Poleski, R.; Yee, J. C.; Bryden, G.; Henderson, C. B.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Carey, S.; Udalski, A.; Pawlak, M.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Collaboration: Spitzer team; OGLE group; and others

    2015-12-01

    We develop a new photometry algorithm that is optimized for the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) Spitzer time series in crowded fields and that is particularly adapted to faint or heavily blended targets. We apply this to the 170 targets from the 2015 Spitzer microlensing campaign and present the results of three variants of this algorithm in an online catalog. We present detailed accounts of the application of this algorithm to two difficult cases, one very faint and the other very crowded. Several of Spitzer's instrumental characteristics that drive the specific features of this algorithm are shared by Kepler and WFIRST, implying that these features may prove to be a useful starting point for algorithms designed for microlensing campaigns by these other missions.

  10. Millisecond optical photometry of the DQ Herculis objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imamura, James N.; Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.

    1988-01-01

    The results of millisecond optical photometry of the DQ Herculis stars EX Hya, H2252-035, V1223 Sgr, and AE Aqr obtained at the Las Campanas Observatory and Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory during the years 1985, 1986, and 1987 are reported. The data for coherent and incoherent features are searched for. Coherent features (other than those previously known) were not detected for frequencies between 0.1 and 250 Hz at 4-sigma upper limits of 0.05-0.4 percent. Evidence is not found for 1-3 s, quasi-coherent features. Such features have been detected in the optical emission of the AM Her objects AN UMa, EF Eri, and E1405-451. Because of the similarities between AM Her and DQ Her objects, it was suggested that such quasi-coherent features might also be found in the DQ Her objects.

  11. Results of the 2015 Mexican Asteroid Photometry Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sada, Pedro V.; Navarro-Meza, Samuel; Reyes-Ruiz, Mauricio; Olguin, Lorenzo L.; Saucedo, Julio C.; Loera-Gonzalez, Pablo

    2016-04-01

    The 2015 Mexican Asteroid Photometry Campaign was organized at the 2nd National Planetary Astrophysics Workshop held in 2015 March at the Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León in Monterrey, México. Three asteroids were selected for coordinated observations from several Mexican observatories. We report full lightcurves for the main-belt asteroid 1084 Tamariwa (P = 6.195 ± 0.001 h) and near-Earth asteroid (NEA) 4055 Magellan (P = 7.479 ± 0.001 h). Asteroid 1466 Mundleria was also observed on eight nights but no lightcurve was obtained because of its faintness, a crowded field-of-view, and low amplitude (<0.03 mag).

  12. Three Years of Photometry of the Delta Cepheid T Vulpecula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, H. T.; Kyaw, T. T.

    2004-12-01

    Three years of UBV photoelectric photometry are presented for the Delta Cepheid, T Vulpecula. The observations were made by the Phoenix-10 automatic photoelectric telescope at the Fairborn Observatory in southern Arizona. T Vul was observed on over 100 different nights during this three-year period. Determination of times of maxima is proceeding using the "master curve" technique suggested by David G. Turner (Saint Mary's University, Halifax). We are thankful for the assistance of Louis J. Boyd (Fairborn Observatory) for telescope operations, Michael A. Seeds (Franklin and Marshall College) for telescope management and initial automated data reduction, and Russell M. Genet (Orion Observatory) and James R. Mueller (California Polytechnic State University) for technical advice. We acknowledge financial support by the Orion Observatory (observation funds) and the Department of Mathematics, California Polytechnic State University (conference and travel funds).

  13. Recovering The Photometry Of Brighter Than Saturated Objects In SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahab, William

    2007-05-01

    We present the results of a technique that recovers the integrity of the SDSS photometry from bright (m < 15) and/or saturated objects in the SDSS. Bright objects saturate the CCD used by the SDSS, with overabundant electrons spilling over to nearby pixels, resulting in bleed trails. The photometric pipeline should, and indeed does, effectively process these bleed trails yielding usable data. This technique filters objects based on their specific flags, and recovers the stellar locus in color-color space. Objects as bright as g = 13 were extremely well recovered, as well as much of the data down to g = 11. We used these data to search for blue, saturated objects, hoping to find bright quasars. No new quasars were discovered, but several previously known objects, including 3C 273, were. We did discover a new cataclysmic variable, demonstrating the viability of this technique in the search for new, bright objects.

  14. An interactive modular design for computerized photometry in spectrochemical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, V. L.

