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Sample records for flare fast electrons

  1. On the 'fast electron hypothesis' for stellar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    It is pointed out that Gurzadyan's (1988) fast-electron hypothesis for stellar flares encounters certain difficulties. The origin of the fast electrons is obscure. Negative flares and predicted ratios of X-ray to optical fluxes are not necessarily a proof of the fast-electron hypothesis. When the electrons thermalize, they will yield X-ray fluxes which are orders of magnitude too large to be consistent with observations.

  2. Thermalisation and hard X-ray bremsstrahlung efficiency of self-interacting solar flare fast electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, R. K.; Helander, P.; MacKinnon, A. L.; Brown, J. C.

    2010-09-01

    Context. Most theoretical descriptions of the production of solar flare bremsstrahlung radiation assume the collision of dilute accelerated particles with a cold, dense target plasma, neglecting interactions of the fast particles with each other. This is inadequate for situations where collisions with this background plasma are not completely dominant, as may be the case in, for example, low-density coronal sources. Aims: We aim to formulate a model of a self-interacting, entirely fast electron population in the absence of a dense background plasma, to investigate its implications for observed bremsstrahlung spectra and the flare energy budget. Methods: We derive approximate expressions for the time-dependent distribution function of the fast electrons using a Fokker-Planck approach. We use these expressions to generate synthetic bremsstrahlung X-ray spectra as would be seen from a corresponding coronal source. Results: We find that our model qualitatively reproduces the observed behaviour of some flares. As the flare progresses, the model's initial power-law spectrum is joined by a lower energy, thermal component. The power-law component diminishes, and the growing thermal component proceeds to dominate the total emission over timescales consistent with flare observations. The power-law exhibits progressive spectral hardening, as is seen in some flare coronal sources. We also find that our model requires a factor of 7-10 fewer accelerated electrons than the cold, thick target model to generate an equivalent hard X-ray flux. Conclusions: This model forms the basis of a treatment of self-interactions among flare fast electrons, a process which affords a more efficient means to produce bremsstrahlung photons and so may reduce the efficiency requirements placed on the particle acceleration mechanism. It also provides a useful description of the thermalisation of fast electrons in coronal sources.

  3. Stochastic acceleration of electrons by fast magnetosonic waves in solar flares: the effects of anisotropy in velocity and wavenumber space

    SciTech Connect

    Pongkitiwanichakul, Peera; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.

    2014-11-20

    We develop a model for stochastic acceleration of electrons in solar flares. As in several previous models, the electrons are accelerated by turbulent fast magnetosonic waves ({sup f}ast waves{sup )} via transit-time-damping (TTD) interactions. (In TTD interactions, fast waves act like moving magnetic mirrors that push the electrons parallel or anti-parallel to the magnetic field). We also include the effects of Coulomb collisions and the waves' parallel electric fields. Unlike previous models, our model is two-dimensional in both momentum space and wavenumber space and takes into account the anisotropy of the wave power spectrum F{sub k} and electron distribution function f {sub e}. We use weak turbulence theory and quasilinear theory to obtain a set of equations that describes the coupled evolution of F{sub k} and f {sub e}. We solve these equations numerically and find that the electron distribution function develops a power-law-like non-thermal tail within a restricted range of energies E in (E {sub nt}, E {sub max}). We obtain approximate analytic expressions for E {sub nt} and E {sub max}, which describe how these minimum and maximum energies depend upon parameters such as the electron number density and the rate at which fast-wave energy is injected into the acceleration region at large scales. We contrast our results with previous studies that assume that F{sub k} and f {sub e} are isotropic, and we compare one of our numerical calculations with the time-dependent hard-X-ray spectrum observed during the 1980 June 27 flare. In our numerical calculations, the electron energy spectra are softer (steeper) than in models with isotropic F{sub k} and f {sub e} and closer to the values inferred from observations of solar flares.

  4. Mirroring of fast solar flare electrons on a downstream corotating interaction region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, K. A.; Sommers, J.; Lin, R. P.; Pick, M.; Chaizy, P.; Murphy, N.; Smith, E. J.; Phillips, J. L.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss an example of confinement of fast solar electrons by a discrete solar wind-interplanetary magnetic field structure on February 22, 1991. The structure is about 190,000 km in width and is clearly defined by changes in the direction of the magnetic field at the Ulysses spacecraft. This structure carries electrons moving toward the Sun as well as away from the Sun. A loss cone in the angular distribution of the fast electrons shows that mirroring, presumably magnetic, takes place downstream from the spacecraft. Following passage of this narrow structure, the return flux vanishes for 21 min after which time the mirroring resumes and persists for several hours. We identify the enhanced magnetic field region lying downstream from the Ulysses spacecraft that is responsible for the mirroring to be a corotating stream interaction region. Backstreaming suprathermal electron measurements by the Los Alamos National Laboratory plasma experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft support this interpretation.

  5. Mirroring of fast solar flare electrons on a downstream corotating interaction region

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.A.; Sommers, J.; Lin, R.P.; Pick, M.; Chaizy, P.; Murphy, N.; Smith, E.J.; Phillips, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    The authors discuss an example of confinement of fast solar electrons by a discrete solar wind-interplanetary magnetic field structure on February 22, 1991. The structure is about 190,000 km in width and is clearly defined by changes in the direction of the magnetic field at the Ulysses spacecraft. This structure carries electrons moving toward the Sun as well as away from the Sun. A loss cone in the angular distribution of the fast electrons shows that mirroring, presumably magnetic, takes place downstream from the spacecraft. Following passage of this narrow structure, the return flux vanishes for 21 min after which time the mirroring resumes and persists for several hours. The authors identify the enhanced magnetic field region lying downstream from the Ulysses spacecraft that is responsible for the mirroring to be a corotating stream interaction region. Backstreaming suprathermal electron measurements by the Los Alamos National Laboratory plasma experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft support this interpretation. 12 refs., 9 figs.

  6. Electron beams in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Dennis, Brian R.; Benz, Arnold O.

    1994-01-01

    A list of publications resulting from this program includes 'The Timing of Electron Beam Signatures in Hard X-Ray and Radio: Solar Flare Observations by BATSE/Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory and PHOENIX'; 'Coherent-Phase or Random-Phase Acceleration of Electron Beams in Solar Flares'; 'Particle Acceleration in Flares'; 'Chromospheric Evaporation and Decimetric Radio Emission in Solar Flares'; 'Sequences of Correlated Hard X-Ray and Type 3 Bursts During Solar Flares'; and 'Solar Electron Beams Detected in Hard X-Rays and Radiowaves.' Abstracts and reprints of each are attached to this report.

  7. Non-thermal recombination - a neglected source of flare hard X-rays and fast electron diagnostics (Corrigendum)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. C.; Mallik, P. C. V.; Badnell, N. R.

    2010-06-01

    Brown and Mallik (BM) recently claimed that non-thermal recombination (NTR) can be a dominant source of flare hard X-rays (HXRs) from hot coronal and chromospheric sources. However, major discrepancies between the thermal continua predicted by BM and by the Chianti database as well as RHESSI flare data, led us to discover substantial errors in the heuristic expression used by BM to extend the Kramers expressions beyond the hydrogenic case. Here we present the relevant corrected expressions and show the key modified results. We conclude that, in most cases, NTR emission was overestimated by a factor of 1-8 by BM but is typically still large enough (as much as 20-30% of the total emission) to be very important for electron spectral inference and detection of electron spectral features such as low energy cut-offs since the recombination spectra contain sharp edges. For extreme temperature regimes and/or if the Fe abundance were as high as some values claimed, NTR could even be the dominant source of flare HXRs, reducing the electron number and energy budget, problems such as in the extreme coronal HXR source cases reported by e.g. Krucker et al.

  8. Electron acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Droge, Wolfgang; Meyer, Peter; Evenson, Paul; Moses, Dan

    1989-01-01

    For the period Spetember 1978 to December 1982, 55 solar flare particle events for which the instruments on board the ISEE-3 spacecraft detected electrons above 10 MeV. Combining data with those from the ULEWAT spectrometer electron spectra in the range from 0.1 to 100 MeV were obtained. The observed spectral shapes can be divided into two classes. The spectra of the one class can be fit by a single power law in rigidity over the entire observed range. The spectra of the other class deviate from a power law, instead exhibiting a steepening at low rigidities and a flattening at high rigidities. Events with power-law spectra are associated with impulsive (less than 1 hr duration) soft X-ray emission, whereas events with hardening spectra are associated with long-duration (more than 1 hr) soft X-ray emission. The characteristics of long-duration events are consistent with diffusive shock acceleration taking place high in the corona. Electron spectra of short-duration flares are well reproduced by the distribution functions derived from a model assuming simultaneous second-order Fermi acceleration and Coulomb losses operating in closed flare loops.

  9. Electron precipitation in solar flares - Collisionless effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Rowland, H. L.

    1984-01-01

    A large fraction of the electrons which are accelerated during the impulsive phase of solar flares stream towards the chromosphere and are unstable to the growth of plasma waves. The linear and nonlinear evolution of plasma waves as a function of time is analyzed with a set of rate equations that follows, in time, the nonlinearly coupled system of plasma waves-ion fluctuations. As an outcome of the fast transfer of wave energy from the beam to the ambient plasma, nonthermal electron tails are formed which can stabilize the anomalous Doppler resonance instability responsible for the pitch angle scattering of the beam electrons. The non-collisional losses of the precipitating electrons are estimated, and the observational implication of these results are discussed.

  10. FAST CONTRACTION OF CORONAL LOOPS AT THE FLARE PEAK

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Rui; Wang Haimin

    2010-05-01

    On 2005 September 8, a coronal loop overlying the active region NOAA 10808 was observed in TRACE 171 A to contract at {approx}100 km s{sup -1} at the peak of an X5.4-2B flare at 21:05 UT. Prior to the fast contraction, the loop underwent a much slower contraction at {approx}6 km s{sup -1} for about 8 minutes, initiating during the flare preheating phase. The sudden switch to fast contraction is presumably corresponding to the onset of the impulsive phase. The contraction resulted in the oscillation of a group of loops located below, with the period of about 10 minutes. Meanwhile, the contracting loop exhibited a similar oscillatory pattern superimposed on the dominant downward motion. We suggest that the fast contraction reflects a suddenly reduced magnetic pressure underneath due either to (1) the eruption of magnetic structures located at lower altitudes or to (2) the rapid conversion of magnetic free energy in the flare core region. Electrons accelerated in the shrinking trap formed by the contracting loop can theoretically contribute to a late-phase hard X-ray burst, which is associated with Type IV radio emission. To complement the X5.4 flare which was probably confined, a similar event observed in SOHO/EIT 195 A on 2004 July 20 in an eruptive, M8.6 flare is briefly described, in which the contraction was followed by the expansion of the same loop leading up to a halo coronal mass ejection. These observations further substantiate the conjecture of coronal implosion and suggest coronal implosion as a new exciter mechanism for coronal loop oscillations.

  11. EVIDENCE FOR HOT FAST FLOW ABOVE A SOLAR FLARE ARCADE

    SciTech Connect

    Imada, S.; Aoki, K.; Hara, H.; Watanabe, T.; Harra, L. K.; Shimizu, T.

    2013-10-10

    Solar flares are one of the main forces behind space weather events. However, the mechanism that drives such energetic phenomena is not fully understood. The standard eruptive flare model predicts that magnetic reconnection occurs high in the corona where hot fast flows are created. Some imaging or spectroscopic observations have indicated the presence of these hot fast flows, but there have been no spectroscopic scanning observations to date to measure the two-dimensional structure quantitatively. We analyzed a flare that occurred on the west solar limb on 2012 January 27 observed by the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and found that the hot (∼30MK) fast (>500 km s{sup –1}) component was located above the flare loop. This is consistent with magnetic reconnection taking place above the flare loop.

  12. Energetic electrons generated during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Gottfried

    2015-12-01

    > electrons are accelerated up to energies beyond 30 keV is one of the open questions in solar physics. A flare is considered as the manifestation of magnetic reconnection in the solar corona. Which mechanisms lead to the production of energetic electrons in the magnetic reconnection region is discussed in this paper. Two of them are described in more detail.

  13. The energy spectra of solar flare electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evenson, P. A.; Hovestadt, D.; Meyer, P.; Moses, D.

    1985-01-01

    A survey of 50 electron energy spectra from .1 to 100 MeV originating from solar flares was made by the combination of data from two spectrometers onboard the International Sun Earth Explorer-3 spacecraft. The observed spectral shapes of flare events can be divided into two classes through the criteria of fit to an acceleration model. This standard two step acceleration model, which fits the spectral shape of the first class of flares, involves an impulsive step that accelerates particles up to 100 keV and a second step that further accelerates these particles up to 100 MeV by a single shock. This fit fails for the second class of flares that can be characterized as having excessively hard spectra above 1 MeV relative to the predictions of the model. Correlations with soft X-ray and meter radio observations imply that the acceleration of the high energy particles in the second class of flares is dominated by the impulsive phase of the flares.

  14. Characteristics of energetic solar flare electron spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Dan; Droege, Wolfgang; Meyer, Peter; Evenson, Paul

    1989-01-01

    A 55 event survey of energy spectra of 0.1-100 MeV interplanetary electrons originating from solar flares as measured by two spectrometers onboard the ISEE 3 (ICE) spacecraft for the years 1978-1982 has been completed. Spectra generated using the maximum flux of a given event in each energy channel were restricted to events with a well-defined flux rise time. Two broad groups of electron spectra are considered. In one group, the spectra are well represented by a single power law in rigidity with spectral index in the range 3-4.5. The spectra in the other group deviate from a power law in rigidity systematically in that they harden with increasing rigidity. Events with near power-law spectra are found to be correlated with long-duration soft X-ray events, whereas those with hardening spectra are correlated with short-duration events. The possible variation of acceleration and propagation processes with the properties of the flare site is discussed, using the duration of the soft X-ray flare emission as an indicator of the physical parameters of the flare site (flare volume, density, coronal height, and magnetic field geometry).

  15. Spectrometers for fast neutrons from solar flares.

    PubMed

    Slobodrian, R J; Potvin, L; Rioux, C

    1994-10-01

    Neutrons with energies exceeding 1 GeV are emitted in the course of solar flares. Suitable dedicated neutron spectrometers with directional characteristics are necessary for a systematic spectroscopy of solar neutrons. We report here a study of instruments based on the detection of proton recoils from hydrogenous media, with double scattering in order to provide directional information, and also a novel scheme based on the detection of radiation from the neutron magnetic dipole moment, permitting also directional detection of neutrons. Specific designs and detection systems are discussed.

  16. Fast spectrophotometry of the flare star EV lacertae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhilyaev, B. E.; Andreev, M. V.; Sergeev, A. V.; Reshetnik, V. N.; Parakhin, N. A.

    2012-12-01

    We present the results of fast spectrophotometry for two flares on EV Lac with a time resolution of 8 s and a spectroscopic resolution R ˜ 100. The observations were performed in May and August 2010 with a slitless spectrograph on the Zeiss-600 telescope at Peak Terskol. We have estimated the UBVR magnitudes from spectrograms through a mathematical convolution of the spectra with the filter transmission curves. The UBV R amplitudes of the August 10, 2010 flare are 2\\underset{raise0.3emsmashriptscriptstyle\\cdot}{m} 83, 1\\underset{raise0.3emsmashriptscriptstyle\\cdot}{m} 94, 0\\underset{raise0.3emsmashriptscriptstyle\\cdot}{m} 82, and 0\\underset{raise0.3emsmashriptscriptstyle\\cdot}{m} 28, respectively. The UBV R amplitudes of the May 30, 2010 flare are 0\\underset{raise0.3emsmashriptscriptstyle\\cdot}{m} 65, 0\\underset{raise0.3emsmashriptscriptstyle\\cdot}{m} 25, 0\\underset{raise0.3emsmashriptscriptstyle\\cdot}{m} 15, and 0\\underset{raise0.3emsmashriptscriptstyle\\cdot}{m} 10, respectively. A detailed colorimetric analysis has allowed important parameters of the flares on EV Lac to be estimated: the temperatures at maximum light and their sizes. The color-color ( U - B)-( B - V ) diagrams confirm that both flares at maximum light radiate as a blackbody. The temperatures at maximum light was 13 400 ± 500 K for the August flare and 5700 ± 100 K for the May flare. During the May flare, an additional hydrogen emission appeared in the Balmer H α, H β, H γ, H δ, H ɛ, H ζ lines and the Balmer continuum (3647 Å) in the spectrum of EV Lac. The excess of emission in the Balmer lines was approximately from two to thirty percent. Based on our colorimetric analysis, we have estimated the linear sizes of the flares at maximum light. The size of the May 30, 2010 flare is approximately 7% of the stellar radius. The size of the August 10, 2010 flare is 3.9% of the stellar radius.

  17. A NEW METHOD FOR CLASSIFYING FLARES OF UV Ceti TYPE STARS: DIFFERENCES BETWEEN SLOW AND FAST FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Dal, H. A.; Evren, S.

    2010-08-15

    In this study, a new method is presented to classify flares derived from the photoelectric photometry of UV Ceti type stars. This method is based on statistical analyses using an independent samples t-test. The data used in analyses were obtained from four flare stars observed between 2004 and 2007. The total number of flares obtained in the observations of AD Leo, EV Lac, EQ Peg, and V1054 Oph is 321 in the standard Johnson U band. As a result flares can be separated into two types, slow and fast, depending on the ratio of flare decay time to flare rise time. The ratio is below 3.5 for all slow flares, while it is above 3.5 for all fast flares. Also, according to the independent samples t-test, there is a difference of about 157 s between equivalent durations of slow and fast flares. In addition, there are significant differences between amplitudes and rise times of slow and fast flares.

  18. COLLISIONAL RELAXATION OF ELECTRONS IN A WARM PLASMA AND ACCELERATED NONTHERMAL ELECTRON SPECTRA IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Kontar, Eduard P.; Jeffrey, Natasha L. S.; Bian, N. H.; Emslie, A. Gordon

    2015-08-10

    Extending previous studies of nonthermal electron transport in solar flares, which include the effects of collisional energy diffusion and thermalization of fast electrons, we present an analytic method to infer more accurate estimates of the accelerated electron spectrum in solar flares from observations of the hard X-ray spectrum. Unlike for the standard cold-target model, the spatial characteristics of the flaring region, especially the necessity to consider a finite volume of hot plasma in the source, need to be taken into account in order to correctly obtain the injected electron spectrum from the source-integrated electron flux spectrum (a quantity straightforwardly obtained from hard X-ray observations). We show that the effect of electron thermalization can be significant enough to nullify the need to introduce an ad hoc low-energy cutoff to the injected electron spectrum in order to keep the injected power in non-thermal electrons at a reasonable value. Rather, the suppression of the inferred low-energy end of the injected spectrum compared to that deduced from a cold-target analysis allows the inference from hard X-ray observations of a more realistic energy in injected non-thermal electrons in solar flares.

  19. Very fast optical flaring from a possible new Galactic magnetar

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanescu, A.; Kanbach, G.; Greiner, J.; Slowikowska, A.; McBreen, S.; Sala, G.

    2009-05-25

    Rapid optical flaring of an unprecedented type was detected from a transient Galactic high-energy source, SWIFT J195509.6+261406[1]. On June 10, 2007, Swift-BAT triggered on GRB 070610, which turned out to be a previously unknown X-ray transient in the Galaxy. Optical emission following this transient was observed after only 421 s with the high-time-resolution single-photon counting photometer OPTIMA. Measurements continued for the following 5 nights.We detected very strong optical flares (>6 mag) with extremely short timescales: duration of individual flares 2-100 s, shortest variability timescales 0.4 s. The scale and magnitude of the observed variability combined with a distance estimate of 4-8 kpc indicate a non-thermal origin of the observed radiation. The morphology of the optical flares is reminiscent of X-ray outbursts of SGRs. The time resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio during the brightest optical outbursts allow to compute their Fourier power spectral density. Features similar to QPOs appear at periods of 6-8 seconds, typical rotational periods for magnetars. X-ray observations independent from our optical analysis show hints of periodicity at a coinciding frequency. We conclude that the timing properties of the fast, bright outbursts of SWIFT J1955 suggest a connection between this transient and magnetars flaring in the optical.

  20. Very fast optical flaring from a possible new Galactic magnetar.

    PubMed

    Stefanescu, A; Kanbach, G; Słowikowska, A; Greiner, J; McBreen, S; Sala, G

    2008-09-25

    Highly luminous rapid flares are characteristic of processes around compact objects like white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes. In the high-energy regime of X-rays and gamma-rays, outbursts with variabilities on timescales of seconds or less are routinely observed, for example in gamma-ray bursts or soft gamma-ray repeaters. At optical wavelengths, flaring activity on such timescales has not been observed, other than from the prompt phase of one exceptional gamma-ray burst. This is mostly due to the fact that outbursts with strong, fast flaring are usually discovered in the high-energy regime; most optical follow-up observations of such transients use instruments with integration times exceeding tens of seconds, which are therefore unable to resolve fast variability. Here we show the observation of extremely bright and rapid optical flaring in the Galactic transient SWIFT J195509.6+261406. Our optical light curves are phenomenologically similar to high-energy light curves of soft gamma-ray repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars, which are thought to be neutron stars with extremely high magnetic fields (magnetars). This suggests that similar processes are in operation, but with strong emission in the optical, unlike in the case of other known magnetars.

  1. The Effects of Wave Escape on Fast Magnetosonic Wave Turbulence in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pongkitiwanichakul, Peera; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. Richard

    2012-01-01

    One of the leading models for electron acceleration in solar flares is stochastic acceleration by weakly turbulent fast magnetosonic waves ("fast waves"). In this model, large-scale flows triggered by magnetic reconnection excite large-wavelength fast waves, and fast-wave energy then cascades from large wavelengths to small wavelengths. Electron acceleration by large-wavelength fast-waves is weak, and so the model relies on the small-wavelength waves produced by the turbulent cascade. In order for the model to work, the energy cascade time for large-wavelength fast waves must be shorter than the time required for the waves to propagate out of the solar-flare acceleration region. To investigate the effects of wave escape, we solve the wave kinetic equation for fast waves in weak turbulence theory, supplemented with a homogeneous wave-loss term.We find that the amplitude of large-wavelength fast waves must exceed a minimum threshold in order for a significant fraction of the wave energy to cascade to small wavelengths before the waves leave the acceleration region.We evaluate this threshold as a function of the dominant wavelength of the fast waves that are initially excited by reconnection outflows.

  2. Electron acceleration in impulsive solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, S.R.; Benz, A.O.; Treumann, R.A.

    1982-12-01

    Simultaneous observations of the hard X-ray, microwave, and type III and DCIM (decimetric)radio bursts associated with the 1978 December 4 solar flare have been used to study the physical parameters relevant to the acceleration and propagation of energetic electrons during the impulsive phase of a solar flare. The hard X-ray observations were made with the X-ray spectrometer aboard the ISEE 3 spacecraft. The radio spectra in metric and decimetric bands were recorded with the radiospectrograph located at Durnten, near Zurich, Switzerland. The microwave observations were made at the Sagamore Hill and Bern observatories. The three metric type III bursts coincided with the three most prominent hard X-ray peaks. This is the fist time a clear one-to-one association between single type III bursts and hard X-ray peaks has been established. The average delay of the type III bursts with respect to the X-ray peaks was 0.5 s. The harder the X-ray spectrum, the higher was the drift rate of the associated type III burst. The characteristic electron energies inferred from the drift rate are of the order of 70 keV. The observed increase in the high-frequency cutoff of the metric type III bursts during the impulsive phase has been examined in terms of the decreasing altitude of the electron acceleration/injection region, the increasing hardness of the electron spectrum, and the decreasing acceleration time. A pulsating decimetric continuum (DCIM) was also found to be present during and before the impulsive phase. The DCIM source seems to coincide spatially with the electron acceleration region and the (projected) origin of the associated type II shock.ction region.

  3. Acceleration of electrons during the flash phase of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, S. R.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of the electron acceleration process operating during the flash phase of solar flares are deduced from the high time resolution observations of impulsive solar X rays greater than or equal to 10 keV and other flash phase emissions from small solar flares, and the implications of these findings are discussed.

  4. Energetic electrons in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batchelor, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    A new analysis was made of a thermal flare model proposed by Brown, Melrose, and Spicer (1979) and Smith and Lilliequist (1979). They assumed the source of impulsive hard X-rays to be a plasma at a temperature of order 10 to the 8th power K, initially located at the apex of a coronal arch, and confined by ion-acoustic turbulence in a collisionless conduction front. Such a source would expand at approximately the ion-sound speed, C sub S = square root of (k T sub e/m sub i), until it filled the arch. Brown, Melrose, and Spicer and Smith and Brown (1980) argued that the source assumed in this model would not explain the simultaneous impulsive microwave emission. In contrast, the new results presented herein suggest that this model leads to the development of a quasi-Maxwellian distribution of electrons that explains both the hard X-ray and microwave emissions. This implies that the source sizes can be determined from observations of the optically-thick portions of microwave spectra and the temperatures obtained from associated hard X-ray observations. In this model, the burst emission would rise to a maximum in a time, t sub r, approximately equal to L/c sub s, where L is the half-length of the arch. New observations of these impulsive flare emissions were analyzed herein to test this prediction of the model. Observations made with the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft and the Bern Radio Observatory are in good agreement with the model.

  5. Ultrarelativistic electrons and solar flare gamma-radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semukhin, P. E.; Kovaltsov, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    Ten solar flares with gamma radiation in excess of 10 MeV were observed. Almost all took place within a heliolatitude greater than 60 deg, close to the solar limb, an indication of the essential anisotropy of high-energy gamma radiation. This high-energy solar flare gamma radiation can be explained by the specific features of the bremsstrahlung of ultrarelativistic electrons trapped within the magnetic arc of the solar atmosphere, even if the acceleration of the electrons is anisotropic.

  6. Two types of electron events in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daibog, E. I.; Kurt, V. G.; Logachev, Y. I.; Stolpovsky, V. G.

    1985-01-01

    The fluxes and spectra of the flare electrons measured on board Venera-I3 and I4 space probes are compared with the parameters of the hard (E sub x approximately 55 keV) and thermal X-ray bursts. The electron flux amplitude has been found to correlate with flare importance in the thermal X-ray range (r approximately 0.8). The following two types of flare events have been found in the electron component of SCR. The electron flux increase is accompanied by a hard X-ray burst and the electron spectrum index in the approximately 25 to 200 keV energy range is gamma approximately 2 to 3. The electron flux increase is not accompanied by a hard X-ray burst and the electron spectrum is softer (Delta gamma approximately 0.7 to 1.0).

  7. Relativistic electron transport and bremsstrahlung production in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, James A.; Ramaty, Reuven

    1989-09-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of ultrarelativistic electron transport in solar flare magnetic loops has been developed. It includes Coulomb, synchrotron, and bremsstrahlung energy losses; pitch-angle scattering by Alfven and whistler turbulence in the coronal region of the loop; and magnetic mirroring in the converging magnetic flux tubes beneath the transition region. Depth distributions, time profiles, energy spectra, and angular distributions of the resulting bremsstrahlung emission are calculated. It is found that both the preferential detection of solar flares with greater than 10 MeV emission near the limb of the sun and the observation of ultrarelativistic electron bremsstrahlung from flares on the disk are consequences of the loop transport model. The declining portions of the observed time profiles of greater than 10 MeV emission from solar flares can also be accounted for, and it is proposed that these portions are determined by transport and not acceleration.

  8. Chemistry of fast electrons

    PubMed Central

    Maximoff, Sergey N.; Head-Gordon, Martin P.

    2009-01-01

    A chemicurrent is a flux of fast (kinetic energy ≳ 0.5−1.3 eV) metal electrons caused by moderately exothermic (1−3 eV) chemical reactions over high work function (4−6 eV) metal surfaces. In this report, the relation between chemicurrent and surface chemistry is elucidated with a combination of top-down phenomenology and bottom-up atomic-scale modeling. Examination of catalytic CO oxidation, an example which exhibits a chemicurrent, reveals 3 constituents of this relation: The localization of some conduction electrons to the surface via a reduction reaction, 0.5 O2 + δe− → Oδ− (Red); the delocalization of some surface electrons into a conduction band in an oxidation reaction, Oδ− + CO → CO2δ− → CO2 + δe− (Ox); and relaxation without charge transfer (Rel). Juxtaposition of Red, Ox, and Rel produces a daunting variety of metal electronic excitations, but only those that originate from CO2 reactive desorption are long-range and fast enough to dominate the chemicurrent. The chemicurrent yield depends on the universality class of the desorption process and the distribution of the desorption thresholds. This analysis implies a power-law relation with exponent 2.66 between the chemicurrent and the heat of adsorption, which is consistent with experimental findings for a range of systems. This picture also applies to other oxidation-reduction reactions over high work function metal surfaces. PMID:19561296

  9. Signatures of Accelerated Electrons in Solar and Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, Arnold O.

    2015-08-01

    Flares energize electrons (and ions) to supra-thermal energies. In most cases the final distribution in momentum or energy space is non-Maxwellian. The non-thermal part of the energy can be the source for various emissions, including hard X-rays, synchrotron radiation and coherent radio emission. Such non-thermal emissions may contain information on the acceleration process. Several acceleration scenarios have been proposed: electric DC field, stochastic, and shock acceleration. There is observational evidence for all three scenarios. The new data come from SDO, X-ray (RHESSI), radio observations (Nobeyama, VLA and e-Callisto). Solar energetic particles are an additional channel of information.Tiny solar microflares and huge stellar flares in binary systems (RS CVns) and dMe dwarfs differ by more than 10 orders of magnitude in released energy. Yet the relation between peak luminosity in thermal (soft) X-ray and non-thermal synchrotron (radio) emission is surprisingly constant. This observational fact indicates that flare acceleration scales with energy release over a large range. Electron acceleration in flares seems to be a universal process. The constraint on simultaneous thermal X-rays and non-thermal (radio) synchrotron emission seems to select on particular kind of flare. In this subset, there seems to be only one type of acceleration.Yet, small deviations are noted: Small solar flares are softer in hard X-rays. Solar nanoflares are relatively weak in synchrotron emission. The recently noted case of radio-poor preflares will also be presented. The deviations suggest that the acceleration is less efficient in small flares and in the early phase of flares. Larger deviations are reported occasionally for solar flares and more often from stellar flares, where either thermal or non-thermal emission seems to be missing completely.The location of the acceleration in solar flares remains disputed. Observations suggesting acceleration in the soft X-ray top-tops, above

  10. Temperature and Electron Density Diagnostics of a Candle-flame-shaped Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidoni, S. E.; McKenzie, D. E.; Longcope, D. W.; Plowman, J. E.; Yoshimura, K.

    2015-02-01

    Candle-flame-shaped flares are archetypical structures that provide indirect evidence of magnetic reconnection. A flare resembling Tsuneta's famous 1992 candle-flame flare occurred on 2011 January 28; we present its temperature and electron density diagnostics. This flare was observed with Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA), Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT), and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Ahead (STEREO-A)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager, resulting in high-resolution, broad temperature coverage, and stereoscopic views of this iconic structure. The high-temperature images reveal a brightening that grows in size to form a tower-like structure at the top of the posteruption flare arcade, a feature that has been observed in other long-duration events. Despite the extensive work on the standard reconnection scenario, there is no complete agreement among models regarding the nature of this high-intensity elongated structure. Electron density maps reveal that reconnected loops that are successively connected at their tops to the tower develop a density asymmetry of about a factor of two between the two legs, giving the appearance of "half-loops." We calculate average temperatures with a new fast differential emission measure (DEM) method that uses SDO/AIA data and analyze the heating and cooling of salient features of the flare. Using STEREO observations, we show that the tower and the half-loop brightenings are not a line-of-sight projection effect of the type studied by Forbes & Acton. This conclusion opens the door for physics-based explanations of these puzzling, recurrent solar flare features, previously attributed to projection effects. We corroborate the results of our DEM analysis by comparing them with temperature analyses from Hinode/XRT.

  11. TEMPERATURE AND ELECTRON DENSITY DIAGNOSTICS OF A CANDLE-FLAME-SHAPED FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Guidoni, S. E.; Plowman, J. E.

    2015-02-10

    Candle-flame-shaped flares are archetypical structures that provide indirect evidence of magnetic reconnection. A flare resembling Tsuneta's famous 1992 candle-flame flare occurred on 2011 January 28; we present its temperature and electron density diagnostics. This flare was observed with Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA), Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT), and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Ahead (STEREO-A)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager, resulting in high-resolution, broad temperature coverage, and stereoscopic views of this iconic structure. The high-temperature images reveal a brightening that grows in size to form a tower-like structure at the top of the posteruption flare arcade, a feature that has been observed in other long-duration events. Despite the extensive work on the standard reconnection scenario, there is no complete agreement among models regarding the nature of this high-intensity elongated structure. Electron density maps reveal that reconnected loops that are successively connected at their tops to the tower develop a density asymmetry of about a factor of two between the two legs, giving the appearance of ''half-loops''. We calculate average temperatures with a new fast differential emission measure (DEM) method that uses SDO/AIA data and analyze the heating and cooling of salient features of the flare. Using STEREO observations, we show that the tower and the half-loop brightenings are not a line-of-sight projection effect of the type studied by Forbes and Acton. This conclusion opens the door for physics-based explanations of these puzzling, recurrent solar flare features, previously attributed to projection effects. We corroborate the results of our DEM analysis by comparing them with temperature analyses from Hinode/XRT.

  12. Energetics of Accelerated Ions and Electrons in Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Share, G. H.; Mugler, A. J.; Murphy, R. J.; Schwartz, R. A.

    2001-12-01

    We have analyzed hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission from 176 solar flares observed from 1980 to 1989 by the Solar Maximum Mission HXRBS and GRS experiments. This joint analysis provides flare spectra from ~40 keV to 8.5 MeV. We compare the photon spectra integrated over the same time intervals by the two experiments. The agreement in most instances is good. We present the combined spectra for all of the flares. These combined spectra can be used to study the shape of the bremsstrahlung continuum and therefore the shape of the accelerated electron spectrum over a broad range in energy. We estimate the energy contained in accelerated electrons above cutoffs of 20 keV and 70 keV using the X-ray data obtained with the HXRBS experiment. These energies range from ~ 1028 to 1034 ergs for a cutoff of 20 keV and from ~ 1027 to 1032 ergs for a cutoff of 70 keV. The energy in accelerated ions can be estimated from the gamma-ray fluxes in nuclear lines. These lines are strong enough to individually determine the energy contained in ions for about 40 flares. We plan to sum gamma-ray spectra from the remaining flares, grouped by the energy contained in electrons, to reveal the weak nuclear lines and therefore to determine the average energy contained in ions in these groupings. This work expands on the study performed by Ramaty and Mandzhavize (2000) for 19 intense nuclear line flares where they concluded that energy is often equipartitioned between accelerated ions and electrons.

  13. THE n-DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRONS AND DOUBLE LAYERS IN THE ELECTRON-BEAM-RETURN-CURRENT SYSTEM OF SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Karlicky, Marian

    2012-05-01

    We investigate processes in the electron-beam-return-current system in the impulsive phase of solar flares to answer a question about the formation of the n-electron distribution detected in this phase of solar flares. An evolution of the electron-beam-return-current system with an initial local density depression is studied using a three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell model. In the system the strong double layer is formed. Its electric field potential increases with the electron beam flux. In this electric field potential, the electrons of background plasma are strongly accelerated and propagate in the return-current direction. The high-energy part of their distribution at the high-potential side of the strong double layer resembles that of the n-distribution. Thus, the detection of the n-distributions, where a form of the high-energy part of the distribution is the most important, can indicate the presence of strong double layers in solar flares. The similarity between processes in solar flare loops and those in the downward current region of the terrestrial aurora, where the double layers were observed by FAST satellite, supports this idea.

  14. Fast X-ray Oscillations During Magnetar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, T.

    2006-01-01

    "We report on recent studies of high frequency variability during magnetar giant flares. These oscillations may represent the first observations of global shear oscillations in neutron star crusts, and can provide a new tools to study neutron star structure.

  15. Fast X-Ray Oscillations during Magnetar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer Tod E.

    2009-01-01

    The giant flares produced by highly magnetized neutron stars, "magnetars," are the brightest sources of high energy radiation outside our solar system. High frequency oscillations have been discovered during portions of the two most recently observed giant flares which may represent the first detection of global oscillation modes of neutron stars. I will give an observational and theoretical overview of these oscillations and describe how they might allow us to probe neutron star interiors and dense matter physics.

  16. Energetic electrons and photospheric electric currents during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musset, S.; Vilmer, N.; Bommier, V.

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares are among the most energetic events in the solar system. Magnetic energy previously stored in the coronal magnetic field is transferred to particle acceleration, plasma motion and plasma heating. Magnetic energy release is likely to occur in coronal currents sheets associated with regions of strong gradient of magnetic connectivity. Coronal current sheets can be traced by their footprints at the surface on the Sun, in e.g. photospheric current ribbons. We aim to study the relationship between the current ribbons observed at the photospheric level which trace coronal current sheets, and the flare energetic electrons traced by their X-ray emissions. The photospheric magnetic field and vertical current density are calculated from SDO/HMI spectropolarimetric data using the UNNOFIT inversion and Metcalf disambiguation codes, while the X-ray images and spectra are reconstructed from RHESSI data. In a first case (the GOES X2.2 flare of February 15, 2011), a spatial correlation is observed between the photospheric current ribbons and the coronal X-ray emissions from energetic electrons (Musset et al., 2015). Moreover, a conjoint evolution of both the photospheric currents and the X-ray emission is observed during the course of the flare. Both results are interpreted as consequences of the magnetic reconnection in coronal current sheets. Propagation of the reconnection sites to new structures during the flare results in new X-ray emission sites and local increase of the photospheric currents We will examine in this contribution whether similar results are obtained for other X-class flares.

  17. Energetic electrons and photospheric electric currents during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musset, Sophie; Vilmer, Nicole; Bommier, Veronique

    2016-07-01

    It is currently admitted that solar flares are powered by magnetic energy previously stored in the coronal magnetic field. During magnetic reconnection processes, this energy is transferred to particle acceleration, plasma motion and plasma heating. Magnetic energy release is likely to occur on coronal currents sheets along regions of strong gradient of magnetic connectivity. These coronal current sheets can be traced by their footprints at the surface on the Sun, i.e. by photospheric current ribbons. We aim to study the relation between these current ribbons observed at the photospheric level, tracing the coronal current sheets, and the flare energetic electrons traced by their X-ray emissions. The photospheric magnetic field and vertical current density have been calculated from SDO/HMI spectropolarimetric data with the UNNOFIT inversion and Metcalf disambiguation codes, while the X-ray images and spectra have been reconstructed from RHESSI data. In a first case, the GOES X2.2 flare of February 15, 2011, a spatial correlation is observed between the photospheric current ribbons and the coronal X-ray emissions from energetic electrons. Moreover, a conjoint evolution of both the photospheric currents and the X-ray emission is observed during the course of the flare. Both results are interpreted as consequences of the magnetic reconnection in coronal current sheets, and propagation of the reconnection sites to new structures during the flare, leading to new X-ray emission and local increase of the photospheric currents (Musset et al., 2015). We shall discuss here similar results obtained for other X-class flares.

  18. Fast X-ray Oscillations during Magnetar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2007-01-01

    The giant flares produced by highly magnetized neutron stars, "magnetars," are the brightest sources of high energy radiation outside our solar system. Serendipitous observations with NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) of the two most recent flares resulted in the discovery of high frequency oscillations in their X-ray fluxes. The frequencies of these oscillations range from approx. 20 Hz to as high as 1800 Hz, and may represent the first detection of global oscillation modes of neutron stars. Here I will present an observational and theoretical overview of these oscillations and discuss how they might allow us to probe neutron star interiors and dense matter physics.

  19. Fast X-Ray Oscillations During Magnetar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2008-01-01

    I will review recent studies of high frequency variability during magnetar giant flares. These oscillations may represent the first observations of global shear oscillations in neutron star crusts. I will also discuss how the observation of crust vibrations can provide a new tool to study neutron star structure.

  20. Gamma-ray emission and electron acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, Vahe; Mctiernan, James M.; Marschhauser, Holger

    1994-01-01

    Recent observations have extended the spectra of the impulsive phase of flares to the GeV range. Such high-energy photons can be produced either by electron bremsstrahlung or by decay of pions produced by accelerated protons. In this paper we investigate the effects of processes which become important at high energies. We examine the effects of synchrotron losses during the transport of electrons as they travel from the acceleration region in the corona to the gamma-ray emission sites deep in the chromosphere and photosphere, and the effects of scattering and absorption of gamma rays on their way from the photosphere to space instruments. These results are compared with the spectra from so-called electron-dominated flares, observed by GRS on the Solar Maximum Mission, which show negligible or no detectable contribution from accelerated protons. The spectra of these flares show a distinct steepening at energies below 100 keV and a rapid falloff at energies above 50 MeV. Following our earlier results based on lower energy gamma-ray flare emission we have modeled these spectra. We show that neither the radiative transfer effects, which are expected to become important at higher energies, nor the transport effects (Coulomb collisions, synchrotron losses, or magnetic field convergence) can explain such sharp spectral deviations from a simple power law. These spectral deviations from a power law are therefore attributed to the acceleration process. In a stochastic acceleration model the low-energy steepening can be attributed to Coulomb collision and the rapid high-energy steepening can result from synchrotron losses during the acceleration process.

  1. Flare and CME onset: UV spectra show fast 3-D flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innes, D. E.

    We present observations taken in the corona above a flare that occurred on the west limb of the Sun. SUMER spectra show large red (400 km/s) and blue (700 km/s) Dopplershifts in Fe XX (107 K), Cr XVI (5×106 K), Si IX (106 K) and O III (105 K) emission lines. These shifts are associated with a fast moving (500 km/s) optical emission front detected in high cadence images, taken with the coronagraph MICA. Yohkoh images, taken 8 min after the hard X-ray peak, show fast soft X-ray ejecta that can be extrapolated back to the position of pre-flare coronal arcade structure seen in EIT 195 images. The observations are interpreted as evidence of a blast wave propagating through the active region coronal loop structure very early in the flare evolution.

  2. Electron Beams for Fast Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, R. A.; Davies, J. R.; Silva, L. O.

    2004-11-01

    In the fast ignitor scenario an intense relativistic electron beam is used to deposit energy inside the fuel target and trigger the thermonuclear reaction. This electron beam is produced on the outer plasma layer of the target by the interaction of an ultra-intense laser. The energy transfer from the laser to the electron beam, and the stability of the propagation of the electron beam are crucial for a successful fast ignitor scheme. We have used three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations using the OSIRIS.framework [1] to explore the self-consistent generation of high current electron beams by ultra intense lasers. Novel laser pulse configurations are explored in order to generate electron beams transporting more energy, and capable of avoiding the deleterious effects of collisionless instabilities in the plasma corona. [1] R. A. Fonseca et al., LNCS 2331, 342-351, (Springer, Heidelberg, 2002);

  3. THE FAST FILAMENT ERUPTION LEADING TO THE X-FLARE ON 2014 MARCH 29

    SciTech Connect

    Kleint, Lucia; Battaglia, Marina; Krucker, Säm; Reardon, Kevin; Dalda, Alberto Sainz; Young, Peter R.

    2015-06-10

    We investigate the sequence of events leading to the solar X1 flare SOL2014-03-29T17:48. Because of the unprecedented joint observations of an X-flare with the ground-based Dunn Solar Telescope and the spacecraft IRIS, Hinode, RHESSI, STEREO, and the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we can sample many solar layers from the photosphere to the corona. A filament eruption was observed above a region of previous flux emergence, which possibly led to a change in magnetic field configuration, causing the X-flare. This was concluded from the timing and location of the hard X-ray emission, which started to increase slightly less than a minute after the filament accelerated. The filament showed Doppler velocities of ∼2–5 km s{sup −1} at chromospheric temperatures for at least one hour before the flare occurred, mostly blueshifts, but also redshifts near its footpoints. Fifteen minutes before the flare, its chromospheric Doppler shifts increased to ∼6–10 km s{sup −1} and plasma heating could be observed before it lifted off with at least 600 km s{sup −1} as seen in IRIS data. Compared to previous studies, this acceleration (∼3–5 km s{sup −2}) is very fast, while the velocities are in the common range for coronal mass ejections. An interesting feature was a low-lying twisted second filament near the erupting filament, which did not seem to participate in the eruption. After the flare ribbons started on each of the second filament’s sides, it seems to have untangled and vanished during the flare. These observations are some of the highest resolution data of an X-class flare to date and reveal some small-scale features yet to be explained.

  4. CORONAL ELECTRON DISTRIBUTION IN SOLAR FLARES: DRIFT-KINETIC MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Minoshima, Takashi; Kusano, Kanya; Masuda, Satoshi; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi

    2011-05-10

    Using a model of particle acceleration and transport in solar flares, we investigate the height distribution of coronal electrons by focusing on the energy-dependent pitch-angle scattering. When pitch-angle scattering is not included, the peak heights of loop-top electrons are constant, regardless of their energy, owing to the continuous acceleration and compression of the electrons via shrinkage of magnetic loops. On the other hand, under pitch-angle scattering, the electron heights are energy-dependent: intermediate-energy electrons are at a higher altitude, whereas lower and higher energy electrons are at lower altitudes. This implies that the intermediate-energy electrons are inhibited from following the shrinking field lines to lower altitudes because pitch-angle scattering causes efficient precipitation of these electrons into the footpoint and their subsequent loss from the loop. This result is qualitatively consistent with the position of the above-the-loop-top hard X-ray (HXR) source that is located above coronal HXR loops emitted by lower energy electrons and microwaves emitted by higher energy electrons. Quantitative agreement with observations might be achieved by considering primary acceleration before the onset of loop shrinkage and additional pitch-angle scattering via wave-particle interactions.

  5. Reconnection-driven plasmoids in blazars: fast flares on a slow envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannios, Dimitrios

    2013-05-01

    TeV flares of a duration of ˜10 min have been observed in several blazars. The fast flaring requires compact regions in the jet that boost their emission towards the observer at an extreme Doppler factor of δem ≳ 50. For ˜100 GeV photons to avoid annihilation in the broad-line region of PKS 1222+216, the flares must come from large (pc) scales, challenging most models proposed to explain them. Here I elaborate on the magnetic reconnection minijet model for the blazar flaring, focusing on the inherently time-dependent aspects of the process of magnetic reconnection. I argue that, for the physical conditions prevailing in blazar jets, the reconnection layer fragments, leading to the formation a large number of plasmoids. Occasionally, a plasmoid grows to become a large, `monster' plasmoid. I show that radiation emitted from the reconnection event can account for the observed `envelope' of day-long blazar activity, while radiation from monster plasmoids can power the fastest TeV flares. The model is applied to several blazars with observed fast flaring. The inferred distance of the dissipation zone from the black hole and the typical size of the reconnection regions are Rdiss ˜ 0.3-1 pc and l' ≲ 1016 cm, respectively. The required magnetization of the jet at this distance is modest: σ ˜ a few. Such distance Rdiss and reconnection size l' are expected if the jet contains field structures with a size of the order of the black hole horizon.

  6. INTEGRAL study of temporal properties of bright flares in Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidoli, L.; Paizis, A.; Postnov, K.

    2016-04-01

    We have characterized the typical temporal behaviour of the bright X-ray flares detected from the three Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXTs) showing the most extreme transient behaviour (XTE J1739-302, IGR J17544-2619, SAX J1818.6-1703). We focus here on the cumulative distributions of the waiting-time (time interval between two consecutive X-ray flares), and the duration of the hard X-ray activity (duration of the brightest phase of an SFXT outburst), as observed by INTEGRAL/IBIS in the energy band 17-50 keV. Adopting the cumulative distribution of waiting-times, it is possible to identify the typical time-scale that clearly separates different outbursts, each composed by several single flares at ˜ks time-scale. This allowed us to measure the duration of the brightest phase of the outbursts from these three targets, finding that they show heavy-tailed cumulative distributions. We observe a correlation between the total energy emitted during SFXT outbursts and the time interval covered by the outbursts (defined as the elapsed time between the first and the last flare belonging to the same outburst as observed by INTEGRAL). We show that temporal properties of flares and outbursts of the sources, which share common properties regardless different orbital parameters, can be interpreted in the model of magnetized stellar winds with fractal structure from the OB-supergiant stars.

  7. Electron trapping and acceleration by kinetic Alfvén waves in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Zimovets, I. V.; Rankin, R.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Theoretical models and spacecraft observations of solar flares highlight the role of wave-particle interaction for non-local electron acceleration. In one scenario, the acceleration of a large electron population up to high energies is due to the transport of electromagnetic energy from the loop-top region down to the footpoints, which is then followed by the energy being released in dense plasma in the lower atmosphere. Aims: We consider one particular mechanism of non-linear electron acceleration by kinetic Alfvén waves. Here, waves are generated by plasma flows in the energy release region near the loop top. We estimate the efficiency of this mechanism and the energies of accelerated electrons. Methods: We use analytical estimates and test-particle modelling to investigate the effects of electron trapping and acceleration by kinetic Alfvén waves in the inhomogeneous plasma of the solar corona. Results: We demonstrate that, for realistic wave amplitudes, electrons can be accelerated up to 10-1000 keV during their propagation along magnetic field lines. Here the electric field that is parallel to the direction of the background magnetic field is about 10 to 103 times the amplitude of the Dreicer electric field. The acceleration mechanism strongly depends on electron scattering which is due to collisions that only take place near the loop footpoints. Conclusions: The non-linear wave-particle interaction can play an important role in the generation of relativistic electrons within flare loops. Electron trapping and coherent acceleration by kinetic Alfvén waves represent the energy cascade from large-scale plasma flows that originate at the loop-top region down to the electron scale. The non-diffusive character of the non-linear electron acceleration may be responsible for the fast generation of high-energy particles.

  8. OPTIMAL ELECTRON ENERGIES FOR DRIVING CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Reep, J. W.; Bradshaw, S. J.; Alexander, D. E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu

    2015-08-01

    In the standard model of solar flares, energy deposition by a beam of electrons drives strong chromospheric evaporation leading to a significantly denser corona and much brighter emission across the spectrum. Chromospheric evaporation was examined in great detail by Fisher et al., who described a distinction between two different regimes, termed explosive and gentle evaporation. In this work, we examine the importance of electron energy and stopping depths on the two regimes and on the atmospheric response. We find that with explosive evaporation, the atmospheric response does not depend strongly on electron energy. In the case of gentle evaporation, lower energy electrons are significantly more efficient at heating the atmosphere and driving up-flows sooner than higher energy electrons. We also find that the threshold between explosive and gentle evaporation is not fixed at a given beam energy flux, but also depends strongly on the electron energy and duration of heating. Further, at low electron energies, a much weaker beam flux is required to drive explosive evaporation.

  9. Onset of electron acceleration in a flare loop

    SciTech Connect

    Sharykin, Ivan; Liu, Siming; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2014-09-20

    We carried out a detailed analysis of X-ray and radio observations of a simple flare loop that occurred on 2002 August 12, with the impulsive hard X-ray (HXR) light curves dominated by a single pulse. The emission spectra of the early impulsive phase are consistent with an isothermal model in the coronal loop with a temperature reaching several keV. A power-law high-energy spectral tail is evident near the HXR peak time, in accordance with the appearance of footpoints at high energies, and is well correlated with the radio emission. The energy content of the thermal component keeps increasing gradually after the disappearance of this nonthermal component. These results suggest that electron acceleration only covers the central period of a longer and more gradual energy dissipation process and that the electron transport within the loop plays a crucial role in the formation of the inferred power-law electron distribution. The spectral index of power-law photons shows a very gradual evolution, indicating that the electron accelerator is in a quasi-steady state, which is confirmed by radio observations. These results are consistent with the theory of stochastic electron acceleration from a thermal background. Advanced modeling with coupled electron acceleration and spatial transport processes is needed to explain these observations more quantitatively, which may reveal the dependence of the electron acceleration on the spatial structure of the acceleration region.

  10. Modeling Flare Hard X-ray Emission from Electrons in Contracting Magnetic Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidoni, Silvina E.; Allred, Joel C.; Alaoui, Meriem; Holman, Gordon D.; DeVore, C. Richard; Karpen, Judith T.

    2016-05-01

    The mechanism that accelerates particles to the energies required to produce the observed impulsive hard X-ray emission in solar flares is not well understood. It is generally accepted that this emission is produced by a non-thermal beam of electrons that collides with the ambient ions as the beam propagates from the top of a flare loop to its footpoints. Most current models that investigate this transport assume an injected beam with an initial energy spectrum inferred from observed hard X-ray spectra, usually a power law with a low-energy cutoff. In our previous work (Guidoni et al. 2016), we proposed an analytical method to estimate particle energy gain in contracting, large-scale, 2.5-dimensional magnetic islands, based on a kinetic model by Drake et al. (2010). We applied this method to sunward-moving islands formed high in the corona during fast reconnection in a simulated eruptive flare. The overarching purpose of the present work is to test this proposed acceleration model by estimating the hard X-ray flux resulting from its predicted accelerated-particle distribution functions. To do so, we have coupled our model to a unified computational framework that simulates the propagation of an injected beam as it deposits energy and momentum along its way (Allred et al. 2015). This framework includes the effects of radiative transfer and return currents, necessary to estimate flare emission that can be compared directly to observations. We will present preliminary results of the coupling between these models.

  11. Solar flare accelerated electron transport through the turbulent solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Hamish; Kontar, Eduard

    Solar flare accelerated electron beams can become unstable during transport from the Sun to the Earth, producing plasma waves in the turbulent inner heliosphere. We simulate solar electron beam propagation to the Earth in the weak turbulent regime taking into account the self-consistent generation of plasma waves. Induced plasma waves interact with the density fluctuations from low frequency MHD turbulence present in the background plasma. These fluctuations act to suppress the generation of waves, most acutely when fluctuations have large amplitudes or small wavelengths. The reduction of plasma wave generation alters the wave distribution which changes electron beam transport. Assuming an observed 5/3 Kolmogorov-type power density spectra of fluctuations, we investigate the energy spectra of the electron beam near the Earth. We find the presence of turbulence in the background plasma alters the spectral index below the break energy of the double power-law formed at 1AU. From an initial single power-law electron distribution, we find a range of spectra below the break energy, with higher levels of turbulence corresponding to a higher spectral index.

  12. Comparing Solar-Flare Acceleration of >-20 MeV Protons and Electrons Above Various Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Albert Y.

    2010-01-01

    A large fraction (up to tens of percent) of the energy released in solar flares goes into accelerated ions and electrons, and studies indicate that these two populations have comparable energy content. RHESSI observations have shown a striking close linear correlation between the 2.223 MeV neutron-capture gamma-ray line and electron bremsstrahlung emission >300 keV, indicating that the flare acceleration of >^20 MeV protons and >300 keV electrons is roughly proportional over >3 orders of magnitude in fluence. We show that the correlations of neutron-capture line fluence with GOES class or with bremsstrahlung emission at lower energies show deviations from proportionality, primarily for flares with lower fluences. From analyzing thirteen flares, we demonstrate that there appear to be two classes of flares with high-energy acceleration: flares that exhibit only proportional acceleration of ions and electrons down to 50 keV and flares that have an additional soft, low-energy bremsstrahlung component, suggesting two separate populations of accelerated electrons. We use RHESSI spectroscopy and imaging to investigate a number of these flares in detail.

  13. Implications of X-Ray Observations for Electron Acceleration and Propagation in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.; Aschwanden, M. J.; Aurass, H.; Battaglia, M.; Grigis, P. C.; Kontar, E. P.; Liu, W.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Zharkova, V. V.

    2011-01-01

    High-energy X-rays and gamma-rays from solar flares were discovered just over fifty years ago. Since that time, the standard for the interpretation of spatially integrated flare X-ray spectra at energies above several tens of keV has been the collisional thick-target model. After the launch of the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) in early 2002, X-ray spectra and images have been of sufficient quality to allow a greater focus on the energetic electrons responsible for the X-ray emission, including their origin and their interactions with the flare plasma and magnetic field. The result has been new insights into the flaring process, as well as more quantitative models for both electron acceleration and propagation, and for the flare environment with which the electrons interact. In this article we review our current understanding of electron acceleration, energy loss, and propagation in flares. Implications of these new results for the collisional thick-target model, for general flare models, and for future flare studies are discussed.

  14. Narrowband Gyrosynchrotron Bursts: Probing Electron Acceleration in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Nita, Gelu M.; Kontar, Eduard P.; Gary, Dale E.

    2016-07-01

    Recently, in a few case studies we demonstrated that gyrosynchrotron microwave emission can be detected directly from the acceleration region when the trapped electron component is insignificant. For the statistical study reported here, we have identified events with steep (narrowband) microwave spectra that do not show a significant trapped component and, at the same time, show evidence of source uniformity, which simplifies the data analysis greatly. Initially, we identified a subset of more than 20 radio bursts with such narrow spectra, having low- and high-frequency spectral indices larger than three in absolute value. A steep low-frequency spectrum implies that the emission is nonthermal (for optically thick thermal emission, the spectral index cannot be steeper than two), and the source is reasonably dense and uniform. A steep high-frequency spectrum implies that no significant electron trapping occurs, otherwise a progressive spectral flattening would be observed. Roughly half of these radio bursts have RHESSI data, which allow for detailed, joint diagnostics of the source parameters and evolution. Based on an analysis of radio-to-X-ray spatial relationships, timing, and spectral fits, we conclude that the microwave emission in these narrowband bursts originates directly from the acceleration regions, which have a relatively strong magnetic field, high density, and low temperature. In contrast, the thermal X-ray emission comes from a distinct loop with a smaller magnetic field, lower density, but higher temperature. Therefore, these flares likely occurred due to interaction between two (or more) magnetic loops.

  15. Quasi-periodic fast-mode magnetosonic wave trains within coronal waveguides associated with flares and CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Ofman, Leon; Broder, Brittany; Karlický, Marian; Downs, Cooper

    2016-03-01

    Quasi-periodic, fast-mode, propagating wave trains (QFPs) are a new observational phenomenon recently discovered in the solar corona by the Solar Dynamics Observatory with extreme ultraviolet (EUV) imaging observations. They originate from flares and propagate at speeds up to ˜2000 km s-1 within funnel-shaped waveguides in the wakes of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). QFPs can carry suffcient energy fluxes required for coronal heating during their occurr ences. They can provide new diagnostics for the solar corona and their associated flares. We present recent observations of QFPs focusing on their spatio-temporal properties, temperature dependence, and statistical correlation with flares and CMEs. Of particular interest is the 2010-Aug-01 C3.2 flare with correlated QFPs and drifting zebra and fiber radio bursts, which might be different manifestations of the same fast-mode wave trains. We also discuss the potential roles of QFPs in accelerating and/or modulating the solar wind.

  16. Multi-wavelength Observations of Fast Infrared Flares from V404 Cygni in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallilar, Yigit; Casella, Piergiorgio; Marsh, Tom; Gandhi, Poshak; Fender, Rob; Littlefair, Stuart; Eikenberry, Steve; Garner, Alan; Stelter, Deno; Dhillon, Vik; Mooley, Kunal

    2016-07-01

    We used the fast photometry mode of our new Canarias InfraRed Camera Experiment (CIRCE) on the 10.4-meter Gran Telescopio Canarias to observe V404 Cyg, a stellar mass black hole binary, on June 25, 2015 during its 2015 outburst. CIRCE provided 10Hz sampling in the Ks-band (2.2 microns) In addition, we obtained simultaneous multi wavelength data from our collaborators: three GHz radio bands from the AMI telescope and three optical/UV bands (u', g', r') from ULTRACAM on the William Herschel 4.2-meter telescope. We identify fast (1-second) IR flares with optical counterparts of varying strength/color, which we argue arise from a relativistic jet outflow. These observations provide important constraints on the emission processes and physical conditions in the jet forming region in V404 Cygni. We will discuss these results as well as their implications for relativistic jet formation around stellar-mass black holes.

  17. Multi-wavelength Observations of Fast Infrared Flares from V404 Cygni in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Dallilar, Yigit; Garner, Alan; Deno Stelter, R.; Gandhi, Poshak; Dhillon, Vik; Littlefair, Stuart; Marsh, Thomas; Fender, Rob P.; Mooley, Kunal

    2016-04-01

    We used the fast photometry mode of our new Canarias InfraRed Camera Experiment (CIRCE) on the 10.4-meter Gran Telescopio Canarias to observe V404 Cyg, a stellar mass black hole binary, on June 25, 2015 during its 2015 outburst. CIRCE provided 10Hz sampling in the Ks-band (2.2 microns) In addition, we obtained simultaneous multi wavelength data from our collaborators: three GHz radio bands from the AMI telescope and three optical/UV bands (u', g', r') from ULTRACAM on the William Herschel 4.2-meter telescope. We identify fast (1-second) IR flares with optical counterparts of varying strength/color, which we argue arise from a relativistic jet outflow. These observations provide important constraints on the emission processes and physical conditions in the jet forming region in V404 Cygni. We will discuss these results as well as their implications for relativistic jet formation around stellar-mass black holes.

  18. Electron impact polarization expected in solar EUV lines from flaring chromospheres/transition regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fineschi, S.; Fontenla, Juan M.; Macneice, P.; Ljepojevic, N. N.

    1991-01-01

    We have evaluated lower bounds on the degree of impact Extreme Ultraviolet/Ultraviolet (EUV/UV) line polarization expected during solar flares. This polarization arises from collisional excitation by energetic electrons with non-Maxwellian velocity distributions. Linear polarization was observed in the S I 1437 A line by the Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter/Solar Maximum Mission (UVSP/SMM) during a flare on 15 July 1980. An early interpretation suggested that impact excitation by electrons propagating through the steep temperature gradient of the flaring transition region/high chromosphere produced this polarization. Our calculations show that the observed polarization in this UV line cannot be due to this effect. We find instead that, in some flare models, the energetic electrons can produce an impact polarization of a few percent in EUV neutral helium lines (i.e., lambda lambda 522, 537, and 584 A).

  19. Turbulent Pitch-angle Scattering and Diffusive Transport of Hard X-Ray-producing Electrons in Flaring Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontar, Eduard P.; Bian, Nicolas H.; Emslie, A. Gordon; Vilmer, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations from RHESSI have revealed that the number of non-thermal electrons in the coronal part of a flaring loop can exceed the number of electrons required to explain the hard X-ray-emitting footpoints of the same flaring loop. Such sources cannot, therefore, be interpreted on the basis of the standard collisional transport model, in which electrons stream along the loop while losing their energy through collisions with the ambient plasma; additional physical processes, to either trap or scatter the energetic electrons, are required. Motivated by this and other observations that suggest that high-energy electrons are confined to the coronal region of the source, we consider turbulent pitch-angle scattering of fast electrons off low-frequency magnetic fluctuations as a confinement mechanism, modeled as a spatial diffusion parallel to the mean magnetic field. In general, turbulent scattering leads to a reduction of the collisional stopping distance of non-thermal electrons along the loop, and hence to an enhancement of the coronal hard X-ray source relative to the footpoints. The variation of source size L with electron energy E becomes weaker than the quadratic behavior pertinent to collisional transport, with the slope of L(E) depending directly on the mean free path λ associated with the non-collisional scattering mechanism. Comparing the predictions of the model with observations, we find that λ ~ (108-109) cm for ~30 keV, less than the length of a typical flaring loop and smaller than, or comparable to, the size of the electron acceleration region.

  20. Turbulent pitch-angle scattering and diffusive transport of hard X-ray-producing electrons in flaring coronal loops

    SciTech Connect

    Kontar, Eduard P.; Bian, Nicolas H.; Emslie, A. Gordon; Vilmer, Nicole E-mail: emslieg@wku.edu

    2014-01-10

    Recent observations from RHESSI have revealed that the number of non-thermal electrons in the coronal part of a flaring loop can exceed the number of electrons required to explain the hard X-ray-emitting footpoints of the same flaring loop. Such sources cannot, therefore, be interpreted on the basis of the standard collisional transport model, in which electrons stream along the loop while losing their energy through collisions with the ambient plasma; additional physical processes, to either trap or scatter the energetic electrons, are required. Motivated by this and other observations that suggest that high-energy electrons are confined to the coronal region of the source, we consider turbulent pitch-angle scattering of fast electrons off low-frequency magnetic fluctuations as a confinement mechanism, modeled as a spatial diffusion parallel to the mean magnetic field. In general, turbulent scattering leads to a reduction of the collisional stopping distance of non-thermal electrons along the loop, and hence to an enhancement of the coronal hard X-ray source relative to the footpoints. The variation of source size L with electron energy E becomes weaker than the quadratic behavior pertinent to collisional transport, with the slope of L(E) depending directly on the mean free path λ associated with the non-collisional scattering mechanism. Comparing the predictions of the model with observations, we find that λ ∼ (10{sup 8}-10{sup 9}) cm for ∼30 keV, less than the length of a typical flaring loop and smaller than, or comparable to, the size of the electron acceleration region.

  1. OBSERVATION OF HEATING BY FLARE-ACCELERATED ELECTRONS IN A SOLAR CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Glesener, Lindsay; Bain, Hazel M.; Krucker, Säm; Lin, Robert P.

    2013-12-20

    We report a Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observation of flare-accelerated electrons in the core of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and examine their role in heating the CME. Previous CME observations have revealed remarkably high thermal energies that can far surpass the CME's kinetic energy. A joint observation by RHESSI and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly of a partly occulted flare on 2010 November 3 allows us to test the hypothesis that this excess energy is collisionally deposited by flare-accelerated electrons. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images show an ejection forming the CME core and sheath, with isothermal multifilter analysis revealing temperatures of ∼11 MK in the core. RHESSI images reveal a large (∼100 × 50 arcsec{sup 2}) hard X-ray (HXR) source matching the location, shape, and evolution of the EUV plasma, indicating that the emerging CME is filled with flare-accelerated electrons. The time derivative of the EUV emission matches the HXR light curve (similar to the Neupert effect observed in soft and HXR time profiles), directly linking the CME temperature increase with the nonthermal electron energy loss, while HXR spectroscopy demonstrates that the nonthermal electrons contain enough energy to heat the CME. This is the most direct observation to date of flare-accelerated electrons heating a CME, emphasizing the close relationship of the two in solar eruptive events.

  2. Energetic Electrons in Solar Flares - As Viewed in X-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2004-01-01

    Hard X-ray observations provide the most direct diagnostic we have of the suprathermal electrons and the hottest thermal plasma present in solar flares. The Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) is obtaining the most comprehensive observations of individual solar flares ever available in hard X-rays. For the first time, high-resolution spectra are available for a large number of flares that accurately display the spectral shape and its evolution and, in many cases, allow us to identify the transition from the bremsstrahlung X-rays produced by suprathermal electrons to the bremsstrahlung at lower energies emitted by thermal plasma. Also, for the first time, images can be produced in arbitrary energy bands above 3 keV, and spectra of distinct imaged components can be obtained. I will review what we have learned from RHESSI observations about flare suprathermal electron distributions and their evolution Next, I will present computations of the energy deposited by these suprathermal electrons in individual flares and compare this with the energy contained in the hot thermal plasma. I will point out unsolved problems in deducing both suprathermal electron distributions and the energy content of the thermal plasma, and discuss possible solutions. Finally, I will present evidence that electron acceleration is associated with magnetic reconnection in the corona.

