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Sample records for flare fast electrons

  1. Mechanisms for fast flare reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanhoven, G.; Deeds, D.; Tachi, T.

    1988-01-01

    Normal collisional-resistivity mechanisms of magnetic reconnection have the drawback that they are too slow to explain the fast rise of solar flares. Two methods are examined which are proposed for the speed-up of the magnetic tearing instability: the anomalous enhancement of resistivity by the injection of MHD turbulence and the increase of Coulomb resistivity by radiative cooling. The results are described for nonlinear numerical simulations of these processes which show that the first does not provide the claimed effects, while the second yields impressive rates of reconnection, but low saturated energy outputs.

  2. Acceleration of runaway electrons in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Moghaddam-taaheri, E.; Goertz, C.K. )

    1990-03-01

    The dc electric field acceleration of electrons out of a thermal plasma and the evolution of the runaway tail are studied numerically, using a relativistic quasi-linear code based on the Ritz-Galerkin method and finite elements. A small field-aligned electric field is turned on at a certain time. The resulting distribution function from the runaway process is used to calculate the synchrotron emission during the evolution of the runaway tail. It is found that, during the runaway tail formation, which lasts a few tens of seconds for typical solar flare conditions, the synchrotron emission level is low, almost ot the same order as the emission from the thermal plasma, at the high-frequency end of the spectrum. However, the emission is enhanced explosively in a few microseconds by several orders of magnitude at the time the runaway tail stops growing along the magnetic field and tends toward isotropy due to the pitch-angle scattering of the fast particles. Results indicate that, in order to account for the observed synchrotron emission spectrum of a typical solar flare, the electric field acceleration phase must be accompanied or preceded by a heating phase which yields an enhanced electron temperature of about 2-15 keV in the flare region if the electric field is 0.1-0.2 times the Dreicer field and cyclotron-to-plasma frequency ratios are of order 1-2. 23 refs.

  3. Acceleration of runaway electrons in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moghaddam-Taaheri, E.; Goertz, C. K.

    1990-01-01

    The dc electric field acceleration of electrons out of a thermal plasma and the evolution of the runaway tail are studied numerically, using a relativistic quasi-linear code based on the Ritz-Galerkin method and finite elements. A small field-aligned electric field is turned on at a certain time. The resulting distribution function from the runaway process is used to calculate the synchrotron emission during the evolution of the runaway tail. It is found that, during the runaway tail formation, which lasts a few tens of seconds for typical solar flare conditions, the synchrotron emission level is low, almost ot the same order as the emission from the thermal plasma, at the high-frequency end of the spectrum. However, the emission is enhanced explosively in a few microseconds by several orders of magnitude at the time the runaway tail stops growing along the magnetic field and tends toward isotropy due to the pitch-angle scattering of the fast particles. Results indicate that, in order to account for the observed synchrotron emission spectrum of a typical solar flare, the electric field acceleration phase must be accompanied or preceded by a heating phase which yields an enhanced electron temperature of about 2-15 keV in the flare region if the electric field is 0.1-0.2 times the Dreicer field and cyclotron-to-plasma frequency ratios are of order 1-2.

  4. FAST CONTRACTION OF CORONAL LOOPS AT THE FLARE PEAK

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Rui; Wang Haimin

    2010-05-01

    On 2005 September 8, a coronal loop overlying the active region NOAA 10808 was observed in TRACE 171 A to contract at {approx}100 km s{sup -1} at the peak of an X5.4-2B flare at 21:05 UT. Prior to the fast contraction, the loop underwent a much slower contraction at {approx}6 km s{sup -1} for about 8 minutes, initiating during the flare preheating phase. The sudden switch to fast contraction is presumably corresponding to the onset of the impulsive phase. The contraction resulted in the oscillation of a group of loops located below, with the period of about 10 minutes. Meanwhile, the contracting loop exhibited a similar oscillatory pattern superimposed on the dominant downward motion. We suggest that the fast contraction reflects a suddenly reduced magnetic pressure underneath due either to (1) the eruption of magnetic structures located at lower altitudes or to (2) the rapid conversion of magnetic free energy in the flare core region. Electrons accelerated in the shrinking trap formed by the contracting loop can theoretically contribute to a late-phase hard X-ray burst, which is associated with Type IV radio emission. To complement the X5.4 flare which was probably confined, a similar event observed in SOHO/EIT 195 A on 2004 July 20 in an eruptive, M8.6 flare is briefly described, in which the contraction was followed by the expansion of the same loop leading up to a halo coronal mass ejection. These observations further substantiate the conjecture of coronal implosion and suggest coronal implosion as a new exciter mechanism for coronal loop oscillations.

  5. EVIDENCE FOR HOT FAST FLOW ABOVE A SOLAR FLARE ARCADE

    SciTech Connect

    Imada, S.; Aoki, K.; Hara, H.; Watanabe, T.; Harra, L. K.; Shimizu, T.

    2013-10-10

    Solar flares are one of the main forces behind space weather events. However, the mechanism that drives such energetic phenomena is not fully understood. The standard eruptive flare model predicts that magnetic reconnection occurs high in the corona where hot fast flows are created. Some imaging or spectroscopic observations have indicated the presence of these hot fast flows, but there have been no spectroscopic scanning observations to date to measure the two-dimensional structure quantitatively. We analyzed a flare that occurred on the west solar limb on 2012 January 27 observed by the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and found that the hot (∼30MK) fast (>500 km s{sup –1}) component was located above the flare loop. This is consistent with magnetic reconnection taking place above the flare loop.

  6. Energetic electrons generated during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Gottfried

    2015-12-01

    > electrons are accelerated up to energies beyond 30 keV is one of the open questions in solar physics. A flare is considered as the manifestation of magnetic reconnection in the solar corona. Which mechanisms lead to the production of energetic electrons in the magnetic reconnection region is discussed in this paper. Two of them are described in more detail.

  7. Effect of electron beams during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboudarham, J.; Henoux, J. C.; Brown, J. C.; van den Oord, J.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.

    1990-12-01

    Electron bombardment of the solar atmosphere has two effects: one is to enhance hydrogen recombination emission, the other is to increase the opacity via an increase of H(-) population. The first effect is the most important in the upper part of the atmosphere, and the second in the lower part. It is predicted that, when enhanced absorption dominates in the part of the atmosphere where radiation originates, there will be a decrease in the white-light emission, leading to a 'negative flare', or 'black-light flare' short duration, not more than about 20 sec.

  8. Bulk Acceleration of Electrons in Solar Flares?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2014-06-01

    In two recent papers it has been argued that RHESSI observations of two coronal “above-the-loop-top” hard X-ray sources, together with EUV observations, show that ALL the electrons in the source volumes must have been accelerated. I will briefly review these papers and show that the interpretation most consistent with the combined flare observations is multi-thermal, with hot, thermal plasma in the “above-the-loop-top” sources and only a fraction, albeit a substantial fraction, of the electrons accelerated. Thus, there is no credible scientific evidence for bulk acceleration of electrons in flares. Differential emission measure (DEM) models deduced from SDO/AIA and RHESSI data, including the inversion of the AIA data to determine DEM, will be discussed as part of this analysis.

  9. COLLISIONAL RELAXATION OF ELECTRONS IN A WARM PLASMA AND ACCELERATED NONTHERMAL ELECTRON SPECTRA IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Kontar, Eduard P.; Jeffrey, Natasha L. S.; Bian, N. H.; Emslie, A. Gordon

    2015-08-10

    Extending previous studies of nonthermal electron transport in solar flares, which include the effects of collisional energy diffusion and thermalization of fast electrons, we present an analytic method to infer more accurate estimates of the accelerated electron spectrum in solar flares from observations of the hard X-ray spectrum. Unlike for the standard cold-target model, the spatial characteristics of the flaring region, especially the necessity to consider a finite volume of hot plasma in the source, need to be taken into account in order to correctly obtain the injected electron spectrum from the source-integrated electron flux spectrum (a quantity straightforwardly obtained from hard X-ray observations). We show that the effect of electron thermalization can be significant enough to nullify the need to introduce an ad hoc low-energy cutoff to the injected electron spectrum in order to keep the injected power in non-thermal electrons at a reasonable value. Rather, the suppression of the inferred low-energy end of the injected spectrum compared to that deduced from a cold-target analysis allows the inference from hard X-ray observations of a more realistic energy in injected non-thermal electrons in solar flares.

  10. Collisional Relaxation of Electrons in a Warm Plasma and Accelerated Nonthermal Electron Spectra in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontar, Eduard P.; Jeffrey, Natasha L. S.; Emslie, A. Gordon; Bian, N. H.

    2015-08-01

    Extending previous studies of nonthermal electron transport in solar flares, which include the effects of collisional energy diffusion and thermalization of fast electrons, we present an analytic method to infer more accurate estimates of the accelerated electron spectrum in solar flares from observations of the hard X-ray spectrum. Unlike for the standard cold-target model, the spatial characteristics of the flaring region, especially the necessity to consider a finite volume of hot plasma in the source, need to be taken into account in order to correctly obtain the injected electron spectrum from the source-integrated electron flux spectrum (a quantity straightforwardly obtained from hard X-ray observations). We show that the effect of electron thermalization can be significant enough to nullify the need to introduce an ad hoc low-energy cutoff to the injected electron spectrum in order to keep the injected power in non-thermal electrons at a reasonable value. Rather, the suppression of the inferred low-energy end of the injected spectrum compared to that deduced from a cold-target analysis allows the inference from hard X-ray observations of a more realistic energy in injected non-thermal electrons in solar flares.

  11. Very fast optical flaring from a possible new Galactic magnetar

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanescu, A.; Kanbach, G.; Greiner, J.; Slowikowska, A.; McBreen, S.; Sala, G.

    2009-05-25

    Rapid optical flaring of an unprecedented type was detected from a transient Galactic high-energy source, SWIFT J195509.6+261406[1]. On June 10, 2007, Swift-BAT triggered on GRB 070610, which turned out to be a previously unknown X-ray transient in the Galaxy. Optical emission following this transient was observed after only 421 s with the high-time-resolution single-photon counting photometer OPTIMA. Measurements continued for the following 5 nights.We detected very strong optical flares (>6 mag) with extremely short timescales: duration of individual flares 2-100 s, shortest variability timescales 0.4 s. The scale and magnitude of the observed variability combined with a distance estimate of 4-8 kpc indicate a non-thermal origin of the observed radiation. The morphology of the optical flares is reminiscent of X-ray outbursts of SGRs. The time resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio during the brightest optical outbursts allow to compute their Fourier power spectral density. Features similar to QPOs appear at periods of 6-8 seconds, typical rotational periods for magnetars. X-ray observations independent from our optical analysis show hints of periodicity at a coinciding frequency. We conclude that the timing properties of the fast, bright outbursts of SWIFT J1955 suggest a connection between this transient and magnetars flaring in the optical.

  12. The Effects of Wave Escape on Fast Magnetosonic Wave Turbulence in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pongkitiwanichakul, Peera; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. Richard

    2012-01-01

    One of the leading models for electron acceleration in solar flares is stochastic acceleration by weakly turbulent fast magnetosonic waves ("fast waves"). In this model, large-scale flows triggered by magnetic reconnection excite large-wavelength fast waves, and fast-wave energy then cascades from large wavelengths to small wavelengths. Electron acceleration by large-wavelength fast-waves is weak, and so the model relies on the small-wavelength waves produced by the turbulent cascade. In order for the model to work, the energy cascade time for large-wavelength fast waves must be shorter than the time required for the waves to propagate out of the solar-flare acceleration region. To investigate the effects of wave escape, we solve the wave kinetic equation for fast waves in weak turbulence theory, supplemented with a homogeneous wave-loss term.We find that the amplitude of large-wavelength fast waves must exceed a minimum threshold in order for a significant fraction of the wave energy to cascade to small wavelengths before the waves leave the acceleration region.We evaluate this threshold as a function of the dominant wavelength of the fast waves that are initially excited by reconnection outflows.

  13. Energetic electrons in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batchelor, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    A new analysis was made of a thermal flare model proposed by Brown, Melrose, and Spicer (1979) and Smith and Lilliequist (1979). They assumed the source of impulsive hard X-rays to be a plasma at a temperature of order 10 to the 8th power K, initially located at the apex of a coronal arch, and confined by ion-acoustic turbulence in a collisionless conduction front. Such a source would expand at approximately the ion-sound speed, C sub S = square root of (k T sub e/m sub i), until it filled the arch. Brown, Melrose, and Spicer and Smith and Brown (1980) argued that the source assumed in this model would not explain the simultaneous impulsive microwave emission. In contrast, the new results presented herein suggest that this model leads to the development of a quasi-Maxwellian distribution of electrons that explains both the hard X-ray and microwave emissions. This implies that the source sizes can be determined from observations of the optically-thick portions of microwave spectra and the temperatures obtained from associated hard X-ray observations. In this model, the burst emission would rise to a maximum in a time, t sub r, approximately equal to L/c sub s, where L is the half-length of the arch. New observations of these impulsive flare emissions were analyzed herein to test this prediction of the model. Observations made with the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft and the Bern Radio Observatory are in good agreement with the model.

  14. Two types of electron events in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daibog, E. I.; Kurt, V. G.; Logachev, Y. I.; Stolpovsky, V. G.

    1985-01-01

    The fluxes and spectra of the flare electrons measured on board Venera-I3 and I4 space probes are compared with the parameters of the hard (E sub x approximately 55 keV) and thermal X-ray bursts. The electron flux amplitude has been found to correlate with flare importance in the thermal X-ray range (r approximately 0.8). The following two types of flare events have been found in the electron component of SCR. The electron flux increase is accompanied by a hard X-ray burst and the electron spectrum index in the approximately 25 to 200 keV energy range is gamma approximately 2 to 3. The electron flux increase is not accompanied by a hard X-ray burst and the electron spectrum is softer (Delta gamma approximately 0.7 to 1.0).

  15. Electron Acceleration in Contracting Magnetic Islands during Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovikov, D.; Tenishev, V.; Gombosi, T. I.; Guidoni, S. E.; DeVore, C. R.; Karpen, J. T.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2017-01-01

    Electron acceleration in solar flares is well known to be efficient at generating energetic particles that produce the observed bremsstrahlung X-ray spectra. One mechanism proposed to explain the observations is electron acceleration within contracting magnetic islands formed by magnetic reconnection in the flare current sheet. In a previous study, a numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulation of an eruptive solar flare was analyzed to estimate the associated electron acceleration due to island contraction. That analysis used a simple analytical model for the island structure and assumed conservation of the adiabatic invariants of particle motion. In this paper, we perform the first-ever rigorous integration of the guiding-center orbits of electrons in a modeled flare. An initially isotropic distribution of particles is seeded in a contracting island from the simulated eruption, and the subsequent evolution of these particles is followed using guiding-center theory. We find that the distribution function becomes increasingly anisotropic over time as the electrons’ energy increases by up to a factor of five, in general agreement with the previous study. In addition, we show that the energized particles are concentrated on the Sunward side of the island, adjacent to the reconnection X-point in the flare current sheet. Furthermore, our analysis demonstrates that the electron energy gain is dominated by betatron acceleration in the compressed, strengthened magnetic field of the contracting island. Fermi acceleration by the shortened field lines of the island also contributes to the energy gain, but it is less effective than the betatron process.

  16. The collisional relaxation of electrons in hot flaring plasma and inferring the properties of solar flare accelerated electrons from X-ray observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffrey, N. L. S.; Kontar, E. P.; Emslie, A. G.; Bian, N. H.

    2015-09-01

    X-ray observations are a direct diagnostic of fast electrons produced in solar flares, energized during the energy release process and directed towards the Sun. Since the properties of accelerated electrons can be substantially changed during their transport and interaction with the background plasma, a model must ultimately be applied to X-ray observations in order to understand the mechanism responsible for their acceleration. A cold thick target model is ubiquitously used for this task, since it provides a simple analytic relationship between the accelerated electron spectrum and the emitting electron spectrum in the X-ray source, with the latter quantity readily obtained from X-ray observations. However, such a model is inappropriate for the majority of solar flares in which the electrons propagate in a hot megaKelvin plasma, because it does not take into account the physics of thermalization of fast electrons. The use of a more realistic model, properly accounting for the properties of the background plasma, and the collisional diffusion and thermalization of electrons, can alleviate or even remove many of the traditional problems associated with the cold thick target model and the deduction of the accelerated electron spectrum from X-ray spectroscopy, such as the number problem and the need to impose an ad hoc low energy cut-off.

  17. Signatures of Accelerated Electrons in Solar and Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, Arnold O.

    2015-08-01

    Flares energize electrons (and ions) to supra-thermal energies. In most cases the final distribution in momentum or energy space is non-Maxwellian. The non-thermal part of the energy can be the source for various emissions, including hard X-rays, synchrotron radiation and coherent radio emission. Such non-thermal emissions may contain information on the acceleration process. Several acceleration scenarios have been proposed: electric DC field, stochastic, and shock acceleration. There is observational evidence for all three scenarios. The new data come from SDO, X-ray (RHESSI), radio observations (Nobeyama, VLA and e-Callisto). Solar energetic particles are an additional channel of information.Tiny solar microflares and huge stellar flares in binary systems (RS CVns) and dMe dwarfs differ by more than 10 orders of magnitude in released energy. Yet the relation between peak luminosity in thermal (soft) X-ray and non-thermal synchrotron (radio) emission is surprisingly constant. This observational fact indicates that flare acceleration scales with energy release over a large range. Electron acceleration in flares seems to be a universal process. The constraint on simultaneous thermal X-rays and non-thermal (radio) synchrotron emission seems to select on particular kind of flare. In this subset, there seems to be only one type of acceleration.Yet, small deviations are noted: Small solar flares are softer in hard X-rays. Solar nanoflares are relatively weak in synchrotron emission. The recently noted case of radio-poor preflares will also be presented. The deviations suggest that the acceleration is less efficient in small flares and in the early phase of flares. Larger deviations are reported occasionally for solar flares and more often from stellar flares, where either thermal or non-thermal emission seems to be missing completely.The location of the acceleration in solar flares remains disputed. Observations suggesting acceleration in the soft X-ray top-tops, above

  18. Radio Studies of Electron Acceleration and Transport During Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.

    2002-05-01

    At centimeter wavelengths solar flare radiation is dominated by incoherent gyrosynchrotron emissions from 10 keV to several MeV electrons. Due to unique sensitivity of the gyrosynchrotron radiation to electron momentum distribution and ambient magnetic field, the radio observations at these wavelengths can provide important clues to the evolution of high-energy electrons residing in the flaring loops. In this talk I review some of recent progress made primarily using the Owens Valley Solar Array (OVSA) to understand acceleration, trapping, and precipitation of electrons during solar flares. These works are extensions of the traditional, correlative studies of temporal and spatial morphologies of radio bursts versus those of other flare radiations (X-rays, UV/EUV, and Hα ) to exploit the multi-frequencies of the OVSA. The results demonstrate additional advantages of radio observations as a flare diagnostic tool when both spatial and spectral resolutions are available, and provide a major initiative in building the Frequency-Agile Radio Telescope (FASR). This work has been supported by NASA grant NAG5-10891. The OVSA is supported by NSF grant AST-9987366 to New Jersey Institute of Technology.

  19. Electron Kappa Distributions in Solar Flares and the Earth's Magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, M.; Krucker, S.; Phan, T.

    2013-12-01

    Explosive phenomena in the solar corona and the Earth's magnetotail produce non-thermal, energetic electrons of up to tens of MeV and hundreds of keV, respectively. While power-law energy spectra have been observed in both environments, similarities and differences of the power-law features remain unclear. Here we propose to use kappa distribution to compare the power-law spectral indices obtained by hard X-ray observations during solar flares as well as in-situ electron measurements in the Earth's magnetotail. We will present RHESSI solar flare observations in which foot-points of the flare loop were behind the solar limb so that the photon spectra of the hard X-ray coronal source could be studied without much contamination by photons from the foot-points. As a reference, we will also show a THEMIS observation of electron kappa distribution in the reconnection flow-braking region within the Earth's magnetotail.

  20. Acceleration of runaway electrons and Joule heating in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    The electric field acceleration of electrons out of a thermal plasma and the simultaneous Joule heating of the plasma are studied. Acceleration and heating timescales are derived and compared, and upper limits are obtained on the acceleration volume and the rate at which electrons can be accelerated. These upper limits, determined by the maximum magnetic field strength observed in flaring regions, place stringent restrictions upon the acceleration process. The role of the plasma resistivity in these processes is examined, and possible sources of anomalous resistivity are summarized. The implications of these results for the microwave and hard X-ray emission from solar flares are examined.

  1. Acceleration of runaway electrons and Joule heating in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.

    1985-01-01

    The electric field acceleration of electrons out of a thermal plasma and the simultaneous Joule heating of the plasma are studied. Acceleration and heating timescales are derived and compared, and upper limits are obtained on the acceleration volume and the rate at which electrons can be accelerated. These upper limits, determined by the maximum magnetic field strength observed in flaring regions, place stringent restrictions upon the acceleration process. The role of the plasma resistivity in these processes is examined, and possible sources of anomalous resistivity are summarized. The implications of these results for the microwave and hard X-ray emission from solar flares are examined.

  2. TEMPERATURE AND ELECTRON DENSITY DIAGNOSTICS OF A CANDLE-FLAME-SHAPED FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Guidoni, S. E.; Plowman, J. E.

    2015-02-10

    Candle-flame-shaped flares are archetypical structures that provide indirect evidence of magnetic reconnection. A flare resembling Tsuneta's famous 1992 candle-flame flare occurred on 2011 January 28; we present its temperature and electron density diagnostics. This flare was observed with Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA), Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT), and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Ahead (STEREO-A)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager, resulting in high-resolution, broad temperature coverage, and stereoscopic views of this iconic structure. The high-temperature images reveal a brightening that grows in size to form a tower-like structure at the top of the posteruption flare arcade, a feature that has been observed in other long-duration events. Despite the extensive work on the standard reconnection scenario, there is no complete agreement among models regarding the nature of this high-intensity elongated structure. Electron density maps reveal that reconnected loops that are successively connected at their tops to the tower develop a density asymmetry of about a factor of two between the two legs, giving the appearance of ''half-loops''. We calculate average temperatures with a new fast differential emission measure (DEM) method that uses SDO/AIA data and analyze the heating and cooling of salient features of the flare. Using STEREO observations, we show that the tower and the half-loop brightenings are not a line-of-sight projection effect of the type studied by Forbes and Acton. This conclusion opens the door for physics-based explanations of these puzzling, recurrent solar flare features, previously attributed to projection effects. We corroborate the results of our DEM analysis by comparing them with temperature analyses from Hinode/XRT.

  3. Temperature and Electron Density Diagnostics of a Candle-flame-shaped Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidoni, S. E.; McKenzie, D. E.; Longcope, D. W.; Plowman, J. E.; Yoshimura, K.

    2015-02-01

    Candle-flame-shaped flares are archetypical structures that provide indirect evidence of magnetic reconnection. A flare resembling Tsuneta's famous 1992 candle-flame flare occurred on 2011 January 28; we present its temperature and electron density diagnostics. This flare was observed with Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA), Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT), and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Ahead (STEREO-A)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager, resulting in high-resolution, broad temperature coverage, and stereoscopic views of this iconic structure. The high-temperature images reveal a brightening that grows in size to form a tower-like structure at the top of the posteruption flare arcade, a feature that has been observed in other long-duration events. Despite the extensive work on the standard reconnection scenario, there is no complete agreement among models regarding the nature of this high-intensity elongated structure. Electron density maps reveal that reconnected loops that are successively connected at their tops to the tower develop a density asymmetry of about a factor of two between the two legs, giving the appearance of "half-loops." We calculate average temperatures with a new fast differential emission measure (DEM) method that uses SDO/AIA data and analyze the heating and cooling of salient features of the flare. Using STEREO observations, we show that the tower and the half-loop brightenings are not a line-of-sight projection effect of the type studied by Forbes & Acton. This conclusion opens the door for physics-based explanations of these puzzling, recurrent solar flare features, previously attributed to projection effects. We corroborate the results of our DEM analysis by comparing them with temperature analyses from Hinode/XRT.

  4. THE n-DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRONS AND DOUBLE LAYERS IN THE ELECTRON-BEAM-RETURN-CURRENT SYSTEM OF SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Karlicky, Marian

    2012-05-01

    We investigate processes in the electron-beam-return-current system in the impulsive phase of solar flares to answer a question about the formation of the n-electron distribution detected in this phase of solar flares. An evolution of the electron-beam-return-current system with an initial local density depression is studied using a three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell model. In the system the strong double layer is formed. Its electric field potential increases with the electron beam flux. In this electric field potential, the electrons of background plasma are strongly accelerated and propagate in the return-current direction. The high-energy part of their distribution at the high-potential side of the strong double layer resembles that of the n-distribution. Thus, the detection of the n-distributions, where a form of the high-energy part of the distribution is the most important, can indicate the presence of strong double layers in solar flares. The similarity between processes in solar flare loops and those in the downward current region of the terrestrial aurora, where the double layers were observed by FAST satellite, supports this idea.

  5. The Energetic Importance of Accelerated Electrons in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    It has been claimed that a large fraction of the total energy released in a solar flare goes initially into accelerated electrons. These electrons generate the observed hard X-ray bremsstrahlung emission as they lose most of their energy by coulomb collisions in the lower corona and chromosphere to heat the plasma seen in soft X-rays. From several recent studies of the Neupert Effect - the empirical result that for many flares the time integral of the hard X-ray emission closely matches the temporal variation of the soft X-ray emission - it appears that the fraction of the released energy going into accelerated electrons is lower, on average, for smaller flares. Also, from relative timing differences, about 25% of all flares are inconsistent with the Neupert Effect. The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) is uniquely capable of investigating the Neupert Effect since it covers soft X-rays down to 3 keV (when both attenuators are out of the field of view) and hard X-rays with keV energy resolution. It has arcsecond-class angular resolution and sub-second time resolution. Several M-class flares have already been detected by RHESSI and I will present their detailed time histories for different energy ranges. I will also present hard and soft X-ray images that reveal the spatial relation between the hot plasma and the accelerated electrons. The results are in general agreement with the Neupert Effect, but they also suggest that there must be other heating mechanisms besides the thermalization of accelerated electrons, even during the impulsive phase.

  6. Acceleration of runaway electrons and Joule heating in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, G.D.

    1985-06-15

    The electric-field acceleration of electrons out of a thermal plasma and the simultaneous Joule heating of the plasma are studied. Acceleration and heating time scales are derived and compared, and upper limits are obtained on the acceleration volume and the rate at which electrons can be accelerated. These upper limits, determined by the maximum magnetic-field strength observed in flaring regions, place stringent restrictions on the acceleration process. The implications of these results for the microwave and hard X-ray emission from solar flares are examined. The major conclusions are: (1) The simple electric-field acceleration of electrons is found, in agreement with Spicer, to be incapable of producing a large enough electron flux to explain the bulk of the observed hard X-ray emission from solar flares as nonthermal bremsstrahlung. For the bulk of the X-ray emission to be nonthermal, at least 10/sup 4/ oppositely directed current channels are required, or an acceleration mechanism that does not result in a net current in the acceleration region is required. (2) lf the bulk of the X-ray emission is thermal, a single current sheet can yield the required heating and acceleration time scales and the required electron energies for the microwave emission. This is accomplished with an electric field that is much smaller than the Dreicer field (E/sub D//Eroughly-equal10--50). (3) The rise time of the nonthermal emission is determined by the time needed to generate the required number of runaway electrons rather than by the time needed to accelerate the electrons to the required energies, which is generally a much shorter time scale. (4) The acceleration of enough electrons to produce a microwave flare requires the resupply of electrons to both the current sheet and the runaway region of velocity space.

  7. Energetic electrons and photospheric electric currents during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musset, S.; Vilmer, N.; Bommier, V.

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares are among the most energetic events in the solar system. Magnetic energy previously stored in the coronal magnetic field is transferred to particle acceleration, plasma motion and plasma heating. Magnetic energy release is likely to occur in coronal currents sheets associated with regions of strong gradient of magnetic connectivity. Coronal current sheets can be traced by their footprints at the surface on the Sun, in e.g. photospheric current ribbons. We aim to study the relationship between the current ribbons observed at the photospheric level which trace coronal current sheets, and the flare energetic electrons traced by their X-ray emissions. The photospheric magnetic field and vertical current density are calculated from SDO/HMI spectropolarimetric data using the UNNOFIT inversion and Metcalf disambiguation codes, while the X-ray images and spectra are reconstructed from RHESSI data. In a first case (the GOES X2.2 flare of February 15, 2011), a spatial correlation is observed between the photospheric current ribbons and the coronal X-ray emissions from energetic electrons (Musset et al., 2015). Moreover, a conjoint evolution of both the photospheric currents and the X-ray emission is observed during the course of the flare. Both results are interpreted as consequences of the magnetic reconnection in coronal current sheets. Propagation of the reconnection sites to new structures during the flare results in new X-ray emission sites and local increase of the photospheric currents We will examine in this contribution whether similar results are obtained for other X-class flares.

  8. Energetic electrons and photospheric electric currents during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musset, Sophie; Vilmer, Nicole; Bommier, Veronique

    2016-07-01

    It is currently admitted that solar flares are powered by magnetic energy previously stored in the coronal magnetic field. During magnetic reconnection processes, this energy is transferred to particle acceleration, plasma motion and plasma heating. Magnetic energy release is likely to occur on coronal currents sheets along regions of strong gradient of magnetic connectivity. These coronal current sheets can be traced by their footprints at the surface on the Sun, i.e. by photospheric current ribbons. We aim to study the relation between these current ribbons observed at the photospheric level, tracing the coronal current sheets, and the flare energetic electrons traced by their X-ray emissions. The photospheric magnetic field and vertical current density have been calculated from SDO/HMI spectropolarimetric data with the UNNOFIT inversion and Metcalf disambiguation codes, while the X-ray images and spectra have been reconstructed from RHESSI data. In a first case, the GOES X2.2 flare of February 15, 2011, a spatial correlation is observed between the photospheric current ribbons and the coronal X-ray emissions from energetic electrons. Moreover, a conjoint evolution of both the photospheric currents and the X-ray emission is observed during the course of the flare. Both results are interpreted as consequences of the magnetic reconnection in coronal current sheets, and propagation of the reconnection sites to new structures during the flare, leading to new X-ray emission and local increase of the photospheric currents (Musset et al., 2015). We shall discuss here similar results obtained for other X-class flares.

  9. Fast X-ray Oscillations during Magnetar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2007-01-01

    The giant flares produced by highly magnetized neutron stars, "magnetars," are the brightest sources of high energy radiation outside our solar system. Serendipitous observations with NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) of the two most recent flares resulted in the discovery of high frequency oscillations in their X-ray fluxes. The frequencies of these oscillations range from approx. 20 Hz to as high as 1800 Hz, and may represent the first detection of global oscillation modes of neutron stars. Here I will present an observational and theoretical overview of these oscillations and discuss how they might allow us to probe neutron star interiors and dense matter physics.

  10. The X-ray emission of solar flares generated by anisotropic electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Kelner, S. R.; Kotov, Y. D.

    1987-12-01

    For three types of the initial angle distribution of fast electrons, energy spectra, directivity, and polarization of the bremsstrahlung have been computed with an account for multiple scattering and energy losses. The influence of Compton scattering and of photoabsorption on the observed hard X-ray emission of solar flares has been investigated. It is obtained that the photon spectrum index depends not only on the spectrum of electrons but also on the registered energy range and on the angle of view of the flare. In the 10 - 40 keV range the spectrum is softer at the limb than in the solar disc centre; in the 60 - 360 keV the situation is reverse, the spectrum being softer in the solar disc centre.

  11. Shock Versus Solar Flare Production of Heliospheric Relativistic Electron Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Cliver, E. W.

    2006-12-01

    Electrons with relativistic (E > 0.3 MeV) energies are often observed as discrete events in the inner heliosphere. Their sharp onsets and antisunward flows indicate that they are produced in solar transient events. In general their origins can be associated in time with both solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Unlike the solar energetic proton (SEP) and ion events, we do not have the advantage of particle elemental abundances and charge states as source diagnostics. We review the characteristics of the electron events observed on the Helios, Venera, ISEE-3, Phobos, and other inner heliospheric spacecraft to determine whether they are more likely to be produced by broad coronal shocks driven by CMEs or by solar flare processes associated with magnetic reconnection. Electron intensity-time profiles and energy spectra are compared with properties of flares and CMEs for this determination. Recent comparisons of peak electron and SEP event intensities provide strong evidence for the shock interpretation, but definitive results require the observations provided by the Sentinels mission.

  12. Relativistic-Electron-Dominated Solar Flares Observed by Fermi/GBM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, A. Y.; Schwartz, R. A.; Dennis, B. R.

    2013-12-01

    Up to tens of percent of the energy released in solar flares goes into accelerating electrons above ~10 keV and ions above ~1 MeV, and the impulsive heating of the ambient solar atmosphere by these particles is partially or wholly responsible for the production of hot flare plasmas (up to ~50 MK). Although flares can accelerate electrons to relativistic energies, in even large flares the typical falling power-law energy spectrum means that the plasma is primarily heated by the much larger number of low-energy electrons. However, there have been flares observed where the electron energy spectra have high low-energy cutoffs (well above ~100 keV), which significantly changes the electron energies responsible for heating and modifies the usual conception of energy transport in a flare. A systematic study of a range of relativistic-electron-dominated flares can improve our understanding of the relevant acceleration processes and how they may differ from those in "typical" flares. We search the Fermi/GBM data set for such flares based on the electron-associated X-ray/gamma-ray bremsstrahlung emission, making use of an improved background-subtraction approach to improve the ability to detect weaker flares. We present the fitted parameters for the relativistic-electron spectrum and their evolution over time, and compare against RHESSI observations and other instruments when available. We also discuss these events in the context of previously observed correlations between relativistic-electron acceleration and ion acceleration in flares.

  13. Ulysses-ARTEMIS radio observation of energetic flare electron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoang, S.; Moncuquet, M.; Poquerusse, M.

    1995-01-01

    Type 3 radio bursts allow us to follow energetic electrons ejected by solar flares into the interplanetary medium, even when the observer is far away from the electrons. The emission frequency f(sub p) is related to the ambient density n(sub e) by f(sub p) varies as the square root of n(sub e), and as a function of the distance r to the sun we have approximately n(sub e) varies as r(exp -2); as a consequence, on a 1/f - t dynamic spectrum type 3 bursts appear as nearly straight traces, whose slope gives an estimation of the source speed. We used the data of the URAP radio receiver on Ulysses (1-1000 kHz), observing sources in the solar wind, and the ground data of the ARTEMIS spectrograph (100-500 MHz), observing sources of the corona, over the years 1991-1994. We found a surprisingly large number of excellent high-frequency - low-frequency associations. A type 3 burst group on ARTEMIS (10 to 100 bursts over 1 to 10 minutes) typically gives rise to one isolated burst on Ulysses. As bursts often start in high frequencies during the maximum phase of flares, this demonstrates in a very convincing manner that some of the flare electrons themselves make it all the way to the interplanetary medium. We discuss decorrelation cases in the context of geometrical configuration between the active region and the two observing sites. We also study how apparent electron speeds vary with the distance to the sun.

  14. THE FAST FILAMENT ERUPTION LEADING TO THE X-FLARE ON 2014 MARCH 29

    SciTech Connect

    Kleint, Lucia; Battaglia, Marina; Krucker, Säm; Reardon, Kevin; Dalda, Alberto Sainz; Young, Peter R.

    2015-06-10

    We investigate the sequence of events leading to the solar X1 flare SOL2014-03-29T17:48. Because of the unprecedented joint observations of an X-flare with the ground-based Dunn Solar Telescope and the spacecraft IRIS, Hinode, RHESSI, STEREO, and the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we can sample many solar layers from the photosphere to the corona. A filament eruption was observed above a region of previous flux emergence, which possibly led to a change in magnetic field configuration, causing the X-flare. This was concluded from the timing and location of the hard X-ray emission, which started to increase slightly less than a minute after the filament accelerated. The filament showed Doppler velocities of ∼2–5 km s{sup −1} at chromospheric temperatures for at least one hour before the flare occurred, mostly blueshifts, but also redshifts near its footpoints. Fifteen minutes before the flare, its chromospheric Doppler shifts increased to ∼6–10 km s{sup −1} and plasma heating could be observed before it lifted off with at least 600 km s{sup −1} as seen in IRIS data. Compared to previous studies, this acceleration (∼3–5 km s{sup −2}) is very fast, while the velocities are in the common range for coronal mass ejections. An interesting feature was a low-lying twisted second filament near the erupting filament, which did not seem to participate in the eruption. After the flare ribbons started on each of the second filament’s sides, it seems to have untangled and vanished during the flare. These observations are some of the highest resolution data of an X-class flare to date and reveal some small-scale features yet to be explained.

  15. SUPPRESSION OF ENERGETIC ELECTRON TRANSPORT IN FLARES BY DOUBLE LAYERS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T. C.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2012-09-20

    During flares and coronal mass ejections, energetic electrons from coronal sources typically have very long lifetimes compared to the transit times across the systems, suggesting confinement in the source region. Particle-in-cell simulations are carried out to explore the mechanisms of energetic electron transport from the corona to the chromosphere and possible confinement. We set up an initial system of pre-accelerated hot electrons in contact with ambient cold electrons along the local magnetic field and let it evolve over time. Suppression of transport by a nonlinear, highly localized electrostatic electric field (in the form of a double layer) is observed after a short phase of free-streaming by hot electrons. The double layer (DL) emerges at the contact of the two electron populations. It is driven by an ion-electron streaming instability due to the drift of the back-streaming return current electrons interacting with the ions. The DL grows over time and supports a significant drop in temperature and hence reduces heat flux between the two regions that is sustained for the duration of the simulation. This study shows that transport suppression begins when the energetic electrons start to propagate away from a coronal acceleration site. It also implies confinement of energetic electrons with kinetic energies less than the electrostatic energy of the DL for the DL lifetime, which is much longer than the electron transit time through the source region.

  16. Joule heating and runaway electron acceleration in a solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Kundu, Mukul R.; Kane, Sharad R.

    1989-01-01

    The hard and soft x ray and microwave emissions from a solar flare (May 14, 1980) were analyzed and interpreted in terms of Joule heating and runaway electron acceleration in one or more current sheets. It is found that all three emissions can be generated with sub-Dreicer electric fields. The soft x ray emitting plasma can only be heated by a single current sheet if the resistivity in the sheet is well above the classical, collisional resistivity of 10(exp 7) K, 10(exp 11)/cu cm plasma. If the hard x ray emission is from thermal electrons, anomalous resistivity or densities exceeding 3 x 10(exp 12)/cu cm are required. If the hard x ray emission is from nonthermal electrons, the emissions can be produced with classical resistivity in the current sheets if the heating rate is approximately 4 times greater than that deduced from the soft x ray data (with a density of 10(exp 10)/cu cm in the soft x ray emitting region), if there are at least 10(exp 4) current sheets, and if the plasma properties in the sheets are characteristic of the superhot plasma observed in some flares by Lin et al., and with Hinotori. Most of the released energy goes directly into bulk heating, rather than accelerated particles.

  17. CORONAL ELECTRON DISTRIBUTION IN SOLAR FLARES: DRIFT-KINETIC MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Minoshima, Takashi; Kusano, Kanya; Masuda, Satoshi; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi

    2011-05-10

    Using a model of particle acceleration and transport in solar flares, we investigate the height distribution of coronal electrons by focusing on the energy-dependent pitch-angle scattering. When pitch-angle scattering is not included, the peak heights of loop-top electrons are constant, regardless of their energy, owing to the continuous acceleration and compression of the electrons via shrinkage of magnetic loops. On the other hand, under pitch-angle scattering, the electron heights are energy-dependent: intermediate-energy electrons are at a higher altitude, whereas lower and higher energy electrons are at lower altitudes. This implies that the intermediate-energy electrons are inhibited from following the shrinking field lines to lower altitudes because pitch-angle scattering causes efficient precipitation of these electrons into the footpoint and their subsequent loss from the loop. This result is qualitatively consistent with the position of the above-the-loop-top hard X-ray (HXR) source that is located above coronal HXR loops emitted by lower energy electrons and microwaves emitted by higher energy electrons. Quantitative agreement with observations might be achieved by considering primary acceleration before the onset of loop shrinkage and additional pitch-angle scattering via wave-particle interactions.

  18. Reconnection-driven plasmoids in blazars: fast flares on a slow envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannios, Dimitrios

    2013-05-01

    TeV flares of a duration of ˜10 min have been observed in several blazars. The fast flaring requires compact regions in the jet that boost their emission towards the observer at an extreme Doppler factor of δem ≳ 50. For ˜100 GeV photons to avoid annihilation in the broad-line region of PKS 1222+216, the flares must come from large (pc) scales, challenging most models proposed to explain them. Here I elaborate on the magnetic reconnection minijet model for the blazar flaring, focusing on the inherently time-dependent aspects of the process of magnetic reconnection. I argue that, for the physical conditions prevailing in blazar jets, the reconnection layer fragments, leading to the formation a large number of plasmoids. Occasionally, a plasmoid grows to become a large, `monster' plasmoid. I show that radiation emitted from the reconnection event can account for the observed `envelope' of day-long blazar activity, while radiation from monster plasmoids can power the fastest TeV flares. The model is applied to several blazars with observed fast flaring. The inferred distance of the dissipation zone from the black hole and the typical size of the reconnection regions are Rdiss ˜ 0.3-1 pc and l' ≲ 1016 cm, respectively. The required magnetization of the jet at this distance is modest: σ ˜ a few. Such distance Rdiss and reconnection size l' are expected if the jet contains field structures with a size of the order of the black hole horizon.

  19. Type III radio burst productivity of solar flares. I - Release of energetic electrons out of the flare site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poquerusse, M.; McIntosh, P. S.

    1990-12-01

    The statistical relationship between type III radio bursts and optical flares, using the comprehensive flare data base at the NOAA National Geophysical Data Center (Boulder, Colorado), and the radio observations obtained with the ARTEMIS multichannel spectrograph in Nancay (France), operating at 500-100 MHz are presented. At variance with previous results, it is seen that type III probability of occurrence depends only weakly upon the spatial extension of the flare observed in H-alpha, but strongly upon its brightness. It is confirmed that the type III probability increases with proximity to sunspots and with mass motions (surges and prominence activity); in addition, statistical data are consistent with both relations holding at fixed flare brightness. Thus, some of the conditions favorable to type III occurrence are characteristic of compact flares, while others are characteristic of large and long-duration flares, which are often related to mass ejections. This apparent paradox suggests that particle acceleration and magnetic expansion are at work simultaneously in the ejection of electron streams out of faring sites.

  20. OPTIMAL ELECTRON ENERGIES FOR DRIVING CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Reep, J. W.; Bradshaw, S. J.; Alexander, D. E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu

    2015-08-01

    In the standard model of solar flares, energy deposition by a beam of electrons drives strong chromospheric evaporation leading to a significantly denser corona and much brighter emission across the spectrum. Chromospheric evaporation was examined in great detail by Fisher et al., who described a distinction between two different regimes, termed explosive and gentle evaporation. In this work, we examine the importance of electron energy and stopping depths on the two regimes and on the atmospheric response. We find that with explosive evaporation, the atmospheric response does not depend strongly on electron energy. In the case of gentle evaporation, lower energy electrons are significantly more efficient at heating the atmosphere and driving up-flows sooner than higher energy electrons. We also find that the threshold between explosive and gentle evaporation is not fixed at a given beam energy flux, but also depends strongly on the electron energy and duration of heating. Further, at low electron energies, a much weaker beam flux is required to drive explosive evaporation.

  1. Comparing Solar-Flare Acceleration of >-20 MeV Protons and Electrons Above Various Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Albert Y.

    2010-01-01

    A large fraction (up to tens of percent) of the energy released in solar flares goes into accelerated ions and electrons, and studies indicate that these two populations have comparable energy content. RHESSI observations have shown a striking close linear correlation between the 2.223 MeV neutron-capture gamma-ray line and electron bremsstrahlung emission >300 keV, indicating that the flare acceleration of >^20 MeV protons and >300 keV electrons is roughly proportional over >3 orders of magnitude in fluence. We show that the correlations of neutron-capture line fluence with GOES class or with bremsstrahlung emission at lower energies show deviations from proportionality, primarily for flares with lower fluences. From analyzing thirteen flares, we demonstrate that there appear to be two classes of flares with high-energy acceleration: flares that exhibit only proportional acceleration of ions and electrons down to 50 keV and flares that have an additional soft, low-energy bremsstrahlung component, suggesting two separate populations of accelerated electrons. We use RHESSI spectroscopy and imaging to investigate a number of these flares in detail.

  2. Electrons Re-Acceleration at the Footpoints of Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkmani, R.; Brown, J.

    2012-08-01

    Hinode's observations revealed a very dynamic and complex chromosphere. This require revisiting the assumption that the chromospheric footpoints of solar flares are areas where accelerated particles only lose energy due to collisions. Traditionally electrons are thought to be accelerated in the coronal part of the loop, then travel to the footpoints where they lose their energy and radiate the observed hard X-ray. Increasing observational evidence challenges this assumption. We review the evidence against this assumption and present the new Local Re-acceleration Thick Target Model (LRTTM) where at the footpoints electrons receive a boost of re-acceleration in addition to the usual collisional loses. Such model may offer an alternative to the standard collisional thick target injection model (TTM) (Brown 1971) of solar HXR burst sources, requiring far fewer electrons and solving some recent problems with the TTM interpretation. We look at the different scenarios which could lead to such re-acceleration and present numerical results from one of them.

  3. Implications of X-Ray Observations for Electron Acceleration and Propagation in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.; Aschwanden, M. J.; Aurass, H.; Battaglia, M.; Grigis, P. C.; Kontar, E. P.; Liu, W.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Zharkova, V. V.

    2011-01-01

    High-energy X-rays and gamma-rays from solar flares were discovered just over fifty years ago. Since that time, the standard for the interpretation of spatially integrated flare X-ray spectra at energies above several tens of keV has been the collisional thick-target model. After the launch of the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) in early 2002, X-ray spectra and images have been of sufficient quality to allow a greater focus on the energetic electrons responsible for the X-ray emission, including their origin and their interactions with the flare plasma and magnetic field. The result has been new insights into the flaring process, as well as more quantitative models for both electron acceleration and propagation, and for the flare environment with which the electrons interact. In this article we review our current understanding of electron acceleration, energy loss, and propagation in flares. Implications of these new results for the collisional thick-target model, for general flare models, and for future flare studies are discussed.

  4. Narrowband Gyrosynchrotron Bursts: Probing Electron Acceleration in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Nita, Gelu M.; Kontar, Eduard P.; Gary, Dale E.

    2016-07-01

    Recently, in a few case studies we demonstrated that gyrosynchrotron microwave emission can be detected directly from the acceleration region when the trapped electron component is insignificant. For the statistical study reported here, we have identified events with steep (narrowband) microwave spectra that do not show a significant trapped component and, at the same time, show evidence of source uniformity, which simplifies the data analysis greatly. Initially, we identified a subset of more than 20 radio bursts with such narrow spectra, having low- and high-frequency spectral indices larger than three in absolute value. A steep low-frequency spectrum implies that the emission is nonthermal (for optically thick thermal emission, the spectral index cannot be steeper than two), and the source is reasonably dense and uniform. A steep high-frequency spectrum implies that no significant electron trapping occurs, otherwise a progressive spectral flattening would be observed. Roughly half of these radio bursts have RHESSI data, which allow for detailed, joint diagnostics of the source parameters and evolution. Based on an analysis of radio-to-X-ray spatial relationships, timing, and spectral fits, we conclude that the microwave emission in these narrowband bursts originates directly from the acceleration regions, which have a relatively strong magnetic field, high density, and low temperature. In contrast, the thermal X-ray emission comes from a distinct loop with a smaller magnetic field, lower density, but higher temperature. Therefore, these flares likely occurred due to interaction between two (or more) magnetic loops.

  5. Inferring the Energy Distribution of Accelerated Electrons in Solar Flares from X-ray Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Sui, Linhui; Su, Yang

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge of the energy distribution of electrons accelerated in solar flares is important for constraining possible acceleration mechanisms and for understanding the relationships between flare X-ray sources, radio sources, and particles observed in space. Solar flare hard X-rays are primarily emitted from dense, thick-target regions in the lower atmosphere, but the electrons are understood to be accelerated higher in the corona. Various processes can distort the X-ray spectrum or the energy distribution of electrons before they reach the thick-target region. After briefly reviewing the processes that affect the X-ray spectrum and the electron distribution, I will describe recent results from a study of flare spectra from RHESSI to determine the importance of these processes in inferring the energy distribution of accelerated electrons.

  6. Diagnostics of electron-heated solar flare models. III - Effects of tapered loop geometry and preheating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.; Li, Peng; Mariska, John T.

    1992-01-01

    A series of hydrodynamic numerical simulations of nonthermal electron-heated solar flare atmospheres and their corresponding soft X-ray Ca XIX emission-line profiles, under the conditions of tapered flare loop geometry and/or a preheated atmosphere, is presented. The degree of tapering is parameterized by the magnetic mirror ratio, while the preheated atmosphere is parameterized by the initial upper chromospheric pressure. In a tapered flare loop, it is found that the upward motion of evaporated material is faster compared with the case where the flare loop is uniform. This is due to the diverging nozzle seen by the upflowing material. In the case where the flare atmosphere is preheated and the flare geometry is uniform, the response of the atmosphere to the electron collisional heating is slow. The upward velocity of the hydrodynamic gas is reduced due not only to the large coronal column depth, but also to the increased inertia of the overlying material. It is concluded that the only possible electron-heated scenario in which the predicted Ca XIX line profiles agree with the BCS observations is when the impulsive flare starts in a preheated dense corona.

  7. Electron impact polarization expected in solar EUV lines from flaring chromospheres/transition regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fineschi, S.; Fontenla, Juan M.; Macneice, P.; Ljepojevic, N. N.

    1991-01-01

    We have evaluated lower bounds on the degree of impact Extreme Ultraviolet/Ultraviolet (EUV/UV) line polarization expected during solar flares. This polarization arises from collisional excitation by energetic electrons with non-Maxwellian velocity distributions. Linear polarization was observed in the S I 1437 A line by the Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter/Solar Maximum Mission (UVSP/SMM) during a flare on 15 July 1980. An early interpretation suggested that impact excitation by electrons propagating through the steep temperature gradient of the flaring transition region/high chromosphere produced this polarization. Our calculations show that the observed polarization in this UV line cannot be due to this effect. We find instead that, in some flare models, the energetic electrons can produce an impact polarization of a few percent in EUV neutral helium lines (i.e., lambda lambda 522, 537, and 584 A).

  8. Multi-wavelength Observations of Fast Infrared Flares from V404 Cygni in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallilar, Yigit; Casella, Piergiorgio; Marsh, Tom; Gandhi, Poshak; Fender, Rob; Littlefair, Stuart; Eikenberry, Steve; Garner, Alan; Stelter, Deno; Dhillon, Vik; Mooley, Kunal

    2016-07-01

    We used the fast photometry mode of our new Canarias InfraRed Camera Experiment (CIRCE) on the 10.4-meter Gran Telescopio Canarias to observe V404 Cyg, a stellar mass black hole binary, on June 25, 2015 during its 2015 outburst. CIRCE provided 10Hz sampling in the Ks-band (2.2 microns) In addition, we obtained simultaneous multi wavelength data from our collaborators: three GHz radio bands from the AMI telescope and three optical/UV bands (u', g', r') from ULTRACAM on the William Herschel 4.2-meter telescope. We identify fast (1-second) IR flares with optical counterparts of varying strength/color, which we argue arise from a relativistic jet outflow. These observations provide important constraints on the emission processes and physical conditions in the jet forming region in V404 Cygni. We will discuss these results as well as their implications for relativistic jet formation around stellar-mass black holes.

  9. Multi-wavelength Observations of Fast Infrared Flares from V404 Cygni in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Dallilar, Yigit; Garner, Alan; Deno Stelter, R.; Gandhi, Poshak; Dhillon, Vik; Littlefair, Stuart; Marsh, Thomas; Fender, Rob P.; Mooley, Kunal

    2016-04-01

    We used the fast photometry mode of our new Canarias InfraRed Camera Experiment (CIRCE) on the 10.4-meter Gran Telescopio Canarias to observe V404 Cyg, a stellar mass black hole binary, on June 25, 2015 during its 2015 outburst. CIRCE provided 10Hz sampling in the Ks-band (2.2 microns) In addition, we obtained simultaneous multi wavelength data from our collaborators: three GHz radio bands from the AMI telescope and three optical/UV bands (u', g', r') from ULTRACAM on the William Herschel 4.2-meter telescope. We identify fast (1-second) IR flares with optical counterparts of varying strength/color, which we argue arise from a relativistic jet outflow. These observations provide important constraints on the emission processes and physical conditions in the jet forming region in V404 Cygni. We will discuss these results as well as their implications for relativistic jet formation around stellar-mass black holes.

  10. Neutron decay electrons after the solar flare of 1980 June 21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffolo, D.; Dröge, W.; Klecker, B.

    1996-06-01

    We have found evidence for fluxes of energetic electrons in interplanetary space on board the ISEE-3/ICE spacecraft which we interpret as the decay products of neutrons generated in a solar flare on 1980 June 21. The decay electrons arrived at the spacecraft shortly before the electrons from the flare and can be distinguished from the latter by their distinctive energy spectrum. The time profile of the decay electrons is in good agreement with the results from a simulation based on a scattering mean free path derived from a fit to the flare electron data. The comparison with simultaneously observed decay protons and a published direct measurement of high-energy neutrons places important constraints on the parent neutron spectrum.

  11. Energetic Electrons in Solar Flares - As Viewed in X-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2004-01-01

    Hard X-ray observations provide the most direct diagnostic we have of the suprathermal electrons and the hottest thermal plasma present in solar flares. The Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) is obtaining the most comprehensive observations of individual solar flares ever available in hard X-rays. For the first time, high-resolution spectra are available for a large number of flares that accurately display the spectral shape and its evolution and, in many cases, allow us to identify the transition from the bremsstrahlung X-rays produced by suprathermal electrons to the bremsstrahlung at lower energies emitted by thermal plasma. Also, for the first time, images can be produced in arbitrary energy bands above 3 keV, and spectra of distinct imaged components can be obtained. I will review what we have learned from RHESSI observations about flare suprathermal electron distributions and their evolution Next, I will present computations of the energy deposited by these suprathermal electrons in individual flares and compare this with the energy contained in the hot thermal plasma. I will point out unsolved problems in deducing both suprathermal electron distributions and the energy content of the thermal plasma, and discuss possible solutions. Finally, I will present evidence that electron acceleration is associated with magnetic reconnection in the corona.

  12. OBSERVATION OF HEATING BY FLARE-ACCELERATED ELECTRONS IN A SOLAR CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Glesener, Lindsay; Bain, Hazel M.; Krucker, Säm; Lin, Robert P.

    2013-12-20

    We report a Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observation of flare-accelerated electrons in the core of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and examine their role in heating the CME. Previous CME observations have revealed remarkably high thermal energies that can far surpass the CME's kinetic energy. A joint observation by RHESSI and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly of a partly occulted flare on 2010 November 3 allows us to test the hypothesis that this excess energy is collisionally deposited by flare-accelerated electrons. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images show an ejection forming the CME core and sheath, with isothermal multifilter analysis revealing temperatures of ∼11 MK in the core. RHESSI images reveal a large (∼100 × 50 arcsec{sup 2}) hard X-ray (HXR) source matching the location, shape, and evolution of the EUV plasma, indicating that the emerging CME is filled with flare-accelerated electrons. The time derivative of the EUV emission matches the HXR light curve (similar to the Neupert effect observed in soft and HXR time profiles), directly linking the CME temperature increase with the nonthermal electron energy loss, while HXR spectroscopy demonstrates that the nonthermal electrons contain enough energy to heat the CME. This is the most direct observation to date of flare-accelerated electrons heating a CME, emphasizing the close relationship of the two in solar eruptive events.

  13. Fast transients - A search in X-rays for short flares, bursts, and related phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connors, A.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Swank, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The HEAO 1 A-2 database on fast high energy X-ray transients was examined for any discernible regularities. The data were taken over the interval 1977-79 with six collimated multiwire, multilayer, proportional counters that had a sensitivity sufficient for detecting events lasting 1-5 sec at energies as low as 8-120 keV. The entire sky was surveyed completely three times in the observational period. Best-fit position, error box corners, mean transient flux and quiescent flux data are provided for all six of the type 3 events that were found. All the sources were within the Galaxy. The duration of the events ranged from 60-2000 sec. The limited number of events observed leads to estimates of 10,000-200,000 events per year. It is suggested that all the events originate from hard flares occurring at a rate of 20,000/yr on dMe/dKe stars.

  14. Electron precipitation and mass motion in the 1991 June 9 white-light flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dela Beaujardiere, J. -F.; Canfield, R. C.; Metcalf, T. R.; Hiei, E.; Sakurai, T.; Ichimoto, K.

    1994-01-01

    We use H alpha line profiles as a diagnostic of mass motion and nonthermal electron precipitation in the white-light flare (WLF) of 1991 June 9 01:34 UT. We find only weak downflow velocities (approximately equals 10km/s) at the site of white-light emission, and comparable velocities elsewhere. We also find that electron precipitation is strongest at the WLF site. We conclude that continuum emission in this flare was probably caused by nonthermal electrons and not by dynamical energy transport via a chromospheric condensation.

  15. OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF THE QUASI-PERIODIC FAST-PROPAGATING MAGNETOSONIC WAVES AND THE ASSOCIATED FLARE ON 2011 MAY 30

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu

    2012-07-01

    On 2011 May 30, quasi-periodic fast-propagating (QFP) magnetosonic waves accompanied by a C2.8 flare were directly imaged by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The QFP waves successively emanated from the flare kernel, they propagated along a cluster of open coronal loops with a phase speed of {approx}834 km s{sup -1} during the flare's rising phase, and the multiple arc-shaped wave trains can be fitted with a series of concentric circles. We generate the k - {omega} diagram of the Fourier power and find a straight ridge that represents the dispersion relation of the waves. Along the ridge, we find a lot of prominent nodes which represent the available frequencies of the QFP waves. On the other hand, the frequencies of the flare are also obtained by analyzing the flare light curves using the wavelet technique. The results indicate that almost all the main frequencies of the flare are consistent with those of the QFP waves. This suggests that the flare and the QFP waves were possibly excited by a common physical origin. On the other hand, a few low frequencies (e.g., 2.5 mHz (400 s) and 0.7 mHz (1428 s)) revealed by the k - {omega} diagram cannot be found in the accompanying flare. We propose that these low frequencies were possibly due to the leakage of the pressure-driven p-mode oscillations from the photosphere into the low corona, which should be a noticeable mechanism for driving the QFP waves observed in the corona.

  16. Electron Densities in Solar Flare Loops, Chromospheric Evaporation Upflows, and Acceleration Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benz, Arnold O.

    1996-01-01

    We compare electron densities measured at three different locations in solar flares: (1) in Soft X-Ray (SXR) loops, determined from SXR emission measures and loop diameters from Yohkoh Soft X-Ray Telescope maps (n(sub e, sup SXR) = (0.2-2.5) x 10(exp 11)/ cu cm); (2) in chromospheric evaporation upflows, inferred from plasma frequency cutoffs of decimetric radio bursts detected with the 0.1-3 GHz spectrometer Phoenix of ETH Zuerich (n(sub e, sup upflow) = (0.3-11) x 10(exp 10)/cu cm; and (3) in acceleration sites, inferred from the plasma frequency at the separatrix between upward-accelerated (type III bursts) and downward-accelerated (reverse-drift bursts) electron beams [n(sub e, sup acc) = (0.6-10) x 10(exp 9)/cu cm]. The comparison of these density measurements, obtained from 44 flare episodes (during 14 different flares), demonstrates the compatibility of flare plasma density diagnostics with SXR and radio methods. The density in the upflowing plasma is found to be somewhat lower than in the filled loops, having ratios in a range n(sub e, sup upflow)/n(sub e, sup SXR) = 0.02-1.3, and a factor of 3.6 higher behind the upflow front. The acceleration sites are found to have a much lower density than the SXR-bright flare loops, i.e., n(sub e, sup acc)/n(sub e, sup SXR) = 0.005- 0.13, and thus must be physically displaced from the SXR-bright flare loops. The scaling law between electron time-of-flight distances l' and loop half-lengths s, l'/s = 1.4 +/- 0.3, recently established by Aschwanden et al. suggests that the centroid of the acceleration region is located above the SXR-bright flare loop, as envisioned in cusp geometries (e.g., in magnetic reconnection models).

  17. Electron Bremsstrahlung Hard X-Ray Spectra, Electron Distributions and Energetics in the 2002 July 23 Solar Flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Sui, Lindhui; Schartz, Richard A.; Emslie, A. Gordon; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    We present and analyze the first high-resolution hard X-ray spectra from a solar flare observed in both X-ray/gamma-ray continuum and gamma-ray lines. The 2002 July 23 flare was observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). The spatially integrated photon flux spectra are well fitted between 10 and 300 keV by the combination of an isothermal component and a double power law. The flare plasma temperature peaks at 40 MK around the time of peak hard X-ray emission and remains above 20 MK 37 min later. We derive the evolution of the nonthermal mean electron flux distribution by directly fitting the RHESSI X-ray spectra with the thin-target bremsstrahlung from a double power-law electron distribution with a low-energy cutoff. We also derive the evolution of the electron flux distribution on the assumption that the emission is thick-target bremsstrahlung. We find that the injected nonthermal electrons are well described throughout the flare by this double power-law distribution with a low-energy cutoff that is typically between 20-40 keV. Using our thick-target results, we compare the energy contained in the nonthermal electrons with the energy content of the thermal flare plasma observed by RHESSI and GOES. We find that the minimum total energy deposited into the flare plasma by nonthermal electrons, 2.6 x 10(exp 31)erg, is on the order of and possibly less than the energy in the thermal plasma. However, these fits do not rule out the possibility that the energy in nonthermal electrons exceeds the energy in the thermal plasma.

  18. Electron Bremsstrahlung Hard X-Ray Spectra, Electron Distributions and Energetics in the 2002 July 23 Solar Flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.; Sui, L.; Schwartz, R. A.; Emslie, A. G.

    2003-01-01

    We present and analyze the first high-resolution hard X-ray spectra from a solar flare observed in both X-ray/gamma-ray continuum and gamma-ray lines. The 2002 July 23 flare was observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). The spatially integrated photon flux spectra are well fitted between 10 and 300 keV by the combination of an isothermal component and a double power law. The flare plasma temperature peaks at 40 MK around the time of peak hard X-ray emission and remains above 20 MK 37 min later. We derive the evolution of the nonthermal mean electron flux distribution by directly fitting the RHESSI X-ray spectra with the thin-target bremsstrahlung from a double power-law electron distribution with a low-energy cutoff. We also derive the evolution of the electron flux distribution on the assumption that the emission is thick-target bremsstrahlung. We find that the injected nonthermal electrons are well described throughout the flare by this double power-law distribution with a low-energy cutoff that is typically between 20 - 40 keV. Using our thick-target results, we compare the energy contained in the nonthermal electrons with the energy content of the thermal flare plasma observed by RHESSI and GOES. We find that the minimum total energy deposited into the flare plasma by nonthermal electrons, 2.6 x 10(exp 31) erg, is on the order of and possibly less than the energy in the thermal plasma. However, these fits do not rule out the possibility that the energy in nonthermal electrons exceeds the energy in the thermal plasma. This work was supported in part by the RHESSI Project and the NASA Sun-Earth Connection program.

  19. THE CRAB NEBULA SUPER-FLARE IN 2011 APRIL: EXTREMELY FAST PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND GAMMA-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Striani, E.; Tavani, M.; Cardillo, M; Piano, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Vittorini, V.; Trois, A.; Costa, E.; Argan, A.; De Paris, G.; Bulgarelli, A.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Weisskopf, M.; Tennant, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Caraveo, P.; Chen, A. W.

    2011-11-01

    We report on the extremely intense and fast gamma-ray flare above 100 MeV detected by AGILE from the Crab Nebula in mid-April 2011. This event is the fourth of a sequence of reported major gamma-ray flares produced by the Crab Nebula in the period 2007/mid-2011. These events are attributed to strong radiative and plasma instabilities in the inner Crab Nebula, and their properties are crucial for theoretical studies of fast and efficient particle acceleration up to 10{sup 15} eV. Here we study the very rapid flux and spectral evolution of the event that on 2011 April 16 reached the record-high peak flux of F = (26 {+-} 5) x 10{sup -6} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} with a rise-time timescale that we determine to be in the range 6-10 hr. The peak flaring gamma-ray spectrum reaches a distinct maximum near 500 MeV with no substantial emission above 1 GeV. The very rapid rise time and overall evolution of the Crab Nebula flare strongly constrain the acceleration mechanisms and challenge MHD models. We briefly discuss the theoretical implications of our observations.

  20. Search for accelerated electron anisotropy signatures based on observed polarization of the flaring loop microwave emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgachev, A. S.; Melnikov, V. F.; Kuznetsov, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    The distribution maps of the circular polarization degree and radio brightness have been analyzed for more than 40 flares based on the Nobeyama Radioheliograph data. It has been shown that the observed microwave emission is polarized in the ordinary mode in some flaring loop parts in six events. Based on a joint analysis of the photospheric magnetic field maps obtained from the HMI/SDO and MDI/SOHO magnetograph's and the radio emission dynamics in different source parts, it has been concluded that the ordinary mode predominance in all six selected events can be connected with implementation of the longitudinal pitch-angle anisotropy of emitting electrons.

  1. OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE OF ELECTRON-DRIVEN EVAPORATION IN TWO SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Ning, Z. J.; Zhang, Q. M.

