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Sample records for flare electron spectra

  1. Electron Bremsstrahlung Hard X-Ray Spectra, Electron Distributions and Energetics in the 2002 July 23 Solar Flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Sui, Lindhui; Schartz, Richard A.; Emslie, A. Gordon; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    We present and analyze the first high-resolution hard X-ray spectra from a solar flare observed in both X-ray/gamma-ray continuum and gamma-ray lines. The 2002 July 23 flare was observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). The spatially integrated photon flux spectra are well fitted between 10 and 300 keV by the combination of an isothermal component and a double power law. The flare plasma temperature peaks at 40 MK around the time of peak hard X-ray emission and remains above 20 MK 37 min later. We derive the evolution of the nonthermal mean electron flux distribution by directly fitting the RHESSI X-ray spectra with the thin-target bremsstrahlung from a double power-law electron distribution with a low-energy cutoff. We also derive the evolution of the electron flux distribution on the assumption that the emission is thick-target bremsstrahlung. We find that the injected nonthermal electrons are well described throughout the flare by this double power-law distribution with a low-energy cutoff that is typically between 20-40 keV. Using our thick-target results, we compare the energy contained in the nonthermal electrons with the energy content of the thermal flare plasma observed by RHESSI and GOES. We find that the minimum total energy deposited into the flare plasma by nonthermal electrons, 2.6 x 10(exp 31)erg, is on the order of and possibly less than the energy in the thermal plasma. However, these fits do not rule out the possibility that the energy in nonthermal electrons exceeds the energy in the thermal plasma.

  2. Electron Bremsstrahlung Hard X-Ray Spectra, Electron Distributions and Energetics in the 2002 July 23 Solar Flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.; Sui, L.; Schwartz, R. A.; Emslie, A. G.

    2003-01-01

    We present and analyze the first high-resolution hard X-ray spectra from a solar flare observed in both X-ray/gamma-ray continuum and gamma-ray lines. The 2002 July 23 flare was observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). The spatially integrated photon flux spectra are well fitted between 10 and 300 keV by the combination of an isothermal component and a double power law. The flare plasma temperature peaks at 40 MK around the time of peak hard X-ray emission and remains above 20 MK 37 min later. We derive the evolution of the nonthermal mean electron flux distribution by directly fitting the RHESSI X-ray spectra with the thin-target bremsstrahlung from a double power-law electron distribution with a low-energy cutoff. We also derive the evolution of the electron flux distribution on the assumption that the emission is thick-target bremsstrahlung. We find that the injected nonthermal electrons are well described throughout the flare by this double power-law distribution with a low-energy cutoff that is typically between 20 - 40 keV. Using our thick-target results, we compare the energy contained in the nonthermal electrons with the energy content of the thermal flare plasma observed by RHESSI and GOES. We find that the minimum total energy deposited into the flare plasma by nonthermal electrons, 2.6 x 10(exp 31) erg, is on the order of and possibly less than the energy in the thermal plasma. However, these fits do not rule out the possibility that the energy in nonthermal electrons exceeds the energy in the thermal plasma. This work was supported in part by the RHESSI Project and the NASA Sun-Earth Connection program.

  3. COLLISIONAL RELAXATION OF ELECTRONS IN A WARM PLASMA AND ACCELERATED NONTHERMAL ELECTRON SPECTRA IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Kontar, Eduard P.; Jeffrey, Natasha L. S.; Bian, N. H.; Emslie, A. Gordon

    2015-08-10

    Extending previous studies of nonthermal electron transport in solar flares, which include the effects of collisional energy diffusion and thermalization of fast electrons, we present an analytic method to infer more accurate estimates of the accelerated electron spectrum in solar flares from observations of the hard X-ray spectrum. Unlike for the standard cold-target model, the spatial characteristics of the flaring region, especially the necessity to consider a finite volume of hot plasma in the source, need to be taken into account in order to correctly obtain the injected electron spectrum from the source-integrated electron flux spectrum (a quantity straightforwardly obtained from hard X-ray observations). We show that the effect of electron thermalization can be significant enough to nullify the need to introduce an ad hoc low-energy cutoff to the injected electron spectrum in order to keep the injected power in non-thermal electrons at a reasonable value. Rather, the suppression of the inferred low-energy end of the injected spectrum compared to that deduced from a cold-target analysis allows the inference from hard X-ray observations of a more realistic energy in injected non-thermal electrons in solar flares.

  4. Collisional Relaxation of Electrons in a Warm Plasma and Accelerated Nonthermal Electron Spectra in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontar, Eduard P.; Jeffrey, Natasha L. S.; Emslie, A. Gordon; Bian, N. H.

    2015-08-01

    Extending previous studies of nonthermal electron transport in solar flares, which include the effects of collisional energy diffusion and thermalization of fast electrons, we present an analytic method to infer more accurate estimates of the accelerated electron spectrum in solar flares from observations of the hard X-ray spectrum. Unlike for the standard cold-target model, the spatial characteristics of the flaring region, especially the necessity to consider a finite volume of hot plasma in the source, need to be taken into account in order to correctly obtain the injected electron spectrum from the source-integrated electron flux spectrum (a quantity straightforwardly obtained from hard X-ray observations). We show that the effect of electron thermalization can be significant enough to nullify the need to introduce an ad hoc low-energy cutoff to the injected electron spectrum in order to keep the injected power in non-thermal electrons at a reasonable value. Rather, the suppression of the inferred low-energy end of the injected spectrum compared to that deduced from a cold-target analysis allows the inference from hard X-ray observations of a more realistic energy in injected non-thermal electrons in solar flares.

  5. The flares of August 1972. [solar flare characteristics and spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.; Tanaka, K.

    1973-01-01

    Observations of the August, 1972 flares at Big Bear and Tel Aviv, involving monochromatic movies, magnetograms, and spectra, are analyzed. The region (McMath 11976) showed inverted polarity from its inception on July 11; the great activity was due to extremely high shear and gradients in the magnetic field, as well as a constant invasion of one polarity into the opposite; observations in lambda 3835 show remarkable fast flashes in the impulsive flare of 18:38 UT on Aug. 2 with lifetimes of 5 sec, which may be due to dumping of particles in the lower chromosphere. Flare loops show evolutionary increases of their tilts to the neutral line in the flares of Aug. 4 and 7. Spectroscopic observations show red asymmetry and red shift of the H alpha emission in the flash phase of the Aug. 7 flare, as well as substantial velocity shear in the photosphere during the flare, somewhat like earthquake movement along a fault. Finally the total H alpha emission of the Aug. 7 flare could be measured accurately as about 2.5 x 10 to the 30th power erg, considerably less than coarser previous estimates for great flares.

  6. EMITTING ELECTRONS SPECTRA AND ACCELERATION PROCESSES IN THE JET OF Mrk 421: FROM THE LOW STATE TO THE GIANT FLARE STATE

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Dahai; Zhang Li; Fan Zhonghui; Zeng Houdun; Yuan Qiang

    2013-03-10

    We investigate the electron energy distributions (EEDs) and the acceleration processes in the jet of Mrk 421 through fitting the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) in different active states in the frame of a one-zone synchrotron self-Compton model. After assuming two possible EEDs formed in different acceleration models: the shock-accelerated power law with exponential cut-off (PLC) EED and the stochastic-turbulence-accelerated log-parabolic (LP) EED, we fit the observed SEDs of Mrk 421 in both low and giant flare states using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method which constrains the model parameters in a more efficient way. The results from our calculations indicate that (1) the PLC and LP models give comparably good fits for the SED in the low state, but the variations of model parameters from low state to flaring can be reasonably explained only in the case of the PLC in the low state; and (2) the LP model gives better fits compared to the PLC model for the SED in the flare state, and the intra-day/night variability observed at GeV-TeV bands can be accommodated only in the LP model. The giant flare may be attributed to the stochastic turbulence re-acceleration of the shock-accelerated electrons in the low state. Therefore, we may conclude that shock acceleration is dominant in the low state, while stochastic turbulence acceleration is dominant in the flare state. Moreover, our result shows that the extrapolated TeV spectra from the best-fit SEDs from optical through GeV with the two EEDs are different. It should be considered with caution when such extrapolated TeV spectra are used to constrain extragalactic background light models.

  7. An upper limit on the hardness of the nonthermal electron spectra produced during the flash phase of solar flares.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, S. R.

    1971-01-01

    The observations of impulsive solar-flare X-rays above 10 keV made with OGO-5 satellite have been analyzed in order to study the variation of the nonthermal electron spectrum from one flare to another. The X-ray spectrum at the maxima of 129 impulsive X-ray bursts is represented by KE to the minus-gamma power photons per sq cm per sec per keV, and the frequency of occurrence of bursts with different values of gamma is studied. It is found that for gamma less than 4.0 the frequency of bursts rapidly decreases with the decrease in the value of gamma. The probability of occurrence of a burst with gamma less than 2.3 is extremely small.

  8. On the possibility to diagnose a kappa-distribution from EVE flare spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzifcakova, Elena; Dudík, Jaroslav

    2015-08-01

    X-ray flare emission is strongly affected by the non-thermal part of the electron distribution. RHESSI observations and also recent theoretical derivations showed that the electron distribution function in coronal X-ray sources could be a kappa-distribution. An effect of kappa-distribution on the relative intensities of spectral lines of Fe XVIII - Fe XXIV observed in SDO/EVE flare spectra was calculated using KAPPA package based on the CHIANTI. Together with CHIANTI, this allows us to estimate the influence of the kappa-distributions on the diagnostics of electron density and temperature from the flare spectra. The possibility to diagnose parameters of the kappa-distribution from EVE flare spectra is discussed. The synthetic spectra for the kappa-distribution are compared with the observed flare spectra.

  9. First dynamic spectra of stellar microwave flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastian, T. S.; Bookbinder, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    The VLA has been used in the spectral-line mode at 1.4 GHz to obtain the first dynamic spectra of stellar sources other than the sun. Two very intense, highly circularly polarized, microwave outbursts were observed on the dMe flare star UV Cet, in addition to a slowly varying, unpolarized component. One outburst was purely left circularly polarized and showed no variations as a function of frequency across the 41 MHz band, whereas the other was as much as 70 percent right-circularly polarized and showed distinct variations with frequency. Although the slowly varying emission is probably due to incoherent gyrosynchrotron emission, the two flaring events are the result of coherent mechanisms. The coherent emission is interpreted in terms of plasma radiation and the cyclotron maser instability.

  10. Solar flare soft-X-ray spectra from Very Low Frequency observations of ionospheric modulations: Possibility of uninterrupted observation of non-thermal electron-plasma interaction in solar atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palit, Sourav; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Ray, Suman

    2016-07-01

    The hard and soft X-ray regions of a solar flare spectrum are the manifestation of interaction, namely of bremsstrahlung radiation of the non-thermal electrons moving inward in the denser part of the solar atmosphere with the plasma heated by those energetic electrons. The continuous and uninterrupted knowledge of X-ray photon spectra of flares are of great importance to derive information on the electron acceleration and hence time-evolution of energy transport and physics during solar flares. Satellite observations of solar X-ray spectrum are often limited by the restricted windows in each duty cycle to avoid the interaction of detectors and instruments with harmful energetic charge particles. In this work we have tried to tackle the problem by examining the possibility of using Earth's ionosphere and atmosphere as the detector of such transient events. Earth's lower ionosphere and upper atmosphere are the places where the X-rays and gamma-rays from such astronomical sources are absorbed. The electron-ion production rates due to the ionization of such energetic photons at different heights depend on the intensity and wavelength of the injected spectra and hence vary from one source to another. Obviously the electron and ion density vs. altitude profile has the imprint of the incident photon spectrum. As a preliminary exercise we developed a novel deconvolution method to extract the soft X-ray part of spectra of some solar flares of different classes from the electron density profiles obtained from Very Low Frequency (VLF) observation of lower ionosphere during those events. The method presented here is useful to carry out a similar exercise to infer the higher energy part of solar flare spectra and spectra of more energetic events such as the GRBs, SGRs etc. with the possibilities of probing even lower parts of the atmosphere.

  11. Muon and Tau Neutrinos Spectra from Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, Daniele; Moscato, Federica

    2003-12-01

    Most power-full solar flare as the ones occurred on 23th February 1956, September 29th 1989, 28th October and on 2nd-4th November 2003 are sources of cosmic rays, X, gamma and neutrino bursts. These flares took place both on front or in the edge and in the hidden solar disk. The 4th November event was the most powerful X event in the highest known rank category X28 just at horizons. The observed and estimated total flare energy (EFL ≃ 1031div 1033 erg) should be a source of a prompt secondary neutrino burst originated, by proton-proton-pion production on the sun itself; a more delayed and spread neutrino flux signal arise by the solar charged flare particles reaching the terrestrial atmosphere. These first earliest prompt solar neutrino burst might be observed, in a few neutrino clustered events, in present or future largest neutrino underground detectors as Super-Kamiokande one, in time correlation with the X-Radio flare. The onset in time correlation has great statistical significance. Our first estimate on the neutrino number events detection at the Super-Kamiokande II Laboratory for horizontal or hidden flare is found to be few events: NeV_bar{ν}_e≃ 0.63&etae ()/(35 MeV) ()/(1031 erg); and NeV_bar{ν}μ ≃ 3.58()/(200 MeV) ()/(1031erg) η,SUB>μ, where η≃ 1, Eνμ > 113 MeV. Our first estimates of neutrino signals in largest underground detectors hint for few events in correlation with X, gamma, radio onser. Our approximated spectra for muons and taus from these rare solar eruption are shown over the most common background. The muon and tau signature is very peculiar and characteristic over electron and anti-electron neutrino fluxes. The rise of muon neutrinos will be detectable above the minimal muon threshold Eν ≃ 113 MeV energy, or above the pion and Δ ° thresholds (Eν≃ 151 and 484 MeV). Any large neutrino flare event record might also verify the expected neutrino flavour mixing leading to a few as well as a comparable

  12. Observations of solar flare photon energy spectra from 20 keV to 7 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshimori, M.; Watanabe, H.; Nitta, N.

    1985-01-01

    Solar flare photon energy spectra in the 20 keV to 7 MeV range are derived from the Apr. 1, Apr. 4, apr. 27 and May 13, 1981 flares. The flares were observed with a hard X-ray and a gamma-ray spectrometers on board the Hinotori satellite. The results show that the spectral shape varies from flare to flare and the spectra harden in energies above about 400 keV. Effects of nuclear line emission on the continuum and of higher energy electron bremsstrahlung are considered to explain the spectral hardening.

  13. Two types of electron events in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daibog, E. I.; Kurt, V. G.; Logachev, Y. I.; Stolpovsky, V. G.

    1985-01-01

    The fluxes and spectra of the flare electrons measured on board Venera-I3 and I4 space probes are compared with the parameters of the hard (E sub x approximately 55 keV) and thermal X-ray bursts. The electron flux amplitude has been found to correlate with flare importance in the thermal X-ray range (r approximately 0.8). The following two types of flare events have been found in the electron component of SCR. The electron flux increase is accompanied by a hard X-ray burst and the electron spectrum index in the approximately 25 to 200 keV energy range is gamma approximately 2 to 3. The electron flux increase is not accompanied by a hard X-ray burst and the electron spectrum is softer (Delta gamma approximately 0.7 to 1.0).

  14. Electron Kappa Distributions in Solar Flares and the Earth's Magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, M.; Krucker, S.; Phan, T.

    2013-12-01

    Explosive phenomena in the solar corona and the Earth's magnetotail produce non-thermal, energetic electrons of up to tens of MeV and hundreds of keV, respectively. While power-law energy spectra have been observed in both environments, similarities and differences of the power-law features remain unclear. Here we propose to use kappa distribution to compare the power-law spectral indices obtained by hard X-ray observations during solar flares as well as in-situ electron measurements in the Earth's magnetotail. We will present RHESSI solar flare observations in which foot-points of the flare loop were behind the solar limb so that the photon spectra of the hard X-ray coronal source could be studied without much contamination by photons from the foot-points. As a reference, we will also show a THEMIS observation of electron kappa distribution in the reconnection flow-braking region within the Earth's magnetotail.

  15. IUE spectra of a flare in HR 5110: A flaring RS CVn or Algol system?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, T.; Linsky, J. L.; Schiffer, F. H., III

    1981-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectra of the RS CVn type binary system HR 5110 were obtained with IUE on May 31, 1979 during a period of intense radio flaring of this star. High temperature transition region lines are present, but are not enhanced above observed quiescent strengths. The similarities of HR 5110 to the Algol system, As Eri, suggest that the 1979 May to June flare may involve mass exchange rather than annihilation of coronal magnetic fields.

  16. Relativistic-Electron-Dominated Solar Flares Observed by Fermi/GBM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, A. Y.; Schwartz, R. A.; Dennis, B. R.

    2013-12-01

    Up to tens of percent of the energy released in solar flares goes into accelerating electrons above ~10 keV and ions above ~1 MeV, and the impulsive heating of the ambient solar atmosphere by these particles is partially or wholly responsible for the production of hot flare plasmas (up to ~50 MK). Although flares can accelerate electrons to relativistic energies, in even large flares the typical falling power-law energy spectrum means that the plasma is primarily heated by the much larger number of low-energy electrons. However, there have been flares observed where the electron energy spectra have high low-energy cutoffs (well above ~100 keV), which significantly changes the electron energies responsible for heating and modifies the usual conception of energy transport in a flare. A systematic study of a range of relativistic-electron-dominated flares can improve our understanding of the relevant acceleration processes and how they may differ from those in "typical" flares. We search the Fermi/GBM data set for such flares based on the electron-associated X-ray/gamma-ray bremsstrahlung emission, making use of an improved background-subtraction approach to improve the ability to detect weaker flares. We present the fitted parameters for the relativistic-electron spectrum and their evolution over time, and compare against RHESSI observations and other instruments when available. We also discuss these events in the context of previously observed correlations between relativistic-electron acceleration and ion acceleration in flares.

  17. Electron Acceleration in Contracting Magnetic Islands during Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovikov, D.; Tenishev, V.; Gombosi, T. I.; Guidoni, S. E.; DeVore, C. R.; Karpen, J. T.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2017-01-01

    Electron acceleration in solar flares is well known to be efficient at generating energetic particles that produce the observed bremsstrahlung X-ray spectra. One mechanism proposed to explain the observations is electron acceleration within contracting magnetic islands formed by magnetic reconnection in the flare current sheet. In a previous study, a numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulation of an eruptive solar flare was analyzed to estimate the associated electron acceleration due to island contraction. That analysis used a simple analytical model for the island structure and assumed conservation of the adiabatic invariants of particle motion. In this paper, we perform the first-ever rigorous integration of the guiding-center orbits of electrons in a modeled flare. An initially isotropic distribution of particles is seeded in a contracting island from the simulated eruption, and the subsequent evolution of these particles is followed using guiding-center theory. We find that the distribution function becomes increasingly anisotropic over time as the electrons’ energy increases by up to a factor of five, in general agreement with the previous study. In addition, we show that the energized particles are concentrated on the Sunward side of the island, adjacent to the reconnection X-point in the flare current sheet. Furthermore, our analysis demonstrates that the electron energy gain is dominated by betatron acceleration in the compressed, strengthened magnetic field of the contracting island. Fermi acceleration by the shortened field lines of the island also contributes to the energy gain, but it is less effective than the betatron process.

  18. Accelerated electron distributions with high- and low-energy cutoffs deduced from the application of a return-current model to solar flare X-ray spectra observed by RHESSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaoui, Meriem; Holman, Gordon D.

    2015-04-01

    The X-ray bremsstrahlung emission observed from solar flares requires a high flux, and corresponding high current, of non-thermal electrons. This current is thought to be stabilized by a co-spatial return current, which also resupplies electrons to the acceleration region. In the standard collisional thick-target model (CTTM), electrons accelerated in the corona lose all of their energy through Coulomb collisions when they reach the higher densities in the lower atmosphere of the sun. In the presence of the return current, however, the electrons also lose energy in the corona as they propagate downward. These losses introduce a break into the observed X-ray spectrum if the potential drop associated with the return current is sufficiently high.We analyzed the temporal evolution of RHESSI (Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager) spectra from a solar flare with strong spectral breaks in terms of a return-current collisional thick-target model (RCCTTM). The presence of strong breaks ensures that albedo and non-uniform ionization are not sufficient to explain the spectral flattening at energies below the break. We find that the model successfully fits the spectral data. The fits were significantly improved with the inclusion of a high-energy cutoff to the injected electron distribution (better chi-squared values and residuals), providing the time evolution of the highest energy to which electrons were accelerated. A lower limit to the low-energy cutoff to the electron distribution was obtained by restricting the beam density to a value less than the ambient coronal density. The derived plasma resistivity and the drift speed of the return-current electrons both suggest that plasma turbulence might have been important in the corona.This work was supported by the NASA Heliophysics Guest Investigator Program and the RHESSI Project.

  19. Modeling Solar Flare Hard X-ray Images and Spectra Observed with RHESSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, Linhui

    2005-01-01

    predictions of the standard flare models: the downward motion of flare loops in the early impulsive phase of each flare, and an initially stationary coronal source above the loops. These features me believed to be related to the formation and development of a current sheet. In particular, the downward loop motion seem to be a common phenomenon in flares, suggesting the necessity for modifications to the existing standard flare. models. Finally, thanks to the broad energy coverage of the RHESSI spectra, a low-energy cutoff of 28 (plus or minus 2) keV in the nonthermal electron distribution was determined for the April 15, 2002, flare. As a result, the energy carried by the nonthermal electrons is found to be comparable to the thermal energy of the flare, but one order of magnitude larger than the kinetic energy of the associated coronal mass ejection. The method used to deduce the electron low-energy cutoff will be useful in the analyses of similar events.

  20. Energetic electrons in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batchelor, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    A new analysis was made of a thermal flare model proposed by Brown, Melrose, and Spicer (1979) and Smith and Lilliequist (1979). They assumed the source of impulsive hard X-rays to be a plasma at a temperature of order 10 to the 8th power K, initially located at the apex of a coronal arch, and confined by ion-acoustic turbulence in a collisionless conduction front. Such a source would expand at approximately the ion-sound speed, C sub S = square root of (k T sub e/m sub i), until it filled the arch. Brown, Melrose, and Spicer and Smith and Brown (1980) argued that the source assumed in this model would not explain the simultaneous impulsive microwave emission. In contrast, the new results presented herein suggest that this model leads to the development of a quasi-Maxwellian distribution of electrons that explains both the hard X-ray and microwave emissions. This implies that the source sizes can be determined from observations of the optically-thick portions of microwave spectra and the temperatures obtained from associated hard X-ray observations. In this model, the burst emission would rise to a maximum in a time, t sub r, approximately equal to L/c sub s, where L is the half-length of the arch. New observations of these impulsive flare emissions were analyzed herein to test this prediction of the model. Observations made with the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft and the Bern Radio Observatory are in good agreement with the model.

  1. Flat microwave spectra seen at X-class flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeongwoo W.; Gary, Dale E.; Zirin, H.

    1994-01-01

    We report peculiar spectral activity of four large microwave bursts as obtained from the Solar Arrays at the Owens Valey Radio Observatory during observations of X-class flares on 24 May 1990 and 7, 8, 22 March 1991. Main observational points that we newly uncovered are: (1) flat flux spectra over 1-18 GHz in large amounts of flux ranging from 10(exp 2) to 10(exp 4) s.f.u. at the maximum phase, (2) a common evolutionary pattern in which the spectral region of dominant flux shifts from high frequencies at the initial rise to low frequencies at the decaying phase, and (3) unusual time profiles that are impulsive at high frequencies but more extended at lower frequencies. We carry out the model calculations of microwave spectra under assumptions of gyrosynchrotron mechanism and a dipole field configuration to reproduce the observational characteristics. Our results are summarized as follows. First, a flat microwave spectrum reaching up to 10(exp 2) - 10(exp 4) s.f.u. may occur in a case where a magnetic loop is extended to an angular size of approximately (0.7-7.0) x 10(exp -7) sterad and contains a huge number (N(E greater than 10 keV) approx. 10(exp 36) - 10(exp 38)) of nonthermal electrons with power-law index approx. 3-3.5 over the entire volume. Second, the observed spectral activity could adequately be accounted for by the shrinking of the region of nonthermal electrons to the loop top and by the softening of the power-law spectrum of electrons in a time scale ranging 3-45 min depending on the event. Third, the extended microwave activity at lower frequencies is probably due to electrons trapped in the loop top where magnetic fields are low. Finally, we clarify the physical distinction between these large, extended microwave bursts and the gradual/post-microwave bursts often seen in weak events, both of which are characterized by long-period activity and broadband spectra.

  2. Energetic electrons generated during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Gottfried

    2015-12-01

    > electrons are accelerated up to energies beyond 30 keV is one of the open questions in solar physics. A flare is considered as the manifestation of magnetic reconnection in the solar corona. Which mechanisms lead to the production of energetic electrons in the magnetic reconnection region is discussed in this paper. Two of them are described in more detail.

  3. Effect of electron beams during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboudarham, J.; Henoux, J. C.; Brown, J. C.; van den Oord, J.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.

    1990-12-01

    Electron bombardment of the solar atmosphere has two effects: one is to enhance hydrogen recombination emission, the other is to increase the opacity via an increase of H(-) population. The first effect is the most important in the upper part of the atmosphere, and the second in the lower part. It is predicted that, when enhanced absorption dominates in the part of the atmosphere where radiation originates, there will be a decrease in the white-light emission, leading to a 'negative flare', or 'black-light flare' short duration, not more than about 20 sec.

  4. EGRET High Energy Capability and Multiwavelength Flare Studies and Solar Flare Proton Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Edward L.

    1997-01-01

    UNH was assigned the responsibility to use their accelerator neutron measurements to verify the TASC response function and to modify the TASC fitting program to include a high energy neutron contribution. Direct accelerator-based measurements by UNH of the energy-dependent efficiencies for detecting neutrons with energies from 36 to 720 MeV in NaI were compared with Monte Carlo TASC calculations. The calculated TASC efficiencies are somewhat lower (by about 20%) than the accelerator results in the energy range 70-300 MeV. The measured energy-loss spectrum for 207 MeV neutron interactions in NaI were compared with the Monte Carlo response for 200 MeV neutrons in the TASC indicating good agreement. Based on this agreement, the simulation was considered to be sufficiently accurate to generate a neutron response library to be used by UNH in modifying the TASC fitting program to include a neutron component in the flare spectrum modeling. TASC energy-loss data on the 1991 June 11 flare was transferred to UNH. Also included appendix: Gamma-rays and neutrons as a probe of flare proton spectra: the solar flare of 11 June 1991.

  5. EGRET High Energy Capability and Multiwavelength Flare Studies and Solar Flare Proton Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Edward L.

    1998-01-01

    The accomplishments of the participation in the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Guest investigator program is summarized in this report. The work involved the study of Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET)/Total Absorption Shower Counter(TASC) flare data. The specific accomplishments were the use of the accelerator neutron measurements obtained at the University of New Hampshire to verify the TASC response function and to modify the TASC fitting program to include a high energy neutron contribution, and to determine a high energy neutron contribution to the emissions from the 1991 June 11, solar flare. The next step in the analysis of this event was doing fits to the TASC energy-loss spectra as a function of time. A significant hardening of the solar proton spectrum over time was found for the flare. Further data was obtained from the Yohkoh HXT time histories and images for the 1991 October 27 flare. The results to date demonstrate that the TASC spectral analysis contributes crucial information on the particle spectrum interacting at the Sun. The report includes a paper accepted for publication, a draft of a paper to be delivered at the 26th International Cosmic Ray Conference and an abstract of a paper to be presented at the Meeting of the American Physical Society.

  6. Energetic electrons and photospheric electric currents during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musset, S.; Vilmer, N.; Bommier, V.

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares are among the most energetic events in the solar system. Magnetic energy previously stored in the coronal magnetic field is transferred to particle acceleration, plasma motion and plasma heating. Magnetic energy release is likely to occur in coronal currents sheets associated with regions of strong gradient of magnetic connectivity. Coronal current sheets can be traced by their footprints at the surface on the Sun, in e.g. photospheric current ribbons. We aim to study the relationship between the current ribbons observed at the photospheric level which trace coronal current sheets, and the flare energetic electrons traced by their X-ray emissions. The photospheric magnetic field and vertical current density are calculated from SDO/HMI spectropolarimetric data using the UNNOFIT inversion and Metcalf disambiguation codes, while the X-ray images and spectra are reconstructed from RHESSI data. In a first case (the GOES X2.2 flare of February 15, 2011), a spatial correlation is observed between the photospheric current ribbons and the coronal X-ray emissions from energetic electrons (Musset et al., 2015). Moreover, a conjoint evolution of both the photospheric currents and the X-ray emission is observed during the course of the flare. Both results are interpreted as consequences of the magnetic reconnection in coronal current sheets. Propagation of the reconnection sites to new structures during the flare results in new X-ray emission sites and local increase of the photospheric currents We will examine in this contribution whether similar results are obtained for other X-class flares.

  7. Energetic electrons and photospheric electric currents during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musset, Sophie; Vilmer, Nicole; Bommier, Veronique

    2016-07-01

    It is currently admitted that solar flares are powered by magnetic energy previously stored in the coronal magnetic field. During magnetic reconnection processes, this energy is transferred to particle acceleration, plasma motion and plasma heating. Magnetic energy release is likely to occur on coronal currents sheets along regions of strong gradient of magnetic connectivity. These coronal current sheets can be traced by their footprints at the surface on the Sun, i.e. by photospheric current ribbons. We aim to study the relation between these current ribbons observed at the photospheric level, tracing the coronal current sheets, and the flare energetic electrons traced by their X-ray emissions. The photospheric magnetic field and vertical current density have been calculated from SDO/HMI spectropolarimetric data with the UNNOFIT inversion and Metcalf disambiguation codes, while the X-ray images and spectra have been reconstructed from RHESSI data. In a first case, the GOES X2.2 flare of February 15, 2011, a spatial correlation is observed between the photospheric current ribbons and the coronal X-ray emissions from energetic electrons. Moreover, a conjoint evolution of both the photospheric currents and the X-ray emission is observed during the course of the flare. Both results are interpreted as consequences of the magnetic reconnection in coronal current sheets, and propagation of the reconnection sites to new structures during the flare, leading to new X-ray emission and local increase of the photospheric currents (Musset et al., 2015). We shall discuss here similar results obtained for other X-class flares.

  8. Bulk Acceleration of Electrons in Solar Flares?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2014-06-01

    In two recent papers it has been argued that RHESSI observations of two coronal “above-the-loop-top” hard X-ray sources, together with EUV observations, show that ALL the electrons in the source volumes must have been accelerated. I will briefly review these papers and show that the interpretation most consistent with the combined flare observations is multi-thermal, with hot, thermal plasma in the “above-the-loop-top” sources and only a fraction, albeit a substantial fraction, of the electrons accelerated. Thus, there is no credible scientific evidence for bulk acceleration of electrons in flares. Differential emission measure (DEM) models deduced from SDO/AIA and RHESSI data, including the inversion of the AIA data to determine DEM, will be discussed as part of this analysis.

  9. Energy spectra of ions from impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Richardson, I. G.; Wenzel, K.-P.

    1992-01-01

    A study of the energy spectra of ions from impulsive solar flares in the 0.1-100 MeV region is reported. Most of the events studied are dominated by He and these He spectra show a persistent steepening or break above about 10 MeV resulting in an increase in the power-law spectral indices from about 2 to about 3.5 or more. Spectra of H, He-3, O, and Fe have spectral indices that are consistent with a value of about 3.5 above about 2 MeV/amu. One event, dominated by protons, shows a clear maximum in the spectrum near 1 MeV. If the rollover in the spectrum below 1 MeV is interpreted as a consequence of matter traversal in the solar atmosphere, then the source of the acceleration would lie only about 800 km above the photosphere, well below the corona. Alternative interpretations are that trapping in the acceleration region directly causes a peak in the resulting ion spectrum or that low-energy particles encounter significant additional scattering during transport from the flare.

  10. Implications of X-Ray Observations for Electron Acceleration and Propagation in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.; Aschwanden, M. J.; Aurass, H.; Battaglia, M.; Grigis, P. C.; Kontar, E. P.; Liu, W.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Zharkova, V. V.

    2011-01-01

    High-energy X-rays and gamma-rays from solar flares were discovered just over fifty years ago. Since that time, the standard for the interpretation of spatially integrated flare X-ray spectra at energies above several tens of keV has been the collisional thick-target model. After the launch of the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) in early 2002, X-ray spectra and images have been of sufficient quality to allow a greater focus on the energetic electrons responsible for the X-ray emission, including their origin and their interactions with the flare plasma and magnetic field. The result has been new insights into the flaring process, as well as more quantitative models for both electron acceleration and propagation, and for the flare environment with which the electrons interact. In this article we review our current understanding of electron acceleration, energy loss, and propagation in flares. Implications of these new results for the collisional thick-target model, for general flare models, and for future flare studies are discussed.

  11. Shock Versus Solar Flare Production of Heliospheric Relativistic Electron Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Cliver, E. W.

    2006-12-01

    Electrons with relativistic (E > 0.3 MeV) energies are often observed as discrete events in the inner heliosphere. Their sharp onsets and antisunward flows indicate that they are produced in solar transient events. In general their origins can be associated in time with both solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Unlike the solar energetic proton (SEP) and ion events, we do not have the advantage of particle elemental abundances and charge states as source diagnostics. We review the characteristics of the electron events observed on the Helios, Venera, ISEE-3, Phobos, and other inner heliospheric spacecraft to determine whether they are more likely to be produced by broad coronal shocks driven by CMEs or by solar flare processes associated with magnetic reconnection. Electron intensity-time profiles and energy spectra are compared with properties of flares and CMEs for this determination. Recent comparisons of peak electron and SEP event intensities provide strong evidence for the shock interpretation, but definitive results require the observations provided by the Sentinels mission.

  12. Energy spectra of ions from impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Richardson, I. G.; Wenzel, K.-P.

    1991-01-01

    A study of the energy spectra of ions from impulsive solar flares in the 0.1 to 100 MeV region is reported with data from the combined observations of experiments on the ISEE 3 and IMP 8 spacecraft. Most of the events studied are dominated by He, and these He spectra show a persistent steepening or break above about 10 MeV resulting in an increase in the power-law spectral indices from about 2 to about 3.5 or more. One event, dominated by protons, shows a clear maximum in the spectrum near 1 MeV. If the rollover in the spectrum below 1 MeV is interpreted as a consequence of matter traversal in the solar atmosphere, then the source of the acceleration would lie only about 800 km above the photosphere, well below the corona. An alternative interpretation is that trapping in the acceleration region directly causes a peak in the spectrum.

  13. Acceleration of runaway electrons in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Moghaddam-taaheri, E.; Goertz, C.K. )

    1990-03-01

    The dc electric field acceleration of electrons out of a thermal plasma and the evolution of the runaway tail are studied numerically, using a relativistic quasi-linear code based on the Ritz-Galerkin method and finite elements. A small field-aligned electric field is turned on at a certain time. The resulting distribution function from the runaway process is used to calculate the synchrotron emission during the evolution of the runaway tail. It is found that, during the runaway tail formation, which lasts a few tens of seconds for typical solar flare conditions, the synchrotron emission level is low, almost ot the same order as the emission from the thermal plasma, at the high-frequency end of the spectrum. However, the emission is enhanced explosively in a few microseconds by several orders of magnitude at the time the runaway tail stops growing along the magnetic field and tends toward isotropy due to the pitch-angle scattering of the fast particles. Results indicate that, in order to account for the observed synchrotron emission spectrum of a typical solar flare, the electric field acceleration phase must be accompanied or preceded by a heating phase which yields an enhanced electron temperature of about 2-15 keV in the flare region if the electric field is 0.1-0.2 times the Dreicer field and cyclotron-to-plasma frequency ratios are of order 1-2. 23 refs.

  14. Acceleration of runaway electrons in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moghaddam-Taaheri, E.; Goertz, C. K.

    1990-01-01

    The dc electric field acceleration of electrons out of a thermal plasma and the evolution of the runaway tail are studied numerically, using a relativistic quasi-linear code based on the Ritz-Galerkin method and finite elements. A small field-aligned electric field is turned on at a certain time. The resulting distribution function from the runaway process is used to calculate the synchrotron emission during the evolution of the runaway tail. It is found that, during the runaway tail formation, which lasts a few tens of seconds for typical solar flare conditions, the synchrotron emission level is low, almost ot the same order as the emission from the thermal plasma, at the high-frequency end of the spectrum. However, the emission is enhanced explosively in a few microseconds by several orders of magnitude at the time the runaway tail stops growing along the magnetic field and tends toward isotropy due to the pitch-angle scattering of the fast particles. Results indicate that, in order to account for the observed synchrotron emission spectrum of a typical solar flare, the electric field acceleration phase must be accompanied or preceded by a heating phase which yields an enhanced electron temperature of about 2-15 keV in the flare region if the electric field is 0.1-0.2 times the Dreicer field and cyclotron-to-plasma frequency ratios are of order 1-2.

  15. The Effects of Low- and High-Energy Cutoffs on Solar Flare Microwave and Hard X-Ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Microwave and hard x-ray spectra provide crucial information about energetic electrons and their environment in solar flares. These spectra are becoming better determined with the Owens Valley Solar Array (OVSA) and the recent launch of the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). The proposed Frequency Agile Solar Radiotelescope (FASR) promises even greater advances in radio observations of solar flares. Both microwave and hard x-ray spectra are sensitive to cutoffs in the electron distribution function. The determination of the high-energy cutoff from these spectra establishes the highest electron energies produced by the acceleration mechanism, while determination of the low-energy cutoff is crucial to establishing the total energy in accelerated electrons. This paper will show computations of the effects of both high- and low-energy cutoffs on microwave and hard x-ray spectra. The optically thick portion of a microwave spectrum is enhanced and smoothed by a low-energy cutoff, while a hard x-ray spectrum is flattened below the cutoff energy. A high-energy cutoff steepens the microwave spectrum and increases the wavelength at which the spectrum peaks, while the hard x-ray spectrum begins to steepen at photon energies roughly an order of magnitude below the electron cutoff energy. This work discusses how flare microwave and hard x-ray spectra can be analyzed together to determine these electron cutoff energies. This work is supported in part by the NASA Sun-Earth Connection Program.

  16. Inferring the Energy Distribution of Accelerated Electrons in Solar Flares from X-ray Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Sui, Linhui; Su, Yang

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge of the energy distribution of electrons accelerated in solar flares is important for constraining possible acceleration mechanisms and for understanding the relationships between flare X-ray sources, radio sources, and particles observed in space. Solar flare hard X-rays are primarily emitted from dense, thick-target regions in the lower atmosphere, but the electrons are understood to be accelerated higher in the corona. Various processes can distort the X-ray spectrum or the energy distribution of electrons before they reach the thick-target region. After briefly reviewing the processes that affect the X-ray spectrum and the electron distribution, I will describe recent results from a study of flare spectra from RHESSI to determine the importance of these processes in inferring the energy distribution of accelerated electrons.

  17. Theoretical Model Images and Spectra for Comparison with HESSI and Microwave Observations of Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor); Holman, G. D.; Sui, L.; McTiernan, J. M.; Petrosian, V.

    2003-01-01

    We have computed bremsstrahlung and gyrosynchrotron images and spectra from a model flare loop. Electrons with a power-law energy distribution are continuously injected at the top of a semi-circular magnetic loop. The Fokker-Planck equation is integrated to obtain the steady-state electron distribution throughout the loop. Coulomb scattering and energy losses and magnetic mirroring are included in the model. The resulting electron distributions are used to compute the radiative emissions. Sample images and spectra are presented. We are developing these models for the interpretation of the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI) x-ray/gamma ray data and coordinated microwave observations. The Fokker-Planck and radiation codes are available on the Web at http://hesperia.gsfc.nasa.gov/hessi/modelware.htm This work is supported in part by the NASA Sun-Earth Connection Program.

  18. Solar flare composition and thermodynamics from RESIK X-ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Sylwester, B.; Sylwester, J.; Kępa, A.; Mrozek, T.; Phillips, K. J. H. E-mail: js@cbk.pan.wroc.pl E-mail: kennethjhphillips@yahoo.com

    2014-06-01

    Previous estimates of the solar flare abundances of Si, S, Cl, Ar, and K from the RESIK X-ray crystal spectrometer on board the CORONAS-F spacecraft were made on the assumption of isothermal X-ray emission. We investigate the effect on these estimates by relaxing this assumption and instead determining the differential emission measure (DEM) or thermal structure of the emitting plasma by re-analyzing RESIK data for a GOES class M1.0 flare on 2002 November 14 (SOL2002-11-14T22:26) for which there was good data coverage. The analysis method uses a maximum-likelihood (Withbroe-Sylwester) routine for evaluating the DEM. In a first step, called here AbuOpt, an optimized set of abundances of Si, S, Ar, and K is found that is consistent with the observed spectra. With these abundances, the DEM evolution during the flare is found. The abundance optimization leads to revised abundances of silicon and sulfur in the flare plasma: A(S) = 6.94 ± 0.06 and A(Si) = 7.56 ± 0.08 (on a logarithmic scale with A(H) = 12). Previously determined abundances of Ar, K, and Cl from an isothermal assumption are still the preferred values. During the flare's maximum phase, the X-ray-emitting plasma has a basically two-temperature structure, with the cooler plasma with approximately constant temperature (3-6 MK) and a hotter plasma with temperature 16-21 MK. Using imaging data from the RHESSI hard X-ray spacecraft, the emission volume of the hot plasma is deduced from which lower limits of the electron density N{sub e} and the thermal content of the plasma are given.

  19. Energetic Electrons in Solar Flares - As Viewed in X-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2004-01-01

    Hard X-ray observations provide the most direct diagnostic we have of the suprathermal electrons and the hottest thermal plasma present in solar flares. The Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) is obtaining the most comprehensive observations of individual solar flares ever available in hard X-rays. For the first time, high-resolution spectra are available for a large number of flares that accurately display the spectral shape and its evolution and, in many cases, allow us to identify the transition from the bremsstrahlung X-rays produced by suprathermal electrons to the bremsstrahlung at lower energies emitted by thermal plasma. Also, for the first time, images can be produced in arbitrary energy bands above 3 keV, and spectra of distinct imaged components can be obtained. I will review what we have learned from RHESSI observations about flare suprathermal electron distributions and their evolution Next, I will present computations of the energy deposited by these suprathermal electrons in individual flares and compare this with the energy contained in the hot thermal plasma. I will point out unsolved problems in deducing both suprathermal electron distributions and the energy content of the thermal plasma, and discuss possible solutions. Finally, I will present evidence that electron acceleration is associated with magnetic reconnection in the corona.

  20. Modeling High Resolution Flare Spectra Using Hydrodynamic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Harry; Doschek, G.

    2006-06-01

    Understanding the hydrodynamic response of the solar atmosphere to the release of energy during a flare has been a long standing problem in solar physics. Early time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations were able to reproduce the high temperatures and densities observed in solar flares, but were not able to model the observations in any detail. For example, these simulations could not account for the relatively slow decay of the observed emission or the absence of blueshifts in high spectral resolution line profiles at flare onset. We have found that by representing the flare as a succession of independently heated filaments it is possible to reproduce both the evolution of line intensity and the shape of the line profile using hydrodynamic simulations. Here we present detailed comparisons between our simulation results and several flares observed with the Yohkoh Bragg Crystal Spectrometer (BCS). Comparisons with 3D MHD simulations will also be discussed.

  1. Narrowband Gyrosynchrotron Bursts: Probing Electron Acceleration in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Nita, Gelu M.; Kontar, Eduard P.; Gary, Dale E.

    2016-07-01

    Recently, in a few case studies we demonstrated that gyrosynchrotron microwave emission can be detected directly from the acceleration region when the trapped electron component is insignificant. For the statistical study reported here, we have identified events with steep (narrowband) microwave spectra that do not show a significant trapped component and, at the same time, show evidence of source uniformity, which simplifies the data analysis greatly. Initially, we identified a subset of more than 20 radio bursts with such narrow spectra, having low- and high-frequency spectral indices larger than three in absolute value. A steep low-frequency spectrum implies that the emission is nonthermal (for optically thick thermal emission, the spectral index cannot be steeper than two), and the source is reasonably dense and uniform. A steep high-frequency spectrum implies that no significant electron trapping occurs, otherwise a progressive spectral flattening would be observed. Roughly half of these radio bursts have RHESSI data, which allow for detailed, joint diagnostics of the source parameters and evolution. Based on an analysis of radio-to-X-ray spatial relationships, timing, and spectral fits, we conclude that the microwave emission in these narrowband bursts originates directly from the acceleration regions, which have a relatively strong magnetic field, high density, and low temperature. In contrast, the thermal X-ray emission comes from a distinct loop with a smaller magnetic field, lower density, but higher temperature. Therefore, these flares likely occurred due to interaction between two (or more) magnetic loops.

  2. Catalogue of solar flare spectra observed at Ondrejov in 1998-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupryakov, Yu. A.; Kotrc, P.; Kashapova, L. K.

    2010-12-01

    We present a catalogue of solar flare data observed with two Ondřejov optical spectrographs during 1998-2007 years. This database was created to enable the data processing more convenient for users interested in the study of the energy release and transport in solar flares. The spectra and Hα filtergrams were obtained both at the Multichannel Flare Spectrograph (MFS) and at the Large Horizontal Spectrograph (HSFA2). The catalogue contains basic information about time of observation of solar flares, their location in AR, importance, availability of related data at the selected X-ray, EUV and radio instruments. The catalogue is available at www.asu.cas.cz/~sos/flare_archive.html.

  3. Energetic solar electron spectra and gamma-ray observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dröge, Wolfgang

    1996-06-01

    We analyze solar energetic electron events measured with particle detectors on board of the ISEE-3 (ICE) and Helios 1 and 2 spacecraft. Energy spectra in the range 0.1 to tens of MeV are generated applying the results of a careful re-examination of the electron response function of the instruments. The spectral shapes of events observed simultaneously, among them five on all three s/c, are in very good agreement inspite of the sometimes considerable difference in azimuthal and radial distances of the s/c with respect to the flare. These findings suggest that transport processes at the Sun and in the interplanetary medium depend only weakly on the electron energy and that the observed spectra are representative of the accelerated electron spectra at the Sun. A comparison of the electron spectra with SMM gamma-ray spectra gives evidence for the existence of different acceleration and emission mechanism in flares with long (LDEs) and short duration (SDEs) soft X-ray emission.

  4. High resolution X-ray spectra of solar flares. V - Interpretation of inner-shell transitions in Fe XX-Fe XXIII

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doschek, G. A.; Feldman, U.; Cowan, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    The paper examines high-resolution solar flare iron line spectra recorded between 1.82 and 1.97 A by a spectrometer flown by the Naval Research Laboratory on an Air Force spacecraft launched on 1979 February 24. The emission line spectrum is due to inner-shell transitions in the ions Fe XX-Fe XXV. Using theoretical spectra and calculations of line intensities obtained by methods discussed by Merts, Cowan, and Magee (1976), electron temperatures as a function of time for two large class X flares are derived. These temperatures are deduced from intensities of lines of Fe XXII, Fe XXIII, and Fe XXIV. The determination of the differential emission measure between about 12-million and 20-million K using these temperatures is considered. The possibility of determining electron densities in flare and tokamak plasmas using the inner-shell spectra of Fe XXI and Fe XX is discussed.

  5. Signatures of Accelerated Electrons in Solar and Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, Arnold O.

    2015-08-01

    Flares energize electrons (and ions) to supra-thermal energies. In most cases the final distribution in momentum or energy space is non-Maxwellian. The non-thermal part of the energy can be the source for various emissions, including hard X-rays, synchrotron radiation and coherent radio emission. Such non-thermal emissions may contain information on the acceleration process. Several acceleration scenarios have been proposed: electric DC field, stochastic, and shock acceleration. There is observational evidence for all three scenarios. The new data come from SDO, X-ray (RHESSI), radio observations (Nobeyama, VLA and e-Callisto). Solar energetic particles are an additional channel of information.Tiny solar microflares and huge stellar flares in binary systems (RS CVns) and dMe dwarfs differ by more than 10 orders of magnitude in released energy. Yet the relation between peak luminosity in thermal (soft) X-ray and non-thermal synchrotron (radio) emission is surprisingly constant. This observational fact indicates that flare acceleration scales with energy release over a large range. Electron acceleration in flares seems to be a universal process. The constraint on simultaneous thermal X-rays and non-thermal (radio) synchrotron emission seems to select on particular kind of flare. In this subset, there seems to be only one type of acceleration.Yet, small deviations are noted: Small solar flares are softer in hard X-rays. Solar nanoflares are relatively weak in synchrotron emission. The recently noted case of radio-poor preflares will also be presented. The deviations suggest that the acceleration is less efficient in small flares and in the early phase of flares. Larger deviations are reported occasionally for solar flares and more often from stellar flares, where either thermal or non-thermal emission seems to be missing completely.The location of the acceleration in solar flares remains disputed. Observations suggesting acceleration in the soft X-ray top-tops, above

  6. Radio Studies of Electron Acceleration and Transport During Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.

    2002-05-01

    At centimeter wavelengths solar flare radiation is dominated by incoherent gyrosynchrotron emissions from 10 keV to several MeV electrons. Due to unique sensitivity of the gyrosynchrotron radiation to electron momentum distribution and ambient magnetic field, the radio observations at these wavelengths can provide important clues to the evolution of high-energy electrons residing in the flaring loops. In this talk I review some of recent progress made primarily using the Owens Valley Solar Array (OVSA) to understand acceleration, trapping, and precipitation of electrons during solar flares. These works are extensions of the traditional, correlative studies of temporal and spatial morphologies of radio bursts versus those of other flare radiations (X-rays, UV/EUV, and Hα ) to exploit the multi-frequencies of the OVSA. The results demonstrate additional advantages of radio observations as a flare diagnostic tool when both spatial and spectral resolutions are available, and provide a major initiative in building the Frequency-Agile Radio Telescope (FASR). This work has been supported by NASA grant NAG5-10891. The OVSA is supported by NSF grant AST-9987366 to New Jersey Institute of Technology.

  7. Acceleration of runaway electrons and Joule heating in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    The electric field acceleration of electrons out of a thermal plasma and the simultaneous Joule heating of the plasma are studied. Acceleration and heating timescales are derived and compared, and upper limits are obtained on the acceleration volume and the rate at which electrons can be accelerated. These upper limits, determined by the maximum magnetic field strength observed in flaring regions, place stringent restrictions upon the acceleration process. The role of the plasma resistivity in these processes is examined, and possible sources of anomalous resistivity are summarized. The implications of these results for the microwave and hard X-ray emission from solar flares are examined.

  8. Acceleration of runaway electrons and Joule heating in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.

    1985-01-01

    The electric field acceleration of electrons out of a thermal plasma and the simultaneous Joule heating of the plasma are studied. Acceleration and heating timescales are derived and compared, and upper limits are obtained on the acceleration volume and the rate at which electrons can be accelerated. These upper limits, determined by the maximum magnetic field strength observed in flaring regions, place stringent restrictions upon the acceleration process. The role of the plasma resistivity in these processes is examined, and possible sources of anomalous resistivity are summarized. The implications of these results for the microwave and hard X-ray emission from solar flares are examined.

  9. Identifying Return-Current Losses in Flare Hard X-ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2011-01-01

    I will report on theoretical studies and a data analysis program aimed at identifying and physically interpreting breaks in hard X-ray spectra resulting from return-current energy losses, as well as heating of the flare plasma resulting from these losses.

  10. The Atmospheric Response to High Nonthermal Electron Beam Fluxes in Solar Flares. I. Modeling the Brightest NUV Footpoints in the X1 Solar Flare of 2014 March 29

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Allred, Joel C.; Daw, Adrian; Cauzzi, Gianna; Carlsson, Mats

    2017-02-01

    The 2014 March 29 X1 solar flare (SOL20140329T17:48) produced bright continuum emission in the far- and near-ultraviolet (NUV) and highly asymmetric chromospheric emission lines, providing long-sought constraints on the heating mechanisms of the lower atmosphere in solar flares. We analyze the continuum and emission line data from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the brightest flaring magnetic footpoints in this flare. We compare the NUV spectra of the brightest pixels to new radiative-hydrodynamic predictions calculated with the RADYN code using constraints on a nonthermal electron beam inferred from the collisional thick-target modeling of hard X-ray data from Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. We show that the atmospheric response to a high beam flux density satisfactorily achieves the observed continuum brightness in the NUV. The NUV continuum emission in this flare is consistent with hydrogen (Balmer) recombination radiation that originates from low optical depth in a dense chromospheric condensation and from the stationary beam-heated layers just below the condensation. A model producing two flaring regions (a condensation and stationary layers) in the lower atmosphere is also consistent with the asymmetric Fe ii chromospheric emission line profiles observed in the impulsive phase.

  11. Observation of solar flare hard x-ray spectra using CdTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.; Tsuneta, S.; Tamura, T.; Kumagai, K.; Katsukawa, Y.; Kubo, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Yamagami, T.; Saito, Y.; Mori, K.

    We present the design and flight results of a balloon-borne hard X-ray detector system for observing high-resolution spectra of solar flares. The instrument is designed to achieve a 3 keV energy resolution over the energy range of 15-120 keV. The instrument uses sixteen 10 × 10 × 0.5 mm cadmium telluride (CdTe) detectors with indium electrodes that act as Schottky barriers to minimize leak current and allow a high bias voltage. Pre-flight tests confirmed that all detectors exceeded the target 3 keV resolution. The pressurized detector vessel uses a low-density (0.1 g/cm^2) CFRP/Rohacell window. The detectors are passively shielded by 2 mm of lead, and field of view is constrained with a graded-Z collimator. The vertical angle of the detectors are fixed at 45 degrees, and the azimuth angle of the entire gondola is controlled using a signal from a sun position sensor. Specially developed electronics accumulate a 128 channel spectrum for each detector, which is read through telemetry every 0.54 seconds. These detectors need to be cooled down to 0 degrees C for optimal performance; due to weight constraints this was achieved purely by radiative cooling, using the detector enclosure surface as a radiator and by placing shields that minimize radiative heat input from the sun and earth while maximizing heat loss to the sky. The first flight of the instrument took place on August 29, 2001 and while no major flares were observed, we succeeded in detecting a small brightening (microflare). Detector temperature of -13 degrees C was achieved, and all systems performed as expected. The instrument was recovered successfully after the flight and a second flight is planned for May 2002.

  12. Si XII X-ray Satellite Lines in Solar Flare Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Dubau, J.; Sylwester, J.; Sylwester, B.

    2006-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the Si XII n=3 and n=4 dielectronic satellite line features at 5.82A and 5.56A respectively, near the Si XIII 1s(sup 2)-1s3p and 1s(sup 2)-1s4p lines (5.681A and 5.405A), is calculated using atomic data presented here. The resulting theoretical spectra are compared with solar flare spectra observed by the RESIK spectrometer on the CORONAS-F spacecraft. The satellites, like the more familiar n=2 satellites near the Si XIII 1s(sup 2)-1s2p lines, are formed mostly by dielectronic recombination, but unlike the n=2 satellites are unblended. The implications for similar satellite lines in flare Fe spectra are discussed.

  13. The Energetic Importance of Accelerated Electrons in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    It has been claimed that a large fraction of the total energy released in a solar flare goes initially into accelerated electrons. These electrons generate the observed hard X-ray bremsstrahlung emission as they lose most of their energy by coulomb collisions in the lower corona and chromosphere to heat the plasma seen in soft X-rays. From several recent studies of the Neupert Effect - the empirical result that for many flares the time integral of the hard X-ray emission closely matches the temporal variation of the soft X-ray emission - it appears that the fraction of the released energy going into accelerated electrons is lower, on average, for smaller flares. Also, from relative timing differences, about 25% of all flares are inconsistent with the Neupert Effect. The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) is uniquely capable of investigating the Neupert Effect since it covers soft X-rays down to 3 keV (when both attenuators are out of the field of view) and hard X-rays with keV energy resolution. It has arcsecond-class angular resolution and sub-second time resolution. Several M-class flares have already been detected by RHESSI and I will present their detailed time histories for different energy ranges. I will also present hard and soft X-ray images that reveal the spatial relation between the hot plasma and the accelerated electrons. The results are in general agreement with the Neupert Effect, but they also suggest that there must be other heating mechanisms besides the thermalization of accelerated electrons, even during the impulsive phase.

  14. Acceleration of runaway electrons and Joule heating in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, G.D.

    1985-06-15

    The electric-field acceleration of electrons out of a thermal plasma and the simultaneous Joule heating of the plasma are studied. Acceleration and heating time scales are derived and compared, and upper limits are obtained on the acceleration volume and the rate at which electrons can be accelerated. These upper limits, determined by the maximum magnetic-field strength observed in flaring regions, place stringent restrictions on the acceleration process. The implications of these results for the microwave and hard X-ray emission from solar flares are examined. The major conclusions are: (1) The simple electric-field acceleration of electrons is found, in agreement with Spicer, to be incapable of producing a large enough electron flux to explain the bulk of the observed hard X-ray emission from solar flares as nonthermal bremsstrahlung. For the bulk of the X-ray emission to be nonthermal, at least 10/sup 4/ oppositely directed current channels are required, or an acceleration mechanism that does not result in a net current in the acceleration region is required. (2) lf the bulk of the X-ray emission is thermal, a single current sheet can yield the required heating and acceleration time scales and the required electron energies for the microwave emission. This is accomplished with an electric field that is much smaller than the Dreicer field (E/sub D//Eroughly-equal10--50). (3) The rise time of the nonthermal emission is determined by the time needed to generate the required number of runaway electrons rather than by the time needed to accelerate the electrons to the required energies, which is generally a much shorter time scale. (4) The acceleration of enough electrons to produce a microwave flare requires the resupply of electrons to both the current sheet and the runaway region of velocity space.

  15. Evidence for beamed electrons in a limb X-ray flare observed by Hard X-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (HXIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haug, Eberhard; Elwert, Gerhard

    1986-01-01

    The limb flare of November 18, 1980, 14:51 UT, was investigated on the basis of X-ray images taken by the Hard X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (HXIS) and of X-ray spectra from the Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) aboard the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM). The impulsive burst was also recorded at microwave frequencies between 2 and 20 GHz whereas no optical flare and no radio event at frequencies below 1 GHz were reported. The flare occurred directly at the SW limb of the solar disk. Taking advantage of the spatial resolution of HXIS images, the time evolution of the X-radiation originating from relatively small source regions can be studied. Using Monte Carlo computations of the energy distribution of energetic electrons traversing the solar plasma, the bremsstrahlung spectra produced by the electrons were derived.

  16. The X-ray emission of solar flares generated by anisotropic electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Kelner, S. R.; Kotov, Y. D.

    1987-12-01

    For three types of the initial angle distribution of fast electrons, energy spectra, directivity, and polarization of the bremsstrahlung have been computed with an account for multiple scattering and energy losses. The influence of Compton scattering and of photoabsorption on the observed hard X-ray emission of solar flares has been investigated. It is obtained that the photon spectrum index depends not only on the spectrum of electrons but also on the registered energy range and on the angle of view of the flare. In the 10 - 40 keV range the spectrum is softer at the limb than in the solar disc centre; in the 60 - 360 keV the situation is reverse, the spectrum being softer in the solar disc centre.

  17. Using Gamma-Ray and Neutron Emission to Determine Solar Flare Accelerated Particle Spectra and Composition and the Conditions Within the Flare Magnetic Loop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    computer codes we have cal- culated the yields of deexcitation lines, escaping neutron spec- tra and the neutron capture line for monoenergetic ...USING GAMMA-RAYAND NEUTRON EMISSION TO DETERMINE SOLAR FLARE ACCELERATED PARTICLE SPECTRA AND COMPOSITION AND THE CONDITIONS WITHIN THE FLARE...California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA Received 2006 May 4; accepted 2006 August 23 ABSTRACT The measurable quantities associated with -ray and neutron

  18. Influence of Stellar Flares on the Chemical Composition of Exoplanets and Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venot, Olivia; Rocchetto, Marco; Carl, Shaun; Roshni Hashim, Aysha; Decin, Leen

    2016-10-01

    More than three thousand exoplanets have been detected so far, and more and more spectroscopic observations of exoplanets are performed. Future instruments (James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), E-ELT, PLATO, Ariel, etc.,) are eagerly awaited, as they will be able to provide spectroscopic data with greater accuracy and sensitivity than what is currently available. This will allow more accurate conclusions to be drawn regarding the chemistry and dynamics of exoplanetary atmospheres, provided that the observational data are carefully processed. One important aspect to consider is temporal stellar atmospheric disturbances that can influence the planetary composition, and hence spectra, and potentially can lead to incorrect assumptions about the steady-state atmospheric composition of the planet. In this paper, we focus on perturbations coming from the host star in the form of flare events that significantly increase photon flux impingement on the exoplanets atmosphere. In some cases, particularly for M stars, this sudden increase may last for several hours. We aim to discover to what extent a stellar flare is able to modify the chemical composition of the planetary atmosphere and, therefore, influence the resulting spectra. We use a one-dimensional thermo-photochemical model to study the neutral atmospheric composition of two hypothetical planets located around the star AD Leo. We place the two planets at different distances from the star, which results in effective atmospheric temperatures of 412 and 1303 K. AD Leo is an active star that has already been observed during a flare. Therefore, we use the spectroscopic data from this flare event to simulate the evolution of the chemical composition of the atmospheres of the two hypothetical planets. We compute synthetic spectra to evaluate the implications for observations. The increase in the incoming photon flux affects the chemical abundances of some important species (such as H and NH3), down to altitudes associated with

  19. The effect of Compton scattering on gamma-ray spectra of the 2005 January 20 flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Gan, Wei-Qun

    2012-10-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy provides a wealth of information about accelerated particles in solar flares, as well as the ambient medium with which these energetic particles interact. The neutron capture line (2.223 MeV), the strongest in the solar gamma-ray spectrum, forms in the deep atmosphere. The energy of these photons can be reduced via Compton scattering. With the fully relativistic GEANT4 toolkit, we have carried out Monte Carlo simulations of the transport of a neutron capture line in solar flares, and applied them to the flare that occurred on 2005 January 20 (X7.1/2B), one of the most powerful gamma-ray flares observed by RHESSI during the 23rd solar cycle. By comparing the fitting results of different models with and without Compton scattering of the neutron capture line, we find that when including the Compton scattering for the neutron capture line, the observed gamma-ray spectrum can be reproduced by a population of accelerated particles with a very hard spectrum (s <= 2.3). The Compton effect of a 2.223 MeV line on the spectra is therefore proven to be significant, which influences the time evolution of the neutron capture line flux as well. The study also suggests that the mean vertical depth for neutron capture in hydrogen for this event is about 8 g cm-2.

  20. A benchmark study for CHIANTI based on RESIK solar flare spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chifor, C.; Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.; Sylwester, J.; Sylwester, B.; Phillips, K. J. H.

    2007-01-01

    Aims:To perform a benchmark analysis for the recent version of the CHIANTI atomic database (v. 5.2) based on high-resolution solar flare X-ray spectra in the range 3.4-6.1 Å from the RESIK crystal spectrometer on the CORONAS-F spacecraft. Methods: A C5.8 flare occurring on 2003 February 22 was chosen for analysis. RESIK spectra of this flare include emission lines of He-like and H-like K, Ar, S, and Si, with some dielectronic lines. Initially, two independent plasma diagnostic techniques are employed: an emission measure (EM) loci analysis using the line flux and the line contribution function G(T_e, N_e), and a new method based on continuum fluxes and contribution functions. We further apply a differential emission measure (DEM) analysis, from which CHIANTI synthetic spectra are derived. The continuum from RESIK spectra is checked against simultaneous RHESSI and GOES observations. Comparisons of CHIANTI synthetic spectra with those from the MEKAL code in the 3.4-6.1 Å range are also presented. Results: The emitting plasma appears multi-thermal, having one dominant temperature component determined independently from the line and continuum EM loci and DEM analyses. Consistency between line and continuum emissions requires photospheric elemental abundances (Asplund et al. 2005), with a depleted sulphur abundance. With the exception of RESIK channel 4 (5.0-6.1 Å), we find overall very good agreement between the calculated and observed intensities. From comparisons with other instruments, RESIK's precision in the continuum level is confirmed to be within the estimated 20% uncertainties in the intensity calibration. We find general agreement between CHIANTI and MEKAL isothermal spectra, but we note that the atomic data for the Si xii and Si xiii ions contained in CHIANTI are more complete. Conclusions: .RESIK observations of both lines and continua are suitable for characterising the properties of the flaring plasma such as temperature, emission measure and elemental

  1. QUASI-PERIODIC PULSATIONS IN SOLAR AND STELLAR FLARES: RE-EVALUATING THEIR NATURE IN THE CONTEXT OF POWER-LAW FLARE FOURIER SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Inglis, A. R.; Ireland, J.; Dominique, M.

    2015-01-10

    The nature of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in solar and stellar flares remains debated. Recent work has shown that power-law-like Fourier power spectra are an intrinsic property of solar and stellar flare signals, a property that many previous studies of this phenomenon have not accounted for. Hence a re-evaluation of the existing interpretations and assumptions regarding QPPs is needed. We adopt a Bayesian method for investigating this phenomenon, fully considering the Fourier power-law properties of flare signals. Using data from the PROBA2/Large Yield Radiometer, Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor, Nobeyama Radioheliograph, and Yohkoh/HXT instruments, we study a selection of flares from the literature identified as QPP events. Additionally, we examine optical data from a recent stellar flare that appears to exhibit oscillatory properties. We find that, for all but one event tested, an explicit oscillation is not required to explain the observations. Instead, the flare signals are adequately described as a manifestation of a power law in the Fourier power spectrum. However, for the flare of 1998 May 8, strong evidence for an explicit oscillation with P ≈ 14-16 s is found in the 17 GHz radio data and the 13-23 keV Yohkoh/HXT data. We conclude that, most likely, many previously analyzed events in the literature may be similarly described by power laws in the flare Fourier power spectrum, without invoking a narrowband, oscillatory component. Hence the prevalence of oscillatory signatures in solar and stellar flares may be less than previously believed. The physical mechanism behind the appearance of the observed power laws is discussed.

  2. Possible evidence for beaming in flares from microwave and hard X-ray imaging and spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmahl, E. J.; Kundu, M. R.; Dennis, B. R.

    1986-01-01

    The magnetic field strength and number of burst-producing energetic electrons are presently deduced for the impulsive phase of a solar flare at microwave wavelengths, with the VLA, and hard X-rays, with the SMM Hard X-ray Burst Spectrometer. The combined data indicate that the number of microwave-emitting electrons is at least three orders of magnitude smaller than the number of thick target electrons producing the hard X-rays; this is suggested to be due to the high beaming and inefficient radiation of gyrosynchrotron emission by comparison with isotropically distributed electrons.

  3. Ulysses-ARTEMIS radio observation of energetic flare electron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoang, S.; Moncuquet, M.; Poquerusse, M.

