Science.gov

Sample records for flaring loops effects

  1. Flare loop radiative hydrodynamics. III - Nonlocal radiative transfer effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, R. C.; Fisher, G. H.; Mcclymont, A. N.

    1983-01-01

    The study has three goals. The first is to demonstrate that processes exist whose intrinsic nonlocal nature cannot be represented by local approximations. The second is to elucidate the physical nature and origins of these nonlocal processes. The third is to suggest that the methods and results described here may prove useful in constructing semiempirical models of the chromosphere by means more efficient than trial and error. Matrices are computed that describe the effect of a temperature perturbation at an arbitrary point in the loop on density, hydrogen ionized fraction, total radiative loss rate, and radiative loss rate of selected hydrogen lines and continua at all other points. It is found that the dominant nonlocal radiative transfer effects can be separated into flux divergence coefficient effects and upper level population effects. The former are most important when the perturbation takes place in a region of significant opacity. Upper level population effects arise in both optically thick and thin regions in response to nonlocal density, ionization, and interlocking effects.

  2. Diagnostics of electron-heated solar flare models. III - Effects of tapered loop geometry and preheating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.; Li, Peng; Mariska, John T.

    1992-01-01

    A series of hydrodynamic numerical simulations of nonthermal electron-heated solar flare atmospheres and their corresponding soft X-ray Ca XIX emission-line profiles, under the conditions of tapered flare loop geometry and/or a preheated atmosphere, is presented. The degree of tapering is parameterized by the magnetic mirror ratio, while the preheated atmosphere is parameterized by the initial upper chromospheric pressure. In a tapered flare loop, it is found that the upward motion of evaporated material is faster compared with the case where the flare loop is uniform. This is due to the diverging nozzle seen by the upflowing material. In the case where the flare atmosphere is preheated and the flare geometry is uniform, the response of the atmosphere to the electron collisional heating is slow. The upward velocity of the hydrodynamic gas is reduced due not only to the large coronal column depth, but also to the increased inertia of the overlying material. It is concluded that the only possible electron-heated scenario in which the predicted Ca XIX line profiles agree with the BCS observations is when the impulsive flare starts in a preheated dense corona.

  3. Diagnostics of electron-heated solar flare models. III - Effects of tapered loop geometry and preheating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.; Li, Peng; Mariska, John T.

    1992-01-01

    A series of hydrodynamic numerical simulations of nonthermal electron-heated solar flare atmospheres and their corresponding soft X-ray Ca XIX emission-line profiles, under the conditions of tapered flare loop geometry and/or a preheated atmosphere, is presented. The degree of tapering is parameterized by the magnetic mirror ratio, while the preheated atmosphere is parameterized by the initial upper chromospheric pressure. In a tapered flare loop, it is found that the upward motion of evaporated material is faster compared with the case where the flare loop is uniform. This is due to the diverging nozzle seen by the upflowing material. In the case where the flare atmosphere is preheated and the flare geometry is uniform, the response of the atmosphere to the electron collisional heating is slow. The upward velocity of the hydrodynamic gas is reduced due not only to the large coronal column depth, but also to the increased inertia of the overlying material. It is concluded that the only possible electron-heated scenario in which the predicted Ca XIX line profiles agree with the BCS observations is when the impulsive flare starts in a preheated dense corona.

  4. An interacting loop model of solar flare bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.

    1981-01-01

    As a result of the strong heating produced at chromospheric levels during a solar flare burst, the local gas pressure can transiently attain very large values in certain regions. The effectiveness of the surrounding magnetic field at confining this high pressure plasma is therefore reduced and the flaring loop becomes free to expand laterally. In so doing it may drive magnetic field lines into neighboring, nonflaring, loops in the same active region, causing magnetic reconnection to take place and triggering another flare burst. The features of this interacting loop model are found to be in good agreement with the energetics and time structure of flare associated solar hard X-ray bursts.

  5. Flare Half-Loops: What Are They?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, David Eugene; Guidoni, S. E.; Longcope, D. W.; Yoshimura, K.

    2012-05-01

    The M1.4 flare of 28 January 2011 has a remarkable resemblance to the famous "Tsuneta candle-flame" flare of 1992. It was observed with Hinode/XRT, SDO/AIA, and STEREO (A)/EUVI, resulting in higher resolution, greater temperature coverage, and stereoscopic views of this iconic structure. The high temperature images reveal a brightening that grows in size to form a tower-like structure at the top of the arcade. They also show that loops which are successively connected to this tower develop a density increase in one of their legs that can exceed twice the density of the other leg, giving the appearance of "half loops". These jumps in density last for an extended period of time. On the other hand, XRT filter ratios suggest that temperature is approximately uniform along the entire loop. XRT filter-ratio density maps corroborate that the brighter legs have higher density than the fainter halves. The tower is associated with a localized density increase, with even higher densities than either leg of the loop. This spatial variation of density may correspond to a shock at the top of the loops. We use STEREO images to show that the half loop brightening is not a line-of-sight projection effect of the type suggested by Forbes & Acton. This work is supported under contract SP02H3901R from Lockheed-Martin to MSU, and under contract NNM07AB07C with the Harvard-Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.

  6. A dynamic flare with anomalously dense flare loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svestka, Z.; Fontenla, J. M.; Machado, M. E.; Martin, S. F.; Neidig, D. F.

    1986-01-01

    The dynamic flare of November 6, 1980 developed a rich system of growing loops which could be followed in H-alpha for 1.5 hours. Throughout the flare, these loops, near the limb, were seen in emission against the disk. Theoretical computations of b-values for a hydrogen atom reveal that this requires electron densities in the loops to be close to 10 to the 12th per cu cm. From measured widths of higher Balmer lines the density at the tops of the loops was found to be 4 x 10 to the 12th per cu cm if no nonthermal motions were present. It is now general knowledge that flare loops are initially observed in X-rays and become visible in H-alpha only after cooling. For such a high density a loop would cool through radiation from 10 to the 7th K to 10 to the 4th K within a few minutes so that the dense H-alpha loops should have heights very close to the heights of the X-ray loops. This, however, contradicts the observations obtained by the HXIS and FCS instruments on board SMM which show the X-ray loops at much higher altitudes than the loops in H-alpha. Therefore, the density must have been significantly smaller when the loops were formed and the flare loops were apparently both shrinking and becoming denser while cooling.

  7. An interacting loop model for solar flare bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.

    1981-01-01

    A schematic model is presented which attempts to explain the quasi-periodic behavior (on a timescale of less than or approximately equal to 10 s) frequency observed in solar hard X-ray bursts. It is shown how, as a result of the strong heating produced during a solar flare burst, the local gas pressure can transiently attain very large values in regions corresponding to the upper preflare chromosphere. The effectiveness of the surrounding magnetic field at confining this high pressure plasma is therefore reduced and the flaring loop becomes free to expand laterally. In so doing it may drive magnetic field lines into neighboring, non-flaring, loops in the same active region, causing magnetic reconnection to take place and triggering another flare burst. The features of this interacting loop model are found to be in good agreement with the energetics and time structure of flare-associated solar hard X-ray bursts.

  8. An interacting loop model for solar flare bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.

    1981-01-01

    A schematic model is presented which attempts to explain the quasi-periodic behavior (on a timescale of less than or approximately equal to 10 s) frequency observed in solar hard X-ray bursts. It is shown how, as a result of the strong heating produced during a solar flare burst, the local gas pressure can transiently attain very large values in regions corresponding to the upper preflare chromosphere. The effectiveness of the surrounding magnetic field at confining this high pressure plasma is therefore reduced and the flaring loop becomes free to expand laterally. In so doing it may drive magnetic field lines into neighboring, non-flaring, loops in the same active region, causing magnetic reconnection to take place and triggering another flare burst. The features of this interacting loop model are found to be in good agreement with the energetics and time structure of flare-associated solar hard X-ray bursts.

  9. Heating and Cooling of Flare Loops in a C5.7 Two-ribbon Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Sarah; Qiu, Jiong

    2016-05-01

    Heating and cooling of flare plasmas can be studied using models constrained by observations. In this work, we analyze and model thermal evolution of a C5.7 two-ribbon flare that occurred on December 26, 2011. The flare was observed by AIA. Two hundred flare loops are identified, which formed sequentially during one hour. Light curves of these flare loops in multiple EUV bands are analyzed to derive the duration and timing of flare emission in each bandpass. These timescales usually reflect cooling of flare plasmas from 10~MK to successively lower temperatures. We then use a zero-dimensional enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops (EBTEL) model to study flare heating and cooling. Several variations on the EBTEL model are assessed. The first model uses an impulsive heating function inferred from the rapid rise of the foot-point UV emission. Synthetic emission from this model evolves and decays more quickly than the observations, as many models do. Two other variations on the model are analyzed, in an attempt to counter this. In one variation the heating function is a combination of an impulsive pulse followed by an extended tail (i.e., continuous heating). The other model uses reduced thermal conduction to slow the flares evolution. These models are compared with one another and the observations, to evaluate effects of different mechanisms governing the thermal evolution of flare plasmas.

  10. Simultaneous Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer and Optical Observations of Ad Leonis: Evidence for Large Coronal Loops and the Neupert Effect in Stellar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Fisher, George H.; Simon, Theodore; Cully, Scott L.; Deustua, Susana E.; Jablonski, Marek; Johns-Krull, Christopher; Pettersen, Bjorn R.; Smith, Verne; Spiesman, William J.; hide

    1995-01-01

    We report on the first simultaneous Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) and optical observations of flares on the dMe flare star AD Leonis. The data show the following features: (1) Two flares (one large and one of moderate size) of several hours duration were observed in the EUV wavelength range; (2) Flare emission observed in the optical precedes the emission seen with EUVE; and (3) Several diminutions (DIMs) in the optical continuum were observed during the period of optical flare activity. To interpret these data, we develop a technique for deriving the coronal loop length from the observed rise and decay behavior of the EUV flare. The technique is generally applicable to existing and future coronal observations of stellar flares. We also determine the pressure, column depth, emission measure, loop cross-sectional area, and peak thermal energy during the two EUV flares, and the temperature, area coverage, and energy of the optical continuum emission. When the optical and coronal data are combined, we find convincing evidence of a stellar 'Neupert effect' which is a strong signature of chromospheric evaporation models. We then argue that the known spatial correlation of white-light emission with hard X-ray emission in solar flares, and the identification of the hard X-ray emission with nonthermal bremsstrahlung produced by accelerated electrons, provides evidence that flare heating on dMe stars is produced by the same electron precipitation mechanism that is inferred to occur on the Sun. We provide a thorough picture of the physical processes that are operative during the largest EUV flare, compare and contrast this picture with the canonical solar flare model, and conclude that the coronal loop length may be the most important factor in determining the flare rise time and energetics.

  11. The effects of magnetic structure on the conduction cooling of flare loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Hoven, G.

    1979-01-01

    A model of the sheared magnetic field in a coronal loop is used to evaluate the average cross-field suppression of axial thermal conduction. If the energy source is uniform in radius, this can lead to heat-flux reduction by a factor greater than three. When the source is annular, in a region of radius where the current density and shear are peaked, the effect can be significantly larger. In one extreme case, however, in which magnetic tearing provides the heating in a very narrow layer, the spatial resonance of the source excitation in a long loop leads to approximately axial conduction.

  12. FINE STRUCTURES AND OVERLYING LOOPS OF CONFINED SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun; Xiang, Yongyuan

    2014-10-01

    Using the Hα observations from the New Vacuum Solar Telescope at the Fuxian Solar Observatory, we focus on the fine structures of three confined flares and the issue why all the three flares are confined instead of eruptive. All the three confined flares take place successively at the same location and have similar morphologies, so can be termed homologous confined flares. In the simultaneous images obtained by the Solar Dynamics Observatory, many large-scale coronal loops above the confined flares are clearly observed in multi-wavelengths. At the pre-flare stage, two dipoles emerge near the negative sunspot, and the dipolar patches are connected by small loops appearing as arch-shaped Hα fibrils. There exists a reconnection between the small loops, and thus the Hα fibrils change their configuration. The reconnection also occurs between a set of emerging Hα fibrils and a set of pre-existing large loops, which are rooted in the negative sunspot, a nearby positive patch, and some remote positive faculae, forming a typical three-legged structure. During the flare processes, the overlying loops, some of which are tracked by activated dark materials, do not break out. These direct observations may illustrate the physical mechanism of confined flares, i.e., magnetic reconnection between the emerging loops and the pre-existing loops triggers flares and the overlying loops prevent the flares from being eruptive.

  13. Flare diagnostics from loop modeling of a stellar flare observed with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reale, Fabio

    2006-01-01

    XMM-Newton data of an X-ray flare observed on Proxima Centauri provide detailed and challenging constraints for flare modeling. The comparison of the data with the results of time-dependent hydrodynamic loop modeling of this flare allows us to constrain not only the loop morphology, but also the details of the heating function. The results show that even a complex flare event like this can be described with a relatively few though constrained components: two loop systems, i.e., a single loop and an arcade, and two heat components, an intense pulse probably located at the loop footpoints followed by a low gradual decay distributed in the coronal part of the loop. The similarity to at least one solar event (the Bastille Day flare in 2000) indicates that this pattern may be common to solar and stellar flares.

  14. HEATING OF FLARE LOOPS WITH OBSERVATIONALLY CONSTRAINED HEATING FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Jiong; Liu Wenjuan; Longcope, Dana W.

    2012-06-20

    We analyze high-cadence high-resolution observations of a C3.2 flare obtained by AIA/SDO on 2010 August 1. The flare is a long-duration event with soft X-ray and EUV radiation lasting for over 4 hr. Analysis suggests that magnetic reconnection and formation of new loops continue for more than 2 hr. Furthermore, the UV 1600 Angstrom-Sign observations show that each of the individual pixels at the feet of flare loops is brightened instantaneously with a timescale of a few minutes, and decays over a much longer timescale of more than 30 minutes. We use these spatially resolved UV light curves during the rise phase to construct empirical heating functions for individual flare loops, and model heating of coronal plasmas in these loops. The total coronal radiation of these flare loops are compared with soft X-ray and EUV radiation fluxes measured by GOES and AIA. This study presents a method to observationally infer heating functions in numerous flare loops that are formed and heated sequentially by reconnection throughout the flare, and provides a very useful constraint to coronal heating models.

  15. On the triggering of M-class solar flare due to loop-loop interaction in AR NOAA 10875

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Srivastava, Abhishek K.; Somov, B. V.; Manoharan, P. K.; Erdélyi, R.; Uddin, Wahab

    We present multiwavelength analysis of an M7.9 /1N solar flare which occurred on 27 April 2006 in AR NOAA 10875. The flare was triggered due to the interaction of two loop systems. GOES soft X-ray and TRACE 195 Å image sequences show the observational evidences of 3-D X-type loop-loop interaction with converging motion at the interaction site. We found the following characteristics during the loop-loop interaction: (i) a short duration/impulsive flare obeying the Neupart effect, (ii) double peak structure in radio flux profiles (in 4.9 and 8.8 GHz), (iii) quasi-periodic oscillations in the radio flux profiles for the duration of ˜3 min, (iv) absence of CME and type III radio burst. The above characteristics observed during the flare are in agreement with the theory and simulation of current loop coalescence by Sakai et al. (1986). These are unique multiwavelength observations, which provide the evidences of loop-loop interaction and associated triggering of solar flare without CME.

  16. Solar flares as cascades of reconnecting magnetic loops.

    PubMed

    Hughes, D; Paczuski, M; Dendy, R O; Helander, P; McClements, K G

    2003-04-04

    A model for the solar coronal magnetic field is proposed where multiple directed loops evolve in space and time. Loops injected at small scales are anchored by footpoints of opposite polarity moving randomly on a surface. Nearby footpoints of the same polarity aggregate, and loops can reconnect when they collide. This may trigger a cascade of further reconnection, representing a solar flare. Numerical simulations show that a power law distribution of flare energies emerges, associated with a scale-free network of loops, indicating self-organized criticality.

  17. The formation flare loops by magnetic reconnection and chromospheric ablation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, T. G.; Malherbe, J. M.; Priest, E. R.

    1989-01-01

    Noncoplanar compressible reconnection theory is combined here with simple scaling arguments for ablation and radiative cooling to predict average properties of hot and cool flare loops as a function of the coronal vector magnetic field. For a coronal field strength of 100 G, the temperature of the hot flare loops decreases from 1.2 x 10 to the 7th K to 4.0 x 10 to the 6th K as the component of the coronal magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of the loops increases from 0 percent to 86 percent of the total field. When the perpendicular component exceeds 86 percent of the total field or when the altitude of the reconnection site exceeds 10 to the 6th km, flare loops no longer occur. Shock-enhanced radiative cooling triggers the formation of cool H-alpha flare loops with predicted densities of roughly 10 to the 13th/cu cm, and a small gap of roughly 1000 km is predicted to exist between the footpoints of the cool flare loops and the inner edges of the flare ribbons.

  18. Solar Flares and Collisions Between Current-Carrying Loops Types and Mechanisms of Solar Flares and Coronal Loop Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Jun-Ichi; de Jager, Cornelis

    1996-07-01

    This paper deals with the temporal dynamics of solar flares. It gives a systematic description of solar flare models and tries to link the observations to results of simulations. After a review of the development of ideas on flare structure and on theories on current-loop interaction in flares since the pioneering work by Gold and Hoyle (1960), this paper gives first a synthesis of present-days observationally based views on solar flares, essentially describing the developments since the review by de Jager (1986). We distinguish between confined/impulsive and eruptive/dynamic flares (briefly: confined and eruptive). The main difference between these two types is one of field-line topology: ‘closed’ or ‘open’. The ‘grand instability’ in a field-line system opening to space is basic to the relation between eruptive flares, filament instability, and Coronal Mass Ejections. A fair part of the paper deals with the developments in our understanding of the physical processes during collisions between current-carrying loops. After work by Tajima et al. (1982), who introduced the concept of current-loop coalescence in solar flares, using results obtained from two-dimensional particle simulation, it became clear that the current-loop interaction process includes a rich variety of physical mechanisms associated with rapid magnetic energy conversion through partial or complete magnetic reconnection, such as prompt high-energy particle acceleration, plasma heating, shock formation, plasma-jet formation and plasma radiation. This part of the paper concentrates on the developments since the review by Sakai and Ohsawa (1987), dealing with particle acceleration by magnetic reconnection and shocks during current-loop coalescence in solar flares. Theoretical research performed since the above review paper refers to magnetic reconnection, shock formation, particle acceleration and plasma emission during collisions between current-carrying loops. These theoretical

  19. Forward Modeling of Standing Slow Modes in Flaring Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, D.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Banerjee, D.; Antolin, P.

    2015-07-01

    Standing slow-mode waves in hot flaring loops are exclusively observed in spectrometers and are used to diagnose the magnetic field strength and temperature of the loop structure. Owing to the lack of spatial information, the longitudinal mode cannot be effectively identified. In this study, we simulate standing slow-mode waves in flaring loops and compare the synthesized line emission properties with Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation spectrographic and Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly imaging observations. We find that the emission intensity and line width oscillations are a quarter period out of phase with Doppler shift velocity in both time and spatial domain, which can be used to identify a standing slow-mode wave from spectroscopic observations. However, the longitudinal overtones could only be measured with the assistance of imagers. We find emission intensity asymmetry in the positive and negative modulations this is because the contribution function pertaining to the atomic emission process responds differently to positive and negative temperature variations. One may detect half periodicity close to the loop apex, where emission intensity modulation is relatively small. The line-of-sight projection affects the observation of Doppler shift significantly. A more accurate estimate of the amplitude of velocity perturbation is obtained by de-projecting the Doppler shift by a factor of 1-2θ/π rather than the traditionally used {cos}θ . If a loop is heated to the hotter wing, the intensity modulation could be overwhelmed by background emission, while the Doppler shift velocity could still be detected to a certain extent.

  20. Inferring Flare Loop Parameters with Measurements of Standing Sausage Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ming-Zhe; Chen, Shao-Xia; Li, Bo; Xia, Li-Dong; Yu, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Standing fast sausage modes in flare loops were suggested to account for a considerable number of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in the light curves of solar flares. This study continues our investigation into the possibility of inverting the measured periods P and damping times τ of sausage modes to deduce the transverse Alfvén time R/v_{Ai}, density contrast ρi/ρe, and the steepness of the density distribution transverse to flare loops. A generic dispersion relation governing linear sausage modes is derived for pressureless cylinders where density inhomogeneity of arbitrary form takes place within the cylinder. We show that in general the inversion problem is under-determined for QPP events where only a single sausage mode exists, whether the measurements are spatially resolved or unresolved. While R/v_{Ai} can be inferred to some extent, the range of possible steepness parameters may be too broad to be useful. However, for spatially resolved measurements where an additional mode is present, it is possible to deduce self-consistently ρi/ρe, the profile steepness, and the internal Alfvén speed v_{Ai}. We show that at least for a recent QPP event that involves a fundamental kink mode in addition to a sausage one, flare loop parameters are well constrained even if the specific form of the transverse density distribution remains unknown. We conclude that spatially resolved, multi-mode QPP measurements need to be pursued to infer flare loop parameters.

  1. Ion energy storage for post-flare loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.

    1985-01-01

    Low-energy non-thermal protons may have long lifetimes in coronal loops with low density and high temperature. If energy were stored in such protons in the initial phases of a solar flare, it could be released slowly during the later phases. Within the present observational limits for post-flare loops, this mechanism should be considered in addition to a field-line reconnection theory of the Kopp and Pneuman type. The thin-target gamma ray emission from the trapped protons is below present limits, but more sensitive observations can test the hypothesis.

  2. Structure and Dynamics of Cool Flare Loops Observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikuła, K.; Heinzel, P.; Liu, W.; Berlicki, A.

    2017-08-01

    Flare loops were well observed with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) during the gradual phase of two solar flares on 2014 March 29 and 2015 June 22. Cool flare loops are visible in various spectral lines formed at chromospheric and transition-region temperatures and exhibit large downflows which correspond to the standard scenario. The principal aim of this work is to analyze the structure and dynamics of cool flare loops observed in Mg ii lines. Synthetic profiles of the Mg ii h line are computed using the classical cloud model and assuming a uniform background intensity. In this paper, we study novel IRIS NUV observations of such loops in Mg ii h and k lines and also show the behavior of hotter lines detected in the FUV channel. We obtained the spatial evolution of the velocities: near the loop top, the flow velocities are small and they are increasing toward the loop legs. Moreover, from slit-jaw image (SJI) movies, we observe some plasma upflows into the loops, which are also detectable in Mg ii spectra. The brightness of the loops systematically decreases with increasing flow velocity, and we ascribe this to the effect of Doppler dimming, which works for Mg ii lines. Emission profiles of Mg ii were found to be extremely broad, and we explain this through the large unresolved non-thermal motions.

  3. FAST CONTRACTION OF CORONAL LOOPS AT THE FLARE PEAK

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Rui; Wang Haimin

    2010-05-01

    On 2005 September 8, a coronal loop overlying the active region NOAA 10808 was observed in TRACE 171 A to contract at {approx}100 km s{sup -1} at the peak of an X5.4-2B flare at 21:05 UT. Prior to the fast contraction, the loop underwent a much slower contraction at {approx}6 km s{sup -1} for about 8 minutes, initiating during the flare preheating phase. The sudden switch to fast contraction is presumably corresponding to the onset of the impulsive phase. The contraction resulted in the oscillation of a group of loops located below, with the period of about 10 minutes. Meanwhile, the contracting loop exhibited a similar oscillatory pattern superimposed on the dominant downward motion. We suggest that the fast contraction reflects a suddenly reduced magnetic pressure underneath due either to (1) the eruption of magnetic structures located at lower altitudes or to (2) the rapid conversion of magnetic free energy in the flare core region. Electrons accelerated in the shrinking trap formed by the contracting loop can theoretically contribute to a late-phase hard X-ray burst, which is associated with Type IV radio emission. To complement the X5.4 flare which was probably confined, a similar event observed in SOHO/EIT 195 A on 2004 July 20 in an eruptive, M8.6 flare is briefly described, in which the contraction was followed by the expansion of the same loop leading up to a halo coronal mass ejection. These observations further substantiate the conjecture of coronal implosion and suggest coronal implosion as a new exciter mechanism for coronal loop oscillations.

  4. ANTI-PHASE SIGNATURE OF FLARE GENERATED TRANSVERSE LOOP OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. S.; Verwichte, E.; Foullon, C.

    2013-09-10

    Transverse loop oscillations observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft are studied after an impulsive solar flare eruption on 2012 May 8. We have found that a transversely oscillating coronal loop seen in the 171 A bandpass oscillates in anti-phase with respect to adjacent larger loops seen in the 193 A and 211 A bandpasses. These unusual oscillations are analyzed to investigate the excitation mechanism responsible for their initial inwardly directed anti-phase behavior. The transverse oscillations are analyzed by constructing space-time diagrams from cuts made parallel to the projected loop displacements. The displacement time oscillation profiles are background subtracted and fitted with a damped cosine curve that includes a linear change in the period with time. The local magnetic topology of the active region is modeled using potential field source surface extrapolation. It reveals that the loops are anchored in different topological regions with foot point locations identified on either side of the EUV flare peak emission source. In this context, the oscillation characteristics indicate that the excitation mechanism is closely linked to the local magnetic field topology and the reconnection generated wave dynamics in the active region rather than following an external flare blast wave. We discuss how observations such as these may serve to identify reconnection processes in similar quadrupolar active regions.

  5. A Flare Due to the Interaction of a Small Loop and a Large Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Akioka, M.; Yan, Y.

    The active region NOAA7773 was a rather stable region. It appeared at the east limb on August 31, 1994. Although the region is almost stable, cancelation of small magnetic patches were observed between the main dipole where some flares occurred. The flare, occurred at 05:32 UT on September 5, 1994 in this active region was analyzed by using the vector magnetogram at Huairou, Beijing, H alpha at Hiraiso/CRL, Japan, and Yohkoh/SXT. In soft X-ray, a small loop and a large loop were identified during the flare. Four H alpha bright patches, corresponding to the foot-points of the two loops, were clearly seen, and each pair were separately situated at the different polarities in the magnetogram. These two loops matches very well to the extrapolated force lines by Boundary Element Method with assumption of force-free field and the observed photospheric vector magnetic field. Therefore, we can derive that there were two magnetic field systems involved in this flare. Soft X-ray observation showed that the two soft X-ray loops were merging into one loop during the flare, it is good agreement with the I-type coalescence simulated by Fishiki et al (1995) and Sakai et al. (1995).

  6. A Statistical Analysis of Loop-Top Motion in Solar Limb Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Sui, Linhui; Brosius, D. G.; Dennis, Brian R.

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies of hot, thermal solar flare loops imaged with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) have identified several flares for which the loop top shrinks downward early in the impulsive phase and then expands upward later in the impulsive phase (Sui & Holman 2003; Sui, Holman & Dennis 2004; Veronig et al. 2005). This early downward motion is not predicted by flare models. We study a statistical sample of RHESSI flares to assess how common this evolution is and to better characterize it. In a sample of 88 flares near the solar lin$ that show identifiable loop structure in RHESSI images, 66% (58 flares) showed downward loop-top motion followed by upward motion. We therefore conclude that the early downward motion is a frequent characteristic of flare loops. We obtain the distribution of the timing of the change from downward to upward motion relative to flare start and peak times. We also obtain the distributions of downward and upward speeds.

  7. A Statistical Analysis of Loop-Top Motion in Solar Limb Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Sui, Linhui; Brosius, D. G.; Dennis, Brian R.

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies of hot, thermal solar flare loops imaged with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) have identified several flares for which the loop top shrinks downward early in the impulsive phase and then expands upward later in the impulsive phase (Sui & Holman 2003; Sui, Holman & Dennis 2004; Veronig et al. 2005). This early downward motion is not predicted by flare models. We study a statistical sample of RHESSI flares to assess how common this evolution is and to better characterize it. In a sample of 88 flares near the solar lin$ that show identifiable loop structure in RHESSI images, 66% (58 flares) showed downward loop-top motion followed by upward motion. We therefore conclude that the early downward motion is a frequent characteristic of flare loops. We obtain the distribution of the timing of the change from downward to upward motion relative to flare start and peak times. We also obtain the distributions of downward and upward speeds.

  8. Signatures of current loop coalescence in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakai, J.; Nakajima, H.; Zaidman, E.; Tajima, T.; Kosugi, T.; Brunel, F.

    1986-01-01

    The nonlinear coalescence instability of current carrying solar loops can explain many of the characteristics of the solar flares such as their impulsive nature, heating and high energy particle acceleration, amplitude oscillations of electromagnetic emission as well as the characteristics of 2-D microwave images obtained during a solar flare. The physical characteristics of the explosive coalescence of currents are presented in detail through computer simulation and theory. Canonical characteristics of the explosive coalescence are: (1) a large amount of impulsive increase of kinetic energies of electrons and ions; (2) simultaneous heating and acceleration of electrons and ions in high and low energy spectra; (3) ensuing quasi-periodic amplitude oscillations in fields and particle quantities; and (4) the double peak (or triple peak) structure in these profiles, participate in the coalescence process, yielding varieties of phenomena.

  9. Analysis of Condensation Downflows in Post-Flare Loops Using Solar Synoptic Chart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Qiao; Wang, Jing-Song; Feng, Xueshang; Zhang, XiaoXin

    2017-08-01

    Post-flare loops (PFLs) are significant feature of eruptive flares during their gradual phases. The condensation downflows in PFLs have been found for decades; however they do not receive enough attention, especially in EUV wavelengths. The solar synoptic chart (SSC) is designed to cover the key objects of solar activities, including active regions, coronal holes, filaments/prominences, flares, and coronal mass ejections. The main aim of the SSC is presenting a timely, comprehensive, and concise chart for space weather forecast; therefore it can provide a complete image of solar activities before, during, and after a flare process. Furthermore, because the composite image of SSC made by high-quality images in multiple EUV wavelengths from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, it can reveal fine structures of condensation downflows in PFLs in different temperatures. Using the SSC, we analyze the condensation downflows in PFLs of X-class flares. The results show that the overall situation of solar activities shown by SSC is helpful for studying the flare process, and SSC effectively presents fine and multi-temperature structure of the condensation downflows in PFLs. Therefore, the SSC is a useful tool not only for space weather forecast but also for the research of solar activities.

  10. Determining Heating Rates in Reconnection Formed Flare Loops of the M8.0 Flare on 2005 May 13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen-Juan; Qiu, Jiong; Longcope, Dana W.; Caspi, Amir

    2013-06-01

    We analyze and model an M8.0 flare on 2005 May 13 observed by the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) to determine the energy release rate from magnetic reconnection that forms and heats numerous flare loops. The flare exhibits two ribbons in UV 1600 Å emission. Analysis shows that the UV light curve at each flaring pixel rises impulsively within a few minutes, and decays slowly with a timescale longer than 10 minutes. Since the lower atmosphere (the transition region and chromosphere) responds to energy deposit nearly instantaneously, the rapid UV brightening is thought to reflect the energy release process in the newly formed flare loop rooted at the footpoint. In this paper, we utilize the spatially resolved (down to 1'') UV light curves and the thick-target hard X-ray emission to construct heating functions of a few thousand flare loops anchored at the UV footpoints, and compute plasma evolution in these loops using the enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops model. The modeled coronal temperatures and densities of these flare loops are then used to calculate coronal radiation. The computed soft X-ray spectra and light curves compare favorably with those observed by RHESSI and by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite X-ray Sensor. The time-dependent transition region differential emission measure for each loop during its decay phase is also computed with a simplified model and used to calculate the optically thin C IV line emission, which dominates the UV 1600 Å bandpass during the flare. The computed C IV line emission decays at the same rate as observed. This study presents a method to constrain heating of reconnection-formed flare loops using all available observables independently, and provides insight into the physics of energy release and plasma heating during the flare. With this method, the lower limit of the total energy used to heat the flare loops in this

  11. DETERMINING HEATING RATES IN RECONNECTION FORMED FLARE LOOPS OF THE M8.0 FLARE ON 2005 MAY 13

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Wenjuan; Qiu Jiong; Longcope, Dana W.; Caspi, Amir

    2013-06-20

    We analyze and model an M8.0 flare on 2005 May 13 observed by the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) to determine the energy release rate from magnetic reconnection that forms and heats numerous flare loops. The flare exhibits two ribbons in UV 1600 A emission. Analysis shows that the UV light curve at each flaring pixel rises impulsively within a few minutes, and decays slowly with a timescale longer than 10 minutes. Since the lower atmosphere (the transition region and chromosphere) responds to energy deposit nearly instantaneously, the rapid UV brightening is thought to reflect the energy release process in the newly formed flare loop rooted at the footpoint. In this paper, we utilize the spatially resolved (down to 1'') UV light curves and the thick-target hard X-ray emission to construct heating functions of a few thousand flare loops anchored at the UV footpoints, and compute plasma evolution in these loops using the enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops model. The modeled coronal temperatures and densities of these flare loops are then used to calculate coronal radiation. The computed soft X-ray spectra and light curves compare favorably with those observed by RHESSI and by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite X-ray Sensor. The time-dependent transition region differential emission measure for each loop during its decay phase is also computed with a simplified model and used to calculate the optically thin C IV line emission, which dominates the UV 1600 A bandpass during the flare. The computed C IV line emission decays at the same rate as observed. This study presents a method to constrain heating of reconnection-formed flare loops using all available observables independently, and provides insight into the physics of energy release and plasma heating during the flare. With this method, the lower limit of the total energy used to heat the flare loops in this event

  12. Well-observed dynamics of flaring and peripheral coronal magnetic loops during an M-class limb flare

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Jinhua; Zhou, Tuanhui; Ji, Haisheng; Feng, Li; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Inhester, Bernd

    2014-08-20

    In this paper, we present a variety of well-observed dynamic behaviors for the flaring and peripheral magnetic loops of the M6.6 class extreme limb flare that occurred on 2011 February 24 (SOL2011-02-24T07:20) from EUV observations by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory and X-ray observations by RHESSI. The flaring loop motion confirms the earlier contraction-expansion picture. We find that the U-shaped trajectory delineated by the X-ray corona source of the flare roughly follows the direction of a filament eruption associated with the flare. Different temperature structures of the coronal source during the contraction and expansion phases strongly suggest different kinds of magnetic reconnection processes. For some peripheral loops, we discover that their dynamics are closely correlated with the filament eruption. During the slow rising to abrupt, fast rising of the filament, overlying peripheral magnetic loops display different responses. Two magnetic loops on the elbow of the active region had a slow descending motion followed by an abrupt successive fast contraction, while magnetic loops on the top of the filament were pushed outward, slowly being inflated for a while and then erupting as a moving front. We show that the filament activation and eruption play a dominant role in determining the dynamics of the overlying peripheral coronal magnetic loops.

  13. Well-observed Dynamics of Flaring and Peripheral Coronal Magnetic Loops during an M-class Limb Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jinhua; Zhou, Tuanhui; Ji, Haisheng; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Inhester, Bernd; Feng, Li

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we present a variety of well-observed dynamic behaviors for the flaring and peripheral magnetic loops of the M6.6 class extreme limb flare that occurred on 2011 February 24 (SOL2011-02-24T07:20) from EUV observations by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory and X-ray observations by RHESSI. The flaring loop motion confirms the earlier contraction-expansion picture. We find that the U-shaped trajectory delineated by the X-ray corona source of the flare roughly follows the direction of a filament eruption associated with the flare. Different temperature structures of the coronal source during the contraction and expansion phases strongly suggest different kinds of magnetic reconnection processes. For some peripheral loops, we discover that their dynamics are closely correlated with the filament eruption. During the slow rising to abrupt, fast rising of the filament, overlying peripheral magnetic loops display different responses. Two magnetic loops on the elbow of the active region had a slow descending motion followed by an abrupt successive fast contraction, while magnetic loops on the top of the filament were pushed outward, slowly being inflated for a while and then erupting as a moving front. We show that the filament activation and eruption play a dominant role in determining the dynamics of the overlying peripheral coronal magnetic loops.

  14. Hard X-ray and microwave sources located around the apex of a solar flare loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, S.; Shimojo, M.; Watanabe, K.; Minoshima, T.; Yaji, K.

    2010-12-01

    The apex of a flare loop is one of important regions to understand particle acceleration in solar flares, under the framework of the flare model based on magnetic reconnection. At that portion, nonthermal emissions are observed in hard X-rays and microwave. These two emissions are originated from electrons accelerated/energized in different energy ranges. Hard X-rays (~ 50 - 100 keV ) are emitted by relatively lower-energy (~ 100 keV) accelerated electrons. On the other hand, microwaves (17 GHz) are emitted by relatively higher-energy (~ 1 MeV) electrons. The locations (heights) of these two emitting regions impose considerable constraints on the acceleration/transport/loss processes of electrons in solar flares. To compare hard X-ray and microwave sources, we chose twenty-three events among all events detected by Nobeyama Radio Heliograph (NoRH) during the almost whole period of its operation (1992 - 2008). The criteria are (1) limb event, (2) simultaneous observation with Yohkoh/HXT or RHESSI, (3) enough number of photons in the energy range of 33 - 53 keV, and (4) microwave source large enough to resolve the flare loop into footpoint and looptop sources. However, only seven events among them can be used for this study. The remaining sixteen events are displaced from the list due to no hard X-ray looptop source, too complex structure of multiple loops, and so force. Among the seven events, six events show that the looptop hard X-ray source is located at a higher altitude than the looptop microwave source. This result suggests that lower-energy accelerated electrons (~ 100 keV) are located at a higher altitude than higher-energy (~ 1 MeV) electrons. What makes this height difference? We discuss the cause of it from various kinds of viewpoints, e.g. emission mechanism, trapping effect, transport process, loss process.

  15. Quasi-periodic processes in the flare loop generated by sudden temperature enhancements at loop footpoints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, M.; Jelínek, P.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: During the impulsive flare phase, the plasma at the flare loop footpoints is rapidly heated by particle beams. In the present paper, we study processes that occur after this sudden heating in a two-dimensional magnetic loop. Methods: We adopt a 2D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, in which we solve a full set of the ideal time-dependent MHD equations by means of the FLASH code, using the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) method. Periods in the processes are estimated by the wavelet analysis technique. Results: We consider a model of the solar atmosphere with a symmetric magnetic loop. The length of this loop in the corona is approximately 21.5 Mm. At both loop footpoints, at the transition region, we initiate the Gaussian temperature (pressure) perturbation with the maximum temperature 14, 7, or 3.5 times higher than the unperturbed temperature. In the corona, the perturbations produce supersonic blast shocks with the Mach number of about 1.1, but well below Alfvén velocities. We consider cases with the same perturbations at both footpoints (symmetric case) and one with different perturbations (asymmetric case). In the symmetric case, the shocks move along both loop legs upwards to the top of the loop, where they interact and form a transient compressed region. Then they continue in their motion to the transition region at the opposite side of the loop, where they are reflected upwards, and so on. At the top of the loop, the shock appears periodically with the period of about 170 s. In the loop legs during this period, a double peak of the plasma parameters, which is connected with two arrivals of shocks, is detected: firstly, when the shock moves up and then when the shock, propagating from the opposite loop leg, moves down. Increasing the distance of the detection point in the loop leg from the top of the loop, the time interval between these shock arrivals increases. Thus, at these detection points, the processes with shorter periods can be detected. After

  16. Coronal seismology of flare-excited longitudinal slow magnetoacoustic waves in hot coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Ofman, L.; Sun, X.; Provornikova, E. A.; Davila, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The flare-excited longitudinal intensity oscillations in hot flaring loops have been recently detected by SDO/AIA in 94 and 131 bandpasses. These oscillations show similar physical properties (such as period, decay time, and trigger) as those slow-mode standing waves previously detected by the SOHO/SUMER spectrometer in Doppler shift of flare lines formed above 6 MK. The multi-wavelength AIA observations with high spatio-temporal resolution and wide temperature coverage enable us to measure both thermal and wave properties of the oscillating hot plasma with unprecedented accuracy. These new measurements can be used to diagnose the complicated energy transport processes in flare plasma by a technique called coronal seismology based on the combination of observations and MHD wave theory. From a detailed case study we have found evidence for thermal conduction suppression in hot loops by measuring the polytropic index and analyzing the phase relationship between the temperature and density wave signals. This result is not only crucial for better understanding the wave dissipation mechanism but also provides an alternative mechanism to explain the puzzles of long-duration events and X-ray loop-top sources which show much slower cooling than expected by the classical Spitzer conductive cooling. This finding may also shed a light on the coronal heating problem because weak thermal conductivity implies slower cooling of hot plasma in nanoflares, so increasing the average coronal temperature for the same heating rate. We will discuss the effects of thermal conduction suppression on the wave damping and loop cooling based on MHD simulations.

  17. Understanding X-Ray Source Motions in a Solar Flare Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Sui, L.; Dennis, B. R.

    2006-06-01

    RHESSI images of a solar flare on 2002 November 28 showed a 3-6 keV hard X-ray source that was initially located at the flare loop top, split and propagated to the foot points of the loop during the flare rise phase, and then propagated back up to the loop top during the declining phase of the flare (Sui, Holman, & Dennis 2006). Higher energy X-ray sources were located lower in the legs of the loop during this period of source evolution, with X-rays above 25 keV seen only at the foot points. Sui, Holman, & Dennis suggested that this spatial evolution reflected the evolution of the spectral index and low-energy cutoff to the distribution of accelerated electrons in the flare.We construct a model flare loop and electron distribution injected at the top of this loop to reproduce the source evolution of the November 28 flare. We determine the constraints on the loop model and the evolution of the accelerated electron distribution. We also study the implications of the model for energy deposition into the loop plasma, and the integrated and imaged X-ray spectra.This work is supported in part by the RHESSI Project and the NASA Guest Investigator Program.

  18. Understanding X-Ray Source Motions in a Solar Flare Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Sui, L.; Dennis, B. R.

    2006-01-01

    RHESSI images of a solar flare on 2002 November 28 showed a 3-6 keV hard X-ray source that was initially located at the flare loop top, split and propagated to the foot points of the loop during the flare rise phase, and then propagated back up to the loop top during the declining phase of the flare (Sai, Holman, & Dennis 2006). Higher energy X-ray sources were located lower in the legs of the loop during this period of source evolution, with X-rays above 25 keV seen only at the foot points. Sui, Holman, & Dennis suggested that this spatial evolution reflected the evolution of the spectral index and low-energy cutoff to the distribution of accelerated electrons in the flare. We construct a model flare loop and electron distribution injected at the top of this loop to reproduce the source evolution of the November 28 flare. We determine the constraints on the loop model and the evolution of the accelerated electron distribution. We also study the implications of the model for energy deposition into the loop plasma, and the integrated and imaged X-ray spectra. This work is supported in part by the RHESSI Project and the NASA Guest Investigator Program.

  19. Understanding X-Ray Source Motions in a Solar Flare Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Sui, L.; Dennis, B. R.

    2006-01-01

    RHESSI images of a solar flare on 2002 November 28 showed a 3-6 keV hard X-ray source that was initially located at the flare loop top, split and propagated to the foot points of the loop during the flare rise phase, and then propagated back up to the loop top during the declining phase of the flare (Sai, Holman, & Dennis 2006). Higher energy X-ray sources were located lower in the legs of the loop during this period of source evolution, with X-rays above 25 keV seen only at the foot points. Sui, Holman, & Dennis suggested that this spatial evolution reflected the evolution of the spectral index and low-energy cutoff to the distribution of accelerated electrons in the flare. We construct a model flare loop and electron distribution injected at the top of this loop to reproduce the source evolution of the November 28 flare. We determine the constraints on the loop model and the evolution of the accelerated electron distribution. We also study the implications of the model for energy deposition into the loop plasma, and the integrated and imaged X-ray spectra. This work is supported in part by the RHESSI Project and the NASA Guest Investigator Program.

  20. On the relationship of late phase loop arcades with confined solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai; Wang, Yuming; Liu, Rui; Shen, Chenglong

    2017-04-01

    The second enhancement of irradiances of warm line (Fe XVI 33.5 nm) after the solar flare is defined as EUV late phase. According to previous studies (e.g., Liu et al. 2013), the late phase is originated from a set of big loop arcades (late phase loop arcades) besides the flare loops in the same active region. While a failed eruption is involved, the late phase peak tend to be much larger than the main peak, named as extremely large EUV late phase (Liu et al. 2015). In this study, we track a series of flare events with EUV late phase in the same active region (NOAA 11598), which include 4 strong flare events and several C class event, and most of them are confined. From these events, we try to understand the formation, evolution and influence of the late phase loop arcades, and their role in the confined solar flare events.

  1. DYNAMICS OF THE FLARING LOOP SYSTEM OF 2005 AUGUST 22 OBSERVED IN MICROWAVES AND HARD X-RAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Reznikova, V. E.; Melnikov, V. F.; Shibasaki, K.

    2010-11-20

    We studied the spatial dynamics of the flaring loop in the 2005 August 22 event using microwave (NoRH) and hard X-ray (RHESSI) observations together with complementary data from SOHO/MDI, SMART at Hida, SOHO/EIT, and TRACE. We have found that (1) the pre-flare morphology of the active region exhibits a strongly sheared arcade seen in H{alpha} and the J-shape filament seen in EUV; (2) energy release and high-energy electron acceleration occur in a sequence along the extensive arcade; (3) the shear angle and the parallel (to the magnetic neutral line) component of the footpoint (FP) distance steadily decrease during the flare process; (4) the radio loop shrinks in length and height during the first emission peak, and later it grows; after the fourth peak the simultaneous descending of the brightest loop and formation of a new microwave loop at a higher altitude occur; (5) the hard X-ray coronal source is located higher than the microwave loop apex and shows faster upward motion; (6) the first peak on microwave time profiles is present in both the loop top and FP regions. However, the emission peaks that follow are present only in the FP regions. We conclude that after the first emission peak the acceleration site is located over the flaring arcade and particles are accelerated along magnetic field lines. We make use of the collapsing magnetic trap model to understand some observational effects.

  2. A Statistical Analysis of Loop-Top Motion in Solar Limb Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, G. D.; Sui, L.; Brosius, D. G.; Dennis, B. R.

    2005-12-01

    Previous studies of hot, thermal solar flare loops imaged with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) have identified several flares for which the loop top shrinks downward early in the impulsive phase and then expands upward later in the impulsive phase (Sui & Holman 2003; Sui, Holman & Dennis 2004; Veronig et al. 2005). This early downward motion is not predicted by flare models. We study a statistical sample of RHESSI flares to assess how common this evolution is and to better characterize it. In a sample of 88 flares near the solar limb that show identifiable loop structure in RHESSI images, 66% (58 flares) showed downward loop-top motion followed by upward motion. We therefore conclude that the early downward motion is a frequent characteristic of flare loops. We obtain the distribution of the timing of the change from downward to upward motion relative to flare start and peak times. We also obtain the distributions of downward and upward speeds. This work was supported in part by NASA SEC Guest Investigator Grant 370-16-20-16 and by the RHESSI project.

  3. Prompt particle acceleration and plasma jet formation during current loop coalescence in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Jun-Ichi

    1990-06-01

    Numerical simulations based on the theory of Sakai and Tajima (1986) are used to study high-energy particle acceleration during current loop coalescence in solar flares. The results show that the electrons and protons can be quasi-periodically accelerated to relativistic energies in a very short period of time (much less than 1 sec) when the ratio of poloidal (loop current) to toroidal (potential field) components of the magnetic field is greater than one. It is shown that the spiral two-sided plasma jet can be explosively driven by the plasma rotational motion during the two-current loop coalescence process. Also, it is found that the rebound following the plasma collapse caused by the magnetic pinch effect may induce super-magnetosonic flow that can lead to fast magnetosonic shock waves.

  4. Above-the-loop-top Oscillation and Quasi-periodic Coronal Wave Generation in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takasao, Shinsuke; Shibata, Kazunari

    2016-06-01

    Observations revealed that various kinds of oscillations are excited in solar flare regions. Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in flare emissions are commonly observed in a wide range of wavelengths. Recent observations have found that fast-mode magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are quasi-periodically emitted from some flaring sites (quasi-periodic propagating fast-mode magnetoacoustic waves; QPFs). Both QPPs and QPFs imply a cyclic disturbance originating from the flaring sites. However, the physical mechanisms remain puzzling. By performing a set of two-dimensional MHD simulations of a solar flare, we discovered the local oscillation above the loops filled with evaporated plasma (above-the-loop-top region) and the generation of QPFs from such oscillating regions. Unlike all previous models for QPFs, our model includes essential physics for solar flares such as magnetic reconnection, heat conduction, and chromospheric evaporation. We revealed that QPFs can be spontaneously excited by the above-the-loop-top oscillation. We found that this oscillation is controlled by the backflow of the reconnection outflow. The new model revealed that flare loops and the above-the-loop-top region are full of shocks and waves, which is different from the previous expectations based on a standard flare model and previous simulations. In this paper, we show the QPF generation process based on our new picture of flare loops and will briefly discuss a possible relationship between QPFs and QPPs. Our findings will change the current view of solar flares to a new view in which they are a very dynamic phenomenon full of shocks and waves.

  5. Non-thermal Motions in and above Flare Loop Tops Measured by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P.

    2013-12-01

    The plasma volume above the soft X-ray emitting loop tops is of particular interest for studying the formation of flare loops. We present observations of non-thermal motions (turbulence) determined from spectral line profiles Fe XXIII and Fe XXIV ions. We compare the non-thermal motions at temperatures near 10 MK with the motions along the same lines-of-sight determined from lines of coronal ions such as Fe XII, Fe XIV, and Fe XV formed at 1-2 MK. We discuss the results in terms of predictions of the effects of magnetic reconnection and non-thermal motion results obtained in flares from earlier X-ray Yohkoh observations of line profiles of Fe XXV and Ca XIX. Fe XXV is formed at significantly higher temperatures than any strong flare EUV spectral line observed by EIS or by imaging telescopes such as AIA or TRACE. This work is supported by a NASA Hinode grant.

  6. Coordinated optical and YOHKOH observations of 26 June 1992 flare loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzel, P.; Kotrč, P.; Schmieder, B.; Hiei, E.; Anwar, B.

    1994-10-01

    Optical spectra of large flare loops were detected by the Ondřejov Multichannel Flare Spectrograph (MFS) during coordinated observations with MSDP at Pic du Midi (Hα) and the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on Yohkoh. The CCD video images taken by the MFS slit-jaw camera document the time-development of the flare loops as seen through the Hα filter. Preliminary analysis of the MSDP images shows the intensity structure of the cool flare loops and their velocity fields. From the spectra we can clearly see the intensity variations along the cool loops. SXT images show the structure of hot X-ray loops similar to that of cool loops. Special attention is devoted to the bright tops, simultaneously observed in X-rays, Hα and other optical lines. Based on a preliminary analysis of the optical spectra, we speculate about possible mechanisms leading to an observed bright emission at the tops of cool loops. We suggest that direct soft X-ray irradiation of cool loops at their tops could be, at least partly, responsible for such a strong brightening.

  7. Electron Densities in Solar Flare Loops, Chromospheric Evaporation Upflows, and Acceleration Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benz, Arnold O.

    1996-01-01

    We compare electron densities measured at three different locations in solar flares: (1) in Soft X-Ray (SXR) loops, determined from SXR emission measures and loop diameters from Yohkoh Soft X-Ray Telescope maps (n(sub e, sup SXR) = (0.2-2.5) x 10(exp 11)/ cu cm); (2) in chromospheric evaporation upflows, inferred from plasma frequency cutoffs of decimetric radio bursts detected with the 0.1-3 GHz spectrometer Phoenix of ETH Zuerich (n(sub e, sup upflow) = (0.3-11) x 10(exp 10)/cu cm; and (3) in acceleration sites, inferred from the plasma frequency at the separatrix between upward-accelerated (type III bursts) and downward-accelerated (reverse-drift bursts) electron beams [n(sub e, sup acc) = (0.6-10) x 10(exp 9)/cu cm]. The comparison of these density measurements, obtained from 44 flare episodes (during 14 different flares), demonstrates the compatibility of flare plasma density diagnostics with SXR and radio methods. The density in the upflowing plasma is found to be somewhat lower than in the filled loops, having ratios in a range n(sub e, sup upflow)/n(sub e, sup SXR) = 0.02-1.3, and a factor of 3.6 higher behind the upflow front. The acceleration sites are found to have a much lower density than the SXR-bright flare loops, i.e., n(sub e, sup acc)/n(sub e, sup SXR) = 0.005- 0.13, and thus must be physically displaced from the SXR-bright flare loops. The scaling law between electron time-of-flight distances l' and loop half-lengths s, l'/s = 1.4 +/- 0.3, recently established by Aschwanden et al. suggests that the centroid of the acceleration region is located above the SXR-bright flare loop, as envisioned in cusp geometries (e.g., in magnetic reconnection models).

  8. Explosive Chromospheric Evaporation Driven by Nonthermal Electrons around One Footpoint of a Solar Flare Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D.; Ning, Z. J.; Huang, Y.; Zhang, Q. M.

    2017-05-01

    We explore the temporal relationship between microwave/hard X-ray (HXR) emission and Doppler velocity during the impulsive phase of a solar flare on 2014 October 27 (SOL2014-10-27) that displays a pulse on the light curves in the microwave (34 GHz) and HXR (25-50 keV) bands before the flare maximum. Imaging observation shows that this pulse mainly comes from one footpoint of a solar flare loop. The slit of the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) stays at this footpoint during this solar flare. The Doppler velocities of Fe xxi 1354.09 Å and Si iv 1402.77 Å are extracted from the Gaussian fitting method. We find that the hot line of Fe xxi 1354.09 Å (log T ˜ 7.05) in the corona exhibits blueshift, while the cool line of Si iv 1402.77 Å (log T ˜ 4.8) in the transition region exhibits redshift, indicating explosive chromospheric evaporation. Evaporative upflows along the flare loop are also observed in the AIA 131 Å image. To our knowledge, this is the first report of chromospheric evaporation evidence from both spectral and imaging observations in the same flare. Both microwave and HXR pulses are well correlated with the Doppler velocities, suggesting that the chromospheric evaporation is driven by nonthermal electrons around this footpoint of a solar flare loop.

  9. MODELING OF GYROSYNCHROTRON RADIO EMISSION PULSATIONS PRODUCED BY MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC LOOP OSCILLATIONS IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Mossessian, George; Fleishman, Gregory D.

    2012-04-01

    A quantitative study of the observable radio signatures of the sausage, kink, and torsional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillation modes in flaring coronal loops is performed. Considering first non-zero order effect of these various MHD oscillation modes on the radio source parameters such as magnetic field, line of sight, plasma density and temperature, electron distribution function, and the source dimensions, we compute time-dependent radio emission (spectra and light curves). The radio light curves (of both flux density and degree of polarization) at all considered radio frequencies are then quantified in both time domain (via computation of the full modulation amplitude as a function of frequency) and in Fourier domain (oscillation spectra, phases, and partial modulation amplitude) to form the signatures specific to a particular oscillation mode and/or source parameter regime. We found that the parameter regime and the involved MHD mode can indeed be distinguished using the quantitative measures derived in the modeling. We apply the developed approach to analyze radio burst recorded by Owens Valley Solar Array and report possible detection of the sausage mode oscillation in one (partly occulted) flare and kink or torsional oscillations in another flare.

  10. Multi-thermal observations of newly formed loops in a dynamic flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svestka, Zdenek F.; Fontenla, Juan M.; Machado, Marcos E.; Martin, Sara F.; Neidig, Donald F.

    1987-01-01

    The dynamic flare of November 6, 1980 (max at about 15:26 UT) developed a rich system of growing loops which could be followed in H-alpha for 1.5 hr. Throughout the flare, these loops, near the limb, were seen in emission against the disk. Theoretical computations of deviations from LTE populations for a hydrogen atom reveal that this requires electron densities in the loops close to, or in excess of 10 to the 12th/cu cm. From measured widths of higher Balmer lines the density at the tops of the loops was found to be 4 x 10 to the 12th/cu cm if no nonthermal motions were present, or 5 x 10 to the 11th/cu cm for a turbulent velocity of about 12 km/s. It is now general knowledge that flare loops are initially observed in X-rays and become visible in H-alpha only after cooling. For such a high density, a loop would cool through radiation from 10 to the 7th to 10 to the 4th K within a few minutes so that the dense H-alpha loops should have heights very close to the heights of the X-ray loops. This, however, contradicts the observations obtained by the HXIS and FCS instruments on board SMM which show the X-ray loops at much higher altitudes than the loops in H-alpha. Therefore, it is suggested that the density must have been significantly lower when the loops were formed, and that the flare loops were apparently both shrinking and increasing in density while cooling.

  11. Flare coronal loop heating and hard X-ray emission from solar flares of August 23, 2005, and November 9, 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsap, Yu. T.; Motorina, G. G.; Kopylova, Yu. G.

    2016-12-01

    The thermal balance and hard X-ray emission of coronal loops for two solar events have been considered in the scope of a "standard" flare model. An important role of the thermal energy release is justified by the event of August 23, 2005, as an example. For the flare of November 9, 2013, it has been established that electrons accelerated at a flare loop top cannot maintain the observed hard X-ray fluxes from the flare footpoints, which indicates that charged particles are additionally accelerated in the chromosphere.

  12. Using a reconnection-powered loop to model a real flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longcope, Dana; Qiu, Jiong; Brewer, Jasmine

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic reconnection has long been invoked to explain the supply of energy for solar flares. In spite of this, few models have been able to capture reconnection-driven energy release at the same time they reproduce other flare-related phenomena, such as chromospheric evaporation. We present a one-dimensional numerical model of flux tube retraction following reconnection. Unlike traditional flare loop models, the energy supply here is not a free parameter but comes self-consistently from the post-reconnection retraction. This model depends on 5 free parameters, two of which can be constrained using pre-flare observations. The remaining three parameters can be varied to fit observations of the actual flare. In this case, they are used to the fit the RHESSI hard X-ray spectrum from a flare on 26 Feb 2004. Once done, the model can be used to reproduce observations from other wavelengths, including their time-evolution. We show that our model agrees with the two different soft X-ray light curves observed by GOES, and the time evolutions observed in various hard X-ray bands observed by RHESSI. The model also predicts hard X-ray emission from the top of the flaring loops, in agreement with hard X-ray images made of the same flare - and many others. While such loop-top sources are well known, their theoretical explanation is still debated. The loop-top source in this model arises from a plug of plasma compressed and heated by slow magnetosonic shocks. This plug persists longer than slow shocks are expected to, giving rise to concentrated source, rather than an elongated jet, and producing considerably more emission than previous models predicted.

  13. DARK POST-FLARE LOOPS OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Qiao; Wang, Jing-Song; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Feng, Xueshang

    2016-04-20

    Solar post-flare loops (PFLs) are arcade-like loop systems that appear during the gradual phases of eruptive flares. The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) allow us to investigate the fine structures in PFLs. In this work, we focus on studying the dark post-flare loops (DPFLs) during X-class flares, which are more evident in SDO/AIA data than in previous EUV data. We identify and analyze the DPFLs observed by SDO and find that: (1) the DPFLs of an X5.4 flare have an average lifetime of 10.0  ±  5.5 minutes, an average width of 1022  ±  339 km, and an average maximum length of 33  ±  10 Mm, (2) blob-like falling features with a size close to the resolution of SDO/AIA are identified in the DPFLs and have an average velocity of 76  ±  19 km s{sup −1}, and (3) the average widths of the DPFLs slightly increase with the characteristic temperatures in the AIA 304, 171, 193, and 211 Å channels. Our investigation shows that DPFLs are found in all of the 20 cases within this study, which suggests that they are a common phenomenon in X-class flares and are probably produced by the same mechanism that creates coronal rain.

  14. An equation for the evolution of solar and stellar flare loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, George H.; Hawley, Suzanne L.

    1990-01-01

    An ordinary differential equation describing the evolution of a coronal loop subjected to a spatially uniform but time-varying heating rate is discussed. It is assumed that the duration of heating is long compared to the sound transit time through the loop, which is assumed to have uniform cross section area. The form of the equation changes as the loop evolves through three states: 'strong evaporation', 'scaling law behavior', and 'strong condensation'. Solutions to the equation may be used to compute the time dependence of the average coronal temperature and emission measure for an assumed temporal variation of the flare heating rate. The results computed from the model agree reasonably well with recent published numerical simulations and may be obtained with far less computational effort. The model is then used to study the May 21, 1980, solar flare observed by SMM and the giant April 12, 1985, flare observed on the star AD Leo.

  15. Determination of the acceleration region size in a loop-structured solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J.; Emslie, A. G.; Kontar, E. P.; Benvenuto, F.; Massone, A. M.; Piana, M.

    2012-07-01

    Aims: To study the acceleration and propagation of bremsstrahlung-producing electrons in solar flares, we analyze the evolution of the flare loop size with respect to energy at a variety of times. A GOES M3.7 loop-structured flare starting around 23:55 on 2002 April 14 is studied in detail using Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations. Methods: We construct photon and mean-electron-flux maps in 2-keV energy bins by processing observationally-deduced photon and electron visibilities, respectively, through several image-processing methods: a visibility-based forward-fit (FWD) algorithm, a maximum entropy (MEM) procedure and the uv-smooth (UVS) approach. We estimate the sizes of elongated flares (i.e., the length and width of flaring loops) by calculating the second normalized moments of the intensity in any given map. Employing a collisional model with an extended acceleration region, we fit the loop lengths as a function of energy in both the photon and electron domains. Results: The resulting fitting parameters allow us to estimate the extent of the acceleration region which is between ~ 13 arcsec and ~19 arcsec. Both forward-fit and uv-smooth algorithms provide substantially similar results with a systematically better fit in the electron domain. Conclusions: The consistency of the estimates from these methods provides strong support that the model can reliably determine geometric parameters of the acceleration region. The acceleration region is estimated to be a substantial fraction (~1/2) of the loop extent, indicating that this dense flaring loop incorporates both acceleration and transport of electrons, with concurrent thick-target bremsstrahlung emission.

  16. Early Results from a Multi-Thermal Model for the Cooling of Post-Flare Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, K. K.; Warren, H. P.

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a multi-thermal model for the cooling of post-flare loops. The model consists of an arcade of many nested loops that reconnect and begin cooling at slightly different times, and have different cooling profiles because of the different loop lengths across the arcade. Cooling due to both conductive and radiative processes is taken into account. The free parameters in the model include initial temperature and density in the loop, loop width and the initial loop length. The results from the model are then compared to TRACE and SXT observations. Our many-loop model does a much better job of predicting the SXT and TRACE light curves than a similar model with only one loop.

  17. MAGNETIC RECONNECTION: FROM 'OPEN' EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET LOOPS TO CLOSED POST-FLARE ONES OBSERVED BY SDO

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Yang, Shuhong; Li, Ting; Zhang, Yuzong; Li, Leping; Jiang, Chaowei E-mail: shuhongyang@nao.cas.cn E-mail: yuzong@nao.cas.cn E-mail: cwjiang@spaceweather.ac.cn

    2013-10-10

    We employ Solar Dynamics Observatory observations and select three well-observed events including two flares and one extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) brightening. During the three events, the EUV loops clearly changed. One event was related to a major solar flare that took place on 2012 July 12 in active region NOAA AR 11520. 'Open' EUV loops rooted in a facula of the AR deflected to the post-flare loops and then merged with them while the flare ribbon approached the facula. Meanwhile, 'open' EUV loops rooted in a pore disappeared from top to bottom as the flare ribbon swept over the pore. The loop evolution was similar in the low-temperature channels (e.g., 171 Å) and the high-temperature channels (e.g., 94 Å). The coronal magnetic fields extrapolated from the photospheric vector magnetograms also show that the fields apparently 'open' prior to the flare become closed after it. The other two events were associated with a B1.1 flare on 2010 May 24 and an EUV brightening on 2013 January 03, respectively. During both of these two events, some 'open' loops either disappeared or darkened before the formation of new closed loops. We suggest that the observations reproduce the picture predicted by the standard magnetic reconnection model: 'open' magnetic fields become closed due to reconnection, manifesting as a transformation from 'open' EUV loops to closed post-flare ones.

  18. Global Sausage Oscillation of Solar Flare Loops Detected by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Hui; Young, Peter R.; Reeves, Katharine K.; Wang, Tongjiang; Antolin, Patrick; Chen, Bin; He, Jiansen

    2016-05-01

    An observation from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph reveals coherent oscillations in the loops of an M1.6 flare on 2015 March 12. Both the intensity and Doppler shift of Fe xxi 1354.08 Å show clear oscillations with a period of ˜25 s. Remarkably similar oscillations were also detected in the soft X-ray flux recorded by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). With an estimated phase speed of ˜2420 km s-1 and a derived electron density of at least 5.4 × 1010 cm-3, the observed short-period oscillation is most likely the global fast sausage mode of a hot flare loop. We find a phase shift of ˜π/2 (1/4 period) between the Doppler shift oscillation and the intensity/GOES oscillations, which is consistent with a recent forward modeling study of the sausage mode. The observed oscillation requires a density contrast between the flare loop and coronal background of a factor ≥42. The estimated phase speed of the global mode provides a lower limit of the Alfvén speed outside the flare loop. We also find an increase of the oscillation period, which might be caused by the separation of the loop footpoints with time.

  19. The bright knots at the tops of soft X-ray flare loops: Quantitative results from Yohkoh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doschek, G. A.; Strong, K. T.; Tsuneta, S.

