Science.gov

Sample records for flaring loops effects

  1. A dynamic flare with anomalously dense flare loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svestka, Z.; Fontenla, J. M.; Machado, M. E.; Martin, S. F.; Neidig, D. F.

    1986-01-01

    The dynamic flare of November 6, 1980 developed a rich system of growing loops which could be followed in H-alpha for 1.5 hours. Throughout the flare, these loops, near the limb, were seen in emission against the disk. Theoretical computations of b-values for a hydrogen atom reveal that this requires electron densities in the loops to be close to 10 to the 12th per cu cm. From measured widths of higher Balmer lines the density at the tops of the loops was found to be 4 x 10 to the 12th per cu cm if no nonthermal motions were present. It is now general knowledge that flare loops are initially observed in X-rays and become visible in H-alpha only after cooling. For such a high density a loop would cool through radiation from 10 to the 7th K to 10 to the 4th K within a few minutes so that the dense H-alpha loops should have heights very close to the heights of the X-ray loops. This, however, contradicts the observations obtained by the HXIS and FCS instruments on board SMM which show the X-ray loops at much higher altitudes than the loops in H-alpha. Therefore, the density must have been significantly smaller when the loops were formed and the flare loops were apparently both shrinking and becoming denser while cooling.

  2. Simultaneous Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer and Optical Observations of Ad Leonis: Evidence for Large Coronal Loops and the Neupert Effect in Stellar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Fisher, George H.; Simon, Theodore; Cully, Scott L.; Deustua, Susana E.; Jablonski, Marek; Johns-Krull, Christopher; Pettersen, Bjorn R.; Smith, Verne; Spiesman, William J.; Valenti, Jeffrey

    1995-01-01

    We report on the first simultaneous Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) and optical observations of flares on the dMe flare star AD Leonis. The data show the following features: (1) Two flares (one large and one of moderate size) of several hours duration were observed in the EUV wavelength range; (2) Flare emission observed in the optical precedes the emission seen with EUVE; and (3) Several diminutions (DIMs) in the optical continuum were observed during the period of optical flare activity. To interpret these data, we develop a technique for deriving the coronal loop length from the observed rise and decay behavior of the EUV flare. The technique is generally applicable to existing and future coronal observations of stellar flares. We also determine the pressure, column depth, emission measure, loop cross-sectional area, and peak thermal energy during the two EUV flares, and the temperature, area coverage, and energy of the optical continuum emission. When the optical and coronal data are combined, we find convincing evidence of a stellar 'Neupert effect' which is a strong signature of chromospheric evaporation models. We then argue that the known spatial correlation of white-light emission with hard X-ray emission in solar flares, and the identification of the hard X-ray emission with nonthermal bremsstrahlung produced by accelerated electrons, provides evidence that flare heating on dMe stars is produced by the same electron precipitation mechanism that is inferred to occur on the Sun. We provide a thorough picture of the physical processes that are operative during the largest EUV flare, compare and contrast this picture with the canonical solar flare model, and conclude that the coronal loop length may be the most important factor in determining the flare rise time and energetics.

  3. Heating and Cooling of Flare Loops in a C5.7 Two-ribbon Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Sarah; Qiu, Jiong

    2016-05-01

    Heating and cooling of flare plasmas can be studied using models constrained by observations. In this work, we analyze and model thermal evolution of a C5.7 two-ribbon flare that occurred on December 26, 2011. The flare was observed by AIA. Two hundred flare loops are identified, which formed sequentially during one hour. Light curves of these flare loops in multiple EUV bands are analyzed to derive the duration and timing of flare emission in each bandpass. These timescales usually reflect cooling of flare plasmas from 10~MK to successively lower temperatures. We then use a zero-dimensional enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops (EBTEL) model to study flare heating and cooling. Several variations on the EBTEL model are assessed. The first model uses an impulsive heating function inferred from the rapid rise of the foot-point UV emission. Synthetic emission from this model evolves and decays more quickly than the observations, as many models do. Two other variations on the model are analyzed, in an attempt to counter this. In one variation the heating function is a combination of an impulsive pulse followed by an extended tail (i.e., continuous heating). The other model uses reduced thermal conduction to slow the flares evolution. These models are compared with one another and the observations, to evaluate effects of different mechanisms governing the thermal evolution of flare plasmas.

  4. The structure, stability and flaring of solar coronal loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Hoven, G.

    1982-01-01

    A review is given of recent progress in the theory of the magnetohydrodynamic behavior of coronal loops, beginning with a brief characterization of thy observations. The equilibrium magnetic field is described, along with the consequences of the empirical requirement for short-term, or infinite-conductivity, stability which is shown to be dominated by the end-effect influence of thy quasi-rigid photosphere. A new loop-flare model is then developed, which takes account of the finite loop length. The primary resistive-sausage-mode instability exhibits the necessary threshold behavior, and produces a number of spatially and energetically distinct flare-release manifestations.

  5. FINE STRUCTURES AND OVERLYING LOOPS OF CONFINED SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun; Xiang, Yongyuan

    2014-10-01

    Using the Hα observations from the New Vacuum Solar Telescope at the Fuxian Solar Observatory, we focus on the fine structures of three confined flares and the issue why all the three flares are confined instead of eruptive. All the three confined flares take place successively at the same location and have similar morphologies, so can be termed homologous confined flares. In the simultaneous images obtained by the Solar Dynamics Observatory, many large-scale coronal loops above the confined flares are clearly observed in multi-wavelengths. At the pre-flare stage, two dipoles emerge near the negative sunspot, and the dipolar patches are connected by small loops appearing as arch-shaped Hα fibrils. There exists a reconnection between the small loops, and thus the Hα fibrils change their configuration. The reconnection also occurs between a set of emerging Hα fibrils and a set of pre-existing large loops, which are rooted in the negative sunspot, a nearby positive patch, and some remote positive faculae, forming a typical three-legged structure. During the flare processes, the overlying loops, some of which are tracked by activated dark materials, do not break out. These direct observations may illustrate the physical mechanism of confined flares, i.e., magnetic reconnection between the emerging loops and the pre-existing loops triggers flares and the overlying loops prevent the flares from being eruptive.

  6. Magnetic confinement effects on the particle escape from the loop top in stochastic acceleration models for solar flares.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Effenberger, F.; Petrosian, V.

    2015-12-01

    Stochastic acceleration scenarios are among the most promising candidates to explain the high energies attained by particles in solar flares. Recent progress in the determination of fundamental acceleration parameters using novel techniques for the inversion of high resolution RHESSI hard X-ray spectra allows to determine non-thermal electron spectra at the loop top and foot points of a flare loop (Chen & Petrosian 2014). One outcome of this work is that the trapping and escape of the electrons is governed by wave particle scatterings and convergence of magnetic lines of force. Here, we present a computational study of the transport and escape processes of particles in the acceleration region. We employ a Fokker-Planck model, which includes pitch-angle scattering and magnetic mirroring in a non-uniform magnetic field. This allows to test analytical approximations for the particle escape times in the loop top region, which are helpful to constrain the key particle acceleration parameters. New perspectives will be given on how the insights gained from the analysis of the particle confinement will enable subsequent studies of a broader class of solar flares.

  7. New flare diagnostics from loop modeling of a stellar flare observedwith XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reale, F.

    XMM-Newton data of an X-ray flare observed on Proxima Centauri provide detailed and challenging constraints for flare modeling. The comparison of the data with the results of time-dependent hydrodynamic loop modeling of this flare allows us to constrain not only the loop morphology, but also the details of the heating function. The results show that even a complex flare event like this can be described with a relatively few - though constrained - components: two loop systems, i.e. a single loop and an arcade, and two heat components, an intense pulse probably located at the loop footpoints followed by a low gradual decay distributed in the coronal part of the loop. The similarity to at least one solar event (the Bastille Day flare in 2000) indicate that this pattern may be common to solar and stellar flares.

  8. Flare diagnostics from loop modeling of a stellar flare observed with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reale, Fabio

    2006-01-01

    XMM-Newton data of an X-ray flare observed on Proxima Centauri provide detailed and challenging constraints for flare modeling. The comparison of the data with the results of time-dependent hydrodynamic loop modeling of this flare allows us to constrain not only the loop morphology, but also the details of the heating function. The results show that even a complex flare event like this can be described with a relatively few though constrained components: two loop systems, i.e., a single loop and an arcade, and two heat components, an intense pulse probably located at the loop footpoints followed by a low gradual decay distributed in the coronal part of the loop. The similarity to at least one solar event (the Bastille Day flare in 2000) indicates that this pattern may be common to solar and stellar flares.

  9. Large-scale electric fields in post-flare loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinata, Satoshi

    1987-01-01

    As the electrical conductivity along the magnetic field in the solar atmosphere is large, parallel electric fields have been neglected in most investigations. The importance of such fields is demonstrated for post-flare loops, and a model for them is introduced which takes into account the effect of parallel electric fields. The electric field calculated from the model is consistent with the electric field observed by Foukal et al. (1983).

  10. HEATING OF FLARE LOOPS WITH OBSERVATIONALLY CONSTRAINED HEATING FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Jiong; Liu Wenjuan; Longcope, Dana W.

    2012-06-20

    We analyze high-cadence high-resolution observations of a C3.2 flare obtained by AIA/SDO on 2010 August 1. The flare is a long-duration event with soft X-ray and EUV radiation lasting for over 4 hr. Analysis suggests that magnetic reconnection and formation of new loops continue for more than 2 hr. Furthermore, the UV 1600 Angstrom-Sign observations show that each of the individual pixels at the feet of flare loops is brightened instantaneously with a timescale of a few minutes, and decays over a much longer timescale of more than 30 minutes. We use these spatially resolved UV light curves during the rise phase to construct empirical heating functions for individual flare loops, and model heating of coronal plasmas in these loops. The total coronal radiation of these flare loops are compared with soft X-ray and EUV radiation fluxes measured by GOES and AIA. This study presents a method to observationally infer heating functions in numerous flare loops that are formed and heated sequentially by reconnection throughout the flare, and provides a very useful constraint to coronal heating models.

  11. Solar flares as cascades of reconnecting magnetic loops.

    PubMed

    Hughes, D; Paczuski, M; Dendy, R O; Helander, P; McClements, K G

    2003-04-01

    A model for the solar coronal magnetic field is proposed where multiple directed loops evolve in space and time. Loops injected at small scales are anchored by footpoints of opposite polarity moving randomly on a surface. Nearby footpoints of the same polarity aggregate, and loops can reconnect when they collide. This may trigger a cascade of further reconnection, representing a solar flare. Numerical simulations show that a power law distribution of flare energies emerges, associated with a scale-free network of loops, indicating self-organized criticality. PMID:12689272

  12. Solar flares as cascades of reconnecting magnetic loops.

    PubMed

    Hughes, D; Paczuski, M; Dendy, R O; Helander, P; McClements, K G

    2003-04-01

    A model for the solar coronal magnetic field is proposed where multiple directed loops evolve in space and time. Loops injected at small scales are anchored by footpoints of opposite polarity moving randomly on a surface. Nearby footpoints of the same polarity aggregate, and loops can reconnect when they collide. This may trigger a cascade of further reconnection, representing a solar flare. Numerical simulations show that a power law distribution of flare energies emerges, associated with a scale-free network of loops, indicating self-organized criticality.

  13. EVIDENCE OF SOLAR FLARE TRIGGERING DUE TO LOOP-LOOP INTERACTION CAUSED BY FOOTPOINT SHEAR MOTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pankaj; Srivastava, A. K.; Uddin, Wahab; Somov, B. V.; Manoharan, P. K.; Erdelyi, R. E-mail: aks@aries.res.i

    2010-11-10

    We analyze multi-wavelength data of an M7.9/1N class solar flare which occurred on 2006 April 27 in AR NOAA 10875. GOES soft X-ray images provide the most likely signature of two interacting loops and their reconnection, which triggers the solar flare. TRACE 195 A images also reveal the loop-loop interaction and the formation of 'X' points with converging motion ({approx}30 km s{sup -1}) at the reconnection site in between this interacting loop system. This provides evidence of progressive reconnection and flare maximization at the interaction site in the active region. The absence of type III radio bursts during this time period indicates no opening of magnetic field lines during the flare energy release, which implies that the change of field line connectivity/orientation occurred only during the loop-loop interaction and reconnection process. The Ondrejov dynamic radio spectrum shows an intense decimetric (DCIM) radio burst (2.5-4.5 GHz, duration {approx}3 minutes) during the flare initiation, which reveals the signature of particle acceleration from the reconnection site during loop-loop interaction. The double-peak structures at 4.9 and 8.8 GHz provide the most likely confirmatory signature of the loop-loop interaction at the flare site in the active region. RHESSI hard X-ray images also show the loop-top and footpoint sources of the corresponding two-loop system, which act like current-carrying flux tubes with resultant opposite magnetic fields and net force of attraction, and their coalescence during the flare maximum. We also suggest that the shear motion/rotation of the footpoint of the smaller loop, which is anchored in the opposite polarity spot, may be responsible for the flare energy buildup and its eventual release due to the loop-loop interaction.

  14. Forward Modeling of Standing Slow Modes in Flaring Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, D.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Banerjee, D.; Antolin, P.

    2015-07-01

    Standing slow-mode waves in hot flaring loops are exclusively observed in spectrometers and are used to diagnose the magnetic field strength and temperature of the loop structure. Owing to the lack of spatial information, the longitudinal mode cannot be effectively identified. In this study, we simulate standing slow-mode waves in flaring loops and compare the synthesized line emission properties with Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation spectrographic and Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly imaging observations. We find that the emission intensity and line width oscillations are a quarter period out of phase with Doppler shift velocity in both time and spatial domain, which can be used to identify a standing slow-mode wave from spectroscopic observations. However, the longitudinal overtones could only be measured with the assistance of imagers. We find emission intensity asymmetry in the positive and negative modulations this is because the contribution function pertaining to the atomic emission process responds differently to positive and negative temperature variations. One may detect half periodicity close to the loop apex, where emission intensity modulation is relatively small. The line-of-sight projection affects the observation of Doppler shift significantly. A more accurate estimate of the amplitude of velocity perturbation is obtained by de-projecting the Doppler shift by a factor of 1–2θ/π rather than the traditionally used {cos}θ . If a loop is heated to the hotter wing, the intensity modulation could be overwhelmed by background emission, while the Doppler shift velocity could still be detected to a certain extent.

  15. Inferring Flare Loop Parameters with Measurements of Standing Sausage Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ming-Zhe; Chen, Shao-Xia; Li, Bo; Xia, Li-Dong; Yu, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Standing fast sausage modes in flare loops were suggested to account for a considerable number of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in the light curves of solar flares. This study continues our investigation into the possibility of inverting the measured periods P and damping times τ of sausage modes to deduce the transverse Alfvén time R/v_{Ai}, density contrast ρi/ρe, and the steepness of the density distribution transverse to flare loops. A generic dispersion relation governing linear sausage modes is derived for pressureless cylinders where density inhomogeneity of arbitrary form takes place within the cylinder. We show that in general the inversion problem is under-determined for QPP events where only a single sausage mode exists, whether the measurements are spatially resolved or unresolved. While R/v_{Ai} can be inferred to some extent, the range of possible steepness parameters may be too broad to be useful. However, for spatially resolved measurements where an additional mode is present, it is possible to deduce self-consistently ρi/ρe, the profile steepness, and the internal Alfvén speed v_{Ai}. We show that at least for a recent QPP event that involves a fundamental kink mode in addition to a sausage one, flare loop parameters are well constrained even if the specific form of the transverse density distribution remains unknown. We conclude that spatially resolved, multi-mode QPP measurements need to be pursued to infer flare loop parameters.

  16. Ion energy storage for post-flare loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.

    1985-01-01

    Low-energy non-thermal protons may have long lifetimes in coronal loops with low density and high temperature. If energy were stored in such protons in the initial phases of a solar flare, it could be released slowly during the later phases. Within the present observational limits for post-flare loops, this mechanism should be considered in addition to a field-line reconnection theory of the Kopp and Pneuman type. The thin-target gamma ray emission from the trapped protons is below present limits, but more sensitive observations can test the hypothesis.

  17. FAST CONTRACTION OF CORONAL LOOPS AT THE FLARE PEAK

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Rui; Wang Haimin

    2010-05-01

    On 2005 September 8, a coronal loop overlying the active region NOAA 10808 was observed in TRACE 171 A to contract at {approx}100 km s{sup -1} at the peak of an X5.4-2B flare at 21:05 UT. Prior to the fast contraction, the loop underwent a much slower contraction at {approx}6 km s{sup -1} for about 8 minutes, initiating during the flare preheating phase. The sudden switch to fast contraction is presumably corresponding to the onset of the impulsive phase. The contraction resulted in the oscillation of a group of loops located below, with the period of about 10 minutes. Meanwhile, the contracting loop exhibited a similar oscillatory pattern superimposed on the dominant downward motion. We suggest that the fast contraction reflects a suddenly reduced magnetic pressure underneath due either to (1) the eruption of magnetic structures located at lower altitudes or to (2) the rapid conversion of magnetic free energy in the flare core region. Electrons accelerated in the shrinking trap formed by the contracting loop can theoretically contribute to a late-phase hard X-ray burst, which is associated with Type IV radio emission. To complement the X5.4 flare which was probably confined, a similar event observed in SOHO/EIT 195 A on 2004 July 20 in an eruptive, M8.6 flare is briefly described, in which the contraction was followed by the expansion of the same loop leading up to a halo coronal mass ejection. These observations further substantiate the conjecture of coronal implosion and suggest coronal implosion as a new exciter mechanism for coronal loop oscillations.

  18. ANTI-PHASE SIGNATURE OF FLARE GENERATED TRANSVERSE LOOP OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. S.; Verwichte, E.; Foullon, C.

    2013-09-10

    Transverse loop oscillations observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft are studied after an impulsive solar flare eruption on 2012 May 8. We have found that a transversely oscillating coronal loop seen in the 171 A bandpass oscillates in anti-phase with respect to adjacent larger loops seen in the 193 A and 211 A bandpasses. These unusual oscillations are analyzed to investigate the excitation mechanism responsible for their initial inwardly directed anti-phase behavior. The transverse oscillations are analyzed by constructing space-time diagrams from cuts made parallel to the projected loop displacements. The displacement time oscillation profiles are background subtracted and fitted with a damped cosine curve that includes a linear change in the period with time. The local magnetic topology of the active region is modeled using potential field source surface extrapolation. It reveals that the loops are anchored in different topological regions with foot point locations identified on either side of the EUV flare peak emission source. In this context, the oscillation characteristics indicate that the excitation mechanism is closely linked to the local magnetic field topology and the reconnection generated wave dynamics in the active region rather than following an external flare blast wave. We discuss how observations such as these may serve to identify reconnection processes in similar quadrupolar active regions.

  19. RE-FLARING OF A POST-FLARE LOOP SYSTEM DRIVEN BY FLUX ROPE EMERGENCE AND TWISTING

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Guo, Y.; Zhang, J.; Jing, J.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2010-06-10

    In this Letter, we study in detail the evolution of the post-flare loops on 2005 January 15 that occurred between two consecutive solar eruption events, both of which generated a fast halo coronal mass ejection (CME) and a major flare. The post-flare loop system, formed after the first CME/flare eruption, evolved rapidly, as manifested by the unusual accelerating rise motion of the loops. Through nonlinear force-free field models, we obtain the magnetic structure over the active region. It clearly shows that the flux rope below the loops also kept rising, accompanied with increasing twist and length. Finally, the post-flare magnetic configuration evolved to a state that resulted in the second CME/flare eruption. This is an event in which the post-flare loops can re-flare in a short period of {approx}16 hr following the first CME/flare eruption. The observed re-flaring at the same location is likely driven by the rapid evolution of the flux rope caused by the magnetic flux emergence and the rotation of the sunspot. This observation provides valuable information on CME/flare models and their prediction.

  20. Accelerated particles and their observational signatures from confined solar flares in twisted coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, Philippa; Kontar, Eduard; Vilmer, Nicole; Gordovskyy, Mykola; Pinto, Rui; Bian, Nicolas

    Twisted magnetic fields provide a reservoir of free magnetic energy, and are ubiquitous in the solar corona. Recent theoretical studies suggest that the onset of the kink instability in twisted coronal loops may generate fragmented current sheets throughout the loop, leading to fast magnetic reconnection which dissipates magnetic energy. This provides a viable model for small self-contained flares. Using a combination of 3D MHD and guiding-centre test-particle simulations, incorporating collisions with the background plasma, we study the kinetics of non-thermal particles accelerated during magnetic reconnection in a flaring twisted coronal loop. It is shown that this model can provide the number of high-energy electrons and acceleration efficiency comparable with those obtained from observations of small flares. We consider various geometries: including idealised cylindrical loop models, as well as, more realistically, curved loops. The effects of gravitational stratification, which has very significant effects on the non-thermal particles through collisions, are included. The calculated loop temperatures and densities, and the energy spectra and pitch-angles of the accelerated particles, are used to forward-model the emission in both Soft X-rays and Hard X-rays, predicting spatial distributions and temporal evolution, as well as radio emission arising from cyclotron/synchrotron radiation. These properties may be compared with observations.

  1. OBSERVATIONS OF RECONNECTING FLARE LOOPS WITH THE ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Harry P.; Sheeley, Neil R. Jr.; O'Brien, Casey M.

    2011-12-01

    Perhaps the most compelling evidence for the role of magnetic reconnection in solar flares comes from the supra-arcade downflows that have been observed above many post-flare loop arcades. These downflows are thought to be related to highly non-potential field lines that have reconnected and are propagating away from the current sheet. We present new observations of supra-arcade downflows taken with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The morphology and dynamics of the downflows observed with AIA provide new evidence for the role of magnetic reconnection in solar flares. With these new observations we are able to measure downflows originating at larger heights than in previous studies. We find, however, that the initial velocities measured here ({approx}144 km s{sup -1}) are well below the Alfven speed expected in the lower corona, and consistent with previous results. We also find no evidence that the downflows brighten with time, as would be expected from chromospheric evaporation. These observations suggest that simple two-dimensional models cannot explain the detailed observations of solar flares.

  2. Signatures of current loop coalescence in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakai, J.; Nakajima, H.; Zaidman, E.; Tajima, T.; Kosugi, T.; Brunel, F.

    1986-01-01

    The nonlinear coalescence instability of current carrying solar loops can explain many of the characteristics of the solar flares such as their impulsive nature, heating and high energy particle acceleration, amplitude oscillations of electromagnetic emission as well as the characteristics of 2-D microwave images obtained during a solar flare. The physical characteristics of the explosive coalescence of currents are presented in detail through computer simulation and theory. Canonical characteristics of the explosive coalescence are: (1) a large amount of impulsive increase of kinetic energies of electrons and ions; (2) simultaneous heating and acceleration of electrons and ions in high and low energy spectra; (3) ensuing quasi-periodic amplitude oscillations in fields and particle quantities; and (4) the double peak (or triple peak) structure in these profiles, participate in the coalescence process, yielding varieties of phenomena.

  3. DETERMINING HEATING RATES IN RECONNECTION FORMED FLARE LOOPS OF THE M8.0 FLARE ON 2005 MAY 13

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Wenjuan; Qiu Jiong; Longcope, Dana W.; Caspi, Amir

    2013-06-20

    We analyze and model an M8.0 flare on 2005 May 13 observed by the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) to determine the energy release rate from magnetic reconnection that forms and heats numerous flare loops. The flare exhibits two ribbons in UV 1600 A emission. Analysis shows that the UV light curve at each flaring pixel rises impulsively within a few minutes, and decays slowly with a timescale longer than 10 minutes. Since the lower atmosphere (the transition region and chromosphere) responds to energy deposit nearly instantaneously, the rapid UV brightening is thought to reflect the energy release process in the newly formed flare loop rooted at the footpoint. In this paper, we utilize the spatially resolved (down to 1'') UV light curves and the thick-target hard X-ray emission to construct heating functions of a few thousand flare loops anchored at the UV footpoints, and compute plasma evolution in these loops using the enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops model. The modeled coronal temperatures and densities of these flare loops are then used to calculate coronal radiation. The computed soft X-ray spectra and light curves compare favorably with those observed by RHESSI and by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite X-ray Sensor. The time-dependent transition region differential emission measure for each loop during its decay phase is also computed with a simplified model and used to calculate the optically thin C IV line emission, which dominates the UV 1600 A bandpass during the flare. The computed C IV line emission decays at the same rate as observed. This study presents a method to constrain heating of reconnection-formed flare loops using all available observables independently, and provides insight into the physics of energy release and plasma heating during the flare. With this method, the lower limit of the total energy used to heat the flare loops in this event

  4. Well-observed dynamics of flaring and peripheral coronal magnetic loops during an M-class limb flare

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Jinhua; Zhou, Tuanhui; Ji, Haisheng; Feng, Li; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Inhester, Bernd

    2014-08-20

    In this paper, we present a variety of well-observed dynamic behaviors for the flaring and peripheral magnetic loops of the M6.6 class extreme limb flare that occurred on 2011 February 24 (SOL2011-02-24T07:20) from EUV observations by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory and X-ray observations by RHESSI. The flaring loop motion confirms the earlier contraction-expansion picture. We find that the U-shaped trajectory delineated by the X-ray corona source of the flare roughly follows the direction of a filament eruption associated with the flare. Different temperature structures of the coronal source during the contraction and expansion phases strongly suggest different kinds of magnetic reconnection processes. For some peripheral loops, we discover that their dynamics are closely correlated with the filament eruption. During the slow rising to abrupt, fast rising of the filament, overlying peripheral magnetic loops display different responses. Two magnetic loops on the elbow of the active region had a slow descending motion followed by an abrupt successive fast contraction, while magnetic loops on the top of the filament were pushed outward, slowly being inflated for a while and then erupting as a moving front. We show that the filament activation and eruption play a dominant role in determining the dynamics of the overlying peripheral coronal magnetic loops.

  5. The first observed stellar X-ray flare oscillation: Constraints on the flare loop length and the magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra-Kraev, U.; Harra, L. K.; Williams, D. R.; Kraev, E.

    2005-06-01

    We present the first X-ray observation of an oscillation during a stellar flare. The flare occurred on the active M-type dwarf AT Mic and was observed with XMM-Newton. The soft X-ray light curve (0.2-12 keV) is investigated with wavelet analysis. The flare's extended, flat peak shows clear evidence for a damped oscillation with a period of around 750 s, an exponential damping time of around 2000 s, and an initial, relative peak-to-peak amplitude of around 15%. We suggest that the oscillation is a standing magneto-acoustic wave tied to the flare loop, and find that the most likely interpretation is a longitudinal, slow-mode wave, with a resulting loop length of (2.5 ± 0.2)×1010 cm. The local magnetic field strength is found to be 105 ± 50 G. These values are consistent with (oscillation-independent) flare cooling time models and pressure balance scaling laws. Such a flare oscillation provides an excellent opportunity to obtain coronal properties like the size of a flare loop or the local magnetic field strength for the otherwise spatially-unresolved star.

  6. A unified view of coronal loop contraction and oscillation in flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, A. J. B.; Simões, P. J. A.; Fletcher, L.

    2015-09-01

    Context. Transverse loop oscillations and loop contractions are commonly associated with solar flares, but the two types of motion have traditionally been regarded as separate phenomena. Aims: We present an observation of coronal loops that contract and oscillate following the onset of a flare. We aim to explain why both behaviours are seen together and why only some of the loops oscillate. Methods: A time sequence of SDO/AIA 171 Å images is analysed to identify the positions of coronal loops following the onset of the M6.4 flare SOL2012-03-09T03:53. We focus on five loops in particular, all of which contract during the flare, with three of them oscillating as well. A simple model is then developed for the contraction and oscillation of a coronal loop. Results: We propose that coronal loop contractions and oscillations can occur in a single response to removal of magnetic energy from the corona. Our model reproduces the various types of loop motion observed and explains why the highest loops oscillate during their contraction, while no oscillation is detected for the shortest contracting loops. The proposed framework suggests that loop motions can be used as a diagnostic for the removal of coronal magnetic energy by flares, while rapid decrease in coronal magnetic energy is a newly identified excitation mechanism for transverse loop oscillations. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org Warning, no authors found for 2015A&A...581A..14.

  7. Quasi-periodic processes in the flare loop generated by sudden temperature enhancements at loop footpoints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, M.; Jelínek, P.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: During the impulsive flare phase, the plasma at the flare loop footpoints is rapidly heated by particle beams. In the present paper, we study processes that occur after this sudden heating in a two-dimensional magnetic loop. Methods: We adopt a 2D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, in which we solve a full set of the ideal time-dependent MHD equations by means of the FLASH code, using the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) method. Periods in the processes are estimated by the wavelet analysis technique. Results: We consider a model of the solar atmosphere with a symmetric magnetic loop. The length of this loop in the corona is approximately 21.5 Mm. At both loop footpoints, at the transition region, we initiate the Gaussian temperature (pressure) perturbation with the maximum temperature 14, 7, or 3.5 times higher than the unperturbed temperature. In the corona, the perturbations produce supersonic blast shocks with the Mach number of about 1.1, but well below Alfvén velocities. We consider cases with the same perturbations at both footpoints (symmetric case) and one with different perturbations (asymmetric case). In the symmetric case, the shocks move along both loop legs upwards to the top of the loop, where they interact and form a transient compressed region. Then they continue in their motion to the transition region at the opposite side of the loop, where they are reflected upwards, and so on. At the top of the loop, the shock appears periodically with the period of about 170 s. In the loop legs during this period, a double peak of the plasma parameters, which is connected with two arrivals of shocks, is detected: firstly, when the shock moves up and then when the shock, propagating from the opposite loop leg, moves down. Increasing the distance of the detection point in the loop leg from the top of the loop, the time interval between these shock arrivals increases. Thus, at these detection points, the processes with shorter periods can be detected. After

  8. Onset of electron acceleration in a flare loop

    SciTech Connect

    Sharykin, Ivan; Liu, Siming; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2014-09-20

    We carried out a detailed analysis of X-ray and radio observations of a simple flare loop that occurred on 2002 August 12, with the impulsive hard X-ray (HXR) light curves dominated by a single pulse. The emission spectra of the early impulsive phase are consistent with an isothermal model in the coronal loop with a temperature reaching several keV. A power-law high-energy spectral tail is evident near the HXR peak time, in accordance with the appearance of footpoints at high energies, and is well correlated with the radio emission. The energy content of the thermal component keeps increasing gradually after the disappearance of this nonthermal component. These results suggest that electron acceleration only covers the central period of a longer and more gradual energy dissipation process and that the electron transport within the loop plays a crucial role in the formation of the inferred power-law electron distribution. The spectral index of power-law photons shows a very gradual evolution, indicating that the electron accelerator is in a quasi-steady state, which is confirmed by radio observations. These results are consistent with the theory of stochastic electron acceleration from a thermal background. Advanced modeling with coupled electron acceleration and spatial transport processes is needed to explain these observations more quantitatively, which may reveal the dependence of the electron acceleration on the spatial structure of the acceleration region.

  9. Coronal seismology of flare-excited longitudinal slow magnetoacoustic waves in hot coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Ofman, L.; Sun, X.; Provornikova, E. A.; Davila, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The flare-excited longitudinal intensity oscillations in hot flaring loops have been recently detected by SDO/AIA in 94 and 131 bandpasses. These oscillations show similar physical properties (such as period, decay time, and trigger) as those slow-mode standing waves previously detected by the SOHO/SUMER spectrometer in Doppler shift of flare lines formed above 6 MK. The multi-wavelength AIA observations with high spatio-temporal resolution and wide temperature coverage enable us to measure both thermal and wave properties of the oscillating hot plasma with unprecedented accuracy. These new measurements can be used to diagnose the complicated energy transport processes in flare plasma by a technique called coronal seismology based on the combination of observations and MHD wave theory. From a detailed case study we have found evidence for thermal conduction suppression in hot loops by measuring the polytropic index and analyzing the phase relationship between the temperature and density wave signals. This result is not only crucial for better understanding the wave dissipation mechanism but also provides an alternative mechanism to explain the puzzles of long-duration events and X-ray loop-top sources which show much slower cooling than expected by the classical Spitzer conductive cooling. This finding may also shed a light on the coronal heating problem because weak thermal conductivity implies slower cooling of hot plasma in nanoflares, so increasing the average coronal temperature for the same heating rate. We will discuss the effects of thermal conduction suppression on the wave damping and loop cooling based on MHD simulations.

  10. KINETIC ALFVEN TURBULENCE AND PARALLEL ELECTRIC FIELDS IN FLARE LOOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J. S.; Wu, D. J.; Lu, J. Y.

    2013-04-20

    This study investigates the spectral structure of the kinetic Alfven turbulence in the low-beta plasmas. We consider a strong turbulence resulting from collisions between counterpropagating wavepackets with equal energy. Our results show that (1) the spectra of the magnetic and electric field fluctuations display a transition at the electron inertial length scale, (2) the turbulence cascades mainly toward the magnetic field direction as the cascade scale is smaller than the electron inertial length, and (3) the parallel electric field increases as the turbulent scale decreases. We also show that the parallel electric field in the solar flare loops can be 10{sup 2}-10{sup 4} times the Dreicer field as the turbulence reaches the electron inertial length scale.

  11. Above-the-loop-top Oscillation and Quasi-periodic Coronal Wave Generation in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takasao, Shinsuke; Shibata, Kazunari

    2016-06-01

    Observations revealed that various kinds of oscillations are excited in solar flare regions. Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in flare emissions are commonly observed in a wide range of wavelengths. Recent observations have found that fast-mode magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are quasi-periodically emitted from some flaring sites (quasi-periodic propagating fast-mode magnetoacoustic waves; QPFs). Both QPPs and QPFs imply a cyclic disturbance originating from the flaring sites. However, the physical mechanisms remain puzzling. By performing a set of two-dimensional MHD simulations of a solar flare, we discovered the local oscillation above the loops filled with evaporated plasma (above-the-loop-top region) and the generation of QPFs from such oscillating regions. Unlike all previous models for QPFs, our model includes essential physics for solar flares such as magnetic reconnection, heat conduction, and chromospheric evaporation. We revealed that QPFs can be spontaneously excited by the above-the-loop-top oscillation. We found that this oscillation is controlled by the backflow of the reconnection outflow. The new model revealed that flare loops and the above-the-loop-top region are full of shocks and waves, which is different from the previous expectations based on a standard flare model and previous simulations. In this paper, we show the QPF generation process based on our new picture of flare loops and will briefly discuss a possible relationship between QPFs and QPPs. Our findings will change the current view of solar flares to a new view in which they are a very dynamic phenomenon full of shocks and waves.

  12. Electron Densities in Solar Flare Loops, Chromospheric Evaporation Upflows, and Acceleration Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benz, Arnold O.

    1996-01-01

    We compare electron densities measured at three different locations in solar flares: (1) in Soft X-Ray (SXR) loops, determined from SXR emission measures and loop diameters from Yohkoh Soft X-Ray Telescope maps (n(sub e, sup SXR) = (0.2-2.5) x 10(exp 11)/ cu cm); (2) in chromospheric evaporation upflows, inferred from plasma frequency cutoffs of decimetric radio bursts detected with the 0.1-3 GHz spectrometer Phoenix of ETH Zuerich (n(sub e, sup upflow) = (0.3-11) x 10(exp 10)/cu cm; and (3) in acceleration sites, inferred from the plasma frequency at the separatrix between upward-accelerated (type III bursts) and downward-accelerated (reverse-drift bursts) electron beams [n(sub e, sup acc) = (0.6-10) x 10(exp 9)/cu cm]. The comparison of these density measurements, obtained from 44 flare episodes (during 14 different flares), demonstrates the compatibility of flare plasma density diagnostics with SXR and radio methods. The density in the upflowing plasma is found to be somewhat lower than in the filled loops, having ratios in a range n(sub e, sup upflow)/n(sub e, sup SXR) = 0.02-1.3, and a factor of 3.6 higher behind the upflow front. The acceleration sites are found to have a much lower density than the SXR-bright flare loops, i.e., n(sub e, sup acc)/n(sub e, sup SXR) = 0.005- 0.13, and thus must be physically displaced from the SXR-bright flare loops. The scaling law between electron time-of-flight distances l' and loop half-lengths s, l'/s = 1.4 +/- 0.3, recently established by Aschwanden et al. suggests that the centroid of the acceleration region is located above the SXR-bright flare loop, as envisioned in cusp geometries (e.g., in magnetic reconnection models).

  13. MODELING OF GYROSYNCHROTRON RADIO EMISSION PULSATIONS PRODUCED BY MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC LOOP OSCILLATIONS IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Mossessian, George; Fleishman, Gregory D.

    2012-04-01

    A quantitative study of the observable radio signatures of the sausage, kink, and torsional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillation modes in flaring coronal loops is performed. Considering first non-zero order effect of these various MHD oscillation modes on the radio source parameters such as magnetic field, line of sight, plasma density and temperature, electron distribution function, and the source dimensions, we compute time-dependent radio emission (spectra and light curves). The radio light curves (of both flux density and degree of polarization) at all considered radio frequencies are then quantified in both time domain (via computation of the full modulation amplitude as a function of frequency) and in Fourier domain (oscillation spectra, phases, and partial modulation amplitude) to form the signatures specific to a particular oscillation mode and/or source parameter regime. We found that the parameter regime and the involved MHD mode can indeed be distinguished using the quantitative measures derived in the modeling. We apply the developed approach to analyze radio burst recorded by Owens Valley Solar Array and report possible detection of the sausage mode oscillation in one (partly occulted) flare and kink or torsional oscillations in another flare.

  14. Multi-thermal observations of newly formed loops in a dynamic flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svestka, Zdenek F.; Fontenla, Juan M.; Machado, Marcos E.; Martin, Sara F.; Neidig, Donald F.

    1987-01-01

    The dynamic flare of November 6, 1980 (max at about 15:26 UT) developed a rich system of growing loops which could be followed in H-alpha for 1.5 hr. Throughout the flare, these loops, near the limb, were seen in emission against the disk. Theoretical computations of deviations from LTE populations for a hydrogen atom reveal that this requires electron densities in the loops close to, or in excess of 10 to the 12th/cu cm. From measured widths of higher Balmer lines the density at the tops of the loops was found to be 4 x 10 to the 12th/cu cm if no nonthermal motions were present, or 5 x 10 to the 11th/cu cm for a turbulent velocity of about 12 km/s. It is now general knowledge that flare loops are initially observed in X-rays and become visible in H-alpha only after cooling. For such a high density, a loop would cool through radiation from 10 to the 7th to 10 to the 4th K within a few minutes so that the dense H-alpha loops should have heights very close to the heights of the X-ray loops. This, however, contradicts the observations obtained by the HXIS and FCS instruments on board SMM which show the X-ray loops at much higher altitudes than the loops in H-alpha. Therefore, it is suggested that the density must have been significantly lower when the loops were formed, and that the flare loops were apparently both shrinking and increasing in density while cooling.

  15. Post-flare loops embedded in a hot coronal fan-like structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svestka, Z.; Farnik, F.; Hudson, H. S.; Hick, P.

    1997-01-01

    Limb events were demonstrated on the sun in which rising post-flare loops were embedded in hot structures looking in soft X-rays like fans of rays, formed during the flare and extending high into the corona. One of these structures is analyzed and it is suggested that these fans of rays represent temporary ministreamers, along which mass flows into interplanetary space. This suggestion is supported by maps of solar wind density constructed from scintillation measurements.

  16. SDO/AIA Observation and Modeling of Flare-excited Slow Waves in Hot Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Ofman, L.; Provornikova, E.; Sun, X.; Davila, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The flare-excited standing slow waves were first detected by SOHO/SUMER as Doppler shift oscillations in hot (>6 MK) coronal loops. It has been suggested that they are excited by small or micro- flares at one loop's footpoint. However, the detailed excitation mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we report an oscillation event observed by SDO/AIA in the 131 channel. The intensity disturbances excited by a C-class flare propagated back and forth along a hot loop for about two period with a strong damping. From the measured oscillation period and loop length, we estimate the wave phase speed to be about 410 km/s. Using a regularized DEM analysis we determine the loop temperature and electron density evolution and find that the loop plasma is heated to a temperature of 8-12 MK with a mean about 9 MK. These measurements support the interpretation as slow magnetoacousic waves. Magnetic field extrapolation suggests that the flare is triggered by slipping and null-point-type reconnections in a fan-spine magnetic topology, and the injected (or impulsively evaporated) hot plasmas flowing along the large spine field lines form the oscillating hot loops. To understand why the propagating waves but not the standing waves as observed previously are excited in this event, we preform simulations using a 3D MHD model based on the observed magnetic configuration including full energy equation. Our simulations indicate that the nature of loop temperature structure is critical for the excitation of whether propagating or standing waves in a hot loop. Our result demonstrates that the slow waves may be used for heating diagnostics of coronal loops with coronal seismology. We also discuss the application of coronal seismology for estimating the average magnetic field strength in the hot loop based on the observed slow waves.

  17. Dark Post-flare Loops Observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Qiao; Wang, Jing-Song; Feng, Xueshang; Zhang, Xiaoxin

    2016-04-01

    Solar post-flare loops (PFLs) are arcade-like loop systems that appear during the gradual phases of eruptive flares. The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) allow us to investigate the fine structures in PFLs. In this work, we focus on studying the dark post-flare loops (DPFLs) during X-class flares, which are more evident in SDO/AIA data than in previous EUV data. We identify and analyze the DPFLs observed by SDO and find that: (1) the DPFLs of an X5.4 flare have an average lifetime of 10.0 ± 5.5 minutes, an average width of 1022 ± 339 km, and an average maximum length of 33 ± 10 Mm, (2) blob-like falling features with a size close to the resolution of SDO/AIA are identified in the DPFLs and have an average velocity of 76 ± 19 km s‑1, and (3) the average widths of the DPFLs slightly increase with the characteristic temperatures in the AIA 304, 171, 193, and 211 Å channels. Our investigation shows that DPFLs are found in all of the 20 cases within this study, which suggests that they are a common phenomenon in X-class flares and are probably produced by the same mechanism that creates coronal rain.

  18. An equation for the evolution of solar and stellar flare loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, George H.; Hawley, Suzanne L.

    1990-01-01

    An ordinary differential equation describing the evolution of a coronal loop subjected to a spatially uniform but time-varying heating rate is discussed. It is assumed that the duration of heating is long compared to the sound transit time through the loop, which is assumed to have uniform cross section area. The form of the equation changes as the loop evolves through three states: 'strong evaporation', 'scaling law behavior', and 'strong condensation'. Solutions to the equation may be used to compute the time dependence of the average coronal temperature and emission measure for an assumed temporal variation of the flare heating rate. The results computed from the model agree reasonably well with recent published numerical simulations and may be obtained with far less computational effort. The model is then used to study the May 21, 1980, solar flare observed by SMM and the giant April 12, 1985, flare observed on the star AD Leo.

  19. MAGNETIC RECONNECTION: FROM 'OPEN' EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET LOOPS TO CLOSED POST-FLARE ONES OBSERVED BY SDO

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Yang, Shuhong; Li, Ting; Zhang, Yuzong; Li, Leping; Jiang, Chaowei E-mail: shuhongyang@nao.cas.cn E-mail: yuzong@nao.cas.cn E-mail: cwjiang@spaceweather.ac.cn

    2013-10-10

    We employ Solar Dynamics Observatory observations and select three well-observed events including two flares and one extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) brightening. During the three events, the EUV loops clearly changed. One event was related to a major solar flare that took place on 2012 July 12 in active region NOAA AR 11520. 'Open' EUV loops rooted in a facula of the AR deflected to the post-flare loops and then merged with them while the flare ribbon approached the facula. Meanwhile, 'open' EUV loops rooted in a pore disappeared from top to bottom as the flare ribbon swept over the pore. The loop evolution was similar in the low-temperature channels (e.g., 171 Å) and the high-temperature channels (e.g., 94 Å). The coronal magnetic fields extrapolated from the photospheric vector magnetograms also show that the fields apparently 'open' prior to the flare become closed after it. The other two events were associated with a B1.1 flare on 2010 May 24 and an EUV brightening on 2013 January 03, respectively. During both of these two events, some 'open' loops either disappeared or darkened before the formation of new closed loops. We suggest that the observations reproduce the picture predicted by the standard magnetic reconnection model: 'open' magnetic fields become closed due to reconnection, manifesting as a transformation from 'open' EUV loops to closed post-flare ones.

  20. Global Sausage Oscillation of Solar Flare Loops Detected by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Hui; Young, Peter R.; Reeves, Katharine K.; Wang, Tongjiang; Antolin, Patrick; Chen, Bin; He, Jiansen

    2016-05-01

    An observation from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph reveals coherent oscillations in the loops of an M1.6 flare on 2015 March 12. Both the intensity and Doppler shift of Fe xxi 1354.08 Å show clear oscillations with a period of ˜25 s. Remarkably similar oscillations were also detected in the soft X-ray flux recorded by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). With an estimated phase speed of ˜2420 km s-1 and a derived electron density of at least 5.4 × 1010 cm-3, the observed short-period oscillation is most likely the global fast sausage mode of a hot flare loop. We find a phase shift of ˜π/2 (1/4 period) between the Doppler shift oscillation and the intensity/GOES oscillations, which is consistent with a recent forward modeling study of the sausage mode. The observed oscillation requires a density contrast between the flare loop and coronal background of a factor ≥42. The estimated phase speed of the global mode provides a lower limit of the Alfvén speed outside the flare loop. We also find an increase of the oscillation period, which might be caused by the separation of the loop footpoints with time.

  1. IMPLOSION OF CORONAL LOOPS DURING THE IMPULSIVE PHASE OF A SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Simões, P. J. A.; Fletcher, L.; Hudson, H. S.; Russell, A. J. B. E-mail: lyndsay.fletcher@glasgow.ac.uk E-mail: hhudson@ssl.berkeley.edu

    2013-11-10

    We study the relationship between implosive motions in a solar flare, and the energy redistribution in the form of oscillatory structures and particle acceleration. The flare SOL2012-03-09T03:53 (M6.4) shows clear evidence for an irreversible (stepwise) coronal implosion. Extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images show at least four groups of coronal loops at different heights overlying the flaring core undergoing fast contraction during the impulsive phase of the flare. These contractions start around a minute after the flare onset, and the rate of contraction is closely associated with the intensity of the hard X-ray and microwave emissions. They also seem to have a close relationship with the dimming associated with the formation of the coronal mass ejection and a global EUV wave. Several studies now have detected contracting motions in the corona during solar flares that can be interpreted as the implosion necessary to release energy. Our results confirm this, and tighten the association with the flare impulsive phase. We add to the phenomenology by noting the presence of oscillatory variations revealed by Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite soft X-rays (SXR) and spatially integrated EUV emission at 94 and 335 Å. We identify pulsations of ≈60 s in SXR and EUV data, which we interpret as persistent, semi-regular compressions of the flaring core region which modulate the plasma temperature and emission measure. The loop oscillations, observed over a large region, also allow us to provide rough estimates of the energy temporarily stored in the eigenmodes of the active-region structure as it approaches its new equilibrium.

  2. Modeling an X-ray flare on Proxima Centauri: Evidence of two flaring loop components and of two heating mechanisms at work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reale, F.; Güdel, M.; Peres, G.; Audard, M.

    2004-03-01

    We model in detail a flare observed on Proxima Centauri with the EPIC-PN on board XMM-Newton at high statistics and high time resolution and coverage. Time-dependent hydrodynamic loop modeling is used to describe the rise and peak of the light curve, and a large fraction of the decay, including its change of slope and a secondary maximum, over more than 2 h. The light curve, the emission measure and the temperature derived from the data allow us to constrain the loop morphology and the heating function and to show that this flare can be described with two components: a major one triggered by an intense heat pulse injected in a single flaring loop with half-length ≈1.0 × 1010 cm, the other one by less intense heat pulses released about 1/2 h after the first one in related loop systems, probably arcades, with the same half-length. The heat functions of the two loop systems appear very similar: an intense pulse located at the loop footpoints followed by a low gradual decay distributed in the coronal part of the loop. The latter result and the similarity to at least one solar event (the Bastille Day flare in 2000) indicate that this pattern may be common to solar and stellar flares. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member states and the USA (NASA).

  3. ANALYSIS AND MODELING OF TWO FLARE LOOPS OBSERVED BY AIA AND EIS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Ding, M. D.; Qiu, J.

    2012-10-10

    We analyze and model an M1.0 flare observed by SDO/AIA and Hinode/EIS to investigate how flare loops are heated and evolve subsequently. The flare is composed of two distinctive loop systems observed in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images. The UV 1600 A emission at the feet of these loops exhibits a rapid rise, followed by enhanced emission in different EUV channels observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). Such behavior is indicative of impulsive energy deposit and the subsequent response in overlying coronal loops that evolve through different temperatures. Using the method we recently developed, we infer empirical heating functions from the rapid rise of the UV light curves for the two loop systems, respectively, treating them as two big loops with cross-sectional area of 5'' by 5'', and compute the plasma evolution in the loops using the EBTEL model. We compute the synthetic EUV light curves, which, with the limitation of the model, reasonably agree with observed light curves obtained in multiple AIA channels and EIS lines: they show the same evolution trend and their magnitudes are comparable by within a factor of two. Furthermore, we also compare the computed mean enthalpy flow velocity with the Doppler shift measurements by EIS during the decay phase of the two loops. Our results suggest that the two different loops with different heating functions as inferred from their footpoint UV emission, combined with their different lengths as measured from imaging observations, give rise to different coronal plasma evolution patterns captured both in the model and in observations.

  4. Stochastic three-wave interaction in flaring solar loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Sharma, R. R.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1983-01-01

    A model is proposed for the dynamic structure of high-frequency microwave bursts. The dynamic component is attributed to beams of precipitating electrons which generate electrostatic waves in the upper hybrid branch. Coherent upconversion of the electrostatic waves to electromagnetic waves produces an intrinsically stochastic emission component which is superposed on the gyrosynchrotron continuum generated by stably trapped electron fluxes. The role of the density and temperature of the ambient plasma in the wave growth and the transition of the three wave upconversion to stochastic, despite the stationarity of the energy source, are discussed in detail. The model appears to reproduce the observational features for reasonable parameters of the solar flare plasma.

  5. Heating and dynamics of two flare loop systems observed by AIA and EIS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Ding, M. D.; Qiu, J.

    2014-02-01

    We investigate heating and evolution of flare loops in a C4.7 two-ribbon flare on 2011 February 13. From Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) imaging observations, we can identify two sets of loops. Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) spectroscopic observations reveal blueshifts at the feet of both sets of loops. The evolution and dynamics of the two sets are quite different. The first set of loops exhibits blueshifts for about 25 minutes followed by redshifts, while the second set shows stronger blueshifts, which are maintained for about one hour. The UV 1600 observation by AIA also shows that the feet of the second set of loops brighten twice. These suggest that continuous heating may be present in the second set of loops. We use spatially resolved UV light curves to infer heating rates in the few tens of individual loops comprising the two loop systems. With these heating rates, we then compute plasma evolution in these loops with the 'enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops' model. The results show that, for the first set of loops, the synthetic EUV light curves from the model compare favorably with the observed light curves in six AIA channels and eight EIS spectral lines, and the computed mean enthalpy flow velocities also agree with the Doppler shift measurements by EIS. For the second set of loops modeled with twice-heating, there are some discrepancies between modeled and observed EUV light curves in low-temperature bands, and the model does not fully produce the prolonged blueshift signatures as observed. We discuss possible causes for the discrepancies.

  6. Accumulation of accelerated electrons in coronal loops and time delays of solar flare nonthermal emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsap, Yu. T.; Stepanov, A. V.; Kopylova, Yu. G.

    2015-12-01

    The mechanisms by which accelerated electrons accumulate in flare loops with regard to the observed time delays between peaks of prolonged (≫1 s) hard X-ray pulses with different energies are considered. The focus is on an analysis of electron pitch-angle scattering by background plasma particles and/or turbulent pulsations in extreme cases of frequent and rare collisions. It was shown that it is difficult to explain the origination of time delays in the scope of a diffusion model when the electron free path length ( l) in the corona is smaller than the flare loop length ( L). The accumulation of energetic particles in loops at l > L is related to a trap-plus-precipitation model in which the regime of weak pitch angle diffusion of trapped electrons in the loss cone predominates.

  7. The spatial distribution of 6 centimeter gyroresonance emission from a flaring X-ray loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Webb, D. F.; Davis, J. M.; Kundu, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Simultaneous high resolution soft X-ray, and 6-cm images of the decay phase of an M3 X-ray flare in Hale Region 16413 have been compared. The X-ray images were obtained with a sounding rocket flown on November 7, 1979 and the 6-cm observations were made with the VLA. A large loop system approximately 1.3 arc min in length, with an average temperature of about 8,000,000 K made up the X-ray flare structure. The peak 6-cm emission seemed to originate from a region below the X-ray loop, and its predicted flux due to thermal bremsstrahlung was approximately one order of magnitude less than observed. The expected gyroresonance absorption is examined through a loop geometry model, and it is found that thermal gyroresonance emission requiring large azimuthal or radial field components, or non-thermal gyrosynchrotron emission which involves continuous electron acceleration, may explain the observations.

  8. Solar Flares and their Effects on Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward Francis; Engle, Scott G.

    2015-08-01

    The effects of flares from the Sun on Earth and other solar-system planets are discussed. The strong X-ray - UV radiation and high plasma fluxes from flares can strongly effect solar system planets even as far out as the Jovian planets and their moons. Data from our "Sun in Time" program are used to study the flare properties of the Sun and solar-type stars from youth to old age. These data imply that the young Sun had numerous, very powerful flares that may have played major roles in the development and evolution of the early atmospheres of Earth and other terrestiral planets. These strong X-UV fluxes from flares can greatly effect the photochemistry of planetary atmospheres as well as ionizing and possibly eroding their atmospheres. Some examples are given. Also briefly discussed are effects of large flares from the present Sun on the Earth. Even though strong solar flares are rarer and less powerful than from the youthful Sun, they can cause significant damage to our communication and satellite systems, electrical networks, and threaten the lives of astronauts in space.This research is supported by grants from NASA (HST and Chandra) and NSF. We gratefully acknowledge this support

  9. EVIDENCE OF MULTIPLE SLOW ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS IN THE STELLAR FLARING LOOPS OF PROXIMA CENTAURI

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, A. K.; Pandey, J. C.; Lalitha, S.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first observational evidence of multiple slow acoustic oscillations in the post-flaring loops of the corona of Proxima Centauri using XMM-Newton observations. We find the signature of periodic oscillations localized in the decay phase of the flare in its soft (0.3-10.0 keV) X-ray emissions. Using the standard wavelet tool, we find multiple periodicities of 1261 s and 687 s. These bursty oscillations persist for durations of 90 minutes and 50 minutes, respectively, for more than three cycles. The intensity oscillations with a period of 1261 s may be the signature of the fundamental mode of slow magnetoacoustic waves with a phase speed of 119 km s{sup –1} in a loop of length 7.5 × 10{sup 9} cm, which is initially heated, producing the flare peak temperature of 33 MK and later cooled down in the decay phase and maintained at an average temperature of 7.2 MK. The other period of 687 s may be associated with the first overtone of slow magnetoacoustic oscillations in the flaring loop. The fundamental mode oscillations show dissipation with a damping time of 47 minutes. The period ratio P {sub 1}/P {sub 2} is found to be 1.83, indicating that such oscillations are most likely excited in longitudinal density stratified stellar loops. We estimate the density scale height of the stellar loop system as ∼23 Mm, which is smaller than the hydrostatic scale height of the hot loop system, and implies the existence of non-equilibrium conditions.

  10. Evidence of Multiple Slow Acoustic Oscillations in the Stellar Flaring Loops of Proxima Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, A. K.; Lalitha, S.; Pandey, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first observational evidence of multiple slow acoustic oscillations in the post-flaring loops of the corona of Proxima Centauri using XMM-Newton observations. We find the signature of periodic oscillations localized in the decay phase of the flare in its soft (0.3-10.0 keV) X-ray emissions. Using the standard wavelet tool, we find multiple periodicities of 1261 s and 687 s. These bursty oscillations persist for durations of 90 minutes and 50 minutes, respectively, for more than three cycles. The intensity oscillations with a period of 1261 s may be the signature of the fundamental mode of slow magnetoacoustic waves with a phase speed of 119 km s-1 in a loop of length 7.5 × 109 cm, which is initially heated, producing the flare peak temperature of 33 MK and later cooled down in the decay phase and maintained at an average temperature of 7.2 MK. The other period of 687 s may be associated with the first overtone of slow magnetoacoustic oscillations in the flaring loop. The fundamental mode oscillations show dissipation with a damping time of 47 minutes. The period ratio P 1/P 2 is found to be 1.83, indicating that such oscillations are most likely excited in longitudinal density stratified stellar loops. We estimate the density scale height of the stellar loop system as ~23 Mm, which is smaller than the hydrostatic scale height of the hot loop system, and implies the existence of non-equilibrium conditions.

  11. The propagation of solar flare particles in a coronal loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A time-dependent diffusion equation with velocity-dependent diffusion and energy-loss coefficients was solved for the case where energetic solar particles are injected into a coronal loop and then diffuse out the ends of the loop into the lower corona/chromosphere. The solution yields for the case of relativistic electrons, precipitation rates and populations which are necessary for calculating thick and thin target X-ray emission. It follows that the thick target emission is necessarily delayed with respect to the particle acceleration on injection by more than the mere travel time of the particle over the loop length. In addition the time-dependent electron population at the top of the loop is calculated. This is useful in estimating the resulting micron-wave emission. The results show relative timing differences in the different emission processes which are functions of particle species, energy and the point of injection of the particles into the loop. Equivalent quantities are calculated for non-relativistic protons.

  12. The Effects of Flare Definitions on the Statistics of Derived Flare Distrubtions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Daniel; Dominique, Marie; Seaton, Daniel B.; Stegen, Koen; White, Arthur

    2016-05-01

    The statistical examination of solar flares is crucial to revealing their global characteristics and behaviour. However, statistical flare studies are often performed using standard but basic flare detection algorithms relying on arbitrary thresholds which may affect the derived flare distributions. We explore the effect of the arbitrary thresholds used in the GOES event list and LYRA Flare Finder algorithms. We find that there is a small but significant relationship between the power law exponent of the GOES flare peak flux frequency distribution and the algorithms’ flare start thresholds. We also find that the power law exponents of these distributions are not stable but appear to steepen with increasing peak flux. This implies that the observed flare size distribution may not be a power law at all. We show that depending on the true value of the exponent of the flare size distribution, this deviation from a power law may be due to flares missed by the flare detection algorithms. However, it is not possible determine the true exponent from GOES/XRS observations. Additionally we find that the PROBA2/LYRA flare size distributions are clearly non-power law. We show that this is consistent with an insufficient degradation correction which causes LYRA absolute irradiance values to be unreliable. This means that they should not be used for flare statistics or energetics unless degradation is adequately accounted for. However they can be used to study time variations over shorter timescales and for space weather monitoring.

  13. Multiple loop activations and continuous energy release in the solar flare of June 15, 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widing, K. G.; Dere, K. P.

    1977-01-01

    The spatial and temporal evolution of the high-temperature plasma in the solar flare of June 15, 1973, is studied using XUV spectroheliograms and X-ray filtergrams obtained from Skylab. The analysis focuses on the changing forms and brightness of Fe XXIII 263-A and Fe XXIV 255-A images. Temperatures and emission measures computed for different times during the flare are compared with those derived from Solrad-9 flux data, the electron temperature in the bright compact core of the Fe XXIV image is determined, and a coronal origin is suggested for this bright core. The observational evidence shows that the overall flare event involved a number of different preexisting loops and arches which were activated in succession. The activation and heating are found to have persisted well past the end of the burst phase, implying that the energy release did not end when the impulsive phase was over. The overall development of the flare is summarized on the basis of the observed order of appearance of the loops.

  14. POST-FLARE ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT CURVES EXPLAINED WITH THERMAL INSTABILITY OF LOOP PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Reale, F.; Landi, E.; Orlando, S.

    2012-02-10

    In the present work, we study the C8 flare that occurred on 2000 September 26 at 19:49 UT and observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation spectrometer from the beginning of the impulsive phase to well beyond the disappearance in the X-rays. The emission first decayed progressively through equilibrium states until the plasma reached 2-3 MK. Then, a series of cooler lines, i.e., Ca X, Ca VII, Ne VI, O IV, and Si III (formed in the temperature range log T = 4.3-6.3 under equilibrium conditions), are emitted at the same time and all evolve in a similar way. Here, we show that the simultaneous emission of lines with such a different formation temperature is due to thermal instability occurring in the flaring plasma as soon as it has cooled below {approx}2 MK. We can qualitatively reproduce the relative start time of the light curves of each line in the correct order with a simple (and standard) model of a single flaring loop. The agreement with the observed light curves is greatly improved, and a slower evolution of the line emission is predicted, if we assume that the model loop consists of an ensemble of subloops or strands heated at slightly different times. Our analysis can be useful for flare observations with the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment.

  15. Plasma dynamics above solar flare soft x-ray loop tops

    SciTech Connect

    Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P.; McKenzie, D. E.

    2014-06-10

    We measure non-thermal motions in flare loop tops and above the loop tops using profiles of highly ionized spectral lines of Fe XXIV and Fe XXIII formed at multimillion-degree temperatures. Non-thermal motions that may be due to turbulence or multiple flow regions along the line of sight are extracted from the line profiles. The non-thermal motions are measured for four flares seen at or close to the solar limb. The profile data are obtained using the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on the Hinode spacecraft. The multimillion-degree non-thermal motions are between 20 and 60 km s{sup –1} and appear to increase with height above the loop tops. Motions determined from coronal lines (i.e., lines formed at about 1.5 MK) tend to be smaller. The multimillion-degree temperatures in the loop tops and above range from about 11 MK to 15 MK and also tend to increase with height above the bright X-ray-emitting loop tops. The non-thermal motions measured along the line of sight, as well as their apparent increase with height, are supported by Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly measurements of turbulent velocities in the plane of the sky.

  16. On the transport and acceleration of solar flare particles in a coronal loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James M.; Lee, Martin A.

    1991-01-01

    The turbulent environment of a flaring solar coronal loop directly affects the population of particles to be accelerated or already accelerated. Under the assumption of a uniform turbulent MHD wave field within the loop, the behavior of a particle distribution as it interacts with the turbulence is discussed, including particle precipitation to the footpoints of the loop and the evolution of the energy distribution as the particles undergo second-order stochastic acceleration. Two cases are discussed in detail: (1) particles spatially diffusing within the loop and precipitating with minimal acceleration in the short time scale of an impulsive event and (2) particles diffusing in both real and momentum space in a long duration event. Collisional losses due to ambient electrons are included. The gamma-ray flare of June 3, 1982 is modeled, and good agreement is obtained between predicted and observed time profiles if the loop length is 100,000 km with an intrinsic spatial diffusion time of 100-450 s. It follows that the production of high-energy neutrons and pi mesons extends over a time scale of 1000 s as observed.

  17. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SHOCKS IN AND ABOVE POST-FLARE LOOPS: TWO-DIMENSIONAL SIMULATION AND A SIMPLIFIED MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Takasao, Shinsuke; Nakamura, Naoki; Shibata, Kazunari; Matsumoto, Takuma

    2015-06-01

    Solar flares are an explosive phenomenon where super-sonic flows and shocks are expected in and above the post-flare loops. To understand the dynamics of post-flare loops, a two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (2D MHD) simulation of a solar flare has been carried out. We found new shock structures in and above the post-flare loops, which were not resolved in the previous work by Yokoyama and Shibata. To study the dynamics of flows along the reconnected magnetic field, the kinematics and energetics of the plasma are investigated along selected field lines. It is found that shocks are crucial to determine the thermal and flow structures in the post-flare loops. On the basis of the 2D MHD simulation, we developed a new post-flare loop model, which we defined as the pseudo-2D MHD model. The model is based on the one-dimensional (1D) MHD equations, where all variables depend on one space dimension, and all the three components of the magnetic and velocity fields are considered. Our pseudo-2D model includes many features of the multi-dimensional MHD processes related to magnetic reconnection (particularly MHD shocks), which the previous 1D hydrodynamic models are not able to include. We compared the shock formation and energetics of a specific field line in the 2D calculation with those in our pseudo-2D MHD model, and found that they give similar results. This model will allow us to study the evolution of the post-flare loops in a wide parameter space without expensive computational cost or neglecting important physics associated with magnetic reconnection.

  18. IMAGING OBSERVATIONS OF QUASI-PERIODIC PULSATIONS IN SOLAR FLARE LOOPS WITH SDO/AIA

    SciTech Connect

    Su, J. T.; Mao, X. J.; Shen, Y. D.; Liu, Y.

    2012-08-20

    Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) of flaring emission with periods from a few seconds to tens of minutes have been widely detected from radio bands to {gamma}-ray emissions. However, in the past the spatial information of pulsations could not be utilized well due to the instrument limits. We report here imaging observations of the QPPs in three loop sections during a C1.7 flare with periods of P = 24 s-3 minutes by means of the extreme-ultraviolet 171 A channel of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We confirm that the QPPs with the shortest period of 24 s were not of an artifact produced by the Nyquist frequency of the AIA 12 s cadence. The QPPs in the three loop sections were interconnected and closely associated with the flare. The detected perturbations propagated along the loops at speeds of 65-200 km s{sup -1}, close to those of acoustic waves in them. The loops were made up of many bright blobs arranged in alternating bright and dark changes in intensity (spatial periodical distribution) with the wavelengths 2.4-5 Mm (as if they were magnetohydrodynamic waves). Furthermore, in the time-distance diagrams, the detected perturbation wavelengths of the QPPs are estimated to be {approx}10 Mm, which evidently do not fit the above ones of the spatial periodic distributions and produce a difference of a factor of 2-4 with them. It is suggested that the short QPPs with periods P < 60 s were possibly sausage-mode oscillations and the long QPPs with periods P > 60 s were the higher (e.g., >2nd) harmonics of slow magnetoacoustic waves.

  19. High-energy gamma-ray emission from pion decay in a solar flare magnetic loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandzhavidze, Natalie; Ramaty, Reuven

    1992-01-01

    The production of high-energy gamma rays resulting from pion decay in a solar flare magnetic loop is investigated. Magnetic mirroring, MHD pitch-angle scattering, and all of the relevant loss processes and photon production mechanisms are taken into account. The transport of both the primary ions and the secondary positrons resulting from the decay of the positive pions, as well as the transport of the produced gamma-ray emission are considered. The distributions of the gamma rays as a function of atmospheric depth, time, emission angle, and photon energy are calculated and the dependence of these distributions on the model parameters are studied. The obtained angular distributions are not sufficiently anisotropic to account for the observed limb brightening of the greater than 10 MeV flare emission, indicating that the bulk of this emission is bremsstrahlung from primary electrons.

  20. SIMULATING THE EFFECTS OF INITIAL PITCH-ANGLE DISTRIBUTIONS ON SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, Henry D.; Reeves, Katharine K.; Martens, Petrus

    2011-07-10

    In this work, we model both the thermal and non-thermal components of solar flares. The model we use, HYLOOP, combines a hydrodynamic equation solver with a non-thermal particle tracking code to simulate the thermal and non-thermal dynamics and emission of solar flares. In order to test the effects of pitch-angle distribution on flare dynamics and emission, a series of flares is simulated with non-thermal electron beams injected at the loop apex. The pitch-angle distribution of each beam is described by a single parameter and allowed to vary from flare to flare. We use the results of these simulations to generate synthetic hard and soft X-ray emissions (HXR and SXR). The light curves of the flares in Hinode's X-ray Telescope passbands show a distinct signal that is highly dependent on pitch-angle distribution. The simulated HXR emission in the 3-6 keV bandpass shows the formation and evolution of emission sources that correspond well to the observations of pre-impulsive flares. This ability to test theoretical models of thermal and non-thermal flare dynamics directly with observations allows for the investigation of a wide range of physical processes governing the evolution of solar flares. We find that the initial pitch-angle distribution of non-thermal particle populations has a profound effect on loop top HXR and SXR emission and that apparent motion of HXR is a natural consequence of non-thermal particle evolution in a magnetic trap.