    1995-01-01

    Type 3 radio bursts allow us to follow energetic electrons ejected by solar flares into the interplanetary medium, even when the observer is far away from the electrons. The emission frequency f(sub p) is related to the ambient density n(sub e) by f(sub p) varies as the square root of n(sub e), and as a function of the distance r to the sun we have approximately n(sub e) varies as r(exp -2); as a consequence, on a 1/f - t dynamic spectrum type 3 bursts appear as nearly straight traces, whose slope gives an estimation of the source speed. We used the data of the URAP radio receiver on Ulysses (1-1000 kHz), observing sources in the solar wind, and the ground data of the ARTEMIS spectrograph (100-500 MHz), observing sources of the corona, over the years 1991-1994. We found a surprisingly large number of excellent high-frequency - low-frequency associations. A type 3 burst group on ARTEMIS (10 to 100 bursts over 1 to 10 minutes) typically gives rise to one isolated burst on Ulysses. As bursts often start in high frequencies during the maximum phase of flares, this demonstrates in a very convincing manner that some of the flare electrons themselves make it all the way to the interplanetary medium. We discuss decorrelation cases in the context of geometrical configuration between the active region and the two observing sites. We also study how apparent electron speeds vary with the distance to the sun.

  4. Electron Beam Return-Current Losses in Solar Flares: Initial Comparison of Analytical and Numerical Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    Accelerated electrons play an important role in the energetics of solar flares. Understanding the process or processes that accelerate these electrons to high, nonthermal energies also depends on understanding the evolution of these electrons between the acceleration region and the region where they are observed through their hard X-ray or radio emission. Energy losses in the co-spatial electric field that drives the current-neutralizing return current can flatten the electron distribution toward low energies. This in turn flattens the corresponding bremsstrahlung hard X-ray spectrum toward low energies. The lost electron beam energy also enhances heating in the coronal part of the flare loop. Extending earlier work by Knight & Sturrock (1977), Emslie (1980), Diakonov & Somov (1988), and Litvinenko & Somov (1991), I have derived analytical and semi-analytical results for the nonthermal electron distribution function and the self-consistent electric field strength in the presence of a steady-state return-current. I review these results, presented previously at the 2009 SPD Meeting in Boulder, CO, and compare them and computed X-ray spectra with numerical results obtained by Zharkova & Gordovskii (2005, 2006). The phYSical significance of similarities and differences in the results will be emphasized. This work is supported by NASA's Heliophysics Guest Investigator Program and the RHESSI Project.

  5. SUPPRESSION OF ENERGETIC ELECTRON TRANSPORT IN FLARES BY DOUBLE LAYERS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T. C.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2012-09-20

    During flares and coronal mass ejections, energetic electrons from coronal sources typically have very long lifetimes compared to the transit times across the systems, suggesting confinement in the source region. Particle-in-cell simulations are carried out to explore the mechanisms of energetic electron transport from the corona to the chromosphere and possible confinement. We set up an initial system of pre-accelerated hot electrons in contact with ambient cold electrons along the local magnetic field and let it evolve over time. Suppression of transport by a nonlinear, highly localized electrostatic electric field (in the form of a double layer) is observed after a short phase of free-streaming by hot electrons. The double layer (DL) emerges at the contact of the two electron populations. It is driven by an ion-electron streaming instability due to the drift of the back-streaming return current electrons interacting with the ions. The DL grows over time and supports a significant drop in temperature and hence reduces heat flux between the two regions that is sustained for the duration of the simulation. This study shows that transport suppression begins when the energetic electrons start to propagate away from a coronal acceleration site. It also implies confinement of energetic electrons with kinetic energies less than the electrostatic energy of the DL for the DL lifetime, which is much longer than the electron transit time through the source region.

  6. Charge composition and energy spectra of ancient solar flare heavy nuclei. [in carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goswami, J. N.; Lal, D.; Macdougall, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    Nuclear tracks in olivine grains from three carbonaceous chondrites are analyzed to determine the energy spectra and charge compositions of solar flare heavy nuclei during the early history of the solar system. Track length measurements of grains irradiated before compaction into meteorites over 4 billion years ago were performed accompanied by calibration experiments using heavy ion beams from an accelerator to identify tracks formed by very heavy (Z between 20 and 28) and very very heavy (Z greater than or equal to 30) groups of nuclei in the Murchison, Murray and Cold Bokkeveld meteorite grains. The time-averaged spectral shape of the solar flare very heavy nuclei is found to be similar to that obtained in lunar sample studies and direct observations. The meteorite grains also reproduce the currently observed enrichment of low-energy heavy ions in solar cosmic rays with respect to photospheric levels, with enhancement factors from 2 to 12 in the energy interval 6-10 MeV/n. Variations of very very heavy/very heavy nuclei abundance ratios within individual kinetic energy intervals are interpreted as representing possible changes of solar flare activity on time scales of 10,000 years.

  7. H-alpha spectra of dynamic chromospheric processes in five well-observed X-ray flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Richard C.; Penn, Matthew J.; Wulser, Jean-Pierre; Kiplinger, Alan L.

    1990-01-01

    Simultaneous H-alpha and hard X-ray (HXR) spectra were obtained for five solar flares to determine the relationship of H-alpha profiles and the nonthermal part of the flare represented by the hard X-ray burst. All five flares exhibited impulsive-phase redshifted H-alpha in emission, which was temporarily and spatially associated with intense HXR emission and broad impulsive-phase H-alpha wings. A few small regions within two flares showed a blueshifted H-alpha emission which appeared only early in the impulsive phase and was temporally correlated with the HXR emission but not with broad H-alpha wings. Finally, there were both redshifted and blueshifted absorption spectra with properties fully consistent with those known for erupting and untwisting filaments.

  8. Joule heating and runaway electron acceleration in a solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Kundu, Mukul R.; Kane, Sharad R.

    1989-01-01

    The hard and soft x ray and microwave emissions from a solar flare (May 14, 1980) were analyzed and interpreted in terms of Joule heating and runaway electron acceleration in one or more current sheets. It is found that all three emissions can be generated with sub-Dreicer electric fields. The soft x ray emitting plasma can only be heated by a single current sheet if the resistivity in the sheet is well above the classical, collisional resistivity of 10(exp 7) K, 10(exp 11)/cu cm plasma. If the hard x ray emission is from thermal electrons, anomalous resistivity or densities exceeding 3 x 10(exp 12)/cu cm are required. If the hard x ray emission is from nonthermal electrons, the emissions can be produced with classical resistivity in the current sheets if the heating rate is approximately 4 times greater than that deduced from the soft x ray data (with a density of 10(exp 10)/cu cm in the soft x ray emitting region), if there are at least 10(exp 4) current sheets, and if the plasma properties in the sheets are characteristic of the superhot plasma observed in some flares by Lin et al., and with Hinotori. Most of the released energy goes directly into bulk heating, rather than accelerated particles.

  9. CORONAL ELECTRON DISTRIBUTION IN SOLAR FLARES: DRIFT-KINETIC MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Minoshima, Takashi; Kusano, Kanya; Masuda, Satoshi; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi

    2011-05-10

    Using a model of particle acceleration and transport in solar flares, we investigate the height distribution of coronal electrons by focusing on the energy-dependent pitch-angle scattering. When pitch-angle scattering is not included, the peak heights of loop-top electrons are constant, regardless of their energy, owing to the continuous acceleration and compression of the electrons via shrinkage of magnetic loops. On the other hand, under pitch-angle scattering, the electron heights are energy-dependent: intermediate-energy electrons are at a higher altitude, whereas lower and higher energy electrons are at lower altitudes. This implies that the intermediate-energy electrons are inhibited from following the shrinking field lines to lower altitudes because pitch-angle scattering causes efficient precipitation of these electrons into the footpoint and their subsequent loss from the loop. This result is qualitatively consistent with the position of the above-the-loop-top hard X-ray (HXR) source that is located above coronal HXR loops emitted by lower energy electrons and microwaves emitted by higher energy electrons. Quantitative agreement with observations might be achieved by considering primary acceleration before the onset of loop shrinkage and additional pitch-angle scattering via wave-particle interactions.

  10. Modeling Images and Spectra of a Solar Flare Observed by RHESSI on 20 February 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, Linhui; Holman, Gordon D.; Dennis, Brian R.; Krucker, Saem; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert Kim

    2002-01-01

    We have analyzed a C7.5 limb flare observed by RHESSI on 20 February 2002. The RHESSI images appear to show two footpoints and a loop-top source. Our goal was to determine if the data are consistent with a simple steady-state model in which high-energy electrons are continuously injected at the top of a semicircular flare loop. A comparison of the RHESSI images with simulated images from the model has made it possible for us to identify spurious sources and fluxes in the RHESSI images. We find the RHESSI results are in many aspects consistent with the model if a thermal source is included between the loop footpoints, but there is a problem with the spectral index of the loop-top source. The thermal source between the footpoints is likely to be a low-lying loop interacting with the northern footpoint of a higher loop containing the loop-top source.

  11. Magnetic structure and nonthermal electrons in the X6.9 flare on 2011 August 9

    SciTech Connect

    Hwangbo, Jung-Eun; Lee, Dae-Young; Lee, Jeongwoo; Park, Sung-Hong; Kim, Sujin; Bong, Su-Chan; Kim, Yeon-Han; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Park, Young-Deuk

    2014-12-01

    The 2011 August 9 flare is one of the largest X-ray flares of sunspot cycle 24, but spatial information is rather limited due to its position close to the western limb. This paper presents information about the location of high-energy electrons derived from hard X-ray and microwave spectra obtained with the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Korean Solar Radio Burst Locator (KSRBL), respectively. The KSRBL microwave spectrum shows significant fluxes at low frequencies, implying that the high-energy electrons reside in a coronal volume highly concentrated at strong magnetic fields, and rapidly expanding with decreasing magnetic fields. After a simple modeling of the microwave spectrum, we found that the microwave source should be located above the inner pair of magnetic poles in a large quadrupolar configuration. The time-dependent evolution of the magnetic field distribution and total nonthermal energy derived from the microwave spectra is also consistent with the standard picture of multiple magnetic reconnections recurring at a magnetic null point that forms above the magnetic quadrupoles and moves up with time.

  12. Electron Acceleration in Pulsar-wind Termination Shocks: An Application to the Crab Nebula Gamma-Ray Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroon, John J.; Becker, Peter A.; Finke, Justin D.; Dermer, Charles D.

    2016-12-01

    The γ-ray flares from the Crab Nebula observed by AGILE and Fermi-LAT reaching GeV energies and lasting several days challenge the standard models for particle acceleration in pulsar-wind nebulae because the radiating electrons have energies exceeding the classical radiation-reaction limit for synchrotron. Previous modeling has suggested that the synchrotron limit can be exceeded if the electrons experience electrostatic acceleration, but the resulting spectra do not agree very well with the data. As a result, there are still some important unanswered questions about the detailed particle acceleration and emission processes occurring during the flares. We revisit the problem using a new analytical approach based on an electron transport equation that includes terms describing electrostatic acceleration, stochastic wave-particle acceleration, shock acceleration, synchrotron losses, and particle escape. An exact solution is obtained for the electron distribution, which is used to compute the associated γ-ray synchrotron spectrum. We find that in our model the γ-ray flares are mainly powered by electrostatic acceleration, but the contributions from stochastic and shock acceleration play an important role in producing the observed spectral shapes. Our model can reproduce the spectra of all the Fermi-LAT and AGILE flares from the Crab Nebula, using magnetic field strengths in agreement with the multi-wavelength observational constraints. We also compute the spectrum and duration of the synchrotron afterglow created by the accelerated electrons, after they escape into the region on the downstream side of the pulsar-wind termination shock. The afterglow is expected to fade over a maximum period of about three weeks after the γ-ray flare.

  13. Type III radio burst productivity of solar flares. I - Release of energetic electrons out of the flare site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poquerusse, M.; McIntosh, P. S.

    1990-12-01

    The statistical relationship between type III radio bursts and optical flares, using the comprehensive flare data base at the NOAA National Geophysical Data Center (Boulder, Colorado), and the radio observations obtained with the ARTEMIS multichannel spectrograph in Nancay (France), operating at 500-100 MHz are presented. At variance with previous results, it is seen that type III probability of occurrence depends only weakly upon the spatial extension of the flare observed in H-alpha, but strongly upon its brightness. It is confirmed that the type III probability increases with proximity to sunspots and with mass motions (surges and prominence activity); in addition, statistical data are consistent with both relations holding at fixed flare brightness. Thus, some of the conditions favorable to type III occurrence are characteristic of compact flares, while others are characteristic of large and long-duration flares, which are often related to mass ejections. This apparent paradox suggests that particle acceleration and magnetic expansion are at work simultaneously in the ejection of electron streams out of faring sites.

  14. OPTIMAL ELECTRON ENERGIES FOR DRIVING CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Reep, J. W.; Bradshaw, S. J.; Alexander, D. E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu

    2015-08-01

    In the standard model of solar flares, energy deposition by a beam of electrons drives strong chromospheric evaporation leading to a significantly denser corona and much brighter emission across the spectrum. Chromospheric evaporation was examined in great detail by Fisher et al., who described a distinction between two different regimes, termed explosive and gentle evaporation. In this work, we examine the importance of electron energy and stopping depths on the two regimes and on the atmospheric response. We find that with explosive evaporation, the atmospheric response does not depend strongly on electron energy. In the case of gentle evaporation, lower energy electrons are significantly more efficient at heating the atmosphere and driving up-flows sooner than higher energy electrons. We also find that the threshold between explosive and gentle evaporation is not fixed at a given beam energy flux, but also depends strongly on the electron energy and duration of heating. Further, at low electron energies, a much weaker beam flux is required to drive explosive evaporation.

  15. Electronic spectra of semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Alivisatos, A.P.

    1993-12-31

    Semiconductor nanocrystals smaller than the bulk exciton show substantial quantum confinement effects. Recent experiments including Stark effect, resonance Raman, valence band photoemission, and near edge X-ray adsorption will be used to put together a picture of the nanocrystal electronic states.

  16. MULTITHERMAL REPRESENTATION OF THE KAPPA-DISTRIBUTION OF SOLAR FLARE ELECTRONS AND APPLICATION TO SIMULTANEOUS X-RAY AND EUV OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, Marina; Motorina, Galina; Kontar, Eduard P. E-mail: eduard.kontar@glasgow.ac.uk

    2015-12-10

    Acceleration of particles and plasma heating is one of the fundamental problems in solar flare physics. An accurate determination of the spectrum of flare-energized electrons over a broad energy range is crucial for our understanding of aspects such as the acceleration mechanism and the total flare energy. Recent years have seen a growing interest in the kappa-distribution as a representation of the total spectrum of flare-accelerated electrons. In this work we present the kappa-distribution as a differential emission measure. This allows for inferring the electron distribution from X-ray observations and EUV observations by simultaneously fitting the proposed function to RHESSI and SDO/AIA data. This yields the spatially integrated electron spectra of a coronal source from less than 0.1 keV up to several tens of keV. The method is applied to a single-loop GOES C4.1 flare. The results show that the total energy can only be determined accurately by combining RHESSI and AIA observations. Simultaneously fitting the proposed representation of the kappa-distribution reduces the electron number density in the analyzed flare by a factor of ∼30 and the total flare energy by a factor of ∼5 compared with the commonly used fitting of RHESSI spectra. The spatially integrated electron spectrum of the investigated flare between 0.043 and 24 keV is consistent with the combination of a low-temperature (∼2 MK) component and a hot (∼11 MK) kappa-like component with spectral index 4, reminiscent of solar wind distributions.

  17. Relativistic Electrons Produced by Reconnecting Electric Fields in a Laser-driven Bench-top Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, J. Y.; Lin, J.; Li, Y. T.; Wang, X.; Li, Y.; Zhang, K.; Yuan, D. W.; Ping, Y. L.; Wei, H. G.; Wang, J. Q.; Su, L. N.; Li, F.; Han, B.; Liao, G. Q.; Yin, C. L.; Fang, Y.; Yuan, X.; Wang, C.; Sun, J. R.; Liang, G. Y.; Wang, F. L.; Ding, Y. K.; He, X. T.; Zhu, J. Q.; Sheng, Z. M.; Li, G.; Zhao, G.; Zhang, J.

    2016-08-01

    Laboratory experiments have been carried out to model the magnetic reconnection process in a solar flare with powerful lasers. Relativistic electrons with energy up to megaelectronvolts are detected along the magnetic separatrices bounding the reconnection outflow, which exhibit a kappa-like distribution with an effective temperature of ˜109 K. The acceleration of non-thermal electrons is found to be more efficient in the case with a guide magnetic field (a component of a magnetic field along the reconnection-induced electric field) than in the case without a guide field. Hardening of the spectrum at energies ≥500 keV is observed in both cases, which remarkably resembles the hardening of hard X-ray and γ-ray spectra observed in many solar flares. This supports a recent proposal that the hardening in the hard X-ray and γ-ray emissions of solar flares is due to a hardening of the source-electron spectrum. We also performed numerical simulations that help examine behaviors of electrons in the reconnection process with the electromagnetic field configurations occurring in the experiments. The trajectories of non-thermal electrons observed in the experiments were well duplicated in the simulations. Our numerical simulations generally reproduce the electron energy spectrum as well, except for the hardening of the electron spectrum. This suggests that other mechanisms such as shock or turbulence may play an important role in the production of the observed energetic electrons.

  18. THE SOLAR FLARE CHLORINE ABUNDANCE FROM RESIK X-RAY SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Sylwester, B.; Sylwester, J.; Phillips, K. J. H.; Kuznetsov, V. D. E-mail: js@cbk.pan.wroc.pl E-mail: kvd@izmiran.ru

    2011-09-01

    The abundance of chlorine is determined from X-ray spectra obtained with the RESIK instrument on CORONAS-F during solar flares between 2002 and 2003. Using weak lines of He-like Cl, Cl XVI, between 4.44 and 4.50 A, and with temperatures and emission measures from GOES on an isothermal assumption, we obtained A(Cl) = 5.75 {+-} 0.26 on a scale A(H) = 12. The uncertainty reflects an approximately a factor of two scatter in measured line fluxes. Nevertheless, our value represents what is probably the best solar determination yet obtained. It is higher by factors of 1.8 and 2.7 than Cl abundance estimates from an infrared sunspot spectrum and nearby H II regions. The constancy of the RESIK abundance values over a large range of flares (GOES class from below C1 to X1) argues for any fractionation that may be present in the low solar atmosphere to be independent of the degree of solar activity.

  19. Singularity Spectra and Generalized Extreme Value Distributions of Decimetric Radio Bursts Associated with Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Reinaldo; Veronese, Thalita; José Alves Bolzan, Maurício; Fernandes, Francisco; Cecatto, José; Karlicky, Marian; Sawant, Hanumant

    The search for turbulent-like patterns and extreme dynamics from time series of solar radio burts has recently advanced due to high-resolution and high-sensitivity observations. Such so-lar radio emissions in the decimetric frequency range (above 1 GHz) are very rich in temporal and spectral fine structures due to nonlinear processes occurring in the magnetic structures on the corresponding active regions. In this paper we analize the decimetric fine structures of 8 X-Class Flares events observed from Brazilian Solar Spectroscope (1-2.5 GHz) and On-drejov radiospectrograph (3 GHz). The Singularity Spectra [1] and Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution [2] are obtained and we interpret our findings as evidence of inhomogeneous lagrangian-like MHD turbulence driving the underlying non-gaussian plasma emission process. Once GEV statistical behavior was found for 75% of the events, the flare ocurrence is discussed into the context of solar extreme events. [1] Bolzan et al., Ann. Geophys., 27, 569-576, 2009. [2] S. Coles, An Introduction to Statistical Modeling of Extreme Values, Springer Series in Statistics, (2001) 228 pp., Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Germany.

  20. TIME-RESOLVED PROPERTIES AND GLOBAL TRENDS IN dMe FLARES FROM SIMULTANEOUS PHOTOMETRY AND SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Davenport, James R. A.; Wisniewski, John P.; Osten, Rachel A.; Hilton, Eric J.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Schmidt, Sarah J.

    2013-07-15

    We present a homogeneous analysis of line and continuum emission from simultaneous high-cadence spectra and photometry covering near-ultraviolet and optical wavelengths for 20 M dwarf flares. These data were obtained to study the white-light continuum components at bluer and redder wavelengths than the Balmer jump. Our goals were to break the degeneracy between emission mechanisms that have been fit to broadband colors of flares and to provide constraints for radiative-hydrodynamic (RHD) flare models that seek to reproduce the white-light flare emission. The main results from the analysis are the following: (1) the detection of Balmer continuum (in emission) that is present during all flares and with a wide range of relative contributions to the continuum flux at bluer wavelengths than the Balmer jump; (2) a blue continuum at flare maximum that is linearly decreasing with wavelength from {lambda} = 4000-4800 A, indicative of hot, blackbody emission with typical temperatures of T{sub BB} {approx} 9000-14, 000 K; (3) a redder continuum apparent at wavelengths longer than H{beta} ({lambda} {approx}> 4900 A) which becomes relatively more important to the energy budget during the late gradual phase. The hot blackbody component and redder continuum component have been detected in previous studies of flares. However, we have found that although the hot blackbody emission component is relatively well-represented by a featureless, single-temperature Planck function, this component includes absorption features and has a continuum shape strikingly similar to the spectrum of an A-type star as directly observed in our flare spectra. New model constraints are presented for the time evolution among the hydrogen Balmer lines and between Ca II K and the blackbody continuum emission. We calculate Balmer jump flux ratios and compare to the solar-type flare heating predictions from RHD models. The model ratios are too large and the blue-optical ({lambda} = 4000-4800 A) slopes are too

  1. Time-resolved Properties and Global Trends in dMe Flares from Simultaneous Photometry and Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Wisniewski, John P.; Osten, Rachel A.; Hilton, Eric J.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Davenport, James R. A.

    2013-07-01

    We present a homogeneous analysis of line and continuum emission from simultaneous high-cadence spectra and photometry covering near-ultraviolet and optical wavelengths for 20 M dwarf flares. These data were obtained to study the white-light continuum components at bluer and redder wavelengths than the Balmer jump. Our goals were to break the degeneracy between emission mechanisms that have been fit to broadband colors of flares and to provide constraints for radiative-hydrodynamic (RHD) flare models that seek to reproduce the white-light flare emission. The main results from the analysis are the following: (1) the detection of Balmer continuum (in emission) that is present during all flares and with a wide range of relative contributions to the continuum flux at bluer wavelengths than the Balmer jump; (2) a blue continuum at flare maximum that is linearly decreasing with wavelength from λ = 4000-4800 Å, indicative of hot, blackbody emission with typical temperatures of T BB ~ 9000-14, 000 K (3) a redder continuum apparent at wavelengths longer than Hβ (λ >~ 4900 Å) which becomes relatively more important to the energy budget during the late gradual phase. The hot blackbody component and redder continuum component have been detected in previous studies of flares. However, we have found that although the hot blackbody emission component is relatively well-represented by a featureless, single-temperature Planck function, this component includes absorption features and has a continuum shape strikingly similar to the spectrum of an A-type star as directly observed in our flare spectra. New model constraints are presented for the time evolution among the hydrogen Balmer lines and between Ca II K and the blackbody continuum emission. We calculate Balmer jump flux ratios and compare to the solar-type flare heating predictions from RHD models. The model ratios are too large and the blue-optical (λ = 4000-4800 Å) slopes are too red in both the impulsive and gradual

  2. Comparing Solar-Flare Acceleration of >-20 MeV Protons and Electrons Above Various Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Albert Y.

    2010-01-01

    A large fraction (up to tens of percent) of the energy released in solar flares goes into accelerated ions and electrons, and studies indicate that these two populations have comparable energy content. RHESSI observations have shown a striking close linear correlation between the 2.223 MeV neutron-capture gamma-ray line and electron bremsstrahlung emission >300 keV, indicating that the flare acceleration of >^20 MeV protons and >300 keV electrons is roughly proportional over >3 orders of magnitude in fluence. We show that the correlations of neutron-capture line fluence with GOES class or with bremsstrahlung emission at lower energies show deviations from proportionality, primarily for flares with lower fluences. From analyzing thirteen flares, we demonstrate that there appear to be two classes of flares with high-energy acceleration: flares that exhibit only proportional acceleration of ions and electrons down to 50 keV and flares that have an additional soft, low-energy bremsstrahlung component, suggesting two separate populations of accelerated electrons. We use RHESSI spectroscopy and imaging to investigate a number of these flares in detail.

  3. Electrons Re-Acceleration at the Footpoints of Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkmani, R.; Brown, J.

    2012-08-01

    Hinode's observations revealed a very dynamic and complex chromosphere. This require revisiting the assumption that the chromospheric footpoints of solar flares are areas where accelerated particles only lose energy due to collisions. Traditionally electrons are thought to be accelerated in the coronal part of the loop, then travel to the footpoints where they lose their energy and radiate the observed hard X-ray. Increasing observational evidence challenges this assumption. We review the evidence against this assumption and present the new Local Re-acceleration Thick Target Model (LRTTM) where at the footpoints electrons receive a boost of re-acceleration in addition to the usual collisional loses. Such model may offer an alternative to the standard collisional thick target injection model (TTM) (Brown 1971) of solar HXR burst sources, requiring far fewer electrons and solving some recent problems with the TTM interpretation. We look at the different scenarios which could lead to such re-acceleration and present numerical results from one of them.

  4. Combined analysis of soft and hard X-ray spectra from flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriel, A. H.; Sherman, J. C.; Bely-Dubau, E.; Orwig, L. E.; Schrijver, J.

    1984-01-01

    An attempt is made to develop a self-consistent model which accounts for the line and continuum data generated by the three X-ray imaging instruments on the SMM satellite. The intensities measured covered the 4-500 kV energy range. The model is based on a differential emission measure and electron beam parameters and is used to predict absolute signals detected by the 15 channels of the SMM sensors. Consideration is given to the thermal contribution, instrumental characteristics, thin target excitation and thick target bremsstrahlung. In comparison with data from a flare event on June 29, 1980, model predictions provide a good fit, including the identification of hard electrons with a 5.3 index during the impulsive phase.

  5. Extreme ultraviolet spectra of solar flares from the extreme ultraviolet spectroheliograph SPIRIT onboard the CORONAS-F satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Shestov, S.; Kuzin, S.; Reva, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present detailed extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectra of four large solar flares: M5.6, X1.3, X3.4, and X17 classes in the spectral ranges 176-207 Å and 280-330 Å. These spectra were obtained by the slitless spectroheliograph SPIRIT onboard the CORONAS-F satellite. To our knowledge, these are the first detailed EUV spectra of large flares obtained with a spectral resolution of ∼0.1 Å. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the obtained spectra and provide identification of the observed spectral lines. The identification was performed based on the calculation of synthetic spectra (the CHIANTI database was used), with simultaneous calculations of the differential emission measure (DEM) and density of the emitting plasma. More than 50 intense lines are present in the spectra that correspond to a temperature range of T = 0.5-16 MK; most of the lines belong to Fe, Ni, Ca, Mg, and Si ions. In all the considered flares, intense hot lines from Ca XVII, Ca XVIII, Fe XX, Fe XXII, and Fe XXIV are observed. The calculated DEMs have a peak at T ∼ 10 MK. The densities were determined using Fe XI-Fe XIII lines and averaged 6.5 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}. We also discuss the identification, accuracy, and major discrepancies of the spectral line intensity prediction.

  6. A Test of Thick-Target Nonuniform Ionization as an Explanation for Breaks in Solar Flare Hard X-Ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, gordon; Dennis Brian R.; Tolbert, Anne K.; Schwartz, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Solar nonthermal hard X-ray (HXR) flare spectra often cannot be fitted by a single power law, but rather require a downward break in the photon spectrum. A possible explanation for this spectral break is nonuniform ionization in the emission region. We have developed a computer code to calculate the photon spectrum from electrons with a power-law distribution injected into a thick-target in which the ionization decreases linearly from 100% to zero. We use the bremsstrahlung cross-section from Haug (1997), which closely approximates the full relativistic Bethe-Heitler cross-section, and compare photon spectra computed from this model with those obtained by Kontar, Brown and McArthur (2002), who used a step-function ionization model and the Kramers approximation to the cross-section. We find that for HXR spectra from a target with nonuniform ionization, the difference (Delta-gamma) between the power-law indexes above and below the break has an upper limit between approx.0.2 and 0.7 that depends on the power-law index delta of the injected electron distribution. A broken power-law spectrum with a. higher value of Delta-gamma cannot result from nonuniform ionization alone. The model is applied to spectra obtained around the peak times of 20 flares observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI from 2002 to 2004 to determine whether thick-target nonuniform ionization can explain the measured spectral breaks. A Monte Carlo method is used to determine the uncertainties of the best-fit parameters, especially on Delta-gamma. We find that 15 of the 20 flare spectra require a downward spectral break and that at least 6 of these could not be explained by nonuniform ionization alone because they had values of Delta-gamma with less than a 2.5% probability of being consistent with the computed upper limits from the model. The remaining 9 flare spectra, based on this criterion, are consistent with the nonuniform ionization model.

  7. An investigation of solar flares and associated solar radio bursts impact on ionospheric total electron content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuyizere, Sarathiel

    2016-07-01

    Solar transients events such as Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and solar flares represent the cause of various aspects of space weather and can impact the modern man made technological system. Such solar transients are often associated with solar radio bursts (SRBs), particularly of type II and III that , at ground level can be detected by the CALLISTO (Compact Astronomical Low-frequency Low-cost Instrument for Spectroscopy and Transportable Observatories) solar spectrometer. The present study aims at investigating solar flares and associated SRBs impact on the ionospheric total electron content (TEC). SRBs data used are dynamic spectra covering the 2014-2015 period and detected by the CALLISTO instrument that is installed at the university of Rwanda, Kigali. To investigate ionospheric impact, we use TEC data from IGS stations located at almost the same universal time zone, and correlate the observed TEC changes to the corresponding observed solar bursts events. Preliminary observations resulting from this study indicate a slight enhancement in TEC during the burst event days. The observed TEC enhancement on the burst day can be associated to increased UV and X-rays radiations and particle acceleration that are associated with SRBs events. This work is a contribution to more understanding of the geo-space impact of solar transients phenomena for modeling and prediction.

  8. An investigation of solar flares and associated solar radio bursts on ionospheric total electron content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uwamahoro, Jean

    2016-07-01

    Solar transients events such as Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and solar flares represent are the cause of various aspects of space weather and can impact the modern man made technological system. Such solar transients are often associated with solar radio bursts (SRBs), particularly of type II and III that , at ground level can be detected by the CALLISTO (Compact Astronomical Low-frequency Low-cost Instrument for Spectroscopy and Transportable Observatories) solar spectrometer. The present study aims at investigating solar flares and associated SRBs impact on the ionospheric total electron content (TEC). SRBs data used are dynamic spectra covering the 2014-2015 period and detected by the CALLISTO instrument that is installed at the university of Rwanda, Kigali. To investigate ionospheric impact, we use TEC data from IGS stations located at almost the same universal time zone, and correlate the observed TEC changes to the corresponding observed solar bursts events. Preliminary observations resulting from this study indicate a slight enhancement in TEC during the burst event days. The observed TEC enhancement on the burst day can be associated to increased UV and X-rays radiations and particle acceleration that are associated with SRBs events. This work is a contribution to more understanding of the geo-space impact of solar transients phenomena for modeling and prediction.

  9. HF Accelerated Electron Fluxes, Spectra, and Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Herbert C.; Jensen, Joseph B.

    2015-10-01

    Wave particle interactions, an essential aspect of laboratory, terrestrial, and astrophysical plasmas, have been studied for decades by transmitting high power HF radio waves into Earth's weakly ionized space plasma, to use it as a laboratory without walls. Application to HF electron acceleration remains an active area of research (Gurevich in Usp Fizicheskikh Nauk 177(11):1145-1177, 2007) today. HF electron acceleration studies began when plasma line observations proved (Carlson et al. in J Atmos Terr Phys 44:1089-1100, 1982) that high power HF radio wave-excited processes accelerated electrons not to ~eV, but instead to -100 times thermal energy (10 s of eV), as a consequence of inelastic collision effects on electron transport. Gurevich et al (J Atmos Terr Phys 47:1057-1070, 1985) quantified the theory of this transport effect. Merging experiment with theory in plasma physics and aeronomy, enabled prediction (Carlson in Adv Space Res 13:1015-1024, 1993) of creating artificial ionospheres once ~GW HF effective radiated power could be achieved. Eventual confirmation of this prediction (Pedersen et al. in Geophys Res Lett 36:L18107, 2009; Pedersen et al. in Geophys Res Lett 37:L02106, 2010; Blagoveshchenskaya et al. in Ann Geophys 27:131-145, 2009) sparked renewed interest in optical inversion to estimate electron spectra in terrestrial (Hysell et al. in J Geophys Res Space Phys 119:2038-2045, 2014) and planetary (Simon et al. in Ann Geophys 29:187-195, 2011) atmospheres. Here we present our unpublished optical data, which combined with our modeling, lead to conclusions that should meaningfully improve future estimates of the spectrum of HF accelerated electron fluxes. Photometric imaging data can significantly improve detection of emissions near ionization threshold, and confirm depth of penetration of accelerated electrons many km below the excitation altitude. Comparing observed to modeled emission altitude shows future experiments need electron density profiles

  10. Diagnostics of electron-heated solar flare models. III - Effects of tapered loop geometry and preheating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.; Li, Peng; Mariska, John T.

    1992-01-01

    A series of hydrodynamic numerical simulations of nonthermal electron-heated solar flare atmospheres and their corresponding soft X-ray Ca XIX emission-line profiles, under the conditions of tapered flare loop geometry and/or a preheated atmosphere, is presented. The degree of tapering is parameterized by the magnetic mirror ratio, while the preheated atmosphere is parameterized by the initial upper chromospheric pressure. In a tapered flare loop, it is found that the upward motion of evaporated material is faster compared with the case where the flare loop is uniform. This is due to the diverging nozzle seen by the upflowing material. In the case where the flare atmosphere is preheated and the flare geometry is uniform, the response of the atmosphere to the electron collisional heating is slow. The upward velocity of the hydrodynamic gas is reduced due not only to the large coronal column depth, but also to the increased inertia of the overlying material. It is concluded that the only possible electron-heated scenario in which the predicted Ca XIX line profiles agree with the BCS observations is when the impulsive flare starts in a preheated dense corona.

  11. Electron impact polarization expected in solar EUV lines from flaring chromospheres/transition regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fineschi, S.; Fontenla, Juan M.; Macneice, P.; Ljepojevic, N. N.

    1991-01-01

    We have evaluated lower bounds on the degree of impact Extreme Ultraviolet/Ultraviolet (EUV/UV) line polarization expected during solar flares. This polarization arises from collisional excitation by energetic electrons with non-Maxwellian velocity distributions. Linear polarization was observed in the S I 1437 A line by the Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter/Solar Maximum Mission (UVSP/SMM) during a flare on 15 July 1980. An early interpretation suggested that impact excitation by electrons propagating through the steep temperature gradient of the flaring transition region/high chromosphere produced this polarization. Our calculations show that the observed polarization in this UV line cannot be due to this effect. We find instead that, in some flare models, the energetic electrons can produce an impact polarization of a few percent in EUV neutral helium lines (i.e., lambda lambda 522, 537, and 584 A).

  12. Inner-shell transitions in Fe XIX-XXII in the X-ray spectra of solar flares and Tokamaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Lemen, J. R.; Cowan, R. D.; Doschek, G. A.; Leibacher, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    Calculated spectra of the ions Fe XIX-XXII for various densities and temperatures are presented, thereby extending the work begun by Doschek, Feldman, and Cowan (1981). The calculations are based on a code (the Cowan code) that computes both the level structure of an ion and intensity factors for the 1s-2p satellite lines. A comparison is made between the calculated spectra and those observed in solar flares by the P78-1 and SMM instruments. The observed intensities of Fe XX lines, which are the most sensitive to density, are found to agree well with those calculated in the low-density limit. The agreement for lines arising from other ions is also very good. It is also seen that the predicted density variations in Fe XX are confirmed by the higher density Princeton Large Torus plasmas. Thus a possible useful density diagnostic is indicated for tokamak and high-density astrophysical plasmas, perhaps including some solar flares.

  13. Electronic absorption spectra from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Anirban

    Methods for simulating electronic absorption spectra of molecules from first principles (i.e., without any experimental input, using quantum mechanics) are developed and compared. The electronic excitation and photoelectron spectra of ethylene are simulated, using the EOM-CCSD method for the electronic structure calculations. The different approaches for simulating spectra are broadly of two types---Frank-Condon (FC) approaches and vibronic coupling approaches. For treating the vibrational motion, the former use the Born-Oppenheimer or single surface approximation while the latter do not. Moreover, in our FC approaches the vibrational Hamiltonian is additively separable along normal mode coordinates, while in vibronic approaches a model Hamiltonian (obtained from ab initio electronic structure theory) provides an intricate coupling between both normal modes and electronic states. A method called vertical FC is proposed, where in accord with the short-time picture of molecular spectroscopy, the approximate excited-state potential energy surface that is used to calculate the electronic spectrum is taken to reproduce the ab initio potential at the ground-state equilibrium geometry. The potential energy surface along normal modes may be treated either in the harmonic approximation or using the full one-dimensional potential. Systems with highly anharmonic potential surfaces can be treated and expensive geometry optimizations are not required, unlike the traditional FC approach. The ultraviolet spectrum of ethylene between 6.2 and 8.7 eV is simulated using vertical FC. While FC approaches for simulation are computationally very efficient, they are not accurate when the underlying approximations are unreasonable. Then, vibronic coupling model Hamiltonians are necessary. Since these Hamiltonians have an analytic form, they are used to map the potential energy surfaces and understand their topology. Spectra are obtained by numerical diagonalization of the Hamiltonians. The

  14. Energetics of Three Solar Flares Observed by RHESSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.; Dennis, B. R.; Sui, Linhui

    2004-01-01

    We compare the energy content of the thermal plasma and suprathermal electrons in three solar flares observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). Fits of computed isothermal and thick-target bremsstrahlung spectra to RHESSI X-ray spectra are used to deduce the instantaneous energy content of the X-ray-emitting plasma and the accumulated energy in suprathermal electrons throughout the three flares. We minimize the energy in the suprathermal electrons by assuming that the electron distributions have a low-energy cutoff that is no lower than the highest cutoff energy that provides a good fit to the X-ray spectra. The energetics of the 2002 April 15 M1 flare and the 2002 April 21 X2 flare are computed and compared with results for the 2002 July 23 X5 flare. We find that for all three. flares the energy in nonthermal electrons is comparable to the energy contained in the thermal plasma.

  15. An Investigation of Fe xv Emission Lines in Solar Flare Spectra

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-05

    321.8 Å)/I(417.3 Å) ratio at 3 electron temperatures, namely that of maximum fractional abundance for Fe  in ionization equilibrium , Te = 106.3 K...spectra 5 pare with the observations. However, Huang et al. (1988) have detected the 2p2 3P–2p3s 3P lines in a tokamak spectrum, and found their

  16. DETERMINATION OF LOW-ENERGY CUTOFFS AND TOTAL ENERGY OF NONTHERMAL ELECTRONS IN A SOLAR FLARE ON 2002 APRIL 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, Linhui; Holman, Gordon D.; Dennis, Brian R.

    2005-01-01

    The determination of the low-energy cutoff to the spectrum of accelerated electrons is decisive for the estimation of the total nonthermal energy in solar flares. Because thermal bremsstrahlung dominates the low-energy part of flare X-ray spectra, this cutoff energy is difficult to determine with spectral fitting alone. We have used anew method that combines spatial, spectral, and temporal analysis to determine the cutoff energy for the M1.2 flare observed with RHESSI on 2002 April 15. A low-energy cutoff of 24 +/- 2 keV is required to ensure that the assumed thermal emissions always dominate over nonthermal emissions at low energies (<20 keV) and that the spectral fitting results are consistent with the RHESSI light curves and images. With this cutoff energy, we obtain a total nonthermal energy in electrons of (1.6 +/- 1) x 10(exp 30) ergs that is comparable to the peak energy in the thermal plasma, estimated from RHESSI observations to be (6 +/- 0.6) x 10(exp 29) ergs assuming a filling factor of 1.

  17. Neutron decay electrons after the solar flare of 1980 June 21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffolo, D.; Dröge, W.; Klecker, B.

    1996-06-01

    We have found evidence for fluxes of energetic electrons in interplanetary space on board the ISEE-3/ICE spacecraft which we interpret as the decay products of neutrons generated in a solar flare on 1980 June 21. The decay electrons arrived at the spacecraft shortly before the electrons from the flare and can be distinguished from the latter by their distinctive energy spectrum. The time profile of the decay electrons is in good agreement with the results from a simulation based on a scattering mean free path derived from a fit to the flare electron data. The comparison with simultaneously observed decay protons and a published direct measurement of high-energy neutrons places important constraints on the parent neutron spectrum.

  18. OBSERVATION OF HEATING BY FLARE-ACCELERATED ELECTRONS IN A SOLAR CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Glesener, Lindsay; Bain, Hazel M.; Krucker, Säm; Lin, Robert P.

    2013-12-20

    We report a Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observation of flare-accelerated electrons in the core of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and examine their role in heating the CME. Previous CME observations have revealed remarkably high thermal energies that can far surpass the CME's kinetic energy. A joint observation by RHESSI and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly of a partly occulted flare on 2010 November 3 allows us to test the hypothesis that this excess energy is collisionally deposited by flare-accelerated electrons. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images show an ejection forming the CME core and sheath, with isothermal multifilter analysis revealing temperatures of ∼11 MK in the core. RHESSI images reveal a large (∼100 × 50 arcsec{sup 2}) hard X-ray (HXR) source matching the location, shape, and evolution of the EUV plasma, indicating that the emerging CME is filled with flare-accelerated electrons. The time derivative of the EUV emission matches the HXR light curve (similar to the Neupert effect observed in soft and HXR time profiles), directly linking the CME temperature increase with the nonthermal electron energy loss, while HXR spectroscopy demonstrates that the nonthermal electrons contain enough energy to heat the CME. This is the most direct observation to date of flare-accelerated electrons heating a CME, emphasizing the close relationship of the two in solar eruptive events.

  19. Statistical analysis of the dynamics of secondary electrons in the flare of a high-voltage beam-type discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Demkin, V. P.; Mel'nichuk, S. V.

    2014-09-15

    In the present work, results of investigations into the dynamics of secondary electrons with helium atoms in the presence of the reverse electric field arising in the flare of a high-voltage pulsed beam-type discharge and leading to degradation of the primary electron beam are presented. The electric field in the discharge of this type at moderate pressures can reach several hundred V/cm and leads to considerable changes in the kinetics of secondary electrons created in the process of propagation of the electron beam generated in the accelerating gap with a grid anode. Moving in the accelerating electric field toward the anode, secondary electrons create the so-called compensating current to the anode. The character of electron motion and the compensating current itself are determined by the ratio of the field strength to the concentration of atoms (E/n). The energy and angular spectra of secondary electrons are calculated by the Monte Carlo method for different ratios E/n of the electric field strength to the helium atom concentration. The motion of secondary electrons with threshold energy is studied for inelastic collisions of helium atoms and differential analysis is carried out of the collisional processes causing energy losses of electrons in helium for different E/n values. The mechanism of creation and accumulation of slow electrons as a result of inelastic collisions of secondary electrons with helium atoms and selective population of metastable states of helium atoms is considered. It is demonstrated that in a wide range of E/n values the motion of secondary electrons in the beam-type discharge flare has the character of drift. At E/n values characteristic for the discharge of the given type, the drift velocity of these electrons is calculated and compared with the available experimental data.

  20. Electron precipitation and mass motion in the 1991 June 9 white-light flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dela Beaujardiere, J. -F.; Canfield, R. C.; Metcalf, T. R.; Hiei, E.; Sakurai, T.; Ichimoto, K.

    1994-01-01

    We use H alpha line profiles as a diagnostic of mass motion and nonthermal electron precipitation in the white-light flare (WLF) of 1991 June 9 01:34 UT. We find only weak downflow velocities (approximately equals 10km/s) at the site of white-light emission, and comparable velocities elsewhere. We also find that electron precipitation is strongest at the WLF site. We conclude that continuum emission in this flare was probably caused by nonthermal electrons and not by dynamical energy transport via a chromospheric condensation.

  1. Electron spectra from decay of fission products

    SciTech Connect

    Dickens, J K

    1982-09-01

    Electron spectra following decay of individual fission products (72 less than or equal to A less than or equal to 162) are obtained from the nuclear data given in the compilation using a listed and documented computer subroutine. Data are given for more than 500 radionuclides created during or after fission. The data include transition energies, absolute intensities, and shape parameters when known. An average beta-ray energy is given for fission products lacking experimental information on transition energies and intensities. For fission products having partial or incomplete decay information, the available data are utilized to provide best estimates of otherwise unknown decay schemes. This compilation is completely referenced and includes data available in the reviewed literature up to January 1982.

  2. Electron Densities in Solar Flare Loops, Chromospheric Evaporation Upflows, and Acceleration Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benz, Arnold O.

    1996-01-01

    We compare electron densities measured at three different locations in solar flares: (1) in Soft X-Ray (SXR) loops, determined from SXR emission measures and loop diameters from Yohkoh Soft X-Ray Telescope maps (n(sub e, sup SXR) = (0.2-2.5) x 10(exp 11)/ cu cm); (2) in chromospheric evaporation upflows, inferred from plasma frequency cutoffs of decimetric radio bursts detected with the 0.1-3 GHz spectrometer Phoenix of ETH Zuerich (n(sub e, sup upflow) = (0.3-11) x 10(exp 10)/cu cm; and (3) in acceleration sites, inferred from the plasma frequency at the separatrix between upward-accelerated (type III bursts) and downward-accelerated (reverse-drift bursts) electron beams [n(sub e, sup acc) = (0.6-10) x 10(exp 9)/cu cm]. The comparison of these density measurements, obtained from 44 flare episodes (during 14 different flares), demonstrates the compatibility of flare plasma density diagnostics with SXR and radio methods. The density in the upflowing plasma is found to be somewhat lower than in the filled loops, having ratios in a range n(sub e, sup upflow)/n(sub e, sup SXR) = 0.02-1.3, and a factor of 3.6 higher behind the upflow front. The acceleration sites are found to have a much lower density than the SXR-bright flare loops, i.e., n(sub e, sup acc)/n(sub e, sup SXR) = 0.005- 0.13, and thus must be physically displaced from the SXR-bright flare loops. The scaling law between electron time-of-flight distances l' and loop half-lengths s, l'/s = 1.4 +/- 0.3, recently established by Aschwanden et al. suggests that the centroid of the acceleration region is located above the SXR-bright flare loop, as envisioned in cusp geometries (e.g., in magnetic reconnection models).

  3. Localisation of chromospheric evaporation in solar flares, by the analysis of X-ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, A. H.; Millier, F.; Lizambert, N.

    1988-03-01

    Analysis of solar flares using the data from the Bent Crystal Spectrometer on the SMM solar flare satellite, shows a thermal plasma which expands vertically at a velocity of up to 350 km/s. This plasma, at a temperature of the order 25 x 10 to the 6th K is observed in the line radiation of He-like Ca XIX. Its velocity is determined by measuring the blue shift of the resonance line 'w', whereas its intensity is expressed relatively to that of the stationary component. The variations of velocity and relative intensity of the evaporating plasma are studied as a function of its location on the solar disk for 33 flares during the year 1980. The results are compared with the values expected from two alternative models A and B. On the basis that when observed at the limb, such flares do not usually show a blue shift, model A interprets this as due to the fact that the motion of the explosive plasma is perpendicular to the line-of-sight. Model B assumes that the process of chromospheric evaporation produces a 'well' in the chromosphere, and thereby occults some of the emission of the ejected material. It is clear that the two models predict different velocity and relative intensity variations as a function of the distance of the flare from disk center. The lack of blue shift for 10 disk flares supports strongly the model B, i.e. the existence of a 'well' whose depth/diameter is between 0.1 and 5 as shown by the observations.

  4. Origin of the Blue Continuum Radiation in the Flare Spectra of dMe Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morchenko, E. S.

    2016-12-01

    Calculations of the emission spectrum of a homogeneous plane layer of pure hydrogen plasma taking into account nonlinear effects (the influence of bremsstrahlung and recombination radiation of the layer itself on its Menzel factors) show that the Planck radiation (the blue component of the optical continuum) during the impulsive phase of large flares on dMe stars originates from the deep (nearphotospheric) layers of the atmosphere. Radiative cooling of the gas behind the front of a stationary shock propagating toward the photosphere of a red dwarf is not capable to create the Planck radiation observed at the peak brightness of the flares.

  5. The collisional relaxation of electrons in hot flaring plasma and inferring the properties of solar flare accelerated electrons from X-ray observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffrey, N. L. S.; Kontar, E. P.; Emslie, A. G.; Bian, N. H.

    2015-09-01

    X-ray observations are a direct diagnostic of fast electrons produced in solar flares, energized during the energy release process and directed towards the Sun. Since the properties of accelerated electrons can be substantially changed during their transport and interaction with the background plasma, a model must ultimately be applied to X-ray observations in order to understand the mechanism responsible for their acceleration. A cold thick target model is ubiquitously used for this task, since it provides a simple analytic relationship between the accelerated electron spectrum and the emitting electron spectrum in the X-ray source, with the latter quantity readily obtained from X-ray observations. However, such a model is inappropriate for the majority of solar flares in which the electrons propagate in a hot megaKelvin plasma, because it does not take into account the physics of thermalization of fast electrons. The use of a more realistic model, properly accounting for the properties of the background plasma, and the collisional diffusion and thermalization of electrons, can alleviate or even remove many of the traditional problems associated with the cold thick target model and the deduction of the accelerated electron spectrum from X-ray spectroscopy, such as the number problem and the need to impose an ad hoc low energy cut-off.

  6. TEMPERATURE AND ELECTRON DENSITY DIAGNOSTICS OF A CANDLE-FLAME-SHAPED FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Guidoni, S. E.; Plowman, J. E.

    2015-02-10

    Candle-flame-shaped flares are archetypical structures that provide indirect evidence of magnetic reconnection. A flare resembling Tsuneta's famous 1992 candle-flame flare occurred on 2011 January 28; we present its temperature and electron density diagnostics. This flare was observed with Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA), Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT), and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Ahead (STEREO-A)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager, resulting in high-resolution, broad temperature coverage, and stereoscopic views of this iconic structure. The high-temperature images reveal a brightening that grows in size to form a tower-like structure at the top of the posteruption flare arcade, a feature that has been observed in other long-duration events. Despite the extensive work on the standard reconnection scenario, there is no complete agreement among models regarding the nature of this high-intensity elongated structure. Electron density maps reveal that reconnected loops that are successively connected at their tops to the tower develop a density asymmetry of about a factor of two between the two legs, giving the appearance of ''half-loops''. We calculate average temperatures with a new fast differential emission measure (DEM) method that uses SDO/AIA data and analyze the heating and cooling of salient features of the flare. Using STEREO observations, we show that the tower and the half-loop brightenings are not a line-of-sight projection effect of the type studied by Forbes and Acton. This conclusion opens the door for physics-based explanations of these puzzling, recurrent solar flare features, previously attributed to projection effects. We corroborate the results of our DEM analysis by comparing them with temperature analyses from Hinode/XRT.

  7. Temperature and Electron Density Diagnostics of a Candle-flame-shaped Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidoni, S. E.; McKenzie, D. E.; Longcope, D. W.; Plowman, J. E.; Yoshimura, K.

    2015-02-01

    Candle-flame-shaped flares are archetypical structures that provide indirect evidence of magnetic reconnection. A flare resembling Tsuneta's famous 1992 candle-flame flare occurred on 2011 January 28; we present its temperature and electron density diagnostics. This flare was observed with Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA), Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT), and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Ahead (STEREO-A)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager, resulting in high-resolution, broad temperature coverage, and stereoscopic views of this iconic structure. The high-temperature images reveal a brightening that grows in size to form a tower-like structure at the top of the posteruption flare arcade, a feature that has been observed in other long-duration events. Despite the extensive work on the standard reconnection scenario, there is no complete agreement among models regarding the nature of this high-intensity elongated structure. Electron density maps reveal that reconnected loops that are successively connected at their tops to the tower develop a density asymmetry of about a factor of two between the two legs, giving the appearance of "half-loops." We calculate average temperatures with a new fast differential emission measure (DEM) method that uses SDO/AIA data and analyze the heating and cooling of salient features of the flare. Using STEREO observations, we show that the tower and the half-loop brightenings are not a line-of-sight projection effect of the type studied by Forbes & Acton. This conclusion opens the door for physics-based explanations of these puzzling, recurrent solar flare features, previously attributed to projection effects. We corroborate the results of our DEM analysis by comparing them with temperature analyses from Hinode/XRT.

  8. Quantum synchrotron spectra from semirelativistic electrons in teragauss magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Synchrotron spectra are calculated from quantum electrodynamic transition rates for thermal and power-law electron distributions. It is shown that quantum effects appear in thermal spectra when the photon energy is greater than the electron temperature, and in power-law spectra when the electron energy in units of the electron rest mass times the magnetic field strength in units of the critical field strength is of order unity. These spectra are compared with spectra calculated from the ultrarelativistic approximation for synchrotron emission. It is found that the approximation for the power-law spectra is good, and the approximation for thermal spectra produces the shape of the spectrum accurately but fails to give the correct normalization. Single photon pair creation masks the quantum effects for power-law distributions, so only modifications to thermal spectra are important for gamma-ray bursts.

  9. Radial Distribution of Electron Spectra from High-Energy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Katz, Robert; Wilson, John W.

    1998-01-01

    The average track model describes the response of physical and biological systems using radial dose distribution as the key physical descriptor. We report on an extension of this model to describe the average distribution of electron spectra as a function of radial distance from an ion. We present calculations of these spectra for ions of identical linear energy transfer (LET), but dissimilar charge and velocity to evaluate the differences in electron spectra from these ions. To illustrate the usefulness of the radial electron spectra for describing effects that are not described by electron dose, we consider the evaluation of the indirect events in microdosimetric distributions for ions. We show that folding our average electron spectra model with experimentally determined frequency distributions for photons or electrons provides a good representation of radial event spectra from high-energy ions in 0.5-2 micrometer sites.

  10. Search for accelerated electron anisotropy signatures based on observed polarization of the flaring loop microwave emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgachev, A. S.; Melnikov, V. F.; Kuznetsov, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    The distribution maps of the circular polarization degree and radio brightness have been analyzed for more than 40 flares based on the Nobeyama Radioheliograph data. It has been shown that the observed microwave emission is polarized in the ordinary mode in some flaring loop parts in six events. Based on a joint analysis of the photospheric magnetic field maps obtained from the HMI/SDO and MDI/SOHO magnetograph's and the radio emission dynamics in different source parts, it has been concluded that the ordinary mode predominance in all six selected events can be connected with implementation of the longitudinal pitch-angle anisotropy of emitting electrons.

  11. Correspondence of electron spectra from photoionization and nuclear internal conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Wark, D.L.; Bartlett, R.; Bowles, T.J.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Sivia, D.S.; Trela, W.; Wilkerson, J.F. ); Brown, G.S. ); Crasemann, B.; Sorensen, S.L.; Schaphorst, S.J. ); Knapp, D.A.; Henderson, J. ); Tulkki, J.; Aberg, T. )

    1991-10-21

    Electron energy spectra have been measured that result from {ital K}-shell ionization of Kr by two different mechanisms: (1) photoionization and (2) internal conversion in the decay of the isomeric state of {sup 83}Kr. It is demonstrated experimentally that these spectra, including satellites on the low-energy side of the primary 1{ital s}-electron peak, are identical. A theoretical interpretation of the identity of the spectra is given. The spectra agree well with a relativistic many-electron calculation in which the satellites are attributed to excitation and ionization of {ital M} and {ital N} electrons during the {ital K}-ionization process.

  12. THE n-DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRONS AND DOUBLE LAYERS IN THE ELECTRON-BEAM-RETURN-CURRENT SYSTEM OF SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Karlicky, Marian

    2012-05-01

    We investigate processes in the electron-beam-return-current system in the impulsive phase of solar flares to answer a question about the formation of the n-electron distribution detected in this phase of solar flares. An evolution of the electron-beam-return-current system with an initial local density depression is studied using a three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell model. In the system the strong double layer is formed. Its electric field potential increases with the electron beam flux. In this electric field potential, the electrons of background plasma are strongly accelerated and propagate in the return-current direction. The high-energy part of their distribution at the high-potential side of the strong double layer resembles that of the n-distribution. Thus, the detection of the n-distributions, where a form of the high-energy part of the distribution is the most important, can indicate the presence of strong double layers in solar flares. The similarity between processes in solar flare loops and those in the downward current region of the terrestrial aurora, where the double layers were observed by FAST satellite, supports this idea.

  13. OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE OF ELECTRON-DRIVEN EVAPORATION IN TWO SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Ning, Z. J.; Zhang, Q. M.

    2015-11-01

    We have explored the relationship between hard X-ray (HXR) emissions and Doppler velocities caused by the chromospheric evaporation in two X1.6 class solar flares on 2014 September 10 and October 22, respectively. Both events display double ribbons and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph slit is fixed on one of their ribbons from the flare onset. The explosive evaporations are detected in these two flares. The coronal line of Fe xxi 1354.09 Å shows blueshifts, but the chromospheric line of C i 1354.29 Å shows redshifts during the impulsive phase. The chromospheric evaporation tends to appear at the front of the flare ribbon. Both Fe xxi and C i display their Doppler velocities with an “increase-peak-decrease” pattern that is well related to the “rising-maximum-decay” phase of HXR emissions. Such anti-correlation between HXR emissions and Fe xxi Doppler shifts and correlation with C i Doppler shifts indicate the electron-driven evaporation in these two flares.

  14. The spatial and temperature structure of vacuum spark plasmas. [comparison with solar flare spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, U.; Goldsmith, S.; Schwob, J. L.; Doschek, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    The spatial and temperature structures of the X-ray emitting components of low-inductance vacuum-spark plasmas are investigated. The plasmas produced by low-inductance vacuum sparks show striking resemblances to solar-flare plasmas. High-resolution photographs show that the spark plasmas are composed of hot (about 30 million K) compact sources (less than 20 microns) and cooler (about 10 million K) larger sources (of the order of 100 microns). Both types of sources may be produced by the same plasma at different times. The differences between the solar flare iron-line spectrum near 1.9 A and the spark iron-line spectrum are discussed and interpreted.

  15. Evidence of electron acceleration around the reconnection X-point in a solar flare

    SciTech Connect

    Narukage, Noriyuki; Shimojo, Masumi; Sakao, Taro

    2014-06-01

    Particle acceleration is one of the most significant features that are ubiquitous among space and cosmic plasmas. It is most prominent during flares in the case of the Sun, with which huge amounts of electromagnetic radiation and high-energy particles are expelled into the interplanetary space through acceleration of plasma particles in the corona. Though it has been well understood that energies of flares are supplied by the mechanism called magnetic reconnection based on the observations in X-rays and EUV with space telescopes, where and how in the flaring magnetic field plasmas are accelerated has remained unknown due to the low plasma density in the flaring corona. We here report the first observational identification of the energetic non-thermal electrons around the point of the ongoing magnetic reconnection (X-point), with the location of the X-point identified by soft X-ray imagery and the localized presence of non-thermal electrons identified from imaging-spectroscopic data at two microwave frequencies. Considering the existence of the reconnection outflows that carries both plasma particles and magnetic fields out from the X-point, our identified non-thermal microwave emissions around the X-point indicate that the electrons are accelerated around the reconnection X-point. Additionally, the plasma around the X-point was also thermally heated up to 10 MK. The estimated reconnection rate of this event is ∼0.017.

  16. Effect of pre-flaring and file size on the accuracy of two electronic apex locators

    PubMed Central

    BRITO-JÚNIOR, Manoel; CAMILO, Carla Cristina; MOREIRA-JÚNIOR, Gil; PECORA, Jesus Djalma; SOUSA-NETO, Manoel Damião

    2012-01-01

    Objective This ex vivo study evaluated the effect of pre-flaring and file size on the accuracy of the Root ZX and Novapex electronic apex locators (EALs). Material and methods The actual working length (WL) was set 1 mm short of the apical foramen in the palatal root canals of 24 extracted maxillary molars. The teeth were embedded in an alginate mold, and two examiners performed the electronic measurements using #10, #15, and #20 K-files. The files were inserted into the root canals until the "0.0" or ''APEX'' signals were observed on the LED or display screens for the Novapex and Root ZX, respectively, retracting to the 1.0 mark. The measurements were repeated after the pre-flaring using the S1 and SX Pro-Taper instruments. Two measurements were performed for each condition and the means were used. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated to verify the intra- and inter-examiner agreement. The mean differences between the WL and electronic length values were analyzed by the three-way ANOVA test (p<0.05). Results ICCs were high (>0.8) and the results demonstrated a similar accuracy for both EALs (p>0.05). Statistically significant accurate measurements were verified in the pre-flared canals, except for the Novapex using a #20 K-file. Conclusions The tested EALs showed acceptable accuracy, whereas the pre-flaring procedure revealed a more significant effect than the used file size. PMID:23138740

  17. Evidence of Electron Acceleration around the Reconnection X-point in a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narukage, Noriyuki; Shimojo, Masumi; Sakao, Taro

    2016-05-01

    Particle acceleration is one of the most significant features that are ubiquitous among space and cosmic plasmas. It is most prominent during flares in the case of the Sun, with which huge amounts of electromagnetic radiation and high-energy particles are expelled into the interplanetary space through acceleration of plasma particles in the corona. Though it has been well understood that energies of flares are supplied by the mechanism called magnetic reconnection based on the observations in X-rays and EUV with space telescopes, where and how in the flaring magnetic field plasmas are accelerated has remained unknown due to the low plasma density in the flaring corona. We here report the first observational identification of the energetic non-thermal electrons around the point of the ongoing magnetic reconnection (X-point), with the location of the X-point identified by soft X-ray imagery and the localized presence of non-thermal electrons identified from imaging-spectroscopic data at two microwave frequencies. Considering the existence of the reconnection outflows that carries both plasma particles and magnetic fields out from the X-point, our identified non-thermal microwave emissions around the X-point indicate that the electrons are accelerated around the reconnection X-point.

  18. Electron density diagnostics in the 10-100 A interval for a solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. A.; Bruner, M. E.; Acton, L. W.; Mason, H. E.

    1986-01-01

    Electron density measurements from spectral-line diagnostics are reported for a solar flare on July 13, 1982, 1627 UT. The spectrogram, covering the 10-95 A interval, contained usable lines of helium-like ions C V, N VI, O VII, and Ne IX which are formed over the temperature interval 0.7-3.5 x 10 to the 6th K. In addition, spectral-line ratios of Si IX, Fe XIV, and Ca XV were compared with new theoretical estimates of their electron density sensitivity to obtain additional electron density diagnostics. An electron density of 3 x 10 to the 10th/cu cm was obtained. The comparison of these results from helium-like and other ions gives confidence in the utility of these tools for solar coronal analysis and will lead to a fuller understanding of the phenomena observed in this flare.

  19. Energetic electrons from solar flares and associated type 3 radio bursts from metric to hectometric wave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1972-01-01

    Distinct Kev electron events as observed by satellites near the earth are, in general, associated with solar flares which are accompained by the emission of both metric and hectometric type 3 radio bursts. The positions of these flares are mainly on the western hemisphere of the sun. These results show that Kev electrons propagate under the control of the magnetic field in the interplanetary space and that, while propagating through this space, these electrons excite type 3 radio bursts from metric to hectometric wave frequencies. Emission characteristics of hectometric type 3 bursts are briefly considered in relation to the positions of associated flares.

  20. Faint Coronal Hard X-rays From Accelerated Electrons in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glesener, Lindsay Erin

    Solar flares are huge explosions on the Sun that release a tremendous amount of energy from the coronal magnetic field, up to 1033 ergs, in a short time (100--1000 seconds), with much of the energy going into accelerated electrons and ions. An efficient acceleration mechanism is needed, but the details of this mechanism remain relatively unknown. A fraction of this explosive energy reaches the Earth in the form of energetic particles, producing geomagnetic storms and posing dangers to spaceborne instruments, astronauts, and Earthbound power grids. There are thus practical reasons, as well as intellectual ones, for wishing to understand this extraordinary form of energy release. Through imaging spectroscopy of the hard X-ray (HXR) emission from solar flares, the behavior of flare-accelerated electrons can be studied. The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI ) spacecraft launched in 2002 with the goal of better understanding flare particle acceleration. Using rotation modulation collimators, RHESSI is able to cover a wide energy range (3 keV--17 MeV) with fine angular and energy resolutions. RHESSI's success in the last 10 years in investigating the relationship between energetic electrons and ions, the nature of faint sources in the corona, the energy distribution of flares, and several other topics have significantly advanced the understanding of flares. But along with the wealth of information revealed by RHESSI come some clear observational challenges. Very few, if any, RHESSI observations have come close to imaging the electron acceleration region itself. This is undoubtedly due to a lack of both sensitivity (HXRs from electron beams in the tenuous corona are faint) and dynamic range (HXR sources at chromospheric flare footpoints are much brighter and tend to obscure faint coronal sources). Greater sensitivity is also required to investigate the role that small flares in the quiet Sun could play in heating the corona. The Focusing Optics

  1. Energetic electron propagation in the decay phase of non-thermal flare emission

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jing; Yan, Yihua; Tsap, Yuri T.

    2014-06-01

    On the basis of the trap-plus-precipitation model, the peculiarities of non-thermal emission in the decay phase of solar flares have been considered. The calculation formulas for the escape rate of trapped electrons into the loss cone in terms of time profiles of hard X-ray (HXR) and microwave (MW) emission have been obtained. It has been found that the evolution of the spectral indices of non-thermal emission depend on the regimes of the pitch angle diffusion of trapped particles into the loss cone. The properties of non-thermal electrons related to the HXR and MW emission of the solar flare on 2004 November 3 are studied with Nobeyama Radioheliograph, Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters, RHESSI, and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite observations. The spectral indices of non-thermal electrons related to MW and HXR emission remained constant or decreased, while the MW escape rate as distinguished from that of the HXRs increased. This may be associated with different diffusion regimes of trapped electrons into the loss cone. New arguments in favor of an important role of the superstrong diffusion for high-energy electrons in flare coronal loops have been obtained.

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of Auger-electron spectra.

    PubMed

    Grau Carles, A; Kossert, K

    2009-01-01

    A procedure to calculate the complex spectra of electron-capture nuclides which simultaneously eject several electrons and X-rays with different energies is presented. The model is applied to compute spectra of the radionuclides (125)I, (123)I and (111)In. The spectra are then compared with experimental spectra obtained by means of liquid scintillation counting. To this end, the computed spectra were transformed to allow for the nonlinear response function for a liquid scintillator, chemical quenching, as well as the Wallac-type amplifier used for the measurements. The calculated spectra are important for applications of free parameter models in liquid scintillation counting and also for studying the impact of electron-capture nuclides on DNA.

  3. Energy transport by energetic electrons released during solar flares. II - Current filamentation and plasma heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Dulk, G. A.; Pritchett, P. L.

