Science.gov

Sample records for flashing jet studies

  1. Flash Rust & Waterjetting Study

    SciTech Connect

    DORSH, P.M..

    2001-11-14

    Certain areas of the primary wall in the AY-101 tank annulus are being cleaned with a remotely operated waterjet. There is some concern on how it will effect the surface of the tank wall after cleaning and how to prevent rust and corrosion from developing on the wall in the future. This study addresses the cause and effects of flash rust, which typically develops on steel surfaces after the waterjetting process.

  2. Mask replication using jet and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selinidis, Kosta S.; Jones, Chris; Doyle, Gary F.; Brown, Laura; Imhof, Joseph; LaBrake, Dwayne L.; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2011-11-01

    The Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM) process uses drop dispensing of UV curable resists to assist high resolution patterning for subsequent dry etch pattern transfer. The technology is actively being used to develop solutions for memory markets including Flash memory and patterned media for hard disk drives. It is anticipated that the lifetime of a single template (for patterned media) or mask (for semiconductor) will be on the order of 104 - 105imprints. This suggests that tens of thousands of templates/masks will be required to satisfy the needs of a manufacturing environment. Electron-beam patterning is too slow to feasibly deliver these volumes, but instead can provide a high quality "master" mask which can be replicated many times with an imprint lithography tool. This strategy has the capability to produce the required supply of "working" templates/masks. In this paper, we review the development of the mask form factor, imprint replication tools and the semiconductor mask replication process. A PerfectaTM MR5000 mask replication tool has been developed specifically to pattern replica masks from an ebeam written master. Performance results, including image placement, critical dimension uniformity, and pattern transfer are covered in detail.

  3. 450mm wafer patterning with jet and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Ecron; Hellebrekers, Paul; Hofemann, Paul; LaBrake, Dwayne L.; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2013-09-01

    The next step in the evolution of wafer size is 450mm. Any transition in sizing is an enormous task that must account for fabrication space, environmental health and safety concerns, wafer standards, metrology capability, individual process module development and device integration. For 450mm, an aggressive goal of 2018 has been set, with pilot line operation as early as 2016. To address these goals, consortiums have been formed to establish the infrastructure necessary to the transition, with a focus on the development of both process and metrology tools. Central to any process module development, which includes deposition, etch and chemical mechanical polishing is the lithography tool. In order to address the need for early learning and advance process module development, Molecular Imprints Inc. has provided the industry with the first advanced lithography platform, the Imprio® 450, capable of patterning a full 450mm wafer. The Imprio 450 was accepted by Intel at the end of 2012 and is now being used to support the 450mm wafer process development demands as part of a multi-year wafer services contract to facilitate the semiconductor industry's transition to lower cost 450mm wafer production. The Imprio 450 uses a Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM) process that employs drop dispensing of UV curable resists to assist high resolution patterning for subsequent dry etch pattern transfer. The technology is actively being used to develop solutions for markets including NAND Flash memory, patterned media for hard disk drives and displays. This paper reviews the recent performance of the J-FIL technology (including overlay, throughput and defectivity), mask development improvements provided by Dai Nippon Printing, and the application of the technology to a 450mm lithography platform.

  4. Progress in mask replication using jet and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selinidis, Kosta S.; Brooks, Cynthia B.; Doyle, Gary F.; Brown, Laura; Jones, Chris; Imhof, Joseph; LaBrake, Dwayne L.; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2011-04-01

    The Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM) process uses drop dispensing of UV curable resists to assist high resolution patterning for subsequent dry etch pattern transfer. The technology is actively being used to develop solutions for memory markets including Flash memory and patterned media for hard disk drives. It is anticipated that the lifetime of a single template (for patterned media) or mask (for semiconductor) will be on the order of 104 - 105imprints. This suggests that tens of thousands of templates/masks will be required to satisfy the needs of a manufacturing environment. Electron-beam patterning is too slow to feasibly deliver these volumes, but instead can provide a high quality "master" mask which can be replicated many times with an imprint lithography tool. This strategy has the capability to produce the required supply of "working" templates/masks. In this paper, we review the development of the mask form factor, imprint replication tools and processes specifically for semiconductor applications. The requirements needed for semiconductors dictate the need for a well defined form factor for both master and replica masks which is also compatible with the existing mask infrastructure established for the 6025 semi standard, 6" x 6" x 0.25" photomasks. Complying with this standard provides the necessary tooling needed for mask fabrication processes, cleaning, metrology, and inspection. The replica form factor has additional features specific to imprinting such as a pre-patterned mesa. A PerfectaTM MR5000 mask replication tool has been developed specifically to pattern replica masks from an e-beam written master. The system specifications include a throughput of four replicas per hour with an added image placement component of 5nm, 3sigma and a critical dimension uniformity error of less than 1nm, 3sigma. A new process has been developed to fabricate replicas with high contrast alignment marks so that designs for imprint can fit within current

  5. Flashing superluminal components in the jet of the radio galaxy 3C120

    PubMed

    Gomez; Marscher; Alberdi; Jorstad; Garcia-Miro

    2000-09-29

    A 16-month sequence of radio images of the active galaxy 3C120 with the Very Long Baseline Array reveals a region in the relativistic jet where superluminal components flash on and off over time scales of months, while the polarization angle rotates. This can be explained by interaction between the jet and an interstellar cloud located about 8 parsecs from the center of the galaxy. The cloud, which rotates the polarization direction and possibly eclipses a section of the jet, represents a "missing link" between the ultradense broad-emission-line clouds closer to the center and the lower density narrow-emission-line clouds seen on kiloparsec scales.

  6. Flashing superluminal components in the jet of the radio galaxy 3C120

    PubMed

    Gomez; Marscher; Alberdi; Jorstad; Garcia-Miro

    2000-09-29

    A 16-month sequence of radio images of the active galaxy 3C120 with the Very Long Baseline Array reveals a region in the relativistic jet where superluminal components flash on and off over time scales of months, while the polarization angle rotates. This can be explained by interaction between the jet and an interstellar cloud located about 8 parsecs from the center of the galaxy. The cloud, which rotates the polarization direction and possibly eclipses a section of the jet, represents a "missing link" between the ultradense broad-emission-line clouds closer to the center and the lower density narrow-emission-line clouds seen on kiloparsec scales. PMID:11009410

  7. Defect reduction for semiconductor memory applications using jet and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhengmao; Luo, Kang; Irving, J. W.; Lu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Wei; Fletcher, Brian; Liu, Weijun; Xu, Frank; LaBrake, Dwayne; Resnick, Douglas; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2013-03-01

    Imprint lithography has been shown to be an effective technique for replication of nano-scale features. Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FIL) involves the field-by-field deposition and exposure of a low viscosity resist deposited by jetting technology onto the substrate. The patterned mask is lowered into the fluid which then quickly flows into the relief patterns in the mask by capillary action. Following this filling step, the resist is crosslinked under UV radiation, and then the mask is removed leaving a patterned resist on the substrate. Acceptance of imprint lithography for manufacturing will require demonstration that it can attain defect levels commensurate with the defect specifications of high end memory devices. Typical defectivity targets are on the order of 0.10/cm2. In previous studies, we have focused on defects such as random non-fill defects occurring during the resist filling process and repeater defects caused by interactions with particles on the substrate. In this work, we attempted to identify the critical imprint defect types using a mask with NAND Flash-like patterns at dimensions as small as 26nm. The two key defect types identified were line break defects induced by small particulates and airborne contaminants which result in local adhesion failure. After identification, the root cause of the defect was determined, and corrective measures were taken to either eliminate or reduce the defect source. As a result, we have been able to reduce defectivity levels by more than three orders of magnitude in only 12 months and are now achieving defectivity adders as small as 2 adders per lot of wafers.

  8. Low-pressure flashing mechanisms in iso-octane liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, M. M.; Simões-Moreira, J. R.

    This paper examines a flashing liquid regime that takes place at very high ratios of injection to discharge pressures in flow restrictions. Typically, the flashing phenomenon has been observed in laboratory experiments where a liquid flows through a short nozzle into a low-pressure chamber at a pressure value considerably lower than the liquid saturation pressure at the injection temperature. By using two visualization techniques, the schlieren and the back-lighting methods, it was possible to identify some compressible phenomena associated with the liquid flashing process from the nozzle exit section. The schlieren method was used to capture the image of a shock-wave structure surrounding a liquid core from which the phase change takes place, and the optical technique allowed us to observe the central liquid core itself. The work corroborates previous physical descriptions of flashing liquid jets to explain an observed choking behaviour as well as the presence of shock waves. According to the present analysis, flashing takes place on the surface of the liquid core through an evaporation wave process, which results from a sudden liquid evaporation in a discontinuous process. Downstream of the evaporation discontinuity, the two-phase flow reaches very high velocities, up to the local sonic speed that typically occurs at high expansion conditions, as inferred from experiments and the physical model. That sonic state is also a point of maximum mass flow rate and it is known as the Chapman Jouguet condition. The freshly sonic two-phase flow expands freely to increasing supersonic velocities and eventually terminates the expansion process through a shock-wave structure. This paper presents experimental results at several test conditions with iso-octane.

  9. Sweeping Jet Optimization Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, LaTunia Pack; Koklu, Mehti; Andino, Marlyn; Lin, John C.; Edelman, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Progress on experimental efforts to optimize sweeping jet actuators for active flow control (AFC) applications with large adverse pressure gradients is reported. Three sweeping jet actuator configurations, with the same orifice size but di?erent internal geometries, were installed on the flap shoulder of an unswept, NACA 0015 semi-span wing to investigate how the output produced by a sweeping jet interacts with the separated flow and the mechanisms by which the flow separation is controlled. For this experiment, the flow separation was generated by deflecting the wing's 30% chord trailing edge flap to produce an adverse pressure gradient. Steady and unsteady pressure data, Particle Image Velocimetry data, and force and moment data were acquired to assess the performance of the three actuator configurations. The actuator with the largest jet deflection angle, at the pressure ratios investigated, was the most efficient at controlling flow separation on the flap of the model. Oil flow visualization studies revealed that the flow field controlled by the sweeping jets was more three-dimensional than expected. The results presented also show that the actuator spacing was appropriate for the pressure ratios examined.

  10. Defect reduction of high-density full-field patterns in jet and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Lovejeet; Luo, Kang; Ye, Zhengmao; Xu, Frank; Haase, Gaddi; Curran, David; LaBrake, Dwayne; Resnick, Douglas; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2011-04-01

    Imprint lithography has been shown to be an effective technique for replication of nano-scale features. Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FIL) involves the field-by-field deposition and exposure of a low viscosity resist deposited by jetting technology onto the substrate. The patterned mask is lowered into the fluid which then quickly flows into the relief patterns in the mask by capillary action. Following this filling step, the resist is crosslinked under UV radiation, and then the mask is removed leaving a patterned resist on the substrate. Acceptance of imprint lithography for manufacturing will require demonstration that it can attain defect levels commensurate with the defect specifications of high end memory devices. Typical defectivity targets are on the order of 0.10/cm2. This work summarizes the results of defect inspections focusing on two key defect types; random non-fill defects occurring during the resist filling process and repeater defects caused by interactions with particles on the substrate. Non-fill defectivity must always be considered within the context of process throughput. The key limiting throughput step in an imprint process is resist filling time. As a result, it is critical to characterize the filling process by measuring non-fill defectivity as a function of fill time. Repeater defects typically have two main sources; mask defects and particle related defects. Previous studies have indicated that soft particles tend to cause non-repeating defects. Hard particles, on the other hand, can cause either resist plugging or mask damage. In this work, an Imprio 500 twenty wafer per hour (wph) development tool was used to study both defect types. By carefully controlling the volume of inkjetted resist, optimizing the drop pattern and controlling the resist fluid front during spreading, fill times of 1.5 seconds were achieved with non-fill defect levels of approximately 1.2/cm2. Longevity runs were used to study repeater defects and a nickel

  11. Jet and flash imprint lithography for the fabrication of patterned media drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Gerard M.; Brooks, Cynthia; Ye, Zhengmao; Johnson, Steve; LaBrake, Dwayne; Sreenivasan, S. V.; Resnick, Douglas J.

    2009-10-01

    The ever-growing demand for hard drives with greater storage density has motivated a technology shift from continuous magnetic media to patterned media hard disks, which are expected to be implemented in future generations of hard disk drives to provide data storage at densities exceeding 1012 bits per square inch. Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM) technology has been employed to pattern the hard disk substrates. This paper discusses the infrastructure required to enable J-FIL in high-volume manufacturing; namely, fabrication of master templates, template replication, high-volume imprinting with precisely controlled residual layers, dual-sided imprinting and defect inspection. Imprinting of disks is demonstrated with substrate throughput currently as high as 180 disks/hour (dual-sided). These processes are applied to patterning hard disk substrates with both discrete tracks and bit-patterned designs.

  12. High-density patterned media fabrication using jet and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhengmao; Ramos, Rick; Brooks, Cynthia; Simpson, Logan; Fretwell, John; Carden, Scott; Hellebrekers, Paul; LaBrake, Dwayne; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2011-04-01

    The Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FIL®) process uses drop dispensing of UV curable resists for high resolution patterning. Several applications, including patterned media, are better, and more economically served by a full substrate patterning process since the alignment requirements are minimal. Patterned media is particularly challenging because of the aggressive feature sizes necessary to achieve storage densities required for manufacturing beyond the current technology of perpendicular recording. In this paper, the key process steps for the application of J-FIL to pattern media fabrication are reviewed with special attention to substrate cleaning, vapor adhesion of the adhesion layer and imprint performance at >300 disk per hour. Also discussed are recent results for imprinting discrete track patterns at half pitches of 24nm and bit patterned media patterns at densities of 1 Tb/in2.

  13. Development of template and mask replication using jet and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Cynthia; Selinidis, Kosta; Doyle, Gary; Brown, Laura; LaBrake, Dwayne; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2010-09-01

    The Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM)1-7 process uses drop dispensing of UV curable resists to assist high resolution patterning for subsequent dry etch pattern transfer. The technology is actively being used to develop solutions for memory markets including Flash memory and patterned media for hard disk drives. It is anticipated that the lifetime of a single template (for patterned media) or mask (for semiconductor) will be on the order of 104 - 105 imprints. This suggests that tens of thousands of templates/masks will be required. It is not feasible to employ electronbeam patterning directly to deliver these volumes. Instead, a "master" template - created by directly patterning with an electron-beam tool - will be replicated many times with an imprint lithography tool to produce the required supply of "working" templates/masks. In this paper, we review the development of the pattern transfer process for both template and mask replicas. Pattern transfer of resolutions down to 25nm has been demonstrated for bit patterned media replication. In addition, final resolution on a semiconductor mask of 28nm has been confirmed. The early results on both etch depth and CD uniformity are promising, but more extensive work is required to characterize the pattern transfer process.

  14. Roll-to-roll nanopatterning using jet and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sean; Ganapathisubramanian, Maha; Miller, Mike; Yang, Jack; Choi, Jin; Xu, Frank; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2012-03-01

    The ability to pattern materials at the nanoscale can enable a variety of applications ranging from high density data storage, displays, photonic devices and CMOS integrated circuits to emerging applications in the biomedical and energy sectors. These applications require varying levels of pattern control, short and long range order, and have varying cost tolerances. Extremely large area R2R manufacturing on flexible substrates is ubiquitous for applications such as paper and plastic processing. It combines the benefits of high speed and inexpensive substrates to deliver a commodity product at low cost. The challenge is to extend this approach to the realm of nanopatterning and realize similar benefits. The cost of manufacturing is typically driven by speed (or throughput), tool complexity, cost of consumables (materials used, mold or master cost, etc.), substrate cost, and the downstream processing required (annealing, deposition, etching, etc.). In order to achieve low cost nanopatterning, it is imperative to move towards high speed imprinting, less complex tools, near zero waste of consumables and low cost substrates. The Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM) process uses drop dispensing of UV curable resists to assist high resolution patterning for subsequent dry etch pattern transfer. The technology is actively being used to develop solutions for memory markets including Flash memory and patterned media for hard disk drives. In this paper we address the key challenges for roll based nanopatterning by introducing a novel concept: Ink Jet based Roll-to-Roll Nanopatterning. To address this challenge, we have introduced a J-FIL based demonstrator product, the LithoFlex 100. Topics that are discussed in the paper include tool design and process performance. In addition, we have used the LithoFlex 100 to fabricate high performance wire grid polarizers on flexible polycarbonate (PC) films. Transmission of better than 80% and extinction ratios on the order of

  15. Experimental study of flash boiling spray vaporization through quantitative vapor concentration and liquid temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gaoming; Hung, David L. S.; Xu, Min

    2014-08-01

    Flash boiling sprays of liquid injection under superheated conditions provide the novel solutions of fast vaporization and better air-fuel mixture formation for internal combustion engines. However, the physical mechanisms of flash boiling spray vaporization are more complicated than the droplet surface vaporization due to the unique bubble generation and boiling process inside a superheated bulk liquid, which are not well understood. In this study, the vaporization of flash boiling sprays was investigated experimentally through the quantitative measurements of vapor concentration and liquid temperature. Specifically, the laser-induced exciplex fluorescence technique was applied to distinguish the liquid and vapor distributions. Quantitative vapor concentration was obtained by correlating the intensity of vapor-phase fluorescence with vapor concentration through systematic corrections and calibrations. The intensities of two wavelengths were captured simultaneously from the liquid-phase fluorescence spectra, and their intensity ratios were correlated with liquid temperature. The results show that both liquid and vapor phase of multi-hole sprays collapse toward the centerline of the spray with different mass distributions under the flash boiling conditions. Large amount of vapor aggregates along the centerline of the spray to form a "gas jet" structure, whereas the liquid distributes more uniformly with large vortexes formed in the vicinity of the spray tip. The vaporization process under the flash boiling condition is greatly enhanced due to the intense bubble generation and burst. The liquid temperature measurements show strong temperature variations inside the flash boiling sprays with hot zones present in the "gas jet" structure and vortex region. In addition, high vapor concentration and closed vortex motion seem to have inhibited the heat and mass transfer in these regions. In summary, the vapor concentration and liquid temperature provide detailed information

  16. Photonic Flash Sintering of Ink-Jet-Printed Back Electrodes for Organic Photovoltaic Applications.

    PubMed

    Polino, Giuseppina; Shanmugam, Santhosh; Bex, Guy J P; Abbel, Robert; Brunetti, Francesca; Di Carlo, Aldo; Andriessen, Ronn; Galagan, Yulia

    2016-01-27

    A study of the photonic flash sintering of a silver nanoparticle ink printed as the back electrode for organic solar cells is presented. A number of sintering settings with different intensities and pulse durations have been tested on both full-area and grid-based silver electrodes, using the complete emission spectrum of the flash lamps from UV-A to NIR. However, none of these settings was able to produce functional devices with performances comparable to those of reference cells prepared using thermally sintered ink. Different degradation mechanisms were detected in the devices with a flash-sintered back electrode. The P3HT:PCBM photoactive layer appears to be highly heat-sensitive and turned out to be severely damaged by the high temperatures generated in the silver layer during the sintering. In addition, UV-induced photochemical degradation of the functional materials was identified as another possible source of performance deterioration in the devices with grid-based electrodes. Reducing the light intensity does not provide a proper solution because in this case the Ag electrode is not sintered sufficiently. For both types of devices, with full-area and grid-based electrodes, these problems could be solved by excluding the short wavelength contribution from the flash light spectrum using a filter. Optimized sintering parameters allowed manufacture of OPV devices with performance equal to those of the reference devices. Photonic flash sintering of the top electrode in organic solar cells was demonstrated for the first time. It reveals the great potential of this sintering method for the future roll-to-roll manufacturing of organic solar cells from solution. PMID:26704172

  17. Photonic Flash Sintering of Ink-Jet-Printed Back Electrodes for Organic Photovoltaic Applications.

    PubMed

    Polino, Giuseppina; Shanmugam, Santhosh; Bex, Guy J P; Abbel, Robert; Brunetti, Francesca; Di Carlo, Aldo; Andriessen, Ronn; Galagan, Yulia

    2016-01-27

    A study of the photonic flash sintering of a silver nanoparticle ink printed as the back electrode for organic solar cells is presented. A number of sintering settings with different intensities and pulse durations have been tested on both full-area and grid-based silver electrodes, using the complete emission spectrum of the flash lamps from UV-A to NIR. However, none of these settings was able to produce functional devices with performances comparable to those of reference cells prepared using thermally sintered ink. Different degradation mechanisms were detected in the devices with a flash-sintered back electrode. The P3HT:PCBM photoactive layer appears to be highly heat-sensitive and turned out to be severely damaged by the high temperatures generated in the silver layer during the sintering. In addition, UV-induced photochemical degradation of the functional materials was identified as another possible source of performance deterioration in the devices with grid-based electrodes. Reducing the light intensity does not provide a proper solution because in this case the Ag electrode is not sintered sufficiently. For both types of devices, with full-area and grid-based electrodes, these problems could be solved by excluding the short wavelength contribution from the flash light spectrum using a filter. Optimized sintering parameters allowed manufacture of OPV devices with performance equal to those of the reference devices. Photonic flash sintering of the top electrode in organic solar cells was demonstrated for the first time. It reveals the great potential of this sintering method for the future roll-to-roll manufacturing of organic solar cells from solution.

  18. Flash photolysis-shock tube studies

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, J.V.

    1993-12-01

    Even though this project in the past has concentrated on the measurement of thermal bimolecular reactions of atomic species with stable molecules by the flash or laser photolysis-shock tube (FP- or LP-ST) method using atomic resonance absorption spectrometry (ARAS) as the diagnostic technique, during the past year the authors have concentrated on studies of the thermal decompositions of selected chlorocarbon molecules. These studies are necessary if the degradation of chlorine containing organic molecules by incineration are to be understood at the molecular level. Clearly, destruction of these molecules will not only involve abstraction reactions, when possible, but also thermal decomposition followed by secondary reactions of the initially formed atoms and radicals. Studies on the thermal decomposition of CH{sub 3}Cl are complete, and the curve-of-growth for Cl-atom atomic resonance absorption has been determined. The new thermal decomposition studies are similar to those already reported for CH{sub 3}Cl.

  19. Collimated Jet Or Expanding Outflow: Possible Origins of GRBs And X-Ray Flashes

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuta, Akira; Yamasaki, Tatsuya; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Mineshige, Shin; /Kyoto U., Yukawa Inst., Kyoto

    2006-08-10

    We investigate the dynamics of an injected outflow propagating in a progenitor in the context of the collapsar model for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) through two dimensional axisymmetric relativistic hydrodynamic simulations. Initially, we locally inject an outflow near the center of a progenitor. We calculate 25 models, in total, by fixing its total input energy to be 10{sup 51} ergs s{sup -1} and radius of the injected outflow to be 7 x 10{sup 7} cm while varying its bulk Lorentz factor, {Lambda}{sub 0} = 1.05 {approx} 5, and its specific internal energy, {epsilon}{sub 0}/c{sup 2} 30 (with c being speed of light). The injected outflow propagates in the progenitor and drives a large-scale outflow or jet. We find a smooth but dramatic transition from a collimated jet to an expanding outflow among calculated models. The opening angle of the outflow ({theta}{sub sim}) is sensitive to {Lambda}{sub 0}; we find {theta}{sub sim} < 2{sup o} for {Lambda}{sub 0} {approx}> 3. The maximum Lorentz factor is, on the other hand, sensitive to both of {Lambda}{sub 0} and {epsilon}{sub 0}; roughly {Lambda}{sub max} {approx} {Lambda}{sub 0}(1 + {epsilon}{sub 0}/c{sup 2}). In particular, a very high Lorentz factor of {Lambda}{sub max} {approx}> 100 is achieved in one model. A variety of opening angles can arise by changing {epsilon}{sub 0}, even when the maximum Lorentz factor is fixed. The jet structure totally depends on {Lambda}{sub 0}. When {Lambda}{sub 0} is high, a strong bow shock appears and generates a back flow. High pressure progenitor gas heated by the bow shock collimates the outflow to form a narrow, relativistic jet. A number of internal oblique shocks within the jet are generated by the presence of the back flow and/or shear instability. When {Lambda}{sub 0} is low, on the contrary, the outflow expands soon after the injection, since the bow shock is weak and thus the pressure of the progenitor gas is not high enough to confine the flow. Our finding will explain a smooth

  20. Jet and flash imprint defectivity: assessment and reduction for semiconductor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matt; Litt, Lloyd C.; Johnson, Steve; Resnick, Douglas J.; Lovell, David

    2011-04-01

    Defectivity has been historically identified as a leading technical roadblock to the implementation of nanoimprint lithography for semiconductor high volume manufacturing. The lack of confidence in nanoimprint's ability to meet defect requirements originates in part from the industry's past experiences with 1X lithography and the shortage in end-user generated defect data. SEMATECH has therefore initiated a defect assessment aimed at addressing these concerns. The goal is to determine whether nanoimprint, specifically Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography from Molecular Imprints, is capable of meeting semiconductor industry defect requirements. At this time, several cycles of learning have been completed in SEMATECH's defect assessment, with promising results. J-FIL process random defectivity of < 0.1 def/cm2 has been demonstrated using a 120nm half-pitch template, providing proof of concept that a low defect nanoimprint process is possible. Template defectivity has also improved significantly as shown by a pre-production grade template at 80nm pitch. Cycles of learning continue on feature sizes down to 22nm.