    1980-01-01

    A general functional description of totally automatic photometry of emission spectra is not available for an operating environment in which the sample compositions and analysis procedures are low-volume and non-routine. The advantages of using an interactive approach to computer control in such an operating environment are demonstrated. This approach includes modular subroutines selected at multiple-option, menu-style decision points. This style of programming is used to trace elemental determinations, including the automated reading of spectrographic plates produced by a 3.4 m Ebert mount spectrograph using a dc-arc in an argon atmosphere. The simplified control logic and modular subroutine approach facilitates innovative research and program development, yet is easily adapted to routine tasks. Operator confidence and control are increased by the built-in options including degree of automation, amount of intermediate data printed out, amount of user prompting, and multidirectional decision points.

  15. USING PHOTOMETRY TO PROBE THE CIRCUMSTELLAR ENVIRONMENT OF {delta} SCORPII

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C. E.; Wiegert, P. A.; Cyr, R. P.; Halonen, R. J.; Tycner, C.; Henry, G. W.; Muterspaugh, M. W.

    2013-05-15

    We acquired Johnson BV photometry of the binary Be disk system {delta} Scorpii during its 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012 observing seasons and used it to probe the innermost regions of the disk. We found that several disk building events have occurred during this time, resulting in an overall brightening in the V band and reddening of the system. In addition to these long-term trends, we found cyclical variability in each observing season on timescales between 60 and 100 days. We were able to reproduce the changes in the magnitude and color of {delta} Sco using our theoretical models and found that variable mass-loss rates in the range 2.5-7.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} over {approx}35 days can reproduce the observed increase in brightness.

  16. Spitzer IRAC Photometry for Time Series in Crowded Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calchi Novati, S.; Gould, A.; Yee, J. C.; Beichman, C.; Bryden, G.; Carey, S.; Fausnaugh, M.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C. B.; Pogge, R. W.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Wibking, B.; Zhu, W.; Spitzer Team; Udalski, A.; Poleski, R.; Pawlak, M.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; OGLE Group

    2015-12-01

    We develop a new photometry algorithm that is optimized for the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) Spitzer time series in crowded fields and that is particularly adapted to faint or heavily blended targets. We apply this to the 170 targets from the 2015 Spitzer microlensing campaign and present the results of three variants of this algorithm in an online catalog. We present detailed accounts of the application of this algorithm to two difficult cases, one very faint and the other very crowded. Several of Spitzer's instrumental characteristics that drive the specific features of this algorithm are shared by Kepler and WFIRST, implying that these features may prove to be a useful starting point for algorithms designed for microlensing campaigns by these other missions.

  17. Interpretation of integrated-disk photometry of Callisto and Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, K.; Ajello, J. M.; Lumme, K.; Bowell, E.

    1983-01-01

    The Lumme-Bowell (1981) theory has been used to interpret the integrated phase curves of Callisto and Ganymede, and it is noted that while the theory explains the brightness angles of these satellites up to about 80 deg solar phase angle, the observed brightness drops off at larger angles more rapidly than predicted. It is suggested that this discrepancy is due to the fact that single regolith particles must have phase functions which are much more elongated in the forward or backward scattering directions than is allowed for by the Lumme-Bowell theory. The hemispheric asymmetry in Callisto's surface texture can be explained by invoking the formation of an ice film on the trailing side, consistent with Voyager detailed photometry and thermometry of Callisto.

  18. Photometry and polarimetry study of cataclysmic variables (cvs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Arti

    2016-07-01

    We present time-resolved photometry and linear polarimetry of the two cataclysmic variables (CVs) 2MASS J01303186+6221324 and 2MASS J03451159+533514. We classify the system 2MASS J01303186+6221324 as a deeply eclipsing intermediate polar which exhibits a deep eclipse of 1.8 mag with orbital period of 3.58 hr. However, the orbital period of the system 2MASS J03451159+533514 is found to be 7.8 hr. We also report the polarimetric observations of these two systems, where the polarization data reveals same periods with those obtained from photometrically. The variations of linear polarization from 1.0-6.0 per cent are seen over an orbital cycle, with a minimum around the time of eclipse for both system.

  19. Flame-Vortex Interactions Imaged in Microgravity - To Assess the Theory Flame Stretch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driscoll, James F.