    1988-01-01

    Two-dimensional electrostatic particle simulations are performed in order to investigate energy transport associated with the propagation of energetic electrons through a flaring flux tube. Results indicate that as the energetic electrons flow outward, a return current of ambient plasma electrons is drawn inward (to maintain quasi-neutrality) which can be spatially separate from the primary current carried by the energetic electrons. Return current electrons are shown to accumulate on either side of the acceleration region of the energetic electrons, and depletions of ambient plasma electrons develop in the return current regions. Plasma ions accelerate across the field lines to produce current closure or charge neutralization, achieving energies comparable to those of the energetic electrons.

  4. Soft X-ray emission from electron-beam-heated solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mariska, John T.; Zarro, Dominic M.

    1991-01-01

    Using time-dependent numerical simulations and Solar Maximum Mission observations of a solar flare on 1985 January 23, a study is conducted of the ability of an electron-beam-heating model to reproduce the rise phase of a flare as observed in soft X-ray lines of Ca XIX. The electron beam is parameterized by a peak flux, a low-energy cutoff, and a spectral index, and has a time dependence similar to the observed hard X-ray burst. For a spectral index of 6, only models with a low-energy cutoff of 20 keV reproduce the observed peak emission in the Ca XIX line complex. All models with a low-energy cutoff of 15 keV produce too much emission, while all models with a 25-keV cutoff too little emission. None of the models reproduces the temporal behavior of the soft X-ray emission. The electron-beam-heated component is theorized to only represent a small fraction of the energy released in the impulsive phase of this flare.

  5. Electron energy-loss spectra in molecular fluorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishimura, H.; Cartwright, D. C.; Trajmar, S.

    1979-01-01

    Electron energy-loss spectra in molecular fluorine, for energy losses from 0 to 17.0 eV, have been taken at incident electron energies of 30, 50, and 90 eV and scattering angles from 5 to 140 deg. Features in the spectra above 11.5 eV energy loss agree well with the assignments recently made from optical spectroscopy. Excitations of many of the eleven repulsive valence excited electronic states are observed and their location correlates reasonably well with recent theoretical results. Several of these excitations have been observed for the first time and four features, for which there are no identifications, appear in the spectra.

  6. Electron acceleration in the turbulent reconnecting current sheets in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, G. P.; Huang, G. L.

    2009-07-01

    Context: We investigate the nonlinear evolution of the electron distribution in the presence of the strong inductive electric field in the reconnecting current sheets (RCS) of solar flares. Aims: We aim to study the characteristics of nonthermal electron-beam plasma instability and its influence on electron acceleration in RCS. Methods: Including the external inductive field, the one-dimensional Vlasov simulation is performed with a realistic mass ratio for the first time. Results: Our principal findings are as follows: 1) the Buneman instability can be quickly excited on the timescale of 10-7 s for the typical parameters of solar flares. After saturation, the beam-plasma instabilities are excited due to the non-Maxwellian electron distribution; 2) the final velocity of the electrons trapped by these waves is of the same order as the phase speed of the waves, while the untrapped electrons continue to be accelerated; 3) the inferred anomalous resistance of the current sheet and the energy conversion rate are basically of the same order as those previously estimated, e.g., “the analysis of Martens”. Conclusions: The Buneman instability is excited on the timescale of 10-7 s and the wave-particle resonant interaction limits the low-energy electrons to be further accelerated in RCS.

  7. The Role of Diffusion in the Transport of Energetic Electrons during Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Nicolas H.; Emslie, A. Gordon; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2017-02-01

    The transport of the energy contained in suprathermal electrons in solar flares plays a key role in our understanding of many aspects of flare physics, from the spatial distributions of hard X-ray emission and energy deposition in the ambient atmosphere to global energetics. Historically the transport of these particles has been largely treated through a deterministic approach, in which first-order secular energy loss to electrons in the ambient target is treated as the dominant effect, with second-order diffusive terms (in both energy and angle) generally being either treated as a small correction or even neglected. Here, we critically analyze this approach, and we show that spatial diffusion through pitch-angle scattering necessarily plays a very significant role in the transport of electrons. We further show that a satisfactory treatment of the diffusion process requires consideration of non-local effects, so that the electron flux depends not just on the local gradient of the electron distribution function but on the value of this gradient within an extended region encompassing a significant fraction of a mean free path. Our analysis applies generally to pitch-angle scattering by a variety of mechanisms, from Coulomb collisions to turbulent scattering. We further show that the spatial transport of electrons along the magnetic field of a flaring loop can be modeled rather effectively as a Continuous Time Random Walk with velocity-dependent probability distribution functions of jump sizes and occurrences, both of which can be expressed in terms of the scattering mean free path.

  8. Microwave imaging of a solar limb flare - Comparison of spectra and spatial geometry with hard X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmahl, E. J.; Kundu, M. R.; Dennis, B. R.

    1985-01-01

    A solar limb flare was mapped using the Very Large Array (VLA) together with hard X-ray (HXR) spectral and spatial observations of the Solar Maximum Mission satellite. Microwave flux records from 2.8 to 19.6 GHz were instrumental in determining the burst spectrum, which has a maximum at 10 GHz. The flux spectrum and area of the burst sources were used to determine the number of electrons producing gyrosynchrotron emission, magnetic field strength, and the energy distribution of gyrosynchrotron-emitting electrons. Applying the thick target model to the HXR spectrum, the number of high energy electrons responsible for the X-ray bursts was found to be 10 to the 36th, and the electron energy distribution was approximately E exp -5, significantly different from the parameters derived from the microwave observations. The HXR imaging observations exhibit some similiarities in size and structure o the first two burst sources mapped with the VLA. However, during the initial burst, the HXR source was single and lower in the corona than the double 6 cm source. The observations are explained in terms of a single loop with an isotropic high-energy electron distribution which produced the microwaves, and a larger beamed component which produced the HXR at the feet of the loop.

  9. Solar Flare Track Exposure Ages in Regolith Particles: A Calibration for Transmission Electron Microscope Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Eve L.; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2015-01-01

    Mineral grains in lunar and asteroidal regolith samples provide a unique record of their interaction with the space environment. Space weathering effects result from multiple processes including: exposure to the solar wind, which results in ion damage and implantation effects that are preserved in the rims of grains (typically the outermost 100 nm); cosmic ray and solar flare activity, which result in track formation; and impact processes that result in the accumulation of vapor-deposited elements, impact melts and adhering grains on particle surfaces. Determining the rate at which these effects accumulate in the grains during their space exposure is critical to studies of the surface evolution of airless bodies. Solar flare energetic particles (mainly Fe-group nuclei) have a penetration depth of a few millimeters and leave a trail of ionization damage in insulating materials that is readily observable by transmission electron microscope (TEM) imaging. The density of solar flare particle tracks is used to infer the length of time an object was at or near the regolith surface (i.e., its exposure age). Track measurements by TEM methods are routine, yet track production rate calibrations have only been determined using chemical etching techniques [e.g., 1, and references therein]. We used focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) sample preparation techniques combined with TEM imaging to determine the track density/exposure age relations for lunar rock 64455. The 64455 sample was used earlier by [2] to determine a track production rate by chemical etching of tracks in anorthite. Here, we show that combined FIB/TEM techniques provide a more accurate determination of a track production rate and also allow us to extend the calibration to solar flare tracks in olivine.

  10. A THz spectrometer combining the free electron laser FLARE with 33 T magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozerov, M.; Bernáth, B.; Kamenskyi, D.; Redlich, B.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Christianen, P. C. M.; Engelkamp, H.; Maan, J. C.

    2017-02-01

    The free electron laser Free electron Laser for Advanced spectroscopy and high Resolution Experiments (FLARE) at the FELIX Laboratory generates powerful radiation in the frequency range of 0.3-3 THz. This light, in combination with 33 T Bitter magnets at the High Field Magnet Laboratory, provides the unique opportunity to perform THz magneto spectroscopy with light intensities many orders of magnitude higher than provided by conventional sources. The performance of the THz spectrometer is measured via high-field electron spin resonance (ESR) in the paramagnetic benchmark system 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). The narrow ESR linewidth of DPPH allows us to resolve a fine structure with 3 GHz spacing, demonstrating a considerable coherence of the individual THz micropulses of FLARE. The spectral resolution Δ ν / ν is better than 0.1%, which is an order of magnitude higher than typical values for a rf-linac based free electron laser. The observed coherence of the high power THz micropulses is a prerequisite for resonant control of matter, such as THz electron spin echo spectroscopy.

  11. Behaviour of Electron Content in the Ionospheric D-Region During Solar X-Ray Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorović Drakul, M.; Čadež, V. M.; Bajčetić, J.; Popović, L. Č.; Blagojević, D.; Nina, A.

    2016-12-01

    One of the most important parameters in ionospheric plasma research, also having a wide practical application in wireless satellite telecommunications, is the total electron content (TEC) representing the columnal electron number density. The F-region with high electron density provides the biggest contribution to TEC while the relatively weakly ionized plasma of the D-region (60 km - 90 km above Earth's surface) is often considered as a negligible cause of satellite signal disturbances. However, sudden intensive ionization processes, like those induced by solar X-ray flares, can cause relative increases of electron density that are significantly larger in the D-region than in regions at higher altitudes. Therefore, one cannot exclude a priori the D-region from investigations of ionospheric influences on propagation of electromagnetic signals emitted by satellites. We discuss here this problem which has not been sufficiently treated in literature so far. The obtained results are based on data collected from the D-region monitoring by very low frequency radio waves and on vertical TEC calculations from the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signal analyses, and they show noticeable variations in the D-region's electron content (TEC_{D) during activity of a solar X-ray flare (it rises by a factor of 136 in the considered case) when TEC_{D} contribution to TEC can reach several percent and which cannot be neglected in practical applications like global positioning procedures by satellites.

  12. X-class Solar Flare Energy Partition into Radiative, Non-Thermal Acceleration of Electrons and Peak Thermal Plasma Components - Methodology and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Christopher S.; Chamberlin, Phillip; Dennis, Brian R.; Hock, Rachel

    2015-08-01

    Solar flares are among the most energetic processes in the solar system. X-class flares are the largest and can convert up to 1033 ergs of magnetic energy into the acceleration of charged particles and the heating of plasma. They are often accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We discuss the methodology and results of the energy partition into three main components: (1) radiative energy, (2) non-thermal acceleration of electrons, and (3) the peak thermal energy content, for a subset of the largest eruptive events from Solar Cycle 23, as derived from satellite observations and empirical models. The bolometric energy content is on the order of 1031 - 1032 ergs and is extracted from Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) measurements by the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) onboard the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE). The Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) contribution of the total radiative output is obtained by implementing the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM). Furthermore, we partition the radiative release into impulsive and gradual phases. X-ray spectra from the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) are used to deduce the energy in the non-thermal accelerated electrons, generally found to be 1031 -1032 ergs, and the peak thermal energy content of around 1030 - 1031 ergs. Aside from the CME kinetic energy, these three components contain a substantial amount of the initial available magnetic energy.

  13. TEMPORAL VARIATIONS OF X-RAY SOLAR FLARE LOOPS: LENGTH, CORPULENCE, POSITION, TEMPERATURE, PLASMA PRESSURE, AND SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey, Natasha L. S.; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2013-04-01

    The spatial and spectral properties of three solar flare coronal X-ray loops are studied before, during, and after the peak X-ray emission. Using observations from the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), we deduce the temporal changes in emitting X-ray length, corpulence, volume, position, number density, and thermal pressure. We observe a decrease in the loop length, width, and volume before the X-ray peak, and an increasing number density and thermal pressure. After the X-ray peak, volume increases and loop corpulence grows due to increasing width. The volume variations are more pronounced than the position variations, often known as magnetic field line contraction. We believe this is the first dedicated study examining the temporal evolution of X-ray loop lengths and widths. Collectively, the observations also show for the first time three temporal phases given by peaks in temperature, X-ray emission, and thermal pressure, with the minimum volume coinciding with the X-ray peak. Although the volume of the flaring plasma decreases before the peak in X-ray emission, the relationship between temperature and volume does not support simple compressive heating in a collapsing magnetic trap model. Within a low {beta} plasma, shrinking loop widths perpendicular to the guiding field can be explained by squeezing the magnetic field threading the region. Plasma heating leads to chromospheric evaporation and growing number density. This produces increasing thermal pressure and decreasing loop lengths as electrons interact at shorter distances and we believe after the X-ray peak, the increasing loop corpulence.

  14. Comparative Study of Non-Thermal Emissions and Electron Transport in a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minoshima, Takashi; Yokoyama, Takaaki; Masuda, Satoshi

    It is well known that a large amount of non-thermal electrons are produced in a solar flare. To understand their acceleration and transport mechanisms, hard X-ray (HXR) and microwave observations are the most powerful means. HXRs are emitted primarily by electrons with energy below several hundred keV via bremsstrahlung (Brown 1971), while microwaves are by electrons with energy above several hundred keV via gyrosynchrotron radiation (e.g., Ramaty 1969). Therefore these two sources of emissions provide information on electrons in two different energy ranges. A comparative study by using both HXR and microwave observations is useful for understanding the physics of electrons over a wide range of energies. We observed a solar flare occurred on 2003 May 29 with HXRs taken by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), and microwaves by the Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters (NoRP) and the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH). In particular, we focus on characteristics of higher energy (>100 keV) HXRs. They are emitted from both footpoints of the flare loop in the same manner as the lower energy (<100 keV) HXRs, while microwaves are emitted primarily at the top of the loop. On the other hand, we found that the time profile of the spectral index of the higher energy HXRs is more similar to that of the microwaves than to that of the lower energy HXRs. To understand the observed characteristics in terms of an energy-dependent transport effect of electrons, we develop a more general treatment of trap-plus-precipitation (TPP; Melrose and Brown, 1976) by using the gyro-averaged Fokker-Planck equation. We model the time evolution of the electron phase space distribution under the influence of Coulomb collisions and magnetic mirror, and then calculate the resulting HXR and microwave emissions for comparison with the observation. It is found that the TPP model in the weak diffusion regime well explains the observed characteristics. Further, we conclude from both the

  15. Electronic and vibrational circular dichroism spectra of (R)-(-)-apomorphine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbate, Sergio; Longhi, Giovanna; Lebon, France; Tommasini, Matteo

    2012-09-01

    Apomorphine is a chiral drug molecule; notwithstanding its extraordinary importance, little attention has been paid to the characterization of its chiroptical properties. Here we report on its electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectra, recorded in methanol and water, and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) in methanol and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solutions. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have allowed us to interpret the spectra and to evaluate the role of possible conformations, charge-states and interactions with counter ions.

  16. Characterization of radiation belt electron energy spectra from CRRES observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, W. R.; Lindstrom, C. D.; Ginet, G. P.

    2010-12-01

    Energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt and the slot region exhibit a wide variety of energy spectral forms, more so than radiation belt protons. We characterize the spatial and temporal dependence of these forms using observations from the CRRES satellite Medium Electron Sensor A (MEA) and High-Energy Electron Fluxmeter (HEEF) instruments, together covering an energy range 0.15-8 MeV. Spectra were classified with two independent methods, data clustering and curve-fitting analyses, in each case defining categories represented by power law, exponential, and bump-on-tail (BOT) or other complex shapes. Both methods yielded similar results, with BOT, exponential, and power law spectra respectively dominating in the slot region, outer belt, and regions just beyond the outer belt. The transition from exponential to power law spectra occurs at higher L for lower magnetic latitude. The location of the transition from exponential to BOT spectra is highly correlated with the location of the plasmapause. In the slot region during the days following storm events, electron spectra were observed to evolve from exponential to BOT yielding differential flux minima at 350-650 keV and maxima at 1.5-2 MeV; such evolution has been attributed to energy-dependent losses from scattering by whistler hiss.

  17. Quasi-periodic Acceleration of Electrons in the Flare on 2012 July 19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jing; Kontar, Eduard P.; Nakariakov, Valery M.; Gao, Guannan

    2016-11-01

    Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) of nonthermal emission in an M7.7 class flare on 2012 July 19 are investigated with spatially resolved observations at microwave and HXR bands and with spectral observations at decimetric, metric waves. Microwave emission at 17 GHz of two footpoints, HXR emission at 20-50 keV of the north footpoint and loop top, and type III bursts at 0.7-3 GHz show prominent in-phase oscillations at 270 s. The microwave emission of the loop leg has less pulsation but stronger emission. Through the estimation of plasma density around the loop top from EUV observations, we find that the local plasma frequency would be 1.5 GHz or even higher. Thus, type III bursts at 700 MHz originate above the loop top. Quasi-periodic acceleration or injection of energetic electrons is proposed to dominate these in-phase QPPs of nonthermal emission from footpoints, loop top, and above. In the overlying region, drifting pulsations (DPS) at 200-600 MHz oscillate at a distinct period (200 s). Its global structure drifts toward lower frequency, which is closely related to upward plasmoids observed simultaneously from EUV emission. Hence, nonthermal emission from overlying plasmoids and underlying flaring loops show different oscillating periods. Two individual systems of quasi-periodic acceleration of electrons are proposed to coincide in the bi-direction outflows from the reconnection region.

  18. Lower hybrid resonance acceleration of electrons and ions in solar flares and the associated microwave emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclements, K. G.; Bingham, R.; Su, J. J.; Dawson, J. M.; Spicer, D. S.

    1993-01-01

    The particle acceleration processes here studied are driven by the relaxation of unstable ion ring distributions; these produce strong wave activity at the lower hybrid resonance frequency which collapses, and forms energetic electron and ion tails. The results obtained are applied to the problem posed by the production of energetic particles by solar flares. The numerical simulation results thus obtained by a 2 1/2-dimensional particle-in-cell code show a simultaneous acceleration of electrons to 10-500 keV energies, and of ions to as much as the 1 MeV range; the energy of the latter is still insufficient to account for gamma-ray emission in the 4-6 MeV range, but furnish a seed population for further acceleration.

  19. IRIS, Hinode, SDO, and RHESSI Observations of a White Light Flare Produced Directly by Nonthermal Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyoung-Sun; Imada, Shinsuke; Watanabe, Kyoko; Bamba, Yumi; Brooks, David H.

    2017-02-01

    An X1.6 flare occurred in active region AR 12192 on 2014 October 22 at 14:02 UT and was observed by Hinode, IRIS, SDO, and RHESSI. We analyze a bright kernel that produces a white light (WL) flare with continuum enhancement and a hard X-ray (HXR) peak. Taking advantage of the spectroscopic observations of IRIS and Hinode/EIS, we measure the temporal variation of the plasma properties in the bright kernel in the chromosphere and corona. We find that explosive evaporation was observed when the WL emission occurred, even though the intensity enhancement in hotter lines is quite weak. The temporal correlation of the WL emission, HXR peak, and evaporation flows indicates that the WL emission was produced by accelerated electrons. To understand the WL emission process, we calculated the energy flux deposited by non-thermal electrons (observed by RHESSI) and compared it to the dissipated energy estimated from a chromospheric line (Mg ii triplet) observed by IRIS. The deposited energy flux from the non-thermal electrons is about (3–7.7) × 1010 erg cm‑2 s‑1 for a given low-energy cutoff of 30–40 keV, assuming the thick-target model. The energy flux estimated from the changes in temperature in the chromosphere measured using the Mg ii subordinate line is about (4.6–6.7) × 109 erg cm‑2 s‑1: ∼6%–22% of the deposited energy. This comparison of estimated energy fluxes implies that the continuum enhancement was directly produced by the non-thermal electrons.

  20. X-ray Flare Spectra from the DIOGENESS Spectrometer and Its Concept Applied to ChemiX on the Interhelioprobe Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylwester, Janusz; Kordylewski, Zbigniew; Płocieniak, Stefan; Siarkowski, Marek; Kowaliński, Mirosław; Nowak, Stanisław; Trzebiński, Witold; Śtęślicki, Marek; Sylwester, Barbara; Stańczyk, Eugeniusz; Zawerbny, Ryszard; Szaforz, Żaneta; Phillips, Kenneth J. H.; Fárník, František; Stepanov, Anatolyi

    2015-12-01

    The DIOGENESS X-ray crystal spectrometer on the CORONAS-F spacecraft operated only for a single month (25 August to 17 September) in 2001, but in its short lifetime obtained one hundred and forty high-resolution spectra of eight solar flares with GOES importance ranging from C9 to X5. The instrument included four scanning flat crystals with wavelength ranges covering the regions of Si xiii (6.65 Å), S xv (5.04 Å), and Ca xix (3.18 Å) X-ray lines and associated dielectronic satellites. Two crystals covering the Ca xix lines were oriented in a "dopplerometer" manner, i.e. such that spatial and spectral displacements, both of which commonly occur in flares, can be separated. We describe the DIOGENESS spectrometer and the spectra obtained during flares that include lines not hitherto seen from spacecraft instruments. An instrument with a very similar concept is currently being built for the two Russian Interhelioprobe spacecraft that are scheduled for launch in 2020 and 2022 and will make a near-encounter (perihelion ˜ 0.3 AU) with the Sun in its orbit. We outline the results that are likely to be obtained.

  1. Flare Observations.

    PubMed

    Benz, Arnold O

    Solar flares are observed at all wavelengths from decameter radio waves to gamma-rays at 100 MeV. This review focuses on recent observations in EUV, soft and hard X-rays, white light, and radio waves. Space missions such as RHESSI, Yohkoh, TRACE, and SOHO have enlarged widely the observational base. They have revealed a number of surprises: Coronal sources appear before the hard X-ray emission in chromospheric footpoints, major flare acceleration sites appear to be independent of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), electrons, and ions may be accelerated at different sites, there are at least 3 different magnetic topologies, and basic characteristics vary from small to large flares. Recent progress also includes improved insights into the flare energy partition, on the location(s) of energy release, tests of energy release scenarios and particle acceleration. The interplay of observations with theory is important to deduce the geometry and to disentangle the various processes involved. There is increasing evidence supporting reconnection of magnetic field lines as the basic cause. While this process has become generally accepted as the trigger, it is still controversial how it converts a considerable fraction of the energy into non-thermal particles. Flare-like processes may be responsible for large-scale restructuring of the magnetic field in the corona as well as for its heating. Large flares influence interplanetary space and substantially affect the Earth's lower ionosphere. While flare scenarios have slowly converged over the past decades, every new observation still reveals major unexpected results, demonstrating that solar flares, after 150 years since their discovery, remain a complex problem of astrophysics including major unsolved questions.

  2. The formation of kappa-distribution accelerated electron populations in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, Nicolas H.; Stackhouse, Duncan J.; Kontar, Eduard P.; Emslie, A. Gordon E-mail: d.stackhouse.1@research.gla.ac.uk E-mail: emslieg@wku.edu

    2014-12-01

    Driven by recent RHESSI observations of confined loop-top hard X-ray sources in solar flares, we consider stochastic acceleration of electrons in the presence of Coulomb collisions. If electron escape from the acceleration region can be neglected, the electron distribution function is determined by a balance between diffusive acceleration and collisions. Such a scenario admits a stationary solution for the electron distribution function that takes the form of a kappa distribution. We show that the evolution toward this kappa distribution involves a 'wave front' propagating forward in velocity space, so that electrons of higher energy are accelerated later; the acceleration timescales with energy according to τ{sub acc} ∼ E {sup 3/2}. At sufficiently high energies escape from the finite-length acceleration region will eventually dominate. For such energies, the electron velocity distribution function is obtained by solving a time-dependent Fokker-Planck equation in the 'leaky-box' approximation. Solutions are obtained in the limit of a small escape rate from an acceleration region that can effectively be considered a thick target.

  3. Stochastic Fermi acceleration of subrelativistic electrons and its role in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selkowitz, Robert; Blackman, Eric G.

    2004-11-01

    We re-examine stochastic Fermi acceleration (STFA) in the low-energy (Newtonian) regime in the context of solar flares. The particle energization rate depends on a dispersive term and on a coherent gain term. The energy dependence of pitch angle scattering is important for determining the electron energy spectrum. For scattering by whistler wave turbulence, STFA produces a quasi-thermal spectrum. A second well-constrained scattering mechanism is needed for STFA to match the observed 10-100 keV non-thermal spectrum. We suggest that STFA most plausibly acts as phase one of a two-phase particle acceleration engine in impulsive flares: STFA can match the thermal spectrum below 10 keV, and possibly the power-law spectrum between 10 and 100 keV, given the proper pitch angle scattering. However, a second phase, such as shock acceleration at loop tops, is probably required to match the spectrum above the observed knee at 100 keV. Understanding this knee, if it survives further observations, is tricky.

  4. Using Supra-Arcade Downflows as Probes of Electron Acceleration During Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Sabrina L.

    2011-01-01

    Extracting information from coronal features above flares has become more reliable with the availability of increasingly higher spatial and temporal-resolution data in recent decades. We are now able to sufficiently probe the region high above long-duration flaring active regions where reconnection is expected to be continually occurring. Flows in the supra-arcade region, first observed with Yohkoh/SXT, have been theorized to be associated with newly-reconnected outflowing loops. High resolution data appears to confirm these assertions. Assuming that these flows are indeed reconnection outflows, then the detection of those directed toward the solar surface (i.e. downflowing) should be associated with particle acceleration between the current sheet and the loop footpoints rooted in the chromosphere. RHESSI observations of highly energetic particles with respect to downflow detections could potentially constrain electron acceleration models. I will discuss measurements of these supra-arcade downflows (SADs) in relation to reconnection model parameters and present preliminary findings comparing the downflow timings with high-energy RHESSI lightcurves.

  5. Tunneling spectra for electrons in the lowest Landau level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnell, F. J.; Simon, Steven H.

    2010-03-01

    The recently developed experimental technique of time dependent capacitance spectroscopy [1] allows for measurements of high-resolution tunneling spectra of 2DEGs in the quantum Hall regime, giving a detailed probe of the single particle spectral function (electron addition and subtraction spectra). These experiments show a number of interesting features including Landau level structure, exchange enhanced Zeeman energy, Coulomb gap physics, effects of fractional quantization, as well as several key features that remain to be explained. While there has been some prior theoretical work[2] towards explaining low energy Coulomb gap features of tunneling spectra found in much earlier tunneling experiments [3], the new experiments[1] have uncovered physics outside of the prior theoretical explanations. Building on a number of these prior theoretical works, we investigate theoretically the expected tunneling spectra for electrons in low Landau levels, including the effects of electron spin and coupling to collective modes. [1] O. E. Dial, R.C. Ashoori, L.N. Pfeiffer, and K.W. West, Nature 448, 176-179 (2007) ; O. E. Dial et al, unpublished. [2] I. Aleiner et al, Phys. Rev. Lett 74 3435; (1994) S. R. E. Yang and A. MacDonald PRL 70 4110 (1993); S. He, P.M. Platzman, and B. I. Halperin, PRL 71 777 (1993). [3] J. P. Eisenstein et al, Phy. Rev. Lett. 69, 3804 (1992).

  6. Electron-hole excitations and optical spectra from first principles

    SciTech Connect

    Rohlfing, Michael; Louie, Steven G.

    2000-08-15

    We present a recently developed approach to calculate electron-hole excitations and the optical spectra of condensed matter from first principles. The key concept is to describe the excitations of the electronic system by the corresponding one- and two-particle Green's function. The method combines three computational techniques. First, the electronic ground state is treated within density-functional theory. Second, the single-particle spectrum of the electrons and holes is obtained within the GW approximation to the electron self-energy operator. Finally, the electron-hole interaction is calculated and a Bethe-Salpeter equation is solved, yielding the coupled electron-hole excitations. The resulting solutions allow the calculation of the entire optical spectrum. This holds both for bound excitonic states below the band gap, as well as for the resonant spectrum above the band gap. We discuss a number of technical developments needed for the application of the method to real systems. To illustrate the approach, we discuss the excitations and optical spectra of spatially isolated systems (atoms, molecules, and semiconductor clusters) and of extended, periodic crystals (semiconductors and insulators). (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  7. Acceleration of electrons and ions by strong lower-hybrid turbulence in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spicer, D. S.; Bingham, R.; Su, J. J.; Shapiro, V. D.; Shevchenko, V.; Ma, S.; Dawson, J. M.; Mcclements, K. G.

    1994-01-01

    One of the outstanding problems in solar flare theory is how to explain the 10-20 keV and greater hard x-ray emissions by a thick target bremsstrahlung model. The model requires the acceleration mechanism to accelerate approximately 10(exp 35) electrons sec(exp -l) with comparable energies, without producing a large return current which persists for long time scales after the beam ceases to exist due to Lenz's law, thereby, producing a self-magnetic field of order a few mega-Gauss. In this paper, we investigate particle acceleration resulting from the relaxation of unstable ion ring distributions, producing strong wave activity at the lower hybrid frequency. It is shown that strong lower hybrid wave turbulence collapses in configuration space producing density cavities containing intense electrostatic lower hybrid wave activity. The collapse of these intense nonlinear wave packets saturate by particle acceleration producing energetic electron and ion tails. There are several mechanisms whereby unstable ion distributions could be formed in the solar atmosphere, including reflection at perpendicular shocks, tearing modes, and loss cone depletion. Numerical simulations of ion ring relaxation processes, obtained using a 2 1/2-D fully electromagnetic, relativistic particle in cell code are discussed. We apply the results to the problem of explaining energetic particle production in solar flares. The results show the simultaneous acceleration of both electrons and ions to very high energies: electrons are accelerated to energies in the range 10-500 keV, while ions are accelerated to energies of the order of MeVs, giving rise to x-ray emission and gamma-ray emission respectively. Our simulations also show wave generation at the electron cyclotron frequency. We suggest that these waves are the solar millisecond radio spikes. The strong turbulence collapse process leads to a highly filamented plasma producing many localized regions for particle acceleration and resulting in

  8. Electronic spectra and structures of some biologically important xanthines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, M. K.; Mishra, P. C.

    1994-08-01

    Electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra of aqueous solutions of xanthine, caffeine, theophylline and theobromine have been studied at different pH. The observed spectra have been interpreted in terms of neutral and ionic forms of the molecules with the help of molecular orbital calculations. At neutral and acidic pH, the spectra can be assigned to the corresponding most stable neutral forms, with the exception that the fluorescence of xanthine at acidic pH appears to originate from the lowest singlet excited state of a cation of the molecule. At alkaline pH, xanthine and theophylline exist mainly as their monoanions. In xanthine and theophylline at alkaline pH, fluorescence originates from the lowest singlet excited state of the corresponding anion. However, in caffeine and theobromine, even at alkaline pH, fluorescence belongs to the neutral species. On the whole, the properties of xanthine are quite different from those of the methyl xanthines.

  9. The electronic spectra of mu-peroxodicobalt(III) complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miskowski, Vincent M.

    1987-01-01

    Problems found in the determination of the electronic spectra of mu-peroxodicobalt(III) complexes are considered, and the common formation of different mu-peroxocomplexes upon oxygenation of Co(II)-ligand solutions is discussed. Three classes of spectra have been identified: (1) planar single bridged complexes; (2) nonplanar single-bridged complexes with a dihedral angle near 145 deg; and (3) dibridged mu-OH(-),O2(2-) complexes with a dihedral angle near 60 deg. All of the peroxide ligand-to-metal charge-transfer spectra are found to be consistent with a simple model that assumes a sinusoidal dependence of pi-asterisk O2(2-) energies and sigma-overlaps upon the dihedral angle.

  10. Rapid temporal evolution of radiation from non-thermal electrons in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Edward T.; Petrosian, Vahe

    1987-01-01

    Solutions of the time dependent Fokker-Planck equation was found for accelerated electrons undergoing Coulomb collisions in a magnetized, fully ionized plasma. An exact solution was found for arbitrary pitch angle and energy distribution in a uniform background plasma. Then, for an inhomogeneous plasma, a solution was found for particles with small pitch angles. These solutions were used to calculate the temporal evolution of bremsstrahlung x-rays from short bursts of nonthermal electron beams, and these spectra were compared with observed high time resolution spectra of short timescale solar hard x-ray bursts. It is shown that the observed softening in time of the spectra rules out a homogeneous background and therefore the possibility of electrons being confined to the corona either because of converging magnetic field or high densities. The inhomogeneous solution was also applied to a model with constant coronal density and exponentially rising chromospheric density. The spectra are shown to be consistent with that produced by a collimated beam of electrons accelerated in the corona with certain given conditions. These conditions could be violated if large pitch angle electrons are present.

  11. EMPIRICAL DETERMINATION OF THE ENERGY LOSS RATE OF ACCELERATED ELECTRONS IN A WELL-OBSERVED SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Torre, Gabriele; Pinamonti, Nicola; Guo, Jingnan; Piana, Michele; Emslie, A. Gordon; Massone, Anna Maria E-mail: pinamont@dima.unige.it E-mail: piana@dima.unige.it E-mail: annamaria.massone@cnr.it

    2012-06-01

    We present electron images of an extended solar flare source, deduced from RHESSI hard X-ray imaging spectroscopy data. We apply the electron continuity equation to these maps in order to determine empirically the form of the energy loss rate for the bremsstrahlung-emitting electrons. We show that this form is consistent with an energy transport model involving Coulomb collisions in a target with a temperature of about 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} K, with a continuous injection of fresh deka-keV electrons at a rate of approximately 10{sup -2} electrons s{sup -1} per ambient electron.

  12. Electronic spectra from TDDFT and machine learning in chemical space

    SciTech Connect

    Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; Hartmann, Mia; Tapavicza, Enrico; Lilienfeld, O. Anatole von

    2015-08-28

    Due to its favorable computational efficiency, time-dependent (TD) density functional theory (DFT) enables the prediction of electronic spectra in a high-throughput manner across chemical space. Its predictions, however, can be quite inaccurate. We resolve this issue with machine learning models trained on deviations of reference second-order approximate coupled-cluster (CC2) singles and doubles spectra from TDDFT counterparts, or even from DFT gap. We applied this approach to low-lying singlet-singlet vertical electronic spectra of over 20 000 synthetically feasible small organic molecules with up to eight CONF atoms. The prediction errors decay monotonously as a function of training set size. For a training set of 10 000 molecules, CC2 excitation energies can be reproduced to within ±0.1 eV for the remaining molecules. Analysis of our spectral database via chromophore counting suggests that even higher accuracies can be achieved. Based on the evidence collected, we discuss open challenges associated with data-driven modeling of high-lying spectra and transition intensities.

  13. Identification of trapped electron modes in frequency fluctuation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnichand, H.; Citrin, J.; Hacquin, S.; Sabot, R.; Krämer-Flecken, A.; Garbet, X.; Bourdelle, C.; Bottereau, C.; Clairet, F.; Giacalone, J. C.; Guimarães-Filho, Z. O.; Guirlet, R.; Hornung, G.; Lebschy, A.; Lotte, P.; Maget, P.; Medvedeva, A.; Molina, D.; Nikolaeva, V.; Prisiazhniuk, D.; Tore Supra, the; the ASDEX Upgrade Teams

    2016-01-01

    Ion temperature gradient (ITG) and trapped electron modes (TEM) are two important micro-instabilities in the plasma core region of fusion devices (r/a≤slant 0.9 ). They usually coexist in the same range of spatial scale (around 0.1<{{k}\\bot}{ρi}<1 ), which makes their discrimination difficult. To investigate them, one can perform gyrokinetic simulations, transport analysis and phase velocity estimations. In Tore Supra, the identification of trapped electron modes (TEM) is made possible due to measured frequency fluctuation spectra. Indeed, turbulent spectra generally expected to be broad-band, can become narrow in case of TEM turbulence, inducing ‘quasi-coherent’ (QC) modes named QC-TEM. Therefore the analysis of frequency fluctuation spectra becomes a possible tool to differentiate TEM from ITG. We have found indications that the TEM can have a QC signature by comparing frequency fluctuation spectra from reflectometry measurements, gyrokinetic simulations and synthetic diagnostic results. Then the scope of the analysis of QC-TEM are discussed and an application is shown, namely transitions between TEM turbulence and MHD fluctuations.

  14. Electronic spectra of the tetraphenylcyclobutadienecyclopentadienylnickel(II) cation and radical

    SciTech Connect

    Peter R. Craig; Miller, John R.; Havlas, Zdenek; Trujillo, Marianela; Rempala, Pawel; Kirby, James P.; Noll, Bruce C.; Michl, Josef

    2016-05-02

    In this study, properties of the tetraphenylcyclobutadienecyclopentadienylnickel(II) cation 1 and its tetra-o-fluoro derivative 1a have been measured and calculated. The B3LYP/TZP optimized geometry of the free cation 1 agrees with a single-crystal X-ray diffraction structure except that in the crystal one of the phenyl substituents is strongly twisted to permit a close-packing interaction of two of its hydrogens with a nearby BF4 anion. The low-energy parts of the solution electronic absorption and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra of 1 and 1a have been interpreted by comparison with TD-DFT (B3LYP/TZP) results. Reduction or pulse radiolysis lead to a neutral 19-electron radical, whose visible absorption and MCD spectra have been recorded and interpreted as well. The reduction is facilitated by ~0.1 V upon going from 1 to 1a

  15. Discriminating the trapped electron modes contribution in density fluctuation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnichand, H.; Sabot, R.; Hacquin, S.; Krämer-Flecken, A.; Bourdelle, C.; Citrin, J.; Garbet, X.; Giacalone, J. C.; Guirlet, R.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Meneses, L.

    2015-09-01

    Quasi-coherent (QC) modes have been reported for more than 10 years in reflectometry fluctuations spectra in the core region of fusion plasmas. They have characteristics in-between coherent and broadband fluctuations as they oscillate at a marked frequency but have a wide spectrum. This work presents further evidences of the link recently established between QC modes and the trapped electron modes (TEM) instabilities (Arnichand et al 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 123017). In electron cyclotron resonance heated discharges of Tore Supra, an enhancement of QC modes amplitude is observed in a region where TEM cause impurity transport and turbulence. In JET Ohmic plasmas, QC modes disappear during density ramp-up and current ramp-down. This is reminiscent of Tore Supra and TEXTOR observations during transitions from the linear Ohmic confinement (LOC) to the saturated Ohmic confinement (SOC) regimes. Evidencing TEM activity then becomes experimentally possible via analysis of fluctuation spectra.

  16. On the Solution of the Continuity Equation for Precipitating Electrons in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. Gordon; Holman, Gordon D.; Litvinenko, Yuri E.

    2014-01-01

    Electrons accelerated in solar flares are injected into the surrounding plasma, where they are subjected to the influence of collisional (Coulomb) energy losses. Their evolution is modeled by a partial differential equation describing continuity of electron number. In a recent paper, Dobranskis & Zharkova claim to have found an "updated exact analytical solution" to this continuity equation. Their solution contains an additional term that drives an exponential decrease in electron density with depth, leading them to assert that the well-known solution derived by Brown, Syrovatskii & Shmeleva, and many others is invalid. We show that the solution of Dobranskis & Zharkova results from a fundamental error in the application of the method of characteristics and is hence incorrect. Further, their comparison of the "new" analytical solution with numerical solutions of the Fokker-Planck equation fails to lend support to their result.We conclude that Dobranskis & Zharkova's solution of the universally accepted and well-established continuity equation is incorrect, and that their criticism of the correct solution is unfounded. We also demonstrate the formal equivalence of the approaches of Syrovatskii & Shmeleva and Brown, with particular reference to the evolution of the electron flux and number density (both differential in energy) in a collisional thick target. We strongly urge use of these long-established, correct solutions in future works.

  17. On the solution of the continuity equation for precipitating electrons in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Emslie, A. Gordon; Holman, Gordon D.; Litvinenko, Yuri E. E-mail: gordon.d.holman@nasa.gov

    2014-09-01

    Electrons accelerated in solar flares are injected into the surrounding plasma, where they are subjected to the influence of collisional (Coulomb) energy losses. Their evolution is modeled by a partial differential equation describing continuity of electron number. In a recent paper, Dobranskis and Zharkova claim to have found an 'updated exact analytical solution' to this continuity equation. Their solution contains an additional term that drives an exponential decrease in electron density with depth, leading them to assert that the well-known solution derived by Brown, Syrovatskii and Shmeleva, and many others is invalid. We show that the solution of Dobranskis and Zharkova results from a fundamental error in the application of the method of characteristics and is hence incorrect. Further, their comparison of the 'new' analytical solution with numerical solutions of the Fokker-Planck equation fails to lend support to their result. We conclude that Dobranskis and Zharkova's solution of the universally accepted and well-established continuity equation is incorrect, and that their criticism of the correct solution is unfounded. We also demonstrate the formal equivalence of the approaches of Syrovatskii and Shmeleva and Brown, with particular reference to the evolution of the electron flux and number density (both differential in energy) in a collisional thick target. We strongly urge use of these long-established, correct solutions in future works.

  18. NEXAFS of ionic solids as seen through resonant electron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elango, M.; Kikas, A.; Maiste, A.; Ruus, R.; Saar, A.

    1995-02-01

    We show that the nonradiative decay patterns of core-hole-electron bound states (core excitons) in the regions of K L 23 edge of KMnF 3 and KCl, Cl L 23 edge of NaCl, and F K edge of alkali fluorides include specific spectator structures which are clearly distinguishable from the normal Auger spectra excited in the regions of continuum transitions.

  19. Energetics of Three Solar Flares Observed by RHESSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, G. D.; Dennis, B. R.; Sui, Linhui

    2004-05-01

    We compare the energy content of the thermal plasma and suprathermal electrons in three solar flares observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). Fits of computed isothermal and thick-target bremsstrahlung spectra to RHESSI X-ray spectra are used to deduce the instantaneous energy content of the X-ray-emitting plasma and the accumulated energy in suprathermal electrons throughout the three flares. We minimize the energy in the suprathermal electrons by assuming that the electron distributions have a low-energy cutoff that is no lower than the highest cutoff energy that provides a good fit to the X-ray spectra. The energetics of the 2002 April 15 M1 flare and the 2002 April 21 X2 flare are computed and compared with results for the 2002 July 23 X5 flare (Holman et al. 2003, ApJ 595, L97). We find that for all three flares the energy in nonthermal electrons is comparable to the energy contained in the thermal plasma.

  20. Measurement of wavelengths and lamb shifts for inner-shell transitions in Fe XVIII-XXIV. [from solar flare X-ray spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seely, J. F.; Feldman, U.; Safronova, U. I.

    1986-01-01

    The wavelengths of inner-shell 1s-2p transitions in the ions Fe XVIII-XXIV have been measured in solar flare spectra recorded by the Naval Research Laboratory crystal spectrometer (SOLFLEX) on the Air Force P78-1 spacecraft. The measurements are compared with previous measurements and with recently calculated wavelengths. It is found that the measured wavelengths are systematically larger than the wavelengths calculated using the Z-expansion method by up to 0.65 mA. For the more highly charged ions, these differences can be attributed to the QED contributions to the transition energies that are not included in the Z-expansion calculations.

  1. Comparison of optical and electron spectra in an infra-red free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, A.M.; Gillespie, W.A.; Martin, P.F.

    1995-12-31

    Time-resolved electron and optical spectra recently acquired at the FELIX facility are presented, showing the evolution of the respective macropulses. A comparison is made between the optical power output during the macropulse and the measured power extracted from the electron beam using a simple model of the cavity losses. Data are available for a wide range of operating conditions: the wavelength range is from 9 {mu}m to 28 {mu}m and detuning are between 1/4{lambda} and 2{lambda}. The effect of rapid electron beam energy changes on the optical and electron spectra will also be discussed.

  2. Toward the Accurate Simulation of Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giussani, Angelo; Nenov, Artur; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Jaiswal, Vishal K.; Rivalta, Ivan; Dumont, Elise; Mukamel, Shaul; Garavelli, Marco

    2015-06-01

    Two-dimensional pump-probe electronic spectroscopy is a powerful technique able to provide both high spectral and temporal resolution, allowing the analysis of ultrafast complex reactions occurring via complementary pathways by the identification of decay-specific fingerprints. [1-2] The understanding of the origin of the experimentally recorded signals in a two-dimensional electronic spectrum requires the characterization of the electronic states involved in the electronic transitions photoinduced by the pump/probe pulses in the experiment. Such a goal constitutes a considerable computational challenge, since up to 100 states need to be described, for which state-of-the-art methods as RASSCF and RASPT2 have to be wisely employed. [3] With the present contribution, the main features and potentialities of two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy are presented, together with the machinery in continuous development in our groups in order to compute two-dimensional electronic spectra. The results obtained using different level of theory and simulations are shown, bringing as examples the computed two-dimensional electronic spectra for some specific cases studied. [2-4] [1] Rivalta I, Nenov A, Cerullo G, Mukamel S, Garavelli M, Int. J. Quantum Chem., 2014, 114, 85 [2] Nenov A, Segarra-Martí J, Giussani A, Conti I, Rivalta I, Dumont E, Jaiswal V K, Altavilla S, Mukamel S, Garavelli M, Faraday Discuss. 2015, DOI: 10.1039/C4FD00175C [3] Nenov A, Giussani A, Segarra-Martí J, Jaiswal V K, Rivalta I, Cerullo G, Mukamel S, Garavelli M, J. Chem. Phys. submitted [4] Nenov A, Giussani A, Fingerhut B P, Rivalta I, Dumont E, Mukamel S, Garavelli M, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. Submitted [5] Krebs N, Pugliesi I, Hauer J, Riedle E, New J. Phys., 2013,15, 08501

  3. PGOPHER: A program for simulating rotational, vibrational and electronic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Western, Colin M.

    2017-01-01

    The PGOPHER program is a general purpose program for simulating and fitting molecular spectra, particularly the rotational structure. The current version can handle linear molecules, symmetric tops and asymmetric tops and many possible transitions, both allowed and forbidden, including multiphoton and Raman spectra in addition to the common electric dipole absorptions. Many different interactions can be included in the calculation, including those arising from electron and nuclear spin, and external electric and magnetic fields. Multiple states and interactions between them can also be accounted for, limited only by available memory. Fitting of experimental data can be to line positions (in many common formats), intensities or band contours and the parameters determined can be level populations as well as rotational constants. PGOPHER is provided with a powerful and flexible graphical user interface to simplify many of the tasks required in simulating, understanding and fitting molecular spectra, including Fortrat diagrams and energy level plots in addition to overlaying experimental and simulated spectra. The program is open source, and can be compiled with open source tools. This paper provides a formal description of the operation of version 9.1.

  4. Electronic and vibrational spectra of some rare earth trifluoromethanesulfonates crystals.

    PubMed

    Paul, P; Ghosh, M; Neogy, D; Mallick, P K

    2011-01-01

    The Raman and infrared spectra of some rare earth (dysprosium and terbium) trifluoromethanesulfonates crystals have been analyzed. Different vibrational frequencies of trifluoromethanesulfonate ions (CF3SO3-) are identified and assigned to different vibrations of the SO3 and CF3 groups. Electronic transitions of R3+ ions (R=Dy, Tb) in these salts have been assigned to transitions from the ground to different energy levels of the ground multiplet. The electronic energy levels of the rare earth ions are also determined theoretically with the help of single electron crystal field theory. They are found to yield results not only in good agreement with the observed spectral data but also in good conformity with those obtained previously from magnetic measurements.

  5. Electronic and vibrational spectra of some rare earth trifluoromethanesulfonates crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, P.; Ghosh, M.; Neogy, D.; Mallick, P. K.

    2011-01-01

    The Raman and infrared spectra of some rare earth (dysprosium and terbium) trifluoromethanesulfonates crystals have been analyzed. Different vibrational frequencies of trifluoromethanesulfonate ions (CF 3SO 3-) are identified and assigned to different vibrations of the SO 3 and CF 3 groups. Electronic transitions of R 3+ ions (R = Dy, Tb) in these salts have been assigned to transitions from the ground to different energy levels of the ground multiplet. The electronic energy levels of the rare earth ions are also determined theoretically with the help of single electron crystal field theory. They are found to yield results not only in good agreement with the observed spectral data but also in good conformity with those obtained previously from magnetic measurements.

  6. EPR and electronic absorption spectra of copper bearing turquoise mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, K. B. N.; Moorthy, L. R.; Reddy, B. J.; Vedanand, S.

    1988-10-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance and optical absorption spectra of turquoise have been studied both at room and low temperatures. It is concluded from the EPR spectra that the ground state of Cu 2+ ion in turquoise is 2A g(d x2- y2) and it is sited in an elongated rhombic octahedron (D 2π). The observed absorption bands at 14970 and 18354 cm -1 are assigned at 2A g→ 2B 1 g( dx2- y2→ xy) and 2A g→[ su2B 3g(d x 2-y 2→d yz) respectively assuming D 2π symmetry which are inconsistent with EPR studies. The three bands in the NIR region are attributed to combinations of fundamental modes of the H 2O molecule present in the sample.

  7. Workshop on Impulsive Solar Flares, 2nd, University of New Hampshire, Durham, Sept. 26-28, 1988, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Papers on impulsive solar flares are presented, covering topics such as the optical properties of impulsive flares, soft X-ray spectroscopy of solar flares, the energy release process in impulsive bursts, high-velocity evaporation and a high-speed shock wave during the impulsive phase of the April 24, 1984 flare, nonpotential magnetic fields at sites of gamma-ray flares, and meter-decimeter and microwave radio observations of solar flares. Other topics include rise times in solar radio bursts, removal of the gradual component in analyses of solar impulsive bursts, ion and relativistic electron transport in solar flares, neutrons and gamma-ray emission on June 3, 1982, emission characteristics of three intense solar flares in cycle 21, and solar flare gamma-ray observations with the Hinotori satellite. Additional topics include spectra of relativistic solar proton ground-level events recorded in Antarctica, a 153-d periodicity in the occurrence of solar flares producing energetic interplanetary electrons, a search for solar neutron response in neutron monitor data, neutral beams in two-ribbon flares and in the geomagnetic tail, beam heating in solar flares, and solar flare gamma-ray line shapes.

  8. Comparison of helium and heavy ion spectra in /sup 3/He-rich solar flares with model calculations based on stochastic Fermi acceleration in Alfven turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Moebius, E.; Scholer, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Gloeckler, G.

    1982-08-01

    A systematic study of the He isotopes, O, and Fe in six /sup 3/He-rich solar flares during the 1977--1979 period using the dE/dx versus E Ultralow Energy Wide Angle Telescope (ULEWAT) of the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland experiment on ISEE 1 and ISEE 3 revealed that the /sup 3/He spectrum is generally harder than that of /sup 4/He, and the O spectrum is harder than that of Fe in the energy range 0.4--4. MeV per nucleon. At higher energies the flux of the anomalous cosmic ray component exceeds the flux of /sup 4/He and O solar particles for 1977. The spectra as measured for /sup 3/He and /sup 4/He are basically in agreement with a stationary model based on stochastic Fermi acceleration in Alfven turbulence including the corresponding rigidity-dependent diffusive particle loss. The oxygen and iron spectra, however, differ from the ones predicted by the model: the variation of the Fe/O ratio is larger than predicted. It is suggested that the occasional observation of a maximum of the /sup 3/He spectrum is due to a short time injection of /sup 3/He and a long time injection of normal composition material. Subject headings: cosmic rays: general: particle acceleration: Sun: abundances: Sun:flares

  9. Excitation spectra of circular, few-electron quantum dots

    PubMed

    Kouwenhoven; Oosterkamp; Danoesastro; Eto; Austing; Honda; Tarucha

    1997-12-05

    Studies of the ground and excited states in semiconductor quantum dots containing 1 to 12 electrons showed that the quantum numbers of the states in the excitation spectra can be identified and compared with exact calculations. A magnetic field induces transitions between the ground and excited states. These transitions were analyzed in terms of crossings between single-particle states, singlet-triplet transitions, spin polarization, and Hund's rule. These impurity-free quantum dots allow "atomic physics" experiments to be performed in magnetic field regimes not accessible for atoms.

  10. Multiple scattering calculations of relativistic electron energy loss spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorissen, K.; Rehr, J. J.; Verbeeck, J.

    2010-04-01

    A generalization of the real-space Green’s-function approach is presented for ab initio calculations of relativistic electron energy loss spectra (EELS) which are particularly important in anisotropic materials. The approach incorporates relativistic effects in terms of the transition tensor within the dipole-selection rule. In particular, the method accounts for relativistic corrections to the magic angle in orientation resolved EELS experiments. The approach is validated by a study of the graphite CK edge, for which we present an accurate magic angle measurement consistent with the predicted value.

  11. Absolute Abundance Measurements in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Harry

    2014-06-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with EVE/SDO and EIS/Hinode. EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines Fe XV-XXIV and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias (F). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is F=1.17+-0.22. Furthermore, we have compared the EVE measurements with corresponding flare observations of intermediate temperature S, Ar, Ca, and Fe emission lines taken with EIS. Our initial calculations also indicate a photospheric composition for these observations. This analysis suggests that the bulk of the plasma evaporated during a flare comes from deep in the chromosphere, below the region where elemental fractionation in the non-flaring corona occurs.

  12. Electronic spectra of the tetraphenylcyclobutadienecyclopentadienylnickel(II) cation and radical

    DOE PAGES

    Peter R. Craig; Miller, John R.; Havlas, Zdenek; ...

    2016-05-02

    In this study, properties of the tetraphenylcyclobutadienecyclopentadienylnickel(II) cation 1 and its tetra-o-fluoro derivative 1a have been measured and calculated. The B3LYP/TZP optimized geometry of the free cation 1 agrees with a single-crystal X-ray diffraction structure except that in the crystal one of the phenyl substituents is strongly twisted to permit a close-packing interaction of two of its hydrogens with a nearby BF–4 anion. The low-energy parts of the solution electronic absorption and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra of 1 and 1a have been interpreted by comparison with TD-DFT (B3LYP/TZP) results. Reduction or pulse radiolysis lead to a neutral 19-electron radical,more » whose visible absorption and MCD spectra have been recorded and interpreted as well. The reduction is facilitated by ~0.1 V upon going from 1 to 1a« less

  13. A Chromospheric Flare Model Consisting of Two Dynamical Layers: Critical Tests from IRIS Data of Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam; Allred, Joel C.; Daw, Adrian N.; Cauzzi, Gianna; Carlsson, Mats; Inglis, Andrew; O'Neill, Aaron; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Uitenbroek, Han

    2017-01-01

    Recent 1D radiative-hydrodynamic simulations of flares have shown that a heated, chromospheric compression layer and a stationary layer, just below the compression, are produced in response to high flux electron beam heating. The hot blackbody-like continuum and redshifted intensity in singly ionized chromospheric lines in these model predictions are generally consistent with broad wavelength coverage spectra of M dwarf flares and with high spectral resolution observations of solar flares, respectively. We critically test this two-component chromospheric flare model against the Fe II profiles and NUV continuum brightness for several X-class solar flares observed with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). We present several new predictions for the Daniel K. Inoue Solar Telescope (DKIST).

  14. On the sensitivity of the goes flare classification to properties of the electron beam in the thick-target model

    SciTech Connect

    Reep, J. W.; Bradshaw, S. J.; McAteer, R. T. J. E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu

    2013-11-20

    The collisional thick-target model, wherein a large number of electrons are accelerated down a flaring loop, can be used to explain many observed properties of solar flares. In this study, we focus on the sensitivity of (GOES) flare classification to the properties of the thick-target model. Using a hydrodynamic model with RHESSI-derived electron beam parameters, we explore the effects of the beam energy flux (or total non-thermal energy), the cut-off energy, and the spectral index of the electron distribution on the soft X-rays observed by GOES. We conclude that (1) the GOES class is proportional to the non-thermal energy E {sup α} for α ≈ 1.7 in the low-energy passband (1-8 Å) and ≈1.6 in the high-energy passband (0.5-4 Å); (2) the GOES class is only weakly dependent on the spectral index in both passbands; (3) increases in the cut-off will increase the flux in the 0.5-4 Å passband but decrease the flux in the 1-8 Å passband, while decreases in the cut-off will cause a decrease in the 0.5-4 Å passband and a slight increase in the 1-8 Å passband.

  15. Database for Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA)Database for Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 100 Database for Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA)Database for Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA) (PC database for purchase)   This database has been designed to facilitate quantitative interpretation of Auger-electron and X-ray photoelectron spectra and to improve the accuracy of quantitation in routine analysis. The database contains all physical data needed to perform quantitative interpretation of an electron spectrum for a thin-film specimen of given composition. A simulation module provides an estimate of peak intensities as well as the energy and angular distributions of the emitted electron flux.

  16. Solar Flare Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-20

    terms of basic solar flare mechanisms. It was shown that Che basic process by which the X-ray radiation of flares is created is by heating the flare...plasma to temperatures of about ten million degrees, through evaporation of the chromosphere. This process is driven both by beams of accelerated electrons...transfer of energy and momentum from the primary energy.release site in the corona. it is important to understand the basic physical processes that carry

  17. Gas-phase Electronic Spectra of Coronene and Corannulene Cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, F.-X.; Rice, Corey A.; Maier, John P.

    2017-02-01

    Gas-phase electronic spectra of the coronene ({{{C}}}24{{{{H}}}12}+) and corannulene ({{{C}}}20{{{{H}}}10}+) cations complexed with helium have been recorded in a quadrupole ion trap at 5 K by photodissociation. The electronic spectrum of {{{C}}}20{{{{H}}}10}+ with two helium atoms was also measured to estimate the perturbation. This method is sufficient for an astronomical comparison because the shift due to the weakly bound helium is on the order of 0.2 Å. {{{C}}}24{{{{H}}}12}+{--}{He} has the origin band of the {{{A}}}2{{{E}}}1g≤ftarrow X{}2{{{E}}}2u transition at 9438.3 Å and that to a much higher state {{{D}}}3≤ftarrow X{}2{{{E}}}2u at 4570 Å. The corannulene cation is subject to a Jahn–Teller distortion in the electronic ground state, leading to the {3}2{{A}}\\prime ≤ftarrow {{X}}{}2{{A}}\\prime \\prime and {3}2{{A}}\\prime \\prime ≤ftarrow {{X}}{}2{{A}}\\prime transitions with origin band maxima when complexed with helium at 5996.1 and 5882.6 Å. These absorptions lie in a region where there is a congestion of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). However, the recorded features have no match with astronomical observations, removing coronene and corannulene cations and probably other aromatic hydrocarbons of this size as possible carriers of the DIBs.

  18. Electronic structure, aromaticity and spectra of hetero[8]circulenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baryshnikov, G. V.; Minaev, B. F.; Minaeva, V. A.

    2015-05-01

    The present review highlights recent advances in experimental and theoretical chemistry dealing with investigation of the electronic structures and physicochemical properties of hetero[8]circulenes. These compounds are the only representatives of planar heteroannulated cyclooctatetraenes. It is shown that high molecular symmetry of hetero[8]circulenes and the extended specific π-conjugated chain are the main factors responsible for high stability of the crystal packing modes and the optical and magnetic properties of these compounds. These effects also determine numerous selection rules for electronic and vibrational transitions in UV-Vis, IR and Raman spectra. Emphasis is given to the aromaticity of hetero[8]circulenes containing the inner antiaromatic cyclooctatetraene core. The planar structure of the latter is stabilized by a polyaromatic system composed of benzene rings and five-membered heterocycles. Due to high thermal and chemical stability of most hetero[8]circulenes combined with semiconducting properties, these compounds can be considered as promising materials for molecular electronics and nanophotonics, in particular for the production of organic light-emitting diodes and field-effect transistors. The bibliography includes 154 references.

  19. Electron acceleration in a flare plasma via coronal circuits. (German Title: Elektronenbeschleunigung im Flareplasma modelliert mit koronalen Schaltkreisen)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Önel, Hakan

    2008-08-01

    The Sun is a star, which due to its proximity has a tremendous influence on Earth. Since its very first days mankind tried to "understand the Sun", and especially in the 20th century science has uncovered many of the Sun's secrets by using high resolution observations and describing the Sun by means of models. As an active star the Sun's activity, as expressed in its magnetic cycle, is closely related to the sunspot numbers. Flares play a special role, because they release large energies on very short time scales. They are correlated with enhanced electromagnetic emissions all over the spectrum. Furthermore, flares are sources of energetic particles. Hard X-ray observations (e.g., by NASA's RHESSI spacecraft) reveal that a large fraction of the energy released during a flare is transferred into the kinetic energy of electrons. However the mechanism that accelerates a large number of electrons to high energies (beyond 20 keV) within fractions of a second is not understood yet. The thesis at hand presents a model for the generation of energetic electrons during flares that explains the electron acceleration based on real parameters obtained by real ground and space based observations. According to this model photospheric plasma flows build up electric potentials in the active regions in the photosphere. Usually these electric potentials are associated with electric currents closed within the photosphere. However as a result of magnetic reconnection, a magnetic connection between the regions of different magnetic polarity on the photosphere can establish through the corona. Due to the significantly higher electric conductivity in the corona, the photospheric electric power supply can be closed via the corona. Subsequently a high electric current is formed, which leads to the generation of hard X-ray radiation in the dense chromosphere. The previously described idea is modelled and investigated by means of electric circuits. For this the microscopic plasma parameters

  20. On the analysis of photo-electron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, C.-Z.; Dinh, P.M.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Suraud, E.

    2015-09-15

    We analyze Photo-Electron Spectra (PES) for a variety of excitation mechanisms from a simple mono-frequency laser pulse to involved combination of pulses as used, e.g., in attosecond experiments. In the case of simple pulses, the peaks in PES reflect the occupied single-particle levels in combination with the given laser frequency. This usual, simple rule may badly fail in the case of excitation pulses with mixed frequencies and if resonant modes of the system are significantly excited. We thus develop an extension of the usual rule to cover all possible excitation scenarios, including mixed frequencies in the attosecond regime. We find that the spectral distributions of dipole, monopole and quadrupole power for the given excitation taken together and properly shifted by the single-particle energies provide a pertinent picture of the PES in all situations. This leads to the derivation of a generalized relation allowing to understand photo-electron yields even in complex experimental setups.

  1. Gas dynamics in the impulsive phase of solar flares. I Thick-target heating by nonthermal electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagai, F.; Emslie, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical investigation is carried out of the gas dynamical response of the solar atmosphere to a flare energy input in the form of precipitating nonthermal electrons. Rather than discussing the origin of these electrons, the spectral and temporal characteristics of the injected flux are inferred through a thick-target model of hard X-ray bremsstrahlung production. It is assumed that the electrons spiral about preexisting magnetic field lines, making it possible for a one-dimensional spatial treatment to be performed. It is also assumed that all electron energy losses are due to Coulomb collisions with ambient particles; that is, return-current ohmic effects and collective plasma processes are neglected. The results are contrasted with earlier work on conductive heating of the flare atmosphere. A local temperature peak is seen at a height of approximately 1500 km above the photosphere. This derives from a spatial maximum in the energy deposition rate from an electron beam. It is noted that such a feature is not present in conductively heated models. The associated localized region of high pressure drives material both upward and downward.

  2. CONSTRAINING SOLAR FLARE DIFFERENTIAL EMISSION MEASURES WITH EVE AND RHESSI

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, Amir; McTiernan, James M.; Warren, Harry P.

    2014-06-20

    Deriving a well-constrained differential emission measure (DEM) distribution for solar flares has historically been difficult, primarily because no single instrument is sensitive to the full range of coronal temperatures observed in flares, from ≲2 to ≳50 MK. We present a new technique, combining extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectra from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory with X-ray spectra from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), to derive, for the first time, a self-consistent, well-constrained DEM for jointly observed solar flares. EVE is sensitive to ∼2-25 MK thermal plasma emission, and RHESSI to ≳10 MK; together, the two instruments cover the full range of flare coronal plasma temperatures. We have validated the new technique on artificial test data, and apply it to two X-class flares from solar cycle 24 to determine the flare DEM and its temporal evolution; the constraints on the thermal emission derived from the EVE data also constrain the low energy cutoff of the non-thermal electrons, a crucial parameter for flare energetics. The DEM analysis can also be used to predict the soft X-ray flux in the poorly observed ∼0.4-5 nm range, with important applications for geospace science.

  3. Constraining Solar Flare Differential Emission Measures with EVE and RHESSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, Amir; McTiernan, James M.; Warren, Harry P.

    2014-06-01

    Deriving a well-constrained differential emission measure (DEM) distribution for solar flares has historically been difficult, primarily because no single instrument is sensitive to the full range of coronal temperatures observed in flares, from lsim2 to gsim50 MK. We present a new technique, combining extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectra from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory with X-ray spectra from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), to derive, for the first time, a self-consistent, well-constrained DEM for jointly observed solar flares. EVE is sensitive to ~2-25 MK thermal plasma emission, and RHESSI to gsim10 MK together, the two instruments cover the full range of flare coronal plasma temperatures. We have validated the new technique on artificial test data, and apply it to two X-class flares from solar cycle 24 to determine the flare DEM and its temporal evolution; the constraints on the thermal emission derived from the EVE data also constrain the low energy cutoff of the non-thermal electrons, a crucial parameter for flare energetics. The DEM analysis can also be used to predict the soft X-ray flux in the poorly observed ~0.4-5 nm range, with important applications for geospace science.

  4. Two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectra: modeling correlated electronic and nuclear motion.

    PubMed

    Terenziani, F; Painelli, A

    2015-05-21

    We calculate 2D electronic-vibrational (2D-EV) spectra of solvated organic dyes modeled in terms of a reduced set of electronic diabatic states (the essential states) non-adiabatically coupled to molecular vibrations. An effective overdamped coordinate, whose dynamics is described by the Smoluchowski diffusion equation, accounts for polar solvation. Results are discussed for two dyes with distinctively different spectroscopic behavior: 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(4-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran (DCM) and 8-(N,N-dibutylamino)-2-azachrysene (AAC). Linear absorption and fluorescence spectra of DCM are well reproduced based on a minimal two-state model. The same model leads to 2D-EV spectra in good agreement with the recent experimental data reported by Oliver and coworkers for DCM in DMSO. In contrast, linear spectra of AAC show a subtle interplay between a locally-excited (LE) and a charge-transfer (CT) excitation, calling for a three-state model. Calculated 2D-EV spectra for AAC show a qualitatively different behavior, demonstrating that the experimental data for DCM do not support a LE/CT interplay. This resolves the long-lasting discussion about the nature of low-lying excitations of DCM in favor of the simplest picture.

  5. A thermal/nonthermal approach to solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benka, Stephen G.

    1991-01-01

    An approach for modeling solar flare high-energy emissions is developed in which both thermal and nonthermal particles coexist and contribute to the radiation. The thermal/nonthermal distribution function is interpreted physically by postulating the existence of DC sheets in the flare region. The currents then provide both primary plasma heating through Joule dissipation, and runaway electron acceleration. The physics of runaway acceleration is discussed. Several methods are presented for obtaining approximations to the thermal/nonthermal distribution function, both within the current sheets and outside of them. Theoretical hard x ray spectra are calculated, allowing for thermal bremsstrahlung from the heated plasma electrons impinging on the chromosphere. A simple model for hard x ray images of two-ribbon flares is presented. Theoretical microwave gyrosynchrotron spectra are calculated and analyzed, uncovering important new effects caused by the interplay of thermal and nonthermal particles. The theoretical spectra are compared with observed high resolution spectra of solar flares, and excellent agreement is found, in both hard x rays and microwaves. The future detailed application of this approach to solar flares is discussed, as are possible refinements to this theory.

  6. VLF Remote -Sensing of the Lower Ionosphere with AWESOME Receivers: Solar Flares, Lightning-induced Electron Precipitation, Sudden Ionospheric Disturbances, Sprites, Gravity Waves and Gamma-ray Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inan, U. S.; Cohen, M.; Scherrer, P.; Scherrer, D.