  1. High throughput Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography for semiconductor memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Fletcher, Brian; Thompson, Ecron; Liu, Weijun; Stachowiak, Tim; Khusnatdinov, Niyaz; Irving, J. W.; Longsine, Whitney; Traub, Matthew; Truskett, Van; LaBrake, Dwayne; Ye, Zhengmao

    2016-03-01

    Imprint lithography has been shown to be an effective technique for replication of nano-scale features. Jet and Flash* Imprint Lithography (J-FIL*) involves the field-by-field deposition and exposure of a low viscosity resist deposited by jetting technology onto the substrate. The patterned mask is lowered into the fluid which then quickly flows into the relief patterns in the mask by capillary action. Following this filling step, the resist is crosslinked under UV radiation, and then the mask is removed, leaving a patterned resist on the substrate. There are two critical components to meeting throughput requirements for imprint lithography. Using a similar approach to what is already done for many deposition and etch processes, imprint stations can be clustered to enhance throughput. The FPA-1200NZ2C is a four station cluster system designed for high volume manufacturing. For a single station, throughput includes overhead, resist dispense, resist fill time (or spread time), exposure and separation. Resist exposure time and mask/wafer separation are well understood processing steps with typical durations on the order of 0.10 to 0.20 seconds. To achieve a total process throughput of 15 wafers per hour (wph) for a single station, it is necessary to complete the fluid fill step in 1.5 seconds. For a throughput of 20 wph, fill time must be reduced to only one second. There are several parameters that can impact resist filling. Key parameters include resist drop volume (smaller is better), system controls (which address drop spreading after jetting), Design for Imprint or DFI (to accelerate drop spreading) and material engineering (to promote wetting between the resist and underlying adhesion layer). In addition, it is mandatory to maintain fast filling, even for edge field imprinting. In this paper, we address the improvements made in all of these parameters to enable a 1.50 second filling process for a sub-20nm device like pattern and have demonstrated this capability

  2. High performance wire grid polarizers using jet and flashTM imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sean; Yang, Jack; Miller, Mike; Ganapathisubramanian, Maha; Menezes, Marlon; Choi, Jin; Xu, Frank; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2013-03-01

    The ability to pattern materials at the nanoscale can enable a variety of applications ranging from high density data storage, displays, photonic devices and CMOS integrated circuits to emerging applications in the biomedical and energy sectors. These applications require varying levels of pattern control, short and long range order, and have varying cost tolerances. Extremely large area roll to roll (R2R) manufacturing on flexible substrates is ubiquitous for applications such as paper and plastic processing. It combines the benefits of high speed and inexpensive substrates to deliver a commodity product at low cost. The challenge is to extend this approach to the realm of nanopatterning and realize similar benefits. The cost of manufacturing is typically driven by speed (or throughput), tool complexity, cost of consumables (materials used, mold or master cost, etc.), substrate cost, and the downstream processing required (annealing, deposition, etching, etc.). In order to achieve low cost nanopatterning, it is imperative to move towards high speed imprinting, less complex tools, near zero waste of consumables and low cost substrates. The Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM) process uses drop dispensing of UV curable resists to assist high resolution patterning for subsequent dry etch pattern transfer. The technology is actively being used to develop solutions for memory markets including Flash memory and patterned media for hard disk drives. In this paper we have developed a roll based J-FIL process and applied it to technology demonstrator tool, the LithoFlex 100, to fabricate large area flexible bilayer wire grid polarizers (WGP) and high performance WGPs on rigid glass substrates. Extinction ratios of better than 10000 were obtained for the glass-based WGPs. Two simulation packages were also employed to understand the effects of pitch, aluminum thickness and pattern defectivity on the optical performance of the WGP devices. It was determined that the

  3. A flash photographic method for droplet impingement studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, V.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes an experimental method to visualize the impingement process of a liquid droplet onto a solid surface with sufficient clarity to reveal fine details of the droplet surface structure and rim jet produced during the impingement process. The method incorporates a 35 mm SLR camera with bellows, motor drive, macro lens, backlighting by a short duration flash lamp, diffusers and a commercially available timing control unit to trigger the flash. Results using the experimental arrangement are demonstrated for a water droplet striking a horizontal surface at a velocity of about 1 m/s, though the photographic method may be applied to any other condition and liquid. A series of photographs are presented that show the repeatability of the impingement process, image clarity, surface structure of the droplet during impingement.

  4. Rectangular subsonic jet flowfield study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Tatterson, Gary B.; Swan, David H.

    1987-01-01

    The flowfield of a rectangular jet with 2:1 aspect ratio was studied at an axial Reynolds number of 127,000, using a three-dimensional laser anemometer. The flowfield surveys resulted in mean velocity vector field plots and contour plots of the Reynolds stress tensor components for the major and minor axes. These data contribute substantially to currently available data of jet flowfields.

  5. A comparison of flash electroretinograms recorded from Burian Allen, JET, C-glide, gold foil, DTL and skin electrodes.

    PubMed

    Esakowitz, L; Kriss, A; Shawkat, F

    1993-01-01

    Single flash scotopic and photopic electroretinograms (ERGs) were recorded from the same subjects using six types of corneal electrode, in order to assess their relative effectiveness. In addition, the ERG from a lower eyelid skin electrode was recorded to give an indication of the degree of attenuation to be expected from a skin electrode. On average, the scotopic ERG recorded from the Burian Allen electrode measured 471 microV (100%), and relative to this the b-waves recorded using other electrodes were as follows: JET (89%), C-glide (77%), gold foil (56%), DTL (46%) and skin (12%). Under photopic conditions the order was the same and the interelectrode proportions similar. The b-wave amplitude recorded using the Burian Allen electrode was 125 microV (100%), and with other electrodes was as follows: JET (93%), C-glide (78%), gold foil (60%), DTL (60%) and skin (14%).

  6. Laboratory studies of volcanic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieffer, Susan Werner; Sturtevant, Bradford

    1984-09-01

    The study of the fluid dynamics of violent volcanic eruptions by laboratory experiment is described, and the important fluid-dynamic processes that can be examined in laboratory models are discussed in detail. In preliminary experiments, pure gases are erupted from small reservoirs. The gases used are Freon 12 and Freon 22, two gases of high molecular weight and high density that are good analogs of heavy and particulate-laden volcanic gases; nitrogen, a moderate molecular weight, moderate density gas for which the thermodynamic properties are well known; and helium, a low molecular weight, lowdensity gas that is used as a basis for comparison with the behavior of the heavier gases and as an analog of steam, the gas that dominates many volcanic eruptions. Transient jets erupt from the reservoir into the laboratory upon rupture of a thin diaphragm at the exit of a convergent nozzle. The gas accelerates from rest in the reservoir to high velocity in the jet. Reservoir pressures and geometries are such that the fluid velocity in the jets is initially supersonic and later decays to subsonic. The measured reservoir pressure decreases as the fluid expands through repetitively reflecting rarefaction waves, but for the conditions of these experiments, a simple steady-discharge model is sufficient to explain the pressure decay and to predict the duration of the flow. Density variations in the flow field have been visualized with schlieren and shadowgraph photography. The observed structure of the jet is correlated with the measured pressure history. The starting vortex generated when the diaphragm ruptures becomes the head of the jet. Though the exit velocity is sonic, the flow head in the helium jet decelerates to about one-third of sonic velocity in the first few nozzle diameters, the nitrogen head decelerates to about three-fourths of sonic velocity, while Freon maintains nearly sonic velocity. The impulsive acceleration of reservoir fluid into the surrounding atmosphere

  7. A study of thunderstorm microphysical properties and lightning flash counts associated with terrestrial gamma-ray flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, D. E.; Splitt, M. E.; Dwyer, J. R.; Lazarus, S.; Smith, D. M.; Rassoul, H. K.

    2015-04-01

    The terrestrial gamma ray flash (TGF) is an emission of highly energetic radiation produced by or at least in close association with lightning. Previous investigations attempted to isolate the production mechanisms and production altitude(s) of TGFs as well as macrophysical characteristics, while thunderstorm microphysical characteristics were largely ignored. This investigation into thunderstorms and their hydrometeor and flash characteristics utilize temporal and spatial coincident satellite passes between the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission to determine the bulk (or footprint) microphysical properties of two types of study events, the thunderstorm complexes which are associated with TGFs (TGF case) and the thunderstorm complexes which did not produce a TGF detected by Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager during the pass (non-TGF case). Results are presented for two different comparison methods. The first case utilizes geographic region weighted by TGF distribution, and the second is based on TGF percentage of occurrence when compared to total flash count of data set. Results show that the associated storms around the TGF location possess differences in the hydrometeor concentrations: cloud liquid water, cloud ice, precipitation water, and precipitation ice. These results take place at different levels of the atmosphere, including the mixed phase region. Additionally, results will show that TGFs are a consistent percentage of observed flashes as the rate of TGFs as a function of Lightning Imaging Sensor flash count is relatively constant.

  8. Flash X-Ray Injector Study

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, A C

    2004-03-26

    The study described in this report1 models the FXR injector from the cathode to the exit of the injector. The calculations are compared to actual experimental measurements, table 1. In these measurements the anode voltage was varied by changing the Marks-Bank charging voltage. The anode-cathode spacing was varied by adjusting the location of the cathode in hopes of finding an island of minimum emittance (none found). The bucking coil current was set for zero field on the cathode. In these measurements, a pepper-pot mask was inserted into FXR at beam bug 135 and viewed downstream via a wiggle probe diagnostic at cell gap J21, figure 1. The observed expansion of the beamlets passing through the mask of known geometric layout and hole size allow a calculation of the phase space beam properties.

  9. Combat aircraft jet engine noise studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewy, S.; Fournier, G.; Pianko, M.

    Methods of noise prediction and attenuation, based on results obtained in civil applications are presented. Input data for directivity and radiation forecasts are given by measurements of vane and blade pressure fluctuations, and by modal analysis of the spinning waves propagating in the inlet duct. Attention is given to sound generation mechanisms for subsonic and supersonic single jets and bypass jets. Prediction methods, based on Lighthill's equation (tensor due to the turbulence), are discussed, and the various means of jet noise reduction are reviewed. The CEPRA 19 anechoic wind tunnel, which is primarily designed for studying the jet noise radiated in the far field with flight effects is described.

  10. Living together flash-floods: the Versilia (Italy) case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caporali, Enrica; Pileggi, Tiziana; Gruntfest, Eve; Ruin, Isabelle; Federici, Giorgio

    2010-05-01

    The phenomena involved in extreme flash-flood events are complex and their prediction is affected by a given degree of uncertainty that makes the warning communication very difficult to achieve. The promotion of the natural hazards perception and the improvement in warning communication, aimed at human life losses reduction, became extremely important to accomplish. As a case study the Versilia river basin, in North - West Tuscany, Central Italy, prone to frequent flash-flood events, is considered. In the area, as stated from Santini (a local historian of XIX century), since 1386 existed special statutes, imposing rivers maintenance for protection against floods. Historical data testify also that the biggest flood events have occurred in the years 1774, 1885, 1902 and 1996. The last event is the one deeply analyzed and better documented. It was exceptional, the consequences on the population were dramatic, and the effects on building and infrastructures were catastrophic. With reference to the Versilia region, a geographic database for flood risk assessment, integrating diachronic data with the results of hydrological and sedimentological modeling, and integrating different competencies, is implemented. The purpose is to provide valuable aid to flash-floods prediction, risk assessment, structural and non-structural mitigation measures. As a first attempt, the combination of all the information available on the history of floods of Versilia region and model results, together with human exposure to flash-flood risk, is also explored. The aim is to investigate the detailed hydrometeorological circumstances that lead to accidental casualties and to better understand the predominant physical factors of risk. In the framework of enhancing natural hazards perception, a very particular educational experience, dedicated to the personnel that work on the territory with different roles and in different fields (i.e. municipal and provincial police, national forest body

  11. Flash Floods: A Spatial and Temporal Analysis A Case Study of the Flash Floods in Southwestern Missouri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollak, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    Floods are the leading cause of weather-related fatalities in the United States and the second most common cause of weather-related death worldwide. Of all floods, flash floods are found to be the most deadly with an average global mortality rate of 3.62%. This study performed a spatial and temporal analysis of flash flood risk using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to analyze an event that occurred in southwestern Missouri in March 2008. The goals of the study were to identify different impacts of the disaster as indicated by flood reports; examine the social and natural factors that account for the spatial and temporal distribution and severity of the impacts; and to compare the results with a previous study of a flash flood event in France. In the Missouri case, the analysis confirmed that small catchments react faster than large catchments and to smaller amounts of rainfall. Seventy-seven percent of incidents (water rescues, fatalities, flooded homes, and flooded roads) occurred in catchments smaller than 200 km2. The study also showed that a majority of the severe impacts (water rescues, fatalities, and flooded homes) occurred after the rainfall had tapered off, perhaps indicating that people erroneously perceive the danger has passed once the rain has stopped. When looking at water rescues and fatalities, the results of this study found that fewer incidents occurred in medium size catchments (50-450 km2) than in either large (>450 km2) or small catchments (<50 km2). This is similar to the French study which found that no fatalities occurred in medium-sized catchments. Using GIS to examine flash flood risk, will take strides forward comparing human vulnerability with size of catchment. This project integrated qualitative and quantitative data using GIS. Displays the time series before, during, and after the flood report/accident which occurred in catchment 5.

  12. Numerical and experimental study of the dynamics of a superheated jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Avick; Gopalakrishnan, Shivasubramanian; Balasubramanian, Sridhar

    2015-11-01

    Flash-boiling is a phenomenon where a liquid experiences low pressures in a system resulting in it getting superheated. The sudden drop in pressures results in accelerated expansion and violent vapour formation. Understanding the physics behind the jet disintegration and flash-boiling phenomenon is still an open problem, with applications in automotive and aerospace combustors. The behaviour of a flash-boiling jet is highly dependent on the input parameters, inlet temperature and pressure. In the present study, the external (outside nozzle) and the internal (inside nozzle) flow characteristics of the two-phase flow has been studied numerically and experimentally. The phase change from liquid to vapour takes place over a finite period of time, modeled sing Homogeneous Relaxation Model (HRM). In order to validate the numerical results, controlled experiments were performed. Optical diagnostic techniques such as Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Shadowgraphy were used to study the flow characteristics. Spray angle, penetration depth, droplet spectra were obtained which provides a better understanding of the break-up mechanism. Linear stability analysis is performed to study the stability characteristics of the jet.

  13. CYTOGENETIC STUDIES IN MICE TREATED WITH THE JET FUELS, JET-A AND JP-8

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytogenetic studies in mice treated with the jet fuels, Jet-A and JP-8
    Abstract
    The genotoxic potential of the jet fuels, Jet-A and JP-8, were examined in mice treated on the skin with a single dose of 240 ug/mouse. Peripheral blood smears were prepared at the start of the ...

  14. Defect reduction for semiconductor memory applications using jet and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhengmao; Luo, Kang; Lu, Xiaoming; Fletcher, Brian; Liu, Weijun; Xu, Frank; LaBrake, Dwayne; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2012-07-01

    Acceptance of imprint lithography for manufacturing will require demonstration that it can attain defect levels commensurate with the defect specifications of high-end memory devices. Defects occurring during imprinting can generally be broken into two categories; random defects and repeating defects. Examples of random defects include fluid phase imprint defects, such as bubbles, and solid phase imprint defects, such as line collapse. Examples of repeater defects include mask fabrication defects and particle induced defects. Previous studies indicated that soft particles cause nonrepeating defects. Hard particles, on the other hand, can cause either permanent resist plugging or mask damage. In a previous study, two specific defect types were examined; random nonfill defects occurring during the resist filling process and repeater defects caused by interactions with particles on the substrate. We attempted to identify the different types of imprint defect types using a mask with line/space patterns at dimensions as small as 26 nm. An Imprio 500 twenty-wafer per hour development tool was used to study the various defect types. The imprint defect density was reduced nearly four orders of magnitude, down to ˜4/cm2 in a period of two years following the availability of low defect imprint masks at 26-nm half-pitch. This reduction was achieved by identifying the root cause of various defects and then taking the appropriate corrective action.

  15. Fuels characterization studies. [jet fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seng, G. T.; Antoine, A. C.; Flores, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    Current analytical techniques used in the characterization of broadened properties fuels are briefly described. Included are liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. High performance liquid chromatographic ground-type methods development is being approached from several directions, including aromatic fraction standards development and the elimination of standards through removal or partial removal of the alkene and aromatic fractions or through the use of whole fuel refractive index values. More sensitive methods for alkene determinations using an ultraviolet-visible detector are also being pursued. Some of the more successful gas chromatographic physical property determinations for petroleum derived fuels are the distillation curve (simulated distillation), heat of combustion, hydrogen content, API gravity, viscosity, flash point, and (to a lesser extent) freezing point.

  16. Study of Beijiang catchment flash-flood forecasting model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Li, J.; Huang, S.; Dong, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Beijiang catchment is a small catchment in southern China locating in the centre of the storm areas of the Pearl River Basin. Flash flooding in Beijiang catchment is a frequently observed disaster that caused direct damages to human beings and their properties. Flood forecasting is the most effective method for mitigating flash floods, the goal of this paper is to develop the flash flood forecasting model for Beijiang catchment. The catchment property data, including DEM, land cover types and soil types, which will be used for model construction and parameter determination, are downloaded from the website freely. Based on the Liuxihe Model, a physically based distributed hydrological model, a model for flash flood forecasting of Beijiang catchment is set up. The model derives the model parameters from the terrain properties, and further optimized with the observed flooding process, which improves the model performance. The model is validated with a few observed floods occurred in recent years, and the results show that the model is reliable and is promising for flash flood forecasting.

  17. Numerical studies of solar chromospheric jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, Haruhisa

    2016-03-01

    some of the short chromospheric jets. The taller jets tend to follow ballistic trajectory. The contribution of the coronal conditions are quantitatively modeled in the form of a power law based on the amplification of shock waves under the density stratified medium. In Chapter 5, the role of the magnetic field is investigated using the two-dimensional simulations. We distinguish the contribution of the corona and magnetic field using the power law. The average magnetic field strength produces only a small effect on the scale of chromospheric jets. The observed regional difference is mainly explained by the difference of the coronal conditions, which is caused by the different magnetic field structure. We also find shorter chromospheric jets above the strong magnetic flux tube. This is in contrast to the observational studies. In Chapter 6, a three-dimensional simulation is presented to investigate the effect of three-dimensionality on the scale of chromospheric jets and the dependence on the photospheric magnetic field structure. The tall chromospheric jets with the maximum height of 10–11 Mm and lifetime of 8–10 min are formed. These tall jets are located above the strong magnetic field concentration. This result is different from the two-dimensional study and consistent with the observational reports. The strongly entangled chromospheric magnetic field drives these tall chromospheric jets through the Lorentz force. We also find that the produced chromospheric jets form a cluster with the diameter of several Mm with finer strands. In Chapter 7, we summarize and discuss our new findings and their implications for the solar chromospheric jets. The regional difference of chromospheric jets is explained through the coronal temperature and density, which is produced by the heating process with the different strength and structure of the magnetic field. The observational relation between the magnetic network and chromospheric jets are interpreted through the magii netic

  18. Numerical studies of solar chromospheric jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, Haruhisa

    2016-03-01

    short chromospheric jets. The taller jets tend to follow ballistic trajectory. The contribution of the coronal conditions are quantitatively modeled in the form of a power law based on the amplification of shock waves under the density stratified medium. In Chapter 5, the role of the magnetic field is investigated using the two-dimensional simulations. We distinguish the contribution of the corona and magnetic field using the power law. The average magnetic field strength produces only a small effect on the scale of chromospheric jets. The observed regional difference is mainly explained by the difference of the coronal conditions, which is caused by the different magnetic field structure. We also find shorter chromospheric jets above the strong magnetic flux tube. This is in contrast to the observational studies. In Chapter 6, a three-dimensional simulation is presented to investigate the effect of three-dimensionality on the scale of chromospheric jets and the dependence on the photospheric magnetic field structure. The tall chromospheric jets with the maximum height of 10-11 Mm and lifetime of 8-10 min are formed. These tall jets are located above the strong magnetic field concentration. This result is different from the two-dimensional study and consistent with the observational reports. The strongly entangled chromospheric magnetic field drives these tall chromospheric jets through the Lorentz force. We also find that the produced chromospheric jets form a cluster with the diameter of several Mm with finer strands. In Chapter 7, we summarize and discuss our new findings and their implications for the solar chromospheric jets. The regional difference of chromospheric jets is explained through the coronal temperature and density, which is produced by the heating process with the different strength and structure of the magnetic field. The observational relation between the magnetic network and chromospheric jets are interpreted through the magii netic energy release

  19. [Laser flash photolysis, EPR and Raman studies of liquids at elevated pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Eyring, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    The proposed research will solve a number of analytical chemical problems in solutions with measurement techniques that benefit from the use of elevated hydrostatic pressures: stopped-flow spectrophotometry (Gd[sup 3+] + L(ligand), [RuL[sub 5]H[sub 2]O][sup 2+], laser flash photolysis of Mo(CO)[sub 6] + L, flash photolysis of binuclear metalloproteins), EPR spectroscopy (Gd[sup 3+] ion-exchanged into ETS-10 and ETAS-10 molecular sieves), laser flash photolysis kinetic studies of Mo(CO)[sub 6]-2,2'-bipyridine, and electrochemical studies of metalloporphyrins using resonance Raman spectroscopy.

  20. [Laser flash photolysis, EPR and Raman studies of liquids at elevated pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Eyring, E.M.

    1992-10-01

    The proposed research will solve a number of analytical chemical problems in solutions with measurement techniques that benefit from the use of elevated hydrostatic pressures: stopped-flow spectrophotometry (Gd{sup 3+} + L(ligand), [RuL{sub 5}H{sub 2}O]{sup 2+}, laser flash photolysis of Mo(CO){sub 6} + L, flash photolysis of binuclear metalloproteins), EPR spectroscopy (Gd{sup 3+} ion-exchanged into ETS-10 and ETAS-10 molecular sieves), laser flash photolysis kinetic studies of Mo(CO){sub 6}-2,2`-bipyridine, and electrochemical studies of metalloporphyrins using resonance Raman spectroscopy.

  1. Study of an under-expanded sonic impinging jet array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joon Ho

    The under-expanded impinging jet is used in various situations, such as the launch of a rocket, the takeoff and landing of a vertical/short take off and landing aircraft, jet engine exhaust impingement, or the thrust vector control system of a solid rocket motor. It is also of considerable interest to study the fluid dynamics of jet impingement on a surface with respect to heat transfer. Past investigations of sonic or supersonic impinging jets were limited to only a single jet and were primarily concentrated on fluid mechanics phenomena. No results exist in the literature for an under-expanded sonic impinging jet array. The present study is focused on the fluid dynamics for an array of under-expanded sonic impinging jets with the ultimate objective being to study the understanding of the interaction between impinging jets and the effect of jet-to-jet spacing (s/d), jet-to-plate spacing (z/d), and the degree of under-expansion (P0/Pa). Schlieren videography was applied to study the variation of structures that dominate the supersonic impinging flow, such as the intercepting shock, reflected shock, normal disk, stand-off-plate shock, and stagnation bubble. A high frequency transducer was used to measure the pressure field of the fluid flow near the impingement surface. Test configurations included non-dimensional jet-to-plate heights from 1 to 10, non-dimensional jet-to-jet spacing of 2 and 4, and pressure ratios from 3.3 to 12.9. Jets with orifice diameter of 12.7 and 25.4 mm were used. The fluid dynamics of an under-expanded sonic jet array differ largely from a single jet at s/d = 2. Midway between jets and near each stagnation bubble region, the jet array shows higher values in surface pressure due to the jet interaction. Both a single jet and a jet array have the linear dependence between z/d for the location of the shock cell and transition from supersonic wall jet to subsonic wall jet. However, the jet array show the location of the shock cell is changing

  2. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Axisymmetric Free Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Eugene S.; Grigsby, Carl E.; Lee, Louise P.; Woodling, Mildred J.

    1959-01-01

    Some experimental and theoretical studies have been made of axisymmetric free jets exhausting from sonic and supersonic nozzles into still air and into supersonic streams with a view toward problems associated with propulsive jets and the investigation of these problems. For jets exhausting into still air, consideration is given to the effects of jet Mach number, nozzle divergence angle, and jet static pressure ratio upon jet structure, jet wavelength, and the shape and curvature of the jet boundary. Studies of the effects of the ratio of specific heats of the jets are included are observations pertaining to jet noise and jet simulation. For jets exhausting into supersonic streams, an attempt has been made to present primarily theoretical certain jet interference effects and in formulating experimental studies. The primary variables considered are jet Mach number, free stream Mach number, jet static pressure ratio, ratio of specific heats of the jet, nozzle exit angle, and boattail angle. The simulation problem and the case of a hypothetical hypersonic vehicle are examined, A few experimental observations are included.

  3. Experimental study of splash generation in a flash smelting furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jong-Leng, Liow; Gray, Neil B.

    1996-08-01

    A survey of previous studies of splash formation in metallurgical vessels revealed that little information is available to characterize and describe the processes involved in splash formation. An experimental study of splash formation by top submerged gas injection was carried out in the settler region of the nickel flash smelting furnace at the Kalgoorlie Nickel Smelter (KNS) both to obtain some visualization of the splash mechanisms that occur on a plant scale and to measure the amount of splash being formed. Video images taken of the splashing showed that large sheets of melt were formed by the escaping gas and subsequently thinned into ligaments which then broke up into large splash drops. The video could only resolve a minimum size of 2 cm. The large splash drops visible on video have an initial velocity between 1 and 2 m/s, are unstable, and fall back into the bath after traveling a short distance. The analysis identified two major splash forming mechanisms. First, the gas injected resulted in the bulk movement of the melt to form a cavity and large sheets of melts being thrown around the point of injection. The area affected by this splash mechanism can be predicted successfully by using an energy balance between the removal of the melt in the cavity and the energy of the gas being injected. Second, the slag free surface within the cavity is highly unstable, and through the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability mechanism, small splash droplets are generated which are carried into the furnace’s top space. A model proposed for the formation of the smaller splash droplets predicted that the splash collected decreases exponentially with increasing height above the slag free surface from the point of splashing, and this is in agreement with the experimental results obtained.

  4. Experimental study of flapping jets in a soap film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Julia; Kim, Ildoo; Mandre, Shreyas

    2015-11-01

    Plateau and Rayleigh's observation and explanation on jet instability have inspired us over the years and there has been a significant advance in understanding the jet dynamics. Here, we present a quasi-two-dimensional experimental study of flapping jets in a soap film. Newtonian and non-Newtonian solutions are injected in a flowing soap film. Thinning, break-ups, and beads-on-a-string of the jets, and axisymmetric vortices shredded from the flapping jets are visualized. We employ PIV of the flow motion around the jets to gain an understanding of the roles of instabilities in the flow.