    2015-11-01

    We have explored the relationship between hard X-ray (HXR) emissions and Doppler velocities caused by the chromospheric evaporation in two X1.6 class solar flares on 2014 September 10 and October 22, respectively. Both events display double ribbons and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph slit is fixed on one of their ribbons from the flare onset. The explosive evaporations are detected in these two flares. The coronal line of Fe xxi 1354.09 Å shows blueshifts, but the chromospheric line of C i 1354.29 Å shows redshifts during the impulsive phase. The chromospheric evaporation tends to appear at the front of the flare ribbon. Both Fe xxi and C i display their Doppler velocities with an “increase-peak-decrease” pattern that is well related to the “rising-maximum-decay” phase of HXR emissions. Such anti-correlation between HXR emissions and Fe xxi Doppler shifts and correlation with C i Doppler shifts indicate the electron-driven evaporation in these two flares.

  2. Evidence of electron acceleration around the reconnection X-point in a solar flare

    SciTech Connect

    Narukage, Noriyuki; Shimojo, Masumi; Sakao, Taro

    2014-06-01

    Particle acceleration is one of the most significant features that are ubiquitous among space and cosmic plasmas. It is most prominent during flares in the case of the Sun, with which huge amounts of electromagnetic radiation and high-energy particles are expelled into the interplanetary space through acceleration of plasma particles in the corona. Though it has been well understood that energies of flares are supplied by the mechanism called magnetic reconnection based on the observations in X-rays and EUV with space telescopes, where and how in the flaring magnetic field plasmas are accelerated has remained unknown due to the low plasma density in the flaring corona. We here report the first observational identification of the energetic non-thermal electrons around the point of the ongoing magnetic reconnection (X-point), with the location of the X-point identified by soft X-ray imagery and the localized presence of non-thermal electrons identified from imaging-spectroscopic data at two microwave frequencies. Considering the existence of the reconnection outflows that carries both plasma particles and magnetic fields out from the X-point, our identified non-thermal microwave emissions around the X-point indicate that the electrons are accelerated around the reconnection X-point. Additionally, the plasma around the X-point was also thermally heated up to 10 MK. The estimated reconnection rate of this event is ∼0.017.

  3. Effect of pre-flaring and file size on the accuracy of two electronic apex locators

    PubMed Central

    BRITO-JÚNIOR, Manoel; CAMILO, Carla Cristina; MOREIRA-JÚNIOR, Gil; PECORA, Jesus Djalma; SOUSA-NETO, Manoel Damião

    2012-01-01

    Objective This ex vivo study evaluated the effect of pre-flaring and file size on the accuracy of the Root ZX and Novapex electronic apex locators (EALs). Material and methods The actual working length (WL) was set 1 mm short of the apical foramen in the palatal root canals of 24 extracted maxillary molars. The teeth were embedded in an alginate mold, and two examiners performed the electronic measurements using #10, #15, and #20 K-files. The files were inserted into the root canals until the "0.0" or ''APEX'' signals were observed on the LED or display screens for the Novapex and Root ZX, respectively, retracting to the 1.0 mark. The measurements were repeated after the pre-flaring using the S1 and SX Pro-Taper instruments. Two measurements were performed for each condition and the means were used. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated to verify the intra- and inter-examiner agreement. The mean differences between the WL and electronic length values were analyzed by the three-way ANOVA test (p<0.05). Results ICCs were high (>0.8) and the results demonstrated a similar accuracy for both EALs (p>0.05). Statistically significant accurate measurements were verified in the pre-flared canals, except for the Novapex using a #20 K-file. Conclusions The tested EALs showed acceptable accuracy, whereas the pre-flaring procedure revealed a more significant effect than the used file size. PMID:23138740

  4. Evidence of Electron Acceleration around the Reconnection X-point in a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narukage, Noriyuki; Shimojo, Masumi; Sakao, Taro

    2016-05-01

    Particle acceleration is one of the most significant features that are ubiquitous among space and cosmic plasmas. It is most prominent during flares in the case of the Sun, with which huge amounts of electromagnetic radiation and high-energy particles are expelled into the interplanetary space through acceleration of plasma particles in the corona. Though it has been well understood that energies of flares are supplied by the mechanism called magnetic reconnection based on the observations in X-rays and EUV with space telescopes, where and how in the flaring magnetic field plasmas are accelerated has remained unknown due to the low plasma density in the flaring corona. We here report the first observational identification of the energetic non-thermal electrons around the point of the ongoing magnetic reconnection (X-point), with the location of the X-point identified by soft X-ray imagery and the localized presence of non-thermal electrons identified from imaging-spectroscopic data at two microwave frequencies. Considering the existence of the reconnection outflows that carries both plasma particles and magnetic fields out from the X-point, our identified non-thermal microwave emissions around the X-point indicate that the electrons are accelerated around the reconnection X-point.

  5. Electron density diagnostics in the 10-100 A interval for a solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. A.; Bruner, M. E.; Acton, L. W.; Mason, H. E.

    1986-01-01

    Electron density measurements from spectral-line diagnostics are reported for a solar flare on July 13, 1982, 1627 UT. The spectrogram, covering the 10-95 A interval, contained usable lines of helium-like ions C V, N VI, O VII, and Ne IX which are formed over the temperature interval 0.7-3.5 x 10 to the 6th K. In addition, spectral-line ratios of Si IX, Fe XIV, and Ca XV were compared with new theoretical estimates of their electron density sensitivity to obtain additional electron density diagnostics. An electron density of 3 x 10 to the 10th/cu cm was obtained. The comparison of these results from helium-like and other ions gives confidence in the utility of these tools for solar coronal analysis and will lead to a fuller understanding of the phenomena observed in this flare.

  6. The Atmospheric Response to High Nonthermal Electron Beam Fluxes in Solar Flares. I. Modeling the Brightest NUV Footpoints in the X1 Solar Flare of 2014 March 29

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Allred, Joel C.; Daw, Adrian; Cauzzi, Gianna; Carlsson, Mats

    2017-02-01

    The 2014 March 29 X1 solar flare (SOL20140329T17:48) produced bright continuum emission in the far- and near-ultraviolet (NUV) and highly asymmetric chromospheric emission lines, providing long-sought constraints on the heating mechanisms of the lower atmosphere in solar flares. We analyze the continuum and emission line data from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the brightest flaring magnetic footpoints in this flare. We compare the NUV spectra of the brightest pixels to new radiative-hydrodynamic predictions calculated with the RADYN code using constraints on a nonthermal electron beam inferred from the collisional thick-target modeling of hard X-ray data from Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. We show that the atmospheric response to a high beam flux density satisfactorily achieves the observed continuum brightness in the NUV. The NUV continuum emission in this flare is consistent with hydrogen (Balmer) recombination radiation that originates from low optical depth in a dense chromospheric condensation and from the stationary beam-heated layers just below the condensation. A model producing two flaring regions (a condensation and stationary layers) in the lower atmosphere is also consistent with the asymmetric Fe ii chromospheric emission line profiles observed in the impulsive phase.

  7. Energetic electrons from solar flares and associated type 3 radio bursts from metric to hectometric wave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1972-01-01

    Distinct Kev electron events as observed by satellites near the earth are, in general, associated with solar flares which are accompained by the emission of both metric and hectometric type 3 radio bursts. The positions of these flares are mainly on the western hemisphere of the sun. These results show that Kev electrons propagate under the control of the magnetic field in the interplanetary space and that, while propagating through this space, these electrons excite type 3 radio bursts from metric to hectometric wave frequencies. Emission characteristics of hectometric type 3 bursts are briefly considered in relation to the positions of associated flares.

  8. Faint Coronal Hard X-rays From Accelerated Electrons in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glesener, Lindsay Erin

    Solar flares are huge explosions on the Sun that release a tremendous amount of energy from the coronal magnetic field, up to 1033 ergs, in a short time (100--1000 seconds), with much of the energy going into accelerated electrons and ions. An efficient acceleration mechanism is needed, but the details of this mechanism remain relatively unknown. A fraction of this explosive energy reaches the Earth in the form of energetic particles, producing geomagnetic storms and posing dangers to spaceborne instruments, astronauts, and Earthbound power grids. There are thus practical reasons, as well as intellectual ones, for wishing to understand this extraordinary form of energy release. Through imaging spectroscopy of the hard X-ray (HXR) emission from solar flares, the behavior of flare-accelerated electrons can be studied. The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI ) spacecraft launched in 2002 with the goal of better understanding flare particle acceleration. Using rotation modulation collimators, RHESSI is able to cover a wide energy range (3 keV--17 MeV) with fine angular and energy resolutions. RHESSI's success in the last 10 years in investigating the relationship between energetic electrons and ions, the nature of faint sources in the corona, the energy distribution of flares, and several other topics have significantly advanced the understanding of flares. But along with the wealth of information revealed by RHESSI come some clear observational challenges. Very few, if any, RHESSI observations have come close to imaging the electron acceleration region itself. This is undoubtedly due to a lack of both sensitivity (HXRs from electron beams in the tenuous corona are faint) and dynamic range (HXR sources at chromospheric flare footpoints are much brighter and tend to obscure faint coronal sources). Greater sensitivity is also required to investigate the role that small flares in the quiet Sun could play in heating the corona. The Focusing Optics

  9. Energetic electron propagation in the decay phase of non-thermal flare emission

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jing; Yan, Yihua; Tsap, Yuri T.

    2014-06-01

    On the basis of the trap-plus-precipitation model, the peculiarities of non-thermal emission in the decay phase of solar flares have been considered. The calculation formulas for the escape rate of trapped electrons into the loss cone in terms of time profiles of hard X-ray (HXR) and microwave (MW) emission have been obtained. It has been found that the evolution of the spectral indices of non-thermal emission depend on the regimes of the pitch angle diffusion of trapped particles into the loss cone. The properties of non-thermal electrons related to the HXR and MW emission of the solar flare on 2004 November 3 are studied with Nobeyama Radioheliograph, Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters, RHESSI, and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite observations. The spectral indices of non-thermal electrons related to MW and HXR emission remained constant or decreased, while the MW escape rate as distinguished from that of the HXRs increased. This may be associated with different diffusion regimes of trapped electrons into the loss cone. New arguments in favor of an important role of the superstrong diffusion for high-energy electrons in flare coronal loops have been obtained.

  10. Fast magnetospheric echoes of energetic electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, K.; Bernstein, W.; Kellogg, P. J.; Whalen, B. A.

    1983-01-01

    Electron beam experiments using rocket-borne instrumentation confirmed earlier observations of fast magnetospheric echoes of artificially injected energetic electrons. A total of 234 echoes were observed in a pitch angle range from 9 to 110 deg at energies of 1.87 and 3.90 keV. Of these, 102 echoes could unambiguously be identified with known accelerator operations at 2, 4 or 8 keV energy and highest current levels resulting in the determination of transit times of typically 300 to 400 ms. In most cases, when echoes were present in both energy channels, the higher energy electrons led the lower energy ones by 50 to 70 ms. Adiabatic theory applied to these observations yields a reflection height of 3000 to 4000 km. The injection process is discussed as the strong beam-plasma interaction that occurred near the electron accelerator appears to be instrumental in generating the source of heated electrons required for successful echo detection.

  11. Energy transport by energetic electrons released during solar flares. II - Current filamentation and plasma heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Dulk, G. A.; Pritchett, P. L.

    1988-01-01

    Two-dimensional electrostatic particle simulations are performed in order to investigate energy transport associated with the propagation of energetic electrons through a flaring flux tube. Results indicate that as the energetic electrons flow outward, a return current of ambient plasma electrons is drawn inward (to maintain quasi-neutrality) which can be spatially separate from the primary current carried by the energetic electrons. Return current electrons are shown to accumulate on either side of the acceleration region of the energetic electrons, and depletions of ambient plasma electrons develop in the return current regions. Plasma ions accelerate across the field lines to produce current closure or charge neutralization, achieving energies comparable to those of the energetic electrons.

  12. Soft X-ray emission from electron-beam-heated solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mariska, John T.; Zarro, Dominic M.

    1991-01-01

    Using time-dependent numerical simulations and Solar Maximum Mission observations of a solar flare on 1985 January 23, a study is conducted of the ability of an electron-beam-heating model to reproduce the rise phase of a flare as observed in soft X-ray lines of Ca XIX. The electron beam is parameterized by a peak flux, a low-energy cutoff, and a spectral index, and has a time dependence similar to the observed hard X-ray burst. For a spectral index of 6, only models with a low-energy cutoff of 20 keV reproduce the observed peak emission in the Ca XIX line complex. All models with a low-energy cutoff of 15 keV produce too much emission, while all models with a 25-keV cutoff too little emission. None of the models reproduces the temporal behavior of the soft X-ray emission. The electron-beam-heated component is theorized to only represent a small fraction of the energy released in the impulsive phase of this flare.

  13. Electron acceleration in the turbulent reconnecting current sheets in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, G. P.; Huang, G. L.

    2009-07-01

    Context: We investigate the nonlinear evolution of the electron distribution in the presence of the strong inductive electric field in the reconnecting current sheets (RCS) of solar flares. Aims: We aim to study the characteristics of nonthermal electron-beam plasma instability and its influence on electron acceleration in RCS. Methods: Including the external inductive field, the one-dimensional Vlasov simulation is performed with a realistic mass ratio for the first time. Results: Our principal findings are as follows: 1) the Buneman instability can be quickly excited on the timescale of 10-7 s for the typical parameters of solar flares. After saturation, the beam-plasma instabilities are excited due to the non-Maxwellian electron distribution; 2) the final velocity of the electrons trapped by these waves is of the same order as the phase speed of the waves, while the untrapped electrons continue to be accelerated; 3) the inferred anomalous resistance of the current sheet and the energy conversion rate are basically of the same order as those previously estimated, e.g., “the analysis of Martens”. Conclusions: The Buneman instability is excited on the timescale of 10-7 s and the wave-particle resonant interaction limits the low-energy electrons to be further accelerated in RCS.

  14. The Role of Diffusion in the Transport of Energetic Electrons during Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Nicolas H.; Emslie, A. Gordon; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2017-02-01

    The transport of the energy contained in suprathermal electrons in solar flares plays a key role in our understanding of many aspects of flare physics, from the spatial distributions of hard X-ray emission and energy deposition in the ambient atmosphere to global energetics. Historically the transport of these particles has been largely treated through a deterministic approach, in which first-order secular energy loss to electrons in the ambient target is treated as the dominant effect, with second-order diffusive terms (in both energy and angle) generally being either treated as a small correction or even neglected. Here, we critically analyze this approach, and we show that spatial diffusion through pitch-angle scattering necessarily plays a very significant role in the transport of electrons. We further show that a satisfactory treatment of the diffusion process requires consideration of non-local effects, so that the electron flux depends not just on the local gradient of the electron distribution function but on the value of this gradient within an extended region encompassing a significant fraction of a mean free path. Our analysis applies generally to pitch-angle scattering by a variety of mechanisms, from Coulomb collisions to turbulent scattering. We further show that the spatial transport of electrons along the magnetic field of a flaring loop can be modeled rather effectively as a Continuous Time Random Walk with velocity-dependent probability distribution functions of jump sizes and occurrences, both of which can be expressed in terms of the scattering mean free path.

  15. Electron Beam Return-Current Losses in Solar Flares: Initial Comparison of Analytical and Numerical Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    Accelerated electrons play an important role in the energetics of solar flares. Understanding the process or processes that accelerate these electrons to high, nonthermal energies also depends on understanding the evolution of these electrons between the acceleration region and the region where they are observed through their hard X-ray or radio emission. Energy losses in the co-spatial electric field that drives the current-neutralizing return current can flatten the electron distribution toward low energies. This in turn flattens the corresponding bremsstrahlung hard X-ray spectrum toward low energies. The lost electron beam energy also enhances heating in the coronal part of the flare loop. Extending earlier work by Knight & Sturrock (1977), Emslie (1980), Diakonov & Somov (1988), and Litvinenko & Somov (1991), I have derived analytical and semi-analytical results for the nonthermal electron distribution function and the self-consistent electric field strength in the presence of a steady-state return-current. I review these results, presented previously at the 2009 SPD Meeting in Boulder, CO, and compare them and computed X-ray spectra with numerical results obtained by Zharkova & Gordovskii (2005, 2006). The phYSical significance of similarities and differences in the results will be emphasized. This work is supported by NASA's Heliophysics Guest Investigator Program and the RHESSI Project.

  16. Solar Flare Track Exposure Ages in Regolith Particles: A Calibration for Transmission Electron Microscope Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Eve L.; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2015-01-01

    Mineral grains in lunar and asteroidal regolith samples provide a unique record of their interaction with the space environment. Space weathering effects result from multiple processes including: exposure to the solar wind, which results in ion damage and implantation effects that are preserved in the rims of grains (typically the outermost 100 nm); cosmic ray and solar flare activity, which result in track formation; and impact processes that result in the accumulation of vapor-deposited elements, impact melts and adhering grains on particle surfaces. Determining the rate at which these effects accumulate in the grains during their space exposure is critical to studies of the surface evolution of airless bodies. Solar flare energetic particles (mainly Fe-group nuclei) have a penetration depth of a few millimeters and leave a trail of ionization damage in insulating materials that is readily observable by transmission electron microscope (TEM) imaging. The density of solar flare particle tracks is used to infer the length of time an object was at or near the regolith surface (i.e., its exposure age). Track measurements by TEM methods are routine, yet track production rate calibrations have only been determined using chemical etching techniques [e.g., 1, and references therein]. We used focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) sample preparation techniques combined with TEM imaging to determine the track density/exposure age relations for lunar rock 64455. The 64455 sample was used earlier by [2] to determine a track production rate by chemical etching of tracks in anorthite. Here, we show that combined FIB/TEM techniques provide a more accurate determination of a track production rate and also allow us to extend the calibration to solar flare tracks in olivine.

  17. Precision fast kickers for kiloampere electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G.J.; Chen, Y.J.; Weir, J.T.

    1999-10-06

    These kickers will be used to make fast dipoles and quadrupoles which are driven by sharp risetime pulsers to provide precision beam manipulations for high current kA electron beams. This technology will be used on the 2nd axis of the DARHT linac at LANL. It will be used to provide 4 micropulses of pulse width 20 to 120 nsec. selected from a 2 {micro}sec., 2kA, 20MeV macropulse. The fast pulsers will have amplitude modulation capability to compensate for beam-induced steering effects and other slow beam centroid motion to within the bandwidth of the kicker system. Scaling laws derived from theory will be presented along with extensive experimental data obtained on the test bed ETA-II.

  18. The passage of fast electrons through matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorini, Adam P.

    This work regards the passage of fast electrons through matter, and in particular how electrons scatter and lose energy within a solid. The basic quantum theory of these scattering processes was first considered in the early- to mid-20th century by Bohr, Bethe, Fermi, and others. This work extends our understanding of how a relativistic electron scatters off, and loses energy to, a complex many-body system. The main idea of this work is that it is now possible to calculate, from first-principles, the inelastic losses of relativistic electrons in condensed matter. We present ab initio calculations based on a real-space Green's function approach, implemented in the FEFF8 computer program[1]. Our work focuses on three topics: Relativistic stopping power and associated loss parameters, electron energy loss spectroscopy in high energy transmission electron microscopes, and the inelastic electron scattering mixed dynamic form factor. We calculate, for the first time, ab initio stopping powers and inelastic mean free paths in real materials. The stopping powers are calculated over a broad energy range, from ten eV to above ten MeV. We also present the first ab initio calculations of the "mean excitation energy". We develop a relativistic theory of inelastic electron scattering, based on ab initio calculations of dielectric response, and the generalized Lorenz gauge. Using our relativistic dielectric theory, we calculate the EELS magic angle ratio for boron nitride and for graphite. In these anisotropic materials we find large relativistic corrections to the magic angle for high energy electron microscopes. We also predict and calculate large deviations in the EELS magic angle from the relativistic vacuum predictions in the low energy-loss regime. Finally, we present calculations of mixed dynamic form factor.

  19. A THz spectrometer combining the free electron laser FLARE with 33 T magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozerov, M.; Bernáth, B.; Kamenskyi, D.; Redlich, B.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Christianen, P. C. M.; Engelkamp, H.; Maan, J. C.

    2017-02-01

    The free electron laser Free electron Laser for Advanced spectroscopy and high Resolution Experiments (FLARE) at the FELIX Laboratory generates powerful radiation in the frequency range of 0.3-3 THz. This light, in combination with 33 T Bitter magnets at the High Field Magnet Laboratory, provides the unique opportunity to perform THz magneto spectroscopy with light intensities many orders of magnitude higher than provided by conventional sources. The performance of the THz spectrometer is measured via high-field electron spin resonance (ESR) in the paramagnetic benchmark system 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). The narrow ESR linewidth of DPPH allows us to resolve a fine structure with 3 GHz spacing, demonstrating a considerable coherence of the individual THz micropulses of FLARE. The spectral resolution Δ ν / ν is better than 0.1%, which is an order of magnitude higher than typical values for a rf-linac based free electron laser. The observed coherence of the high power THz micropulses is a prerequisite for resonant control of matter, such as THz electron spin echo spectroscopy.

  20. Behaviour of Electron Content in the Ionospheric D-Region During Solar X-Ray Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorović Drakul, M.; Čadež, V. M.; Bajčetić, J.; Popović, L. Č.; Blagojević, D.; Nina, A.

    2016-12-01

    One of the most important parameters in ionospheric plasma research, also having a wide practical application in wireless satellite telecommunications, is the total electron content (TEC) representing the columnal electron number density. The F-region with high electron density provides the biggest contribution to TEC while the relatively weakly ionized plasma of the D-region (60 km - 90 km above Earth's surface) is often considered as a negligible cause of satellite signal disturbances. However, sudden intensive ionization processes, like those induced by solar X-ray flares, can cause relative increases of electron density that are significantly larger in the D-region than in regions at higher altitudes. Therefore, one cannot exclude a priori the D-region from investigations of ionospheric influences on propagation of electromagnetic signals emitted by satellites. We discuss here this problem which has not been sufficiently treated in literature so far. The obtained results are based on data collected from the D-region monitoring by very low frequency radio waves and on vertical TEC calculations from the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signal analyses, and they show noticeable variations in the D-region's electron content (TEC_{D) during activity of a solar X-ray flare (it rises by a factor of 136 in the considered case) when TEC_{D} contribution to TEC can reach several percent and which cannot be neglected in practical applications like global positioning procedures by satellites.

  1. Breaking the barrier to fast electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Demin, Soren; Hall, Elizabeth A H

    2009-09-01

    A study of the electron transfer for a non-glycosylated redox variant of GOx is reported, immobilised onto an electrode via a polyhistidine tag. The non-glycosylated variant allows the enzyme to be brought closer to the electrode, and within charge transfer distances predicted by Marcus' theory. The enzyme-electrode-hybrid shows direct very fast reversible electrochemical electron transfer, with a rate constant of approximately 350 s(-1) under anaerobic conditions. This is 2 orders of magnitude faster than the enzyme-free flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). These results are discussed in the context of the conformation of FAD in the active site of GOx. Further data, presented in the presence of oxygen, show a reduced electron transfer rate (approximately 160 s(-1)) that may be associated with the oxygen interaction with the histidines in the active site. These residues are implicated in the proton transfer mechanism and thus suggest that the presence of oxygen may have a profound effect in attenuating the direct electron transfer rate and thus moderating 'short-circuit' incidental electron transfer between proteins.

  2. Fast magnetospheric echoes of energetic electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, K.; Bernstein, W.; Kellogg, P. J.; Whalen, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    Electron beam experiments using rocketborne instrumentation have confirmed earlier observations of fast magnetospheric echoes of artificially injected energetic electrons. A total of 234 echoes have been observed in a pitch angle range from 9 to 110 deg at energies of 1.87 and 3.90 keV. Out of this number, 95 echoes could unambiguously be identified with known accelerator operations at 2-, 4-, or 8-keV energy and highest current levels resulting in the determination of transit times of typically 300 to 400 ms. In most cases, when echoes were present in both energy channels, the higher-energy electrons led the lower-energy ones by 50 to 70 ms. Adiabatic theory applied to these observations yields a reflection height of 3000 to 4000 km. An alternative interpretation is briefly examined, and its relative merit in describing the observations is evaluated. The injection process is discussed in some detail as the strong beam-plasma interaction that occurred near the electron accelerator appears to be instrumental in generating the source of heated electrons required for successful echo detection for both processes.

  3. Fast flexible electronics with strained silicon nanomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Han; Seo, Jung-Hun; Paskiewicz, Deborah M.; Zhu, Ye; Celler, George K.; Voyles, Paul M.; Zhou, Weidong; Lagally, Max G.; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2013-01-01

    Fast flexible electronics operating at radio frequencies (>1 GHz) are more attractive than traditional flexible electronics because of their versatile capabilities, dramatic power savings when operating at reduced speed and broader spectrum of applications. Transferrable single-crystalline Si nanomembranes (SiNMs) are preferred to other materials for flexible electronics owing to their unique advantages. Further improvement of Si-based device speed implies significant technical and economic advantages. While the mobility of bulk Si can be enhanced using strain techniques, implementing these techniques into transferrable single-crystalline SiNMs has been challenging and not demonstrated. The past approach presents severe challenges to achieve effective doping and desired material topology. Here we demonstrate the combination of strained- NM-compatible doping techniques with self-sustained-strain sharing by applying a strain-sharing scheme between Si and SiGe multiple epitaxial layers, to create strained print-transferrable SiNMs. We demonstrate a new speed record of Si-based flexible electronics without using aggressively scaled critical device dimensions. PMID:23416347

  4. Comparative Study of Non-Thermal Emissions and Electron Transport in a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minoshima, Takashi; Yokoyama, Takaaki; Masuda, Satoshi

    It is well known that a large amount of non-thermal electrons are produced in a solar flare. To understand their acceleration and transport mechanisms, hard X-ray (HXR) and microwave observations are the most powerful means. HXRs are emitted primarily by electrons with energy below several hundred keV via bremsstrahlung (Brown 1971), while microwaves are by electrons with energy above several hundred keV via gyrosynchrotron radiation (e.g., Ramaty 1969). Therefore these two sources of emissions provide information on electrons in two different energy ranges. A comparative study by using both HXR and microwave observations is useful for understanding the physics of electrons over a wide range of energies. We observed a solar flare occurred on 2003 May 29 with HXRs taken by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), and microwaves by the Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters (NoRP) and the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH). In particular, we focus on characteristics of higher energy (>100 keV) HXRs. They are emitted from both footpoints of the flare loop in the same manner as the lower energy (<100 keV) HXRs, while microwaves are emitted primarily at the top of the loop. On the other hand, we found that the time profile of the spectral index of the higher energy HXRs is more similar to that of the microwaves than to that of the lower energy HXRs. To understand the observed characteristics in terms of an energy-dependent transport effect of electrons, we develop a more general treatment of trap-plus-precipitation (TPP; Melrose and Brown, 1976) by using the gyro-averaged Fokker-Planck equation. We model the time evolution of the electron phase space distribution under the influence of Coulomb collisions and magnetic mirror, and then calculate the resulting HXR and microwave emissions for comparison with the observation. It is found that the TPP model in the weak diffusion regime well explains the observed characteristics. Further, we conclude from both the

  5. Quasi-periodic Acceleration of Electrons in the Flare on 2012 July 19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jing; Kontar, Eduard P.; Nakariakov, Valery M.; Gao, Guannan

    2016-11-01

    Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) of nonthermal emission in an M7.7 class flare on 2012 July 19 are investigated with spatially resolved observations at microwave and HXR bands and with spectral observations at decimetric, metric waves. Microwave emission at 17 GHz of two footpoints, HXR emission at 20-50 keV of the north footpoint and loop top, and type III bursts at 0.7-3 GHz show prominent in-phase oscillations at 270 s. The microwave emission of the loop leg has less pulsation but stronger emission. Through the estimation of plasma density around the loop top from EUV observations, we find that the local plasma frequency would be 1.5 GHz or even higher. Thus, type III bursts at 700 MHz originate above the loop top. Quasi-periodic acceleration or injection of energetic electrons is proposed to dominate these in-phase QPPs of nonthermal emission from footpoints, loop top, and above. In the overlying region, drifting pulsations (DPS) at 200-600 MHz oscillate at a distinct period (200 s). Its global structure drifts toward lower frequency, which is closely related to upward plasmoids observed simultaneously from EUV emission. Hence, nonthermal emission from overlying plasmoids and underlying flaring loops show different oscillating periods. Two individual systems of quasi-periodic acceleration of electrons are proposed to coincide in the bi-direction outflows from the reconnection region.

  6. Magnetic structure and nonthermal electrons in the X6.9 flare on 2011 August 9

    SciTech Connect

    Hwangbo, Jung-Eun; Lee, Dae-Young; Lee, Jeongwoo; Park, Sung-Hong; Kim, Sujin; Bong, Su-Chan; Kim, Yeon-Han; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Park, Young-Deuk

    2014-12-01

    The 2011 August 9 flare is one of the largest X-ray flares of sunspot cycle 24, but spatial information is rather limited due to its position close to the western limb. This paper presents information about the location of high-energy electrons derived from hard X-ray and microwave spectra obtained with the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Korean Solar Radio Burst Locator (KSRBL), respectively. The KSRBL microwave spectrum shows significant fluxes at low frequencies, implying that the high-energy electrons reside in a coronal volume highly concentrated at strong magnetic fields, and rapidly expanding with decreasing magnetic fields. After a simple modeling of the microwave spectrum, we found that the microwave source should be located above the inner pair of magnetic poles in a large quadrupolar configuration. The time-dependent evolution of the magnetic field distribution and total nonthermal energy derived from the microwave spectra is also consistent with the standard picture of multiple magnetic reconnections recurring at a magnetic null point that forms above the magnetic quadrupoles and moves up with time.

  7. Lower hybrid resonance acceleration of electrons and ions in solar flares and the associated microwave emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclements, K. G.; Bingham, R.; Su, J. J.; Dawson, J. M.; Spicer, D. S.

    1993-01-01

    The particle acceleration processes here studied are driven by the relaxation of unstable ion ring distributions; these produce strong wave activity at the lower hybrid resonance frequency which collapses, and forms energetic electron and ion tails. The results obtained are applied to the problem posed by the production of energetic particles by solar flares. The numerical simulation results thus obtained by a 2 1/2-dimensional particle-in-cell code show a simultaneous acceleration of electrons to 10-500 keV energies, and of ions to as much as the 1 MeV range; the energy of the latter is still insufficient to account for gamma-ray emission in the 4-6 MeV range, but furnish a seed population for further acceleration.

  8. IRIS, Hinode, SDO, and RHESSI Observations of a White Light Flare Produced Directly by Nonthermal Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyoung-Sun; Imada, Shinsuke; Watanabe, Kyoko; Bamba, Yumi; Brooks, David H.

    2017-02-01

    An X1.6 flare occurred in active region AR 12192 on 2014 October 22 at 14:02 UT and was observed by Hinode, IRIS, SDO, and RHESSI. We analyze a bright kernel that produces a white light (WL) flare with continuum enhancement and a hard X-ray (HXR) peak. Taking advantage of the spectroscopic observations of IRIS and Hinode/EIS, we measure the temporal variation of the plasma properties in the bright kernel in the chromosphere and corona. We find that explosive evaporation was observed when the WL emission occurred, even though the intensity enhancement in hotter lines is quite weak. The temporal correlation of the WL emission, HXR peak, and evaporation flows indicates that the WL emission was produced by accelerated electrons. To understand the WL emission process, we calculated the energy flux deposited by non-thermal electrons (observed by RHESSI) and compared it to the dissipated energy estimated from a chromospheric line (Mg ii triplet) observed by IRIS. The deposited energy flux from the non-thermal electrons is about (3–7.7) × 1010 erg cm‑2 s‑1 for a given low-energy cutoff of 30–40 keV, assuming the thick-target model. The energy flux estimated from the changes in temperature in the chromosphere measured using the Mg ii subordinate line is about (4.6–6.7) × 109 erg cm‑2 s‑1: ∼6%–22% of the deposited energy. This comparison of estimated energy fluxes implies that the continuum enhancement was directly produced by the non-thermal electrons.

  9. Flare Observations.

    PubMed

    Benz, Arnold O

    Solar flares are observed at all wavelengths from decameter radio waves to gamma-rays at 100 MeV. This review focuses on recent observations in EUV, soft and hard X-rays, white light, and radio waves. Space missions such as RHESSI, Yohkoh, TRACE, and SOHO have enlarged widely the observational base. They have revealed a number of surprises: Coronal sources appear before the hard X-ray emission in chromospheric footpoints, major flare acceleration sites appear to be independent of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), electrons, and ions may be accelerated at different sites, there are at least 3 different magnetic topologies, and basic characteristics vary from small to large flares. Recent progress also includes improved insights into the flare energy partition, on the location(s) of energy release, tests of energy release scenarios and particle acceleration. The interplay of observations with theory is important to deduce the geometry and to disentangle the various processes involved. There is increasing evidence supporting reconnection of magnetic field lines as the basic cause. While this process has become generally accepted as the trigger, it is still controversial how it converts a considerable fraction of the energy into non-thermal particles. Flare-like processes may be responsible for large-scale restructuring of the magnetic field in the corona as well as for its heating. Large flares influence interplanetary space and substantially affect the Earth's lower ionosphere. While flare scenarios have slowly converged over the past decades, every new observation still reveals major unexpected results, demonstrating that solar flares, after 150 years since their discovery, remain a complex problem of astrophysics including major unsolved questions.

  10. Evidence for beamed electrons in a limb X-ray flare observed by Hard X-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (HXIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haug, Eberhard; Elwert, Gerhard

    1986-01-01

    The limb flare of November 18, 1980, 14:51 UT, was investigated on the basis of X-ray images taken by the Hard X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (HXIS) and of X-ray spectra from the Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) aboard the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM). The impulsive burst was also recorded at microwave frequencies between 2 and 20 GHz whereas no optical flare and no radio event at frequencies below 1 GHz were reported. The flare occurred directly at the SW limb of the solar disk. Taking advantage of the spatial resolution of HXIS images, the time evolution of the X-radiation originating from relatively small source regions can be studied. Using Monte Carlo computations of the energy distribution of energetic electrons traversing the solar plasma, the bremsstrahlung spectra produced by the electrons were derived.

  11. The formation of kappa-distribution accelerated electron populations in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, Nicolas H.; Stackhouse, Duncan J.; Kontar, Eduard P.; Emslie, A. Gordon E-mail: d.stackhouse.1@research.gla.ac.uk E-mail: emslieg@wku.edu

    2014-12-01

    Driven by recent RHESSI observations of confined loop-top hard X-ray sources in solar flares, we consider stochastic acceleration of electrons in the presence of Coulomb collisions. If electron escape from the acceleration region can be neglected, the electron distribution function is determined by a balance between diffusive acceleration and collisions. Such a scenario admits a stationary solution for the electron distribution function that takes the form of a kappa distribution. We show that the evolution toward this kappa distribution involves a 'wave front' propagating forward in velocity space, so that electrons of higher energy are accelerated later; the acceleration timescales with energy according to τ{sub acc} ∼ E {sup 3/2}. At sufficiently high energies escape from the finite-length acceleration region will eventually dominate. For such energies, the electron velocity distribution function is obtained by solving a time-dependent Fokker-Planck equation in the 'leaky-box' approximation. Solutions are obtained in the limit of a small escape rate from an acceleration region that can effectively be considered a thick target.

  12. An investigation of solar flares and associated solar radio bursts impact on ionospheric total electron content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuyizere, Sarathiel

    2016-07-01

    Solar transients events such as Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and solar flares represent the cause of various aspects of space weather and can impact the modern man made technological system. Such solar transients are often associated with solar radio bursts (SRBs), particularly of type II and III that , at ground level can be detected by the CALLISTO (Compact Astronomical Low-frequency Low-cost Instrument for Spectroscopy and Transportable Observatories) solar spectrometer. The present study aims at investigating solar flares and associated SRBs impact on the ionospheric total electron content (TEC). SRBs data used are dynamic spectra covering the 2014-2015 period and detected by the CALLISTO instrument that is installed at the university of Rwanda, Kigali. To investigate ionospheric impact, we use TEC data from IGS stations located at almost the same universal time zone, and correlate the observed TEC changes to the corresponding observed solar bursts events. Preliminary observations resulting from this study indicate a slight enhancement in TEC during the burst event days. The observed TEC enhancement on the burst day can be associated to increased UV and X-rays radiations and particle acceleration that are associated with SRBs events. This work is a contribution to more understanding of the geo-space impact of solar transients phenomena for modeling and prediction.

  13. An investigation of solar flares and associated solar radio bursts on ionospheric total electron content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uwamahoro, Jean

    2016-07-01

    Solar transients events such as Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and solar flares represent are the cause of various aspects of space weather and can impact the modern man made technological system. Such solar transients are often associated with solar radio bursts (SRBs), particularly of type II and III that , at ground level can be detected by the CALLISTO (Compact Astronomical Low-frequency Low-cost Instrument for Spectroscopy and Transportable Observatories) solar spectrometer. The present study aims at investigating solar flares and associated SRBs impact on the ionospheric total electron content (TEC). SRBs data used are dynamic spectra covering the 2014-2015 period and detected by the CALLISTO instrument that is installed at the university of Rwanda, Kigali. To investigate ionospheric impact, we use TEC data from IGS stations located at almost the same universal time zone, and correlate the observed TEC changes to the corresponding observed solar bursts events. Preliminary observations resulting from this study indicate a slight enhancement in TEC during the burst event days. The observed TEC enhancement on the burst day can be associated to increased UV and X-rays radiations and particle acceleration that are associated with SRBs events. This work is a contribution to more understanding of the geo-space impact of solar transients phenomena for modeling and prediction.

  14. Stochastic Fermi acceleration of subrelativistic electrons and its role in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selkowitz, Robert; Blackman, Eric G.

    2004-11-01

    We re-examine stochastic Fermi acceleration (STFA) in the low-energy (Newtonian) regime in the context of solar flares. The particle energization rate depends on a dispersive term and on a coherent gain term. The energy dependence of pitch angle scattering is important for determining the electron energy spectrum. For scattering by whistler wave turbulence, STFA produces a quasi-thermal spectrum. A second well-constrained scattering mechanism is needed for STFA to match the observed 10-100 keV non-thermal spectrum. We suggest that STFA most plausibly acts as phase one of a two-phase particle acceleration engine in impulsive flares: STFA can match the thermal spectrum below 10 keV, and possibly the power-law spectrum between 10 and 100 keV, given the proper pitch angle scattering. However, a second phase, such as shock acceleration at loop tops, is probably required to match the spectrum above the observed knee at 100 keV. Understanding this knee, if it survives further observations, is tricky.

  15. Using Supra-Arcade Downflows as Probes of Electron Acceleration During Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Sabrina L.

    2011-01-01

    Extracting information from coronal features above flares has become more reliable with the availability of increasingly higher spatial and temporal-resolution data in recent decades. We are now able to sufficiently probe the region high above long-duration flaring active regions where reconnection is expected to be continually occurring. Flows in the supra-arcade region, first observed with Yohkoh/SXT, have been theorized to be associated with newly-reconnected outflowing loops. High resolution data appears to confirm these assertions. Assuming that these flows are indeed reconnection outflows, then the detection of those directed toward the solar surface (i.e. downflowing) should be associated with particle acceleration between the current sheet and the loop footpoints rooted in the chromosphere. RHESSI observations of highly energetic particles with respect to downflow detections could potentially constrain electron acceleration models. I will discuss measurements of these supra-arcade downflows (SADs) in relation to reconnection model parameters and present preliminary findings comparing the downflow timings with high-energy RHESSI lightcurves.

  16. Acceleration of electrons and ions by strong lower-hybrid turbulence in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spicer, D. S.; Bingham, R.; Su, J. J.; Shapiro, V. D.; Shevchenko, V.; Ma, S.; Dawson, J. M.; Mcclements, K. G.

    1994-01-01

    One of the outstanding problems in solar flare theory is how to explain the 10-20 keV and greater hard x-ray emissions by a thick target bremsstrahlung model. The model requires the acceleration mechanism to accelerate approximately 10(exp 35) electrons sec(exp -l) with comparable energies, without producing a large return current which persists for long time scales after the beam ceases to exist due to Lenz's law, thereby, producing a self-magnetic field of order a few mega-Gauss. In this paper, we investigate particle acceleration resulting from the relaxation of unstable ion ring distributions, producing strong wave activity at the lower hybrid frequency. It is shown that strong lower hybrid wave turbulence collapses in configuration space producing density cavities containing intense electrostatic lower hybrid wave activity. The collapse of these intense nonlinear wave packets saturate by particle acceleration producing energetic electron and ion tails. There are several mechanisms whereby unstable ion distributions could be formed in the solar atmosphere, including reflection at perpendicular shocks, tearing modes, and loss cone depletion. Numerical simulations of ion ring relaxation processes, obtained using a 2 1/2-D fully electromagnetic, relativistic particle in cell code are discussed. We apply the results to the problem of explaining energetic particle production in solar flares. The results show the simultaneous acceleration of both electrons and ions to very high energies: electrons are accelerated to energies in the range 10-500 keV, while ions are accelerated to energies of the order of MeVs, giving rise to x-ray emission and gamma-ray emission respectively. Our simulations also show wave generation at the electron cyclotron frequency. We suggest that these waves are the solar millisecond radio spikes. The strong turbulence collapse process leads to a highly filamented plasma producing many localized regions for particle acceleration and resulting in

  17. Signatures of the coalescence instability in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, H.; Tajima, T.; Brunel, F.

    1984-11-01

    Double sub-peak structures in the quasi periodic oscillations in the time profiles of solar flares in 1980 and 1982 are discussed. Computer simulations of the coalescence instability of two current loops agree with observations of the (widely differing) flares. The simultaneous accelerations of electrons and ions, and the double sub-peak structure in quasi periodic pulses are well explained. The double sub-peak structure is more pronounced when the currents in the two loops are sufficient for fast coalescence to occur. This corresponds to the 1980 flare. When the currents are insufficient for fast coalescence, the double sub-peak structure is less pronounced, as in the 1982 flare. Observations suggest the collision of the two microwave sources for the 1982 event. It is argued that this mechanism is a plausible particle acceleration mechanism in solar flares. (ESA)

  18. EMPIRICAL DETERMINATION OF THE ENERGY LOSS RATE OF ACCELERATED ELECTRONS IN A WELL-OBSERVED SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Torre, Gabriele; Pinamonti, Nicola; Guo, Jingnan; Piana, Michele; Emslie, A. Gordon; Massone, Anna Maria E-mail: pinamont@dima.unige.it E-mail: piana@dima.unige.it E-mail: annamaria.massone@cnr.it

    2012-06-01

    We present electron images of an extended solar flare source, deduced from RHESSI hard X-ray imaging spectroscopy data. We apply the electron continuity equation to these maps in order to determine empirically the form of the energy loss rate for the bremsstrahlung-emitting electrons. We show that this form is consistent with an energy transport model involving Coulomb collisions in a target with a temperature of about 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} K, with a continuous injection of fresh deka-keV electrons at a rate of approximately 10{sup -2} electrons s{sup -1} per ambient electron.

  19. Fast electron microscopy via compressive sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Kurt W; Anderson, Hyrum S; Wheeler, Jason W

    2014-12-09

    Various technologies described herein pertain to compressive sensing electron microscopy. A compressive sensing electron microscope includes a multi-beam generator and a detector. The multi-beam generator emits a sequence of electron patterns over time. Each of the electron patterns can include a plurality of electron beams, where the plurality of electron beams is configured to impart a spatially varying electron density on a sample. Further, the spatially varying electron density varies between each of the electron patterns in the sequence. Moreover, the detector collects signals respectively corresponding to interactions between the sample and each of the electron patterns in the sequence.

  20. Relativistic Electrons Produced by Reconnecting Electric Fields in a Laser-driven Bench-top Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, J. Y.; Lin, J.; Li, Y. T.; Wang, X.; Li, Y.; Zhang, K.; Yuan, D. W.; Ping, Y. L.; Wei, H. G.; Wang, J. Q.; Su, L. N.; Li, F.; Han, B.; Liao, G. Q.; Yin, C. L.; Fang, Y.; Yuan, X.; Wang, C.; Sun, J. R.; Liang, G. Y.; Wang, F. L.; Ding, Y. K.; He, X. T.; Zhu, J. Q.; Sheng, Z. M.; Li, G.; Zhao, G.; Zhang, J.

    2016-08-01

    Laboratory experiments have been carried out to model the magnetic reconnection process in a solar flare with powerful lasers. Relativistic electrons with energy up to megaelectronvolts are detected along the magnetic separatrices bounding the reconnection outflow, which exhibit a kappa-like distribution with an effective temperature of ˜109 K. The acceleration of non-thermal electrons is found to be more efficient in the case with a guide magnetic field (a component of a magnetic field along the reconnection-induced electric field) than in the case without a guide field. Hardening of the spectrum at energies ≥500 keV is observed in both cases, which remarkably resembles the hardening of hard X-ray and γ-ray spectra observed in many solar flares. This supports a recent proposal that the hardening in the hard X-ray and γ-ray emissions of solar flares is due to a hardening of the source-electron spectrum. We also performed numerical simulations that help examine behaviors of electrons in the reconnection process with the electromagnetic field configurations occurring in the experiments. The trajectories of non-thermal electrons observed in the experiments were well duplicated in the simulations. Our numerical simulations generally reproduce the electron energy spectrum as well, except for the hardening of the electron spectrum. This suggests that other mechanisms such as shock or turbulence may play an important role in the production of the observed energetic electrons.

  1. Enhancement of fast electron energy deposition by external magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honrubia, J. J.; Murakami, M.; Mima, K.; Johzaki, T.; Sunahara, A.; Nagatomo, H.; Fujioka, S.; Shiraga, H.; Azechi, H.

    2016-03-01

    Recently, generation of external magnetic fields of a few kT has been reported [Fujioka et al. Scientific Reports 2013 3 1170]. These fields can be used in fast ignition to mitigate the large fast electron divergence. In this summary, two fast ignition applications are briefly outlined. The first one deals with electron guiding by external B-fields applied at the end of the shell implosion of a re-entrant cone target. Preliminary results show that the B-field strength at the time of peak ρR may be sufficiently high for fast electron guiding. The second application deals with guiding of fast electrons in magnetized wires surrounded by plasma. Results show a significant enhancement of electron energy deposition at the end of the wire, which is particularly important for low-Z wires.

  2. On the Solution of the Continuity Equation for Precipitating Electrons in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. Gordon; Holman, Gordon D.; Litvinenko, Yuri E.

    2014-01-01

    Electrons accelerated in solar flares are injected into the surrounding plasma, where they are subjected to the influence of collisional (Coulomb) energy losses. Their evolution is modeled by a partial differential equation describing continuity of electron number. In a recent paper, Dobranskis & Zharkova claim to have found an "updated exact analytical solution" to this continuity equation. Their solution contains an additional term that drives an exponential decrease in electron density with depth, leading them to assert that the well-known solution derived by Brown, Syrovatskii & Shmeleva, and many others is invalid. We show that the solution of Dobranskis & Zharkova results from a fundamental error in the application of the method of characteristics and is hence incorrect. Further, their comparison of the "new" analytical solution with numerical solutions of the Fokker-Planck equation fails to lend support to their result.We conclude that Dobranskis & Zharkova's solution of the universally accepted and well-established continuity equation is incorrect, and that their criticism of the correct solution is unfounded. We also demonstrate the formal equivalence of the approaches of Syrovatskii & Shmeleva and Brown, with particular reference to the evolution of the electron flux and number density (both differential in energy) in a collisional thick target. We strongly urge use of these long-established, correct solutions in future works.

  3. On the solution of the continuity equation for precipitating electrons in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Emslie, A. Gordon; Holman, Gordon D.; Litvinenko, Yuri E. E-mail: gordon.d.holman@nasa.gov

    2014-09-01

    Electrons accelerated in solar flares are injected into the surrounding plasma, where they are subjected to the influence of collisional (Coulomb) energy losses. Their evolution is modeled by a partial differential equation describing continuity of electron number. In a recent paper, Dobranskis and Zharkova claim to have found an 'updated exact analytical solution' to this continuity equation. Their solution contains an additional term that drives an exponential decrease in electron density with depth, leading them to assert that the well-known solution derived by Brown, Syrovatskii and Shmeleva, and many others is invalid. We show that the solution of Dobranskis and Zharkova results from a fundamental error in the application of the method of characteristics and is hence incorrect. Further, their comparison of the 'new' analytical solution with numerical solutions of the Fokker-Planck equation fails to lend support to their result. We conclude that Dobranskis and Zharkova's solution of the universally accepted and well-established continuity equation is incorrect, and that their criticism of the correct solution is unfounded. We also demonstrate the formal equivalence of the approaches of Syrovatskii and Shmeleva and Brown, with particular reference to the evolution of the electron flux and number density (both differential in energy) in a collisional thick target. We strongly urge use of these long-established, correct solutions in future works.

  4. Electron Acceleration in Pulsar-wind Termination Shocks: An Application to the Crab Nebula Gamma-Ray Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroon, John J.; Becker, Peter A.; Finke, Justin D.; Dermer, Charles D.

    2016-12-01

    The γ-ray flares from the Crab Nebula observed by AGILE and Fermi-LAT reaching GeV energies and lasting several days challenge the standard models for particle acceleration in pulsar-wind nebulae because the radiating electrons have energies exceeding the classical radiation-reaction limit for synchrotron. Previous modeling has suggested that the synchrotron limit can be exceeded if the electrons experience electrostatic acceleration, but the resulting spectra do not agree very well with the data. As a result, there are still some important unanswered questions about the detailed particle acceleration and emission processes occurring during the flares. We revisit the problem using a new analytical approach based on an electron transport equation that includes terms describing electrostatic acceleration, stochastic wave-particle acceleration, shock acceleration, synchrotron losses, and particle escape. An exact solution is obtained for the electron distribution, which is used to compute the associated γ-ray synchrotron spectrum. We find that in our model the γ-ray flares are mainly powered by electrostatic acceleration, but the contributions from stochastic and shock acceleration play an important role in producing the observed spectral shapes. Our model can reproduce the spectra of all the Fermi-LAT and AGILE flares from the Crab Nebula, using magnetic field strengths in agreement with the multi-wavelength observational constraints. We also compute the spectrum and duration of the synchrotron afterglow created by the accelerated electrons, after they escape into the region on the downstream side of the pulsar-wind termination shock. The afterglow is expected to fade over a maximum period of about three weeks after the γ-ray flare.

  5. Electron Cyclotron Maser Emissions from Evolving Fast Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J. F.; Wu, D. J.; Chen, L.; Zhao, G. Q.; Tan, C. M.

    2016-05-01

    Fast electron beams (FEBs) are common products of solar active phenomena. Solar radio bursts are an important diagnostic tool for understanding FEBs and the solar plasma environment in which they propagate along solar magnetic fields. In particular, the evolution of the energy spectrum and velocity distribution of FEBs due to the interaction with the ambient plasma and field during propagation can significantly influence the efficiency and properties of their emissions. In this paper, we discuss the possible evolution of the energy spectrum and velocity distribution of FEBs due to energy loss processes and the pitch-angle effect caused by magnetic field inhomogeneity, and we analyze the effects of the evolution on electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) emission, which is one of the most important mechanisms for producing solar radio bursts by FEBs. Our results show that the growth rates all decrease with the energy loss factor Q, but increase with the magnetic mirror ratio σ as well as with the steepness index δ. Moreover, the evolution of FEBs can also significantly influence the fastest growing mode and the fastest growing phase angle. This leads to the change of the polarization sense of the ECM emission. In particular, our results also reveal that an FEB that undergoes different evolution processes will generate different types of ECM emission. We believe the present results to be very helpful for a more comprehensive understanding of the dynamic spectra of solar radio bursts.

  6. Elongation of Flare Ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jiong; Longcope, Dana W.; Cassak, Paul A.; Priest, Eric R.

    2017-03-01

    We present an analysis of the apparent elongation motion of flare ribbons along the polarity inversion line (PIL), as well as the shear of flare loops in several two-ribbon flares. Flare ribbons and loops spread along the PIL at a speed ranging from a few to a hundred km s‑1. The shear measured from conjugate footpoints is consistent with the measurement from flare loops, and both show the decrease of shear toward a potential field as a flare evolves and ribbons and loops spread along the PIL. Flares exhibiting fast bidirectional elongation appear to have a strong shear, which may indicate a large magnetic guide field relative to the reconnection field in the coronal current sheet. We discuss how the analysis of ribbon motion could help infer properties in the corona where reconnection takes place.

  7. IMPULSIVITY PARAMETER FOR SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Fajardo-Mendieta, W. G.; Alvarado-Gómez, J. D.; Calvo-Mozo, B.; Martinez-Oliveros, J. C. E-mail: bcalvom@unal.edu.co E-mail: jalvarad@eso.org

    2016-02-10

    Three phases are typically observed during solar flares: the preflare, impulsive, and decay phases. During the impulsive phase, it is believed that the electrons and other particles are accelerated after the stored energy in the magnetic field is released by reconnection. The impulsivity of a solar flare is a quantifiable property that shows how quickly this initial energy release occurs. It is measured via the impulsivity parameter, which we define as the inverse of the overall duration of the impulsive phase. We take the latter as the raw width of the most prominent nonthermal emission of the flare. We computed this observable over a work sample of 48 M-class events that occurred during the current Solar Cycle 24 by using three different methods. The first method takes into account all of the nonthermal flare emission and gives very accurate results, while the other two just cover fixed energy intervals (30–40 keV and 25–50 keV) and are useful for fast calculations. We propose an alternative way to classify solar flares according to their impulsivity parameter values, defining three different types of impulsivity, namely, high, medium, and low. This system of classification is independent of the manner used to calculated the impulsivity parameter. Lastly, we show the relevance of this tool as a discriminator of different HXR generation processes.

  8. Strong shock generation by fast electron energy deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, T. E.; Pasley, J.; Robinson, A. P. L.

    2013-12-15

    It has been suggested that fast electrons may play a beneficial role in the formation of the ignitor shock in shock ignition owing to the high areal density of the fuel at the time of the ignitor pulse. In this paper, we extend previous studies which have focused on monoenergetic electron sources to populations with extended energy distributions. In good agreement with analytic scalings, we show that strong shocks can be produced with peak pressures of a few hundred Mbar to over 1 Gbar using fast electron intensities of 1–10 PW/cm{sup 2} in a uniform deuterium-tritium plasma at 10 g/cm{sup 3}. However, the length required for shock formation increases with fast electron temperature. As this shock formation distance becomes comparable to the target size, the shock is not able to fully develop, and this implies a limit on the ability of fast electrons to aid shock formation.

  9. Stopping and transport of fast electrons in superdense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Okabayashi, A.; Habara, H.; Yabuuchi, T.; Iwawaki, T.; Tanaka, K. A.

    2013-08-15

    Studied is the stopping and transport of relativistic fast electrons in the vicinity of compressed dense plasma core relevant to fast ignition. Electromagnetic cascade Monte-Carlo is coupled to 2D-PIC simulation. The 2D PIC simulates input electron energy spectrum and angular dependence. The electron energy distributions after passing through the plasma core are calculated at different viewing angles, which well agree with the experiment below several MeV energy range. The implications of calculated results as to collisional damping on several MeV electrons are discussed with the theory based on the stopping power model. The spatial distribution of plasma temperature is also estimated via deposited energy by fast electrons, showing the strong heating at the core surface.

  10. On the sensitivity of the goes flare classification to properties of the electron beam in the thick-target model

    SciTech Connect

    Reep, J. W.; Bradshaw, S. J.; McAteer, R. T. J. E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu

    2013-11-20

    The collisional thick-target model, wherein a large number of electrons are accelerated down a flaring loop, can be used to explain many observed properties of solar flares. In this study, we focus on the sensitivity of (GOES) flare classification to the properties of the thick-target model. Using a hydrodynamic model with RHESSI-derived electron beam parameters, we explore the effects of the beam energy flux (or total non-thermal energy), the cut-off energy, and the spectral index of the electron distribution on the soft X-rays observed by GOES. We conclude that (1) the GOES class is proportional to the non-thermal energy E {sup α} for α ≈ 1.7 in the low-energy passband (1-8 Å) and ≈1.6 in the high-energy passband (0.5-4 Å); (2) the GOES class is only weakly dependent on the spectral index in both passbands; (3) increases in the cut-off will increase the flux in the 0.5-4 Å passband but decrease the flux in the 1-8 Å passband, while decreases in the cut-off will cause a decrease in the 0.5-4 Å passband and a slight increase in the 1-8 Å passband.

  11. Fast wire scanner for intense electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T.; Agladze, N. I.; Bazarov, I. V.; Bartnik, A.; Dobbins, J.; Dunham, B.; Full, S.; Li, Y.; Liu, X.; Savino, J.; Smolenski, K.

    2014-02-01

    We have developed a cost-effective, fast rotating wire scanner for use in accelerators where high beam currents would otherwise melt even carbon wires. This new design uses a simple planetary gear setup to rotate a carbon wire, fixed at one end, through the beam at speeds in excess of 20 m/s. We present results from bench tests, as well as transverse beam profile measurements taken at Cornell's high-brightness energy recovery linac photoinjector, for beam currents up to 35 mA.

  12. Fast wave direct electron heating in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, M.; Jaeger, E.F.; Rimini, F.G.; Rasmussen, D.A.; Stevens, J.E.; Wilson, J.R.; Batchelor, D.B.; Bell, M.; Budny, R.; Fredrickson, E.; Goldfinger, R.C.; Hammett, G.; Hoffman, D.J.; Hosea, J.C.; Janos, A.; Majeski, R.; Mansfield, D.; Phillips, C.K.; Rogers, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Taylor, G.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1993-05-01

    Direct electron heating experiments were carried out in two regimes: B{sub T} = 4.6 T with D{sup +} supershots; and B{sub T} = 2.3 T with {sup 3}He majority. The electron power deposition profiles measured with modulation of RF power are found to be strongly peaked in the core with the total volume-integrated power of up to 80% of the modulated power. The magnitude and profile shape agree well with those predicted by a full-wave code.

  13. Solar Flare Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-20

    terms of basic solar flare mechanisms. It was shown that Che basic process by which the X-ray radiation of flares is created is by heating the flare...plasma to temperatures of about ten million degrees, through evaporation of the chromosphere. This process is driven both by beams of accelerated electrons...transfer of energy and momentum from the primary energy.release site in the corona. it is important to understand the basic physical processes that carry

  14. Investigation on Radio-Quiet and Radio-Loud Fast CMEs and Their Associated Flares During Solar Cycles 23 and 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, K.; Shanmugaraju, A.

    2015-03-01

    We present the results of a detailed analysis on the differences between radio-loud (RL) and radio-quiet (RQ) fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) ( V≥900 km s-1) observed during the period 1996 - 2012. The analysis consists of three different steps in which we examined the properties of (i) RL and RQ CMEs, (ii) accelerating (class-A) and decelerating (class-D) CMEs among RL and RQ CMEs, and (iii) associated flares. The last two steps and events from a longer period are the extensions of the earlier work on RL and RQ CMEs that mainly aimed to determine the reason for the radio-quietness of some fast CMEs. During this period, we found that 38 % of fast CMEs are RL and 62 % of fast CMEs are RQ. Moreover, fewer RQ CMEs occur around the disc centre. The average speeds of RL and RQ CMEs are 1358 km s-1 and 1092 km s-1. Around 10 % of the RQ events are halo CMEs, but ≈ 66 % of RL events are halo CMEs. The mean acceleration or deceleration value of RL-CMEs is slightly greater than that of RQ-CMEs. When we divide these events based on their acceleration behaviour into class A and class D, there are no considerable differences between classes A and D of RL-CMEs or between classes A and D of RQ CMEs, except for their initial acceleration values. But there are significant differences among their associated flare properties. According to our study here, the RQ CMEs are less energetic than RL CMEs, and they are not associated with flares as strong as those associated with RL CMEs. This confirms the previous results that RQ CMEs do not often exceed the critical Alfvén speed of 1000 km s-1 in the outer corona that is needed to produce type II radio bursts.

  15. Statistical analysis of the dynamics of secondary electrons in the flare of a high-voltage beam-type discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Demkin, V. P.; Mel'nichuk, S. V.

    2014-09-15

    In the present work, results of investigations into the dynamics of secondary electrons with helium atoms in the presence of the reverse electric field arising in the flare of a high-voltage pulsed beam-type discharge and leading to degradation of the primary electron beam are presented. The electric field in the discharge of this type at moderate pressures can reach several hundred V/cm and leads to considerable changes in the kinetics of secondary electrons created in the process of propagation of the electron beam generated in the accelerating gap with a grid anode. Moving in the accelerating electric field toward the anode, secondary electrons create the so-called compensating current to the anode. The character of electron motion and the compensating current itself are determined by the ratio of the field strength to the concentration of atoms (E/n). The energy and angular spectra of secondary electrons are calculated by the Monte Carlo method for different ratios E/n of the electric field strength to the helium atom concentration. The motion of secondary electrons with threshold energy is studied for inelastic collisions of helium atoms and differential analysis is carried out of the collisional processes causing energy losses of electrons in helium for different E/n values. The mechanism of creation and accumulation of slow electrons as a result of inelastic collisions of secondary electrons with helium atoms and selective population of metastable states of helium atoms is considered. It is demonstrated that in a wide range of E/n values the motion of secondary electrons in the beam-type discharge flare has the character of drift. At E/n values characteristic for the discharge of the given type, the drift velocity of these electrons is calculated and compared with the available experimental data.

  16. Fast Waves and Electron Current Drive in the Irvine Torus.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, Robert Croft

    This work reports the results of experimental studies of the fast wave with frequencies near the mean gyro-frequency (omega ~ ~ (omega _{rm ci}omega_{ rm ce})^{1/2}) in magnetized, toroidal plasmas with comparison to theory. Experiments investigating fast wave dispersion and damping, and the use of unidirectional fast waves to drive steady-state electron currents were performed on the Irvine Torus. The wave was excited in the plasmas by a phased array antenna which allowed launching of uni - or bi-directional fast waves around the torus. Probe measurements of the angle of propagation of wave energy, radial wavelengths, and the direction and magnitude of radial wave phase velocities were found to be in good agreement with predictions from cold plasma theory. Measurements of fast wave damping showed the observed damping lengths to be anomalously short when compared to predictions for electron Landau damping, transit-time magnetic pumping, and collisional damping, but may be explained by effects due to fast wave scattering from drift wave density fluctuations. Steady-state electron currents were driven by uni-directional fast waves. Low power experiments (< 25W) generated up to 1.3 A of electron current with a peak efficiency of eta = INR _{rm o}/P ~eq 6 times 10^{-2}A/W (10 ^{13}cm^{-3 }) m. Up to 14% of the wave energy was converted to poloidal magnetic field energy. The maximum current observed was found to be in rough agreement with a prediction from quasi-linear theory. Electron currents generated by application of radio-frequency power applied to a loop coupler antenna designed to excite the fast wave were observed in the Princeton Large Torus.

  17. DETERMINATION OF LOW-ENERGY CUTOFFS AND TOTAL ENERGY OF NONTHERMAL ELECTRONS IN A SOLAR FLARE ON 2002 APRIL 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, Linhui; Holman, Gordon D.; Dennis, Brian R.

    2005-01-01

    The determination of the low-energy cutoff to the spectrum of accelerated electrons is decisive for the estimation of the total nonthermal energy in solar flares. Because thermal bremsstrahlung dominates the low-energy part of flare X-ray spectra, this cutoff energy is difficult to determine with spectral fitting alone. We have used anew method that combines spatial, spectral, and temporal analysis to determine the cutoff energy for the M1.2 flare observed with RHESSI on 2002 April 15. A low-energy cutoff of 24 +/- 2 keV is required to ensure that the assumed thermal emissions always dominate over nonthermal emissions at low energies (<20 keV) and that the spectral fitting results are consistent with the RHESSI light curves and images. With this cutoff energy, we obtain a total nonthermal energy in electrons of (1.6 +/- 1) x 10(exp 30) ergs that is comparable to the peak energy in the thermal plasma, estimated from RHESSI observations to be (6 +/- 0.6) x 10(exp 29) ergs assuming a filling factor of 1.

  18. MULTITHERMAL REPRESENTATION OF THE KAPPA-DISTRIBUTION OF SOLAR FLARE ELECTRONS AND APPLICATION TO SIMULTANEOUS X-RAY AND EUV OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, Marina; Motorina, Galina; Kontar, Eduard P. E-mail: eduard.kontar@glasgow.ac.uk

    2015-12-10

    Acceleration of particles and plasma heating is one of the fundamental problems in solar flare physics. An accurate determination of the spectrum of flare-energized electrons over a broad energy range is crucial for our understanding of aspects such as the acceleration mechanism and the total flare energy. Recent years have seen a growing interest in the kappa-distribution as a representation of the total spectrum of flare-accelerated electrons. In this work we present the kappa-distribution as a differential emission measure. This allows for inferring the electron distribution from X-ray observations and EUV observations by simultaneously fitting the proposed function to RHESSI and SDO/AIA data. This yields the spatially integrated electron spectra of a coronal source from less than 0.1 keV up to several tens of keV. The method is applied to a single-loop GOES C4.1 flare. The results show that the total energy can only be determined accurately by combining RHESSI and AIA observations. Simultaneously fitting the proposed representation of the kappa-distribution reduces the electron number density in the analyzed flare by a factor of ∼30 and the total flare energy by a factor of ∼5 compared with the commonly used fitting of RHESSI spectra. The spatially integrated electron spectrum of the investigated flare between 0.043 and 24 keV is consistent with the combination of a low-temperature (∼2 MK) component and a hot (∼11 MK) kappa-like component with spectral index 4, reminiscent of solar wind distributions.

  19. An upper limit on the hardness of the nonthermal electron spectra produced during the flash phase of solar flares.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, S. R.