    1995-01-01

    Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT) observations from the Japanese Yohkoh spacecraft have shown that confined bright regions are common features at the tops of flare loops throughout most of the duration of the flares. In this paper we present quantitative results for these flare knots, in relation to other flare regions, for four relatively 'simple' flares. Emission measure distributions, electron temperatures, and electron densities are derived from SXT and Yohkoh Bragg Crystal Spectrometer (BCS) observations. The four flares selected are dominated by what appear to be single-loop structures, with bright knots at the loop tops. The flares are neither long-duration nor impulsive events. The spatial distributions of brightness and emission measure in the flares are found to be quite similar for all four events, even though there are significant differences in dynamical behavior between at least two of the events. Temperatures and densities calculated for these flares are consistent with previous results from many solar experiments. An investigation of intensity correlations between adjacent pixels at the tops of the loops suggests the existence of local disturbances in the magnetic loops that occur on spatial scales less than the radii of the loops.

  20. X-ray source motion along the loop in two solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Zongjun

    2013-08-01

    We explore the 3-8 keV X-ray source motion along the loop legs in two solar flares observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) on August 12 and November 28, 2002. Firstly, an artificial loop is constructed to have an outline with a fixed width wide enough to cover the X-ray sources at an energy band between 3-60 keV and at various times. Secondly, RHESSI images are reconstructed at 15 energy bands with an 8 s integration window but 1 s cadence. Thirdly, the X-ray source motions are traced from the brightness distribution along the flare loop. We find that these two events tend to start as a single source at 3-8 keV around the loop top, and then separate into two which move downward along the loop legs. These two almost reach the feet of the loop at the hard X-ray (i.e. at 25-50 keV) peak. After that, the two sources move back upward to the loop top and merge together at the same position where they began. The typical timescale is about ˜70 s, and the maximum speed can reach 1000 km s-1. Such a downward-to-upward motion along the loop is rarely seen in the observations, and it seems to be consistent with the density evolution at the loop top, first decreasing after heating and then increasing due to evaporation.

  1. An Interacting Loop Model for Solar Flare Bursts.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    the flare [ Machado , Emslie, and Brown 1978].) However, the relation 8 < 1 follows from considera- tion of steady-state conditions; as we shall show...Brown 1973; Lin and Hudson 1976; Emslie 1980), soft X- ray irradiation (Somov 1975; Henoux and Nakagawa 1977, 1978; Machado 1978; Hyder 1981), and...temperature for the upper chromosphere (see Machado et al. 1980). Clearly a more detailed description of Te(N) for large N would be desirable in order to more

  2. IMPLOSION OF CORONAL LOOPS DURING THE IMPULSIVE PHASE OF A SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Simões, P. J. A.; Fletcher, L.; Hudson, H. S.; Russell, A. J. B. E-mail: lyndsay.fletcher@glasgow.ac.uk E-mail: hhudson@ssl.berkeley.edu

    2013-11-10

    We study the relationship between implosive motions in a solar flare, and the energy redistribution in the form of oscillatory structures and particle acceleration. The flare SOL2012-03-09T03:53 (M6.4) shows clear evidence for an irreversible (stepwise) coronal implosion. Extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images show at least four groups of coronal loops at different heights overlying the flaring core undergoing fast contraction during the impulsive phase of the flare. These contractions start around a minute after the flare onset, and the rate of contraction is closely associated with the intensity of the hard X-ray and microwave emissions. They also seem to have a close relationship with the dimming associated with the formation of the coronal mass ejection and a global EUV wave. Several studies now have detected contracting motions in the corona during solar flares that can be interpreted as the implosion necessary to release energy. Our results confirm this, and tighten the association with the flare impulsive phase. We add to the phenomenology by noting the presence of oscillatory variations revealed by Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite soft X-rays (SXR) and spatially integrated EUV emission at 94 and 335 Å. We identify pulsations of ≈60 s in SXR and EUV data, which we interpret as persistent, semi-regular compressions of the flaring core region which modulate the plasma temperature and emission measure. The loop oscillations, observed over a large region, also allow us to provide rough estimates of the energy temporarily stored in the eigenmodes of the active-region structure as it approaches its new equilibrium.

  3. Heating and dynamics of two flare loop systems observed by AIA and EIS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Ding, M. D.; Qiu, J.

    2014-02-01

    We investigate heating and evolution of flare loops in a C4.7 two-ribbon flare on 2011 February 13. From Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) imaging observations, we can identify two sets of loops. Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) spectroscopic observations reveal blueshifts at the feet of both sets of loops. The evolution and dynamics of the two sets are quite different. The first set of loops exhibits blueshifts for about 25 minutes followed by redshifts, while the second set shows stronger blueshifts, which are maintained for about one hour. The UV 1600 observation by AIA also shows that the feet of the second set of loops brighten twice. These suggest that continuous heating may be present in the second set of loops. We use spatially resolved UV light curves to infer heating rates in the few tens of individual loops comprising the two loop systems. With these heating rates, we then compute plasma evolution in these loops with the 'enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops' model. The results show that, for the first set of loops, the synthetic EUV light curves from the model compare favorably with the observed light curves in six AIA channels and eight EIS spectral lines, and the computed mean enthalpy flow velocities also agree with the Doppler shift measurements by EIS. For the second set of loops modeled with twice-heating, there are some discrepancies between modeled and observed EUV light curves in low-temperature bands, and the model does not fully produce the prolonged blueshift signatures as observed. We discuss possible causes for the discrepancies.

  4. The spatial distribution of 6 centimeter gyroresonance emission from a flaring X-ray loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Webb, D. F.; Davis, J. M.; Kundu, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Simultaneous high resolution soft X-ray, and 6-cm images of the decay phase of an M3 X-ray flare in Hale Region 16413 have been compared. The X-ray images were obtained with a sounding rocket flown on November 7, 1979 and the 6-cm observations were made with the VLA. A large loop system approximately 1.3 arc min in length, with an average temperature of about 8,000,000 K made up the X-ray flare structure. The peak 6-cm emission seemed to originate from a region below the X-ray loop, and its predicted flux due to thermal bremsstrahlung was approximately one order of magnitude less than observed. The expected gyroresonance absorption is examined through a loop geometry model, and it is found that thermal gyroresonance emission requiring large azimuthal or radial field components, or non-thermal gyrosynchrotron emission which involves continuous electron acceleration, may explain the observations.

  5. EVIDENCE OF MULTIPLE SLOW ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS IN THE STELLAR FLARING LOOPS OF PROXIMA CENTAURI

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, A. K.; Pandey, J. C.; Lalitha, S.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first observational evidence of multiple slow acoustic oscillations in the post-flaring loops of the corona of Proxima Centauri using XMM-Newton observations. We find the signature of periodic oscillations localized in the decay phase of the flare in its soft (0.3-10.0 keV) X-ray emissions. Using the standard wavelet tool, we find multiple periodicities of 1261 s and 687 s. These bursty oscillations persist for durations of 90 minutes and 50 minutes, respectively, for more than three cycles. The intensity oscillations with a period of 1261 s may be the signature of the fundamental mode of slow magnetoacoustic waves with a phase speed of 119 km s{sup –1} in a loop of length 7.5 × 10{sup 9} cm, which is initially heated, producing the flare peak temperature of 33 MK and later cooled down in the decay phase and maintained at an average temperature of 7.2 MK. The other period of 687 s may be associated with the first overtone of slow magnetoacoustic oscillations in the flaring loop. The fundamental mode oscillations show dissipation with a damping time of 47 minutes. The period ratio P {sub 1}/P {sub 2} is found to be 1.83, indicating that such oscillations are most likely excited in longitudinal density stratified stellar loops. We estimate the density scale height of the stellar loop system as ∼23 Mm, which is smaller than the hydrostatic scale height of the hot loop system, and implies the existence of non-equilibrium conditions.

  6. The propagation of solar flare particles in a coronal loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A time-dependent diffusion equation with velocity-dependent diffusion and energy-loss coefficients was solved for the case where energetic solar particles are injected into a coronal loop and then diffuse out the ends of the loop into the lower corona/chromosphere. The solution yields for the case of relativistic electrons, precipitation rates and populations which are necessary for calculating thick and thin target X-ray emission. It follows that the thick target emission is necessarily delayed with respect to the particle acceleration on injection by more than the mere travel time of the particle over the loop length. In addition the time-dependent electron population at the top of the loop is calculated. This is useful in estimating the resulting micron-wave emission. The results show relative timing differences in the different emission processes which are functions of particle species, energy and the point of injection of the particles into the loop. Equivalent quantities are calculated for non-relativistic protons.

  7. Search for accelerated electron anisotropy signatures based on observed polarization of the flaring loop microwave emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgachev, A. S.; Melnikov, V. F.; Kuznetsov, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    The distribution maps of the circular polarization degree and radio brightness have been analyzed for more than 40 flares based on the Nobeyama Radioheliograph data. It has been shown that the observed microwave emission is polarized in the ordinary mode in some flaring loop parts in six events. Based on a joint analysis of the photospheric magnetic field maps obtained from the HMI/SDO and MDI/SOHO magnetograph's and the radio emission dynamics in different source parts, it has been concluded that the ordinary mode predominance in all six selected events can be connected with implementation of the longitudinal pitch-angle anisotropy of emitting electrons.

  8. Solar Flares and their Effects on Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward Francis; Engle, Scott G.

    2015-08-01

    The effects of flares from the Sun on Earth and other solar-system planets are discussed. The strong X-ray - UV radiation and high plasma fluxes from flares can strongly effect solar system planets even as far out as the Jovian planets and their moons. Data from our "Sun in Time" program are used to study the flare properties of the Sun and solar-type stars from youth to old age. These data imply that the young Sun had numerous, very powerful flares that may have played major roles in the development and evolution of the early atmospheres of Earth and other terrestiral planets. These strong X-UV fluxes from flares can greatly effect the photochemistry of planetary atmospheres as well as ionizing and possibly eroding their atmospheres. Some examples are given. Also briefly discussed are effects of large flares from the present Sun on the Earth. Even though strong solar flares are rarer and less powerful than from the youthful Sun, they can cause significant damage to our communication and satellite systems, electrical networks, and threaten the lives of astronauts in space.This research is supported by grants from NASA (HST and Chandra) and NSF. We gratefully acknowledge this support

  9. A Reconnection-driven Model of the Hard X-Ray Loop-top Source from Flare 2004-Feb-26

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longcope, Dana; Qiu, Jiong; Brewer, Jasmine

    2016-12-01

    A compact X-class flare on 2004 February 26 showed a concentrated source of hard X-rays at the tops of the flare’s loops. This was analyzed in previous work and interpreted as plasma heated and compressed by slow magnetosonic shocks (SMSs) generated during post-reconnection retraction of the flux. That work used analytic expressions from a thin flux tube (TFT) model, which neglected many potentially important factors such as thermal conduction and chromospheric evaporation. Here we use a numerical solution of the TFT equations to produce a more comprehensive and accurate model of the same flare, including those effects previously omitted. These simulations corroborate the prior hypothesis that slow-mode shocks persist well after the retraction has ended, thus producing a compact, loop-top source instead of an elongated jet, as steady reconnection models predict. Thermal conduction leads to densities higher than analytic estimates had predicted, and evaporation enhances the density still higher, but at lower temperatures. X-ray light curves and spectra are synthesized by convolving the results from a single TFT simulation with the rate at which flux is reconnected, as measured through motion of flare ribbons, for example. These agree well with light curves observed by RHESSI and GOES and spectra from RHESSI. An image created from a superposition of TFT model runs resembles one produced from RHESSI observations. This suggests that the HXR loop-top source, at least the one observed in this flare, could be the result of SMSs produced in fast reconnection models like Petschek’s.

  10. STATISTICS OF FLARING LOOPS OBSERVED BY THE NOBEYAMA RADIOHELIOGRAPH. III. ASYMMETRY OF TWO FOOTPOINT EMISSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Guangli; Song Qiwu; Huang Yu

    2010-11-10

    .e., the energy release above a single loop (group 1) and in the coalescence of two flaring loops (group 2). The asymmetry of the two FP emissions cannot simply be explained by the mirroring effect, but it may strongly depend on the asymmetry of the initial pitch angles of nonthermal electrons in the two FPs. The normal or abnormal events are defined as whether a stronger emission corresponds to a stronger or weaker polarization in the two FPs, with a comparable proportion of the normal and abnormal events in the two groups.

  11. Multiple loop activations and continuous energy release in the solar flare of June 15, 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widing, K. G.; Dere, K. P.

    1977-01-01

    The spatial and temporal evolution of the high-temperature plasma in the solar flare of June 15, 1973, is studied using XUV spectroheliograms and X-ray filtergrams obtained from Skylab. The analysis focuses on the changing forms and brightness of Fe XXIII 263-A and Fe XXIV 255-A images. Temperatures and emission measures computed for different times during the flare are compared with those derived from Solrad-9 flux data, the electron temperature in the bright compact core of the Fe XXIV image is determined, and a coronal origin is suggested for this bright core. The observational evidence shows that the overall flare event involved a number of different preexisting loops and arches which were activated in succession. The activation and heating are found to have persisted well past the end of the burst phase, implying that the energy release did not end when the impulsive phase was over. The overall development of the flare is summarized on the basis of the observed order of appearance of the loops.

  12. The Effects of Flare Definitions on the Statistics of Derived Flare Distrubtions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Daniel; Dominique, Marie; Seaton, Daniel B.; Stegen, Koen; White, Arthur

    2016-05-01

    The statistical examination of solar flares is crucial to revealing their global characteristics and behaviour. However, statistical flare studies are often performed using standard but basic flare detection algorithms relying on arbitrary thresholds which may affect the derived flare distributions. We explore the effect of the arbitrary thresholds used in the GOES event list and LYRA Flare Finder algorithms. We find that there is a small but significant relationship between the power law exponent of the GOES flare peak flux frequency distribution and the algorithms’ flare start thresholds. We also find that the power law exponents of these distributions are not stable but appear to steepen with increasing peak flux. This implies that the observed flare size distribution may not be a power law at all. We show that depending on the true value of the exponent of the flare size distribution, this deviation from a power law may be due to flares missed by the flare detection algorithms. However, it is not possible determine the true exponent from GOES/XRS observations. Additionally we find that the PROBA2/LYRA flare size distributions are clearly non-power law. We show that this is consistent with an insufficient degradation correction which causes LYRA absolute irradiance values to be unreliable. This means that they should not be used for flare statistics or energetics unless degradation is adequately accounted for. However they can be used to study time variations over shorter timescales and for space weather monitoring.

  13. Decaying post-flare loops system observed by SOHO/CDS and Yohkoh/SXT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varady, M.; Fludra, A.; Heinzel, P.

    2000-03-01

    The results of an analysis of joint SOHO/CDS and Yohkoh/SXT observations of a decaying post-flare loops system with a rapid time evolution are presented. The loop system was a remnant of a small single loop flare (GOES class C2.9). Using the CDS raster taken in several EUV lines with different formation temperatures and a temperature sensitive line pair Fe XVI 360.8/Si XII 520.7 we confirmed the existence of the vertical stratification in the loop system according to the line formation temperature. The analysis of the SXT data showed a strong decay of the system with time. While the temperature of the hot part of the system (T =~ 2.5 MK) decreased only slightly, the total emission measure dropped by more than a factor of four in approximately 103 s. This could be explained by a plasma outflow from the loops with velocity approximately 10 km/s. On the other hand, signs of rapid, probably radiative cooling can be identified in the images obtained from the CDS raster taken in cool lines of O V and O III. Using the density sensitive line pair of Fe XIV 334.2/353.8 and the integrated intensity of Fe XIV 334.2 line we determined the electron densities and emission measures across the top of the loop system. From the results of these measurements, taking all known uncertainties into account, we obtained that the geometrical filling factor at the top of the system in the regions with maximum electron density in the Fe XIV line lies in the interval from =~ 0.01 to =~ 0.2. A simple theoretical approximation of the energy balance in the post-flare plasma gives a total cooling time =~ 750 s.

  14. Intercomparison of numerical models of flaring coronal loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopp, R. A.; Fisher, G. H.; Macneice, P.; Mcwhirter, R. W. P.; Peres, G.

    1986-01-01

    The proposed Benchmark Problem consists of an infinitesimal magnetic flux tube containing a low-beta plasma. The field strength is assumed to be so large that the plasma can move only along the flux tube, whose shape remains invariant with time (i.e., the fluid motion is essentially one-dimensional). The flux tube cross section is taken to be constant over its entire length. In planar view the flux tube has a semi-circular shape, symmetric about its midpoint s = s sub max and intersecting the chromosphere-corona interface (CCI) perpendicularly at each foot point. The arc length from the loop apex to the CCI is 10,000 km. The flux tube extends an additional 2000 km below the CCI to include the chromosphere, which initially has a uniform temperature of 8000 K. The temperature at the top of the loop was fixed initially at 2 X 1 million K. The plasma is assumed to be a perfect gas (gamma = 5/3), consisting of pure hydrogen which is considered to be fully ionized at all temperatures. For simplicity, moreover, the electron and ion temperatures are taken to be everywhere equal at all times (corresponding to an artificially enhanced electron-ion collisional coupling). While there was more-or-less unanimous agreement as to certain global properties of the system behavior (peak temperature reached, thermal-wave time scales, etc.), no two groups could claim satisfactory accord when a more detailed comparison of solutions was attempted.

  15. On the transport and acceleration of solar flare particles in a coronal loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James M.; Lee, Martin A.

    1991-01-01

    The turbulent environment of a flaring solar coronal loop directly affects the population of particles to be accelerated or already accelerated. Under the assumption of a uniform turbulent MHD wave field within the loop, the behavior of a particle distribution as it interacts with the turbulence is discussed, including particle precipitation to the footpoints of the loop and the evolution of the energy distribution as the particles undergo second-order stochastic acceleration. Two cases are discussed in detail: (1) particles spatially diffusing within the loop and precipitating with minimal acceleration in the short time scale of an impulsive event and (2) particles diffusing in both real and momentum space in a long duration event. Collisional losses due to ambient electrons are included. The gamma-ray flare of June 3, 1982 is modeled, and good agreement is obtained between predicted and observed time profiles if the loop length is 100,000 km with an intrinsic spatial diffusion time of 100-450 s. It follows that the production of high-energy neutrons and pi mesons extends over a time scale of 1000 s as observed.

  16. Plasma dynamics above solar flare soft x-ray loop tops

    SciTech Connect

    Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P.; McKenzie, D. E.

    2014-06-10

    We measure non-thermal motions in flare loop tops and above the loop tops using profiles of highly ionized spectral lines of Fe XXIV and Fe XXIII formed at multimillion-degree temperatures. Non-thermal motions that may be due to turbulence or multiple flow regions along the line of sight are extracted from the line profiles. The non-thermal motions are measured for four flares seen at or close to the solar limb. The profile data are obtained using the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on the Hinode spacecraft. The multimillion-degree non-thermal motions are between 20 and 60 km s{sup –1} and appear to increase with height above the loop tops. Motions determined from coronal lines (i.e., lines formed at about 1.5 MK) tend to be smaller. The multimillion-degree temperatures in the loop tops and above range from about 11 MK to 15 MK and also tend to increase with height above the bright X-ray-emitting loop tops. The non-thermal motions measured along the line of sight, as well as their apparent increase with height, are supported by Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly measurements of turbulent velocities in the plane of the sky.

  17. Ionospheric effects of solar flares at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, K. K.; Lodhi, Neelesh K.; Singh, Sachchidanand

    2009-08-01

    From an analysis of electron density profiles recorded aboard Mars Global Surveyor, we report observations of some new and aeronomically important solar flare effects in the ionosphere of Mars. We find that all flares result in the formation of a well defined E layer peak, not always seen on other days. Further, while majority of flares result in elevated electron densities in the E region alone, some flares affect both the E and F1 layers. These altitude - related effects can provide vital information on the relative enhancement of photon fluxes in the various wavelength bands during solar flares. By using the unit optical depth values at Mars from Fox (2004) and the XUV irradiance model of Meier et al. (2002) for the Bastille Day solar flare, we infer that the well defined E peaks could result from enhancement of photon fluxes in the 10-13 nm spectral band. The extension of effect to the F1 layer is due to hardening of the 26-91 nm spectral band, as supported by Solar EUV Monitor measurements on Solar Heliospheric Observatory.

  18. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SHOCKS IN AND ABOVE POST-FLARE LOOPS: TWO-DIMENSIONAL SIMULATION AND A SIMPLIFIED MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Takasao, Shinsuke; Nakamura, Naoki; Shibata, Kazunari; Matsumoto, Takuma

    2015-06-01

    Solar flares are an explosive phenomenon where super-sonic flows and shocks are expected in and above the post-flare loops. To understand the dynamics of post-flare loops, a two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (2D MHD) simulation of a solar flare has been carried out. We found new shock structures in and above the post-flare loops, which were not resolved in the previous work by Yokoyama and Shibata. To study the dynamics of flows along the reconnected magnetic field, the kinematics and energetics of the plasma are investigated along selected field lines. It is found that shocks are crucial to determine the thermal and flow structures in the post-flare loops. On the basis of the 2D MHD simulation, we developed a new post-flare loop model, which we defined as the pseudo-2D MHD model. The model is based on the one-dimensional (1D) MHD equations, where all variables depend on one space dimension, and all the three components of the magnetic and velocity fields are considered. Our pseudo-2D model includes many features of the multi-dimensional MHD processes related to magnetic reconnection (particularly MHD shocks), which the previous 1D hydrodynamic models are not able to include. We compared the shock formation and energetics of a specific field line in the 2D calculation with those in our pseudo-2D MHD model, and found that they give similar results. This model will allow us to study the evolution of the post-flare loops in a wide parameter space without expensive computational cost or neglecting important physics associated with magnetic reconnection.

  19. Flare-Control Effectiveness at Hypersonic Speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontis, Konstantinos

    The effects of flare control on the aerodynamic characteristics, performance, and stability of a cylindrical body under laminar and turbulent boundary layer conditions have been studied experimentally and computationally. The experimental study has been carried out in a hypersonic gun tunnel at a Mach number of 8.2 and a Reynolds number of 158,100, based on the cylinder diameter, at flare angles 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 degrees and at pitch angles of -12 to 12 deg for the 10 deg flare case only. The surface flow was studied using the oil-dot technique. Some information regarding the shock layer was obtained from schlieren pictures. The effects of turbulence on onset of separation were also deduced from pressure measurements over the cylinder and the flare. The forces were measured with a three-component balance equipped with semiconductor strain gauges. The effects of centre of gravity (CG) location on the aerodynamic characteristics and in particular on the CMαwere examined. The results under turbulent conditions and zero-incidence were compared with numerical simulations performed using a 3-D time-marching Navier-Stokes code. The magnitude of the separated region, the minimum flare angle required to induce separation, and the effects of small-scale separation are detailed.

  20. IMAGING OBSERVATIONS OF QUASI-PERIODIC PULSATIONS IN SOLAR FLARE LOOPS WITH SDO/AIA

    SciTech Connect

    Su, J. T.; Mao, X. J.; Shen, Y. D.; Liu, Y.

    2012-08-20

    Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) of flaring emission with periods from a few seconds to tens of minutes have been widely detected from radio bands to {gamma}-ray emissions. However, in the past the spatial information of pulsations could not be utilized well due to the instrument limits. We report here imaging observations of the QPPs in three loop sections during a C1.7 flare with periods of P = 24 s-3 minutes by means of the extreme-ultraviolet 171 A channel of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We confirm that the QPPs with the shortest period of 24 s were not of an artifact produced by the Nyquist frequency of the AIA 12 s cadence. The QPPs in the three loop sections were interconnected and closely associated with the flare. The detected perturbations propagated along the loops at speeds of 65-200 km s{sup -1}, close to those of acoustic waves in them. The loops were made up of many bright blobs arranged in alternating bright and dark changes in intensity (spatial periodical distribution) with the wavelengths 2.4-5 Mm (as if they were magnetohydrodynamic waves). Furthermore, in the time-distance diagrams, the detected perturbation wavelengths of the QPPs are estimated to be {approx}10 Mm, which evidently do not fit the above ones of the spatial periodic distributions and produce a difference of a factor of 2-4 with them. It is suggested that the short QPPs with periods P < 60 s were possibly sausage-mode oscillations and the long QPPs with periods P > 60 s were the higher (e.g., >2nd) harmonics of slow magnetoacoustic waves.

  1. Imaging Observations of Quasi-periodic Pulsations in Solar Flare Loops with SDO/AIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, J. T.; Shen, Y. D.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Y.; Mao, X. J.

    2012-08-01

    Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) of flaring emission with periods from a few seconds to tens of minutes have been widely detected from radio bands to γ-ray emissions. However, in the past the spatial information of pulsations could not be utilized well due to the instrument limits. We report here imaging observations of the QPPs in three loop sections during a C1.7 flare with periods of P = 24 s-3 minutes by means of the extreme-ultraviolet 171 Å channel of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We confirm that the QPPs with the shortest period of 24 s were not of an artifact produced by the Nyquist frequency of the AIA 12 s cadence. The QPPs in the three loop sections were interconnected and closely associated with the flare. The detected perturbations propagated along the loops at speeds of 65-200 km s-1, close to those of acoustic waves in them. The loops were made up of many bright blobs arranged in alternating bright and dark changes in intensity (spatial periodical distribution) with the wavelengths 2.4-5 Mm (as if they were magnetohydrodynamic waves). Furthermore, in the time-distance diagrams, the detected perturbation wavelengths of the QPPs are estimated to be ~10 Mm, which evidently do not fit the above ones of the spatial periodic distributions and produce a difference of a factor of 2-4 with them. It is suggested that the short QPPs with periods P < 60 s were possibly sausage-mode oscillations and the long QPPs with periods P > 60 s were the higher (e.g., >2nd) harmonics of slow magnetoacoustic waves.

  2. Image watermarking against lens flare effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chotikawanid, Piyanart; Amornraksa, Thumrongrat

    2017-02-01

    Lens flare effects in various photo and camera software nowadays can partially or fully damage the watermark information within the watermarked image. We propose in this paper a spatial domain based image watermarking against lens flare effects. The watermark embedding is based on the modification of the saturation color component in HSV color space of a host image. For watermark extraction, a homomorphic filter is used to predict the original embedding component from the watermarked component, and the watermark is blindly recovered by differentiating both components. The watermarked image's quality is evaluated by wPSNR, while the extracted watermark's accuracy is evaluated by NC. The experimental results against various types of lens flare effects from both computer software and mobile application showed that our proposed method outperformed the previous methods.

  3. High-energy gamma-ray emission from pion decay in a solar flare magnetic loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandzhavidze, Natalie; Ramaty, Reuven

    1992-01-01

    The production of high-energy gamma rays resulting from pion decay in a solar flare magnetic loop is investigated. Magnetic mirroring, MHD pitch-angle scattering, and all of the relevant loss processes and photon production mechanisms are taken into account. The transport of both the primary ions and the secondary positrons resulting from the decay of the positive pions, as well as the transport of the produced gamma-ray emission are considered. The distributions of the gamma rays as a function of atmospheric depth, time, emission angle, and photon energy are calculated and the dependence of these distributions on the model parameters are studied. The obtained angular distributions are not sufficiently anisotropic to account for the observed limb brightening of the greater than 10 MeV flare emission, indicating that the bulk of this emission is bremsstrahlung from primary electrons.

  4. Effect of electron beams during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboudarham, J.; Henoux, J. C.; Brown, J. C.; van den Oord, J.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.

    1990-12-01

    Electron bombardment of the solar atmosphere has two effects: one is to enhance hydrogen recombination emission, the other is to increase the opacity via an increase of H(-) population. The first effect is the most important in the upper part of the atmosphere, and the second in the lower part. It is predicted that, when enhanced absorption dominates in the part of the atmosphere where radiation originates, there will be a decrease in the white-light emission, leading to a 'negative flare', or 'black-light flare' short duration, not more than about 20 sec.

  5. Standing Sausage Modes in Nonuniform Magnetic Tubes: An Inversion Scheme for Inferring Flare Loop Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Xia; Li, Bo; Xiong, Ming; Yu, Hui; Guo, Ming-Zhe

    2015-10-01

    Standing sausage modes in flare loops are important for interpreting quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in solar flare light curves. We propose an inversion scheme that consistently uses their periods P and damping times τ to diagnose flare loop parameters. We derive a generic dispersion relation governing linear sausage waves in pressure-less straight tubes, for which the transverse density inhomogeneity takes place in a layer of arbitrary width l and is of arbitrary form. We find that P and τ depend on the combination of [R/{v}{Ai},L/R,l/R,{ρ }{{i}}/{ρ }{{e}}], where R is the loop radius, L is the looplength, vAi is the internal Alfvén speed, and ρi/ρe is the density contrast. For all the density profiles examined, P and τ experience saturation when L/R ≫ 1, yielding an inversion curve in the [R/{v}{Ai},l/R,{ρ }{{i}}/{ρ }{{e}}] space with a specific density profile when L/R is sufficiently large. When applied to a spatially unresolved QPP event, the scheme yields that R/vAi is the best constrained, whereas l/R corresponds to the other extreme. For spatially resolved QPPs, while L/R ≫ 1 cannot be assumed beforehand, an inversion curve remains possible due to additional geometrical constraints. When a spatially resolved QPP event involves another mode, as is the case for a recent event, the full set of [{v}{Ai},l,{ρ }{{i}}/{ρ }{{e}}] can be inferred. We conclude that the proposed scheme provides a useful tool for magneto-seismologically exploiting QPPs.

  6. SIMULATING THE EFFECTS OF INITIAL PITCH-ANGLE DISTRIBUTIONS ON SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, Henry D.; Reeves, Katharine K.; Martens, Petrus

    2011-07-10

    In this work, we model both the thermal and non-thermal components of solar flares. The model we use, HYLOOP, combines a hydrodynamic equation solver with a non-thermal particle tracking code to simulate the thermal and non-thermal dynamics and emission of solar flares. In order to test the effects of pitch-angle distribution on flare dynamics and emission, a series of flares is simulated with non-thermal electron beams injected at the loop apex. The pitch-angle distribution of each beam is described by a single parameter and allowed to vary from flare to flare. We use the results of these simulations to generate synthetic hard and soft X-ray emissions (HXR and SXR). The light curves of the flares in Hinode's X-ray Telescope passbands show a distinct signal that is highly dependent on pitch-angle distribution. The simulated HXR emission in the 3-6 keV bandpass shows the formation and evolution of emission sources that correspond well to the observations of pre-impulsive flares. This ability to test theoretical models of thermal and non-thermal flare dynamics directly with observations allows for the investigation of a wide range of physical processes governing the evolution of solar flares. We find that the initial pitch-angle distribution of non-thermal particle populations has a profound effect on loop top HXR and SXR emission and that apparent motion of HXR is a natural consequence of non-thermal particle evolution in a magnetic trap.

  7. LARGE-SCALE CONTRACTION AND SUBSEQUENT DISRUPTION OF CORONAL LOOPS DURING VARIOUS PHASES OF THE M6.2 FLARE ASSOCIATED WITH THE CONFINED FLUX ROPE ERUPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kushwaha, Upendra; Joshi, Bhuwan; Moon, Yong-Jae; Veronig, Astrid M.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate evolutionary phases of an M6.2 flare and the associated confined eruption of a prominence. The pre-flare phase exhibits spectacular large-scale contraction of overlying extreme ultraviolet (EUV) coronal loops during which the loop system was subjected to an altitude decrease of ∼20 Mm (40% of the initial height) for an extended span of ∼30 minutes. This contraction phase is accompanied by sequential EUV brightenings associated with hard X-ray (HXR; up to 25 keV) and microwave (MW) sources from low-lying loops in the core region which together with X-ray spectra indicate strong localized heating in the source region before the filament activation. With the onset of the flare’s impulsive phase, we detect HXR and MW sources that exhibit intricate temporal and spatial evolution in relation to the fast rise of the prominence. Following the flare maximum, the filament eruption slowed down and subsequently became confined within the large overlying active region loops. During the confinement process of the erupting prominence, we detect MW emission from the extended coronal region with multiple emission centroids, which likely represent emission from hot blobs of plasma formed after the collapse of the expanding flux rope and entailing prominence material. RHESSI spectroscopy reveals high plasma temperature (∼30 MK) and substantial non-thermal characteristics (δ ∼ 5) during the impulsive phase of the flare. The time evolution of thermal energy exhibits a good correspondence with the variations in cumulative non-thermal energy, which suggests that the energy of accelerated particles is efficiently converted to hot flare plasma, implying an effective validation of the Neupert effect.

  8. Motion of 3-6 keV Nonthermal Sources Along the Legs of a Flare Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, Linhui; Holman, Gordon D.; Dennis, Brian R.

    2007-01-01

    Observations of nonthermal X-ray sources me critical to studying electron acceleration and transport in solar flares. Strong thermal emission radiated from the preheated plasma before the flare impulsive phase often makes it difficult to detect low-energy X-ray sources that are produced by relatively low-energy nonthermal electrons. Knowledge of the distribution of these low-energy nonthermal electrons is particularly important in determining the total nonthermal electron energy in solar flares. We report on an 'early impulsive flare' in which impulsive hard X-ray emission was seen early in the flare before the soft X-ray emission had risen significantly, indicating limited plasma pre-heating. Early in the flare, RHESSI < 25 keV images show coronal sources that moved first downward and then upwards along the legs of a flare loop. In particular, the 3-6 keV source appeared as a single coronal source at the start of the flare, and then it involved into two coronal sources moving down along the two legs of the loop. After nearly reaching the two footpoints at the hard X-ray peak, the two sources moved back up to the looptop again. RHESSI images and light curves all indicate that nonthermal emission dominated at energies as low as 3-6 keV. We suggest that the evolution of both the spectral index and the low-energy cutoff of the injected electron distribution could result in the accelerated electrons reaching a lower altitude along the legs of the dense flare loop and hence result in the observed downward and upward motions of the nonthermal sources.

  9. Eruption and acceleration of flare-associated coronal mass ejection loops in the low corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupert, W. M.; Thompson, B. J.; Gurman, J. B.; Plunkett, S. P.

    2001-11-01

    Observations made by the EUV imaging telescope (EIT) and the Large-Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) on board the Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) have been used to characterize the eruption and acceleration of flare-associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the low corona. For three well-observed limb events we tracked CME loops back to preexisting but faint EUV-emitting loops at heights of 100-250 Mm that initially brightened slowly and possibly increased slowly in height, apparently in response to filament activity and eruption in the associated active regions. Subsequent CME acceleration coincided with a rapid rise of the soft X-ray flux, occurred between 100 and 350 Mm above the surface, and may have been as high as 0.5 km s-1 s-1, consistent with an impulsive acceleration of the CME to the speeds observed in subsequent white-light observations. The existence of a delay of up to 30 min observed between initial filament eruption in H alpha and subsequent high acceleration of the CME in one event implies that there may have been two separate phases of magnetic reconnection, with the initial filament activity acting as a trigger for subsequent CME and energetic particle acceleration in the impulsive stage of the flare. The presence or absence of this impulsive phase may provide a basis for the two types of CMEs that have been discussed in the literature.

  10. Numerical simulations of loops heated to solar flare temperatures. I - Gasdynamics. II - X-ray and UV spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, C.-C.; Oran, E. S.; Doschek, G. A.; Boris, J. P.; Mariska, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    The NRL's Dynamic Flux Tube Model is used to numerically simulate the dynamic response of a coronal magnetic loop to an energy input of the order encountered in solar flares. The coronal plasma is heated by the deposition of flare energy at the top of the loop to more than 10 million K, yielding a conduction front that moves toward the chromosphere, where the plasma is heated by the large downward conductive flux and ablates upward to the coronal part of the loop at velocities of a few hundred km/sec. The conduction front simultaneously produces chromospheric ablation and compresses the material ahead of it. With the aid of compressional instabilities, the compressed plasma grows throughout the flare heating phase, presenting a possible source of the flare optical continuum emission which is correlated with soft X-ray radiation. The observational consequences of rapidly heated loop gas dynamic processes are discussed. In the second part of this presentation, the dynamical calculation results previously obtained are used to predict the spectral line intensities, profiles and wavelengths of several X-ray lines and the UV line of Fe XXI at 1354.1 A. Three different viewing orientations of the loop are considered.

  11. The Role of Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability for Producing Loop-top Hard X-Ray Sources in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xia; Yuan, Ding; Xia, Chun; Van Doorsselaere, Tom; Keppens, Rony

    2016-12-01

    We propose a model for the formation of loop-top hard X-ray (HXR) sources in solar flares through the inverse Compton mechanism, scattering the surrounding soft X-ray (SXR) photons to higher energy HXR photons. We simulate the consequences of a flare-driven energy deposit in the upper chromosphere in the impulsive phase of single loop flares. The consequent chromosphere evaporation flows from both footpoints reach speeds up to hundreds of kilometers per second, and we demonstrate how this triggers Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) in the loop top, under mildly asymmetric conditions, or more toward the loop flank for strongly asymmetric cases. The KHI vortices further fragment the magnetic topology into multiple magnetic islands and current sheets, and the hot plasma within leads to a bright loop-top SXR source region. We argue that the magnetohydrodynamic turbulence that appears at the loop apex could be an efficient accelerator of non-thermal particles, which the island structures can trap at the loop-top. These accelerated non-thermal particles can upscatter the surrounding thermal SXR photons emitted by the extremely hot evaporated plasma to HXR photons.

  12. Effects of flare definitions on the statistics of derived flare distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, D. F.; Dominique, M.; Seaton, D.; Stegen, K.; White, A.

    2016-08-01

    The statistical examination of solar flares is crucial to revealing their global characteristics and behaviour. Such examinations can tackle large-scale science questions or give context to detailed single-event studies. However, they are often performed using standard but basic flare detection algorithms relying on arbitrary thresholds. This arbitrariness may lead to important scientific conclusions being drawn from results caused by subjective choices in algorithms rather than the true nature of the Sun. In this paper, we explore the effect of the arbitrary thresholds used in the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) event list and Large Yield RAdiometer (LYRA) Flare Finder algorithms. We find that there is a small but significant relationship between the power law exponent of the GOES flare peak flux frequency distribution and the flare start thresholds of the algorithms. We also find that the power law exponents of these distributions are not stable, but appear to steepen with increasing peak flux. This implies that the observed flare size distribution may not be a power law at all. We show that depending on the true value of the exponent of the flare size distribution, this deviation from a power law may be due to flares missed by the flare detection algorithms. However, it is not possible determine the true exponent from GOES/XRS observations. Additionally we find that the PROBA2/LYRA flare size distributions are artificially steep and clearly non-power law. We show that this is consistent with an insufficient degradation correction. This means that PROBA2/LYRA should not be used for flare statistics or energetics unless degradation is adequately accounted for. However, it can be used to study variations over shorter timescales and for space weather monitoring.

  13. Validation of a scaling law for the coronal magnetic field strength and loop length of solar and stellar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namekata, Kosuke; Sakaue, Takahito; Watanabe, Kyoko; Asai, Ayumi; Shibata, Kazunari

    2017-02-01

    Shibata and Yokoyama (1999, ApJ, 526, L49; 2002, ApJ, 577, 422) proposed a method of estimating the coronal magnetic field strength (B) and magnetic loop length (L) of solar and stellar flares, on the basis of magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the magnetic reconnection model. Using the scaling law provided by Shibata and Yokoyama (1999, ApJ, 526, L49; 2002, ApJ, 577, 422), we obtain B and L as functions of the emission measure (EM = n2L3) and temperature (T) at the flare peak. Here, n is the coronal electron density of the flares. This scaling law enables the estimation of B and L for unresolved stellar flares from the observable physical quantities EM and T, which is helpful for studying stellar surface activities. To apply this scaling law to stellar flares, we discuss its validity for spatially resolved solar flares. Quantities EM and T are calculated from GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) soft X-ray flux data, and B and L are theoretically estimated using the scaling law. For the same flare events, B and L were also observationally estimated with images taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Magnetogram and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 94 Å pass band. As expected, a positive correlation was found between the theoretically and observationally estimated values. We interpret this result as indirect evidence that flares are caused by magnetic reconnection. Moreover, this analysis makes us confident about the validity of applying this scaling law to stellar flares as well as solar flares.

  14. Decaying Post-Flare Loops System Observed By SOHO/CDS And Yohkoh/SXT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varady, M.; Fludra, A.; Heinzel, P.

    1999-10-01

    The results of an analysis of joint CDS of SOHO and SXT of Yohkoh observations of a decaying post-flare loop system are presented. The SXT images were used to explain some peculiar structural features visible in the examined CDS raster, resulting from the rapid evolution of the observed system and from the way the CDS rasters are built. The SXT data was also used to determine the time evolution of the temperature and the emission measure of the hot part of the system during its decay. The CDS data, with a very good temperature coverage, contains a density sensitive line pair of Fe XIV which was used for electron density analysis and a temperature sensitive line pair of Fe XVI and Si XII which was used to study the temperature structure of the loop system. From the integrated intensities of selected lines the emission measures were calculated. From these measurements we estimated the filling factor of the loop system in Fe XIV line.

  15. MODELING OF REFLECTIVE PROPAGATING SLOW-MODE WAVE IN A FLARING LOOP

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, X.; Yuan, D.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Keppens, R.; Xia, C.

    2015-11-01

    Quasi-periodic propagating intensity disturbances have been observed in large coronal loops in extreme ultraviolet images over a decade, and are widely accepted to be slow magnetosonic waves. However, spectroscopic observations from Hinode/EIS revealed their association with persistent coronal upflows, making this interpretation debatable. We perform a 2.5D magnetohydrodynamic simulation to imitate the chromospheric evaporation and the following reflected patterns in a flare loop. Our model encompasses the corona, transition region, and chromosphere. We demonstrate that the quasi periodic propagating intensity variations captured by the synthesized Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 131, 94 Å emission images match the previous observations well. With particle tracers in the simulation, we confirm that these quasi periodic propagating intensity variations consist of reflected slow mode waves and mass flows with an average speed of 310 km s{sup −1} in an 80 Mm length loop with an average temperature of 9 MK. With the synthesized Doppler shift velocity and intensity maps of the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation Fe xix line emission, we confirm that these reflected slow mode waves are propagating waves.

  16. Towards the circuit theory of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, V. V.; Stepanov, A. V.

    1992-06-01

    The coalescence of a flare loop and a filament is presently used to illustrate magnetic-loop reemergence and the correct application of the generalized form of Ohm's law for solar flares. Flare energy release entails large current values, a nonsteady-state process, and the existence of a neutral component in a flare plasma. Current dissipation furnishes effective Joule heating of the plasma and particle acceleration in a solar flare. Due to the decisive role played in the energy release process by ion-atom collisions, flare loop resistance can grow by 8-10 orders of magnitude. The energy release from the upper part of a flare loop stimulates powerful energy release from the chromospheric level.

  17. The dynamo theory of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, V. V.; Stepanov, A. V.

    1991-04-01

    It is shown that the main problems of the dynamo theory of solar flares; namely, the unrealistically great current growth time and the current interruption mechanism, can be solved by assuming the emergence of magnetic loops with current and by the correct application of Ohm's law. A generalized Ohm's law for solar flares is obtained, and prerequisites for flare energy release are proposed. Coalescence of a flare loop and of a filament is considered as an example, and it is shown that the current dissipation increases dramatically as compared with that in completely ionized plasma, providing effective Joule heating of the plasma and particle acceleration in a solar flare. The ion-atom collisions play the decisive role in the energy release process, leading to an 8-10-order-of-magnitude increase in the flare loop resistance. The energy release emerging from the upper part of a flare loop stimulates a powerful energy release in the chromosphere.

  18. Hot spine loops and the nature of a late-phase solar flare

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xudong; Todd Hoeksema, J.; Liu, Yang; Aulanier, Guillaume; Su, Yingna; Hannah, Iain G.; Hock, Rachel A.

    2013-12-01

    The fan-spine magnetic topology is believed to be responsible for many curious features in solar explosive events. A spine field line links distinct flux domains, but direct observation of such a feature has been rare. Here we report a unique event observed by the Solar Dynamic Observatory where a set of hot coronal loops (over 10 MK) connected to a quasi-circular chromospheric ribbon at one end and a remote brightening at the other. Magnetic field extrapolation suggests that these loops are partly tracers of the evolving spine field line. Continuous slipping- and null-point-type reconnections were likely at work, energizing the loop plasma and transferring magnetic flux within and across the fan quasi-separatrix layer. We argue that the initial reconnection is of the 'breakout' type, which then transitioned to a more violent flare reconnection with an eruption from the fan dome. Significant magnetic field changes are expected and indeed ensued. This event also features an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) late phase, i.e., a delayed secondary emission peak in warm EUV lines (about 2-7 MK). We show that this peak comes from the cooling of large post-reconnection loops beside and above the compact fan, a direct product of eruption in such topological settings. The long cooling time of the large arcades contributes to the long delay; additional heating may also be required. Our result demonstrates the critical nature of cross-scale magnetic coupling—topological change in a sub-system may lead to explosions on a much larger scale.

  19. Where is the chromospheric response to conductive energy input from a hot pre-flare coronal loop?

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, Marina; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Simões, Paulo J. A.

    2014-07-01

    Before the onset of a flare is observed in hard X-rays, there is often a prolonged pre-flare or pre-heating phase with no detectable hard X-ray emission but pronounced soft X-ray emission, which suggests that energy is already being released and deposited into the corona and chromosphere at this stage. This work analyzes the temporal evolution of coronal source heating and the chromospheric response during this pre-heating phase to investigate the origin and nature of early energy release and transport during a solar flare. Simultaneous X-ray, EUV, and microwave observations of a well-observed flare with a prolonged pre-heating phase are analyzed to study the time evolution of the thermal emission and to determine the onset of particle acceleration. During the 20 minute duration of the pre-heating phase we find no hint of accelerated electrons in either hard X-rays or microwave emission. However, the total energy budget during the pre-heating phase suggests that energy must be supplied to the flaring loop to sustain the observed temperature and emission measure. Under the assumption of this energy being transported toward the chromosphere via thermal conduction, significant energy deposition at the chromosphere is expected. However, no detectable increase of the emission in the AIA wavelength channels sensitive to chromospheric temperatures is observed. The observations suggest energy release and deposition in the flaring loop before the onset of particle acceleration, yet a model in which energy is conducted to the chromosphere and subsequent heating of the chromosphere is not supported by the observations.

  20. PROPERTIES OF THE ACCELERATION REGIONS IN SEVERAL LOOP-STRUCTURED SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Jingnan; Piana, Michele; Gordon Emslie, A.; Massone, Anna Maria E-mail: piana@dima.unige.it E-mail: annamaria.massone@cnr.it

    2012-08-10

    Using RHESSI hard X-ray imaging spectroscopy observations, we analyze electron flux maps for a number of extended coronal loop flares. For each event, we fit a collisional model with an extended acceleration region to the observed variation of loop length with electron energy E, resulting in estimates of the plasma density in, and longitudinal extent of, the acceleration region. These quantities in turn allow inference of the number of particles within the acceleration region and hence the filling factor f-the ratio of the emitting volume to the volume that encompasses the emitting region(s). We obtain values of f that lie mostly between 0.1 and 1.0; the (geometric) mean value is f = 0.20 Multiplication-Sign / Division-Sign 3.9, somewhat less than, but nevertheless consistent with, unity. Further, coupling information on the number of particles in the acceleration region with information on the total rate of acceleration of particles above a certain reference energy (obtained from spatially integrated hard X-ray data) also allows inference of the specific acceleration rate (electron s{sup -1} per ambient electron above the chosen reference energy). We obtain a (geometric) mean value of the specific acceleration rate {eta}(20 keV) =(6.0 Multiplication-Sign / Division-Sign 3.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} electrons s{sup -1} per ambient electron; this value has implications both for the global electrodynamics associated with replenishment of the acceleration region and for the nature of the particle acceleration process.

  1. THE SPECIFIC ACCELERATION RATE IN LOOP-STRUCTURED SOLAR FLARES-IMPLICATIONS FOR ELECTRON ACCELERATION MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jingnan; Emslie, A. Gordon; Piana, Michele E-mail: piana@dima.unige.it

    2013-03-20

    We analyze electron flux maps based on RHESSI hard X-ray imaging spectroscopy data for a number of extended coronal-loop flare events. For each event, we determine the variation of the characteristic loop length L with electron energy E, and we fit this observed behavior with models that incorporate an extended acceleration region and an exterior 'propagation' region, and which may include collisional modification of the accelerated electron spectrum inside the acceleration region. The models are characterized by two parameters: the plasma density n in, and the longitudinal extent L{sub 0} of, the acceleration region. Determination of the best-fit values of these parameters permits inference of the volume that encompasses the acceleration region and of the total number of particles within it. It is then straightforward to compute values for the emission filling factor and for the specific acceleration rate (electrons s{sup -1} per ambient electron above a chosen reference energy). For the 24 events studied, the range of inferred filling factors is consistent with a value of unity. The inferred mean value of the specific acceleration rate above E{sub 0} = 20 keV is {approx}10{sup -2} s{sup -1}, with a 1{sigma} spread of about a half-order-of-magnitude above and below this value. We compare these values with the predictions of several models, including acceleration by large-scale, weak (sub-Dreicer) fields, by strong (super-Dreicer) electric fields in a reconnecting current sheet, and by stochastic acceleration processes.

  2. Turbulent pitch-angle scattering and diffusive transport of hard X-ray-producing electrons in flaring coronal loops

    SciTech Connect

    Kontar, Eduard P.; Bian, Nicolas H.; Emslie, A. Gordon; Vilmer, Nicole E-mail: emslieg@wku.edu

    2014-01-10

    Recent observations from RHESSI have revealed that the number of non-thermal electrons in the coronal part of a flaring loop can exceed the number of electrons required to explain the hard X-ray-emitting footpoints of the same flaring loop. Such sources cannot, therefore, be interpreted on the basis of the standard collisional transport model, in which electrons stream along the loop while losing their energy through collisions with the ambient plasma; additional physical processes, to either trap or scatter the energetic electrons, are required. Motivated by this and other observations that suggest that high-energy electrons are confined to the coronal region of the source, we consider turbulent pitch-angle scattering of fast electrons off low-frequency magnetic fluctuations as a confinement mechanism, modeled as a spatial diffusion parallel to the mean magnetic field. In general, turbulent scattering leads to a reduction of the collisional stopping distance of non-thermal electrons along the loop, and hence to an enhancement of the coronal hard X-ray source relative to the footpoints. The variation of source size L with electron energy E becomes weaker than the quadratic behavior pertinent to collisional transport, with the slope of L(E) depending directly on the mean free path λ associated with the non-collisional scattering mechanism. Comparing the predictions of the model with observations, we find that λ ∼ (10{sup 8}-10{sup 9}) cm for ∼30 keV, less than the length of a typical flaring loop and smaller than, or comparable to, the size of the electron acceleration region.

  3. Influence of magnetic field structure on the conduction cooling of flare loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Sturrock, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    A simple model facilitates calculation of the influence of magnetic-field configuration on the conduction cooling rate of a hot post-flare coronal plasma. The magnetic field is taken to be that produced by a line dipole or point dipole at an arbitrary depth below the chromosphere. For the high temperatures (at least 10 million K) produced by flares, the plasma may remain static and isobaric. The influence of the field is such as to increase the heat flux (per unit area) into the chromosphere, but to decrease the total conduction cooling of the flare plasma. This leads to a significant enhancement of the total energy radiated by the flare plasma.

  4. TEMPORAL VARIATIONS OF X-RAY SOLAR FLARE LOOPS: LENGTH, CORPULENCE, POSITION, TEMPERATURE, PLASMA PRESSURE, AND SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey, Natasha L. S.; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2013-04-01

    The spatial and spectral properties of three solar flare coronal X-ray loops are studied before, during, and after the peak X-ray emission. Using observations from the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), we deduce the temporal changes in emitting X-ray length, corpulence, volume, position, number density, and thermal pressure. We observe a decrease in the loop length, width, and volume before the X-ray peak, and an increasing number density and thermal pressure. After the X-ray peak, volume increases and loop corpulence grows due to increasing width. The volume variations are more pronounced than the position variations, often known as magnetic field line contraction. We believe this is the first dedicated study examining the temporal evolution of X-ray loop lengths and widths. Collectively, the observations also show for the first time three temporal phases given by peaks in temperature, X-ray emission, and thermal pressure, with the minimum volume coinciding with the X-ray peak. Although the volume of the flaring plasma decreases before the peak in X-ray emission, the relationship between temperature and volume does not support simple compressive heating in a collapsing magnetic trap model. Within a low {beta} plasma, shrinking loop widths perpendicular to the guiding field can be explained by squeezing the magnetic field threading the region. Plasma heating leads to chromospheric evaporation and growing number density. This produces increasing thermal pressure and decreasing loop lengths as electrons interact at shorter distances and we believe after the X-ray peak, the increasing loop corpulence.

  5. Origins and effects of solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Rust, D.M. ||

    1993-12-31

    During the 1989 - 1991 peak of solar activity, geomagnetic storms from interplanetary shocks caused a massive failure in the Canadian power grid, minor failures in other power eqipment, and many communications disruptions and satellite malfunctions. The proton storms would have been lethal for unshielded space travellers. Had the power managers been given a credible, timely forecast of the solar storm, they could have protected their generating equipment and the grid. They do not keep protective circuits in place full-time because that reduces efficiency and increases the cost of power distribution. Nor will astronauts on the moon or in deep space confine themselves full-time to thick-walled, radiation-resistant closets. To enable manned deep space exploration we have to find a way to determine what happens in solar flares. Only this will improve the forecasts. Expensive and restrictive protective measures would then have to be applied only when a major flare is clearly imminent. There is no generally accepted flare theory or description of the pre-flare state or of the instabilities. The Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) cleared up many questions about electromagnetic flare emissions and the structure of the flaring atmosphere, but the dynamic of the magnetic fields is still a mystery.

  6. X-Ray Source Motions and Their Implications for Flare Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2008-01-01

    RHESSI observations have revealed a downward contraction of solar flare loops followed by upward expansion. In some flares a pair of above-the-looptop sources is observed, one just above the top of the cooler flare loops and the other a discrete source well above the looptops characterized by an effective temperature gradient increasing toward lower altitudes. In one flare the higher, temperature-inverted coronal source sped outward at a speed consistent with that of a coronal mass ejection associated with the flare. In some flares with minimal preheating (early impulsive flares), nonthermal X-ray sources have been observed to propagate downward and then upward along the legs of the flare loop. I will discuss the implications of all of these X-ray source motions for flare models, and their use as diagnostics of the evolution of the physical conditions in flares.

  7. Using coronal loops to reconstruct the magnetic field of an active region before and after a major flare

    SciTech Connect

    Malanushenko, A.; Schrijver, C. J.; DeRosa, M. L.; Wheatland, M. S.

    2014-03-10

    The shapes of solar coronal loops are sensitive to the presence of electrical currents that are the carriers of the non-potential energy available for impulsive activity. We use this information in a new method for modeling the coronal magnetic field of active region (AR) 11158 as a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF). The observations used are coronal images around the time of major flare activity on 2011 February 15, together with the surface line-of-sight magnetic field measurements. The data are from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The model fields are constrained to approximate the coronal loop configurations as closely as possible, while also being subject to the force-free constraints. The method does not use transverse photospheric magnetic field components as input and is thereby distinct from methods for modeling NLFFFs based on photospheric vector magnetograms. We validate the method using observations of AR 11158 at a time well before major flaring and subsequently review the field evolution just prior to and following an X2.2 flare and associated eruption. The models indicate that the energy released during the instability is about 1 × 10{sup 32} erg, consistent with what is needed to power such a large eruptive flare. Immediately prior to the eruption, the model field contains a compact sigmoid bundle of twisted flux that is not present in the post-eruption models, which is consistent with the observations. The core of that model structure is twisted by ≈0.9 full turns about its axis.

  8. Influence of magnetic field structure on the conduction cooling of flare loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Sturrock, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    A simple model facilitates calculation of the influence of magnetic field configuration on the conduction cooling rate of a hot post-flare coronal plasma. The magnetic field is taken to be that produced by a line dipole or point dipole at an arbitrary depth below the chromosphere. For the high temperatures (T greater than or equal to 10 to the 7th power K) produced by flares, the plasma may remain static and isobaric. The influence of the field is such as to increase the heat flux (per unit area) into the chromosphere, but to decrease the total conduction cooling of the flare plasma. This leads to a significant enhancement of the total energy radiated by the flare plasma.

  9. Multi-instrument observations of a failed flare eruption associated with MHD waves in a loop bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisticò, G.; Polito, V.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Del Zanna, G.

    2017-04-01

    Context. We present observations of a B7.9-class flare that occurred on the 24th January, 2015, using the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and the X-Ray Telescope of Hinode. The flare triggers the eruption of a dense cool plasma blob as seen in AIA 171 Å, which is unable to completely break out and remains confined within a local bundle of active region loops. During this process, transverse oscillations of the threads are observed. The cool plasma is then observed to descend back to the chromosphere along each loop strand. At the same time, a larger diffuse co-spatial loop observed in the hot wavebands of SDO/AIA and Hinode/XRT is formed, exhibiting periodic intensity variations along its length. Aims: The formation and evolution of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves depend upon the values of the local plasma parameters (e.g. density, temperature and magnetic field), which can hence be inferred by coronal seismology. In this study we aim to assess how the observed MHD modes are affected by the variation of density and temperature. Methods: We combined analysis of EUV/X-ray imaging and spectroscopy using SDO/AIA, Hinode/EIS and XRT. Results: The transverse oscillations of the cool loop threads are interpreted in terms of vertically polarised kink oscillations. The fitting procedure applied to the loop displacement time series gives a period of 3.5 to 4 min, and an amplitude of 5 Mm. The oscillations are strongly damped showing very low quality factor (1.5-2), which is defined as the ratio of the damping time and the oscillation period. The weak variation of the period of the kink wave, which is estimated from the fitting analysis, is in agreement with the density variations due to the presence of the plasma blob inferred from the intensity light curve at 171 Å. The coexisting intensity oscillations along the hot loop are interpreted as a slow MHD wave with a period of 10 min and phase

  10. Non-Maxwellian distribution functions in flaring coronal loops - Comparison of Landau-Fokker-Planck and BGK solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ljepojevic, N. N.; Macneice, P.

    1988-01-01

    The high-velocity tail of the electron distribution has been calculated by solving the high-velocity form of the Landau equation for a thermal structure representative of a flaring coronal loop. These calculations show an enhancement of the tail population above Maxwellian for electrons moving down the temperature gradient. The results obtained are used to test the reliability of the BGK approximation. The comparison shows that the BGK technique can estimate contributions to the heat flux from the high-energy tail to within an order of magnitude.

  11. Effects of Coulomb collisions on cyclotron maser and plasma wave growth in magnetic loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Russell J.; Petrosian, Vahe

    1990-01-01

    The evolution of nonthermal electrons accelerated in magnetic loops is determined by solving the kinetic equation, including magnetic field convergence and Coulomb collisions in order to determine the effects of these interactions on the induced cyclotron maser and plasma wave growth. It is found that the growth rates are larger and the possibility of cyclotron maser action is stronger for smaller loop column density, for larger magnetic field convergence, for a more isotropic injected electron pitch angle distribution, and for more impulsive acceleration. For modest values of the column density in the coronal portion of a flaring loop, the growth rates of instabilities are significantly reduced, and the reduction is much larger for the cyclotron modes than for the plasma wave modes. The rapid decrease in the growth rates with increasing loop column density suggests that, in flare loops when such phenomena occur, the densities are lower than commonly accepted.

  12. Closed coronal structures. V - Gasdynamic models of flaring loops and comparison with SMM observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peres, G.; Serio, S.; Vaiana, G.; Acton, L.; Leibacher, J.; Rosner, R.; Pallavicini, R.

    1983-01-01

    A time-dependent one-dimensional code incorporating energy, momentum and mass conservation equations, and taking the entire solar atmospheric structure into account, is used to investigate the hydrodynamic response of confined magnetic structures to strong heating perturbations. Model calculation results are compared with flare observations which include the light curves of spectral lines formed over a wide range of coronal flare temperatures, as well as determinations of Doppler shifts for the high temperature plasma. It is shown that the numerical simulation predictions are in good overall agreement with the observed flare coronal plasma evolution, correctly reproducing the temporal profile of X-ray spectral lines and their relative intensities. The predicted upflow velocities support the interpretation of the blueshifts as due to evaporation of chromospheric material.

  13. Closed coronal structures. V - Gasdynamic models of flaring loops and comparison with SMM observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peres, G.; Serio, S.; Vaiana, G.; Acton, L.; Leibacher, J.; Rosner, R.; Pallavicini, R.

    1983-01-01

    A time-dependent one-dimensional code incorporating energy, momentum and mass conservation equations, and taking the entire solar atmospheric structure into account, is used to investigate the hydrodynamic response of confined magnetic structures to strong heating perturbations. Model calculation results are compared with flare observations which include the light curves of spectral lines formed over a wide range of coronal flare temperatures, as well as determinations of Doppler shifts for the high temperature plasma. It is shown that the numerical simulation predictions are in good overall agreement with the observed flare coronal plasma evolution, correctly reproducing the temporal profile of X-ray spectral lines and their relative intensities. The predicted upflow velocities support the interpretation of the blueshifts as due to evaporation of chromospheric material.

  14. Transient activity in the loop prominence system of a flare active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagare, S. P.; Nagabhushana, B. S.; Aleem, P. S. M.

    1989-09-01

    Solar limb observations of the activity in a loop prominence system associated with an active region were obtained on February 2, 1984. The activity was observed for a total duration of over seven hours of which the maximum phase lasted for about an hour. From a series of Ca II K prominence spectroheliograms taken during this phase, the individual loops appear to experience a sequence of activity; the brightening of kernel, brightening of portions of the loop, motion of the enhanced brightenings along the legs of the loop and a diffuse appearance of the loop at the end phase. The details of these phenomena and other associated activity are described.

  15. EVIDENCE OF THERMAL CONDUCTION SUPPRESSION IN A SOLAR FLARING LOOP BY CORONAL SEISMOLOGY OF SLOW-MODE WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tongjiang; Ofman, Leon; Provornikova, Elena; Sun, Xudong; Davila, Joseph M.

    2015-09-20

    Analysis of a longitudinal wave event observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory is presented. A time sequence of 131 Å images reveals that a C-class flare occurred at one footpoint of a large loop and triggered an intensity disturbance (enhancement) propagating along it. The spatial features and temporal evolution suggest that a fundamental standing slow-mode wave could be set up quickly after meeting of two initial disturbances from the opposite footpoints. The oscillations have a period of ∼12 minutes and a decay time of ∼9 minutes. The measured phase speed of 500 ± 50 km s{sup −1} matches the sound speed in the heated loop of ∼10 MK, confirming that the observed waves are of slow mode. We derive the time-dependent temperature and electron density wave signals from six AIA extreme-ultraviolet channels, and find that they are nearly in phase. The measured polytropic index from the temperature and density perturbations is 1.64 ± 0.08 close to the adiabatic index of 5/3 for an ideal monatomic gas. The interpretation based on a 1D linear MHD model suggests that the thermal conductivity is suppressed by at least a factor of 3 in the hot flare loop at 9 MK and above. The viscosity coefficient is determined by coronal seismology from the observed wave when only considering the compressive viscosity dissipation. We find that to interpret the rapid wave damping, the classical compressive viscosity coefficient needs to be enhanced by a factor of 15 as the upper limit.

  16. Generation of a flare loop structure and ejection of magnetic flux from an erupting laboratory arched magnetic flux rope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, S.; Gekelman, W. N.