    2006-11-01

    Stanford University Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio receivers have been used extensively for remote sensing of the ionosphere and the magnetosphere. Among the phenomena that can be uniquely measured via VLF receivers are radio atmospherics, whistlers, electron precipitation, solar flares, sudden ionospheric disturbances, gravity waves, sprites, and cosmic gamma-ray flares. With the use of simple square air-core magnetic loop antennas of a couple of meters in size, the sensitivity of these instruments allows the measurement of magnetic fields as low as several tens of femtoTesla per root Hz, in the frequency range of ~300 Hz to 50 kHz. This sensitivity well exceeds that required to detect any event above the ambient atmospheric noise floor, determined by the totality of lightning activity on this planet. In recent years, as cost of production, timing accuracy (due to low cost GPS cards), and data handling flexibility of the systems has improved, it has become possible to distribute many of these instruments in the form of arrays, to perform interferometric and holographic imaging of the lower ionosphere. These goals can be achieved using the newest version of the Stanford VLF receiver, known as AWESOME: Atmospheric Weather Educational System for Observation and Modeling of Electromagnetics. In the context of the IHY/UNBSS program for 2007, the AWESOME receivers can be used extensively as part of the United Nations initiative to place scientific instruments in developing countries. Drawing on the Stanford experiences from setting up arrays of VLF receivers, including an interferometer in Alaska, the Holographic Array for Ionospheric and Lightning research (HAIL) consisting of instruments at 13 different high schools in mid-western United States, a broader set of ELF/VLF receivers in Alaska, and various receivers abroad, including in France, Japan, Greece, Turkey, and India, a global network of ELF/VLF receivers offer possibilities for a wide range of scientific topics

  7. Non-thermal Electron Acceleration in Low Mach Number Collisionless Shocks. I. Particle Energy Spectra and Acceleration Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xinyi; Sironi, Lorenzo; Narayan, Ramesh

    2014-10-01

    Electron acceleration to non-thermal energies in low Mach number (Ms <~ 5) shocks is revealed by radio and X-ray observations of galaxy clusters and solar flares, but the electron acceleration mechanism remains poorly understood. Diffusive shock acceleration, also known as first-order Fermi acceleration, cannot be directly invoked to explain the acceleration of electrons. Rather, an additional mechanism is required to pre-accelerate the electrons from thermal to supra-thermal energies, so they can then participate in the Fermi process. In this work, we use two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell plasma simulations to study electron acceleration in low Mach number shocks. We focus on the particle energy spectra and the acceleration mechanism in a reference run with Ms = 3 and a quasi-perpendicular pre-shock magnetic field. We find that about 15% of the electrons can be efficiently accelerated, forming a non-thermal power-law tail in the energy spectrum with a slope of p ~= 2.4. Initially, thermal electrons are energized at the shock front via shock drift acceleration (SDA). The accelerated electrons are then reflected back upstream where their interaction with the incoming flow generates magnetic waves. In turn, the waves scatter the electrons propagating upstream back toward the shock for further energization via SDA. In summary, the self-generated waves allow for repeated cycles of SDA, similarly to a sustained Fermi-like process. This mechanism offers a natural solution to the conflict between the bright radio synchrotron emission observed from the outskirts of galaxy clusters and the low electron acceleration efficiency usually expected in low Mach number shocks.

  8. Non-thermal electron acceleration in low Mach number collisionless shocks. I. Particle energy spectra and acceleration mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xinyi; Narayan, Ramesh; Sironi, Lorenzo

    2014-10-20

    Electron acceleration to non-thermal energies in low Mach number (M{sub s} ≲ 5) shocks is revealed by radio and X-ray observations of galaxy clusters and solar flares, but the electron acceleration mechanism remains poorly understood. Diffusive shock acceleration, also known as first-order Fermi acceleration, cannot be directly invoked to explain the acceleration of electrons. Rather, an additional mechanism is required to pre-accelerate the electrons from thermal to supra-thermal energies, so they can then participate in the Fermi process. In this work, we use two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell plasma simulations to study electron acceleration in low Mach number shocks. We focus on the particle energy spectra and the acceleration mechanism in a reference run with M{sub s} = 3 and a quasi-perpendicular pre-shock magnetic field. We find that about 15% of the electrons can be efficiently accelerated, forming a non-thermal power-law tail in the energy spectrum with a slope of p ≅ 2.4. Initially, thermal electrons are energized at the shock front via shock drift acceleration (SDA). The accelerated electrons are then reflected back upstream where their interaction with the incoming flow generates magnetic waves. In turn, the waves scatter the electrons propagating upstream back toward the shock for further energization via SDA. In summary, the self-generated waves allow for repeated cycles of SDA, similarly to a sustained Fermi-like process. This mechanism offers a natural solution to the conflict between the bright radio synchrotron emission observed from the outskirts of galaxy clusters and the low electron acceleration efficiency usually expected in low Mach number shocks.

  9. Vibrational spectra, electronic and quantum mechanical investigations on ciprofloxacin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajalakshmi, K.; Gunasekaran, S.; Kumaresan, S.

    2014-07-01

    The Fourier transform infrared and FT-Raman spectra of ciprofloxacin have been recorded in region 4,000-400 and 4,000-100 cm-1, respectively. A complete assignment and analysis of fundamental vibrational modes of the molecule have been carried out. The observed fundamental modes have been compared with harmonic vibrational frequencies computed using density functional theory calculations by employing B3LYP functional at 6-31 G ( d, p) level. The most stable geometry of compound under investigation has been determined from potential energy scan. The first-order hyperpolarizability ( β o ) and other related properties ( μ, α o ) of ciprofloxacin have been calculated using this theory on a finite field approach. UV-vis spectrum of the compound has been recorded and electronic properties, such as highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energies have been calculated with B3LYP/6-31 G ( d, p) level. These calculated energies show that charge transfer occurs within molecule. The other molecular properties like molecular electrostatic potential, Mulliken population analysis and thermodynamic properties of title compound have also been calculated.

  10. Solar flare particle radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of the solar particles accelerated by solar flares and subsequently observed near the orbit of the earth are studied. Considered are solar particle intensity-time profiles, the composition and spectra of solar flare events, and the propagation of solar particles in interplanetary space. The effects of solar particles at the earth, riometer observations of polar cap cosmic noise absorption events, and the production of solar cell damage at synchronous altitudes by solar protons are also discussed.

  11. Implications of RHESSI Observations for Solar Flare Models and Energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2006-01-01

    Observations of solar flares in X-rays and gamma-rays provide the most direct information about the hottest plasma and energetic electrons and ions accelerated in flares. The Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) has observed over 18000 solar flares in X-rays and gamma-rays since its launch in February of 2002. RHESSI observes the full Sun at photon energies from as low as 3 keV to as high as 17 MeV with a spectral resolution on the order of 1 keV. It also provides images in arbitrary bands within this energy range with spatial resolution as good as 3 seconds of arc. Full images are typically produced every 4 seconds, although higher time resolution is possible. This unprecedented combination of spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution, spectral range and flexibility has led to fundamental advances in our understanding of flares. I will show RHESSI and coordinated observations that confirm coronal magnetic reconnection models for eruptive flares and coronal mass ejections, but also present new puzzles for these models. I will demonstrate how the analysis of RHESSI spectra has led to a better determination of the energy flux and total energy in accelerated electrons, and of the energy in the hot, thermal flare plasma. I will discuss how these energies compare with each other and with the energy contained in other flare-related phenomena such as interplanetary particles and coronal mass ejections.

  12. YOHKOH/WBS Recalibration and a Comprehensive Catalogue of Solar Flares Observed by YOHKOH SXT, HXT and WBS Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, J.; Matsumoto, Y.; Yoshimura, K.; Kubo, S.; Kotoku, J.; Masuda, S.; Sawa, M.; Suga, K.; Yoshimori, M.; Kosugi, T.; Watanabe, T.

    2006-07-01

    The flare catalogue of the Yohkoh mission is compiled and linked to this article as an electronic supplement. For showing flare characteristics over wide energy range concisely, we provide the images of Hard X-ray Telescope (HXT) and the Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT), and the spectra of Hard X-ray Spectrometer (HXS) and Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) with the Wide Band Spectrometer (WBS) time profiles. The energy versus pulse height (PH) data channels in HXS and GRS are re-calibrated by using the data of the whole mission period. Secular gain changes are recognized in HXS, and the characteristics of power-law flare spectra simultaneously observed by HXT and HXS confirms the trend. The GRS gains are different for the flare observations during the previous maximum and for the current maximum. The total of 33 γ -ray events are observed, and for 12 of them γ-ray flare spectra are obtained.

  13. Exciton Scattering approach for conjugated macromolecules: from electronic spectra to electron-phonon coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretiak, Sergei

    2014-03-01

    The exciton scattering (ES) technique is a multiscale approach developed for efficient calculations of excited-state electronic structure and optical spectra in low-dimensional conjugated macromolecules. Within the ES method, the electronic excitations in the molecular structure are attributed to standing waves representing quantum quasi-particles (excitons), which reside on the graph. The exciton propagation on the linear segments is characterized by the exciton dispersion, whereas the exciton scattering on the branching centers is determined by the energy-dependent scattering matrices. Using these ES energetic parameters, the excitation energies are then found by solving a set of generalized ``particle in a box'' problems on the graph that represents the molecule. All parameters can be extracted from quantum-chemical computations of small molecular fragments and tabulated in the ES library for further applications. Subsequently, spectroscopic modeling for any macrostructure within considered molecular family could be performed with negligible numerical effort. The exciton scattering properties of molecular vertices can be further described by tight-binding or equivalently lattice models. The on-site energies and hopping constants are obtained from the exciton dispersion and scattering matrices. Such tight-binding model approach is particularly useful to describe the exciton-phonon coupling, energetic disorder and incoherent energy transfer in large branched conjugated molecules. Overall the ES applications accurately reproduce the optical spectra compared to the reference quantum chemistry results, and make possible to predict spectra of complex macromolecules, where conventional electronic structure calculations are unfeasible.

  14. Radio and Hard X-Ray Images of High-Energy Electrons in an X-Class Solar Flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, S. M.; Krucker, S.; Shibasaki, K.; Yokoyama, T.; Shimojo, M.; Kundu, Mukul R.

    2003-01-01

    We present the first comparison between radio images of high-energy electrons accelerated by a solar flare and images of hard X-rays produced by the same electrons at photon energies above 100 keV. The images indicate that the high-energy X-rays originate at the footpoints of the loops dominating the radio emission. The radio and hard X-ray light curves match each other well and are quantitatively consistent with an origin in a single population of nonthermal electrons with a power-law index of around 4.5-5. The high-frequency radio spectral index suggests a flatter energy spectrum, but this is ruled out by the X-ray spectrum up to 8 MeV.

  15. Electron pitch angle scattering and the impulsive phase microwave and hard X-ray emission from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.; Kundu, M. R.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1982-01-01

    Observations and theoretical considerations have led to a model for impulsive phase flare emission involving the heating and acceleration of thermal electrons in the coronal part of a magnetic loop. The bulk of the heated gas is confined between conduction fronts, but particles with velocities a few times greater than the thermal velocity can escape into the lower part of the loop. It is shown that, when the electron gyrofrequency exceeds the plasma frequency, the escaping electrons are unstable to the generation of electrostatic plasma waves which scatter the particles in pitch angle to a nearly isotropic distribution. It is also shown that this scattering can (1) enhance the microwave emission from the upper part of the loop, and (2) due to the Landau damping of both low and high phase velocity waves, can lead to one or two breaks in the impulsive-phase hard X-ray spectrum.

  16. Nonthermal X-ray Spectral Flattening toward Low Energies in Early Impulsive Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2007-01-01

    The determination of the low-energy cutoff to nonthermal electron distributions is critical to the calculation of the nonthermal energy in solar flares. The most direct evidence for low-energy cutoffs is flattening of the power-law, nontherma1 X-ray spectra at low energies. However, because of the plasma preheating often seen in flares, the thermal emissions at low energies may hide such spectral flattening of the nonthermal component. We select a category of flares, which we call "early impulsive flares", in which the > 25 keV hard X-ray (HXR) flux increase is delayed by less than 30 s after the flux increase at lower energies. Thus, the plasma preheating in these flares is minimal, so the nonthermal spectrum can be determined to lower energies than in flares with significant preheating. Out of a sample of 33 early impulsive flares observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopy Imager (RHESSI), 9 showed spectral flattening toward low energies. In these events, the break energy of the double power-law fit to the HXR spectra lies in the range of 10-50 keV, significantly lower than the value we have seen for other flares that do not show such early impulsive emissions. In particular, it correlates with the HXR flux. After correcting the spatially-integrated spectra for albedo from isotropically emitted X-rays and using RHESSI imaging spectroscopy to exclude the extended albedo halo, we find that albedo associated with isotropic or nearly isotropic electrons can only account for the spectral flattening in 3 flares near Sun center. The spectral flattening in the remaining 6 flares is found to be consistent with the existence of a low-energy cutoff in the electron spectrum, falling in the range of 15-50 keV, which also correlates with the HXR flux.

  17. An investigation of small goes flares with intense hard x-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, L.; Harra-Murnion, L. K.; Culhane, J. L.; Schwartz, A.

    1997-01-01

    Most solar flare observations show that intense hard X-ray bursts come from large flares that have a large GOES classification (large peak 1 - 8 A˚ flux). This correlation, known as the ``Big Flare Syndrome'', suggests that more intense flares tend to have harder spectra. We have observed 7 flares that are exceptions to this. These flares have small GOES classifications ranging from B1.4 to C5.5 and peak hard X-ray count rates similar to those often observed from M class flares. This paper examines the cause of this anomoly using the Yohkoh Soft X-Ray Telescope, Hard X-Ray Telescope, and Bragg Crystal Spectrometer. Two hypotheses are proposed for the exceptions: (1) flares with multiple magnetic loops and common footpoints, producing multiple hard X-ray emission regions and low density thermal plasma distributed over a large volume, and (2) high densities in the magnetic loops restricting the propagation of the non-thermal electrons in the loop after magnetic reconnection has occurred and suppressing chromospheric evaporation. Two of the flares support the first hypothesis. The other flares either have data missing or are too small to be properly analysed by the Yohkoh instruments.

  18. Solar Flares Observed with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2004-01-01

    Solar flares are impressive examples of explosive energy release in unconfined, magnetized plasma. It is generally believed that the flare energy is derived from the coronal magnetic field. However, we have not been able to establish the specific energy release mechanism(s) or the relative partitioning of the released energy between heating, particle acceleration (electrons and ions), and mass motions. NASA's RHESSI Mission was designed to study the acceleration and evolution of electrons and ions in flares by observing the X-ray and gamma-ray emissions these energetic particles produce. This is accomplished through the combination of high-resolution spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging, including the first images of flares in gamma rays. RHESSI has observed over 12,000 solar flares since its launch on February 5, 2002. I will demonstrate how we use the RHESSI spectra to deduce physical properties of accelerated electrons and hot plasma in flares. Using images to estimate volumes, w e typically find that the total energy in accelerated electrons is comparable to that in the thermal plasma. I will also present flare observations that provide strong support for the presence of magnetic reconnection in a large-scale, vertical current sheet in the solar corona. RHESSI observations such as these are allowing us to probe more deeply into the physics of solar flares.

  19. Detecting Solar Neutrino Flares and Flavors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, D.

    2004-06-01

    Most power-full solar flare as the ones occurred on 23th February 1956, September 29th 1989 and recent ones occurred on 28th October, on 2nd-4th and 13th November 2003 have been respectively recorded by Radio-X- and Cosmic Rays detectors. These flares took place most in the open or in the edge and in the hidden solar disk (as for the September 29th, 1989 beyond 105Wo and for last November 2003 flare events). The 4th November event was the most powerful X event in the highest known rank category X28. The observed and estimated total flare energy E = 1031-1033 erg should be a source also of a prompt secondary neutrino burst originated, by proton-proton-pion production on the sun itself; a more delayed and spread neutrino flux signal arise later on the terrestrial atmosphere. These first earliest prompt solar neutrino burst might be already recorde, in a few neutrino clustered events, in largest neutrino underground detectors as Super-Kamiokande one, in time correlation with the sharp X-Radio flare onset. Our first estimate at the Super-Kamiokande II Laboratory is found to be a few (1-5) events. Their discover (or absence) should constrains the solar flare acceleration, energetic and its inner environment. Any large neutrino flare event might even verify the expected neutrino flavour mixing leading to comparable electron- muon event as well as a comparable energy fluence and spectra. Rare Tau appearence by neutrino muon into tau conversion might also arise.

  20. Electronic Spectra from Molecular Dynamics: A Simple Approach.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    to the measured contours. This method and others such as the methods of Lax, Lee, Tellinghuisen and Moeller and the Landau - Zener - Stuckleberg...dynamic binning spectra, and his semi- classical Franck-Condon spectra are approximated by our harmonic quantum correction. The Landau - Zener ...depends on our assumption of two degrees of freedom, and Eq. (3.6) is gen- eral. B. Equivalence with Landau - Zener - Stuckelberg, Tully - Preston (LZSTP

  1. Unfolding ambient electron plasma density from wave spectra induced by electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiraga, A.; Klos, Z.; Oraevsky, V.; Dokukin, V.; Pulinets, S.

    Numerous rocket and few satellite projects were devoted to study of astrophysical plasma with the aid of active electron beam experiments. The quality and volume of wave data from such experiments did not fulfill original expectat ions due to complexity of involved processes, technical malfunctions and limited diagnostics. Due to fortunate, temporal malfunction of plasma accelerator, there were several cases when pulsed electron beam had been injected from the APEX satellite into otherwise unmodified ionospheric plasma. Instantaneous current intensity didn't exceeded 0.15A and an unstabilized acceleration voltage was of the order of 10keV. Injection pitch angle slowly changed according to moderate three-axis satellite stabilization. Injections took place in the altitude range 400-1100km in the European region and in the north, polar region. A receiver with bandwidth of 15kHz was connected to a cylindrical dipole antenna having half lengths of 7.5m. The receiver operated in survey mode providing one spectrum every 2s or 8s. The single spectrum was measured in 1s with an equally spaced mesh of 200 frequencies starting from 100kHz with a step of 50kHz. Electron beam induced spectra show up large variety of narrow band structures. In many cases, from reproducibility or slow evolution of the spectra, it may be inferred that distinct interactions prevail for some ranges of ambient electron gyro (fc) and plasma (fn) frequencies, injection pitch angles and beam intensity. Interaction plausibility arguments are useful in preliminary assignment of spectral structures. We show that discrete emission can be identified at least on ambient plasma frequency or ambient upper hybrid frequency. One class of arguments supporting such identification is provided by interrelation between spectral signatures of local plasma density in passive mode and beam induced spectra. Another class of arguments is provided by interrelations between spectral structures induced by electron beam

  2. VLF Remote Sensing of the Lower Ionosphere: Solar Flares, Electron Precipitation, Sudden Ionospheric Disturbances, Sprites, Gravity Waves and Gamma-ray Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, J. H.; Cohen, M.; Inan, U. S.; Scherrer, P. H.; Scherrer, D.

    2005-12-01

    Stanford University Very Low Frequency (VLF) and Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) radio receivers have been used extensively for remote sensing of the ionosphere and the magnetosphere. Among the phenomena that can be uniquely measured via ELF/VLF receivers are radio atmospherics, whistlers, electron precipitation, solar flares, sudden ionospheric disturbances, gravity waves, sprites, and cosmic gamma-ray flares. With the use of simple square air-core magnetic loop antennas of a couple of meters in size, the sensitivity of these instruments allows the measurement of magnetic fields as low as several tens of femtoTesla per root-Hz, in the frequency range of ~30 Hz to 50 kHz. This sensitivity well exceeds that required to detect any event above the ambient atmospheric noise floor, determined by the totality of lightning activity on the planet. In recent years, as cost of production, timing accuracy (due to low cost GPS clocks), and data handling flexibility of the systems has improved, it has become possible to distribute many of these instruments in the form of arrays, to perform interferometric and holographic imaging of the lower ionosphere. In the context of the IHY in 2007, the ELF/VLF receiver can used extensively as part of the United Nations initiative to place scientific instruments in developing countries. Stanford University's past experiences setting up arrays of ELF/VLF receivers include an interferometer in Alaska, the Holographic Array for Ionospheric and Lightning research (HAIL) consisting of instruments at 13 different high schools in mid-western United States, a broader set of ELF/VLF receivers in Alaska, and various receivers abroad, including in France, Japan, Greece, Turkey, Ireland, and India. A global network of ELF/VLF receivers offer possibilities for a wide range of scientific topics, as well as serving as a means for educational outreach. These goals will be achieved using the newest version of the Stanford VLF receiver, known as AWESOME

  3. Electron transport estimated from electron spectra using electron spectrometer in LFEX laser target experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, T.; Hata, M.; Matsuo, K.; Kojima, S.; Arikawa, Y.; Fujioka, S.; Sakagami, H.; Sunahara, A.; Nagatomo, H.; Johzaki, T.; Yogo, A.; Morace, A.; Zhang, Z.; Shiraga, H.; Sakata, S.; Nagai, T.; Abe, Y.; Lee, S.; Nakai, M.; Nishimura, H.; Azechi, H.; FIREX Group; GXII-LFEX Group

    2016-05-01

    Hot electrons which are generated from targets irradiated by a high-intense laser are measured by two electron spectrometers (ESMs). However, total electron energy observed by the ESM is only less than 1%. Hot electrons are confined by self-fields due to the huge current. When an external magnetic field of several hundred Tesla is applied during the laser irradiation on targets, the ESM signals always increase. In the simulation, the same result can be obtained. The reason is that the Alfvén limit can be mitigated due to the external longitudinal magnetic field.

  4. Adiabatic heating in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maetzler, C.; Bai, T.; Crannell, C. J.; Frost, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    The dynamic X-ray spectra of two simple, impulsive solar flares are examined together with H alpha, microwave and meter wave radio observations. X-ray spectra of both events were characteristic of thermal bremsstrahlung from single temperature plasmas. The symmetry between rise and fall was found to hold for the temperature and emission measure. The relationship between temperature and emission measure was that of an adiabatic compression followed by adiabatic expansion; the adiabatic index of 5/3 indicated that the electron distribution remained isotropic. Observations in H alpha provided further evidence for compressive energy transfer.

  5. Solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.

    1974-01-01

    A review of the knowledge about solar flares which has been obtained through observations from the earth and from space by various methods. High-resolution cinematography is best carried out at H-alpha wavelengths to reveal the structure, time history, and location of flares. The classification flares in H alpha according to either physical or morphological criteria is discussed. The study of flare morphology, which shows where, when, and how flares occur, is important for evaluating theories of flares. Consideration is given to studies of flares by optical spectroscopy, radio emissions, and at X-ray and XUV wavelengths. Research has shown where and possibly why flares occur, but the physics of the instability involved, of the particle acceleration, and of the heating are still not understood.

  6. Cumulant approach for electronic excitations in x-ray and electron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehr, J. J.

    A quantitative treatment of electronic excitations and other many-body effects in x-ray and electron spectra has long been challenging. Physically, electronic correlations and atomic vibrations lead to inelastic losses and damping effects that are ignored in ground state methods or approximations such as TDDFT. Quasi-particle (QP) approaches such as the GW approximation yield significant improvements, as demonstrated in real-space Green's function and GW/Bethe-Salpeter equation calculations, but still ignore multi-electron excitations. Recently such excitations have been treated with considerable success using cumulant expansion techniques and the quasi-boson approximation. In this beyond QP approach, excitations such as plasmons and electron-hole excitations appear as satellites in the spectral function. The method naturally accounts for multiple-satellites and can be extended to include extrinsic losses and interference effects. Extensions for effects of vibrations and strong correlations including charge-transfer satellites may also be possible. These advances are illustrated with a number of applications. Supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-97ER45623.

  7. Detailed Monte Carlo Simulation of electron transport and electron energy loss spectra.

    PubMed

    Attarian Shandiz, M; Salvat, F; Gauvin, R

    2016-11-01

    A computer program for detailed Monte Carlo simulation of the transport of electrons with kinetic energies in the range between about 0.1 and about 500 keV in bulk materials and in thin solid films is presented. Elastic scattering is described from differential cross sections calculated by the relativistic (Dirac) partial-wave expansion method with different models of the scattering potential. Inelastic interactions are simulated from an optical-data model based on an empirical optical oscillator strength that combines optical functions of the solid with atomic photoelectric data. The generalized oscillator strength is built from the adopted optical oscillator strength by using an extension algorithm derived from Lindhard's dielectric function for a free-electron gas. It is shown that simulated backscattering fractions of electron beams from bulk (semi-infinite) specimens are in good agreement with experimental data for beam energies from 0.1 keV up to about 100 keV. Simulations also yield transmitted and backscattered fractions of electron beams on thin solid films that agree closely with measurements for different film thicknesses and incidence angles. Simulated most probable deflection angles and depth-dose distributions also agree satisfactorily with measurements. Finally, electron energy loss spectra of several elemental solids are simulated and the effects of the beam energy and the foil thickness on the signal to background and signal to noise ratios are investigated. SCANNING 38:475-491, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Observations of the scatter-free solar-flare electrons in the energy range 20-1000 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Fisk, L. A.; Lin, R. P.

    1971-01-01

    Observations of the scatter-free electron events from solar active region McMath No. 8905 are presented. The measurements were made on Explorer 33 satellite. The data show that more than 80% of the electrons from these events undergo no or little scattering and that these electrons travel only approximately 1.5 a.u. between the sun and the earth. The duration of these events cannot be accounted fully by velocity dispersion alone. It is suggested that these electrons could be continuously injected into interplanetary medium for a time interval of approximately 2 to 3 minutes. Energy spectra of these electrons are discussed.

  9. The Energetics of White-light Flares Observed by SDO/HMI and RHESSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Neng-Yi; Xu, Yan; Wang, Haimin

    2016-11-01

    White-light (WL) flares have been observed and studied for more than a century since their first discovery. However, some fundamental physics behind the brilliant emission remains highly controversial. One of the important facts in addressing the flare energetics is the spatio-temporal correlation between the WL emission and the hard X-ray (HXR) radiation, presumably suggesting that energetic electrons are the energy sources. In this study, we present a statistical analysis of 25 strong flares (≥M5) observed simultaneously by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI), on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). Among these events, WL emission was detected by SDO/HMI in 13 flares, associated with HXR emission. To quantitatively describe the strength of WL emission, equivalent area (EA) is defined as the integrated contrast enhancement over the entire flaring area. Our results show that the EA is inversely proportional to the HXR power-law index, indicating that stronger WL emission tends to be associated with a larger population of high energy electrons. However, no obvious correlation is found between WL emission and flux of non-thermal electrons at 50 keV. For the other group of 13 flares without detectable WL emission, the HXR spectra are softer (larger power-law index) than those flares with WL emission, especially for the X-class flares in this group.

  10. Formation of the 0.511.-MeV line in solar flares. [statistical mechanics of line spectra for gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Joyce, G.; Ramaty, R.; Werntz, C.

    1976-01-01

    The gamma-ray line produced at 0.51-MeV was studied and is shown to be the result of either of free annihilation of positrons with electrons or of the decay of positronium by 2-photon emission. Positron annihilation from the bound state of positronium may also proceed by 3-photon emission, resulting in a continuum with energies up to 0.51-MeV. Accurate calculations of the rates of free annihilation and positronium formation in a solar-flare plasma are presented. Estimates of the positronium-formulation rates by charge exchange and the rates of dissociation and quenching are also considered. The temperature and density dependence of the ratio of 3-photon to 2-photon emission was obtained. It is shown that when the ratio of free electrons to neutral atoms in the plasma is approximately unity or greater, the Doppler width of the 0.51-MeV line is a function of the temperature of the annihilation region. For the small ion densities characteristics of the photosphere, the width is predominantly a function of the density.

  11. Momentum spectra for single and double electron ionization of He in relativistic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, C. J.; Olson, R. E.; Schmitt, W.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.

    1997-11-01

    The complete momentum spectra for single and double ionization of He by 1-GeV/u (β=0.88) U92+ have been investigated using a classical trajectory Monte Carlo method corrected for the relativistic projectile. The 1/r12 electron-electron interaction has been included in the post-collision region for double ionization to incorporate the effects of both the nuclear-electron and electron-electron ionizing interactions, and to access the effects of electron correlation in the electron spectra. Experimental measurements were able to determine the longitudinal momentum spectra for single ionization; these observations are in accordance with the theoretical predictions for the three-body momentum balance between projectile, recoil ion, and ionized electron. In particular, the Lorentz contraction of the Coulomb interaction of the projectile manifests itself in the decrease of the post-collision interaction of the projectile with the electron and recoil ion, causing them to recoil back-to-back as in the case for a short electromagnetic pulse. This feature is clearly displayed in both the theoretical and experimental longitudinal momentum spectra, and by comparing to calculations that are performed at the same collision speed but do not include the relativistic potentials. Moreover, collision plane spectra of the three particles demonstrate that the momenta of the recoil ion and ionized electron are preferentially equal, and opposite, to each other. The electron spectra for double ionization show that the inclusion of the electron-electron interaction in the post-collision regime partitions the combined ionization momentum of the electrons so that the electrons are preferentially emitted in opposite azimuthal angles to one another. This is in contrast to calculations made assuming independent electrons.

  12. Measurements of Absolute Abundances in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Harry P.

    2014-05-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines (Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias (f). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature, it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is f = 1.17 ± 0.22. This analysis suggests that the bulk of the plasma evaporated during a flare comes from deep in the chromosphere, below the region where elemental fractionation occurs.

  13. MEASUREMENTS OF ABSOLUTE ABUNDANCES IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Harry P.

    2014-05-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines (Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias (f). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature, it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is f = 1.17 ± 0.22. This analysis suggests that the bulk of the plasma evaporated during a flare comes from deep in the chromosphere, below the region where elemental fractionation occurs.

  14. On Possible Manifestation of Non-Thermal Electrons in the Hα/Hβ Line Profile Ratio in the June 26, 1999 Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotrc, P.; Kashapova, L. K.

    2006-08-01

    We analyzed the solar flare on 26 June 1999 which consisted of three subsequent phases. All of them were followed by events of quite different types (Kotrc et al., IAU Symp 223, 2004). Just the second phase of the flare was accompanied by radio bursts and HXR emission that could be considered as an indirect evidence of accelerated non-thermal particle beams. Theoretical calculations of thermal mechanisms coupled with accelerated electron beams in flares showed that the ratio of the Hα/Hβ line profiles could be a possible indicator whether a mechanism of non-thermal radiation excitation was present or absent (Kasparova & Heinzel, A&A, 2002). This effect should follow the occurrence of the particle beams in time and then decay. In the flare kernel associated thus possibly with the influence of non-thermal electron beams we found that the ratio of the Hα/Hβ line profiles demonstrated a very specific form which substantially differs from those ones obtained in "thermal" kernels (occurring in the first and in the another flare phases). This effect can be characterized by presence of specific "sidelobes" occurring in the ratio of the line profiles. The effect was observed in the region nearby the HXR sourcelocation where it appeared just after the end of the radio-spectrum spike and therefore it corresponds most probably to the occurrence of non-thermal processes in the flare. The associated HXR effect was rather short lasting, i.e. the effect of "sidelobes" disappeared earlier then the emission. We try to trace the evolution and the possible decay of this effect. On one hand the obtained results will be an additional evidence of the theoretical predictions, on the other hand they could be useful for development of technique for detecting the presence or absence of the non-thermal electron beams. Conclusions are discussed both from their observational and theoretical aspects.

  15. Investigations of turbulent motions and particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakimiec, J.; Fludra, A.; Lemen, J. R.; Dennis, B. R.; Sylwester, J.

    1986-01-01

    Investigations of X-raya spectra of solar flares show that intense random (turbulent) motions are present in hot flare plasma. Here it is argued that the turbulent motions are of great importance for flare development. They can efficiently enhance flare energy release and accelerate particles to high energies.

  16. Analytic and numerical calculations of quantum synchrotron spectra from relativistic electron distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, J. J.; Petrosian, V.

    1987-01-01

    Calculations are performed numerically and analytically of synchrotron spectra for thermal and power-law electron distributions using the single-particle synchrotron power spectrum derived from quantum electrodynamics. It is found that the photon energy at which quantum effects appear is proportional to temperature and independent of field strength for thermal spectra; quantum effects introduce an exponential roll-off away from the classical spectra. For power law spectra, the photon energy at which quantum effects appear is inversely proportional to the magnetic field strength; quantum effects produce a steeper power law than is found classically. The results are compared with spectra derived from the classical power spectrum with an energy cutoff ensuring conservation of energy. It is found that an energy cutoff is generally an inadequate approximation of quantum effects for low photon energies and for thermal spectra, but gives reasonable results for high-energy emission from power-law electron distributions.

  17. Relationship of solar flare accelerated particles to solar energetic particles (SEPs) observed in the interplanetary medium

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, R.P.

    2005-08-01

    Observations of hard X-ray (HXR)/gamma-ray continuum and gamma-ray lines produced by energetic electrons and ions, respectively, colliding with the solar atmosphere, have shown that large solar flares can accelerate ions up to many GeV and electrons up to hundreds of MeV. Solar energetic particles (SEPs) are observed by spacecraft near 1 AU and by ground-based instrumentation to extend up to similar energies, but these appear to be accelerated by shocks associated with fast Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). The Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) mission provides high-resolution spectroscopy and imaging of flare HXRs and gamma-rays. Here we review RHESSI observations for large solar flares and SEP events. The 23 July gamma-ray line flare was associated with a fast, wide CME but no SEPs were observed, while the 21 April 2002 flare had no detectable gamma-ray line emission but a fast CME and strong SEP event were observed. The October- November 2003 series of large flares and associated fast CMEs produced both gamma-ray line emission and strong SEP events. The spectra of flare-accelerated protons, inferred from the gamma-ray line emission observed by RHESSI, is found to be essentially identical to the spectra of the SEPs observed near 1 AU for the well-connected 2 November and 20 January events.

  18. Nuclear processes and accelerated particles in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear processes and particle acceleration in solar flares are discussed and the theory of gamma-ray and neutron production is reviewed. Gamma-ray, neutron, and charged-particle observations of solar flares are compared with predictions, and the implications of these comparisons for particle energy spectra, total numbers, anisotropies, electron-to-proton ratios, and acceleration mechanisms are considered. Elemental and isotopic abundances of the ambient gas derived from gamma-ray observations have also been compared to abundances obtained from observations of escaping accelerated particles and other sources.

  19. HARD X-RAY AND MICROWAVE EMISSIONS FROM SOLAR FLARES WITH HARD SPECTRAL INDICES

    SciTech Connect

    Kawate, T.; Nishizuka, N.; Oi, A.; Ohyama, M.; Nakajima, H.

    2012-03-10

    We analyze 10 flare events that radiate intense hard X-ray (HXR) emission with significant photons over 300 keV to verify that the electrons that have a common origin of acceleration mechanism and energy power-law distribution with solar flares emit HXRs and microwaves. Most of these events have the following characteristics. HXRs emanate from the footpoints of flare loops, while microwaves emanate from the tops of flare loops. The time profiles of the microwave emission show delays of peak with respect to those of the corresponding HXR emission. The spectral indices of microwave emissions show gradual hardening in all events, while the spectral indices of the corresponding HXR emissions are roughly constant in most of the events, though rather rapid hardening is simultaneously observed in some for both indices during the onset time and the peak time. These characteristics suggest that the microwave emission emanates from the trapped electrons. Then, taking into account the role of the trapping of electrons for the microwave emission, we compare the observed microwave spectra with the model spectra calculated by a gyrosynchrotron code. As a result, we successfully reproduce the eight microwave spectra. From this result, we conclude that the electrons that have a common acceleration and a common energy distribution with solar flares emit both HXR and microwave emissions in the eight events, though microwave emission is contributed to by electrons with much higher energy than HXR emission.

  20. Electronic structure and TDDFT optical absorption spectra of silver nanorods.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Hannah E; Aikens, Christine M

    2009-04-23

    Density functional theory calculations are employed to determine optimized geometries and excitation spectra for small pentagonal silver nanorods Ag(n), with n = 13, 19, 25, 31, 37, 43, 49, 55, 61, and 67 in various charge states. The asymptotically correct SAOP functional is utilized in the excitation calculations. Silver nanorods exhibit a sharp longitudinal excitation that results from a mixture of orbital transitions; the wavelength for this excitation depends linearly on the length of the nanorod. The broad transverse excitation arises from multiple excited states. A particle-in-a-box model is employed to explain the linear dependence of the longitudinal excitation wavelength on nanorod length.

  1. Dynamics of Quantal Heating in Electron Systems with Discrete Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, William; Dietrich, Scott; Vitkalov, Sergey; Bykov, Alexey

    2015-03-01

    The temporal evolution of quantal Joule heating of 2D electrons in GaAs quantum well placed in quantizing magnetic fields is studied using a difference frequency method. The method is based on measurements of the electron conductivity oscillating at the beat frequency f =f1 -f2 between two microwaves applied to 2D system at frequencies f1 and f2. The method provides direct access to the dynamical characteristics of the heating and yields the inelastic scattering time τin of 2D electrons. The obtained τin is strongly temperature dependent, varying from 0.13 ns at 5.5K to 1 ns at 2.4K in magnetic field B=0.333T. When temperature T exceeds the Landau level separation the relaxation rate 1 /τin is proportional to T2, indicating the electron-electron interaction as the dominant mechanism limiting the quantal heating. At lower temperatures the rate tends to be proportional to T3, indicating considerable contribution from electron-phonon scattering. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation (DMR 1104503), the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project no.14-02-01158) and the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation.

  2. Instability of Electrons Trapped by the Coronal Magnetic Field and Its Evidence in the Fine Structure (Zebra Pattern) of Solar Radio Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlotnik, E. Y.

    2013-06-01

    Solar radio emission is a significant source of information regarding coronal plasma parameters and the processes occurring in the solar atmosphere. High resolution frequency, space, and time observations together with the developed theory make it possible to retrieve physical conditions in the radiation source and recognize the radiation mechanisms responsible for various kinds of solar radio emission. In particular, the high brightness temperature of many bursts testifies to coherent radiation mechanisms, that is, to plasma instabilities in the corona. As an example, the fine structure of solar radio spectra looking like a set of quasi-harmonic stripes of enhanced and lowered radiation, which is observed against the type IV continuum at the post-flare phase of activity, is considered. It is shown that such emission arises from a trap-like source filled with a weakly anisotropic equilibrium plasma and a small addition of electrons which have a shortage of small velocities perpendicular to the magnetic field. For many recorded events with the mentioned fine spectral structure the instability processes responsible for the observed features are recognized. Namely, the background type IV continuum is due to the loss-cone instability of hot non-equilibrium electrons, and the enhanced striped radiation results from the double-plasma-resonance effect in the regions where the plasma frequency f p coincides with the harmonics of electron gyrofrequency f B ; f p= sf B . Estimations of the electron number density and magnetic field in the coronal magnetic traps, as well as the electron number density and velocities of hot electrons necessary to excite the radiation with the observed fine structure, are given. It is also shown that in some cases several ensembles of non-equilibrium electrons can coexist in magnetic traps during solar flares and that its radio signature sensitively depends on the parameters of the distribution functions of the various ensembles.

  3. Particle Acceleration in Solar Flares and Associated CME Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosian, Vahé

    2016-10-01

    Observations relating the characteristics of electrons seen near Earth (solar energetic particles [SEPs]) and those producing flare radiation show that in certain (prompt) events the origin of both populations appears to be the flare site, which shows strong correlation between the number and spectral index of SEP and hard X-ray radiating electrons, but in others (delayed), which are associated with fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs), this relation is complex and SEPs tend to be harder. Prompt event spectral relation disagrees with that expected in thick or thin target models. We show that using a more accurate treatment of the transport of the accelerated electrons to the footpoints and to Earth can account for this discrepancy. Our results are consistent with those found by Chen & Petrosian for two flares using nonparametric inversion methods, according to which we have weak diffusion conditions, and trapping mediated by magnetic field convergence. The weaker correlations and harder spectra of delayed events can come about by reacceleration of electrons in the CME shock environment. We describe under what conditions such a hardening can be achieved. Using this (acceleration at the flare and reacceleration in the CME) scenario, we show that we can describe the similar dichotomy that exists between the so-called impulsive, highly enriched (3He and heavy ions), and softer SEP events and stronger, more gradual SEP events with near-normal ionic abundances and harder spectra. These methods can be used to distinguish the acceleration mechanisms and to constrain their characteristics.

  4. Electronic absorption spectra of hydrogenated protonated naphthalene and proflavine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaca, A.; Bilalbegović, G.

    2011-09-01

    We study hydrogenated cations of two polycyclic hydrocarbon molecules as models of hydrogenated organic species that form in the interstellar medium. Optical spectra of the hydrogenated naphthalene cation Hn-C10H+8 for n= 1, 2 and 10, as well as the astrobiologically interesting hydrogenated proflavine cation Hn-C13H11N+3 for n= 1 and 14, are calculated. The pseudopotential time-dependent density functional theory is used. It is found that the fully hydrogenated proflavine cation H14-C13H11N+3 shows a broad spectrum in which the positions of individual lines are almost lost. The positions, shapes and intensities of lines change in hydronaphthalene and hydroproflavine cations, showing that hydrogen additions induce substantially different optical spectra in comparison with base polycyclic hydrocarbon cations. One calculated line in the visible spectrum of H10-C10H+8 and one in the visible spectrum of H-C13H11N+3 are close to the measured diffuse interstellar bands. We also present the positions of near-ultraviolet lines.

  5. Track Structure Model for Radial Distributions of Electron Spectra and Event Spectra from High-Energy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Katz, R.; Wilson, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    An analytic method is described for evaluating the average radial electron spectrum and the radial and total frequency-event spectrum for high-energy ions. For high-energy ions, indirect events make important contributions to frequency-event spectra. The method used for evaluating indirect events is to fold the radial electron spectrum with measured frequency-event spectrum for photons or electrons. The contribution from direct events is treated using a spatially restricted linear energy transfer (LET). We find that high-energy heavy ions have a significantly reduced frequency-averaged final energy (yF) compared to LET, while relativistic protons have a significantly increased yF and dose-averaged lineal energy (yD) for typical site sizes used in tissue equivalent proportional counters. Such differences represent important factors in evaluating event spectra with laboratory beams, in space- flight, or in atmospheric radiation studies and in validation of radiation transport codes. The inadequacy of LET as descriptor because of deviations in values of physical quantities, such as track width, secondary electron spectrum, and yD for ions of identical LET is also discussed.

  6. Pulsed HF radiowave absorption measurements at 2.1 MHZ. over Delhi under quiet and solar flare conditions and related electron density height profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandra Swamy, A. C.

    EXTENDED ABSTRACT Pulsed HF radiowave absorption measurements at 2.1 MHZ. over Delhi under quiet and solar flare conditions and related electron density height profiles A.C.Balachandra swmay & Late C.S.G.K. Setty Absorption of radio waves in the ionosphere is of great practical importance for radio communication and navigation systems. The first attempt to measure the absolute magnitude of the radiowave absorption were made by appletion and Ratcliffe (1930) using the frequency change method for medium frequency waves reflected from the E-region. They concluded from their experiment that the main part of the attenuation occurred below the reflection level and named the absorption region, D-region of the ionosphere. One of the basic properties of the ionosphere is the absorption of high Frequency Radiowaves. HF radiowave absorption results mainly from collisions between electrons (which are set into forced oscillations by the electric field of the wave) and neutral air particles, the RF energy abstracted from the wave being converted into thermal energy. The radiowave absorption in the ionosphere depends on electron density and collision frequency. The most important absorbing regions are the D-region and the lower E-region (50-100 Km.) The regular diurnal variation of the electron density in this height range is caused mainly by the changes in the depth of penetration of solar XUV radiations with solar zenith angle under quiet solar conditions. In 1937 Dellinger J.H.identified fade outs in high frequency radio circuits as due to abnormal ionospheric absorption associated with solar flares. The onset of the fade out was usually rapid and the duration was typically tens of minutes like that of the visible flare, because of the sudden onset, the immediate effects of solar flares are known collectively as sudden Ionospheric Disturbances (STD). The phenomenon discovered by Dellinger is usually called a short Wave Fadeout(SWF). Since the SWF is due to abnormal absorption

  7. Analysis of flares in the chromosphere and corona of main- and pre-main-sequence M-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo-Chacón, I.

    2015-11-01

    having an accretion disk) we carry out a detailed analysis of an extremely long rise phase and of a shorter, weaker flare (allowing us to compare the results with those reported for young stars but surrounded by disks). Assuming multitemperature models to describe the coronal flaring plasma, we have calculated the metal abundance, the electron temperatures and the respective emission measures by fitting the spectra with the Astrophysical Plasma Emission Code included in the XSPEC software, which calculates spectral models for hot, optically thin plasmas. Moreover, we are able to estimate the size of the flaring loops by using theoretical models. These sizes give us an idea about the extent of the corona. For those flares in which heating does not entirely drive the flare evolution we use the models reported by Reale (2007) and Reale et al. (1997) for the rise and decay phases, respectively, including the effect of sustained heating during the decay. Instead, the stellar version of the Kopp & Poletto (1984)'s solar two-ribbon flare model (Poletto et al. 1988) is used when the residual heating completely drives the flare over the plasma cooling. Later, we apply the so-called RTV scaling laws (Rosner et al. 1978) and other fundamental laws of physics to determine additional characteristics of the plasma contained in the flaring loops (electron density and pressure), as well as the volume of the flaring region, the heating rate per unit volume, and the strength of the magnetic field required to confine this plasma. Making some assumptions we are also able to estimate the number of loops involved in the observed flares and the kind of magnetic structures present in the atmosphere of these types of stars. Finally, we discuss and interpret the results in the context of solar and stellar flares reported so far.

  8. Discovery of the Electronic Spectra of Hps and Dps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimminger, Robert A.; Wei, Jie; Ellis, Blaine; Clouthier, Dennis J.; Wang, Zhong; Sears, Trevor

    2009-06-01

    The hitherto unknown electronic spectrum of the closed shell transient molecule HPS has been observed in the 685 - 846 nm region by laser-induced fluorescence and single vibronic level emission techniques. HPS (and DPS) were produced in a pulsed electric discharge jet using a precursor mixture of 3% PH_3 and 1% H_2S (or PD_3 and D_2S) in high pressure argon. The weak set of observed bands are assigned to the à ^1A^''-X˜ ^1A^' electronic transition on the basis of chemical evidence, isotope shifts and the correspondence of the vibrational frequencies, excitation energy, and band contours with predictions based on our own high level ab initio calculations. Theory predicts that the HPS bond angle decreases on electronic excitation, contrary to expectations based on Walsh diagrams.

  9. Substorm effects in auroral spectra. [electron spectrum hardening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eather, R. H.; Mende, S. B.

    1973-01-01

    A substorm time parameter is defined and used to order a large body of photometric data obtained on aircraft expeditions at high latitudes. The statistical analysis demonstrates hardening of the electron spectrum at the time of substorm, and it is consistent with the accepted picture of poleward expansion of aurora at the time of substorm and curvature drift of substorm-injected electrons. These features are not evident from a similar analysis in terms of magnetic time. We conclude that the substorm time concept is a useful ordering parameter for auroral data.

  10. RELATION BETWEEN THE CORONAL MASS EJECTION ACCELERATION AND THE NON-THERMAL FLARE CHARACTERISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Berkebile-Stoiser, S.; Veronig, A. M.; Bein, B. M.; Temmer, M.

    2012-07-01

    We investigate the relationship between the main acceleration phase of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and the particle acceleration in the associated flares as evidenced in Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager non-thermal X-rays for a set of 37 impulsive flare-CME events. Both the CME peak velocity and peak acceleration yield distinct correlations with various parameters characterizing the flare-accelerated electron spectra. The highest correlation coefficient is obtained for the relation of the CME peak velocity and the total energy in accelerated electrons (c = 0.85), supporting the idea that the acceleration of the CME and the particle acceleration in the associated flare draw their energy from a common source, probably magnetic reconnection in the current sheet behind the erupting structure. In general, the CME peak velocity shows somewhat higher correlations with the non-thermal flare parameters than the CME peak acceleration, except for the spectral index of the accelerated electron spectrum, which yields a higher correlation with the CME peak acceleration (c Almost-Equal-To -0.6), indicating that the hardness of the flare-accelerated electron spectrum is tightly coupled to the impulsive acceleration process of the rising CME structure. We also obtained high correlations between the CME initiation height h{sub 0} and the non-thermal flare parameters, with the highest correlation of h{sub 0} to the spectral index {delta} of flare-accelerated electrons (c Almost-Equal-To 0.8). This means that CMEs erupting at low coronal heights, i.e., in regions of stronger magnetic fields, are accompanied by flares that are more efficient at accelerating electrons to high energies. In the majority of events ({approx}80%), the non-thermal flare emission starts after the CME acceleration, on average delayed by Almost-Equal-To 6 minutes, in line with the standard flare model where the rising flux rope stretches the field lines underneath until magnetic

  11. Electronic and Vibrational Spectra of InP Quantum Dots Formed by Sequential Ion Implantation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, C.; Mu, R.; Tung, Y. S.; Ueda, A.; Henderson, D. O.; White, C. W.

    1997-01-01

    We have performed sequential ion implantation of indium and phosphorus into silica combined with controlled thermal annealing to fabricate InP quantum dots in a dielectric host. Electronic and vibrational spectra were measured for the as-implanted and annealed samples. The annealed samples show a peak in the infrared spectra near 320/cm which is attributed to a surface phonon mode and is in good agreement with the value calculated from Frolich's theory of surface phonon polaritons. The electronic spectra show the development of a band near 390 nm that is attributed to quantum confined InP.

  12. Electronic Spectra of Bare and Solvated Ruthenium Polypyridine Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shuang; Smith, James E. T.; Weber, J. Mathias

    2016-06-01

    We present work on a prototypical water oxidation catalyst, namely the aqua-complex [(bpy)(tpy)Ru-OH_2]2+ (2,2'-bpy = bipyridine, tpy = 2,2':6',2"-terpyridine), and its hydrated clusters [(bpy)(tpy)Ru-OH_2]2+ ·(H2O)_n, with n = 1 - 4. This complex is the starting species in a catalytic cycle for water oxidation. We couple electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with laser spectroscopy to circumvent challenges that arise in reactive solutions from speciation. Here, we report the electronic spectrum of [(bpy)(tpy)Ru-OH_2]2+ by photodissociation spectroscopy of mass selected, cryogenically prepared ions, and we examine effects of its microhydration environment on its electronic structure. In particular, we investigate the solvatochromic shift of the spectral envelope upon sequential addition of water molecules up to the tetrahydrate.

  13. Understanding X-Ray Source Motions in a Solar Flare Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Sui, L.; Dennis, B. R.

    2006-06-01

    RHESSI images of a solar flare on 2002 November 28 showed a 3-6 keV hard X-ray source that was initially located at the flare loop top, split and propagated to the foot points of the loop during the flare rise phase, and then propagated back up to the loop top during the declining phase of the flare (Sui, Holman, & Dennis 2006). Higher energy X-ray sources were located lower in the legs of the loop during this period of source evolution, with X-rays above 25 keV seen only at the foot points. Sui, Holman, & Dennis suggested that this spatial evolution reflected the evolution of the spectral index and low-energy cutoff to the distribution of accelerated electrons in the flare.We construct a model flare loop and electron distribution injected at the top of this loop to reproduce the source evolution of the November 28 flare. We determine the constraints on the loop model and the evolution of the accelerated electron distribution. We also study the implications of the model for energy deposition into the loop plasma, and the integrated and imaged X-ray spectra.This work is supported in part by the RHESSI Project and the NASA Guest Investigator Program.

  14. Understanding X-Ray Source Motions in a Solar Flare Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Sui, L.; Dennis, B. R.

    2006-01-01

    RHESSI images of a solar flare on 2002 November 28 showed a 3-6 keV hard X-ray source that was initially located at the flare loop top, split and propagated to the foot points of the loop during the flare rise phase, and then propagated back up to the loop top during the declining phase of the flare (Sai, Holman, & Dennis 2006). Higher energy X-ray sources were located lower in the legs of the loop during this period of source evolution, with X-rays above 25 keV seen only at the foot points. Sui, Holman, & Dennis suggested that this spatial evolution reflected the evolution of the spectral index and low-energy cutoff to the distribution of accelerated electrons in the flare. We construct a model flare loop and electron distribution injected at the top of this loop to reproduce the source evolution of the November 28 flare. We determine the constraints on the loop model and the evolution of the accelerated electron distribution. We also study the implications of the model for energy deposition into the loop plasma, and the integrated and imaged X-ray spectra. This work is supported in part by the RHESSI Project and the NASA Guest Investigator Program.

  15. Effects of intermolecular interaction on inelastic electron tunneling spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kula, Mathias; Luo, Yi

    2008-02-01

    We have examined the effects of intermolecular interactions on the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) of model systems: a pair of benzenethiol or a pair of benzenedithiol sandwiched between gold electrodes. The dependence of the IETS on the mutual position of and distance between the paired molecules has been predicted and discussed in detailed. It is shown that, although in most cases, there are clear spectral fingerprints present which allow identification of the actual structures of the molecules inside the junction. Caution must be exercised since some characteristic lines can disappear at certain symmetries. The importance of theoretical simulation is emphasized.

  16. X-ray spectra from the Cornell Electron-Beam Ion Source (CEBIS I)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Kostroun, V.O.; Ghanbari, E.; Janson, S.W.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation emitted from the Cornell electron beam ion source (CEBIS I) has been surveyed with a Si(Li) x-ray detector. These spectra can be used to estimate backgrounds from electron bremsstrahlung and to evaluate the feasibility of atomic physics experiments using the CEBIS I source in this configuration. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  17. Reliable modeling of the electronic spectra of realistic uranium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tecmer, Paweł; Govind, Niranjan; Kowalski, Karol; de Jong, Wibe A.; Visscher, Lucas

    2013-07-01

    We present an EOMCCSD (equation of motion coupled cluster with singles and doubles) study of excited states of the small [UO2]2+ and [UO2]+ model systems as well as the larger UVIO2(saldien) complex. In addition, the triples contribution within the EOMCCSDT and CR-EOMCCSD(T) (completely renormalized EOMCCSD with non-iterative triples) approaches for the [UO2]2+ and [UO2]+ systems as well as the active-space variant of the CR-EOMCCSD(T) method—CR-EOMCCSd(t)—for the UVIO2(saldien) molecule are investigated. The coupled cluster data were employed as benchmark to choose the "best" appropriate exchange-correlation functional for subsequent time-dependent density functional (TD-DFT) studies on the transition energies for closed-shell species. Furthermore, the influence of the saldien ligands on the electronic structure and excitation energies of the [UO2]+ molecule is discussed. The electronic excitations as well as their oscillator dipole strengths modeled with TD-DFT approach using the CAM-B3LYP exchange-correlation functional for the [UVO2(saldien)]- with explicit inclusion of two dimethyl sulfoxide molecules are in good agreement with the experimental data of Takao et al. [Inorg. Chem. 49, 2349 (2010), 10.1021/ic902225f].

  18. Flare energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Dejager, C.; Dennis, B. R.; Hudson, H. S.; Simnett, G. M.; Strong, K. T.; Bentley, R. D.; Bornmann, P. L.; Bruner, M. E.; Cargill, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    In this investigation of flare energetics, researchers sought to establish a comprehensive and self-consistent picture of the sources and transport of energy within a flare. To achieve this goal, they chose five flares in 1980 that were well observed with instruments on the Solar Maximum Mission, and with other space-borne and ground-based instruments. The events were chosen to represent various types of flares. Details of the observations available for them and the corresponding physical parameters derived from these data are presented. The flares were studied from two perspectives, the impulsive and gradual phases, and then the results were compared to obtain the overall picture of the energics of these flares. The role that modeling can play in estimating the total energy of a flare when the observationally determined parameters are used as the input to a numerical model is discussed. Finally, a critique of the current understanding of flare energetics and the methods used to determine various energetics terms is outlined, and possible future directions of research in this area are suggested.

  19. Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    Because the Earth resides in the atmosphere of our nearest stellar neighbor, events occurring on the Sun's surface directly affect us by interfering with satellite operations and communications, astronaut safety, and, in extreme circumstances, power grid stability. Solar flares, the most energetic events in our solar system, are a substantial source of hazardous space weather affecting our increasingly technology-dependent society. While flares have been observed using ground-based telescopes for over 150 years, modern space-bourne observatories have provided nearly continuous multi-wavelength flare coverage that cannot be obtained from the ground. We can now probe the origins and evolution of flares by tracking particle acceleration, changes in ionized plasma, and the reorganization of magnetic fields. I will walk through our current understanding of why flares occur and how they affect the Earth and also show several examples of these fantastic explosions.

  20. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  1. Simulation of electron energy loss spectra of nanomaterials with linear-scaling density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, E. W.; Ratcliff, L. E.; Payne, M. C.; Haynes, P. D.; Hine, N. D. M.

    2016-05-01

    Experimental techniques for electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) combine high energy resolution with high spatial resolution. They are therefore powerful tools for investigating the local electronic structure of complex systems such as nanostructures, interfaces and even individual defects. Interpretation of experimental electron energy loss spectra is often challenging and can require theoretical modelling of candidate structures, which themselves may be large and complex, beyond the capabilities of traditional cubic-scaling density functional theory. In this work, we present functionality to compute electron energy loss spectra within the onetep linear-scaling density functional theory code. We first demonstrate that simulated spectra agree with those computed using conventional plane wave pseudopotential methods to a high degree of precision. The ability of onetep to tackle large problems is then exploited to investigate convergence of spectra with respect to supercell size. Finally, we apply the novel functionality to a study of the electron energy loss spectra of defects on the (1 0 1) surface of an anatase slab and determine concentrations of defects which might be experimentally detectable.

  2. Lunar surface cosmic ray experiment. [including solar flare studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, P. B.

    1974-01-01

    The galactic cosmic ray and solar flare experiment on Apollo 16 is reported. The published papers presented describe the experiment, equipment, data processing techniques, and operational history. The principle findings include: (1) The composition of heavy ions in interplanetary space at energies between approximately 30 and 130 MeV/nucleon is the same, within experimental errors. (2) The ability of a Lexan stack to determine simultaneously the energy spectra of major elements from He up to Fe in the energy interval 0.2 to 30 MeV/nucleon revealed systematic changes in the composition of solar flare particles as a function of energy. (3) Heavy ions emitted in a solar flare appear to be completely stripped of electrons, and are not in charge equilibrium at the time of acceleration and releases from the sun.

  3. M DWARF FLARE CONTINUUM VARIATIONS ON ONE-SECOND TIMESCALES: CALIBRATING AND MODELING OF ULTRACAM FLARE COLOR INDICES

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hilton, Eric J.; Wisniewski, John P.; Dhillon, Vik S.; Marsh, Tom R.; Brown, Benjamin P.

    2016-04-01

    We present a large data set of high-cadence dMe flare light curves obtained with custom continuum filters on the triple-beam, high-speed camera system ULTRACAM. The measurements provide constraints for models of the near-ultraviolet (NUV) and optical continuum spectral evolution on timescales of ≈1 s. We provide a robust interpretation of the flare emission in the ULTRACAM filters using simultaneously obtained low-resolution spectra during two moderate-sized flares in the dM4.5e star YZ CMi. By avoiding the spectral complexity within the broadband Johnson filters, the ULTRACAM filters are shown to characterize bona fide continuum emission in the NUV, blue, and red wavelength regimes. The NUV/blue flux ratio in flares is equivalent to a Balmer jump ratio, and the blue/red flux ratio provides an estimate for the color temperature of the optical continuum emission. We present a new “color–color” relationship for these continuum flux ratios at the peaks of the flares. Using the RADYN and RH codes, we interpret the ULTRACAM filter emission using the dominant emission processes from a radiative-hydrodynamic flare model with a high nonthermal electron beam flux, which explains a hot, T ≈ 10{sup 4} K, color temperature at blue-to-red optical wavelengths and a small Balmer jump ratio as observed in moderate-sized and large flares alike. We also discuss the high time resolution, high signal-to-noise continuum color variations observed in YZ CMi during a giant flare, which increased the NUV flux from this star by over a factor of 100.

  4. Electronic Spectra of Some Linear Triatomic Molecules Containing Transition Metal Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merer, Anthony J.

    2000-06-01

    Gerhard Herzberg was always interested in obtaining spectra of new free radicals, and he was particularly skilled at identifying the carriers from internal evidence such as missing lines, rotational constants and the numbers of different spectra that appeared on isotope substitution. Our recent sub-Doppler experiments with transition metals show that nuclear hyperfine structure provides another piece of evidence, of the type which Herzberg would have appreciated. Laser ablation of group 4-6 metals in the presence of methane has led to the discovery of the family of the simplest possible organometallic compounds, linear triatomic molecules with the formula MCH. These are unstable free radicals which have extensive electronic spectra in the visible and near infra-red; the spectra are very complicated because of strong vibronic coupling between the close-lying electronic states, but the molecular structures and vibrational frequencies can be obtained from them.

  5. Fermi-LAT Observations of High-energy Behind-the-limb Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Ciprini, S.; Costanza, F.; Cutini, S.; D’Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Grenier, I. A.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kashapova, L.; Krucker, S.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Liu, W.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J. D.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Pal’shin, V.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Principe, G.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, O.; Rubio da Costa, F.; Sgrò, C.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Tajima, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Torres, D. F.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.

    2017-02-01

    We report on the Fermi-LAT detection of high-energy emission from the behind-the-limb (BTL) solar flares that occurred on 2013 October 11, and 2014 January 6 and September 1. The Fermi-LAT observations are associated with flares from active regions originating behind both the eastern and western limbs, as determined by STEREO. All three flares are associated with very fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and strong solar energetic particle events. We present updated localizations of the >100 MeV photon emission, hard X-ray (HXR) and EUV images, and broadband spectra from 10 keV to 10 GeV, as well as microwave spectra. We also provide a comparison of the BTL flares detected by Fermi-LAT with three on-disk flares and present a study of some of the significant quantities of these flares as an attempt to better understand the acceleration mechanisms at work during these occulted flares. We interpret the HXR emission to be due to electron bremsstrahlung from a coronal thin-target loop top with the accelerated electron spectra steepening at semirelativistic energies. The >100 MeV gamma-rays are best described by a pion-decay model resulting from the interaction of protons (and other ions) in a thick-target photospheric source. The protons are believed to have been accelerated (to energies >10 GeV) in the CME environment and precipitate down to the photosphere from the downstream side of the CME shock and landed on the front side of the Sun, away from the original flare site and the HXR emission.

  6. Effect of electron beam pulse width on time-of-flight spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misakian, M.; Mumma, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    A simple but useful formula describing the effect of electron gun pulse width on the time of flight (TOF) spectra measured in translational spectroscopy experiments is developed. An approximately monoenergetic pulsed electrostatically focused electron beam traverses a scattering cell filled with a Maxwellian gas. Inelastic electron collisions with the gas produce metastable particles, ions, scattered electrons, and photons which then pass through a collimating slit system at right angles to the electron beam. TOF techniques are used to separate the photon signal from the metastable particle signal and to measure the TOF distribution of the metastable species.

  7. The electronic absorption spectra of pyridine azides, solvent-solute interaction.

    PubMed

    Abu-Eittah, Rafie H; Khedr, Mahmoud K

    2009-01-01

    The electronic absorption spectra of: 2-, 3-, and 4-azidopyridines have been investigated in a wide variety of polar and non-polar solvents. According to Onsager model, the studied spectra indicate that the orientation polarization of solvent dipoles affects the electronic spectrum much stronger than the induction polarization of solvent dipoles. The effect of solvent dipole moment predominates that of solvent refractive index in determining the values of band maxima of an electronic spectrum. The spectra of azidopyridines differ basically from these of pyridine or mono-substituted pyridine. Results at hand indicate that the azide group perturbs the pyridine ring in the case of 3-azidopyridine much more than it does in the case of 2-azidopyridine. This result agrees with the predictions of the resonance theory. Although the equilibrium <==> azide tetrazole is well known, yet the observed spectra prove that such an equilibrium does not exist at the studied conditions. The spectra of the studied azidopyridines are characterized by the existence of overlapping transitions. Gaussian analysis is used to obtain nice, resolved spectra. All the observed bands correspond to pi-->pi* transitions, n-->pi* may be overlapped with the stronger pi-->pi* ones.

  8. Complex time dependent wave packet technique for thermal equilibrium systems - Electronic spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reimers, J. R.; Wilson, K. R.; Heller, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    A time dependent wave packet method is presented for the rapid calculation of the properties of systems in thermal equilibrium and is applied, as an illustration, to electronic spectra. The thawed Gaussian approximation to quantum wave packet dynamics combined with evaluation of the density matrix operator by imaginary time propagation is shown to give exact electronic spectra for harmonic potentials and excellent results for both a Morse potential and for the band contours of the three transitions of the visible electronic absorption spectrum of the iodine molecule. The method, in principle, can be extended to many atoms (e.g., condensed phases) and to other properties (e.g., infrared and Raman spectra and thermodynamic variables).

  9. Quantitative analysis of flare accelerated electrons through their hard X-ray and microwave radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, K. L.; Trottet, G.

    1985-01-01

    Hard X-ray and microwave modelling that takes into account the temporal evolution of the electron spectrum as well as the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field and the ambient medium in the radio source is presented. This method is illustrated for the June 29 1980 10:41 UT event. The implication on the process of acceleration/injection is discussed.

  10. Two-dimensional electronic spectra of the photosynthetic apparatus of green sulfur bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Tobias; Rodriguez, Mirta

    2017-01-01

    Advances in time resolved spectroscopy have provided new insight into the energy transmission in natural photosynthetic complexes. Novel theoretical tools and models are being developed in order to explain the experimental results. We provide a model calculation for the two-dimensional electronic spectra of Cholorobaculum tepidum which correctly describes the main features and transfer time scales found in recent experiments. From our calculation one can infer the coupling of the antenna chlorosome with the environment and the coupling between the chlorosome and the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex. We show that environment assisted transport between the subunits is the required mechanism to reproduce the experimental two-dimensional electronic spectra. PMID:28345621

  11. γ-Ray spectra and enhancement factors for positron annihilation with core electrons.

    PubMed

    Green, D G; Gribakin, G F

    2015-03-06

    Many-body theory is developed to calculate the γ spectra for positron annihilation in noble-gas atoms. Inclusion of electron-positron correlation effects and core annihilation gives spectra in excellent agreement with experiment [K. Iwata et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 39 (1997)]. The calculated correlation enhancement factors γ_{nl} for individual electron orbitals nl are found to scale with the ionization energy I_{nl} (in eV), as γ_{nl}=1+sqrt[A/I_{nl}]+(B/I_{nl})^{β}, where A≈40  eV, B≈24  eV, and β≈2.3.

  12. Microplume model of spatial-yield spectra. [applying to electron gas degradation in molecular nitrogen gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, A. E. S.; Singhal, R. P.

    1979-01-01

    An analytic representation for the spatial (radial and longitudinal) yield spectra is developed in terms of a model containing three simple 'microplumes'. The model is applied to electron energy degradation in molecular nitrogen gas for 0.1 to 5 keV incident electrons. From the nature of the cross section input to this model it is expected that the scaled spatial yield spectra for other gases will be quite similar. The model indicates that each excitation, ionization, etc. plume should have its individual spatial and energy dependence. Extensions and aeronomical and radiological applications of the model are discussed.