    1971-01-01

    The observations of impulsive solar-flare X-rays above 10 keV made with OGO-5 satellite have been analyzed in order to study the variation of the nonthermal electron spectrum from one flare to another. The X-ray spectrum at the maxima of 129 impulsive X-ray bursts is represented by KE to the minus-gamma power photons per sq cm per sec per keV, and the frequency of occurrence of bursts with different values of gamma is studied. It is found that for gamma less than 4.0 the frequency of bursts rapidly decreases with the decrease in the value of gamma. The probability of occurrence of a burst with gamma less than 2.3 is extremely small.

  20. Fast electron generation and transport in a turbulent, magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Stoneking, Matthew Randall

    1994-05-01

    The nature of fast electron generation and transport in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed field pinch (RFP) is investigated using two electron energy analyzer (EEA) probes and a thermocouple calorimeter. The parallel velocity distribution of the fast electron population is well fit by a drifted Maxwellian distribution with temperature of about 100 eV and drift velocity of about 2 x 106 m/s. Cross-calibration of the EEA with the calorimeter provides a measurement of the fast electron perpendicular temperature of 30 eV, much lower than the parallel temperature, and is evidence that the kinetic dynamo mechanism (KDT) is not operative in MST. The fast electron current is found to match to the parallel current at the edge, and the fast electron density is about 4 x 1011 cm-3 independent of the ratio of the applied toroidal electric field to the critical electric field for runaways. First time measurements of magnetic fluctuation induced particle transport are reported. By correlating electron current fluctuations with radial magnetic fluctuations the transported flux of electrons is found to be negligible outside r/a~0.9, but rises the level of the expected total particle losses inside r/a~0.85. A comparison of the measured diffusion coefficient is made with the ausilinear stochastic diffusion coefficient. Evidence exists that the reduction of the transport is due to the presence of a radial ambipolar electric field of magnitude 500 V/m, that acts to equilibrate the ion and electron transport rates. The convective energy transport associated with the measured particle transport is large enough to account for the observed magnetic fluctuation induced energy transport in MST.

  1. The 100-month Swift catalogue of supergiant fast X-ray transients. I. BAT on-board and transient monitor flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, P.; Krimm, H. A.; Palmer, D. M.; Ducci, L.; Esposito, P.; Vercellone, S.; Evans, P. A.; Guidorzi, C.; Mangano, V.; Kennea, J. A.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Burrows, D. N.; Gehrels, N.

    2014-02-01

    Context. Supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs) are high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) that are defined by their hard X-ray flaring behaviour. During these flares they reach peak luminosities of 1036-1037 erg s-1 for a few hours (in the hard X-ray), which are much shorter timescales than those characterizing Be/X-ray binaries. Aims: We investigate the characteristics of bright flares (detections in excess of 5σ) for a sample of SFXTs and their relation to the orbital phase. Methods: We have retrieved all Swift/BAT Transient Monitor light curves and collected all detections in excess of 5σ from both daily- and orbital-averaged light curves in the time range of 2005 February 12 to 2013 May 31 (MJD 53 413-56 443). We also considered all on-board detections as recorded in the same time span and selected those in excess of 5σ and within 4 arcmin of each source in our sample. Results: We present a catalogue of over a thousand BAT flares from 11 SFXTs, down to 15-150 keV fluxes of ~6 × 10-10 erg cm-2 s-1 (daily timescale) and ~1.5 × 10-9 erg cm-2 s-1 (orbital timescale, averaging ~800 s); the great majority of these flares are unpublished. The catalogue spans 100 months. This population is characterized by short (a few hundred seconds) and relatively bright (in excess of 100 mCrab, 15-50 keV) events. In the hard X-ray, these flares last generally much less than a day. Clustering of hard X-ray flares can be used to indirectly measure the length of an outburst, even when the low-level emission is not detected. We construct the distributions of flares, of their significance (in terms of σ), and of their flux as a function of orbital phase to infer the properties of these binary systems. In particular, we observe a trend of clustering of flares at some phases as Porb increases, which is consistent with a progression from tight circular or mildly eccentric orbits at short periods to wider and more eccentric orbits at longer orbital periods. Finally, we estimate the

  2. Electron acceleration in a flare plasma via coronal circuits. (German Title: Elektronenbeschleunigung im Flareplasma modelliert mit koronalen Schaltkreisen)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Önel, Hakan

    2008-08-01

    The Sun is a star, which due to its proximity has a tremendous influence on Earth. Since its very first days mankind tried to "understand the Sun", and especially in the 20th century science has uncovered many of the Sun's secrets by using high resolution observations and describing the Sun by means of models. As an active star the Sun's activity, as expressed in its magnetic cycle, is closely related to the sunspot numbers. Flares play a special role, because they release large energies on very short time scales. They are correlated with enhanced electromagnetic emissions all over the spectrum. Furthermore, flares are sources of energetic particles. Hard X-ray observations (e.g., by NASA's RHESSI spacecraft) reveal that a large fraction of the energy released during a flare is transferred into the kinetic energy of electrons. However the mechanism that accelerates a large number of electrons to high energies (beyond 20 keV) within fractions of a second is not understood yet. The thesis at hand presents a model for the generation of energetic electrons during flares that explains the electron acceleration based on real parameters obtained by real ground and space based observations. According to this model photospheric plasma flows build up electric potentials in the active regions in the photosphere. Usually these electric potentials are associated with electric currents closed within the photosphere. However as a result of magnetic reconnection, a magnetic connection between the regions of different magnetic polarity on the photosphere can establish through the corona. Due to the significantly higher electric conductivity in the corona, the photospheric electric power supply can be closed via the corona. Subsequently a high electric current is formed, which leads to the generation of hard X-ray radiation in the dense chromosphere. The previously described idea is modelled and investigated by means of electric circuits. For this the microscopic plasma parameters

  3. Gas dynamics in the impulsive phase of solar flares. I Thick-target heating by nonthermal electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagai, F.; Emslie, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical investigation is carried out of the gas dynamical response of the solar atmosphere to a flare energy input in the form of precipitating nonthermal electrons. Rather than discussing the origin of these electrons, the spectral and temporal characteristics of the injected flux are inferred through a thick-target model of hard X-ray bremsstrahlung production. It is assumed that the electrons spiral about preexisting magnetic field lines, making it possible for a one-dimensional spatial treatment to be performed. It is also assumed that all electron energy losses are due to Coulomb collisions with ambient particles; that is, return-current ohmic effects and collective plasma processes are neglected. The results are contrasted with earlier work on conductive heating of the flare atmosphere. A local temperature peak is seen at a height of approximately 1500 km above the photosphere. This derives from a spatial maximum in the energy deposition rate from an electron beam. It is noted that such a feature is not present in conductively heated models. The associated localized region of high pressure drives material both upward and downward.

  4. Fast flexible electronics using transferrable silicon nanomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kan; Seo, Jung-Hun; Zhou, Weidong; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2012-04-01

    A systematic review, covering the aspects of material preparation, device fabrication and process integration, is provided for flexible electronics operating in high-frequency domain based on transferrable monocrystalline silicon (Si) nanomembranes (NM). Previously demonstrated methods of releasing Si NM from silicon-on-insulator source substrates and transferring it to flexible substrates are briefly described. Due to the processing temperature limitation of most flexible substrates, a pre-release NM selective doping scheme is used for Si NMs. With proper selections of ion implantation energy and dose, fully doped Si NMs across their entire thickness with very low sheet resistivity can be obtained, allowing flip transfer of the NMs for backside and even double side processing. A general conclusion of preferred low implantation energy for shallower depth ion implantation is identified. The evolvement of radio frequency (RF) flexible Si thin-film transistor (TFT) structures is described in detail. The continuous performance enhancement of TFTs owing to process and TFT structure innovations is analysed. Demonstrations of flexible Si RF switches and RF inductors and capacitors are also briefly reviewed as valuable components of the general flexible device family, some of which also benefit from the pre-release NM doping technique. With the proved feasibility of these basic RF elements and related processing techniques, more complicated flexible RF circuits can be expected. Future research directions are also discussed, including further enhancement of device performance, building more types of semiconductor devices on flexible substrates, and process integration for flexible circuits and systems.

  5. Multiple-electron processes in fast ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, A.S.

    1989-03-01

    Research in atomic physics at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Super-HILAC and Bevalac accelerators on multiple-electron processes in fast ion-atom collisions is described. Experiments have studied various aspects of the charge-transfer, ionization, and excitation processes. Examples of processes in which electron correlation plays a role are resonant transfer and excitation and Auger-electron emission. Processes in which electron behavior can generally be described as uncorrelated include ionization and charge transfer in high-energy ion-atom collisions. A variety of experiments and results for energies from 1 MeV/u to 420 MeV/u are presented. 20 refs., 15 figs.

  6. Fast electronic relaxation in lathanide porphyrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvirko, M. P.; Stelmakh, G. F.; Pyatosin, V. E.; Solovyov, K. N.; Kachura, T. F.; Piskarskas, A. S.; Gadonas, R. A.

    1986-08-01

    The photophysical processes in porphyrin complexes of lanthanides (Ln) and their correlation with Ln 3+ ion characteristics have been studied by picosecond transient spectroscopy and spectrofluorimetry. The lifetimes of the S 2, S 1 and T 1 π-electron states have been determined for the Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu complexes of tetrabenzporphin (TBP). Depending on the nature of the Ln 3+ ion the non-radiative decay rates of the Ln TBP (π, π*) states vary by several orders of magnitude: from 3 × 10 11 to > 2 × 10 13 s -1 for the S 2 decay, from 2 × 10 10 to > 2 × 10 11 s -1 for the S 1 decay and from 6 × 10 2 to 3 × 10 10 s -1 for the T 1 decay. The T 1 deactivation rate constant of paramagnetic complexes decreases exponentially with the energy gap between the T 1 level and the nearest lower-lying accepting 4f-level beginning with Δ E ≈ 4000 cm -1. For Δ E < 4000 cm -1 there is a tendency toward stabilization of the τ -1T values. By example of the Dy, Tb, Ho, Er and Tm complexes it is shown that combination states, in which the Ln 3+_ ion and the macrocyclic ligand are excited simultaneously, participate in the deactivation of the S 2 and S 1 states. The anomalously high rates of deactivation of the S 2, S 1 and T 1 states in the case of Eu, Yb and Sm complexes are due to the charge-transfer states involved in relaxation processes.

  7. VLF Remote -Sensing of the Lower Ionosphere with AWESOME Receivers: Solar Flares, Lightning-induced Electron Precipitation, Sudden Ionospheric Disturbances, Sprites, Gravity Waves and Gamma-ray Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inan, U. S.; Cohen, M.; Scherrer, P.; Scherrer, D.

    2006-11-01

    Stanford University Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio receivers have been used extensively for remote sensing of the ionosphere and the magnetosphere. Among the phenomena that can be uniquely measured via VLF receivers are radio atmospherics, whistlers, electron precipitation, solar flares, sudden ionospheric disturbances, gravity waves, sprites, and cosmic gamma-ray flares. With the use of simple square air-core magnetic loop antennas of a couple of meters in size, the sensitivity of these instruments allows the measurement of magnetic fields as low as several tens of femtoTesla per root Hz, in the frequency range of ~300 Hz to 50 kHz. This sensitivity well exceeds that required to detect any event above the ambient atmospheric noise floor, determined by the totality of lightning activity on this planet. In recent years, as cost of production, timing accuracy (due to low cost GPS cards), and data handling flexibility of the systems has improved, it has become possible to distribute many of these instruments in the form of arrays, to perform interferometric and holographic imaging of the lower ionosphere. These goals can be achieved using the newest version of the Stanford VLF receiver, known as AWESOME: Atmospheric Weather Educational System for Observation and Modeling of Electromagnetics. In the context of the IHY/UNBSS program for 2007, the AWESOME receivers can be used extensively as part of the United Nations initiative to place scientific instruments in developing countries. Drawing on the Stanford experiences from setting up arrays of VLF receivers, including an interferometer in Alaska, the Holographic Array for Ionospheric and Lightning research (HAIL) consisting of instruments at 13 different high schools in mid-western United States, a broader set of ELF/VLF receivers in Alaska, and various receivers abroad, including in France, Japan, Greece, Turkey, and India, a global network of ELF/VLF receivers offer possibilities for a wide range of scientific topics

  8. Summary: Electron-cloud effects and fast-ion instability

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, Miguel A.

    2000-03-22

    This is my summary of the talks on the electron-cloud effect and the fast-ion instability that were presented at the 8th ICFA Beam Dynamics Mini-Work shop on Two-Stream Instabilities in Particle Accelerators and Storage Rings,Santa Fe, NM, February 16--18, 2000.

  9. Shutterless ion mobility spectrometer with fast pulsed electron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunert, E.; Heptner, A.; Reinecke, T.; Kirk, A. T.; Zimmermann, S.

    2017-02-01

    Ion mobility spectrometers (IMS) are devices for fast and very sensitive trace gas analysis. The measuring principle is based on an initial ionization process of the target analyte. Most IMS employ radioactive electron sources, such as 63Ni or 3H. These radioactive materials have the disadvantage of legal restrictions and the electron emission has a predetermined intensity and cannot be controlled or disabled. In this work, we replaced the 3H source of our IMS with 100 mm drift tube length with our nonradioactive electron source, which generates comparable spectra to the 3H source. An advantage of our emission current controlled nonradioactive electron source is that it can operate in a fast pulsed mode with high electron intensities. By optimizing the geometric parameters and developing fast control electronics, we can achieve very short electron emission pulses for ionization with high intensities and an adjustable pulse width of down to a few nanoseconds. This results in small ion packets at simultaneously high ion densities, which are subsequently separated in the drift tube. Normally, the required small ion packet is generated by a complex ion shutter mechanism. By omitting the additional reaction chamber, the ion packet can be generated directly at the beginning of the drift tube by our pulsed nonradioactive electron source with only slight reduction in resolving power. Thus, the complex and costly shutter mechanism and its electronics can also be omitted, which leads to a simple low-cost IMS-system with a pulsed nonradioactive electron source and a resolving power of 90.

  10. A thermodynamical analysis of rf current drive with fast electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizarro, João P. S.

    2015-08-01

    The problem of rf current drive (CD) by pushing fast electrons with high-parallel-phase-velocity waves, such as lower-hybrid (LH) or electron-cyclotron (EC) waves, is revisited using the first and second laws, the former to retrieve the well-known one-dimensional (1D) steady-state CD efficiency, and the latter to calculate a lower bound for the rate of entropy production when approaching steady state. The laws of thermodynamics are written in a form that explicitly takes care of frictional dissipation and are thus applied to a population of fast electrons evolving under the influence of a dc electric field, rf waves, and collisions while in contact with a thermal, Maxwellian reservoir with a well-defined temperature. Besides the laws of macroscopic thermodynamics, there is recourse to basic elements of kinetic theory only, being assumed a residual dc electric field and a strong rf drive, capable of sustaining in the resonant region, where waves interact with electrons, a raised fast-electron tail distribution, which becomes an essentially flat plateau in the case of the 1D theory for LHCD. Within the 1D model, particularly suited for LHCD as it solely retains fast-electron dynamics in velocity space parallel to the ambient magnetic field, an H theorem for rf CD is also derived, which is written in different forms, and additional physics is recovered, such as the synergy between the dc and rf power sources, including the rf-induced hot conductivity, as well as the equation for electron-bulk heating. As much as possible 1D results are extended to 2D, to account for ECCD by also considering fast-electron velocity-space dynamics in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field, which leads to a detailed discussion on how the definition of an rf-induced conductivity may depend on whether one works at constant rf current or power. Moreover, working out the collisional dissipated power and entropy-production rate written in terms of the fast-electron distribution, it

  11. A thermodynamical analysis of rf current drive with fast electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bizarro, João P. S.

    2015-08-15

    The problem of rf current drive (CD) by pushing fast electrons with high-parallel-phase-velocity waves, such as lower-hybrid (LH) or electron-cyclotron (EC) waves, is revisited using the first and second laws, the former to retrieve the well-known one-dimensional (1D) steady-state CD efficiency, and the latter to calculate a lower bound for the rate of entropy production when approaching steady state. The laws of thermodynamics are written in a form that explicitly takes care of frictional dissipation and are thus applied to a population of fast electrons evolving under the influence of a dc electric field, rf waves, and collisions while in contact with a thermal, Maxwellian reservoir with a well-defined temperature. Besides the laws of macroscopic thermodynamics, there is recourse to basic elements of kinetic theory only, being assumed a residual dc electric field and a strong rf drive, capable of sustaining in the resonant region, where waves interact with electrons, a raised fast-electron tail distribution, which becomes an essentially flat plateau in the case of the 1D theory for LHCD. Within the 1D model, particularly suited for LHCD as it solely retains fast-electron dynamics in velocity space parallel to the ambient magnetic field, an H theorem for rf CD is also derived, which is written in different forms, and additional physics is recovered, such as the synergy between the dc and rf power sources, including the rf-induced hot conductivity, as well as the equation for electron-bulk heating. As much as possible 1D results are extended to 2D, to account for ECCD by also considering fast-electron velocity-space dynamics in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field, which leads to a detailed discussion on how the definition of an rf-induced conductivity may depend on whether one works at constant rf current or power. Moreover, working out the collisional dissipated power and entropy-production rate written in terms of the fast-electron distribution, it

  12. Relationship of solar flare accelerated particles to solar energetic particles (SEPs) observed in the interplanetary medium

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, R.P.

    2005-08-01

    Observations of hard X-ray (HXR)/gamma-ray continuum and gamma-ray lines produced by energetic electrons and ions, respectively, colliding with the solar atmosphere, have shown that large solar flares can accelerate ions up to many GeV and electrons up to hundreds of MeV. Solar energetic particles (SEPs) are observed by spacecraft near 1 AU and by ground-based instrumentation to extend up to similar energies, but these appear to be accelerated by shocks associated with fast Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). The Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) mission provides high-resolution spectroscopy and imaging of flare HXRs and gamma-rays. Here we review RHESSI observations for large solar flares and SEP events. The 23 July gamma-ray line flare was associated with a fast, wide CME but no SEPs were observed, while the 21 April 2002 flare had no detectable gamma-ray line emission but a fast CME and strong SEP event were observed. The October- November 2003 series of large flares and associated fast CMEs produced both gamma-ray line emission and strong SEP events. The spectra of flare-accelerated protons, inferred from the gamma-ray line emission observed by RHESSI, is found to be essentially identical to the spectra of the SEPs observed near 1 AU for the well-connected 2 November and 20 January events.

  13. Fast launch speeds in radio flares, from a new determination of the intrinsic motions of SS 433's jet bolides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffrey, Robert M.; Blundell, Katherine M.; Trushkin, Sergei A.; Mioduszewski, Amy J.

    2016-09-01

    We present new high-resolution, multi-epoch, Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio images of the Galactic microquasar SS 433. We are able to observe plasma knots in the milliarcsecond-scale jets more than 50 d after their launch. This unprecedented baseline in time allows us to determine the bulk launch speed of the radio-emitting plasma during a radio flare, using a new method which we present here, and which is completely independent of optical spectroscopy. We also apply this method to an earlier sequence of 39 short daily VLBA observations, which cover a period in which SS 433 moved from quiescence into a flare. In both data sets we find, for the first time at radio wavebands, clear evidence that the launch speeds of the milliarcsecond-scale jets rise as high as 0.32c during flaring episodes. By comparing these images of SS 433 with photometric radio monitoring from the RATAN-600 telescope, we explore further properties of these radio flares.

  14. Fast magnetic reconnection due to anisotropic electron pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Cassak, P. A.; Baylor, R. N.; Fermo, R. L.; Beidler, M. T.; Shay, M. A.; Swisdak, M.; Drake, J. F.; Karimabadi, H.

    2015-02-15

    A new regime of fast magnetic reconnection with an out-of-plane (guide) magnetic field is reported in which the key role is played by an electron pressure anisotropy described by the Chew-Goldberger-Low gyrotropic equations of state in the generalized Ohm's law, which even dominates the Hall term. A description of the physical cause of this behavior is provided and two-dimensional fluid simulations are used to confirm the results. The electron pressure anisotropy causes the out-of-plane magnetic field to develop a quadrupole structure of opposite polarity to the Hall magnetic field and gives rise to dispersive waves. In addition to being important for understanding what causes reconnection to be fast, this mechanism should dominate in plasmas with low plasma beta and a high in-plane plasma beta with electron temperature comparable to or larger than ion temperature, so it could be relevant in the solar wind and some tokamaks.

  15. Radio and Hard X-Ray Images of High-Energy Electrons in an X-Class Solar Flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, S. M.; Krucker, S.; Shibasaki, K.; Yokoyama, T.; Shimojo, M.; Kundu, Mukul R.

    2003-01-01

    We present the first comparison between radio images of high-energy electrons accelerated by a solar flare and images of hard X-rays produced by the same electrons at photon energies above 100 keV. The images indicate that the high-energy X-rays originate at the footpoints of the loops dominating the radio emission. The radio and hard X-ray light curves match each other well and are quantitatively consistent with an origin in a single population of nonthermal electrons with a power-law index of around 4.5-5. The high-frequency radio spectral index suggests a flatter energy spectrum, but this is ruled out by the X-ray spectrum up to 8 MeV.

  16. Electron pitch angle scattering and the impulsive phase microwave and hard X-ray emission from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.; Kundu, M. R.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1982-01-01

    Observations and theoretical considerations have led to a model for impulsive phase flare emission involving the heating and acceleration of thermal electrons in the coronal part of a magnetic loop. The bulk of the heated gas is confined between conduction fronts, but particles with velocities a few times greater than the thermal velocity can escape into the lower part of the loop. It is shown that, when the electron gyrofrequency exceeds the plasma frequency, the escaping electrons are unstable to the generation of electrostatic plasma waves which scatter the particles in pitch angle to a nearly isotropic distribution. It is also shown that this scattering can (1) enhance the microwave emission from the upper part of the loop, and (2) due to the Landau damping of both low and high phase velocity waves, can lead to one or two breaks in the impulsive-phase hard X-ray spectrum.

  17. Collimated fast electron beam generation in critical density plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Iwawaki, T. Habara, H.; Morita, K.; Tanaka, K. A.; Baton, S.; Fuchs, J.; Chen, S.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Rousseaux, C.; Filippi, F.; Nazarov, W.

    2014-11-15

    Significantly collimated fast electron beam with a divergence angle 10° (FWHM) is observed when an ultra-intense laser pulse (I = 10{sup 14 }W/cm{sup 2}, 300 fs) irradiates a uniform critical density plasma. The uniform plasma is created through the ionization of an ultra-low density (5 mg/c.c.) plastic foam by X-ray burst from the interaction of intense laser (I = 10{sup 14 }W/cm{sup 2}, 600 ps) with a thin Cu foil. 2D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation well reproduces the collimated electron beam with a strong magnetic field in the region of the laser pulse propagation. To understand the physical mechanism of the collimation, we calculate energetic electron motion in the magnetic field obtained from the 2D PIC simulation. As the results, the strong magnetic field (300 MG) collimates electrons with energy over a few MeV. This collimation mechanism may attract attention in many applications such as electron acceleration, electron microscope and fast ignition of laser fusion.

  18. A Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) Detector for Fast Neutron Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewett, C. C.; McMahan, M.; Cerny, J.; Heilbronn, L.; Johnson, M.

    2008-10-01

    We have built a Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector for detection of fast neutrons at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The detector consists of a 0.0625 inch thick polypropylene neutron converter, three GEM foils and a grid of 16 readout pads on a printed circuit board. In this talk, we present images of the GEM detector, the results of tests with ^60Co, AmBe sources and our neutron beam, and a comparison between the proposed fast neutron GEM detector and a fast neutron ^238U fission chamber we purchased. One of the advantages of the GEM detector over the fission chamber is the fact that it provides the x-y position information of the neutrons.

  19. Visualizing fast electron energy transport into laser-compressed high-density fast-ignition targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrott, L. C.; Wei, M. S.; McGuffey, C.; Solodov, A. A.; Theobald, W.; Qiao, B.; Stoeckl, C.; Betti, R.; Chen, H.; Delettrez, J.; Döppner, T.; Giraldez, E. M.; Glebov, V. Y.; Habara, H.; Iwawaki, T.; Key, M. H.; Luo, R. W.; Marshall, F. J.; McLean, H. S.; Mileham, C.; Patel, P. K.; Santos, J. J.; Sawada, H.; Stephens, R. B.; Yabuuchi, T.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-05-01

    Recent progress in kilojoule-scale high-intensity lasers has opened up new areas of research in radiography, laboratory astrophysics, high-energy-density physics, and fast-ignition (FI) laser fusion. FI requires efficient heating of pre-compressed high-density fuel by an intense relativistic electron beam produced from laser-matter interaction. Understanding the details of electron beam generation and transport is crucial for FI. Here we report on the first visualization of fast electron spatial energy deposition in a laser-compressed cone-in-shell FI target, facilitated by doping the shell with copper and imaging the K-shell radiation. Multi-scale simulations accompanying the experiments clearly show the location of fast electrons and reveal key parameters affecting energy coupling. The approach provides a more direct way to infer energy coupling and guide experimental designs that significantly improve the laser-to-core coupling to 7%. Our findings lay the groundwork for further improving efficiency, with 15% energy coupling predicted in FI experiments using an existing megajoule-scale laser driver.

  20. FAST VARIABILITY AND MILLIMETER/IR FLARES IN GRMHD MODELS OF Sgr A* FROM STRONG-FIELD GRAVITATIONAL LENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Chi-kwan; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Özel, Feryal; Marrone, Daniel; Medeiros, Lia; Sadowski, Aleksander; Narayan, Ramesh

    2015-10-20

    We explore the variability properties of long, high-cadence general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulations across the electromagnetic spectrum using an efficient, GPU-based radiative transfer algorithm. We focus on both standard and normal evolution (SANE) and magnetically arrested disk (MAD) simulations with parameters that successfully reproduce the time-averaged spectral properties of Sgr A* and the size of its image at 1.3 mm. We find that the SANE models produce short-timescale variability with amplitudes and power spectra that closely resemble those inferred observationally. In contrast, MAD models generate only slow variability at lower flux levels. Neither set of models shows any X-ray flares, which most likely indicates that additional physics, such as particle acceleration mechanisms, need to be incorporated into the GRMHD simulations to account for them. The SANE models show strong, short-lived millimeter/infrared (IR) flares, with short (≲1 hr) time lags between the millimeter and IR wavelengths, that arise from the combination of short-lived magnetic flux tubes and strong-field gravitational lensing near the horizon. Such events provide a natural explanation for the observed IR flares with no X-ray counterparts.

  1. Fast Instability Caused by Electron Cloud in Combined Function Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, S. A.; Adamson, P.; Burov, A.; Nagaitsev, S.; Yang, M. J.

    2016-12-12

    One of the factors which may limit the intensity in the Fermilab Recycler is a fast transverse instability. It develops within a hundred turns and, in certain conditions, may lead to a beam loss. The high rate of the instability suggest that its cause is electron cloud. We studied the phenomena by observing the dynamics of stable and unstable beam, simulating numerically the build-up of the electron cloud, and developed an analytical model of an electron cloud driven instability with the electrons trapped in combined function di-poles. We found that beam motion can be stabilized by a clearing bunch, which confirms the electron cloud nature of the instability. The clearing suggest electron cloud trapping in Recycler combined function mag-nets. Numerical simulations show that up to 1% of the particles can be trapped by the magnetic field. Since the process of electron cloud build-up is exponential, once trapped this amount of electrons significantly increases the density of the cloud on the next revolution. In a Recycler combined function dipole this multi-turn accumulation allows the electron cloud reaching final intensities orders of magnitude greater than in a pure dipole. The estimated resulting instability growth rate of about 30 revolutions and the mode fre-quency of 0.4 MHz are consistent with experimental observations and agree with the simulation in the PEI code. The created instability model allows investigating the beam stability for the future intensity upgrades.

  2. X-ray studies of flaring magnetic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, Christopher Philip

    This thesis studies non-thermal emission from flaring magnetic structures by looking at HXR emission from flare footpoints at a faint X-ray source above a flare loop and finally at radio emission generated by eruptions. By complementing high quality data from recent missions with data from older instrumentation, studies were performed to compare with accepted models. The relation between Hard X-ray footpoint emission and magnetic field strength in a sample of 32 flares was studied in order to investigate the effects of the magnetic field on the transport of accelerated electrons. It was found that one third of compact flares studied had stronger footpoints in stronger magnetic regions whereas the reverse is anticipated from magnetic trapping arguments. On 16th April 2002, a limb flare was studied in many wavelengths. This provided an opportunity to study an erupting filament from the low corona and into interplanetary space. RHESSI identified a moving X-ray source associated with a rising filament, confirming the plasmoid definition of Tsuneta (1997). The velocity profile of the filament was determined along with its exponential acceleration. This suggested that an instability was responsible for eruption, possibly the kink instability. Doppler shifts were observed on either side of the filament as it crossed the slit field of view, suggesting helical flows and thus a flux rope. A succession of quadrupolar flares, followed by an LDE were then studied. An associated CME was seen and appeared linked to the quadrupolar flares which should re main confined. The flaring region triggered loop expansion, which interacted with a neighbouring large-scale streamer. This led to a fast CME front, which weakened the restraining field above the active region filaments allowing a partial filament eruption. Although at first glance the observations appeared contradictory it was demonstrated that the quadrupolar flares remained confined while triggering a large-scale eruption.

  3. VLF Remote Sensing of the Lower Ionosphere: Solar Flares, Electron Precipitation, Sudden Ionospheric Disturbances, Sprites, Gravity Waves and Gamma-ray Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, J. H.; Cohen, M.; Inan, U. S.; Scherrer, P. H.; Scherrer, D.

    2005-12-01

    Stanford University Very Low Frequency (VLF) and Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) radio receivers have been used extensively for remote sensing of the ionosphere and the magnetosphere. Among the phenomena that can be uniquely measured via ELF/VLF receivers are radio atmospherics, whistlers, electron precipitation, solar flares, sudden ionospheric disturbances, gravity waves, sprites, and cosmic gamma-ray flares. With the use of simple square air-core magnetic loop antennas of a couple of meters in size, the sensitivity of these instruments allows the measurement of magnetic fields as low as several tens of femtoTesla per root-Hz, in the frequency range of ~30 Hz to 50 kHz. This sensitivity well exceeds that required to detect any event above the ambient atmospheric noise floor, determined by the totality of lightning activity on the planet. In recent years, as cost of production, timing accuracy (due to low cost GPS clocks), and data handling flexibility of the systems has improved, it has become possible to distribute many of these instruments in the form of arrays, to perform interferometric and holographic imaging of the lower ionosphere. In the context of the IHY in 2007, the ELF/VLF receiver can used extensively as part of the United Nations initiative to place scientific instruments in developing countries. Stanford University's past experiences setting up arrays of ELF/VLF receivers include an interferometer in Alaska, the Holographic Array for Ionospheric and Lightning research (HAIL) consisting of instruments at 13 different high schools in mid-western United States, a broader set of ELF/VLF receivers in Alaska, and various receivers abroad, including in France, Japan, Greece, Turkey, Ireland, and India. A global network of ELF/VLF receivers offer possibilities for a wide range of scientific topics, as well as serving as a means for educational outreach. These goals will be achieved using the newest version of the Stanford VLF receiver, known as AWESOME

  4. Reply to Origin of fast electrons' from slow atomic collisions''

    SciTech Connect

    Baragiola, R.A. ); Alonso, E.V. ); Oliva, A.; Bonanno, A.; Xu, F. )

    1993-08-01

    We show reasons why negative ions cannot contribute significantly to our observation of fast electrons in slow atomic collisions [Phys. Rev. 45, 5286 (1992)]. We point out that the opposite suggestion by Yasui [preceding Comment, Phys. Rev. A 48, 1711 (1993)] results from multiple errors in his analysis, including inadequate consideration of energy conservation, the use of nonapplicable data from the literature, neglect of decay in flight of metastable negative ions, nonconsideration of detection efficiency, and the inconsistent fit of experimental data.

  5. Proton, Electron and Ion Temperatures in Fast Shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, John C.; Korreck, Kelly E.

    2005-08-01

    The Coulomb equilibration time scale among various particle species behind a fast collisionless shock can be much larger than the dynamical time scale in a supernova remnant or CME. Ultraviolet and optical emission line profiles can be used to measure proton, electron and ion temperatures. Particles are fairly close to thermal equilibrium behind a relatively slow (350 km/s) shock, but very far from equilibrium in faster (2000-3000 km/s) shocks.

  6. The Electron and ion Plasma Experiment for Fast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, C. W.; McFadden, J. P.; Turin, P.; Curtis, D. W.; Magoncelli, A.

    2001-08-01

    The ion and electron plasma experiment on the Fast Auroral Snapshot satellite (FAST) is designed to measure pitch-angle distributions of suprathermal auroral electrons and ions with high sensitivity, wide dynamic range, good energy and angular resolution, and exceptional time resolution. These measurements support the primary scientific goal of the FAST mission to understand the physical processes responsible for auroral particle acceleration and heating, and associated wave-particle interactions. The instrument includes a complement of 8 pairs of `Top Hat' electrostatic analyzer heads with microchannel plate (MCP) electron multipliers and discrete anodes to provide angle resolved measurements. The analyzers are packaged in four instrument stacks, each containing four analyzers. These four stacks are equally spaced around the spacecraft spin plane. Analyzers mounted on opposite sides of the spacecraft operate in pairs such that their individual 180° fields of view combine to give an unobstructed 360° field of view in the spin plane. The earth's magnetic field is within a few degrees of the spin plane during most auroral crossings, so the time resolution for pitch-angle distribution measurements is independent of the spacecraft spin period. Two analyzer pairs serve as electron and ion spectrometers that obtain distributions of 48 energies at 32 angles every 78 ms. Their standard energy ranges are 4 eV to 32 keV for electrons and 3 eV to 24 keV for ions. These sensors also have deflection plates that can track the magnetic field direction within 10° of the spin plane to resolve narrow, magnetic field-aligned beams of electrons and ions. The remaining six analyzer pairs collectively function as an electron spectrograph, resolving distributions with 16 contiguous pitch-angle bins and a selectable trade-off of energy and time resolution. Two examples of possible operating modes are a maximum time resolution mode with 16 angles and 6 energies every 1.63 ms, or a

  7. Statistical aspects of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1987-01-01

    A survey of the statistical properties of 850 H alpha solar flares during 1975 is presented. Comparison of the results found here with those reported elsewhere for different epochs is accomplished. Distributions of rise time, decay time, and duration are given, as are the mean, mode, median, and 90th percentile values. Proportions by selected groupings are also determined. For flares in general, mean values for rise time, decay time, and duration are 5.2 + or - 0.4 min, and 18.1 + or 1.1 min, respectively. Subflares, accounting for nearly 90 percent of the flares, had mean values lower than those found for flares of H alpha importance greater than 1, and the differences are statistically significant. Likewise, flares of bright and normal relative brightness have mean values of decay time and duration that are significantly longer than those computed for faint flares, and mass-motion related flares are significantly longer than non-mass-motion related flares. Seventy-three percent of the mass-motion related flares are categorized as being a two-ribbon flare and/or being accompanied by a high-speed dark filament. Slow rise time flares (rise time greater than 5 min) have a mean value for duration that is significantly longer than that computed for fast rise time flares, and long-lived duration flares (duration greater than 18 min) have a mean value for rise time that is significantly longer than that computed for short-lived duration flares, suggesting a positive linear relationship between rise time and duration for flares. Monthly occurrence rates for flares in general and by group are found to be linearly related in a positive sense to monthly sunspot number. Statistical testing reveals the association between sunspot number and numbers of flares to be significant at the 95 percent level of confidence, and the t statistic for slope is significant at greater than 99 percent level of confidence. Dependent upon the specific fit, between 58 percent and 94 percent of

  8. Solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.

    1974-01-01

    A review of the knowledge about solar flares which has been obtained through observations from the earth and from space by various methods. High-resolution cinematography is best carried out at H-alpha wavelengths to reveal the structure, time history, and location of flares. The classification flares in H alpha according to either physical or morphological criteria is discussed. The study of flare morphology, which shows where, when, and how flares occur, is important for evaluating theories of flares. Consideration is given to studies of flares by optical spectroscopy, radio emissions, and at X-ray and XUV wavelengths. Research has shown where and possibly why flares occur, but the physics of the instability involved, of the particle acceleration, and of the heating are still not understood.

  9. Glow discharges with electrostatic confinement of fast electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, V. I.; Metel, A. S.

    2015-06-01

    This review presents a unified treatment of glow discharges with electrostatic confinement of fast electrons. These discharges include hollow cathode discharges, wire and cage discharges, reflect discharges with brush and multirod cathodes, and discharges in crossed electric and magnetic fields. Fast electrons bouncing inside electrostatic traps provide efficient ionization of gas at very low gas pressures. The electrostatic trap effect (ETE) was first observed by Paschen in hollow cathode discharges almost a century ago. The key parameters that define fundamental characteristics of ETE discharges are the ionization length λN, the penetration range, Λ, and the diffusion length λ of the fast electrons, and two universal geometric parameters of the traps: effective width a and length L. Peculiarities of electron kinetics and ion collection mechanism explain experimental observations for different trap geometries. The ETE is observed only at Λ > a, when the penetration range of the γ-electrons emitted by the cathode exceeds the trap width. In the optimal pressure range, when λN > a, and Λ < L, the cathode potential fall Uc is independent of gas pressure p. With increasing current, Uc tends to its upper limit W/eβγ, where β is the percentage of ions arriving at the cathode and W is the gas ionization cost. In the low-pressure range, Λ > L, Uc rises from hundreds to thousands of volts. The sign of the anode potential fall, Ua, depends on the anode surface Sa and its position. When Sa is large compared to a critical value S*, Ua is negative and small. At Sa < S*, the value of Ua becomes positive and rises up to 0.5-1 kV with decreasing p ultimately causing discharge extinction. Scaling laws indicate common physics between vacuum discharges and atmospheric pressure micro-discharges. We discuss peculiarities of electron kinetics under different conditions using semi-analytical models. Recent experimental results and applications of glow

  10. Discovery of Fast X-ray Oscillations During the 1998 Giant Flare from SGR 1900+14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, T.; Watts, A.

    2005-01-01

    We report the discovery of complex high frequency variability during the August 27, 1998 giant flare from SGR 1900+14 using the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). We detect an approx. equals 84 Hz oscillation (QPO) during a 1 s interval beginning approximately 1 min after the initial hard spike. The amplitude is energy dependent, reaching a maximum of 26% (rms) for photons above 30 keV, and is not detected below 11 keV, with a 90% confidence upper limit of 14% (rms). Remarkably, additional QPOs are detected in the average power spectrum of data segments centered on the rotational phase at which the 84 Hz signal was detected. Two signals, at 53.5 and 155.1 Hz, are strongly detected, while a third feature at 28 Hz is found with lower significance. These QPOs are not detected at other rotational phases. The phenomenology seen in the SGR 1900+14 flare is similar to that of QPOs recently reported by Israel et al. (2005) from the December 27, 2004 flare from SGR 1806-20, suggesting they may have a common origin, perhaps torsional vibrations of the neutron star crust. Indeed, an association of the four frequencies (in increasing order) found in SGR 1900+14 with l = 2, 4, 7, and 13 toroidal modes appears plausible. We discuss our findings in the context of this model and show that if the stars have similar masses then the magnetic field in SGR 1806-20 must be about twice as large as in SGR 1900+14, broadly consistent with estimates from pulse timing.

  11. Studies of electron and proton isochoric heating for fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, A; Key, M; Akli, K; Beg, F; Clarke, R; Clarke, D; Chen, M; Chung, H; Chen, S; Freeman, R; Green, J; Gu, P; Gregori, G; Highbarger, K; Habara, H; Hatchett, S; Hey, D; Heathcote, R; Hill, J; King, J; Kodama, R; Koch, J; Lancaster, K; Langdon, B; Murphy, C; Norreys, P; Neely, D; Nakatsutsumi, M; Nakamura, H; Patel, N; Patel, P; Pasley, J; Snavley, R; Stephens, R; Stoeckl, C; Foord, M; Tabak, M; Theobald, W; Storm, M; Tanaka, K; Tempo, M; Toley, M; Town, R; Wilks, S; VanWoerkom, L; Weber, R; Yabuuchi, T; Zhang, B

    2006-10-02

    Isochoric heating of inertially confined fusion plasmas by laser driven MeV electrons or protons is an area of great topical interest in the inertial confinement fusion community, particularly with respect to the fast ignition (FI) proposal to use this technique to initiate burn in a fusion capsule. Experiments designed to investigate electron isochoric heating have measured heating in two limiting cases of interest to fast ignition, small planar foils and hollow cones. Data from Cu K{alpha} fluorescence, crystal x-ray spectroscopy of Cu K shell emission, and XUV imaging at 68eV and 256 eV are used to test PIC and Hybrid PIC modeling of the interaction. Isochoric heating by focused proton beams generated at the concave inside surface of a hemi-shell and from a sub hemi-shell inside a cone have been studied with the same diagnostic methods plus imaging of proton induced K{alpha}. Conversion efficiency to protons has also been measured and modeled. Conclusions from the proton and electron heating experiments will be presented. Recent advances in modeling electron transport and innovative target designs for reducing igniter energy and increasing gain curves will also be discussed.

  12. Fast electronic resistance switching involving hidden charge density wave states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaskivskyi, I.; Mihailovic, I. A.; Brazovskii, S.; Gospodaric, J.; Mertelj, T.; Svetin, D.; Sutar, P.; Mihailovic, D.

    2016-05-01

    The functionality of computer memory elements is currently based on multi-stability, driven either by locally manipulating the density of electrons in transistors or by switching magnetic or ferroelectric order. Another possibility is switching between metallic and insulating phases by the motion of ions, but their speed is limited by slow nucleation and inhomogeneous percolative growth. Here we demonstrate fast resistance switching in a charge density wave system caused by pulsed current injection. As a charge pulse travels through the material, it converts a commensurately ordered polaronic Mott insulating state in 1T-TaS2 to a metastable electronic state with textured domain walls, accompanied with a conversion of polarons to band states, and concurrent rapid switching from an insulator to a metal. The large resistance change, high switching speed (30 ps) and ultralow energy per bit opens the way to new concepts in non-volatile memory devices manipulating all-electronic states.

  13. Quantum-Sequencing: Fast electronic single DNA molecule sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casamada Ribot, Josep; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-03-01

    A major goal of third-generation sequencing technologies is to develop a fast, reliable, enzyme-free, high-throughput and cost-effective, single-molecule sequencing method. Here, we present the first demonstration of unique ``electronic fingerprint'' of all nucleotides (A, G, T, C), with single-molecule DNA sequencing, using Quantum-tunneling Sequencing (Q-Seq) at room temperature. We show that the electronic state of the nucleobases shift depending on the pH, with most distinct states identified at acidic pH. We also demonstrate identification of single nucleotide modifications (methylation here). Using these unique electronic fingerprints (or tunneling data), we report a partial sequence of beta lactamase (bla) gene, which encodes resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, with over 95% success rate. These results highlight the potential of Q-Seq as a robust technique for next-generation sequencing.

  14. Fast electronic resistance switching involving hidden charge density wave states

    PubMed Central

    Vaskivskyi, I.; Mihailovic, I. A.; Brazovskii, S.; Gospodaric, J.; Mertelj, T.; Svetin, D.; Sutar, P.; Mihailovic, D.

    2016-01-01

    The functionality of computer memory elements is currently based on multi-stability, driven either by locally manipulating the density of electrons in transistors or by switching magnetic or ferroelectric order. Another possibility is switching between metallic and insulating phases by the motion of ions, but their speed is limited by slow nucleation and inhomogeneous percolative growth. Here we demonstrate fast resistance switching in a charge density wave system caused by pulsed current injection. As a charge pulse travels through the material, it converts a commensurately ordered polaronic Mott insulating state in 1T–TaS2 to a metastable electronic state with textured domain walls, accompanied with a conversion of polarons to band states, and concurrent rapid switching from an insulator to a metal. The large resistance change, high switching speed (30 ps) and ultralow energy per bit opens the way to new concepts in non-volatile memory devices manipulating all-electronic states. PMID:27181483

  15. On Possible Manifestation of Non-Thermal Electrons in the Hα/Hβ Line Profile Ratio in the June 26, 1999 Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotrc, P.; Kashapova, L. K.

    2006-08-01

    We analyzed the solar flare on 26 June 1999 which consisted of three subsequent phases. All of them were followed by events of quite different types (Kotrc et al., IAU Symp 223, 2004). Just the second phase of the flare was accompanied by radio bursts and HXR emission that could be considered as an indirect evidence of accelerated non-thermal particle beams. Theoretical calculations of thermal mechanisms coupled with accelerated electron beams in flares showed that the ratio of the Hα/Hβ line profiles could be a possible indicator whether a mechanism of non-thermal radiation excitation was present or absent (Kasparova & Heinzel, A&A, 2002). This effect should follow the occurrence of the particle beams in time and then decay. In the flare kernel associated thus possibly with the influence of non-thermal electron beams we found that the ratio of the Hα/Hβ line profiles demonstrated a very specific form which substantially differs from those ones obtained in "thermal" kernels (occurring in the first and in the another flare phases). This effect can be characterized by presence of specific "sidelobes" occurring in the ratio of the line profiles. The effect was observed in the region nearby the HXR sourcelocation where it appeared just after the end of the radio-spectrum spike and therefore it corresponds most probably to the occurrence of non-thermal processes in the flare. The associated HXR effect was rather short lasting, i.e. the effect of "sidelobes" disappeared earlier then the emission. We try to trace the evolution and the possible decay of this effect. On one hand the obtained results will be an additional evidence of the theoretical predictions, on the other hand they could be useful for development of technique for detecting the presence or absence of the non-thermal electron beams. Conclusions are discussed both from their observational and theoretical aspects.

  16. Progress in Fast Ignition Studies with Electrons and Protons

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, A. J.; Chen, H.; Hey, D.; Key, M. H.; MacPhee, A. G.; Patel, P. K.; Ping, Y.; Akli, K. U.; Stephens, R. B.; Bartal, T.; Beg, F. N.; Chawla, S.; Chen, S.; Higginson, D.; King, J. A.; Ma, T.; Wei, M. S.; Chen, C. D.; Chowdhury, E.; Link, A.

    2009-09-10

    Isochoric heating of inertially confined fusion plasmas by laser driven MeV electrons or protons is an area of great topical interest in the inertial confinement fusion community, particularly with respect to the fast ignition (FI) concept for initiating burn in a fusion capsule. In order to investigate critical aspects needed for a FI point design, experiments were performed to study 1) laser-to-electrons or protons conversion issues and 2) laser-cone interactions including prepulse effects. A large suite of diagnostics was utilized to study these important parameters. Using cone--wire surrogate targets it is found that pre-pulse levels on medium scale lasers such as Titan at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory produce long scale length plasmas that strongly effect coupling of the laser to FI relevant electrons inside cones. The cone wall thickness also affects coupling to the wire. Conversion efficiency to protons has also been measured and modeled as a function of target thickness, material. Conclusions from the proton and electron source experiments will be presented. Recent advances in modeling electron transport and innovative target designs for reducing igniter energy and increasing gain curves will also be discussed. In conclusion, a program of study will be presented based on understanding the fundamental physics of the electron or proton source relevant to FI.

  17. Fast electron transport and spatial energy deposition in imploded fast ignition cone-in-shell targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrott, Leonard

    2014-10-01

    We report on the first experimental observation and model validation of the spatial energy deposition of fast electrons into the imploded, high-density core of integrated cone-in-shell fast ignition experiments on OMEGA. Spatial energy deposition was characterized via fast electron produced K α fluorescence from a Cu tracer added to the CD shell. 2-D images of the Cu K α fluorescence were obtained using a spherically bent Bragg crystal imager. 54 of the 60 OMEGA beams (18 kJ) were used for fuel assembly, and the high intensity EP beam (10 ps, 0.5--1.5 kJ, Ip >1019 W/cm2) , was focused onto the inner cone tip to produce fast electrons. Cu K α emission from a 300 μm region surrounding the cone tip correlated well with the predicted core size from radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the shell implosion. The emission also emanated from as far back as 100 μm from the cone tip, indicative of an electron source position with a large standoff distance from the cone tip, consistent with the presence of an extended pre-plasma from the EP pre-pulse. We observed a simultaneous increase in both K α yield (up to 70%) and thermal neutron number (up to 2×) with increasing EP beam energy. K α yield data also show an improved energy coupling using the high contrast EP pulse. Comprehensive simulations of the electron production within the cone and subsequent transport into the imploded core have been performed using the implicit PIC code LSP and the hybrid-PIC code ZUMA. These simulations explain the observed K α shape and yield trends and identify parameters that constrain energy coupling into the compressed core. This work was performed under the auspices of U.S. DOE under Contracts DE-FC02-04ER54789 (FSC), DE-FG02-05ER54834 (ACE) and DE-NA0000854 (NLUF).

  18. Fast Transverse Instability and Electron Cloud Measurements in Fermilab Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Eldred, Jeffery; Adamson, Philip; Capista, David; Eddy, Nathan; Kourbanis, Ioanis; Morris, Denton; Thangaraj, Jayakar; Yang, Ming-Jen; Zwaska, Robert; Ji, Yichen

    2015-03-01

    A new transverse instability is observed that may limit the proton intensity in the Fermilab Recycler. The instability is fast, leading to a beam-abort loss within two hundred turns. The instability primarily affects the first high-intensity batch from the Fermilab Booster in each Recycler cycle. This paper analyzes the dynamical features of the destabilized beam. The instability excites a horizontal betatron oscillation which couples into the vertical motion and also causes transverse emittance growth. This paper describes the feasibility of electron cloud as the mechanism for this instability and presents the first measurements of the electron cloud in the Fermilab Recycler. Direct measurements of the electron cloud are made using a retarding field analyzer (RFA) newly installed in the Fermilab Recycler. Indirect measurements of the electron cloud are made by propagating a microwave carrier signal through the beampipe and analyzing the phase modulation of the signal. The maximum betatron amplitude growth and the maximum electron cloud signal occur during minimums of the bunch length oscillation.

  19. Electron loss of fast projectiles in collisions with molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Matveev, V. I.; Makarov, D. N.; Rakhimov, Kh. Yu.

    2011-07-15

    The single- and multiple-electron loss of fast highly charged projectiles in collisions with neutral molecules is studied within the framework of a nonperturbative approach. The cross sections for single-, double-, and triple-electron losses are calculated for the collision system Fe{sup q+}{yields}N{sub 2} (q=24, 25, 26) at the collision energies 10, 100, and 1000 MeV/nucleon. The effects caused by the collision multiplicity and the orientation of the axis of the target molecule are treated. It is shown that the collision multiplicity effect leads to considerable differences for the cases of perpendicular and parallel orientations of the molecular axes with respect to the direction of the projectile motion, while for chaotic orientation such an effect is negligible.

  20. Fast electrons from electron-ion collisions in strong laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kull, H.-J.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2005-06-01

    Electron-ion collisions in the presence of a strong laser field lead to a distribution of fast electrons with maximum energy Emax=(k0+2v0)2/2(a.u.), where k0 is the impact and v0 the quiver velocity of the electron. The energy spectrum is calculated by two approaches: (1) The time-dependent Schrödinger equation is numerically solved for wave packet scattering from a one-dimensional softcore Coulomb potential. Multiphoton energy spectra are obtained demonstrating a separation of the energy spectrum into an exponential distribution for transmission and a plateau distribution for reflection. (2) The energy spectrum is analytically calculated in the framework of classical instantaneous Coulomb collisions with random impact parameters and random phases of the laser field. An exact solution for the energy spectrum is obtained from which the fraction of fast electrons in the plateau region can be estimated.

  1. Pulsed HF radiowave absorption measurements at 2.1 MHZ. over Delhi under quiet and solar flare conditions and related electron density height profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandra Swamy, A. C.

    EXTENDED ABSTRACT Pulsed HF radiowave absorption measurements at 2.1 MHZ. over Delhi under quiet and solar flare conditions and related electron density height profiles A.C.Balachandra swmay & Late C.S.G.K. Setty Absorption of radio waves in the ionosphere is of great practical importance for radio communication and navigation systems. The first attempt to measure the absolute magnitude of the radiowave absorption were made by appletion and Ratcliffe (1930) using the frequency change method for medium frequency waves reflected from the E-region. They concluded from their experiment that the main part of the attenuation occurred below the reflection level and named the absorption region, D-region of the ionosphere. One of the basic properties of the ionosphere is the absorption of high Frequency Radiowaves. HF radiowave absorption results mainly from collisions between electrons (which are set into forced oscillations by the electric field of the wave) and neutral air particles, the RF energy abstracted from the wave being converted into thermal energy. The radiowave absorption in the ionosphere depends on electron density and collision frequency. The most important absorbing regions are the D-region and the lower E-region (50-100 Km.) The regular diurnal variation of the electron density in this height range is caused mainly by the changes in the depth of penetration of solar XUV radiations with solar zenith angle under quiet solar conditions. In 1937 Dellinger J.H.identified fade outs in high frequency radio circuits as due to abnormal ionospheric absorption associated with solar flares. The onset of the fade out was usually rapid and the duration was typically tens of minutes like that of the visible flare, because of the sudden onset, the immediate effects of solar flares are known collectively as sudden Ionospheric Disturbances (STD). The phenomenon discovered by Dellinger is usually called a short Wave Fadeout(SWF). Since the SWF is due to abnormal absorption

  2. Effect of fast drifting electrons on electron temperature measurement with a triple Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Subir Chowdhury, Satyajit; Pal, Rabindranath

    2015-08-14

    Triple Langmuir Probe (TLP) is a widely used diagnostics for instantaneous measurement of electron temperature and density in low temperature laboratory plasmas as well as in edge region of fusion plasma devices. Presence of a moderately energetic flowing electron component, constituting only a small fraction of the bulk electrons, is also a generally observed scenario in plasma devices, where plasmas are produced by electron impact ionization of neutrals. A theoretical analysis of its effect on interpretation of the TLP data for bulk electron temperature measurement is presented here assuming electron velocity distribution is not deviating substantially from a Maxwellian. The study predicts conventional expression from standard TLP theory to give overestimated value of bulk electron temperature. Correction factor is significant and largely depends on population density, temperature, and energy of the fast component. Experimental verification of theoretical results is obtained in the magnetized plasma linear experimental device of Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics where plasma is produced by an electron cyclotron resonance method and known to have a fast flowing electron component.

  3. Fast electron heating of dense plasma relevant to shock ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, T. E.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Pasley, J.

    2013-10-01

    With an intensity in the range of 1016 W/cm2, the ignitor pulse in shock-ignition inertial confinement fusion is well above the threshold of parametric instabilities. Simulations (e.g. Klimo et al. 2011 Phys. Plasmas 18, 082709) indicate that a significant amount of energy will be deposited in energetic electrons with energies <100 keV and it has been proposed that these may play a beneficial role in enhancing the ignitor shock. Simulations by Gus'kov et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 255004 (2012)) show that, under shock-ignition relevant conditions, a mono-energetic electron beam can drive strong shocks in a uniform plasma. We extend this study to the more realistic case of a Maxwellian energy distribution in the fast electron population. Having a distribution of electron mean-free-paths results in a more extended heating profile compared to a mono-energetic beam. However, we show it is still possible to launch strong shocks in this more realistic scenario and achieve equivalent pressures. The peak pressures achieved compare well with analytic scalings. We thank AWE for their financial assistance in support of the doctoral research of T. E. F.

  4. High-energy gamma-ray emission from solar flares: Summary of Fermi large area telescope detections and analysis of two M-class flares

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Bottacini, E.; Buehler, R.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; and others

    2014-05-20

    We present the detections of 18 solar flares detected in high-energy γ-rays (above 100 MeV) with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during its first 4 yr of operation. This work suggests that particle acceleration up to very high energies in solar flares is more common than previously thought, occurring even in modest flares, and for longer durations. Interestingly, all these flares are associated with fairly fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We then describe the detailed temporal, spatial, and spectral characteristics of the first two long-lasting events: the 2011 March 7 flare, a moderate (M3.7) impulsive flare followed by slowly varying γ-ray emission over 13 hr, and the 2011 June 7 M2.5 flare, which was followed by γ-ray emission lasting for 2 hr. We compare the Fermi LAT data with X-ray and proton data measurements from GOES and RHESSI. We argue that the γ-rays are more likely produced through pion decay than electron bremsstrahlung, and we find that the energy spectrum of the proton distribution softens during the extended emission of the 2011 March 7 flare. This would disfavor a trapping scenario for particles accelerated during the impulsive phase of the flare and point to a continuous acceleration process at play for the duration of the flares. CME shocks are known for accelerating the solar energetic particles (SEPs) observed in situ on similar timescales, but it might be challenging to explain the production of γ-rays at the surface of the Sun while the CME is halfway to the Earth. A stochastic turbulence acceleration process occurring in the solar corona is another likely scenario. Detailed comparison of characteristics of SEPs and γ-ray-emitting particles for several flares will be helpful to distinguish between these two possibilities.

  5. Heating a plasma by a broadband stream of fast electrons: Fast ignition, shock ignition, and Gbar shock wave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gus’kov, S. Yu.; Nicolai, Ph.; Ribeyre, X.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2015-09-15

    An exact analytic solution is found for the steady-state distribution function of fast electrons with an arbitrary initial spectrum irradiating a planar low-Z plasma with an arbitrary density distribution. The solution is applied to study the heating of a material by fast electrons of different spectra such as a monoenergetic spectrum, a step-like distribution in a given energy range, and a Maxwellian spectrum, which is inherent in laser-produced fast electrons. The heating of shock- and fast-ignited precompressed inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets as well as the heating of a target designed to generate a Gbar shock wave for equation of state (EOS) experiments by laser-produced fast electrons with a Maxwellian spectrum is investigated. A relation is established between the energies of two groups of Maxwellian fast electrons, which are responsible for generation of a shock wave and heating the upstream material (preheating). The minimum energy of the fast and shock igniting beams as well as of the beam for a Gbar shock wave generation increases with the spectral width of the electron distribution.

  6. Microwave Type III Pair Bursts in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Baolin; Mészárosová, Hana; Karlický, Marian; Huang, Guangli; Tan, Chengming

    2016-03-01

    A solar microwave type III pair burst is composed of normal and reverse-sloped (RS) burst branches with oppositely fast frequency drifts. It is the most sensitive signature of the primary energy release and electron accelerations in flares. This work reports 11 microwave type III pair events in 9 flares observed by radio spectrometers in China and the Czech Republic at a frequency of 0.80-7.60 GHz during 1994-2014. These type III pairs occurred in flare impulsive and postflare phases with separate frequencies in the range of 1.08-3.42 GHz and a frequency gap of 10-1700 MHz. The frequency drift increases with the separate frequency (fx), the lifetime of each burst is anti-correlated to fx, while the frequency gap is independent of fx. In most events, the normal branches are drifting obviously faster than the RS branches. The type III pairs occurring in flare impulsive phase have lower separate frequencies, longer lifetimes, wider frequency gaps, and slower frequency drifts than that occurring in postflare phase. Also, the latter always has strong circular polarization. Further analysis indicates that near the flare energy release sites the plasma density is about {10}10{--}{10}11 cm-3 and the temperature is higher than 107 K. These results provide new constraints to the acceleration mechanism in solar flares.

  7. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of fast-electron driven beta-induced Aflvén eigenmode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Junyi; Zhang, Wenlu; Lin, Zhihong; Holod, Ihor; Li, Ding; Chen, Yang; Cao, Jintao

    2016-05-01

    The fast-electron driven beta-induced Alfvén eigenmode (e-BAE) in toroidal plasmas is investigated for the first time using global gyrokinetic particle simulations, where the fast electron is described by the drift kinetic equation. The simulation shows that the e-BAE propagates in the fast electron diamagnetic direction and its polarization is close to an ideal MHD mode. The phase space structure shows that only the fast electron processional resonance is responsible for the e-BAE excitations while fast-ion driven BAE can be excited through all the channels, including transit, bounce, and processional resonance.

  8. Formation of very hard electron and gamma-ray spectra of flat-spectrum radio quasars in the fast-cooling regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Dahai; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2016-07-01

    In the external Compton scenario, we investigate the formation of a very hard electron spectrum in the fast-cooling regime, using a time-dependent emission model. It is shown that a very hard electron distribution, N^' }_e({γ ^' })∝ {γ ^' }^{-p}, with spectral index p ˜ 1.3 is formed below the minimum energy of injection electrons when inverse Compton scattering takes place in the Klein-Nishina regime, i.e. inverse Compton scattering of relativistic electrons on broad-line region radiation in flat-spectrum radio quasars. This produces a very hard gamma-ray spectrum and can explain in reasonable fashion the very hard Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) spectrum of the flat-spectrum radio quasar 3C 279 during the extreme gamma-ray flare in 2013 December.

  9. Measurements of Fast Magnetic Reconnection Driven by Relativistic Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Anthony; McKelvey, Andrew; Zulick, Calvin; Chuanfei, Dong; Maksimchuk, Anatoly; Thomas, Alexander; Yanovsky, Victor; Krushelnick, Karl; Willingale, Louise; Chykov, Vladimir; Nilson, Phil; Chen, Hui; Williams, Gerald; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Fox, Will

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a process whereby opposing magnetic field lines are forced together and topologically rearrange, resulting in lower magnetic potential energy and in corresponding plasma heating. Such occurrences are ubiquitous in astrophysics as well as appearing in laboratory plasmas such as in ICF in the form of instabilities. We report measurements in the domain of ultra-fast, ultra-intense lasers, in which the mechanism responsible follows from radially expanding surface electrons with v ~ c . Results are compared from two laser facilities (HERCULES and Omega EP), both of which produced two relativistic intensity pulses focused within close proximity onto copper foils. A spherical X-ray crystal was used to image the Kα radiation induced by electron currents, revealing the midplane diffusion region wherein electrons are accelerated into the target by the electric field generated during reconnection. The characteristics of this signal are studied as a function of the focal spot separation, laser energy, and pulse duration. The results are then compared to 3D PIC simulations.

  10. Fast Thermal Shutdown of Tokamak Discharges Without Runaway Electron Avalanching

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhtiari, M.; Yoshino, R.; Nishida, Y

    2002-03-15

    The possibility of using massive quantities of injected deuterium with and without additional admixture of lesser quantities of higher-Z impurities to effect fast thermal shutdown of a tokamak discharge without causing runaway electron avalanching is systematically studied. It is found that various combinations of deuterium alone and deuterium with impurities (helium, nitrogen, argon, and krypton) can provide acceptable runaway-free thermal shutdown. The admixture of impurities cited reduces the quantity of deuterium needed and also reduces the radiative cooling time needed for the plasma to reach final thermal equilibrium, where radiation losses balance ohmic input. In contrast, the addition of neon does not appreciably reduce deuterium quantity or promote faster cooling. This difference relative to the other impurity studies can be understood from the radiation versus plasma temperature characteristics for neon.

  11. New fast beam profile monitor for electron-positron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Bogomyagkov, A. V.; Gurko, V. F.; Zhuravlev, A. N.; Zubarev, P. V.; Kiselev, V. A.; Meshkov, O. I.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Selivanov, A. N.; Smaluk, V. V.; Khilchenko, A. D.

    2007-04-15

    A new fast beam profile monitor has been developed at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. This monitor is based on the Hamamatsu multianode photomultiplier with 16 anode strips and provides turn-by-turn measurement of the transverse beam profile. The device is equipped with an internal memory, which has enough capacity to store 131 072 samples of the beam profile. The dynamic range of the beam profile monitor allows us to study turn-by-turn beam dynamics within the bunch charge range from 1 pC up to 10 nC. Using this instrument, we have investigated at the VEPP-4M electron-positron collider a number of beam dynamics effects which cannot be observed by other beam diagnostics tools.

  12. A Cold Flare with Delayed Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Pal'shin, Valentin D.; Meshalkina, Natalia; Lysenko, Alexandra L.; Kashapova, Larisa K.; Altyntsev, Alexander T.

    2016-05-01

    Recently, a number of peculiar flares have been reported that demonstrate significant nonthermal particle signatures with low, if any, thermal emission, which implies a close association of the observed emission with the primary energy release/electron acceleration region. This paper presents a flare that appears “cold” at the impulsive phase, while displaying delayed heating later on. Using hard X-ray data from Konus-Wind, microwave observations by SSRT, RSTN, NoRH, and NoRP, context observations, and three-dimensional modeling, we study the energy release, particle acceleration, and transport, and the relationships between the nonthermal and thermal signatures. The flaring process is found to involve the interaction between a small loop and a big loop with the accelerated particles divided roughly equally between them. Precipitation of the electrons from the small loop produced only a weak thermal response because the loop volume was small, while the electrons trapped in the big loop lost most of their energy in the coronal part of the loop, which resulted in coronal plasma heating but no or only weak chromospheric evaporation, and thus unusually weak soft X-ray emission. The energy losses of the fast electrons in the big tenuous loop were slow, which resulted in the observed delay of the plasma heating. We determined that the impulsively accelerated electron population had a beamed angular distribution in the direction of the electric force along the magnetic field of the small loop. The accelerated particle transport in the big loop was primarily mediated by turbulent waves, which is similar to other reported cold flares.

  13. Flare energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Dejager, C.; Dennis, B. R.; Hudson, H. S.; Simnett, G. M.; Strong, K. T.; Bentley, R. D.; Bornmann, P. L.; Bruner, M. E.; Cargill, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    In this investigation of flare energetics, researchers sought to establish a comprehensive and self-consistent picture of the sources and transport of energy within a flare. To achieve this goal, they chose five flares in 1980 that were well observed with instruments on the Solar Maximum Mission, and with other space-borne and ground-based instruments. The events were chosen to represent various types of flares. Details of the observations available for them and the corresponding physical parameters derived from these data are presented. The flares were studied from two perspectives, the impulsive and gradual phases, and then the results were compared to obtain the overall picture of the energics of these flares. The role that modeling can play in estimating the total energy of a flare when the observationally determined parameters are used as the input to a numerical model is discussed. Finally, a critique of the current understanding of flare energetics and the methods used to determine various energetics terms is outlined, and possible future directions of research in this area are suggested.