  3. Radio Nondetection of the SGR 1806–20 Giant Flare and Implications for Fast Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Patel, Chitrang

    2016-08-01

    We analyze archival data from the Parkes radio telescope, which was observing a location 35.°6 away from SGR 1806‑20 during its giant γ-ray flare of 2004 December 27. We show that no fast radio burst (FRB)-like burst counterpart was detected, and set a radio limit of 110 MJy at 1.4 GHz, including the estimated 70 dB suppression of the signal due to its location in the far sidelobe of Parkes and the predicted scattering from the interstellar medium. The upper limit for the ratio of magnetar giant flare radio to γ-ray fluence is η SGR ≲ 107 Jy ms erg‑1 cm2. Based on the nondetection of a short and prompt γ-ray counterpart of 15 FRBs in γ-ray transient monitors, we set a lower limit on the fluence ratios of FRBs to be η FRB ≳ 107–9 Jy ms erg‑1 cm2. The fluence ratio limit for SGR 1806‑20 is inconsistent with all but one of the 15 FRBs. We discuss possible variations in the magnetar-FRB emission mechanism and observational caveats that may reconcile the theory with observations.

  4. Radio Nondetection of the SGR 1806-20 Giant Flare and Implications for Fast Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Patel, Chitrang

    2016-08-01

    We analyze archival data from the Parkes radio telescope, which was observing a location 35.°6 away from SGR 1806-20 during its giant γ-ray flare of 2004 December 27. We show that no fast radio burst (FRB)-like burst counterpart was detected, and set a radio limit of 110 MJy at 1.4 GHz, including the estimated 70 dB suppression of the signal due to its location in the far sidelobe of Parkes and the predicted scattering from the interstellar medium. The upper limit for the ratio of magnetar giant flare radio to γ-ray fluence is η SGR ≲ 107 Jy ms erg-1 cm2. Based on the nondetection of a short and prompt γ-ray counterpart of 15 FRBs in γ-ray transient monitors, we set a lower limit on the fluence ratios of FRBs to be η FRB ≳ 107-9 Jy ms erg-1 cm2. The fluence ratio limit for SGR 1806-20 is inconsistent with all but one of the 15 FRBs. We discuss possible variations in the magnetar-FRB emission mechanism and observational caveats that may reconcile the theory with observations.

  5. From electron maps to acceleration models in the physics of flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massone, Anna Maria

    Electron maps reconstructed from RHESSI visibilities represent a powerful source of information for constraining models of electron acceleration in solar plasma physics during flaring events. In this talk I will describe how and to which extent electron maps can be utilized to estimate local electron spectral indices, the evolution of centroid position at different energies in the electron space and the compatibility of RHESSI observations with different theoretical models for the acceleration mechanisms.

  6. Flare-associated Fast-mode Coronal Wave Trains Discovered by SDO/AIA: Physical Properties and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Ofman, L.; Downs, C.; Cheung, C. M. M.; Broder, B.; De Pontieu, B.

    2015-12-01

    Quasi-periodic Fast Propagating wave trains (QFPs) are a new observational phenomenon discovered in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). They are fast-mode magnetosonic waves, closely related to quasi-periodic pulsations in solar flare emission ranging from radio to X-ray wavelengths. The significance of QFPs lies in their diagnostic potential, because they can provide critical clues to flare energy release and serve as new tools for coronal seismology. In this presentation, we report recent advances in observing and modeling QFPs. For example, using differential emission measure (DEM) inversion, we found clear evidence of heating and cooling cycles that are consistent with alternating compression and rarefaction expected for magnetosonic wave pulses. Moreover, recent IRIS observations of QFP source regions revealed sawtooth-like flare ribbon motions, indicative of pulsed magnetic reconnection, that are correlated with QFP excitation. More interestingly, from a survey of over 100 QFP events, we found a preferential association with eruptive flares rather than confined flares. We will discuss the implications of these results and the potential roles of QFPs in coronal heating, energy transport, and solar eruptions.

  7. OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF THE QUASI-PERIODIC FAST-PROPAGATING MAGNETOSONIC WAVES AND THE ASSOCIATED FLARE ON 2011 MAY 30

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu

    2012-07-01

    On 2011 May 30, quasi-periodic fast-propagating (QFP) magnetosonic waves accompanied by a C2.8 flare were directly imaged by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The QFP waves successively emanated from the flare kernel, they propagated along a cluster of open coronal loops with a phase speed of {approx}834 km s{sup -1} during the flare's rising phase, and the multiple arc-shaped wave trains can be fitted with a series of concentric circles. We generate the k - {omega} diagram of the Fourier power and find a straight ridge that represents the dispersion relation of the waves. Along the ridge, we find a lot of prominent nodes which represent the available frequencies of the QFP waves. On the other hand, the frequencies of the flare are also obtained by analyzing the flare light curves using the wavelet technique. The results indicate that almost all the main frequencies of the flare are consistent with those of the QFP waves. This suggests that the flare and the QFP waves were possibly excited by a common physical origin. On the other hand, a few low frequencies (e.g., 2.5 mHz (400 s) and 0.7 mHz (1428 s)) revealed by the k - {omega} diagram cannot be found in the accompanying flare. We propose that these low frequencies were possibly due to the leakage of the pressure-driven p-mode oscillations from the photosphere into the low corona, which should be a noticeable mechanism for driving the QFP waves observed in the corona.

  8. Observational Study of the Quasi-periodic Fast-propagating Magnetosonic Waves and the Associated Flare on 2011 May 30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yuandeng; Liu, Yu

    2012-07-01

    On 2011 May 30, quasi-periodic fast-propagating (QFP) magnetosonic waves accompanied by a C2.8 flare were directly imaged by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The QFP waves successively emanated from the flare kernel, they propagated along a cluster of open coronal loops with a phase speed of ~834 km s-1 during the flare's rising phase, and the multiple arc-shaped wave trains can be fitted with a series of concentric circles. We generate the k - ω diagram of the Fourier power and find a straight ridge that represents the dispersion relation of the waves. Along the ridge, we find a lot of prominent nodes which represent the available frequencies of the QFP waves. On the other hand, the frequencies of the flare are also obtained by analyzing the flare light curves using the wavelet technique. The results indicate that almost all the main frequencies of the flare are consistent with those of the QFP waves. This suggests that the flare and the QFP waves were possibly excited by a common physical origin. On the other hand, a few low frequencies (e.g., 2.5 mHz (400 s) and 0.7 mHz (1428 s)) revealed by the k - ω diagram cannot be found in the accompanying flare. We propose that these low frequencies were possibly due to the leakage of the pressure-driven p-mode oscillations from the photosphere into the low corona, which should be a noticeable mechanism for driving the QFP waves observed in the corona.

  9. Electron acceleration at slow-mode shocks in the magnetic reconnection region in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Gottfried; Aurass, Henry; Önel, Hakan; Warmuth, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    A solar flare appears as an sudden enhancement of the emission of electromagnetic radiation of the Sun covering a broad range of the spectrum from the radio up to the gamma-ray range. That indicates the generation of energetic electrons during flares, which are considered as the manifestation of magnetic reconnection in the solar corona. Spacecraft observations in the Earth's magnetosphere, as for instance by NASA's MMS mission, have shown that electrons can efficiently accelerated at the slow-mode shocks occuring in the magnetic reconnection region. This mechanism is applied to solar flares. The electrons are accelerated by the cross-shock potential at slow-mode shocks resulting in magnetic field aligned beams of energetic electrons in the downstream region. The interaction of this electron beam with the plasma leads to the excitation of whistler waves and, subsequently, to a strong heating of the electrons in the downstream region. Considering this process under coronal circumstances, enough electrons with energies >30keV are generated in the magnetic reconnection region as required for the hard X-ray radiation during solar flares as observed by NASA's RHESSI mission.

  10. Electron Densities in Solar Flare Loops, Chromospheric Evaporation Upflows, and Acceleration Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benz, Arnold O.

    1996-01-01

    We compare electron densities measured at three different locations in solar flares: (1) in Soft X-Ray (SXR) loops, determined from SXR emission measures and loop diameters from Yohkoh Soft X-Ray Telescope maps (n(sub e, sup SXR) = (0.2-2.5) x 10(exp 11)/ cu cm); (2) in chromospheric evaporation upflows, inferred from plasma frequency cutoffs of decimetric radio bursts detected with the 0.1-3 GHz spectrometer Phoenix of ETH Zuerich (n(sub e, sup upflow) = (0.3-11) x 10(exp 10)/cu cm; and (3) in acceleration sites, inferred from the plasma frequency at the separatrix between upward-accelerated (type III bursts) and downward-accelerated (reverse-drift bursts) electron beams [n(sub e, sup acc) = (0.6-10) x 10(exp 9)/cu cm]. The comparison of these density measurements, obtained from 44 flare episodes (during 14 different flares), demonstrates the compatibility of flare plasma density diagnostics with SXR and radio methods. The density in the upflowing plasma is found to be somewhat lower than in the filled loops, having ratios in a range n(sub e, sup upflow)/n(sub e, sup SXR) = 0.02-1.3, and a factor of 3.6 higher behind the upflow front. The acceleration sites are found to have a much lower density than the SXR-bright flare loops, i.e., n(sub e, sup acc)/n(sub e, sup SXR) = 0.005- 0.13, and thus must be physically displaced from the SXR-bright flare loops. The scaling law between electron time-of-flight distances l' and loop half-lengths s, l'/s = 1.4 +/- 0.3, recently established by Aschwanden et al. suggests that the centroid of the acceleration region is located above the SXR-bright flare loop, as envisioned in cusp geometries (e.g., in magnetic reconnection models).

  11. Using Models for How Energetic Electrons Heat the Atmosphere During Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Joel

    2011-01-01

    Using models for how energetic electrons heat the atmosphere during flares, we simulate the radiative-hydrodynamic response of the lower solar atmosphere to flare heating. The simulations account for much of the non-LTE, optically thick radiative transfer that occurs in the chromosphere. Our models predict an increase in white light continuum during the flare on the order of 20%, but this is highly sensitive to the electron beam flux used in the simulation. We find that a majority of the white light continuum originates in the chromosphere as a result of Balmer and Paschen recombinations, but a significant portion also forms in the photosphere which has been heated by radiative backwarming.

  12. The smallest hard X-ray flare?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Sam; Hannah, Iain; Smith, David M.; Grefenstette, Brian; Marsh, Andrew; Hudson, Hugh S.; White, Stephen M.; Chen, Bin

    2016-05-01

    We report a NuSTAR observation of a small solar flare on 2015 September 1, estimated to be on the order of a GOES class A.05 flare in brightness. This flare is fainter than any hard X-ray (HXR) flares in the existing literature, and with a peak rate of only ˜5 counts s-1 detector-1 observed by RHESSI, is effectively the smallest that can just barely be detected by the current standard (indirectly imaging) solar HXR instrumentation, though we expect that smaller flares will continue to be discovered as instrumental and observational techniques progress. The flare occurred during a solar observation by the highly sensitive NuSTAR astrophysical HXR spacecraft, which used its direct focusing optics to produce detailed flare spectra and images. The flare exhibits properties commonly observed in larger flares, including a fast rise and more gradual decay, and similar spatial dimensions to the RHESSI microflares. We will discuss the presence of non-thermal (flare-accelerated) electrons during the impulsive phase. The flare is small in emission measure, temperature, and energy, though not in physical dimensions. Its presence is an indication that flares do indeed scale down to smaller energies and retain what we customarily think of as “flarelike” properties.

  13. Furiously fast and red: sub-second optical flaring in V404 Cyg during the 2015 outburst peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, P.; Littlefair, S. P.; Hardy, L. K.; Dhillon, V. S.; Marsh, T. R.; Shaw, A. W.; Altamirano, D.; Caballero-Garcia, M. D.; Casares, J.; Casella, P.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Charles, P. A.; Dallilar, Y.; Eikenberry, S.; Fender, R. P.; Hynes, R. I.; Knigge, C.; Kuulkers, E.; Mooley, K.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; Pahari, M.; Rahoui, F.; Russell, D. M.; Hernández Santisteban, J. V.; Shahbaz, T.; Terndrup, D. M.; Tomsick, J.; Walton, D. J.

    2016-06-01

    We present observations of rapid (sub-second) optical flux variability in V404 Cyg during its 2015 June outburst. Simultaneous three-band observations with the ULTRACAM fast imager on four nights show steep power spectra dominated by slow variations on ˜100-1000 s time-scales. Near the peak of the outburst on June 26, a dramatic change occurs and additional, persistent sub-second optical flaring appears close in time to giant radio and X-ray flaring. The flares reach peak optical luminosities of ˜ few × 1036 erg s-1. Some are unresolved down to a time resolution of 24 ms. Whereas the fast flares are stronger in the red, the slow variations are bluer when brighter. The redder slopes, emitted power and characteristic time-scales of the fast flares can be explained as optically thin synchrotron emission from a compact jet arising on size scales ˜140-500 Gravitational radii (with a possible additional contribution by a thermal particle distribution). The origin of the slower variations is unclear. The optical continuum spectral slopes are strongly affected by dereddening uncertainties and contamination by strong Hα emission, but the variations of these slopes follow relatively stable loci as a function of flux. Cross-correlating the slow variations between the different bands shows asymmetries on all nights consistent with a small red skew (i.e. red lag). X-ray reprocessing and non-thermal emission could both contribute to these. These data reveal a complex mix of components over five decades in time-scale during the outburst.

  14. THE CRAB NEBULA SUPER-FLARE IN 2011 APRIL: EXTREMELY FAST PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND GAMMA-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Striani, E.; Tavani, M.; Cardillo, M; Piano, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Vittorini, V.; Trois, A.; Costa, E.; Argan, A.; De Paris, G.; Bulgarelli, A.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Weisskopf, M.; Tennant, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Caraveo, P.; Chen, A. W.

    2011-11-01

    We report on the extremely intense and fast gamma-ray flare above 100 MeV detected by AGILE from the Crab Nebula in mid-April 2011. This event is the fourth of a sequence of reported major gamma-ray flares produced by the Crab Nebula in the period 2007/mid-2011. These events are attributed to strong radiative and plasma instabilities in the inner Crab Nebula, and their properties are crucial for theoretical studies of fast and efficient particle acceleration up to 10{sup 15} eV. Here we study the very rapid flux and spectral evolution of the event that on 2011 April 16 reached the record-high peak flux of F = (26 {+-} 5) x 10{sup -6} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} with a rise-time timescale that we determine to be in the range 6-10 hr. The peak flaring gamma-ray spectrum reaches a distinct maximum near 500 MeV with no substantial emission above 1 GeV. The very rapid rise time and overall evolution of the Crab Nebula flare strongly constrain the acceleration mechanisms and challenge MHD models. We briefly discuss the theoretical implications of our observations.

  15. Diffusive transport of energetic electrons in the 2004, May 21 solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musset, Sophie; Kontar, Eduard; Vilmer, Nicole

    2016-07-01

    Solar flares are associated with efficient particle acceleration, in particular with the production of energetic electrons which are diagnosed through the X-ray and radio emissions that they produce when interacting with the solar atmosphere. Particle transport from the acceleration sites to the radiation sites remains of the challenging topic in the field of high energy solar physics and has an important impact on the interpretation of the particle emissions in the context of acceleration models. In order to address the transport of flare associated energetic electrons in the low corona, we use imaging spectroscopic observations from RHESSI of the 2004 May 21 solar flare which presents together with the usually observed HXR footpoints a well observed coronal non-thermal X-ray source. The number of X-ray emitting energetic electrons in the coronal source is compared to the number of electrons needed to produce the hard X-ray emission in the footpoints and is found twice as large. Such an excess of the number of electrons in the coronal source cannot be explained in the context of the standard model of X-ray emissions in which the dominant electron transport is collisional. In the present flare, an additional process is needed to explain how energetic electrons can be efficiently trapped in the corona. In the hypothesis of turbulent pitch-angle scattering of hard X-ray producing energetic electrons (Kontar et al, 2014), diffusive transport can indeed lead to a confinement of energetic electrons in the coronal source. Based on this assumption, we estimated for the present event the mean-free path of energetic electrons and found a value of 10^8 - 10^9 meters, much smaller than the size of the observed flaring loop itself. This implies that a diffusive transport of energetic electrons is dominant in this flare which is in good agreement with the results of a previous study based on the gyrosynchrotron emissions from the energetic electrons (Kuznetsov & Kontar, 2015).

  16. OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE OF ELECTRON-DRIVEN EVAPORATION IN TWO SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Ning, Z. J.; Zhang, Q. M.

    2015-11-01

    We have explored the relationship between hard X-ray (HXR) emissions and Doppler velocities caused by the chromospheric evaporation in two X1.6 class solar flares on 2014 September 10 and October 22, respectively. Both events display double ribbons and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph slit is fixed on one of their ribbons from the flare onset. The explosive evaporations are detected in these two flares. The coronal line of Fe xxi 1354.09 Å shows blueshifts, but the chromospheric line of C i 1354.29 Å shows redshifts during the impulsive phase. The chromospheric evaporation tends to appear at the front of the flare ribbon. Both Fe xxi and C i display their Doppler velocities with an “increase-peak-decrease” pattern that is well related to the “rising-maximum-decay” phase of HXR emissions. Such anti-correlation between HXR emissions and Fe xxi Doppler shifts and correlation with C i Doppler shifts indicate the electron-driven evaporation in these two flares.

  17. Subwavelength nanobrush target to collimate fast electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zongqing; Cao, Lihua; Cao, Leifeng; Zhou, Weimin; Wu, Yuchi; Zhu, Bin; Dong, Kegong; Zhang, Baohan; Ding, Yongkun; Gu, Yuqiu

    2011-10-01

    A subwavelength nanobrush target was proposed to collimate fast electrons in laser plasma interaction, which consists of a 5 μm copper underlay covered with a 20 μm thick layer of metallic fibers. The diameter of the individual fibers is about 200 nm and the spacing between them is about 150 nm. The experiment was hold at SILEX-I laser facility (10 J, 31 fs, 300 TW). When a subwavelength nanobrush target interacts with ultraintense laser of 7.9*1018/cm2, highly collimated fast electron beam with divergence angle nearly zero whereas the divergence of the plane target is 40 degree. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations show that the fast electrons will be accelerated and guided by strong transient electromagnetic fields created at the wall surfaces of nanobrushs. Both experiment and simulation show that the subwavelength nanobrush target can indeed generate fast electrons more efficiency and collimate them. The scheme should be useful for fast ignition and K α source research in inertial confinement fusion.

  18. Evidence of electron acceleration around the reconnection X-point in a solar flare

    SciTech Connect

    Narukage, Noriyuki; Shimojo, Masumi; Sakao, Taro

    2014-06-01

    Particle acceleration is one of the most significant features that are ubiquitous among space and cosmic plasmas. It is most prominent during flares in the case of the Sun, with which huge amounts of electromagnetic radiation and high-energy particles are expelled into the interplanetary space through acceleration of plasma particles in the corona. Though it has been well understood that energies of flares are supplied by the mechanism called magnetic reconnection based on the observations in X-rays and EUV with space telescopes, where and how in the flaring magnetic field plasmas are accelerated has remained unknown due to the low plasma density in the flaring corona. We here report the first observational identification of the energetic non-thermal electrons around the point of the ongoing magnetic reconnection (X-point), with the location of the X-point identified by soft X-ray imagery and the localized presence of non-thermal electrons identified from imaging-spectroscopic data at two microwave frequencies. Considering the existence of the reconnection outflows that carries both plasma particles and magnetic fields out from the X-point, our identified non-thermal microwave emissions around the X-point indicate that the electrons are accelerated around the reconnection X-point. Additionally, the plasma around the X-point was also thermally heated up to 10 MK. The estimated reconnection rate of this event is ∼0.017.

  19. Electron density diagnostics in the 10-100 A interval for a solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. A.; Bruner, M. E.; Acton, L. W.; Mason, H. E.

    1986-01-01

    Electron density measurements from spectral-line diagnostics are reported for a solar flare on July 13, 1982, 1627 UT. The spectrogram, covering the 10-95 A interval, contained usable lines of helium-like ions C V, N VI, O VII, and Ne IX which are formed over the temperature interval 0.7-3.5 x 10 to the 6th K. In addition, spectral-line ratios of Si IX, Fe XIV, and Ca XV were compared with new theoretical estimates of their electron density sensitivity to obtain additional electron density diagnostics. An electron density of 3 x 10 to the 10th/cu cm was obtained. The comparison of these results from helium-like and other ions gives confidence in the utility of these tools for solar coronal analysis and will lead to a fuller understanding of the phenomena observed in this flare.

  20. Accumulation of accelerated electrons in coronal loops and time delays of solar flare nonthermal emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsap, Yu. T.; Stepanov, A. V.; Kopylova, Yu. G.

    2015-12-01

    The mechanisms by which accelerated electrons accumulate in flare loops with regard to the observed time delays between peaks of prolonged (≫1 s) hard X-ray pulses with different energies are considered. The focus is on an analysis of electron pitch-angle scattering by background plasma particles and/or turbulent pulsations in extreme cases of frequent and rare collisions. It was shown that it is difficult to explain the origination of time delays in the scope of a diffusion model when the electron free path length ( l) in the corona is smaller than the flare loop length ( L). The accumulation of energetic particles in loops at l > L is related to a trap-plus-precipitation model in which the regime of weak pitch angle diffusion of trapped electrons in the loss cone predominates.

  1. Properties of solar flare electrons, deduced from hard X-ray and spatially resolved microwave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, K. A.; Hurford, G. J.; Zirin, H.; Dulk, G. A.; Dennis, B. R.; Frost, K. J.; Orwig, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    An important question concerning an understanding of impulsive solar flares is related to the energetic electrons responsible for the microwave and the hard X-ray emission. A description is presented of an investigation in which spatially resolved microwave observations of an impulsive flare and hard X-ray data from the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) are used to test the hypothesis that the two types of emission come from the same basic electron population. The considered observations are found to imply that the microwaves and hard X-rays were not produced by a common population of electrons with either a Maxwellian or single power-law energy distribution. It is suggested that the calculations should be repeated when observations of stronger events become available, for which a better determination of the X-ray spectrum is possible. The possibility is considered that microwaves and moderately hard X-rays come from spatially different regions.

  2. Energetic electrons from solar flares and associated type 3 radio bursts from metric to hectometric wave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1972-01-01

    Distinct Kev electron events as observed by satellites near the earth are, in general, associated with solar flares which are accompained by the emission of both metric and hectometric type 3 radio bursts. The positions of these flares are mainly on the western hemisphere of the sun. These results show that Kev electrons propagate under the control of the magnetic field in the interplanetary space and that, while propagating through this space, these electrons excite type 3 radio bursts from metric to hectometric wave frequencies. Emission characteristics of hectometric type 3 bursts are briefly considered in relation to the positions of associated flares.

  3. Faint Coronal Hard X-rays From Accelerated Electrons in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glesener, Lindsay Erin

    Solar flares are huge explosions on the Sun that release a tremendous amount of energy from the coronal magnetic field, up to 1033 ergs, in a short time (100--1000 seconds), with much of the energy going into accelerated electrons and ions. An efficient acceleration mechanism is needed, but the details of this mechanism remain relatively unknown. A fraction of this explosive energy reaches the Earth in the form of energetic particles, producing geomagnetic storms and posing dangers to spaceborne instruments, astronauts, and Earthbound power grids. There are thus practical reasons, as well as intellectual ones, for wishing to understand this extraordinary form of energy release. Through imaging spectroscopy of the hard X-ray (HXR) emission from solar flares, the behavior of flare-accelerated electrons can be studied. The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI ) spacecraft launched in 2002 with the goal of better understanding flare particle acceleration. Using rotation modulation collimators, RHESSI is able to cover a wide energy range (3 keV--17 MeV) with fine angular and energy resolutions. RHESSI's success in the last 10 years in investigating the relationship between energetic electrons and ions, the nature of faint sources in the corona, the energy distribution of flares, and several other topics have significantly advanced the understanding of flares. But along with the wealth of information revealed by RHESSI come some clear observational challenges. Very few, if any, RHESSI observations have come close to imaging the electron acceleration region itself. This is undoubtedly due to a lack of both sensitivity (HXRs from electron beams in the tenuous corona are faint) and dynamic range (HXR sources at chromospheric flare footpoints are much brighter and tend to obscure faint coronal sources). Greater sensitivity is also required to investigate the role that small flares in the quiet Sun could play in heating the corona. The Focusing Optics

  4. Energetic electron propagation in the decay phase of non-thermal flare emission

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jing; Yan, Yihua; Tsap, Yuri T.

    2014-06-01

    On the basis of the trap-plus-precipitation model, the peculiarities of non-thermal emission in the decay phase of solar flares have been considered. The calculation formulas for the escape rate of trapped electrons into the loss cone in terms of time profiles of hard X-ray (HXR) and microwave (MW) emission have been obtained. It has been found that the evolution of the spectral indices of non-thermal emission depend on the regimes of the pitch angle diffusion of trapped particles into the loss cone. The properties of non-thermal electrons related to the HXR and MW emission of the solar flare on 2004 November 3 are studied with Nobeyama Radioheliograph, Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters, RHESSI, and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite observations. The spectral indices of non-thermal electrons related to MW and HXR emission remained constant or decreased, while the MW escape rate as distinguished from that of the HXRs increased. This may be associated with different diffusion regimes of trapped electrons into the loss cone. New arguments in favor of an important role of the superstrong diffusion for high-energy electrons in flare coronal loops have been obtained.

  5. Electron distribution functions in solar flares from combined X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet observations

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, M.; Kontar, E. P.

    2013-12-20

    Simultaneous solar flare observations with SDO and RHESSI provide spatially resolved information about hot plasma and energetic particles in flares. RHESSI allows the properties of both hot (≳8 MK) thermal plasma and non-thermal electron distributions to be inferred, while SDO/AIA is more sensitive to lower temperatures. We present and implement a new method to reconstruct electron distribution functions from SDO/AIA data. The combined analysis of RHESSI and AIA data allows the electron distribution function to be inferred over the broad energy range from 0.1 keV up to a few tens of keV. The analysis of two well-observed flares suggests that the distributions in general agree to within a factor of three when the RHESSI values are extrapolated into the intermediate range 1-3 keV, with AIA systematically predicting lower electron fluxes. Possible instrumental and numerical effects, as well as potential physical origins for this discrepancy, are discussed. The inferred electron distribution functions in general show one or two nearly Maxwellian components at energies below ∼15 keV and a non-thermal tail above.

  6. Radio Spectroscopic Imaging of Bi-directional Electron Beam Pairs in a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Wang, Zhitao; Gary, Dale E.

    2016-05-01

    In solar flares, energetic electrons are believed to be accelerated at or near the magnetic reconnection site. They propagate outward along newly reconnected field lines usually in the form of electron beams. These beams can emit radio waves commonly known as type III radio bursts. An important feature of these bursts is that they are emitted near the local plasma frequency or its harmonic, which is only a function of the ambient plasma density. In particular, an electron beam propagating upward in the corona encounters plasma with lower and lower density, producing a radio burst with a “normal” frequency slope (whose frequency decreases in time). Similarly, a downward propagating beam produces a reverse-slope burst. Sometimes both the normal- and reverse-slope type III bursts are observed simultaneously. These type III burst with opposite slopes have been considered to be the signature of a pair of bi-directional electron beams emerging from a common acceleration site. However, previous studies had no imaging capability to locate these bursts and put them in the flare context. Here we report observations of decimetric type III burst pairs by the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) during the impulsive phase of a C5.6 flare. Using VLA’s unprecedented ultra-high-cadence spectroscopic imaging capability, we demonstrate that the type III burst pairs indeed correspond to high speed (~0.1c), bi-directional electron beams emerging from a common site in the corona where post-flare loops appeared later on. Implications of our results on magnetic reconnection and particle acceleration will be briefly discussed.

  7. Differences between electron energy distributions in both steady and flare states of Mrk 501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yaping; Yan, Dahai; Zhang, Li

    2014-08-01

    Possible electron energy distributions (EEDs) for Mrk 501 are studied through fitting multiband energy spectra in both steady and flare states with a one-zone synchrotron self-Compton model. Two kinds of the EEDs formed in different acceleration and cooling processes are assumed: a power law with an exponential cut-off (PLC) EED and a log-parabolic (LP) EED. The Markov Chain Monte Carlo method is used to estimate the model parameters in our fits. The results show that the LP model fits the spectral energy distributions better in both steady and flare states than PLC model, and the changes of model parameters from steady state to flare state can be explained reasonably. Therefore, it is concluded that the EEDs and the acceleration mechanisms in both steady and flare states would be the same for Mrk 501. Compared to Mrk 421 having different EEDs in different states, our analysis indicates that both acceleration and cooling processes are different in the jets of these two sources.

  8. Energy transport by energetic electrons released during solar flares. II - Current filamentation and plasma heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Dulk, G. A.; Pritchett, P. L.

    1988-01-01

    Two-dimensional electrostatic particle simulations are performed in order to investigate energy transport associated with the propagation of energetic electrons through a flaring flux tube. Results indicate that as the energetic electrons flow outward, a return current of ambient plasma electrons is drawn inward (to maintain quasi-neutrality) which can be spatially separate from the primary current carried by the energetic electrons. Return current electrons are shown to accumulate on either side of the acceleration region of the energetic electrons, and depletions of ambient plasma electrons develop in the return current regions. Plasma ions accelerate across the field lines to produce current closure or charge neutralization, achieving energies comparable to those of the energetic electrons.

  9. Electron acceleration in the turbulent reconnecting current sheets in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, G. P.; Huang, G. L.

    2009-07-01

    Context: We investigate the nonlinear evolution of the electron distribution in the presence of the strong inductive electric field in the reconnecting current sheets (RCS) of solar flares. Aims: We aim to study the characteristics of nonthermal electron-beam plasma instability and its influence on electron acceleration in RCS. Methods: Including the external inductive field, the one-dimensional Vlasov simulation is performed with a realistic mass ratio for the first time. Results: Our principal findings are as follows: 1) the Buneman instability can be quickly excited on the timescale of 10-7 s for the typical parameters of solar flares. After saturation, the beam-plasma instabilities are excited due to the non-Maxwellian electron distribution; 2) the final velocity of the electrons trapped by these waves is of the same order as the phase speed of the waves, while the untrapped electrons continue to be accelerated; 3) the inferred anomalous resistance of the current sheet and the energy conversion rate are basically of the same order as those previously estimated, e.g., “the analysis of Martens”. Conclusions: The Buneman instability is excited on the timescale of 10-7 s and the wave-particle resonant interaction limits the low-energy electrons to be further accelerated in RCS.

  10. Radio and hard X-ray signatures of flare accelerated electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilmer, N. R.

    2003-12-01

    While imaging and spectral radio observations in the decimetric-dekametric domain provide signatures of non-thermal electrons in the middle and upper corona, hard X-rays as well as microwaves trace flare accelerated electrons in the low corona and the chromosphere. Radio observations combined with hard X-ray observations thus allow to analyse the signature of energetic electrons in a whole range of coronal heights. We shall present here the results of multiwavelength studies primarily based on the analysis of HXR and decimetric/metric spatially resolved observations from RHESSI and the Nançay Radioheliograph. We shall outline how these combined observations provide information on the magnetic structures at different spatial scales in which energetic electrons are accelerated and injected as well as on the link between the production of energetic electrons interacting at the Sun and the injection of escaping electrons giving rise to the radio emissions at the lowest frequencies.

  11. The nature of relativistic electron intensity changes during solar flare quiet times between 1963 and 1969

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, F. B.; Cline, T. L.; Simnett, G. M.

    1971-01-01

    Time variations of the 3-12 MeV interplanetary electron intensity, observed by the Explorer-18, -28, and -33 spacecrafts, have been studied in detail. Apart from solar flare effects, there are five distinct periods when the electron intensity has undergone a series of increases, and these are strongly correlated with solar rotation. The intensity increases are separate phenomena, and are strikingly anticorrelated with increases in the low energy solar proton intensity. The electron energy spectrum during those quiet-time increases is typically represented by dJ/dE = k E/2.0 + or - 0.25 similar to the galactic electron spectrum. There are, in addition, Forbush decreases in the electron intensity frequently coincident with those in the neutron monitor. It is concluded that these characteristics all support the hypothesis of a galactic origin for the electrons observed during quiet-time increases.

  12. Energetic electrons, type III radio bursts, and impulsive solar flare X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, S.R.

    1981-08-01

    Observations of impulsive hard X-ray and type III radio bursts made during the maximum of the last solar activity cycle have been analyzed for a statistical study of the relationship between these two solar flare phenomena. Spectral measurements of 10--68 keV X-rays, which covered 7068 hr of observation time and the range 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -5/ ergs cm/sup -2/ s/sup -1/ of flux of X-rays > or approx. =20 keV, were made with the University of California (Berkeley) experiment aboard the OGO 5 satellite. The radio data consisted of copies of the original spectral records as well as tabulated data. The principle findings are: (1) about 20% of impulsive hard X-ray bursts are correlated with type III radio bursts; conversely, only approx.3% of the reported type III radio bursts are correlated with impulsive X-rays bursts; (2) the location of the associated H..cap alpha.. flare on the solar disk has little or no effect on the X-ray--type III burst correlation; (3) the magnitude of the X-ray--type III burst correlation increases systematically with the increase in the following quantities: intensity and starting frequency of the type III burst, peak energy flux and spectral hardness of the X-ray burst, and the peak nonthermal emission measure and spectral hardness of the ''instantaneous'' electron spectrum > or approx. =20 keV inside the x-ray source; (4) the observations are consistent with the electron populations responsible for both the X-ray and type III emissions being accelerated in a single acceleration process; (5) the observations suggest a flare model where the primary instability responsible for electron acceleration during the impulsive phase occurs in the corona. The exact location of this instability varies from one flare to another as well as during the impulsive phase of a single flare and determines the hardness of the accelerated electron spectrum and the characteristics of associated X-ray, EUV, optical, and radio emissions.

  13. Solar Flare Track Exposure Ages in Regolith Particles: A Calibration for Transmission Electron Microscope Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Eve L.; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2015-01-01

    Mineral grains in lunar and asteroidal regolith samples provide a unique record of their interaction with the space environment. Space weathering effects result from multiple processes including: exposure to the solar wind, which results in ion damage and implantation effects that are preserved in the rims of grains (typically the outermost 100 nm); cosmic ray and solar flare activity, which result in track formation; and impact processes that result in the accumulation of vapor-deposited elements, impact melts and adhering grains on particle surfaces. Determining the rate at which these effects accumulate in the grains during their space exposure is critical to studies of the surface evolution of airless bodies. Solar flare energetic particles (mainly Fe-group nuclei) have a penetration depth of a few millimeters and leave a trail of ionization damage in insulating materials that is readily observable by transmission electron microscope (TEM) imaging. The density of solar flare particle tracks is used to infer the length of time an object was at or near the regolith surface (i.e., its exposure age). Track measurements by TEM methods are routine, yet track production rate calibrations have only been determined using chemical etching techniques [e.g., 1, and references therein]. We used focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) sample preparation techniques combined with TEM imaging to determine the track density/exposure age relations for lunar rock 64455. The 64455 sample was used earlier by [2] to determine a track production rate by chemical etching of tracks in anorthite. Here, we show that combined FIB/TEM techniques provide a more accurate determination of a track production rate and also allow us to extend the calibration to solar flare tracks in olivine.

  14. Precision fast kickers for kiloampere electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G.J.; Chen, Y.J.; Weir, J.T.

    1999-10-06

    These kickers will be used to make fast dipoles and quadrupoles which are driven by sharp risetime pulsers to provide precision beam manipulations for high current kA electron beams. This technology will be used on the 2nd axis of the DARHT linac at LANL. It will be used to provide 4 micropulses of pulse width 20 to 120 nsec. selected from a 2 {micro}sec., 2kA, 20MeV macropulse. The fast pulsers will have amplitude modulation capability to compensate for beam-induced steering effects and other slow beam centroid motion to within the bandwidth of the kicker system. Scaling laws derived from theory will be presented along with extensive experimental data obtained on the test bed ETA-II.

  15. The passage of fast electrons through matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorini, Adam P.

    This work regards the passage of fast electrons through matter, and in particular how electrons scatter and lose energy within a solid. The basic quantum theory of these scattering processes was first considered in the early- to mid-20th century by Bohr, Bethe, Fermi, and others. This work extends our understanding of how a relativistic electron scatters off, and loses energy to, a complex many-body system. The main idea of this work is that it is now possible to calculate, from first-principles, the inelastic losses of relativistic electrons in condensed matter. We present ab initio calculations based on a real-space Green's function approach, implemented in the FEFF8 computer program[1]. Our work focuses on three topics: Relativistic stopping power and associated loss parameters, electron energy loss spectroscopy in high energy transmission electron microscopes, and the inelastic electron scattering mixed dynamic form factor. We calculate, for the first time, ab initio stopping powers and inelastic mean free paths in real materials. The stopping powers are calculated over a broad energy range, from ten eV to above ten MeV. We also present the first ab initio calculations of the "mean excitation energy". We develop a relativistic theory of inelastic electron scattering, based on ab initio calculations of dielectric response, and the generalized Lorenz gauge. Using our relativistic dielectric theory, we calculate the EELS magic angle ratio for boron nitride and for graphite. In these anisotropic materials we find large relativistic corrections to the magic angle for high energy electron microscopes. We also predict and calculate large deviations in the EELS magic angle from the relativistic vacuum predictions in the low energy-loss regime. Finally, we present calculations of mixed dynamic form factor.

  16. Behaviour of Electron Content in the Ionospheric D-Region During Solar X-Ray Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorović Drakul, M.; Čadež, V. M.; Bajčetić, J.; Popović, L. Č.; Blagojević, D.; Nina, A.

    2016-08-01

    One of the most important parameters in ionospheric plasma research, also having a wide practical application in wireless satellite telecommunications, is the total electron content (TEC) representing the columnal electron number density. The F-region with high electron density provides the biggest contribution to TEC while the relatively weakly ionized plasma of the D-region (60 km - 90 km above Earth's surface) is often considered as a negligible cause of satellite signal disturbances. However, sudden intensive ionization processes, like those induced by solar X-ray flares, can cause relative increases of electron density that are significantly larger in the D-region than in regions at higher altitudes. Therefore, one cannot exclude a priori the D-region from investigations of ionospheric influences on propagation of electromagnetic signals emitted by satellites. We discuss here this problem which has not been sufficiently treated in literature so far. The obtained results are based on data collected from the D-region monitoring by very low frequency radio waves and on vertical TEC calculations from the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signal analyses, and they show noticeable variations in the D-region's electron content (TEC_{D}) during activity of a solar X-ray flare (it rises by a factor of 136 in the considered case) when TEC_{D} contribution to TEC can reach several percent and which cannot be neglected in practical applications like global positioning procedures by satellites.

  17. Fast magnetospheric echoes of energetic electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, K.; Bernstein, W.; Kellogg, P. J.; Whalen, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    Electron beam experiments using rocketborne instrumentation have confirmed earlier observations of fast magnetospheric echoes of artificially injected energetic electrons. A total of 234 echoes have been observed in a pitch angle range from 9 to 110 deg at energies of 1.87 and 3.90 keV. Out of this number, 95 echoes could unambiguously be identified with known accelerator operations at 2-, 4-, or 8-keV energy and highest current levels resulting in the determination of transit times of typically 300 to 400 ms. In most cases, when echoes were present in both energy channels, the higher-energy electrons led the lower-energy ones by 50 to 70 ms. Adiabatic theory applied to these observations yields a reflection height of 3000 to 4000 km. An alternative interpretation is briefly examined, and its relative merit in describing the observations is evaluated. The injection process is discussed in some detail as the strong beam-plasma interaction that occurred near the electron accelerator appears to be instrumental in generating the source of heated electrons required for successful echo detection for both processes.

  18. Breaking the barrier to fast electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Demin, Soren; Hall, Elizabeth A H

    2009-09-01

    A study of the electron transfer for a non-glycosylated redox variant of GOx is reported, immobilised onto an electrode via a polyhistidine tag. The non-glycosylated variant allows the enzyme to be brought closer to the electrode, and within charge transfer distances predicted by Marcus' theory. The enzyme-electrode-hybrid shows direct very fast reversible electrochemical electron transfer, with a rate constant of approximately 350 s(-1) under anaerobic conditions. This is 2 orders of magnitude faster than the enzyme-free flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). These results are discussed in the context of the conformation of FAD in the active site of GOx. Further data, presented in the presence of oxygen, show a reduced electron transfer rate (approximately 160 s(-1)) that may be associated with the oxygen interaction with the histidines in the active site. These residues are implicated in the proton transfer mechanism and thus suggest that the presence of oxygen may have a profound effect in attenuating the direct electron transfer rate and thus moderating 'short-circuit' incidental electron transfer between proteins.

  19. Fast flexible electronics with strained silicon nanomembranes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Han; Seo, Jung-Hun; Paskiewicz, Deborah M; Zhu, Ye; Celler, George K; Voyles, Paul M; Zhou, Weidong; Lagally, Max G; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2013-01-01

    Fast flexible electronics operating at radio frequencies (>1 GHz) are more attractive than traditional flexible electronics because of their versatile capabilities, dramatic power savings when operating at reduced speed and broader spectrum of applications. Transferrable single-crystalline Si nanomembranes (SiNMs) are preferred to other materials for flexible electronics owing to their unique advantages. Further improvement of Si-based device speed implies significant technical and economic advantages. While the mobility of bulk Si can be enhanced using strain techniques, implementing these techniques into transferrable single-crystalline SiNMs has been challenging and not demonstrated. The past approach presents severe challenges to achieve effective doping and desired material topology. Here we demonstrate the combination of strained- NM-compatible doping techniques with self-sustained-strain sharing by applying a strain-sharing scheme between Si and SiGe multiple epitaxial layers, to create strained print-transferrable SiNMs. We demonstrate a new speed record of Si-based flexible electronics without using aggressively scaled critical device dimensions.

  20. Energetic electrons, Type III radio bursts, and impulsive solar flare X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of impulsive hard X-ray and type III radio bursts made during the maximum of the last solar activity cycle are analyzed. Spectral measurements of 10-68 keV X-rays were made with the University of California (Berkeley) experiment aboard the OGO 5 satellite. About 20% of impulsive hard X-ray bursts are correlated with type III radio bursts, whereas only about 3% of the reported type III radio bursts are correlated with impulsive X-ray bursts. The location of the associated H gamma flare on the solar disk has little effect on the X-ray-type III burst correlation. The magnitude of the X-ray-type III burst correlation increases systematically with an increase in the intensity and starting frequency of the radio burst, the peak energy and hardness of the X-ray burst, and the peak nonthermal emission measure and spectral hardness of the electron spectrum not less than 20 keV inside the X-ray source. Observations are consistent with the electron populations responsible for both the X-ray and type III emissions accelerated in a single acceleration process; they also suggest a flare model where the primary instability causing electron acceleration during the impulsive phase occurs in the corona.

  1. How do fast impulse CMEs related to powerful flares but unrelated to eruptive filaments appear and move?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagainova, Iu. S.; Fainshtein, V. G.

    2015-02-01

    GOES-12/SXI and SDO/AIA data were used to examine the formation and initial stage of movement for several fast pulse 'halo'-type coronal mass ejections (HCMEs) that were related to GOES M and X class flares but unrelated to solar filament eruptions. According to their formation, the HCMEs under study can be subdivided into three groups: (i) Most of the HCMEs studied resulted from broken equilibrium - presumably, due to an emerging new magnetic flux - of solitary wide loop-like emission structures identified with the future ejection observable in the 195 Å channel a few hours before the mass ejection starts moving or before the relevant flare onset; (ii) a CME can form from several individual loop-like structures or, possibly, a loop arcade; (iii) for some HCMEs, their formation starts with a group of coronal loops moving upwards as first observed in the 'hot' 131 Å channel. A few minutes later, loops start to move observable in images taken with the 'colder' 211 Å channel, still later in the 193 Å channel, and finally, in 171 Å channel images. The moving loop-like structures affect the overlying coronal areas in such a way that a frontal HCME structure forms, its brightness increasing from the 'hottest' to the 'coldest' line. Moreover, loops are observed moving sunwards, towards the CME origin, resulting in an area of lower brightness forming behind the frontal structure. All the coronal mass ejections we studied started to move before the related solar flares appeared. The kinematics of the HCME's under examination has been studied along, generally, curvilinear trajectories in the plane-of-sky. It has been concluded that two types of coronal mass ejections exist differing in their time speed profile determined by the area and magnetic configuration of the active area where the mass ejection originated. Homologous HCMEs - i.e. appearing in the same active area at different times - have the same speed profile.

  2. Magnetic structure and nonthermal electrons in the X6.9 flare on 2011 August 9

    SciTech Connect

    Hwangbo, Jung-Eun; Lee, Dae-Young; Lee, Jeongwoo; Park, Sung-Hong; Kim, Sujin; Bong, Su-Chan; Kim, Yeon-Han; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Park, Young-Deuk

    2014-12-01

    The 2011 August 9 flare is one of the largest X-ray flares of sunspot cycle 24, but spatial information is rather limited due to its position close to the western limb. This paper presents information about the location of high-energy electrons derived from hard X-ray and microwave spectra obtained with the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Korean Solar Radio Burst Locator (KSRBL), respectively. The KSRBL microwave spectrum shows significant fluxes at low frequencies, implying that the high-energy electrons reside in a coronal volume highly concentrated at strong magnetic fields, and rapidly expanding with decreasing magnetic fields. After a simple modeling of the microwave spectrum, we found that the microwave source should be located above the inner pair of magnetic poles in a large quadrupolar configuration. The time-dependent evolution of the magnetic field distribution and total nonthermal energy derived from the microwave spectra is also consistent with the standard picture of multiple magnetic reconnections recurring at a magnetic null point that forms above the magnetic quadrupoles and moves up with time.

  3. Quasi-periodic Acceleration of Electrons in the Flare on 2012 July 19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jing; Kontar, Eduard P.; Nakariakov, Valery M.; Gao, Guannan

    2016-11-01

    Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) of nonthermal emission in an M7.7 class flare on 2012 July 19 are investigated with spatially resolved observations at microwave and HXR bands and with spectral observations at decimetric, metric waves. Microwave emission at 17 GHz of two footpoints, HXR emission at 20–50 keV of the north footpoint and loop top, and type III bursts at 0.7–3 GHz show prominent in-phase oscillations at 270 s. The microwave emission of the loop leg has less pulsation but stronger emission. Through the estimation of plasma density around the loop top from EUV observations, we find that the local plasma frequency would be 1.5 GHz or even higher. Thus, type III bursts at 700 MHz originate above the loop top. Quasi-periodic acceleration or injection of energetic electrons is proposed to dominate these in-phase QPPs of nonthermal emission from footpoints, loop top, and above. In the overlying region, drifting pulsations (DPS) at 200–600 MHz oscillate at a distinct period (200 s). Its global structure drifts toward lower frequency, which is closely related to upward plasmoids observed simultaneously from EUV emission. Hence, nonthermal emission from overlying plasmoids and underlying flaring loops show different oscillating periods. Two individual systems of quasi-periodic acceleration of electrons are proposed to coincide in the bi-direction outflows from the reconnection region.

  4. Ion and relativistic electron acceleration by Alfven and whistler turbulence in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.; Ramaty, Reuven

    1987-01-01

    A model is proposed in which turbulent Alfven and whistler waves simultaneously produce the proton and electron spectra implied by the gamma-ray observations noted during the impulsive phase of the June 3, 1982 flare. The results demonstrate that protons can be accelerated to several GeV in less than about 10 sec by Alfven turbulence whose energy density is greater than a few erg/cu cm. It is also found that electrons may be accelerated to tens of MeV on similar time scales by whistler and Alfven turbulence. A lower limit on the energy density of the Alfven turbulence is obtained which is small compared to the total magnetic energy density.

  5. Evidence for beamed electrons in a limb X-ray flare observed by Hard X-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (HXIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haug, Eberhard; Elwert, Gerhard

    1986-01-01

    The limb flare of November 18, 1980, 14:51 UT, was investigated on the basis of X-ray images taken by the Hard X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (HXIS) and of X-ray spectra from the Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) aboard the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM). The impulsive burst was also recorded at microwave frequencies between 2 and 20 GHz whereas no optical flare and no radio event at frequencies below 1 GHz were reported. The flare occurred directly at the SW limb of the solar disk. Taking advantage of the spatial resolution of HXIS images, the time evolution of the X-radiation originating from relatively small source regions can be studied. Using Monte Carlo computations of the energy distribution of energetic electrons traversing the solar plasma, the bremsstrahlung spectra produced by the electrons were derived.

  6. The Formation of Kappa-Distribution Accelerated Electron Populations in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, N. H.; Kontar, E.; Emslie, G.

    2015-12-01

    Driven by recent RHESSI observations of confined loop-top hard X-ray sources in solar flares, we consider stochastic acceleration of electrons in the presence of Coulomb collisions. If electron escape from the acceleration region can be neglected, the electron distribution function is determined by a balance between diffusive acceleration and collisions. Such a scenario admits a stationary solution for the electron distribution function that takes the form of a kappa distribution. We show that the evolution toward this kappa distribution involves a "wave front" propagating forwards in velocity space, so that electrons of higher energy are accelerated later; the acceleration time scales as the power three-half of the energy. At sufficiently high energies escape from the finite-length acceleration region will eventually dominate. For such energies, the electron velocity distribution function is obtained by solving a time-dependent Fokker-Planck equation in the "leaky-box" approximation. Solutions are obtained in the limit of a small escape rate from an acceleration region that can effectively be considered a thick target.

  7. SOLAR WIND DENSITY TURBULENCE AND SOLAR FLARE ELECTRON TRANSPORT FROM THE SUN TO THE EARTH

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Hamish A. S.; Kontar, Eduard P. E-mail: eduard@astro.gla.ac.u

    2010-09-20

    Solar flare accelerated electron beams propagating away from the Sun can interact with the turbulent interplanetary media, producing plasma waves and Type III radio emission. These electron beams are detected near the Earth with a double power-law energy spectrum. We simulate electron beam propagation from the Sun to the Earth in the weak turbulent regime taking into account the self-consistent generation of plasma waves and subsequent wave interaction with density fluctuations from low-frequency MHD turbulence. The rate at which plasma waves are induced by an unstable electron beam is reduced by background density fluctuations, most acutely when fluctuations have large amplitudes or small wavelengths. This suppression of plasma waves alters the wave distribution which changes the electron beam transport. Assuming a 5/3 Kolmogorov-type power-density spectrum of fluctuations often observed near the Earth, we investigate the corresponding energy spectrum of the electron beam after it has propagated 1 AU. We find a direct correlation between the spectrum of the double power-law below the break energy and the turbulent intensity of the background plasma. For an initial spectral index of 3.5, we find a range of spectra below the break energy between 1.6 and 2.1, with higher levels of turbulence corresponding to higher spectral indices.

  8. The formation of kappa-distribution accelerated electron populations in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, Nicolas H.; Stackhouse, Duncan J.; Kontar, Eduard P.; Emslie, A. Gordon E-mail: d.stackhouse.1@research.gla.ac.uk E-mail: emslieg@wku.edu

    2014-12-01

    Driven by recent RHESSI observations of confined loop-top hard X-ray sources in solar flares, we consider stochastic acceleration of electrons in the presence of Coulomb collisions. If electron escape from the acceleration region can be neglected, the electron distribution function is determined by a balance between diffusive acceleration and collisions. Such a scenario admits a stationary solution for the electron distribution function that takes the form of a kappa distribution. We show that the evolution toward this kappa distribution involves a 'wave front' propagating forward in velocity space, so that electrons of higher energy are accelerated later; the acceleration timescales with energy according to τ{sub acc} ∼ E {sup 3/2}. At sufficiently high energies escape from the finite-length acceleration region will eventually dominate. For such energies, the electron velocity distribution function is obtained by solving a time-dependent Fokker-Planck equation in the 'leaky-box' approximation. Solutions are obtained in the limit of a small escape rate from an acceleration region that can effectively be considered a thick target.

  9. Multispectral elastic scanning lidar for industrial flare research: characterizing the electronic subsystem and application.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; Facundes da Costa, Renata; Bedoya, Andrés Esteban; Guardani, Roberto; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas; Bastidas, Álvaro Efrain; Landulfo, Eduardo

    2014-12-15

    This work deals with the analysis of the electronic subsystem of a multiwavelength elastic scanning lidar. Several calibration tests are applied to the Cubatão scanning lidar placed at the industrial area of Cubatão in the State of São Paulo (Brazil), in order to improve the knowledge of its performing itself and to design protocols for correcting lidar signal for undesirable instrumental effects. In particular, the trigger delay is assessed by means of zero-bin and bin-shift tests for analog (AN) and photo-counting (PC) signals, respectively. Dark current test is also performed to detect potential range-dependency that could affect lidar products. All tests were performed at different spatial resolutions. These instrumental corrections were applied to a case study of data acquired for characterizing the optical and microphysical properties of particles in an industrial flare. To that aim, a graphical method based on the space defined by the extinction-related Angström exponent versus its spectral curvature is used to derive the contribution of fine aerosol to extinction and the size of the fine aerosols in the industrial flare, therefore revealing features of the processes occurring inside the flame. Our study demonstrates the potential of this new technique for the study and measurement of industrial emissions. PMID:25607056

  10. Multispectral elastic scanning lidar for industrial flare research: characterizing the electronic subsystem and application.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; Facundes da Costa, Renata; Bedoya, Andrés Esteban; Guardani, Roberto; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas; Bastidas, Álvaro Efrain; Landulfo, Eduardo

    2014-12-15

    This work deals with the analysis of the electronic subsystem of a multiwavelength elastic scanning lidar. Several calibration tests are applied to the Cubatão scanning lidar placed at the industrial area of Cubatão in the State of São Paulo (Brazil), in order to improve the knowledge of its performing itself and to design protocols for correcting lidar signal for undesirable instrumental effects. In particular, the trigger delay is assessed by means of zero-bin and bin-shift tests for analog (AN) and photo-counting (PC) signals, respectively. Dark current test is also performed to detect potential range-dependency that could affect lidar products. All tests were performed at different spatial resolutions. These instrumental corrections were applied to a case study of data acquired for characterizing the optical and microphysical properties of particles in an industrial flare. To that aim, a graphical method based on the space defined by the extinction-related Angström exponent versus its spectral curvature is used to derive the contribution of fine aerosol to extinction and the size of the fine aerosols in the industrial flare, therefore revealing features of the processes occurring inside the flame. Our study demonstrates the potential of this new technique for the study and measurement of industrial emissions.

  11. Multiple-wavelength analysis of energy release during a solar flare - Thermal and nonthermal electron populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, Robert F.; Lang, Kenneth R.; Klein, Karl-Ludwig; Kerdraon, Alain; Trottet, Gerard

    1990-01-01

    Collaborative solar investigations by Tufts University and the Observatoire de Paris have resulted in simultaneous radio observations with the Very Large Array (VLA) and the Nancay Radioheliograph (NR), comparisons of this radio data with X-ray observations, and theoretical interpretations of the dominant radiation mechanisms during a weak impulsive solar flare observed on May 28, 1988. The VLA has mapped the flaring structures at time intervals of 3.3 s, showing that the preflash and flash-phase components of the impulsive emission originate in spatially separated sources. The 20.7 cm preflash source is ascribed to thermal gyroresonance emission from coronal loops with typical magnetic field strengths of up to 270 G; this emission is associated with heating and exhibits no detectable hard X-ray radiation above 30 keV. The flash-phase 20.7 cm source and the hard X-ray emission are attributed to nonthermal electrons in the coronal and chromospheric portions of a magnetic loop. The combination of imaging observations at 20.7 and 91.6 cm excludes emission from a confined hot plasma during the flash phase.

  12. An investigation of solar flares and associated solar radio bursts on ionospheric total electron content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uwamahoro, Jean

    2016-07-01

    Solar transients events such as Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and solar flares represent are the cause of various aspects of space weather and can impact the modern man made technological system. Such solar transients are often associated with solar radio bursts (SRBs), particularly of type II and III that , at ground level can be detected by the CALLISTO (Compact Astronomical Low-frequency Low-cost Instrument for Spectroscopy and Transportable Observatories) solar spectrometer. The present study aims at investigating solar flares and associated SRBs impact on the ionospheric total electron content (TEC). SRBs data used are dynamic spectra covering the 2014-2015 period and detected by the CALLISTO instrument that is installed at the university of Rwanda, Kigali. To investigate ionospheric impact, we use TEC data from IGS stations located at almost the same universal time zone, and correlate the observed TEC changes to the corresponding observed solar bursts events. Preliminary observations resulting from this study indicate a slight enhancement in TEC during the burst event days. The observed TEC enhancement on the burst day can be associated to increased UV and X-rays radiations and particle acceleration that are associated with SRBs events. This work is a contribution to more understanding of the geo-space impact of solar transients phenomena for modeling and prediction.

  13. An investigation of solar flares and associated solar radio bursts impact on ionospheric total electron content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuyizere, Sarathiel

    2016-07-01

    Solar transients events such as Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and solar flares represent the cause of various aspects of space weather and can impact the modern man made technological system. Such solar transients are often associated with solar radio bursts (SRBs), particularly of type II and III that , at ground level can be detected by the CALLISTO (Compact Astronomical Low-frequency Low-cost Instrument for Spectroscopy and Transportable Observatories) solar spectrometer. The present study aims at investigating solar flares and associated SRBs impact on the ionospheric total electron content (TEC). SRBs data used are dynamic spectra covering the 2014-2015 period and detected by the CALLISTO instrument that is installed at the university of Rwanda, Kigali. To investigate ionospheric impact, we use TEC data from IGS stations located at almost the same universal time zone, and correlate the observed TEC changes to the corresponding observed solar bursts events. Preliminary observations resulting from this study indicate a slight enhancement in TEC during the burst event days. The observed TEC enhancement on the burst day can be associated to increased UV and X-rays radiations and particle acceleration that are associated with SRBs events. This work is a contribution to more understanding of the geo-space impact of solar transients phenomena for modeling and prediction.

  14. Using Supra-Arcade Downflows as Probes of Electron Acceleration During Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Sabrina L.

    2011-01-01

    Extracting information from coronal features above flares has become more reliable with the availability of increasingly higher spatial and temporal-resolution data in recent decades. We are now able to sufficiently probe the region high above long-duration flaring active regions where reconnection is expected to be continually occurring. Flows in the supra-arcade region, first observed with Yohkoh/SXT, have been theorized to be associated with newly-reconnected outflowing loops. High resolution data appears to confirm these assertions. Assuming that these flows are indeed reconnection outflows, then the detection of those directed toward the solar surface (i.e. downflowing) should be associated with particle acceleration between the current sheet and the loop footpoints rooted in the chromosphere. RHESSI observations of highly energetic particles with respect to downflow detections could potentially constrain electron acceleration models. I will discuss measurements of these supra-arcade downflows (SADs) in relation to reconnection model parameters and present preliminary findings comparing the downflow timings with high-energy RHESSI lightcurves.

  15. Acceleration of electrons and ions by strong lower-hybrid turbulence in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spicer, D. S.; Bingham, R.; Su, J. J.; Shapiro, V. D.; Shevchenko, V.; Ma, S.; Dawson, J. M.; Mcclements, K. G.

    1994-01-01

    One of the outstanding problems in solar flare theory is how to explain the 10-20 keV and greater hard x-ray emissions by a thick target bremsstrahlung model. The model requires the acceleration mechanism to accelerate approximately 10(exp 35) electrons sec(exp -l) with comparable energies, without producing a large return current which persists for long time scales after the beam ceases to exist due to Lenz's law, thereby, producing a self-magnetic field of order a few mega-Gauss. In this paper, we investigate particle acceleration resulting from the relaxation of unstable ion ring distributions, producing strong wave activity at the lower hybrid frequency. It is shown that strong lower hybrid wave turbulence collapses in configuration space producing density cavities containing intense electrostatic lower hybrid wave activity. The collapse of these intense nonlinear wave packets saturate by particle acceleration producing energetic electron and ion tails. There are several mechanisms whereby unstable ion distributions could be formed in the solar atmosphere, including reflection at perpendicular shocks, tearing modes, and loss cone depletion. Numerical simulations of ion ring relaxation processes, obtained using a 2 1/2-D fully electromagnetic, relativistic particle in cell code are discussed. We apply the results to the problem of explaining energetic particle production in solar flares. The results show the simultaneous acceleration of both electrons and ions to very high energies: electrons are accelerated to energies in the range 10-500 keV, while ions are accelerated to energies of the order of MeVs, giving rise to x-ray emission and gamma-ray emission respectively. Our simulations also show wave generation at the electron cyclotron frequency. We suggest that these waves are the solar millisecond radio spikes. The strong turbulence collapse process leads to a highly filamented plasma producing many localized regions for particle acceleration and resulting in

  16. Soft X-ray diagnostics of electron-heated solar flare atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Peng; Emslie, A. Gordon; Mariska, John T.

    1989-01-01

    The dependence of the impulsive-phase Ca XIX w line profile on the form of the flare energy input (assumed to be due to the collisional degradation of a beam of high-energy electrons) is considered. The injected flux spectrum has the form of a power law with a low-energy 'knee', and the effects of varying the total energy flux, spectral index, and knee energy on the w line profile during the impulsive phase have been evaluated. Early in the burst, blueshifts of order 400 km/s are noted, and the peak intensity of the blueshifted component together with spatially unresolved hard X-ray burst spectra can be used to determine the beam filling factor.

  17. Relativistic Electrons Produced by Reconnecting Electric Fields in a Laser-driven Bench-top Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, J. Y.; Lin, J.; Li, Y. T.; Wang, X.; Li, Y.; Zhang, K.; Yuan, D. W.; Ping, Y. L.; Wei, H. G.; Wang, J. Q.; Su, L. N.; Li, F.; Han, B.; Liao, G. Q.; Yin, C. L.; Fang, Y.; Yuan, X.; Wang, C.; Sun, J. R.; Liang, G. Y.; Wang, F. L.; Ding, Y. K.; He, X. T.; Zhu, J. Q.; Sheng, Z. M.; Li, G.; Zhao, G.; Zhang, J.

    2016-08-01

    Laboratory experiments have been carried out to model the magnetic reconnection process in a solar flare with powerful lasers. Relativistic electrons with energy up to megaelectronvolts are detected along the magnetic separatrices bounding the reconnection outflow, which exhibit a kappa-like distribution with an effective temperature of ˜109 K. The acceleration of non-thermal electrons is found to be more efficient in the case with a guide magnetic field (a component of a magnetic field along the reconnection-induced electric field) than in the case without a guide field. Hardening of the spectrum at energies ≥500 keV is observed in both cases, which remarkably resembles the hardening of hard X-ray and γ-ray spectra observed in many solar flares. This supports a recent proposal that the hardening in the hard X-ray and γ-ray emissions of solar flares is due to a hardening of the source-electron spectrum. We also performed numerical simulations that help examine behaviors of electrons in the reconnection process with the electromagnetic field configurations occurring in the experiments. The trajectories of non-thermal electrons observed in the experiments were well duplicated in the simulations. Our numerical simulations generally reproduce the electron energy spectrum as well, except for the hardening of the electron spectrum. This suggests that other mechanisms such as shock or turbulence may play an important role in the production of the observed energetic electrons.

  18. Fast electron microscopy via compressive sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Kurt W; Anderson, Hyrum S; Wheeler, Jason W

    2014-12-09

    Various technologies described herein pertain to compressive sensing electron microscopy. A compressive sensing electron microscope includes a multi-beam generator and a detector. The multi-beam generator emits a sequence of electron patterns over time. Each of the electron patterns can include a plurality of electron beams, where the plurality of electron beams is configured to impart a spatially varying electron density on a sample. Further, the spatially varying electron density varies between each of the electron patterns in the sequence. Moreover, the detector collects signals respectively corresponding to interactions between the sample and each of the electron patterns in the sequence.

  19. On the Solution of the Continuity Equation for Precipitating Electrons in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. Gordon; Holman, Gordon D.; Litvinenko, Yuri E.

    2014-01-01

    Electrons accelerated in solar flares are injected into the surrounding plasma, where they are subjected to the influence of collisional (Coulomb) energy losses. Their evolution is modeled by a partial differential equation describing continuity of electron number. In a recent paper, Dobranskis & Zharkova claim to have found an "updated exact analytical solution" to this continuity equation. Their solution contains an additional term that drives an exponential decrease in electron density with depth, leading them to assert that the well-known solution derived by Brown, Syrovatskii & Shmeleva, and many others is invalid. We show that the solution of Dobranskis & Zharkova results from a fundamental error in the application of the method of characteristics and is hence incorrect. Further, their comparison of the "new" analytical solution with numerical solutions of the Fokker-Planck equation fails to lend support to their result.We conclude that Dobranskis & Zharkova's solution of the universally accepted and well-established continuity equation is incorrect, and that their criticism of the correct solution is unfounded. We also demonstrate the formal equivalence of the approaches of Syrovatskii & Shmeleva and Brown, with particular reference to the evolution of the electron flux and number density (both differential in energy) in a collisional thick target. We strongly urge use of these long-established, correct solutions in future works.

  20. On the solution of the continuity equation for precipitating electrons in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Emslie, A. Gordon; Holman, Gordon D.; Litvinenko, Yuri E. E-mail: gordon.d.holman@nasa.gov

    2014-09-01

    Electrons accelerated in solar flares are injected into the surrounding plasma, where they are subjected to the influence of collisional (Coulomb) energy losses. Their evolution is modeled by a partial differential equation describing continuity of electron number. In a recent paper, Dobranskis and Zharkova claim to have found an 'updated exact analytical solution' to this continuity equation. Their solution contains an additional term that drives an exponential decrease in electron density with depth, leading them to assert that the well-known solution derived by Brown, Syrovatskii and Shmeleva, and many others is invalid. We show that the solution of Dobranskis and Zharkova results from a fundamental error in the application of the method of characteristics and is hence incorrect. Further, their comparison of the 'new' analytical solution with numerical solutions of the Fokker-Planck equation fails to lend support to their result. We conclude that Dobranskis and Zharkova's solution of the universally accepted and well-established continuity equation is incorrect, and that their criticism of the correct solution is unfounded. We also demonstrate the formal equivalence of the approaches of Syrovatskii and Shmeleva and Brown, with particular reference to the evolution of the electron flux and number density (both differential in energy) in a collisional thick target. We strongly urge use of these long-established, correct solutions in future works.

  1. Impulsive phase of solar flares. 1: Characteristics of high energy electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, J.; Petrosian, V.

    1981-01-01

    The variation along a magnetic field line of the energy and pitch angle distribution of high energy electrons injected into a cold hydrogen plasma containing either an open or closed magnetic field structure was investigated. The problem is formulated as a time independent Fokker-Planck Equation for the electron number distribution as a function of the electron energy, electron pitch angle, and the structure of the global magnetic field. Simple analytic solution valid in the small pitch angle regime and for slowly varying magnetic field is presented. For the more general situation a numerical code for solving the Fokker-Planck Equation was used and it was found that the analytic expression agrees well with the numerical results to values of the pitch angle much larger than expected. For most practical applications, one many confidently use the analytic expression instead of having to resort to lengthy numerical computations. These results are useful in the study of the nonthermal models of the impulsive phase of solar flares.