    2001-01-01

    The goals of this research are to: 1) Assess the Theory of Flame Stretch by operating a unique flame-vortex experiment under microgravity conditions in the NASA Glenn 2.2 Second Drop Tower (drops to identify operating conditions have been completed); 2) Obtain high speed shadowgraph images (500-1000 frames/s) using the drop rig (images were obtained at one-g, and the NASA Kodak RO camera is being mounted on the drop rig); 3) Obtain shadowgraph and PIV images at 1-g while varying the effects of buoyancy by controlling the Froude number (completed); 4) Numerically model the inwardly-propagating spherical flame that is observed in the experiment using full chemistry and the RUN 1DL code (completed); 5) Send images of the flame shape to Dr. G. Patniak at NRL who is numerically simulating the entire flame-vortex interaction of the present experiment (data transfer completed); and 6) Assess the feasibility of obtaining PIV velocity field images in the drop rig, which would be useful (but not required) for our assessment of the Theory of Flame Stretch (PIV images were obtained at one-g using same low laser power that is available from fiber optic cable in drop tower). The motivation for the work is to obtain novel measurement needed to develop a physically accurate model of turbulent combustion that can help in the control of engine pollutants. The unique experiment allows, for the first time, the detailed study of a negatively-curved (negatively stretched) flame, which is one of the five fundamental types of premixed flames. While there have been studies of flat flames, positively-curved (outwardly-propagating) cases and positively-strained (counterflow) cases, this is the first detailed study of a negatively-curved (inwardly-propagating) flame. The first set of drops in the 2.2 Second Drop Tower showed that microgravity provides more favorable conditions for achieving inwardly-propagating flames (IPFs) than 1-g. A vortex interacts with a flame and creates a spherical

  20. Computatonal and experimental study of laminar flames

    SciTech Connect

    Smooke, M.D.; Long, M.B.

    1993-12-01

    This research has centered on an investigation of the effects of complex chemistry and detailed transport on the structure and extinction of hydrocarbon flames in counterflow, cylindrical and coflowing axisymmetric configurations. The authors have pursued both computational and experimental aspects of the research in parallel. The computational work has focused on the application of accurate and efficient numerical methods for the solution of the one and two-dimensional nonlinear boundary value problems describing the various reacting systems. Detailed experimental measurements were performed on axisymmetric coflow flames using two-dimensional imaging techniques. In particular, spontaneous Raman scattering and laser induced fluorescence were used to measure the temperature, major and minor species profiles.

  1. Velocity profiles in laminar diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Valerie J.; Margle, Janice M.

    1986-01-01

    Velocity profiles in vertical laminar diffusion flames were measured by using laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Four fuels were used: n-heptane, iso-octane, cyclohexane, and ethyl alcohol. The velocity profiles were similar for all the fuels, although there were some differences in the peak velocities. The data compared favorably with the theoretical velocity predictions. The differences could be attributed to errors in experimental positioning and in the prediction of temperature profiles. Error in the predicted temperature profiles are probably due to the difficulty in predicting the radiative heat losses from the flame.

  2. Flame stabilization in chlorine-hydrocarbon mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Steblev, A.V.

    1986-11-01

    The authors determine the limits of stable steady-state combustion of binary mixtures of methane, propane, ethylene, and chlorine using cylindrical stabilizers of various diameters. The studies were performed on Bunsen burners. Two series of experiments were performed. The first studied the effect of stabilizer size on the limits of flame stabilization in mixtures of fixed composition having the highest flame velocity; the second studied the effect on combustion limits of mixture composition for the fixed stabilizer diameter at which the combustion limits were widest. The principles established by these experiments are used as contributing factors in the design of high-output combustion chambers for hydrocarbon-chlorine mixtures.

  3. Pdf prediction of supersonic hydrogen flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eifler, P.; Kollmann, W.

    1993-01-01

    A hybrid method for the prediction of supersonic turbulent flows with combustion is developed consisting of a second order closure for the velocity field and a multi-scalar pdf method for the local thermodynamic state. It is shown that for non-premixed flames and chemical equilibrium mixture fraction, the logarithm of the (dimensionless) density, internal energy per unit mass and the divergence of the velocity have several advantages over other sets of scalars. The closure model is applied to a supersonic non-premixed flame burning hydrogen with air supplied by a supersonic coflow and the results are compared with a limited set of experimental data.

  4. Edge-Flames in Von Karman Swirling Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayagam, Vedha; Williams, Forman A.