  14. Fast sub-electron detectors review for interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feautrier, Philippe; Gach, Jean-Luc; Bério, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    New disruptive technologies are now emerging for detectors dedicated to interferometry. The detectors needed for this kind of applications need antonymic characteristics: the detector noise must be very low, especially when the signal is dispersed but at the same time must also sample the fast temporal characteristics of the signal. This paper describes the new fast low noise technologies that have been recently developed for interferometry and adaptive optics. The first technology is the Avalanche PhotoDiode (APD) infrared arrays made of HgCdTe. In this paper are presented the two programs that have been developed in that field: the Selex Saphira 320x256 [1] and the 320x255 RAPID detectors developed by Sofradir/CEA LETI in France [2], [3], [4]. Status of these two programs and future developments are presented. Sub-electron noise can now be achieved in the infrared using this technology. The exceptional characteristics of HgCdTe APDs are due to a nearly exclusive impaction ionization of the electrons, and this is why these devices have been called "electrons avalanche photodiodes" or e-APDs. These characteristics have inspired a large effort in developing focal plan arrays using HgCdTe APDs for low photon number applications such as active imaging in gated mode (2D) and/or with direct time of flight detection (3D imaging) and, more recently, passive imaging for infrared wave front correction and fringe tracking in astronomical observations. In addition, a commercial camera solution called C-RED, based on Selex Saphira and commercialized by First Light Imaging [5], is presented here. Some groups are also working with instruments in the visible. In that case, another disruptive technology is showing outstanding performances: the Electron Multiplying CCDs (EMCCD) developed mainly by e2v technologies in UK. The OCAM2 camera, commercialized by First Light Imaging [5], uses the 240x240 EMMCD from e2v and is successfully implemented on the VEGA instrument on the CHARA

  15. EMITTING ELECTRONS SPECTRA AND ACCELERATION PROCESSES IN THE JET OF Mrk 421: FROM THE LOW STATE TO THE GIANT FLARE STATE

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Dahai; Zhang Li; Fan Zhonghui; Zeng Houdun; Yuan Qiang

    2013-03-10

    We investigate the electron energy distributions (EEDs) and the acceleration processes in the jet of Mrk 421 through fitting the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) in different active states in the frame of a one-zone synchrotron self-Compton model. After assuming two possible EEDs formed in different acceleration models: the shock-accelerated power law with exponential cut-off (PLC) EED and the stochastic-turbulence-accelerated log-parabolic (LP) EED, we fit the observed SEDs of Mrk 421 in both low and giant flare states using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method which constrains the model parameters in a more efficient way. The results from our calculations indicate that (1) the PLC and LP models give comparably good fits for the SED in the low state, but the variations of model parameters from low state to flaring can be reasonably explained only in the case of the PLC in the low state; and (2) the LP model gives better fits compared to the PLC model for the SED in the flare state, and the intra-day/night variability observed at GeV-TeV bands can be accommodated only in the LP model. The giant flare may be attributed to the stochastic turbulence re-acceleration of the shock-accelerated electrons in the low state. Therefore, we may conclude that shock acceleration is dominant in the low state, while stochastic turbulence acceleration is dominant in the flare state. Moreover, our result shows that the extrapolated TeV spectra from the best-fit SEDs from optical through GeV with the two EEDs are different. It should be considered with caution when such extrapolated TeV spectra are used to constrain extragalactic background light models.

  16. Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    Because the Earth resides in the atmosphere of our nearest stellar neighbor, events occurring on the Sun's surface directly affect us by interfering with satellite operations and communications, astronaut safety, and, in extreme circumstances, power grid stability. Solar flares, the most energetic events in our solar system, are a substantial source of hazardous space weather affecting our increasingly technology-dependent society. While flares have been observed using ground-based telescopes for over 150 years, modern space-bourne observatories have provided nearly continuous multi-wavelength flare coverage that cannot be obtained from the ground. We can now probe the origins and evolution of flares by tracking particle acceleration, changes in ionized plasma, and the reorganization of magnetic fields. I will walk through our current understanding of why flares occur and how they affect the Earth and also show several examples of these fantastic explosions.

  17. Energy Release and Transport in Super-Hot Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, A.; McTiernan, J. M.; Shih, A.; Martinez Oliveros, J. C.; Allred, J. C.; Warren, H. P.

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares efficiently convert the magnetic energy stored in the Sun's complex coronal magnetic field into the kinetic energies of hot plasma, accelerated particles, and bulk flows. In intense flares, up to 10^32-33 ergs can go into heating plasma to tens of MK, accelerating electrons to hundreds of MeV and ions to tens of GeV, and ejecting 10^9-10 kg of coronal material into the heliosphere at thousands of km/s. However, the exact physical mechanisms behind these phenomena are poorly understood. For example, while "super-hot" (T > 30 MK) plasma temperatures appear to be common in the most intense, X-class flares, how that plasma is so efficiently heated remains unknown. Current studies favor an in situ heating process for super-hot plasma, versus chromospheric evaporation for cooler plasma, although the specific mechanism is under debate. X-class flares are also often associated with enhanced photospheric/chromospheric white light emission, which is itself poorly understood, and with fast (>1000 km/s) CMEs; super-hot flares are more commonly observed in eruptive two-ribbon arcade flares than in highly-confined events. These phenomena may well have common underlying drivers. We discuss the current understanding of super-hot plasma in solar flares, its formation, and evolution, based on observations from RHESSI, SDO/EVE, SDO/AIA, and other instruments. We discuss the energetics of these events and their relationship to white light enhancement and fast CMEs. We explore the possibility of energy deposition by accelerated ions as a common driver for super-hot plasmas and white light enhancement, and discuss future instrumentation -- both for CubeSats and Explorers -- that will provide a deeper understanding of these phenomena and their interrelationships.

  18. A modified Fricke gel dosimeter for fast electron blood dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Lama, L. S.; de Góes, E. G.; Sampaio, F. G. A.; Petchevist, P. C. D.; de Almeida, A.

    2014-12-01

    It has been suggested for more than forty years that blood and blood components be irradiated before allogeneic transfusions for immunosuppressed patients in order to avoid the Transfusion-Associated Graft-versus-Host Disease (TA-GVHD). Whole blood, red blood cells, platelets and granulocytes may have viable T cells and should be irradiated before transfusion for different patient clinical conditions. According to international guides, absorbed doses from 25 up to 50 Gy should be delivered to the central middle plane of each blood bag. Although gamma and X-rays from radiotherapy equipments and dedicated cell irradiators are commonly used for this purpose, electron beams from Linear Accelerators (LINACs) could be used as well. In this work, we developed a methodology able to acquire dosimetric data from blood irradiations, especially after fast electrons exposures. This was achieved using a proposed Fricke Xylenol Gel (FXGp) dosimeter, which presents closer radiological characteristics (attenuation coefficients and stopping-powers) to the whole blood, as well as complete absorbed dose range linearity. The developed methodology and the FXGp dosimeter were also able to provide isodose curves and field profiles for the irradiated samples.

  19. Fast-Electron-Driven Instability in the HSX Stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, C.; Brower, D. L.; Spong, D. A.; Breizman, B. N.; Almagri, A. F.; Anderson, D. T.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Guttenfelder, W.; Likin, K.; Lore, J.; Lu, J.; Schmitt, J.; Zhai, K.

    2008-11-01

    Coherent, global fluctuations in the frequency range 20-120 kHz are observed in the quasi-helically symmetric HSX Stellarator. The modes have n=1 and m>1, peak in the plasma core and are driven by fast electrons associated with electron cyclotron resonance heating. Typically one mode is observed but under certain conditions secondary and tertiary modes are also present with frequency spacing ˜20 kHz. Large parallel wavenumber and lack of any frequency scaling with iota suggest the mode is not Alfvenic. Lagrangian formulation for coupled shear Alfven and acoustic waves have been investigated and modeling indicates the fluctuation may be a sound wave with weak Alfvenic coupling. Predicted mode frequencies and band spacing are consistent with observations. The measured fluctuation is very sensitive to magnetic ripple as just a 2% perturbation results in the mode no longer being observed. This is expected for acoustic modes which are more sensitive to ripple by a factor 1/β compared to Alfvenic modes. *Supported by USDOE contracts DE-FG03-01ER54615 and DE-FG02-93EE54222.

  20. Fast character projection electron beam lithography for diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harzendorf, Torsten; Fuchs, Frank; Banasch, Michael; Zeitner, Uwe D.

    2014-05-01

    Electron beam lithography becomes attractive also for the fabrication of large scale diffractive optical elements by the use of the character projection (CP) technique. Even in the comparable fast variable shaped beam (VSB) exposure approach for conventional electron beam writers optical nanostructures may require very long writing times exceeding 24 hours per wafer because of the high density of features, as required by e.g. sub-wavelength nanostructures. Using character projection, the writing time can be reduced by more than one order of magnitude, due to the simultaneous exposure of multiple features. The benefit of character projection increases with increasing complexity of the features and decreasing period. In this contribution we demonstrate the CP technique for a grating of hexagonal symmetry at 350nm period. The pattern is designed to provide antireflective (AR) properties, which can be adapted in their spectral and angular domain for applications from VIS to NIR by changing the feature size and the etching depth of the nanostructure. This AR nanostructure can be used on the backside of optical elements e.g. gratings, when an AR coating stack could not be applied for the reason of climatic conditions or wave front accuracy.

  1. Fast electron transport in lower-hybrid current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Kupfer, K.; Bers, A.

    1991-01-01

    We generalize the quasilinear-Fokker-Planck formulation for lower-hybrid current drive to include the wave induced radial transport of fast electrons. Toroidal ray tracing shows that the wave fields in the plasma develop a large poloidal component associated with the upshift in k1l and the filling of the "spectral gap". These fields lead to an enhanced radial E x B drift of resonant electrons. Two types of radial flows are obtained: an outward convective flow driven by the asymmetry in the poloidal wave spectrum, and a diffusive flow proportional to the width of the poloidal spectrum. Simulations of Alcator C and JT60, show that the radial convection velocity has a broad maximum of nearly 1 m/sec and is independent of the amplitude of fields. In both cases, the radial diffusion is found to be highly localized near the magnetic axis. For JT60, the peak of the diffusion profile can be quite large, nearly 1 m2/sec.

  2. The flares of August 1972. [solar flare characteristics and spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.; Tanaka, K.

    1973-01-01

    Observations of the August, 1972 flares at Big Bear and Tel Aviv, involving monochromatic movies, magnetograms, and spectra, are analyzed. The region (McMath 11976) showed inverted polarity from its inception on July 11; the great activity was due to extremely high shear and gradients in the magnetic field, as well as a constant invasion of one polarity into the opposite; observations in lambda 3835 show remarkable fast flashes in the impulsive flare of 18:38 UT on Aug. 2 with lifetimes of 5 sec, which may be due to dumping of particles in the lower chromosphere. Flare loops show evolutionary increases of their tilts to the neutral line in the flares of Aug. 4 and 7. Spectroscopic observations show red asymmetry and red shift of the H alpha emission in the flash phase of the Aug. 7 flare, as well as substantial velocity shear in the photosphere during the flare, somewhat like earthquake movement along a fault. Finally the total H alpha emission of the Aug. 7 flare could be measured accurately as about 2.5 x 10 to the 30th power erg, considerably less than coarser previous estimates for great flares.

  3. Rapid temporal evolution of radiation from non-thermal electrons in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Edward T.; Petrosian, Vahe

    1987-01-01

    Solutions of the time dependent Fokker-Planck equation was found for accelerated electrons undergoing Coulomb collisions in a magnetized, fully ionized plasma. An exact solution was found for arbitrary pitch angle and energy distribution in a uniform background plasma. Then, for an inhomogeneous plasma, a solution was found for particles with small pitch angles. These solutions were used to calculate the temporal evolution of bremsstrahlung x-rays from short bursts of nonthermal electron beams, and these spectra were compared with observed high time resolution spectra of short timescale solar hard x-ray bursts. It is shown that the observed softening in time of the spectra rules out a homogeneous background and therefore the possibility of electrons being confined to the corona either because of converging magnetic field or high densities. The inhomogeneous solution was also applied to a model with constant coronal density and exponentially rising chromospheric density. The spectra are shown to be consistent with that produced by a collimated beam of electrons accelerated in the corona with certain given conditions. These conditions could be violated if large pitch angle electrons are present.

  4. Ultraintense laser-produced fast-electron propagation in gas jets.

    PubMed

    Batani, D; Baton, S D; Manclossi, M; Santos, J J; Amiranoff, F; Koenig, M; Martinolli, E; Antonicci, A; Rousseaux, C; Le Gloahec, M Rabec; Hall, T; Malka, V; Cowan, T E; King, J; Freeman, R R; Key, M; Stephens, R

    2005-02-11

    We study the propagation of fast electrons in a gas at different densities. A large relativistic electron current is produced by focusing a short-pulse ultrahigh-intensity laser on a metallic target. It then propagates in a gas jet placed behind the foil. Shadowgraphy in the gas shows an electron cloud moving at sub-relativistic average velocities. The experiment shows (i) the essential role of the density of background material for allowing propagation of fast electrons, (ii) the importance of the ionization phase which produces free electrons available for the return current, and (iii) the effect of electrostatic fields on fast-electron propagation.

  5. Quantitative analysis of flare accelerated electrons through their hard X-ray and microwave radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, K. L.; Trottet, G.

    1985-01-01

    Hard X-ray and microwave modelling that takes into account the temporal evolution of the electron spectrum as well as the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field and the ambient medium in the radio source is presented. This method is illustrated for the June 29 1980 10:41 UT event. The implication on the process of acceleration/injection is discussed.

  6. Slow-rise and Fast-rise Phases of an Erupting Solar Filament and Flare Emission Onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2005-01-01

    We observe the eruption of an active-region solar filament of 1998 July 11 using high time cadence and high spatial resolution EUV observations from the TRACE satellite, along with soft X-ray images from the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on the Yohkoh satellite, hard X-ray fluxes from the BATSE instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) satellite and from the hard X-ray telescope (HXT) on Yohkoh, and ground-based magnetograms. We concentrate on the initiation of the eruption in an effort to understand the eruption mechanism. Prior to eruption the filament undergoes slow upward movement in a "slow rise" phase with an approximately constant velocity of about 15 km/s that lasts about 10 min. It then erupts in a "fast-rise" phase, accelerating to a velocity of about 200 km/s in about 5 min, and then decelerating to approximately 150 km/s over the next 5 min. EUV brightenings begin about concurrent with the start of the filament's slow rise, and remain immediately beneath the rising filament during the slow rise; initial soft X-ray brightenings occur at about the same time and location. Strong hard X-ray emission begins after the onset of the fast rise, and does not peak until the filament has traveled to a substantial altitude (to a height about equal to the initial length of the erupting filament) beyond its initial location. Additional information is available in the original extended abstract.

  7. Fast electrons from electron-ion collisions in strong laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kull, H.-J.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.

    2005-06-15

    Electron-ion collisions in the presence of a strong laser field lead to a distribution of fast electrons with maximum energy E{sub max}=(k{sub 0}+2v{sub 0}){sup 2}/2(a.u.), where k{sub 0} is the impact and v{sub 0} the quiver velocity of the electron. The energy spectrum is calculated by two approaches: (1) The time-dependent Schroedinger equation is numerically solved for wave packet scattering from a one-dimensional softcore Coulomb potential. Multiphoton energy spectra are obtained demonstrating a separation of the energy spectrum into an exponential distribution for transmission and a plateau distribution for reflection. (2) The energy spectrum is analytically calculated in the framework of classical instantaneous Coulomb collisions with random impact parameters and random phases of the laser field. An exact solution for the energy spectrum is obtained from which the fraction of fast electrons in the plateau region can be estimated.

  8. Solar flare model atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Fisher, George H.

    1993-01-01

    Solar flare model atmospheres computed under the assumption of energetic equilibrium in the chromosphere are presented. The models use a static, one-dimensional plane parallel geometry and are designed within a physically self-consistent coronal loop. Assumed flare heating mechanisms include collisions from a flux of non-thermal electrons and x-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona. The heating by energetic electrons accounts explicitly for variations of the ionized fraction with depth in the atmosphere. X-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona incorporates a flare loop geometry by approximating distant portions of the loop with a series of point sources, while treating the loop leg closest to the chromospheric footpoint in the plane-parallel approximation. Coronal flare heating leads to increased heat conduction, chromospheric evaporation and subsequent changes in coronal pressure; these effects are included self-consistently in the models. Cooling in the chromosphere is computed in detail for the important optically thick HI, CaII and MgII transitions using the non-LTE prescription in the program MULTI. Hydrogen ionization rates from x-ray photo-ionization and collisional ionization by non-thermal electrons are included explicitly in the rate equations. The models are computed in the 'impulsive' and 'equilibrium' limits, and in a set of intermediate 'evolving' states. The impulsive atmospheres have the density distribution frozen in pre-flare configuration, while the equilibrium models assume the entire atmosphere is in hydrostatic and energetic equilibrium. The evolving atmospheres represent intermediate stages where hydrostatic equilibrium has been established in the chromosphere and corona, but the corona is not yet in energetic equilibrium with the flare heating source. Thus, for example, chromospheric evaporation is still in the process of occurring.

  9. MAGNETIC-ISLAND CONTRACTION AND PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN SIMULATED ERUPTIVE SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Guidoni, S. E.; DeVore, C. R.; Karpen, J. T.; Lynch, B. J.

    2016-03-20

    The mechanism that accelerates particles to the energies required to produce the observed high-energy impulsive emission in solar flares is not well understood. Drake et al. proposed a mechanism for accelerating electrons in contracting magnetic islands formed by kinetic reconnection in multi-layered current sheets (CSs). We apply these ideas to sunward-moving flux ropes (2.5D magnetic islands) formed during fast reconnection in a simulated eruptive flare. A simple analytic model is used to calculate the energy gain of particles orbiting the field lines of the contracting magnetic islands in our ultrahigh-resolution 2.5D numerical simulation. We find that the estimated energy gains in a single island range up to a factor of five. This is higher than that found by Drake et al. for islands in the terrestrial magnetosphere and at the heliopause, due to strong plasma compression that occurs at the flare CS. In order to increase their energy by two orders of magnitude and plausibly account for the observed high-energy flare emission, the electrons must visit multiple contracting islands. This mechanism should produce sporadic emission because island formation is intermittent. Moreover, a large number of particles could be accelerated in each magnetohydrodynamic-scale island, which may explain the inferred rates of energetic-electron production in flares. We conclude that island contraction in the flare CS is a promising candidate for electron acceleration in solar eruptions.

  10. Magnetic-Island Contraction and Particle Acceleration in Simulated Eruptive Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidoni, S. E.; Devore, C. R.; Karpen, J. T.; Lynch, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism that accelerates particles to the energies required to produce the observed high-energy impulsive emission in solar flares is not well understood. Drake et al. proposed a mechanism for accelerating electrons in contracting magnetic islands formed by kinetic reconnection in multi-layered current sheets (CSs). We apply these ideas to sunward-moving flux ropes (2.5D magnetic islands) formed during fast reconnection in a simulated eruptive flare. A simple analytic model is used to calculate the energy gain of particles orbiting the field lines of the contracting magnetic islands in our ultrahigh-resolution 2.5D numerical simulation. We find that the estimated energy gains in a single island range up to a factor of five. This is higher than that found by Drake et al. for islands in the terrestrial magnetosphere and at the heliopause, due to strong plasma compression that occurs at the flare CS. In order to increase their energy by two orders of magnitude and plausibly account for the observed high-energy flare emission, the electrons must visit multiple contracting islands. This mechanism should produce sporadic emission because island formation is intermittent. Moreover, a large number of particles could be accelerated in each magneto hydro dynamic-scale island, which may explain the inferred rates of energetic-electron production in flares. We conclude that island contraction in the flare CS is a promising candidate for electron acceleration in solar eruptions.

  11. Magnetic-island Contraction and Particle Acceleration in Simulated Eruptive Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidoni, S. E.; DeVore, C. R.; Karpen, J. T.; Lynch, B. J.

    2016-03-01

    The mechanism that accelerates particles to the energies required to produce the observed high-energy impulsive emission in solar flares is not well understood. Drake et al. proposed a mechanism for accelerating electrons in contracting magnetic islands formed by kinetic reconnection in multi-layered current sheets (CSs). We apply these ideas to sunward-moving flux ropes (2.5D magnetic islands) formed during fast reconnection in a simulated eruptive flare. A simple analytic model is used to calculate the energy gain of particles orbiting the field lines of the contracting magnetic islands in our ultrahigh-resolution 2.5D numerical simulation. We find that the estimated energy gains in a single island range up to a factor of five. This is higher than that found by Drake et al. for islands in the terrestrial magnetosphere and at the heliopause, due to strong plasma compression that occurs at the flare CS. In order to increase their energy by two orders of magnitude and plausibly account for the observed high-energy flare emission, the electrons must visit multiple contracting islands. This mechanism should produce sporadic emission because island formation is intermittent. Moreover, a large number of particles could be accelerated in each magnetohydrodynamic-scale island, which may explain the inferred rates of energetic-electron production in flares. We conclude that island contraction in the flare CS is a promising candidate for electron acceleration in solar eruptions.

  12. Particle Acceleration in Solar Flares and Associated CME Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosian, Vahé

    2016-10-01

    Observations relating the characteristics of electrons seen near Earth (solar energetic particles [SEPs]) and those producing flare radiation show that in certain (prompt) events the origin of both populations appears to be the flare site, which shows strong correlation between the number and spectral index of SEP and hard X-ray radiating electrons, but in others (delayed), which are associated with fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs), this relation is complex and SEPs tend to be harder. Prompt event spectral relation disagrees with that expected in thick or thin target models. We show that using a more accurate treatment of the transport of the accelerated electrons to the footpoints and to Earth can account for this discrepancy. Our results are consistent with those found by Chen & Petrosian for two flares using nonparametric inversion methods, according to which we have weak diffusion conditions, and trapping mediated by magnetic field convergence. The weaker correlations and harder spectra of delayed events can come about by reacceleration of electrons in the CME shock environment. We describe under what conditions such a hardening can be achieved. Using this (acceleration at the flare and reacceleration in the CME) scenario, we show that we can describe the similar dichotomy that exists between the so-called impulsive, highly enriched (3He and heavy ions), and softer SEP events and stronger, more gradual SEP events with near-normal ionic abundances and harder spectra. These methods can be used to distinguish the acceleration mechanisms and to constrain their characteristics.

  13. X-class Solar Flare Energy Partition into Radiative, Non-Thermal Acceleration of Electrons and Peak Thermal Plasma Components - Methodology and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Christopher S.; Chamberlin, Phillip; Dennis, Brian R.; Hock, Rachel

    2015-08-01

    Solar flares are among the most energetic processes in the solar system. X-class flares are the largest and can convert up to 1033 ergs of magnetic energy into the acceleration of charged particles and the heating of plasma. They are often accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We discuss the methodology and results of the energy partition into three main components: (1) radiative energy, (2) non-thermal acceleration of electrons, and (3) the peak thermal energy content, for a subset of the largest eruptive events from Solar Cycle 23, as derived from satellite observations and empirical models. The bolometric energy content is on the order of 1031 - 1032 ergs and is extracted from Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) measurements by the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) onboard the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE). The Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) contribution of the total radiative output is obtained by implementing the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM). Furthermore, we partition the radiative release into impulsive and gradual phases. X-ray spectra from the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) are used to deduce the energy in the non-thermal accelerated electrons, generally found to be 1031 -1032 ergs, and the peak thermal energy content of around 1030 - 1031 ergs. Aside from the CME kinetic energy, these three components contain a substantial amount of the initial available magnetic energy.

  14. Measurements of the fast electron bremsstrahlung emission during electron cyclotron resonance heating in the HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y. P.; Liu, Yi; Song, X. Y.; Yuan, G. L.; Chen, W.; Ji, X. Q.; Ding, X. T.; Yang, J. W.; Zhou, J.; Li, X.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.; Pan, C. H.; Liu, Y.

    2010-10-15

    A fast electron bremsstrahlung (FEB) diagnostic technique based on cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector has been developed recently in the HL-2A tokamak for measurements of the temporal evolution of FEB emission in the energy range of 10-200 keV. With a perpendicular viewing into the plasma on the equatorial plane, the hard x-ray spectra with eight different energy channels are measured. The discrimination of the spectra is implemented by an accurate spectrometry. The system also makes use of fast digitization and software signal processing technology. An ambient environment of neutrons, gammas, and magnetic disturbance requires careful shielding. During electron cyclotron resonance heating, the generation of fast electrons and the oscillations of electron fishbone (e-fishbone) have been found. Using the FEB measurement system, it has been experimentally identified that the mode strongly correlates with the electron cyclotron resonance heating produced fast electrons with 30-70 keV.

  15. High time resolution electron measurement by Fast Electron energy Spectrum Analyzer (FESA)

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Yoshifumi; Fujimoto, Masaki; Maezawa, Kiyoshi; Shinohara, Iku; Tsuda, Yuichi; Sasaki, Shintaro; Kojima, Hirotsugu

    2009-06-16

    We have newly developed an electron energy analyzer FESA (Fast Electron energy Spectrum Analyzer) for a future magnetospheric satellite mission SCOPE. The SCOPE mission is designed in order that observational studies from the cross-scale coupling viewpoint are enabled. One of the key observations necessary for the SCOPE mission is high-time resolution electron measurement. Eight FESAs on a spinning spacecraft are capable of measuring three dimensional electron distribution function with time resolution of 8 msec. FESA consists of two electrostatic analyzers that are composed of three nested hemispherical deflectors. Single FESA functions as four top-hat type electrostatic analyzers that can measure electrons with four different energies simultaneously. By measuring the characteristics of the test model FESA, we proved the validity of the design concept of FESA. Based on the measured characteristics, we designed FESA optimized for the SCOPE mission. This optimized analyzer has good enough performance to measure three dimensional electron distribution functions around the magnetic reconnection region in the Earth's magnetotail.

  16. Fast electron beam measurements from relativistically intense, frequency-doubled laser-solid interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, R. H. H.; Pérez, F.; Streeter, M. J. V.; Clark, E. L.; Davies, J. R.; Schlenvoigt, H.-P.; Santos, J. J.; Hulin, S.; Lancaster, K. L.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Vauzour, B.; Soloviev, A. A.; Baton, S. D.; Rose, S. J.; Norreys, P. A.

    2013-09-01

    Experimental measurements of the fast electron beam created by the interaction of relativistically intense, frequency-doubled laser light with planar solid targets and its subsequent transport within the target are presented and compared with those of a similar experiment using the laser fundamental frequency. Using frequency-doubled laser light, the fast electron source size is significantly reduced, while evidence suggests the divergence angle may be reduced. Pyrometric measurements of the target rear surface temperature and the Cu Kα imager data indicate the laser to fast electron absorption fraction is reduced using frequency doubled laser light. Bremsstrahlung measurements indicate the fast electron temperature is 125 keV, while the laser energy absorbed into forward-going fast electrons was found to be 16 ± 4% for frequency doubled light at a mean laser intensity of 5 ± 3 × 1018 W cm-2.

  17. Solar flares: an overview.

    PubMed

    Rust, D M

    1992-01-01

    This is a survey of solar phenomena and physical models that may be useful for improving forecasts of solar flares and proton storms in interplanetary space. Knowledge of the physical processes that accelerate protons has advanced because of gamma-ray and X-ray observations from the Solar Maximum Mission telescopes. Protons are accelerated at the onset of flares, but the duration of any subsequent proton storm at 1 AU depends on the structure of the interplanetary fields. X-ray images of the solar corona show possible fast proton escape paths. Magnetographs and high-resolution visible-band images show the magnetic field structure near the acceleration region and the heating effects of sunward-directed protons. Preflare magnetic field growth and shear may be the most important clues to the physical processes that generate high energy solar particles. Any dramatic improvement in flare forecasts will require high resolution solar telescopes in space. Several possibilities for improvements in the art of flare forecasting are presented, among them: the use of acoustic tomography to probe for subsurface magnetic fields; a satellite-borne solar magnetograph; and an X-ray telescope to monitor the corona for eruptions.

  18. Mean free path of a suddenly created fast electron moving in a degenerate electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, I.; Echenique, P. M.

    2012-03-01

    A lower bound on the mean free path (l) of a swift electron moving in a degenerate electron gas is calculated by implementing a standard theoretical framework for the collision rate, 1/τ, with a scattering amplitude characterized by the matrix element of a hole-screened interaction potential taken between plane-wave states. The instantaneous hole around a system's electron is considered at the Hartree-Fock level for the ground-state wave function of the degenerate electron gas. The real transitions in the many-body system are considered by following Galitskii's treatment on an almost perfect Fermi gas of neutral atomic constituents. The analytical results show minima both in τ and l, and they appear at (E/EF)≃4.6 and (E/EF)≃2.5, respectively, where E is the kinetic energy of the fast electron and EF is the Fermi energy of the host. Comparison with mean free path data obtained recently for Cu is made and a reasonable agreement is found.

  19. Fast imaging with inelastically scattered electrons by off-axis chromatic confocal electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Changlin; Zhu, Ye; Lazar, Sorin; Etheridge, Joanne

    2014-04-25

    We introduce off-axis chromatic scanning confocal electron microscopy, a technique for fast mapping of inelastically scattered electrons in a scanning transmission electron microscope without a spectrometer. The off-axis confocal mode enables the inelastically scattered electrons to be chromatically dispersed both parallel and perpendicular to the optic axis. This enables electrons with different energy losses to be separated and detected in the image plane, enabling efficient energy filtering in a confocal mode with an integrating detector. We describe the experimental configuration and demonstrate the method with nanoscale core-loss chemical mapping of silver (M4,5) in an aluminium-silver alloy and atomic scale imaging of the low intensity core-loss La (M4,5@840  eV) signal in LaB6. Scan rates up to 2 orders of magnitude faster than conventional methods were used, enabling a corresponding reduction in radiation dose and increase in the field of view. If coupled with the enhanced depth and lateral resolution of the incoherent confocal configuration, this offers an approach for nanoscale three-dimensional chemical mapping.

  20. Characterization of the fast electrons distribution produced in a high intensity laser target interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Westover, B.; Chen, C. D.; Patel, P. K.; McLean, H.; Beg, F. N.

    2014-03-15

    Experiments on the Titan laser (∼150 J, 0.7 ps, 2 × 10{sup 20} W cm{sup −2}) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory were carried out in order to study the properties of fast electrons produced by high-intensity, short pulse laser interacting with matter under conditions relevant to Fast Ignition. Bremsstrahlung x-rays produced by these fast electrons were measured by a set of compact filter-stack based x-ray detectors placed at three angles with respect to the target. The measured bremsstrahlung signal allows a characterization of the fast electron beam spectrum, conversion efficiency of laser energy into fast electron kinetic energy and angular distribution. A Monte Carlo code Integrated Tiger Series was used to model the bremsstrahlung signal and infer a laser to fast electron conversion efficiency of 30%, an electron slope temperature of about 2.2 MeV, and a mean divergence angle of 39°. Simulations were also performed with the hybrid transport code ZUMA which includes fields in the target. In this case, a conversion efficiency of laser energy to fast electron energy of 34% and a slope temperature between 1.5 MeV and 4 MeV depending on the angle between the target normal direction and the measuring spectrometer are found. The observed temperature of the bremsstrahlung spectrum, and therefore the inferred electron spectrum are found to be angle dependent.

  1. Statistical Analyses of White-Light Flares: Two Main Results about Flare Behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal, Hasan Ali

    2012-08-01

    We present two main results, based on models and the statistical analyses of 1672 U-band flares. We also discuss the behaviour of white-light flares. In addition, the parameters of the flares detected from two years of observations on CR Dra are presented. By comparing with flare parameters obtained from other UV Ceti-type stars, we examine the behaviour of the optical flare processes along with the spectral types. Moreover, we aimed, using large white-light flare data, to analyse the flare time-scales with respect to some results obtained from X-ray observations. Using SPSS V17.0 and GraphPad Prism V5.02 software, the flares detected from CR Dra were modelled with the OPEA function, and analysed with the t-Test method to compare similar flare events in other stars. In addition, using some regression calculations in order to derive the best histograms, the time-scales of white-light flares were analysed. Firstly, CR Dra flares have revealed that white-light flares behave in a similar way as their counterparts observed in X-rays. As can be seen in X-ray observations, the electron density seems to be a dominant parameter in white-light flare process, too. Secondly, the distributions of the flare time-scales demonstrate that the number of observed flares reaches a maximum value in some particular ratios, which are 0.5, or its multiples, and especially positive integers. The thermal processes might be dominant for these white-light flares, while non-thermal processes might be dominant in the others. To obtain better results for the behaviour of the white-light flare process along with the spectral types, much more stars in a wide spectral range, from spectral type dK5e to dM6e, must be observed in white-light flare patrols.

  2. Experiment vs. theory on electric inhibition of fast electron penetration of targets

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, R R; Akli, K U; Batani, D; Baton, S; Hatchett, S P; Hey, D; Key, M H; King, J A; MacKinnon, A J; Norreys, P A; Snavely, R A; Stephens, R; Stoeckl, C; Town, R J; Zhang, B

    2005-06-13

    A dominant force of inhibition of fast electrons in normal density matter is due to an axially directed electrostatic field. Fast electrons leave the critical density layer and enter the solid in an assumed relativistic Maxwellian energy distribution. Within a cycle of the solid density plasma frequency, the charge separation is neutralized by a background return current density j{sub b} = en{sub b}v{sub b} equal and opposite to the fast electron current density j{sub f} = en{sub f}v{sub f} [1] where it is assumed that the fast electron number density is much less than the background number density, n{sub f} << n{sub b} [2]. This charge and current neutralization allows the forward moving fast electron current to temporarily exceed the Alfven limit by many orders of magnitude [3]. During this period the cold return current, in passing through the material resistivity, ohmically generates an electric field in opposition to the fast current. As a result, the fast electron current loses its energy to the material, via the return current, in the form of heat [4]. So, although the highly energetic electrons suffer relatively little direct collisional loss of energy (owing to the inverse relation of the Coulomb cross section to velocity), their motion is substantially damped by ohmic heating of the slower return current. The equation for the ohmically generated electric field, E, is given by Ohm's law, E = j{sub c}{eta} where {eta} is the material resistivity.

  3. Evidence of locally enhanced target heating due to instabilities of counter-streaming fast electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koester, Petra; Booth, Nicola; Cecchetti, Carlo A.; Chen, Hui; Evans, Roger G.; Gregori, Gianluca; Labate, Luca; Levato, Tadzio; Li, Bin; Makita, Mikako; Mithen, James; Murphy, Christopher D.; Notley, Margaret; Pattathil, Rajeev; Riley, David; Woolsey, Nigel; Gizzi, Leonida A.

    2015-02-01

    The high-current fast electron beams generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions require the onset of a balancing return current in order to propagate in the target material. Such a system of counter-streaming electron currents is unstable to a variety of instabilities such as the current-filamentation instability and the two-stream instability. An experimental study aimed at investigating the role of instabilities in a system of symmetrical counter-propagating fast electron beams is presented here for the first time. The fast electron beams are generated by double-sided laser-irradiation of a layered target foil at laser intensities above 1019 W/cm2. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of the emission from the central Ti layer shows that locally enhanced energy deposition is indeed achieved in the case of counter-propagating fast electron beams.

  4. Evidence of locally enhanced target heating due to instabilities of counter-streaming fast electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Koester, Petra; Cecchetti, Carlo A.; Booth, Nicola; Woolsey, Nigel; Chen, Hui; Evans, Roger G.; Gregori, Gianluca; Li, Bin; Mithen, James; Murphy, Christopher D.; Labate, Luca; Gizzi, Leonida A.; Levato, Tadzio; Makita, Mikako; Riley, David; Notley, Margaret; Pattathil, Rajeev

    2015-02-15

    The high-current fast electron beams generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions require the onset of a balancing return current in order to propagate in the target material. Such a system of counter-streaming electron currents is unstable to a variety of instabilities such as the current-filamentation instability and the two-stream instability. An experimental study aimed at investigating the role of instabilities in a system of symmetrical counter-propagating fast electron beams is presented here for the first time. The fast electron beams are generated by double-sided laser-irradiation of a layered target foil at laser intensities above 10{sup 19 }W/cm{sup 2}. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of the emission from the central Ti layer shows that locally enhanced energy deposition is indeed achieved in the case of counter-propagating fast electron beams.

  5. Solar and stellar flares and their impact on planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kazunari

    Recent observations of the Sun revealed that the solar atmosphere is full of flares and flare-like phenomena, which affect terrestrial environment and our civilization. It has been established that flares are caused by the release of magnetic energy through magnetic reconnection. Many stars show flares similar to solar flares, and such stellar flares especially in stars with fast rotation are much more energetic than solar flares. These are called superflares. The total energy of a solar flare is 1029 - 1032 erg, while that of a superflare is 1033 - 1038 erg. Recently, it was found that superflares (with 1034 - 1035 erg) occur on Sun-like stars with slow rotation with frequency once in 800 - 5000 years. This suggests the possibility of superflares on the Sun. We review recent development of solar and stellar flare research, and briefly discuss possible impacts of superflares on the Earth and exoplanets.

  6. Review of tokamak experiments on direct electron heating and current drive with fast waves

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R.I.

    1993-12-01

    Results from tokamak experiments on direct electron interaction with the compressional Alfven wave ({open_quote}fast wave{close_quote}) are reviewed. Experiments aimed at electron heating as well as those in which fast wave electron current drive was investigated are discussed. A distinction is drawn between experiments employing the lower hybrid range of frequencies, where both the lower hybrid wave ({open_quote}slow wave{close_quote}) and the fast wave can propagate in much of the plasma, and those experiments using the fast wave in the range of moderate to high ion cyclotron harmonics, where only the fast wave can penetrate to the plasma core. Most of the early tokamak experiments were in the lower hybrid frequency regime, and the observed electron interaction appeared to be very similar to that obtained with the slow wave at the same frequency. In particular, electron interaction with the fast wave was observed only below a density limit nearly the same as the well known slow wave density limit. In the more recent lower frequency fast wave experiments, electron interaction (heating and current drive) is observed at the center of the discharge, where slow waves are not present.

  7. Study of wave-particle interaction between fast Magnetosonic and energetic electrons based on numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, S.

    2015-12-01

    There are many energetic electrons in the radiation belt of Earth. When the geomagnetic activity becomes stronger, the energy flux of energetic electrons will increase to more than ten times in the outer radiation belt, therefore it is very important to study how the energetic electrons generate and the lifetime of energetic electrons for space weather research. The acceleration of electrons in radiation belt is mainly depending on wave-particle interaction: the whistler mode chorus is the main driver for local acceleration mechanism, which could accelerate and loss energetic electrons; the geomagnetic pulsation ULF wave will cause energetic electron inward radial diffusion which will charge the electrons; recently observation results show us that the fast magnetosonic waves may also accelerate energetic electrons. For the reason that we try to study the wave-particle interaction between fast Magnetosonic and energetic electrons based on numerical simulation, in which the most important past is at the storm time the combination of highly warped Earth magnetic field and fast magnetosonic wave field will be applied for the electromagnetic environment of moving test particles. The energy, pitch angle and cross diffusion coefficients will be calculated respectively in this simulation to study how the electrons receive energy from fast magnetosonic wave. The diffusion coefficients within different dipole Earth magnetic field and non-dipole storm magnetic field are compared, while dynamics of electrons at selected initial energys are shown in our study.

  8. Reconstruction of the energy spectrum of electrons accelerated in the April 15, 2002 solar flare based on IRIS X-ray spectrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motorina, G. G.; Kudryavtsev, I. V.; Lazutkov, V. P.; Savchenko, M. I.; Skorodumov, D. V.; Charikov, Yu. E.

    2016-04-01

    We reconstruct the energy distribution of electrons accelerated in the April 15, 2002 solar flare on the basis of the data from the IRIS X-ray spectrometer onboard the CORONAS-F satellite. We obtain the solution to the integral equations describing the transformation of the spectrum of X-ray photons during the recording and reconstruction of the spectrum of accelerated electrons in the bremsstrahlung source using the random search method and the Tikhonov regularization method. In this event, we detected a singularity in the electron spectrum associated with the existence of a local minimum in the energy range 40-60 keV, which cannot be detected by a direct method.

  9. Energy deposition of quasi-two temperature relativistic electrons in fast-shock ignition scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, Seyed Abolfazl; Farahbod, Amir Hossein

    2016-10-01

    Previous calculations from Solodov et al. (2008) indicate that classical stopping and scattering dominate electrons energy deposition and transport when the electrons reach the dense plasma in FSI inertial confinement fusion concept [1]. Our calculations show that, by using quasi- two temperature electrons energy distribution function [2] in comparison with exponential [3] or monoenergetic distribution function and also increasing fast electrons energy to about 7 MeV, the ratio of beam blooming to straggling definitely decreases. Our analytical analysis shows that for fuel mass more than 1 mg and for fast ignitor wavelength λif > 0.53 μ m, straggling and beam blooming increases. Meanwhile, by reducing fast ignitor wavelength from 0.53 to 0.35 micron, and for fuel mass about 2 mg, electron penetration into the dense fuel slightly increases. Therefore, reduction of scattering (blooming and straggling) of electrons and enhancement of electron penetration into the dense fuel, can be obtained in relativistic regime with high energy fast electrons of the order of 5 Mev and more. Such derivations can be used in theoretical studies of the ignition conditions and PIC simulations of the electron transport in fast ignition scenario.

  10. Improved Detection of Fast Neutrons with Solid-State Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzakis, J.; Hassan, S. M.; Clark, E. L.; Talebitaher, A.; Lee, P.

    2014-02-01

    There is an increasing requirement for alternative and improved detection of fast neutrons due to the renewed interest in neutron diagnostics applications. Some applications require heavily shielded neutron sources that emit a substantial proportion of their emission as fast neutrons and so require high performance fast neutron detectors. In some applications, the detection of neutron bursts from pulsed neutron sources has to be synchronized to the repetition rate of the source. Typical fast neutron detectors incorporate scintillators that are sensitive to all kinds of ionizing radiations as well as neutrons, and their efficiency is low. In this paper, we present a device based on the principle of neutron activation coupled to solid-state p-i-n diodes connected to a charge amplifier. The charge amplifier is specially developed to operate with high capacitance detectors and has been optimized by the aid of the SPICE program. A solid-state pulse shaping filter follows the charge amplifier, as an inexpensive solution, capable to provide pulses that can be counted by a digital counter.

  11. Limiting Superluminal Electron and Neutrino Velocities Using the 2010 Crab Nebula Flare and the IceCube PeV Neutrino Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2014-01-01

    The observation of two PetaelectronVolt (PeV)-scale neutrino events reported by Ice Cube allows one to place constraints on Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) in the neutrino sector. After first arguing that at least one of the PetaelectronVolt IceCube events was of extragalactic origin, I derive an upper limit for the difference between putative superluminal neutrino and electron velocities of less than or equal to approximately 5.6 x 10(exp -19) in units where c = 1, confirming that the observed PetaelectronVolt neutrinos could have reached Earth from extragalactic sources. I further derive a new constraint on the superluminal electron velocity, obtained from the observation of synchrotron radiation from the Crab Nebula flare of September, 2010. The inference that the greater than 1 GigaelectronVolt gamma-rays from synchrotron emission in the flare were produced by electrons of energy up to approx. 5.1 PetaelectronVolt indicates the nonoccurrence of vacuum Cerenkov radiation by these electrons. This implies a new, strong constraint on superluminal electron velocities delta(sub e) less than or equal to approximately 5 x 10(exp -21). It immediately follows that one then obtains an upper limit on the superluminal neutrino velocity alone of delta(sub v) less than or equal to approximately 5.6 x 10(exp -19), many orders of magnitude better than the time-of-flight constraint from the SN1987A neutrino burst. However, if the electrons are subluminal the constraint on the absolute value of delta(sub e) less than or equal to approximately 8 x 10(exp -17), obtained from the Crab Nebula gamma-ray spectrum, places a weaker constraint on superluminal neutrino velocity of delta(sub v) less than or equal to approximately 8 x 10(exp -17).

  12. SCATTERING POLARIZATION IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Štěpán, Jiří; Heinzel, Petr

    2013-11-20

    There is ongoing debate about the origin and even the very existence of a high degree of linear polarization of some chromospheric spectral lines observed in solar flares. The standard explanation of these measurements is in terms of the impact polarization caused by non-thermal proton and/or electron beams. In this work, we study the possible role of resonance line polarization due to radiation anisotropy in the inhomogeneous medium of the flare ribbons. We consider a simple two-dimensional model of the flaring chromosphere and we self-consistently solve the non-LTE problem taking into account the role of resonant scattering polarization and of the Hanle effect. Our calculations show that the horizontal plasma inhomogeneities at the boundary of the flare ribbons can lead to a significant radiation anisotropy in the line formation region and, consequently, to a fractional linear polarization of the emergent radiation of the order of several percent. Neglecting the effects of impact polarization, our model can provide a clue for resolving some of the common observational findings, namely: (1) why a high degree of polarization appears mainly at the edges of the flare ribbons; (2) why polarization can also be observed during the gradual phase of a flare; and (3) why polarization is mostly radial or tangential. We conclude that radiation transfer in realistic multi-dimensional models of solar flares needs to be considered as an essential ingredient for understanding the observed spectral line polarization.

  13. Fast electron transport and induced heating in solid targets from rear-side interferometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Malka, G; Nicolaï, Ph; Brambrink, E; Santos, J J; Aléonard, M M; Amthor, K; Audebert, P; Breil, J; Claverie, G; Gerbaux, M; Gobet, F; Hannachi, F; Méot, V; Morel, P; Scheurer, J N; Tarisien, M; Tikhonchuk, V

    2008-02-01

    Fast adiabatic plasma heating of a thin solid target irradiated by a high intensity laser has been observed by an optical fast interferometry diagnostic. It is driven by the hot electron current induced by the laser plasma interaction at the front side of the target. Radial and longitudinal temperature profiles are calculated to reproduce the observed rear-side plasma expansion. The main parameters of the suprathermal electrons (number, temperature, and divergence) have been deduced from these observations.

  14. Fast electron transport and induced heating in solid targets from rear-side interferometry imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Malka, G.; Aleonard, M. M.; Claverie, G.; Gerbaux, M.; Gobet, F.; Hannachi, F.; Scheurer, J. N.; Tarisien, M.; Brambrink, E.; Audebert, P.; Amthor, K.; Meot, V.; Morel, P.

    2008-02-15

    Fast adiabatic plasma heating of a thin solid target irradiated by a high intensity laser has been observed by an optical fast interferometry diagnostic. It is driven by the hot electron current induced by the laser plasma interaction at the front side of the target. Radial and longitudinal temperature profiles are calculated to reproduce the observed rear-side plasma expansion. The main parameters of the suprathermal electrons (number, temperature, and divergence) have been deduced from these observations.

  15. Stochastic Particle Acceleration in Impulsive Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.

    2001-01-01

    The acceleration of a huge number of electrons and ions to relativistic energies over timescales ranging from several seconds to several tens of seconds is the fundamental problem in high-energy solar physics. The cascading turbulence model we have developed has been shown previously (e.g., Miller 2000; Miller & Roberts 1995; Miner, LaRosa, & Moore 1996) to account for all the bulk features (such as acceleration timescales, fluxes, total number of energetic particles, and maximum energies) of electron and proton acceleration in impulsive solar flares. While the simulation of this acceleration process is involved, the essential idea of the model is quite simple, and consists of just a few parts: 1. During the primary flare energy release phase, we assume that low-amplitude MHD Alfven and fast mode waves are excited at long wavelengths, say comparable to the size of the event (although the results are actually insensitive to this initial wavelength). While an assumption, this appears reasonable in light of the likely highly turbulent nature of the flare. 2. These waves then cascade in a Kolmogorov-like fashion to smaller wavelengths (e.g., Verma et al. 1996), forming a power-law spectral density in wavenumber space through the inertial range. 3. When the mean wavenumber of the fast mode waves has increased sufficiently, the transit-time acceleration rate (Miller 1997) for superAlfvenic electrons can overcome Coulomb energy losses, and these electrons are accelerated out of the thermal distribution and to relativistic energies (Miller et al. 1996). As the Alfven waves cascade to higher wavenumbers, they can cyclotron resonate with progressively lower energy protons. Eventually, they will resonate with protons in the tail of the thermal distribution, which will then be accelerated to relativistic energies as well (Miller & Roberts 1995). Hence, both ions and electrons are stochastically accelerated, albeit by different mechanisms and different waves. 4. When the

  16. Flare stars at radio wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    1990-01-01

    The radio emission from dMe flare stars is discussed using Very Large Array and Arecibo observations as examples. Active flare stars emit weak, unpolarized, quiescent radio radiation that may be always present. Although thermal bremsstrahlung and/or thermal gyroresonance radiation account for the slowly-varying, quiescent radio radiation of solar active regions, these processes cannot account for the long-wavelength quiescent radiation observed from nearby dMe flare stars. It has been attributed to nonthermal gyrosynchrotron radiation, but some as yet unexplained mechanism must be continually producing the energetic electrons. Long duration, narrow-band radiation is also emitted from some nearby dMe stars at 20 cm wavelength. Such radiation may be attributed to coherent plasma radiation or to coherent electron-cyclotron masers. Impulsive stellar flares exhibit rapid variations that require radio sources that are smaller than the star in size, and high brightness temperatures greater than 10(exp 15) K that are also explained by coherent radiation processes. Quasi-periodic temporal fluctuations suggest pulsations during some radio flares. Evidence for frequency structure and positive or negative frequency drifts during radio flares from dMe stars is also presented.

  17. Flare stars at radio wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    1989-01-01

    The radio emission from dMe flare stars is discussed using Very Large Array and Arecibo observations as examples. Active flare stars emit weak, unpolarized, quiescent radio radiation that may be always present. Although thermal bremsstrahlung and/or thermal gyroresonance radiation account for the slowly-varying, quiescent radio radiation of solar active regions, these processes cannot account for the long-wavelength quiescent radiation observed from nearby dMe flare stars. It has been attributed to nonthermal gyrosynchrotron radiation, but some as yet unexplained mechanism must be continually producing the energetic electrons. Long duration, narrow-band radiation is also emitted from some nearby dMe stars at 20 cm wavelength. Such radiation may be attributed to coherent plasma radiation or to coherent electron-cyclotron masers. Impulsive stellar flares exhibit rapid variations that require radio sources that are smaller than the star in size, and high brightness temperatures greater than 10(exp 15) K that are also explained by coherent radiation processes. Quasi-periodic temporal fluctuations suggest pulsations during some radio flares. Evidence for frequency structure and positive or negative frequency drifts during radio flares from dMe stars is also presented.

  18. Fermi-LAT Observations of High-energy Behind-the-limb Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Ciprini, S.; Costanza, F.; Cutini, S.; D’Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Grenier, I. A.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kashapova, L.; Krucker, S.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Liu, W.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J. D.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Pal’shin, V.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Principe, G.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, O.; Rubio da Costa, F.; Sgrò, C.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Tajima, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Torres, D. F.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.

    2017-02-01

    We report on the Fermi-LAT detection of high-energy emission from the behind-the-limb (BTL) solar flares that occurred on 2013 October 11, and 2014 January 6 and September 1. The Fermi-LAT observations are associated with flares from active regions originating behind both the eastern and western limbs, as determined by STEREO. All three flares are associated with very fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and strong solar energetic particle events. We present updated localizations of the >100 MeV photon emission, hard X-ray (HXR) and EUV images, and broadband spectra from 10 keV to 10 GeV, as well as microwave spectra. We also provide a comparison of the BTL flares detected by Fermi-LAT with three on-disk flares and present a study of some of the significant quantities of these flares as an attempt to better understand the acceleration mechanisms at work during these occulted flares. We interpret the HXR emission to be due to electron bremsstrahlung from a coronal thin-target loop top with the accelerated electron spectra steepening at semirelativistic energies. The >100 MeV gamma-rays are best described by a pion-decay model resulting from the interaction of protons (and other ions) in a thick-target photospheric source. The protons are believed to have been accelerated (to energies >10 GeV) in the CME environment and precipitate down to the photosphere from the downstream side of the CME shock and landed on the front side of the Sun, away from the original flare site and the HXR emission.

  19. Electron Generation and Transport in Intense Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interactions Relevant to Fast Ignition ICF

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Tammy Yee Wing

    2010-01-01

    The reentrant cone approach to Fast Ignition, an advanced Inertial Confinement Fusion scheme, remains one of the most attractive because of the potential to efficiently collect and guide the laser light into the cone tip and direct energetic electrons into the high density core of the fuel. However, in the presence of a preformed plasma, the laser energy is largely absorbed before it can reach the cone tip. Full scale fast ignition laser systems are envisioned to have prepulses ranging between 100 mJ to 1 J. A few of the imperative issues facing fast ignition, then, are the conversion efficiency with which the laser light is converted to hot electrons, the subsequent transport characteristics of those electrons, and requirements for maximum allowable prepulse this may put on the laser system. This dissertation examines the laser-to-fast electron conversion efficiency scaling with prepulse for cone-guided fast ignition. Work in developing an extreme ultraviolet imager diagnostic for the temperature measurements of electron-heated targets, as well as the validation of the use of a thin wire for simultaneous determination of electron number density and electron temperature will be discussed.

  20. Impulsive solar X-ray bursts: Bremsstrahlung radiation from a beam of electrons in the solar chromosphere and the total energy of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis of various aspects of impulsive X-ray bursts (IXB's) has lead to the consideration of a model where the X-rays are produced by bremsstrahlung radiation from a beam of electrons directed toward the photosphere. It was found that in general the X-ray spectrum from such a beam will fall off more rapidly than when the effect of the beaming of radiation is neglected. Furthermore, the spectral index of the resulting X-rays appears to increase by about unity for X-ray energies 100 kev, a fact which may explain the observed cutoff in the spectrum of the IXB's. It is also shown that in such a model there is sufficient energy in the form of nonthermal electrons to explain the total energy (approximately 10 to the 32nd power ergs) of a flare.

  1. Study of Flare Energy Release Using Events with Numerous Type III-like Bursts in Microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshalkina, N. S.; Altyntsev, A. T.; Zhdanov, D. A.; Lesovoi, S. V.; Kochanov, A. A.; Yan, Y. H.; Tan, C. M.

    2012-10-01

    The analysis of narrowband drifting of type III-like structures in radio bursts dynamic spectra allows one to obtain unique information about the primary energy release mechanisms in solar flares. The SSRT (Siberian Solar Radio Telescope) spatially resolved images and its high spectral and temporal resolution allow for direct determination not only of the source positions but also of the exciter velocities along the flare loop. Practically, such measurements are possible during some special time intervals when SSRT is observing the flare region in two high-order fringes near 5.7 GHz; thus, two 1D brightness distributions are recorded simultaneously at two frequency bands. The analysis of type III-like bursts recorded during the flare 14 April 2002 is presented. Using multiwavelength radio observations recorded by the SSRT, the Huairou Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer (SBRS), the Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters (NoRP), and the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), we study an event with series of several tens of drifting microwave pulses with drift rates in the range from -7 to 13 GHz s-1. The sources of the fast-drifting bursts were located near the top of a flare loop in a volume of a few Mm in size. The slow drift of the exciters along the flare loop suggests a high pitch anisotropy of the emitting electrons.

  2. A Physical Relationship Between Electron-Proton Temperature Equilibration and Mach Number in Fast Collisionless Shocks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    PHYSICAL RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ELECTRON-PROTON TEMPERATURE EQUILIBRATION AND MACH NUMBER IN FAST COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS Parviz Ghavamian,1 J. Martin Laming,2...neutrals have had little time to equilibrate with electrons and 1 Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Balti- more, MD; parviz

  3. Electron heating by fast mode magnetohydrodynamic waves in the solar wind emanating from coronal holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habbal, S. R.; Leer, E.

    1982-01-01

    It is shown that fast mode magnetohydrodynamic waves, propagating outwards from the sun in coronal hole regions, will dissipate primarily through collisionless interaction with electrons rather than with protons. This dissipation can lead to higher electron than proton temperatures in the accelerating region of the solar wind, provided the waves carry a sufficiently large energy flux.

  4. Bremsstrahlung measurements for characterization of intense short-pulse, laser produced fast electrons with OMEGA EP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daykin, Tyler; Sawada, Hiroshi; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Pandit, Rishi; Chen, Cliff; Beg, Farhat; Chen, Hui; McLean, Harry; Patel, Pravesh; Tommasini, Riccardo

    2016-10-01

    Understanding relativistic fast electron generation and transport inside solids is important for applications such as generation of high energy x-ray sources and fast ignition. An experiment was carried out to study the scaling of the fast electron spectrum and bremsstrahlung generation in multi-pico second laser interactions using 1 ps and 10 ps OMEGA EP short-pulse beam to generate fast electrons at a similar peak intensity of 5x1018 W/cm2. The bremsstrahlung produced by collisions of the fast electrons with background ions was recorded using differential filter stacked spectrometers. A preliminary analysis with a Monte Carlo Code ITS shows that the electrons injection having an electron slope 1.8 MeV matched well with the high energy component of the 1 ps and 10 ps bremsstrahlung measurements. Details of the data analysis and modeling with Monte Carlo and a hybrid particle-in-cell codes will be presented at the conference. Work supported by the UNR Office of the Provost and by DOE/OFES under Contract No. DE-SC0008827. This collaborative work was partially supported under the auspices of the US DOE by LLNL under Contracts No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 and No. DE-FG-02-05ER54834.

  5. Dynamics of fast electron beams and bounded targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabala, N.; Rivacoba, A.

    2015-07-01

    We analyze the full relativistic force experienced by swift electrons moving close to planar films for the experimental conditions commonly used in electron energy loss spectroscopy in STEM. In metals the main effects derive from the dispersion of the surface plasmons, which are clearly observed in the EEL spectra. In insulators we explore the role played by the Cherenkov radiation (CR) emitted in the energy gap window. The focus is placed on the transverse force and different factors which may turn this force into repulsive, as reported in recent experimental and theoretical works.

  6. Optical Emission from the Interaction of Fast Electrons with Metallic Films Containing a Circular Aperture: A Study of Radiative Decoherence of Fast Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia de Abajo, F. J.

    2009-06-12

    Light emission resulting from the interaction of swift electrons with a distant material is shown to produce an unexpectedly large fraction of decoherence in the moving charges. The decoherence probability diverges for an electron passing through a hole drilled in a perfectly conducting metal film, regardless of the size of the opening. This divergence, which is logarithmic in the ratio of film radius to aperture radius, originates in an infrared catastrophe that differs from other sources of decoherence (e.g., bremsstrahlung radiation). Our results provide new avenues for controlling and assessing the role of coherence during electron acceleration (for example, in transmission electron microscopes) and for exploiting partial quantum interference of fast electrons.

  7. Guiding and collimating fast electron beam by the quasi-static electromagnetic field array

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Zhao, Z. Q.; He, W. H.; Dong, K. G.; Wu, Y. C.; Zhu, B.; Zhang, T. K.; Zhang, B.; Zhang, Z. M.; Gu, Y. Q.; Cao, L. H.

    2014-10-15

    A guidance and collimation scheme for fast electron beam in a traverse periodic quasi-static electromagnetic field array is proposed with the semi-analytic method and the particle-in-cell simulation. The sheath electric fields on the surfaces of nanowires and the magnetic fields around the nanowires form a traverse periodic quasi-static electromagnetic field array. Therefore, most of the fast electrons are confined at the nanowire surfaces and transport forward. More importantly, due to the divergent property of the beams, the magnitudes of the generated fields decrease with the target depth. The lateral momenta of the electrons convert into the forward momenta through Lorenz force, and they cannot recover their initial values. Therefore, the fast electrons can be guided and collimated efficiently in the gaps between the nanowires. In our particle-in-cell simulations, the observed guiding efficiency exceeds 80% compared with the reference target.

  8. Control of wire heating with resistively guided fast electrons through an inverse conical taper

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, A. P. L. Schmitz, H.; Green, J. S.; Booth, N.; Ridgers, C. P.; Pasley, J.

    2015-04-15

    The heating of a solid wire embedded in a solid substrate (of lower Z material) with relativistic electrons generated by ultra-intense laser irradiation is considered. Previously, it has been noted that the initial angular distribution of the fast electrons is a highly important factor in the efficacy of the heating [Robinson et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 122701 (2013)]. We show that, using 3D numerical simulations, the addition of an inverse conical taper at the front of wire can considerably improve the heating of the wire due to the reduction of angular spread of the fast electrons which is caused by transport through the inverse conical taper [Robinson et al., “Guiding of laser-generated fast electrons by exploiting the resistivity-gradients around a conical guide element,” Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion (to be published)].

  9. Magnetic collimation of fast electrons in specially engineered targets irradiated by ultraintense laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Hongbo; Zhu Shaoping; Wu Sizhong; Chen Mo; Zhou Cangtao; He, X. T.; Yu Wei; Nagatomo, Hideo

    2011-02-15

    The efficient magnetic collimation of fast electron flow transporting in overdense plasmas is investigated with two-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell numerical simulations. It is found that the specially engineered targets exhibiting either high-resistivity-core-low-resistivity-cladding structure or low-density-core-high-density-cladding structure can collimate fast electrons. Two main mechanisms to generate collimating magnetic fields are found. In high-resistivity-core-low-resistivity-cladding structure targets, the magnetic field at the interfaces is generated by the gradients of the resistivity and fast electron current, while in low-density-core-high-density-cladding structure targets, the magnetic field is generated by the rapid changing of the flow velocity of the background electrons in transverse direction (perpendicular to the flow velocity) caused by the density jump. The dependences of the maximal magnetic field on the incident laser intensity and plasma density, which are studied by numerical simulations, are supported by our analytical calculations.

  10. Simulations of Fuel Assembly and Fast-Electron Transport in Integrated Fast-Ignition Experiments on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodov, A. A.; Theobald, W.; Anderson, K. S.; Shvydky, A.; Epstein, R.; Betti, R.; Myatt, J. F.; Stoeckl, C.; Jarrott, L. C.; McGuffey, C.; Qiao, B.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Stephens, R. B.

    2013-10-01

    Integrated fast-ignition experiments on OMEGA benefit from improved performance of the OMEGA EP laser, including higher contrast, higher energy, and a smaller focus. Recent 8-keV, Cu-Kα flash radiography of cone-in-shell implosions and cone-tip breakout measurements showed good agreement with the 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations using the code DRACO. DRACO simulations show that the fuel assembly can be further improved by optimizing the compression laser pulse, evacuating air from the shell, and by adjusting the material of the cone tip. This is found to delay the cone-tip breakout by ~220 ps and increase the core areal density from ~80 mg/cm2 in the current experiments to ~500 mg/cm2 at the time of the OMEGA EP beam arrival before the cone-tip breakout. Simulations using the code LSP of fast-electron transport in the recent integrated OMEGA experiments with Cu-doped shells will be presented. Cu-doping is added to probe the transport of fast electrons via their induced Cu K-shell fluorescent emission. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration DE-NA0001944 and the Office of Science under DE-FC02-04ER54789.

  11. Fast probe of local electronic states in nanostructures utilizing a single-lead quantum dot

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, Tomohiro; Amaha, Shinichi; Nakajima, Takashi; Delbecq, Matthieu R.; Yoneda, Jun; Takeda, Kenta; Sugawara, Retsu; Allison, Giles; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D.; Tarucha, Seigo

    2015-01-01

    Transport measurements are powerful tools to probe electronic properties of solid-state materials. To access properties of local electronic states in nanostructures, such as local density of states, electronic distribution and so on, micro-probes utilizing artificial nanostructures have been invented to perform measurements in addition to those with conventional macroscopic electronic reservoirs. Here we demonstrate a new kind of micro-probe: a fast single-lead quantum dot probe, which utilizes a quantum dot coupled only to the target structure through a tunneling barrier and fast charge readout by RF reflectometry. The probe can directly access the local electronic states with wide bandwidth. The probe can also access more electronic states, not just those around the Fermi level, and the operations are robust against bias voltages and temperatures. PMID:26416582

  12. Gas dynamic theory of flight of fast electron flux in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, V. N.

    The one-dimensional flight of a fast electron flux in plasma is investigated taking into account generation and absorption of plasma waves. The transition from the kinetic description to the gas dynamics is made. The closed set of gas dynamic equations for electrons and plasmons is derived and an automodel solution is obtained in the case of instantaneous injection. This solution represents the beam-plasma formation on natural oscillations in the system electrons+plasmons is considered.

  13. Fast electron current density profile and diffusion studies during LHCD in PBX-M

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.E.; Kesner, J.; Luckhardt, S.; Paoletti, F.; von Goeler, S.; Bernabei, S.; Kaita, R.; Rimini, F.

    1993-08-01

    Successful current profile control experiments using lower hybrid current drive (LCHD) clearly require knowledge of (1) the location of the driven fast electrons and (2) the ability to maintain that location from spreading due to radial diffusion. These issues can be addressed by examining the data from the hard x-ray camera on PBX-M, a unique diagnostic producing two-dimensional, time resolved tangential images of fast electron bremsstrahlung. Using modeling, these line-of-sight images are inverted to extract a radial fast electron current density profile. We note that ``hollow`` profiles have been observed, indicative of off-axis current drive. These profiles can then be used to calculate an upper bound for an effective fast electron diffusion constant: assuming an extremely radially narrow lower hybrid absorption profile and a transport model based on Rax and Moreau, a model fast electron current density profile is calculated and compared to the experimentally derived profile. The model diffusion constant is adjusted until a good match is found. Applied to steady-state quiescent modes on PBX-M, we obtain an upper limit for an effective diffusion constant of about D*=1.1 m{sup 2}/sec.

  14. Current drive with combined electron cyclotron wave and high harmonic fast wave in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. C.; Gong, X. Y.; Dong, J. Q.; Wang, J.; Zhang, N.; Zheng, P. W.; Yin, C. Y.