  2. Electron Cyclotron Maser Emissions from Evolving Fast Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J. F.; Wu, D. J.; Chen, L.; Zhao, G. Q.; Tan, C. M.

    2016-05-01

    Fast electron beams (FEBs) are common products of solar active phenomena. Solar radio bursts are an important diagnostic tool for understanding FEBs and the solar plasma environment in which they propagate along solar magnetic fields. In particular, the evolution of the energy spectrum and velocity distribution of FEBs due to the interaction with the ambient plasma and field during propagation can significantly influence the efficiency and properties of their emissions. In this paper, we discuss the possible evolution of the energy spectrum and velocity distribution of FEBs due to energy loss processes and the pitch-angle effect caused by magnetic field inhomogeneity, and we analyze the effects of the evolution on electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) emission, which is one of the most important mechanisms for producing solar radio bursts by FEBs. Our results show that the growth rates all decrease with the energy loss factor Q, but increase with the magnetic mirror ratio σ as well as with the steepness index δ. Moreover, the evolution of FEBs can also significantly influence the fastest growing mode and the fastest growing phase angle. This leads to the change of the polarization sense of the ECM emission. In particular, our results also reveal that an FEB that undergoes different evolution processes will generate different types of ECM emission. We believe the present results to be very helpful for a more comprehensive understanding of the dynamic spectra of solar radio bursts.

  3. Electron inertia modifications to X-point reconnection in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClements, K. G.; Thyagaraja, A.; Ben Ayed, N.; Fletcher, L.

    The evolution of perturbations to a current-free magnetic X-point is studied as a paradigm for short timescale energy release in solar flares, taking into account electron inertia as well as resistivity. Electron inertia is found to have a negligible effect whenever the collisionless skin depth is less than the resistive scale length. Non-potential magnetic field energy in this resistive MHD limit initially reaches equipartition with flow energy, in accordance with ideal MHD, and is then dissipated extremely rapidly, on an Alfvénic timescale that is essentially independent of Lundquist number. In agreement with resistive MHD results obtained by previous authors [1], the magnetic field energy and kinetic energy are then observed to decay on a longer timescale and exhibit oscillatory behavior, reflecting the existence of discrete normal modes with finite real frequency. When the collisionless skin depth exceeds the resistive scale length, the field energy again decays on an Alfvénic timescale, while the kinetic energy (which is equally partitioned between ions and electrons in this case) decays on the electron collision timescale. In this regime filaments appear in the field and velocity profiles, suggesting the possibility of particle acceleration in oppositely-directed current channels and symmetrical precipitation out of the acceleration region. Both the rapid decay in field energy and the filamentation process arise from phase mixing associated with a continuous eigenmode spectrum that replaces the discrete resistive MHD spectrum [2]. Because of the Alfvénic timescale of the field decay, very modest perturbation amplitudes are sufficient for the corresponding inductive electric fields to produce hard X-ray emitting electrons on sub-second timescales. The model thus provides a framework for interpreting observations of short timescale energy release and particle acceleration in the impulsive phase of flares. This work was supported by the United Kingdom

  4. Magnetically guided fast electrons in cylindrically compressed matter.

    PubMed

    Pérez, F; Debayle, A; Honrubia, J; Koenig, M; Batani, D; Baton, S D; Beg, F N; Benedetti, C; Brambrink, E; Chawla, S; Dorchies, F; Fourment, C; Galimberti, M; Gizzi, L A; Gremillet, L; Heathcote, R; Higginson, D P; Hulin, S; Jafer, R; Koester, P; Labate, L; Lancaster, K L; MacKinnon, A J; MacPhee, A G; Nazarov, W; Nicolai, P; Pasley, J; Ramis, R; Richetta, M; Santos, J J; Sgattoni, A; Spindloe, C; Vauzour, B; Vinci, T; Volpe, L

    2011-08-01

    Fast electrons produced by a 10 ps, 160 J laser pulse through laser-compressed plastic cylinders are studied experimentally and numerically in the context of fast ignition. K(α)-emission images reveal a collimated or scattered electron beam depending on the initial density and the compression timing. A numerical transport model shows that implosion-driven electrical resistivity gradients induce strong magnetic fields able to guide the electrons. The good agreement with measured beam sizes provides the first experimental evidence for fast-electron magnetic collimation in laser-compressed matter. PMID:21902333

  5. Gas dynamics in the impulsive phase of solar flares. I. Thick-target heating by nonthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, F.; Emslie, A.G.

    1984-04-15

    In this paper we investigate numerically the gas dynamical response of the solar atmosphere to a flare energy input in the form of precipitating nonthermal electrons. The origin of these electrons is not addressed: the spectral and temporal characteristics of the injected flux are instead inferred through a thick-target model of hard X-ray bremsstrahlung production. The electrons are assumed to spiral about preexisting magnetic field lines, enabling a one-dimensional spatial treatment to be preformed. All electron energy losses are assumed to be due to Coulomb collisions with ambient particles; i.e., we neglect return-current ohmic effects and collective plasma processes. One of the main aims of the study is to contrast our results with earlier work on conductive heating of the flare atmosphere; detailed consideration of this issue will bepresented in later papers.

  6. Radio and X-ray Diagnostics of Electron Beams in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilmer, Nicole; Kontar, Eduard; Hamish; Reid, A. S.; Maksimovic, Milan

    Solar flares are associated with efficient production of energetic particles at all energies. While energetic electrons and ions interacting with the solar atmosphere produce high energy X-rays and gamma-rays, the energetic electrons escaping to the corona and interplanetary medium produce coherent radio emissions (in particular type III bursts) and may be directly detected by experiments aboard spacecraft. We shall present the results of two statistical studies combining X-ray observations from RHESSI and of type III bursts observed in the decimeter/meter range and imaged by the Nançay Radioheliograph We shall show how the combination of X-ray and radio observations allows for some events to deduce the characteristics of the electron beam acceleration sites (height and size). We shall also present the results of a recent study on the percentage of decimetric/metric type III bursts observed with Nançay which have a counterpart at lower frequencies (namely in the range 14 to 1 MHz ) observed with Wind/Waves. This study is based on a list of events for which X-ray emission (by RHESSI) is also observed in connection with the type III bursts. We shall discuss the different reasons which could explain the extent or not of the metric type III burst to the hectometric range.

  7. THE SPECIFIC ACCELERATION RATE IN LOOP-STRUCTURED SOLAR FLARES-IMPLICATIONS FOR ELECTRON ACCELERATION MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jingnan; Emslie, A. Gordon; Piana, Michele E-mail: piana@dima.unige.it

    2013-03-20

    We analyze electron flux maps based on RHESSI hard X-ray imaging spectroscopy data for a number of extended coronal-loop flare events. For each event, we determine the variation of the characteristic loop length L with electron energy E, and we fit this observed behavior with models that incorporate an extended acceleration region and an exterior 'propagation' region, and which may include collisional modification of the accelerated electron spectrum inside the acceleration region. The models are characterized by two parameters: the plasma density n in, and the longitudinal extent L{sub 0} of, the acceleration region. Determination of the best-fit values of these parameters permits inference of the volume that encompasses the acceleration region and of the total number of particles within it. It is then straightforward to compute values for the emission filling factor and for the specific acceleration rate (electrons s{sup -1} per ambient electron above a chosen reference energy). For the 24 events studied, the range of inferred filling factors is consistent with a value of unity. The inferred mean value of the specific acceleration rate above E{sub 0} = 20 keV is {approx}10{sup -2} s{sup -1}, with a 1{sigma} spread of about a half-order-of-magnitude above and below this value. We compare these values with the predictions of several models, including acceleration by large-scale, weak (sub-Dreicer) fields, by strong (super-Dreicer) electric fields in a reconnecting current sheet, and by stochastic acceleration processes.

  8. Ionisation Equilibrium for the Non-Maxwellian Electron n-Distributions in Solar Flares: Updated Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzifčáková, Elena; Dudík, Jaroslav

    2015-12-01

    We use the latest available atomic data to calculate the ionisation and recombination rates for the non-Maxwellian n-distributions, which were shown previously to provide a good fit to the enhanced intensities of dielectronic satellite lines during solar flares. The ionisation and recombination coefficients are subsequently used to derive the ionisation equilibrium. To do so, we consider odd values of n ranging from 1 to 19, i.e., from Maxwellian to strongly non-Maxwellian cases. These calculations involve all elements with proton number up to 30, i.e., H to Zn. The n-distributions modify both the ionisation and the recombination rates. The ionisation rates decrease more steeply at lower pseudo-temperatures, while the radiative recombination rate is reduced due to a lower number of low-energy electrons. The peaks of the dielectronic recombination rates become narrower. These changes are reflected in the ionisation equilibrium. Ion abundance peaks become narrower and can also be shifted, mostly towards higher temperatures. The He-like ions are an important exception, as they are formed in a larger temperature range than that for the Maxwellian distribution. The ions Si xiii - xiv used previously for the diagnostics of the n-distributions are affected only weakly, confirming the determination of n. The ionisation equilibria are available as the electronic supplementary material in a format compatible with the CHIANTI database.

  9. Bulk Energization of Electrons in Solar Flares by Alfvén Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melrose, D. B.; Wheatland, M. S.

    2014-03-01

    Bulk energization of electrons to 10 - 20 keV in solar flares is attributed to dissipation of Alfvén waves that transport energy and potential downward to an acceleration region near the chromosphere. The acceleration involves the parallel electric field that develops in the limit of inertial Alfvén waves (IAWs). A two-potential model for IAWs is used to relate the parallel potential to the cross-field potential transported by the waves. We identify a maximum parallel potential in terms of a maximum current density that corresponds to the threshold for the onset of anomalous resistivity. This maximum is of order 10 kV when the threshold is that for the Buneman instability. We argue that this restricts the cross-field potential in an Alfvén wave to about 10 kV. Effective dissipation requires a large number of up- and down-current paths associated with multiple Alfvén waves. The electron acceleration occurs in localized, transient, anomalously conducting regions (LTACRs) and is associated with the parallel electric field determined by Ohm's law with an anomalous resistivity. We introduce an idealized model in which the LTACRs are (upward-)current sheets, a few skin depths in thickness, separated by much larger regions of weaker return current. We show that this model can account semi-quantitatively for bulk energization.

  10. Proportionality law between the flare SXR intensity and the number of released solar near-relativistic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agueda, N.; Klein, K.-L.; SEPServer Consortium

    2015-05-01

    We study a set of solar near-relativistic (NR; >50 keV) electron events observed by the Wind and the ACE spacecraft near the Earth orbit. Interplanetary transport simulations are used to take into account the propagation effects from the source to the spacecraft. Inversion methods developed within the EU/FP7 SEPServer project are then used to extract, from directional intensities observed near the Earth orbit, the electron release history in the low solar corona. We compare the release time histories with context electromagnetic observations of solar eruptions, in soft X-rays, radio, hard X-rays and white light. The distribution of release profiles is bimodal. NR electrons are released during either short (<30 min) or long (>2 h) periods. Short release episodes appear to originate in solar flares, in coincidence with the timing of type III radio bursts reaching the local plasma line measured at 1 AU. The origin of long release episodes seems to be more intricate. They are associated with signatures of long acceleration processes in the low corona (long decay of the soft X-ray emission, type IV radio bursts, and time-extended microwave emission). We present a proportionality empirical law between the intensity of the SXR flare and the number of electrons released during flare-accelerated events.

  11. Flare plasma dynamics obseved with the YOHKOH Bragg crystal spectrometer. III. Spectral signatures of electron-beam-heated atmospheres.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marriska, John. T.

    1995-05-01

    Using numerical simulations of an electon-beam-heated solar flare, we investigate the observational consequences of variations in the electron beam total energy flux and the low-energy cut off value for models with both low and high initial densities. To do this we use the evolution of the physical parameters of the simulated flares to synthesize the time evolution of the spectrum in the wavelength region surrounding tha Ca xix resonance line. These spectra are then summed over a 9 s time interval to simulate typical spectra from the Yohkoh Bragg crystal spectometer and the first three moments are computed for comparison with observational results. This comparison shows that no single low or high initial density model satisfies the observed average behavior of the Ca xix resonance line. Low initial density models produce too large a blue shift velocity, while high initial density model have lines that are too narrow. Comparison of these models with the Yohkok data suggests that the key problem for models of the impulsive phase ofa solar flare is producing significant amounts of stationary hot plasma early in the flare.

  12. PROBING DYNAMICS OF ELECTRON ACCELERATION WITH RADIO AND X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY, IMAGING, AND TIMING IN THE 2002 APRIL 11 SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Nita, Gelu M.; Gary, Dale E.; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2013-05-10

    Based on detailed analysis of radio and X-ray observations of a flare on 2002 April 11 augmented by realistic three-dimensional modeling, we have identified a radio emission component produced directly at the flare acceleration region. This acceleration region radio component has distinctly different (1) spectrum, (2) light curves, (3) spatial location, and, thus, (4) physical parameters from those of the separately identified trapped or precipitating electron components. To derive evolution of physical parameters of the radio sources we apply forward fitting of the radio spectrum time sequence with the gyrosynchrotron source function with five to six free parameters. At the stage when the contribution from the acceleration region dominates the radio spectrum, the X-ray- and radio-derived electron energy spectral indices agree well with each other. During this time the maximum energy of the accelerated electron spectrum displays a monotonic increase with time from {approx}300 keV to {approx}2 MeV over roughly one minute duration indicative of an acceleration process in the form of growth of the power-law tail; the fast electron residence time in the acceleration region is about 2-4 s, which is much longer than the time of flight and so requires a strong diffusion mode there to inhibit free-streaming propagation. The acceleration region has a relatively strong magnetic field, B {approx} 120 G, and a low thermal density, n{sub e} {approx}< 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}. These acceleration region properties are consistent with a stochastic acceleration mechanism.

  13. Impulsive H-alpha diagnostics of electron-beam-heated solar flare model chromospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Richard C.; Gayley, Kenneth G.

    1987-01-01

    Time-dependent H-alpha profiles were computed for the dynamic model atmospheres of Fisher, Canfield, and McClymont (1985) simulating the effects of an intense impulsively initiated power-law beam of electrons incident on the chromosphere. The temporal response of H-alpha arises from three separate physical mechanisms, whose relative importance varies over the line profile. The fastest variations (typically less than 0.1 s for the explosive heating discussed here) arise from energy imbalance; these are apparent on chromospheric heating and cooling time scales and have their greatest amplitude at line center. Slower variations arise from ionization imbalance and are most apparent in the blue wing. The slowest variations arise from hydrodynamic effects and are related to the formation of a chromospheric condensation; these are most apparent in the red wing. These results provide a basis for the design and analysis of observations of H-alpha, in coordination with hard X-rays or microwaves, to test mechanisms of energy transport in solar flares.

  14. On the sensitivity of the goes flare classification to properties of the electron beam in the thick-target model

    SciTech Connect

    Reep, J. W.; Bradshaw, S. J.; McAteer, R. T. J. E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu

    2013-11-20

    The collisional thick-target model, wherein a large number of electrons are accelerated down a flaring loop, can be used to explain many observed properties of solar flares. In this study, we focus on the sensitivity of (GOES) flare classification to the properties of the thick-target model. Using a hydrodynamic model with RHESSI-derived electron beam parameters, we explore the effects of the beam energy flux (or total non-thermal energy), the cut-off energy, and the spectral index of the electron distribution on the soft X-rays observed by GOES. We conclude that (1) the GOES class is proportional to the non-thermal energy E {sup α} for α ≈ 1.7 in the low-energy passband (1-8 Å) and ≈1.6 in the high-energy passband (0.5-4 Å); (2) the GOES class is only weakly dependent on the spectral index in both passbands; (3) increases in the cut-off will increase the flux in the 0.5-4 Å passband but decrease the flux in the 1-8 Å passband, while decreases in the cut-off will cause a decrease in the 0.5-4 Å passband and a slight increase in the 1-8 Å passband.

  15. Investigation on Radio-Quiet and Radio-Loud Fast CMEs and Their Associated Flares During Solar Cycles 23 and 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, K.; Shanmugaraju, A.

    2015-03-01

    We present the results of a detailed analysis on the differences between radio-loud (RL) and radio-quiet (RQ) fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) ( V≥900 km s-1) observed during the period 1996 - 2012. The analysis consists of three different steps in which we examined the properties of (i) RL and RQ CMEs, (ii) accelerating (class-A) and decelerating (class-D) CMEs among RL and RQ CMEs, and (iii) associated flares. The last two steps and events from a longer period are the extensions of the earlier work on RL and RQ CMEs that mainly aimed to determine the reason for the radio-quietness of some fast CMEs. During this period, we found that 38 % of fast CMEs are RL and 62 % of fast CMEs are RQ. Moreover, fewer RQ CMEs occur around the disc centre. The average speeds of RL and RQ CMEs are 1358 km s-1 and 1092 km s-1. Around 10 % of the RQ events are halo CMEs, but ≈ 66 % of RL events are halo CMEs. The mean acceleration or deceleration value of RL-CMEs is slightly greater than that of RQ-CMEs. When we divide these events based on their acceleration behaviour into class A and class D, there are no considerable differences between classes A and D of RL-CMEs or between classes A and D of RQ CMEs, except for their initial acceleration values. But there are significant differences among their associated flare properties. According to our study here, the RQ CMEs are less energetic than RL CMEs, and they are not associated with flares as strong as those associated with RL CMEs. This confirms the previous results that RQ CMEs do not often exceed the critical Alfvén speed of 1000 km s-1 in the outer corona that is needed to produce type II radio bursts.

  16. MAPS FOR FAST ELECTRON CLOUD SIMULATIONS AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    IRISO,Y.PEGGS,S.

    2004-07-05

    Luminosity in several colliders, including RHIC, is limited by the electron cloud effect. A careful re-distribution of the bunch pattern around the azimuth of a ring can decrease the average electron density for a fixed total bunch current, allowing the luminosity to be increased. In the search for a bunch pattern that maximizes the luminosity, a fast computer simulation is a key requirement. We discuss the use of fast polynomial maps to simulate the bunch to bunch evolution of the electron density at RHIC. Such maps are empirically derived from existing conventional slow simulation codes.

  17. Statistical analysis of the dynamics of secondary electrons in the flare of a high-voltage beam-type discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Demkin, V. P.; Mel'nichuk, S. V.

    2014-09-15

    In the present work, results of investigations into the dynamics of secondary electrons with helium atoms in the presence of the reverse electric field arising in the flare of a high-voltage pulsed beam-type discharge and leading to degradation of the primary electron beam are presented. The electric field in the discharge of this type at moderate pressures can reach several hundred V/cm and leads to considerable changes in the kinetics of secondary electrons created in the process of propagation of the electron beam generated in the accelerating gap with a grid anode. Moving in the accelerating electric field toward the anode, secondary electrons create the so-called compensating current to the anode. The character of electron motion and the compensating current itself are determined by the ratio of the field strength to the concentration of atoms (E/n). The energy and angular spectra of secondary electrons are calculated by the Monte Carlo method for different ratios E/n of the electric field strength to the helium atom concentration. The motion of secondary electrons with threshold energy is studied for inelastic collisions of helium atoms and differential analysis is carried out of the collisional processes causing energy losses of electrons in helium for different E/n values. The mechanism of creation and accumulation of slow electrons as a result of inelastic collisions of secondary electrons with helium atoms and selective population of metastable states of helium atoms is considered. It is demonstrated that in a wide range of E/n values the motion of secondary electrons in the beam-type discharge flare has the character of drift. At E/n values characteristic for the discharge of the given type, the drift velocity of these electrons is calculated and compared with the available experimental data.

  18. Statistical analysis of the dynamics of secondary electrons in the flare of a high-voltage beam-type discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demkin, V. P.; Mel'nichuk, S. V.

    2014-09-01

    In the present work, results of investigations into the dynamics of secondary electrons with helium atoms in the presence of the reverse electric field arising in the flare of a high-voltage pulsed beam-type discharge and leading to degradation of the primary electron beam are presented. The electric field in the discharge of this type at moderate pressures can reach several hundred V/cm and leads to considerable changes in the kinetics of secondary electrons created in the process of propagation of the electron beam generated in the accelerating gap with a grid anode. Moving in the accelerating electric field toward the anode, secondary electrons create the so-called compensating current to the anode. The character of electron motion and the compensating current itself are determined by the ratio of the field strength to the concentration of atoms (Е/n). The energy and angular spectra of secondary electrons are calculated by the Monte Carlo method for different ratios E/n of the electric field strength to the helium atom concentration. The motion of secondary electrons with threshold energy is studied for inelastic collisions of helium atoms and differential analysis is carried out of the collisional processes causing energy losses of electrons in helium for different E/n values. The mechanism of creation and accumulation of slow electrons as a result of inelastic collisions of secondary electrons with helium atoms and selective population of metastable states of helium atoms is considered. It is demonstrated that in a wide range of E/n values the motion of secondary electrons in the beam-type discharge flare has the character of drift. At E/n values characteristic for the discharge of the given type, the drift velocity of these electrons is calculated and compared with the available experimental data.

  19. DETERMINATION OF LOW-ENERGY CUTOFFS AND TOTAL ENERGY OF NONTHERMAL ELECTRONS IN A SOLAR FLARE ON 2002 APRIL 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, Linhui; Holman, Gordon D.; Dennis, Brian R.

    2005-01-01

    The determination of the low-energy cutoff to the spectrum of accelerated electrons is decisive for the estimation of the total nonthermal energy in solar flares. Because thermal bremsstrahlung dominates the low-energy part of flare X-ray spectra, this cutoff energy is difficult to determine with spectral fitting alone. We have used anew method that combines spatial, spectral, and temporal analysis to determine the cutoff energy for the M1.2 flare observed with RHESSI on 2002 April 15. A low-energy cutoff of 24 +/- 2 keV is required to ensure that the assumed thermal emissions always dominate over nonthermal emissions at low energies (<20 keV) and that the spectral fitting results are consistent with the RHESSI light curves and images. With this cutoff energy, we obtain a total nonthermal energy in electrons of (1.6 +/- 1) x 10(exp 30) ergs that is comparable to the peak energy in the thermal plasma, estimated from RHESSI observations to be (6 +/- 0.6) x 10(exp 29) ergs assuming a filling factor of 1.

  20. MULTITHERMAL REPRESENTATION OF THE KAPPA-DISTRIBUTION OF SOLAR FLARE ELECTRONS AND APPLICATION TO SIMULTANEOUS X-RAY AND EUV OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, Marina; Motorina, Galina; Kontar, Eduard P. E-mail: eduard.kontar@glasgow.ac.uk

    2015-12-10

    Acceleration of particles and plasma heating is one of the fundamental problems in solar flare physics. An accurate determination of the spectrum of flare-energized electrons over a broad energy range is crucial for our understanding of aspects such as the acceleration mechanism and the total flare energy. Recent years have seen a growing interest in the kappa-distribution as a representation of the total spectrum of flare-accelerated electrons. In this work we present the kappa-distribution as a differential emission measure. This allows for inferring the electron distribution from X-ray observations and EUV observations by simultaneously fitting the proposed function to RHESSI and SDO/AIA data. This yields the spatially integrated electron spectra of a coronal source from less than 0.1 keV up to several tens of keV. The method is applied to a single-loop GOES C4.1 flare. The results show that the total energy can only be determined accurately by combining RHESSI and AIA observations. Simultaneously fitting the proposed representation of the kappa-distribution reduces the electron number density in the analyzed flare by a factor of ∼30 and the total flare energy by a factor of ∼5 compared with the commonly used fitting of RHESSI spectra. The spatially integrated electron spectrum of the investigated flare between 0.043 and 24 keV is consistent with the combination of a low-temperature (∼2 MK) component and a hot (∼11 MK) kappa-like component with spectral index 4, reminiscent of solar wind distributions.

  1. An upper limit on the hardness of the nonthermal electron spectra produced during the flash phase of solar flares.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, S. R.

    1971-01-01

    The observations of impulsive solar-flare X-rays above 10 keV made with OGO-5 satellite have been analyzed in order to study the variation of the nonthermal electron spectrum from one flare to another. The X-ray spectrum at the maxima of 129 impulsive X-ray bursts is represented by KE to the minus-gamma power photons per sq cm per sec per keV, and the frequency of occurrence of bursts with different values of gamma is studied. It is found that for gamma less than 4.0 the frequency of bursts rapidly decreases with the decrease in the value of gamma. The probability of occurrence of a burst with gamma less than 2.3 is extremely small.

  2. Fast electron generation and transport in a turbulent, magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Stoneking, W.R.

    1994-05-01

    The nature of fast electron generation and transport in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed field pinch (RFP) is investigated using two electron energy analyzer (EEA) probes and a thermocouple calorimeter. The parallel velocity distribution of the fast electron population is well fit by a drifted Maxwellian distribution with temperature of about 100 eV and drift velocity of about 2 {times} 10{sup 6} m/s. Cross-calibration of the EEA with the calorimeter provides a measurement of the fast electron perpendicular temperature of 30 eV, much lower than the parallel temperature, and is evidence that the kinetic dynamo mechanism (KDT) is not operative in MST. The fast electron current is found to match to the parallel current at the edge, and the fast electron density is about 4 {times} 10{sup 11} cm{sup {minus}3} independent of the ratio of the applied toroidal electric field to the critical electric field for runaways. First time measurements of magnetic fluctuation induced particle transport are reported. By correlating electron current fluctuations with radial magnetic fluctuations the transported flux of electrons is found to be negligible outside r/a{approximately}0.9, but rises the level of the expected total particle losses inside r/a{approximately}0.85. A comparison of the measured diffusion coefficient is made with the ausilinear stochastic diffusion coefficient. Evidence exists that the reduction of the transport is due to the presence of a radial ambipolar electric field of magnitude 500 V/m, that acts to equilibrate the ion and electron transport rates. The convective energy transport associated with the measured particle transport is large enough to account for the observed magnetic fluctuation induced energy transport in MST.

  3. Electron acceleration in a flare plasma via coronal circuits. (German Title: Elektronenbeschleunigung im Flareplasma modelliert mit koronalen Schaltkreisen)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Önel, Hakan

    2008-08-01

    The Sun is a star, which due to its proximity has a tremendous influence on Earth. Since its very first days mankind tried to "understand the Sun", and especially in the 20th century science has uncovered many of the Sun's secrets by using high resolution observations and describing the Sun by means of models. As an active star the Sun's activity, as expressed in its magnetic cycle, is closely related to the sunspot numbers. Flares play a special role, because they release large energies on very short time scales. They are correlated with enhanced electromagnetic emissions all over the spectrum. Furthermore, flares are sources of energetic particles. Hard X-ray observations (e.g., by NASA's RHESSI spacecraft) reveal that a large fraction of the energy released during a flare is transferred into the kinetic energy of electrons. However the mechanism that accelerates a large number of electrons to high energies (beyond 20 keV) within fractions of a second is not understood yet. The thesis at hand presents a model for the generation of energetic electrons during flares that explains the electron acceleration based on real parameters obtained by real ground and space based observations. According to this model photospheric plasma flows build up electric potentials in the active regions in the photosphere. Usually these electric potentials are associated with electric currents closed within the photosphere. However as a result of magnetic reconnection, a magnetic connection between the regions of different magnetic polarity on the photosphere can establish through the corona. Due to the significantly higher electric conductivity in the corona, the photospheric electric power supply can be closed via the corona. Subsequently a high electric current is formed, which leads to the generation of hard X-ray radiation in the dense chromosphere. The previously described idea is modelled and investigated by means of electric circuits. For this the microscopic plasma parameters

  4. Acceleration and guiding of fast electrons by a nanobrush target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zongqing; Cao, Lihua; Cao, Leifeng; Wang, Jian; Huang, Wenzhong; Jiang, Wei; He, Yingling; Wu, Yuchi; Zhu, Bin; Dong, Kegong; Ding, Yongkun; Zhang, Baohan; Gu, Yuqiu; Yu, M. Y.; He, X. T.

    2010-12-01

    Laser interaction with a nanobrush target plasma is investigated at the SILEX-I laser facility [X. F. Wei et al., J. Phys. Conf. Ser. 112, 032010 (2008)] with a laser of intensity 7.9×1018 W/cm2. Highly collimated fast electron beams with yields of more than three times higher than that from the planar target can be produced. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation confirms that a layered surface structure can increase the efficiency of laser energy absorption, and the resulting fast electrons are tightly collimated and guided by the plasma layers to a cross section of about the laser spot size.

  5. Transport inhibition of coronal energetic electrons by multiple double layers: application to solar flares and expansion of the corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, T.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M. M.

    2012-12-01

    The transport of electrons from a coronal acceleration site to the chromosphere and out to the solar wind is a key issue in understanding the dynamics of solar flares and the expansion of the hot corona. The physics of how these energetic electrons transport from the corona remains poorly understood. Using a particle-in-cell code, we recently simulated an initial system of very hot electrons in contact with cold electrons along the local magnetic field, and found that transport inhibition begins when the hot electrons start to propagate from the source region [1]. This is due to the formation of a large-amplitude, localized electrostatic electric field, in the form of a double layer (DL), which is driven by an ion/return-current-electron streaming instability. The DL provides a potential barrier that suppresses the hot electron transport into the cold electron region, and significantly reduces electron heat flux. The result can help explain the observed prolonged duration of looptop hard X-ray emission. As a continued effort, simulations of increasing sizes are performed. Larger simulations allow the system to evolve for longer time and give rise to more complex dynamics. Instead of a single DL observed in smaller simulations [1], multiple DLs are generated. A succession of many weak DLs, occurring from the corona to the Earth, was considered to make up the interplanetary potential difference in exospheric solar wind models [2]. The observation of multiple DLs in the larger simulations favors this scenario. The dynamics of multiple DLs and the associated transport regulation are being investigated, and the application to solar flares and coronal expansion will be discussed. [1] T.C. Li, J.F. Drake and M. Swisdak, ApJ, in press, 2012 [2] C. Lacombe, et. al., Ann. Geophysicae, 20, 609, 2002

  6. Electronic diffusion coefficient for fast-ion dechanneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, H.; Ohtsuki, Y. H.; Kubo, K.

    1986-12-01

    A new local electronic diffusion coefficient for fast-ion dechanneling is derived on the basis of the fundamental method. To reveal detailed effects of electron states, numerical calculations are performed with use of the Roothaan-Hartree-Fock atomic wave functions. It is found that the Lindhard's formula of the electronic diffusion coefficient, which is proportional to the local electron density, is only a simple approximation of our rigorous formula and that this ``local-density approximation'' is not always sufficient, especially for metal targets.

  7. Electronic diffusion coefficient for fast-ion dechanneling

    SciTech Connect

    Nitta, H.; Ohtsuki, Y.H.; Kubo, K.

    1986-12-01

    A new local electronic diffusion coefficient for fast-ion dechanneling is derived on the basis of the fundamental method. To reveal detailed effects of electron states, numerical calculations are performed with use of the Roothaan-Hartree-Fock atomic wave functions. It is found that the Lindhard's formula of the electronic diffusion coefficient, which is proportional to the local electron density, is only a simple approximation of our rigorous formula and that this ''local-density approximation'' is not always sufficient, especially for metal targets.

  8. VLF Remote -Sensing of the Lower Ionosphere with AWESOME Receivers: Solar Flares, Lightning-induced Electron Precipitation, Sudden Ionospheric Disturbances, Sprites, Gravity Waves and Gamma-ray Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inan, U. S.; Cohen, M.; Scherrer, P.; Scherrer, D.

    2006-11-01

    Stanford University Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio receivers have been used extensively for remote sensing of the ionosphere and the magnetosphere. Among the phenomena that can be uniquely measured via VLF receivers are radio atmospherics, whistlers, electron precipitation, solar flares, sudden ionospheric disturbances, gravity waves, sprites, and cosmic gamma-ray flares. With the use of simple square air-core magnetic loop antennas of a couple of meters in size, the sensitivity of these instruments allows the measurement of magnetic fields as low as several tens of femtoTesla per root Hz, in the frequency range of ~300 Hz to 50 kHz. This sensitivity well exceeds that required to detect any event above the ambient atmospheric noise floor, determined by the totality of lightning activity on this planet. In recent years, as cost of production, timing accuracy (due to low cost GPS cards), and data handling flexibility of the systems has improved, it has become possible to distribute many of these instruments in the form of arrays, to perform interferometric and holographic imaging of the lower ionosphere. These goals can be achieved using the newest version of the Stanford VLF receiver, known as AWESOME: Atmospheric Weather Educational System for Observation and Modeling of Electromagnetics. In the context of the IHY/UNBSS program for 2007, the AWESOME receivers can be used extensively as part of the United Nations initiative to place scientific instruments in developing countries. Drawing on the Stanford experiences from setting up arrays of VLF receivers, including an interferometer in Alaska, the Holographic Array for Ionospheric and Lightning research (HAIL) consisting of instruments at 13 different high schools in mid-western United States, a broader set of ELF/VLF receivers in Alaska, and various receivers abroad, including in France, Japan, Greece, Turkey, and India, a global network of ELF/VLF receivers offer possibilities for a wide range of scientific topics

  9. Micro focusing of fast electrons with opened cone targets

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Feng; Liu Xiaoxuan; Ding Wenjun; Du Fei; Li Yutong; Ma Jinglong; Liu Xiaolong; Chen Liming; Lu Xin; Dong Quanli; Wang Weimin; Wang Zhaohua; Wei Zhiyi; Liu Bicheng; Sheng Zhengming; Zhang Jie

    2012-01-15

    Using opened reentrant cone silicon targets, we have demonstrated the effect of micro focusing of fast electrons generated in intense laser-plasma interactions. When an intense femtosecond laser pulse is focused tightly onto one of the side walls of the cone, fast electron beam emitted along the side wall is observed. When a line focus spot, which is long enough to irradiate both of the side walls of the cone simultaneously, is used, two electron beams emitted along each side wall, respectively, are observed. The two beams should cross each other near the open tip of the cone, resulting in micro focusing. We use a two-dimensional Particle-In-Cell code to simulate the electron emission both in opened and closed cone targets. The simulation results of the opened cone targets are in agreement with the experimental observation while the results of the closed cone targets do not show the micro focusing effect.

  10. Energy degradation of fast electrons in hydrogen gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Yueming; Mccray, Richard

    1991-01-01

    An equation is derived for calculating the energy distribution of fast electrons in a partially ionized gas and a method is provided to solve for the electron degradation spectrum and the energy deposition in different forms (ionization, excitation, or heating). As an example, the energy degradation of fast electrons in a gas of pure hydrogen is calculated, considering excitations to the lowest 10 atomic levels. The Bethe approximation and the continuous slowing-down approximation are discussed and it is concluded that these approximations are accurate to the order of 20 percent for electrons with initial energy of greater than about keV. The method and results can be used to determine heating, excitations, and ionizations by high-energy photoelectrons or cosmic-ray particles in various astrophysical circumstances, such as the interstellar medium, supernova envelopes, and QSO emission-line clouds.

  11. Arbitrary amplitude fast electron-acoustic solitons in three-electron component space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbuli, L. N.; Maharaj, S. K.; Bharuthram, R.; Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S.

    2016-06-01

    We examine the characteristics of fast electron-acoustic solitons in a four-component unmagnetised plasma model consisting of cool, warm, and hot electrons, and cool ions. We retain the inertia and pressure for all the plasma species by assuming adiabatic fluid behaviour for all the species. By using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential technique, the allowable Mach number ranges for fast electron-acoustic solitary waves are explored and discussed. It is found that the cool and warm electron number densities determine the polarity switch of the fast electron-acoustic solitons which are limited by either the occurrence of fast electron-acoustic double layers or warm and hot electron number density becoming unreal. For the first time in the study of solitons, we report on the coexistence of fast electron-acoustic solitons, in addition to the regular fast electron-acoustic solitons and double layers in our multi-species plasma model. Our results are applied to the generation of broadband electrostatic noise in the dayside auroral region.

  12. Experimental investigation of fast electron diffusion during ECRH

    SciTech Connect

    Steimle, R.F.; Roberts, D.R.; Giruzzi, G.

    1995-06-07

    The spatial diffusion of fast electrons created by electron cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) is examined using electron cyclotron emissions viewed along a nearly vertical chord in the TEXT-U tokamak. Enhanced emission at frequencies downshifted from the cold cyclotron frequency is attributed to non-thermal electrons. The emission spectra during ECRH are consistent with the presence of low density suprathermal electrons. Comparison of the spectra measured during ECRH with a bounce averaged Fokker-Planck code which incorporates the effects of magnetic and/or electrostatic turbulence on the distribution function, shows that the level of magnetic fluctuations in the center of TEXT-U is between 3 and 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}. This level of magnetic fluctuation is a factor of 2 to 5 too small to explain the transport of thermal electrons (E {approximately} 1 keV) in TEXT. Thus, magnetic fluctuations are an unlikely major cause of the transport of thermal electrons in TEXT.

  13. Electronic excitations in fast ion-solid collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burgdoerfer, J. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1990-01-01

    We review recent developments in the study of electronic excitation of projectiles in fast ion-solid collisions. Our focus will be primarily on theory but experimental advances will also be discussed. Topics include the evidence for velocity-dependent thresholds for the existence of bound states, wake-field effects on excited states, the electronic excitation of channeled projectiles, transport phenomena, and the interaction of highly charged ions with surfaces. 44 refs., 14 figs.

  14. Flare Hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczak, M.; Dubieniecki, P.

    2015-12-01

    On the basis of the Solar Maximum Mission observations, Švestka ( Solar Phys. 121, 399, 1989) introduced a new class of flares, the so-called flare hybrids. When they start, they look like typical compact flares (phase 1), but later on, they look like flares with arcades of magnetic loops (phase 2). We summarize the characteristic features of flare hybrids in soft and hard X-rays as well as in the extreme ultraviolet; these features allow us to distinguish flare hybrids from other flares. In this article, additional energy release or long plasma cooling timescales are suggested as possible causes of phase 2. We estimate the frequency of flare hybrids, and study the magnetic configurations favorable for flare hybrid occurrence. Flare hybrids appear to be quite frequent, and the difference between the lengths of magnetic loops in the two interacting loop systems seem to be a crucial parameter for determining their characteristics.

  15. Fast and Reliable Evaluation of Preservice Teacher Electronic Portfolios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulzen, James; Young, Michael F.

    2007-01-01

    This study describes a rubric supporting fast and reliable assessment of preservice teacher electronic portfolios. The assessment calls for raters to quickly scan a portfolio to gain an overall impression, then dichotomously score a large number of indicators (e.g., educational philosophy, educational technology use, imaginative use of…

  16. Fast launch speeds in radio flares, from a new determination of the intrinsic motions of SS 433's jet bolides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffrey, Robert M.; Blundell, Katherine M.; Trushkin, Sergei A.; Mioduszewski, Amy J.

    2016-09-01

    We present new high-resolution, multi-epoch, Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio images of the Galactic microquasar SS 433. We are able to observe plasma knots in the milliarcsecond-scale jets more than 50 d after their launch. This unprecedented baseline in time allows us to determine the bulk launch speed of the radio-emitting plasma during a radio flare, using a new method which we present here, and which is completely independent of optical spectroscopy. We also apply this method to an earlier sequence of 39 short daily VLBA observations, which cover a period in which SS 433 moved from quiescence into a flare. In both data sets we find, for the first time at radio wavebands, clear evidence that the launch speeds of the milliarcsecond-scale jets rise as high as 0.32c during flaring episodes. By comparing these images of SS 433 with photometric radio monitoring from the RATAN-600 telescope, we explore further properties of these radio flares.

  17. A thermodynamical analysis of rf current drive with fast electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizarro, João P. S.

    2015-08-01

    The problem of rf current drive (CD) by pushing fast electrons with high-parallel-phase-velocity waves, such as lower-hybrid (LH) or electron-cyclotron (EC) waves, is revisited using the first and second laws, the former to retrieve the well-known one-dimensional (1D) steady-state CD efficiency, and the latter to calculate a lower bound for the rate of entropy production when approaching steady state. The laws of thermodynamics are written in a form that explicitly takes care of frictional dissipation and are thus applied to a population of fast electrons evolving under the influence of a dc electric field, rf waves, and collisions while in contact with a thermal, Maxwellian reservoir with a well-defined temperature. Besides the laws of macroscopic thermodynamics, there is recourse to basic elements of kinetic theory only, being assumed a residual dc electric field and a strong rf drive, capable of sustaining in the resonant region, where waves interact with electrons, a raised fast-electron tail distribution, which becomes an essentially flat plateau in the case of the 1D theory for LHCD. Within the 1D model, particularly suited for LHCD as it solely retains fast-electron dynamics in velocity space parallel to the ambient magnetic field, an H theorem for rf CD is also derived, which is written in different forms, and additional physics is recovered, such as the synergy between the dc and rf power sources, including the rf-induced hot conductivity, as well as the equation for electron-bulk heating. As much as possible 1D results are extended to 2D, to account for ECCD by also considering fast-electron velocity-space dynamics in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field, which leads to a detailed discussion on how the definition of an rf-induced conductivity may depend on whether one works at constant rf current or power. Moreover, working out the collisional dissipated power and entropy-production rate written in terms of the fast-electron distribution, it

  18. A thermodynamical analysis of rf current drive with fast electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bizarro, João P. S.

    2015-08-15

    The problem of rf current drive (CD) by pushing fast electrons with high-parallel-phase-velocity waves, such as lower-hybrid (LH) or electron-cyclotron (EC) waves, is revisited using the first and second laws, the former to retrieve the well-known one-dimensional (1D) steady-state CD efficiency, and the latter to calculate a lower bound for the rate of entropy production when approaching steady state. The laws of thermodynamics are written in a form that explicitly takes care of frictional dissipation and are thus applied to a population of fast electrons evolving under the influence of a dc electric field, rf waves, and collisions while in contact with a thermal, Maxwellian reservoir with a well-defined temperature. Besides the laws of macroscopic thermodynamics, there is recourse to basic elements of kinetic theory only, being assumed a residual dc electric field and a strong rf drive, capable of sustaining in the resonant region, where waves interact with electrons, a raised fast-electron tail distribution, which becomes an essentially flat plateau in the case of the 1D theory for LHCD. Within the 1D model, particularly suited for LHCD as it solely retains fast-electron dynamics in velocity space parallel to the ambient magnetic field, an H theorem for rf CD is also derived, which is written in different forms, and additional physics is recovered, such as the synergy between the dc and rf power sources, including the rf-induced hot conductivity, as well as the equation for electron-bulk heating. As much as possible 1D results are extended to 2D, to account for ECCD by also considering fast-electron velocity-space dynamics in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field, which leads to a detailed discussion on how the definition of an rf-induced conductivity may depend on whether one works at constant rf current or power. Moreover, working out the collisional dissipated power and entropy-production rate written in terms of the fast-electron distribution, it

  19. Energy of microwave-emitting electrons and hard x-ray/microwave source model in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nitta, N.; Kosugi, T.

    1986-01-01

    Based on the rate of increse of the microwave flux relative to the hard X-ray flux at various energies from the onset to the peak of a flare, the mean energy of microwave-emitting electrons is estimated for 22 flares observed simultaneously in hard X-rays and microwaves. The energy of electrons varying in proportion to the 17 GHz emission is found to concentrate below 100 keV, and the mean energy or eletrons emitting 70 keV x-rays is less than about 130 keV for thin-target and less than about 180 keV for thick-target emission models, suggesting that the 17 GHz emission derives from electrons with energy of less than a few hundred keV. The magnetic field strength in the microwave source is found to be 500-1000 G for the thick-target and 1000-2000 G for the thin-target case, and 16 of the 22 events examined can be successfully explained by the thick-target model. Of the six events which cannot be explained by the thick-target model, two events give L of less than about 300 km.

  20. Hot electron production and heating by hot electrons in fast ignitor research

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M.H.; Estabrook, K.; Hammel, B.

    1997-12-01

    In an experimental study of the physics of fast ignition the characteristics of the hot electron source at laser intensities up to 10(to the 20th power) Wcm{sup -2} and the heating produced at depth by hot electrons have been measured. Efficient generation of hot electrons but less than the anticipated heating have been observed.

  1. Coincidence electron/ion imaging with a fast frame camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen; Lee, Suk Kyoung; Lin, Yun Fei; Lingenfelter, Steven; Winney, Alexander; Fan, Lin

    2015-05-01

    A new time- and position- sensitive particle detection system based on a fast frame CMOS camera is developed for coincidence electron/ion imaging. The system is composed of three major components: a conventional microchannel plate (MCP)/phosphor screen electron/ion imager, a fast frame CMOS camera and a high-speed digitizer. The system collects the positional information of ions/electrons from a fast frame camera through real-time centroiding while the arrival times are obtained from the timing signal of MCPs processed by a high-speed digitizer. Multi-hit capability is achieved by correlating the intensity of electron/ion spots on each camera frame with the peak heights on the corresponding time-of-flight spectrum. Efficient computer algorithms are developed to process camera frames and digitizer traces in real-time at 1 kHz laser repetition rate. We demonstrate the capability of this system by detecting a momentum-matched co-fragments pair (methyl and iodine cations) produced from strong field dissociative double ionization of methyl iodide. We further show that a time resolution of 30 ps can be achieved when measuring electron TOF spectrum and this enables the new system to achieve a good energy resolution along the TOF axis.

  2. Fast magnetic reconnection due to anisotropic electron pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Cassak, P. A.; Baylor, R. N.; Fermo, R. L.; Beidler, M. T.; Shay, M. A.; Swisdak, M.; Drake, J. F.; Karimabadi, H.

    2015-02-15

    A new regime of fast magnetic reconnection with an out-of-plane (guide) magnetic field is reported in which the key role is played by an electron pressure anisotropy described by the Chew-Goldberger-Low gyrotropic equations of state in the generalized Ohm's law, which even dominates the Hall term. A description of the physical cause of this behavior is provided and two-dimensional fluid simulations are used to confirm the results. The electron pressure anisotropy causes the out-of-plane magnetic field to develop a quadrupole structure of opposite polarity to the Hall magnetic field and gives rise to dispersive waves. In addition to being important for understanding what causes reconnection to be fast, this mechanism should dominate in plasmas with low plasma beta and a high in-plane plasma beta with electron temperature comparable to or larger than ion temperature, so it could be relevant in the solar wind and some tokamaks.

  3. Fast magnetic reconnection due to anisotropic electron pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassak, Paul; Baylor, Robert; Fermo, Raymond; Beidler, Matthew; Shay, Michael; Swisdak, Marc; Drake, James; Karimabadi, Homa

    2015-11-01

    A new regime of fast magnetic reconnection with an out-of-plane (guide) magnetic field is reported in which the key role is played by an electron pressure anisotropy described by the Chew-Goldberger-Low gyrotropic equations of state in the generalized Ohm's law, which even dominates the Hall term. A description of the physical cause of this behavior is provided and two-dimensional fluid simulations are used to confirm the results. The electron pressure anisotropy causes the out-of-plane magnetic field to develop a quadrupole structure of opposite polarity to the Hall magnetic field and gives rise to dispersive waves. In addition to being important for understanding what causes reconnection to be fast, this mechanism should dominate in plasmas with low plasma beta and a high in-plane plasma beta with electron temperature comparable to or larger than ion temperature, so it could be relevant in the solar wind and some tokamaks.

  4. Fast magnetic reconnection due to anisotropic electron pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassak, P. A.; Baylor, R. N.; Fermo, R. L.; Beidler, M. T.; Shay, M. A.; Swisdak, M.; Drake, J. F.; Karimabadi, H.

    2015-02-01

    A new regime of fast magnetic reconnection with an out-of-plane (guide) magnetic field is reported in which the key role is played by an electron pressure anisotropy described by the Chew-Goldberger-Low gyrotropic equations of state in the generalized Ohm's law, which even dominates the Hall term. A description of the physical cause of this behavior is provided and two-dimensional fluid simulations are used to confirm the results. The electron pressure anisotropy causes the out-of-plane magnetic field to develop a quadrupole structure of opposite polarity to the Hall magnetic field and gives rise to dispersive waves. In addition to being important for understanding what causes reconnection to be fast, this mechanism should dominate in plasmas with low plasma beta and a high in-plane plasma beta with electron temperature comparable to or larger than ion temperature, so it could be relevant in the solar wind and some tokamaks.

  5. Particle kinematics in solar flares: observations and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Marina

    2008-12-01

    flare loops. In a second part, observations of so-called ``pre-flares'' are presented. This earliest phase of a flare cannot be explained by the standard flare model of chromospheric evaporation which involves energy transport and deposition in the chromosphere by beams of accelerated electrons. In pre-flares, an increase in density and emission measure is observed, indicating that chromospheric evaporation is occurring. However, no observational signatures of fast electrons are found. We show that if energy is transported by means of thermal conduction instead of an electron beam, the observations can explained.

  6. FAST VARIABILITY AND MILLIMETER/IR FLARES IN GRMHD MODELS OF Sgr A* FROM STRONG-FIELD GRAVITATIONAL LENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Chi-kwan; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Özel, Feryal; Marrone, Daniel; Medeiros, Lia; Sadowski, Aleksander; Narayan, Ramesh

    2015-10-20

    We explore the variability properties of long, high-cadence general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulations across the electromagnetic spectrum using an efficient, GPU-based radiative transfer algorithm. We focus on both standard and normal evolution (SANE) and magnetically arrested disk (MAD) simulations with parameters that successfully reproduce the time-averaged spectral properties of Sgr A* and the size of its image at 1.3 mm. We find that the SANE models produce short-timescale variability with amplitudes and power spectra that closely resemble those inferred observationally. In contrast, MAD models generate only slow variability at lower flux levels. Neither set of models shows any X-ray flares, which most likely indicates that additional physics, such as particle acceleration mechanisms, need to be incorporated into the GRMHD simulations to account for them. The SANE models show strong, short-lived millimeter/infrared (IR) flares, with short (≲1 hr) time lags between the millimeter and IR wavelengths, that arise from the combination of short-lived magnetic flux tubes and strong-field gravitational lensing near the horizon. Such events provide a natural explanation for the observed IR flares with no X-ray counterparts.

  7. Collimated fast electron beam generation in critical density plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Iwawaki, T. Habara, H.; Morita, K.; Tanaka, K. A.; Baton, S.; Fuchs, J.; Chen, S.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Rousseaux, C.; Filippi, F.; Nazarov, W.

    2014-11-15

    Significantly collimated fast electron beam with a divergence angle 10° (FWHM) is observed when an ultra-intense laser pulse (I = 10{sup 14 }W/cm{sup 2}, 300 fs) irradiates a uniform critical density plasma. The uniform plasma is created through the ionization of an ultra-low density (5 mg/c.c.) plastic foam by X-ray burst from the interaction of intense laser (I = 10{sup 14 }W/cm{sup 2}, 600 ps) with a thin Cu foil. 2D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation well reproduces the collimated electron beam with a strong magnetic field in the region of the laser pulse propagation. To understand the physical mechanism of the collimation, we calculate energetic electron motion in the magnetic field obtained from the 2D PIC simulation. As the results, the strong magnetic field (300 MG) collimates electrons with energy over a few MeV. This collimation mechanism may attract attention in many applications such as electron acceleration, electron microscope and fast ignition of laser fusion.

  8. Visualizing fast electron energy transport into laser-compressed high-density fast-ignition targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrott, L. C.; Wei, M. S.; McGuffey, C.; Solodov, A. A.; Theobald, W.; Qiao, B.; Stoeckl, C.; Betti, R.; Chen, H.; Delettrez, J.; Döppner, T.; Giraldez, E. M.; Glebov, V. Y.; Habara, H.; Iwawaki, T.; Key, M. H.; Luo, R. W.; Marshall, F. J.; McLean, H. S.; Mileham, C.; Patel, P. K.; Santos, J. J.; Sawada, H.; Stephens, R. B.; Yabuuchi, T.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-05-01

    Recent progress in kilojoule-scale high-intensity lasers has opened up new areas of research in radiography, laboratory astrophysics, high-energy-density physics, and fast-ignition (FI) laser fusion. FI requires efficient heating of pre-compressed high-density fuel by an intense relativistic electron beam produced from laser-matter interaction. Understanding the details of electron beam generation and transport is crucial for FI. Here we report on the first visualization of fast electron spatial energy deposition in a laser-compressed cone-in-shell FI target, facilitated by doping the shell with copper and imaging the K-shell radiation. Multi-scale simulations accompanying the experiments clearly show the location of fast electrons and reveal key parameters affecting energy coupling. The approach provides a more direct way to infer energy coupling and guide experimental designs that significantly improve the laser-to-core coupling to 7%. Our findings lay the groundwork for further improving efficiency, with 15% energy coupling predicted in FI experiments using an existing megajoule-scale laser driver.

  9. VLF Remote Sensing of the Lower Ionosphere: Solar Flares, Electron Precipitation, Sudden Ionospheric Disturbances, Sprites, Gravity Waves and Gamma-ray Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, J. H.; Cohen, M.; Inan, U. S.; Scherrer, P. H.; Scherrer, D.

    2005-12-01

    Stanford University Very Low Frequency (VLF) and Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) radio receivers have been used extensively for remote sensing of the ionosphere and the magnetosphere. Among the phenomena that can be uniquely measured via ELF/VLF receivers are radio atmospherics, whistlers, electron precipitation, solar flares, sudden ionospheric disturbances, gravity waves, sprites, and cosmic gamma-ray flares. With the use of simple square air-core magnetic loop antennas of a couple of meters in size, the sensitivity of these instruments allows the measurement of magnetic fields as low as several tens of femtoTesla per root-Hz, in the frequency range of ~30 Hz to 50 kHz. This sensitivity well exceeds that required to detect any event above the ambient atmospheric noise floor, determined by the totality of lightning activity on the planet. In recent years, as cost of production, timing accuracy (due to low cost GPS clocks), and data handling flexibility of the systems has improved, it has become possible to distribute many of these instruments in the form of arrays, to perform interferometric and holographic imaging of the lower ionosphere. In the context of the IHY in 2007, the ELF/VLF receiver can used extensively as part of the United Nations initiative to place scientific instruments in developing countries. Stanford University's past experiences setting up arrays of ELF/VLF receivers include an interferometer in Alaska, the Holographic Array for Ionospheric and Lightning research (HAIL) consisting of instruments at 13 different high schools in mid-western United States, a broader set of ELF/VLF receivers in Alaska, and various receivers abroad, including in France, Japan, Greece, Turkey, Ireland, and India. A global network of ELF/VLF receivers offer possibilities for a wide range of scientific topics, as well as serving as a means for educational outreach. These goals will be achieved using the newest version of the Stanford VLF receiver, known as AWESOME

  10. Behaviour of fast electron transport in solid targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, M.; Baton, S. D.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Fuchs, J.; Loupias, B.; Guillou, P.; Batani, D.; Morace, A.; Piazza, D.; Kodama, R.; Norimatsu, T.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Rousseaux, C.

    2006-06-01

    One of the main issues of the fast ignitor scheme is the role of fast electron transport in the solid fuel heating. Recent experiments used a new target scheme based on the use of cone to guide the PW laser and enhance the electron production. In this context it is fundamental to understand the physics underlying this new target scheme. We report here recent and preliminary results of ultra-intense laser pulse interaction with three layer targets in presence of the cone or without. Experiments have been performed at LULI with the 100 TW laser facility, at intensities up to 3 1019 W/cm2. Several diagnostics have been implemented (2D Kα imaging, Kα spectroscopy and rear side imaging, protons emission) to quantify the cone effect.

  11. Statistical aspects of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1987-01-01

    A survey of the statistical properties of 850 H alpha solar flares during 1975 is presented. Comparison of the results found here with those reported elsewhere for different epochs is accomplished. Distributions of rise time, decay time, and duration are given, as are the mean, mode, median, and 90th percentile values. Proportions by selected groupings are also determined. For flares in general, mean values for rise time, decay time, and duration are 5.2 + or - 0.4 min, and 18.1 + or 1.1 min, respectively. Subflares, accounting for nearly 90 percent of the flares, had mean values lower than those found for flares of H alpha importance greater than 1, and the differences are statistically significant. Likewise, flares of bright and normal relative brightness have mean values of decay time and duration that are significantly longer than those computed for faint flares, and mass-motion related flares are significantly longer than non-mass-motion related flares. Seventy-three percent of the mass-motion related flares are categorized as being a two-ribbon flare and/or being accompanied by a high-speed dark filament. Slow rise time flares (rise time greater than 5 min) have a mean value for duration that is significantly longer than that computed for fast rise time flares, and long-lived duration flares (duration greater than 18 min) have a mean value for rise time that is significantly longer than that computed for short-lived duration flares, suggesting a positive linear relationship between rise time and duration for flares. Monthly occurrence rates for flares in general and by group are found to be linearly related in a positive sense to monthly sunspot number. Statistical testing reveals the association between sunspot number and numbers of flares to be significant at the 95 percent level of confidence, and the t statistic for slope is significant at greater than 99 percent level of confidence. Dependent upon the specific fit, between 58 percent and 94 percent of

  12. Solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.

    1974-01-01

    A review of the knowledge about solar flares which has been obtained through observations from the earth and from space by various methods. High-resolution cinematography is best carried out at H-alpha wavelengths to reveal the structure, time history, and location of flares. The classification flares in H alpha according to either physical or morphological criteria is discussed. The study of flare morphology, which shows where, when, and how flares occur, is important for evaluating theories of flares. Consideration is given to studies of flares by optical spectroscopy, radio emissions, and at X-ray and XUV wavelengths. Research has shown where and possibly why flares occur, but the physics of the instability involved, of the particle acceleration, and of the heating are still not understood.

  13. Glow discharges with electrostatic confinement of fast electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, V. I.; Metel, A. S.

    2015-06-01

    This review presents a unified treatment of glow discharges with electrostatic confinement of fast electrons. These discharges include hollow cathode discharges, wire and cage discharges, reflect discharges with brush and multirod cathodes, and discharges in crossed electric and magnetic fields. Fast electrons bouncing inside electrostatic traps provide efficient ionization of gas at very low gas pressures. The electrostatic trap effect (ETE) was first observed by Paschen in hollow cathode discharges almost a century ago. The key parameters that define fundamental characteristics of ETE discharges are the ionization length λN, the penetration range, Λ, and the diffusion length λ of the fast electrons, and two universal geometric parameters of the traps: effective width a and length L. Peculiarities of electron kinetics and ion collection mechanism explain experimental observations for different trap geometries. The ETE is observed only at Λ > a, when the penetration range of the γ-electrons emitted by the cathode exceeds the trap width. In the optimal pressure range, when λN > a, and Λ < L, the cathode potential fall Uc is independent of gas pressure p. With increasing current, Uc tends to its upper limit W/eβγ, where β is the percentage of ions arriving at the cathode and W is the gas ionization cost. In the low-pressure range, Λ > L, Uc rises from hundreds to thousands of volts. The sign of the anode potential fall, Ua, depends on the anode surface Sa and its position. When Sa is large compared to a critical value S*, Ua is negative and small. At Sa < S*, the value of Ua becomes positive and rises up to 0.5-1 kV with decreasing p ultimately causing discharge extinction. Scaling laws indicate common physics between vacuum discharges and atmospheric pressure micro-discharges. We discuss peculiarities of electron kinetics under different conditions using semi-analytical models. Recent experimental results and applications of glow

  14. A FAST FLARE AND DIRECT REDSHIFT CONSTRAINT IN FAR-ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRA OF THE BLAZAR S5 0716+714

    SciTech Connect

    Danforth, Charles W.; Nalewajko, Krzysztof; France, Kevin; Keeney, Brian A.

    2013-02-10

    The BL Lacertae object S5 0716+714 is one of the most studied blazars on the sky due to its active variability and brightness in many bands, including very-high-energy gamma rays. We present here two serendipitous results from recent far-ultraviolet spectroscopic observations by the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). First, during the course of our 7.3 hr HST observations, the blazar increased in flux rapidly by {approx}40% (-0.45 mag hr{sup -1}) followed by a slower decline (+0.36 mag hr{sup -1}) to previous FUV flux levels. We model this flare using asymmetric flare templates and constrain the physical size and energetics of the emitting region. Furthermore, the spectral index of the object softens considerably during the course of the flare from {alpha}{sub {nu}} Almost-Equal-To -1.0 to {alpha}{sub {nu}} Almost-Equal-To -1.4. Second, we constrain the source redshift directly using the {approx}30 intervening absorption systems. A system at z = 0.2315 is detected in Ly{alpha}, Ly{beta}, O VI, and N V and defines the lower bound on the source redshift. No absorbers are seen in the remaining spectral coverage (0.2315 < z {sub Ly{alpha}} {approx}< 0.47) and we set a statistical upper bound of z < 0.322 (95% confidence) on the blazar. This is the first direct redshift limit for this object and is consistent with literature estimates of z = 0.31 {+-} 0.08 based on the detection of a host galaxy.

  15. Studies of electron and proton isochoric heating for fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, A; Key, M; Akli, K; Beg, F; Clarke, R; Clarke, D; Chen, M; Chung, H; Chen, S; Freeman, R; Green, J; Gu, P; Gregori, G; Highbarger, K; Habara, H; Hatchett, S; Hey, D; Heathcote, R; Hill, J; King, J; Kodama, R; Koch, J; Lancaster, K; Langdon, B; Murphy, C; Norreys, P; Neely, D; Nakatsutsumi, M; Nakamura, H; Patel, N; Patel, P; Pasley, J; Snavley, R; Stephens, R; Stoeckl, C; Foord, M; Tabak, M; Theobald, W; Storm, M; Tanaka, K; Tempo, M; Toley, M; Town, R; Wilks, S; VanWoerkom, L; Weber, R; Yabuuchi, T; Zhang, B

    2006-10-02

    Isochoric heating of inertially confined fusion plasmas by laser driven MeV electrons or protons is an area of great topical interest in the inertial confinement fusion community, particularly with respect to the fast ignition (FI) proposal to use this technique to initiate burn in a fusion capsule. Experiments designed to investigate electron isochoric heating have measured heating in two limiting cases of interest to fast ignition, small planar foils and hollow cones. Data from Cu K{alpha} fluorescence, crystal x-ray spectroscopy of Cu K shell emission, and XUV imaging at 68eV and 256 eV are used to test PIC and Hybrid PIC modeling of the interaction. Isochoric heating by focused proton beams generated at the concave inside surface of a hemi-shell and from a sub hemi-shell inside a cone have been studied with the same diagnostic methods plus imaging of proton induced K{alpha}. Conversion efficiency to protons has also been measured and modeled. Conclusions from the proton and electron heating experiments will be presented. Recent advances in modeling electron transport and innovative target designs for reducing igniter energy and increasing gain curves will also be discussed.

  16. Observational evidence for thermal wave fronts in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.; Simnett, G. M.; Smith, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    Images in 3.5-30 keV X-rays obtained during the first few minutes of seven solar flares show rapid motions. In each case X-ray emission first appeared at one end of a magnetic field structure, and then propagated along the field at a velocity between 800 and 1700 km/s. The observed X-ray structures were 45,000-230,000 km long. Simultaneous H-alpha images were available in three cases; they showed brightenings when the fast-moving fronts arrived at the chromosphere. The fast-moving fronts are interpreted as electron thermal conduction fronts since their velocities are consistent with conduction at the observed temperatures of 1-3 x 10 to the 7th K. The inferred conductive heat flux of up to 10-billion ergs/s sq cm accounts for most of the energy released in the flares, implying that the flares were primarily thermal phenomena.

  17. Study of plasma heating induced by fast electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morace, A.; Magunov, A.; Batani, D.; Redaelli, R.; Fourment, C.; Santos, J. J.; Malka, G.; Boscheron, A.; Casner, A.; Nazarov, W.; Vinci, T.; Okano, Y.; Inubushi, Y.; Nishimura, H.; Flacco, A.; Spindloe, C.; Tolley, M.

    2009-12-01

    We studied the induced plasma heating in three different kinds of targets: mass limited, foam targets, and large mass targets. The experiment was performed at Alisé Laser Facility of CEA/CESTA. The laser system emitted a ˜1 ps pulse with ˜10 J energy at a wavelength of ˜1 μm. Mass limited targets had three layers with thicknesses of 10 μm C8H8, 1 μm C8H7Cl, and 10 μm C8H8 with size of 100×100 μm2. Detailed spectroscopic analysis of x rays emitted from the Cl tracer showed that it was possible to heat up the plasma from mass limited targets to a temperature of ˜250 eV with density of ˜1021 cm-3. The plasma heating is only produced by fast electron transport in the target, being the 10 μm C8H8 overcoating thick enough to prevent any possible direct irradiation of the tracer layer even taking into account mass-ablation due to the prepulse. These results demonstrate that with mass limited targets, it is possible to generate a plasma heated up to several hundreds eV. It is also very important for research concerning high energy density phenomena and for fast ignition (in particular for the study of fast electrons transport and induced heating).

  18. Electron theory of fast and ultrafast dissipative magnetization dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fähnle, M; Illg, C

    2011-12-14

    For metallic magnets we review the experimental and electron-theoretical investigations of fast magnetization dynamics (on a timescale of ns to 100 ps) and of laser-pulse-induced ultrafast dynamics (few hundred fs). It is argued that for both situations the dominant contributions to the dissipative part of the dynamics arise from the excitation of electron-hole pairs and from the subsequent relaxation of these pairs by spin-dependent scattering processes, which transfer angular momentum to the lattice. By effective field theories (generalized breathing and bubbling Fermi-surface models) it is shown that the Gilbert equation of motion, which is often used to describe the fast dissipative magnetization dynamics, must be extended in several aspects. The basic assumptions of the Elliott-Yafet theory, which is often used to describe the ultrafast spin relaxation after laser-pulse irradiation, are discussed very critically. However, it is shown that for Ni this theory probably yields a value for the spin-relaxation time T(1) in good agreement with the experimental value. A relation between the quantity α characterizing the damping of the fast dynamics in simple situations and the time T(1) is derived. PMID:22089491

  19. Quantum-Sequencing: Fast electronic single DNA molecule sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casamada Ribot, Josep; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-03-01

    A major goal of third-generation sequencing technologies is to develop a fast, reliable, enzyme-free, high-throughput and cost-effective, single-molecule sequencing method. Here, we present the first demonstration of unique ``electronic fingerprint'' of all nucleotides (A, G, T, C), with single-molecule DNA sequencing, using Quantum-tunneling Sequencing (Q-Seq) at room temperature. We show that the electronic state of the nucleobases shift depending on the pH, with most distinct states identified at acidic pH. We also demonstrate identification of single nucleotide modifications (methylation here). Using these unique electronic fingerprints (or tunneling data), we report a partial sequence of beta lactamase (bla) gene, which encodes resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, with over 95% success rate. These results highlight the potential of Q-Seq as a robust technique for next-generation sequencing.

  20. Fast electronic resistance switching involving hidden charge density wave states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaskivskyi, I.; Mihailovic, I. A.; Brazovskii, S.; Gospodaric, J.; Mertelj, T.; Svetin, D.; Sutar, P.; Mihailovic, D.