  5. Numberical studies of the radiant flash pyrolysis of cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, V.; Antal, M.J. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    When biomass particles are heated very rapidly (>1000/sup 0/ C/s) in an oxygen free environment, they undergo pyrolysis with the formation of little or no char. If concentrated solar energy is used to rapidly heat the particles their temperature may exceed that of the surrounding gaseous environment by several hundred degrees Celsius when pyrolysis occurs. This ''two temperature'' effect gives rise to the formation of high yields of syrups from the pyrolyzing biomass. Numberical exploration of the combined effects of heat and mass transfer on the radiative flash pyrolysis phenonmena are described in this paper. (5 tables, 8 figs, 12 refs.)

  6. Numerical studies of the radiant flash pyrolysis of cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, V.; Antal, M.J. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    When biomass particles are heated very rapidly (temperatures greater than 1000 degrees/s) in an oxygen free environment, they undergo pyrolysis with the formation of little or no char. If concentrated solar energy is used to rapidly heat the particles their temperature may exceed that of the surrounding gaseous environment by several hundred degrees Celsius when pyrolysis occurs. This two temperature effect gives rise to the formation of high yields of syrups from the pyrolyzing biomass. Numerical exploration of the combined effects of heat and mass transfer on the radiative flash pyrolysis phenonmena are described in this paper. 12 references.

  7. Experimental study of highly viscous impinging jets

    SciTech Connect

    Gomon, M.

    1998-12-01

    The objective of this research is to study the behavior of highly viscous gravity-driven jets filling a container. Matters of interest are the formation of voids in the fluid pool during the filling process and the unstable behavior of the fluid in the landing region which manifests itself as an oscillating motion. The working fluids used in this research are intended to simulate the flow behavior of molten glass. Qualitative and quantitative results are obtained in a parametric study. The fraction of voids present in the fluid pool after the filling of the container is measured for different parameter values of viscosity and mass flow rate. Likewise, frequencies of the oscillating jet are measured. Results are inconclusive with regard to a correlation between parameter settings and void fractions. As for frequencies, power law correlations are established.

  8. Laboratory studies of volcanic jets.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, S.W.; Sturtevant, B.

    1984-01-01

    Laboratory experiments to study the fluid dynamics of violent volcanic eruptions employed pure gases erupted from small reservoirs. The gases used were Freon 12 and Freon 22, both of high molecular weight and high density, to model heavy, particulate- laden volcanic gases; nitrogen, a moderate molecular weight and density gas with well known thermodynamic properties; and He, a low molecular weight and density gas used as an analogue of steam, the dominant gas of most volcanic eruptions.-W.H.B.

  9. Escitalopram Reduces Hot Flashes in Non-depressed Menopausal Women: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, Roseanne DeFronzo; Menza, Matthew; Allen, Lesley A.; Marin, Humberto; Bienfait, Karina L.; Tiu, Jade; Howarth, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Background Hot flashes are one of the most troubling manifestations of menopause, affecting about 80% of women. Due to recent controversies about hormone replacement therapy (HRT), many women are seeking alternative treatments. The use of antidepressants to treat hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms has been an active area of investigation. However, the majority of past research in this area has included women with significant medical or psychiatric histories that may influence treatment response. This was the first study to examine the impact of escitalopram on hot flashes, mood, sleep, and quality of life in a healthy sample of non-depressed menopausal women. Methods Twenty-five menopausal women, with no significant psychiatric or medical history, were enrolled. All women were treated with escitalopram (10-20mg flexibly dosed) for 8 weeks. The active treatment phase was preceded by a single blind placebo lead-in period. Results Over the course of the study, women reported significant decreases in both hot flash frequency and severity and improvements in dysphoria, anxiety, quality of life, and sleep. Conclusions These preliminary findings suggest that escitalopram may be a feasible and effective option for treating hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms in healthy women who might not ordinarily consider antidepressant treatment. PMID:19439155

  10. Multiple jet study data correlations. [data correlation for jet mixing flow of air jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. E.; Eberhardt, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    Correlations are presented which allow determination of penetration and mixing of multiple cold air jets injected normal to a ducted subsonic heated primary air stream. Correlations were obtained over jet-to-primary stream momentum flux ratios of 6 to 60 for locations from 1 to 30 jet diameters downstream of the injection plane. The range of geometric and operating variables makes the correlations relevant to gas turbine combustors. Correlations were obtained for the mixing efficiency between jets and primary stream using an energy exchange parameter. Also jet centerplane velocity and temperature trajectories were correlated and centerplane dimensionless temperature distributions defined. An assumption of a Gaussian vertical temperature distribution at all stations is shown to result in a reasonable temperature field model. Data are presented which allow comparison of predicted and measured values over the range of conditions specified above.

  11. Analytical study of twin-jet shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    The development of an analytical model, an aircraft noise prediction computer program, to estimate the shielding of one jet by an adjacent jet in a twin jet configuration, is discussed. Noise estimations included consideration not only of noise sources on the aircraft, but also of the propagation path between source and receiver. A three-dimensional case is considered in which noise source is a discrete frequency point source at rest with respect to the jet axis. The shielding jet is assumed to be a cylinder of heated flow in which the temperature and flow velocity profiles are constant across the jet. The effect on shielding of the orientation of the emitting jet with respect to the shielding jet was investigated. Forward and backward scattering phenomena as well as the influence of jet flow speed were also investigated.

  12. Experimental and theoretical study of combustion jet ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. Y.; Ghoniem, A. F.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    A combustion jet ignition system was developed to generate turbulent jets of combustion products containing free radicals and to discharge them as ignition sources into a combustible medium. In order to understand the ignition and the inflammation processes caused by combustion jets, the studies of the fluid mechanical properties of turbulent jets with and without combustion were conducted theoretically and experimentally. Experiments using a specially designed igniter, with a prechamber to build up and control the stagnation pressure upstream of the orifice, were conducted to investigate the formation processes of turbulent jets of combustion products. The penetration speed of combustion jets has been found to be constant initially and then decreases monotonically as turbulent jets of combustion products travel closer to the wall. This initial penetration speed to combustion jets is proportional to the initial stagnation pressure upstream of the orifice for the same stoichiometric mixture. Computer simulations by Chorin's Random Vortex Method implemented with the flame propagation algorithm for the theoretical model of turbulent jets with and without combustion were performed to study the turbulent jet flow field. In the formation processes of the turbulent jets, the large-scale eddy structure of turbulence, the so-called coherent structure, dominates the entrainment and mixing processes. The large-scale eddy structure of turbulent jets in this study is constructed by a series of vortex pairs, which are organized in the form of a staggered array of vortex clouds generating local recirculation flow patterns.

  13. Theoretical and experimental study of the formation conditions of stepped leaders in negative flashes

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Shijun; Zeng, Rong; Zhuang, Chijie; Li, Jianming

    2015-08-15

    Natural lightning flashes are stochastic and uncontrollable, and thus, it is difficult to observe the formation process of a downward negative stepped leader (NSL) directly and in detail. This situation has led to some dispute over the actual NSL formation mechanism, and thus has hindered improvements in the lightning shielding analysis model. In this paper, on the basis of controllable long air gap discharge experiments, the formation conditions required for NSLs in negative flashes have been studied. First, a series of simulation experiments on varying scales were designed and carried out. The NSL formation processes were observed, and several of the characteristic process parameters, including the scale, the propagation velocity, and the dark period, were obtained. By comparing the acquired formation processes and the characteristic parameters with those in natural lightning flashes, the similarity between the NSLs in the simulation experiments and those in natural flashes was proved. Then, based on the local thermodynamic equation and the space charge estimation method, the required NSL formation conditions were deduced, and the space background electric field (E{sub b}) was proposed as the primary parameter for NSL formation. Finally, the critical value of E{sub b} required for the formation of NSLs in natural flashes was determined to be approximately 75 kV/m by extrapolation of the results of the simulation experiments.

  14. Hypnosis for hot flashes among postmenopausal women study: A study protocol of an ongoing randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hot flashes are a highly prevalent problem associated with menopause and breast cancer treatments. The recent findings from the Women's Health Initiative have important implications for the significance of a non-hormonal, mind-body intervention for hot flashes in breast cancer survivors. Women who take hormone therapy long-term may have a 1.2 to 2.0 fold increased risk of developing breast cancer. In addition, it is now known that hormone therapy with estrogen and progestin is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke. Currently there are limited options to hormone replacement therapy as non-hormonal pharmacological agents are associated with only modest activity and many adverse side effects. Because of this there is a need for more alternative, non-hormonal therapies. Hypnosis is a mind-body intervention that has been shown to reduce self-reported hot flashes by up to 68% among breast cancer survivors, however, the use of hypnosis for hot flashes among post-menopausal women has not been adequately explored and the efficacy of hypnosis in reducing physiologically measured hot flashes has not yet been determined. Methods/design A sample of 180 post-menopausal women will be randomly assigned to either a 5-session Hypnosis Intervention or 5-session structured-attention control with 12 week follow-up. The present study will compare hypnosis to a structured-attention control in reducing hot flashes (perceived and physiologically monitored) in post-menopausal women in a randomized clinical trial. Outcomes will be hot flashes (self-report daily diaries; physiological monitoring; Hot Flash Related Daily Interference Scale), anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory; Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS); anxiety visual analog scale (VAS rating); depression (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale), sexual functioning (Sexual Activity Questionnaire), sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) and cortisol. Discussion

  15. Chandra enables study of x-ray jets

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The exquisite angular resolution of the Chandra x-ray telescope has enabled the detection and study of resolved x-ray jets in a wide variety of astronomical systems. Chandra has detected extended jets in our galaxy from protostars, symbiotic binaries, neutron star pulsars, black hole binaries, extragalactic jets in radio sources, and quasars. The x-ray data play an essential role in deducing the emission mechanism of the jets, in revealing the interaction of jets with the intergalactic or intracluster media, and in studying the energy generation budget of black holes. PMID:20378839

  16. Chandra enables study of x-ray jets.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Daniel

    2010-04-20

    The exquisite angular resolution of the Chandra x-ray telescope has enabled the detection and study of resolved x-ray jets in a wide variety of astronomical systems. Chandra has detected extended jets in our galaxy from protostars, symbiotic binaries, neutron star pulsars, black hole binaries, extragalactic jets in radio sources, and quasars. The x-ray data play an essential role in deducing the emission mechanism of the jets, in revealing the interaction of jets with the intergalactic or intracluster media, and in studying the energy generation budget of black holes. PMID:20378839

  17. A study on flash sintering and related phenomena in titania and its composite with alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhar

    In 2010, Cologna et. al. [1] reported that with a help of small electric field 120 Vcm-1, the sintering temperature of 3 mol % yittria stabilized zirconia could be brought down to 850°C from 1450°C. On top of reducing the temperature requirements, the green sample could be sintered from starting density of 50% to near full density in mere 5 seconds, a sintering rate three orders of magnitude higher than conventional methods. This discovery led to the emergence of a new field of enhanced sintering with electric field, named "Flash Sintering". The objective of this thesis is to understand the phenomenological behavior of flash-sintering and related phenomena on titania and its composites with alumina at elevated temperature. The possible mechanisms to explain flash sintering are discussed: Joule heating and the avalanche of defect generation [2], both induced by the rapid rise in conductivity just before the onset of the flash. Apparently, both mechanisms play a role. The thesis covers the response of pure titania and composites of titania-alumina under flash and compared with conventional sintering. We start with the sintering behavior of pure titania and observe lowering of sintering temperature requirements with higher applied electric field. The conductivity of titania during flash is also measured, and compared with the nominal conductivity of titania at equivalent temperatures. The conductivity during flash is determined to be have a different activation energy. For the composites of titania-alumina, effect of flash on the constrained sintering was studied. It is a known fact that sintering of one component of composite slows down when the other component of a different densification rate is added to it, called constrained sintering. In our case, large inclusions of alumina particles were added to nano-grained titania green compact that hindered its densification. Flash sintering was found to be overcoming this problem and near full densification was achieved

  18. Flash photoelectrochemical studies of transient electrode processes important in solar-energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perone, S. P.

    1982-10-01

    Electroanalytical and spectroscopic measurement techniques were applied to the study of transient photolytic, photoemissive, and photoelectrolytic processes associated with UV-visible irradiation of an electrode/solution interface. Both semiconductor and metallic electrodes were employed. For the characterization of transient phenomena, the general methodology of flash photolysis was employed (including both xenon flash lamp and tunable pulsed dye laser sources). The perspective afforded by transient electroanalytical/spectroscopic measurements of photoinitiated electrode processes provided more definitive mechanistic insight to solar conversion phenomena in photogalvanic or photoelectrolysis processes.

  19. Study of Jet Transverse Momentum and Jet Rapidity Dependence on Dijet Azimuthal Decorrelations

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarthula, Kiran

    2012-01-01

    In a collision experiment involving highly energetic particles such as hadrons, processes at high momentum transfers can provide information useful for many studies involving Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). One way of analyzing these interactions is through angular distributions. In hadron-hadron collisions, the angular distribution between the two leading jets with the largest transverse momentum (pT ) is affected by the production of additional jets. While soft radiation causes small differences in the azimuthal angular distribution of the two leading jets produced in a collision event, additional hard jets produced in the event have more pronounced influence on the distribution of the two leading jets produced in the collision. Thus, the dijet azimuthal angular distribution can serve as a variable that can be used to study the transition from soft to hard QCD processes in a collision event. This dissertation presents a triple-differential study involving the azimuthal angular distribution and the jet transverse momenta, and jet rapidities of the first two leading jets. The data used for this research are obtained from proton-antiproton (p$\\bar{p}$) collisions occurring at a center of mass energy of 1.96TeV, using the DØ detector in Run II of the Tevatron Collider at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Illinois, USA. Comparisons are made to perturbative QCD (pQCD) predictions at next-to-leading order (NLO).

  20. Atrial inflow can alter regurgitant jet size: in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Grimes, R Y; Nyarko, S J; Pulido, G A; Yang, S; Walker, P G; Levine, R A; Yoganathan, A P

    1995-01-01

    Recent studies have attempted to predict the severity of regurgitant lesions from color Doppler jet size, which is a function of orifice momentum for free jets. Jets of mitral and tricuspid regurgitation, however, are opposed by flows entering the atria. Despite their low velocities, these counterflows may have considerable momentum that can limit jet penetration. The purpose of this study was to address the hypothesis that such counterflow fields influence regurgitant jet size. Steady flow was driven through 2.4- and 5.1-mm-diameter circular orifices at 2 to 6 m/s. At a constant orifice velocity and flow rate, the velocity of a uniform counterflow field was varied from 5 to 30 cm/s. Jet dimensions were measured by both fluorescent dye visualization and Doppler color flow mapping. The results showed that despite its relatively low velocities, counterflow dramatically curtailed jet length and area. Jet dimensions were functions of the ratio of jet to counterflow momentum. Thus, atrial inflow may participate in determining jet size and can alter the relation between jet size and lesion severity in mitral and tricuspid regurgitation.

  1. Statistical study of the polar X-ray jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sako, Nobuharu; Shimojo, Masumi; Kitabayashi, Teruyuki

    The X-Ray Telescope(XRT) abroad Hinode had revealed that X-ray jets in the polar region occur at the high frequency. Savcheva et al. (2007) studied 104 X-ray jets occurred around the south pole and reported the parameters of the jets. However, their study included only the X-ray jets that occurred in the coronal hole. In order to reveal the properties of the polar X-ray jets in not only the coronal hole but also the quiet region, we detected 870 polar X-ray jets occurred around the north pole, and investigated the jets statistically. The 470 jets in the 848 events occurred in the coronal hole. The occurrence rate of the jets in the coronal hole and the quiet sun is 5.04×10-12 jets/hr/km2 and 7.66×10-12 jets/hr/km2 , respectively. It shows that the quiet region is more productive of X-ray jets than the coronal hole. We derived five parameters of the polar X-ray jets, and the average of the parameters are 2.91×104 km for the maximum length, 4.42×103 km for the width, and 180 km/sec for the apparent velocity. The lifetime and length scale of the jets in this result is smaller than that in Savcheva et al. (2007). The reason for these differences is that we could detect smaller jets than the previous work because we used not only X-ray intensity images but also the running difference images for detecting the jets. We derived also the frequency distributions of the parameters and found thatthe frequency distributions of the lifetime and the X-ray intensity of the footpoint flare show the power-raw distribution. The power-law index of the lifetime is -4.22±0.36, and it is smaller than the index(-1.2) derived from the jets that occurred near the active regions(Shimojo et al. 1996). The difference indicates that the occurrence rate of the polar X-ray jets with short lifetime is larger than that of the X-ray jets that occurred near active regions.On the other hand, the power-raw index of the X-ray intensity of the footpoint flare is -2.04±0.27. The index is smaller

  2. A Visual Study of Vortex Generator Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, Debora A.; Stadnicki, John

    1997-11-01

    A jet which issues from a small hole in a flow surface, pitched and skewed relative to the crossflow, creates a single streamwise vortex which resembles the flow downstream of a half-delta-wing vortex generator. The term ``vortex generator jet'' (VGJ) has been used to describe such a flow. Investigators of jet-generated vortices have recognized their applicability to active control and their flexibility in terms of being activated and deactivated. We have installed a spanwise array of VGJ's in a turbulent boundary layer in the zero-pressure-gradient test section of the 12" × 36" boundary layer wind tunnel at Boston University. The Reynolds number based on jet diameter is in the range 4000 < Re < 10000. Our experimental investigations include flow visualization of a single pitched and skewed jet in crossflow, as well as wall shear stress measurements downstream of the array of jets. To capture still images of a cross-section of the jet flow, a light sheet formed by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser is used to illuminate smoke-tagged jet fluid. The wall shear stress measurements are made using an oil-film interferometry technique. Parameters varied include jet velocity and angles of jet pitch and skew.

  3. Experimental study of elliptical jet from sub to supercritical conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Muthukumaran, C. K.; Vaidyanathan, Aravind

    2014-04-15

    The jet mixing at supercritical conditions involves fluid dynamics as well as thermodynamic phenomena. All the jet mixing studies at critical conditions to the present date have focused only on axisymmetric jets. When the liquid jet is injected into supercritical environment, the thermodynamic transition could be well understood by considering one of the important fluid properties such as surface tension since it decides the existence of distinct boundary between the liquid and gaseous phase. It is well known that an elliptical liquid jet undergoes axis-switching phenomena under atmospheric conditions due to the presence of surface tension. The experimental investigations were carried out with low speed elliptical jet under supercritical condition. Investigation of the binary component system with fluoroketone jet and N{sub 2} gas as environment shows that the surface tension force dominates for a large downstream distance, indicating delayed thermodynamic transition. The increase in pressure to critical state at supercritical temperature is found to expedite the thermodynamic transition. The ligament like structures has been observed rather than droplets for supercritical pressures. However, for the single component system with fluoroketone jet and fluoroketone environment shows that the jet disintegrates into droplets as it is subjected to the chamber conditions even for the subcritical pressures and no axis switching phenomenon is observed. For a single component system, as the pressure is increased to critical state, the liquid jet exhibits gas-gas like mixing behavior and that too without exhibiting axis-switching behavior.

  4. A computational study of asymmetric glottal jet deflection during phonation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, X.; Mittal, R.; Bielamowicz, S.

    2011-01-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations are used to explore the mechanism for asymmetric deflection of the glottal jet during phonation. The model employs the full Navier–Stokes equations for the flow but a simple laryngeal geometry and vocal-fold motion. The study focuses on the effect of Reynolds number and glottal opening angle with a particular emphasis on examining the importance of the so-called “Coanda effect” in jet deflection. The study indicates that the glottal opening angle has no substantial effect on glottal jet deflection. Deflection in the glottal jet is always preceded by large-scale asymmetry in the downstream portion of the glottal jet. A detailed analysis of the velocity and vorticity fields shows that these downstream asymmetric vortex structures induce a flow at the glottal exit which is the primary driver for glottal jet deflection. PMID:21476669

  5. A computational study of asymmetric glottal jet deflection during phonation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, X; Mittal, R; Bielamowicz, S

    2011-04-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations are used to explore the mechanism for asymmetric deflection of the glottal jet during phonation. The model employs the full Navier-Stokes equations for the flow but a simple laryngeal geometry and vocal-fold motion. The study focuses on the effect of Reynolds number and glottal opening angle with a particular emphasis on examining the importance of the so-called "Coanda effect" in jet deflection. The study indicates that the glottal opening angle has no substantial effect on glottal jet deflection. Deflection in the glottal jet is always preceded by large-scale asymmetry in the downstream portion of the glottal jet. A detailed analysis of the velocity and vorticity fields shows that these downstream asymmetric vortex structures induce a flow at the glottal exit which is the primary driver for glottal jet deflection. PMID:21476669

  6. Numerical and experimental study of rotating jet flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seungwon; Che, Zhizhao; Kahouadji, Lyes; Matar, Omar; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir

    2015-11-01

    Rotating jets are investigated through experimental measurements and numerical simulations. The experiments are performed on a rotating jet rig and the effects of a range of parameters controlling the liquid jet are investigated, e.g. jet flow rate, rotation speed, jet diameter, etc. Different regimes of the jet morphology are identified, and the dependence on several dimensionless numbers is studied, e.g. Reynolds number, Weber number, etc. The breakup process of droplets is visualized through high speed imaging. Full three-dimensional direct numerical simulations are performed using BLUE, a massively parallel two-phase flow code. The novel interface algorithms in BLUE track the gas-liquid interface through a wide dynamic range including ligament formation, break up and rupture. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  7. Benchmark studies of thermal jet mixing in SFRs using a two-jet model

    SciTech Connect

    Omotowa, O. A.; Skifton, R.; Tokuhiro, A.

    2012-07-01

    To guide the modeling, simulations and design of Sodium Fast Reactors (SFRs), we explore and compare the predictive capabilities of two numerical solvers COMSOL and OpenFOAM in the thermal jet mixing of two buoyant jets typical of the outlet flow from a SFR tube bundle. This process will help optimize on-going experimental efforts at obtaining high resolution data for V and V of CFD codes as anticipated in next generation nuclear systems. Using the k-{epsilon} turbulence models of both codes as reference, their ability to simulate the turbulence behavior in similar environments was first validated for single jet experimental data reported in literature. This study investigates the thermal mixing of two parallel jets having a temperature difference (hot-to-cold) {Delta}T{sub hc}= 5 deg. C, 10 deg. C and velocity ratios U{sub c}/U{sub h} = 0.5, 1. Results of the computed turbulent quantities due to convective mixing and the variations in flow field along the axial position are presented. In addition, this study also evaluates the effect of spacing ratio between jets in predicting the flow field and jet behavior in near and far fields. (authors)

  8. Some properties of negative cloud-to-ground flashes from observations of a local thunderstorm based on accurate-stroke-count studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Baoyou; Ma, Ming; Xu, Weiwei; Ma, Dong

    2015-12-01

    Properties of negative cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning flashes, in terms of number of strokes per flash, inter-stroke intervals and the relative intensity of subsequent and first strokes, were presented by accurate-stroke-count studies based on all 1085 negative flashes from a local thunderstorm. The percentage of single-stroke flashes and stroke multiplicity evolved significantly during the whole life cycle of the study thunderstorm. The occurrence probability of negative CG flashes decreased exponentially with the increasing number of strokes per flash. About 30.5% of negative CG flashes contained only one stroke and number of strokes per flash averaged 3.3. In a subset of 753 negative multiple-stroke flashes, about 41.4% contained at least one subsequent stroke stronger than the corresponding first stroke. Subsequent strokes tended to decrease in strength with their orders and the ratio of subsequent to first stroke peaks presented a geometric mean value of 0.52. Interestingly, negative CG flashes of higher multiplicity tended to have stronger initial strokes. 2525 inter-stroke intervals showed a more or less log-normal distribution and gave a geometric mean value of 62 ms. For CG flashes of particular multiplicity geometric mean inter-stroke intervals tended to decrease with the increasing number of strokes per flash, while those intervals associated with higher order strokes tended to be larger than those associated with low order strokes.

  9. A Comprehensive Study on Energy Efficiency and Performance of Flash-based SSD

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Seon-Yeon; Kim, Youngjae; Urgaonkar, Bhuvan; Lee, Joonwon; Seo, Euiseong

    2011-01-01

    Use of flash memory as a storage medium is becoming popular in diverse computing environments. However, because of differences in interface, flash memory requires a hard-disk-emulation layer, called FTL (flash translation layer). Although the FTL enables flash memory storages to replace conventional hard disks, it induces significant computational and space overhead. Despite the low power consumption of flash memory, this overhead leads to significant power consumption in an overall storage system. In this paper, we analyze the characteristics of flash-based storage devices from the viewpoint of power consumption and energy efficiency by using various methodologies. First, we utilize simulation to investigate the interior operation of flash-based storage of flash-based storages. Subsequently, we measure the performance and energy efficiency of commodity flash-based SSDs by using microbenchmarks to identify the block-device level characteristics and macrobenchmarks to reveal their filesystem level characteristics.

  10. [Dynamic contrast medium studies with flash sequences in nuclear magnetic resonance tomography of the breast].

    PubMed

    Heywang, S H; Hilbertz, T; Pruss, E; Wolf, A; Permanetter, W; Eiermann, W; Lissner, J

    1988-03-01

    In this study the dynamic contrast behavior after Gd-DTPA of different breast tissues and tumors has been investigated with a series of T1-weighted FLASH-sequences during the first 5 minutes after the application of Gd-DTPA. The results of these dynamic FLASH-measurements have been compared to the results of the SE-sequences 6-10 and 11-15 minutes after Gd-DTPA in 40 patients with 54 different breast tissues. It could be shown that in a number of cases a better differentiation (e.g. DD between carcinomas and proliferative dysplasia) was possible on FLASH-scans early after contrast medium than on the late SE-scans. Only the distinction between non-proliferative and proliferative dysplasia was better on the late SE-scans. Evaluation of the enhancement dynamics may be helpful in some cases as an additional information. Further investigations are necessary to confirm these findings and to assess their value.