    1999-01-01

    Classical understanding of diffusion flames dictates that they, unlike the premixed flames, do not possess a characteristic propagation velocity and are constrained by stoichiometric requirements at the flame surface. However, it has been commonly observed that when local extinction occurs within a diffusion flame sheet, the edges that are formed propagate with distinct speeds. In general, the propagation speed of these edges depend on their geometrical shape (concave, convex, or straight) among other factors. Recently, Buckmaster investigated the dynamics of straight diffusion flame edges separating burning and quenched regions using simplified one-dimensional models. He showed that these flame edges can have positive, negative, or zero velocity depending on the Damkoehler number of the equilibrium diffusion flame that support them. It was also shown that this unsteady flame-edge behavior is intrinsically linked to S-curve behavior of the diffusion flame with varying Damkoehler number. When the system Damkoehler number lies between the extinction and ignition limits, flame edges can propagate as an "ignition wave" or as a "failure wave," and for a critical Damkoehler number remain as a stationary flame-edge. We have extend Buckmaster's 1-d model to more general edge-flame configurations where the edges appear as "flame holes" or as "flame disks". These two configurations along with the straight-edge case cover the entire range of possible edge-flame geometry observable in planar diffusion-flame sheets. A generalized map of edge-flame propagation velocities as a function of the system Damkoehler number and the edge-flame radius is presented. Experimentally we show that edge flames can be created using diffusion flames embedded in von Karman boundary layers. In a von Karman boundary layer, the flow is generated by spinning a solid (fuel) disk in a quiescent ambient gas. Under normal gravity we were able to produce "flame disks" over a range of fuel-disk rotational

  5. The effect of flame structure on soot formation and transport in turbulent nonpremixed flames using direct numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lignell, David O.; Chen, Jacqueline H.; Smith, Philip J.; Lu, Tianfeng; Law, Chung K.

    2007-10-15

    Direct numerical simulations of a two-dimensional, nonpremixed, sooting ethylene flame are performed to examine the effects of soot-flame interactions and transport in an unsteady configuration. A 15-step, 19-species (with 10 quasi-steady species) chemical mechanism was used for gas chemistry, with a two-moment, four-step, semiempirical soot model. Flame curvature is shown to result in flames that move, relative to the fluid, either toward or away from rich soot formation regions, resulting in soot being essentially convected into or away from the flame. This relative motion of flame and soot results in a wide spread of soot in the mixture fraction coordinate. In regions where the center of curvature of the flame is in the fuel stream, the flame motion is toward the fuel and soot is located near the flame at high temperature and hence has higher reaction rates and radiative heat fluxes. Soot-flame breakthrough is also observed in these regions. Fluid convection and flame displacement velocity relative to fluid convection are of similar magnitudes while thermophoretic diffusion is 5-10 times lower. These results emphasize the importance of both unsteady and multidimensional effects on soot formation and transport in turbulent flames. (author)

  6. Suppression of Low Strain Rate Nonpremixed Flames by an Agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamins, A.; Bundy, M.; Puri, I. K.; McGrattan, K.; Park, W. C.

    2001-01-01

    The agent concentration required to achieve the suppression of low strain rate nonpremixed flames is an important consideration for fire protection in a microgravity environment such as a space platform. Currently, there is a lack of understanding of the structure and extinction of low strain rate (<20 s(exp -1)) nonpremixed flames. The exception to this statement is the study by Maruta et al., who reported measurements of low strain rate suppression of methane-air diffusion flames with N2 added to the fuel stream under microgravity conditions. They found that the nitrogen concentration required to achieve extinction increased as the strain rate decreased until a critical value was obtained. As the strain rate was further decreased, the required N2 concentration decreased. This phenomenon was termed "turning point" behavior and was attributed to radiation-induced nonpremixed flame extinction. In terms of fire safety, a critical agent concentration assuring suppression under all flow conditions represents a fundamental limit for nonpremixed flames. Counterflow flames are a convenient configuration for control of the flame strain rate. In high and moderately strained near-extinction nonpremixed flames, analysis of flame structure typically neglects radiant energy loss because the flames are nonluminous and the hot gas species are confined to a thin reaction zone. In counterflowing CH4-air flames, for example, radiative heat loss fractions ranging from 1 to 6 percent have been predicted and measured. The objective of this study is to investigate the impact of radiative emission, flame strain, agent addition, and buoyancy on the structure and extinction of low strain rate nonpremixed flames through measurements and comparison with flame simulations. The suppression effectiveness of a number of suppressants (N2, CO2, or CF3Br) was considered as they were added to either the fuel or oxidizer streams of low strain rate methane-air diffusion flames.