    2016-05-01

    The functionality of computer memory elements is currently based on multi-stability, driven either by locally manipulating the density of electrons in transistors or by switching magnetic or ferroelectric order. Another possibility is switching between metallic and insulating phases by the motion of ions, but their speed is limited by slow nucleation and inhomogeneous percolative growth. Here we demonstrate fast resistance switching in a charge density wave system caused by pulsed current injection. As a charge pulse travels through the material, it converts a commensurately ordered polaronic Mott insulating state in 1T-TaS2 to a metastable electronic state with textured domain walls, accompanied with a conversion of polarons to band states, and concurrent rapid switching from an insulator to a metal. The large resistance change, high switching speed (30 ps) and ultralow energy per bit opens the way to new concepts in non-volatile memory devices manipulating all-electronic states.

  1. Fast-electron transport in cylindrically laser-compressed matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, F.; Koenig, M.; Batani, D.; Baton, S. D.; Beg, F. N.; Benedetti, C.; Brambrink, E.; Chawla, S.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Galimberti, M.; Gizzi, L. A.; Heathcote, R.; Higginson, D. P.; Hulin, S.; Jafer, R.; Koester, P.; Labate, L.; Lancaster, K.; Mac Kinnon, A. J.; McPhee, A. G.; Nazarov, W.; Nicolai, P.; Pasley, J.; Ravasio, A.; Richetta, M.; Santos, J. J.; Sgattoni, A.; Spindloe, C.; Vauzour, B.; Volpe, L.

    2009-12-01

    Experimental and theoretical results of relativistic electron transport in cylindrically compressed matter are presented. This experiment, which is a part of the HiPER roadmap, was achieved on the VULCAN laser facility (UK) using four long pulses beams (~4 × 50 J, 1 ns, at 0.53 µm) to compress a hollow plastic cylinder filled with plastic foam of three different densities (0.1, 0.3 and 1 g cm-3). 2D simulations predict a density of 2-5 g cm-3 and a plasma temperature up to 100 eV at maximum compression. A short pulse (10 ps, 160 J) beam generated fast electrons that propagate through the compressed matter by irradiating a nickel foil at an intensity of 5 × 1018 W cm-2. X-ray spectrometer and imagers were implemented in order to estimate the compressed plasma conditions and to infer the hot electron characteristics. Results are discussed and compared with simulations.

  2. Fast electronic resistance switching involving hidden charge density wave states

    PubMed Central

    Vaskivskyi, I.; Mihailovic, I. A.; Brazovskii, S.; Gospodaric, J.; Mertelj, T.; Svetin, D.; Sutar, P.; Mihailovic, D.

    2016-01-01

    The functionality of computer memory elements is currently based on multi-stability, driven either by locally manipulating the density of electrons in transistors or by switching magnetic or ferroelectric order. Another possibility is switching between metallic and insulating phases by the motion of ions, but their speed is limited by slow nucleation and inhomogeneous percolative growth. Here we demonstrate fast resistance switching in a charge density wave system caused by pulsed current injection. As a charge pulse travels through the material, it converts a commensurately ordered polaronic Mott insulating state in 1T–TaS2 to a metastable electronic state with textured domain walls, accompanied with a conversion of polarons to band states, and concurrent rapid switching from an insulator to a metal. The large resistance change, high switching speed (30 ps) and ultralow energy per bit opens the way to new concepts in non-volatile memory devices manipulating all-electronic states. PMID:27181483

  3. Structure retrieval with fast electrons using segmented detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, H. G.; D'Alfonso, A. J.; Chen, Z.; Morgan, A. J.; Weyland, M.; Zheng, C.; Fuhrer, M. S.; Findlay, S. D.; Allen, L. J.

    2016-04-01

    We introduce an algorithm for the reconstruction of the complex transmission function of a specimen using segmented detectors in scanning transmission electron microscopy geometry. The phase of the transmission function can be related to magnetic and electric fields within the specimen and is sensitive to lighter elements. The technique is demonstrated for simulated data and also using experimental datasets taken from a MoS2 monolayer and a SrTiO3 crystal. We present an extension to the algorithm to account for uncertainties in the illuminating probe. The algorithm can be implemented using fast Fourier transforms, and this provides the possibility of reconstructing specimen transmission functions in real time.

  4. Fast Transverse Instability and Electron Cloud Measurements in Fermilab Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Eldred, Jeffery; Adamson, Philip; Capista, David; Eddy, Nathan; Kourbanis, Ioanis; Morris, Denton; Thangaraj, Jayakar; Yang, Ming-Jen; Zwaska, Robert; Ji, Yichen

    2015-03-01

    A new transverse instability is observed that may limit the proton intensity in the Fermilab Recycler. The instability is fast, leading to a beam-abort loss within two hundred turns. The instability primarily affects the first high-intensity batch from the Fermilab Booster in each Recycler cycle. This paper analyzes the dynamical features of the destabilized beam. The instability excites a horizontal betatron oscillation which couples into the vertical motion and also causes transverse emittance growth. This paper describes the feasibility of electron cloud as the mechanism for this instability and presents the first measurements of the electron cloud in the Fermilab Recycler. Direct measurements of the electron cloud are made using a retarding field analyzer (RFA) newly installed in the Fermilab Recycler. Indirect measurements of the electron cloud are made by propagating a microwave carrier signal through the beampipe and analyzing the phase modulation of the signal. The maximum betatron amplitude growth and the maximum electron cloud signal occur during minimums of the bunch length oscillation.

  5. A fast tearing mode instability driven by agyrotropic electron pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinpour, M.

    2014-09-01

    The collisionless plasma environment at the current sheet of the Earth’s magnetotail is subjected to fast dynamic evolutions such as tearing instability. By considering agyrotropic pressure for electron and ion components of a collisionless plasma, we analytically investigate the dynamics of tearing mode instability, in which, breaking the frozen-in condition can either be provided by the electron inertia or by agyrotropic electron pressure. A set of linearized Hall-Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations describes the evolution of tearing mode in a sheared force-free field. The presented scaling analysis shows that if the plasma-β exceeds a specified value, then the main mechanism of magnetic reconnection process is the nongyrotropic electron pressure. In this regime, the role played by agyrotropic ion pressure inside the reconnection layer is out of significance. Therefore, the electron-MHD framework, adequately, describes the dynamics of tearing instability with a growth rate which is much faster compared to the cases with a dominated bulk inertia or a gyrotropic plasma pressure.

  6. Experimental evidence of electric inhibition in fast electron penetration and of electric-field-limited fast electron transport in dense matter

    PubMed

    Pisani; Bernardinello; Batani; Antonicci; Martinolli; Koenig; Gremillet; Amiranoff; Baton; Davies; Hall; Scott; Norreys; Djaoui; Rousseaux; Fews; Bandulet; Pepin

    2000-11-01

    Fast electron generation and propagation were studied in the interaction of a green laser with solids. The experiment, carried out with the LULI TW laser (350 fs, 15 J), used K(alpha) emission from buried fluorescent layers to measure electron transport. Results for conductors (Al) and insulators (plastic) are compared with simulations: in plastic, inhibition in the propagation of fast electrons is observed, due to electric fields which become the dominant factor in electron transport. PMID:11102017

  7. Pulsed HF radiowave absorption measurements at 2.1 MHZ. over Delhi under quiet and solar flare conditions and related electron density height profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandra Swamy, A. C.

    EXTENDED ABSTRACT Pulsed HF radiowave absorption measurements at 2.1 MHZ. over Delhi under quiet and solar flare conditions and related electron density height profiles A.C.Balachandra swmay & Late C.S.G.K. Setty Absorption of radio waves in the ionosphere is of great practical importance for radio communication and navigation systems. The first attempt to measure the absolute magnitude of the radiowave absorption were made by appletion and Ratcliffe (1930) using the frequency change method for medium frequency waves reflected from the E-region. They concluded from their experiment that the main part of the attenuation occurred below the reflection level and named the absorption region, D-region of the ionosphere. One of the basic properties of the ionosphere is the absorption of high Frequency Radiowaves. HF radiowave absorption results mainly from collisions between electrons (which are set into forced oscillations by the electric field of the wave) and neutral air particles, the RF energy abstracted from the wave being converted into thermal energy. The radiowave absorption in the ionosphere depends on electron density and collision frequency. The most important absorbing regions are the D-region and the lower E-region (50-100 Km.) The regular diurnal variation of the electron density in this height range is caused mainly by the changes in the depth of penetration of solar XUV radiations with solar zenith angle under quiet solar conditions. In 1937 Dellinger J.H.identified fade outs in high frequency radio circuits as due to abnormal ionospheric absorption associated with solar flares. The onset of the fade out was usually rapid and the duration was typically tens of minutes like that of the visible flare, because of the sudden onset, the immediate effects of solar flares are known collectively as sudden Ionospheric Disturbances (STD). The phenomenon discovered by Dellinger is usually called a short Wave Fadeout(SWF). Since the SWF is due to abnormal absorption

  8. Laser-driven ablation through fast electrons in PALS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Chodukowski, T.; Demchenko, N.; Kalinowska, Z.; Kasperczuk, A.; Krousky, E.; Pfeifer, M.; Pisarczyk, P.; Pisarczyk, T.; Renner, O.; Skala, J.; Smid, M.; Ullschmied, J.

    2016-03-01

    Energy transfer to shock wave in Al and Cu targets irradiated by a laser pulse with intensity of I≈1-50 PW/cm2 and duration of 250 ps was investigated at Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS). The iodine laser provided energy in the range of 100-600 J at the first and third harmonic frequencies. The focal spot radius of laser beam on the target was varied from 160 to 40 μm. The dominant contribution of fast electron energy transfer into the ablation process was found when using the first harmonic radiation, the focal spot radius of 40-100 μm, and the energy of 300-600 J. The fast electron heating results in the growth of ablation pressure from 60 Mbar at the intensity of 10 PW/cm2 to 180 Mbar at the intensity of 50 PW/cm2 and in the growth of the efficiency of the energy conversion into the shock wave from 2 to 7% under the conditions of 2D ablation.

  9. Isochoric heating from fast electrons using mass limited targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Michel; Baton, Sophie; Guillou, Perceval; Audebert, Patrick; Lecherbourg, Ludovic; Barbrel, Benjamin; Bastiani-Ceccotti, Serna; Rousseaux, Christophe; Gremillet, Laurent; Lefevre, Erik; Back, Christina; Patel, Pravesh; Cowan, Tom; Rassuchine, Jenny

    2008-04-01

    Experiments to investigate fast electron transport in thin, mass-limited multilayer targets were performed at the LULI 100 TW laser facility. The targets were composed of V/Cu/Al and varied from 300 to 50 μm in diameter. They were isochorically heated by a 20 J, 300 ps laser pulse that delivered I˜2x10^19 W/cm2 to form a warm dense plasma. X-ray emission from the Cu and Al layers was measured using conical and spherical Bragg crystals. Time-resolved Kα emission spectra were also obtained using an ultra-fast streak camera indicating a total refluxing of the electrons. The data from targets of different size and/or Cu layer thickness are compared and analyzed to better understand the heating of the target and temperature of the plasma. Temperatures up to several hundred eV have been deduced from detailed spectra analysis. Comparison with PIC simulations will be presented.

  10. Study of plasma heating induced by fast electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Morace, A.; Batani, D.; Redaelli, R.; Magunov, A.; Fourment, C.; Santos, J. J.; Malka, G.; Boscheron, A.; Nazarov, W.; Vinci, T.; Okano, Y.; Inubushi, Y.; Nishimura, H.; Flacco, A.; Spindloe, C.; Tolley, M.

    2009-12-15

    We studied the induced plasma heating in three different kinds of targets: mass limited, foam targets, and large mass targets. The experiment was performed at Alise Laser Facility of CEA/CESTA. The laser system emitted a approx1 ps pulse with approx10 J energy at a wavelength of approx1 {mu}m. Mass limited targets had three layers with thicknesses of 10 {mu}m C{sub 8}H{sub 8}, 1 {mu}m C{sub 8}H{sub 7}Cl, and 10 {mu}m C{sub 8}H{sub 8} with size of 100x100 {mu}m{sup 2}. Detailed spectroscopic analysis of x rays emitted from the Cl tracer showed that it was possible to heat up the plasma from mass limited targets to a temperature of approx250 eV with density of approx10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}. The plasma heating is only produced by fast electron transport in the target, being the 10 {mu}m C{sub 8}H{sub 8} overcoating thick enough to prevent any possible direct irradiation of the tracer layer even taking into account mass-ablation due to the prepulse. These results demonstrate that with mass limited targets, it is possible to generate a plasma heated up to several hundreds eV. It is also very important for research concerning high energy density phenomena and for fast ignition (in particular for the study of fast electrons transport and induced heating).

  11. Effect of fast drifting electrons on electron temperature measurement with a triple Langmuir probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Subir; Chowdhury, Satyajit; Palivela, Yaswanth; Pal, Rabindranath

    2015-08-01

    Triple Langmuir Probe (TLP) is a widely used diagnostics for instantaneous measurement of electron temperature and density in low temperature laboratory plasmas as well as in edge region of fusion plasma devices. Presence of a moderately energetic flowing electron component, constituting only a small fraction of the bulk electrons, is also a generally observed scenario in plasma devices, where plasmas are produced by electron impact ionization of neutrals. A theoretical analysis of its effect on interpretation of the TLP data for bulk electron temperature measurement is presented here assuming electron velocity distribution is not deviating substantially from a Maxwellian. The study predicts conventional expression from standard TLP theory to give overestimated value of bulk electron temperature. Correction factor is significant and largely depends on population density, temperature, and energy of the fast component. Experimental verification of theoretical results is obtained in the magnetized plasma linear experimental device of Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics where plasma is produced by an electron cyclotron resonance method and known to have a fast flowing electron component.

  12. Effect of fast drifting electrons on electron temperature measurement with a triple Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Subir Chowdhury, Satyajit; Pal, Rabindranath

    2015-08-14

    Triple Langmuir Probe (TLP) is a widely used diagnostics for instantaneous measurement of electron temperature and density in low temperature laboratory plasmas as well as in edge region of fusion plasma devices. Presence of a moderately energetic flowing electron component, constituting only a small fraction of the bulk electrons, is also a generally observed scenario in plasma devices, where plasmas are produced by electron impact ionization of neutrals. A theoretical analysis of its effect on interpretation of the TLP data for bulk electron temperature measurement is presented here assuming electron velocity distribution is not deviating substantially from a Maxwellian. The study predicts conventional expression from standard TLP theory to give overestimated value of bulk electron temperature. Correction factor is significant and largely depends on population density, temperature, and energy of the fast component. Experimental verification of theoretical results is obtained in the magnetized plasma linear experimental device of Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics where plasma is produced by an electron cyclotron resonance method and known to have a fast flowing electron component.

  13. High-energy gamma-ray emission from solar flares: Summary of Fermi large area telescope detections and analysis of two M-class flares

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Bottacini, E.; Buehler, R.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; and others

    2014-05-20

    We present the detections of 18 solar flares detected in high-energy γ-rays (above 100 MeV) with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during its first 4 yr of operation. This work suggests that particle acceleration up to very high energies in solar flares is more common than previously thought, occurring even in modest flares, and for longer durations. Interestingly, all these flares are associated with fairly fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We then describe the detailed temporal, spatial, and spectral characteristics of the first two long-lasting events: the 2011 March 7 flare, a moderate (M3.7) impulsive flare followed by slowly varying γ-ray emission over 13 hr, and the 2011 June 7 M2.5 flare, which was followed by γ-ray emission lasting for 2 hr. We compare the Fermi LAT data with X-ray and proton data measurements from GOES and RHESSI. We argue that the γ-rays are more likely produced through pion decay than electron bremsstrahlung, and we find that the energy spectrum of the proton distribution softens during the extended emission of the 2011 March 7 flare. This would disfavor a trapping scenario for particles accelerated during the impulsive phase of the flare and point to a continuous acceleration process at play for the duration of the flares. CME shocks are known for accelerating the solar energetic particles (SEPs) observed in situ on similar timescales, but it might be challenging to explain the production of γ-rays at the surface of the Sun while the CME is halfway to the Earth. A stochastic turbulence acceleration process occurring in the solar corona is another likely scenario. Detailed comparison of characteristics of SEPs and γ-ray-emitting particles for several flares will be helpful to distinguish between these two possibilities.

  14. Fast electronic structure methods for strongly correlated molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head-Gordon, Martin; Beran, Gregory J. O.; Sodt, Alex; Jung, Yousung

    2005-01-01

    A short review is given of newly developed fast electronic structure methods that are designed to treat molecular systems with strong electron correlations, such as diradicaloid molecules, for which standard electronic structure methods such as density functional theory are inadequate. These new local correlation methods are based on coupled cluster theory within a perfect pairing active space, containing either a linear or quadratic number of pair correlation amplitudes, to yield the perfect pairing (PP) and imperfect pairing (IP) models. This reduces the scaling of the coupled cluster iterations to no worse than cubic, relative to the sixth power dependence of the usual (untruncated) coupled cluster doubles model. A second order perturbation correction, PP(2), to treat the neglected (weaker) correlations is formulated for the PP model. To ensure minimal prefactors, in addition to favorable size-scaling, highly efficient implementations of PP, IP and PP(2) have been completed, using auxiliary basis expansions. This yields speedups of almost an order of magnitude over the best alternatives using 4-center 2-electron integrals. A short discussion of the scope of accessible chemical applications is given.

  15. Heating a plasma by a broadband stream of fast electrons: Fast ignition, shock ignition, and Gbar shock wave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gus’kov, S. Yu.; Nicolai, Ph.; Ribeyre, X.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2015-09-15

    An exact analytic solution is found for the steady-state distribution function of fast electrons with an arbitrary initial spectrum irradiating a planar low-Z plasma with an arbitrary density distribution. The solution is applied to study the heating of a material by fast electrons of different spectra such as a monoenergetic spectrum, a step-like distribution in a given energy range, and a Maxwellian spectrum, which is inherent in laser-produced fast electrons. The heating of shock- and fast-ignited precompressed inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets as well as the heating of a target designed to generate a Gbar shock wave for equation of state (EOS) experiments by laser-produced fast electrons with a Maxwellian spectrum is investigated. A relation is established between the energies of two groups of Maxwellian fast electrons, which are responsible for generation of a shock wave and heating the upstream material (preheating). The minimum energy of the fast and shock igniting beams as well as of the beam for a Gbar shock wave generation increases with the spectral width of the electron distribution.

  16. Ionic Composition and Electron Heating in the Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepri, Susan T.; Laming, J. M.

    2006-06-01

    In-situ observations of charge states of fast solar wind ions reveal higher average charges than the coronal hole source regions as derived from spectroscopy, implying that some extra electron heating and ionization must have occurred in the wind acceleration region prior to freeze-in. We present an extensive analysis of Ulysses and ACE charge state data near the boundaries of different coronal holes, and from different regions within coronal holes to compare with the predictions of a model by Laming (2004). In this model, electrons are heated by lower-hybrid waves, which are in turn generated by solar wind ions gyrating in cross-B density gradients. The observed charge states place constraints on the steepness and ubiquity of cross-field density gradients, which may arise as the end-result of MHD turbulent cascade.In this talk we give a brief overview of the subject and highlight our important findings. We find that, in general, oxygen and carbon charge states behave similarly in both equatorial and polar coronal holes. The charge states of both are lower in the coronal holes than in the solar wind, as previously reported by in-situ studies. For heavier ions, such as silicon and iron, there is not an appreciable difference between the ionic composition outside of coronal holes and at different regions inside of coronal holes. This may be due to processes that take place further out in the corona where these heavier ions freeze-in. We find slightly lower ionic charge states in the fast wind that have been previously reported, which reduces the amount of electron heating required. This work is sponsored by grants from the NSF and NASA.

  17. Microwave Type III Pair Bursts in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Baolin; Mészárosová, Hana; Karlický, Marian; Huang, Guangli; Tan, Chengming

    2016-03-01

    A solar microwave type III pair burst is composed of normal and reverse-sloped (RS) burst branches with oppositely fast frequency drifts. It is the most sensitive signature of the primary energy release and electron accelerations in flares. This work reports 11 microwave type III pair events in 9 flares observed by radio spectrometers in China and the Czech Republic at a frequency of 0.80-7.60 GHz during 1994-2014. These type III pairs occurred in flare impulsive and postflare phases with separate frequencies in the range of 1.08-3.42 GHz and a frequency gap of 10-1700 MHz. The frequency drift increases with the separate frequency (fx), the lifetime of each burst is anti-correlated to fx, while the frequency gap is independent of fx. In most events, the normal branches are drifting obviously faster than the RS branches. The type III pairs occurring in flare impulsive phase have lower separate frequencies, longer lifetimes, wider frequency gaps, and slower frequency drifts than that occurring in postflare phase. Also, the latter always has strong circular polarization. Further analysis indicates that near the flare energy release sites the plasma density is about {10}10{--}{10}11 cm-3 and the temperature is higher than 107 K. These results provide new constraints to the acceleration mechanism in solar flares.

  18. Theory of microwave and X-ray emission. [application to behavior of nonthermal electrons created at impulsive phase of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takakura, T.

    1973-01-01

    The behaviour of the nonthermal electrons created at the impulsive phase of flares has been deduced from the microwave impulsive bursts and hard X-ray burst by many researchers. There is almost no doubt of the emission mechanisms that radio emissions are due to gyrosynchrotron emission and hard X-rays are collisional bremsstrahlung. However, there remain three controversial problems. One is whether the emission sources of the microwave impulsive burst and hard X-ray burst are common or not. Another is whether the injection of the nonthermal electrons into the source is impulsive or continuous. The other is the relation among the nonthermal electrons, soft X-rays, EUV flash, H-alpha kernels, and white light flares. These three problems are not independent of each other.

  19. Formation of very hard electron and gamma-ray spectra of flat-spectrum radio quasars in the fast-cooling regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Dahai; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2016-07-01

    In the external Compton scenario, we investigate the formation of a very hard electron spectrum in the fast-cooling regime, using a time-dependent emission model. It is shown that a very hard electron distribution, N^' }_e({γ ^' })∝ {γ ^' }^{-p}, with spectral index p ˜ 1.3 is formed below the minimum energy of injection electrons when inverse Compton scattering takes place in the Klein-Nishina regime, i.e. inverse Compton scattering of relativistic electrons on broad-line region radiation in flat-spectrum radio quasars. This produces a very hard gamma-ray spectrum and can explain in reasonable fashion the very hard Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) spectrum of the flat-spectrum radio quasar 3C 279 during the extreme gamma-ray flare in 2013 December.

  20. Fast Frontend Electronics for high luminosity particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardinali, M.

    Future experiments of nuclear and particle physics are moving towards the high luminosity regime, in order to access suppressed processes like rare B decays or exotic charmonium resonances. In this scenario, high rate capability is a key requirement for electronics instrumentation, together with excellent timing resolution for precise event reconstruction. The development of dedicated FrontEnd Electronics (FEE) for detectors has become increasingly challenging. A current trend in R&D is towards multipurpose FEE which can be easily adapted to a great variety of detectors, without impairing the required high performance. We report on high-precision timing solutions which utilise high-bandwidth preamplifiers and fast discriminators providing Time-over-Threshold information, which can be used for charge measurements or walk corrections thus improving the obtainable timing resolution. The output signal are LVDS and can be directly fed into a multi-hit TDC readout. The performance of the electronics was investigated for single photon signals, typical for imaging Cherenkov detectors. The opposite condition of light signals arising from plastic scintillators, was also studied. High counting rates per channel of several MHz were achieved, and a timing resolution of better than 100 ps could be obtained in a test experiment using the full readout chain.

  1. A Cold Flare with Delayed Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Pal'shin, Valentin D.; Meshalkina, Natalia; Lysenko, Alexandra L.; Kashapova, Larisa K.; Altyntsev, Alexander T.

    2016-05-01

    Recently, a number of peculiar flares have been reported that demonstrate significant nonthermal particle signatures with low, if any, thermal emission, which implies a close association of the observed emission with the primary energy release/electron acceleration region. This paper presents a flare that appears “cold” at the impulsive phase, while displaying delayed heating later on. Using hard X-ray data from Konus-Wind, microwave observations by SSRT, RSTN, NoRH, and NoRP, context observations, and three-dimensional modeling, we study the energy release, particle acceleration, and transport, and the relationships between the nonthermal and thermal signatures. The flaring process is found to involve the interaction between a small loop and a big loop with the accelerated particles divided roughly equally between them. Precipitation of the electrons from the small loop produced only a weak thermal response because the loop volume was small, while the electrons trapped in the big loop lost most of their energy in the coronal part of the loop, which resulted in coronal plasma heating but no or only weak chromospheric evaporation, and thus unusually weak soft X-ray emission. The energy losses of the fast electrons in the big tenuous loop were slow, which resulted in the observed delay of the plasma heating. We determined that the impulsively accelerated electron population had a beamed angular distribution in the direction of the electric force along the magnetic field of the small loop. The accelerated particle transport in the big loop was primarily mediated by turbulent waves, which is similar to other reported cold flares.

  2. Fast Electronics for the Dafne Transverse Feedback Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drago, Alessandro

    Transverse feedback systems for controlling the vertical coupled-bunch instabilities in the positron and electron main rings are installed at DAFNE. They started to be operative respectively from June and September 2000. For the horizontal plane, similar systems have been installed in summer 2001 with less kicker power. Design specifications and the basic system concepts are presented. Real time bunch-by-bunch offset correction is implemented using digital signal processors and dual-port RAM's. Fast analog to digital sampling is performed at the maximum bunch frequency (368 MHz). The system manages at full speed a continuous flow of 8-bits data and it has the capability to invert the sign or put to zero the output for any combination of bunches. A conversion from digital to analog produces the output correcting signal.

  3. Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    Because the Earth resides in the atmosphere of our nearest stellar neighbor, events occurring on the Sun's surface directly affect us by interfering with satellite operations and communications, astronaut safety, and, in extreme circumstances, power grid stability. Solar flares, the most energetic events in our solar system, are a substantial source of hazardous space weather affecting our increasingly technology-dependent society. While flares have been observed using ground-based telescopes for over 150 years, modern space-bourne observatories have provided nearly continuous multi-wavelength flare coverage that cannot be obtained from the ground. We can now probe the origins and evolution of flares by tracking particle acceleration, changes in ionized plasma, and the reorganization of magnetic fields. I will walk through our current understanding of why flares occur and how they affect the Earth and also show several examples of these fantastic explosions.

  4. Flare-antenna unit for system in which flare is remotely activated by radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltz, Frederick F.; Wilson, Charles E.

    1995-06-01

    A flare-antenna assembly has flare material enclosed in a cylindrical antenna and forms part of a marker beacon. The flare aids in the search for the marker beacon by providing means for both visual and infrared detection. The flare is actuated in response to a specific remote radio signal being received by the antenna. The received signal is decoded by the electronic system within the marker beacon. If the received signal meets the necessary criteria the electronic system generates an electrical signal that detonates a squib embedded in the flare material. The detonation of the squib activates the flare.

  5. EMITTING ELECTRONS SPECTRA AND ACCELERATION PROCESSES IN THE JET OF Mrk 421: FROM THE LOW STATE TO THE GIANT FLARE STATE

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Dahai; Zhang Li; Fan Zhonghui; Zeng Houdun; Yuan Qiang

    2013-03-10

    We investigate the electron energy distributions (EEDs) and the acceleration processes in the jet of Mrk 421 through fitting the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) in different active states in the frame of a one-zone synchrotron self-Compton model. After assuming two possible EEDs formed in different acceleration models: the shock-accelerated power law with exponential cut-off (PLC) EED and the stochastic-turbulence-accelerated log-parabolic (LP) EED, we fit the observed SEDs of Mrk 421 in both low and giant flare states using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method which constrains the model parameters in a more efficient way. The results from our calculations indicate that (1) the PLC and LP models give comparably good fits for the SED in the low state, but the variations of model parameters from low state to flaring can be reasonably explained only in the case of the PLC in the low state; and (2) the LP model gives better fits compared to the PLC model for the SED in the flare state, and the intra-day/night variability observed at GeV-TeV bands can be accommodated only in the LP model. The giant flare may be attributed to the stochastic turbulence re-acceleration of the shock-accelerated electrons in the low state. Therefore, we may conclude that shock acceleration is dominant in the low state, while stochastic turbulence acceleration is dominant in the flare state. Moreover, our result shows that the extrapolated TeV spectra from the best-fit SEDs from optical through GeV with the two EEDs are different. It should be considered with caution when such extrapolated TeV spectra are used to constrain extragalactic background light models.

  6. The flares of August 1972. [solar flare characteristics and spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.; Tanaka, K.

    1973-01-01

    Observations of the August, 1972 flares at Big Bear and Tel Aviv, involving monochromatic movies, magnetograms, and spectra, are analyzed. The region (McMath 11976) showed inverted polarity from its inception on July 11; the great activity was due to extremely high shear and gradients in the magnetic field, as well as a constant invasion of one polarity into the opposite; observations in lambda 3835 show remarkable fast flashes in the impulsive flare of 18:38 UT on Aug. 2 with lifetimes of 5 sec, which may be due to dumping of particles in the lower chromosphere. Flare loops show evolutionary increases of their tilts to the neutral line in the flares of Aug. 4 and 7. Spectroscopic observations show red asymmetry and red shift of the H alpha emission in the flash phase of the Aug. 7 flare, as well as substantial velocity shear in the photosphere during the flare, somewhat like earthquake movement along a fault. Finally the total H alpha emission of the Aug. 7 flare could be measured accurately as about 2.5 x 10 to the 30th power erg, considerably less than coarser previous estimates for great flares.

  7. Single electron capture in fast ion-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milojević, Nenad

    2014-12-01

    Single-electron capture cross sections in collisions between fast bare projectiles and heliumlike atomic systems are investigated by means of the four-body boundary-corrected first Born (CB1-4B) approximation. The prior and post transition amplitudes for single charge exchange encompassing symmetric and asymmetric collisions are derived in terms of twodimensional real integrals in the case of the prior form and five-dimensional quadratures for the post form. The dielectronic interaction V12 = 1/r12 = 1/|r1 - r2| explicitly appears in the complete perturbation potential Vf of the post transition probability amplitude T+if. An illustrative computation is performed involving state-selective and total single capture cross sections for the p - He (prior and post form) and He2+, Li3+Be4+B5+C6+ - He (prior form) collisions at intermediate and high impact energies. We have also studied differential cross sections in prior and post form for single electron transfer from helium by protons. The role of dynamic correlations is examined as a function of increased projectile energy. Detailed comparisons with the measurements are carried out and the obtained theoretical cross sections are in reasonable agreement with the available experimental data.

  8. A modified Fricke gel dosimeter for fast electron blood dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Lama, L. S.; de Góes, E. G.; Sampaio, F. G. A.; Petchevist, P. C. D.; de Almeida, A.

    2014-12-01

    It has been suggested for more than forty years that blood and blood components be irradiated before allogeneic transfusions for immunosuppressed patients in order to avoid the Transfusion-Associated Graft-versus-Host Disease (TA-GVHD). Whole blood, red blood cells, platelets and granulocytes may have viable T cells and should be irradiated before transfusion for different patient clinical conditions. According to international guides, absorbed doses from 25 up to 50 Gy should be delivered to the central middle plane of each blood bag. Although gamma and X-rays from radiotherapy equipments and dedicated cell irradiators are commonly used for this purpose, electron beams from Linear Accelerators (LINACs) could be used as well. In this work, we developed a methodology able to acquire dosimetric data from blood irradiations, especially after fast electrons exposures. This was achieved using a proposed Fricke Xylenol Gel (FXGp) dosimeter, which presents closer radiological characteristics (attenuation coefficients and stopping-powers) to the whole blood, as well as complete absorbed dose range linearity. The developed methodology and the FXGp dosimeter were also able to provide isodose curves and field profiles for the irradiated samples.

  9. Combined Particle Acceleration in Solar Flares and Associated CME Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosian, Vahe

    2016-07-01

    I will review some observations of the characteristics of accelerated electrons seen near Earth (as SEPs) and those producing flare radiation in the low corona and chromosphere. The similarities and differences between the numbers, spectral distribution, etc. of the two population can shed light on the mechanism and sites of the acceleration. I will show that in some events the origin of both population appears to be the flare site while in others, with harder SEP spectra, in addition to acceleration at the flare site, there appears to be a need for a second stage re-acceleration in the associated fast Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) environment. This scenario can also describe a similar dichotomy that exists between the so called impulsive, highly enriched (3He and heavy ions) and softer SEP ion events, and stronger more gradual SEP events with near normal ionic abundances and harder spectra. I will also describe under what conditions such hardening can be achieved.

  10. FLARING PATTERNS IN BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Paggi, A.; Cavaliere, A.; Tavani, M.; Vittorini, V.; D'Ammando, F.

    2011-08-01

    Blazars radiate from relativistic jets launched by a supermassive black hole along our line of sight; the subclass of flat spectrum radio quasars exhibits broad emission lines, a telltale sign of a gas-rich environment and high accretion rate, contrary to the other subclass of the BL Lacertae objects. We show that this dichotomy of the sources in physical properties is enhanced in their flaring activity. The BL Lac flares yielded spectral evidence of being driven by further acceleration of highly relativistic electrons in the jet. Here, we discuss spectral fits of multi-{lambda} data concerning strong flares of the two flat spectrum radio quasars 3C 454.3 and 3C 279 recently detected in {gamma}-rays by the AGILE and Fermi satellites. We find that optimal spectral fits are provided by external Compton radiation enhanced by increasing production of thermal seed photons by growing accretion. We find such flares to trace patterns on the jet-power-electron-energy plane that diverge from those followed by flaring BL Lac objects and discuss why these occur.

  11. Effects of laser polarization on jet emission of fast electrons in femtosecond-laser plasmas.

    PubMed

    Chen, L M; Zhang, J; Li, Y T; Teng, H; Liang, T J; Sheng, Z M; Dong, Q L; Zhao, L Z; Wei, Z Y; Tang, X W

    2001-11-26

    Effects of laser polarization on fast electron emission are studied from an aluminum target irradiated by ultrashort laser pulses at 2 x 10(16) W/cm(2). Jet emission of outgoing fast electrons collimated in the polarization direction is observed for s-polarized laser irradiation, whereas for p-polarized irradiation highly directional emission of outgoing fast electrons is found in the direction close to the normal of the target. The behavior of ingoing fast electrons into the target for s- and p-polarized irradiation is also investigated by observing x-ray bremsstrahlung radiation at the backside of the target.

  12. Slow-rise and Fast-rise Phases of an Erupting Solar Filament and Flare Emission Onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2005-01-01

    We observe the eruption of an active-region solar filament of 1998 July 11 using high time cadence and high spatial resolution EUV observations from the TRACE satellite, along with soft X-ray images from the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on the Yohkoh satellite, hard X-ray fluxes from the BATSE instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) satellite and from the hard X-ray telescope (HXT) on Yohkoh, and ground-based magnetograms. We concentrate on the initiation of the eruption in an effort to understand the eruption mechanism. Prior to eruption the filament undergoes slow upward movement in a "slow rise" phase with an approximately constant velocity of about 15 km/s that lasts about 10 min. It then erupts in a "fast-rise" phase, accelerating to a velocity of about 200 km/s in about 5 min, and then decelerating to approximately 150 km/s over the next 5 min. EUV brightenings begin about concurrent with the start of the filament's slow rise, and remain immediately beneath the rising filament during the slow rise; initial soft X-ray brightenings occur at about the same time and location. Strong hard X-ray emission begins after the onset of the fast rise, and does not peak until the filament has traveled to a substantial altitude (to a height about equal to the initial length of the erupting filament) beyond its initial location. Additional information is available in the original extended abstract.

  13. Quantitative analysis of flare accelerated electrons through their hard X-ray and microwave radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, K. L.; Trottet, G.

    1985-01-01

    Hard X-ray and microwave modelling that takes into account the temporal evolution of the electron spectrum as well as the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field and the ambient medium in the radio source is presented. This method is illustrated for the June 29 1980 10:41 UT event. The implication on the process of acceleration/injection is discussed.

  14. Solar flare model atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Fisher, George H.

    1993-01-01

    Solar flare model atmospheres computed under the assumption of energetic equilibrium in the chromosphere are presented. The models use a static, one-dimensional plane parallel geometry and are designed within a physically self-consistent coronal loop. Assumed flare heating mechanisms include collisions from a flux of non-thermal electrons and x-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona. The heating by energetic electrons accounts explicitly for variations of the ionized fraction with depth in the atmosphere. X-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona incorporates a flare loop geometry by approximating distant portions of the loop with a series of point sources, while treating the loop leg closest to the chromospheric footpoint in the plane-parallel approximation. Coronal flare heating leads to increased heat conduction, chromospheric evaporation and subsequent changes in coronal pressure; these effects are included self-consistently in the models. Cooling in the chromosphere is computed in detail for the important optically thick HI, CaII and MgII transitions using the non-LTE prescription in the program MULTI. Hydrogen ionization rates from x-ray photo-ionization and collisional ionization by non-thermal electrons are included explicitly in the rate equations. The models are computed in the 'impulsive' and 'equilibrium' limits, and in a set of intermediate 'evolving' states. The impulsive atmospheres have the density distribution frozen in pre-flare configuration, while the equilibrium models assume the entire atmosphere is in hydrostatic and energetic equilibrium. The evolving atmospheres represent intermediate stages where hydrostatic equilibrium has been established in the chromosphere and corona, but the corona is not yet in energetic equilibrium with the flare heating source. Thus, for example, chromospheric evaporation is still in the process of occurring.

  15. Magnetic-island Contraction and Particle Acceleration in Simulated Eruptive Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidoni, S. E.; DeVore, C. R.; Karpen, J. T.; Lynch, B. J.

    2016-03-01

    The mechanism that accelerates particles to the energies required to produce the observed high-energy impulsive emission in solar flares is not well understood. Drake et al. proposed a mechanism for accelerating electrons in contracting magnetic islands formed by kinetic reconnection in multi-layered current sheets (CSs). We apply these ideas to sunward-moving flux ropes (2.5D magnetic islands) formed during fast reconnection in a simulated eruptive flare. A simple analytic model is used to calculate the energy gain of particles orbiting the field lines of the contracting magnetic islands in our ultrahigh-resolution 2.5D numerical simulation. We find that the estimated energy gains in a single island range up to a factor of five. This is higher than that found by Drake et al. for islands in the terrestrial magnetosphere and at the heliopause, due to strong plasma compression that occurs at the flare CS. In order to increase their energy by two orders of magnitude and plausibly account for the observed high-energy flare emission, the electrons must visit multiple contracting islands. This mechanism should produce sporadic emission because island formation is intermittent. Moreover, a large number of particles could be accelerated in each magnetohydrodynamic-scale island, which may explain the inferred rates of energetic-electron production in flares. We conclude that island contraction in the flare CS is a promising candidate for electron acceleration in solar eruptions.

  16. Propagation anisotropies of solar flare protons and electrons at low energies in interplanetary space.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pyle, K. R.

    1973-01-01

    Flux anisotropies in interplanetary space were investigated for protons with E greater than 0.66 MeV and electrons with E greater than 400 keV. Data were taken from the University of Chicago charged-particle telescope aboard the deep-space probe Pioneer 7 and from the Goddard Space Flight Center magnetometer aboard the same spacecraft. Flux anisotropies lying to the east of the average interplanetary magnetic field direction were first reported by McCracken et al. (1971), late in a solar particle event, for proton energies greater than 7.5 MeV. This work extends this investigation to much lower proton energies, studies the proton and electron anisotropies during both early and late phases of a particle event, and makes use of detailed magnetic field data. The investigation consists of two parts, a study of many periods taken at random during solar events, for both protons and electrons, and a detailed analysis of one period, early in an event, during which the magnetic field was near the solar direction.

  17. Particle Acceleration in Solar Flares and Associated CME Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosian, Vahé

    2016-10-01

    Observations relating the characteristics of electrons seen near Earth (solar energetic particles [SEPs]) and those producing flare radiation show that in certain (prompt) events the origin of both populations appears to be the flare site, which shows strong correlation between the number and spectral index of SEP and hard X-ray radiating electrons, but in others (delayed), which are associated with fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs), this relation is complex and SEPs tend to be harder. Prompt event spectral relation disagrees with that expected in thick or thin target models. We show that using a more accurate treatment of the transport of the accelerated electrons to the footpoints and to Earth can account for this discrepancy. Our results are consistent with those found by Chen & Petrosian for two flares using nonparametric inversion methods, according to which we have weak diffusion conditions, and trapping mediated by magnetic field convergence. The weaker correlations and harder spectra of delayed events can come about by reacceleration of electrons in the CME shock environment. We describe under what conditions such a hardening can be achieved. Using this (acceleration at the flare and reacceleration in the CME) scenario, we show that we can describe the similar dichotomy that exists between the so-called impulsive, highly enriched (3He and heavy ions), and softer SEP events and stronger, more gradual SEP events with near-normal ionic abundances and harder spectra. These methods can be used to distinguish the acceleration mechanisms and to constrain their characteristics.

  18. BATSE Solar Flare Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. A.

    1998-01-01

    This final report describes the progress originally proposed: (1) the continued improvement of a software and database environment capable of supporting all users of BATSE solar data as well as providing scientific expertise and effort to the BATSE solar community; (2) the continued participation with the PI team and other guest investigators in the detailed analysis of the BATSE detectors' response at low energies; (3) using spectroscopic techniques to fully exploit the potential of electron time-of-flight studies; and, (4) a full search for flare gamma-ray line emission at 2.2 MeV from all GOES X-class flares observed with BATSE.

  19. Lifetime measurements in transitional nuclei by fast electronic scintillation timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprio, M. A.; Zamfir, N. V.; Casten, R. F.; Amro, H.; Barton, C. J.; Beausang, C. W.; Cooper, J. R.; Gürdal, G.; Hecht, A. A.; Hutter, C.; Krücken, R.; McCutchan, E. A.; Meyer, D. A.; Novak, J. R.; Pietralla, N.; Ressler, J. J.; Berant, Z.; Brenner, D. S.; Gill, R. L.; Regan, P. H.

    2002-10-01

    A new generation of experiments studying nuclei in spherical-deformed transition regions has been motivated by the introduction of innovative theoretical approaches to the treatment of these nuclei. The important structural signatures in the transition regions, beyond the basic yrast level properties, involve γ-ray transitions between low-spin, non-yrast levels, and so information on γ-ray branching ratios and absolute matrix elements (or level lifetimes) for these transitions is crucial. A fast electronic scintillation timing (FEST) system [H. Mach, R. L. Gill, and M. Moszyński, Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 280, 49 (1989)], making use of BaF2 and plastic scintillation detectors, has been implemented at the Yale Moving Tape Collector for the measurement of lifetimes of states populated in β^ decay. Experiments in the A100 (Pd, Ru) and A150 (Dy, Yb) regions have been carried out, and a few examples will be presented. Supported by the US DOE under grants and contracts DE-FG02-91ER-40609, DE-FG02-88ER-40417, and DE-AC02-98CH10886 and by the German DFG under grant Pi 393/1.

  20. Measurements of the fast electron bremsstrahlung emission during electron cyclotron resonance heating in the HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y. P.; Liu, Yi; Song, X. Y.; Yuan, G. L.; Chen, W.; Ji, X. Q.; Ding, X. T.; Yang, J. W.; Zhou, J.; Li, X.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.; Pan, C. H.; Liu, Y.

    2010-10-15

    A fast electron bremsstrahlung (FEB) diagnostic technique based on cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector has been developed recently in the HL-2A tokamak for measurements of the temporal evolution of FEB emission in the energy range of 10-200 keV. With a perpendicular viewing into the plasma on the equatorial plane, the hard x-ray spectra with eight different energy channels are measured. The discrimination of the spectra is implemented by an accurate spectrometry. The system also makes use of fast digitization and software signal processing technology. An ambient environment of neutrons, gammas, and magnetic disturbance requires careful shielding. During electron cyclotron resonance heating, the generation of fast electrons and the oscillations of electron fishbone (e-fishbone) have been found. Using the FEB measurement system, it has been experimentally identified that the mode strongly correlates with the electron cyclotron resonance heating produced fast electrons with 30-70 keV.

  1. High time resolution electron measurement by Fast Electron energy Spectrum Analyzer (FESA)

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Yoshifumi; Fujimoto, Masaki; Maezawa, Kiyoshi; Shinohara, Iku; Tsuda, Yuichi; Sasaki, Shintaro; Kojima, Hirotsugu

    2009-06-16

    We have newly developed an electron energy analyzer FESA (Fast Electron energy Spectrum Analyzer) for a future magnetospheric satellite mission SCOPE. The SCOPE mission is designed in order that observational studies from the cross-scale coupling viewpoint are enabled. One of the key observations necessary for the SCOPE mission is high-time resolution electron measurement. Eight FESAs on a spinning spacecraft are capable of measuring three dimensional electron distribution function with time resolution of 8 msec. FESA consists of two electrostatic analyzers that are composed of three nested hemispherical deflectors. Single FESA functions as four top-hat type electrostatic analyzers that can measure electrons with four different energies simultaneously. By measuring the characteristics of the test model FESA, we proved the validity of the design concept of FESA. Based on the measured characteristics, we designed FESA optimized for the SCOPE mission. This optimized analyzer has good enough performance to measure three dimensional electron distribution functions around the magnetic reconnection region in the Earth's magnetotail.

  2. Solar flares: an overview.

    PubMed

    Rust, D M

    1992-01-01

    This is a survey of solar phenomena and physical models that may be useful for improving forecasts of solar flares and proton storms in interplanetary space. Knowledge of the physical processes that accelerate protons has advanced because of gamma-ray and X-ray observations from the Solar Maximum Mission telescopes. Protons are accelerated at the onset of flares, but the duration of any subsequent proton storm at 1 AU depends on the structure of the interplanetary fields. X-ray images of the solar corona show possible fast proton escape paths. Magnetographs and high-resolution visible-band images show the magnetic field structure near the acceleration region and the heating effects of sunward-directed protons. Preflare magnetic field growth and shear may be the most important clues to the physical processes that generate high energy solar particles. Any dramatic improvement in flare forecasts will require high resolution solar telescopes in space. Several possibilities for improvements in the art of flare forecasting are presented, among them: the use of acoustic tomography to probe for subsurface magnetic fields; a satellite-borne solar magnetograph; and an X-ray telescope to monitor the corona for eruptions.

  3. Selective four electron reduction of O2 by an iron porphyrin electrocatalyst under fast and slow electron fluxes.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Subhra; Sengupta, Kushal; Mittra, Kaustuv; Bandyopadhyay, Sabyasachi; Dey, Abhishek

    2012-08-01

    An iron porphyrin catalyst with four electron donor groups is reported. The porphyrin ligand bears a distal hydrogen bonding pocket which inverts the normal axial ligand binding selectivity exhibited by porphyrins bearing sterically crowded distal structures. This catalyst specifically reduces O(2) by four electrons under both fast and slow electron fluxes at pH 7.

  4. Characterization of the fast electrons distribution produced in a high intensity laser target interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Westover, B.; Chen, C. D.; Patel, P. K.; McLean, H.; Beg, F. N.

    2014-03-15

    Experiments on the Titan laser (∼150 J, 0.7 ps, 2 × 10{sup 20} W cm{sup −2}) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory were carried out in order to study the properties of fast electrons produced by high-intensity, short pulse laser interacting with matter under conditions relevant to Fast Ignition. Bremsstrahlung x-rays produced by these fast electrons were measured by a set of compact filter-stack based x-ray detectors placed at three angles with respect to the target. The measured bremsstrahlung signal allows a characterization of the fast electron beam spectrum, conversion efficiency of laser energy into fast electron kinetic energy and angular distribution. A Monte Carlo code Integrated Tiger Series was used to model the bremsstrahlung signal and infer a laser to fast electron conversion efficiency of 30%, an electron slope temperature of about 2.2 MeV, and a mean divergence angle of 39°. Simulations were also performed with the hybrid transport code ZUMA which includes fields in the target. In this case, a conversion efficiency of laser energy to fast electron energy of 34% and a slope temperature between 1.5 MeV and 4 MeV depending on the angle between the target normal direction and the measuring spectrometer are found. The observed temperature of the bremsstrahlung spectrum, and therefore the inferred electron spectrum are found to be angle dependent.

  5. The sun's spots and flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, David M.

    1987-01-01

    The Solar Maximum Mission (SMM), designed to study the solar activity, was launched on February 14, 1980, just before the 1980 peak of sunspot and flare activity. The seven instruments aboard the SMM, information received by each of the instruments, and the performance of these instruments are described, together with the repair mission carried out to replace the attitude control module and the defective electronics in the satellite's observatory. The highlights of the scientific results obtained by the SMM mission and the new discoveries made are discussed, with special attention given to the flare loops, flare loop interactions, and the mass ejection events recorded.

  6. Experiment vs. theory on electric inhibition of fast electron penetration of targets

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, R R; Akli, K U; Batani, D; Baton, S; Hatchett, S P; Hey, D; Key, M H; King, J A; MacKinnon, A J; Norreys, P A; Snavely, R A; Stephens, R; Stoeckl, C; Town, R J; Zhang, B

    2005-06-13

    A dominant force of inhibition of fast electrons in normal density matter is due to an axially directed electrostatic field. Fast electrons leave the critical density layer and enter the solid in an assumed relativistic Maxwellian energy distribution. Within a cycle of the solid density plasma frequency, the charge separation is neutralized by a background return current density j{sub b} = en{sub b}v{sub b} equal and opposite to the fast electron current density j{sub f} = en{sub f}v{sub f} [1] where it is assumed that the fast electron number density is much less than the background number density, n{sub f} << n{sub b} [2]. This charge and current neutralization allows the forward moving fast electron current to temporarily exceed the Alfven limit by many orders of magnitude [3]. During this period the cold return current, in passing through the material resistivity, ohmically generates an electric field in opposition to the fast current. As a result, the fast electron current loses its energy to the material, via the return current, in the form of heat [4]. So, although the highly energetic electrons suffer relatively little direct collisional loss of energy (owing to the inverse relation of the Coulomb cross section to velocity), their motion is substantially damped by ohmic heating of the slower return current. The equation for the ohmically generated electric field, E, is given by Ohm's law, E = j{sub c}{eta} where {eta} is the material resistivity.

  7. Evidence of locally enhanced target heating due to instabilities of counter-streaming fast electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Koester, Petra; Cecchetti, Carlo A.; Booth, Nicola; Woolsey, Nigel; Chen, Hui; Evans, Roger G.; Gregori, Gianluca; Li, Bin; Mithen, James; Murphy, Christopher D.; Labate, Luca; Gizzi, Leonida A.; Levato, Tadzio; Makita, Mikako; Riley, David; Notley, Margaret; Pattathil, Rajeev

    2015-02-15

    The high-current fast electron beams generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions require the onset of a balancing return current in order to propagate in the target material. Such a system of counter-streaming electron currents is unstable to a variety of instabilities such as the current-filamentation instability and the two-stream instability. An experimental study aimed at investigating the role of instabilities in a system of symmetrical counter-propagating fast electron beams is presented here for the first time. The fast electron beams are generated by double-sided laser-irradiation of a layered target foil at laser intensities above 10{sup 19 }W/cm{sup 2}. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of the emission from the central Ti layer shows that locally enhanced energy deposition is indeed achieved in the case of counter-propagating fast electron beams.

  8. Cherenkov-type diamond detectors for measurements of fast electrons in the TORE-SUPRA tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Jakubowski, L.; Sadowski, M. J.; Zebrowski, J.; Rabinski, M.; Malinowski, K.; Mirowski, R.; Lotte, Ph.; Gunn, J.; Pascal, J-Y.; Colledani, G.; Basiuk, V.; Goniche, M.; Lipa, M.

    2010-01-15

    The paper presents a schematic design and tests of a system applicable for measurements of fast electron pulses emitted from high-temperature plasma generated inside magnetic confinement fusion machines, and particularly in the TORE-SUPRA facility. The diagnostic system based on the registration of the Cherenkov radiation induced by fast electrons within selected solid radiators is considered, and electron low-energy thresholds for different radiators are given. There are some estimates of high thermal loads, which might be deposited by intense electron beams upon parts of the diagnostic equipment within the TORE-SUPRA device. There are some proposed measures to overcome this difficulty by the selection of appropriate absorption filters and Cherenkov radiators, and particularly by the application of a fast-moving reciprocating probe. The paper describes the measuring system, its tests, as well as some results of the preliminary measurements of fast electrons within TORE-SUPRA facility.

  9. Flare models: Chapter 9 of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    By reviewing the properties of solar flares analyzed by each of the seven teams of the Skylab workshop, a set of primary and secondary requirements of flare models are derived. A number of flare models are described briefly and their properties compared with the primary requirements. It appears that, at this time, each flare model has some strong points and some weak points. It has not yet been demonstrated that any one flare model meets all the proposed requirements.

  10. Reconstruction of the energy spectrum of electrons accelerated in the April 15, 2002 solar flare based on IRIS X-ray spectrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motorina, G. G.; Kudryavtsev, I. V.; Lazutkov, V. P.; Savchenko, M. I.; Skorodumov, D. V.; Charikov, Yu. E.

    2016-04-01

    We reconstruct the energy distribution of electrons accelerated in the April 15, 2002 solar flare on the basis of the data from the IRIS X-ray spectrometer onboard the CORONAS-F satellite. We obtain the solution to the integral equations describing the transformation of the spectrum of X-ray photons during the recording and reconstruction of the spectrum of accelerated electrons in the bremsstrahlung source using the random search method and the Tikhonov regularization method. In this event, we detected a singularity in the electron spectrum associated with the existence of a local minimum in the energy range 40-60 keV, which cannot be detected by a direct method.

  11. A recent strong X-ray flaring activity of 1ES 1959+650 with possibly less efficient stochastic acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapanadze, B.; Dorner, D.; Vercellone, S.; Romano, P.; Kapanadze, S.; Mdzinarishvili, T.

    2016-09-01

    We present an X-ray flaring activity of 1ES 1959+650 in 2015 August-2016 January, which was the most powerful and prolonged during the 10.75 yr period since the start of its monitoring with X-ray Telescope onboard Swift. A new highest historical 0.3-10 keV count rate was recorded three times that makes this object the third BL Lacertae source exceeding the level of 20 counts s-1. Along with the overall variability by a factor of 5.7, this epoch was characterized by fast X-ray flares by a factor of 2.0-3.1, accompanied with an extreme spectral variability. The source also shows a simultaneous flaring activity in the optical - UV and 0.3-100 GeV bands, although a fast γ-ray flare without significant optical - X-ray counterparts is also found. In contrast to the X-ray flares in the previous years, the stochastic acceleration seems be less important for the electrons responsible for producing X-ray emission during this flare that challenges the earlier suggestion that the electrons in the jets of TeV-detected BL Lacertae objects should undergo an efficient stochastic acceleration resulting in a lower X-ray spectral curvature.

  12. SCATTERING POLARIZATION IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Štěpán, Jiří; Heinzel, Petr

    2013-11-20

    There is ongoing debate about the origin and even the very existence of a high degree of linear polarization of some chromospheric spectral lines observed in solar flares. The standard explanation of these measurements is in terms of the impact polarization caused by non-thermal proton and/or electron beams. In this work, we study the possible role of resonance line polarization due to radiation anisotropy in the inhomogeneous medium of the flare ribbons. We consider a simple two-dimensional model of the flaring chromosphere and we self-consistently solve the non-LTE problem taking into account the role of resonant scattering polarization and of the Hanle effect. Our calculations show that the horizontal plasma inhomogeneities at the boundary of the flare ribbons can lead to a significant radiation anisotropy in the line formation region and, consequently, to a fractional linear polarization of the emergent radiation of the order of several percent. Neglecting the effects of impact polarization, our model can provide a clue for resolving some of the common observational findings, namely: (1) why a high degree of polarization appears mainly at the edges of the flare ribbons; (2) why polarization can also be observed during the gradual phase of a flare; and (3) why polarization is mostly radial or tangential. We conclude that radiation transfer in realistic multi-dimensional models of solar flares needs to be considered as an essential ingredient for understanding the observed spectral line polarization.

  13. Improved Detection of Fast Neutrons with Solid-State Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzakis, J.; Hassan, S. M.; Clark, E. L.; Talebitaher, A.; Lee, P.

    2014-02-01

    There is an increasing requirement for alternative and improved detection of fast neutrons due to the renewed interest in neutron diagnostics applications. Some applications require heavily shielded neutron sources that emit a substantial proportion of their emission as fast neutrons and so require high performance fast neutron detectors. In some applications, the detection of neutron bursts from pulsed neutron sources has to be synchronized to the repetition rate of the source. Typical fast neutron detectors incorporate scintillators that are sensitive to all kinds of ionizing radiations as well as neutrons, and their efficiency is low. In this paper, we present a device based on the principle of neutron activation coupled to solid-state p-i-n diodes connected to a charge amplifier. The charge amplifier is specially developed to operate with high capacitance detectors and has been optimized by the aid of the SPICE program. A solid-state pulse shaping filter follows the charge amplifier, as an inexpensive solution, capable to provide pulses that can be counted by a digital counter.

  14. Limiting Superluminal Electron and Neutrino Velocities Using the 2010 Crab Nebula Flare and the IceCube PeV Neutrino Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2014-01-01

    The observation of two PetaelectronVolt (PeV)-scale neutrino events reported by Ice Cube allows one to place constraints on Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) in the neutrino sector. After first arguing that at least one of the PetaelectronVolt IceCube events was of extragalactic origin, I derive an upper limit for the difference between putative superluminal neutrino and electron velocities of less than or equal to approximately 5.6 x 10(exp -19) in units where c = 1, confirming that the observed PetaelectronVolt neutrinos could have reached Earth from extragalactic sources. I further derive a new constraint on the superluminal electron velocity, obtained from the observation of synchrotron radiation from the Crab Nebula flare of September, 2010. The inference that the greater than 1 GigaelectronVolt gamma-rays from synchrotron emission in the flare were produced by electrons of energy up to approx. 5.1 PetaelectronVolt indicates the nonoccurrence of vacuum Cerenkov radiation by these electrons. This implies a new, strong constraint on superluminal electron velocities delta(sub e) less than or equal to approximately 5 x 10(exp -21). It immediately follows that one then obtains an upper limit on the superluminal neutrino velocity alone of delta(sub v) less than or equal to approximately 5.6 x 10(exp -19), many orders of magnitude better than the time-of-flight constraint from the SN1987A neutrino burst. However, if the electrons are subluminal the constraint on the absolute value of delta(sub e) less than or equal to approximately 8 x 10(exp -17), obtained from the Crab Nebula gamma-ray spectrum, places a weaker constraint on superluminal neutrino velocity of delta(sub v) less than or equal to approximately 8 x 10(exp -17).

  15. Updated calculations of the ionization equilibrium for the non-Maxwellian electron n-distributions in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzifcakova, Elena; Dudík, Jaroslav

    2015-08-01

    Observed flare high intensities of the Si XIId satellite lines in comparison with the Si XIII allowed lines cannot be interpreted under the assumption of a Maxwellian distribution. This behavior of the relative line intensities can be explained by the presence of n-distribution with a higher and narrower shape than the Maxwellian one. This distribution can be formed in flaring plasma in the electric double layers and its presence is associated with type III radio bursts.The latest atomic data to calculate the ionization equilibrium for the non-thermal n-distributions with n ranging from 1 to 19 were used. These calculations involve each of elements with atomic number up to 30. The n-distributions influence both the ionization and recombination rates and make the ion abundance peaks narrower. They can also shift the maxima of the ion abundance peaks in comparison with the Maxwellian distribution and can influence the temperature diagnostics.

  16. Stochastic Particle Acceleration in Impulsive Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.

    2001-01-01

    The acceleration of a huge number of electrons and ions to relativistic energies over timescales ranging from several seconds to several tens of seconds is the fundamental problem in high-energy solar physics. The cascading turbulence model we have developed has been shown previously (e.g., Miller 2000; Miller & Roberts 1995; Miner, LaRosa, & Moore 1996) to account for all the bulk features (such as acceleration timescales, fluxes, total number of energetic particles, and maximum energies) of electron and proton acceleration in impulsive solar flares. While the simulation of this acceleration process is involved, the essential idea of the model is quite simple, and consists of just a few parts: 1. During the primary flare energy release phase, we assume that low-amplitude MHD Alfven and fast mode waves are excited at long wavelengths, say comparable to the size of the event (although the results are actually insensitive to this initial wavelength). While an assumption, this appears reasonable in light of the likely highly turbulent nature of the flare. 2. These waves then cascade in a Kolmogorov-like fashion to smaller wavelengths (e.g., Verma et al. 1996), forming a power-law spectral density in wavenumber space through the inertial range. 3. When the mean wavenumber of the fast mode waves has increased sufficiently, the transit-time acceleration rate (Miller 1997) for superAlfvenic electrons can overcome Coulomb energy losses, and these electrons are accelerated out of the thermal distribution and to relativistic energies (Miller et al. 1996). As the Alfven waves cascade to higher wavenumbers, they can cyclotron resonate with progressively lower energy protons. Eventually, they will resonate with protons in the tail of the thermal distribution, which will then be accelerated to relativistic energies as well (Miller & Roberts 1995). Hence, both ions and electrons are stochastically accelerated, albeit by different mechanisms and different waves. 4. When the

  17. Electromagnetic interactions between a fast electron beam and metamaterial cloaks.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinying; Dong, Yunxia; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2008-10-01

    Relativistic energy loss and photon emission in the interaction of ideal and nonideal metamaterial cloaks with an external electron beam are studied based on the classical electrodynamics. The effects of various imperfect parameters on the efficiency of the cloak are emphasized. The energy-loss spectra and the photon emission for such structures with the different combinations of electron velocity and impact parameter are calculated. It is shown that the efficiency of nonideal electromagnetic cloaks and the effect of various nonideal parameters on the cloak invisibility can be exhibited in the electron energy loss spectroscopy. This means that the properties of cloak can be explored by scanning transmission electron microscopy.

  18. Effect of bremsstrahlung radiation emission on fast electrons in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embréus, O.; Stahl, A.; Fülöp, T.

    2016-09-01

    Bremsstrahlung radiation emission is an important energy loss mechanism for energetic electrons in plasmas. In this paper we investigate the effect of spontaneous bremsstrahlung emission on the momentum‑space structure of the electron distribution, fully accounting for the emission of finite‑energy photons by modeling the bremsstrahlung interactions with a Boltzmann collision operator. We find that electrons accelerated by electric fields can reach significantly higher energies than predicted by the commonly used radiative stopping‑power model. Furthermore, we show that the emission of soft photons can contribute significantly to the dynamics of electrons with an anisotropic distribution by causing pitch‑angle scattering at a rate that increases with energy.

  19. Effect of bremsstrahlung radiation emission on fast electrons in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embréus, O.; Stahl, A.; Fülöp, T.

    2016-09-01

    Bremsstrahlung radiation emission is an important energy loss mechanism for energetic electrons in plasmas. In this paper we investigate the effect of spontaneous bremsstrahlung emission on the momentum-space structure of the electron distribution, fully accounting for the emission of finite-energy photons by modeling the bremsstrahlung interactions with a Boltzmann collision operator. We find that electrons accelerated by electric fields can reach significantly higher energies than predicted by the commonly used radiative stopping-power model. Furthermore, we show that the emission of soft photons can contribute significantly to the dynamics of electrons with an anisotropic distribution by causing pitch-angle scattering at a rate that increases with energy.

  20. Cherenkov Detector For Measurements Of Fast Electrons In CASTOR-Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Jakubowski, L.; Sadowski, M. J.; Stanislawski, J.; Malinowski, K.; Zebrowski, J.; Jakubowski, M.; Weinzettl, V.; Stockel, J.; Vacha, M.; Peterka, M.

    2008-04-07

    The paper reports on capabilities of an improved version of the Cherenkov detector designed for measurements of fast electrons. The described technique enables the identification of electron beams, the measurements of their temporal characteristics, as well as the estimation of their spatial properties to be performed. Results obtained in the last experimental campaign with the CASTOR facility show good measuring capabilities of such a detection system. The radial distributions of fast-electron streams at different plasma densities, as well as the electron fluency dependences on discharge currents and toroidal magnetic fields are also presented.

  1. Modern observations and models of Solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsyk, Pavel; Somov, Boris

    As well known, that fast particles propagating along flare loop generate bremsstrahlung hard x-ray emission and gyro-synchrotron microwave emission. We present the self-consistent kinetic description of propagation accelerated particles. The key point of this approach is taking into account the effect of reverse current. In our two-dimensional model the electric field of reverse current has the strong influence to the beam of accelerated particles. It decelerates part of the electrons in the beam and turns back other part of them without significant energy loss. The exact analytical solution for the appropriate kinetic equation with Landau collision integral was found. Using derived distribution function of electrons we’ve calculated evolution of their energy spectrum and plasma heating, coronal microwave emission and characteristics of hard x-ray emission in the corona and in the chromosphere. All results were compared with modern high precision space observations.

  2. Electron Generation and Transport in Intense Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interactions Relevant to Fast Ignition ICF

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Tammy Yee Wing

    2010-01-01

    The reentrant cone approach to Fast Ignition, an advanced Inertial Confinement Fusion scheme, remains one of the most attractive because of the potential to efficiently collect and guide the laser light into the cone tip and direct energetic electrons into the high density core of the fuel. However, in the presence of a preformed plasma, the laser energy is largely absorbed before it can reach the cone tip. Full scale fast ignition laser systems are envisioned to have prepulses ranging between 100 mJ to 1 J. A few of the imperative issues facing fast ignition, then, are the conversion efficiency with which the laser light is converted to hot electrons, the subsequent transport characteristics of those electrons, and requirements for maximum allowable prepulse this may put on the laser system. This dissertation examines the laser-to-fast electron conversion efficiency scaling with prepulse for cone-guided fast ignition. Work in developing an extreme ultraviolet imager diagnostic for the temperature measurements of electron-heated targets, as well as the validation of the use of a thin wire for simultaneous determination of electron number density and electron temperature will be discussed.

  3. X-ray and radio observations of energetic electrons produced in the 3 November 2003 solar flare at ~09:5000 UT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauphin, C.; Vilmer, N.; Lüthi, T.; Magun, A.; Krucker, S.; Schwartz, R.; Trottet, G.

    Hard X-ray and radio observations provide complementary observations of energetic electrons produced in solar flares. The GOES X4 flare on 03 November 2003 at ˜ 09:50 UT was observed and imaged up to several 100 keV by the RHESSI experiment. It was simultaneously observed at metric/decimetric wavelengths by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH) and at centimetric/millimetric wavelengths by radio instruments operated by the Institute of Applied Physics (University of Bern). We present in this contribution an analysis of these radio and X-ray data. The time profiles of the X-ray emission above 50 keV and of the centimetric/millimetric emissions show two main parts (impulsive emission lasting about three minutes) and a long duration emission (partially observed by RHESSI) separated in time by four minutes. At metric/decimetric wavelengths a type II burst with an unusually high frequency is observed between the impulsive emissions and the long duration radio continuum. Combined analysis of RHESSI sources at energies above a few hundred keV and of metric/decimetric sources observed by the NRH shows the extension in space of both X-ray and radio sources traced by energetic electrons between the impulsive part of the event and the late energetic X-ray phase associated with the strong radio continuum. Spectral analysis of the high energy X-ray continuum and of the centimetric/millimetric will be performed to infer the characteristics of energetic electrons in both parts of the events and to further investigate in this event the relationship between centimetric-millimetric emitting electrons and HXR/GR bremsstrahlung emitting ones.