  11. Experimental Study on Light Flash Radiant Intensity Generated by Strong Shock 2A12 Aluminum Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Enling; Zhang, Lijiao; Zhang, Qingming; Shi, Xiaohan; Wang, Meng; Wang, Di; Xiang, Shenghai; Xia, Jin; Han, Yafei; Xu, Mingyang; Wu, Jin; Zhang, Shuang; Yuan, Jianfei

    2015-07-01

    In order to study the light flash radiant intensity produced by strong shock on a 2A12 aluminum target at the same projectile incidence angles and different shock velocities, experimental measurements were conducted for light flash phenomena of a 2A12 aluminum projectile impacting a 2A12 aluminum target under the conditions of different impact velocity and the same projectile incidence angles of 45° by using an optical pyrometer measurement system and a two-stage light gas gun loading system. Experimental results show that the peak values of the light flash radiant intensity for the wavelength of 550 nm are largest in the wavelength ranges of 600 nm, 650 nm and 700 nm when a 2A12 aluminum projectile impacts a double-layer 2A12 aluminum plate in the present experimental conditions. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 10972145, 11272218, 11472178), State Key Program of National Natural Science of China (No. 11032003), Program for Liaoning Excellent Talents in University, China (No. LR2013008)

  12. Experimental study of a vertical jet in a vegetated crossflow.

    PubMed

    Ben Meftah, Mouldi; De Serio, Francesca; Malcangio, Daniela; Mossa, Michele; Petrillo, Antonio Felice

    2015-12-01

    Aquatic ecosystems have long been used as receiving environments of wastewater discharges. Effluent discharge in a receiving water body via single jet or multiport diffuser, reflects a number of complex phenomena, affecting the ecosystem services. Discharge systems need to be designed to minimize environmental impacts. Therefore, a good knowledge of the interaction between effluents, discharge systems and receiving environments is required to promote best environmental management practice. This paper reports innovative 3D flow velocity measurements of a jet discharged into an obstructed crossflow, simulating natural vegetated channel flows for which correct environmental management still lacks in literature. In recent years, numerous experimental and numerical studies have been conducted on vegetated channels, on the one hand, and on turbulent jets discharged into unvegetated crossflows, on the other hand. Despite these studies, however, there is a lack of information regarding jets discharged into vegetated crossflow. The present study aims at obtaining a more thorough understanding of the interaction between a turbulent jet and an obstructed crossflow. In order to achieve such an objective, a series of laboratory experiments was carried out in the Department of Civil, Environmental, Building Engineering and Chemistry of the Technical University of Bari - Italy. The physical model consists of a vertical jet discharged into a crossflow, obstructed by an array of vertical, rigid, circular and threaded steel cylinders. Analysis of the measured flow velocities shows that the array of emergent rigid vegetation significantly affects the jet and the ambient flow structures. It reduces the mean channel velocity, allowing the jet to penetrate higher into the crossflow. It significantly increases the transversal flow motion, promoting a major lateral spreading of the jet within the crossflow. Due to the vegetation array effects, the jet undergoes notable variations in its

  13. Experimental study of a vertical jet in a vegetated crossflow.

    PubMed

    Ben Meftah, Mouldi; De Serio, Francesca; Malcangio, Daniela; Mossa, Michele; Petrillo, Antonio Felice

    2015-12-01

    Aquatic ecosystems have long been used as receiving environments of wastewater discharges. Effluent discharge in a receiving water body via single jet or multiport diffuser, reflects a number of complex phenomena, affecting the ecosystem services. Discharge systems need to be designed to minimize environmental impacts. Therefore, a good knowledge of the interaction between effluents, discharge systems and receiving environments is required to promote best environmental management practice. This paper reports innovative 3D flow velocity measurements of a jet discharged into an obstructed crossflow, simulating natural vegetated channel flows for which correct environmental management still lacks in literature. In recent years, numerous experimental and numerical studies have been conducted on vegetated channels, on the one hand, and on turbulent jets discharged into unvegetated crossflows, on the other hand. Despite these studies, however, there is a lack of information regarding jets discharged into vegetated crossflow. The present study aims at obtaining a more thorough understanding of the interaction between a turbulent jet and an obstructed crossflow. In order to achieve such an objective, a series of laboratory experiments was carried out in the Department of Civil, Environmental, Building Engineering and Chemistry of the Technical University of Bari - Italy. The physical model consists of a vertical jet discharged into a crossflow, obstructed by an array of vertical, rigid, circular and threaded steel cylinders. Analysis of the measured flow velocities shows that the array of emergent rigid vegetation significantly affects the jet and the ambient flow structures. It reduces the mean channel velocity, allowing the jet to penetrate higher into the crossflow. It significantly increases the transversal flow motion, promoting a major lateral spreading of the jet within the crossflow. Due to the vegetation array effects, the jet undergoes notable variations in its

  14. A Parametric Study of Jet Interactions with Rarefied Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, C. E.

    2004-01-01

    Three-dimensional computational techniques, in particular the uncoupled CFD-DSMC of the present study, are available to be applied to problems such as jet interactions with variable density regions ranging from a continuum jet to a rarefied free stream. When the value of the jet to free stream momentum flux ratio approximately greater than 2000 for a sharp leading edge flat plate forward separation vortices induced by the jet interaction are present near the surface. Also as the free stream number density n (infinity) decreases, the extent and magnitude of normalized pressure increases and moves upstream of the nozzle exit. Thus for the flat plate model the effect of decreasing n (infinity) is to change the sign of the moment caused by the jet interaction on the flat plate surface.

  15. Study of supersonic plasma technology jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selezneva, Svetlana; Gravelle, Denis; Boulos, Maher; van de Sanden, Richard; Schram, Dc

    2001-10-01

    Recently some new techniques using remote thermal plasma for thin film deposition and plasma chemistry processes were developed. These techniques include PECVD of diamonds, diamond-like and polymer films; a-C:H and a-Si:H films. The latter are of especial interest because of their applications for solar cell production industry. In remote plasma deposition, thermal plasma is formed by means of one of traditional plasma sources. The chamber pressure is reduced with the help of continuous pumping. In that way the flow is accelerated up to the supersonic speed. The plasma expansion is controlled using a specific torch nozzle design. To optimize the deposition process detailed knowledge about the gas dynamic structure of the jet and chemical kinetics mechanisms is required. In the paper, we show how the flow pattern and the character of the deviations from local thermodynamic equilibrium differs in plasmas generated by different plasma sources, such as induction plasma torch, traditional direct current arc and cascaded arc. We study the effects of the chamber pressure, nozzle design and carrier gas on the resulting plasma properties. The analysis is performed by means of numerical modeling using commercially available FLUENT program with incorporated user-defined subroutines for two-temperature model. The results of continuum mechanics approach are compared with that of the kinetic Monte Carlo method and with the experimental data.

  16. Fluorescence Imaging Study of Impinging Underexpanded Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inman, Jennifer A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Nowak, Robert J.; Alderfer, David W.

    2008-01-01

    An experiment was designed to create a simplified simulation of the flow through a hole in the surface of a hypersonic aerospace vehicle and the subsequent impingement of the flow on internal structures. In addition to planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) flow visualization, pressure measurements were recorded on the surface of an impingement target. The PLIF images themselves provide quantitative spatial information about structure of the impinging jets. The images also help in the interpretation of impingement surface pressure profiles by highlighting the flow structures corresponding to distinctive features of these pressure profiles. The shape of the pressure distribution along the impingement surface was found to be double-peaked in cases with a sufficiently high jet-exit-to-ambient pressure ratio so as to have a Mach disk, as well as in cases where a flow feature called a recirculation bubble formed at the impingement surface. The formation of a recirculation bubble was in turn found to depend very sensitively upon the jet-exit-to-ambient pressure ratio. The pressure measured at the surface was typically less than half the nozzle plenum pressure at low jet pressure ratios and decreased with increasing jet pressure ratios. Angled impingement cases showed that impingement at a 60deg angle resulted in up to a factor of three increase in maximum pressure at the plate compared to normal incidence.

  17. A computational study of spatially evolving turbulent plane jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Scott Alan

    1998-09-01

    Turbulent plane jets are prototypical free shear flows of practical interest in propulsion, combustion and environmental flows. While considerable experimental research has been performed on planar jets, very few computational studies exist. To the author's knowledge, this is the first computational study of planar turbulent jets utilizing direct numerical simulation. Non-uniform, fourth-order compact derivatives in space and a low storage fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration scheme in time are used to numerically solve the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Characteristic 'nonreflecting' boundary conditions are coupled with characteristic inflow boundary conditions to allow forcing at the inflow. Up to 2.3 million grid points are used. Two-dimensional simulations are initially performed in order to evaluate their relevance to turbulent jets. It is found that they behave in a fashion fundamentally different than is observed experimentally for planar jets. This difference is due to a two-dimensional vortex dipole instability which unrealistically dominates these simulations. A detailed study of the spatial development of a three- dimensional turbulent jet has been performed. Profiles of the mean velocity field and Reynolds stresses achieve self-similarity rapidly and compare very well with experimental data. The self-similar jet growth rate, K1u = 0.094, and centerline velocity decay rate, C1u = 0.208, are in good agreement with the typical experimental values, K1u = 0.100 and C1u = 0.189, of Gutmark and Wygnanski. The downstream growth of the centerline fluctuation intensities match the experimental evolution, although there are small differences due to the sensitivity of jets to the upstream conditions. The development of the initial shear layer instability as well as the downstream transition to the jet column mode at the end of the potential core is captured well. The evolution of the mixing process in turbulent planar jets is studied through analysis of the

  18. 3-D LDA study of a rectangular jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Tatterson, Gary B.; Swan, David H.

    1988-01-01

    The flow field of a rectangular jet with a 2:1 aspect ratio was studied at an axial Reynolds number of 100,000 (Mach number 0.09) using three-dimensional laser Doppler velocimetry. The flow field survey resulted in mean velocity vector field plots and contour plots of the Reynolds stress tensor components. This paper presents contour plots in the planes of the jet minor and major axes at different axial locations. These data contribute substantially to currently available data of jet flow fields and will provide a valuable database for three-dimensional modeling.

  19. Line scan versus flash thermography: comparative study on reinforced carbon-carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolard, Deonna F.; Cramer, K. Elliott

    2005-03-01

    Thermographic inspection techniques fundamentally vary by method of heat deposition. Some systems use a short burst of energy from a flash lamp while others control the motion of a quartz lamp over the material. Both techniques have had a history of successful inspections on aircraft and boiler tubes, for example. Historically, the system used for inspections was determined by the thermographic equipment available to the researcher. This paper will compare the flash and line scan thermographic systems on Reinforced Carbon-Carbon. Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) is a brittle composite material that is found on the Space Shuttle"s nose section, wing leading edges, and chin panel. It is used to protect the orbiter"s aluminum frame from superheated air during flight. In the time since the Columbia accident, impact tests on RCC panels have been ongoing. Flash thermography has been successfully used to scan the impact site for delaminations. While the system has proven effective, it is not without limitations. A single scan yields only that section of material that is in the field of view of the infrared camera. Additionally, delaminations deep within the material may not be resolved as well as with quartz heating. A comparative study was conducted using a RCC panel with flat-bottom holes varying in diameter and depth. The panel was scanned with the Thermal Line Scanner, the Thermal Photocopier, and the Echotherm from Thermal Wave Imaging. Signal to noise ratios were calculated for the defects and used to compare the three systems. This paper will discuss the details of the study and show the results obtained from each of the three systems.

  20. Disaster Management in Flash Floods in Leh (Ladakh): A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Preeti; Khanna, Anurag; Majumdar, S

    2012-01-01

    Background: On August 6, 2010, in the dark of the midnight, there were flash floods due to cloud burst in Leh in Ladakh region of North India. It rained 14 inches in 2 hours, causing loss of human life and destruction. The civil hospital of Leh was badly damaged and rendered dysfunctional. Search and rescue operations were launched by the Indian Army immediately after the disaster. The injured and the dead were shifted to Army Hospital, Leh, and mass casualty management was started by the army doctors while relief work was mounted by the army and civil administration. Objective: The present study was done to document disaster management strategies and approaches and to assesses the impact of flash floods on human lives, health hazards, and future implications of a natural disaster. Materials and Methods: The approach used was both quantitative as well as qualitative. It included data collection from the primary sources of the district collectorate, interviews with the district civil administration, health officials, and army officials who organized rescue operations, restoration of communication and transport, mass casualty management, and informal discussions with local residents. Results: 234 persons died and over 800 were reported missing. Almost half of the people who died were local residents (49.6%) and foreigners (10.2%). Age-wise analysis of the deaths shows that the majority of deaths were reported in the age group of 25–50 years, accounting for 44.4% of deaths, followed by the 11–25-year age group with 22.2% deaths. The gender analysis showed that 61.5% were males and 38.5% were females. A further analysis showed that more females died in the age groups <10 years and ≥50 years. Conclusions: Disaster preparedness is critical, particularly in natural disasters. The Army's immediate search, rescue, and relief operations and mass casualty management effectively and efficiently mitigated the impact of flash floods, and restored normal life. PMID:23112446

  1. Cartographic Production for the FLaSH Map Study: Generation of Rugosity Grids, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, Lisa L.; Knorr, Paul O.; Hansen, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Project Summary This series of raster data is a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Data Series release from the Florida Shelf Habitat Project (FLaSH). This disc contains two raster images in Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI) raster grid format, jpeg image format, and Geo-referenced Tagged Image File Format (GeoTIFF). Data is also provided in non-image ASCII format. Rugosity grids at two resolutions (250 m and 1000 m) were generated for West Florida shelf waters to 250 m using a custom algorithm that follows the methods of Valentine and others (2004). The Methods portion of this document describes the specific steps used to generate the raster images. Rugosity, also referred to as roughness, ruggedness, or the surface-area ratio (Riley and others, 1999; Wilson and others, 2007), is a visual and quantitative measurement of terrain complexity, a common variable in ecological habitat studies. The rugosity of an area can affect biota by influencing habitat, providing shelter from elements, determining the quantity and type of living space, influencing the type and quantity of flora, affecting predator-prey relationships by providing cover and concealment, and, as an expression of vertical relief, can influence local environmental conditions such as temperature and moisture. In the marine environment rugosity can furthermore influence current flow rate and direction, increase the residence time of water in an area through eddying and current deflection, influence local water conditions such as chemistry, turbidity, and temperature, and influence the rate and nature of sedimentary deposition. State-of-the-art computer-mapping techniques and data-processing tools were used to develop shelf-wide raster and vector data layers. Florida Shelf Habitat (FLaSH) Mapping Project (http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/flash) endeavors to locate available data, identify data gaps, synthesize existing information, and expand our understanding of geologic processes in our dynamic

  2. Jet Noise Reduction by Microjets - A Parametric Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of injecting tiny secondary jets (microjets ) on the radiated noise from a subsonic primary jet is studied experimentally. The microjets are injected on to the primary jet near the nozzle exit with variable port geometry, working fluid and driving pressure. A clear noise reduction is observed that improves with increasing jet pressure. It is found that smaller diameter ports with higher driving pressure, but involving less thrust and mass fraction, can produce better noise reduction. A collection of data from the present as well as past experiments is examined in an attempt to correlate the noise reduction with the operating parameters. The results indicate that turbulent mixing noise reduction, as monitored by OASPL at a shallow angle, correlates with the ratio of jet to primary jet driving pressures normalized by the ratio of corresponding diameters (p d /pjD). With gaseous injection, the spectral amplitudes decrease at lower frequencies while an increase is noted at higher frequencies. It is apparent that this amplitude crossover is at least partly due to shock-associated noise from the underexpanded jets themselves. Such crossover is not seen with water injection since the flow in that case is incompressible and there is no shock-associated noise. Centerline velocity data show that larger noise reduction is accompanied by faster jet decay as well as significant reduction in turbulence intensities. While a physical understanding of the dependence of noise reduction on p d /pjD remains unclear, given this correlation, an analysis explains the observed dependence of the effect on various other parameters.

  3. Flash Bulletin: Fireflies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Debbie

    1984-01-01

    Explains the flashes of light emitted by fireflies as competition, species-specific code, species identification and mating behavior and ecology. Suggests activities to conduct to study the insects and their behavior. (ERB)

  4. A Flash Flood Study on the Small Montaneous River Catchments in Western Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Győri, Maria-Mihaela; Haidu, Ionel; Humbert, Joël

    2013-04-01

    The present study focuses on flash flood modeling on several mountaneous catchments situated in Western Romania by the use of two methodologies, when rainfall and catchment characteristics are known. Hence, the Soil Conservation Service (SCS) Method and the Rational Method will be employed for the generation of the 1%, 2% and 10% historical flash flood hydrographs on the basis of data spanning from 1989-2009. The SCS Method has been applied on the three gauged catchments in the study area: Petris, Troas and Monorostia making use of the existing interconnection between GIS and the rainfall-runoff models. The DEM, soil data and land use preprocessing in GIS allowed a determination of the hydrologic parameters needed for the rainfall-runoff model, with special emphasis on determining the time of concentration, Lag time and the weighted Curve Number according to Antecedent Moisture Conditions II, adapted for the Romanian territory. HEC-HMS rainfall-runoff model (Hydrologic Engineering Center- Hydrologic Modeling System) facilitates the historical 1%, 2% and 10% flash flood hydrograph generation for the three afore mentioned watersheds. The model is calibrated against measured streamflow data from the three existing gauging stations. The results show a good match between the resulted hydrographs and the observed hydrographs under the form of the Peak Weighted Error RMS values. The hydrographs generated by surface runoff on the ungauged catchments in the area is based on an automation of a workflow in GIS, built with ArcGIS Model Builder graphical interface, as a large part of the functions needed were available as ArcGIS tools. The several components of this model calculate: the runoff depth in mm, the runoff coefficient, the travel time and finally the discharge module which is an application of the rational method, allowing the discharge computation for every cell within the catchment. The result consists of discharges for each isochrones that will be subsequently

  5. Jet shielding of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

  6. Studies of Burning Plasma Physics in JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayoral, Marie-Line

    2003-10-01

    In burning plasma experiments, the very energetic alpha particles resulting from Deuterium-Tritium fusion reactions will be the dominant heating mechanism. This type of heating is different in two aspects from the externally supplied heating dominant in present experiments. First, alpha particles heating depends on the local values of plasma density and temperature, but will also influence, in turn, these plasma parameters. We will consequently be faced with an intricate self-consistent plasma system, with less powerful outside actuators to control e.g. the fusion rate. Experiments have been performed at JET where a part of the external Radio Frequency (RF) heating, determined by the measured central density and temperature, has been used to simulate of the alpha heating and the abovementioned dependence. Secondly, the presence of very energetic particles with large orbits can influence the magneto-hydrodynamic stability of plasmas. Sawteeth, for example, can be temporarily stabilized, resulting in stronger sawtooth crashes when the higher stability limit is eventually crossed. Neo-classical tearing modes (NTMs), extremely damaging for the plasma confinement, are found to be associated with those large crashes. Energetic 4He ions injected at 120 keV and accelerated by RF power to over 2 MeV have provided the necessary energetic particles to investigate those effects. New scenarios have been used in order to control the stability of the sawteeth even in the presence of fast particles and prevent or delay the appearance of NTMs. Further results are expected from the planned trace tritium experiments foreseen on JET during October 2003. This will, together with state-of-the-art numerical simulations, deliver invaluable information for a better understanding and prediction of burning plasma behaviour.

  7. Fluorescence Imaging Study of Transition in Underexpanded Free Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Jennifer A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Nowak, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) is demonstrated to be a valuable tool for studying the onset of transition to turbulence. For this study, we have used PLIF of nitric oxide (NO) to image underexpanded axisymmetric free jets issuing into a low-pressure chamber through a smooth converging nozzle with a sonic orifice. Flows were studied over a range of Reynolds numbers and nozzle-exit-to-ambient pressure ratios with the aim of empirically determining criteria governing the onset of turbulence. We have developed an image processing technique, involving calculation of the standard deviation of the intensity in PLIF images, in order to aid in the identification of turbulence. We have used the resulting images to identify laminar, transitional and turbulent flow regimes. Jet scaling parameters were used to define a rescaled Reynolds number that incorporates the influence of a varying pressure ratio. An empirical correlation was found between transition length and this rescaled Reynolds number for highly underexpanded jets.

  8. Laboratory Studies of Supersonic Magnetized Plasma Jets and Radiative Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Sergey

    2013-06-01

    In this talk I will focus on laboratory plasma experiments producing magnetically driven supersonic plasma jets and on the interaction of these jets with ambient media. The experiments are scalable to astrophysical flows in that the critical dimensionless numbers such as the plasma collisionality, the plasma beta, the Reynolds number and the magnetic Reynolds number are all in the astrophysically appropriate ranges. The experimental results will be compared with computer simulations performed with laboratory plasma codes and with astrophysical codes. In the experiments the jets are driven and collimated by the toroidal magnetic fields and it is found that the level of MHD instabilities in the jets strongly depends on the strength of the field represented by the ratio of the thermal to magnetic field pressures (plasma beta). The experiments show the possibility of formation of episodic outflows, with periodic ejections of magnetic bubbles naturally evolving into a heterogeneous jet propagating inside a channel made of self-collimated magnetic cavities [1,2]. We also found that it is possible to form quasi-laminar jets which are “indirectly” collimated by the toroidal magnetic fields, but this requires the presence of the lower density halo plasma surrounding the central jet [3]. Studies of the radiative shocks formed in the interaction of the supersonic magnetized plasma flows with ambient plasma will be also presented, and the development of cooling instabilities in the post-shock plasma will be discussed. This research was sponsored by EPSRC Grant No. EP/G001324/1 and by the OFES DOE under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-SC-0001063. References 1. A. Ciardi, S.V. Lebedev, A. Frank et al., The Astrophysical Journal, 691: L147-L150 (2009) 2. F.A. Suzuki-Vidal, S.V. Lebedev, S.N. Bland et al., Physics of Plasmas, 17, 112708 (2010). 3. F.A. Suzuki-Vidal, M. Bocchi, S.V. Lebedev et al., Physics of Plasmas, 19, 022708 (2012).

  9. Study on the characteristics of supersonic Coanda jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Shigeru; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Kudo, Takemasa; Yu, Shen

    1998-09-01

    Techniques using Coanda effect have been applied to the fluid control devices. In this field, experimental studies were so far performed for the spiral jet obtained by the Coanda jet issuing from a conical cylinder with an annular slit, thrust vectoring of supersonic Coanda jets and so on. It is important from the viewpoints of effective applications to investigate the characteristics of the supersonic Coanda jet in detail. In the present study, the effects of pressure ratios and nozzle configurations on the characteristics of the supersonic Coanda jet have been investigated experimentally by a schlieren optical method and pressure measurements. Furthermore, Navier-Stokes equations were solved numerically using a 2nd-order TVD finite-volume scheme with a 3rd-order three stage Runge-Kutta method for time integration. k - ɛ model was used in the computations. The effects of initial conditions on Coanda flow were investigated numerically. As a result, the simulated flow fields were compared with experimental data in good agreement qualitatively.

  10. Numerical Study on GRB-Jet Formation in Collapsars

    SciTech Connect

    Nagataki, Shigehiro; Takahashi, Rohta; Mizuta, Akira; Takiwaki, Tomoya; /Tokyo U.

    2006-08-22

    Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations are performed using the ZEUS-2D code to investigate the dynamics of a collapsar that generates a GRB jet, taking account of realistic equation of state, neutrino cooling and heating processes, magnetic fields, and gravitational force from the central black hole and self gravity. It is found that neutrino heating processes are not so efficient to launch a jet in this study. It is also found that a jet is launched mainly by B{sub {phi}} fields that are amplified by the winding-up effect. However, since the ratio of total energy relative to the rest mass energy in the jet is not so high as several hundred, we conclude that the jets seen in this study are not be a GRB jet. This result suggests that general relativistic effects, which are not included in this study, will be important to generate a GRB jet. Also, the accretion disk with magnetic fields may still play an important role to launch a GRB jet, although a simulation for much longer physical time {approx} 10-100 s is required to confirm this effect. It is shown that considerable amount of {sup 56}Ni is synthesized in the accretion disk. Thus there will be a possibility for the accretion disk to supply sufficient amount of {sup 56}Ni required to explain the luminosity of a hypernova. Also, it is shown that neutron-rich matter due to electron captures with high entropy per baryon is ejected along the polar axis. Moreover, it is found that the electron fraction becomes larger than 0.5 around the polar axis near the black hole by {nu}{sub e} capture at the region. Thus there will be a possibility that r-process and r/p-process nucleosynthesis occur at these regions. Finally, much neutrons will be ejected from the jet, which suggests that signals from the neutron decays may be observed as the delayed bump of the light curve of the afterglow or gamma-rays.