    2011-12-01

    A laboratory plasma experiment has been built to generate an arched magnetic flux rope (AMFR) which is essentially an arch-shaped, current-carrying, magnetized plasma structure. Coronal loops and prominences are the main examples of solar AMFRs that frequently erupt and evolve into more energetic events such as flares and coronal mass ejections. Numerous small-scale AMFRs are also observed in the solar corona. In order to capture the important micro-physics of an erupting AMFR, the laboratory experiment has been designed by careful scaling of the solar plasma parameters. The laboratory AMFR (n ~ 1019 m-3, Te ~ 10 eV, L ~ 0.5 m) is produced using a LaB6 plasma source in presence of an arched vacuum magnetic field (B ~ 1 kG) and it evolves in a large magnetized plasma (1.0 m diameter, 4.5 m long, n ~ 1018 m-3, Te ~ 4 eV, B = 25-150 G). Two laser beams (1064 nm, ~0.5 J/pulse) strike movable carbon targets placed behind the electrodes to generate controlled plasma flows from the footpoints of the AMFR. The laser generated flows can mimic a variety of plasma flow conditions that exist on the sun and they can trigger the AMFR eruption by injecting dense plasma and magnetic flux in the AMFR. The experiment runs continuously with a 0.5 Hz repetition rate and is highly reproducible. Thus, several thousands of identical eruptions are routinely generated and evolution of the magnetic field, density, and plasma temperature is recorded in 3D with a high spatiotemporal resolution ( dx = 1 mm, dt= 20 ns) using movable diagnostic probes. Fast-camera images of the erupting AMFR demonstrate striking similarities between laboratory and solar plasma structures, most notably the observation of a flare-loop like structure following the eruption of the laboratory AMFR. The eruption of the AMFR can be initiated either by the laser generated intense flows or by the presence of a strong background magnetic field (B > 50 G ~ magnetic field at the leading edge of the AMFR). In both scenarios

  17. Plasma motions and non-thermal line broadening in flaring twisted coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordovskyy, M.; Kontar, E. P.; Browning, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Observation of coronal extreme ultra-violet (EUV) spectral lines sensitive to different temperatures offers an opportunity to evaluate the thermal structure and flows in flaring atmospheres. This, in turn, can be used to estimate the partitioning between the thermal and kinetic energies released in flares. Aims: Our aim is to forward-model large-scale (50-10 000 km) velocity distributions to interpret non-thermal broadening of different spectral EUV lines observed in flares. The developed models allow us to understand the origin of the observed spectral line shifts and broadening, and link these features to particular physical phenomena in flaring atmospheres. Methods: We use ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) to derive unstable twisted magnetic fluxtube configurations in a gravitationally stratified atmosphere. The evolution of these twisted fluxtubes is followed using resistive MHD with anomalous resistivity depending on the local density and temperature. The model also takes thermal conduction and radiative losses in the continuum into account. The model allows us to evaluate average velocities and velocity dispersions, which would be interpreted as non-thermal velocities in observations, at different temperatures for different parts of the models. Results: Our models show qualitative and quantitative agreement with observations. Thus, the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity dispersions demonstrate substantial correlation with the temperature, increasing from about 20-30 km s-1 around 1 MK to about 200-400 km s-1 near 10-20 MK. The average LOS velocities also correlate with velocity dispersions, although they demonstrate a very strong scattering compared to the observations. We also note that near footpoints the velocity dispersions across the magnetic field are systematically lower than those along the field. We conclude that the correlation between the flow velocities, velocity dispersions, and temperatures are likely to indicate that the same heating

  18. Modelling loop-top X-ray source and reconnection outflows in solar flares with intense lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jiayong; Li, Yutong; Wang, Xiaogang; Wang, Jiaqi; Dong, Quanli; Xiao, Chijie; Wang, Shoujun; Liu, Xun; Zhang, Lei; An, Lin; Wang, Feilu; Zhu, Jianqiang; Gu, Yuan; He, Xiantu; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Jie

    2010-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a process by which oppositely directed magnetic field lines passing through a plasma undergo dramatic rearrangement, converting magnetic potential into kinetic energy and heat. It is believed to play an important role in many plasma phenomena including solar flares, star formation and other astrophysical events, laser-driven plasma jets, and fusion plasma instabilities. Because of the large differences of scale between laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, it is often difficult to extrapolate the reconnection phenomena studied in one environment to those observed in the other. In some cases, however, scaling laws do permit reliable connections to made, such as the experimental simulation of interactions between the solar wind and the Earth's magnetosphere. Here we report well-scaled laboratory experiments that reproduce loop-top-like X-ray source emission by reconnection outflows interacting with a solid target. Our experiments exploit the mega-gauss-scale magnetic field generated by interaction of a high-intensity laser with a plasma to reconstruct a magnetic reconnection topology similar to that which occurs in solar flares. We also identify the separatrix and diffusion regions associated with reconnection in which ions become decoupled from electrons on a scale of the ion inertial length.

  19. Solar flare model atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Fisher, George H.

    1993-01-01

    Solar flare model atmospheres computed under the assumption of energetic equilibrium in the chromosphere are presented. The models use a static, one-dimensional plane parallel geometry and are designed within a physically self-consistent coronal loop. Assumed flare heating mechanisms include collisions from a flux of non-thermal electrons and x-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona. The heating by energetic electrons accounts explicitly for variations of the ionized fraction with depth in the atmosphere. X-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona incorporates a flare loop geometry by approximating distant portions of the loop with a series of point sources, while treating the loop leg closest to the chromospheric footpoint in the plane-parallel approximation. Coronal flare heating leads to increased heat conduction, chromospheric evaporation and subsequent changes in coronal pressure; these effects are included self-consistently in the models. Cooling in the chromosphere is computed in detail for the important optically thick HI, CaII and MgII transitions using the non-LTE prescription in the program MULTI. Hydrogen ionization rates from x-ray photo-ionization and collisional ionization by non-thermal electrons are included explicitly in the rate equations. The models are computed in the 'impulsive' and 'equilibrium' limits, and in a set of intermediate 'evolving' states. The impulsive atmospheres have the density distribution frozen in pre-flare configuration, while the equilibrium models assume the entire atmosphere is in hydrostatic and energetic equilibrium. The evolving atmospheres represent intermediate stages where hydrostatic equilibrium has been established in the chromosphere and corona, but the corona is not yet in energetic equilibrium with the flare heating source. Thus, for example, chromospheric evaporation is still in the process of occurring.

  20. Effects of solar flares on the ionosphere of Mars.

    PubMed

    Mendillo, Michael; Withers, Paul; Hinson, David; Rishbeth, Henry; Reinisch, Bodo

    2006-02-24

    All planetary atmospheres respond to the enhanced x-rays and ultraviolet (UV) light emitted from the Sun during a flare. Yet only on Earth are observations so continuous that the consequences of these essentially unpredictable events can be measured reliably. Here, we report observations of solar flares, causing up to 200% enhancements to the ionosphere of Mars, as recorded by the Mars Global Surveyor in April 2001. Modeling the altitude dependence of these effects requires that relative enhancements in the soft x-ray fluxes far exceed those in the UV.

  1. Mass ejections. [during solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.; Hildner, E.; Hansen, R. T.; Dryer, M.; Mcclymont, A. N.; Mckenna-Lawlor, S. M. P.; Mclean, D. J.; Schmahl, E. J.; Steinolfson, R. S.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

    1980-01-01

    Observations and model simulations of solar mass ejection phenomena are examined in an investigation of flare processes. Consideration is given to Skylab and other observations of flare-associated sprays, eruptive prominences, surges and coronal transients, and to MHD, gas dynamic and magnetic loop models developed to account for them. Magnetic forces are found to confine spray material, which originates in preexisting active-region filaments, within steadily expanding loops, while surges follow unmoving, preexisting magnetic field lines. Simulations of effects of a sudden pressure pulse at the bottom of the corona are found to exhibit many characteristics of coronal transients associated with flares, and impulsive heating low in the chromosphere is found to be able to account for surges. The importance of the magnetic field as the ultimate source of energy which drives eruptive phenomena as well as flares is pointed out.

  2. Crystal packing effects on protein loops.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Chaya S; Pollack, Rena M

    2005-07-01

    The effects of crystal packing on protein loop structures are examined by (1) a comparison of loops in proteins that have been crystallized in alternate packing arrangements, and (2) theoretical prediction of loops both with and without the inclusion of the crystal environment. Results show that in a minority of cases, loop geometries are dependent on crystal packing effects. Explicit representation of the crystal environment in a loop prediction algorithm can be used to model these effects and to reconstruct the structures, and relative energies, of a loop in alternative packing environments. By comparing prediction results with and without the inclusion of the crystal environment, the loop prediction algorithm can further be used to identify cases in which a crystal structure does not represent the most stable state of a loop in solution. We anticipate that this capability has implications for structural biology.

  3. Microwave signatures from a reconnecting plasma pinch, with application to loop flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mok, Y.

    1983-01-01

    A calculation is made of microwave signature of a cylindrical plasma pinch undergoing magnetic reconnection, a process which occurs in many astrophysical situations, such as solar flares. Depending on the viewing angle and the average energy of the accelerated electrons, the microwaves from this betatron-like source show various amounts of circular polarization. The degree of polarization is shown to be frequency dependent, and the sense of polarization is sometimes reversed. The power spectrum is predicted to have several interesting properties, which can be compared with high-resolution measurements.

  4. Elongation of Flare Ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jiong; Longcope, Dana W.; Cassak, Paul A.; Priest, Eric R.

    2017-03-01

    We present an analysis of the apparent elongation motion of flare ribbons along the polarity inversion line (PIL), as well as the shear of flare loops in several two-ribbon flares. Flare ribbons and loops spread along the PIL at a speed ranging from a few to a hundred km s‑1. The shear measured from conjugate footpoints is consistent with the measurement from flare loops, and both show the decrease of shear toward a potential field as a flare evolves and ribbons and loops spread along the PIL. Flares exhibiting fast bidirectional elongation appear to have a strong shear, which may indicate a large magnetic guide field relative to the reconnection field in the coronal current sheet. We discuss how the analysis of ribbon motion could help infer properties in the corona where reconnection takes place.

  5. Effect of flares on the chemical composition of exoplanets atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venot, O.; Decin, L.

    2015-10-01

    M stars are very abundant in our Galaxy, and very likely harbour the majority of planetary systems. But a particularity of M stars is that they are the most active class of stars. Indeed, they experience stellar variability such as flares. These violent and unpredictable outbursts originate from the photosphere and are caused by magnetic processus. During such an event, the energy emitted by the star can vary by several orders of magnitude for the whole wavelength range. It results in an enhancement of the H# emission and of the continuum. Different studies on the effect of flares on exoplanets have already been conducted [1, 2]. Here we are interested in the effect of a flare on the atmospheric composition of a warm Neptune orbiting around an M star. Using the stellar flux of AD Leo recorded during a flare event [1] and the chemical model of [3], we have studied the impact on the atmosphere. We have also computed the synthetic spectra assuming that such an event occurs during a transit. We will present these results.

  6. The extreme Halloween 2003 solar flares (and Bastille Day, 2000 Flare), ICMEs, and resultant extreme ionospheric effects: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Mannucci, A. J.; Iijima, B.; Guarnieri, F. L.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Judge, D. L.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Pap, J.

    Extreme solar flares can cause extreme ionospheric effects. The Oct 28, 2003 flare caused a ˜25 TECU (a total electron content unit is 10 16 electron/m 2 column density), or a ˜30%, increase in the local noon equatorial ionospheric column density. This enhancement occurred within ˜5 min. This TEC increase was ˜5 times the TEC increases detected for the Oct 29, 2003, Nov 4, 2003, and the July 14, 2000 (Bastille Day) flares. In the 260-340 Å EUV wavelength range, the Oct 28 flare peak count rate was more than twice as large as for the other three flares. Another strong ionospheric effect is the delayed influence (due to solar wind propagation) of interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) electric fields on the ionosphere. For the Oct 28 and 29 flares, the associated ICMEs propagated from the sun to the Earth at particularly high speeds. The prompt penetration of the interplanetary electric field caused the dayside equatorial ionospheric to be strongly convected upward. This led to enhanced TEC to values >300% nominal values in ˜2 h. Proposed mechanisms for this TEC enhancement will be discussed.

  7. Broadband microwave sub-second pulsations in an expanding coronal loop of the 2011 August 10 flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészárosová, H.; Rybák, J.; Kashapova, L.; Gömöry, P.; Tokhchukova, S.; Myshyakov, I.

    2016-09-01

    Aims: We studied the characteristic physical properties and behavior of broadband microwave sub-second pulsations observed in an expanding coronal loop during the GOES C2.4 solar flare on 2011 August 10. Methods: The complex microwave dynamic spectrum and the expanding loop images were analyzed with the help of SDO/AIA/HMI, RHESSI, and the STEREO/SECCHI-EUVI data processing software, wavelet analysis methods, the GX Simulator tool, and the NAFE method. Results: We found sub-second pulsations and other different burst groups in the complex radio spectrum. The broadband (bandwidth about 1 GHz) sub-second pulsations (temporal period range 0.07-1.49 s, no characteristic dominant period) lasted 70 s in the frequency range 4-7 GHz. These pulsations were not correlated at their individual frequencies, had no measurable frequency drift, and zero polarization. In these pulsations, we found the signatures of fast sausage magnetoacoustic waves with the characteristic periods of 0.7 and 2 s. The other radio bursts showed their characteristic frequency drifts in the range of -262-520 MHz s-1. They helped us to derive average values of 20-80 G for the coronal magnetic field strength in the place of radio emission. It was revealed that the microwave event belongs to an expanding coronal loop with twisted sub-structures observed in the 131, 94, and 193 Å SDO/AIA channels. Their slit-time diagrams were compared with the location of the radio source at 5.7 GHz to realize that the EUV intensity of the expanding loop increased just before the radio source triggering. We reveal two EUV bidirectional flows that are linked with the start time of the loop expansion. Their positions were close to the radio source and propagated with velocities within a range of 30-117 km s-1. Conclusions: We demonstrate that periodic regime of the electron acceleration in a model of the quasi-periodic magnetic reconnection might be able to explain physical properties and behavior of the sub

  8. Using Gamma-Ray and Neutron Emission to Determine Solar Flare Accelerated Particle Spectra and Composition and the Conditions Within the Flare Magnetic Loop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    computer codes we have cal- culated the yields of deexcitation lines, escaping neutron spec- tra and the neutron capture line for monoenergetic ...USING GAMMA-RAYAND NEUTRON EMISSION TO DETERMINE SOLAR FLARE ACCELERATED PARTICLE SPECTRA AND COMPOSITION AND THE CONDITIONS WITHIN THE FLARE...California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA Received 2006 May 4; accepted 2006 August 23 ABSTRACT The measurable quantities associated with -ray and neutron

  9. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF FLARING LOOPS OBSERVED BY NOBEYAMA RADIOHELIOGRAPH. I. COMPARISON OF LOOPTOP AND FOOTPOINTS

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Guangli; Nakajima, Hiroshi E-mail: nakaji15@dia.janis.or.jp

    2009-05-01

    Twenty-four events with looplike structures at 17 and 34 GHz are selected from the flare list of Nobeyama Radioheliograph. We obtained the brightness temperatures at 17 and 34 GHz, the polarization degrees at 17 GHz, and the power-law spectral indices at the radio peak time for one looptop (LT) and two footpoints (FPs) of each event. We also calculated the magnetic field strengths and the column depths of nonthermal electrons in the LT and FPs of each event, using the equations modified from the gyrosynchrotron equations by Dulk. The main statistical results from those data are summarized as follows. (1) The spectral indices, the brightness temperatures at 17 and 34 GHz, the polarization degrees at 17 GHz, the calculated magnetic field strengths, and the calculated column densities of nonthermal electrons are always positively correlated between the LT and the two FPs of the selected events. (2) About one-half of the events have the brightest LT at 17 and 34 GHz. (3) The spectral indices in the two FPs are larger (softer) than those in the corresponding LT in most events. (4) The calculated magnetic field strengths in the two FPs are always larger than those in the corresponding LT. (5) Most of the events have the same positive or negative polarization sense in the LT and the two FPs. (6) The brightness temperatures at 17 and 34 GHz in each of the LT and the two FPs statistically decrease with their spectral indices and the calculated magnetic field strengths, but increase with their calculated column densities of nonthermal electrons. Moreover, we try to discuss the possible causes of the present statistical results.

  10. Chromospheric magnetic field and density structure measurements using hard X-rays in a flaring coronal loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontar, E. P.; Hannah, I. G.; MacKinnon, A. L.

    2008-10-01

    Aims: A novel method of using hard X-rays as a diagnostic for chromospheric density and magnetic structures is developed to infer sub-arcsecond vertical variation of magnetic flux tube size and neutral gas density. Methods: Using Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) X-ray data and the newly developed X-ray visibilities forward fitting technique we find the FWHM and centroid positions of hard X-ray sources with sub-arcsecond resolution (~0.2'') for a solar limb flare. We show that the height variations of the chromospheric density and the magnetic flux densities can be found with an unprecedented vertical resolution of ~150 km by mapping 18-250 keV X-ray emission of energetic electrons propagating in the loop at chromospheric heights of 400-1500 km. Results: Our observations suggest that the density of the neutral gas is in good agreement with hydrostatic models with a scale height of around 140 ± 30 km. FWHM sizes of the X-ray sources decrease with energy suggesting the expansion (fanning out) of magnetic flux tubes in the chromosphere with height. The magnetic scale height B(z)(dB/dz)-1 is found to be of the order of 300 km and a strong horizontal magnetic field is associated with noticeable flux tube expansion at a height of ~900 km.

  11. Effects of time delay and pitch control sensitivity in the flared landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthe, C. J.; Chalk, C. R.; Wingarten, N. C.; Grantham, W.

    1986-01-01

    Between December 1985 and January 1986, a flared landing program was conducted, using the USAF Total In-Flight simulator airplane, to examine time delay effects in a formal manner. Results show that as pitch sensitivity is increased, tolerance to time delay decreases. With the proper selection of pitch sensitivity, Level I performance was maintained with time delays ranging from 150 milliseconds to greater than 300 milliseconds. With higher sensitivity, configurations with Level I performance at 150 milliseconds degraded to level 2 at 200 milliseconds. When metrics of time delay and pitch sensitivity effects are applied to enhance previously developed predictive criteria, the result is an improved prediction technique which accounts for significant closed loop items.

  12. Effects of time delay and pitch control sensitivity in the flared landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthe, C. J.; Chalk, C. R.; Wingarten, N. C.; Grantham, W.

    1986-01-01

    Between December 1985 and January 1986, a flared landing program was conducted, using the USAF Total In-Flight simulator airplane, to examine time delay effects in a formal manner. Results show that as pitch sensitivity is increased, tolerance to time delay decreases. With the proper selection of pitch sensitivity, Level I performance was maintained with time delays ranging from 150 milliseconds to greater than 300 milliseconds. With higher sensitivity, configurations with Level I performance at 150 milliseconds degraded to level 2 at 200 milliseconds. When metrics of time delay and pitch sensitivity effects are applied to enhance previously developed predictive criteria, the result is an improved prediction technique which accounts for significant closed loop items.

  13. Preliminary analyses of solar flare effects on geomagnetic H component at equatorial and low latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugonabo, Obiageli Josephine; Ugwu, Ernest Benjamin Ikechukwu; Nneka Okeke, Francisca

    The study of solar flare effect (SFE) on geomagnetic H component at mid latitudes was carried out using data from INTERMAGNET website. M and X solar flare effects on three stations, Addis Ababa (AAE), Bangui (BNG), and Tamanrasset (TAM) were investigated. It was found that the ratio is greater than zero for all the three stations used, hence SFE enhances geomagnetic field in the equatorial and low latitudes. It was equally noted that the SFE on geomagnetic field is not just a simple augmentation at the pre-flare ionospheric currents over these stations. It is concluded that both pre-flare and solar flare amplitude variations of H are high in low and equatorial stations. Keywords: Solar flare, geomagnetic component, latitudes.

  14. Effects of X-ray flares on the aeronomy of Mars: Simultaneous measurements of ionospheric effects of X-ray flares on Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, Syed A.; Machado Santos, Angela; Abdu, Mangalathayil A.; Batista, Inez S.; Shah, Siddhi Y.; Thirupathaiah, P.

    2016-07-01

    MIRI: Validation and Testing Requirements We have studied X-ray aeronomy in the ionospheric E region of Mars during six X-ray flares that occurred on 28 March and 6 April, 2001; 17,18 March and 21 April, 2003 and 19 February, 2005 respectively. These flares were responded by the corresponding electron density profiles of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). The time series of photoionization rate, photoelectron impact ionization rate, photoelectron flux, ion density, electron density and total Electron Content (TEC) are predicted for each flare day. The estimated production rate, flux and densities are increased by 1-2 orders of magnitude due to effects of these flares in the E region ionosphere of Mars. The normalized estimated TEC are compared with the normalized measured TEC of MGS profiles. At the peak flare time the normalized estimated and normalized measured TEC were enhanced by a factor of 5-10 and 2 respectively. The effects of these flares were also registered in the D region equatorial ionosphere of Earth at Fortaleza observatory. The flares of 6 April, 2001, 17 March and 21 April, 2003 also produced electron density enhancement in the E region ionosphere of Earth at College AK and Cachoeira Paulista observatories. The minimum frequency fmin, recorded in ionogram, increased by 100% (due to D region absorption) while the foE increased by 20%, in the Earth's ionosphere.

  15. Extreme-Ultraviolet and X-Ray Spectroscopy of a Solar Flare Loop Observed at High Time Resolution: A Case Study in Chromospheric Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.; Phillips, Kenneth J. H.

    2004-09-01

    We present extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) and X-ray light curves and Doppler velocity measurements for a GOES class M2 solar flare observed in NOAA Active Region 9433 on 2001 April 24 at high time resolution with the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite (9.83 s) and the Bragg Crystal Spectrometer (BCS) and Hard X-Ray Telescope (HXT) on board the Yohkoh satellite (9.00 s). Coordinated imagery with SOHO's Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope and the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer satellite reveal that the CDS slit was centered on the flare commencement site; coordinated magnetograms from SOHO's Michelson Doppler Imager are consistent with this site being the footpoint of a flare loop anchored in positive magnetic field near the outer edge of a sunspot's penumbra. CDS observations include the preflare quiescent phase, two precursors, the flare impulsive and peak phases, and its slow decline. We find that (1) the average wavelengths of O III, O IV, O V, Ne VI, and He II lines measured during the preflare quiescent phase are equal (within the measurement uncertainties) to those measured during the late decline phase, indicating that they can be used as reference standards against which to measure Doppler velocities during the flare; (2) the EUV lines of O III, O IV, O V, and He II exhibit upflow velocities of ~40 km s-1 during both precursor events, suggestive of small-scale chromospheric evaporation; (3) the Fe XIX EUV intensity rises and stays above its preflare noise level during the second (later) precursor; (4) the maximum upflow velocities measured in Fe XIX with CDS (64 km s-1) and in Ca XIX (65 km s-1) and S XV (78 km s-1) with BCS occur during the flare impulsive phase and are simultaneous within the instrumental time resolutions; (5) the Fe XIX EUV intensity begins its impulsive rise nearly 90 s later than the rise in intensities of the cooler lines; (6) hard X-ray emission arises nearly 60

  16. The Effect of Loops in Connectivity Percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagh, Varda F.; Thorpe, M. F.

    We introduce a new method that employs the concepts of redundancy and stress from rigidity theory to study the effect of loops in connectivity percolation. In the rigidity percolation redundant bonds are not necessary to maintain the rigidity of a network. These redundant bonds cause internal stress in some regions and as a result those regions carry finite forces that characterize them as over-constrained. In connectivity percolation the bonds that cause a loop correspond to redundant bonds in rigidity and all the bonds that are part of a loop are equivalent to over-constrained bonds in rigidity. To illustrate this we start with a network in 2D where all the bonds are present and remove the bonds randomly. Then using renormalization groups and numerical simulations we study the behavior of loops near percolation transition in hierarchical networks and lattices.

  17. Effects of transport coefficients on excitation of flare-induced standing slow-mode waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tongjiang; Ofman, Leon; Davila, Joseph

    2017-08-01

    The flare-excited longitudinal intensity oscillations in hot flaring loops have been recently detected by SDO/AIA, and interpreted as the slow-mode standing waves. By means of the seismology technique we have, for the first time, determined the transport coefficients in the hot (>9 MK) flare plasma, and found that thermal conductivity is suppressed by at least 3 times and viscosity coefficient is enhanced by a factor of 15 as the upper limit (Wang et al. 2015, ApJL, 811, L13). In this presentation, we first discuss possible causes for conduction suppression and viscosity enhancements. Then we use the nonlinear MHD simulations to validate the seismology method that is based on linear analytical analysis, and demonstrate the inversion scheme for determining transport coefficients using numerical parametric study. Finally, we show how the seismologically-determined transport coefficients are crucial for understanding the excitation of the observed standing slow-mode waves in coronal loops and the heating of the loop plasma by a footpoint flare.

  18. FLARES PRODUCING WELL-ORGANIZED POST-FLARE ARCADES (SLINKIES) HAVE EARLY PRECURSORS

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutova, M. P.

    2011-06-01

    Exploding loop systems producing X-ray flares often, but not always, bifurcate into a long-living, well-organized system of multi-threaded loop arcades resembling solenoidal slinkies. The physical conditions that cause or prevent this process are not known. To address this problem, we examined most of the major (X-class) flares that occurred during the last decade and found that the flares that bifurcate into long-living slinky arcades have different signatures than those that do not 'produce' such structures. The most striking difference is that, in all cases of slinky formation, GOES high energy proton flux becomes significantly enhanced 10-24 hr before the flare occurs. No such effect was found prior to the 'non-slinky' flares. This fact may be associated with the difference between energy production by a given active region and the amount of energy required to bring the entire system into the form of well-organized, self-similar loop arcades. As an example illustrating the process of post-flare slinky formation, we present observations taken with the Hinode satellite, in several wavelengths, showing a time sequence of pre-flare and flare activity, followed by the formation of dynamically stable, well-organized structures. One of the important features revealed is that post-flare coronal slinky formation is preceded by scale invariant structure formation in the underlying chromosphere/transition region. We suggest that the observed regularities can be understood within the framework of self-organized critical dynamics characterized by scale invariant structure formation with critical parameters largely determined by energy saturation level. The observed regularities per se may serve as a long-term precursor of strong flares and may help to study predictability of system behavior.

  19. Flares and dynamic aspects. [solar physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanssen, E. T.

    1981-01-01

    Theory of the dynamic nature of solar flares, eruptive prominences, and coronal transients is surveyed. Two types of flare are considered: compact eruptions (small flares) which are probably loops, and large eruptions of double filament flares. The physical sense of this classification is justified, using solar observations. Even leaving the question unanswered of whether a coronal transient is a loop of ejected matter or a shock wave, the important, perhaps fundamental, role of mass motion in flare physics is evidenced.

  20. Solar and Stellar Flares and Their Effects on Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kazunari

    2015-08-01

    Recent space observations of the Sun revealed that the solar atmosphere is full of explosions, such as flares and flare-like phenomena. These flares generate not only strong electromagnetic emissions but also nonthermal particles and bulk plasma ejections, which sometimes lead to geomagnetic storms and affect terrestrial environment and our civilization, damaging satellite, power-grids, radio communication etc. Solar flares are prototype of various explosions in our universe, and hence are important not only for geophysics and environmental science but also for astrophysics. The energy source of solar flares is now established to be magnetic energy stored near sunspots. There is now increasing observational evidence that solar flares are caused by magnetic reconnection, merging of anti-parallel magnetic field lines and associated magneto-plasma dynamics (Shibata and Magara 2011, Living Review). It has also been known that many stars show flares similar to solar flares, and often such stellar flares are much more energetic than solar flares. The total energy of a solar flare is typically 10^29 - 10^32 erg. On the other hand, there are much more energetic flares (10^33 - 10^38 erg) in stars, especially in young stars. These are called superflares. We argue that these superflares on stars can also be understood in a unified way based on the reconnection mechanism. Finally we show evidence of occurrence of superflares on Sun-like stars according to recent stellar observations (Maehara et al. 2012, Nature, Shibayama et al. 2013), which revealed that superflares with energy of 10^34 - 10^35 erg (100 - 1000 times of the largest solar flares) occur with frequency of once in 800 - 5000 years on Sun-like stars which are very similar to our Sun. Against the previous belief, these new observations as well as theory (Shibata et al. 2013) suggest that we cannot deny the possibility of superflares on the present Sun. Finally, we shall discuss possible impacts of these superflares

  1. Solar flare associated coronal mass ejections causing geo-effectiveness and Forbush decreases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Beena; Chandra, Harish

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, we have selected 35 halo Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) associated with solar flares, Geomagnetic Storms (GSs) and Forbush decrease (Fd) chosen from 1st January 2000 to 31st December 2007 (i.e., the descending phase of solar cycle 23) observed by the Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) on board the SOHO spacecraft. Statistical analyses are performed to look at the distribution of solar flares associated with halo CMEs causing GSs and Fd and investigated the relationship between solar flare and halo CME parameters with GSs and Fd. Forbush decrease is the phenomenon of rapid decrease in cosmic ray intensity following the CME. Our analysis indicates that during 2000 to 2007 the northern region produced 44 % of solar flares associated with halo CMEs, GSs, and Fd, whereas 56 % solar flares associated with halo CMEs, GSs, and Fd were produced in the southern region. The northern and the southern hemispheres between 10° to 20° latitudinal belts are found to be more effective in producing events leading to Fd. From our selected events, we found that about 60 % of super-intense storms (Dst ≤ -200 nT) caused by halo CMEs are associated with X-class flares. Fast halo CMEs associated with X-class flares originating from 0° to 25° latitudes are better potential candidates in producing super-intense GSs than the slow halo CMEs associated with other classes of flares.

  2. Effect of an X-Class Solar Flare on the OI 630 nm Dayglow Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, Uma; Pallamraju, Duggirala; Chakrabarti, Supriya

    2010-01-01

    We present a striking event that shows a prompt effect of an X-class solar flare (X6.2/3B) in the neutral optical dayglow emissions. This flare occurred on 13 December 2001 at 1424 UT and peaked at 1430 UT. The peak-to pre-flare X-ray intensity ratio as observed by GOES-10 was greater than 300 and the EUV flux observed by SEM/SOHO was greater by around 60%. As a response to this flare, the daytime redline (OI 630 nm) column integrated emission intensity measured from Carmen Alto (23.16degS, 70.66degW), in Chile, showed a prompt increase of around 50%. Our results show that this prompt enhancement in the thermospheric dayglow seems to be caused mainly due to an increase in photoelectrons due to a sudden increase in the solar EUV flux associated with this flare.

  3. Effect of an X-Class Solar Flare on the OI 630 nm Dayglow Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, Uma; Pallamraju, Duggirala; Chakrabarti, Supriya

    2010-01-01

    We present a striking event that shows a prompt effect of an X-class solar flare (X6.2/3B) in the neutral optical dayglow emissions. This flare occurred on 13 December 2001 at 1424 UT and peaked at 1430 UT. The peak-to pre-flare X-ray intensity ratio as observed by GOES-10 was greater than 300 and the EUV flux observed by SEM/SOHO was greater by around 60%. As a response to this flare, the daytime redline (OI 630 nm) column integrated emission intensity measured from Carmen Alto (23.16degS, 70.66degW), in Chile, showed a prompt increase of around 50%. Our results show that this prompt enhancement in the thermospheric dayglow seems to be caused mainly due to an increase in photoelectrons due to a sudden increase in the solar EUV flux associated with this flare.

  4. Proteins mediating DNA loops effectively block transcription.

    PubMed

    Vörös, Zsuzsanna; Yan, Yan; Kovari, Daniel T; Finzi, Laura; Dunlap, David

    2017-07-01

    Loops are ubiquitous topological elements formed when proteins simultaneously bind to two noncontiguous DNA sites. While a loop-mediating protein may regulate initiation at a promoter, the presence of the protein at the other site may be an obstacle for RNA polymerases (RNAP) transcribing a different gene. To test whether a DNA loop alters the extent to which a protein blocks transcription, the lac repressor (LacI) was used. The outcome of in vitro transcription along templates containing two LacI operators separated by 400 bp in the presence of LacI concentrations that produced both looped and unlooped molecules was visualized with scanning force microscopy (SFM). An analysis of transcription elongation complexes, moving for 60 s at an average of 10 nt/s on unlooped DNA templates, revealed that they more often surpassed LacI bound to the lower affinity O2 operator than to the highest affinity Os operator. However, this difference was abrogated in looped DNA molecules where LacI became a strong roadblock independently of the affinity of the operator. Recordings of transcription elongation complexes, using magnetic tweezers, confirmed that they halted for several minutes upon encountering a LacI bound to a single operator. The average pause lifetime is compatible with RNAP waiting for LacI dissociation, however, the LacI open conformation visualized in the SFM images also suggests that LacI could straddle RNAP to let it pass. Independently of the mechanism by which RNAP bypasses the LacI roadblock, the data indicate that an obstacle with looped topology more effectively interferes with transcription. © 2017 The Authors Protein Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Protein Society.

  5. Effects of camera location on the reconstruction of 3D flare trajectory with two cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özsaraç, Seçkin; Yeşilkaya, Muhammed

    2015-05-01

    Flares are used as valuable electronic warfare assets for the battle against infrared guided missiles. The trajectory of the flare is one of the most important factors that determine the effectiveness of the counter measure. Reconstruction of the three dimensional (3D) position of a point, which is seen by multiple cameras, is a common problem. Camera placement, camera calibration, corresponding pixel determination in between the images of different cameras and also the triangulation algorithm affect the performance of 3D position estimation. In this paper, we specifically investigate the effects of camera placement on the flare trajectory estimation performance by simulations. Firstly, 3D trajectory of a flare and also the aircraft, which dispenses the flare, are generated with simple motion models. Then, we place two virtual ideal pinhole camera models on different locations. Assuming the cameras are tracking the aircraft perfectly, the view vectors of the cameras are computed. Afterwards, using the view vector of each camera and also the 3D position of the flare, image plane coordinates of the flare on both cameras are computed using the field of view (FOV) values. To increase the fidelity of the simulation, we have used two sources of error. One is used to model the uncertainties in the determination of the camera view vectors, i.e. the orientations of the cameras are measured noisy. Second noise source is used to model the imperfections of the corresponding pixel determination of the flare in between the two cameras. Finally, 3D position of the flare is estimated using the corresponding pixel indices, view vector and also the FOV of the cameras by triangulation. All the processes mentioned so far are repeated for different relative camera placements so that the optimum estimation error performance is found for the given aircraft and are trajectories.

  6. Straight line access and coronal flaring: effect on canal length.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Kyle P; Walton, Richard E; Rivera, Eric M

    2002-06-01

    The object of this study was to determine if canal length is altered as a result of straight-line access (SLA) and coronal flaring (CF). Selected were 86 canals of extracted molars and premolars from two groups: straight or severely curved (Schneider curvature <5 degrees and >20 degrees). The reference cusp tip and root-end were flattened to produce reproducible measurements. A #10 file was placed such that the tip extended slightly beyond the apex, with the handle on the referenced cusp. The amount of file protrusion was measured with a stereomicroscope. Then, SLA and CF were performed and the corresponding file replaced to the same coronal reference position. Apical file protrusion was measured again. The change in canal length was determined by the difference in the pre- and post-SLA/CF measurements. A Wilcoxon signed rank test statistically verified that there was a measurable, significant (p < 0.001) change in canal length after SLA and CF. The mean change overall was slight, with a decrease of 0.17 mm. Severe curvature had a slightly greater, significant effect on the amount of change. Tooth type had no significant effect. Changes in working length from SLA and CF, although statistically significant, were very small and clinically unimportant.

  7. The 26 December 2001 Solar Eruptive Event Responsible for GLE63. II. Multi-Loop Structure of Microwave Sources in a Major Long-Duration Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechnev, V.; Uralov, A. M.; Kiselev, V. I.; Kochanov, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Our analysis of the observations of the SOL2001-12-26 event, which was related to ground-level enhancement of cosmic-ray intensity GLE63, including microwave spectra and images from the Nobeyama Radioheliograph at 17 and 34 GHz, from the Siberian Solar Radio Telescope at 5.7 GHz, and from the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer in 1600 Å, has led to the following results: A flare ribbon overlapped with the sunspot umbra, which is typical of large particle events. Atypical were i) the long duration of the flare, which lasted more than one hour; ii) the moderate intensity of the microwave burst, which was about 104 sfu; iii) the low peak frequency of the gyrosynchrotron spectrum, which was about 6 GHz; and its insensitivity to the flux increase by more than one order of magnitude. This was accompanied by a nearly constant ratio of the flux emitted by the volume in the high-frequency part of the spectrum to its elevated low-frequency part determined by the area of the source. With the self-similarity of the spectrum, a similarity was observed between the moving microwave sources and the brightest parts of the flare ribbons in 1600 Å images. We compared the 17 GHz and 1600 Å images and confirm that the microwave sources were associated with multiple flare loops, whose footpoints appeared in the ultraviolet as intermittent bright kernels. To understand the properties of the event, we simulated its microwave emission using a system of several homogeneous gyrosynchrotron sources above the ribbons. The scatter between the spectra and the sizes of the individual sources is determined by the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field within the ribbons. The microwave flux is mainly governed by the magnetic flux passing through the ribbons and the sources. The apparent simplicity of the microwave structures is caused by a poorer spatial resolution and dynamic range of the microwave imaging. The results indicate that microwave manifestations of accelerated electrons correspond

  8. Ionization effects due to solar flare on terrestrial ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Tan, A.

    1976-01-01

    Sudden frequency deviation ionospheric disturbances related to the flares of May 18 and 19, 1973 were observed from the NASA/MSFC high frequency Doppler sounder array system in Huntsville, Alabama. The results are compared with those observed at Table Mountain near Boulder, Colorado and at the University of Hawaii.

  9. Leptogenesis from loop effects in curved spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Jamie I.; Shore, Graham M.

    2016-04-01

    We describe a new mechanism — radiatively-induced gravitational leptogenesis — for generating the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe. We show how quantum loop effects in C and CP violating theories cause matter and antimatter to propagate differently in the presence of gravity, and prove this is forbidden in flat space by CPT and translation symmetry. This generates a curvature-dependent chemical potential for leptons, allowing a matter-antimatter asymmetry to be generated in thermal equilibrium in the early Universe. The time-dependent dynamics necessary for leptogenesis is provided by the interaction of the virtual self-energy cloud of the leptons with the expanding curved spacetime background, which violates the strong equivalence principle and allows a distinction between matter and antimatter. We show here how this mechanism is realised in a particular BSM theory, the see-saw model, where the quantum loops involve the heavy sterile neutrinos responsible for light neutrino masses. We demonstrate by explicit computation of the relevant two-loop Feynman diagrams how the size of the radiative corrections relevant for leptogenesis becomes enhanced by increasing the mass hierarchy of the sterile neutrinos, and show how the induced lepton asymmetry may be sufficiently large to play an important rôle in determining the baryon-to-photon ratio of the Universe.

  10. Effective potential for Polyakov loops in lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemoto, Y.; RBC Collaboration

    2003-05-01

    Toward the derivation of an effective theory for Polyakov loops in lattice QCD, we examine Polyakov loop correlation functions using the multi-level algorithm which was recently developed by Luscher and Weisz.

  11. The flares of August 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.; Tanaka, K.

    1972-01-01

    Analysis is made of observations of the August, 1972 flares at Big Bear and Tel Aviv, involving monochromatic movies, magnetograms, and spectra. In each flare the observations fit a model of particle acceleration in the chromosphere with emission produced by impart and by heating by the energetic electrons and protons. The region showed twisted flux and high gradients from birth, and flares appear due to strong magnetic shears and gradients across the neutral line produced by sunspot motions. Post flare loops show a strong change from sheared, force-free fields parallel to potential-field-like loops, perpendicular to the neutral line above the surface.

  12. The flare kernel in the impulsive phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejager, C.

    1986-01-01

    The impulsive phase of a flare is characterized by impulsive bursts of X-ray and microwave radiation, related to impulsive footpoint heating up to 50 or 60 MK, by upward gas velocities (150 to 400 km/sec) and by a gradual increase of the flare's thermal energy content. These phenomena, as well as non-thermal effects, are all related to the impulsive energy injection into the flare. The available observations are also quantitatively consistent with a model in which energy is injected into the flare by beams of energetic electrons, causing ablation of chromospheric gas, followed by convective rise of gas. Thus, a hole is burned into the chromosphere; at the end of impulsive phase of an average flare the lower part of that hole is situated about 1800 km above the photosphere. H alpha and other optical and UV line emission is radiated by a thin layer (approx. 20 km) at the bottom of the flare kernel. The upward rising and outward streaming gas cools down by conduction in about 45 s. The non-thermal effects in the initial phase are due to curtailing of the energy distribution function by escape of energetic electrons. The single flux tube model of a flare does not fit with these observations; instead we propose the spaghetti-bundle model. Microwave and gamma-ray observations suggest the occurrence of dense flare knots of approx. 800 km diameter, and of high temperature. Future observations should concentrate on locating the microwave/gamma-ray sources, and on determining the kernel's fine structure and the related multi-loop structure of the flaring area.

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Are psychological factors effective in disease flare?

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Volkan; Umay, Ebru; Gündoğdu, İbrahim; Karaahmet, Zeliha Özgür; Öztürk, Arif Erhan

    2017-01-01

    Objective Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is clinically an undulant disease, and reasons for flare or remission vary. We aimed to identify factors potentially associated with disease flare and remission. Material and Methods Two hundred and seventy-four patients with RA who were admitted to our center between January 2010 and January 2016 were included. Disease activity was evaluated using disease activity score 28 (DAS 28); functional status was evaluated using the modified Health Assessment Questionnaire (m-HAQ), a questionnaire that comprises flare or remission domains such as psychological stress and mood status, physical trauma, nutrition regimen, infection, antibiotic use, and seasonal weather changes. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) were used to identify if patients had a mood disorder. Four subscales of Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale-2 (AIMS-2) (level of tension, mood, general perception of health, and satisfaction with health) were used to determine patient quality of life. Results Of the 274 patients, 261 were female (95.3%) and 13 were male (4.7%); the mean age was 52.10±9.41 years. According to patients’ perception, the most frequent reasons for joint symptoms were psychological stress/mood disorder (86.1%), followed by infection (49.6%) and trauma (46.4%). The most frequent factors for remission of symptoms were antibiotic use (42.7%), cold weather (34.3%), and hot weather (19%). Conclusion Psychological stress and mood status are independent factors for relapse periods in patients with RA. These should be considered particularly in patients who are resistant to different treatment regimens and in whom any other reason for disease flare is not obvious. PMID:28638686

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Are psychological factors effective in disease flare?

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Volkan; Umay, Ebru; Gündoğdu, İbrahim; Karaahmet, Zeliha Özgür; Öztürk, Arif Erhan

    2017-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is clinically an undulant disease, and reasons for flare or remission vary. We aimed to identify factors potentially associated with disease flare and remission. Two hundred and seventy-four patients with RA who were admitted to our center between January 2010 and January 2016 were included. Disease activity was evaluated using disease activity score 28 (DAS 28); functional status was evaluated using the modified Health Assessment Questionnaire (m-HAQ), a questionnaire that comprises flare or remission domains such as psychological stress and mood status, physical trauma, nutrition regimen, infection, antibiotic use, and seasonal weather changes. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) were used to identify if patients had a mood disorder. Four subscales of Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale-2 (AIMS-2) (level of tension, mood, general perception of health, and satisfaction with health) were used to determine patient quality of life. Of the 274 patients, 261 were female (95.3%) and 13 were male (4.7%); the mean age was 52.10±9.41 years. According to patients' perception, the most frequent reasons for joint symptoms were psychological stress/mood disorder (86.1%), followed by infection (49.6%) and trauma (46.4%). The most frequent factors for remission of symptoms were antibiotic use (42.7%), cold weather (34.3%), and hot weather (19%). Psychological stress and mood status are independent factors for relapse periods in patients with RA. These should be considered particularly in patients who are resistant to different treatment regimens and in whom any other reason for disease flare is not obvious.

  15. Effect of topical betaxolol on acute rise of aqueous flare induced by prostaglandin E(2) in pigmented rabbits.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, S; Hayasaka, S; Zhang, X Y; Hayasaka, Y; Nagaki, Y; Kitagawa, K

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of topical betaxolol on experimental ocular inflammation. Transcorneal diffusion of 25 microg/mL (7.09 x 10(-2) mmol/L) of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), placed in a glass cylinder, was employed to induce aqueous flare elevation in pigmented rabbits. Betaxolol was administered topically before PGE(2) application. Aqueous flare was measured with a laser flare cell meter. Four-, two-, and one-time topical instillations of betaxolol inhibited the PGE(2)-induced aqueous flare elevation by 44% +/- 8%, 32 +/- 7%, and 8 +/- 6%(mean +/- SD), respectively. The inhibition of flare elevation was dependent on the number of betaxolol instillations. Topical betaxolol has an inhibitory effect on PGE(2)-induced aqueous flare elevation in rabbit eyes.

  16. Major Solar Flare

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-18

    The Sun erupted with an X8 solar flare, one of the largest of the current solar cycle (Sept. 10, 2017). Its source was the same sunspot region that produced an X9 flare last week. This is shown in two wavelengths of extreme ultraviolet light at the same time and each reveals different features. Both are colorized to identify in which wavelength they were observed. The coils of loops after the flare are the magnetic field lines reorganizing themselves after the eruption. The video clip covers about six hours. Movies are available at https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21958

  17. Generalized effective description of loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Gupt, Brajesh

    2015-10-01

    The effective description of loop quantum cosmology (LQC) has proved to be a convenient platform to study phenomenological implications of the quantum bounce that resolves the classical big bang singularity. Originally, this description was derived using Gaussian quantum states with small dispersions. In this paper we present a generalization to incorporate states with large dispersions. Specifically, we derive the generalized effective Friedmann and Raychaudhuri equations and propose a generalized effective Hamiltonian which are being used in an ongoing study of the phenomenological consequences of a broad class of quantum geometries. We also discuss an interesting interplay between the physics of states with larger dispersions in standard LQC, and of sharply peaked states in (hypothetical) LQC theories with larger area gap.

  18. Effective scenario of loop quantum cosmology.

    PubMed

    Ding, You; Ma, Yongge; Yang, Jinsong

    2009-02-06

    Semiclassical states in isotropic loop quantum cosmology are employed to show that the improved dynamics has the correct classical limit. The effective Hamiltonian for the quantum cosmological model with a massless scalar field is thus obtained, which incorporates also the next to leading order quantum corrections. The possibility that the higher order correction terms may lead to significant departure from the leading order effective scenario is revealed. If the semiclassicality of the model is maintained in the large scale limit, there are great possibilities for a k=0 Friedmann expanding universe to undergo a collapse in the future due to the quantum gravity effect. Thus the quantum bounce and collapse may contribute a cyclic universe in the new scenario.

  19. Effective loop quantum geometry of Schwarzschild interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortez, Jerónimo; Cuervo, William; Morales-Técotl, Hugo A.; Ruelas, Juan C.

    2017-03-01

    The success of loop quantum cosmology to resolve classical singularities of homogeneous models has led to its application to the classical Schwarszchild black hole interior, which takes the form of a homogeneous Kantowski-Sachs model. The first steps of this were done in pure quantum mechanical terms, hinting at the traversable character of the would-be classical singularity, and then others were performed using effective heuristic models capturing quantum effects that allowed a geometrical description closer to the classical one but avoided its singularity. However, the problem of establishing the link between the quantum and effective descriptions was left open. In this work, we propose to fill in this gap by considering the path-integral approach to the loop quantization of the Kantowski-Sachs model corresponding to the Schwarzschild black hole interior. We show that the transition amplitude can be expressed as a path integration over the imaginary exponential of an effective action which just coincides, under some simplifying assumptions, with the heuristic one. Additionally, we further explore the consequences of the effective dynamics. We prove first that such dynamics imply some rather simple bounds for phase-space variables, and in turn—remarkably, in an analytical way—they imply that various phase-space functions that were singular in the classical model are now well behaved. In particular, the expansion rate, its time derivative, and the shear become bounded, and hence the Raychaudhuri equation is finite term by term, thus resolving the singularities of classical geodesic congruences. Moreover, all effective scalar polynomial invariants turn out to be bounded.

  20. The effects of different solar flare characteristics on the global thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlowski, David J.; Ridley, Aaron J.

    2011-08-01

    Given the ability of global models of the upper atmosphere to utilize high-resolution solar spectra to specify the solar soft X-ray and EUV irradiance, researchers now have the ability to perform detailed theoretical analysis of the response of the upper atmosphere to dynamic solar forcing more completely than ever before. Therefore, it is possible to develop a more quantitative understanding of the response of the thermosphere to solar flares. In this study, the effect of different characteristics of solar flares on the thermosphere is investigated. This is done in a theoretical manner, using synthetic solar irradiance data that is based on observations as input to the global ionosphere-thermosphere model (GITM). Specifically, the neutral response to the total incident energy, peak flare magnitude, background irradiance magnitude, duration of the impulsive phase, and decay time is investigated. It is found that the density response at 400 km altitude is linearly dependent on the total integrated energy above the background level being deposited into the atmosphere, and that the day-side response is strongly dependent on both the total incident energy into the system and the peak flare magnitude. Also, the decay time of the flare is important in determining the time at which the maximum global response occurs. Finally, the duration of the impulsive phase is found to have little effect on the global response of the system.

  1. Ginga observations of X-ray flares on Algol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, R. A.; Uchida, Y.; Tsuneta, S.; Nagase, F.

    1992-01-01

    The Ginga X-ray satellite observed Algol (Beta Per) for 2 days in 1989 January, including both the primary optical eclipse and most of the secondary eclipse. We derive upper limits of about 20 and 10 percent, respectively, for the eclipsed flux fraction during the two eclipses. A large flare lasting over 12 hr was seen prior to and during secondary eclipse. High-temperature Fe line emission is clearly detected in the proportional counter data. The Fe line equivalent width is variable during the flare, ranging from 0.4-1.0 keV. Except for two intervals during the flare rise, the observed equivalent width is lower than predicted using solar abundances and an optically thin plasma model. Similar behavior has also been observed by Ginga in a large flare on UX Ari: in both events, opacity effects at line center may be playing a significant role. Loop model analysis of the large flare suggests that it involves a substantially longer loop or loops than a shorter duration Algol flare seen with Exosat.

  2. X-ray studies of flaring magnetic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, Christopher Philip

    This thesis studies non-thermal emission from flaring magnetic structures by looking at HXR emission from flare footpoints at a faint X-ray source above a flare loop and finally at radio emission generated by eruptions. By complementing high quality data from recent missions with data from older instrumentation, studies were performed to compare with accepted models. The relation between Hard X-ray footpoint emission and magnetic field strength in a sample of 32 flares was studied in order to investigate the effects of the magnetic field on the transport of accelerated electrons. It was found that one third of compact flares studied had stronger footpoints in stronger magnetic regions whereas the reverse is anticipated from magnetic trapping arguments. On 16th April 2002, a limb flare was studied in many wavelengths. This provided an opportunity to study an erupting filament from the low corona and into interplanetary space. RHESSI identified a moving X-ray source associated with a rising filament, confirming the plasmoid definition of Tsuneta (1997). The velocity profile of the filament was determined along with its exponential acceleration. This suggested that an instability was responsible for eruption, possibly the kink instability. Doppler shifts were observed on either side of the filament as it crossed the slit field of view, suggesting helical flows and thus a flux rope. A succession of quadrupolar flares, followed by an LDE were then studied. An associated CME was seen and appeared linked to the quadrupolar flares which should re main confined. The flaring region triggered loop expansion, which interacted with a neighbouring large-scale streamer. This led to a fast CME front, which weakened the restraining field above the active region filaments allowing a partial filament eruption. Although at first glance the observations appeared contradictory it was demonstrated that the quadrupolar flares remained confined while triggering a large-scale eruption.

  3. The response of the chromosphere during a stellar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.

    1991-01-01

    A set of chromospheric models was developed, having a coronal loop geometry, energy balance through the entire loop from photosphere to corona, and a rigorous treatment of the radiative transfer in the important, optically thick, chromospheric emission lines. The models show that the soft X-ray emission and thermal conduction from a long lived hot corona are effective heating agents in the lower atmosphere during the gradual phase of stellar flares. The model predictions show the correct order of magnitude for the emission lines produced during the gradual phase of the flare with a reasonable coronal temperature evolution.

  4. Effect of enhanced x-ray flux on the ionosphere over Cyprus during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, Md. Golam; Haralambous, Haris

    2015-06-01

    In this work we study the effect of solar flares on the ionosphere over Cyprus. Solar flares are impulsive solar activity events usually coupled with Coronal Mass Ejection (CME). The arrival and the subsequent impact of solar flares on geospace, following an eruption on the Sun's surface is almost immediate (around 9 min) whereas the impact of CMEs is rather delayed (2-3 days) as the former is based on X-ray radiation whereas the latter phenomenon is related with particles and magnetic fields travelling at lower speeds via the Solar Wind. The penetration of X-rays down to the Dregion following such an event enhances the electron density. This increase can be monitored by ionosondes, which measure the electron density up to the maximum electron density NmF2. The significance of this increase lies on the increase of signal absorption causing limited window of operating frequencies for HF communications. In this study the effect of enhanced X-ray flux on the ionosphere over Cyprus during solar flares has been investigated. To establish the correlation and extent of impact on different layers, data of X-ray intensity from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and ionospheric characteristics (D & F layer) over Nicosia station (35° N, 33° E) were examined for all solar flares during the period 2011-2014. The analysis revealed a positive and good correlation between frequency of minimum reflection, fmin and X-ray intensity for D layer demonstrating that X-rays play a dominant role in the ionization of lower ionosphere. Hence, X-ray flux can be used as a good proxy for studying the solar flare effects on lower ionosphere. The correlation coefficient between maximum electron density of F layer, NmF2 and X-ray intensity was found to be poor.

  5. Effects of scenery, lighting, glideslope, and experience on timing the landing flare.

    PubMed

    Palmisano, Stephen; Favelle, Simone; Sachtler, W L

    2008-09-01

    This study examined three visual strategies for timing the initiation of the landing flare based on perceptions of either: (a) a critical height above ground level; (b) a critical runway width angle (Psi); or (c) a critical time-to-contact (TTC) with the runway. Visual displays simulated landing approaches with trial-to-trial variations in glideslope, lighting, and scene detail. Twenty-four participants (8 private pilots, 8 student pilots, and 8 nonpilots) were instructed to initiate the flare when they perceived that their TTC with the runway (30 m wide by 840 m long) had reached a critical value of 2 seconds. Our results demonstrated a significant effect of flight experience on flare timing accuracy and dominance of the height-based strategy over the runway-width-angle and TTC-based strategies. (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. Predicting resist sensitivity to chemical flare effects though use of exposure density gradient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyatt, Michael; DeVilliers, Anton; Jain, Kaveri

    2011-04-01

    Chemical flare has been shown to be a process limiter for patterns that are surrounded by areas of unexposed resist for certain chemically amplified resists. Using a pattern known to be susceptible to chemical flare effect a method was developed and tested on several materials. Details of the testing patterns, consisting of placements of small and large pattern density areas set to provide multiple degrees of resist loading; and a second level of loading variation achieved by selective exposure locations of those patterns across the wafer are given. Descriptions of the determination of slopes from linear trend-lines of the critical dimensions responses can be used to provide a gauge for internal evaluations as well as feedback to the vendors for chemical flare sensitivity.

  7. Assessing out-of-band flare effects at the wafer level for EUV lithography

    SciTech Connect

    George, Simi; Naulleau, Patrick; Kemp, Charles; Denham, Paul; Rekawa, Senajith

    2010-01-25

    To accurately estimate the flare contribution from the out-of-band (OOB), the integration of a DUV source into the SEMATECH Berkeley 0.3-NA Micro-field Exposure tool is proposed, enabling precisely controlled exposures along with the EUV patterning of resists in vacuum. First measurements evaluating the impact of bandwidth selected exposures with a table-top set-up and subsequent EUV patterning show significant impact on line-edge roughness and process performance. We outline a simulation-based method for computing the effective flare from resist sensitive wavelengths as a function of mask pattern types and sizes. This simulation method is benchmarked against measured OOB flare measurements and the results obtained are in agreement.

  8. Quantitative assessment of the effects of pupillary dilation on aqueous flare in eyes with chronic anterior uveitis using laser flare photometry.

    PubMed

    Ikeji, Felicia; Pavesio, Carlos; Bunce, Catey; White, Edward

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether pupillary dilation has any effect on anterior chamber flare measurements using a Kowa laser flare meter (FM-500) in patients with chronic anterior uveitis (CAU). Twenty-five eyes of 25 consecutive patients with CAU were assessed for anterior chamber inflammation by an experienced operator using the Kowa laser flare meter. Ten measurements were taken in total, with the highest and the lowest measurements deducted. The mean value and standard deviation was then recorded. One drop of tropicamide 1% and phenylephrine 2.5% was then applied and after 30 min the measurements were repeated and the results recorded. Sixteen women (64%) and nine men (36%) were recruited. The majority of patients were white Caucasian (68%). Fifteen left and ten right eyes were studied and the median (interquartile range: IQR) visual acuity was 6/9 (6/6-6/18). Iris colour was classified as brown, blue, grey/hazel and hazel. Thirteen eyes (52%) had brown irises, eight (32%) had blue, two had grey and the remainder were grey/hazel and hazel. The mean (SD) age was 50.8 (12.59) years. The median (IQR) flare reading before dilation was 17.93 (8.33-29.93) and after dilation was 15.97 (10.17-29.4). The mean change was -0.74 which was not a statistically significantly different to 0 (P=0.25) and the 95% limits of agreements ranged from -6.91 to 5.43. This study showed little evidence of any systematic difference between dilated and undilated flare measurements. The measurement of flare was not affected by the dilation of the pupil and measurements could be taken before or after papillary dilation for the purpose of patient follow-up data and clinical studies.

  9. Pre-Flare Flows in the Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, A. J.; Harra, L. K.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Green, L. M.; Matthews, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    Solar flares take place in regions of strong magnetic fields and are generally accepted to be the result of a resistive instability leading to magnetic reconnection. When new flux emerges into a pre-existing active region it can act as a flare and coronal mass ejection trigger. In this study we observed active region 10955 after the emergence of small-scale additional flux at the magnetic inversion line. We found that flaring began when additional positive flux levels exceeded 1.38×1020 Mx (maxwell), approximately 7 h after the initial flux emergence. We focussed on the pre-flare activity of one B-class flare that occurred on the following day. The earliest indication of activity was a rise in the non-thermal velocity one hour before the flare. 40 min before flaring began, brightenings and pre-flare flows were observed along two loop systems in the corona, involving the new flux and the pre-existing active region loops. We discuss the possibility that reconnection between the new flux and pre-existing loops before the flare drives the flows by either generating slow mode magnetoacoustic waves or a pressure gradient between the newly reconnected loops. The subsequent B-class flare originated from fast reconnection of the same loop systems as the pre-flare flows.

  10. The Time-Dependent Effect of a Stellar Flare on Terrestrial Planet Habitability and Biosignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Segura, A.; Meadows, V.; Kasting, J.; Hawley, S.

    2009-01-01

    Due to their low stellar luminosities, M dwarf habitable zones (as defined by Kasting et al. 1993) lie very near the star ( 0.2 AU or less), making planets in the habitable zone especially vulnerable to the effects of stellar activity. Although M dwarfs emit the bulk of their flux in the optical and near infrared, activity on these stars produces energetic radiation, from X rays to ultraviolet (UV), that may be dangerous for life on a planet in the habitable zone (HZ) of the star. In particular, stellar activity is a concern for the continuity of habitability on the planetary surface, as starspots or flares may cause the stellar irradiance to vary strongly with time. Using a convective/radiative model coupled to a photochemical model, we simulated the atmosphere of an Earth-like planet located in the habitable zone of the active M dwarf AD Leo over the course of a large flare. We present the time-dependent atmospheric temperature and composition profiles for water, methane and ozone, finding that while water and ozone are photolyzed in the stratosphere, the temperature profile and methane column depth are relatively unperturbed. Ozone number density decreases in the stratosphere during the impulsive phase of the flare, but quickly recovers to preflare levels thereafter. While the UV flux at the planetary surface changes with the ozone concentration during the flare, we find that the planetary surface UV flux is less than that received on Earth's surface except during the very peak of the flare. We conclude that even large flares may not be detrimental to life on planets with Earth-like atmospheres.

  11. Effect of a Flared Renal Stent on the Performance of Fenestrated Stent-Grafts at Rest and Exercise Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kandail, Harkamaljot; Hamady, Mohamad; Xu, Xiao Yun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the hemodynamic impact of a flared renal stent on the performance of fenestrated stent-grafts (FSGs) by analyzing flow patterns and wall shear stress–derived parameters in flared and nonflared FSGs in different physiologic scenarios. Methods: Hypothetical models of FSGs were created with and without flaring of the proximal portion of the renal stent. Flared FSGs with different dilation angles and protrusion lengths were examined, as well as a nonplanar flared FSG to account for lumbar curvature. Laminar and pulsatile blood flow was simulated by numerically solving Navier-Stokes equations. A physiologically realistic flow rate waveform was prescribed at the inlet, while downstream vasculature was modeled using a lumped parameter 3-element windkessel model. No slip boundary conditions were imposed at the FSG walls, which were assumed to be rigid. While resting simulations were performed on all the FSGs, exercise simulations were also performed on a flared FSG to quantify the effect of flaring in different physiologic scenarios. Results: For cycle-averaged inflow of 2.94 L/min (rest) and 4.63 L/min (exercise), 27% of blood flow was channeled into each renal branch at rest and 21% under exercise for all the flared FSGs examined. Although the renal flow waveform was not affected by flaring, flow within the flared FSGs was disturbed. This flow disturbance led to high endothelial cell activation potential (ECAP) values at the renal ostia for all the flared geometries. Reducing the dilation angle or protrusion length and exercise lowered the ECAP values for flared FSGs. Conclusion: Flaring of renal stents has a negligible effect on the time dependence of renal flow rate waveforms and can maintain sufficient renal perfusion at rest and exercise. Local flow patterns are, however, strongly dependent on renal flaring, which creates a local flow disturbance and may increase the thrombogenicity at the renal ostia. Smaller dilation angles, shorter

  12. String-Loop Effect in Low-Energy Effective Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, H.; Tanabchi, B. P.; Saadat, A. M.

    2010-05-01

    In this short article we are going to obtain the equations of motion from the low-energy effective action in the string cosmology. In the first time we consider the string-loop effect in the dilaton gravity and obtain the equations of motion, and obtain solution of them under some assumption for the specific potential.

  13. The effects of flaring in H1 on the observed velocity field of spirals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olling, Rob; Vangorkom, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    This work is part of a larger project in which we want to determine the shapes of dark halos around spiral galaxies. Rotation curves 'probe' the halos in the radial direction. The derived halo mass distributions are badly constrained. The local halo densities fully determine the width of the gas distribution once the gaseous velocity dispersion is known. There where the dark halo dominates, the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of the gas layer is proportional to (rho(sub halo))(exp -0.5). Therefore, measuring the width of the gas layer probes the halo density directly. In a dark halo dominated potential, the FWHM of the gas layer increases linearly with radius. This increase of the thickness of the gas layer is known as 'flaring'. Flaring has been found inside the stellar disk. Beyond the edge of the stellar disk, the analysis is hampered by the onset of the warp. Since the galaxy we are studying, NGC 4244, has no significant warp we hope to extend Rupen's analysis into the halo dominated regime. The usual method to derive a rotation curve from an observed 2-dimensional velocity field is to assume that the hydrogen is distributed in infinitely thin rings. For a flaring disk, any line of sight samples many different parts of the galaxy, all having different densities and projected velocities. In order to fully exploit the information contained in the gas distribution, we have to understand the effects of flaring on the observables (the spectrum for each point of the galaxy). We have investigated the effects of a flaring disk on the observed velocity field. It is obvious that the largest (kinematical) effects are to be expected for low density dark halos at large inclinations. For low mass galaxies we expect that the flaring of the H1 layer will have a major effect on the observed kinematics. For galaxy with intermediate V(sub max,halo) seen at intermediate inclinations, one overestimates Vsin(i) typically by a few percent. For more massive galaxies, any effects

  14. Effect of pre-flaring and file size on the accuracy of two electronic apex locators

    PubMed Central

    BRITO-JÚNIOR, Manoel; CAMILO, Carla Cristina; MOREIRA-JÚNIOR, Gil; PECORA, Jesus Djalma; SOUSA-NETO, Manoel Damião

    2012-01-01

    Objective This ex vivo study evaluated the effect of pre-flaring and file size on the accuracy of the Root ZX and Novapex electronic apex locators (EALs). Material and methods The actual working length (WL) was set 1 mm short of the apical foramen in the palatal root canals of 24 extracted maxillary molars. The teeth were embedded in an alginate mold, and two examiners performed the electronic measurements using #10, #15, and #20 K-files. The files were inserted into the root canals until the "0.0" or ''APEX'' signals were observed on the LED or display screens for the Novapex and Root ZX, respectively, retracting to the 1.0 mark. The measurements were repeated after the pre-flaring using the S1 and SX Pro-Taper instruments. Two measurements were performed for each condition and the means were used. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated to verify the intra- and inter-examiner agreement. The mean differences between the WL and electronic length values were analyzed by the three-way ANOVA test (p<0.05). Results ICCs were high (>0.8) and the results demonstrated a similar accuracy for both EALs (p>0.05). Statistically significant accurate measurements were verified in the pre-flared canals, except for the Novapex using a #20 K-file. Conclusions The tested EALs showed acceptable accuracy, whereas the pre-flaring procedure revealed a more significant effect than the used file size. PMID:23138740

  15. Fine Structure in Solar Flares.

    PubMed

    Warren

    2000-06-20

    We present observations of several large two-ribbon flares observed with both the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) and the soft X-ray telescope on Yohkoh. The high spatial resolution TRACE observations show that solar flare plasma is generally not confined to a single loop or even a few isolated loops but to a multitude of fine coronal structures. These observations also suggest that the high-temperature flare plasma generally appears diffuse while the cooler ( less, similar2 MK) postflare plasma is looplike. We conjecture that the diffuse appearance of the high-temperature flare emission seen with TRACE is due to a combination of the emission measure structure of these flares and the instrumental temperature response and does not reflect fundamental differences in plasma morphology at the different temperatures.

  16. The effect of Compton scattering on gamma-ray spectra of the 2005 January 20 flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Gan, Wei-Qun

    2012-10-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy provides a wealth of information about accelerated particles in solar flares, as well as the ambient medium with which these energetic particles interact. The neutron capture line (2.223 MeV), the strongest in the solar gamma-ray spectrum, forms in the deep atmosphere. The energy of these photons can be reduced via Compton scattering. With the fully relativistic GEANT4 toolkit, we have carried out Monte Carlo simulations of the transport of a neutron capture line in solar flares, and applied them to the flare that occurred on 2005 January 20 (X7.1/2B), one of the most powerful gamma-ray flares observed by RHESSI during the 23rd solar cycle. By comparing the fitting results of different models with and without Compton scattering of the neutron capture line, we find that when including the Compton scattering for the neutron capture line, the observed gamma-ray spectrum can be reproduced by a population of accelerated particles with a very hard spectrum (s <= 2.3). The Compton effect of a 2.223 MeV line on the spectra is therefore proven to be significant, which influences the time evolution of the neutron capture line flux as well. The study also suggests that the mean vertical depth for neutron capture in hydrogen for this event is about 8 g cm-2.