  4. On Flare and CME Predictability Based on Sunspot Group Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsós, M. B.; Ruderman, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    We propose to apply the weighted horizontal magnetic gradient (WGM), introduced in Korsós et al. (2015), for analysing the pre-flare and pre-CME behaviour and evolution of Active Regions (ARs) using the SDO/HMI-Debrecen Data catalogue. To demonstrate the power of investigative capabilities of the WGM method in terms of flare/CME eruptions, we show the results of studying three typical active regions, namely, AR11818, AR12017 and AR11495. The choice of ARs represent typical cases of flaring with a fast CME, flare eruption without a CME and non-flaring cases, respectively. AR11818 produced an M1.4 energetic flare with a fast "halo" CME (vlinear=1202 km/s) while in AR12017 occurred an X1.0 flare without a CME. The AR11495 is a good example for non-flaring ARs. The value and temporal variation of WGM is found to possess potentially important diagnostic information about the intensity of expected flares. However, this test turns out not only to provide information about the intensity of expected flares but may also show whether a flare will occur with/without a fast CME.

  5. Evolution of the Coronal Magnetic Structures traced by X-ray and Radio Emitting Electrons during the Flare of 3 November 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilmer, N. R.; Dauphin, C.; Krucker, S.

    2004-05-01

    During their transit on the solar disk AR 0488 and AR0486 produced 12 X-class flares. Two of these flares (28 October 2003 and 3 November 2003) were observed at both X-ray/gamma-ray wavelengths by the RHESSI experiment and by the Nancay Radioheliograph. We shall present here results for the 3 November 2003 event which was observed and imaged up to several 100 keV by RHESSI and which produced at radio wavelengths a type II burst with an unusually high starting frequency and a long duration continuum extending from the low corona to the interplanetary medium. The combined analysis of RHESSI sources at energies above a few hundred keV and of metric/decimetric sources observed by the NRH shows a spatial extension of both X-ray and radio sources traced by energetic electrons between the impulsive part of the event and the late energetic X-ray phase associated with the radio continuum. This spatial extension will be discussed in the context of the shock-associated type II burst and of the CME onset. Analysis of radio and X-ray spectra will be tentatively done to investigate the nature of the radio continuum.

  6. Dynamics of fast electron beams and bounded targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabala, N.; Rivacoba, A.

    2015-07-01

    We analyze the full relativistic force experienced by swift electrons moving close to planar films for the experimental conditions commonly used in electron energy loss spectroscopy in STEM. In metals the main effects derive from the dispersion of the surface plasmons, which are clearly observed in the EEL spectra. In insulators we explore the role played by the Cherenkov radiation (CR) emitted in the energy gap window. The focus is placed on the transverse force and different factors which may turn this force into repulsive, as reported in recent experimental and theoretical works.

  7. Study of the propagation of ultra-intense laser-produced fast electrons in gas jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batani, D.; Manclossi, M.; Piazza, D.; Baton, S. D.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Koenig, M.; Popescu, H.; Amiranoff, F.; Rabec Le Gloahec, M.; Rousseaux, C.; Borghesi, M.; Cecchetti, C.

    2006-06-01

    We present the results of some recent experiments performed at the LULI laboratory using the 100 TW laser facility concerning the study of the propagation of fast electrons in gas targets. Novel diagnostics have been implemented including chirped shadowgraphy and proton radiography. Proton radiography images did show the presence of very strong fields in the gas probably produced by charge separation. In turn, these imply a slowing down of the fast electron cloud as it penetrates in the gas, and a strong inhibition of propagation. Indeed chirped shadowgraphy images show a strong reduction of the electron cloud velocity from the initial value close to a fraction of c.

  8. Simulations of Fuel Assembly and Fast-Electron Transport in Integrated Fast-Ignition Experiments on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodov, A. A.; Theobald, W.; Anderson, K. S.; Shvydky, A.; Epstein, R.; Betti, R.; Myatt, J. F.; Stoeckl, C.; Jarrott, L. C.; McGuffey, C.; Qiao, B.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Stephens, R. B.

    2013-10-01

    Integrated fast-ignition experiments on OMEGA benefit from improved performance of the OMEGA EP laser, including higher contrast, higher energy, and a smaller focus. Recent 8-keV, Cu-Kα flash radiography of cone-in-shell implosions and cone-tip breakout measurements showed good agreement with the 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations using the code DRACO. DRACO simulations show that the fuel assembly can be further improved by optimizing the compression laser pulse, evacuating air from the shell, and by adjusting the material of the cone tip. This is found to delay the cone-tip breakout by ~220 ps and increase the core areal density from ~80 mg/cm2 in the current experiments to ~500 mg/cm2 at the time of the OMEGA EP beam arrival before the cone-tip breakout. Simulations using the code LSP of fast-electron transport in the recent integrated OMEGA experiments with Cu-doped shells will be presented. Cu-doping is added to probe the transport of fast electrons via their induced Cu K-shell fluorescent emission. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration DE-NA0001944 and the Office of Science under DE-FC02-04ER54789.

  9. Control of wire heating with resistively guided fast electrons through an inverse conical taper

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, A. P. L. Schmitz, H.; Green, J. S.; Booth, N.; Ridgers, C. P.; Pasley, J.

    2015-04-15

    The heating of a solid wire embedded in a solid substrate (of lower Z material) with relativistic electrons generated by ultra-intense laser irradiation is considered. Previously, it has been noted that the initial angular distribution of the fast electrons is a highly important factor in the efficacy of the heating [Robinson et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 122701 (2013)]. We show that, using 3D numerical simulations, the addition of an inverse conical taper at the front of wire can considerably improve the heating of the wire due to the reduction of angular spread of the fast electrons which is caused by transport through the inverse conical taper [Robinson et al., “Guiding of laser-generated fast electrons by exploiting the resistivity-gradients around a conical guide element,” Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion (to be published)].

  10. Effects of fast monoenergetic electrons on the generalized Bohm criterion for electronegative dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chekour, S.; Tahraoui, A.; Zaham, B.

    2012-05-15

    In this work, we have generalized the computation of Bohm criterion for electronegative complex plasma in the presence of fast monoenergetic electrons coming from a plane electrode. For this, we have established a 1D, collisionless, stationary, and unmagnetized electronegative plasma sheath model. The electrons and negative ions are considered in thermodynamic equilibrium; however, the positive ions, the dust grains, and the fast monoenergetic electrons are described by cold fluid equations. The generalized Bohm criterion has been calculated by using Sagdeev's pseudo potential method and the dust grain charge equation. The self-consistent relation between the dust grain surface potential at the edge and dust grains density is also derived. The numerical results reveal that the presence of the fast monoenergetic electrons increases the positive ion Mach number. On the other hand, the raise of electronegativity decreases this positive Mach number. The evolution of dust grain surface potential at the sheath edge is also illustrated and discussed.

  11. Guiding and collimating fast electron beam by the quasi-static electromagnetic field array

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Zhao, Z. Q.; He, W. H.; Dong, K. G.; Wu, Y. C.; Zhu, B.; Zhang, T. K.; Zhang, B.; Zhang, Z. M.; Gu, Y. Q.; Cao, L. H.

    2014-10-15

    A guidance and collimation scheme for fast electron beam in a traverse periodic quasi-static electromagnetic field array is proposed with the semi-analytic method and the particle-in-cell simulation. The sheath electric fields on the surfaces of nanowires and the magnetic fields around the nanowires form a traverse periodic quasi-static electromagnetic field array. Therefore, most of the fast electrons are confined at the nanowire surfaces and transport forward. More importantly, due to the divergent property of the beams, the magnitudes of the generated fields decrease with the target depth. The lateral momenta of the electrons convert into the forward momenta through Lorenz force, and they cannot recover their initial values. Therefore, the fast electrons can be guided and collimated efficiently in the gaps between the nanowires. In our particle-in-cell simulations, the observed guiding efficiency exceeds 80% compared with the reference target.

  12. Role of lattice structure and low temperature resistivity in fast-electron-beam filamentation in carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dance, R. J.; Butler, N. M. H.; Gray, R. J.; MacLellan, D. A.; Rusby, D. R.; Scott, G. G.; Zielbauer, B.; Bagnoud, V.; Xu, H.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Neely, D.; McKenna, P.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of low temperature (eV to tens-of-eV) electrical resistivity on the onset of the filamentation instability in fast-electron transport is investigated in targets comprising of layers of ordered (diamond) and disordered (vitreous) carbon. It is shown experimentally and numerically that the thickness of the disordered carbon layer influences the degree of filamentation of the fast-electron beam. Strong filamentation is produced if the thickness is of the order of 60 μm or greater, for an electron distribution driven by a sub-picosecond, mid-1020 Wcm-2 laser pulse. It is shown that the position of the vitreous carbon layer relative to the fast-electron source (where the beam current density and background temperature are highest) does not have a strong effect because the resistive filamentation growth rate is high in disordered carbon over a wide range of temperatures up to the Spitzer regime.

  13. Improved Fermi operator expansion methods for fast electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, WanZhen; Saravanan, Chandra; Shao, Yihan; Baer, Roi; Bell, Alexis T.; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2003-08-01

    Linear scaling algorithms based on Fermi operator expansions (FOE) have been considered significantly slower than other alternative approaches in evaluating the density matrix in Kohn-Sham density functional theory, despite their attractive simplicity. In this work, two new improvements to the FOE method are introduced. First, novel fast summation methods are employed to evaluate a matrix polynomial or Chebyshev matrix polynomial with matrix multiplications totalling roughly twice the square root of the degree of the polynomial. Second, six different representations of the Fermi operators are compared to assess the smallest possible degree of polynomial expansion for a given target precision. The optimal choice appears to be the complementary error function. Together, these advances make the FOE method competitive with the best existing alternatives.

  14. Vibrational control of electron-transfer reactions: a feasibility study for the fast coherent transfer regime.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, P; Ma, Z; Zhang, P; Beratan, D N; Skourtis, S S

    2015-12-14

    Molecular vibrations and electron-vibrational interactions are central to the control of biomolecular electron and energy-transfer rates. The vibrational control of molecular electron-transfer reactions by infrared pulses may enable the precise probing of electronic-vibrational interactions and of their roles in determining electron-transfer mechanisms. This type of electron-transfer rate control is advantageous because it does not alter the electronic state of the molecular electron-transfer system or irreversibly change its molecular structure. For bridge-mediated electron-transfer reactions, infrared (vibrational) excitation of the bridge linking the electron donor to the electron acceptor was suggested as being capable of influencing the electron-transfer rate by modulating the bridge-mediated donor-to-acceptor electronic coupling. This kind of electron-transfer experiment has been realized, demonstrating that bridge-mediated electron-transfer rates can be changed by exciting vibrational modes of the bridge. Here, we use simple models and ab initio computations to explore the physical constraints on one's ability to vibrationally perturb electron-transfer rates using infrared excitation. These constraints stem from the nature of molecular vibrational spectra, the strengths of the electron-vibrational coupling, and the interaction between molecular vibrations and infrared radiation. With these constraints in mind, we suggest parameter regimes and molecular architectures that may enhance the vibrational control of electron transfer for fast coherent electron-transfer reactions.

  15. Fast probe of local electronic states in nanostructures utilizing a single-lead quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Tomohiro; Amaha, Shinichi; Nakajima, Takashi; Delbecq, Matthieu R.; Yoneda, Jun; Takeda, Kenta; Sugawara, Retsu; Allison, Giles; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D.; Tarucha, Seigo

    2015-09-01

    Transport measurements are powerful tools to probe electronic properties of solid-state materials. To access properties of local electronic states in nanostructures, such as local density of states, electronic distribution and so on, micro-probes utilizing artificial nanostructures have been invented to perform measurements in addition to those with conventional macroscopic electronic reservoirs. Here we demonstrate a new kind of micro-probe: a fast single-lead quantum dot probe, which utilizes a quantum dot coupled only to the target structure through a tunneling barrier and fast charge readout by RF reflectometry. The probe can directly access the local electronic states with wide bandwidth. The probe can also access more electronic states, not just those around the Fermi level, and the operations are robust against bias voltages and temperatures.

  16. Fast probe of local electronic states in nanostructures utilizing a single-lead quantum dot

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, Tomohiro; Amaha, Shinichi; Nakajima, Takashi; Delbecq, Matthieu R.; Yoneda, Jun; Takeda, Kenta; Sugawara, Retsu; Allison, Giles; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D.; Tarucha, Seigo

    2015-01-01

    Transport measurements are powerful tools to probe electronic properties of solid-state materials. To access properties of local electronic states in nanostructures, such as local density of states, electronic distribution and so on, micro-probes utilizing artificial nanostructures have been invented to perform measurements in addition to those with conventional macroscopic electronic reservoirs. Here we demonstrate a new kind of micro-probe: a fast single-lead quantum dot probe, which utilizes a quantum dot coupled only to the target structure through a tunneling barrier and fast charge readout by RF reflectometry. The probe can directly access the local electronic states with wide bandwidth. The probe can also access more electronic states, not just those around the Fermi level, and the operations are robust against bias voltages and temperatures. PMID:26416582

  17. The preplasma effect on the properties of the shock wave driven by a fast electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llor Aisa, E.; Ribeyre, X.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2016-08-01

    Strong shock wave generation by a mono-energetic fast electron beam in a plasma with an increasing density profile is studied theoretically. The proposed analytical model describes the shock wave characteristics for a homogeneous plasma preceded by a low density precursor. The shock pressure and the time of shock formation depend on the ratio of the electron stopping length to the preplasma areal density and on the initial energy of injected electrons. The conclusions of theoretical model are confirmed in numerical simulations.

  18. Fast electron current density profile and diffusion studies during LHCD in PBX-M

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.E.; Kesner, J.; Luckhardt, S.; Paoletti, F.; von Goeler, S.; Bernabei, S.; Kaita, R.; Rimini, F.

    1993-08-01

    Successful current profile control experiments using lower hybrid current drive (LCHD) clearly require knowledge of (1) the location of the driven fast electrons and (2) the ability to maintain that location from spreading due to radial diffusion. These issues can be addressed by examining the data from the hard x-ray camera on PBX-M, a unique diagnostic producing two-dimensional, time resolved tangential images of fast electron bremsstrahlung. Using modeling, these line-of-sight images are inverted to extract a radial fast electron current density profile. We note that ``hollow`` profiles have been observed, indicative of off-axis current drive. These profiles can then be used to calculate an upper bound for an effective fast electron diffusion constant: assuming an extremely radially narrow lower hybrid absorption profile and a transport model based on Rax and Moreau, a model fast electron current density profile is calculated and compared to the experimentally derived profile. The model diffusion constant is adjusted until a good match is found. Applied to steady-state quiescent modes on PBX-M, we obtain an upper limit for an effective diffusion constant of about D*=1.1 m{sup 2}/sec.

  19. Non-relativistic solar electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.

    1974-01-01

    Summary of both the direct spacecraft observations of nonrelativistic solar electrons, and observations of the X-ray and radio emission generated by these particles at the sun and in the interplanetary medium. These observations bear on three physical processes basic to energetic particle phenomena: (1) the acceleration of particles in tenuous plasmas; (2) the propagation of energetic charged particles in a disordered magnetic field, and (3) the interaction of energetic charged particles with tenuous plasmas to produce electromagnetic radiation. Because these electrons are frequently accelerated and emitted by the sun, mostly in small and relatively simple flares, it is possible to define a detailed physical picture of these processes. In many small solar flares nonrelativistic electrons accelerated during flash phase constitute the bulk of the total flare energy. Thus the basic flare mechanism in these flares essentially converts the available flare energy into fast electrons. Nonrelativistic electrons exhibit a wide variety of propagation modes in the interplanetary medium, ranging from diffusive to essentially scatter-free. This variability in the propagation may be explained in terms of the distribution of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations.

  20. Evolution and magnetic topology of the M 1.0 flare of October 22, 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlicki, A.; Schmieder, B.; Vilmer, N.; Aulanier, G.; Del Zanna, G.

    2004-09-01

    In this paper we analyse an M 1.0 confined flare observed mainly during its gradual phase. We use the data taken during a coordinated observational campaign between ground based instruments (THEMIS and VTT) and space observatories (SoHO/CDS and MDI, TRACE and RHESSI). We use these multi-wavelength observations to study the morphology and evolution of the flare, to analyse its gradual phase and to understand the role of various heating mechanisms. During the flare, RHESSI observed emission only within the 3-25 keV spectral range. The RHESSI spectra indicate that the emission of the flare was mainly of thermal origin with a small non-thermal component observed between 10 and 20 keV. Nevertheless, the energy contained in the non-thermal electrons is negligible compared to the thermal energy of the flaring plasma. The temperature of plasma obtained from the fitting of the RHESSI X-ray spectra was between 8.5 and 14 MK. The lower temperature limit is typical for a plasma contained in post flare loops observed in X-rays. Higher temperatures were observed during a secondary peak of emission corresponding to a small impulsive event. The SoHO/CDS observations performed in EUV Fe XIX line also confirm the presence of a hot plasma at temperatures similar to those obtained from RHESSI spectra. The EUV structures were located at the same place as RHESSI X-ray emission. The magnetic topology analysis of the AR coming from a linear force-free field extrapolation explains the observed features of the gradual phase of the flare i.e. the asymmetry of the ribbons and their fast propagation. The combination of the multi-wavelength observations with the magnetic model further suggests that the onset of the flare would be due to the reconnection of an emerging flux in a sheared magnetic configuration.

  1. Solar flare soft-X-ray spectra from Very Low Frequency observations of ionospheric modulations: Possibility of uninterrupted observation of non-thermal electron-plasma interaction in solar atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palit, Sourav; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Ray, Suman

    2016-07-01

    The hard and soft X-ray regions of a solar flare spectrum are the manifestation of interaction, namely of bremsstrahlung radiation of the non-thermal electrons moving inward in the denser part of the solar atmosphere with the plasma heated by those energetic electrons. The continuous and uninterrupted knowledge of X-ray photon spectra of flares are of great importance to derive information on the electron acceleration and hence time-evolution of energy transport and physics during solar flares. Satellite observations of solar X-ray spectrum are often limited by the restricted windows in each duty cycle to avoid the interaction of detectors and instruments with harmful energetic charge particles. In this work we have tried to tackle the problem by examining the possibility of using Earth's ionosphere and atmosphere as the detector of such transient events. Earth's lower ionosphere and upper atmosphere are the places where the X-rays and gamma-rays from such astronomical sources are absorbed. The electron-ion production rates due to the ionization of such energetic photons at different heights depend on the intensity and wavelength of the injected spectra and hence vary from one source to another. Obviously the electron and ion density vs. altitude profile has the imprint of the incident photon spectrum. As a preliminary exercise we developed a novel deconvolution method to extract the soft X-ray part of spectra of some solar flares of different classes from the electron density profiles obtained from Very Low Frequency (VLF) observation of lower ionosphere during those events. The method presented here is useful to carry out a similar exercise to infer the higher energy part of solar flare spectra and spectra of more energetic events such as the GRBs, SGRs etc. with the possibilities of probing even lower parts of the atmosphere.

  2. Characterization of intense laser-produced fast electrons using hard x-rays via bremsstrahlung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, H.; Sentoku, Y.; Bass, A.; Griffin, B.; Pandit, R.; Beg, F.; Chen, H.; McLean, H.; Link, A. J.; Patel, P. K.; Ping, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Energy distribution of high-power, short-pulse laser produced fast electrons was experimentally and numerically studied using high-energy bremsstrahlung x-rays. The hard x-ray photons and escaping electrons from various metal foils, irradiated by the 50 TW Leopard laser at Nevada Terawatt Facility, were recorded with a differential filter stack spectrometer that is sensitive to photons produced by mainly 0.5-2 MeV electrons and an electron spectrometer measuring >2 MeV electrons. The experimental bremsstrahlung and the slope of the measured escaped electrons were compared with an analytic calculation using an input electron spectrum estimated with the ponderomotive scaling. The result shows that the electron spectrum entering a Cu foil could be continuous single slope with the slope temperature of ˜1.5 MeV in the detector range. The experiment and analytic calculation were then compared with a 2D particle-in-cell code, PICLS, including a newly developed radiation transport module. The simulation shows that a two-temperature electron distribution is generated at the laser interaction region, but only the hot component of the fast electrons flow into the target during the interaction because the low energy electron component is trapped by self-generated magnetic field in the preformed plasma. A significant amount of the photons less than 100 keV observed in the experiment could be attributed to the low energy electrons entering the foil a few picoseconds later after the gating field disappears.

  3. Effects of resistive magnetic field on fast electron divergence measured in experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X. H.; Zhuo, H. B.; Ma, Y. Y.; Xu, H.; Yu, T. P.; Zou, D. B.; Ge, Z. Y.; Xu, B. B.; Zhu, Q. J.; Shao, F. Q.; Borghesi, M.

    2015-02-01

    Transport of fast electrons driven by an ultraintense laser through a tracer layer buried in solid targets is studied by particle-in-cell simulations. It is found that intense resistive magnetic fields, having a magnitude of several thousand Tesla, are generated at the interfaces of the materials due to the steep resistivity gradient between the target and tracer layer. Such magnetic fields can significantly inhibit the fast electron propagation. The electrons that can penetrate the first interface are mostly confined in the buried layer by the magnetic fields and cause heating of the tracer layer. The lateral extent of the heated region can be significantly larger than that of the relativistic electron beam. This finding suggests that the relativistic electron divergence inferred from Kα x-ray emission in experiments might be overestimated.

  4. Exciton dispersion in silicon nanostructures formed by intense, ultra-fast electronic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamza, A. V.; Newman, M. W.; Thielen, P. A.; Lee, H. W. H.; Schenkel, T.; McDonald, J. W.; Schneider, D. H.

    The intense, ultra-fast electronic excitation of clean silicon (100)-(2×1) surfaces leads to the formation of silicon nanostructures embedded in silicon, which photoluminesce in the yellow-green ( 2-eV band gap). The silicon surfaces were irradiated with slow, highly charged ions (e.g. Xe44+ and Au53+) to produce the ultra-fast electronic excitation. The observation of excitonic features in the luminescence from these nanostructures has recently been reported. In this paper we report the dispersion of the excitonic features with laser excitation energy. A phonon-scattering process is proposed to explain the observed dispersion.

  5. Transport of fast electrons in a nanowire array with collisional effects included

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Boyuan; Zhang, Zhimeng; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Bo; Zhao, Zongqing; Shan, Lianqiang; Zhou, Weimin; Zhang, Baohan; Cao, Lihua; Gu, Yuqiu

    2015-12-15

    The transport of picosecond laser generated fast electrons in a nanowire array is studied with two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Our simulations show that a fast electron beam is initially guided and collimated by strong magnetic filaments in the array. Subsequently, after the decomposition of the structure of nanowire array due to plasma expansion, the beam is still collimated by the resistive magnetic field. An analytical model is established to give a criterion for long-term beam collimation in a nanowire array; it indicates that the nanowire cell should be wide enough to keep the beam collimated in picosecond scale.

  6. Recent experiment on fast electron transport in ultra-high intensity laser interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batani, D.; Baton, S.; Koenig, M.; Guillou, P.; Loupias, B.; Vinci, T.; Rousseaux, C.; Gremillet, L.; Morace, A.; Redaelli, R.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Kodama, R.; Ozaki, N.; Norimatsu, T.; Rassuchine, J.; Cowan, T.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Santos, J. J.

    2008-05-01

    We performed an experiment with cone targets in planar geometry devoted to the study of fast electron generation, propagation, and target heating. This was done at LULI with the 100 TW laser at intensities up to 1019 W/cm2. Fast electrons penetration, with and without cones, was studied with different diagnostics (Kα imaging, Kα spectroscopy, visible emission) for ω or 2ω irradiation. At ω, the pre-plasma generated by the laser pedestal fills the cone and prevents the beam from reaching the tip.

  7. Fast electron transport and heating in ultraintense laser pulse interaction with solid targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Michel; Amiranoff, Francois; Baton, Sophie; Gremillet, Laurent; Martinolli, Emanuele; Batani, Dimitri; Bernardinello, Andrea; Greison, Gabriella; Hall, Tom; Rabec Le Gloahec, Marc; Rousseaux, Christophe; Santos, Joao

    2000-10-01

    In the context of the fast electron transport in solid matter and the fast ignitor scheme, we report on results from ultraintense laser pulse interaction with thick targets. Experiments have been performed at LULI with the 100 TW CPA Nd:glass laser, at intensities up to a few 10^19 W/cm^2. Images obtained from classical and chirped-pulse time-resolved reflectometry diagnostics of the back-side target give evidence of the rear surface heating; the geometry and the dynamics of the energy deposition of the relativistic electrons flux into matter are also inferred.

  8. PIC modeling of material dependence on fast electron generation and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, R.; Wei, M. S.; Chawla, S.; Sentoku, Y.; Stephens, R. B.; Beg, F. N.

    2011-10-01

    2D collisional PIC simulations, using PICLS code that includes dynamic ionization and radiation cooling, are performed to model a recent experiment on the Titan laser using multi-foil targets, where 2x reduction in total fast electron flux and a smaller spot size through high-Z layer were observed. Modeling show that a thin high-Z transport layer (e.g., Au) near lower Z source layer introduces a collimating effect on fast electron transport. Strong self-generated resistive B-fields are produced inside Au layer and at the interface (Al/Au), which confine the fast electron propagation and can also trap electrons in wing region to inhibit their propagation. In addition, effects of the surface material on LPI produced fast electron source characteristics are examined in both planar and buried cone geometries. Supported by US DOE under contracts DE-AC52 07NA27344(ACE) and DE-FC02-04ER54789 (FSC).

  9. Integrated kinetic simulation of laser-plasma interactions, fast-electron generation, and transport in fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, A. J.; Cohen, B. I.; Divol, L.

    2010-05-15

    We present new results on the physics of short-pulse laser-matter interaction of kilojoule-picosecond pulses at full spatial and temporal scale using a new approach that combines a three-dimensional collisional electromagnetic particle-in-cell code with a magnetohydrodynamic-hybrid model of high-density plasma. In the latter, collisions damp out plasma waves, and an Ohm's law with electron inertia effects neglected determines the electric field. In addition to yielding orders of magnitude in speed-up while avoiding numerical instabilities, this allows us to model the whole problem in a single unified framework: the laser-plasma interaction at subcritical densities, energy deposition at relativistic critical densities, and fast- electron transport in solid densities. Key questions such as the multipicosecond temporal evolution of the laser energy conversion into hot electrons, the impact of return currents on the laser-plasma interaction, and the effect of self-generated electric and magnetic fields on electron transport will be addressed. We will report applications to current experiments.

  10. Integrated Kinetic Simulation of Laser-Plasma Interactions, Fast-Electron Generation and Transport in Fast Ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, A; Cohen, B; Divol, L

    2009-11-16

    We present new results on the physics of short-pulse laser-matter interaction of kilojoule-picosecond pulses at full spatial and temporal scale, using a new approach that combines a 3D collisional electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell code with an MHD-hybrid model of high-density plasma. In the latter, collisions damp out plasma waves, and an Ohm's law with electron inertia effects neglected determines the electric field. In addition to yielding orders of magnitude in speed-up while avoiding numerical instabilities, this allows us to model the whole problem in a single unified framework: the laser-plasma interaction at sub-critical densities, energy deposition at relativistic critical densities, and fast-electron transport in solid densities. Key questions such as the multi-picosecond temporal evolution of the laser energy conversion into hot electrons, the impact of return currents on the laser-plasma interaction, and the effect of self-generated electric and magnetic fields on electron transport will be addressed. We will report applications to current experiments.

  11. Bayesian model comparison of solar flare spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, J.; Holman, G.

    2012-12-01

    The detailed understanding of solar flares requires an understanding of the physics of accelerated electrons, since electrons carry a large fraction of the total energy released in a flare. Hard X-ray energy flux spectral observations of solar flares can be fit with different parameterized models of the interaction of the flare-accelerated electrons with the solar plasma. Each model describes different possible physical effects that may occur in solar flares. Bayesian model comparison provides a technique for assessing which model best describes the data. The advantage of this technique over others is that it can fully account for the different number and type of parameters in each model. We demonstrate this using Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) spectral data from the GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) X4.8 flare of 23-July-2002. We suggest that the observed spectrum can be reproduced using two different parameterized models of the flare electron content. The first model assumes that the flare-accelerated electron spectrum consisting of a single power law with a fixed low energy cutoff assumed to be below the range of fitted X-ray energies, interacting with a non-uniformly ionized target. The second model assumes that the flare-accelerated electron spectrum has a broken power law and a low energy cutoff, which interacts with a fully ionized target plasma. The low energy cutoff in this model is a parameter used in fitting the data. We will introduce and use Bayesian model comparison techniques to decide which model best explains the observed data. This work is funded by the NASA Solar and Heliospheric Physics program.

  12. Neutrons and Gamma Rays from Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    The theory of neutron and gamma-ray production in flares is reviewed and comparisons of the calculations with data are made. The principal conclusions pertain to the accelerated proton and electron numbers and spectra in flares and to the interaction site of these particles in the solar atmosphere. For the June 21, 1980 flare, from which high-energy neutrons and high-energy ( MeV) photons were seen, the electron-to-proton ratio is energy dependent and much smaller than unity at energies greater than 1 MeV. The interaction site of these particles appears to be the solar chromosphere.

  13. Controlling the fast electron divergence in a solid target with multiple laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Volpe, L; Feugeas, J-L; Nicolai, Ph; Santos, J J; Touati, M; Breil, J; Batani, D; Tikhonchuk, V

    2014-12-01

    Controlling the divergence of laser-driven fast electrons is compulsory to meet the ignition requirements in the fast ignition inertial fusion scheme. It was shown recently that using two consecutive laser pulses one can improve the electron-beam collimation. In this paper we propose an extension of this method by using a sequence of several laser pulses with a gradually increasing intensity. Profiling the laser-pulse intensity opens a possibility to transfer to the electron beam a larger energy while keeping its divergence under control. We present numerical simulations performed with a radiation hydrodynamic code coupled to a reduced kinetic module. Simulation with a sequence of three laser pulses shows that the proposed method allows one to improve the efficiency of the double pulse scheme at least by a factor of 2. This promises to provide an efficient energy transport in a dense matter by a collimated beam of fast electrons, which is relevant for many applications such as ion-beam sources and could present also an interest for fast ignition inertial fusion. PMID:25615206

  14. Electronic and structural response of materials to fast intense laser pulses, including light-induced superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Roland E.

    2016-06-01

    This is a very brief discussion of some experimental and theoretical studies of materials responding to fast intense laser pulses, with emphasis on those cases where the electronic response and structural response are both potentially important (and ordinarily coupled). Examples are nonthermal insulator-to-metal transitions and light-induced superconductivity in cuprates, fullerenes, and an organic Mott insulator.

  15. Observations of the scatter-free solar-flare electrons in the energy range 20-1000 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Fisk, L. A.; Lin, R. P.

    1971-01-01

    Observations of the scatter-free electron events from solar active region McMath No. 8905 are presented. The measurements were made on Explorer 33 satellite. The data show that more than 80% of the electrons from these events undergo no or little scattering and that these electrons travel only approximately 1.5 a.u. between the sun and the earth. The duration of these events cannot be accounted fully by velocity dispersion alone. It is suggested that these electrons could be continuously injected into interplanetary medium for a time interval of approximately 2 to 3 minutes. Energy spectra of these electrons are discussed.

  16. Identification of ultra-fast electronic and thermal processes during femtosecond laser ablation of Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, Shazia; Shahid Rafique, M.; Husinsky, Wolfgang

    2012-11-01

    Ultra-fast electronic and thermal processes for the energy deposition mechanism during femtosecond laser ablation of Si have been identified by means of atomic force microscopy and Raman scattering techniques. For this purpose, Si targets were exposed with 800-nm, 25-fs Ti:sapphire laser pulses for different laser fluencies in air and under UHV (ultra high vacuum) conditions. Various nano- and microstructures on the surface of the irradiated samples are revealed by a detailed surface topography analysis. Ultra-fast electronic processes are dominant in the lower-fluence regime. Therefore, by starting from the ablation threshold three different fluence regimes have been chosen: a lower-fluence regime (0.06-0.5 J cm-2 single-shot irradiation under UHV condition and 0.25-2.5 J cm-2 single-shot irradiation in ambient condition), a moderate-fluence regime (0.25-1.5 J cm-2 multiple-shot irradiation), and a higher-fluence regime (2.5-3.5 J cm-2 multiple-shot irradiation). Around the ablation threshold fluence, most significant features identified at the Si surface are nanohillock-like structures. The appearance of these nanohillocks is regarded as typical features for fast electronic processes (correlated with existence of hot electrons) and is explained on the basis of Coulomb explosion. The growth of these typical features (nanohillocks) by femtosecond laser irradiation is an element of novelty. At moderate irradiation fluence, a ring-shaped ablation with larger bumps and periodic surface structures is observed and is considered as a footprint of ultra-fast melting. Further increase in the laser fluence, i.e. a higher-fluence regime, resulted in strong enhancement of the thermal process with the appearance of larger islands. The change in surface topography provides an innovative clue to differentiate between ultra-fast electronic processes, i.e. Coulomb explosion (sub-100 fs) at a lower-fluence regime and ultra-fast melting (hundreds of fs) at a moderate-fluence regime

  17. Fast Electronic Relaxation in Metal Clusters via Excitation of Coherent Shape Deformations: Slipping Through a Bottleneck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kresin, Vitaly; Ovchinnikov, Yuri; Kresin, Vladimir

    2005-03-01

    We introduce and describe a fast electronic relaxation channel which is particular to free metallic nanoclusters. This channel overcomes the possibility of a phonon bottleneck by invoking the essential role of cluster shape deformations. Such a deformation entails the appearance of coherent surface phonon excitations and enables internal conversion at the level crossing point, thus allowing large energy transfer from an excited electron to the ionic subsystem. As a result, one can show that (unlike usual multiphonon processes) the shape deformation channel is capable of producing short electronic relaxation times, much less than a picosecond. The calculations are in agreement with recent pump-probe photoelectron measurements of relaxation in Aln^- clusters.

  18. An electron/ion spectrometer with the ability of low energy electron measurement for fast ignition experiments.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, T; Kojima, S; Arikawa, Y; Shiraga, H; Sakagami, H; Fujioka, S; Kato, R

    2014-11-01

    An electron energy spectrometer (ESM) is one of the most fundamental diagnostics in the fast ignition experiment. It is necessary to observe the spectra down to a low energy range in order to obtain the accurate deposition efficiency toward the core. Here, we realize the suitable ESM by using a ferrite magnet with a moderate magnetic field of 0.3 T and a rectangular magnetic circuit covered with a steel plate in the inlet side. PMID:25430292

  19. An electron/ion spectrometer with the ability of low energy electron measurement for fast ignition experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, T.; Sakagami, H.; Kojima, S.; Arikawa, Y.; Shiraga, H.; Fujioka, S.; Kato, R.

    2014-11-15

    An electron energy spectrometer (ESM) is one of the most fundamental diagnostics in the fast ignition experiment. It is necessary to observe the spectra down to a low energy range in order to obtain the accurate deposition efficiency toward the core. Here, we realize the suitable ESM by using a ferrite magnet with a moderate magnetic field of 0.3 T and a rectangular magnetic circuit covered with a steel plate in the inlet side.

  20. LASER-driven fast electron dynamics in gaseous media under the influence of large electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batani, D.; Baton, S. D.; Manclossi, M.; Piazza, D.; Koenig, M.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Popescu, H.; Rousseaux, C.; Borghesi, M.; Cecchetti, C.; Schiavi, A.

    2009-03-01

    We present the results of experiments performed at the LULI laboratory, using the 100 TW laser facility, on the study of the propagation of fast electrons in gas targets. The implemented diagnostics included chirped shadowgraphy and proton imaging. Proton images showed the presence of very large fields in the gas (produced by charge separation). In turn, these imply a strong inhibition of propagation, and a slowing down of the fast electron cloud as it penetrates in the gas. Indeed chirped shadowgraphy images show a reduction in time of the velocity of the electron cloud from the initial value, of the order of a fraction of c, over a time scale of a few picoseconds.

  1. Solar Flare Aimed at Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    At the height of the solar cycle, the Sun is finally displaying some fireworks. This image from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) shows a large solar flare from June 6, 2000 at 1424 Universal Time (10:24 AM Eastern Daylight Savings Time). Associated with the flare was a coronal mass ejection that sent a wave of fast moving charged particles straight towards Earth. (The image was acquired by the Extreme ultaviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT), one of 12 instruments aboard SOHO) Solar activity affects the Earth in several ways. The particles generated by flares can disrupt satellite communications and interfere with power transmission on the Earth's surface. Earth's climate is tied to the total energy emitted by the sun, cooling when the sun radiates less energy and warming when solar output increases. Solar radiation also produces ozone in the stratosphere, so total ozone levels tend to increase during the solar maximum. For more information about these solar flares and the SOHO mission, see NASA Science News or the SOHO home page. For more about the links between the sun and climate change, see Sunspots and the Solar Max. Image courtesy SOHO Extreme ultaviolet Imaging Telescope, ESA/NASA

  2. An optimum design of implosion with external magnetic field for electron beam guiding in fast ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatomo, H.; Johzaki, T.; Asahina, T.; Matsuo, K.; Sunahara, A.; Sakagami, H.; Sano, T.; Mima, K.; Morace, A.; Zhang, Z.; Fujioka, S.; Shigemori, K.; Shiraga, H.; FIREX project group

    2016-05-01

    Compression of solid spherical target under the strong external magnetic field is studied using two dimensional radiative magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulation code for fast ignition. The simulation results show that a compression of a solid sphere target is stable, and it is possible to achieve a high areal density core plasma. Assuming the GXII scale laser, it will be ρR=60-80mg/cm2. Due to the magnetic diffusion in the solid target, the magnetic mirror ratio is less than 4, which does not reflect most of the hot electrons for heating core. These properties are preferable for fast ignition scheme.

  3. SXR Continuum Radiation Transmitted Through Metallic Filters: An Analytical Approach To Fast Electron Temperature Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Tritz, K.; Kramer, T.; Stutman, D.; Finkentha, M.; Hill, K.; Bitter, M.

    2010-08-26

    A new set of analytic formulae describes the transmission of soft X-ray (SXR) continuum radiation through a metallic foil for its application to fast electron temperature measurements in fusion plasmas. This novel approach shows good agreement with numerical calculations over a wide range of plasma temperatures in contrast with the solutions obtained when using a transmission approximated by a single-Heaviside function [S. von Goeler, Rev. Sci. Instrum., 20, 599, (1999)]. The new analytic formulae can improve the interpretation of the experimental results and thus contribute in obtaining fast teperature measurements in between intermittent Thomson Scattering data.

  4. White-light Flares on Close Binaries Observed with Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Qing; Xin, Yu; Liu, Ji-Feng; Zhang, Xiao-Bin; Gao, Shuang

    2016-06-01

    Based on Kepler data, we present the results of a search for white light flares on 1049 close binaries. We identify 234 flare binaries, of which 6818 flares are detected. We compare the flare-binary fraction in different binary morphologies (“detachedness”). The result shows that the fractions in over-contact and ellipsoidal binaries are approximately 10%-20% lower than those in detached and semi-detached systems. We calculate the binary flare activity level (AL) of all the flare binaries, and discuss its variations along the orbital period (P orb) and rotation period (P rot, calculated for only detached binaries). We find that the AL increases with decreasing P orb or P rot, up to the critical values at P orb ˜ 3 days or P rot ˜ 1.5 days, and thereafter the AL starts decreasing no matter how fast the stars rotate. We examine the flaring rate as a function of orbital phase in two eclipsing binaries on which a large number of flares are detected. It appears that there is no correlation between flaring rate and orbital phase in these two binaries. In contrast, when we examine the function with 203 flares on 20 non-eclipse ellipsoidal binaries, bimodal distribution of amplitude-weighted flare numbers shows up at orbital phases 0.25 and 0.75. Such variation could be larger than what is expected from the cross section modification.

  5. Measurements of Continuum Flux in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotrč, P.; Heinzel, P.; Procházka, O.

    2016-04-01

    A broad-band diagnostics of chromospheric flare plasma needs to analyze spectra covering many spectral lines and various continuum features. The flare spectra are well detected on the background of the solar disk, but the detection of flare line emission from the Sun-as-a-star in optical is much more difficult due to a strong background radiation. When the flare/background radiation contrast is strong enough to be detected, we need a device for measuring the flux from a selected part of the flaring region. Here we present technical demands for such an instrument and its brief description. This device denoted as Image Selector is a post-focus instrument installed at the horizontal solar telescope HSFA2 of the Ondřejov observatory, described by Kotrč (2009). Its core consists of a system of diaphragms, imaging Hα telescope and a fast spectrometer with dispersion of 3 px per Å but with cadency reaching up to 50 frames per second. The first solar flares observed recently by this novel technique provide quite interesting results. Our analysis of the data proves that the described device is sufficiently sensitive to detect variations in the Balmer continuum during solar flares.

  6. Understanding Solar Flare Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatland, M. S.

    2005-12-01

    A review is presented of work aimed at understanding solar flare statistics, with emphasis on the well known flare power-law size distribution. Although avalanche models are perhaps the favoured model to describe flare statistics, their physical basis is unclear, and they are divorced from developing ideas in large-scale reconnection theory. An alternative model, aimed at reconciling large-scale reconnection models with solar flare statistics, is revisited. The solar flare waiting-time distribution has also attracted recent attention. Observed waiting-time distributions are described, together with what they might tell us about the flare phenomenon. Finally, a practical application of flare statistics to flare prediction is described in detail, including the results of a year of automated (web-based) predictions from the method.

  7. RE-FLARING OF A POST-FLARE LOOP SYSTEM DRIVEN BY FLUX ROPE EMERGENCE AND TWISTING

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Guo, Y.; Zhang, J.; Jing, J.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2010-06-10

    In this Letter, we study in detail the evolution of the post-flare loops on 2005 January 15 that occurred between two consecutive solar eruption events, both of which generated a fast halo coronal mass ejection (CME) and a major flare. The post-flare loop system, formed after the first CME/flare eruption, evolved rapidly, as manifested by the unusual accelerating rise motion of the loops. Through nonlinear force-free field models, we obtain the magnetic structure over the active region. It clearly shows that the flux rope below the loops also kept rising, accompanied with increasing twist and length. Finally, the post-flare magnetic configuration evolved to a state that resulted in the second CME/flare eruption. This is an event in which the post-flare loops can re-flare in a short period of {approx}16 hr following the first CME/flare eruption. The observed re-flaring at the same location is likely driven by the rapid evolution of the flux rope caused by the magnetic flux emergence and the rotation of the sunspot. This observation provides valuable information on CME/flare models and their prediction.

  8. Analysis of Fast Electron Energy Distribution by Measuring Hard X-ray Bremsstrahlung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daykin, Tyler; Sawada, Hiroshi; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Bass, Anthony; Griffin, Brandon; Pandit, Rishi; Beg, Farhat; Chen, Hui; McLean, Harry; Link, Anthony; Patel, Prav; Ping, Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Characterization of intense, short-pulse laser-produced fast electrons is important for fundamental understanding and applications. We carried out an experiment to characterize the fast electron energy distribution by measuring angular-dependent high-energy bremsstrahlung x-rays. A 100 μm thick metal foil (Al, Cu, and Ag) mounted on a plastic backing was irradiated by the 0.35 ps, 15 J Leopard Laser at the Nevada Terawatt Facility. The bremsstrahlung x-rays and the escaping electrons from the target were recorded using differential filter stack spectrometers at 22° and 45° off laser axis and a magnet-based electron spectrometer along the laser axis. The electron spectrum inferred from two different diagnostics had single slope temperature of ~ 1.5 MeV for the Cu foil. The results were compared to an analytic calculation and a 2-D Particle-in-cell code, PICLS. The analysis of the electron energy distribution and angular distribution will be presented. This work was supported by the UNR Office of the Provost and by DOE/OFES under Contract No. DE-SC0008827. This collaborative work was partially supported under the auspices of the US Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Con.

  9. Generation and Transport of Fast Electrons in Laser Irradiated Targets at Relativistic Intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiranoff, F.; Baton, S. D.; Gremillet, L.; Guilbaud, O.; Koenig, M.; Martinolli, E.; Santos, J. J.; Le Gloahec, M. Rabec; Rousseaux, C.; Hall, T.

    2002-10-01

    The transport of relativistic electrons in solid targets irradiated by a short laser pulse at relativistic intensities has been studied both experimentally and numerically. A Monte-Carlo collision code takes into account individual collisions with the ions and electrons in the target. A 3D-hybrid code takes into account these collisions as well as the generation of electric and magnetic fields and the self-consistent motion of the electrons in these fields. It predicts a magnetic guiding of a fraction of the fast electron current over long distances and a localized heating of the material along the propagation axis. In experiments performed at LULI on the 100 TW laser facility, several diagnostics have been implemented to diagnose the geometry of the fast electron transport and the target heating. The typical conditions were: E1 less-than-or-equal 20 J, lambda = 1 mum, tau approximately 300 fs, I approximately 1018-5.1019W/cm2. The results indicate a modest heating of the target (typically 20-40 eV over 20 mum to 50 mum), consistent with an acceleration of the electrons inside a wide aperture cone along the laser axis.

  10. Particle Acceleration in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosian, V.

    Several new observations notably high spatial and spectral X-ray observations of impulsive phase of solar flares by YOHKOH and RHESSI, and Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) spectra by ACE have provided strong evidence in favor of stochastic acceleration of electrons, protons and other ions by plasma waves or turbulence. Theoretical arguments also favor such a model if the seed particles come from the background thermal plasma. I will describe these evidences and the theoretical framework for evaluation of the accelerated particle spectra, their transport and radiation. The predictions of the models will be compared with several features of the observations with specific emphasize on heating vs acceleration by turbulence, thermal vs nonthermal electron spectra, looptop vs footpoint emission fro flaring loops, electron vs proton acceleration rates and 3He vs 4He (and other ion) abundances in SEPs.

  11. Measurement of Fast Electron Transport by Lower Hybrid Modulation Experiments in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, A. E.; Bonoli, P. T.; Parker, R.; Porkolab, M.; Wallace, G.; Wright, J. C.; Wilson, J. R.; Harvey, R. W.; Smirnov, A. P.

    2009-11-26

    The Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) system on Alcator C-Mod can produce spectra with a wide range of peak parallel refractive index (n{sub parallel}). An experiment in which LH power is square-wave modulated on a time scale much faster than the current relaxation time does not significantly alter the poloidal magnetic field inside the plasma and thus allows for realistic modeling and consistent plasma conditions for different ny spectra. Boxcar binning of hard x-rays during LH power modulation allows for time resolution sufficient to resolve the build-up, steady-state, and slowing-down of fast electrons. A transport model built in Matlab has been used to determine a fast electron pinch velocity for a high-n{sub parallel} case of 1-2 m/s.

  12. A fast high-order method to calculate wakefield forces in an electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Mitchell, Chad; Ryne, Robert D.

    2012-03-22

    In this paper we report on a high-order fast method to numerically calculate wakefield forces in an electron beam given a wake function model. This method is based on a Newton-Cotes quadrature rule for integral approximation and an FFT method for discrete summation that results in an O(Nlog(N)) computational cost, where N is the number of grid points. Using the Simpson quadrature rule with an accuracy of O(h4), where h is the grid size, we present numerical calculation of the wakefields from a resonator wake function model and from a one-dimensional coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) wake model. Besides the fast speed and high numerical accuracy, the calculation using the direct line density instead of the first derivative of the line density avoids numerical filtering of the electron density function for computing the CSR wakefield force. I. INTRODUCTION

  13. SMALL-SCALE MICROWAVE BURSTS IN LONG-DURATION SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Baolin

    2013-08-20

    Solar small-scale microwave bursts (SMBs), including microwave dot, spike, and narrow-band type III bursts, are characterized by very short timescales, narrow frequency bandwidth, and very high brightness temperatures. Based on observations of the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer at Huairou with superhigh cadence and frequency resolution, this work presents an intensive investigation of SMBs in several flares that occurred in active region NOAA 10720 during 2005 January 14-21. Especially for long-duration flares, the SMBs occurred not only in the early rising and impulsive phase, but also in the flare decay phase and even after the end of the flare. These SMBs are strong bursts with inferred brightness temperatures of at least 8.18 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11}-1.92 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} K, very short lifetimes of 5-18 ms, relative frequency bandwidths of 0.7%-3.5%, and superhigh frequency drifting rates. Together with their obviously different polarizations from background emission (the quiet Sun, and the underlying flaring broadband continuum), such SMBs should be individual, independent strong coherent bursts related to some non-thermal energy release and the production of energetic particles in a small-scale source region. These facts show the existence of small-scale strong non-thermal energy releasing activities after the flare maxima, which is meaningful for predicting space weather. Physical analysis indicates that a plasma mechanism may be the most favorable candidate for the formation of SMBs. From the plasma mechanism, the velocities and kinetic energy of fast electrons can be deduced and the region of electron acceleration can also be tracked.

  14. Acoustic mode driven by fast electrons in TJ-II Electron Cyclotron Resonance plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, B. J.; Ochando, M. A.; López-Bruna, D.

    2016-08-01

    Intense harmonic oscillations in radiation signals (δ I/I∼ 5{%}) are commonly observed during Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) heating in TJ-II stellarator plasmas at low line-averaged electron density, 0.15 < \\bar{n}e < 0.6 ×1019 \\text{m}-3 . The frequency agrees with acoustic modes. The poloidal modal structure is compatible with Geodesic Acoustic Modes (GAM) but an n \

  15. Fast Monte Carlo Electron-Photon Transport Method and Application in Accurate Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Lijuan; Sun, Guangyao; Zheng, Huaqing; Song, Jing; Chen, Zhenping; Li, Gui

    2014-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) method is the most accurate computational method for dose calculation, but its wide application on clinical accurate radiotherapy is hindered due to its poor speed of converging and long computation time. In the MC dose calculation research, the main task is to speed up computation while high precision is maintained. The purpose of this paper is to enhance the calculation speed of MC method for electron-photon transport with high precision and ultimately to reduce the accurate radiotherapy dose calculation time based on normal computer to the level of several hours, which meets the requirement of clinical dose verification. Based on the existing Super Monte Carlo Simulation Program (SuperMC), developed by FDS Team, a fast MC method for electron-photon coupled transport was presented with focus on two aspects: firstly, through simplifying and optimizing the physical model of the electron-photon transport, the calculation speed was increased with slightly reduction of calculation accuracy; secondly, using a variety of MC calculation acceleration methods, for example, taking use of obtained information in previous calculations to avoid repeat simulation of particles with identical history; applying proper variance reduction techniques to accelerate MC method convergence rate, etc. The fast MC method was tested by a lot of simple physical models and clinical cases included nasopharyngeal carcinoma, peripheral lung tumor, cervical carcinoma, etc. The result shows that the fast MC method for electron-photon transport was fast enough to meet the requirement of clinical accurate radiotherapy dose verification. Later, the method will be applied to the Accurate/Advanced Radiation Therapy System ARTS as a MC dose verification module.

  16. Fast electron flux driven by lower hybrid wave in the scrape-off layer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y. L.; Xu, G. S.; Wang, H. Q.; Wan, B. N.; Chen, R.; Wang, L.; Gan, K. F.; Yang, J. H.; Zhang, X. J.; Liu, S. C.; Li, M. H.; Ding, S.; Yan, N.; Zhang, W.; Hu, G. H.; Liu, Y. L.; Shao, L. M.; Li, J.; Chen, L.; Zhao, N.; and others

    2015-02-15

    The fast electron flux driven by Lower Hybrid Wave (LHW) in the scrape-off layer (SOL) in EAST is analyzed both theoretically and experimentally. The five bright belts flowing along the magnetic field lines in the SOL and hot spots at LHW guard limiters observed by charge coupled device and infrared cameras are attributed to the fast electron flux, which is directly measured by retarding field analyzers (RFA). The current carried by the fast electron flux, ranging from 400 to 6000 A/m{sup 2} and in the direction opposite to the plasma current, is scanned along the radial direction from the limiter surface to the position about 25 mm beyond the limiter. The measured fast electron flux is attributed to the high parallel wave refractive index n{sub ||} components of LHW. According to the antenna structure and the LHW power absorbed by plasma, a broad parallel electric field spectrum of incident wave from the antennas is estimated. The radial distribution of LHW-driven current density is analyzed in SOL based on Landau damping of the LHW. The analytical results support the RFA measurements, showing a certain level of consistency. In addition, the deposition profile of the LHW power density in SOL is also calculated utilizing this simple model. This study provides some fundamental insight into the heating and current drive effects induced by LHW in SOL, and should also help to interpret the observations and related numerical analyses of the behaviors of bright belts and hot spots induced by LHW.

  17. Collective effects in electronic sputtering of organic molecular ions by fast incident cluster ions

    SciTech Connect

    Salehpour, M.; Fishel, D.L.; Hunt, J.E.

    1988-07-15

    The collective sputtering effect of fast primary cluster ions on the yield of secondary molecular ions has been demonstrated for the first time. Results show that the sputtering yield of valine negative molecular ions per incident carbon atom, in a C/sup +//sub n/ incident cluster ion, increases with increasing n. The yield results are interpreted as a direct effect of the enhancement in the electronic stopping power per atom in cluster ions compared to atomic ions.

  18. Studies on LH-generated Fast Electron Tail Using the Oblique ECE Diagnostic at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Sozzi, C.; Grossetti, G.; Farina, D.; Figini, L.; Garavaglia, S.; Nowak, S.; Baranov, Y.; Kirov, K.; Luna, E. de la

    2009-11-26

    The new Oblique ECE diagnostics of JET allows simultaneous measurement along three lines of sight at different toroidal angles. JET pulses, in which modulated LHCD power was applied, were analyzed by means of the SPECE emission code, which takes into account the fast electron tail generated by LH. The code results were compared to the ECE spectra from the oblique ECE diagnostic. The match between the computed and the experimental data from the three lines of sight provides an estimate of the density of superthermal electrons and of their maximum energy from which the fraction of the plasma current driven by LHCD is derived.

  19. Effective Parameters on Energy Losses of Fast Electron in Fusion Mediums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, M.; S. F., Ghazizadeh

    2013-10-01

    The stopping and scattering of fast electrons in a dense plasma relevant to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) are investigated numerically with the latest improved cross section equations. Binary and collective effects are considered to determine beam transport parameters such as range, penetration depth, spreading processes as straggling and blooming versus electron energy and plasma parameters. Blooming and straggling effects, which act as consequences of scattering with statistical assumption in collisions, lead to a non-uniform, extended region of energy deposition. Finally the mean angle of deflections is calculated for different plasma energies.

  20. The fast beam condition monitor BCM1F backend electronics upgraded MicroTCA-based architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagozdzinska, Agnieszka A.; Bell, Alan; Dabrowski, Anne E.; Guthoff, Moritz; Hempel, Maria; Henschel, Hans; Karacheban, Olena; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lokhovitskiy, Arkady; Leonard, Jessica L.; Loos, Robert; Miraglia, Marco; Penno, Marek; Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Przyborowski, Dominik; Stickland, David; Trapani, Pier Paolo; Romaniuk, Ryszard; Ryjov, Vladimir; Walsh, Roberval

    2014-11-01

    The Beam Radiation Instrumentation and Luminosity Project of the CMS experiment, consists of several beam monitoring systems. One system, the upgraded Fast Beams Condition Monitor, is based on 24 single crystal CVD diamonds with a double-pad sensor metallization and a custom designed readout. Signals for real-time monitoring are transmitted to the counting room, where they are received and processed by new back-end electronics designed to extract information on LHC collision, beam induced background and activation products. The Slow Control Driver is designed for the front-end electronics configuration and control. The system architecture and the upgrade status will be presented.

  1. Imaging Ultra-fast Molecular Dynamics in Free Electron Laser Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. Z.; Jiang, Y. H.

    The free electron laser (FEL) provides the coherent, brilliant and ultrashort light pulse in short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet and X-ray) regimes, opening up possibilities to study ultra-fast molecular dynamics in photo-induced chemical reactions with new methodologies. In this chapter, we introduce the time-resolved pump-probe experiments on gas-phase targets with FEL facilities to image the nuclear and electronic motions in molecular reactions, which serve as a benchmark for further FEL applications like coherent diffraction imaging and coherent control of functional dynamics in complex molecular reactions.

  2. Fast Ion Induced Shearing of 2D Alfven Eigenmodes Measured by Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tobias, Ben; Classen, I.G.J.; Domier, C. W.; Heidbrink, W.; Luhmann, N.C.; Nazikian, Raffi; Park, H.K.; Spong, Donald A; Van Zeeland, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Two-dimensional images of electron temperature perturbations are obtained with electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) on the DIII-D tokamak and compared to Alfven eigenmode structures obtained by numerical modeling using both ideal MHD and hybrid MHD-gyrofluid codes. While many features of the observations are found to be in excellent agreement with simulations using an ideal MHD code (NOVA), other characteristics distinctly reveal the influence of fast ions on the mode structures. These features are found to be well described by the nonperturbative hybrid MHD-gyrofluid model TAEFL.

  3. Study of fast electron generation using multi beam of LFEX-class laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, M.; Sakagami, H.; Johzaki, T.; Sentoku, Y.; Nagatomo, H.

    2016-05-01

    Fast Ignition Realization Experiment project phase-I (FIREX-I) is being performed at Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University. In this project, the four-beam bundled high-energy Petawatt laser (LFEX) is being operated. LFEX laser provides great multi-beam irradiation flexibility, with the possibility of arrange the pulses in temporal sequence, spatially separate them in distinct spots of focus them in a single spot. In this paper, we study the two- beam interference effects on high-intensity picosecond laser-plasma interaction (LPI) by twodimensional relativistic Particle-In-Cell simulations. The interference causes surface perturbation, which enhances laser absorption and underdense plasma generation, increasing the accelerated electron number and their slope temperature. The laser-to-electron energy conversion efficiency for two-beam interference case is suitable for Fast Ignition (FI) compared to the single beam case, but the increment of fast electron divergence leads to lower energy coupling. To optimize the target design for FI, these interference effects should be taken into consideration.

  4. Analytical estimates of electron quasi-linear diffusion by fast magnetosonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourenas, D.; Artemyev, A. V.; Agapitov, O. V.; Krasnoselskikh, V.

    2013-06-01

    Quantifying the loss of relativistic electrons from the Earth's radiation belts requires to estimate the effects of many kinds of observed waves, ranging from ULF to VLF. Analytical estimates of electron quasi-linear diffusion coefficients for whistler-mode chorus and hiss waves of arbitrary obliquity have been recently derived, allowing useful analytical approximations for lifetimes. We examine here the influence of much lower frequency and highly oblique, fast magnetosonic waves (also called ELF equatorial noise) by means of both approximate analytical formulations of the corresponding diffusion coefficients and full numerical simulations. Further analytical developments allow us to identify the most critical wave and plasma parameters necessary for a strong impact of fast magnetosonic waves on electron lifetimes and acceleration in the simultaneous presence of chorus, hiss, or lightning-generated waves, both inside and outside the plasmasphere. In this respect, a relatively small frequency over ion gyrofrequency ratio appears more favorable, and other propitious circumstances are characterized. This study should be useful for a comprehensive appraisal of the potential effect of fast magnetosonic waves throughout the magnetosphere.

  5. A dynamic flare with anomalously dense flare loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svestka, Z.; Fontenla, J. M.; Machado, M. E.; Martin, S. F.; Neidig, D. F.

    1986-01-01

    The dynamic flare of November 6, 1980 developed a rich system of growing loops which could be followed in H-alpha for 1.5 hours. Throughout the flare, these loops, near the limb, were seen in emission against the disk. Theoretical computations of b-values for a hydrogen atom reveal that this requires electron densities in the loops to be close to 10 to the 12th per cu cm. From measured widths of higher Balmer lines the density at the tops of the loops was found to be 4 x 10 to the 12th per cu cm if no nonthermal motions were present. It is now general knowledge that flare loops are initially observed in X-rays and become visible in H-alpha only after cooling. For such a high density a loop would cool through radiation from 10 to the 7th K to 10 to the 4th K within a few minutes so that the dense H-alpha loops should have heights very close to the heights of the X-ray loops. This, however, contradicts the observations obtained by the HXIS and FCS instruments on board SMM which show the X-ray loops at much higher altitudes than the loops in H-alpha. Therefore, the density must have been significantly smaller when the loops were formed and the flare loops were apparently both shrinking and becoming denser while cooling.

  6. Fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Y.; Wang, W. X.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Ethier, S.; Mazzucato, E.; Bell, R.; Lee, K. C.; Domier, C. W.; Smith, D. R.; Yuh, H.

    2015-11-15

    In this letter, we report the first observation of the fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus eXperiment [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. The observation was made in a set of RF-heated L-mode plasmas with toroidal magnetic field of 0.55 T and plasma current of 300 kA. It is observed that electron-scale turbulence spectral power (measured with a high-k collective microwave scattering system) decreases significantly following fast cessation of RF heating that occurs in less than 200 μs. The large drop in the turbulence spectral power has a short time delay of about 1–2 ms relative to the RF cessation and happens on a time scale of 0.5–1 ms, much smaller than the energy confinement time of about 10 ms. Power balance analysis shows a factor of about 2 decrease in electron thermal diffusivity after the sudden drop of turbulence spectral power. Measured small changes in equilibrium profiles across the RF cessation are unlikely able to explain this sudden reduction in the measured turbulence and decrease in electron thermal transport, supported by local linear stability analysis and both local and global nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. The observations imply that nonlocal flux-driven mechanism may be important for the observed turbulence and electron thermal transport.

  7. Fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Y.; Wang, W. X.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Ethier, S.; Mazzucato, E.; Lee, K. C.; Domier, C. W.; Bell, R.; Smith, D. R.; Yuh, H.

    2015-11-03

    In this letter, we report the first observation of the fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus eXperiment [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. The observation was made in a set of RF-heated L-mode plasmas with toroidal magnetic field of 0.55 T and plasma current of 300 kA. It is observed that electron-scale turbulence spectral power (measured with a high-k collective microwave scattering system) decreases significantly following fast cessation of RF heating that occurs in less than 200 μs. The large drop in the turbulence spectral power has a short time delay of about 1–2 ms relative to the RF cessation and happens on a time scale of 0.5–1 ms, much smaller than the energy confinement time of about 10 ms. Power balance analysis shows a factor of about 2 decrease in electron thermal diffusivity after the sudden drop of turbulence spectral power. Measured small changes in equilibrium profiles across the RF cessation are unlikely able to explain this sudden reduction in the measured turbulence and decrease in electron thermal transport, supported by local linear stability analysis and both local and global nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. Furthermore, the observations imply that nonlocal flux-driven mechanism may be important for the observed turbulence and electron thermal transport.

  8. Fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ren, Y.; Wang, W. X.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Ethier, S.; Mazzucato, E.; Lee, K. C.; Domier, C. W.; Bell, R.; et al

    2015-11-03

    In this letter, we report the first observation of the fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus eXperiment [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. The observation was made in a set of RF-heated L-mode plasmas with toroidal magnetic field of 0.55 T and plasma current of 300 kA. It is observed that electron-scale turbulence spectral power (measured with a high-k collective microwave scattering system) decreases significantly following fast cessation of RF heating that occurs in less than 200 μs. The large drop in the turbulence spectral power has a short time delaymore » of about 1–2 ms relative to the RF cessation and happens on a time scale of 0.5–1 ms, much smaller than the energy confinement time of about 10 ms. Power balance analysis shows a factor of about 2 decrease in electron thermal diffusivity after the sudden drop of turbulence spectral power. Measured small changes in equilibrium profiles across the RF cessation are unlikely able to explain this sudden reduction in the measured turbulence and decrease in electron thermal transport, supported by local linear stability analysis and both local and global nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. Furthermore, the observations imply that nonlocal flux-driven mechanism may be important for the observed turbulence and electron thermal transport.« less

  9. EMPIRICAL CONSTRAINTS ON PROTON AND ELECTRON HEATING IN THE FAST SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Cranmer, Steven R.; Kasper, Justin C.; Matthaeus, William H.; Breech, Benjamin A.

    2009-09-10

    We analyze measured proton and electron temperatures in the high-speed solar wind in order to calculate the separate rates of heat deposition for protons and electrons. When comparing with other regions of the heliosphere, the fast solar wind has the lowest density and the least frequent Coulomb collisions. This makes the fast wind an optimal testing ground for studies of collisionless kinetic processes associated with the dissipation of plasma turbulence. Data from the Helios and Ulysses plasma instruments were collected to determine mean radial trends in the temperatures and the electron heat conduction flux between 0.29 and 5.4 AU. The derived heating rates apply specifically for these mean plasma properties and not for the full range of measured values around the mean. We found that the protons receive about 60% of the total plasma heating in the inner heliosphere, and that this fraction increases to approximately 80% by the orbit of Jupiter. A major factor affecting the uncertainty in this fraction is the uncertainty in the measured radial gradient of the electron heat conduction flux. The empirically derived partitioning of heat between protons and electrons is in rough agreement with theoretical predictions from a model of linear Vlasov wave damping. For a modeled power spectrum consisting only of Alfvenic fluctuations, the best agreement was found for a distribution of wavenumber vectors that evolves toward isotropy as distance increases.

  10. Biggest Solar Flare on Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    View an animation from the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT). At 4:51 p.m. EDT, on Monday, April 2, 2001, the sun unleashed the biggest solar flare ever recorded, as observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite. The flare was definitely more powerful than the famous solar flare on March 6, 1989, which was related to the disruption of power grids in Canada. This recent explosion from the active region near the sun's northwest limb hurled a coronal mass ejection into space at a whopping speed of roughly 7.2 million kilometers per hour. Luckily, the flare was not aimed directly towards Earth. Solar flares, among the solar system's mightiest eruptions, are tremendous explosions in the atmosphere of the Sun capable of releasing as much energy as a billion megatons of TNT. Caused by the sudden release of magnetic energy, in just a few seconds flares can accelerate solar particles to very high velocities, almost to the speed of light, and heat solar material to tens of millions of degrees. Solar ejections are often associated with flares and sometimes occur shortly after the flare explosion. Coronal mass ejections are clouds of electrified, magnetic gas weighing billions of tons ejected from the Sun and hurled into space with speeds ranging from 12 to 1,250 miles per second. Depending on the orientation of the magnetic fields carried by the ejection cloud, Earth-directed coronal mass ejections cause magnetic storms by interacting with the Earth's magnetic field, distorting its shape, and accelerating electrically charged particles (electrons and atomic nuclei) trapped within. Severe solar weather is often heralded by dramatic auroral displays, northern and southern lights, and magnetic storms that occasionally affect satellites, radio communications and power systems. The flare and solar ejection has also generated a storm of high-velocity particles, and the number of particles with ten million electron-volts of energy in the space near

  11. SOHO Captures CME From X5.4 Solar Flare

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) captured this movie of the sun's coronal mass ejection (CME) associated with an X5.4 solar flare on the evening of March 6, 2012. The extremely fast and en...