  11. Experimental study of self magnetic pinch diode as flash radiography source at 4 megavolt

    SciTech Connect

    Etchessahar, Bertrand; Bicrel, Béatrice; Cassany, Bruno; Desanlis, Thierry; Voisin, Luc; Maisonny, Rémi; Toury, Martial; Hourdin, Laurent; Cartier, Frédéric; Cartier, Stéphanie; D'Almeida, Thierry; Delbos, Christophe; Garrigues, Alain; Plouhinec, Damien; Ritter, Sandra; Sol, David; Zucchini, Frédéric; Caron, Michel

    2013-10-15

    The Self Magnetic Pinch (SMP) diode is a potential high-brightness X-ray source for high voltage generators (2–10 MV) that has shown good reliability for flash radiography applications [D. D. Hinchelwood et al., “High power self-pinch diode experiments for radiographic applications” IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 35(3), 565–572 (2007)]. We have studied this diode at about 4 MV, driven by the ASTERIX generator operated at the CEA/GRAMAT [G. Raboisson et al., “ASTERIX, a high intensity X-ray generator,” in Proceedings of the 7th IEEE Pulsed Power Conference (1989), pp. 567–570]. This generator, made up of a capacitor bank and a Blumlein line, was initially designed to test the behavior of electronic devices under irradiation. In our experiments, the vacuum diode is modified in order to set up flash radiographic diodes. A previous set of radiographic experiments was carried out on ASTERIX with a Negative Polarity Rod Pinch (NPRP) diode [B. Etchessahar et al., “Study and optimization of negative polarity rod pinch diode as flash radiography source at 4.5 MV,” Phys. Plasmas 19(9), 093104 (2012)]. The SMP diode which is examined in the present study provides an alternative operating point on the same generator and a different radiographic performance: 142 ± 11 rad at 1 m dose (Al) for a 3.46 ± 0.42 mm spot size (1.4× FWHM of the LSF). This performance is obtained in a reproducible and robust nominal configuration. However, several parametric variations were also tested, such as cathode diameter and anode/cathode gap. They showed that an even better performance is accessible after optimization, in particular, a smaller spot size (<3 mm). Numbers of electrical, optical, and X-ray diagnostics have been implemented in order to gain more insight in the diode physics and to optimize it further. For the first time in France, visible and laser imaging of the SMP diode has been realized, from a radial point of view, thus, providing key information on the electrode

  12. Experimental study of self magnetic pinch diode as flash radiography source at 4 megavolt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etchessahar, Bertrand; Maisonny, Rémi; Toury, Martial; Hourdin, Laurent; Bicrel, Béatrice; Cassany, Bruno; Desanlis, Thierry; Voisin, Luc; Cartier, Frédéric; Cartier, Stéphanie; D'Almeida, Thierry; Delbos, Christophe; Garrigues, Alain; Plouhinec, Damien; Ritter, Sandra; Sol, David; Zucchini, Frédéric; Caron, Michel

    2013-10-01

    The Self Magnetic Pinch (SMP) diode is a potential high-brightness X-ray source for high voltage generators (2-10 MV) that has shown good reliability for flash radiography applications [D. D. Hinchelwood et al., "High power self-pinch diode experiments for radiographic applications" IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 35(3), 565-572 (2007)]. We have studied this diode at about 4 MV, driven by the ASTERIX generator operated at the CEA/GRAMAT [G. Raboisson et al., "ASTERIX, a high intensity X-ray generator," in Proceedings of the 7th IEEE Pulsed Power Conference (1989), pp. 567-570]. This generator, made up of a capacitor bank and a Blumlein line, was initially designed to test the behavior of electronic devices under irradiation. In our experiments, the vacuum diode is modified in order to set up flash radiographic diodes. A previous set of radiographic experiments was carried out on ASTERIX with a Negative Polarity Rod Pinch (NPRP) diode [B. Etchessahar et al., "Study and optimization of negative polarity rod pinch diode as flash radiography source at 4.5 MV," Phys. Plasmas 19(9), 093104 (2012)]. The SMP diode which is examined in the present study provides an alternative operating point on the same generator and a different radiographic performance: 142 ± 11 rad at 1 m dose (Al) for a 3.46 ± 0.42 mm spot size (1.4× FWHM of the LSF). This performance is obtained in a reproducible and robust nominal configuration. However, several parametric variations were also tested, such as cathode diameter and anode/cathode gap. They showed that an even better performance is accessible after optimization, in particular, a smaller spot size (<3 mm). Numbers of electrical, optical, and X-ray diagnostics have been implemented in order to gain more insight in the diode physics and to optimize it further. For the first time in France, visible and laser imaging of the SMP diode has been realized, from a radial point of view, thus, providing key information on the electrode plasmas evolution

  13. Experimental study on confined two-phase jets

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, Y.; Albagli, D. )

    1991-09-01

    The basic mixing phenomena in confined, coaxial, particle-laden turbulent flows are studied within the scope of ram combustor research activities. Cold-flow experiments in a relatively simple configuration of confined, coaxial two-phase jets provided both qualitative and quantitative insight on the multiphase mixing process. Pressure, tracer gas concentration, and two-phase velocity measurements revealed that unacceptably long ram combustors are needed for complete confined jet mixing. Comparison of the experimental results with a previous numerical simulation displayed a very good agreement, indicating the potential of the experimental facility for validation of computational parametric studies. 38 refs.

  14. A case study of a low level jet during OPALE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallée, H.; Barral, H.; Vignon, E.; Genthon, C.

    2014-12-01

    A case study of a low level jet during the OPALE (Oxidant Production over Antarctic Land and its Export) summer campaign is presented. It has been observed at Dome C (East Antarctica) and is simulated accurately by the three-dimensional version of the Modèle Atmosphérique Régional (MAR). It is found that this low level jet is not related to an episode of thermal wind, conforting that Dome C may be a~place where turbulence on flat terrain can be studied.

  15. A Simulation Study on the Flash X-Ray Spectra Spatial Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiufeng; Li, Shiping; Cao, Hongrui; Xiao, Rui; Chen, Nan; Zhang, Linwen; Yin, Zejie

    2013-11-01

    Accurate measurement of flash X-ray energy spectra plays an important role in high-energy flash radiography. In this paper, by virtue of Geant4 toolkit, we simulated the generation and transport of X-ray photons resulting from the interaction of a high-energy electron beam with a solid thin target. We obtained the flash X-ray energy spectral distribution in the plane perpendicular to the electron beam incident direction. Our results indicate that the flash X-ray spectrum is almost uniform in the azimuthal direction but is quite different in the radius direction. Specifically, as the radius increases, the incident X-ray dose decreases significantly. Our work paves a theoretical basis for selecting appropriate structures and layout of the spectrometer and facilitates the measurements of flash X-ray energy spectra.

  16. Study of liquid jet instability by confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lisong; Adamson, Leanne J.; Bain, Colin D.

    2012-07-01

    The instability of a liquid microjet was used to measure the dynamic surface tension of liquids at the surface ages of ≤1 ms using confocal microscopy. The reflected light from a laser beam at normal incidence to the jet surface is linear in the displacement of the surface near the confocal position, leading to a radial resolution of 4 nm and a dynamic range of 4 μm in the surface position, thus permitting the measurement of amplitude of oscillation at the very early stage of jet instability. For larger oscillations outside the linear region of the confocal response, the swell and neck position of the jet can be located separately and the amplitude of oscillation determined with an accuracy of 0.2 μm. The growth rate of periodically perturbed water and ethanol/water mixture jets with a 100-μm diameter nozzle and mean velocity of 5.7 m s-1 has been measured. The dynamic surface tension was determined from the growth rate of the instability with a linear, axisymmetric, constant property model. Synchronisation of the confocal imaging system with the perturbation applied to the jet permitted a detailed study of the temporal evolution of the neck into a ligament and eventually into a satellite drop.

  17. Numerical Study on Cryogenic Coflowing Jets under Transcritical Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Hiroumi; Teramoto, Susumu; Okamoto, Koji; Yamanishi, Nobuhiro

    2012-11-01

    A numerical and experimental study is presented on cryogenic coflowing jets under transcritical conditions for a better understanding of the propellant mixing in supercritical-pressure rocket engines. The major concerns are dominant flow structures in the mixing of cryogenic coflowing jets under transcritical conditions. Experimentally, in advance of detailed numerical simulations, cryogenic nitrogen/gaseous nitrogen coaxial jets were visualized by the backlighting photography technique. It was observed that a dense nitrogen core has a shear-layer instability near the injector exit and eventually breaks up into large lumps which dissolve and fade away downstream. In numerical simulations, LES technique was employed for more detailed discussion on the flow structures. LES of a cryogenic nitrogen/gaseous nitrogen coflowing plane jet was conducted with the same density and velocity ratios of inner/outer jets as the experiments. As observed in the experiments, the shear-layer instability in the inner mixing layers is predominant near the injector exit. After roll-up and paring, the shear-layer instability waves become large-scale vortices. They cause coherent vortex structures which become dominant in the downstream and break the dense core into lumps. Strouhal numbers of the shear-layer instability and the dense lump shedding in the numerical simulations were comparable to those measured in the experiments, respectively.

  18. Experimental study of airfoil separation control using synthetic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xi; Mohseni, Kamran

    2010-11-01

    The flow control over an airfoil is studied experimentally in a wind tunnel. Synthetic jets are placed on the top surface of the airfoil as flow actuators. The position and the angle of the jet orifice, together with the frequency and jet strength could be varied in order to adjust the separation or reattachment points on the surface. An Array of hot-film sensors are located on the surface in order to detect the location of the reattachment point. The airfoil is mounted on a 6 d.o.f force balance system to dynamically measure the drag and lift forces on the airfoil. Results from the hot-film sensor array measurement are correlated to the measured drag and lift forces.

  19. Simplification approach to detect urban areas vulnerable to flash floods using GIS: a case study Warsaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicht, Marzena; Osińska-Skotak, Katarzyna

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a consistent methodology to determine urban areas that are particularly vulnerable to the effects of torrential rains. They are, as a result of climate change, more and more prevalent in the temperate climate, usually spring - summer from mid-May to late August - and involve the risk of flash floods. In recent years, the increase in the incidence of such phenomena is noticeable throughout the whole Europe. It is assumed that through the analysis of environmental and infrastructural conditions, using the developed methodology, it is possible to determine areas vulnerable to flooding due to torrential rains. This may lead to a better management, quicker response in case of a phenomenon, and even to take measures to prevent the occurrence of adverse effects of torrential rains (for instance modernization of the urban drainage system and development of methods to get rid of rapidly collected water). Designation of areas particularly vulnerable to the effects of heavy rains can be achieved by adapting hydrological models, but they require an appropriate adjustment and highly accurate input data: (based on spot or radar measurements of precipitation, land cover, soil type, humidity, wind speed, vegetation species in a given area, growing season, the roughness and porosity of the cover and soil moisture) but such detailed data are generally hard to obtain or not available for less developed areas. It could also be achieved by performing spatial analysis in GIS, which is a more simplified form of modelling, but it gives results more quickly and the methodology can be adapted to the commonly available data. A case study of Warsaw's district Powiśle has been undertaken for three epochs - from 2008 to 2010 and areas, that are particularly vulnerable to the effects of flash floods and heavy rains, have been designated.

  20. Study on the engine oil's wear based on the flash point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niculescu, R.; Iorga-Simăn, V.; Trică, A.; Clenci, A.

    2016-08-01

    Increasing energy performance of internal combustion engines is largely influenced by frictional forces that arise between moving parts. Thus, in this respect, the nature and quality of the engine oil used is an important factor. Equally important is the effect of various engine injection strategies upon the oil quality. In other words, it's of utmost importance to maintain the quality of engine oil during engine's operation. Oil dilution is one of the most common causes that lead to its wear, creating lubrication problems. Moreover, at low temperatures operating conditions, the oil dilution with diesel fuel produces wax. When starting the engine, this may lead to lubrication deficiencies and even oil starvation with negative consequences on the engine mechanism parts wear (piston, rings and cylinders) but also crankcase bearings wear.Engine oil dilution with diesel fuel have several causes: wear of rings and/or injectors, late post-injection strategy for the sake of particulate filter regeneration, etc.This paper presents a study on the degree of deterioration of engine oils as a result of dilution with diesel fuel. The analysed oils used for this study were taken from various models of engines equipped with diesel particulate filter. The assessment is based on the determination of oil flash point and dilution degree using the apparatus Eraflash produced by Eralytics, Austria. Eraflash measurement is directly under the latest and safest standards ASTM D6450 & D7094), which are in excellent correlation with ASTM D93 Pensky - Martens ASTM D56 TAG methods; it uses the Continuous Closed Cup method for finding the Flash Point (CCCFP).

  1. Electron transfer kinetics in purified reaction centers from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum studied by multiple-flash excitation.

    PubMed

    Kusumoto, N; Sétif, P; Brettel, K; Seo, D; Sakurai, H

    1999-09-14

    Reaction center preparations from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum, which contain monoheme cytochrome c, were studied by flash-absorption spectroscopy in the near-UV, visible, and near-infrared regions. The decay kinetics of the photooxidized primary donor P840(+), together with the amount of photooxidized cytochrome c, were analyzed along a series of four flashes spaced by 1 ms: 95% of the P840(+) was reduced by cytochrome c with a t(1/2) of approximately 65 micros after the first flash, 80% with a t(1/2) of approximately 100 micros after the second flash, and 23% with a t(1/2) of approximately 100 micros after the third flash; after the fourth flash, almost no cytochrome c oxidation occurred. The observed rates, the establishment of redox equilibrium after each flash, and the total amount of photooxidizable cytochrome c are consistent with the presence of two equivalent cytochrome c molecules per photooxidizable P840. The data are well fitted assuming a standard free energy change DeltaG degrees of -53 meV for electron transfer from one cytochrome c to P840(+), DeltaG degrees being independent of the oxidation state of the other cytochrome c. These observations support a model with two monoheme cytochromes c which are symmetrically arranged around the reaction center core. From the ratio of menaquinone-7 to the bacteriochlorophyll pigment absorbing at 663 nm, it was estimated that our preparations contain 0.6-1.2 menaquinone-7 molecules per reaction center. However, no transient signal due to menaquinone could be observed between 360 and 450 nm in the time window from 10 ns to 4 micros. No recombination reaction between the primary partners P840(+) and A(0)(-) could be detected under normal conditions. Such a recombination was observed (t(1/2) approximately 19 ns) under highly reducing conditions or after accumulation of three electrons on the acceptor side during a series of flashes, showing that the secondary acceptors can stabilize three electrons

  2. Nanosecond flash studies of reduction of benzophenone by aliphatic amines. Quantum yields and kinetic isotope effects

    SciTech Connect

    Inbar, S.; Linschitz, H.; Cohen, S.G.

    1981-03-11

    Nanosecond flash photolysis, steady irradiation, and deuterium substitution studies have been carried out on solutions of benzophenone with added reductants. Quantum yields (phi/sub ketyl/) for reduction in benzene of benzophenone triplet to ketyl radical, based on phi = 2 for benzhydrol (I), were approx. 1 for cyclohexane (II), tert-butylamine (III), 2-aminobutane (IV), cyclohexylamine (V), di-n-propylamine (VI), and triethylamine (VII), approx. 0.7 for 1,4-diazabicyclo(2.2.2)octane (VIII), and approx. 0 for tert-butyl alcohol (IX). Thus, quenching, without radical formation by H abstraction from N and/or ..cap alpha..-C, does not occur with common aliphatic amines but does with Dabco (VIII). The latter quenching is markedly increased by small additions of acetonitrile; the flash spectrum from this compound indicates formation of a triplet amine CT complex or radical ion pair. Triplet-reductant interaction rate constants, k/sur ir/, are high for the amines (approx. 10/sup 8/-10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/) but also show significant deuterium kinetic isotope effects: 1.9 with III-N-d/sub 2/; 1.4 with IV-N-d/sub 2/; 1.2-1.3 with IV-..cap alpha..-C-d. It is proposed that k/sub ir/ measures H atom abstraction, favored in the transition state by an initial charge-transfer interaction. Overall steady irradiation quantum yields of reduction by amines, phi/sub Red/, are much lower than phi/sub ketyl/. This is attributed to disproportionationreactions of ketyl and alkylaminyl radicals for primary and secondary amines, and, possibly, aminoalkyl radicals for tertiary amines. In the case of tert-butylamine, the rate constant for disproportionation is obtained from the decay kinetics of ketyl radical and leads to phi/sub Red/ in agreement with that directly measured.

  3. MAXI and GLAST Studies of Jets in Active Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Madejski, Greg; Kataoka, Jun; Sikora, Marek

    2008-10-13

    The recent launch of GLAST--coinciding with the MAXI workshop--opens a new era for studies of jet-dominated active galaxies, known as blazars. While the emission processes operating in various spectral bands in blazars are reasonably well understood, the knowledge of the details of the structure of the jet, location of the dissipation region with respect to the accreting black hole, and coupling of the jet to the accretion process are known only at a rudimentary level. Blazars are variable, and this provides an opportunity to use the variability in various bands--and in particular, the relationship of respective time series to each other--to explore the relative location of regions responsible for emission in the respective bands. Observationally, this requires well-sampled time series in as many spectral bands as possible. To this end, with its all-sky, sensitive monitoring capability, the recently launched GLAST, and MAXI, to be deployed in 2009, are the most promising instruments bound to provide good sampling in respectively the energetic gamma-ray, and the soft X-ray band. This paper highlights the inferences regarding blazar jets that can be gleaned from such joint observations.

  4. Flash Floods Simulation Using a Physical based hydrological Model at the Eastern Nile Basin: Case studies; Wadi Assiut, Egypt and Wadi Gumara, Lake Tana, Ethiopia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saber, M.; Sefelnasr, A.; Yilmaz, K. K.

    2015-12-01

    Flash flood is a natural hydrological phenomenon which affects many regions of the world. The behavior and effect of this phenomenon is different from one region to the other regions depending on several issues such as climatology and hydrological and topographical conditions at the target regions. Wadi assiut, Egypt as arid environment, and Gumara catchment, Lake Tana, Ethiopia, as humid conditions have been selected for application. The main target of this work is to simulate flash floods at both catchments considering the difference between them on the flash flood behaviors based on the variability of both of them. In order to simulate the flash floods, remote sensing data and a physical-based distributed hydrological model, Hydro-BEAM-WaS (Hydrological River Basin Environmental Assessment Model incorporating Wadi System) have been integrated used in this work. Based on the simulation results of flash floods in these regions, it was found that the time to reach the maximum peak is very short and consequently the warning time is very short as well. It was found that the flash floods starts from zero flow in arid environment, but on the contrary in humid arid, it starts from Base flow which is changeable based on the simulated events. Distribution maps of flash floods showing the vulnerable regions of these selected areas have been developed. Consequently, some mitigation strategies relying on this study have been introduced. The proposed methodology can be applied effectively for flash flood forecasting at different climate regions, however the paucity of observational data.

  5. Laser flash photolysis studies of atmospheric free radical chemistry using optical diagnostic techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wine, Paul H.; Nicovich, J. M.; Hynes, Anthony J.; Stickel, Robert E.; Thorn, R. P.; Chin, Mian; Cronkhite, Jeffrey A.; Shackelford, Christie J.; Zhao, Zhizhong; Daykin, Edward P.

    1993-01-01

    Some recent studies carried out in our laboratory are described where laser flash photolytic production of reactant free radicals has been combined with reactant and/or product detection using time-resolved optical techniques to investigate the kinetics and mechanisms of important atmospheric chemical reactions. Discussed are (1) a study of the radical-radical reaction O + BrO yields Br + O2 where two photolysis lasers are employed to prepare the reaction mixture and where the reactants O and BrO are monitored simultaneously using atomic resonance fluorescence to detect O and multipass UV absorption to detect BrO; (2) a study of the reaction of atomic chlorine with dimethylsulfide (CH3SCH3) where atomic resonance fluorescence detection of Cl is employed to elucidate the kinetics and tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy is employed to investigate the HCl product yield; and (3) a study of the aqueous phase chemistry of Cl2(-) radicals where longpath UV absorption spectroscopy is employed to investigate the kinetics of the Cl2(-) + H2O reaction.

  6. Researchers Identify Genes Linked to Hot Flashes

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_161579.html Researchers Identify Genes Linked to Hot Flashes Mutations found in women of all races, ... Some women may be genetically predisposed to suffer hot flashes before or during menopause, a new study ...

  7. Sediment transport during flash flood events on an intermittent river: an experimental laboratory study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustabachir, H.; Chahinian, N.; Romieux, N.; Vittenet, J.; Gayrard, E.; Tournoud, M. G.

    2009-04-01

    Flash floods have a number of impacts on the water quality of river systems because the later is the resultant of pollutant input into the river and its transformation along its course. In the case of intermittent rivers this impact is increased by the long drought periods that usually precede such floods. Indeed, the pollutants are known to accumulate in the dry river sediments during the drought period and are flushed away by the first floods. The Vène, a small experimental catchment (67 km²) located in southern France is a perfect example of this type of behavior. The field data collected on the catchment since 1994 through routine and flood monitoring clearly show an increase in suspended solids and nutrient concentrations during flash floods. However, the hydraulic conditions which lead to the triggering of sediment movement and re-suspension are not known. The aim of this study is to investigate sediment re-suspension mechanisms by reproducing the dynamics of sediment movement during flash floods at the reach scale in controlled laboratory conditions. A rectangular flume (6m*0.29m*0.18m) is used as a scale model of a 1 km reach. Variable flow conditions can be set in the flume through a quarter turn valve. Discharge values are monitored using an electromagnetic flow meter and water velocity measurements are carried out in the flume using a Pitot probe coupled to a digital manometer. Dynamic similarity is imposed between the reach and the flume i.e. the reach's Froude number is set equal to that of the flume. The reach's rating curve is used to determine a set of experimental height and flow values for the flume. For each test, the slope of the flume is modified in order to respect the rating curve. The flume's bed is reconstructed by respecting the similarity ratios determined previously using glass micro beads to represent its sediments. Various tests are carried out in steady-state conditions for different discharge values. In transient conditions, the

  8. The Study of Relativistic AGN Jets and Experimental Survey of AGN Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabzali, V.; Davoudifar, P.; Mickaelian, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    AGN, their evolution and their relativistic jets were studied on the basis of data from multi-wavelength surveys. NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) and VLBI were used to study radio jets and radio continuum emission of AGN. A population of AGN will be selected and used in a future optical survey for their jets.

  9. An experimental study of the glottal jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasikova, Darina; Sidlof, Petr; Kotek, Michal; Kopecky, Vaclav

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents results of the flow field analysis in a static scaled model of human larynx. Here we are focused on the effect of the nozzle gap parameter and the incoming flow velocity. The study is performed in the aerodynamic channel using the PIV technique.

  10. Comparative Study of Bunch Length And Arrival Time Measurements at FLASH

    SciTech Connect

    Schlarb, H.; Azima, A.; Dusterer, S.; Huning, M.; Knabbe, E.A.; Roehrs, M.; Rybnikov, V.; Schmidt, B.; Steffen, B.; Ross, M.C.; Schmueser, P.; Winter, A.; /Hamburg U.

    2007-04-16

    Diagnostic devices to precisely measure the longitudinal electron beam profile and the bunch arrival time require elaborate new instrumentation techniques. At FLASH, two entirely different methods are used. The bunch profile can be determined with high precision by a transverse deflecting RF structure, but the method is disruptive and does not allow to monitor multiple bunches in a macro-pulse train. It is therefore complemented by two non-disruptive electrooptical devices, called EO and TEO. The EO setup uses a dedicated diagnostic laser synchronized to the machine RF. The longitudinal electron beam profile is encoded in the intensity profile of a chirped laser pulse and analyzed by looking at the spectral composition of the pulse. The second setup, TEO, utilizes the TiSa-based laser system used for pump-probe experiments. Here, the temporal electron shape is encoded into the spatial dimension of the laser pulse by an intersection angle between the laser and the electron beam at the EO-crystal. In this paper, we present a comparative study of bunch length and arrival time measurements performed simultaneously with all three experimental techniques.

  11. Geomorphological factors of flash floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Yulia

    2016-04-01

    Growing anthropogenic load, rise of extreme meteorological events frequency and total precipitation depth often lead to increasing danger of catastrophic fluvial processes worldwide. Flash floods are one of the most dangerous and less understood types of them. Difficulties of their study are mainly related to short duration of single events, remoteness and hard access to origin areas. Most detailed researches of flash floods focus on hydrological parameters of the flow itself and its meteorological factors. At the same time, importance of the basin geological and geomorphological structure for flash floods generation and the role they play in global sediment redistribution is yet poorly understood. However, understanding and quantitative assessment of these features is a real basis for a complete concept of factors, characteristics and dynamics of flash floods. This work is a review of published data on flash floods, and focuses on the geomorphological factors of the phenomenon. We consider both individual roles and interactions between different geomorphological features (the whole basin parameters, characteristics of the single slopes and valley bottom). Special attention is paid to critical values of certain factors. This approach also highlights the gaps or less studied factors of flash floods. Finally, all data is organized into a complex diagram that may be used for flash floods modeling. This also may help to reach a new level of flash flood predictions and risk assessment.

  12. Jet Cooled Rotational Studies of Dipeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabezas, C.; Mata, M. Varela S.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2011-06-01

    Rotational spectra of Gly-Pro and Pro-Gly dipeptides have been examined with laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave (LA-MB-FTMW) spectroscopy. Three conformers for Gly-Pro and one for Pro-Gly have been unequivocally identified in the supersonic expansion by the comparison of the experimental rotational and 14N (I=1) nuclear quadrupole coupling constants with those predicted by ab initio methods. The quadrupole hyperfine structure of two 14N nuclei has been totally resolved and it allows to experimentally characterize the main intramolecular forces which stabilize the assigned conformers. The biomimetic molecule Ac-Ala-NH_2 has been also studied. The C_7 and C_5 peptide conformations (intramolecularly hydrogen-bonded seven- or five-membered cycle, respectively) have been unequivocally identified in the supersonic expansion. The ability to identify peptide conformations suggest that it soon may be possible to explore the structures of larger peptides using LA-MB-FTMW spectroscopy. J. L. Alonso, C. Pérez, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, S. Blanco, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 11,617-627 (2009)and references therein

  13. Flash-Fire Propensity and Heat-Release Rate Studies of Improved Fire Resistant Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fewell, L. L.

    1978-01-01

    Twenty-six improved fire resistant materials were tested for flash-fire propensity and heat release rate properties. The tests were conducted to obtain a descriptive index based on the production of ignitable gases during the thermal degradation process and on the response of the materials under a specific heat load.

  14. The Giant Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubert, T.; Chanrion, O.; Arnone, E.; Zanotti, F.; Cummer, S.; Li, J.; Füllekrug, M.; van der Velde, O.

    2012-04-01

    Thunderstorm clouds may discharge directly to the ionosphere in spectacular luminous jets - the longest electric discharges on our planet. The electric properties of jets, such as their polarity, conductivity, and currents, have been predicted by models, but are poorly characterized by measurements. Here we present an analysis of the first gigantic jet that with certainty has a positive polarity. The jet region in the mesosphere was illuminated by an unusual sprite discharge generated by a positive cloud-to-ground lightning flash shortly after the onset of the jet. The sprite appeared with elements in a ring at ~40 km distance around the jet, the elements pointing curving away from the jet. This suggests that the field close the jet partially cancels the field driving the sprite. From a simple model of the event we conclude that a substantial portion of the positive cloud potential must be carried to ~50 km altitude, which is also consistent with the observed channel expansion and the electromagnetic radiation associated with the jet. It is further shown that blue jets are likely to substantially modify the free electron content in the lower ionosphere because of increased electron attachment driven by the jet electric field. The model further makes clear the relationship between jets, gigantic jets, and sprites. This is the first time that sprites are used for sounding the properties of the mesosphere. The observations presented here will allow evaluation of theories for jet and gigantic jet generation and of their influence on the atmosphere-ionosphere system.