  17. Effect of a Radiation Cooling and Heating Function on Standing Longitudinal Oscillations in Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Moon, Y.-J.

    2016-06-01

    Standing long-period (with periods longer than several minutes) oscillations in large, hot (with a temperature higher than 3 MK) coronal loops have been observed as the quasi-periodic modulation of the EUV and microwave intensity emission and the Doppler shift of coronal emission lines, and they have been interpreted as standing slow magnetoacoustic (longitudinal) oscillations. Quasi-periodic pulsations of shorter periods, detected in thermal and non-thermal emissions in solar flares could be produced by a similar mechanism. We present theoretical modeling of the standing slow magnetoacoustic mode, showing that this mode of oscillation is highly sensitive to peculiarities of the radiative cooling and heating function. We generalized the theoretical model of standing slow magnetoacoustic oscillations in a hot plasma, including the effects of the radiative losses and accounting for plasma heating. The heating mechanism is not specified and taken empirically to compensate the cooling by radiation and thermal conduction. It is shown that the evolution of the oscillations is described by a generalized Burgers equation. The numerical solution of an initial value problem for the evolutionary equation demonstrates that different dependences of the radiative cooling and plasma heating on the temperature lead to different regimes of the oscillations, including growing, quasi-stationary, and rapidly decaying. Our findings provide a theoretical foundation for probing the coronal heating function and may explain the observations of decayless long-period, quasi-periodic pulsations in flares. The hydrodynamic approach employed in this study should be considered with caution in the modeling of non-thermal emission associated with flares, because it misses potentially important non-hydrodynamic effects.

  18. Comparison of effects of spreader grafts and flaring sutures on nasal airway resistance in rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Mir Mohammad

    2015-09-01

    Cephalic resection of the lateral crura of the alar cartilages, lateral osteotomies, and removal of the nasal hump during rhinoplasty may cause collapse of the internal nasal valve angle. This study was performed to compare preventive effects of two techniques (spreader grafts and flaring sutures) on rhinoplasty by rhinomanometry. Two hundred and forty-eight patients participated in this semi-experimental study. The patients were assigned into two groups. 28 of them were not available for follow-up. All patients had a straight nose in the midline and no severe septal deviations. 87 of 220 patients underwent the spreader grafts technique and the flaring sutures technique was performed in 133 patients. The nasal airway resistance was calculated by active anterior rhinomanometry on admission to hospital and again between 3 and 6 months following surgery. The mean of follow-up was 20.9 ± 2.9 weeks. After rhinoplasty, nasal airway resistance decreased in 46 patients (52.9 percent) of spreader grafts group and in 84 patients (63.2 percent) of flaring sutures group. The median nasal airway resistance difference (before-after surgery) of spreader grafts and flaring sutures groups was 0.027 Pa/ml/s (range -110 to 130) and 0.017 Pa/ml/s (range -0.690 to 0.790), respectively. The difference of nasal airway resistance between before and after rhinoplasty in two groups was insignificance (Mann-Whitney U test, P = 0.5). The spreader grafts and flaring sutures move the dorsal border of the upper lateral cartilage in a lateral direction and had similar preventive effect on nasal airway resistance after rhinoplasty.

  19. Flare model sensitivity of the Balmer spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falchi, A.; Falciani, R.; Smaldone, L. A.; Tozzi, G. P.

    1989-01-01

    Careful studies of various chromospheric spectral signatures are very important in order to explore their possible sensitivity to the modifications of the thermodynamic quantities produced by the flare occurrence. Pioneer work of Canfield and co-workers have shown how the H alpha behavior is able to indicate different changes in the atmospheric parameters structure associated to the flare event. It was decided to study the behavior of the highest Balmer lines and of the Balmer continuum in different solar flare model atmospheres. These spectral features, originating in the deep photosphere in a quiet area, may have a sensitivity different from H alpha to the modification of a flare atmosphere. The details of the method used to compute the Stark profile of the higher Balmer line (n is greater than or equal to 6) and their merging were extensively given elsewhere (Donati-Falchi et al., 1985; Falchi et al., 1989). The models used were developed by Ricchiazzi in his thesis (1982) evaluating the chromospheric response to both the nonthermal electron flux, for energy greater than 20 kev, (F sub 20) and to the thermal conduction, (F sub c). The effect of the coronal pressure values (P sub O) at the apex of the flare loop is also included.

  20. Two-Loop Effective Action for Theories with Fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizullaev, B. A.; Musakhanov, M. M.

    1995-08-01

    On the basis of a new approach for the calculation of the effective action developed in our previous works we calculate the effective action (up to two-loop level) for some models containing fermion fields. This method allows us to calculate the fermionic part of the effective action properly. The two-loop contribution to the effective potential for the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model is calculated and is shown to vanish.

  1. Solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.

    1974-01-01

    A review of the knowledge about solar flares which has been obtained through observations from the earth and from space by various methods. High-resolution cinematography is best carried out at H-alpha wavelengths to reveal the structure, time history, and location of flares. The classification flares in H alpha according to either physical or morphological criteria is discussed. The study of flare morphology, which shows where, when, and how flares occur, is important for evaluating theories of flares. Consideration is given to studies of flares by optical spectroscopy, radio emissions, and at X-ray and XUV wavelengths. Research has shown where and possibly why flares occur, but the physics of the instability involved, of the particle acceleration, and of the heating are still not understood.

  2. Dynamical Casimir effect and loop corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedov, E. T.; Alexeev, S. O.

    2017-09-01

    We calculate quantum loop corrections to the stress-energy flux caused by moving mirrors. We consider massless, self-interacting, ϕ4, real scalar theory. In these calculations we encounter new and quite unexpected subtleties due to the absence of global hyperbolicity in the presence of mirrors. We attempt to clearly phrase as many hidden assumptions and complications as possible that appear while solving the problem in question. On top of that, we find that quantum loop corrections to the stress-energy flux grow with time and are not suppressed in comparison with the semiclassical contributions. Thus, we observe the breakdown of the perturbation theory, and we discuss its physical origin and ways to deal with such a situation. As a byproduct, we observe a similarity of the problem in question with that for the minimally coupled, massless scalar field in de Sitter space.

  3. Analysis of flares in the chromosphere and corona of main- and pre-main-sequence M-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo-Chacón, I.

    2015-11-01

    having an accretion disk) we carry out a detailed analysis of an extremely long rise phase and of a shorter, weaker flare (allowing us to compare the results with those reported for young stars but surrounded by disks). Assuming multitemperature models to describe the coronal flaring plasma, we have calculated the metal abundance, the electron temperatures and the respective emission measures by fitting the spectra with the Astrophysical Plasma Emission Code included in the XSPEC software, which calculates spectral models for hot, optically thin plasmas. Moreover, we are able to estimate the size of the flaring loops by using theoretical models. These sizes give us an idea about the extent of the corona. For those flares in which heating does not entirely drive the flare evolution we use the models reported by Reale (2007) and Reale et al. (1997) for the rise and decay phases, respectively, including the effect of sustained heating during the decay. Instead, the stellar version of the Kopp & Poletto (1984)'s solar two-ribbon flare model (Poletto et al. 1988) is used when the residual heating completely drives the flare over the plasma cooling. Later, we apply the so-called RTV scaling laws (Rosner et al. 1978) and other fundamental laws of physics to determine additional characteristics of the plasma contained in the flaring loops (electron density and pressure), as well as the volume of the flaring region, the heating rate per unit volume, and the strength of the magnetic field required to confine this plasma. Making some assumptions we are also able to estimate the number of loops involved in the observed flares and the kind of magnetic structures present in the atmosphere of these types of stars. Finally, we discuss and interpret the results in the context of solar and stellar flares reported so far.

  4. Scaling Laws of Solar and Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Stern, Robert A.; Güdel, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    In this study we compile for the first time comprehensive data sets of solar and stellar flare parameters, including flare peak temperatures Tp, flare peak volume emission measures EMp, and flare durations τf from both solar and stellar data, as well as flare length scales L from solar data. Key results are that both the solar and stellar data are consistent with a common scaling law of EMp propto T4.7p, but the stellar flares exhibit ≈250 times higher emission measures (at the same flare peak temperature). For solar flares we observe also systematic trends for the flare length scale L(Tp) propto T0.9p and the flare duration τF(Tp) propto T0.9p as a function of the flare peak temperature. Using the theoretical RTV scaling law and the fractal volume scaling observed for solar flares, i.e., V(L) propto L2.4, we predict a scaling law of EMp propto T4.3p, which is consistent with observations, and a scaling law for electron densities in flare loops, np propto T2p/L propto T1.1p. The RTV-predicted electron densities were also found to be consistent with densities inferred from total emission measures, np = (EMp/qVV)1/2, using volume filling factors of qV = 0.03-0.08 constrained by fractal dimensions measured in solar flares. Solar and stellar flares are expected to have similar electron densities for equal flare peak temperatures Tp, but the higher emission measures of detected stellar flares most likely represent a selection bias of larger flare volumes and higher volume filling factors, due to low detector sensitivity at higher temperatures. Our results affect also the determination of radiative and conductive cooling times, thermal energies, and frequency distributions of solar and stellar flare energies.

  5. Anemone structure of Active Region NOAA 10798 and related geo-effective flares/ CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, A.; Ishii, T. T.; Shibata, K.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2006-08-01

    Introduction: We report the evolution and the coronal features of an active region NOAA 10798, and the related magnetic storms. Method: We examined in detail the photospheric and coronal features of the active region by using observational data in soft X-rays, in extreme ultraviolet images, and in magnetogram obtained with GOES, SOHO satellites. We also examined the interplanetary disturbances from the ACE data. Results: This active region was located in the middle of a small coronal hole, and generated 3 M-class flares. The flares are associated with high speed CMEs up to 2000 km/s. The interplanetary disturbances also show a structure with southward strong magnetic field. These produced a magnetic storm on 2005 August 24. Conclusions: The anemone structure may play a role for producing the high-speed and geo-effective CMEs even the near limb locations.

  6. SECONDARY FLARE RIBBONS OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Li, Ting; Yang, Shuhong E-mail: liting@nao.cas.cn

    2014-02-20

    Using the observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we statistically investigate the flare ribbons (FRs) of 19 X-class flares of the 24th solar cycle from 2010 June to 2013 August. Of these 19 flares, the source regions of 16 can be observed by AIA and the FRs of each flare are well detected, and 11 of the 16 display multiple ribbons. Based on the ribbon brightness and the relationship between the ribbons and post-flare loops, we divide the multiple ribbons into two types: normal FRs, which are connected by post-flare loops and have been extensively investigated, and secondary flare ribbons (SFRs), which are weaker than the FRs, not connected by post-flare loops, and always have a short lifetime. Of the 11 SFRs, 10 appear simultaneously with the FRs, and none of them have post-flare loops. The last one, on the other hand, appears 80 minutes later than the FR, lasts almost two hours, and also has no post-flare loops detected. We suggest that the magnetic reconnection associated with this SFR is triggered by the blast wave that results from the main flare. These observations imply that in some flare processes, more than two sets of magnetic loops or more than twice the number of magnetic reconnections are involved.

  7. Determining the flare dispensing program effectiveness against conical-scan and spin-scan reticle systems via Gaussian mixture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahingil, Mehmet C.; Aslan, Murat Ş.

    2013-05-01

    The reticle systems which are considered as the classical approach for determining the angular position of radiating targets in infrared band are widely used in early generation surface-to-air and air-to-air infrared guided missile seekers. One of the cost-effective ways of protecting aircrafts against these missiles is to dispense flare decoys from the countermeasure dispensing system (CMDS) integrated into the aircraft platform. Although this counter-measuring technique seems very simple, if not optimized carefully, it may not be effective for protecting the aircraft. Flares should be dispensed in accordance with a specific dispensing program which determines the number of flares to be dispensed from each dispenser of the CMDS and timing sequence of dispensing. Optimizing the parameters of the dispensing program is not trivial. It requires a good understanding of the operating principle of the threat seeker, operational capabilities of own platform and engagement scenario between them. In the present paper, we propose a complete simulation-based procedure to form an effectiveness boundary of flare dispensing programs against the spin-scan and conical-scan reticle seekers. The region of effectiveness is determined via Gaussian mixture models. The raw data is collected via extensive number of simulations using a MATLAB-coded simulator which models reticle-based seeker, aircraft radiation, aircraft motion, aircraft CMDS system, flare motion and flare radiation.

  8. Large-scale brightenings associated with flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandrini, Cristina H.; Machado, Marcos E.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that large-scale brightenings (LSBs) associated with solar flares, similar to the 'giant arches' discovered by Svestka et al. (1982) in images obtained by the SSM HXIS hours after the onset of two-ribbon flares, can also occur in association with confined flares in complex active regions. For these events, a clear link between the LSB and the underlying flare is clearly evident from the active-region magnetic field topology. The implications of these findings are discussed within the framework of the interacting loops of flares and the giant arch phenomenology.

  9. Flares in childhood eczema.

    PubMed

    Langan, S M

    2009-01-01

    Eczema is a major public health problem affecting children worldwide. Few studies have directly assessed triggers for disease flares. This paper presents evidence from a published systematic review and a prospective cohort study looking at flare factors in eczema. This systematic review suggested that foodstuffs in selected groups, dust exposure, unfamiliar pets, seasonal variation, stress, and irritants may be important in eczema flares. We performed a prospective cohort study that focused on environmental factors and identified associations between exposure to nylon clothing, dust, unfamiliar pets, sweating, shampoo, and eczema flares. Results from this study also demonstrated some new key findings. First, the effect of shampoo was found to increase in cold weather, and second, combinations of environmental factors were associated with disease exacerbation, supporting a multiple component disease model. This information is likely to be useful to families and may lead to the ability to reduce disease flares in the future.

  10. The Role of Entropic Effects on DNA Loop Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, David; Tkachenko, Alexei; Lillian, Todd; Perkins, Noel; Meiners, Jens Christian

    2009-03-01

    The formation of protein mediated DNA loops often regulates gene expression. Typically, a protein is simultaneously bound to two DNA operator sites. An example is the lactose repressor which binds to the Lac operon of E. coli. We characterize the mechanics of this system by calculating the free energy cost of loop formation. We construct a Hamiltonian that describes the change in DNA bending energy due to linear perturbations about the looped and open states, starting from a non-linear mechanical rod model that determines the shape and bending energy of the inter-operator DNA loop while capturing the intrinsic curvature and sequence-dependent elasticity of the DNA. The crystal structure of the LacI protein provides the boundary conditions for the DNA. We then calculate normal modes of the open and closed loops to account for the thermal fluctuations. The ratio of determinants of the two Hamiltonians yields the partition function, and the enthalphic and entropic cost of looping. This calculation goes beyond standard elastic energy models because it fully accounts for the substantial entropic differences between the two states. It also includes effects of sequence dependent curvature and stiffness and allows anisotropic variations in persistence length. From the free energy we then calculate the J-factor and ratio of loop lifetimes.

  11. Effect of flaring of natural gas in oil fields of Assam on rice cultivation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, K K; Hazarika, S; Kalita, B; Sharma, B

    2011-07-01

    Assam (India) is endowed with natural resources like oil, coal and natural gas. The crude oil, one of the most precious natural resources, is found in the districts of upper Assam. During the process of extraction of crude oil, low-pressure natural gas is burnt in the air. Most of the oil wells in upper Assam are located near rice fields and therefore, rice crop grown near the oil wells is exposed to light uninterruptedly causing grain sterility resulting significant loss in grain yield. To identify promising varieties for these areas, we studied the effect of flare on rice varieties with different photoperiod sensitivity. The high light intensity and increased light hours were the factors responsible for substantial loss in grain yield near the flare resulting from delay in flower initiation, reduction of panicle length, having less number of grains per panicle and more grain sterility. To prevent significant loss in yield, photoperiod-sensitive traditional and improved rice varieties should not be grown up to the distance of 80 and 100 m, respectively from the boundary wall of the flare pit. Modern weakly-photoperiod sensitive varieties like Ranjti and Mahsuri can be grown 40 m away from the wall while modern photoperiod insensitive variety like Jaya, can be cultivated 20 m away from the wall without significant loss in yield.

  12. Evaluation the effect of energetic particles in solar flares on satellite's life time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, Z.; Davoudifar, P.

    2016-09-01

    As the satellites have a multiple role in the humans' life, their damages and therefore logical failures of their segment causes problems and lots of expenses. So evaluating different types of failures in their segments has a crustal role. Solar particles are one of the most important reasons of segment damages (hard and soft) during a solar event or in usual times. During a solar event these particle may cause extensive damages which are even permanent (hard errors). To avoid these effects and design shielding mediums, we need to know SEP (solar energetic particles) flux and MTTF (mean time between two failures) of segments. In the present work, we calculated SEP flux witch collide the satellite in common times, in different altitudes. OMERE software was used to determine the coordinates and specifications of a satellite which in simulations has been launched to space. Then we considered a common electronic computer part and calculated MTTF for it. In the same way the SEP fluxes were calculated during different solar flares of different solar cycles and MTFFs were evaluated during occurring of solar flares. Thus a relation between solar flare energy and life time of the satellite electronic part (hours) was obtained.

  13. Effects of topical adrenergic agents on prostaglandin E2-induced aqueous flare and intraocular pressure elevation in pigmented rabbits.

    PubMed

    Nakamura-Shibasaki, Momoko; Latief, Miftahul Akhyar; Ko, Ji-Ae; Funaishi, Kunihiko; Kiuchi, Yoshiaki

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of signals through adrenergic receptors on the changes in the aqueous flare and intraocular pressure (IOP) induced by topical prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in pigmented rabbits. Adrenergic agents were applied topically to pigmented Dutch rabbits, and PGE2 was then applied to induce an increase in the aqueous flare and IOP. The degree of aqueous flare was measured with a laser flare meter, and the IOP was measured with a rebound tonometer. Measurements were made every 30 min after the PGE2 had been applied for 2 h and at 4.0 and 4.5 h. Repeated measure analysis of variance and Dunnett's post hoc tests were used for the statistical analyses. The topical application of PGE-2 increased the aqueous flare for more than 4.5 h. The topical instillation of 1.0 % apraclonidine significantly inhibited the increase in the PGE2-induced aqueous flare by 75.1 %, of 0.1 % brimonidine by 57.2 %, of 0.04 % dipivefrin by 57.4 %, and a combination of 0.1 % brimonidine and 5 % phenylephrine by 78.9 %. Topical 5.0 % phenylephrine and 0.05 % isoproterenol had little effect on the aqueous flare elevation induced by PGE2. The IOP increased 0.5 h after the topical application of PGE-2. Topical 1.0 % apraclonidine, 0.1 % brimonidine, 0.1 % dipivefrin, and the combination of 0.1 % brimonidine and 5.0 % phenylephrine significantly inhibited the PGE2-induced IOP elevation. However, topical 5.0 % phenylephrine and 0.05 % isoproterenol did not significantly inhibit the IOP elevation caused by PGE2. Signaling by the α2 receptor inhibits both the PGE2-induced flare and IOP elevation caused by topical PGE2 application.

  14. Flares and MHD Jets in Protostar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, M.; Shibata, K.; Matsumoto, R.

    We present a magnetic reconnection model for hard X-ray emission and flare-like hard X-ray variabilities associated with protostars detected by ASCA. The energy released by protostellar flares is 102 - 105 times larger than solar flares. Moreover, the spectrum is harder. A new ingredient in protostellar flare is the existence of a protostellar disk which can twist the magnetic fields threading the protostellar disk. We carried out magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the disk-star interaction. The closed magnetic loops connecting the central star and the disk are twisted by the rotation of the disk. In the presence of resistivity, magnetic reconnection takes place in the current sheet formed inside the expanding loops. Hot, outgoing plasmoid and post flare loops are formed as a result of the reconnection. Numerical results are consistent with the observed plasma temperature (107 - 108K), the length of the flaring loop (1011-1012cm), the total energy of X-ray flares (~1035-36erg). Furthermore, along the opening magnetic loops, hot jet is ejected in bipolar directions with speed 200-400 km/s. The speed and mass flow rate of the jet is consistent with those of optical jets. Our model can explain both the X-ray flare-like variability and mass outflow in star forming region.

  15. The effects of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability on resonance absorption layers in coronal loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpen, Judith T.; Dahlburg, Russell B.; Davila, Joseph M.

    1994-01-01

    One of the long-standing uncertainties in the wave-resonance theory of coronal heating is the stability of the resonance layer. The wave motions in the resonance layer produce highly localized shear flows which vary sinusoidally in time with the resonance period. This configuration is potentially susceptible to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI), which can enhance small-scale structure and turbulent broadening of shear layers on relatively rapid ideal timescales. We have investigated numerically the response of a characteristic velocity profile, derived from resonance absorption models, to finite fluid perturbations comparable to photospheric fluctuations. We find that the KHI primarily should affect long (approximately greater than 6 x 10(exp 4) km) loops where higher velocity flows (M approximately greater than 0.2) exist in resonance layers of order 100 km wide. There, the Kelvin-Helmholtz growth time is comparable to or less than the resonance quarter-period, and the potentially stabilizing magnetic effects are not felt until the instability is well past the linear growth stage. Not only is the resonance layer broadened by the KHI, but also the convective energy transport out of the resonance layer is increased, thus adding to the efficiency of the wave-resonance heating process. In shorter loops, e.g., those in bright points and compact flares, the stabilization due to the magnetic field and the high resonance frequency inhibit the growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability beyond a minimal level.

  16. Infrared countermeasure flare performance measurements using a gas gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorthy, Lakshmanan; Stringer, Michael; Taylor, Mark R. G.; Kollias, S.

    2004-12-01

    A unique and cost effective measurement facility called the Reusable Aerodynamic Flare Ejection Capability (RAFEC) has been developed at the Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO), Australia. The RAFEC system involves the use of a reusable, carrier projectile that is launched from a 10 inch, nitrogen driven gas gun. The IRCM flare is loaded in the carrier projectile and the gas gun launches the carrier projectile with a known velocity of between approximately 350 to 650 knots. At a pre-determined time after firing and in the field of view of the measuring instrumentation, the flare is ejected from the carrier projectile for performance measurements to be undertaken. The temporal, spatial and spectral quantities were accomplished with the instruments fielded around the gas gun line of fire and the trajectory is derived from the spatial measurements. The data will be used for hardware in the loop simulations and modelling. Further improvements such as; (1) multiple (maximum of three) flare ejection, (2) 1"x1"x8" format flares made to the carrier projectile, and (3) design and manufacture of the puston, a new item of firing hardware to obtain lower muzzle velocities have enhanced the RAFEC capability. Thus the RAFEC system provides a more realistic IRCM performance measurement capability as it incorporates the deceleration effects experienced by the flare on deployment.

  17. The flares of August 1972. [solar flare characteristics and spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.; Tanaka, K.

    1973-01-01

    Observations of the August, 1972 flares at Big Bear and Tel Aviv, involving monochromatic movies, magnetograms, and spectra, are analyzed. The region (McMath 11976) showed inverted polarity from its inception on July 11; the great activity was due to extremely high shear and gradients in the magnetic field, as well as a constant invasion of one polarity into the opposite; observations in lambda 3835 show remarkable fast flashes in the impulsive flare of 18:38 UT on Aug. 2 with lifetimes of 5 sec, which may be due to dumping of particles in the lower chromosphere. Flare loops show evolutionary increases of their tilts to the neutral line in the flares of Aug. 4 and 7. Spectroscopic observations show red asymmetry and red shift of the H alpha emission in the flash phase of the Aug. 7 flare, as well as substantial velocity shear in the photosphere during the flare, somewhat like earthquake movement along a fault. Finally the total H alpha emission of the Aug. 7 flare could be measured accurately as about 2.5 x 10 to the 30th power erg, considerably less than coarser previous estimates for great flares.

  18. The flares of August 1972. [solar flare characteristics and spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.; Tanaka, K.

    1973-01-01

    Observations of the August, 1972 flares at Big Bear and Tel Aviv, involving monochromatic movies, magnetograms, and spectra, are analyzed. The region (McMath 11976) showed inverted polarity from its inception on July 11; the great activity was due to extremely high shear and gradients in the magnetic field, as well as a constant invasion of one polarity into the opposite; observations in lambda 3835 show remarkable fast flashes in the impulsive flare of 18:38 UT on Aug. 2 with lifetimes of 5 sec, which may be due to dumping of particles in the lower chromosphere. Flare loops show evolutionary increases of their tilts to the neutral line in the flares of Aug. 4 and 7. Spectroscopic observations show red asymmetry and red shift of the H alpha emission in the flash phase of the Aug. 7 flare, as well as substantial velocity shear in the photosphere during the flare, somewhat like earthquake movement along a fault. Finally the total H alpha emission of the Aug. 7 flare could be measured accurately as about 2.5 x 10 to the 30th power erg, considerably less than coarser previous estimates for great flares.

  19. When matching matters: Loop effects in Higgs effective theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Ayres; López-Val, David; Plehn, Tilman

    2016-11-01

    Effective Lagrangians are a useful tool for a data-driven approach to physics beyond the Standard Model at the LHC. However, for the new physics scales accessible at the LHC, the effective operator expansion is only relatively slowly converging at best. For tree-level processes, it has been found that the agreement between the effective Lagrangian and a range of UV-complete models depends sensitively on the appropriate definition of the matching. We extend this analysis to the one-loop level, which is relevant for electroweak precision data and Higgs decay to photons. We show that near the scale of electroweak symmetry breaking the validity of the effective theory description can be systematically improved through an appropriate matching procedure. In particular, we find a significant increase in accuracy when including suitable terms suppressed by the Higgs vacuum expectation value in the matching.

  20. Polarisation of microwave emission from reconnecting twisted coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordovskyy, M.; Browning, P. K.; Kontar, E. P.

    2017-08-01

    Context. Magnetic reconnection and particle acceleration due to the kink instability in twisted coronal loops can be a viable scenario for confined solar flares. Detailed investigation of this phenomenon requires reliable methods for observational detection of magnetic twist in solar flares, which may not be possible solely through extreme UV and soft X-ray thermal emission. Polarisation of microwave emission in flaring loops can be used as one of the detection criteria. Aims: The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of magnetic twist in flaring coronal loops on the polarisation of gyro-synchrotron microwave (GSMW) emission, and determine whether it could provide a means for magnetic twist detection. Methods: We consider time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic and test-particle models developed using the LARE3D and GCA codes to investigate twisted coronal loops that relax after kink instability. Synthetic GSMW emission maps (I and V Stokes components) are calculated using GX simulator. Results: It is found that flaring twisted coronal loops produce GSMW radiation with a gradient of circular polarisation across the loop. However, these patterns may be visible only for a relatively short period of time owing to fast magnetic reconfiguration after the instability. Their visibility also depends on the orientation and position of the loop on the solar disk. Typically, it would be difficult to see these characteristic polarisation patterns in a twisted loop seen from the top (i.e. close to the centre of the solar disk), but easier in a twisted loop seen from the side (i.e. observed very close to the limb).

  1. COMPTEL solar flare observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. M.; Aarts, H.; Bennett, K.; Debrunner, H.; Devries, C.; Denherder, J. W.; Eymann, G.; Forrest, D. J.; Diehl, R.; Hermsen, W.

    1992-01-01

    COMPTEL as part of a solar target of opportunity campaign observed the sun during the period of high solar activity from 7-15 Jun. 1991. Major flares were observed on 9 and 11 Jun. Although both flares were large GOES events (greater than or = X10), they were not extraordinary in terms of gamma-ray emission. Only the decay phase of the 15 Jun. flare was observed by COMPTEL. We report the preliminary analysis of data from these flares, including the first spectroscopic measurement of solar flare neutrons. The deuterium formation line at 2.223 MeV was present in both events and for at least the 9 Jun. event, was comparable to the flux in the nuclear line region of 4-8 MeV, consistent with Solar-Maximum Mission (SSM) Observations. A clear neutron signal was present in the flare of 9 Jun. with the spectrum extending up to 80 MeV and consistent in time with the emission of gamma-rays, confirming the utility of COMPTEL in measuring the solar neutron flux at low energies. The neutron flux below 100 MeV appears to be lower than that of the 3 Jun. 1982 flare by more than an order of magnitude. The neutron signal of the 11 Jun. event is under study. Severe dead time effects resulting from the intense thermal x-rays require significant corrections to the measured flux which increase the magnitude of the associated systematic uncertainties.

  2. Flare energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Dejager, C.; Dennis, B. R.; Hudson, H. S.; Simnett, G. M.; Strong, K. T.; Bentley, R. D.; Bornmann, P. L.; Bruner, M. E.; Cargill, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    In this investigation of flare energetics, researchers sought to establish a comprehensive and self-consistent picture of the sources and transport of energy within a flare. To achieve this goal, they chose five flares in 1980 that were well observed with instruments on the Solar Maximum Mission, and with other space-borne and ground-based instruments. The events were chosen to represent various types of flares. Details of the observations available for them and the corresponding physical parameters derived from these data are presented. The flares were studied from two perspectives, the impulsive and gradual phases, and then the results were compared to obtain the overall picture of the energics of these flares. The role that modeling can play in estimating the total energy of a flare when the observationally determined parameters are used as the input to a numerical model is discussed. Finally, a critique of the current understanding of flare energetics and the methods used to determine various energetics terms is outlined, and possible future directions of research in this area are suggested.

  3. What Causes Lupus Flares?

    PubMed

    Fernandez, David; Kirou, Kyriakos A

    2016-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the prototypic systemic autoimmune disease, follows a chronic disease course, punctuated by flares. Disease flares often occur without apparent cause, perhaps from progressive inherent buildup of autoimmunity. However, there is evidence that certain environmental factors may trigger the disease. These include exposure to UV light, infections, certain hormones, and drugs which may activate the innate and adaptive immune system, resulting in inflammation, cytotoxic effects, and clinical symptoms. Uncontrolled disease flares, as well as their treatment, especially with glucocorticoids, can cause significant organ damage. Tight surveillance and timely control of lupus flares with judicial use of effective treatments to adequately suppress the excessive immune system activation are required to bring about long term remission of the disease. We hope that new clinical trials will soon offer additional effective and target-specific biologic treatments for SLE.

  4. Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    Because the Earth resides in the atmosphere of our nearest stellar neighbor, events occurring on the Sun's surface directly affect us by interfering with satellite operations and communications, astronaut safety, and, in extreme circumstances, power grid stability. Solar flares, the most energetic events in our solar system, are a substantial source of hazardous space weather affecting our increasingly technology-dependent society. While flares have been observed using ground-based telescopes for over 150 years, modern space-bourne observatories have provided nearly continuous multi-wavelength flare coverage that cannot be obtained from the ground. We can now probe the origins and evolution of flares by tracking particle acceleration, changes in ionized plasma, and the reorganization of magnetic fields. I will walk through our current understanding of why flares occur and how they affect the Earth and also show several examples of these fantastic explosions.

  5. Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Solar flares accelerate both ions and electrons to high energies, and their X-ray and gamma-ray signatures not only probe the relationship between their respective acceleration, but also allow for the measurement of accelerated and ambient abundances. RHESSI observations have shown a striking close linear correlation of gamma-ray line fluence from accelerated ions > approx.20 MeV and bremsstrahlung emission from relativistic accelerated electrons >300 keV, when integrated over complete flares, suggesting a common acceleration mechanism. SMM/GRS observations, however, show a weaker correlation, and this discrepancy might be associated with previously observed electron-rich episodes within flares and/or temporal variability of gamma-ray line fluxes over the course of flares. We use the latest RHESSI gamma-ray analysis techniques to study the temporal behavior of the RHESSI flares, and determine what changes can be attributed to an evolving acceleration mechanism or to evolving abundances.

  6. Loop and water effect on stability of intertriplex DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Linjing; Lee, Imshik; Wang, Chen; Li, Qing; Bai, Chunli

    1998-02-01

    Stability of four intratriplexes and one intertriplex influenced by loops and water have been investigated by molecular mechanics calculation. The four intratriplexes are 5'-d(TC) 6-d(T) m-d(CT) 6-d(C) n-d(AG) 6-3' ( m, n = 3 or 4), the corresponding intertriplex is d(TC) 6∗d(AG) 6·d(CT) 6 (·, Watson-Crick hydrogen bond; ∗, Hoogsteen hydrogen bond). We studied in detail how loops and water would effect intra- and interstrand interactions of the five triplexes, respectively. The results showed that the existence of loops may have limited impact on the stability of the concerned triplex structures, regardless of water environment. In contrast, water molecules do have appreciable effects on triplex stability. Sugar conformations of the five triplexes were also discussed in this paper. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the FT-IR experiments.

  7. Effect of solar flare on the equatorial electrojet in eastern Brazil region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, R. G.; Janardhan, P.; Chandra, H.; Trivedi, N. B.; Erick, Vidal

    2017-06-01

    The effect of solar flare, sudden commencement of magnetic storm and of the disturbances ring current on the equatorial electrojet in the Eastern Brazil region, where the ground magnetic declination is as large as 20^{^{circ }}\\hbox {W} is studied based on geomagnetic data with one minute resolution from Bacabal during November-December 1990. It is shown that the mean diurnal vector of the horizontal field was aligned along 2{^{circ }}\\hbox {E} of north at Huancayo and 30{^{circ }}\\hbox {W} of north at Bacabal during the month of December 1990. Number of solar flares that occurred on 30 December 1990 indicated the direction of solar flare related Δ H vector to be aligned along 5{^{circ }}\\hbox {E} of north at Huancayo and 28{^{circ }}\\hbox {W} of north at Bacabal. This is expected as the solar flare effects are due to the enhanced conductivity in the ionosphere. The SC at 2230 UT on 26 November 1990 produced a positive impulse in Δ X and negative impulse in Δ Y at Bacabal with Δ H vector aligned along 27{^{circ }}\\hbox {W} of north. At Huancayo the Δ H vector associated with SC is aligned along 8{^{circ }}\\hbox {E} of north, few degrees east to the alignment of the diurnal vector of H. The magnetic storm that followed the SC had a minimum Dst index of -150 nT. The corresponding storm time disturbance in Δ X at Huancayo as well as at Bacabal were about -250 nT but Δ Y at Bacabal was about +70 nT and very small at Huancayo, that give the alignment of the H vector due to ring current about 16{^{circ }}\\hbox {W} of north at Bacabal and almost along N-S at Huancayo. Thus alignment of the Δ H vector due to ring current at Bacabal is 14{^{circ }}\\hbox {E} of the mean direction of Δ H vector during December 1990. This is consistent with the direction of ring current dependent on the dipole declination at the ring current altitude which is about 5{^{circ }}\\hbox {W} of north over Bacabal and the deviation of declination due to the ring current during

  8. The warming effect of the flare of natural gas on soil biological activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevdokimov, Ilya; Yusupov, Irek; Shavnin, Sergey

    2017-04-01

    Simulation of global warming is one of the key issues of international efforts to study climatic changes. A number of manipulation experiments with soil warming have been established throughout the world in the last decades. We used warming with natural gas flare near the pine forest as a kind of manipulation experiment to assess the synergistic effect of drying and warming on plant-soil-microbial interactions. The experimental area is situated in a pine forest subzone of the forest zone of the Western Siberia near Pokachi, Yugra (61o73'N, 75o49'E). The experimental plots were established in a young Scotch pine forest on sandy podzolic soil at three distances of 70, 90 and 130 m from the flare of natural gas, with trees exposed to strong (S) moderate (M), and weak (W) impact, respectively. Increase of soil temperature in summer time were moderate: on average 0.7oC and 1.3oC for the plots M and S, respectively, compared to the plot W. The plot S demonstrated increase in CO2 efflux from the soil surface, mainly due to intensifying plant root respiration, by 18% compared to the plot W as well as increase in SOM content by 31%, with intensive accumulation of recalcitrant humus. By contrast, microbial biomass, labile SOM pool and basal respiration were higher in soil with weak flaring impact by 74%, 33% and 24%, respectively. Thus, three trends in plant-soil-microbe system exposed to warming and drying were revealed: i) SOM accumulation, ii) suppression of microbial activity, and iii) stimulation of root respiration. The research was supported by the Russian Science Foundation and Russian Foundation for Basic Researches.

  9. Effects of auxiliary fiber posts on endodontically treated teeth with flared canals.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Xu, B; Wang, Y; Cai, Y

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the fracture resistance and retention of endodontically treated roots with over-flared canals restored with different post systems, including one cast metal post and four fiber posts with/without auxiliary fiber posts. One hundred endodontically treated incisor roots were experimentally flared using a tapered diamond bur. The roots were restored using one of the five post systems: Ni-Cr cast metal post (CM), D.T. Light glass fiber post (DT), Macro-Lock glass fiber post (ML), ML+2 Fibercone auxiliary fiber posts (2FC), and ML+5 Fibercone auxiliary fiber posts (5FC). After fabrication of the crowns, half of the specimens (n=50) were subjected to a fracture failure test--loading with an incremental static force at an angle of 45 degrees to the long axis of the root. The other 50 samples underwent a pull-out test. Fracture failure strength and pull-out strength were measured and analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey's post hoc test (α=0.05). After the tests were completed, all specimens displayed oblique root fractures or cracks, initiating from the palatal cervical margin and propagating in a labial-apical direction. The order of the fracture failure strength was as follows: 5FC=CM=2FC>ML>DT. Cast metal posts demonstrated the highest pull-out strength (p<0.05). No significant differences in pull-out strength were found in the ML, 2FC, and 5FC groups. Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that the application of an auxiliary fiber post could significantly increase the fracture resistance of over-flared roots; however, no beneficial effects in enhancing retention were observed.

  10. Effect of restoration technique on stress distribution in roots with flared canals: an FEA study.

    PubMed

    Belli, Sema; Eraslan, Öznur; Eraslan, Oğuz; Eskitaşcıoğlu, Gürcan

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this finite element analysis (FEA) study was to test the effect of different restorative techniques on stress distribution in roots with flared canals. Five three-dimensional (3D) FEA models that simulated a maxillary incisor with excessive structure loss and flared root canals were created and restored with the following techniques/materials: 1) a prefabricated post: 2) one main and two accessory posts; 3) i-TFC post-core (Sun Medical); 4) the thickness of the root was increased by using composite resin and the root was then restored using a prefabricated post; 5) an anatomic post was created by using composite resin and a prefabricated glass-fiber post. Composite cores and ceramic crowns were created. A 300-N static load was applied at the center of the palatal surface of the tooth to calculate stress distributions. SolidWorks/Cosmosworks structural analysis programs were used for FEA analysis. The analysis of the von Mises and tensile stress values revealed that prefabricated post, accessory post, and i-TFC post systems showed similar stress distributions. They all showed high stress areas at the buccal side of the root (3.67 MPa) and in the cervical region of the root (> 3.67 MPa) as well as low stress accumulation within the post space (0 to 1 MPa). The anatomic post kept the stress within its body and directed less stress towards the remaining tooth structure. The creation of an anatomic post may save the remaining tooth structure in roots with flared canals by reducing the stress levels.

  11. Solar flare effects on the thermosphere and E-layer as observed by GRACE and DEMETER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Krauss, Sandro; Sawas, Sami; Hausleitner, Walter; Parrot, Michel; Voller, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the effect of solar flares on the lower thermosphere and ionosphere of the Earth. For this study we select solar flares which occurred in the period from Nov. 2004 to Sept. 2005. We combine the measurements of the GRACE and DEMETER satellites which lead us to estimate, respectively, the atmospheric density and the electric field variation at an altitude of about 100 km. The accelerometer measurements from GRACE orbiting at an altitude of about 450 km comprise all non gravitational forces acting on the satellite and may be used to determine the atmospheric neutral density. The intensity variation of the transmitter ground signals is detected by DEMETER at an altitude in the order of 700 km. In this study we insist on an atmosphere-ionosphere coupling effect which may appear at an altitude of about 100 km. This crucial altitude corresponds to critical regions where important changes are observed in the atmosphere (Mesosphere/Thermosphere) and in the ionosphere (D/E layers). We discuss the possible correlation between the measurements of GRACE and DEMETER observations, where both the local and global effects are taken into consideration.

  12. Solar flare particle radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of the solar particles accelerated by solar flares and subsequently observed near the orbit of the earth are studied. Considered are solar particle intensity-time profiles, the composition and spectra of solar flare events, and the propagation of solar particles in interplanetary space. The effects of solar particles at the earth, riometer observations of polar cap cosmic noise absorption events, and the production of solar cell damage at synchronous altitudes by solar protons are also discussed.

  13. Estimating two-loop radiative effects in the MOLLER experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksejevs, A. G.; Barkanova, S. G.; Zykunov, V. A.; Kuraev, E. A.

    2013-07-15

    Within the on-shell renormalization scheme, two-loop electroweak corrections to the parityviolating polarization asymmetry in the reaction e{sup -}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}e{sup -}({gamma}, {gamma}{gamma}) were estimated for the MOLLER experiment at JLab. The infrared divergence and the imaginary part of the amplitude were taken completely under control. Relevant compact expressions obtained by using asymptotic methods are free from unphysical parameters and are convenient for analysis and for numerical estimations. A numerical analysis revealed a significant scale of two-loop effects and the need for taking them into account in the MOLLER experiment.

  14. On the Convergence in Effective Loop Quantum Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Corichi, Alejandro; Vukasinac, Tatjana; Zapata, Jose Antonio

    2010-07-12

    In Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC) there is a discreteness parameter {lambda}, that has been heuristically associated to a fundamental granularity of quantum geometry. It is also possible to consider {lambda} as a regulator in the same spirit as that used in lattice field theory, where it specifies a regular lattice in the real line. A particular quantization of the k = 0 FLRW loop cosmological model yields a completely solvable model, known as solvable loop quantum cosmology(sLQC). In this contribution, we consider effective classical theories motivated by sLQC and study their {lambda}-dependence, with a special interest on the limit {lambda}{yields}0 and the role of the evolution parameter in the convergence of such limit.

  15. Completely inverted hysteresis loops: Inhomogeneity effects or experimental artifacts

    SciTech Connect

    Song, C. Cui, B.; Pan, F.; Yu, H. Y.

    2013-11-14

    Completely inverted hysteresis loops (IHL) are obtained by the superconducting quantum interference device with large cooling fields (>10 kOe) in (La,Sr)MnO{sub 3} films with self-assembled LaSrMnO{sub 4}, an antiferromagnetic interface. Although the behaviours of measured loops show many features characteristic to the IHL, its origin, however, is not due to the exchange coupling between (La,Sr)MnO{sub 3}/LaSrMnO{sub 4}, an often accepted view on IHL. Instead, we demonstrate that the negative remanence arises from the hysteresis of superconducting coils, which drops abruptly when lower cooling fields are utilized. Hence the completely inverted hysteresis loops are experimental artifacts rather than previously proposed inhomogeneity effects in complicated materials.

  16. One Loop Superstring Effective Actions and d = 4 Supergravity

    SciTech Connect

    Moura, Filipe

    2008-06-25

    We review our recent work on the existence of a new independent R{sup 4} term, at one loop, in the type IIA and heterotic effective actions, after reduction to four dimensions, besides the usual square of the Bel-Robinson tensor. We discuss its supersymmetrization.

  17. Emerging flux as a driver for homologous flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranns, N. D. R.; Harra, L. K.; Matthews, S. A.; Culhane, J. L.

    2000-08-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of 2 M-class solar flares observed by SoHO and Yohkoh, which appear to be homologous. By examination of the flare loop morphology and footpoints we propose a schematic reconnection scenario of a two loop interaction in a quadrupolar magnetic configuration, for both flares (Machado ?; Mandrini ?). After the first flare, the combination of chance emergence of new flux at an opportune location and a subsequent flare, of the type described by Heyvaerts et al. (?), form a new quadrupolar configuration in which the second flare occurred. Therefore though the two M-class flares are homologous by definition, they appear to conform to a scenario in which the preflare conditions are reformed after the first flare by emerging flux, rather than models which involve the continual shearing of a single magnetic structure.

  18. The solar flare myth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Many years of research have demonstrated that large, nonrecurrent geomagnetic storms, shock wave disturbances in the solar wind, and energetic particle events in interplanetary space often occur in close association with large solar flares. This result has led to a pradigm of cause and effect - that large solar flares are the fundamental cause of these events in the near-Earth space environmemt. This paradigm, which I call 'the solar flare myth,' dominates the popular perception of the relationship between solar activity and interplanetary and geomagnetic events and has provided much of the pragmatic rationale for the study of the solar flare phenomenon. Yet there is good evidence that this paradigm is wrong and that flares do not generally play a central role in producing major transient disturbances in the near-Earth space environment. In this paper I outline a different paradigm of cause and effect that removes solar flares from their central position in the chain of events leading from the Sun to near-Earth space. Instead, this central role is given to events known as coronal mass ejections.

  19. The solar flare myth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Many years of research have demonstrated that large, nonrecurrent geomagnetic storms, shock wave disturbances in the solar wind, and energetic particle events in interplanetary space often occur in close association with large solar flares. This result has led to a pradigm of cause and effect - that large solar flares are the fundamental cause of these events in the near-Earth space environmemt. This paradigm, which I call 'the solar flare myth,' dominates the popular perception of the relationship between solar activity and interplanetary and geomagnetic events and has provided much of the pragmatic rationale for the study of the solar flare phenomenon. Yet there is good evidence that this paradigm is wrong and that flares do not generally play a central role in producing major transient disturbances in the near-Earth space environment. In this paper I outline a different paradigm of cause and effect that removes solar flares from their central position in the chain of events leading from the Sun to near-Earth space. Instead, this central role is given to events known as coronal mass ejections.

  20. The Effects of Wave Escape on Fast Magnetosonic Wave Turbulence in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pongkitiwanichakul, Peera; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. Richard

    2012-01-01

    One of the leading models for electron acceleration in solar flares is stochastic acceleration by weakly turbulent fast magnetosonic waves ("fast waves"). In this model, large-scale flows triggered by magnetic reconnection excite large-wavelength fast waves, and fast-wave energy then cascades from large wavelengths to small wavelengths. Electron acceleration by large-wavelength fast-waves is weak, and so the model relies on the small-wavelength waves produced by the turbulent cascade. In order for the model to work, the energy cascade time for large-wavelength fast waves must be shorter than the time required for the waves to propagate out of the solar-flare acceleration region. To investigate the effects of wave escape, we solve the wave kinetic equation for fast waves in weak turbulence theory, supplemented with a homogeneous wave-loss term.We find that the amplitude of large-wavelength fast waves must exceed a minimum threshold in order for a significant fraction of the wave energy to cascade to small wavelengths before the waves leave the acceleration region.We evaluate this threshold as a function of the dominant wavelength of the fast waves that are initially excited by reconnection outflows.

  1. Flare Observations.

    PubMed

    Benz, Arnold O

    Solar flares are observed at all wavelengths from decameter radio waves to gamma-rays at 100 MeV. This review focuses on recent observations in EUV, soft and hard X-rays, white light, and radio waves. Space missions such as RHESSI, Yohkoh, TRACE, and SOHO have enlarged widely the observational base. They have revealed a number of surprises: Coronal sources appear before the hard X-ray emission in chromospheric footpoints, major flare acceleration sites appear to be independent of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), electrons, and ions may be accelerated at different sites, there are at least 3 different magnetic topologies, and basic characteristics vary from small to large flares. Recent progress also includes improved insights into the flare energy partition, on the location(s) of energy release, tests of energy release scenarios and particle acceleration. The interplay of observations with theory is important to deduce the geometry and to disentangle the various processes involved. There is increasing evidence supporting reconnection of magnetic field lines as the basic cause. While this process has become generally accepted as the trigger, it is still controversial how it converts a considerable fraction of the energy into non-thermal particles. Flare-like processes may be responsible for large-scale restructuring of the magnetic field in the corona as well as for its heating. Large flares influence interplanetary space and substantially affect the Earth's lower ionosphere. While flare scenarios have slowly converged over the past decades, every new observation still reveals major unexpected results, demonstrating that solar flares, after 150 years since their discovery, remain a complex problem of astrophysics including major unsolved questions. Supplementary material is available for this article at 10.12942/lrsp-2008-1.

  2. Effective nonrenormalizable theories at one loop

    SciTech Connect

    Gaillard, M.K.

    1987-10-12

    The paper focuses on a nonrenormalizable theory that is more closely related to those suggested by superstrings, namely a gauged nonlinear delta-model, but one which can also be obtained analytically in a particular limit of a parameter (m/sub H/ ..-->.. infinity) of the standard, renormalizable electroweak theory. This will provide another laboratory for testing the validity of calculations using the effective theory. We find (as for certain superstring inspired models to be discussed later) features similar to those for the Fermi theory: quadratic divergences can be reinterpreted as renormalizations, while new terms are generated at the level of logarithmic divergences. Also introduced in the context of more familiar physics are notions such as scalar metric, scalar curvature and nonlinear symmetries, that play an important role in formal aspects of string theories. 58 refs., 12 figs.

  3. THERMAL FRONTS IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Karlický, Marian

    2015-12-01

    We studied the formation of a thermal front during the expansion of hot plasma into colder plasma. We used a three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell model that includes inductive effects. In early phases, in the area of the expanding hot plasma, we found several thermal fronts, which are defined as a sudden decrease of the local electron kinetic energy. The fronts formed a cascade. Thermal fronts with higher temperature contrast were located near plasma density depressions, generated during the hot plasma expansion. The formation of the main thermal front was associated with the return-current process induced by hot electron expansion and electrons backscattered at the front. A part of the hot plasma was trapped by the thermal front while another part, mainly with the most energetic electrons, escaped and generated Langmuir and electromagnetic waves in front of the thermal front, as shown by the dispersion diagrams. Considering all of these processes and those described in the literature, we show that anomalous electric resistivity is produced at the location of the thermal front. Thus, the thermal front can contribute to energy dissipation in the current-carrying loops of solar flares. We estimated the values of such anomalous resistivity in the solar atmosphere together with collisional resistivity and electric fields. We propose that the slowly drifting reverse drift bursts, observed at the beginning of some solar flares, could be signatures of the thermal front.

  4. PRECURSOR FLARES IN OJ 287

    SciTech Connect

    Pihajoki, P.; Berdyugin, A.; Lindfors, E.; Reinthal, R.; Sillanpaeae, A.; Takalo, L.; Valtonen, M.; Nilsson, K.; Zola, S.; Koziel-Wierzbowska, D.; Liakos, A.; Drozdz, M.; Winiarski, M.; Ogloza, W.; Provencal, J.; Santangelo, M. M. M.; Salo, H.; Chandra, S.; Ganesh, S.; Baliyan, K. S.; and others

    2013-02-10

    We have studied three most recent precursor flares in the light curve of the blazar OJ 287 while invoking the presence of a precessing binary black hole in the system to explain the nature of these flares. Precursor flare timings from the historical light curves are compared with theoretical predictions from our model that incorporate effects of an accretion disk and post-Newtonian description for the binary black hole orbit. We find that the precursor flares coincide with the secondary black hole descending toward the accretion disk of the primary black hole from the observed side, with a mean z-component of approximately z{sub c} = 4000 AU. We use this model of precursor flares to predict that precursor flare of similar nature should happen around 2020.96 before the next major outburst in 2022.

  5. THE ABRUPT CHANGES IN THE PHOTOSPHERIC MAGNETIC AND LORENTZ FORCE VECTORS DURING SIX MAJOR NEUTRAL-LINE FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, G. J. D.

    2012-11-01

    We analyze the spatial and temporal variations of the abrupt photospheric magnetic changes associated with six major flares using 12 minute, 0.''5 pixel{sup -1} vector magnetograms from NASA's Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory satellite. The six major flares occurred near the main magnetic neutral lines of four active regions, NOAA 11158, 11166, 11283, and 11429. During all six flares the neutral-line field vectors became stronger and more horizontal, in each case almost entirely due to strengthening of the horizontal field components parallel to the neutral line. In all six cases the neutral-line pre-flare fields were more vertical than the reference potential fields, and collapsed abruptly and permanently closer to potential-field tilt angles during every flare, implying that the relaxation of magnetic stress associated with non-potential tilt angles plays a major role during major flares. The shear angle with respect to the reference potential field did not show such a pattern, demonstrating that flare processes do not generally relieve magnetic stresses associated with photospheric magnetic shear. The horizontal fields became significantly and permanently more aligned with the neutral line during the four largest flares, suggesting that the collapsing field is on average more aligned with the neutral line than the pre-flare neutral-line field. The vertical Lorentz force had a large, abrupt, permanent downward change during each of the flares, consistent with loop collapse. The horizontal Lorentz force changes acted mostly parallel to the neutral line in opposite directions on each side, a signature of the fields contracting during the flare, pulling the two sides of the neutral line toward each other. The greater effect of the flares on field tilt than on shear may be explained by photospheric line-tying.

  6. Sunspot waves and flare energy release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sych, R.; Karlický, M.; Altyntsev, A.; Dudík, J.; Kashapova, L.

    2015-05-01

    Context. We study the possibility of flare process triggering by waves propagating from the sunspot along a magnetic loop (channel) to a nearby flare site. Aims: We present a relationship between the dynamics of ~3-min slow magnetoacoustic waves in the sunspot and flare emergence process. Waves propagating in the magnetic channel whose one foot is anchored in the umbra represent the disturbing agent responsible for triggering the flare energy release. Methods: We applied time-distance plots and pixel wavelet filtration methods to obtain spatio-temporal distribution of wave power variations in radio and SDO/AIA data. To find the magnetic channel, we used potential magnetic field extrapolation of SDO/HMI magnetograms. The propagation velocity of wave fronts was measured from wave locations at specific times. Results: In the correlation curves of the 17 GHz (NoRH) radio emission, we found a monotonous energy amplification of the 3-min waves in the sunspot umbra before the 2012 June 7 flare. This amplification was associated with an increase in the length of the oscillatory wakes in coronal loops (SDO/AIA, 171 Å) prior to the flare onset. A peculiarity of the flare is the constant level of the flare emission in soft X-rays (RHESSI, 3-25 keV) for ~10 min after the short impulsive phase, which indicates continuing energy release. Throughout this time, we found transverse oscillations of the flare loop with a 30 s period in the radio-frequency range (NoRH, 17 GHz). This period appears to be related to the 3-min waves from the sunspot. The magnetic field extrapolation based on SDO/HMI magnetograms shows the existence of the magnetic channel (waveguide) connecting the sunspot with the energy release region. Conclusions: We analysed the sunspot 3-min wave dynamics and found a correlation between the oscillation power amplification and flare triggering in the region connected to the sunspot through the magnetic channel. We propose that this amplified wave flux triggered the

  7. Energetics and Interplanetary Effects of the August 14 and 18, 1979 Solar Flares,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    PD-AM2 696 ENERGETICS AND INTERPLANETARY EFFECTS OF THE AUGUST 14 1/1 AND 18 1979 SOLR (U) CALIFORNIA UNIY BERKELEY SPACE SCIENCES LAB S R KANE ET AL...and Trottet, G., impulsive and gradual hard X-ray surces in a solar flare Awe . and Ass’s- pA&. 108.306. 1982. Woo, ft. 198 (private communication). Woo...777777-77. coJ LLA. 71. V (AGW DO aw )xl 0L8 SPECTRUM AT TIME OF MAXIMUM FLUX 19-20 AUG 1979 IMP-8/GSFC04 I I I I 1111" I I I I 1൓ 103 dJfdP:430

  8. Loop quantization

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolau, A.

    1988-10-01

    Loop unwinding is a known technique for reducing loop overhead, exposing parallelism, and increasing the efficiency of pipelining. Traditional loop unwinding is limited to the innermost loop in a group of nested loops and the amount of unwinding either is fixed or must be specified by the user, on a case by case basis. In this paper the authors present a general technique for automatically unwinding multiply nested loops, explain its advantages over other transformation techniques, and illustrate its practical effectiveness. Lopp Quantization could be beneficial by itself or coupled with other loop transformations.

  9. Nonequilibrium ionization effects in asymmetrically heated loops. [in solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spadaro, D.; Antiochos, Spiro K.; Mariska, J. T.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of nonequilibrium ionization on magnetic loop models with a steady siphon flow that is driven by a nonuniform heating rate are investigated. The model developed by Mariska (1988) to explain the observed redshifts of transition region emission lines is examined, and the number densities of the ions of carbon and oxygen along the loop are computed, with and without the approximation of ionization equilibrium. Considerable deviations from equilibrium were found. In order to determine the consequences of these nonequilibrium effects on the characteristics of the EUV emission from the loop plasma, the profiles and wavelength positions of all the important emission lines due to carbon and oxygen were calculated. The calculations are in broad agreement with Mariska's conclusions, although they show a significant diminution of the Doppler shifts, as well as modifications to the line widths. It is concluded that the inclusion of nonequilibrium effects make it more difficult to reproduce the observed characteristics of the solar transition region by means of the asymmetric-heating models.

  10. Further Exploration of Post-Flare Giant Arches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Matthew; Seaton, Daniel B.; Dennis, Brian R.; feng, Li

    2017-08-01

    Recent observations from the SWAP EUV imager on-board PROBA2 and SXI X-ray observations from the GOES satellite have shown that post-flare giant arches and regular post-flare loops are one and the same thing. However, it is still not clear how certain loop systems are able to sustain prolonged growth to heights of approximately 400000 km (>0.5 solar-radii). In this presentation we further explore the energy deposition rate above post-flare loop systems through high-energy RHESSI observations. We also explore the difference between the loop systems through a multi-wavelength epoch analysis.

  11. The flare of November 29, 1996 observed by SOHO/CDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaykowska, A.; Rank, G.; Ruedi, I.; Solanki, S. K.; de Pontieu, B.

    We present flare and post-flare observations obtained with the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) on November 29, 1996. On this day at around 20:40 UT, an M 1.0/1F flare occurred in the solar active region NOAA 7999 and was accidentally observed by the Normal Incidence Spectrometer (NIS), one of the two spectrometers of CDS (Harrison et al., 1995). The data consist of two rasters lasting for 135 minutes each and both cover an area of 4 times 4 arcminutes. The first raster is pointed at the northern part of the active region during the flare whereas the second one covers the southern part of the active region after the main phase of the flare. The observations were part of the Joint Observing Program (JOP) 54 which is aimed at the investigation of scaling laws in coronal loops. Consequently the details of observations such as line list and exposure time weren't convenient for flare observations. In addition a flare can lead to over-exposures, i.e., saturation of the CCD detector pixels, and a burn-in degeneration of the detector in bright lines. Therefore observations of flares with CDS are avoided and the flare from November 29, 1996, is so far the only noteworthy flare observed by CDS. In our case we have remarkable saturation in the chromospheric He I line at 584 AA and the coronal Fe XVI lines at 335 AA and 361 AA, which are formed at an equilibrium temperature of about 2.5 cdot 10^6 K. Another effect of illumination on the CCD detector being too high is that the electron well of each pixel may fill and hence bleed to adjacent pixels. This effect is clearly seen in our data. As the flare occurred, the 2 times 240 arcseconds slit was being rastered across the active region from west to east. We thus have a convolution of spatial and temporal effects which are not easy to separate. However, we have spectral information of each pixel in all lines and exposures which are not saturated. Hence, line parameters

  12. Wound Magnetostatics and Flaring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boily, C. M.; Lynden-Bell, D.

    1996-03-01

    We discuss the winding of a force-free axisymmetric magnetic field rooted on a heavy conductor onz=0. In quadrupolar symmetry the field expands in the half-spacez>0 and the toroidal flux concentrates on a conical surface. After a mean twist of 208°, the conical layer hosts large toroidal current loops with reversal of the magnetic flux on either side. The evolution of the field structure is described by scale-free static solutionsB˜r -(p+2), withp taking values between 0 and 2. The large expansion factor of the field structure is suggestive of flaring originating on the solar photosphere.

  13. Temperature and Electron Density Diagnostics of a Candle-flame-shaped Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidoni, S. E.; McKenzie, D. E.; Longcope, D. W.; Plowman, J. E.; Yoshimura, K.

    2015-02-01

    Candle-flame-shaped flares are archetypical structures that provide indirect evidence of magnetic reconnection. A flare resembling Tsuneta's famous 1992 candle-flame flare occurred on 2011 January 28; we present its temperature and electron density diagnostics. This flare was observed with Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA), Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT), and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Ahead (STEREO-A)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager, resulting in high-resolution, broad temperature coverage, and stereoscopic views of this iconic structure. The high-temperature images reveal a brightening that grows in size to form a tower-like structure at the top of the posteruption flare arcade, a feature that has been observed in other long-duration events. Despite the extensive work on the standard reconnection scenario, there is no complete agreement among models regarding the nature of this high-intensity elongated structure. Electron density maps reveal that reconnected loops that are successively connected at their tops to the tower develop a density asymmetry of about a factor of two between the two legs, giving the appearance of "half-loops." We calculate average temperatures with a new fast differential emission measure (DEM) method that uses SDO/AIA data and analyze the heating and cooling of salient features of the flare. Using STEREO observations, we show that the tower and the half-loop brightenings are not a line-of-sight projection effect of the type studied by Forbes & Acton. This conclusion opens the door for physics-based explanations of these puzzling, recurrent solar flare features, previously attributed to projection effects. We corroborate the results of our DEM analysis by comparing them with temperature analyses from Hinode/XRT.

  14. TEMPERATURE AND ELECTRON DENSITY DIAGNOSTICS OF A CANDLE-FLAME-SHAPED FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Guidoni, S. E.; Plowman, J. E.

    2015-02-10

    Candle-flame-shaped flares are archetypical structures that provide indirect evidence of magnetic reconnection. A flare resembling Tsuneta's famous 1992 candle-flame flare occurred on 2011 January 28; we present its temperature and electron density diagnostics. This flare was observed with Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA), Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT), and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Ahead (STEREO-A)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager, resulting in high-resolution, broad temperature coverage, and stereoscopic views of this iconic structure. The high-temperature images reveal a brightening that grows in size to form a tower-like structure at the top of the posteruption flare arcade, a feature that has been observed in other long-duration events. Despite the extensive work on the standard reconnection scenario, there is no complete agreement among models regarding the nature of this high-intensity elongated structure. Electron density maps reveal that reconnected loops that are successively connected at their tops to the tower develop a density asymmetry of about a factor of two between the two legs, giving the appearance of ''half-loops''. We calculate average temperatures with a new fast differential emission measure (DEM) method that uses SDO/AIA data and analyze the heating and cooling of salient features of the flare. Using STEREO observations, we show that the tower and the half-loop brightenings are not a line-of-sight projection effect of the type studied by Forbes and Acton. This conclusion opens the door for physics-based explanations of these puzzling, recurrent solar flare features, previously attributed to projection effects. We corroborate the results of our DEM analysis by comparing them with temperature analyses from Hinode/XRT.

  15. Thermal phase transition with full 2-loop effective potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine, M.; Meyer, M.; Nardini, G.

    2017-07-01

    Theories with extended Higgs sectors constructed in view of cosmological ramifications (gravitational wave signal, baryogenesis, dark matter) are often faced with conflicting requirements for their couplings; in particular those influencing the strength of a phase transition may be large. Large couplings compromise perturbative studies, as well as the high-temperature expansion that is invoked in dimensionally reduced lattice investigations. With the example of the inert doublet extension of the Standard Model (IDM), we show how a resummed 2-loop effective potential can be computed without a high-T expansion, and use the result to scrutinize its accuracy. With the exception of Tc, which is sensitive to contributions from heavy modes, the high-T expansion is found to perform well. 2-loop corrections weaken the transition in IDM, but they are moderate, whereby a strong transition remains an option.

  16. X-ray flares in protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, M. R.; Shibata, K.; Matsumoto, R.

    1995-12-01

    Origin of X-ray flares in protostars and the formation of magnetohydrodynamical jets are studied by numerically simulating the interaction between the disk material and the dipole magnetic field of the central protostar.At the initial state, we assume that a thin Keplerian disk is threaded by the dipole magnetic fields of the central star. The closed magnetic loops connecting the central star and the disk are twisted by the rotation of the disk. As the twist accumulates, magnetic loops expand and finally approach to the open field configuration. In the presence of resistivity, magnetic reconnection takes place in the current sheet developed along the expanding magnetic loops. Outgoing magnetic island and 'post flare loops' are formed as a result of the reconnection.This process can be regarded as a bifurcation to the lower energy state triggered by continuous helicity injection (e.g., Kusano 1995). The time scale of this flare is the order of the rotation period of the disk. The released magnetic energy (typically 10(35) erg in protostars) goes into the thermal energy of the plasma in the flaring loop and the thermal and kinetic energies of the ejected plasmoids. The maximum speed of the streamer is the order of the Keplerian rotation speed around the inner edge of the disk. High energy particles created by the reconnection by bremsstrahlung emission at the footpoints of the flaring loop. The length of the flaring loop is several times larger than the radius of the central star. The magnetic reconnection accompanying this mechanism can explain hard X-ray flares in protostars observed by ASCA (Koyama et al. 1995).