  12. The flare kernel in the impulsive phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejager, C.

    1986-01-01

    The impulsive phase of a flare is characterized by impulsive bursts of X-ray and microwave radiation, related to impulsive footpoint heating up to 50 or 60 MK, by upward gas velocities (150 to 400 km/sec) and by a gradual increase of the flare's thermal energy content. These phenomena, as well as non-thermal effects, are all related to the impulsive energy injection into the flare. The available observations are also quantitatively consistent with a model in which energy is injected into the flare by beams of energetic electrons, causing ablation of chromospheric gas, followed by convective rise of gas. Thus, a hole is burned into the chromosphere; at the end of impulsive phase of an average flare the lower part of that hole is situated about 1800 km above the photosphere. H alpha and other optical and UV line emission is radiated by a thin layer (approx. 20 km) at the bottom of the flare kernel. The upward rising and outward streaming gas cools down by conduction in about 45 s. The non-thermal effects in the initial phase are due to curtailing of the energy distribution function by escape of energetic electrons. The single flux tube model of a flare does not fit with these observations; instead we propose the spaghetti-bundle model. Microwave and gamma-ray observations suggest the occurrence of dense flare knots of approx. 800 km diameter, and of high temperature. Future observations should concentrate on locating the microwave/gamma-ray sources, and on determining the kernel's fine structure and the related multi-loop structure of the flaring area.

  13. Electron correlations in single-electron capture from helium by fast protons and α particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mančev, Ivan; Milojević, Nenad

    2010-02-01

    Single-electron capture from heliumlike atomic systems by bare projectiles is investigated by means of the four-body boundary-corrected first Born approximation (CB1-4B). The effect of the dynamic electron correlation is explicitly taken into account through the complete perturbation potential. The quantum-mechanical post and prior transition amplitudes for single charge exchange encompassing symmetric and/or asymmetric collisions are derived in terms of two-dimensional real integrals in the case of the prior form and five-dimensional quadratures for the post form. An illustrative computation is performed for single-electron capture from helium by protons and α particles at intermediate and high impact energies. The role of dynamic correlations is examined as a function of increased projectile energy. The validity and utility of the proposed CB1-4B method is critically assessed in comparison with the existing experimental data for total cross sections, and excellent agreement is obtained.

  14. Origin of the Universal Correlation between the Flare Temperature and the Emission Measure for Solar and Stellar Flares.

    PubMed

    Shibata; Yokoyama

    1999-11-20

    We present a theory to explain the observed universal correlation between flare temperature T and emission measure EM=n2V for solar and stellar flares (including solar microflares observed by Yohkoh as well as protostellar flares observed by ASCA), where n is the electron density and V is the volume. The theory is based on a magnetic reconnection model with heat conduction and chromospheric evaporation, assuming that the gas pressure of a flare loop is comparable to the magnetic pressure. This theory predicts the relation EM~B-5T17/2, which explains well the observed correlation between EM and T in the range of 6x106 K < T<108 K and 1044flares, if the magnetic field strength B of a flare loop is nearly constant for solar and stellar flares.

  15. Evolution of the angular distribution of laser-generated fast electrons due to resistive self-collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, A. P. L. Schmitz, H.

    2015-10-15

    The evolution of the angular distribution of laser-generated fast electrons propagating in dense plasmas is studied by 3D numerical simulations. As resistively generated magnetic fields can strongly influence and even pinch the fast electron beam, the question of the effect on the angular distribution is of considerable interest. It was conjectured that in the limit of strong collimation, there will only be minimal changes to the angular distribution, whereas the largest reduction in the angular distribution will occur where there is only modest pinching of the fast electron beam and the beam is able to expand considerably. The results of the numerical simulations indicate this conjecture.

  16. Simulation of laser-plasma interactions and fast-electron transport in inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.I. Kemp, A.J.; Divol, L.

    2010-06-20

    A new framework is introduced for kinetic simulation of laser-plasma interactions in an inhomogeneous plasma motivated by the goal of performing integrated kinetic simulations of fast-ignition laser fusion. The algorithm addresses the propagation and absorption of an intense electromagnetic wave in an ionized plasma leading to the generation and transport of an energetic electron component. The energetic electrons propagate farther into the plasma to much higher densities where Coulomb collisions become important. The high-density plasma supports an energetic electron current, return currents, self-consistent electric fields associated with maintaining quasi-neutrality, and self-consistent magnetic fields due to the currents. Collisions of the electrons and ions are calculated accurately to track the energetic electrons and model their interactions with the background plasma. Up to a density well above critical density, where the laser electromagnetic field is evanescent, Maxwell's equations are solved with a conventional particle-based, finite-difference scheme. In the higher-density plasma, Maxwell's equations are solved using an Ohm's law neglecting the inertia of the background electrons with the option of omitting the displacement current in Ampere's law. Particle equations of motion with binary collisions are solved for all electrons and ions throughout the system using weighted particles to resolve the density gradient efficiently. The algorithm is analyzed and demonstrated in simulation examples. The simulation scheme introduced here achieves significantly improved efficiencies.

  17. Fast electronic relaxation in metal nanoclusters via excitation of coherent shape deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kresin, Vitaly V.; Ovchinnikov, Yu. N.

    2006-03-01

    Electron-phonon relaxation in size-quantized systems may become inhibited when the spacing of discrete electron energy levels exceeds the magnitude of the phonon frequency. We show, however, that nanoclusters can support a fast nonradiative relaxation channel which derives from their distinctive ability to undergo Jahn-Teller shape deformations. Such a deformation represents a collective and coherent vibrational excitation and enables electronic transitions to occur without a multiphonon bottleneck. We analyze this mechanism for a metal cluster within the analytical framework of a three-dimensional potential well undergoing a spheroidal distortion. An expression for the time evolution of the distortion parameter is derived, the electronic level crossing condition formulated, and the probability of electronic transition at a level crossing is evaluated. An application to electron-hole recombination in a closed-shell aluminum cluster with 40 electrons shows that the short (˜250fs) excitation lifetime observed in recent pump-probe experiments can be explained by the proposed mechanism.

  18. Hybrid Simulation of Laser-Plasma Interactions and Fast Electron Transport in Inhomogeneous Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B I; Kemp, A; Divol, L

    2009-05-27

    A new framework is introduced for kinetic simulation of laser-plasma interactions in an inhomogenous plasma motivated by the goal of performing integrated kinetic simulations of fast-ignition laser fusion. The algorithm addresses the propagation and absorption of an intense electromagnetic wave in an ionized plasma leading to the generation and transport of an energetic electron component. The energetic electrons propagate farther into the plasma to much higher densities where Coulomb collisions become important. The high-density plasma supports an energetic electron current, return currents, self-consistent electric fields associated with maintaining quasi-neutrality, and self-consistent magnetic fields due to the currents. Collisions of the electrons and ions are calculated accurately to track the energetic electrons and model their interactions with the background plasma. Up to a density well above critical density, where the laser electromagnetic field is evanescent, Maxwell's equations are solved with a conventional particle-based, finite-difference scheme. In the higher-density plasma, Maxwell's equations are solved using an Ohm's law neglecting the inertia of the background electrons with the option of omitting the displacement current in Ampere's law. Particle equations of motion with binary collisions are solved for all electrons and ions throughout the system using weighted particles to resolve the density gradient efficiently. The algorithm is analyzed and demonstrated in simulation examples. The simulation scheme introduced here achieves significantly improved efficiencies.

  19. Guiding and focusing of fast electron beams produced by ultra-intense laser pulse using a double cone funnel target

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wen-shuai; Cai, Hong-bo; Zhu, Shao-ping

    2015-10-15

    A novel double cone funnel target design aiming at efficiently guiding and focusing fast electron beams produced in high intensity (>10{sup 19 }W/cm{sup 2}) laser-solid interactions is investigated via two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The forward-going fast electron beams are shown to be directed and focused to a smaller size in comparison with the incident laser spot size. This plasma funnel attached on the cone target guides and focuses electrons in a manner akin to the control of liquid by a plastic funnel. Such device has the potential to add substantial design flexibility and prevent inefficiencies for important applications such as fast ignition. Two reasons account for the collimation of fast electron beams. First, the sheath electric fields and quasistatic magnetic fields inside the vacuum gap of the double cone provide confinement of the fast electrons in the laser-plasma interaction region. Second, the interface magnetic fields inside the beam collimator further guide and focus the fast electrons during the transport. The application of this technique to cone-guided fast ignition is considered, and it is shown that it can enhance the laser energy deposition in the compressed fuel plasma by a factor of 2 in comparison with the single cone target case.

  20. Study of target heating induced by fast electrons in mass limited targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessio, Morace; Alexander, Magunov; Dimitri, Batani; Renato, Redaelli; Claude, Fourment; Jorge, Santos Joao; Gerard, Malka; Alain, Boscheron; Alexis, Casner; Wigen, Nazarov; Tommaso, Vinci; Yasuaki, Okano; Yuichi, Inubushi; Hiroaki, Nishimura; Alessandro, Flacco; Chris, Spindloe; Martin, Tolley

    2010-02-01

    We studied the induced plasma heating in three different kind of targets: mass limited, foam targets and large mass targets. The experiment was performed at Alisé laser facility of CEA/CESTA. The laser system emitted a ˜1-ps pulse with ˜10 J energy at a wavelength of ˜1 μm. Mass limited targets had three layers with thickness 10 μm C8H8, 1 μm C8H7Cl, 10 μm C8H8 with size 100 μm×100 μm. Detailed spectroscopic analysis of X-rays emitted from the Cl tracer showed that it was possible to heat up the plasma mass limited targets to a temperature ˜250 eV with density ˜1021 cm-3. The plasma heating is only produced by fast electron transport in the target, being the 10 μm C8H8 overcoating thick enough to prevent any possible direct irradiation of the tracer layer even taking into account mass-ablation due to the pre-pulse. These results demonstrate that with mass limited targets is possible to generate a plasma heated up to several hundreds eV. It is also very important for research concerning high energy density phenomena and for fast ignition (in particular for the study of fast electrons transport and induced heating).

  1. Study of target heating induced by fast electrons in mass limited targets

    SciTech Connect

    Alessio, Morace; Dimitri, Batani; Renato, Redaelli; Alexander, Magunov; Claude, Fourment; Jorge, Santos Joao; Gerard, Malka; Alain, Boscheron; Wigen, Nazarov; Tommaso, Vinci; Yasuaki, Okano; Yuichi, Inubushi; Hiroaki, Nishimura; Alessandro, Flacco; Chris, Spindloe; Martin, Tolley

    2010-02-02

    We studied the induced plasma heating in three different kind of targets: mass limited, foam targets and large mass targets. The experiment was performed at Alise laser facility of CEA/CESTA. The laser system emitted a {approx}1-ps pulse with {approx}10 J energy at a wavelength of {approx}1 {mu}m. Mass limited targets had three layers with thickness 10 {mu}m C{sub 8}H{sub 8}, 1 {mu}m C{sub 8}H{sub 7}Cl, 10 {mu}m C{sub 8}H{sub 8} with size 100 {mu}mx100 {mu}m. Detailed spectroscopic analysis of X-rays emitted from the Cl tracer showed that it was possible to heat up the plasma mass limited targets to a temperature {approx}250 eV with density {approx}10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}. The plasma heating is only produced by fast electron transport in the target, being the 10 {mu}m C{sub 8}H{sub 8} overcoating thick enough to prevent any possible direct irradiation of the tracer layer even taking into account mass-ablation due to the pre-pulse. These results demonstrate that with mass limited targets is possible to generate a plasma heated up to several hundreds eV. It is also very important for research concerning high energy density phenomena and for fast ignition (in particular for the study of fast electrons transport and induced heating).

  2. Experimental control of a fast chaotic time-delay opto-electronic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakely, Jonathan Neal

    2003-10-01

    The focus of this thesis is the experimental investigation of the dynamics and control of a new type of fast chaotic opto-electronic device: an active interferometer with electronic bandpass filtered delayed feedback displaying chaotic oscillations with a fundamental frequency as high as 100 MHz. To stabilize the system, I introduce a new form of delayed feedback control suitable for fast time-delay systems. The method provides a new tool for the fundamental study of fast dynamical systems as well as for technological exploitation of chaos. The new opto-electronic device consists of a semiconductor laser, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, and an electronic feedback loop. The device offers a high degree of design flexibility at a much lower cost than other known sources of fast optical chaos. Both the nonlinearity and the timescale of the oscillations are easily manipulated experimentally. To characterize the dynamics of the system, I observe experimentally its behavior in the time and frequency domains as the feedback-loop gain is varied. The system displays a route to chaos that begins with a Hopf bifurcation from a steady state to a periodic oscillation at the so-called fundamental frequency. Further bifurcations give rise to a chaotic regime with a broad, flattened power spectrum. I develop a mathematical model of the device that shows very good agreement with the observed dynamics. To control chaos in the device, I introduce a new control method suitable for fast time-delay systems, in particular. The method is a modification of a well known control approach called time-delay autosynchronization (TDAS) in which the control perturbation is formed by comparing the current value of a system variable to its value at a time in the past equal to the period of the orbit to be stabilized. The current state of a time-delay dynamical system retains a memory of the state of the system one feedback delay time in the past. As a result, the past state of the system can be used

  3. An arbitrary amplitude fast magnetosonic soliton in quantum electron-positron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, S.; Mushtaq, A.; Mahmood, S.

    2013-02-01

    Nonlinear fast magnetosonic waves are studied in a collisionless homogenous, magnetized electron-positron-ion (e-p-i) plasma. The multi-component quantum magneto-hydrodynamic model is used in which ions are assumed to be dynamic whereas electron and positron quantum fluids are taken to be inertialess. The Sagdeev potential approach is used to obtain arbitrary amplitude magnetosonic structures in dense e-p-i plasmas. It is found that the wave amplitude as well as the width of the magnetosonic structure depends on different plasma parameters such as the electron to positron density ratio, plasma beta, quantum parameter and the Alfvénic Mach number. The numerical results have also been obtained for illustration.

  4. Directed fast electron beams in ultraintense picosecond laser irradiated solid targets

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, X. L.; Lin, X. X.; Yuan, X. H. E-mail: ytli@iphy.ac.cn; Sheng, Z. M.; Carroll, D. C.; Neely, D.; Gray, R. J.; Tresca, O.; McKenna, P.; Yu, T. P.; Chen, M.; Liu, F.; Zhuo, H. B.; Zielbauer, B.; and others

    2015-08-31

    We report on fast electron transport and emission patterns from solid targets irradiated by s-polarized, relativistically intense, picosecond laser pulses. A beam of multi-MeV electrons is found to be transported along the target surface in the laser polarization direction. The spatial-intensity and energy distributions of this beam are compared with the beam produced along the laser propagation axis. It is shown that even for peak laser intensities an order of magnitude higher than the relativistic threshold, laser polarization still plays an important role in electron energy transport. Results from 3D particle-in-cell simulations confirm the findings. The characterization of directional beam emission is important for applications requiring efficient energy transfer, including secondary photon and ion source development.

  5. Solar flares and energetic particles.

    PubMed

    Vilmer, Nicole

    2012-07-13

    Solar flares are now observed at all wavelengths from γ-rays to decametre radio waves. They are commonly associated with efficient production of energetic particles at all energies. These particles play a major role in the active Sun because they contain a large amount of the energy released during flares. Energetic electrons and ions interact with the solar atmosphere and produce high-energy X-rays and γ-rays. Energetic particles can also escape to the corona and interplanetary medium, produce radio emissions (electrons) and may eventually reach the Earth's orbit. I shall review here the available information on energetic particles provided by X-ray/γ-ray observations, with particular emphasis on the results obtained recently by the mission Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. I shall also illustrate how radio observations contribute to our understanding of the electron acceleration sites and to our knowledge on the origin and propagation of energetic particles in the interplanetary medium. I shall finally briefly review some recent progress in the theories of particle acceleration in solar flares and comment on the still challenging issue of connecting particle acceleration processes to the topology of the complex magnetic structures present in the corona.

  6. Glow discharge with electrostatic confinement of electrons in a chamber bombarded by fast electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metel, A. S.; Grigoriev, S. N.; Melnik, Yu. A.; Prudnikov, V. V.

    2011-07-01

    A metal substrate is immersed in plasma of glow discharge with electrostatic confinement of electrons inside the vacuum chamber volume V ≈ 0.12 m3 filled with argon or nitrogen at pressures 0.005-5 Pa, and dependence of discharge characteristics on negative substrate potential is studied. Emitted by the substrate secondary electrons bombard the chamber walls and it results in electron emission growth of the chamber walls and rise of gas ionization intensity inside the chamber. Increase of voltage U between the chamber and the substrate up to 10 kV at a constant discharge current I d in the anode circuit results in a manifold rise of current I in the substrate circuit and decrease of discharge voltage U d between the anode and the chamber from hundreds to tens of volts. At pressure p < 0.05 Pa nonuniformity of plasma density does not exceed ˜10%. Using the Child-Langmuir law, as well as measurement results of sheath width d between homogeneous plasma and a lengthy flat substrate dependent on voltage U ion current density j i on the substrate surface and ion-electron emission coefficient γ i are calculated. After the current in circuit of a substrate made of the same material is measured, the γ i values may be used to evaluate the average dose of ion implantation. The rate of dose rise at a constant high voltage U is by an order of magnitude higher than in known systems equipped with generators of square-wave high-voltage pulses. Application to the substrate of 10-ms-wide sinusoidal high-voltage pulses, which follow each other with 100-Hz frequency, results in synchronous oscillations of voltage U and ion current I i in the substrate circuit. In this case variation of the sheath width d due to oscillations of U and Ii is insignificant and d does not exceed several centimeters thus enabling substrate treatment in a comparatively small vacuum chamber.

  7. Wake-field and fast head-tail instability caused by an electron cloud.

    PubMed

    Ohmi, K; Zimmermann, F; Perevedentsev, E

    2002-01-01

    In positron and proton storage rings, electrons produced by photoemission, ionization, and secondary emission accumulate in the vacuum chamber during multibunch operation with close spacing. A positron or proton bunch passing through this "electron cloud" experiences a force similar to a short-range wake field. This effective wake field can cause a transverse-mode-coupling instability, if the electron-cloud density exceeds a threshold value. In this report, we compute the electron-cloud induced wake in a region without external magnetic field both analytically and via computer simulation, for parameters representing the low-energy positron ring of KEKB and the LHC proton beam in the CERN SPS. We study the linearity and time dependence of the wake function and its variation with the size of the electron cloud. Using a broadband resonator model for the electron-cloud wake field, we then evaluate theoretical expressions for the transverse-mode-coupling instability based on the linearized Vlasov equation, and for the instability threshold of fast transverse blow up including its dependence on chromaticity.

  8. Hot-electron generation from laser–pre-plasma interactions in cone-guided fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Davies, J. R.; Ma, T.; Mori, W. B.; Tonge, J.; Ren, C.; Solodov, A. A.; Theobald, W.

    2013-05-15

    Two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations were performed for the cone-in-shell integrated fast-ignition experiments at the Omega Laser Facility [W. Theobald et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 056305 (2011)]. The initial plasma density profile in the PIC simulations was taken from hydrodynamic simulations of the prepulse interaction with the gold cone. Hot-electron generation from laser–pre-plasma interactions and transport up to 100× the critical density (n{sub c}) was studied. The simulation showed a mean divergence half-angle of 68° and 50% absorption for the hot electrons. The simulation results show that the generated hot electrons were dominated in number by low-energy electrons but in energy by multi-MeV electrons. Electron transport between 5 and 100 n{sub c} was ballistic. In the late stage of the simulation, all the results were largely independent of polarization, indicating a stochastic hot-electron–generation mechanism.

  9. Quantitative interpretation of the very fast electronic relaxation of most Ln3+ ions in dissolved complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, Pascal H.; Belorizky, Elie

    2012-02-01

    In a reference frame rigidly bound to the complex, we consider two Hamiltonians possibly at the origin of the very fast electronic relaxation of the paramagnetic lanthanide Ln3+ ions (Ln = Ce to Nd, Tb to Yb), namely the mean (static) ligand-field Hamiltonian and the transient ligand-field Hamiltonian. In the laboratory frame, the bombardment of the complex by solvent molecules causes its Brownian rotation and its vibration-distorsion dynamics governing the fluctuations of the static and transient terms, respectively. These fluctuations are at the origin of electronic relaxation. The electronic relaxation of a Ln3+ ion is defined by the decays of the time correlation functions (TCFs) of the longitudinal and transverse components of the total angular momentum J of its ground multiplet. The Brownian rotation of the complex and its vibration-distorsion dynamics are simulated by random walks, which enable us to compute the TCFs from first principles. It is shown that the electronic relaxation is governed mainly by the magnitude of the transient ligand-field, and not by its particular expression. The range of expected values of this ligand-field together with the lower limit of relaxation time enforced by the values of the vibration-distortion correlation time in liquids give rise to effective electronic relaxation times which are in satisfactory overall agreement with the experimental data. In particular, these considerations explain why the electronic relaxation times vary little with the coordinating ligand and are practically independent of the external field magnitude.

  10. Wake-field and fast head-tail instability caused by an electron cloud.

    PubMed

    Ohmi, K; Zimmermann, F; Perevedentsev, E

    2002-01-01

    In positron and proton storage rings, electrons produced by photoemission, ionization, and secondary emission accumulate in the vacuum chamber during multibunch operation with close spacing. A positron or proton bunch passing through this "electron cloud" experiences a force similar to a short-range wake field. This effective wake field can cause a transverse-mode-coupling instability, if the electron-cloud density exceeds a threshold value. In this report, we compute the electron-cloud induced wake in a region without external magnetic field both analytically and via computer simulation, for parameters representing the low-energy positron ring of KEKB and the LHC proton beam in the CERN SPS. We study the linearity and time dependence of the wake function and its variation with the size of the electron cloud. Using a broadband resonator model for the electron-cloud wake field, we then evaluate theoretical expressions for the transverse-mode-coupling instability based on the linearized Vlasov equation, and for the instability threshold of fast transverse blow up including its dependence on chromaticity. PMID:11800799

  11. Neutral pion production in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, D. J.; Vestrand, W. T.; Chupp, E. L.; Rieger, E.; Cooper, J. F.; Share, G. H.

    1985-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on SMM has detected more than 130 flares with emission approx 300 keV. More than 10 of these flares were detected at photon energies 10 MeV. Although the majority of the emission at 10 MeV must be from electron bremsstrahlung, at least two of the flares have spectral properties 40 MeV that require gamma rays from the decay of neutral pions. It is found that pion production can occur early in the impulsive phase as defined by hard X-rays near 100 keV. It is also found in one of these flares that a significant portion of this high-energy emission is produced well after the impulsive phase. This extended production phase, most clearly observed at high energies, may be a signature of the acceleration process which produces solar energetic particles (SEP's) in space.

  12. Solar Flares: Magnetohydrodynamic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kazunari; Magara, Tetsuya

    2011-12-01

    This paper outlines the current understanding of solar flares, mainly focused on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes responsible for producing a flare. Observations show that flares are one of the most explosive phenomena in the atmosphere of the Sun, releasing a huge amount of energy up to about 10^32 erg on the timescale of hours. Flares involve the heating of plasma, mass ejection, and particle acceleration that generates high-energy particles. The key physical processes for producing a flare are: the emergence of magnetic field from the solar interior to the solar atmosphere (flux emergence), local enhancement of electric current in the corona (formation of a current sheet), and rapid dissipation of electric current (magnetic reconnection) that causes shock heating, mass ejection, and particle acceleration. The evolution toward the onset of a flare is rather quasi-static when free energy is accumulated in the form of coronal electric current (field-aligned current, more precisely), while the dissipation of coronal current proceeds rapidly, producing various dynamic events that affect lower atmospheres such as the chromosphere and photosphere. Flares manifest such rapid dissipation of coronal current, and their theoretical modeling has been developed in accordance with observations, in which numerical simulations proved to be a strong tool reproducing the time-dependent, nonlinear evolution of a flare. We review the models proposed to explain the physical mechanism of flares, giving an comprehensive explanation of the key processes mentioned above. We start with basic properties of flares, then go into the details of energy build-up, release and transport in flares where magnetic reconnection works as the central engine to produce a flare.

  13. Emergency flare tip repair

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, G.A.

    1982-07-01

    Two damaged propane storage tank flares serving a large LPG storage facility near the Arabian Gulf were given emergency service. A diagram of over-all layout and spatial relationships between tanks and piping, and tables with general information relevant to selecting an acceptable radiant heat load factor and flare line flow characteristics were presented. The general equation for predicting radiant heat flux from a point source was used. The ignition of the temporary flare was discussed.

  14. Flare Emission Onset in the Slow-Rise and Fast-Rise Phases of an Erupting Solar Filament Observed with TRACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, A. C.; Moore, R. L.

    2005-01-01

    We observe the eruption of an active-region solar filament of 1998 July 11 using high time cadence and high spatial resolution EUV observations from the TRACE sareiii'ce, along with soft X-ray images from the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on the Yohkoh satellite, hard X-ray fluxes from the BATSE instrument on the (CGRO) satellite and from the hard X-ray telescope (HXT) on Yohkoh, and ground-based magnetograms. We concentrate on the initiation of the eruption in an effort to understand the eruption mechanism. First the filament undergoes slow upward movement in a "slow rise" phase with an approximately constant velocity of approximately 15 km/s that lasts about 10-min, and then it erupts in a "fast-rise" phase, reaching a velocity of about 200 km/s in about 5-min, followed by a period of deceleration. EUV brightenings begin just before the start of the filament's slow rise, and remain immediately beneath the rising filament during the slow rise; initial soft X-ray brightenings occur at about the same time and location. Strong hard X-ray emission begins after the onset of the fast rise, and does not peak until the filament has traveled a substantial altitude (to a height about equal to the initial length of the erupting filament) beyond its initial location. Our observations are consistent with the slow-rise phase of the eruption resulting from the onset of "tether cutting" reconnection between magnetic fields beneath the filament, and the fast rise resulting from an explosive increase in the reconnection rate or by catastrophic destabilization of the overlying filament-carrying fields. About two days prior to the event new flux emerged near the location of the initial brightenings, and this recently- emerged flux could have been a catalyst for initiating the tether-cutting reconnection. With the exception of the initial slow rise, our findings qualitatively agree with the prediction for erupting-flux-rope height as a function of time in a model discussed by Chen

  15. Note: Measurements of fast electrons in the TORE-SUPRA tokamak by means of modified Cherenkov-type diamond detector

    SciTech Connect

    Jakubowski, L.; Sadowski, M. J.; Zebrowski, J.; Rabinski, M.; Jakubowski, M. J.; Malinowski, K.; Mirowski, R.; Lotte, Ph.; Goniche, M.; Gunn, J.; Colledani, G.; Pascal, J.-Y.; Basiuk, V.

    2013-01-15

    The Note reports on experimental studies of ripple born fast electrons within the TORE-SUPRA facility, which were performed by means of a modified measuring head equipped with diamond detectors designed especially for recording the electron-induced Cherenkov radiation. There are presented signals produced by fast electrons in the TORE-SUPRA machine, which were recorded during two experimental campaigns performed in 2010. Shapes of these electron-induced signals are considerably different from those observed during the first measurements carried out by the prototype Cherenkov probe in 2008. An explanation of the observed differences is given.

  16. Particle acceleration in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Kosugi, Takeo; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benka, Steve G.; Chupp, Edward L.; Enome, Shinzo; Garcia, Howard; Holman, Gordon D.; Kurt, Victoria G.; Sakao, Taro

    1994-01-01

    Particle acceleration is intrinsic to the primary energy release in the impulsive phase of solar flares, and we cannot understand flares without understanding acceleration. New observations in soft and hard X-rays, gamma-rays and coherent radio emissions are presented, suggesting flare fragmentation in time and space. X-ray and radio measurements exhibit at least five different time scales in flares. In addition, some new observations of delayed acceleration signatures are also presented. The theory of acceleration by parallel electric fields is used to model the spectral shape and evolution of hard X-rays. The possibility of the appearance of double layers is further investigated.

  17. Solar flares. [plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with explosions in a magnetized solar plasma, known as flares, whose effects are seen throughout the electromagnetic spectrum, from gamma-rays through the visible and to the radio band. The diverse phenomena associated with flares are discussed, along with the physical mechanisms that have been advanced to explain them. The impact of solar flare research on the development of plasma physics and magnetohydrodynamics is noted. The rapid development of solar flare research during the past 20 years, owing to the availability of high-resolution images, detailed magnetic field measurements, and improved spectral data, is illustrated.

  18. Flared tube attachment fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkire, I. D.; King, J. P., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Tubes can be flared first, then attached to valves and other flow line components, with new fitting that can be disassembled and reused. Installed fitting can be disassembled so parts can be inspected. It can be salvaged and reused without damaging flared tube; tube can be coated, tempered, or otherwise treated after it has been flared, rather than before, as was previously required. Fitting consists of threaded male portion with conical seating surface, hexagonal nut with hole larger than other diameter of flared end of tube, and split ferrule.

  19. Analysis of the fast electron scaling theory for the heating of a solid target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, R. J.; Borghesi, M.; Robinson, A. P. L.

    2016-08-01

    Simple scaling laws for laser-generated fast electron heating of solids that employ a Spitzer-like resistivity are unlikely to be universally adequate as this model does not produce an adequate description of a material's behaviour at low temperatures. This is demonstrated in this paper by using both numerical simulations and by comparing existing analytical scaling laws for low temperature resistivity. Generally, we find that, in the low temperature regime, the scaling for the heating of the background material has a much stronger dependence on the key empirical parameters (laser intensity, pulse duration, etc.).

  20. Temporal Characterization of Electron Beam Bunches with a Fast Streak Camera at the JLab FEL Facility

    SciTech Connect

    S. Zhang; S.V. Benson; D. Douglas; D. Hardy; C. Hernandez-Garcia; K. Jordan; G. Neil; Michelle D. Shinn

    2005-08-21

    The design and construction of an optical transport that brings synchrotron radiation from electron bunches to a fast streak camera in a remote area has become a useful tool for online observation of bunch length and stability. This paper will report on the temporal measurements we have done, comparison with simulations, and the on-going work for another imaging optical transport system that will make possible the direct measurement of the longitudinal phase space by measuring the bunch length as a function of energy

  1. Development of a prototype T-shaped fast switching device for electron cyclotron current drive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Kenji; Nagashima, Koji; Honzu, Toshihiko; Saigusa, Mikio; Oda, Yasuhisa; Takahashi, Koji; Sakamoto, Keishi

    2016-09-01

    A T-shaped high-power switching device composed of circular corrugated waveguides with three ports and double dielectric disks made of sapphire was proposed as a fast switching device based on a new principle in electron cyclotron current drive systems. This switching device has the advantages of operating at a fixed frequency and being compact. The design of the prototype switch was obtained by numerical simulations using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The size of these components was optimized for the frequency band of 170 GHz. Low-power tests were carried out in a cross-shaped model.

  2. Study of fast electron jet produced from interaction of intense laser beam with solid target at oblique incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Sanyasi Rao, Bobbili; Arora, Vipul; Anant Naik, Prasad; Dass Gupta, Parshotam

    2012-11-15

    Fast electrons generated along target normal direction from the interaction of intense ultrashort Ti:sapphire laser pulses ({lambda}{sub 0} = 800 nm) with planar copper target at 45 Degree-Sign incidence angle have been experimentally studied under different interaction conditions. Angular spread and energy spectrum of the fast electrons was measured for both p- and s-polarized laser irradiation at intensities in the range 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16}- 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} (for a fixed pulse duration of 45 fs) and for pulse duration in the range 45 fs-1.2 ps (for a fixed laser fluence of 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} J/cm{sup 2}). The fast electrons were observed consistently along the target normal direction over the entire range of interaction conditions in the form of a collimated jet, within a half cone angle of 20 Degree-Sign . The fast electrons have continuous energy spectrum with effective temperature 290 keV and 160 keV, respectively, for p- and s-polarized 45 fs laser pulse irradiation at intensity 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. Scaling laws for temperature of fast electrons with laser intensity and pulse duration were obtained. The experimental results have been explained on the basis of laser absorption and fast electron generation through the resonance absorption mechanism.

  3. Prompt acceleration of ions by oblique turbulent shocks in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, R. B.; Vlahos, L.

    1985-01-01

    Solar flares often accelerate ions and electrons to relativistic energies. The details of the acceleration process are not well understood, but until recently the main trend was to divide the acceleration process into two phases. During the first phase elctrons and ions are heated and accelerated up to several hundreds of keV simultaneously with the energy release. These mildly relativistic electrons interact with the ambient plasma and magnetic fields and generate hard X-ray and radio radiation. The second phase, usually delayed from the first by several minutes, is responsible for accelerating ions and electrons to relativistic energies. Relativistic electrons and ions interact with the solar atmosphere or escape from the Sun and generate gamma ray continuum, gamma ray line emission, neutron emission or are detected in space by spacecraft. In several flares the second phase is coincident with the start of a type 2 radio burst that is believed to be the signature of a shock wave. Observations from the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft have shown, for the first time, that several flares accelerate particles to all energies nearly simultaneously. These results posed a new theoretical problem: How fast are shocks and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence formed and how quickly can they accelerate ions to 50 MeV in the lower corona? This problem is discussed.

  4. Tunable graphene micro-emitters with fast temporal response and controllable electron emission

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Gongtao; Wei, Xianlong; Gao, Song; Chen, Qing; Peng, Lianmao

    2016-01-01

    Microfabricated electron emitters have been studied for half a century for their promising applications in vacuum electronics. However, tunable microfabricated electron emitters with fast temporal response and controllable electron emission still proves challenging. Here, we report the scaling down of thermionic emitters to the microscale using microfabrication technologies and a Joule-heated microscale graphene film as the filament. The emission current of the graphene micro-emitters exhibits a tunability of up to six orders by a modest gate voltage. A turn-on/off time of less than 1 μs is demonstrated for the graphene micro-emitters, indicating a switching speed about five orders of magnitude faster than their bulky counterparts. Importantly, emission performances of graphene micro-emitters are controllable and reproducible through engineering graphene dimensions by microfabrication technologies, which enables us to fabricate graphene micro-emitter arrays with uniform emission performances. Graphene micro-emitters offer an opportunity of realizing large-scale addressable micro-emitter arrays for vacuum electronics applications. PMID:27160693

  5. Tunable graphene micro-emitters with fast temporal response and controllable electron emission.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gongtao; Wei, Xianlong; Gao, Song; Chen, Qing; Peng, Lianmao

    2016-05-10

    Microfabricated electron emitters have been studied for half a century for their promising applications in vacuum electronics. However, tunable microfabricated electron emitters with fast temporal response and controllable electron emission still proves challenging. Here, we report the scaling down of thermionic emitters to the microscale using microfabrication technologies and a Joule-heated microscale graphene film as the filament. The emission current of the graphene micro-emitters exhibits a tunability of up to six orders by a modest gate voltage. A turn-on/off time of less than 1 μs is demonstrated for the graphene micro-emitters, indicating a switching speed about five orders of magnitude faster than their bulky counterparts. Importantly, emission performances of graphene micro-emitters are controllable and reproducible through engineering graphene dimensions by microfabrication technologies, which enables us to fabricate graphene micro-emitter arrays with uniform emission performances. Graphene micro-emitters offer an opportunity of realizing large-scale addressable micro-emitter arrays for vacuum electronics applications.

  6. Development of Multi-GeV Electron Radiography for Measurements of Fast, Dynamic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Frank; Danly, Christopher; Fabritius, Joseph; Mariam, Fesseha; Poulson, Daniel; Simpson, Raspberry; Walstrom, Peter; Wilde, Carl

    2015-06-01

    Charged particle radiography has been developed in the past decade to provide high-resolution, muti-frame flash radiography of dynamic systems. This development has focused on proton radiography utilizing 11 MeV to 50 GeV protons for a wide range of measurements. Recently, these techniques are being applied to the use of high energy electrons for applications at a future LANL MaRIE facility. At MaRIE Multi-GeV electrons will be used to diagnose small, quickly evolving systems, requiring resolution and frame rates beyond the capability of the existing 800 MeV proton radiography. The electron accelerator proposed for MaRIE will be capable of meeting the fast frame rate and resolution requirements for MaRIE. Because of the light mass of the electrons, bremsstrahlung processes become dominant in the electron interactions within the material being studied. Simulations have been performed to study these interactions, but measurements are required to fully understand the capabilities of this new measurement technique. A radiography system to make these measurements is being designed for measurements at the SLAC accelerator facility. We will present the plans for these measurements along with an estimate from simulations of the performance characteristics of a future capability.

  7. Global Sausage Oscillation of Solar Flare Loops Detected by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Hui; Young, Peter R.; Reeves, Katharine K.; Wang, Tongjiang; Antolin, Patrick; Chen, Bin; He, Jiansen

    2016-05-01

    An observation from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph reveals coherent oscillations in the loops of an M1.6 flare on 2015 March 12. Both the intensity and Doppler shift of Fe xxi 1354.08 Å show clear oscillations with a period of ˜25 s. Remarkably similar oscillations were also detected in the soft X-ray flux recorded by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). With an estimated phase speed of ˜2420 km s-1 and a derived electron density of at least 5.4 × 1010 cm-3, the observed short-period oscillation is most likely the global fast sausage mode of a hot flare loop. We find a phase shift of ˜π/2 (1/4 period) between the Doppler shift oscillation and the intensity/GOES oscillations, which is consistent with a recent forward modeling study of the sausage mode. The observed oscillation requires a density contrast between the flare loop and coronal background of a factor ≥42. The estimated phase speed of the global mode provides a lower limit of the Alfvén speed outside the flare loop. We also find an increase of the oscillation period, which might be caused by the separation of the loop footpoints with time.

  8. Quasi-Periodic Pulsations with Varying Period in Multi-Wavelength Observations of an X-class Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jing; Tan, Baolin; Zhang, Yin; Karlický, Marian; Mészárosová, Hana

    2014-08-01

    This work presents an interesting phenomenon of the period variation in quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) observed during the impulsive phase of a coronal mass ejection-related X1.1 class flare on 2012 July 6. The period of QPPs was changed from 21 s at soft X-rays (SXR) to 22-23 s at microwaves, to ~24 s at extreme ultraviolet emissions (EUV), and to 27-32 s at metric-decimetric waves. The microwave, EUV, and SXR QPPs, emitted from flare loops of different heights, were oscillating in phase. Fast kink mode oscillations were proposed to be the modulation mechanism, which may exist in a wide region in the solar atmosphere from the chromosphere to the upper corona or even to the interplanetary space. Changed parameters of flare loops through the solar atmosphere could result in the varying period of QPPs at different wavelengths. The first appearing microwave QPPs and quasi-periodic metric-decimetric type III bursts were generated by energetic electrons. This may imply that particle acceleration or magnetic reconnection were located between these two non-thermal emission sources. Thermal QPPs (in SXR and EUV emissions) occurred later than the nonthermal ones, which would suggest a some time for plasma heating or energy dissipation in flare loops during burst processes. At the beginning of flare, a sudden collapse and expansion of two separated flare loop structures occurred simultaneously with the multi-wavelength QPPs. An implosion in the corona, including both collapse and expansion of flare loops, could be a trigger of loop oscillations in a very large region in the solar atmosphere.

  9. Quasi-periodic pulsations with varying period in multi-wavelength observations of an X-class flare

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jing; Tan, Baolin; Zhang, Yin; Karlický, Marian; Mészárosová, Hana

    2014-08-10

    This work presents an interesting phenomenon of the period variation in quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) observed during the impulsive phase of a coronal mass ejection-related X1.1 class flare on 2012 July 6. The period of QPPs was changed from 21 s at soft X-rays (SXR) to 22-23 s at microwaves, to ∼24 s at extreme ultraviolet emissions (EUV), and to 27-32 s at metric-decimetric waves. The microwave, EUV, and SXR QPPs, emitted from flare loops of different heights, were oscillating in phase. Fast kink mode oscillations were proposed to be the modulation mechanism, which may exist in a wide region in the solar atmosphere from the chromosphere to the upper corona or even to the interplanetary space. Changed parameters of flare loops through the solar atmosphere could result in the varying period of QPPs at different wavelengths. The first appearing microwave QPPs and quasi-periodic metric-decimetric type III bursts were generated by energetic electrons. This may imply that particle acceleration or magnetic reconnection were located between these two non-thermal emission sources. Thermal QPPs (in SXR and EUV emissions) occurred later than the nonthermal ones, which would suggest a some time for plasma heating or energy dissipation in flare loops during burst processes. At the beginning of flare, a sudden collapse and expansion of two separated flare loop structures occurred simultaneously with the multi-wavelength QPPs. An implosion in the corona, including both collapse and expansion of flare loops, could be a trigger of loop oscillations in a very large region in the solar atmosphere.

  10. Fast electron energy deposition in a magnetized plasma: Kinetic theory and particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Robiche, J.; Rax, J.-M.; Bonnaud, G.; Gremillet, L.

    2010-03-15

    The collisional dynamics of a relativistic electron jet in a magnetized plasma are investigated within the framework of kinetic theory. The relativistic Fokker-Planck equation describing slowing down, pitch angle scattering, and cyclotron rotation is derived and solved. Based on the solution of this Fokker-Planck equation, an analytical formula for the root mean square spot size transverse to the magnetic field is derived and this result predicts a reduction in radial transport. Some comparisons with particle-in-cell simulation are made and confirm striking agreement between the theory and the simulation. For fast electron with 1 MeV typical kinetic energy interacting with a solid density hydrogen plasma, the energy deposition density in the transverse direction increases by a factor 2 for magnetic field of the order of 1 T. Along the magnetic field, the energy deposition profile is unaltered compared with the field-free case.

  11. Diagnostics of Fast Electrons within Castor Tokamak by Means of a Modified Cherenkov-Type Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Zebrowski, J.; Jakubowski, L.; Sadowski, M. J.; Malinowski, K.; Jakubowski, M.; Weinzettl, V.; Stockel, J.; Peterka, M.

    2008-03-19

    The paper reports on experimental studies performed within the CASTOR tokamak, which was operated at IPP in Prague, Czech Republic, during the last experimental campaign carried out in autumn 2006. The main aim was to implement a new diagnostic technique for measurements of energetic (>80 keV) electrons within the tokamak edge plasma region. The technique was based on the use of a Cherenkov-type probe similar to the first prototype detector, which was tested during the previous experiments with the CASTOR device. In particular, the distributions of fast electrons in a standard scenario at different values of plasma current I{sub p}, and toroidal magnetic field B{sub T} are determined.

  12. Time dependence of fast electron beam divergence in ultraintense laser-plasma interactions.

    PubMed

    Akli, K U; Storm, M J; McMahon, M; Jiang, S; Ovchinnikov, V; Schumacher, D W; Freeman, R R; Dyer, G; Ditmire, T

    2012-08-01

    We report on the measurement and computer simulation of the divergence of fast electrons generated in an ultraintense laser-plasma interaction (LPI) and the subsequent propagation in a nonrefluxing target. We show that, at Iλ(2) of 10(20) Wcm(-2)μm(2), the time-integrated electron beam full divergence angle is (60±5)°. However, our time-resolved 2D particle-in-cell simulations show the initial beam divergence to be much smaller (≤30°). Our simulations show the divergence to monotonically increase with time, reaching a final value of (68±7)° after the passage of the laser pulse, consistent with the experimental time-integrated measurements. By revealing the time-dependent nature of the LPI, we find that a substantial fraction of the laser energy (~7%) is transported up to 100 μm with a divergence of 32°.

  13. Observations of particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.

    1979-01-01

    Solar flares provide several examples of nonthermal particle acceleration. The paper reviews the information gained about these processes via X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, which can presently distinguish among three separate particle-acceleration processes at the sun: an impulsive accelerator of more than 20 keV electrons, a gradual accelerator of more than 20 keV electrons, and a gradual accelerator of more than 10 MeV ions. The acceleration energy efficiency (total particle energy divided by total flare energy) of any of these mechanisms cannot be less than about 0.1%, although the gradual acceleration does not occur in every flare. The observational material suggests that both the impulsive and gradual accelerations take place preferentially in closed magnetic-field structures, but that the electrons decay in these traps before they can escape. The ions escape very efficiently.

  14. SECONDARY ELECTRON TRAJECTORIES IN HIGH-GRADIENT VACUUM INSULATORS WITH FAST HIGH-VOLTAGE PULSES

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Blackfield, D; Nelson, S D; Poole, B

    2010-04-21

    Vacuum insulators composed of alternating layers of metal and dielectric, known as high-gradient insulators (HGIs), have been shown to withstand higher electric fields than conventional insulators. Primary or secondary electrons (emitted from the insulator surface) can be deflected by magnetic fields from external sources, the high-current electron beam, the conduction current in the transmission line, or the displacement current in the insulator. These electrons are deflected either toward or away from the insulator surface and this affects the performance of the vacuum insulator. This paper shows the effects of displacement current from short voltage pulses on the performance of high gradient insulators. Generally, vacuum insulator failure is due to surface flashover, initiated by electrons emitted from a triple junction. These electrons strike the insulator surface thus producing secondary electrons, and can lead to a subsequent electron cascade along the surface. The displacement current in the insulator can deflect electrons either toward or away from the insulator surface, and affects the performance of the vacuum insulator when the insulator is subjected to a fast high-voltage pulse. Vacuum insulators composed of alternating layers of metal and dielectric, known as high-gradient insulators (HGIs), have been shown to withstand higher electric fields than conventional insulators. HGIs, being tolerant of the direct view of high-current electron and ion beams, and having desirable RF properties for accelerators, are a key enabling technology for the dielectric-wall accelerators (DWA) being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Characteristically, insulator surface breakdown thresholds go up as the applied voltage pulse width decreases. To attain the highest accelerating gradient in the DWA, short accelerating voltage pulses are only applied locally, along the HGI accelerator tube, in sync with the charged particle bunch, and the effects of

  15. A Simple Transmission Electron Microscopy Method for Fast Thickness Characterization of Suspended Graphene and Graphite Flakes.

    PubMed

    Rubino, Stefano; Akhtar, Sultan; Leifer, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    We present a simple, fast method for thickness characterization of suspended graphene/graphite flakes that is based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We derive an analytical expression for the intensity of the transmitted electron beam I 0(t), as a function of the specimen thickness t (t<λ; where λ is the absorption constant for graphite). We show that in thin graphite crystals the transmitted intensity is a linear function of t. Furthermore, high-resolution (HR) TEM simulations are performed to obtain λ for a 001 zone axis orientation, in a two-beam case and in a low symmetry orientation. Subsequently, HR (used to determine t) and bright-field (to measure I 0(0) and I 0(t)) images were acquired to experimentally determine λ. The experimental value measured in low symmetry orientation matches the calculated value (i.e., λ=225±9 nm). The simulations also show that the linear approximation is valid up to a sample thickness of 3-4 nm regardless of the orientation and up to several ten nanometers for a low symmetry orientation. When compared with standard techniques for thickness determination of graphene/graphite, the method we propose has the advantage of being simple and fast, requiring only the acquisition of bright-field images. PMID:26915000

  16. A Simple Transmission Electron Microscopy Method for Fast Thickness Characterization of Suspended Graphene and Graphite Flakes.

    PubMed

    Rubino, Stefano; Akhtar, Sultan; Leifer, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    We present a simple, fast method for thickness characterization of suspended graphene/graphite flakes that is based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We derive an analytical expression for the intensity of the transmitted electron beam I 0(t), as a function of the specimen thickness t (t<λ; where λ is the absorption constant for graphite). We show that in thin graphite crystals the transmitted intensity is a linear function of t. Furthermore, high-resolution (HR) TEM simulations are performed to obtain λ for a 001 zone axis orientation, in a two-beam case and in a low symmetry orientation. Subsequently, HR (used to determine t) and bright-field (to measure I 0(0) and I 0(t)) images were acquired to experimentally determine λ. The experimental value measured in low symmetry orientation matches the calculated value (i.e., λ=225±9 nm). The simulations also show that the linear approximation is valid up to a sample thickness of 3-4 nm regardless of the orientation and up to several ten nanometers for a low symmetry orientation. When compared with standard techniques for thickness determination of graphene/graphite, the method we propose has the advantage of being simple and fast, requiring only the acquisition of bright-field images.

  17. A COLD, TENUOUS SOLAR FLARE: ACCELERATION WITHOUT HEATING

    SciTech Connect

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Nita, Gelu M.; Gary, Dale E.; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2011-04-10

    We report the observation of an unusual cold, tenuous solar flare, which reveals itself via numerous and prominent non-thermal manifestations, while lacking any noticeable thermal emission signature. RHESSI hard X-rays and 0.1-18 GHz radio data from OVSA and Phoenix-2 show copious electron acceleration (10{sup 35} electrons s{sup -1} above 10 keV) typical for GOES M-class flares with electrons energies up to 100 keV, but GOES temperatures not exceeding 6.1 MK. The imaging, temporal, and spectral characteristics of the flare have led us to a firm conclusion that the bulk of the microwave continuum emission from this flare was produced directly in the acceleration region. The implications of this finding for the flaring energy release and particle acceleration are discussed.

  18. Hollow cone illumination for fast TEM, and outrunning damage with electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, J. C. H.; Subramanian, G.; Musumeci, P.

    2015-11-01

    We consider the possibility of imaging individual bioparticles using snapshot diffraction from femotsecond pulses, using a 3 MeV electron beam, based on the recent experimental performance of these coherent beams. Assuming that radiation damage can be outrun using 100 fs pulses (or less), we find that a sufficient number of electrons are scattered per particle only if the beam diameter can be matched to that of the particle (e.g. a virus), about three orders of magnitude smaller than has currently been demonstrated (and limited by space-charge effects). We then propose the use of the hollow-cone illumination mode for fast transmission electron microscope imaging, because it can provide full-field atomic resolution imaging despite the use of the large incoherent annular source required for an efficient photocathode, so that coherent illumination is not needed for high-resolution imaging. Reciprocity arguments are used to compare this full-field mode with data aquisition times and source brightness in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

  19. Design and implementation of electronics and data acquisition system for Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, A.; Ahmad, S.; Barrillon, P.; Brandt, S.; Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Chang, S.-H.; Chang, Y.-Y.; Chen, C. R.; Chen, P.; Choi, H. S.; Choi, Y. J.; Connell, P.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Eyles, C.; Grossan, B.; Huang, J. J.; Huang, M.-H. A.; Jeong, S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, Y. W.; Krasnov, A. S.; Lee, J.; Lim, H.; Lin, C.-Y.; Linder, E. V.; Liu, T.-C.; Lund, N.; Nam, J. W.; Min, K. W.; Na, G. W.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Park, I. H.; Reglero, V.; Ripa, J.; Rodrigo, J. M.; Smoot, G. F.; Suh, J. E.; Svertilov, S.; Vedenkin, N.; Wang, M.-Z.; Yashin, I.

    2013-07-01

    The Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO) Pathfinder for Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) consists of two telescopes. The UFFO Burst Alert & Trigger Telescope (UBAT) handles the detection and localization of GRBs, and the Slewing Mirror Telescope (SMT) conducts the measurement of the UV/optical afterglow. UBAT is equipped with an X-ray detector, analog and digital signal readout electronics that detects X-rays from GRBs and determines the location. SMT is equipped with a stepping motor and the associated electronics to rotate the slewing mirror targeting the GRBs identified by UBAT. First the slewing mirror points to a GRB, then SMT obtains the optical image of the GRB using the intensified CCD and its readout electronics. The UFFO Data Acquisition system (UDAQ) is responsible for the overall function and operation of the observatory and the communication with the satellite main processor. In this paper we present the design and implementation of the electronics of UBAT and SMT as well as the architecture and implementation of UDAQ.

  20. Standing Alfven Waves Transitioned from Fast-Growing, Travelling Waves: Indications from Electron Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Wang, Z. H.; Zong, Q.; Hao, Y.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Kivelson, M.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2014-12-01

    Ultra-Low Frequency (ULF) electromagnetic oscillations, usually interpreted as standing Alfven waves, are a major candidate to accelerate electrons to relativistic energies in the Earth's Van Allen radiation belt. Electrons can promptly gain energy from ULF waves when they resonate with each other via a process named drift resonance, which is characterized in spacecraft observations by an energy dependence of phase differences between electron fluxes and electromagnetic oscillations. Such a dependence, recently observed by Van Allen Probes, has been presented as a most unambiguous identification of the drift-resonance electron acceleration (Claudepierre et al., 2013). In this paper, we revisit the same event to find that in the early stage of the ULF oscillations, the observed phase relationship appeared to be not fully consistent with the drift resonance theory. We further examine these apparent inconsistencies, to suggest that they arose from the fast growth of travelling Alfven waves before they were transitioned into the more typical standing waves. These observations, therefore, provide a rare opportunity to understand the generation, evolution, and particle-interaction of ULF oscillations in the Earth's magnetosphere.

  1. Flares in childhood eczema.

    PubMed

    Langan, S M

    2009-01-01

    Eczema is a major public health problem affecting children worldwide. Few studies have directly assessed triggers for disease flares. This paper presents evidence from a published systematic review and a prospective cohort study looking at flare factors in eczema. This systematic review suggested that foodstuffs in selected groups, dust exposure, unfamiliar pets, seasonal variation, stress, and irritants may be important in eczema flares. We performed a prospective cohort study that focused on environmental factors and identified associations between exposure to nylon clothing, dust, unfamiliar pets, sweating, shampoo, and eczema flares. Results from this study also demonstrated some new key findings. First, the effect of shampoo was found to increase in cold weather, and second, combinations of environmental factors were associated with disease exacerbation, supporting a multiple component disease model. This information is likely to be useful to families and may lead to the ability to reduce disease flares in the future. PMID:20054505

  2. Fast electron generation and transport in solid matter irradiated at relativistic intensities. Evidence of vxB acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baton, S. D.; Santos, J. J.; Amiranoff, F.; Popescu, H.; Gremillet, L.; Koenig, M.; Martinolli, E.; Rousseaux, C.; Rabec-Le-Gloahec, M.; Hall, T. A.; Batani, D.; Perelli, E.; Scianitti, F.; Cowan, T. E.

    2002-11-01

    In the context of the fast electron transport in solid matter and the fast ignitor scheme,we report on measurements of second harmonic of the laser light observed on the rear side of solid targets irradiated by the 100 TW laser at LULI. This emission can be explained by the acceleration of short bunches of electrons in the front of the target by the vxB force. The observations indicate that, in our conditions, the minimum fraction of the laser energy transferred to these electron bunches is of the order of 1 °.

  3. Frequency distributions and correlations of solar X-ray flare parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosby, Norma B.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Dennis, Brian R.

    1993-01-01

    Frequency distributions of flare parameters are determined from over 12,000 solar flares. The flare duration, the peak counting rate, the peak hard X-ray flux, the total energy in electrons, and the peak energy flux in electrons are among the parameters studied. Linear regression fits, as well as the slopes of the frequency distributions, are used to determine the correlations between these parameters. The relationship between the variations of the frequency distributions and the solar activity cycle is also investigated. Theoretical models for the frequency distribution of flare parameters are dependent on the probability of flaring and the temporal evolution of the flare energy build-up. The results of this study are consistent with stochastic flaring and exponential energy build-up. The average build-up time constant is found to be 0.5 times the mean time between flares.

  4. SUNSPOT ROTATION, FLARE ENERGETICS, AND FLUX ROPE HELICITY: THE HALLOWEEN FLARE ON 2003 OCTOBER 28

    SciTech Connect

    Kazachenko, Maria D.; Canfield, Richard C.; Longcope, Dana W.; Qiu Jiong

    2010-10-20

    We study the X17 eruptive flare on 2003 October 28 using Michelson Doppler Imager observations of photospheric magnetic and velocity fields and TRACE 1600 A images of the flare in a three-dimensional model of energy buildup and release in NOAA 10486. The most dramatic feature of this active region is the 123{sup 0} rotation of a large positive sunspot over 46 hr prior to the event. We apply a method for including such rotation in the framework of the minimum current corona model of the buildup of energy and helicity due to the observed motions. We distinguish between helicity and energy stored in the whole active region and that released in the flare itself. We find that while the rotation of a sunspot contributes significantly to the energy and helicity budgets of the whole active region, it makes only a minor contribution to that part of the region that flares. We conclude that in spite of the fast rotation, shearing motions alone store sufficient energy and helicity to account for the flare energetics and interplanetary coronal mass ejection helicity content within their observational uncertainties. Our analysis demonstrates that the relative importance of shearing and rotation in this flare depends critically on their location within the parent active region topology.

  5. Chromospheric evaporation flows and density changes deduced from Hinode/EIS during an M1.6 flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gömöry, P.; Veronig, A. M.; Su, Y.; Temmer, M.; Thalmann, J. K.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We study the response of the solar atmosphere during a GOES M1.6 flare using spectroscopic and imaging observations. In particular, we examine the evolution of the mass flows and electron density together with the energy input derived from hard X-ray (HXR) in the context of chromospheric evaporation. Methods: We analyzed high-cadence sit-and-stare observations acquired with the Hinode/EIS spectrometer in the Fe xiii 202.044 Å (log T = 6.2) and Fe xvi 262.980 Å (log T = 6.4) spectral lines to derive temporal variations of the line intensity, Doppler shifts, and electron density during the flare. We combined these data with HXR measurements acquired with RHESSI to derive the energy input to the lower atmosphere by flare-accelerated electrons. Results: During the flare impulsive phase, we observe no significant flows in the cooler Fe xiii line but strong upflows, up to 80-150 km s-1, in the hotter Fe xvi line. The largest Doppler shifts observed in the Fe xvi line were co-temporal with the sharp intensity peak. The electron density obtained from a Fe xiii line pair ratio exhibited fast increase (within two minutes) from the pre-flare level of 5.01 × 109 cm-3 to 3.16 × 1010 cm-3 during the flare peak. The nonthermal energy flux density deposited from the coronal acceleration site to the lower atmospheric layers during the flare peak was found to be 1.34 × 1010 erg s-1 cm-2 for a low-energy cut-off that was estimated to be 16 keV. During the decline flare phase, we found a secondary intensity and density peak of lower amplitude that was preceded by upflows of ~15 km s-1 that were detected in both lines. The flare was also accompanied by a filament eruption that was partly captured by the EIS observations. We derived Doppler velocities of 250-300 km s-1 for the upflowing filament material. Conclusions: The spectroscopic results for the flare peak are consistent with the scenario of explosive chromospheric evaporation, although a comparatively low value of the

  6. The Magnetospheric Multiscale Missions Fast Plasma Investigations Dual Electron Spectrometer Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shappirio, M.; Adrian, M.; Aulleti, C.; Avanov, L.; Barrie, A.; Chornay, D.; Moore, T.; Rosnack, T.; Tucker, C.

    2009-01-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale mission (MMS) is designed to examine magnetic reconnection that occurs on both the Earths dayside magnetopause and in the magnetotail region on Earths night side. In order to resolve fine structures of the three dimensional electron distributions in both regions, the Fast Plasma Investigation's (FPI) Dual Electron Spectrometer (DES) is designed to measure electron distributions with a time resolution of 30 ms. In order to achieve this unprecedented sampling rate, the DES will have eight individual spectrometers each sampling 180 x 45 degree sections of the sky. Because of the field of view limitations of top hat analyzers, each spectrometer will use electro-static deflectors to change its look direction. The engineering model of the DES has been fabricated and tested. We will present the results of measurements for fields of view, angular FVVHM responses, dE/E, analyzer constant, and geometric factors for all deflection states. We will compare these results to simulation results and discuss causes of the response variations.

  7. A global simulation for laser driven MeV electrons in fast ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Chuang

    2005-10-01

    A comprehensive examination of the interaction of a picosecond-long ignition pulse with high-density (40 times critical density) pellets using a two- simensional particle-in-cell model is described. The global geometry consists of a 50-diameter pellet surrounded by a corona which is isolated by a vacuum region from the boundary. Due to the significant spread in the transverse momentum of the hot electrons created during the laser-plasma interactions, the electron distribution is only marginally unstable to the Weibel instability. We find that the return current as well as the forward-going hot electron flux contributes to the instability, with the ions playing an important role of neutralizing the space charge. No global current filament coalescence has been observed. We find also that the simulation size and boundary condition can have profound effects on the nonlinear evolution of the filaments. This work is supported by the US DoE through the Fusion Science Center for Extreme States of Matter and Fast Ignition Physics at University of Rochester. [In collaboration with M.A.Tzoufras, J.Tonge, F.S.Tsung and W.B.Mori (UCLA); M.Fiore, R.A.Fonseca and L.O.Silva (IST, Portugal); and J.C.Adam and A.Heron (Ecole Polytechnique, France)

  8. COMPTEL solar flare observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. M.; Aarts, H.; Bennett, K.; Debrunner, H.; Devries, C.; Denherder, J. W.; Eymann, G.; Forrest, D. J.; Diehl, R.; Hermsen, W.

    1992-01-01

    COMPTEL as part of a solar target of opportunity campaign observed the sun during the period of high solar activity from 7-15 Jun. 1991. Major flares were observed on 9 and 11 Jun. Although both flares were large GOES events (greater than or = X10), they were not extraordinary in terms of gamma-ray emission. Only the decay phase of the 15 Jun. flare was observed by COMPTEL. We report the preliminary analysis of data from these flares, including the first spectroscopic measurement of solar flare neutrons. The deuterium formation line at 2.223 MeV was present in both events and for at least the 9 Jun. event, was comparable to the flux in the nuclear line region of 4-8 MeV, consistent with Solar-Maximum Mission (SSM) Observations. A clear neutron signal was present in the flare of 9 Jun. with the spectrum extending up to 80 MeV and consistent in time with the emission of gamma-rays, confirming the utility of COMPTEL in measuring the solar neutron flux at low energies. The neutron flux below 100 MeV appears to be lower than that of the 3 Jun. 1982 flare by more than an order of magnitude. The neutron signal of the 11 Jun. event is under study. Severe dead time effects resulting from the intense thermal x-rays require significant corrections to the measured flux which increase the magnitude of the associated systematic uncertainties.

  9. THERMAL FRONTS IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Karlický, Marian

    2015-12-01

    We studied the formation of a thermal front during the expansion of hot plasma into colder plasma. We used a three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell model that includes inductive effects. In early phases, in the area of the expanding hot plasma, we found several thermal fronts, which are defined as a sudden decrease of the local electron kinetic energy. The fronts formed a cascade. Thermal fronts with higher temperature contrast were located near plasma density depressions, generated during the hot plasma expansion. The formation of the main thermal front was associated with the return-current process induced by hot electron expansion and electrons backscattered at the front. A part of the hot plasma was trapped by the thermal front while another part, mainly with the most energetic electrons, escaped and generated Langmuir and electromagnetic waves in front of the thermal front, as shown by the dispersion diagrams. Considering all of these processes and those described in the literature, we show that anomalous electric resistivity is produced at the location of the thermal front. Thus, the thermal front can contribute to energy dissipation in the current-carrying loops of solar flares. We estimated the values of such anomalous resistivity in the solar atmosphere together with collisional resistivity and electric fields. We propose that the slowly drifting reverse drift bursts, observed at the beginning of some solar flares, could be signatures of the thermal front.

  10. Thermal Fronts in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, Marian

    2015-12-01

    We studied the formation of a thermal front during the expansion of hot plasma into colder plasma. We used a three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell model that includes inductive effects. In early phases, in the area of the expanding hot plasma, we found several thermal fronts, which are defined as a sudden decrease of the local electron kinetic energy. The fronts formed a cascade. Thermal fronts with higher temperature contrast were located near plasma density depressions, generated during the hot plasma expansion. The formation of the main thermal front was associated with the return-current process induced by hot electron expansion and electrons backscattered at the front. A part of the hot plasma was trapped by the thermal front while another part, mainly with the most energetic electrons, escaped and generated Langmuir and electromagnetic waves in front of the thermal front, as shown by the dispersion diagrams. Considering all of these processes and those described in the literature, we show that anomalous electric resistivity is produced at the location of the thermal front. Thus, the thermal front can contribute to energy dissipation in the current-carrying loops of solar flares. We estimated the values of such anomalous resistivity in the solar atmosphere together with collisional resistivity and electric fields. We propose that the slowly drifting reverse drift bursts, observed at the beginning of some solar flares, could be signatures of the thermal front.

  11. Counter-diabatic driving for fast spin control in a two-electron double quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Ban, Yue; Chen, Xi

    2014-01-01

    The techniques of shortcuts to adiabaticity have been proposed to accelerate the "slow" adiabatic processes in various quantum systems with the applications in quantum information processing. In this paper, we study the counter-diabatic driving for fast adiabatic spin manipulation in a two-electron double quantum dot by designing time-dependent electric fields in the presence of spin-orbit coupling. To simplify implementation and find an alternative shortcut, we further transform the Hamiltonian in term of Lie algebra, which allows one to use a single Cartesian component of electric fields. In addition, the relation between energy and time is quantified to show the lower bound for the operation time when the maximum amplitude of electric fields is given. Finally, the fidelity is discussed with respect to noise and systematic errors, which demonstrates that the decoherence effect induced by stochastic environment can be avoided in speeded-up adiabatic control. PMID:25174453

  12. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of fast neutron-generated defects in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goltzene, A.; Meyer, B.; Schwab, C.; Greenbaum, S. G.; Wagner, R. J.; Kennedy, T. A.

    1984-12-01

    A series of fast neutron-irradiated GaAs samples (neutron fluence range of 2×1015-2.5×1017 cm-2) has been investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The EPR spectra at 9 GHz exhibit a broad (˜1 kG) Lorentzian singlet at g≊2.09 superimposed on the AsGa quadruplet. The singlet intensity scales linearly with neutron fluence as does that of the quadruplet. The presence of this new defect has not been reported in as-grown GaAs known to have large concentrations of AsGa defects. EPR measurements at 35, 159, and 337 GHz indicate that the singlet linewidth increases with the microwave frequency.

  13. Counter-diabatic driving for fast spin control in a two-electron double quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Ban, Yue; Chen, Xi

    2014-09-01

    The techniques of shortcuts to adiabaticity have been proposed to accelerate the "slow" adiabatic processes in various quantum systems with the applications in quantum information processing. In this paper, we study the counter-diabatic driving for fast adiabatic spin manipulation in a two-electron double quantum dot by designing time-dependent electric fields in the presence of spin-orbit coupling. To simplify implementation and find an alternative shortcut, we further transform the Hamiltonian in term of Lie algebra, which allows one to use a single Cartesian component of electric fields. In addition, the relation between energy and time is quantified to show the lower bound for the operation time when the maximum amplitude of electric fields is given. Finally, the fidelity is discussed with respect to noise and systematic errors, which demonstrates that the decoherence effect induced by stochastic environment can be avoided in speeded-up adiabatic control.

  14. How to represent crystal structures for machine learning: Towards fast prediction of electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütt, K. T.; Glawe, H.; Brockherde, F.; Sanna, A.; Müller, K. R.; Gross, E. K. U.