  1. Flare Hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczak, M.; Dubieniecki, P.

    2015-12-01

    On the basis of the Solar Maximum Mission observations, Švestka ( Solar Phys. 121, 399, 1989) introduced a new class of flares, the so-called flare hybrids. When they start, they look like typical compact flares (phase 1), but later on, they look like flares with arcades of magnetic loops (phase 2). We summarize the characteristic features of flare hybrids in soft and hard X-rays as well as in the extreme ultraviolet; these features allow us to distinguish flare hybrids from other flares. In this article, additional energy release or long plasma cooling timescales are suggested as possible causes of phase 2. We estimate the frequency of flare hybrids, and study the magnetic configurations favorable for flare hybrid occurrence. Flare hybrids appear to be quite frequent, and the difference between the lengths of magnetic loops in the two interacting loop systems seem to be a crucial parameter for determining their characteristics.

  2. Standing Sausage Modes in Nonuniform Magnetic Tubes: An Inversion Scheme for Inferring Flare Loop Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Xia; Li, Bo; Xiong, Ming; Yu, Hui; Guo, Ming-Zhe

    2015-10-01

    Standing sausage modes in flare loops are important for interpreting quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in solar flare light curves. We propose an inversion scheme that consistently uses their periods P and damping times τ to diagnose flare loop parameters. We derive a generic dispersion relation governing linear sausage waves in pressure-less straight tubes, for which the transverse density inhomogeneity takes place in a layer of arbitrary width l and is of arbitrary form. We find that P and τ depend on the combination of [R/{v}{Ai},L/R,l/R,{ρ }{{i}}/{ρ }{{e}}], where R is the loop radius, L is the looplength, vAi is the internal Alfvén speed, and ρi/ρe is the density contrast. For all the density profiles examined, P and τ experience saturation when L/R ≫ 1, yielding an inversion curve in the [R/{v}{Ai},l/R,{ρ }{{i}}/{ρ }{{e}}] space with a specific density profile when L/R is sufficiently large. When applied to a spatially unresolved QPP event, the scheme yields that R/vAi is the best constrained, whereas l/R corresponds to the other extreme. For spatially resolved QPPs, while L/R ≫ 1 cannot be assumed beforehand, an inversion curve remains possible due to additional geometrical constraints. When a spatially resolved QPP event involves another mode, as is the case for a recent event, the full set of [{v}{Ai},l,{ρ }{{i}}/{ρ }{{e}}] can be inferred. We conclude that the proposed scheme provides a useful tool for magneto-seismologically exploiting QPPs.

  3. Motion of 3-6 keV Nonthermal Sources Along the Legs of a Flare Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, Linhui; Holman, Gordon D.; Dennis, Brian R.

    2007-01-01

    Observations of nonthermal X-ray sources me critical to studying electron acceleration and transport in solar flares. Strong thermal emission radiated from the preheated plasma before the flare impulsive phase often makes it difficult to detect low-energy X-ray sources that are produced by relatively low-energy nonthermal electrons. Knowledge of the distribution of these low-energy nonthermal electrons is particularly important in determining the total nonthermal electron energy in solar flares. We report on an 'early impulsive flare' in which impulsive hard X-ray emission was seen early in the flare before the soft X-ray emission had risen significantly, indicating limited plasma pre-heating. Early in the flare, RHESSI < 25 keV images show coronal sources that moved first downward and then upwards along the legs of a flare loop. In particular, the 3-6 keV source appeared as a single coronal source at the start of the flare, and then it involved into two coronal sources moving down along the two legs of the loop. After nearly reaching the two footpoints at the hard X-ray peak, the two sources moved back up to the looptop again. RHESSI images and light curves all indicate that nonthermal emission dominated at energies as low as 3-6 keV. We suggest that the evolution of both the spectral index and the low-energy cutoff of the injected electron distribution could result in the accelerated electrons reaching a lower altitude along the legs of the dense flare loop and hence result in the observed downward and upward motions of the nonthermal sources.

  4. Effects of flare definitions on the statistics of derived flare distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, D. F.; Dominique, M.; Seaton, D.; Stegen, K.; White, A.

    2016-08-01

    The statistical examination of solar flares is crucial to revealing their global characteristics and behaviour. Such examinations can tackle large-scale science questions or give context to detailed single-event studies. However, they are often performed using standard but basic flare detection algorithms relying on arbitrary thresholds. This arbitrariness may lead to important scientific conclusions being drawn from results caused by subjective choices in algorithms rather than the true nature of the Sun. In this paper, we explore the effect of the arbitrary thresholds used in the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) event list and Large Yield RAdiometer (LYRA) Flare Finder algorithms. We find that there is a small but significant relationship between the power law exponent of the GOES flare peak flux frequency distribution and the flare start thresholds of the algorithms. We also find that the power law exponents of these distributions are not stable, but appear to steepen with increasing peak flux. This implies that the observed flare size distribution may not be a power law at all. We show that depending on the true value of the exponent of the flare size distribution, this deviation from a power law may be due to flares missed by the flare detection algorithms. However, it is not possible determine the true exponent from GOES/XRS observations. Additionally we find that the PROBA2/LYRA flare size distributions are artificially steep and clearly non-power law. We show that this is consistent with an insufficient degradation correction. This means that PROBA2/LYRA should not be used for flare statistics or energetics unless degradation is adequately accounted for. However, it can be used to study variations over shorter timescales and for space weather monitoring.

  5. Modeling of Reflective Propagating Slow-mode Wave in a Flaring Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, X.; Yuan, D.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Keppens, R.; Xia, C.

    2015-11-01

    Quasi-periodic propagating intensity disturbances have been observed in large coronal loops in extreme ultraviolet images over a decade, and are widely accepted to be slow magnetosonic waves. However, spectroscopic observations from Hinode/EIS revealed their association with persistent coronal upflows, making this interpretation debatable. We perform a 2.5D magnetohydrodynamic simulation to imitate the chromospheric evaporation and the following reflected patterns in a flare loop. Our model encompasses the corona, transition region, and chromosphere. We demonstrate that the quasi periodic propagating intensity variations captured by the synthesized Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 131, 94 Å emission images match the previous observations well. With particle tracers in the simulation, we confirm that these quasi periodic propagating intensity variations consist of reflected slow mode waves and mass flows with an average speed of 310 km s‑1 in an 80 Mm length loop with an average temperature of 9 MK. With the synthesized Doppler shift velocity and intensity maps of the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation Fe xix line emission, we confirm that these reflected slow mode waves are propagating waves.

  6. MODELING OF REFLECTIVE PROPAGATING SLOW-MODE WAVE IN A FLARING LOOP

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, X.; Yuan, D.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Keppens, R.; Xia, C.

    2015-11-01

    Quasi-periodic propagating intensity disturbances have been observed in large coronal loops in extreme ultraviolet images over a decade, and are widely accepted to be slow magnetosonic waves. However, spectroscopic observations from Hinode/EIS revealed their association with persistent coronal upflows, making this interpretation debatable. We perform a 2.5D magnetohydrodynamic simulation to imitate the chromospheric evaporation and the following reflected patterns in a flare loop. Our model encompasses the corona, transition region, and chromosphere. We demonstrate that the quasi periodic propagating intensity variations captured by the synthesized Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 131, 94 Å emission images match the previous observations well. With particle tracers in the simulation, we confirm that these quasi periodic propagating intensity variations consist of reflected slow mode waves and mass flows with an average speed of 310 km s{sup −1} in an 80 Mm length loop with an average temperature of 9 MK. With the synthesized Doppler shift velocity and intensity maps of the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation Fe xix line emission, we confirm that these reflected slow mode waves are propagating waves.

  7. Flare-generated Shock Wave Propagation through Solar Coronal Arcade Loops and an Associated Type II Radio Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Innes, D. E.; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents multiwavelength observations of a flare-generated type II radio burst. The kinematics of the shock derived from the type II burst closely match a fast extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wave seen propagating through coronal arcade loops. The EUV wave was closely associated with an impulsive M1.0 flare without a related coronal mass ejection, and was triggered at one of the footpoints of the arcade loops in active region NOAA 12035. It was initially observed in the 335 Å images from the Atmospheric Image Assembly with a speed of ˜800 km s‑1 and it accelerated to ˜1490 km s‑1 after passing through the arcade loops. A fan–spine magnetic topology was revealed at the flare site. A small, confined filament eruption (˜340 km s‑1) was also observed moving in the opposite direction to the EUV wave. We suggest that breakout reconnection in the fan–spine topology triggered the flare and associated EUV wave that propagated as a fast shock through the arcade loops.

  8. Flare-generated Shock Wave Propagation through Solar Coronal Arcade Loops and an Associated Type II Radio Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Innes, D. E.; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents multiwavelength observations of a flare-generated type II radio burst. The kinematics of the shock derived from the type II burst closely match a fast extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wave seen propagating through coronal arcade loops. The EUV wave was closely associated with an impulsive M1.0 flare without a related coronal mass ejection, and was triggered at one of the footpoints of the arcade loops in active region NOAA 12035. It was initially observed in the 335 Å images from the Atmospheric Image Assembly with a speed of ˜800 km s-1 and it accelerated to ˜1490 km s-1 after passing through the arcade loops. A fan-spine magnetic topology was revealed at the flare site. A small, confined filament eruption (˜340 km s-1) was also observed moving in the opposite direction to the EUV wave. We suggest that breakout reconnection in the fan-spine topology triggered the flare and associated EUV wave that propagated as a fast shock through the arcade loops.

  9. An interpretation of flare-induced and decayless coronal-loop oscillations as interference patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Hindman, Bradley W.; Jain, Rekha

    2014-04-01

    We present an alternative model of coronal-loop oscillations, which considers that the waves are trapped in a two-dimensional waveguide formed by the entire arcade of field lines. This differs from the standard one-dimensional model which treats the waves as the resonant oscillations of just the visible bundle of field lines. Within the framework of our two-dimensional model, the two types of oscillations that have been observationally identified, flare-induced waves and 'decayless' oscillations, can both be attributed to MHD fast waves. The two components of the signal differ only because of the duration and spatial extent of the source that creates them. The flare-induced waves are generated by strong localized sources of short duration, while the decayless background can be excited by a continuous, stochastic source. Further, the oscillatory signal arising from a localized, short-duration source can be interpreted as a pattern of interference fringes produced by waves that have traveled diverse routes of various pathlengths through the waveguide. The resulting amplitude of the fringes slowly decays in time with an inverse square root dependence. The details of the interference pattern depend on the shape of the arcade and the spatial variation of the Alfvén speed. The rapid decay of this wave component, which has previously been attributed to physical damping mechanisms that remove energy from resonant oscillations, occurs as a natural consequence of the interference process without the need for local dissipation.

  10. Hot spine loops and the nature of a late-phase solar flare

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xudong; Todd Hoeksema, J.; Liu, Yang; Aulanier, Guillaume; Su, Yingna; Hannah, Iain G.; Hock, Rachel A.

    2013-12-01

    The fan-spine magnetic topology is believed to be responsible for many curious features in solar explosive events. A spine field line links distinct flux domains, but direct observation of such a feature has been rare. Here we report a unique event observed by the Solar Dynamic Observatory where a set of hot coronal loops (over 10 MK) connected to a quasi-circular chromospheric ribbon at one end and a remote brightening at the other. Magnetic field extrapolation suggests that these loops are partly tracers of the evolving spine field line. Continuous slipping- and null-point-type reconnections were likely at work, energizing the loop plasma and transferring magnetic flux within and across the fan quasi-separatrix layer. We argue that the initial reconnection is of the 'breakout' type, which then transitioned to a more violent flare reconnection with an eruption from the fan dome. Significant magnetic field changes are expected and indeed ensued. This event also features an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) late phase, i.e., a delayed secondary emission peak in warm EUV lines (about 2-7 MK). We show that this peak comes from the cooling of large post-reconnection loops beside and above the compact fan, a direct product of eruption in such topological settings. The long cooling time of the large arcades contributes to the long delay; additional heating may also be required. Our result demonstrates the critical nature of cross-scale magnetic coupling—topological change in a sub-system may lead to explosions on a much larger scale.

  11. SDO/AIA observations and model of standing waves in hot coronal loops excited by a flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tongjiang; Ofman, Leon; Provornikova, Elena; Davila, Joseph M.

    2014-06-01

    The strongly damped Doppler shift oscillations in hot coronal loops were first observed by SOHO/SUMER in flare lines formed at plasma temperature more than 6 MK. They were mainly interpreted as the standing slow magnetosonic waves excited by impulsive energy release at the loop’s footpoint based on the measured properties and on MHD modeling results. Longitudinal waves with similar properties have been recently observed by SDO/AIA in active region loops. In this study, we report a new event that exhibited the flare-excited intensity disturbances propagating back and forth in a hot coronal loop imaged by AIA in 131 bandpass. We measure the physical parameters of the wave and loop plasma, determine the loop geometry, and explore the triggering mechanism. We identify the wave modes (propagating or standing waves) based on these measurements and on 3D MHD modeling. A loop model is constructed with enhanced density in a hydrostatic equilibrium following potential or force-free magnetic field lines extrapolated from the photospheric magnetic field data observed by SDO/HMI. We also discuss the applications of coronal seismology to this event.

  12. Where is the chromospheric response to conductive energy input from a hot pre-flare coronal loop?

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, Marina; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Simões, Paulo J. A.

    2014-07-01

    Before the onset of a flare is observed in hard X-rays, there is often a prolonged pre-flare or pre-heating phase with no detectable hard X-ray emission but pronounced soft X-ray emission, which suggests that energy is already being released and deposited into the corona and chromosphere at this stage. This work analyzes the temporal evolution of coronal source heating and the chromospheric response during this pre-heating phase to investigate the origin and nature of early energy release and transport during a solar flare. Simultaneous X-ray, EUV, and microwave observations of a well-observed flare with a prolonged pre-heating phase are analyzed to study the time evolution of the thermal emission and to determine the onset of particle acceleration. During the 20 minute duration of the pre-heating phase we find no hint of accelerated electrons in either hard X-rays or microwave emission. However, the total energy budget during the pre-heating phase suggests that energy must be supplied to the flaring loop to sustain the observed temperature and emission measure. Under the assumption of this energy being transported toward the chromosphere via thermal conduction, significant energy deposition at the chromosphere is expected. However, no detectable increase of the emission in the AIA wavelength channels sensitive to chromospheric temperatures is observed. The observations suggest energy release and deposition in the flaring loop before the onset of particle acceleration, yet a model in which energy is conducted to the chromosphere and subsequent heating of the chromosphere is not supported by the observations.

  13. CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION IN SOLAR FLARE LOOP STRANDS OBSERVED WITH THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER ON BOARD HINODE

    SciTech Connect

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.

    2013-01-10

    The entire profile of the Fe XXIII line at 263.8 A, formed at temperature Almost-Equal-To 14 MK, was blueshifted by an upward velocity -122 {+-} 33 km s{sup -1} when it was first detected by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer operating in rapid cadence (11.18 s) stare mode during a C1 solar flare. The entire profile became even more blueshifted over the next two exposures, when the upward velocity reached its maximum of -208 {+-} 14 km s{sup -1} before decreasing to zero over the next 12 exposures. After that, a weak, secondary blueshifted component appeared for five exposures, reached a maximum upward velocity of -206 {+-} 33 km s{sup -1}, and disappeared after the maximum line intensity (stationary plus blueshifted) was achieved. Velocities were measured relative to the intense stationary profile observed near the flare's peak and early during its decline. The initial episode during which the entire profile was blueshifted lasted about 156 s, while the following episode during which a secondary blueshifted component was detected lasted about 56 s. The first episode likely corresponds to chromospheric evaporation in a single loop strand, while the second corresponds to evaporation in an additional strand, as described in multi-strand flare loop models proposed by Hori et al. and Warren and Doschek. Line emission from progressively cooler ions (Fe XVII, XVI, and XIV) brightened at successively later times, consistent with cooling of flare-heated plasma.

  14. THE SPECIFIC ACCELERATION RATE IN LOOP-STRUCTURED SOLAR FLARES-IMPLICATIONS FOR ELECTRON ACCELERATION MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jingnan; Emslie, A. Gordon; Piana, Michele E-mail: piana@dima.unige.it

    2013-03-20

    We analyze electron flux maps based on RHESSI hard X-ray imaging spectroscopy data for a number of extended coronal-loop flare events. For each event, we determine the variation of the characteristic loop length L with electron energy E, and we fit this observed behavior with models that incorporate an extended acceleration region and an exterior 'propagation' region, and which may include collisional modification of the accelerated electron spectrum inside the acceleration region. The models are characterized by two parameters: the plasma density n in, and the longitudinal extent L{sub 0} of, the acceleration region. Determination of the best-fit values of these parameters permits inference of the volume that encompasses the acceleration region and of the total number of particles within it. It is then straightforward to compute values for the emission filling factor and for the specific acceleration rate (electrons s{sup -1} per ambient electron above a chosen reference energy). For the 24 events studied, the range of inferred filling factors is consistent with a value of unity. The inferred mean value of the specific acceleration rate above E{sub 0} = 20 keV is {approx}10{sup -2} s{sup -1}, with a 1{sigma} spread of about a half-order-of-magnitude above and below this value. We compare these values with the predictions of several models, including acceleration by large-scale, weak (sub-Dreicer) fields, by strong (super-Dreicer) electric fields in a reconnecting current sheet, and by stochastic acceleration processes.

  15. Turbulent Pitch-angle Scattering and Diffusive Transport of Hard X-Ray-producing Electrons in Flaring Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontar, Eduard P.; Bian, Nicolas H.; Emslie, A. Gordon; Vilmer, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations from RHESSI have revealed that the number of non-thermal electrons in the coronal part of a flaring loop can exceed the number of electrons required to explain the hard X-ray-emitting footpoints of the same flaring loop. Such sources cannot, therefore, be interpreted on the basis of the standard collisional transport model, in which electrons stream along the loop while losing their energy through collisions with the ambient plasma; additional physical processes, to either trap or scatter the energetic electrons, are required. Motivated by this and other observations that suggest that high-energy electrons are confined to the coronal region of the source, we consider turbulent pitch-angle scattering of fast electrons off low-frequency magnetic fluctuations as a confinement mechanism, modeled as a spatial diffusion parallel to the mean magnetic field. In general, turbulent scattering leads to a reduction of the collisional stopping distance of non-thermal electrons along the loop, and hence to an enhancement of the coronal hard X-ray source relative to the footpoints. The variation of source size L with electron energy E becomes weaker than the quadratic behavior pertinent to collisional transport, with the slope of L(E) depending directly on the mean free path λ associated with the non-collisional scattering mechanism. Comparing the predictions of the model with observations, we find that λ ~ (108-109) cm for ~30 keV, less than the length of a typical flaring loop and smaller than, or comparable to, the size of the electron acceleration region.

  16. Turbulent pitch-angle scattering and diffusive transport of hard X-ray-producing electrons in flaring coronal loops

    SciTech Connect

    Kontar, Eduard P.; Bian, Nicolas H.; Emslie, A. Gordon; Vilmer, Nicole E-mail: emslieg@wku.edu

    2014-01-10

    Recent observations from RHESSI have revealed that the number of non-thermal electrons in the coronal part of a flaring loop can exceed the number of electrons required to explain the hard X-ray-emitting footpoints of the same flaring loop. Such sources cannot, therefore, be interpreted on the basis of the standard collisional transport model, in which electrons stream along the loop while losing their energy through collisions with the ambient plasma; additional physical processes, to either trap or scatter the energetic electrons, are required. Motivated by this and other observations that suggest that high-energy electrons are confined to the coronal region of the source, we consider turbulent pitch-angle scattering of fast electrons off low-frequency magnetic fluctuations as a confinement mechanism, modeled as a spatial diffusion parallel to the mean magnetic field. In general, turbulent scattering leads to a reduction of the collisional stopping distance of non-thermal electrons along the loop, and hence to an enhancement of the coronal hard X-ray source relative to the footpoints. The variation of source size L with electron energy E becomes weaker than the quadratic behavior pertinent to collisional transport, with the slope of L(E) depending directly on the mean free path λ associated with the non-collisional scattering mechanism. Comparing the predictions of the model with observations, we find that λ ∼ (10{sup 8}-10{sup 9}) cm for ∼30 keV, less than the length of a typical flaring loop and smaller than, or comparable to, the size of the electron acceleration region.

  17. TEMPORAL VARIATIONS OF X-RAY SOLAR FLARE LOOPS: LENGTH, CORPULENCE, POSITION, TEMPERATURE, PLASMA PRESSURE, AND SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey, Natasha L. S.; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2013-04-01

    The spatial and spectral properties of three solar flare coronal X-ray loops are studied before, during, and after the peak X-ray emission. Using observations from the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), we deduce the temporal changes in emitting X-ray length, corpulence, volume, position, number density, and thermal pressure. We observe a decrease in the loop length, width, and volume before the X-ray peak, and an increasing number density and thermal pressure. After the X-ray peak, volume increases and loop corpulence grows due to increasing width. The volume variations are more pronounced than the position variations, often known as magnetic field line contraction. We believe this is the first dedicated study examining the temporal evolution of X-ray loop lengths and widths. Collectively, the observations also show for the first time three temporal phases given by peaks in temperature, X-ray emission, and thermal pressure, with the minimum volume coinciding with the X-ray peak. Although the volume of the flaring plasma decreases before the peak in X-ray emission, the relationship between temperature and volume does not support simple compressive heating in a collapsing magnetic trap model. Within a low {beta} plasma, shrinking loop widths perpendicular to the guiding field can be explained by squeezing the magnetic field threading the region. Plasma heating leads to chromospheric evaporation and growing number density. This produces increasing thermal pressure and decreasing loop lengths as electrons interact at shorter distances and we believe after the X-ray peak, the increasing loop corpulence.

  18. Using coronal loops to reconstruct the magnetic field of an active region before and after a major flare

    SciTech Connect

    Malanushenko, A.; Schrijver, C. J.; DeRosa, M. L.; Wheatland, M. S.

    2014-03-10

    The shapes of solar coronal loops are sensitive to the presence of electrical currents that are the carriers of the non-potential energy available for impulsive activity. We use this information in a new method for modeling the coronal magnetic field of active region (AR) 11158 as a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF). The observations used are coronal images around the time of major flare activity on 2011 February 15, together with the surface line-of-sight magnetic field measurements. The data are from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The model fields are constrained to approximate the coronal loop configurations as closely as possible, while also being subject to the force-free constraints. The method does not use transverse photospheric magnetic field components as input and is thereby distinct from methods for modeling NLFFFs based on photospheric vector magnetograms. We validate the method using observations of AR 11158 at a time well before major flaring and subsequently review the field evolution just prior to and following an X2.2 flare and associated eruption. The models indicate that the energy released during the instability is about 1 × 10{sup 32} erg, consistent with what is needed to power such a large eruptive flare. Immediately prior to the eruption, the model field contains a compact sigmoid bundle of twisted flux that is not present in the post-eruption models, which is consistent with the observations. The core of that model structure is twisted by ≈0.9 full turns about its axis.

  19. PLASMOID EJECTIONS AND LOOP CONTRACTIONS IN AN ERUPTIVE M7.7 SOLAR FLARE: EVIDENCE OF PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND HEATING IN MAGNETIC RECONNECTION OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Wei; Chen Qingrong; Petrosian, Vahe

    2013-04-20

    Where particle acceleration and plasma heating take place in relation to magnetic reconnection is a fundamental question for solar flares. We report analysis of an M7.7 flare on 2012 July 19 observed by SDO/AIA and RHESSI. Bi-directional outflows in forms of plasmoid ejections and contracting cusp-shaped loops originate between an erupting flux rope and underlying flare loops at speeds of typically 200-300 km s{sup -1} up to 1050 km s{sup -1}. These outflows are associated with spatially separated double coronal X-ray sources with centroid separation decreasing with energy. The highest temperature is located near the nonthermal X-ray loop-top source well below the original heights of contracting cusps near the inferred reconnection site. These observations suggest that the primary loci of particle acceleration and plasma heating are in the reconnection outflow regions, rather than the reconnection site itself. In addition, there is an initial ascent of the X-ray and EUV loop-top source prior to its recently recognized descent, which we ascribe to the interplay among multiple processes including the upward development of reconnection and the downward contractions of reconnected loops. The impulsive phase onset is delayed by 10 minutes from the start of the descent, but coincides with the rapid speed increases of the upward plasmoids, the individual loop shrinkages, and the overall loop-top descent, suggestive of an intimate relation of the energy release rate and reconnection outflow speed.

  20. EVIDENCE OF THERMAL CONDUCTION SUPPRESSION IN A SOLAR FLARING LOOP BY CORONAL SEISMOLOGY OF SLOW-MODE WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tongjiang; Ofman, Leon; Provornikova, Elena; Sun, Xudong; Davila, Joseph M.

    2015-09-20

    Analysis of a longitudinal wave event observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory is presented. A time sequence of 131 Å images reveals that a C-class flare occurred at one footpoint of a large loop and triggered an intensity disturbance (enhancement) propagating along it. The spatial features and temporal evolution suggest that a fundamental standing slow-mode wave could be set up quickly after meeting of two initial disturbances from the opposite footpoints. The oscillations have a period of ∼12 minutes and a decay time of ∼9 minutes. The measured phase speed of 500 ± 50 km s{sup −1} matches the sound speed in the heated loop of ∼10 MK, confirming that the observed waves are of slow mode. We derive the time-dependent temperature and electron density wave signals from six AIA extreme-ultraviolet channels, and find that they are nearly in phase. The measured polytropic index from the temperature and density perturbations is 1.64 ± 0.08 close to the adiabatic index of 5/3 for an ideal monatomic gas. The interpretation based on a 1D linear MHD model suggests that the thermal conductivity is suppressed by at least a factor of 3 in the hot flare loop at 9 MK and above. The viscosity coefficient is determined by coronal seismology from the observed wave when only considering the compressive viscosity dissipation. We find that to interpret the rapid wave damping, the classical compressive viscosity coefficient needs to be enhanced by a factor of 15 as the upper limit.

  1. Evidence of Thermal Conduction Suppression in a Solar Flaring Loop by Coronal Seismology of Slow-mode Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tongjiang; Ofman, Leon; Sun, Xudong; Provornikova, Elena; Davila, Joseph M.

    2015-09-01

    Analysis of a longitudinal wave event observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory is presented. A time sequence of 131 Å images reveals that a C-class flare occurred at one footpoint of a large loop and triggered an intensity disturbance (enhancement) propagating along it. The spatial features and temporal evolution suggest that a fundamental standing slow-mode wave could be set up quickly after meeting of two initial disturbances from the opposite footpoints. The oscillations have a period of ˜12 minutes and a decay time of ˜9 minutes. The measured phase speed of 500 ± 50 km s‑1 matches the sound speed in the heated loop of ˜10 MK, confirming that the observed waves are of slow mode. We derive the time-dependent temperature and electron density wave signals from six AIA extreme-ultraviolet channels, and find that they are nearly in phase. The measured polytropic index from the temperature and density perturbations is 1.64 ± 0.08 close to the adiabatic index of 5/3 for an ideal monatomic gas. The interpretation based on a 1D linear MHD model suggests that the thermal conductivity is suppressed by at least a factor of 3 in the hot flare loop at 9 MK and above. The viscosity coefficient is determined by coronal seismology from the observed wave when only considering the compressive viscosity dissipation. We find that to interpret the rapid wave damping, the classical compressive viscosity coefficient needs to be enhanced by a factor of 15 as the upper limit.

  2. Solar and Stellar Flares over Time: Effects on Hosted Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward F.; DeWarf, Laurence E.; Engle, Scott G.; Gropp, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The effects of flares from the Sun on Earth and other solar-system planets are presented. Also discussed are the flare properties of cooler, commonplace main-sequence K-M stars. Data from our "Sun in Time" program are used to study the flare properties of the Sun and solar-type stars from youth to old age. These studies are based on ground-based observations, UV and X-ray space missions (IUE & HST, ROSAT & Chandra) as well as a wealth of data from the Kepler Mission. The ultra-high precision photometry available from the Kepler Mission (and K2) has made it possible to study starspots, flare properties, and rotations of thousands of G, K, M stars. Superflares (defined as E > 10+33 ergs ~X-100 flares) on hundreds of mostly G and K stars have been found. (See e.g. Shibayama et al. 2013; Maehara et al. 2015; Notsu et al. 2013/15; Saar et al. 2015; Guinan et al. 2015). Using our Age-Rotation relations, we determine correlations of flares properties of the Sun and solar-type over a wide range of ages. We also compare these flare histories with the cooler, more common K- and M-type stars. The analysis of these datasets imply that the young Sun had numerous, very powerful flares that may have played major roles the evolution of the early atmospheres of Earth and other terrestrial planets. The strong X-UV fluxes and proton fluences from flares and associated plasmas from coronal mass ejection events can greatly affect the photochemistry of planetary atmospheres as well as ionizing and possibly eroding their atmospheres. Some examples are given. Also discussed are the effects of superflares from the present Sun on the Earth. Even though solar superflares are rarer (~1 per 300-500 yrs) than from the young Sun (> 1-2 per year), they could cause significant damage to our communication and satellite systems, electrical networks, and threaten the lives of astronauts in space..This research is supported by grants from NSF/RUI and NASA: NSF, AST 1009903; Chandra GO2-13020X, HST GO

  3. Effects of solar flares on the ionosphere of Mars.

    PubMed

    Mendillo, Michael; Withers, Paul; Hinson, David; Rishbeth, Henry; Reinisch, Bodo

    2006-02-24

    All planetary atmospheres respond to the enhanced x-rays and ultraviolet (UV) light emitted from the Sun during a flare. Yet only on Earth are observations so continuous that the consequences of these essentially unpredictable events can be measured reliably. Here, we report observations of solar flares, causing up to 200% enhancements to the ionosphere of Mars, as recorded by the Mars Global Surveyor in April 2001. Modeling the altitude dependence of these effects requires that relative enhancements in the soft x-ray fluxes far exceed those in the UV.

  4. Plasma motions and non-thermal line broadening in flaring twisted coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordovskyy, M.; Kontar, E. P.; Browning, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Observation of coronal extreme ultra-violet (EUV) spectral lines sensitive to different temperatures offers an opportunity to evaluate the thermal structure and flows in flaring atmospheres. This, in turn, can be used to estimate the partitioning between the thermal and kinetic energies released in flares. Aims: Our aim is to forward-model large-scale (50-10 000 km) velocity distributions to interpret non-thermal broadening of different spectral EUV lines observed in flares. The developed models allow us to understand the origin of the observed spectral line shifts and broadening, and link these features to particular physical phenomena in flaring atmospheres. Methods: We use ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) to derive unstable twisted magnetic fluxtube configurations in a gravitationally stratified atmosphere. The evolution of these twisted fluxtubes is followed using resistive MHD with anomalous resistivity depending on the local density and temperature. The model also takes thermal conduction and radiative losses in the continuum into account. The model allows us to evaluate average velocities and velocity dispersions, which would be interpreted as non-thermal velocities in observations, at different temperatures for different parts of the models. Results: Our models show qualitative and quantitative agreement with observations. Thus, the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity dispersions demonstrate substantial correlation with the temperature, increasing from about 20-30 km s-1 around 1 MK to about 200-400 km s-1 near 10-20 MK. The average LOS velocities also correlate with velocity dispersions, although they demonstrate a very strong scattering compared to the observations. We also note that near footpoints the velocity dispersions across the magnetic field are systematically lower than those along the field. We conclude that the correlation between the flow velocities, velocity dispersions, and temperatures are likely to indicate that the same heating

  5. Solar flare model atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Fisher, George H.

    1993-01-01

    Solar flare model atmospheres computed under the assumption of energetic equilibrium in the chromosphere are presented. The models use a static, one-dimensional plane parallel geometry and are designed within a physically self-consistent coronal loop. Assumed flare heating mechanisms include collisions from a flux of non-thermal electrons and x-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona. The heating by energetic electrons accounts explicitly for variations of the ionized fraction with depth in the atmosphere. X-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona incorporates a flare loop geometry by approximating distant portions of the loop with a series of point sources, while treating the loop leg closest to the chromospheric footpoint in the plane-parallel approximation. Coronal flare heating leads to increased heat conduction, chromospheric evaporation and subsequent changes in coronal pressure; these effects are included self-consistently in the models. Cooling in the chromosphere is computed in detail for the important optically thick HI, CaII and MgII transitions using the non-LTE prescription in the program MULTI. Hydrogen ionization rates from x-ray photo-ionization and collisional ionization by non-thermal electrons are included explicitly in the rate equations. The models are computed in the 'impulsive' and 'equilibrium' limits, and in a set of intermediate 'evolving' states. The impulsive atmospheres have the density distribution frozen in pre-flare configuration, while the equilibrium models assume the entire atmosphere is in hydrostatic and energetic equilibrium. The evolving atmospheres represent intermediate stages where hydrostatic equilibrium has been established in the chromosphere and corona, but the corona is not yet in energetic equilibrium with the flare heating source. Thus, for example, chromospheric evaporation is still in the process of occurring.

  6. Electron precipitation in solar flares - Collisionless effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Rowland, H. L.

    1984-01-01

    A large fraction of the electrons which are accelerated during the impulsive phase of solar flares stream towards the chromosphere and are unstable to the growth of plasma waves. The linear and nonlinear evolution of plasma waves as a function of time is analyzed with a set of rate equations that follows, in time, the nonlinearly coupled system of plasma waves-ion fluctuations. As an outcome of the fast transfer of wave energy from the beam to the ambient plasma, nonthermal electron tails are formed which can stabilize the anomalous Doppler resonance instability responsible for the pitch angle scattering of the beam electrons. The non-collisional losses of the precipitating electrons are estimated, and the observational implication of these results are discussed.

  7. Mass ejections. [during solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.; Hildner, E.; Hansen, R. T.; Dryer, M.; Mcclymont, A. N.; Mckenna-Lawlor, S. M. P.; Mclean, D. J.; Schmahl, E. J.; Steinolfson, R. S.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

    1980-01-01

    Observations and model simulations of solar mass ejection phenomena are examined in an investigation of flare processes. Consideration is given to Skylab and other observations of flare-associated sprays, eruptive prominences, surges and coronal transients, and to MHD, gas dynamic and magnetic loop models developed to account for them. Magnetic forces are found to confine spray material, which originates in preexisting active-region filaments, within steadily expanding loops, while surges follow unmoving, preexisting magnetic field lines. Simulations of effects of a sudden pressure pulse at the bottom of the corona are found to exhibit many characteristics of coronal transients associated with flares, and impulsive heating low in the chromosphere is found to be able to account for surges. The importance of the magnetic field as the ultimate source of energy which drives eruptive phenomena as well as flares is pointed out.

  8. Broadband microwave sub-second pulsations in an expanding coronal loop of the 2011 August 10 flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészárosová, H.; Rybák, J.; Kashapova, L.; Gömöry, P.; Tokhchukova, S.; Myshyakov, I.

    2016-09-01

    Aims: We studied the characteristic physical properties and behavior of broadband microwave sub-second pulsations observed in an expanding coronal loop during the GOES C2.4 solar flare on 2011 August 10. Methods: The complex microwave dynamic spectrum and the expanding loop images were analyzed with the help of SDO/AIA/HMI, RHESSI, and the STEREO/SECCHI-EUVI data processing software, wavelet analysis methods, the GX Simulator tool, and the NAFE method. Results: We found sub-second pulsations and other different burst groups in the complex radio spectrum. The broadband (bandwidth about 1 GHz) sub-second pulsations (temporal period range 0.07-1.49 s, no characteristic dominant period) lasted 70 s in the frequency range 4-7 GHz. These pulsations were not correlated at their individual frequencies, had no measurable frequency drift, and zero polarization. In these pulsations, we found the signatures of fast sausage magnetoacoustic waves with the characteristic periods of 0.7 and 2 s. The other radio bursts showed their characteristic frequency drifts in the range of -262-520 MHz s-1. They helped us to derive average values of 20-80 G for the coronal magnetic field strength in the place of radio emission. It was revealed that the microwave event belongs to an expanding coronal loop with twisted sub-structures observed in the 131, 94, and 193 Å SDO/AIA channels. Their slit-time diagrams were compared with the location of the radio source at 5.7 GHz to realize that the EUV intensity of the expanding loop increased just before the radio source triggering. We reveal two EUV bidirectional flows that are linked with the start time of the loop expansion. Their positions were close to the radio source and propagated with velocities within a range of 30-117 km s-1. Conclusions: We demonstrate that periodic regime of the electron acceleration in a model of the quasi-periodic magnetic reconnection might be able to explain physical properties and behavior of the sub

  9. Effects of time delay and pitch control sensitivity in the flared landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthe, C. J.; Chalk, C. R.; Wingarten, N. C.; Grantham, W.

    1986-01-01

    Between December 1985 and January 1986, a flared landing program was conducted, using the USAF Total In-Flight simulator airplane, to examine time delay effects in a formal manner. Results show that as pitch sensitivity is increased, tolerance to time delay decreases. With the proper selection of pitch sensitivity, Level I performance was maintained with time delays ranging from 150 milliseconds to greater than 300 milliseconds. With higher sensitivity, configurations with Level I performance at 150 milliseconds degraded to level 2 at 200 milliseconds. When metrics of time delay and pitch sensitivity effects are applied to enhance previously developed predictive criteria, the result is an improved prediction technique which accounts for significant closed loop items.

  10. Preliminary analyses of solar flare effects on geomagnetic H component at equatorial and low latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugonabo, Obiageli Josephine; Ugwu, Ernest Benjamin Ikechukwu; Nneka Okeke, Francisca

    The study of solar flare effect (SFE) on geomagnetic H component at mid latitudes was carried out using data from INTERMAGNET website. M and X solar flare effects on three stations, Addis Ababa (AAE), Bangui (BNG), and Tamanrasset (TAM) were investigated. It was found that the ratio is greater than zero for all the three stations used, hence SFE enhances geomagnetic field in the equatorial and low latitudes. It was equally noted that the SFE on geomagnetic field is not just a simple augmentation at the pre-flare ionospheric currents over these stations. It is concluded that both pre-flare and solar flare amplitude variations of H are high in low and equatorial stations. Keywords: Solar flare, geomagnetic component, latitudes.

  11. Effects of X-ray flares on the aeronomy of Mars: Simultaneous measurements of ionospheric effects of X-ray flares on Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, Syed A.; Machado Santos, Angela; Abdu, Mangalathayil A.; Batista, Inez S.; Shah, Siddhi Y.; Thirupathaiah, P.

    2016-07-01

    MIRI: Validation and Testing Requirements We have studied X-ray aeronomy in the ionospheric E region of Mars during six X-ray flares that occurred on 28 March and 6 April, 2001; 17,18 March and 21 April, 2003 and 19 February, 2005 respectively. These flares were responded by the corresponding electron density profiles of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). The time series of photoionization rate, photoelectron impact ionization rate, photoelectron flux, ion density, electron density and total Electron Content (TEC) are predicted for each flare day. The estimated production rate, flux and densities are increased by 1-2 orders of magnitude due to effects of these flares in the E region ionosphere of Mars. The normalized estimated TEC are compared with the normalized measured TEC of MGS profiles. At the peak flare time the normalized estimated and normalized measured TEC were enhanced by a factor of 5-10 and 2 respectively. The effects of these flares were also registered in the D region equatorial ionosphere of Earth at Fortaleza observatory. The flares of 6 April, 2001, 17 March and 21 April, 2003 also produced electron density enhancement in the E region ionosphere of Earth at College AK and Cachoeira Paulista observatories. The minimum frequency fmin, recorded in ionogram, increased by 100% (due to D region absorption) while the foE increased by 20%, in the Earth's ionosphere.

  12. The universal one-loop effective action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozd, Aleksandra; Ellis, John; Quevillon, Jérémie; You, Tevong

    2016-03-01

    We present the universal one-loop effective action for all operators of dimension up to six obtained by integrating out massive, non-degenerate multiplets. Our general expression may be applied to loops of heavy fermions or bosons, and has been checked against partial results available in the literature. The broad applicability of this approach simplifies one-loop matching from an ultraviolet model to a lower-energy effective field theory (EFT), a procedure which is now reduced to the evaluation of a combination of matrices in our universal expression, without any loop integrals to evaluate. We illustrate the relationship of our results to the Standard Model (SM) EFT, using as an example the supersymmetric stop and sbottom squark Lagrangian and extracting from our universal expression the Wilson coefficients of dimension-six operators composed of SM fields.

  13. Heat transport in steep temperature gradients. I - Small flaring solar loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. F.

    1986-01-01

    Results on nonlocal heat transport which properly takes into account the presence of fast electrons with mean free paths much longer than the temperature scale height L are reviewed. In terms of the mean free path for the slow bulk electrons, lambda(s), the nonlocal effects are important whenever lambda(s)/L greater than 0.001, with the following consequences. The heat flux in the hot part of the gradient is reduced relative to the Spitzer-Haerm value q(SH) which does not take into account the heat carried away by the fast electrons. The heat flux in the cold part of the gradient is enhanced relative to the value q(SH) which does not take into account the heat deposited by the fast electrons. These quite general results, which should have several applications in astrophysics, are applied to the problem of thermal hard X-ray burst models. It is shown that heat is not bottled up as effectively as in some past models, and temperatures achieved for realistic energy input rates are consequently not as high. As a result such sources can be effective only in the soft part (10-30 keV) of the hard X-ray range for energy input rates up to 6,400 ergs/cu cm s. The analysis is based on a fluid model and does not consider the X-ray signature of fast electrons which escape to distances far beyond the conduction fronts formed. It is shown that such electrons could at most be effective in the soft part of the hard X-ray range.

  14. FLARES PRODUCING WELL-ORGANIZED POST-FLARE ARCADES (SLINKIES) HAVE EARLY PRECURSORS

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutova, M. P.

    2011-06-01

    Exploding loop systems producing X-ray flares often, but not always, bifurcate into a long-living, well-organized system of multi-threaded loop arcades resembling solenoidal slinkies. The physical conditions that cause or prevent this process are not known. To address this problem, we examined most of the major (X-class) flares that occurred during the last decade and found that the flares that bifurcate into long-living slinky arcades have different signatures than those that do not 'produce' such structures. The most striking difference is that, in all cases of slinky formation, GOES high energy proton flux becomes significantly enhanced 10-24 hr before the flare occurs. No such effect was found prior to the 'non-slinky' flares. This fact may be associated with the difference between energy production by a given active region and the amount of energy required to bring the entire system into the form of well-organized, self-similar loop arcades. As an example illustrating the process of post-flare slinky formation, we present observations taken with the Hinode satellite, in several wavelengths, showing a time sequence of pre-flare and flare activity, followed by the formation of dynamically stable, well-organized structures. One of the important features revealed is that post-flare coronal slinky formation is preceded by scale invariant structure formation in the underlying chromosphere/transition region. We suggest that the observed regularities can be understood within the framework of self-organized critical dynamics characterized by scale invariant structure formation with critical parameters largely determined by energy saturation level. The observed regularities per se may serve as a long-term precursor of strong flares and may help to study predictability of system behavior.

  15. Solar and Stellar Flares and Their Effects on Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kazunari

    2015-08-01

    Recent space observations of the Sun revealed that the solar atmosphere is full of explosions, such as flares and flare-like phenomena. These flares generate not only strong electromagnetic emissions but also nonthermal particles and bulk plasma ejections, which sometimes lead to geomagnetic storms and affect terrestrial environment and our civilization, damaging satellite, power-grids, radio communication etc. Solar flares are prototype of various explosions in our universe, and hence are important not only for geophysics and environmental science but also for astrophysics. The energy source of solar flares is now established to be magnetic energy stored near sunspots. There is now increasing observational evidence that solar flares are caused by magnetic reconnection, merging of anti-parallel magnetic field lines and associated magneto-plasma dynamics (Shibata and Magara 2011, Living Review). It has also been known that many stars show flares similar to solar flares, and often such stellar flares are much more energetic than solar flares. The total energy of a solar flare is typically 10^29 - 10^32 erg. On the other hand, there are much more energetic flares (10^33 - 10^38 erg) in stars, especially in young stars. These are called superflares. We argue that these superflares on stars can also be understood in a unified way based on the reconnection mechanism. Finally we show evidence of occurrence of superflares on Sun-like stars according to recent stellar observations (Maehara et al. 2012, Nature, Shibayama et al. 2013), which revealed that superflares with energy of 10^34 - 10^35 erg (100 - 1000 times of the largest solar flares) occur with frequency of once in 800 - 5000 years on Sun-like stars which are very similar to our Sun. Against the previous belief, these new observations as well as theory (Shibata et al. 2013) suggest that we cannot deny the possibility of superflares on the present Sun. Finally, we shall discuss possible impacts of these superflares

  16. Structures in the Algol Corona: Searching for Flare Eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favata, Fabio

    Our recent successful observation of a total eclipse of a large flare on Algol (with BeppoSAX) has demonstrated the diagnostic power of flare eclipses, allowing for the first time to derive the size of the coronal structure responsible for a stellar flare (and thus by inference the size of coronal structures in general) on purely geometrical grounds. The loop is compact, much smaller than deduced by the analysis of the flare decay, and located on the pole of the active star. We propose to observe Algol for two binary orbits searching for similar flare eclipses. Further detections of flare eclipses (for which RXTE, with its large effective area is ideally suited) will allow to directly constrain the characteristic sized of structures in the Algol corona.

  17. Effect of small flares in the neutral component of secondary cosmic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bondarenko, V. I.; Raychenko, L. V.; Yukhimuk, A. K.

    1974-01-01

    The results are presented of an investigation of the effect of small flares, scale divisions 1 and 1(+), in the neutron component of secondary cosmic radiation from the data of neutron supermonitors at the stations of Kiev, Bukhta Tiksi, and Deep River. It is shown that flares of scale divisions 1 and 1(+) are accompanied by an effect in the neutron component amounting to about 0.4%. A mechanism is presented for calculating the outflow of particles accelerated in small flares, owing to diffusion across the magnetic field of a trap.

  18. Effect of a solar flare on a traveling atmospheric disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Liying; Burns, Alan G.; Liu, Hanli; Chamberlin, Phillip C.

    2012-10-01

    It is known that the sudden injection of energy during geomagnetic storms can excite atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) or traveling atmospheric disturbances (TADs). Together with large-scale circulation, these AGWs/TADs transport energy and momentum away from their sources. In this paper, we investigate possible involvement of AGWs/TADs during solar flares. Model simulations of an X17 flare that occurred on October 28, 2003 shows that AGWs/TADS contributed to flare energy transport from the sunlit South-Pole region to the nightside equatorial region in 3-4 h, resulting in ˜10% nightside equatorial neutral density enhancement in the upper thermosphere. These nightside AGWs/TADs have a phase speed on the order of ˜750 m/s and a horizontal wavelength on the order of 4000 km. Enhanced solar heating to the thermosphere through enhanced ionization during flares occurs on the entire dayside, with the spatial scale of the increased solar heating being too large to excite AGWs/TADs. Further analysis revealed that strong localized enhancement of Joule heating was produced during the October 28, 2003 flare. This sudden injection of the localized heating, together with preexisting AGWs/TADs excited by moderate geomagnetic activity prior to the flare, produced intensified AGWs/TADs, which propagated energy and momentum to the equatorial region. On the other hand, model simulations showed that, under assumed geomagnetically quiet conditions, strong localized enhancement of Joule heating and AGWs/TADs were not produced during the flare. This interplay between geomagnetic activity and solar flares can be a challenge to space weather monitoring, specification, and forecasting.

  19. Straight line access and coronal flaring: effect on canal length.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Kyle P; Walton, Richard E; Rivera, Eric M

    2002-06-01

    The object of this study was to determine if canal length is altered as a result of straight-line access (SLA) and coronal flaring (CF). Selected were 86 canals of extracted molars and premolars from two groups: straight or severely curved (Schneider curvature <5 degrees and >20 degrees). The reference cusp tip and root-end were flattened to produce reproducible measurements. A #10 file was placed such that the tip extended slightly beyond the apex, with the handle on the referenced cusp. The amount of file protrusion was measured with a stereomicroscope. Then, SLA and CF were performed and the corresponding file replaced to the same coronal reference position. Apical file protrusion was measured again. The change in canal length was determined by the difference in the pre- and post-SLA/CF measurements. A Wilcoxon signed rank test statistically verified that there was a measurable, significant (p < 0.001) change in canal length after SLA and CF. The mean change overall was slight, with a decrease of 0.17 mm. Severe curvature had a slightly greater, significant effect on the amount of change. Tooth type had no significant effect. Changes in working length from SLA and CF, although statistically significant, were very small and clinically unimportant.

  20. Effects of camera location on the reconstruction of 3D flare trajectory with two cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özsaraç, Seçkin; Yeşilkaya, Muhammed

    2015-05-01

    Flares are used as valuable electronic warfare assets for the battle against infrared guided missiles. The trajectory of the flare is one of the most important factors that determine the effectiveness of the counter measure. Reconstruction of the three dimensional (3D) position of a point, which is seen by multiple cameras, is a common problem. Camera placement, camera calibration, corresponding pixel determination in between the images of different cameras and also the triangulation algorithm affect the performance of 3D position estimation. In this paper, we specifically investigate the effects of camera placement on the flare trajectory estimation performance by simulations. Firstly, 3D trajectory of a flare and also the aircraft, which dispenses the flare, are generated with simple motion models. Then, we place two virtual ideal pinhole camera models on different locations. Assuming the cameras are tracking the aircraft perfectly, the view vectors of the cameras are computed. Afterwards, using the view vector of each camera and also the 3D position of the flare, image plane coordinates of the flare on both cameras are computed using the field of view (FOV) values. To increase the fidelity of the simulation, we have used two sources of error. One is used to model the uncertainties in the determination of the camera view vectors, i.e. the orientations of the cameras are measured noisy. Second noise source is used to model the imperfections of the corresponding pixel determination of the flare in between the two cameras. Finally, 3D position of the flare is estimated using the corresponding pixel indices, view vector and also the FOV of the cameras by triangulation. All the processes mentioned so far are repeated for different relative camera placements so that the optimum estimation error performance is found for the given aircraft and are trajectories.

  1. Observations of a soft X-ray rising loop associated with a type II burst and a coronal mass ejection in the 03 November 2003 X-ray flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauphin, C.; Vilmer, N.; Krucker, S.

    2006-08-01

    Context: .We report observations of a type II burst - the signature of a shock wave - starting at the unusual high frequency of 650 MHz during the 03 November 2003 flare. This flare is associated with the propagation of a soft X-ray coronal loop and with a coronal mass ejection (CME). Aims: .We study in this paper the origin of the shock wave in the low corona and present a kinematics analysis of the soft X-ray coronal loop and of the CME observed a few tens of minutes later. Methods: .We study in this paper the spatial and temporal relation between the soft X-ray rising loop observed by the GOES soft X-ray Imager (GOES/SXI), the type II sources observed by the Nançay Radio Heliograph (NRH) and the CME observed by LASCO (Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronograph). Results: .This analysis shows that the type II burst observed during this flare is driven by the X-ray rising loop. Furthermore, the kinematics analysis of the X-ray coronal loop and CME shows that the two structures are related. Conclusions: .The direct comparison of the type II sources with the GOES/SXI observations clearly shows that the type II burst is ignited by the shock wave created ahead of the rising X-ray loop. Finally, we propose to interpret these different observations in the framework of an ascending magnetic structure with a reconnecting process operating in the tail of this ascending structure.

  2. One-loop effective lagrangians after matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Aguila, F.; Kunszt, Z.; Santiago, J.

    2016-05-01

    We discuss the limitations of the covariant derivative expansion prescription advocated to compute the one-loop Standard Model (SM) effective lagrangian when the heavy fields couple linearly to the SM. In particular, one-loop contributions resulting from the exchange of both heavy and light fields must be explicitly taken into account through matching because the proposed functional approach alone does not account for them. We review a simple case with a heavy scalar singlet of charge -1 to illustrate the argument. As two other examples where this matching is needed and this functional method gives a vanishing result, up to renormalization of the heavy sector parameters, we re-evaluate the one-loop corrections to the T-parameter due to a heavy scalar triplet with vanishing hypercharge coupling to the Brout-Englert-Higgs boson and to a heavy vector-like quark singlet of charged 2 / 3 mixing with the top quark, respectively. In all cases we make use of a new code for matching fundamental and effective theories in models with arbitrary heavy field additions.

  3. Leptogenesis from loop effects in curved spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Jamie I.; Shore, Graham M.

    2016-04-01

    We describe a new mechanism — radiatively-induced gravitational leptogenesis — for generating the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe. We show how quantum loop effects in C and CP violating theories cause matter and antimatter to propagate differently in the presence of gravity, and prove this is forbidden in flat space by CPT and translation symmetry. This generates a curvature-dependent chemical potential for leptons, allowing a matter-antimatter asymmetry to be generated in thermal equilibrium in the early Universe. The time-dependent dynamics necessary for leptogenesis is provided by the interaction of the virtual self-energy cloud of the leptons with the expanding curved spacetime background, which violates the strong equivalence principle and allows a distinction between matter and antimatter. We show here how this mechanism is realised in a particular BSM theory, the see-saw model, where the quantum loops involve the heavy sterile neutrinos responsible for light neutrino masses. We demonstrate by explicit computation of the relevant two-loop Feynman diagrams how the size of the radiative corrections relevant for leptogenesis becomes enhanced by increasing the mass hierarchy of the sterile neutrinos, and show how the induced lepton asymmetry may be sufficiently large to play an important rôle in determining the baryon-to-photon ratio of the Universe.

  4. Ionization effects due to solar flare on terrestrial ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Tan, A.

    1976-01-01

    Sudden frequency deviation ionospheric disturbances related to the flares of May 18 and 19, 1973 were observed from the NASA/MSFC high frequency Doppler sounder array system in Huntsville, Alabama. The results are compared with those observed at Table Mountain near Boulder, Colorado and at the University of Hawaii.

  5. The flare kernel in the impulsive phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejager, C.

    1986-01-01

    The impulsive phase of a flare is characterized by impulsive bursts of X-ray and microwave radiation, related to impulsive footpoint heating up to 50 or 60 MK, by upward gas velocities (150 to 400 km/sec) and by a gradual increase of the flare's thermal energy content. These phenomena, as well as non-thermal effects, are all related to the impulsive energy injection into the flare. The available observations are also quantitatively consistent with a model in which energy is injected into the flare by beams of energetic electrons, causing ablation of chromospheric gas, followed by convective rise of gas. Thus, a hole is burned into the chromosphere; at the end of impulsive phase of an average flare the lower part of that hole is situated about 1800 km above the photosphere. H alpha and other optical and UV line emission is radiated by a thin layer (approx. 20 km) at the bottom of the flare kernel. The upward rising and outward streaming gas cools down by conduction in about 45 s. The non-thermal effects in the initial phase are due to curtailing of the energy distribution function by escape of energetic electrons. The single flux tube model of a flare does not fit with these observations; instead we propose the spaghetti-bundle model. Microwave and gamma-ray observations suggest the occurrence of dense flare knots of approx. 800 km diameter, and of high temperature. Future observations should concentrate on locating the microwave/gamma-ray sources, and on determining the kernel's fine structure and the related multi-loop structure of the flaring area.

  6. Generalized effective description of loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Gupt, Brajesh

    2015-10-01

    The effective description of loop quantum cosmology (LQC) has proved to be a convenient platform to study phenomenological implications of the quantum bounce that resolves the classical big bang singularity. Originally, this description was derived using Gaussian quantum states with small dispersions. In this paper we present a generalization to incorporate states with large dispersions. Specifically, we derive the generalized effective Friedmann and Raychaudhuri equations and propose a generalized effective Hamiltonian which are being used in an ongoing study of the phenomenological consequences of a broad class of quantum geometries. We also discuss an interesting interplay between the physics of states with larger dispersions in standard LQC, and of sharply peaked states in (hypothetical) LQC theories with larger area gap.

  7. Effective scenario of loop quantum cosmology.

    PubMed

    Ding, You; Ma, Yongge; Yang, Jinsong

    2009-02-01

    Semiclassical states in isotropic loop quantum cosmology are employed to show that the improved dynamics has the correct classical limit. The effective Hamiltonian for the quantum cosmological model with a massless scalar field is thus obtained, which incorporates also the next to leading order quantum corrections. The possibility that the higher order correction terms may lead to significant departure from the leading order effective scenario is revealed. If the semiclassicality of the model is maintained in the large scale limit, there are great possibilities for a k=0 Friedmann expanding universe to undergo a collapse in the future due to the quantum gravity effect. Thus the quantum bounce and collapse may contribute a cyclic universe in the new scenario.

  8. Post-flare effects in the lower ionosphere of middle latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krivsky, L.

    1989-01-01

    Beginning in the 1960s, records were made of noise from the region around the Polar Star on 29 MHz (Krivsky and Tlamicha, 1960) at the Ondrejov Observatory near Prague. Since the aerial characteristic was not too narrow, radio bursts were received of solar origin (of flares) at the noise level, SCNA effects (sudden cosmic noise absorption) at the time of intensive flare X-emission and in some rare cases, after large proton flares, small absorption effects of a few hours duration (Krivsky, 1969). These post-flare absorption effects in cosmic noise are evidently analogous with PCA effects (polar cap absorption) and are connected with ionospheric absorption of radio cosmic noise, caused by fast particles of subcosmic radiation. The recording of long term absorption effects after large particle flares at European midlatitudes was reported at the beginning of the 1960s. It was then usual to record radio cosmic noise with riometers at frequencies of about 18 MHz in the polar or subpolar regions in an effort to record PCA effects of subcosmic radiation (Hakura, 1968). An attempt was made to record the complex of emissions mentioned as well as the effects in a new frequency range (30 MHz), which did not agree with the ideas of the contemporaneous representatives of the Ionospheric Department of the Geophysical Institute in Prague. In recent years radio cosmic noise has been recorded at the Upice Observatory. These long term after flare effects of cosmic radio noise absorption (AF-CNA) at middle latitudes are reported to the geophysical and ionospheric community for the first time.

  9. Effect of enhanced x-ray flux on the ionosphere over Cyprus during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, Md. Golam; Haralambous, Haris

    2015-06-01

    In this work we study the effect of solar flares on the ionosphere over Cyprus. Solar flares are impulsive solar activity events usually coupled with Coronal Mass Ejection (CME). The arrival and the subsequent impact of solar flares on geospace, following an eruption on the Sun's surface is almost immediate (around 9 min) whereas the impact of CMEs is rather delayed (2-3 days) as the former is based on X-ray radiation whereas the latter phenomenon is related with particles and magnetic fields travelling at lower speeds via the Solar Wind. The penetration of X-rays down to the Dregion following such an event enhances the electron density. This increase can be monitored by ionosondes, which measure the electron density up to the maximum electron density NmF2. The significance of this increase lies on the increase of signal absorption causing limited window of operating frequencies for HF communications. In this study the effect of enhanced X-ray flux on the ionosphere over Cyprus during solar flares has been investigated. To establish the correlation and extent of impact on different layers, data of X-ray intensity from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and ionospheric characteristics (D & F layer) over Nicosia station (35° N, 33° E) were examined for all solar flares during the period 2011-2014. The analysis revealed a positive and good correlation between frequency of minimum reflection, fmin and X-ray intensity for D layer demonstrating that X-rays play a dominant role in the ionization of lower ionosphere. Hence, X-ray flux can be used as a good proxy for studying the solar flare effects on lower ionosphere. The correlation coefficient between maximum electron density of F layer, NmF2 and X-ray intensity was found to be poor.

  10. Assessing out-of-band flare effects at the wafer level for EUV lithography

    SciTech Connect

    George, Simi; Naulleau, Patrick; Kemp, Charles; Denham, Paul; Rekawa, Senajith

    2010-01-25

    To accurately estimate the flare contribution from the out-of-band (OOB), the integration of a DUV source into the SEMATECH Berkeley 0.3-NA Micro-field Exposure tool is proposed, enabling precisely controlled exposures along with the EUV patterning of resists in vacuum. First measurements evaluating the impact of bandwidth selected exposures with a table-top set-up and subsequent EUV patterning show significant impact on line-edge roughness and process performance. We outline a simulation-based method for computing the effective flare from resist sensitive wavelengths as a function of mask pattern types and sizes. This simulation method is benchmarked against measured OOB flare measurements and the results obtained are in agreement.

  11. Quantitative assessment of the effects of pupillary dilation on aqueous flare in eyes with chronic anterior uveitis using laser flare photometry.

    PubMed

    Ikeji, Felicia; Pavesio, Carlos; Bunce, Catey; White, Edward

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether pupillary dilation has any effect on anterior chamber flare measurements using a Kowa laser flare meter (FM-500) in patients with chronic anterior uveitis (CAU). Twenty-five eyes of 25 consecutive patients with CAU were assessed for anterior chamber inflammation by an experienced operator using the Kowa laser flare meter. Ten measurements were taken in total, with the highest and the lowest measurements deducted. The mean value and standard deviation was then recorded. One drop of tropicamide 1% and phenylephrine 2.5% was then applied and after 30 min the measurements were repeated and the results recorded. Sixteen women (64%) and nine men (36%) were recruited. The majority of patients were white Caucasian (68%). Fifteen left and ten right eyes were studied and the median (interquartile range: IQR) visual acuity was 6/9 (6/6-6/18). Iris colour was classified as brown, blue, grey/hazel and hazel. Thirteen eyes (52%) had brown irises, eight (32%) had blue, two had grey and the remainder were grey/hazel and hazel. The mean (SD) age was 50.8 (12.59) years. The median (IQR) flare reading before dilation was 17.93 (8.33-29.93) and after dilation was 15.97 (10.17-29.4). The mean change was -0.74 which was not a statistically significantly different to 0 (P=0.25) and the 95% limits of agreements ranged from -6.91 to 5.43. This study showed little evidence of any systematic difference between dilated and undilated flare measurements. The measurement of flare was not affected by the dilation of the pupil and measurements could be taken before or after papillary dilation for the purpose of patient follow-up data and clinical studies. PMID:20502943

  12. Quantitative assessment of the effects of pupillary dilation on aqueous flare in eyes with chronic anterior uveitis using laser flare photometry.

    PubMed

    Ikeji, Felicia; Pavesio, Carlos; Bunce, Catey; White, Edward

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether pupillary dilation has any effect on anterior chamber flare measurements using a Kowa laser flare meter (FM-500) in patients with chronic anterior uveitis (CAU). Twenty-five eyes of 25 consecutive patients with CAU were assessed for anterior chamber inflammation by an experienced operator using the Kowa laser flare meter. Ten measurements were taken in total, with the highest and the lowest measurements deducted. The mean value and standard deviation was then recorded. One drop of tropicamide 1% and phenylephrine 2.5% was then applied and after 30 min the measurements were repeated and the results recorded. Sixteen women (64%) and nine men (36%) were recruited. The majority of patients were white Caucasian (68%). Fifteen left and ten right eyes were studied and the median (interquartile range: IQR) visual acuity was 6/9 (6/6-6/18). Iris colour was classified as brown, blue, grey/hazel and hazel. Thirteen eyes (52%) had brown irises, eight (32%) had blue, two had grey and the remainder were grey/hazel and hazel. The mean (SD) age was 50.8 (12.59) years. The median (IQR) flare reading before dilation was 17.93 (8.33-29.93) and after dilation was 15.97 (10.17-29.4). The mean change was -0.74 which was not a statistically significantly different to 0 (P=0.25) and the 95% limits of agreements ranged from -6.91 to 5.43. This study showed little evidence of any systematic difference between dilated and undilated flare measurements. The measurement of flare was not affected by the dilation of the pupil and measurements could be taken before or after papillary dilation for the purpose of patient follow-up data and clinical studies.

  13. The response of the chromosphere during a stellar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.

    1991-01-01

    A set of chromospheric models was developed, having a coronal loop geometry, energy balance through the entire loop from photosphere to corona, and a rigorous treatment of the radiative transfer in the important, optically thick, chromospheric emission lines. The models show that the soft X-ray emission and thermal conduction from a long lived hot corona are effective heating agents in the lower atmosphere during the gradual phase of stellar flares. The model predictions show the correct order of magnitude for the emission lines produced during the gradual phase of the flare with a reasonable coronal temperature evolution.

  14. Xrt And Shinx Joint Flare Study: Ar 11024

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engell, Alexander; Sylwester, J.; Siarkowski, M.

    2010-05-01

    From 12:00 UT on July 3 through July 7, 2009 SphinX (Solar Photometer IN X-rays) observes 130 flares with active region (AR) 11024 being the only AR on disk. XRT (X-Ray Telescope) is able to observe 64 of these flare events. The combination of both instruments results in a flare study revealing (1) a relationship between flux emergence and flare rate, (2) that the presence of active region loops typically results in different flare morphologies (single and multiple loop flares) then when there is a lack of an active region loop environment where more cusp and point-like flares are observed, (3) cusp and point-like flares often originate from the same location, and (4) a distribution of flare temperatures corresponding to the different flare morphologies. The differences between the observed flare morphologies may occur as the result of the heated plasma through the flaring process being confined by the proximity of loop structures as for the single and multiple loop flares, while for cusp and point-like flares they occur in an early-phase environment that lack loop presence. The continuing flux emergence of AR 11024 likely provides different magnetic interactions and may be the source responsible for all of the flares.

  15. Effect of a Flared Renal Stent on the Performance of Fenestrated Stent-Grafts at Rest and Exercise Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kandail, Harkamaljot; Hamady, Mohamad; Xu, Xiao Yun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the hemodynamic impact of a flared renal stent on the performance of fenestrated stent-grafts (FSGs) by analyzing flow patterns and wall shear stress–derived parameters in flared and nonflared FSGs in different physiologic scenarios. Methods: Hypothetical models of FSGs were created with and without flaring of the proximal portion of the renal stent. Flared FSGs with different dilation angles and protrusion lengths were examined, as well as a nonplanar flared FSG to account for lumbar curvature. Laminar and pulsatile blood flow was simulated by numerically solving Navier-Stokes equations. A physiologically realistic flow rate waveform was prescribed at the inlet, while downstream vasculature was modeled using a lumped parameter 3-element windkessel model. No slip boundary conditions were imposed at the FSG walls, which were assumed to be rigid. While resting simulations were performed on all the FSGs, exercise simulations were also performed on a flared FSG to quantify the effect of flaring in different physiologic scenarios. Results: For cycle-averaged inflow of 2.94 L/min (rest) and 4.63 L/min (exercise), 27% of blood flow was channeled into each renal branch at rest and 21% under exercise for all the flared FSGs examined. Although the renal flow waveform was not affected by flaring, flow within the flared FSGs was disturbed. This flow disturbance led to high endothelial cell activation potential (ECAP) values at the renal ostia for all the flared geometries. Reducing the dilation angle or protrusion length and exercise lowered the ECAP values for flared FSGs. Conclusion: Flaring of renal stents has a negligible effect on the time dependence of renal flow rate waveforms and can maintain sufficient renal perfusion at rest and exercise. Local flow patterns are, however, strongly dependent on renal flaring, which creates a local flow disturbance and may increase the thrombogenicity at the renal ostia. Smaller dilation angles, shorter

  16. Hydrodynamic instability of a thermosyphon loop with wall damping effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bin-Juine; Hu, S.-P.