  17. Covariant effective action for loop quantum cosmology a la Palatini

    SciTech Connect

    Olmo, Gonzalo J.; Singh, Parampreet E-mail: psingh@perimeterinstitute.ca

    2009-01-15

    In loop quantum cosmology, non-perturbative quantum gravity effects lead to the resolution of the big bang singularity by a quantum bounce without introducing any new degrees of freedom. Though fundamentally discrete, the theory admits a continuum description in terms of an effective Hamiltonian. Here we provide an algorithm to obtain the corresponding effective action, establishing in this way the covariance of the theory for the first time. This result provides new insights on the continuum properties of the discrete structure of quantum geometry and opens new avenues to extract physical predictions such as those related to gauge invariant cosmological perturbations.

  18. Aharonov-Bohm effect without closing a loop

    SciTech Connect

    Retzker, A.; Nussinov, S.; Reznik, B.; Aharonov, Y.; Botero, A.

    2006-03-15

    We discuss the consequences of the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect in setups involving several charged particles, wherein none of the charged particles encloses a closed loop around the magnetic flux. We show that in such setups, the AB phase is encoded either in the relative phase of a bipartite or multipartite entangled photons states, or alternatively, gives rise to an overall AB phase that can be measured relative to another reference system. These setups involve processes of annihilation or creation of electron-hole pairs. We discuss the relevance of such effects in 'vacuum birefringence' in QED, and comment on their connection to other known effects.

  19. Pre-flare coronal dimmings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. M.; Su, Y. N.; Ji, H. S.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Coronal dimmings are regions of decreased extreme-ultravoilet (EUV) and/or X-ray (originally Skylab, then Yohkoh/SXT) intensities, which are often associated with flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The large-scale impulsive dimmings have been thoroughly observed and investigated. The pre-flare dimmings before the flare impulsive phase, however, have rarely been studied in detail. Aims: We focus on the pre-flare coronal dimmings. We report our multiwavelength observations of the GOES X1.6 solar flare and the accompanying halo CME that was produced by the eruption of a sigmoidal magnetic flux rope (MFR) in NOAA active region (AR) 12158 on 2014 September 10. Methods: The eruption was observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). The photospheric line-of-sight magnetograms were observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board SDO. The soft X-ray (SXR) fluxes were recorded by the GOES spacecraft. The halo CME was observed by the white-light coronagraphs of the Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) on board SOHO. Results: About 96 min before the onset of the flare/CME, narrow pre-flare coronal dimmings appeared at the two ends of the twisted MFR. They extended very slowly, with their intensities decreasing with time, while their apparent widths (8-9 Mm) continued to be nearly constant. During the impulsive and decay phases of flare, typical fan-like twin dimmings appeared and expanded, with a much larger extent and lower intensities than the pre-flare dimmings. The percentage of the 171 Å intensity decrease reaches 40%. The pre-flare dimmings are most striking in 171, 193, and 211 Å with formation temperatures of 0.6-2.5 MK. The northern part of the pre-flare dimmings could also be recognized in 131 and 335 Å. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first detailed study of pre-flare coronal dimmings; they can be explained by density depletion as a result of the gradual

  20. Thermal instability in post-flare plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.

    1976-01-01

    The cooling of post-flare plasmas is discussed and the formation of loop prominences is explained as due to a thermal instability. A one-dimensional model was developed for active loop prominences. Only the motion and heat fluxes parallel to the existing magnetic fields are considered. The relevant size scales and time scales are such that single-fluid MHD equations are valid. The effects of gravity, the geometry of the field and conduction losses to the chromosphere are included. A computer code was constructed to solve the model equations. Basically, the system is treated as an initial value problem (with certain boundary conditions at the chromosphere-corona transition region), and a two-step time differencing scheme is used.

  1. FLARES AND THEIR UNDERLYING MAGNETIC COMPLEXITY

    SciTech Connect

    Engell, Alexander J.; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Siarkowski, Marek; Gryciuk, Magda; Sylwester, Janusz; Sylwester, Barbara; Cirtain, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    SphinX (Solar PHotometer IN X-rays), a full-disk-integrated spectrometer, observed 137 flare-like/transient events with active region (AR) 11024 being the only AR on disk. The Hinode X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and Solar Optical Telescope observe 67 of these events and identified their location from 12:00 UT on July 3 through 24:00 UT 2009 July 7. We find that the predominant mechanisms for flares observed by XRT are (1) flux cancellation and (2) the shearing of underlying magnetic elements. Point- and cusp-like flare morphologies seen by XRT all occur in a magnetic environment where one polarity is impeded by the opposite polarity and vice versa, forcing the flux cancellation process. The shearing is either caused by flux emergence at the center of the AR and separation of polarities along a neutral line or by individual magnetic elements having a rotational motion. Both mechanisms are observed to contribute to single- and multiple-loop flares. We observe that most loop flares occur along a large portion of a polarity inversion line. Point- and cusp-like flares become more infrequent as the AR becomes organized with separation of the positive and negative polarities. SphinX, which allows us to identify when these flares occur, provides us with a statistically significant temperature and emission scaling law for A and B class flares: EM = 6.1 x 10{sup 33} T{sup 1.9{+-}0.1}.

  2. Origin of the Universal Correlation between the Flare Temperature and the Emission Measure for Solar and Stellar Flares.

    PubMed

    Shibata; Yokoyama

    1999-11-20

    We present a theory to explain the observed universal correlation between flare temperature T and emission measure EM=n2V for solar and stellar flares (including solar microflares observed by Yohkoh as well as protostellar flares observed by ASCA), where n is the electron density and V is the volume. The theory is based on a magnetic reconnection model with heat conduction and chromospheric evaporation, assuming that the gas pressure of a flare loop is comparable to the magnetic pressure. This theory predicts the relation EM~B-5T17/2, which explains well the observed correlation between EM and T in the range of 6x106 K < T<108 K and 1044flares, if the magnetic field strength B of a flare loop is nearly constant for solar and stellar flares.

  3. Effect of coronal flaring on apical extrusion of debris during root canal instrumentation using single-file systems.

    PubMed

    Topçuoğlu, H S; Üstün, Y; Akpek, F; Aktı, A; Topçuoğlu, G

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of coronal flaring on the amount of debris extruded apically during root canal preparation using the Reciproc, WaveOne (WO) and OneShape (OS) single-file systems. Ninety extracted single-rooted mandibular incisor teeth were randomly assigned to six groups (n = 15 for each group) for canal instrumentation. Endodontic access cavities were prepared in each tooth. In three of the six groups, coronal flaring was not performed; coronal flaring was performed with Gates-Glidden drills on all teeth in the remaining three groups. The canals were then instrumented with one or other of the following single-file instrument systems: Reciproc, WO and OS. Debris extruded apically during instrumentation was collected into pre-weighed Eppendorf tubes. The tubes were then stored in an incubator at 70 °C for 5 days. The weight of the dry extruded debris was established by subtracting the pre-instrumentation and post-instrumentation weight of the Eppendorf tubes for each group. Data were analysed using one-way analysis of variance (anova) and Tukey's post hoc tests (P = 0.05). Reciproc and WO files without coronal flaring produced significantly more debris compared with the other groups (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in apical extrusion of debris amongst the other groups (P > 0.05). All single-file systems caused apical extrusion of debris. Performing coronal flaring prior to canal preparation reduced the amount of apically extruded debris when using Reciproc or WO systems. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Solar Flare and IMF Sector Structure Effects in the Lower Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lastovicka, J.

    1984-01-01

    About 1% of all sudden ionospheric disturbances (SIDs) observed at the Panska Ves Observatory (Czechoslovakia), were found to be not of solar-XUV origin. Among them, the very rare SWF events (observed at L = 2.4) of corpuscular origin are the most interesting. The IMF sector structure effects in the midlatitude lower ionosphere are minor in comparison with effects of solar flares, geomagnetic storms, etc. There are two basic types of effects. The first type is a disturbance, best developed in geomagnetic activity, and observed in the night-time ionosphere. It can be interpreted as a response to sector structure related changes of geomagnetic (= magnetospheric) activity. The other type is best developed in the tropospheric vorticity area index and is also observed in the day-time ionosphere in winter. This effect is quietening in the ionosphere as well as troposphere. While the occurrence of the former type is persistent in time, the latter is severely diminished in some periods. All the stratosphere, the 10-mb level temperature and height above Berlin-Tempelhof do not display any observable IMF section structure effect.

  5. Solar flare and IMF sector structure effects in the lower ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Lastovicka, J.

    1984-05-01

    About 1% of all sudden ionospheric disturbances (SIDs) observed at the Panska Ves Observatory (Czechoslovakia), were found to be not of solar-XUV origin. Among them, the very rare SWF events (observed at L 2.4) of corpuscular origin are the most interesting. The IMF sector structure effects in the midlatitude lower ionosphere are minor in comparison with effects of solar flares, geomagnetic storms, etc. There are two basic types of effects. The first type is a disturbance, best developed in geomagnetic activity, and observed in the night-time ionosphere. It can be interpreted as a response to sector structure related changes of geomagnetic (magnetospheric) activity. The other type is best developed in the tropospheric vorticity area index and is also observed in the day-time ionosphere in winter. This effect is quietening in the ionosphere as well as troposphere. While the occurrence of the former type is persistent in time, the latter is severely diminished in some periods. All the stratosphere, the 10-mb level temperature and height above Berlin-Tempelhof do not display any observable IMF section structure effect.

  6. The structure of high-temperature solar flare plasma in non-thermal flare models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.

    1985-01-01

    Analytic differential emission measure distributions have been derived for coronal plasma in flare loops heated both by collisions of high-energy suprathermal electrons with background plasma, and by ohmic heating by the beam-normalizing return current. For low densities, reverse current heating predominates, while for higher densities collisional heating predominates. There is thus a minimum peak temperature in an electron-heated loop. In contrast to previous approximate analyses, it is found that a stable reverse current can dominate the heating rate in a flare loop, especially in the low corona. Two 'scaling laws' are found which relate the peak temperature in the loop to the suprathermal electron flux. These laws are testable observationally and constitute a new diagnostic procedure for examining modes of energy transport in flaring loops.

  7. Effect of calcium hydroxide and triple antibiotic paste as intracanal medicaments on the incidence of inter-appointment flare-up in diabetic patients: An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Swathi; Vivekananda Pai, A. R.; Thomas, Manuel S.; Bhat, Vishal

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate and compare the effect of antibacterial intracanal medicaments on inter-appointment flare-up in diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: Fifty diabetic patients requiring root canal treatment were assigned into groups I, II, and III. In group I, no intracanal medicament was placed. In groups II and III, calcium hydroxide and triple antibiotic pastes were placed as intracanal medicaments, respectively. Patients were instructed to record their pain on days 1, 2, 3, 7, and 14. Inter-appointment flare-up was evaluated using verbal rating scale (VRS). Results: Overall incidence of inter-appointment flare-up among diabetic patients was found to be 16%. In group I, 50% of the patients and in group II, 15% of the patients developed inter-appointment flare-up. However, no patients in group III developed inter-appointment flare-up. The comparison of these results was found to be statistically significant (P = 0.002; χ2 = 12.426). However, with respect to intergroup comparison, only the difference between groups I and III was found to be statistically significant (P = 0.002; χ2 = 12.00). Conclusions: Calcium hydroxide and triple antibiotic paste are effective for managing inter-appointment flare-ups in diabetic patients. Triple antibiotic paste is more effective than calcium hydroxide in preventing the occurrence of flare-up in diabetic patients. PMID:24944440

  8. Loop quantum cosmology of Bianchi IX: effective dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corichi, Alejandro; Montoya, Edison

    2017-03-01

    We study solutions to the effective equations for the Bianchi IX class of spacetimes within loop quantum cosmology (LQC). We consider Bianchi IX models whose matter content is a massless scalar field, by numerically solving the loop quantum cosmology effective equations, with and without inverse triad corrections. The solutions are classified using certain geometrically motivated classical observables. We show that both effective theories—with lapse N  =  V and N  =  1—resolve the big bang singularity and reproduce the classical dynamics far from the bounce. Moreover, due to the positive spatial curvature, there is an infinite number of bounces and recollapses. We study the limit of large field momentum and show that both effective theories reproduce the same dynamics, thus recovering general relativity. We implement a procedure to identify amongst the Bianchi IX solutions, those that behave like k  =  0,1 FLRW as well as Bianchi I, II, and VII0 models. The effective solutions exhibit Bianchi I phases with Bianchi II transitions and also Bianchi VII0 phases, which had not been studied before. We comment on the possible implications of these results for a quantum modification to the classical BKL behaviour.

  9. The Effect of Magnetic Topology on the Escape of Flare Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Masson, S.; DeVore, C. R.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection in the solar atmosphere is believed to be the driver of most solar explosive phenomena. Therefore, the topology of the coronal magnetic field is central to understanding the solar drivers of space weather. Of particular importance to space weather are the impulsive Solar Energetic particles that are associated with some CME/eruptive flare events. Observationally, the magnetic configuration of active regions where solar eruptions originate appears to agree with the standard eruptive flare model. According to this model, particles accelerated at the flare reconnection site should remain trapped in the corona and the ejected plasmoid. However, flare-accelerated particles frequently reach the Earth long before the CME does. We present a model that may account for the injection of energetic particles onto open magnetic flux tubes connecting to the Earth. Our model is based on the well-known 2.5D breakout topology, which has a coronal null point (null line) and a four-flux system. A key new addition, however, is that we include an isothermal solar wind with open-flux regions. Depending on the location of the open flux with respect to the null point, we find that the flare reconnection can consist of two distinct phases. At first, the flare reconnection involves only closed field, but if the eruption occurs close to the open field, we find a second phase involving interchange reconnection between open and closed. We argue that this second reconnection episode is responsible for the injection of flare-accelerated particles into the interplanetary medium. We will report on our recent work toward understanding how flare particles escape to the heliosphere. This work uses high-resolution 2.5D MHD numerical simulations performed with the Adaptively Refined MHD Solver (ARMS).

  10. Anemone structure of AR NOAA 10798 and related geo-effective flares and CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, A.; Ishii, T. T.; Shibata, K.; Gopalswamy, N.

    We report coronal features of an active region NOAA 10798 This active region was located in the middle of a small coronal hole and generated 3 M-class flares The flares are associated with high speed CMEs which produced a magnetic storm on 2005 August 24 We examined the coronal features by using observational data in soft X-rays in extreme ultraviolets and in microwaves obtained with GOES SOHO TRACE satellites and Nobeyama Radioheliograph

  11. A Spectral Analysis of the Masuda Flare Using Yohkoh Hard X-Ray Telescope Pixon Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, David; Metcalf, Thomas R.

    1997-11-01

    Masuda's discovery of a compact hard X-ray impulsive source at the apex of a flaring coronal loop has received a great deal of recent attention in the solar physics community. The Masuda flare, which occurred on 1992 January 13, exhibited evidence of energy deposition in a compact region some distance above the soft X-ray loop, suggesting, to some authors, a flare process similar to the classical model for two-ribbon flares proposed by Shibata et al. These conclusions were made on the basis of a maximum entropy method (MEM) reconstruction of the Yohkoh Hard X-Ray Telescope (HXT) observations. Recently, a new approach has been developed for reconstructing the spatial information from the HXT: that of pixon reconstruction, proposed by Metcalf et al. In this paper, we apply the pixon reconstruction technique to the event of 1992 January 13 and determine the temporal and spectral characteristics of the loop-top source. While our emphasis here is on the spectral properties of the Masuda flare, we also provide a brief comparison between the pixon reconstruction and that of MEM for the hard X-ray loop top. In carrying out the comparison between the methods, we have applied recent improvements to the instrument response functions and reconstruction algorithms. We have also identified a previously unknown effect of weak source suppression that was inherent in previous analyses and that significantly compromised the ability to study weak sources of hard X-ray emission in the presence of strong sources. The improved response functions and the better flux estimation used in this paper reduce (but do not eliminate) the effects of this suppression, and consequently, it should be noted that the MEM analysis presented in this paper is quite distinct from any that have been carried out previously. Our conclusions are that (a) a compact loop-top hard X-ray source exists with an impulsive temporal profile spanning the peak of the flare; (b) the loop-top source is nonthermal in nature

  12. Secular effects on inflation from one-loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrer, J. A.; Espriu, D.

    2008-06-01

    In this Letter we revisit and extend a previous analysis where the possible relevance of quantum gravity effects in a cosmological setup was studied. The object of interest are non-local (logarithmic) terms generated in the effective action of gravity due to the exchange in loops of massless modes (such as photons or the gravitons themselves). We correct one mistake existing in the previous work and discuss the issue in a more general setting in different cosmological scenarios. We obtain the one-loop quantum-corrected evolution equations for the cosmological scale factor up to a given order in a derivative expansion in two particular cases: a matter dominated universe with vanishing cosmological constant, and in a de Sitter universe. We show that the quantum corrections, albeit tiny, may have a secular effect that eventually modifies the expansion rate. For a de Sitter universe they tend to slow down the rate of the expansion, while the effect may be the opposite in a matter dominated universe.

  13. Fields, Flares, And Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucheron, L.; Al-Ghraibah, Amani; McAteer, J.; Cao, H.; Jackiewicz, J.; McNamara, B.; Voelz, D.; Calabro, B.; DeGrave, K.; Kirk, M.; Madadi, A.; Petsov, A.; Taylor, G.

    2011-05-01

    Solar active regions are the source of many energetic and geo-effective events such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Understanding how these complex source regions evolve and produce these events is of fundamental importance, not only to solar physics, but also to the demands of space weather forecasting. We propose to investigate the physical properties of active region magnetic fields using fractal-, gradient-, neutral line-, emerging flux-, wavelet- and general image-based techniques, and to correlate them to solar activity. The combination of these projects with solarmonitor.org and the international Max Millenium Campaign presents an opportunity for accurate and timely flare predictions for the first time. Many studies have attempted to relate solar flares to their concomitant magnetic field distributions. However, a consistent, causal relationship between the magnetic field on the photosphere and the production of solar flares is unknown. Often the local properties of the active region magnetic field - critical in many theories of activity - are lost in the global definition of their diagnostics, in effect smoothing out variations that occur on small spatial scales. Mindful of this, our overall goal is to create measures that are sensitive to both the global and the small-scale nature of energy storage and release in the solar atmosphere in order to study solar flare prediction. This set of active region characteristics will be automatically explored for discriminating features through the use of feature selection methods. Such methods search a feature space while optimizing a criterion - the prediction of a flare in this case. The large size of the datasets used in this project make it well suited for an exploration of a large feature space. This work is funded through a New Mexico State University Interdisciplinary Research Grant.

  14. Extreme solar EUV flares and ICMEs and resultant extreme ionospheric effects: Comparison of the Halloween 2003 and the Bastille Day events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Guarnieri, F. L.; Fuller-Rowell, T.; Mannucci, A. J.; Iijima, B.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Judge, D. L.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Saito, A.; Tsuda, T.; Verkhoglyadova, O. P.; Zambon, G. A.

    2006-06-01

    Extreme solar flares can cause extreme ionospheric effects. The 28 October 2003 flare caused a ~25 total electron content units (TECU = 1016 el/m2 column density), or a ~30%, increase in the local noon equatorial ionospheric column density. The rise in the TEC enhancement occurred in ~5 min. This TEC increase was ~5 times the TEC increases detected for the 29 October and the 4 November 2003 flares and the 14 July 2000 (Bastille Day) flare. In the 260-340 Å EUV wavelength range, the 28 October flare peak count rate was more than twice as large as for the other three flares. Another strong ionospheric effect is the delayed influence of the interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) electric fields on the ionosphere. For the 28 and 29 October flares, the associated ICMEs propagated from the Sun to the Earth at particularly high speeds. The prompt penetration of the interplanetary electric fields (IEFs) caused the dayside near-equatorial ionosphere to be strongly uplifted by E × B convection. Consequential diffusion of the uplifted plasma down the Earth's magnetic field lines to higher magnetic latitudes is a major plasma transport process during these IEF (superstorm) events. Such diffusion should lead to inverted midlatitude ionospheres (oxygen ions at higher altitudes than protons). The energy input into the midlatitude ionospheres by this superfountain phenomenon could lead to local dayside midlatitude disturbance dynamos, features which cannot propagate from the nightside auroral zones.

  15. Outer Atmospheres of Low Mass Stars — Flare Characteristics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalitha, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2013-04-01

    We compare the coronal properties during flares on active low mass stars CN Leonis, AB Doradus A and Proxima Centauri observed with XMM-Newton. From the X-ray data we analyze the temporal evolution of temperature, emission measure and coronal abundance. The nature of these flares are with secondary events following the first flare peak in the light curve, raising the question regarding the involved magnetic structure. We infer from the plasma properties and the geometry of the flaring structure that the flare originates from a compact arcade rather than in a single loop.

  16. Classification of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, T.; Sturrock, P. A.

    The historical background of solar flare classification before the SMM launch is reviewed along with recent developments made by observations with SMM, Hinotori, and other contemporary satellite and ground-based observations. Based on these recent findings, solar flares are grouped into five classes: thermal hard X-ray flares, nonthermal hard X-ray flares, impulsive gamma-ray/proton flares, gradual gamma-ray/proton flares, and quiescent filament-eruption flares. The roles of filament eruptions in flare development are examined, and theoretical ideas related to processes occurring in different flare classes are discussed.

  17. Are Complex Magnetic Field Structures Responsible for the Confined X-class Flares in Super Active Region 12192?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Li, Ting; Chen, Huadong

    2017-08-01

    From 2014 October 19 to 27, six X-class flares occurred in super active region (AR) 12192. They were all confined flares and were not followed by coronal mass ejections. To examine the structures of the four flares close to the solar disk center from October 22 to 26, we firstly employ composite triple-time images in each flare process to display the stratified structure of these flare loops. The loop structures of each flare in both the lower (171 Å) and higher (131 Å) temperature channels are complex, e.g., the flare loops rooting at flare ribbons are sheared or twisted (enwound) together, and the complex structures were not destroyed during the flares. For the first flare, although the flare loop system appears as a spindle shape, we can estimate its structures from observations, with lengths ranging from 130 to 300 Mm, heights from 65 to 150 Mm, widths at the middle part of the spindle from 40 to 100 Mm, and shear angles from 16° to 90°. Moreover, the flare ribbons display irregular movements, such as the left ribbon fragments of the flare on October 22 sweeping a small region repeatedly, and both ribbons of the flare on October 26 moved along the same direction instead of separating from each other. These irregular movements also imply that the corresponding flare loops are complex, e.g., several sets of flare loops are twisted together. Although previous studies have suggested that the background magnetic fields prevent confined flares from erupting,based on these observations, we suggest that complex flare loop structures may be responsible for these confined flares.

  18. Progress and problems in flare particle diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. C.

    Recent solar maxima saw major progress in remote diagnosis of flare particles at the sun via advances in ground and space instrumentation and in coordinated observing campaigns, including in situ measurements of related space plasma particles, waves, and fields. This review discusses aspects of where we stand with regard to remote particle diagnostics, emphasising recent progress and new problems. Special attention is paid to interpretation of `hard' [hard X-ray (HXR) and gamma-ray (GR)] photon data from the Ramaty High Energy Spectrometric Imager (RHESSI) and emphasising their implications for the basic physics problems of acceleration, propagation, and flare energy transport budget. In particular the following are discussed: - a) HXR SPECTRAL INVERSION Progress in numerical regularisation algorithms incorporating physical constraints Real thin and thick target and thermal model electron distribution recovery Testing/exclusion of models by application of these to RHESSI data Interpretive complications - e.g. albedo, directivity, energy dispersion b) HXR SPECTROSCOPIC IMAGE INTERPRETATION Image reconstruction algorithms - 2-D to 3-D ambiguity Source sizes and physics implications Source sizes and locations compared with TRACE, radio and other data Beam energy losses, and atmospheric density structure - e.g. coronal thick targets Evidence for and implications of complex versus simple loop structure Diffuse source (e.g. albedo patch) detection c) HXR ANISOTROPY AND POLARISATION d) GR-LINE SPECTRA AND IMAGES AND OTHER ION DIAGNOSTICS Implications for MEV ion acceleration sites, propagation, and energy budget Low energy ion diagnostics e) FLARE ENERGY BUDGET Real evidence for low energy cut-offs in particle spectra Neupert effect and status of the single loop particle heated model

  19. X-ray observations of the impulsive phase of solar flares with the Yohkoh satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Andrew

    This thesis starts with an overview of the physics of the solar corona, concentrating on X-ray emission and the plasma dynamics associated with the impulsive or rise phase of solar flares. The Yohkoh satellite is described, with a section on each major instrument on board. Analysis techniques used in the thesis are then introduced, with a section of soft X-ray spectroscopy and on the application of the Maximum Entropy Method image reconstruction technique to data from the Hard X-ray Telescope on Yohkoh. The instrumental effect known as fixed pattern noise is described, leading to a numerical model of the BCS digitisation process, which is used both to understand the limits of the detector, and to correct the data in a limited way. Alternative methods for the avoidance of fixed pattern noise are evaluated. The analysis of a solar flare with unusually large soft X-ray blue shifts is then performed. Physical parameters of the plasma during the initial stages of the flare are derived, which are used in an energy balance calculation. Agreement is found between the energy in nonthermal electrons and that contained in the coronal plasma, supporting the nonthermal beam driven chromospheric evaporation theory of impulsive flares. The location of superhot plasma in two impulsive flares and one hot thermal flare is then investigated. Superhot plasma is found to be located close to the chromosphere, and related to the nonthermal burst in the two impulsive flares. Superhot plasma in the hot thermal flare is distributed uniformly throughout the loop. The differences are explained as being due to the different energy transport processes active in each type of flare.

  20. Effect of resumption of second line drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis that flared up after treatment discontinuation

    PubMed Central

    ten, W; Hermans, J.; Breedveld, F.; Dijkmans, B.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the effect of resumption of second line drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) that flared after treatment discontinuation.
METHODS—RA patients were studied whose RA flared up after discontinuation of second line treatment while being in remission and who received a second course of the drug. Disease activity parameters were prospectively assessed at the time of treatment discontinuation, during the period when the disease flared up, and three months thereafter. Furthermore the medical charts were reviewed at 12 months after treatment resumption.
RESULTS—There were 51 patients included in the study: 25 patients treated with antimalarial drugs, 10 with parenteral gold, four with d-penicillamine, eight with sulphasalazine, two with azathioprine, and two with methotrexate. Disease activity parameters showed significant improvement within three months of treatment resumption, but remained significantly worse when compared with that measured before treatment discontinuation. Within three months 47% of the patients fulfilled 20% response criteria. Disease activity 12 months after treatment resumption was considered to be absent in 35%, mild in 43%, and moderate or active in 22% of the patients. In four (8%) patients the resumed treatment was stopped because of lack of efficacy. Side effects were recorded in four patients, which did not result in treatment discontinuation.
CONCLUSIONS—Resumption of second line drugs in RA patients whose disease flared up after discontinuation of treatment is effective and safe in most patients. Half of the patients responded within three months after resumption of the second line drug.

 PMID:9165995

  1. Effects of the canopy and anchoring on evaporation flow from a solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unverferth, John E.; Longcope, Dana

    2017-08-01

    Spectroscopic observations of flare ribbons typically show chromospheric evaporation flows which are subsonic for their high temperatures. This contrasts with many numerical simulation where evaporation is typically supersonic. These simulations typically assume flow along a flux tube with uniform cross-sectional area. A simple model of the chromospheric canopy, however, includes many regions of low magnetic field strength, where flux tubes achieve local maxima in area: effectively chambers in the flux tubes. We find that one third of all field lines in a model have some form of chamber through which evaporation flow must pass. Using a one dimensional isothermal hydrodynamic code we simulated supersonic flow through an assortment of chambers. We find that there is a subset of solutions that allow for a stationary standing shock in the chamber. These solutions result in a slower and denser upflow into the corona. We also constructed simple synthetic lines and found that shocked solutions showed brighter and slower emission. When taken as an ensemble over a cell of the model canopy, the lines appear slower, even subsonic, than expected due to the outsized contribution from shocked solutions.

  2. The effects of space weather for HF propagation in the period of solar flare on 25 February 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarchuk, S. N.; Kurkin, V. I.; Polekh, N. M.; Podlesniy, A. V.; Zolotukhina, N. A.; Romanova, E. B.

    2015-11-01

    On the base of the space-distributed multipurpose chirp ionosonde effects of solar flare influence on conditions of HF signals distribution in the northeast region of Russia were registered on February 25, 2014. The absorption increase in D - ionosphere areas during flare due to splash in x-ray radiation was shown in disappearance of the signals corresponding to modes with multiple reflections from ionospheric layer both for the ionograms of oblique and vertical sounding. In the period of a magnetic storm on February 27, 2014 on the oblique sounding ionograms on paths Magadan - Irkutsk and Khabarovsk - Irkutsk in evening and night hours of local time, were observed additional signals with abnormally big delay. The amplitude relief of abnormal signals was characterized by strong diffusion, and frequencies exceeded the maximal observed frequencies of standard propagation modes.

  3. Geomagnetic solar flare effect on February 4 and 6, 1986 at the China Antarctic Great Wall Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiao-Ping; Lin, Yun-Fang

    1995-02-01

    Taking the sampled every minute values of the horizontal, declination and vertical components H, D, Z and the intensity of total field F calculated from H and Z on the magnetograms at ten geomagnetic observatories in China in the same periods, and at the China Antarctic Great Wall Station (CAGWS), the authors conducted the maximum entropy analysis and band-pass filtration of these data and obtained the following results: (1) At the period T=10 - 90 min geomagnetic solar flare effect (sfe) is evident on the sunlit hemisphere. It is more pronounced at periods 15, 20, 25 and 30 min, and most prominent at 30 35 min. The solar X-ray spectra at the same time showed their peaks at 10 and 15 min; (2) The period T=10 - 70 min of sfe at the CAGWS in the western Hemisphere was also recognizable after spectral analysis and filtration, but the corresponding period of the maximum amplitude was different from that in the sunlit hemisphere. The results further proved that the geomagnetic effect of solar flares could also be observed in the dark hemisphere; (3) The subsolar points of two solar flares were found around Lanzhou, and the associated current density in the ionosphere was about 24 A/km. The transitional zone from positive to negative sfe was found around the geographic latitude ϕ=22° - 24°N, where the sfe in H-crochet was almost illegible.

  4. Study of the effect of solar flares on VLF signals during D-layer preparation or disappearance time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Suman; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Palit, Sourav

    2016-07-01

    "Very Low Frequency" (VLF) is one of the bands of the Radio waves having frequency 3-30 KHz, which propagates through the Earth-ionosphere wave-guide. In relation to propagation of radio waves through ionosphere, low mass and high mobility cause electrons to play a vital role. Electrons are not distributed uniformly in the ionosphere and depending on this factor, ionosphere has different layers namely D, E and F. Different ionospheric layers generally exist during day and night time. During day-time when the main source of the ionization of the ionosphere is Sun, the lower most layer of ionosphere is D-layer. But during the night-time when Sun is absent and cosmic ray is the main source of the ionization of the ionosphere, this D-layer disappears and E-layer becomes the lower most region of the ionosphere. Normally, patterns of VLF signal depend on regular solar flux variations. However, during solar flares extra energetic particles are released from Sun, which makes the changes in the ionization of the ionosphere and these changes can perturb VLF signal amplitude. Usually if a solar flare occurs during any time of day, it only affects the amplitude and phase of the VLF signals. But in the present work, we found the if the flare occurs during D-layer preparation / disappearance time, then it will not only affect to amplitude and phase of the VLF signals but also to terminator times of VLF signals. We have observed that the sun set terminator time of the VLF signals shifted towards night time due to the effect of a M-class solar flare which occurred during the D-layer disappearance time. The shift is so high that it crossed 5σ level. We are now trying to a make model using the ion-chemistry and LWPC code to explain this observed effect.

  5. Analyzing the effectiveness of flare dispensing programs against pulse width modulation seekers using self-organizing maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahingil, Mehmet C.; Aslan, Murat Š.

    2013-10-01

    Infrared guided missile seekers utilizing pulse width modulation in target tracking is one of the threats against air platforms. To be able to achieve a "soft-kill" protection of own platform against these type of threats, one needs to examine carefully the seeker operating principle with its special electronic counter-counter measure (ECCM) capability. One of the cost-effective ways of soft kill protection is to use flare decoys in accordance with an optimized dispensing program. Such an optimization requires a good understanding of the threat seeker, capabilities of the air platform and engagement scenario information between them. Modeling and simulation is very powerful tool to achieve a valuable insight and understand the underlying phenomenology. A careful interpretation of simulation results is crucial to infer valuable conclusions from the data. In such an interpretation there are lots of factors (features) which affect the results. Therefore, powerful statistical tools and pattern recognition algorithms are of special interest in the analysis. In this paper, we show how self-organizing maps (SOMs), which is one of those powerful tools, can be used in analyzing the effectiveness of various flare dispensing programs against a PWM seeker. We perform several Monte Carlo runs for a typical engagement scenario in a MATLAB-based simulation environment. In each run, we randomly change the flare dispending program and obtain corresponding class: "successful" or "unsuccessful", depending on whether the corresponding flare dispensing program deceives the seeker or not, respectively. Then, in the analysis phase, we use SOMs to interpret and visualize the results.

  6. Predicted solar flare activity for the 1990s - Possible effects on navigation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kunches, J.M.; Hirman, J.W. )

    1990-01-01

    The current solar cycle, which began in September 1986, may prove to be the highest ever, as measured by sunspot numbers and radio flux. The cycle's frequent and strong solar flare activity can be illustrated by the March 1989 episode, which caused many problems for navigation systems. Flares and the geomagnetic storms that sometimes accompany them can disrupt low-frequency systems such as Loran-C, as well as the satellite-borne GPS. Although the maximum of the solar cycle is expected during the first quarter of 1990, flare activity is likely to persist at high levels for a few years to follow. Geomagnetic activity may occur at any time in the cycle, and thus geomagnetic disruptions are possible at any point in the 1990s. 5 refs.

  7. SCATTERING POLARIZATION IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Štěpán, Jiří; Heinzel, Petr

    2013-11-20

    There is ongoing debate about the origin and even the very existence of a high degree of linear polarization of some chromospheric spectral lines observed in solar flares. The standard explanation of these measurements is in terms of the impact polarization caused by non-thermal proton and/or electron beams. In this work, we study the possible role of resonance line polarization due to radiation anisotropy in the inhomogeneous medium of the flare ribbons. We consider a simple two-dimensional model of the flaring chromosphere and we self-consistently solve the non-LTE problem taking into account the role of resonant scattering polarization and of the Hanle effect. Our calculations show that the horizontal plasma inhomogeneities at the boundary of the flare ribbons can lead to a significant radiation anisotropy in the line formation region and, consequently, to a fractional linear polarization of the emergent radiation of the order of several percent. Neglecting the effects of impact polarization, our model can provide a clue for resolving some of the common observational findings, namely: (1) why a high degree of polarization appears mainly at the edges of the flare ribbons; (2) why polarization can also be observed during the gradual phase of a flare; and (3) why polarization is mostly radial or tangential. We conclude that radiation transfer in realistic multi-dimensional models of solar flares needs to be considered as an essential ingredient for understanding the observed spectral line polarization.

  8. The Effects of Low- and High-Energy Cutoffs on Solar Flare Microwave and Hard X-Ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Microwave and hard x-ray spectra provide crucial information about energetic electrons and their environment in solar flares. These spectra are becoming better determined with the Owens Valley Solar Array (OVSA) and the recent launch of the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). The proposed Frequency Agile Solar Radiotelescope (FASR) promises even greater advances in radio observations of solar flares. Both microwave and hard x-ray spectra are sensitive to cutoffs in the electron distribution function. The determination of the high-energy cutoff from these spectra establishes the highest electron energies produced by the acceleration mechanism, while determination of the low-energy cutoff is crucial to establishing the total energy in accelerated electrons. This paper will show computations of the effects of both high- and low-energy cutoffs on microwave and hard x-ray spectra. The optically thick portion of a microwave spectrum is enhanced and smoothed by a low-energy cutoff, while a hard x-ray spectrum is flattened below the cutoff energy. A high-energy cutoff steepens the microwave spectrum and increases the wavelength at which the spectrum peaks, while the hard x-ray spectrum begins to steepen at photon energies roughly an order of magnitude below the electron cutoff energy. This work discusses how flare microwave and hard x-ray spectra can be analyzed together to determine these electron cutoff energies. This work is supported in part by the NASA Sun-Earth Connection Program.

  9. The Effects of Low- and High-Energy Cutoffs on Solar Flare Microwave and Hard X-Ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Microwave and hard x-ray spectra provide crucial information about energetic electrons and their environment in solar flares. These spectra are becoming better determined with the Owens Valley Solar Array (OVSA) and the recent launch of the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). The proposed Frequency Agile Solar Radiotelescope (FASR) promises even greater advances in radio observations of solar flares. Both microwave and hard x-ray spectra are sensitive to cutoffs in the electron distribution function. The determination of the high-energy cutoff from these spectra establishes the highest electron energies produced by the acceleration mechanism, while determination of the low-energy cutoff is crucial to establishing the total energy in accelerated electrons. This paper will show computations of the effects of both high- and low-energy cutoffs on microwave and hard x-ray spectra. The optically thick portion of a microwave spectrum is enhanced and smoothed by a low-energy cutoff, while a hard x-ray spectrum is flattened below the cutoff energy. A high-energy cutoff steepens the microwave spectrum and increases the wavelength at which the spectrum peaks, while the hard x-ray spectrum begins to steepen at photon energies roughly an order of magnitude below the electron cutoff energy. This work discusses how flare microwave and hard x-ray spectra can be analyzed together to determine these electron cutoff energies. This work is supported in part by the NASA Sun-Earth Connection Program.

  10. Numerical simulations of flares on M dwarf stars. I - Hydrodynamics and coronal X-ray emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Chung-Chieh; Pallavicini, Roberto

    1991-01-01

    Flare-loop models are utilized to simulate the time evolution and physical characteristics of stellar X-ray flares by varying the values of flare-energy input and loop parameters. The hydrodynamic evolution is studied in terms of changes in the parameters of the mass, energy, and momentum equations within an area bounded by the chromosphere and the corona. The zone supports a magnetically confined loop for which processes are described including the expansion of heated coronal gas, chromospheric evaporation, and plasma compression at loop footpoints. The intensities, time profiles, and average coronal temperatures of X-ray flares are derived from the simulations and compared to observational evidence. Because the amount of evaporated material does not vary linearly with flare-energy input, large loops are required to produce the energy measured from stellar flares.

  11. Solar flares: an overview.

    PubMed

    Rust, D M

    1992-01-01

    This is a survey of solar phenomena and physical models that may be useful for improving forecasts of solar flares and proton storms in interplanetary space. Knowledge of the physical processes that accelerate protons has advanced because of gamma-ray and X-ray observations from the Solar Maximum Mission telescopes. Protons are accelerated at the onset of flares, but the duration of any subsequent proton storm at 1 AU depends on the structure of the interplanetary fields. X-ray images of the solar corona show possible fast proton escape paths. Magnetographs and high-resolution visible-band images show the magnetic field structure near the acceleration region and the heating effects of sunward-directed protons. Preflare magnetic field growth and shear may be the most important clues to the physical processes that generate high energy solar particles. Any dramatic improvement in flare forecasts will require high resolution solar telescopes in space. Several possibilities for improvements in the art of flare forecasting are presented, among them: the use of acoustic tomography to probe for subsurface magnetic fields; a satellite-borne solar magnetograph; and an X-ray telescope to monitor the corona for eruptions.

  12. Vortex and Sink Flows in Eruptive Flares as a Model for Coronal Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccarello, F. P.; Aulanier, G.; Dudík, J.; Démoulin, P.; Schmieder, B.; Gilchrist, S. A.

    2017-03-01

    Eruptive flares are sudden releases of magnetic energy that involve many phenomena, several of which can be explained by the standard 2D flare model and its realizations in 3D. We analyze a 3D magnetohydrodynamics simulation, in the framework of this model, that naturally explains the contraction of coronal loops in the proximity of the flare sites, as well as the inflow toward the region above the cusp-shaped loops. We find that two vorticity arcs located along the flanks of the erupting magnetic flux rope are generated as soon as the eruption begins. The magnetic arcades above the flux rope legs are then subjected to expansion, rotation, or contraction depending on which part of the vortex flow advects them. In addition to the vortices, an inward-directed magnetic pressure gradient exists in the current sheet below the magnetic flux rope. It results in the formation of a sink that is maintained by reconnection. We conclude that coronal loop apparent implosions observed during eruptive flares are the result of hydromagnetic effects related to the generation of vortex and sink flows when a flux rope moves in a magnetized environment.

  13. How did a Major Confined Flare Occur in Super Solar Active Region 12192?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Wu, S. T.; Yurchyshyn, V.; Wang, H.; Feng, X. S.; Hu, Q.

    2016-12-01

    We study the physical mechanism of a major X-class solar flare that occurred in the super NOAA active region (AR) 12192 using a data-driven numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modeling complemented with observations. With the evolving magnetic fields observed at the solar surface as bottom boundary input, we drive an MHD system to evolve self-consistently in correspondence with the realistic coronal evolution. During a two-day time interval, the modeled coronal field has been slowly stressed by the photospheric field evolution,which gradually created a large-scale coronal current sheet, i.e., a narrow layer with intense current, in the core of the AR. The current layer was successively enhanced until it became so thin that a tether-cutting reconnection between the sheared magnetic arcades was set in, which led to a flare. The modeled reconnecting field lines and their footpoints match well the observed hot flaring loops and the flare ribbons, respectively, suggesting that the model has successfully "reproduced" the macroscopic magnetic process of the flare. In particular, with simulation, we explained why this event is a confined eruption-the consequent of the reconnection is the shared arcade instead of a newly formed flux rope. We also found much weaker magnetic implosion effect comparing to many other X-class flares.

  14. Particle propagation, wave growth and energy dissipation in a flaring flux tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, S. M.; Melrose, D. B.; Dulk, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    Wave amplification by downgoing particles in a common flare model is investigated. The flare is assumed to occur at the top of a coronal magnetic flux loop, and results in the heating of plasma in the flaring region. The hot electrons propagate down the legs of the flux tube towards increasing magnetic field. It is simple to demonstrate that the velocity distributions which result in this model are unstable to both beam instabilities and cyclotron maser action. An explanation is presented for the propagation effects on the distribution, and the properties of the resulting amplified waves are explored, concentrating on cyclotron maser action, which has properties (emission in the z mode below the local gyrofrequency) quite different from maser action by other distributions considered in the context of solar flares. The z mode waves will be damped in the coronal plasma surrounding the flaring flux tube and lead to heating there. This process may be important in the overall energy budget of the flare. The downgoing maser is compared with the loss cone maser, which is more likely to produce observable bursts.

  15. Electron acceleration in solar-flare magnetic traps: Model properties and their observational confirmations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsyk, P. A.; Somov, B. V.

    2017-09-01

    Using an analytical solution of the kinetic equation, we have investigated the model properties of the coronal and chromospheric hard X-ray sources in the limb flare of July 19, 2012. We calculated the emission spectrum at the flare loop footpoints in the thick-target approximation with a reverse current and showed it to be consistent with the observed one. The spectrum of the coronal source located above the flare loop was calculated in the thin-target approximation. In this case, the slope of the hard X-ray spectrum is reproduced very accurately, but the intensity of the coronal emission is lower than the observed one by several times. Previously, we showed that this contradiction is completely removed if the additional (relative to the primary acceleration in the reconnecting current layer) electron acceleration in the coronal magnetic trap that contracts in the transverse direction and decreases in length during the impulsive flare phase is taken into account. In this paper we study in detail this effect in the context of a more realistic flare scenario, where a whole ensemble of traps existed in the hard X-ray burst time, each of which was at different stages of its evolution: formation, collapse, destruction. Our results point not only to the existence of first-order Fermi acceleration and betatron electron heating in solar flares but also to their high efficiency. Highly accurate observations of a specific flare are used as an example to show that the previously predicted theoretical features of the model find convincing confirmations.

  16. One loop superstring effective actions and N=8 supergravity

    SciTech Connect

    Moura, Filipe

    2008-06-15

    In a previous article we have shown the existence of a new independent R{sup 4} term, at one loop, in the type IIA and heterotic effective actions, after reduction to four dimensions, besides the usual square of the Bel-Robinson tensor. It had been shown that such a term could not be directly supersymmetrized, but we showed that was possible after coupling to a scalar chiral multiplet. In this article, we study the extended (N=8) supersymmetrization of this term, where no other coupling can be taken. We show that such supersymmetrization cannot be achieved at the linearized level. This is in conflict with the theory one gets after toroidal compactification of type II superstrings being N=8 supersymmetric. We interpret this result in the face of the recent claim that perturbative supergravity cannot be decoupled from string theory in d{>=}4, and N=8, d=4 supergravity is in the swampland.

  17. New numerical results and novel effective string predictions for Wilson loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billó, M.; Caselle, M.; Pellegrini, R.

    2012-01-01

    We compute the prediction of the Nambu-Goto effective string model for a rectangular Wilson loop up to three loops. This is done through the use of an operatorial, first order formulation and of the open string analogues of boundary states. This result is interesting since there are universality theorems stating that the predictions up to three loops are common to all effective string models. To test the effective string prediction, we use a Montecarlo evaluation, in the 3 d Ising gauge model, of an observable (the ratio of two Wilson loops with the same perimeter) for which boundary effects are relatively small. Our simulation attains a level of precision which is sufficient to test the two-loop correction. The three-loop correction seems to go in the right direction, but is actually yet beyond the reach of our simulation, since its effect is comparable with the statistical errors of the latter.

  18. A multiwavelength study of a double impulsive flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, K. T.; Benz, A. O.; Dennis, B. R.; Poland, A. I.; Leibacher, J. W.; Mewe, R.; Schrijver, J.; Simnett, G.; Smith, J. B., Jr.; Sylwester, J.

    1984-01-01

    Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) and ground-based observations are given for two flares which occurred 3 min apart in the same section of the active region. The physical characteristics of the two flares are derived and compared, and the main difference between them is noted to be in the preflare state of the coronal plasma at the flare site. These data suggest that the plasma filling the flaring loops absorbed most of the energy released during the impulsive phase of the second flare, so that only a fraction of the energy could reach the chromosphere to produce mass motions and turbulence. Since a study of the brightest flares observed by SMM shows that at least 43 percent of them are multiple, the situation presently studied may be quite common, and the difference in initial plasma conditions could explain at least some of the large variations in observed flare parameters.

  19. Effects of Scenery, Lighting, Glideslope, and Experience on Timing the Landing Flare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmisano, Stephen; Favelle, Simone; Sachtler, W. L.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined three visual strategies for timing the initiation of the landing flare based on perceptions of either: (a) a critical height above ground level; (b) a critical runway width angle ([psi]); or (c) a critical time-to-contact (TTC) with the runway. Visual displays simulated landing approaches with trial-to-trial variations in…

  20. Effects of Scenery, Lighting, Glideslope, and Experience on Timing the Landing Flare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmisano, Stephen; Favelle, Simone; Sachtler, W. L.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined three visual strategies for timing the initiation of the landing flare based on perceptions of either: (a) a critical height above ground level; (b) a critical runway width angle ([psi]); or (c) a critical time-to-contact (TTC) with the runway. Visual displays simulated landing approaches with trial-to-trial variations in…

  1. The distribution of solar flares and probable relations to biological effects.

    PubMed

    Petropoulos, B; Poulakos, C

    1991-10-01

    We have compared the monthly distribution of the total number of flares to the monthly mortality from cardiovascular and myocardial infarctions for the time period 1974-1983, and computed correlation coefficients. Periodicities of 3 and 5 months (150 days) have been found in both distributions.

  2. A Cold Flare with Delayed Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Pal'shin, Valentin D.; Meshalkina, Natalia; Lysenko, Alexandra L.; Kashapova, Larisa K.; Altyntsev, Alexander T.

    2016-05-01

    Recently, a number of peculiar flares have been reported that demonstrate significant nonthermal particle signatures with low, if any, thermal emission, which implies a close association of the observed emission with the primary energy release/electron acceleration region. This paper presents a flare that appears “cold” at the impulsive phase, while displaying delayed heating later on. Using hard X-ray data from Konus-Wind, microwave observations by SSRT, RSTN, NoRH, and NoRP, context observations, and three-dimensional modeling, we study the energy release, particle acceleration, and transport, and the relationships between the nonthermal and thermal signatures. The flaring process is found to involve the interaction between a small loop and a big loop with the accelerated particles divided roughly equally between them. Precipitation of the electrons from the small loop produced only a weak thermal response because the loop volume was small, while the electrons trapped in the big loop lost most of their energy in the coronal part of the loop, which resulted in coronal plasma heating but no or only weak chromospheric evaporation, and thus unusually weak soft X-ray emission. The energy losses of the fast electrons in the big tenuous loop were slow, which resulted in the observed delay of the plasma heating. We determined that the impulsively accelerated electron population had a beamed angular distribution in the direction of the electric force along the magnetic field of the small loop. The accelerated particle transport in the big loop was primarily mediated by turbulent waves, which is similar to other reported cold flares.

  3. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: Coronal magnetic loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, Valerii V.; Stepanov, Alexander V.

    2008-11-01

    The goal of this review is to outline some new ideas in the physics of coronal magnetic loops, the fundamental structural elements of the atmospheres of the Sun and flaring stars, which are involved in phenomena such as stellar coronal heating, flare energy release, charged particle acceleration, and the modulation of optical, radio, and X-ray emissions. The Alfvén-Carlqvist view of a coronal loop as an equivalent electric circuit allows a good physical understanding of loop processes. Describing coronal loops as MHD-resonators explains various ways in which flaring emissions from the Sun and stars are modulated, whereas modeling them by magnetic mirror traps allows one to describe the dynamics and emission of high-energy particles. Based on these approaches, loop plasma and fast particle parameters are obtained and models for flare energy release and stellar corona heating are developed.

  4. Structure and function in bacteriorhodopsin: the effect of the interhelical loops on the protein folding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Allen, S J; Kim, J M; Khorana, H G; Lu, H; Booth, P J

    2001-04-27

    The loops connecting the seven transmembrane helices of bacteriorhodopsin have each been replaced in turn by structureless linkers of Gly-Gly-Ser repeat sequences, and the effect on the protein folding kinetics has been determined. An SDS-denatured state of each loop mutant bacterio-opsin was folded in l-alpha-1,2-dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine/l-alpha-1,2-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine micelles, containing retinal, to give functional bacteriorhodopsin. Stopped-flow mixing was used to initiate the folding reaction, giving a time resolution of milliseconds, and changes in protein fluorescence were used to monitor folding. All loop mutant proteins folded according to the same reaction scheme as wild-type protein. The folding kinetics of the AB, BC and DE loop mutants were the same as wild-type protein, despite the blue-shifted chromophore band of the BC loop mutant bR state. A partially folded apoprotein intermediate state of the AB loop mutant did however appear to decay in the absence of retinal. The most significant effects on the folding kinetics were seen for mutant protein with structureless linkers in place of the CD, EF and FG loops. The rate-limiting apoprotein folding step of the CD loop mutant was about ten times slower than wild-type, whilst that of the EF loop mutant was almost four times slower than wild-type. Wild-type behaviour was observed for the other folding and retinal binding events of the CD and EF loop mutant proteins. These effects of the CD and EF loop mutations on apoprotein folding correlate with the fact that these two loop mutants also have the least stable, partially folded apoprotein intermediate of all the loop mutants, and are the most affected by a decrease in lipid lateral pressure. In contrast, the FG loop mutant exhibited wild-type apoprotein folding, but altered covalent binding of retinal and final folding to bacteriorhodopsin. This correlates with the fact that the FG loop mutant bacteriorhodopsin is the most susceptible to

  5. The Dependence of Solar Flare Limb Darkening on Emission Peak Formation Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemann, Edward; Epp, Luke; Eparvier, Francis; Chamberlin, Phillip C.

    2017-08-01

    Solar limb effects are local brightening or darkening of an emission that depend on where in the Sun's atmosphere it forms. Near the solar limb, optically thick (thin) emissions will darken (brighten) as the column of absorbers (emitters) along the line-of-sight increases. Note that in limb brightening, emission sources are re-arranged whereas in limb darkening they are obscured. Thus, only limb darkening is expected to occur in disk integrated observations. Limb darkening also results in center-to-limb variations of disk-integrated solar flare spectra, with important consequences for how planetary atmospheres are affected by flares. Flares are typically characterized by their flux in the optically thin 0.1-0.8 nm band measured by the X-ray Sensor (XRS) on board the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). On the other hand, Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) line emissions can limb darken because they are sensitive to resonant scattering, resulting in a flare's location on the solar disk controlling the amount of ionizing radiation that reaches a planet. For example, an X-class flare originating from disk center may significantly heat a planet's thermosphere, whereas the same flare originating near the limb may have no effect because much of the effective emissions are scattered in the solar corona.To advance the relatively poor understanding of flare limb darkening, we use over 300 M-class or larger flares observed by the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to characterize limb darkening as a function of emission peak formation temperature, Tf. For hot coronal emissions (Tf>2 MK), these results show a linear relationship between the degree of limb darkening and Tf where lines with Tf=2 MK darken approximately 7 times more than lines with Tf=16 MK. Because the extent of limb darkening is dependent on the height of the source plasma, we use simple Beer-Lambert radiative transfer analysis to interpret these results

  6. Flaring Red Dwarf Star (Illustration)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-06

    This illustration shows a red dwarf star orbited by a hypothetical exoplanet. Red dwarfs tend to be magnetically active, displaying gigantic arcing prominences and a wealth of dark sunspots. Red dwarfs also erupt with intense flares that could strip a nearby planet's atmosphere over time, or make the surface inhospitable to life as we know it. By mining data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) spacecraft, a team of astronomers identified dozens of flares at a range of durations and strengths. The team measured events with less total energy than many previously detected flares from red dwarfs. This is important because, although individually less energetic and therefore less hostile to life, smaller flares might be much more frequent and add up over time to produce a cumulative effect on an orbiting planet. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21473

  7. A Rayleigh Scatter-Based Ocular Flare Analysis Meter for Flare Photometry of the Anterior Chamber

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Deborah L.; Axtelle, Jim; Rath, Susan; Dyer, Andrew; Harrison, Benjamin; Rogers, Claude; Menon, Naresh; Van Gelder, Russell N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Existing flare photometers are based on the Tyndall effect, which requires sophisticated laser photometry. The ocular flare analysis meter (OFAM) is a nonlaser photometer that uses quantitative Rayleigh scatter and absorption from visible light to compute a flare value. This study is designed to correlate OFAM measurements with qualitative measurements of flare in vitro and in vivo. Methods Following validation of the device on artificial anterior chambers containing known protein concentrations, flare readings were obtained from 90 subjects (46 with and 44 without uveitis) in one eye. Subjects were graded by the Standardization of Uveitis Nomenclature (SUN) working group flare scoring system and received the OFAM flare measurements. Results The OFAM showed linear response in vitro to protein concentrations ranging from 0 to 0.5 mg/ml. In clinical use in subjects ranging from SUN flare scores of 0+ to 2+, OFAM showed statistically significant measurement accuracy (P = 0.0008 of flare 0 versus flare 2; P = 0.031 of flare 0 versus flare 1). Distinction of SUN scores 1 and 2 was borderline significant (P = 0.057). Conclusion The OFAM photometry correlates with the standard SUN scoring system. This method may provide an objective method to diagnosis and monitor uveitis. Further longitudinal studies are warranted. Translational Relevance Currently, ocular flare is assessed qualitatively in most clinical settings. The existing methodology uses only Tyndall effect to measure flare. The OFAM uses an alternate, nonlaser means for measurement of anterior chamber flare by measure of Raleigh scatter. This pilot clinical study suggests that the OFAM device may be useful in measurement of uveitis activity. PMID:26688778

  8. A Rayleigh Scatter-Based Ocular Flare Analysis Meter for Flare Photometry of the Anterior Chamber.

    PubMed

    Lam, Deborah L; Axtelle, Jim; Rath, Susan; Dyer, Andrew; Harrison, Benjamin; Rogers, Claude; Menon, Naresh; Van Gelder, Russell N

    2015-12-01

    Existing flare photometers are based on the Tyndall effect, which requires sophisticated laser photometry. The ocular flare analysis meter (OFAM) is a nonlaser photometer that uses quantitative Rayleigh scatter and absorption from visible light to compute a flare value. This study is designed to correlate OFAM measurements with qualitative measurements of flare in vitro and in vivo. Following validation of the device on artificial anterior chambers containing known protein concentrations, flare readings were obtained from 90 subjects (46 with and 44 without uveitis) in one eye. Subjects were graded by the Standardization of Uveitis Nomenclature (SUN) working group flare scoring system and received the OFAM flare measurements. The OFAM showed linear response in vitro to protein concentrations ranging from 0 to 0.5 mg/ml. In clinical use in subjects ranging from SUN flare scores of 0+ to 2+, OFAM showed statistically significant measurement accuracy (P = 0.0008 of flare 0 versus flare 2; P = 0.031 of flare 0 versus flare 1). Distinction of SUN scores 1 and 2 was borderline significant (P = 0.057). The OFAM photometry correlates with the standard SUN scoring system. This method may provide an objective method to diagnosis and monitor uveitis. Further longitudinal studies are warranted. Currently, ocular flare is assessed qualitatively in most clinical settings. The existing methodology uses only Tyndall effect to measure flare. The OFAM uses an alternate, nonlaser means for measurement of anterior chamber flare by measure of Raleigh scatter. This pilot clinical study suggests that the OFAM device may be useful in measurement of uveitis activity.

  9. The morphology of 20 x 10 exp 6 K plasma in large non-impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, Loren W.; Feldman, Uri; Bruner, Marilyn E.; Doschek, George A.; Hirayama, Tadashi; Hudson, Hugh S.; Lemen, James R.; Ogawara, Yoshiaki; Strong, Keith T.; Tsuneta, Saku

    1992-01-01

    We have examined images of 10 flares observed by the Soft X-ray Telescope on-board the Yohkoh spacecraft. These images show that the hottest portion of the soft X-ray flare is located in compact regions that appear to be situated at the tops of loops. These compact regions form at, or shortly after, flare onset, and persist well into the decay phase of the flares. In some cases, the compact regions are only a few thousand kilometers in size and are small compared to the lengths of flaring loops. This is inconsistent with the smoother intensity distribution along the loops expected from models of chromospheric evaporation.

  10. Flare Particle Escape in 3D Solar Eruptive Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.; Masson, Sophie; DeVore, C. R.

    2015-04-01

    Among the most important, but least understood forms of space weather are the so-called Impulsive Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events, which can be especially hazardous to deep-space astronauts. These energetic particles are generally believed to be produced by the flare reconnection that is the primary driver of solar eruptive events (SEE). A key point is that in the standard model of SEEs, the particles should remain trapped in the coronal flare loops and in the ejected plasmoid, the CME. However, flare-accelerated particles frequently reach the Earth long before the CME does. In previous 2.5D calculations we showed how the external reconnection that is an essential element of the breakout model for CME initiation could lead to the escape of flare-accelerated particles. The problem, however, is that in 2.5D this reconnection also tends to destroy the plasmoid, which disagrees with the observation that SEP events are often associated with well-defined plasmoids at 1 AU known as “magnetic clouds”. Consequently, we have extended our model to a fully 3D topology that includes a multi-polar coronal field suitable for a breakout SEE near a coronal hole region. We performed high-resolution 3D MHD numerical simulations with the Adaptively Refined MHD Solver (ARMS). Our results demonstrate that the model allows for the effective escape of energetic particles from deep within an ejecting well-defined plasmoid. We show how the complex interactions between the flare and breakout reconnection reproduce all the main observational features of SEEs and SEPs. We discuss the implications of our calculations for the upcoming Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus missions, which will measure SEEs and SEPs near the Sun, thereby, mitigating propagation effects.This research was supported, in part, by the NASA SR&T and TR&T Programs.

  11. Energy Transport Effects in Flaring Atmospheres Heated by Mixed Particle Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkova, Valentina; Zharkov, Sergei; Macrae, Connor; Druett, Malcolm; Scullion, Eamon

    2016-07-01

    We investigate energy and particle transport in the whole flaring atmosphere from the corona to the photosphere and interior for the flaring events on the 1st July 2012, 6 and 7 September 2011 by using the RHESSI and SDO instruments as well as high-resolution observations from the Swedish 1-metre Solar Telescope (SST3) CRISP4 (CRisp Imaging Spectro-polarimeter). The observations include hard and soft X-ray emission, chromospheric emission in both H-alpha 656.3 nm core and continuum, as well as, in the near infra-red triplet Ca II 854.2 nm core and continuum channels and local helioseismic responses (sunquakes). The observations are compared with the simulations of hard X-ray emission and tested by hydrodynamic simulations of flaring atmospheres of the Sun heated by mixed particle beams. The temperature, density and macro-velocity variations of the ambient atmospheres are calculated for heating by mixed beams and the seismic response of the solar interior to generation of supersonic shocks moving into the solar interior. We investigate the termination depths of these shocks beneath the quiet photosphere levels and compare them with the parameters of seismic responses in the interior, or sunquakes (Zharkova and Zharkov, 2015). We also present an investigation of radiative conditions modelled in a full non-LTE approach for hydrogen during flare onsets with particular focus on Balmer and Paschen emission in the visible, near UV and near IR ranges and compare them with observations. The links between different observational features derived from HXR, optical and seismic emission are interpreted by different particle transport models that will allow independent evaluation of the particle transport scenarios.

  12. Simulating VIIRS Observed Gas Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, F. C.

    2015-12-01

    VIIRS Nightfire (VNF) had been proved being able to effectively detect gas flares at night, and characterize their temperature and source size. [1] However, limited access to generally confidential gas flare operation measurements made it difficult to verify the output. Although flared gas volume is occasionally available, it is not common to log the temperature and flames size which directly links to VNF output. To understand the mechanism of gas flare and how VIIRS perceives the event, a platform is proposed to simulate the gas flare being observed by VIIRS. The methodology can be described in three steps. (1) Use CFD simulation software ISIS-3D to simulate a simple gas flare. [2] Scalar fields of temperature and species concentration related to combustion are extracted from the simulation. The instantaneous scalar can be determined from time-averaging or guess by stochastic time and space series (TASS) from single-point statistics [3]. (2) Model spectral radiance intensity of simulated gas flare using RADCAL. [4] RADCAL developed by NIST can accurately model the spectral radiance emitted on the direction of lineof-sight given the spatial profile of temperature and concentration of species. (3) Use radiative transfer modeling to calculate the energy propagated to VIIRS. The modeled radiation will then be weighted by the MODTRAN [5] modeled transmissivity over predefined atmosphere to the satellite, with geometrical effects considered. Such platform can help understanding how exactly VNF is measuring gas flares, and thus lead to more precise characterization of combustion events. [1] C. D. Elvidge et al, Remote Sensing, 2013[2] IRSN ISIS-3D[3] M. E. Kounalakis et al, ASME J. Heat Transfer, 1991 [4] W. L. Grosshandler, NIST Technical Note 1402, 1993 [5] A. Berk et al, MODTRAN 5.2.0.0 User's Manual

  13. The Effect of Radiative Cooling on Coronal Loop Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Terradas, Jaume

    2008-10-01

    Coronal loops that exhibit kink-mode oscillations have generally been assumed to have a constant density and temperature during the observed time interval. Analyzing their intensities in an EUV wave band, however, clearly shows that their brightness varies in a way that is consistent with a temperature cooling through the EUV passband, which limits their detection time, observed damping time, and number of observable periods. We study kink-mode oscillations of eight loops observed during the so-called harmonica event on 2001 April 15, 21:58-22:27 UT in the 171 Å band. We find loop densities of ne = (1.4 +/- 0.6) × 109 cm-3, loop widths of w = 2.0 +/- 2.6 Mm, and e-folding cooling times of τcool = 17 +/- 7 minutes, when they cool through the peak temperature T = 0.95 MK of the 171 Å band. We conclude that oscillations of a single loop cannot be detected longer than 10-20 minutes in one single filter and appropriate light curve modeling is necessary to disentangle the subsequent oscillation phases of multiple near-cospatial loops.

  14. Analysis of ultraviolet and X-ray observations of three homologous solar flares from SMM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Chung-Chieh; Pallavicini, Roberto

    1987-01-01

    Three homologous flares observed in the UV lines of Fe XXI and O V and in X-rays from the SMM were studied. It was found that: (1) the homology of the flares was most noticeable in Fe XXI and soft X-ray emissions; (2) the three flares shared many of the same loop footprints which were located in O V bright kernals associated with hard X-ray bursts; and (3) in spite of the strong spatial homology, the temporal evolution in UV and X-ray emissions varied from flare to flare. A comparison between the UV observations and photospheric magnetograms revealed that the basic flare configuration was a complex loop system consisting of many loops or bundles of loops.

  15. Analysis of ultraviolet and X-ray observations of three homologous solar flares from SMM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Chung-Chieh; Pallavicini, Roberto

    1987-01-01

    Three homologous flares observed in the UV lines of Fe XXI and O V and in X-rays from the SMM were studied. It was found that: (1) the homology of the flares was most noticeable in Fe XXI and soft X-ray emissions; (2) the three flares shared many of the same loop footprints which were located in O V bright kernals associated with hard X-ray bursts; and (3) in spite of the strong spatial homology, the temporal evolution in UV and X-ray emissions varied from flare to flare. A comparison between the UV observations and photospheric magnetograms revealed that the basic flare configuration was a complex loop system consisting of many loops or bundles of loops.