    2014-05-01

    High-throughput density functional calculations of solids are highly time-consuming. As an alternative, we propose a machine learning approach for the fast prediction of solid-state properties. To achieve this, local spin-density approximation calculations are used as a training set. We focus on predicting the value of the density of electronic states at the Fermi energy. We find that conventional representations of the input data, such as the Coulomb matrix, are not suitable for the training of learning machines in the case of periodic solids. We propose a novel crystal structure representation for which learning and competitive prediction accuracies become possible within an unrestricted class of spd systems of arbitrary unit-cell size.

  15. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy based on conventional optics and fast dual chopper data acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heisler, Ismael A.; Moca, Roberta; Camargo, Franco V. A.; Meech, Stephen R.

    2014-06-01

    We report an improved experimental scheme for two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D-ES) based solely on conventional optical components and fast data acquisition. This is accomplished by working with two choppers synchronized to a 10 kHz repetition rate amplified laser system. We demonstrate how scattering and pump-probe contributions can be removed during 2D measurements and how the pump probe and local oscillator spectra can be generated and saved simultaneously with each population time measurement. As an example the 2D-ES spectra for cresyl violet were obtained. The resulting 2D spectra show a significant oscillating signal during population evolution time which can be assigned to an intramolecular vibrational mode.

  16. Direct observation of ultrafast surface transport of laser-driven fast electrons in a solid target

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Prashant Kumar; Chatterjee, Gourab; Adak, Amitava; Ahmed, Saima; Lad, Amit D.; Ravindra Kumar, G.; Cui, Y. Q.; Wang, W. M.; Sheng, Z. M.

    2013-11-15

    We demonstrate rapid spread of surface ionization on a glass target excited by an intense, ultrashort laser pulse at an intensity of 3 × 10{sup 17} W cm{sup −2}. Time- and space-resolved reflectivity of the target surface indicates that the initial plasma region created by the pump pulse expands at c/7. The measured quasi-static megagauss magnetic field is found to expand in a manner very similar to that of surface ionization. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations reproduce measurements of surface ionization and magnetic fields. Both the experiment and simulation convincingly demonstrate the role of self-induced electric and magnetic fields in confining fast electrons along the target-vacuum interface.

  17. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy based on conventional optics and fast dual chopper data acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Heisler, Ismael A. Moca, Roberta; Meech, Stephen R.; Camargo, Franco V. A.

    2014-06-15

    We report an improved experimental scheme for two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D-ES) based solely on conventional optical components and fast data acquisition. This is accomplished by working with two choppers synchronized to a 10 kHz repetition rate amplified laser system. We demonstrate how scattering and pump-probe contributions can be removed during 2D measurements and how the pump probe and local oscillator spectra can be generated and saved simultaneously with each population time measurement. As an example the 2D-ES spectra for cresyl violet were obtained. The resulting 2D spectra show a significant oscillating signal during population evolution time which can be assigned to an intramolecular vibrational mode.

  18. Detection of a long-duration solar gamma-ray flare on Jun. 11, 1991 with EGRET on Compton-GRO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanbach, G.; Bertsch, D. L.; Fitchel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kniffen, D. A.; Kwok, P. W.; Lin, Y. C.; Mattox, J. R.; Mayer-Hasslewander, H. A.

    1992-01-01

    On 11 Jun. 1991, the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (Comption-GRO) observed high energy gamma radiation above 30 MeV from the Sun following an intense flare around 2:00 Universal Time (UT). After the decay of most of the x ray flare, which caused nearly complete deadtime losses in EGRET, high energy emission was registered during the interval from about 3:30 UT to at least 10:30 UT. Gamma rays were detected up to energies above 1 GeV. The solar origin of the emission is assured by the time profile of the gamma ray count rate and by time resolved sky maps, which show a clear maximum at the position of the sun. The gamma ray lightcurve of the flare can be described with two components: a fast decaying emission with an e-folding time constant of about 25 minutes and a slow decay with about 255 minutes. There are indications for a spectral evolution with time, such that the emission below 100 MeV fades away earlier than the 100 to 300 MeV radiation, roughly in the time scale of the fast component. The spectrum of the flare can be fitted with a composite of a proton generated pion neutral spectrum and an electron bremsstrahlung component. The latter can be identified with the fast decaying component of the lightcurve.

  19. Size Distributions of Solar Flares and Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Ling, A. G.; Belov, A.; Yashiro, S.

    2012-01-01

    We suggest that the flatter size distribution of solar energetic proton (SEP) events relative to that of flare soft X-ray (SXR) events is primarily due to the fact that SEP flares are an energetic subset of all flares. Flares associated with gradual SEP events are characteristically accompanied by fast (much > 1000 km/s) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that drive coronal/interplanetary shock waves. For the 1996-2005 interval, the slopes (alpha values) of power-law size distributions of the peak 1-8 Angs fluxes of SXR flares associated with (a) >10 MeV SEP events (with peak fluxes much > 1 pr/sq cm/s/sr) and (b) fast CMEs were approx 1.3-1.4 compared to approx 1.2 for the peak proton fluxes of >10 MeV SEP events and approx 2 for the peak 1-8 Angs fluxes of all SXR flares. The difference of approx 0.15 between the slopes of the distributions of SEP events and SEP SXR flares is consistent with the observed variation of SEP event peak flux with SXR peak flux.

  20. SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS OF SOLAR FLARES AND SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cliver, E. W.; Ling, A. G.; Belov, A.; Yashiro, S.

    2012-09-10

    We suggest that the flatter size distribution of solar energetic proton (SEP) events relative to that of flare soft X-ray (SXR) events is primarily due to the fact that SEP flares are an energetic subset of all flares. Flares associated with gradual SEP events are characteristically accompanied by fast ({>=}1000 km s{sup -1}) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that drive coronal/interplanetary shock waves. For the 1996-2005 interval, the slopes ({alpha} values) of power-law size distributions of the peak 1-8 A fluxes of SXR flares associated with (a) >10 MeV SEP events (with peak fluxes {>=}1 pr cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1}) and (b) fast CMEs were {approx}1.3-1.4 compared to {approx}1.2 for the peak proton fluxes of >10 MeV SEP events and {approx}2 for the peak 1-8 A fluxes of all SXR flares. The difference of {approx}0.15 between the slopes of the distributions of SEP events and SEP SXR flares is consistent with the observed variation of SEP event peak flux with SXR peak flux.

  1. Tube flare inspection tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meunier, G. E.

    1980-01-01

    Flare angle and symmetry of tube ends can be checked by simple tool that consists of two stainless steel pins bonded to rubber plug. Primary function of tool is to inspect tubes before they are installed, thereby eliminating expense and inconvenience of repairing leaks caused by imperfect flares. Measuring hole tapers, countersink angles, and bearing race angles are other possible uses. Tool is used with optical comparator. Axis of tool is alined with centerline of tube. Shadow of seated pins on comparator screen allows operator to verify flare angle is within tolerance.

  2. Fast-electron refluxing effects on anisotropic hard-x-ray emission from intense laser-plasma interactions.

    PubMed

    McKeever, K; Makita, M; Nersisyan, G; Dzelzainis, T; White, S; Kettle, B; Dromey, B; Zepf, M; Sarri, G; Doria, D; Ahmed, H; Lewis, C L S; Riley, D; Robinson, A P L

    2015-03-01

    Fast-electron generation and dynamics, including electron refluxing, is at the core of understanding high-intensity laser-plasma interactions. This field is itself of strong relevance to fast ignition fusion and the development of new short-pulse, intense, x-ray, γ-ray, and particle sources. In this paper, we describe experiments that explicitly link fast-electron refluxing and anisotropy in hard-x-ray emission. We find the anisotropy in x-ray emission to be strongly correlated to the suppression of refluxing. In contrast to some previous work, the peak of emission is directly along the rear normal to the target rather than along either the incident laser direction or the specular reflection direction. PMID:25871224

  3. Electron emission in collisions of fast highly charged bare ions with helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Abhoy; Mandal, Chittranjan; Purkait, Malay

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the electron emission from ground state helium atom in collision with fast bare heavy ions at intermediate and high incident energies. In the present study, we have applied the present three-body formalism of the three Coulomb wave (3C-3B) model and the previously adopted four-body formalism of the three Coulomb wave (3C-4B). To represent the active electron in the helium atom in the 3C-3B model, the initial bound state wavefunction is chosen to be hydrogenic with an effective nuclear charge. The wavefunction for the ejected electron in the exit channel has been approximated to be a Coulomb continuum wavefunction with same effective nuclear charge. Effectively the continuum-continuum correlation effect has been considered in the present investigation. Here we have calculated the energy and angular distribution of double differential cross sections (DDCS) at low and high energy electron emission from helium atom. The large forward-backward asymmetry is observed in the angular distribution which is explained in terms of the two-center effect (TCE). Our theoretical results are compared with available experimental results as well as other theoretical calculations based on the plain wave Born approximation (PWBA), continuum-distorted wave (CDW) approximation, continuum-distorted wave eikonal-initial state (CDW-EIS) approximation, and the corresponding values obtained from the 3C-4B model [S. Jana, R. Samanta, M. Purkait, Phys. Scr. 88, 055301 (2013)] respectively. It is observed that the four-body version of the present investigation produces results which are in better agreement with experimental observations for all cases.

  4. A pnCCD-based, fast direct single electron imaging camera for TEM and STEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryll, H.; Simson, M.; Hartmann, R.; Holl, P.; Huth, M.; Ihle, S.; Kondo, Y.; Kotula, P.; Liebel, A.; Müller-Caspary, K.; Rosenauer, A.; Sagawa, R.; Schmidt, J.; Soltau, H.; Strüder, L.

    2016-04-01

    We report on a new camera that is based on a pnCCD sensor for applications in scanning transmission electron microscopy. Emerging new microscopy techniques demand improved detectors with regards to readout rate, sensitivity and radiation hardness, especially in scanning mode. The pnCCD is a 2D imaging sensor that meets these requirements. Its intrinsic radiation hardness permits direct detection of electrons. The pnCCD is read out at a rate of 1,150 frames per second with an image area of 264 x 264 pixel. In binning or windowing modes, the readout rate is increased almost linearly, for example to 4000 frames per second at 4× binning (264 x 66 pixel). Single electrons with energies from 300 keV down to 5 keV can be distinguished due to the high sensitivity of the detector. Three applications in scanning transmission electron microscopy are highlighted to demonstrate that the pnCCD satisfies experimental requirements, especially fast recording of 2D images. In the first application, 65536 2D diffraction patterns were recorded in 70 s. STEM images corresponding to intensities of various diffraction peaks were reconstructed. For the second application, the microscope was operated in a Lorentz-like mode. Magnetic domains were imaged in an area of 256 x 256 sample points in less than 37 seconds for a total of 65536 images each with 264 x 132 pixels. Due to information provided by the two-dimensional images, not only the amplitude but also the direction of the magnetic field could be determined. In the third application, millisecond images of a semiconductor nanostructure were recorded to determine the lattice strain in the sample. A speed-up in measurement time by a factor of 200 could be achieved compared to a previously used camera system.

  5. Electron correlations in single-electron capture into any state of fast projectiles from heliumlike atomic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mančev, Ivan; Milojević, Nenad; Belkić, Dževad

    2013-11-01

    State-selective and total single-electron capture cross sections in fast collisions of a bare projectile with a heliumlike target are examined in the four-body formalism. A special emphasis is given to a proper inclusion of dynamic electron-electron correlation effects. For this purpose, the post form of the four-body boundary-corrected first Born approximation (CB1-4B) is utilized. With regard to our related previous study, where the prior version has been considered, in the present work an extensive analytical study of the post-transition amplitude for electron capture into the arbitrary final states nflfmf of the projectile is carried out. The post-transition amplitude for single charge exchange encompassing symmetric and asymmetric collisions is derived in terms of five-dimensional integrals over real variables. The dielectronic interaction V12=1/r12≡1/|r⃗1-r⃗2| explicitly appears in the perturbation potential Vf of the post-transition probability amplitude Tif+, such that the CB1-4B method can provide information about the relative significance of the dynamic interelectron correlation in the collisions under study. An illustrative computation is performed involving state-selective and total single capture cross sections for the p-He collisions at intermediate and high impact energies. The so-called post-prior discrepancy, which plagues almost all the existing distorted wave approximations, is presently shown to be practically nonexistent in the CB1-4B method. The validity of our findings is critically assessed in comparisons with the available experimental data for both state-selective and total cross sections summed over all the discrete energy levels of the hydrogenlike atom formed with the projectile. Overall, excellent performance of the CB1-4B method is recorded, thus robustly establishing this formalism as the leading first-order description of high-energy single charge exchange, which is a collision of paramount theoretical and practical

  6. Fokker-Planck/Ray Tracing for Electron Bernstein and Fast Wave Modeling in Support of NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R. W.

    2009-11-12

    This DOE grant supported fusion energy research, a potential long-term solution to the world's energy needs. Magnetic fusion, exemplified by confinement of very hot ionized gases, i.e., plasmas, in donut-shaped tokamak vessels is a leading approach for this energy source. Thus far, a mixture of hydrogen isotopes has produced 10's of megawatts of fusion power for seconds in a tokamak reactor at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in New Jersey. The research grant under consideration, ER54684, uses computer models to aid in understanding and projecting efficacy of heating and current drive sources in the National Spherical Torus Experiment, a tokamak variant, at PPPL. The NSTX experiment explores the physics of very tight aspect ratio, almost spherical tokamaks, aiming at producing steady-state fusion plasmas. The current drive is an integral part of the steady-state concept, maintaining the magnetic geometry in the steady-state tokamak. CompX further developed and applied models for radiofrequency (rf) heating and current drive for applications to NSTX. These models build on a 30 year development of rf ray tracing (the all-frequencies GENRAY code) and higher dimensional Fokker-Planck rf-collisional modeling (the 3D collisional-quasilinear CQL3D code) at CompX. Two mainline current-drive rf modes are proposed for injection into NSTX: (1) electron Bernstein wave (EBW), and (2) high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) modes. Both these current drive systems provide a means for the rf to access the especially high density plasma--termed high beta plasma--compared to the strength of the required magnetic fields. The CompX studies entailed detailed modeling of the EBW to calculate the efficiency of the current drive system, and to determine its range of flexibility for driving current at spatial locations in the plasma cross-section. The ray tracing showed penetration into NSTX bulk plasma, relatively efficient current drive, but a limited ability to produce current over the whole

  7. The emission of energetic electrons from atoms by fast ions considered as a charge-transfer process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miraglia, J. E.; Ponce, V. H.

    1980-03-01

    The ejection of energetic electrons from atoms by fast ions is described using as final electron states the continuum orbitals in the field of the projectile. The electronic distribution in the first-order Born approximation is equal to the distribution for direct ionisation where the final electron state is described by a plane wave times the Coulomb factor centred on the projectile. In the second-order Born approximation the distribution of ejected electrons is significantly decreased, and it is shown that it is equivalent to the correct distribution for direct ionisation in first order times the Coulomb factor around the projectile. For the case of ejected electrons with negligible momentum in the frame of the projectile, it is shown that the electron distribution centered on the projectile is isotropic to order v to the -12th, while the double scattering term in v to the -11th depends on the direction of motion of the electron.

  8. What Causes Lupus Flares?

    PubMed

    Fernandez, David; Kirou, Kyriakos A

    2016-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the prototypic systemic autoimmune disease, follows a chronic disease course, punctuated by flares. Disease flares often occur without apparent cause, perhaps from progressive inherent buildup of autoimmunity. However, there is evidence that certain environmental factors may trigger the disease. These include exposure to UV light, infections, certain hormones, and drugs which may activate the innate and adaptive immune system, resulting in inflammation, cytotoxic effects, and clinical symptoms. Uncontrolled disease flares, as well as their treatment, especially with glucocorticoids, can cause significant organ damage. Tight surveillance and timely control of lupus flares with judicial use of effective treatments to adequately suppress the excessive immune system activation are required to bring about long term remission of the disease. We hope that new clinical trials will soon offer additional effective and target-specific biologic treatments for SLE.

  9. Solar gamma rays. [in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Kozlovsky, B.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The theory of gamma ray production in solar flares is treated in detail. Both lines and continuum are produced. Results show that the strongest line predicted at 2.225 MeV with a width of less than 100 eV and detected at 2.24 + or - 2.02 MeV, is due to neutron capture by protons in the photosphere. Its intensity is dependent on the photospheric He-3 abundance. The neutrons are produced in nuclear reactions of flare accelerated particles which also produce positrons and prompt nuclear deexcitation lines. The strongest prompt lines are at 4.43 MeV from c-12 and at approximately 6.2 from 0-16 and N-15. The gamma ray continuum, produced by electron bremsstrahlung, allows the determination of the spectrum and number of accelerated electrons in the MeV region. From the comparison of the line and continuum intensities a proton-to-electron ratio of about 10 to 100 at the same energy for the 1972, August 4 flare. For the same flare the protons above 2.5 MeV which are responsible for the gamma ray emission produce a few percent of the heat generated by the electrons which make the hard X rays above 20 keV.

  10. Development of fast heating electron beam annealing setup for ultra high vacuum chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sadhan Chandra; Majumdar, Abhijit E-mail: majumdar@uni-greifswald.de; Hippler, R.; Katiyal, Sumant; Shripathi, T.

    2014-02-15

    We report the design and development of a simple, electrically low powered and fast heating versatile electron beam annealing setup (up to 1000 °C) working with ultra high vacuum (UHV) chamber for annealing thin films and multilayer structures. The important features of the system are constant temperature control in UHV conditions for the temperature range from room temperature to 1000 ºC with sufficient power of 330 W, at constant vacuum during annealing treatment. It takes approximately 6 min to reach 1000 °C from room temperature (∼10{sup −6} mbar) and 45 min to cool down without any extra cooling. The annealing setup consists of a UHV chamber, sample holder, heating arrangement mounted on suitable UHV electrical feed-through and electronic control and feedback systems to control the temperature within ±1 ºC of set value. The outside of the vacuum chamber is cooled by cold air of 20 °C of air conditioning machine used for the laboratory, so that chamber temperature does not go beyond 50 °C when target temperature is maximum. The probability of surface oxidation or surface contamination during annealing is examined by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of virgin Cu sample annealed at 1000 °C.

  11. Classical treatment of the electron emission from collisions of uracil molecules with fast protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkadi, L.

    2015-12-01

    The electron emission from the uracil molecule induced by fast proton impact has been investigated using the classical-trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method. Applying the independent-particle model, the full three-body dynamics of the projectile, an active electron, and the molecule core is considered. The interactions with the molecule core are described by a multicenter potential built from screened atomic potentials. Double and single differential, as well as total ionization cross sections are calculated and compared with the predictions of the first Born approximation with correct boundary conditions (CB1), the continuum-distorted-wave-eikonal-initial-state (CDW-EIS) approach, as well as the combined classical-trajectory Monte Carlo-classical over-the-barrier (CTMC-COB) model. The effect of the molecular treatment of the ionization by the multicenter potential is analyzed by simplified CTMC calculations in which the ionization cross section of the uracil is determined as a linear combination of the contributions of the constituent atoms of the molecule.

  12. FASTDEF: fast defocus and astigmatism estimation for high-throughput transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vargas, J; Otón, J; Marabini, R; Jonic, S; de la Rosa-Trevín, J M; Carazo, J M; Sorzano, C O S

    2013-02-01

    In this work we present a fast and automated algorithm for estimating the contrast transfer function (CTF) of a transmission electron microscope. The approach is very suitable for High Throughput work because: (a) it does not require any initial defocus estimation, (b) it is almost an order of magnitude faster than existing approaches, (c) it opens the way to well-defined extensions to the estimation of higher order aberrations, at the same time that provides defocus and astigmatism estimations comparable in accuracy to well established methods, such as Xmipp and CTFFIND3 approaches. The new algorithm is based on obtaining the wrapped modulating phase of the power spectra density pattern by the use of a quadrature filter. This phase is further unwrapped in order to obtain the continuous and smooth absolute phase map; then a Zernike polynomial fitting is performed and the defocus and astigmatism parameters are determined. While the method does not require an initial estimation of the defocus parameters or any non-linear optimization procedure, these approaches can be used if further refinement is desired. Results of the CTF estimation method are presented for standard negative stained images, cryo-electron microscopy images in the absence of carbon support, as well as micrographs with only ice. Additionally, we have also tested the proposed method with micrographs acquired from tilted and untilted samples, obtaining good results. The algorithm is freely available as a part of the Xmipp package [http://xmipp.cnb.csic.es].

  13. Silicon Ultra fast Cameras for electron and γ sources In Medical Applications: a progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgheroni, A.; Badano, L.; Berst, D.; Bianchi, C.; Bol, J.; Caccia, M.; Cappellini, C.; Claus, G.; Colledani, C.; Conte, L.; Czermak, A.; Deptuch, G.; de Boer, W.; Domanski, K.; Dulinski, W.; Dulny, B.; Ferrando, O.; Grigoriev, E.; Grabiec, P.; Grodner, M.; Lorusso, R.; Jaroszewicz, B.; Jastrzab, M.; Jungermann, L.; Klatka, T.; Kociubinski, A.; Koziel, M.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharski, K.; Kuta, S.; Marczewski, J.; Mozzanica, A.; Niemec, H.; Novario, R.; Paolucci, L.; Popowski, Y.; Prest, M.; Przykutta, A.; Riester, J.-L.; Rovere, M.; Sapor, M.; Schweickert, H.; Sowicki, B.; Spanò, B.; Szelezniak, M.; Tomaszewski, D.; Zalewska, A.

    2006-01-01

    SUCIMA (Silicon Ultra fast Cameras for electron and γ sources In Medical Applications) is a project approved by the European Commission within the Fifth Framework Programme, with the primary goal of developing a real time dosimeter based on direct detection of ionising particles in a position sensitive Silicon sensor. The main applications of this device are imaging of intravascular brachytherapy radioactive sources with activities up to 3 GBq and real time monitoring of hadrontherapy beams. In order to perform a feasibility study, during the first two years a real time dosimeter has been engineered using Silicon microstrip detectors read out by an integrating dead-timeless front-end electronics. The prototypes have been qualified as relative dosimeter with respect to certified secondary standards; moreover, further measurements are on going in order to investigate the possibility to use the sensors as absolute dosimeters. Since the final device is supposed to provide a two dimensional image, two different Monolithic Active Pixel dosimeters have been designed and produced by the collaboration based on CMOS and Silicon On Insulator technologies. The main features of the two sensors are presented in this paper.

  14. Detecting Solar Neutrino Flares and Flavors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, D.

    2004-06-01

    Most power-full solar flare as the ones occurred on 23th February 1956, September 29th 1989 and recent ones occurred on 28th October, on 2nd-4th and 13th November 2003 have been respectively recorded by Radio-X- and Cosmic Rays detectors. These flares took place most in the open or in the edge and in the hidden solar disk (as for the September 29th, 1989 beyond 105Wo and for last November 2003 flare events). The 4th November event was the most powerful X event in the highest known rank category X28. The observed and estimated total flare energy E = 1031-1033 erg should be a source also of a prompt secondary neutrino burst originated, by proton-proton-pion production on the sun itself; a more delayed and spread neutrino flux signal arise later on the terrestrial atmosphere. These first earliest prompt solar neutrino burst might be already recorde, in a few neutrino clustered events, in largest neutrino underground detectors as Super-Kamiokande one, in time correlation with the sharp X-Radio flare onset. Our first estimate at the Super-Kamiokande II Laboratory is found to be a few (1-5) events. Their discover (or absence) should constrains the solar flare acceleration, energetic and its inner environment. Any large neutrino flare event might even verify the expected neutrino flavour mixing leading to comparable electron- muon event as well as a comparable energy fluence and spectra. Rare Tau appearence by neutrino muon into tau conversion might also arise.

  15. A solar tornado triggered by flares?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panesar, N. K.; Innes, D. E.; Tiwari, S. K.; Low, B. C.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Solar tornados are dynamical, conspicuously helical magnetic structures that are mainly observed as a prominence activity. Aims: We investigate and propose a triggering mechanism for the solar tornado observed in a prominence cavity by SDO/AIA on September 25, 2011. Methods: High-cadence EUV images from the SDO/AIA and the Ahead spacecraft of STEREO/EUVI are used to correlate three flares in the neighbouring active-region (NOAA 11303) and their EUV waves with the dynamical developments of the tornado. The timings of the flares and EUV waves observed on-disk in 195 Å are analysed in relation to the tornado activities observed at the limb in 171 Å. Results: Each of the three flares and its related EUV wave occurred within ten hours of the onset of the tornado. They have an observed causal relationship with the commencement of activity in the prominence where the tornado develops. Tornado-like rotations along the side of the prominence start after the second flare. The prominence cavity expands with the accelerating tornado motion after the third flare. Conclusions: Flares in the neighbouring active region may have affected the cavity prominence system and triggered the solar tornado. A plausible mechanism is that the active-region coronal field contracted by the "Hudson effect" through the loss of magnetic energy as flares. Subsequently, the cavity expanded by its magnetic pressure to fill the surrounding low corona. We suggest that the tornado is the dynamical response of the helical prominence field to the cavity expansion. Movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. The solar flare myth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Many years of research have demonstrated that large, nonrecurrent geomagnetic storms, shock wave disturbances in the solar wind, and energetic particle events in interplanetary space often occur in close association with large solar flares. This result has led to a pradigm of cause and effect - that large solar flares are the fundamental cause of these events in the near-Earth space environmemt. This paradigm, which I call 'the solar flare myth,' dominates the popular perception of the relationship between solar activity and interplanetary and geomagnetic events and has provided much of the pragmatic rationale for the study of the solar flare phenomenon. Yet there is good evidence that this paradigm is wrong and that flares do not generally play a central role in producing major transient disturbances in the near-Earth space environment. In this paper I outline a different paradigm of cause and effect that removes solar flares from their central position in the chain of events leading from the Sun to near-Earth space. Instead, this central role is given to events known as coronal mass ejections.

  17. Fast three-material modeling with triple arch projection for electronic cleansing in CTC.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunna; Lee, Jeongjin; Kim, Bohyoung; Kim, Se Hyung; Shin, Yeong-Gil

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a fast three-material modeling for electronic cleansing (EC) in computed tomographic colonography. Using a triple arch projection, our three-material modeling provides a very quick estimate of the three-material fractions to remove ridge-shaped artifacts at the T-junctions where air, soft-tissue (ST), and tagged residues (TRs) meet simultaneously. In our approach, colonic components including air, TR, the layer between air and TR, the layer between ST and TR (L(ST/TR)), and the T-junction are first segmented. Subsequently, the material fraction of ST for each voxel in L(ST/TR) and the T-junction is determined. Two-material fractions of the voxels in L(ST/TR) are derived based on a two-material transition model. On the other hand, three-material fractions of the voxels in the T-junction are estimated based on our fast three-material modeling with triple arch projection. Finally, the CT density value of each voxel is updated based on our fold-preserving reconstruction model. Experimental results using ten clinical datasets demonstrate that the proposed three-material modeling successfully removed the T-junction artifacts and clearly reconstructed the whole colon surface while preserving the submerged folds well. Furthermore, compared with the previous three-material transition model, the proposed three-material modeling resulted in about a five-fold increase in speed with the better preservation of submerged folds and the similar level of cleansing quality in T-junction regions.

  18. Device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma to drive fast liners

    DOEpatents

    Thode, Lester E.

    1981-01-01

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy and momentum into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target. Fast liners disposed in the high-density target plasma are explosively or ablatively driven to implosion by a heated annular plasma surrounding the fast liner which is generated by an annular relativistic electron beam. An azimuthal magnetic field produced by axial current flow in the annular plasma, causes the energy in the heated annular plasma to converge on the fast liner.

  19. Diagnostics of Solar Flare Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, Procheta; Brown, J. C.; MacKinnon, A. L.

    2009-05-01

    For work on my thesis dissertation, we have been studying some energetic processes in solar flares. On our work on Hard X-ray (HXR) emission from flares, we have shown that recombination emission can exceed the bremsstrahlung HXR flux for certain flare conditions. We will show some spectral features characteristic of non-thermal recombination HXR emission and will suggest how it plays a significant role in the flare HXR continuum, something that has been ignored in the past. It is important to note that these results could demand a reconsideration of the numbers of accelerated electrons since recombination can be much more efficient in producing HXR photons than bremsstrahlung. In related work on diagnosing particle acceleration in flares, we also have an interest in studying solar neutrons. To this end, we will present our work done with new-age neutron detectors developed by our colleagues at the University of New Hampshire. Using laboratory and simulated data from the detector to produce its response matrix, we then employ regularisation and deconvolution techniques to produce encouraging results for data inversion. As a corollary, we have also been reconsidering the role of inverse Compton (IC) scattering of photospheric photons. Gamma-ray observations clearly show the presence of 100 MeV electrons and positrons in the solar corona, by-products of GeV energy ions. Here we will present results of IC scattering of such photons taking proper account of radiation field geometry near the solar surface. If observed, such radiation would let us determine the number of secondary positrons produced in large flares, contributing to a full picture of ion acceleration and to predicting neutron fluxes to be encountered by future inner heliosphere space missions. This work is supported by a UK STFC Rolling Grant and a Dorothy Hodgkin's Scholarship (PM).

  20. Solar Flares and the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Solar flares are the biggest explosions in the solar system. They are important both for understanding explosive events in the Universe and for their impact on human technology and communications. The satellite-based HESSI is designed to study the explosive release of energy and the acceleration of electrons, protons, and other charged particles to high energies in solar flares. HESSI produces "color" movies of the Sun in high-energy X rays and gamma rays radiated by these energetic particles. HESSI's X-ray and gamma-ray images of flares are obtained using techniques similar to those used in radio interferometry. Ground-based radio observations of the Sun provide an important complement to the HESSI observations of solar flares. I will describe the HESSI Project and the high-energy aspects of solar flares, and how these relate to radio astronomy techniques and observations.

  1. Intermittent Flare Energy Release: A Signature of Contracting Magnetic Islands from Reconnection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidoni, S. E.; Karpen, J. T.; DeVore, C.

    2013-12-01

    Many flares show short-lived enhancements of emission that protrude above their smooth underlying emission. These spikes have been observed over a vast energy spectrum, from radio to hard x-rays. In hard X-rays, for example, their duration ranges from 0.2 to 2 s, with the majority occurring during the flare impulsive phase (Cheng 2012). In most cases, this intermittent energy release is situated at the footpoints of flare arcades where ionized particles, previously accelerated to high energies at coronal heights, are decelerated by the dense solar surface. It is not yet understood what mechanisms accelerate ionized particles to the energies required to produce the observed emission spikes. Drake et al. (2006) proposed a kinetic mechanism for accelerating electrons from contracting magnetic islands that form as reconnection proceeds, analogous to the energy gain of a ball bouncing between converging walls. They estimated that multi-island regions of macroscopic dimensions might account for the required acceleration rates in flares, but at this time it is impractical to simulate large-scale systems in kinetic models. On the other hand, our recent high-resolution MHD simulations of a breakout eruptive flare (Karpen et al. 2012) allow us to resolve in detail the generation and evolution of macroscopic magnetic islands in a flare current sheet. Incorporating a rigorous kinetic model into our global simulations is not feasible at present. However, we intend to breach the gap between kinetic and fluid models by characterizing the contractions of islands as they move away from the main reconnection site, to determine their plausibility as candidates for the observed bursts of radiation. With our null-tracking capabilities, we follow the creation and evolution of the X- and O-type (island) nulls that result from spatially and temporally localized reconnection. Different regimes of current-sheet reconnection (slow/fast), island sizes, rates of island coalescence, and rates

  2. Millimeter emission of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagnibeda, V. G.; Smirnova, V. V.; Ryzhov, V. S.; Zhiltsov, A. V.

    2013-06-01

    We analyzed two unique radio observations of millimeter solar flares at 93 and 140 GHz with the THz component in these spectra. Data were obtained from ground-based radio-telescope RT-7.5 operated by Bauman Moscow State Technical University (BMSTU) with the spacial resolution of 2.5 and 1.5 arc-minutes. We analyzed temporal structure of observed radio-bursts and their dynamics in comparison with soft and hard X-ray light-curves obtained from GOES and RHESSI space-based observations. It was found the 140 GHz emission enhancement at the spectra that is new independent confirmation of the THz component existance. Also, we analyzed data of microwave solar flares with the emission enhanced at 35 GHz obtained from Nobeyama radioheliograph (NoRH) and radiopolarimeter (NoRP). It was found that the maximum of the flux density spectra was shifted toward high frequencies that didn't agree with the model spectrum obtained from microwave observations. We assumed, that such kind of spectra are associated with the gyro-synchrotron radiation of the significant number of high-energetic electrons emission with energies of about 500 keV. The emission mechanism at millimeter waves is the gyro-synchrotron radiation. However, if the energetic electrons are not enough the thermal emission mechanism could be dominant factor at millimeter radiation that could also explain the spectral maximum shift to high frequencies.

  3. A Model of Solar Flares Based on Arcade Field Reconnection and Merging of Magnetic Islands

    SciTech Connect

    G.S. Choe; C.Z. Cheng

    2001-12-12

    Solar flares are intense, abrupt releases of energy in the solar corona. In the impulsive phase of a flare, the intensity of hard X-ray emission reaches a sharp peak indicating the highest reconnection rate. It is often observed that an X-ray emitting plasma ejecta (plasmoid) is launched before the impulsive phase and accelerated throughout the phase. Thus, the plasmoid ejection may not be an effect of fast magnetic reconnection as conventionally assumed, but a cause of fast reconnection. Based on resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations, a solar flare model is presented, which can explain these observational characteristics of flares. In the model, merging of a newly generated magnetic island and a pre-existing island results in stretching and thinning of a current sheet, in which fast magnetic reconnection is induced. Recurrence of homologous flares naturally arises in this model. Mechanisms of magnetic island formation are also discussed.

  4. A statistic study of ionospheric solar flare activity indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Bo; Ding, Feng; Ning, Baiqi; Wan, Weixing; Yu, You; Hu, Lianhuan

    According to the Chapman ionization theory, an ionospheric solar flare activity indicator (ISFAI) is given by the solar zenith angle and the variation rate of ionospheric vertical total electron content, which is measured from a global network of dual-frequency GPS receivers. The ISFAI is utilized to statistically analyze the ionospheric responses to 1439 M-class and 126 X-class solar flares during solar cycle 23 (1996-2008). The statistical results show that the occurrence of ISFAI peak increases obviously at 3.2 total electron content unit (TECU)/h (1 TECU = 1016 elm-2) and reaches the maximum at 10 TECU/h during M-class flares and 10 TECU/h and 40 TECU/h for X-class flares. ISFAI is closely correlated with the 26-34 nm extreme ultraviolet flux but poorly related to the 0.1-0.8 nm X-ray flux. The central meridian distance (CMD) of flare location is an important reason for depressing relationship between ISFAI and X-ray Flux. Through the CMD effect modification, the ISFAI has a significant dependence on the X-ray flux with a correlation coefficient of 0.76. The ISFAI sensitivity enables to detect the extreme X-class flares, as well as the variations of one order of magnitude or even smaller (such as for C-class flares). Meanwhile, ISFAI is helpful to the calibration of the X-ray flux at 0.1-0.8 nm observed by GOES during some flares. In addition, statistical results demonstrate that ISFAI can detect 80% of all M-class flares and 92% for all X-class ones during 1996-2008. Owing to the high sensitivity and temporal resolution, ISFAI can be utilized as a solar flare detection parameter to monitor space weather.

  5. Application of an Electronic Nose Instrument to Fast Classification of Polish Honey Types

    PubMed Central

    Dymerski, Tomasz; Gębicki, Jacek; Wardencki, Waldemar; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents practical utilization of an electronic nose prototype, based on the FIGARO semiconductor sensors, in fast classification of Polish honey types—acacia flower, linden flower, rape, buckwheat and honeydew ones. A set of thermostating modules of the prototype provided gradient temperature characteristics of barbotage-prepared gas mixtures and stable measurement conditions. Three chemometric data analysis methods were employed for the honey samples classification: principal component analysis (PCA), linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and cluster analysis (CA) with the furthest neighbour method. The investigation confirmed usefulness of this type of instrument in correct classification of all aforementioned honey types. In order to provide optimum measurement conditions during honey samples classification the following parameters were selected: volumetric flow rate of carrier gas—15 L/h, barbotage temperature—35 °C, time of sensor signal acquisition since barbotage process onset—60 s. Chemometric analysis allowed discrimination of three honey types using PCA and CA and all five honey types with LDA. The reproducibility of 96% of the results was within the range 4.9%–8.6% CV. PMID:24945677

  6. Magnetic field measurements for study of fast electron transport in magnetized HED plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Hiroshi; Griffin, Brandon; Presura, Radu; Haque, Showera; Sentoku, Yasuhiko

    2014-10-01

    Interaction of megagauss magnetic fields with high energy density (HED) plasma is of great interest in the field of magnetized plasma. The field changes fundamental properties of the HED plasma such as thermal and magnetic diffusion. A coupled capability utilizing the 1.0 MA Zebra pulsed power generator and the 50 TW Leopard laser at Nevada Terawatt Facility enables to create such a condition for studies of magnetized plasma properties. We have conducted an experiment to measure magnetic fields generated by a 1.0 MA, 100 ns Zebra pulsed current in stainless steel coils. Using a 532 nm continuous laser from a single longitudinal mode laser system, the temporal change in the magnetic field was measured with the Faraday rotation in F2 glass. The probe laser passing through the 1.5 mm in radius and 1.75 mm thick glass placed in the vicinity of the inductive coils was split with a Glan-Taylor prism to measure vertical and horizontal polarization components with photodiodes. We will present the analysis of the experimental result and a design of a coupled experiment for study of fast electron transport in the magnetized plasma.

  7. Fast camera studies at an electron cyclotron resonance table plasma generator

    SciTech Connect

    Rácz, R.; Biri, S.

    2014-02-15

    A simple table-size ECR plasma generator operates in the ATOMKI without axial magnetic trap and without any particle extraction tool. Radial plasma confinement is ensured by a NdFeB hexapole. The table-top ECR is a simplified version of the 14 GHz ATOMKI-ECRIS. Plasma diagnostics experiments are planned to be performed at this device before installing the measurement setting at the “big” ECRIS. Recently, the plasma generator has been operated in pulsed RF mode in order to investigate the time evolution of the ECR plasma in two different ways. (1) The visible light radiation emitted by the plasma was investigated by the frames of a fast camera images with 1 ms temporal resolution. Since the visible light photographs are in strong correlation with the two-dimensional spatial distribution of the cold electron components of the plasma it can be important to understand better the transient processes just after the breakdown and just after the glow. (2) The time-resolved ion current on a specially shaped electrode was measured simultaneously in order to compare it with the visible light photographs. The response of the plasma was detected by changing some external setting parameters (gas pressure and microwave power) and was described in this paper.

  8. Fast camera studies at an electron cyclotron resonance table plasma generator.

    PubMed

    Rácz, R; Biri, S; Hajdu, P; Pálinkás, J

    2014-02-01

    A simple table-size ECR plasma generator operates in the ATOMKI without axial magnetic trap and without any particle extraction tool. Radial plasma confinement is ensured by a NdFeB hexapole. The table-top ECR is a simplified version of the 14 GHz ATOMKI-ECRIS. Plasma diagnostics experiments are planned to be performed at this device before installing the measurement setting at the "big" ECRIS. Recently, the plasma generator has been operated in pulsed RF mode in order to investigate the time evolution of the ECR plasma in two different ways. (1) The visible light radiation emitted by the plasma was investigated by the frames of a fast camera images with 1 ms temporal resolution. Since the visible light photographs are in strong correlation with the two-dimensional spatial distribution of the cold electron components of the plasma it can be important to understand better the transient processes just after the breakdown and just after the glow. (2) The time-resolved ion current on a specially shaped electrode was measured simultaneously in order to compare it with the visible light photographs. The response of the plasma was detected by changing some external setting parameters (gas pressure and microwave power) and was described in this paper.

  9. Application of an electronic nose instrument to fast classification of Polish honey types.

    PubMed

    Dymerski, Tomasz; Gębicki, Jacek; Wardencki, Waldemar; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents practical utilization of an electronic nose prototype, based on the FIGARO semiconductor sensors, in fast classification of Polish honey types-acacia flower, linden flower, rape, buckwheat and honeydew ones. A set of thermostating modules of the prototype provided gradient temperature characteristics of barbotage-prepared gas mixtures and stable measurement conditions. Three chemometric data analysis methods were employed for the honey samples classification: principal component analysis (PCA), linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and cluster analysis (CA) with the furthest neighbour method. The investigation confirmed usefulness of this type of instrument in correct classification of all aforementioned honey types. In order to provide optimum measurement conditions during honey samples classification the following parameters were selected: volumetric flow rate of carrier gas-15 L/h, barbotage temperature-35 °C, time of sensor signal acquisition since barbotage process onset-60 s. Chemometric analysis allowed discrimination of three honey types using PCA and CA and all five honey types with LDA. The reproducibility of 96% of the results was within the range 4.9%-8.6% CV. PMID:24945677

  10. Double ionization of helium by fast electrons with the Generalized Sturmian Functions method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosio, M. J.; Colavecchia, F. D.; Gasaneo, G.; Mitnik, D. M.; Ancarani, L. U.

    2015-03-01

    The double ionization of helium by high energy electron impact is studied. The corresponding four-body Schrödinger equation is transformed into a set of driven equations containing successive orders in the projectile-target interaction. The first order driven equation is solved with a generalized Sturmian functions approach. The transition amplitude, extracted from the asymptotic limit of the first order solution, is equivalent to the familiar first Born approximation. Fivefold differential cross sections are calculated for (e, 3e) processes within the high incident energy and small momentum transfer regimes. The results are compared with other numerical methods, and with the only absolute experimental data available. Our cross sections agree in shape and magnitude with those of the convergent close coupling method for the (10+10) eV and (4+4) eV emission energies. To date this had not been achieved by any two different numerical schemes when solving the three-body continuum problem for the fast projectile (e, 3e) process. Though agreement with the experimental data, in particular with respect to the magnitude, is not achieved, our findings partly clarify a long standing puzzle.

  11. Fast Nitrogen Atoms from Dissociative Excitation of N2 by Electron Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajello, Joseph M.; Ciocca, Marco

    1996-01-01

    The Doppler profiles of one of the fine structure lines of the N I (1200 A) g (sup 4)S(sup 0)-(sup 4)P multiplet and of the N II (1085 A) g (sup 3)p(sup O)-(sup 3)D multiplet have been measured. Excitation of the multiplets is produced by electron impact dissociative excitation of N2. The experimental line profiles are evaluated by fast Fourier transform (FFT) techniques and analysis of the profiles yields the kinetic energy distribution of fragments. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of N I (1200 A) increases from 27+/-6 mA at 30 eV to 37+/-4 mA at 100 eV as the emission cross section of the dissociative ionization excitation process becomes more important relative to the dissociative excitation process. The FWHM of the N II (1085 A) line is 36+/-4 mA at 100 eV. For each multiplet the kinetic energy distribution function of each of the two fragment N atoms (ions) is much broader than thermal with a mean energy above 1.0 eV. The dissociation process with the largest cross section is predissociation and predominantly produces N atoms with kinetic energy distributions having mean energies above 0.5 eV. Dissociative processes can lead to a substantial escape flux of N I atoms from the satellites, Titan and Triton of the outer planets.

  12. Open Probe: a device for ultra fast electron ionization mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Poliak, Marina; Gordin, Alexander; Amirav, Aviv

    2010-07-01

    Open Probe is based on a vaporization oven mounted on a transfer line of a gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GC/MS) which is connected to the MS ion source via a short flow restriction capillary. The probe oven is open to room air while having helium purge flow protection to eliminate or significantly reduce air leakage into the oven and MS ion source. Sample analysis can be as simple as touch (the sample), push (the sample holder) into the open probe oven, and have the results. Experiments were performed with a GC/MS with supersonic molecular beams and with a standard Agilent 5975 MSD. Powders and tablets analysis were performed by touching the sample with the bottom side of a melting point vial and inserting it into the open probe oven with total analysis cycle time of <30 s. Similarly, trace trinitrotoluene (TNT) on human fingerprints was analyzed. Additional sample holder types included swabs, spoons, and vials. The open probe is a leak-proof MS probe which is characterized by fast analysis cycle time, and it uses a low cost mass spectrometer of GC/MS with the benefits of electron ionization of library search and uniform, quantitative response without ion suppression effects. PMID:20509627

  13. Flares and habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrevaya, Ximena C.; Cortón, Eduardo; Mauas, Pablo J. D.

    2012-07-01

    At present, dwarf M stars are being considered as potential hosts for habitable planets. However, an important fraction of these stars are flare stars, which among other kind of radiation, emit large amounts of UV radiation during flares, and it is unknown how this events can affect life, since biological systems are particularly vulnerable to UV. In this work we evaluate a well known dMe star, EV Lacertae (GJ 873) as a potential host for the emergence and evolution of life, focusing on the effects of the UV emission associated with flare activity. Since UV-C is particularly harmful for living organisms, we studied the effect of UV-C radiation on halophile archaea cultures. The halophile archaea or haloarchaea are extremophile microorganisms, which inhabit in hypersaline environments and which show several mechanisms to cope with UV radiation since they are naturally exposed to intense solar UV radiation on Earth. To select the irradiance to be tested, we considered a moderate flare on this star. We obtained the mean value for the UV-C irradiance integrating the IUE spectrum in the impulsive phase, and considering a hypothetical planet in the center of the liquid water habitability zone. To select the irradiation times we took the most frequent duration of flares on this star which is from 9 to 27 minutes. Our results show that even after considerable UV damage, the haloarchaeal cells survive at the tested doses, showing that this kind of life could survive in a relatively hostile UV environment.

  14. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  15. Direct Electron Heating Observed by Fast Waves in ICRF Range on a Low-Density Low Temperature Tokamak ADITYA

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, K.; Kulkarni, S.; Rathi, D.; Varia, A.; Jadav, H.; Parmar, K.; Kadia, B.; Joshi, R.; Srinivas, Y.; Singh, R.; Kumar, S.; Dani, S.; Gayatri, A.; Yogi, R.; Singh, M.; Joisa, Y.; Rao, C.; Kumar, S.; Jha, R.; Manchanda, R.

    2011-12-23

    Fast wave electron heating experiments are carried out on Aditya tokamak [R = 0.75 m, a = 0.25m,Bt = 0.75T,ne{approx}1-3E13/cc,Te{approx}250eV] with the help of indigenously developed 200 kW, 20-40 MHz RF heating system. Significant direct electron heating is observed by fast waves in hydrogen plasma with prompt rise in electron temperature with application of RF power and it increases linearly with RF power. A corresponding increase in plasma beta and hence increase in stored diamagnetic energy is also observed in presence of RF. We observe an improvement of energy confinement time from 2-4msec during ohmic heating phase to 3-6msec in RF heating phase. This improvement is within the ohmic confinement regime for the present experiments. The impurity radiation and electron density do not escalate significantly with RF power. The direct electron heating by fast wave in Aditya is also predicted by ion cyclotron resonance heating code TORIC.

  16. Fast dropouts of multi-MeV electrons due to combined effects of EMIC and whistler mode waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourenas, D.; Artemyev, A. V.; Ma, Q.; Agapitov, O. V.; Li, W.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate how whole populations of 2-6 MeV electrons can be quickly lost from the Earth's outer radiation belt at L= 3-6 through precipitation into the atmosphere due to quasi-linear pitch angle scattering by combined electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) and whistler mode waves of realistic intensities occurring at the same or different local times. We provide analytical estimates of the corresponding relativistic electron lifetimes, emphasizing that the combined effects of both waves can lead to very fast (2-10 h) dropouts. Scaling laws for the loss timescales are derived, allowing us to determine the various plasma and wave parameter domains potentially leading to strong and fast dropouts. The analysis reveals that the fastest MeV electron dropouts occur at approximately the same rate over some high energy range and almost independently of EMIC wave amplitudes above a certain threshold. These results should help to better understand the dynamic variability of the radiation belts.

  17. Explosive evaporation in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, George H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper develops a simple analytical model for the phenomenon of 'explosive evaporation' driven by nonthermal electron heating in solar flares. The model relates the electron energy flux and spectrum, plus details of the preflare atmosphere, to the time scale for explosive evaporation to occur, the maximum pressure and temperature to be reached, rough estimates for the UV pulse emission flux and duration, and the evolution of the blueshifted component of the soft X-ray lines. An expression is given for the time scale for buildup to maximum pressures and the onset of rapid motion of the explosively evaporating plasma. This evaporation can excite a rapid response of UV line and continuum emission. The emission lines formed in the plasma approach a given emissivity-weighted blueshift speed.

  18. Fast electron heating in ultra-intense laser-solid interaction by shifted Kα line fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinolli, E.; Koenig, M.; Santos, J. J.; Amiranoff, F.; Baton, S. D.; Batani, D.; Perelli, E.; Scianitti, F.; Gremillet, L.; Rabec, M.; Rousseaux, C.; Hall, T. A.; Key, M. H.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Koch, J. A.; Freeman, R. R.; Snavely, R. A.; King, J. A.; Andersen, C.; Hill, J. M.; Stephens, R. B.; Cowan, T. E.; Ng, A.; Ao, T.

    2002-11-01

    In the context of the fast ignition studies[1], the heating of the dense fuel by fast electrons appears to be one of the most relevant aspects currently investigated [2]. In order to estimate the energy deposition and the efficiency of the fast electron transport in solid targets, we have performed experiments on LULI and RAL high power lasers, at irradiances up to a few 10^19 W/cm^2. Shifted Kα lines from an aluminum fluorescer layer buried at different depths in multilayered targets were detected using a Bragg conical-crystal spectrograph. The results were used to infer the ionization stage of the Al layer. Monte Carlo and hybrid transport codes[3] were used to study fast electron energy release by collisions and ohmic effect. The energy coupling to the target is described within an ionization model for dense matter[4] and compared to the experimental data. Despite some uncertainties of the modeling, the results give an indication of a deep heating of the target up to 30 eV after propagation in 100 μm Al. [1] M Tabak et al., Phys. of Plasmas 1, 1626 (1994) [2] E Martinolli et al., submitted to PRL, may 2002 [3] L Gremillet et al. Phys. of Plasmas 9, 941, (2002) [4] G Chiu and A Ng, PRE 59, 1024, (1999)

  19. MEASUREMENTS OF ABSOLUTE ABUNDANCES IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Harry P.

    2014-05-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines (Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias (f). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature, it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is f = 1.17 ± 0.22. This analysis suggests that the bulk of the plasma evaporated during a flare comes from deep in the chromosphere, below the region where elemental fractionation occurs.

  20. Fields, Flares, And Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucheron, L.; Al-Ghraibah, Amani; McAteer, J.; Cao, H.; Jackiewicz, J.; McNamara, B.; Voelz, D.; Calabro, B.; DeGrave, K.; Kirk, M.; Madadi, A.; Petsov, A.; Taylor, G.

    2011-05-01

    Solar active regions are the source of many energetic and geo-effective events such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Understanding how these complex source regions evolve and produce these events is of fundamental importance, not only to solar physics, but also to the demands of space weather forecasting. We propose to investigate the physical properties of active region magnetic fields using fractal-, gradient-, neutral line-, emerging flux-, wavelet- and general image-based techniques, and to correlate them to solar activity. The combination of these projects with solarmonitor.org and the international Max Millenium Campaign presents an opportunity for accurate and timely flare predictions for the first time. Many studies have attempted to relate solar flares to their concomitant magnetic field distributions. However, a consistent, causal relationship between the magnetic field on the photosphere and the production of solar flares is unknown. Often the local properties of the active region magnetic field - critical in many theories of activity - are lost in the global definition of their diagnostics, in effect smoothing out variations that occur on small spatial scales. Mindful of this, our overall goal is to create measures that are sensitive to both the global and the small-scale nature of energy storage and release in the solar atmosphere in order to study solar flare prediction. This set of active region characteristics will be automatically explored for discriminating features through the use of feature selection methods. Such methods search a feature space while optimizing a criterion - the prediction of a flare in this case. The large size of the datasets used in this project make it well suited for an exploration of a large feature space. This work is funded through a New Mexico State University Interdisciplinary Research Grant.

  1. RHESSI and Trace Observations of the 21 April 2002 X1.5 Flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Peter T.; Dennis, Brian R.; Krucker, Saem; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, A. Kimberly

    2002-01-01

    Observations of the X1.5 flare on 21 April 2002 are reviewed using the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE). The major findings are as follows: 1. The 3-25 keV X-rays started 54 mins before the EUV (195 A) emission suggesting that the initial energy release heated plasma directly to 220 MK, well above the 1.6 MK needed to produce the Fe XII (195 A) line. 2. Using coaligned 12-25 keV RHESSI and TRACE images, further evidence is found for the existence of hot (15-20 MK) plasma in the 195 A passband. This hot, diffuse emission is attributed to the presence of the Fe XXIV (192 A) line within the TRACE 195 A passband. 3. The 12-25 keV source centroid moves away from the limb with an apparent velocity of approx. 9.9 km/ s, slowing to approx. 1.7 km/ s after 3 hours, its find altitude being approx. 120 Mm after approx. 12 hours. This suggests that the energy release site moves to higher altitudes in agreement with classical flare models. 4. The 50-100 keV emission correlates well with EUV flare ribbons, suggesting thick-target interactions at the footpoints of the magnetic arcade. The 50-100 keV time profile matches the time derivative of the GOES light curve (Neupert effect), which suggests that the same electrons that produced the thick-target hard X-ray emission also heat the plasma seen in soft X-rays. 5. X-ray footpoint emission has an E(sup -3) spectrum down to approx. 10 keV suggesting a lower electron cutoff energy than previously thought. 6. The hard X-ray (25-200 keV) peaks have FWHM durations of approx. 1 min suggesting a more gradual energy release process than expected. 7. The TRACE images reveal a bright symmetric front propagating away from the main flare site at speeds of greater than or = 120 km/ s. This may be associated with fast CME observed several minutes later by LASCO. 8. Dark sinuous lanes are observed in the TRACE images that extend almost radially from the post-flare loop

  2. Valentines Day X2 Flare

    NASA Video Gallery

    Active region 1158 let loose with an X2.2 flare at 0153 UT or 8:50 pm ET on February 15, 2011, the largest flare since Dec. 2006 and the biggest flare so far in Solar Cycle 24. This video was taken...

  3. Accelerated particles and their observational signatures from confined solar flares in twisted coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, Philippa; Kontar, Eduard; Vilmer, Nicole; Gordovskyy, Mykola; Pinto, Rui; Bian, Nicolas

    Twisted magnetic fields provide a reservoir of free magnetic energy, and are ubiquitous in the solar corona. Recent theoretical studies suggest that the onset of the kink instability in twisted coronal loops may generate fragmented current sheets throughout the loop, leading to fast magnetic reconnection which dissipates magnetic energy. This provides a viable model for small self-contained flares. Using a combination of 3D MHD and guiding-centre test-particle simulations, incorporating collisions with the background plasma, we study the kinetics of non-thermal particles accelerated during magnetic reconnection in a flaring twisted coronal loop. It is shown that this model can provide the number of high-energy electrons and acceleration efficiency comparable with those obtained from observations of small flares. We consider various geometries: including idealised cylindrical loop models, as well as, more realistically, curved loops. The effects of gravitational stratification, which has very significant effects on the non-thermal particles through collisions, are included. The calculated loop temperatures and densities, and the energy spectra and pitch-angles of the accelerated particles, are used to forward-model the emission in both Soft X-rays and Hard X-rays, predicting spatial distributions and temporal evolution, as well as radio emission arising from cyclotron/synchrotron radiation. These properties may be compared with observations.

  4. IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF MAGNETIC RECONNECTION AND CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION IN A SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Hui; Reeves, Katharine K.; Raymond, John C.; Chen, Bin; Murphy, Nicholas A.; Li, Gang; Guo, Fan; Liu, Wei

    2014-12-20

    Magnetic reconnection is believed to be the dominant energy release mechanism in solar flares. The standard flare model predicts both downward and upward outflow plasmas with speeds close to the coronal Alfvén speed. Yet, spectroscopic observations of such outflows, especially the downflows, are extremely rare. With observations of the newly launched Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), we report the detection of a greatly redshifted (∼125 km s{sup –1} along the line of sight) Fe XXI 1354.08 Å emission line with a ∼100 km s{sup –1} nonthermal width at the reconnection site of a flare. The redshifted Fe XXI feature coincides spatially with the loop-top X-ray source observed by RHESSI. We interpret this large redshift as the signature of downward-moving reconnection outflow/hot retracting loops. Imaging observations from both IRIS and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory also reveal the eruption and reconnection processes. Fast downward-propagating blobs along these loops are also found from cool emission lines (e.g., Si IV, O IV, C II, Mg II) and images of AIA and IRIS. Furthermore, the entire Fe XXI line is blueshifted by ∼260 km s{sup –1} at the loop footpoints, where the cool lines mentioned above all exhibit obvious redshift, a result that is consistent with the scenario of chromospheric evaporation induced by downward-propagating nonthermal electrons from the reconnection site.

  5. The high accuracy model of the 19 July 2012 solar flare: kinetic description, calculations of X-Ray and microwave emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsyk, Pavel; Somov, Boris

    2016-04-01

    The limb white-light solar flare M7.7 class was observed at the 19 July 2012 at 05:58UT by RHESSI, GOES and SDO with high spectral, spatial and temporal resolution. These new data make possible to test modern models of solar flares. The flare, which considered here, locates in the picture plane, so we well see two different hard X-ray sources: footpoint and above-the-loop-top. The loop was observed in whit-light and microwave wavelengths. The key part of the presented work is high accuracy kinetic model, which describe behavior of electrons in the target - solar flare loop. We interpret the footpoint source in approximation of the thick target model with reverse current and above-the-loop-top source - in the thin target approximation. The microwave spectrum in the range from 1 to 50 GHz was calculated. Our results fit well the observational data, particularly so important parameter as hard X-Ray spectral index. But intensity of emission of the coronal source was estimated incorrect, it was low than observed. This problem can be solved by taking into account effects of particles acceleration in the collapsing magnetic trap, when fast electrons receive additional energy without changing the index of their energy spectrum. In the result we have flux ~ 5 1010 erg cm-2 s-1 for electrons with energies more then 15 keV, that ~ 5 times larger then in the case classical thick target model. Accordingly , so high flux of electrons to the Chromosphere provides effective heating of the cold plasma in the target, but the reverse current electric field restrict depth of the electron penetration. Received in this work estimates may be used for interpretation of the solar flare optical source formation and evolution.

  6. Particle/fluid simulations of an eruptive flare: Identifying the field-aligned currents responsible for the hard x-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    While magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) can provide a reasonable description of the overall magnetic reconnection that is believed to drive flares, additional, and often separate processes have to be envoked to in order to explain the electron acceleration that is responsible for many of the observed flare emissions. A new model that incorporates the dynamic coronal current sheets, the reconnection site, and possible electron acceleration processes is developed through the use of two-dimensional particle and modified two-fluid simulations. The specific example of an eruptive flare driven by the coalescence of flux tubes supported by prescribed photospheric current elements is evaluated. It is shown that the electrons and ions have differential trajectories through the coronal current sheet which leads to the development of additonal plasma currents that flow around the surface of the current sheet. These surface currents are explicitly neglected in MHD but they are vital to the flare dynamics because they divert current from the coronal current sheet into the chromosphere, producing an effective resistivity that aids the development of fast reconnection. Because the surface currents are in the plane of the magnetic field, electrons in them experience strong acceleration and can account for the observed hard X-ray emissions. Model predictions are compared with observed time profiles of hard X-ray emissions and Doppler shifts seen in soft X-ray line emissions and are able to account for such features as (1) the asymmetry in the rise and decay time of the hard X-rays, (2) the apparent delay between the largest Doppler shifts and the hard X-ray peak, and (3) the relatively low intensity of the blue-shifted component. The use of particle and fluid simulations is important because it provides different, but complementary treatments of the electron acceleration, the global magnetic morphology, and the flare current system.

  7. Implications of RHESSI Observations for Solar Flare Models and Energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2006-01-01

    Observations of solar flares in X-rays and gamma-rays provide the most direct information about the hottest plasma and energetic electrons and ions accelerated in flares. The Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) has observed over 18000 solar flares in X-rays and gamma-rays since its launch in February of 2002. RHESSI observes the full Sun at photon energies from as low as 3 keV to as high as 17 MeV with a spectral resolution on the order of 1 keV. It also provides images in arbitrary bands within this energy range with spatial resolution as good as 3 seconds of arc. Full images are typically produced every 4 seconds, although higher time resolution is possible. This unprecedented combination of spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution, spectral range and flexibility has led to fundamental advances in our understanding of flares. I will show RHESSI and coordinated observations that confirm coronal magnetic reconnection models for eruptive flares and coronal mass ejections, but also present new puzzles for these models. I will demonstrate how the analysis of RHESSI spectra has led to a better determination of the energy flux and total energy in accelerated electrons, and of the energy in the hot, thermal flare plasma. I will discuss how these energies compare with each other and with the energy contained in other flare-related phenomena such as interplanetary particles and coronal mass ejections.

  8. GAMMA-RAY BURST FLARES: ULTRAVIOLET/OPTICAL FLARING. I

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, C. A.; Roming, P. W. A.; De Pasquale, M.; Oates, S. R.

    2013-09-01

    We present a previously unused method for the detection of flares in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves and use this method to detect flares in the ultraviolet/optical. The algorithm makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion to analyze the residuals of the fitted light curve, removing all major features, and to determine the statistically best fit to the data by iteratively adding additional ''breaks'' to the light curve. These additional breaks represent the individual components of the detected flares: T{sub start}, T{sub stop}, and T{sub peak}. We present the detection of 119 unique flaring periods detected by applying this algorithm to light curves taken from the Second Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) GRB Afterglow Catalog. We analyzed 201 UVOT GRB light curves and found episodes of flaring in 68 of the light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of {approx}2 flares per GRB. Flaring is generally restricted to the first 1000 s of the afterglow, but can be observed and detected beyond 10{sup 5} s. More than 80% of the flares detected are short in duration with {Delta}t/t of <0.5. Flares were observed with flux ratios relative to the underlying light curve of between 0.04 and 55.42. Many of the strongest flares were also seen at greater than 1000 s after the burst.

  9. Experimental Study on Fast Electrons Transport in Ultra-intense Laser Irradiated Solid Targets by Transition Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhijian, Zheng; Guangcan, Wang; Yuqiu, Gu

    2008-11-01

    The experiment was performed with SILEX laser facility(Ti-saphhire) at LFRC in China. The SILEX parameter: wavelength 0.8μm, duration 35fs, output power 280TW, contrast 5*105, The focal spot φ10μm(F/1.7), intensity on target surface 1*10^19W/cm^2(F/3). The main diagnostic equipments are the electron spectrometer, OMA spectrometer, optical streak camera. Some experimental results are given: The spectrum of optical emission from rear surface is rather narrow around some particular frequencies(1φ, 2φ, 3φ), We ascribe and confirm that the spike-like spectral line that is coherent transition radiation; The coherent light is also seen on time-integrated image with ring-patter due to Weibel instability of the fast electron transport; Obtained experimental cure of target thickness vs OTR image intensity is relative to mean free path of fast electron; The measuring optical transition radiation(OTR) duration of 171ps much longer than 1ps duration of fast electron transport target, the possible explanation is that the OTR duration to be determined magnetic diffusion time.

  10. Fast Electron Correlation Methods for Molecular Clusters without Basis Set Superposition Errors

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiya, Muneaki; Hirata, So; Valiev, Marat

    2008-02-19

    Two critical extensions to our fast, accurate, and easy-to-implement binary or ternary interaction method for weakly-interacting molecular clusters [Hirata et al. Mol. Phys. 103, 2255 (2005)] have been proposed, implemented, and applied to water hexamers, hydrogen fluoride chains and rings, and neutral and zwitterionic glycine–water clusters with an excellent result for an initial performance assessment. Our original method included up to two- or three-body Coulomb, exchange, and correlation energies exactly and higher-order Coulomb energies in the dipole–dipole approximation. In this work, the dipole moments are replaced by atom-centered point charges determined so that they reproduce the electrostatic potentials of the cluster subunits as closely as possible and also self-consistently with one another in the cluster environment. They have been shown to lead to dramatic improvement in the description of short-range electrostatic potentials not only of large, charge-separated subunits like zwitterionic glycine but also of small subunits. Furthermore, basis set superposition errors (BSSE) known to plague direct evaluation of weak interactions have been eliminated by com-bining the Valiron–Mayer function counterpoise (VMFC) correction with our binary or ternary interaction method in an economical fashion (quadratic scaling n2 with respect to the number of subunits n when n is small and linear scaling when n is large). A new variant of VMFC has also been proposed in which three-body and all higher-order Coulomb effects on BSSE are estimated approximately. The BSSE-corrected ternary interaction method with atom-centered point charges reproduces the VMFC-corrected results of conventional electron correlation calculations within 0.1 kcal/mol. The proposed method is significantly more accurate and also efficient than conventional correlation methods uncorrected of BSSE.

  11. Large solar flares and their ionospheric D region enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Neil R.; Rodger, Craig J.; Clilverd, Mark A.

    2005-06-01

    On 4 November 2003, the largest solar flare ever recorded saturated the GOES satellite X-ray detectors, making an assessment of its size difficult. However, VLF radio phase advances effectively recorded the lowering of the VLF reflection height and hence the lowest edge of the Earth's ionosphere. Previously, these phase advances were used to extrapolate the GOES 0.1-0.8 nm ("XL") fluxes from saturation at X17 to give a peak magnitude of X45 ± 5 for this great flare. Here it is shown that a similar extrapolation, but using the other GOES X-ray band, 0.05-0.4 nm ("XS"), is also consistent with a magnitude of X45. Also reported here are VLF phase measurements from two paths near dawn: "Omega Australia" to Dunedin, New Zealand (only just all sunlit) and NPM, Hawaii, to Ny Alesund, Svalbard (only partly sunlit), which also give remarkably good extrapolations of the flare flux, suggesting that VLF paths monitoring flares do not necessarily need to be in full daylight. D region electron densities are modeled as functions of X-ray flux up to the level of the great X45 flare by using flare-induced VLF amplitudes together with the VLF phase changes. During this great flare, the "Wait" reflection height, H', was found to have been lowered to ˜53 km or ˜17 km below the normal midday value of ˜70 km. Finally, XL/XS ratios are examined during some large flares, including the great flare. Plots of such ratios against XL can give quite good estimates of the great flare's size (X45) but without use of VLF measurements.

  12. Gamma-ray and microwave evidence for two phases of acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, T.; Ramaty, R.

    1976-01-01

    Relativistic electrons in large solar flares produce gamma ray continuum by bremsstrahlung and microwave emission by gyrosynchrotron radiation. Using observations of the 1972, August 4 flare, the electron spectrum and the physical properties of the common emitting region of these radiations were evaluated. Information was also obtained on energetic protons in this flare by using gamma ray lines. From the electron spectrum, the proton-to-electron ratio, and the time dependences of the microwave emission, the 2.2 MeV line and the gamma ray continuum, it was concluded that in large solar flares relativistic electrons and energetic nuclei are accelerated by a mechanism which is different from the mechanism which accelerates approximately less than 100 keV electrons in flares.