    2016-12-01

    The current driven by combined electron cyclotron wave (ECW) and high harmonic fast wave is investigated using the GENRAY/CQL3D package. It is shown that no significant synergetic current is found in a range of cases with a combined ECW and fast wave (FW). This result is consistent with a previous study [Harvey et al., in Proceedings of IAEA TCM on Fast Wave Current Drive in Reactor Scale Tokamaks (Synergy and Complimentarily with LHCD and ECRH), Arles, France, IAEA, Vienna, 1991]. However, a positive synergy effect does appear with the FW in the lower hybrid range of frequencies. This positive synergy effect can be explained using a picture of the electron distribution function induced by the ECW and a very high harmonic fast wave (helicon). The dependence of the synergy effect on the radial position of the power deposition, the wave power, the wave frequency, and the parallel refractive index is also analyzed, both numerically and physically.

  15. Characterization of intense laser-produced fast electrons using hard x-rays via bremsstrahlung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, H.; Sentoku, Y.; Bass, A.; Griffin, B.; Pandit, R.; Beg, F.; Chen, H.; McLean, H.; Link, A. J.; Patel, P. K.; Ping, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Energy distribution of high-power, short-pulse laser produced fast electrons was experimentally and numerically studied using high-energy bremsstrahlung x-rays. The hard x-ray photons and escaping electrons from various metal foils, irradiated by the 50 TW Leopard laser at Nevada Terawatt Facility, were recorded with a differential filter stack spectrometer that is sensitive to photons produced by mainly 0.5-2 MeV electrons and an electron spectrometer measuring >2 MeV electrons. The experimental bremsstrahlung and the slope of the measured escaped electrons were compared with an analytic calculation using an input electron spectrum estimated with the ponderomotive scaling. The result shows that the electron spectrum entering a Cu foil could be continuous single slope with the slope temperature of ˜1.5 MeV in the detector range. The experiment and analytic calculation were then compared with a 2D particle-in-cell code, PICLS, including a newly developed radiation transport module. The simulation shows that a two-temperature electron distribution is generated at the laser interaction region, but only the hot component of the fast electrons flow into the target during the interaction because the low energy electron component is trapped by self-generated magnetic field in the preformed plasma. A significant amount of the photons less than 100 keV observed in the experiment could be attributed to the low energy electrons entering the foil a few picoseconds later after the gating field disappears.

  16. Solar flare soft-X-ray spectra from Very Low Frequency observations of ionospheric modulations: Possibility of uninterrupted observation of non-thermal electron-plasma interaction in solar atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palit, Sourav; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Ray, Suman

    2016-07-01

    The hard and soft X-ray regions of a solar flare spectrum are the manifestation of interaction, namely of bremsstrahlung radiation of the non-thermal electrons moving inward in the denser part of the solar atmosphere with the plasma heated by those energetic electrons. The continuous and uninterrupted knowledge of X-ray photon spectra of flares are of great importance to derive information on the electron acceleration and hence time-evolution of energy transport and physics during solar flares. Satellite observations of solar X-ray spectrum are often limited by the restricted windows in each duty cycle to avoid the interaction of detectors and instruments with harmful energetic charge particles. In this work we have tried to tackle the problem by examining the possibility of using Earth's ionosphere and atmosphere as the detector of such transient events. Earth's lower ionosphere and upper atmosphere are the places where the X-rays and gamma-rays from such astronomical sources are absorbed. The electron-ion production rates due to the ionization of such energetic photons at different heights depend on the intensity and wavelength of the injected spectra and hence vary from one source to another. Obviously the electron and ion density vs. altitude profile has the imprint of the incident photon spectrum. As a preliminary exercise we developed a novel deconvolution method to extract the soft X-ray part of spectra of some solar flares of different classes from the electron density profiles obtained from Very Low Frequency (VLF) observation of lower ionosphere during those events. The method presented here is useful to carry out a similar exercise to infer the higher energy part of solar flare spectra and spectra of more energetic events such as the GRBs, SGRs etc. with the possibilities of probing even lower parts of the atmosphere.

  17. Fast electron transfer from PbSe quantum dots to TiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Masumoto, Yasuaki; Takagi, Hayato; Umino, Hikaru; Suzumura, Eri

    2013-12-04

    Fast electron transfer from PbSe quantum dots (QDs) to the porous anatase TiO{sub 2} film was observed in transient absorption, when the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital level of PbSe QDs is higher than that of TiO{sub 2}. In PbSe QDs 2.7nm in diameter linked to the TiO{sub 2} film the bleaching recovery decay shortened to 1ps from 650ps observed in the non-linked PbSe QDs. The electron transfer from the quantum state in small PbSe QDs to TiO{sub 2} takes place fast and efficiently.

  18. Effect of laser wavelength and intensity on the divergence of hot electrons in fast ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Boyuan; Tian, Chao; Zhang, Zhimeng; Zhang, Feng; Shan, Lianqiang; Zhang, Bo; Zhou, Weimin; Zhang, Baohan; Gu, Yuqiu

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the short wavelength laser is believed to have a promising prospect in fast ignition for reducing the conflict between laser energy requirement and electron stopping range. Here we investigate the influence of laser wavelength and intensity in the angular dispersion of hot electrons. Both our theoretical model and numerical simulations show that the angular dispersion would increase rapidly with the shortening of laser wavelength due to the Weibel instability, while the laser intensity has little effect on it. These results have important implications for fast ignition.

  19. Integrated Kinetic Simulation of Laser-Plasma Interactions, Fast-Electron Generation and Transport in Fast Ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, A; Cohen, B; Divol, L

    2009-11-16

    We present new results on the physics of short-pulse laser-matter interaction of kilojoule-picosecond pulses at full spatial and temporal scale, using a new approach that combines a 3D collisional electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell code with an MHD-hybrid model of high-density plasma. In the latter, collisions damp out plasma waves, and an Ohm's law with electron inertia effects neglected determines the electric field. In addition to yielding orders of magnitude in speed-up while avoiding numerical instabilities, this allows us to model the whole problem in a single unified framework: the laser-plasma interaction at sub-critical densities, energy deposition at relativistic critical densities, and fast-electron transport in solid densities. Key questions such as the multi-picosecond temporal evolution of the laser energy conversion into hot electrons, the impact of return currents on the laser-plasma interaction, and the effect of self-generated electric and magnetic fields on electron transport will be addressed. We will report applications to current experiments.

  20. Integrated kinetic simulation of laser-plasma interactions, fast-electron generation, and transport in fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, A. J.; Cohen, B. I.; Divol, L.

    2010-05-15

    We present new results on the physics of short-pulse laser-matter interaction of kilojoule-picosecond pulses at full spatial and temporal scale using a new approach that combines a three-dimensional collisional electromagnetic particle-in-cell code with a magnetohydrodynamic-hybrid model of high-density plasma. In the latter, collisions damp out plasma waves, and an Ohm's law with electron inertia effects neglected determines the electric field. In addition to yielding orders of magnitude in speed-up while avoiding numerical instabilities, this allows us to model the whole problem in a single unified framework: the laser-plasma interaction at subcritical densities, energy deposition at relativistic critical densities, and fast- electron transport in solid densities. Key questions such as the multipicosecond temporal evolution of the laser energy conversion into hot electrons, the impact of return currents on the laser-plasma interaction, and the effect of self-generated electric and magnetic fields on electron transport will be addressed. We will report applications to current experiments.

  1. A new electron spectroscopy system for measuring electron emission from fast ion interactions with atomic, molecular, and condensed phase targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Wilson L.

    A new electron spectroscopy system has been developed for measuring electron emission from gas and solid targets induced by fast ion impact. This system uses an ultrahigh-vacuum compatible cylindrical deflector analyzer, designed and fabricated in the Department of Physics at East Carolina University, to measure electron yields as a function of electron energy and emission angle for fast ions interacting with materials. The new spectroscopy system was tested in a previously existing high-vacuum target chamber that has been installed on a new beam line in the ECU Accelerator Laboratory. In addition to the new analyzer, a new data acquisition and experimental control system, based on LabVIEW computer control software, was developed and tested using an existing cylindrical mirror analyzer. Data from this system was compared to previous results to confirm the functionality of the design. Subsequently, the new analyzer was installed in the high-vacuum target chamber and tested by measuring Auger electron emission from 2 MeV protons incident on an argon gas target and comparing to well-known emission spectra. Ultimately, the new electron spectroscopy system will be used for measuring electron yields from condensed phase targets in ultrahigh-vacuum conditions in future experiments.

  2. Non-thermal effects of electrons on stopbands of fast ion-acoustic solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maharaj, S. K.; Bharuthram, R.

    2017-02-01

    The occurrence of a stopband which is a forbidden range in soliton speeds was recently reported to occur for fast ion-acoustic solitons in a model with cold ions, warm adiabatic ions, and Boltzmann electrons (Nsengiyumva et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 102301 (2014)). The stopband occurs as a direct consequence of the existence of two solutions for the soliton speed which coincides with the warm ion density limit and is restricted to a certain range of cold to warm ion density ratios. In this study, we investigate the effects of the presence of non-thermal electrons on stopbands through adopting a Cairns and kappa distribution for the electrons. Our results reveal that increasing non-thermal electron effects based on a Cairns (kappa) distribution has the effect of reducing (increasing) the width of the stopband. The stopband obtained for two-temperature Boltzmann electrons increases in width for increasing cool electron density and hot to cool electron temperature.

  3. 154 MHz Detection of Faint, Polarized Flares from UV Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, C. R.; Lenc, E.; Kaplan, D. L.; Murphy, Tara; Anderson, G. E.

    2017-02-01

    We have detected four flares from UV Ceti at 154 MHz using the Murchison Widefield Array. The flares have flux densities between 10 and 65 mJy—a factor of 100 fainter than most flares in the literature at these frequencies—and are only detected in polarization. The circular polarized fractions are limited to > 27% at 3σ confidence and two of the flares exhibit polarity reversal. We suggest that these flares occur periodically on a timescale consistent with the rotational period of UV Ceti. During the brightest observed flare, we also detect significant linear polarization with a polarization fraction > 18%. Averaging the data in 6 minute, 10 MHz frequency bins we find that the flux density of these flares does not vary over the 30 MHz bandwidth of the Murchison Widefield Array; however, we cannot rule out finer time-frequency structure. Using the measured flux densities for the flares, we estimate brightness temperatures between ({10}13{--}{10}14) K, indicative of a coherent emission mechanism. The brightness temperature and polarization characteristics point to the electron cyclotron maser mechanism. We also calculate the flare rates given our four observed flares and compare them to flare rates for the set of M dwarf stars with known 100–200 MHz flares. Our measurement is the first for flares with intensities < 100 mJy at 100–200 MHz.

  4. Energetics of Three Solar Flares Observed by RHESSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.; Dennis, B. R.; Sui, Linhui

    2004-01-01

    We compare the energy content of the thermal plasma and suprathermal electrons in three solar flares observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). Fits of computed isothermal and thick-target bremsstrahlung spectra to RHESSI X-ray spectra are used to deduce the instantaneous energy content of the X-ray-emitting plasma and the accumulated energy in suprathermal electrons throughout the three flares. We minimize the energy in the suprathermal electrons by assuming that the electron distributions have a low-energy cutoff that is no lower than the highest cutoff energy that provides a good fit to the X-ray spectra. The energetics of the 2002 April 15 M1 flare and the 2002 April 21 X2 flare are computed and compared with results for the 2002 July 23 X5 flare. We find that for all three. flares the energy in nonthermal electrons is comparable to the energy contained in the thermal plasma.

  5. Observations of the scatter-free solar-flare electrons in the energy range 20-1000 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Fisk, L. A.; Lin, R. P.

    1971-01-01

    Observations of the scatter-free electron events from solar active region McMath No. 8905 are presented. The measurements were made on Explorer 33 satellite. The data show that more than 80% of the electrons from these events undergo no or little scattering and that these electrons travel only approximately 1.5 a.u. between the sun and the earth. The duration of these events cannot be accounted fully by velocity dispersion alone. It is suggested that these electrons could be continuously injected into interplanetary medium for a time interval of approximately 2 to 3 minutes. Energy spectra of these electrons are discussed.

  6. An electron/ion spectrometer with the ability of low energy electron measurement for fast ignition experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, T.; Sakagami, H.; Kojima, S.; Arikawa, Y.; Shiraga, H.; Fujioka, S.; Kato, R.

    2014-11-15

    An electron energy spectrometer (ESM) is one of the most fundamental diagnostics in the fast ignition experiment. It is necessary to observe the spectra down to a low energy range in order to obtain the accurate deposition efficiency toward the core. Here, we realize the suitable ESM by using a ferrite magnet with a moderate magnetic field of 0.3 T and a rectangular magnetic circuit covered with a steel plate in the inlet side.

  7. Spectrum of fast electrons in a dense gas in the presence of a nonuniform pulsed field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachev, A. N.; Yakovlenko, S. I.

    2007-01-01

    The problems of gas preionization in discharges related to laser physics are considered. The propagation of fast electrons injected from the cathode in the presence of a nonuniform nonstationary field and the motion of multiplying electrons at the edge of the avalanche in the presence of a nonuniform nonstationary field are simulated. The effect of the voltage pulse steepness and the field nonuniformity on the mean propagation velocity of fast electrons and their energy distribution is demonstrated. At certain combinations of the voltage pulse rise time and amplitude and at a certain time interval, the center of gravity of the electron cloud can move in the opposite direction relative to the direction of force acting upon electrons. It is also demonstrated that the number of hard particles (and, hence, the hard component of the x-ray bremsstrahlung) increases with both an increase in the voltage amplitude and a decrease in the pulse rise time. For nonoptimal conditions of the picosecond voltage pulse, an assumption is formulated: an electron beam in gas is formed due to the electrons at the edge of the avalanche rather than the background multiplication wave approaching the anode.

  8. Adiabatic Phase Mixing and Fast Electron Heating in Thin current Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, H.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M. M.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Using particle-in-cell simulations and kinetic theory, it's found that strong Buneman instability develop non-linearly in thin current layer form in plasma with Ω e/ω pe< 1. The Buneman instability produces strong electric field and fast phase mixing which leads to the increase of electron temperature by more than a factor of 10 in a few tens of electron gyro-periods. The resonance of wave-particles feeds waves with particle's kinetic energy and causes the growth of waves and strong trapping of electrons at a large velocity range. We discovered it is the adiabatic movement of trapped electrons produce fast phase mixing when the particle's bounce rate is much larger than the growth and decay rate of waves. The adiabatic movement effectively exchange energy between particles and waves and redistribute the energy from high velocity electrons to low energy electrons with the assistance of the non-adiabatic crossing of separatrix of electron holes. The implications of the results for reconnection are being explored.

  9. SXR Continuum Radiation Transmitted Through Metallic Filters: An Analytical Approach To Fast Electron Temperature Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Tritz, K.; Kramer, T.; Stutman, D.; Finkentha, M.; Hill, K.; Bitter, M.

    2010-08-26

    A new set of analytic formulae describes the transmission of soft X-ray (SXR) continuum radiation through a metallic foil for its application to fast electron temperature measurements in fusion plasmas. This novel approach shows good agreement with numerical calculations over a wide range of plasma temperatures in contrast with the solutions obtained when using a transmission approximated by a single-Heaviside function [S. von Goeler, Rev. Sci. Instrum., 20, 599, (1999)]. The new analytic formulae can improve the interpretation of the experimental results and thus contribute in obtaining fast teperature measurements in between intermittent Thomson Scattering data.

  10. Chromospheric Condensation and Quasi-periodic Pulsations in a Circular-ribbon Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. M.; Li, D.; Ning, Z. J.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we report our multiwavelength observations of the C3.1 circular-ribbon flare SOL2015-10-16T10:20 in active region (AR) 12434. The flare consisted of a circular flare ribbon (CFR), an inner flare ribbon (IFR) inside it, and a pair of short parallel flare ribbons (PFRs). The PFRs located to the north of the IFR were most striking in the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) 1400 and 2796 Å images. For the first time, we observed the circular-ribbon flare in the Ca ii H line of the Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode, which has a similar shape as observed in the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 1600 Å on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). Photospheric line-of-sight magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board SDO show that the flare is associated with positive polarities with a negative polarity inside. The IFR and CFR were cospatial with the negative polarity and positive polarities, implying the existence of a magnetic null point ({\\boldsymbol{B}}=0) and a dome-like spine-fan topology. During the impulsive phase of the flare, “two-step” raster observations of IRIS with a cadence of 6 s and an exposure time of 2 s showed plasma downflow at the CFR in the Si iv λ1402.77 line ({log}T≈ 4.8), suggesting chromospheric condensation. The downflow speeds first increased rapidly from a few km s-1 to the peak values of 45-52 km s-1, before decreasing gradually to the initial levels. The decay timescales of condensation were 3-4 minutes, indicating ongoing magnetic reconnection. Interestingly, the downflow speeds are positively correlated with the logarithm of the Si iv line intensity and time derivative of the GOES soft X-ray (SXR) flux in 1-8 Å. The radio dynamic spectra are characterized by a type III radio burst associated with the flare, which implies that the chromospheric condensation was most probably driven by nonthermal electrons. Using an analytical expression and the peak Doppler velocity, we derive the

  11. Solar Flare Aimed at Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    At the height of the solar cycle, the Sun is finally displaying some fireworks. This image from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) shows a large solar flare from June 6, 2000 at 1424 Universal Time (10:24 AM Eastern Daylight Savings Time). Associated with the flare was a coronal mass ejection that sent a wave of fast moving charged particles straight towards Earth. (The image was acquired by the Extreme ultaviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT), one of 12 instruments aboard SOHO) Solar activity affects the Earth in several ways. The particles generated by flares can disrupt satellite communications and interfere with power transmission on the Earth's surface. Earth's climate is tied to the total energy emitted by the sun, cooling when the sun radiates less energy and warming when solar output increases. Solar radiation also produces ozone in the stratosphere, so total ozone levels tend to increase during the solar maximum. For more information about these solar flares and the SOHO mission, see NASA Science News or the SOHO home page. For more about the links between the sun and climate change, see Sunspots and the Solar Max. Image courtesy SOHO Extreme ultaviolet Imaging Telescope, ESA/NASA

  12. Hot electron temperature and coupling efficiency scaling with prepulse for cone-guided fast ignition.

    PubMed

    Ma, T; Sawada, H; Patel, P K; Chen, C D; Divol, L; Higginson, D P; Kemp, A J; Key, M H; Larson, D J; Le Pape, S; Link, A; MacPhee, A G; McLean, H S; Ping, Y; Stephens, R B; Wilks, S C; Beg, F N

    2012-03-16

    The effect of increasing prepulse energy levels on the energy spectrum and coupling into forward-going electrons is evaluated in a cone-guided fast-ignition relevant geometry using cone-wire targets irradiated with a high intensity (10(20) W/cm(2)) laser pulse. Hot electron temperature and flux are inferred from Kα images and yields using hybrid particle-in-cell simulations. A two-temperature distribution of hot electrons was required to fit the full profile, with the ratio of energy in a higher energy (MeV) component increasing with a larger prepulse. As prepulse energies were increased from 8 mJ to 1 J, overall coupling from laser to all hot electrons entering the wire was found to fall from 8.4% to 2.5% while coupling into only the 1-3 MeV electrons dropped from 0.57% to 0.03%.

  13. Understanding Solar Flare Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatland, M. S.

    2005-12-01

    A review is presented of work aimed at understanding solar flare statistics, with emphasis on the well known flare power-law size distribution. Although avalanche models are perhaps the favoured model to describe flare statistics, their physical basis is unclear, and they are divorced from developing ideas in large-scale reconnection theory. An alternative model, aimed at reconciling large-scale reconnection models with solar flare statistics, is revisited. The solar flare waiting-time distribution has also attracted recent attention. Observed waiting-time distributions are described, together with what they might tell us about the flare phenomenon. Finally, a practical application of flare statistics to flare prediction is described in detail, including the results of a year of automated (web-based) predictions from the method.

  14. Ion Acceleration in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.; Weir, Sue B.

    1996-01-01

    Solar flares are among the most energetic and interesting phenomena in the Solar system, releasing up to 1032 ergs of energy on timescales of several tens of seconds to several tens of minutes. Much of this energy is in the form of suprathermal electrons and ions, which remain trapped at the Sun and produce a wide variety of radiations, as well as escape into interplanetary space, where they can be directly observed. The radiation from trapped particles consists in general of (1) continuum emission; (2) narrow gamma-ray nuclear deexcitation lines; and (3) high-energy neutrons observed in space or by ground-based neutron monitors. The particles that escape into space consist of both electrons and ions, which often have compositions quite different than that of the ambient solar atmosphere. Flares thus present many diagnostics of the particle acceleration mechanism(s), the identification of which is the ultimate goal of flare research. Moreover, flares in fact offer the only opportunity in astrophysics to study the simultaneous energization of both electrons and ions. Hopefully, an understanding of flares with their wealth of diagnostic data will lead to a better understanding of particle acceleration at other sites in the Universe. It is now generally accepted that flares are roughly divided into two classes: impulsive and gradual. Gradual events are large, occur high in the corona, have long-duration soft and hard X-rays and gamma rays, are electron poor, are associated with Type II radio emission and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and produce energetic ions with coronal abundance ratios. Impulsive events are more compact, occur lower in the corona, produce short-duration radiation, and exhibit dramatic abundance enhancements in the energetic ions. Their He-3/He-4 ratio is - 1, which is a huge increase over the coronal value of about 5 x 10(exp -4), and they also posses smaller but still significant enhancements of Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe relative to He-4, C, N, and O

  15. Analysis of Fast Electron Energy Distribution by Measuring Hard X-ray Bremsstrahlung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daykin, Tyler; Sawada, Hiroshi; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Bass, Anthony; Griffin, Brandon; Pandit, Rishi; Beg, Farhat; Chen, Hui; McLean, Harry; Link, Anthony; Patel, Prav; Ping, Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Characterization of intense, short-pulse laser-produced fast electrons is important for fundamental understanding and applications. We carried out an experiment to characterize the fast electron energy distribution by measuring angular-dependent high-energy bremsstrahlung x-rays. A 100 μm thick metal foil (Al, Cu, and Ag) mounted on a plastic backing was irradiated by the 0.35 ps, 15 J Leopard Laser at the Nevada Terawatt Facility. The bremsstrahlung x-rays and the escaping electrons from the target were recorded using differential filter stack spectrometers at 22° and 45° off laser axis and a magnet-based electron spectrometer along the laser axis. The electron spectrum inferred from two different diagnostics had single slope temperature of ~ 1.5 MeV for the Cu foil. The results were compared to an analytic calculation and a 2-D Particle-in-cell code, PICLS. The analysis of the electron energy distribution and angular distribution will be presented. This work was supported by the UNR Office of the Provost and by DOE/OFES under Contract No. DE-SC0008827. This collaborative work was partially supported under the auspices of the US Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Con.

  16. Predicting the Response of the Mars Ionosphere to Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallows, K.; Withers, P.; Gonzalez, G.

    2015-12-01

    The increased soft X-ray irradiance during solar flares generates increased electron densities in the lower ionosphere of Mars. The relative changes in electron density during a flare are greater for larger flares and also at lower altitudes and larger flares, due to the wavelength dependence of both the flux increase during the flare and the absorption of flux by the neutral atmosphere. These relationships have been explored [Bougher et al. 2001, Fox et al. 2004, Mendillo et al. 2006, Mahajan et al. 2011, Lollo et al. 2012] but not quantified, which has impeded the validation of simulations of the ionospheric effects of solar flares. Such simulations are necessary for developing accurate descriptions of the physical processes governing ionospheric behavior under extreme conditions. We present a response function, a mathematical expression for the change in electron density during a solar flare as a function of the change in solar flux and an optical depth proxy. This response function is based on analysis of 20 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) radio occultation electron density profiles measured during solar flares. Characterizing the response as a function of optical depth, rather than altitude, provides the best description of ionospheric variability during a flare; otherwise non-negligible solar zenith angle effects are present. We demonstrate that the response function can be used to predict ionospheric electron densities during a specified solar flare by reproducing profiles known to be disturbed by a solar flare. We also demonstrate that the response function can be used to infer the strength of solar flares not visible at Earth by finding the flux enhancement required to reproduce an apparently flare affected profile given an undisturbed profile on the same date.

  17. A fast high-order method to calculate wakefields in an electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Ji; Mitchell, Chad; Ryne, Robert D.

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, we report on a high-order fast method to numerically calculate wakefields in an electron beam given a wake function model. This method is based on a Newton-Cotes quadrature rule for integral approximation and an FFT method for discrete summation that results in an O(N log(N)) computational cost, where N is the number of grid points. Using the Simpson quadrature rule with an accuracy of O(h4), where h is the grid size, we present numerical calculation of the wakefields from a resonator wake function model and from a one-dimensional coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) wake model. Besides the fast speed and high numerical accuracy, the calculation using the direct line density instead of the first derivative of the line density avoids numerical filtering of the electron density function for computing the CSR wakefield.

  18. A fast high-order method to calculate wakefield forces in an electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Mitchell, Chad; Ryne, Robert D.

    2012-03-22

    In this paper we report on a high-order fast method to numerically calculate wakefield forces in an electron beam given a wake function model. This method is based on a Newton-Cotes quadrature rule for integral approximation and an FFT method for discrete summation that results in an O(Nlog(N)) computational cost, where N is the number of grid points. Using the Simpson quadrature rule with an accuracy of O(h4), where h is the grid size, we present numerical calculation of the wakefields from a resonator wake function model and from a one-dimensional coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) wake model. Besides the fast speed and high numerical accuracy, the calculation using the direct line density instead of the first derivative of the line density avoids numerical filtering of the electron density function for computing the CSR wakefield force. I. INTRODUCTION

  19. A new equation in two dimensional fast magnetoacoustic shock waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Masood, W.; Jehan, Nusrat; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2010-03-15

    Nonlinear properties of the two dimensional fast magnetoacoustic waves are studied in a three-component plasma comprising of electrons, positrons, and ions. In this regard, Kadomtsev-Petviashvili-Burger (KPB) equation is derived using the small amplitude perturbation expansion method. Under the condition that the electron and positron inertia are ignored, Burger-Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (Burger-KP) for a fast magnetoacoustic wave is derived for the first time, to the best of author's knowledge. The solutions of both KPB and Burger-KP equations are obtained using the tangent hyperbolic method. The effects of positron concentration, kinematic viscosity, and plasma beta are explored both for the KPB and the Burger-KP shock waves and the differences between the two are highlighted. The present investigation may have relevance in the study of nonlinear electromagnetic shock waves both in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas.

  20. Acoustic mode driven by fast electrons in TJ-II Electron Cyclotron Resonance plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, B. J.; Ochando, M. A.; López-Bruna, D.

    2016-08-01

    Intense harmonic oscillations in radiation signals (δ I/I∼ 5{%}) are commonly observed during Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) heating in TJ-II stellarator plasmas at low line-averaged electron density, 0.15 < \\bar{n}e < 0.6 ×1019 \\text{m}-3 . The frequency agrees with acoustic modes. The poloidal modal structure is compatible with Geodesic Acoustic Modes (GAM) but an n \

  1. Fast electron flux driven by lower hybrid wave in the scrape-off layer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y. L.; Xu, G. S.; Wang, H. Q.; Wan, B. N.; Chen, R.; Wang, L.; Gan, K. F.; Yang, J. H.; Zhang, X. J.; Liu, S. C.; Li, M. H.; Ding, S.; Yan, N.; Zhang, W.; Hu, G. H.; Liu, Y. L.; Shao, L. M.; Li, J.; Chen, L.; Zhao, N.; and others

    2015-02-15

    The fast electron flux driven by Lower Hybrid Wave (LHW) in the scrape-off layer (SOL) in EAST is analyzed both theoretically and experimentally. The five bright belts flowing along the magnetic field lines in the SOL and hot spots at LHW guard limiters observed by charge coupled device and infrared cameras are attributed to the fast electron flux, which is directly measured by retarding field analyzers (RFA). The current carried by the fast electron flux, ranging from 400 to 6000 A/m{sup 2} and in the direction opposite to the plasma current, is scanned along the radial direction from the limiter surface to the position about 25 mm beyond the limiter. The measured fast electron flux is attributed to the high parallel wave refractive index n{sub ||} components of LHW. According to the antenna structure and the LHW power absorbed by plasma, a broad parallel electric field spectrum of incident wave from the antennas is estimated. The radial distribution of LHW-driven current density is analyzed in SOL based on Landau damping of the LHW. The analytical results support the RFA measurements, showing a certain level of consistency. In addition, the deposition profile of the LHW power density in SOL is also calculated utilizing this simple model. This study provides some fundamental insight into the heating and current drive effects induced by LHW in SOL, and should also help to interpret the observations and related numerical analyses of the behaviors of bright belts and hot spots induced by LHW.

  2. Fast Formation of Magnetic Islands in a Plasma in the Presence of Counterstreaming Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Califano, F.; Attico, N.; Pegoraro, F.; Bertin, G.; Bulanov, S. V.

    2001-06-04

    With the help of 2D-3V (two dimensional in space and three dimensional in velocity) Vlasov simulations we show that the magnetic field generated by the electromagnetic current filamentation instability develops magnetic islands due to the onset of a fast reconnection process that occurs on the electron dynamical time scale. This process is relevant to magnetic channel coalescence in relativistic laser plasma interactions.

  3. Fast Monte Carlo Electron-Photon Transport Method and Application in Accurate Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Lijuan; Sun, Guangyao; Zheng, Huaqing; Song, Jing; Chen, Zhenping; Li, Gui

    2014-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) method is the most accurate computational method for dose calculation, but its wide application on clinical accurate radiotherapy is hindered due to its poor speed of converging and long computation time. In the MC dose calculation research, the main task is to speed up computation while high precision is maintained. The purpose of this paper is to enhance the calculation speed of MC method for electron-photon transport with high precision and ultimately to reduce the accurate radiotherapy dose calculation time based on normal computer to the level of several hours, which meets the requirement of clinical dose verification. Based on the existing Super Monte Carlo Simulation Program (SuperMC), developed by FDS Team, a fast MC method for electron-photon coupled transport was presented with focus on two aspects: firstly, through simplifying and optimizing the physical model of the electron-photon transport, the calculation speed was increased with slightly reduction of calculation accuracy; secondly, using a variety of MC calculation acceleration methods, for example, taking use of obtained information in previous calculations to avoid repeat simulation of particles with identical history; applying proper variance reduction techniques to accelerate MC method convergence rate, etc. The fast MC method was tested by a lot of simple physical models and clinical cases included nasopharyngeal carcinoma, peripheral lung tumor, cervical carcinoma, etc. The result shows that the fast MC method for electron-photon transport was fast enough to meet the requirement of clinical accurate radiotherapy dose verification. Later, the method will be applied to the Accurate/Advanced Radiation Therapy System ARTS as a MC dose verification module.

  4. Studies on LH-generated Fast Electron Tail Using the Oblique ECE Diagnostic at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Sozzi, C.; Grossetti, G.; Farina, D.; Figini, L.; Garavaglia, S.; Nowak, S.; Baranov, Y.; Kirov, K.; Luna, E. de la

    2009-11-26

    The new Oblique ECE diagnostics of JET allows simultaneous measurement along three lines of sight at different toroidal angles. JET pulses, in which modulated LHCD power was applied, were analyzed by means of the SPECE emission code, which takes into account the fast electron tail generated by LH. The code results were compared to the ECE spectra from the oblique ECE diagnostic. The match between the computed and the experimental data from the three lines of sight provides an estimate of the density of superthermal electrons and of their maximum energy from which the fraction of the plasma current driven by LHCD is derived.

  5. Experimental Verification of the Role of Electron Pressure in Fast Magnetic Reconnection with a Guide Field.

    PubMed

    Fox, W; Sciortino, F; V Stechow, A; Jara-Almonte, J; Yoo, J; Ji, H; Yamada, M

    2017-03-24

    We report detailed laboratory observations of the structure of a reconnection current sheet in a two-fluid plasma regime with a guide magnetic field. We observe and quantitatively analyze the quadrupolar electron pressure variation in the ion-diffusion region, as originally predicted by extended magnetohydrodynamics simulations. The projection of the electron pressure gradient parallel to the magnetic field contributes significantly to balancing the parallel electric field, and the resulting cross-field electron jets in the reconnection layer are diamagnetic in origin. These results demonstrate how parallel and perpendicular force balance are coupled in guide field reconnection and confirm basic theoretical models of the importance of electron pressure gradients for obtaining fast magnetic reconnection.

  6. Effect of non-local electron conduction in compression of solid ball target for fast ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatomo, Hideo; Asahina, Takashi; Nicolai, Philippe; Sunahara, Atsushi; Johzaki, Tomoyuki

    2016-10-01

    In the first phase of the fast ignition scheme, fuel target is compressed by the implosion laser, where only achievement of high dense fuel is required because the increment of the temperature to ignite the fuel is given by heating lasers. The ideal compression method for solid target is isentropic compression with tailored pulse shape. However, it requires the high laser intensity >1015 W/cm2 which cause the hot electrons. Numerical simulation for these conditions non-local electron transport model is necessary. Recently, we have installed SNB model to a 2-D radiation hydrodynamic simulation code. In this presentation, effect of hot electron in isentropic compression and optimum method are discussed, which may be also significant for shock ignition scheme. Also effect of external magnetic field to the hot electron will be considered. This study was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant No. 26400532.

  7. Experimental Verification of the Role of Electron Pressure in Fast Magnetic Reconnection with a Guide Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, W.; Sciortino, F.; Stechow, A. V.; Jara-Almonte, J.; Yoo, J.; Ji, H.; Yamada, M.

    2017-03-01

    We report detailed laboratory observations of the structure of a reconnection current sheet in a two-fluid plasma regime with a guide magnetic field. We observe and quantitatively analyze the quadrupolar electron pressure variation in the ion-diffusion region, as originally predicted by extended magnetohydrodynamics simulations. The projection of the electron pressure gradient parallel to the magnetic field contributes significantly to balancing the parallel electric field, and the resulting cross-field electron jets in the reconnection layer are diamagnetic in origin. These results demonstrate how parallel and perpendicular force balance are coupled in guide field reconnection and confirm basic theoretical models of the importance of electron pressure gradients for obtaining fast magnetic reconnection.

  8. Fast electron temperature, MHD and transport measurements on NSTX using a multi-energy SXR array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Stutman, D.; Tritz, K.; Finkenthal, M.; Bell, R.; Hosea, J.; Kaye, S.; Leblanc, B.; Sabbagh, S.

    2007-11-01

    A compact multi-energy soft X-ray array has been developed for fast (<=0.1 ms) time and space-resolved electron temperature, MHD and transport measurements on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The electron temperature is obtained by modeling the slope of the continuum radiation from ratios of the Abel inverted radial emissivity profiles in three energy ranges [1]. The applicability of this diagnostic technique to radio frequency electron heating and current drive experiments, perturbative electron and impurity transport studies, as well as an analysis of the impact of several types of MHD activity such as NTMs, RWMs, ELMs and Fishbones will be discussed. This work supported by U.S. DoE Contract No. DE-AC02-76CH03073 DoE and grant No. DE-FG02-99ER5452 at The Johns Hopkins University. [1] L. F. Delgado-Aparicio, et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion, 49, 1245 (2007).

  9. Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Fast Electron Driven Beta-induced Alfven Eigenmodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenlu; Cheng, Junyi; Lin, Zhihong

    2016-10-01

    The fast electron driven beta induced Alfven eigenmode (e-BAE) has been routinely observed in HL-2A tokamak. We study e-BAE for the first time using global gyrokinetic GTC simulation, where the fast electrons are described by the drift kinetic model. Frequency chirping is observed in nonlinear simulations in the absence of sources and sinks, which provide a new nonlinear paradigm beyond the standard ``bump-on-tail'' model. For weakly driven case, nonlinear frequency is observed to be in phase with particle flux, and nonlinear mode structure is almost the same as linear stage. In the strongly driven case, BAAE is also unstable and co-exists with BAE after the BAE saturation. Analysis of nonlinear wave-particle interactions shows that the frequency chirping is induced by the nonlinear evolution of the coherent structures in the fast electron phase space, where the dynamics of the coherent structure is controlled by the formation and destruction of phrase space islands in the canonical variables. Zonal fields are found to affect wave-particle resonance in the nonlinear e-BAE simulations.

  10. Study of fast electron generation using multi beam of LFEX-class laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, M.; Sakagami, H.; Johzaki, T.; Sentoku, Y.; Nagatomo, H.

    2016-05-01

    Fast Ignition Realization Experiment project phase-I (FIREX-I) is being performed at Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University. In this project, the four-beam bundled high-energy Petawatt laser (LFEX) is being operated. LFEX laser provides great multi-beam irradiation flexibility, with the possibility of arrange the pulses in temporal sequence, spatially separate them in distinct spots of focus them in a single spot. In this paper, we study the two- beam interference effects on high-intensity picosecond laser-plasma interaction (LPI) by twodimensional relativistic Particle-In-Cell simulations. The interference causes surface perturbation, which enhances laser absorption and underdense plasma generation, increasing the accelerated electron number and their slope temperature. The laser-to-electron energy conversion efficiency for two-beam interference case is suitable for Fast Ignition (FI) compared to the single beam case, but the increment of fast electron divergence leads to lower energy coupling. To optimize the target design for FI, these interference effects should be taken into consideration.

  11. Fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Ren, Y.; Wang, W. X.; LeBlanc, B. P.; ...

    2015-11-03

    In this letter, we report the first observation of the fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus eXperiment [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. The observation was made in a set of RF-heated L-mode plasmas with toroidal magnetic field of 0.55 T and plasma current of 300 kA. It is observed that electron-scale turbulence spectral power (measured with a high-k collective microwave scattering system) decreases significantly following fast cessation of RF heating that occurs in less than 200 μs. The large drop in the turbulence spectral power has a short time delaymore » of about 1–2 ms relative to the RF cessation and happens on a time scale of 0.5–1 ms, much smaller than the energy confinement time of about 10 ms. Power balance analysis shows a factor of about 2 decrease in electron thermal diffusivity after the sudden drop of turbulence spectral power. Measured small changes in equilibrium profiles across the RF cessation are unlikely able to explain this sudden reduction in the measured turbulence and decrease in electron thermal transport, supported by local linear stability analysis and both local and global nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. Furthermore, the observations imply that nonlocal flux-driven mechanism may be important for the observed turbulence and electron thermal transport.« less

  12. EMPIRICAL CONSTRAINTS ON PROTON AND ELECTRON HEATING IN THE FAST SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Cranmer, Steven R.; Kasper, Justin C.; Matthaeus, William H.; Breech, Benjamin A.

    2009-09-10

    We analyze measured proton and electron temperatures in the high-speed solar wind in order to calculate the separate rates of heat deposition for protons and electrons. When comparing with other regions of the heliosphere, the fast solar wind has the lowest density and the least frequent Coulomb collisions. This makes the fast wind an optimal testing ground for studies of collisionless kinetic processes associated with the dissipation of plasma turbulence. Data from the Helios and Ulysses plasma instruments were collected to determine mean radial trends in the temperatures and the electron heat conduction flux between 0.29 and 5.4 AU. The derived heating rates apply specifically for these mean plasma properties and not for the full range of measured values around the mean. We found that the protons receive about 60% of the total plasma heating in the inner heliosphere, and that this fraction increases to approximately 80% by the orbit of Jupiter. A major factor affecting the uncertainty in this fraction is the uncertainty in the measured radial gradient of the electron heat conduction flux. The empirically derived partitioning of heat between protons and electrons is in rough agreement with theoretical predictions from a model of linear Vlasov wave damping. For a modeled power spectrum consisting only of Alfvenic fluctuations, the best agreement was found for a distribution of wavenumber vectors that evolves toward isotropy as distance increases.

  13. Fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Y.; Wang, W. X.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Ethier, S.; Mazzucato, E.; Bell, R.; Lee, K. C.; Domier, C. W.; Smith, D. R.; Yuh, H.

    2015-11-15

    In this letter, we report the first observation of the fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus eXperiment [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. The observation was made in a set of RF-heated L-mode plasmas with toroidal magnetic field of 0.55 T and plasma current of 300 kA. It is observed that electron-scale turbulence spectral power (measured with a high-k collective microwave scattering system) decreases significantly following fast cessation of RF heating that occurs in less than 200 μs. The large drop in the turbulence spectral power has a short time delay of about 1–2 ms relative to the RF cessation and happens on a time scale of 0.5–1 ms, much smaller than the energy confinement time of about 10 ms. Power balance analysis shows a factor of about 2 decrease in electron thermal diffusivity after the sudden drop of turbulence spectral power. Measured small changes in equilibrium profiles across the RF cessation are unlikely able to explain this sudden reduction in the measured turbulence and decrease in electron thermal transport, supported by local linear stability analysis and both local and global nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. The observations imply that nonlocal flux-driven mechanism may be important for the observed turbulence and electron thermal transport.

  14. Fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Y.; Wang, W. X.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Ethier, S.; Mazzucato, E.; Lee, K. C.; Domier, C. W.; Bell, R.; Smith, D. R.; Yuh, H.

    2015-11-03

    In this letter, we report the first observation of the fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus eXperiment [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. The observation was made in a set of RF-heated L-mode plasmas with toroidal magnetic field of 0.55 T and plasma current of 300 kA. It is observed that electron-scale turbulence spectral power (measured with a high-k collective microwave scattering system) decreases significantly following fast cessation of RF heating that occurs in less than 200 μs. The large drop in the turbulence spectral power has a short time delay of about 1–2 ms relative to the RF cessation and happens on a time scale of 0.5–1 ms, much smaller than the energy confinement time of about 10 ms. Power balance analysis shows a factor of about 2 decrease in electron thermal diffusivity after the sudden drop of turbulence spectral power. Measured small changes in equilibrium profiles across the RF cessation are unlikely able to explain this sudden reduction in the measured turbulence and decrease in electron thermal transport, supported by local linear stability analysis and both local and global nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. Furthermore, the observations imply that nonlocal flux-driven mechanism may be important for the observed turbulence and electron thermal transport.

  15. Fast Transverse Beam Instability Caused by Electron Cloud Trapped in Combined Function Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Electron cloud instabilities affect the performance of many circular high-intensity particle accelerators. They usually have a fast growth rate and might lead to an increase of the transverse emittance and beam loss. A peculiar example of such an instability is observed in the Fermilab Recycler proton storage ring. Although this instability might pose a challenge for future intensity upgrades, its nature had not been completely understood. The phenomena has been studied experimentally by comparing the dynamics of stable and unstable beam, numerically by simulating the build-up of the electron cloud and its interaction with the beam, and analytically by constructing a model of an electron cloud driven instability with the electrons trapped in combined function dipoles. Stabilization of the beam by a clearing bunch reveals that the instability is caused by the electron cloud, trapped in beam optics magnets. Measurements of microwave propagation confirm the presence of the cloud in the combined function dipoles. Numerical simulations show that up to 10$^{-2}$ of the particles can be trapped by their magnetic field. Since the process of electron cloud build-up is exponential, once trapped this amount of electrons significantly increases the density of the cloud on the next revolution. In a combined function dipole this multi-turn accumulation allows the electron cloud reaching final intensities orders of magnitude greater than in a pure dipole. The estimated fast instability growth rate of about 30 revolutions and low mode frequency of 0.4 MHz are consistent with experimental observations and agree with the simulations. The created instability model allows investigating the beam stability for the future intensity upgrades.

  16. A dynamic flare with anomalously dense flare loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svestka, Z.; Fontenla, J. M.; Machado, M. E.; Martin, S. F.; Neidig, D. F.

    1986-01-01

    The dynamic flare of November 6, 1980 developed a rich system of growing loops which could be followed in H-alpha for 1.5 hours. Throughout the flare, these loops, near the limb, were seen in emission against the disk. Theoretical computations of b-values for a hydrogen atom reveal that this requires electron densities in the loops to be close to 10 to the 12th per cu cm. From measured widths of higher Balmer lines the density at the tops of the loops was found to be 4 x 10 to the 12th per cu cm if no nonthermal motions were present. It is now general knowledge that flare loops are initially observed in X-rays and become visible in H-alpha only after cooling. For such a high density a loop would cool through radiation from 10 to the 7th K to 10 to the 4th K within a few minutes so that the dense H-alpha loops should have heights very close to the heights of the X-ray loops. This, however, contradicts the observations obtained by the HXIS and FCS instruments on board SMM which show the X-ray loops at much higher altitudes than the loops in H-alpha. Therefore, the density must have been significantly smaller when the loops were formed and the flare loops were apparently both shrinking and becoming denser while cooling.

  17. Biggest Solar Flare on Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    View an animation from the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT). At 4:51 p.m. EDT, on Monday, April 2, 2001, the sun unleashed the biggest solar flare ever recorded, as observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite. The flare was definitely more powerful than the famous solar flare on March 6, 1989, which was related to the disruption of power grids in Canada. This recent explosion from the active region near the sun's northwest limb hurled a coronal mass ejection into space at a whopping speed of roughly 7.2 million kilometers per hour. Luckily, the flare was not aimed directly towards Earth. Solar flares, among the solar system's mightiest eruptions, are tremendous explosions in the atmosphere of the Sun capable of releasing as much energy as a billion megatons of TNT. Caused by the sudden release of magnetic energy, in just a few seconds flares can accelerate solar particles to very high velocities, almost to the speed of light, and heat solar material to tens of millions of degrees. Solar ejections are often associated with flares and sometimes occur shortly after the flare explosion. Coronal mass ejections are clouds of electrified, magnetic gas weighing billions of tons ejected from the Sun and hurled into space with speeds ranging from 12 to 1,250 miles per second. Depending on the orientation of the magnetic fields carried by the ejection cloud, Earth-directed coronal mass ejections cause magnetic storms by interacting with the Earth's magnetic field, distorting its shape, and accelerating electrically charged particles (electrons and atomic nuclei) trapped within. Severe solar weather is often heralded by dramatic auroral displays, northern and southern lights, and magnetic storms that occasionally affect satellites, radio communications and power systems. The flare and solar ejection has also generated a storm of high-velocity particles, and the number of particles with ten million electron-volts of energy in the space near

  18. SOHO Captures CME From X5.4 Solar Flare

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) captured this movie of the sun's coronal mass ejection (CME) associated with an X5.4 solar flare on the evening of March 6, 2012. The extremely fast and en...

  19. The flare kernel in the impulsive phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejager, C.

    1986-01-01

    The impulsive phase of a flare is characterized by impulsive bursts of X-ray and microwave radiation, related to impulsive footpoint heating up to 50 or 60 MK, by upward gas velocities (150 to 400 km/sec) and by a gradual increase of the flare's thermal energy content. These phenomena, as well as non-thermal effects, are all related to the impulsive energy injection into the flare. The available observations are also quantitatively consistent with a model in which energy is injected into the flare by beams of energetic electrons, causing ablation of chromospheric gas, followed by convective rise of gas. Thus, a hole is burned into the chromosphere; at the end of impulsive phase of an average flare the lower part of that hole is situated about 1800 km above the photosphere. H alpha and other optical and UV line emission is radiated by a thin layer (approx. 20 km) at the bottom of the flare kernel. The upward rising and outward streaming gas cools down by conduction in about 45 s. The non-thermal effects in the initial phase are due to curtailing of the energy distribution function by escape of energetic electrons. The single flux tube model of a flare does not fit with these observations; instead we propose the spaghetti-bundle model. Microwave and gamma-ray observations suggest the occurrence of dense flare knots of approx. 800 km diameter, and of high temperature. Future observations should concentrate on locating the microwave/gamma-ray sources, and on determining the kernel's fine structure and the related multi-loop structure of the flaring area.

  20. Origin of the Universal Correlation between the Flare Temperature and the Emission Measure for Solar and Stellar Flares.

    PubMed

    Shibata; Yokoyama

    1999-11-20

    We present a theory to explain the observed universal correlation between flare temperature T and emission measure EM=n2V for solar and stellar flares (including solar microflares observed by Yohkoh as well as protostellar flares observed by ASCA), where n is the electron density and V is the volume. The theory is based on a magnetic reconnection model with heat conduction and chromospheric evaporation, assuming that the gas pressure of a flare loop is comparable to the magnetic pressure. This theory predicts the relation EM~B-5T17/2, which explains well the observed correlation between EM and T in the range of 6x106 K < T<108 K and 1044flares, if the magnetic field strength B of a flare loop is nearly constant for solar and stellar flares.

  1. Hybrid Simulation of Laser-Plasma Interactions and Fast Electron Transport in Inhomogeneous Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B I; Kemp, A; Divol, L

    2009-05-27

    A new framework is introduced for kinetic simulation of laser-plasma interactions in an inhomogenous plasma motivated by the goal of performing integrated kinetic simulations of fast-ignition laser fusion. The algorithm addresses the propagation and absorption of an intense electromagnetic wave in an ionized plasma leading to the generation and transport of an energetic electron component. The energetic electrons propagate farther into the plasma to much higher densities where Coulomb collisions become important. The high-density plasma supports an energetic electron current, return currents, self-consistent electric fields associated with maintaining quasi-neutrality, and self-consistent magnetic fields due to the currents. Collisions of the electrons and ions are calculated accurately to track the energetic electrons and model their interactions with the background plasma. Up to a density well above critical density, where the laser electromagnetic field is evanescent, Maxwell's equations are solved with a conventional particle-based, finite-difference scheme. In the higher-density plasma, Maxwell's equations are solved using an Ohm's law neglecting the inertia of the background electrons with the option of omitting the displacement current in Ampere's law. Particle equations of motion with binary collisions are solved for all electrons and ions throughout the system using weighted particles to resolve the density gradient efficiently. The algorithm is analyzed and demonstrated in simulation examples. The simulation scheme introduced here achieves significantly improved efficiencies.

  2. Simulation of laser-plasma interactions and fast-electron transport in inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.I. Kemp, A.J.; Divol, L.

    2010-06-20

    A new framework is introduced for kinetic simulation of laser-plasma interactions in an inhomogeneous plasma motivated by the goal of performing integrated kinetic simulations of fast-ignition laser fusion. The algorithm addresses the propagation and absorption of an intense electromagnetic wave in an ionized plasma leading to the generation and transport of an energetic electron component. The energetic electrons propagate farther into the plasma to much higher densities where Coulomb collisions become important. The high-density plasma supports an energetic electron current, return currents, self-consistent electric fields associated with maintaining quasi-neutrality, and self-consistent magnetic fields due to the currents. Collisions of the electrons and ions are calculated accurately to track the energetic electrons and model their interactions with the background plasma. Up to a density well above critical density, where the laser electromagnetic field is evanescent, Maxwell's equations are solved with a conventional particle-based, finite-difference scheme. In the higher-density plasma, Maxwell's equations are solved using an Ohm's law neglecting the inertia of the background electrons with the option of omitting the displacement current in Ampere's law. Particle equations of motion with binary collisions are solved for all electrons and ions throughout the system using weighted particles to resolve the density gradient efficiently. The algorithm is analyzed and demonstrated in simulation examples. The simulation scheme introduced here achieves significantly improved efficiencies.

  3. Are solar gamma-ray-line flares different from other large flares?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Crosby, N. B.; Dennis, B. R.

    1994-01-01

    We reevaluate evidence indicating that gamma-ray-line (GRL) flares are fundamentally different from other large flares without detectable GRL emission and find no compelling support for this proposition. For large flares observed by the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) from 1980 to 1982, we obtain a reasonably good correlation between 4-8 MeV GRL fluences and greater than 50 keV hard X-ray fluences and find no evidence for a distinct population of large hard X-ray flares that lack commensurate GRL emission. Our results are consistent with the acceleration of the bulk of the approximately 100 keV electrons and approximately 10 MeV protons (i.e., the populations of these species that interact in the solar atmosphere to produce hard X-ray and GRL emission) by a common process in large flares of both long and short durations.

  4. Guiding and focusing of fast electron beams produced by ultra-intense laser pulse using a double cone funnel target

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wen-shuai; Cai, Hong-bo; Zhu, Shao-ping

    2015-10-15

    A novel double cone funnel target design aiming at efficiently guiding and focusing fast electron beams produced in high intensity (>10{sup 19 }W/cm{sup 2}) laser-solid interactions is investigated via two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The forward-going fast electron beams are shown to be directed and focused to a smaller size in comparison with the incident laser spot size. This plasma funnel attached on the cone target guides and focuses electrons in a manner akin to the control of liquid by a plastic funnel. Such device has the potential to add substantial design flexibility and prevent inefficiencies for important applications such as fast ignition. Two reasons account for the collimation of fast electron beams. First, the sheath electric fields and quasistatic magnetic fields inside the vacuum gap of the double cone provide confinement of the fast electrons in the laser-plasma interaction region. Second, the interface magnetic fields inside the beam collimator further guide and focus the fast electrons during the transport. The application of this technique to cone-guided fast ignition is considered, and it is shown that it can enhance the laser energy deposition in the compressed fuel plasma by a factor of 2 in comparison with the single cone target case.

  5. Directed fast electron beams in ultraintense picosecond laser irradiated solid targets

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, X. L.; Lin, X. X.; Yuan, X. H. E-mail: ytli@iphy.ac.cn; Sheng, Z. M.; Carroll, D. C.; Neely, D.; Gray, R. J.; Tresca, O.; McKenna, P.; Yu, T. P.; Chen, M.; Liu, F.; Zhuo, H. B.; Zielbauer, B.; and others

    2015-08-31

    We report on fast electron transport and emission patterns from solid targets irradiated by s-polarized, relativistically intense, picosecond laser pulses. A beam of multi-MeV electrons is found to be transported along the target surface in the laser polarization direction. The spatial-intensity and energy distributions of this beam are compared with the beam produced along the laser propagation axis. It is shown that even for peak laser intensities an order of magnitude higher than the relativistic threshold, laser polarization still plays an important role in electron energy transport. Results from 3D particle-in-cell simulations confirm the findings. The characterization of directional beam emission is important for applications requiring efficient energy transfer, including secondary photon and ion source development.

  6. Fast magnetospheric echoes of artificially injected electrons observed above a bright auroral arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, K.; Bernstein, W.

    1983-01-01

    Rocket-borne electron beam experiments confirmed earlier observations of fast magnetospheric echoes of artificially injected energetic electrons. A total of 234 echoes were observed at pitch angles from 9 to 10 deg at energies of 1.87 and 3.90 keV. Of these, 102 echoes are unambiguously related to preceding accelerator operations at 2, 4 or 8 keV energy and highest current levels resulting in the determination of transit times of typically 300 to 400 msec. When echoes are present in both energy channels, higher energy electrons lead lower energy ones by 50 to 70 msec. Adiabatic theory applied to the observations yields a reflection height of 3000 to 4000 km.

  7. Observations of stimulated Raman scattering using simultaneous Thomson scattering, fast electron spectroscopy, and infrared diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, G.; Meyer, J.; Yazhou, Z.

    1986-10-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in a CO/sub 2/ laser(lambda/sub 0/ -- 10.6 ..mu..m) produced plasma has been studied experimentally. The enhanced electron plasma wave (epw) fluctuations observed with ruby laser Thomson scattering have been compared with the scattered infrared (IR) spectra and the high-energy (near 100 keV) electrons. No scattered IR light in the range 1.5lambda/sub 0/ fast electrons are well correlated with the Thomson scattered wave vector spectra.

  8. Multislice theory of fast electron scattering incorporating atomic inner-shell ionization.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, C

    2005-09-01

    It is demonstrated how atomic inner-shell ionization can be incorporated into a multislice theory of fast electron scattering. The resulting theory therefore accounts for both inelastic scattering due to inner-shell ionization and dynamical elastic scattering. The theory uses a description of the ionization process based on the angular momentum representation for both the initial and final states of the atomic electron. For energy losses near threshold, only a small number of independent states of the ejected atomic electron need to be considered, reducing demands on computing time, and eliminating the need for tabulated inelastic scattering factors. The theory is used to investigate the influence of the collection aperture size on the spatial origin of the silicon K-shell EELS signal generated by a STEM probe. The validity of a so-called local approximation is also considered.

  9. Solar flares and energetic particles.

    PubMed

    Vilmer, Nicole

    2012-07-13

    Solar flares are now observed at all wavelengths from γ-rays to decametre radio waves. They are commonly associated with efficient production of energetic particles at all energies. These particles play a major role in the active Sun because they contain a large amount of the energy released during flares. Energetic electrons and ions interact with the solar atmosphere and produce high-energy X-rays and γ-rays. Energetic particles can also escape to the corona and interplanetary medium, produce radio emissions (electrons) and may eventually reach the Earth's orbit. I shall review here the available information on energetic particles provided by X-ray/γ-ray observations, with particular emphasis on the results obtained recently by the mission Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. I shall also illustrate how radio observations contribute to our understanding of the electron acceleration sites and to our knowledge on the origin and propagation of energetic particles in the interplanetary medium. I shall finally briefly review some recent progress in the theories of particle acceleration in solar flares and comment on the still challenging issue of connecting particle acceleration processes to the topology of the complex magnetic structures present in the corona.

  10. Fast variability of tera-electron volt gamma rays from the radio galaxy M87.

    PubMed

    Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Borrel, V; Braun, I; Brown, A M; Bühler, R; Büsching, I; Carrigan, S; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L-M; Coignet, G; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Degrange, B; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Drury, L O'c; Dubus, G; Egberts, K; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Feinstein, F; Ferrero, E; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Funk, Seb; Funk, S; Füssling, M; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, D; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hoffmann, A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Hoppe, S; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; de Jager, O C; Kendziorra, E; Kerschhaggl, M; Khélifi, B; Komin, Nu; Konopelko, A; Kosack, K; Lamanna, G; Latham, I J; Le Gallou, R; Lemière, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J-P; Lohse, T; Martin, J M; Martineau-Huynh, O; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; Maurin, G; McComb, T J L; Moulin, E; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nolan, S J; Noutsos, A; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ouchrif, M; Panter, M; Pelletier, G; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Ranchon, S; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Reimer, A; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Sahakian, V; Santangelo, A; Saugé, L; Schlenker, S; Schlickeiser, R; Schröder, R; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Shalchi, A; Sol, H; Spangler, D; Spanier, F; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Superina, G; Tam, P H; Tavernet, J-P; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vialle, J P; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Wagner, S J; Ward, M

    2006-12-01

    The detection of fast variations of the tera-electron volt (TeV) (10(12) eV) gamma-ray flux, on time scales of days, from the nearby radio galaxy M87 is reported. These variations are about 10 times as fast as those observed in any other wave band and imply a very compact emission region with a dimension similar to the Schwarzschild radius of the central black hole. We thus can exclude several other sites and processes of the gamma-ray production. The observations confirm that TeV gamma rays are emitted by extragalactic sources other than blazars, where jets are not relativistically beamed toward the observer.

  11. Electron loss of fast many-electron ions colliding with neutral atoms: possible scaling rules for the total cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevelko, V. P.; Litsarev, M. S.; Song, M.-Y.; Tawara, H.; Yoon, J.-S.

    2009-03-01

    General features of the total electron-loss (projectile ionization) cross sections, σtot, for fast many-electron ions colliding with neutral atoms are investigated. Two independent scaling laws for σtot are obtained: one follows from the experimental data and another one from the classical calculations based on the n-particle classical trajectory Monte Carlo (nCTMC) and semi-classical treatments. The semi-classical method has recently been developed based upon the energy deposition model and the statistical ionization probabilities. Both scaling relations are expressed in terms of the projectile velocity v, its first ionization potential I1 and the nuclear charge ZA of the target atom. The accuracy of the scaling relations suggested is a factor of 2-3. At the high-velocity region (v2 Gt I1), experimental data are found to decrease approximately as σtot ~ v-2, i.e., close to the Born ionization cross section. At low energies, the σtot values are better described by the classical approximation which accounts for multi-electron-loss processes. These scaling laws obtained are compared with a known scaling law for the Ar target and are used for the prediction of the total electron-loss cross sections in a wide range of the collision parameters. The predicted cross sections σtot can be approximately evaluated as a minimum cross section obtained from two scaling formulae.

  12. Wake-field and fast head-tail instability caused by an electron cloud.

    PubMed

    Ohmi, K; Zimmermann, F; Perevedentsev, E

    2002-01-01

    In positron and proton storage rings, electrons produced by photoemission, ionization, and secondary emission accumulate in the vacuum chamber during multibunch operation with close spacing. A positron or proton bunch passing through this "electron cloud" experiences a force similar to a short-range wake field. This effective wake field can cause a transverse-mode-coupling instability, if the electron-cloud density exceeds a threshold value. In this report, we compute the electron-cloud induced wake in a region without external magnetic field both analytically and via computer simulation, for parameters representing the low-energy positron ring of KEKB and the LHC proton beam in the CERN SPS. We study the linearity and time dependence of the wake function and its variation with the size of the electron cloud. Using a broadband resonator model for the electron-cloud wake field, we then evaluate theoretical expressions for the transverse-mode-coupling instability based on the linearized Vlasov equation, and for the instability threshold of fast transverse blow up including its dependence on chromaticity.

  13. Advances In Understanding Solar And Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam F.

    2016-07-01

    Flares result from the sudden reconnection and relaxation of magnetic fields in the coronae of stellar atmospheres. The highly dynamic atmospheric response produces radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum, from the radio to X-rays, on a range of timescales, from seconds to days. New high resolution data of solar flares have revealed the intrinsic spatial properties of the flaring chromosphere, which is thought to be where the majority of the flare energy is released as radiation in the optical and near-UV continua and emission lines. New data of stellar flares have revealed the detailed properties of the broadband (white-light) continuum emission, which provides straightforward constraints for models of the transformation of stored magnetic energy in the corona into thermal energy of the lower atmosphere. In this talk, we discuss the physical processes that produce several important spectral phenomena in the near-ultraviolet and optical as revealed from new radiative-hydrodynamic models of flares on the Sun and low mass stars. We present recent progress with high-flux nonthermal electron beams in reproducing the observed optical continuum color temperature of T 10,000 K and the Balmer jump properties in the near-ultraviolet. These beams produce dense, heated chromospheric condensations, which can explain the shape and strength of the continuum emission in M dwarf flares and the red-wing asymmetries in the chromospheric emission lines in recent observations of solar flares from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph. Current theoretical challenges and future modeling directions will be discussed, as well as observational synergies between solar and stellar flares.

  14. Optimization of Cone Wall Thickness to Reduce High Energy Electron Generation for Fast-Ignition Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Sadaoki; Zhe, Zhang; Sawada, Hiroshi; Firex Team

    2015-11-01

    In Fast Ignition Inertial Confinement Fusion, optimization of relativistic electron beam (REB) accelerated by a high-intensity laser pulse is critical for the efficient core heating. The high-energy tail of the electron spectrum is generated by the laser interaction with a long-scale-length plasma and does not efficiently couple to a fuel core. In the cone-in-shell scheme, long-scale-length plasmas can be produced inside the cone by the pedestal of a high-intensity laser, radiation heating of the inner cone wall and shock wave from an implosion core. We have investigated a relation between the presence of pre-plasma inside the cone and the REB energy distribution using the Gekko XII and 2kJ-PW LFEX laser at the Institute of Laser Engineering. The condition of an inner cone wall was monitored using VISAR and SOP systems on a cone-in-shell implosion. The generation of the REB was measured with an electron energy analyzer and a hard x-ray spectrometer on a separate shot by injecting the LFEX laser in an imploded target. The result shows the strong correlation between the preheat and high-energy tail generation. Optimization of cone-wall thickness for the fast-ignition will be discussed. This work is supported by NIFS, MEXT/JSPS KAKENHI Grant and JSPS Fellows (Grant Number 14J06592).

  15. Study of fast electron transport and ionization in isochorically heated solid foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Hiroshi; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Pandit, Rishi; Yabuuchi, Toshinori; Zastrau, Ulf; Foerster, Eckhart; Beg, Farhat; McLean, Harry; Chen, Hui; Park, J.-B.; Patel, Prav; Link, Anthony; Ping, Yuan

    2016-10-01

    Interaction of a high-power, short-pulse laser with a solid target generates a significant number of relativistic MeV electrons, subsequently heating the target isochorically in the transport process. Fast electron driven ionization of a solid titanium foil was studied by measuring Ti K-alpha x-rays and performing 2-D particle-in-cell simulations. The experiment was performed using the 50 TW Leopard short-pulse laser at UNR's Nevada Terawatt Facility. The 15 J, 0.35 ps laser was tightly focused on to a various sized, 2- μm thick Ti foil within a 8 μm spot to achieve the peak intensity of 2×1019 W/cm2. The transport of the fast electrons produced 4.51 keV Ti K-alpha x-rays. The yields and 2-D monochromatic images were recorded with a Bragg crystal spectrometer and a spherically bent crystal imager. The ionization degree of the heated foil was determined to be 15 from the ionized K-alpha lines and the missing emission in the images. 2-D PIC simulations using a PICLS code with a radiation transport module were performed to calculate the K-alpha profiles and spectra. Details of the experiment and comparison will be presented.

  16. Absolute Abundance Measurements in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Harry

    2014-06-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with EVE/SDO and EIS/Hinode. EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines Fe XV-XXIV and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias (F). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is F=1.17+-0.22. Furthermore, we have compared the EVE measurements with corresponding flare observations of intermediate temperature S, Ar, Ca, and Fe emission lines taken with EIS. Our initial calculations also indicate a photospheric composition for these observations. This analysis suggests that the bulk of the plasma evaporated during a flare comes from deep in the chromosphere, below the region where elemental fractionation in the non-flaring corona occurs.

  17. Ionospheric effects of solar flares at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, K. K.; Lodhi, Neelesh K.; Singh, Sachchidanand

    2009-08-01

    From an analysis of electron density profiles recorded aboard Mars Global Surveyor, we report observations of some new and aeronomically important solar flare effects in the ionosphere of Mars. We find that all flares result in the formation of a well defined E layer peak, not always seen on other days. Further, while majority of flares result in elevated electron densities in the E region alone, some flares affect both the E and F1 layers. These altitude - related effects can provide vital information on the relative enhancement of photon fluxes in the various wavelength bands during solar flares. By using the unit optical depth values at Mars from Fox (2004) and the XUV irradiance model of Meier et al. (2002) for the Bastille Day solar flare, we infer that the well defined E peaks could result from enhancement of photon fluxes in the 10-13 nm spectral band. The extension of effect to the F1 layer is due to hardening of the 26-91 nm spectral band, as supported by Solar EUV Monitor measurements on Solar Heliospheric Observatory.