  16. Observations of limb flares with a soft X-ray telescope. [flown on Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. G.

    1976-01-01

    The structure and evolution of 26 limb flares have been observed with a soft X-ray telescope flown on Skylab. The results are: (1) One or more well defined loops were the only structures of flare intensity observed during the rise phase and near flare maximum, except for knots which were close to the resolution of the telescope; (2) the flare core features were always sharply defined during rise phase; and (3) for the twenty events which contained loops, the geometry of the structure near maximum was that of a loop in ten cases, a loop with a spike at the top in four cases, a cusp or triangle in four cases, and a cusp combined with a spike in another two cases. Based on observation of the original film, it is suggested that flares which underwent large scale deformations had become unstable to MHD kinks. This implies that these flares occurred in magnetic flux tubes through which significant currents were flowing.

  17. The effect of a strong stellar flare on the atmospheric chemistry of an earth-like planet orbiting an M dwarf.

    PubMed

    Segura, Antígona; Walkowicz, Lucianne M; Meadows, Victoria; Kasting, James; Hawley, Suzanne

    2010-09-01

    Main sequence M stars pose an interesting problem for astrobiology: their abundance in our galaxy makes them likely targets in the hunt for habitable planets, but their strong chromospheric activity produces high-energy radiation and charged particles that may be detrimental to life. We studied the impact of the 1985 April 12 flare from the M dwarf AD Leonis (AD Leo), simulating the effects from both UV radiation and protons on the atmospheric chemistry of a hypothetical, Earth-like planet located within its habitable zone. Based on observations of solar proton events and the Neupert effect, we estimated a proton flux associated with the flare of 5.9 × 10⁸ protons cm⁻² sr⁻¹ s⁻¹ for particles with energies >10 MeV. Then we calculated the abundance of nitrogen oxides produced by the flare by scaling the production of these compounds during a large solar proton event called the Carrington event. The simulations were performed with a 1-D photochemical model coupled to a 1-D radiative/convective model. Our results indicate that the UV radiation emitted during the flare does not produce a significant change in the ozone column depth of the planet. When the action of protons is included, the ozone depletion reaches a maximum of 94% two years after the flare for a planet with no magnetic field. At the peak of the flare, the calculated UV fluxes that reach the surface, in the wavelength ranges that are damaging for life, exceed those received on Earth during less than 100 s. Therefore, flares may not present a direct hazard for life on the surface of an orbiting habitable planet. Given that AD Leo is one of the most magnetically active M dwarfs known, this conclusion should apply to planets around other M dwarfs with lower levels of chromospheric activity.

  18. The Effect of a Strong Stellar Flare on the Atmospheric Chemistry of an Earth-like Planet Orbiting an M Dwarf

    PubMed Central

    Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Meadows, Victoria; Kasting, James; Hawley, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Main sequence M stars pose an interesting problem for astrobiology: their abundance in our galaxy makes them likely targets in the hunt for habitable planets, but their strong chromospheric activity produces high-energy radiation and charged particles that may be detrimental to life. We studied the impact of the 1985 April 12 flare from the M dwarf AD Leonis (AD Leo), simulating the effects from both UV radiation and protons on the atmospheric chemistry of a hypothetical, Earth-like planet located within its habitable zone. Based on observations of solar proton events and the Neupert effect, we estimated a proton flux associated with the flare of 5.9 × 108 protons cm−2 sr−1 s−1 for particles with energies >10 MeV. Then we calculated the abundance of nitrogen oxides produced by the flare by scaling the production of these compounds during a large solar proton event called the Carrington event. The simulations were performed with a 1-D photochemical model coupled to a 1-D radiative/convective model. Our results indicate that the UV radiation emitted during the flare does not produce a significant change in the ozone column depth of the planet. When the action of protons is included, the ozone depletion reaches a maximum of 94% two years after the flare for a planet with no magnetic field. At the peak of the flare, the calculated UV fluxes that reach the surface, in the wavelength ranges that are damaging for life, exceed those received on Earth during less than 100 s. Therefore, flares may not present a direct hazard for life on the surface of an orbiting habitable planet. Given that AD Leo is one of the most magnetically active M dwarfs known, this conclusion should apply to planets around other M dwarfs with lower levels of chromospheric activity. Key Words: M dwarf—Flare—Habitable zone—Planetary atmospheres. Astrobiology 10, 751–771. PMID:20879863

  19. LYRA OBSERVATIONS OF TWO OSCILLATION MODES IN A SINGLE FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Van Doorsselaere, T.; Goossens, M.; De Groof, A.; Berghmans, D.

    2011-10-20

    We analyze light curves from the LYRA irradiance experiment on board PROBA2 during the flare of 2010 February 8. We see both long- and short-period oscillations during the flare. The long-period oscillation is interpreted in terms of standing slow sausage modes; the short-period oscillation is thought to be a standing fast sausage mode. The simultaneous presence of two oscillation modes in the same flaring structure allows for new coronal seismological applications. The periods are used to find seismological estimates of the plasma-{beta} and the density contrast of the flaring loop. Also the wave mode number is estimated from the observed periods.

  20. FNAS/solar flare energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Machado, M. E.

    1992-01-01

    We have performed an extensive study of solar flare energy buildup and release, concentrating in two aspects: (1) relationship with 3D field topology and measured electric currents; and (2) flare onset characteristics as determined from combined x ray and ultraviolet observations. We extended our previous studies on the characteristic topology of flaring regions, by following the evolution of an active region over three consecutive days. From comparison with flare observations in x rays and h alpha, we found further support for the hypothesis that flares were triggered by taking place at the separators (3D generalization of and x-type neutral point). Furthermore, we found that emerging in flux at a site within the active regions where no (or little) activity was previously observed, caused the appearance of a secondary separator and thereon continuous triggering of activity at such site. Our topology arguments were then applied to a study of sympathetic activity between two regions within an active complex. Here again we found that interacting field structures along separators and separatrices, which act as pathways for recurrent flaring to spread between the regions, could be used to understand how activity spread to potentially explosive sites with the complex. We also finished our study of flare onset characteristics as determined from combined x ray and ultraviolet observations. Using a quasi-static modeling approach, we find that this phase is characterized by a relatively low level of energy release, 10 exp 26-27 erg/s, which is sufficient to produce 'gentle' evaporation, a shift in the location of the transition zone as compared to pre-flare conditions, and an increase in the temperature and density of coronal loops. All these changes have profound implications on the observed signatures of impulsive phase phenomena, which had been neglected in the past. As a follow-up of this investigation, we now plan to apply our results to the interpretation of high

  1. Evidence of thermal conduction depression in hot coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tongjiang; Ofman, Leon; Sun, Xudong; Provornikova, Elena; Davila, Joseph

    2015-08-01

    Slow magnetoacoustic waves were first detected in hot (>6 MK) flare loops by the SOHO/SUMER spectrometer as Doppler shift oscillations in Fe XIX and Fe XXI lines. These oscillations are identified as standing slow-mode waves because the estimated phase speeds are close to the sound speed in the loop and some cases show a quarter period phase shift between velocity and intensity oscillations. The observed very rapid excitation and damping of standing slow mode waves have been studied by many authors using theories and numerical simulations, however, the exact mechanisms remain not well understood. Recently, flare-induced longitudinal intensity oscillations in hot post-flare loops have been detected by SDO/AIA. These oscillations have the similar physical properties as SUMER loop oscillations, and have been interpreted as the slow-mode waves. The multi-wavelength AIA observations with high spatio-temporal resolution and wide temperature coverage allow us to explore the wave excitation and damping mechanisms with an unprecedented detail to develope new coronal seismology. In this paper, we present accurate measurements of the effective adiabatic index (γeff) in the hot plasma from the electron temperature and density wave signals of a flare-induced longitudinal wave event using SDO/AIA data. Our results strikingly and clearly reveal that thermal conduction is highly depressed in hot (˜10 MK) post-flare loops and suggest that the compressive viscosity is the dominant wave damping mechanism which allows determination of the viscosity coefficient from the observables by coronal seismology. This new finding challenges our current understanding of thermal energy transport in solar and stellar flares, and may provide an alternative explanation of long-duration events and enhance our understand of coronal heating mechanism. We will discuss our results based on non-ideal MHD theory and simulations. We will also discuss the flare trigger mechanism based on magnetic topology

  2. The effect of insulin feedback on closed loop glucose control.

    PubMed

    Steil, Garry M; Palerm, Cesar C; Kurtz, Natalie; Voskanyan, Gayane; Roy, Anirban; Paz, Sachiko; Kandeel, Fouad R

    2011-05-01

    Initial studies of closed-loop proportional integral derivative control in individuals with type 1 diabetes showed good overnight performance, but with breakfast meal being the hardest to control and requiring supplemental carbohydrate to prevent hypoglycemia. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of insulin feedback to improve the breakfast-meal profile. We performed a single center study with closed-loop control over approximately 30 h at an inpatient clinical research facility. Eight adult subjects with previously diagnosed type 1 diabetes participated. Subjects received closed-loop insulin delivery with supplemental carbohydrate as needed. Outcome measures were plasma insulin concentration, model-predicted plasma insulin concentration, 2-h postprandial and 3- to 4-h glucose rate-of-change following breakfast after 1 d of closed-loop control, and the need for supplemental carbohydrate in response to nadir hypoglycemia. Plasma insulin levels during closed loop were well correlated with model predictions (R = 0.86). Fasting glucose after 1 d of closed loop was not different from nighttime target (118 ± 9 vs. 110 mg/dl; P = 0.38). Two-hour postbreakfast glucose was 132 ± 16 mg/dl with stable values 3-4 h after the meal (0.03792 ± 0.0884 mg/dl · min, not different from 0; P = 0.68) and at target (97 ± 6 mg/dl, not different from 90; P = 0.28). Three subjects required supplemental carbohydrates after breakfast on d 2 of closed loop. Insulin feedback can be implemented using a model estimate of concentration. Proportional integral derivative control with insulin feedback can achieve a desired breakfast response but still requires supplemental carbohydrate to be delivered in some instances. Studies assessing more optimal control configurations and safeguards need to be conducted.

  3. Comparative effect of topical diclofenac and topical dexamethasone on anterior chamber flare and postoperative pain following rhegmatogenous retinal detachment surgery.

    PubMed

    Ben Yahia, Salim; Kahloun, Rim; Abroug, Nesrine; Kaibi, Imene; Laadhari, Ghassen; Jelliti, Bechir; Khairallah, Moncef

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the effect of topical diclofenac and topical dexamethasone on anterior chamber flare and postoperative pain following rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) surgery. This prospective study included 40 eyes of 40 patients treated for RRD. Twenty-eight patients underwent scleral buckling and 12 patients underwent 20-gauge pars plana vitrectomy (PPV). For each surgical procedure, patients were postoperatively randomly divided into two groups: the first group received topical dexamethasone phosphate 0.1 % four times daily for 28 days; the second group received topical diclofenac sodium 0.1 % three times daily for 28 days. The inflammatory reaction in the anterior chamber was measured with laser flare photometry preoperatively and 1, 7, 14, 28, and 90 days postoperatively. Pain level was evaluated with Scott's visual analog scale at day 1, 7, 14, and 28 postoperatively. For patients treated with scleral buckling, there was no significant difference between the two groups regarding mean aqueous flare at day 1 (p = 0.096), day 7 (p = 0.435), day 14 (p = 0.510), day 28 (p = 0.583), and day 90 (p = 0.423). The group who received diclofenac had significantly lower pain score at days 7, 14, and 28 (p = 0.048, p = 0.017, and p = 0.028, respectively). For patients treated with PPV, there was no significant difference between the two groups regarding mean aqueous flare at day 1 (p = 0.400), day 7 (p = 0.728), day 14 (p = 0.843), day 28 (p = 0.939), and day 90 (p = 0.568). Patients who received diclofenac had significantly lower pain score at days 7, 14, and 28 (p = 0.032, p = 0.030, and p = 0.023, respectively). Topical diclofenac seems to be as potent as topical dexamethasone in managing postoperative inflammatory response induced by surgery for RRD with better analgesic effect. Both of them are consequences of blood-aqueous barrier and blood-retinal barrier breakdown.

  4. Observation of nano-flares and transient coronal heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serge, Koutchmy; Golub, Leon; Bazin, Cyrille; Tavabi, Ehsan

    Nano-flares are the best candidate for heating the bulk of the corona but their signature is still not clearly recognized in the data. The Hinode XRT provided many high resolution partial frame sequences that allowed study of intermittent flash events in quiet areas, suggesting a definite signature of nano-flares. The Yohkoh so-called SXR transient brightenings are now recorded by XRT with a wealth of detail. The typical resolution and low noise of XRT permits detection at a much lower intensity threshold and a much shorter duration. In order to evaluate what is a nano-flare, we selected a well-observed solar disk event seen at the beginning of the XRT mission, when the Sun was still very quiet. This single flare event is recorded outside of any active region and does not show any GOES or RHESSI signature, even at the lowest level. This nano-flare shows structures suggestive of rather horizontal low lying loops with a short intense flash phase. No jet is observed. EUV brightening counterparts exist, including the 304Å TR emission, detected by the SECCHI EUV imagers on the two STEREO spacecrafts. Filtergrams taken simultaneously at a fast rate in Hα are deeply processed to look at the resulting effects, seen as a faint brightening and a cool transient very small scale feature. We argue in favor of many similar SXR events permanently occurring at the TR levels, not showing strong EUV brightenings but with horizontally stretched structures similar to the recently described Hi-C reconnection events called magnetic “braids” that include twists and possibly counter flows.

  5. Stochastic acceleration of electrons by fast magnetosonic waves in solar flares: the effects of anisotropy in velocity and wavenumber space

    SciTech Connect

    Pongkitiwanichakul, Peera; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.

    2014-11-20

    We develop a model for stochastic acceleration of electrons in solar flares. As in several previous models, the electrons are accelerated by turbulent fast magnetosonic waves ({sup f}ast waves{sup )} via transit-time-damping (TTD) interactions. (In TTD interactions, fast waves act like moving magnetic mirrors that push the electrons parallel or anti-parallel to the magnetic field). We also include the effects of Coulomb collisions and the waves' parallel electric fields. Unlike previous models, our model is two-dimensional in both momentum space and wavenumber space and takes into account the anisotropy of the wave power spectrum F{sub k} and electron distribution function f {sub e}. We use weak turbulence theory and quasilinear theory to obtain a set of equations that describes the coupled evolution of F{sub k} and f {sub e}. We solve these equations numerically and find that the electron distribution function develops a power-law-like non-thermal tail within a restricted range of energies E in (E {sub nt}, E {sub max}). We obtain approximate analytic expressions for E {sub nt} and E {sub max}, which describe how these minimum and maximum energies depend upon parameters such as the electron number density and the rate at which fast-wave energy is injected into the acceleration region at large scales. We contrast our results with previous studies that assume that F{sub k} and f {sub e} are isotropic, and we compare one of our numerical calculations with the time-dependent hard-X-ray spectrum observed during the 1980 June 27 flare. In our numerical calculations, the electron energy spectra are softer (steeper) than in models with isotropic F{sub k} and f {sub e} and closer to the values inferred from observations of solar flares.

  6. Signatures of the coalescence instability in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, H.; Tajima, T.; Brunel, F.

    1984-11-01

    Double sub-peak structures in the quasi periodic oscillations in the time profiles of solar flares in 1980 and 1982 are discussed. Computer simulations of the coalescence instability of two current loops agree with observations of the (widely differing) flares. The simultaneous accelerations of electrons and ions, and the double sub-peak structure in quasi periodic pulses are well explained. The double sub-peak structure is more pronounced when the currents in the two loops are sufficient for fast coalescence to occur. This corresponds to the 1980 flare. When the currents are insufficient for fast coalescence, the double sub-peak structure is less pronounced, as in the 1982 flare. Observations suggest the collision of the two microwave sources for the 1982 event. It is argued that this mechanism is a plausible particle acceleration mechanism in solar flares. (ESA)

  7. EVIDENCE FOR HOT FAST FLOW ABOVE A SOLAR FLARE ARCADE

    SciTech Connect

    Imada, S.; Aoki, K.; Hara, H.; Watanabe, T.; Harra, L. K.; Shimizu, T.

    2013-10-10

    Solar flares are one of the main forces behind space weather events. However, the mechanism that drives such energetic phenomena is not fully understood. The standard eruptive flare model predicts that magnetic reconnection occurs high in the corona where hot fast flows are created. Some imaging or spectroscopic observations have indicated the presence of these hot fast flows, but there have been no spectroscopic scanning observations to date to measure the two-dimensional structure quantitatively. We analyzed a flare that occurred on the west solar limb on 2012 January 27 observed by the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and found that the hot (∼30MK) fast (>500 km s{sup –1}) component was located above the flare loop. This is consistent with magnetic reconnection taking place above the flare loop.

  8. COMPLEX FLARE DYNAMICS INITIATED BY A FILAMENT–FILAMENT INTERACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Chunming; McAteer, R. T. James; Liu, Rui; Alexander, David; Sun, Xudong

    2015-11-01

    We report on an eruption involving a relatively rare filament–filament interaction on 2013 June 21, observed by SDO and STEREO-B. The two filaments were separated in height with a “double-decker” configuration. The eruption of the lower filament began simultaneously with a descent of the upper filament, resulting in a convergence and direct interaction of the two filaments. The interaction was accompanied by the heating of surrounding plasma and an apparent crossing of a loop-like structure through the upper filament. The subsequent coalescence of the filaments drove a bright front ahead of the erupting structures. The whole process was associated with a C3.0 flare followed immediately by an M2.9 flare. Shrinking loops and descending dark voids were observed during the M2.9 flare at different locations above a C-shaped flare arcade as part of the energy release, giving us unique insight into the flare dynamics.

  9. Thermal and Non-Thermal Emission in Two-Ribbon Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, H.

    2004-05-01

    The observation that in many flares there is a good correlation between the soft X-ray emission and the time-integrated non-thermal emission --- the Neupert effect --- indicates a strong link between magnetic reconnection and particle acceleration. We present hydrodynamic simulations of flare loops heated by precipitating energetic electrons. Instead of representing a flare as a single loop, we model it as a succession of independently heated, small-scale filaments. We find that to reproduce the observed thermal emission the energy in the injected electrons must be proportional to the soft X-ray flux, not the derivative of the soft X-ray flux as suggested by the Neupert effect. Comparisons between the simulations and GOES and RHESSI observations indicates that there is not sufficient energy in the non-thermal electrons to account for the thermal emission observed in a large, long duration flare. This suggests that there must be in situ heating of coronal plasma as well as particle acceleration during magnetic reconnection.

  10. Imaging Observations of Magnetic Reconnection in a Solar Eruptive Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Sun, X.; Ding, M. D.; Qiu, J.; Priest, E. R.

    2017-02-01

    Solar flares are among the most energetic events in the solar atmosphere. It is widely accepted that flares are powered by magnetic reconnection in the corona. An eruptive flare is usually accompanied by a coronal mass ejection, both of which are probably driven by the eruption of a magnetic flux rope (MFR). Here we report an eruptive flare on 2016 March 23 observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The extreme-ultraviolet imaging observations exhibit the clear rise and eruption of an MFR. In particular, the observations reveal solid evidence of magnetic reconnection from both the corona and chromosphere during the flare. Moreover, weak reconnection is observed before the start of the flare. We find that the preflare weak reconnection is of tether-cutting type and helps the MFR to rise slowly. Induced by a further rise of the MFR, strong reconnection occurs in the rise phases of the flare, which is temporally related to the MFR eruption. We also find that the magnetic reconnection is more of 3D-type in the early phase, as manifested in a strong-to-weak shear transition in flare loops, and becomes more 2D-like in the later phase, as shown by the apparent rising motion of an arcade of flare loops.

  11. The Coronal Loop Inventory Project: Expanded Analysis and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Christian, G. M.; Chastain, R. A.

    2016-11-01

    We have expanded upon earlier work that investigates the relative importance of coronal loops with isothermal versus multithermal cross-field temperature distributions. These results are important for determining if loops have substructure in the form of unresolved magnetic strands. We have increased the number of loops targeted for temperature analysis from 19 to 207 with the addition of 188 new loops from multiple regions. We selected all loop segments visible in the 171 Å images of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) that had a clean background. Eighty-six of the new loops were rejected because they could not be reliably separated from the background in other AIA filters. Sixty-one loops required multithermal models to reproduce the observations. Twenty-eight loops were effectively isothermal, that is, the plasma emission to which AIA is sensitive could not be distinguished from isothermal emission, within uncertainties. Ten loops were isothermal. Also, part of our inventory was one small flaring loop, one very cool loop whose temperature distribution could not be constrained by the AIA data, and one loop with inconclusive results. Our survey can confirm an unexpected result from the pilot study: we found no isothermal loop segments where we could properly use the 171-to-193 ratio method, which would be similar to the analysis done for many loops observed with TRACE and EIT. We recommend caution to observers who assume the loop plasma is isothermal, and hope that these results will influence the direction of coronal heating models and the effort modelers spend on various heating scenarios.

  12. Modeling the Emission from the 15 February 2011 Solar Flare using Multi-Filamented Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allred, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The 15 February 2011 X-class solar flare was observed by numerous instruments in many spectral regimes making it an ideal case for studying the origins of flare emission. We have developed detailed 1D models describing the transport of flare-accelerated electrons and ions through magnetic flux loops in the solar atmosphere, how these particles heat the ambient plasma, and the emission produced from the flaring loops. However, because of their 1D geometry these models do not include important spatial information. For example, the flare impulsive phase may last several hundred seconds, but it is unlikely that flare-accelerated particles precipitate down a single flux loop for the duration of the entire impulsive phase. In fact, from high-resolution spatial observations we know that many filaments are successively heated in the impulsive phase. We will describe a novel approach which uses the timing of pulses in hard and soft X-ray fluxes observed during the 15 February 2011 flare as a proxy for the lifetime of the impulsive phase on individual loops. We will combine many loops simulated with our 1D flare loop model to construct a multi-filamented model of the Sun's atmospheric response and emission produced during this flare. We will compare this predicted emission to observations of obtained by the EVE, AIA and RHESSI instruments.

  13. Review of current loop coalescence process.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, J.-I.

    This paper concentrates on the developments since the review by Sakai and Ohsawa (1987) dealing with particle acceleration by magnetic reconnection and shocks during current loop coalescence in solar flares.

  14. Sun Emits a Mid-Level Flare

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Caption: A burst of solar material leaps off the left side of the sun in what’s known as a prominence eruption. This image combines three images from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory captured on May 3, 2013, at 1:45 pm EDT, just as an M-class solar flare from the same region was subsiding. The images include light from the 131, 171 and 304 Angstrom wavelengths. Credit: NASA/Goddard/SDO --- The sun emitted a mid-level solar flare, peaking at 1:32 pm EDT on May 3, 2013. Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth's atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground, however -- when intense enough -- they can disturb the atmosphere in the layer where GPS and communications signals travel. This disrupts the radio signals for as long as the flare is ongoing, and the radio blackout for this flare has already subsided. This flare is classified as an M5.7 class flare. M-class flares are the weakest flares that can still cause some space weather effects near Earth. Increased numbers of flares are quite common at the moment, since the sun's normal 11-year activity cycle is ramping up toward solar maximum, which is expected in late 2013. Updates will be provided as they are available on the flare and whether there was an associated coronal mass ejection (CME), another solar phenomenon that can send solar particles into space and affect electronic systems in satellites and on Earth. NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  15. Slipping magnetic reconnection during an X-class solar flare observed by SDO/AIA

    SciTech Connect

    Dudík, J.; Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.; Janvier, M.; Aulanier, G.; Schmieder, B.; Karlický, M. E-mail: mjanvier@maths.dundee.ac.uk

    2014-04-01

    We present SDO/AIA observations of an eruptive X-class flare of 2012 July 12, and compare its evolution with the predictions of a three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulation. We focus on the dynamics of flare loops that are seen to undergo slipping reconnection during the flare. In the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 131 Å observations, lower parts of 10 MK flare loops exhibit an apparent motion with velocities of several tens of km s{sup –1} along the developing flare ribbons. In the early stages of the flare, flare ribbons consist of compact, localized bright transition-region emission from the footpoints of the flare loops. A differential emission measure analysis shows that the flare loops have temperatures up to the formation of Fe XXIV. A series of very long, S-shaped loops erupt, leading to a coronal mass ejection observed by STEREO. The observed dynamics are compared with the evolution of magnetic structures in the 'standard solar flare model in 3D.' This model matches the observations well, reproducing the apparently slipping flare loops, S-shaped erupting loops, and the evolution of flare ribbons. All of these processes are explained via 3D reconnection mechanisms resulting from the expansion of a torus-unstable flux rope. The AIA observations and the numerical model are complemented by radio observations showing a noise storm in the metric range. Dm-drifting pulsation structures occurring during the eruption indicate plasmoid ejection and enhancement of the reconnection rate. The bursty nature of radio emission shows that the slipping reconnection is still intermittent, although it is observed to persist for more than an hour.

  16. EBL effect on the observation of multi-TeV flaring of 2009 from Markarian 501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Sarira; Yáñez, Marco Vladimir Lemus; Miranda, Luis Salvador; de León, Alberto Rosales; Gupta, Virendra

    2017-01-01

    Markarian 501 is a high-peaked BL Lacertae object and has undergone many major outbursts since its discovery in 1996. As a part of the multiwavelength campaign, in the year 2009 this blazar was observed for 4.5 months from March 9 to August 1 and during the period April 17 to May 5 it was observed by both space and ground based observatories covering the entire electromagnetic spectrum. A very strong high energy γ -ray flare was observed on May 1 by Whipple telescope in the energy range 317 GeV to 5 TeV and the flux was about 10 times higher than the average baseline flux. Previously during 1997 Markarian 501 had undergone another long outburst, which was observed by HEGRA telescopes and the energy spectrum was well beyond 10 TeV. The photohadronic model complemented by the extragalactic background radiation (EBL) correction fits well with the flares data observed by both Whipple and HEGRA. Our model predicts a steeper slope of the energy spectrum beyond 10 TeV, which is compatible with the improved analysis of the HEGRA data.

  17. Flare-associated Energy Exchange Between the Photosphere and Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramenko, Valentyna; Harra, L.

    2012-05-01

    In recent decades, it has been clearly demonstrated that strong flares in ARs (referred before as chromospheric flares) are not restricted to some closed volume in the chromosphere but rather involve a huge volume from deep sub-photospheric layers to the outer heliosphere. Undoubtedly, there exists interaction and energy exchange between different parts of the volume occupied by a flare, e.g., reconnection between up-welling loops and the pre-existing flux, waves and shocks, seismic response to a flare, momentum distribution and Lorentz Force acting, accelerated particle, heat, X-ray propagation, Poynting flux transport, etc. However, mechanisms of the processes, as well as their relationship with the flare itself (is a phenomenon a prelude to the flare, its consequence or non of such) is not well understood yet. We explore new metrics of the photospheric magnetic field: we monitor the magnetic energy dissipation rate. For three strong flares, we found that the magnetic energy dissipation rate sets to a monotonous ceasing several hours before the flare onset. Assuming nearly gradual energy input, the reduction of the energy dissipation rate implies that somewhere in the active region, the energy is being accumulated. The non-dissipated and accumulated energy amounts to (3 - 10) x 1032 ergs. We presume that at least part of the energy accumulated immediately before the flare is transferred into the corona and further drives the corona to a trigger point when flare occurs.

  18. F-actin structure destabilization and DNase I binding loop: fluctuations mutational cross-linking and electron microscopy analysis of loop states and effects on F-actin.

    PubMed

    Oztug Durer, Zeynep A; Diraviyam, Karthikeyan; Sept, David; Kudryashov, Dmitri S; Reisler, Emil

    2010-01-22

    The conformational dynamics of filamentous actin (F-actin) is essential for the regulation and functions of cellular actin networks. The main contribution to F-actin dynamics and its multiple conformational states arises from the mobility and flexibility of the DNase I binding loop (D-loop; residues 40-50) on subdomain 2. Therefore, we explored the structural constraints on D-loop plasticity at the F-actin interprotomer space by probing its dynamic interactions with the hydrophobic loop (H-loop), the C-terminus, and the W-loop via mutational disulfide cross-linking. To this end, residues of the D-loop were mutated to cysteines on yeast actin with a C374A background. These mutants showed no major changes in their polymerization and nucleotide exchange properties compared to wild-type actin. Copper-catalyzed disulfide cross-linking was investigated in equimolar copolymers of cysteine mutants from the D-loop with either wild-type (C374) actin or mutant S265C/C374A (on the H-loop) or mutant F169C/C374A (on the W-loop). Remarkably, all tested residues of the D-loop could be cross-linked to residues 374, 265, and 169 by disulfide bonds, demonstrating the plasticity of the interprotomer region. However, each cross-link resulted in different effects on the filament structure, as detected by electron microscopy and light-scattering measurements. Disulfide cross-linking in the longitudinal orientation produced mostly no visible changes in filament morphology, whereas the cross-linking of D-loop residues >45 to the H-loop, in the lateral direction, resulted in filament disruption and the presence of amorphous aggregates on electron microscopy images. A similar aggregation was also observed upon cross-linking the residues of the D-loop (>41) to residue 169. The effects of disulfide cross-links on F-actin stability were only partially accounted for by the simulations of current F-actin models. Thus, our results present evidence for the high level of conformational plasticity in

  19. Deterministically Driven Avalanche Models of Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strugarek, Antoine; Charbonneau, Paul; Joseph, Richard; Pirot, Dorian

    2014-08-01

    We develop and discuss the properties of a new class of lattice-based avalanche models of solar flares. These models are readily amenable to a relatively unambiguous physical interpretation in terms of slow twisting of a coronal loop. They share similarities with other avalanche models, such as the classical stick-slip self-organized critical model of earthquakes, in that they are driven globally by a fully deterministic energy-loading process. The model design leads to a systematic deficit of small-scale avalanches. In some portions of model space, mid-size and large avalanching behavior is scale-free, being characterized by event size distributions that have the form of power-laws with index values, which, in some parameter regimes, compare favorably to those inferred from solar EUV and X-ray flare data. For models using conservative or near-conservative redistribution rules, a population of large, quasiperiodic avalanches can also appear. Although without direct counterparts in the observational global statistics of flare energy release, this latter behavior may be relevant to recurrent flaring in individual coronal loops. This class of models could provide a basis for the prediction of large solar flares.

  20. Studies of Solar Flares and Coronal Loops.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-10

    atmosphere. In the 9:7:0 atmosphere, for exam- radiative loss rates depend. It should also be emphasized pIe , T, is 47 K less than the VAL/F r,,. This result...i( Tipo + T pl) and equations (5) and (8), we get P (D - w t P = + 0 (9j where 0 = o ’-, +T (k" -B,)- (o fTQ 10R B0 . G!) = ( - 1 ) R p + T ( k

  1. COPD flare-ups

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms and signs of a COPD flare-up. Warning Signs of COPD Flare-up Signs of a ... 21810710 . Vestbo J, Hurd SS, Agusti AG, et al. Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD). Global ...

  2. Understanding Solar Flare Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatland, M. S.

    2005-12-01

    A review is presented of work aimed at understanding solar flare statistics, with emphasis on the well known flare power-law size distribution. Although avalanche models are perhaps the favoured model to describe flare statistics, their physical basis is unclear, and they are divorced from developing ideas in large-scale reconnection theory. An alternative model, aimed at reconciling large-scale reconnection models with solar flare statistics, is revisited. The solar flare waiting-time distribution has also attracted recent attention. Observed waiting-time distributions are described, together with what they might tell us about the flare phenomenon. Finally, a practical application of flare statistics to flare prediction is described in detail, including the results of a year of automated (web-based) predictions from the method.

  3. Analysis of Chromospheric Evaporation in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Kosovichev, Alexander G.

    2017-08-01

    Chromospheric evaporation is one of the key processes of solar flares. Properties of chromospheric evaporation are thought to be closely connected to the energy release rates and energy transport mechanisms. Previous investigations revealed that in addition to electron-beam heating the chromospheric evaporation can be driven by heat fluxes and, probably, by other mechanisms. In this work, we present a study of flare events simultaneously observed by IRIS, SDO and RHESSI, focusing on spatio-temporal characteristics of the flare dynamics and its relation to the magnetic field topology. Event selection is performed using the Interactive Multi-Instrument Database of Solar Flares (IMIDSF) recently developed by the Center for Computational Heliophysics (CCH) at NJIT. The selection of IRIS observations was restricted to the fast-scanning regimes (coarse-raster or sparse-raster modes with ≥ 4 slit positions, ≥ 6`` spatial coverage, and ≤ 60 sec loop time). We have chosen 14 events, and estimated the spatially-resolved intensities and Doppler shifts of the chromospheric (Mg II), transition region (C II) and hot coronal (Fe XXI) lines reflecting the dynamics of the chromospheric evaporation. The correlations among the derived line profile properties, flare morphology, magnetic topology and hard X-ray characteristics will be presented, and compared with the RADYN flare models and other scenarios of chromospheric evaporations.

  4. Multithread Hydrodynamic Modeling of a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Harry P.

    2006-01-01

    Past hydrodynamic simulations have been able to reproduce the high temperatures and densities characteristic of solar flares. These simulations, however, have not been able to account for the slow decay of the observed flare emission or the absence of blueshifts in high spectral resolution line profiles. Recent work has suggested that modeling a flare as a sequence of independently heated threads instead of as a single loop may resolve the discrepancies between the simulations and observations. In this paper, we present a method for computing multithread, time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations of solar flares and apply it to observations of the Masuda flare of 1992 January 13. We show that it is possible to reproduce the temporal evolution of high temperature thermal flare plasma observed with the instruments on the GOES and Yohkoh satellites. The results from these simulations suggest that the heating timescale for a individual thread is on the order of 200 s. Significantly shorter heating timescales (20 s) lead to very high temperatures and are inconsistent with the emission observed by Yohkoh.

  5. Manifestation of intermediate meson loop effects in charmonium decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuan-Jiang; Li, Gang; Zhao, Qiang

    2010-09-01

    We report the progress on understanding some of those existing puzzles in charmonium decays. We show that the intermediate meson loops (IML) as a long-distance transition mechanism will provide novel insights into these issues. In particular, we show that the IML mechanism would be essentially important for understanding the Ψ(3770) non-Dbar D decays. We also comment that such a mechanism is correlated with the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka (OZI) rule evasions in charmonium hadronic decays.

  6. Effect of Solar Flare Index (If) on seasonal Rainfall variation over Gangetic West Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Rajdeep

    It is well established that Sun is the source of all energy on the Earth and it controls many of tropospheric, stratospheric and ionospheric phenomenons. There are many solar parameters which are responsible for affecting the atmosphere. Among all parameters If index, defined by the Scientist Sawyer in the year 1967, has been taken into consideration. There are already so many work which has been established in the field of ionosphere with the If index and it is believed that there may be some correlation found between the tropospheric phenomenon and this solar If index. Therefore, this might be the first step taken to describe the findings of a correlation between the If index in the Troposphere with the monthly precipitation mainly in monsoon period along with three other different seasons as mentioned by the Indian Meteorological Department during a period of 22 year solar cycle in the year 1989 to 2010 over Gangetic West Bengal. As it is already known that the seasonal rainfall variation mainly depend on some predominating factor like inclination angle of the Earth, the perigee and apogee position of the earth with respect to the sun. Besides this, many world tropospheric phenomenons like EL NINO, Sea surface temperature variation, Southern Oscillation Index, high pressure over Tibetan plateau are directly or indirectly controlled by the Sun and these phenomenons also affects the monsoonal climate over Indian subcontinent. Here it is being found out a relation between the solar flare If index and the precipitation amount over Gangetic West Bengal and ultimately the symmetrical relationship in between these two parameter is seen. Since If index depends on the disc area which has been created at the time of solar flare. There are many solar parameters which have different periodic variation, therefore, it can be said that the disc area may be a periodically changed variable of Sun and it is a time dependent factor. During this small interval of time it is very

  7. Observations and Modeling of Solar Flare Atmospheric Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.

    2015-09-01

    Solar flares are one of the most energetic events in solar atmosphere, which last minutes to tens of minutes. The eruption of a solar flare involves energy release, plasma heating, particle acceleration, mass flows, waves, etc. A solar flare releases a large amount of energy, and its emission spans a wide wavelength range. Solar flares are usually accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs); therefore they could significantly affect the space environments between the Earth and the Sun. At present, we do not fully understand the whole flare process. There are still many important questions to be resolved, such as when and where is the energy released? How long does the energy release last? What are the main ways of energy release? And how does the solar atmosphere respond to the energy release? To address these questions, we study in detail the flare heating and dynamic evolution. We first give a brief review of previous flare studies (Chapter 1), and introduce the observing instruments (Chapter 2) and the modeling method (Chapter 3) related to this thesis work. Then we use spectral data to investigate the chromospheric evaporation (Chapter 4). Based on the results, we further explore the flare heating problem. With observationally inferred heating functions, we model two flare loops, and compare the results with observations (Chapter 5). A consistency is achieved between modeling and observations. In addition, we model two different sets of flare loop systems with quite different heating profiles and dynamic evolutions (Chapter 6). The details are described as below. Firstly, we investigate the chromospheric evaporation in the flare on 2007 January 16 using line profiles observed by the Extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode. Three points with different magnetic polarities at flare ribbons are analyzed in detail. We find that the three points show different patterns of upflows and downflows in the impulsive phase of the flare. The

  8. An X-ray flare from 47 Cas

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Jeewan C.; Karmakar, Subhajeet

    2015-02-01

    Using XMM-Newton observations, we investigate properties of a flare from the very active but poorly known stellar system 47 Cas. The luminosity at the peak of the flare is found to be 3.54 × 10{sup 30} erg s{sup −1}, which is ∼2 times higher than that at a quiescent state. The quiescent state corona of 47 Cas can be represented by two temperature plasma: 3.7 and 11.0 MK. The time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy of the flare show the variable nature of the temperature, the emission measure, and the abundance. The maximum temperature during the flare is derived as 72.8 MK. We infer the length of a flaring loop to be 3.3 × 10{sup 10} cm using a hydrodynamic loop model. Using the RGS spectra, the density during the flare is estimated as 4.0 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3}. The loop scaling laws are also applied when deriving physical parameters of the flaring plasma.

  9. Gravitational steady states of solar coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Linda E.; Asgari-Targhi, M.

    2017-02-01

    Coronal loops on the surface of the sun appear to consist of curved, plasma-confining magnetic flux tubes or "ropes," anchored at both ends in the photosphere. Toroidal loops carrying current are inherently unstable to expansion in the major radius due to toroidal-curvature-induced imbalances in the magnetic and plasma pressures. An ideal MHD analysis of a simple isolated loop with density and pressure higher than the surrounding corona, based on the theory of magnetically confined toroidal plasmas, shows that the radial force balance depends on the loop internal structure and varies over parameter space. It provides a unified picture of simple loop steady states in terms of the plasma beta βo, the inverse aspect ratio ɛ =a /Ro , and the MHD gravitational parameter G ̂≡g a /vA2 , all at the top of the loop, where g is the acceleration due to gravity, a the average minor radius, and vA the shear Alfvén velocity. In the high and low beta tokamak orderings, βo=2 noT /(Bo2/2 μo)˜ɛ1 and ɛ2 , that fit many loops, the solar gravity can sustain nonaxisymmetric steady states at G ̂˜ɛ βo that represent the maximum stable height. At smaller G ̂≤ɛ2βo , the loop is axisymmetric to leading order and stabilized primarily by the two fixed loop ends. Very low beta, nearly force-free, steady states with βo˜ɛ3 may also exist, with or without gravity, depending on higher order effects. The thin coronal loops commonly observed in solar active regions have ɛ ≃0.02 and fit the high beta steady states. G ̂ increases with loop height. Fatter loops in active regions that form along magnetic neutral lines and may lead to solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejections have ɛ ≃0.1 -0.2 and may fit the low beta ordering. Larger loops tend to have G ̂>ɛ βo and be unstable to radial expansion because the exponential hydrostatic reduction in the density at the loop-top reduces the gravitational force -ρG ̂ R ̂ below the level that balances expansion, in agreement with

  10. Remote flare brightenings and type III reverse slope bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, F.; Moore, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Observations are presented on two large (H-alpha class 2) flares that each produced an extensive chain of discrete H-alpha brightenings spanning 370,000-470,000 km in length in remote quiet regions more than 100,000 km from the main flare site. A large group of Type III RS bursts was also observed accompanying each flare. The onset of about half the remote H-alpha emission patches were nearly simultaneous with the RS bursts. One flare was observed in hard X-rays, and it is noted that the RS bursts occurred during hard X-ray spikes. For the other flare, soft X-ray filtergrams indicate coronal loops connecting from the main flare site to the remote H-alpha brightenings. Observations indicate that the RS burst electrons were generated in the flares, and it is proposed that the remote H-alpha brightenings were initiated by direct heating of the chromosphere by RS burst electrons traveling in closed magnetic loops connecting the flare site to the remote patches. It is also suggested that after onset, the brightenings were heated by thermal conduction by slower thermal electrons.

  11. Gravitational Steady States of Coronal Loops as Magnetic Flux Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, L.; Asgari-Targhi, M.

    2016-12-01

    Many coronal loops observed on the surface of the sun appear to bemagnetic flux ropes containing plasma, with ends tied in the photosphere. Different types of loops contribute to important solar processes, but relatively little is known about their configuration.Like all toroidal confined, curved plasmas carrying current,they are intrinsically unstable to expansion in major radius.Consistent 3D MHD steady states are derived for the coronal partof the loop, including non-negligible effects due to the plasma pressure and solar gravity. Most loops have relativelyslender inverse aspect ratios ɛ =a/R≤ 1.For predominantly simple, non-helical loops, three gravitationally stabilized asymptotic solutions can be foundthat can be related to toroidal magnetically confined plasams.Comparison to observations shows thattwo solutions bracket the observed heights R<108m of the common thin coronal loops (ɛ ˜ 0.02) in solar active regions.The third solution better describes the fatter loops (ɛ ˜ 0.1)that sometimes appear along the magnetic neutral line in an active regionand grow to produce solar flares or coronal mass ejections.Since radial expansion is higher order than the basic flux ropeconfinement, the states also approximately describe radially unstable loops over similar heights.The solutions can also be generalized to other stabilizing mechanismsand may provide a useful basis for studies of loop dynamics.

  12. The Relationship between Extreme Ultraviolet Non-thermal Line Broadening and High-energy Particles during Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawate, T.; Imada, S.

    2013-10-01

    We have studied the relationship between the location of EUV non-thermal broadening and high-energy particles during large flares using the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode, the Nobeyama Radio Polarimeter, the Nobeyama Radioheliograph, and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory. We have analyzed five large flare events that contain thermal-rich, intermediate, and thermal-poor flares classified by the definition discussed in the paper. We found that, in the case of thermal-rich flares, the non-thermal broadening of Fe XXIV occurred at the top of the flaring loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of 17 GHz microwaves is located at the footpoint of the flare loop. On the other hand, in the case of intermediate/thermal-poor flares, the non-thermal broadening of Fe XXIV occurred at the footpoint of the flare loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of 17 GHz microwaves is located at the top of the flaring loop. We discussed the difference between thermal-rich and intermediate/thermal-poor flares based on the spatial information of non-thermal broadening, which may provide clues that the presence of turbulence plays an important role in the pitch angle scattering of high-energy electrons.

  13. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET NON-THERMAL LINE BROADENING AND HIGH-ENERGY PARTICLES DURING SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Kawate, T.; Imada, S.

    2013-10-01

    We have studied the relationship between the location of EUV non-thermal broadening and high-energy particles during large flares using the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode, the Nobeyama Radio Polarimeter, the Nobeyama Radioheliograph, and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory. We have analyzed five large flare events that contain thermal-rich, intermediate, and thermal-poor flares classified by the definition discussed in the paper. We found that, in the case of thermal-rich flares, the non-thermal broadening of Fe XXIV occurred at the top of the flaring loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of 17 GHz microwaves is located at the footpoint of the flare loop. On the other hand, in the case of intermediate/thermal-poor flares, the non-thermal broadening of Fe XXIV occurred at the footpoint of the flare loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of 17 GHz microwaves is located at the top of the flaring loop. We discussed the difference between thermal-rich and intermediate/thermal-poor flares based on the spatial information of non-thermal broadening, which may provide clues that the presence of turbulence plays an important role in the pitch angle scattering of high-energy electrons.

  14. A Database of Flare Ribbon Properties From Solar Dynamics Observatory: Reconnection Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazachenko, Maria D.; Welsch, Brian; Lynch, Benjamin J.; Sun, Xudong

    2017-08-01

    We present a database of 3137 solar flare ribbon events corresponding to every flare of GOES class C1.0 and greater within 45 degrees from the disk center, from April 2010 until April 2016, observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory. For every event in the database, we compare the GOES peak X-ray flux with corresponding active-region and flare-ribbon properties. We find that while the peak X-ray flux is not correlated with the AR unsigned magnetic flux, it is strongly correlated with the flare ribbon reconnection flux, flare ribbon area, and the fraction of active region flux that undergoes reconnection. We find the relationship between the peak X-ray flux and the flare ribbon reconnection flux to be I_{X,peak} ~ \\Phi_{ribbon}^{1.3} for flares >M1 and I_{X,peak} ~ \\Phi_{ribbon}^{1.5} over the entire flare set (>C1). This scaling law is consistent with earlier hydrodynamic simulations of impulsively heated flare loops. Using the flare reconnection flux as a proxy for the total released flare energy E, we find that the occurrence frequency of flare energies follows a power-law dependence: dN/dE ~ E^{-1.6} for E within 10^{31} to 10^{33} erg, consistent with earlier studies of solar and stellar flares. This database is available online and can be used for future quantitative studies of flares.

  15. Electron acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Droge, Wolfgang; Meyer, Peter; Evenson, Paul; Moses, Dan

    1989-01-01

    For the period Spetember 1978 to December 1982, 55 solar flare particle events for which the instruments on board the ISEE-3 spacecraft detected electrons above 10 MeV. Combining data with those from the ULEWAT spectrometer electron spectra in the range from 0.1 to 100 MeV were obtained. The observed spectral shapes can be divided into two classes. The spectra of the one class can be fit by a single power law in rigidity over the entire observed range. The spectra of the other class deviate from a power law, instead exhibiting a steepening at low rigidities and a flattening at high rigidities. Events with power-law spectra are associated with impulsive (less than 1 hr duration) soft X-ray emission, whereas events with hardening spectra are associated with long-duration (more than 1 hr) soft X-ray emission. The characteristics of long-duration events are consistent with diffusive shock acceleration taking place high in the corona. Electron spectra of short-duration flares are well reproduced by the distribution functions derived from a model assuming simultaneous second-order Fermi acceleration and Coulomb losses operating in closed flare loops.

  16. FlareLab: early results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltwisch, H.; Kempkes, P.; Mackel, F.; Stein, H.; Tenfelde, J.; Arnold, L.; Dreher, J.; Grauer, R.

    2010-12-01

    The FlareLab experiment at Bochum University has been constructed to generate and investigate plasma-filled magnetic flux tubes similar to arch-shaped solar prominences, which often result in coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In its first version, the device has been used to reproduce and extend previous studies of Bellan et al (1998 Phys. Plasmas 5 1991). Here the plasma source consists of two electrodes, which can be connected to a 1.0 kJ capacitor bank, and of a horseshoe magnet, which provides an arch-shaped guiding field. The discharge is ignited in a cloud of hydrogen gas that has been puffed into the space above the electrodes. In the first few microseconds the plasma current rises at a rate of several kA µs-1, causing the plasma column to pinch along the guiding B-field and to form an expanding loop structure. The observed dynamics of the magnetic flux tubes is analysed by means of three-dimensional MHD simulations in order to determine the influence of parameters like the initial magnetic field geometry on magnetic stability. At present, FlareLab is redesigned to mimic a model that was proposed by Titov and Démoulin (1999 Astron. Astrophys. 351 707) to investigate twisted magnetic configurations in solar flares.

  17. Observations and modeling of plasma flows driven by solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brannon, Sean Robert

    One of the fundamental statements that can be made about the solar atmosphere is that it is structured. This structuring is generally believed to be the result of both the arrangement of the magnetic field in the corona and the distribution of plasma along magnetic loops. The standard model of solar flares involves plasma transported into coronal loops via a process known as chromospheric evaporation, and the resulting evolution of the flare loops is believed to be sensitive to the physical mechanism of energy input into the chromosphere by the flare. We present here the results of three investigations into chromospheric plasma flows driven by solar flare energy release and transport. First, we develop a 1-D hydrodynamic code to simulate the response of a simplified model chromosphere to energy input via thermal conduction from reconnection-driven shocks. We use the results from a set of simulations spanning a parameter space in both shock speed and chromospheric-to-coronal temperature ratio to infer power-law relationships between these quantities and observable evaporation properties. Second, we use imaging and spectral observations of a quasi-periodic oscillation of a flare ribbon to determine the phase relationship between Doppler shifts of the ribbon plasma and the oscillation. The phase difference we find leads us to suggest an origin in a current sheet instability. Finally, we use imaging and spectral data of an on-disk flare event and resulting flare loop plasma flows to generally validate the standard picture of flare loop evolution, including evaporation, cooling time, and draining downflows, and we use a simple free-fall model to produce the first direct comparison between observed and synthetic downflow spectra.

  18. On the Importance of the Flare's Late Phase for the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Eparvier, Frank; Jones, Andrew R.; Hock, Rachel; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Klimchuk, James A.; Didkovsky, Leonid; Judge, Darrell; Mariska, John; Bailey, Scott; hide

    2011-01-01

    The new solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance observations from NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) have revealed a new class of solar flares that are referred to as late phase flares. These flares are characterized by the hot 2-5 MK coronal emissions (e.g., Fe XVI 33.5 nm) showing large secondary peaks that appear many minutes to hours after an eruptive flare event. In contrast, the cool 0.7-1.5 MK coronal emissions (e.g., Fe IX 17.1 nm) usually dim immediately after the flare onset and do not recover until after the delayed second peak of the hot coronal emissions. We refer to this period of 1-5 hours after the fl amrea sin phase as the late phase, and this late phase is uniquely different than long duration flares associated with 2-ribbon flares or large filament eruptions. Our analysis of the late phase flare events indicates that the late phase involves hot coronal loops near the flaring region, not directly related to the original flaring loop system but rather with the higher post-eruption fields. Another finding is that space weather applications concerning Earth s ionosphere and thermosphere need to consider these late phase flares because they can enhance the total EUV irradiance flare variation by a factor of 2 when the late phase contribution is included.

  19. Effect of the X5.4 Class Solar Flare Event of Solar Cycle 24 ON the GPS Signal Reception in Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, S.; Musa, T. A.; Aris, W. A. W.; Gopir, G.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we examine the effect of solar flare event on the Global Positioning System (GPS) signal reception in Peninsular Malaysia during the X5.4 class solar flare on 7th March 2012, 00:24 UT at active region AR1429. GPS data from six MyRTKnet stations that cover the northern, southern, western and eastern regions of Peninsular Malaysia were used, namely Langkawi (Kedah), Bandar Baharu (Pulau Pinang), Pekan (Pahang), Mersing (Johor), Tanjung Pengelih (Johor) and Malacca (Malacca). The total electron content (TEC) was estimated based on the single layer ionospheric model. Next, the ionospheric delay for each GPS frequency of L1 (1575.42 MHz), L2 (1227.60 MHz) and L5 (1176.45 MHz) was then calculated. The results show that solar flare event can influence the GPS signal reception in Peninsular Malaysia where the X5.4 class solar flare shows significant effect of the ionospheric delay within the range of 9 m - 20 m. These research findings will significantly contribute to space weather study and its effects on space-based positioning system such as the GPS.

  20. Geo-Effective Solar Flare Events In December 2006: Space Weather Effect on Mars and Venus Oxygen Loss to Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futaana, Y.; Barabash, S.; Yamauchi, M.; Lundin, R.; McKenna-Lawlor, S.

    2007-12-01

    In Dec. 2006, single sunspot region produced a series of proton solar flares, up to X9.0 level on 5 Dec 2006 10:35 UT. One unique feature of this X9.0 flare is that MeV particles originated from this proton flare were observed at Venus and Mars by Venus Express (VEX) and Mars Express (MEX), which are respectively located away from Earth by nearly +160° and -160° as viewed from the Sun. On 5 Dec 2006, the plasma instruments ASPERA-3 and ASPERA-4 on board MEX and VEX have detected a large enhancement in their respective background count level, which is a typical signature of intensive MeV particle flux. The timing of these enhancements were consistent with the estimated field-aligned travel time along the Parker spiral from the site of X9.0 flare to Venus and Mars. The Mars Express data indicate a one-order enhancement in the heavy ion outflow from the Martian atmosphere during the SEP period. This is the first observation of the increase of escaping flux at Mars during a violent solar activity. This suggests that the solar EUV flux levels also significantly affect the atmospheric loss from unmagnetized planets.

  1. Equatorial ionospheric electrodynamics during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruilong; Liu, Libo; Le, Huijun; Chen, Yiding

    2017-05-01

    Previous investigations on ionospheric responses to solar flares focused mainly on the photoionization caused by the increased X-rays and extreme ultraviolet irradiance. However, little attention was paid to the related electrodynamics. In this letter, we explored the equatorial electric field (EEF) and electrojet (EEJ) in the ionosphere at Jicamarca during flares from 1998 to 2008. It is verified that solar flares increase dayside eastward EEJ but decrease dayside eastward EEF, revealing a negative correlation between EEJ and EEF. The decreased EEF weakens the equatorial fountain effect and depresses the low-latitude electron density. During flares, the enhancement in the Cowling conductivity may modulate ionospheric dynamo and decrease the EEF. Besides, the decreased EEF is closely related to the enhanced ASY-H index that qualitatively reflects Region 2 field-aligned current (R2 FAC). We speculated that solar flares may also decrease EEF through enhancing R2 FAC that leads to an overshielding-like effect.

  2. Sun Emits a Mid-Level Flare

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Caption: NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) captured this image of an M5.7 class flare on May 3, 2013 at 1:30 p.m. EDT. This image shows light in the 131 Angstrom wavelength, a wavelength of light that can show material at the very hot temperatures of a solar flare and that is typically colorized in teal. Caption: NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) captured this image of an M5.7 class flare on May 3, 2013 at 1:30 p.m. EDT. This image shows light in the 131 Angstrom wavelength, a wavelength of light that can show material at the very hot temperatures of a solar flare and that is typically colorized in teal. Credit: NASA/Goddard/SDO --- The sun emitted a mid-level solar flare, peaking at 1:32 pm EDT on May 3, 2013. Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth's atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground, however -- when intense enough -- they can disturb the atmosphere in the layer where GPS and communications signals travel. This disrupts the radio signals for as long as the flare is ongoing, and the radio blackout for this flare has already subsided. This flare is classified as an M5.7 class flare. M-class flares are the weakest flares that can still cause some space weather effects near Earth. Increased numbers of flares are quite common at the moment, since the sun's normal 11-year activity cycle is ramping up toward solar maximum, which is expected in late 2013. Updates will be provided as they are available on the flare and whether there was an associated coronal mass ejection (CME), another solar phenomenon that can send solar particles into space and affect electronic systems in satellites and on Earth. NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling

  3. The effects of spaceflight on open-loop and closed-loop postural control mechanisms: human neurovestibular studies on SLS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J. J.; De Luca, C. J.; Pavlik, A. E.; Roy, S. H.; Emley, M. S.; Young, L. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Stabilogram-diffusion analysis was used to examine how prolonged periods in microgravity affect the open-loop and closed-loop postural control mechanisms. It was hypothesized that following spaceflight: (1) the effective stochastic activity of the open-loop postural control schemes in astronauts is increased; (2) the effective stochastic activity and uncorrelated behavior, respectively, of the closed-loop postural control mechanisms in astronauts are increased; and (3) astronauts utilized open-loop postural controls schemes for shorter time intervals and smaller displacements. Four crew members and two alternates from the 14-day Spacelab Life Sciences 2 Mission were included in the study. Each subject was tested under eyes-open, quiet-standing conditions on multiple preflight and postflight days. The subjects' center-of-pressure trajectories were measured with a force platform and analyzed according to stabilogram-diffusion analysis. It was found that the effective stochastic activity of the open-loop postural control schemes in three of the four crew members was increased following spaceflight. This result is interpreted as an indication that there may be in-flight adaptations to higher-level descending postural control pathways, e.g., a postflight increase in the tonic activation of postural muscles. This change may also be the consequence of a compensatory (e.g., "stiffening") postural control strategy that is adopted by astronauts to account for general feeling of postflight unsteadiness. The crew members, as a group, did not exhibit any consistent preflight/postflight differences in the steady-state behavior of their closed-loop postural control mechanisms or in the functional interaction of their open-loop and closed-loop postural control mechanisms. These results are interpreted as indications that although there may be in-flight adaptations to the vestibular system and/or proprioceptive system, input from the visual system can compensate for such changes

  4. The effects of spaceflight on open-loop and closed-loop postural control mechanisms: human neurovestibular studies on SLS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J. J.; De Luca, C. J.; Pavlik, A. E.; Roy, S. H.; Emley, M. S.; Young, L. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Stabilogram-diffusion analysis was used to examine how prolonged periods in microgravity affect the open-loop and closed-loop postural control mechanisms. It was hypothesized that following spaceflight: (1) the effective stochastic activity of the open-loop postural control schemes in astronauts is increased; (2) the effective stochastic activity and uncorrelated behavior, respectively, of the closed-loop postural control mechanisms in astronauts are increased; and (3) astronauts utilized open-loop postural controls schemes for shorter time intervals and smaller displacements. Four crew members and two alternates from the 14-day Spacelab Life Sciences 2 Mission were included in the study. Each subject was tested under eyes-open, quiet-standing conditions on multiple preflight and postflight days. The subjects' center-of-pressure trajectories were measured with a force platform and analyzed according to stabilogram-diffusion analysis. It was found that the effective stochastic activity of the open-loop postural control schemes in three of the four crew members was increased following spaceflight. This result is interpreted as an indication that there may be in-flight adaptations to higher-level descending postural control pathways, e.g., a postflight increase in the tonic activation of postural muscles. This change may also be the consequence of a compensatory (e.g., "stiffening") postural control strategy that is adopted by astronauts to account for general feeling of postflight unsteadiness. The crew members, as a group, did not exhibit any consistent preflight/postflight differences in the steady-state behavior of their closed-loop postural control mechanisms or in the functional interaction of their open-loop and closed-loop postural control mechanisms. These results are interpreted as indications that although there may be in-flight adaptations to the vestibular system and/or proprioceptive system, input from the visual system can compensate for such changes

  5. The effects of spaceflight on open-loop and closed-loop postural control mechanisms: human neurovestibular studies on SLS-2.

    PubMed

    Collins, J J; De Luca, C J; Pavlik, A E; Roy, S H; Emley, M S

    1995-01-01

    Stabilogram-diffusion analysis was used to examine how prolonged periods in microgravity affect the open-loop and closed-loop postural control mechanisms. It was hypothesized that following spaceflight: (1) the effective stochastic activity of the open-loop postural control schemes in astronauts is increased; (2) the effective stochastic activity and uncorrelated behavior, respectively, of the closed-loop postural control mechanisms in astronauts are increased; and (3) astronauts utilized open-loop postural controls schemes for shorter time intervals and smaller displacements. Four crew members and two alternates from the 14-day Spacelab Life Sciences 2 Mission were included in the study. Each subject was tested under eyes-open, quiet-standing conditions on multiple preflight and postflight days. The subjects' center-of-pressure trajectories were measured with a force platform and analyzed according to stabilogram-diffusion analysis. It was found that the effective stochastic activity of the open-loop postural control schemes in three of the four crew members was increased following spaceflight. This result is interpreted as an indication that there may be in-flight adaptations to higher-level descending postural control pathways, e.g., a postflight increase in the tonic activation of postural muscles. This change may also be the consequence of a compensatory (e.g., "stiffening") postural control strategy that is adopted by astronauts to account for general feeling of postflight unsteadiness. The crew members, as a group, did not exhibit any consistent preflight/postflight differences in the steady-state behavior of their closed-loop postural control mechanisms or in the functional interaction of their open-loop and closed-loop postural control mechanisms. These results are interpreted as indications that although there may be in-flight adaptations to the vestibular system and/or proprioceptive system, input from the visual system can compensate for such changes

  6. Prediction of Loops in G Protein-Coupled Receptor Homology Models: Effect of Imprecise Surroundings and Constraints.

    PubMed

    Arora, Bhumika; Coudrat, Thomas; Wootten, Denise; Christopoulos, Arthur; Noronha, Santosh B; Sexton, Patrick M

    2016-04-25

    In the present study, we explored the extent to which inaccuracies inherent in homology models of the transmembrane helical cores of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can impact loop prediction. We demonstrate that loop prediction in homology models is much more difficult than loop reconstruction in crystal structures because of the imprecise positioning of loop anchors. Deriving information from 17 recently available GPCR crystal structures, we estimated all of the possible errors that could occur in loop anchors as the result of comparative modeling. Subsequently, we performed an exhaustive analysis to decipher the effect of these errors on loop modeling using ICM High Precision Sampling. The influence of the presence of other extracellular loops was also explored. Our results reveal that the error space of modeled loop residues is much larger than that of the anchor residues, although modeling a particular extracellular loop in the presence of other extracellular loops provides constraints that help in predicting near-native loop conformations observed in crystal structures. This implies that errors in loop anchor positions introduce increased uncertainty in the modeled loop coordinates. Therefore, for the success of any GPCR structure prediction algorithm, minimizing errors in the helical end points is likely to be critical for successful loop modeling.

  7. CORONAL ALFVEN SPEED DETERMINATION: CONSISTENCY BETWEEN SEISMOLOGY USING AIA/SDO TRANSVERSE LOOP OSCILLATIONS AND MAGNETIC EXTRAPOLATION

    SciTech Connect

    Verwichte, E.; Foullon, C.; White, R. S.; Van Doorsselaere, T.

    2013-04-10

    Two transversely oscillating coronal loops are investigated in detail during a flare on the 2011 September 6 using data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We compare two independent methods to determine the Alfven speed inside these loops. Through the period of oscillation and loop length, information about the Alfven speed inside each loop is deduced seismologically. This is compared with the Alfven speed profiles deduced from magnetic extrapolation and spectral methods using AIA bandpass. We find that for both loops the two methods are consistent. Also, we find that the average Alfven speed based on loop travel time is not necessarily a good measure to compare with the seismological result, which explains earlier reported discrepancies. Instead, the effect of density and magnetic stratification on the wave mode has to be taken into account. We discuss the implications of combining seismological, extrapolation, and spectral methods in deducing the physical properties of coronal loops.

  8. EVIDENCE THAT TEMPORAL CHANGES IN SOLAR SUBSURFACE HELICITY PRECEDE ACTIVE REGION FLARING

    SciTech Connect

    Reinard, A. A.; Komm, R.; Hill, F.

    2010-02-20

    We report on the analysis of subsurface vorticity/helicity measurements for flare producing and quiet active regions. We have developed a parameter to investigate whether large, decreasing kinetic helicity density commonly occurs prior to active region flaring. This new parameter is effective at separating flaring and non-flaring active regions and even separates among C-, M-, and X-class flare producing regions. In addition, this parameter provides advance notice of flare occurrence, as it increases 2-3 days before the flare occurs. These results are striking on an average basis, though on an individual basis there is still considerable overlap between flare associated and non-flare associated values. We propose the following qualitative scenario for flare production: subsurface rotational kinetic energy twists the magnetic field lines into an unstable configuration, resulting in explosive reconnection and a flare.

  9. Spectroscopic far ultraviolet observations of transition zone instabilities and their possible role in a pre-flare energy build-up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, G. E.; Patterson, N. P.; Scherrer, V. E.

    1976-01-01

    Highly flare-productive newly emerging active regions are characterized by numerous small low-lying loops which frequently show a chaotic pattern. Flare activity in such a region subsides as the chaotic loop structures relax and expand into a bipolar configuration. The transition zone in such an active region is highly unstable, as shown by broadened and shifted nonthermal line profiles of medium-ionized elements like Si III, Si IV, and C IV. These transition-zone instabilities, which occur as isolated events in active regions of low flare productivity, are often observed prior to flares. Transition-zone instabilities can be traced to the footpoints of active loops and seem to be accompanied by heating of the loop. The loops vary in size and show differing degrees of activity, with the brightest and most compact ones seemingly being in a pre-flare state which results in the catastrophic energy release along the loop during a flare.

  10. Can we explain atypical solar flares?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalmasse, K.; Chandra, R.; Schmieder, B.; Aulanier, G.