  13. Unfolding linac photon spectra and incident electron energies from experimental transmission data, with direct independent validation

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, E. S. M.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: In a recent computational study, an improved physics-based approach was proposed for unfolding linac photon spectra and incident electron energies from transmission data. In this approach, energy differentiation is improved by simultaneously using transmission data for multiple attenuators and detectors, and the unfolding robustness is improved by using a four-parameter functional form to describe the photon spectrum. The purpose of the current study is to validate this approach experimentally, and to demonstrate its application on a typical clinical linac. Methods: The validation makes use of the recent transmission measurements performed on the Vickers research linac of National Research Council Canada. For this linac, the photon spectra were previously measured using a NaI detector, and the incident electron parameters are independently known. The transmission data are for eight beams in the range 10-30 MV using thick Be, Al and Pb bremsstrahlung targets. To demonstrate the approach on a typical clinical linac, new measurements are performed on an Elekta Precise linac for 6, 10 and 25 MV beams. The different experimental setups are modeled using EGSnrc, with the newly added photonuclear attenuation included. Results: For the validation on the research linac, the 95% confidence bounds of the unfolded spectra fall within the noise of the NaI data. The unfolded spectra agree with the EGSnrc spectra (calculated using independently known electron parameters) with RMS energy fluence deviations of 4.5%. The accuracy of unfolding the incident electron energy is shown to be {approx}3%. A transmission cutoff of only 10% is suitable for accurate unfolding, provided that the other components of the proposed approach are implemented. For the demonstration on a clinical linac, the unfolded incident electron energies and their 68% confidence bounds for the 6, 10 and 25 MV beams are 6.1 {+-} 0.1, 9.3 {+-} 0.1, and 19.3 {+-} 0.2 MeV, respectively. The unfolded spectra

  14. Geant4-DNA simulation of electron slowing-down spectra in liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Incerti, S.; Kyriakou, I.; Tran, H. N.

    2017-04-01

    This work presents the simulation of monoenergetic electron slowing-down spectra in liquid water by the Geant4-DNA extension of the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit (release 10.2p01). These spectra are simulated for several incident energies using the most recent Geant4-DNA physics models, and they are compared to literature data. The influence of Auger electron production is discussed. For the first time, a dedicated Geant4-DNA example allowing such simulations is described and is provided to Geant4 users, allowing further verification of Geant4-DNA track structure simulation capabilities.

  15. Photoelectron spectra and electronic structure of nitrogen analogues of boron β-diketonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonov, Sergey A.; Vovna, Vitaliy I.; Borisenko, Aleksandr V.

    2016-07-01

    The electronic structure of the valence levels of seven nitrogen-containing boron complexes was investigated using methods of ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory. The ionization energies of π- and σ-levels were obtained from photoelectron spectra. The electronic structure of nitrogen-containing compounds was compared with the electronic structure of β-diketonates. It was shown the influence of various substituents on carbon and nitrogen atoms of six-membered ring on the electronic structure of complexes. The changes in the electronic structure after the substitution of atoms in condensed cycles have been identified. In order to compare the experimental vertical ionization energies IEi with Kohn-Sham orbital energies εi we used the analogue of Koopmans theorem and average amendment to the orbital energy of the electrons (δbari). For 26 electronic levels of seven studied complexes, the calculated values are in good accordance with experimental energy intervals between electron levels.

  16. Solar flare model atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Fisher, George H.

    1993-01-01

    Solar flare model atmospheres computed under the assumption of energetic equilibrium in the chromosphere are presented. The models use a static, one-dimensional plane parallel geometry and are designed within a physically self-consistent coronal loop. Assumed flare heating mechanisms include collisions from a flux of non-thermal electrons and x-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona. The heating by energetic electrons accounts explicitly for variations of the ionized fraction with depth in the atmosphere. X-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona incorporates a flare loop geometry by approximating distant portions of the loop with a series of point sources, while treating the loop leg closest to the chromospheric footpoint in the plane-parallel approximation. Coronal flare heating leads to increased heat conduction, chromospheric evaporation and subsequent changes in coronal pressure; these effects are included self-consistently in the models. Cooling in the chromosphere is computed in detail for the important optically thick HI, CaII and MgII transitions using the non-LTE prescription in the program MULTI. Hydrogen ionization rates from x-ray photo-ionization and collisional ionization by non-thermal electrons are included explicitly in the rate equations. The models are computed in the 'impulsive' and 'equilibrium' limits, and in a set of intermediate 'evolving' states. The impulsive atmospheres have the density distribution frozen in pre-flare configuration, while the equilibrium models assume the entire atmosphere is in hydrostatic and energetic equilibrium. The evolving atmospheres represent intermediate stages where hydrostatic equilibrium has been established in the chromosphere and corona, but the corona is not yet in energetic equilibrium with the flare heating source. Thus, for example, chromospheric evaporation is still in the process of occurring.

  17. Electron slowing-down spectra in water for electron and photon sources calculated with the Geant4-DNA code.

    PubMed

    Vassiliev, Oleg N

    2012-02-21

    Recently, a very low energy extension was added to the Monte Carlo simulation toolkit Geant4. It is intended for radiobiological modeling and is referred to as Geant4-DNA. Its performance, however, has not been systematically benchmarked in terms of transport characteristics. This study reports on the electron slowing-down spectra and mean energy per ion pair, the W-value, in water for monoenergetic electron and photon sources calculated with Geant4-DNA. These quantities depend on electron energy, but not on spatial or angular variables which makes them a good choice for testing the model of energy transfer processes. The spectra also have a scientific value for radiobiological modeling as they describe the energy distribution of electrons entering small volumes, such as the cell nucleus. Comparisons of Geant4-DNA results with previous studies showed overall good agreement. Some differences in slowing-down spectra between Geant4-DNA and previous studies were found at 100 eV and at approximately 500 eV that were attributed to approximations in models of vibrational excitations and atomic de-excitation after ionization by electron impact. We also found that the high-energy part of the Geant4-DNA spectrum for a 1 keV electron source was higher, and the asymptotic high-energy W-value was lower than previous studies reported.

  18. High-cadence and high-resolution Hα imaging spectroscopy of a circular flare's remote ribbon with IBIS

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Na; Jing, Ju; Chen, Xin; Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Wang, Haimin; Tritschler, Alexandra; Reardon, Kevin; Denker, Carsten

    2013-06-01

    We present an unprecedented high-resolution Hα imaging spectroscopic observation of a C4.1 flare taken with the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer (IBIS) in conjunction with the adaptive optics system at the 76 cm Dunn Solar Telescope on 2011 October 22 in the active region NOAA 11324. Such a two-dimensional spectroscopic observation covering the entire evolution of a flare ribbon with high spatial (0.''1 pixel{sup –1} image scale), cadence (4.8 s), and spectral (0.1 Å step size) resolution is rarely reported. The flare consists of a main circular ribbon that occurred in a parasitic magnetic configuration and a remote ribbon that was observed by the IBIS. Such a circular-ribbon flare with a remote brightening is predicted in three-dimensional fan-spine reconnection but so far has been rarely studied. During the flare impulsive phase, we define 'core' and 'halo' structures in the observed ribbon based on IBIS narrowband images in the Hα line wing and line center. Examining the Hα emission spectra averaged in the flare core and halo areas, we find that only those from the flare cores show typical nonthermal electron beam heating characteristics that have been revealed by previous theoretical simulations and observations of flaring Hα line profiles. These characteristics include broad and centrally reversed emission spectra, excess emission in the red wing with regard to the blue wing (i.e., red asymmetry), and redshifted bisectors of the emission spectra. We also observe rather quick timescales for the heating (∼30 s) and cooling (∼14-33 s) in the flare core locations. Therefore, we suggest that the flare cores revealed by IBIS track the sites of electron beam precipitation with exceptional spatial and temporal resolution. The flare cores show two-stage motion (a parallel motion along the ribbon followed by an expansion motion perpendicular to the ribbon) during the two impulsive phases of the flare. Some cores jump quickly (30 km s{sup –1

  19. Structure and electronic spectra of DNA mini-hairpins with G(n):C(n) stems.

    PubMed

    Tuma, Jennifer; Tonzani, Stefano; Schatz, George C; Karaba, Andrew H; Lewis, Frederick D

    2007-11-15

    The solution structure of a synthetic DNA mini-hairpin possessing a stilbenediether linker and three G:C base pairs has been obtained using (1)H NMR spectral data and constrained torsion angle molecular dynamics. Notable features of this structure include a compact hairpin loop having a short stilbene-guanine plane-to-plane distance and approximate B-DNA geometry for the three base pairs. Comparison of the electronic spectra of mini-hairpins having one-to-four G:C base pairs and stilbenediether or hexamethyleneglycol linkers reveals the presence of features in the UV and CD spectra of the stilbene-linked hairpins that are not observed for the ethyleneglycol-linked hairpins. Investigation of the electronic structure of a stilbene-linked hairpin having a single G:C base pair by means of time-dependent density functional theory shows that the highest occupied molecular orbital, but not the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, is delocalized over the stilbene and adjacent guanine. The calculated UV and CD spectra are highly dependent upon hairpin conformation, but reproduce the major features of the experimental spectra. These results illustrate the utility of an integrated experimental and theoretical approach to understanding the complex electronic spectra of pi-stacked chromophores.

  20. Accelerating calculations of ultrafast time-resolved electronic spectra with efficient quantum dynamics methods.

    PubMed

    Wehrle, Marius; Sulc, Miroslav; Vanícek, Jirí

    2011-01-01

    We explore three specific approaches for speeding up the calculation of quantum time correlation functions needed for time-resolved electronic spectra. The first relies on finding a minimum set of sufficiently accurate electronic surfaces. The second increases the time step required for convergence of exact quantum simulations by using different split-step algorithms to solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The third approach lowers the number of trajectories needed for convergence of approximate semiclassical dynamics methods.

  1. Comparison between Monte Carlo and experimental aluminum and silicon electron energy loss spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dapor, Maurizio; Calliari, Lucia; Scarduelli, Giorgina

    2011-07-01

    A Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is described and used to calculate the energy distribution spectra of backscattered electrons from Al and Si. For the simulations, elastic scattering cross sections are calculated by numerically solving the Dirac equation in a central field. Inelastic scattering cross sections are computed within the dielectric response theory developed by Ritchie, and by Tung et al. Extension from the optical case to non-zero momentum transfer is done according to Ritchie and Howie. To evaluate surface and bulk contributions to the spectra, the Monte Carlo model treats the surface excitations according to the Werner differential surface and volume excitation probability theory. The Monte Carlo calculations are compared with the experimental reflection electron energy loss (REEL) spectra acquired in our laboratory.

  2. Two-dimensional spectra of electron collisions with acrylonitrile and methacrylonitrile reveal nuclear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regeta, K.; Allan, M.

    2015-05-01

    Detailed experimental information on the motion of a nuclear packet on a complex (resonant) anion potential surface is obtained by measuring 2-dimensional (2D) electron energy loss spectra. The cross section is plotted as a function of incident electron energy, which determines which resonant anion state is populated, i.e., along which normal coordinate the wave packet is launched, and of the electron energy loss, which reveals into which final states each specific resonant state decays. The 2D spectra are presented for acrylonitrile and methacrylonitrile, at the incident energy range 0.095-1.0 eV, where the incoming electron is temporarily captured in the lowest π∗ orbital. The 2D spectra reveal selectivity patterns with respect to which vibrations are excited in the attachment and de-excited in the detachment. Further insight is gained by recording 1D spectra measured along horizontal, vertical, and diagonal cuts of the 2D spectrum. The methyl group in methacrylonitrile increases the resonance width 7 times. This converts the sharp resonances of acrylonitrile into boomerang structures but preserves the essence of the selectivity patterns. Selectivity of vibrational excitation by higher-lying shape resonances up to 8 eV is also reported.

  3. Two-dimensional spectra of electron collisions with acrylonitrile and methacrylonitrile reveal nuclear dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Regeta, K. Allan, M.

    2015-05-14

    Detailed experimental information on the motion of a nuclear packet on a complex (resonant) anion potential surface is obtained by measuring 2-dimensional (2D) electron energy loss spectra. The cross section is plotted as a function of incident electron energy, which determines which resonant anion state is populated, i.e., along which normal coordinate the wave packet is launched, and of the electron energy loss, which reveals into which final states each specific resonant state decays. The 2D spectra are presented for acrylonitrile and methacrylonitrile, at the incident energy range 0.095-1.0 eV, where the incoming electron is temporarily captured in the lowest π{sup ∗} orbital. The 2D spectra reveal selectivity patterns with respect to which vibrations are excited in the attachment and de-excited in the detachment. Further insight is gained by recording 1D spectra measured along horizontal, vertical, and diagonal cuts of the 2D spectrum. The methyl group in methacrylonitrile increases the resonance width 7 times. This converts the sharp resonances of acrylonitrile into boomerang structures but preserves the essence of the selectivity patterns. Selectivity of vibrational excitation by higher-lying shape resonances up to 8 eV is also reported.

  4. Effects of Electronic-State-Dependent Solute Polarizability: Application to Solute-Pump/Solvent-Probe Spectra.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiang; Ladanyi, Branka M; Stratt, Richard M

    2015-07-23

    Experimental studies of solvation dynamics in liquids invariably ask how changing a solute from its electronic ground state to an electronically excited state affects a solution's dynamics. With traditional time-dependent-fluorescence experiments, that means looking for the dynamical consequences of the concomitant change in solute-solvent potential energy. But if one follows the shift in the dynamics through its effects on the macroscopic polarizability, as recent solute-pump/solvent-probe spectra do, there is another effect of the electronic excitation that should be considered: the jump in the solute's own polarizability. We examine the spectroscopic consequences of this solute polarizability change in the classic example of the solvation dye coumarin 153 dissolved in acetonitrile. After demonstrating that standard quantum chemical methods can be used to construct accurate multisite models for the polarizabilities of ground- and excited-state solvation dyes, we show via simulation that this polarizability change acts as a contrast agent, significantly enhancing the observable differences in optical-Kerr spectra between ground- and excited-state solutions. A comparison of our results with experimental solute-pump/solvent-probe spectra supports our interpretation and modeling of this spectroscopy. We predict, in particular, that solute-pump/solvent-probe spectra should be sensitive to changes in both the solvent dynamics near the solute and the electronic-state-dependence of the solute's own rotational dynamics.

  5. Spectral study of suggested Apollo sites. [proposals for financial support and the electronic spectra of pyroxenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccord, T. B.

    1973-01-01

    The spectrophotometry (0.3 to 1.1 microns) of visited and proposed Apollo landing sites is presented along with proposals for financial support of the spectral study. The electronic spectra of pyroxenes is investigated along with an interpretation of telescopic spectral reflectivity curves of the moon. Reprints of published articles related to these studies are included.

  6. COMPARISON OF PHOTOMETRIC VARIABILITY BEFORE AND AFTER STELLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Karoff, C.

    2014-01-20

    The energy in the solar acoustic spectrum is known to be correlated with flares, but it is not known if the same is true for stellar flares. In order to answer this question, we have analyzed 73 flares in 39 solar-like stars. These flares were identified in the 854 solar-like stars observed by the Kepler spacecraft that have stellar parameters measured with asteroseismology. Though we were not able to identify a statistically significant enhancement of the energy in the high-frequency part of the post-flare acoustic spectra compared to the pre-flare spectra of these stars, we did identify a larger variability between the energy in the high-frequency part of the post- and pre-flare acoustic spectra compared to spectra taken at random times.

  7. A Unified Computational Model for Solar and Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allred, Joel; Kowalski, Adam; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-04-01

    We describe a unified computational framework which can be used to model impulsive flares on the Sun and on dMe stars. The models are constructed assuming that the flare impulsive phase is caused by a beam of charged particles (primarily electrons and protons) that is accelerated in the corona and propagates downward depositing energy and momentum along the way. This rapidly heats the lower stellar atmosphere causing it to explosively expand and emission to dramatically brighten. Our models consist of flux tubes that extend from the sub-photosphere into the corona. We simulate how these flare-accelerated particles propagate down one dimensional flux tubes and heat the stellar atmosphere using Fokker-Planck kinetic theory. Detailed radiative transfer is included so that model predictions can be directly compared with observations. The flux of flare-accelerated particles drives return currents which additionally heat the stellar atmosphere, and these effects are also included in our models. We examine the impact of the flare-accelerated particle beams on model solar and dMe stellar atmospheres and perform parameter studies varying the injected particle energy spectra. We find the atmospheric response is strongly dependent on the accelerated particle cutoff energy and spectral index.

  8. On the fine structure of spectra of the inelastic-electron-scattering cross section and the Si surface parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Parshin, A. S. Igumenov, A. Yu.; Mikhlin, Yu. L.; Pchelyakov, O. P.; Nikiforov, A. I.; Timofeev, V. A.

    2015-04-15

    Reflection electron-energy loss spectra are obtained for a series of Si samples with different crystallographic orientations, prepared under different technological conditions. Using the experimental spectra, the electron energy loss dependences of the product of the mean inelastic free path and differential inelastic electron scattering cross section are calculated. A new technique is suggested for analyzing the spectra of inelastic electron scattering cross section by simulating experimental spectra with the use of the three-parameter Tougaard universal cross section functions. The results of the simulation are used to determine the nature of loss peaks and to calculate the surface parameter.

  9. SUB-THz RADIATION MECHANISMS IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2010-02-01

    Observations in the sub-THz range of large solar flares have revealed a mysterious spectral component increasing with frequency and hence distinct from the microwave component commonly accepted to be produced by gyrosynchrotron (GS) emission from accelerated electrons. Evidently, having a distinct sub-THz component requires either a distinct emission mechanism (compared to the GS one), or different properties of electrons and location, or both. We find, however, that the list of possible emission mechanisms is incomplete. This Letter proposes a more complete list of emission mechanisms, capable of producing a sub-THz component, both well known and new in this context, and calculates a representative set of their spectra produced by (1) free-free emission, (2) GS emission, (3) synchrotron emission from relativistic positrons/electrons, (4) diffusive radiation, and (5) Cherenkov emission. We discuss the possible role of the mechanisms in forming the sub-THz emission and emphasize their diagnostics potential for flares.

  10. Vibrationally high-resolved electronic spectra of MCl2 (M = C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb) and photoelectron spectra of MCl2-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Yibin; Pang, Min; Shen, Wei; Li, Ming; He, Rongxing

    2016-10-01

    We systematically studied the vibrational-resolved electronic spectra of group IV dichlorides using the Franck-Condon approximation combined with the Duschinsky and Herzberg-Teller effects in harmonic and anharmonic frameworks (only the simulation of absorption spectra includes the anharmonicity). Calculated results showed that the band shapes of simulated spectra are in accordance with those of the corresponding experimental or theoretical ones. We found that the symmetric bend mode in progression of absorption is the most active one, whereas the main contributor in photoelectron spectra is the symmetric stretching mode. Moreover, the Duschinsky and anharmonic effects exert weak influence on the absorption spectra, except for PbCl2 molecule. The theoretical insights presented in this work are significant in understanding the photophysical properties of MCl2 (M = C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb) and studying the Herzberg-Teller and the anharmonic effects on the absorption spectra of new dichlorides of this main group.

  11. Hard X-Ray Emission from Partially Occulted Solar Flares: RHESSI Observations in Two Solar Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Effenberger, Frederic; Rubio da Costa, Fatima; Oka, Mitsuo; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Liu, Wei; Petrosian, Vahé; Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Säm

    2017-02-01

    Flares close to the solar limb, where the footpoints are occulted, can reveal the spectrum and structure of the coronal looptop source in X-rays. We aim at studying the properties of the corresponding energetic electrons near their acceleration site, without footpoint contamination. To this end, a statistical study of partially occulted flares observed with Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager is presented here, covering a large part of solar cycles 23 and 24. We perform detailed spectra, imaging, and light curve analyses for 116 flares and include contextual observations from SDO and STEREO when available, providing further insights into flare emission that were previously not accessible. We find that most spectra are fitted well with a thermal component plus a broken power-law, non-thermal component. A thin-target kappa distribution model gives satisfactory fits after the addition of a thermal component. X-ray imaging reveals small spatial separation between the thermal and non-thermal components, except for a few flares with a richer coronal source structure. A comprehensive light curve analysis shows a very good correlation between the derivative of the soft X-ray flux (from GOES) and the hard X-rays for a substantial number of flares, indicative of the Neupert effect. The results confirm that non-thermal particles are accelerated in the corona and estimated timescales support the validity of a thin-target scenario with similar magnitudes of thermal and non-thermal energy fluxes.

  12. Valence photoelectron spectra of an electron-beam-irradiated C60 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoe, Jun; Nakao, Aiko; Hida, Akira

    2004-10-01

    Valence photoelectron spectra of an electron-beam (EB) irradiated C60 film, which exhibited metallic electron-transport properties in air at room temperature, are presented. The electronic structure of the C60 film became closer to that of graphite as the EB-irradiation time increased, and its density of states around the Fermi level was eventually greater than for the graphite. This suggests that the electronic structure of the C60 film changed from a semiconductor to a semimetal and/or metal by EB irradiation. Interestingly, the electronic structure remained metallic even after five days of air exposure, which is the reason for the metallic electron-transport property in our previous report [Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 595 (2003)].

  13. A satellite investigation of energy flux and inferred potential drop in auroral electron energy spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Burch, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    The relationship between auroral electron energy flux and the inferred accelerating potential drop for accelerated Maxwellian distributions is investigated on the basis of Atmospheric Explorer D spectral measurements. An analytical approximation for the total downward energy flux carried by an isotropic Maxwellian electron population accelerated by a field-aligned electrostatic potential drop is derived which is valid for values of the electron energy/characteristic accelerated Maxwellian distribution energy which are less than the difference between the ratio of the magnetic field strengths at the altitude of observation and the altitude of potential drop, and unity. Data from the Low Energy Electron Experiment on board AE D obtained on both the dayside and the nightside during periods of significant inverted-V type electron precipitation shows that the 455 energy spectra considered, 160 of them, obtained between 60 and 85 deg invariant latitude, could be fit to accelerated Maxwellian distributions. The 160 Maxwellian spectra are then shown to be in agreement with the predictions of the accelerated Maxwellian model. Finally, analysis of individual spectra suggests that the altitude of the inferred potential drop is at a maximum near the center of the inverted-V structures.

  14. Helium induced fine structure in the electronic spectra of anthracene derivatives doped into superfluid helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Pentlehner, D.; Slenczka, A.

    2015-01-07

    Electronic spectra of organic molecules doped into superfluid helium nanodroplets show characteristic features induced by the helium environment. Besides a solvent induced shift of the electronic transition frequency, in many cases, a spectral fine structure can be resolved for electronic and vibronic transitions which goes beyond the expected feature of a zero phonon line accompanied by a phonon wing as known from matrix isolation spectroscopy. The spectral shape of the zero phonon line and the helium induced phonon wing depends strongly on the dopant species. Phonon wings, for example, are reported ranging from single or multiple sharp transitions to broad (Δν > 100 cm{sup −1}) diffuse signals. Despite the large number of example spectra in the literature, a quantitative understanding of the helium induced fine structure of the zero phonon line and the phonon wing is missing. Our approach is a systematic investigation of related molecular compounds, which may help to shed light on this key feature of microsolvation in superfluid helium droplets. This paper is part of a comparative study of the helium induced fine structure observed in electronic spectra of anthracene derivatives with particular emphasis on a spectrally sharp multiplet splitting at the electronic origin. In addition to previously discussed species, 9-cyanoanthracene and 9-chloroanthracene will be presented in this study for the first time.

  15. Flare line impact polarization. Na D2 589 nm line polarization in the 2001 June 15 flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénoux, J. C.; Karlický, M.

    2013-08-01

    Context. The impact polarization of optical chromospheric lines in solar flares is still being debated. For this reason, additional observations and improved flare atmosphere models are needed still. Aims: The polarization-free telescope THEMIS used in multiline 2 MulTiRaies (MTR) mode allows accurate simultaneous linear polarization measurements in various spectral lines. Methods: In the 2001 June 15 flare, Hα, Hβ, and Mg D2 lines linear impact polarization was reported as present in THEMIS 2 MTR observations. In this paper, THEMIS data analysis was extended to the Na D2 line. Sets of I ± U and I ± Q flare Stokes S 2D-spectra were corrected from dark-current, spectral-line curvature and from transmission differences. Then, we derived the linear polarization degree P and polarization orientation angle α 2D-spectra. No change in relative positioning could be found that would reduce the Stokes parameters U and Q values. No V and I crosstalks could explain our results either. Results: The Na D2 line is linearly polarized with a polarization degree exceeding 5% at some locations. The polarization was found to be radial at outer ribbons edges, and tangential at their inner edges. This orientation change may be due to differences in electron distribution functions on the opposite borders of flare chromospheric ribbons. Electron beams propagating along magnetic field lines, together with return currents, could explain both radial and tangential polarization. At the inner ribbon edges, intensity profile-width enlargements and blueshifts in polarization profiles are observed. This suggests chromospheric evaporation. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. Proton Transmitting Energy Spectra and Transmission Electron Microscope Examinations of Biological Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chun-yu; Xia, Yue-yuan; Zhang, Jian-hua; Mu, Yu-guang; Wang, Rui-jin; Liu, Ji-tian; Liu, Xiang-dong; Yu, Zeng-liang

    1999-02-01

    Transmission energy spectra of 530 keV H+ ion penetrating 140 μm thick seed coat of maize and fruit peel of grape with thickness of 100 μm were measured. The result indicates that these thick biological targets, as seen by the penetrating ions, are inhomogeneous, and there are open "channel like" paths along which the incident ions can transmit the targets easily. While most of the incident ions are stopped in the targets, some of the transmitting ions only lose a small fraction of their initial incident energy. The transmission energy spectra show a pure electronic stopping feature. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) micrographes taken from the samples of seed coat of maize and fruit peel of tomato with thickness of 60 μm indicate that 150 keV electron beam from the TEM can penetrate the thick samples to give very good images with clear contrasts.

  17. Disentangling atomic-layer-specific x-ray absorption spectra by Auger electron diffraction spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Fumihiko; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Kato, Yukako; Hashimoto, Mie; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2009-11-01

    In order to investigate the electronic and magnetic structures of each atomic layer at subsurface, we have proposed a new method, Auger electron diffraction spectroscopy, which is the combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and Auger electron diffraction (AED) techniques. We have measured a series of Ni LMM AED patterns of the Ni film grown on Cu(001) surface for various thicknesses. Then we deduced a set of atomic-layer-specific AED patterns in a numerical way. Furthermore, we developed an algorithm to disentangle XANES spectra from different atomic layers using these atomic-layer-specific AED patterns. Surface and subsurface core level shift were determined for each atomic layer.

  18. FUV Continuum in Flare Kernels Observed by IRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daw, Adrian N.; Kowalski, Adam; Allred, Joel C.; Cauzzi, Gianna

    2016-05-01

    Fits to Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) spectra observed from bright kernels during the impulsive phase of solar flares are providing long-sought constraints on the UV/white-light continuum emission. Results of fits of continua plus numerous atomic and molecular emission lines to IRIS far ultraviolet (FUV) spectra of bright kernels are presented. Constraints on beam energy and cross sectional area are provided by cotemporaneous RHESSI, FERMI, ROSA/DST, IRIS slit-jaw and SDO/AIA observations, allowing for comparison of the observed IRIS continuum to calculations of non-thermal electron beam heating using the RADYN radiative-hydrodynamic loop model.

  19. Spectrum of solar flare protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorny, I. M.; Balabin, Yu. V.; Podgorny, A. I.; Vashenyuk, E. V.

    2010-08-01

    Most of big solar flares are accompanied by relativistic protons. The prompt component of relativistic protons moves along the interplanetary magnetic field lines and arrives at the Earth's orbit when the flare favorably located in the western solar hemisphere. The neutron monitor measurements reveal an exponential law energy spectrum. Calculations of relativistic proton acceleration in the flare current sheet with magnetic and electric fields found from 3D MHD simulations also demonstrate an exponential law spectrum. A comparison of the measured and calculated spectra permits to estimate the rate of reconnection in the Bastille flare (14 July 2000) as ˜107cm/s. The delay component of relativistic protons exhibits a power law energy spectrum.

  20. Quantum chemical prediction of vibrational spectra of large molecular systems with radical or metallic electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimoto, Yoshio; Irle, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    Quantum chemical simulation of infrared (IR) and Raman spectra for molecules with open-shell, radical, or multiradical electronic structure represents a major challenge. We report analytic second-order geometrical derivatives of the Mermin free energy for the second-order self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding (DFTB2) method with fractional occupation numbers (FONs). This new method is applied to the evaluation of Nsbnd O radical stretching modes in various open-shell molecules and to the prediction of the evolution of IR and Raman spectra of graphene nanoribbons with increasing molecular size.

  1. X-ray photoelectron spectra and electronic structure of rare-earth orthovanadates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhkov, M. V.; Kostikov, S. P.; Ivanov, I. K.; Gubanov, V. A.

    1981-08-01

    Photoelectron spectra of 4 d and valence states in RVO 4 ( R = Y, Nd, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Yb) have been investigated. The experimental spectra are interpreted using the results of the Xα discrete variational method calculations for orthovanadates. Transformations of electronic structure and covalency in the RVO 4 series are discussed. It is shown that lanthanide 4 f orbitals significantly mix with the O 2 pAO's and hybridize with the rare-earths 5 pAO's. The 5 p levels spin-orbital splitting in orthovanadates has been evaluated.

  2. Statistical Analyses of White-Light Flares: Two Main Results about Flare Behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal, Hasan Ali

    2012-08-01

    We present two main results, based on models and the statistical analyses of 1672 U-band flares. We also discuss the behaviour of white-light flares. In addition, the parameters of the flares detected from two years of observations on CR Dra are presented. By comparing with flare parameters obtained from other UV Ceti-type stars, we examine the behaviour of the optical flare processes along with the spectral types. Moreover, we aimed, using large white-light flare data, to analyse the flare time-scales with respect to some results obtained from X-ray observations. Using SPSS V17.0 and GraphPad Prism V5.02 software, the flares detected from CR Dra were modelled with the OPEA function, and analysed with the t-Test method to compare similar flare events in other stars. In addition, using some regression calculations in order to derive the best histograms, the time-scales of white-light flares were analysed. Firstly, CR Dra flares have revealed that white-light flares behave in a similar way as their counterparts observed in X-rays. As can be seen in X-ray observations, the electron density seems to be a dominant parameter in white-light flare process, too. Secondly, the distributions of the flare time-scales demonstrate that the number of observed flares reaches a maximum value in some particular ratios, which are 0.5, or its multiples, and especially positive integers. The thermal processes might be dominant for these white-light flares, while non-thermal processes might be dominant in the others. To obtain better results for the behaviour of the white-light flare process along with the spectral types, much more stars in a wide spectral range, from spectral type dK5e to dM6e, must be observed in white-light flare patrols.

  3. THE SOLAR FLARE IRON ABUNDANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Dennis, B. R. E-mail: Brian.R.Dennis@nasa.gov

    2012-03-20

    The abundance of iron is measured from emission line complexes at 6.65 keV (Fe line) and 8 keV (Fe/Ni line) in RHESSI X-ray spectra during solar flares. Spectra during long-duration flares with steady declines were selected, with an isothermal assumption and improved data analysis methods over previous work. Two spectral fitting models give comparable results, viz., an iron abundance that is lower than previous coronal values but higher than photospheric values. In the preferred method, the estimated Fe abundance is A(Fe) = 7.91 {+-} 0.10 (on a logarithmic scale, with A(H) = 12) or 2.6 {+-} 0.6 times the photospheric Fe abundance. Our estimate is based on a detailed analysis of 1898 spectra taken during 20 flares. No variation from flare to flare is indicated. This argues for a fractionation mechanism similar to quiet-Sun plasma. The new value of A(Fe) has important implications for radiation loss curves, which are estimated.

  4. Analysis of coronal and chromospheric hard X-ray sources in an eruptive solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimovets, Ivan; Golovin, Dmitry; Livshits, Moisey; Vybornov, Vadim; Sadykov, Viacheslav; Mitrofanov, Igor

    We have analyzed hard X-ray emission of an eruptive solar flare on 3 November 2010. The entire flare region was observed by the STEREO-B spacecraft. This gave us an information that chromospheric footpoints of flare magnetic loops were behind the east solar limb for an earth observer. Hard X-ray emission from the entire flare region was detected by the High Energy Neutron Detector (HEND) onboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft while hard X-rays from the coronal part of the flare region were detected by the RHESSI. This rare situation has allowed us to investigate both coronal and chromospheric sources of hard X-ray emission separately. Flare impulsive phase was accompanied by eruption of a magnetic flux rope and formation of a plasmoid detected by the AIA/SDO in the EUV range. Two coronal hard X-ray sources (S_{1} and S_{2}) were detected by the RHESSI. The upper source S_{1} coincided with the plasmoid and the lower source S_{2} was near the tops of the underlying flare loops that is in accordance with the standard model of eruptive flares. Imaging spectroscopy with the RHESSI has allowed to measure energetic spectra of hard X-ray emission from the S_{1} and S_{2} sources. At the impulsive phase peak they have power-law shape above ≈ 15 keV with spectral slopes gamma_{S_{1}}=3.46 ± 1.58 and gamma_{S_{2}}=4.64 ± 0.12. Subtracting spatially integrated spectrum of coronal hard X-ray emission measured by the RHESSI from the spectrum measured by the HEND we found spectrum of hard X-rays emitted from the footpoints of the flare loops (source S_{0}). This spectrum has a power-law shape with gamma_{S_{0}}=2.21 ± 0.57. It is shown that it is not possible to explain the measured spectra of the S_{2} and S_{0} sources in frames of the thin and thick target models respectively if we assume that electrons were accelerated in the energy release site situated below the plasmoid and above the flare loops as suggested by the standard flare model. To resolve the contradiction

  5. Electric and magnetic spectra from MHD to electron scales in the magnetosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteini, L.; Alexandrova, O.; Chen, C. H. K.; Lacombe, C.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the transition of the turbulence from large to kinetic scales using Cluster observations. Simultaneous spectra of magnetic and electric fields in the Earth's magnetosheath from magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) to electron scales are presented for the first time. While the two spectra have approximatively similar behaviour in the fluid-MHD regime, they show different trends in the kinetic range. As the magnetic field spectrum steepens at ion scales, the electric field spectrum is characterized by a shallower power law continuing down to electron scales. Such an evolution is consistent with theoretical expectations, assuming that the turbulence is dominated by highly oblique {k}-vectors and that between ion and electron scales the electric field is governed by the non-ideal terms in the generalized Ohm's law. This leads to an expected linear increase of the electric-to-magnetic ratio of fluctuations, consistent with observations presented here. The influence of local whistler wave activity on electron-scale spectra is also discussed.

  6. Statistical and theoretical studies of flares from Sagittarius A*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ya-Ping; Yuan, Qiang; Wang, Q. Daniel; Chen, P. F.; Neilsen, Joseph; Fang, Taotao; Zhang, Shuo; Dexter, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Multi-wavelength flares have routinely been observed from the supermassive black hole, Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), at our Galactic center. The nature of these flares remains largely unclear, despite many theoretical models. We study the statistical properties of the Sgr A* X-ray flares and find that they are consistent with the theoretical prediction of the self-organized criticality system with the spatial dimension S = 3. We suggest that the X-ray flares represent plasmoid ejections driven by magnetic reconnection (similar to solar flares) in the accretion flow onto the black hole. Motivated by the statistical results, we further develop a time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model for the multi-band flares from Sgr A* by analogy with models of solar flares/coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We calculate the X-ray, infrared flare light curves, and the spectra, and find that our model can explain the main features of the flares.

  7. Electronic and vibrational spectra of matrix isolated anthracene radical cations - Experimental and theoretical aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szczepanski, Jan; Vala, Martin; Talbi, Dahbia; Parisel, Olivier; Ellinger, Yves

    1993-01-01

    The IR vibrational and visible/UV electronic absorption spectra of the anthracene cation, An(+), were studied experimentally, in argon matrices at 12 K, as well as theoretically, using ab initio calculations for the vibrational modes and enhanced semiempirical methods with configuration interaction for the electronic spectra. It was found that both approaches predicted well the observed photoelectron spectrum. The theoretical IR intensities showed some remarkable differences between neutral and ionized species (for example, the CH in-plane bending modes and CC in-plane stretching vibrations were predicted to increase by several orders of magnitude upon ionization). Likewise, estimated experimental IR intensities showed a significant increase in the cation band intensities over the neutrals. The implication of these findings for the hypothesis that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon cations are responsible for the unidentified IR emission bands from interstellar space is discussed.

  8. Sensitivity Analysis of X-ray Spectra from Scanning Electron Microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Thomas Martin; Patton, Bruce W.; Weber, Charles F.; Bekar, Kursat B.

    2014-10-01

    The primary goal of this project is to evaluate x-ray spectra generated within a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determine elemental composition of small samples. This will be accomplished by performing Monte Carlo simulations of the electron and photon interactions in the sample and in the x-ray detector. The elemental inventories will be determined by an inverse process that progressively reduces the difference between the measured and simulated x-ray spectra by iteratively adjusting composition and geometric variables in the computational model. The intended benefit of this work will be to develop a method to perform quantitative analysis on substandard samples (heterogeneous phases, rough surfaces, small sizes, etc.) without involving standard elemental samples or empirical matrix corrections (i.e., true standardless quantitative analysis).

  9. DFT computation and experimental analysis of vibrational and electronic spectra of phenoxy acetic acid herbicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arul Dhas, D.; Hubert Joe, I.; Roy, S. D. D.; Balachandran, S.

    2013-05-01

    An absolute vibrational analysis has been attempted on the basis of experimental FTIR and NIR-FT Raman spectra with calculated vibrational wavenumbers and intensities of phenoxy acetic acids. The equilibrium geometry, bonding features and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers have been calculated with the help of B3LYP method with Dunning correlation consistent basis set aug-cc-pVTZ. The electronic structures of molecular fragments were described in terms of natural bond orbital analysis, which shows intermolecular Osbnd H⋯O and intramolecular Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The electronic absorption spectra with different solvents have been investigated in combination with time-dependent density functional theory calculation. The pKa values of phenoxy acetic acids were compared.

  10. Theoretical analysis of electronic absorption spectra of vitamin B12 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andruniow, Tadeusz; Kozlowski, Pawel M.; Zgierski, Marek Z.

    2001-10-01

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TD-DFT) is applied to analyze the electronic absorption spectra of vitamin B12. To accomplish this two model systems were considered: CN-[CoIII-corrin]-CN (dicyanocobinamide, DCC) and imidazole-[CoIII-corrin]-CN (cyanocobalamin, ImCC). For both models 30 lowest excited states were calculated together with transition dipole moments. When the results of TD-DFT calculations were directly compared with experiment it was found that the theoretical values systematically overestimate experimental data by approximately 0.5 eV. The uniform adjustment of the calculated transition energies allowed detailed analysis of electronic absorption spectra of vitamin B12 models. All absorption bands in spectral range 2.0-5.0 eV were readily assigned. In particular, TD-DFT calculations were able to explain the origin of the shift of the lowest absorption band caused by replacement of the-CN axial ligand by imidazole.

  11. Vibronic and Vibrational Coherences in Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectra of Supramolecular J-Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In J-aggregates of cyanine dyes, closely packed molecules form mesoscopic tubes with nanometer-diameter and micrometer-length. Their efficient energy transfer pathways make them suitable candidates for artificial light harvesting systems. This great potential calls for an in-depth spectroscopic analysis of the underlying energy deactivation network and coherence dynamics. We use two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with sub-10 fs laser pulses in combination with two-dimensional decay-associated spectra analysis to describe the population flow within the aggregate. Based on the analysis of Fourier-transform amplitude maps, we distinguish between vibrational or vibronic coherence dynamics as the origin of pronounced oscillations in our two-dimensional electronic spectra. PMID:23461650

  12. Flare Data in High Temporal Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaparová, J.

    Analysis of the September 23, 1998 flare H? spectra and filtergrams is presented. Spectra were obtained using multichannel flare spectrograph (MFS) at the Astronomical Institute in Ond?ejov, Czech Republic, having a temporal resolution of 25 frames/s and a spatial resolution of ?1? decreased by seeing to 3? - 5?. High temporal resolution was firstly used for detecting of the chromosphere response to the pulse beam heating.

  13. Statistical simulation of the energy spectra of field-emission electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, N. V.; Antonov, A. Yu.; Demchenko, N. S.

    2017-02-01

    Random energies of electrons that escape from the source in the course of field emission are simulated using energy spectra. A relationship of the random values of total energy and the energy related to the normal (with respect to surface) component of momentum is established. A family of quadrature formulas needed for the integration of the distribution density of particles is analyzed. A hypothesis on the compliance of selected random energies with desired distribution laws is statistically tested.

  14. Signatures of current loop coalescence in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakai, J.; Nakajima, H.; Zaidman, E.; Tajima, T.; Kosugi, T.; Brunel, F.

    1986-01-01

    The nonlinear coalescence instability of current carrying solar loops can explain many of the characteristics of the solar flares such as their impulsive nature, heating and high energy particle acceleration, amplitude oscillations of electromagnetic emission as well as the characteristics of 2-D microwave images obtained during a solar flare. The physical characteristics of the explosive coalescence of currents are presented in detail through computer simulation and theory. Canonical characteristics of the explosive coalescence are: (1) a large amount of impulsive increase of kinetic energies of electrons and ions; (2) simultaneous heating and acceleration of electrons and ions in high and low energy spectra; (3) ensuing quasi-periodic amplitude oscillations in fields and particle quantities; and (4) the double peak (or triple peak) structure in these profiles, participate in the coalescence process, yielding varieties of phenomena.

  15. Electron momentum spectroscopy study of amantadine: binding energy spectra and valence orbital electron density distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinyuk, I. V.; Zheng, Y.; Brion, C. E.

    2000-11-01

    The electron binding energy spectrum and valence orbital electron momentum density distributions of amantadine (1-aminoadamantane), an important anti-viral and anti-Parkinsonian drug, have been measured by electron momentum spectroscopy. Theoretical momentum distributions, calculated at the 6-311++G** and AUG-CC-PVTZ levels within the target Hartree-Fock and also the target Kohn-Sham density functional theory approximations, show good agreement with the experimental results. The results for amantadine are also compared with those for the parent molecule, adamantane, reported earlier (Chem. Phys. 253 (2000) 41). Based on the comparison tentative assignments of the valence region ionization bands of amantadine have been made.

  16. Quantum-chemical investigation of the structure and electronic absorption spectra of electroluminescent zinc complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaev, B. F.; Baryshnikov, G. V.; Korop, A. A.; Minaeva, V. A.; Kaplunov, M. G.

    2013-01-01

    Using the quantum chemical methods of the density functional theory and of the electron density topological analysis, we have studied the structure of two recently synthesized electroluminescent zinc complexes, one with aminoquinoline ligands and the other with a Schiff base (N,O-donor). The energies and intensities of vertical excitations for the molecules under study have been calculated in terms of the PM3 semiempirical approximation taking into account the configurational interaction between singly excited singlet excited states. Good agreement between calculation results and experimental data on the electron density topological characteristics and on the visible and UV absorption spectra has been obtained.

  17. Raman spectra and electron-phonon coupling in disordered graphene with gate-tunable doping

    SciTech Connect

    Childres, Isaac; Jauregui, Luis A.; Chen, Yong P.

    2014-12-21

    We report a Raman spectroscopy study of graphene field-effect transistors with a controlled amount of defects introduced in graphene by exposure to electron-beam irradiation. Raman spectra are taken at T = 8 K over a range of back gate voltages (V{sub g}) for various irradiation dosages (R{sub e}). We study effects in the Raman spectra due to V{sub g}-induced doping and artificially created disorder at various R{sub e}. With moderate disorder (irradiation), the Raman G peak with respect to the graphene carrier density (n{sub FE}) exhibits a minimum in peak frequency and a maximum in peak width near the charge-neutral point (CNP). These trends are similar to those seen in previous works on pristine graphene and have been attributed to a reduction of electron-phonon coupling strength (D) and removal of the Kohn anomaly as the Fermi level moves away from the CNP. We also observe a maximum in I{sub 2D}/I{sub G} and weak maximum in I{sub D}/I{sub G} near the CNP. All the observed dependences of Raman parameters on n{sub FE} weaken at stronger disorder (higher R{sub e}), implying that disorder causes a reduction of D as well. Our findings are valuable for understanding Raman spectra and electron-phonon physics in doped and disordered graphene.

  18. Electronic spectra of jet-cooled isoindoline: Spectroscopic determination of energy difference between conformational isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Sei'ichi; Okuyama, Katsuhiko

    2010-04-01

    The electronic spectra of jet-cooled isoindoline between the electronic ground (S0) state and the ππ ∗ lowest-excited singlet state (S1) were observed by the fluorescence excitation and single-vibronic-level dispersed fluorescence methods. The low-frequency progression due to the puckering vibration appeared in both spectra. Analysis of dispersed spectra together with geometry optimization at the level of B3LYP/6-311+G(d) indicated the presence of conformational isomers possessing axial and equatorial N-H bonds with respect to the molecular plane. The 0-0 bands of the axial and equatorial conformers were measured at 37 022 and 36 761 cm-1, respectively. Three common levels in the S1 state accessible from the respective S0-state zero levels were observed. From their transition frequencies, the S0-state energy difference between the isomers was determined to be 47.7±0.2 cm-1, where the axial conformer was more stable. In the S1 state, the energy difference was 213.7±0.2 cm-1, and the equatorial conformer was more stable. The cause of switching from a stable conformation upon excitation is discussed in terms of the electron conjugation between the π∗ orbital in benzene and the lone pair orbital of nitrogen.

  19. Kinetic energies to analyze the experimental auger electron spectra by density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Kazunaka

    2016-02-01

    In the Auger electron spectra (AES) simulations, we define theoretical modified kinetic energies of AES in the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The modified kinetic energies correspond to two final-state holes at the ground state and at the transition-state in DFT calculations, respectively. This method is applied to simulate Auger electron spectra (AES) of 2nd periodic atom (Li, Be, B, C, N, O, F)-involving substances (LiF, beryllium, boron, graphite, GaN, SiO2, PTFE) by deMon DFT calculations using the model molecules of the unit cell. Experimental KVV (valence band electrons can fill K-shell core holes or be emitted during KVV-type transitions) AES of the (Li, O) atoms in the substances agree considerably well with simulation of AES obtained with the maximum kinetic energies of the atoms, while, for AES of LiF, and PTFE substance, the experimental F KVV AES is almost in accordance with the spectra from the transitionstate kinetic energy calculations.

  20. Reconstruction of the energy spectrum of electrons accelerated in the April 15, 2002 solar flare based on IRIS X-ray spectrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motorina, G. G.; Kudryavtsev, I. V.; Lazutkov, V. P.; Savchenko, M. I.; Skorodumov, D. V.; Charikov, Yu. E.

    2016-04-01

    We reconstruct the energy distribution of electrons accelerated in the April 15, 2002 solar flare on the basis of the data from the IRIS X-ray spectrometer onboard the CORONAS-F satellite. We obtain the solution to the integral equations describing the transformation of the spectrum of X-ray photons during the recording and reconstruction of the spectrum of accelerated electrons in the bremsstrahlung source using the random search method and the Tikhonov regularization method. In this event, we detected a singularity in the electron spectrum associated with the existence of a local minimum in the energy range 40-60 keV, which cannot be detected by a direct method.

  1. Optical Spectral Observations of a Flickering White-light Kernel in a C1 Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Cauzzi, Gianna; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2015-01-01

    We analyze optical spectra of a two-ribbon, long-duration C1.1 flare that occurred on 2011 August 18 within AR 11271 (SOL2011-08-18T15:15). The impulsive phase of the flare was observed with a comprehensive set of space-borne and ground-based instruments, which provide a range of unique diagnostics of the lower flaring atmosphere. Here we report the detection of enhanced continuum emission, observed in low-resolution spectra from 3600 Å to 4550 Å acquired with the Horizontal Spectrograph at the Dunn Solar Telescope. A small, <=0.''5 (1015 cm2) penumbral/umbral kernel brightens repeatedly in the optical continuum and chromospheric emission lines, similar to the temporal characteristics of the hard X-ray variation as detected by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor on the Fermi spacecraft. Radiative-hydrodynamic flare models that employ a nonthermal electron beam energy flux high enough to produce the optical contrast in our flare spectra would predict a large Balmer jump in emission, indicative of hydrogen recombination radiation from the upper flare chromosphere. However, we find no evidence of such a Balmer jump in the bluemost spectral region of the continuum excess. Just redward of the expected Balmer jump, we find evidence of a "blue continuum bump" in the excess emission which may be indicative of the merging of the higher order Balmer lines. The large number of observational constraints provides a springboard for modeling the blue/optical emission for this particular flare with radiative-hydrodynamic codes, which are necessary to understand the opacity effects for the continuum and emission line radiation at these wavelengths.

  2. OPTICAL SPECTRAL OBSERVATIONS OF A FLICKERING WHITE-LIGHT KERNEL IN A C1 SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Cauzzi, Gianna; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2015-01-10

    We analyze optical spectra of a two-ribbon, long-duration C1.1 flare that occurred on 2011 August 18 within AR 11271 (SOL2011-08-18T15:15). The impulsive phase of the flare was observed with a comprehensive set of space-borne and ground-based instruments, which provide a range of unique diagnostics of the lower flaring atmosphere. Here we report the detection of enhanced continuum emission, observed in low-resolution spectra from 3600 Å to 4550 Å acquired with the Horizontal Spectrograph at the Dunn Solar Telescope. A small, ≤0.''5 (10{sup 15} cm{sup 2}) penumbral/umbral kernel brightens repeatedly in the optical continuum and chromospheric emission lines, similar to the temporal characteristics of the hard X-ray variation as detected by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor on the Fermi spacecraft. Radiative-hydrodynamic flare models that employ a nonthermal electron beam energy flux high enough to produce the optical contrast in our flare spectra would predict a large Balmer jump in emission, indicative of hydrogen recombination radiation from the upper flare chromosphere. However, we find no evidence of such a Balmer jump in the bluemost spectral region of the continuum excess. Just redward of the expected Balmer jump, we find evidence of a ''blue continuum bump'' in the excess emission which may be indicative of the merging of the higher order Balmer lines. The large number of observational constraints provides a springboard for modeling the blue/optical emission for this particular flare with radiative-hydrodynamic codes, which are necessary to understand the opacity effects for the continuum and emission line radiation at these wavelengths.

  3. Photodissociation Electronic Spectra of Cold Protonated Quinoline and Isoquinoline in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Féraud, Géraldine; Domenianni, Luis; Marceca, Ernesto; Dedonder-Lardeux, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe

    2017-03-27

    Photofragmentation electronic spectra of isolated single-isomeric N-protonated quinoline (quinolinium) and isoquinoline (isoquinolinium) ions have been measured at a temperature of ∼40 K using a mass-selective, 10 cm(-1) spectral resolution, photodissociation spectrometer. Additionally, ab initio adiabatic transition energies calculated using the RI-ADC(2) method have been employed to assist in the assignment of the spectra. Three electronic transitions having ππ* character were clearly evidenced for both protonated ions within the UV and deep-UV spectral ranges. The corresponding spectra at room temperature were previously reported by Hansen et al., together with TD-DFT calculations and a careful analysis of the possible fragmentation mechanisms. This information will be complemented in the present study by appending better resolved spectra, characteristic of cold ions, in which well-defined vibrational progressions associated with the S1 ← S0 and S3 ← S0 transitions exhibit clear 0-0 bands at hν0-0 = 27868 and 42230 cm(-1), for protonated quinoline, and at hν0-0 = 28043 and 41988 cm(-1), for protonated isoquinoline. Active vibrations in the spectra were assigned with the help of calculated normal modes, looking very similar to those of the structurally related protonated naphthalene. Finally, we have observed that the bandwidths associated with the deep-UV S3 ← S0 transition denote a lifetime for the S3 excited state in the subpicosecond time scale, in contrast with that of S1.

  4. Discrete electronic-vibrational fluorescence spectra in the low-pressure phenanthrene and naphthacene vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Mirumyants, S.O.; Kozlov, V.K.; Vandyukov, E.A.

    1986-10-01

    In recent years considerable attention has been paid to developing methods for analysis and control of air pollutants. In this work the results of the study on quasiline fluorescence spectra for phenathrene and naphthacene in the gas phase are presented. Despite the fact that phenanthrene is a stereoisomer of anthracene, the shapes and intensities of their absorption and fluorescence spectra are markedly different. The oscillator strength of the first electronic transition in anthracene vapors is 50 times larger than that for the phenanthrene vapor (0.1 and 0.002, respectively). Therefore, the studies of the quasiline fluorescence spectrum of the phenanthrene vapor required a long exposition period (from 7 to 31 h) during the photographic detection. It is known that phenanthrene exhibits a characteristic quasiline spectrum in the 34584000-A range in frozen solutions. The authors have also investigated the possibility of obtaining structured quasiline vapor spectra for a more complex aromatic compound such as naphthacene which comprises four benzyl rings. In conclusion, the quasiline fluorescence spectra for phenanthrene and naphthacene in the gas phase have been obtained for the first time. In certain experimental conditions, phenanthrene and naphthacene emit wellresolved quasiline spectra which are dependent on the excitation frequency, temperature, and vapor pressure. For both compounds there is a frequency range for quasiline fluorescence excitation for which a shift of the quasiline spectrum occurs if the excitation frequency is changed within that range. Also more accurate values for the frequencies of the O-O electronic transition in phenanthrene and naphthacene have been obtained. Diagrams are included.

  5. Limiting Superluminal Electron and Neutrino Velocities Using the 2010 Crab Nebula Flare and the IceCube PeV Neutrino Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2014-01-01

    The observation of two PetaelectronVolt (PeV)-scale neutrino events reported by Ice Cube allows one to place constraints on Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) in the neutrino sector. After first arguing that at least one of the PetaelectronVolt IceCube events was of extragalactic origin, I derive an upper limit for the difference between putative superluminal neutrino and electron velocities of less than or equal to approximately 5.6 x 10(exp -19) in units where c = 1, confirming that the observed PetaelectronVolt neutrinos could have reached Earth from extragalactic sources. I further derive a new constraint on the superluminal electron velocity, obtained from the observation of synchrotron radiation from the Crab Nebula flare of September, 2010. The inference that the greater than 1 GigaelectronVolt gamma-rays from synchrotron emission in the flare were produced by electrons of energy up to approx. 5.1 PetaelectronVolt indicates the nonoccurrence of vacuum Cerenkov radiation by these electrons. This implies a new, strong constraint on superluminal electron velocities delta(sub e) less than or equal to approximately 5 x 10(exp -21). It immediately follows that one then obtains an upper limit on the superluminal neutrino velocity alone of delta(sub v) less than or equal to approximately 5.6 x 10(exp -19), many orders of magnitude better than the time-of-flight constraint from the SN1987A neutrino burst. However, if the electrons are subluminal the constraint on the absolute value of delta(sub e) less than or equal to approximately 8 x 10(exp -17), obtained from the Crab Nebula gamma-ray spectrum, places a weaker constraint on superluminal neutrino velocity of delta(sub v) less than or equal to approximately 8 x 10(exp -17).

  6. SCATTERING POLARIZATION IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Štěpán, Jiří; Heinzel, Petr

    2013-11-20

    There is ongoing debate about the origin and even the very existence of a high degree of linear polarization of some chromospheric spectral lines observed in solar flares. The standard explanation of these measurements is in terms of the impact polarization caused by non-thermal proton and/or electron beams. In this work, we study the possible role of resonance line polarization due to radiation anisotropy in the inhomogeneous medium of the flare ribbons. We consider a simple two-dimensional model of the flaring chromosphere and we self-consistently solve the non-LTE problem taking into account the role of resonant scattering polarization and of the Hanle effect. Our calculations show that the horizontal plasma inhomogeneities at the boundary of the flare ribbons can lead to a significant radiation anisotropy in the line formation region and, consequently, to a fractional linear polarization of the emergent radiation of the order of several percent. Neglecting the effects of impact polarization, our model can provide a clue for resolving some of the common observational findings, namely: (1) why a high degree of polarization appears mainly at the edges of the flare ribbons; (2) why polarization can also be observed during the gradual phase of a flare; and (3) why polarization is mostly radial or tangential. We conclude that radiation transfer in realistic multi-dimensional models of solar flares needs to be considered as an essential ingredient for understanding the observed spectral line polarization.

  7. OptaDOS: A tool for obtaining density of states, core-level and optical spectra from electronic structure codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Andrew J.; Nicholls, Rebecca J.; Pickard, Chris J.; Yates, Jonathan R.

    2014-05-01

    We present OptaDOS, a program for calculating core-electron and low-loss electron energy loss spectra (EELS) and optical spectra along with total-, projected- and joint-density of electronic states (DOS) from single-particle eigenenergies and dipole transition coefficients. Energy-loss spectroscopy is an important tool for probing bonding within a material. Interpreting these spectra can be aided by first principles calculations. The spectra are generated from the eigenenergies through integration over the Brillouin zone. An important feature of this code is that this integration is performed using a choice of adaptive or linear extrapolation broadening methods which we show produces higher accuracy spectra than standard fixed-width Gaussian broadening. OptaDOS may be straightforwardly interfaced to any electronic structure code. OptaDOS is freely available under the GNU General Public licence from http://www.optados.org.

  8. Comparison between IBIS Observations and Radiative Transfer Hydrodynamic Simulations of a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio da Costa, F.; Kleint, L.; Liu, W.; Sainz Dalda, A.; Petrosian, V.

    2014-12-01

    High-resolution spectroscopic observations of solar flares are rare but can provide valuable diagnostics. On September 24, 2011 an M3.0 class flare was observed by the Interferometric BIdimensional Spectropolarimeter (IBIS) in chromospheric Hα and CaII 8542 Å lines and by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) in X-rays. We fitted the RHESSI spectra at different times with a power-law plus isothermal component. We then used the fitted real-time spectral parameters of nonthermal electrons as the input to the RADYN radiative hydrodynamic code (Carlsson et al, 1992, 1996; Allred et al, 2005) to simulate the low-chromospheric response to collisional heating by energetic electrons. We synthesized both the Hα and CaII 8542 Å lines from the simulation results and compare them with the IBIS observations. We discuss the constraints from this comparison on particle acceleration mechanisms in solar flares.

  9. Electronic and Crystal-field Effects in the Fine Structure of Electron Energy-loss Spectra of Manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, W.; Tao, J.; Varela, M.; Pennycook, S.J.; Pantelides, S.T.

    2009-02-23

    The fine structure of oxygen-K electron energy-loss spectra (EELS) of transition-metal oxides is known to correlate with nominal oxidation states (NOSs) that are often interpreted as charge states. Here we report calculations of O-K EELS in La{sub x}Ca{sub 1-x}MnO{sub 3} that agree with measured spectra and show that the variation in the prepeak's intensity with doping is controlled by the orbital occupancy of the majority-spin Mn 3d states, while its width is controlled by crystal-field splitting. The results confirm an earlier conclusion that the NOS extracted from EELS corresponds only to orbital occupancies, while the physical charge renders all atoms electrically neutral, even in so-called ionic crystals.

  10. High Energy Flares Of FSRQs: The Connection Of Flaring States With The Accretion Disk Luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacciani, Luigi; Tavecchio, F.; Donnarumma, I.; Stamerra, A.

    2016-10-01

    High-Energy gamma-ray flares (E>10 GeV) of Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars (FSRQ) give us strong constraints on jet-physics, and on the surrounding-mediumWe performed the first study of these flares, examining FERMI-LAT archival-data, and triggering 40 ToO-observations from near-ir to TeV (e.g., for PKS 1441+25), at the occurrence of new flaresWe identified about 270 gamma-ray HE flares, and we already investigated peculiar and short-flares of 3C 454.3, CTA 102 and other 10 HE-flares, showing remarkably hard gamma-ray spectra. We argued that these flares originate at parsec distance from the Supermassive Black-Hole (distant scenario), possibly powered by magnetic-reconnections or turbulence in the flowFor the whole sample of 270 flares, we will show here spectral and temporal propertiesFurthermore, we compared the sub-sample of HE-flares with the whole sample of gamma-ray flares. We will show and discuss that jet luminosities and disks correlate not only on years averaged time-scales, but also during High-Energy gamma-ray flares (time-resolved within this investigation with time-scale of the order of 10 days or less).

  11. Self-Consistent Synchrotron Spectra from Trans-Relativistic Electron Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Most existing analytical models describing the second-order Fermi acceleration of relativistic electrons due to collisions with MHD waves assume that the injected seed particles are already highly relativistic, despite the fact that the most prevalent source of particles is usually the non-relativistic thermal background gas. This presents a problem because the momentum dependence of the momentum diffusion coefficient describing the interaction between the electrons and the MHD waves is qualitatively different in the non-relativistic and highly relativistic limits. The lack of an analytical model has forced workers to rely on numerical simulations to obtain particle spectra describing the trans-relativistic case. In this work, we present the first analytical solution to the global, trans-relativistic problem of electron acceleration, obtained by using a hybrid form for the momentum diffusion coefficient, given by the sum of the two asymptotic forms. We refer to this process as "quasi hard-sphere scattering." The model also incorporates the appropriate momentum dependence for the particle escape timescale, and the effect of synchrotron and inverse-Compton losses, which are critical for establishing the location of the high-energy cutoff in the particle spectrum. Since synchrotron and inverse-Compton losses are included in the transport equation, the resulting radiation spectra are computed self-consistently. The results can be used to model the acceleration of radiating electrons in AGN and solar environments, applications of both types are discussed.

  12. Theoretical and experimental IR, Raman and NMR spectra in studying the electronic structure of 2-nitrobenzoates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świsłocka, R.; Samsonowicz, M.; Regulska, E.; Lewandowski, W.

    2007-05-01

    The influence of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium on the electronic system of the 2-nitrobenzoic acid (2-NBA) was studied. Optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds were calculated by HF, B3PW91, B3LYP methods using 6-311++G ∗∗ basis set. The theoretical IR and NMR spectra were obtained. The vibrational (FT-IR, FT-Raman) and NMR ( 1H and 13C) spectra for 2-nitrobenzoic acid salts of alkali metals were also recorded. The assignment of vibrational spectra was done. Characteristic shifts of band wavenumbers and changes in band intensities along the metal series were observed. Good correlation between the wavenumbers of the vibrational bands in the IR and Raman spectra for 2-nitrobenzoates (2-NB) and ionic potential, electronegativity, atomic mass and affinity of metals were found. The chemical shifts of protons and carbons ( 1H, 13C NMR) in the series of studied alkali metal 2-nitrobenzoates were observed too. The calculated parameters were compared to experimental characteristic of studied compounds.

  13. Electronic spectra and DFT calculations of some pyrimido[1,2-a]benzimidazole derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshakre, Mohamed E.; Moustafa, H.; Hassaneen, Huwaida. M. E.; Moussa, Abdelrahim. Z.

    2015-06-01

    Ground state properties of 2,4-diphenyl-1,4-dihydrobenzo[4,5]imidazo[1,2-a]pyrimidine, compound 1, and its derivatives are investigated experimentally and theoretically in Dioxane and DMF. The calculations show that all the studied compounds (1-7) are non-planar, resulting in a significant impact on the electronic and structural properties. The ground state properties of compounds 1-7 at B3LYP/6-311G (d, p) show that compound 5 has the lowest EHOMO, ELUMO, and ΔE indicating highest reactivity. Compound 7 is found to have the highest polarity. The observed UV spectra in Dioxane and DMF of compounds 1-4 show 2 bands, while compounds 5-7 show 4 bands in both solvents. Band maxima (λmax) and intensities of the spectra are found to have solvent dependence reflected as blue and red shifts. The theoretical spectra computed at TD-B3LYP/6-311G (d, p) in gas phase, Dioxane and DMF indicate a good agreement with the observed spectra.

  14. A STATISTICAL STUDY OF THE SPECTRAL HARDENING OF CONTINUUM EMISSION IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, X.; Chen, Y.; Li, G. E-mail: gang.li@uah.edu

    2013-09-10

    The observed hard X-ray and {gamma}-ray continuum in solar flares is interpreted as Bremsstrahlung emission of accelerated non-thermal electrons. It has been noted for a long time that in many flares the energy spectra show hardening at energies around or above 300 keV. In this paper, we first conduct a survey of spectral hardening events that were previously studied in the literature. We then perform a systematic examination of 185 flares from the Solar Maximum Mission. We identify 23 electron-dominated events whose energy spectra show clear double power laws. A statistical study of these events shows that the spectral index below the break ({gamma}{sub 1}) anti-correlates with the break energy ({epsilon}{sub b}). Furthermore, {gamma}{sub 1} also anti-correlates with Fr, the fraction of photons above the break compared to the total photons. A hardening spectrum, as well as the correlations between ({gamma}{sub 1}, {epsilon}{sub b}) and ({gamma}{sub 1}, Fr), provide stringent constraints on the underlying electron acceleration mechanism. Our results support a recent proposal that electrons are being accelerated diffusively at a flare termination shock with a width of the order of an ion inertial length scale.

  15. STATISTICAL STUDY of HARD X-RAY SPECTRAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SOLAR FLARES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaoui, M.; Krucker, S.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Lin, R. P.

    2009-12-01

    We investigate the spectral characteristics of 75 solar flares at the hard X-ray peak time observed by RHESSI (Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager) in the energy range 12-150keV. At energies above 40keV, the Hard X-ray emission is mostly produced by bremsstrahlung of suprathermal electrons as they interact with the ambient plasma in the chromosphere. The observed photon spectra therefore provide diagnostics of electron acceleration processes in Solar flares. We will present statistical results of spectral fitting using two models: a broken power law plus a thermal component which is a direct fit of the photon spectrum and a thick target model plus a thermal component which is a fit of the photon spectra with assumptions on the electrons emitting bremsstrahlung in the thick target approximation.

  16. Infrared Spectra of Acetylene Diluted in Solid Nitrogen upon Irradiation with Vacuum Ultraviolet Light and Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu-Jong; Chuang, Shiang-Jiun; Chen, Sian-Cong; Huang, Tzu-Ping

    2014-05-01

    Infrared spectra and chemical reactions of acetylene diluted in solid nitrogen at 10 K upon irradiation with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light and energetic electrons were investigated in separate experiments. Irradiation of the matrix sample with VUV light peaking at 160 and 121.6 nm yielded simple products, including C2H, CN, and isomers of C2N2. In contrast, electron irradiation of a similar sample generated N3, C2H, and various nitriles. The reaction mechanisms for photolysis and radiolysis of the matrix samples are discussed. Our results may help explain the distribution of trace species detected in the atmosphere of Titan. In addition, the UV absorption spectrum of the electron-bombarded icy sample was obtained and might be useful for future spectral investigations of Pluto by New Horizons.

  17. Theoretical calculations on electronic transitions for H/sub 3/, including Rydberg and transition state spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Petsalakis, I.D.; Theodorakopoulos, G.; Wright, J.S.