  15. Usefulness of satellite water vapour imagery in forecasting strong convection: A flash-flood case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Christo G.; Kozinarova, Gergana

    Using a case study of a severe convective event as an example, a framework for interpreting 6.2 µm channel satellite imagery that enables to indicate upper-level conditioning of the convective environment is presented and discussed. In order to illustrate the approach, all convective cells during the summer of 2007 that produced precipitations over Bulgaria are considered. They are classified regarding the observed moisture pattern in mid-upper levels as well as the low-level conditions of air humidity and convergence of the flow. Water vapour (WV) images are used to study the evolution of the upper-level moist and dry structures. The proposed interpretation is that the role of the upper-level dry boundaries identified in the WV imagery as favoured areas for the initiation of deep moist convection cannot be understood (and hence cannot be forecasted accurately) by considering them in isolation from the dynamic rate at which they are maintained. The paper examines the 23 June 2006 flash flood in Sofia city as a case, in which the operational forecast of the National Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology of Bulgaria based on the mesoscale NWP model ALADIN underestimated the severity of the convective process. A comparison between the satellite water vapour imagery and the corresponding geopotential field of the dynamical tropopause, expressed in terms of potential vorticity (PV), shows an error in the performance of the ARPEGE operational numerical model. There is an obvious mismatch between the PV anomaly structure and the dry zone of the imagery. The forecast field shows underestimation of the tropopause height gradient and displacement of the PV anomaly to the southwest of the real position seen in the satellite image. It is concluded that the observed poor forecast is a result of the ARPEGE failure to treat correctly the interaction between the PV anomaly and the low-level warm anomaly.

  16. A study of jet handedness at the Z{sup 0} resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, H.; SLD Collaboration

    1993-10-01

    We present a preliminary study of jet handedness is hadronic decays of Z{sup 0} bosons measured in the SLD experiment at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). Following the proposal of Nachtman and Efremov et al., we defined a scalar quantity for each hadronic jet and measured the sign asymmetry (jet handedness) of this quantity for samples of quark jets and antiquark jets, which are expected to be oppositely polarized in Z{sup 0} decays. From our preliminary study, no evidence for a significantly non-zero handedness was observed. Assuming standard model values of quark polarizations, we set an upper limit on the analyzing power of our handedness method.

  17. A study of changes in apparent ionospheric reflection height within individual lightning flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somu, Vijaya B.; Rakov, Vladimir A.; Haddad, Michael A.; Cummer, Steven A.

    2015-12-01

    Ionospheric reflection heights estimated using the zero-to-zero and peak-to-peak methods to measure skywave delay relative to the ground wave were compared for 108 first and 124 subsequent strokes at distances greater than 100 km. For either metric there was a considerable decrease in average reflection height for subsequent strokes relative to first strokes. We showed that the observed difference cannot be explained by the difference in frequency content of first and subsequent return-stroke currents. Apparent changes in reflection height (estimated using the peak-to-peak method) within individual flashes for 54 daytime and 11 nighttime events at distances ranging from 50 km to 330 km were compared, and significant differences were found. For daytime conditions, the majority of the flashes showed either decrease (57%) or non-monotonic variation (39%) in reflection height with respect to the immediately preceding stroke. With respect to the first stroke, 91% of the flashes showed monotonic decrease in height. For nighttime flashes, patterns in reflection height changes with respect to the immediately preceding stroke were as follows: 46% no change, 27% monotonic decrease, and 27% non-monotonic variation. When changes were measured with respect to the first stroke, 54% of nighttime flashes showed monotonic decrease and 46% no change. Ionospheric reflection height tends to increase with return-stroke peak current. The observed daytime effects can be explained by (a) the dependence of EMP penetration depth on source intensity, which decreases with stroke order, (b) additional ionization associated with elves, or (c) combination of (a) and (b) above.

  18. Experimental study of vortex breakdown in swirling jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billant, Paul; Chomaz, Jean-Marc; Huerre, Patrick

    1998-12-01

    The goal of this study is to characterize the various breakdown states taking place in a swirling water jet as the swirl ratio S and Reynolds number Re are varied. A pressure-driven water jet discharges into a large tank, swirl being imparted by means of a motor which sets into rotation a honeycomb within a settling chamber. The experiments are conducted for two distinct jet diameters by varying the swirl ratio S while maintaining the Reynolds number Re fixed in the range 300jet axis in a co-rotating direction with respect to the upstream vortex flow. The two flow configurations, bubble or cone, are observed to coexist above the threshold Sc at the same values of the Reynolds number Re and swirl parameter S. The selection of breakdown state is extremely sensitive to small temperature inhomogeneities present in the apparatus. When S reaches Sc, breakdown gradually sets in, a stagnation point appearing in the downstream turbulent region of the flow and slowly moving upstream until it reaches an equilibrium location. In an intermediate range of Reynolds numbers, the breakdown threshold displays hysteresis lying in the ability of the breakdown state to remain stable for Sjet is

  19. Jet-A reaction mechanism study for combustion application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chi-Ming; Kundu, Krishna; Acosta, Waldo

    1991-01-01

    Simplified chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms for the combustion of Jet A fuel was studied. Initially, 40 reacting species and 118 elementary chemical reactions were chosen based on a literature review. Through a sensitivity analysis with the use of LSENS General Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code, 16 species and 21 elementary chemical reactions were determined from this study. This mechanism is first justified by comparison of calculated ignition delay time with the available shock tube data, then it is validated by comparison of calculated emissions from the plug flow reactor code with in-house flame tube data.

  20. Jet-A reaction mechanism study for combustion application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chi-Ming; Kundu, Krishna; Acosta, Waldo

    1991-01-01

    Simplified chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms for the combustion of Jet A fuel are studied. Initially 40 reacting species and 118 elementary chemical reactions were chosen based on the literature review of previous works. Through a sensitivity analysis with the use of LSENS General Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code, 16 species and 21 elementary chemical reactions were determined from this study. This mechanism is first justified by comparison of calculated ignition delay time with available shock tube data, then it is validated by comparison of calculated emissions from plug flow reactor code with in-house flame tube data.

  1. The Electronically Steerable Flash Lidar: A NASA Facility Instrument for Ecological Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramond, T.; Weimer, C. S.; Lefsky, M. A.; Duong, H.

    2011-12-01

    The Electronically Steerable Flash Lidar (ESFL) is a lidar concept created at Ball Aerospace and developed in conjunction with NASA. It represents a new paradigm for airborne or spaceborne lidar remote sensing. Instead of the mechanical scanning common to airborne lidars, or the fixed beam approach found in spaceborne lidars, ESFL allows the number and position of transmitted beams to vary shot-to-shot. This is done using an acousto-optic beam deflector that splits a single laser beam into N output beams, where N and the position of beam N on the ground can be reconfigured in real time electronically. This transmitter concept is coupled with a Flash Focal Plane Array (FFPA), a pixilated detector where every pixel delivers a time-resolved intensity waveform, thus allowing lidar imaging. The ESFL enables several jumps in capability for remote sensing of ecosystems. Multiple spatial scales can be probed simultaneously or within the same flight transect because beam spacings can be varied in real time. This means contiguous beams can be applied to regions where smaller scale variability needs to be probed, and in areas where maximum across-track coverage is needed, those beams are spread out. Furthermore, each beam can be projected onto multiple pixels, allowing one to collect a waveform over multiple length scales simultaneously. The electronic interface with the AOBD means that the transmitted pattern can respond to any of a multitude of inputs. The ESFL can interface with another forward-looking sensor, such as a hyperspectral instrument or another lidar or a digital camera. The data from that second sensor could be used to direct the ESFL observation toward, for example, an area with a specific spectral signature, or an area free from clouds. The ESFL concept was designed with a path to space in mind, but an airborne version has been built and tested on aircraft. The work continues under a NASA Airborne Instrument Technology Transition (AITT) grant designed to

  2. Numerical study of sound propagation in a jet flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, S. L.; Liu, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    An improved computer oriented solution method for problems involving the propagation of sound through a nonuniform jet flow is developed. The method seeks to optimize the use of computer resources such as core storage space and central memory time. Complete formulation details are presented for a jet flow model consisting of a fixed point source on the jet center line in the potential core.

  3. An experimental study of the noise generating mechanisms in supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, D. K.

    1979-01-01

    Flow fluctuation measurements with normal and X-wire hot-wire probes and acoustic measurements with a traversing condenser microphone were carried out in small air jets in the Mach number range from M = 0.9 to 2.5. One of the most successful studies involved a moderate Reynolds number M = 2.1 jet. The large scale turbulence properties in the jet, and the noise radiation were characterized. A parallel study involved similar measurements on a low Reynolds number M = 0.9 jet. These measurements show that there are important differences in the noise generation process of the M = 0.9 jet in comparison with low supersonic Mach number (M = 1.4) jets. Problems encounted while performing X-wire measurements in low Reynolds number jets of M = 2.1 and 2.5, and in installing a vacuum pump are discussed.

  4. Experimental and Numerical Studies for Soot Formation in Laminar Coflow Diffusion Flames of Jet A-1 and Synthetic Jet Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffaripour, Meghdad

    In the present doctoral thesis, fundamental experimental and numerical studies are conducted for the laminar, atmospheric pressure, sooting, coflow diffusion flames of Jet A-1 and synthetic jet fuels. The first part of this thesis presents a comparative experimental study for Jet A-1, which is a widely used petroleum-based fuel, and four synthetically produced alternative jet fuels. The main goals of this part of the thesis are to compare the soot emission levels of the alternative fuels to those of a standard fuel, Jet A-1, and to determine the effect of fuel chemical composition on soot formation characteristics. To achieve these goals, experimental measurements are constructed and performed for flame temperature, soot concentration, soot particle size, and soot aggregate structure in the flames of pre-vaporized jet fuels. The results show that a considerable reduction in soot production, compared to the standard fuel, can be obtained by using synthetic fuels which will help in addressing future regulations. A strong correlation between the aromatic content of the fuels and the soot concentration levels in the flames is observed. The second part of this thesis presents the development and experimental validation of a fully-coupled soot formation model for laminar coflow jet fuel diffusion flames. The model is coupled to a detailed kinetic mechanism to predict the chemical structure of the flames and soot precursor concentrations. This model also provides information on size and morphology of soot particles. The flames of a three-component surrogate for Jet A-1, a three-component surrogate for a synthetic jet fuel, and pure n-decane are simulated using this model. Concentrations of major gaseous species and flame temperatures are well predicted by the model. Soot volume fractions are predicted reasonably well everywhere in the flame, except near the flame centerline where soot concentrations are underpredicted by a factor of up to five. There is an excellent

  5. ATOMIC BEAM STUDIES IN THE RHIC H-JET POLARIMETER.

    SciTech Connect

    MAKDISI,Y.; ZELENSKI,A.; GRAHAM,D.; KOKHANOVSKI,S.; MAHLER,G.; NASS,A.; RITTER,J.; ZUBETS,V.; ET AL.

    2005-01-28

    The results of atomic beam production studies are presented. Improved cooling of the atoms before jet formation in the dissociator cold nozzle apparently reduces the atomic beam velocity spread and improves beam focusing conditions. A carefully designed sextupole separating (and focusing) magnet system takes advantage of the high brightness source. As a result a record beam intensity of a 12.4 {center_dot} 10{sup 16} atoms/s was obtained within 10 mm acceptance at the collision point. The results of the polarization dilution factor measurements (by the hydrogen molecules at the collision point) are also presented.

  6. Flash Smelting of Lead Concentrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nermes, Esko O.; Talonen, Timo T.

    1982-11-01

    Oxygen-autogenous flash smelting of lead concentrates followed by slag reduction by injection coal in an electric furnace has been developed and is ready for commercial application. Pilot-plant studies demonstrate that the process works. Pilot studies have established process characteristics. The process is easily controlled. Process equipment and operation are based on the extensive experience with Outokumpu flash smelting technology in smelting copper and nickel. The process equipment is small, even for high capacities. Flash smelter and electric furnace equipment are designed for close fit in order to meet the environmental control requirements.

  7. An Experimental and CFD Study of a Supersonic Coaxial Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, A. D.; White, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    A supersonic coaxial jet facility is designed and experimental data are acquired suitable for the validation of CFD codes employed in the analysis of high-speed air-breathing engines. The center jet is of a light gas, the coflow jet is of air, and the mixing layer between them is compressible. The jet flow field is characterized using schlieren imaging, surveys with pitot, total temperature and gas sampling probes, and RELIEF velocimetry. VULCAN, a structured grid CFD code, is used to solve for the nozzle and jet flow, and the results are compared to the experiment for several variations of the kappa - omega turbulence model

  8. Time-Resolved Imaging Study of Jetting Dynamics during Laser Printing of Viscoelastic Alginate Solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengyi; Xiong, Ruitong; Mei, Renwei; Huang, Yong; Chrisey, Douglas B

    2015-06-16

    Matrix-assisted pulsed-laser evaporation direct-write (MAPLE DW) has been successfully implemented as a promising laser printing technology for various fabrication applications, in particular, three-dimensional bioprinting. Since most bioinks used in bioprinting are viscoelastic, it is of importance to understand the jetting dynamics during the laser printing of viscoelastic fluids in order to control and optimize the laser printing performance. In this study, MAPLE DW was implemented to study the jetting dynamics during the laser printing of representative viscoelastic alginate bioinks and evaluate the effects of operating conditions (e.g., laser fluence) and material properties (e.g., alginate concentration) on the jet formation performance. Through a time-resolved imaging approach, it is found that when the laser fluence increases or the alginate concentration decreases, the jetting behavior changes from no material transferring to well-defined jetting to well-defined jetting with an initial bulgy shape to jetting with a bulgy shape to pluming/splashing. For the desirable well-defined jetting regimes, as the laser fluence increases, the jet velocity and breakup length increase while the breakup time and primary droplet size decrease. As the alginate concentration increases, the jet velocity and breakup length decrease while the breakup time and primary droplet size increase. In addition, Ohnesorge, elasto-capillary, and Weber number based phase diagrams are presented to better appreciate the dependence of jetting regimes on the laser fluence and alginate concentration.

  9. Experimental results to study astrophysical plasma jets using Intense Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loupias, B.; Gregory, C. D.; Falize, E.; Waugh, J.; Seiichi, D.; Pikuz, S.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Ravasio, A.; Bouquet, S.; Michaut, C.; Barroso, P.; Rabec Le Gloahec, M.; Nazarov, W.; Takabe, H.; Sakawa, Y.; Woolsey, N.; Koenig, M.

    2009-08-01

    We present experimental results of plasma jet, interacted with an ambient medium, using intense lasers to investigate the complex features of astrophysical jets. This experiment was performed in France at the LULI facility, Ecole Polytechnique, using one long pulse laser to generate the jet and a short pulse laser to probe it by proton radiography. A foam filled cone target was used to generate high velocity plasma jet, and a gas jet nozzle produced the well known ambient medium. Using visible pyrometry and interferometry, we were able to measure the jet velocity and electronic density. We get a panel of measurements at various gas density and time delay. From these measurements, we could underline the growth of a perturbed shape of the jet interaction with the ambient medium. The reason of this last observation is still in debate and will be presented in the article.

  10. Further studies of the photoproduction of isolated photons with a jet at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Bokhonov, V.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Brock, I.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; D'Agostini, G.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dolinska, G.; Drugakov, V.; Dusini, S.; Ferrando, J.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Januschek, F.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Khein, L. A.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Martin, J. F.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Mujkic, K.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nigro, A.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Samojlov, V.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Temiraliev, T.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2014-08-01

    In this extended analysis using the ZEUS detector at HERA, the photoproduction of isolated photons together with a jet is measured for different ranges of the fractional photon energy, x {/γ meas}, contributing to the photon-jet final state. Cross sections are evaluated in the photon transverse-energy and pseudorapidity ranges 6 < E {/T γ } < 15 GeV and -0 .7 < η γ < 0 .9, and for jet transverse-energy and pseudorapidity ranges 4 < E {/T jet} < 35 GeV and -1 .5 < η jet < 1 .8, for an integrated luminosity of 374 pb-1. The kinematic observables studied comprise the transverse energy and pseudorapidity of the photon and the jet, the azimuthal difference between them, the fraction of proton energy taking part in the interaction, and the difference between the pseudorapidities of the photon and the jet. Higher-order theoretical calculations are compared to the results.

  11. Study and application of a high-pressure water jet multi-functional flow test system.

    PubMed

    Shi, Huaizhong; Li, Gensheng; Huang, Zhongwei; Li, Jingbin; Zhang, Yi

    2015-12-01

    As the exploration and development of oil and gas focus more and more on deeper formation, hydraulic issues such as high-pressure water jet rock breaking, wellbore multiphase flow law, cuttings carrying efficiency, and hydraulic fracturing technique during the drilling and completion process have become the key points. To accomplish related researches, a high-pressure water jet multi-functional flow test system was designed. The following novel researches are carried out: study of high-pressure water jet characteristics under confining pressure, wellbore multiphase flow regime, hydraulic pressure properties of down hole tools during jet fracturing and pulsed cavitation jet drilling, and deflector's friction in radial jet drilling. The validity and feasibility of the experimental results provided by the system with various test modules have proved its importance in the research of the high-pressure water jet and well completion technology. PMID:26724077

  12. Experimental Study on Thermal Interaction of Ethanol Jets in High Temperature Fluorinert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa, Rongyuan; Takahashi, Minoru

    As a fundamental study for the direct contact heat exchange which was employed for in-vessel heat exchange in the Pb-Bi-cooled direct contact boiling water small fast reactor (PBWFR) and for the steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) accident in lead alloy-cooled fast reactor (LFR), ethanol jet was injected into high temperature fluorinert (FC-3283) as a simulation experiment in order to investigate the jet boiling phenomena just after volatile water contacting with the high temperature continuous lead alloy liquid. Two series of tests (no-boiling and boiling) were initiated to evaluate the ethanol vapor volume which generated around the ethanol jet. From synchronized temperature measurement around ethanol jet, the overview of the boiling behavior showed that jet boiling occurred at bottom part of jet first and developed to the upper part within very narrow area around jet.

  13. Study and application of a high-pressure water jet multi-functional flow test system.

    PubMed

    Shi, Huaizhong; Li, Gensheng; Huang, Zhongwei; Li, Jingbin; Zhang, Yi

    2015-12-01

    As the exploration and development of oil and gas focus more and more on deeper formation, hydraulic issues such as high-pressure water jet rock breaking, wellbore multiphase flow law, cuttings carrying efficiency, and hydraulic fracturing technique during the drilling and completion process have become the key points. To accomplish related researches, a high-pressure water jet multi-functional flow test system was designed. The following novel researches are carried out: study of high-pressure water jet characteristics under confining pressure, wellbore multiphase flow regime, hydraulic pressure properties of down hole tools during jet fracturing and pulsed cavitation jet drilling, and deflector's friction in radial jet drilling. The validity and feasibility of the experimental results provided by the system with various test modules have proved its importance in the research of the high-pressure water jet and well completion technology.

  14. Study and application of a high-pressure water jet multi-functional flow test system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Huaizhong; Li, Gensheng; Huang, Zhongwei; Li, Jingbin; Zhang, Yi

    2015-12-01

    As the exploration and development of oil and gas focus more and more on deeper formation, hydraulic issues such as high-pressure water jet rock breaking, wellbore multiphase flow law, cuttings carrying efficiency, and hydraulic fracturing technique during the drilling and completion process have become the key points. To accomplish related researches, a high-pressure water jet multi-functional flow test system was designed. The following novel researches are carried out: study of high-pressure water jet characteristics under confining pressure, wellbore multiphase flow regime, hydraulic pressure properties of down hole tools during jet fracturing and pulsed cavitation jet drilling, and deflector's friction in radial jet drilling. The validity and feasibility of the experimental results provided by the system with various test modules have proved its importance in the research of the high-pressure water jet and well completion technology.

  15. Experimental parametric study of jet vortex generators for flow separation control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selby, Gregory

    1991-01-01

    A parametric wind-tunnel study was performed with jet vortex generators to determine their effectiveness in controlling flow separation associated with low-speed turbulence flow over a two-dimensional rearward-facing ramp. Results indicate that flow-separation control can be accomplished, with the level of control achieved being a function of jet speed, jet orientation (with respect to the free-stream direction), and orifice pattern (double row of jets vs. single row). Compared to slot blowing, jet vortex generators can provide an equivalent level of flow control over a larger spanwise region (for constant jet flow area and speed). Dye flow visualization tests in a water tunnel indicated that the most effective jet vortex generator configurations produced streamwise co-rotating vortices.

  16. Fuzzy jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets. To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets, are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.

  17. Fuzzy jets

    DOE PAGES

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Here, collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets . To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets , are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet taggingmore » variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.« less

  18. Estimation of the relative severity of floods in small ungauged catchments for preliminary observations on flash flood preparedness: a case study in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eung Seok; Choi, Hyun Il

    2012-04-01

    An increase in the occurrence of sudden local flooding of great volume and short duration has caused significant danger and loss of life and property in Korea as well as many other parts of the World. Since such floods usually accompanied by rapid runoff and debris flow rise quite quickly with little or no advance warning to prevent flood damage, this study presents a new flash flood indexing methodology to promptly provide preliminary observations regarding emergency preparedness and response to flash flood disasters in small ungauged catchments. Flood runoff hydrographs are generated from a rainfall-runoff model for the annual maximum rainfall series of long-term observed data in the two selected small ungauged catchments. The relative flood severity factors quantifying characteristics of flood runoff hydrographs are standardized by the highest recorded maximum value, and then averaged to obtain the flash flood index only for flash flood events in each study catchment. It is expected that the regression equations between the proposed flash flood index and rainfall characteristics can provide the basis database of the preliminary information for forecasting the local flood severity in order to facilitate flash flood preparedness in small ungauged catchments.

  19. FLASH MHD simulations of experiments that study shock-generated magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeferacos, P.; Fatenejad, M.; Flocke, N.; Graziani, C.; Gregori, G.; Lamb, D. Q.; Lee, D.; Meinecke, J.; Scopatz, A.; Weide, K.

    2015-12-01

    We summarize recent additions and improvements to the high energy density physics capabilities in FLASH, highlighting new non-ideal magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) capabilities. We then describe 3D Cartesian and 2D cylindrical FLASH MHD simulations that have helped to design and analyze experiments conducted at the Vulcan laser facility. In these experiments, a laser illuminates a carbon rod target placed in a gas-filled chamber. A magnetic field diagnostic (called a Bdot) employing three very small induction coils is used to measure all three components of the magnetic field at a chosen point in space. The simulations have revealed that many fascinating physical processes occur in the experiments. These include megagauss magnetic fields generated by the interaction of the laser with the target via the Biermann battery mechanism, which are advected outward by the vaporized target material but decrease in strength due to expansion and resistivity; magnetic fields generated by an outward expanding shock via the Biermann battery mechanism; and a breakout shock that overtakes the first wave, the contact discontinuity between the target material and the gas, and then the initial expanding shock. Finally, we discuss the validation and predictive science we have done for this experiment with FLASH.

  20. Flow visualization study of the effect of injection hole geometry on an inclined jet in crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, F. F.; Ciancone, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    A flow visualization was studied by using neutrally buoyant, helium-filled soap bubbles, to determine the effect of injection hole geometry on the trajectory of an air jet in a crossflow and to investigate the mechanisms involved in jet deflection. Experimental variables were the blowing rate, and the injection hole geometry cusp facing upstream (CUS), cusp facing downstream (CDS), round, swirl passage, and oblong. It is indicated that jet deflection is governed by both the pressure drag forces and the entrainment of free-stream fluid into the jet flow. For injection hole geometries with similar cross-sectional areas and similar mass flow rates, the jet configuration with the larger aspect ratio experienced a greater deflection. Entrainment arises from lateral shearing forces on the sides of the jet, which set up a dual vortex motion within the jet and thereby cause some of the main-stream fluid momentum to be swept into the jet flow. This additional momentum forces the jet nearer the surface. Of the jet configurations, the oblong, CDS, and CUS configutations exhibited the largest deflections. The results correlate well with film cooling effectiveness data, which suggests a need to determine the jet exit configuration of optimum aspect ratio to provide maximum film cooling effectiveness.

  1. Flow visualization study of the effect of injection hole geometry on an inclined jet in crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Frederick F.; Ciancone, Michael L.

    1987-01-01

    A flow visualization was studied by using neutrally buoyant, helium-filled soap bubbles, to determine the effect of injection hole geometry on the trajectory of an air jet in a crossflow and to investigate the mechanisms involved in jet deflection. Experimental variables were the blowing rate, and the injection hole geometry cusp facing upstream (CUS), cusp facing downstream (CDS), round, swirl passage, and oblong. It is indicated that jet deflection is governed by both the pressure drag forces and the entrainment of free-stream fluid into the jet flow. For injection hole geometries with similar cross-sectional areas and similar mass flow rates, the jet configuration with the larger aspect ratio experienced a greater deflection. Entrainment arises from lateral shearing forces on the sides of the jet, which set up a dual vortex motion within the jet and thereby cause some of the main-stream fluid momentum to be swept into the jet flow. This additional momentum forces the jet nearer the surface. Of the jet configurations, the oblong, CDS, and CUS configurations exhibited the largest deflections. The results correlate well with film cooling effectiveness data, which suggests a need to determine the jet exit configuration of optimum aspect ratio to provide maximum film cooling effectiveness.

  2. Statistical Study of Chromospheric Anemone Jets Observed with Hinode/SOT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizuka, N.; Nakamura, T.; Kawate, T.; Singh, K. A. P.; Shibata, K.

    2011-04-01

    The Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode has revealed numerous tiny jets in all regions of the chromosphere outside of sunspots. A typical chromospheric anemone jet has a cusp-shaped structure and bright footpoint, similar to the shape of an X-ray anemone jet observed previously with the Soft X-ray Telescope on board Yohkoh. The similarity in the shapes of chromospheric and X-ray anemone jets suggests that chromospheric anemone jets are produced as a result of the magnetic reconnection between a small bipole (perhaps a tiny emerging flux) and a pre-existing uniform magnetic field in the lower chromosphere. We examine various chromospheric anemone jets in the solar active region near the solar limb and study the typical features (e.g., length, width, lifetime, and velocity) of the chromospheric anemone jets. Statistical studies show that chromospheric anemone jets have: (1) a typical length ~1.0-4.0 Mm, (2) a width ~100-400 km, (3) a lifetime ~100-500 s, and (4) a velocity ~5-20 km s-1. The velocity of the chromospheric anemone jets is comparable to the local Alfvén speed in the lower solar chromosphere (~10 km s-1). The histograms of chromospheric anemone jets near the limb and near the disk center show similar averages and shapes of distributions, suggesting that the characteristic behavior of chromospheric anemone jets is independent of whether they are observed on the disk or at the limb. The observed relationship between the velocity and length of chromospheric anemone jets shows that the jets do not follow ballistic motion but are more likely accelerated by some other mechanism. This is consistent with numerical simulations of chromospheric anemone jets.