  18. Solar Flares: Magnetohydrodynamic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kazunari; Magara, Tetsuya

    2011-12-01

    This paper outlines the current understanding of solar flares, mainly focused on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes responsible for producing a flare. Observations show that flares are one of the most explosive phenomena in the atmosphere of the Sun, releasing a huge amount of energy up to about 1032 erg on the timescale of hours. Flares involve the heating of plasma, mass ejection, and particle acceleration that generates high-energy particles. The key physical processes for producing a flare are: the emergence of magnetic field from the solar interior to the solar atmosphere (flux emergence), local enhancement of electric current in the corona (formation of a current sheet), and rapid dissipation of electric current (magnetic reconnection) that causes shock heating, mass ejection, and particle acceleration. The evolution toward the onset of a flare is rather quasi-static when free energy is accumulated in the form of coronal electric current (field-aligned current, more precisely), while the dissipation of coronal current proceeds rapidly, producing various dynamic events that affect lower atmospheres such as the chromosphere and photosphere. Flares manifest such rapid dissipation of coronal current, and their theoretical modeling has been developed in accordance with observations, in which numerical simulations proved to be a strong tool reproducing the time-dependent, nonlinear evolution of a flare. We review the models proposed to explain the physical mechanism of flares, giving an comprehensive explanation of the key processes mentioned above. We start with basic properties of flares, then go into the details of energy build-up, release and transport in flares where magnetic reconnection works as the central engine to produce a flare.

  19. Demonstration of effective control of fast-ion-stabilized sawteeth by electron-cyclotron current drive.

    PubMed

    Lennholm, M; Eriksson, L-G; Turco, F; Bouquey, F; Darbos, C; Dumont, R; Giruzzi, G; Jung, M; Lambert, R; Magne, R; Molina, D; Moreau, P; Rimini, F; Segui, J-L; Song, S; Traisnel, E

    2009-03-20

    In a tokamak plasma, sawtooth oscillations in the central temperature, caused by a magnetohydrodynamic instability, can be partially stabilized by fast ions. The resulting less frequent sawtooth crashes can trigger unwanted magnetohydrodynamic activity. This Letter reports on experiments showing that modest electron-cyclotron current drive power, with the deposition positioned by feedback control of the injection angle, can reliably shorten the sawtooth period in the presence of ions with energies >or=0.5 MeV. Certain surprising elements of the results are evaluated qualitatively in terms of existing theory.

  20. A fast solver for the gyrokinetic field equation with adiabatic electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Borchardt, M.; Kleiber, R.; Hackbusch, W.

    2012-07-15

    Describing turbulence and microinstabilities in fusion devices is often modelled with the gyrokinetic equation. During the time evolution of the distribution function a field equation for the electrostatic potential needs to be solved. In the case of adiabatic electrons it contains a flux-surface-average term resulting in an integro-differential equation. Its numerical solution is time and memory intensive for three-dimensional configurations. Here a new algorithm is presented which only requires the numerical inversion of a simpler differential operator and a subsequent addition of a correction term. This new procedure is as fast as solving the equation without the surface average.

  1. Analysis of the fast electron scaling theory for the heating of a solid target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, R. J.; Borghesi, M.; Robinson, A. P. L.

    2016-08-01

    Simple scaling laws for laser-generated fast electron heating of solids that employ a Spitzer-like resistivity are unlikely to be universally adequate as this model does not produce an adequate description of a material's behaviour at low temperatures. This is demonstrated in this paper by using both numerical simulations and by comparing existing analytical scaling laws for low temperature resistivity. Generally, we find that, in the low temperature regime, the scaling for the heating of the background material has a much stronger dependence on the key empirical parameters (laser intensity, pulse duration, etc.).

  2. Development of a prototype T-shaped fast switching device for electron cyclotron current drive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Kenji; Nagashima, Koji; Honzu, Toshihiko; Saigusa, Mikio; Oda, Yasuhisa; Takahashi, Koji; Sakamoto, Keishi

    2016-09-01

    A T-shaped high-power switching device composed of circular corrugated waveguides with three ports and double dielectric disks made of sapphire was proposed as a fast switching device based on a new principle in electron cyclotron current drive systems. This switching device has the advantages of operating at a fixed frequency and being compact. The design of the prototype switch was obtained by numerical simulations using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The size of these components was optimized for the frequency band of 170 GHz. Low-power tests were carried out in a cross-shaped model.

  3. Flare Emission Onset in the Slow-Rise and Fast-Rise Phases of an Erupting Solar Filament Observed with TRACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, A. C.; Moore, R. L.

    2005-01-01

    We observe the eruption of an active-region solar filament of 1998 July 11 using high time cadence and high spatial resolution EUV observations from the TRACE sareiii'ce, along with soft X-ray images from the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on the Yohkoh satellite, hard X-ray fluxes from the BATSE instrument on the (CGRO) satellite and from the hard X-ray telescope (HXT) on Yohkoh, and ground-based magnetograms. We concentrate on the initiation of the eruption in an effort to understand the eruption mechanism. First the filament undergoes slow upward movement in a "slow rise" phase with an approximately constant velocity of approximately 15 km/s that lasts about 10-min, and then it erupts in a "fast-rise" phase, reaching a velocity of about 200 km/s in about 5-min, followed by a period of deceleration. EUV brightenings begin just before the start of the filament's slow rise, and remain immediately beneath the rising filament during the slow rise; initial soft X-ray brightenings occur at about the same time and location. Strong hard X-ray emission begins after the onset of the fast rise, and does not peak until the filament has traveled a substantial altitude (to a height about equal to the initial length of the erupting filament) beyond its initial location. Our observations are consistent with the slow-rise phase of the eruption resulting from the onset of "tether cutting" reconnection between magnetic fields beneath the filament, and the fast rise resulting from an explosive increase in the reconnection rate or by catastrophic destabilization of the overlying filament-carrying fields. About two days prior to the event new flux emerged near the location of the initial brightenings, and this recently- emerged flux could have been a catalyst for initiating the tether-cutting reconnection. With the exception of the initial slow rise, our findings qualitatively agree with the prediction for erupting-flux-rope height as a function of time in a model discussed by Chen

  4. Particle acceleration in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Kosugi, Takeo; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benka, Steve G.; Chupp, Edward L.; Enome, Shinzo; Garcia, Howard; Holman, Gordon D.; Kurt, Victoria G.; Sakao, Taro

    1994-01-01

    Particle acceleration is intrinsic to the primary energy release in the impulsive phase of solar flares, and we cannot understand flares without understanding acceleration. New observations in soft and hard X-rays, gamma-rays and coherent radio emissions are presented, suggesting flare fragmentation in time and space. X-ray and radio measurements exhibit at least five different time scales in flares. In addition, some new observations of delayed acceleration signatures are also presented. The theory of acceleration by parallel electric fields is used to model the spectral shape and evolution of hard X-rays. The possibility of the appearance of double layers is further investigated.

  5. Prompt acceleration of ions by oblique turbulent shocks in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, R. B.; Vlahos, L.

    1985-01-01

    Solar flares often accelerate ions and electrons to relativistic energies. The details of the acceleration process are not well understood, but until recently the main trend was to divide the acceleration process into two phases. During the first phase elctrons and ions are heated and accelerated up to several hundreds of keV simultaneously with the energy release. These mildly relativistic electrons interact with the ambient plasma and magnetic fields and generate hard X-ray and radio radiation. The second phase, usually delayed from the first by several minutes, is responsible for accelerating ions and electrons to relativistic energies. Relativistic electrons and ions interact with the solar atmosphere or escape from the Sun and generate gamma ray continuum, gamma ray line emission, neutron emission or are detected in space by spacecraft. In several flares the second phase is coincident with the start of a type 2 radio burst that is believed to be the signature of a shock wave. Observations from the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft have shown, for the first time, that several flares accelerate particles to all energies nearly simultaneously. These results posed a new theoretical problem: How fast are shocks and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence formed and how quickly can they accelerate ions to 50 MeV in the lower corona? This problem is discussed.

  6. Plasmon-mediated electron emission from the coronene molecule under fast ion impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Shubhadeep; Tribedi, L. C.

    2015-12-01

    The existence of the collective electronic excitation in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules has been predicted before on the basis of the presence of a large delocalized π electron cloud around the carbon skeleton. Here, we present a manifestation of energy and angular distributions of electron emission upon deexcitation of the collective plasmon resonance in coronene, a PAH molecule, under fast ion impact. The angular distributions of these electrons show an unusually enhanced forward-backward angular asymmetry, in contrast to the observed uniform distributions for simpler atomic (Ne) or molecular (CH4) targets. A simple model of photoelectron angular distribution from an oscillating dipolar plasmon, calculated including the first retardation term in the transition matrix element, provides excellent agreement with the observed distribution. The ratio of forward-to-backward electron emission intensity clearly exhibits a broad peak which is in excellent agreement with the theoretical prediction of the plamson peak. This observation may provide some new inputs towards the astrophysical problem of UV photon absorption by PAHs in the interstellar medium, or in the search for materials suitable for UV plasmonics.

  7. Tunable graphene micro-emitters with fast temporal response and controllable electron emission

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Gongtao; Wei, Xianlong; Gao, Song; Chen, Qing; Peng, Lianmao

    2016-01-01

    Microfabricated electron emitters have been studied for half a century for their promising applications in vacuum electronics. However, tunable microfabricated electron emitters with fast temporal response and controllable electron emission still proves challenging. Here, we report the scaling down of thermionic emitters to the microscale using microfabrication technologies and a Joule-heated microscale graphene film as the filament. The emission current of the graphene micro-emitters exhibits a tunability of up to six orders by a modest gate voltage. A turn-on/off time of less than 1 μs is demonstrated for the graphene micro-emitters, indicating a switching speed about five orders of magnitude faster than their bulky counterparts. Importantly, emission performances of graphene micro-emitters are controllable and reproducible through engineering graphene dimensions by microfabrication technologies, which enables us to fabricate graphene micro-emitter arrays with uniform emission performances. Graphene micro-emitters offer an opportunity of realizing large-scale addressable micro-emitter arrays for vacuum electronics applications. PMID:27160693

  8. Multi-GeV electron radiography for measurements of fast dynamic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, F. E.; Fabritius, J.; Mariam, F. G.; Poulson, D.; Simpson, R.; Walstrom, P.; Wilde, C.

    2017-01-01

    Charged particle radiography has been developed in the past decade to provide high-resolution, muti-frame flash radiography of dynamic systems. This development has focused on proton radiography utilizing 11 MeV to 50 GeV protons for a wide range of measurements. Recently, these techniques are being applied to the use of high energy electrons for applications at a future LANL MaRIE facility. At MaRIE Multi-GeV electrons may be used to diagnose small, quickly evolving systems, requiring resolution and frame rates beyond the capability of the existing 800 MeV proton radiography. The electron accelerator proposed for MaRIE will be capable of meeting the fast frame rate and resolution requirements for MaRIE. Because of the light mass of the electrons, bremsstrahlung processes become dominant in the electron interactions within the material being studied. Simulations have been performed to study these interactions, but measurements are required to fully understand the capabilities of this new measurement technique. We present an estimate from simulations of the performance characteristics of this future capability.

  9. Time dependence of fast electron beam divergence in ultraintense laser-plasma interactions.

    PubMed

    Akli, K U; Storm, M J; McMahon, M; Jiang, S; Ovchinnikov, V; Schumacher, D W; Freeman, R R; Dyer, G; Ditmire, T

    2012-08-01

    We report on the measurement and computer simulation of the divergence of fast electrons generated in an ultraintense laser-plasma interaction (LPI) and the subsequent propagation in a nonrefluxing target. We show that, at Iλ(2) of 10(20) Wcm(-2)μm(2), the time-integrated electron beam full divergence angle is (60±5)°. However, our time-resolved 2D particle-in-cell simulations show the initial beam divergence to be much smaller (≤30°). Our simulations show the divergence to monotonically increase with time, reaching a final value of (68±7)° after the passage of the laser pulse, consistent with the experimental time-integrated measurements. By revealing the time-dependent nature of the LPI, we find that a substantial fraction of the laser energy (~7%) is transported up to 100 μm with a divergence of 32°.

  10. Fast electron energy deposition in a magnetized plasma: Kinetic theory and particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Robiche, J.; Rax, J.-M.; Bonnaud, G.; Gremillet, L.

    2010-03-15

    The collisional dynamics of a relativistic electron jet in a magnetized plasma are investigated within the framework of kinetic theory. The relativistic Fokker-Planck equation describing slowing down, pitch angle scattering, and cyclotron rotation is derived and solved. Based on the solution of this Fokker-Planck equation, an analytical formula for the root mean square spot size transverse to the magnetic field is derived and this result predicts a reduction in radial transport. Some comparisons with particle-in-cell simulation are made and confirm striking agreement between the theory and the simulation. For fast electron with 1 MeV typical kinetic energy interacting with a solid density hydrogen plasma, the energy deposition density in the transverse direction increases by a factor 2 for magnetic field of the order of 1 T. Along the magnetic field, the energy deposition profile is unaltered compared with the field-free case.

  11. Quasi-periodic pulsations with varying period in multi-wavelength observations of an X-class flare

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jing; Tan, Baolin; Zhang, Yin; Karlický, Marian; Mészárosová, Hana

    2014-08-10

    This work presents an interesting phenomenon of the period variation in quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) observed during the impulsive phase of a coronal mass ejection-related X1.1 class flare on 2012 July 6. The period of QPPs was changed from 21 s at soft X-rays (SXR) to 22-23 s at microwaves, to ∼24 s at extreme ultraviolet emissions (EUV), and to 27-32 s at metric-decimetric waves. The microwave, EUV, and SXR QPPs, emitted from flare loops of different heights, were oscillating in phase. Fast kink mode oscillations were proposed to be the modulation mechanism, which may exist in a wide region in the solar atmosphere from the chromosphere to the upper corona or even to the interplanetary space. Changed parameters of flare loops through the solar atmosphere could result in the varying period of QPPs at different wavelengths. The first appearing microwave QPPs and quasi-periodic metric-decimetric type III bursts were generated by energetic electrons. This may imply that particle acceleration or magnetic reconnection were located between these two non-thermal emission sources. Thermal QPPs (in SXR and EUV emissions) occurred later than the nonthermal ones, which would suggest a some time for plasma heating or energy dissipation in flare loops during burst processes. At the beginning of flare, a sudden collapse and expansion of two separated flare loop structures occurred simultaneously with the multi-wavelength QPPs. An implosion in the corona, including both collapse and expansion of flare loops, could be a trigger of loop oscillations in a very large region in the solar atmosphere.

  12. Global Sausage Oscillation of Solar Flare Loops Detected by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Hui; Young, Peter R.; Reeves, Katharine K.; Wang, Tongjiang; Antolin, Patrick; Chen, Bin; He, Jiansen

    2016-05-01

    An observation from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph reveals coherent oscillations in the loops of an M1.6 flare on 2015 March 12. Both the intensity and Doppler shift of Fe xxi 1354.08 Å show clear oscillations with a period of ˜25 s. Remarkably similar oscillations were also detected in the soft X-ray flux recorded by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). With an estimated phase speed of ˜2420 km s-1 and a derived electron density of at least 5.4 × 1010 cm-3, the observed short-period oscillation is most likely the global fast sausage mode of a hot flare loop. We find a phase shift of ˜π/2 (1/4 period) between the Doppler shift oscillation and the intensity/GOES oscillations, which is consistent with a recent forward modeling study of the sausage mode. The observed oscillation requires a density contrast between the flare loop and coronal background of a factor ≥42. The estimated phase speed of the global mode provides a lower limit of the Alfvén speed outside the flare loop. We also find an increase of the oscillation period, which might be caused by the separation of the loop footpoints with time.

  13. Observations of particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.

    1979-01-01

    Solar flares provide several examples of nonthermal particle acceleration. The paper reviews the information gained about these processes via X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, which can presently distinguish among three separate particle-acceleration processes at the sun: an impulsive accelerator of more than 20 keV electrons, a gradual accelerator of more than 20 keV electrons, and a gradual accelerator of more than 10 MeV ions. The acceleration energy efficiency (total particle energy divided by total flare energy) of any of these mechanisms cannot be less than about 0.1%, although the gradual acceleration does not occur in every flare. The observational material suggests that both the impulsive and gradual accelerations take place preferentially in closed magnetic-field structures, but that the electrons decay in these traps before they can escape. The ions escape very efficiently.

  14. SECONDARY ELECTRON TRAJECTORIES IN HIGH-GRADIENT VACUUM INSULATORS WITH FAST HIGH-VOLTAGE PULSES

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Blackfield, D; Nelson, S D; Poole, B

    2010-04-21

    Vacuum insulators composed of alternating layers of metal and dielectric, known as high-gradient insulators (HGIs), have been shown to withstand higher electric fields than conventional insulators. Primary or secondary electrons (emitted from the insulator surface) can be deflected by magnetic fields from external sources, the high-current electron beam, the conduction current in the transmission line, or the displacement current in the insulator. These electrons are deflected either toward or away from the insulator surface and this affects the performance of the vacuum insulator. This paper shows the effects of displacement current from short voltage pulses on the performance of high gradient insulators. Generally, vacuum insulator failure is due to surface flashover, initiated by electrons emitted from a triple junction. These electrons strike the insulator surface thus producing secondary electrons, and can lead to a subsequent electron cascade along the surface. The displacement current in the insulator can deflect electrons either toward or away from the insulator surface, and affects the performance of the vacuum insulator when the insulator is subjected to a fast high-voltage pulse. Vacuum insulators composed of alternating layers of metal and dielectric, known as high-gradient insulators (HGIs), have been shown to withstand higher electric fields than conventional insulators. HGIs, being tolerant of the direct view of high-current electron and ion beams, and having desirable RF properties for accelerators, are a key enabling technology for the dielectric-wall accelerators (DWA) being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Characteristically, insulator surface breakdown thresholds go up as the applied voltage pulse width decreases. To attain the highest accelerating gradient in the DWA, short accelerating voltage pulses are only applied locally, along the HGI accelerator tube, in sync with the charged particle bunch, and the effects of

  15. Guiding and collimating the fast electrons by using a low-density-core target with buried high density layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Chong; Wan, Feng; Hou, Ya-Juan; Jia, Mo-Ran; Sang, Hai-Bo; Xie, Bai-Song; Liu, Shi-Bing

    2017-02-01

    A low-density-core target with buried high density layers is proposed to improve the transport of fast electrons and involved problems are investigated by using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. It is demonstrated that this target can collimate the fast electrons efficiently and lead to a better beam quality. The enhancement is attributed to the weakening of the two stream instability and the better collimation by the self-generated multilayer megagauss magnetic field as well as the baroclinic magnetic field. Comparing this to that without buried high density layers, the energy flux of fast electrons is increased by a factor of about 1.8 and has a narrower transverse distribution in space. Besides, the dependence of the efficiency on the target parameters is examined, and the optimal target parameters are also obtained. Such a target can be useful to many applications, such as fast ignition in inertial fusion.

  16. A Simple Transmission Electron Microscopy Method for Fast Thickness Characterization of Suspended Graphene and Graphite Flakes.

    PubMed

    Rubino, Stefano; Akhtar, Sultan; Leifer, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    We present a simple, fast method for thickness characterization of suspended graphene/graphite flakes that is based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We derive an analytical expression for the intensity of the transmitted electron beam I 0(t), as a function of the specimen thickness t (t<λ; where λ is the absorption constant for graphite). We show that in thin graphite crystals the transmitted intensity is a linear function of t. Furthermore, high-resolution (HR) TEM simulations are performed to obtain λ for a 001 zone axis orientation, in a two-beam case and in a low symmetry orientation. Subsequently, HR (used to determine t) and bright-field (to measure I 0(0) and I 0(t)) images were acquired to experimentally determine λ. The experimental value measured in low symmetry orientation matches the calculated value (i.e., λ=225±9 nm). The simulations also show that the linear approximation is valid up to a sample thickness of 3-4 nm regardless of the orientation and up to several ten nanometers for a low symmetry orientation. When compared with standard techniques for thickness determination of graphene/graphite, the method we propose has the advantage of being simple and fast, requiring only the acquisition of bright-field images.

  17. Fast electron temperature measurements using a 'multicolor' optical soft x-ray array

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Stutman, D.; Tritz, K.; Finkenthal, M.; Bell, R.; Hosea, J.; Kaita, R.; LeBlanc, B.; Roquemore, L.; Wilson, J. R.

    2007-10-01

    A fast ({<=}0.1 ms) and compact 'multicolor' scintillator-based optical soft x-ray (OSXR) array has been developed for time- and space-resolved measurements of the electron temperature [T{sub e}(R,t)] profiles in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. The 48-channel tangential multicolor OSXR prototype was tested on the National Spherical Torus Experiment. Each sight line views the same plasma volume at the midplane (0{<=}r/a{<=}1), in three distinct energy ranges determined by beryllium foils with different thicknesses. A tangential view of the toroidally (circular) symmetric plasma allows an Abel inversion of the line-integrated SXR brightness to obtain the x-ray emissivity profiles which are then used to constrain the reconstruction of the fast T{sub e}(R,t). The first assessment of the electron temperature is obtained by modeling the slope of the continuum radiation with the ideal double-foil method using both the line-integrated intensity measurements as well as the inverted SXR emissivity profiles.

  18. Equatorial and Low-Latitudes Ionospheric Reaction to Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoli Candido, C. M.; Becker-Guedes, F.; Paula, E. R.; Takahashi, H.

    2015-12-01

    Solar X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons are responsible for ionizing the terrestrial atmosphere and create the ionosphere. During solar flares, a fast increase in the electron density at different altitude regions takes place due to the abrupt enhance of the X-ray and EUV fluxes reaching Earth. With these changes in the ionosphere, radio communication and navigation can be drastically affected. The magnitudes of these Space Weather events can be related to the X-ray peak brightness and duration, which drive the intensity of the ionosphere response when the associated electromagnetic wave hit the sunlit side of the Earth's atmosphere. Other aspects defining these changes in a particular region are the local time, the solar zenith angle, and the position of the flare in the solar disc for each event. In order to improve the understand of radio signal degradation and loss in the Brazilian sector due to solar abrupt electromagnetic emissions, total electron content (TEC) data obtained by a GPS network formed by tents of dual-frequency receivers spread all over Brazilian territory were analyzed. It was observed different ionospheric local changes during several X-ray events identified by GOES satellite regarding the 0.1-0.8 nm range, and some case studies were ponder for a more detailed analysis of these effects. Considering the results, we have made an estimation of the ionospheric disturbances range for a particular event with great chance to affect space based communications in the equatorial and low-latitude regions.

  19. GeV flares observations with GLAST LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, A.; Omodei, N.; Piro, L.

    2007-07-12

    Early X-ray afterglow observations show that X-ray flares are very common features in GRB light curves. X-ray flares may reflect long duration central engine activity. The delayed flare photons are expected to interact with relativistic electrons by Inverse Compton giving delayed high energy counterparts that potentially will be detected by GLAST LAT, which could observe GRB from 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. The nature oh high energy spectral components from GRB detected by EGRET is still debated. Observations with GLAST LAT will give useful information to constrain the origin of X-ray flares. In this work we simulate a set of possible GeV emitting flares in the context of External Shock model to study the capability of GLAST LAT to detect GeV flares at different intensities and durations.

  20. Accelerated electron distributions with high- and low-energy cutoffs deduced from the application of a return-current model to solar flare X-ray spectra observed by RHESSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaoui, Meriem; Holman, Gordon D.

    2015-04-01

    The X-ray bremsstrahlung emission observed from solar flares requires a high flux, and corresponding high current, of non-thermal electrons. This current is thought to be stabilized by a co-spatial return current, which also resupplies electrons to the acceleration region. In the standard collisional thick-target model (CTTM), electrons accelerated in the corona lose all of their energy through Coulomb collisions when they reach the higher densities in the lower atmosphere of the sun. In the presence of the return current, however, the electrons also lose energy in the corona as they propagate downward. These losses introduce a break into the observed X-ray spectrum if the potential drop associated with the return current is sufficiently high.We analyzed the temporal evolution of RHESSI (Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager) spectra from a solar flare with strong spectral breaks in terms of a return-current collisional thick-target model (RCCTTM). The presence of strong breaks ensures that albedo and non-uniform ionization are not sufficient to explain the spectral flattening at energies below the break. We find that the model successfully fits the spectral data. The fits were significantly improved with the inclusion of a high-energy cutoff to the injected electron distribution (better chi-squared values and residuals), providing the time evolution of the highest energy to which electrons were accelerated. A lower limit to the low-energy cutoff to the electron distribution was obtained by restricting the beam density to a value less than the ambient coronal density. The derived plasma resistivity and the drift speed of the return-current electrons both suggest that plasma turbulence might have been important in the corona.This work was supported by the NASA Heliophysics Guest Investigator Program and the RHESSI Project.

  1. Heat flux of fast electrons to the limiter in lower hybrid current drive plasma on WT-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekawa, T.; Nakamura, M.; Komatsu, T.; Kishino, T.; Kishigami, Y.; Makino, K.; Maehara, T.; Minami, T.; Hanada, K.; Iida, M.; Terumichi, Y.; Tanaka, S.

    1992-10-01

    The heat flux of fast electrons to the local limiter in LHCD plasmas in WT-3 has been investigated by thermal measurement of the limiter. The amount of the heat flux (PFE) is found to be about on third of the net radiofrequency power (Prf) injected into the plasma for various discharge conditions. The results combined with other measurements show that the confinement of fast electrons deteriorates as Prf increases. This direct loss of fast electrons is one of the causes of the degradation of the current drive efficiency. Heat transport of the bulk electrons is also found to increase as Prf increases. Experimental results indicate that a significant part of the remaining RF power (2Prf/3) flows to the bulk electrons. The slowing down power of fast electrons in the energy range above several tens of keV is estimated to be quite small compared with 2Prf/3, suggesting that a significant part of the remaining power flows to the bulk electrons via other channels. A plausible channel is the absorption of RF power via lower energy electrons by an upshift of the parallel refractive index of the injected lower hybrid waves. This seems to be another cause of the degradation of the current drive efficiency

  2. Characterization and scaling effect of the resistive magnetic field on guiding laser generated fast electrons in solid targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Leblanc, Philippe

    2013-10-01

    For applications such as fast ignition, laser generated fast electrons play an essential role in determining energy deposition mechanics. However, the physics behind the electron beam self-guiding in solid materials is poorly understood. Upon examination of experimental results and simulation data, it has been determined that understanding the resistive magnetic field is crucial in determining laser produced fast electron transport patterns in solid targets. The scaling of the resistive magnetic field and confinement conditions are derived and are compared with 2-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. We study the impact of the initial state of the material (Z dependence, conductor or insulator) on global electron transport patterns. The fast electron transport seen in the simulations are found to be consistent with our scaling rule. Previous experimental observations (e.g. Stephens PRE 2004 and Sentoku PRL 2011) that show confinement or divergence in various materials are explained by this empirical resistive scaling. Our scaling is a powerful tool to design applications of compact radiation source, where controlling fast electron transport is critical.

  3. Flares in childhood eczema.

    PubMed

    Langan, S M

    2009-01-01

    Eczema is a major public health problem affecting children worldwide. Few studies have directly assessed triggers for disease flares. This paper presents evidence from a published systematic review and a prospective cohort study looking at flare factors in eczema. This systematic review suggested that foodstuffs in selected groups, dust exposure, unfamiliar pets, seasonal variation, stress, and irritants may be important in eczema flares. We performed a prospective cohort study that focused on environmental factors and identified associations between exposure to nylon clothing, dust, unfamiliar pets, sweating, shampoo, and eczema flares. Results from this study also demonstrated some new key findings. First, the effect of shampoo was found to increase in cold weather, and second, combinations of environmental factors were associated with disease exacerbation, supporting a multiple component disease model. This information is likely to be useful to families and may lead to the ability to reduce disease flares in the future.

  4. Particle and field characteristics of broadband electrons observed by the FAST satellite during a geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, A.; Shiokawa, K.; Seki, K.; Strangeway, R. J.; McFadden, J. P.; Carlson, C. W.

    2007-06-01

    Broadband electrons (BBEs) are remarkable flux enhancements (>1013 eV cm-2 s-1) of precipitating electrons over a broad energy range (0.03-30 keV) near the equatorward edge of the auroral oval during geomagnetic storms. We show characteristics of particles (energy spectra and pitch angle distribution) and fields (electric field, magnetic field, and wave spectra) during a BBE event observed by the Fast Auroral SnapshoT (FAST) satellite. The BBEs were observed at an altitude of ˜2000 km at 59°-61° invariant latitudes (ILATs) and 21 h magnetic local time (MLT). The event was observed at ˜7 min after the onset of a substorm during the main phase of the Bastille Day geomagnetic storm (minimum Dst = -301 nT) on 15 July 2000. The precipitation region of the BBEs corresponded to a localized intensification of auroral emission, lasting ˜14 min, observed by the Polar UVI images at 50°-60° geomagnetic latitudes (MLATs) and 20-21 MLTs. These results suggest that rapid particle acceleration was occurring in the inner magnetosphere associated with a storm-time substorm. The pitch angle distribution of BBEs was isotropic except for a loss cone feature around the field-aligned upward direction at a higher energy range above ˜1 keV, while field-aligned electron fluxes were larger than the perpendicular fluxes below ˜1 keV. These results imply that a higher energy part of the BBEs originated from higher altitudes in the inner magnetosphere and that a lower energy part was accelerated parallel to the local magnetic field at lower altitudes near the satellite. Intense fluctuations of electric and magnetic fields were observed during this BBE event. From these results, we discuss possible acceleration of the lower energy part of BBEs through wave-particle interaction.

  5. Frequency distributions and correlations of solar X-ray flare parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosby, Norma B.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Dennis, Brian R.

    1993-01-01

    Frequency distributions of flare parameters are determined from over 12,000 solar flares. The flare duration, the peak counting rate, the peak hard X-ray flux, the total energy in electrons, and the peak energy flux in electrons are among the parameters studied. Linear regression fits, as well as the slopes of the frequency distributions, are used to determine the correlations between these parameters. The relationship between the variations of the frequency distributions and the solar activity cycle is also investigated. Theoretical models for the frequency distribution of flare parameters are dependent on the probability of flaring and the temporal evolution of the flare energy build-up. The results of this study are consistent with stochastic flaring and exponential energy build-up. The average build-up time constant is found to be 0.5 times the mean time between flares.

  6. Implications of RHESSI Flare Observations for Magnetic Reconnection Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Sui, Linhui; Dennis, Brian R.

    2004-01-01

    The Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations of the 2002 April 15 solar flare and related flares provide compelling evidence for the formation of a large-scale, reconnecting current sheet in at least some flares. We describe the observed evolution of the April 15 flare in terms of magnetic reconnection models. We argue that the flare most likely evolved through magnetic geometries associated with super-slow reconnection (early rise phase), fast reconnection (impulsive phase), and slow reconnection (gradual phase). We also provide evidence for X-ray brightenings within the evolving current sheet, possibly induced by the tearing mode instability. This work was supported in part by the RHESSI Program and NASA's Sun-Earth Connection Program. This work would not have been possible without the dedicated efforts of the entire RHESSI team.

  7. Intense femtosecond laser driven collimated fast electron transport in a dielectric medium-role of intensity contrast.

    PubMed

    Dey, Indranuj; Adak, Amitava; Singh, Prashant Kumar; Shaikh, Moniruzzaman; Chatterjee, Gourab; Sarkar, Deep; Lad, Amit D; Kumar, G Ravindra

    2016-12-12

    Ultra-high intensity (> 1018 W/cm2), femtosecond (~30 fs) laser induced fast electron transport in a transparent dielectric has been studied for two laser systems having three orders of magnitude different peak to pedestal intensity contrast, using ultrafast time-resolved shadowgraphy. Use of a 400 nm femtosecond pulse as a probe enables the exclusive visualization of the dynamics of highest density electrons (> 7 × 1021 cm-3) observed so far. High picosecond contrast (~109) results in greater coupling of peak laser energy to the plasma electrons, enabling long (~1 mm), collimated (divergence angle ~2°) transport of fast electrons inside the dielectric medium at relativistic speeds (~0.66c). In comparison, the laser system with a contrast of ~106 has a large pre-plasma, limiting the coupling of laser energy to the solid and yielding limited fast electron injection into the dielectric. In the lower contrast case, bulk of the electrons expand as a cloud inside the medium with an order of magnitude lower speed than that of the fast electrons obtained with the high contrast laser. The expansion speed of the plasma towards vacuum is similar for the two contrasts.

  8. Ionization of N2 in collisions with fast electrons: Evidence of an interference effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Chowdhury, Madhusree; Stia, C. R.; Tachino, C. A.; Fojon, O. A.; Rivarola, Roberto D.; Tribedi, Lokesh C.

    2016-11-01

    Absolute double differential cross sections (DDCS) of electron emission were measured for ionization of N2 by fast electrons with energy 7 keV. Measurements were performed for different electron emission angles and energies. Evidence of oscillation due to Young-type interference was observed in the DDCS ratios for all angles. The frequency for large backward angle is found to be larger compared to that for small forward angle. Consequently, the forward-backward asymmetry parameter reveals the oscillatory structure even more clearly. The oscillations observed for both experimental-to-theoretical DDCS ratios and forward-backward asymmetry were well explained by the Cohen-Fano model of interference in a molecular double slit. A periodic deviation of the Cohen-Fano model from the asymmetry parameter data reveals the presence of a higher-frequency component. The first Born model was employed to explain the results of molecular nitrogen for which a complete-neglect-of-differential-overlap approximation was used along with an effective atomic number.

  9. Design of a fast electron beam scanning system for compact synchrotron light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, H. O.; Lehr, H.

    1989-07-01

    The design of an electron beam scanning system for compact storage ring synchrotron light sources is described. The main features are a scan frequency of 100 Hz and an angular amplitude of ±5 mrad. Different configurations of scan dipoles permit confining the scan to one cell using four dipoles or to repeat the scan periodically along the whole circumference by means of two scan dipoles per cell. Combinations of these basic configurations are possible. The location of the nodes of the pivoting electron beam can be optimized with respect to the maximum scan angle by slightly unbalancing the field strength in different scan dipoles. The scan dipoles are H-shaped magnets made from laminated iron. Their gap width is 68 mm. They are powered by fast transistor-bridge supplies which are controlled by freely programmable function generators capable of realizing a triangular current waveform with a deviation of less than 0.1% except for a 1% neighborhood of the apex. Estimates of the influence of the scanning on both quantum and Coulomb lifetime indicate acceptable lifetime reductions provided the minimum distance between distorted closed orbit and aperture exceeds about six standard deviations of the spatial electron distribution.

  10. Energetics of RHESSI X-Class Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Haga, Leah; Holman, Gordon D.; Hudson, Hugh

    2005-01-01

    The thermal and nonthermal energies of several X-class flares seen with the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) will be presented. The same techniques described by Emslie et al. (JGR, 109, A10104, 2004) are used to take the RHESSI imaging spectroscopic observations and compute the energies in the thermal plasma and in the nonthermal electrons as a function of time throughout the flares. Radiative and conductive cooling rates are estimated and total thermal and nonthermal energies are computed for each flare. Typically, the energy in nonthermal electrons integrated up to the time of peak soft X-ray emission is equal to or exceeds the energy in the thermal plasma at that time. This suggests that energy must have been converted into a form not visible with RHESSI and that the total energy released by the flares may be significantly greater than the sum of energies calculated from the RHESSI observations alone. This conclusion is supported by the high radiative energy seen with SORCE during the impulsive phase of the 28 October 2003 flare. The peak increase in total solar irradiance of 270 mW per square meters measured with SORCE was over two orders of magnitude higher than the peak soft X-ray flux seen with GOES or RHESSI. The implications of this new observation as compared to the energetics derived from the X-ray observations of that flare will be discussed along with the energetics analysis of most of the other X- class flares in October/November 2003.

  11. Remote flare brightenings and type III reverse slope bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, F.; Moore, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Observations are presented on two large (H-alpha class 2) flares that each produced an extensive chain of discrete H-alpha brightenings spanning 370,000-470,000 km in length in remote quiet regions more than 100,000 km from the main flare site. A large group of Type III RS bursts was also observed accompanying each flare. The onset of about half the remote H-alpha emission patches were nearly simultaneous with the RS bursts. One flare was observed in hard X-rays, and it is noted that the RS bursts occurred during hard X-ray spikes. For the other flare, soft X-ray filtergrams indicate coronal loops connecting from the main flare site to the remote H-alpha brightenings. Observations indicate that the RS burst electrons were generated in the flares, and it is proposed that the remote H-alpha brightenings were initiated by direct heating of the chromosphere by RS burst electrons traveling in closed magnetic loops connecting the flare site to the remote patches. It is also suggested that after onset, the brightenings were heated by thermal conduction by slower thermal electrons.

  12. THERMAL FRONTS IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Karlický, Marian

    2015-12-01

    We studied the formation of a thermal front during the expansion of hot plasma into colder plasma. We used a three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell model that includes inductive effects. In early phases, in the area of the expanding hot plasma, we found several thermal fronts, which are defined as a sudden decrease of the local electron kinetic energy. The fronts formed a cascade. Thermal fronts with higher temperature contrast were located near plasma density depressions, generated during the hot plasma expansion. The formation of the main thermal front was associated with the return-current process induced by hot electron expansion and electrons backscattered at the front. A part of the hot plasma was trapped by the thermal front while another part, mainly with the most energetic electrons, escaped and generated Langmuir and electromagnetic waves in front of the thermal front, as shown by the dispersion diagrams. Considering all of these processes and those described in the literature, we show that anomalous electric resistivity is produced at the location of the thermal front. Thus, the thermal front can contribute to energy dissipation in the current-carrying loops of solar flares. We estimated the values of such anomalous resistivity in the solar atmosphere together with collisional resistivity and electric fields. We propose that the slowly drifting reverse drift bursts, observed at the beginning of some solar flares, could be signatures of the thermal front.

  13. Design of fast signal processing readout front-end electronics implemented in CMOS 40 nm technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleczek, Rafal

    2016-12-01

    The author presents considerations on the design of fast readout front-end electronics implemented in a CMOS 40 nm technology with an emphasis on the system dead time, noise performance and power dissipation. The designed processing channel consists of a charge sensitive amplifier with different feedback types (Krummenacher, resistive and constant current blocks), a threshold setting block, a discriminator and a counter with logic circuitry. The results of schematic and post-layout simulations with randomly generated input pulses in a time domain according to the Poisson distribution are presented and analyzed. Dead time below 20 ns is possible while keeping noise ENC ≈ 90 e- for a detector capacitance CDET = 160 fF.

  14. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy based on conventional optics and fast dual chopper data acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heisler, Ismael A.; Moca, Roberta; Camargo, Franco V. A.; Meech, Stephen R.

    2014-06-01

    We report an improved experimental scheme for two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D-ES) based solely on conventional optical components and fast data acquisition. This is accomplished by working with two choppers synchronized to a 10 kHz repetition rate amplified laser system. We demonstrate how scattering and pump-probe contributions can be removed during 2D measurements and how the pump probe and local oscillator spectra can be generated and saved simultaneously with each population time measurement. As an example the 2D-ES spectra for cresyl violet were obtained. The resulting 2D spectra show a significant oscillating signal during population evolution time which can be assigned to an intramolecular vibrational mode.

  15. Counter-diabatic driving for fast spin control in a two-electron double quantum dot

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Yue; Chen, Xi

    2014-01-01

    The techniques of shortcuts to adiabaticity have been proposed to accelerate the “slow” adiabatic processes in various quantum systems with the applications in quantum information processing. In this paper, we study the counter-diabatic driving for fast adiabatic spin manipulation in a two-electron double quantum dot by designing time-dependent electric fields in the presence of spin-orbit coupling. To simplify implementation and find an alternative shortcut, we further transform the Hamiltonian in term of Lie algebra, which allows one to use a single Cartesian component of electric fields. In addition, the relation between energy and time is quantified to show the lower bound for the operation time when the maximum amplitude of electric fields is given. Finally, the fidelity is discussed with respect to noise and systematic errors, which demonstrates that the decoherence effect induced by stochastic environment can be avoided in speeded-up adiabatic control. PMID:25174453

  16. COMPTEL solar flare observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. M.; Aarts, H.; Bennett, K.; Debrunner, H.; Devries, C.; Denherder, J. W.; Eymann, G.; Forrest, D. J.; Diehl, R.; Hermsen, W.

    1992-01-01

    COMPTEL as part of a solar target of opportunity campaign observed the sun during the period of high solar activity from 7-15 Jun. 1991. Major flares were observed on 9 and 11 Jun. Although both flares were large GOES events (greater than or = X10), they were not extraordinary in terms of gamma-ray emission. Only the decay phase of the 15 Jun. flare was observed by COMPTEL. We report the preliminary analysis of data from these flares, including the first spectroscopic measurement of solar flare neutrons. The deuterium formation line at 2.223 MeV was present in both events and for at least the 9 Jun. event, was comparable to the flux in the nuclear line region of 4-8 MeV, consistent with Solar-Maximum Mission (SSM) Observations. A clear neutron signal was present in the flare of 9 Jun. with the spectrum extending up to 80 MeV and consistent in time with the emission of gamma-rays, confirming the utility of COMPTEL in measuring the solar neutron flux at low energies. The neutron flux below 100 MeV appears to be lower than that of the 3 Jun. 1982 flare by more than an order of magnitude. The neutron signal of the 11 Jun. event is under study. Severe dead time effects resulting from the intense thermal x-rays require significant corrections to the measured flux which increase the magnitude of the associated systematic uncertainties.

  17. Modelling the impulsive phase of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio da Costa, F.; Petrosian, V.; Liu, W.; Carlsson, M.

    2013-12-01

    Solar flares are the most energetic events in the solar system. In order to study this sudden release of energy and evaluate the response of the solar chromosphere to the deposition of thermal energy, we simulate the conditions of the solar atmosphere by creating a 1D plane-parallel atmospheric model and analyze the energy transport of a beam of non-thermal electrons that is injected at the top of the coronal loop. This is done using a numerical model which combines the radiative hydrodynamic equations (RADYN code - Carlsson & Stein, 1992) with the calculation of particle acceleration and transport (Flare code - Petrosian & Liu, 2004). With this model, it is for example possible to compare the emission of solar flares in several lines with available observations. The assemblage of high resolution chromospheric flare observations from the IRIS imaging spectrograph makes it an excellent time for this work. We discuss how accelerated particle heating and energy deposition rate are affected by the variation of cut-off energy and flux of non-thermal electrons as well as spectral index and investigate the response of the atmosphere to the acceleration of particles. Our flare simulation treats each atom in non-LTE condition and calculates in detail the transitions between its energy levels. It also assumes an optically thick atmosphere, which is crucial for understanding how energy is transported from the chromosphere deep into the photosphere.

  18. Solar Flare Impacts on Ionospheric Electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qian, Liying; Burns, Alan G.; Solomon, Stanley C.; Chamberlin, Phillip C.

    2012-01-01

    The sudden increase of X-ray and extreme ultra-violet irradiance during flares increases the density of the ionosphere through enhanced photoionization. In this paper, we use model simulations to investigate possible additional contributions from electrodynamics, finding that the vertical E X B drift in the magnetic equatorial region plays a significant role in the ionosphere response to solar flares. During the initial stage of flares, upward E X B drifts weaken in the magnetic equatorial region, causing a weakened equatorial fountain effect, which in turn causes lowering of the peak height of the F2 region and depletion of the peak electron density of the F2 region. In this initial stage, total electron content (TEC) enhancement is predominantly determined by solar zenith angle control of photoionization. As flares decay, upward E X B drifts are enhanced in the magnetic equatorial region, causing increases of the peak height and density of the F2 region. This process lasts for several hours, causing a prolonged F2-region disturbance and TEC enhancement in the magnetic equator region in the aftermath of flares. During this stage, the global morphology of the TEC enhancement becomes predominantly determined by these perturbations to the electrodynamics of the ionosphere.

  19. Detection of a long-duration solar gamma-ray flare on Jun. 11, 1991 with EGRET on Compton-GRO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanbach, G.; Bertsch, D. L.; Fitchel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kniffen, D. A.; Kwok, P. W.; Lin, Y. C.; Mattox, J. R.; Mayer-Hasslewander, H. A.

    1992-01-01

    On 11 Jun. 1991, the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (Comption-GRO) observed high energy gamma radiation above 30 MeV from the Sun following an intense flare around 2:00 Universal Time (UT). After the decay of most of the x ray flare, which caused nearly complete deadtime losses in EGRET, high energy emission was registered during the interval from about 3:30 UT to at least 10:30 UT. Gamma rays were detected up to energies above 1 GeV. The solar origin of the emission is assured by the time profile of the gamma ray count rate and by time resolved sky maps, which show a clear maximum at the position of the sun. The gamma ray lightcurve of the flare can be described with two components: a fast decaying emission with an e-folding time constant of about 25 minutes and a slow decay with about 255 minutes. There are indications for a spectral evolution with time, such that the emission below 100 MeV fades away earlier than the 100 to 300 MeV radiation, roughly in the time scale of the fast component. The spectrum of the flare can be fitted with a composite of a proton generated pion neutral spectrum and an electron bremsstrahlung component. The latter can be identified with the fast decaying component of the lightcurve.

  20. Size Distributions of Solar Flares and Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Ling, A. G.; Belov, A.; Yashiro, S.

    2012-01-01

    We suggest that the flatter size distribution of solar energetic proton (SEP) events relative to that of flare soft X-ray (SXR) events is primarily due to the fact that SEP flares are an energetic subset of all flares. Flares associated with gradual SEP events are characteristically accompanied by fast (much > 1000 km/s) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that drive coronal/interplanetary shock waves. For the 1996-2005 interval, the slopes (alpha values) of power-law size distributions of the peak 1-8 Angs fluxes of SXR flares associated with (a) >10 MeV SEP events (with peak fluxes much > 1 pr/sq cm/s/sr) and (b) fast CMEs were approx 1.3-1.4 compared to approx 1.2 for the peak proton fluxes of >10 MeV SEP events and approx 2 for the peak 1-8 Angs fluxes of all SXR flares. The difference of approx 0.15 between the slopes of the distributions of SEP events and SEP SXR flares is consistent with the observed variation of SEP event peak flux with SXR peak flux.

  1. Study of the Influences of the Ionospheric Responses to the Solar Flares by the Solar Flare Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Ridley, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Electron densities in the ionosphere increase during solar flares due to the sudden increase in the solar irradiance at soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet wavelengths. In this study, we perform simulations for a list of solar flares with different classes and locations on the solar disk (center-to-limb variations) using the Global Ionosphere and Thermosphere Model (GITM). First, we make an analysis of magnitudes and distribution of the TEC perturbations due to different solar flares. Solar flares occurring in different seasons are chosen from the list in order to examine how perturbations of electron densities depend on altitudes (E and F regions), latitudes (seasonal variations) and longitudes (sunrise, dayside and sunset), as well as the time dependences of the increasing and decaying of the electron densities around the flares. Also, we investigate the TEC data by the global GPS network from the Madrigal database for the solar flares on the list, determining the characteristics of solar flare that would allow them to be detected by the ground-based GPS observations. The TEC data by GPS and by GITM are compared to determine how well the modeling and observations match each other during different solar flares.

  2. Electron emission in collisions of fast highly charged bare ions with helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Abhoy; Mandal, Chittranjan; Purkait, Malay

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the electron emission from ground state helium atom in collision with fast bare heavy ions at intermediate and high incident energies. In the present study, we have applied the present three-body formalism of the three Coulomb wave (3C-3B) model and the previously adopted four-body formalism of the three Coulomb wave (3C-4B). To represent the active electron in the helium atom in the 3C-3B model, the initial bound state wavefunction is chosen to be hydrogenic with an effective nuclear charge. The wavefunction for the ejected electron in the exit channel has been approximated to be a Coulomb continuum wavefunction with same effective nuclear charge. Effectively the continuum-continuum correlation effect has been considered in the present investigation. Here we have calculated the energy and angular distribution of double differential cross sections (DDCS) at low and high energy electron emission from helium atom. The large forward-backward asymmetry is observed in the angular distribution which is explained in terms of the two-center effect (TCE). Our theoretical results are compared with available experimental results as well as other theoretical calculations based on the plain wave Born approximation (PWBA), continuum-distorted wave (CDW) approximation, continuum-distorted wave eikonal-initial state (CDW-EIS) approximation, and the corresponding values obtained from the 3C-4B model [S. Jana, R. Samanta, M. Purkait, Phys. Scr. 88, 055301 (2013)] respectively. It is observed that the four-body version of the present investigation produces results which are in better agreement with experimental observations for all cases.

  3. Solar Flare Geometries. I. The Area Fractal Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Aschwanden, Pascal D.

    2008-02-01

    In this study we investigate for the first time the fractal dimension of solar flares and find that the flare area observed in EUV wavelengths exhibits a fractal scaling. We measure the area fractal dimension D2, also called the Hausdorff dimension, with a box-counting method, which describes the fractal area as A(L) ~ LD2. We apply the fractal analysis to a statistical sample of 20 GOES X- and M-class flares, including the Bastille Day 2000 July 14 flare, one of the largest flares ever recorded. We find that the fractal area (normalized by the time-integrated flare area Af) varies from near zero at the beginning of the flare to a maximum of A(t)/Af = 0.65 +/- 0.12 after the peak time of the flare, which corresponds to an area fractal dimension in the range of 1.0lesssim D2(t) lesssim 1.89 +/- 0.05. We find that the total EUV flux Ftot(t) is linearly correlated with the fractal area A(t) . From the area fractal dimension D2, the volume fractal dimension D3 can be inferred (subject of Paper II), which is crucial to inferring a realistic volume filling factor, which affects the derived electron densities, thermal energies, and cooling times of solar and stellar flares.

  4. Fokker-Planck/Ray Tracing for Electron Bernstein and Fast Wave Modeling in Support of NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R. W.

    2009-11-12

    This DOE grant supported fusion energy research, a potential long-term solution to the world's energy needs. Magnetic fusion, exemplified by confinement of very hot ionized gases, i.e., plasmas, in donut-shaped tokamak vessels is a leading approach for this energy source. Thus far, a mixture of hydrogen isotopes has produced 10's of megawatts of fusion power for seconds in a tokamak reactor at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in New Jersey. The research grant under consideration, ER54684, uses computer models to aid in understanding and projecting efficacy of heating and current drive sources in the National Spherical Torus Experiment, a tokamak variant, at PPPL. The NSTX experiment explores the physics of very tight aspect ratio, almost spherical tokamaks, aiming at producing steady-state fusion plasmas. The current drive is an integral part of the steady-state concept, maintaining the magnetic geometry in the steady-state tokamak. CompX further developed and applied models for radiofrequency (rf) heating and current drive for applications to NSTX. These models build on a 30 year development of rf ray tracing (the all-frequencies GENRAY code) and higher dimensional Fokker-Planck rf-collisional modeling (the 3D collisional-quasilinear CQL3D code) at CompX. Two mainline current-drive rf modes are proposed for injection into NSTX: (1) electron Bernstein wave (EBW), and (2) high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) modes. Both these current drive systems provide a means for the rf to access the especially high density plasma--termed high beta plasma--compared to the strength of the required magnetic fields. The CompX studies entailed detailed modeling of the EBW to calculate the efficiency of the current drive system, and to determine its range of flexibility for driving current at spatial locations in the plasma cross-section. The ray tracing showed penetration into NSTX bulk plasma, relatively efficient current drive, but a limited ability to produce current over the whole

  5. Radio Spectroscopic Imaging of Electron Beams in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastian, Timothy S.; Chen, B.

    2012-05-01

    The recently upgraded Jansky Very Large Array was used to observe the radio emission from a C class solar flare. Observations were performed from 1-2 GHz with a spectral resolution of 1 MHz and time resolution of 100 ms. A number of fast-drift, type-III-like radio bursts was observed, the result of nonthermal electron beams propagating from the flare site, guided by the coronal magnetic field. Using these dynamic, imaging, spectroscopic observations, the electron beam trajectories are deduced.Implications are briefly discussed.

  6. Characterization of Fast-Electron Beam Propagation Through Solid-Density Matter by Optical Transition Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, M.; Myatt, J.; Stoeckl, C.

    2006-10-01

    A diagnostic has been developed to measure the emission of optical transition radiation (OTR) produced by relativistic electrons emerging at the rear side of laser-illuminated targets. The device will be deployed in the newly completed multiterawatt (MTW) experimental facility at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The MTW laser is capable of producing 10-J, 600-fs pulses of 1053-nm-wavelength radiation, which are focused using an f/2 off-axis parabolic mirror to intensities in excess of 10^19 Wcm-2. A 20x microscope objective with a resolution of better than 1 μm will image the OTR signal onto a CCD camera. A postprocessor to the particle-in-cell code LSP will be used to generate a simulated OTR signal from the calculated fast-electron distributions at the rear side of the target for comparison with experimental data. This talk will present the characteristics and capabilities of the OTR device along with the most recently acquired data. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-92SF19460.

  7. Electron removal from H0(n) in fast collisions with multiply charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. J.; Meyer, F. W.

    1982-09-01

    The cross sections for electron removal from highly excited (n=9-24) hydrogen atoms in fast collisions with multiply charged (q=1-5) N, O, and Ar ions were investigated in an ion-atom crossed-beams experiment. The ion-atom collisions occurred inside a deflector where a moderate electrostatic field of up to 1.8 kV/cm was applied. The range of collision velocity (vc) investigated is vc=1.0v1-2.0v1, where v1=2.2×108 cm/s is the Bohr velocity. The electron-removal cross section was found to be independent of ion species for a given q and vc, to increase as q2 for a given vc, and to decrease as v-2c for a given q. These q and vc dependences of the experimental cross section are in accord with classical Coulomb ionization theories. The experimental n dependence of the cross section differs significantly from the theoretically predicted dependence, but the difference can be accounted for if we assume the presence of the external electric field in the collision volume reduces the ionization energy.

  8. Development of fast heating electron beam annealing setup for ultra high vacuum chamber.

    PubMed

    Das, Sadhan Chandra; Majumdar, Abhijit; Katiyal, Sumant; Shripathi, T; Hippler, R

    2014-02-01

    We report the design and development of a simple, electrically low powered and fast heating versatile electron beam annealing setup (up to 1000 °C) working with ultra high vacuum (UHV) chamber for annealing thin films and multilayer structures. The important features of the system are constant temperature control in UHV conditions for the temperature range from room temperature to 1000 ºC with sufficient power of 330 W, at constant vacuum during annealing treatment. It takes approximately 6 min to reach 1000 °C from room temperature (∼10(-6) mbar) and 45 min to cool down without any extra cooling. The annealing setup consists of a UHV chamber, sample holder, heating arrangement mounted on suitable UHV electrical feed-through and electronic control and feedback systems to control the temperature within ±1 ºC of set value. The outside of the vacuum chamber is cooled by cold air of 20 °C of air conditioning machine used for the laboratory, so that chamber temperature does not go beyond 50 °C when target temperature is maximum. The probability of surface oxidation or surface contamination during annealing is examined by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of virgin Cu sample annealed at 1000 °C.

  9. Development of fast heating electron beam annealing setup for ultra high vacuum chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sadhan Chandra; Majumdar, Abhijit E-mail: majumdar@uni-greifswald.de; Hippler, R.; Katiyal, Sumant; Shripathi, T.

    2014-02-15

    We report the design and development of a simple, electrically low powered and fast heating versatile electron beam annealing setup (up to 1000 °C) working with ultra high vacuum (UHV) chamber for annealing thin films and multilayer structures. The important features of the system are constant temperature control in UHV conditions for the temperature range from room temperature to 1000 ºC with sufficient power of 330 W, at constant vacuum during annealing treatment. It takes approximately 6 min to reach 1000 °C from room temperature (∼10{sup −6} mbar) and 45 min to cool down without any extra cooling. The annealing setup consists of a UHV chamber, sample holder, heating arrangement mounted on suitable UHV electrical feed-through and electronic control and feedback systems to control the temperature within ±1 ºC of set value. The outside of the vacuum chamber is cooled by cold air of 20 °C of air conditioning machine used for the laboratory, so that chamber temperature does not go beyond 50 °C when target temperature is maximum. The probability of surface oxidation or surface contamination during annealing is examined by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of virgin Cu sample annealed at 1000 °C.

  10. Development of fast heating electron beam annealing setup for ultra high vacuum chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sadhan Chandra; Majumdar, Abhijit; Katiyal, Sumant; Shripathi, T.; Hippler, R.

    2014-02-01

    We report the design and development of a simple, electrically low powered and fast heating versatile electron beam annealing setup (up to 1000 °C) working with ultra high vacuum (UHV) chamber for annealing thin films and multilayer structures. The important features of the system are constant temperature control in UHV conditions for the temperature range from room temperature to 1000 °C with sufficient power of 330 W, at constant vacuum during annealing treatment. It takes approximately 6 min to reach 1000 °C from room temperature (˜10-6 mbar) and 45 min to cool down without any extra cooling. The annealing setup consists of a UHV chamber, sample holder, heating arrangement mounted on suitable UHV electrical feed-through and electronic control and feedback systems to control the temperature within ±1 °C of set value. The outside of the vacuum chamber is cooled by cold air of 20 °C of air conditioning machine used for the laboratory, so that chamber temperature does not go beyond 50 °C when target temperature is maximum. The probability of surface oxidation or surface contamination during annealing is examined by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of virgin Cu sample annealed at 1000 °C.

  11. What Causes Lupus Flares?

    PubMed

    Fernandez, David; Kirou, Kyriakos A

    2016-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the prototypic systemic autoimmune disease, follows a chronic disease course, punctuated by flares. Disease flares often occur without apparent cause, perhaps from progressive inherent buildup of autoimmunity. However, there is evidence that certain environmental factors may trigger the disease. These include exposure to UV light, infections, certain hormones, and drugs which may activate the innate and adaptive immune system, resulting in inflammation, cytotoxic effects, and clinical symptoms. Uncontrolled disease flares, as well as their treatment, especially with glucocorticoids, can cause significant organ damage. Tight surveillance and timely control of lupus flares with judicial use of effective treatments to adequately suppress the excessive immune system activation are required to bring about long term remission of the disease. We hope that new clinical trials will soon offer additional effective and target-specific biologic treatments for SLE.

  12. Cross sections of electron capture and electron capture with ionization of argon atoms by fast 3He2+ ions at various impact parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afrosimov, V. V.; Basalaev, A. A.; Panov, M. N.

    2017-01-01

    The absolute differential cross sections of scattering of fast particles formed in processes with capture of one or two electrons from Ar atoms have been measured for 6-keV He2+ ions in the interval of scattering angles within 0°-2.5°. The cross sections of electron capture and electron capture with ionization have been determined as functions of the impact parameter. The probabilities of these processes are compared to the distribution of electron density in various shells of target atoms. Applicability of the models of screened Coulomb interaction potentials to description of the scattering of recharged particles is assessed.

  13. Detecting Solar Neutrino Flares and Flavors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, D.

    2004-06-01

    Most power-full solar flare as the ones occurred on 23th February 1956, September 29th 1989 and recent ones occurred on 28th October, on 2nd-4th and 13th November 2003 have been respectively recorded by Radio-X- and Cosmic Rays detectors. These flares took place most in the open or in the edge and in the hidden solar disk (as for the September 29th, 1989 beyond 105Wo and for last November 2003 flare events). The 4th November event was the most powerful X event in the highest known rank category X28. The observed and estimated total flare energy E = 1031-1033 erg should be a source also of a prompt secondary neutrino burst originated, by proton-proton-pion production on the sun itself; a more delayed and spread neutrino flux signal arise later on the terrestrial atmosphere. These first earliest prompt solar neutrino burst might be already recorde, in a few neutrino clustered events, in largest neutrino underground detectors as Super-Kamiokande one, in time correlation with the sharp X-Radio flare onset. Our first estimate at the Super-Kamiokande II Laboratory is found to be a few (1-5) events. Their discover (or absence) should constrains the solar flare acceleration, energetic and its inner environment. Any large neutrino flare event might even verify the expected neutrino flavour mixing leading to comparable electron- muon event as well as a comparable energy fluence and spectra. Rare Tau appearence by neutrino muon into tau conversion might also arise.

  14. Solar flare particle radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of the solar particles accelerated by solar flares and subsequently observed near the orbit of the earth are studied. Considered are solar particle intensity-time profiles, the composition and spectra of solar flare events, and the propagation of solar particles in interplanetary space. The effects of solar particles at the earth, riometer observations of polar cap cosmic noise absorption events, and the production of solar cell damage at synchronous altitudes by solar protons are also discussed.

  15. The structure of high-temperature solar flare plasma in non-thermal flare models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.

    1985-01-01

    Analytic differential emission measure distributions have been derived for coronal plasma in flare loops heated both by collisions of high-energy suprathermal electrons with background plasma, and by ohmic heating by the beam-normalizing return current. For low densities, reverse current heating predominates, while for higher densities collisional heating predominates. There is thus a minimum peak temperature in an electron-heated loop. In contrast to previous approximate analyses, it is found that a stable reverse current can dominate the heating rate in a flare loop, especially in the low corona. Two 'scaling laws' are found which relate the peak temperature in the loop to the suprathermal electron flux. These laws are testable observationally and constitute a new diagnostic procedure for examining modes of energy transport in flaring loops.

  16. Gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula.

    PubMed

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Allafort, A; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bouvier, A; Brandt, T J; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Cannon, A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Çelik, Ö; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Costamante, L; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Luca, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Frailis, M; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashi, K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Horan, D; Itoh, R; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, T J; Khangulyan, D; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lee, S-H; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Marelli, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Naumann-Godo, M; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Pierbattista, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Romani, R W; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sanchez, D; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Schalk, T L; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Troja, E; Uchiyama, Y; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Wang, P; Wood, K S; Yang, Z; Ziegler, M

    2011-02-11

    A young and energetic pulsar powers the well-known Crab Nebula. Here, we describe two separate gamma-ray (photon energy greater than 100 mega-electron volts) flares from this source detected by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The first flare occurred in February 2009 and lasted approximately 16 days. The second flare was detected in September 2010 and lasted approximately 4 days. During these outbursts, the gamma-ray flux from the nebula increased by factors of four and six, respectively. The brevity of the flares implies that the gamma rays were emitted via synchrotron radiation from peta-electron-volt (10(15) electron volts) electrons in a region smaller than 1.4 × 10(-2) parsecs. These are the highest-energy particles that can be associated with a discrete astronomical source, and they pose challenges to particle acceleration theory.

  17. The solar flare myth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Many years of research have demonstrated that large, nonrecurrent geomagnetic storms, shock wave disturbances in the solar wind, and energetic particle events in interplanetary space often occur in close association with large solar flares. This result has led to a pradigm of cause and effect - that large solar flares are the fundamental cause of these events in the near-Earth space environmemt. This paradigm, which I call 'the solar flare myth,' dominates the popular perception of the relationship between solar activity and interplanetary and geomagnetic events and has provided much of the pragmatic rationale for the study of the solar flare phenomenon. Yet there is good evidence that this paradigm is wrong and that flares do not generally play a central role in producing major transient disturbances in the near-Earth space environment. In this paper I outline a different paradigm of cause and effect that removes solar flares from their central position in the chain of events leading from the Sun to near-Earth space. Instead, this central role is given to events known as coronal mass ejections.

  18. The dependence of solar flare energetics on flare volumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.

    1978-01-01

    The sizes of 45 X-ray flares observed on Skylab have been measured and compared to flare rise times, energies, and energy release rates as determined from Solard and XREA X-ray data. The X-ray rise time is correlated with the length and volume of the flare. The energy of the flare and the rate of increase of that energy are correlated with flare length and volume. Both the energy per unit volume and the rate of energy increase per unit volume are inversely correlated with flare length and volume. There is no correlation between the emission measure and the volume.

  19. Device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma to drive fast liners

    DOEpatents

    Thode, Lester E.

    1981-01-01

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy and momentum into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target. Fast liners disposed in the high-density target plasma are explosively or ablatively driven to implosion by a heated annular plasma surrounding the fast liner which is generated by an annular relativistic electron beam. An azimuthal magnetic field produced by axial current flow in the annular plasma, causes the energy in the heated annular plasma to converge on the fast liner.

  20. Flare model sensitivity of the Balmer spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falchi, A.; Falciani, R.; Smaldone, L. A.; Tozzi, G. P.

    1989-01-01

    Careful studies of various chromospheric spectral signatures are very important in order to explore their possible sensitivity to the modifications of the thermodynamic quantities produced by the flare occurrence. Pioneer work of Canfield and co-workers have shown how the H alpha behavior is able to indicate different changes in the atmospheric parameters structure associated to the flare event. It was decided to study the behavior of the highest Balmer lines and of the Balmer continuum in different solar flare model atmospheres. These spectral features, originating in the deep photosphere in a quiet area, may have a sensitivity different from H alpha to the modification of a flare atmosphere. The details of the method used to compute the Stark profile of the higher Balmer line (n is greater than or equal to 6) and their merging were extensively given elsewhere (Donati-Falchi et al., 1985; Falchi et al., 1989). The models used were developed by Ricchiazzi in his thesis (1982) evaluating the chromospheric response to both the nonthermal electron flux, for energy greater than 20 kev, (F sub 20) and to the thermal conduction, (F sub c). The effect of the coronal pressure values (P sub O) at the apex of the flare loop is also included.

  1. Account of nonlocal ionization by fast electrons in the fluid models of a direct current glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Rafatov, I.; Bogdanov, E. A.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.