    1988-12-01

    MRD-CI calculations have been carried out on the ground and excited electronic states of H/sub 3/ for D/sub 3//sub h/, D/sub infinity//sub h/, C/sub infinity//sub v/, and C/sub 2//sub v/ geometries. Dipole transition moments between the various electronic states have been also obtained at the different geometries calculated. The present work provides accurate theoretical information relevant to the transition state spectroscopy of H+H/sub 2/ along a collinear path and also along a perpendicular path. In addition, the present work is the first all-electron configuration interaction treatment of the Rydberg states of H/sub 3/, and the results are in excellent agreement with the observed spectra.

  18. Path integral investigation of the electronic spectra of He-tetracene clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitley, Heather D.; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2008-03-01

    Planar aromatic molecules (PAMs) are nanoscale precursors to bulk graphite. Their electronic spectra have been extensively studied in ^4He nanodroplets and show a number of unusual spectroscopic features. We have conducted many-body quantum simulations of tetracene in He nanodroplets to probe the 1.1 cm-1 spectral splitting of the electronic origin seen for this PAM. We calculate spectral shifts and He density profiles via path integral quantum Monte Carlo simulations. The spectral splitting is examined using a path integral correlation function approach to determine the lowest-lying vibrational excitation frequencies for small HeN-tetracene clusters. Simulations in the S1 state of tetracene utilize a semi-empirical perturbative interaction potential for a He atom with a PAM. Results for the splitting of the electronic origin and the spectral shifts are in good agreement with experiment. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Target optimization for desired X-ray spectra produced by laser plasma accelerated electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobok, Maxim; Brantov, Andrey; Bychenkov, Valery

    2016-10-01

    Different regimes of electron acceleration from low-density targets are investigated using three-dimensional numerical simulations. Multiple spatial target density profiles were examined, including laser pre-pulse modified targets. The size of the plasma corona is shown to be one of the main parameters characterizing the temperature and number of hot electrons, which determine the yield of X-ray radiation and its hardness. The generation of X-ray radiation by laser accelerated electrons, which impact the converter target located behind the laser target, was studied. The X-ray spectra were computed using Monte-Carlo simulations. This work was partially supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research 16-02-00088-a.

  20. Magnetic phases in lunar material and their electron magnetic resonance spectra - Apollo 14.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Electron magnetic resonance spectra of soil samples 14163,68, 14148,31, 14149,47, 14156,31, and 14003,60, and of fragmental rocks 14301,66, 14303,42, 14310,68, 14311,36, 14318,36, and 14321,166 have been recorded at 9 and 35 GHz at 300 K and at 9 GHz at 130 K. One spectral component, the characteristic ferromagnetic resonance, of all the soil samples is 50 to 1000 times more intense than any other component in the soils or in the spectra of the rocks. The intensity of this component in Apollo 11, Apollo 12, and Apollo 14 soils varies only within one order of magnitude. It varies with depth below lunar surface but is not correlated with depth. The intensity does not have any correlation with the fraction of glassy particles nor with the fraction of anorthositic particles.

  1. Experimental and DFT studies on the vibrational, electronic spectra and NBO analysis of thiamethoxam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Yu; Ni, Haiwei; Ma, Kuirong; Li, Rongqing

    2014-01-01

    Vibrational and electronic spectral measurements were performed for 3-(2-chloro-1,3-thiazol-5-ylmethyl)-5-methyl-1,3,5-oxadiazinan-4-ylidene(nitro) amine (thiamethoxam). Optimized geometrical structure and harmonic vibrational frequencies were calculated with ab initio RHF and DFT (B3LYP, CAMB3LYP, M06 and PBE1PBE) methods with 6-311++G (d, p) basis set. Complete assignments of the observed spectra were proposed. The absorption spectra of the compound were computed in gas-phase using TD-B3LYP/6-311++G (d, p) approach and H2O solution using PCM-TD-B3LYP/6-311++G (d, p) approach. The calculated results matched well with the experimental values. Temperature dependence of thermodynamic parameters in the range of 100-1000 K were determined. The bond orbital occupancies, contribution from parent natural bond orbital (NBO), the natural atomic hybrids was discussed.

  2. Experimental and DFT studies on the vibrational, electronic spectra and NBO analysis of thiamethoxam.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Yu; Ni, Haiwei; Ma, Kuirong; Li, Rongqing

    2014-01-24

    Vibrational and electronic spectral measurements were performed for 3-(2-chloro-1,3-thiazol-5-ylmethyl)-5-methyl-1,3,5-oxadiazinan-4-ylidene(nitro) amine (thiamethoxam). Optimized geometrical structure and harmonic vibrational frequencies were calculated with ab initio RHF and DFT (B3LYP, CAMB3LYP, M06 and PBE1PBE) methods with 6-311++G (d, p) basis set. Complete assignments of the observed spectra were proposed. The absorption spectra of the compound were computed in gas-phase using TD-B3LYP/6-311++G (d, p) approach and H2O solution using PCM-TD-B3LYP/6-311++G (d, p) approach. The calculated results matched well with the experimental values. Temperature dependence of thermodynamic parameters in the range of 100-1000 K were determined. The bond orbital occupancies, contribution from parent natural bond orbital (NBO), the natural atomic hybrids was discussed.

  3. Flare stars at radio wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    1990-01-01

    The radio emission from dMe flare stars is discussed using Very Large Array and Arecibo observations as examples. Active flare stars emit weak, unpolarized, quiescent radio radiation that may be always present. Although thermal bremsstrahlung and/or thermal gyroresonance radiation account for the slowly-varying, quiescent radio radiation of solar active regions, these processes cannot account for the long-wavelength quiescent radiation observed from nearby dMe flare stars. It has been attributed to nonthermal gyrosynchrotron radiation, but some as yet unexplained mechanism must be continually producing the energetic electrons. Long duration, narrow-band radiation is also emitted from some nearby dMe stars at 20 cm wavelength. Such radiation may be attributed to coherent plasma radiation or to coherent electron-cyclotron masers. Impulsive stellar flares exhibit rapid variations that require radio sources that are smaller than the star in size, and high brightness temperatures greater than 10(exp 15) K that are also explained by coherent radiation processes. Quasi-periodic temporal fluctuations suggest pulsations during some radio flares. Evidence for frequency structure and positive or negative frequency drifts during radio flares from dMe stars is also presented.

  4. Flare stars at radio wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    1989-01-01

    The radio emission from dMe flare stars is discussed using Very Large Array and Arecibo observations as examples. Active flare stars emit weak, unpolarized, quiescent radio radiation that may be always present. Although thermal bremsstrahlung and/or thermal gyroresonance radiation account for the slowly-varying, quiescent radio radiation of solar active regions, these processes cannot account for the long-wavelength quiescent radiation observed from nearby dMe flare stars. It has been attributed to nonthermal gyrosynchrotron radiation, but some as yet unexplained mechanism must be continually producing the energetic electrons. Long duration, narrow-band radiation is also emitted from some nearby dMe stars at 20 cm wavelength. Such radiation may be attributed to coherent plasma radiation or to coherent electron-cyclotron masers. Impulsive stellar flares exhibit rapid variations that require radio sources that are smaller than the star in size, and high brightness temperatures greater than 10(exp 15) K that are also explained by coherent radiation processes. Quasi-periodic temporal fluctuations suggest pulsations during some radio flares. Evidence for frequency structure and positive or negative frequency drifts during radio flares from dMe stars is also presented.

  5. Impulsive solar X-ray bursts: Bremsstrahlung radiation from a beam of electrons in the solar chromosphere and the total energy of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis of various aspects of impulsive X-ray bursts (IXB's) has lead to the consideration of a model where the X-rays are produced by bremsstrahlung radiation from a beam of electrons directed toward the photosphere. It was found that in general the X-ray spectrum from such a beam will fall off more rapidly than when the effect of the beaming of radiation is neglected. Furthermore, the spectral index of the resulting X-rays appears to increase by about unity for X-ray energies 100 kev, a fact which may explain the observed cutoff in the spectrum of the IXB's. It is also shown that in such a model there is sufficient energy in the form of nonthermal electrons to explain the total energy (approximately 10 to the 32nd power ergs) of a flare.

  6. Study of Flare Energy Release Using Events with Numerous Type III-like Bursts in Microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshalkina, N. S.; Altyntsev, A. T.; Zhdanov, D. A.; Lesovoi, S. V.; Kochanov, A. A.; Yan, Y. H.; Tan, C. M.

    2012-10-01

    The analysis of narrowband drifting of type III-like structures in radio bursts dynamic spectra allows one to obtain unique information about the primary energy release mechanisms in solar flares. The SSRT (Siberian Solar Radio Telescope) spatially resolved images and its high spectral and temporal resolution allow for direct determination not only of the source positions but also of the exciter velocities along the flare loop. Practically, such measurements are possible during some special time intervals when SSRT is observing the flare region in two high-order fringes near 5.7 GHz; thus, two 1D brightness distributions are recorded simultaneously at two frequency bands. The analysis of type III-like bursts recorded during the flare 14 April 2002 is presented. Using multiwavelength radio observations recorded by the SSRT, the Huairou Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer (SBRS), the Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters (NoRP), and the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), we study an event with series of several tens of drifting microwave pulses with drift rates in the range from -7 to 13 GHz s-1. The sources of the fast-drifting bursts were located near the top of a flare loop in a volume of a few Mm in size. The slow drift of the exciters along the flare loop suggests a high pitch anisotropy of the emitting electrons.

  7. Detection of nanoscale electron spin resonance spectra demonstrated using nitrogen-vacancy centre probes in diamond

    PubMed Central

    Hall, L. T.; Kehayias, P.; Simpson, D. A.; Jarmola, A.; Stacey, A.; Budker, D.; Hollenberg, L. C. L.

    2016-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) describes a suite of techniques for characterizing electronic systems with applications in physics, chemistry, and biology. However, the requirement for large electron spin ensembles in conventional ESR techniques limits their spatial resolution. Here we present a method for measuring ESR spectra of nanoscale electronic environments by measuring the longitudinal relaxation time of a single-spin probe as it is systematically tuned into resonance with the target electronic system. As a proof of concept, we extracted the spectral distribution for the P1 electronic spin bath in diamond by using an ensemble of nitrogen-vacancy centres, and demonstrated excellent agreement with theoretical expectations. As the response of each nitrogen-vacancy spin in this experiment is dominated by a single P1 spin at a mean distance of 2.7 nm, the application of this technique to the single nitrogen-vacancy case will enable nanoscale ESR spectroscopy of atomic and molecular spin systems. PMID:26728001

  8. Understanding the inelastic electron-tunneling spectra of alkanedithiols on gold.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Gemma C; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Frauenheim, Thomas; Di Carlo, Aldo; Reimers, Jeffrey R; Hush, Noel S

    2006-03-07

    We present results for a simulated inelastic electron-tunneling spectra (IETS) from calculations using the "gDFTB" code. The geometric and electronic structure is obtained from calculations using a local-basis density-functional scheme, and a nonequilibrium Green's function formalism is employed to deal with the transport aspects of the problem. The calculated spectrum of octanedithiol on gold(111) shows good agreement with experimental results and suggests further details in the assignment of such spectra. We show that some low-energy peaks, unassigned in the experimental spectrum, occur in a region where a number of molecular modes are predicted to be active, suggesting that these modes are the cause of the peaks rather than a matrix signal, as previously postulated. The simulations also reveal the qualitative nature of the processes dominating IETS. It is highly sensitive only to the vibrational motions that occur in the regions of the molecule where there is electron density in the low-voltage conduction channel. This result is illustrated with an examination of the predicted variation of IETS with binding site and alkane chain length.

  9. The beta-SiC(100) surface studied by low energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, and electron energy loss spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayan, M.

    1986-01-01

    The beta-SiC(100) surface has been studied by low energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, high resolution electron energy loss spectra (HREELS), and core level excitation EELS. Two new Si-terminated phases have been discovered, one with (3 x 2) symmetry, and the other with (2 x 1) symmetry. Models are presented to describe these phases. New results, for the C-rich surface, are presented and discussed. In addition, core level excitation EELS results are given and compared with theory.

  10. Data-driven Radiative Hydrodynamic Modeling of the 2014 March 29 X1.0 Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio da Costa, Fatima; Kleint, Lucia; Petrosian, Vahé; Liu, Wei; Allred, Joel C.

    2016-08-01

    Spectroscopic observations of solar flares provide critical diagnostics of the physical conditions in the flaring atmosphere. Some key features in observed spectra have not yet been accounted for in existing flare models. Here we report a data-driven simulation of the well-observed X1.0 flare on 2014 March 29 that can reconcile some well-known spectral discrepancies. We analyzed spectra of the flaring region from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) in Mg ii h&k, the Interferometric BIdimensional Spectropolarimeter at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST/IBIS) in Hα 6563 Å and Ca ii 8542 Å, and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscope Imager (RHESSI) in hard X-rays. We constructed a multithreaded flare loop model and used the electron flux inferred from RHESSI data as the input to the radiative hydrodynamic code RADYN to simulate the atmospheric response. We then synthesized various chromospheric emission lines and compared them with the IRIS and IBIS observations. In general, the synthetic intensities agree with the observed ones, especially near the northern footpoint of the flare. The simulated Mg ii line profile has narrower wings than the observed one. This discrepancy can be reduced by using a higher microturbulent velocity (27 km s-1) in a narrow chromospheric layer. In addition, we found that an increase of electron density in the upper chromosphere within a narrow height range of ≈800 km below the transition region can turn the simulated Mg ii line core into emission and thus reproduce the single peaked profile, which is a common feature in all IRIS flares.

  11. Bayesian electron density inference from JET lithium beam emission spectra using Gaussian processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Sehyun; Svensson, J.; Brix, M.; Ghim, Y.-C.; Contributors, JET

    2017-03-01

    A Bayesian model to infer edge electron density profiles is developed for the JET lithium beam emission spectroscopy (Li-BES) system, measuring Li I (2p-2s) line radiation using 26 channels with  ∼1 cm spatial resolution and 10∼ 20 ms temporal resolution. The density profile is modelled using a Gaussian process prior, and the uncertainty of the density profile is calculated by a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) scheme. From the spectra measured by the transmission grating spectrometer, the Li I line intensities are extracted, and modelled as a function of the plasma density by a multi-state model which describes the relevant processes between neutral lithium beam atoms and plasma particles. The spectral model fully takes into account interference filter and instrument effects, that are separately estimated, again using Gaussian processes. The line intensities are inferred based on a spectral model consistent with the measured spectra within their uncertainties, which includes photon statistics and electronic noise. Our newly developed method to infer JET edge electron density profiles has the following advantages in comparison to the conventional method: (i) providing full posterior distributions of edge density profiles, including their associated uncertainties, (ii) the available radial range for density profiles is increased to the full observation range (∼26 cm), (iii) an assumption of monotonic electron density profile is not necessary, (iv) the absolute calibration factor of the diagnostic system is automatically estimated overcoming the limitation of the conventional technique and allowing us to infer the electron density profiles for all pulses without preprocessing the data or an additional boundary condition, and (v) since the full spectrum is modelled, the procedure of modulating the beam to measure the background signal is only necessary for the case of overlapping of the Li I line with impurity lines.

  12. Electronic Spectra of TRIS(2,2'-BIPYRIDINE)-METAL Complex Ions in Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shuang; Smith, James E. T.; Weber, J. Mathias

    2016-06-01

    Tris(bpy)-metal complexes (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) and their derivatives are important systems in metal-organic chemistry. While tris(bpy)-ruthenium, Ru(bpy)32+, has been extensively studied, less attention has been paid to analogous complexes involving first row transition metals. Here we report the electronic spectra of a series of dicationic tris(bpy) chelates with different transition metals, measured by photodisscociation spectroscopy of cryogenically prepared ions. We focus our attention on the π-π* transitions in the UV region of the spectrum.

  13. Differential spectra and phase space densities of trapped electrons at Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcilwain, C. E.; Fillius, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    Using Pioneer 10 data, differential spectra and phase-space densities have been constructed for trapped electrons at Jupiter. These quantities should assist in calculating synchrotron radiation from these particles and in evaluating the diffusion mechanisms that accelerate the particles. Absorption by the moons Io and Europa is evident, and injection by Io is demonstrated by a density peak in phase space, which demands a local source. There is also a rapid decrease in density between the moons, which could call for either a local loss mechanism or nonlocal losses fed by diffusion.

  14. Solvent effects on the electronic absorption spectra and acid strength of some substituted pyridinols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashem, Elham Y.; Saleh, Magda S.

    2002-01-01

    The electronic absorption spectra of some substituted pyridinols in organic solvents of different polarities are studied. Also, the solvent effects on the intramolecular charge transfer bands are discussed using various solvent parameters. The acid-base equilibria of the compounds used are studied spectrophotometrically in various mixed aqueous solvents at 25 °C and 0.1 M ionic strength (NaClO 4). Furthermore, the influence of the solvents on the dissociation constants and tautomeric equilibria of a pyridinol derivatives are discussed. The effect of molecular structure of the pyridinols on the p K's is also examined.

  15. Influence of vortex quantum fluctuations on the electronic spectra of superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartosch, Lorenz; Sachdev, Subir

    2006-03-01

    We compute the influence of the zero point motion of vortices on the electronic quasiparticle spectra of two-dimensional s- and d-wave superconductors. In the core region the zero point motion of the vortices leads to a shift of spectral weight away from the Fermi level and thereby reduces the zero bias conductance peak. We discuss the relationship of our results to STM measurements on the cuprates and the observed 7 meV LDOS peaks near the core of vortices.

  16. Study of the photoelectron and electron momentum spectra of cyclopentene using benchmark Dyson orbital theories.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan R; Ning, Chuan G; Deng, Jing K; Deleuze, Michael S

    2008-05-07

    A complete study of the valence electronic structure and related electronic excitation properties of cyclopentene in its C(s) ground state geometry is presented. Ionization spectra obtained from this compound by means of photoelectron spectroscopy (He I and He II) and electron momentum spectroscopy have been analyzed in details up to electron binding energies of 30 eV using one-particle Green's function (1p-GF) theory along with the outer-valence (OVGF) and the third-order algebraic diagrammatic construction [ADC(3)] schemes. The employed geometries derive from DFT/B3LYP calculations in conjunction with the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set, and closely approach the structures inferred from experiments employing microwave spectroscopy or electron diffraction in the gas phase. The 1p-GF/ADC(3) calculations indicate that the orbital picture of ionization breaks down at electron binding energies larger than approximately 17 eV in the inner-valence region, and that the outer-valence 7a' orbital is also subject to a significant dispersion of the ionization intensity over shake-up states. This study confirms further the rule that OVGF pole strengths smaller than 0.85 foretell a breakdown of the orbital picture of ionization at the ADC(3) level. Spherically averaged (e, 2e) electron momentum distributions at an electron impact energy of 1200 eV that were experimentally inferred from an angular analysis of EMS intensities have been interpreted by comparison with accurate simulations employing ADC(3) Dyson orbitals. Very significant discrepancies were observed with momentum distributions obtained from several outer-valence ionization bands using standard Kohn-Sham orbitals.

  17. SU-E-T-238: Deriving Electron Contamination Spectra From Pure and Clinical Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, C; Plessis, F du

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To extract the electron contamination energy spectra for an Elekta Precise Linac, based on pure photon and measured clinical beam percentage depth dose data. And to include this as an additional source in isource 4 in DOSXYZnrc. Methods: A pure photon beam was simulated for the Linac using isource 4 in the DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo (MC) code. Percentage depth dose (PDD) data were extracted afterwards for a range of field sizes (FS). These simulated dose data were compared to actual measured dose PDD data, with the data normalized at 10 cm depth. The resulting PDD data resembled the electron contamination depth dose. Since the dose fall-off is a strictly decreasing function, a method was adopted to derive the contamination electron spectrum. Afterwards this spectrum was used in a DOSXYZnrc MC simulation run to verify that the original electron depth dose could be replicated. Results: Various square aperture FS’s for 6, 8 and 15 megavolt (MV) photon beams were modeled, simulated and compared to their respective actual measured PDD data. As FS increased, simulated pure photon depth-dose profiles shifted deeper, thus requiring electron contamination to increase the surface dose. The percentage of electron weight increased with increase in FS. For a FS of 15×15 cm{sup 2}, the percentage electron weight is 0.1%, 0.2% and 0.4% for 6, 8 and 15 MV beams respectively. Conclusion: From the PDD results obtained, an additional electron contamination source was added to the photon source model so that simulation and measured PDD data could match within 2 % / 2 mm gamma-index criteria. The improved source model could assure more accurate simulations of surface doses. This research project was funded by the South African Medical Research Council (MRC) with funds from National Treasury under its Economic Competitiveness and Support package.

  18. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Mössbauer Spectra of Iron Ions in Bizen Pottery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Yuki; Ikeya, Motoji

    1995-11-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and Mössbauer spectra of Japanese traditional Bizen pottery and its constituent clays have been measured to study the relationship between the color of pottery surface and the relevant states of iron ions ( Fe3+ and Fe2+). Hyperfine signals of Mn2+, presumably in carbonates, and a broad signal at g=2.0 similar to that of hematite ( Fe2O3) were observed for good-quality clay, while a signal at g>9 similar to that of magnetite ( Fe3O4) was observed for poor-quality clay. In pottery, the apparent g-factor of g=4.3 due to a large orthorhombic distortion E(Sx2-Sy2) and g=6 due to a large axial field DSz2 were observed in addition to the broad signal around g=2 due to oxidation of iron into Fe2O3. Subtle change of colors resulted in the change of EPR spectra. Mössbauer spectra indicatcd that almost all of the iron ions at the surface of pottery are strongly oxidized into Fe3+ when the pottery is fired in oxidizing atmosphere, while those inside the pottery and at the surface fired at reducing atmosphere are not strongly oxidized into Fe3+.

  19. Impact of the Electronic Band Structure in High-Harmonic Generation Spectra of Solids.

    PubMed

    Tancogne-Dejean, Nicolas; Mücke, Oliver D; Kärtner, Franz X; Rubio, Angel

    2017-02-24

    An accurate analytic model describing the microscopic mechanism of high-harmonic generation (HHG) in solids is derived. Extensive first-principles simulations within a time-dependent density-functional framework corroborate the conclusions of the model. Our results reveal that (i) the emitted HHG spectra are highly anisotropic and laser-polarization dependent even for cubic crystals; (ii) the harmonic emission is enhanced by the inhomogeneity of the electron-nuclei potential; the yield is increased for heavier atoms; and (iii) the cutoff photon energy is driver-wavelength independent. Moreover, we show that it is possible to predict the laser polarization for optimal HHG in bulk crystals solely from the knowledge of their electronic band structure. Our results pave the way to better control and optimize HHG in solids by engineering their band structure.

  20. Impact of the Electronic Band Structure in High-Harmonic Generation Spectra of Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tancogne-Dejean, Nicolas; Mücke, Oliver D.; Kärtner, Franz X.; Rubio, Angel

    2017-02-01

    An accurate analytic model describing the microscopic mechanism of high-harmonic generation (HHG) in solids is derived. Extensive first-principles simulations within a time-dependent density-functional framework corroborate the conclusions of the model. Our results reveal that (i) the emitted HHG spectra are highly anisotropic and laser-polarization dependent even for cubic crystals; (ii) the harmonic emission is enhanced by the inhomogeneity of the electron-nuclei potential; the yield is increased for heavier atoms; and (iii) the cutoff photon energy is driver-wavelength independent. Moreover, we show that it is possible to predict the laser polarization for optimal HHG in bulk crystals solely from the knowledge of their electronic band structure. Our results pave the way to better control and optimize HHG in solids by engineering their band structure.

  1. Measurement of Separate Cosmic-Ray Electron and Positron Spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Brogland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K.; McEnery, J. E.

    2011-01-01

    We measured separate cosmic-ray electron and positron spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Because the instrument does not have an onboard magnet, we distinguish the two species by exploiting the Earth's shadow, which is offset in opposite directions for opposite charges due to the Earth's magnetic field. We estimate and subtract the cosmic-ray proton background using two different methods that produce consistent results. We report the electron-only spectrum, the positron-only spectrum, and the positron fraction between 20 GeV and 200 GeV, We confirm that the fraction rises with energy in the 20-100 GeV range and determine for the first time that it continues to rise between 100 and 200 GeV,

  2. Measurement of Separate Cosmic-Ray Electron and Positron Spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K.; McEnery, J. E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Ackemann, M.

    2012-01-01

    We measured separate cosmic-ray electron and positron spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Because the instrument does not have an onboard magnet, we distinguish the two species by exploiting Earth's shadow, which, is offset in opposite directions for opposite charges due to Earth's magnetic field. We estimate and subtract the cosmic-ray proton background using two different methods that produce consistent results. We report the electron-only spectrum, the positron-only spectrum, and the positron fraction between 20 and 200 Ge V. We confirm that the fraction rises with energy in the 20-100 Ge V range. The three new spectral points between 100 and 200 GeV are consistent with a fraction that is continuing to rise with energy.

  3. Theoretical calculations on the electron absorption spectra of selected Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) and derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du, Ping

    1993-01-01

    As a theoretical component of the joint effort with the laboratory of Dr. Lou Allamandola to search for potential candidates for interstellar organic carbon compound that are responsible for the visible diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIB's), quantum mechanical calculations were performed on the electron absorption spectra of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and derivatives. In the completed project, 15 different species of naphthalene, its hydrogen abstraction and addition derivatives, and corresponding cations and anions were studied. Using semiempirical quantum mechanical method INDO/S, the ground electronic state of each species was evaluated with restricted Hartree-Fock scheme and limited configuration interaction. The lowest energy spin state for each species was used for electron absorption calculations. Results indicate that these calculations are accurate enough to reproduce the spectra of naphthalene cation and anion observed in neon matrix. The spectral pattern of the hydrogen abstraction and addition derivatives predicted based on these results indicate that the electron configuration of the pi orbitals of these species is the dominant determinant. A combined list of 19 absorptions calculated from 4500 A to 10,400 A were compiled and suggested as potential candidates that are relevant for the DIB's absorptions. Continued studies on pyrene and derivatives revealed the ground state symmetries and multiplicities of its neutral, anionic, and cationic species. Spectral calculations show that the cation (B(sub 3g)-2) and the anion (A(sub u)-2) are more likely to have low energy absorptions in the regions between 10 kK and 20 kK, similar to naphthalene. These absorptions, together with those to be determined from the hydrogen abstraction and addition derivatives of pyrene, can be used to provide additional candidates and suggest experimental work in the search for interstellar compounds that are responsible for DIB's.

  4. A combination spectrophotometer for measuring electronic absorption, natural circular dichroism, and magnetic circular dichroism spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Policke, Timothy A.; Schreiner, Anton F.; Trexler, Jack W.; Knopp, James A.

    1990-08-01

    The design, construction, and evaluation of a combination spectrometer for measuring electronic absorption (EA), natural circular dichroism (CD), and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) are described. Around the optical components of a JASCO ORD/UV-5 spectropolarimeter, a new EA/CD/MCD instrument was built with the realized intentions of increasing sensitivity and upgrading the analog tube type circuitry to a solid-state digitally, computer-controlled spectrophotometer. It is a flexible, dynamic, and user-controllable system, interfaced to an Apple II Plus computer, for studying instrument and signal parameters. The monochromator (M), photoelastic modulator (PEM), photomultiplier tube applied voltage (PMHV), and photomultiplier tube dc output current (PMdc) are under complete and independent software control. Our system has two unique aspects for obtaining the circular dichroism. First, the ac signal is measured with a voltage-to-frequency (V/f) converter; and, second, both the ac and the dc are independently recorded and their ratio is digitally calculated. This design has several advantages which include the elimination of voltage divider integrated circuits or division electronics, a wide dynamic range, a greater precision of ac values at low percentages of full scale, and the capability of continuous integration over long time periods. Also, both types of spectra, EA and CD or MCD, are obtained from the current output of the PM. This paper not only describes the design of the instrument for obtaining the two types of spectra but also compares four methods of obtaining the circular dichroism. Sensitivities of ˜1×10-7ΔA units are achievable as determined by measuring CD spectra of the well-known enantiomer (+)-[Co(en)3]3+.

  5. Spatially and momentum resolved energy electron loss spectra from an ultra-thin PrNiO{sub 3} layer

    SciTech Connect

    Kinyanjui, M. K. Kaiser, U.; Benner, G.; Pavia, G.; Boucher, F.; Habermeier, H.-U.; Keimer, B.

    2015-05-18

    We present an experimental approach which allows for the acquisition of spectra from ultra-thin films at high spatial, momentum, and energy resolutions. Spatially and momentum (q) resolved electron energy loss spectra have been obtained from a 12 nm ultra-thin PrNiO{sub 3} layer using a nano-beam electron diffraction based approach which enabled the acquisition of momentum resolved spectra from individual, differently oriented nano-domains and at different positions of the PrNiO{sub 3} thin layer. The spatial and wavelength dependence of the spectral excitations are obtained and characterized after the analysis of the experimental spectra using calculated dielectric and energy loss functions. The presented approach makes a contribution towards obtaining momentum-resolved spectra from nanostructures, thin film, heterostructures, surfaces, and interfaces.

  6. M Dwarf Flare Continuum Variations on One-second Timescales: Calibrating and Modeling of ULTRACAM Flare Color Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Wisniewski, John P.; Dhillon, Vik S.; Marsh, Tom R.; Hilton, Eric J.; Brown, Benjamin P.

    2016-04-01

    We present a large data set of high-cadence dMe flare light curves obtained with custom continuum filters on the triple-beam, high-speed camera system ULTRACAM. The measurements provide constraints for models of the near-ultraviolet (NUV) and optical continuum spectral evolution on timescales of ≈1 s. We provide a robust interpretation of the flare emission in the ULTRACAM filters using simultaneously obtained low-resolution spectra during two moderate-sized flares in the dM4.5e star YZ CMi. By avoiding the spectral complexity within the broadband Johnson filters, the ULTRACAM filters are shown to characterize bona fide continuum emission in the NUV, blue, and red wavelength regimes. The NUV/blue flux ratio in flares is equivalent to a Balmer jump ratio, and the blue/red flux ratio provides an estimate for the color temperature of the optical continuum emission. We present a new “color-color” relationship for these continuum flux ratios at the peaks of the flares. Using the RADYN and RH codes, we interpret the ULTRACAM filter emission using the dominant emission processes from a radiative-hydrodynamic flare model with a high nonthermal electron beam flux, which explains a hot, T ≈ 104 K, color temperature at blue-to-red optical wavelengths and a small Balmer jump ratio as observed in moderate-sized and large flares alike. We also discuss the high time resolution, high signal-to-noise continuum color variations observed in YZ CMi during a giant flare, which increased the NUV flux from this star by over a factor of 100. Based on observations obtained with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m telescope, which is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium, based on observations made with the William Herschel Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofsica de Canarias, and observations, and based on observations made with the ESO Telescopes

  7. Observations and Simulations of the Na i D1 Line Profiles in an M-class Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Christian, D. J.; Kowalski, A. F.; Jess, D. B.; Grant, S. D. T.; Kawate, T.; Simões, P. J. A.; Allred, J. C.; Keenan, F. P.

    2016-12-01

    We study the temporal evolution of the Na i D1 line profiles in the M3.9 flare SOL2014-06-11T21:03 UT, using observations at high spectral resolution obtained with the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer instrument on the Dunn Solar Telescope combined with radiative hydrodynamic simulations. Our results show a significant increase in the intensities of the line core and wings during the flare. The analysis of the line profiles from the flare ribbons reveals that the Na i D1 line has a central reversal with excess emission in the blue wing (blue asymmetry). We combine RADYN and RH simulations to synthesize Na i D1 line profiles of the flaring atmosphere and find good agreement with the observations. Heating with a beam of electrons modifies the radiation field in the flaring atmosphere and excites electrons from the ground state 3s 2S to the first excited state 3p 2P, which in turn modifies the relative population of the two states. The change in temperature and the population density of the energy states make the sodium line profile revert from absorption into emission. Furthermore, the rapid changes in temperature break the pressure balance between the different layers of the lower atmosphere, generating upflow/downflow patterns. Analysis of the simulated spectra reveals that the asymmetries of the Na i D1 flare profile are produced by the velocity gradients in the lower solar atmosphere.

  8. Relation between fine structure of energy spectra for pulsating aurora electrons and frequency spectra of whistler mode chorus waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Y.; Saito, S.; Seki, K.; Nishiyama, T.; Kataoka, R.; Asamura, K.; Katoh, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Sakanoi, T.; Hirahara, M.; Oyama, S.; Kurita, S.; Santolik, O.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the origin of the fine structure of the energy spectrum of precipitating electrons for the pulsating aurora (PsA) observed by the low-altitude Reimei satellite. The Reimei satellite achieved simultaneous observations of the optical images and precipitating electrons of the PsA from satellite altitude (~620 km) with resolution of 40 ms. The main modulation of precipitation, with a few seconds, and the internal modulations, with a few hertz, that are embedded inside the main modulations are identified above ~3 keV. Moreover, stable precipitations at ~1 keV are found for the PsA. A "precipitation gap" is discovered between two energy bands. We identify the origin of the fine structure of the energy spectrum for the precipitating electrons using the computer simulation on the wave-particle interaction between electrons and chorus waves. The lower band chorus (LBC) bursts cause the main modulation of energetic electrons, and the generation and collapse of the LBC bursts determines on-off switching of the PsA. A train of rising tone elements embedded in the LBC bursts drives the internal modulations. A close set of upper band chorus (UBC) waves causes the stable precipitations at ~1 keV. We show that a wave power gap around the half gyrofrequency at the equatorial plane in the magnetosphere between LBC and UBC reduces the loss rate of electrons at the intermediate energy range, forming a gap of precipitating electrons in the ionosphere.

  9. Spectral investigations of 2,5-difluoroaniline by using mass, electronic absorption, NMR, and vibrational spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kose, Etem; Karabacak, Mehmet; Bardak, Fehmi; Atac, Ahmet

    2016-11-01

    One of the most significant aromatic amines is aniline, a primary aromatic amine replacing one hydrogen atom of a benzene molecule with an amino group (NH2). This study reports experimental and theoretical investigation of 2,5-difluoroaniline molecule (2,5-DFA) by using mass, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis), 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier transform infrared and Raman (FT-IR and FT-Raman) spectra, and supported with theoretical calculations. Mass spectrum (MS) of 2,5-DFA is presented with their stabilities. The UV-vis spectra of the molecule are recorded in the range of 190-400 nm in water and ethanol solvents. The 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts are recorded in CDCl3 solution. The vibrational spectra are recorded in the region 4000-400 cm-1 (FT-IR) and 4000-10 cm-1 (FT-Raman), respectively. Theoretical studies are underpinned the experimental results as described below; 2,5-DFA molecule is optimized by using B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The mass spectrum is evaluated and possible fragmentations are proposed based on the stable structure. The electronic properties, such as excitation energies, oscillator strengths, wavelengths, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), HOMO and LUMO energies, are determined by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). The electrostatic potential surface (ESPs), density of state (DOS) diagrams are also prepared and evaluated. In addition to these, reduced density gradient (RDG) analysis is performed, and thermodynamic features are carried out theoretically. The NMR spectra (1H and 13C) are calculated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The vibrational spectra of 2,5-DFA molecule are obtained by using DFT/B3LYP method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. Fundamental vibrations are assigned based on the potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes. The nonlinear optical properties (NLO) are also investigated. The theoretical and experimental results give a detailed description of

  10. Improved peptide identification for proteomic analysis based on comprehensive characterization of electron transfer dissociation spectra.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rui-Xiang; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Song, Chun-Qing; Chi, Hao; Yang, Bing; Xiu, Li-Yun; Tao, Li; Jing, Zhi-Yi; Liu, Chao; Wang, Le-Heng; Fu, Yan; He, Si-Min

    2010-12-03

    In recent years, electron transfer dissociation (ETD) has enjoyed widespread applications from sequencing of peptides with or without post-translational modifications to top-down analysis of intact proteins. However, peptide identification rates from ETD spectra compare poorly with those from collision induced dissociation (CID) spectra, especially for doubly charged precursors. This is in part due to an insufficient understanding of the characteristics of ETD and consequently a failure of database search engines to make use of the rich information contained in the ETD spectra. In this study, we statistically characterized ETD fragmentation patterns from a collection of 461 440 spectra and subsequently implemented our findings into pFind, a database search engine developed earlier for CID data. From ETD spectra of doubly charged precursors, pFind 2.1 identified 63-122% more unique peptides than Mascot 2.2 under the same 1% false discovery rate. For higher charged peptides as well as phosphopeptides, pFind 2.1 also consistently obtained more identifications. Of the features built into pFind 2.1, the following two greatly enhanced its performance: (1) refined automatic detection and removal of high-intensity peaks belonging to the precursor, charge-reduced precursor, or related neutral loss species, whose presence often set spectral matching askew; (2) a thorough consideration of hydrogen-rearranged fragment ions such as z + H and c - H for peptide precursors of different charge states. Our study has revealed that different charge states of precursors result in different hydrogen rearrangement patterns. For a fragment ion, its propensity of gaining or losing a hydrogen depends on (1) the ion type (c or z) and (2) the size of the fragment relative to the precursor, and both dependencies are affected by (3) the charge state of the precursor. In addition, we discovered ETD characteristics that are unique for certain types of amino acids (AAs), such as a prominent

  11. Helios 1 energetic particle observations of the solar gamma ray flare events of 7, 21 June 1980 and 3 June 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, F. B.; Vanhollebeke, M. A. I.; Trainor, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The observed characteristics of the energetic particles associated with the solar gamma-ray events of 3, 21 June 1980 and 3 June 1982 differ in several important aspects from the typical solar particle increases. They have flat energy spectra, are electron rich and have small precursors increases that begin some hours before the impulsive flare increase.

  12. Impact of environmentally induced fluctuations on quantum mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational pigment states in photosynthetic energy transfer and 2D electronic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Fleming, Graham R.; Ishizaki, Akihito

    2015-06-01

    Recently, nuclear vibrational contribution signatures in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy have attracted considerable interest, in particular as regards interpretation of the oscillatory transients observed in light-harvesting complexes. These transients have dephasing times that persist for much longer than theoretically predicted electronic coherence lifetime. As a plausible explanation for this long-lived spectral beating in 2D electronic spectra, quantum-mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational states (vibronic excitons) were proposed by Christensson et al. [J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 7449 (2012)] and have since been explored. In this work, we address a dimer which produces little beating of electronic origin in the absence of vibronic contributions, and examine the impact of protein-induced fluctuations upon electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures by calculating the electronic energy transfer dynamics and 2D electronic spectra in a numerically accurate manner. It is found that, at cryogenic temperatures, the electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures are rather robust, even under the influence of the fluctuations and despite the small Huang-Rhys factors of the Franck-Condon active vibrational modes. This results in long-lasting beating behavior of vibrational origin in the 2D electronic spectra. At physiological temperatures, however, the fluctuations eradicate the mixing, and hence, the beating in the 2D spectra disappears. Further, it is demonstrated that such electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures do not necessarily play a significant role in electronic energy transfer dynamics, despite contributing to the enhancement of long-lived quantum beating in 2D electronic spectra, contrary to speculations in recent publications.

  13. Impact of environmentally induced fluctuations on quantum mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational pigment states in photosynthetic energy transfer and 2D electronic spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Ishizaki, Akihito; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-06-07

    Recently, nuclear vibrational contribution signatures in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy have attracted considerable interest, in particular as regards interpretation of the oscillatory transients observed in light-harvesting complexes. These transients have dephasing times that persist for much longer than theoretically predicted electronic coherence lifetime. As a plausible explanation for this long-lived spectral beating in 2D electronic spectra, quantum-mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational states (vibronic excitons) were proposed by Christensson et al. [J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 7449 (2012)] and have since been explored. In this work, we address a dimer which produces little beating of electronic origin in the absence of vibronic contributions, and examine the impact of protein-induced fluctuations upon electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures by calculating the electronic energy transfer dynamics and 2D electronic spectra in a numerically accurate manner. It is found that, at cryogenic temperatures, the electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures are rather robust, even under the influence of the fluctuations and despite the small Huang-Rhys factors of the Franck-Condon active vibrational modes. This results in long-lasting beating behavior of vibrational origin in the 2D electronic spectra. At physiological temperatures, however, the fluctuations eradicate the mixing, and hence, the beating in the 2D spectra disappears. Further, it is demonstrated that such electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures do not necessarily play a significant role in electronic energy transfer dynamics, despite contributing to the enhancement of long-lived quantum beating in 2D electronic spectra, contrary to speculations in recent publications.

  14. Impact of environmentally induced fluctuations on quantum mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational pigment states in photosynthetic energy transfer and 2D electronic spectra.

    PubMed

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Fleming, Graham R; Ishizaki, Akihito

    2015-06-07

    Recently, nuclear vibrational contribution signatures in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy have attracted considerable interest, in particular as regards interpretation of the oscillatory transients observed in light-harvesting complexes. These transients have dephasing times that persist for much longer than theoretically predicted electronic coherence lifetime. As a plausible explanation for this long-lived spectral beating in 2D electronic spectra, quantum-mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational states (vibronic excitons) were proposed by Christensson et al. [J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 7449 (2012)] and have since been explored. In this work, we address a dimer which produces little beating of electronic origin in the absence of vibronic contributions, and examine the impact of protein-induced fluctuations upon electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures by calculating the electronic energy transfer dynamics and 2D electronic spectra in a numerically accurate manner. It is found that, at cryogenic temperatures, the electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures are rather robust, even under the influence of the fluctuations and despite the small Huang-Rhys factors of the Franck-Condon active vibrational modes. This results in long-lasting beating behavior of vibrational origin in the 2D electronic spectra. At physiological temperatures, however, the fluctuations eradicate the mixing, and hence, the beating in the 2D spectra disappears. Further, it is demonstrated that such electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures do not necessarily play a significant role in electronic energy transfer dynamics, despite contributing to the enhancement of long-lived quantum beating in 2D electronic spectra, contrary to speculations in recent publications.

  15. Densities and mass motions in transition-zone plasmas in solar flares observed from Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, C.-C.

    1980-01-01

    The electron densities and bulk motions in the transition-zone plasma of a solar flare are investigated by an analysis of EUV emission line spectra taken on Skylab. Spectra of three flares were obtained with the NRL normal incidence grating slit spectrograph in the ranges 1100-1940 and 1940-3940 A. The line ratios of transition-zone Si III lines and the intensity of the forbidden O IV 1401-A lines during flare maximum indicate electron densities on the order of 10 to the 12th/cu cm, decreasing by a factor of 2 to 3 in the flare decay phase. Line broadening of the transition-zone ions such as Si III, O IV, C IV and N V is noted, and the observed asymmetrical N V line profiles are approximated by a bi-Gaussian model of a stationary and a moving plasma component with a bulk velocity of 12 to 70 km/sec. Turbulent velocities of from 45 to 85 km/sec and from 20 to 40 km/sec are also indicated for the moving and stationary components of the transition-zone plasma, respectively.

  16. QED Approach to Modeling Spectra of the Multicharged Ions in a Plasma: Oscillator and Electron-ion Collision Strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Glushkov, A. V.; Khetselius, O. Yu.; Loboda, A. V.; Ignatenko, A.; Svinarenko, A.; Korchevsky, D.; Lovett, L.

    2008-10-22

    The uniform energy approach, formally based on the QED theory with using gauge invariant scheme of generation of the optimal one-electron representation, is used for the description of spectra of the multicharged ions in a laser plasma, calculation of electron-ion collision strengths, cross-sections in Ne-like and Ar-like ions.

  17. Electronic spectra of 2- and 3-tolunitrile in the gas phase. II. Geometry changes from Franck-Condon fits of fluorescence emission spectra.

    PubMed

    Gmerek, Felix; Stuhlmann, Benjamin; Álvarez-Valtierra, Leonardo; Pratt, David W; Schmitt, Michael

    2016-02-28

    We determined the changes of the geometries of 2- and 3-tolunitrile upon excitation to the lowest excited singlet states from Franck-Condon fits of the vibronic intensities in several fluorescence emission spectra and of the rotational constant changes upon excitation. These structural changes can be connected to the altered electron distribution in the molecules and are compared to the results of ab initio calculations. We show how the torsional barriers of the methyl groups in both components are used as probe of the molecular changes upon electronic excitation.

  18. Electronic spectra of 2- and 3-tolunitrile in the gas phase. II. Geometry changes from Franck-Condon fits of fluorescence emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gmerek, Felix; Stuhlmann, Benjamin; Álvarez-Valtierra, Leonardo; Pratt, David W.; Schmitt, Michael

    2016-02-01

    We determined the changes of the geometries of 2- and 3-tolunitrile upon excitation to the lowest excited singlet states from Franck-Condon fits of the vibronic intensities in several fluorescence emission spectra and of the rotational constant changes upon excitation. These structural changes can be connected to the altered electron distribution in the molecules and are compared to the results of ab initio calculations. We show how the torsional barriers of the methyl groups in both components are used as probe of the molecular changes upon electronic excitation.

  19. FTIR and Raman spectra, electronic spectra and normal coordinate analysis of N,N-dimethyl-3-phenyl-3-pyridin-2-yl-propan-1-amine by DFT method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renuga, S.; Karthikesan, M.; Muthu, S.

    2014-06-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and FT-Raman spectra of N,N-dimethyl-3-phenyl-3-pyridin-2-yl-propan-1-amine have been recorded in the range 4000-500 cm-1 and 4000-50 cm-1 respectively. The complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound were carried out using the observed FT-IR and FT Raman data. The vibrational frequencies experimentally determined, was compared with the theoretical frequencies computed by DFT gradient calculations (B3LYP method) employing the 6-31+G(d, p) basis set for the optimized geometry of the compound. The geometry and normal modes of vibration obtained from the DFT method are in good agreement with the experimental data. The assignments of the vibrational spectra have been carried out with the help of Normal Coordinate Analysis (NCA) following the Scaled Quantum Mechanical Force Field Methodology (SQMFF). The calculated infrared and Raman spectra of the title compounds were also stimulated utilizing the scaled force fields and the computed dipole derivatives for IR intensities and polarizability derivatives for Raman intensities. The change in electron density (ED) in the σ* and π* antibonding orbitals and stabilization energies E(2) have been calculated by Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis to give clear evidence of stabilization originating in the hyper conjugation of hydrogen-bonded interaction. The electronic spectrum determined by TD-DFT method is compared with the observed electronic spectrum.

  20. FTIR and Raman spectra, electronic spectra and normal coordinate analysis of N,N-dimethyl-3-phenyl-3-pyridin-2-yl-propan-1-amine by DFT method.

    PubMed

    Renuga, S; Karthikesan, M; Muthu, S

    2014-06-05

    The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and FT-Raman spectra of N,N-dimethyl-3-phenyl-3-pyridin-2-yl-propan-1-amine have been recorded in the range 4000-500cm(-1) and 4000-50cm(-1) respectively. The complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound were carried out using the observed FT-IR and FT Raman data. The vibrational frequencies experimentally determined, was compared with the theoretical frequencies computed by DFT gradient calculations (B3LYP method) employing the 6-31+G(d,p) basis set for the optimized geometry of the compound. The geometry and normal modes of vibration obtained from the DFT method are in good agreement with the experimental data. The assignments of the vibrational spectra have been carried out with the help of Normal Coordinate Analysis (NCA) following the Scaled Quantum Mechanical Force Field Methodology (SQMFF). The calculated infrared and Raman spectra of the title compounds were also stimulated utilizing the scaled force fields and the computed dipole derivatives for IR intensities and polarizability derivatives for Raman intensities. The change in electron density (ED) in the σ(*) and π(*) antibonding orbitals and stabilization energies E(2) have been calculated by Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis to give clear evidence of stabilization originating in the hyper conjugation of hydrogen-bonded interaction. The electronic spectrum determined by TD-DFT method is compared with the observed electronic spectrum.

  1. Study of non-thermal photon production under different scenarios in solar flares. 2: The Compton inverse and Bremsstrahlung models and fittings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Peraza, J.; Alvarez, M.; Laville, A.; Gallegos, A.

    1985-08-01

    Energy spectra of photons emitted from Bremsstrahlung (BR) of energetic electrons with matter, is obtained from the deconvolution of the electron energy spectra. It can be inferred that the scenario for the production of X-rays and gamma rays in solar flares may vary from event to event. However, it is possible in many cases to associated low energy events to impulsive acceleration, and the high energy phase of some events to stochastic acceleration. In both cases, flare particles seem to be strongly modulated by local energy losses. Electric field acceleration, associated to neutral current sheets is a suitable candidate for impulsive acceleration. Finally, that the predominant radiation process of this radiation is the inverse Compton effect due to the local flare photon field.

  2. Study of non-thermal photon production under different scenarios in solar flares. 2: The Compton inverse and Bremsstrahlung models and fittings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Peraza, J.; Alvarez, M.; Laville, A.; Gallegos, A.

    1985-01-01

    Energy spectra of photons emitted from Bremsstrahlung (BR) of energetic electrons with matter, is obtained from the deconvolution of the electron energy spectra. It can be inferred that the scenario for the production of X-rays and gamma rays in solar flares may vary from event to event. However, it is possible in many cases to associated low energy events to impulsive acceleration, and the high energy phase of some events to stochastic acceleration. In both cases, flare particles seem to be strongly modulated by local energy losses. Electric field acceleration, associated to neutral current sheets is a suitable candidate for impulsive acceleration. Finally, that the predominant radiation process of this radiation is the inverse Compton effect due to the local flare photon field.

  3. A self-consistent combined radiative transfer hydrodynamic and particle acceleration model for the X1.0 class flare on March 29, 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio da Costa, F.; Kleint, L.; Sainz Dalda, A.; Petrosian, V.; Liu, W.

    2015-12-01

    The X1.0 flare on March 29, 2014 was well observed, covering its emission at several wavelengths from the photosphere to the corona. The RHESSI spectra images allow us to estimate the temporal variation of the electron spectra using regularized inversion techniques. Using this as input for a combined particle acceleration and transport (Stanford-Flare) and radiative transfer hydrodynamic (Radyn) code, we calculate the response of the atmosphere to the electron heating. We will present the evolution of the thermal continuum and several line emissions. Comparing them with GOES soft X-ray and high resolution observations from IRIS, SDO and DST/IBIS allows us to test the basic mechanism(s) of acceleration and to constrain its characteristics. We will also present perspectives on how to apply this methodology and related diagnostics to other flares.

  4. Properties of electron flux spectra around the plasmapause in the chorus and hiss regions using POES.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, Ian; Rodger, Craig; Clilverd, Mark

    2014-05-01

    The European FP7 PLASMON project aims to provide observations of plasmaspheric densities, and link the plasmaspheric variations to relativistic electron precipitation from the radiation belts. This is intended to assist in the estimation and prevent damage of space assets from space weather events as well as to improve forecasting (http://plasmon.elte.hu). As part of the PLASMON project, electron fluxes from the POES series of satellites are being used to determine the link between energetic electron precipitation energy spectra and magnitude to the position of the plasmapause. The MEPED instrument onboard POES measures electron flux from 90° (trapped particles) and 0° (losscone) telescopes, in 3 integral energy channels (>30, >100 and >300 keV). These fluxes have been compared to the DEMETER/IDP instrument to confirm that published geometric factor corrections (Yando et al. 2011) can be accurately applied to the POES data to produce as accurate as possible fluxes. These global fluxes have then been separated into regions in which Chorus (23:00-11:00 MLT) and Hiss (11:00-16:00 MLT) whistler mode waves are expected to occur, in 0.2 L-shell bins with a 20 minute temporal resolution. The plasmapause locations have been determined from the O'Brien and Moldwin (2003) models based on Kp, Ae and Dst peaks. We are currently comparing the POES spectral gradient and flux magnitude with plasmapause location and geomagnetic activity for the locations in which chorus and hiss are known to occur. This presentation will focus on the electron flux spectral gradient behaviour either side of the plasmapause, a value that is difficult to measure from ground based techniques.

  5. Study of polymorphism in imatinib mesylate: A quantum chemical approach using electronic and vibrational spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Anubha; Joshi, B. D.; Tandon, Poonam; Ayala, A. P.; Bansal, A. K.; Grillo, Damián

    2013-02-01

    Imatinib mesylate, 4-(4-methyl-piperazin-1-ylmethyl)-N-u[4-methyl-3-(4-pyridin-3-yl)pyrimidine-2-ylamino)phenyl]benzamide methanesulfonate is a therapeutic drug that is approved for the treatment of chronic myelogeneous leukemia (CML) and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). It is known that imatinib mesylate exists in two polymorphic forms α and β. However, β-form is more stable than the α-form. In this work, we present a detailed vibrational spectroscopic investigation of β-form by using FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. These data are supported by quantum mechanical calculations using DFT employing 6-311G(d,p) basis set, which allow us to characterize completely the vibrational spectra of this compound. The FT-IR spectrum of α-form has also been discussed. The importance of hydrogen-bond formation in the molecular packing arrangements of both forms has been examined with the vibrational shifts observed due to polymorphic changes. The red shift of the NH stretching bands in the infrared spectrum from the computed wavenumber indicates the weakening of the NH bond. The UV-vis spectroscopic studies along with the HOMO-LUMO analysis of both polymorphs (α and β) were performed and their chemical activity has been discussed. The TD-DFT method was used to calculate the electronic absorption spectra in the gas phase as well as in the solvent environment using IEF-PCM model and 6-31G basis set. Finally, the results obtained complements to the experimental findings.

  6. A comparison between spectra of runaway electron beams in SF6 and air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Tarasenko, Victor; Gu, Jianwei; Baksht, Evgenii; Wang, Ruexue; Yan, Ping; Shao, Tao

    2015-12-01

    Runaway electron (RAE) with extremely high-energy plays important role on the avalanche propagation, streamer formation, and ionization waves in nanosecond-pulse discharges. In this paper, the generation of a supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) in SF6 and air in an inhomogeneous electric field is investigated. A VPG-30-200 generator with a pulse rise time of ˜1.6 ns and a full width at half maximum of 3-5 ns is used to produce RAE beams. The SAEBs in SF6 and air are measured by using aluminum foils with different thicknesses. Furthermore, the SAEB spectra in SF6 and air at pressures of 7.5 Torr, 75 Torr, and 750 Torr are compared. The results showed that amplitude of RAE beam current generated at the breakdown in SF6 was approximately an order of magnitude less than that in air. The energy of SAEB in air was not smaller than that in SF6 in nanosecond-pulse discharges under otherwise equal conditions. Moreover, the difference between the maximum energy of the electron distributions in air and SF6 decreased when the rise time of the voltage pulse increased. It was because the difference between the breakdown voltages in air and SF6 decreased when the rise time of the voltage pulse increased.

  7. A comparison between spectra of runaway electron beams in SF{sub 6} and air

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Ruexue; Yan, Ping; Shao, Tao; Tarasenko, Victor; Gu, Jianwei; Baksht, Evgenii

    2015-12-15

    Runaway electron (RAE) with extremely high-energy plays important role on the avalanche propagation, streamer formation, and ionization waves in nanosecond-pulse discharges. In this paper, the generation of a supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) in SF{sub 6} and air in an inhomogeneous electric field is investigated. A VPG-30-200 generator with a pulse rise time of ∼1.6 ns and a full width at half maximum of 3–5 ns is used to produce RAE beams. The SAEBs in SF{sub 6} and air are measured by using aluminum foils with different thicknesses. Furthermore, the SAEB spectra in SF{sub 6} and air at pressures of 7.5 Torr, 75 Torr, and 750 Torr are compared. The results showed that amplitude of RAE beam current generated at the breakdown in SF{sub 6} was approximately an order of magnitude less than that in air. The energy of SAEB in air was not smaller than that in SF{sub 6} in nanosecond-pulse discharges under otherwise equal conditions. Moreover, the difference between the maximum energy of the electron distributions in air and SF{sub 6} decreased when the rise time of the voltage pulse increased. It was because the difference between the breakdown voltages in air and SF{sub 6} decreased when the rise time of the voltage pulse increased.

  8. ULTRAVIOLET AND INFRARED SPECTRA OF ELECTRON-BOMBARDED SOLID NITROGEN AND METHANE DILUTED IN SOLID NITROGEN

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Jong; Chuang, Shiang-Jiun; Huang, Tzu-Ping; Chen, Hui-Fen

    2013-05-01

    The infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectra of pure solid N{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} diluted in solid N{sub 2} (1/100) irradiated with energetic electrons at 10 K were obtained. The IR absorption measurements of the electron-bombarded pure N{sub 2} solid reveal the formation of N{sub 3} and N{sub 3} {sup +}, which was confirmed by the observed electronic transitions A {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub u} {sup +}<- X {sup 2}{Pi}{sub g} of N{sub 3} and A {sup 3}{Pi}{sub u} <- X {sup 3}{Sigma}{sub g} {sup -} of N{sub 3} {sup +}. In the case of N{sub 2} ice containing a small proportion of CH{sub 4}, we have identified the products of irradiated CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} ice, including N{sub 3}, C{sub n} N (n = 1-3), CN{sub 2}, (CN){sub 2}, CH{sub 3}N, HCN{sub 2}, HC{sub 2}N, C(NH){sub 2}, HNC, HCN, CH{sub 3}, C{sub 2}H, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, CN{sup -}, NH{sub 3} {sup +}, and HC{sub 3}N{sup +}. UV absorption measurement of the ice sample was carried out and the possible carriers associated with the observed absorption bands were assigned and discussed.

  9. Features in the electronic structure and photoemission spectra of organic molecular semiconductors: The molecules of metal-phthalocyanines and PTCDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonov, E. V.; Uspenskii, Yu. A.; Khokhlov, D. R.

    2013-09-01

    The role of many-electron effects in the formation of electronic quasiparticle spectra in organic molecular semiconductors (OMS) is analyzed. Many-body perturbation theory, ab initio calculations of metal phthalocyanines and PTCDA molecules, and experimental photoemission spectra are applied to this analysis. It is shown that density functional theory (DFT) poorly reproduces the electronic spectra of OMS. The use of a hybrid functional method (HFM) provides precise reproduction of both valence and conducting bands, while the HOMO-LUMO gap remains underestimated. The correct gap width is obtained in both DFT and HFM, when it is calculated through ionization and affinity energies. It is shown that such an approach gives a formula for gap correction due to electron correlations, which is close to an expression derived from the GW approximation.

  10. Solvatochromic behavior of the electronic absorption spectra of gallic acid and some of its azo derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoud, Mamdouh S.; Hagagg, Sawsan S.; Ali, Alaa E.; Nasr, Nessma M.

    The electronic absorption spectra of gallic acid and its azo derivatives have been studied in various solvents of different polarities. Multiple regression techniques were applied to calculate the regression and correlation coefficients based on an equation that relates the wavenumbers of the absorption band maxima (υmax-) to the solvent parameters; refractive index (n), dielectric constant (D), empirical Kamlet-Taft solvent parameters, π*(dipolarity/polarizability), α (solvent hydrogen-bond donor acidity) and β (solvent hydrogen-bond acceptor basicity). The fitting coefficient obtained from this analysis allows estimating the contribution of each type of interactions relative to total spectral shifts in solution. The dependence of υmax- on the solvent parameters indicates that the obtained bands are affected by specific and non-specific solute-solvent interactions.

  11. Ferromagnetic phases of lunar fines and breccias - Electron magnetic resonance spectra of Apollo 16 samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Electron magnetic resonance measurements have been made at 9 GHz and at temperatures from 1.2 to 400 K and 35 GHz (300 K) on samples of fines and breccias from Apollo 11-16. Unsorted Apollo 16 fines (less than 1 mm) have Delta H (average) = 580 G and specific intensities that have the same range as fines from the other Apollo collections. The magnetic properties of the 'characteristic' resonance are not in accord with those of iron particles. On the bases of the properties of the 'characteristic' resonance as a function of temperature and Apollo site, laboratory heat treatments on synthetic materials and lunar crystalline rocks and a comparison with the 'characteristic' resonance of the resonance spectra of breccia specimens for which iron particle sizes have been determined from other measurements, it is suggested that some fraction (about 20%) of the 'characteristic' resonance is due to sub-micron particles of ferric oxide phases.

  12. Combined treatment of relaxation and fluctuation dynamics in the calculation of two-dimensional electronic spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Seibt, Joachim; Pullerits, Tõnu

    2014-09-21

    While the theoretical description of population transfer subsequent to electronic excitation in combination with a line shape function description of vibrational dynamics in the context of 2D-spectroscopy is well-developed under the assumption of different timescales of population transfer and fluctuation dynamics, the treatment of the interplay between both kinds of processes lacks a comprehensive description. To bridge this gap, we use the cumulant expansion approach to derive response functions, which account for fluctuation dynamics and population transfer simultaneously. We compare 2D-spectra of a model system under different assumptions about correlations between fluctuations and point out under which conditions a simplified treatment is justified. Our study shows that population transfer and dissipative fluctuation dynamics cannot be described independent of each other in general. Advantages and limitations of the proposed calculation method and its compatibility with the modified Redfield description are discussed.

  13. Nightmare from which you will never awake: Electronic to vibrational spectra!

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, Nuwon

    2013-01-01

    The theoretical background of ab initio methods and density functional theory is provided. The anharmonicity associated with weakly bound metal cation dihydrogen complexes is examined using the vibrational self-consistent field (VSCF) method and the interaction between a hydrogen molecule and a metal cation is characterized. A study of molecular hydrogen clustering around the lithium cation and their accompanied vibrational anharmonicity employing VSCF is illustrated. A qualitative interpretation is provided of solvent-induced shifts of amides and simulated electronic absorption spectra using the combined time-dependent density functional theory/effective fragment potential method (TDDFT/EFP). An excited-state solvent assisted quadruple hydrogen atom transfer reaction of a coumarin derivative is elucidated using micro solvated quantum mechanical (QM) water and macro solvated EFP water. A dispersion correction to the QM-EFP1 interaction energy is presented.

  14. Determining the band gap and mean kinetic energy of atoms from reflection electron energy loss spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Vos, M.; Marmitt, G. G.; Finkelstein, Y.; Moreh, R.

    2015-09-14

    Reflection electron energy loss spectra from some insulating materials (CaCO{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, and SiO{sub 2}) taken at relatively high incoming electron energies (5–40 keV) are analyzed. Here, one is bulk sensitive and a well-defined onset of inelastic excitations is observed from which one can infer the value of the band gap. An estimate of the band gap was obtained by fitting the spectra with a procedure that includes the recoil shift and recoil broadening affecting these measurements. The width of the elastic peak is directly connected to the mean kinetic energy of the atom in the material (Doppler broadening). The experimentally obtained mean kinetic energies of the O, C, Li, Ca, and Si atoms are compared with the calculated ones, and good agreement is found, especially if the effect of multiple scattering is taken into account. It is demonstrated experimentally that the onset of the inelastic excitation is also affected by Doppler broadening. Aided by this understanding, we can obtain a good fit of the elastic peak and the onset of inelastic excitations. For SiO{sub 2}, good agreement is obtained with the well-established value of the band gap (8.9 eV) only if it is assumed that the intensity near the edge scales as (E − E{sub gap}){sup 1.5}. For CaCO{sub 3}, the band gap obtained here (7 eV) is about 1 eV larger than the previous experimental value, whereas the value for Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} (7.5 eV) is the first experimental estimate.

  15. Theoretical analysis of structures and electronic spectra in molecular cadmium chalcogenide clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Kiet A.; Pachter, Ruth; Day, Paul N.; Su, Haibin

    2015-06-01

    We present calculated structural and optical properties of molecular cadmium chalcogenide nonstoichiometric clusters with a size range of less than 1 nm to more than 2 nm with well-defined chemical compositions and structures in comparison to experimental characterization and previous theoretical work. A unified treatment of these clusters to obtain a fundamental understanding of the size, ligand, and solvation effects on their optical properties has not been heretofore presented. The clusters belong to three topological classes, specifically supertetrahedral (Tn), penta-supertetrahedral (Pn), and capped supertetrahedral (Cn), where n is the number of metal layers in each cluster. The tetrahedrally shaped Tn clusters examined in this work are Cd(ER)42- (T1), Cd4(ER)102- (T2), and Cd 10 E4 ' ( ER ) 16 4 - (T3), where R is an organic group, E and E' are chalcogen atoms (sulfur or selenium). The first member of the Pn series considered is M8E'(ER)162-. For the Cn series, we consider the first three members, M 17 E4 ' ( ER ) 28 2 - , M 32 E14 ' ( ER ) 36 L 4 , and M 54 E32 ' ( ER ) 48 L 4 4 - (L = neutral ligand). Mixed ligand clusters with capping ER groups replaced by halogen or neutral ligands were also considered. Ligands and solvent were found to have a large influence on the color and intensity of the electronic absorption spectra of small clusters. Their effects are generally reduced with increasing cluster sizes. Blueshifts were observed for the first electronic transition with reduced size for both cadmium sulfide and cadmium selenide series. Due to weakly absorbing and forbidden transitions underlying the one-photon spectra, more care is needed in interpreting the quantum confinement from the clusters' lowest-energy absorption bands.

  16. Determining the band gap and mean kinetic energy of atoms from reflection electron energy loss spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vos, M.; Marmitt, G. G.; Finkelstein, Y.; Moreh, R.

    2015-09-01

    Reflection electron energy loss spectra from some insulating materials (CaCO3, Li2CO3, and SiO2) taken at relatively high incoming electron energies (5-40 keV) are analyzed. Here, one is bulk sensitive and a well-defined onset of inelastic excitations is observed from which one can infer the value of the band gap. An estimate of the band gap was obtained by fitting the spectra with a procedure that includes the recoil shift and recoil broadening affecting these measurements. The width of the elastic peak is directly connected to the mean kinetic energy of the atom in the material (Doppler broadening). The experimentally obtained mean kinetic energies of the O, C, Li, Ca, and Si atoms are compared with the calculated ones, and good agreement is found, especially if the effect of multiple scattering is taken into account. It is demonstrated experimentally that the onset of the inelastic excitation is also affected by Doppler broadening. Aided by this understanding, we can obtain a good fit of the elastic peak and the onset of inelastic excitations. For SiO2, good agreement is obtained with the well-established value of the band gap (8.9 eV) only if it is assumed that the intensity near the edge scales as (E - Egap)1.5. For CaCO3, the band gap obtained here (7 eV) is about 1 eV larger than the previous experimental value, whereas the value for Li2CO3 (7.5 eV) is the first experimental estimate.

  17. KEPLER FLARES. I. ACTIVE AND INACTIVE M DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Davenport, James R. A.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Wisniewski, John P.; Deitrick, Russell; Hilton, Eric J.; Hebb, Leslie

    2014-12-20

    We analyzed Kepler short-cadence M dwarf observations. Spectra from the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5 m telescope identify magnetically active (Hα in emission) stars. The active stars are of mid-M spectral type, have numerous flares, and have well-defined rotational modulation due to starspots. The inactive stars are of early M type, exhibit less starspot signature, and have fewer flares. A Kepler to U-band energy scaling allows comparison of the Kepler flare frequency distributions with previous ground-based data. M dwarfs span a large range of flare frequency and energy, blurring the distinction between active and inactive stars designated solely by the presence of Hα. We analyzed classical and complex (multiple peak) flares on GJ 1243, finding strong correlations between flare energy, amplitude, duration, and decay time, with only a weak dependence on rise time. Complex flares last longer and have higher energy at the same amplitude, and higher energy flares are more likely to be complex. A power law fits the energy distribution for flares with log E{sub K{sub p}}> 31 erg, but the predicted number of low-energy flares far exceeds the number observed, at energies where flares are still easily detectable, indicating that the power-law distribution may flatten at low energy. There is no correlation of flare occurrence or energy with starspot phase, the flare waiting time distribution is consistent with flares occurring randomly in time, and the energies of consecutive flares are uncorrelated. These observations support a scenario where many independent active regions on the stellar surface are contributing to the observed flare rate.