    2015-02-01

    Context. We used multiwavelength high-resolution data from ARIES, THEMIS, and SDO instruments to analyze a non-standard, C3.3 class flare produced within the active region NOAA 11589 on 2012 October 16. Magnetic flux emergence and cancellation were continuously detected within the active region, the latter leading to the formation of two filaments. Aims: Our aim is to identify the origins of the flare taking the complex dynamics of its close surroundings into account. Methods: We analyzed the magnetic topology of the active region using a linear force-free field extrapolation to derive its 3D magnetic configuration and the location of quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs), which are preferred sites for flaring activity. Because the active region's magnetic field was nonlinear force-free, we completed a parametric study using different linear force-free field extrapolations to demonstrate the robustness of the derived QSLs. Results: The topological analysis shows that the active region presented a complex magnetic configuration comprising several QSLs. The considered data set suggests that an emerging flux episode played a key role in triggering the flare. The emerging flux probably activated the complex system of QSLs, leading to multiple coronal magnetic reconnections within the QSLs. This scenario accounts for the observed signatures: the two extended flare ribbons developed at locations matched by the photospheric footprints of the QSLs and were accompanied with flare loops that formed above the two filaments, which played no important role in the flare dynamics. Conclusions: This is a typical example of a complex flare that can a priori show standard flare signatures that are nevertheless impossible to interpret with any standard model of eruptive or confined flare. We find that a topological analysis, however, permitted us to unveil the development of such complex sets of flare signatures. Movies associated to Figs. 1, 3, and 9 are only available at the CDS via

  11. A Double Candle-Flame-Shaped Solar Flare Observed by SDO and STEREO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, T.; Liu, R.; Wang, Y.; Liu, K.; Zhuang, B.; Zhang, Q.; Liu, J.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate an M1.4 flare occurring on 2011 January 28 near the northwest solar limb. The flare loop system exhibits a double candle-flame configuration in SDO/AIA's hot passbands, sharing a much larger cusp-shaped structure. The results of DEM analysis show that each candle flame has a similar temperature distribution as the famous Tsuneta flare. STEREO-A provides us a view from directly above the flare, and in SECCHI/EUVI 195 Å the post-flare loops are observed to propagate eastward. We performed a 3D reconstruction of the pos-flare loops with AIA and EUVI data. With the aid of the squashing factor Q based on a potential extrapolation of the photospheric field, we recognized that the footpoints of the post-flare loops were slipping along high-Q lines on the photosphere, and the reconstructed loops share similarity with the filed lines that are traced starting from the high-Q lines. The heights of the loops increase as they slip horizontally eastward, giving the loop-top a velocity of about 10 km/s. An extremely large EUV late phase in Fe XVI 33.5 nm observed by SDO/EVE is suggested to be related to the slipping magnetic reconnection occurring in the quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs) whose photosheric footprints are featured by the high-Q lines.

  12. On the flaring of cometary plasma tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ershkovich, A. I.; Niedner, M. B., Jr.; Brandt, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    Assuming that hypersonic pressure balance with the solar wind governs the shape of plasma tails, it is found that the gas pressure of tail ions and the magnetic field strength at the flanks of the ionopause control the flaring state. The gas pressure exhibits the larger effect: for constant pressures above a certain critical value, the tail flares essentially without limit, while for smaller values the tail flares only near the head (becoming cylindrical at greater distances). The influence of the magnetic field is that the tail flares to larger distances the higher the field strength at the flanks of the ionopause. The observed variability in flaring (and the implied differences in gas pressure and magnetic field) are throught to be the result of changes in the position and shape of the sunward cometary ionopause. Insertion of reasonable comet and solar wind parameters into the pressure balance equations is found to give good agreement with the observations.

  13. Solar flare gamma-ray line shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werntz, C.; Kim, Y. E.; Lang, Frederick L.

    1990-01-01

    A computer code has been developed which is used to calculate ab initio the laboratory shapes and energy shifts of gamma-ray lines from (C-12)(p, gamma/4.438/)p-prime(C-12) and (O-16)(p, gamma/6.129/)p-prime(O-16) reactions and to calculate the expected shapes of these lines from solar flares. The sensitivity of observable solar flare gamma-ray line shapes to the directionality of the incident particles is investigated for several projectile angular distributions. Shapes of the carbon and oxygen lines are calculated assuming realistic proton energy spectra for particles in circular orbits at the mirror points of magnetic loops, for particle beams directed downward into the photosphere, and for isotropic particle distributions. Line shapes for flare sites near the center of the sun and on the limb are shown for both thin-target and thick-target interaction models.

  14. Solar flare gamma-ray line shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werntz, C.; Kim, Y. E.; Lang, Frederick L.

    1990-01-01

    A computer code has been developed which is used to calculate ab initio the laboratory shapes and energy shifts of gamma-ray lines from (C-12)(p, gamma/4.438/)p-prime(C-12) and (O-16)(p, gamma/6.129/)p-prime(O-16) reactions and to calculate the expected shapes of these lines from solar flares. The sensitivity of observable solar flare gamma-ray line shapes to the directionality of the incident particles is investigated for several projectile angular distributions. Shapes of the carbon and oxygen lines are calculated assuming realistic proton energy spectra for particles in circular orbits at the mirror points of magnetic loops, for particle beams directed downward into the photosphere, and for isotropic particle distributions. Line shapes for flare sites near the center of the sun and on the limb are shown for both thin-target and thick-target interaction models.

  15. Effect of topical ketorolac 0.4%, nepafenac 0.1%, and bromfenac 0.09% on postoperative inflammation using laser flare photometry in patients having phacoemulsification.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Sabin; Ram, Jagat; Bansal, Reema; Pandav, Surinder S; Gupta, Amod

    2015-10-01

    To study the effect of topical ketorolac 0.4% (Acular LS), bromfenac 0.09% (Megabrom), and nepafenac 0.1% (Nevanac) on postoperative inflammation using laser flare photometry in patients having phacoemulsification with posterior chamber intraocular lens (PC IOL) implantation. Tertiary care center, Chandigarh, India. Prospective randomized case series. Patients with age-related cataract having phacoemulsification with PC IOL implantation were randomized into 4 groups receiving topical ketorolac 0.4% (Group A), bromfenac 0.09% (Group B), nepafenac 0.1% (Group C), or no nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (Group D, control). The topical NSAIDs were started 1 day prior to the surgery and continued for 6 weeks postoperatively. All patients received a standard regimen of moxifloxacin 0.5% (Vigamox) and prednisolone acetate 1.0% (Pred Forte) eyedrops in tapering doses postoperatively. Visual acuity, intraocular pressure (IOP), laser flare photometry, and fundus examination were done preoperatively and postoperatively at 1 day and 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks. The study comprised 120 patients (120 eyes) (Group A = 33 patients, Group B = 30 patients, Group C = 31 patients, and Group D = 26 patients). The laser flare photometry values at the end of 4 weeks and 8 weeks were minimal in the nepafenac group compared with the other NSAID groups and the no-NSAID group (P = .032 at 4 weeks and P = .252 at 8 weeks). The topical NSAIDs ketorolac 0.4%, bromfenac 0.09%, and nepafenac 0.1% were effective for the reduction of postoperative inflammation following phacoemulsification. Compared with ketorolac tromethamine, bromfenac, and the control, nepafenac was significantly effective 1 month postoperatively in reducing anterior chamber flare, as evidenced by decreased laser flare photometry. No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2015 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Ionospheric effects of solar flares and their associated particle ejections in March 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotukhina, N.; Polekh, N.; Kurkin, V.; Romanova, E.

    2015-06-01

    Flares of March 4-9, 2012 were accompanied by an intensification of solar electromagnetic and corpuscular radiations and five coronal mass ejections. Bursts of X-rays and increased solar cosmic ray fluxes caused an increase in ionospheric absorption manifesting itself in data from vertical sounding stations as enhancements of the lowest frequency of reflections up to 4-6 MHz at the daytime and as the disappearance of reflections in the ionograms of high latitude stations. Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICME) generated March 7-8 moderate and March 8-11 intense magnetic storms accompanied by ionospheric disturbances. At the peaks of both magnetic storms there were abrupt afternoon-evening decreases in the ionospheric F2-layer critical frequency (foF2). During the March 7-8 storm, the foF2 decrease concurred with the reversal of the interplanetary magnetic field azimuthal component (IMF By) which initiated restructuring of magnetospheric convection; during the March 8-11 storm, with the abrupt weakening of the interplanetary magnetic field southward component (IMF Bz) which triggered a substorm.

  17. Abundance ratios of oxygen, neon, and magnesium in solar active regions and flares: The FIP effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widing, K. G.; Feldman, U.

    1995-01-01

    Relative abundances of oxygen, neon, and magnesium have been derived for a sample of nine solar active regions, flares, and an erupting prominance by combining plots of the ion differential emission measures. The observations were photographed in the 300-600 A range by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) spectroheliograph on Skylab. Methods for deriving the Mg/Ne abundance ratio-which measures the separation between the low- first ionization potential (FIP) and high-FIP abundnace plateaus-have been described in previous papers. In this paper we describe the spectroscopic methods for deriving the O/Ne abundance ratio, which gives the ratio between two high-FIP elements. The plot of the O/Ne ratio versus the Mg/Ne ratio in the sample of nine Skylab events is shown. The variation in the Mg/Ne ratio by a factor of 6 is associated with a much smaller range in the O/Ne ratio. This is broadly consistent with the presence of the standard FIP pattern of abundances in the outer atmosphere of the Sun. However, a real change in the relative abundances of oxygen and neon by a factor of 1.5 cannot be excluded.

  18. Abundance ratios of oxygen, neon, and magnesium in solar active regions and flares: The FIP effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widing, K. G.; Feldman, U.

    1995-01-01

    Relative abundances of oxygen, neon, and magnesium have been derived for a sample of nine solar active regions, flares, and an erupting prominance by combining plots of the ion differential emission measures. The observations were photographed in the 300-600 A range by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) spectroheliograph on Skylab. Methods for deriving the Mg/Ne abundance ratio-which measures the separation between the low- first ionization potential (FIP) and high-FIP abundnace plateaus-have been described in previous papers. In this paper we describe the spectroscopic methods for deriving the O/Ne abundance ratio, which gives the ratio between two high-FIP elements. The plot of the O/Ne ratio versus the Mg/Ne ratio in the sample of nine Skylab events is shown. The variation in the Mg/Ne ratio by a factor of 6 is associated with a much smaller range in the O/Ne ratio. This is broadly consistent with the presence of the standard FIP pattern of abundances in the outer atmosphere of the Sun. However, a real change in the relative abundances of oxygen and neon by a factor of 1.5 cannot be excluded.

  19. Evolution of the anemone AR NOAA 10798 and the related geo-effective flares and CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Ayumi; Shibata, Kazunari; Ishii, Takako T.; Oka, Mitsuo; Kataoka, Ryuho; Fujiki, Ken'ichi; Gopalswamy, Nat

    2009-02-01

    We present a detailed examination of the features of the active region (AR) NOAA 10798. This AR generated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that caused a large geomagnetic storm on 24 August 2005 with the minimum Dst index of -216 nT. We examined the evolution of the AR and the features on/near the solar surface and in the interplanetary space. The AR emerged in the middle of a small coronal hole, and formed a sea anemone like configuration. Hα filaments were formed in the AR, which have southward axial field. Three M class flares were generated, and the first two that occurred on 22 August 2005 were followed by Halo-type CMEs. The speeds of the CMEs were fast, and recorded about 1200 and 2400 km s-1, respectively. The second CME was especially fast, and caught up and interacted with the first (slower) CME during their travelings toward Earth. These acted synergically to generate an interplanetary disturbance with strong southward magnetic field of about -50 nT, which was followed by the large geomagnetic storm.

  20. Effect of self-induced magnetic force in a coronal loop transient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, T.; Dryer, M.

    1981-01-01

    The distribution of the self-induced magnetic force in a section of a model coronal loop is examined and it is found that an axial current produces a pointwise magnetic force in the direction toward the axis of the loop. The direction of the pointwise magnetic force indicates that the effect of this force, acting alone, is to cause a contraction of the cross section of the magnetic loop toward the axis, but not the translation motion of the loop as a whole. It is concluded that forces other than the self-induced magnetic force, such as thermal force of pressure gradient or extra-induced magnetic force of magnetic buoyancy, must be involved in the acceleration mechanisms for the heliocentrifugal motion of coronal transients.

  1. An investigation of small goes flares with intense hard x-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, L.; Harra-Murnion, L. K.; Culhane, J. L.; Schwartz, A.

    1997-01-01

    Most solar flare observations show that intense hard X-ray bursts come from large flares that have a large GOES classification (large peak 1 - 8 A˚ flux). This correlation, known as the ``Big Flare Syndrome'', suggests that more intense flares tend to have harder spectra. We have observed 7 flares that are exceptions to this. These flares have small GOES classifications ranging from B1.4 to C5.5 and peak hard X-ray count rates similar to those often observed from M class flares. This paper examines the cause of this anomoly using the Yohkoh Soft X-Ray Telescope, Hard X-Ray Telescope, and Bragg Crystal Spectrometer. Two hypotheses are proposed for the exceptions: (1) flares with multiple magnetic loops and common footpoints, producing multiple hard X-ray emission regions and low density thermal plasma distributed over a large volume, and (2) high densities in the magnetic loops restricting the propagation of the non-thermal electrons in the loop after magnetic reconnection has occurred and suppressing chromospheric evaporation. Two of the flares support the first hypothesis. The other flares either have data missing or are too small to be properly analysed by the Yohkoh instruments.

  2. MULTIWAVELENGTH ANALYSIS OF A SOLAR FLARE ON 2002 APRIL 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, Linhui; Holman, Gordon D.; White, Stephen M.; Zhang, Jie

    2005-01-01

    We carried out a multiwavelength analysis of the solar limb flare on 2002 April 15. The observations all indicate that the flare occurred in an active region with an asymmetric dipole magnetic configuration. The earlier conclusion that magnetic reconnection is occurring in a large-scale current sheet in this flare is M e r supported by these observations: (1) Several bloblike sources, seen in RHESSI 12-25 keV X-ray images later in the flare, appeared along a line above the flare loops. These indicate the continued presence of the current sheet and are likely to be magnetic islands in the stretched sheet produced by the tearing-mode instability. (2) A cusplike structure is seen in Nobeyama Radioheliogiaph (NoRH) 34 GHz microwave images around the time of the peak flare emission. We quantitatively demonstrate that the X-ray-emitting thermal plasma seen with RHESSI had a higher temperature than the microwave-emitting plasma seen with NoRH. Since the radio data preferentially see cooler thermal plasma, this result is consistent with the picture in which energy release occurs at progressively greater heights and the hard X-rays see hot new loops while the radio sees older cooling loops. The kinetic energy of the coronal mass ejection (CME) associated with this flare was found to be about 1 order of magnitude less than both the thermal energy in the hot plasma and the nonthermal energy carried by the accelerated electrons in the flare, as deduced from the RHESSI observations. This contrasts with the higher CME kinetic energies typically deduced for large flares.

  3. MULTIWAVELENGTH ANALYSIS OF A SOLAR FLARE ON 2002 APRIL 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, Linhui; Holman, Gordon D.; White, Stephen M.; Zhang, Jie

    2005-01-01

    We carried out a multiwavelength analysis of the solar limb flare on 2002 April 15. The observations all indicate that the flare occurred in an active region with an asymmetric dipole magnetic configuration. The earlier conclusion that magnetic reconnection is occurring in a large-scale current sheet in this flare is M e r supported by these observations: (1) Several bloblike sources, seen in RHESSI 12-25 keV X-ray images later in the flare, appeared along a line above the flare loops. These indicate the continued presence of the current sheet and are likely to be magnetic islands in the stretched sheet produced by the tearing-mode instability. (2) A cusplike structure is seen in Nobeyama Radioheliogiaph (NoRH) 34 GHz microwave images around the time of the peak flare emission. We quantitatively demonstrate that the X-ray-emitting thermal plasma seen with RHESSI had a higher temperature than the microwave-emitting plasma seen with NoRH. Since the radio data preferentially see cooler thermal plasma, this result is consistent with the picture in which energy release occurs at progressively greater heights and the hard X-rays see hot new loops while the radio sees older cooling loops. The kinetic energy of the coronal mass ejection (CME) associated with this flare was found to be about 1 order of magnitude less than both the thermal energy in the hot plasma and the nonthermal energy carried by the accelerated electrons in the flare, as deduced from the RHESSI observations. This contrasts with the higher CME kinetic energies typically deduced for large flares.

  4. A magnetic bald-patch flare in solar active region 11117

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chao-Wei; Feng, Xue-Shang; Wu, Shi-Tsan; Hu, Qiang

    2017-09-01

    With SDO observations and a data-constrained magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model, we identify a confined multi-ribbon flare that occurred on 2010 October 25 in solar active region 11117 as a magnetic bald patch (BP) flare with strong evidence. From the photospheric magnetic field observed by SDO/HMI, we find there are indeed magnetic BPs on the polarity inversion lines (PILs) which match parts of the flare ribbons. From the 3D coronal magnetic field derived from an MHD relaxation model constrained by the vector magnetograms, we find strikingly good agreement of the BP separatrix surface (BPSS) footpoints with the flare ribbons, and the BPSS itself with the hot flaring loop system. Moreover, the triggering of the BP flare can be attributed to a small flux emergence under the lobe of the BPSS, and the relevant change of coronal magnetic field through the flare is reproduced well by the pre-flare and post-flare MHD solutions, which match the corresponding pre- and post-flare AIA observations, respectively. Our work contributes to the study of non-typical flares that constitute the majority of solar flares but which cannot be explained by the standard flare model.

  5. Characteristics of Solar Flare Hard X-ray Emissions: Observations and Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei

    2006-12-01

    The main theme of this thesis is the investigation of the physics of acceleration and transport of particles in solar flares, and their thermal and nonthermal radiative signatures. The observational studies, using hard X-rays (HXRs) observed by the RHESSI mission, concentrate on four flares, which support the classical magnetic reconnection model of solar flares in various ways. In the X3.9 flare occurring on 11/03/2003, there is a monotonic upward motion of the loop top (LT) source accompanied by a systematic increase in the separation of the footpoint (FP) sources at a comparable speed. This is consistent with the reconnection model with an inverted-Y geometry. The 04/30/2002 event exhibits rarely observed two coronal sources. The two sources (with almost identical spectra) show energy-dependent structures, with higher-energy emission being close together. This suggests that reconnection takes place within the region between the sources. In the 10/29/2003 X10 flare, the logarithmic total HXR flux of the FPs correlates with the mean magnetic field. The two FPs show asymmetric HXR fluxes, which is qualitatively consistent with the magnetic mirroring effect. The M1.7 flare on 11/13/2003 reveals evidence of evaporation directly imaged by RHESSI for the first time, in which emission from the legs of the loop appears at intermediate energies. The emission centroid moves toward the LT as time proceeds, indicating an increase of density in the loop. The theoretical modeling of this work combines the stochastic acceleration model with the NRL hydrodynamic model to study the interplay of the particle acceleration, transport, and radiation effects and the atmospheric response to the energy deposition by nonthermal electrons. We find that low-energy electrons in the quasi-thermal portion of the spectrum affects the hydrodynamics by producing more heating in the corona than the previous models that used a power-law spectrum with a low-energy cutoff. The Neupert effect is

  6. Characteristics of Solar Flare Hard X-ray Emissions: Observations and Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei

    2007-05-01

    The main theme of this dissertation is the investigation of the physics of acceleration and transport of particles in solar flares and their radiative signatures. The observational studies, using hard X-rays (HXRs) observed by RHESSI, concentrate on four flares, which support the classical magnetic reconnection model of flares in various ways. In the 11/03/2003 X3.9 flare, there is an upward motion of the loop-top source, accompanied by a systematic increase in the separation of the foot-point sources at a comparable speed. This is consistent with the reconnection model with an inverted-Y geometry. The 04/30/2002 M1.3 event exhibits rarely observed two coronal sources, with very similar spectra and their higher-energy emission being close together. This suggests that reconnection occurs between the two sources. In the 10/29/2003 X10 flare, the logarithmic total HXR flux of the two foot-points correlates with their mean magnetic field. The foot-points show asymmetric HXR fluxes, qualitatively consistent with the magnetic mirroring effect. The 11/13/2003 M1.7 flare reveals evidence of chromospheric evaporation directly imaged by RHESSI for the first time. The emission centroids move toward the loop-top, indicating a density increase in the loop. The theoretical modeling of this work combines the Stanford stochastic acceleration model with the NRL hydrodynamic model to study the interplay of the particle acceleration, transport, and radiation effects and the atmospheric response to the energy deposition by electrons. I find that low-energy electrons in the quasi-thermal portion of the spectrum affects the hydrodynamics by producing more heating in the corona than the previous models that used a power-law spectrum with a low-energy cutoff. The Neupert effect is found to be present and effects of suppression of thermal conduction are tested in the presence of hydrodynamic flows. I gratefully thank my adviser, Prof. Vahe' Petrosian, my collaborators, and funding support

  7. Major Solar Flare

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-11

    A large sunspot was the source of a powerful solar flare (an X 9.3) and a coronal mass ejection (Sept. 6, 2017). The flare was the largest solar flare of the last decade. For one thing, it created a strong shortwave radio blackout over Europe, Africa and the Atlantic Ocean. Sunspot 2673 has been also the source of several other smaller to medium-sized solar flares over the past few days. Data from the SOHO spacecraft shows the large cloud of particles blasting into space just after the flare. Note: the bright vertical line and the other rays with barred lines are aberrations in our instruments caused by the bright flash of the flare. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21949

  8. Bulk Acceleration of Electrons in Solar Flares?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2014-06-01

    In two recent papers it has been argued that RHESSI observations of two coronal “above-the-loop-top” hard X-ray sources, together with EUV observations, show that ALL the electrons in the source volumes must have been accelerated. I will briefly review these papers and show that the interpretation most consistent with the combined flare observations is multi-thermal, with hot, thermal plasma in the “above-the-loop-top” sources and only a fraction, albeit a substantial fraction, of the electrons accelerated. Thus, there is no credible scientific evidence for bulk acceleration of electrons in flares. Differential emission measure (DEM) models deduced from SDO/AIA and RHESSI data, including the inversion of the AIA data to determine DEM, will be discussed as part of this analysis.

  9. Dynamics of flare sprays. [in sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Martin, S. F.; Hansen, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    During solar cycle No. 20 new insight into the flare-spray phenomenon has been attained due to several innovations in solar optical-observing techniques (higher spatial resolution cinema-photography, tunable passband filters, multislit spectroscopy and extended angular field coronagraphs). From combined analysis of 13 well-observed sprays which occurred between 1969-1974 it is concluded that (1) the spray material originates from a preexisting active region filament which undergoes increased absorption some tens of minutes prior to the abrupt chromospheric brightening at the 'flare-start', and (2) the spray material is confined within a steadily expanding, loop-shaped (presumable magnetically controlled) envelope with part of the materials draining back down along one or both legs of the loop.

  10. An unorthodox X-Class Long-Duration Confined Flare

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Rui; Gou, Tingyu; Wang, Yuming; Liu, Kai; Titov, Viacheslav S.; Wang, Haimin

    2014-07-20

    We report the observation of an X-class long-duration flare which is clearly confined. It appears as a compact-loop flare in the traditional EUV passbands (171 and 195 Å), but in the passbands sensitive to flare plasmas (94 and 131 Å), it exhibits a cusp-shaped structure above an arcade of loops like other long-duration events. Inspecting images in a running difference approach, we find that the seemingly diffuse, quasi-static cusp-shaped structure consists of multiple nested loops that repeatedly rise upward and disappear approaching the cusp edge. Over the gradual phase, we detect numerous episodes of loop rising, each lasting minutes. A differential emission measure analysis reveals that the temperature is highest at the top of the arcade and becomes cooler at higher altitudes within the cusp-shaped structure, contrary to typical long-duration flares. With a nonlinear force-free model, our analysis shows that the event mainly involves two adjacent sheared arcades separated by a T-type hyperbolic flux tube (HFT). One of the arcades harbors a magnetic flux rope, which is identified with a filament that survives the flare owing to the strong confining field. We conclude that a new emergence of magnetic flux in the other arcade triggers the flare, while the preexisting HFT and flux rope dictate the structure and dynamics of the flare loops and ribbons during the long-lasting decay phase, and that a quasi-separatrix layer high above the HFT could account for the cusp-shaped structure.

  11. Modelling the impulsive phase of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio da Costa, F.; Petrosian, V.; Liu, W.; Carlsson, M.

    2013-12-01

    Solar flares are the most energetic events in the solar system. In order to study this sudden release of energy and evaluate the response of the solar chromosphere to the deposition of thermal energy, we simulate the conditions of the solar atmosphere by creating a 1D plane-parallel atmospheric model and analyze the energy transport of a beam of non-thermal electrons that is injected at the top of the coronal loop. This is done using a numerical model which combines the radiative hydrodynamic equations (RADYN code - Carlsson & Stein, 1992) with the calculation of particle acceleration and transport (Flare code - Petrosian & Liu, 2004). With this model, it is for example possible to compare the emission of solar flares in several lines with available observations. The assemblage of high resolution chromospheric flare observations from the IRIS imaging spectrograph makes it an excellent time for this work. We discuss how accelerated particle heating and energy deposition rate are affected by the variation of cut-off energy and flux of non-thermal electrons as well as spectral index and investigate the response of the atmosphere to the acceleration of particles. Our flare simulation treats each atom in non-LTE condition and calculates in detail the transitions between its energy levels. It also assumes an optically thick atmosphere, which is crucial for understanding how energy is transported from the chromosphere deep into the photosphere.

  12. Solar Flares: Magnetohydrodynamic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kazunari; Magara, Tetsuya

    2011-12-01

    This paper outlines the current understanding of solar flares, mainly focused on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes responsible for producing a flare. Observations show that flares are one of the most explosive phenomena in the atmosphere of the Sun, releasing a huge amount of energy up to about 1032 erg on the timescale of hours. Flares involve the heating of plasma, mass ejection, and particle acceleration that generates high-energy particles. The key physical processes for producing a flare are: the emergence of magnetic field from the solar interior to the solar atmosphere (flux emergence), local enhancement of electric current in the corona (formation of a current sheet), and rapid dissipation of electric current (magnetic reconnection) that causes shock heating, mass ejection, and particle acceleration. The evolution toward the onset of a flare is rather quasi-static when free energy is accumulated in the form of coronal electric current (field-aligned current, more precisely), while the dissipation of coronal current proceeds rapidly, producing various dynamic events that affect lower atmospheres such as the chromosphere and photosphere. Flares manifest such rapid dissipation of coronal current, and their theoretical modeling has been developed in accordance with observations, in which numerical simulations proved to be a strong tool reproducing the time-dependent, nonlinear evolution of a flare. We review the models proposed to explain the physical mechanism of flares, giving an comprehensive explanation of the key processes mentioned above. We start with basic properties of flares, then go into the details of energy build-up, release and transport in flares where magnetic reconnection works as the central engine to produce a flare.

  13. Effect of a Sausage Oscillation on Radio Zebra-pattern Structures in a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sijie; Nakariakov, V. M.; Yan, Yihua

    2016-07-01

    Sausage modes that are axisymmetric fast magnetoacoustic oscillations of solar coronal loops are characterized by variation of the plasma density and magnetic field, and hence cause time variations of the electron plasma frequency and cyclotron frequency. The latter parameters determine the condition for the double plasma resonance (DPR), which is responsible for the appearance of zebra-pattern (ZP) structures in time spectra of solar type IV radio bursts. We perform numerical simulations of standing and propagating sausage oscillations in a coronal loop modeled as a straight, field-aligned plasma slab, and determine the time variation of the DPR layer locations. Instant values of the plasma density and magnetic field at the DPR layers allowed us to construct skeletons of the time variation of ZP stripes in radio spectra. In the presence of a sausage oscillation, the ZP structures are shown to have characteristic wiggles with the time period prescribed by the sausage oscillation. Standing and propagating sausage oscillations are found to have different signatures in ZP patterns. We conclude that ZP wiggles can be used for the detection of short-period sausage oscillations and the exploitation of their seismological potential.

  14. Study of the effect of loop inductance on the RF transmission line to cavity coupling coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, Shankar; Pant, K. K.

    2016-08-01

    Coupling of RF power is an important aspect in the design and development of RF accelerating structures. RF power coupling employing coupler loops has the advantage of tunability of β, the transmission line to cavity coupling coefficient. Analytical expressions available in literature for determination of size of the coupler loop using Faraday's law of induction show reasonably good agreement with experimentally measured values of β below critical coupling (β ≤ 1) but show large deviation with experimentally measured values and predictions by simulations for higher values of β. In actual accelerator application, many RF cavities need to be over-coupled with β > 1 for reasons of beam loading compensation, reduction of cavity filling time, etc. This paper discusses a modified analytical formulation by including the effect of loop inductance in the determination of loop size for any desired coupling coefficient. The analytical formulation shows good agreement with 3D simulations and with experimentally measured values. It has been successfully qualified by the design and development of power coupler loops for two 476 MHz pre-buncher RF cavities, which have successfully been conditioned at rated power levels using these coupler loops.

  15. Study of the effect of loop inductance on the RF transmission line to cavity coupling coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Lal, Shankar Pant, K. K.

    2016-08-15

    Coupling of RF power is an important aspect in the design and development of RF accelerating structures. RF power coupling employing coupler loops has the advantage of tunability of β, the transmission line to cavity coupling coefficient. Analytical expressions available in literature for determination of size of the coupler loop using Faraday’s law of induction show reasonably good agreement with experimentally measured values of β below critical coupling (β ≤ 1) but show large deviation with experimentally measured values and predictions by simulations for higher values of β. In actual accelerator application, many RF cavities need to be over-coupled with β > 1 for reasons of beam loading compensation, reduction of cavity filling time, etc. This paper discusses a modified analytical formulation by including the effect of loop inductance in the determination of loop size for any desired coupling coefficient. The analytical formulation shows good agreement with 3D simulations and with experimentally measured values. It has been successfully qualified by the design and development of power coupler loops for two 476 MHz pre-buncher RF cavities, which have successfully been conditioned at rated power levels using these coupler loops.

  16. Study of the effect of loop inductance on the RF transmission line to cavity coupling coefficient.

    PubMed

    Lal, Shankar; Pant, K K

    2016-08-01

    Coupling of RF power is an important aspect in the design and development of RF accelerating structures. RF power coupling employing coupler loops has the advantage of tunability of β, the transmission line to cavity coupling coefficient. Analytical expressions available in literature for determination of size of the coupler loop using Faraday's law of induction show reasonably good agreement with experimentally measured values of β below critical coupling (β ≤ 1) but show large deviation with experimentally measured values and predictions by simulations for higher values of β. In actual accelerator application, many RF cavities need to be over-coupled with β > 1 for reasons of beam loading compensation, reduction of cavity filling time, etc. This paper discusses a modified analytical formulation by including the effect of loop inductance in the determination of loop size for any desired coupling coefficient. The analytical formulation shows good agreement with 3D simulations and with experimentally measured values. It has been successfully qualified by the design and development of power coupler loops for two 476 MHz pre-buncher RF cavities, which have successfully been conditioned at rated power levels using these coupler loops.

  17. Initiation and chromospheric effects of a M1.0 class solar flare from high-resolution multi-wavelength observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadykov, V. M.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Sharykin, I. N.; Zimovets, I. V.; Dominguez, S. Vargas

    2017-10-01

    Initiation and development of a M 1.0 class flare of June 12, 2014, was observed by space and ground-based telescopes, including EUV and X-ray imaging spectroscopy by IRIS and RHESSI, and high-resolution optical imaging by 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST). Analyzing the NST data, we found small-scale loop-like structures in the region of the magnetic field Polarity Inversion Line (PIL), the emergence and interaction of which caused photospheric brightenings temporarily coinciding with hard X-ray impulses. Detailed studies of the PIL region reveal signatures of photospheric plasma downflows and dissipation of electric currents. The reconstructed magnetic field topology shows a bundle of lines connecting the PIL region with the flare ribbons which were places of chromospheric evaporation observed by IRIS. The observations suggest a scenario with the primary energy release processes located in the low atmospheric layers of the PIL, energizing the overlying large-scale magnetic structure and causing ``gentle'' chromospheric evaporation.

  18. Particle acceleration in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Kosugi, Takeo; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benka, Steve G.; Chupp, Edward L.; Enome, Shinzo; Garcia, Howard; Holman, Gordon D.; Kurt, Victoria G.; Sakao, Taro

    1994-01-01

    Particle acceleration is intrinsic to the primary energy release in the impulsive phase of solar flares, and we cannot understand flares without understanding acceleration. New observations in soft and hard X-rays, gamma-rays and coherent radio emissions are presented, suggesting flare fragmentation in time and space. X-ray and radio measurements exhibit at least five different time scales in flares. In addition, some new observations of delayed acceleration signatures are also presented. The theory of acceleration by parallel electric fields is used to model the spectral shape and evolution of hard X-rays. The possibility of the appearance of double layers is further investigated.

  19. Flares, CMEs and sunquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkov, Sergei; Matthews, Sarah A.; Green, Lucie M.; Zharkova, Valentina

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are believed to be manifestations of a sudden and rapid release of the accumulated magnetic energy in the corona. Only recently, the photospheric changes due to the reconnection and coronal magnetic field reconfiguration have been seriously considered from the theoretical point of view. Analysis of seismic emission (sun-quakes) induced in the solar interior in the vicinity of flares offers us an opportunity to explore the physical processes of energy transport in flaring atmospheres. Only a limited number of M and X-class flares have been reported to show seismic signatures in the form or ripples or egression sources, revealing that some of the most powerful flares often do not produce any seismic signatures. In fact, the most powerful signatures were recorded from an M-class flare. This raises important questions about how the flare energy and momentum are transported to the solar surface and interior in order to produce sun-quakes. Using observations by Hinode, RHESSI and SDO we analyse and test the new theories, gaining insight into the flare physics using flare seismology.

  20. Flares in Profile

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-04-11

    An active region at the sun's edge produced several M5-class (medium sized) flares over a ten-hour period (Apr. 3, 2017). The most dramatic flare occurs about half way through the video clip, when it shoots up a bright towering plume of plasma. These were the strongest flares of the year so far. Some coronal mass ejections (which hurled clouds of plasma into space) were also associated with some of these flares. The images were taken in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. Movies are available at https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21584

  1. Particle acceleration in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Kosugi, Takeo; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benka, Steve G.; Chupp, Edward L.; Enome, Shinzo; Garcia, Howard; Holman, Gordon D.; Kurt, Victoria G.; Sakao, Taro

    1994-01-01

    Particle acceleration is intrinsic to the primary energy release in the impulsive phase of solar flares, and we cannot understand flares without understanding acceleration. New observations in soft and hard X-rays, gamma-rays and coherent radio emissions are presented, suggesting flare fragmentation in time and space. X-ray and radio measurements exhibit at least five different time scales in flares. In addition, some new observations of delayed acceleration signatures are also presented. The theory of acceleration by parallel electric fields is used to model the spectral shape and evolution of hard X-rays. The possibility of the appearance of double layers is further investigated.

  2. Flare SOL2012-07-06: On the Origin of the Circular Polarization Reversal Between 17 GHz and 34 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altyntsev, A.; Meshalkina, N.; Myshyakov, I.; Pal`shin, V.; Fleishman, G.

    2017-09-01

    The new generation of multiwavelength radioheliographs with high spatial resolution will employ microwave imaging spectropolarimetry to recover flare topology and plasma parameters in the flare sources and along the wave propagation paths. The recorded polarization depends on the emission mechanism and emission regime (optically thick or thin), the emitting particle properties, and propagation effects. Here, we report an unusual flare, SOL2012-07-06T01:37, whose optically thin gyrosynchrotron emission of the main source displays an apparently ordinary mode sense of polarization in contrast to the classical theory that favors the extraordinary mode. This flare produced copious nonthermal emission in hard X-rays and in high-frequency microwaves up to 80 GHz. It is found that the main flare source corresponds to an interaction site of two loops with greatly different sizes. The flare occurred in the central part of the solar disk, which allows reconstructing the magnetic field in the flare region using vector magnetogram data. We have investigated the three possible known reasons of the circular polarization sense reversal - mode coupling, positron contribution, and the effect of beamed angular distribution. We excluded polarization reversal due to contribution of positrons because there was no relevant response in the X-ray emission. We find that a beam-like electron distribution can produce the observed polarization behavior, but the source thermal density must be much higher than the estimate from to the X-ray data. We conclude that the apparent ordinary wave emission in the optically thin mode is due to radio wave propagation across the quasi-transverse (QT) layer. The abnormally high transition frequency (above 35 GHz) can be achieved reasonably low in the corona where the magnetic field value is high and transverse to the line of sight. This places the microwave source below this QT layer, i.e. very low in the corona.

  3. Evidence for Magnetic Reconnection in Three Homologous Solar Flares Observed by RHESSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, Lin-Hui; Holman, Gordon D.; Dennis, Brian R.

    2004-01-01

    We present RHESSI observF5oss of three homologous flares, which occurred between April 14 and 16, 2002. We find that the RHESSI images of all three flares at energies between 6 and 25 keV had some common features: (1) A. separate coronal source up to approx. 30 deg. above the flare loop appeared in the early impulsive phase and stayed stationary for several minutes. (2) Before the flare loop moved upward; previously reported by others, the flare loop-top centroid moved downward for 2-4 minutes during the early impulsive phase of the Ears: falling by 13 - 30% of its initial height with a speed between 8 and 23 km/s. We conclude that these features are associated with the formation and development of a current sheet between the loop-top and the coronal source. In the April 14-15 flare, we find that the hard X-ray flux (greater than 25 keV) is correlated with the rate at which the flare loop moves upward, indicating that the faster the loop grows, the faster the reconnection rate, and therefore, the greater the flux of accelerated electrons. Subject headings: Sun: L'iaies-Sun: X-1-ay-s -

  4. Ambient ultrafine particles provide a strong adjuvant effect in the secondary immune response: implication for traffic-related asthma flares.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Harkema, Jack R; Lewandowski, Ryan P; Wang, Meiying; Bramble, Lori A; Gookin, Glenn R; Ning, Zhi; Kleinman, Michael T; Sioutas, Constantinos; Nel, Andre E

    2010-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated that intranasal administration of ambient ultrafine particles (UFP) acts as an adjuvant for primary allergic sensitization to ovalbumin (OVA) in Balb/c mice. It is important to find out whether inhaled UFP exert the same effect on the secondary immune response as a way of explaining asthma flares in already-sensitized individuals due to traffic exposure near a freeway. The objective of this study is to determine whether inhalation exposure to ambient UFP near an urban freeway could enhance the secondary immune response to OVA in already-sensitized mice. Prior OVA-sensitized animals were exposed to concentrated ambient UFP at the time of secondary OVA challenge in our mobile animal laboratory in Los Angeles. OVA-specific antibody production, airway morphometry, allergic airway inflammation, cytokine gene expression, and oxidative stress marker were assessed. As few as five ambient UFP exposures were sufficient to promote the OVA recall immune response, including generating allergic airway inflammation in smaller and more distal airways compared with the adjuvant effect of intranasally instilled UFP on the primary immune response. The secondary immune response was characterized by the T helper 2 and IL-17 cytokine gene expression in the lung. In summary, our results demonstrated that inhalation of prooxidative ambient UFP could effectively boost the secondary immune response to an experimental allergen, indicating that vehicular traffic exposure could exacerbate allergic inflammation in already-sensitized subjects.

  5. Ambient ultrafine particles provide a strong adjuvant effect in the secondary immune response: implication for traffic-related asthma flares

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Harkema, Jack R.; Lewandowski, Ryan P.; Wang, Meiying; Bramble, Lori A.; Gookin, Glenn R.; Ning, Zhi; Kleinman, Michael T.; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2010-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that intranasal administration of ambient ultrafine particles (UFP) acts as an adjuvant for primary allergic sensitization to ovalbumin (OVA) in Balb/c mice. It is important to find out whether inhaled UFP exert the same effect on the secondary immune response as a way of explaining asthma flares in already-sensitized individuals due to traffic exposure near a freeway. The objective of this study is to determine whether inhalation exposure to ambient UFP near an urban freeway could enhance the secondary immune response to OVA in already-sensitized mice. Prior OVA-sensitized animals were exposed to concentrated ambient UFP at the time of secondary OVA challenge in our mobile animal laboratory in Los Angeles. OVA-specific antibody production, airway morphometry, allergic airway inflammation, cytokine gene expression, and oxidative stress marker were assessed. As few as five ambient UFP exposures were sufficient to promote the OVA recall immune response, including generating allergic airway inflammation in smaller and more distal airways compared with the adjuvant effect of intranasally instilled UFP on the primary immune response. The secondary immune response was characterized by the T helper 2 and IL-17 cytokine gene expression in the lung. In summary, our results demonstrated that inhalation of prooxidative ambient UFP could effectively boost the secondary immune response to an experimental allergen, indicating that vehicular traffic exposure could exacerbate allergic inflammation in already-sensitized subjects. PMID:20562226

  6. Multi-Wavelength Observation Results of the C5.6 Limb Flare of 1 August 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; You, Jianqi; Du, Qiusheng; Yu, Xingfeng

    2004-11-01

    We obtained a complete set of Hα, Ca Π 8542 Å and He I 10830 Å spectra and slit-jaw Hα images of the C5.6 limb flare of 1 August 2003 using the Multi-channel Infrared Solar Spectrograph (MISS) at Purple Mountain Observatory. This flare was also observed by the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and partially by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) on SOHO. This flare underwent a rapid rising and expanding episode in the impulsive phase. All the Hα, Ca Π 8542 Å and He I 10830 Å profiles of the flare are rather wide and the widest profiles were observed in the middle bright part of the flare instead of at the flare loop top near the flare maximum. The flare manifested obvious rotation in the flare loop and the decrease of the rotation angular speed with time at the loop-top may imply a de-twisting process of the magnetic field. The significant increases of the Doppler widths of these lines in the impulsive phase reflect quick heating of the chromosphere, and rapid rising and expanding of the flare loop. The RHESSI observations give a thermal energy spectrum for this flare, and two thermal sources and no non-thermal source are found in the reconstructed RHESSI images. This presumably indicates that the energy transfer in this flare is mainly by heat conduction. The stronger thermal source is located near the solar limb with its position unchanged in the flare process and spatially coincident with the intense EUV and Hα emissions. The weaker one moved during the flare process and is located in the Hα dark cavities. This flare may support the theory of the magnetic reconnections in the lower solar atmosphere.

  7. Contact effects and quantum interference in engineered dangling bond loops on silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleshchonok, Andrii; Gutierrez, Rafael; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2015-08-01

    Dangling bond structures created on H-passivated silicon surfaces offer a novel platform for engineering planar nanoscale circuits, compatible with conventional semiconductor technologies. In this investigation we focus on the electronic structure and quantum transport signatures of dangling bond loops built on H-passivated Si(100) surfaces contacted by carbon nanoribbons, thus leading to a two-terminal planar, nanoscale setup. The computational studies were carried out to rationalize the influence of the local atomic-scale contacts of the dangling bond system to the mesoscopic electrodes as well as the possibility of revealing quantum interference effects in the dangling bond loops. Our results reveal a strong sensitivity of the low-energy quantum transmission to the loop topology and to the atomistic details of the electrode-loop contact. Varying the length of the loop or the spatial position of at least one of the electrodes has a drastic impact on the quantum interference pattern; depending on whether constructive or destructive interference within the loop takes place, the conductance of the system can be tuned over several orders of magnitude, thus suggesting the possibility of exploiting such quantum mechanical effects in the design of two-dimensional, atomic-scale electronic devices such as logic gates.Dangling bond structures created on H-passivated silicon surfaces offer a novel platform for engineering planar nanoscale circuits, compatible with conventional semiconductor technologies. In this investigation we focus on the electronic structure and quantum transport signatures of dangling bond loops built on H-passivated Si(100) surfaces contacted by carbon nanoribbons, thus leading to a two-terminal planar, nanoscale setup. The computational studies were carried out to rationalize the influence of the local atomic-scale contacts of the dangling bond system to the mesoscopic electrodes as well as the possibility of revealing quantum interference effects in

  8. Effects of CW interference on the carrier tracking loop of the deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sue, M. K.

    1984-01-01

    A radio-frequency interference (RFI) environment can cause serious problems for communications systems, such as the Deep Space Network (DSN). For this reason, it is necessary to determine first the RFI susceptibility characteristics for DSN receiving systgms. The present investigation is concerned with CW RFI's which are close in frequency to the carrier frequency. The carrier tracking loop is highly sensitive, and this type of RFI will degrade the carrier loop performance before saturation effects become noticeable. The investigation has the objective to develop an analytical model which will make it possible to predict the tracking performance of the Block IV receiver when operated in the presence of a CW RFI in the receiver passband. The Block IV receiver represents one of the DSN receivers. Attention is given to the effects of a CW RFI on a phase-locked loop, the effects of a bandpass limiter, numerical results, experimental verification, and aspects of computer simulation.

  9. Mixed heavy-light matching in the Universal One-Loop Effective Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Sebastian A. R.; Quevillon, Jérémie; You, Tevong; Zhang, Zhengkang

    2016-11-01

    Recently, a general result for evaluating the path integral at one loop was obtained in the form of the Universal One-Loop Effective Action. It may be used to derive effective field theory operators of dimensions up to six, by evaluating the traces of matrices in this expression, with the mass dependence encapsulated in the universal coefficients. Here we show that it can account for loops of mixed heavy-light particles in the matching procedure. Our prescription for computing these mixed contributions to the Wilson coefficients is conceptually simple. Moreover it has the advantage of maintaining the universal structure of the effective action, which we illustrate using the example of integrating out a heavy electroweak triplet scalar coupling to a light Higgs doublet. Finally we also identify new structures that were previously neglected in the universal results.

  10. Unexpected extra-renal effects of loop diuretics in the preterm neonate.

    PubMed

    Cotton, Robert; Suarez, Sandra; Reese, Jeff

    2012-08-01

    The loop diuretics furosemide and bumetanide are commonly used in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Furosemide, because of its actions on the ubiquitous Na(+) -K(+) -2Cl(-) isoform cotransporter and its promotion of prostanoid production and release, also has non-diuretic effects on vascular smooth muscle, airways, the ductus arteriosus and theoretically the gastrointestinal tract. Loop diuretics also affect the central nervous system through modulation of the GABA-A chloride channel.   The loop diuretics have a variety of biological effects that are potentially harmful as well as beneficial. Care should be taken with the use of these agents because the range of their effects may be broader than the single action sought by the prescribing physician. © 2012 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica © 2012 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  11. Unexpected Extra-renal Effects of Loop Diuretics in the Preterm Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Cotton, Robert; Suarez, Sandra; Reese, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    The loop diuretics furosemide and bumetanide are commonly used in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Furosemide, due to its actions on the ubiquitous NKCC1 co-transporter and its promotion of prostanoid production and release, also has non-diuretic effects on vascular smooth muscle, airways, the ductus arteriosus, and theoretically the gastrointestinal tract. Loop diuretics also affect the central nervous system through the inhibitory neurotransmitter, GABA. Conclusion The loop diuretics have a variety of biological effects that are potentially harmful as well as beneficial. Care should be taken with the use of these agents since the range of their effects may be broader than the single action sought by the prescribing physician. PMID:22536874

  12. Spatio-temporal Dynamics of Sources of Hard X-Ray Pulsations in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, S. A.; Zimovets, I. V.; Morgachev, A. S.; Struminsky, A. B.

    2016-11-01

    We present a systematic analysis of the spatio-temporal evolution of sources of hard X-ray (HXR) pulsations in solar flares. We concentrate on disk flares whose impulsive phases are accompanied by a series of more than three successive peaks (pulsations) of HXR emission detected in the RHESSI 50 - 100 keV energy channel with a four-second time cadence. Twenty-nine such flares observed from February 2002 to June 2015 with characteristic time differences between successive peaks P ≈8 - 270 s are studied. The main observational result of the analysis is that sources of HXR pulsations in all flares are not stationary, they demonstrate apparent movements or displacements in the parent active regions from pulsation to pulsation. The flares can be subdivided into two main groups depending on the character of the dynamics of the HXR sources. Group 1 consists of 16 flares (55 %) that show systematic dynamics of the HXR sources from pulsation to pulsation with respect to a magnetic polarity inversion line (MPIL), which has a simple extended trace on the photosphere. Group 2 consists of 13 flares (45 %) that show more chaotic displacements of the HXR sources with respect to an MPIL with a more complex structure, and sometimes several MPILs are present in the parent active regions of such flares. Based on the observations, we conclude that the mechanism of the flare HXR pulsations (at least with time differences of the considered range) is related to successive triggering of the flare energy release process in different magnetic loops (or bundles of loops) of the parent active regions. Group 1 flare regions consist of loops stacked into magnetic arcades that are extended along MPILs. Group 2 flare regions have more complex magnetic structures, and the loops are arranged more chaotically and randomly there. We also found that at least 14 (88 %) group 1 flares and 11 (85 %) group 2 flares are accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), i.e. the absolute majority of the

  13. Predictions of active region flaring probability using subsurface helicity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinard, A. A.; Komm, R.; Hill, F.

    2010-12-01

    Solar flares are responsible for a number of hazardous effects on the earth such as disabling high-frequency radio communications, interfering with GPS measurements, and disrupting satellites. However, forecasting flare occurrence is currently very difficult. One possible means for predicting flare occurrence lies in helioseismology, i.e. analysis of the region below the active region for signs of an impending flare. Time series helioseismic data collected by the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) has been analyzed for a subset of active regions that produce large flares and a subset with very high magnetic field strength that produce no flares. A predictive parameter has been developed and analyzed using discriminant analysis as well as traditional forecasting tools such as the Heidke skill score. Preliminary results show that this parameter predicts the flaring probability of an active region 2-3 days in advance with a relatively high degree of success.

  14. Using subsurface helicity measurements to predict flare occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinard, A. A.; Henthorn, J.; Komm, R.; Hill, F.

    2009-12-01

    Solar flares are responsible for a number of hazardous effects including disabling high-frequency radio communications, interfering with GPS measurements, and disrupting satellites. Forecasting flare occurrence is very difficult, giving little advanced notice of these events. One possible means for predicting flare occurrence lies in helioseismology, i.e. analysis of the region below the active region for signs of an impending flare. Time series helioseismic data collected by the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) have been analyzed for a subset of active regions that produce large flares and a subset with very high magnetic field strength that produce no flares. A predictive parameter has been developed and analyzed using discriminant analysis as well as traditional forecasting tools such as the Heidke skill score. Preliminary results indicate this parameter predicts flare occurrence with a high success rate.

  15. Modeling Solar Flare Hard X-ray Images and Spectra Observed with RHESSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, Linhui

    2005-01-01

    Observations obtained with the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) of a flare on February 20, 2002 indicate a hard X-ray (HXR) coronal source at or near the top of a flare loop (called a HXR looptop source). The existence of the HXR looptop source suggests that magnetic reconnection, which is believed to power flares, occurs above the loop. In order to explain this HXR looptop source, I created a steady-state particle transport model, in which high-energy electrons are continuously injected at the top of a semicircular flare loop. Based on the simulation results, I find that the model predictions are consistent with the RHESSI observations in many respects, but the spectrum of the looptop source obtained from the model is steeper than that from the RHESSI data. This suggests that, instead of being accelerated above the loop as generally believed, the particles might be accelerated in the looptop itself. RHESSI-observations of three other homologous flares that occurred between April 14 and 16, 2002, provide strong evidence for the presence of a large scale current sheet above a flare loop, which is the basis of standard flare models. The most convincing finding is the presence of the temperature distribution of a separate coronal source above the flare loops: the hotter part of the coronal source was located lower in altitude the cooler part. Together with the fact that the hotter flare loops are higher than the cooler loops, the observations support the existence of a large-scale current sheet between the top of the flare loops and the coronal source above. Blob-Like sources along a line above the loop in the decay phase of the April 15, 2002, flare, which are suggestive of magnetic islands initiated by the tearing-mode instability, and the observation of a cusp structure in microwaves, further support the presence of the current sheet. The observations of the three homologous flares reveal two other features which are beyond the

  16. Modeling Solar Flare Hard X-ray Images and Spectra Observed with RHESSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, Linhui

    2005-01-01

    Observations obtained with the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) of a flare on February 20, 2002 indicate a hard X-ray (HXR) coronal source at or near the top of a flare loop (called a HXR looptop source). The existence of the HXR looptop source suggests that magnetic reconnection, which is believed to power flares, occurs above the loop. In order to explain this HXR looptop source, I created a steady-state particle transport model, in which high-energy electrons are continuously injected at the top of a semicircular flare loop. Based on the simulation results, I find that the model predictions are consistent with the RHESSI observations in many respects, but the spectrum of the looptop source obtained from the model is steeper than that from the RHESSI data. This suggests that, instead of being accelerated above the loop as generally believed, the particles might be accelerated in the looptop itself. RHESSI-observations of three other homologous flares that occurred between April 14 and 16, 2002, provide strong evidence for the presence of a large scale current sheet above a flare loop, which is the basis of standard flare models. The most convincing finding is the presence of the temperature distribution of a separate coronal source above the flare loops: the hotter part of the coronal source was located lower in altitude the cooler part. Together with the fact that the hotter flare loops are higher than the cooler loops, the observations support the existence of a large-scale current sheet between the top of the flare loops and the coronal source above. Blob-Like sources along a line above the loop in the decay phase of the April 15, 2002, flare, which are suggestive of magnetic islands initiated by the tearing-mode instability, and the observation of a cusp structure in microwaves, further support the presence of the current sheet. The observations of the three homologous flares reveal two other features which are beyond the

  17. NASA Captures Images of a Late Summer Flare [detail

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    On Aug. 24, 2014, the sun emitted a mid-level solar flare, peaking at 8:16 a.m. EDT. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured images of the flare, which erupted on the left side of the sun. Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth's atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground, however -- when intense enough -- they can disturb the atmosphere in the layer where GPS and communications signals travel. This close-up of a moderate flare on Aug. 24, 2014, shows light in the 131 and 171 Angstrom wavelengths. The former wavelength, usually colorized in teal, highlights the extremely hot material of a flare. The latter, usually colorized in gold, highlights magnet loops in the sun's atmosphere. To see how this event may affect Earth, please visit NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center at spaceweather.gov, the U.S. government's official source for space weather forecasts, alerts, watches and warnings. This flare is classified as an M5 flare. M-class flares are ten times less powerful than the most intense flares, called X-class flares. Credit: NASA/Goddard/SDO NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  18. Using Two-Ribbon Flare Observations and MHD Simulations to Constrain Flare Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazachenko, Maria D.; Lynch, Benjamin J.; Welsch, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Flare ribbons are emission structures that are frequently observed during flares in transition-region and chromospheric radiation. These typically straddle a polarity inversion line (PIL) of the radial magnetic field at the photosphere, and move apart as the flare progresses. The ribbon flux - the amount of unsigned photospheric magnetic flux swept out by flare ribbons - is thought to be related to the amount coronal magnetic reconnection, and hence provides a key diagnostic tool for understanding the physical processes at work in flares and CMEs. Previous measurements of the magnetic flux swept out by flare ribbons required time-consuming co-alignment between magnetograph and intensity data from different instruments, explaining why those studies only analyzed, at most, a few events. The launch of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), both aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), presented a rare opportunity to compile a much larger sample of flare-ribbon events than could readily be assembled before. We created a dataset of 363 events of both flare ribbon positions and fluxes, as a function of time, for all C9.-class and greater flares within 45 degrees of disk center observed by SDO from June 2010 till April 2015. For this purpose, we used vector magnetograms (2D magnetic field maps) from HMI and UV images from AIA. A critical problem with using unprocessed AIA data is the existence of spurious intensities in AIA data associated with strong flare emission, most notably "blooming" (spurious smearing of saturated signal into neighboring pixels, often in streaks). To overcome this difficulty, we have developed an algorithmic procedure that effectively excludes artifacts like blooming. We present our database and compare statistical properties of flare ribbons, e.g. evolutions of ribbon reconnection fluxes, reconnection flux rates and vertical currents with the properties from MHD simulations.

  19. Two-loop effective Kähler potential in three-dimensional N = 2 SQED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merzlikin, B. S.

    2017-03-01

    We consider three-dimensional Abelian N = 2 supersymmetric Chern-Simons-matter model with two chiral superfields and study local superspace contributions to low-energy effective action in the matter superfields sector of the theory. Using supergraph technique we compute the effective Kähler potential in the explicit form up to the two-loop approximation.

  20. Loop expansion of the average effective action in the functional renormalization group approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrov, Peter M.; Merzlikin, Boris S.

    2015-10-01

    We formulate a perturbation expansion for the effective action in a new approach to the functional renormalization group method based on the concept of composite fields for regulator functions being their most essential ingredients. We demonstrate explicitly the principal difference between the properties of effective actions in these two approaches existing already on the one-loop level in a simple gauge model.

  1. All one-loop scalar vertices in the effective potential approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargo-Molina, José Eliel; Morais, António P.; Pasechnik, Roman; Sampaio, Marco O. P.; Wessén, Jonas

    2016-08-01

    Using the one-loop Coleman-Weinberg effective potential, we derive a general analytic expression for all the derivatives of the effective potential with respect to any number of classical scalar fields. The result is valid for a renormalisable theory in four dimensions with any number of scalars, fermions or gauge bosons. This result corresponds to the zero-external momentum contribution to a general one-loop diagram with N scalar external legs. We illustrate the use of the general result in two simple scalar singlet extensions of the Standard Model, to obtain the dominant contributions to the triple couplings of light scalar particles under the zero external momentum approximation.

  2. Closed loop models for analyzing the effects of simulator characteristics. [digital simulation of human operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baron, S.; Muralidharan, R.; Kleinman, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    The optimal control model of the human operator is used to develop closed loop models for analyzing the effects of (digital) simulator characteristics on predicted performance and/or workload. Two approaches are considered: the first utilizes a continuous approximation to the discrete simulation in conjunction with the standard optimal control model; the second involves a more exact discrete description of the simulator in a closed loop multirate simulation in which the optimal control model simulates the pilot. Both models predict that simulator characteristics can have significant effects on performance and workload.

  3. The high accuracy model of the 19 July 2012 solar flare: kinetic description, calculations of X-Ray and microwave emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsyk, Pavel; Somov, Boris

    2016-04-01

    The limb white-light solar flare M7.7 class was observed at the 19 July 2012 at 05:58UT by RHESSI, GOES and SDO with high spectral, spatial and temporal resolution. These new data make possible to test modern models of solar flares. The flare, which considered here, locates in the picture plane, so we well see two different hard X-ray sources: footpoint and above-the-loop-top. The loop was observed in whit-light and microwave wavelengths. The key part of the presented work is high accuracy kinetic model, which describe behavior of electrons in the target - solar flare loop. We interpret the footpoint source in approximation of the thick target model with reverse current and above-the-loop-top source - in the thin target approximation. The microwave spectrum in the range from 1 to 50 GHz was calculated. Our results fit well the observational data, particularly so important parameter as hard X-Ray spectral index. But intensity of emission of the coronal source was estimated incorrect, it was low than observed. This problem can be solved by taking into account effects of particles acceleration in the collapsing magnetic trap, when fast electrons receive additional energy without changing the index of their energy spectrum. In the result we have flux ~ 5 1010 erg cm-2 s-1 for electrons with energies more then 15 keV, that ~ 5 times larger then in the case classical thick target model. Accordingly , so high flux of electrons to the Chromosphere provides effective heating of the cold plasma in the target, but the reverse current electric field restrict depth of the electron penetration. Received in this work estimates may be used for interpretation of the solar flare optical source formation and evolution.

  4. Observation and numerical modeling of chromospheric evaporation during the impulsive phase of a solar flare

    SciTech Connect

    Imada, Shinsuke; Murakami, Izumi; Watanabe, Tetsuya

    2015-10-15

    We have studied the chromospheric evaporation flow during the impulsive phase of the flare by using the Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer observation and 1D hydrodynamic numerical simulation coupled to the time-dependent ionization. The observation clearly shows that the strong redshift can be observed at the base of the flaring loop only during the impulsive phase. We performed two different numerical simulations to reproduce the strong downflows in FeXII and FeXV during the impulsive phase. By changing the thermal conduction coefficient, we carried out the numerical calculation of chromospheric evaporation in the thermal conduction dominant regime (conductivity coefficient κ{sub 0} = classical value) and the enthalpy flux dominant regime (κ{sub 0} = 0.1 × classical value). The chromospheric evaporation calculation in the enthalpy flux dominant regime could reproduce the strong redshift at the base of the flare during the impulsive phase. This result might indicate that the thermal conduction can be strongly suppressed in some cases of flare. We also find that time-dependent ionization effect is important to reproduce the strong downflows in Fe XII and Fe XV.

  5. The development and cooling of a solar limb-flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veck, N. J.; Strong, K. T.; Jordan, C.; Simnett, G. M.; Cargill, P. J.; Priest, E. R.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of a flare that began in soft X-rays at 20:37 UT on April 12, 1980 at the west limb of the sun are discussed. The observations of the flare and postflare loops are first described, and the Solar Maximum Mission data are interpreted in terms of the temperature, density, and geometry of the emitting regions. The observed postflare cooling time is compared with that expected from radiation, conduction, and enthalpy flux. The loop model is discussed, and the observed events are compared with other proposed models.

  6. Composition of energetic particles from solar flares.

    PubMed

    Garrard, T L; Stone, E C

    1994-10-01

    We present a model for composition of heavy ions in the solar energetic particles (SEP). The SEP composition in a typical large solar particle event reflects the composition of the Sun, with adjustments due to fractionation effects which depend on the first ionization potential (FIP) of the ion and on the ratio of ionic charge to mass (Q/M). Flare-to-flare variations in composition are represented by parameters describing these fractionation effects and the distributions of these parameters are presented.

  7. Thermal stability of static coronal loops. I - Effects of boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Shoub, E. C.; An, C.-H.; Emslie, A. G.

    1985-01-01

    The linear stability of static coronal-loop models undergoing thermal perturbations was investigated. The effect of conditions at the loop base on the stability properties of the models was considered in detail. The question of appropriate boundary conditions at the loop base was considered and it was concluded that the most physical assumptions are that the temperature and density (or pressure) perturbations vanish there. However, if the base is taken to be sufficiently deep in the chromosphere, either several chromospheric scale heights or several coronal loop lengths in depth, then the effect of the boundary conditions on loop stability becomes negligible so that all physically acceptable conditions are equally appropriate. For example, one could as well assume that the velocity vanishes at the base. The growth rates and eigenmodes of static models in which gravity is neglected and in which the coronal heating is a relatively simple function, either constant per-unit mass or per-unit volume were calculated. It was found that all such models are unstable with a growth rate of the order of the coronal cooling time. The physical implications of these results for the solar corona and transition region are discussed.

  8. Thermal stability of static coronal loops: Part 1: Effects of boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Shoub, E. C.; An, C. H.; Emslie, A. G.

    1985-01-01

    The linear stability of static coronal-loop models undergoing thermal perturbations was investigated. The effect of conditions at the loop base on the stability properties of the models was considered in detail. The question of appropriate boundary conditions at the loop base was considered and it was concluded that the most physical assumptions are that the temperature and density (or pressure) perturbations vanish there. However, if the base is taken to be sufficiently deep in the chromosphere, either several chromospheric scale heights or several coronal loop lengths in depth, then the effect of the boundary conditions on loop stability becomes negligible so that all physically acceptable conditions are equally appropriate. For example, one could as well assume that the velocity vanishes at the base. The growth rates and eigenmodes of static models in which gravity is neglected and in which the coronal heating is a relatively simple function, either constant per-unit mass or per-unit volume were calculated. It was found that all such models are unstable with a growth rate of the order of the coronal cooling time. The physical implications of these results for the solar corona and transition region are discussed.

  9. Extending the Universal One-Loop Effective Action: heavy-light coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Sebastian A. R.; Quevillon, Jérémie; You, Tevong; Zhang, Zhengkang

    2017-08-01

    The Universal One-Loop Effective Action (UOLEA) is a general expression for the effective action obtained by evaluating in a model-independent way the one-loop expansion of a functional path integral. It can be used to match UV theories to their low-energy EFTs more efficiently by avoiding redundant steps in the application of functional methods, simplifying the process of obtaining Wilson coefficients of operators up to dimension six. In addition to loops involving only heavy fields, matching may require the inclusion of loops containing both heavy and light particles. Here we use the recently-developed covariant diagram technique to extend the UOLEA to include heavy-light terms which retain the same universal structure as the previously-derived heavy-only terms. As an example of its application, we integrate out a heavy singlet scalar with a linear coupling to a light doublet Higgs. The extension presented here is a first step towards completing the UOLEA to incorporate all possible structures encountered in a covariant derivative expansion of the one-loop path integral.

  10. Effect of pre-emptive flares on Man-Portable Air-Defence (MANPAD) systems with a track angle bias counter-countermeasure (CCM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackman, James; Richardson, Mark; Butters, Brian; Walmsley, Roy; Millwood, Nic; Yuen, Peter; James, David

    2010-10-01

    Man-Portable Air-Defence (MANPAD) systems can employ a range of counter-countermeasures (CCM) to reject expendable IR decoys. Three hypothetical MANPAD models are based on reticle types and CCM features that may be found in 1st and 2nd generation MANPADs. These are used in simulations to estimate the probability of escaping hit (PEH) when no IR decoys are used, when IR decoys are deployed reactively and when decoys are deployed preemptively. These cases are simulated for seekers with no CCM and with a track angle bias CCM. The results confirm that the rise rate CCM significantly reduces the PEH when IR decoys are used reactively. The use of pre-emptive flares timed to deploy at or about the time when the seeker is uncaged increases the PEH significantly. A more detailed investigation of the effects of aircraft aspect angle and flare timing on miss distance was carried out to examine the effects of the CCM compared with no CCM. With the aircraft at an altitude of 1000m and a range of 2km there is a critical period in which a flare needs to be released in order to achieve a significant miss distance when the CCM is in use. The conical scan seeker used with the track angle bias CCM was the most effective combination requiring the shortest time during which the flare had to be deployed. Further simulations at longer ranges and different aircraft azimuth angles showed that there is a time window that is range dependant during which pre-emptive decoys are fully effective independently of the aircraft azimuth or threat direction.