  7. THE PANCHROMATIC HUBBLE ANDROMEDA TREASURY. X. ULTRAVIOLET TO INFRARED PHOTOMETRY OF 117 MILLION EQUIDISTANT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Byler, Nell; Johnson, L. C. E-mail: jd@astro.washington.edu E-mail: lcjohnso@astro.washington.edu; and others

    2014-11-01

    We have measured stellar photometry with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) and Advanced Camera for Surveys in near ultraviolet (F275W, F336W), optical (F475W, F814W), and near infrared (F110W, F160W) bands for 117 million resolved stars in M31. As part of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury survey, we measured photometry with simultaneous point-spread function (PSF) fitting across all bands and at all source positions after precise astrometric image alignment (<5-10 mas accuracy). In the outer disk, the photometry reaches a completeness-limited depth of F475W ∼ 28, while in the crowded, high surface brightness bulge, the photometry reaches F475W ∼ 25. We find that simultaneous photometry and optimized measurement parameters significantly increase the detection limit of the lowest-resolution filters (WFC3/IR) providing color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) that are up to 2.5 mag deeper when compared with CMDs from WFC3/IR photometry alone. We present extensive analysis of the data quality including comparisons of luminosity functions and repeat measurements, and we use artificial star tests to quantify photometric completeness, uncertainties and biases. We find that the largest sources of systematic error in the photometry are due to spatial variations in the PSF models and charge transfer efficiency corrections. This stellar catalog is the largest ever produced for equidistant sources, and is publicly available for download by the community.

  8. EXTENDED PHOTOMETRY FOR THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: A TESTBED FOR PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Daniel J.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Coil, Alison L.; Cooper, Michael C.; Gwyn, Stephen D. J. E-mail: janewman@pitt.edu E-mail: m.cooper@uci.edu

    2013-02-15

    This paper describes a new catalog that supplements the existing DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey photometric and spectroscopic catalogs with ugriz photometry from two other surveys: the Canada-France-Hawaii Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Each catalog is cross-matched by position on the sky in order to assign ugriz photometry to objects in the DEEP2 catalogs. We have recalibrated the CFHTLS photometry where it overlaps DEEP2 in order to provide a more uniform data set. We have also used this improved photometry to predict DEEP2 BRI photometry in regions where only poorer measurements were available previously. In addition, we have included improved astrometry tied to SDSS rather than USNO-A2.0 for all DEEP2 objects. In total this catalog contains {approx}27, 000 objects with full ugriz photometry as well as robust spectroscopic redshift measurements, 64% of which have r > 23. By combining the secure and accurate redshifts of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey with ugriz photometry, we have created a catalog that can be used as an excellent testbed for future photo-z studies, including tests of algorithms for surveys such as LSST and DES.

  9. 33 CFR 154.822 - Detonation arresters, flame arresters, and flame screens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Commandant (G-MSO). (c) Each flame screen required by this part must be either a single screen of corrosion resistant wire of at least 30 by 30 mesh, or two screens, both of corrosion resistant wire, of at least...

  10. 33 CFR 154.822 - Detonation arresters, flame arresters, and flame screens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Commandant (G-MSO). (c) Each flame screen required by this part must be either a single screen of corrosion resistant wire of at least 30 by 30 mesh, or two screens, both of corrosion resistant wire, of at least...

  11. An experimental study of air-assist atomizer spray flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Chien-Pei; Wang, Geng; Chigier, Norman

    1988-01-01

    It is noted that air-assisted atomizer spray flames encountered in furnaces, boilers, and gas turbine combustors possess a more complex structure than homogeneous turbulent diffusion flames, due to the swirling motion introduced into the fuel and air flows for the control of flame stability, length, combustion intensity, and efficiency. Detailed comparisons are presented between burning and nonburning condition measurements of these flames obtained by nonintrusive light scattering phase/Doppler detection. Spray structure is found to be drastically changed within the flame reaction zone, with changes in the magnitude and shape of drop number density, liquid flux, mean drop size diameter, and drop mean axial velocity radial distributions.

  12. Flame Structure and Scalar Properties in Microgravity Laminar Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feikema, D. A.; Lim, J.; Sivathanu, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Recent results from microgravity combustion experiments conducted in the Zero Gravity Facility (ZGF) 5.18 second drop tower are reported. Emission mid-infrared spectroscopy measurements have been completed to quantitatively determine the flame temperature, water and carbon dioxide vapor concentrations, radiative emissive power, and soot concentrations in a microgravity laminar ethylene/air flame. The ethylene/air laminar flame conditions are similar to previously reported experiments including the Flight Project, Laminar Soot Processes (LSP). Soot concentrations and gas temperatures are in reasonable agreement with similar results available in the literature. However, soot concentrations and flame structure dramatically change in long duration microgravity laminar diffusion flames as demonstrated in this paper.