  18. Electronic structure, bonding, spectra, and linear and nonlinear electric properties of Ti@C28.

    PubMed

    Skwara, Bartłomiej; Góra, Robert W; Zaleśny, Robert; Lipkowski, Paweł; Bartkowiak, Wojciech; Reis, Heribert; Papadopoulos, Manthos G; Luis, Josep M; Kirtman, Bernard

    2011-09-22

    The potential energy surface (PES) of Ti@C(28) has been revisited, and the stationary points have been carefully characterized. In particular, the C(2v) symmetry structure considered previously turns out to be a transition state lying 2.3 kcal/mol above the ground state of C(3v) symmetry at the MP2/6-31G(d) level. A large binding energy of 181.3 kcal/mol is found at the ROMP2/6-31G(d) level. Topological analysis of the generalized Ti@C(28) density reveals four bond paths between Ti and carbon atoms of the host. The character of all four contacts corresponds to a partially covalent closed shell interaction. UV-vis, IR, and Raman spectra are calculated and compared with C(28)H(4). The dipole moment and the static electronic and double harmonic vibrational (hyper)polarizabilities have been obtained. Distortion of the fullerene cage due to encapsulation leads to nonzero diagonal components of the electronic first hyperpolarizability β, and to an increase in the diagonal components of the electronic polarizability α and second hyperpolarizability γ. However, introduction of the Ti atom causes a comparable or larger reduction in most cases due to localized bonding interactions. At the double harmonic level, the average vibrational β is much larger than its electronic counterpart, but the opposite is true for α and for the contribution to γ that has been calculated. There is also a very large anharmonic (nuclear relaxation) contribution to β which results from a shallow PES with four minima separated by very low barriers. Thus, the vibrational γ (and α) may, likewise, become much larger when anharmonicity is taken into account.

  19. 154 MHz Detection of Faint, Polarized Flares from UV Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, C. R.; Lenc, E.; Kaplan, D. L.; Murphy, Tara; Anderson, G. E.

    2017-02-01

    We have detected four flares from UV Ceti at 154 MHz using the Murchison Widefield Array. The flares have flux densities between 10 and 65 mJy—a factor of 100 fainter than most flares in the literature at these frequencies—and are only detected in polarization. The circular polarized fractions are limited to > 27% at 3σ confidence and two of the flares exhibit polarity reversal. We suggest that these flares occur periodically on a timescale consistent with the rotational period of UV Ceti. During the brightest observed flare, we also detect significant linear polarization with a polarization fraction > 18%. Averaging the data in 6 minute, 10 MHz frequency bins we find that the flux density of these flares does not vary over the 30 MHz bandwidth of the Murchison Widefield Array; however, we cannot rule out finer time-frequency structure. Using the measured flux densities for the flares, we estimate brightness temperatures between ({10}13{--}{10}14) K, indicative of a coherent emission mechanism. The brightness temperature and polarization characteristics point to the electron cyclotron maser mechanism. We also calculate the flare rates given our four observed flares and compare them to flare rates for the set of M dwarf stars with known 100–200 MHz flares. Our measurement is the first for flares with intensities < 100 mJy at 100–200 MHz.

  20. Spots and White Light Flares in an L Dwarf

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Program GN-2012A-Q-37) GMOS spectrograph (Hook et al. 2004) when a series of flares occurred. A spectrum of the most powerful flare in its impulsive...10:14 Hα HeI HeI HeI OI Fig. 4. Gemini-North GMOS spectra of W1906+40 in quiescence (below) and in flare. Note the broad Hα, atomic emission lines

  1. Molecular above-threshold ionization spectra as an evidence of the three-point interference of electron wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasović, Elvedin; Milošević, Dejan B.; Gazibegović-Busuladžić, Azra; Čerkić, Aner; Busuladžić, Mustafa

    2015-03-01

    We consider high-order above-threshold ionization (HATI) of polyatomic molecules ionized by a strong linearly polarized laser field. Improved molecular strong-field approximation by which the HATI process on polyatomic molecular species can be described is developed. Using this theory we calculate photoelectron angular-energy spectra for different triatomic molecules. Special attention is devoted to the minima that are observed in the calculated high-energy electron spectra of the ozone and carbon dioxide molecules. A key difference between these minima and minima that are observed in the corresponding spectra of diatomic molecules are presented.

  2. A satellite investigation of energy flux and inferred potential drop in auroral electron energy spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meniett, J. D.; Burch, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Because predicted relationship (epsilon directly varies with V squared) between auroral electron energy flux (epsilon) and the inferred acceleration potential drop (V) for accelerated Maxwellian distributions was favorably tested by other using sounding rocket data for the limiting case of eVE 1 (where Ec is the characteristic energy of the accelerated Maxwellian distribution) and for a single inverted-V observed by the Injun 5 satellite, data from Atmosphere D were used to extend these studies over the range .2 eV/Ec 5 and for a wide range of latitudes and local times on both the nightside and the dayside. Results show good agreement with the full accelerated Maxwellian model. An analytical approximation to the electron energy flux was derived which better describes the data over the range .2 eV/Ec approximated 3. Analyses of individual energy spectra at small and large pitch angles through well-defined inverted-V structures suggest that the altitude of the inferred potential drop maximizes near the center of the inverted-V's.

  3. The effect of electron measurements both inside and outside the heliosphere on the modelling of local interstellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisschoff, Driaan; Potgieter, Marius

    2016-07-01

    A local interstellar spectrum (LIS) for electrons can be calculated with Galactic propagation models to benefit both Galactic and heliospheric propagation studies by considering the improved measurements for cosmic rays (CRs) made over the last few years, such as by Voyager 1 and PAMELA. Cosmic ray measurements made by Voyager 1 outside the dominant influence of solar modulation uniquely allows the direct comparison of modelled Galactic spectra to experimental data. Recent improved analysis of the PAMELA electron spectra gives measurements for the exceptional solar minimum of 2009 which clearly depict ideal minimum modulation conditions for CRs in the heliosphere. Utilizing the GALPROP code, a LIS for electrons is computed to directly reproduce the electron spectra observed by Voyager 1. Using this LIS as input to a comprehensive solar modulation model enables the comparison with the PAMELA electron spectra. To accomplish reproducing the electron measurements of both CR experiments, we established a LIS with by varying the source spectrum and diffusion parameters in the GALPROP code. Inclusion of reacceleration in Galactic space improves the LIS to also match the lower energy PAMELA values after been modulated through a full 3D solar modulation model.

  4. Electron spectra of xenon clusters irradiated with a laser-driven plasma soft-x-ray laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Namba, S.; Takiyama, K.; Hasegawa, N.; Kishimoto, M.; Nishikino, M.; Kawachi, T.

    2011-11-15

    Xenon clusters were irradiated with plasma soft-x-ray laser pulses (having a wavelength of 13.9 nm, time duration of 7 ps, and intensities of up to 10 GW/cm{sup 2}). The laser photon energy was high enough to photoionize 4d core electrons. The cross section is large due to a giant resonance. The interaction was investigated by measuring the electron energy spectra. The photoelectron spectra for small clusters indicate that the spectral width due to the 4d hole significantly broadens with increasing cluster size. For larger clusters, the electron energy spectra evolve into a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, as a strongly coupled cluster nanoplasma is generated.

  5. IMPULSIVITY PARAMETER FOR SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Fajardo-Mendieta, W. G.; Alvarado-Gómez, J. D.; Calvo-Mozo, B.; Martinez-Oliveros, J. C. E-mail: bcalvom@unal.edu.co E-mail: jalvarad@eso.org

    2016-02-10

    Three phases are typically observed during solar flares: the preflare, impulsive, and decay phases. During the impulsive phase, it is believed that the electrons and other particles are accelerated after the stored energy in the magnetic field is released by reconnection. The impulsivity of a solar flare is a quantifiable property that shows how quickly this initial energy release occurs. It is measured via the impulsivity parameter, which we define as the inverse of the overall duration of the impulsive phase. We take the latter as the raw width of the most prominent nonthermal emission of the flare. We computed this observable over a work sample of 48 M-class events that occurred during the current Solar Cycle 24 by using three different methods. The first method takes into account all of the nonthermal flare emission and gives very accurate results, while the other two just cover fixed energy intervals (30–40 keV and 25–50 keV) and are useful for fast calculations. We propose an alternative way to classify solar flares according to their impulsivity parameter values, defining three different types of impulsivity, namely, high, medium, and low. This system of classification is independent of the manner used to calculated the impulsivity parameter. Lastly, we show the relevance of this tool as a discriminator of different HXR generation processes.

  6. State-of-the-Art Observations and Modeling of Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Hawley, Suzanne L.

    2015-03-01

    Flares are observed on a wide variety of stellar types, ranging from closely orbiting binary systems consisting of an evolved member (RS CVn's) and young, nearby super-active M dwarfs (dMe's). The timescales and energies of flares span many orders of magnitude and typically far exceed the scales of even the largest solar flares observed. In particular, the active M dwarfs produce an energetic signature in the near-UV and optical continuum, which is often referred to as the white-light continuum. White-light emission has been studied in Johnson UBVR filters during a few large-amplitude flares, and the best emission mechanism that fits the broadband color distribution is a T~104 K blackbody (Hawley & Fisher 1992). Time-resolved blue spectra have revealed a consistent picture, with little or no Balmer jump and a smoothly rising continuum toward the near-UV (Hawley & Pettersen 1991). However, the most recent self-consistent radiative-hydrodynamic (RHD) models, which use a solar-type flare heating function from accelerated, nonthermal electrons, do not reproduce this emission spectrum. Instead, these models predict that the white-light is dominated by Balmer continuum emission from Hydrogen recombination in the chromosphere (Allred et al. 2006). Moreover, Allred et al. (2006) showed that the Johnson colors of the model prediction exhibit a broadband distribution similar to a blackbody with T~9000 K.

  7. Solar flare ionization in the mesosphere observed by coherent-scatter radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. W.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1986-01-01

    The coherent-scatter technique, as used with the Urbana radar, is able to measure relative changes in electron density at one altitude during the progress of a solar flare when that altitude contains a statistically steady turbulent layer. This work describes the analysis of Urbana coherent-scatter data from the times of 13 solar flares in the period from 1978 to 1983. Previous methods of measuring electron density changes in the D-region are summarized. Models of X-ray spectra, photoionization rates, and ion-recombination reaction schemes are reviewed. The coherent-scatter technique is briefly described, and a model is developed which relates changes in scattered power to changes in electron density. An analysis technique is developed using X-ray flux data from geostationary satellites and coherent scatter data from the Urbana radar which empirically distinguishes between proposed D-region ion-chemical schemes, and estimates the nonflare ion-pair production rate.

  8. Temperature dependence on the electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of natural jasper from Taroko Gorge (Taiwan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemantha Kumar, G. N.; Parthasarathy, G.; Chakradhar, R. P. S.; Rao, J. Lakshmana; Ratnakaram, Y. C.

    2010-04-01

    Structural properties of natural jasper from Taroko Gorge (Taiwan) have been investigated by means of powder X-ray diffraction, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic techniques. The EPR spectrum at room temperature exhibits a sharp resonance signal at g = 2.007 and two more resonance signals centered at g ≈ 4.3 and 14.0. The resonance signal at g = 2.007 has been attributed to the E' center and is related to a natural radiation-induced paramagnetic defect. Two more resonance signals centered at g ≈ 4.3 and 14.0 are characteristic of Fe3+ ions. The EPR spectra recorded at room temperature of jasper samples, heat-treated at temperatures ranging from 473 to 1,473 K exhibit marked temperature dependence. The resonance signal corresponding to E' center disappears at elevated temperatures. A broad, intense resonance signal centered at g ≈ 2.0 appears at elevated temperatures. This resonance signal is a characteristic of Fe3+ ions, which are present as hematite in the jasper sample. The intensity of the resonance signal becomes dominant at elevated temperatures at ≥873 K, masking g ≈ 4.3 and g ≈ 14.0 resonance signals. The EPR spectra of jasper heat-treated at 673 K have been recorded at temperatures between 123 and 296 K. The population of spin levels ( N) has been calculated for the broad g ≈ 2.0 resonance signal. It is found that N decreases with decreasing temperature. The linewidth (ΔH) of g ≈ 2.0 resonance signal of the heat-treated jasper is found to increase with decreasing temperature. This has been attributed to spin-spin interaction of the Fe3+ ions present in the form of hematite in the studied jasper sample.

  9. Photoelectron spectra of small LaOn- clusters: decreasing electron affinity upon increasing the number of oxygen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingeler, R.; Lüttgens, G.; Pontius, N.; Rochow, R.; Bechthold, P. S.; Neeb, M.; Eberhardt, W.

    We present mass selected photoelectron spectra of small lanthanum oxide cluster anions LaOn- (n=1-5) which have been generated in a laser vaporization cluster source. The electron affinity of the lanthanum oxide clusters drops continuously with the number of chemisorbed oxygen atoms as revealed from the anion photoelectron spectra. The decreasing electron affinity behaves contrary to several other metal oxide clusters. The geometry of some of the measured clusters are discussed in comparsion with configuration interaction and density functional calculations using a Gaussian94 program package.

  10. Chromospheric Condensation and Quasi-periodic Pulsations in a Circular-ribbon Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. M.; Li, D.; Ning, Z. J.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we report our multiwavelength observations of the C3.1 circular-ribbon flare SOL2015-10-16T10:20 in active region (AR) 12434. The flare consisted of a circular flare ribbon (CFR), an inner flare ribbon (IFR) inside it, and a pair of short parallel flare ribbons (PFRs). The PFRs located to the north of the IFR were most striking in the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) 1400 and 2796 Å images. For the first time, we observed the circular-ribbon flare in the Ca ii H line of the Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode, which has a similar shape as observed in the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 1600 Å on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). Photospheric line-of-sight magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board SDO show that the flare is associated with positive polarities with a negative polarity inside. The IFR and CFR were cospatial with the negative polarity and positive polarities, implying the existence of a magnetic null point ({\\boldsymbol{B}}=0) and a dome-like spine-fan topology. During the impulsive phase of the flare, “two-step” raster observations of IRIS with a cadence of 6 s and an exposure time of 2 s showed plasma downflow at the CFR in the Si iv λ1402.77 line ({log}T≈ 4.8), suggesting chromospheric condensation. The downflow speeds first increased rapidly from a few km s-1 to the peak values of 45-52 km s-1, before decreasing gradually to the initial levels. The decay timescales of condensation were 3-4 minutes, indicating ongoing magnetic reconnection. Interestingly, the downflow speeds are positively correlated with the logarithm of the Si iv line intensity and time derivative of the GOES soft X-ray (SXR) flux in 1-8 Å. The radio dynamic spectra are characterized by a type III radio burst associated with the flare, which implies that the chromospheric condensation was most probably driven by nonthermal electrons. Using an analytical expression and the peak Doppler velocity, we derive the

  11. The role of the big flare syndrome in correlations of solar energetic proton fluxes and associated microwave burst parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahler, S. W.

    1981-09-01

    In previous studies correlating E > 10 MeV proton fluxes and spectra with various associated microwave burst parameters, the resulting high correlations were assumed to reflect a common acceleration process for the protons and the microwave-emitting electrons. We suggest and test an alternative explanation for these correlations, which we term the Big Flare Syndrome (BFS), that states that, statistically, energetic flare phenomena are more intense in larger flares, regardless of the detailed physics. Peak 1-8 A X-ray fluxes, characteristic of the thermal flare, are correlated with peak proton fluxes to derive correlation coefficients characteristics of the BFS. Of all microwave parameters tested for the 1973-1979 period, only the time-integrated flux densities at 8800 and 15400 MHz may be significantly larger than expected form the BFS. We fail to confirm previous results associating peak proton spectra with peak microwave spectral characteristics, thus finding no evidence that peak microwave fluxes are indicative of proton acceleration. We extend this conclusion to peak hard X-ray correlations. The strongly nonlinear relationship deduced between flare energy and proton production also appears invalid.

  12. Density functional calculations of the vibronic structure of electronic absorption spectra.

    PubMed

    Dierksen, Marc; Grimme, Stefan

    2004-02-22

    Calculations of the vibronic structure in electronic spectra of large organic molecules based on density functional methods are presented. The geometries of the excited states are obtained from time-dependent density functional (TDDFT) calculations employing the B3LYP hybrid functional. The vibrational functions and transition dipole moment derivatives are calculated within the harmonic approximation by finite difference of analytical gradients and the transition dipole moment, respectively. Normal mode mixing is taken into account by the Duschinsky transformation. The vibronic structure of strongly dipole-allowed transitions is calculated within the Franck-Condon approximation. Weakly dipole-allowed and dipole-forbidden transitions are treated within the Franck-Condon-Herzberg-Teller and Herzberg-Teller approximation, respectively. The absorption spectra of several organic pi systems (anthracene, pentacene, pyrene, octatetraene, styrene, azulene, phenoxyl) are calculated and compared with experimental data. For dipole-allowed transitions in general a very good agreement between theory and experiment is obtained. This indicates the good quality of the optimized geometries and harmonic force fields. Larger errors are found for the weakly dipole-allowed S0 --> S1 transition of pyrene which can tentatively be assigned to TDDFT errors for the relative energies of excited states close to the target state. The weak bands of azulene and phenoxyl are very well described within the Franck-Condon approximation which can be explained by the large energy gap (>1.2 eV) to higher-lying excited states leading to small vibronic couplings. Once corrections are made for the errors in the theoretical 0-0 transition energies, the TDDFT approach to calculate vibronic structure seems to outperform both widely used ab initio methods based on configuration interaction singles or complete active space self-consistent field wave functions and semiempirical treatments regarding accuracy

  13. The impact of non-thermal electrons on event horizon scale images and spectra of Sgr A*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, S. Alwin; Dexter, Jason; Quataert, Eliot

    2016-12-01

    Decomposing an arbitrary electron energy distribution into sums of Maxwellian and power law components is an efficient method to calculate synchrotron emission and absorption. We use this method to study the effect of non-thermal electrons on submm images and spectra of the Galactic center black hole, Sgr A*. We assume a spatially uniform functional form for the electron distribution function and use a semi-analytic radiatively inefficient accretion flow and a 2D general relativistic MHD snapshot as example models of the underlying accretion flow structure. We develop simple analytic models which allow us to generalize from the numerical examples. A high energy electron component containing a small fraction (few per cent) of the total internal energy (e.g. a "power law tail") can produce a diffuse halo of emission, which modifies the observed image size and structure. A population of hot electrons with a larger energy fraction (e.g. resulting from a diffusion in electron energy space) can dominate the emission, so that the observed images and spectra are well approximated by considering only a single thermal component for a suitable choice of the electron temperature. We discuss the implications of these results for estimating accretion flow or black hole parameters from images and spectra, and for the identification of the black hole "shadow" in future mm-VLBI data. In particular, the location of the first minimum in visibility profiles does not necessarily correspond to the shadow size as sometimes assumed.

  14. Simulation studies for operating electron beam ion trap at very low energy for disentangling edge plasma spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Xuelong; Fei Zejie; Xiao Jun; Lu Di; Hutton, Roger; Zou Yaming

    2012-07-15

    Electron beam ion traps (EBITs) are very useful tools for disentanglement studies of atomic processes in plasmas. In order to assist studies on edge plasma spectroscopic diagnostics, a very low energy EBIT, SH-PermEBIT, has been set up at the Shanghai EBIT lab. In this work, simulation studies for factors which hinder an EBIT to operate at very low electron energies were made based on the Tricomp (Field Precision) codes. Longitudinal, transversal, and total kinetic energy distributions were analyzed for all the electron trajectories. Influences from the electron current and electron energy on the energy depression caused by the space charge are discussed. The simulation results show that although the energy depression is most serious along the center of the electron beam, the electrons in the outer part of the beam are more likely to be lost when an EBIT is running at very low energy. Using the simulation results to guide us, we successfully managed to reach the minimum electron beam energy of 60 eV with a beam transmission above 57% for the SH-PermEBIT. Ar and W spectra were measured from the SH-PermEBIT at the apparent electron beam energies (read from the voltage difference between the electron gun cathode and the central drift tube) of 60 eV and 1200 eV, respectively. The spectra are shown in this paper.

  15. The Multi-Instrument (EVE-RHESSI) DEM for Solar Flares, and Implications for Non-thermal Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McTiernan, J. M.; Caspi, A.; Warren, H. P.

    2013-12-01

    Observations of hard X-ray bremmstrahlung from solar flares directly probe the non-thermal electron population. For low energies, however, the spectra are typically dominated by thermal emission and the low energy extent of the non-thermal spectrum can be only loosely quantified. To address this issue, we combine observations from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on-board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and X-ray data from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). For a sample of solar flares, we model the emission using a Differential Emission Measure (DEM) for the thermal emission seen with both instruments and a power law fit for the non-thermal emission observed by RHESSI. Spectra for both instruments are fit simultaneously in a self-consistent manner. This improvement over the traditional isothermal approximation for thermal flare emission is intended to resolve the ambiguity in the range where the thermal and non-thermal components may have similar photon fluxes. This "crossover" range can extend up to 30 keV for medium to large solar flares. It is expected that a low energy cutoff of the non-thermal electron spectrum is in this energy range, but is obscured by thermal emission. For each flare in the sample we establish limits for the low energy cutoff of the non-thermal spectrum. These limits, in turn, can be used to establish limits on the energy of non-thermal electrons accelerated during the flare. This research is supported by NASA contract NAS5-98033 and NASA Heliophysics Guest Investigator Grant NNX12AH48G.

  16. Analysis of Electron and Antineutrino Energy Spectra from Fissile Samples under Irradiation based on Gross Theory of Beta-decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, T.; Tachibana, T.; Chiba, S.

    2016-06-01

    We applied the gross theory of β-decay to calculate the reactor electron and antineutrino ({{{bar ν }}{e}}) spectra emitted from 235,238U and 239,241Pu by summing up all the contributions from a large number of decaying fission-products (FPs). We make it clear what kinds of transition types and FP nuclides are important to shape the lepton spectra. After taking the ambiguity in the current data for fission yields and Qβ-values into account, we suggested a possibility that the high-energy part of the widely referred electron-spectra by Schreckenbach et al., almost only one experimental data set available now, might possibly be too low. Arguments on a special role of the odd(Z)-odd(N) nuclides and on the consistency between U-238 and other fissiles in the experimental data lead to the importance of a new and independent measurement of electron energy spectra which could be converted into the reactor {{{bar ν }}{e}} spectra.

  17. Understanding Solar Flare Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatland, M. S.

    2005-12-01

    A review is presented of work aimed at understanding solar flare statistics, with emphasis on the well known flare power-law size distribution. Although avalanche models are perhaps the favoured model to describe flare statistics, their physical basis is unclear, and they are divorced from developing ideas in large-scale reconnection theory. An alternative model, aimed at reconciling large-scale reconnection models with solar flare statistics, is revisited. The solar flare waiting-time distribution has also attracted recent attention. Observed waiting-time distributions are described, together with what they might tell us about the flare phenomenon. Finally, a practical application of flare statistics to flare prediction is described in detail, including the results of a year of automated (web-based) predictions from the method.

  18. Solar Flare Impulsive Phase Observations from SDO and Other Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Woods, Thomas N.; Schrijver, Karel; Warren, Harry; Milligan, Ryan; Christe, Steven; Brosius, Jeffrey W.

    2010-01-01

    With the start of normal operations of the Solar Dynamics Observatory in May 2010, the Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) have been returning the most accurate solar XUV and EUV measurements every 10 and 12 seconds, respectively, at almost 100% duty cycle. The focus of the presentation will be the solar flare impulsive phase observations provided by EVE and AIA and what these observations can tell us about the evolution of the initial phase of solar flares. Also emphasized throughout is how simultaneous observations with other instruments, such as RHESSI, SOHO-CDS, and HINODE-EIS, will help provide a more complete characterization of the solar flares and the evolution and energetics during the impulsive phase. These co-temporal observations from the other solar instruments can provide information such as extending the high temperature range spectra and images beyond that provided by the EUV and XUV wavelengths, provide electron density input into the lower atmosphere at the footpoints, and provide plasma flows of chromospheric evaporation, among other characteristics.

  19. Theoretical Auger electron and X-ray emission spectra of CO and H 2O by density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Takao; Chong, Delano P.; Maki, Jun; Kawabe, Hiroyuki; Endo, Kazunaka

    2002-02-01

    We propose a new method for analysis of X-ray emission and Auger electron spectra (XES and AES) of molecules involving the valence spectra using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. To obtain the more accurate transition energies and the relative intensities, we use the total-energy difference procedure ( ΔE-KS) for all transition energies, and transform the coefficients in the LCGTO-MO scheme in the DFT to those for the linear combination of the LCGTO-AO scheme. The method is applied to the analysis of valence spectra, XES and AES for CO and H 2O molecules. The simulated spectra are in a good agreement with the experimental results.

  20. Ion Acceleration in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.; Weir, Sue B.

    1996-01-01

    Solar flares are among the most energetic and interesting phenomena in the Solar system, releasing up to 1032 ergs of energy on timescales of several tens of seconds to several tens of minutes. Much of this energy is in the form of suprathermal electrons and ions, which remain trapped at the Sun and produce a wide variety of radiations, as well as escape into interplanetary space, where they can be directly observed. The radiation from trapped particles consists in general of (1) continuum emission; (2) narrow gamma-ray nuclear deexcitation lines; and (3) high-energy neutrons observed in space or by ground-based neutron monitors. The particles that escape into space consist of both electrons and ions, which often have compositions quite different than that of the ambient solar atmosphere. Flares thus present many diagnostics of the particle acceleration mechanism(s), the identification of which is the ultimate goal of flare research. Moreover, flares in fact offer the only opportunity in astrophysics to study the simultaneous energization of both electrons and ions. Hopefully, an understanding of flares with their wealth of diagnostic data will lead to a better understanding of particle acceleration at other sites in the Universe. It is now generally accepted that flares are roughly divided into two classes: impulsive and gradual. Gradual events are large, occur high in the corona, have long-duration soft and hard X-rays and gamma rays, are electron poor, are associated with Type II radio emission and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and produce energetic ions with coronal abundance ratios. Impulsive events are more compact, occur lower in the corona, produce short-duration radiation, and exhibit dramatic abundance enhancements in the energetic ions. Their He-3/He-4 ratio is - 1, which is a huge increase over the coronal value of about 5 x 10(exp -4), and they also posses smaller but still significant enhancements of Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe relative to He-4, C, N, and O

  1. Vibrational and electronic spectra of 2-nitrobenzanthrone: An experimental and computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onchoke, Kefa K.; Chaudhry, Saad N.; Ojeda, Jorge J.

    2016-01-01

    The environmental pollutant 2-nitrobenzanthrone (2-NBA) poses human health hazards, and is formed by atmospheric reactions of NOX gases with atmospheric particulates. Though its mutagenic effects have been studied in biological systems, its comprehensive spectroscopic experimental data are scarce. Thus, vibrational and optical spectroscopic analysis (UV-Vis, and fluorescence) of 2-NBA was studied using both experimental and density functional theory employing B3LYP method with 6-311 + G(d,p) basis set. The scaled theoretical vibrational frequencies show good agreement to experiment to within 5 cm- 1 and < 20 cm- 1 for frequencies < 1800 cm- 1 and 2700-3200 cm- 1, respectively. In addition, predictions of the DFT frequencies below 1800 cm- 1 yield an overall root mean square (RMS) of ± 20.1 and ± 20.6 cm- 1 for benzanthrone and 2-NBA, respectively. On the basis of normal coordinate analysis complete assignments of harmonic experimental infrared and Raman bands are made. The influence of the nitro group substitution upon the benzanthrone structure and symmetric CH vibrations, and electronic spectra is noted. This study is useful for the development of spectroscopy-mutagenicity relationships in nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  2. Electronic spectra and trans—cis isomerism of streptopolymethine cyanines. A CS INDO CI study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momicchioli, Fabio; Baraldi, Ivan; Ponterini, Glauco; Berthier, Gaston

    The understanding of the role played by cyanine dyes in various fields of application calls for a thorough knowledge of the excited state properties of their parent chromophores, i.e. cationic streptopolymethyne cyanines. For this aim we performed a detailed CS INDO CI investigation on the electronic spectra of tri-, penta- and heptamethine cyanines, both unsubstituted (TC, PC, HC) and terminally substituted by methyl groups (BMTC, BMPC, BMHC). The study comprised S0 Sn, and S0 Tn transitions of the trans and all mono- cis isomers. CI expansions involved solely π orbitals of the polymethine chains and pseudo-π orbitals of the substituents and included all singly-excited and the most important doubly- and triply-excited configurations. The spectroscopic effects of methyl substitution are fairly well described and are shown to be especially important in the upper excited states. The identification of the photochemically formed stereoisomers is attempted in terms of mono- cis isomers. For BMPC, in particular, we report the absorption spectrum of the phototropic form and show that the photoisomer is identifiable as the 3-4 cis form.

  3. The Moving Lines on Electron Spectra as Charge Reflexes on Non-equilibrium States of Nanostructured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchuk, Oleg A.

    2016-04-01

    The experimental results present the phenomenon of moving lines on electron spectra which are linked spatially and in time with the localization and durability of the processes of new surface producing in folds and grain boundaries. This effect was also realized for a thin-layer composite "organic on metal films on dielectric substrate" in modeling non-equilibrium conditions which are created by the intensive electron beam pulse impact. It was found that the nature of the inceptive adsorption layer, in addition to the metal film, determines the initial positions of moving lines on the spectra. The main accents in these investigations were in observations of appearance of the moving lines, dynamics of their displacements on the spectra, final stages when these lines vanished, and finding the general regularities between the spontaneous and induced events.

  4. The Moving Lines on Electron Spectra as Charge Reflexes on Non-equilibrium States of Nanostructured Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mishchuk, Oleg A

    2016-12-01

    The experimental results present the phenomenon of moving lines on electron spectra which are linked spatially and in time with the localization and durability of the processes of new surface producing in folds and grain boundaries. This effect was also realized for a thin-layer composite "organic on metal films on dielectric substrate" in modeling non-equilibrium conditions which are created by the intensive electron beam pulse impact. It was found that the nature of the inceptive adsorption layer, in addition to the metal film, determines the initial positions of moving lines on the spectra. The main accents in these investigations were in observations of appearance of the moving lines, dynamics of their displacements on the spectra, final stages when these lines vanished, and finding the general regularities between the spontaneous and induced events.

  5. Predicting the Response of the Mars Ionosphere to Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallows, K.; Withers, P.; Gonzalez, G.

    2015-12-01

    The increased soft X-ray irradiance during solar flares generates increased electron densities in the lower ionosphere of Mars. The relative changes in electron density during a flare are greater for larger flares and also at lower altitudes and larger flares, due to the wavelength dependence of both the flux increase during the flare and the absorption of flux by the neutral atmosphere. These relationships have been explored [Bougher et al. 2001, Fox et al. 2004, Mendillo et al. 2006, Mahajan et al. 2011, Lollo et al. 2012] but not quantified, which has impeded the validation of simulations of the ionospheric effects of solar flares. Such simulations are necessary for developing accurate descriptions of the physical processes governing ionospheric behavior under extreme conditions. We present a response function, a mathematical expression for the change in electron density during a solar flare as a function of the change in solar flux and an optical depth proxy. This response function is based on analysis of 20 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) radio occultation electron density profiles measured during solar flares. Characterizing the response as a function of optical depth, rather than altitude, provides the best description of ionospheric variability during a flare; otherwise non-negligible solar zenith angle effects are present. We demonstrate that the response function can be used to predict ionospheric electron densities during a specified solar flare by reproducing profiles known to be disturbed by a solar flare. We also demonstrate that the response function can be used to infer the strength of solar flares not visible at Earth by finding the flux enhancement required to reproduce an apparently flare affected profile given an undisturbed profile on the same date.

  6. Do A-type stars flare?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, M. G.; Antoci, V.; Korhonen, H.; White, T. R.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Lehtinen, J.; Nikbakhsh, S.; Viuho, J.

    2017-04-01

    For flares to be generated, stars have to have a sufficiently deep outer convection zone (F5 and later), strong large-scale magnetic fields (Ap/Bp-type stars) or strong, radiatively driven winds (B5 and earlier). Normal A-type stars possess none of these and therefore should not flare. Nevertheless, flares have previously been detected in the Kepler light curves of 33 A-type stars and interpreted to be intrinsic to the stars. Here, we present new and detailed analyses of these 33 stars, imposing very strict criteria for the flare detection. We confirm the presence of flare-like features in 27 of the 33 A-type stars. A study of the pixel data and the surrounding field of view reveals that 14 of these 27 flaring objects have overlapping neighbouring stars and five stars show clear contamination in the pixel data. We have obtained high-resolution spectra for 2/3 of the entire sample and confirm that our targets are indeed A-type stars. Detailed analyses revealed that 11 out of 19 stars with multiple epochs of observations are spectroscopic binaries. Furthermore, and contrary to previous studies, we find that the flares can originate from a cooler, unresolved companion. We note the presence of Hα emission in eight stars. Whether this emission is circumstellar or magnetic in origin is unknown. In summary, we find possible alternative explanations for the observed flares for at least 19 of the 33 A-type stars, but find no truly convincing target to support the hypothesis of flaring A-type stars.

  7. Electronic and oscillation absorption spectra of blood plamsa at surgical diseases of thyroid gland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guminetskiy, S. G.; Motrich, A. V.; Poliansky, I. Y.; Hyrla, Ya. V.

    2012-01-01

    The results of investigating the absorption spectra of blood plasma in the visible and infrared parts of spectra obtained using the techniques of spherical photometer and spectrophotometric complex "Specord IR75" are presented. The possibility of using these spectra for diagnoses the cases of diffuse toxic goiter and nodular goiter and control of treatment process in postsurgical period in the cases of thyroid gland surgery is estimated.

  8. Electronic and oscillation absorption spectra of blood plamsa at surgical diseases of thyroid gland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guminetskiy, S. G.; Motrich, A. V.; Poliansky, I. Y.; Hyrla, Ya. V.

    2011-09-01

    The results of investigating the absorption spectra of blood plasma in the visible and infrared parts of spectra obtained using the techniques of spherical photometer and spectrophotometric complex "Specord IR75" are presented. The possibility of using these spectra for diagnoses the cases of diffuse toxic goiter and nodular goiter and control of treatment process in postsurgical period in the cases of thyroid gland surgery is estimated.

  9. Modeling of electron energy spectra and mobilities in semi-metallic Hg1-xCdxTe quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melezhik, E. O.; Gumenjuk-Sichevska, J. V.; Sizov, F. F.

    2015-11-01

    Electron mobility, energy spectra, and intrinsic carrier concentrations in the n-type Hg0.32Cd0.68Te/Hg1-xCdxTe/Hg0.32Cd0.68Te quantum well (QW) in semi-metallic state are numerically modeled. Energy spectra and wave functions were calculated in the framework of the 8-band k-p Hamiltonian. In our model, electron scattering on longitudinal optical phonons, charged impurities, and holes has been taken into account, and the mobility has been calculated by an iterative solution of the Boltzmann transport equation. Our results show that the increase of the electron concentration in the well enhances the screening of the 2D electron gas, decreases the hole concentration, and can ultimately lead to a high electron mobility at liquid nitrogen temperatures. The increase of the electron concentration in the QW could be achieved in situ by delta-doping of barriers or by applying the top-gate potential. Our modeling has shown that for low molar composition x the concentration of holes in the well is high in a wide range of electron concentrations; in this case, the purity of samples does not significantly influence the electron mobility. These results are important in the context of establishing optimal parameters for the fabrication of high-mobility Hg1-xCdxTe quantum wells able to operate at liquid nitrogen temperature and thus suitable for applications in terahertz detectors.

  10. Nonsequential Double Ionization of Atoms in Strong Laser Field: Identifying the Mechanisms behind the Correlated-Electron Momentum Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Difa; Fu, Libin; Liu, Jie

    Within the strong-field physics community, there has been increasing interest on nonsequential double ionization (NSDI) induced by electron-electron (e-e) correlation. A large variety of novel phenomena has been revealed in experiments during the past decades. However, the theoretical understanding and interpretation of this process is still far from being complete. The most accurate simulation, i.e. the exact solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) for two electrons in a laser field is computationally expensive. In order to overcome the difficulty, we proposed a feasible semiclassical model, in which we treat the tunneling ionization of the outmost electron quantum mechanically according to the ADK theory, sample the inner electron from microcanonical distribution and then evolve the two electrons with Newton's equations. With this model, we have successfully explained various NSDI phenomena, including the excessive DI yield, the energy spectra and angular distribution of photoelectrons. Very recently, it is adopted to reveal the physical mechanisms behind the fingerlike structure in the correlated electron momentum spectra, the unexpected correlation-anticorrelation transition close to the recollision threshold, and the anomalous NSDI of alkaline-earth-metal atoms in circularly polarized field. The obvious advantage of our model is that it gives time-resolved insights into the complex dynamics of NSDI, from the turn-on of the laser field to the final escape of the electrons, thus allowing us to disentangle and thoroughly analyze the underlying physical mechanisms.

  11. Further observations of protons resulting from the decay of neutrons ejected by solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evenson, P. A.; Kroeger, R.; Meyer, P.

    1985-01-01

    The solar flare of 1984 April 24 produced a large gamma ray fluence with energy 2MeV. The time profile of the interplanetary flux from this flare indicates the presence of decaying solar neutrons. This makes a total of three neutron flares so far observed by this method. The three flares are used to place constraints on the fluence and spectra of neutrons emitted by the Sun.

  12. Hard X-ray bursts from flare behind the solar limb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    The determination of the location of the region of origin of hard X-rays is important in evaluating the importance of 10-100 keV electrons in solar flares and in understanding flare particle acceleration. At present only limb-occulted events are available to give some information on the height of X-ray emission. In fifteen months of OSO-7 operation, nine major soft X-ray events had no reported correlated H alpha flare. We examine the hard X-ray spectra of eight of these events with good candidate X-ray flare producing active regions making limb transit at the time of the soft X-ray bursts. All eight bursts had significant X-ray emission in the 30-44 keV range, but only one had flux at the 3 sigma level above 44 keV. The data are consistent with most X-ray emission occurring in the lower chromosphere, but some electron trapping at high altitudes is necessary to explain the small nonthermal fluxes observed.

  13. Independent-electron analysis of the x-ray spectra from single-electron capture in Ne10 + collisions with He, Ne, and Ar atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Anthony C. K.; Kirchner, Tom

    2015-09-01

    We present a theoretical study on the x-ray spectra from single-electron capture in 4.54 keV/amu Ne10 +-He, -Ne, and -Ar collisions. Single-particle capture probabilities were calculated using the two-center basis generator method within the independent electron model. In this framework we investigated the effects of a time-dependent screening potential that models target response on capture cross sections and x-ray spectra. Excellent agreement is shown with the previously measured relative cross sections and x-ray spectra and calculations based on the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method using the no-response single-particle electron capture probabilities in a multinomial single-electron capture analysis. Our results demonstrate the importance of using this consistent statistical analysis of single-electron capture within the independent electron model; a requirement that a previous calculation for the same collision problem using the two-center atomic-orbital close-coupling method may not have considered.

  14. Detecting faint echoes in stellar-flare light curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bromley, Benjamin C.

    1992-01-01

    Observational considerations are discussed for detecting echoes from flare-star photospheres and from stellar or planetary companions. Synthetic spectra are used to determine optimal conditions for the recovery of echoes in flare light curves. The most detectable echoes are expected to appear in broadband observations of the UV continuum. Short-lived flares are ideal for resolving echoes from the flare-star photosphere and may provide constraints for stellar-flare models. Strong outbursts may be used to detect stellar or planetary companions of a flare star. However, the possible planetary configurations that may be probed by this method are limited to Jupiter-size objects in tight orbits about the parent star.

  15. A dynamic flare with anomalously dense flare loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svestka, Z.; Fontenla, J. M.; Machado, M. E.; Martin, S. F.; Neidig, D. F.

    1986-01-01

    The dynamic flare of November 6, 1980 developed a rich system of growing loops which could be followed in H-alpha for 1.5 hours. Throughout the flare, these loops, near the limb, were seen in emission against the disk. Theoretical computations of b-values for a hydrogen atom reveal that this requires electron densities in the loops to be close to 10 to the 12th per cu cm. From measured widths of higher Balmer lines the density at the tops of the loops was found to be 4 x 10 to the 12th per cu cm if no nonthermal motions were present. It is now general knowledge that flare loops are initially observed in X-rays and become visible in H-alpha only after cooling. For such a high density a loop would cool through radiation from 10 to the 7th K to 10 to the 4th K within a few minutes so that the dense H-alpha loops should have heights very close to the heights of the X-ray loops. This, however, contradicts the observations obtained by the HXIS and FCS instruments on board SMM which show the X-ray loops at much higher altitudes than the loops in H-alpha. Therefore, the density must have been significantly smaller when the loops were formed and the flare loops were apparently both shrinking and becoming denser while cooling.

  16. SU-E-T-432: Field Size Influence On the Electron and Photon Spectra Within Small MV Field Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Benmakhlouf, H; Andreo, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the influence of photon field size on the electron and photon fluence spectra in the active volume of small field detectors. Methods: The PENELOPE MC system based usercode PenEasy was used to calculate the material influence on the spectra by scoring the differential fluence in inserts of silicon, carbon, phosphorus and aluminium having 3 mm diameter and height. The spectra were then calculated inside the active volume of eleven detectors (ion chambers and solid-state detectors) whose geometry was simulated with great detail. The inserts/detectors were placed at 10 cm depth in a 30 cm x 30 cm x 30 cm water phantom and irradiated with 2.5 MeV photons and Varian Clinac 6 MV beams of small, medium and large size. Results: For all configurations, photon spectra in the scoring volume were similar to that in a small water volume except for additional characteristic x-ray peaks resulting from the material itself and from the materials surrounding the detectors (i.e. high-Z shielding the silicon). Electron fluence calculated in the inserts were up to 60% larger than in water; the difference increased with material density and decreasing field size. MC-calculated doses were compared to analytically determined collision kerma and restricted cema (cut-off=15keV). For the inserts, with large and medium fields K-col agreed with MC-dose, but K-col overestimated the dose for small fields due to lack of lateral CPE. For the detectors, up to 15% differences between K-col and the MC-dose were found. For all configurations the C-delta and MC-dose agreed within ±2%. Conclusion: The most relevant findings were that shielding affects substantially the photon spectra and material conditions the electron spectra, their field size dependence varying with the geometry configuration. These affect the values of factors entering into relative dosimetry.

  17. Biggest Solar Flare on Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    View an animation from the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT). At 4:51 p.m. EDT, on Monday, April 2, 2001, the sun unleashed the biggest solar flare ever recorded, as observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite. The flare was definitely more powerful than the famous solar flare on March 6, 1989, which was related to the disruption of power grids in Canada. This recent explosion from the active region near the sun's northwest limb hurled a coronal mass ejection into space at a whopping speed of roughly 7.2 million kilometers per hour. Luckily, the flare was not aimed directly towards Earth. Solar flares, among the solar system's mightiest eruptions, are tremendous explosions in the atmosphere of the Sun capable of releasing as much energy as a billion megatons of TNT. Caused by the sudden release of magnetic energy, in just a few seconds flares can accelerate solar particles to very high velocities, almost to the speed of light, and heat solar material to tens of millions of degrees. Solar ejections are often associated with flares and sometimes occur shortly after the flare explosion. Coronal mass ejections are clouds of electrified, magnetic gas weighing billions of tons ejected from the Sun and hurled into space with speeds ranging from 12 to 1,250 miles per second. Depending on the orientation of the magnetic fields carried by the ejection cloud, Earth-directed coronal mass ejections cause magnetic storms by interacting with the Earth's magnetic field, distorting its shape, and accelerating electrically charged particles (electrons and atomic nuclei) trapped within. Severe solar weather is often heralded by dramatic auroral displays, northern and southern lights, and magnetic storms that occasionally affect satellites, radio communications and power systems. The flare and solar ejection has also generated a storm of high-velocity particles, and the number of particles with ten million electron-volts of energy in the space near

  18. Electronic spectra of Fe3+ oxides and oxide hydroxides in the near IR to near UV.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherman, David M.; Waite, T.D.

    1985-01-01

    Optical absorption and diffuse reflectance spectra of several Fe2O3 and FeOOH polymorphs (hematite, maghemite, goethite, lepidocrocite) in the near-IR to near-UV spectral regions (2000-200 nm) are presented. The spectra consist primarily of Fe3+ ligand field and ligand-to-metal charge-transfer transitions.-J.A.Z.

  19. Electronic absorption spectra of blood plasma of patients with various forms of goiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushenko, O. G.; Poliansky, I. Y.; Guminetskiy, S. G.; Motrich, A. V.; Hyrla, Ya. V.

    2012-01-01

    The results of absorption spectra of blood plasma in the ultraviolet and visible areas of the spectrum using the technique of spherical photometer. Possibilities of using these spectra to detect the diseases - diffuse toxic goiter and nodular euthyroid goiter and to control the surgical treatment of this pathology.

  20. Electronic absorption spectra of blood plasma of patients with various forms of goiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushenko, O. G.; Poliansky, I. Y.; Guminetskiy, S. G.; Motrich, A. V.; Hyrla, Ya. V.

    2011-09-01

    The results of absorption spectra of blood plasma in the ultraviolet and visible areas of the spectrum using the technique of spherical photometer. Possibilities of using these spectra to detect the diseases - diffuse toxic goiter and nodular euthyroid goiter and to control the surgical treatment of this pathology.

  1. DFT analysis on the molecular structure, vibrational and electronic spectra of 2-(cyclohexylamino)ethanesulfonic acid.

    PubMed

    Renuga Devi, T S; Sharmi kumar, J; Ramkumaar, G R

    2015-02-25

    The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of 2-(cyclohexylamino)ethanesulfonic acid were recorded in the regions 4000-400 cm(-1) and 4000-50 cm(-1) respectively. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule in the ground state were calculated using Hartee-Fock and Density functional method (B3LYP) with the correlation consistent-polarized valence double zeta (cc-pVDZ) basis set and 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The most stable conformer was optimized and the structural and vibrational parameters were determined based on this. The complete assignments were performed based on the Potential Energy Distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes, calculated using Vibrational Energy Distribution Analysis (VEDA) 4 program. With the observed FTIR and FT-Raman data, a complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound were carried out. Thermodynamic properties and Atomic charges were calculated using both Hartee-Fock and density functional method using the cc-pVDZ basis set and compared. The calculated HOMO-LUMO energy gap revealed that charge transfer occurs within the molecule. (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated using Gauge Including Atomic Orbital (GIAO) method and were compared with experimental results. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions, charge delocalization have been analyzed using Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis. The first order hyperpolarizability (β) and Molecular Electrostatic Potential (MEP) of the molecule was computed using DFT calculations. The electron density based local reactivity descriptor such as Fukui functions were calculated to explain the chemical reactivity site in the molecule.

  2. DFT analysis on the molecular structure, vibrational and electronic spectra of 2-(cyclohexylamino)ethanesulfonic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renuga Devi, T. S.; Sharmi kumar, J.; Ramkumaar, G. R.

    2015-02-01

    The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of 2-(cyclohexylamino)ethanesulfonic acid were recorded in the regions 4000-400 cm-1 and 4000-50 cm-1 respectively. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule in the ground state were calculated using Hartee-Fock and Density functional method (B3LYP) with the correlation consistent-polarized valence double zeta (cc-pVDZ) basis set and 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The most stable conformer was optimized and the structural and vibrational parameters were determined based on this. The complete assignments were performed based on the Potential Energy Distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes, calculated using Vibrational Energy Distribution Analysis (VEDA) 4 program. With the observed FTIR and FT-Raman data, a complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound were carried out. Thermodynamic properties and Atomic charges were calculated using both Hartee-Fock and density functional method using the cc-pVDZ basis set and compared. The calculated HOMO-LUMO energy gap revealed that charge transfer occurs within the molecule. 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated using Gauge Including Atomic Orbital (GIAO) method and were compared with experimental results. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions, charge delocalization have been analyzed using Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis. The first order hyperpolarizability (β) and Molecular Electrostatic Potential (MEP) of the molecule was computed using DFT calculations. The electron density based local reactivity descriptor such as Fukui functions were calculated to explain the chemical reactivity site in the molecule.

  3. The sensitivity of saturation transfer electron paramagnetic resonance spectra to restricted amplitude uniaxial rotational diffusion.

    PubMed

    Hustedt, E J; Beth, A H

    2001-12-01

    Computational methods have been developed to model the effects of constrained or restricted amplitude uniaxial rotational diffusion (URD) on saturation transfer electron paramagnetic resonance (ST-EPR) signals observed from nitroxide spin labels. These methods, which have been developed to model the global rotational motion of intrinsic membrane proteins that can interact with the cytoskeleton or other peripheral proteins, are an extension of previous work that described computationally efficient algorithms for calculating ST-EPR spectra for unconstrained URD (Hustedt and Beth, 1995, Biophys. J. 69:1409-1423). Calculations are presented that demonstrate the dependence of the ST-EPR signal (V'(2)) on the width (Delta) of a square-well potential as a function of the microwave frequency, the correlation time for URD, and the orientation of the spin-label with respect to the URD axis. At a correlation time of 10 micros, the V'(2) signal is very sensitive to Delta in the range from 0 to 60 degrees, marginally sensitive from 60 degrees to 90 degrees, and insensitive beyond 90 degrees. Sensitivity to Delta depends on the correlation time for URD with higher sensitivity to large values of Delta at the shorter correlation times, on the microwave frequency, and on the orientation of the spin-label relative to the URD axis. The computational algorithm has been incorporated into a global nonlinear least-squares analysis approach, based upon the Marquardt-Levenberg method (Blackman et al., 2001, Biophys. J. 81:3363-3376). This has permitted determination of the correlation time for URD and the width of the square-well potential by automated fitting of experimental ST-EPR data sets obtained from a spin-labeled membrane protein and provided a new automated method for analysis of data obtained from any system that exhibits restricted amplitude URD.

  4. Elongation of Flare Ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jiong; Longcope, Dana W.; Cassak, Paul A.; Priest, Eric R.

    2017-03-01

    We present an analysis of the apparent elongation motion of flare ribbons along the polarity inversion line (PIL), as well as the shear of flare loops in several two-ribbon flares. Flare ribbons and loops spread along the PIL at a speed ranging from a few to a hundred km s‑1. The shear measured from conjugate footpoints is consistent with the measurement from flare loops, and both show the decrease of shear toward a potential field as a flare evolves and ribbons and loops spread along the PIL. Flares exhibiting fast bidirectional elongation appear to have a strong shear, which may indicate a large magnetic guide field relative to the reconnection field in the coronal current sheet. We discuss how the analysis of ribbon motion could help infer properties in the corona where reconnection takes place.

  5. The flare kernel in the impulsive phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejager, C.

    1986-01-01

    The impulsive phase of a flare is characterized by impulsive bursts of X-ray and microwave radiation, related to impulsive footpoint heating up to 50 or 60 MK, by upward gas velocities (150 to 400 km/sec) and by a gradual increase of the flare's thermal energy content. These phenomena, as well as non-thermal effects, are all related to the impulsive energy injection into the flare. The available observations are also quantitatively consistent with a model in which energy is injected into the flare by beams of energetic electrons, causing ablation of chromospheric gas, followed by convective rise of gas. Thus, a hole is burned into the chromosphere; at the end of impulsive phase of an average flare the lower part of that hole is situated about 1800 km above the photosphere. H alpha and other optical and UV line emission is radiated by a thin layer (approx. 20 km) at the bottom of the flare kernel. The upward rising and outward streaming gas cools down by conduction in about 45 s. The non-thermal effects in the initial phase are due to curtailing of the energy distribution function by escape of energetic electrons. The single flux tube model of a flare does not fit with these observations; instead we propose the spaghetti-bundle model. Microwave and gamma-ray observations suggest the occurrence of dense flare knots of approx. 800 km diameter, and of high temperature. Future observations should concentrate on locating the microwave/gamma-ray sources, and on determining the kernel's fine structure and the related multi-loop structure of the flaring area.

  6. Global Energetics of Solar Flares. III. Nonthermal Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Holman, Gordon; O'Flannagain, Aidan; Caspi, Amir; McTiernan, James M.; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2016-11-01

    This study entails the third part of a global flare energetics project, in which Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) data of 191 M and X-class flare events from the first 3.5 years of the Solar Dynamics Observatory mission are analyzed. We fit a thermal and a nonthermal component to RHESSI spectra, yielding the temperature of the differential emission measure (DEM) tail, the nonthermal power-law slope and flux, and the thermal/nonthermal cross-over energy e co. From these parameters, we calculate the total nonthermal energy E nt in electrons with two different methods: (1) using the observed cross-over energy e co as low-energy cutoff, and (2) using the low-energy cutoff e wt predicted by the warm thick-target bremsstrahlung model of Kontar et al. Based on a mean temperature of T e = 8.6 MK in active regions, we find low-energy cutoff energies of {e}{wt}=6.2+/- 1.6 {keV} for the warm-target model, which is significantly lower than the cross-over energies {e}{co}=21+/- 6 {keV}. Comparing with the statistics of magnetically dissipated energies E mag and thermal energies E th from the two previous studies, we find the following mean (logarithmic) energy ratios with the warm-target model: {E}{nt}=0.41 {E}{mag}, {E}{th}=0.08 {E}{mag}, and {E}{th}=0.15 {E}{nt}. The total dissipated magnetic energy exceeds the thermal energy in 95% and the nonthermal energy in 71% of the flare events, which confirms that magnetic reconnection processes are sufficient to explain flare energies. The nonthermal energy exceeds the thermal energy in 85% of the events, which largely confirms the warm thick-target model.

  7. Rotational modulation and flares on RS CVn and BY Dra-type stars. V - Exosat and IUE observations of a flare on EQ Pegasi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisch, B. M.; Butler, C. J.; Doyle, J. G.; Rodono, M.

    1987-01-01

    Time-trailed UV spectra and a soft X-ray lightcurve were obtained during a flare on the binary dMe star EQ Peg AB. On the basis of solar flare Mg II surface fluxes and an about 70-percent enhancement in the disk-integrated flux during the flare on EQ Peg, it is estimated that the chromospheric flare covered about 1.5 percent of the stellar surface. The size scale is estimated to be comparable to that of a solar two-ribbon flare. This unusual flare is noted to exhibit a low-energy soft X-ray rise phase which is longer than that of most flares; it is longer than the decay phase and peaks much later than the medium energy light curve. Evidence of variable Fe II emission and variable continuum emission in select UV bands during the flare is noted.

  8. Origin of the Universal Correlation between the Flare Temperature and the Emission Measure for Solar and Stellar Flares.

    PubMed

    Shibata; Yokoyama

    1999-11-20

    We present a theory to explain the observed universal correlation between flare temperature T and emission measure EM=n2V for solar and stellar flares (including solar microflares observed by Yohkoh as well as protostellar flares observed by ASCA), where n is the electron density and V is the volume. The theory is based on a magnetic reconnection model with heat conduction and chromospheric evaporation, assuming that the gas pressure of a flare loop is comparable to the magnetic pressure. This theory predicts the relation EM~B-5T17/2, which explains well the observed correlation between EM and T in the range of 6x106 K < T<108 K and 1044flares, if the magnetic field strength B of a flare loop is nearly constant for solar and stellar flares.

  9. Density functional calculations on electronic circular dichroism spectra of chiral transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Autschbach, Jochen; Jorge, Francisco E; Ziegler, Tom

    2003-05-05

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) has for the first time been applied to the computation of circular dichroism (CD) spectra of transition metal complexes, and a detailed comparison with experimental spectra has been made. Absorption spectra are also reported. Various Co(III) complexes as well as [Rh(en)(3)](3+) are studied in this work. The resulting simulated CD spectra are generally in good agreement with experimental spectra after corrections for systematic errors in a few of the lowest excitation energies are applied. This allows for an interpretation and assignment of the spectra for the whole experimentally accessible energy range (UV/vis). Solvent effects on the excitations are estimated via inclusion of a continuum solvent model. This significantly improves the computed excitation energies for charge-transfer bands for complexes of charge +3, but has only a small effect on those for neutral or singly charged complexes. The energies of the weak d-to-d transitions of the Co complexes are systematically overestimated due to deficiencies of the density functionals. These errors are much smaller for the 4d metal complex. Taking these systematic errors and the effect of a solvent into consideration, TD-DFT computations are demonstrated to be a reliable tool in order to assist with the assignment and interpretation of CD spectra of chiral transition metal complexes.

  10. Recent research directions in Fribourg: nuclear dynamics in resonances revealed by 2-dimensional EEL spectra, electron collisions with ionic liquids and electronic excitation of pyrimidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Michael; Regeta, Khrystyna; Gorfinkiel, Jimena D.; Mašín, Zdeněk; Grimme, Stefan; Bannwarth, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    The article briefly reviews three subjects recently investigated in Fribourg: (i) electron collisions with surfaces of ionic liquids, (ii) two-dimensional (2D) electron energy loss spectra and (iii) resonances in absolute cross sections for electronic excitation of unsaturated compounds. Electron energy loss spectra of four ionic liquids revealed a number of excited states, including triplet states. A solution of a dye in an ionic liquid showed an energy-loss band of the solute, but not in all ionic liquids. 2D spectra reveal state-to-state information (given resonance to given final state) and are shown to be an interesting means to gain insight into dynamics of nuclear motion in resonances. Absolute cross sections for pyrimidine are reported as a function of scattering angle and as a function of electron energy. They reveal resonant structure which was reproduced very nicely by R-matrix calculations. The calculation provided an assignment of the resonances which reveals common patterns in compounds containing double bonds.

  11. Electronic structure, photoemission spectra, and vacuum-ultraviolet optical spectra of CsPbCl3 and CsPbBr3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidrich, K.; Schäfer, W.; Schreiber, M.; Söchtig, J.; Trendel, G.; Treusch, J.; Grandke, T.; Stolz, H. J.

    1981-11-01

    Optical spectra of CsPbCl3 and CsPbBr3 have been measured in the range from 2 to 10 eV and have been combined with ultraviolet-photoemission-spectroscopy (UPS)-measurements at 21.1 and 40.8 eV. A quantitative band calculation is presented, which takes into account anion-anion interaction as well as electronic states of the Cs+ ion. The prominent features of earlier band models and measurements are reestablished through our measurements and calculations, namely that the valence band consists of anionic p functions and Pb 6s functions, the lowest conduction band being Pb 6p type, and the lowest gap occuring at the R point of the Brillouin zone. Inclusion of a further (Cs 6s-type) conduction band, however, is necessary to bring the calculated joint density of states into agreement with vacuum-ultraviolet optical spectra. The calculated densities of states of the valence bands are in quantitative agreement with those deduced from our UPS measurements.

  12. Improving the simulation of vibrationally resolved electronic spectra of phenanthrene: A computational Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Min; Yang, Pan; Shen, Wei; Li, Ming; He, Rongxing

    2015-05-01

    Based on the density functional theory and its time-dependent extension, the properties of the ground and the first excited states of phenanthrene were calculated. In harmonic and anharmonic approximations, the well-resolved absorption and emission spectra of phenanthrene were simulated using the Franck-Condon approximation combined with the Herzberg-Teller and Duschinsky effects, and the results reproduced the experimental spectra very well. The mirror symmetry breakdown between absorption and emission spectra is induced mainly from the Herzberg-Teller effect and Duschinsky mode mixing. Moreover, most of the vibrational modes were tentatively assigned and compared with the experiment.

  13. The EVE Doppler Sensitivity and Flare Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Woods, T. N.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Didkovsky, L.; Del Zanna, G.

    2011-01-01

    The Extreme-ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) obtains continuous EUV spectra of the Sun viewed as a star. Its primary objective is the characterization of solar spectral irradiance, but its sensitivity and stability make it extremely interesting for observations of variability on time scales down to the limit imposed by its basic 10 s sample interval. In this paper we characterize the Doppler sensitivity of the EVE data. We find that the 30.4 nm line of He II has a random Doppler error below 0.001 nm (1 pm, better than 10 km/s as a redshift), with ample stability to detect the orbital motion of its satellite, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Solar flares also displace the spectrum, both because of Doppler shifts and because of EVE's optical layout, which (as with a slitless spectrograph) confuses position and wavelength. As a flare develops, the centroid of the line displays variations that reflect Doppler shifts and therefore flare dynamics. For the impulsive phase of the flare SOL2010-06-12, we find the line centroid to have a redshift of 16.8 +/- 5.9 km/s relative to that of the flare gradual phase (statistical errors only). We find also that high-temperature lines, such as Fe XXIV 19.2 nm, have well-determined Doppler components for major flares, with decreasing apparent blueshifts as expected from chromospheric evaporation flows.

  14. High-energy particle production in solar flares (SEP, gamma-ray and neutron emissions). [solar energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, E. L.

    1987-01-01

    Electrons and ions, over a wide range of energies, are produced in association with solar flares. Solar energetic particles (SEPs), observed in space and near earth, consist of electrons and ions that range in energy from 10 keV to about 100 MeV and from 1 MeV to 20 GeV, respectively. SEPs are directly recorded by charged particle detectors, while X-ray, gamma-ray, and neutron detectors indicate the properties of the accelerated particles (electrons and ions) which have interacted in the solar atmosphere. A major problem of solar physics is to understand the relationship between these two groups of charged particles; in particular whether they are accelerated by the same mechanism. The paper reviews the physics of gamma-rays and neutron production in the solar atmosphere and the method by which properties of the primary charged particles produced in the solar flare can be deduced. Recent observations of energetic photons and neutrons in space and at the earth are used to present a current picture of the properties of impulsively flare accelerated electrons and ions. Some important properties discussed are time scale of production, composition, energy spectra, accelerator geometry. Particular attention is given to energetic particle production in the large flare on June 3, 1982.

  15. Are solar gamma-ray-line flares different from other large flares?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Crosby, N. B.; Dennis, B. R.

    1994-01-01

    We reevaluate evidence indicating that gamma-ray-line (GRL) flares are fundamentally different from other large flares without detectable GRL emission and find no compelling support for this proposition. For large flares observed by the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) from 1980 to 1982, we obtain a reasonably good correlation between 4-8 MeV GRL fluences and greater than 50 keV hard X-ray fluences and find no evidence for a distinct population of large hard X-ray flares that lack commensurate GRL emission. Our results are consistent with the acceleration of the bulk of the approximately 100 keV electrons and approximately 10 MeV protons (i.e., the populations of these species that interact in the solar atmosphere to produce hard X-ray and GRL emission) by a common process in large flares of both long and short durations.

  16. White-light continuum emission from solar flare and plages: observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlicki, Arkadiusz; Awasthi, Arun Kumar; Heinzel, Petr

    2015-08-01

    Observations of flares in optical continuum emission are very rare. Therefore, the analysis of such observations is very useful and may contribute to our understanding of the flaring chromosphere. We study the white-light continuum emission observed during the X6.9 flare observed on August 09, 2011. This emission comes not only from the flare ribbons but also form the nearby plage area observed within the active region. The main aim of this work is to disentangle the flare and plage emission and to understand the physical mechanisms responsible for the production of white-light continuum.There are two main mechanisms which can be responsible for the optical continuum emission of the solar atmosphere: enhanced photospheric H- continuum due to the temperature increase below the temperature minimum region, or hydrogen recombination continua (Balmer, Paschen) formed in solar chromosphere. In our work we analyse the physical conditions in solar active atmosphere in order to obtain the contribution from these two mechanisms to the whole continuum emission of the flare and plage.We analyzed the spatial, spectral and temporal evolution study of the flare and plage parameters by analyzing multi-wavelength observations obtained from ground and space based solar observatories. We study the morphological correlation of the white-light continuum emission observed with different instruments. Moreover, we also explore the non-thermal electron beam properties by forward fitting the observed X-ray spectra.The unique opportunity of an intense X6.9 flare occurrence close to the limb enabled us to explore the origin of white-light continuum with better visibility. The analysis of multi-wavelength data revealed the origin of this emission from the foot-points of the loops. Spatial association of HXR foot-points synthesized from RHESSI observations confirmed this finding. In addition, we found a good temporal correlation of hard (>30 keV) X-ray with the white-light emission. However

  17. VERITAS OBSERVATIONS OF DAY-SCALE FLARING OF M 87 IN 2010 APRIL

    SciTech Connect

    Aliu, E.; Errando, M.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Bouvier, A.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Benbow, W.; Bradbury, S. M.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; Duke, C.; Falcone, A.; and others

    2012-02-20

    VERITAS has been monitoring the very-high-energy (VHE; > 100 GeV) gamma-ray activity of the radio galaxy M 87 since 2007. During 2008, flaring activity on a timescale of a few days was observed with a peak flux of (0.70 {+-} 0.16) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} at energies above 350 GeV. In 2010 April, VERITAS detected a flare from M 87 with peak flux of (2.71 {+-} 0.68) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for E > 350 GeV. The source was observed for six consecutive nights during the flare, resulting in a total of 21 hr of good-quality data. The most rapid flux variation occurred on the trailing edge of the flare with an exponential flux decay time of 0.90{sup +0.22}{sub -0.15} days. The shortest detected exponential rise time is three times as long, at 2.87{sup +1.65}{sub -0.99} days. The quality of the data sample is such that spectral analysis can be performed for three periods: rising flux, peak flux, and falling flux. The spectra obtained are consistent with power-law forms. The spectral index at the peak of the flare is equal to 2.19 {+-} 0.07. There is some indication that the spectrum is softer in the falling phase of the flare than the peak phase, with a confidence level corresponding to 3.6 standard deviations. We discuss the implications of these results for the acceleration and cooling rates of VHE electrons in M 87 and the constraints they provide on the physical size of the emitting region.

  18. Spectroscopic Observations of a Solar Flare and the Associated Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, S.; Tian, H.; McKillop, S.

    2013-12-01

    We used data from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode to examine a coronal mass ejection and a preceding flare observed on 21 November 2012 between 15:00 and 17:00 UT. Images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory were used to align the data from EIS with specific events occurring. We analyzed spectra of a few emission lines at three locations on the flare site and one location in the erupting prominence. On the flare site, we found line profiles showing typical characteristics of chromospheric evaporation: downflows at cooler lines and upflows at hotter lines. At one particular location on the flare site, we clearly identified dominant downflows on the order of 100 km/s in lines through Fe VIII to Fe XVI. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that such strong high-speed downflows have been spectroscopically observed in the impulsive phase of solar flares. The profile of the Fe VIII 184.54 line reveals two peaks and we were able to use the double Gaussian fit to separate the rapid downflows of dense material from the nearly stationary coronal background emission. For the erupting prominence, we were able to analyze multiple lines, cooler and warmer, of interest using this double Gaussian fit to separate the background emission from the emission of the ejected material. Our results show that the LOS velocities of the ejected material are about 100 km/s in the lower corona. Additionally, in each region of interest, we used the ratio of the density-sensitive line pair FeXII 195/186 to determine the electron density. Our results clearly show that the coronal densities were greatly enhanced during the flare. The density of the ejected material is also much larger than the typical coronal density. This research was supported by the NSF grant for the Solar Physics REU Program at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (AGS-1263241).