    2012-09-15

    We developed and tested a simple hybrid model for a glow discharge, which incorporates nonlocal ionization by fast electrons into the 'simple' and 'extended' fluid frameworks. Calculations have been performed for an argon gas. Comparison with the experimental data as well as with the hybrid (particle) and fluid modelling results demonstated good applicability of the proposed model.

  2. Solar Flares and the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Solar flares are the biggest explosions in the solar system. They are important both for understanding explosive events in the Universe and for their impact on human technology and communications. The satellite-based HESSI is designed to study the explosive release of energy and the acceleration of electrons, protons, and other charged particles to high energies in solar flares. HESSI produces "color" movies of the Sun in high-energy X rays and gamma rays radiated by these energetic particles. HESSI's X-ray and gamma-ray images of flares are obtained using techniques similar to those used in radio interferometry. Ground-based radio observations of the Sun provide an important complement to the HESSI observations of solar flares. I will describe the HESSI Project and the high-energy aspects of solar flares, and how these relate to radio astronomy techniques and observations.

  3. Models of the Solar Atmospheric Response to Flare Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Joel

    2011-01-01

    I will present models of the solar atmospheric response to flare heating. The models solve the equations of non-LTE radiation hydrodynamics with an electron beam added as a flare energy source term. Radiative transfer is solved in detail for many important optically thick hydrogen and helium transitions and numerous optically thin EUV lines making the models ideally suited to study the emission that is produced during flares. I will pay special attention to understanding key EUV lines as well the mechanism for white light production. I will also present preliminary results of how the model solar atmosphere responds to Fletcher & Hudson type flare heating. I will compare this with the results from flare simulations using the standard thick target model.

  4. Fast Nitrogen Atoms from Dissociative Excitation of N2 by Electron Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajello, Joseph M.; Ciocca, Marco

    1996-01-01

    The Doppler profiles of one of the fine structure lines of the N I (1200 A) g (sup 4)S(sup 0)-(sup 4)P multiplet and of the N II (1085 A) g (sup 3)p(sup O)-(sup 3)D multiplet have been measured. Excitation of the multiplets is produced by electron impact dissociative excitation of N2. The experimental line profiles are evaluated by fast Fourier transform (FFT) techniques and analysis of the profiles yields the kinetic energy distribution of fragments. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of N I (1200 A) increases from 27+/-6 mA at 30 eV to 37+/-4 mA at 100 eV as the emission cross section of the dissociative ionization excitation process becomes more important relative to the dissociative excitation process. The FWHM of the N II (1085 A) line is 36+/-4 mA at 100 eV. For each multiplet the kinetic energy distribution function of each of the two fragment N atoms (ions) is much broader than thermal with a mean energy above 1.0 eV. The dissociation process with the largest cross section is predissociation and predominantly produces N atoms with kinetic energy distributions having mean energies above 0.5 eV. Dissociative processes can lead to a substantial escape flux of N I atoms from the satellites, Titan and Triton of the outer planets.

  5. Magnetic field measurements for study of fast electron transport in magnetized HED plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Hiroshi; Griffin, Brandon; Presura, Radu; Haque, Showera; Sentoku, Yasuhiko

    2014-10-01

    Interaction of megagauss magnetic fields with high energy density (HED) plasma is of great interest in the field of magnetized plasma. The field changes fundamental properties of the HED plasma such as thermal and magnetic diffusion. A coupled capability utilizing the 1.0 MA Zebra pulsed power generator and the 50 TW Leopard laser at Nevada Terawatt Facility enables to create such a condition for studies of magnetized plasma properties. We have conducted an experiment to measure magnetic fields generated by a 1.0 MA, 100 ns Zebra pulsed current in stainless steel coils. Using a 532 nm continuous laser from a single longitudinal mode laser system, the temporal change in the magnetic field was measured with the Faraday rotation in F2 glass. The probe laser passing through the 1.5 mm in radius and 1.75 mm thick glass placed in the vicinity of the inductive coils was split with a Glan-Taylor prism to measure vertical and horizontal polarization components with photodiodes. We will present the analysis of the experimental result and a design of a coupled experiment for study of fast electron transport in the magnetized plasma.

  6. Fast camera studies at an electron cyclotron resonance table plasma generator

    SciTech Connect

    Rácz, R.; Biri, S.

    2014-02-15

    A simple table-size ECR plasma generator operates in the ATOMKI without axial magnetic trap and without any particle extraction tool. Radial plasma confinement is ensured by a NdFeB hexapole. The table-top ECR is a simplified version of the 14 GHz ATOMKI-ECRIS. Plasma diagnostics experiments are planned to be performed at this device before installing the measurement setting at the “big” ECRIS. Recently, the plasma generator has been operated in pulsed RF mode in order to investigate the time evolution of the ECR plasma in two different ways. (1) The visible light radiation emitted by the plasma was investigated by the frames of a fast camera images with 1 ms temporal resolution. Since the visible light photographs are in strong correlation with the two-dimensional spatial distribution of the cold electron components of the plasma it can be important to understand better the transient processes just after the breakdown and just after the glow. (2) The time-resolved ion current on a specially shaped electrode was measured simultaneously in order to compare it with the visible light photographs. The response of the plasma was detected by changing some external setting parameters (gas pressure and microwave power) and was described in this paper.

  7. Fast intrinsic emissions of wide-gap oxides under electron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushchik, A.; Savikhin, F.; Tokbergenov, I.

    2003-01-01

    The emission spectra have been measured in the range of 1.6-9.0 eV under irradiation of wide-gap oxides by single electron pulses (3 ns, 300 kV), A fast (tau < 3 ns) continuous and temperature-independent emission, connected mainly with the transitions of hot holes between the levels of the valence band of oxides, can be separated in these spectra at 300-600 K, when the inertial emissions (5-7 eV) of localized excitations undergo a strong thermal quenching. It is suggested that a drastic decrease of the intensity of this so-called hole intraband luminescence (IBL) in a short-wavelength spectral region is caused by the lowering of the density of states at the edges of the valence band and, therefore, supplies information on the width of an anion valence band E-v. The drastic decrease of the IBL, intensity takes place at 6.4-8.6 eV in BaMgAl10O17, SrAl2O4, MgAl4O7, MgO and BeO, that agrees satisfactorily with the values of E-v in these systems obtained by other methods.

  8. Hinode/EIS plasma diagnostics in the flaring solar chromosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, D. R.; Fletcher, L.; Hannah, I. G.

    2011-08-01

    Context. The impulsive phase of solar flares is a time of rapid energy deposition and heating in the lower solar atmosphere, leading to changes in the temperature, density, ionisation and velocity structure of this region. Aims: We aim to study the lower atmosphere during the impulsive phase of a flare using imaging and spectroscopic data from Hinode/EIS, RHESSI and TRACE. We place these observations in context by using a wide range of temperature observations from each instrument. Methods: We analyse sparse raster data from the Hinode/EIS spectrometer to derive the density and line-of-sight velocity in flare footpoints, in a GOES C6.6 flare observed on 05-June-2007. The raster duration was 150s across the centre of a small active region, allowing multiple exposures of the flare ribbons and footpoints. Using RHESSI and Hinode/XRT we test both non-thermal and thermal models for the HXR emission. Results: During the flare impulsive phase, we find evidence from XRT for flare footpoints at temperatures exceeding 7 MK. We measure the electron number density increasing up to a few ×1010 cm-3 in the footpoints, at temperatures of ~1.5-2 MK, accompanied by small downflows at temperatures below Fe XIII and upflows of up to ~140 km s-1 at temperatures above. This is reasonable in the context of HXR diagnostics of the flare electron beam. The electrons inferred have sufficient energy to affect the chromospheric ionisation structure. Conclusions: EIS sparse raster data coupled with RHESSI imaging and spectroscopy prove useful here in studying the lower atmosphere of solar flares, and in this event suggest heat deposition relatively high in the chromosphere drives chromospheric evaporation while increasing the observed electron densities at footpoints. However, from RHESSI spectral fitting it is not possible to say whether the data are more consistent with a model including a non-thermal beam, or purely thermal model.

  9. An Investigation of Flare Footpoint DEMs using AIA Diffraction Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raftery, Claire; Bain, Hazel; Schwartz, Richard; Torre, Gabriele; Krucker, Sam

    2015-04-01

    The heating of flare footpoints by accelerated electrons is a well-established component of the standard flare model. However, limitations of current instruments make it challenging to obtain high cadence, high resolution observations of the brightest footpoint regions, predominantly due to low cadence, or pixel saturation.In moderate and large flares observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory’s Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, CCD pixels in the footpoint regions are frequently saturated despite the automatic exposure control. Using the method of Schwartz et al. (2014), we reconstruct saturated footpoint kernels in the brightest flaring regions and investigate the evolving footpoint differential emission measure at the full 12 second AIA cadence. This is compared to the changing electron fluxes observed with the Reuven Ramaty Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) to investigate the relationship between the non-thermal electron energy flux and the footpoint thermal response.(Schwartz, R. A., Torre, G., & Piana, M. (2014), Astrophysical Journal Letters, 793, LL23 )

  10. A Chromospheric Flare Model Consisting of Two Dynamical Layers: Critical Tests from IRIS Data of Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam; Allred, Joel C.; Daw, Adrian N.; Cauzzi, Gianna; Carlsson, Mats; Inglis, Andrew; O'Neill, Aaron; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Uitenbroek, Han

    2017-01-01

    Recent 1D radiative-hydrodynamic simulations of flares have shown that a heated, chromospheric compression layer and a stationary layer, just below the compression, are produced in response to high flux electron beam heating. The hot blackbody-like continuum and redshifted intensity in singly ionized chromospheric lines in these model predictions are generally consistent with broad wavelength coverage spectra of M dwarf flares and with high spectral resolution observations of solar flares, respectively. We critically test this two-component chromospheric flare model against the Fe II profiles and NUV continuum brightness for several X-class solar flares observed with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). We present several new predictions for the Daniel K. Inoue Solar Telescope (DKIST).

  11. Understanding Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.; Karpen, J. T.; DeVore, C. R.

    2012-05-01

    Solar flares and their associated coronal mass ejections are the most energetic explosions in the solar system. The largest events pose the greatest space weather dangers to life and civilization, and are of extreme importance to human space exploration. They also provide the best opportunity to study the universal processes of magnetic reconnection and particle acceleration that underlie most solar activity. The two great mysteries of solar flares are: how can so much energy be released so quickly, and how can such a large fraction (50% or more) end up in energetic particles. We present results from recent numerical modeling that sheds new light on these mysteries. These calculations use the highest spatial resolution yet achieved in order to resolve the flare dynamics as clearly as possible. We conclude from this work that magnetic island formation is the defining property of magnetic reconnection in the solar corona, at least, in the large-scale current sheet required for a solar flare. Furthermore, we discuss the types of future observations and modeling that will be required to solve definitively the solar flare mysteries. This work was supported, in part, by the NASA TR&T and SR&T Programs.

  12. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  13. Divergence-free transport of laser-produced fast electrons along a meter-long wire target.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hiroaki; Tokita, Shigeki; Inoue, Shunsuke; Hashida, Masaki; Sakabe, Shuji

    2013-04-12

    We demonstrate that, from a 10-μm metal wire irradiated by a 10(19)  W/cm2 laser pulse, fast electrons form a nearly perfect circular beam around the wire and propagate along it. The total charge and diameter of the electron beam are maintained over a propagation distance of 1 m. Moreover, the electron beam can be guided along a slightly bent wire. Numerical simulations suggest that a relatively weak steady electric field, which does not decay for several nanoseconds, is generated around the wire and plays a key role in the long-distance guidance.

  14. Energetics of Three Solar Flares Observed by RHESSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, G. D.; Dennis, B. R.; Sui, Linhui

    2004-05-01

    We compare the energy content of the thermal plasma and suprathermal electrons in three solar flares observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). Fits of computed isothermal and thick-target bremsstrahlung spectra to RHESSI X-ray spectra are used to deduce the instantaneous energy content of the X-ray-emitting plasma and the accumulated energy in suprathermal electrons throughout the three flares. We minimize the energy in the suprathermal electrons by assuming that the electron distributions have a low-energy cutoff that is no lower than the highest cutoff energy that provides a good fit to the X-ray spectra. The energetics of the 2002 April 15 M1 flare and the 2002 April 21 X2 flare are computed and compared with results for the 2002 July 23 X5 flare (Holman et al. 2003, ApJ 595, L97). We find that for all three flares the energy in nonthermal electrons is comparable to the energy contained in the thermal plasma.

  15. Explosive evaporation in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, George H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper develops a simple analytical model for the phenomenon of 'explosive evaporation' driven by nonthermal electron heating in solar flares. The model relates the electron energy flux and spectrum, plus details of the preflare atmosphere, to the time scale for explosive evaporation to occur, the maximum pressure and temperature to be reached, rough estimates for the UV pulse emission flux and duration, and the evolution of the blueshifted component of the soft X-ray lines. An expression is given for the time scale for buildup to maximum pressures and the onset of rapid motion of the explosively evaporating plasma. This evaporation can excite a rapid response of UV line and continuum emission. The emission lines formed in the plasma approach a given emissivity-weighted blueshift speed.

  16. Detection of a long-duration solar gamma-ray flare on June 11, 1991 with EGRET on COMPTON-GRO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanbach, G.; Bertsch, D. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kniffen, D. A.; Kwok, P. W.; Lin, Y. C.; Mattox, J. R.; Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.

    1993-01-01

    The detection of high energy photon emission from a long-duration solar gamma-ray flare on June 11, 1991 is reported. Gamma rays were detected up to energies above 1 GeV. The solar origin of this emission is assured by the time profile of the gamma-ray count rate and by time-resolved sky maps, which show a clear maximum at the position of the sun. There are indications for a spectral evolution with time, such that the emission below 100 MeV fades away earlier than the 100-300 MeV radiation, roughly on the time scale of the fast component. The spectrum of the flare can be well fitted with a composite of a proton generated pi exp 0 spectrum and an electron bremsstrahlung component. The latter can be identified with the fast decaying component of the lightcurve.

  17. Soft x-ray continuum radiation transmitted through metallic filters: An analytical approach to fast electron temperature measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Hill, K.; Bitter, M.; Tritz, K.; Kramer, T.; Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.

    2010-10-15

    A new set of analytic formulas describes the transmission of soft x-ray continuum radiation through a metallic foil for its application to fast electron temperature measurements in fusion plasmas. This novel approach shows good agreement with numerical calculations over a wide range of plasma temperatures in contrast with the solutions obtained when using a transmission approximated by a single-Heaviside function [S. von Goeler et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 599 (1999)]. The new analytic formulas can improve the interpretation of the experimental results and thus contribute in obtaining fast temperature measurements in between intermittent Thomson scattering data.

  18. Measurements of Absolute Abundances in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Harry P.

    2014-05-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines (Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias (f). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature, it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is f = 1.17 ± 0.22. This analysis suggests that the bulk of the plasma evaporated during a flare comes from deep in the chromosphere, below the region where elemental fractionation occurs.

  19. MEASUREMENTS OF ABSOLUTE ABUNDANCES IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Harry P.

    2014-05-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines (Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias (f). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature, it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is f = 1.17 ± 0.22. This analysis suggests that the bulk of the plasma evaporated during a flare comes from deep in the chromosphere, below the region where elemental fractionation occurs.

  20. Valentines Day X2 Flare

    NASA Video Gallery

    Active region 1158 let loose with an X2.2 flare at 0153 UT or 8:50 pm ET on February 15, 2011, the largest flare since Dec. 2006 and the biggest flare so far in Solar Cycle 24. This video was taken...

  1. The high accuracy model of the 19 July 2012 solar flare: kinetic description, calculations of X-Ray and microwave emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsyk, Pavel; Somov, Boris

    2016-04-01

    The limb white-light solar flare M7.7 class was observed at the 19 July 2012 at 05:58UT by RHESSI, GOES and SDO with high spectral, spatial and temporal resolution. These new data make possible to test modern models of solar flares. The flare, which considered here, locates in the picture plane, so we well see two different hard X-ray sources: footpoint and above-the-loop-top. The loop was observed in whit-light and microwave wavelengths. The key part of the presented work is high accuracy kinetic model, which describe behavior of electrons in the target - solar flare loop. We interpret the footpoint source in approximation of the thick target model with reverse current and above-the-loop-top source - in the thin target approximation. The microwave spectrum in the range from 1 to 50 GHz was calculated. Our results fit well the observational data, particularly so important parameter as hard X-Ray spectral index. But intensity of emission of the coronal source was estimated incorrect, it was low than observed. This problem can be solved by taking into account effects of particles acceleration in the collapsing magnetic trap, when fast electrons receive additional energy without changing the index of their energy spectrum. In the result we have flux ~ 5 1010 erg cm-2 s-1 for electrons with energies more then 15 keV, that ~ 5 times larger then in the case classical thick target model. Accordingly , so high flux of electrons to the Chromosphere provides effective heating of the cold plasma in the target, but the reverse current electric field restrict depth of the electron penetration. Received in this work estimates may be used for interpretation of the solar flare optical source formation and evolution.

  2. IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF MAGNETIC RECONNECTION AND CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION IN A SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Hui; Reeves, Katharine K.; Raymond, John C.; Chen, Bin; Murphy, Nicholas A.; Li, Gang; Guo, Fan; Liu, Wei

    2014-12-20

    Magnetic reconnection is believed to be the dominant energy release mechanism in solar flares. The standard flare model predicts both downward and upward outflow plasmas with speeds close to the coronal Alfvén speed. Yet, spectroscopic observations of such outflows, especially the downflows, are extremely rare. With observations of the newly launched Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), we report the detection of a greatly redshifted (∼125 km s{sup –1} along the line of sight) Fe XXI 1354.08 Å emission line with a ∼100 km s{sup –1} nonthermal width at the reconnection site of a flare. The redshifted Fe XXI feature coincides spatially with the loop-top X-ray source observed by RHESSI. We interpret this large redshift as the signature of downward-moving reconnection outflow/hot retracting loops. Imaging observations from both IRIS and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory also reveal the eruption and reconnection processes. Fast downward-propagating blobs along these loops are also found from cool emission lines (e.g., Si IV, O IV, C II, Mg II) and images of AIA and IRIS. Furthermore, the entire Fe XXI line is blueshifted by ∼260 km s{sup –1} at the loop footpoints, where the cool lines mentioned above all exhibit obvious redshift, a result that is consistent with the scenario of chromospheric evaporation induced by downward-propagating nonthermal electrons from the reconnection site.

  3. Activation of solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Cargill, P.J.; Migliuolo, S.; Hood, A.W.

    1984-11-01

    The physics of the activation of two-ribbon solar flares via the MHD instability of coronal arcades is presented. The destabilization of a preflare magnetic field is necessary for a rapid energy release, characteristic of the impulsive phase of the flare, to occur. The stability of a number of configurations are examined, and the physical consequences and relative importance of varying pressure profiles and different sets of boundary conditions (involving field-line tying) are discussed. Instability modes, driven unstable by pressure gradients, are candidates for instability. Shearless vs. sheared equilibria are also discussed. (ESA)

  4. Implications of RHESSI Observations for Solar Flare Models and Energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2006-01-01

    Observations of solar flares in X-rays and gamma-rays provide the most direct information about the hottest plasma and energetic electrons and ions accelerated in flares. The Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) has observed over 18000 solar flares in X-rays and gamma-rays since its launch in February of 2002. RHESSI observes the full Sun at photon energies from as low as 3 keV to as high as 17 MeV with a spectral resolution on the order of 1 keV. It also provides images in arbitrary bands within this energy range with spatial resolution as good as 3 seconds of arc. Full images are typically produced every 4 seconds, although higher time resolution is possible. This unprecedented combination of spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution, spectral range and flexibility has led to fundamental advances in our understanding of flares. I will show RHESSI and coordinated observations that confirm coronal magnetic reconnection models for eruptive flares and coronal mass ejections, but also present new puzzles for these models. I will demonstrate how the analysis of RHESSI spectra has led to a better determination of the energy flux and total energy in accelerated electrons, and of the energy in the hot, thermal flare plasma. I will discuss how these energies compare with each other and with the energy contained in other flare-related phenomena such as interplanetary particles and coronal mass ejections.

  5. Experimental Study on Fast Electrons Transport in Ultra-intense Laser Irradiated Solid Targets by Transition Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhijian, Zheng; Guangcan, Wang; Yuqiu, Gu

    2008-11-01

    The experiment was performed with SILEX laser facility(Ti-saphhire) at LFRC in China. The SILEX parameter: wavelength 0.8μm, duration 35fs, output power 280TW, contrast 5*105, The focal spot φ10μm(F/1.7), intensity on target surface 1*10^19W/cm^2(F/3). The main diagnostic equipments are the electron spectrometer, OMA spectrometer, optical streak camera. Some experimental results are given: The spectrum of optical emission from rear surface is rather narrow around some particular frequencies(1φ, 2φ, 3φ), We ascribe and confirm that the spike-like spectral line that is coherent transition radiation; The coherent light is also seen on time-integrated image with ring-patter due to Weibel instability of the fast electron transport; Obtained experimental cure of target thickness vs OTR image intensity is relative to mean free path of fast electron; The measuring optical transition radiation(OTR) duration of 171ps much longer than 1ps duration of fast electron transport target, the possible explanation is that the OTR duration to be determined magnetic diffusion time.

  6. [Dose distributions of fast electrons with an energy of 7-24 Mev in electromagnetic beam formation].

    PubMed

    Shambulov, R S; Khvan, G V; Saĭbekov, T S; Azhigaliev, N A; Shuinbekov, A D

    1983-03-01

    The formation of a wide beam is found necessary for a clinical application of a fast electron beam. A method of formation using thin dispersion foils is the most common one. An electromagnetic method of formation has been worked out, and dose distributions of fast electrons formed by this method have been compared in the tissue equivalent medium with those formed with the help of dispersion foils. The effect of some of the individual units of the forming device in these two methods of formation has been assessed. The experiment was conducted on medical beta-trons B-15 and B-5M-25 manufactured in the USSR. The depth dose distributions of fast electrons along the beam central axis in the electromagnetic formation for electrons with an energy of 7-24 MEV, field 8 X 10 cm and DSS = 90 cm are presented. It has been established that the beam intensity in the electromagnetic formation is higher than in the utilization of dispersion foils. Depth dose distribution is better in the electromagnetic formation than in the utilization of dispersion foils.

  7. Fast Electron Correlation Methods for Molecular Clusters without Basis Set Superposition Errors

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiya, Muneaki; Hirata, So; Valiev, Marat

    2008-02-19

    Two critical extensions to our fast, accurate, and easy-to-implement binary or ternary interaction method for weakly-interacting molecular clusters [Hirata et al. Mol. Phys. 103, 2255 (2005)] have been proposed, implemented, and applied to water hexamers, hydrogen fluoride chains and rings, and neutral and zwitterionic glycine–water clusters with an excellent result for an initial performance assessment. Our original method included up to two- or three-body Coulomb, exchange, and correlation energies exactly and higher-order Coulomb energies in the dipole–dipole approximation. In this work, the dipole moments are replaced by atom-centered point charges determined so that they reproduce the electrostatic potentials of the cluster subunits as closely as possible and also self-consistently with one another in the cluster environment. They have been shown to lead to dramatic improvement in the description of short-range electrostatic potentials not only of large, charge-separated subunits like zwitterionic glycine but also of small subunits. Furthermore, basis set superposition errors (BSSE) known to plague direct evaluation of weak interactions have been eliminated by com-bining the Valiron–Mayer function counterpoise (VMFC) correction with our binary or ternary interaction method in an economical fashion (quadratic scaling n2 with respect to the number of subunits n when n is small and linear scaling when n is large). A new variant of VMFC has also been proposed in which three-body and all higher-order Coulomb effects on BSSE are estimated approximately. The BSSE-corrected ternary interaction method with atom-centered point charges reproduces the VMFC-corrected results of conventional electron correlation calculations within 0.1 kcal/mol. The proposed method is significantly more accurate and also efficient than conventional correlation methods uncorrected of BSSE.

  8. Workshop on Impulsive Solar Flares, 2nd, University of New Hampshire, Durham, Sept. 26-28, 1988, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Papers on impulsive solar flares are presented, covering topics such as the optical properties of impulsive flares, soft X-ray spectroscopy of solar flares, the energy release process in impulsive bursts, high-velocity evaporation and a high-speed shock wave during the impulsive phase of the April 24, 1984 flare, nonpotential magnetic fields at sites of gamma-ray flares, and meter-decimeter and microwave radio observations of solar flares. Other topics include rise times in solar radio bursts, removal of the gradual component in analyses of solar impulsive bursts, ion and relativistic electron transport in solar flares, neutrons and gamma-ray emission on June 3, 1982, emission characteristics of three intense solar flares in cycle 21, and solar flare gamma-ray observations with the Hinotori satellite. Additional topics include spectra of relativistic solar proton ground-level events recorded in Antarctica, a 153-d periodicity in the occurrence of solar flares producing energetic interplanetary electrons, a search for solar neutron response in neutron monitor data, neutral beams in two-ribbon flares and in the geomagnetic tail, beam heating in solar flares, and solar flare gamma-ray line shapes.

  9. Gamma-ray and microwave evidence for two phases of acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, T.; Ramaty, R.

    1976-01-01

    Relativistic electrons in large solar flares produce gamma-ray continuum by bremsstrahlung and microwave emission by gyrosynchrotron radiation. Using observations of the August 4, 1972, flare, a detailed evaluation is made of the electron spectrum and the physical properties (density, magnetic field, size, and temperature) of the common emitting region of these radiations. Information is also obtained on energetic protons in this flare by using gamma-ray lines. From the electron spectrum, the proton-to-electron ratio, and the time dependences of the microwave emission, the 2.2-MeV line, and the gamma-ray continuum, it is concluded that relativistic electrons and energetic nuclei are accelerated in large solar flares by a mechanism which is different from the mechanism which accelerates electrons with energies not exceeding about 100 keV in flares.

  10. Gamma-ray and microwave evidence for two phases of acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, T.; Ramaty, R.

    1976-01-01

    Relativistic electrons in large solar flares produce gamma ray continuum by bremsstrahlung and microwave emission by gyrosynchrotron radiation. Using observations of the 1972, August 4 flare, the electron spectrum and the physical properties of the common emitting region of these radiations were evaluated. Information was also obtained on energetic protons in this flare by using gamma ray lines. From the electron spectrum, the proton-to-electron ratio, and the time dependences of the microwave emission, the 2.2 MeV line and the gamma ray continuum, it was concluded that in large solar flares relativistic electrons and energetic nuclei are accelerated by a mechanism which is different from the mechanism which accelerates approximately less than 100 keV electrons in flares.

  11. Particle acceleration by a solar flare termination shock.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Bastian, Timothy S; Shen, Chengcai; Gary, Dale E; Krucker, Säm; Glesener, Lindsay

    2015-12-04

    Solar flares--the most powerful explosions in the solar system--are also efficient particle accelerators, capable of energizing a large number of charged particles to relativistic speeds. A termination shock is often invoked in the standard model of solar flares as a possible driver for particle acceleration, yet its existence and role have remained controversial. We present observations of a solar flare termination shock and trace its morphology and dynamics using high-cadence radio imaging spectroscopy. We show that a disruption of the shock coincides with an abrupt reduction of the energetic electron population. The observed properties of the shock are well reproduced by simulations. These results strongly suggest that a termination shock is responsible, at least in part, for accelerating energetic electrons in solar flares.

  12. THREE-DIMENSIONAL RADIO AND X-RAY MODELING AND DATA ANALYSIS SOFTWARE: REVEALING FLARE COMPLEXITY

    SciTech Connect

    Nita, Gelu M.; Fleishman, Gregory D.; Gary, Dale E.; Kuznetsov, Alexey A.; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2015-02-01

    Many problems in solar physics require analysis of imaging data obtained in multiple wavelength domains with differing spatial resolution in a framework supplied by advanced three-dimensional (3D) physical models. To facilitate this goal, we have undertaken a major enhancement of our IDL-based simulation tools developed earlier for modeling microwave and X-ray emission. The enhanced software architecture allows the user to (1) import photospheric magnetic field maps and perform magnetic field extrapolations to generate 3D magnetic field models; (2) investigate the magnetic topology by interactively creating field lines and associated flux tubes; (3) populate the flux tubes with user-defined nonuniform thermal plasma and anisotropic, nonuniform, nonthermal electron distributions; (4) investigate the spatial and spectral properties of radio and X-ray emission calculated from the model; and (5) compare the model-derived images and spectra with observational data. The package integrates shared-object libraries containing fast gyrosynchrotron emission codes, IDL-based soft and hard X-ray codes, and potential and linear force-free field extrapolation routines. The package accepts user-defined radiation and magnetic field extrapolation plug-ins. We use this tool to analyze a relatively simple single-loop flare and use the model to constrain the magnetic 3D structure and spatial distribution of the fast electrons inside this loop. We iteratively compute multi-frequency microwave and multi-energy X-ray images from realistic magnetic flux tubes obtained from pre-flare extrapolations, and compare them with imaging data obtained by SDO, NoRH, and RHESSI. We use this event to illustrate the tool's use for the general interpretation of solar flares to address disparate problems in solar physics.

  13. Three-dimensional Radio and X-Ray Modeling and Data Analysis Software: Revealing Flare Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nita, Gelu M.; Fleishman, Gregory D.; Kuznetsov, Alexey A.; Kontar, Eduard P.; Gary, Dale E.

    2015-02-01

    Many problems in solar physics require analysis of imaging data obtained in multiple wavelength domains with differing spatial resolution in a framework supplied by advanced three-dimensional (3D) physical models. To facilitate this goal, we have undertaken a major enhancement of our IDL-based simulation tools developed earlier for modeling microwave and X-ray emission. The enhanced software architecture allows the user to (1) import photospheric magnetic field maps and perform magnetic field extrapolations to generate 3D magnetic field models; (2) investigate the magnetic topology by interactively creating field lines and associated flux tubes; (3) populate the flux tubes with user-defined nonuniform thermal plasma and anisotropic, nonuniform, nonthermal electron distributions; (4) investigate the spatial and spectral properties of radio and X-ray emission calculated from the model; and (5) compare the model-derived images and spectra with observational data. The package integrates shared-object libraries containing fast gyrosynchrotron emission codes, IDL-based soft and hard X-ray codes, and potential and linear force-free field extrapolation routines. The package accepts user-defined radiation and magnetic field extrapolation plug-ins. We use this tool to analyze a relatively simple single-loop flare and use the model to constrain the magnetic 3D structure and spatial distribution of the fast electrons inside this loop. We iteratively compute multi-frequency microwave and multi-energy X-ray images from realistic magnetic flux tubes obtained from pre-flare extrapolations, and compare them with imaging data obtained by SDO, NoRH, and RHESSI. We use this event to illustrate the tool's use for the general interpretation of solar flares to address disparate problems in solar physics.

  14. Smokeless, efficient, nontoxic flaring

    SciTech Connect

    Leite, O.C. )

    1991-03-01

    The primary function of a flare is to dispose of toxic, corrosive or flammable vapors safely, under relief conditions, by converting them into less objectional products by combustion. Toxic limits are the greatest concentration of a poisonous substance that can be tolerated in the air for a length of time without danger. Most emergencies causing overpressure on safety relief valves can be controlled within 5 to 10 minutes, for example, by shutting down a pump or compressor. A period of 10 to 30 minutes should be sufficient to control any emergency situation short of a catastrophe. Atmospheric discharge of hydrocarbons or other flammables should be designed to avoid the formation of flammable mixtures and exposure of personnel to toxic or corrosive vapors at grade level or on elevated structures. Either elevated flares or ground flares can accomplish efficiently the discharges to atmosphere when properly designed. Proper design is based on the characteristics of waste gas, heat radiation, noise levels, smoke and atmospheric dispersion. Smokeless flares use smoke suppression systems, like stream injection, forced draft air fans, high pressure gas injection and other devices to reduce the smoking tendency of certain fuels, improving air entrainment and mixing.

  15. Effect of fast electrons on the stability of resistive interchange modes in the TJ-II stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, L.; Ochando, M. A.; Carreras, B. A.; Carralero, D.; Hidalgo, C.; van Milligen, B. Ph.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we report on electromagnetic phenomena in low-β plasmas at the TJ-II stellarator, controlled by external heating. To understand the observations qualitatively, we introduce a simple modification of the standard resistive MHD equations, to include the potential impact of fast electrons on instabilities. The dominant instabilities of the modeling regime are resistive interchange modes, and calculations are performed in a configuration with similar characteristics as the TJ-II stellarator. The main effect of the trapping of fast electrons by magnetic islands induced by MHD instabilities is to increase the magnetic component of the fluctuations, changing the character of the instability to tearing-like and modifying the frequency of the modes. These effects seem to be consistent with some of the experimental observations.

  16. Guiding of laser-generated fast electrons by exploiting the resistivity-gradients around a conical guide element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, A. P. L.; Schmitz, H.; Green, J. S.; Ridgers, C. P.; Booth, N.

    2015-06-01

    Previously it has been suggested that the resistivity gradient at the interface between two different Z materials may allow one to guide a laser-generated fast electron beam propagating in a solid density target due to the enhanced growth of resistive self-generation of magnetic field and that this might be employed in an ellipsoidal target to produce a more collimated beam for propagation through homogeneous material. In this paper we show that a low-angle conical element may also have high efficacy in producing a collimated flow. Although the conical element does not have the geometric focussing properties of the ellipsoidal configuration, the conical element will tend to reduce the angular spread of the fast electrons through reducing their propagation angle on each successive bounce

  17. Radio outbursts in RS Canum Venaticorum stars - coronal heating and electron runaway

    SciTech Connect

    Mullan, D.J.

    1985-08-01

    Radio outbursts of RS CVn stars are sometimes thought of as analogs of flares in red dwarf stars. The possibility is examined that the outbursts are not due to flares, but rather to a highly efficient case of coronal heating: mechanical energy reaching the corona from the convection zone of an RS CVn star gives rise to induced electric fields which may be so large that electron runaway becomes possible. It is proposed that gyrosynchrotron emission from fast electrons which are produced by this process are the source of radio outbursts from RS CVn stars. 31 references.

  18. Reverse Current in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. W., III

    1978-01-01

    An idealized steady state model of a stream of energetic electrons neutralized by a reverse current in the pre-flare solar plasma was developed. These calculations indicate that, in some cases, a significant fraction of the beam energy may be dissipated by the reverse current. Joule heating by the reverse current is a more effective mechanism for heating the plasma than collisional losses from the energetic electrons because the Ohmic losses are caused by thermal electrons in the reverse current which have much shorter mean free paths than the energetic electrons. The heating due to reverse currents is calculated for two injected energetic electron fluxes. For the smaller injected flux, the temperature of the coronal plasma is raised by about a factor of two. The larger flux causes the reverse current drift velocity to exceed the critical velocity for the onset of ion cyclotron turbulence, producing anomalous resistivity and an order of magnitude increase in the temperature. The heating is so rapid that the lack of ionization equilibrium may produce a soft X-ray and EUV pulse from the corona.

  19. Fast ion induced shearing of 2D Alfvén eigenmodes measured by electron cyclotron emission imaging.

    PubMed

    Tobias, B J; Classen, I G J; Domier, C W; Heidbrink, W W; Luhmann, N C; Nazikian, R; Park, H K; Spong, D A; Van Zeeland, M A

    2011-02-18

    Two-dimensional images of electron temperature perturbations are obtained with electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) on the DIII-D tokamak and compared to Alfvén eigenmode structures obtained by numerical modeling using both ideal MHD and hybrid MHD-gyrofluid codes. While many features of the observations are found to be in excellent agreement with simulations using an ideal MHD code (NOVA), other characteristics distinctly reveal the influence of fast ions on the mode structures. These features are found to be well described by the nonperturbative hybrid MHD-gyrofluid model TAEFL.

  20. Fast Ion Induced Shearing of 2D Alfvén Eigenmodes Measured by Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias, B. J.; Classen, I. G. J.; Domier, C. W.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Nazikian, R.; Park, H. K.; Spong, D. A.; van Zeeland, M. A.

    2011-02-01

    Two-dimensional images of electron temperature perturbations are obtained with electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) on the DIII-D tokamak and compared to Alfvén eigenmode structures obtained by numerical modeling using both ideal MHD and hybrid MHD-gyrofluid codes. While many features of the observations are found to be in excellent agreement with simulations using an ideal MHD code (NOVA), other characteristics distinctly reveal the influence of fast ions on the mode structures. These features are found to be well described by the nonperturbative hybrid MHD-gyrofluid model TAEFL.

  1. Effect of the electric field pattern on the generation of fast electrons in front of lower hybrid launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Valade, Laurent Ekedahl, Annika; Colas, Laurent; Goniche, Marc; Hillairet, Julien; Fuchs, Vladimir; Petrzilka, Vaclav; Li, Miaohui; Zhang, Bin

    2015-12-10

    The effect of the detailed waveguide spectrum on the electron acceleration has been studied for the 3.7 GHz LHCD launchers in Tore Supra, i.e. the ITER-like passive-active multijunction (PAM) launcher and the fully-active-multijunction (FAM) launcher, using test electron modelling technique. The detailed launched antenna wave spectrum is used as input to the code that computes the dynamics of the electrons in the electric field. Comparison with the LHCD launchers in EAST, operating at 2.45 GHz and 4.6 GHz, has also been made. The simulations show that the PAM-design generates lower flux of fast electrons than FAM-launchers, this could be the consequence of the wider waveguide of PAM-launcher (14.65 mm for Tore-Supra) than FAM-launcher (8 mm for Tore-Supra)

  2. Forging Fast Ion Conducting Nanochannels with Swift Heavy Ions: The Correlated Role of Local Electronic and Atomic Structure

    DOE PAGES

    Sachan, Ritesh; Cooper, Valentino R.; Liu, Bin; ...

    2016-12-19

    Atomically disordered oxides have attracted significant attention in recent years due to the possibility of enhanced ionic conductivity. However, the correlation between atomic disorder, corresponding electronic structure, and the resulting oxygen diffusivity is not well understood. The disordered variants of the ordered pyrochlore structure in gadolinium titanate (Gd2Ti2O7) are seen as a particularly interesting prospect due to intrinsic presence of a vacant oxygen site in the unit atomic structure, which could provide a channel for fast oxygen conduction. In this paper, we provide insights into the subangstrom scale on the disordering-induced variations in the local atomic environment and its effectmore » on the electronic structure in high-energy ion irradiation-induced disordered nanochannels, which can be utilized as pathways for fast oxygen ion transport. With the help of an atomic plane-by-plane-resolved analyses, the work shows how the presence of various types of TiOx polyhedral that exist in the amorphous and disordered crystalline phase modify the electronic structures relative to the ordered pyrochlore phase in Gd2Ti2O7. Finally, the correlated molecular dynamics simulations on the disordered structures show a remarkable enhancement in oxygen diffusivity as compared with ordered pyrochlore lattice and make that a suitable candidate for applications requiring fast oxygen conduction.« less

  3. Forging Fast Ion Conducting Nanochannels with Swift Heavy Ions: The Correlated Role of Local Electronic and Atomic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Sachan, Ritesh; Cooper, Valentino R.; Liu, Bin; Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Voas, Brian K.; Lang, Maik; Ou, Xin; Trautmann, Christina; Zhang, Yanwen; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Weber, William J.

    2016-12-19

    Atomically disordered oxides have attracted significant attention in recent years due to the possibility of enhanced ionic conductivity. However, the correlation between atomic disorder, corresponding electronic structure, and the resulting oxygen diffusivity is not well understood. The disordered variants of the ordered pyrochlore structure in gadolinium titanate (Gd2Ti2O7) are seen as a particularly interesting prospect due to intrinsic presence of a vacant oxygen site in the unit atomic structure, which could provide a channel for fast oxygen conduction. In this paper, we provide insights into the subangstrom scale on the disordering-induced variations in the local atomic environment and its effect on the electronic structure in high-energy ion irradiation-induced disordered nanochannels, which can be utilized as pathways for fast oxygen ion transport. With the help of an atomic plane-by-plane-resolved analyses, the work shows how the presence of various types of TiOx polyhedral that exist in the amorphous and disordered crystalline phase modify the electronic structures relative to the ordered pyrochlore phase in Gd2Ti2O7. Finally, the correlated molecular dynamics simulations on the disordered structures show a remarkable enhancement in oxygen diffusivity as compared with ordered pyrochlore lattice and make that a suitable candidate for applications requiring fast oxygen conduction.

  4. Gamma-ray burst flares: X-ray flaring. II

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, C. A.; Roming, P. W. A.

    2014-06-10

    We present a catalog of 498 flaring periods found in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves taken from the online Swift X-Ray Telescope GRB Catalogue. We analyzed 680 individual light curves using a flare detection method developed and used on our UV/optical GRB Flare Catalog. This method makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion to analyze the residuals of fitted GRB light curves and statistically determines the optimal fit to the light curve residuals in an attempt to identify any additional features. These features, which we classify as flares, are identified by iteratively adding additional 'breaks' to the light curve. We find evidence of flaring in 326 of the analyzed light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of ∼1.5 flares per GRB. As with the UV/optical, flaring in our sample is generally confined to the first 1000 s of the afterglow, but can be detected to beyond 10{sup 5} s. Only ∼50% of the detected flares follow the 'classical' definition of Δt/t ≤ 0.5, with many of the largest flares exceeding this value.

  5. Fast pulsed operation of a small non-radioactive electron source with continuous emission current control

    SciTech Connect

    Cochems, P.; Kirk, A. T.; Bunert, E.; Runge, M.; Goncalves, P.; Zimmermann, S.

    2015-06-15

    Non-radioactive electron sources are of great interest in any application requiring the emission of electrons at atmospheric pressure, as they offer better control over emission parameters than radioactive electron sources and are not subject to legal restrictions. Recently, we published a simple electron source consisting only of a vacuum housing, a filament, and a single control grid. In this paper, we present improved control electronics that utilize this control grid in order to focus and defocus the electron beam, thus pulsing the electron emission at atmospheric pressure. This allows short emission pulses and excellent stability of the emitted electron current due to continuous control, both during pulsed and continuous operations. As an application example, this electron source is coupled to an ion mobility spectrometer. Here, the pulsed electron source allows experiments on gas phase ion chemistry (e.g., ion generation and recombination kinetics) and can even remove the need for a traditional ion shutter.

  6. Transient particle acceleration associated with solar flares.

    PubMed

    Chupp, E L

    1990-10-12

    Understanding how individual charged particles can be accelerated to extreme energies (10(20) electron volts), remains a foremost problem in astrophysics. Within our solar system, the active sun is capable of producing, on a short time scale, ions with energies higher than 25 gigaelectron volts. Satellite and ground-based observation over the past 30 years have greatly increased our knowledge of the properties of transient bursts of energetic particles emitted from the sun in association with solar flares, but a real understanding of the solar flare particle acceleration process requires greatly refined experimental data. On the practical side, it is also imperative that this problem be solved if man is to venture, for long periods of time, beyond the protective umbrella of Earth's magnetic field, which excludes much of the biologically damaging solar energetic particles. It is only through an understanding of the basic acceleration problem that we can expect to be able to predict the occurrence of a solar flare with lethal solar radiations. For our knowledge of these effects to advance, a new space mission dedicated to studying the high-energy aspects of solar flares at high spatial and energy resolution will be required.

  7. CONSTRAINING SOLAR FLARE DIFFERENTIAL EMISSION MEASURES WITH EVE AND RHESSI

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, Amir; McTiernan, James M.; Warren, Harry P.

    2014-06-20

    Deriving a well-constrained differential emission measure (DEM) distribution for solar flares has historically been difficult, primarily because no single instrument is sensitive to the full range of coronal temperatures observed in flares, from ≲2 to ≳50 MK. We present a new technique, combining extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectra from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory with X-ray spectra from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), to derive, for the first time, a self-consistent, well-constrained DEM for jointly observed solar flares. EVE is sensitive to ∼2-25 MK thermal plasma emission, and RHESSI to ≳10 MK; together, the two instruments cover the full range of flare coronal plasma temperatures. We have validated the new technique on artificial test data, and apply it to two X-class flares from solar cycle 24 to determine the flare DEM and its temporal evolution; the constraints on the thermal emission derived from the EVE data also constrain the low energy cutoff of the non-thermal electrons, a crucial parameter for flare energetics. The DEM analysis can also be used to predict the soft X-ray flux in the poorly observed ∼0.4-5 nm range, with important applications for geospace science.

  8. Constraining Solar Flare Differential Emission Measures with EVE and RHESSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, Amir; McTiernan, James M.; Warren, Harry P.

    2014-06-01

    Deriving a well-constrained differential emission measure (DEM) distribution for solar flares has historically been difficult, primarily because no single instrument is sensitive to the full range of coronal temperatures observed in flares, from lsim2 to gsim50 MK. We present a new technique, combining extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectra from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory with X-ray spectra from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), to derive, for the first time, a self-consistent, well-constrained DEM for jointly observed solar flares. EVE is sensitive to ~2-25 MK thermal plasma emission, and RHESSI to gsim10 MK together, the two instruments cover the full range of flare coronal plasma temperatures. We have validated the new technique on artificial test data, and apply it to two X-class flares from solar cycle 24 to determine the flare DEM and its temporal evolution; the constraints on the thermal emission derived from the EVE data also constrain the low energy cutoff of the non-thermal electrons, a crucial parameter for flare energetics. The DEM analysis can also be used to predict the soft X-ray flux in the poorly observed ~0.4-5 nm range, with important applications for geospace science.

  9. Flare coronal loop heating and hard X-ray emission from solar flares of August 23, 2005, and November 9, 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsap, Yu. T.; Motorina, G. G.; Kopylova, Yu. G.

    2016-12-01

    The thermal balance and hard X-ray emission of coronal loops for two solar events have been considered in the scope of a "standard" flare model. An important role of the thermal energy release is justified by the event of August 23, 2005, as an example. For the flare of November 9, 2013, it has been established that electrons accelerated at a flare loop top cannot maintain the observed hard X-ray fluxes from the flare footpoints, which indicates that charged particles are additionally accelerated in the chromosphere.

  10. The Soft X-Ray/Microwave Ratio of Solar and Stellar Flares and Coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, A. O.; Guedel, M.

    1994-01-01

    We have carried out plasma diagnostics of solar flares using soft X-ray (SXR) and simultaneous microwave observations and have compared the ratio of X-ray to microwave luminosities of solar flares with various active late-type stars available in the published literature. Both the SXR low-level ('quiescent') emission from stellar coronae and the flaring emission from the Sun and stars are generally interpreted as thermal radiations of coronal plasmas. On the other hand, the microwave emission of stars and solar flares is generally attributed to an extremely hot or nonthermal population of electrons. Solar flare SXR are conventionally measured in a narrower and harder passband than the stellar sources. Observations of the GOES-2 satellite in two energy channels have been used to estimate the luminosity of solar flares as it would appear in the ROSAT satellite passband. The solar and stellar flare luminosities fit well at the lower end of the active stellar coronae. The flare SXR/microwave ratio is similar to the ratio for stellar coronae. The average ratio follows a power-law relation L(sub X) varies as L(sub R)(sup 0.73 +/- 0.03) over 10 orders of magnitude from solar microflares to RS CVn and FK Com-type coronae. Dwarf Me and Ke stars, and RS CVn stars are also compatible with a linear SXR/microwave relation, but the ratio is slightly different for each type of star. Considering the differences between solar flares, stellar flares and the various active stellar coronae, the similarity of the SXR/microwave ratios is surprising. It suggests that the energetic electrons in low-level stellar coronae observed in microwaves are related in a similar way to the coronal thermal plasma as flare electrons to the flare thermal plasma, and, consequently, that the heating mechanism of active stellar coronae is a flare-like process.

  11. Fast crystallization of amorphous Gd2Zr2O7 induced by thermally activated electron-beam irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhangyi; Qi, Jianqi; Zhou, Li; Feng, Zhao; Yu, Xiaohe; Gong, Yichao; Yang, Mao; Shi, Qiwu; Wei, Nian; Lu, Tiecheng

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the ionization and displacement effects of an electron-beam (e-beam) on amorphous Gd2Zr2O7 synthesized by the co-precipitation and calcination methods. The as-received amorphous specimens were irradiated under electron beams at different energies (80 keV, 120 keV, and 2 MeV) and then characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. A metastable fluorite phase was observed in nanocrystalline Gd2Zr2O7 and is proposed to arise from the relatively lower surface and interface energy compared with the pyrochlore phase. Fast crystallization could be induced by 120 keV e-beam irradiation (beam current = 0.47 mA/cm2). The crystallization occurred on the nanoscale upon ionization irradiation at 400 °C after a dose of less than 1017 electrons/cm2. Under e-beam irradiation, the activation energy for the grain growth process was approximately 10 kJ/mol, but the activation energy was 135 kJ/mol by calcination in a furnace. The thermally activated ionization process was considered the fast crystallization mechanism. PMID:26648597

  12. Fast measurements of the electron temperature and parallel heat flux in ELMy H-mode on the COMPASS tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamek, J.; Seidl, J.; Komm, M.; Weinzettl, V.; Panek, R.; Stöckel, J.; Hron, M.; Hacek, P.; Imrisek, M.; Vondracek, P.; Horacek, J.; Devitre, A.; the COMPASS Team

    2017-02-01

    We report the latest results on fast measurements of the electron temperature and parallel heat flux in the COMPASS tokamak scrape-off layer (SOL) and divertor region during ELMy H-mode plasmas. The system of ball-pen and Langmuir probes installed on the divertor target, the horizontal reciprocating manipulator and the fast data-acquisition system with sampling frequency rate f  =  5 MSa s-1 allow us to measure the electron temperature and parallel heat flux during inter-ELM and ELM periods with high temporal resolution. The filamentary structure of the electron temperature and parallel heat flux was observed during ELMs in the SOL as well as in the divertor region. The position of the filaments within ELMs is not regular and therefore the resulting conditionally averaged ELM neglects the peak values of the electron temperature and parallel heat flux. We have found a substantial difference between the value of the radial power decay length in the inter-ELM period λ q,inter  =  2.5 mm and the decay length of the peak ELM heat flux λ q,ELM  =  13.1 mm. The decay length of the ELM energy density was found to be λ E,ELM  =  5.4 mm.

  13. Raman scattering and associated fast electron production. Final technical report, April 16, 1984-April 15, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, R.D.; Pietrzyk, Z.A.

    1985-08-01

    High energy electrons in plasmas have been attributed to various causes including trapping by electron plasma waves created by stimulated Raman scattering. A theory, consistent with experimental results, based on the acceleration of trapped electrons by such electron plasma waves as they propagate in the presence of a density gradient away from the region where they are created is presented. Single particle simulations show accelerating voltages as high as 20 GV/m.

  14. Evolution of flare ribbons, electric currents, and quasi-separatrix layers during an X-class flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janvier, M.; Savcheva, A.; Pariat, E.; Tassev, S.; Millholland, S.; Bommier, V.; McCauley, P.; McKillop, S.; Dougan, F.

    2016-07-01

    traces of an eruptive flare, in a complex topology, with direct measurements of electric currents and QSLs from observational data and a magnetic field model. The results, obtained by two different and independent approaches 1) confirm previous results of current increase during the impulsive phase of the flare and 2) show how NLFFF models can capture the essential physical signatures of flares even in a complex magnetic field topology. A movie associated to Fig. 1 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  15. MULTIWAVELENGTH ANALYSIS OF A SOLAR FLARE ON 2002 APRIL 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, Linhui; Holman, Gordon D.; White, Stephen M.; Zhang, Jie

    2005-01-01

    We carried out a multiwavelength analysis of the solar limb flare on 2002 April 15. The observations all indicate that the flare occurred in an active region with an asymmetric dipole magnetic configuration. The earlier conclusion that magnetic reconnection is occurring in a large-scale current sheet in this flare is M e r supported by these observations: (1) Several bloblike sources, seen in RHESSI 12-25 keV X-ray images later in the flare, appeared along a line above the flare loops. These indicate the continued presence of the current sheet and are likely to be magnetic islands in the stretched sheet produced by the tearing-mode instability. (2) A cusplike structure is seen in Nobeyama Radioheliogiaph (NoRH) 34 GHz microwave images around the time of the peak flare emission. We quantitatively demonstrate that the X-ray-emitting thermal plasma seen with RHESSI had a higher temperature than the microwave-emitting plasma seen with NoRH. Since the radio data preferentially see cooler thermal plasma, this result is consistent with the picture in which energy release occurs at progressively greater heights and the hard X-rays see hot new loops while the radio sees older cooling loops. The kinetic energy of the coronal mass ejection (CME) associated with this flare was found to be about 1 order of magnitude less than both the thermal energy in the hot plasma and the nonthermal energy carried by the accelerated electrons in the flare, as deduced from the RHESSI observations. This contrasts with the higher CME kinetic energies typically deduced for large flares.

  16. Blazar flares powered by plasmoids in relativistic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulou, Maria; Giannios, Dimitrios; Sironi, Lorenzo

    2016-11-01

    Powerful flares from blazars with short (˜min) variability time-scales are challenging for current models of blazar emission. Here, we present a physically motivated ab initio model for blazar flares based on the results of recent particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of relativistic magnetic reconnection. PIC simulations demonstrate that quasi-spherical plasmoids filled with high-energy particles and magnetic fields are a self-consistent by-product of the reconnection process. By coupling our PIC-based results (i.e. plasmoid growth, acceleration profile, particle and magnetic content) with a kinetic equation for the evolution of the electron distribution function we demonstrate that relativistic reconnection in blazar jets can produce powerful flares whose temporal and spectral properties are consistent with the observations. In particular, our model predicts correlated synchrotron and synchrotron self-Compton flares of duration of several hours-days powered by the largest and slowest moving plasmoids that form in the reconnection layer. Smaller and faster plasmoids produce flares of sub-hour duration with higher peak luminosities than those powered by the largest plasmoids. Yet, the observed fluence in both types of flares is similar. Multiple flares with a range of flux-doubling time-scales (minutes to several hours) observed over a longer period of flaring activity (days or longer) may be used as a probe of the reconnection layer's orientation and the jet's magnetization. Our model shows that blazar flares are naturally expected as a result of magnetic reconnection in a magnetically dominated jet.

  17. General purpose pulse shape analysis for fast scintillators implemented in digital readout electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asztalos, Stephen J.; Hennig, Wolfgang; Warburton, William K.

    2016-01-01

    Pulse shape discrimination applied to certain fast scintillators is usually performed offline. In sufficiently high-event rate environments data transfer and storage become problematic, which suggests a different analysis approach. In response, we have implemented a general purpose pulse shape analysis algorithm in the XIA Pixie-500 and Pixie-500 Express digital spectrometers. In this implementation waveforms are processed in real time, reducing the pulse characteristics to a few pulse shape analysis parameters and eliminating time-consuming waveform transfer and storage. We discuss implementation of these features, their advantages, necessary trade-offs and performance. Measurements from bench top and experimental setups using fast scintillators and XIA processors are presented.

  18. Development of a diagnostic technique based on Cherenkov effect for measurements of fast electrons in fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Plyusnin, V. V.; Duarte, P.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.

    2012-08-15

    A diagnostic technique based on the Cherenkov effect is proposed for detection and characterization of fast (super-thermal and runaway) electrons in fusion devices. The detectors of Cherenkov radiation have been specially designed for measurements in the ISTTOK tokamak. Properties of several materials have been studied to determine the most appropriate one to be used as a radiator of Cherenkov emission in the detector. This technique has enabled the detection of energetic electrons (70 keV and higher) and the determination of their spatial and temporal variations in the ISTTOK discharges. Measurement of hard x-ray emission has also been carried out in experiments for validation of the measuring capabilities of the Cherenkov-type detector and a high correlation was found between the data of both diagnostics. A reasonable agreement was found between experimental data and the results of numerical modeling of the runaway electron generation in ISTTOK.

  19. X-ray generation by fast electrons propagating in nanofibres irradiated by a laser pulse of relativistic intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, A A; Platonov, K Yu

    2016-02-28

    Numerical simulations were made of the interaction of a relativistically intense laser pulse with a target consisting of nanometre fibres. Fast electrons were shown to execute forced betatron oscillations in the electrostatic fibre field and the laser field. The fibre diameter was determined whereby the amplitude of betatron electron oscillations is resonantly increased. The power of coherent X-ray betatron radiation of the electron bunch was calculated outside of the resonance domain and in the resonance case. We showed that the laser-to-X-ray betatron radiation conversion coefficient in the resonance case amounts to a few percent and the target made up of nanometre fibres may be regarded as an efficient laser-driven source of coherent X- and gamma-ray radiation. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  20. A Hard Gamma-Ray Flare from 3C 279 in 2013 December

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliya, Vaidehi S.; Diltz, Chris; Böttcher, Markus; Stalin, C. S.; Buckley, David

    2016-01-01

    The blazar 3C 279 exhibited twin γ-ray flares of similar intensity in 2013 December and 2014 April. In this work, we present a detailed multi-wavelength analysis of the 2013 December flaring event. Multi-frequency observations reveal the uncorrelated variability patterns with X-ray and optical-UV fluxes peaking after the γ-ray maximum. The broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) at the peak of the γ-ray activity shows a rising γ-ray spectrum but a declining optical-UV flux. This observation along with the detection of uncorrelated variability behavior rules out the one-zone leptonic emission scenario. We, therefore, adopt two independent methodologies to explain the SED: a time-dependent lepto-hadronic modeling and a two-zone leptonic radiative modeling approach. In the lepto-hadronic modeling, a distribution of electrons and protons subjected to a randomly orientated magnetic field produces synchrotron radiation. Electron synchrotron is used to explain the IR to UV emission while proton synchrotron emission is used to explain the high-energy γ-ray emission. A combination of both electron synchrotron self-Compton emission and proton synchrotron emission is used to explain the X-ray spectral break seen during the later stage of the flare. In the two-zone modeling, we assume a large emission region emitting primarily in IR to X-rays and γ-rays to come primarily from a fast-moving compact emission region. We conclude by noting that within a span of four months, 3C 279 has shown the dominance of a variety of radiative processes over each other and this reflects the complexity involved in understanding the physical properties of blazar jets in general.

  1. A HARD GAMMA-RAY FLARE FROM 3C 279 IN 2013 DECEMBER

    SciTech Connect

    Paliya, Vaidehi S.; Stalin, C. S.; Diltz, Chris; Böttcher, Markus; Buckley, David

    2016-01-20

    The blazar 3C 279 exhibited twin γ-ray flares of similar intensity in 2013 December and 2014 April. In this work, we present a detailed multi-wavelength analysis of the 2013 December flaring event. Multi-frequency observations reveal the uncorrelated variability patterns with X-ray and optical–UV fluxes peaking after the γ-ray maximum. The broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) at the peak of the γ-ray activity shows a rising γ-ray spectrum but a declining optical–UV flux. This observation along with the detection of uncorrelated variability behavior rules out the one-zone leptonic emission scenario. We, therefore, adopt two independent methodologies to explain the SED: a time-dependent lepto-hadronic modeling and a two-zone leptonic radiative modeling approach. In the lepto-hadronic modeling, a distribution of electrons and protons subjected to a randomly orientated magnetic field produces synchrotron radiation. Electron synchrotron is used to explain the IR to UV emission while proton synchrotron emission is used to explain the high-energy γ-ray emission. A combination of both electron synchrotron self-Compton emission and proton synchrotron emission is used to explain the X-ray spectral break seen during the later stage of the flare. In the two-zone modeling, we assume a large emission region emitting primarily in IR to X-rays and γ-rays to come primarily from a fast-moving compact emission region. We conclude by noting that within a span of four months, 3C 279 has shown the dominance of a variety of radiative processes over each other and this reflects the complexity involved in understanding the physical properties of blazar jets in general.

  2. Electrophysical and optophysical properties of air ionized by a short pulse of fast electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagin, Iu. P.; Stal', N. L.; Khokhlov, V. D.; Chernoiarskii, A. A.

    A method for solving the nonstationary kinetic equation of electron deceleration is developed which is based on the multigroup approximation. The electron distribution function in air ionized by nonstationary sources of primary electrons is determined, and the avalanche formation of secondary electrons is considered. Theoretical and experimental results are presented on the time dependence of the air luminescence intensity in two spectral intervals, one including the 391.4 nm N2(+) band and the other including the 337.1 nm N2 band, for different values of gas pressure under the effect of a short beam of electrons with energies of 100 keV.

  3. Imaging X-Ray Polarimeter for Solar Flares (IXPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosack, Michael; Black, J. Kevin; Deines-Jones, Philip; Dennis, Brian R.; Hill, Joanne E.; Jahoda, Keith; Shih, Albert Y.; Urba, Christian E.; Emslie, A. Gordon

    2011-01-01

    We describe the design of a balloon-borne Imaging X-ray Polarimeter for Solar flares (IX PS). This novel instrument, a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for photoelectric polarimetry, will be capable of measuring polarization at the few percent level in the 20-50 keV energy range during an M- or X class flare, and will provide imaging information at the approx.10 arcsec level. The primary objective of such observations is to determine the directivity of nonthermal high-energy electrons producing solar hard X-rays, and hence to learn about the particle acceleration and energy release processes in solar flares. Secondary objectives include the separation of the thermal and nonthermal components of the flare X-ray emissions and the separation of photospheric albedo fluxes from direct emissions.

  4. Solar Flare Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmahl, Edward J.; Kundu, Mukul R.

    2000-01-01

    During the past year we have been working with the HESSI (High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager) team in preparation for launch in early 2001. HESSI has as its primary scientific goal photometric imaging and spectroscopy of solar flares in hard X-rays and gamma-rays with an approx. 2 sec angular resolution, approx. keV energy resolution and approx. 2 s time resolution over the 6 keV to 15 MeV energy range. We have performed tests of the imager using a specially designed experiment which exploits the second-harmonic response of HESSI's sub-collimators to an artificial X-ray source at a distance of 1550 cm from its front grids. Figures show the response to X-rays at energies in the range where HESSI is expected to image solar flares. To prepare the team and the solar user community for imaging flares with HESSI, we have written a description of the major imaging concepts. This paper will be submitted for publication in a referred journal.

  5. Solar flare leaves sun quaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-05-01

    Dr. Alexander G. Kosovichev, a senior research scientist from Stanford University, and Dr. Valentina V. Zharkova from Glasgow (United Kingdom) University found the tell-tale seismic signature in data on the Sun's surface collected by the Michelson Doppler Imager onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft immediately following a moderate-sized flare on July 9, 1996. "Although the flare was a moderate one, it still released an immense amount of energy," said Dr. Craig Deforest, a researcher with the SOHO project. "The energy released is equal to completely covering the Earth's continents with a yard of dynamite and detonating it all at once." SOHO is a joint project of the European Space Agency and NASA. The finding is reported in the May 28 issue of the journal Nature, and is the subject of a press conference at the spring meeting of the American Geophysical Union in Boston, Mass., May 27. The solar quake that the science team recorded looks much like ripples spreading from a rock dropped into a pool of water. But over the course of an hour, the solar waves traveled for a distance equal to 10 Earth diameters before fading into the fiery background of the Sun's photosphere. Unlike water ripples that travel outward at a constant velocity, the solar waves accelerated from an initial speed of 22,000 miles per hour to a maximum of 250,000 miles per hour before disappearing. "People have looked for evidence of seismic waves from flares before, but they didn't have a theory so they didn't know where to look," says Kosovichev. Several years ago Kosovichev and Zharkova developed a theory that can explain how a flare, which explodes in space above the Sun's surface, can generate a major seismic wave in the Sun's interior. According to the currently accepted model of solar flares, the primary explosion creates high-energy electrons (electrically charged subatomic particles). These are funneled down into a magnetic flux tube, an invisible tube of magnetic

  6. Well-observed dynamics of flaring and peripheral coronal magnetic loops during an M-class limb flare

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Jinhua; Zhou, Tuanhui; Ji, Haisheng; Feng, Li; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Inhester, Bernd

    2014-08-20

    In this paper, we present a variety of well-observed dynamic behaviors for the flaring and peripheral magnetic loops of the M6.6 class extreme limb flare that occurred on 2011 February 24 (SOL2011-02-24T07:20) from EUV observations by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory and X-ray observations by RHESSI. The flaring loop motion confirms the earlier contraction-expansion picture. We find that the U-shaped trajectory delineated by the X-ray corona source of the flare roughly follows the direction of a filament eruption associated with the flare. Different temperature structures of the coronal source during the contraction and expansion phases strongly suggest different kinds of magnetic reconnection processes. For some peripheral loops, we discover that their dynamics are closely correlated with the filament eruption. During the slow rising to abrupt, fast rising of the filament, overlying peripheral magnetic loops display different responses. Two magnetic loops on the elbow of the active region had a slow descending motion followed by an abrupt successive fast contraction, while magnetic loops on the top of the filament were pushed outward, slowly being inflated for a while and then erupting as a moving front. We show that the filament activation and eruption play a dominant role in determining the dynamics of the overlying peripheral coronal magnetic loops.

  7. The Impact of Return-Current Losses on the Observed Emissions from Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2011-01-01

    Electrons accelerated in solar flares are expected to drive a co-spatial return current in the ambient plasma when they escape the acceleration region. This return current maintains plasma neutrality and the stability of the beam of streaming electrons. The electric field that drives this return current also decelerates the energetic electrons in the beam. The corresponding energy loss experienced by the accelerated electrons can affect the observed properties of the X-ray and radio emissions from flares and the evolution of the thermal flare plasma. I will discuss the properties of the flare emissions expected in a classical, steady-state model. As part of this discussion, I will examine Gordon Emslie's 1980 conjecture that return-current losses result in a maximum brightness for the hard X-ray emission from flares.

  8. Energy release in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John C.; Correia, Emilia; Farnik, Frantisek; Garcia, Howard; Henoux, Jean-Claude; La Rosa, Ted N.; Machado, Marcos E. (Compiler); Nakajima, Hiroshi; Priest, Eric R.