    1992-04-01

    An analysis using linear system theory and Nyquist criterion was carried out in the present study to investigate the hydrodynamic instability of a thermosyphon loop. The analytical results show that the loop becomes more unstable (i.e., the area of the stable region is reduced) if the length of the heater or cooler section increases or the loop aspect ratio W/H decreases. The present results indicate that the consideration of hydrodynamic instability in the thermosyphon loop or many similar engineering systems could be overlooked if the damping effect of wall is present.

  17. Inverse spin Hall effect in a closed loop circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Omori, Y.; Auvray, F.; Wakamura, T.; Niimi, Y.; Fert, A.

    2014-06-16

    We present measurements of inverse spin Hall effects (ISHEs), in which the conversion of a spin current into a charge current via the ISHE is detected not as a voltage in a standard open circuit but directly as the charge current generated in a closed loop. The method is applied to the ISHEs of Bi-doped Cu and Pt. The derived expression of ISHE for the loop structure can relate the charge current flowing into the loop to the spin Hall angle of the SHE material and the resistance of the loop.

  18. The Importance of Geometric Effects in Coronal Loop Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikić, Zoran; Lionello, Roberto; Mok, Yung; Linker, Jon A.; Winebarger, Amy R.

    2013-08-01

    We systematically investigate the effects of geometrical assumptions in one-dimensional (1D) models of coronal loops. Many investigations of coronal loops have been based on restrictive assumptions, including symmetry in the loop shape and heating profile, and a uniform cross-sectional area. Starting with a solution for a symmetric uniform-area loop with uniform heating, we gradually relax these restrictive assumptions to consider the effects of nonuniform area, nonuniform heating, a nonsymmetric loop shape, and nonsymmetric heating, to show that the character of the solutions can change in important ways. We find that loops with nonuniform cross-sectional area are more likely to experience thermal nonequilibrium, and that they produce significantly enhanced coronal emission, compared with their uniform-area counterparts. We identify a process of incomplete condensation in loops experiencing thermal nonequilibrium during which the coronal parts of loops never fully cool to chromospheric temperatures. These solutions are characterized by persistent siphon flows. Their properties agree with observations (Lionello et al.) and may not suffer from the drawbacks that led Klimchuk et al. to conclude that thermal nonequilibrium is not consistent with observations. We show that our 1D results are qualitatively similar to those seen in a three-dimensional model of an active region. Our results suggest that thermal nonequilibrium may play an important role in the behavior of coronal loops, and that its dismissal by Klimchuk et al., whose model suffered from some of the restrictive assumptions we described, may have been premature.

  19. THE IMPORTANCE OF GEOMETRIC EFFECTS IN CORONAL LOOP MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Mikic, Zoran; Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mok, Yung; Winebarger, Amy R.

    2013-08-20

    We systematically investigate the effects of geometrical assumptions in one-dimensional (1D) models of coronal loops. Many investigations of coronal loops have been based on restrictive assumptions, including symmetry in the loop shape and heating profile, and a uniform cross-sectional area. Starting with a solution for a symmetric uniform-area loop with uniform heating, we gradually relax these restrictive assumptions to consider the effects of nonuniform area, nonuniform heating, a nonsymmetric loop shape, and nonsymmetric heating, to show that the character of the solutions can change in important ways. We find that loops with nonuniform cross-sectional area are more likely to experience thermal nonequilibrium, and that they produce significantly enhanced coronal emission, compared with their uniform-area counterparts. We identify a process of incomplete condensation in loops experiencing thermal nonequilibrium during which the coronal parts of loops never fully cool to chromospheric temperatures. These solutions are characterized by persistent siphon flows. Their properties agree with observations (Lionello et al.) and may not suffer from the drawbacks that led Klimchuk et al. to conclude that thermal nonequilibrium is not consistent with observations. We show that our 1D results are qualitatively similar to those seen in a three-dimensional model of an active region. Our results suggest that thermal nonequilibrium may play an important role in the behavior of coronal loops, and that its dismissal by Klimchuk et al., whose model suffered from some of the restrictive assumptions we described, may have been premature.

  20. The sun's spots and flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, David M.

    1987-01-01

    The Solar Maximum Mission (SMM), designed to study the solar activity, was launched on February 14, 1980, just before the 1980 peak of sunspot and flare activity. The seven instruments aboard the SMM, information received by each of the instruments, and the performance of these instruments are described, together with the repair mission carried out to replace the attitude control module and the defective electronics in the satellite's observatory. The highlights of the scientific results obtained by the SMM mission and the new discoveries made are discussed, with special attention given to the flare loops, flare loop interactions, and the mass ejection events recorded.

  1. Ionospheric and magnetospheric effects of solar flares monitored by ground-based riometer and magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronan Coelho Stekel, Tardelli; Schuch, Nelson Jorge; Echer, Ezequiel; Guarnieri, Fernando; Makita, Kazuo; Espindola Antunes, Cassio; Moro, Juliano; Machado Paulo, Claudio

    The solar flare incidence follows a behavior similar to the solar cycle activity, which results in periodic disturbances on the Earth's ionosphere and magnetosphere. The correlation of this phenomenon can provide important information about the magnetosphere, the Sun/Earth interaction, as well as events occurring in the ionosphere which can, for instance, generate disturbances in telecommunications, small satellites or even in the space weather. Riometer and magnetometers data analysis can provide useful way for measuring and understanding the effects of solar flare radiation in the ionosphere and magnetosphere. The Solar Flare effect (SFE) is associated with the sudden change of ionospheric currents caused by the extra ionization produced by soft X-ray (0.1 to 9.0 nm) and EUV (9.0 to 100.0 nm) radiation from the solar flare. The objective of this work is to present the correlation of the ionospheric and magnetospheric (H, D, Z) sudden disturbances due to high-intensity solar flares (M and X class), that can emit up to 1032 ergs of energy. For this purpose, analysis were performed for the riometer and magnetometers dedicated to study the Solar-Earth interactions at the Southern Space Observatory (SSO/CRS/INPE -MCT), (29.4° S, 53.8° W, 480m a.s.l), São Martinho da a Serra, RS, Brazil. To identify and investigate the sudden radiation increase caused by the solar flare, the X-ray data (0.1 to 0.8 nm) from GOES Satellites and the EUV data (26.0 to 34.0 nm and 0.1 to 50.0 nm) from the Solar EUV Monitor (SEM) on the SOHO spacecraft are correlated. With the analysis of these ground-based instruments and spacecrafts data, the correlation of the solar activity and the magnetospheric and ionospheric disturbances were performed, as for the Sudden Ionospheric Disturbance (SID) and Magnetic Crochet about 60% D-component variation during a large solar flare was observed.

  2. Effect of a Radiation Cooling and Heating Function on Standing Longitudinal Oscillations in Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Moon, Y.-J.

    2016-06-01

    Standing long-period (with periods longer than several minutes) oscillations in large, hot (with a temperature higher than 3 MK) coronal loops have been observed as the quasi-periodic modulation of the EUV and microwave intensity emission and the Doppler shift of coronal emission lines, and they have been interpreted as standing slow magnetoacoustic (longitudinal) oscillations. Quasi-periodic pulsations of shorter periods, detected in thermal and non-thermal emissions in solar flares could be produced by a similar mechanism. We present theoretical modeling of the standing slow magnetoacoustic mode, showing that this mode of oscillation is highly sensitive to peculiarities of the radiative cooling and heating function. We generalized the theoretical model of standing slow magnetoacoustic oscillations in a hot plasma, including the effects of the radiative losses and accounting for plasma heating. The heating mechanism is not specified and taken empirically to compensate the cooling by radiation and thermal conduction. It is shown that the evolution of the oscillations is described by a generalized Burgers equation. The numerical solution of an initial value problem for the evolutionary equation demonstrates that different dependences of the radiative cooling and plasma heating on the temperature lead to different regimes of the oscillations, including growing, quasi-stationary, and rapidly decaying. Our findings provide a theoretical foundation for probing the coronal heating function and may explain the observations of decayless long-period, quasi-periodic pulsations in flares. The hydrodynamic approach employed in this study should be considered with caution in the modeling of non-thermal emission associated with flares, because it misses potentially important non-hydrodynamic effects.

  3. Fine Structure in Solar Flares.

    PubMed

    Warren

    2000-06-20

    We present observations of several large two-ribbon flares observed with both the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) and the soft X-ray telescope on Yohkoh. The high spatial resolution TRACE observations show that solar flare plasma is generally not confined to a single loop or even a few isolated loops but to a multitude of fine coronal structures. These observations also suggest that the high-temperature flare plasma generally appears diffuse while the cooler ( less, similar2 MK) postflare plasma is looplike. We conjecture that the diffuse appearance of the high-temperature flare emission seen with TRACE is due to a combination of the emission measure structure of these flares and the instrumental temperature response and does not reflect fundamental differences in plasma morphology at the different temperatures.

  4. EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF QUASI-PERIODIC PULSATIONS IN A SOLAR POST-FLARE CUSP-SHAPE LOOP WITH SDO/AIA

    SciTech Connect

    Su, J. T.; Shen, Y. D.; Liu, Y.

    2012-07-20

    We present extreme-ultraviolet multi-wavelength observations with the SDO/AIA instruments of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) propagating along a cusp-shaped loop formed after an M2.2 flare on the Sun. Our motivation is to detect whether there were slow-mode magnetoacoustic waves propagating along its protruding flux tube. To this end, with fast Fourier transform we extract the short (<3 minutes) and long (>3 minutes) period components of the QPPs from time-space diagrams of the tube slices. We find that velocity differences did exist among the short/long-period components of different wavelengths, but only one event in the long-period ones showed they were greater than the measurement errors (e.g., 65 km s{sup -1}), which were 330 km s{sup -1} detected in 171 A, 590 km s{sup -1} in 211 A, and 180 km s{sup -1} in 304 A. The intensity modulation in all wavelengths is found to be very large, e.g., {approx}60% of the emission trend for an event in the 171 A passband, which would be an order of magnitude higher than the perturbation of the plasma density in the slow-mode magnetoacoustic waves. Moreover, only the QPPs with upward velocities of 50-300 km s{sup -1} are found in the tube, and the downward ones of several tens of kilometers are never unambiguously detected. Therefore, most of the QPP events under study were likely the episodic outflows along the tube, and the one with a supersonic speed of 590 km s{sup -1} may be a kink wave.

  5. Solar flares. [plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with explosions in a magnetized solar plasma, known as flares, whose effects are seen throughout the electromagnetic spectrum, from gamma-rays through the visible and to the radio band. The diverse phenomena associated with flares are discussed, along with the physical mechanisms that have been advanced to explain them. The impact of solar flare research on the development of plasma physics and magnetohydrodynamics is noted. The rapid development of solar flare research during the past 20 years, owing to the availability of high-resolution images, detailed magnetic field measurements, and improved spectral data, is illustrated.

  6. Radiative and reconnection instabilities - Compressible and viscous effects. [for solar flares and filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tachi, T.; Steinolfson, R. S.; Van Hoven, G.

    1985-01-01

    Filaments and flares are prominent indicators of the magnetic fields of solar activity. These instability phenomena arise from the influence of weak transport effects (radiation and resistivity, respectively) on coronal magnetodynamics and energy flow. It has been shown that the filament and flare (tearing or reconnection) mechanisms are resistively coupled in sheared magnetic fields of the kind existing in active regions. The present paper expands this treatment to include the effects of compressibility and viscosity, which are most prominent at short wavelengths. The results show that compressibility affects the radiative mode, including a modest increase of its growth rate, and that viscosity modifies the tearing mode, partially through a decrease of its growth rate. A comprehensive discussion of the mode structures and flows is presented. The strongest effect found is a reversal, at very long wavelengths, of the radiative cooling of the resistive interior layer of the tearing mode, caused by compressional heating.

  7. Solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.

    1974-01-01

    A review of the knowledge about solar flares which has been obtained through observations from the earth and from space by various methods. High-resolution cinematography is best carried out at H-alpha wavelengths to reveal the structure, time history, and location of flares. The classification flares in H alpha according to either physical or morphological criteria is discussed. The study of flare morphology, which shows where, when, and how flares occur, is important for evaluating theories of flares. Consideration is given to studies of flares by optical spectroscopy, radio emissions, and at X-ray and XUV wavelengths. Research has shown where and possibly why flares occur, but the physics of the instability involved, of the particle acceleration, and of the heating are still not understood.

  8. Analysis of flares in the chromosphere and corona of main- and pre-main-sequence M-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo-Chacón, I.

    2015-11-01

    having an accretion disk) we carry out a detailed analysis of an extremely long rise phase and of a shorter, weaker flare (allowing us to compare the results with those reported for young stars but surrounded by disks). Assuming multitemperature models to describe the coronal flaring plasma, we have calculated the metal abundance, the electron temperatures and the respective emission measures by fitting the spectra with the Astrophysical Plasma Emission Code included in the XSPEC software, which calculates spectral models for hot, optically thin plasmas. Moreover, we are able to estimate the size of the flaring loops by using theoretical models. These sizes give us an idea about the extent of the corona. For those flares in which heating does not entirely drive the flare evolution we use the models reported by Reale (2007) and Reale et al. (1997) for the rise and decay phases, respectively, including the effect of sustained heating during the decay. Instead, the stellar version of the Kopp & Poletto (1984)'s solar two-ribbon flare model (Poletto et al. 1988) is used when the residual heating completely drives the flare over the plasma cooling. Later, we apply the so-called RTV scaling laws (Rosner et al. 1978) and other fundamental laws of physics to determine additional characteristics of the plasma contained in the flaring loops (electron density and pressure), as well as the volume of the flaring region, the heating rate per unit volume, and the strength of the magnetic field required to confine this plasma. Making some assumptions we are also able to estimate the number of loops involved in the observed flares and the kind of magnetic structures present in the atmosphere of these types of stars. Finally, we discuss and interpret the results in the context of solar and stellar flares reported so far.

  9. Determining the flare dispensing program effectiveness against conical-scan and spin-scan reticle systems via Gaussian mixture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahingil, Mehmet C.; Aslan, Murat Ş.

    2013-05-01

    The reticle systems which are considered as the classical approach for determining the angular position of radiating targets in infrared band are widely used in early generation surface-to-air and air-to-air infrared guided missile seekers. One of the cost-effective ways of protecting aircrafts against these missiles is to dispense flare decoys from the countermeasure dispensing system (CMDS) integrated into the aircraft platform. Although this counter-measuring technique seems very simple, if not optimized carefully, it may not be effective for protecting the aircraft. Flares should be dispensed in accordance with a specific dispensing program which determines the number of flares to be dispensed from each dispenser of the CMDS and timing sequence of dispensing. Optimizing the parameters of the dispensing program is not trivial. It requires a good understanding of the operating principle of the threat seeker, operational capabilities of own platform and engagement scenario between them. In the present paper, we propose a complete simulation-based procedure to form an effectiveness boundary of flare dispensing programs against the spin-scan and conical-scan reticle seekers. The region of effectiveness is determined via Gaussian mixture models. The raw data is collected via extensive number of simulations using a MATLAB-coded simulator which models reticle-based seeker, aircraft radiation, aircraft motion, aircraft CMDS system, flare motion and flare radiation.

  10. The Role of Entropic Effects on DNA Loop Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, David; Tkachenko, Alexei; Lillian, Todd; Perkins, Noel; Meiners, Jens Christian

    2009-03-01

    The formation of protein mediated DNA loops often regulates gene expression. Typically, a protein is simultaneously bound to two DNA operator sites. An example is the lactose repressor which binds to the Lac operon of E. coli. We characterize the mechanics of this system by calculating the free energy cost of loop formation. We construct a Hamiltonian that describes the change in DNA bending energy due to linear perturbations about the looped and open states, starting from a non-linear mechanical rod model that determines the shape and bending energy of the inter-operator DNA loop while capturing the intrinsic curvature and sequence-dependent elasticity of the DNA. The crystal structure of the LacI protein provides the boundary conditions for the DNA. We then calculate normal modes of the open and closed loops to account for the thermal fluctuations. The ratio of determinants of the two Hamiltonians yields the partition function, and the enthalphic and entropic cost of looping. This calculation goes beyond standard elastic energy models because it fully accounts for the substantial entropic differences between the two states. It also includes effects of sequence dependent curvature and stiffness and allows anisotropic variations in persistence length. From the free energy we then calculate the J-factor and ratio of loop lifetimes.

  11. The Effects of Hairpin loops on Ligand-DNA Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Binh; Wilson, W. David

    2009-01-01

    Hairpin nucleic acids are frequently used in physical studies due to their greater thermal stability compared to their equivalent duplex structures. They are also good models for more complex loop-containing structures such as quadruplexes, i-motifs, cruciforms, and molecular beacons. Although a connecting loop can increase stability, there is little information on how the loop influences the interactions of small molecules with attached base-paired nucleic acid regions. In this study, the effects of different hairpin loops on the interactions of A/T specific DNA minor groove binding agents with a common stem sequence have been investigated by spectroscopic and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor methods. The results indicate that the hairpin loop has little influence on the specific site interactions on the stem but significantly affects nonspecific binding. The use of a non-nucleotide loop (with a reduced negative charge) not only enhances the thermal stability of the hairpin but also reduces the non-specific binding at the loop without compromising the primary binding affinity on the stem. PMID:19778070

  12. SECONDARY FLARE RIBBONS OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Li, Ting; Yang, Shuhong E-mail: liting@nao.cas.cn

    2014-02-20

    Using the observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we statistically investigate the flare ribbons (FRs) of 19 X-class flares of the 24th solar cycle from 2010 June to 2013 August. Of these 19 flares, the source regions of 16 can be observed by AIA and the FRs of each flare are well detected, and 11 of the 16 display multiple ribbons. Based on the ribbon brightness and the relationship between the ribbons and post-flare loops, we divide the multiple ribbons into two types: normal FRs, which are connected by post-flare loops and have been extensively investigated, and secondary flare ribbons (SFRs), which are weaker than the FRs, not connected by post-flare loops, and always have a short lifetime. Of the 11 SFRs, 10 appear simultaneously with the FRs, and none of them have post-flare loops. The last one, on the other hand, appears 80 minutes later than the FR, lasts almost two hours, and also has no post-flare loops detected. We suggest that the magnetic reconnection associated with this SFR is triggered by the blast wave that results from the main flare. These observations imply that in some flare processes, more than two sets of magnetic loops or more than twice the number of magnetic reconnections are involved.

  13. Evaluation the effect of energetic particles in solar flares on satellite's life time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, Z.; Davoudifar, P.

    2016-09-01

    As the satellites have a multiple role in the humans' life, their damages and therefore logical failures of their segment causes problems and lots of expenses. So evaluating different types of failures in their segments has a crustal role. Solar particles are one of the most important reasons of segment damages (hard and soft) during a solar event or in usual times. During a solar event these particle may cause extensive damages which are even permanent (hard errors). To avoid these effects and design shielding mediums, we need to know SEP (solar energetic particles) flux and MTTF (mean time between two failures) of segments. In the present work, we calculated SEP flux witch collide the satellite in common times, in different altitudes. OMERE software was used to determine the coordinates and specifications of a satellite which in simulations has been launched to space. Then we considered a common electronic computer part and calculated MTTF for it. In the same way the SEP fluxes were calculated during different solar flares of different solar cycles and MTFFs were evaluated during occurring of solar flares. Thus a relation between solar flare energy and life time of the satellite electronic part (hours) was obtained.

  14. Effect of flaring of natural gas in oil fields of Assam on rice cultivation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, K K; Hazarika, S; Kalita, B; Sharma, B

    2011-07-01

    Assam (India) is endowed with natural resources like oil, coal and natural gas. The crude oil, one of the most precious natural resources, is found in the districts of upper Assam. During the process of extraction of crude oil, low-pressure natural gas is burnt in the air. Most of the oil wells in upper Assam are located near rice fields and therefore, rice crop grown near the oil wells is exposed to light uninterruptedly causing grain sterility resulting significant loss in grain yield. To identify promising varieties for these areas, we studied the effect of flare on rice varieties with different photoperiod sensitivity. The high light intensity and increased light hours were the factors responsible for substantial loss in grain yield near the flare resulting from delay in flower initiation, reduction of panicle length, having less number of grains per panicle and more grain sterility. To prevent significant loss in yield, photoperiod-sensitive traditional and improved rice varieties should not be grown up to the distance of 80 and 100 m, respectively from the boundary wall of the flare pit. Modern weakly-photoperiod sensitive varieties like Ranjti and Mahsuri can be grown 40 m away from the wall while modern photoperiod insensitive variety like Jaya, can be cultivated 20 m away from the wall without significant loss in yield. PMID:23029930

  15. Large-scale brightenings associated with flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandrini, Cristina H.; Machado, Marcos E.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that large-scale brightenings (LSBs) associated with solar flares, similar to the 'giant arches' discovered by Svestka et al. (1982) in images obtained by the SSM HXIS hours after the onset of two-ribbon flares, can also occur in association with confined flares in complex active regions. For these events, a clear link between the LSB and the underlying flare is clearly evident from the active-region magnetic field topology. The implications of these findings are discussed within the framework of the interacting loops of flares and the giant arch phenomenology.

  16. Flares in childhood eczema.

    PubMed

    Langan, S M

    2009-01-01

    Eczema is a major public health problem affecting children worldwide. Few studies have directly assessed triggers for disease flares. This paper presents evidence from a published systematic review and a prospective cohort study looking at flare factors in eczema. This systematic review suggested that foodstuffs in selected groups, dust exposure, unfamiliar pets, seasonal variation, stress, and irritants may be important in eczema flares. We performed a prospective cohort study that focused on environmental factors and identified associations between exposure to nylon clothing, dust, unfamiliar pets, sweating, shampoo, and eczema flares. Results from this study also demonstrated some new key findings. First, the effect of shampoo was found to increase in cold weather, and second, combinations of environmental factors were associated with disease exacerbation, supporting a multiple component disease model. This information is likely to be useful to families and may lead to the ability to reduce disease flares in the future. PMID:20054505

  17. Effect of helix stability on the formation of loop-loop complexes.

    PubMed

    Sehdev, Preeti; Crews, Gordon; Soto, Ana Maria

    2012-12-01

    Kissing loop complexes are loop-loop complexes where two RNA hairpins interact through their complementary loops. In this work, we have investigated the role of the helical stems on the ability of hairpins derived from the ColE1 plasmid to associate as kissing loop complexes in the presence and absence of divalent cations. Our results show that although kissing loop complexes form more readily in the presence of Mg(2+), they are able to form in the presence of 850 mM NaCl, as long as their stems contain at least six base-pairs. Formation of the Na(+) loop-loop complexes is facilitated by changing the sequence at the stem-loop interface to include less stable AU base pairs. We suggest that the conformation at the stem-loop interface is critical in the formation of kissing loop complexes and that in the absence of Mg(2+) the conformation at the stem-loop interface is packed more loosely than with Mg(2+), to allow for a lower charge density. Consistent with this hypothesis, shortening the stems to five base pairs results in unfolding of the hairpins and formation of an extended duplex rather than a kissing loop complex because the short stems are not stable enough to tolerate the necessary conformation at the stem-loop interface to allow the formation of a kissing loop complex. PMID:23094588

  18. The flares of August 1972. [solar flare characteristics and spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.; Tanaka, K.

    1973-01-01

    Observations of the August, 1972 flares at Big Bear and Tel Aviv, involving monochromatic movies, magnetograms, and spectra, are analyzed. The region (McMath 11976) showed inverted polarity from its inception on July 11; the great activity was due to extremely high shear and gradients in the magnetic field, as well as a constant invasion of one polarity into the opposite; observations in lambda 3835 show remarkable fast flashes in the impulsive flare of 18:38 UT on Aug. 2 with lifetimes of 5 sec, which may be due to dumping of particles in the lower chromosphere. Flare loops show evolutionary increases of their tilts to the neutral line in the flares of Aug. 4 and 7. Spectroscopic observations show red asymmetry and red shift of the H alpha emission in the flash phase of the Aug. 7 flare, as well as substantial velocity shear in the photosphere during the flare, somewhat like earthquake movement along a fault. Finally the total H alpha emission of the Aug. 7 flare could be measured accurately as about 2.5 x 10 to the 30th power erg, considerably less than coarser previous estimates for great flares.

  19. FLARE ENERGY BUILD-UP IN A DECAYING ACTIVE REGION NEAR A CORONAL HOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Su Yingna; Van Ballegooijen, Adriaan; Golub, Leon; Schmieder, Brigitte; Berlicki, Arkadiusz; Guo, Yang; Huang Guangli

    2009-10-10

    A B1.7 two-ribbon flare occurred in a highly non-potential decaying active region near a coronal hole at 10:00 UT on 2008 May 17. This flare is 'large' in the sense that it involves the entire region, and it is associated with both a filament eruption and a coronal mass ejection. We present multi-wavelength observations from EUV (TRACE, STEREO/EUVI), X-rays (Hinode/XRT), and Halpha (THEMIS, BBSO) prior to, during and after the flare. Prior to the flare, the region contained two filaments. The long J-shaped sheared loops corresponding to the southern filament were evolved from two short loop systems, which happened around 22:00 UT after a filament eruption on May 16. Formation of highly sheared loops in the southeastern part of the region was observed by STEREO 8 hr before the flare. We also perform nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) modeling for the region at two times prior to the flare, using the flux rope insertion method. The models include the non-force-free effect of magnetic buoyancy in the photosphere. The best-fit NLFFF models show good fit to observations both in the corona (X-ray and EUV loops) and chromosphere (Halpha filament). We find that the horizontal fields in the photosphere are relatively insensitive to the present of flux ropes in the corona. The axial flux of the flux rope in the NLFFF model on May 17 is twice that on May 16, and the model on May 17 is only marginally stable. We also find that the quasi-circular flare ribbons are associated with the separatrix between open and closed fields. This observation and NLFFF modeling suggest that this flare may be triggered by the reconnection at the null point on the separatrix surface.

  20. COMPTEL solar flare observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. M.; Aarts, H.; Bennett, K.; Debrunner, H.; Devries, C.; Denherder, J. W.; Eymann, G.; Forrest, D. J.; Diehl, R.; Hermsen, W.

    1992-01-01

    COMPTEL as part of a solar target of opportunity campaign observed the sun during the period of high solar activity from 7-15 Jun. 1991. Major flares were observed on 9 and 11 Jun. Although both flares were large GOES events (greater than or = X10), they were not extraordinary in terms of gamma-ray emission. Only the decay phase of the 15 Jun. flare was observed by COMPTEL. We report the preliminary analysis of data from these flares, including the first spectroscopic measurement of solar flare neutrons. The deuterium formation line at 2.223 MeV was present in both events and for at least the 9 Jun. event, was comparable to the flux in the nuclear line region of 4-8 MeV, consistent with Solar-Maximum Mission (SSM) Observations. A clear neutron signal was present in the flare of 9 Jun. with the spectrum extending up to 80 MeV and consistent in time with the emission of gamma-rays, confirming the utility of COMPTEL in measuring the solar neutron flux at low energies. The neutron flux below 100 MeV appears to be lower than that of the 3 Jun. 1982 flare by more than an order of magnitude. The neutron signal of the 11 Jun. event is under study. Severe dead time effects resulting from the intense thermal x-rays require significant corrections to the measured flux which increase the magnitude of the associated systematic uncertainties.

  1. What Causes Lupus Flares?

    PubMed

    Fernandez, David; Kirou, Kyriakos A

    2016-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the prototypic systemic autoimmune disease, follows a chronic disease course, punctuated by flares. Disease flares often occur without apparent cause, perhaps from progressive inherent buildup of autoimmunity. However, there is evidence that certain environmental factors may trigger the disease. These include exposure to UV light, infections, certain hormones, and drugs which may activate the innate and adaptive immune system, resulting in inflammation, cytotoxic effects, and clinical symptoms. Uncontrolled disease flares, as well as their treatment, especially with glucocorticoids, can cause significant organ damage. Tight surveillance and timely control of lupus flares with judicial use of effective treatments to adequately suppress the excessive immune system activation are required to bring about long term remission of the disease. We hope that new clinical trials will soon offer additional effective and target-specific biologic treatments for SLE.

  2. Solar flare effects on the thermosphere and E-layer as observed by GRACE and DEMETER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Krauss, Sandro; Sawas, Sami; Hausleitner, Walter; Parrot, Michel; Voller, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the effect of solar flares on the lower thermosphere and ionosphere of the Earth. For this study we select solar flares which occurred in the period from Nov. 2004 to Sept. 2005. We combine the measurements of the GRACE and DEMETER satellites which lead us to estimate, respectively, the atmospheric density and the electric field variation at an altitude of about 100 km. The accelerometer measurements from GRACE orbiting at an altitude of about 450 km comprise all non gravitational forces acting on the satellite and may be used to determine the atmospheric neutral density. The intensity variation of the transmitter ground signals is detected by DEMETER at an altitude in the order of 700 km. In this study we insist on an atmosphere-ionosphere coupling effect which may appear at an altitude of about 100 km. This crucial altitude corresponds to critical regions where important changes are observed in the atmosphere (Mesosphere/Thermosphere) and in the ionosphere (D/E layers). We discuss the possible correlation between the measurements of GRACE and DEMETER observations, where both the local and global effects are taken into consideration.

  3. Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    Because the Earth resides in the atmosphere of our nearest stellar neighbor, events occurring on the Sun's surface directly affect us by interfering with satellite operations and communications, astronaut safety, and, in extreme circumstances, power grid stability. Solar flares, the most energetic events in our solar system, are a substantial source of hazardous space weather affecting our increasingly technology-dependent society. While flares have been observed using ground-based telescopes for over 150 years, modern space-bourne observatories have provided nearly continuous multi-wavelength flare coverage that cannot be obtained from the ground. We can now probe the origins and evolution of flares by tracking particle acceleration, changes in ionized plasma, and the reorganization of magnetic fields. I will walk through our current understanding of why flares occur and how they affect the Earth and also show several examples of these fantastic explosions.

  4. Estimating two-loop radiative effects in the MOLLER experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksejevs, A. G.; Barkanova, S. G.; Zykunov, V. A.; Kuraev, E. A.

    2013-07-15

    Within the on-shell renormalization scheme, two-loop electroweak corrections to the parityviolating polarization asymmetry in the reaction e{sup -}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}e{sup -}({gamma}, {gamma}{gamma}) were estimated for the MOLLER experiment at JLab. The infrared divergence and the imaginary part of the amplitude were taken completely under control. Relevant compact expressions obtained by using asymptotic methods are free from unphysical parameters and are convenient for analysis and for numerical estimations. A numerical analysis revealed a significant scale of two-loop effects and the need for taking them into account in the MOLLER experiment.

  5. Completely inverted hysteresis loops: Inhomogeneity effects or experimental artifacts

    SciTech Connect

    Song, C. Cui, B.; Pan, F.; Yu, H. Y.

    2013-11-14

    Completely inverted hysteresis loops (IHL) are obtained by the superconducting quantum interference device with large cooling fields (>10 kOe) in (La,Sr)MnO{sub 3} films with self-assembled LaSrMnO{sub 4}, an antiferromagnetic interface. Although the behaviours of measured loops show many features characteristic to the IHL, its origin, however, is not due to the exchange coupling between (La,Sr)MnO{sub 3}/LaSrMnO{sub 4}, an often accepted view on IHL. Instead, we demonstrate that the negative remanence arises from the hysteresis of superconducting coils, which drops abruptly when lower cooling fields are utilized. Hence the completely inverted hysteresis loops are experimental artifacts rather than previously proposed inhomogeneity effects in complicated materials.

  6. On the Convergence in Effective Loop Quantum Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Corichi, Alejandro; Vukasinac, Tatjana; Zapata, Jose Antonio

    2010-07-12

    In Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC) there is a discreteness parameter {lambda}, that has been heuristically associated to a fundamental granularity of quantum geometry. It is also possible to consider {lambda} as a regulator in the same spirit as that used in lattice field theory, where it specifies a regular lattice in the real line. A particular quantization of the k = 0 FLRW loop cosmological model yields a completely solvable model, known as solvable loop quantum cosmology(sLQC). In this contribution, we consider effective classical theories motivated by sLQC and study their {lambda}-dependence, with a special interest on the limit {lambda}{yields}0 and the role of the evolution parameter in the convergence of such limit.

  7. SDO Sees Late Phase in Solar Flares

    NASA Video Gallery

    On May 5, 2010, shortly after the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) began normal operation, the sun erupted with numerous coronal loops and flares. Many of these showed a previously unseen "late pha...

  8. Radio flares of compact binary mergers: the effect of non-trivial outflow geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margalit, Ben; Piran, Tsvi

    2015-10-01

    The next generation gravitational waves (GW) detectors are most sensitive to GW emitted by compact (neutron star/black hole) binary mergers. If one of those is a neutron star the merger will also emit electromagnetic radiation via three possible channels: gamma-ray bursts and their (possibly orphan) afterglows, Li-Paczynski Macronovae and radio flares. This accompanying electromagnetic radiation is vitally important in confirming the GW detections. It could also reveal a wealth of information regarding the merger and will open a window towards multimessenger astronomy. Identifying and characterizing these counterparts is therefore of utmost importance. In this work, we explore late time radio flares emitted by the dynamically ejected outflows. We build upon previous work and consider the effect of the outflow's non-trivial geometry. Using an approximate method, we estimate the radio light-curves for several ejected matter distributions obtained in numerical simulations. Our method provides an upper limit to the effect of non-sphericity. Together with the spherical estimates, the resulting light curves bound the actual signal. We find that while non-spherical geometries can in principle lead to an enhanced emission, in most cases they result in an increase in the time-scale compared with a corresponding spherical configuration. This would weaken somewhat these signals and might decrease the detection prospects.

  9. Flares from small to large: X-ray spectroscopy of Proxima Centauri with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güdel, M.; Audard, M.; Reale, F.; Skinner, S. L.; Linsky, J. L.

    2004-03-01

    We report results from a comprehensive study of the nearby M dwarf Proxima Centauri with the XMM-Newton satellite, using simultaneously its X-ray detectors and the Optical Monitor with its U band filter. We find strongly variable coronal X-ray emission, with flares ranging over a factor of 100 in peak flux. The low-level emission is found to be continuously variable on at least three time scales (a slow decay of several hours, modulation on a time scale of 1 hr, and weak flares with time scales of a few minutes). Several weak flares are characteristically preceded by an optical burst, compatible with predictions from standard solar flare models. We propose that the U band bursts are proxies for the elusive stellar non-thermal hard X-ray bursts suggested from solar observations. In the course of the observation, a very large X-ray flare started and was observed essentially in its entirety. Its peak luminosity reached 3.9× 1028 erg s-1 [0.15-10 keV], and the total X-ray energy released in the same band is derived to be 1.5× 1032 ergs. This flare has for the first time allowed to measure significant density variations across several phases of the flare from X-ray spectroscopy of the O VII He-like triplet; we find peak densities reaching up to 4× 1011 cm-3 for plasma of about 1-5 MK. Abundance ratios show little variability in time, with a tendency of elements with a high first ionization potential to be overabundant relative to solar photospheric values. Using Fe XVII lines with different oscillator strengths, we do not find significant effects due to opacity during the flare, indicating that large opacity increases are not the rule even in extreme flares. We model the large flare in terms of an analytic 2-Ribbon flare model and find that the flaring loop system should have large characteristic sizes (≈ 1R*) within the framework of this simplistic model. These results are supported by full hydrodynamic simulations. Comparing the large flare to flares of similar

  10. Transport and containment of plasma, particles and energy within flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, L. W.; Brown, W. A.; Bruner, M. E. C.; Haisch, B. M.; Strong, K. T.

    1983-01-01

    Results from the analysis of flares observed by the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) and a recent rocket experiment are discussed. Evidence for primary energy release in the corona through the interaction of magnetic structures, particle and plasma transport into more than a single magnetic structure at the time of a flare and a complex and changing magnetic topology during the course of a flare is found. The rocket data are examined for constraints on flare cooling, within the context of simple loop models. These results form a basis for comments on the limitations of simple loop models for flares.

  11. The Effects of Wave Escape on Fast Magnetosonic Wave Turbulence in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pongkitiwanichakul, Peera; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. Richard

    2012-01-01

    One of the leading models for electron acceleration in solar flares is stochastic acceleration by weakly turbulent fast magnetosonic waves ("fast waves"). In this model, large-scale flows triggered by magnetic reconnection excite large-wavelength fast waves, and fast-wave energy then cascades from large wavelengths to small wavelengths. Electron acceleration by large-wavelength fast-waves is weak, and so the model relies on the small-wavelength waves produced by the turbulent cascade. In order for the model to work, the energy cascade time for large-wavelength fast waves must be shorter than the time required for the waves to propagate out of the solar-flare acceleration region. To investigate the effects of wave escape, we solve the wave kinetic equation for fast waves in weak turbulence theory, supplemented with a homogeneous wave-loss term.We find that the amplitude of large-wavelength fast waves must exceed a minimum threshold in order for a significant fraction of the wave energy to cascade to small wavelengths before the waves leave the acceleration region.We evaluate this threshold as a function of the dominant wavelength of the fast waves that are initially excited by reconnection outflows.

  12. Elimination of projection effects from vector magnetograms - The pre-flare configuration of active region AR 4474

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, P.; Hagyard, M. J.; Hathaway, D. H.

    1988-01-01

    A simple method of transforming vector magnetograms to heliographic coordinates is demonstrated. The merits of this transformation are illustrated using a vector magnetogram obtained with the MSFC vector magnetograph 80 minutes prior to a white light flare in active region AR 4474 on April 25, 1984. The original magnetogram shows strong magnetic shear along the neutral line at both the flare site and a nonflaring site. The transformation of the magnetogram to heliographic coordinates shows that the elimination of projection effects results in a much shorter length of the sheared region at the nonflaring site than what is inferred from the image plane vector magnetogram. The length of the sheared region at the flare site is relatively less affected by the transformation.

  13. Effective nonrenormalizable theories at one loop

    SciTech Connect

    Gaillard, M.K.

    1987-10-12

    The paper focuses on a nonrenormalizable theory that is more closely related to those suggested by superstrings, namely a gauged nonlinear delta-model, but one which can also be obtained analytically in a particular limit of a parameter (m/sub H/ ..-->.. infinity) of the standard, renormalizable electroweak theory. This will provide another laboratory for testing the validity of calculations using the effective theory. We find (as for certain superstring inspired models to be discussed later) features similar to those for the Fermi theory: quadratic divergences can be reinterpreted as renormalizations, while new terms are generated at the level of logarithmic divergences. Also introduced in the context of more familiar physics are notions such as scalar metric, scalar curvature and nonlinear symmetries, that play an important role in formal aspects of string theories. 58 refs., 12 figs.

  14. The solar flare myth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Many years of research have demonstrated that large, nonrecurrent geomagnetic storms, shock wave disturbances in the solar wind, and energetic particle events in interplanetary space often occur in close association with large solar flares. This result has led to a pradigm of cause and effect - that large solar flares are the fundamental cause of these events in the near-Earth space environmemt. This paradigm, which I call 'the solar flare myth,' dominates the popular perception of the relationship between solar activity and interplanetary and geomagnetic events and has provided much of the pragmatic rationale for the study of the solar flare phenomenon. Yet there is good evidence that this paradigm is wrong and that flares do not generally play a central role in producing major transient disturbances in the near-Earth space environment. In this paper I outline a different paradigm of cause and effect that removes solar flares from their central position in the chain of events leading from the Sun to near-Earth space. Instead, this central role is given to events known as coronal mass ejections.

  15. The cooling and condensation of flare coronal plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Sturrock, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    A model is investigated for the decay of flare heated coronal loops in which rapid radiative cooling at the loop base creates strong pressure gradients which, in turn, generate large (supersonic) downward flows. The coronal material cools and 'condenses' onto the flare chromosphere. The features which distinguish this model from previous models of flare cooling are: (1) most of the thermal energy of the coronal plasma may be lost by mass motion rather than by conduction or coronal radiation; (2) flare loops are not isobaric during their decay phase, and large downward velocities are present near the footpoints; (3) the differential emission measure q has a strong temperature dependence.

  16. THERMAL FRONTS IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Karlický, Marian

    2015-12-01

    We studied the formation of a thermal front during the expansion of hot plasma into colder plasma. We used a three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell model that includes inductive effects. In early phases, in the area of the expanding hot plasma, we found several thermal fronts, which are defined as a sudden decrease of the local electron kinetic energy. The fronts formed a cascade. Thermal fronts with higher temperature contrast were located near plasma density depressions, generated during the hot plasma expansion. The formation of the main thermal front was associated with the return-current process induced by hot electron expansion and electrons backscattered at the front. A part of the hot plasma was trapped by the thermal front while another part, mainly with the most energetic electrons, escaped and generated Langmuir and electromagnetic waves in front of the thermal front, as shown by the dispersion diagrams. Considering all of these processes and those described in the literature, we show that anomalous electric resistivity is produced at the location of the thermal front. Thus, the thermal front can contribute to energy dissipation in the current-carrying loops of solar flares. We estimated the values of such anomalous resistivity in the solar atmosphere together with collisional resistivity and electric fields. We propose that the slowly drifting reverse drift bursts, observed at the beginning of some solar flares, could be signatures of the thermal front.

  17. Thermal Fronts in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, Marian

    2015-12-01

    We studied the formation of a thermal front during the expansion of hot plasma into colder plasma. We used a three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell model that includes inductive effects. In early phases, in the area of the expanding hot plasma, we found several thermal fronts, which are defined as a sudden decrease of the local electron kinetic energy. The fronts formed a cascade. Thermal fronts with higher temperature contrast were located near plasma density depressions, generated during the hot plasma expansion. The formation of the main thermal front was associated with the return-current process induced by hot electron expansion and electrons backscattered at the front. A part of the hot plasma was trapped by the thermal front while another part, mainly with the most energetic electrons, escaped and generated Langmuir and electromagnetic waves in front of the thermal front, as shown by the dispersion diagrams. Considering all of these processes and those described in the literature, we show that anomalous electric resistivity is produced at the location of the thermal front. Thus, the thermal front can contribute to energy dissipation in the current-carrying loops of solar flares. We estimated the values of such anomalous resistivity in the solar atmosphere together with collisional resistivity and electric fields. We propose that the slowly drifting reverse drift bursts, observed at the beginning of some solar flares, could be signatures of the thermal front.

  18. Coronal X-Ray Flares on Active Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordon, Raanan

    2008-09-01

    neutralize the abundance differences between the corona and the photosphere. We found that solar flares also follow this pattern. Our preferred interpretation is that material from the footprints of magnetic loops is being evaporated into the corona (chromospheric evaporation). Such a scenario, which is supported by radio timing evidence, means that the quiescence inverse-FIP composition of highly active coronae is genuine and is not an artifact of uncertain photospheric abundances. Since large flares tend to neutralize the quiescence FIP bias, they are not the direct cause for the inverse-FIP effect, which remains to be discovered.

  19. PRECURSOR FLARES IN OJ 287

    SciTech Connect

    Pihajoki, P.; Berdyugin, A.; Lindfors, E.; Reinthal, R.; Sillanpaeae, A.; Takalo, L.; Valtonen, M.; Nilsson, K.; Zola, S.; Koziel-Wierzbowska, D.; Liakos, A.; Drozdz, M.; Winiarski, M.; Ogloza, W.; Provencal, J.; Santangelo, M. M. M.; Salo, H.; Chandra, S.; Ganesh, S.; Baliyan, K. S.; and others

    2013-02-10

    We have studied three most recent precursor flares in the light curve of the blazar OJ 287 while invoking the presence of a precessing binary black hole in the system to explain the nature of these flares. Precursor flare timings from the historical light curves are compared with theoretical predictions from our model that incorporate effects of an accretion disk and post-Newtonian description for the binary black hole orbit. We find that the precursor flares coincide with the secondary black hole descending toward the accretion disk of the primary black hole from the observed side, with a mean z-component of approximately z{sub c} = 4000 AU. We use this model of precursor flares to predict that precursor flare of similar nature should happen around 2020.96 before the next major outburst in 2022.

  20. Neutron and gamma ray production in the 1991 June X-class flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Hua, X. M.; Kozlovsky, B.; Lingenfelter, R. E.; Mandzhavidze, N.

    1992-01-01

    We present new calculations of pion radiation and neutron emission from solar flares. We fit the recently reported high energy GAMMA-1 observations with pion radiation produced in a solar flare magnetic loop. We calculate the expected neutron emission in such a loop model and make predictions of the neutron fluences expected from the 1991 June X-class flares.

  1. THE ABRUPT CHANGES IN THE PHOTOSPHERIC MAGNETIC AND LORENTZ FORCE VECTORS DURING SIX MAJOR NEUTRAL-LINE FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, G. J. D.

    2012-11-01

    We analyze the spatial and temporal variations of the abrupt photospheric magnetic changes associated with six major flares using 12 minute, 0.''5 pixel{sup -1} vector magnetograms from NASA's Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory satellite. The six major flares occurred near the main magnetic neutral lines of four active regions, NOAA 11158, 11166, 11283, and 11429. During all six flares the neutral-line field vectors became stronger and more horizontal, in each case almost entirely due to strengthening of the horizontal field components parallel to the neutral line. In all six cases the neutral-line pre-flare fields were more vertical than the reference potential fields, and collapsed abruptly and permanently closer to potential-field tilt angles during every flare, implying that the relaxation of magnetic stress associated with non-potential tilt angles plays a major role during major flares. The shear angle with respect to the reference potential field did not show such a pattern, demonstrating that flare processes do not generally relieve magnetic stresses associated with photospheric magnetic shear. The horizontal fields became significantly and permanently more aligned with the neutral line during the four largest flares, suggesting that the collapsing field is on average more aligned with the neutral line than the pre-flare neutral-line field. The vertical Lorentz force had a large, abrupt, permanent downward change during each of the flares, consistent with loop collapse. The horizontal Lorentz force changes acted mostly parallel to the neutral line in opposite directions on each side, a signature of the fields contracting during the flare, pulling the two sides of the neutral line toward each other. The greater effect of the flares on field tilt than on shear may be explained by photospheric line-tying.

  2. Nonequilibrium ionization effects in asymmetrically heated loops. [in solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spadaro, D.; Antiochos, Spiro K.; Mariska, J. T.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of nonequilibrium ionization on magnetic loop models with a steady siphon flow that is driven by a nonuniform heating rate are investigated. The model developed by Mariska (1988) to explain the observed redshifts of transition region emission lines is examined, and the number densities of the ions of carbon and oxygen along the loop are computed, with and without the approximation of ionization equilibrium. Considerable deviations from equilibrium were found. In order to determine the consequences of these nonequilibrium effects on the characteristics of the EUV emission from the loop plasma, the profiles and wavelength positions of all the important emission lines due to carbon and oxygen were calculated. The calculations are in broad agreement with Mariska's conclusions, although they show a significant diminution of the Doppler shifts, as well as modifications to the line widths. It is concluded that the inclusion of nonequilibrium effects make it more difficult to reproduce the observed characteristics of the solar transition region by means of the asymmetric-heating models.

  3. Characteristics of gamma-ray line flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, T.; Dennis, B.

    1983-01-01

    Observations of solar gamma rays by the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) demonstrate that energetic protons and ions are rapidly accelerated during the impulsive phase. To understand the acceleration mechanisms for these particles, the characteristics of the gamma ray line flares observed by SMM were studied. Some very intense hard X-ray flares without detectable gamma ray lines were also investigated. Gamma ray line flares are distinguished from other flares by: (1) intense hard X-ray and microwave emissions; (2) delay of high energy hard X-rays; (3) emission of type 2 and/or type 4 radio bursts; and (4) flat hard X-ray spectra (average power law index: 3.1). The majority of the gamma ray line flares shared all these characteristics, and the remainder shared at least three of them. Positive correlations were found between durations of spike bursts and spatial sizes of flare loops as well as between delay times and durations of spike bursts.

  4. Covariant effective action for loop quantum cosmology a la Palatini

    SciTech Connect

    Olmo, Gonzalo J.; Singh, Parampreet E-mail: psingh@perimeterinstitute.ca

    2009-01-15

    In loop quantum cosmology, non-perturbative quantum gravity effects lead to the resolution of the big bang singularity by a quantum bounce without introducing any new degrees of freedom. Though fundamentally discrete, the theory admits a continuum description in terms of an effective Hamiltonian. Here we provide an algorithm to obtain the corresponding effective action, establishing in this way the covariance of the theory for the first time. This result provides new insights on the continuum properties of the discrete structure of quantum geometry and opens new avenues to extract physical predictions such as those related to gauge invariant cosmological perturbations.

  5. Aharonov-Bohm effect without closing a loop

    SciTech Connect

    Retzker, A.; Nussinov, S.; Reznik, B.; Aharonov, Y.; Botero, A.

    2006-03-15

    We discuss the consequences of the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect in setups involving several charged particles, wherein none of the charged particles encloses a closed loop around the magnetic flux. We show that in such setups, the AB phase is encoded either in the relative phase of a bipartite or multipartite entangled photons states, or alternatively, gives rise to an overall AB phase that can be measured relative to another reference system. These setups involve processes of annihilation or creation of electron-hole pairs. We discuss the relevance of such effects in 'vacuum birefringence' in QED, and comment on their connection to other known effects.

  6. Temperature and Electron Density Diagnostics of a Candle-flame-shaped Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidoni, S. E.; McKenzie, D. E.; Longcope, D. W.; Plowman, J. E.; Yoshimura, K.

    2015-02-01

    Candle-flame-shaped flares are archetypical structures that provide indirect evidence of magnetic reconnection. A flare resembling Tsuneta's famous 1992 candle-flame flare occurred on 2011 January 28; we present its temperature and electron density diagnostics. This flare was observed with Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA), Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT), and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Ahead (STEREO-A)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager, resulting in high-resolution, broad temperature coverage, and stereoscopic views of this iconic structure. The high-temperature images reveal a brightening that grows in size to form a tower-like structure at the top of the posteruption flare arcade, a feature that has been observed in other long-duration events. Despite the extensive work on the standard reconnection scenario, there is no complete agreement among models regarding the nature of this high-intensity elongated structure. Electron density maps reveal that reconnected loops that are successively connected at their tops to the tower develop a density asymmetry of about a factor of two between the two legs, giving the appearance of "half-loops." We calculate average temperatures with a new fast differential emission measure (DEM) method that uses SDO/AIA data and analyze the heating and cooling of salient features of the flare. Using STEREO observations, we show that the tower and the half-loop brightenings are not a line-of-sight projection effect of the type studied by Forbes & Acton. This conclusion opens the door for physics-based explanations of these puzzling, recurrent solar flare features, previously attributed to projection effects. We corroborate the results of our DEM analysis by comparing them with temperature analyses from Hinode/XRT.

  7. TEMPERATURE AND ELECTRON DENSITY DIAGNOSTICS OF A CANDLE-FLAME-SHAPED FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Guidoni, S. E.; Plowman, J. E.

    2015-02-10

    Candle-flame-shaped flares are archetypical structures that provide indirect evidence of magnetic reconnection. A flare resembling Tsuneta's famous 1992 candle-flame flare occurred on 2011 January 28; we present its temperature and electron density diagnostics. This flare was observed with Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA), Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT), and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Ahead (STEREO-A)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager, resulting in high-resolution, broad temperature coverage, and stereoscopic views of this iconic structure. The high-temperature images reveal a brightening that grows in size to form a tower-like structure at the top of the posteruption flare arcade, a feature that has been observed in other long-duration events. Despite the extensive work on the standard reconnection scenario, there is no complete agreement among models regarding the nature of this high-intensity elongated structure. Electron density maps reveal that reconnected loops that are successively connected at their tops to the tower develop a density asymmetry of about a factor of two between the two legs, giving the appearance of ''half-loops''. We calculate average temperatures with a new fast differential emission measure (DEM) method that uses SDO/AIA data and analyze the heating and cooling of salient features of the flare. Using STEREO observations, we show that the tower and the half-loop brightenings are not a line-of-sight projection effect of the type studied by Forbes and Acton. This conclusion opens the door for physics-based explanations of these puzzling, recurrent solar flare features, previously attributed to projection effects. We corroborate the results of our DEM analysis by comparing them with temperature analyses from Hinode/XRT.

  8. Flares and habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrevaya, Ximena C.; Cortón, Eduardo; Mauas, Pablo J. D.

    2012-07-01

    At present, dwarf M stars are being considered as potential hosts for habitable planets. However, an important fraction of these stars are flare stars, which among other kind of radiation, emit large amounts of UV radiation during flares, and it is unknown how this events can affect life, since biological systems are particularly vulnerable to UV. In this work we evaluate a well known dMe star, EV Lacertae (GJ 873) as a potential host for the emergence and evolution of life, focusing on the effects of the UV emission associated with flare activity. Since UV-C is particularly harmful for living organisms, we studied the effect of UV-C radiation on halophile archaea cultures. The halophile archaea or haloarchaea are extremophile microorganisms, which inhabit in hypersaline environments and which show several mechanisms to cope with UV radiation since they are naturally exposed to intense solar UV radiation on Earth. To select the irradiance to be tested, we considered a moderate flare on this star. We obtained the mean value for the UV-C irradiance integrating the IUE spectrum in the impulsive phase, and considering a hypothetical planet in the center of the liquid water habitability zone. To select the irradiation times we took the most frequent duration of flares on this star which is from 9 to 27 minutes. Our results show that even after considerable UV damage, the haloarchaeal cells survive at the tested doses, showing that this kind of life could survive in a relatively hostile UV environment.

  9. Thermal instability in post-flare plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.

    1976-01-01

    The cooling of post-flare plasmas is discussed and the formation of loop prominences is explained as due to a thermal instability. A one-dimensional model was developed for active loop prominences. Only the motion and heat fluxes parallel to the existing magnetic fields are considered. The relevant size scales and time scales are such that single-fluid MHD equations are valid. The effects of gravity, the geometry of the field and conduction losses to the chromosphere are included. A computer code was constructed to solve the model equations. Basically, the system is treated as an initial value problem (with certain boundary conditions at the chromosphere-corona transition region), and a two-step time differencing scheme is used.

  10. Analysis of sampling and quantization effects on the performance of PN code tracking loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, K. J.; Srinivasan, M.

    2002-01-01

    Pseudonoise (PN) code tracking loops in direct-sequence spread-spectrum systems are often implemented using digital hardware. Performance degradation due to quantization and sampling effects is not adequately characterized by the traditional analog system feedback loop analysis.

  11. Solar Flare and IMF Sector Structure Effects in the Lower Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lastovicka, J.

    1984-01-01

    About 1% of all sudden ionospheric disturbances (SIDs) observed at the Panska Ves Observatory (Czechoslovakia), were found to be not of solar-XUV origin. Among them, the very rare SWF events (observed at L = 2.4) of corpuscular origin are the most interesting. The IMF sector structure effects in the midlatitude lower ionosphere are minor in comparison with effects of solar flares, geomagnetic storms, etc. There are two basic types of effects. The first type is a disturbance, best developed in geomagnetic activity, and observed in the night-time ionosphere. It can be interpreted as a response to sector structure related changes of geomagnetic (= magnetospheric) activity. The other type is best developed in the tropospheric vorticity area index and is also observed in the day-time ionosphere in winter. This effect is quietening in the ionosphere as well as troposphere. While the occurrence of the former type is persistent in time, the latter is severely diminished in some periods. All the stratosphere, the 10-mb level temperature and height above Berlin-Tempelhof do not display any observable IMF section structure effect.

  12. Solar flare and IMF sector structure effects in the lower ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Lastovicka, J.

    1984-05-01

    About 1% of all sudden ionospheric disturbances (SIDs) observed at the Panska Ves Observatory (Czechoslovakia), were found to be not of solar-XUV origin. Among them, the very rare SWF events (observed at L 2.4) of corpuscular origin are the most interesting. The IMF sector structure effects in the midlatitude lower ionosphere are minor in comparison with effects of solar flares, geomagnetic storms, etc. There are two basic types of effects. The first type is a disturbance, best developed in geomagnetic activity, and observed in the night-time ionosphere. It can be interpreted as a response to sector structure related changes of geomagnetic (magnetospheric) activity. The other type is best developed in the tropospheric vorticity area index and is also observed in the day-time ionosphere in winter. This effect is quietening in the ionosphere as well as troposphere. While the occurrence of the former type is persistent in time, the latter is severely diminished in some periods. All the stratosphere, the 10-mb level temperature and height above Berlin-Tempelhof do not display any observable IMF section structure effect.

  13. Flares and Their Underlying Magnetic Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engell, Alexander J.; Siarkowski, Marek; Gryciuk, Magda; Sylwester, Janusz; Sylwester, Barbara; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Cirtain, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    SphinX (Solar PHotometer IN X-rays), a full-disk-integrated spectrometer, observed 137 flare-like/transient events with active region (AR) 11024 being the only AR on disk. The Hinode X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and Solar Optical Telescope observe 67 of these events and identified their location from 12:00 UT on July 3 through 24:00 UT 2009 July 7. We find that the predominant mechanisms for flares observed by XRT are (1) flux cancellation and (2) the shearing of underlying magnetic elements. Point- and cusp-like flare morphologies seen by XRT all occur in a magnetic environment where one polarity is impeded by the opposite polarity and vice versa, forcing the flux cancellation process. The shearing is either caused by flux emergence at the center of the AR and separation of polarities along a neutral line or by individual magnetic elements having a rotational motion. Both mechanisms are observed to contribute to single- and multiple-loop flares. We observe that most loop flares occur along a large portion of a polarity inversion line. Point- and cusp-like flares become more infrequent as the AR becomes organized with separation of the positive and negative polarities. SphinX, which allows us to identify when these flares occur, provides us with a statistically significant temperature and emission scaling law for A and B class flares: EM = 6.1 × 1033 T 1.9±0.1.

  14. FLARES AND THEIR UNDERLYING MAGNETIC COMPLEXITY

    SciTech Connect

    Engell, Alexander J.; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Siarkowski, Marek; Gryciuk, Magda; Sylwester, Janusz; Sylwester, Barbara; Cirtain, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    SphinX (Solar PHotometer IN X-rays), a full-disk-integrated spectrometer, observed 137 flare-like/transient events with active region (AR) 11024 being the only AR on disk. The Hinode X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and Solar Optical Telescope observe 67 of these events and identified their location from 12:00 UT on July 3 through 24:00 UT 2009 July 7. We find that the predominant mechanisms for flares observed by XRT are (1) flux cancellation and (2) the shearing of underlying magnetic elements. Point- and cusp-like flare morphologies seen by XRT all occur in a magnetic environment where one polarity is impeded by the opposite polarity and vice versa, forcing the flux cancellation process. The shearing is either caused by flux emergence at the center of the AR and separation of polarities along a neutral line or by individual magnetic elements having a rotational motion. Both mechanisms are observed to contribute to single- and multiple-loop flares. We observe that most loop flares occur along a large portion of a polarity inversion line. Point- and cusp-like flares become more infrequent as the AR becomes organized with separation of the positive and negative polarities. SphinX, which allows us to identify when these flares occur, provides us with a statistically significant temperature and emission scaling law for A and B class flares: EM = 6.1 x 10{sup 33} T{sup 1.9{+-}0.1}.

  15. Origin of the Universal Correlation between the Flare Temperature and the Emission Measure for Solar and Stellar Flares.

    PubMed

    Shibata; Yokoyama

    1999-11-20

    We present a theory to explain the observed universal correlation between flare temperature T and emission measure EM=n2V for solar and stellar flares (including solar microflares observed by Yohkoh as well as protostellar flares observed by ASCA), where n is the electron density and V is the volume. The theory is based on a magnetic reconnection model with heat conduction and chromospheric evaporation, assuming that the gas pressure of a flare loop is comparable to the magnetic pressure. This theory predicts the relation EM~B-5T17/2, which explains well the observed correlation between EM and T in the range of 6x106 K < T<108 K and 1044flares, if the magnetic field strength B of a flare loop is nearly constant for solar and stellar flares.

  16. The Effect of Magnetic Topology on the Escape of Flare Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Masson, S.; DeVore, C. R.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection in the solar atmosphere is believed to be the driver of most solar explosive phenomena. Therefore, the topology of the coronal magnetic field is central to understanding the solar drivers of space weather. Of particular importance to space weather are the impulsive Solar Energetic particles that are associated with some CME/eruptive flare events. Observationally, the magnetic configuration of active regions where solar eruptions originate appears to agree with the standard eruptive flare model. According to this model, particles accelerated at the flare reconnection site should remain trapped in the corona and the ejected plasmoid. However, flare-accelerated particles frequently reach the Earth long before the CME does. We present a model that may account for the injection of energetic particles onto open magnetic flux tubes connecting to the Earth. Our model is based on the well-known 2.5D breakout topology, which has a coronal null point (null line) and a four-flux system. A key new addition, however, is that we include an isothermal solar wind with open-flux regions. Depending on the location of the open flux with respect to the null point, we find that the flare reconnection can consist of two distinct phases. At first, the flare reconnection involves only closed field, but if the eruption occurs close to the open field, we find a second phase involving interchange reconnection between open and closed. We argue that this second reconnection episode is responsible for the injection of flare-accelerated particles into the interplanetary medium. We will report on our recent work toward understanding how flare particles escape to the heliosphere. This work uses high-resolution 2.5D MHD numerical simulations performed with the Adaptively Refined MHD Solver (ARMS).

  17. Statistical study of spatio-temporal distribution of precursor solar flares associated with major flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyenge, N.; Ballai, I.; Baranyi, T.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present investigation is to study the spatio-temporal distribution of precursor flares during the 24 h interval preceding M- and X-class major flares and the evolution of follower flares. Information on associated (precursor and follower) flares is provided by Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). Flare list, while the major flares are observed by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) system satellites between 2002 and 2014. There are distinct evolutionary differences between the spatio-temporal distributions of associated flares in about one-day period depending on the type of the main flare. The spatial distribution was characterized by the normalized frequency distribution of the quantity δ (the distance between the major flare and its precursor flare normalized by the sunspot group diameter) in four 6 h time intervals before the major event. The precursors of X-class flares have a double-peaked spatial distribution for more than half a day prior to the major flare, but it changes to a lognormal-like distribution roughly 6 h prior to the event. The precursors of M-class flares show lognormal-like distribution in each 6 h subinterval. The most frequent sites of the precursors in the active region are within a distance of about 0.1 diameter of sunspot group from the site of the major flare in each case. Our investigation shows that the build-up of energy is more effective than the release of energy because of precursors.

  18. Fields, Flares, And Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucheron, L.; Al-Ghraibah, Amani; McAteer, J.; Cao, H.; Jackiewicz, J.; McNamara, B.; Voelz, D.; Calabro, B.; DeGrave, K.; Kirk, M.; Madadi, A.; Petsov, A.; Taylor, G.

    2011-05-01

    Solar active regions are the source of many energetic and geo-effective events such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Understanding how these complex source regions evolve and produce these events is of fundamental importance, not only to solar physics, but also to the demands of space weather forecasting. We propose to investigate the physical properties of active region magnetic fields using fractal-, gradient-, neutral line-, emerging flux-, wavelet- and general image-based techniques, and to correlate them to solar activity. The combination of these projects with solarmonitor.org and the international Max Millenium Campaign presents an opportunity for accurate and timely flare predictions for the first time. Many studies have attempted to relate solar flares to their concomitant magnetic field distributions. However, a consistent, causal relationship between the magnetic field on the photosphere and the production of solar flares is unknown. Often the local properties of the active region magnetic field - critical in many theories of activity - are lost in the global definition of their diagnostics, in effect smoothing out variations that occur on small spatial scales. Mindful of this, our overall goal is to create measures that are sensitive to both the global and the small-scale nature of energy storage and release in the solar atmosphere in order to study solar flare prediction. This set of active region characteristics will be automatically explored for discriminating features through the use of feature selection methods. Such methods search a feature space while optimizing a criterion - the prediction of a flare in this case. The large size of the datasets used in this project make it well suited for an exploration of a large feature space. This work is funded through a New Mexico State University Interdisciplinary Research Grant.

  19. Outer Atmospheres of Low Mass Stars — Flare Characteristics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalitha, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2013-04-01

    We compare the coronal properties during flares on active low mass stars CN Leonis, AB Doradus A and Proxima Centauri observed with XMM-Newton. From the X-ray data we analyze the temporal evolution of temperature, emission measure and coronal abundance. The nature of these flares are with secondary events following the first flare peak in the light curve, raising the question regarding the involved magnetic structure. We infer from the plasma properties and the geometry of the flaring structure that the flare originates from a compact arcade rather than in a single loop.

  20. Flare models: Chapter 9 of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    By reviewing the properties of solar flares analyzed by each of the seven teams of the Skylab workshop, a set of primary and secondary requirements of flare models are derived. A number of flare models are described briefly and their properties compared with the primary requirements. It appears that, at this time, each flare model has some strong points and some weak points. It has not yet been demonstrated that any one flare model meets all the proposed requirements.

  1. The smallest hard X-ray flare?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Sam; Hannah, Iain; Smith, David M.; Grefenstette, Brian; Marsh, Andrew; Hudson, Hugh S.; White, Stephen M.; Chen, Bin

    2016-05-01

    We report a NuSTAR observation of a small solar flare on 2015 September 1, estimated to be on the order of a GOES class A.05 flare in brightness. This flare is fainter than any hard X-ray (HXR) flares in the existing literature, and with a peak rate of only ˜5 counts s-1 detector-1 observed by RHESSI, is effectively the smallest that can just barely be detected by the current standard (indirectly imaging) solar HXR instrumentation, though we expect that smaller flares will continue to be discovered as instrumental and observational techniques progress. The flare occurred during a solar observation by the highly sensitive NuSTAR astrophysical HXR spacecraft, which used its direct focusing optics to produce detailed flare spectra and images. The flare exhibits properties commonly observed in larger flares, including a fast rise and more gradual decay, and similar spatial dimensions to the RHESSI microflares. We will discuss the presence of non-thermal (flare-accelerated) electrons during the impulsive phase. The flare is small in emission measure, temperature, and energy, though not in physical dimensions. Its presence is an indication that flares do indeed scale down to smaller energies and retain what we customarily think of as “flarelike” properties.

  2. Effect of resumption of second line drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis that flared up after treatment discontinuation

    PubMed Central

    ten, W; Hermans, J.; Breedveld, F.; Dijkmans, B.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the effect of resumption of second line drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) that flared after treatment discontinuation.
METHODS—RA patients were studied whose RA flared up after discontinuation of second line treatment while being in remission and who received a second course of the drug. Disease activity parameters were prospectively assessed at the time of treatment discontinuation, during the period when the disease flared up, and three months thereafter. Furthermore the medical charts were reviewed at 12 months after treatment resumption.
RESULTS—There were 51 patients included in the study: 25 patients treated with antimalarial drugs, 10 with parenteral gold, four with d-penicillamine, eight with sulphasalazine, two with azathioprine, and two with methotrexate. Disease activity parameters showed significant improvement within three months of treatment resumption, but remained significantly worse when compared with that measured before treatment discontinuation. Within three months 47% of the patients fulfilled 20% response criteria. Disease activity 12 months after treatment resumption was considered to be absent in 35%, mild in 43%, and moderate or active in 22% of the patients. In four (8%) patients the resumed treatment was stopped because of lack of efficacy. Side effects were recorded in four patients, which did not result in treatment discontinuation.
CONCLUSIONS—Resumption of second line drugs in RA patients whose disease flared up after discontinuation of treatment is effective and safe in most patients. Half of the patients responded within three months after resumption of the second line drug.