  11. One-loop effective action and Schwinger effect in (anti-) de Sitter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Kim, Sang Pyo

    2014-09-01

    We study the Schwinger mechanism by a uniform electric field in dS2 and AdS2 and the curvature effect on the Schwinger effect, and further propose a thermal interpretation of the Schwinger formula in terms of the Gibbons-Hawking temperature and the Unruh temperature for an accelerating charge in dS2 and an analogous expression in AdS2. The exact one-loop effective action is found in the proper-time integral in each space, which is determined by the effective mass, the Maxwell scalar, and the scalar curvature, and whose pole structure gives the imaginary part of the effective action and the exact pair-production rate. The exact pair-production rate is also given the thermal interpretation.

  12. A Database of Flare Ribbon Properties from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. I. Reconnection Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazachenko, Maria D.; Lynch, Benjamin J.; Welsch, Brian T.; Sun, Xudong

    2017-08-01

    We present a database of 3137 solar flare ribbon events corresponding to every flare of GOES class C1.0 and greater within 45° from the central meridian, from 2010 April until 2016 April, observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory. For every event in the database, we compare the GOES peak X-ray flux with the corresponding active region and flare ribbon properties. We find that while the peak X-ray flux is not correlated with the active region unsigned magnetic flux, it is strongly correlated with the flare ribbon reconnection flux, flare ribbon area, and the fraction of active region flux that undergoes reconnection. We find the relationship between the peak X-ray flux and the flare ribbon reconnection flux to be {I}{{X},{peak}}\\propto {{{Φ }}}{ribbon}1.5. This scaling law is consistent with earlier hydrodynamic simulations of impulsively heated flare loops. Using the flare reconnection flux as a proxy for the total released flare energy E, we find that the occurrence frequency of flare energies follows a power-law dependence: {dN}/{dE}\\propto {E}-1.6 for {10}31< E< {10}33 {erg}, consistent with earlier studies of solar and stellar flares. The database is available online and can be used for future quantitative studies of flares.

  13. Solar Flare Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, T.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Like weather forecasting, solar flare forecasting (or forecasting solar activity in general) is motivated by pragmatic needs. Solar flares, coronal mass ejections, solar winds and other solar activity intimately influence the near-Earth space environment. All kinds of spacecraft including weather and communication satellites are orbiting Earth, and their performance and lifetimes are greatly infl...

  14. The Flare Genesis Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.

    2002-01-01

    Using the Flare Genesis Experiment (FGE), a balloon-borne observatory with an 80-cm solar telescope we observed the active region NOAA 8844 on January 25, 2000 for several hours. FGE was equipped with a vector polarimeter and a tunable Fabry-Perot narrow-band filter. It recorded time series of filtergrams, vector magnetograms, and Dopplergrams at the Ca(I) 6122.2 angstrom line, and H-alpha filtergrams with a cadence between 2.5 and 7.5 minutes. At the time of the observations, NOAA 8844 was located at approximately 5 N 30 W. The region was rapidly growing during the observations; new magnetic flux was constantly emerging in three supergranules near its center. We describe in detail how the FGE data were analyzed and report on the structure and behavior of peculiar moving dipolar features (MDFs) observed in the active region. In longitudinal magnetograms, the MDFs appeared to be small dipoles in the emerging fields. The east-west orientation of their polarities was opposite that of the sunspots. The dipoles were oriented parallel to their direction of motion, which was in most cases towards the sunspots. Previously, dipolar moving magnetic features have only been observed flowing out from sunspots. Vector magnetograms show that the magnetic field of each MDF negative part was less inclined to the local horizontal than the ones of the positive part. We identify the MDFs as undulations, or stitches, where the emerging flux ropes are still tied to the photosphere. We present a U-loop model that can account for their unusual structure and behavior, and it shows how emerging flux can shed its entrained mass.

  15. Observations of the 12.3 micron Mg I emission line during a major solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deming, Drake; Jennings, Donald E.; Osherovich, Vladimir; Wiedemann, Gunter; Hewagama, Tilak

    1990-01-01

    The extremely Zeeman-sensitive 12.32 micron Mg I solar emission line was observed during a 3B/X5.7 solar flare on October 24, 1989. When compared to postflare values, Mg I emission-line intensity in the penumbral flare ribbon was 20 percent greater at the peak of the flare in soft X-rays, and the 12 micron continuum intensity was 7 percent greater. The flare also excited the emission line in the umbra where it is normally absent. The umbral flare emission exhibits a Zeeman splitting 200 G less than the adjacent penumbra, suggesting that it is excited at higher altitude. The absolute penumbral magnetic field strength did not change by more than 100 G between the flare peak and postflare period. However, a change in the inclination of the field lines, probably related to the formation and development of the flare loop system, was seen.

  16. Determining the solar-flare photospheric scale height from SMM gamma-ray measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingenfelter, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    A connected series of Monte Carlo programs was developed to make systematic calculations of the energy, temporal and angular dependences of the gamma-ray line and neutron emission resulting from such accelerated ion interactions. Comparing the results of these calculations with the Solar Maximum Mission/Gamma Ray Spectrometer (SMM/GRS) measurements of gamma-ray line and neutron fluxes, the total number and energy spectrum of the flare-accelerated ions trapped on magnetic loops at the Sun were determined and the angular distribution, pitch angle scattering, and mirroring of the ions on loop fields were constrained. Comparing the calculations with measurements of the time dependence of the neutron capture line emission, a determination of the He-3/H ratio in the photosphere was also made. The diagnostic capabilities of the SMM/GRS measurements were extended by developing a new technique to directly determine the effective photospheric scale height in solar flares from the neutron capture gamma-ray line measurements, and critically test current atmospheric models in the flare region.

  17. Coronal Seismology of Flare-Excited Standing Slow-Mode Waves Observed by SDO/AIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tongjiang; Ofman, Leon; Davila, Joseph M.

    2016-05-01

    Flare-excited longitudinal intensity oscillations in hot flaring loops have been recently detected by SDO/AIA in 94 and 131 Å bandpasses. Based on the interpretation in terms of a slow-mode wave, quantitative evidence of thermal conduction suppression in hot (>9 MK) loops has been obtained for the first time from measurements of the polytropic index and phase shift between the temperature and density perturbations (Wang et al. 2015, ApJL, 811, L13). This result has significant implications in two aspects. One is that the thermal conduction suppression suggests the need of greatly enhanced compressive viscosity to interpret the observed strong wave damping. The other is that the conduction suppression provides a reasonable mechanism for explaining the long-duration events where the thermal plasma is sustained well beyond the duration of impulsive hard X-ray bursts in many flares, for a time much longer than expected by the classical Spitzer conductive cooling. In this study, we model the observed standing slow-mode wave in Wang et al. (2015) using a 1D nonlinear MHD code. With the seismology-derived transport coefficients for thermal conduction and compressive viscosity, we successfully simulate the oscillation period and damping time of the observed waves. Based on the parametric study of the effect of thermal conduction suppression and viscosity enhancement on the observables, we discuss the inversion scheme for determining the energy transport coefficients by coronal seismology.

  18. Dynamic Effects of Topoisomerase I Inhibition on R-Loops and Short Transcripts at Active Promoters.

    PubMed

    Marinello, Jessica; Bertoncini, Stefania; Aloisi, Iris; Cristini, Agnese; Malagoli Tagliazucchi, Guidantonio; Forcato, Mattia; Sordet, Olivier; Capranico, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase I-DNA-cleavage complexes (Top1cc) stabilized by camptothecin (CPT) have specific effects at transcriptional levels. We recently reported that Top1cc increase antisense transcript (aRNAs) levels at divergent CpG-island promoters and, transiently, DNA/RNA hybrids (R-loop) in nuclear and mitochondrial genomes of colon cancer HCT116 cells. However, the relationship between R-loops and aRNAs was not established. Here, we show that aRNAs can form R-loops in N-TERA-2 cells under physiological conditions, and that promoter-associated R-loops are somewhat increased and extended in length immediately upon cell exposure to CPT. In contrast, persistent Top1ccs reduce the majority of R-loops suggesting that CPT-accumulated aRNAs are not commonly involved in R-loops. The enhancement of aRNAs by Top1ccs is present both in human colon cancer HCT116 cells and WI38 fibroblasts suggesting a common response of cancer and normal cells. Although Top1ccs lead to DSB and DDR kinases activation, we do not detect a dependence of aRNA accumulation on ATM or DNA-PK activation. However, we showed that the cell response to persistent Top1ccs can involve an impairment of aRNA turnover rather than a higher synthesis rate. Finally, a genome-wide analysis shows that persistent Top1ccs also determine an accumulation of sense transcripts at 5'-end gene regions suggesting an increased occurrence of truncated transcripts. Taken together, the results indicate that Top1 may regulate transcription initiation by modulating RNA polymerase-generated negative supercoils, which can in turn favor R-loop formation at promoters, and that transcript accumulation at TSS is a response to persistent transcriptional stress by Top1 poisoning.

  19. Solar flare energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, R. P.

    A review is presented regarding the current knowledge of the energetics of solar flares. Recent observations by the Solar Maximum Mission and by balloon-borne instrumentation indicate that the flare hard X-ray emission arises from nonthermal bremsstrahlung - the collisions of fast electrons into a cold ambient medium (Ee much greater than kT). Under this interpretation, most of the energy released for many flares is initially contained in the energetic electrons. These electrons can produce most of the observed flare phenomena via interactions with the solar atmosphere. In large flares a shock wave may result from explosive heating of the solar atmosphere by these electrons. This shock wave can accelerate nuclei to relativistic energies. It is argued that recent SMM observations of fast gamma-ray bursts are consistent with this picture of shock acceleration of nuclei.

  20. Solar flare energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    A review is presented regarding the current knowledge of the energetics of solar flares. Recent observations by the Solar Maximum Mission and by balloon-borne instrumentation indicate that the flare hard X-ray emission arises from nonthermal bremsstrahlung - the collisions of fast electrons into a cold ambient medium (Ee much greater than kT). Under this interpretation, most of the energy released for many flares is initially contained in the energetic electrons. These electrons can produce most of the observed flare phenomena via interactions with the solar atmosphere. In large flares a shock wave may result from explosive heating of the solar atmosphere by these electrons. This shock wave can accelerate nuclei to relativistic energies. It is argued that recent SMM observations of fast gamma-ray bursts are consistent with this picture of shock acceleration of nuclei.

  1. Adverse Health Effects of Benzene Exposure Among Children Following a Flaring Incident at the British Petroleum Refinery in Texas City.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Mark A; Reddy, G Kesava

    2016-03-01

    This study examined the health effects of benzene exposure among children from a flaring incident at the British Petroleum (BP) refinery in Texas City, Texas. A total of 899 children (benzene exposed, n = 641 and unexposed, n = 258), aged <17 years, were included. Hematological analysis showed that white blood cell (×10(3)/µL) counts were significantly decreased in the exposed children compared with the unexposed children (7.1 ± 2.2 versus 7.6 ± 2.1, P = .001). Similarly, the hemoglobin (g/dL) levels were decreased significantly in the exposed group compared with the unexposed group (12.7 ± 1.3 vs 13.1 ± 1.5, P = .001). Conversely, platelet (×10(3)/µL) counts were increased significantly in the exposed group compared with the unexposed group (318.6 ± 79.8 versus 266.9 ± 58.8, P = .001). Hepatic enzymes were also significantly elevated among exposed children compared with the unexposed children. These findings suggest that children exposed to benzene are at a higher risk of developing both hepatic and bone marrow-related disorders. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Effect of Variable Emittance Coatings on the Operation of a Miniature Loop Heat Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Donya M.; Ku, Jentung; Ottenstein, Laura; Swanson, Theodore; Hess, Steve; Darrin, Ann

    2005-01-01

    Abstract. As the size of spacecraft shrink to accommodate small and more efficient instruments, smaller launch vehicles, and constellation missions, all subsystems must also be made smaller. Under NASA NFL4 03-OSS-02, Space Technology-8 (ST 8), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and Jet Propulsion Laboratory jointly conducted a Concept Definition study to develop a miniature loop heat pipe (MLHP) thermal management system design suitable for future small spacecraft. The proposed MLHP thermal management system consists of a miniature loop heat pipe (LHP) and deployable radiators that are coated with variable emittance coatings (VECs). As part of the Phase A study and proof of the design concept, variable emittance coatings were integrated with a breadboard miniature loop heat pipe. The miniature loop heat pipe was supplied by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PL), while the variable emittance technology were supplied by Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory and Sensortex, Inc. The entire system was tested under vacuum at various temperature extremes and power loads. This paper summarizes the results of this testing and shows the effect of the VEC on the operation of a miniature loop heat pipe.

  3. Close-loop simulation of the medial olivocochlear anti-masking effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi-Wen; Yu, Lu-Ming; Wu, Po-Jui

    2015-12-01

    The medial olivocochlear reflex (MOCR) is known to affect cochlear signal processing via the electromechanical changes it induces in outer hair cells (OHCs). Experiments showed that electrically stimulating the MOC efferents (i.e., open-loop stimulation) suppresses cochlear responses to acoustic noise while enhancing the response to tone bursts if the signal-to-noise ratio is sufficiently high [5]. However, such experiments did not reveal precisely how MOCR affects cochlear signal processing in a close loop. Presently we have built an integrated computer model for the MOCR pathway; the constituting sub-models include a model for cochlear mechanics with electromotile OHCs [11], a neurotransmitter release model for the synapse between inner hair cells (IHCs) and spiral ganglion cells [16], an electrical model for the T-multipolar (TM) cells in the cochlear nucleus [6], a relay from TM cells to the MOC interneurons, and a convolution kernel describing the change of OHC potassium conductance triggered by the MOC inhibitory post synaptic potentials. Thus, close-loop responses of the entire system can be simulated for arbitrary acoustic stimuli. Both open-loop and close-loop simulations demonstrate a decrease in the auditory nerve fiber (ANF) response to noise but an increase in the response to high-level tone bursts. The present integrated computer model can potentially be used for testing hypotheses regarding the physiological mechanisms for MOC anti-masking effects.

  4. Diffraction hysteresis loop modelisation in transverse magneto-optical Kerr effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vial, Alexandre; Van Labeke, Daniel

    1998-07-01

    We theoretically study the diffraction of light by a magneto-optical grating for the transverse magneto-optical Kerr effect (TMOKE) case when the magnetization runs from saturation in one direction to saturation in the opposite direction. We use a vectorial theory of diffraction based on a perturbative approximation to the Rayleigh-Fano method, which leads to analytical formulae. We plot diffraction hysteresis loops (DHL) for several diffracted harmonics. We show that for a particular angle of incidence, the loop corresponding to one diffracted harmonic is flat.

  5. Two-loop virtual top-quark effect on Higgs-boson decay to bottom quarks.

    PubMed

    Butenschön, Mathias; Fugel, Frank; Kniehl, Bernd A

    2007-02-16

    In most of the mass range encompassed by the limits from the direct search and the electroweak precision tests, the Higgs boson of the standard model preferably decays to bottom quarks. We present, in analytic form, the dominant two-loop electroweak correction, of O(GF2mt4), to the partial width of this decay. It amplifies the familiar enhancement due to the O(GFmt2) one-loop correction by about +16% and thus more than compensates the screening by about -8% through strong-interaction effects of order O(alphasGFmt2).

  6. Some effects of quantization on a noiseless phase-locked loop. [sampling phase errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    If the VCO of a phase-locked receiver is to be replaced by a digitally programmed synthesizer, the phase error signal must be sampled and quantized. Effects of quantizing after the loop filter (frequency quantization) or before (phase error quantization) are investigated. Constant Doppler or Doppler rate noiseless inputs are assumed. The main result gives the phase jitter due to frequency quantization for a Doppler-rate input. By itself, however, frequency quantization is impractical because it makes the loop dynamic range too small.

  7. Flare build-up study - Homologous flares group. I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martres, M.-J.; Mein, N.; Mouradian, Z.; Rayrole, J.; Schmieder, B.; Simon, G.; Soru-Escaut, I.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1984-01-01

    Solar Maximum Mission observations have been used to study the origin and amount of energy, mechanism of storage and release, and conditions for the occurrence of solar flares, and some results of these studies as they pertain to homologous flares are briefly discussed. It was found that every set of flares produced 'rafales' of homologous flares, i.e., two, three, four, or more flares separated in time by an hour or less. No great changes in macroscopic photospheric patterns were observed during these flaring periods. A quantitative brightness parameter of the relation between homologous flares is defined. Scale changes detected in the dynamic spectrum of flare sites are in good agreement with a theoretical suggestion by Sturrock. Statistical results for different homologous flare active regions show the existence in homologous flaring areas of a 'pivot' of previous filaments interpreted as a signature of an anomaly in the solar rotation.

  8. Effect of current-loop sizes on the para-Meissner effect in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, N. Murali; Lingam, Lydia S.; Ghosh, P. K.; Shrivastava, Keshav N.

    1998-01-01

    We find that there is a range of current-loop sizes and a range of temperatures under which the para-Meissner effect is predicted. When the phase φ/ φ0 of the Josephson Hamiltonian varies in a certain range, the magnetization becomes positive. In general, the magnetization can be both positive as well as negative with zero resistivity in all phases. The susceptibility as a function of temperature at small magnetic fields is explained on the basis of Josephson interaction. The transition temperature of the para-Meissner effect, TpM, is different from that of the Meissner effect, Tc> TpM. The experimental measurements of the magnetization of Tl 2CaBa 2Cu 2O 8 at low fields are in agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  9. Higgs Decay to Two Photons at One Loop in the Standard Model Effective Field Theory.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Christine; Trott, Michael

    2015-11-06

    We present the calculation of the CP conserving contributions to Γ(h→γγ), from dimension six operators at one-loop order, in the linear standard model effective field theory. We discuss the impact of these corrections on interpreting current and future experimental bounds on this decay.

  10. Ionospheric Effects of the X-Ray Flares of September 24, 2011 According to Oblique Sounding Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vertogradov, G. G.; Vertogradova, E. G.; Uryadov, V. P.

    2014-10-01

    We present the results of observations of a sudden wideband attenuation of short radio waves and Doppler-shift variations of the signals from broadcast stations on oblique sounding paths in the Eurasian longitudinal sector during a series of X-ray flares that occurred on September 24, 2011. The results of modeling of the electron-density profiles in the lower ionosphere based on measurements of attenuation of short waves on the Moscow—Rostov-on-Don path at a frequency of 9996 kHz of the standard-time RWM station during the most powerful flare that occurred on September 24, 2011 at 09:40 UT are given.

  11. An Investigation of the Aerodynamic Stabilizing Effectiveness of Several Split Flare Afterbody Configurations in the Presence of an Underexpanded Jet Plume at Transonic Mach Numbers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-01-09

    flare afterbody FD2 Large diameter solid flare afterbody F6D2 Large diameter, 6-r tal, split flare afterbody F6D2S Large diameter, 6-petal, split flare...flow separation inhibitor. 5 As expected, the large diameter, solid flare, FD2 , has the highest base pressure plateau and the cylindrical afterbody...angle of attack slopes at small angles of attack are shown as a function of CRT in Figure 6. Clearly, the large diameter, solid flare, FD2 , is the most

  12. Solar Eruptions: Coronal Mass Ejections and Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2012-01-01

    This lecture introduces the topic of Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares, collectively known as solar eruptions. During solar eruptions, the released energy flows out from the Sun in the form of magnetized plasma and electromagnetic radiation. The electromagnetic radiation suddenly increases the ionization content of the ionosphere, thus impacting communication and navigation systems. Flares can be eruptive or confined. Eruptive flares accompany CMEs, while confined flares hav only electromagnetic signature. CMEs can drive MHD shocks that accelerate charged particles to very high energies in the interplanetary space, which pose radiation hazard to astronauts and space systems. CMEs heading in the direction of Earth arrive in about two days and impact Earth's magnetosphere, producing geomagnetic storms. The magnetic storms result in a number of effects including induced currnts that can disrupt power grids, railroads, and underground pipelines

  13. Quasi-periodic pulsations in partially occulted flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szaforz, Zaneta; Tomczak, Michal

    The model of oscillating magnetic traps (OMT) suggests that the cusp-like magnetic structures located in an upper part of flare loops are responsible for quasi-periodic pulsations (QPP) observed sometimes in hard X-rays (HXR). Electrons within these oscillating traps are efficiently accelerated and confined, therefore the traps should be recognize as loop-top HXR sources. However, these sources are difficult for reconstruction in the presence of the stronger footpoint HXR sources. To overcome this problem, we analyzed partially occulted flares, observed by Yohkoh, from the survey of Tomczak (2009). We will present the correlation between the diameter of the loop-top HXR source and the period of pulsations. We will present also some interesting examples of observations, for which changes in QPPs coincide with the changes in appearance of loop-top sources.

  14. Investigation of the influence of capillary effect on operation of the loop heat pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikielewicz, Dariusz; Błauciak, Krzysztof

    2014-09-01

    In the paper presented are studies on the investigation of the capillary forces effect induced in the porous structure of a loop heat pipe using water and ethanol ad test fluids. The potential application of such effect is for example in the evaporator of the domestic micro-CHP unit, where the reduction of pumping power could be obtained. Preliminary analysis of the results indicates water as having the best potential for developing the capillary effect.

  15. Effect of DNA Hairpin Loops on the Twist of Planar DNA Origami Tiles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhe; Wang, Lei; Yan, Hao; Liu, Yan

    2012-01-01

    The development of scaffolded DNA origami, a technique in which a long single-stranded viral genome is folded into arbitrary shapes by hundreds of short synthetic oligonucleotides, represents an important milestone in DNA nanotechnology. Recent findings have revealed that two-dimensional (2D)DNA origami structures based on the original design parameters adopt a global twist with respect to the tile plane, which may be because the conformation of the constituent DNA (10.67 bp/turn) deviates from the natural B-type helical twist (10.4 bp/turn). Here we aim to characterize the effects of DNA hairpin loops on the overall curvature of the tile and explore their ability to control, and ultimately eliminate any unwanted curvature. A series of dumbbell-shaped DNA loops were selectively displayed on the surface of DNA origami tiles with the expectation that repulsive interactions among the neighboring dumbbell loops and between the loops and the DNA origami tile would influence the structural features of the underlying tiles. A systematic, atomic force microscopy (AFM) study of how the number and position of the DNA loops influenced the global twist of the structure was performed, and several structural models to explain the results were proposed. The observations unambiguously revealed that the first generation of rectangular shaped origami tiles adopt a conformation in which the upper right (corner 2) and bottom left (corner 4) corners bend upward out of the plane, causing linear superstructures attached by these corners to form twisted ribbons. Our experimental observations are consistent with the twist model predicted by the DNA mechanical property simulation software CanDo. Through the systematic design and organization of various numbers of dumbbell loops on both surfaces of the tile, a nearly planar rectangular origami tile was achieved. PMID:22126326

  16. Effects of internal hydrogen on the vacancy loop formation probability in Al

    SciTech Connect

    Bui, T.X.; Sirois, E.; Robertson, I.M. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Kirk, M.A. )

    1990-04-01

    The effect of internal hydrogen on the formation of vacancy dislocation loops from heavy-ion generated displacement cascades in Al has been investigated. Samples of high-purity aluminum and aluminum containing 900 and 1300 appM of hydrogen were irradiated at room temperature with 50 keV Kr+ ions. The ion dose rate was typically 2 {times} 10{sup 10}ions cm{sup {minus}2} sec{sup {minus}1} and the ion dose was between 10{sup 11} and 10{sup 13} ion cm{sup {minus}2}. Under these irradiation conditions, dislocation loops were observed in all compositions, although the formation probability was relatively low (less than 10 percent of the displacement cascades produced a vacancy loop). The loop formation probability was further reduced by the presence of hydrogen. No difference in the geometry or the size of the loops created in the hydrogen free and hydrogen charged samples was found. These results are difficult to interpret, and the explanation may lie in the distribution and form of the hydrogen. To account for the large hydrogen concentrations and from calculations of the energy associated with hydrogen entry into aluminum, it has been suggested that the hydrogen enters the aluminum lattice with an accompanying vacancy. This will create hydrogen-vacancy complexes in the material; two dimensional complexes have been detected in the hydrogen-charged, but unirradiated, samples by the small-angle x-ray scattering technique. The possibility of these complexes trapping the vacancies produced by the cascade process exists thus lowering the formation probability. However, such a mechanism must occur within the lifetime of the cascade. Alternatively, if a displacement cascade overlaps with the hydrogen-vacancy complexes, the lower atomic density of the region will result in an increase in the cascade volume (decrease in the local vacancy concentration) which will also reduce the loop formation probability.

  17. The effect of partial acclimatization to high altitude on loop gain and central sleep apnoea severity.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Gareth; Ainslie, Philip N; Shepherd, Kelly; Dawson, Andrew; Swart, Marianne; Lucas, Samuel; Burgess, Keith R

    2012-07-01

    Loop gain is an engineering term that predicts the stability of a feedback control system, such as the control of breathing. Based on earlier studies at lower altitudes, it was hypothesized that acclimatization to high altitude would lead to a reduction in loop gain and thus central sleep apnoea (CSA) severity. This study used exposure to very high altitude to induce CSA in healthy subjects to investigate the effect of partial acclimatization on loop gain and CSA severity. Measurements were made on 12 subjects (age 30 ± 10 years, body mass index 22.8 ± 1.9, eight males, four females) at an altitude of 5050 m over a 2-week period upon initial arrival (days 2-4) and following partial acclimatization (days 12-14). Sleep was studied by full polysomnography, and resting arterial blood gases were measured. Loop gain was measured by the 'duty cycle' method (duration of hyperpnoea/cycle length). Partial acclimatization to high-altitude exposure was associated with both an increase in loop gain (duty cycle fell from 0.60 ± 0.05 to 0.55 ± 0.06 (P = 0.03)) and severity of CSA (apnoea-hypopnoea index increased from 76.8 ± 48.8 to 115.9 ± 20.2 (P = 0.01)), while partial arterial carbon dioxide concentration fell from 29 ± 3 to 26 ± 2 (P = 0.01). Contrary to the results at lower altitudes, at high-altitude loop gain and severity of CSA increased. © 2012 The Authors. Respirology © 2012 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  18. Predicting the Response of the Mars Ionosphere to Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallows, K.; Withers, P.; Gonzalez, G.

    2015-12-01

    The increased soft X-ray irradiance during solar flares generates increased electron densities in the lower ionosphere of Mars. The relative changes in electron density during a flare are greater for larger flares and also at lower altitudes and larger flares, due to the wavelength dependence of both the flux increase during the flare and the absorption of flux by the neutral atmosphere. These relationships have been explored [Bougher et al. 2001, Fox et al. 2004, Mendillo et al. 2006, Mahajan et al. 2011, Lollo et al. 2012] but not quantified, which has impeded the validation of simulations of the ionospheric effects of solar flares. Such simulations are necessary for developing accurate descriptions of the physical processes governing ionospheric behavior under extreme conditions. We present a response function, a mathematical expression for the change in electron density during a solar flare as a function of the change in solar flux and an optical depth proxy. This response function is based on analysis of 20 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) radio occultation electron density profiles measured during solar flares. Characterizing the response as a function of optical depth, rather than altitude, provides the best description of ionospheric variability during a flare; otherwise non-negligible solar zenith angle effects are present. We demonstrate that the response function can be used to predict ionospheric electron densities during a specified solar flare by reproducing profiles known to be disturbed by a solar flare. We also demonstrate that the response function can be used to infer the strength of solar flares not visible at Earth by finding the flux enhancement required to reproduce an apparently flare affected profile given an undisturbed profile on the same date.

  19. Flare models. [solar physics current status review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.

    1980-01-01

    The current status of solar flare modeling is reviewed. Primary and secondary observational features that a proposed flare model should be capable of explaining are discussed, including energy storage and release, particle acceleration, mass ejection, heating of the temperature minimum region, X-ray, EUV, UV, visible and radio emission and mass flow. Consideration is then given to the twisted flux tube paramagnetic recombination model of Gold and Hoyle (1960), the current model of Alfven and Carlqvist (1967), closed current-sheet models such as those of Syrovatskii (1966, 1969, 1977) and Uchida and Sakurai (1977), open-field models such as those of Carmichael (1964) and Barnes and Sturrock (1972), the emerging flux model of Heyvaerts and Priest (1974, 1977, 1978) and the loop-flare models of Spicer (1977) and Colgate (1978). It is noted that no one model can yet account for all the observational features, and that there may turn out to be several types of flare, each requiring its own explanation.

  20. Flare models. [solar physics current status review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.

    1980-01-01

    The current status of solar flare modeling is reviewed. Primary and secondary observational features that a proposed flare model should be capable of explaining are discussed, including energy storage and release, particle acceleration, mass ejection, heating of the temperature minimum region, X-ray, EUV, UV, visible and radio emission and mass flow. Consideration is then given to the twisted flux tube paramagnetic recombination model of Gold and Hoyle (1960), the current model of Alfven and Carlqvist (1967), closed current-sheet models such as those of Syrovatskii (1966, 1969, 1977) and Uchida and Sakurai (1977), open-field models such as those of Carmichael (1964) and Barnes and Sturrock (1972), the emerging flux model of Heyvaerts and Priest (1974, 1977, 1978) and the loop-flare models of Spicer (1977) and Colgate (1978). It is noted that no one model can yet account for all the observational features, and that there may turn out to be several types of flare, each requiring its own explanation.

  1. Loop-to-loop coupling.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Lucero, Larry Martin; Langston, William L.; Salazar, Robert Austin; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Basilio, Lorena I.; Bacon, Larry Donald

    2012-05-01

    This report estimates inductively-coupled energy to a low-impedance load in a loop-to-loop arrangement. Both analytical models and full-wave numerical simulations are used and the resulting fields, coupled powers and energies are compared. The energies are simply estimated from the coupled powers through approximations to the energy theorem. The transmitter loop is taken to be either a circular geometry or a rectangular-loop (stripline-type) geometry that was used in an experimental setup. Simple magnetic field models are constructed and used to estimate the mutual inductance to the receiving loop, which is taken to be circular with one or several turns. Circuit elements are estimated and used to determine the coupled current and power (an equivalent antenna picture is also given). These results are compared to an electromagnetic simulation of the transmitter geometry. Simple approximate relations are also given to estimate coupled energy from the power. The effect of additional loads in the form of attached leads, forming transmission lines, are considered. The results are summarized in a set of susceptibility-type curves. Finally, we also consider drives to the cables themselves and the resulting common-to-differential mode currents in the load.

  2. Regulative Loops, Step Loops and Task Loops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanLehn, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    This commentary suggests a generalization of the conception of the behavior of tutoring systems, which the target article characterized as having an outer loop that was executed once per task and an inner loop that was executed once per step of the task. A more general conception sees these two loops as instances of regulative loops, which…

  3. Regulative Loops, Step Loops and Task Loops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanLehn, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    This commentary suggests a generalization of the conception of the behavior of tutoring systems, which the target article characterized as having an outer loop that was executed once per task and an inner loop that was executed once per step of the task. A more general conception sees these two loops as instances of regulative loops, which…

  4. One-loop effects of extra dimensions on the WWγ and WWZ vertices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Tlalpa, A.; Montaño, J.; Novales-Sánchez, H.; Ramírez-Zavaleta, F.; Toscano, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    The one-loop contribution of the excited Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes of the SUL(2) gauge group on the off-shell W-W+γ and W-W+Z vertices is calculated in the context of a pure Yang-Mills theory in five dimensions and its phenomenological implications discussed. The use of a gauge-fixing procedure for the excited KK modes that is covariant under the standard gauge transformations of the SUL(2) group is stressed. A gauge-fixing term and the Faddeev-Popov ghost sector for the KK gauge modes that are separately invariant under the standard gauge transformations of SUL(2) are presented. It is shown that the one-loop contributions of the KK modes to the off-shell W-W+γ and W-W+Z vertices are free of ultraviolet divergences and well-behaved at high energies. It is found that for a size of the fifth dimension of R-1˜1TeV, the one-loop contribution of the KK modes to these vertices is about 1 order of magnitude lower than the corresponding standard model radiative correction. This contribution is similar to the one estimated for new gauge bosons contributions in other contexts. Tree-level effects on these vertices induced by operators of higher canonical dimension are also investigated. It is found that these effects are lower than those generated at the one-loop order by the KK gauge modes.

  5. An affinity-effect relationship for microbial communities in plant-soil feedback loops.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yi; Clay, Sharon A; Davis, Adam S; Dille, Anita; Felix, Joel; Ramirez, Analiza H M; Sprague, Christy L; Yannarell, Anthony C

    2014-05-01

    Feedback loops involving soil microorganisms can regulate plant populations. Here, we hypothesize that microorganisms are most likely to play a role in plant-soil feedback loops when they possess an affinity for a particular plant and the capacity to consistently affect the growth of that plant for good or ill. We characterized microbial communities using whole-community DNA fingerprinting from multiple "home-and-away" experiments involving giant ragweed (Ambrosia trifida L.) and common sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), and we looked for affinity-effect relationships in these microbial communities. Using canonical ordination and partial least squares regression, we developed indices expressing each microorganism's affinity for ragweed or sunflower and its putative effect on plant biomass, and we used linear regression to analyze the relationship between microbial affinity and effect. Significant linear affinity-effect relationships were found in 75 % of cases. Affinity-effect relationships were stronger for ragweed than for sunflower, and ragweed affinity-effect relationships showed consistent potential for negative feedback loops. The ragweed feedback relationships indicated the potential involvement of multiple microbial taxa, resulting in strong, consistent affinity-effect relationships in spite of large-scale microbial variability between trials. In contrast, sunflower plant-soil feedback may involve just a few key players, making it more sensitive to underlying microbial variation. We propose that affinity-effect relationship can be used to determine key microbial players in plant-soil feedback against a low "signal-to-noise" background of complex microbial datasets.

  6. Crystal Orientation and Temperature Effects on the Double Hysteresis Loop Behavior of a PVDF- g-PS Graft Copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lei; Yang, Lianyun; Guan, Fangxiao

    2013-03-01

    In a recent report, double hysteresis loop behavior is observed in a nanoconfined poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-trifluoroethylene-co-chlorotrifluoroethylene)-graft-polystyrene [P(VDF-TrFE-CTFE)- g-PS] copolymer. It is considered that the PS grafts are capable of reducing the compensation polarization and thus the polarization electric field during the reverse poling process, resulting in the double hysteresis loop behavior. In this study, we further investigated crystal orientation and temperature effects on this novel ferroelectric behavior. It is observed that with increasing the orientation factor, the electric displacement-electric field (D-E) loop changes from linear for non-oriented film to double loop for the well-oriented film. With increasing the temperature, the double hysteresis loop is gradually replaced by the single and open loop, which is attributed to the impurity ion migrational loss in the sample. This work is supported by NSF (DMR-0907580).

  7. A RECONNECTING CURRENT SHEET IMAGED IN A SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Rui; Liu Chang; Wang Haimin; Lee, Jeongwoo; Wang, Tongjiang; Stenborg, Guillermo

    2010-11-01

    Magnetic reconnection changes the magnetic field topology and powers explosive events in astrophysical, space, and laboratory plasmas. For flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the solar atmosphere, the standard model predicts the presence of a reconnecting current sheet, which has been the subject of considerable theoretical and numerical modeling over the last 50 years, yet direct, unambiguous observational verification has been absent. In this Letter, we show a bright sheet structure of global length (>0.25 R {sub sun}) and macroscopic width ((5-10)x10{sup 3} km) distinctly above the cusp-shaped flaring loop, imaged during the flare rising phase in EUV. The sheet formed due to the stretch of a transequatorial loop system and was accompanied by various reconnection signatures. This unique event provides a comprehensive view of the reconnection geometry and dynamics in the solar corona.

  8. NEW SOLAR EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IRRADIANCE OBSERVATIONS DURING FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Thomas N.; Hock, Rachel; Eparvier, Frank; Jones, Andrew R.; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Klimchuk, James A.; Didkovsky, Leonid; Judge, Darrell; Mariska, John; Warren, Harry; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Webb, David F.; Bailey, Scott; Tobiska, W. Kent

    2011-10-01

    New solar extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance observations from the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) EUV Variability Experiment provide full coverage in the EUV range from 0.1 to 106 nm and continuously at a cadence of 10 s for spectra at 0.1 nm resolution and even faster, 0.25 s, for six EUV bands. These observations can be decomposed into four distinct characteristics during flares. First, the emissions that dominate during the flare's impulsive phase are the transition region emissions, such as the He II 30.4 nm. Second, the hot coronal emissions above 5 MK dominate during the gradual phase and are highly correlated with the GOES X-ray. A third flare characteristic in the EUV is coronal dimming, seen best in the cool corona, such as the Fe IX 17.1 nm. As the post-flare loops reconnect and cool, many of the EUV coronal emissions peak a few minutes after the GOES X-ray peak. One interesting variation of the post-eruptive loop reconnection is that warm coronal emissions (e.g., Fe XVI 33.5 nm) sometimes exhibit a second large peak separated from the primary flare event by many minutes to hours, with EUV emission originating not from the original flare site and its immediate vicinity, but rather from a volume of higher loops. We refer to this second peak as the EUV late phase. The characterization of many flares during the SDO mission is provided, including quantification of the spectral irradiance from the EUV late phase that cannot be inferred from GOES X-ray diagnostics.

  9. Detrimental Health Effects of Benzene Exposure in Adults After a Flaring Disaster at the BP Refinery Plant in Texas City.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Mark A; Reddy, G Kesava

    2016-04-01

    To examine the adverse effects of benzene exposure in adults from a prolonged flaring disaster at the BP refinery in Texas City, Texas. Adults aged 18 years and older who had been exposed and unexposed to benzene were included. We reviewed medical charts and compared measures of white blood cells (WBCs), platelets, hemoglobin, hematocrit, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate amino transferase (AST), and alanine amino transferase (ALT) in exposed and unexposed adults. Records from 2213 adults (benzene exposed, n=1826; unexposed, n=387) were reviewed. Benzene-exposed subjects had significantly higher WBC counts (7.9±2.3 vs 6.8±1.6×10(3) per µL, P=0.0000) and platelet counts (270.8±60.9 vs 242.5±53.7×10(3) per µL, P=0.0000) than did the unexposed subjects. Serum creatinine levels were also significantly higher in the exposed group than in the unexposed group (1.0±0.2 vs 0.8±0.2 mg/dL, P=0.000). Serum levels of ALP were significantly higher in the exposed subjects than in the unexposed subjects (82.1±15.6 vs 71.8±8.2 IU/L, P=0.000). Similarly, benzene-exposed subjects had significantly higher levels of AST (26.2±6.4 vs 19.7±5.3 IU/L, P=0.000) and ALT (30.6±10.8 vs 20.9±9.6 IU/L, P=0.000) than in those unexposed to benzene. Benzene exposure resulted in significant alterations in hematologic and liver profiles in adults.

  10. Health effects of benzene exposure among children following a flaring incident at the British Petroleum Refinery in Texas City.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Mark A; Reddy, G Kesava

    2014-02-01

    Human exposure to benzene is associated with multiple adverse health effects leading to hematological malignancies. The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the health consequences of benzene exposure in children following a flaring incident at the British petroleum (BP) refinery in Texas City, Texas. The study included children aged <17 years who had been exposed and unexposed to benzene. Using medical charts, clinical data including white blood cell (WBC) counts, platelets counts, hemoglobin, hematocrit, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate amino transferase (AST), alanine amino transferase (ALT), and somatic symptom complaints by the children exposed to benzene were reviewed and analyzed. A total of 312 subjects (benzene exposed, n = 157 and unexposed, n = 155) were included. Hematologic analysis showed that WBC counts were significantly decreased in benzene-exposed children compared with the unexposed children (6.8 ± 2.1 versus 7.3 ± 1.7, P = .022). Conversely, platelet (X 10(3) per μL) counts were increased significantly in the benzene-exposed group compared with the unexposed group (278.4 ± 59.9 versus 261.6 ± 51.7, P = .005). Similarly, benzene-exposed children had significantly higher levels of ALP (183.7± 95.6 versus 165 ± 70.3 IU/L, P = .04), AST (23.6 ± 15.3 versus 20.5 ± 5.5 IU/L, P = .015), and ALT (19.2 ± 7.8 versus 16.9 ± 6.9 IU/L, P = .005) compared with the unexposed children. Together, the results of the study reveal that children exposed to benzene experienced significantly altered blood profiles, liver enzymes, and somatic symptoms indicating that children exposed to benzene are at a higher risk of developing hepatic or blood related disorders.

  11. Fibromyalgia Flares: A Qualitative Analysis.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Ann; Whipple, Mary O; Rhudy, Lori M

    2016-03-01

    Patients with fibromyalgia report periods of symptom exacerbation, colloquially referred to as "flares" and despite clinical observation of flares, no research has purposefully evaluated the presence and characteristics of flares in fibromyalgia. The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe fibromyalgia flares in a sample of patients with fibromyalgia. Using seven open-ended questions, patients were asked to describe how they perceived fibromyalgia flares and triggers and alleviating factors associated with flares. Patients were also asked to describe how a flare differs from their typical fibromyalgia symptoms and how they cope with fibromyalgia flares. Content analysis was used to analyze the text. A total of 44 participants completed the survey. Responses to the seven open-ended questions revealed three main content areas: causes of flares, flare symptoms, and dealing with a flare. Participants identified stress, overdoing it, poor sleep, and weather changes as primary causes of flares. Symptoms characteristic of flares included flu-like body aches/exhaustion, pain, fatigue, and variety of other symptoms. Participants reported using medical treatments, rest, activity and stress avoidance, and waiting it out to cope with flares. Our results demonstrate that periods of symptom exacerbation (i.e., flares) are commonly experienced by patients with fibromyalgia and symptoms of flares can be differentiated from every day or typical symptoms of fibromyalgia. Our study is the first of its kind to qualitatively explore characteristics, causes, and management strategies of fibromyalgia flares. Future studies are needed to quantitatively characterize fibromyalgia flares and evaluate mechanisms of flares. © 2015 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Coronal mass ejection and solar flare initiation processes without appreciable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselovsky, I.

    TRACE and SOHO/EIT movies clearly show the cases of the coronal mass ejection and solar flare initiations without noticeable large-scale topology modifications in observed features. Instead of this, the appearance of new intermediate scales is often omnipresent in the erupting region structures when the overall configuration is preserved. Examples of this kind are presented and discussed in the light of the existing magnetic field reconnection paradigms. It is demonstrated that spurious large-scale reconnections and detachments are often produced due to the projection effects in poorly resolved images of twisted loops and sheared arcades especially when deformed parts of them are underexposed and not seen in the images only because of this reason. Other parts, which are normally exposed or overexposed, can make the illusion of "islands" or detached elements in these situations though in reality they preserve the initial magnetic connectivity. Spurious "islands" of this kind could be wrongly interpreted as signatures of topological transitions in the large-scale magnetic fields in many instances described in the vast literature in the past based mainly on fuzzy YOHKOH images, which resulted in the myth about universal solar flare models and the scenario of detached magnetic island formations with new null points in the large scale magnetic field. The better visualization with higher resolution and sensitivity limits allowed to clarify this confusion and to avoid this unjustified interpretation. It is concluded that topological changes obviously can happen in the coronal magnetic fields, but these changes are not always necessary ingredients at least of all coronal mass ejections and solar flares. The scenario of the magnetic field opening is not universal for all ejections. Otherwise, expanding ejections with closed magnetic configurations can be produced by the fast E cross B drifts in strong inductive electric fields, which appear due to the emergence of the new

  13. Effectiveness of flossing loops in the control of the gingival health

    PubMed Central

    Azcarate-Velázquez, Francisco; Garrido-Serrano, Roberto; Castillo-Dalí, Gabriel; Serrera-Figallo, María-Angeles; Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    Background One of the key factor in the good condition of periodontal tissues is their daily hygiene. Oral hygiene techniques such brushing and a good interdental hygiene by correct flossing are very important. The aim of this study is to compare the use of dental floss in a loop vs traditional floss in the control of Loe-Silness Gingival Index (IG), Turesky´s Plaque Index (IPT), Gingival Bleeding Index (IS) and the values of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and interleukin 8 (IL-8). Material and Methods A comparative study of 40 patients in which each patient was his own control, using during 45 days each one of the devices (new loop floss and conventional floss) of interdental hygiene analysed. Data for Loe-Silness Gingival Index (IG), Turesky´s Plaque Index (IPT), Gingival Bleeding Index (IS) and the values of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and interleukin 8 (IL-8)were collected and measured in every visit for every type of interdental hygiene device. Results Our data indicates that the rate of Turesky´s Plaque Index presented statistically significant differences between groups (loop: 1.66 ± 0.8; traditional: 1.12 ± 0.8; p<0.0001). The rest of the indices studied showed no statistically significant differences. Conclusions The creation of new dental floss designs try to make their use easier and more sensitive, and plaque removal more effective. The loop design can facilitate interdental hygiene, reaching similar effectiveness than traditional floss, improving some indicators, such as Turesky´s Plaque Index. Key words:Dental floss, bacterial plaque, loop floss, plaque index, periodontal diseases. PMID:28638551

  14. Self-organized braiding in solar coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, M. A.; Asgari-Targhi, M.; Deluca, E. E.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate the evolution of braided solar coronal loops. We assume that coronal loops consist of several internal strands which twist and braid about each other. Reconnection between the strands leads to small flares and heating of the loop to x-ray temperatures. Using a method of generating and releasing braid structure similar to a forest fire model, we show that the reconnected field lines evolve to a self-organised critical state. In this state, the frequency distributions of coherent braid sequences as well as flare energies follow power law distributions. We demonstrate how the presence of net helicity in the loop alters the distribution laws.

  15. The development of X-ray flare onsets near active region filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.

    1981-01-01

    Skylab X-ray images of the early phases of six active region transient brightenings were compared with simultaneous H-alpha images to study the spatial relationships between filaments and the X-ray brightenings. When the X-ray loops were roughly perpendicular to the axes of the H-alpha filaments, the filaments did not disappear. X-ray loops which appeared nearly parallel to the filaments were generally associated with the disappearances of those filaments. It is suggested that the perpendicular loops correspond to the class I X-ray flares of Pallavicinic et al. (1977) while the parallel loops are the early phases of their class II flares characterized in the decay phases by arcades of large loops with low energy densities. Both kinds of X-ray flares can be associated with impulsive phases.

  16. The dependence of solar flare energetics on flare volumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.

    1978-01-01

    The sizes of 45 X-ray flares observed on Skylab have been measured and compared to flare rise times, energies, and energy release rates as determined from Solard and XREA X-ray data. The X-ray rise time is correlated with the length and volume of the flare. The energy of the flare and the rate of increase of that energy are correlated with flare length and volume. Both the energy per unit volume and the rate of energy increase per unit volume are inversely correlated with flare length and volume. There is no correlation between the emission measure and the volume.

  17. Cooling of solar flares plasmas. 1: Theoretical considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cargill, Peter J.; Mariska, John T.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    1995-01-01

    Theoretical models of the cooling of flare plasma are reexamined. By assuming that the cooling occurs in two separate phase where conduction and radiation, respectively, dominate, a simple analytic formula for the cooling time of a flare plasma is derived. Unlike earlier order-of-magnitude scalings, this result accounts for the effect of the evolution of the loop plasma parameters on the cooling time. When the conductive cooling leads to an 'evaporation' of chromospheric material, the cooling time scales L(exp 5/6)/p(exp 1/6), where the coronal phase (defined as the time maximum temperature). When the conductive cooling is static, the cooling time scales as L(exp 3/4)n(exp 1/4). In deriving these results, use was made of an important scaling law (T proportional to n(exp 2)) during the radiative cooling phase that was forst noted in one-dimensional hydrodynamic numerical simulations (Serio et al. 1991; Jakimiec et al. 1992). Our own simulations show that this result is restricted to approximately the radiative loss function of Rosner, Tucker, & Vaiana (1978). for different radiative loss functions, other scaling result, with T and n scaling almost linearly when the radiative loss falls off as T(exp -2). It is shown that these scaling laws are part of a class of analytic solutions developed by Antiocos (1980).

  18. Spatial Offsets in Flare-CME Current Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, John C.; Giordano, Silvio; Ciaravella, Angela

    2017-07-01

    Magnetic reconnection plays an integral part in nearly all models of solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The reconnection heats and accelerates the plasma, produces energetic electrons and ions, and changes the magnetic topology to form magnetic flux ropes and to allow CMEs to escape. Structures that appear between flare loops and CME cores in optical, UV, EUV, and X-ray observations have been identified as current sheets and have been interpreted in terms of the nature of the reconnection process and the energetics of the events. Many of these studies have used UV spectral observations of high temperature emission features in the [Fe xviii] and Si xii lines. In this paper, we discuss several surprising cases in which the [Fe xviii] and Si xii emission peaks are spatially offset from each other. We discuss interpretations based on asymmetric reconnection, on a thin reconnection region within a broader streamer-like structure, and on projection effects. Some events seem to be easily interpreted as the projection of a sheet that is extended along the line of sight that is viewed an angle, but a physical interpretation in terms of asymmetric reconnection is also plausible. Other events favor an interpretation as a thin current sheet embedded in a streamer-like structure.

  19. Nuclear gamma rays from stellar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colgate, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    Solar flare observations are consistent with the phenomenological description that a loop of magnetic flux is convected to the surface of the star and twisted. The resulting inductive current parallel to the field is dissipated at an enhanced rate throughout the field volume by current limiting instabilities. The steady state balance between joule heating and thermal conduction along the field lines of force to the denser, cooler surface establishes a temperature distribution. The expansion of heated and ionized surface layers leads to a pressure balance and hence predictable density and X-ray emission measure. The current limitation instabilities result observationally in the parallel current being transferred to run-away ions that reach a kinetic energy of some finite fraction of the inductive potential drop. The nuclear excitation gamma rays produced by such a run-away ion current are calculated for a white dwarf flare.

  20. Initiation Processes for the 2013 May 13 X1.7 Limb Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jinhua; Wang, Ya; Zhou, Tuanhui; Ji, Haisheng

    2017-01-01

    For the X1.7 class flare on 2013 May 13 (SOL2013-05-13T01:53), its initiation process was well observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory and the Extreme UltraViolet Imager (EUVI) on board STEREO-B. The initiation process incorporates the following phenomena: an X-ray precursor that started ∼9 minutes before flare onset, two hot magnetic loops (as seen with AIA hot channels) forming a sigmoidal core magnetic structure (as seen with the EUVI), a rapidly formed magnetic flux rope (MFR) that expands outward, and a flare loop that contracts inward. The two hot magnetic loops were activated after the occurrence of the X-ray precursor. After activation, magnetic reconnection occurred between the two hot magnetic loops (inside the sigmoid structure), which produced the expanding MFR and the contracting flare loop (CFL). The MFR and CFL can only be seen with AIA hot and cool channels, respectively. For this flare, the real initiation time can be regarded as being from the starting time of the precursor, and its impulsive phase started when the MFR began its fast expansion. In addition, the CFL and the growing postflare magnetic loops are different loop systems, and the CFL was the product of magnetic reconnection between sheared magnetic fields that also produced the MFR.

  1. Depressor effect of closed-loop chip system in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xing-Ya; Huang, Xing-Lin; Wang, Han-Jun; Zhou, Li-Min; Xu, Yao; Wang, Wei; Zhu, Guo-Qing

    2007-12-30

    We previously reported that a closed-loop chip system was designed to decrease arterial pressure in normal rabbits and rats. In the present study, the depressor effects of the chip system were investigated in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY). The arterial pressure was recorded, sampled, operated and processed in the chip system. The chip system instantaneously controlled arterial pressure by stimulating the left aortic depressor nerve according to the feedback signals of arterial pressure. The closed-loop chip system effectively decreased mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) in both SHR and WKY rats. It decreased the duration and the maximal MAP level of the pressor response evoked by either intravenous injection of phenylephrine or cutaneous nociceptive stimulation in SHR, but had no significant effect on the magnitude of the increase in MAP. Furthermore, the chip system significantly increased the baroreflex gain in SHR, but not in normal WKY rats. These results suggest that the closed-loop chip system effectively decreases the arterial pressure and increases baroreflex gain in SHR. The chip system does not abolish the arterial pressure responses to accidental pressor events, but decreases the duration and the maximal MAP level of the pressor responses.

  2. Manipulating superconducting fluctuations by the Little-Parks-de Gennes effect in ultrasmall Al loops.

    PubMed

    Staley, Neal E; Liu, Ying

    2012-09-11

    The destruction of superconducting phase coherence by quantum fluctuations and the control of these fluctuations are a problem of long-standing interest, with recent impetus provided by the relevance of these issues to the pursuit of high temperature superconductivity. Building on the work of Little and Parks, de Gennes predicted more than three decades ago that superconductivity could be destroyed near half-integer-flux quanta in ultrasmall loops, resulting in a destructive regime, and restored by adding a superconducting side branch, which does not affect the flux quantization condition. We report the experimental observation of this Little-Parks-de Gennes effect in Al loops prepared by advanced e-beam lithography. We show that the effect can be used to restore the lost phase coherence by employing side branches.

  3. New constraints on dark matter effective theories from standard model loops.

    PubMed

    Crivellin, Andreas; D'Eramo, Francesco; Procura, Massimiliano

    2014-05-16

    We consider an effective field theory for a gauge singlet Dirac dark matter particle interacting with the standard model fields via effective operators suppressed by the scale Λ ≳ 1 TeV. We perform a systematic analysis of the leading loop contributions to spin-independent Dirac dark matter-nucleon scattering using renormalization group evolution between Λ and the low-energy scale probed by direct detection experiments. We find that electroweak interactions induce operator mixings such that operators that are naively velocity suppressed and spin dependent can actually contribute to spin-independent scattering. This allows us to put novel constraints on Wilson coefficients that were so far poorly bounded by direct detection. Constraints from current searches are already significantly stronger than LHC bounds, and will improve in the near future. Interestingly, the loop contribution we find is isospin violating even if the underlying theory is isospin conserving.

  4. Comment on 'The solar flare myth' by J. T. Gosling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Hugh; Haisch, Bernhard; Strong, Keith T.

    1995-01-01

    In a recent paper Gosling (1993) claims that solar flares are relatively unimportant for understanding the terrestrial consequences of solar activity, and argues that coronal mass ejections (CMEs) produce the most powerful terrestrial disturbances. This opinion conflicts with observation, as it is well known that CMEs and flares are closely associated, and we disagree with Gosling's insistence on a simplistic cause-and-effect description of the interrelated phenomena of a solar flare. In this brief response we present new Yohkoh data and review older results that demonstrate the close relationships among CMEs, flares, filament eruptions, and other forms of energy release such as particle acceleration.

  5. Comment on 'The solar flare myth' by J. T. Gosling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Hugh; Haisch, Bernhard; Strong, Keith T.

    1995-01-01

    In a recent paper Gosling (1993) claims that solar flares are relatively unimportant for understanding the terrestrial consequences of solar activity, and argues that coronal mass ejections (CMEs) produce the most powerful terrestrial disturbances. This opinion conflicts with observation, as it is well known that CMEs and flares are closely associated, and we disagree with Gosling's insistence on a simplistic cause-and-effect description of the interrelated phenomena of a solar flare. In this brief response we present new Yohkoh data and review older results that demonstrate the close relationships among CMEs, flares, filament eruptions, and other forms of energy release such as particle acceleration.

  6. Magnetic Trapping of Flare Electrons and Microwave Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Gary, D. E.

    1999-05-01

    The topic of trapping of flare-produced electrons in magnetic loops and their evolution under Coulomb collision has received considerable attention in relation to interpreting hard X ray observations, since the first work by Melrose and Brown in 1976. However, application of the idea to the study of microwave radiation has been more limited. Petrosian in 1982 illustrated how the magnetic field affects the trapping and beaming of electrons to predict spatial morphology of microwave emission given magnetic structure and location of a flaring loop. Mel'nikov in 1994 used a model for trap and precipitation to study relative intensities and time delays between microwaves and hard X rays. We present a detailed modeling of microwave emission from electrons undergoing Coulomb interaction in magnetic traps, designed for quantitative analysis of spatially-resolved, multiwavelength microwave observations such as those of the Solar Arrays at Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO). Our main concern is to properly relate the precipitation rate and pitch angle diffusion to magnetic quantities of the flaring loop and injection parameters. In this approach, we use coronal field extrapolation and overlays of soft X ray loops to provide the magnetic quantities so that the microwave spectrum can be used mainly as the electron diagnostic. We discuss the model capabilities and apply the results to a flare that occurred in AR 7515 on 1993 June 3. This flare showed spectral flattening in the decay phase along with morphological variation suggestive of a magnetic trap around the loop top, and the spectral flattening is interpreted as driven by Coulomb collision in the magnetic trap. The OVRO Solar Array is supported through NSF grants AST-9796238 and ATM-9796213, and NASA grant NAG5-6831 to New Jersey Institute of Technology.

  7. Effects of Field-Aligned Flows on Standing Kink and Sausage Modes Supported by Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.-X.; Li, B.; Xia, L.-D.; Chen, Y.-J.; Yu, H.

    2014-05-01

    Fundamental standing modes and their overtones play an important role in coronal seismology. We examine the effects of a significant field-aligned flow on standing modes that are supported by coronal loops, which are modeled here as cold magnetic slabs. Of particular interest are the period ratios of the fundamental to its ( n-1)th overtone [ P 1/ nP n ] for kink and sausage modes, and the threshold half-width-to-length ratio for sausage modes. For standing kink modes, the flow significantly reduces P 1/ nP n in general, the effect being particularly strong for higher n and weaker density contrast [] between loops and their surroundings. That said, even when approaches infinity, this effect is still substantial, reducing the minimal P 1/ nP n by up to 13.7 % (24.5 %) for n=2 ( n=4) relative to the static case, when the Alfvén Mach number [ M A] reaches 0.8, where M A measures the loop flow speed in units of the internal Alfvén speed. Although it is not negligible for standing sausage modes, the flow effect in reducing P 1/ nP n is not as strong. However, the threshold half-width-to-length ratio is considerably higher in the flowing case than in its static counterpart. For in the range [9,1024] and M A in the range [0,0.5], an exhaustive parameter study yields that this threshold is well fitted by , which involves the two parameters in a simple way. This allows one to analytically constrain the combination for a loop with a known width-to-length ratio when a standing sausage oscillation is identified. It also allows one to examine the idea of partial sausage modes in more detail, and the flow is found to significantly reduce the spatial extent where partial modes are allowed.

  8. Magnetohydrodynamics of atmospheric transients. III - Basic results of nonplane two-dimensional analysis. [of solar flares effect on solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakagawa, Y.; Wu, S. T.; Han, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    The dynamic response of a stratified atmosphere permeated by a magnetic field to a sudden localized energy release (e.g., the onset of a flare) is examined in a physically self-consistent manner within the approximation of axisymmetric two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics. In contrast to the previous plane analyses, with the inclusion of out-of-plane components of magnetic and velocity fields, it is shown that the presence of transverse waves leads to spiraling material motions and formation of ring current with open (mostly radial) magnetic field configuration. In the closed (mostly azimuthal) magnetic field, the evolutionary response of a magnetic field is shown to follow the typical sequence observed with a flare, namely, the relaxations of magnetic shear toward the potential configuration. The details of the results are described with discussions on their physical significance.

  9. Stochastic gyroresonant electron acceleration on a low-beta plasma. II - Implications of thermal effects in a solar flare plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.; Steinacker, Juergen

    1992-01-01

    We consider the thermal damping of R and L waves under typical solar flare conditions. We find that the thermal particles cause rapid dissipation of the cyclotron waves, but do not affect whistlers and Alfven waves. The dissipation of electron cyclotron waves in particular leads to a threshold energy for acceleration which is about 10 times the thermal energy. Therefore, in the absence of an instability that excites these HF waves, a second mechanism is required in order to inject a sufficient number of electrons above the threshold energy and account for solar flare gamma-ray bremsstrahlung emission. We also find that the comoving gyroresonance, which occurs when the electron is in gyroresonance with an R wave whose group velocity equals the parallel electron velocity, can be realized by relativistic electrons if the plasma temperature is less than or approximately equal to 5,000,000 K.

  10. Spectral Hardening and Geoeffectiveness of Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, R.; Kumar, S.; Dave, H.; Deshpande, M. R.

    We present the results of a few typical flares that observed by the first space borne solar astronomy experiment of India namely "Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS)" mission, which has completed one year of its successful operation in geostationary orbit. The SOXS mission onboard GSAT-2 Indian spacecraft was launched successfully by GSLV-D2 rocket on 08 May 2003 to study the energy release and particle acceleration in solar flares. The SOXS is composed of two independent payloads viz. SOXS Low Energy Detector (SLD) payload, and SOXS High Energy Detector (SHD) payload. We restrict our presentation to SLD payload that designed, developed and fabricated by Physical Research Laboratory (PRL) in collaboration with Space Application Centre (SAC), Ahmedabad and ISRO Satellite Centre (ISAC), Bangalore of Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO). We briefly present the scientific objectives and instrumentation of the SLD payload. The SLD payload employs the state-of-art solid state detectors viz. Si PIN and CZT detectors, which reveal sub-keV spectral and 100ms temporal resolution characteristics that are necessary to study the spectral response of the flare components. The dynamic range of Si and CZT detectors is 4-25 and 4-56 keV respectively. The SLD has observed more than 140 flares of C and M class since its commissioning in the orbit. We present the X-ray emission characteristics of a few typical flares in view of their spectral hardening and geo-effectiveness. We extend our study of these flares to optical and radio waveband observations in order to improve the relationship of X-ray spectral hardening and geo-effectiveness. The flares with harder spectra and associated with small or large CME, and radio emission at frequencies above 10 GHz are found geo-effective.

  11. Ionic charge distributions of energetic particles from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.; Waldron, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects which solar flare X-rays have on the charge states of solar cosmic rays is determined quantitatively. Rather than to characterize the charge distribution by temperature alone, it is proposed that the X-ray flux at the acceleration site also is used. The effects of flare X-rays are modeled mathematically.

  12. Effect of Gas Flaring on the Environment: A Case Study of a Part of Niger Delta, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akeem, N. A.; Anifowose, A. Y. B.

    2016-12-01

    Gas flaring is a common practice in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. It releases greenhouse gases into the atmosphere and causes reduction in the biodiversity and health status of inhabitants of the environment. This study examines the use of Remote Sensing and GIS in assessing the impact of gas flaring on water quality, land surface temperature (LST), and vegetation cover within the study area. Landsat imageries (1987, 2002 and 2015) covering the study area were utilized in carrying out time series analysis to compare pollution of surface water, land surface temperature and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) changes. The water quality parameters investigated are pH, Nitrate, Lead, Iron, Sulphate and Total Dissolve Solids. The pH and nitrate values obtained were not within the standard limits set by W.H.O.; they range between 4.12-6.04 and 80.50-88.30mg/l respectively. Values range between 0.0-0.04 mg/l for Pb, 0.01-1.20 mg/l for Fe, 39.98-245.60 mg/l for SO4, and 0.0-7.0 mg/l for TDS. The area covered with vegetation reduced from 63.0% to 54.2% and to 46.4%, with the area occupied by unhealthy vegetation increasing from 49.61% to 53.87% and a further decrease to 48.1%. It was also observed that the volume of gas flared had a direct impact on the variation of the land surface temperature with the mean LST of 1987 as 28.1oC, increasing to 31.3oC in 2002 and decreasing to 25.5oC in 2015. The results therefore revealed gas flaring as a significant factor responsible for unfavorable water quality, high temperature variation and the rapid decline in the health of natural vegetation of the study area.

  13. Classical Physics and Quantum Loops

    SciTech Connect

    Barry R. Holstein; John F. Donoghue

    2004-05-01

    The standard picture of the loop expansion associates a factor of h-bar with each loop, suggesting that the tree diagrams are to be associated with classical physics, while loop effects are quantum mechanical in nature. We discuss examples wherein classical effects arise from loop contributions and display the relationship between the classical terms and the long range effects of massless particles.

  14. Partially massless higher-spin theory II: one-loop effective actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brust, Christopher; Hinterbichler, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    We continue our study of a generalization of the D-dimensional linearized Vasiliev higher-spin equations to include a tower of partially massless (PM) fields. We compute one-loop effective actions by evaluating zeta functions for both the "minimal" and "non-minimal" parity-even versions of the theory. Specifically, we compute the log-divergent part of the effective action in odd-dimensional Euclidean AdS spaces for D = 7 through 19 (dual to the a-type conformal anomaly of the dual boundary theory), and the finite part of the effective action in even-dimensional Euclidean AdS spaces for D = 4 through 8 (dual to the free energy on a sphere of the dual boundary theory). We pay special attention to the case D = 4, where module mixings occur in the dual field theory and subtlety arises in the one-loop computation. The results provide evidence that the theory is UV complete and one-loop exact, and we conjecture and provide evidence for a map between the inverse Newton's constant of the partially massless higher-spin theory and the number of colors in the dual CFT.

  15. Modeling Images and Spectra of a Solar Flare Observed by RHESSI on 20 February 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, Linhui; Holman, Gordon D.; Dennis, Brian R.; Krucker, Saem; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert Kim

    2002-01-01

    We have analyzed a C7.5 limb flare</