  3. STATISTICAL STUDY OF CHROMOSPHERIC ANEMONE JETS OBSERVED WITH HINODE/SOT

    SciTech Connect

    Nishizuka, N.; Nakamura, T.; Kawate, T.; Singh, K. A. P.; Shibata, K.

    2011-04-10

    The Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode has revealed numerous tiny jets in all regions of the chromosphere outside of sunspots. A typical chromospheric anemone jet has a cusp-shaped structure and bright footpoint, similar to the shape of an X-ray anemone jet observed previously with the Soft X-ray Telescope on board Yohkoh. The similarity in the shapes of chromospheric and X-ray anemone jets suggests that chromospheric anemone jets are produced as a result of the magnetic reconnection between a small bipole (perhaps a tiny emerging flux) and a pre-existing uniform magnetic field in the lower chromosphere. We examine various chromospheric anemone jets in the solar active region near the solar limb and study the typical features (e.g., length, width, lifetime, and velocity) of the chromospheric anemone jets. Statistical studies show that chromospheric anemone jets have: (1) a typical length {approx}1.0-4.0 Mm, (2) a width {approx}100-400 km, (3) a lifetime {approx}100-500 s, and (4) a velocity {approx}5-20 km s{sup -1}. The velocity of the chromospheric anemone jets is comparable to the local Alfven speed in the lower solar chromosphere ({approx}10 km s{sup -1}). The histograms of chromospheric anemone jets near the limb and near the disk center show similar averages and shapes of distributions, suggesting that the characteristic behavior of chromospheric anemone jets is independent of whether they are observed on the disk or at the limb. The observed relationship between the velocity and length of chromospheric anemone jets shows that the jets do not follow ballistic motion but are more likely accelerated by some other mechanism. This is consistent with numerical simulations of chromospheric anemone jets.

  4. Study of runaway electron generation during major disruptions in JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plyusnin, V. V.; Riccardo, V.; Jaspers, R.; Alper, B.; Kiptily, V. G.; Mlynar, J.; Popovichev, S.; de La Luna, E.; Andersson, F.; EFDA contributors, JET

    2006-02-01

    Extensive analysis of disruptions in JET has helped advance the understanding of trends of disruption-generated runaway electrons. Tomographic reconstruction of the soft x-ray emission has made possible a detailed observation of the magnetic flux geometry evolution during disruptions. With the aid of soft and hard x-ray diagnostics runaway electrons have been detected at the very beginning of disruptions. A study of runaway electron parameters has shown that an approximate upper bound for the conversion efficiency of pre-disruptive plasma currents into runaways is about 60% over a wide range of plasma currents in JET. Runaway generation has been simulated with a test particle model in order to verify the results of experimental data analysis and to obtain the background for extrapolation of the existing results onto larger devices such as ITER. It was found that close agreement between the modelling results and experimental data could be achieved if in the calculations the post-disruption plasma electron temperature was assumed equal to 10 eV and if the plasma column geometry evolution is taken into account in calculations. The experimental trends and numerical simulations show that runaway electrons are a critical issue for ITER and, therefore, the development of mitigation methods, which suppress runaway generation, is an essential task.

  5. [Study on the fluctuation phenomena of arc plasma spraying jet].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wen-hua; Liu, Di; Tian, Kuo

    2002-08-01

    The turbulence phenomenon is one of the most attractive characteristics of a DC arc plasma spraying jet. Most of the previous investigations believe that there is a laminar flow region in core of the jet. A spectrum diagnostic system has been built up in this paper to investigate these effects with the aid of high-speed digital camera. The FFT method has been applied to the analysis on the arc voltage and light signals. The influence of the arc behavior and the power supply on the jet is full-scale. It seems that there is not a laminar flow region in core of the jet. Moreover, from the light dynamic variation graph, the jet fluctuation due to the arc voltage behavior maybe is the dominant characteristic of the jet behavior.

  6. A computational study of highly viscous impinging jets

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, M.W.

    1998-11-01

    Two commercially-available computational fluid dynamics codes, FIDAP (Fluent, Inc., Lebanon, NH) and FLOW-3D (Flow Science, Inc., Los Alamos, NM), were used to simulate the landing region of jets of highly viscous fluids impinging on flat surfaces. The volume-of-fluid method was combined with finite difference and finite element approaches to predict the jet behavior. Several computational models with varying degrees of physical realism were developed, and the results were compared with experimental observations. In experiments, the jet exhibited several complex behaviors. As soon as it exited the nozzle, the jet began to neck down and become narrower. When it impacted the solid surface, the jet developed an instability near the impact point and buckled to the side. This buckling became a spiraling motion, and the jet spiraled about the impact point. As the jet spiraled around, a cone-shaped pile was build up which eventually became unstable and slumped to the side. While all of these behaviors were occurring, air bubbles, or voids, were being entrapped in the fluid pool. The results obtained from the FLOW-3D models more closely matched the behavior of real jets than the results obtained from /the FIDAP models. Most of the FLOW-3D models predicted all of the significant jet behaviors observed in experiments: necking, buckling, spiraling, slumping, and void entrapment. All of the FIDAP models predicted that the jet would buckle relatively far from the point of impact, whereas the experimentally observed jet behavior indicates that the jets buckle much nearer the impact point. Furthermore, it was shown that FIDAP is incapable of incorporating heat transfer effects into the model, making it unsuitable for this work.

  7. Lunar Impact Flash Locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, D. E.; Suggs, R. M.; Kupferschmidt, L.; Feldman, J.

    2015-01-01

    A bright impact flash detected by the NASA Lunar Impact Monitoring Program in March 2013 brought into focus the importance of determining the impact flash location. A process for locating the impact flash, and presumably its associated crater, was developed using commercially available software tools. The process was successfully applied to the March 2013 impact flash and put into production on an additional 300 impact flashes. The goal today: provide a description of the geolocation technique developed.

  8. Native point defect formation in flash sintered ZnO studied by depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hantian; Asel, Thaddeus J.; Cox, Jon W.; Zhang, Yuanyao; Luo, Jian; Brillson, L. J.

    2016-09-01

    Depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy studies of flash sintered ZnO reveal that thermal runaway induces the formation of native point defects inside individual grains. Defects associated with oxygen vacancies (VO) form preferentially, contributing additional donors that increase conductivity within the grains of the polycrystalline material. Hyperspectral imaging of the granular cross sections shows filaments of increased VO following thermal runaway between the capacitor anode and cathode, supporting a heating mechanism localized on a granular scale. Within the grains, these defects form preferentially inside rather than at their boundaries, further localizing the dominant heating mechanism.

  9. Monte Carlo sensitivity in jet studies - what is the physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, P.

    1983-07-01

    Tests of perturbative QCD in hard processes involving jets have been found to depend on the jet fragmentation model used. We emphasize the need for testing the factorization of hard and soft processes, i.e., the independent fragmentation of jets. A method of analysis is suggested, which allows a model-independent determination of the gluon fragmentation function from e/sup +/e/sup -/ data. We also comment on some simple features expected in anti pp ..-->.. (2 or 3 jets) + X events. 19 references.

  10. Model for straight and helical solar jets. I. Parametric studies of the magnetic field geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pariat, E.; Dalmasse, K.; DeVore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.; Karpen, J. T.

    2015-01-01

    Context. Jets are dynamic, impulsive, well-collimated plasma events developing at many different scales and in different layers of the solar atmosphere. Aims: Jets are believed to be induced by magnetic reconnection, a process central to many astrophysical phenomena. Studying their dynamics can help us to better understand the processes acting in larger eruptive events (e.g., flares and coronal mass ejections) as well as mass, magnetic helicity, and energy transfer at all scales in the solar atmosphere. The relative simplicity of their magnetic geometry and topology, compared with larger solar active events, makes jets ideal candidates for studying the fundamental role of reconnection in energetic events. Methods: In this study, using our recently developed numerical solver ARMS, we present several parametric studies of a 3D numerical magneto-hydrodynamic model of solar-jet-like events. We studied the impact of the magnetic field inclination and photospheric field distribution on the generation and properties of two morphologically different types of solar jets, straight and helical, which can account for the observed so-called standard and blowout jets. Results: Our parametric studies validate our model of jets for different geometric properties of the magnetic configuration. We find that a helical jet is always triggered for the range of parameters we tested. This demonstrates that the 3D magnetic null-point configuration is a very robust structure for the energy storage and impulsive release characteristic of helical jets. In certain regimes determined by magnetic geometry, a straight jet precedes the onset of a helical jet. We show that the reconnection occurring during the straight-jet phase influences the triggering of the helical jet. Conclusions: Our results allow us to better understand the energization, triggering, and driving processes of straight and helical jets. Our model predicts the impulsiveness and energetics of jets in terms of the surrounding

  11. Positive Flash High-Speed Spectral Characteristics in the Upward Lightning Triggering Study (UPLIGHTS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orville, R. E.; Warner, T.

    2013-12-01

    The spectral properties of positive lightning flashes have been recorded for the first time. Two high-speed cameras, each operating at 35,000 fps, have recorded the positive leaders in the UPLIGHTS experiment in Rapid City, South Dakota. One of the cameras is modified to a spectrograph with a transmission diffraction grating to capture the lightning emissions from 400 to 900 nm. The positive leader infrared spectral emissions are relatively more intense compared to the visible spectral emissions. The positive lightning return stroke peak currents range from 24 to 91 kA.

  12. The study of a plasma jet injected by an on-board plasma thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebnev, I. A.; Ivanov, G. V.; Khodnenko, V. P.; Morozov, A. I.; Perkov, I. A.; Pertsev, A. A.; Romanovskii, Iu. A.; Rylov, Iu. P.; Shishkin, G. G.; Trifonov, Iu. V.

    The injection of a steady plasma jet into the ionosphere results in interactions which were studied in experiments conducted onboard two Meteor satellites in 1977-1979. The jet parameters at the propulsion system output were as follows: propulsive mass: Xe; Xe (+) ion density at the nozzle section; 3 x 10 to the 11th per cu cm; plasma stream divergence: 20 degrees; jet velocity: 10-12 km/cm; ion energy: 130 eV; electron temperature: 1 + 3 eV. A Bennett-type modified radio-frequency mass-spectrometer and a two-channel electromagnetic wave analyzer were used for the measurements. It was found that (1) the injected plasma jet propagation depends on the jet injection pitch angle; (2) when the plasma jet was injected along the magnetic field, impactless jet spreading took place without considerable interaction with the ionospheric plasma; (3) when the plasma jet was injected across the magnetic field, considerable interaction was observed between the plasma jet/ionospheric plasma and the earth's magnetic field; and (4) electromagnetic fields were generated near the satellite by plasma jet interaction.

  13. Arc Jet Testing of Thermal Protection Materials: 3 Case Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sylvia; Conley, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Arc jet testing is used to simulate entry to test thermal protection materials. This paper discusses the usefulness of arc jet testing for 3 cases. Case 1 is MSL and PICA, Case 2 is Advanced TUFROC, and Case 3 is conformable ablators.

  14. 35 minute green flash observed at Little America on 16 October 1929: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Lock, James A

    2015-02-01

    On 16 October 1929 five members of the Byrd Expedition 1 observed an intermittent 35 min green flash at the Little America station (latitude -78.57°) in Antarctica. The flash was the result of strong atmospheric refraction, likely associated with a subcritical Novaya Zemlya mirage. This paper examines the constraints placed on the observation by the Earth-Sun orbital kinematics. It is found that the length of the observation cannot be explained solely by the slowness of the setting rate of the Sun, nor the time required just before the beginning of the Antarctic summer for the top of the Sun to set, reach its relative minimum position at the horizon, and then rise back up again. The observed length of the effect, however, is consistent with the Sun effectively setting twice and rising twice during the observation, with the first effective rising being the result of the observers climbing up the radio towers at the Little America station in order to keep the top of the Sun in view. PMID:25967839

  15. 35 minute green flash observed at Little America on 16 October 1929: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Lock, James A

    2015-02-01

    On 16 October 1929 five members of the Byrd Expedition 1 observed an intermittent 35 min green flash at the Little America station (latitude -78.57°) in Antarctica. The flash was the result of strong atmospheric refraction, likely associated with a subcritical Novaya Zemlya mirage. This paper examines the constraints placed on the observation by the Earth-Sun orbital kinematics. It is found that the length of the observation cannot be explained solely by the slowness of the setting rate of the Sun, nor the time required just before the beginning of the Antarctic summer for the top of the Sun to set, reach its relative minimum position at the horizon, and then rise back up again. The observed length of the effect, however, is consistent with the Sun effectively setting twice and rising twice during the observation, with the first effective rising being the result of the observers climbing up the radio towers at the Little America station in order to keep the top of the Sun in view.

  16. Anethole-Water a Combined Jet, Matrix, and Computational Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newby, Josh; Nesheiwat, Jackleen

    2016-06-01

    Anethole [(E)-1-methoxy-4-(1-propenyl)benzene] is a natural product molecule that is commonly recognized as the flavor component of anise, fennel, and licorice. Previously, we reported the jet-cooled, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and single vibronic level fluorescence (SVLF) spectra of anethole. In this work, several weak bands were observed and were tentatively assigned as van der Waals clusters of anethole with water. We have since confirmed this assignment and have conducted a more detailed study to determine the geometry of these clusters. Results from LIF, SVLF, and matrix isolation FTIR spectroscopy, as well as computational results will be presented in this talk. J. Phys. Chem. A, 2013, 117 (48), 12831-12841 Newly built system at Hobart and William Smith Colleges

  17. An experimental study of turbulent flow in attachment jet combustors by LDV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Wu, Cheng-Kang

    1993-12-01

    Flame stabilization in attachment jet combustors is based on the existence of the high temperature recirculation zone, provided by the Coanda effect of an attachment jet. The single attachment jet in a rectangular channel is a fundamental form of this type of flow. In this paper, the detailed characteristics of turbulent flow of a single attachment jet were experimentally studied by using a 2-D LDV. The flowfield consists of a forward flow and two reverse flows. The forward one is composed of a curved and a straight section. The curved section resembles a bent turbulent free jet, and the straight part is basically a section of turbulent wall jet. A turbulent counter-gradient transport region exists at the curved section. According to the results, this kind of combustor should have a large sudden enlargement ratio and not too narrow in width.

  18. A study of flow past an airfoil with a jet issuing from its lower surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krothapalli, A.; Leopold, D.

    1984-01-01

    The aerodynamics of a NACA 0018 airfoil with a rectangular jet of finite aspect ratio exiting from its lower surface at 90 deg to the chord were investigated. The jet was located at 50% of the wing chord. Measurements include static pressures on the airfoil surface, total pressures in the near wake, and local velocity vectors in different planes of the wake. The effects of jet cross flow interaction on the aerodynamics of the airfoil are studied. It is indicated that at all values of momentum coefficients, the jet cross flow interaction produces a strong contra-rotating vortex structure in the near wake. The flow behind the jet forms a closed recirculation region which extends up to a chord length down stream of the trailing edge which results in the flow field to become highly three dimensional. The various aerodynamic force coefficients vary significantly along the span of the wing. The results are compared with a jet flap configuration.

  19. Experimental study of highly turbulent isothermal opposed-jet flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Gianfilippo; Gomez, Alessandro

    2010-10-01

    Opposed-jet flows have been shown to provide a valuable means to study a variety of combustion problems, but have been limited to either laminar or modestly turbulent conditions. With the ultimate goal of developing a burner for laboratory flames reaching turbulence regimes of relevance to practical systems, we characterized highly turbulent, strained, isothermal, opposed-jet flows using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The bulk strain rate was kept at 1250 s-1 and specially designed and properly positioned turbulence generation plates in the incoming streams boosted the turbulence intensity to well above 20%, under conditions that are amenable to flame stabilization. The data were analyzed with proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and a novel statistical analysis conditioned to the instantaneous position of the stagnation surface. Both POD and the conditional analysis were found to be valuable tools allowing for the separation of the truly turbulent fluctuations from potential artifacts introduced by relatively low-frequency, large-scale instabilities that would otherwise partly mask the turbulence. These instabilities cause the stagnation surface to wobble with both an axial oscillation and a precession motion about the system axis of symmetry. Once these artifacts are removed, the longitudinal integral length scales are found to decrease as one approaches the stagnation line, as a consequence of the strained flow field, with the corresponding outer scale turbulent Reynolds number following a similar trend. The Taylor scale Reynolds number is found to be roughly constant throughout the flow field at about 200, with a value virtually independent of the data analysis technique. The novel conditional statistics allowed for the identification of highly convoluted stagnation lines and, in some cases, of strong three-dimensional effects, that can be screened, as they typically yield more than one stagnation line in the flow field. The ability to lock on the

  20. Experimental study of propagation of instability waves in a submerged jet under transverse acoustic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, A. K.; Krasheninnikov, S. Yu.; Maslov, V. P.; Zakharov, D. E.

    2016-07-01

    An experimental study was conducted on the specific features of instability wave propagation in the mixing layer of a turbulent jet when the jet is excited by an external acoustic wave. We used the technique of conditional phase averaging of data obtained by particle image velocimetry using the reference signal of a microphone placed near the jet. The influence of the excitation frequency on the characteristics of large-scale structures in the mixing layer was investigated. It is shown that the propagation patterns of the instability waves agree well with previously obtained data on the localization of acoustic sources in turbulent jets.

  1. Theoretical study of the effects of refraction on the noise produced by turbulence in jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, E. W.; Graham, B. B.

    1974-01-01

    The production of noise by turbulence in jets is an extremely complex problem. One aspect of that problem, the transmission of acoustic disturbances from the interior of the jet through the mean velocity profile and into the far field is studied. The jet (two-dimensional or circular cylindrical) is assumed infinitely long with mean velocity profile independent of streamwise location. The noise generator is a sequence of transient sources drifting with the surrounding fluid and confined to a short length of the jet.

  2. Numerical study of a confined slot impinging jet with nanofluids

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Heat transfer enhancement technology concerns with the aim of developing more efficient systems to satisfy the increasing demands of many applications in the fields of automotive, aerospace, electronic and process industry. A solution for obtaining efficient cooling systems is represented by the use of confined or unconfined impinging jets. Moreover, the possibility of increasing the thermal performances of the working fluids can be taken into account, and the introduction of nanoparticles in a base fluid can be considered. Results In this article, a numerical investigation on confined impinging slot jet working with a mixture of water and Al2O3 nanoparticles is described. The flow is turbulent and a constant temperature is applied on the impinging. A single-phase model approach has been adopted. Different geometric ratios, particle volume concentrations and Reynolds number have been considered to study the behavior of the system in terms of average and local Nusselt number, convective heat transfer coefficient and required pumping power profiles, temperature fields and stream function contours. Conclusions The dimensionless stream function contours show that the intensity and size of the vortex structures depend on the confining effects, given by H/W ratio, Reynolds number and particle concentrations. Furthermore, for increasing concentrations, nanofluids realize increasing fluid bulk temperature, as a result of the elevated thermal conductivity of mixtures. The local Nusselt number profiles show the highest values at the stagnation point, and the lowest at the end of the heated plate. The average Nusselt number increases for increasing particle concentrations and Reynolds numbers; moreover, the highest values are observed for H/W = 10, and a maximum increase of 18% is detected at a concentration equal to 6%. The required pumping power as well as Reynolds number increases and particle concentrations grow, which is almost 4.8 times greater than the

  3. Susceptibility to the Flash-Beep Illusion Is Increased in Children Compared to Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Innes-Brown, Hamish; Barutchu, Ayla; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Crewther, David P.; Grayden, David B.; Paolini, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Audio-visual integration was studied in children aged 8-17 (N = 30) and adults (N = 22) using the "flash-beep illusion" paradigm, where the presentation of two beeps causes a single flash to be perceived as two flashes ("fission" illusion), and a single beep causes two flashes to be perceived as one flash ("fusion" illusion). Children reported…

  4. NUCLEAR FLASH TYPE STEAM GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Johns, F.L.; Gronemeyer, E.C.; Dusbabek, M.R.

    1962-09-01

    A nuclear steam generating apparatus is designed so that steam may be generated from water heated directly by the nuclear heat source. The apparatus comprises a pair of pressure vessels mounted one within the other, the inner vessel containing a nuclear reactor heat source in the lower portion thereof to which water is pumped. A series of small ports are disposed in the upper portion of the inner vessel for jetting heated water under pressure outwardly into the atmosphere within the interior of the outer vessel, at which time part of the jetted water flashes into steam. The invention eliminates the necessity of any intermediate heat transfer medium and components ordinarily required for handling that medium. (AEC)

  5. Analytic and Monte Carlo studies of jets with heavy mesons and quarkonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, Reggie; Dai, Lin; Hornig, Andrew; Leibovich, Adam K.; Makris, Yiannis; Mehen, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    We study jets with identified hadrons in which a family of jet-shape variables called angularities are measured, extending the concept of fragmenting jet functions (FJFs) to these observables. FJFs determine the fraction of energy, z, carried by an identified hadron in a jet with angularity, τ a . The FJFs are convolutions of fragmentation functions (FFs), evolved to the jet energy scale, with perturbatively calculable matching coefficients. Renormalization group equations are used to provide resummed calculations with next-to-leading logarithm prime (NLL') accuracy. We apply this formalism to two-jet events in e + e - collisions with B mesons in the jets, and three-jet events in which a J/ψ is produced in the gluon jet. In the case of B mesons, we use a phenomenological FF extracted from e + e - collisions at the Z 0 pole evaluated at the scale μ = m b . For events with J/ψ, the FF can be evaluated in terms of Non-Relativistic QCD (NRQCD) matrix elements at the scale μ = 2 m c . The z and τ a distributions from our NLL' calculations are compared with predictions from monte carlo event generators. While we find consistency between the predictions for B mesons and the J/ψ distributions in τ a , we find the z distributions for J/ψ differ significantly. We describe an attempt to merge PYTHIA showers with NRQCD FFs that gives good agreement with NLL' calculations of the z distributions.

  6. Characterization of the transient species generated by the photoionization of Berberine: A laser flash photolysis study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ling-Li; Wang, Mei; Zhu, Hui; Li, Kun; Zhu, Rong-Rong; Sun, Xiao-Yu; Yao, Si-De; Wu, Qing-Sheng; Wang, Shi-Long

    2009-09-01

    Using 266 nm laser flash photolysis it has been demonstrated that Berberine (BBR) in aqueous solution is ionized via a mono-photonic process giving a hydrated electron, anion radical that formed by hydrated electron react with steady state of BBR, and neutral radical that formed from rapid deprotonation of the radical cation of BBR. The quantum yield of photoionization is determined to be 0.03 at room temperature with KI solution used as a reference. Furthermore utilizing pH changing method and the SO 4rad - radical oxidation method, the assignment of radical cation of BBR was further confirmed, the p Ka value of it was calculated, and the related set up rate constant was also determined.

  7. An empirical study of the effect of the variables in a flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) experiment.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Emma F; Foot, Jonathan S; McNab, Hamish; Milligan, Andrew A

    2004-09-21

    The effect of the variation of the experimental parameters on the conversion of precursor to products in a typical flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) experiment was investigated empirically. Temperature-conversion plots can be used to optimise FVP conditions and their mechanistic significance is exemplified. At a given temperature, the conversion can be increased by an increase in the background pressure, or by packing a section of the furnace tube with inert material (particularly when placed at the trap end of the furnace tube) or by employing a catalyst. Despite the prevailing view that only intramolecular reactions take place by FVP, it has been shown by a 'dual-FVP' cross-over experiment that the dimerisation of benzyl radicals occurs in the gas-phase, before the cold trap, under standard conditions. However, reduction in through-put rate, increase in furnace temperature and reduction in background pressure all reduce the amount of gas-phase coupling.

  8. A 1D (radial) Plasma Jet Propagation Study for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, J. R.; Bogatu, I. N.; Galkin, S. A.; Kim, J. S.; Welch, D. R.; Thoma, C.; Golovkin, I.; Macfarlane, J. J.; Case, A.; Messer, S. J.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Cassibry, J. T.; Awe, T. J.; Hsu, S. C.

    2011-10-01

    The Plasma Liner Experiment will explore the formation of imploding spherical ``plasma liners'' that reach peak pressures of 0.1 Mbar upon stagnation. The liners will be formed through the merging of dense, high velocity plasma jets (n ~1017 cm-3, T ~3 eV, v ~50 km/s) in a spherically convergent geometry. The focus of this 1D (radial) study is argon plasma jet evolution during propagation from the rail gun source to the jet merging radius. The study utilizes the Large Scale Plasma (LSP) PIC code with atomic physics included through the use of a non-Local Thermal Equilibrium (NLTE) Equation of State (EOS) table. We will present scenarios for expected 1D (radial) plasma jet evolution, from upon exiting the PLX rail gun to reaching the jet merging radius. The importance of radiation cooling early in the simulation is highlighted. Work supported by US DOE grant DE-FG02-05ER54835.

  9. The Near Noise Field of Static Jets and Some Model Studies of Devices for Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lassiter, Leslie W; Hubbard, Harvey H

    1956-01-01

    An experimental study is presented of the pressure fluctuations near jet exhaust streams made during unchoked operation of a turbojet engine and a 1-inch-diameter high-temperature model jet and during choked operation of various sizes of model jets with unheated air. The tests for unchoked operation indicate a random spectrum of rather narrow band width which varies in frequency content with axial position along the jet. Pressure surveys from the model tests along lines parallel to the 15 degree jet boundary indicate that the station of greatest pressure fluctuations is determined by the jet velocity and the radial distance, with a tendency of the maximum to shift downstream as either parameter is increased. From model tests the magnitude of the fluctuations appears to increase as about the second power of jet velocity at points just outside the jet boundary and as increasingly higher powers of jet velocity as distance from the boundary is increased. A laboratory method of noise reduction with model jets was found to produce large decreases in the magnitude of the lower-frequency components of the spectra and thereby also to reduce the total radiated energy. Choked operation of model jets with unheated air indicates the appearance of a discrete-frequency component of very large magnitude. Shadowgraph records of the flow show that this condition is associated with the appearance of flow formations suggestive of partly formed toroidal vortices in the vicinity of the shocks. Elimination of these formations is found to eliminate the discrete component and thereby to reduce the overall noise level.