 PMID:9165995

  3. The Myth of Long Duration Flare Emission: Slow Heating or Slow Cooling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jiong; Longcope, Dana; Klimchuk, James A.

    2015-04-01

    Long duration flare emissions lasting for a few hours are likely governed by magnetic reconnection that continuously heats flare plasmas in continuously formed flare loops. In this study, we confirm that this process leads to the long-duration total emission for up to four hours in a C2.9 flare on 2011 September 13. Observed by AIA, the flare exhibits an ordered spread of flare UV ribbons along the polarity inversion line, followed by the sequential formation of post-flare loops in EUV emissions. We infer heating rates of thousands of flare loops from the UV light curves at the flare foot-points, and model the flare total emission with the 0d EBTEL model, which reproduces the global evolution pattern of the long-duration flare EUV emissions as the result of superposition of continuously formed and heated flare loops. However, observations at single loop pixels also show long duration EUV emission at 10 MK, long cooling time from 10 MK to 3 MK, and later on very short duration of EUV emission at 1-2 MK. All of these signatures cannot be produced by superposition of multiple impulsive heating events. Our experiments, with both the 0d EBTEL model and a 1d hydrodynamic model, have demonstrated that a heating profile in a single loop consisting of two parts, an intense impulsive heating followed by a low-rate heating 1-2 orders of magnitude smaller that is attenuated over 20-30 minutes, is required to produce the observed time evolution signatures in a single loop. The total energy in the gradual heating phase is comparable with that in the impulsive heating phase in a flare loop. We discuss viable physical mechanisms for such two-phase heating in a post-reconnection flare loop.

  4. Geomagnetic solar flare effect on February 4 and 6, 1986 at the China Antarctic Great Wall Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiao-Ping; Lin, Yun-Fang

    1995-02-01

    Taking the sampled every minute values of the horizontal, declination and vertical components H, D, Z and the intensity of total field F calculated from H and Z on the magnetograms at ten geomagnetic observatories in China in the same periods, and at the China Antarctic Great Wall Station (CAGWS), the authors conducted the maximum entropy analysis and band-pass filtration of these data and obtained the following results: (1) At the period T=10 - 90 min geomagnetic solar flare effect (sfe) is evident on the sunlit hemisphere. It is more pronounced at periods 15, 20, 25 and 30 min, and most prominent at 30 35 min. The solar X-ray spectra at the same time showed their peaks at 10 and 15 min; (2) The period T=10 - 70 min of sfe at the CAGWS in the western Hemisphere was also recognizable after spectral analysis and filtration, but the corresponding period of the maximum amplitude was different from that in the sunlit hemisphere. The results further proved that the geomagnetic effect of solar flares could also be observed in the dark hemisphere; (3) The subsolar points of two solar flares were found around Lanzhou, and the associated current density in the ionosphere was about 24 A/km. The transitional zone from positive to negative sfe was found around the geographic latitude ϕ=22° - 24°N, where the sfe in H-crochet was almost illegible.

  5. Analyzing the effectiveness of flare dispensing programs against pulse width modulation seekers using self-organizing maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahingil, Mehmet C.; Aslan, Murat Š.

    2013-10-01

    Infrared guided missile seekers utilizing pulse width modulation in target tracking is one of the threats against air platforms. To be able to achieve a "soft-kill" protection of own platform against these type of threats, one needs to examine carefully the seeker operating principle with its special electronic counter-counter measure (ECCM) capability. One of the cost-effective ways of soft kill protection is to use flare decoys in accordance with an optimized dispensing program. Such an optimization requires a good understanding of the threat seeker, capabilities of the air platform and engagement scenario information between them. Modeling and simulation is very powerful tool to achieve a valuable insight and understand the underlying phenomenology. A careful interpretation of simulation results is crucial to infer valuable conclusions from the data. In such an interpretation there are lots of factors (features) which affect the results. Therefore, powerful statistical tools and pattern recognition algorithms are of special interest in the analysis. In this paper, we show how self-organizing maps (SOMs), which is one of those powerful tools, can be used in analyzing the effectiveness of various flare dispensing programs against a PWM seeker. We perform several Monte Carlo runs for a typical engagement scenario in a MATLAB-based simulation environment. In each run, we randomly change the flare dispending program and obtain corresponding class: "successful" or "unsuccessful", depending on whether the corresponding flare dispensing program deceives the seeker or not, respectively. Then, in the analysis phase, we use SOMs to interpret and visualize the results.

  6. Study of the effect of solar flares on VLF signals during D-layer preparation or disappearance time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Suman; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Palit, Sourav

    2016-07-01

    "Very Low Frequency" (VLF) is one of the bands of the Radio waves having frequency 3-30 KHz, which propagates through the Earth-ionosphere wave-guide. In relation to propagation of radio waves through ionosphere, low mass and high mobility cause electrons to play a vital role. Electrons are not distributed uniformly in the ionosphere and depending on this factor, ionosphere has different layers namely D, E and F. Different ionospheric layers generally exist during day and night time. During day-time when the main source of the ionization of the ionosphere is Sun, the lower most layer of ionosphere is D-layer. But during the night-time when Sun is absent and cosmic ray is the main source of the ionization of the ionosphere, this D-layer disappears and E-layer becomes the lower most region of the ionosphere. Normally, patterns of VLF signal depend on regular solar flux variations. However, during solar flares extra energetic particles are released from Sun, which makes the changes in the ionization of the ionosphere and these changes can perturb VLF signal amplitude. Usually if a solar flare occurs during any time of day, it only affects the amplitude and phase of the VLF signals. But in the present work, we found the if the flare occurs during D-layer preparation / disappearance time, then it will not only affect to amplitude and phase of the VLF signals but also to terminator times of VLF signals. We have observed that the sun set terminator time of the VLF signals shifted towards night time due to the effect of a M-class solar flare which occurred during the D-layer disappearance time. The shift is so high that it crossed 5σ level. We are now trying to a make model using the ion-chemistry and LWPC code to explain this observed effect.

  7. THE COOLING OF CORONAL PLASMAS. IV. CATASTROPHIC COOLING OF LOOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Cargill, P. J.; Bradshaw, S. J.

    2013-07-20

    We examine the radiative cooling of coronal loops and demonstrate that the recently identified catastrophic cooling is due to the inability of a loop to sustain radiative/enthalpy cooling below a critical temperature, which can be >1 MK in flares, 0.5-1 MK in active regions, and 0.1 MK in long tenuous loops. Catastrophic cooling is characterized by a rapid fall in coronal temperature, while the coronal density changes by a small amount. Analytic expressions for the critical temperature are derived and show good agreement with numerical results. This effect considerably limits the lifetime of coronal plasmas below the critical temperature.

  8. One loop superstring effective actions and N=8 supergravity

    SciTech Connect

    Moura, Filipe

    2008-06-15

    In a previous article we have shown the existence of a new independent R{sup 4} term, at one loop, in the type IIA and heterotic effective actions, after reduction to four dimensions, besides the usual square of the Bel-Robinson tensor. It had been shown that such a term could not be directly supersymmetrized, but we showed that was possible after coupling to a scalar chiral multiplet. In this article, we study the extended (N=8) supersymmetrization of this term, where no other coupling can be taken. We show that such supersymmetrization cannot be achieved at the linearized level. This is in conflict with the theory one gets after toroidal compactification of type II superstrings being N=8 supersymmetric. We interpret this result in the face of the recent claim that perturbative supergravity cannot be decoupled from string theory in d{>=}4, and N=8, d=4 supergravity is in the swampland.

  9. SCATTERING POLARIZATION IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Štěpán, Jiří; Heinzel, Petr

    2013-11-20

    There is ongoing debate about the origin and even the very existence of a high degree of linear polarization of some chromospheric spectral lines observed in solar flares. The standard explanation of these measurements is in terms of the impact polarization caused by non-thermal proton and/or electron beams. In this work, we study the possible role of resonance line polarization due to radiation anisotropy in the inhomogeneous medium of the flare ribbons. We consider a simple two-dimensional model of the flaring chromosphere and we self-consistently solve the non-LTE problem taking into account the role of resonant scattering polarization and of the Hanle effect. Our calculations show that the horizontal plasma inhomogeneities at the boundary of the flare ribbons can lead to a significant radiation anisotropy in the line formation region and, consequently, to a fractional linear polarization of the emergent radiation of the order of several percent. Neglecting the effects of impact polarization, our model can provide a clue for resolving some of the common observational findings, namely: (1) why a high degree of polarization appears mainly at the edges of the flare ribbons; (2) why polarization can also be observed during the gradual phase of a flare; and (3) why polarization is mostly radial or tangential. We conclude that radiation transfer in realistic multi-dimensional models of solar flares needs to be considered as an essential ingredient for understanding the observed spectral line polarization.

  10. The landing flare: An analysis and flight-test investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seckel, E.

    1975-01-01

    Results are given of an extensive investigation of conventional landing flares in general aviation type airplanes. A wide range of parameters influencing flare behavior are simulated in experimental landings in a variable-stability Navion. The most important feature of the flare is found to be the airplane's deceleration in the flare. Various effects on this are correlated in terms of the average flare load factor. Piloting technique is extensively discussed. Design criteria are presented.

  11. The distribution of solar flares and probable relations to biological effects.

    PubMed

    Petropoulos, B; Poulakos, C

    1991-10-01

    We have compared the monthly distribution of the total number of flares to the monthly mortality from cardiovascular and myocardial infarctions for the time period 1974-1983, and computed correlation coefficients. Periodicities of 3 and 5 months (150 days) have been found in both distributions.

  12. Effects of Scenery, Lighting, Glideslope, and Experience on Timing the Landing Flare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmisano, Stephen; Favelle, Simone; Sachtler, W. L.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined three visual strategies for timing the initiation of the landing flare based on perceptions of either: (a) a critical height above ground level; (b) a critical runway width angle ([psi]); or (c) a critical time-to-contact (TTC) with the runway. Visual displays simulated landing approaches with trial-to-trial variations in…

  13. Solar flares: an overview.

    PubMed

    Rust, D M

    1992-01-01

    This is a survey of solar phenomena and physical models that may be useful for improving forecasts of solar flares and proton storms in interplanetary space. Knowledge of the physical processes that accelerate protons has advanced because of gamma-ray and X-ray observations from the Solar Maximum Mission telescopes. Protons are accelerated at the onset of flares, but the duration of any subsequent proton storm at 1 AU depends on the structure of the interplanetary fields. X-ray images of the solar corona show possible fast proton escape paths. Magnetographs and high-resolution visible-band images show the magnetic field structure near the acceleration region and the heating effects of sunward-directed protons. Preflare magnetic field growth and shear may be the most important clues to the physical processes that generate high energy solar particles. Any dramatic improvement in flare forecasts will require high resolution solar telescopes in space. Several possibilities for improvements in the art of flare forecasting are presented, among them: the use of acoustic tomography to probe for subsurface magnetic fields; a satellite-borne solar magnetograph; and an X-ray telescope to monitor the corona for eruptions.

  14. How Did a Major Confined Flare Occur in Super Solar Active Region 12192?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chaowei; Wu, S. T.; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl; Wang, Haiming; Feng, Xueshang; Hu, Qiang

    2016-09-01

    We study the physical mechanism of a major X-class solar flare that occurred in the super NOAA active region (AR) 12192 using data-driven numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modeling complemented with observations. With the evolving magnetic fields observed at the solar surface as bottom boundary input, we drive an MHD system to evolve self-consistently in correspondence with the realistic coronal evolution. During a two-day time interval, the modeled coronal field has been slowly stressed by the photospheric field evolution, which gradually created a large-scale coronal current sheet, i.e., a narrow layer with intense current, in the core of the AR. The current layer was successively enhanced until it became so thin that a tether-cutting reconnection between the sheared magnetic arcades was set in, which led to a flare. The modeled reconnecting field lines and their footpoints match well the observed hot flaring loops and the flare ribbons, respectively, suggesting that the model has successfully “reproduced” the macroscopic magnetic process of the flare. In particular, with simulation, we explained why this event is a confined eruption—the consequence of the reconnection is a shared arcade instead of a newly formed flux rope. We also found a much weaker magnetic implosion effect compared to many other X-class flares.

  15. Subscriber loop optical distribution architecture: a cost-effective TDM/TDMA subscriber loop system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda, Javier; Eldering, Charles A.

    1992-02-01

    While it is clear that the development of the laser and low loss optical fiber has had an unmistakable impact on the field of telecommunications, the deployment of optical fiber in the subscriber (local) loop is an especially challenging task. It requires development of low cost equipment that will initially be used at low bit rates (< few tens of Mb/s) due to the fact that basic telephone service does not require more than 64 kb/s per subscriber. Transmission of TV data, in either analog or digital form, will make more efficient use of the fiber bandwidth and generate additional revenues. But as seen from the perspective of the telephony industry, basic telephone services are the principal source of revenue and economic justification for the installation of subscriber loop fiber systems. For large scale deployment in the subscriber loop, the fiber optic system must provide basic telephone services with equal or better performance at a cost that is competitive with that of existing copper pair technology. In this paper we examine a number of possible fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) and fiber-to-the-curb (FTTC) architectures, and present an architecture for urban areas that is best classified as fiber-to-the-building (FTTB). We examine the costs and performance characteristics of the various networks. We show how demographic information can be used to optimize the capacity of the remote terminals. It is shown that for the demography of Spain (where in urban areas the majority of the population resides in apartment buildings with 10 or more dwellings) a remote terminal with a variable subscriber capacity presents a cost savings over remote terminals with a fixed number of subscriber channels.

  16. A Cold Flare with Delayed Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Pal'shin, Valentin D.; Meshalkina, Natalia; Lysenko, Alexandra L.; Kashapova, Larisa K.; Altyntsev, Alexander T.

    2016-05-01

    Recently, a number of peculiar flares have been reported that demonstrate significant nonthermal particle signatures with low, if any, thermal emission, which implies a close association of the observed emission with the primary energy release/electron acceleration region. This paper presents a flare that appears “cold” at the impulsive phase, while displaying delayed heating later on. Using hard X-ray data from Konus-Wind, microwave observations by SSRT, RSTN, NoRH, and NoRP, context observations, and three-dimensional modeling, we study the energy release, particle acceleration, and transport, and the relationships between the nonthermal and thermal signatures. The flaring process is found to involve the interaction between a small loop and a big loop with the accelerated particles divided roughly equally between them. Precipitation of the electrons from the small loop produced only a weak thermal response because the loop volume was small, while the electrons trapped in the big loop lost most of their energy in the coronal part of the loop, which resulted in coronal plasma heating but no or only weak chromospheric evaporation, and thus unusually weak soft X-ray emission. The energy losses of the fast electrons in the big tenuous loop were slow, which resulted in the observed delay of the plasma heating. We determined that the impulsively accelerated electron population had a beamed angular distribution in the direction of the electric force along the magnetic field of the small loop. The accelerated particle transport in the big loop was primarily mediated by turbulent waves, which is similar to other reported cold flares.

  17. Effect of Interaction between Chromatin Loops on Cell-to-Cell Variability in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tianshou

    2016-01-01

    According to recent experimental evidence, the interaction between chromatin loops, which can be characterized by three factors—connection pattern, distance between regulatory elements, and communication form, play an important role in determining the level of cell-to-cell variability in gene expression. These quantitative experiments call for a corresponding modeling effect that addresses the question of how changes in these factors affect variability at the expression level in a systematic rather than case-by-case fashion. Here we make such an effort, based on a mechanic model that maps three fundamental patterns for two interacting DNA loops into a 4–state model of stochastic transcription. We first show that in contrast to side-by-side loops, nested loops enhance mRNA expression and reduce expression noise whereas alternating loops have just opposite effects. Then, we compare effects of facilitated tracking and direct looping on gene expression. We find that the former performs better than the latter in controlling mean expression and in tuning expression noise, but this control or tuning is distance–dependent, remarkable for moderate loop lengths, and there is a limit loop length such that the difference in effect between two communication forms almost disappears. Our analysis and results justify the facilitated chromatin–looping hypothesis. PMID:27153118

  18. Energy Transport Effects in Flaring Atmospheres Heated by Mixed Particle Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkova, Valentina; Zharkov, Sergei; Macrae, Connor; Druett, Malcolm; Scullion, Eamon

    2016-07-01

    We investigate energy and particle transport in the whole flaring atmosphere from the corona to the photosphere and interior for the flaring events on the 1st July 2012, 6 and 7 September 2011 by using the RHESSI and SDO instruments as well as high-resolution observations from the Swedish 1-metre Solar Telescope (SST3) CRISP4 (CRisp Imaging Spectro-polarimeter). The observations include hard and soft X-ray emission, chromospheric emission in both H-alpha 656.3 nm core and continuum, as well as, in the near infra-red triplet Ca II 854.2 nm core and continuum channels and local helioseismic responses (sunquakes). The observations are compared with the simulations of hard X-ray emission and tested by hydrodynamic simulations of flaring atmospheres of the Sun heated by mixed particle beams. The temperature, density and macro-velocity variations of the ambient atmospheres are calculated for heating by mixed beams and the seismic response of the solar interior to generation of supersonic shocks moving into the solar interior. We investigate the termination depths of these shocks beneath the quiet photosphere levels and compare them with the parameters of seismic responses in the interior, or sunquakes (Zharkova and Zharkov, 2015). We also present an investigation of radiative conditions modelled in a full non-LTE approach for hydrogen during flare onsets with particular focus on Balmer and Paschen emission in the visible, near UV and near IR ranges and compare them with observations. The links between different observational features derived from HXR, optical and seismic emission are interpreted by different particle transport models that will allow independent evaluation of the particle transport scenarios.

  19. The Effect of Radiative Cooling on Coronal Loop Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Terradas, Jaume

    2008-10-01

    Coronal loops that exhibit kink-mode oscillations have generally been assumed to have a constant density and temperature during the observed time interval. Analyzing their intensities in an EUV wave band, however, clearly shows that their brightness varies in a way that is consistent with a temperature cooling through the EUV passband, which limits their detection time, observed damping time, and number of observable periods. We study kink-mode oscillations of eight loops observed during the so-called harmonica event on 2001 April 15, 21:58-22:27 UT in the 171 Å band. We find loop densities of ne = (1.4 +/- 0.6) × 109 cm-3, loop widths of w = 2.0 +/- 2.6 Mm, and e-folding cooling times of τcool = 17 +/- 7 minutes, when they cool through the peak temperature T = 0.95 MK of the 171 Å band. We conclude that oscillations of a single loop cannot be detected longer than 10-20 minutes in one single filter and appropriate light curve modeling is necessary to disentangle the subsequent oscillation phases of multiple near-cospatial loops.

  20. The effect of a strong stellar flare on the atmospheric chemistry of an earth-like planet orbiting an M dwarf.

    PubMed

    Segura, Antígona; Walkowicz, Lucianne M; Meadows, Victoria; Kasting, James; Hawley, Suzanne

    2010-09-01

    Main sequence M stars pose an interesting problem for astrobiology: their abundance in our galaxy makes them likely targets in the hunt for habitable planets, but their strong chromospheric activity produces high-energy radiation and charged particles that may be detrimental to life. We studied the impact of the 1985 April 12 flare from the M dwarf AD Leonis (AD Leo), simulating the effects from both UV radiation and protons on the atmospheric chemistry of a hypothetical, Earth-like planet located within its habitable zone. Based on observations of solar proton events and the Neupert effect, we estimated a proton flux associated with the flare of 5.9 × 10⁸ protons cm⁻² sr⁻¹ s⁻¹ for particles with energies >10 MeV. Then we calculated the abundance of nitrogen oxides produced by the flare by scaling the production of these compounds during a large solar proton event called the Carrington event. The simulations were performed with a 1-D photochemical model coupled to a 1-D radiative/convective model. Our results indicate that the UV radiation emitted during the flare does not produce a significant change in the ozone column depth of the planet. When the action of protons is included, the ozone depletion reaches a maximum of 94% two years after the flare for a planet with no magnetic field. At the peak of the flare, the calculated UV fluxes that reach the surface, in the wavelength ranges that are damaging for life, exceed those received on Earth during less than 100 s. Therefore, flares may not present a direct hazard for life on the surface of an orbiting habitable planet. Given that AD Leo is one of the most magnetically active M dwarfs known, this conclusion should apply to planets around other M dwarfs with lower levels of chromospheric activity.

  1. The Effect of a Strong Stellar Flare on the Atmospheric Chemistry of an Earth-like Planet Orbiting an M Dwarf

    PubMed Central

    Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Meadows, Victoria; Kasting, James; Hawley, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Main sequence M stars pose an interesting problem for astrobiology: their abundance in our galaxy makes them likely targets in the hunt for habitable planets, but their strong chromospheric activity produces high-energy radiation and charged particles that may be detrimental to life. We studied the impact of the 1985 April 12 flare from the M dwarf AD Leonis (AD Leo), simulating the effects from both UV radiation and protons on the atmospheric chemistry of a hypothetical, Earth-like planet located within its habitable zone. Based on observations of solar proton events and the Neupert effect, we estimated a proton flux associated with the flare of 5.9 × 108 protons cm−2 sr−1 s−1 for particles with energies >10 MeV. Then we calculated the abundance of nitrogen oxides produced by the flare by scaling the production of these compounds during a large solar proton event called the Carrington event. The simulations were performed with a 1-D photochemical model coupled to a 1-D radiative/convective model. Our results indicate that the UV radiation emitted during the flare does not produce a significant change in the ozone column depth of the planet. When the action of protons is included, the ozone depletion reaches a maximum of 94% two years after the flare for a planet with no magnetic field. At the peak of the flare, the calculated UV fluxes that reach the surface, in the wavelength ranges that are damaging for life, exceed those received on Earth during less than 100 s. Therefore, flares may not present a direct hazard for life on the surface of an orbiting habitable planet. Given that AD Leo is one of the most magnetically active M dwarfs known, this conclusion should apply to planets around other M dwarfs with lower levels of chromospheric activity. Key Words: M dwarf—Flare—Habitable zone—Planetary atmospheres. Astrobiology 10, 751–771. PMID:20879863

  2. Simulating VIIRS Observed Gas Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, F. C.

    2015-12-01

    VIIRS Nightfire (VNF) had been proved being able to effectively detect gas flares at night, and characterize their temperature and source size. [1] However, limited access to generally confidential gas flare operation measurements made it difficult to verify the output. Although flared gas volume is occasionally available, it is not common to log the temperature and flames size which directly links to VNF output. To understand the mechanism of gas flare and how VIIRS perceives the event, a platform is proposed to simulate the gas flare being observed by VIIRS. The methodology can be described in three steps. (1) Use CFD simulation software ISIS-3D to simulate a simple gas flare. [2] Scalar fields of temperature and species concentration related to combustion are extracted from the simulation. The instantaneous scalar can be determined from time-averaging or guess by stochastic time and space series (TASS) from single-point statistics [3]. (2) Model spectral radiance intensity of simulated gas flare using RADCAL. [4] RADCAL developed by NIST can accurately model the spectral radiance emitted on the direction of lineof-sight given the spatial profile of temperature and concentration of species. (3) Use radiative transfer modeling to calculate the energy propagated to VIIRS. The modeled radiation will then be weighted by the MODTRAN [5] modeled transmissivity over predefined atmosphere to the satellite, with geometrical effects considered. Such platform can help understanding how exactly VNF is measuring gas flares, and thus lead to more precise characterization of combustion events. [1] C. D. Elvidge et al, Remote Sensing, 2013[2] IRSN ISIS-3D[3] M. E. Kounalakis et al, ASME J. Heat Transfer, 1991 [4] W. L. Grosshandler, NIST Technical Note 1402, 1993 [5] A. Berk et al, MODTRAN 5.2.0.0 User's Manual

  3. INVESTIGATION OF CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION IN A NEUPERT-TYPE SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Ning Zongjun; Cao Wenda

    2010-07-10

    The Neupert effect implies a flare model in which the hard X-rays (HXRs) are produced by energetic electrons via electron-ion bremsstrahlung as they lose their energies in the chromosphere, while the soft X-rays (SXRs) are produced by thermal bremsstrahlung from 'chromospheric evaporation' due to plasma being heated by those same electrons. Based on this concept, we investigate the evidence for chromospheric evaporation in a Neupert-type flare on 2004 October 30. First, we demonstrate that this event is consistent with the Neupert effect. Using the RHESSI data, both thermal and nonthermal energies are derived after the onset of this flare. The high correlation between the derivative of the SXRs and HXRs and between the derivative of the thermal energy and nonthermal energy indicates that the 2004 October 30 flare is a Neupert-type event. Second, chromospheric evaporation is necessarily expected during the flare's rising phase. We analyze RHESSI images at different energies and different times around the flare maximum. The HXR emission tends to move the footpoints close to each other, finally merging them into a single source with the same position as the loop-top source. When the projection effect (due to this event being near the disk center) is taken into account, this fact can be regarded as the signature of chromospheric evaporation in the X-ray observations. RHESSI observations show three kinds of evidence that are consistent with the evaporation model. First, at a given instant, the higher energy X-rays originate from the deeper layers of the atmosphere or further away from the loop top. Second, in a given energy band, i.e., at 20-30 keV, the earlier X-rays originate from the deeper layers or further away from the loop top. Third, the X-ray footpoint sources at higher energies disappear at later times. Based on these characteristics, chromospheric evaporation took about 100 s for the 2004 October 30 flare. X-rays at all energy bands do not show evidence of

  4. 2PI effective action at four loop order in φ4 theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrington, M. E.; Meggison, B. A.; Pickering, D.

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that perturbative pressure calculations show poor convergence. Calculations using a two-particle irreducible (2PI) effective action show improved convergence at the 3 loop level, but no calculations have been done at 4 loops. We consider the 2PI effective theory for a symmetric scalar theory with quartic coupling in four dimensions. We calculate the pressure and two different nonperturbative vertices as functions of coupling and temperature. Our results show that the 4 loop contribution can become larger than the 3 loop term when the coupling is large. This indicates a breakdown of the 2PI approach, and the need for higher order n PI approximations. In addition, our results demonstrate the renormalizability of 2PI calculations at the 4 loop level. This is interesting because the counterterm structure of the 2PI theory at 4 loops is different from the structure at n ≤3 loops. Two vertex counterterms are required at the 4 loop level, but not at lower loop order. This unique feature of the 2PI theory has never been verified numerically.

  5. Stochastic acceleration of electrons by fast magnetosonic waves in solar flares: the effects of anisotropy in velocity and wavenumber space

    SciTech Connect

    Pongkitiwanichakul, Peera; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.

    2014-11-20

    We develop a model for stochastic acceleration of electrons in solar flares. As in several previous models, the electrons are accelerated by turbulent fast magnetosonic waves ({sup f}ast waves{sup )} via transit-time-damping (TTD) interactions. (In TTD interactions, fast waves act like moving magnetic mirrors that push the electrons parallel or anti-parallel to the magnetic field). We also include the effects of Coulomb collisions and the waves' parallel electric fields. Unlike previous models, our model is two-dimensional in both momentum space and wavenumber space and takes into account the anisotropy of the wave power spectrum F{sub k} and electron distribution function f {sub e}. We use weak turbulence theory and quasilinear theory to obtain a set of equations that describes the coupled evolution of F{sub k} and f {sub e}. We solve these equations numerically and find that the electron distribution function develops a power-law-like non-thermal tail within a restricted range of energies E in (E {sub nt}, E {sub max}). We obtain approximate analytic expressions for E {sub nt} and E {sub max}, which describe how these minimum and maximum energies depend upon parameters such as the electron number density and the rate at which fast-wave energy is injected into the acceleration region at large scales. We contrast our results with previous studies that assume that F{sub k} and f {sub e} are isotropic, and we compare one of our numerical calculations with the time-dependent hard-X-ray spectrum observed during the 1980 June 27 flare. In our numerical calculations, the electron energy spectra are softer (steeper) than in models with isotropic F{sub k} and f {sub e} and closer to the values inferred from observations of solar flares.

  6. Modern observations and models of Solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsyk, Pavel; Somov, Boris

    As well known, that fast particles propagating along flare loop generate bremsstrahlung hard x-ray emission and gyro-synchrotron microwave emission. We present the self-consistent kinetic description of propagation accelerated particles. The key point of this approach is taking into account the effect of reverse current. In our two-dimensional model the electric field of reverse current has the strong influence to the beam of accelerated particles. It decelerates part of the electrons in the beam and turns back other part of them without significant energy loss. The exact analytical solution for the appropriate kinetic equation with Landau collision integral was found. Using derived distribution function of electrons we’ve calculated evolution of their energy spectrum and plasma heating, coronal microwave emission and characteristics of hard x-ray emission in the corona and in the chromosphere. All results were compared with modern high precision space observations.

  7. Effects of strapping field profiles on plasma loop expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Bao Nguyen Quoc; Bellan, Paul

    2013-10-01

    Tokamak-like forces may explain fundamental behaviors of solar plasma arches. The hoop force causes arched, current-carrying plasma loops to expand unless additional forces are applied. This expansion was slowed and even inhibited by a magnetic field of proper polarity in previous solar loop experiments at Caltech but there was no attempt to characterize the strapping field's spatial profile. Kliem and Torok predicted an explosive-like transition from slow expansion to fast eruption if the vertical decay rate of the strapping field exceeds an instability threshold. We have constructed a new set of independently powered auxiliary coils designed to be placed inside the vacuum chamber and closer to the plasma source. The resulting strapping field has a sharper decay rate than with our previous coils and is expected to exceed the instability threshold. Progress on the interaction between arched plasma loops and strapping magnetic fields will be presented. Supported by the NSF and AFOSR.

  8. Suppression of Parallel Transport in Turbulent Magnetized Plasmas and Its Impact on the Non-thermal and Thermal Aspects of Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Nicolas H.; Kontar, Eduard P.; Emslie, A. Gordon

    2016-06-01

    The transport of the energy contained in electrons, both thermal and suprathermal, in solar flares plays a key role in our understanding of many aspects of the flare phenomenon, from the spatial distribution of hard X-ray emission to global energetics. Motivated by recent RHESSI observations that point to the existence of a mechanism that confines electrons to the coronal parts of flare loops more effectively than Coulomb collisions, we here consider the impact of pitch-angle scattering off turbulent magnetic fluctuations on the parallel transport of electrons in flaring coronal loops. It is shown that the presence of such a scattering mechanism in addition to Coulomb collisional scattering can significantly reduce the parallel thermal and electrical conductivities relative to their collisional values. We provide illustrative expressions for the resulting thermoelectric coefficients that relate the thermal flux and electrical current density to the temperature gradient and the applied electric field. We then evaluate the effect of these modified transport coefficients on the flare coronal temperature that can be attained, on the post-impulsive-phase cooling of heated coronal plasma, and on the importance of the beam-neutralizing return current on both ambient heating and the energy loss rate of accelerated electrons. We also discuss the possible ways in which anomalous transport processes have an impact on the required overall energy associated with accelerated electrons in solar flares.

  9. EVIDENCE FOR HOT FAST FLOW ABOVE A SOLAR FLARE ARCADE

    SciTech Connect

    Imada, S.; Aoki, K.; Hara, H.; Watanabe, T.; Harra, L. K.; Shimizu, T.

    2013-10-10

    Solar flares are one of the main forces behind space weather events. However, the mechanism that drives such energetic phenomena is not fully understood. The standard eruptive flare model predicts that magnetic reconnection occurs high in the corona where hot fast flows are created. Some imaging or spectroscopic observations have indicated the presence of these hot fast flows, but there have been no spectroscopic scanning observations to date to measure the two-dimensional structure quantitatively. We analyzed a flare that occurred on the west solar limb on 2012 January 27 observed by the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and found that the hot (∼30MK) fast (>500 km s{sup –1}) component was located above the flare loop. This is consistent with magnetic reconnection taking place above the flare loop.

  10. COMPLEX FLARE DYNAMICS INITIATED BY A FILAMENT–FILAMENT INTERACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Chunming; McAteer, R. T. James; Liu, Rui; Alexander, David; Sun, Xudong

    2015-11-01

    We report on an eruption involving a relatively rare filament–filament interaction on 2013 June 21, observed by SDO and STEREO-B. The two filaments were separated in height with a “double-decker” configuration. The eruption of the lower filament began simultaneously with a descent of the upper filament, resulting in a convergence and direct interaction of the two filaments. The interaction was accompanied by the heating of surrounding plasma and an apparent crossing of a loop-like structure through the upper filament. The subsequent coalescence of the filaments drove a bright front ahead of the erupting structures. The whole process was associated with a C3.0 flare followed immediately by an M2.9 flare. Shrinking loops and descending dark voids were observed during the M2.9 flare at different locations above a C-shaped flare arcade as part of the energy release, giving us unique insight into the flare dynamics.

  11. Particle Acceleration in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosian, V.

    Several new observations notably high spatial and spectral X-ray observations of impulsive phase of solar flares by YOHKOH and RHESSI, and Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) spectra by ACE have provided strong evidence in favor of stochastic acceleration of electrons, protons and other ions by plasma waves or turbulence. Theoretical arguments also favor such a model if the seed particles come from the background thermal plasma. I will describe these evidences and the theoretical framework for evaluation of the accelerated particle spectra, their transport and radiation. The predictions of the models will be compared with several features of the observations with specific emphasize on heating vs acceleration by turbulence, thermal vs nonthermal electron spectra, looptop vs footpoint emission fro flaring loops, electron vs proton acceleration rates and 3He vs 4He (and other ion) abundances in SEPs.

  12. Relativistic electron transport and bremsstrahlung production in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, James A.; Ramaty, Reuven

    1989-09-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of ultrarelativistic electron transport in solar flare magnetic loops has been developed. It includes Coulomb, synchrotron, and bremsstrahlung energy losses; pitch-angle scattering by Alfven and whistler turbulence in the coronal region of the loop; and magnetic mirroring in the converging magnetic flux tubes beneath the transition region. Depth distributions, time profiles, energy spectra, and angular distributions of the resulting bremsstrahlung emission are calculated. It is found that both the preferential detection of solar flares with greater than 10 MeV emission near the limb of the sun and the observation of ultrarelativistic electron bremsstrahlung from flares on the disk are consequences of the loop transport model. The declining portions of the observed time profiles of greater than 10 MeV emission from solar flares can also be accounted for, and it is proposed that these portions are determined by transport and not acceleration.

  13. Slipping magnetic reconnection during an X-class solar flare observed by SDO/AIA

    SciTech Connect

    Dudík, J.; Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.; Janvier, M.; Aulanier, G.; Schmieder, B.; Karlický, M. E-mail: mjanvier@maths.dundee.ac.uk

    2014-04-01

    We present SDO/AIA observations of an eruptive X-class flare of 2012 July 12, and compare its evolution with the predictions of a three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulation. We focus on the dynamics of flare loops that are seen to undergo slipping reconnection during the flare. In the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 131 Å observations, lower parts of 10 MK flare loops exhibit an apparent motion with velocities of several tens of km s{sup –1} along the developing flare ribbons. In the early stages of the flare, flare ribbons consist of compact, localized bright transition-region emission from the footpoints of the flare loops. A differential emission measure analysis shows that the flare loops have temperatures up to the formation of Fe XXIV. A series of very long, S-shaped loops erupt, leading to a coronal mass ejection observed by STEREO. The observed dynamics are compared with the evolution of magnetic structures in the 'standard solar flare model in 3D.' This model matches the observations well, reproducing the apparently slipping flare loops, S-shaped erupting loops, and the evolution of flare ribbons. All of these processes are explained via 3D reconnection mechanisms resulting from the expansion of a torus-unstable flux rope. The AIA observations and the numerical model are complemented by radio observations showing a noise storm in the metric range. Dm-drifting pulsation structures occurring during the eruption indicate plasmoid ejection and enhancement of the reconnection rate. The bursty nature of radio emission shows that the slipping reconnection is still intermittent, although it is observed to persist for more than an hour.

  14. Effect of Thermal Conduction on Acoustic Waves in Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdan, T. J.

    2006-05-01

    The influence of classical (Spitzer) thermal conduction on longitudinal acoustic waves in a coronal loop is determined through an idealized but exactly solvable model. The model consists of an isothermal, stratified (constant gravity) atmosphere in which a monochromatic acoustic wave, traveling in the direction of decreasing density, is imposed throughout the lower half of the atmosphere. Based on the linearized equations of motion, the complete steady state (t-->∞) solution is obtained. In addition to the imposed driving wave, the solution also contains reflected and transmitted acoustic and thermal conduction waves. The mode transformation and mixing occurs in the vicinity of the atmospheric layer where the gas pressure passes through a critical value set by the magnitude of the thermal conduction and other model parameters. For 5 minute waves in a million degree loop, this critical pressure is on the order of 8×10-4 in cgs units. Since the apex gas pressure of many coronal loops of current interest is thought to be comfortably in excess of this value, mode mixing and transformation is not likely to be a relevant factor for understanding acoustic waves in these structures. On the other hand, enhanced thermal conductivity as a result of plasma instabilities, for example, could revive the importance of this mechanism for coronal loops. If this mixing layer is present, the calculations show that the pair of thermal conduction waves invariably gains the overwhelming majority of the energy flux of the incoming acoustic wave. This energy is rapidly dissipated in the neighborhood of the mixing layer.

  15. Effects of different strapping field profiles on plasma loop expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Bao Nguyen Quoc; Bellan, Paul

    2012-10-01

    The hoop force causes arched, current-carrying plasma loops to expand unless additional forces are applied. This expansion was slowed and even inhibited by a magnetic field of proper polarity in previous solar coronal loop experiments [1] but there was no attempt to characterize the strapping field's spatial profile. We have reproduced the Hansen results by mounting the coils producing the strapping field on two ports of the vacuum chamber. We plan to enhance the setup by mounting coils on 3 axis adjustable stands that provide precision placement of the coil relative to the plasma. This precise placement allows us to adjust the altitude decay profile of the strapping field which is predicted to determine the slow rise to fast eruption behavior of plasma loops on the sun [2]. Preliminary data on the interaction between the plasma and specified strapping field profiles will be presented. We have also developed 3-axis Hall sensors capable of generating vector maps of the strapping field. [4pt] [1] J. F. Hansen and P. M. Bellan, Astrophys. J. Lett. 563, L183 (2001)[0pt] [2] B. Kliem and T. Torok, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 255002 (2006)

  16. Understanding Solar Flare Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatland, M. S.

    2005-12-01

    A review is presented of work aimed at understanding solar flare statistics, with emphasis on the well known flare power-law size distribution. Although avalanche models are perhaps the favoured model to describe flare statistics, their physical basis is unclear, and they are divorced from developing ideas in large-scale reconnection theory. An alternative model, aimed at reconciling large-scale reconnection models with solar flare statistics, is revisited. The solar flare waiting-time distribution has also attracted recent attention. Observed waiting-time distributions are described, together with what they might tell us about the flare phenomenon. Finally, a practical application of flare statistics to flare prediction is described in detail, including the results of a year of automated (web-based) predictions from the method.

  17. Effects of grain size, hardness, and stress on the magnetic hysteresis loops of ferromagnetic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwun, H.; Burkhardt, G. L.

    1987-02-01

    Effects of grain size, hardness, and stress on the magnetic hysteresis loops of AISI 410 stainless steel and SAE 4340 steel specimens were investigated experimentally. It was observed that both hardness and stress significantly influenced the hysteresis loops, while the grain size had a minimal effect. For each material, the mechanically harder specimen was more difficult to magnetize. Upon application of uniaxial stress, the magnetic induction increased under tension and decreased under compression, with the sides of the hysteresis loops becoming inclined more toward the vertical axis under tension and the horizontal axis under compression. For each material, the effects of stress on the hysteresis loops were greater for the mechanically softer specimen and exhibited an inverse relationship to the hardness. The effects of stress were not dependent on grain size.

  18. Charge state distributions of iron in impulsive solar flares: Importance of stripping effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostryakov, V. M.; Kartavykh, Y. Y.; Ruffolo, D.; Kovaltsov, G. A.; Kocharov, L.

    2000-12-01

    A model of stochastic acceleration of heavy ions by Alfvén wave turbulence has been developed. It takes into account spatial diffusion, Coulomb losses, and the possibility of charge changes for ions during stochastic acceleration. The main processes influencing the ionic charge states are the stripping by thermal electrons and protons as constituents of a surrounding medium and dielectronic and radiative recombination. We have calculated energy spectra and charge distributions of nonthermal Fe ions as a sample species. The dependence of the charge distributions and energy spectra of iron on the parameters of the plasma (temperature and number density) is studied. We compare our results with measurements to date of the mean charge of iron in impulsive solar flare events and conclude that they indicate source plasma ionization temperatures between 6□×106 and 107K.

  19. Observations and Modeling of Solar Flare Atmospheric Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.

    2015-09-01

    Solar flares are one of the most energetic events in solar atmosphere, which last minutes to tens of minutes. The eruption of a solar flare involves energy release, plasma heating, particle acceleration, mass flows, waves, etc. A solar flare releases a large amount of energy, and its emission spans a wide wavelength range. Solar flares are usually accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs); therefore they could significantly affect the space environments between the Earth and the Sun. At present, we do not fully understand the whole flare process. There are still many important questions to be resolved, such as when and where is the energy released? How long does the energy release last? What are the main ways of energy release? And how does the solar atmosphere respond to the energy release? To address these questions, we study in detail the flare heating and dynamic evolution. We first give a brief review of previous flare studies (Chapter 1), and introduce the observing instruments (Chapter 2) and the modeling method (Chapter 3) related to this thesis work. Then we use spectral data to investigate the chromospheric evaporation (Chapter 4). Based on the results, we further explore the flare heating problem. With observationally inferred heating functions, we model two flare loops, and compare the results with observations (Chapter 5). A consistency is achieved between modeling and observations. In addition, we model two different sets of flare loop systems with quite different heating profiles and dynamic evolutions (Chapter 6). The details are described as below. Firstly, we investigate the chromospheric evaporation in the flare on 2007 January 16 using line profiles observed by the Extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode. Three points with different magnetic polarities at flare ribbons are analyzed in detail. We find that the three points show different patterns of upflows and downflows in the impulsive phase of the flare. The

  20. An X-ray flare from 47 Cas

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Jeewan C.; Karmakar, Subhajeet

    2015-02-01

    Using XMM-Newton observations, we investigate properties of a flare from the very active but poorly known stellar system 47 Cas. The luminosity at the peak of the flare is found to be 3.54 × 10{sup 30} erg s{sup −1}, which is ∼2 times higher than that at a quiescent state. The quiescent state corona of 47 Cas can be represented by two temperature plasma: 3.7 and 11.0 MK. The time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy of the flare show the variable nature of the temperature, the emission measure, and the abundance. The maximum temperature during the flare is derived as 72.8 MK. We infer the length of a flaring loop to be 3.3 × 10{sup 10} cm using a hydrodynamic loop model. Using the RGS spectra, the density during the flare is estimated as 4.0 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3}. The loop scaling laws are also applied when deriving physical parameters of the flaring plasma.

  1. Effect of the X5.4 Class Solar Flare Event of Solar Cycle 24 ON the GPS Signal Reception in Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, S.; Musa, T. A.; Aris, W. A. W.; Gopir, G.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we examine the effect of solar flare event on the Global Positioning System (GPS) signal reception in Peninsular Malaysia during the X5.4 class solar flare on 7th March 2012, 00:24 UT at active region AR1429. GPS data from six MyRTKnet stations that cover the northern, southern, western and eastern regions of Peninsular Malaysia were used, namely Langkawi (Kedah), Bandar Baharu (Pulau Pinang), Pekan (Pahang), Mersing (Johor), Tanjung Pengelih (Johor) and Malacca (Malacca). The total electron content (TEC) was estimated based on the single layer ionospheric model. Next, the ionospheric delay for each GPS frequency of L1 (1575.42 MHz), L2 (1227.60 MHz) and L5 (1176.45 MHz) was then calculated. The results show that solar flare event can influence the GPS signal reception in Peninsular Malaysia where the X5.4 class solar flare shows significant effect of the ionospheric delay within the range of 9 m - 20 m. These research findings will significantly contribute to space weather study and its effects on space-based positioning system such as the GPS.

  2. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET NON-THERMAL LINE BROADENING AND HIGH-ENERGY PARTICLES DURING SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Kawate, T.; Imada, S.

    2013-10-01

    We have studied the relationship between the location of EUV non-thermal broadening and high-energy particles during large flares using the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode, the Nobeyama Radio Polarimeter, the Nobeyama Radioheliograph, and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory. We have analyzed five large flare events that contain thermal-rich, intermediate, and thermal-poor flares classified by the definition discussed in the paper. We found that, in the case of thermal-rich flares, the non-thermal broadening of Fe XXIV occurred at the top of the flaring loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of 17 GHz microwaves is located at the footpoint of the flare loop. On the other hand, in the case of intermediate/thermal-poor flares, the non-thermal broadening of Fe XXIV occurred at the footpoint of the flare loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of 17 GHz microwaves is located at the top of the flaring loop. We discussed the difference between thermal-rich and intermediate/thermal-poor flares based on the spatial information of non-thermal broadening, which may provide clues that the presence of turbulence plays an important role in the pitch angle scattering of high-energy electrons.

  3. Observations and modeling of plasma flows driven by solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brannon, Sean Robert

    One of the fundamental statements that can be made about the solar atmosphere is that it is structured. This structuring is generally believed to be the result of both the arrangement of the magnetic field in the corona and the distribution of plasma along magnetic loops. The standard model of solar flares involves plasma transported into coronal loops via a process known as chromospheric evaporation, and the resulting evolution of the flare loops is believed to be sensitive to the physical mechanism of energy input into the chromosphere by the flare. We present here the results of three investigations into chromospheric plasma flows driven by solar flare energy release and transport. First, we develop a 1-D hydrodynamic code to simulate the response of a simplified model chromosphere to energy input via thermal conduction from reconnection-driven shocks. We use the results from a set of simulations spanning a parameter space in both shock speed and chromospheric-to-coronal temperature ratio to infer power-law relationships between these quantities and observable evaporation properties. Second, we use imaging and spectral observations of a quasi-periodic oscillation of a flare ribbon to determine the phase relationship between Doppler shifts of the ribbon plasma and the oscillation. The phase difference we find leads us to suggest an origin in a current sheet instability. Finally, we use imaging and spectral data of an on-disk flare event and resulting flare loop plasma flows to generally validate the standard picture of flare loop evolution, including evaporation, cooling time, and draining downflows, and we use a simple free-fall model to produce the first direct comparison between observed and synthetic downflow spectra.

  4. FlareLab: early results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltwisch, H.; Kempkes, P.; Mackel, F.; Stein, H.; Tenfelde, J.; Arnold, L.; Dreher, J.; Grauer, R.

    2010-12-01

    The FlareLab experiment at Bochum University has been constructed to generate and investigate plasma-filled magnetic flux tubes similar to arch-shaped solar prominences, which often result in coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In its first version, the device has been used to reproduce and extend previous studies of Bellan et al (1998 Phys. Plasmas 5 1991). Here the plasma source consists of two electrodes, which can be connected to a 1.0 kJ capacitor bank, and of a horseshoe magnet, which provides an arch-shaped guiding field. The discharge is ignited in a cloud of hydrogen gas that has been puffed into the space above the electrodes. In the first few microseconds the plasma current rises at a rate of several kA µs-1, causing the plasma column to pinch along the guiding B-field and to form an expanding loop structure. The observed dynamics of the magnetic flux tubes is analysed by means of three-dimensional MHD simulations in order to determine the influence of parameters like the initial magnetic field geometry on magnetic stability. At present, FlareLab is redesigned to mimic a model that was proposed by Titov and Démoulin (1999 Astron. Astrophys. 351 707) to investigate twisted magnetic configurations in solar flares.

  5. Electron acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Droge, Wolfgang; Meyer, Peter; Evenson, Paul; Moses, Dan

    1989-01-01

    For the period Spetember 1978 to December 1982, 55 solar flare particle events for which the instruments on board the ISEE-3 spacecraft detected electrons above 10 MeV. Combining data with those from the ULEWAT spectrometer electron spectra in the range from 0.1 to 100 MeV were obtained. The observed spectral shapes can be divided into two classes. The spectra of the one class can be fit by a single power law in rigidity over the entire observed range. The spectra of the other class deviate from a power law, instead exhibiting a steepening at low rigidities and a flattening at high rigidities. Events with power-law spectra are associated with impulsive (less than 1 hr duration) soft X-ray emission, whereas events with hardening spectra are associated with long-duration (more than 1 hr) soft X-ray emission. The characteristics of long-duration events are consistent with diffusive shock acceleration taking place high in the corona. Electron spectra of short-duration flares are well reproduced by the distribution functions derived from a model assuming simultaneous second-order Fermi acceleration and Coulomb losses operating in closed flare loops.

  6. On the Importance of the Flare's Late Phase for the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Eparvier, Frank; Jones, Andrew R.; Hock, Rachel; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Klimchuk, James A.; Didkovsky, Leonid; Judge, Darrell; Mariska, John; Bailey, Scott; Tobiska, W. Kent; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Webb, David F.; Warren, Harry

    2011-01-01

    The new solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance observations from NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) have revealed a new class of solar flares that are referred to as late phase flares. These flares are characterized by the hot 2-5 MK coronal emissions (e.g., Fe XVI 33.5 nm) showing large secondary peaks that appear many minutes to hours after an eruptive flare event. In contrast, the cool 0.7-1.5 MK coronal emissions (e.g., Fe IX 17.1 nm) usually dim immediately after the flare onset and do not recover until after the delayed second peak of the hot coronal emissions. We refer to this period of 1-5 hours after the fl amrea sin phase as the late phase, and this late phase is uniquely different than long duration flares associated with 2-ribbon flares or large filament eruptions. Our analysis of the late phase flare events indicates that the late phase involves hot coronal loops near the flaring region, not directly related to the original flaring loop system but rather with the higher post-eruption fields. Another finding is that space weather applications concerning Earth s ionosphere and thermosphere need to consider these late phase flares because they can enhance the total EUV irradiance flare variation by a factor of 2 when the late phase contribution is included.

  7. Effect of loop length variation on quadruplex-Watson Crick duplex competition

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Niti; Sahoo, Bankanidhi; Varun, K. A. S.; Maiti, Sudipta; Maiti, Souvik

    2008-01-01

    The effect of loop length on quadruplex stability has been studied when the G-rich strand is present along with its complementary C-rich strand, thereby resulting in competition between quadruplex and duplex structures. Using model sequences with loop lengths varying from T to T5, we carried out extensive FRET to discover the influence of loop length on the quadruplex-Watson Crick duplex competition. The binding data show an increase in the binding affinity of quadruplexes towards their complementary strands upon increasing the loop length. Our kinetic data reveal that unfolding of the quadruplex in presence of a complementary strand involves a contribution from a predominant slow and a small population of fast opening conformer. The contribution from the fast opening conformer increases upon increasing the loop length leading to faster duplex formation. FCS data show an increase in the interconversion between the quadruplex conformers in presence of the complementary strand, which shifts the equilibrium towards the fast opening conformer with an increase in loop length. The relative free-energy difference (ΔΔG°) between the duplex and quadruplex indicates that an increase in loop length favors duplex formation and out competes the quadruplex. PMID:18599514

  8. CORONAL ALFVEN SPEED DETERMINATION: CONSISTENCY BETWEEN SEISMOLOGY USING AIA/SDO TRANSVERSE LOOP OSCILLATIONS AND MAGNETIC EXTRAPOLATION

    SciTech Connect

    Verwichte, E.; Foullon, C.; White, R. S.; Van Doorsselaere, T.

    2013-04-10

    Two transversely oscillating coronal loops are investigated in detail during a flare on the 2011 September 6 using data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We compare two independent methods to determine the Alfven speed inside these loops. Through the period of oscillation and loop length, information about the Alfven speed inside each loop is deduced seismologically. This is compared with the Alfven speed profiles deduced from magnetic extrapolation and spectral methods using AIA bandpass. We find that for both loops the two methods are consistent. Also, we find that the average Alfven speed based on loop travel time is not necessarily a good measure to compare with the seismological result, which explains earlier reported discrepancies. Instead, the effect of density and magnetic stratification on the wave mode has to be taken into account. We discuss the implications of combining seismological, extrapolation, and spectral methods in deducing the physical properties of coronal loops.

  9. Evolution of the anemone AR NOAA 10798 and the related geo-effective flares and CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Ayumi; Shibata, Kazunari; Ishii, Takako T.; Oka, Mitsuo; Kataoka, Ryuho; Fujiki, Ken'ichi; Gopalswamy, Nat

    2009-02-01

    We present a detailed examination of the features of the active region (AR) NOAA 10798. This AR generated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that caused a large geomagnetic storm on 24 August 2005 with the minimum Dst index of -216 nT. We examined the evolution of the AR and the features on/near the solar surface and in the interplanetary space. The AR emerged in the middle of a small coronal hole, and formed a sea anemone like configuration. Hα filaments were formed in the AR, which have southward axial field. Three M class flares were generated, and the first two that occurred on 22 August 2005 were followed by Halo-type CMEs. The speeds of the CMEs were fast, and recorded about 1200 and 2400 km s-1, respectively. The second CME was especially fast, and caught up and interacted with the first (slower) CME during their travelings toward Earth. These acted synergically to generate an interplanetary disturbance with strong southward magnetic field of about -50 nT, which was followed by the large geomagnetic storm.

  10. The Effects of Bromocriptine on Preventing Postpartum Flare in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients from South China

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Qiu; Liuqin, Liang; Hao, Li; Shiwen, Yuan; Zhongping, Zhan; Dongying, Chen; Fan, Lian; Hanshi, Xu; Xiuyan, Yang; Yujin, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Prolactin plays an important role on the disease flare of postpartum SLE patients. 76 pregnant SLE patients were enrolled in this study to evaluate the efficacy of bromocriptine (an inhibitor of prolactin secretion) on preventing the postpartum disease relapse. Methods. Patients were randomly divided into the treatment group (bromocriptine, 2.5 mg oral, twice a day for 14 days after delivery) and the control group. All the patients were followed up for 12 months. Clinical features were recorded every 4 weeks. Serum prolactin and estradiol levels were measured at the second week and the second month after delivery. The endpoint of the study was disease relapse and defined when SLEDAI score increased by ≥3 points from the antenatal baseline. Results. (1) Serum levels of prolactin and estradiol decreased significantly in bromocriptine treatment group at the second week (P < 0.001) and second month (P < 0.05) after delivery compared to control group. (2) The relapse rate of the treatment group was lower than the control group (χ2 = 4.68, P = 0.0305). Conclusions. Two weeks of oral bromocriptine treatment in postpartum SLE patients may relieve the disease from hyperprolactinemia and hyperestrogenemia and may be beneficial in preventing the patients from disease relapse. PMID:25973434

  11. Abundance ratios of oxygen, neon, and magnesium in solar active regions and flares: The FIP effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widing, K. G.; Feldman, U.

    1995-01-01

    Relative abundances of oxygen, neon, and magnesium have been derived for a sample of nine solar active regions, flares, and an erupting prominance by combining plots of the ion differential emission measures. The observations were photographed in the 300-600 A range by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) spectroheliograph on Skylab. Methods for deriving the Mg/Ne abundance ratio-which measures the separation between the low- first ionization potential (FIP) and high-FIP abundnace plateaus-have been described in previous papers. In this paper we describe the spectroscopic methods for deriving the O/Ne abundance ratio, which gives the ratio between two high-FIP elements. The plot of the O/Ne ratio versus the Mg/Ne ratio in the sample of nine Skylab events is shown. The variation in the Mg/Ne ratio by a factor of 6 is associated with a much smaller range in the O/Ne ratio. This is broadly consistent with the presence of the standard FIP pattern of abundances in the outer atmosphere of the Sun. However, a real change in the relative abundances of oxygen and neon by a factor of 1.5 cannot be excluded.

  12. Can we explain atypical solar flares?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalmasse, K.; Chandra, R.; Schmieder, B.; Aulanier, G.

    2015-02-01

    Context. We used multiwavelength high-resolution data from ARIES, THEMIS, and SDO instruments to analyze a non-standard, C3.3 class flare produced within the active region NOAA 11589 on 2012 October 16. Magnetic flux emergence and cancellation were continuously detected within the active region, the latter leading to the formation of two filaments. Aims: Our aim is to identify the origins of the flare taking the complex dynamics of its close surroundings into account. Methods: We analyzed the magnetic topology of the active region using a linear force-free field extrapolation to derive its 3D magnetic configuration and the location of quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs), which are preferred sites for flaring activity. Because the active region's magnetic field was nonlinear force-free, we completed a parametric study using different linear force-free field extrapolations to demonstrate the robustness of the derived QSLs. Results: The topological analysis shows that the active region presented a complex magnetic configuration comprising several QSLs. The considered data set suggests that an emerging flux episode played a key role in triggering the flare. The emerging flux probably activated the complex system of QSLs, leading to multiple coronal magnetic reconnections within the QSLs. This scenario accounts for the observed signatures: the two extended flare ribbons developed at locations matched by the photospheric footprints of the QSLs and were accompanied with flare loops that formed above the two filaments, which played no important role in the flare dynamics. Conclusions: This is a typical example of a complex flare that can a priori show standard flare signatures that are nevertheless impossible to interpret with any standard model of eruptive or confined flare. We find that a topological analysis, however, permitted us to unveil the development of such complex sets of flare signatures. Movies associated to Figs. 1, 3, and 9 are only available at the CDS via

  13. Effect of self-induced magnetic force in a coronal loop transient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, T.; Dryer, M.

    1981-01-01

    The distribution of the self-induced magnetic force in a section of a model coronal loop is examined and it is found that an axial current produces a pointwise magnetic force in the direction toward the axis of the loop. The direction of the pointwise magnetic force indicates that the effect of this force, acting alone, is to cause a contraction of the cross section of the magnetic loop toward the axis, but not the translation motion of the loop as a whole. It is concluded that forces other than the self-induced magnetic force, such as thermal force of pressure gradient or extra-induced magnetic force of magnetic buoyancy, must be involved in the acceleration mechanisms for the heliocentrifugal motion of coronal transients.

  14. A Double Candle-Flame-Shaped Solar Flare Observed by SDO and STEREO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, T.; Liu, R.; Wang, Y.; Liu, K.; Zhuang, B.; Zhang, Q.; Liu, J.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate an M1.4 flare occurring on 2011 January 28 near the northwest solar limb. The flare loop system exhibits a double candle-flame configuration in SDO/AIA's hot passbands, sharing a much larger cusp-shaped structure. The results of DEM analysis show that each candle flame has a similar temperature distribution as the famous Tsuneta flare. STEREO-A provides us a view from directly above the flare, and in SECCHI/EUVI 195 Å the post-flare loops are observed to propagate eastward. We performed a 3D reconstruction of the pos-flare loops with AIA and EUVI data. With the aid of the squashing factor Q based on a potential extrapolation of the photospheric field, we recognized that the footpoints of the post-flare loops were slipping along high-Q lines on the photosphere, and the reconstructed loops share similarity with the filed lines that are traced starting from the high-Q lines. The heights of the loops increase as they slip horizontally eastward, giving the loop-top a velocity of about 10 km/s. An extremely large EUV late phase in Fe XVI 33.5 nm observed by SDO/EVE is suggested to be related to the slipping magnetic reconnection occurring in the quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs) whose photosheric footprints are featured by the high-Q lines.

  15. Contact effects and quantum interference in engineered dangling bond loops on silicon surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kleshchonok, Andrii; Gutierrez, Rafael; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2015-09-01

    Dangling bond structures created on H-passivated silicon surfaces offer a novel platform for engineering planar nanoscale circuits, compatible with conventional semiconductor technologies. In this investigation we focus on the electronic structure and quantum transport signatures of dangling bond loops built on H-passivated Si(100) surfaces contacted by carbon nanoribbons, thus leading to a two-terminal planar, nanoscale setup. The computational studies were carried out to rationalize the influence of the local atomic-scale contacts of the dangling bond system to the mesoscopic electrodes as well as the possibility of revealing quantum interference effects in the dangling bond loops. Our results reveal a strong sensitivity of the low-energy quantum transmission to the loop topology and to the atomistic details of the electrode-loop contact. Varying the length of the loop or the spatial position of at least one of the electrodes has a drastic impact on the quantum interference pattern; depending on whether constructive or destructive interference within the loop takes place, the conductance of the system can be tuned over several orders of magnitude, thus suggesting the possibility of exploiting such quantum mechanical effects in the design of two-dimensional, atomic-scale electronic devices such as logic gates. PMID:26228007

  16. Contact effects and quantum interference in engineered dangling bond loops on silicon surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kleshchonok, Andrii; Gutierrez, Rafael; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2015-09-01

    Dangling bond structures created on H-passivated silicon surfaces offer a novel platform for engineering planar nanoscale circuits, compatible with conventional semiconductor technologies. In this investigation we focus on the electronic structure and quantum transport signatures of dangling bond loops built on H-passivated Si(100) surfaces contacted by carbon nanoribbons, thus leading to a two-terminal planar, nanoscale setup. The computational studies were carried out to rationalize the influence of the local atomic-scale contacts of the dangling bond system to the mesoscopic electrodes as well as the possibility of revealing quantum interference effects in the dangling bond loops. Our results reveal a strong sensitivity of the low-energy quantum transmission to the loop topology and to the atomistic details of the electrode-loop contact. Varying the length of the loop or the spatial position of at least one of the electrodes has a drastic impact on the quantum interference pattern; depending on whether constructive or destructive interference within the loop takes place, the conductance of the system can be tuned over several orders of magnitude, thus suggesting the possibility of exploiting such quantum mechanical effects in the design of two-dimensional, atomic-scale electronic devices such as logic gates.

  17. Suppression of Parallel Transport in Turbulent Magnetized Plasmas and Its Impact on Non-Thermal and Thermal Aspects of Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emslie, A. Gordon; Bian, Nicolas H.; Kontar, Eduard

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by recent RHESSI observations that point to the existence of a mechanism that confines electrons to the coronal parts of flare loops more effectively than Coulomb collisions, we consider the impact of pitch-angle scattering off turbulent magnetic fluctuations on the parallel transport of electrons in flaring coronal loops. It is shown that the presence of such a scattering mechanism in addition to Coulomb collisional scattering can significantly reduce the parallel thermal and electrical conductivities relative to their collisional values. We provide illustrative expressions for the resulting thermoelectric coefficients that relate the thermal flux and electrical current density to the temperature gradient and the applied electric field. We then evaluate the effect of these modified transport coefficients on several items of interest to the modeling of flares, including: the peak flare coronal temperature that can be attained, the post-impulsive-phase cooling time of heated coronal plasma, and the importance of the beam-neutralizing return current on both ambient heating and the energy loss rate of accelerated electrons. We also discuss the ways in which anomalous transport processes have an impact on the required overall energy content of accelerated electrons in solar flares.

  18. Loop Diuretics Have Anxiolytic Effects in Rat Models of Conditioned Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Krystal, Andrew D.; Sutherland, Janice; Hochman, Daryl W.

    2012-01-01

    A number of antiepileptic medications that modulate GABAA mediated synaptic transmission are anxiolytic. The loop diuretics furosemide (Lasix) and bumetanide (Bumex) are thought to have antiepileptic properties. These drugs also modulate GABAA mediated signalling through their antagonism of cation-chloride cotransporters. Given that loop diuretics may act as antiepileptic drugs that modulate GABAergic signalling, we sought to investigate whether they also mediate anxiolytic effects. Here we report the first investigation of the anxiolytic effects of these drugs in rat models of anxiety. Furosemide and bumetanide were tested in adult rats for their anxiolytic effects using four standard anxiety models: 1) contextual fear conditioning; 2) fear-potentiated startle; 3) elevated plus maze, and 4) open-field test. Furosemide and bumetanide significantly reduced conditioned anxiety in the contextual fear-conditioning and fear-potentiated startle models. At the tested doses, neither compound had significant anxiolytic effects on unconditioned anxiety in the elevated plus maze and open-field test models. These observations suggest that loop diuretics elicit significant anxiolytic effects in rat models of conditioned anxiety. Since loop diuretics are antagonists of the NKCC1 and KCC2 cotransporters, these results implicate the cation-chloride cotransport system as possible molecular mechanism involved in anxiety, and as novel pharmacological target for the development of anxiolytics. In view of these findings, and since furosemide and bumetanide are safe and well tolerated drugs, the clinical potential of loop diuretics for treating some types of anxiety disorders deserves further investigation. PMID:22514741

  19. Dynamical behaviour in coronal loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisch, Bernhard M.

    1986-01-01

    Rapid variability has been found in two active region coronal loops observed by the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) and the Hard X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (HXIS) onboard the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM). There appear to be surprisingly few observations of the short-time scale behavior of hot loops, and the evidence presented herein lends support to the hypothesis that coronal heating may be impulsive and driven by flaring.

  20. Characteristics of Solar Flare Hard X-ray Emissions: Observations and Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei

    2007-05-01

    The main theme of this dissertation is the investigation of the physics of acceleration and transport of particles in solar flares and their radiative signatures. The observational studies, using hard X-rays (HXRs) observed by RHESSI, concentrate on four flares, which support the classical magnetic reconnection model of flares in various ways. In the 11/03/2003 X3.9 flare, there is an upward motion of the loop-top source, accompanied by a systematic increase in the separation of the foot-point sources at a comparable speed. This is consistent with the reconnection model with an inverted-Y geometry. The 04/30/2002 M1.3 event exhibits rarely observed two coronal sources, with very similar spectra and their higher-energy emission being close together. This suggests that reconnection occurs between the two sources. In the 10/29/2003 X10 flare, the logarithmic total HXR flux of the two foot-points correlates with their mean magnetic field. The foot-points show asymmetric HXR fluxes, qualitatively consistent with the magnetic mirroring effect. The 11/13/2003 M1.7 flare reveals evidence of chromospheric evaporation directly imaged by RHESSI for the first time. The emission centroids move toward the loop-top, indicating a density increase in the loop. The theoretical modeling of this work combines the Stanford stochastic acceleration model with the NRL hydrodynamic model to study the interplay of the particle acceleration, transport, and radiation effects and the atmospheric response to the energy deposition by electrons. I find that low-energy electrons in the quasi-thermal portion of the spectrum affects the hydrodynamics by producing more heating in the corona than the previous models that used a power-law spectrum with a low-energy cutoff. The Neupert effect is found to be present and effects of suppression of thermal conduction are tested in the presence of hydrodynamic flows. I gratefully thank my adviser, Prof. Vahe' Petrosian, my collaborators, and funding support

  1. Effect of a Sausage Oscillation on Radio Zebra-pattern Structures in a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sijie; Nakariakov, V. M.; Yan, Yihua

    2016-07-01

    Sausage modes that are axisymmetric fast magnetoacoustic oscillations of solar coronal loops are characterized by variation of the plasma density and magnetic field, and hence cause time variations of the electron plasma frequency and cyclotron frequency. The latter parameters determine the condition for the double plasma resonance (DPR), which is responsible for the appearance of zebra-pattern (ZP) structures in time spectra of solar type IV radio bursts. We perform numerical simulations of standing and propagating sausage oscillations in a coronal loop modeled as a straight, field-aligned plasma slab, and determine the time variation of the DPR layer locations. Instant values of the plasma density and magnetic field at the DPR layers allowed us to construct skeletons of the time variation of ZP stripes in radio spectra. In the presence of a sausage oscillation, the ZP structures are shown to have characteristic wiggles with the time period prescribed by the sausage oscillation. Standing and propagating sausage oscillations are found to have different signatures in ZP patterns. We conclude that ZP wiggles can be used for the detection of short-period sausage oscillations and the exploitation of their seismological potential.