  13. Particle acceleration by a solar flare termination shock.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Bastian, Timothy S; Shen, Chengcai; Gary, Dale E; Krucker, Säm; Glesener, Lindsay

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares--the most powerful explosions in the solar system--are also efficient particle accelerators, capable of energizing a large number of charged particles to relativistic speeds. A termination shock is often invoked in the standard model of solar flares as a possible driver for particle acceleration, yet its existence and role have remained controversial. We present observations of a solar flare termination shock and trace its morphology and dynamics using high-cadence radio imaging spectroscopy. We show that a disruption of the shock coincides with an abrupt reduction of the energetic electron population. The observed properties of the shock are well reproduced by simulations. These results strongly suggest that a termination shock is responsible, at least in part, for accelerating energetic electrons in solar flares.

  14. Particle acceleration by a solar flare termination shock.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Bastian, Timothy S; Shen, Chengcai; Gary, Dale E; Krucker, Säm; Glesener, Lindsay

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares--the most powerful explosions in the solar system--are also efficient particle accelerators, capable of energizing a large number of charged particles to relativistic speeds. A termination shock is often invoked in the standard model of solar flares as a possible driver for particle acceleration, yet its existence and role have remained controversial. We present observations of a solar flare termination shock and trace its morphology and dynamics using high-cadence radio imaging spectroscopy. We show that a disruption of the shock coincides with an abrupt reduction of the energetic electron population. The observed properties of the shock are well reproduced by simulations. These results strongly suggest that a termination shock is responsible, at least in part, for accelerating energetic electrons in solar flares. PMID:26785486

  15. THREE-DIMENSIONAL RADIO AND X-RAY MODELING AND DATA ANALYSIS SOFTWARE: REVEALING FLARE COMPLEXITY

    SciTech Connect

    Nita, Gelu M.; Fleishman, Gregory D.; Gary, Dale E.; Kuznetsov, Alexey A.; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2015-02-01

    Many problems in solar physics require analysis of imaging data obtained in multiple wavelength domains with differing spatial resolution in a framework supplied by advanced three-dimensional (3D) physical models. To facilitate this goal, we have undertaken a major enhancement of our IDL-based simulation tools developed earlier for modeling microwave and X-ray emission. The enhanced software architecture allows the user to (1) import photospheric magnetic field maps and perform magnetic field extrapolations to generate 3D magnetic field models; (2) investigate the magnetic topology by interactively creating field lines and associated flux tubes; (3) populate the flux tubes with user-defined nonuniform thermal plasma and anisotropic, nonuniform, nonthermal electron distributions; (4) investigate the spatial and spectral properties of radio and X-ray emission calculated from the model; and (5) compare the model-derived images and spectra with observational data. The package integrates shared-object libraries containing fast gyrosynchrotron emission codes, IDL-based soft and hard X-ray codes, and potential and linear force-free field extrapolation routines. The package accepts user-defined radiation and magnetic field extrapolation plug-ins. We use this tool to analyze a relatively simple single-loop flare and use the model to constrain the magnetic 3D structure and spatial distribution of the fast electrons inside this loop. We iteratively compute multi-frequency microwave and multi-energy X-ray images from realistic magnetic flux tubes obtained from pre-flare extrapolations, and compare them with imaging data obtained by SDO, NoRH, and RHESSI. We use this event to illustrate the tool's use for the general interpretation of solar flares to address disparate problems in solar physics.

  16. Fast-digitizing and track-finding electronics for the vertex detector in the Opal experiment at the Large Electron Positron Collider (LEP) at Cern

    SciTech Connect

    Jaroslawski, S.; Jeffs, M.; Matson, R.; Milborrow, R.; White, D. )

    1990-10-01

    The vertex front-end electronics is described. It comprises fast analog-to-digital conversion circuits and a fast programmable track trigger processor. The function of the electronics is to examine, within one LEP beam crossing (22 {mu}s), data generated in the detector for the evidence of charged particle tracks. Measurements of ionization drift times are based on a gated 93-MHz oscillator synchronized to a precision crystal clock and give points in space. The axial positions of these points along the detector are found by analyzing the difference in time of arrivals of signals at the ends of the detector ({ital z} by timing). Particle tracks are found by 36 track finders operating in parallel and are matched by semicuston coincidence chips. The track information is used in the first stage of data reduction in Opal (the first-level trigger).

  17. Effect of fast electrons on the stability of resistive interchange modes in the TJ-II stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, L.; Ochando, M. A.; Carreras, B. A.; Carralero, D.; Hidalgo, C.; van Milligen, B. Ph.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we report on electromagnetic phenomena in low-β plasmas at the TJ-II stellarator, controlled by external heating. To understand the observations qualitatively, we introduce a simple modification of the standard resistive MHD equations, to include the potential impact of fast electrons on instabilities. The dominant instabilities of the modeling regime are resistive interchange modes, and calculations are performed in a configuration with similar characteristics as the TJ-II stellarator. The main effect of the trapping of fast electrons by magnetic islands induced by MHD instabilities is to increase the magnetic component of the fluctuations, changing the character of the instability to tearing-like and modifying the frequency of the modes. These effects seem to be consistent with some of the experimental observations.

  18. A statistic study of ionospheric solar flare activity indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Bo; Wan, Weixing; Ning, Baiqi; Ding, Feng; Hu, Lianhuan; Yu, You

    2014-01-01

    According to the Chapman ionization theory, an ionospheric solar flare activity indicator (ISFAI) is given by the solar zenith angle and the variation rate of ionospheric vertical total electron content, which is measured from a global network of dual-frequency GPS receivers. The ISFAI is utilized to statistically analyze the ionospheric responses to 1439 M-class and 126 X-class solar flares during solar cycle 23 (1996-2008). The statistical results show that the occurrence of ISFAI peak increases obviously at 3.2 total electron content unit (TECU)/h (1 TECU = 1016 el m-2) and reaches the maximum at 10 TECU/h during M-class flares and 10 TECU/h and 40 TECU/h for X-class flares. ISFAI is closely correlated with the 26-34 nm extreme ultraviolet flux but poorly related to the 0.1-0.8 nm X-ray flux. The central meridian distance (CMD) of flare location is an important reason for depressing relationship between ISFAI and X-ray Flux. Through the CMD effect modification, the ISFAI has a significant dependence on the X-ray flux with a correlation coefficient of 0.76. The ISFAI sensitivity enables to detect the extreme X-class flares, as well as the variations of one order of magnitude or even smaller (such as for C-class flares). Meanwhile, ISFAI is helpful to the calibration of the X-ray flux at 0.1-0.8 nm observed by GOES during some flares. In addition, the statistical results demonstrate that ISFAI can detect 80% of all M-class flares and 92% for all X-class ones during 1996-2008.

  19. TIME-DEPENDENT MODELS OF FLARES FROM SAGITTARIUS A*

    SciTech Connect

    Dodds-Eden, Katie; Genzel, Reinhard; Gillessen, Stefan; Eisenhauer, Frank; Sharma, Prateek; Quataert, Eliot; Porquet, Delphine

    2010-12-10

    The emission from Sgr A*, the supermassive black hole in the Galactic Center, shows order of magnitude variability ('flares') a few times a day that is particularly prominent in the near-infrared (NIR) and X-rays. We present a time-dependent model for these flares motivated by the hypothesis that dissipation of magnetic energy powers the flares. We show that episodic magnetic reconnection can occur near the last stable circular orbit in time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic simulations of black hole accretion-the timescales and energetics of these events are broadly consistent with the flares from Sgr A*. Motivated by these results, we present a spatially one-zone time-dependent model for the electron distribution function in flares, including energy loss due to synchrotron cooling and adiabatic expansion. Synchrotron emission from transiently accelerated particles can explain the NIR/X-ray light curves and spectra of a luminous flare observed on 2007 April 4. A significant decrease in the magnetic field strength during the flare (coincident with the electron acceleration) is required to explain the simultaneity and symmetry of the simultaneous light curves. Our models predict that the NIR and X-ray spectral indices are related by {Delta}{alpha} {approx_equal} 0.5 (where {nu}F{sub {nu}} {proportional_to} {nu}{sup {alpha}}) and that there is only modest variation in the spectral index during flares. We also explore implications of this model for longer wavelength (radio-submillimeter) emission seemingly associated with X-ray and NIR flares; we argue that a few hour decrease in the submillimeter emission is a more generic consequence of large-scale magnetic reconnection than delayed radio emission from adiabatic expansion.

  20. Reverse Current in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. W., III

    1978-01-01

    An idealized steady state model of a stream of energetic electrons neutralized by a reverse current in the pre-flare solar plasma was developed. These calculations indicate that, in some cases, a significant fraction of the beam energy may be dissipated by the reverse current. Joule heating by the reverse current is a more effective mechanism for heating the plasma than collisional losses from the energetic electrons because the Ohmic losses are caused by thermal electrons in the reverse current which have much shorter mean free paths than the energetic electrons. The heating due to reverse currents is calculated for two injected energetic electron fluxes. For the smaller injected flux, the temperature of the coronal plasma is raised by about a factor of two. The larger flux causes the reverse current drift velocity to exceed the critical velocity for the onset of ion cyclotron turbulence, producing anomalous resistivity and an order of magnitude increase in the temperature. The heating is so rapid that the lack of ionization equilibrium may produce a soft X-ray and EUV pulse from the corona.

  1. Gamma-ray burst flares: X-ray flaring. II

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, C. A.; Roming, P. W. A.

    2014-06-10

    We present a catalog of 498 flaring periods found in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves taken from the online Swift X-Ray Telescope GRB Catalogue. We analyzed 680 individual light curves using a flare detection method developed and used on our UV/optical GRB Flare Catalog. This method makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion to analyze the residuals of fitted GRB light curves and statistically determines the optimal fit to the light curve residuals in an attempt to identify any additional features. These features, which we classify as flares, are identified by iteratively adding additional 'breaks' to the light curve. We find evidence of flaring in 326 of the analyzed light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of ∼1.5 flares per GRB. As with the UV/optical, flaring in our sample is generally confined to the first 1000 s of the afterglow, but can be detected to beyond 10{sup 5} s. Only ∼50% of the detected flares follow the 'classical' definition of Δt/t ≤ 0.5, with many of the largest flares exceeding this value.

  2. Fast ion induced shearing of 2D Alfvén eigenmodes measured by electron cyclotron emission imaging.

    PubMed

    Tobias, B J; Classen, I G J; Domier, C W; Heidbrink, W W; Luhmann, N C; Nazikian, R; Park, H K; Spong, D A; Van Zeeland, M A

    2011-02-18

    Two-dimensional images of electron temperature perturbations are obtained with electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) on the DIII-D tokamak and compared to Alfvén eigenmode structures obtained by numerical modeling using both ideal MHD and hybrid MHD-gyrofluid codes. While many features of the observations are found to be in excellent agreement with simulations using an ideal MHD code (NOVA), other characteristics distinctly reveal the influence of fast ions on the mode structures. These features are found to be well described by the nonperturbative hybrid MHD-gyrofluid model TAEFL.

  3. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Conversion of the energy of fast electrons to thermal plasma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergunova, G. A.; Rozanov, Vladislav B.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis is made of the conversion of the energy of highly energetic fast electrons, generated by the action of CO2 laser radiation on a target, into characteristic radiation emitted by a plasma formed from shell targets which, for instance, may be present inside targets irradiated by the CO2 laser. Analytical formulas are obtained for the temperature of the converted radiation. The results show that it is possible to control this radiation by choosing the parameters of the target and of the fast electron flux. The efficiency of conversion into characteristic thermal radiation is found numerically to be 95%. This method of conversion is more favorable than direct interaction of CO2 laser radiation with a target since the emitting region is localized in the target mass. When a laser interacts with a target the mass of this region increases with time and so the temperature of the emitted radiation is lower than in the case when fast electrons act on the target.

  4. Flare evolution and magnetic configuration study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlicki, A.; Schmieder, B.; Aulanier, G.; Vilmer, N.; Yan, Y. H.

    We will present the analysis of M1.0 confined flare emission and evolution in the context of the topology of the coronal magnetic field. This flare was observed in NOAA 0162 on 22 October 2002. The multiwavelength data were taken during a coordinated observational campaign between ground based instruments and space observatories. The photospheric line-of-sight magnetic field observations were obtained with THEMIS and SOHO/MDI. We used these data to perform linear force-free field extrapolation of magnetic field into the corona. Our extrapolation provides an explanation of the appearance of H-alpha flare ribbons. An elongated shape of X-ray emission observed by Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) also follow the predicted shape of extrapolated field lines. Moreover, the X-ray emission observed by RHESSI permit to see thermal emission of coronal loops heated probably by non-thermal electrons, accelerated during the reconnection processes. The presence of non-thermal particles can be deduced from RHESSI X-ray spectra reconstructed during the gradual phase of the flare. On Huairou vector magnetograms of the AR we see that there was strong shear between one of main negative spot and the north small positive spot. The extrapolation with non-constant alpha force-free field model did not obtain any loop to connect these two spots.

  5. Transient particle acceleration associated with solar flares.

    PubMed

    Chupp, E L

    1990-10-12

    Understanding how individual charged particles can be accelerated to extreme energies (10(20) electron volts), remains a foremost problem in astrophysics. Within our solar system, the active sun is capable of producing, on a short time scale, ions with energies higher than 25 gigaelectron volts. Satellite and ground-based observation over the past 30 years have greatly increased our knowledge of the properties of transient bursts of energetic particles emitted from the sun in association with solar flares, but a real understanding of the solar flare particle acceleration process requires greatly refined experimental data. On the practical side, it is also imperative that this problem be solved if man is to venture, for long periods of time, beyond the protective umbrella of Earth's magnetic field, which excludes much of the biologically damaging solar energetic particles. It is only through an understanding of the basic acceleration problem that we can expect to be able to predict the occurrence of a solar flare with lethal solar radiations. For our knowledge of these effects to advance, a new space mission dedicated to studying the high-energy aspects of solar flares at high spatial and energy resolution will be required.

  6. Effect of the electric field pattern on the generation of fast electrons in front of lower hybrid launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valade, Laurent; Fuchs, Vladimir; Ekedahl, Annika; Petrzilka, Vaclav; Colas, Laurent; Goniche, Marc; Hillairet, Julien; Li, Miaohui; Zhang, Bin

    2015-12-01

    The effect of the detailed waveguide spectrum on the electron acceleration has been studied for the 3.7 GHz LHCD launchers in Tore Supra, i.e. the ITER-like passive-active multijunction (PAM) launcher and the fully-active-multijunction (FAM) launcher, using test electron modelling technique. The detailed launched antenna wave spectrum is used as input to the code that computes the dynamics of the electrons in the electric field. Comparison with the LHCD launchers in EAST, operating at 2.45 GHz and 4.6 GHz, has also been made. The simulations show that the PAM-design generates lower flux of fast electrons than FAM-launchers, this could be the consequence of the wider waveguide of PAM-launcher (14.65 mm for Tore-Supra) than FAM-launcher (8 mm for Tore-Supra).

  7. Effect of the electric field pattern on the generation of fast electrons in front of lower hybrid launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Valade, Laurent Ekedahl, Annika; Colas, Laurent; Goniche, Marc; Hillairet, Julien; Fuchs, Vladimir; Petrzilka, Vaclav; Li, Miaohui; Zhang, Bin

    2015-12-10

    The effect of the detailed waveguide spectrum on the electron acceleration has been studied for the 3.7 GHz LHCD launchers in Tore Supra, i.e. the ITER-like passive-active multijunction (PAM) launcher and the fully-active-multijunction (FAM) launcher, using test electron modelling technique. The detailed launched antenna wave spectrum is used as input to the code that computes the dynamics of the electrons in the electric field. Comparison with the LHCD launchers in EAST, operating at 2.45 GHz and 4.6 GHz, has also been made. The simulations show that the PAM-design generates lower flux of fast electrons than FAM-launchers, this could be the consequence of the wider waveguide of PAM-launcher (14.65 mm for Tore-Supra) than FAM-launcher (8 mm for Tore-Supra)

  8. Predictions of reconnected flux, energy and helicity in eruptive solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazachenko, Maria Dmitiyevna

    2010-12-01

    In order to better understand the solar genesis of interplanetary magnetic clouds, I model the magnetic and topological properties of several large eruptive solar flares and relate them to observations. My main hypothesis is that the flux ropes ejected during eruptive solar flares are the result of a sequence of magnetic reconnections. To test this hypothesis, I use the three-dimensional Minimum Current Corona model of flare energy storage (Longcope, 1996) together with pre-flare photospheric magnetic field and flare ribbon observations to predict the basic flare properties: reconnected magnetic flux, free energy, and flux rope helicity. Initially, the MCC model was able to quantify the properties of the flares that occur in active regions with only photospheric shearing motions. Since rotating motions may also play a key role in the flare energetics, I develop a method for including both shearing and rotating motions into the MCC model. I use this modified method to predict the model flare properties and then compare them to the observed quantities. Firstly, for two flares in active regions with fast rotating sunspots, I find that the relative importance of shearing and rotation to those flares depends critically on their location within the parent active region topology. Secondly, for four flares analyzed with the MCC model (three flares described here and one flare described in Longcope et al. (2007)), I find that the modeled flare properties agree with the observed properties within the uncertainties of the methods used. This agreement compels me to believe that the magnetic clouds associated with these four solar flares are formed by low-corona magnetic reconnection during the eruption as modeled by the MCC model, rather than eruption of pre-existing structures in the corona or formation in the upper corona with participation of the global magnetic field. I note that since all four flares occurred in active regions without significant pre-flare flux emergence

  9. Fast pulsed operation of a small non-radioactive electron source with continuous emission current control.

    PubMed

    Cochems, P; Kirk, A T; Bunert, E; Runge, M; Goncalves, P; Zimmermann, S

    2015-06-01

    Non-radioactive electron sources are of great interest in any application requiring the emission of electrons at atmospheric pressure, as they offer better control over emission parameters than radioactive electron sources and are not subject to legal restrictions. Recently, we published a simple electron source consisting only of a vacuum housing, a filament, and a single control grid. In this paper, we present improved control electronics that utilize this control grid in order to focus and defocus the electron beam, thus pulsing the electron emission at atmospheric pressure. This allows short emission pulses and excellent stability of the emitted electron current due to continuous control, both during pulsed and continuous operations. As an application example, this electron source is coupled to an ion mobility spectrometer. Here, the pulsed electron source allows experiments on gas phase ion chemistry (e.g., ion generation and recombination kinetics) and can even remove the need for a traditional ion shutter.

  10. Fast pulsed operation of a small non-radioactive electron source with continuous emission current control

    SciTech Connect

    Cochems, P.; Kirk, A. T.; Bunert, E.; Runge, M.; Goncalves, P.; Zimmermann, S.

    2015-06-15

    Non-radioactive electron sources are of great interest in any application requiring the emission of electrons at atmospheric pressure, as they offer better control over emission parameters than radioactive electron sources and are not subject to legal restrictions. Recently, we published a simple electron source consisting only of a vacuum housing, a filament, and a single control grid. In this paper, we present improved control electronics that utilize this control grid in order to focus and defocus the electron beam, thus pulsing the electron emission at atmospheric pressure. This allows short emission pulses and excellent stability of the emitted electron current due to continuous control, both during pulsed and continuous operations. As an application example, this electron source is coupled to an ion mobility spectrometer. Here, the pulsed electron source allows experiments on gas phase ion chemistry (e.g., ion generation and recombination kinetics) and can even remove the need for a traditional ion shutter.

  11. CONSTRAINING SOLAR FLARE DIFFERENTIAL EMISSION MEASURES WITH EVE AND RHESSI

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, Amir; McTiernan, James M.; Warren, Harry P.

    2014-06-20

    Deriving a well-constrained differential emission measure (DEM) distribution for solar flares has historically been difficult, primarily because no single instrument is sensitive to the full range of coronal temperatures observed in flares, from ≲2 to ≳50 MK. We present a new technique, combining extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectra from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory with X-ray spectra from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), to derive, for the first time, a self-consistent, well-constrained DEM for jointly observed solar flares. EVE is sensitive to ∼2-25 MK thermal plasma emission, and RHESSI to ≳10 MK; together, the two instruments cover the full range of flare coronal plasma temperatures. We have validated the new technique on artificial test data, and apply it to two X-class flares from solar cycle 24 to determine the flare DEM and its temporal evolution; the constraints on the thermal emission derived from the EVE data also constrain the low energy cutoff of the non-thermal electrons, a crucial parameter for flare energetics. The DEM analysis can also be used to predict the soft X-ray flux in the poorly observed ∼0.4-5 nm range, with important applications for geospace science.

  12. Dual frequency observations of flares with the VLA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulk, G. A.; Bastian, T. S.; Hurford, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    Observations are presented of two subflares near the limb on 21 and 22 November 1981 and an M7.7 flare on 8 May 1981 made at 5 and 15 GHz using the VLA. One of the November flares produced no 5 GHz radiation, while the 15 GHz radiation in the other flare emanated from a source which was smaller, lower, and displaced from the 5 GHz source. The flare occurring on 8 May was intense and complex, and contained two or more sources at both 5 and 15 GHz. Prior to the peak of the flare, the sources were found to grow in size, after which time only weak subsources were visible to the VLA. These subsources were found to be located between or at the edge of the H-alpha ribbons and the two hard X-ray sources imaged by the Hinotori satellite. Highly polarized, bursty radiation was observed at 1 and 2 GHz, which indicated that an electron-cyclotron maser operated during the flare. The maximum field strength in flaring loops is estimated to be 360-600 gauss.

  13. The Soft X-Ray/Microwave Ratio of Solar and Stellar Flares and Coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, A. O.; Guedel, M.

    1994-01-01

    We have carried out plasma diagnostics of solar flares using soft X-ray (SXR) and simultaneous microwave observations and have compared the ratio of X-ray to microwave luminosities of solar flares with various active late-type stars available in the published literature. Both the SXR low-level ('quiescent') emission from stellar coronae and the flaring emission from the Sun and stars are generally interpreted as thermal radiations of coronal plasmas. On the other hand, the microwave emission of stars and solar flares is generally attributed to an extremely hot or nonthermal population of electrons. Solar flare SXR are conventionally measured in a narrower and harder passband than the stellar sources. Observations of the GOES-2 satellite in two energy channels have been used to estimate the luminosity of solar flares as it would appear in the ROSAT satellite passband. The solar and stellar flare luminosities fit well at the lower end of the active stellar coronae. The flare SXR/microwave ratio is similar to the ratio for stellar coronae. The average ratio follows a power-law relation L(sub X) varies as L(sub R)(sup 0.73 +/- 0.03) over 10 orders of magnitude from solar microflares to RS CVn and FK Com-type coronae. Dwarf Me and Ke stars, and RS CVn stars are also compatible with a linear SXR/microwave relation, but the ratio is slightly different for each type of star. Considering the differences between solar flares, stellar flares and the various active stellar coronae, the similarity of the SXR/microwave ratios is surprising. It suggests that the energetic electrons in low-level stellar coronae observed in microwaves are related in a similar way to the coronal thermal plasma as flare electrons to the flare thermal plasma, and, consequently, that the heating mechanism of active stellar coronae is a flare-like process.

  14. Recent Progress in Understanding Energy Transfer in Solar Flares Resulting from Coordinated IRIS, SDO, and Hinode Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, K.

    2015-12-01

    Flares are the most energetic events that take place on the Sun, and studying them results in a wealth of information about the energy transfer between the solar corona and lower layers of the atmosphere. Prior to a flare, magnetic fields in the photosphere and chromosphere are stressed until a trigger causes energy release in the corona. Manifestations of this energy release are accelerated electrons high in the corona, increased intensity in post-flare arcades and chromospheric footpoint brightenings. Chromospheric evaporation at flare footpoints gives insight into the particular energy release mechanisms during solar flares. Progress in understanding the energy storage, release and deposition of energy during solar flares has come thanks to coordinated observations between IRIS, SDO and Hinode. In this talk, I will review recent results from these coordinated efforts, including observations of reconnection outflows, chromospheric evaporation, turbulence in flare loop tops, and flare triggering.

  15. Probability and shape of the spectral line of a single bulk characteristic energy loss of a fast electron in a medium with electron absorption and strong spatial dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Libenson, B. N.

    2011-10-15

    The probability of single characteristic energy loss of a fast electron in a reflection experiment has been calculated. Unlike many works concerning this subject, the bremsstrahlung of bulk plasmons in the non- Cherenkov ranges of frequencies and wavevectors of a plasmon has been taken into account. The contributions to the probability of single loss and to the shape of the spectral line from a quantum correction that is due to the interference of elastic and inelastic electron scattering events have been determined. The probability has been calculated in the kinetic approximation for the relative permittivity, where the short-wavelength range of the plasmon spectrum is correctly taken into account. In view of these circumstances, the expression for the mean free path of the electron with respect to the emission of a bulk plasmon that was obtained by Pines [D. Pines, Elementary Excitations in Solids (Benjamin, New York, 1963)] has been refined. The coherence length of the fast electron in the medium-energy range under consideration has been estimated. The shape of the spectral line of energy losses in the non-Cherenkov frequency range has been determined. It has been shown that the probability of the single emission of the bulk plasmon incompletely corresponds to the Poisson statistics.

  16. Evolution of flare ribbons, electric currents, and quasi-separatrix layers during an X-class flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janvier, M.; Savcheva, A.; Pariat, E.; Tassev, S.; Millholland, S.; Bommier, V.; McCauley, P.; McKillop, S.; Dougan, F.

    2016-07-01

    traces of an eruptive flare, in a complex topology, with direct measurements of electric currents and QSLs from observational data and a magnetic field model. The results, obtained by two different and independent approaches 1) confirm previous results of current increase during the impulsive phase of the flare and 2) show how NLFFF models can capture the essential physical signatures of flares even in a complex magnetic field topology. A movie associated to Fig. 1 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. Flares as Avalanches?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, P.

    2003-05-01

    In 1991, E.T. Lu and R. Hamilton (ApJ 380, L89) suggested that flares could be interpreted as avalanches of reconnection events in coronal magnetic structures driven to a self-organized critical state. Physical underpinning for the simple cellular automaton model they used to illustrate their idea can be readily found in the nanoflare conjecture for coronal heating championed over the past two decades by E.N. Parker (e.g., ApJ 330, 474 [1988]). In this lecture I will give a brief overview of Lu & Hamilton's avalanche model, and describe how it can be physically interpreted in the context of Parker's nanoflare conjecture. After discussing some illustrative model results, I will focus on recent comparisons of the model's predictions with flare observations. Finally, I will discuss some recent attempts at quantitatively exploring the physical relationship between model components and the physics of magnetic reconnection.

  18. Modeling radiation belt electron acceleration by ULF fast mode waves, launched by solar wind dynamic pressure fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degeling, A. W.; Rankin, R.; Zong, Q.-G.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the magnetospheric MHD and energetic electron response to a Storm Sudden Commencement (SSC) and subsequent magnetopause buffeting, focusing on an interval following an SSC event on 25 November 2001. We find that the electron flux signatures observed by LANL, Cluster, and GOES spacecraft during this event can largely be reproduced using an advective kinetic model for electron phase space density, using externally prescribed electromagnetic field inputs, (herein described as a "test-kinetic model") with electromagnetic field inputs provided by a 2-D linear ideal MHD model for ULF waves. In particular, we find modulations in electron flux phase shifted by 90° from the local azimuthal ULF wave electric field (Eφ) and a net enhancement in electron flux after 1.5 h for energies between 500 keV and 1.5 MeV near geosynchronous orbit. We also demonstrate that electrons in this energy range satisfy the drift resonance condition for the ULF waves produced by the MHD model. This confirms the conclusions reached by Tan et al. (2011), that the energization process in this case is dominated by drift-resonant interactions between electrons and MHD fast mode waves, produced by fluctuations in solar wind dynamic pressure.

  19. Blazar flares powered by plasmoids in relativistic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulou, Maria; Giannios, Dimitrios; Sironi, Lorenzo

    2016-11-01

    Powerful flares from blazars with short (˜min) variability time-scales are challenging for current models of blazar emission. Here, we present a physically motivated ab initio model for blazar flares based on the results of recent particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of relativistic magnetic reconnection. PIC simulations demonstrate that quasi-spherical plasmoids filled with high-energy particles and magnetic fields are a self-consistent by-product of the reconnection process. By coupling our PIC-based results (i.e. plasmoid growth, acceleration profile, particle and magnetic content) with a kinetic equation for the evolution of the electron distribution function we demonstrate that relativistic reconnection in blazar jets can produce powerful flares whose temporal and spectral properties are consistent with the observations. In particular, our model predicts correlated synchrotron and synchrotron self-Compton flares of duration of several hours-days powered by the largest and slowest moving plasmoids that form in the reconnection layer. Smaller and faster plasmoids produce flares of sub-hour duration with higher peak luminosities than those powered by the largest plasmoids. Yet, the observed fluence in both types of flares is similar. Multiple flares with a range of flux-doubling time-scales (minutes to several hours) observed over a longer period of flaring activity (days or longer) may be used as a probe of the reconnection layer's orientation and the jet's magnetization. Our model shows that blazar flares are naturally expected as a result of magnetic reconnection in a magnetically dominated jet.

  20. Raman scattering and associated fast electron production. Final technical report, April 16, 1984-April 15, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, R.D.; Pietrzyk, Z.A.

    1985-08-01

    High energy electrons in plasmas have been attributed to various causes including trapping by electron plasma waves created by stimulated Raman scattering. A theory, consistent with experimental results, based on the acceleration of trapped electrons by such electron plasma waves as they propagate in the presence of a density gradient away from the region where they are created is presented. Single particle simulations show accelerating voltages as high as 20 GV/m.

  1. Solar Flare Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmahl, Edward J.; Kundu, Mukul R.

    2000-01-01

    During the past year we have been working with the HESSI (High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager) team in preparation for launch in early 2001. HESSI has as its primary scientific goal photometric imaging and spectroscopy of solar flares in hard X-rays and gamma-rays with an approx. 2 sec angular resolution, approx. keV energy resolution and approx. 2 s time resolution over the 6 keV to 15 MeV energy range. We have performed tests of the imager using a specially designed experiment which exploits the second-harmonic response of HESSI's sub-collimators to an artificial X-ray source at a distance of 1550 cm from its front grids. Figures show the response to X-rays at energies in the range where HESSI is expected to image solar flares. To prepare the team and the solar user community for imaging flares with HESSI, we have written a description of the major imaging concepts. This paper will be submitted for publication in a referred journal.

  2. PRECURSOR FLARES IN OJ 287

    SciTech Connect

    Pihajoki, P.; Berdyugin, A.; Lindfors, E.; Reinthal, R.; Sillanpaeae, A.; Takalo, L.; Valtonen, M.; Nilsson, K.; Zola, S.; Koziel-Wierzbowska, D.; Liakos, A.; Drozdz, M.; Winiarski, M.; Ogloza, W.; Provencal, J.; Santangelo, M. M. M.; Salo, H.; Chandra, S.; Ganesh, S.; Baliyan, K. S.; and others

    2013-02-10

    We have studied three most recent precursor flares in the light curve of the blazar OJ 287 while invoking the presence of a precessing binary black hole in the system to explain the nature of these flares. Precursor flare timings from the historical light curves are compared with theoretical predictions from our model that incorporate effects of an accretion disk and post-Newtonian description for the binary black hole orbit. We find that the precursor flares coincide with the secondary black hole descending toward the accretion disk of the primary black hole from the observed side, with a mean z-component of approximately z{sub c} = 4000 AU. We use this model of precursor flares to predict that precursor flare of similar nature should happen around 2020.96 before the next major outburst in 2022.

  3. General purpose pulse shape analysis for fast scintillators implemented in digital readout electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asztalos, Stephen J.; Hennig, Wolfgang; Warburton, William K.

    2016-01-01

    Pulse shape discrimination applied to certain fast scintillators is usually performed offline. In sufficiently high-event rate environments data transfer and storage become problematic, which suggests a different analysis approach. In response, we have implemented a general purpose pulse shape analysis algorithm in the XIA Pixie-500 and Pixie-500 Express digital spectrometers. In this implementation waveforms are processed in real time, reducing the pulse characteristics to a few pulse shape analysis parameters and eliminating time-consuming waveform transfer and storage. We discuss implementation of these features, their advantages, necessary trade-offs and performance. Measurements from bench top and experimental setups using fast scintillators and XIA processors are presented.

  4. Gamma-ray lines and neutrons from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Kozlovsky, B.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    The energy spectrum of accelerated protons and nuclei at the site of a limb flare was derived by a technique, using observations of the time dependent flux of high energy neutrons at the earth. This energy spectrum is very similar to the energy spectra of 7 disk flares for which the accelerated particle spectra was previously derived using observations of 4 to 7 MeV to 2.223 MeV fluence ratios. The implied spectra for all of these flares are too steep to produce any significant amount of radiation from pi meson decay. It is suggested that the observed 10 MeV gamma rays from the flare are bremsstrahlung of relativistic electrons. Previously announced in STAR as N83-19695

  5. Gamma-ray lines and neutrons from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Kozlovsky, B.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    The energy spectrum of accelerated protons and nuclei at the site of a limb flare was derived by a technique, using observations of the time dependent flux of high energy neutrons at the Earth. This energy spectrum is very similar to the energy spectra of 7 disk flares for which the accelerated particle spectra was previously derived using observations of 4 to 7 MeV to 2.223 MeV fluence ratios. The implied spectra for all of these flares are too steep to produce any significant amount of radiation from pi meson decay. It is suggested that the observed 10 MeV gamma rays from the flare are bremsstrahlung of relativistic electrons.

  6. Imaging X-Ray Polarimeter for Solar Flares (IXPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosack, Michael; Black, J. Kevin; Deines-Jones, Philip; Dennis, Brian R.; Hill, Joanne E.; Jahoda, Keith; Shih, Albert Y.; Urba, Christian E.; Emslie, A. Gordon

    2011-01-01

    We describe the design of a balloon-borne Imaging X-ray Polarimeter for Solar flares (IX PS). This novel instrument, a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for photoelectric polarimetry, will be capable of measuring polarization at the few percent level in the 20-50 keV energy range during an M- or X class flare, and will provide imaging information at the approx.10 arcsec level. The primary objective of such observations is to determine the directivity of nonthermal high-energy electrons producing solar hard X-rays, and hence to learn about the particle acceleration and energy release processes in solar flares. Secondary objectives include the separation of the thermal and nonthermal components of the flare X-ray emissions and the separation of photospheric albedo fluxes from direct emissions.

  7. Solar flare leaves sun quaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-05-01

    Dr. Alexander G. Kosovichev, a senior research scientist from Stanford University, and Dr. Valentina V. Zharkova from Glasgow (United Kingdom) University found the tell-tale seismic signature in data on the Sun's surface collected by the Michelson Doppler Imager onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft immediately following a moderate-sized flare on July 9, 1996. "Although the flare was a moderate one, it still released an immense amount of energy," said Dr. Craig Deforest, a researcher with the SOHO project. "The energy released is equal to completely covering the Earth's continents with a yard of dynamite and detonating it all at once." SOHO is a joint project of the European Space Agency and NASA. The finding is reported in the May 28 issue of the journal Nature, and is the subject of a press conference at the spring meeting of the American Geophysical Union in Boston, Mass., May 27. The solar quake that the science team recorded looks much like ripples spreading from a rock dropped into a pool of water. But over the course of an hour, the solar waves traveled for a distance equal to 10 Earth diameters before fading into the fiery background of the Sun's photosphere. Unlike water ripples that travel outward at a constant velocity, the solar waves accelerated from an initial speed of 22,000 miles per hour to a maximum of 250,000 miles per hour before disappearing. "People have looked for evidence of seismic waves from flares before, but they didn't have a theory so they didn't know where to look," says Kosovichev. Several years ago Kosovichev and Zharkova developed a theory that can explain how a flare, which explodes in space above the Sun's surface, can generate a major seismic wave in the Sun's interior. According to the currently accepted model of solar flares, the primary explosion creates high-energy electrons (electrically charged subatomic particles). These are funneled down into a magnetic flux tube, an invisible tube of magnetic

  8. Development of a diagnostic technique based on Cherenkov effect for measurements of fast electrons in fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Plyusnin, V. V.; Duarte, P.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.

    2012-08-15

    A diagnostic technique based on the Cherenkov effect is proposed for detection and characterization of fast (super-thermal and runaway) electrons in fusion devices. The detectors of Cherenkov radiation have been specially designed for measurements in the ISTTOK tokamak. Properties of several materials have been studied to determine the most appropriate one to be used as a radiator of Cherenkov emission in the detector. This technique has enabled the detection of energetic electrons (70 keV and higher) and the determination of their spatial and temporal variations in the ISTTOK discharges. Measurement of hard x-ray emission has also been carried out in experiments for validation of the measuring capabilities of the Cherenkov-type detector and a high correlation was found between the data of both diagnostics. A reasonable agreement was found between experimental data and the results of numerical modeling of the runaway electron generation in ISTTOK.

  9. Optical shadowgraphy and proton imaging as diagnostics tools for fast electron propagation in ultrahigh-intensity laser-matter interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manclossi, M.; Batani, D.; Piazza, D.; Baton, S.; Amiranoff, F.; Koenig, M.; Popescu, H.; Audebert, P.; Santos, J. J.; Martinolli, E.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Le Gloahec, M. R.; Antonicci, A.; Rousseaux, C.; Borghesi, M.; Cecchetti, C.; Malka, V.; Hall, T.

    2005-10-01

    This paper reports the results of some recent experiments performed at the LULI laboratory (Palaiseau, France) concerning the propagation of large relativistic electron currents in a gas jet. We present our experimental results according to the type of diagnostics used in the experiments: (1) time resolved optical shadowgraphy and (2) proton imaging. Proton radiography images did show the presence of very strong fields in the gas probably produced by charge separation. In turn, these imply a slowing down of the fast electron cloud as it penetrates in the gas. Indeed, shadowgraphy images show a strong inhibition of propagation and a strong reduction in time of the velocity of the electron cloud from the initial value, which is of the order of a fraction of c.

  10. AD Leonis: Flares observed by XMM-Newton and Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Besselaar, E. J. M.; Raassen, A. J. J.; Mewe, R.; van der Meer, R. L. J.; Güdel, M.; Audard, M.

    2003-12-01

    The M-dwarf AD Leonis has been observed with the Reflection Grating Spectrometers and the European Photon Imaging Camera aboard XMM-Newton and also with the Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory. In the observation taken with XMM-Newton five large flares produced by AD Leo were identified and only one in the observation taken with Chandra. A quiescent level to the lightcurves is difficult to define, since several smaller flares mutually overlap each other. However, we defined a quasi-steady state outside of obvious flares or flare decays. The spectra from the flare state and the quasi-steady state are analysed separately. From these spectra the temperature structure was derived with a multi-temperature model and with a differential emission measure model. The multi-temperature model was also used to determine the relative abundances of \\element{C}, \\element{N}, \\element{O}, \\element{Ne}, \\element{Mg}, \\element{Si}, \\element{S}, and \\element{Fe}. \\element{He}-like ions, such as O Vii and Ne Ix, produce line triplets which are used to determine or constrain the electron temperature and electron density of the corresponding ion. During the flare state a higher emission measure at the hottest temperature is found for both XMM-Newton and Chandra observations. The derived abundances suggest the presence of an inverse First Ionization Potential effect in the corona of AD Leo.

  11. Well-observed dynamics of flaring and peripheral coronal magnetic loops during an M-class limb flare

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Jinhua; Zhou, Tuanhui; Ji, Haisheng; Feng, Li; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Inhester, Bernd

    2014-08-20

    In this paper, we present a variety of well-observed dynamic behaviors for the flaring and peripheral magnetic loops of the M6.6 class extreme limb flare that occurred on 2011 February 24 (SOL2011-02-24T07:20) from EUV observations by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory and X-ray observations by RHESSI. The flaring loop motion confirms the earlier contraction-expansion picture. We find that the U-shaped trajectory delineated by the X-ray corona source of the flare roughly follows the direction of a filament eruption associated with the flare. Different temperature structures of the coronal source during the contraction and expansion phases strongly suggest different kinds of magnetic reconnection processes. For some peripheral loops, we discover that their dynamics are closely correlated with the filament eruption. During the slow rising to abrupt, fast rising of the filament, overlying peripheral magnetic loops display different responses. Two magnetic loops on the elbow of the active region had a slow descending motion followed by an abrupt successive fast contraction, while magnetic loops on the top of the filament were pushed outward, slowly being inflated for a while and then erupting as a moving front. We show that the filament activation and eruption play a dominant role in determining the dynamics of the overlying peripheral coronal magnetic loops.

  12. Evidence for Fast Electron Transfer between the High-Spin Haems in Cytochrome bd-I from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Siletsky, Sergey A.; Poole, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome bd-I is one of the three proton motive force-generating quinol oxidases in the O2-dependent respiratory chain of Escherichia coli. It contains one low-spin haem (b558) and the two high-spin haems (b595 and d) as the redox-active cofactors. In order to examine the flash-induced intraprotein reverse electron transfer (the so-called ''electron backflow''), CO was photolyzed from the ferrous haem d in one-electron reduced (b5583+b5953+d2+-CO) cytochrome bd-I, and the fully reduced (b5582+b5952+d2+-CO) oxidase as a control. In contrast to the fully reduced cytochrome bd-I, the transient spectrum of one-electron reduced oxidase at a delay time of 1.5 μs is clearly different from that at a delay time of 200 ns. The difference between the two spectra can be modeled as the electron transfer from haem d to haem b595 in 3–4% of the cytochrome bd-I population. Thus, the interhaem electron backflow reaction induced by photodissociation of CO from haem d in one-electron reduced cytochrome bd-I comprises two kinetically different phases: the previously unnoticed fast electron transfer from haem d to haem b595 within 0.2–1.5 μs and the slower well-defined electron equilibration with τ ~16 μs. The major new finding of this work is the lack of electron transfer at 200 ns. PMID:27152644

  13. Electrophysical and optophysical properties of air ionized by a short pulse of fast electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagin, Iu. P.; Stal', N. L.; Khokhlov, V. D.; Chernoiarskii, A. A.

    A method for solving the nonstationary kinetic equation of electron deceleration is developed which is based on the multigroup approximation. The electron distribution function in air ionized by nonstationary sources of primary electrons is determined, and the avalanche formation of secondary electrons is considered. Theoretical and experimental results are presented on the time dependence of the air luminescence intensity in two spectral intervals, one including the 391.4 nm N2(+) band and the other including the 337.1 nm N2 band, for different values of gas pressure under the effect of a short beam of electrons with energies of 100 keV.

  14. Energy release in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John C.; Correia, Emilia; Farnik, Frantisek; Garcia, Howard; Henoux, Jean-Claude; La Rosa, Ted N.; Machado, Marcos E. (Compiler); Nakajima, Hiroshi; Priest, Eric R.

    1994-01-01

    Team 2 of the Ottawa Flares 22 Workshop dealt with observational and theoretical aspects of the characteristics and processes of energy release in flares. Main results summarized in this article stress the global character of the flaring phenomenon in active regions, the importance of discontinuities in magnetic connectivity, the role of field-aligned currents in free energy storage, and the fragmentation of energy release in time and space.

  15. Pre-flare Activity and Magnetic Reconnection during the Evolutionary Stages of Energy Release in a Solar Eruptive Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Bhuwan; Veronig, Astrid M.; Lee, Jeongwoo; Bong, Su-Chan; Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we present a multi-wavelength analysis of an eruptive white-light M3.2 flare that occurred in active region NOAA 10486 on 2003 November 1. The excellent set of high-resolution observations made by RHESSI and the TRACE provides clear evidence of significant pre-flare activities for ~9 minutes in the form of an initiation phase observed at EUV/UV wavelengths followed by an X-ray precursor phase. During the initiation phase, we observed localized brightenings in the highly sheared core region close to the filament and interactions among short EUV loops overlying the filament, which led to the opening of magnetic field lines. The X-ray precursor phase is manifested in RHESSI measurements below ~30 keV and coincided with the beginning of flux emergence at the flaring location along with early signatures of the eruption. The RHESSI observations reveal that both plasma heating and electron acceleration occurred during the precursor phase. The main flare is consistent with the standard flare model. However, after the impulsive phase, an intense hard X-ray (HXR) looptop source was observed without significant footpoint emission. More intriguingly, for a brief period, the looptop source exhibited strong HXR emission with energies up to ~50-100 keV and significant non-thermal characteristics. The present study indicates a causal relation between the activities in the pre-flare and the main flare. We also conclude that pre-flare activities, occurring in the form of subtle magnetic reorganization along with localized magnetic reconnection, played a crucial role in destabilizing the active region filament, leading to a solar eruptive flare and associated large-scale phenomena.

  16. Angular distribution, kinetic energy distributions, and excitation functions of fast metastable oxygen fragments following electron impact of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misakian, M.; Mumma, M. J.; Faris, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Dissociative excitation of CO2 by electron impact was studied using the methods of translational spectroscopy and angular distribution analysis. Earlier time of flight studies revealed two overlapping spectra, the slower of which was attributed to metastable CO(a3 pi) fragments. The fast peak is the focus of this study. Threshold energy, angular distribution, and improve time of flight measurements indicate that the fast peak actually consists of five overlapping features. The slowest of the five features is found to consist of metastable 0(5S) produced by predissociation of a sigma u + state of CO2 into 0(5S) + CO(a3 pi). Oxygen Rydberg fragments originating directly from a different sigma u + state are believed to make up the next fastest feature. Mechanisms for producing the three remaining features are discussed.

  17. Optical flares in SS433

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irsmambetova, T. R.

    2014-03-01

    An analysis of the precessional and orbital variability separately in active and quiescent states was carried out by using the photometric database in V-band of the SAI. The main orbital light curves in the active and quiet states in different precessional phases are approximately the same - primary and secondary eclipses are also observed. There are 30 most bright flares that have been studied on phase diagrams. The phase diagrams show the dependence of the flares' appearance on combination between the nodding phases and the precession phases. An analysis of the above results suggests that the flares originate in jets. Perhaps variations in jet speed cause flares activity in SS433.

  18. Solar Flares, Type III Radio Bursts, Coronal Mass Ejections, and Energetic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, Hilary V.; Erickson, W. C.; Prestage, N. P.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this correlative study between greater than 20 MeV solar proton events, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), flares, and radio bursts it is found that essentially all of the proton events are preceded by groups of type III bursts and all are preceded by CMEs. These type III bursts (that are a flare phenomenon) usually are long-lasting, intense bursts seen in the low-frequency observations made from space. They are caused by streams of electrons traveling from close to the solar surface out to 1 AU. In most events the type III emissions extend into, or originate at, the time when type II and type IV bursts are reported (some 5 to 10 minutes after the start of the associated soft X-ray flare) and have starting frequencies in the 500 to approximately 100 MHz range that often get lower as a function of time. These later type III emissions are often not reported by ground-based observers, probably because of undue attention to type II bursts. It is suggested to call them type III-1. Type III-1 bursts have previously been called shock accelerated (SA) events, but an examination of radio dynamic spectra over an extended frequency range shows that the type III-1 bursts usually start at frequencies above any type II burst that may be present. The bursts sometimes continue beyond the time when type II emission is seen and, furthermore, sometimes occur in the absence of any type II emission. Thus the causative electrons are unlikely to be shock accelerated and probably originate in the reconnection regions below fast CMEs. A search did not find any type III-1 bursts that were not associated with CMEs. The existence of low-frequency type III bursts proves that open field lines extend from within 0.5 radius of the Sun into the interplanetary medium (the bursts start above 100 MHz, and such emission originates within 0.5 solar radius of the solar surface). Thus it is not valid to assume that only closed field lines exist in the flaring regions associated with CMEs and some

  19. The relationship between energetic particles and flare properties for impulsive solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Cane, H.V.; Reames, D.V.

    1990-06-01

    The impulsive mode of particle acceleration is studied by searching for 0.2-2 MeV electron increases associated with intense type III/V bursts. It is found that the presence of a type III/V burst in association with a relatively intense flare event indicates the acceleration and escape of greater than 100 KeV electrons. A list of type III/V electron events is compiled, showing that the majority included greater than 10 MeV proton increases, although they were not followed by a type II burst. The results suggest that there are two different modes of proton acceleration with the second mode becoming significant only for larger, gradual flares. 19 refs.

  20. Fast electron spin resonance controlled manipulation of spin injection into quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, Andreas Siller, Jan; Schittny, Robert; Krämmer, Christoph; Kalt, Heinz; Hetterich, Michael

    2014-06-23

    In our spin-injection light-emitting diodes, electrons are spin-polarized in a semimagnetic ZnMnSe spin aligner and then injected into InGaAs quantum dots. The resulting electron spin state can be read out by measuring the circular polarization state of the emitted light. Here, we resonantly excite the Mn 3d electron spin system with microwave pulses and perform time-resolved measurements of the spin dynamics. We find that we are able to control the spin polarization of the injected electrons on a microsecond timescale. This electron spin resonance induced spin control could be one of the ingredients required to utilize the quantum dot electrons or the Mn spins as qubits.

  1. Electrophysical and optophysical properties of air ionized by a short pulse of fast electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Vagin, Yu.P.; Stal', N.L.; Khokhlov, V.D.; Chernoyarskii, A.A.

    1987-12-01

    A method of solving the nonsteady kinetic equation of deceleration of electrons is developed in the basis of the application of the multigroup approximation. The electron distribution function in air ionized by nonsteady sources of primary electrons is determined, and the process of avalanche formation of secondary electrons in air is investigated. The time dependence of the emission intensity of air is determined, experimentally and by calculation, in two spectral intervals, one of which includes the lambda = 391.4 nm NS N/sub 2//sup +/ (O, O) band while the other includes the lambda = 337.1 nm 2 PS N/sub 2/ (O, O) band, under the action of a short electron beam with an energy E = 100 keV for different values of the gas pressure. The agreement between theoretical results and experimental data indicates the reliability of the method of solving the nonsteady kinetic equation of electron deceleration proposed in the paper.

  2. HEATING AND CURRENT DRIVE IN NSTX WITH ELECTRON BERNSTEIN WAVES AND HIGH HARMONIC FAST WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, Abhay K

    2010-06-14

    A suitable theoretical and computational framework for studying heating and current drive by electron Bernstein waves in the National Spherical Torus Experiment has been developed. This framework can also be used to study heating and current drive by electron Bernstein waves in spherical tori and other magnetic confinement devices. It is also useful in studying the propagation and damping of electron cyclotron waves in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

  3. Solar Aurora and a White Light Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2016-07-01

    A white light flare analyzed by Krucker et al. (2011) poses a severe challenge to the solar physicist because of the high energy fluxes implied by a hitherto not achieved spatial resolution of simultaneous observations with Hinode and RHESSI. A scenario based on the auroral acceleration mechanism applied to flare conditions, 'Solar Aurora', is able to reproduce the observations, but implies several far-reaching assumptions on the mechanism as well as on the environmental parameters. Unavoidable consequences exist with regard to the spatial and temporal scales. They are extremely short because of the high density of the corona and the need for an energy conversion process involving some kind of anomalous resistivity, i.e. extremely high electric current densities. A further postulate is that of spontaneous propagation of an energy conversion front (ENF), once established, in three dimensions. It is assumed that about one half of the converted energy appears in form of runaway electrons. Obliqueness of the ENFs prevents the existence of a return current problem for the emerging runaway electrons. The key flare parameters are formulated quantitatively in terms of the environmental properties. Transverse length scales turn out to be in the ten centimeter range, time-scales in the range of one millisecond. The energy conversion occurs in 10E3 -10E4 ENFs just above the transition region in a background field of the order of 2000 G. Observational consequences are being discussed.

  4. Fast spin information transfer between distant quantum dots using individual electrons.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, B; Hermelin, S; Takada, S; Yamamoto, M; Tarucha, S; Ludwig, A; Wieck, A D; Bäuerle, C; Meunier, T

    2016-08-01

    Transporting ensembles of electrons over long distances without losing their spin polarization is an important benchmark for spintronic devices. It usually requires injecting and probing spin-polarized electrons in conduction channels using ferromagnetic contacts or optical excitation. In parallel with this development, important efforts have been dedicated to achieving control of nanocircuits at the single-electron level. The detection and coherent manipulation of the spin of a single electron trapped in a quantum dot are now well established. Combined with the recently demonstrated control of the displacement of individual electrons between two distant quantum dots, these achievements allow the possibility of realizing spintronic protocols at the single-electron level. Here, we demonstrate that spin information carried by one or two electrons can be transferred between two quantum dots separated by a distance of 4 μm with a classical fidelity of 65%. We show that at present it is limited by spin flips occurring during the transfer procedure before and after electron displacement. Being able to encode and control information in the spin degree of freedom of a single electron while it is being transferred over distances of a few micrometres on nanosecond timescales will pave the way towards 'quantum spintronics' devices, which could be used to implement large-scale spin-based quantum information processing. PMID:27240417

  5. Fast spin information transfer between distant quantum dots using individual electrons.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, B; Hermelin, S; Takada, S; Yamamoto, M; Tarucha, S; Ludwig, A; Wieck, A D; Bäuerle, C; Meunier, T

    2016-08-01

    Transporting ensembles of electrons over long distances without losing their spin polarization is an important benchmark for spintronic devices. It usually requires injecting and probing spin-polarized electrons in conduction channels using ferromagnetic contacts or optical excitation. In parallel with this development, important efforts have been dedicated to achieving control of nanocircuits at the single-electron level. The detection and coherent manipulation of the spin of a single electron trapped in a quantum dot are now well established. Combined with the recently demonstrated control of the displacement of individual electrons between two distant quantum dots, these achievements allow the possibility of realizing spintronic protocols at the single-electron level. Here, we demonstrate that spin information carried by one or two electrons can be transferred between two quantum dots separated by a distance of 4 μm with a classical fidelity of 65%. We show that at present it is limited by spin flips occurring during the transfer procedure before and after electron displacement. Being able to encode and control information in the spin degree of freedom of a single electron while it is being transferred over distances of a few micrometres on nanosecond timescales will pave the way towards 'quantum spintronics' devices, which could be used to implement large-scale spin-based quantum information processing.

  6. Fast spin information transfer between distant quantum dots using individual electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, B.; Hermelin, S.; Takada, S.; Yamamoto, M.; Tarucha, S.; Ludwig, A.; Wieck, A. D.; Bäuerle, C.; Meunier, T.

    2016-08-01

    Transporting ensembles of electrons over long distances without losing their spin polarization is an important benchmark for spintronic devices. It usually requires injecting and probing spin-polarized electrons in conduction channels using ferromagnetic contacts or optical excitation. In parallel with this development, important efforts have been dedicated to achieving control of nanocircuits at the single-electron level. The detection and coherent manipulation of the spin of a single electron trapped in a quantum dot are now well established. Combined with the recently demonstrated control of the displacement of individual electrons between two distant quantum dots, these achievements allow the possibility of realizing spintronic protocols at the single-electron level. Here, we demonstrate that spin information carried by one or two electrons can be transferred between two quantum dots separated by a distance of 4 μm with a classical fidelity of 65%. We show that at present it is limited by spin flips occurring during the transfer procedure before and after electron displacement. Being able to encode and control information in the spin degree of freedom of a single electron while it is being transferred over distances of a few micrometres on nanosecond timescales will pave the way towards ‘quantum spintronics’ devices, which could be used to implement large-scale spin-based quantum information processing.

  7. Enhancement Effects of Transition and Vavilov-Cherenkov Radiation Mechanisms Under Grazing Interaction of Fast Electrons With a Thick Substrate Applied by Thin Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irribarra, E.; Kubankin, A. S.; Sotnikov, A.; Nazhmudinov, R. M.; Fam, T.; Starovoytov, A. P.

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents the results of a theoretical study and a mathematical model of radiation processes occurred during the grazing interaction of fast electrons with semi-infinite targets applied on a thin amorphous layer. The developed model considers Vavilov-Cherenkov and transition radiation mechanisms and predicts the possibility to enhance the angular radiation density under grazing incidence of fast electrons on the layer. The characteristics of possible extreme vacuum ultraviolet and soft X-ray sources are estimated.

  8. Millimeter Observation of Solar Flares with Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, D. F.; Valio, A. B. M.

    2016-04-01

    We present the investigation of two solar flares on February 17 and May 13, 2013, studied in radio from 5 to 405 GHz (RSTN, POEMAS, SST), and in X-rays up to 300 keV (FERMI and RHESSI). The objective of this work is to study the evolution and energy distribution of the population of accelerated electrons and the magnetic field configuration. For this we constructed and fit the radio spectrum by a gyro synchrotron model. The optically thin spectral indices from radio observations were compared to that of the hard X-rays, showing that the radio spectral index is harder than the latter by 2. These flares also presented 10-15 % circular polarized emission at 45 and 90 GHz that suggests that the sources are located at different legs of an asymmetric loop.

  9. A slingshot model for solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Gregory

    1991-01-01

    Recent observations of intense, impulsive gamma-ray and X-ray-emitting solar flares underline the suddenness of these events. The simultaneous emission of X-rays greater than 40 keV from electron bremsstrahlung and gamma-rays requiring several MeV protons shows that all particles must be accelerated in less than 5 s. This paper proposes a simple model to explain such events, using the energy stored in the stretched field lines of a coronal arch. When reconnection occurs at the top of the arch, field lines retract like stretched rubber bands, sweeping up plasma and acting like a piston or slingshot. When the slug of plasma caught in the magnetic fields strikes the photosphere, it deposits its considerable kinetic energy, heating and compressing the intruding slug. Ten slugs of 100 km radius striking the photosphere may account for the 10 to the 29th ergs radiation from loop flares.

  10. Observations of solar flare photon energy spectra from 20 keV to 7 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshimori, M.; Watanabe, H.; Nitta, N.

    1985-01-01

    Solar flare photon energy spectra in the 20 keV to 7 MeV range are derived from the Apr. 1, Apr. 4, apr. 27 and May 13, 1981 flares. The flares were observed with a hard X-ray and a gamma-ray spectrometers on board the Hinotori satellite. The results show that the spectral shape varies from flare to flare and the spectra harden in energies above about 400 keV. Effects of nuclear line emission on the continuum and of higher energy electron bremsstrahlung are considered to explain the spectral hardening.

  11. Energy Content in Flares From Gamma Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, R. J.; Kozlovsky, B.; Share, G. H.

    2001-12-01

    How the energy content of energetic particles is shared between electrons and ions is a fundamental consideration for understanding the acceleration processes in solar flares. The accelerated electron spectrum greater than about 30 keV can be deduced from measurements of the hard X-ray bremsstrahlung spectrum. The accelerated ion spectrum from a few MeV/nucleon to about 70 MeV/nucleon can be deduced from ratios of measured gamma-ray lines. The recent application of these methods to combined HXRBS and GRS SMM gamma-ray data from 19 strong gamma-ray line flares indicated aproximate equipartition of the energy between electrons and ions. The techniques used for these determinations will be discussed with emphasis on the ion spectral determination. A new extended study of more than 135 SMM flares will also be discussed.

  12. Modification of water in a nanosecond diffuse discharge with fast electron preionization at a short voltage rise time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlovskii, Victor M.; Panarin, Victor A.; Shulepov, Mikhail A.

    2015-12-01

    The paper studies the dynamics of a nanosecond diffuse discharge with no additional preionization at a voltage rise time of less than 1 ns and its effect on drinking and distilled water. It is shown that the diffuse discharge is formed due to avalanche charge multiplication initiated by fast electrons and is sustained by secondary breakdown waves through ionized gas channels. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reveals that repeated exposure to the discharge changes the absorption spectra of drinking and distilled water such that the stretching vibration band of OH groups broadens and lacks clearly defined peaks. The water conductivity after irradiation increases. Probably, this is due to cluster rearrangement of water molecules.

  13. Rapid embedded wire heating via resistive guiding of laser-generated fast electrons as a hydrodynamic driver

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, A. P. L.; Schmitz, H.; Pasley, J.

    2013-12-15

    Resistively guiding laser-generated fast electron beams in targets consisting of a resistive wire embedded in lower Z material should allow one to rapidly heat the wire to over 100 eV over a substantial distance without strongly heating the surrounding material. On the multi-ps timescale, this can drive hydrodynamic motion in the surrounding material. Thus, ultra-intense laser solid interactions have the potential as a controlled driver of radiation hydrodynamics in solid density material. In this paper, we assess the laser and target parameters needed to achieve such rapid and controlled heating of the embedded wire.

  14. Runaway electron generation as possible trigger for enhancement of magnetohydrodynamic plasma activity and fast changes in runaway beam behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Pankratov, I. M. E-mail: rjzhou@ipp.ac.cn; Zhou, R. J. E-mail: rjzhou@ipp.ac.cn; Hu, L. Q.

    2015-07-15

    Peculiar phenomena were observed during experiments with runaway electrons: rapid changes in the synchrotron spot and its intensity that coincided with stepwise increases in the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) signal (cyclotron radiation of suprathermal electrons). These phenomena were initially observed in TEXTOR (Tokamak Experiment for Technology Oriented Research), where these events only occurred in the current decay phase or in discharges with thin stable runaway beams at a q = 1 drift surface. These rapid changes in the synchrotron spot were interpreted by the TEXTOR team as a fast pitch angle scattering event. Recently, similar rapid changes in the synchrotron spot and its intensity that coincided with stepwise increases in the non-thermal ECE signal were observed in the EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) runaway discharge. Runaway electrons were located around the q = 2 rational magnetic surface (ring-like runaway electron beam). During the EAST runaway discharge, stepwise ECE signal increases coincided with enhanced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity. This behavior was peculiar to this shot. In this paper, we show that these non-thermal ECE step-like jumps were related to the abrupt growth of suprathermal electrons induced by bursting electric fields at reconnection events during this MHD plasma activity. Enhancement of the secondary runaway electron generation also occurred simultaneously. Local changes in the current-density gradient appeared because of local enhancement of the runaway electron generation process. These current-density gradient changes are considered to be a possible trigger for enhancement of the MHD plasma activity and the rapid changes in runaway beam behavior.

  15. Observations of interplanetary energetic charged particles from gamma-ray line solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesses, M. E.; Klecker, B.; Gloeckler, G.; Hovestadt, D.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of interplanetary energetic ions from the 7 June, 21 June and 1 July 1980 gamma ray line solar flares are presented. The observations are from the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland Ultra Low Energy Wide Angle Telescope aboard the ISEE-3 spacecraft. Both June flares produced relatively low intensity proton events at earth with peak intensities at 10-20 MeV approximately 5 x .01 protons square cm sec sr MeV)-1. Neither flare showed evidence of being enriched in either 3He or Fe at approximately 1 MeV/nucleon. The 1 July flare produced no observable ion or electron enhancements.

  16. Fast wave direct electron heating in advanced inductive and ITER baseline scenario discharges in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R. I.; Jackson, G. L.; Luce, T. C.; Politzer, P. A.; Austin, M. E.; Diem, S. J.; Kaufman, M. C.; Ryan, P. M.; Doyle, E. J.; Zeng, L.; Grierson, B. A.; Hosea, J. C.; Nagy, A.; Perkins, R.; Solomon, W. M.; Taylor, G.; Maggiora, R.; Milanesio, D.; Porkolab, M.; Turco, F.

    2014-02-12

    Fast Wave (FW) heating and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) are used in the DIII-D tokamak to study plasmas with low applied torque and dominant electron heating characteristic of burning plasmas. FW heating via direct electron damping has reached the 2.5 MW level in high performance ELMy H-mode plasmas. In Advanced Inductive (AI) plasmas, core FW heating was found to be comparable to that of ECH, consistent with the excellent first-pass absorption of FWs predicted by ray-tracing models at high electron beta. FW heating at the ∼2 MW level to ELMy H-mode discharges in the ITER Baseline Scenario (IBS) showed unexpectedly strong absorption of FW power by injected neutral beam (NB) ions, indicated by significant enhancement of the D-D neutron rate, while the intended absorption on core electrons appeared rather weak. The AI and IBS discharges are compared in an effort to identify the causes of the different response to FWs.

  17. A mechanism for the abundance enhancements of heavy nuclei in solar flare particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartwright, B. G.; Mogro-Campero, A.

    1973-01-01

    A mechanism is proposed to account for the recently reported abundance enhancements of heavy nuclei in solar flares. The mechanism requires two acceleration stages for its operation: First, fully stripped ions are accelerated to suprathermal energies, and subsequently, a fraction of these ions are Fermi accelerated to higher energies. It is shown that because injection into Fermi acceleration is rigidity dependent and the ions may pick up electrons during transport to the Fermi acceleration region, an enhancement of the abundances of heavy nuclei can occur. The degree of the enhancement depends on a number of factors particular to each flare, so that the degree of enhancement may be variable from flare to flare, or may be a function of time within a given flare. In some flares, conditions may be such that no enhancement would be expected.

  18. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET NON-THERMAL LINE BROADENING AND HIGH-ENERGY PARTICLES DURING SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Kawate, T.; Imada, S.

    2013-10-01

    We have studied the relationship between the location of EUV non-thermal broadening and high-energy particles during large flares using the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode, the Nobeyama Radio Polarimeter, the Nobeyama Radioheliograph, and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory. We have analyzed five large flare events that contain thermal-rich, intermediate, and thermal-poor flares classified by the definition discussed in the paper. We found that, in the case of thermal-rich flares, the non-thermal broadening of Fe XXIV occurred at the top of the flaring loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of 17 GHz microwaves is located at the footpoint of the flare loop. On the other hand, in the case of intermediate/thermal-poor flares, the non-thermal broadening of Fe XXIV occurred at the footpoint of the flare loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of 17 GHz microwaves is located at the top of the flaring loop. We discussed the difference between thermal-rich and intermediate/thermal-poor flares based on the spatial information of non-thermal broadening, which may provide clues that the presence of turbulence plays an important role in the pitch angle scattering of high-energy electrons.

  19. Solar flare discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Hugh S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper considers the discoveries that have appreciably changed our understanding of the physics of solar flares. A total of 42 discoveries from all disciplines, ranging from Galileo's initial observation of faculae to the recent discovery of strong limb brightening in 10-MeV gamma-radiation, are identified. The rate of discovery increased dramatically over the past four decades as new observational tools became available. The assessment of significance suggests that recent discoveries -though more numerous - are individually less significant; perhaps this is because the minor early discoveries tend to be taken for granted.

  20. Anticorrelated Emission of High Harmonics and Fast Electron Beams From Plasma Mirrors.

    PubMed

    Bocoum, Maïmouna; Thévenet, Maxence; Böhle, Frederik; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Vernier, Aline; Jullien, Aurélie; Faure, Jérôme; Lopez-Martens, Rodrigo

    2016-05-01

    We report for the first time on the anticorrelated emission of high-order harmonics and energetic electron beams from a solid-density plasma with a sharp vacuum interface-plasma mirror-driven by an intense ultrashort laser pulse. We highlight the key role played by the nanoscale structure of the plasma surface during the interaction by measuring the spatial and spectral properties of harmonics and electron beams emitted by a plasma mirror. We show that the nanoscale behavior of the plasma mirror can be controlled by tuning the scale length of the electron density gradient, which is measured in situ using spatial-domain interferometry. PMID:27203328