  13. On open and closed tips of bunsen burner flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovsky, G.; Sivashinsky, G. I.

    1994-04-01

    An adiabatic, constant-density reaction-diffusion-advection model for the Bunsen burner flame tip is studied numerically. It is shown that for Lewis numbers exceeding unity the reaction rate and flame speed gradually increase toward the flame tip. For small Lewis numbers the picture is quite different. The reaction rate drops near the tip. In spite of this the flame survives and, moreover, manages to consume all the fuel supplied to the reaction zone. There is no leakage of the fuel through the front. The flame speed varies nonmonotonously along the front from gradual reduction to steep increase near the tip.

  14. Analytical Study of Gravity Effects on Laminar Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelman, R. B.; Fortune, O.; Weilerstein, G.

    1972-01-01

    A mathematical model is presented for the description of axisymmetric laminar-jet diffusion flames. The analysis includes the effects of inertia, viscosity, diffusion, gravity and combustion. These mechanisms are coupled in a boundary layer type formulation and solutions are obtained by an explicit finite difference technique. A dimensional analysis shows that the maximum flame width radius, velocity and thermodynamic state characterize the flame structure. Comparisons with experimental data showed excellent agreement for normal gravity flames and fair agreement for steady state low Reynolds number zero gravity flames. Kinetics effects and radiation are shown to be the primary mechanisms responsible for this discrepancy. Additional factors are discussed including elipticity and transient effects.

  15. Structure of Flame Balls at Low Lewis Number (SOFBALL) Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Structure of Flame Balls at Low Lewis (SOFBALL) experiment, was run on Space Shuttle Columbia in 2003 for STS-107. The experiment tested various fuel-oxygen-inert gas mixtures in microgravity to produce flame balls, which are spherical steady flames that reveal combustion processes hidden by the volatile effects of gravity on Earth. In this video, a hydrogen-oxygen-sulfur hexafluoride gas mixture produced nine flame balls, the most ever created at once, one of which lasted 81 minutes making it the longest lasting flame ball ever burned in space.

  16. Analytic modeling of a spray diffusion flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harsha, P. T.; Edelman, R. B.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed model for a spray diffusion flame is described. The model is based on the boundary layer form of the equations of motion, with droplet transport accounted for using a discretized droplet size distribution function. Interphase transport of mass and energy are accounted for, with a flame-sheet model used to describe the combustion process on a droplet scale. Near dynamic equilibrium is assumed for the description of droplet transport; droplets can diffuse relative to the gas phase. Gas-phase mixing is accounted for using a two-equation turbulence model; buoyancy effects are included, with a temperature fluctuation equation used to account for buoyancy effects on turbulence structure. Thermal radiation from gas-phase CO2 and H2O is included. Gas-phase chemical kinetics are modeled using a 20-reaction, 10-species version of the advanced quasi-global chemical kinetics formulation. Results are compared with data for a vaporizing Freon spray and a pentane spray flame. It is shown that the computational approach provides a reasonably valid picture of the overall development of a spray diffusion flame, and, furthermore, provides a useful tool for the parametric examination of the spray combustion process.

  17. BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS: CAUSE FOR CONCERN?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have routinely been added to consumer products for several decades in a successful effort to reduce fire-related injury and property damage. Recently, concern for this emerging class of chemicals has risen due to the occurrence of several class...

  18. HEALTH EFFECTS OF BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS (BFRS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Brominated flame retardant use has increased dramatically in order to provide fire safety to consumers. However, there is growing concern about widespread environmental contamination and potential health risks from some of these products. The most used products...

  19. BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS: WHY DO WE CARE?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) save lives and property by preventing the spread of fires or delaying the time of flashover, enhancing the time people have to escape. The worldwide production of BFRs exceeded 200,000 metric tons in 2003 placing them in the high production vol...

  20. HEALTH ASPECTS OF BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS (BFRS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to reduce the societal costs of fires, flammability standards have been set for consumer products and equipment. Flame retardants containing bromine have constituted the largest share of this market due both to their efficiency and cost. While there are at least 75 dif...