  2. Study of the effect of loop inductance on the RF transmission line to cavity coupling coefficient.

    PubMed

    Lal, Shankar; Pant, K K

    2016-08-01

    Coupling of RF power is an important aspect in the design and development of RF accelerating structures. RF power coupling employing coupler loops has the advantage of tunability of β, the transmission line to cavity coupling coefficient. Analytical expressions available in literature for determination of size of the coupler loop using Faraday's law of induction show reasonably good agreement with experimentally measured values of β below critical coupling (β ≤ 1) but show large deviation with experimentally measured values and predictions by simulations for higher values of β. In actual accelerator application, many RF cavities need to be over-coupled with β > 1 for reasons of beam loading compensation, reduction of cavity filling time, etc. This paper discusses a modified analytical formulation by including the effect of loop inductance in the determination of loop size for any desired coupling coefficient. The analytical formulation shows good agreement with 3D simulations and with experimentally measured values. It has been successfully qualified by the design and development of power coupler loops for two 476 MHz pre-buncher RF cavities, which have successfully been conditioned at rated power levels using these coupler loops.

  3. Study of the effect of loop inductance on the RF transmission line to cavity coupling coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, Shankar; Pant, K. K.

    2016-08-01

    Coupling of RF power is an important aspect in the design and development of RF accelerating structures. RF power coupling employing coupler loops has the advantage of tunability of β, the transmission line to cavity coupling coefficient. Analytical expressions available in literature for determination of size of the coupler loop using Faraday's law of induction show reasonably good agreement with experimentally measured values of β below critical coupling (β ≤ 1) but show large deviation with experimentally measured values and predictions by simulations for higher values of β. In actual accelerator application, many RF cavities need to be over-coupled with β > 1 for reasons of beam loading compensation, reduction of cavity filling time, etc. This paper discusses a modified analytical formulation by including the effect of loop inductance in the determination of loop size for any desired coupling coefficient. The analytical formulation shows good agreement with 3D simulations and with experimentally measured values. It has been successfully qualified by the design and development of power coupler loops for two 476 MHz pre-buncher RF cavities, which have successfully been conditioned at rated power levels using these coupler loops.

  4. Study of the effect of loop inductance on the RF transmission line to cavity coupling coefficient.

    PubMed

    Lal, Shankar; Pant, K K

    2016-08-01

    Coupling of RF power is an important aspect in the design and development of RF accelerating structures. RF power coupling employing coupler loops has the advantage of tunability of β, the transmission line to cavity coupling coefficient. Analytical expressions available in literature for determination of size of the coupler loop using Faraday's law of induction show reasonably good agreement with experimentally measured values of β below critical coupling (β ≤ 1) but show large deviation with experimentally measured values and predictions by simulations for higher values of β. In actual accelerator application, many RF cavities need to be over-coupled with β > 1 for reasons of beam loading compensation, reduction of cavity filling time, etc. This paper discusses a modified analytical formulation by including the effect of loop inductance in the determination of loop size for any desired coupling coefficient. The analytical formulation shows good agreement with 3D simulations and with experimentally measured values. It has been successfully qualified by the design and development of power coupler loops for two 476 MHz pre-buncher RF cavities, which have successfully been conditioned at rated power levels using these coupler loops. PMID:27587114

  5. Slipping Magnetic Reconnections with Multiple Flare Ribbons during an X-class Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Chen, Yao; Wang, Bing

    2016-06-01

    With the observations of the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we present the slipping magnetic reconnections with multiple flare ribbons (FRs) during an X1.2 eruptive flare on 2014 January 7. A center negative polarity was surrounded by several positive ones, and three FRs appeared. The three FRs showed apparent slipping motions, and hook structures formed at their ends. Due to the moving footpoints of the erupting structures, one tight semi-circular hook disappeared after the slippage along its inner and outer edges, and coronal dimmings formed within the hook. The east hook also faded as a result of the magnetic reconnection between the arcades of a remote filament and a hot loop that was impulsively heated by the under flare loops. Our results are accordant with the slipping magnetic reconnection regime in three-dimensional standard model for eruptive flares. We suggest that the complex structures of the flare are likely a consequence of the more complex flux distribution in the photosphere, and the eruption involves at least two magnetic reconnections.

  6. Flare evolution and magnetic configuration study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlicki, A.; Schmieder, B.; Aulanier, G.; Vilmer, N.; Yan, Y. H.

    We will present the analysis of M1.0 confined flare emission and evolution in the context of the topology of the coronal magnetic field. This flare was observed in NOAA 0162 on 22 October 2002. The multiwavelength data were taken during a coordinated observational campaign between ground based instruments and space observatories. The photospheric line-of-sight magnetic field observations were obtained with THEMIS and SOHO/MDI. We used these data to perform linear force-free field extrapolation of magnetic field into the corona. Our extrapolation provides an explanation of the appearance of H-alpha flare ribbons. An elongated shape of X-ray emission observed by Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) also follow the predicted shape of extrapolated field lines. Moreover, the X-ray emission observed by RHESSI permit to see thermal emission of coronal loops heated probably by non-thermal electrons, accelerated during the reconnection processes. The presence of non-thermal particles can be deduced from RHESSI X-ray spectra reconstructed during the gradual phase of the flare. On Huairou vector magnetograms of the AR we see that there was strong shear between one of main negative spot and the north small positive spot. The extrapolation with non-constant alpha force-free field model did not obtain any loop to connect these two spots.

  7. The Effect of Loops on the Structural Organization of α-Helical Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tastan, Oznur; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Meirovitch, Hagai

    2009-01-01

    Loops connecting the transmembrane (TM) α-helices in membrane proteins are expected to affect the structural organization of the thereby connected helices and the helical bundles as a whole. This effect, which has been largely ignored previously, is studied here by analyzing the x-ray structures of 41 α-helical membrane proteins. First we define the loop flexibility ratio, R, and find that 53% of the loops are stretched, where a stretched loop constrains the distance between the two connected helices. The significance of this constraining effect is supported by experiments carried out with bacteriorhodopsin and rhodopsin, in which cutting or eliminating their (predominately stretched) loops has led to a decrease in protein stability, and for rhodopsin, in most cases, also to the destruction of the structure. We show that for nonstretched loops in the extramembranous regions, the fraction of hydrophobic residues is comparable to that for soluble proteins; furthermore (as is also the case for soluble proteins), the hydrophobic residues in these regions are preferentially buried. This is expected to lead to the compact structural organization of the loops, which is transferred to the TM helices, causing them to assemble. We argue that a soluble protein complexed with a membrane protein similarly promotes compactness; other properties of such complexes are also studied. We calculate complementary attractive interactions between helices, including hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions of sequential motifs, such as GXXXG. The relative and combined effects of all these factors on the association of the TM helices are discussed and protein structures with only a few of these factors are analyzed. Our study emphasizes the need for classifying membrane proteins into groups according to structural organization. This classification should be considered when procedures for structural analysis or prediction are developed and applied. Detailed analysis of each structure

  8. Dynamics of flare sprays. [in sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Martin, S. F.; Hansen, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    During solar cycle No. 20 new insight into the flare-spray phenomenon has been attained due to several innovations in solar optical-observing techniques (higher spatial resolution cinema-photography, tunable passband filters, multislit spectroscopy and extended angular field coronagraphs). From combined analysis of 13 well-observed sprays which occurred between 1969-1974 it is concluded that (1) the spray material originates from a preexisting active region filament which undergoes increased absorption some tens of minutes prior to the abrupt chromospheric brightening at the 'flare-start', and (2) the spray material is confined within a steadily expanding, loop-shaped (presumable magnetically controlled) envelope with part of the materials draining back down along one or both legs of the loop.

  9. An unorthodox X-Class Long-Duration Confined Flare

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Rui; Gou, Tingyu; Wang, Yuming; Liu, Kai; Titov, Viacheslav S.; Wang, Haimin

    2014-07-20

    We report the observation of an X-class long-duration flare which is clearly confined. It appears as a compact-loop flare in the traditional EUV passbands (171 and 195 Å), but in the passbands sensitive to flare plasmas (94 and 131 Å), it exhibits a cusp-shaped structure above an arcade of loops like other long-duration events. Inspecting images in a running difference approach, we find that the seemingly diffuse, quasi-static cusp-shaped structure consists of multiple nested loops that repeatedly rise upward and disappear approaching the cusp edge. Over the gradual phase, we detect numerous episodes of loop rising, each lasting minutes. A differential emission measure analysis reveals that the temperature is highest at the top of the arcade and becomes cooler at higher altitudes within the cusp-shaped structure, contrary to typical long-duration flares. With a nonlinear force-free model, our analysis shows that the event mainly involves two adjacent sheared arcades separated by a T-type hyperbolic flux tube (HFT). One of the arcades harbors a magnetic flux rope, which is identified with a filament that survives the flare owing to the strong confining field. We conclude that a new emergence of magnetic flux in the other arcade triggers the flare, while the preexisting HFT and flux rope dictate the structure and dynamics of the flare loops and ribbons during the long-lasting decay phase, and that a quasi-separatrix layer high above the HFT could account for the cusp-shaped structure.

  10. Ambient ultrafine particles provide a strong adjuvant effect in the secondary immune response: implication for traffic-related asthma flares.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Harkema, Jack R; Lewandowski, Ryan P; Wang, Meiying; Bramble, Lori A; Gookin, Glenn R; Ning, Zhi; Kleinman, Michael T; Sioutas, Constantinos; Nel, Andre E

    2010-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated that intranasal administration of ambient ultrafine particles (UFP) acts as an adjuvant for primary allergic sensitization to ovalbumin (OVA) in Balb/c mice. It is important to find out whether inhaled UFP exert the same effect on the secondary immune response as a way of explaining asthma flares in already-sensitized individuals due to traffic exposure near a freeway. The objective of this study is to determine whether inhalation exposure to ambient UFP near an urban freeway could enhance the secondary immune response to OVA in already-sensitized mice. Prior OVA-sensitized animals were exposed to concentrated ambient UFP at the time of secondary OVA challenge in our mobile animal laboratory in Los Angeles. OVA-specific antibody production, airway morphometry, allergic airway inflammation, cytokine gene expression, and oxidative stress marker were assessed. As few as five ambient UFP exposures were sufficient to promote the OVA recall immune response, including generating allergic airway inflammation in smaller and more distal airways compared with the adjuvant effect of intranasally instilled UFP on the primary immune response. The secondary immune response was characterized by the T helper 2 and IL-17 cytokine gene expression in the lung. In summary, our results demonstrated that inhalation of prooxidative ambient UFP could effectively boost the secondary immune response to an experimental allergen, indicating that vehicular traffic exposure could exacerbate allergic inflammation in already-sensitized subjects. PMID:20562226

  11. Solar Flares: Magnetohydrodynamic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kazunari; Magara, Tetsuya

    2011-12-01

    This paper outlines the current understanding of solar flares, mainly focused on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes responsible for producing a flare. Observations show that flares are one of the most explosive phenomena in the atmosphere of the Sun, releasing a huge amount of energy up to about 10^32 erg on the timescale of hours. Flares involve the heating of plasma, mass ejection, and particle acceleration that generates high-energy particles. The key physical processes for producing a flare are: the emergence of magnetic field from the solar interior to the solar atmosphere (flux emergence), local enhancement of electric current in the corona (formation of a current sheet), and rapid dissipation of electric current (magnetic reconnection) that causes shock heating, mass ejection, and particle acceleration. The evolution toward the onset of a flare is rather quasi-static when free energy is accumulated in the form of coronal electric current (field-aligned current, more precisely), while the dissipation of coronal current proceeds rapidly, producing various dynamic events that affect lower atmospheres such as the chromosphere and photosphere. Flares manifest such rapid dissipation of coronal current, and their theoretical modeling has been developed in accordance with observations, in which numerical simulations proved to be a strong tool reproducing the time-dependent, nonlinear evolution of a flare. We review the models proposed to explain the physical mechanism of flares, giving an comprehensive explanation of the key processes mentioned above. We start with basic properties of flares, then go into the details of energy build-up, release and transport in flares where magnetic reconnection works as the central engine to produce a flare.

  12. Emergency flare tip repair

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, G.A.

    1982-07-01

    Two damaged propane storage tank flares serving a large LPG storage facility near the Arabian Gulf were given emergency service. A diagram of over-all layout and spatial relationships between tanks and piping, and tables with general information relevant to selecting an acceptable radiant heat load factor and flare line flow characteristics were presented. The general equation for predicting radiant heat flux from a point source was used. The ignition of the temporary flare was discussed.

  13. Unexpected Extra-renal Effects of Loop Diuretics in the Preterm Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Cotton, Robert; Suarez, Sandra; Reese, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    The loop diuretics furosemide and bumetanide are commonly used in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Furosemide, due to its actions on the ubiquitous NKCC1 co-transporter and its promotion of prostanoid production and release, also has non-diuretic effects on vascular smooth muscle, airways, the ductus arteriosus, and theoretically the gastrointestinal tract. Loop diuretics also affect the central nervous system through the inhibitory neurotransmitter, GABA. Conclusion The loop diuretics have a variety of biological effects that are potentially harmful as well as beneficial. Care should be taken with the use of these agents since the range of their effects may be broader than the single action sought by the prescribing physician. PMID:22536874

  14. Contact effects and quantum interference in engineered dangling bond loops on silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleshchonok, Andrii; Gutierrez, Rafael; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2015-08-01

    Dangling bond structures created on H-passivated silicon surfaces offer a novel platform for engineering planar nanoscale circuits, compatible with conventional semiconductor technologies. In this investigation we focus on the electronic structure and quantum transport signatures of dangling bond loops built on H-passivated Si(100) surfaces contacted by carbon nanoribbons, thus leading to a two-terminal planar, nanoscale setup. The computational studies were carried out to rationalize the influence of the local atomic-scale contacts of the dangling bond system to the mesoscopic electrodes as well as the possibility of revealing quantum interference effects in the dangling bond loops. Our results reveal a strong sensitivity of the low-energy quantum transmission to the loop topology and to the atomistic details of the electrode-loop contact. Varying the length of the loop or the spatial position of at least one of the electrodes has a drastic impact on the quantum interference pattern; depending on whether constructive or destructive interference within the loop takes place, the conductance of the system can be tuned over several orders of magnitude, thus suggesting the possibility of exploiting such quantum mechanical effects in the design of two-dimensional, atomic-scale electronic devices such as logic gates.Dangling bond structures created on H-passivated silicon surfaces offer a novel platform for engineering planar nanoscale circuits, compatible with conventional semiconductor technologies. In this investigation we focus on the electronic structure and quantum transport signatures of dangling bond loops built on H-passivated Si(100) surfaces contacted by carbon nanoribbons, thus leading to a two-terminal planar, nanoscale setup. The computational studies were carried out to rationalize the influence of the local atomic-scale contacts of the dangling bond system to the mesoscopic electrodes as well as the possibility of revealing quantum interference effects in

  15. Particle kinematics in solar flares: observations and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Marina

    2008-12-01

    This thesis is devoted to the study of particle acceleration and propagation processes in solar flares. Solar flares are amongst the most powerful and energetic activity phenomena our Sun exhibits. They release energy of the order of 10(32) erg in seconds to minutes. In the process, electrons and protons are accelerated to relativistic energies, making flares very efficient particle accelerators. The most compelling observational signatures of flares can be found in X-rays and extreme ultra-violet wavelengths. Due to atmospheric absorption, those wavelengths can only be studied from space. Since the beginning of the space age, countless flares have been observed by satellites. The present work is largely based on observations by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), an X-ray satellite which has been observing the Sun since February 2002. It is a NASA mission with substantial Swiss hardware and software contribution. Using RHESSI observations of flares of different intensity, a deeper understanding of the particle transport and energy transport processes in flare loops, as well as the acceleration site and acceleration mechanism is sought. The time evolution of images and spectra is studied along with the quantitative relations between X-ray sources observed in the corona (coronal sources) and from the chromosphere (footpoints). The spectral relations found between coronal sources and footpoints are compared to the so-called ``intermediate thin-thick target model'', which was based on observations by the satellite Yohkoh. We show that the spectral relations between coronal sources and footpoints observed with RHESSI cannot be explained by the intermediate thin-thick target model. In a next step, return currents in the flare loop were considered. With this extension to the existing model, the spectra of the coronal source and the footpoints, as well as the relations between them can be explained, indicating the importance of return currents in

  16. Post Flare Giant Arches and Run-Away Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Matthew; Seaton, Daniel B.; Savage, Sabrina; Bryans, Paul

    2016-05-01

    The nature of post-flare giant arches and their relation to regular post flare loops has long been debated, especially in the context of how post-flare giant arches can sustain their growth for such long periods. In this presentation we discuss how magnetic reconnection can be sustained to such great heights, and the role the background corona plays in maintaining this growth. We use observations from 14 October 2014, when the SWAP EUV solar telescope on-board the PROBA2 spacecraft observed an eruption that led to the formation of perhaps the largest post-eruptive loop system seen in the solar corona in solar cycle 24. These loops grew to a height of approximately 400000 km (>0.5 solar-radii). We provide evidence of on-going reconnection, through observations spanning from the chromosphere to the middle corona, and discuss how only certain conditions can maintain prolonged growth.

  17. Particle acceleration in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Kosugi, Takeo; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benka, Steve G.; Chupp, Edward L.; Enome, Shinzo; Garcia, Howard; Holman, Gordon D.; Kurt, Victoria G.; Sakao, Taro

    1994-01-01

    Particle acceleration is intrinsic to the primary energy release in the impulsive phase of solar flares, and we cannot understand flares without understanding acceleration. New observations in soft and hard X-rays, gamma-rays and coherent radio emissions are presented, suggesting flare fragmentation in time and space. X-ray and radio measurements exhibit at least five different time scales in flares. In addition, some new observations of delayed acceleration signatures are also presented. The theory of acceleration by parallel electric fields is used to model the spectral shape and evolution of hard X-rays. The possibility of the appearance of double layers is further investigated.

  18. Flared tube attachment fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkire, I. D.; King, J. P., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Tubes can be flared first, then attached to valves and other flow line components, with new fitting that can be disassembled and reused. Installed fitting can be disassembled so parts can be inspected. It can be salvaged and reused without damaging flared tube; tube can be coated, tempered, or otherwise treated after it has been flared, rather than before, as was previously required. Fitting consists of threaded male portion with conical seating surface, hexagonal nut with hole larger than other diameter of flared end of tube, and split ferrule.

  19. Evidence for Magnetic Reconnection in Three Homologous Solar Flares Observed by RHESSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, Lin-Hui; Holman, Gordon D.; Dennis, Brian R.

    2004-01-01

    We present RHESSI observF5oss of three homologous flares, which occurred between April 14 and 16, 2002. We find that the RHESSI images of all three flares at energies between 6 and 25 keV had some common features: (1) A. separate coronal source up to approx. 30 deg. above the flare loop appeared in the early impulsive phase and stayed stationary for several minutes. (2) Before the flare loop moved upward; previously reported by others, the flare loop-top centroid moved downward for 2-4 minutes during the early impulsive phase of the Ears: falling by 13 - 30% of its initial height with a speed between 8 and 23 km/s. We conclude that these features are associated with the formation and development of a current sheet between the loop-top and the coronal source. In the April 14-15 flare, we find that the hard X-ray flux (greater than 25 keV) is correlated with the rate at which the flare loop moves upward, indicating that the faster the loop grows, the faster the reconnection rate, and therefore, the greater the flux of accelerated electrons. Subject headings: Sun: L'iaies-Sun: X-1-ay-s -

  20. How big was the Carrington 1859 Flare?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Svalgaard, L.; Neidig, D. F.

    2004-05-01

    The 1859 space weather event was distinguished by its great geomagnetic storm, widespread low-latitude aurora, and intense solar energetic particle event (inferred from the NO3 concentration in polar ice cores). Arguably each of these three effects was the largest ever observed. What can we say about the size of the associated solar flare? We have two observations with which to make such an assessment: (1) Carrington's and Hodgson's report of the white-light flare and (2) the solar flare effect or magnetic crochet observed in the Kew and Greenwich magnetograms. Estimates of the area, duration, spectrum, and intensity of the white-light emission indicate a large (~2 x 1030 erg) but not unequalled event (the white-light emission of the 24 April 1984 >X13 flare contained ~6 x 1030 erg). The magnetic crochet of 130 nT in the horizontal force, however, exceeds that for all >X10 soft X-ray flares observed from 1984-2002 (we are presently compiling magnetic data for the recent October-November 2003 activity for comparison with the 1859 event). Thus at this point, we can conservatively say that Carrington's flare likely had a soft X-ray classification >X10 and was at least comparable to the largest flares recorded during the spacecraft era.

  1. All one-loop scalar vertices in the effective potential approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargo-Molina, José Eliel; Morais, António P.; Pasechnik, Roman; Sampaio, Marco O. P.; Wessén, Jonas

    2016-08-01

    Using the one-loop Coleman-Weinberg effective potential, we derive a general analytic expression for all the derivatives of the effective potential with respect to any number of classical scalar fields. The result is valid for a renormalisable theory in four dimensions with any number of scalars, fermions or gauge bosons. This result corresponds to the zero-external momentum contribution to a general one-loop diagram with N scalar external legs. We illustrate the use of the general result in two simple scalar singlet extensions of the Standard Model, to obtain the dominant contributions to the triple couplings of light scalar particles under the zero external momentum approximation.

  2. Spatio-temporal Dynamics of Sources of Hard X-Ray Pulsations in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, S. A.; Zimovets, I. V.; Morgachev, A. S.; Struminsky, A. B.

    2016-09-01

    We present a systematic analysis of the spatio-temporal evolution of sources of hard X-ray (HXR) pulsations in solar flares. We concentrate on disk flares whose impulsive phases are accompanied by a series of more than three successive peaks (pulsations) of HXR emission detected in the RHESSI 50 - 100 keV energy channel with a four-second time cadence. Twenty-nine such flares observed from February 2002 to June 2015 with characteristic time differences between successive peaks P ≈8 - 270 s are studied. The main observational result of the analysis is that sources of HXR pulsations in all flares are not stationary, they demonstrate apparent movements or displacements in the parent active regions from pulsation to pulsation. The flares can be subdivided into two main groups depending on the character of the dynamics of the HXR sources. Group 1 consists of 16 flares ( 55~%) that show systematic dynamics of the HXR sources from pulsation to pulsation with respect to a magnetic polarity inversion line (MPIL), which has a simple extended trace on the photosphere. Group 2 consists of 13 flares ( 45~%) that show more chaotic displacements of the HXR sources with respect to an MPIL with a more complex structure, and sometimes several MPILs are present in the parent active regions of such flares. Based on the observations, we conclude that the mechanism of the flare HXR pulsations (at least with time differences of the considered range) is related to successive triggering of the flare energy release process in different magnetic loops (or bundles of loops) of the parent active regions. Group 1 flare regions consist of loops stacked into magnetic arcades that are extended along MPILs. Group 2 flare regions have more complex magnetic structures, and the loops are arranged more chaotically and randomly there. We also found that at least 14 ( 88~%) group 1 flares and 11 ( 85~%) group 2 flares are accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), i.e. the absolute majority of the

  3. Modeling solar flare hard X-ray images and spectra observed with RHESSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Linhui

    2004-12-01

    Observations obtained with the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) of a flare on February 20, 2002 indicate a hard X-ray (HXR) coronal source at or near the top of a flare loop (called a HXR looptop source). The existence of the HXR looptop source suggests that magnetic reconnection, which is believed to power flares, occurs above the loop. In order to explain this HXR looptop source, I created a steady-state particle transport model, in which high-energy electrons are continuously injected at the top of a semicircular flare loop. Based on the simulation results, I find that the model predictions are consistent with the RHESSI observations in many respects, but the spectrum of the looptop source obtained from the model is steeper than that from the RHESSI data. This suggests that, instead of being accelerated above the loop as generally believed, the particles might be accelerated in the looptop itself. RHESSI observations of three other homologous flares that occurred between April 14 and 16, 2002, provide strong evidence for the presence of a large- scale current sheet above a flare loop, which is the basis of standard flare models. The most convincing finding is the presence of the temperature distribution of a separate coronal source above the flare loops: the hotter part of the coronal source was located lower in altitude than the cooler part. Together with the fact that the hotter flare loops are higher than the cooler loops, the observations support the existence of a large-scale current sheet between the top of the flare loops and the coronal source above. Blob-like sources along a line above the loop in the decay phase of the April 15, 2002, flare, which are suggestive of magnetic islands initiated by the tearing-mode instability, and the observation of a cusp structure in microwaves, further support the presence of the current sheet. The observations of the three homologous flares reveal two other features which are beyond the

  4. Using Two-Ribbon Flare Observations and MHD Simulations to Constrain Flare Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazachenko, Maria D.; Lynch, Benjamin J.; Welsch, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Flare ribbons are emission structures that are frequently observed during flares in transition-region and chromospheric radiation. These typically straddle a polarity inversion line (PIL) of the radial magnetic field at the photosphere, and move apart as the flare progresses. The ribbon flux - the amount of unsigned photospheric magnetic flux swept out by flare ribbons - is thought to be related to the amount coronal magnetic reconnection, and hence provides a key diagnostic tool for understanding the physical processes at work in flares and CMEs. Previous measurements of the magnetic flux swept out by flare ribbons required time-consuming co-alignment between magnetograph and intensity data from different instruments, explaining why those studies only analyzed, at most, a few events. The launch of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), both aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), presented a rare opportunity to compile a much larger sample of flare-ribbon events than could readily be assembled before. We created a dataset of 363 events of both flare ribbon positions and fluxes, as a function of time, for all C9.-class and greater flares within 45 degrees of disk center observed by SDO from June 2010 till April 2015. For this purpose, we used vector magnetograms (2D magnetic field maps) from HMI and UV images from AIA. A critical problem with using unprocessed AIA data is the existence of spurious intensities in AIA data associated with strong flare emission, most notably "blooming" (spurious smearing of saturated signal into neighboring pixels, often in streaks). To overcome this difficulty, we have developed an algorithmic procedure that effectively excludes artifacts like blooming. We present our database and compare statistical properties of flare ribbons, e.g. evolutions of ribbon reconnection fluxes, reconnection flux rates and vertical currents with the properties from MHD simulations.

  5. The high accuracy model of the 19 July 2012 solar flare: kinetic description, calculations of X-Ray and microwave emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsyk, Pavel; Somov, Boris

    2016-04-01

    The limb white-light solar flare M7.7 class was observed at the 19 July 2012 at 05:58UT by RHESSI, GOES and SDO with high spectral, spatial and temporal resolution. These new data make possible to test modern models of solar flares. The flare, which considered here, locates in the picture plane, so we well see two different hard X-ray sources: footpoint and above-the-loop-top. The loop was observed in whit-light and microwave wavelengths. The key part of the presented work is high accuracy kinetic model, which describe behavior of electrons in the target - solar flare loop. We interpret the footpoint source in approximation of the thick target model with reverse current and above-the-loop-top source - in the thin target approximation. The microwave spectrum in the range from 1 to 50 GHz was calculated. Our results fit well the observational data, particularly so important parameter as hard X-Ray spectral index. But intensity of emission of the coronal source was estimated incorrect, it was low than observed. This problem can be solved by taking into account effects of particles acceleration in the collapsing magnetic trap, when fast electrons receive additional energy without changing the index of their energy spectrum. In the result we have flux ~ 5 1010 erg cm-2 s-1 for electrons with energies more then 15 keV, that ~ 5 times larger then in the case classical thick target model. Accordingly , so high flux of electrons to the Chromosphere provides effective heating of the cold plasma in the target, but the reverse current electric field restrict depth of the electron penetration. Received in this work estimates may be used for interpretation of the solar flare optical source formation and evolution.

  6. Observation and numerical modeling of chromospheric evaporation during the impulsive phase of a solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imada, Shinsuke; Murakami, Izumi; Watanabe, Tetsuya

    2015-10-01

    We have studied the chromospheric evaporation flow during the impulsive phase of the flare by using the Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer observation and 1D hydrodynamic numerical simulation coupled to the time-dependent ionization. The observation clearly shows that the strong redshift can be observed at the base of the flaring loop only during the impulsive phase. We performed two different numerical simulations to reproduce the strong downflows in FeXII and FeXV during the impulsive phase. By changing the thermal conduction coefficient, we carried out the numerical calculation of chromospheric evaporation in the thermal conduction dominant regime (conductivity coefficient κ0 = classical value) and the enthalpy flux dominant regime (κ0 = 0.1 × classical value). The chromospheric evaporation calculation in the enthalpy flux dominant regime could reproduce the strong redshift at the base of the flare during the impulsive phase. This result might indicate that the thermal conduction can be strongly suppressed in some cases of flare. We also find that time-dependent ionization effect is important to reproduce the strong downflows in Fe XII and Fe XV.

  7. Observation and numerical modeling of chromospheric evaporation during the impulsive phase of a solar flare

    SciTech Connect

    Imada, Shinsuke; Murakami, Izumi; Watanabe, Tetsuya

    2015-10-15

    We have studied the chromospheric evaporation flow during the impulsive phase of the flare by using the Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer observation and 1D hydrodynamic numerical simulation coupled to the time-dependent ionization. The observation clearly shows that the strong redshift can be observed at the base of the flaring loop only during the impulsive phase. We performed two different numerical simulations to reproduce the strong downflows in FeXII and FeXV during the impulsive phase. By changing the thermal conduction coefficient, we carried out the numerical calculation of chromospheric evaporation in the thermal conduction dominant regime (conductivity coefficient κ{sub 0} = classical value) and the enthalpy flux dominant regime (κ{sub 0} = 0.1 × classical value). The chromospheric evaporation calculation in the enthalpy flux dominant regime could reproduce the strong redshift at the base of the flare during the impulsive phase. This result might indicate that the thermal conduction can be strongly suppressed in some cases of flare. We also find that time-dependent ionization effect is important to reproduce the strong downflows in Fe XII and Fe XV.

  8. Stereoscopic Observation of Slipping Reconnection in a Double Candle-flame-shaped Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Tingyu; Liu, Rui; Wang, Yuming; Liu, Kai; Zhuang, Bin; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Quanhao; Liu, Jiajia

    2016-04-01

    The 2011 January 28 M1.4 flare exhibits two side-by-side candle-flame-shaped flare loop systems underneath a larger cusp-shaped structure during the decay phase, as observed at the northwestern solar limb by the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The northern loop system brightens following the initiation of the flare within the southern loop system, but all three cusp-shaped structures are characterized by ˜10 MK temperatures, hotter than the arch-shaped loops underneath. The “Ahead” satellite of the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory provides a top view, in which the post-flare loops brighten sequentially, with one end fixed while the other apparently slipping eastward. By performing stereoscopic reconstruction of the post-flare loops in EUV and mapping out magnetic connectivities, we found that the footpoints of the post-flare loops are slipping along the footprint of a hyperbolic flux tube (HFT) separating the two loop systems and that the reconstructed loops share similarity with the magnetic field lines that are traced starting from the same HFT footprint, where the field lines are relatively flexible. These results argue strongly in favor of slipping magnetic reconnection at the HFT. The slipping reconnection was likely triggered by the flare and manifested as propagative dimmings before the loop slippage is observed. It may contribute to the late-phase peak in Fe xvi 33.5 nm, which is even higher than its main-phase counterpart, and may also play a role in the density and temperature asymmetry observed in the northern loop system through heat conduction.

  9. Composition of energetic particles from solar flares.

    PubMed

    Garrard, T L; Stone, E C

    1994-10-01

    We present a model for composition of heavy ions in the solar energetic particles (SEP). The SEP composition in a typical large solar particle event reflects the composition of the Sun, with adjustments due to fractionation effects which depend on the first ionization potential (FIP) of the ion and on the ratio of ionic charge to mass (Q/M). Flare-to-flare variations in composition are represented by parameters describing these fractionation effects and the distributions of these parameters are presented.

  10. Identification of Candidate Predictors of Lupus Flare.

    PubMed

    Crow, Mary K; Olferiev, Mikhail; Kirou, Kyriakos A

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus, the prototype systemic autoimmune disease, is characterized by extensive self-reactivity, inflammation, and organ system damage. Sustained production of type I interferon is seen in many patients and contributes to immune dysregulation. Disease activity fluctuates with periods of relative quiescence or effective management by immunosuppressive drugs, followed by disease flares. Tissue damage accumulates over time, with kidneys and cardiovascular system particularly affected. Identification of the underlying molecular mechanisms that precede clinical exacerbations, allowing prediction of future flare, could lead to therapeutic interventions that prevent severe disease. We generated gene expression data from a longitudinal cohort of lupus patients, some showing at least one period of severe flare and others with relatively stable disease over the period of study. Candidate predictors of future clinical flare were identified based on analysis of differentially expressed gene transcripts between the flare and non-flare groups at a time when all patients had relatively quiescent clinical disease activity. Our results suggest the hypothesis that altered regulation of genome stability and nucleic acid fidelity may be important molecular precursors of future clinical flare, generating endogenous nucleic acid triggers that engage intracellular mechanisms that mimic a chronic host response to viral infection.

  11. Adverse Health Effects of Benzene Exposure Among Children Following a Flaring Incident at the British Petroleum Refinery in Texas City.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Mark A; Reddy, G Kesava

    2016-03-01

    This study examined the health effects of benzene exposure among children from a flaring incident at the British Petroleum (BP) refinery in Texas City, Texas. A total of 899 children (benzene exposed, n = 641 and unexposed, n = 258), aged <17 years, were included. Hematological analysis showed that white blood cell (×10(3)/µL) counts were significantly decreased in the exposed children compared with the unexposed children (7.1 ± 2.2 versus 7.6 ± 2.1, P = .001). Similarly, the hemoglobin (g/dL) levels were decreased significantly in the exposed group compared with the unexposed group (12.7 ± 1.3 vs 13.1 ± 1.5, P = .001). Conversely, platelet (×10(3)/µL) counts were increased significantly in the exposed group compared with the unexposed group (318.6 ± 79.8 versus 266.9 ± 58.8, P = .001). Hepatic enzymes were also significantly elevated among exposed children compared with the unexposed children. These findings suggest that children exposed to benzene are at a higher risk of developing both hepatic and bone marrow-related disorders. PMID:26269465

  12. Adverse Health Effects of Benzene Exposure Among Children Following a Flaring Incident at the British Petroleum Refinery in Texas City.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Mark A; Reddy, G Kesava

    2016-03-01

    This study examined the health effects of benzene exposure among children from a flaring incident at the British Petroleum (BP) refinery in Texas City, Texas. A total of 899 children (benzene exposed, n = 641 and unexposed, n = 258), aged <17 years, were included. Hematological analysis showed that white blood cell (×10(3)/µL) counts were significantly decreased in the exposed children compared with the unexposed children (7.1 ± 2.2 versus 7.6 ± 2.1, P = .001). Similarly, the hemoglobin (g/dL) levels were decreased significantly in the exposed group compared with the unexposed group (12.7 ± 1.3 vs 13.1 ± 1.5, P = .001). Conversely, platelet (×10(3)/µL) counts were increased significantly in the exposed group compared with the unexposed group (318.6 ± 79.8 versus 266.9 ± 58.8, P = .001). Hepatic enzymes were also significantly elevated among exposed children compared with the unexposed children. These findings suggest that children exposed to benzene are at a higher risk of developing both hepatic and bone marrow-related disorders.

  13. The development and cooling of a solar limb-flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veck, N. J.; Strong, K. T.; Jordan, C.; Simnett, G. M.; Cargill, P. J.; Priest, E. R.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of a flare that began in soft X-rays at 20:37 UT on April 12, 1980 at the west limb of the sun are discussed. The observations of the flare and postflare loops are first described, and the Solar Maximum Mission data are interpreted in terms of the temperature, density, and geometry of the emitting regions. The observed postflare cooling time is compared with that expected from radiation, conduction, and enthalpy flux. The loop model is discussed, and the observed events are compared with other proposed models.

  14. Effect of Variable Emittance Coatings on the Operation of a Miniature Loop Heat Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Donya M.; Ku, Jentung; Ottenstein, Laura; Swanson, Theodore; Hess, Steve; Darrin, Ann

    2005-01-01

    Abstract. As the size of spacecraft shrink to accommodate small and more efficient instruments, smaller launch vehicles, and constellation missions, all subsystems must also be made smaller. Under NASA NFL4 03-OSS-02, Space Technology-8 (ST 8), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and Jet Propulsion Laboratory jointly conducted a Concept Definition study to develop a miniature loop heat pipe (MLHP) thermal management system design suitable for future small spacecraft. The proposed MLHP thermal management system consists of a miniature loop heat pipe (LHP) and deployable radiators that are coated with variable emittance coatings (VECs). As part of the Phase A study and proof of the design concept, variable emittance coatings were integrated with a breadboard miniature loop heat pipe. The miniature loop heat pipe was supplied by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PL), while the variable emittance technology were supplied by Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory and Sensortex, Inc. The entire system was tested under vacuum at various temperature extremes and power loads. This paper summarizes the results of this testing and shows the effect of the VEC on the operation of a miniature loop heat pipe.

  15. Close-loop simulation of the medial olivocochlear anti-masking effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi-Wen; Yu, Lu-Ming; Wu, Po-Jui

    2015-12-01

    The medial olivocochlear reflex (MOCR) is known to affect cochlear signal processing via the electromechanical changes it induces in outer hair cells (OHCs). Experiments showed that electrically stimulating the MOC efferents (i.e., open-loop stimulation) suppresses cochlear responses to acoustic noise while enhancing the response to tone bursts if the signal-to-noise ratio is sufficiently high [5]. However, such experiments did not reveal precisely how MOCR affects cochlear signal processing in a close loop. Presently we have built an integrated computer model for the MOCR pathway; the constituting sub-models include a model for cochlear mechanics with electromotile OHCs [11], a neurotransmitter release model for the synapse between inner hair cells (IHCs) and spiral ganglion cells [16], an electrical model for the T-multipolar (TM) cells in the cochlear nucleus [6], a relay from TM cells to the MOC interneurons, and a convolution kernel describing the change of OHC potassium conductance triggered by the MOC inhibitory post synaptic potentials. Thus, close-loop responses of the entire system can be simulated for arbitrary acoustic stimuli. Both open-loop and close-loop simulations demonstrate a decrease in the auditory nerve fiber (ANF) response to noise but an increase in the response to high-level tone bursts. The present integrated computer model can potentially be used for testing hypotheses regarding the physiological mechanisms for MOC anti-masking effects.

  16. Coronal Seismology of Flare-Excited Standing Slow-Mode Waves Observed by SDO/AIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tongjiang; Ofman, Leon; Davila, Joseph M.

    2016-05-01

    Flare-excited longitudinal intensity oscillations in hot flaring loops have been recently detected by SDO/AIA in 94 and 131 Å bandpasses. Based on the interpretation in terms of a slow-mode wave, quantitative evidence of thermal conduction suppression in hot (>9 MK) loops has been obtained for the first time from measurements of the polytropic index and phase shift between the temperature and density perturbations (Wang et al. 2015, ApJL, 811, L13). This result has significant implications in two aspects. One is that the thermal conduction suppression suggests the need of greatly enhanced compressive viscosity to interpret the observed strong wave damping. The other is that the conduction suppression provides a reasonable mechanism for explaining the long-duration events where the thermal plasma is sustained well beyond the duration of impulsive hard X-ray bursts in many flares, for a time much longer than expected by the classical Spitzer conductive cooling. In this study, we model the observed standing slow-mode wave in Wang et al. (2015) using a 1D nonlinear MHD code. With the seismology-derived transport coefficients for thermal conduction and compressive viscosity, we successfully simulate the oscillation period and damping time of the observed waves. Based on the parametric study of the effect of thermal conduction suppression and viscosity enhancement on the observables, we discuss the inversion scheme for determining the energy transport coefficients by coronal seismology.

  17. X-RAY FLARES OF EV Lac: STATISTICS, SPECTRA, AND DIAGNOSTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Huenemoerder, David P.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Testa, Paola; Drake, Jeremy J.; Osten, Rachel A.; Reale, Fabio

    2010-11-10

    We study the spectral and temporal behavior of X-ray flares from the active M dwarf EV Lac in 200 ks of exposure with the Chandra/HETGS. We derive flare parameters by fitting an empirical function which characterizes the amplitude, shape, and scale. The flares range from very short (<1 ks) to long ({approx}10{sup 4} s) duration events with a range of shapes and amplitudes for all durations. We extract spectra for composite flares to study their mean evolution and to compare flares of different lengths. Evolution of spectral features in the density-temperature plane shows probable sustained heating. The short flares are significantly hotter than the longer flares. We determined an upper limit to the Fe K fluorescent flux, the best-fit value being close to what is expected for compact loops.

  18. The Flare Genesis Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.

    2002-01-01

    Using the Flare Genesis Experiment (FGE), a balloon-borne observatory with an 80-cm solar telescope we observed the active region NOAA 8844 on January 25, 2000 for several hours. FGE was equipped with a vector polarimeter and a tunable Fabry-Perot narrow-band filter. It recorded time series of filtergrams, vector magnetograms, and Dopplergrams at the Ca(I) 6122.2 angstrom line, and H-alpha filtergrams with a cadence between 2.5 and 7.5 minutes. At the time of the observations, NOAA 8844 was located at approximately 5 N 30 W. The region was rapidly growing during the observations; new magnetic flux was constantly emerging in three supergranules near its center. We describe in detail how the FGE data were analyzed and report on the structure and behavior of peculiar moving dipolar features (MDFs) observed in the active region. In longitudinal magnetograms, the MDFs appeared to be small dipoles in the emerging fields. The east-west orientation of their polarities was opposite that of the sunspots. The dipoles were oriented parallel to their direction of motion, which was in most cases towards the sunspots. Previously, dipolar moving magnetic features have only been observed flowing out from sunspots. Vector magnetograms show that the magnetic field of each MDF negative part was less inclined to the local horizontal than the ones of the positive part. We identify the MDFs as undulations, or stitches, where the emerging flux ropes are still tied to the photosphere. We present a U-loop model that can account for their unusual structure and behavior, and it shows how emerging flux can shed its entrained mass.

  19. Two-loop virtual top-quark effect on Higgs-boson decay to bottom quarks.

    PubMed

    Butenschön, Mathias; Fugel, Frank; Kniehl, Bernd A

    2007-02-16

    In most of the mass range encompassed by the limits from the direct search and the electroweak precision tests, the Higgs boson of the standard model preferably decays to bottom quarks. We present, in analytic form, the dominant two-loop electroweak correction, of O(GF2mt4), to the partial width of this decay. It amplifies the familiar enhancement due to the O(GFmt2) one-loop correction by about +16% and thus more than compensates the screening by about -8% through strong-interaction effects of order O(alphasGFmt2).

  20. Some effects of quantization on a noiseless phase-locked loop. [sampling phase errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    If the VCO of a phase-locked receiver is to be replaced by a digitally programmed synthesizer, the phase error signal must be sampled and quantized. Effects of quantizing after the loop filter (frequency quantization) or before (phase error quantization) are investigated. Constant Doppler or Doppler rate noiseless inputs are assumed. The main result gives the phase jitter due to frequency quantization for a Doppler-rate input. By itself, however, frequency quantization is impractical because it makes the loop dynamic range too small.

  1. Curvature and torsion effects in electric current-carrying twisted solar loops

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia de Andrade, L. C.

    2006-11-15

    Riemannian geometry of the electric current-carrying solar loops is obtained from a thin tube approximation of twisted magnetic flux tubes. The Frenet torsion and curvature affect the electron drift speed of the electrons of the current along the toroidal direction of the tube. The twist of the tube is computed and it is shown that twist is maximum at the surface of the tube and minimum at the tube axis. This acts as inertia effects to the electron drift. The higher the torsion of the tube axis the smaller is the velocity along the direction of the tube. This effect is similar to the one obtained by Tyspin et al. [Physics of Plasmas, 5, 3385 (1998)] in the case of toroidal devices with curvature and torsion. Here the simple geometrical effects are enough to slow down the currents and no viscosity in the fluid is taken into account. A slight compressibility of the plasma flow is due to the twist of the tube. As applications of these ideas, it is shown that torsion effects are not enough to accelerate electrons up to relativistic energies, and the torsion is computed in the case of the force-free loop. The value of torsion is used to compute the electron acceleration in two distinct cases. The first is the case when the Riemann loop suffers the action of a dc electric sub-Dreicer field, where the magnetic field is direct along the magnetic loop, and the loop moves along the orthogonal direction to the loop as in vortex filaments. In this case, the acceleration is shown to be of the order of 10{sup -17} cm s{sup -2} for a solar torsion of the order of 10{sup -4} cm{sup -1}. The second case is for the curvature drift contribution, where torsion is also present. In this case we show that torsion is not present in the velocity drift but just in the electron acceleration. Though these values are extremely low, they can be improved by considering small loops lowering the radius of the loop which, here, was taken as 600 km. Curvature drift acceleration is also estimated as

  2. String states, loops and effective actions in noncommutative field theory and matrix models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinacker, Harold C.

    2016-09-01

    Refining previous work by Iso, Kawai and Kitazawa, we discuss bi-local string states as a tool for loop computations in noncommutative field theory and matrix models. Defined in terms of coherent states, they exhibit the stringy features of noncommutative field theory. This leads to a closed form for the 1-loop effective action in position space, capturing the long-range non-local UV/IR mixing for scalar fields. The formalism applies to generic fuzzy spaces. The non-locality is tamed in the maximally supersymmetric IKKT or IIB model, where it gives rise to supergravity. The linearized supergravity interactions are obtained directly in position space at one loop using string states on generic noncommutative branes.

  3. Bayesian model comparison of solar flare spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, J.; Holman, G.

    2012-12-01

    The detailed understanding of solar flares requires an understanding of the physics of accelerated electrons, since electrons carry a large fraction of the total energy released in a flare. Hard X-ray energy flux spectral observations of solar flares can be fit with different parameterized models of the interaction of the flare-accelerated electrons with the solar plasma. Each model describes different possible physical effects that may occur in solar flares. Bayesian model comparison provides a technique for assessing which model best describes the data. The advantage of this technique over others is that it can fully account for the different number and type of parameters in each model. We demonstrate this using Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) spectral data from the GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) X4.8 flare of 23-July-2002. We suggest that the observed spectrum can be reproduced using two different parameterized models of the flare electron content. The first model assumes that the flare-accelerated electron spectrum consisting of a single power law with a fixed low energy cutoff assumed to be below the range of fitted X-ray energies, interacting with a non-uniformly ionized target. The second model assumes that the flare-accelerated electron spectrum has a broken power law and a low energy cutoff, which interacts with a fully ionized target plasma. The low energy cutoff in this model is a parameter used in fitting the data. We will introduce and use Bayesian model comparison techniques to decide which model best explains the observed data. This work is funded by the NASA Solar and Heliospheric Physics program.

  4. Blood flow in histamine- and allergen-induced weal and flare responses, effects of an H1 antagonist, alpha-adrenoceptor agonist and a topical glucocorticoid.

    PubMed

    Hammarlund, A; Olsson, P; Pipkorn, U

    1990-01-01

    Allergen has previously been shown to induce a continuous increase in local dermal blood flow after a prick test in allergic subjects, whereas histamine induced, initially, similar peak increases in blood flow of much shorter duration. Blood flow changes induced by histamine and allergen have now been evaluated (i) after pretreatment with a local corticosteroid cream, clobetasole-17-propionate; (ii) after oral administration of the H1-antihistamine loratadine; and (iii) after oral pretreatment with the alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist pseudoephedrine. Blinded placebo-controlled designs were used in the substudies. Laser doppler flowmetry was used for non-invasive recording of changes in local blood flow intermittently for 24 h after the topical corticosteroid, 6 h for the substudies on loratadine and pseudoephedrine. The size of the immediate weal and flare reactions, as well as late phase reactions, were also determined. Pretreatment with clobetasole-17-propionate cream on the skin for 1 week prior to prick tests did not affect the blood flow response elicited by histamine or allergen, in either the initial part (up to 1 h) or the protracted 24 h determinations. The size of the weal and flare reactions decreased. Loratadine and pseudoephedrine did not reduce the initial allergen-induced increase in blood flow, while lower blood flow compared with placebo pretreatment was noted for the protracted (1-6 h) determinations. Blood flow changes after histamine were unaffected. The histamine-induced weal and flare was inhibited by loratadine more effectively than the corresponding allergen-induced reaction. The weal and flare reactions after histamine and allergen were not changed after pseudoephedrine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Investigation of the influence of capillary effect on operation of the loop heat pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikielewicz, Dariusz; Błauciak, Krzysztof

    2014-09-01

    In the paper presented are studies on the investigation of the capillary forces effect induced in the porous structure of a loop heat pipe using water and ethanol ad test fluids. The potential application of such effect is for example in the evaporator of the domestic micro-CHP unit, where the reduction of pumping power could be obtained. Preliminary analysis of the results indicates water as having the best potential for developing the capillary effect.

  6. Effective equations of cosmological models in (loop) quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, David

    This dissertation focuses on the properties of several differing models within quantum cosmology. Specifically, by using the method of effective equations, we explore: a linear discrete Schrodinger model, a non-linear discrete Schrodinger model, factor ordering ambiguities in the Hamiltonian constraint (with a focus on large-volume behavior), and the use of the electric vector potential as deparameterized time. In the linear and non-linear Schrodinger models, we arrive at a new possibility for studying inhomogeneous quantum cosmology (where the non-linearities are interpreted as non-local deviations from the spatial average) that allows for a variety of dynamics and raises a number of questions for future research. We then turn our focus to the general effects of factor ordering ambiguities and their possible role in large-volume collapse of a k = 0 isotropic quantum cosmology with a free, massless scalar field. With the additional inclusion of holonomy and inverse-triad corrections, the choice in factor ordering of the Hamiltonian constraint is quite relevant; however, with our assumptions, we do not see any significant departure from classical large-volume behavior. The final model discussed is formulated with the electric vector potential as the global internal time in a Wheeler-DeWitt setting sourced by radiation. While further analysis is required to make a definitive statement on the impact that the choice of deparameterization makes, we find that the specific form of quantum state can affect early-universe dynamics and even lead to new possibilities.

  7. Solar Eruptions: Coronal Mass Ejections and Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2012-01-01

    This lecture introduces the topic of Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares, collectively known as solar eruptions. During solar eruptions, the released energy flows out from the Sun in the form of magnetized plasma and electromagnetic radiation. The electromagnetic radiation suddenly increases the ionization content of the ionosphere, thus impacting communication and navigation systems. Flares can be eruptive or confined. Eruptive flares accompany CMEs, while confined flares hav only electromagnetic signature. CMEs can drive MHD shocks that accelerate charged particles to very high energies in the interplanetary space, which pose radiation hazard to astronauts and space systems. CMEs heading in the direction of Earth arrive in about two days and impact Earth's magnetosphere, producing geomagnetic storms. The magnetic storms result in a number of effects including induced currnts that can disrupt power grids, railroads, and underground pipelines

  8. Magnetic Fields in Limb Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozitsky, V. G.; Lozitska, N. I.; Botygina, O. A.

    2013-02-01

    Two limb solar flares, of 14 July 2005 and 19 July 2012, of importance X1.2 and M7.7, are analyzed at present work. Magnetic field strength in named flares are investigated by Stokes I±V profiles of Hα and D3 HeI lines. There are direct evidences to the magnetic field inhomogeneity in flares, in particular, non-paralelism of bisectors in I+V and I-V profiles. In some flare places, the local maximums of bisectors splitting were found in both lines. If these bisector splittings are interpreted as Zeeman effect manifestation, the following magnetic field strengths reach up to 2200 G in Hα and 1300 G in D3. According to calculations, the observed peculiarities of line profiles may indicate the existence of optically thick emissive small-scale elements with strong magnetic fields and lowered temperature.

  9. Recent Progress in Understanding Energy Transfer in Solar Flares Resulting from Coordinated IRIS, SDO, and Hinode Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, K.

    2015-12-01

    Flares are the most energetic events that take place on the Sun, and studying them results in a wealth of information about the energy transfer between the solar corona and lower layers of the atmosphere. Prior to a flare, magnetic fields in the photosphere and chromosphere are stressed until a trigger causes energy release in the corona. Manifestations of this energy release are accelerated electrons high in the corona, increased intensity in post-flare arcades and chromospheric footpoint brightenings. Chromospheric evaporation at flare footpoints gives insight into the particular energy release mechanisms during solar flares. Progress in understanding the energy storage, release and deposition of energy during solar flares has come thanks to coordinated observations between IRIS, SDO and Hinode. In this talk, I will review recent results from these coordinated efforts, including observations of reconnection outflows, chromospheric evaporation, turbulence in flare loop tops, and flare triggering.

  10. A SURVEY OF HIGH-CONTRAST STELLAR FLARES OBSERVED BY CHANDRA

    SciTech Connect

    McCleary, J. E.; Wolk, S. J.

    2011-06-15

    The X-ray light curves of pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars can show variability in the form of flares altering a baseline characteristic activity level; the largest X-ray flares are characterized by a rapid rise to more than 10 times the characteristic count rate, followed by a slower quasi-exponential decay. Analysis of these high-contrast X-ray flares enables the study of the innermost magnetic fields of PMS stars. We have scanned the ANCHORS database of Chandra observations of star-forming regions to extend the study of flare events on PMS stars both in sky coverage and in volume. We developed a sample of 30 high-contrast flares out of the 14,000 stars of various ages and masses available in ANCHORS at the start of our study. Applying methods of time-resolved spectral analysis, we obtain the temperatures, confining magnetic field strengths, and loop lengths of these bright, energetic flares. The results of the flare analysis are compared to the Two Micron All Sky Survey and Spitzer data available for the stars in our sample. We find that the longest flare loop lengths (of order several stellar radii) are only seen on stars whose IR data indicates the presence of disks. This suggests that the longest flares may stretch all the way to the disk. Such long flares tend to be more tenuous than the other large flares studied. A wide range of loop lengths are observed, indicating that different types of flares may occur on disked young stellar objects.

  11. Tube flare inspection tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meunier, G. E.

    1980-01-01

    Flare angle and symmetry of tube ends can be checked by simple tool that consists of two stainless steel pins bonded to rubber plug. Primary function of tool is to inspect tubes before they are installed, thereby eliminating expense and inconvenience of repairing leaks caused by imperfect flares. Measuring hole tapers, countersink angles, and bearing race angles are other possible uses. Tool is used with optical comparator. Axis of tool is alined with centerline of tube. Shadow of seated pins on comparator screen allows operator to verify flare angle is within tolerance.

  12. The heat transfer effects of tube wall on a parallel-loop thermosyphon

    SciTech Connect

    Yueh, C.S.; Weng, C.I. ); Hwang, C.C. )

    1993-03-01

    The effects of tube wall heat transfer on the natural convection flows in a parallel loop thermosyphon are investigated analytically. The results show that the thermosyphon with consideration of those effects is more stable than that without the consideration. They also reveal that an increase in the value of thermal diffusivity ratio, [alpha], or radius ratio, [delta], will increase the magnitude of the onset critical Rayleigh number, Ra[sub c] and reduce the velocity of steady flow.

  13. The heat transfer effects of tube wall on a parallel-loop thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yueh, C. S.; Weng, C. I.; Hwang, C. C.

    1993-04-01

    The effects of heat transfer of the tube wall on the natural convection flows in a parallel loops thermosyphon are investigated analytically. The results show that the thermosyphon with consideration of those effects is more stable than that without the consideration. They also reveal that an increase the value of thermal diffusivity ratio or radius ratio will increase the magnitude of the onset critical Rayleigh number and reduce the velocity of steady flow.

  14. Effects of heat losses (or gains) from insulated portions of closed-loop thermosyphons with vertical heat transfer sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, M. A.; Baliga, B. R.

    1993-05-01

    The effect of heat losses or gains in the modeling of thermosyphons is investigated analytically using a closed-loop model where the circulating liquid is heated by a constant and uniform heat flux in the heated section of the loop and is cooled in a cooling section maintained at a constant wall temperature; elsewhere the pipes are insulated from the ambient fluid. The results of the analysis indicate that the performance of a closed-loop thermosyphon can be markedly affected by heat gains or losses in the insulated sections of the loop.

  15. Health effects of benzene exposure among children following a flaring incident at the British Petroleum Refinery in Texas City.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Mark A; Reddy, G Kesava

    2014-02-01

    Human exposure to benzene is associated with multiple adverse health effects leading to hematological malignancies. The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the health consequences of benzene exposure in children following a flaring incident at the British petroleum (BP) refinery in Texas City, Texas. The study included children aged <17 years who had been exposed and unexposed to benzene. Using medical charts, clinical data including white blood cell (WBC) counts, platelets counts, hemoglobin, hematocrit, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate amino transferase (AST), alanine amino transferase (ALT), and somatic symptom complaints by the children exposed to benzene were reviewed and analyzed. A total of 312 subjects (benzene exposed, n = 157 and unexposed, n = 155) were included. Hematologic analysis showed that WBC counts were significantly decreased in benzene-exposed children compared with the unexposed children (6.8 ± 2.1 versus 7.3 ± 1.7, P = .022). Conversely, platelet (X 10(3) per μL) counts were increased significantly in the benzene-exposed group compared with the unexposed group (278.4 ± 59.9 versus 261.6 ± 51.7, P = .005). Similarly, benzene-exposed children had significantly higher levels of ALP (183.7± 95.6 versus 165 ± 70.3 IU/L, P = .04), AST (23.6 ± 15.3 versus 20.5 ± 5.5 IU/L, P = .015), and ALT (19.2 ± 7.8 versus 16.9 ± 6.9 IU/L, P = .005) compared with the unexposed children. Together, the results of the study reveal that children exposed to benzene experienced significantly altered blood profiles, liver enzymes, and somatic symptoms indicating that children exposed to benzene are at a higher risk of developing hepatic or blood related disorders.

  16. Diagnosis and treatment of lupus nephritis flares--an update.

    PubMed

    Sprangers, Ben; Monahan, Marianne; Appel, Gerald B

    2012-12-01

    Relapses or flares of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are frequent and observed in 27-66% of patients. SLE flares are defined as an increase in disease activity, in general, requiring alternative treatment or intensification of therapy. A renal flare is indicated by an increase in proteinuria and/or serum creatinine concentration, abnormal urine sediment or a reduction in creatinine clearance rate as a result of active disease. The morbidity associated with renal flares is derived from both the kidney damage due to lupus nephritis and treatment-related toxic effects. Current induction treatment protocols achieve remission in the majority of patients with lupus nephritis; however, few studies focus on treatment interventions for renal flares in these patients. The available data, however, suggest that remission can be induced again in a substantial percentage of patients experiencing a lupus nephritis flare. Lupus nephritis flares are independently associated with an increased risk of deterioration in renal function; prevention of renal flares might, therefore, also decrease long-term morbidity and mortality. Appropriate immunosuppressive maintenance therapy might lead to a decrease in the occurrence of renal and extrarenal flares in patients with SLE, and monitoring for the early detection and treatment of renal flares could improve their outcomes.

  17. Loop-to-loop coupling.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Lucero, Larry Martin; Langston, William L.; Salazar, Robert Austin; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Basilio, Lorena I.; Bacon, Larry Donald

    2012-05-01

    This report estimates inductively-coupled energy to a low-impedance load in a loop-to-loop arrangement. Both analytical models and full-wave numerical simulations are used and the resulting fields, coupled powers and energies are compared. The energies are simply estimated from the coupled powers through approximations to the energy theorem. The transmitter loop is taken to be either a circular geometry or a rectangular-loop (stripline-type) geometry that was used in an experimental setup. Simple magnetic field models are constructed and used to estimate the mutual inductance to the receiving loop, which is taken to be circular with one or several turns. Circuit elements are estimated and used to determine the coupled current and power (an equivalent antenna picture is also given). These results are compared to an electromagnetic simulation of the transmitter geometry. Simple approximate relations are also given to estimate coupled energy from the power. The effect of additional loads in the form of attached leads, forming transmission lines, are considered. The results are summarized in a set of susceptibility-type curves. Finally, we also consider drives to the cables themselves and the resulting common-to-differential mode currents in the load.

  18. Regulative Loops, Step Loops and Task Loops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanLehn, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    This commentary suggests a generalization of the conception of the behavior of tutoring systems, which the target article characterized as having an outer loop that was executed once per task and an inner loop that was executed once per step of the task. A more general conception sees these two loops as instances of regulative loops, which…

  19. Fast-sausage oscillations in coronal loops with smooth boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopin, I.; Nagorny, I.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: The effect of the transition layer (shell) in nonuniform coronal loops with a continuous radial density profile on the properties of fast-sausage modes are studied analytically and numerically. Methods: We modeled the coronal waveguide as a structured tube consisting of a cord and a transition region (shell) embedded within a magnetic uniform environment. The derived general dispersion relation was investigated analytically and numerically in the context of frequency, cut-off wave number, and the damping rate of fast-sausage oscillations for various values of loop parameters. Results: The frequency of the global fast-sausage mode in the loops with a diffuse (or smooth) boundary is determined mainly by the external Alfvén speed and longitudinal wave number. The damping rate of such a mode can be relatively low. The model of coronal loop with diffuse boundary can support a comparatively low-frequency, global fast-sausage mode of detectable quality without involving extremely low values of the density contrast. The effect of thin transition layer (corresponds to the loops with steep boundary) is negligible and produces small reductions of oscillation frequency and relative damping rate in comparison with the case of step-function density profile. Seismological application of obtained results gives the estimated Alfvén speed outside the flaring loop about 3.25 Mm/s.

  20. Dual frequency observations of flares with the VLA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulk, G. A.; Bastian, T. S.; Hurford, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    Observations are presented of two subflares near the limb on 21 and 22 November 1981 and an M7.7 flare on 8 May 1981 made at 5 and 15 GHz using the VLA. One of the November flares produced no 5 GHz radiation, while the 15 GHz radiation in the other flare emanated from a source which was smaller, lower, and displaced from the 5 GHz source. The flare occurring on 8 May was intense and complex, and contained two or more sources at both 5 and 15 GHz. Prior to the peak of the flare, the sources were found to grow in size, after which time only weak subsources were visible to the VLA. These subsources were found to be located between or at the edge of the H-alpha ribbons and the two hard X-ray sources imaged by the Hinotori satellite. Highly polarized, bursty radiation was observed at 1 and 2 GHz, which indicated that an electron-cyclotron maser operated during the flare. The maximum field strength in flaring loops is estimated to be 360-600 gauss.

  1. The decay of the 1973 August 9 flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dere, K. P.; Cook, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    The state and evolution of the decay-phase plasma from a compact solar flare that occurred on August 9, 1973, are investigated on the basis of XUV and X-ray observations from Skylab and Solrad 9. Density-sensitive line ratios are used to determine the electron density over the temperature range from 30,000 to 5 million K, and the differential emission measure in the temperature interval from 30,000 to 20 million K is derived for several times in the decay phase. The morphology of the flare is discussed, including its relation to the observed photospheric magnetic field. The sequential formation of new loops during the decay phase is emphasized as an essential element for understanding the decay phase of the flare. This idea is developed further by comparing the observed differential emission measure with that predicted by a semiempirical model which considers the sequential formation of isothermal loops that cool by radiation and thermal conduction.

  2. NEW SOLAR EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IRRADIANCE OBSERVATIONS DURING FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Thomas N.; Hock, Rachel; Eparvier, Frank; Jones, Andrew R.; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Klimchuk, James A.; Didkovsky, Leonid; Judge, Darrell; Mariska, John; Warren, Harry; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Webb, David F.; Bailey, Scott; Tobiska, W. Kent

    2011-10-01

    New solar extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance observations from the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) EUV Variability Experiment provide full coverage in the EUV range from 0.1 to 106 nm and continuously at a cadence of 10 s for spectra at 0.1 nm resolution and even faster, 0.25 s, for six EUV bands. These observations can be decomposed into four distinct characteristics during flares. First, the emissions that dominate during the flare's impulsive phase are the transition region emissions, such as the He II 30.4 nm. Second, the hot coronal emissions above 5 MK dominate during the gradual phase and are highly correlated with the GOES X-ray. A third flare characteristic in the EUV is coronal dimming, seen best in the cool corona, such as the Fe IX 17.1 nm. As the post-flare loops reconnect and cool, many of the EUV coronal emissions peak a few minutes after the GOES X-ray peak. One interesting variation of the post-eruptive loop reconnection is that warm coronal emissions (e.g., Fe XVI 33.5 nm) sometimes exhibit a second large peak separated from the primary flare event by many minutes to hours, with EUV emission originating not from the original flare site and its immediate vicinity, but rather from a volume of higher loops. We refer to this second peak as the EUV late phase. The characterization of many flares during the SDO mission is provided, including quantification of the spectral irradiance from the EUV late phase that cannot be inferred from GOES X-ray diagnostics.

  3. IMPULSIVE PHASE CORONAL HARD X-RAY SOURCES IN AN X3.9 CLASS SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Qingrong; Petrosian, Vahe E-mail: vahep@stanford.edu

    2012-03-20

    We present the analysis of a pair of unusually energetic coronal hard X-ray (HXR) sources detected by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager during the impulsive phase of an X3.9 class solar flare on 2003 November 3, which simultaneously shows two intense footpoint (FP) sources. A distinct loop top (LT) coronal source is detected up to {approx}150 keV and a second (upper) coronal source up to {approx}80 keV. These photon energies, which were not fully investigated in earlier analysis of this flare, are much higher than commonly observed in coronal sources and pose grave modeling challenges. The LT source in general appears higher in altitude with increasing energy and exhibits a more limited motion compared to the expansion of the thermal loop. The high-energy LT source shows an impulsive time profile and its nonthermal power-law spectrum exhibits soft-hard-soft evolution during the impulsive phase, similar to the FP sources. The upper coronal source exhibits an opposite spatial gradient and a similar spectral slope compared to the LT source. These properties are consistent with the model of stochastic acceleration of electrons by plasma waves or turbulence. However, the LT and FP spectral index difference (varying from {approx}0 to 1) is much smaller than commonly measured and than that expected from a simple stochastic acceleration model. Additional confinement or trapping mechanisms of high-energy electrons in the corona are required. Comprehensive modeling including both kinetic effects and the macroscopic flare structure may shed light on this behavior. These results highlight the importance of imaging spectroscopic observations of the LT and FP sources up to high energies in understanding electron acceleration in solar flares. Finally, we show that the electrons producing the upper coronal HXR source may very likely be responsible for the type III radio bursts at the decimetric/metric wavelength observed during the impulsive phase of this

  4. Dynamical symmetry breaking of λφ4 theory in the two loop effective potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ji-Feng; Ruan, Jian-Hong

    2002-06-01

    The two loop effective potential of massless λφ4 theory is presented in several regularization and renormalization prescriptions and the dynamical symmetry breaking solution is obtained in the strong-coupling situation in several prescriptions except the Coleman-Weinberg prescription. The beta function in the broken phase becomes negative and the UV fixed point turns out to be a strong-coupling one, and its numeric value varies with the renormalization prescriptions, a detail which is different from the asymptotic-free solution in the one loop case. The symmetry-breaking phase is shown to be an entirely strong-coupling phase. The reason for the relevance of the renormalization prescriptions is shown to be due to the nonperturbative nature of the effective potential. We also reanalyze the two loop effective potential by adopting a differential equation approach based on the understanding that all the quantum field theories are ill-defined formulations of the “low-energy” effective theories of a complete underlying theory. The relevance of the prescriptions of fixing the local ambiguities to physical properties such as symmetry breaking is further emphasized. We also tentatively propose a rescaling insensitivity argument for fixing the quadratic ambiguities. Some detailed properties of the strongly coupled broken phase and related issues are discussed.