  19. VERITAS Observations of Day-scale Flaring of M 87 in 2010 April

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, J. S>

    2012-01-01

    VERITAS has been monitoring the very-high-energy (VHE; > 100 GeV) gamma-ray activity of the radio galaxy M 87 since 2007. During 2008, flaring activity on a timescale of a few days was observed with a peak flux of (0.70 +/- 0.16) x 10(exp -11)/sq cm/s at energies above 350 GeV. In 2010 April, VERITAS detected a flare from M 87 with peak flux of (2.71 +/- 0.68) x 10(exp -11)/sq cm/s for E > 350 GeV. The source was observed for six consecutive nights during the flare, resulting in a total of21 hr of good-quality data. The most rapid flux variation occurred on the trailing edge of the flare with an exponential flux decay time of 0,90 +0.22/-0.15 days, The shortest detected exponential rise time is three times as long, at 2.87 +1.65/-0.99 days. The quality of the data sample is such that spectral analysis can he performed for three periods: rising flux, peak flux, and falling flux. The spectra obtained are consistent with power-law forms. The spectral index at the peak of the flare is equal to 2.19 +/- 0.07, There is some indication that the spectrum is softer in the falling phase of the flare than the peak phase, with a confidence level corresponding to 3.6 standard deviations. We discuss the implications of these results for the acceleration and cooling rates of VHE electrons in M 87 and the constraints they provide on the physical size of the emitting region.

  20. Solar flares and energetic particles.

    PubMed

    Vilmer, Nicole

    2012-07-13

    Solar flares are now observed at all wavelengths from γ-rays to decametre radio waves. They are commonly associated with efficient production of energetic particles at all energies. These particles play a major role in the active Sun because they contain a large amount of the energy released during flares. Energetic electrons and ions interact with the solar atmosphere and produce high-energy X-rays and γ-rays. Energetic particles can also escape to the corona and interplanetary medium, produce radio emissions (electrons) and may eventually reach the Earth's orbit. I shall review here the available information on energetic particles provided by X-ray/γ-ray observations, with particular emphasis on the results obtained recently by the mission Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. I shall also illustrate how radio observations contribute to our understanding of the electron acceleration sites and to our knowledge on the origin and propagation of energetic particles in the interplanetary medium. I shall finally briefly review some recent progress in the theories of particle acceleration in solar flares and comment on the still challenging issue of connecting particle acceleration processes to the topology of the complex magnetic structures present in the corona.

  1. Multiple spectra of electron spin resonance in chiral molecule-based magnets networked by a single chiral ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mito, M.; Nagano, T.; Tsuruta, K.; Deguchi, H.; Takagi, S.; Kishine, J.; Yoshida, Y.; Inoue, K.

    2013-10-01

    A molecule-based magnet [Cr(CN)6][Mn(R/S)-pnH(H2O)](H2O) (termed R/S-GN) is a chiral crystal without an inversion center and mirror reflection, and its structural network is constructed using a chiral ligand diaminopropane (R/S)-pn. In S-GN, multiple spectra of ESR were observed below the magnetic ordering temperature by Morgunov et al. [Phys. Rev. B 77, 184419 (2008)]. They concluded that the phenomenon at the high field side occurred because the incommensurate magnetic structure resulted in a length-controllable superlattice of domain walls (the so-called chiral soliton lattice, CSL) under a dc magnetic field H applied perpendicular to the magnetic chiral axis. However, there multiple spectra were observed even for H nearly parallel to the chiral axis, a-axis, and their interpretation is unreasonable. Thus, we conducted an X-band electron spin resonance (ESR) measurement of R-GN under conditions similar to those of their experiment and performed Fourier spectrum analyses for the data of R-GN as an approach of physical characterization. By using two Lorentz spectra, the main ESR spectra for H // a were reproduced, and furthermore two prominent periodic modes were found by spectrum analyses based on Fourier transform. Two characteristic periods, p1 and p2 (spectra observed below the magnetic ordering temperature are due not to hyperfine structure but magnetic fine structure, and it certainly originates from the existence of plural nonequivalent magnetic sites. Thus, it is unreasonable to consider CSL to explain the multiple ESR spectra observed independently of the field direction, whereas the observed complex spectra appeal wealthy scientific potentiality in chiral crystals.

  2. iSpectra: An Open Source Toolbox For The Analysis of Spectral Images Recorded on Scanning Electron Microscopes.

    PubMed

    Liebske, Christian

    2015-08-01

    iSpectra is an open source and system-independent toolbox for the analysis of spectral images (SIs) recorded on energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) systems attached to scanning electron microscopes (SEMs). The aim of iSpectra is to assign pixels with similar spectral content to phases, accompanied by cumulative phase spectra with superior counting statistics for quantification. Pixel-to-phase assignment starts with a threshold-based pre-sorting of spectra to create groups of pixels with identical elemental budgets, similar to a method described by van Hoek (2014). Subsequent merging of groups and re-assignments of pixels using elemental or principle component histogram plots enables the user to generate chemically and texturally plausible phase maps. A variety of standard image processing algorithms can be applied to groups of pixels to optimize pixel-to-phase assignments, such as morphology operations to account for overlapping excitation volumes over pixels located at phase boundaries. iSpectra supports batch processing and allows pixel-to-phase assignments to be applied to an unlimited amount of SIs, thus enabling phase mapping of large area samples like petrographic thin sections.

  3. pH-Induced changes in electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra of phenazine derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryazanova, O. A.; Voloshin, I. M.; Makitruk, V. L.; Zozulya, V. N.; Karachevtsev, V. A.

    2007-04-01

    The visible electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra as well as fluorescence polarization degrees of imidazo-[4,5-d]-phenazine (F1), 2-methylimidazo-[4,5-d]-phenazine (F2), 2-trifluoridemethylimidazo-[4,5-d]-phenazine (F3), 1,2,3-triazole-[4,5-d]-phenazine (F4) and their glycosides, imidazo-[4,5-d]-phenazine-N1-β- D-ribofuranoside (F1rib), 1,2,3-triazole-[4,5-d]-phenazine-N1-β- D-glucopyranoside (F4gl), were investigated in aqueous buffered solutions over the pH range of 0-12, where the spectral transformations were found to be reversible. The effects of protonation and deprotonation on spectral properties of these dyes were studied. We have determined the ranges of pH, where individual ionic species are predominant. In aqueous buffered solutions the fluorescence was found only for neutral species of F1, F1rib, F2, and F4gl dyes, whereas for the ionic forms of these dyes, as well as for F3 and F4 ones, the fluorescence has not been detected. The concentrational deprotonation p Ka values were evaluated from experimental data. It was shown that donor-acceptor properties of the substituent group in the second position of the pentagonal ring substantially affect the values of the deprotonation constants and the character of protonation for chromophore. The substitution of a hydrogen atom in the NH-group by the sugar residue blocks the formation of the anionic species, and results in enhancement of the dye emission intensity. The steep emission dependence for F1 and F1rib over pH range of 0-7 with intensities ratio of IpH 7/ IpH 1 = 60 allows us to propose them as possible indicator dyes in luminescence based pH sensors for investigation of processes accompanied by acidification, e.g. as gastric pH-sensors. A comparative analysis of the studied dyes has shown that F4gl is the most promising compound to be used as a fluorescent probe for investigation of molecular hybridization of nucleic acids.

  4. Theoretical study of the electronic spectra of neutral and cationic NpO and NpO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, Attila; Infante, Ivan

    2015-08-01

    The electronic spectra of neutral NpO and NpO2 as well as of their mono- (NpO+, NpO2+) and dications (NpO2+, NpO22+) were studied using multiconfigurational relativistic quantum chemical calculations at the complete active space self-consistent field/CASPT2 level of theory taking into account spin-orbit coupling. The active space included 16 orbitals: all the 7s, 6d, and 5f orbitals of neptunium together with selected orbitals of oxygen. The vertical excitation energies on the ground state geometries have been computed up to ca. 35 000 cm-1. The gas-phase electronic spectra were evaluated on the basis of the computed Einstein coefficients at 298 K and 3000 K. The computed vertical transition energies show good agreement with previous condensed-phase results on NpO2+ and NpO22+.

  5. All-electron first-principles GW+Bethe-Salpeter calculation for optical absorption spectra of sodium clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Noguchi, Yoshifumi; Ohno, Kaoru

    2010-04-15

    The optical absorption spectra of sodium clusters (Na{sub 2n}, n{<=} 4) are calculated by using an all-electron first-principles GW+Bethe-Salpeter method with the mixed-basis approach within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation. In these small systems, the excitonic effect strongly affects the optical properties due to the confinement of exciton in the small system size. The present state-of-the-art method treats the electron-hole two-particle Green's function by incorporating the ladder diagrams up to the infinite order and therefore takes into account the excitonic effect in a good approximation. We check the accuracy of the present method by comparing the resulting spectra with experiments. In addition, the effect of delocalization in particular in the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital in the GW quasiparticle wave function is also discussed by rediagonalizing the Dyson equation.

  6. Quantum Chemical Study of the Reaction of C+ with Interstellar Ice: Predictions of Vibrational and Electronic Spectra of Reaction Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woon, David E.

    2015-06-01

    The C+ cation (CII) is the dominant form of carbon in diffuse clouds and an important tracer for star formation in molecular clouds. We studied the low energy deposition of C+ on ice using density functional theory calculations on water clusters as large as 18 H2O. Barrierless reactions occur with water to form two dominant sets of products: HOC + H3O+ and CO- + 2H3O+. In order to provide testable predictions, we have computed both vibrational and electronic spectra for pure ice and processed ice clusters. While vibrational spectroscopy is expected to be able to discern that C+ has reacted with ice by the addition of H3O+ features not present in pure ice, it does not provided characteristic bands that would discern between HOC and CO-. On the other hand, predictions of electronic spectra suggest that low energy absorptions may occur for CO- and not HOC, making it possible to distinguish one product from the other.

  7. Advances In Understanding Solar And Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam F.

    2016-07-01

    Flares result from the sudden reconnection and relaxation of magnetic fields in the coronae of stellar atmospheres. The highly dynamic atmospheric response produces radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum, from the radio to X-rays, on a range of timescales, from seconds to days. New high resolution data of solar flares have revealed the intrinsic spatial properties of the flaring chromosphere, which is thought to be where the majority of the flare energy is released as radiation in the optical and near-UV continua and emission lines. New data of stellar flares have revealed the detailed properties of the broadband (white-light) continuum emission, which provides straightforward constraints for models of the transformation of stored magnetic energy in the corona into thermal energy of the lower atmosphere. In this talk, we discuss the physical processes that produce several important spectral phenomena in the near-ultraviolet and optical as revealed from new radiative-hydrodynamic models of flares on the Sun and low mass stars. We present recent progress with high-flux nonthermal electron beams in reproducing the observed optical continuum color temperature of T 10,000 K and the Balmer jump properties in the near-ultraviolet. These beams produce dense, heated chromospheric condensations, which can explain the shape and strength of the continuum emission in M dwarf flares and the red-wing asymmetries in the chromospheric emission lines in recent observations of solar flares from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph. Current theoretical challenges and future modeling directions will be discussed, as well as observational synergies between solar and stellar flares.

  8. A simplified Tamm-Dancoff density functional approach for the electronic excitation spectra of very large molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimme, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    Two approximations in the Tamm-Dancoff density functional theory approach (TDA-DFT) to electronically excited states are proposed which allow routine computations for electronic ultraviolet (UV)- or circular dichroism (CD) spectra of molecules with 500-1000 atoms. Speed-ups compared to conventional time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) treatments of about two to three orders of magnitude in the excited state part at only minor loss of accuracy are obtained. The method termed sTDA ("s" for simplified) employs atom-centered Löwdin-monopole based two-electron repulsion integrals with the asymptotically correct 1/R behavior and perturbative single excitation configuration selection. It is formulated generally for any standard global hybrid density functional with given Fock-exchange mixing parameter ax. The method performs well for two standard benchmark sets of vertical singlet-singlet excitations for values of ax in the range 0.2-0.6. The mean absolute deviations from reference data are only 0.2-0.3 eV and similar to those from standard TD-DFT. In three cases (two dyes and one polypeptide), good mutual agreement between the electronic spectra (up to 10-11 eV excitation energy) from the sTDA method and those from TD(A)-DFT is obtained. The computed UV- and CD-spectra of a few typical systems (e.g., C60, two transition metal complexes, [7]helicene, polyalanine, a supramolecular aggregate with 483 atoms and about 7000 basis functions) compare well with corresponding experimental data. The method is proposed together with medium-sized double- or triple-zeta type atomic-orbital basis sets as a quantum chemical tool to investigate the spectra of huge molecular systems at a reliable DFT level.

  9. Research Investigation Directed Toward Extending the Useful Range of the Electromagnetic Spectrum. [atomic spectra and electronic structure of alkali metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, S. R.; Happer, W.

    1974-01-01

    The report discusses completed and proposed research in atomic and molecular physics conducted at the Columbia Radiation Laboratory from July 1972 to June 1973. Central topics described include the atomic spectra and electronic structure of alkali metals and helium, molecular microwave spectroscopy, the resonance physics of photon echoes in some solid state systems (including Raman echoes, superradiance, and two photon absorption), and liquid helium superfluidity.

  10. Calculation of Vibrational and Electronic Excited-State Absorption Spectra of Arsenic-Water Complexes Using Density Functional Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-03

    of Arsenic- Water Complexes Using Density Functional Theory June 3, 2016 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. L. Huang S.g...NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Calculation of Vibrational and Electronic Excited-State Absorption Spectra of Arsenic- Water Complexes Using... water molecules should be associated with response features that are intermediate between that of isolated molecules and that of a bulk system. DFT and

  11. Ionospheric effects of solar flares at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, K. K.; Lodhi, Neelesh K.; Singh, Sachchidanand

    2009-08-01

    From an analysis of electron density profiles recorded aboard Mars Global Surveyor, we report observations of some new and aeronomically important solar flare effects in the ionosphere of Mars. We find that all flares result in the formation of a well defined E layer peak, not always seen on other days. Further, while majority of flares result in elevated electron densities in the E region alone, some flares affect both the E and F1 layers. These altitude - related effects can provide vital information on the relative enhancement of photon fluxes in the various wavelength bands during solar flares. By using the unit optical depth values at Mars from Fox (2004) and the XUV irradiance model of Meier et al. (2002) for the Bastille Day solar flare, we infer that the well defined E peaks could result from enhancement of photon fluxes in the 10-13 nm spectral band. The extension of effect to the F1 layer is due to hardening of the 26-91 nm spectral band, as supported by Solar EUV Monitor measurements on Solar Heliospheric Observatory.

  12. Measurement of the high energy component of the x-ray spectra in the VENUS electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, D.; Benitez, J. Y.; Lyneis, C. M.; Todd, D. S.; Ropponen, T.; Ropponen, J.; Koivisto, H.; Gammino, S.

    2008-03-15

    High performance electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources, such as VENUS (Versatile ECR for NUclear Science), produce large amounts of x-rays. By studying their energy spectra, conclusions can be drawn about the electron heating process and the electron confinement. In addition, the bremsstrahlung from the plasma chamber is partly absorbed by the cold mass of the superconducting magnet, adding an extra heat load to the cryostat. Germanium or NaI detectors are generally used for x-ray measurements. Due to the high x-ray flux from the source, the experimental setup to measure bremsstrahlung spectra from ECR ion sources is somewhat different from that for the traditional nuclear physics measurements these detectors are generally used for. In particular, the collimation and background shielding can be problematic. In this paper, we will discuss the experimental setup for such a measurement, the energy calibration and background reduction, the shielding of the detector, and collimation of the x-ray flux. We will present x-ray energy spectra and cryostat heating rates depending on various ion source parameters, such as confinement fields, minimum B-field, rf power, and heating frequency.

  13. Microsolvation in superfluid helium droplets studied by the electronic spectra of six porphyrin derivatives and one chlorine compound.

    PubMed

    Riechers, R; Pentlehner, D; Slenczka, A

    2013-06-28

    After almost two decades of high resolution molecular spectroscopy in superfluid helium droplets, the understanding of microsolvation is still the subject of intense experimental and theoretical research. According to the published spectroscopic work including microwave, infrared, and electronic spectroscopy, the latter appears to be particularly promising to study microsolvation because of the appearance of pure molecular transitions and spectrally separated phonon wings. Instead of studying the very details of the influence of the helium environment for one particular dopant molecule as previously done for phthalocyanine, the present study compares electronic spectra of a series of non-polar porphyrin derivatives when doped into helium droplets consisting of 10(4)-10(5) helium atoms. Thereby, we focus on the helium-induced fine structure, as revealed most clearly at the corresponding electronic origin. The interpretation and the assignment of particular features obtained in the fluorescence excitation spectra are based on additional investigations of dispersed emission spectra and of the saturation behavior. Besides many dopant-specific results, the experimental study provides strong evidence for a particular triple peak feature representing the characteristic signature of helium solvation for all seven related dopant species.

  14. Energy spectra of three electrons in SiGe/Si/SiGe laterally coupled triple quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Y. F.; Wang, L.; Liu, Z.; Wu, M. W.

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the energy spectra of three electrons in SiGe/Si/SiGe equilateral triangular and symmetric linear triple quantum dots in the presence of magnetic (in either Faraday or Voigt configuration) and electric fields with only the lowest valley eigenstate being relevant by using the real-space configuration interaction method. The strong electron-electron Coulomb interaction, which is crucial to the energy spectra, is explicitly calculated whereas the weak spin-orbit coupling is treated perturbatively. In both equilateral triangular and symmetric linear triple quantum dots, we find doublet-quartet transition of ground-state spin configuration by varying dot size or interdot distance in the absence of external fields. This transition has not been reported in the literature on triple quantum dots. In the magnetic-field (Faraday configuration) dependence of energy spectra, we find anticrossings with large energy splittings between the energy levels with the same spin state in the absence of the spin-orbit coupling. This anticrossing behavior originates from the triple quantum dot confinement potential. In addition, with the inclusion of the spin-orbit coupling, we find that all the intersections shown in the equilateral triangular case become anticrossing whereas only part of the intersections in symmetric linear case show anticrossing behavior in the presence of magnetic field in either the Faraday or Voigt configuration. All the anticrossing behaviors are analyzed based on symmetry consideration. Moreover, we show that the electric field can effectively influence the energy levels and the charge configurations.

  15. Study of electron transition energies between anions and cations in spinel ferrites using differential UV-vis absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, L. C.; Wu, L. Q.; Li, S. Q.; Li, Z. Z.; Tang, G. D.; Qi, W. H.; Ge, X. S.; Ding, L. L.

    2016-07-01

    It is very important to determine electron transition energies (Etr) between anions and different cations in order to understand the electrical transport and magnetic properties of a material. Many authors have analyzed UV-vis absorption spectra using the curve (αhν)2 vs E, where α is the absorption coefficient and E(=hν) is the photon energy. Such an approach can give only two band gap energies for spinel ferrites. In this paper, using differential UV-vis absorption spectra, dα/dE vs E, we have obtained electron transition energies (Etr) between the anions and cations, Fe2+ and Fe3+ at the (A) and [B] sites and Ni2+ at the [B] sites for the (A)[B]2O4 spinel ferrite samples CoxNi0.7-xFe2.3O4 (0.0≤x≤0.3), CrxNi0.7Fe2.3-xO4 (0.0≤x≤0.3) and Fe3O4. We suggest that the differential UV-vis absorption spectra should be accepted as a general analysis method for determining electron transition energies between anions and cations.

  16. Solar Flares as Natural Particle Accelerators: A High-energy View from X-ray Observations and Theoretical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei

    2008-07-01

    Solar flares, which have significant space weather consequences, are natural particle accelerators and one of the most spectacular phenomena of solar activity. RHESSI is the most advanced solar X-ray and gamma-ray mission ever flown and has opened a new era in solar flare research following its launch in 2002. This book offers a glimpse of this active research area from a high-energy perspective and contains a comprehensive guideline for RHESSI data analysis. Its main theme is the investigation of particle acceleration and transport in solar flares. The strength of this book lies in its well-balanced account of the latest X-ray observations and theoretical models. The observational focus is on the morphology and spectra of imaged X-ray sources produced by nonthermal electrons or hot plasma. The modeling takes the novel approach of combining the Fokker-Planck treatment of the accelerated particles with the hydrodynamic treatment of the heated atmosphere. Applications of this modeling technique reach beyond the Sun to other exotic environments in the universe, such as extrasolar planetary auroras, stellar flares, and flares on accretion disks around neutron stars and black holes.

  17. Effects of Incident Electron Fluence and Energy on the Election Yield Curves and Emission Spectra of Dielectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, Alec; Dennison, J. R.; Thomson, Clint

    2005-01-01

    We present an experimental study of evolution of electron emission yields and spectra as a result of internal charge build up due to electron dose. Reliable total, backscattered and secondary yield curves and electron emission spectra for un-charged insulators using a low fluence, pulsed electron beam (= or < 5 microsec at = or < 3 nA/sq mm or = or < 10(exp 5) e/sq mm per pulse) with low energy electron and UV flooding to neutralize the charging between pulses. Quantifiable changes in yield curves are observed due to < 100 fC/sq mm fluences for several excellent dielectric thin film materials. We find good agreement with a phenomenological argument based on insulator charging predicted by the yield curve; this includes an approximately linear decrease in the magnitude of the yield as incident energies approach the crossover energies and an exponential decrease in yield as accumulated internal charge reduces the landing energy to asymptotically approach a steady state surface charge and unity yield. We also find that the exponential decay of yield curves with fluence exhibit an energy dependent decay constant, alpha(E), over a broad range of incident energies below, between and above the crossover energies. Finally, we present some preliminary physics-based models for this energy dependence and attempt to relate our charging measurements to knowledge of how charge is deposited within the insulator, the mechanisms for charge trapping and transport, and how the profile of trapped charge affects the transport and emission of charges from insulators.

  18. Solar Flares: Magnetohydrodynamic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kazunari; Magara, Tetsuya

    2011-12-01

    This paper outlines the current understanding of solar flares, mainly focused on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes responsible for producing a flare. Observations show that flares are one of the most explosive phenomena in the atmosphere of the Sun, releasing a huge amount of energy up to about 1032 erg on the timescale of hours. Flares involve the heating of plasma, mass ejection, and particle acceleration that generates high-energy particles. The key physical processes for producing a flare are: the emergence of magnetic field from the solar interior to the solar atmosphere (flux emergence), local enhancement of electric current in the corona (formation of a current sheet), and rapid dissipation of electric current (magnetic reconnection) that causes shock heating, mass ejection, and particle acceleration. The evolution toward the onset of a flare is rather quasi-static when free energy is accumulated in the form of coronal electric current (field-aligned current, more precisely), while the dissipation of coronal current proceeds rapidly, producing various dynamic events that affect lower atmospheres such as the chromosphere and photosphere. Flares manifest such rapid dissipation of coronal current, and their theoretical modeling has been developed in accordance with observations, in which numerical simulations proved to be a strong tool reproducing the time-dependent, nonlinear evolution of a flare. We review the models proposed to explain the physical mechanism of flares, giving an comprehensive explanation of the key processes mentioned above. We start with basic properties of flares, then go into the details of energy build-up, release and transport in flares where magnetic reconnection works as the central engine to produce a flare.

  19. Influence of weak vibrational-electronic couplings on 2D electronic spectra and inter-site coherence in weakly coupled photosynthetic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monahan, Daniele M.; Whaley-Mayda, Lukas; Ishizaki, Akihito; Fleming, Graham R.

    2015-08-01

    Coherence oscillations measured in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectra of pigment-protein complexes may have electronic, vibrational, or mixed-character vibronic origins, which depend on the degree of electronic-vibrational mixing. Oscillations from intrapigment vibrations can obscure the inter-site coherence lifetime of interest in elucidating the mechanisms of energy transfer in photosynthetic light-harvesting. Huang-Rhys factors (S) for low-frequency vibrations in Chlorophyll and Bacteriochlorophyll are quite small (S ≤ 0.05), so it is often assumed that these vibrations influence neither 2D spectra nor inter-site coherence dynamics. In this work, we explore the influence of S within this range on the oscillatory signatures in simulated 2D spectra of a pigment heterodimer. To visualize the inter-site coherence dynamics underlying the 2D spectra, we introduce a formalism which we call the "site-probe response." By comparing the calculated 2D spectra with the site-probe response, we show that an on-resonance vibration with Huang-Rhys factor as small as S = 0.005 and the most strongly coupled off-resonance vibrations (S = 0.05) give rise to long-lived, purely vibrational coherences at 77 K. We moreover calculate the correlation between optical pump interactions and subsequent entanglement between sites, as measured by the concurrence. At 77 K, greater long-lived inter-site coherence and entanglement appear with increasing S. This dependence all but vanishes at physiological temperature, as environmentally induced fluctuations destroy the vibronic mixing.

  20. Influence of weak vibrational-electronic couplings on 2D electronic spectra and inter-site coherence in weakly coupled photosynthetic complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Daniele M.; Whaley-Mayda, Lukas; Fleming, Graham R.; Ishizaki, Akihito

    2015-08-14

    Coherence oscillations measured in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectra of pigment-protein complexes may have electronic, vibrational, or mixed-character vibronic origins, which depend on the degree of electronic-vibrational mixing. Oscillations from intrapigment vibrations can obscure the inter-site coherence lifetime of interest in elucidating the mechanisms of energy transfer in photosynthetic light-harvesting. Huang-Rhys factors (S) for low-frequency vibrations in Chlorophyll and Bacteriochlorophyll are quite small (S ≤ 0.05), so it is often assumed that these vibrations influence neither 2D spectra nor inter-site coherence dynamics. In this work, we explore the influence of S within this range on the oscillatory signatures in simulated 2D spectra of a pigment heterodimer. To visualize the inter-site coherence dynamics underlying the 2D spectra, we introduce a formalism which we call the “site-probe response.” By comparing the calculated 2D spectra with the site-probe response, we show that an on-resonance vibration with Huang-Rhys factor as small as S = 0.005 and the most strongly coupled off-resonance vibrations (S = 0.05) give rise to long-lived, purely vibrational coherences at 77 K. We moreover calculate the correlation between optical pump interactions and subsequent entanglement between sites, as measured by the concurrence. At 77 K, greater long-lived inter-site coherence and entanglement appear with increasing S. This dependence all but vanishes at physiological temperature, as environmentally induced fluctuations destroy the vibronic mixing.

  1. Particle acceleration in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Kosugi, Takeo; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benka, Steve G.; Chupp, Edward L.; Enome, Shinzo; Garcia, Howard; Holman, Gordon D.; Kurt, Victoria G.; Sakao, Taro

    1994-01-01

    Particle acceleration is intrinsic to the primary energy release in the impulsive phase of solar flares, and we cannot understand flares without understanding acceleration. New observations in soft and hard X-rays, gamma-rays and coherent radio emissions are presented, suggesting flare fragmentation in time and space. X-ray and radio measurements exhibit at least five different time scales in flares. In addition, some new observations of delayed acceleration signatures are also presented. The theory of acceleration by parallel electric fields is used to model the spectral shape and evolution of hard X-rays. The possibility of the appearance of double layers is further investigated.

  2. On a Flat-shape Emission in the Solar Flare on 7th June 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotrč, P.; Kupryakov, Yu. A.; Kashapova, L. K.; Bárta, M.

    We present results of the study of the C1.5 solar flare~(SOL2012-06-07T05:56) which occurred on June 7, 2012. This weak flare showed an extraordinary long flat emission in the X-ray flux curve in the 3-12 keV energy band. Duration of this flat period was about 10 minutes while the duration of the flare was almost 20 minutes. As this particular shape was observed both by RHESSI and FERMI, it could not be caused by an instrumental effect. We analyzed the optical spectra and slit-jaw images from the solar spectrograph in Ondřejov and in the hard X-ray by RHESSI as well as EUV data obtained by SDO and all available microwave data. We found that the "flat emission" period was also observed in microwaves (5-17 GHz). During this period the motion of the flare source from the spot to south direction was revealed. A localized maximum of the chromospheric emission was also shifting in the same direction. Quasi-periodic pulsations with periods of about 5 minutes were detected in evolution of the electron temperature that is an evidence of the energy input during the "flat emission" period.

  3. The Use of Optical Electronegativities to Assign Electronic Spectra of Semiquinone Complexes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-03

    SDTIC FiLE COPY AD- A225 382 OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH Contract N00014-84-G-0201 D T IC Task No. 0051-865 16* EL E CT E AUG 1519901D D Technical Report...discussed by Benelli et al. who have compared the spectra of mono-semiquinone complexes of Cr , Co, Ni and Zn with both DTBSq and tetrachlorosemiquinone...region transitions in the Ni, Cr and Co complexes were assigned as MLCT, based on the absence of corresponding bands in the spectra of the Zn analogues and

  4. Scale invariance and scaling law of Thomson backscatter spectra of electrons moving in the resonance regime in combined laser and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yi-Jia; Jiang, Chun; Lv, Chong; Wan, Feng; Sang, Hai-Bo; Xie, Bai-Song

    2016-11-01

    The Thomson backscatter spectra by an electron moving in the resonance acceleration regime are derived analytically and computed numerically in the simultaneous presence of a superintense laser field and a strong uniform magnetic field. The dependences of fundamental frequency of harmonic spectra on the laser intensity and magnetic resonance parameter are examined carefully. By calculating the emission of a single electron in a circularly polarized laser field of plane-wave form and a constant external magnetic field, the scale invariance of the radiation spectra is evident in terms of harmonic orders. The scaling law of backscattered spectra is exhibited remarkably for the laser intensity as well as for the initial axial momentum of the electron when the cyclotron frequency of the electron approaches the laser frequency. The results indicate that the magnetic resonance parameter plays an important role in the strength of emission. And the found rich features of backscattering spectra may be useful to the tunability of the radiation source.

  5. Prediction soft-X-ray spectrum of solar flares from Very Low Frequency observations: an inverse problem in ionospheric science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palit, Sourav; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Ray, Suman

    2016-07-01

    Earth's lower ionosphere and upper atmosphere absorb X-rays and gamma-rays from astronomical sources such as solar flares, Short Gamma ray Repeaters (SGRs) or Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). The electron-ion production rates due to the ionization of such energetic photons at different heights depend on the intensity and wavelength of the injected spectrum and hence vary from one source to another. Obviously the ion density vs. altitude profile has the imprint of the incident photon spectrum. In this paper, we examine the possibility of inverting the electron density-height profiles uniquely by deconvolution of the VLF amplitude signal to obtain information on the injected spectrum. We have been able to reproduce the soft-X-ray part of the injected spectra from two different classes of solar flares with satisfactory accuracy. With the possibilities of probing even lower parts of the atmosphere, the method presented here is useful to carry out a similar exercise to infer the higher energy part of solar flare spectra and spectra of more energetic events such as the GRBs, SGRs etc. We show that to a certain accuracy, the Earth's atmosphere may be used as a gigantic detector of relatively strong ionizing extra-terrestrial events.

  6. On the nature of excited electronic states in cyanine dyes: implications for visual pigment spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinur, Uri; Honig, Barry; Schulten, Klaus

    1980-06-01

    CNDO/S CI calculations are carried out on polyenes and on cyanine dyes. In contrast to polyenes, doubly excited configurations have a strong effect on the first optically allowed excited state in cyanines. Protonated Schiff bases of retinal are closely related to cyanine dyes, with important consequences for models of visual pigment spectra and photochemistry.

  7. Observations of particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.

    1979-01-01

    Solar flares provide several examples of nonthermal particle acceleration. The paper reviews the information gained about these processes via X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, which can presently distinguish among three separate particle-acceleration processes at the sun: an impulsive accelerator of more than 20 keV electrons, a gradual accelerator of more than 20 keV electrons, and a gradual accelerator of more than 10 MeV ions. The acceleration energy efficiency (total particle energy divided by total flare energy) of any of these mechanisms cannot be less than about 0.1%, although the gradual acceleration does not occur in every flare. The observational material suggests that both the impulsive and gradual accelerations take place preferentially in closed magnetic-field structures, but that the electrons decay in these traps before they can escape. The ions escape very efficiently.

  8. Analysis of the electronic, IR, and 1H NMR spectra of conjugated oligomers based on 4,4'-triphenylamine vinylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baryshnikov, G. V.; Minaeva, V. A.; Minaev, B. F.; Sun, V.-H.; Grigoras, M.

    2016-09-01

    Two types of conjugated oligomers based on 4,4'-triphenylamine vinylene have been synthesized and characterized by the methods of IR, UV-visible, and 1H NMR spectroscopy. The corresponding spectra have also been simulated theoretically at the density functional theory level with application of the B3LYP and BMK hybrid exchange-correlation functionals. A comparative analysis of the experimental and theoretical spectra of polymers and oligomers has revealed regularities of the manifestation of spectral signals depending on the conjugation chain length and the presence of a substituent in the triphenylamine core. It has been established, in particular, that the absolute intensity of IR bands satisfies a linear dependence with increase in the degree of polymerization; however, no frequency shift is observed at the same time. The position of the main peak in electron absorption spectra demonstrates the bathochromic shift with an increase in the oligomeric chain length due to the narrowing of the energy gap between the boundary molecular orbitals. Based on the theoretical estimation of the hydrogen atoms chemical shifts, the signals of various protons types in the strongly broadened experimental 1H NMR spectra of the bis-(4-iodine phenyl)-phenylamine and N,N-bis-(4-iodine phenyl)-4'-(phenylethynyl)-phenylamine polymerization products have also been identified.

  9. Electronic Absorption Spectra of Tetrapyrrole-Based Pigments via TD-DFT: A Reduced Orbital Space Study.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Kushal; Virgil, Kyle A; Jakubikova, Elena

    2016-07-28

    Tetrapyrrole-based pigments play a crucial role in photosynthesis as principal light absorbers in light-harvesting chemical systems. As such, accurate theoretical descriptions of the electronic absorption spectra of these pigments will aid in the proper description and understanding of the overall photophysics of photosynthesis. In this work, time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) at the CAM-B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory is employed to produce the theoretical absorption spectra of several tetrapyrrole-based pigments. However, the application of TD-DFT to large systems with several hundreds of atoms can become computationally prohibitive. Therefore, in this study, TD-DFT calculations with reduced orbital spaces (ROSs) that exclude portions of occupied and virtual orbitals are pursued as a viable, computationally cost-effective alternative to conventional TD-DFT calculations. The effects of reducing orbital space size on theoretical spectra are qualitatively and quantitatively described, and both conventional and ROS results are benchmarked against experimental absorption spectra of various tetrapyrrole-based pigments. The orbital reduction approach is also applied to a large natural pigment assembly that comprises the principal light-absorbing component of the reaction center in purple bacteria. Overall, we find that TD-DFT calculations with proper and judicious orbital space reductions can adequately reproduce conventional, full orbital space, TD-DFT results of all pigments studied in this work.

  10. Solar flare gamma-ray line shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werntz, C.; Kim, Y. E.; Lang, Frederick L.

    1990-01-01

    A computer code has been developed which is used to calculate ab initio the laboratory shapes and energy shifts of gamma-ray lines from (C-12)(p, gamma/4.438/)p-prime(C-12) and (O-16)(p, gamma/6.129/)p-prime(O-16) reactions and to calculate the expected shapes of these lines from solar flares. The sensitivity of observable solar flare gamma-ray line shapes to the directionality of the incident particles is investigated for several projectile angular distributions. Shapes of the carbon and oxygen lines are calculated assuming realistic proton energy spectra for particles in circular orbits at the mirror points of magnetic loops, for particle beams directed downward into the photosphere, and for isotropic particle distributions. Line shapes for flare sites near the center of the sun and on the limb are shown for both thin-target and thick-target interaction models.

  11. Thick target bremsstrahlung spectra for 1.00-, 1.25-, and 1.40-Mev electrons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, W.; Motz, J.W.; Cialella, C.

    1954-01-01

    The spectrum of radiation produced by 1.0-, 1.25-, and 1.40-Mev electrons incident on a thick tungsten target was measured at 0A????and 90A????with the incident beam by a method involving the magnetic analysis of Compton electrons. The effects of electron scattering and energy loss in the target preclude any simple interpretation of this data to yield a differential bremsstrahlung cross section. However, an estimate of the spectra to be expected at 0A????and 90A????was obtained by combining the Sauter expression for the bremsstrahlung cross section with the available information on electron scatter and energy loss in the target and backscatter from the target. The reliability of the estimate is limited because the Sauter formula was calculated by using the Born approximation, the electron scattering calculations are applicable to an infinite medium only, and the backscatter was estimated empirically from Bothe's experimental data which were obtained with lower energy electrons (370 kev). Furthermore electron energy straggling was neglected. Nevertheless, the predicted spectral shapes at 0A????and 90A????and the relative intensities at these two angles are in qualitative agreement with the measured values. The absolute magnitudes of the measured intensities at both angles are about a factor of two greater than the predicted values. ?? 1954 The American Physical Society.

  12. Gamma Spectra Resulting From the Annihilation of Positrons with Electrons in Single, Selected Core Levels of Cu, Ag and Au

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S; Eshed, A; Goktepeli, S; Sterne, P A; Koymen, A R; Chen, W C; Weiss, A H

    2005-07-25

    The {gamma}-ray energy spectra due to positron annihilation with the 3p core-level of Cu, the 4p core-level of Ag, and 5p core level of Au were obtained separately from the total annihilation spectrum by measuring the energies of {gamma}-rays time coincident with Auger electrons emitted as a result of filling the core-hole left by annihilation. The results of these measurements are compared to the total annihilation spectra and with LDA based theoretical calculations. A comparison of area normalized momentum distributions with the individual cores extracted from the Doppler measurements shows good qualitative agreement, however, in all three spectra, the calculated values of the momentum density appears to fall below the measured values as the momentum increases. The discrepancies between theory and experiment are well outside the statistical uncertainties of the experiment and become more pronounced with increasing Z going down the column from Cu to Ag to Au. The comparison with the experimental results clearly indicates that the calculations are not predicting the correct ratio of high momentum to low momentum spectral weight and suggest the need to improve the treatment of many body electron-positron correlation effects in annihilation as they pertain to core levels.

  13. Simulation of Accurate Vibrationally Resolved Electronic Spectra: the Integrated Time-Dependent and Time-Independent Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiardi, Alberto; Barone, Vincenzo; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Bloino, Julien

    2014-06-01

    Two parallel theories including Franck-Condon, Herzberg-Teller and Duschinsky (i.e., mode mixing) effects, allowing different approximations for the description of excited state PES have been developed in order to simulate realistic, asymmetric, electronic spectra line-shapes taking into account the vibrational structure: the so-called sum-over-states or time-independent (TI) method and the alternative time-dependent (TD) approach, which exploits the properties of the Fourier transform. The integrated TI-TD procedure included within a general purpose QM code [1,2], allows to compute one photon absorption, fluorescence, phosphorescence, electronic circular dichroism, circularly polarized luminescence and resonance Raman spectra. Combining both approaches, which use a single set of starting data, permits to profit from their respective advantages and minimize their respective limits: the time-dependent route automatically includes all vibrational states and, possibly, temperature effects, while the time-independent route allows to identify and assign single vibronic transitions. Interpretation, analysis and assignment of experimental spectra based on integrated TI-TD vibronic computations will be illustrated for challenging cases of medium-sized open-shell systems in the gas and condensed phases with inclusion of leading anharmonic effects. 1. V. Barone, A. Baiardi, M. Biczysko, J. Bloino, C. Cappelli, F. Lipparini Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys, 14, 12404, (2012) 2. A. Baiardi, V. Barone, J. Bloino J. Chem. Theory Comput., 9, 4097-4115 (2013)

  14. The effect of drift on the evolution of the electron/positron spectra in an axisymmetric pulsar wind nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Vorster, Michael J.; Moraal, Harm

    2014-06-20

    Charged particles propagating through a structured magnetic field are subject to drift motion. The primary aim of the present paper is therefore to investigate the effects of gradient, curvature, and neutral sheet drift on the evolution of the electron and positron spectra in a pulsar wind nebula, where the drift motion is a direct result of the magnetic field having an Archimedean spiral structure. In order to investigate the evolution of the spectra, the steady-state, axisymmetric Fokker-Planck transport equation is solved numerically using a finite-difference scheme. Apart from drift motion, the transport processes of convection and diffusion, along with the energy loss processes of adiabatic cooling and synchrotron radiation, are also included in the model. It is found that drift, particularly neutral sheet drift, can lead to a quantitative difference in the evolution of the electron and positron spectra. This difference may be of importance when interpreting the positron excess observed by PAMELA and AMS-02 near Earth.

  15. Influence of annealing temperature on Raman and photoluminescence spectra of electron beam evaporated TiO₂ thin films.

    PubMed

    Vishwas, M; Narasimha Rao, K; Chakradhar, R P S

    2012-12-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) thin films were deposited on fused quartz substrates by electron beam evaporation method at room temperature. The films were annealed at different temperatures in ambient air. The surface morphology/roughness at different annealing temperatures were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The crystallinity of the film has improved with the increase of annealing temperature. The effect of annealing temperature on optical, photoluminescence and Raman spectra of TiO(2) films were investigated. The refractive index of TiO(2) films were studied by envelope method and reflectance spectra and it is observed that the refractive index of the films was high. The photoluminescence intensity corresponding to green emission was enhanced with increase of annealing temperature. The peaks in Raman spectra depicts that the TiO(2) film is of anatase phase after annealing at 300°C and higher. The films show high refractive index, good optical quality and photoluminescence characteristics suggest that possible usage in opto-electronic and optical coating applications.

  16. The study of X-ray M-shell spectra of W ions from the LLNL Electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Neill, P; Harris, C; Shlyaptseva, A S; Hamasha, S; Hansen, S; Beiersdorfer, P; Safronova, U I

    2003-11-24

    M-shell spectra of W ions have been produced at the Livermore EBIT-II electron beam ion trap at different energies of the electron beam. A survey has been performed for 2.4 keV, 2.8 keV, 3.6 keV and for steps in energy of 100 eV over the 3.9-4.6 keV energy range. The analysis of 11 W spectra has shown the presence of a wide variety of ionization stages from Se-like to Cr-like W; the appearances of these ionization stages correlate well with the energy of their production. The present paper focuses on the identification of 63 experimental features of W ions in a spectral region from 5 to 6 Angstrom using calculations with inclusion of all ionization stages matching this spectral region. The majority of lines in all spectra have been identified and assigned to the 4f {yields} 3d and 4d {yields} 3p transitions. This is the first work that lists a comprehensive identification of so many resolved spectral features of M-shell transitions in W ions recorded in such detail in the laboratory.

  17. GeV flares observations with GLAST LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, A.; Omodei, N.; Piro, L.

    2007-07-12

    Early X-ray afterglow observations show that X-ray flares are very common features in GRB light curves. X-ray flares may reflect long duration central engine activity. The delayed flare photons are expected to interact with relativistic electrons by Inverse Compton giving delayed high energy counterparts that potentially will be detected by GLAST LAT, which could observe GRB from 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. The nature oh high energy spectral components from GRB detected by EGRET is still debated. Observations with GLAST LAT will give useful information to constrain the origin of X-ray flares. In this work we simulate a set of possible GeV emitting flares in the context of External Shock model to study the capability of GLAST LAT to detect GeV flares at different intensities and durations.

  18. Electron-hole excitations and optical spectra of bulk SrO from many-body perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Bo; Wang, Neng-Ping; Rohlfing, Michael

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports the quasiparticle band structure and the optical absorption spectrum of SrO, using many-body perturbation theory. The quasiparticle band structure is calculated within the GW approximation. Taking the electron-hole interaction into consideration, electron-hole pair states and optical excitations are obtained by solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the electron-hole two-particle Green function. The calculated band gap for SrO is 6.0 eV, which is in good agreement with the corresponding experimental results. The theoretical result of optical absorption spectrum for SrO is also in close agreement with the experimental data. In particular, the calculated excitation energy for the lowest exciton peak in the optical absorption spectra of SrO reproduces very well the corresponding experimental result.

  19. SOLAR FLARE CHROMOSPHERIC LINE EMISSION: COMPARISON BETWEEN IBIS HIGH-RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS AND RADIATIVE HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Fatima Rubio da; Petrosian, Vahé; Kleint, Lucia; Dalda, Alberto Sainz; Liu, Wei

    2015-05-01

    Solar flares involve impulsive energy release, which results in enhanced radiation over a broad spectral range and a wide range of heights. In particular, line emission from the chromosphere can provide critical diagnostics of plasma heating processes. Thus, a direct comparison between high-resolution spectroscopic observations and advanced numerical modeling results could be extremely valuable, but has not yet been attempted. In this paper, we present such a self-consistent investigation of an M3.0 flare observed by the Dunn Solar Telescope’s Interferometric Bi-dimensional Spectrometer (IBIS) on 2011 September 24 which we have modeled using the radiative hydrodynamic code RADYN. We obtained images and spectra of the flaring region with IBIS in Hα 6563 Å and Ca ii 8542 Å, and with RHESSI in X-rays. The latter observations were used to infer the non-thermal electron population, which was passed to RADYN to simulate the atmospheric response to electron collisional heating. We then synthesized spectral lines and compared their shapes and intensities to those observed by IBIS and found a general agreement. In particular, the synthetic Ca ii 8542 Å profile fits well to the observed profile, while the synthetic Hα profile is fainter in the core than for the observation. This indicates that Hα emission is more responsive to the non-thermal electron flux than the Ca ii 8542 Å emission. We suggest that it is necessary to refine the energy input and other processes to resolve this discrepancy.

  20. MOLECULAR ORBITALS AND ELECTRON-TRANSFER SPECTRA IN RUTILE. GROWTH OF CRYSTALS BY FLAME FUSION,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CRYSTAL GROWTH , *TITANIUM COMPOUNDS, *ABSORPTION, SINGLE CRYSTALS , OXIDES, MEASUREMENT, ELECTRON TRANSITIONS, SPECTROPHOTOMETERS, ULTRAVIOLET...RADIATION, POLARIZATION, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE, SYMMETRY(CRYSTALLOGRAPHY), YTTRIUM COMPOUNDS, ALUMINUM COMPOUNDS.

  1. Electronic energy loss spectra from mono-layer to few layers of phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Brij; Thakur, Rajesh; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    Using first principles calculations, electronic and optical properties of few-layers phosphorene has been investigated. Electronic band structure show a moderate band gap of 0.9 eV in monolayer phosphorene which decreases with increasing number of layers. Optical properties of few-layers of phosphorene in infrared and visible region shows tunability with number of layers. Electron energy loss function has been plotted and huge red shift in plasmonic behaviours is found. These tunable electronic and optical properties of few-layers of phosphorene can be useful for the applications of optoelectronic devices.

  2. A QM/MM-MD study on protein electronic properties: Circular dichroism spectra of oxytocin and insulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Yuya; Akinaga, Yoshinobu; Kawashima, Yukio; Jung, Jaewoon; Ten-no, Seiichiro

    2012-06-01

    A QM/MM (quantum-mechanical/molecular-mechanical) molecular-dynamics approach based on the generalized hybrid-orbital (GHO) method, in conjunction with the second-order perturbation (MP2) theory and the second-order approximate coupled-cluster (CC2) model, is employed to calculate electronic property accounting for a protein environment. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra originating from chiral disulfide bridges of oxytocin and insulin at room temperature are computed. It is shown that the sampling of thermal fluctuation of molecular geometries facilitated by the GHO-MD method plays an important role in the obtained spectra. It is demonstrated that, while the protein environments in an oxytocin molecule have significant electrostatic influence on its chiral center, it is compensated by solvent induced charges. This gives a reasonable explanation to experimental observations. GHO-MD simulations starting from different experimental structures of insulin indicate that existence of the disulfide bridges with negative dihedral angles is crucial.

  3. Electronic structure and optical absorption spectra of CdSe covered with ZnSe and ZnS epilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, So Jeong; Lee, Geunsik; Kim, Jai Sam; Shin, Seung Koo; Yoon, Young-Gui

    2006-02-01

    Using the first-principles methods we compute the electronic structure and the absorption spectra for a wurtzite CdSe (0001) slab covered with zincblende ZnSe and ZnS epilayers. For each structure we compute the DOS and the imaginary part of the dielectric function. We find that the semiconductor passivation shifts the 'near Fermi-level' states of the bare CdSe slab down to lower energy levels. The migration suggests the decrease of surface effects and energy loss. We observe the substantial reduction of the abnormal peaks in the absorption spectra of the bare CdSe slab, which seems to be a consequence of the DOS migration. This is consistent with the experimental results that a proper passivation enhance the luminescence efficiency. We also study the case that the epilayer surface is terminated with PH 3 and find the PH 3 passivation also reduces the surface state to some extent.

  4. Pure absorption electron spin echo envelope modulation spectra by using the filter-diagonalization method for harmonic inversion.

    PubMed

    Jeschke, G; Mandelshtam, V A; Shaka, A J

    1999-03-01

    Harmonic inversion of electron spin echo envelope (ESEEM) time-domain signals by filter diagonalization is investigated as an alternative to Fourier transformation. It is demonstrated that this method features enhanced resolution compared to Fourier-transform magnitude spectra, since it can eliminate dispersive contributions to the line shape, even if no linear phase correction is possible. Furthermore, instrumental artifacts can be easily removed from the spectra if they are narrow either in time or frequency domain. This applies to echo crossings that are only incompletely eliminated by phase cycling and to spurious spectrometer frequencies, respectively. The method is computationally efficient and numerically stable and does not require extensive parameter adjustments or advance knowledge of the number of spectral lines. Experiments on gamma-irradiated methyl-alpha-d-glucopyranoside show that more information can be obtained from typical ESEEM time-domain signals by filter-diagonalization than by Fourier transformation.

  5. Ultrafast optical nonlinearity, electronic absorption, vibrational spectra and solvent effect studies of ninhydrin.

    PubMed

    Sajan, D; Devi, T Uma; Safakath, K; Philip, Reji; Němec, Ivan; Karabacak, M

    2013-05-15

    FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV-Vis spectra of the nonlinear optical molecule ninhydrin have been recorded and analyzed. The equilibrium geometry, bonding features, and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers have been investigated with the help of B3LYP density functional theory method. A detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra is carried out with the aid of normal coordinate analysis following the scaled quantum mechanical force field methodology. Solvent effects have been calculated using time-dependent density functional theory in combination with the polarized continuum model. Natural bond orbital analysis confirms the occurrence of strong intermolecular hydrogen bonding in the molecule. Employing the open-aperture z-scan technique, nonlinear optical absorption of the sample has been studied in the ultrafast and short-pulse excitation regimes, using 100 fs and 5 ns laser pulses respectively. It is found that ninhydrin exhibits optical limiting for both excitations, indicating potential photonic applications.

  6. Flares in childhood eczema.

    PubMed

    Langan, S M

    2009-01-01

    Eczema is a major public health problem affecting children worldwide. Few studies have directly assessed triggers for disease flares. This paper presents evidence from a published systematic review and a prospective cohort study looking at flare factors in eczema. This systematic review suggested that foodstuffs in selected groups, dust exposure, unfamiliar pets, seasonal variation, stress, and irritants may be important in eczema flares. We performed a prospective cohort study that focused on environmental factors and identified associations between exposure to nylon clothing, dust, unfamiliar pets, sweating, shampoo, and eczema flares. Results from this study also demonstrated some new key findings. First, the effect of shampoo was found to increase in cold weather, and second, combinations of environmental factors were associated with disease exacerbation, supporting a multiple component disease model. This information is likely to be useful to families and may lead to the ability to reduce disease flares in the future.

  7. MODELING OF GYROSYNCHROTRON RADIO EMISSION PULSATIONS PRODUCED BY MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC LOOP OSCILLATIONS IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Mossessian, George; Fleishman, Gregory D.

    2012-04-01

    A quantitative study of the observable radio signatures of the sausage, kink, and torsional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillation modes in flaring coronal loops is performed. Considering first non-zero order effect of these various MHD oscillation modes on the radio source parameters such as magnetic field, line of sight, plasma density and temperature, electron distribution function, and the source dimensions, we compute time-dependent radio emission (spectra and light curves). The radio light curves (of both flux density and degree of polarization) at all considered radio frequencies are then quantified in both time domain (via computation of the full modulation amplitude as a function of frequency) and in Fourier domain (oscillation spectra, phases, and partial modulation amplitude) to form the signatures specific to a particular oscillation mode and/or source parameter regime. We found that the parameter regime and the involved MHD mode can indeed be distinguished using the quantitative measures derived in the modeling. We apply the developed approach to analyze radio burst recorded by Owens Valley Solar Array and report possible detection of the sausage mode oscillation in one (partly occulted) flare and kink or torsional oscillations in another flare.

  8. Resonance Raman and temperature-dependent electronic absorption spectra of cavity and noncavity models of the hydrated electron

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Jennifer R.; Larsen, Ross E.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Most of what is known about the structure of the hydrated electron comes from mixed quantum/classical simulations, which depend on the pseudopotential that couples the quantum electron to the classical water molecules. These potentials usually are highly repulsive, producing cavity-bound hydrated electrons that break the local water H-bonding structure. However, we recently developed a more attractive potential, which produces a hydrated electron that encompasses a region of enhanced water density. Both our noncavity and the various cavity models predict similar experimental observables. In this paper, we work to distinguish between these models by studying both the temperature dependence of the optical absorption spectrum, which provides insight into the balance of the attractive and repulsive terms in the potential, and the resonance Raman spectrum, which provides a direct measure of the local H-bonding environment near the electron. We find that only our noncavity model can capture the experimental red shift of the hydrated electron’s absorption spectrum with increasing temperature at constant density. Cavity models of the hydrated electron predict a solvation structure similar to that of the larger aqueous halides, leading to a Raman O–H stretching band that is blue-shifted and narrower than that of bulk water. In contrast, experiments show the hydrated electron has a broader and red-shifted O–H stretching band compared with bulk water, a feature recovered by our noncavity model. We conclude that although our noncavity model does not provide perfect quantitative agreement with experiment, the hydrated electron must have a significant degree of noncavity character. PMID:23382233

  9. Coronal vs chromospheric heating through co-spatial return currents during the 19 and 20 Jan 2005 solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaoui, Meriem; Holman, Gordon D.

    2016-05-01

    The high electron flux required to explain the bremsstrahlung X-ray emission observed from solar flares is expected to be accompanied by a neutralizing co-spatial return current. In addition to resupplying the acceleration region with electrons, this return current will both heat the coronal plasma and flatten the electron distribution at lower energies. This flattening in the electron distribution in turn flattens the X-ray spectrum. We have found that return-current collisional thick-target model (RCCTTM) of Holman (2012) provides an acceptable fit to X-ray spectra with strong breaks for 18 flares observed with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). This is a 1D model similar to the collisional thick-target model (CTTM) with two additional assumptions: (1) electrons lose some of their energy through return current losses along their path to the thick target, where they lose all their remaining energy through Coulomb collisions; (2) the non-thermal beam is streaming in a warm target, which means that electrons will be thermalized at a non-zero energy. We assume this energy to be equal to the analytical value derived by Kontar et al. 2015. We show that return-current heating in the corona is about an order of magnitude higher than the heating at the footpoints at times during the flare.

  10. Electron interaction with phosphate cytidine oligomer dCpdC: base-centered radical anions and their electronic spectra.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jiande; Wang, Jing; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2014-01-30

    Computational chemistry approach was applied to explore the nature of electron attachment to cytosine-rich DNA single strands. An oligomer dinucleoside phosphate deoxycytidylyl-3',5'-deoxycytidine (dCpdC) was selected as a model system for investigations by density functional theory. Electron distribution patterns for the radical anions of dCpdC in aqueous solution were explored. The excess electron may reside on the nucleobase at the 5' position (dC(•-)pdC) or at the 3' position (dCpdC(•-)). From comparison with electron attachment to the cytosine related DNA fragments, the electron affinity for the formation of the cytosine-centered radical anion in DNA is estimated to be around 2.2 eV. Electron attachment to cytosine sites in DNA single strands might cause perturbations of local structural characteristics. Visible absorption spectroscopy may be applied to validate computational results and determine experimentally the existence of the base-centered radical anion. The time-dependent DFT study shows the absorption around 550-600 nm for the cytosine-centered radical anions of DNA oligomers. This indicates that if such species are detected experimentally they would be characterized by a distinctive color.

  11. Frequency distributions and correlations of solar X-ray flare parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosby, Norma B.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Dennis, Brian R.

    1993-01-01

    Frequency distributions of flare parameters are determined from over 12,000 solar flares. The flare duration, the peak counting rate, the peak hard X-ray flux, the total energy in electrons, and the peak energy flux in electrons are among the parameters studied. Linear regression fits, as well as the slopes of the frequency distributions, are used to determine the correlations between these parameters. The relationship between the variations of the frequency distributions and the solar activity cycle is also investigated. Theoretical models for the frequency distribution of flare parameters are dependent on the probability of flaring and the temporal evolution of the flare energy build-up. The results of this study are consistent with stochastic flaring and exponential energy build-up. The average build-up time constant is found to be 0.5 times the mean time between flares.

  12. Oxygen-induced changes in electron-energy-loss spectra for Al, Be and Ni. [Al; Be; Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, H.H.; Landers, R.; Kleiman, G.G. , 13081-970 Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brasil); Zehner, D.M. )

    1999-09-01

    Electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) data are presented to illustrate line shape changes that occur as a result of oxygen interaction with metal surfaces. The metals were aluminum, beryllium and nickel. Core-level EELS data were taken for excitations from Al(2p), Be(1s), Ni(3p/3s) and O(1s) levels to the conduction band (CB) density of states (DOS) of the materials. The primary beam energies for the spectra were 300, 450, 300, and 1135 eV, respectively. The data are presented in both the (as measured) first-derivative and the integral forms. The integral spectra were corrected for coherent background losses and analyzed for CB DOS information. These spectra were found to be in qualitative agreement with published experimental and theoretical studies of these materials. One peak in the spectra for Al oxide is analyzed for its correlation with excitonic screening of the Al(2p) core hole. Similar evidence for exciton formation is found in the Ni(3p) spectra for Ni oxide. Data are also presented showing oxygen-induced changes in the lower-loss-energy EELS curves that, in the pure metal, are dominated by plasmon-loss and interband-transition signals. Single-scattering loss profiles in the integral form of the data were calculated using a procedure of Tougaard and Chorkendorff [S. Tougaard and I. Chorkendorff, Phys. Rev. B. [bold 35], 6570 (1987)]. For all three oxides these profiles are dominated by a feature with a loss energy of around 20[endash]25 eV. Although this feature has been ascribed by other researchers as due to bulk plasmon losses in the oxide, an alternative explanation is that the feature is simply due to O(2s)-to-CB-level excitations. An even stronger feature is found at 7 eV loss energy for Ni oxide. Speculation is given as to its source. The line shapes in both the core-level and noncore-level spectra can also be used simply as [open quotes]fingerprints[close quotes] of the surface chemistry of the materials. Our data were taken using commercially

  13. Attosecond electronic and nuclear quantum photodynamics of ozone monitored with time and angle resolved photoelectron spectra

    PubMed Central

    Decleva, Piero; Quadri, Nicola; Perveaux, Aurelie; Lauvergnat, David; Gatti, Fabien; Lasorne, Benjamin; Halász, Gábor J.; Vibók, Ágnes

    2016-01-01

    Recently we reported a series of numerical simulations proving that it is possible in principle to create an electronic wave packet and subsequent electronic motion in a neutral molecule photoexcited by a UV pump pulse within a few femtoseconds. We considered the ozone molecule: for this system the electronic wave packet leads to a dissociation process. In the present work, we investigate more specifically the time-resolved photoelectron angular distribution of the ozone molecule that provides a much more detailed description of the evolution of the electronic wave packet. We thus show that this experimental technique should be able to give access to observing in real time the creation of an electronic wave packet in a neutral molecule and its impact on a chemical process. PMID:27819356

  14. Formation of very hard electron and gamma-ray spectra of flat-spectrum radio quasars in the fast-cooling regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Dahai; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2016-07-01

    In the external Compton scenario, we investigate the formation of a very hard electron spectrum in the fast-cooling regime, using a time-dependent emission model. It is shown that a very hard electron distribution, N^' }_e({γ ^' })∝ {γ ^' }^{-p}, with spectral index p ˜ 1.3 is formed below the minimum energy of injection electrons when inverse Compton scattering takes place in the Klein-Nishina regime, i.e. inverse Compton scattering of relativistic electrons on broad-line region radiation in flat-spectrum radio quasars. This produces a very hard gamma-ray spectrum and can explain in reasonable fashion the very hard Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) spectrum of the flat-spectrum radio quasar 3C 279 during the extreme gamma-ray flare in 2013 December.

  15. Controlling quantum-beating signals in 2D electronic spectra by packing synthetic heterodimers on single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lili; Griffin, Graham B.; Zhang, Alice; Zhai, Feng; Williams, Nicholas E.; Jordan, Richard F.; Engel, Gregory S.

    2017-02-01

    In multidimensional spectroscopy, dynamics of coherences between excited states report on the interactions between electronic states and their environment. The prolonged coherence lifetimes revealed through beating signals in the spectra of some systems may result from vibronic coupling between nearly degenerate excited states, and recent observations confirm the existence of such coupling in both model systems and photosynthetic complexes. Understanding the origin of beating signals in the spectra of photosynthetic complexes has been given considerable attention; however, strategies to generate them in artificial systems that would allow us to test the hypotheses in detail are still lacking. Here we demonstrate control over the presence of quantum-beating signals by packing structurally flexible synthetic heterodimers on single-walled carbon nanotubes, and thereby restrict the motions of chromophores. Using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy, we find that both limiting the relative rotation of chromophores and tuning the energy difference between the two electronic transitions in the dimer to match a vibrational mode of the lower-energy monomer are necessary to enhance the observed quantum-beating signals.

  16. Exploring the effect of vibronic contributions on light harvesting efficiency of NKX-2587 derivatives through vibrationally resolved electronic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Pan; Shen, Wei; Li, Ming; He, Rongxing

    2017-01-01

    The vibrationally resolved electronic spectra of five metal-free NKX-2587 derivatives containing heteroatom with different atomic sizes and electronegativity, were simulated within the Franck-Condon approximation including the Herzberg-Teller and Duschinsky effects, aimed at exploring the correlation of vibronic structure associated with the spectrum and efficiency of dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The parameters of short-circuit current density (Jsc) and open circuit voltage (Voc) involving efficiency of DSSCs, such as total dipole moments (μnormal), the light harvesting efficiency (LHE), injection driving force (∆ Ginject), and the number of electrons in the conduction band (nc), were calculated and discussed in detail. Results showed that the heteroatoms in the same period with large size and weak electronegativity and the ones in the same main group with large size and weak electronegativity are beneficial to Voc. The sizes and electronegativity of the heteroatoms have a weak effect on Jsc. The low-frequency modes play important roles in enhancing the intensities of the electronic spectra and structures can affect light harvesting efficiency (LHE). In this sense, our results provided guidance for understanding the sources of spectral intensities of dye molecules, and a valuable help for rational design of new molecules to improve the energy conversion efficiency (η) of DSSCs.

  17. Synthesis of nanoparticles in helium droplets—A characterization comparing mass-spectra and electron microscopy data

    SciTech Connect

    Thaler, Philipp; Volk, Alexander; Lackner, Florian; Steurer, Johannes; Schnedlitz, Martin; Ernst, Wolfgang E.; Knez, Daniel; Haberfehlner, Georg

    2015-10-07

    Micrometer sized helium droplets provide an extraordinary environment for the growth of nanoparticles. The method promises great potential for the preparation of core-shell particles as well as one-dimensional nanostructures, which agglomerate along quantum vortices, without involving solvents, ligands, or additives. Using a new apparatus, which enables us to record mass spectra of heavy dopant clusters (>10{sup 4} amu) and to produce samples for transmission electron microscopy simultaneously, we synthesize bare and bimetallic nanoparticles consisting of various materials (Au, Ni, Cr, and Ag). We present a systematical study of the growth process of clusters and nanoparticles inside the helium droplets, which can be described with a simple theoretical model.

  18. Influence of the quantum zero-point motion of a vortex on the electronic spectra of s -wave superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartosch, Lorenz; Sachdev, Subir

    2006-10-01

    We compute the influence of the quantum zero-point motion of a vortex on the electronic quasiparticle spectra of s -wave superconductors. The vortex is assumed to be pinned by a harmonic potential, and its coupling to the quasiparticles is computed in the framework of BCS theory. Near the core of the vortex, the motion leads to a shift of spectral weight away from the chemical potential, and thereby reduces the zero bias conductance peak; additional structure at the frequency of the harmonic trap is also observed.

  19. Extreme ultraviolet ionization of pure He nanodroplets: Mass-correlated photoelectron imaging, Penning ionization, and electron energy-loss spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Buchta, D.; Stienkemeier, F.; Mudrich, M.; Krishnan, S. R.; Moshammer, R.; Brauer, N. B.; Drabbels, M.; O’Keeffe, P.; Coreno, M.; Devetta, M.; Di Fraia, M.; Callegari, C.; Richter, R.; Prince, K. C.; Ullrich, J.

    2013-08-28

    The ionization dynamics of pure He nanodroplets irradiated by Extreme ultraviolet radiation is studied using Velocity-Map Imaging PhotoElectron-PhotoIon COincidence spectroscopy. We present photoelectron energy spectra and angular distributions measured in coincidence with the most abundant ions He{sup +}, He{sub 2}{sup +}, and He{sub 3}{sup +}. Surprisingly, below the autoionization threshold of He droplets, we find indications for multiple excitation and subsequent ionization of the droplets by a Penning-like process. At high photon energies we observe inelastic collisions of photoelectrons with the surrounding He atoms in the droplets.

  20. Energetics of RHESSI X-Class Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Haga, Leah; Holman, Gordon D.; Hudson, Hugh

    2005-01-01

    The thermal and nonthermal energies of several X-class flares seen with the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) will be presented. The same techniques described by Emslie et al. (JGR, 109, A10104, 2004) are used to take the RHESSI imaging spectroscopic observations and compute the energies in the thermal plasma and in the nonthermal electrons as a function of time throughout the flares. Radiative and conductive cooling rates are estimated and total thermal and nonthermal energies are computed for each flare. Typically, the energy in nonthermal electrons integrated up to the time of peak soft X-ray emission is equal to or exceeds the energy in the thermal plasma at that time. This suggests that energy must have been converted into a form not visible with RHESSI and that the total energy released by the flares may be significantly greater than the sum of energies calculated from the RHESSI observations alone. This conclusion is supported by the high radiative energy seen with SORCE during the impulsive phase of the 28 October 2003 flare. The peak increase in total solar irradiance of 270 mW per square meters measured with SORCE was over two orders of magnitude higher than the peak soft X-ray flux seen with GOES or RHESSI. The implications of this new observation as compared to the energetics derived from the X-ray observations of that flare will be discussed along with the energetics analysis of most of the other X- class flares in October/November 2003.