    1994-01-01

    Team 2 of the Ottawa Flares 22 Workshop dealt with observational and theoretical aspects of the characteristics and processes of energy release in flares. Main results summarized in this article stress the global character of the flaring phenomenon in active regions, the importance of discontinuities in magnetic connectivity, the role of field-aligned currents in free energy storage, and the fragmentation of energy release in time and space.

  9. Enhanced loss of magnetic-mirror-trapped fast electrons by a shear Alfvén wave

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Gekelman, W.; Pribyl, P.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2014-05-15

    Laboratory observations of enhanced loss of magnetic mirror trapped fast electrons irradiated by a shear Alfvén Wave (SAW) are reported. The experiment is performed in the quiescent after-glow plasma in the Large Plasma Device [Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62(12), 2875–2883 (1991)]. A trapped energetic electron population (>100 keV) is generated in a magnetic mirror section (mirror ratio ≈ 2, length = 3.5 m) by an X-mode high power microwave pulse, and forms a hot electron ring due to the grad-B and curvature drift. SAWs of arbitrary polarization are launched externally by a Rotating Magnetic Field source (δB/B{sub 0} ≈ 0.1%, λ{sub ∥} ≈ 9 m). Irradiated by a right-handed circularly polarized SAW, the loss of electrons, in both the radial and the axial direction of the mirror field, is significantly enhanced and is modulated at f{sub Alfvén}. The periodical loss continues even after the termination of the SAW. Experimental observations suggest that a spatial distortion of the ring is formed in the SAW field and creates a collective mode of the hot electron population that degrades its confinement and leads to electron loss from the magnetic mirror. The results could have implications on techniques of radiation belt remediation.

  10. Multifrequency observations of a flare on UV Ceti.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, A. V.; Fuerst, E.; Krueger, A.; Hildebrandt, J.; Barwig, H.; Schmitt, J.

    1995-07-01

    Multifrequency observations of the flare of December 31, 1991 on UV Ceti are presented. The radio observations were carried out with the Effelsberg 100-m radio telescope at 4750MHz, whereas optical photometry was performed using the 0.8-m telescope of the Wendelstein Observatory in the five UBVRI colors. The radio burst started ~5min after the maximum of an optical flare. X-ray emission observed with the ROSAT PSPC before and after the optical flare conclusively demonstrates that an X-ray flare has occured. Several narrow-bandwidth radio spikes with duration of about 0.1s, peak flux density of 250mJy, and >=75% LH polarization were recorded. An interpretation of the spikes in terms of electron-cyclotron maser emission (ECME) and, alternatively, coherent plasma emission is proposed. The flare plasma parameters obtained from radio and soft X-ray data are as follows: n_e_=~10^11^/cm-3, T_e_=~10^7^K, B=~(200-800)G. Using these values, the escape windows for ECME have been calculated at ν=4.75GHz. It has been shown that there is actually no "perpendicular" window for the ordinary mode at the second and third harmonics of the electron gyrofrequency. The optical flare's cross-section area and the temperature of the "cool" plasma were found to be 4x10^16^cm^2^ and 16000K, respectively. Possible reasons for the time delay between the optical and radio flares as well as stellar flare models are discussed.

  11. Solar Flares, Type III Radio Bursts, Coronal Mass Ejections, and Energetic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, Hilary V.; Erickson, W. C.; Prestage, N. P.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this correlative study between greater than 20 MeV solar proton events, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), flares, and radio bursts it is found that essentially all of the proton events are preceded by groups of type III bursts and all are preceded by CMEs. These type III bursts (that are a flare phenomenon) usually are long-lasting, intense bursts seen in the low-frequency observations made from space. They are caused by streams of electrons traveling from close to the solar surface out to 1 AU. In most events the type III emissions extend into, or originate at, the time when type II and type IV bursts are reported (some 5 to 10 minutes after the start of the associated soft X-ray flare) and have starting frequencies in the 500 to approximately 100 MHz range that often get lower as a function of time. These later type III emissions are often not reported by ground-based observers, probably because of undue attention to type II bursts. It is suggested to call them type III-1. Type III-1 bursts have previously been called shock accelerated (SA) events, but an examination of radio dynamic spectra over an extended frequency range shows that the type III-1 bursts usually start at frequencies above any type II burst that may be present. The bursts sometimes continue beyond the time when type II emission is seen and, furthermore, sometimes occur in the absence of any type II emission. Thus the causative electrons are unlikely to be shock accelerated and probably originate in the reconnection regions below fast CMEs. A search did not find any type III-1 bursts that were not associated with CMEs. The existence of low-frequency type III bursts proves that open field lines extend from within 0.5 radius of the Sun into the interplanetary medium (the bursts start above 100 MHz, and such emission originates within 0.5 solar radius of the solar surface). Thus it is not valid to assume that only closed field lines exist in the flaring regions associated with CMEs and some

  12. Fast electron spin resonance controlled manipulation of spin injection into quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, Andreas Siller, Jan; Schittny, Robert; Krämmer, Christoph; Kalt, Heinz; Hetterich, Michael

    2014-06-23

    In our spin-injection light-emitting diodes, electrons are spin-polarized in a semimagnetic ZnMnSe spin aligner and then injected into InGaAs quantum dots. The resulting electron spin state can be read out by measuring the circular polarization state of the emitted light. Here, we resonantly excite the Mn 3d electron spin system with microwave pulses and perform time-resolved measurements of the spin dynamics. We find that we are able to control the spin polarization of the injected electrons on a microsecond timescale. This electron spin resonance induced spin control could be one of the ingredients required to utilize the quantum dot electrons or the Mn spins as qubits.

  13. The extreme Halloween 2003 solar flares (and Bastille Day, 2000 Flare), ICMEs, and resultant extreme ionospheric effects: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Mannucci, A. J.; Iijima, B.; Guarnieri, F. L.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Judge, D. L.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Pap, J.

    Extreme solar flares can cause extreme ionospheric effects. The Oct 28, 2003 flare caused a ˜25 TECU (a total electron content unit is 10 16 electron/m 2 column density), or a ˜30%, increase in the local noon equatorial ionospheric column density. This enhancement occurred within ˜5 min. This TEC increase was ˜5 times the TEC increases detected for the Oct 29, 2003, Nov 4, 2003, and the July 14, 2000 (Bastille Day) flares. In the 260-340 Å EUV wavelength range, the Oct 28 flare peak count rate was more than twice as large as for the other three flares. Another strong ionospheric effect is the delayed influence (due to solar wind propagation) of interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) electric fields on the ionosphere. For the Oct 28 and 29 flares, the associated ICMEs propagated from the sun to the Earth at particularly high speeds. The prompt penetration of the interplanetary electric field caused the dayside equatorial ionospheric to be strongly convected upward. This led to enhanced TEC to values >300% nominal values in ˜2 h. Proposed mechanisms for this TEC enhancement will be discussed.

  14. Heating and current drive in NSTX with electron berstein waves and high harmonic fast waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, Abhay K.

    2010-03-14

    A suitable theoretical and computational framework for studying heating and current drive by electron Bernstein waves in the National Spherical Torus Experiment has been developed. This framework can also be used to study heating and current drive by electron Bernstein waves in spherical tori and other magnetic confinement devices. It is also useful in studying the propagation and damping of electron cyclotron waves in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

  15. Characterization and optimization of a thin direct electron detector for fast imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dourki, I.; Westermeier, F.; Schopper, F.; Richter, R. H.; Andricek, L.; Ninkovic, J.; Treis, J.; Koffmane, C.; Wassatsch, A.; Peric, I.; Epp, S. W.; Miller, R. J. D.

    2017-03-01

    Direct electron detectors are increasingly used to explore the dynamics of macromolecules in real space and real time using transmission electron microscopy. The purpose of this work is to optimize the most suitable detector configuration of a thin silicon detector by Monte Carlo Simulations. Several simulations were performed to achieve an advanced detector geometry that reduces significantly the background signal due to backscattered electrons resulting in an enhanced imaging performance of the detector. Utilizing DEPFET (DEpleted P-channel Field Effect Transistor) technology and the novel ideas for the optimized detector geometry, a unique direct hit electron detector is currently being produced.

  16. Characteristics of Gamma-Ray Line Flares,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    Sauna -ray line flares now identified, can yield valuable insight that is not obtainable from studying the few Sana-ray line flares observed before...Spectrometer (HUBS; cf., Orwig, Dennis, and Frost 1980) and found that the Sauna -ray line flares are very intense hard X-ray flares. For comparison, we...found that all the Sauna -ray line flares produced hard X-ray emissions with RXRBS peak count rates > 7500 counts s"- (all but two flares were > 104

  17. Solar Aurora and a White Light Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2016-07-01

    A white light flare analyzed by Krucker et al. (2011) poses a severe challenge to the solar physicist because of the high energy fluxes implied by a hitherto not achieved spatial resolution of simultaneous observations with Hinode and RHESSI. A scenario based on the auroral acceleration mechanism applied to flare conditions, 'Solar Aurora', is able to reproduce the observations, but implies several far-reaching assumptions on the mechanism as well as on the environmental parameters. Unavoidable consequences exist with regard to the spatial and temporal scales. They are extremely short because of the high density of the corona and the need for an energy conversion process involving some kind of anomalous resistivity, i.e. extremely high electric current densities. A further postulate is that of spontaneous propagation of an energy conversion front (ENF), once established, in three dimensions. It is assumed that about one half of the converted energy appears in form of runaway electrons. Obliqueness of the ENFs prevents the existence of a return current problem for the emerging runaway electrons. The key flare parameters are formulated quantitatively in terms of the environmental properties. Transverse length scales turn out to be in the ten centimeter range, time-scales in the range of one millisecond. The energy conversion occurs in 10E3 -10E4 ENFs just above the transition region in a background field of the order of 2000 G. Observational consequences are being discussed.

  18. Investigation of fast-electron-induced Kα x rays in laser-produced blow-off plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, H.; Wei, M. S.; Chawla, S.; Morace, A.; Akli, K.; Yabuuchi, T.; Nakanii, N.; Key, M. H.; Patel, P. K.; Mackinnon, A. J.; McLean, H. S.; Stephens, R. B.; Beg, F. N.

    2014-03-01

    Refluxing of fast electrons generated by high-intensity, short-pulse lasers was investigated by measuring electron-induced Kα x rays from a buried tracer layer. Using planar foils of Au/Cu/CH, the 150-J, 0.7-ps TITAN short-pulse laser was focused on the gold foil to generate fast electrons and the 3-ns, 300-J long pulse beam irradiated on the CH side to create expanding plasma as a conducting medium. By delaying the short-pulse beam timing from the long pulse laser irradiation, the plasma size was varied to change electron refluxing in the target rear. The total yields and two-dimensional images of 8.05-keV Cu-Kα x ray were recorded with an x-ray spectrometer and two monochromatic crystal imagers. The measurements show that the integrated yields decrease by a factor of 10 from refluxing to the nonrefluxing limit. Similar radial profiles of the Kα images in the rear were observed at all delays. Hybrid-particle-in-cell simulations using plasma profiles calculated by a radiation-hydrodynamic code HYDRA agree well with the measured Kα yields. The simulations suggest that conducting plasma with the size of ˜300 μm in the laser direction and ˜600 μm in the lateral direction at the density of 2 × 1020 1/cm3 is sufficiently large to prevent electrons from refluxing in the target. The parameters found in this study can be useful in designing experiments utilizing a Kα x-ray source in refluxing regime or a tracer layer in nonrefluxing regime.

  19. Investigation of fast-electron-induced Kα x rays in laser-produced blow-off plasma.

    PubMed

    Sawada, H; Wei, M S; Chawla, S; Morace, A; Akli, K; Yabuuchi, T; Nakanii, N; Key, M H; Patel, P K; Mackinnon, A J; McLean, H S; Stephens, R B; Beg, F N

    2014-03-01

    Refluxing of fast electrons generated by high-intensity, short-pulse lasers was investigated by measuring electron-induced Kα x rays from a buried tracer layer. Using planar foils of Au/Cu/CH, the 150-J, 0.7-ps TITAN short-pulse laser was focused on the gold foil to generate fast electrons and the 3-ns, 300-J long pulse beam irradiated on the CH side to create expanding plasma as a conducting medium. By delaying the short-pulse beam timing from the long pulse laser irradiation, the plasma size was varied to change electron refluxing in the target rear. The total yields and two-dimensional images of 8.05-keV Cu-Kα x ray were recorded with an x-ray spectrometer and two monochromatic crystal imagers. The measurements show that the integrated yields decrease by a factor of 10 from refluxing to the nonrefluxing limit. Similar radial profiles of the Kα images in the rear were observed at all delays. Hybrid-particle-in-cell simulations using plasma profiles calculated by a radiation-hydrodynamic code HYDRA agree well with the measured Kα yields. The simulations suggest that conducting plasma with the size of ∼300 μm in the laser direction and ∼600 μm in the lateral direction at the density of 2 × 1020 1/cm3 is sufficiently large to prevent electrons from refluxing in the target. The parameters found in this study can be useful in designing experiments utilizing a Kα x-ray source in refluxing regime or a tracer layer in nonrefluxing regime.

  20. Rapid embedded wire heating via resistive guiding of laser-generated fast electrons as a hydrodynamic driver

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, A. P. L.; Schmitz, H.; Pasley, J.

    2013-12-15

    Resistively guiding laser-generated fast electron beams in targets consisting of a resistive wire embedded in lower Z material should allow one to rapidly heat the wire to over 100 eV over a substantial distance without strongly heating the surrounding material. On the multi-ps timescale, this can drive hydrodynamic motion in the surrounding material. Thus, ultra-intense laser solid interactions have the potential as a controlled driver of radiation hydrodynamics in solid density material. In this paper, we assess the laser and target parameters needed to achieve such rapid and controlled heating of the embedded wire.

  1. Stabilization and isomerization of radical cations generated by fast electron irradiation of unsaturated organic molecules in a solid argon matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, V. I.; Sukhov, F. F.; Orlov, A. Yu.; Tyulpina, I. V.; Ivanchenko, V. K.

    2006-01-01

    Matrix isolation EPR spectroscopy was used to study the fate of "hot" unsaturated radical cations produced by fast electron irradiation in solid argon. It was found that the radical cations of cis-2-butene, trans-2-butene and ethyl vinyl ether resulting from highly exothermic hole transfer (excess energy>6 eV) underwent effective relaxation in an argon matrix. 1-Butene radical cation exhibits isomerization to cis-2-butene radical cation. The role of molecular structure of organic radical cations in excess energy relaxation is discussed.

  2. Enzyme-immobilized SiO2-Si electrode: Fast interfacial electron transfer with preserved enzymatic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Yau, Siu-Tung

    2005-12-01

    The enzyme, glucose oxidase (GOx), is immobilized using electrostatic interaction on the native oxide of heavily doped n-type silicon. Voltammetric measurement shows that the immobilized GOx gives rise to a very fast enzyme-silicon interfacial electron transfer rate constant of 7.9s-1. The measurement also suggests that the enzyme retains its native conformation when immobilized on the silicon surface. The preserved native conformation of GOx is further confirmed by testing the enzymatic activity of the immobilized GOx using glucose. The GOx-immobilized silicon is shown to behave as a glucose sensor that detects glucose with concentrations as low as 50μM.

  3. Observations of solar flare photon energy spectra from 20 keV to 7 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshimori, M.; Watanabe, H.; Nitta, N.

    1985-01-01

    Solar flare photon energy spectra in the 20 keV to 7 MeV range are derived from the Apr. 1, Apr. 4, apr. 27 and May 13, 1981 flares. The flares were observed with a hard X-ray and a gamma-ray spectrometers on board the Hinotori satellite. The results show that the spectral shape varies from flare to flare and the spectra harden in energies above about 400 keV. Effects of nuclear line emission on the continuum and of higher energy electron bremsstrahlung are considered to explain the spectral hardening.

  4. An investigation of small goes flares with intense hard x-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, L.; Harra-Murnion, L. K.; Culhane, J. L.; Schwartz, A.

    1997-01-01

    Most solar flare observations show that intense hard X-ray bursts come from large flares that have a large GOES classification (large peak 1 - 8 A˚ flux). This correlation, known as the ``Big Flare Syndrome'', suggests that more intense flares tend to have harder spectra. We have observed 7 flares that are exceptions to this. These flares have small GOES classifications ranging from B1.4 to C5.5 and peak hard X-ray count rates similar to those often observed from M class flares. This paper examines the cause of this anomoly using the Yohkoh Soft X-Ray Telescope, Hard X-Ray Telescope, and Bragg Crystal Spectrometer. Two hypotheses are proposed for the exceptions: (1) flares with multiple magnetic loops and common footpoints, producing multiple hard X-ray emission regions and low density thermal plasma distributed over a large volume, and (2) high densities in the magnetic loops restricting the propagation of the non-thermal electrons in the loop after magnetic reconnection has occurred and suppressing chromospheric evaporation. Two of the flares support the first hypothesis. The other flares either have data missing or are too small to be properly analysed by the Yohkoh instruments.

  5. Runaway electron generation as possible trigger for enhancement of magnetohydrodynamic plasma activity and fast changes in runaway beam behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Pankratov, I. M. E-mail: rjzhou@ipp.ac.cn; Zhou, R. J. E-mail: rjzhou@ipp.ac.cn; Hu, L. Q.

    2015-07-15

    Peculiar phenomena were observed during experiments with runaway electrons: rapid changes in the synchrotron spot and its intensity that coincided with stepwise increases in the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) signal (cyclotron radiation of suprathermal electrons). These phenomena were initially observed in TEXTOR (Tokamak Experiment for Technology Oriented Research), where these events only occurred in the current decay phase or in discharges with thin stable runaway beams at a q = 1 drift surface. These rapid changes in the synchrotron spot were interpreted by the TEXTOR team as a fast pitch angle scattering event. Recently, similar rapid changes in the synchrotron spot and its intensity that coincided with stepwise increases in the non-thermal ECE signal were observed in the EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) runaway discharge. Runaway electrons were located around the q = 2 rational magnetic surface (ring-like runaway electron beam). During the EAST runaway discharge, stepwise ECE signal increases coincided with enhanced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity. This behavior was peculiar to this shot. In this paper, we show that these non-thermal ECE step-like jumps were related to the abrupt growth of suprathermal electrons induced by bursting electric fields at reconnection events during this MHD plasma activity. Enhancement of the secondary runaway electron generation also occurred simultaneously. Local changes in the current-density gradient appeared because of local enhancement of the runaway electron generation process. These current-density gradient changes are considered to be a possible trigger for enhancement of the MHD plasma activity and the rapid changes in runaway beam behavior.

  6. Runaway electron generation as possible trigger for enhancement of magnetohydrodynamic plasma activity and fast changes in runaway beam behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratov, I. M.; Zhou, R. J.; Hu, L. Q.

    2015-07-01

    Peculiar phenomena were observed during experiments with runaway electrons: rapid changes in the synchrotron spot and its intensity that coincided with stepwise increases in the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) signal (cyclotron radiation of suprathermal electrons). These phenomena were initially observed in TEXTOR (Tokamak Experiment for Technology Oriented Research), where these events only occurred in the current decay phase or in discharges with thin stable runaway beams at a q = 1 drift surface. These rapid changes in the synchrotron spot were interpreted by the TEXTOR team as a fast pitch angle scattering event. Recently, similar rapid changes in the synchrotron spot and its intensity that coincided with stepwise increases in the non-thermal ECE signal were observed in the EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) runaway discharge. Runaway electrons were located around the q = 2 rational magnetic surface (ring-like runaway electron beam). During the EAST runaway discharge, stepwise ECE signal increases coincided with enhanced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity. This behavior was peculiar to this shot. In this paper, we show that these non-thermal ECE step-like jumps were related to the abrupt growth of suprathermal electrons induced by bursting electric fields at reconnection events during this MHD plasma activity. Enhancement of the secondary runaway electron generation also occurred simultaneously. Local changes in the current-density gradient appeared because of local enhancement of the runaway electron generation process. These current-density gradient changes are considered to be a possible trigger for enhancement of the MHD plasma activity and the rapid changes in runaway beam behavior.

  7. Properties of Solar Flare Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Title, Alan; DeRosa, Marc

    The continuous full disk observations provided by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) give an observer the impression that flare and filament eruptions are related. However, both detailed analysis of a number of events as well as a number of statistical studies have provided only rare examples of clear causal behavior. But the mechanisms of flare triggering are not well understood, so the lack of hard evidence is not surprising. Here we have examined the waiting-time statistics of GOES X-ray flares of magnitude C5 or greater during the last sunspot cycle with the aim of assessing the degree to which flares are clustered in time. Clusters are groups of flares in which all successive flares occur within a fixed separation time - the linking window. While many of the flares in a cluster may come from the same active region, the clusters that last more than a disk passage must result from flares in multiple active regions. The longest cluster of the last cycle lasted more than 42 days. None of the flares were separated by more than 36 hours. Since that cluster lasted more than three disk passages, it could not have been caused by a single region. We find that during the last maximum, eight clusters contributed 44% of all flares. All of these clusters spanned multiple disk passages, but occupied only 16.5% of the cycle duration. Two of the clusters provided 34% of the flares. We suggest that this behavior implies that a component of the observed coordinated behavior has its origin in the solar dynamo.

  8. Fast wave direct electron heating in advanced inductive and ITER baseline scenario discharges in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsker, R. I.; Austin, M. E.; Diem, S. J.; Doyle, E. J.; Grierson, B. A.; Hosea, J. C.; Jackson, G. L.; Kaufman, M. C.; Luce, T. C.; Maggiora, R.; Milanesio, D.; Nagy, A.; Perkins, R.; Politzer, P. A.; Porkolab, M.; Ryan, P. M.; Solomon, W. M.; Taylor, G.; Turco, F.; Zeng, L.

    2014-02-01

    Fast Wave (FW) heating and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) are used in the DIII-D tokamak to study plasmas with low applied torque and dominant electron heating characteristic of burning plasmas. FW heating via direct electron damping has reached the 2.5 MW level in high performance ELMy H-mode plasmas. In Advanced Inductive (AI) plasmas, core FW heating was found to be comparable to that of ECH, consistent with the excellent first-pass absorption of FWs predicted by ray-tracing models at high electron beta. FW heating at the ˜2 MW level to ELMy H-mode discharges in the ITER Baseline Scenario (IBS) showed unexpectedly strong absorption of FW power by injected neutral beam (NB) ions, indicated by significant enhancement of the D-D neutron rate, while the intended absorption on core electrons appeared rather weak. The AI and IBS discharges are compared in an effort to identify the causes of the different response to FWs.

  9. Fast wave direct electron heating in advanced inductive and ITER baseline scenario discharges in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R. I.; Jackson, G. L.; Luce, T. C.; Politzer, P. A.; Austin, M. E.; Diem, S. J.; Kaufman, M. C.; Ryan, P. M.; Doyle, E. J.; Zeng, L.; Grierson, B. A.; Hosea, J. C.; Nagy, A.; Perkins, R.; Solomon, W. M.; Taylor, G.; Maggiora, R.; Milanesio, D.; Porkolab, M.; Turco, F.

    2014-02-12

    Fast Wave (FW) heating and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) are used in the DIII-D tokamak to study plasmas with low applied torque and dominant electron heating characteristic of burning plasmas. FW heating via direct electron damping has reached the 2.5 MW level in high performance ELMy H-mode plasmas. In Advanced Inductive (AI) plasmas, core FW heating was found to be comparable to that of ECH, consistent with the excellent first-pass absorption of FWs predicted by ray-tracing models at high electron beta. FW heating at the ∼2 MW level to ELMy H-mode discharges in the ITER Baseline Scenario (IBS) showed unexpectedly strong absorption of FW power by injected neutral beam (NB) ions, indicated by significant enhancement of the D-D neutron rate, while the intended absorption on core electrons appeared rather weak. The AI and IBS discharges are compared in an effort to identify the causes of the different response to FWs.

  10. Global Energetics of Solar Flares. V. Energy Closure in Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Caspi, Amir; Cohen, Christina M. S.; Holman, Gordon; Jing, Ju; Kretzschmar, Matthieu; Kontar, Eduard P.; McTiernan, James M.; Mewaldt, Richard A.; O’Flannagain, Aidan; Richardson, Ian G.; Ryan, Daniel; Warren, Harry P.; Xu, Yan

    2017-02-01

    In this study we synthesize the results of four previous studies on the global energetics of solar flares and associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which include magnetic, thermal, nonthermal, and CME energies in 399 solar M- and X-class flare events observed during the first 3.5 yr of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission. Our findings are as follows. (1) The sum of the mean nonthermal energy of flare-accelerated particles ({E}{nt}), the energy of direct heating ({E}{dir}), and the energy in CMEs ({E}{CME}), which are the primary energy dissipation processes in a flare, is found to have a ratio of ({E}{nt}+{E}{dir}+{E}{CME})/{E}{mag}=0.87+/- 0.18, compared with the dissipated magnetic free energy {E}{mag}, which confirms energy closure within the measurement uncertainties and corroborates the magnetic origin of flares and CMEs. (2) The energy partition of the dissipated magnetic free energy is: 0.51 ± 0.17 in nonthermal energy of ≥slant 6 {keV} electrons, 0.17 ± 0.17 in nonthermal ≥slant 1 {MeV} ions, 0.07 ± 0.14 in CMEs, and 0.07 ± 0.17 in direct heating. (3) The thermal energy is almost always less than the nonthermal energy, which is consistent with the thick-target model. (4) The bolometric luminosity in white-light flares is comparable to the thermal energy in soft X-rays (SXR). (5) Solar energetic particle events carry a fraction ≈ 0.03 of the CME energy, which is consistent with CME-driven shock acceleration. (6) The warm-target model predicts a lower limit of the low-energy cutoff at {e}c≈ 6 {keV}, based on the mean peak temperature of the differential emission measure of T e = 8.6 MK during flares. This work represents the first statistical study that establishes energy closure in solar flare/CME events.

  11. Characterization of fast photoelectron packets in weak and strong laser fields in ultrafast electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Plemmons, Dayne A; Tae Park, Sang; Zewail, Ahmed H; Flannigan, David J

    2014-11-01

    The development of ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM) and variants thereof (e.g., photon-induced near-field electron microscopy, PINEM) has made it possible to image atomic-scale dynamics on the femtosecond timescale. Accessing the femtosecond regime with UEM currently relies on the generation of photoelectrons with an ultrafast laser pulse and operation in a stroboscopic pump-probe fashion. With this approach, temporal resolution is limited mainly by the durations of the pump laser pulse and probe electron packet. The ability to accurately determine the duration of the electron packets, and thus the instrument response function, is critically important for interpretation of dynamics occurring near the temporal resolution limit, in addition to quantifying the effects of the imaging mode. Here, we describe a technique for in situ characterization of ultrashort electron packets that makes use of coupling with photons in the evanescent near-field of the specimen. We show that within the weakly-interacting (i.e., low laser fluence) regime, the zero-loss peak temporal cross-section is precisely the convolution of electron packet and photon pulse profiles. Beyond this regime, we outline the effects of non-linear processes and show that temporal cross-sections of high-order peaks explicitly reveal the electron packet profile, while use of the zero-loss peak becomes increasingly unreliable.

  12. Modulated Electron Radiation Therapy: An Investigation On Fast Beam Models and Radiation-Tolerant Solutions For Automated Motion Control Of A Few Leaf Electron Collimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaconstadopoulos, Paul

    The purpose of this study was to address two specific issues related with the clinical application of Modulated Electron Radiation Therapy (MERT). The first was to investigate radiation-tolerant solutions for automated motion control of a Few Leaf Electron Collimator. Secondly, we implemented a fast, Monte Carlo-based, parameterized beam model for characterization of the electron beam in modulated deliveries. Two approaches were investigated for the implementation of a radiation-tolerant position feedback system: (i) the use of CMOS-based optical encoders protected by a prototype shield and (ii) the use of an analog device, such as a potentiometer, whose radiation tolerance is significantly higher. The two approaches were implemented and their performance tested. Results indicated that the optical encoders could not be safely used under radiation even with the presence of a shield. The analog position feedback system showed to be a viable solution. Future work will be focused towards the direction of implementing an analog position feedback system suitable for clinical use. The MC-based, parameterized beam model is based on the idea of deriving the scattered electron beam characteristics directly on the exit plane of the linear accelerator by the use of source scatter fluence kernels. Primary beam characteristics are derived by fast Monte Carlo simulations. The novelty of the method is that arbitrary rectangular fields can be recreated fast by superposition of the appropriate source kernels directly on the output plane. Depth, profile dose distributions and dose output, were derived for three field sizes (8 x 8, 2 x 2 and 2 x 8 cm 2) and energies of 6 MeV and 20 MeV electron beams by the beam model and compared with full Monte Carlo simulations. The primary beam showed excellent agreement in all cases. Scattered particles agreed well for the larger field sizes of 8 x 8 and 2 x 8 cm2, while discrepancies were encountered for scattered particles for the smaller field

  13. A mechanism for the abundance enhancements of heavy nuclei in solar flare particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartwright, B. G.; Mogro-Campero, A.

    1973-01-01

    A mechanism is proposed to account for the recently reported abundance enhancements of heavy nuclei in solar flares. The mechanism requires two acceleration stages for its operation: First, fully stripped ions are accelerated to suprathermal energies, and subsequently, a fraction of these ions are Fermi accelerated to higher energies. It is shown that because injection into Fermi acceleration is rigidity dependent and the ions may pick up electrons during transport to the Fermi acceleration region, an enhancement of the abundances of heavy nuclei can occur. The degree of the enhancement depends on a number of factors particular to each flare, so that the degree of enhancement may be variable from flare to flare, or may be a function of time within a given flare. In some flares, conditions may be such that no enhancement would be expected.

  14. Generation of a beam of fast electrons by tightly focusing a radially polarized ultrashort laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Payeur, S.; Fourmaux, S.; Schmidt, B. E.; MacLean, J. P.; Tchervenkov, C.; Legare, F.; Kieffer, J. C.; Piche, M.

    2012-07-23

    The generation of an electron beam through longitudinal field acceleration from a tightly focused radially polarized (TM{sub 01}) laser mode is reported. The longitudinal field is generated by focusing a TM{sub 01} few-cycle laser pulse (1.8 {mu}m, 550 {mu}J, 15 fs) with a high numerical aperture parabola. The created longitudinal field in the focal region is intense enough to ionize atoms and accelerate electrons to 23 keV of energy from a low density oxygen gas. The characteristics of the electron beam are presented.

  15. FLARE RIBBON ENERGETICS IN THE EARLY PHASE OF AN SDO FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, L.; Hannah, I. G.; Hudson, H. S.; Innes, D. E.

    2013-07-10

    The sites of chromospheric excitation during solar flares are marked by extended extreme ultraviolet ribbons and hard X-ray (HXR) footpoints. The standard interpretation is that these are the result of heating and bremsstrahlung emission from non-thermal electrons precipitating from the corona. We examine this picture using multi-wavelength observations of the early phase of an M-class flare SOL2010-08-07T18:24. We aim to determine the properties of the heated plasma in the flare ribbons, and to understand the partition of the power input into radiative and conductive losses. Using GOES, SDO/EVE, SDO/AIA, and RHESSI, we measure the temperature, emission measure (EM), and differential emission measure of the flare ribbons, and deduce approximate density values. The non-thermal EM, and the collisional thick target energy input to the ribbons are obtained from RHESSI using standard methods. We deduce the existence of a substantial amount of plasma at 10 MK in the flare ribbons, during the pre-impulsive and early-impulsive phase of the flare. The average column EM of this hot component is a few times 10{sup 28} cm{sup -5}, and we can calculate that its predicted conductive losses dominate its measured radiative losses. If the power input to the hot ribbon plasma is due to collisional energy deposition by an electron beam from the corona then a low-energy cutoff of {approx}5 keV is necessary to balance the conductive losses, implying a very large electron energy content. Independent of the standard collisional thick-target electron beam interpretation, the observed non-thermal X-rays can be provided if one electron in 10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} in the 10 MK (1 keV) ribbon plasma has an energy above 10 keV. We speculate that this could arise if a non-thermal tail is generated in the ribbon plasma which is being heated by other means, for example, by waves or turbulence.

  16. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET NON-THERMAL LINE BROADENING AND HIGH-ENERGY PARTICLES DURING SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Kawate, T.; Imada, S.

    2013-10-01

    We have studied the relationship between the location of EUV non-thermal broadening and high-energy particles during large flares using the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode, the Nobeyama Radio Polarimeter, the Nobeyama Radioheliograph, and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory. We have analyzed five large flare events that contain thermal-rich, intermediate, and thermal-poor flares classified by the definition discussed in the paper. We found that, in the case of thermal-rich flares, the non-thermal broadening of Fe XXIV occurred at the top of the flaring loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of 17 GHz microwaves is located at the footpoint of the flare loop. On the other hand, in the case of intermediate/thermal-poor flares, the non-thermal broadening of Fe XXIV occurred at the footpoint of the flare loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of 17 GHz microwaves is located at the top of the flaring loop. We discussed the difference between thermal-rich and intermediate/thermal-poor flares based on the spatial information of non-thermal broadening, which may provide clues that the presence of turbulence plays an important role in the pitch angle scattering of high-energy electrons.

  17. The Relationship between Extreme Ultraviolet Non-thermal Line Broadening and High-energy Particles during Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawate, T.; Imada, S.

    2013-10-01

    We have studied the relationship between the location of EUV non-thermal broadening and high-energy particles during large flares using the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode, the Nobeyama Radio Polarimeter, the Nobeyama Radioheliograph, and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory. We have analyzed five large flare events that contain thermal-rich, intermediate, and thermal-poor flares classified by the definition discussed in the paper. We found that, in the case of thermal-rich flares, the non-thermal broadening of Fe XXIV occurred at the top of the flaring loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of 17 GHz microwaves is located at the footpoint of the flare loop. On the other hand, in the case of intermediate/thermal-poor flares, the non-thermal broadening of Fe XXIV occurred at the footpoint of the flare loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of 17 GHz microwaves is located at the top of the flaring loop. We discussed the difference between thermal-rich and intermediate/thermal-poor flares based on the spatial information of non-thermal broadening, which may provide clues that the presence of turbulence plays an important role in the pitch angle scattering of high-energy electrons.

  18. On the possibility to diagnose a kappa-distribution from EVE flare spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzifcakova, Elena; Dudík, Jaroslav

    2015-08-01

    X-ray flare emission is strongly affected by the non-thermal part of the electron distribution. RHESSI observations and also recent theoretical derivations showed that the electron distribution function in coronal X-ray sources could be a kappa-distribution. An effect of kappa-distribution on the relative intensities of spectral lines of Fe XVIII - Fe XXIV observed in SDO/EVE flare spectra was calculated using KAPPA package based on the CHIANTI. Together with CHIANTI, this allows us to estimate the influence of the kappa-distributions on the diagnostics of electron density and temperature from the flare spectra. The possibility to diagnose parameters of the kappa-distribution from EVE flare spectra is discussed. The synthetic spectra for the kappa-distribution are compared with the observed flare spectra.

  19. A fast cross-validation method for alignment of electron tomography images based on Beer-Lambert law.

    PubMed

    Yan, Rui; Edwards, Thomas J; Pankratz, Logan M; Kuhn, Richard J; Lanman, Jason K; Liu, Jun; Jiang, Wen

    2015-11-01

    In electron tomography, accurate alignment of tilt series is an essential step in attaining high-resolution 3D reconstructions. Nevertheless, quantitative assessment of alignment quality has remained a challenging issue, even though many alignment methods have been reported. Here, we report a fast and accurate method, tomoAlignEval, based on the Beer-Lambert law, for the evaluation of alignment quality. Our method is able to globally estimate the alignment accuracy by measuring the goodness of log-linear relationship of the beam intensity attenuations at different tilt angles. Extensive tests with experimental data demonstrated its robust performance with stained and cryo samples. Our method is not only significantly faster but also more sensitive than measurements of tomogram resolution using Fourier shell correlation method (FSCe/o). From these tests, we also conclude that while current alignment methods are sufficiently accurate for stained samples, inaccurate alignments remain a major limitation for high resolution cryo-electron tomography.

  20. Shaped electric fields for fast optimal manipulation of electron spin and position in a double quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budagosky, J. A.; Khomitsky, D. V.; Sherman, E. Ya.; Castro, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    We use quantum optimal control theory algorithms to design external electric fields that drive the coupled spin and orbital dynamics of an electron in a double quantum dot, subject to the spin-orbit coupling and Zeeman magnetic fields. We obtain time profiles of multifrequency electric field pulses which increase the rate of spin-flip transitions by several orders of magnitude in comparison with monochromatic fields, where the spin Rabi oscillations were predicted to be very slow. This precise (with fidelity higher than 1 ×10-4 ) and fast (at the time scale of the order of 0.1 ns, comparable with the Zeeman spin rotation and the interdot tunneling time) simultaneous control of the spin and position is achieved while keeping the electron in the four lowest tunneling- and Zeeman-split levels through the duration of the pulse. The proposed algorithms suggest effective applications in spintronics and quantum information devices.

  1. A fast cross-validation method for alignment of electron tomography images based on Beer-Lambert law

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Rui; Edwards, Thomas J.; Pankratz, Logan M.; Kuhn, Richard J.; Lanman, Jason K.; Liu, Jun; Jiang, Wen

    2015-01-01

    In electron tomography, accurate alignment of tilt series is an essential step in attaining high-resolution 3D reconstructions. Nevertheless, quantitative assessment of alignment quality has remained a challenging issue, even though many alignment methods have been reported. Here, we report a fast and accurate method, tomoAlignEval, based on the Beer-Lambert law, for the evaluation of alignment quality. Our method is able to globally estimate the alignment accuracy by measuring the goodness of log-linear relationship of the beam intensity attenuations at different tilt angles. Extensive tests with experimental data demonstrated its robust performance with stained and cryo samples. Our method is not only significantly faster but also more sensitive than measurements of tomogram resolution using Fourier shell correlation method (FSCe/o). From these tests, we also conclude that while current alignment methods are sufficiently accurate for stained samples, inaccurate alignments remain a major limitation for high resolution cryo-electron tomography. PMID:26455556

  2. Variability of Thermosphere and Ionosphere Responses to Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qian, Liying; Burns, Alan G.; Chamberlin, Philip C.; Solomon, Stanley C.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated how the rise rate and decay rate of solar flares affect the thermosphere and ionosphere responses to them. Model simulations and data analysis were conducted for two flares of similar magnitude (X6.2 and X5.4) that had the same location on the solar limb, but the X6.2 flare had longer rise and decay times. Simulated total electron content (TEC) enhancements from the X6.2 and X5.4 flares were 6 total electron content units (TECU) and approximately 2 TECU, and the simulated neutral density enhancements were approximately 15% -20% and approximately 5%, respectively, in reasonable agreement with observations. Additional model simulations showed that for idealized flares with the same magnitude and location, the thermosphere and ionosphere responses changed significantly as a function of rise and decay rates. The Neupert Effect, which predicts that a faster flare rise rate leads to a larger EUV enhancement during the impulsive phase, caused a larger maximum ion production enhancement. In addition, model simulations showed that increased E x B plasma transport due to conductivity increases during the flares caused a significant equatorial anomaly feature in the electron density enhancement in the F region but a relatively weaker equatorial anomaly feature in TEC enhancement, owing to dominant contributions by photochemical production and loss processes. The latitude dependence of the thermosphere response correlated well with the solar zenith angle effect, whereas the latitude dependence of the ionosphere response was more complex, owing to plasma transport and the winter anomaly.

  3. MIMAC low energy electron-recoil discrimination measured with fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riffard, Q.; Santos, D.; Guillaudin, O.; Bosson, G.; Bourrion, O.; Bouvier, J.; Descombes, T.; Muraz, J.-F.; Lebreton, L.; Maire, D.; Colas, P.; Giomataris, I.; Busto, J.; Fouchez, D.; Brunner, J.; Tao, C.

    2016-08-01

    MIMAC (MIcro-TPC MAtrix of Chambers) is a directional WIMP Dark Matter detector project. Direct dark matter experiments need a high level of electron/recoil discrimination to search for nuclear recoils produced by WIMP-nucleus elastic scattering. In this paper, we proposed an original method for electron event rejection based on a multivariate analysis applied to experimental data acquired using monochromatic neutron fields. This analysis shows that a 105 rejection power is reachable for electron/recoil discrimination. Moreover, the efficiency was estimated by a Monte-Carlo simulation showing that a 105 electron rejection power is reached with a 86.49 ± 0.17% nuclear recoil efficiency considering the full energy range and 94.67 ± 0.19% considering a 5 keV lower threshold.

  4. Experimental demonstration of the role of electron pressure in fast magnetic reconnection with a guide field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, W.; Sciortino, F.; von Stechow, A.; Jara-Almonte, J.; Yoo, J.; Ji, H.; Yamada, M.

    2016-10-01

    We report detailed laboratory observations of the structure of reconnection current sheets in a two-fluid plasma regime with a guide magnetic field, conducted on the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment. We observe in the laboratory for the first time the quadrupolar electron pressure variation in the ion-diffusion region, as originally predicted by extended MHD simulation. We quantitatively analyze the parallel and perpendicular force balance, and observe the projection of the electron pressure gradient parallel to the B field balances the parallel electric field. The resulting cross-field electron jets in the reconnection layer are diamagnetic in origin. Electron density variations are observed to dominate temperature variations and may provide a new diagnostic of reconnection with finite guide field for fusion experiments and spacecraft missions. Supported by Max-Planck Princeton Center for Plasma Physics.

  5. A fast multichannel Martin-Puplett interferometer for electron cyclotron emission measurements on JET

    SciTech Connect

    Simonetto, A.; Sozzi, C.; Garavaglia, S.; Nowak, S.; Fessey, J. A.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2011-11-15

    A Martin Puplett interferometer for electron cyclotron emission (ECE) measurements from JET tokamak plasmas was extended to multichannel operation for simultaneous radial and oblique ECE measurements. This paper describes the new optics and the instrument's performance.

  6. Classification of Solar Flares

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-01

    Svestka, Z . 1985. Sol. Phys. 100: 435-63 45. Decker, R. B., Viahos, L. 1986. Ap. J. 306: 710-29 46. Dennis, B. R. 1985. Sol. Phys. 100: 465-90 47...169-224 51. Dungey, J. W. 1953. Phil. Mag. Ser. 7,44: 725-38 53 52. Dwivedi, B. N., Hudson, H. S., Kane, S. R., Svestka, Z . 1984. Sol. Phys. 90: 331...57 95. Kiepenheuer, K. 0. 1964. in The Physics of Solar Flares, ed. W. N. Hess (NASA SP-50), 323-31 96. Kippehahn, R., Schluter, A. 1957. Z . Astrophys

  7. Solar Flares Observed with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2004-01-01

    Solar flares are impressive examples of explosive energy release in unconfined, magnetized plasma. It is generally believed that the flare energy is derived from the coronal magnetic field. However, we have not been able to establish the specific energy release mechanism(s) or the relative partitioning of the released energy between heating, particle acceleration (electrons and ions), and mass motions. NASA's RHESSI Mission was designed to study the acceleration and evolution of electrons and ions in flares by observing the X-ray and gamma-ray emissions these energetic particles produce. This is accomplished through the combination of high-resolution spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging, including the first images of flares in gamma rays. RHESSI has observed over 12,000 solar flares since its launch on February 5, 2002. I will demonstrate how we use the RHESSI spectra to deduce physical properties of accelerated electrons and hot plasma in flares. Using images to estimate volumes, w e typically find that the total energy in accelerated electrons is comparable to that in the thermal plasma. I will also present flare observations that provide strong support for the presence of magnetic reconnection in a large-scale, vertical current sheet in the solar corona. RHESSI observations such as these are allowing us to probe more deeply into the physics of solar flares.

  8. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Fragmentation pathways for selected electronic states of the acetylene dication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, T.; Rescigno, T. N.; Weber, T.; Miyabe, S.; Jahnke, T.; Alnaser, A. S.; Hertlein, M. P.; Jagutzki, O.; Schmidt, L. Ph H.; Schöffler, M.; Foucar, L.; Schössler, S.; Havermeier, T.; Odenweller, M.; Voss, S.; Feinberg, B.; Landers, A. L.; Prior, M. H.; Dörner, R.; Cocke, C. L.; Belkacem, A.

    2008-05-01

    Coincident measurement of the Auger electron and fragment ion momenta emitted after carbon core-level photoionization of acetylene has yielded new understanding of how the dication fragments. Ab initio calculations and experimental data, including body-frame Auger angular distributions, are used to identify the parent electronic states and together yield a comprehensive map of the dissociation pathways which include surface crossings and barriers to direct dissociation. The Auger angular distributions for certain breakup channels show evidence of core-hole localization.

  9. On the State of a Solar Active Region Before Flares and CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsós, M. B.; Erdélyi, R.

    2016-06-01

    Several attempts have been made to find reliable diagnostic tools to determine the state prior to flares and related coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in solar active regions (ARs). Characterization of the level of mixed states is carried out using the Debrecen sunspot Data for 116 flaring ARs. Conditional flare probabilities (CFPs) are calculated for different flaring classes. The association with slow/fast CMEs is examined. Two precursor parameters are introduced: (i) the sum of the (daily averaged) horizontal magnetic gradient G S (G DS ) and (ii) the separation parameter {S}l-f. We found that if {S}l-f≤slant 1 for a flaring AR then the CFP of the expected highest-intensity flare being X-class is more than 70%. If 1≤slant {S}l-f≤slant 3 the CFP is more than 45% for the highest-intensity flare(s) to be M-class, and if 3≤slant {S}l-f≤slant 13 there is larger than 60% CFP that C-class flare(s) may have the strongest intensity within 48 hr. Next, from analyzing G S for determining CFP we found: if 5.5≤slant {log}({G}S) ≤slant 6.5, then it is very likely that C-class flare(s) may be the most intense; if 6.5≤slant {log}({G}S)≤slant 7.5 then there is ˜45% CFP that M-class could have the highest intensity; finally, if 7.5≤slant {log}({G}S) then there is at least 70% chance that the strongest energy release will be X-class in the next 48 hr. ARs are unlikely to produce X-class flare(s) if 13≤slant {S}l-f and log(G S ) ≤slant 5.5. Finally, in terms of providing an estimate of an associated slow/fast CME, we found that, if {log}({S}l-f) ≥slant 0.4 or {log}({G}{DS}) ≤slant 6.5, there is no accompanying fast CME in the following 24 hr.

  10. Explosive Chromospheric Evaporation in a Circular-ribbon Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. M.; Li, D.; Ning, Z. J.; Su, Y. N.; Ji, H. S.; Guo, Y.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we report our multiwavelength observations of the C4.2 circular-ribbon flare in active region (AR) 12434 on 2015 October 16. The short-lived flare was associated with positive magnetic polarities and a negative polarity inside, as revealed by the photospheric line-of-sight magnetograms. Such a magnetic pattern is strongly indicative of a magnetic null point and spine-fan configuration in the corona. The flare was triggered by the eruption of a mini-filament residing in the AR, which produced the inner flare ribbon (IFR) and the southern part of a closed circular flare ribbon (CFR). When the eruptive filament reached the null point, it triggered null point magnetic reconnection with the ambient open field and generated the bright CFR and a blowout jet. Raster observations of the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph show plasma upflow at speeds of 35-120 km s-1 in the Fe xxi λ1354.09 line ({log}T≈ 7.05) and downflow at speeds of 10-60 km s-1 in the Si iv λ1393.77 line ({log}T≈ 4.8) at certain locations of the CFR and IFR during the impulsive phase of the flare, indicating explosive chromospheric evaporation. Coincidence of the single hard X-ray source at 12-25 keV with the IFR and calculation based on the thick-target model suggest that the explosive evaporation was most probably driven by nonthermal electrons.

  11. Temporal Variability of Ion Acceleration and Abundances in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Solar flares accelerate both ions and electrons to high energies, and their X-ray and gamma-ray signatures not only probe the relationship between their respective acceleration, but also allow for the measurement of accelerated and ambient abundances. RHESSI observations have shown a striking close linear correlation of gamma-ray line fluence from accelerated ions greater than approximately 20 MeV and bremsstrahlung emission from relativistic accelerated electrons greater than 300 keV, when integrated over complete flares, suggesting a common acceleration mechanism. SMM/GRS observations, however, show a weaker correlation, and this discrepancy might be associated with previously observed electron-rich episodes within flares and/or temporal variability of gamma-ray line fluxes over the course of flares. We use the latest RHESSI gamma-ray analysis techniques to study the temporal behavior of the RHESSI flares, and determine what changes can be attributed to an evolving acceleration mechanism or to evolving abundances. We also discuss possible explanations for changing abundances.

  12. Temporal Variability of Ion Acceleration and Abundances in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Albert Y.

    2012-01-01

    solar flares accelerate both ions and electrons to high energies, and their x-ray and gamma-ray signatures not only probe the relationship between their respective acceleration, but also allow for the measurement of accelerated and ambient abundances. RHESSI observations have shown a striking close linear correlation of gamma-ray line fluence from accelerated ions > approx 20 MeV and bremsstrahlung emission from relativistic accelerated electrons >300 kev, when integrated over complete flares, suggesting a common acceleration mechanism. SMM/GRS observations, however, show a weaker correlation, and this discrepancy might be associated with previously observed electron-rich episodes within flares and/or temporal variability of gamma-ray line fluxes over the course of flares. We use the latest RHESSI gamma-ray analysis techniques to study the temporal behavior of the RHESSI flares, and determine what changes can be attributed to an evolving acceleration mechanism or to evolving abundances. We also discuss possible explanations for changing abundances.

  13. Signal enhancement of neutral He emission lines by fast electron bombardment of laser-induced He plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suyanto, Hery; Pardede, Marincan; Hedwig, Rinda; Marpaung, Alion Mangasi; Ramli, Muliadi; Lie, Tjung Jie; Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Tjia, May On; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2016-08-01

    A time-resolved spectroscopic study is performed on the enhancement signals of He gas plasma emission using nanosecond (ns) and picosecond (ps) lasers in an orthogonal configuration. The ns laser is used for the He gas plasma generation and the ps laser is employed for the ejection of fast electrons from a metal target, which serves to excite subsequently the He atoms in the plasma. The study is focused on the most dominant He I 587.6 nm and He I 667.8 nm emission lines suggested to be responsible for the He-assisted excitation (HAE) mechanism. The time-dependent intensity enhancements induced by the fast electrons generated with a series of delayed ps laser ablations are deduced from the intensity time profiles of both He emission lines. The results clearly lead to the conclusion that the metastable excited triplet He atoms are actually the species overwhelmingly produced during the recombination process in the ns laser-induced He gas plasma. These metastable He atoms are believed to serve as the major energy source for the delayed excitation of analyte atoms in ns laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) using He ambient gas.

  14. 3D Ion and Electron Distribution Function Measurements from the Fast Plasma Investigation on the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, B. L.; Pollock, C. J.; Avanov, L. A.; Barrie, A. C.; Burch, J. L.; Chandler, M. O.; Clark, G. B.; Coffey, V. N.; Dickson, C.; Dorelli, J.; Ergun, R. E.; Fuselier, S. A.; Gershman, D. J.; Gliese, U.; Holland, M. P.; Jacques, A. D.; Kreisler, S.; Lavraud, B.; MacDonald, E.; Mauk, B.; Moore, T. E.; Mukai, T.; Nakamura, R.; Paterson, W. R.; Rager, A. C.; Saito, Y.; Salo, C.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Torbert, R. B.; Vinas, A. F.; Yokota, S.

    2015-12-01

    The primary focus of the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, launched in March 2015, is magnetic reconnection and associated processes. Understanding hinges critically on the kinetic physics that allows reconnection to take place. The Fast Plasma Investigation (FPI) provides electron and ion distribution functions at 4.5s cadence and, for select periods of time, at cadences of 30ms for electrons and 150ms for ions. These select time periods are chosen after in situ acquisition based on inspection of the low resolution data. Thus the FPI provides, independent of spacecraft spin rate, the time resolution needed to resolve the small, fast-moving reconnection diffusion regions. The first mission phase focuses on the dayside magnetopause and this presentation is intended to demonstrate the capabilities of FPI to resolve the important spatial scales relevant to the reconnection process. Magnetopause and other boundary crossings will be examined and the phase-space trajectories identified at the tetrahedral satellite locations through analysis of the 3D distribution functions.

  15. Fine Structure in Solar Flares.

    PubMed

    Warren

    2000-06-20

    We present observations of several large two-ribbon flares observed with both the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) and the soft X-ray telescope on Yohkoh. The high spatial resolution TRACE observations show that solar flare plasma is generally not confined to a single loop or even a few isolated loops but to a multitude of fine coronal structures. These observations also suggest that the high-temperature flare plasma generally appears diffuse while the cooler ( less, similar2 MK) postflare plasma is looplike. We conjecture that the diffuse appearance of the high-temperature flare emission seen with TRACE is due to a combination of the emission measure structure of these flares and the instrumental temperature response and does not reflect fundamental differences in plasma morphology at the different temperatures.

  16. Parameterization of solar flare dose

    SciTech Connect

    Lamarche, A.H.; Poston, J.W.

    1996-12-31

    A critical aspect of missions to the moon or Mars will be the safety and health of the crew. Radiation in space is a hazard for astronauts, especially high-energy radiation following certain types of solar flares. A solar flare event can be very dangerous if astronauts are not adequately shielded because flares can deliver a very high dose in a short period of time. The goal of this research was to parameterize solar flare dose as a function of time to see if it was possible to predict solar flare occurrence, thus providing a warning time. This would allow astronauts to take corrective action and avoid receiving a dose greater than the recommended limit set by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP).

  17. Flare heating and ionization of the low solar chromosphere. II - Observations of five solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Thomas R.; Canfield, Richard C.; Saba, Julia L. R.

    1990-01-01

    Two neutral Mg spectral lines formed in the temperature-minimum region and the low chromosphere, at 4571 and 5173 A, are used to quantify the changes in the atmospheric structure as a function of time during five solar flares. Eight proposed flare heating and ionization mechanisms and predictions of the effects of each on the temperature minimum region are discussed. Two Mg spectral observations made at the National Solar Observatory (Sacramento Peak), along with observations of hard and soft X-rays from the SMM and GOES satellites, are compared to the predictions of the eight proposed mechanisms. The initial effects in all five flares are consistent with backwarming by enhanced Balmer- and Paschen-continuum radiation originating in the upper chromosphere. Extended heating observed in two of the flares is most likely due to UV irradiation. In all cases heating by the dissipation of nonreversed electric currents, collisions with an electron or proton beam, irradiation by soft X-rays, and dissipation of Alfven waves are eliminated.

  18. Amplification of a fast wave by extracting both the kinetic energy and electrostatic potential energy of a large-orbit relativistic electron beam in a coaxial electrostatic wiggler

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Shichang

    2010-05-15

    Nonlinear model and simulation technique of the interaction and energy transfer between a fast wave and a large-orbit relativistic electron beam in a coaxial electrostatic wiggler are presented. Unlike the situations in a magnetostatic-wiggler free-electron laser (MWFEL) and in an electron cyclotron maser (ECM), the electrostatic potential of the electrons plays an important role and participates in the energy exchange between the wave and the electron beam. Compared to MWFEL and ECM, the coaxial electrostatic-wiggler configuration has a distinguishing peculiarity that besides the electron-beam's kinetic energy, its electrostatic potential energy can be effectively transferred to the fast wave. Simulation shows that wave could be amplified with ultrahigh gain by extracting both the kinetic energy and electrostatic potential energy of the electron beam.

  19. Effects of X-ray flares on the aeronomy of Mars: Simultaneous measurements of ionospheric effects of X-ray flares on Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, Syed A.; Machado Santos, Angela; Abdu, Mangalathayil A.; Batista, Inez S.; Shah, Siddhi Y.; Thirupathaiah, P.

    2016-07-01

    MIRI: Validation and Testing Requirements We have studied X-ray aeronomy in the ionospheric E region of Mars during six X-ray flares that occurred on 28 March and 6 April, 2001; 17,18 March and 21 April, 2003 and 19 February, 2005 respectively. These flares were responded by the corresponding electron density profiles of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). The time series of photoionization rate, photoelectron impact ionization rate, photoelectron flux, ion density, electron density and total Electron Content (TEC) are predicted for each flare day. The estimated production rate, flux and densities are increased by 1-2 orders of magnitude due to effects of these flares in the E region ionosphere of Mars. The normalized estimated TEC are compared with the normalized measured TEC of MGS profiles. At the peak flare time the normalized estimated and normalized measured TEC were enhanced by a factor of 5-10 and 2 respectively. The effects of these flares were also registered in the D region equatorial ionosphere of Earth at Fortaleza observatory. The flares of 6 April, 2001, 17 March and 21 April, 2003 also produced electron density enhancement in the E region ionosphere of Earth at College AK and Cachoeira Paulista observatories. The minimum frequency fmin, recorded in ionogram, increased by 100% (due to D region absorption) while the foE increased by 20%, in the Earth's ionosphere.

  20. Impact of Pre-Plasma on Fast Electron Generation and Transport from Short Pulse High Intensity Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peebles, J.; McGuffey, C.; Krauland, C.; Jarrott, L. C.; Sorokovikova, A.; Qiao, B.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Park, J.; Link, A.; Chen, H.; McLean, H. S.; Wagner, C.; Minello, V.; McCary, E.; Meadows, A.; Spinks, M.; Gaul, E.; Dyer, G.; Hegelich, B. M.; Martinez, M.; Donovan, M.; Ditmire, T.

    2014-10-01

    We present the results and analysis from recent short pulse laser matter experiments using the Texas Petawatt Laser to study the impact of pre-plasma on fast electron generation and transport. The experimental setup consisted of 3 separate beam elements: a main, high intensity, short pulse beam for the interaction, a secondary pulse of equal intensity interacting with a separate thin foil target to generate protons for side-on proton imaging and a third, low intensity, wider beam to generate a varied scale length pre-plasma. The main target consisted of a multilayer planar Al foil with a buried Cu fluor layer. The electron beam was characterized with multiple diagnostics, including several bremsstrahlung spectrometers, magnetic electron spectrometers and Cu-K α imaging. The protons from the secondary target were used to image the fields on the front of the target in the region of laser plasma interaction. Features seen in the interaction region by these protons will be presented along with characteristics of the generated electron beam. This work performed under the auspices of the US DOE under Contracts DE-FOA-0000583 (FES, NNSA).

  1. Fermi Large Area Telescope observations of high-energy gamma-ray emission from Solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesce Rollins, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) observations of the active Sun provide the largest sample of detected solar flares with emission greater than 30 MeV to date. These include detections of impulsive and sustained emission, extending up to 20 hours in the case of the 2012 March 7 X-class flares. These high-energy flares are coincident with GOES X-ray flares of X, M and C classes as well as very fast Coronal Mass Ejections (CME). We will present results from the First Fermi-LAT solar flare catalog covering the majority of Solar Cycle 24 including correlation studies with the associated Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) and CMEs.

  2. Empirical Constraints on Proton and Electron Heating in the Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cranmer, Steven R.; Matthaeus, William H.; Breech, Benjamin A.; Kasper, Justin C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents analyses of measured proton and electron temperatures in the high-speed solar wind that are used to calculate the separate rates of heat deposition for protons and electrons. It was found that the protons receive about 60% of the total plasma heating in the inner heliosphere, and that this fraction increases to approximately 80% by the orbit of Jupiter. The empirically derived partitioning of heat between protons and electrons is in rough agreement with theoretical predictions from a model of linear Vlasov wave damping. For a modeled power spectrum consisting only of Alfvenic fluctuations, the best agreement was found for a distribution of wavenumber vectors that evolves toward isotropy as distance increases.

  3. Inferring Flare Loop Parameters with Measurements of Standing Sausage Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ming-Zhe; Chen, Shao-Xia; Li, Bo; Xia, Li-Dong; Yu, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Standing fast sausage modes in flare loops were suggested to account for a considerable number of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in the light curves of solar flares. This study continues our investigation into the possibility of inverting the measured periods P and damping times τ of sausage modes to deduce the transverse Alfvén time R/v_{Ai}, density contrast ρi/ρe, and the steepness of the density distribution transverse to flare loops. A generic dispersion relation governing linear sausage modes is derived for pressureless cylinders where density inhomogeneity of arbitrary form takes place within the cylinder. We show that in general the inversion problem is under-determined for QPP events where only a single sausage mode exists, whether the measurements are spatially resolved or unresolved. While R/v_{Ai} can be inferred to some extent, the range of possible steepness parameters may be too broad to be useful. However, for spatially resolved measurements where an additional mode is present, it is possible to deduce self-consistently ρi/ρe, the profile steepness, and the internal Alfvén speed v_{Ai}. We show that at least for a recent QPP event that involves a fundamental kink mode in addition to a sausage one, flare loop parameters are well constrained even if the specific form of the transverse density distribution remains unknown. We conclude that spatially resolved, multi-mode QPP measurements need to be pursued to infer flare loop parameters.

  4. M DWARF FLARE CONTINUUM VARIATIONS ON ONE-SECOND TIMESCALES: CALIBRATING AND MODELING OF ULTRACAM FLARE COLOR INDICES

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hilton, Eric J.; Wisniewski, John P.; Dhillon, Vik S.; Marsh, Tom R.; Brown, Benjamin P.

    2016-04-01

    We present a large data set of high-cadence dMe flare light curves obtained with custom continuum filters on the triple-beam, high-speed camera system ULTRACAM. The measurements provide constraints for models of the near-ultraviolet (NUV) and optical continuum spectral evolution on timescales of ≈1 s. We provide a robust interpretation of the flare emission in the ULTRACAM filters using simultaneously obtained low-resolution spectra during two moderate-sized flares in the dM4.5e star YZ CMi. By avoiding the spectral complexity within the broadband Johnson filters, the ULTRACAM filters are shown to characterize bona fide continuum emission in the NUV, blue, and red wavelength regimes. The NUV/blue flux ratio in flares is equivalent to a Balmer jump ratio, and the blue/red flux ratio provides an estimate for the color temperature of the optical continuum emission. We present a new “color–color” relationship for these continuum flux ratios at the peaks of the flares. Using the RADYN and RH codes, we interpret the ULTRACAM filter emission using the dominant emission processes from a radiative-hydrodynamic flare model with a high nonthermal electron beam flux, which explains a hot, T ≈ 10{sup 4} K, color temperature at blue-to-red optical wavelengths and a small Balmer jump ratio as observed in moderate-sized and large flares alike. We also discuss the high time resolution, high signal-to-noise continuum color variations observed in YZ CMi during a giant flare, which increased the NUV flux from this star by over a factor of 100.

  5. Plasmons in doped finite carbon nanotubes and their interactions with fast electrons and quantum emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vega, Sandra; Cox, Joel D.; de Abajo, F. Javier García

    2016-08-01

    We study the potential of highly doped finite carbon nanotubes to serve as plasmonic elements that mediate the interaction between quantum emitters. Similar to graphene, nanotubes support intense plasmons that can be modulated by varying their level of electrical doping. These excitations exhibit large interaction with light and electron beams, as revealed upon examination of the corresponding light extinction cross-section and electron energy-loss spectra. We show that quantum emitters experience record-high Purcell factors, while they undergo strong mutual interaction mediated by their coupling to the tube plasmons. Our results show the potential of doped finite nanotubes as tunable plasmonic materials for quantum optics applications.

  6. Explosive plasma flows in a solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarro, Dominic M.; Canfield, Richard C.; Metcalf, Thomas R.; Strong, Keith T.

    1988-01-01

    Solar Maximum Mission soft X-ray data and Sacramento Peak Observatory H-alpha observations are combined in a study of the impulsive phase of a solar flare. A blue asymmetry, indicative of upflows, was observed in the coronal Ca XIX line during the soft X-ray rise phase. A red asymmetry, indicative of downflows, was observed simultaneously in chromospheric H-alpha emitted from bright flare kernels during the period of hard X-ray emission. Combining the velocity data with a measurement of coronal electron density, it is shown that the impulsive phase momentum of upflowing soft X-ray-emitting plasma equalled that of the downflowing H-alpha-emitting plasma to within one order of magnitude. In particular, the momentum of the upflowing plasma was 2 x 10 to the 21st g cm/s while that of the downflowing plasma was 7 x 10 to the 21st g cm/s, with a factor of 2 uncertainty on each value. This equality supports the explosive chromospheric evaporation model of solar flares, in which a sudden pressure increase at the footprint of a coronal loop produces oppositely directed flows in the heated plasma.

  7. Fast electron propagation in Ti foils irradiated with sub-picosecond laser pulses at Iλ{sup 2}>10{sup 18} Wcm{sup −2}μm{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Makita, M.; Nersisyan, G.; McKeever, K.; Dzelzainis, T.; White, S.; Kettle, B.; Dromey, B.; Doria, D.; Zepf, M.; Lewis, C. L. S.; Riley, D.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Hansen, S. B.

    2014-02-15

    We have studied the propagation of fast electrons through laser irradiated Ti foils by monitoring the emission of hard X-rays and K-α radiation from bare foils and foils backed by a thick epoxy layer. Key observations include strong refluxing of electrons and divergence of the electron beam in the foil with evidence of magnetic field collimation. Our diagnostics have allowed us to estimate the fast electron temperature and fraction of laser energy converted to fast electrons. We have observed clear differences between the fast electron temperatures observed with bare and epoxy backed targets which may be due to the effects of refluxing.

  8. Development and Testing of Gallium Arsenide Photoconductive Detectors for Ultra Fast, High Dose Rate Pulsed Electron and Bremsstrahlung Radiation Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kharashvili, George; Makarashvili, Vakhtang; Mitchell, Marc; Beezhold, Wendland; Spaulding, Randy; Wells, Douglas; Gesell, Thomas; Wingert, Wayne

    2009-03-10

    Real time radiation dose measurements are challenging in high dose rate environments such as those used for testing electronic devices or biological agents. Dosimetry needs in pulsed reactor fields and particle accelerator facilities require development of dosimeters with fast (10 s of picoseconds) response to pulsed radiation, linear response over a