  5. Cooling of solar flares plasmas. 1: Theoretical considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cargill, Peter J.; Mariska, John T.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    1995-01-01

    Theoretical models of the cooling of flare plasma are reexamined. By assuming that the cooling occurs in two separate phase where conduction and radiation, respectively, dominate, a simple analytic formula for the cooling time of a flare plasma is derived. Unlike earlier order-of-magnitude scalings, this result accounts for the effect of the evolution of the loop plasma parameters on the cooling time. When the conductive cooling leads to an 'evaporation' of chromospheric material, the cooling time scales L(exp 5/6)/p(exp 1/6), where the coronal phase (defined as the time maximum temperature). When the conductive cooling is static, the cooling time scales as L(exp 3/4)n(exp 1/4). In deriving these results, use was made of an important scaling law (T proportional to n(exp 2)) during the radiative cooling phase that was forst noted in one-dimensional hydrodynamic numerical simulations (Serio et al. 1991; Jakimiec et al. 1992). Our own simulations show that this result is restricted to approximately the radiative loss function of Rosner, Tucker, & Vaiana (1978). for different radiative loss functions, other scaling result, with T and n scaling almost linearly when the radiative loss falls off as T(exp -2). It is shown that these scaling laws are part of a class of analytic solutions developed by Antiocos (1980).

  6. New constraints on dark matter effective theories from standard model loops.

    PubMed

    Crivellin, Andreas; D'Eramo, Francesco; Procura, Massimiliano

    2014-05-16

    We consider an effective field theory for a gauge singlet Dirac dark matter particle interacting with the standard model fields via effective operators suppressed by the scale Λ ≳ 1 TeV. We perform a systematic analysis of the leading loop contributions to spin-independent Dirac dark matter-nucleon scattering using renormalization group evolution between Λ and the low-energy scale probed by direct detection experiments. We find that electroweak interactions induce operator mixings such that operators that are naively velocity suppressed and spin dependent can actually contribute to spin-independent scattering. This allows us to put novel constraints on Wilson coefficients that were so far poorly bounded by direct detection. Constraints from current searches are already significantly stronger than LHC bounds, and will improve in the near future. Interestingly, the loop contribution we find is isospin violating even if the underlying theory is isospin conserving.

  7. New constraints on dark matter effective theories from standard model loops.

    PubMed

    Crivellin, Andreas; D'Eramo, Francesco; Procura, Massimiliano

    2014-05-16

    We consider an effective field theory for a gauge singlet Dirac dark matter particle interacting with the standard model fields via effective operators suppressed by the scale Λ ≳ 1 TeV. We perform a systematic analysis of the leading loop contributions to spin-independent Dirac dark matter-nucleon scattering using renormalization group evolution between Λ and the low-energy scale probed by direct detection experiments. We find that electroweak interactions induce operator mixings such that operators that are naively velocity suppressed and spin dependent can actually contribute to spin-independent scattering. This allows us to put novel constraints on Wilson coefficients that were so far poorly bounded by direct detection. Constraints from current searches are already significantly stronger than LHC bounds, and will improve in the near future. Interestingly, the loop contribution we find is isospin violating even if the underlying theory is isospin conserving. PMID:24877928

  8. One-loop effects from spin-1 resonances in Composite Higgs models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contino, Roberto; Salvarezza, Matteo

    2015-07-01

    We compute the 1-loop correction to the electroweak observables from spin-1 resonances in SO(5)/SO(4) composite Higgs models. The strong dynamics is modeled with an effective description comprising the Nambu-Goldstone bosons and the lowest-lying spin-1 resonances. A classification is performed of the relevant operators including custodially-breaking effects from the gauging of hypercharge. The 1-loop contribution of the resonances is extracted in a diagrammatic approach by matching to the low-energy theory of Nambu-Goldstone bosons. We find that the correction is numerically important in a significant fraction of the parameter space and tends to weaken the bounds providing a negative shift to the S parameter.

  9. Slipping Magnetic Reconnection, Chromospheric Evaporation, Implosion, and Precursors in the 2014 September 10 X1.6-Class Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudík, Jaroslav; Polito, Vanessa; Janvier, Miho; Mulay, Sargam M.; Karlický, Marian; Aulanier, Guillaume; Del Zanna, Giulio; Dzifčáková, Elena; Mason, Helen E.; Schmieder, Brigitte

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the occurrence of slipping magnetic reconnection, chromospheric evaporation, and coronal loop dynamics in the 2014 September 10 X-class flare. Slipping reconnection is found to be present throughout the flare from its early phase. Flare loops are seen to slip in opposite directions toward both ends of the ribbons. Velocities of 20–40 km s‑1 are found within time windows where the slipping is well resolved. The warm coronal loops exhibit expanding and contracting motions that are interpreted as displacements due to the growing flux rope that subsequently erupts. This flux rope existed and erupted before the onset of apparent coronal implosion. This indicates that the energy release proceeds by slipping reconnection and not via coronal implosion. The slipping reconnection leads to changes in the geometry of the observed structures at the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph slit position, from flare loop top to the footpoints in the ribbons. This results in variations of the observed velocities of chromospheric evaporation in the early flare phase. Finally, it is found that the precursor signatures, including localized EUV brightenings as well as nonthermal X-ray emission, are signatures of the flare itself, progressing from the early phase toward the impulsive phase, with the tether-cutting being provided by the slipping reconnection. The dynamics of both the flare and outlying coronal loops is found to be consistent with the predictions of the standard solar flare model in three dimensions.

  10. Millimeter Observation of Solar Flares with Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, D. F.; Valio, A. B. M.

    2016-04-01

    We present the investigation of two solar flares on February 17 and May 13, 2013, studied in radio from 5 to 405 GHz (RSTN, POEMAS, SST), and in X-rays up to 300 keV (FERMI and RHESSI). The objective of this work is to study the evolution and energy distribution of the population of accelerated electrons and the magnetic field configuration. For this we constructed and fit the radio spectrum by a gyro synchrotron model. The optically thin spectral indices from radio observations were compared to that of the hard X-rays, showing that the radio spectral index is harder than the latter by 2. These flares also presented 10-15 % circular polarized emission at 45 and 90 GHz that suggests that the sources are located at different legs of an asymmetric loop.

  11. A slingshot model for solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Gregory

    1991-01-01

    Recent observations of intense, impulsive gamma-ray and X-ray-emitting solar flares underline the suddenness of these events. The simultaneous emission of X-rays greater than 40 keV from electron bremsstrahlung and gamma-rays requiring several MeV protons shows that all particles must be accelerated in less than 5 s. This paper proposes a simple model to explain such events, using the energy stored in the stretched field lines of a coronal arch. When reconnection occurs at the top of the arch, field lines retract like stretched rubber bands, sweeping up plasma and acting like a piston or slingshot. When the slug of plasma caught in the magnetic fields strikes the photosphere, it deposits its considerable kinetic energy, heating and compressing the intruding slug. Ten slugs of 100 km radius striking the photosphere may account for the 10 to the 29th ergs radiation from loop flares.

  12. Starspots on flare stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    Sizes of starspots on flare stars can be derived from the author's convection-cell hypothesis. The sizes are in fair agreement with those observed on YY Gem, CC Eri, and BY Dra by Bopp and Evans (1973). The hypothesis predicts that periodic brightness variations due to starspots are restricted to stars brighter than a critical absolute visual magnitude. A convective model of a starspot on YY Gem has been computed, assuming that the missing flux is in the form of Alfven waves. It is found that the surface field must exceed 10,000 G, and is probably less than about 30,000 G. With a surface field of 20,000 G, the effective temperature of the spot is in the range from 1590 to 1890 K, depending on the field gradient. These figures are to be compared with an effective temperature of 2000 K estimated from observations by Bopp and Evans. Efficient dynamo action is shown to be a possible mechanism for generating such large surface fields. There is a possibility that tidal effects may influence starspot formation.

  13. Reverse-current effect in present-day models of solar flares: Theory and high-accuracy observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsyk, P. A.; Somov, B. V.

    2014-08-01

    We propose an accurate analytical model for the source of hard X-ray emission from a flare in the form of a "thick target" with a reverse current to explain the results of present-day observations of solar flares onboard the GOES, Hinode, RHESSI, and TRACE satellites. The model, one-dimensional in coordinate space and two-dimensional in velocity space, self-consistently takes into account the fact that the beam electrons lose the kinetic energy of their motion along the magnetic field almost without any collisions under the action of the reverse-current electric field. Some of the electrons return from the emission source to the acceleration region without losing the kinetic energy of their transverse motion. Based on the observed hard X-ray bremsstrahlung spectrum, the model allows the injection spectrum of accelerated electrons to be reconstructed with a high accuracy. As an example, we consider the white-light flare of December 6, 2006, which was observed with a high spatial resolution in the optical wavelength range at the main maximum of hard X-ray emission. Within the framework of our model, we show that to explain the hard X-ray spectrum, the flux density of the energy transferred by electrons with energies above 18 keV was ˜3 × 1013 erg cm-2 s-1. This exceeds the habitual values typical of the classical model of a thick target without a reverse current by two orders of magnitude. The electron density in the beam is also very high: ˜1011 cm-3. A more careful consideration of plasma processes in such dense electron beams is needed when the physical parameters of a flare are calculated.

  14. Comment on 'The solar flare myth' by J. T. Gosling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Hugh; Haisch, Bernhard; Strong, Keith T.

    1995-01-01

    In a recent paper Gosling (1993) claims that solar flares are relatively unimportant for understanding the terrestrial consequences of solar activity, and argues that coronal mass ejections (CMEs) produce the most powerful terrestrial disturbances. This opinion conflicts with observation, as it is well known that CMEs and flares are closely associated, and we disagree with Gosling's insistence on a simplistic cause-and-effect description of the interrelated phenomena of a solar flare. In this brief response we present new Yohkoh data and review older results that demonstrate the close relationships among CMEs, flares, filament eruptions, and other forms of energy release such as particle acceleration.

  15. Unique examples of solar flare effects in geomagnetic H field during partial counter electrojet along CPMN longitude sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, R. G.; Chandra, H.; Yumoto, K.

    2013-09-01

    Yamazaki et al. (2009) reported two strong negative crochets during midday (solar flares on 8 June 2000, 3 July 2002), along the Circum-pan pacific magnetometers network (CPMN). The association of these with equatorial counter electrojet was doubted and suggestion was made to investigate the cause of these unique events. Present investigations were motivated by their paper. In this paper, detailed examination of geomagnetic data for the two events is made at all stations within 75°E (Indian) and 160°E (western Pacific) longitude sectors. Latitudinal variations of ΔH on 18 June 2000 showed negative gradient towards the dip equator suggesting a partial counter electrojet both in the Indian and CPMN sectors. A partial counter electrojet also existed from morning to 1300 LT in the western Pacific sector on 3 July 2002. There are two current sheets over the equatorial electrojet region, one at higher level flowing eastward associated with global Sq current system and another intense current layer at 107 km, flowing eastward during normal and westward during partial/full counter electrojet periods. Solar flares are likely to affect the electrojet current more strongly as a result of the absorption, in the lower E-region, of the shorter wavelength solar X-rays flare spectrum.

  16. Effect of External Pressure Drop on Loop Heat Pipe Operating Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jentung, Ku; Ottenstein, Laura; Rogers, Paul; Cheung, Kwok; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the effect of the pressure drop on the operating temperature in a loop heat pipe (LHP). Because the evaporator and the compensation chamber (CC) both contain two-phase fluid, a thermodynamic constraint exists between the temperature difference and the pressure drop for these two components. As the pressure drop increases, so will the temperature difference. The temperature difference in turn causes an increase of the heat leak from the evaporator to the CC, resulting in a higher CC temperature. Furthermore, the heat leak strongly depends on the vapor void fraction inside the evaporator core. Tests were conducted by installing a valve on the vapor line so as to vary the pressure drop, and by charging the LHP with various amounts of fluid. Test results verify that the LHP operating temperature increases with an increasing differential pressure, and the temperature increase is a strong function of the fluid inventory in the loop.

  17. Loop electrosurgical excision procedure: an effective, inexpensive, and durable teaching model.

    PubMed

    Connor, R Shae; Dizon, A Mitch; Kimball, Kristopher J

    2014-12-01

    The effectiveness of simulation training for enhancing operative skills is well established. Here we describe the construction of a simple, low-cost model for teaching the loop electrosurgical excision procedure. Composed of common materials such as polyvinyl chloride pipe and sausages, the simulation model, shown in the accompanying figure, can be easily reproduced by other training programs. In addition, we also present an instructional video that utilizes this model to review loop electrosurgical excision procedure techniques, highlighting important steps in the procedure and briefly addressing challenging situations and common mistakes as well as strategies to prevent them. The video and model can be used in conjunction with a simulation skills laboratory to teach the procedure to students, residents, and new practitioners. PMID:24887318

  18. Effects of low sampling rate in the digital data-transition tracking loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mileant, A.; Million, S.; Hinedi, S.

    1994-01-01

    This article describes the performance of the all-digital data-transition tracking loop (DTTL) with coherent and noncoherent sampling using nonlinear theory. The effects of few samples per symbol and of noncommensurate sampling and symbol rates are addressed and analyzed. Their impact on the probability density and variance of the phase error are quantified through computer simulations. It is shown that the performance of the all-digital DTTL approaches its analog counterpart when the sampling and symbol rates are noncommensurate (i.e., the number of samples per symbol is an irrational number). The loop signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) (inverse of phase error variance) degrades when the number of samples per symbol is an odd integer but degrades even further for even integers.

  19. Type of condensers and their cooling effect in the loop thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrabovský, Peter; Nemec, Patrik; Malcho, Milan

    2014-08-01

    This work investigates the cooling effect of three condensers in the loop thermosyphon in horizontal position. The cooling liquid flows in 1-tube condenser circuit. The work compares cooling effect of different types of condensers (flat condenser and ribbed tube condenser) at different thermal load. Cooling effect of condenser is connected with thermal changes in the evaporator. We have found out that the higher the thermal resistance is, the lower the condenser output is. Measurements and calculated values have proved different outputs of condensers.

  20. Electron trapping and acceleration by kinetic Alfvén waves in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Zimovets, I. V.; Rankin, R.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Theoretical models and spacecraft observations of solar flares highlight the role of wave-particle interaction for non-local electron acceleration. In one scenario, the acceleration of a large electron population up to high energies is due to the transport of electromagnetic energy from the loop-top region down to the footpoints, which is then followed by the energy being released in dense plasma in the lower atmosphere. Aims: We consider one particular mechanism of non-linear electron acceleration by kinetic Alfvén waves. Here, waves are generated by plasma flows in the energy release region near the loop top. We estimate the efficiency of this mechanism and the energies of accelerated electrons. Methods: We use analytical estimates and test-particle modelling to investigate the effects of electron trapping and acceleration by kinetic Alfvén waves in the inhomogeneous plasma of the solar corona. Results: We demonstrate that, for realistic wave amplitudes, electrons can be accelerated up to 10-1000 keV during their propagation along magnetic field lines. Here the electric field that is parallel to the direction of the background magnetic field is about 10 to 103 times the amplitude of the Dreicer electric field. The acceleration mechanism strongly depends on electron scattering which is due to collisions that only take place near the loop footpoints. Conclusions: The non-linear wave-particle interaction can play an important role in the generation of relativistic electrons within flare loops. Electron trapping and coherent acceleration by kinetic Alfvén waves represent the energy cascade from large-scale plasma flows that originate at the loop-top region down to the electron scale. The non-diffusive character of the non-linear electron acceleration may be responsible for the fast generation of high-energy particles.

  1. Black Carbon Emissions from Associated Natural Gas Flaring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyant, C.; Shepson, P. B.; Subramanian, R.; Cambaliza, M. O. L.; Mccabe, D. C.; Baum, E. K.; Caulton, D.; Heimburger, A. M. F.; Bond, T. C.

    2014-12-01

    Approximately 150 billion cubic meters (BCM) of associated natural gas is flared and vented in the world, annually, emitting greenhouse gases and other pollutants with no energy benefit. Based on estimates from satellite observations, the United States flares about 7 BCM of gas, annually (the 5th highest flaring volume worldwide). The volume of gas flared in the US is growing, largely due to flaring in the Bakken formation in North Dakota. Black carbon (BC), a combustion by-product from gas flaring, is a short-term climate pollutant that absorbs shortwave radiation both in the atmosphere and on snow and ice surfaces. Flaring may be a significant source of global BC climate effects. For example, modeling estimates suggest that associated gas flares are the source of a significant percentage of BC surface concentrations in the Arctic, where BC-induced ice melting occurs. However, there are no direct field measurements of BC emission factors from associated gas flares. Emission measurements of BC that include a range of flaring conditions are needed to ascertain the magnitude of BC emissions from this source. Over one hundred flare plumes were sampled in the Bakken formation using a small aircraft. Methane, carbon dioxide, and BC were measured simultaneously, allowing the calculation of BC mass emission factors using the carbon balance method. BC was measured using two methods; optical absorption was measured using a Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) and BC particle number and mass concentrations were measured with a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). Simultaneous sampling of BC absorption and mass allows for the calculation of the BC mass absorption cross-section. Results indicate that emission factor variability between flares in the region is significant; there are two orders of magnitude variation in the BC emission factors.

  2. Pre-flare Activity and Magnetic Reconnection during the Evolutionary Stages of Energy Release in a Solar Eruptive Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Bhuwan; Veronig, Astrid M.; Lee, Jeongwoo; Bong, Su-Chan; Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we present a multi-wavelength analysis of an eruptive white-light M3.2 flare that occurred in active region NOAA 10486 on 2003 November 1. The excellent set of high-resolution observations made by RHESSI and the TRACE provides clear evidence of significant pre-flare activities for ~9 minutes in the form of an initiation phase observed at EUV/UV wavelengths followed by an X-ray precursor phase. During the initiation phase, we observed localized brightenings in the highly sheared core region close to the filament and interactions among short EUV loops overlying the filament, which led to the opening of magnetic field lines. The X-ray precursor phase is manifested in RHESSI measurements below ~30 keV and coincided with the beginning of flux emergence at the flaring location along with early signatures of the eruption. The RHESSI observations reveal that both plasma heating and electron acceleration occurred during the precursor phase. The main flare is consistent with the standard flare model. However, after the impulsive phase, an intense hard X-ray (HXR) looptop source was observed without significant footpoint emission. More intriguingly, for a brief period, the looptop source exhibited strong HXR emission with energies up to ~50-100 keV and significant non-thermal characteristics. The present study indicates a causal relation between the activities in the pre-flare and the main flare. We also conclude that pre-flare activities, occurring in the form of subtle magnetic reorganization along with localized magnetic reconnection, played a crucial role in destabilizing the active region filament, leading to a solar eruptive flare and associated large-scale phenomena.

  3. Seismic Emissions from a Highly Impulsive M6.7 Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Oliveros, J. C.; Moradi, H.; Donea, A.-C.

    2008-09-01

    On 10 March 2001 the active region NOAA 9368 produced an unusually impulsive solar flare in close proximity to the solar limb. This flare has previously been studied in great detail, with observations classifying it as a type 1 white-light flare with a very hard spectrum in hard X-rays. The flare was also associated with a type II radio burst and coronal mass ejection. The flare emission characteristics appeared to closely correspond to previous instances of seismic emission from acoustically active flares. Using standard local helioseismic methods, we identified the seismic signatures produced by the flare that, to date, is the least energetic (in soft X-rays) of the flares known to have generated a detectable acoustic transient. Holographic analysis of the flare shows a compact acoustic source strongly correlated with the impulsive hard X-rays, visible continuum, and radio emission. Time distance diagrams of the seismic waves emanating from the flare region also show faint signatures, mainly in the eastern sector of the active region. The strong spatial coincidence between the seismic source and the impulsive visible continuum emission reinforces the theory that a substantial component of the seismic emission seen is a result of sudden heating of the low photosphere associated with the observed visible continuum emission. Furthermore, the low-altitude magnetic loop structure inferred from potential-field extrapolations in the flaring region suggests that there is a significant anti-correlation between the seismicity of a flare and the height of the magnetic loops that conduct the particle beams from the corona.

  4. Time delays in the nonthermal radiation of solar flares according to observations of the CORONAS-F satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsap, Yu. T.; Stepanov, A. V.; Kashapova, L. K.; Myagkova, I. N.; Bogomolov, A. V.; Kopylova, Yu. G.; Goldvarg, T. B.

    2016-07-01

    In 2001-2003, the X-ray and microwave observations of ten solar flares of M- and X-classes were carried out by the CORONAS-F orbital station, the RSTN Sun service, and Nobeyama radio polarimeters. Based on these observations, a correlation analysis of time profiles of nonthermal radiation was performed. On average, hard X-ray radiation outstrips the microwave radiation in 9 events, i.e., time delays are positive. The appearance of negative delays is associated with effective scattering of accelerated electrons in pitch angles, where the length of the free path of a particle is less than the half-length of a flare loop. The additional indications are obtained in favor of the need to account for the effect of magnetic mirrors on the dynamics of energetic particles in the coronal arches.

  5. FLARING PATTERNS IN BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Paggi, A.; Cavaliere, A.; Tavani, M.; Vittorini, V.; D'Ammando, F.

    2011-08-01

    Blazars radiate from relativistic jets launched by a supermassive black hole along our line of sight; the subclass of flat spectrum radio quasars exhibits broad emission lines, a telltale sign of a gas-rich environment and high accretion rate, contrary to the other subclass of the BL Lacertae objects. We show that this dichotomy of the sources in physical properties is enhanced in their flaring activity. The BL Lac flares yielded spectral evidence of being driven by further acceleration of highly relativistic electrons in the jet. Here, we discuss spectral fits of multi-{lambda} data concerning strong flares of the two flat spectrum radio quasars 3C 454.3 and 3C 279 recently detected in {gamma}-rays by the AGILE and Fermi satellites. We find that optimal spectral fits are provided by external Compton radiation enhanced by increasing production of thermal seed photons by growing accretion. We find such flares to trace patterns on the jet-power-electron-energy plane that diverge from those followed by flaring BL Lac objects and discuss why these occur.

  6. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  7. One-loop soft supersymmetry breaking terms in superstring effective theories.

    SciTech Connect

    Binetruy, Pierre; Gaillard, Mary K.; Nelson, Brent D.

    2000-11-01

    We perform a systematic analysis of soft supersymmetry breaking terms at the one loop level in a large class of string effective field theories. This includes the so-called anomaly mediated contributions. We illustrate our results for several classes of orbifold models. In particular, we discuss a class of models where soft supersymmetry breaking terms are determined by quasi model independent anomaly mediated contributions, with possibly non-vanishing scalar masses at the one loop level. We show that the latter contribution depends on the detailed prescription of the regularization process which is assumed to represent the Planck scale physics of the underlying fundamental theory. The usual anomaly mediation case with vanishing scalar masses at one loop is not found to be generic. However gaugino masses and A-terms always vanish at tree level if supersymmetry breaking is moduli dominated with the moduli stabilized at self-dual points, whereas the manishing of the B-term depends on the origin of the mu-term in the underlying theory. We also discuss the supersymmetric spectrum of O-I and O-II models, as well as a model of gaugino condensation. For reference, explicit spectra corresponding to a Higgs mass of 114 GeV are given. Finally, we address general strategies for distinguishing among these models.

  8. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures at two loops

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, John Joseph M.; Foreman, Simon; Green, Daniel; Senatore, Leonardo E-mail: sfore@stanford.edu E-mail: senatore@stanford.edu

    2014-07-01

    Large scale structure surveys promise to be the next leading probe of cosmological information. It is therefore crucial to reliably predict their observables. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a manifestly convergent perturbation theory for the weakly non-linear regime of dark matter, where correlation functions are computed in an expansion of the wavenumber k of a mode over the wavenumber associated with the non-linear scale k{sub NL}. Since most of the information is contained at high wavenumbers, it is necessary to compute higher order corrections to correlation functions. After the one-loop correction to the matter power spectrum, we estimate that the next leading one is the two-loop contribution, which we compute here. At this order in k/k{sub NL}, there is only one counterterm in the EFTofLSS that must be included, though this term contributes both at tree-level and in several one-loop diagrams. We also discuss correlation functions involving the velocity and momentum fields. We find that the EFTofLSS prediction at two loops matches to percent accuracy the non-linear matter power spectrum at redshift zero up to k∼ 0.6 h Mpc{sup −1}, requiring just one unknown coefficient that needs to be fit to observations. Given that Standard Perturbation Theory stops converging at redshift zero at k∼ 0.1 h Mpc{sup −1}, our results demonstrate the possibility of accessing a factor of order 200 more dark matter quasi-linear modes than naively expected. If the remaining observational challenges to accessing these modes can be addressed with similar success, our results show that there is tremendous potential for large scale structure surveys to explore the primordial universe.

  9. Serf studies of mass motions arising in flares

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    It is believed that radio type IVs, co-spatial with dense hot plasmoids, may be the result of a plasma radiation emission mechanism. The injection of mass into the corona was recently observed in chromospheric and coronal lines with magnetic field changes and also at very high speeds into loops. The start time of coronal loop transients, if extrapolated to the chromosphere, in most cases precedes flare H-alpha or X-ray emission. Observational inferences from polarization and other studies are seen as favoring the three-dimensional bubble over the planar loop as a description of coronal mass motions.

  10. Simulations of Gyrosynchrotron Microwave Emission from an Oscillating 3D Magnetic Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, A. A.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Reznikova, V. E.

    2015-04-01

    Radio observations of solar flares often reveal various periodic or quasi-periodic oscillations. Most likely, these oscillations are caused by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillations of flaring loops which modulate the emission. Interpreting the observations requires comparing them with simulations. We simulated the gyrosynchrotron radio emission from a semicircular (toroidal-shaped) magnetic loop containing sausage-mode MHD oscillations. The aim was to detect the observable signatures specific to the considered MHD mode and to study their dependence on the various source parameters. The MHD waves were simulated using a linear three-dimensional model of a magnetized plasma cylinder; both standing and propagating waves were considered. The curved loop was formed by replicating the MHD solutions along the plasma cylinder and bending the cylinder; this model allowed us to study the effect of varying the viewing angle along the loop. The radio emission was simulated using a three-dimensional model, and its spatial and temporal variations were analyzed. We considered several loop orientations and different parameters of the magnetic field, plasma, and energetic electrons in the loop. In the model with low plasma density, the intensity oscillations at all frequencies are synchronous (with the exception of a narrow spectral region below the spectral peak). In the model with high plasma density, the emission at low frequencies (where the Razin effect is important) oscillates in anti-phase with the emissions at higher frequencies. The oscillations at high and low frequencies are more pronounced in different parts of the loop (depending on the loop orientation). The layers where the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field changes sign can produce additional peculiarities in the oscillation patterns.

  11. Detecting Quantum Gravitational Effects of Loop Quantum Cosmology in the Early Universe?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Tao; Wang, Anzhong; Cleaver, Gerald; Kirsten, Klaus; Sheng, Qin; Wu, Qiang

    2015-07-01

    We derive the primordial power spectra and spectral indexes of the density fluctuations and gravitational waves in the framework of loop quantum cosmology (LQC) with holonomy and inverse-volume corrections by using the uniform asymptotic approximation method to its third order, at which the upper error bounds are ≲ 0.15% and accurate enough for the current and forthcoming cosmological observations. Then, using the Planck, BAO, and supernova data, we obtain the tightest constraints on quantum gravitational effects from LQC corrections and find that such effects could be well within the detection of the current and forthcoming cosmological observations.

  12. Proximity effect induced magnetoresistance hysteresis loops in a topological insulator/YIG heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montazeri, Mohammad; Lang, Murong; Onbasli, Mehmet C.; Kou, Xufeng; He, Liang; Ross, Caroline A.; Wang, Kang L.

    2014-03-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the proximity effect induced hysteretic magnetoresistance in an 8 quintuple layers of Bi2Se3 films grown on Gallium Gadolinium Garnet (GGG) (111) substrates with a 50 nm Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) buffer layer by molecular beam epitaxy. With in-plane and out-of-plane magnetic field, square wave shaped and butterfly shaped resistance hysteresis loops can be observed up to 25 K, respectively. The relationship between the hysteretic MR curves and the magnetic switching of the YIG will be discussed in the context of a proximity effect between the YIG and the TI.

  13. A solar tornado triggered by flares?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panesar, N. K.; Innes, D. E.; Tiwari, S. K.; Low, B. C.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Solar tornados are dynamical, conspicuously helical magnetic structures that are mainly observed as a prominence activity. Aims: We investigate and propose a triggering mechanism for the solar tornado observed in a prominence cavity by SDO/AIA on September 25, 2011. Methods: High-cadence EUV images from the SDO/AIA and the Ahead spacecraft of STEREO/EUVI are used to correlate three flares in the neighbouring active-region (NOAA 11303) and their EUV waves with the dynamical developments of the tornado. The timings of the flares and EUV waves observed on-disk in 195 Å are analysed in relation to the tornado activities observed at the limb in 171 Å. Results: Each of the three flares and its related EUV wave occurred within ten hours of the onset of the tornado. They have an observed causal relationship with the commencement of activity in the prominence where the tornado develops. Tornado-like rotations along the side of the prominence start after the second flare. The prominence cavity expands with the accelerating tornado motion after the third flare. Conclusions: Flares in the neighbouring active region may have affected the cavity prominence system and triggered the solar tornado. A plausible mechanism is that the active-region coronal field contracted by the "Hudson effect" through the loss of magnetic energy as flares. Subsequently, the cavity expanded by its magnetic pressure to fill the surrounding low corona. We suggest that the tornado is the dynamical response of the helical prominence field to the cavity expansion. Movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  14. Plasma Sloshing in Pulse-heated Solar and Stellar Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reale, F.

    2016-08-01

    There is evidence that coronal heating is highly intermittent, and flares are the high energy extreme. The properties of the heat pulses are difficult to constrain. Here, hydrodynamic loop modeling shows that several large amplitude oscillations (˜20% in density) are triggered in flare light curves if the duration of the heat pulse is shorter than the sound crossing time of the flaring loop. The reason for this is that the plasma does not have enough time to reach pressure equilibrium during heating, and traveling pressure fronts develop. The period is a few minutes for typical solar coronal loops, dictated by the sound crossing time in the decay phase. The long period and large amplitude make these oscillations different from typical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. This diagnostic can be applied both to observations of solar and stellar flares and to future observations of non-flaring loops at high resolution.

  15. TRANSITION REGION EMISSION FROM SOLAR FLARES DURING THE IMPULSIVE PHASE

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, H.; Raymond, J. C.; Murphy, N. A.; Suleiman, R.; Giordano, S.; Ko, Y.-K.; Ciaravella, A.

    2011-07-10

    There are relatively few observations of UV emission during the impulsive phases of solar flares, so the nature of that emission is poorly known. Photons produced by solar flares can resonantly scatter off atoms and ions in the corona. Based on off-limb measurements by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer, we derive the O VI {lambda}1032 luminosities for 29 flares during the impulsive phase and the Ly{alpha} luminosities of 5 flares, and we compare them with X-ray luminosities from GOES measurements. The upper transition region and lower transition region luminosities of the events observed are comparable. They are also comparable to the luminosity of the X-ray emitting gas at the beginning of the flare, but after 10-15 minutes the X-ray luminosity usually dominates. In some cases, we can use Doppler dimming to estimate flow speeds of the O VI emitting gas, and five events show speeds in the 40-80 km s{sup -1} range. The O VI emission could originate in gas evaporating to fill the X-ray flare loops, in heated chromospheric gas at the footpoints, or in heated prominence material in the coronal mass ejection. All three sources may contribute in different events or even in a single event, and the relative timing of UV and X-ray brightness peaks, the flow speeds, and the total O VI luminosity favor each source in one or more events.

  16. The Origin of the EUV Late Phase: A Case Study of the C8.8 Flare on 2010 May 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hock, R. A.; Woods, T. N.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Eparvier, F. G.; Jones, A. R.

    2012-01-01

    Since the launch of NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory on 2010 February 11, the Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) has observed numerous flares. One interesting feature observed by EVE is that a subset of flares exhibit an additional enhancement of the 2-3 million K emission several hours after the flares soft X-ray emission. From the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) images, we observe that this secondary emission, dubbed the EUV late phase, occurs in the same active region as the flare but not in the same coronal loops. Here, we examine the C8.8 flare that occurred on 2010 May 5 as a case study of EUV late phase flares. In addition to presenting detailed observations from both AIA and EVE, we develop a physical model of this flare and test it using the Enthalpy Based Thermal Evolution of Loops (EBTEL) model.

  17. Valentines Day X2 Flare

    NASA Video Gallery

    Active region 1158 let loose with an X2.2 flare at 0153 UT or 8:50 pm ET on February 15, 2011, the largest flare since Dec. 2006 and the biggest flare so far in Solar Cycle 24. This video was taken...

  18. Microcatheter Looping Facilitates Access to Both the Acutely Angled Parent Artery and Cerebral Aneurysms for Effective Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cong-Hui; Ye, Jian-Ya; Su, Xian-Hui; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Dong-Liang; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Er-Wei; Han, Yong-Feng; Yang, Song-Tao; Gao, Bu-Lang

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aneurysms with an acutely angled parent artery are difficult to access for coiling. This study aimed to investigate the safety and effectiveness of microcatheter looping for embolization of cerebral aneurysms with access difficulty. Ten patients (male:female=5:5) with cerebral aneurysms treated with the microcatheter looping technique were analyzed retrospectively. The parent artery formed an acute angle with the major artery in five aneurysms. The microcatheter was looped into a “α” loop for treatment in the anterior temporal artery aneurysm and a “U” loop in the remaining nine aneurysms. All ten aneurysms were successfully treated with the microcatheter looping technique. The microcatheter tip was successfully navigated into the aneurysm sac and remained stable throughout the embolization process. All aneurysms were occluded with total occlusion in five and near-total occlusion in five, and the parent artery remained patent in all cases. No complications occurred peri-procedurally. The Glasgow Outcome Scale was 5 in all patients before discharge. Follow-up angiography six to 12 months later revealed a good occlusion status of the aneurysms. The microcatheter looping technique is effective when the conventional embolization technique fails to treat cerebral aneurysms with difficult access especially when the parent artery forming an acute angle with the major artery exacerbates difficult access to the aneurysms. PMID:25496676

  19. BATSE Solar Flare Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. A.

    1998-01-01

    This final report describes the progress originally proposed: (1) the continued improvement of a software and database environment capable of supporting all users of BATSE solar data as well as providing scientific expertise and effort to the BATSE solar community; (2) the continued participation with the PI team and other guest investigators in the detailed analysis of the BATSE detectors' response at low energies; (3) using spectroscopic techniques to fully exploit the potential of electron time-of-flight studies; and, (4) a full search for flare gamma-ray line emission at 2.2 MeV from all GOES X-class flares observed with BATSE.

  20. Max 1991: Flare Research at the Next Solar Maximum. Workshop 1: Scientific Objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Richard C.; Dennis, Brian R.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the Max 1991 program is to gather coordinated sets of solar flare and active region data and to perform interpretive and theoretical research aimed at understanding flare energy storage and release, particle acceleration, flare energy transport, and the propagation of flare effects to Earth. The workshop was divided into four areas of concern: energy storage, energy release, particle acceleration, and energy transport.

  1. GAMMA-RAY BURST FLARES: ULTRAVIOLET/OPTICAL FLARING. I

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, C. A.; Roming, P. W. A.; De Pasquale, M.; Oates, S. R.

    2013-09-01

    We present a previously unused method for the detection of flares in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves and use this method to detect flares in the ultraviolet/optical. The algorithm makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion to analyze the residuals of the fitted light curve, removing all major features, and to determine the statistically best fit to the data by iteratively adding additional ''breaks'' to the light curve. These additional breaks represent the individual components of the detected flares: T{sub start}, T{sub stop}, and T{sub peak}. We present the detection of 119 unique flaring periods detected by applying this algorithm to light curves taken from the Second Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) GRB Afterglow Catalog. We analyzed 201 UVOT GRB light curves and found episodes of flaring in 68 of the light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of {approx}2 flares per GRB. Flaring is generally restricted to the first 1000 s of the afterglow, but can be observed and detected beyond 10{sup 5} s. More than 80% of the flares detected are short in duration with {Delta}t/t of <0.5. Flares were observed with flux ratios relative to the underlying light curve of between 0.04 and 55.42. Many of the strongest flares were also seen at greater than 1000 s after the burst.

  2. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope.

    PubMed

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale; Wang, Haimin

    2016-01-01

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere's response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80-200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics. PMID:27071459

  3. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale; Wang, Haimin

    2016-04-01

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere’s response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80–200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics.

  4. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6~m New Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale E.; Wang, Haimin

    2016-05-01

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6~m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere's response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80-200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics.

  5. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope.

    PubMed

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale; Wang, Haimin

    2016-04-13

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere's response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80-200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics.

  6. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale; Wang, Haimin

    2016-01-01

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere’s response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80–200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics. PMID:27071459

  7. One-loop effective potential of the Higgs field on the Schwarzschild background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazinski, P. O.

    2009-12-01

    A one-loop effective potential of the Higgs field on the Schwarzschild background is derived in the framework of a toy model: a SO(N) scalar multiplet interacting with the gauge fields, the SO(N) gauge symmetry being broken by the Higgs mechanism. As expected, the potential depends on the space point and results in a mass shift of all massive particles near a black hole. It is shown that the obtained potential is generally covariant, depends on the space point through the metric component g00 in the adapted coordinates, and has the same form for an arbitrary static, spherically symmetric background. Some properties of this potential are investigated. In particular, if the conformal symmetry holds valid for massless particles on the given background, there exist only two possible scenarios depending on the sign of an arbitrary constant arising from the regularization procedure: the masses of all massive particles grow infinitely, when they approach the black hole horizon, or the gauge symmetry is restored at a finite distance from the horizon and all particles become massless. If the conformal symmetry is spoiled, an additional term in the effective potential appears and the intermediate regime arises. Several normalization conditions fixing the undefined constants are proposed, and estimations for the mass shifts are given in these cases. It should be mentioned that the use of the one-loop approximation becomes questionable in the region where the one-loop effective potential acquires large values. So, in that region, we can believe in the obtained results only to a certain extent.

  8. Non-singular bounce scenarios in loop quantum cosmology and the effective field description

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yi-Fu; Wilson-Ewing, Edward E-mail: wilson-ewing@phys.lsu.edu

    2014-03-01

    A non-singular bouncing cosmology is generically obtained in loop quantum cosmology due to non-perturbative quantum gravity effects. A similar picture can be achieved in standard general relativity in the presence of a scalar field with a non-standard kinetic term such that at high energy densities the field evolves into a ghost condensate and causes a non-singular bounce. During the bouncing phase, the perturbations can be stabilized by introducing a Horndeski operator. Taking the matter content to be a dust field and an ekpyrotic scalar field, we compare the dynamics in loop quantum cosmology and in a non-singular bouncing effective field model with a non-standard kinetic term at both the background and perturbative levels. We find that these two settings share many important properties, including the result that they both generate scale-invariant scalar perturbations. This shows that some quantum gravity effects of the very early universe may be mimicked by effective field models.

  9. Effect of Bending Anisotropy on the 3D Conformation of Short DNA Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzi, Davood; Mohammad-Rafiee, Farshid; Golestanian, Ramin

    2008-10-01

    The equilibrium three dimensional shape of relatively short loops of DNA is studied using an elastic model that takes into account anisotropy in bending rigidities. Using a reasonable estimate for the anisotropy, it is found that cyclized DNA with lengths that are not integer multiples of the pitch take on nontrivial shapes that involve bending out of planes and formation of kinks. The effect of sequence inhomogeneity on the shape of DNA is addressed, and shown to enhance the geometrical features. These findings could shed some light on the role of DNA conformation in protein DNA interactions.

  10. Supermatrix proper-time representation of one-loop effective action and gauge invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Min, H. ); Lee, C. )

    1990-01-15

    Starting from the supermatrix proper-time representation, we construct the gauge-invariant one-loop effective action for generic renormalizable field theories involving spin-0, -1/2, and -1 fields in flat or curved spacetime. In the presence of fermion couplings involving the {gamma}{sub 5} matrix (but the theory having no genuine gauge anomaly), gauge invariance requires that the usual ultraviolet renormalization procedure be supplemented by appropriate finite renormalization terms. The supermatrix method is very convenient for finding the finite renormalization terms associated with vertex functions involving some external fermion legs.

  11. The October 28, 2003 extreme EUV solar flare and resultant extreme ionospheric effects: Comparison to other Halloween events and the Bastille Day event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Judge, D. L.; Guarnieri, F. L.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Jones, A. R.; Nuttall, J.; Zambon, G. A.; Didkovsky, L.; Mannucci, A. J.; Iijima, B.; Meier, R. R.; Immel, T. J.; Woods, T. N.; Prasad, S.; Floyd, L.; Huba, J.; Solomon, S. C.; Straus, P.; Viereck, R.

    2005-01-01

    Some of the most intense solar flares measured in 0.1 to 0.8 nm x-rays in recent history occurred near the end of 2003. The Nov 4 event is the largest in the NOAA records (X28) and the Oct 28 flare was the fourth most intense (X17). The Oct 29 flare was class X7. These flares are compared and contrasted to the July 14, 2000 Bastille Day (X10) event using the SOHO SEM 26.0 to 34.0 nm EUV and TIMED SEE 0.1-194 nm data. High time resolution, ~30s ground-base GPS data and the GUVI FUV dayglow data are used to examine the flare-ionosphere relationship. In the 26.0 to 34.0 nm wavelength range, the Oct 28 flare is found to have a peak intensity greater than twice that of the Nov 4 flare, indicating strong spectral variability from flare-to-flare. Solar absorption of the EUV portion of the Nov 4 limb event is a possible cause. The dayside ionosphere responds dramatically (~2.5 min 1/e rise time) to the x-ray and EUV input by an abrupt increase in total electron content (TEC). The Oct 28 TEC ionospheric peak enhancement at the subsolar point is ~25 TECU (25 × 1012 electrons/cm2) or 30% above background. In comparison, the Nov 4, Oct 29 and the Bastille Day events have ~5-7 TECU peak enhancements above background. The Oct 28 TEC enhancement lasts ~3 hrs, far longer than the flare duration. This latter ionospheric feature is consistent with increased electron production in the middle altitude ionosphere, where recombination rates are low. It is the EUV portion of the flare spectrum that is responsible for photoionization of this region. Further modeling will be necessary to fully understand the detailed physics and chemistry of flare-ionosphere coupling.

  12. Statistical aspects of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1987-01-01

    A survey of the statistical properties of 850 H alpha solar flares during 1975 is presented. Comparison of the results found here with those reported elsewhere for different epochs is accomplished. Distributions of rise time, decay time, and duration are given, as are the mean, mode, median, and 90th percentile values. Proportions by selected groupings are also determined. For flares in general, mean values for rise time, decay time, and duration are 5.2 + or - 0.4 min, and 18.1 + or 1.1 min, respectively. Subflares, accounting for nearly 90 percent of the flares, had mean values lower than those found for flares of H alpha importance greater than 1, and the differences are statistically significant. Likewise, flares of bright and normal relative brightness have mean values of decay time and duration that are significantly longer than those computed for faint flares, and mass-motion related flares are significantly longer than non-mass-motion related flares. Seventy-three percent of the mass-motion related flares are categorized as being a two-ribbon flare and/or being accompanied by a high-speed dark filament. Slow rise time flares (rise time greater than 5 min) have a mean value for duration that is significantly longer than that computed for fast rise time flares, and long-lived duration flares (duration greater than 18 min) have a mean value for rise time that is significantly longer than that computed for short-lived duration flares, suggesting a positive linear relationship between rise time and duration for flares. Monthly occurrence rates for flares in general and by group are found to be linearly related in a positive sense to monthly sunspot number. Statistical testing reveals the association between sunspot number and numbers of flares to be significant at the 95 percent level of confidence, and the t statistic for slope is significant at greater than 99 percent level of confidence. Dependent upon the specific fit, between 58 percent and 94 percent of

  13. Modeling the Effect of Multiple Matrix Cracking Modes on Cyclic Hysteresis Loops of 2D Woven Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the effect of multiple matrix cracking modes on cyclic loading/unloading hysteresis loops of 2D woven ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) has been investigated. The interface slip between fibers and the matrix existed in matrix cracking mode 3 and mode 5, in which matrix cracking and interface debonding occurred in longitudinal yarns, are considered as the major reason for hysteresis loops of 2D woven CMCs. The effects of fiber volume content, peak stress, matrix crack spacing, interface properties, matrix cracking mode proportion and interface wear on interface slip and hysteresis loops have been analyzed. The cyclic loading/unloading hysteresis loops of 2D woven SiC/SiC composite corresponding to different peak stresses have been predicted using the present analysis. It was found that the damage parameter, i.e., the proportion of matrix cracking mode 3 in the entire cracking modes of the composite, increases with increasing peak stress.

  14. X-rays Flares and Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.

    2011-04-01

    X-ray observations of star forming regions show that magnetic reconnection flares are powerful and frequent in pre-main sequence solar-type stars. Well-defined samples in the Orion Nebula Cluster and Taurus clouds exhibit flares with peak X- ray luminosities Lx˜10^29 - 10^32 erg/s, orders of magnitude stronger and more frequent than contemporary solar flares. X-rays are emitted in magnetic loops extending 0.1-10 R * above the stellar surface and thus have a favorable geometry to irradiate the protoplanetary disk. Several lines of evidence - fluorescent iron X-ray emission line, forbidden [NeII] infrared line, and excited molecular bands - support X-ray irradiation of cold material in some young systems. Several astrophysical consequences of X-ray irradiation are outlined. As ionization fractions need only reach 10-12 to induce the magnetorotational instability and associated turbulence, X-rays may be the principal determinant of the extent of the viscous "active zone" and laminar "dead zone" in the layered accretion disk. X-ray irradiation may thus play a major role in planet formation processes: particle settling; meter-size inspiral; protoplanetary migration; and dissipation of the gaseous disk.

  15. Explosive plasma flows in a solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarro, Dominic M.; Canfield, Richard C.; Metcalf, Thomas R.; Strong, Keith T.

    1988-01-01

    Solar Maximum Mission soft X-ray data and Sacramento Peak Observatory H-alpha observations are combined in a study of the impulsive phase of a solar flare. A blue asymmetry, indicative of upflows, was observed in the coronal Ca XIX line during the soft X-ray rise phase. A red asymmetry, indicative of downflows, was observed simultaneously in chromospheric H-alpha emitted from bright flare kernels during the period of hard X-ray emission. Combining the velocity data with a measurement of coronal electron density, it is shown that the impulsive phase momentum of upflowing soft X-ray-emitting plasma equalled that of the downflowing H-alpha-emitting plasma to within one order of magnitude. In particular, the momentum of the upflowing plasma was 2 x 10 to the 21st g cm/s while that of the downflowing plasma was 7 x 10 to the 21st g cm/s, with a factor of 2 uncertainty on each value. This equality supports the explosive chromospheric evaporation model of solar flares, in which a sudden pressure increase at the footprint of a coronal loop produces oppositely directed flows in the heated plasma.

  16. Plasma Loops in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, R. J.; Cram, L. E.; Durrant, C.; Loughhead, R. E.

    1991-07-01

    A comprehensive account of the properties of plasma loops, the fundamental structural elements of the solar corona. Plasma loops cover a wide range of sizes and range in temperature from tens of thousands to millions of degrees. They not only define the structure of individual active regions but connect different active regions--even across the solar equator. Loops also play an integral and decisive role in the enormous solar explosions called flares. Over recent years a wealth of space and ground-based observations of loops has been obtained in various widely-spaced regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. In this book the authors have selected the best observational material from the literature on which to base a detailed account of the properties of flare and non-flare loops. The book also explores the larger implications of the loop structures for our understanding of solar and stellar coronae. The text is enhanced by a large number of illustrations and unique and beautiful photographs obtained from the ground and from space.

  17. Electron beams in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Dennis, Brian R.; Benz, Arnold O.

    1994-01-01

    A list of publications resulting from this program includes 'The Timing of Electron Beam Signatures in Hard X-Ray and Radio: Solar Flare Observations by BATSE/Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory and PHOENIX'; 'Coherent-Phase or Random-Phase Acceleration of Electron Beams in Solar Flares'; 'Particle Acceleration in Flares'; 'Chromospheric Evaporation and Decimetric Radio Emission in Solar Flares'; 'Sequences of Correlated Hard X-Ray and Type 3 Bursts During Solar Flares'; and 'Solar Electron Beams Detected in Hard X-Rays and Radiowaves.' Abstracts and reprints of each are attached to this report.

  18. Infrared divergences and harmonic anomalies in the two-loop superstring effective action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pioline, Boris; Russo, Rodolfo

    2015-12-01

    We analyze the pertubative contributions to the {D}^4{R}^4 and {D}^6{R}^4 couplings in the low-energy effective action of type II string theory compactified on a torus T d , with particular emphasis on two-loop corrections. In general, it is necessary to introduce an infrared cut-off Λ to separate local interactions from non-local effects due to the exchange of massless states. We identify the degenerations of the genus-two Riemann surface which are responsible for power-like dependence on Λ, and give an explicit prescription for extracting the Λ-independent effective couplings. These renormalized couplings are then shown to be eigenmodes of the Laplace operator with respect to the torus moduli, up to computable anomalous source terms arising in the presence of logarithmic divergences, in precise agreement with predictions from U-duality. Our results for the two-loop {D}^6{R}^4 contribution also probe essential properties of the Kawazumi-Zhang invariant.

  19. Active Region Emergence and Remote Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yixing; Welsch, Brian T.

    2016-02-01

    We study the effect of new emerging solar active regions on the large-scale magnetic environment of existing regions. We first present a theoretical approach to quantify the "interaction energy" between new and pre-existing regions as the difference between i) the summed magnetic energies of their individual potential fields and ii) the energy of their superposed potential fields. We expect that this interaction energy can, depending upon the relative arrangements of newly emerged and pre-existing magnetic flux, indicate the existence of "topological" free magnetic energy in the global coronal field that is independent of any "internal" free magnetic energy due to coronal electric currents flowing within the newly emerged and pre-existing flux systems. We then examine the interaction energy in two well-studied cases of flux emergence, but find that the predicted energetic perturbation is relatively small compared to energies released in large solar flares. Next, we present an observational study of the influence of the emergence of new active regions on flare statistics in pre-existing active regions, using NOAA's Solar Region Summary and GOES flare databases. As part of an effort to precisely determine the emergence time of active regions in a large event sample, we find that emergence in about half of these regions exhibits a two-stage behavior, with an initial gradual phase followed by a more rapid phase. Regarding flaring, we find that the emergence of new regions is associated with a significant increase in the occurrence rate of X- and M-class flares in pre-existing regions. This effect tends to be more significant when pre-existing and new emerging active regions are closer. Given the relative weakness of the interaction energy, this effect suggests that perturbations in the large-scale magnetic field, such as topology changes invoked in the "breakout" model of coronal mass ejections, might play a significant role in the occurrence of some flares.

  20. Data Set of Flare-Ribbon Reconnected Magnetic Fluxes: A Critical Tool for Understanding Solar Flares and Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazachenko, M.; Lynch, B. J.; Welsch, B. T.

    2015-12-01

    Flare ribbons are emission structures that are frequently observed during flares in transition-region and chromospheric radiation. These typically straddle a polarity inversion line (PIL) of the radial magnetic field at the photosphere, and move apart as the flare progresses. The ribbon flux - the amount of unsigned photospheric magnetic flux swept out by flare ribbons - is thought to be related to the amount coronal magnetic reconnection, and hence provides a key diagnostic tool for understanding the physical processes at work in flares and CMEs. Previous measurements of the magnetic flux swept out by flare ribbons required time-consuming co-alignment between magnetograph and intensity data from different instruments, explaining why those studies only analyzed, at most, a few events. The launch of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), both aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), presented a rare opportunity to compile a much larger sample of flare-ribbon events than could readily be assembled before. We created a dataset of 141 events of both flare ribbon positions and fluxes, as a function of time, for all C9.-class and greater flares within 45 degrees of disk center observed by SDO from January 2013 till April 2015. For this purpose, we used vector magnetograms (2D magnetic field maps) from HMI and UV images from AIA. A critical problem with using unprocessed AIA data is the existence of spurious intensities in AIA data associated with strong flare emission, most notably "blooming" (spurious smearing of saturated signal into neighboring pixels, often in streaks). To overcome this difficulty, we have developed an algorithmic procedure that effectively excludes artifacts like blooming. We present our database and compare statistical properties of flare ribbons, e.g. evolutions of ribbon reconnection fluxes and reconnection flux rates, with the properties from theoretical models.

  1. OBSERVATIONS OF THE MAGNETIC RECONNECTION SIGNATURE OF AN M2 FLARE ON 2000 MARCH 23

    SciTech Connect

    Li Leping; Zhang Jun E-mail: zjun@ourstar.bao.ac.c

    2009-09-20

    Multiwavelength observations of an M 2.0 flare event on 2000 March 23 in the NOAA active region 8910 provide us a good chance to study the detailed structure and dynamics of the magnetic reconnection region. In the process of the flare, extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) loops displayed two types of sideward motions upon a loop-top hard X-ray source with average velocities of 75 and 25.6 km s{sup -1}, respectively. Meanwhile, a part of the loops disappeared and new post-flare loops formed. We consider these two motions to be the observational evidence of reconnection inflow, and find an X-shaped structure upon the post-flare loops during the period of the second motion. Two separations of the flare ribbons are associated with these two sideward motions, with average velocities of 3.3 and 1.3 km s{sup -1}, respectively. The sideward motions of the EUV loops and the separations of the flare ribbons are temporally consistent with two peaks of the X-ray flux. This indicates that there are two types of magnetic reconnection in the process of the flare. Using the observation of photospheric magnetic field, the velocities of the sideward motions, and the separations, we deduce the corresponding coronal magnetic field strength to be about 13.2-15.2 G, and estimate the reconnection rates to be 0.05 and 0.02 for these two magnetic reconnection processes, respectively. Besides the sideward motions of EUV loops and the separations of flare ribbons, we also observe motions of bright points upward and downward along the EUV loops with velocities ranging from 45.4 to 556.7 km s{sup -1}, which are thought to be the plasmoids accelerated in the current sheet and ejected upward and downward when magnetic reconnection occurs and energy releases. A cloud of bright material flowing outward from the loop-top hard X-ray source with an average velocity of 51 km s{sup -1} in the process of the flare may be accelerated by the tension force of the newly reconnected magnetic field lines. All the

  2. Differential emission measure analysis of a limb solar flare on 2012 July 19

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J. Q.; Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D. E-mail: xincheng@nju.edu.cn

    2014-05-01

    We perform Differential Emission Measure (DEM) analysis of an M7.7 flare that occurred on 2012 July 19 and was well observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory. Using the observational data with unprecedented high temporal and spatial resolution from six AIA coronal passbands, we calculate the DEM of the flare and derive the time series of maps of DEM-weighted temperature and emission measure (EM). It is found that, during the flare, the highest EM region is located in the flare loop top with a value varying between ∼8.4 × 10{sup 28} cm{sup –5} and ∼2.5 × 10{sup 30} cm{sup –5}. The temperature there rises from ∼8 MK at about 04:40 UT (the initial rise phase) to a maximum value of ∼13 MK at about 05:20 UT (the hard X-ray peak). Moreover, we find a hot region that is above the flare loop top with a temperature even up to ∼16 MK. We also analyze the DEM properties of the reconnection site. The temperature and density there are not as high as that in the loop top and the flux rope, indicating that the main heating may not take place inside the reconnection site. In the end, we examine the dynamic behavior of the flare loops. Along the flare loop, both the temperature and the EM are the highest in the loop top and gradually decrease toward the footpoints. In the northern footpoint, an upward force appears with a biggest value in the impulsive phase, which we conjecture originates from chromospheric evaporation.

  3. ON THE ORIGIN OF THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET LATE PHASE OF SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Kai; Wang Yuming; Zhang Jie; Cheng Xin

    2013-05-10

    Solar flares typically have an impulsive phase that is followed by a gradual phase as best seen in soft X-ray emissions. A recent discovery based on the EUV Variability Experiment observations on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) reveals that some flares exhibit a second large peak separated from the first main phase peak by tens of minutes to hours, which is coined as the flare's EUV late phase. In this paper, we address the origin of the EUV late phase by analyzing in detail two late phase flares, an M2.9 flare on 2010 October 16 and an M1.4 flare on 2011 February 18, using multi-passband imaging observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board SDO. We find that (1) the late phase emission originates from a different magnetic loop system, which is much larger and higher than the main phase loop system. (2) The two loop systems have different thermal evolution. While the late phase loop arcade reaches its peak brightness progressively at a later time spanning for more than one hour from high to low temperatures, the main phase loop arcade reaches its peak brightness at almost the same time (within several minutes) in all temperatures. (3) Nevertheless, the two loop systems seem to be connected magnetically, forming an asymmetric magnetic quadruple configuration. (4) Further, the footpoint brightenings in UV wavelengths show a systematic delay of about one minute from the main flare region to the remote footpoint of the late phase arcade system. We argue that the EUV late phase is the result of a long-lasting cooling process in the larger magnetic arcade system.

  4. Plasma Heating in Solar Flares and their Soft and Hard X-Ray Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falewicz, R.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, the energy budgets of two single-loop-like flares observed in X-ray are analyzed under the assumption that nonthermal electrons (NTEs) are the only source of plasma heating during all phases of both events. The flares were observed by RHESSI and GOES on 2002 February 20 and June 2, respectively. Using a one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic code for both flares, the energy deposited in the chromosphere was derived applying RHESSI observational data. The use of the Fokker-Planck formalism permits the calculation of distributions of the NTEs in flaring loops and thus spatial distributions of the X-ray nonthermal emissions and integral fluxes for the selected energy ranges that were compared with the observed ones. Additionally, a comparative analysis of the spatial distributions of the signals in the RHESSI images was conducted for the footpoints and for all the flare loops in selected energy ranges with these quantities' fluxes obtained from the models. The best compatibility of the model and observations was obtained for the 2002 June 2 event in the 0.5-4 Å GOES range and total fluxes in the 6-12 keV, 12-25 keV, 20-25 keV, and 50-100 keV energy bands. Results of photometry of the individual flaring structures in a high energy range show that the best compliance occurred for the 2002 June 2 flare, where the synthesized emissions were at least 30% higher than the observed emissions. For the 2002 February 20 flare, synthesized emission is about four times lower than the observed one. However, in the low energy range the best conformity was obtained for the 2002 February 20 flare, where emission from the model is about 11% lower than the observed one. The larger inconsistency occurs for the 2002 June 2 solar flare, where synthesized emission is about 12 times greater or even more than the observed emission. Some part of these differences may be caused by inevitable flaws of the applied methodology, like by an assumption that the model of the flare is

  5. Plasma heating in solar flares and their soft and hard X-ray emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Falewicz, R.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, the energy budgets of two single-loop-like flares observed in X-ray are analyzed under the assumption that nonthermal electrons (NTEs) are the only source of plasma heating during all phases of both events. The flares were observed by RHESSI and GOES on 2002 February 20 and June 2, respectively. Using a one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic code for both flares, the energy deposited in the chromosphere was derived applying RHESSI observational data. The use of the Fokker-Planck formalism permits the calculation of distributions of the NTEs in flaring loops and thus spatial distributions of the X-ray nonthermal emissions and integral fluxes for the selected energy ranges that were compared with the observed ones. Additionally, a comparative analysis of the spatial distributions of the signals in the RHESSI images was conducted for the footpoints and for all the flare loops in selected energy ranges with these quantities' fluxes obtained from the models. The best compatibility of the model and observations was obtained for the 2002 June 2 event in the 0.5-4 Å GOES range and total fluxes in the 6-12 keV, 12-25 keV, 20-25 keV, and 50-100 keV energy bands. Results of photometry of the individual flaring structures in a high energy range show that the best compliance occurred for the 2002 June 2 flare, where the synthesized emissions were at least 30% higher than the observed emissions. For the 2002 February 20 flare, synthesized emission is about four times lower than the observed one. However, in the low energy range the best conformity was obtained for the 2002 February 20 flare, where emission from the model is about 11% lower than the observed one. The larger inconsistency occurs for the 2002 June 2 solar flare, where synthesized emission is about 12 times greater or even more than the observed emission. Some part of these differences may be caused by inevitable flaws of the applied methodology, like by an assumption that the model of the flare is

  6. Gamma-ray burst flares: X-ray flaring. II

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, C. A.; Roming, P. W. A.

    2014-06-10

    We present a catalog of 498 flaring periods found in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves taken from the online Swift X-Ray Telescope GRB Catalogue. We analyzed 680 individual light curves using a flare detection method developed and used on our UV/optical GRB Flare Catalog. This method makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion to analyze the residuals of fitted GRB light curves and statistically determines the optimal fit to the light curve residuals in an attempt to identify any additional features. These features, which we classify as flares, are identified by iteratively adding additional 'breaks' to the light curve. We find evidence of flaring in 326 of the analyzed light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of ∼1.5 flares per GRB. As with the UV/optical, flaring in our sample is generally confined to the first 1000 s of the afterglow, but can be detected to beyond 10{sup 5} s. Only ∼50% of the detected flares follow the 'classical' definition of Δt/t ≤ 0.5, with many of the largest flares exceeding this value.

  7. The one-loop matter bispectrum in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Angulo, Raul E.; Foreman, Simon; Schmittfull, Marcel; Senatore, Leonardo

    2015-10-14

    With this study, given the importance of future large scale structure surveys for delivering new cosmological information, it is crucial to reliably predict their observables. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a manifestly convergent perturbative scheme to compute the clustering of dark matter in the weakly nonlinear regime in an expansion in k/kNL, where k is the wavenumber of interest and kNL is the wavenumber associated to the nonlinear scale. It has been recently shown that the EFTofLSS matches to 1% level the dark matter power spectrum at redshift zero up to k ≃ 0.3 hmore » Mpc–1 and k ≃ 0.6 h Mpc–1 at one and two loops respectively, using only one counterterm that is fit to data. Similar results have been obtained for the momentum power spectrum at one loop. This is a remarkable improvement with respect to former analytical techniques. Here we study the prediction for the equal-time dark matter bispectrum at one loop. We find that at this order it is sufficient to consider the same counterterm that was measured in the power spectrum. Without any remaining free parameter, and in a cosmology for which kNL is smaller than in the previously considered cases (σ8=0.9), we find that the prediction from the EFTofLSS agrees very well with N-body simulations up to k ≃ 0.25 h Mpc–1, given the accuracy of the measurements, which is of order a few percent at the highest k's of interest. While the fit is very good on average up to k ≃ 0.25 h Mpc–1, the fit performs slightly worse on equilateral configurations, in agreement with expectations that for a given maximum k, equilateral triangles are the most nonlinear.« less

  8. Do All Candle-Flame-Shaped Flares Have the Same Temperature Distribution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Tingyu; Liu, Rui; Wang, Yuming

    2015-08-01

    We performed a differential emission measure (DEM) analysis of candle-flame-shaped flares observed with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory. The DEM profile of flaring plasmas generally exhibits a double peak distribution in temperature, with a cold component around log T≈6.2 and a hot component around log T≈7.0. Attributing the cold component mainly to the coronal background, we propose a mean temperature weighted by the hot DEM component as a better representation of flaring plasma than the conventionally defined mean temperature, which is weighted by the whole DEM profile. Based on this corrected mean temperature, the majority of the flares studied, including a confined flare with a double candle-flame shape sharing the same cusp-shaped structure, resemble the famous Tsuneta flare in temperature distribution, i.e., the cusp-shaped structure has systematically higher temperatures than the rounded flare arcade underneath. However, the M7.7 flare on 19 July 2012 poses a very intriguing violation of this paradigm: the temperature decreases with altitude from the tip of the cusp toward the top of the arcade; the hottest region is slightly above the X-ray loop-top source that is co-spatial with the emission-measure-enhanced region at the top of the arcade. This signifies that a different heating mechanism from the slow-mode shocks attached to the reconnection site operates in the cusp region during the flare decay phase.

  9. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF SOLAR FLARES WITH A CONSTRAINED PEAK X-RAY FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, Trevor A.; Testa, Paola; Reeves, Katharine K.

    2013-06-20

    We present an analysis of soft X-ray (SXR) and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) observations of solar flares with an approximate C8 Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) class. Our constraint on peak GOES SXR flux allows for the investigation of correlations between various flare parameters. We show that the duration of the decay phase of a flare is proportional to the duration of its rise phase. Additionally, we show significant correlations between the radiation emitted in the flare rise and decay phases. These results suggest that the total radiated energy of a given flare is proportional to the energy radiated during the rise phase alone. This partitioning of radiated energy between the rise and decay phases is observed in both SXR and EUV wavelengths. Though observations from the EUV Variability Experiment show significant variation in the behavior of individual EUV spectral lines during different C8 events, this work suggests that broadband EUV emission is well constrained. Furthermore, GOES and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly data allow us to determine several thermal parameters (e.g., temperature, volume, density, and emission measure) for the flares within our sample. Analysis of these parameters demonstrate that, within this constrained GOES class, the longer duration solar flares are cooler events with larger volumes capable of emitting vast amounts of radiation. The shortest C8 flares are typically the hottest events, smaller in physical size, and have lower associated total energies. These relationships are directly comparable with several scaling laws and flare loop models.

  10. Signatures of Accelerated Electrons in Solar and Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, Arnold O.

    2015-08-01

    Flares energize electrons (and ions) to supra-thermal energies. In most cases the final distribution in momentum or energy space is non-Maxwellian. The non-thermal part of the energy can be the source for various emissions, including hard X-rays, synchrotron radiation and coherent radio emission. Such non-thermal emissions may contain information on the acceleration process. Several acceleration scenarios have been proposed: electric DC field, stochastic, and shock acceleration. There is observational evidence for all three scenarios. The new data come from SDO, X-ray (RHESSI), radio observations (Nobeyama, VLA and e-Callisto). Solar energetic particles are an additional channel of information.Tiny solar microflares and huge stellar flares in binary systems (RS CVns) and dMe dwarfs differ by more than 10 orders of magnitude in released energy. Yet the relation between peak luminosity in thermal (soft) X-ray and non-thermal synchrotron (radio) emission is surprisingly constant. This observational fact indicates that flare acceleration scales with energy release over a large range. Electron acceleration in flares seems to be a universal process. The constraint on simultaneous thermal X-rays and non-thermal (radio) synchrotron emission seems to select on particular kind of flare. In this subset, there seems to be only one type of acceleration.Yet, small deviations are noted: Small solar flares are softer in hard X-rays. Solar nanoflares are relatively weak in synchrotron emission. The recently noted case of radio-poor preflares will also be presented. The deviations suggest that the acceleration is less efficient in small flares and in the early phase of flares. Larger deviations are reported occasionally for solar flares and more often from stellar flares, where either thermal or non-thermal emission seems to be missing completely.The location of the acceleration in solar flares remains disputed. Observations suggesting acceleration in the soft X-ray top-tops, above

  11. Effects of External EGR Loop on Cycle-to-Cycle Dynamics of Dilute SI Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Brian C; Finney, Charles; Wagner, Robert; Edwards, Michelle L

    2014-01-01

    Operation of spark-ignition (SI) engines with high levels of charge dilution through exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) achieves significant efficiency gains while maintaining stoichiometric operation for compatibility with three-way catalysts. Dilution levels, however, are limited by cyclic variability including significant numbers of misfires that becomes significant with increasing dilution. This variability has been shown to have both stochastic and deterministic components. Stochastic effects include turbulence, mixing variations, and the like, while the deterministic effect is primarily due to the nonlinear dependence of flame propagation rates and ignition characteristics on the charge composition, which is influenced by the composition of residual gases from prior cycles. The dynamics of operation with an external EGR loop differ substantially from those of dilute operation without external recirculation, both in time-scale and cylinder synchronization effects, especially when misfires are encountered. This paper examines these differences and the implications for prior-cycle-based control strategies.

  12. Over-and-Out Coronal Mass Ejections: Blowouts of Magnetic Arches by Ejective Flares in One Foot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2006-01-01

    Streamer puffs from compact ejective flares in the foot of an outer loop of the magnetic arcade under a streamer were recently identified as a new variety of coronal mass ejection (CME) (Bemporad, Sterling, Moore, & Poletto 2006, ApJ Letters, in press). In the reported examples, the compact flares produced only weak to moderate soft X-ray bursts having peak intensities no stronger than GOES class C3. Here, we present two examples of this type of CME in which the compact flare in the flank of the steamer base is much stronger (one M-class, the other X-class in GOES X-rays) and the resulting streamer puff is wider and brighter than in the discovery examples. Coronal dimming observed in SOHOBIT Fe XII images in the launching of each of these two CMEs M e r supports the view that these CMEs are produced by a high loop of the steamer arcade being blown out by magnetoplasma ejecta exploding up the leg of the loop from the flare. In addition, we present evidence that this same type of CME occurs on larger scales than in the above examples. We examine a sequence of flare eruptions seated on the north side of AR 8210 as it rotated across the southern hemisphere in late April and early May 1998. Each flare occurs in synchrony with the launching of a large CME centered on the equator. Coronal dimming in EIT Fe XII images shows the trans-equatorial footprints of these CMEs extending north from the flare site. The set of flare-with-CME events includes the trans-equatorial loop eruptions reported by Khan & Hudson (1998, GRL, 27, 1083). Our observations indicate that these CMEs were not driven by the self-eruption of the transequatorial loops, but that these loops were part of a trans-equatorial magnetic arch that was blown open by ejecta from the flares on the north side of AR 8210. Thus, a relatively compact ejective flare can be the driver of a CME that is much larger in lateral extent than the flare and is laterally far offset from the flare. It has previously been thought

  13. Modeling Flare Hard X-ray Emission from Electrons in Contracting Magnetic Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidoni, Silvina E.; Allred, Joel C.; Alaoui, Meriem; Holman, Gordon D.; DeVore, C. Richard; Karpen, Judith T.

    2016-05-01

    The mechanism that accelerates particles to the energies required to produce the observed impulsive hard X-ray emission in solar flares is not well understood. It is generally accepted that this emission is produced by a non-thermal beam of electrons that collides with the ambient ions as the beam propagates from the top of a flare loop to its footpoints. Most current models that investigate this transport assume an injected beam with an initial energy spectrum inferred from observed hard X-ray spectra, usually a power law with a low-energy cutoff. In our previous work (Guidoni et al. 2016), we proposed an analytical method to estimate particle energy gain in contracting, large-scale, 2.5-dimensional magnetic islands, based on a kinetic model by Drake et al. (2010). We applied this method to sunward-moving islands formed high in the corona during fast reconnection in a simulated eruptive flare. The overarching purpose of the present work is to test this proposed acceleration model by estimating the hard X-ray flux resulting from its predicted accelerated-particle distribution functions. To do so, we have coupled our model to a unified computational framework that simulates the propagation of an injected beam as it deposits energy and momentum along its way (Allred et al. 2015). This framework includes the effects of radiative transfer and return currents, necessary to estimate flare emission that can be compared directly to observations. We will present preliminary results of the coupling between these models.

  14. The Physical Processes of Eruptive Flares Revealed By An Extremely-Long-Duration Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Zhou, Zhenjun

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we report the physical processes of eruptive flares inferred from an extremely- long-duration event occurred on June 21, 2011. The flare, peaked at C7.7 level, had a two-hour-long rise time in soft X-rays emission; this rise time is much longer than the typical rise time of solar flares that last for only about ten minutes. Combining the fact that the flare occurred near the disk center as seen by SDO, but near the limbs as seen by STEREO A and B, we are able to track the evolution of the eruption in 3-D as well as in a rare slow-motion manner. The time sequence of temperature maps, constructed from six corona-temperature passbands of AIA, clearly shows process of how the highly-twisted sigmoid structure prior to the eruption is transformed into a near-potential post-eruption loop arcade. The observed sigmoid is likely to be the structure of a twisted magnetic flux rope, which reached a height of about 60 Mm at the onset of the eruption. The onset is likely triggered by the torus instability (or loss of equilibrium) of the flux rope as indicated by the slow rise motion prior to the impulsive phase. We also find that the complex evolution of footprints of the eruption as seen from AIA transition region images is consistent with the magnetic evolution in the corona, which is the consequence of the combined effects of the expansion of the magnetic flux rope and the magnetic reconnection of surrounding magnetic fields.

  15. Coronal extension of the MURaM radiative MHD code: From quiet sun to flare simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempel, Matthias D.; Cheung, Mark

    2016-05-01

    We present a new version of the MURaM radiative MHD code, which includes a treatment of the solar corona in terms of MHD, optically thin radiative loss and field-aligned heat conduction. In order to relax the severe time-step constraints imposed by large Alfven velocities and heat conduction we use a combination of semi-relativistic MHD with reduced speed of light ("Boris correction") and a hyperbolic formulation of heat conduction. We apply the numerical setup to 4 different setups including a mixed polarity quiet sun, an open flux region, an arcade solution and an active region setup and find all cases an amount of coronal heating sufficient to maintain a corona with temperatures from 1 MK (quiet sun) to 2 MK (active region, arcade). In all our setups the Poynting flux is self-consistently created by photospheric and sub-photospheric magneto-convection in the lower part of our simulation domain. Varying the maximum allowed Alfven velocity ("reduced speed of light") leads to only minor changes in the coronal structure as long as the limited Alfven velocity remains larger than the speed of sound and about 1.5-3 times larger than the peak advection velocity. We also found that varying details of the numerical diffusivities that govern the resistive and viscous energy dissipation do not strongly affect the overall coronal heating, but the ratio of resistive and viscous energy dependence is strongly dependent on the effective numerical magnetic Prandtl number. We use our active region setup in order to simulate a flare triggered by the emergence of a twisted flux rope into a pre-existing bipolar active region. Our simulation yields a series of flares, with the strongest one reaching GOES M1 class. The simulation reproduces many observed properties of eruptions such as flare ribbons, post flare loops and a sunquake.

  16. Detection of the Acceleration Site in a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Kontar, E. P.; Nita, G. M.; Gary, D. E.

    2011-05-01

    We report the observation of an unusual cold, tenuous solar flare (ApJL, v. 731, p. L19, 2011), which reveals itself via numerous and prominent non-thermal manifestations, while lacking any noticeable thermal emission signature. RHESSI hard X-rays and 0.1-18 GHz radio data from OVSA and Phoenix-2 show copious electron acceleration (1035 electrons per second above 10 keV) typical for GOES M-class flares with electrons energies up to 100 keV, but GOES temperatures not exceeding 6.1 MK. The HXR footpoints and coronal radio sources belong, supposedly, to a single magnetic loop, which departs strongly from the corresponding potential loop (obtained from a photospheric extrapolation) in agreement with the apparent need of a non-potential magnetic field structure to produce a flare. The imaging, temporal, and spectral characteristics of the flare have led us to a firm conclusion that the bulk of the microwave continuum emission from this flare was produced directly in the acceleration region. We found that the electron acceleration efficiency is very high in the flare, so almost all available thermal electrons are eventually accelerated. However, given a relatively small flaring volume and rather low thermal density at the flaring loop, the total energy release turned out to be insufficient for a significant heating of the coronal plasma or for a prominent chromospheric response giving rise to chromospheric evaporation. Some sort of stochastic acceleration process is needed to account for an approximately energy-independent lifetime of about 3 s for the electrons in the acceleration region. This work was supported in part by NSF grants AGS-0961867, AST-0908344, and NASA grants NNX10AF27G and NNX11AB49G to New Jersey Institute of Technology. This work was supported by a UK STFC rolling grant, STFC/PPARC Advanced Fellowship, and the Leverhulme Trust, UK. Financial support by the European Commission through the SOLAIRE and HESPE Networks is gratefully acknowledged.

  17. RHESSI and Trace Observations of the 21 April 2002 X1.5 Flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Peter T.; Dennis, Brian R.; Krucker, Saem; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, A. Kimberly

    2002-01-01

    Observations of the X1.5 flare on 21 April 2002 are reviewed using the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE). The major findings are as follows: 1. The 3-25 keV X-rays started 54 mins before the EUV (195 A) emission suggesting that the initial energy release heated plasma directly to 220 MK, well above the 1.6 MK needed to produce the Fe XII (195 A) line. 2. Using coaligned 12-25 keV RHESSI and TRACE images, further evidence is found for the existence of hot (15-20 MK) plasma in the 195 A passband. This hot, diffuse emission is attributed to the presence of the Fe XXIV (192 A) line within the TRACE 195 A passband. 3. The 12-25 keV source centroid moves away from the limb with an apparent velocity of approx. 9.9 km/ s, slowing to approx. 1.7 km/ s after 3 hours, its find altitude being approx. 120 Mm after approx. 12 hours. This suggests that the energy release site moves to higher altitudes in agreement with classical flare models. 4. The 50-100 keV emission correlates well with EUV flare ribbons, suggesting thick-target interactions at the footpoints of the magnetic arcade. The 50-100 keV time profile matches the time derivative of the GOES light curve (Neupert effect), which suggests that the same electrons that produced the thick-target hard X-ray emission also heat the plasma seen in soft X-rays. 5. X-ray footpoint emission has an E(sup -3) spectrum down to approx. 10 keV suggesting a lower electron cutoff energy than previously thought. 6. The hard X-ray (25-200 keV) peaks have FWHM durations of approx. 1 min suggesting a more gradual energy release process than expected. 7. The TRACE images reveal a bright symmetric front propagating away from the main flare site at speeds of greater than or = 120 km/ s. This may be associated with fast CME observed several minutes later by LASCO. 8. Dark sinuous lanes are observed in the TRACE images that extend almost radially from the post-flare loop

  18. {theta} parameter in loop quantum gravity: Effects on quantum geometry and black hole entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Rezende, Danilo Jimenez; Perez, Alejandro

    2008-10-15

    The precise analog of the {theta}-quantization ambiguity of Yang-Mills theory exists for the real SU(2) connection formulation of general relativity. As in the former case {theta} labels representations of large gauge transformations, which are superselection sectors in loop quantum gravity. We show that unless {theta}=0, the (kinematical) geometric operators such as area and volume are not well defined on spin network states. More precisely the intersection of their domain with the dense set Cyl in the kinematical Hilbert space H of loop quantum gravity is empty. The absence of a well-defined notion of area operator acting on spin network states seems at first in conflict with the expected finite black hole entropy. However, we show that the black hole (isolated) horizon area--which in contrast to kinematical area is a (Dirac) physical observable--is indeed well defined, and quantized so that the black hole entropy is proportional to the area. The effect of {theta} is negligible in the semiclassical limit where proportionality to area holds.

  19. Ferroelectric-like hysteresis loop originated from non-ferroelectric effects

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Bora; Seol, Daehee; Lee, Shinbuhm; Lee, Ho Nyung; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-09-06

    Piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) has provided advanced nanoscale understanding and analysis of ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties. In PFM-based studies, electromechanical strain induced by the converse piezoelectric effect is probed and analyzed as a PFM response. However, electromechanical strain can also arise from several non-piezoelectric origins that may lead to a misinterpretation of the observed response. Among them, electrostatic interaction can significantly affect the PFM response. Nonetheless, previous studies explored solely the influence of electrostatic interaction on the PFM response under the situation accompanied with polarization switching. Here, we show the influence of the electrostatic interaction in the absence of polarizationmore » switching by using unipolar voltage sweep. The obtained results reveal that the electromechanical neutralization between piezoresponse of polarization and electrostatic interaction plays a crucial role in the observed ferroelectric-like hysteresis loop despite the absence of polarization switching. Furthermore, our work can provide a basic guideline for the correct interpretation of the hysteresis loop in PFM-based studies.« less

  20. Ferroelectric-like hysteresis loop originated from non-ferroelectric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bora; Seol, Daehee; Lee, Shinbuhm; Lee, Ho Nyung; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-09-01

    Piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) has provided advanced nanoscale understanding and analysis of ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties. In PFM-based studies, electromechanical strain induced by the converse piezoelectric effect is probed and analyzed as a PFM response. However, electromechanical strain can also arise from several non-piezoelectric origins that may lead to a misinterpretation of the observed response. Among them, electrostatic interaction can significantly affect the PFM response. Nonetheless, previous studies explored solely the influence of electrostatic interaction on the PFM response under the situation accompanied with polarization switching. Here, we show the influence of the electrostatic interaction in the absence of polarization switching by using unipolar voltage sweep. The obtained results reveal that the electromechanical neutralization between piezoresponse of polarization and electrostatic interaction plays a crucial role in the observed ferroelectric-like hysteresis loop despite the absence of polarization switching. Thus, our work can provide a basic guideline for the correct interpretation of the hysteresis loop in PFM-based studies.

  1. Soft X-Ray Pulsations in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simões, P. J. A.; Hudson, H. S.; Fletcher, L.

    2015-12-01

    The soft X-ray emissions ( hν>1.5 keV) of solar flares mainly come from the bright coronal loops at the highest temperatures normally achieved in the flare process. Their ubiquity has led to their use as a standard measure of flare occurrence and energy, although the overwhelming bulk of the total flare energy goes elsewhere. Recently Dolla et al. ( Astrophys. J. Lett. 749, L16, 2012) noted quasi-periodic pulsations (QPP) in the soft X-ray signature of the X-class flare SOL2011-02-15, as observed by the standard photometric data from the GOES ( Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) spacecraft. In this article we analyse the suitability of the GOES data for this type of analysis and find them to be generally valuable after September, 2010 (GOES-15). We then extend the result of Dolla et al. to a complete list of X-class flares from Cycle 24 and show that most of them (80 %) display QPPs in the impulsive phase. The pulsations show up cleanly in both channels of the GOES data, making use of time-series of irradiance differences (the digital time derivative on the 2-s sampling). We deploy different techniques to characterise the periodicity of GOES pulsations, considering the red-noise properties of the flare signals, finding a range of characteristic time scales of the QPPs for each event, but usually with no strong signature of a single period dominating in the power spectrum. The QPP may also appear on somewhat longer time scales during the later gradual phase, possibly with a greater tendency towards coherence, but the sampling noise in GOES difference data for high irradiance values (X-class flares) makes these more uncertain. We show that there is minimal phase difference between the differenced GOES energy channels, or between them and the hard X-ray variations on short time scales. During the impulsive phase, the footpoints of the newly forming flare loops may also contribute to the observed soft X-ray variations.

  2. Loop for the observation of film temperature effects on decomposition (LOFTED)

    SciTech Connect

    Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Kolb, William J.; Briggs, Ronald J.; Christian, Joshua Mark; Ray, Daniel A; Gill, David.; Kelton, John W.; Chisman, Kye Martin

    2014-09-01

    Molten nitrate salt Loop for the Observation of Film Temperature Effects on Decomposition (LOFTED) was designed, fabricated, and tested. This unique experimental arrangement allowed a 60/40 molten nitrate salt to be continuously pumped through a Haynes 230 pipe, allowing simulation of a solar receiver. The wall temperature was held at 670°C during the test and the bulk temperature range from 600-610°C for approximately 1200 hours. Salt decomposition was tested using a calibrated total alkalinity methodology to assess oxide content over time. Several alloys (347SS, HR-224, In625-SQ, Haynes 230) were tested for corrosion performance over the duration of the study and compared to previous static tests. Results yielded nearly a tenfold increase in corrosion rate as compared to 600°C, owing to the need to understand the effects of flow and mass transport on corrosion in molten salt environments.

  3. PLASMA HEATING IN THE VERY EARLY AND DECAY PHASES OF SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Falewicz, R.; Rudawy, P.; Siarkowski, M. E-mail: rudawy@astro.uni.wroc.pl

    2011-05-20

    In this paper, we analyze the energy budgets of two single-loop solar flares under the assumption that non-thermal electrons (NTEs) are the only source of plasma heating during all phases of both events. The flares were observed by RHESSI and GOES on 2002 September 20 and 2002 March 17, respectively. For both investigated flares we derived the energy fluxes contained in NTE beams from the RHESSI observational data constrained by observed GOES light curves. We showed that energy delivered by NTEs was fully sufficient to fulfill the energy budgets of the plasma during the pre-heating and impulsive phases of both flares as well as during the decay phase of one of them. We concluded that in the case of the investigated flares there was no need to use any additional ad hoc heating mechanisms other than heating by NTEs.

  4. Multiple Wavelength Observations of Flaring Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    The radio emission of quiescent active regions at 6 cm wavelength marks the legs of magnetic dipoles, and the emission at 20 cm wavelength delineates the radio wavelength counterpart of the coronal loops previously detected at X-ray wavelengths. At both wavelengths the temperatures have coronal values of a few million degrees. The polarization of the radio emission specifies the structure and strength of the coronal magnetic field (H ≈ 600 Gauss at heights h ≈ 4 x 109 cm above sunspot umbrae). At 6 cm and 20 cm wavelength the solar bursts have angular sizes between 5" and 30", brightness temperatures between 2 x 107 K and 2 x 108 K, and degrees of circular polarization between 10% and 90%. The location of the burst energy release is specified with second-of-arc accuracy. At radio wavelengths the bursts occur within the central regions of magnetic loops, while the flaring Ha kernels are located at the loop footpoints. Coronal loops exhibit enhanced radio emission (preburst heating) a few minutes before the release of burst energy. The radio polarization data indicate magnetic changes before and during solar bursts.

  5. STUDY OF TWO SUCCESSIVE THREE-RIBBON SOLAR FLARES ON 2012 JULY 6

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haimin; Liu, Chang; Deng, Na; Xu, Yan; Jing, Ju; Zeng, Zhicheng; Cao, Wenda

    2014-01-20

    This Letter reports two rarely observed three-ribbon flares (M1.9 and C9.2) on 2012 July 6 in NOAA AR 11515, which we found using Hα observations of 0.''1 resolution from the New Solar Telescope and Ca II H images from Hinode. The flaring site is characterized by an intriguing ''fish-bone-like'' morphology evidenced by both Hα images and a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation, where two semi-parallel rows of low-lying, sheared loops connect an elongated, parasitic negative field with the sandwiching positive fields. The NLFFF model also shows that the two rows of loops are asymmetric in height and have opposite twists, and are enveloped by large-scale field lines including open fields. The two flares occurred in succession within half an hour and are located at the two ends of the flaring region. The three ribbons of each flare run parallel to the magnetic polarity inversion line, with the outer two lying in the positive field and the central one in the negative field. Both flares show surge-like flows in Hα apparently toward the remote region, while the C9.2 flare is also accompanied by EUV jets possibly along the open field lines. Interestingly, the 12-25 keV hard X-ray sources of the C9.2 flare first line up with the central ribbon then shift to concentrate on the top of the higher branch of loops. These results are discussed in favor of reconnection along the coronal null line, producing the three flare ribbons and the associated ejections.

  6. Dynamics of the ankle joint analyzed through moment-angle loops during human walking: gender and age effects.

    PubMed

    Crenna, Paolo; Frigo, Carlo

    2011-12-01

    Aim of this study was to provide a non-invasive assessment of the dynamic properties of the ankle joint during human locomotion, with specific focus on the effects of gender and age. Accordingly, flexion-extension angles and moments, obtained through gait analysis, were used to generate moment-angle loops at the ankle joint in 120 healthy subjects walking at a same normalized speed. Four reproducible types of loops were identified: Typical Loops, Narrow, Large and Yielding loops. No significant changes in the slopes of the main loop phases were observed as a function of gender and age, with the exception of a relative increase in the slope of the descending phase in elderly males compared to adult females. As for the ergometric parameters, the peak ankle moment, work produced and net work along the cycle were slightly, but significantly affected, with progressively decrease in the following order: Adult Males, Adult Females, Elderly Males and Elderly Females. The evidence that only few of the quantitative aspects of moment-angle loops were affected suggests that the control strategy which regulates the biomechanical properties of the ankle joint during walking is rather robust and qualitatively consistent across genders and age.

  7. Characteristics, location and origin of flare activity in a complex active region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Machado, M. E.; Gary, G. A.; Hagyard, M. J.; Hernandez, A. M.; Rovira, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    The observational characteristics of series of multiple-loop flares from a complex active region are summarized. The location of the highest observed photospheric magnetic shear is found to be the commonly observed site of flare onset, but not, in many cases, the magnetic region where the largest time-integrated energy release is observed. The observations thus reveal a consistent pattern of energy-release processes related to the magnetic-field topology.

  8. Molecular models need to be tested: the case of a solar flares discoidal HDL model.

    PubMed

    Shih, Amy Y; Sligar, Stephen G; Schulten, Klaus

    2008-06-01

    In the absence of atomic structures of high-density lipoproteins in their lipid-bound states, many molecular models have been produced based on experimental data. Using molecular dynamics, we show that a recently proposed "solar-flares" model of discoidal high-density lipoprotein is implausible. Our simulations show a collapse of the protruding solar-flare loops and a notable protein rearrangement due to an energetically unfavorable orientation of the hydrophobic protein surface toward the aqueous solvent.

  9. Flares as Avalanches?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, P.

    2003-05-01

    In 1991, E.T. Lu and R. Hamilton (ApJ 380, L89) suggested that flares could be interpreted as avalanches of reconnection events in coronal magnetic structures driven to a self-organized critical state. Physical underpinning for the simple cellular automaton model they used to illustrate their idea can be readily found in the nanoflare conjecture for coronal heating championed over the past two decades by E.N. Parker (e.g., ApJ 330, 474 [1988]). In this lecture I will give a brief overview of Lu & Hamilton's avalanche model, and describe how it can be physically interpreted in the context of Parker's nanoflare conjecture. After discussing some illustrative model results, I will focus on recent comparisons of the model's predictions with flare observations. Finally, I will discuss some recent attempts at quantitatively exploring the physical relationship between model components and the physics of magnetic reconnection.

  10. Observations of loops and prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, Keith T.

    1994-01-01

    We review recent observations by the Yohkoh-SXT (Soft X-ray Telescope) in collaboration with other spacecraft and ground-based observatories of coronal loops and prominences. These new results point to problems that SoHO will be able to address. With a unique combination of rapid-cadence digital imaging (greater than or equal to 32 s full-disk and greater than or equal to 2 s partial-frame images), high spatial resolution (greater than or equal to 2.5 arcsec pixels), high sensitivity (EM less than or equal to 10(exp 42) cm(exp -3)), a low-scatter mirror, and large dynamic range, SXT can observe a vast range of targets on the Sun. Over the first 21 months of Yohkoh operations SXT has taken over one million images of the corona and so is building up an invaluable long-term database on the large-scale corona and loop geometry. The most striking thing about the SXT images is the range of loop sizes and shapes. The active regions are a bright tangle of magnetic field lines, surrounded by a network of large-scale quiet-Sun loops stretching over distances in excess of 105 km. The cross-section of most loops seems to be constant. Loops displaying significant Gamma's are the exception, not the rule, implying the presence of widespread currents in the corona. All magnetic structures show changes. Time scales range from seconds to months. The question of how these structures are formed, become filled with hot plasma, and are maintained is still open. While we see the propagation of brightenings along the length of active-region loops and in X-ray jets with velocities of several hundred km/s, much higher velocities are seen in the quiet Sun. In XBP flares, for example, velocities of over 1000 km/s are common. Active-region loops seem to be in constant motion, moving slowly outward, carrying plasma with them. During flares, loops often produce localized brightenings at the base and later at the apex of the loop. Quiescent filaments and prominences have been observed regularly

  11. A statistic study of ionospheric solar flare activity indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Bo; Ding, Feng; Ning, Baiqi; Wan, Weixing; Yu, You; Hu, Lianhuan

    According to the Chapman ionization theory, an ionospheric solar flare activity indicator (ISFAI) is given by the solar zenith angle and the variation rate of ionospheric vertical total electron content, which is measured from a global network of dual-frequency GPS receivers. The ISFAI is utilized to statistically analyze the ionospheric responses to 1439 M-class and 126 X-class solar flares during solar cycle 23 (1996-2008). The statistical results show that the occurrence of ISFAI peak increases obviously at 3.2 total electron content unit (TECU)/h (1 TECU = 1016 elm-2) and reaches the maximum at 10 TECU/h during M-class flares and 10 TECU/h and 40 TECU/h for X-class flares. ISFAI is closely correlated with the 26-34 nm extreme ultraviolet flux but poorly related to the 0.1-0.8 nm X-ray flux. The central meridian distance (CMD) of flare location is an important reason for depressing relationship between ISFAI and X-ray Flux. Through the CMD effect modification, the ISFAI has a significant dependence on the X-ray flux with a correlation coefficient of 0.76. The ISFAI sensitivity enables to detect the extreme X-class flares, as well as the variations of one order of magnitude or even smaller (such as for C-class flares). Meanwhile, ISFAI is helpful to the calibration of the X-ray flux at 0.1-0.8 nm observed by GOES during some flares. In addition, statistical results demonstrate that ISFAI can detect 80% of all M-class flares and 92% for all X-class ones during 1996-2008. Owing to the high sensitivity and temporal resolution, ISFAI can be utilized as a solar flare detection parameter to monitor space weather.

  12. Large solar flares and their ionospheric D region enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Neil R.; Rodger, Craig J.; Clilverd, Mark A.

    2005-06-01

    On 4 November 2003, the largest solar flare ever recorded saturated the GOES satellite X-ray detectors, making an assessment of its size difficult. However, VLF radio phase advances effectively recorded the lowering of the VLF reflection height and hence the lowest edge of the Earth's ionosphere. Previously, these phase advances were used to extrapolate the GOES 0.1-0.8 nm ("XL") fluxes from saturation at X17 to give a peak magnitude of X45 ± 5 for this great flare. Here it is shown that a similar extrapolation, but using the other GOES X-ray band, 0.05-0.4 nm ("XS"), is also consistent with a magnitude of X45. Also reported here are VLF phase measurements from two paths near dawn: "Omega Australia" to Dunedin, New Zealand (only just all sunlit) and NPM, Hawaii, to Ny Alesund, Svalbard (only partly sunlit), which also give remarkably good extrapolations of the flare flux, suggesting that VLF paths monitoring flares do not necessarily need to be in full daylight. D region electron densities are modeled as functions of X-ray flux up to the level of the great X45 flare by using flare-induced VLF amplitudes together with the VLF phase changes. During this great flare, the "Wait" reflection height, H', was found to have been lowered to ˜53 km or ˜17 km below the normal midday value of ˜70 km. Finally, XL/XS ratios are examined during some large flares, including the great flare. Plots of such ratios against XL can give quite good estimates of the great flare's size (X45) but without use of VLF measurements.

  13. Waves in Solar Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T. J.

    2016-02-01

    The corona is visible in the optical band only during a total solar eclipse or with a coronagraph. Coronal loops are believed to be plasma-filled closed magnetic flux anchored in the photosphere. Based on the temperature regime, they are generally classified into cool, warm, and hot loops. The magnetized coronal structures support propagation of various types of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) waves. This chapter reviews the recent progress made in studies based on observations of four types of wave phenomena mainly occurring in coronal loops of active regions, including: flare-excited slow-mode waves; impulsively excited kink-mode waves; propagating slow magnetoacoustic waves; and ubiquitous propagating kink (Alfvénic) waves. This review not only comprehensively discusses these waves and coronal seismology but also topics that are newly emerging or hotly debated in order to provide the reader with useful guidance on further studies.

  14. Solar Flare Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmahl, Edward J.; Kundu, Mukul R.

    2000-01-01

    During the past year we have been working with the HESSI (High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager) team in preparation for launch in early 2001. HESSI has as its primary scientific goal photometric imaging and spectroscopy of solar flares in hard X-rays and gamma-rays with an approx. 2 sec angular resolution, approx. keV energy resolution and approx. 2 s time resolution over the 6 keV to 15 MeV energy range. We have performed tests of the imager using a specially designed experiment which exploits the second-harmonic response of HESSI's sub-collimators to an artificial X-ray source at a distance of 1550 cm from its front grids. Figures show the response to X-rays at energies in the range where HESSI is expected to image solar flares. To prepare the team and the solar user community for imaging flares with HESSI, we have written a description of the major imaging concepts. This paper will be submitted for publication in a referred journal.

  15. Magnetic flux cancellation and Doppler shifts in flaring active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtseva, Olga; Petrie, Gordon

    2016-05-01

    Flux cancellation plays an important role in some theories of solar eruptions. The mechanism of flux cancellation is suggested by many models to be a necessary condition of flare initiation as a part of slow reconnection processes in the lower atmosphere. In our earlier work we analyzed flux cancellation events during major flares using GONG line-of-sight magnetograms. In this work we use vector magnetic field data from SDO/HMI for better interpretation of the longitudinal field changes. We also compute Doppler velocity shifts at the cancellation sites in attempt to distinguish between the three physical processes that could stand behind flux removal from the photosphere: submergence of U-shaped loops, emergence of Ω-shaped loops and magnetic reconnection.

  16. Energy release in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John C.; Correia, Emilia; Farnik, Frantisek; Garcia, Howard; Henoux, Jean-Claude; La Rosa, Ted N.; Machado, Marcos E. (Compiler); Nakajima, Hiroshi; Priest, Eric R.

    1994-01-01

    Team 2 of the Ottawa Flares 22 Workshop dealt with observational and theoretical aspects of the characteristics and processes of energy release in flares. Main results summarized in this article stress the global character of the flaring phenomenon in active regions, the importance of discontinuities in magnetic connectivity, the role of field-aligned currents in free energy storage, and the fragmentation of energy release in time and space.

  17. Effect of reactive site loop elongation on the inhibitory activity of C1-inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bos, Ineke G A; Lubbers, Yvonne T P; Eldering, Eric; Abrahams, Jan Pieter; Hack, C Erik

    2004-06-01

    The serine protease inhibitor C1-Inhibitor (C1-Inh) inhibits several complement- and contact-system proteases, which play an important role in inflammation. C1-Inh has a short reactive site loop (RSL) compared to other serpins. RSL length determines the inhibitory activity of serpins. We investigated the effect of RSL elongation on inhibitory activity of C1-Inh by insertion of one or two alanine residues in the RSL. One of five mutants had an increased association rate with kallikrein, but was nevertheless a poor inhibitor because of a simultaneous high stoichiometry of inhibition (>10). The association rate of the other variants was lower than that of wild-type C1-Inh. These data suggest that the relatively weak inhibitory activity of C1-Inh is not the result of its short RSL. The short RSL of C1-Inh has, surprisingly, the optimal length for inhibition.

  18. A Hertzsprung-Russell-like Diagram for Solar/Stellar Flares and Corona: Emission Measure versus Temperature Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kazunari; Yokoyama, Takaaki

    2002-09-01

    In our previous paper, we presented a theory to explain the observed universal correlation between the emission measure (EM=n2V) and temperature (T) for solar/stellar flares on the basis of the magnetic reconnection model with heat conduction and chromospheric evaporation. Here n is the electron density and V is the volume. By extending our theory to general situations, we examined the EM-T diagram in detail and found the following properties: (1) The universal correlation sequence (``main-sequence flares'') with EM~T17/2 corresponds to the case of constant heating flux or, equivalently, the case of constant magnetic field strength in the reconnection model. (2) The EM-T diagram has a forbidden region, in which gas pressure of flares exceeds magnetic pressure. (3) There is a coronal branch with EM~T15/2 for T<107 K and EM~T13/2 for T>107 K. This branch is situated on the left side of the main-sequence flares in the EM-T diagram. (4) There is another forbidden region determined by the length of flare loop; the lower limit of the flare loop is 107 cm. Small flares near this limit correspond to nanoflares observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory EUV Imaging Telescope. (5) We can plot the flare evolution track on the EM-T diagram. A flare evolves from the coronal branch to main-sequence flares, then returns to the coronal branch eventually. These properties of the EM-T diagram are similar to those of the H-R diagram for stars, and thus we propose that the EM-T diagram is quite useful for estimating the physical quantities (loop length, heating flux, magnetic field strength, total energy, and so on) of flares and coronae when there are no spatially resolved imaging observations.

  19. Observation of the Evolution of a Current Sheet in a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chunming; Liu, Rui; Alexander, David; McAteer, James

    2016-05-01

    We report multi-wavelength and multi-viewpoint observations of a solar eruptive event which involves loop-loop interactions. During a C2.0 flare, motions associated with inflowing and outflowing plasma provide evidence for ongoing magnetic reconnection. The flare loop top and a rising "concave-up" feature are connected by a current-sheet-like structure (CSLS). The physical properties (thickness, length, temperature, and density) of the CSLS are evaluated. In regions adjacent to the CSLS, the EUV emission (characteristic temperature at 1.6 MK) begins to increase more than ten minutes prior to the onset of the flare, and steeply decreases during the decay phase. The reduction of the emission resembles that expected from coronal dimming. The dynamics of this event imply a magnetic reconnection rate in the range 0.01--0.05.

  20. Optical flares in SS433

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irsmambetova, T. R.

    2014-03-01

    An analysis of the precessional and orbital variability separately in active and quiescent states was carried out by using the photometric database in V-band of the SAI. The main orbital light curves in the active and quiet states in different precessional phases are approximately the same - primary and secondary eclipses are also observed. There are 30 most bright flares that have been studied on phase diagrams. The phase diagrams show the dependence of the flares' appearance on combination between the nodding phases and the precession phases. An analysis of the above results suggests that the flares originate in jets. Perhaps variations in jet speed cause flares activity in SS433.

  1. Quantum memory effects in noninteracting cold-atom systems: Hysteresis loop and lattice transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Chihchun; Metcalf, Mekena; Lai, Chenyen

    2016-05-01

    Memory effects are observable in magnetization, rechargeable batteries, and many systems exhibiting history-dependent states. Quantum memory effects are observable, for instance, in atomic superfluids. A counter-intuitive question is whether quantum memory effects can exist in noninteracting systems. Here we present two examples of cold-atom systems demonstrating memory effects in noninteracting systems. The first example is a ring-shaped potential loaded with noninteracting fermions. An artificial vector potential drives a current and with a tunable dissipative background, the current lags behind the driving and exhibits hysteresis loops. The dissipative energy can be controlled by the coupling between the fermions and the background. In the second example, cold atoms loaded in a tunable optical lattice transformed from the triangular to the kagome geometry. The kagome lattice supports a flat-band consisting of degenerate localized states. Quantum memory effects are observable after a lattice transformation as the steady-state density depends on the rate of the transformation. The versatility of memory effects in cold-atom systems promises novel applications in atomtronics.

  2. The one-loop matter bispectrum in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Angulo, Raul E.; Foreman, Simon; Schmittfull, Marcel; Senatore, Leonardo

    2015-10-14

    With this study, given the importance of future large scale structure surveys for delivering new cosmological information, it is crucial to reliably predict their observables. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a manifestly convergent perturbative scheme to compute the clustering of dark matter in the weakly nonlinear regime in an expansion in k/kNL, where k is the wavenumber of interest and kNL is the wavenumber associated to the nonlinear scale. It has been recently shown that the EFTofLSS matches to 1% level the dark matter power spectrum at redshift zero up to k ≃ 0.3 h Mpc–1 and k ≃ 0.6 h Mpc–1 at one and two loops respectively, using only one counterterm that is fit to data. Similar results have been obtained for the momentum power spectrum at one loop. This is a remarkable improvement with respect to former analytical techniques. Here we study the prediction for the equal-time dark matter bispectrum at one loop. We find that at this order it is sufficient to consider the same counterterm that was measured in the power spectrum. Without any remaining free parameter, and in a cosmology for which kNL is smaller than in the previously considered cases (σ8=0.9), we find that the prediction from the EFTofLSS agrees very well with N-body simulations up to k ≃ 0.25 h Mpc–1, given the accuracy of the measurements, which is of order a few percent at the highest k's of interest. While the fit is very good on average up to k ≃ 0.25 h Mpc–1, the fit performs slightly worse on equilateral configurations, in agreement with expectations that for a given maximum k, equilateral triangles are the most nonlinear.

  3. Observation and analysis of ballistic downflows in a M-class flare using IRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brannon, Sean

    2016-05-01

    Despite significant advances in instrumentation, there remain no studies that analyze observations of on-disk flare loop plasma flows covering the entire evolution from chromospheric evaporation, through plasma cooling, to draining downflows. We present results from an imaging and spectroscopic observation from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the SOL2015-03-12T11:50:00 M-class flare, at high spatial resolution and time cadence. Our analysis of this event reveals initial plasma evaporation at flare temperatures indicated by 100-200 km/s blueshifts in the Fe XXI line. We subsequently observe plasma cooling into chromospheric lines (Si IV and O IV) with ~11 minute delay, followed by loop draining at ~40 km/s as indicated by a ``C''-shaped redshift structure and significant (~60 km/s) non-thermal broadening. We use density sensitive lines to calculate a plasma density for the flare loops, and estimate a theoretical cooling time approximately equal to the observed delay. Finally, we use a simple elliptical free-fall draining model to construct synthetic spectra, and perform what we believe to be the first direct comparison of such synthetic spectra to observations of draining downflows in flare loops.

  4. Transient particle acceleration associated with solar flares.

    PubMed

    Chupp, E L

    1990-10-12

    Understanding how individual charged particles can be accelerated to extreme energies (10(20) electron volts), remains a foremost problem in astrophysics. Within our solar system, the active sun is capable of producing, on a short time scale, ions with energies higher than 25 gigaelectron volts. Satellite and ground-based observation over the past 30 years have greatly increased our knowledge of the properties of transient bursts of energetic particles emitted from the sun in association with solar flares, but a real understanding of the solar flare particle acceleration process requires greatly refined experimental data. On the practical side, it is also imperative that this problem be solved if man is to venture, for long periods of time, beyond the protective umbrella of Earth's magnetic field, which excludes much of the biologically damaging solar energetic particles. It is only through an understanding of the basic acceleration problem that we can expect to be able to predict the occurrence of a solar flare with lethal solar radiations. For our knowledge of these effects to advance, a new space mission dedicated to studying the high-energy aspects of solar flares at high spatial and energy resolution will be required.

  5. Solar flares, proton showers, and the space shuttle.

    PubMed

    Rust, D M

    1982-05-28

    The space shuttle era will focus renewed attention on the hazards of the space environment to human habitation. The chief unpredictable hazard for astronauts is energetic proton radiation from solar flares. In some orbits, there is no reasonable level of shielding material that will protect shuttle occupants from potentially lethal doses of radiation. The effects of a solar flare that occurred druing the first flight of the Columbia are discussed and current flare research reviewed. The emphasis is on progress made during the recent international Solar Maximum Year toward understanding the origins of proton showers.

  6. Risk factors of systemic lupus erythematosus flares during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Jara, Luis J; Medina, Gabriela; Cruz-Dominguez, Pilar; Navarro, Carmen; Vera-Lastra, Olga; Saavedra, Miguel A

    2014-12-01

    This review examines the risk factors for the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) flares during pregnancy. In preconception, anti-DNA, hypocomplementemia, previous thrombosis, triple antiphospholipid (aPL) antibody positivity, active lupus nephritis and discontinuation of medications such as hydroxychloroquine and azathioprine are factors associated with pregnancy failure. During pregnancy, SLE flares are associated with aPL antibodies, synergic changes of pregnancy on Th1 and TH2 cytokines, other cytokines and chemokines that interact with hormones such as estrogen and prolactin that amplify the inflammatory effect. From the clinical point of view, SLE activity at pregnancy onset, thrombocytopenia, lupus nephritis, arterial hypertension, aPL syndromes, preeclampsia is associated with lupus flares and fetal complications. In puerperium, the risk factors of flares are similar to pregnancy. Hyperactivity of immune system, autoantibodies, hyperprolactinemia, active lupus nephritis, decrease in TH2 cytokines with increase in TH1 cytokines probably participate in SLE flare. The SLE flares during pregnancy make the difference between an uncomplicated pregnancy and pregnancy with maternal and fetal complications. Therefore, the knowledge of risk factors leads the best treatment strategies to reduce flares and fetal complications in SLE patients.

  7. The Effects of Closed-Loop Medical Devices on the Autonomy and Accountability of Persons and Systems.

    PubMed

    Kellmeyer, Philipp; Cochrane, Thomas; Müller, Oliver; Mitchell, Christine; Ball, Tonio; Fins, Joseph J; Biller-Andorno, Nikola

    2016-10-01

    Closed-loop medical devices such as brain-computer interfaces are an emerging and rapidly advancing neurotechnology. The target patients for brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are often severely paralyzed, and thus particularly vulnerable in terms of personal autonomy, decisionmaking capacity, and agency. Here we analyze the effects of closed-loop medical devices on the autonomy and accountability of both persons (as patients or research participants) and neurotechnological closed-loop medical systems. We show that although BCIs can strengthen patient autonomy by preserving or restoring communicative abilities and/or motor control, closed-loop devices may also create challenges for moral and legal accountability. We advocate the development of a comprehensive ethical and legal framework to address the challenges of emerging closed-loop neurotechnologies like BCIs and stress the centrality of informed consent and refusal as a means to foster accountability. We propose the creation of an international neuroethics task force with members from medical neuroscience, neuroengineering, computer science, medical law, and medical ethics, as well as representatives of patient advocacy groups and the public. PMID:27634714

  8. The Effects of Closed-Loop Medical Devices on the Autonomy and Accountability of Persons and Systems.

    PubMed

    Kellmeyer, Philipp; Cochrane, Thomas; Müller, Oliver; Mitchell, Christine; Ball, Tonio; Fins, Joseph J; Biller-Andorno, Nikola

    2016-10-01

    Closed-loop medical devices such as brain-computer interfaces are an emerging and rapidly advancing neurotechnology. The target patients for brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are often severely paralyzed, and thus particularly vulnerable in terms of personal autonomy, decisionmaking capacity, and agency. Here we analyze the effects of closed-loop medical devices on the autonomy and accountability of both persons (as patients or research participants) and neurotechnological closed-loop medical systems. We show that although BCIs can strengthen patient autonomy by preserving or restoring communicative abilities and/or motor control, closed-loop devices may also create challenges for moral and legal accountability. We advocate the development of a comprehensive ethical and legal framework to address the challenges of emerging closed-loop neurotechnologies like BCIs and stress the centrality of informed consent and refusal as a means to foster accountability. We propose the creation of an international neuroethics task force with members from medical neuroscience, neuroengineering, computer science, medical law, and medical ethics, as well as representatives of patient advocacy groups and the public.

  9. Observations of solar flares with IRIS and SDO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D.; Innes, D. E.; Ning, Z. J.

    2016-03-01

    Flare kernels brighten simultaneously in all Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) channels making it difficult to determine their temperature structure. The Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) is able to spectrally resolve Fe xxi emission from cold chromospheric brightenings, so it can be used to infer the amount of Fe xxi emission in the 131 Å AIA channel. We use observations of two small solar flares seen by IRIS and SDO to compare the emission measures (EMs) deduced from the IRIS Fe xxi line and the AIA 131 Å channel to determine the fraction of Fe xxi emission in flare kernels in the 131 Å channel of AIA. Cotemporal and cospatial pseudo-raster AIA images are compared with the IRIS results. We use multi-Gaussian line fitting to separate the blending chromospheric emission so as to derive Fe xxi intensities and Doppler shifts in IRIS spectra. We define loop and kernel regions based on the brightness of the 131 Å and 1600 Å intensities. In the loop regions the Fe xxi EMs are typically 80% of the 131 Å values, and range from 67% to 92%. Much of the scatter is due to small misalignments, but the largest site with low Fe xxi contributions was probably affected by a recent injection of cool plasma into the loop. In flare kernels the contribution of Fe xxi increases from less than 10% at the low-intensity 131 Å sites to 40-80% in the brighter kernels. Here the Fe xxi is superimposed on bright chromospheric emission and the Fe xxi line shows blueshifts, sometimes extending up to the edge of the spectral window, 200 km s-1. The AIA 131 Å emission in flare loops is due to Fe xxi emission with a 10-20% contribution from continuum, Fe xxiii, and cooler background plasma emission. In bright flare kernels up to 52% of the 131 Å is from cooler plasma. The wide range seen in the kernels is caused by significant structure in the kernels, which is seen as sharp gradients in Fe xxi EM at sites of molecular and transition region

  10. THREE-DIMENSIONAL SIMULATIONS OF GYROSYNCHROTRON EMISSION FROM MILDLY ANISOTROPIC NONUNIFORM ELECTRON DISTRIBUTIONS IN SYMMETRIC MAGNETIC LOOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, Alexey A.; Nita, Gelu M.; Fleishman, Gregory D.

    2011-12-01

    Microwave emission of solar flares is formed primarily by incoherent gyrosynchrotron radiation generated by accelerated electrons in coronal magnetic loops. The resulting emission depends on many factors, including pitch-angle distribution of the emitting electrons and the source geometry. In this work, we perform systematic simulations of solar microwave emission using recently developed tools (GS Simulator and fast gyrosynchrotron codes) capable of simulating maps of radio brightness and polarization as well as spatially resolved emission spectra. A three-dimensional model of a symmetric dipole magnetic loop is used. We compare the emission from isotropic and anisotropic (of loss-cone type) electron distributions. We also investigate effects caused by inhomogeneous distribution of the emitting particles along the loop. It is found that the effect of the adopted moderate electron anisotropy is the most pronounced near the footpoints and it also depends strongly on the loop orientation. Concentration of the emitting particles at the looptop results in a corresponding spatial shift of the radio brightness peak, thus reducing effects of the anisotropy. The high-frequency ({approx}> 50 GHz) emission spectral index is specified mainly by the energy spectrum of the emitting electrons; however, at intermediate frequencies (around 10-20 GHz), the spectrum shape is strongly dependent on the electron anisotropy, spatial distribution, and magnetic field nonuniformity. The implications of the obtained results for the diagnostics of the energetic electrons in solar flares are discussed.

  11. Effects of backlash and dead band on temperature control of the primary loop of a conceptual nuclear Brayton space powerplant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrick, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical study was made of the stability of a closed-loop liquid-lithium temperature control of the primary loop of a conceptual nuclear Brayton space powerplant. The operating point was varied from 20 to 120 percent of design. A describing-function technique was used to evaluate the effects of temperature dead band and control coupling backlash. From the system investigation, it was predicted that a limit cycle will not exist with a temperature dead band, but a limit cycle will not exist when backlash is present. The results compare favorably with a digital computer simulation.

  12. An analysis of airline landing flare data based on flight and training simulator measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heffley, R. K.; Schulman, T. M.; Clement, T. M.

    1982-01-01

    Landings by experienced airline pilots transitioning to the DC-10, performed in flight and on a simulator, were analyzed and compared using a pilot-in-the-loop model of the landing maneuver. By solving for the effective feedback gains and pilot compensation which described landing technique, it was possible to discern fundamental differences in pilot behavior between the actual aircraft and the simulator. These differences were then used to infer simulator fidelity in terms of specific deficiencies and to quantify the effectiveness of training on the simulator as compared to training in flight. While training on the simulator, pilots exhibited larger effective lag in commanding the flare. The inability to compensate adequately for this lag was associated with hard or inconsistent landings. To some degree this deficiency was carried into flight, thus resulting in a slightly different and inferior landing technique than exhibited by pilots trained exclusively on the actual aircraft.

  13. Solar flare discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Hugh S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper considers the discoveries that have appreciably changed our understanding of the physics of solar flares. A total of 42 discoveries from all disciplines, ranging from Galileo's initial observation of faculae to the recent discovery of strong limb brightening in 10-MeV gamma-radiation, are identified. The rate of discovery increased dramatically over the past four decades as new observational tools became available. The assessment of significance suggests that recent discoveries -though more numerous - are individually less significant; perhaps this is because the minor early discoveries tend to be taken for granted.

  14. RE-INTERPRETATION OF SUPRA-ARCADE DOWNFLOWS IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, Sabrina L.; Reeves, Katharine K.

    2012-03-10

    Following the eruption of a filament from a flaring active region, sunward-flowing voids are often seen above developing post-eruption arcades. First discovered using the soft X-ray telescope aboard Yohkoh, these supra-arcade downflows (SADs) are now an expected observation of extreme ultra-violet and soft X-ray coronal imagers and spectrographs (e.g, TRACE, SOHO/SUMER, Hinode/XRT, SDO/AIA). Observations made prior to the operation of AIA suggested that these plasma voids (which are seen in contrast to bright, high-temperature plasma associated with current sheets) are the cross-sections of evacuated flux tubes retracting from reconnection sites high in the corona. The high temperature imaging afforded by AIA's 131, 94, and 193 Angstrom-Sign channels coupled with the fast temporal cadence allows for unprecedented scrutiny of the voids. For a flare occurring on 2011 October 22, we provide evidence suggesting that SADs, instead of being the cross-sections of relatively large, evacuated flux tubes, are actually wakes (i.e., trailing regions of low density) created by the retraction of much thinner tubes. This re-interpretation is a significant shift in the fundamental understanding of SADs, as the features once thought to be identifiable as the shrinking loops themselves now appear to be 'side effects' of the passage of the loops through the supra-arcade plasma. In light of the fact that previous measurements have attributed to the shrinking loops characteristics that may instead belong to their wakes, we discuss the implications of this new interpretation on previous parameter estimations and on reconnection theory.

  15. Effective dynamics, big bounces, and scaling symmetry in Bianchi type I loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, D.-W.

    2007-12-15

    The detailed formulation for loop quantum cosmology (LQC) in the Bianchi I model with a scalar massless field has been constructed. In this paper, its effective dynamics is studied in two improved strategies for implementing the LQC discreteness corrections. Both schemes show that the big bang is replaced by the big bounces, which take place up to 3 times, once in each diagonal direction, when the area or volume scale factor approaches the critical values in the Planck regime measured by the reference of the scalar field momentum. These two strategies give different evolutions: In one scheme, the effective dynamics is independent of the choice of the finite sized cell prescribed to make Hamiltonian finite; in the other, the effective dynamics reacts to the macroscopic scales introduced by the boundary conditions. Both schemes reveal interesting symmetries of scaling, which are reminiscent of the relational interpretation of quantum mechanics and also suggest that the fundamental spatial scale (area gap) may give rise to a temporal scale.

  16. Open loop compensation for the eddy current effect in the APS storage ring vacuum chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Y.; Bridges, J.; Emery, L.; Decker, G.

    1991-01-01

    In the third generation synchrotron light sources, closed orbit stabilization against external vibrations is critical to ensure low emittance and high brightness. The Advanced Photon Source (APS) will use a large number (678) of correction magnets to create local bumps and to achieve global orbit stabilization. In this paper, we will present the result of the effort to counter the effect due to the finite inductance of the magnet and the eddy current in the 1/2 in.-thick aluminum storage ring vacuum chamber. The amplitude attenuation and the phase shift of the correction magnet field inside the APS storage ring vacuum chamber were measured. A circuit to compensate for this effect was then inserted between the signal source and the magnet power supply. The amplitude was restored with an error of less than 20% of the source signal amplitude and the phase shift was reduced from 80{degrees} to 12{degrees} at 10 Hz. Incorporation of this circuit in the closed loop feedback scheme and the resulting beneficial effect in the closed orbit stabilization will be discussed. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Long-term containment of energetic particles in coronal loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Yun-Tung; Northrop, Theodore G.; Finn, John M.

    1993-01-01

    Recent observation from the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory shows that gamma-ray emission after a solar flare can last for as long as 8 hours. There is also evidence that electrons and protons are accelerated only during the impulsive phase of the flare and are subsequently mirror trapped in coronal magnetic loops. This poses the following dilemma: if the magnetic field lines in the loop are simple plane arches, the protons will drift across the cross section of the loop in seconds to minutes, rather than hours. To solve the dilemma, we use guiding center theory to show that long-term containment of energetic protons in a coronal loop is possible if magnetic field lines have enough twist. We also find that in the trapped region of the loop, the twist angle of field lines between the mirror points of a bounce orbit is approximately 2 pi.

  18. Assessing the effect of dynamics on the closed-loop protein-folding hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Chintapalli, Sree V; Illingworth, Christopher J R; Upton, Graham J G; Sacquin-Mora, Sophie; Reeves, Philip J; Mohammedali, Hani S; Reynolds, Christopher A

    2014-02-01

    The closed-loop (loop-n-lock) hypothesis of protein folding suggests that loops of about 25 residues, closed through interactions between the loop ends (locks), play an important role in protein structure. Coarse-grain elastic network simulations, and examination of loop lengths in a diverse set of proteins, each supports a bias towards loops of close to 25 residues in length between residues of high stability. Previous studies have established a correlation between total contact distance (TCD), a metric of sequence distances between contacting residues (cf. contact order), and the log-folding rate of a protein. In a set of 43 proteins, we identify an improved correlation (r(2) = 0.76), when the metric is restricted to residues contacting the locks, compared to the equivalent result when all residues are considered (r(2) = 0.65). This provides qualified support for the hypothesis, albeit with an increased emphasis upon the importance of a much larger set of residues surrounding the locks. Evidence of a similar-sized protein core/extended nucleus (with significant overlap) was obtained from TCD calculations in which residues were successively eliminated according to their hydrophobicity and connectivity, and from molecular dynamics simulations. Our results suggest that while folding is determined by a subset of residues that can be predicted by application of the closed-loop hypothesis, the original hypothesis is too simplistic; efficient protein folding is dependent on a considerably larger subset of residues than those involved in lock formation.

  19. Supercoiling Effects on Short-Range DNA Looping in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Mogil, Lauren S.; Becker, Nicole A.; Maher, L. James

    2016-01-01

    DNA-protein loops can be essential for gene regulation. The Escherichia coli lactose (lac) operon is controlled by DNA-protein loops that have been studied for decades. Here we adapt this model to test the hypothesis that negative superhelical strain facilitates the formation of short-range (6–8 DNA turns) repression loops in E. coli. The natural negative superhelicity of E. coli DNA is regulated by the interplay of gyrase and topoisomerase enzymes, adding or removing negative supercoils, respectively. Here, we measured quantitatively DNA looping in three different E. coli strains characterized by different levels of global supercoiling: wild type, gyrase mutant (gyrB226), and topoisomerase mutant (ΔtopA10). DNA looping in each strain was measured by assaying repression of the endogenous lac operon, and repression of ten reporter constructs with DNA loop sizes between 70–85 base pairs. Our data are most simply interpreted as supporting the hypothesis that negative supercoiling facilitates gene repression by small DNA-protein loops in living bacteria. PMID:27783696

  20. Ultraviolet Events Observed in Active Regions. 2; An Interpretation of Flaring Arches and Associated Small Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontenla, J.; Rovira, M.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

    1997-01-01

    We analyze Hz, UV, and X-ray emissions in and around the spectacular arch system seen in the corona on 1980 March 27 during the Solar Maximum Mission. The flaring of the arch plasma is studied, and its dependence on triggering mechanisms related to the observed small limb flare in the arch footpoint is analyzed. To drive these events, we propose a mechanism in which small electric current circuits and the localized magnetic free energy are continuously generated at a magnetic null by a pressure gradient, which then compress or expand the plasma. This free energy dissipates by Joule effect and upward transport.

  1. Fermion loops in the effective potential of N = 1 supergravity, with application to no-scale models

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, J.W.

    1990-03-27

    Powerful and quite general arguments suggest that N = 1 supergravity, and in particular the superstring-inspired no-scale models, may describe the physics of the four-dimensional vacuum at energy densities below the Planck scale. These models are not renormalizable, since they arise as effective theories after the large masses have been integrated out of the fundamental theory; thus, they have divergences in their loop amplitudes that must be regulated by imposing a cutoff. Before physics at experimental energies can be extracted from these models, the true vacuum state or states must be identified: at tree level, the ground states of the effective theories are highly degenerate. Radiative corrections at the one-loop level have been shown to break the degeneracy sufficiently to identify the states of vanishing vacuum energy. As the concluding step in a program to calculate these corrections within a self-consistent cutoff prescription, all fermionic one-loop divergent corrections to the scalar effective potential are evaluated. (The corresponding bosonic contributions have been found elsewhere.) The total effective scalar Lagrange density for N = 1 supergravity is written down, and comments are made about cancellations between the fermionic and bosonic loops. Finally, the result is specialized to a toy no-scale model with a single generation of matter fields, and prospects for eventual phenomenological constraints on theories of this type are briefly discussed. 48 refs.

  2. A statistic study of ionospheric solar flare activity indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Bo; Wan, Weixing; Ning, Baiqi; Ding, Feng; Hu, Lianhuan; Yu, You

    2014-01-01

    According to the Chapman ionization theory, an ionospheric solar flare activity indicator (ISFAI) is given by the solar zenith angle and the variation rate of ionospheric vertical total electron content, which is measured from a global network of dual-frequency GPS receivers. The ISFAI is utilized to statistically analyze the ionospheric responses to 1439 M-class and 126 X-class solar flares during solar cycle 23 (1996-2008). The statistical results show that the occurrence of ISFAI peak increases obviously at 3.2 total electron content unit (TECU)/h (1 TECU = 1016 el m-2) and reaches the maximum at 10 TECU/h during M-class flares and 10 TECU/h and 40 TECU/h for X-class flares. ISFAI is closely correlated with the 26-34 nm extreme ultraviolet flux but poorly related to the 0.1-0.8 nm X-ray flux. The central meridian distance (CMD) of flare location is an important reason for depressing relationship between ISFAI and X-ray Flux. Through the CMD effect modification, the ISFAI has a significant dependence on the X-ray flux with a correlation coefficient of 0.76. The ISFAI sensitivity enables to detect the extreme X-class flares, as well as the variations of one order of magnitude or even smaller (such as for C-class flares). Meanwhile, ISFAI is helpful to the calibration of the X-ray flux at 0.1-0.8 nm observed by GOES during some flares. In addition, the statistical results demonstrate that ISFAI can detect 80% of all M-class flares and 92% for all X-class ones during 1996-2008.

  3. Parameterization of solar flare dose

    SciTech Connect

    Lamarche, A.H.; Poston, J.W.

    1996-12-31

    A critical aspect of missions to the moon or Mars will be the safety and health of the crew. Radiation in space is a hazard for astronauts, especially high-energy radiation following certain types of solar flares. A solar flare event can be very dangerous if astronauts are not adequately shielded because flares can deliver a very high dose in a short period of time. The goal of this research was to parameterize solar flare dose as a function of time to see if it was possible to predict solar flare occurrence, thus providing a warning time. This would allow astronauts to take corrective action and avoid receiving a dose greater than the recommended limit set by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP).

  4. Solar Flares and the Chromosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2015-08-01

    During a solar flare, the chromosphere emits across a large fraction of the electromagnetic spectrum, providing diagnostic information on heating, dynamics and flare energy transport by both thermal and non-thermal means. The evolution of chromospheric ribbons and footpoints also traces the progress of coronal reconnection, and links radiation output with magnetic evolution. Since the chromosphere emits the majority of a flare's radiation, the current emphasis on chromospheric observations by missions such as IRIS, and future large facilities such as the DKIST, is very beneficial to flare research. In this talk I will overview recent developments in observations and theory of flaring chromospheres and make some suggestions about profitable future avenues for research.

  5. Effects of asymmetric passband filtering on the phase of the Costas loop's reconstructed carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, K. T.

    1979-01-01

    The reconstructed carrier of a telemetry return signal is used in deriving the Doppler and range information in the radiometric systems. When suppressed carrier BPSK signalling with Costas loop demodulation is used, there are concerns on the amount of shift in the reconstructed carrier phase, when the received signal suffers asymmetric bandpass filtering through the various stages of the receiver. It is concluded that the phase shifts due to asymmetric bandpass filtering on the Costas loop's reconstructed carrier can be slightly worse than those suffered by the residual carrier loop's reconstructed carrier. However, they are well within the error budgets of the radiometric system.

  6. Internal and External Reconnection Series Homologous Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2001-01-01

    Using data from the extreme ultraviolet imaging telescope (EIT) on SOHO and the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on Yohkoh, we examine a series of morphologically homologous solar flares occurring in National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) active region 8210 over May 1-2, 1998. An emerging flux region (EFR) impacted against a sunspot to the west and next to a coronal hole to the east is the source of the repeated flaring. An SXT sigmoid parallels the EFR's neutral line at the site of the initial flaring in soft X rays. In EIT each flaring episode begins with the formation of a crinkle pattern external to the EFR. These EIT crinkles move out from, and then in toward, the EFR with velocities approx. 20 km/ s. A shrinking and expansion of the width of the coronal hole coincides with the crinkle activity, and generation and evolution of a postflare loop system begins near the time of crinkle formation. Using a schematic based on magnetograms of the region, we suggest that these observations are consistent with the standard reconnection-based model for solar eruptions but are modified by the presence of the additional magnetic fields of the sunspot and coronal hole. In the schematic, internal reconnection begins inside of the EFR-associated fields, unleashing a flare, postflare loops, and a coronal mass ejection (CME). External reconnection, first occurring between the escaping CME and the coronal hole field and second occurring between fields formed as a result of the first external reconnection, results in the EIT crinkles and changes in the coronal hole boundary. By the end of the second external reconnection, the initial setup is reinstated; thus the sequence can repeat, resulting in morphologically homologous eruptions. Our inferred magnetic topology is similar to that suggested in the "breakout model" of eruptions although we cannot determine if our eruptions are released primarily by the breakout mechanism (external reconnection) or, alternatively

  7. Extreme Ultraviolet Late-Phase Flares: Before and During the Solar Dynamics Observatory Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Thomas N.

    2014-09-01

    The solar extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) have revealed interesting characteristics of warm coronal emissions, such as Fe xvi 335 Å emission, which peak soon after the hot coronal X-ray emissions peak during a flare and then sometimes peak for a second time hours after the X-ray flare peak. This flare type, with two warm coronal emission peaks but only one X-ray peak, has been named the EUV late phase (Woods et al., Astrophys. J. 739, 59, 2011). These flares have the distinct properties of i) having a complex magnetic-field structure with two initial sets of coronal loops, with one upper set overlaying a lower set, ii) having an eruptive flare initiated in the lower set and disturbing both loop sets, iii) having the hot coronal emissions emitted only from the lower set in conjunction with the X-ray peak, and iv) having the first peak of the warm coronal emissions associated with the lower set and its second peak emitted from the upper set many minutes to hours after the first peak and without a second X-ray enhancement. The disturbance of the coronal loops by the eruption is at about the same time, but the relaxation and cooling down of the heated coronal loops during the post-flare reconnections have different time scales with the longer, upper loops being significantly delayed from the lower loops. The difference in these cooling time scales is related to the difference between the two peak times of the warm coronal emission and is also apparent in the decay profile of the X-ray emissions having two distinct decays, with the first decay slope being steeper (faster) and the delayed decay slope being smaller (slower) during the time of the warm-coronal-emission second peak. The frequency and relationship of the EUV late-phase decay times between the Fe xvi 335 Å two flare peaks and X-ray decay slopes are examined using three years of SDO/ EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) data, and the X-ray dual-decay character is

  8. Solar flare leaves sun quaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-05-01

    energy, and produce X-rays, microwaves and a shock wave that heats the solar surface. Kosovichev and Zharkova developed a theory that predicts the nature and magnitude of the shock waves that this beam of energetic electrons should create when they slam down into the solar atmosphere. Although their theory directed them to the right area to search for the seismic waves, the waves that they found were 10 times stronger than they had predicted. "They were so strong that you can see them in the raw data," Kosovichev says. The solar seismic waves appear to be compression waves like the "P" waves generated by an earthquake. They travel throughout the Sun's interior. In fact, the waves should recombine on the opposite side of the Sun from the location of the flare to create a faint duplicate of the original ripple pattern, Kosovichev predicts. Now that they know how to find them, the SOHO scientists say that the seismic waves generated by solar flares should allow them to verify independently some of the conditions in the solar interior that they have inferred from studying the pattern of waves that are continually ruffling the Sun's surface. SOHO is part of the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) program, a global effort to observe and understand our star and its effects on our environment. The ISTP mission includes more than 20 satellites, coupled with with ground-based observatories and modeling centers, that allow scientists to study the Sun, the Earth, and the space between them in unprecedented detail. ISTP is a joint program of NASA, ESA, Japan's Institute for Astronautical Science, and Russia's Space Research Institute. Still images of the solar quake can be found at the following internet address: FTP://PAO.GSFC.NASA.GOV/newsmedia/QUAKE/ For further information, please contact : ESA Public Relations Division Tel:+33(0)1.53.69.71.55 Fax: +33(0)1.53.69.76.90 3

  9. The Solar Flare Myth in solar-terrestrial physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gosling, J.T.

    1993-07-01

    Early observations of associations between solar flares and large non- recurrent geomagnetic storms, large {open_quote}solar{close_quote} energetic particle events, and transient shock wave disturbances in the solar wind led to a paradigm of cause and effect that gave flares a central position in the chain of events leading from solar activity to major transient disturbances in the near-earth space environment. However, research in the last two decades shows that this emphasis on flares is misplaced. In this paper the author outlines briefly the rationale for a different paradigm of cause and effect in solar- terrestrial physics that removes solar flares from their central position as the {open_quote}cause{close_quote} of major disturbances in the near-earth space environment. Instead, this central role of {open_quote}cause{close_quote} is played by events now known as coronal mass ejections, or CMEs.

  10. On the sensitivity of the goes flare classification to properties of the electron beam in the thick-target model

    SciTech Connect

    Reep, J. W.; Bradshaw, S. J.; McAteer, R. T. J. E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu

    2013-11-20

    The collisional thick-target model, wherein a large number of electrons are accelerated down a flaring loop, can be used to explain many observed properties of solar flares. In this study, we focus on the sensitivity of (GOES) flare classification to the properties of the thick-target model. Using a hydrodynamic model with RHESSI-derived electron beam parameters, we explore the effects of the beam energy flux (or total non-thermal energy), the cut-off energy, and the spectral index of the electron distribution on the soft X-rays observed by GOES. We conclude that (1) the GOES class is proportional to the non-thermal energy E {sup α} for α ≈ 1.7 in the low-energy passband (1-8 Å) and ≈1.6 in the high-energy passband (0.5-4 Å); (2) the GOES class is only weakly dependent on the spectral index in both passbands; (3) increases in the cut-off will increase the flux in the 0.5-4 Å passband but decrease the flux in the 1-8 Å passband, while decreases in the cut-off will cause a decrease in the 0.5-4 Å passband and a slight increase in the 1-8 Å passband.

  11. Gage tests tube flares quickly and accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, F. D.

    1966-01-01

    Flared tube gage with a test cone that is precisely made with a tapering surface to complement the tube flare is capable of determining the accuracy of a tube flare efficiently and economically. This device should improve the speed, efficiency, and accuracy of tube flare inspections.

  12. Synergetic effects of mixed copper-iron oxides oxygen carriers in chemical looping combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Siriwardane, Ranjani; Tian, Hanjing; Simonyi, Thomas; Poston, James

    2013-06-01

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is an emerging technology for clean energy production from fuels. CLC produces sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}-streams without a significant energy penalty. Development of efficient oxygen carriers is essential to successfully operate a CLC system. Copper and iron oxides are promising candidates for CLC. Copper oxide possesses high reactivity but it has issues with particle agglomeration due to its low melting point. Even though iron oxide is an inexpensive oxygen carrier it has a slower reactivity. In this study, mixed metal oxide carriers containing iron and copper oxides were evaluated for coal and methane CLC. The components of CuO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were optimized to obtain good reactivity while maintaining physical and chemical stability during cyclic reactions for methane-CLC and solid-fuel CLC. Compared with single metal oxygen carriers, the optimized Cu–Fe mixed oxide oxygen carriers demonstrated high reaction rate, better combustion conversion, greater oxygen usage and improved physical stability. Thermodynamic calculations, XRD, TGA, flow reactor studies and TPR experiments suggested that there is a strong interaction between CuO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} contributing to a synergistic effect during CLC reactions. The amount of oxygen release of the mixed oxide carrier in the absence of a fuel was similar to that of the single metal oxides. However, in the presence of fuels, the oxygen consumption and the reaction profiles of the mixed oxide carriers were significantly better than that of the single metal oxides. The nature of the fuel not only influenced the reactivity, but also the final reduction status of the oxygen carriers during chemical looping combustion. Cu oxide of the mixed oxide was fully reduced metallic copper with both coal and methane. Fe oxide of the mixed oxide was fully reduced Fe metal with methane but it was reduced to only FeO with coal. Possible mechanisms of how the presence of CuO enhances the

  13. Use of evidence to support healthy public policy: a policy effectiveness-feasibility loop.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Sarah; Unwin, Nigel; Critchley, Julia; Capewell, Simon; Husseini, Abdullatif; Maziak, Wasim; Zaman, Shahaduz; Ben Romdhane, Habiba; Fouad, Fouad; Phillimore, Peter; Unal, Belgin; Khatib, Rana; Shoaibi, Azza; Ahmad, Balsam

    2012-11-01

    Public policy plays a key role in improving population health and in the control of diseases, including non-communicable diseases. However, an evidence-based approach to formulating healthy public policy has been difficult to implement, partly on account of barriers that hinder integrated work between researchers and policy-makers. This paper describes a "policy effectiveness-feasibility loop" (PEFL) that brings together epidemiological modelling, local situation analysis and option appraisal to foster collaboration between researchers and policy-makers. Epidemiological modelling explores the determinants of trends in disease and the potential health benefits of modifying them. Situation analysis investigates the current conceptualization of policy, the level of policy awareness and commitment among key stakeholders, and what actually happens in practice, thereby helping to identify policy gaps. Option appraisal integrates epidemiological modelling and situation analysis to investigate the feasibility, costs and likely health benefits of various policy options. The authors illustrate how PEFL was used in a project to inform public policy for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes in four parts of the eastern Mediterranean. They conclude that PEFL may offer a useful framework for researchers and policy-makers to successfully work together to generate evidence-based policy, and they encourage further evaluation of this approach.

  14. On the benefits of hysteresis effects for closed-loop separation control using plasma actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benard, N.; Cattafesta, L. N.; Moreau, E.; Griffin, J.; Bonnet, J. P.

    2011-08-01

    Flow separation control by a non-thermal plasma actuator is considered for a NACA 0015 airfoil at a chord Reynolds number of 1.9 × 105. Static hysteresis in the lift coefficient is demonstrated for increasing and then decreasing sinusoidal voltage amplitude supplying a typical single dielectric barrier discharge actuator at the leading edge of the model. In addition to these open-loop experiments, unsteady surface pressure signals are examined for transient processes involving forced reattachment and natural separation. The results show that strong pressure oscillations in the relatively slow separation process, compared to reattachment, precede the ultimate massive flow separation. To enhance the contrast between the parts of the signal related to the attached flow and those related to the incipient separation, RMS estimate of filtered values of Cp is used to define a flow separation predictor that is implemented in feedback control. Two simple controllers are proposed, one based on a predefined threshold of the unsteady Cp and another that utilizes the flow separation predictor to identify incipient separation. The latter effectively leverages the hysteresis in the post-stall regime to reduce the electrical power consumed by the actuator while maintaining continuously attached flow.

  15. System identification of closed-loop cardiovascular control: effects of posture and autonomic blockade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, T. J.; Appel, M. L.; Mukkamala, R.; Mathias, J. M.; Cohen, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    We applied system identification to the analysis of fluctuations in heart rate (HR), arterial blood pressure (ABP), and instantaneous lung volume (ILV) to characterize quantitatively the physiological mechanisms responsible for the couplings between these variables. We characterized two autonomically mediated coupling mechanisms [the heart rate baroreflex (HR baroreflex) and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (ILV-HR)] and two mechanically mediated coupling mechanisms [the blood pressure wavelet generated with each cardiac contraction (circulatory mechanics) and the direct mechanical effects of respiration on blood pressure (ILV-->ABP)]. We evaluated the method in humans studied in the supine and standing postures under control conditions and under conditions of beta-sympathetic and parasympathetic pharmacological blockades. Combined beta-sympathetic and parasympathetic blockade abolished the autonomically mediated couplings while preserving the mechanically mediated coupling. Selective autonomic blockade and postural changes also altered the couplings in a manner consistent with known physiological mechanisms. System identification is an "inverse-modeling" technique that provides a means for creating a closed-loop model of cardiovascular regulation for an individual subject without altering the underlying physiological control mechanisms.

  16. Using Sdo's AIA to Investigate Energy Transport from a Flare's Energy Release Site to the Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.; Holman, Gordon D.

    2012-01-01

    Coordinated observations of a GOES B4.8 microflare with SDOs Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the RamatyHigh Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) on 2010 July 31 show that emission in all seven of AIAs EUV channels brightened simultaneously nearly 6 min before RHESSI or GOES detected emission from plasma at temperatures around 10 MK. Aims. To help interpret these and AIA flare observations in general, we characterized the expected temporal responses of AIAs 94, 131, 171, 193, 211, and 335 channels to solar flare brightenings by combining (1) AIAs nominal temperature response functions available through SSWIDL with (2) EUV spectral line data observed in a flare loop Coordinated observations of a GOES B4.8 microflare with SDOs Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the RamatyHigh Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) on 2010 July 31 show that emission in all seven of AIAs EUV channels brightenedsimultaneously nearly 6 min before RHESSI or GOES detected emission from plasma at temperatures around 10 MK.Aims. To help interpret these and AIA flare observations in general, we characterized the expected temporal responses of AIAs 94,131, 171, 193, 211, and 335 channels to solar flare brightenings by combining (1) AIAs nominal temperature response functionsavailable through SSWIDL with (2) EUV spectral line data observed in a flare loop

  17. Solar flare predictions and warnings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, K. P., III

    1972-01-01

    The real-time solar monitoring information supplied to support SPARCS equipped rocket launches, the routine collection and analysis of 3.3-mm solar radio maps, short-term flare forecasts based on these maps, longer-term forecasts based on the recurrence of active regions, and an extension of the flare forecasting technique are summarized. Forecasts for expectation of a solar flare of class or = 2F are given and compared with observed flares. A total of 52 plage regions produced all the flares of class or = 1N during the study period. The following results are indicated: of the total of 21 positive forecasts, 3 were correct and 18 were incorrect; of the total of 31 negative forecasts, 3 were incorrect and 28 were correct; of a total of 6 plage regions producing large flares, 3 were correctly forecast and 3 were missed; and of 46 regions not producing any large flares, 18 were incorrectly forecast and 28 were correctly forecast.

  18. Highlights of the study of energy release in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.; Batchelor, D. A.

    1987-01-01

    From February 26 to March 1, 1979, 32 solar flare investigators attended a workshop at Cambridge, MA to define objectives and devise a scientific program for the study of energy release in flares (SERF) during the coming solar maximum. Herein, some major results of the ensuing five-year effort to observe and understand the flare energy release process and its effects (energetic particle production, coronal and chromospheric heating, electromagnetic radiations, and mass motions and ejections) are reviewed. The central issue - what processes store and release the energy liberated in flares - remains unresolved except in the most general terms (e.g., it is generally agreed that the energy is stored in sheared or stressed magnetic fields and released by field annihilation during some MHD instability). Resolving that issue is still one of the most important goals in solar physics, but the advances during the SERF program have brought it closer.

  19. Olopatadine hydrochloride inhibits capsaicin-induced flare response in humans.

    PubMed

    Shindo, Masahisa; Yoshida, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    Capsaicin, a vanilloid, has the potential for releasing substance P (SP) from sensory nerves. Topical application of capsaicin induces a flare response in the skin. However, it has not been clarified whether the release of SP is involved in the process of flare response or not. A potent antihistamine drug, olopatadine hydrochloride, is known to have inhibitory action against the release of SP. We examined the effects of olopatadine (at a dose of 5 mg) on skin reaction induced by topical application of capsaicin in 10 healthy subjects. The scores of capsaicin-induced flare responses after olopatadine administration were significantly lower at 30 min than at baseline. Our findings suggest that olopatadine hydrochloride could inhibit capsaicin-induced flare responses.

  20. Characteristics of the photospheric magnetic field associated with solar flare initiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ya-Hui; Chen, P. F.; Hsieh, Min-Shiu; Wu, S. T.; He, Han; Tsai, Tsung-Che E-mail: chenpf@nju.edu.cn E-mail: wus@uah.edu E-mail: tctsai@narlabs.org.tw

    2014-05-01

    The physical environment governing the solar flare initiation is not fully understood, although there are significant efforts to address the relationship between magnetic non-potential parameters and early flare signatures. In this study, we attempt to characterize the flare initiation based on the processed Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager vector magnetograms, Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 1600 Å, and RHESSI hard X-ray observations. Three flare events, the M6.6 flare on 2011 February 13, the X2.2 flare on 2011 February 15, and the X2.1 flare on 2011 September 6, in two active regions AR 11158 and AR 11283 are investigated. We analyze the source field strength in the photosphere, which is defined as the magnitude of the observed magnetic field deviation from the potential field. It is found that one of the strong source field regions above the magnetic polarity inversion line well connects the initial bright kernels of two conjugate ribbons. The results imply that the distribution of the photospheric source field strength can be used to locate the initiation site of flaring loops regardless of the configuration of pre-flare magnetic fields or the evolution of active regions. Moreover, the field configuration in the strong source field regions tends to become more inclined after flares, which is consistent with the coronal implosion scenario. We also employ a fast method to derive the total current density from the photospheric vector magnetogram in the framework of force-free field. This method can provide fast estimation of photospheric current density within a reasonable accuracy without appealing for the more accurate calculation from a model extrapolation.

  1. Ion Acceleration in Solar Flares Determined by Solar Neutron Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, K.; Solar Neutron Observation Group

    2013-05-01

    Large amounts of particles can be accelerated to relativistic energy in association with solar flares and/or accompanying phenomena (e.g., CME-driven shocks), and they sometimes reach very near the Earth and penetrate the Earth's atmosphere. These particles are observed by ground-based detectors (e.g., neutron monitors) as Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs). Some of the GLEs originate from high energy solar neutrons which are produced in association with solar flares. These neutrons are also observed by ground-based neutron monitors and solar neutron telescopes. Recently, some of the solar neutron detectors have also been operating in space. By observing these solar neutrons, we can obtain information about ion acceleration in solar flares. Such neutrons were observed in association with some X-class flares in solar cycle 23, and sometimes they were observed by two different types of detectors. For example, on 2005 September 7, large solar neutron signals were observed by the neutron monitor at Mt. Chacaltaya in Bolivia and Mexico City, and by the solar neutron telescopes at Chacaltaya and Mt. Sierra Negra in Mexico in association with an X17.0 flare. The neutron signal continued for more than 20 minutes with high statistical significance. Intense gamma-ray emission was also registered by INTEGRAL, and by RHESSI during the decay phase. We analyzed these data using the solar-flare magnetic-loop transport and interaction model of Hua et al. (2002), and found that the model could successfully fit the data with intermediate values of loop magnetic convergence and pitch angle scattering parameters. These results indicate that solar neutrons were produced at the same time as the gamma-ray line emission and that ions were continuously accelerated at the emission site. In this paper, we introduce some of the solar neutron observations in solar cycle 23, and discuss the tendencies of the physical parameters of solar neutron GLEs, and the energy spectrum and population of the

  2. Observations of H-alpha and microwave brightening caused by a distant solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, M. R.; Bobrowsky, M.; Rust, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    Synthesized maps with integration times of 10 and 30 sec, based on the observation of three subflares at 6 cm and H-alpha 6563 A, indicate that most of the 6 cm burst emission originated in 10-15 arcsec features coincident with, or adjacent to, H-alpha flare kernels. During the onset of one of the subflares, 6 cm emission was discovered in a loop stretching over 100,000 km from the primary flare site in association with H-alpha flare-like brightness at the remote footpoint of the loop. Assuming a primary flare site origin for the energy of the distant brightening, about 4 x 10 to the 24th ergs/sec propagated along the connecting magnetic loop at a velocity of more than 6000 km/sec. It is suggested that the energy may have been carried by electrons originating in the high energy tail of the electron thermal velocity distribution, escaping from the primary flare site.

  3. Photospheric and Coronal Observations of Abrupt Magnetic Restructuring in Two Flaring Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, Gordon

    2016-05-01

    For two major X-class flares observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory Ahead (STEREO-A) spacecraft when they were close to quadrature, we compare major, abrupt changes in the photospheric magnetic vector field to changes in the observed coronal magnetic structure during the two flares. The Lorentz force changes in strong photospheric fields within active regions are estimated from time series of SDO Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) vector magnetograms. These show that the major changes occurred in each case near the main neutral line of the region and in two neighboring twisted opposite-polarity sunspots. In each case the horizontal parallel field strengthened significantly near the neutral line while the azimuthal field in the sunspots decreased, suggesting that a flux rope joining the two sunspots collapsed across the neutral line with reduced magnetic pressure because of a reduced field twist component. At the same time, the coronal extreme ultraviolet (EUV) loop structure was observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard SDO and the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) on STEREO-A to decrease significantly in height during each eruption, discontinuous changes signifying ejection of magnetized plasma, and outward-propagating continuous but abrupt changes consistent with loop contraction. An asymmetry in the observed EUV loop changes during one of the flares matches an asymmetry in the photospheric magnetic changes associated with that flare. The observations are discussed in terms of the well-known tether-cutting and breakout flare initiation models.

  4. Quasi-Periodic Pulsations with Varying Period in Multi-Wavelength Observations of an X-class Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jing; Tan, Baolin; Zhang, Yin; Karlický, Marian; Mészárosová, Hana

    2014-08-01

    This work presents an interesting phenomenon of the period variation in quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) observed during the impulsive phase of a coronal mass ejection-related X1.1 class flare on 2012 July 6. The period of QPPs was changed from 21 s at soft X-rays (SXR) to 22-23 s at microwaves, to ~24 s at extreme ultraviolet emissions (EUV), and to 27-32 s at metric-decimetric waves. The microwave, EUV, and SXR QPPs, emitted from flare loops of different heights, were oscillating in phase. Fast kink mode oscillations were proposed to be the modulation mechanism, which may exist in a wide region in the solar atmosphere from the chromosphere to the upper corona or even to the interplanetary space. Changed parameters of flare loops through the solar atmosphere could result in the varying period of QPPs at different wavelengths. The first appearing microwave QPPs and quasi-periodic metric-decimetric type III bursts were generated by energetic electrons. This may imply that particle acceleration or magnetic reconnection were located between these two non-thermal emission sources. Thermal QPPs (in SXR and EUV emissions) occurred later than the nonthermal ones, which would suggest a some time for plasma heating or energy dissipation in flare loops during burst processes. At the beginning of flare, a sudden collapse and expansion of two separated flare loop structures occurred simultaneously with the multi-wavelength QPPs. An implosion in the corona, including both collapse and expansion of flare loops, could be a trigger of loop oscillations in a very large region in the solar atmosphere.

  5. Quasi-periodic pulsations with varying period in multi-wavelength observations of an X-class flare

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jing; Tan, Baolin; Zhang, Yin; Karlický, Marian; Mészárosová, Hana

    2014-08-10

    This work presents an interesting phenomenon of the period variation in quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) observed during the impulsive phase of a coronal mass ejection-related X1.1 class flare on 2012 July 6. The period of QPPs was changed from 21 s at soft X-rays (SXR) to 22-23 s at microwaves, to ∼24 s at extreme ultraviolet emissions (EUV), and to 27-32 s at metric-decimetric waves. The microwave, EUV, and SXR QPPs, emitted from flare loops of different heights, were oscillating in phase. Fast kink mode oscillations were proposed to be the modulation mechanism, which may exist in a wide region in the solar atmosphere from the chromosphere to the upper corona or even to the interplanetary space. Changed parameters of flare loops through the solar atmosphere could result in the varying period of QPPs at different wavelengths. The first appearing microwave QPPs and quasi-periodic metric-decimetric type III bursts were generated by energetic electrons. This may imply that particle acceleration or magnetic reconnection were located between these two non-thermal emission sources. Thermal QPPs (in SXR and EUV emissions) occurred later than the nonthermal ones, which would suggest a some time for plasma heating or energy dissipation in flare loops during burst processes. At the beginning of flare, a sudden collapse and expansion of two separated flare loop structures occurred simultaneously with the multi-wavelength QPPs. An implosion in the corona, including both collapse and expansion of flare loops, could be a trigger of loop oscillations in a very large region in the solar atmosphere.

  6. MAGNETIC RECONNECTION DURING THE TWO-PHASE EVOLUTION OF A SOLAR ERUPTIVE FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Bhuwan; Cho, K.-S.; Bong, S.-C.; Kim, Y.-H.; Veronig, Astrid; Moon, Y.-J.; Lee, Jeongwoo; Manoharan, P. K.

    2009-12-01

    We present a detailed multi-wavelength analysis and interpretation of the evolution of an M7.6 flare that occurred near the southeast limb on 2003 October 24. Pre-flare images at TRACE 195 A show that the bright and complex system of coronal loops already existed at the flaring site. The X-ray observations of the flare taken from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) spacecraft reveal two phases of the flare evolution. The first phase is characterized by the altitude decrease of the X-ray looptop (LT) source for approx11 minutes. Such a long duration of the descending LT source motion is reported for the first time. The EUV loops, located below the X-ray LT source, also undergo contraction with similar speed (approx15 km s{sup -1}) in this interval. During the second phase the two distinct hard X-ray footpoint (FP) sources are observed which correlate well with UV and Halpha flare ribbons. The X-ray LT source now exhibits upward motion as anticipated from the standard flare model. The RHESSI spectra during the first phase are soft and indicative of hot thermal emission from flaring loops with temperatures T > 25 MK at the early stage. On the other hand, the spectra at high energies (epsilon approx> 25 keV) follow hard power laws during the second phase (gamma = 2.6-2.8). We show that the observed motion of the LT and FP sources can be understood as a consequence of three-dimensional magnetic reconnection at a separator in the corona. During the first phase of the flare, the reconnection releases an excess of magnetic energy related to the magnetic tensions generated before a flare by the shear flows in the photosphere. The relaxation of the associated magnetic shear in the corona by the reconnection process explains the descending motion of the LT source. During the second phase, the ordinary reconnection process dominates describing the energy release in terms of the standard model of large eruptive flares with increasing FP separation

  7. Solar Flare Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmahl, Edward J.; Kundu, Mukul R.

    1998-01-01

    We have continued our previous efforts in studies of fourier imaging methods applied to hard X-ray flares. We have performed physical and theoretical analysis of rotating collimator grids submitted to GSFC(Goddard Space Flight Center) for the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI). We have produced simulation algorithms which are currently being used to test imaging software and hardware for HESSI. We have developed Maximum-Entropy, Maximum-Likelihood, and "CLEAN" methods for reconstructing HESSI images from count-rate profiles. This work is expected to continue through the launch of HESSI in July, 2000. Section 1 shows a poster presentation "Image Reconstruction from HESSI Photon Lists" at the Solar Physics Division Meeting, June 1998; Section 2 shows the text and viewgraphs prepared for "Imaging Simulations" at HESSI's Preliminary Design Review on July 30, 1998.

  8. Building Big Flares: Constraining Generating Processes of Solar Flare Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyse Jackson, T.; Kashyap, V.; McKillop, S.

    2015-12-01

    We address mechanisms which seek to explain the observed solar flare distribution, dN/dE ~ E1.8. We have compiled a comprehensive database, from GOES, NOAA, XRT, and AIA data, of solar flares and their characteristics, covering the year 2013. These datasets allow us to probe how stored magnetic energy is released over the course of an active region's evolution. We fit power-laws to flare distributions over various attribute groupings. For instance, we compare flares that occur before and after an active region reaches its maximum area, and show that the corresponding flare distributions are indistinguishable; thus, the processes that lead to magnetic reconnection are similar in both cases. A turnover in the distribution is not detectable at the energies accessible to our study, suggesting that a self-organized critical (SOC) process is a valid mechanism. However, we find changes in the distributions that suggest that the simple picture of an SOC where flares draw energy from an inexhaustible reservoir of stored magnetic energy is incomplete. Following the evolution of the flare distribution over the lifetimes of active regions, we find that the distribution flattens with time, and for larger active regions, and that a single power-law model is insufficient. This implies that flares that occur later in the lifetime of the active region tend towards higher energies. We conclude that the SOC process must have an upper bound. Increasing the scope of the study to include data from other years and more instruments will increase the robustness of these results. This work was supported by the NSF-REU Solar Physics Program at SAO, grant number AGS 1263241, NASA Contract NAS8-03060 to the Chandra X-ray Center and by NASA Hinode/XRT contract NNM07AB07C to SAO

  9. THE EMISSION MEASURE DISTRIBUTION OF IMPULSIVE PHASE FLARE FOOTPOINTS

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, D. R.; Hannah, I. G.; Fletcher, L.; Milligan, R. O.

    2013-04-10

    The temperature distribution of the emitting plasma is a crucial constraint when studying the heating of solar flare footpoints. However, determining this for impulsive phase footpoints has been difficult in the past due to insufficient spatial resolution to resolve the footpoints from the loop structures, and a lack of spectral and temporal coverage. We use the capabilities of Hinode/Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer to obtain the first emission measure distributions (EMDs) from impulsive phase footpoints in six flares. Observations with good spectral coverage were analyzed using a regularized inversion method to recover the EMDs. We find that the EMDs all share a peak temperature of around 8 MK, with lines formed around this temperature having emission measures (EMs) peaking between 10{sup 28} and 10{sup 29} cm{sup -5}, indicating a substantial presence of plasma at very high temperatures within the footpoints. An EMD gradient of EM(T) {approx} T is found in all events. Previous theoretical work on EM gradients shows this to be consistent with a scenario in which the deposited flare energy directly heats only the top layer of the flare chromosphere, while deeper layers are heated by conduction.

  10. The impulsive hard X-rays from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, J.

    1984-01-01

    A technique for determining the physical arrangement of a solar flare during the impulsive phase was developed based upon a nonthermal model interpretation of the emitted hard X-rays. Accurate values are obtained for the flare parameters, including those which describe the magnetic field structure and the beaming of the energetic electrons, parameters which have hitherto been mostly inaccessible. The X-ray intensity height structure can be described readily with a single expression based upon a semi-empirical fit to the results from many models. Results show that the degree of linear polarization of the X-rays from a flaring loop does not exceed 25 percent and can easily and naturally be as low as the polarization expected from a thermal model. This is a highly significant result in that it supersedes those based upon less thorough calculations of the electron beam dynamics and requires that a reevaluation of hopes of using polarization measurements to discriminate between categories of flare models.

  11. Effective field theory of large scale structure at two loops: The apparent scale dependence of the speed of sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldauf, Tobias; Mercolli, Lorenzo; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2015-12-01

    We study the effective field theory (EFT) of large-scale structure for cosmic density and momentum fields. We show that the finite part of the two-loop calculation and its counterterms introduces an apparent scale dependence for the leading-order parameter cs2 of the EFT starting at k =0.1 h Mpc-1 . These terms limit the range over which one can trust the one-loop EFT calculation at the 1% level to k <0.1 h Mpc-1 at redshift z =0 . We construct a well-motivated one-parameter ansatz to fix the relative size of the one- and two-loop counterterms using their high-k sensitivity. Although this one-parameter model is a very restrictive choice for the counterterms, it explains the apparent scale dependence of cs2 seen in simulations. It is also able to capture the scale dependence of the density power spectrum up to k ≈0.3 h Mpc-1 at the 1% level at redshift z =0 . Considering a simple scheme for the resummation of large-scale motions, we find that the two-loop calculation reduces the need for this IR resummation at k <0.2 h Mpc-1 . Finally, we extend our calculation to momentum statistics and show that the same one-parameter model can also describe density-momentum and momentum-momentum statistics.

  12. Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Test of a Flare-type Membrane Aeroshell for Atmospheric Entry Capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Kazuhiko; Koyama, Masashi; Kimura, Yusuke; Suzuki, Kojiro; Abe, Takashi; Koichi Hayashi, A.

    A flexible aeroshell for atmospheric entry vehicles has attracted attention as an innovative space transportation system. In this study, hypersonic wind tunnel tests were carried out to investigate the behavior, aerodynamic characteristics and aerodynamic heating environment in hypersonic flow for a previously developed capsule-type vehicle with a flare-type membrane aeroshell made of ZYLON textile sustained by a rigid torus frame. Two different models with different flare angles (45º and 60º) were tested to experimentally clarify the effect of flare angle. Results indicate that flare angle of aeroshell has significant and complicate effect on flow field and aerodynamic heating in hypersonic flow at Mach 9.45 and the flare angle is very important parameter for vehicle design with the flare-type membrane aeroshell.

  13. Flare heating and ionization of the low solar chromosphere. II - Observations of five solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Thomas R.; Canfield, Richard C.; Saba, Julia L. R.

    1990-01-01

    Two neutral Mg spectral lines formed in the temperature-minimum region and the low chromosphere, at 4571 and 5173 A, are used to quantify the changes in the atmospheric structure as a function of time during five solar flares. Eight proposed flare heating and ionization mechanisms and predictions of the effects of each on the temperature minimum region are discussed. Two Mg spectral observations made at the National Solar Observatory (Sacramento Peak), along with observations of hard and soft X-rays from the SMM and GOES satellites, are compared to the predictions of the eight proposed mechanisms. The initial effects in all five flares are consistent with backwarming by enhanced Balmer- and Paschen-continuum radiation originating in the upper chromosphere. Extended heating observed in two of the flares is most likely due to UV irradiation. In all cases heating by the dissipation of nonreversed electric currents, collisions with an electron or proton beam, irradiation by soft X-rays, and dissipation of Alfven waves are eliminated.

  14. Models and Comparisons of Long Duration and Impulsive Solar Flare Events from SDO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, Trevor; Testa, P.; Reeves, K.

    2012-01-01

    We compare observational signatures of two GOES C8-class solar flares through instrumentation on Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) provide a unique look at the sun through global scale, fast cadence, high-resolution photometric and spectral measurements; this data is ideal for analyzing the temporal evolution of flare properties. The two flares studied differ in both time scale and morphology, one may be classified as a long duration event (LDE), while the other is highly impulsive. Differences are noted in behavior in the AIA EUV bands as well as several spectral lines. Furthermore, we apply both zero and one dimensional multi-threaded hydrodynamic loop models to synthesize light curves and spectra for each flare. Funding provided by NSF REU solar physics program at CfA, grant number ATM-0851866 and Marlboro College.

  15. Gamma rays from pion decay - Evidence for long-term trapping of particles in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandzhavidze, Natalie; Ramaty, Reuven

    1992-01-01

    The energy spectrum and time dependence of the 50 MeV to 2 GeV gamma rays observed from the 1991 June 11 solar flare are analyzed. It is shown that the emission detected at the late phase of this flare with EGRET on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory can be explained by a model in which the bulk of the particles were accelerated during the impulsive phase and subsequently trapped in coronal magnetic loops. The observed spectrum was fit with a combination of pion decay radiation and primary electron bremsstrahlung. The 1991 June 11 data are compared with data for the 1982 June 3 and 1991 June 15 flares from which pion decay emission was also observed. The fact that the fluxes from these three flares are ordered in time in accordance with the predicted time dependence of emission produced by trapped particles provides support for the model.

  16. Hydrodynamic modeling of an X-ray flare on Proxima Centauri observed by the Einstein telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Reale, F.; Peres, G.; Serio, S.; Rosner, R.; Schmitt, J.H.M.M.

    1988-05-01

    Hydrodynamic numerical calculations of a flare which occurred on Proxima Centauri and was observed by the Einstein satellite on August 20, 1980 at 12:50 UT are presented. The highlights of the hydrodynamic code are reviewed, and the physical and geometrical parameters necessary for the calculations are derived and compared with observations. The results are consistent with the stellar flare being caused by the rapid dissipation of 5.9 x 10 to the 31st ergs, within a magnetic loop structure whose semilength is 7 x 10 to the 9th cm and cross-sectional radius is 7.3 x 10 to the 8th cm. The results provide evidence that flares on late-type stars can be described by a hydrodynamic model with a relatively simple geometry, similar to solar compact flares. 39 references.

  17. PRODUCTIVITY OF SOLAR FLARES AND MAGNETIC HELICITY INJECTION IN ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung-hong; Wang Haimin; Chae, Jongchul

    2010-07-20

    The main objective of this study is to better understand how magnetic helicity injection in an active region (AR) is related to the occurrence and intensity of solar flares. We therefore investigate the magnetic helicity injection rate and unsigned magnetic flux, as a reference. In total, 378 ARs are analyzed using SOHO/MDI magnetograms. The 24 hr averaged helicity injection rate and unsigned magnetic flux are compared with the flare index and the flare-productive probability in the next 24 hr following a measurement. In addition, we study the variation of helicity over a span of several days around the times of the 19 flares above M5.0 which occurred in selected strong flare-productive ARs. The major findings of this study are as follows: (1) for a sub-sample of 91 large ARs with unsigned magnetic fluxes in the range from (3-5) x 10{sup 22} Mx, there is a difference in the magnetic helicity injection rate between flaring ARs and non-flaring ARs by a factor of 2; (2) the GOES C-flare-productive probability as a function of helicity injection displays a sharp boundary between flare-productive ARs and flare-quiet ones; (3) the history of helicity injection before all the 19 major flares displayed a common characteristic: a significant helicity accumulation of (3-45) x 10{sup 42} Mx{sup 2} during a phase of monotonically increasing helicity over 0.5-2 days. Our results support the notion that helicity injection is important in flares, but it is not effective to use it alone for the purpose of flare forecast. It is necessary to find a way to better characterize the time history of helicity injection as well as its spatial distribution inside ARs.

  18. A model of flow in a closed-loop thermosyphon including the Soret effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, J. E.

    1985-11-01

    This theoretical study addresses the nature of convective motions in a toroidal loop of binary fluid oriented in the vertical plane and heated from below. The boundaries of the loop are impermeable, but gradients of the solute can be set up by Soret diffusion in the direction around the loop. The existence and stability of steady solutions are discussed over the Rayleigh number-Soret coefficient parameter plane. When the Soret coefficient is negative, periodic and chaotic oscillations analogous to those of thermohaline convection are predicted. When the Soret coefficient is positive, relaxation oscillations and low Rayleigh number chaotic motions are found. Both sets of phenomena are predicted to occur for realistic thermosyphon parameters.

  19. Observation of the Evolution of a Current Sheet in a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chunming; Liu, Rui; Alexander, David; McAteer, R. T. James

    2016-04-01

    We report multi-wavelength and multi-viewpoint observations of a solar eruptive event that involves loop–loop interactions. During a C2.0 flare, motions associated with inflowing and outflowing plasma provide evidence for ongoing magnetic reconnection. The flare loop top and a rising “concave-up” feature are connected by a current-sheet-like structure (CSLS). The physical properties (thickness, length, temperature, and density) of the CSLS are evaluated. In regions adjacent to the CSLS, the EUV emission (characteristic temperature at 1.6 MK) begins to increase more than 10 minutes prior to the onset of the flare, and steeply decreases during the decay phase. The reduction of the emission resembles that expected from coronal dimming. The dynamics of this event imply a magnetic reconnection rate in the range 0.01–0.05.

  20. Magnetic Evolution of Super-Active Region NOAA AR 10486 and the Large 4B/X17.2 Class Flare Observed During Octbober 28, 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambastha, Ashok

    2005-09-01

    Extensive flare activity was observed in super-active region NOAA10486 during its disk passage of October 22-November 04, 2003. An extremely energetic 4B/X17.2 flare on October 28, 2003/11:10 UT was observed from USO when the active region was located at S16E08, i.e., close to the disk-centre. This flare was rated the third largest X-ray flare recorded by GOES satellite, and the largest in the optical class (4B) observed so far from USO. Chromospheric H-alpha filtergrams were obtained before, during and in the decay phase of the two-ribbon flare at a cadence of 3-4 seconds. The temporal and spatial structure evolution was analyzed with the help of a movie constructed using more than 4000 images. Magnetograms from NASA-MSFC showed large magnetic shear around the flare site which was delineated by a large active filament. The filament erupted as the flare progressed. In the decay phase of the flare, a system of post-flare loops developed at the site of the erupted filament. Observation from TRACE also exhibited these loop structures. Associated with this flare, a fast Earthward moving halo CME was also detected by SOHO, which initiated a major geomagnetic storm on October 29, 2003 at 06:13 UT, i.e., within a record time of 19 hours after the flare. This large flare was followed by another 2B/X11 event on October 29, 2003/20:49 UT, not observed from USO as it occurred in our night-time. We have used white light full disk images and line-of-sight magnetograms obtained from SOHO-MDI for determination of proper motion of the main sunspots and corresponding magnetic fluxes in order to understand rapid magnetic energy build-up in the active region, giving rise to the two large flares within such a short time.

  1. Evolution of Magnetic Helicity During Eruptive Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priest, E. R.; Longcope, D. W.; Janvier, M.

    2016-08-01

    During eruptive solar flares and coronal mass ejections, a non-potential magnetic arcade with much excess magnetic energy goes unstable and reconnects. It produces a twisted erupting flux rope and leaves behind a sheared arcade of hot coronal loops. We suggest that the twist of the erupting flux rope can be determined from conservation of magnetic flux and magnetic helicity and equipartition of magnetic helicity. It depends on the geometry of the initial pre-eruptive structure. Two cases are considered, in the first of which a flux rope is not present initially but is created during the eruption by the reconnection. In the second case, a flux rope is present under the arcade in the pre-eruptive state, and the effect of the eruption and reconnection is to add an amount of magnetic helicity that depends on the fluxes of the rope and arcade and the geometry.

  2. Radiation hydrodynamics in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, G.H.

    1985-10-18

    Solar flares are rather violent and extremely complicated phenomena, and it should be made clear at the outset that a physically complete picture describing all aspects of flares does not exist. From the wealth of data which is available, it is apparent that many different types of physical processes are involved during flares: energetic particle acceleration, rapid magnetohydrodynamic motion of complex field structures, magnetic reconnection, violent mass motion along magnetic field lines, and the heating of plasma to tens of millions of degrees, to name a few. The goal of this paper is to explore just one aspect of solar flares, namely, the interaction of hydrodynamics and radiation processes in fluid being rapidly heated along closed magnetic field lines. The models discussed are therefore necessarily restrictive, and will address only a few of the observed or observable phenomena. 46 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Chandra Monitors the Flaring Crab

    NASA Video Gallery

    Scientists hoped that NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory would locate X-ray sources correlated to the gamma-ray flares seen by Fermi and Italy's AGILE satellites. Two observations were made during th...

  4. Slipping magnetic reconnection in coronal loops.

    PubMed

    Aulanier, Guillaume; Golub, Leon; Deluca, Edward E; Cirtain, Jonathan W; Kano, Ryouhei; Lundquist, Loraine L; Narukage, Noriyuki; Sakao, Taro; Weber, Mark A

    2007-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection of solar coronal loops is the main process that causes solar flares and possibly coronal heating. In the standard model, magnetic field lines break and reconnect instantaneously at places where the field mapping is discontinuous. However, another mode may operate where the magnetic field mapping is continuous but shows steep gradients: The field lines may slip across each other. Soft x-ray observations of fast bidirectional motions of coronal loops, observed by the Hinode spacecraft, support the existence of this slipping magnetic reconnection regime in the Sun's corona. This basic process should be considered when interpreting reconnection, both on the Sun and in laboratory-based plasma experiments. PMID:18063789

  5. Effect of DNA looping on the induction kinetics of the lac operon.

    PubMed

    Narang, Atul

    2007-08-21

    The induction of the lac operon follows cooperative kinetics. The first mechanistic model of these kinetics is the de facto standard in the modeling literature [Yagil, G., Yagil, E., 1971. On the relation between effector concentration and the rate of induced enzyme synthesis. Biophys. J. 11, 11-17]. Yet, subsequent studies have shown that the model is based on incorrect assumptions. Specifically, the repressor is a tetramer with four (not two) inducer-binding sites, and the operon contains two auxiliary operators (in addition to the main operator). Furthermore, these structural features are crucial for the formation of DNA loops, the key determinants of lac repression and induction. Indeed, the repression is determined almost entirely (>95%) by the looped complexes [Oehler, S., Eismann, E.R., Krämer, H., Müller-Hill, B., 1990. The three operators of the lac operon cooperate in repression. EMBO J. 9(4), 973-979], and the pronounced cooperativity of the induction curve hinges upon the existence of the looped complexes [Oehler, S., Alberti, S., Müller-Hill, B., 2006. Induction of the lac promoter in the absence of DNA loops and the stoichiometry of induction. Nucleic Acids Res. 34(2), 606-612]. Here, we formulate a model of lac induction taking due account of the tetrameric structure of the repressor and the existence of looped complexes. We show that: (1) The kinetics are significantly more cooperative than those predicted by the Yagil and Yagil model. The cooperativity is higher because the formation of looped complexes is easily abolished by repressor-inducer binding. (2) The model provides good fits to the repression data for cells containing wild-type tetrameric or mutant dimeric repressor, as well as the induction curves for 6 different strains of Escherichia coli. It also implies that the ratios of certain looped and non-looped complexes are independent of inducer and repressor levels, a conclusion that can be rigorously tested by gel electrophoresis. (3

  6. Solar flare injection as analog of active experiment in an ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzhin, Yu.; Sinelnikov, V.; Shagimuratov, I.; Kanonidi, Kh.

    At realization of active experiment are always known precisely both localization and amplitude of an entered disturbance (whether at a beam particles or mass injection, whether at heating of an ionosphere by EM wave radiation). The nuclear explosion in atmosphere was the maiden active experiment, but the action source was instant and very multicomponent (shock wave, energetic particles and EM radiation with a broadband spectrum) or, in other words, effect was too complex. The solar flare renders mixed action on near Earth space too, but it is clear separated in time (the short pulse of electromagnetic radiation reaches the Earth behind some minutes, then the solar cosmic rays and after one day (or two) the high-velocity flow of plasma arrive) and space of each components action: ionosphere, polar cap or magnitosphere. Analysis of form and dynamics of the X-ray pulse radiation (data of GOES satellites) from a solar flare (class X17) 28.10.03 shows, that there are all basis to consider it as reference source for active experiment in an ionosphere. For this short pulse of EM radiation the investigation of disturbances (SFE, SID or Crochet) of ionosphere Sq currents system and dynamics of the integral plasma contents (or TEC, the data of GPS constellation) in an ionosphere for a network of Europe midlatitude stations (IGS and INTERMAGNET) are conducted. The availability of a maximum gradient (up to 15 A/km) of loop currents and sharp increase in TEC on a narrow range of Sun zenith angles (Z0=60°-75°) is shown. The observed spatial dependence of intensity of such localized disturbance generated in an ionosphere by short EM pulse from a solar flare is discussed.

  7. A flare observed in coronal, transition region, and helium I 10830 Å emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Zhicheng; Cao, Wenda; Qiu, Jiong; Judge, Philip G.

    2014-10-01

    On 2012 June 17, we observed the evolution of a C-class flare associated with the eruption of a filament near a large sunspot in the active region NOAA 11504. We obtained high spatial resolution filtergrams using the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory in broadband TiO at 706 nm (bandpass: 10 Å) and He I 10830 Å narrow band (bandpass: 0.5 Å, centered 0.25 Å to the blue). We analyze the spatio-temporal behavior of the He I 10830 Å data, which were obtained over a 90''×90'' field of view with a cadence of 10 s. We also analyze simultaneous data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment instruments on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft, and data from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and GOES spacecrafts. Non-thermal effects are ignored in this analysis. Several quantitative aspects of the data, as well as models derived using the '0D' enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops model code, indicate that the triplet states of the 10830 Å multiplet are populated by photoionization of chromospheric plasma followed by radiative recombination. Surprisingly, the He II 304 Å line is reasonably well matched by standard emission measure calculations, along with the C IV emission which dominates the Atmosphere Imaging Assembly 1600 Å channel during flares. This work lends support to some of our previous work combining X-ray, EUV, and UV data of flares to build models of energy transport from corona to chromosphere.

  8. HOW GAS-DYNAMIC FLARE MODELS POWERED BY PETSCHEK RECONNECTION DIFFER FROM THOSE WITH AD HOC ENERGY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Longcope, D. W.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2015-11-10

    Aspects of solar flare dynamics, such as chromospheric evaporation and flare light curves, have long been studied using one-dimensional models of plasma dynamics inside a static flare loop, subjected to some energy input. While extremely successful at explaining the observed characteristics of flares, all such models so far have specified energy input ad hoc, rather than deriving it self-consistently. There is broad consensus that flares are powered by magnetic energy released through reconnection. Recent work has generalized Petschek’s basic reconnection scenario, topological change followed by field line retraction and shock heating, to permit its inclusion in a one-dimensional flare loop model. Here we compare the gas dynamics driven by retraction and shocking to those from more conventional static loop models energized by ad hoc source terms. We find significant differences during the first minute, when retraction leads to larger kinetic energies and produces higher densities at the loop top, while ad hoc heating tends to rarify the loop top. The loop-top density concentration is related to the slow magnetosonic shock, characteristic of Petschek’s model, but persists beyond the retraction phase occurring in the outflow jet. This offers an explanation for observed loop-top sources of X-ray and EUV emission, with advantages over that provided by ad hoc heating scenarios. The cooling phases of the two models are, however, notably similar to one another, suggesting that observations at that stage will yield little information on the nature of energy input.

  9. Particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Forman, M. A.

    1987-01-01

    The most direct signatures of particle acceleration in flares are energetic particles detected in interplanetary space and in the Earth atmosphere, and gamma rays, neutrons, hard X-rays, and radio emissions produced by the energetic particles in the solar atmosphere. The stochastic and shock acceleration theories in flares are reviewed and the implications of observations on particle energy spectra, particle confinement and escape, multiple acceleration phases, particle anistropies, and solar atmospheric abundances are discussed.

  10. AD Leonis: Flares observed by XMM-Newton and Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Besselaar, E. J. M.; Raassen, A. J. J.; Mewe, R.; van der Meer, R. L. J.; Güdel, M.; Audard, M.

    2003-12-01

    The M-dwarf AD Leonis has been observed with the Reflection Grating Spectrometers and the European Photon Imaging Camera aboard XMM-Newton and also with the Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory. In the observation taken with XMM-Newton five large flares produced by AD Leo were identified and only one in the observation taken with Chandra. A quiescent level to the lightcurves is difficult to define, since several smaller flares mutually overlap each other. However, we defined a quasi-steady state outside of obvious flares or flare decays. The spectra from the flare state and the quasi-steady state are analysed separately. From these spectra the temperature structure was derived with a multi-temperature model and with a differential emission measure model. The multi-temperature model was also used to determine the relative abundances of \\element{C}, \\element{N}, \\element{O}, \\element{Ne}, \\element{Mg}, \\element{Si}, \\element{S}, and \\element{Fe}. \\element{He}-like ions, such as O Vii and Ne Ix, produce line triplets which are used to determine or constrain the electron temperature and electron density of the corresponding ion. During the flare state a higher emission measure at the hottest temperature is found for both XMM-Newton and Chandra observations. The derived abundances suggest the presence of an inverse First Ionization Potential effect in the corona of AD Leo.

  11. Effects of long DNA folding and small RNA stem–loop in thermophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Yusuke T.; Tlusty, Tsvi; Libchaber, Albert

    2012-01-01

    In thermophoresis, with the fluid at rest, suspensions move along a gradient of temperature. In an aqueous solution, a PEG polymer suspension is depleted from the hot region and builds a concentration gradient. In this gradient, DNA polymers of different sizes can be separated. In this work the effect of the polymer structure for genomic DNA and small RNA is studied. For genome-size DNA, individual single T4 DNA is visualized and tracked in a PEG solution under a temperature gradient built by infrared laser focusing. We find that T4 DNA follows steps of depletion, ring-like localization, and accumulation patterns as the PEG volume fraction is increased. Furthermore, a coil–globule transition for DNA is observed for a large enough PEG volume fraction. This drastically affects the localization position of T4 DNA. In a similar experiment, with small RNA such as ribozymes we find that the stem–loop folding of such polymers has important consequences. The RNA polymers having a long and rigid stem accumulate, whereas a polymer with stem length less than 4 base pairs shows depletion. Such measurements emphasize the crucial contribution of the double-stranded parts of RNA for thermal separation and selection under a temperature gradient. Because huge temperature gradients are present around hydrothermal vents in the deep ocean seafloor, this process might be relevant, at the origin of life, in an RNA world hypothesis. Ribozymes could be selected from a pool of random sequences depending on the length of their stems. PMID:23071341

  12. Impulsive thermal x-ray emission from a low-lying coronal loop

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Siming; Li, Youping; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2013-06-01

    Understanding the relationship among different emission components plays an essential role in the study of particle acceleration and energy conversion in solar flares. In flares where gradual and impulsive emission components can be readily identified, the impulsive emission has been attributed to non-thermal particles. We carry out detailed analysis of Hα and X-ray observations of a GOES class B microflare loop on the solar disk. The impulsive hard X-ray emission, however, is found to be consistent with a hot, quasi-thermal origin, and there is little evidence of emission from chromospheric footpoints, which challenges conventional models of flares and reveals a class of microflares associated with dense loops. Hα observations indicate that the loop lies very low in the solar corona or even in the chromosphere and both emission and absorption materials evolve during the flare. The enhanced Hα emission may very well originate from the photosphere when the low-lying flare loop heats up the underlying chromosphere and reduces the corresponding Hα opacity. These observations may be compared with detailed modeling of flare loops with the internal kink instability, where the mode remains confined in space without apparent change in the global field shape, to uncover the underlying physical processes and to probe the structure of solar atmosphere.

  13. Rapid fluctuations in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, Peter A.

    1986-01-01

    Study of rapid fluctuations in the emission of radiation from solar flares provides a promising approach for probing the magneto-plasma structure and plasma processes that are responsible for a flare. It is proposed that elementary flare bursts in X-ray and microwave emission may be attributed to fine structure of the coronal magnetic field, related to the aggregation of photospheric magnetic field into magnetic knots. Fluctuations that occur on a subsecond time-scale may be due to magnetic islands that develop in current sheets during magnetic reconnection. The impulsive phase may sometimes represent the superposition of a large number of the elementary energy-release processes responsible for elementary flare bursts. If so, the challenge of trying to explain the properties of the impulsive phase in terms of the properties of the elementary processes must be faced. Magnetic field configurations that might produce solar flares are divided into a number of categories, depending on: whether or not there is a filament; whether there is no current sheet, a closed current sheet, or an open current sheet; and whether the filament erupts into the corona, or is ejected completely from the Sun's atmosphere. Analysis of the properties of these possible configurations is compared with different types of flares, and to Bai's subdivision of gamma-ray/proton events.

  14. Particle densities within the acceleration region of a solar flare

    SciTech Connect

    Krucker, Säm; Battaglia, Marina

    2014-01-01

    The limb flare SOL2012-07-19T05:58 (M7.7) provides the best example of a non-thermal above-the-loop-top hard X-ray source with simultaneous observations by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory. By combining the two sets of observations, we present the first direct measurement of the thermal proton density and non-thermal electron density within the above-the-loop-top source where particle acceleration occurs. We find that both densities are of the same order of magnitude of a few times 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}, about 30 times lower than the density in the underlying thermal flare loops. The equal densities indicate that the entire electron population within the above-the-loop-top source is energized. While the derived densities depend on the unknown source depth and filling factor, the ratio of these two densities does not. Within the uncertainties, the ratio is one for a low energy cutoff of the non-thermal electron spectrum between 10 and 15 keV. RHESSI observations only constrain the cutoff energy to below ∼15 keV, leaving the spectral shape of the electrons within the above-the-loop-top source at lower energies unknown. Nevertheless, these robust results strongly corroborate earlier findings that the above-the-loop-top source is the acceleration region where a bulk energization process acts on all electrons.

  15. Flares of Orion population variables in the association Taurus T3

    SciTech Connect

    Khodzhaev, A.S.

    1988-03-01

    Thirteen new flare stars that are irregular variables of the Orion population have been found in an investigation of the Taurus Dark Cloud region by the homogeneous photographic multiexposure method using wide-angle Schmidt telescopes of the Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory. About 750 h of effective observation time led to the discovery of 17 flares in these stars. Analysis of the complicated light curves of the flares of these stars indicates a variety and multiplicity of phenomena and different dynamics of the energy release processes during the flares. The existence of flare stars that simultaneously exhibit the properties of T Tau and UV Cet type indicates that there is an intimate relationship between these types of young nonstationary stars. The flare star population in the region of the Taurus Dark Cloud is in all probability as young as the analogous groups of stars in Orion and Monoceros.

  16. The effect of local melting of DNA on DNA loop formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jiyoun; Kim, Harold

    Statistical mechanics of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) is well described by the wormlike chain model (WLC) which assumes a harmonic bending potential. Such smooth bending potential may no longer be valid for large bending angles to form small loops (<100 bp). Instead, DNA may rely on rare structural transitions such as local melting (opening) of base pairs to lower the energetic cost. In theory, open base pairs called bubbles can increase the looping probability of short DNA molecules by a few orders of magnitude, but a robust experimental validation of this theoretical prediction is lacking. Here, we investigated the correlation between local melting probability and looping dynamics of dsDNA using single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). We designed two groups of short DNA molecules with low and high melting probabilities around their center and measured their looping and unlooping rates in equilibrium. Our data allow rigorous tests of meltable wormlike chain (MWLC) models at short length scales for setting ranges of acceptable free energy cost of bubble formation and flexibility values of a bubble.

  17. An extended superhot solar flare X-ray source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Ohki, K. I.; Tsuneta, S.

    1985-01-01

    A superhot hard X-ray source in a solar flare occulted by the solar limb was identified. Its hard X-ray image was found to show great horizontal extent but little vertical extent. An H alpha brightening at the same limb position about an hour later suggests a multi-component loop prominence system, so that it appears that a superhot source can evolve in the same manner as a normal solar soft X-ray source. The assignment of plausiable values to physical parameters in the source suggests (from the simplest form of classical thermal-conduction theory) that either new physics will be required to suppress conduction, or else that gradual energy release well after the impulsive phase of the flare must occur. In this respect too, the superhot source appears to resemble ordinary soft X-ray sources, except of course that its temperature is higher.

  18. An extended superhot solar flare X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Ohki, K. I.; Tsuneta, S.

    1985-08-01

    A superhot hard X-ray source in a solar flare occulted by the solar limb was identified. Its hard X-ray image was found to show great horizontal extent but little vertical extent. An H alpha brightening at the same limb position about an hour later suggests a multi-component loop prominence system, so that it appears that a superhot source can evolve in the same manner as a normal solar soft X-ray source. The assignment of plausiable values to physical parameters in the source suggests (from the simplest form of classical thermal-conduction theory) that either new physics will be required to suppress conduction, or else that gradual energy release well after the impulsive phase of the flare must occur. In this respect too, the superhot source appears to resemble ordinary soft X-ray sources, except of course that its temperature is higher.

  19. Observations of solar flare photon energy spectra from 20 keV to 7 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshimori, M.; Watanabe, H.; Nitta, N.

    1985-01-01

    Solar flare photon energy spectra in the 20 keV to 7 MeV range are derived from the Apr. 1, Apr. 4, apr. 27 and May 13, 1981 flares. The flares were observed with a hard X-ray and a gamma-ray spectrometers on board the Hinotori satellite. The results show that the spectral shape varies from flare to flare and the spectra harden in energies above about 400 keV. Effects of nuclear line emission on the continuum and of higher energy electron bremsstrahlung are considered to explain the spectral hardening.

  20. Collisional heating by nonthermal electrons in a tapered magnetic loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrashekar, S.; Emslie, A. Gordon

    1987-01-01

    The behavior of nonthermal electrons ejected into a tapered magnetic loop, under the action of both Coulomb collisional and magnetic field gradient forces is studied. An approximate analytic formula for the heating rate as a function of distance along the loop is developed, and found to be in good agreement with exact numerical solutions of the relevant equations. Such a formula is useful as a source term in many situations, such as hydrodynamic simulations of atmospheric response to flare energy input.

  1. EVIDENCE FOR COLLAPSING FIELDS IN THE CORONA AND PHOTOSPHERE DURING THE 2011 FEBRUARY 15 X2.2 FLARE: SDO/AIA AND HMI OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Gosain, S.

    2012-04-10

    We use high-resolution Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly observations to study the evolution of the coronal loops in a flaring solar active region, NOAA 11158. We identify three distinct phases of the coronal loop dynamics during this event: (1) slow-rise phase: slow rising motion of the loop-tops prior to the flare in response to the slow rise of the underlying flux rope; (2) collapse phase: sudden contraction of the loop-tops, with the lower loops collapsing earlier than the higher loops; and (3) oscillation phase: the loops exhibit global kink oscillations after the collapse phase at different periods, with the period decreasing with the decreasing height of the loops. The period of these loop oscillations is used to estimate the field strength in the coronal loops. Furthermore, we also use SDO/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) observations to study the photospheric changes close to the polarity inversion line (PIL). The longitudinal magnetograms show a stepwise permanent decrease in the magnetic flux after the flare over a coherent patch along the PIL. Furthermore, we examine the HMI Stokes I, Q, U, V profiles over this patch and find that the Stokes-V signal systematically decreases while the Stokes-Q and U signals increase after the flare. These observations suggest that close to the PIL the field configuration became more horizontal after the flare. We also use HMI vector magnetic field observations to quantify the changes in the field inclination angle and find an inward collapse of the field lines toward the PIL by {approx}10 Degree-Sign . These observations are consistent with the 'coronal implosion' scenario and its predictions about flare-related photospheric field changes.

  2. The flare-related depression of the noise storm on May 5, 1978

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehme, A.; Krueger, A.

    1982-02-01

    It is noted that, although a number of flares are capable of triggering the emission of a noise storm, in some rare cases flares may also lead to a depression of the radio flux of a preexisting noise storm. Details of this phenomenon are demonstrated at the flare of May 5, 1978, which is thought to provide an instructive example. With the aid of extensive observations during the solar cycle no. 20, a number of further noise storm depressions could be detected whereas chance coincidences with flares could be ruled out by a statistical treatment. Possible mechanisms related to the noise storm depression effect are discussed.

  3. A comparative study between clinical grading of anterior chamber flare and flare reading using the Kowa laser flare meter.

    PubMed

    Konstantopoulou, Kallirroi; Del'Omo, Roberto; Morley, Anne M; Karagiannis, Dimitris; Bunce, Catey; Pavesio, Carlos

    2015-10-01

    To assess the accuracy of standard clinical grading of aqueous flare in uveitis according to the Standardization of Uveitis Nomenclature consensus, and compare the results with the readings of the laser flare meter, Kowa 500. Two examiners clinically graded the flare in 110 eyes. The flare was then measured using the Kowa laser flare meter. Twenty-nine eyes were graded as anterior chamber flare +2; for 18 of these, the clinicians were in agreement, the rest differed by the order of one grade. The range of the laser flare meter for these eyes was 5.2-899.1 photons/ms. The median value was 41.4. Seventy-four eyes were graded with flare +1. Agreement was established in 51 of these eyes. Disagreement for the rest was again by the order of 1, and the flare meter range was 1.1-169.9 photons/ms, median value 18.4. For the clinical measure of flare 0, the clinicians disagreed on three out of five eyes. The flare meter readings ranged from 2.5 to 14.1 photons/ms, median value 9.9. Only two eyes were graded with flare +3 and there was one step disagreement on both of them. We found little evidence of association between the flare readings and intraocular pressure or age. Our findings suggest that clinical evaluation of aqueous flare is subjective. Compared with the Kowa laser flare meter's numeric readings, the discrepancies observed indicate that clinical grading is an approximate science. The laser flare meter provides an accurate, reproducible, non-invasive assessment of aqueous flare that can prove valuable in research and clinical decisions.

  4. Examining the Relationship between Immediate Serial Recall and Immediate Free Recall: Common Effects of Phonological Loop Variables but Only Limited Evidence for the Phonological Loop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spurgeon, Jessica; Ward, Geoff; Matthews, William J.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the contribution of the phonological loop to immediate free recall (IFR) and immediate serial recall (ISR) of lists of between one and 15 words. Following Baddeley (1986, 2000, 2007, 2012), we assumed that visual words could be recoded into the phonological store when presented silently but that recoding would be prevented by…

  5. CORONAL ELECTRON DISTRIBUTION IN SOLAR FLARES: DRIFT-KINETIC MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Minoshima, Takashi; Kusano, Kanya; Masuda, Satoshi; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi

    2011-05-10

    Using a model of particle acceleration and transport in solar flares, we investigate the height distribution of coronal electrons by focusing on the energy-dependent pitch-angle scattering. When pitch-angle scattering is not included, the peak heights of loop-top electrons are constant, regardless of their energy, owing to the continuous acceleration and compression of the electrons via shrinkage of magnetic loops. On the other hand, under pitch-angle scattering, the electron heights are energy-dependent: intermediate-energy electrons are at a higher altitude, whereas lower and higher energy electrons are at lower altitudes. This implies that the intermediate-energy electrons are inhibited from following the shrinking field lines to lower altitudes because pitch-angle scattering causes efficient precipitation of these electrons into the footpoint and their subsequent loss from the loop. This result is qualitatively consistent with the position of the above-the-loop-top hard X-ray (HXR) source that is located above coronal HXR loops emitted by lower energy electrons and microwaves emitted by higher energy electrons. Quantitative agreement with observations might be achieved by considering primary acceleration before the onset of loop shrinkage and additional pitch-angle scattering via wave-particle interactions.

  6. The Effect of Subcooling on the Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics in a Two-Phase Loop Thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imura, Hideaki; Takeshita, Kazuhiro; Doi, Kyoji; Noda, Ken-Ichi

    A two-phase loop thermosyphon is used as a heat transfer device in an energy-saving heat transportation system and so forth, because it transports thermal energy without any external power supply such as a pump under a body force field. We previously performed a fundamental study on the flow and heat transfer characteristics in a two-phase loop thermosyphon installed with a single heated tube evaporator both experimentally and theoretically which was made under the condition of near saturation temperature of liquid in a reservoir. In the present study, the effects of liquid subcooling and the heat input on the circulation mass flow rates, pressure and temperature distributions, and heat transfer coefficients in the evaporator were examined experimentally using water, ethanol, benzene and Freon 113 as the working fluids. On the other hand, the circulation mass flow rates, pressure and temperature distributions were theoretically calculated and compared with the experimental results.

  7. First-order electroweak phase transition powered by additional F-term loop effects in an extended supersymmetric Higgs sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanemura, Shinya; Senaha, Eibun; Shindou, Tetsuo

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the one-loop effect of new charged scalar bosons on the Higgs potential at finite temperatures in the supersymmetric standard model with four Higgs doublet chiral superfields as well as a pair of charged singlet chiral superfields. In this model, the mass of the lightest Higgs boson h is determined only by the D-term in the Higgs potential at the tree-level, while the triple Higgs boson coupling for hhh can receive a significant radiative correction due to nondecoupling one-loop contributions of the additional charged scalar bosons. We find that the same nondecoupling mechanism can also contribute to realize stronger first order electroweak phase transition than that in the minimal supersymmetric standard model, which is definitely required for a successful scenario of electroweak baryogenesis. Therefore, this model can be a new candidate for a model in which the baryon asymmetry of the Universe is explained at the electroweak scale.

  8. Effects of Gravity on Start-up of a Miniature Loop Heat Pipe with Multiple Evaporators and Multiple Condensers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Nagano, Hosei

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental study on the effect of gravity on the start-up of a miniature loop heat pipe (MLHP) with two evaporators and two condensers. Each evaporator has an outer diameter of 9 mm and has its own integral compensation chamber (CC). The MLHP was placed under five configurations where the relative elevation and tilt among the loop components were varied. The four well-known initial conditions between the evaporator and CC prior to the LHP start-up were created in this experimental study through combinations of: 1) the test configuration; 2) the method of preconditioning the loop prior to start-up, and 3) the heat load distribution among the evaporators. A total of 165 start-ups were conducted under the five test configurations. All of these start-ups were successful. However, the effect of gravity on start-up transients was clearly seen under otherwise the same heat load distribution and sink temperatures. An analytical model was used to simulate the MLHP transient behaviors, and the model predictions agreed very well with the experimental results.

  9. The analysis of SCS return momentum effects on the RCS water level during mid-loop operations

    SciTech Connect

    swang Seo, J.; Young Yang, J.; Tack Hwang, S.

    1995-09-01

    An accurate prediction of Reactor Coolant System (RCS) water levels is of importance in the determination of allowable operating range to ensure the safety during the mid-loop operations. However, complex hydraulic phenomena induced by Shutdown Cooling System (SCS) return momentum cause different water levels from those in the loop where the water level indicators are located. This was apparantly observed at the pre-core cold hydro test of the Younggwang Nuclear Unit 3 (YGN 3) in Korea. In this study, in order to analytically understand the effect of the SCS return momentum on the RCS water level and its general trend, a model using one-dimensional momentum equation, hydraulic jump, Bernoulli equation, flow resistance coefficient, and total water volume conservation has been developed to predict the RCS water levels at various RCS locations during the mid-loop conditions and the simulation results were compared with the test data. The analysis shows that the hydraulic jump in the operating cold legs in conjunction with the momentum loss throughout the RCS is the main cause creating the water level differences at various RCS locations. The prediction results provide good explanations for the test data and show the significant effect of the SCS return momentum on the RCS water levels.

  10. THE THERMAL PROPERTIES OF SOLAR FLARES OVER THREE SOLAR CYCLES USING GOES X-RAY OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Daniel F.; Gallagher, Peter T.; Milligan, Ryan O.; Dennis, Brian R.; Kim Tolbert, A.; Schwartz, Richard A.; Alex Young, C.

    2012-10-15

    Solar flare X-ray emission results from rapidly increasing temperatures and emission measures in flaring active region loops. To date, observations from the X-Ray Sensor (XRS) on board the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) have been used to derive these properties, but have been limited by a number of factors, including the lack of a consistent background subtraction method capable of being automatically applied to large numbers of flares. In this paper, we describe an automated Temperature and Emission measure-Based Background Subtraction method (TEBBS), that builds on the methods of Bornmann. Our algorithm ensures that the derived temperature is always greater than the instrumental limit and the pre-flare background temperature, and that the temperature and emission measure are increasing during the flare rise phase. Additionally, TEBBS utilizes the improved estimates of GOES temperatures and emission measures from White et al. TEBBS was successfully applied to over 50,000 solar flares occurring over nearly three solar cycles (1980-2007), and used to create an extensive catalog of the solar flare thermal properties. We confirm that the peak emission measure and total radiative losses scale with background subtracted GOES X-ray flux as power laws, while the peak temperature scales logarithmically. As expected, the peak emission measure shows an increasing trend with peak temperature, although the total radiative losses do not. While these results are comparable to previous studies, we find that flares of a given GOES class have lower peak temperatures and higher peak emission measures than previously reported. The TEBBS database of flare thermal plasma properties is publicly available at http://www.SolarMonitor.org/TEBBS/.

  11. Analog front-end measuring biopotential signal with effective offset rejection loop.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seunghyun; Kim, Hyunho; Song, Haryong; Cho, Dong-il Dan; Ko, Hyoungho

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analog front-end (AFE) IC design for recording biopotential signals. The AFE employs a capacitively coupled instrumentation amplifier to achieve a low-noise and high-common mode rejection ratio (CMRR) system. A ripple reduction loop is proposed to reduce the ripple generated by the up-modulating chopper. The low frequency noise is attenuated by an input AC coupling capacitor, and is attenuated again by a DC servo loop. The proposed AFE features a differential gain of 71 dB, and a CMRR of 89 dB, at 50 Hz. Furthermore, the proposed AFE can robustly acquire biopotential signals even in the presence of an input offset and ripples. PMID:26406095

  12. THE SOLAR FLARE IRON ABUNDANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Dennis, B. R. E-mail: Brian.R.Dennis@nasa.gov

    2012-03-20

    The abundance of iron is measured from emission line complexes at 6.65 keV (Fe line) and 8 keV (Fe/Ni line) in RHESSI X-ray spectra during solar flares. Spectra during long-duration flares with steady declines were selected, with an isothermal assumption and improved data analysis methods over previous work. Two spectral fitting models give comparable results, viz., an iron abundance that is lower than previous coronal values but higher than photospheric values. In the preferred method, the estimated Fe abundance is A(Fe) = 7.91 {+-} 0.10 (on a logarithmic scale, with A(H) = 12) or 2.6 {+-} 0.6 times the photospheric Fe abundance. Our estimate is based on a detailed analysis of 1898 spectra taken during 20 flares. No variation from flare to flare is indicated. This argues for a fractionation mechanism similar to quiet-Sun plasma. The new value of A(Fe) has important implications for radiation loss curves, which are estimated.

  13. Largest Solar Flare on Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The largest solar flare ever recorded occurred at 4:51 p.m. EDT, on Monday, April 2, 2001. as Observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite. Solar flares, among the solar systems mightiest eruptions, are tremendous explosions in the atmosphere of the Sun capable of releasing as much energy as a billion megatons of TNT. Caused by the sudden release of magnetic energy, in just a few seconds, solar flares can accelerate solar particles to very high velocities, almost to the speed of light, and heat solar material to tens of millions of degrees. The recent explosion from the active region near the sun's northwest limb hurled a coronal mass ejection into space at a whopping speed of roughly 7.2 million kilometers per hour. Luckily, the flare was not aimed directly towards Earth. Second to the most severe R5 classification of radio blackout, this flare produced an R4 blackout as rated by the NOAA SEC. This classification measures the disruption in radio communications. Launched December 2, 1995 atop an ATLAS-IIAS expendable launch vehicle, the SOHO is a cooperative effort involving NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). (Image courtesy NASA Goddard SOHO Project office)

  14. Reverse Current in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. W., III

    1978-01-01

    An idealized steady state model of a stream of energetic electrons neutralized by a reverse current in the pre-flare solar plasma was developed. These calculations indicate that, in some cases, a significant fraction of the beam energy may be dissipated by the reverse current. Joule heating by the reverse current is a more effective mechanism for heating the plasma than collisional losses from the energetic electrons because the Ohmic losses are caused by thermal electrons in the reverse current which have much shorter mean free paths than the energetic electrons. The heating due to reverse currents is calculated for two injected energetic electron fluxes. For the smaller injected flux, the temperature of the coronal plasma is raised by about a factor of two. The larger flux causes the reverse current drift velocity to exceed the critical velocity for the onset of ion cyclotron turbulence, producing anomalous resistivity and an order of magnitude increase in the temperature. The heating is so rapid that the lack of ionization equilibrium may produce a soft X-ray and EUV pulse from the corona.

  15. Characteristics of the flare acceleration region derived from simultaneous hard X-ray and radio observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, H. A. S.; Vilmer, N.; Kontar, E. P.

    2011-05-01

    We investigate the type III radio bursts and X-ray signatures of accelerated electrons in a well-observed solar flare in order to find the spatial properties of the acceleration region. Combining simultaneous RHESSI hard X-ray flare