  10. Electronic Flash In Data Acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. E.

    1982-02-01

    Photographic acquisition of data often may be simplified, or the data quality improved upon by employing electronic flash sources with traditional equipment or techniques. The relatively short flash duration compared to movie camera shutters, or to the long integration time of video camera provides improved spatial resolution through blur reduction, particularly important as image movement becomes a significant fraction of film format dimension. Greater accuracy typically is achieved in velocity and acceleration determinations by using a stroboscopic light source rather than a movie camera frame-rate control as a time standard. Electrical efficiency often is an important advantage of electronic flash sources since almost any necessary light level for exposure may be produced, yet the source typically is "off" most of the time. Various synchronization techniques greatly expand the precise control of exposure. Biomechanical and sports equipment studies may involve velocities up to 200 feet-per-second, and often will have associated very rapid actions of interest. The need for brief exposures increases H.s one "ZOOMS in on the action." In golf, for example, the swing may be examined using 100 microsecond (Us) flashes at rates of 60 or 120 flashes-per-second (FPS). Accurate determination of linear and rotational velocity of the ball requires 10 Us flashes at 500-1,000 FPS, while sub-Us flashes at 20,000-50,000 FPS are required to resolve the interaction of the ball and the club, head. Some seldom. used techniques involving streak photography are described, with enhanced results obtained by combining strobe with the usual continuous light source. The combination of strobe and a fast electro-mechanical shutter is considered for Us photography under daylight conditions.

  11. Experimental study of generalized self-filtering unstable resonators in an ablative-wall flash-lamp-pumped dye laser.

    PubMed

    Mahmodi, M; Farahbod, A H; Hariri, A

    1998-02-20

    The performance of a generalized self-filtering unstable resonator (GSFUR) that consists of two curved mirrors in a nonconfocal scheme with a low magnification of M = -1.62 in an ablative-wall flash-lamp dye laser is reported. The objective was to study the near- and far-field intensity distribution and the divergence of the laser beam. It was found that the output beam has a nearly Gaussian distribution with a pulse duration of ~400 ns FWHM, almost independent of the diameter of the field-limiting aperture, but increases slightly with the pumping rate. A diffraction-limited laser beam of 1.1 mrad was obtained from this laser cavity. The output energy was ~1 mJ when an intracavity glass plate was used as an output coupler. The required relations needed for the GSFUR design were also derived. PMID:18268685

  12. Gas jet studies towards an optimization of the IGISOL LIST method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reponen, M.; Moore, I. D.; Pohjalainen, I.; Kessler, T.; Karvonen, P.; Kurpeta, J.; Marsh, B.; Piszczek, S.; Sonnenschein, V.; Äystö, J.

    2011-04-01

    Gas jets emitted from an ion guide have been studied as a function of nozzle type and gas cell-to-background pressure ratio in order to obtain a low divergent, uniform jet over a distance of several cm. The jet has been probed by imaging the light emitted from excited argon or helium gas atoms. For a simple exit hole or converging-diverging nozzle, the jet diameter was found to be insensitive to the nozzle shape and inlet pressure. Sonic jets with a FWHM below 6 mm were achieved with a background pressure larger than 1 mbar in the expansion chamber. The measurements are supported by the detection of radioactive 219Rn recoils from an alpha recoil source mounted within the gas cell. A Laval nozzle produced a well-collimated supersonic jet at low background pressures with a FWHM of ˜6 mm over a distance of 14 cm. Direct Pitot probe measurements, on-axis, revealed a non-uniform pressure distribution in the gas jet of the Laval nozzle, supporting the visual observations. All measurements are motivated by the requirement of a good geometrical overlap between atoms and counter-propagating laser beams in the gas cell-based Laser Ion Source Trap (LIST) project. Computational fluid dynamics gas flow simulations were initiated to guide the future development of the gas jet system.

  13. Jet pumps for thermoacoustic applications: Design guidelines based on a numerical parameter study.

    PubMed

    Oosterhuis, Joris P; Bühler, Simon; Wilcox, Douglas; van der Meer, Theo H

    2015-10-01

    The oscillatory flow through tapered cylindrical tube sections (jet pumps) is characterized by a numerical parameter study. The shape of a jet pump results in asymmetric hydrodynamic end effects which cause a time-averaged pressure drop to occur under oscillatory flow conditions. Hence, jet pumps are used as streaming suppressors in closed-loop thermoacoustic devices. A two-dimensional axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics model is used to calculate the performance of a large number of conical jet pump geometries in terms of time-averaged pressure drop and acoustic power dissipation. The investigated geometrical parameters include the jet pump length, taper angle, waist diameter, and waist curvature. In correspondence with previous work, four flow regimes are observed which characterize the jet pump performance and dimensionless parameters are introduced to scale the performance of the various jet pump geometries. The simulation results are compared to an existing quasi-steady theory and it is shown that this theory is only applicable in a small operation region. Based on the scaling parameters, an optimum operation region is defined and design guidelines are proposed which can be directly used for future jet pump design. PMID:26520283

  14. Jet pumps for thermoacoustic applications: Design guidelines based on a numerical parameter study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oosterhuis, Joris P.; Bühler, Simon; Wilcox, Douglas; van der Meer, Theo H.

    2015-10-01

    The oscillatory flow through tapered cylindrical tube sections (jet pumps) is characterized by a numerical parameter study. The shape of a jet pump results in asymmetric hydrodynamic end effects which cause a time-averaged pressure drop to occur under oscillatory flow conditions. Hence, jet pumps are used as streaming suppressors in closed-loop thermoacoustic devices. A two-dimensional axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics model is used to calculate the performance of a large number of conical jet pump geometries in terms of time-averaged pressure drop and acoustic power dissipation. The investigated geometrical parameters include the jet pump length, taper angle, waist diameter and waist curvature. In correspondence with previous work, four flow regimes are observed which characterize the jet pump performance and dimensionless parameters are introduced to scale the performance of the various jet pump geometries. The simulation results are compared to an existing quasi-steady theory and it is shown that this theory is only applicable in a small operation region. Based on the scaling parameters, an optimum operation region is defined and design guidelines are proposed which can be directly used for future jet pump design.

  15. Numerical study of jets produced by conical wire arrays on the Magpie pulsed power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocchi, M.; Chittenden, J. P.; Ciardi, A.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Hall, G. N.; de Grouchy, P.; Lebedev, S. V.; Bott, S. C.

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this work is to model the jets produced by conical wire arrays on the MAGPIE generator, and to design and test new setups to strengthen the link between laboratory and astrophysical jets. We performed the modelling with direct three-dimensional magneto-hydro-dynamic numerical simulations using the code GORGON. We applied our code to the typical MAGPIE setup and we successfully reproduced the experiments. We found that a minimum resolution of ˜100 μm is required to retrieve the unstable character of the jet. We investigated the effect of changing the number of wires and found that arrays with less wires produce more unstable jets, and that this effect has magnetic origin. Finally, we studied the behaviour of the conical array together with a conical shield on top of it to reduce the presence of unwanted low density plasma flows. The resulting jet is shorter and less dense.

  16. NICA fixed target mode: Soft jet studies in the relative 4-velocity space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okorokov, V. A.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental results obtained by studying the properties of soft jets in the 4-velocity space at √{{s}} ˜ 2-20 GeV are presented. The changes in the mean distance from the jet axis to the jet particles, the mean kinetic energy of these particles, and the cluster dimension in response to the growth of the collision energy are consistent with the assumption that quark degrees of freedom manifest themselves in processes of pion-jet production at intermediate energies. The energy at which quark degrees of freedom begin to manifest themselves experimentally in the production of soft pion jets is estimated for the first time. The estimated value of this energy is 2.8±0.6 GeV. The suggestions are made for future investigations on NICA.

  17. Studies of jet fuel additives using the quartz crystal microbalance and pressure monitoring at 140 C

    SciTech Connect

    Zabarnick, S.; Grinstead, R.R. . Aerospace Mechanics Div./KL-463)

    1994-11-01

    Recent advances in jet aircraft and engine technology have placed an ever increasing heat load on the aircraft. The bulk of this excess heat is absorbed by the aircraft fuel, as jet fuel is used as the primary coolant for the numerous heat sources. The quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and pressure monitoring are used for the evaluation of jet fuel additives for the improvement of jet fuel thermal stability. The mechanisms of additive behavior are determined by measuring the time-dependent deposition with the QCM and oxidation by pressure measurements. Studies at various additive concentrations permits the determination of optimum additive concentrations. Additive packages made of mixtures of antioxidants, detergent/dispersants, and metal deactivators are shown to yield good improvements in thermal stability over a wide range of jet fuel types.

  18. Space shuttle orbiter reaction control system jet interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rausch, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The space shuttle orbiter has forward mounted and rear mounted Reaction Control Systems (RCS) which are used for orbital maneuvering and also provide control during entry and abort maneuvers in the atmosphere. The effects of interaction between the RCS jets and the flow over the vehicle in the atmosphere are studied. Test data obtained in the NASA Langley Research Center 31 inch continuous flow hypersonic tunnel at a nominal Mach number of 10.3 is analyzed. The data were obtained with a 0.01 scale force model with aft mounted RCS nozzles mounted on the sting off of the force model balance. The plume simulations were accomplished primarily using air in a cold gas simulation through scaled nozzles, however, various cold gas mixtures of Helium and Argon were also tested. The effect of number of nozzles was tested as were limited tests of combined controls. The data show that RCS nozzle exit momentum ratio is the primary correlating parameter for effects where the plume impinges on an adjacent surface and mass flow ratio is the parameter where the plume interaction is primarily with the external stream. An analytic model of aft mounted RCS units was developed in which the total reaction control moments are the sum of thrust, impingement, interaction, and cross-coupling terms.

  19. Thermal diffusivity study of aged Li-ion batteries using flash method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagpure, Shrikant C.; Dinwiddie, Ralph; Babu, S. S.; Rizzoni, Giorgio; Bhushan, Bharat; Frech, Tim

    Advanced Li-ion batteries with high energy and power density are fast approaching compatibility with automotive demands. While the mechanism of operation of these batteries is well understood, the aging mechanisms are still under investigation. Investigation of aging mechanisms in Li-ion batteries becomes very challenging, as aging does not occur due to a single process, but because of multiple physical processes occurring at the same time in a cascading manner. As the current characterization techniques such as Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy are used independent of each other they do not provide a comprehensive understanding of material degradation at different length (nm 2 to m 2) scales. Thus to relate the damage mechanisms of the cathode at mm length scale to micro/nanoscale, data at an intermediate length scale is needed. As such, we demonstrate here the use of thermal diffusivity analysis by flash method to bridge the gap between different length scales. In this paper we present the thermal diffusivity analysis of an unaged and aged cell. Thermal diffusivity analysis maps the damage to the cathode samples at millimeter scale lengths. Based on these maps we also propose a mechanism leading to the increase of the thermal diffusivity as the cells are aged.

  20. Photorearrangements of bridgehead-aryl-substituted dibenzobarrelenes. Steady-state and laser flash photolysis studies

    SciTech Connect

    Pratapan, S.; Ashok, K. ); Gopidas, K.R. Indian Inst. of Tech., Kanpur ); Rath, N.P.; Das, P.K. ); George, M.V. Univ. of Notre Dame, IN Indian Inst. of Tech., Kanpur )

    1990-02-16

    Examples of a novel di-{pi}-methane rearrangement of 9-aryl-substituted dibenzobarrelenes containing 1,2-dibenzoylalkene moieties (1a-f) are presented. Steady-state irradiation of the dibenzobarrelenes 1a-f in benzene gives the regioselectively formed dibenzopentalenofurans, 5a-f, in excellent yields (74-90%). The structure of the bromo derivative 5f was confirmed through X-ray crystallographic analysis. Controlled irradiation of 1b, a representative example, at low temperatures suggests that the dibenzopentalenofurans (5a-f) are formed through the thermal isomerization of the corresponding dibenzosemibullvalenes 6a-f, which, in turn, arise through a di-{pi}-methane type of rearrangement. Laser flash photolysis (337.1 nm) of 1a-f in benzene gives rise to transient phenomena, attributable to dibenzobarrelenes triplets ({phi}{sup T} = 0.2-0.5). These transients are characterized by broad and diffuse absorption spectra and possess short lifetimes (0.13-0.19 {mu}s). They are readily quenched by oxygen, HTEMPO (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-1-oxy), ferrocene, and {beta}-carotene, with rate constants in the limit of diffusion control (10{sup 8}-10{sup 10} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}).

  1. Runaway beam studies during disruptions at JET-ILW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reux, C.; Plyusnin, V.; Alper, B.; Alves, D.; Bazylev, B.; Belonohy, E.; Brezinsek, S.; Decker, J.; Devaux, S.; de Vries, P.; Fil, A.; Gerasimov, S.; Lupelli, I.; Jachmich, S.; Khilkevitch, E. M.; Kiptily, V.; Koslowski, R.; Kruezi, U.; Lehnen, M.; Manzanares, A.; Mlynář, J.; Nardon, E.; Nilsson, E.; Riccardo, V.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Shevelev, A. E.; Sozzi, C.

    2015-08-01

    Runaway electrons (RE) during disruptions are a concern for future tokamaks including ITER with its metallic wall. Although RE are rare in spontaneous disruptions with the JET ITER-like Wall (JET-ILW), RE beams up to 380 kA were obtained using massive injection (MGI) of argon in JET-ILW divertor discharges. Entry points into the RE domain defined by operational parameters (toroidal field, argon fraction in MGI) are unchanged but higher RE currents have been obtained inside the JET-ILW MGI-generated RE domain when compared to JET-C. This might be due to the influence of the metallic wall on the current quench plasma. Temperatures of 900 °C have been observed following RE impacts on beryllium tiles. Heat deposition depth of ∼2 mm has to be assumed to match the tile cooling time. 3D simulations of the RE energy deposition using the ENDEP/MEMOS codes show that material melting is unlikely with 100 kA RE beams.

  2. Studies of the effects of curvature on dilution jet mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdeman, James D.; Srinivasan, Ram; Reynolds, Robert S.; White, Craig D.

    1992-02-01

    An analytical program was conducted using both three-dimensional numerical and empirical models to investigate the effects of transition liner curvature on the mixing of jets injected into a confined crossflow. The numerical code is of the TEACH type with hybrid numerics; it uses the power-law and SIMPLER algorithms, an orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system, and an algebraic Reynolds stress turbulence model. From the results of the numerical calculations, an existing empirical model for the temperature field downstream of single and multiple rows of jets injected into a straight rectangular duct was extended to model the effects of curvature. Temperature distributions, calculated with both the numerical and empirical models, are presented to show the effects of radius of curvature and inner and outer wall injection for single and opposed rows of cool dilution jets injected into a hot mainstream flow.

  3. Experimental studies on an air-air jet exhaust pump

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    Industrial ventilation employing an air-air jet exhaust pump connected to a compressed-air line was investigated. The motive air supply pressure was maintained between 2 and 3 bar. A unique ejector housing was constructed to receive both the convergent-divergent primary nozzle and the mixing chamber. The entire unit adapts readily to any existing compressed-air system. The mixing chamber was so constructed that the length of its cylindrical section may be changed. Pressure variations along the mixing chamber were recorded, and this offered a valuable appreciation of the effects of the length-to-diameter ratios. Results indicate the influence of the supply air pressure and pressure ratio on the jet entrainment capacity and efficiency. It has also been shown that the present design is capable of achieving the maximum reported jet-pump efficiency of around 25% corresponding to a nozzle-to-mixing chamber area ratio of 0.15.

  4. Multiwavelength study of 20 jets that emanate from the periphery of active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulay, Sargam M.; Tripathi, Durgesh; Del Zanna, Giulio; Mason, Helen

    2016-05-01

    Aims: We present a multiwavelength analysis of 20 EUV jets which occurred at the periphery of active regions close to sunspots. We discuss the physical parameters of the jets and their relation with other phenomena such as Hα surges, nonthermal type-III radio bursts and hard X-ray (HXR) emission. Methods: These jets were observed between August 2010 and June 2013 by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument that is onboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). We selected events that were observed on the solar disk within +/-60° latitude. Using AIA wavelength channels that are sensitive to coronal temperatures, we studied the temperature distribution in the jets using the line of sight (LOS) differential emission measure (DEM) technique. We also investigated the role of the photospheric magnetic field using the LOS magnetogram data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard SDO. Results: It has been observed that most of the jets originated from the western periphery of active regions. Their lifetimes range from 5 to 39 min with an average of 18 min and their velocities range from 87 to 532 km s-1 with an average of 271 km s-1. All the jets are co-temporally associated with Hα surges. Most of the jets are co-temporal with nonthermal type-III radio bursts observed by the Wind/WAVES spacecraft in the frequency range from 20 kHz to 13 MHz. We confirm the source region of these bursts using the potential field source surface (PFSS) technique. Using Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations, we found that half of the jets produced HXR emission and they often shared the same source region as the HXR emission (6-12 keV). Ten out of 20 events showed that the jets originated in a region of flux cancellation and six jets in a region of flux emergence. Four events showed flux emergence and then cancellation during the jet evolution. DEM analyses showed that for most of the spires of the jets, the DEM peaked at around log

  5. Sensitivity of Orographic Moist Convection to Landscape Variability: A Study of the Buffalo Creek, Colorado, Flash Flood Case of 1996.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fei; Warner, Thomas T.; Manning, Kevin

    2001-11-01

    A number of numerical experiments with a high-resolution mesoscale model were conducted to study the convective rainfall event that caused the 1996 Buffalo Creek, Colorado, flash flood. Different surface conditions and treatments of land surface physics were utilized to assess the sensitivity of this orographic moist convection to local and regional landscape forcing.Given accurate large-scale synoptic conditions at the lateral boundaries, the mesoscale model with a convection-resolving grid shows reasonably good skill in simulating this convective event with a lead time of up to 12 h. Sensitivity experiments show that a primary reason for this success is the use of an advanced land surface model that provides time-varying soil-moisture fields. This land surface model plays an important role in capturing the complex interactions among the land surface, the PBL, cloud-modulated radiation, and precipitation. For the case simulated, such interactions contribute to the temporal and spatial distribution of surface heating at small scales, and the convective triggering and development.Tests show that the landscape variability at small and large scales significantly affects the location and intensity of the moist convection. For example, on timescales of 6 to 12 h, differences in initial soil moisture associated with irrigation in the plains affect the evolution of the convection near the Continental Divide. Also, the surface modification by a wildfire burn influences the path of the major convective event that caused the flash flood.A watershed-based quantitative-precipitation-forecast skill score is proposed and employed. The relative success with which this severe thunderstorm is simulated over complex terrain provides some hope that the careful treatment of land surface physics in convection-resolving models can perhaps provide some useful level of predictability.

  6. Experimental approaches for studying non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Shashurin, A.; Keidar, M.

    2015-12-15

    This work reviews recent research efforts undertaken in the area non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets with special focus on experimental approaches. Physics of small non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets operating in kHz frequency range at powers around few Watts will be analyzed, including mechanism of breakdown, process of ionization front propagation, electrical coupling of the ionization front with the discharge electrodes, distributions of excited and ionized species, discharge current spreading, transient dynamics of various plasma parameters, etc. Experimental diagnostic approaches utilized in the field will be considered, including Rayleigh microwave scattering, Thomson laser scattering, electrostatic streamer scatterers, optical emission spectroscopy, fast photographing, etc.

  7. Jet injection of a monoclonal antibody: A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Hogan, N Catherine; Cloutier, A M; Hunter, I W

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) represent a major group of biotherapeutics. The high concentration and volume of drug administered together with a shift to administration via the subcutaneous route have generated interest in alternative delivery technologies. The feasibility of using a novel, highly controllable jet injection technology to deliver a mAb is presented. The effect of delivery parameters on protein structure were evaluated and compared with delivery using a conventional needle and syringe. Injection of mAb into a rat model showed that jet injection using the device resulted in more rapid absorption and longer duration of exposure.

  8. Analytical study of the twin-jet shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, C. H.

    1983-01-01

    The development of the analytical model of twin-jet shielding is summarized. The models consist of a point noise source impinging on a cylinder of heated flow in which the temperature and flow velocity are uniform cross the cross section. In the formulation of the model, the wave equations are written for the regions outside the flow and within the flow cylinder. The solutions to the wave equations are matched at the jet boundary under the conditions of continuity of pressure and continuity of the vortex sheet. The solution reduces to an indefinite integral involving Bessel functions. The integral is solved approximately using a saddle point method.

  9. A numerical study of drop-on-demand ink jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fromm, J.

    1982-01-01

    Ongoing work related to development and utilization of a numerical model for treating the fluid dynamics of ink jets is discussed. The model embodies the complete nonlinear, time dependent, axi-symmetric equations in finite difference form. The jet nozzle geometry with no-slip boundary conditions and the existence of a contact circle are included. The contact circle is allowed some freedom of movement, but wetting of exterior surfaces is not addressed. The principal objective in current numerical experiments is to determine what pressure history, in conjunction with surface forces, will lead to clean drop formation.

  10. Flash Proton Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Frank E.

    Protons were first investigated as radiographic probes as high energy proton accelerators became accessible to the scientific community in the 1960s. Like the initial use of X-rays in the 1800s, protons were shown to be a useful tool for studying the contents of opaque materials, but the electromagnetic charge of the protons opened up a new set of interaction processes which complicated their use. These complications in combination with the high expense of generating protons with energies high enough to penetrate typical objects resulted in proton radiography becoming a novelty, demonstrated at accelerator facilities, but not utilized to their full potential until the 1990s at Los Alamos. During this time Los Alamos National Laboratory was investigating a wide range of options, including X-rays and neutrons, as the next generation of probes to be used for thick object flash radiography. During this process it was realized that the charge nature of the protons, which was the source of the initial difficulty with this idea, could be used to recover this technique. By introducing a magnetic imaging lens downstream of the object to be radiographed, the blur resulting from scattering within the object could be focused out of the measurements, dramatically improving the resolution of proton radiography of thick systems. Imaging systems were quickly developed and combined with the temporal structure of a proton beam generated by a linear accelerator, providing a unique flash radiography capability for measurements at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This technique has now been employed at LANSCE for two decades and has been adopted around the world as the premier flash radiography technique for the study of dynamic material properties.

  11. A performance application study of a jet-flap helicopter rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, R. J.; Laforge, S.; Holchin, B. W.

    1972-01-01

    A performance study was made of the application of a jet-flap to a reaction-drive rotor for a heavy-lift helicopter mission and for a high-speed-helicopter maneuverability (200 knots, 2g) mission. The results of the study are as follows: As a result of the increase in maximum airfoil lift coefficient achieved by the jet-flap, rotor solidity is reduced with the jet-flap to approximately 59% of a nonjet-flap rotor. As a result of the saving in rotor solidity, and hence in rotor weight, the jet-flap configuration had a 21% higher productivity than a nonjet-flap configuration. Of the three propulsion systems studied utilizing a jet-flap (hot cycle, warm cycle, cold cycle) the hot cycle gave the largest increase in productivity. The 200 knot 2g mission is performed best with a warm cycle propulsion system. The jet-flap permits designing for a rotor blade loading coefficient C sub T/sigma = .170 at 2g without encountering blade stall. The jet-flap rotor permits a 200 knot 2g maneuver without suffering the penalty of an unreasonable rotor solidity that would be required by a nonjet-flap rotor.

  12. Creation of magnetized jet using a ring of laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wen; Liang, Edison P.; Tzeferacos, Petros; Lamb, Donald Q.

    2015-12-01

    We propose a new way of generating magnetized supersonic jets using a ring laser to irradiate a flat surface target. Using 2D FLASH code simulations which include the Biermann Battery term, we demonstrate that strong toroidal fields can be generated and sustained downstream in the collimated jet outflow far from the target surface. The field strength can be controlled by varying the ring laser separation, thereby providing a versatile laboratory platform for studying the effects of magnetic field in a variety of astrophysical settings.

  13. Preliminary Study Using Forward Reaction Control System Jets During Space Shuttle Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Restrepo, Carolina; Valasek, John

    2006-01-01

    Failure or degradation of the flight control system, or hull damage, can lead to loss of vehicle control during entry. Possible failure scenarios are debris impact and wing damage that could result in a large aerodynamic asymmetry which cannot be trimmed out without additional yaw control. Currently the space shuttle uses aerodynamic control surfaces and Reaction Control System jets to control attitude. The forward jets are used for orbital maneuvering only, while the aft jets are used for yaw control during entry. This paper develops a controller for using the forward reaction control system jets as an additional control during entry, and assesses its value and feasibility during failure situations. Forward-aft jet blending logic is created, and implemented on a simplified model of the space shuttle entry flight control system. The model is validated and verified on the nonlinear, six degree-of-freedom Shuttle Engineering Simulator. A rudimentary human factors study was undertaken using the forward cockpit simulator at Johnson Space Center, to assess flying qualities of the new system and pilot workload. Results presented in the paper show that the combination of forward and aft jets provides useful additional yaw control, in addition to potential fuel savings and the ability to balance the use of the fuel in the forward and aft tanks to meet availability constraints of both forward and aft fuel tanks. Piloted simulation studies indicated that using both sets of jets while flying a damaged space shuttle reduces pilot workload, and makes the vehicle more responsive.

  14. Experimental study of turbulence in isothermal jet impingement at intermediate plate spacings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landfried, D. Tyler; Valentino, Alex; Mazumdar, Sagnik; Jana, Anirban; Kimber, Mark

    2013-11-01

    One fundamental problem in fluid dynamics is that of the axisymmetric round flow impinging on a plate placed some distance downstream of the jet. Impinging jets have a rich history of applications including small plate spacings, H/D ~ 1, such as encountered in electronics cooling, or large plate spacings, H/D ~ 102, such as vertical takeoff aircrafts and rocket engines. However, intermediate plate spacings, such as the lower plenum of the next generation nuclear reactors, are not typically studied. In this paper, an experimental study is conducted investigating the effect of the impingement plate on the flow behavior compared to the near free jet behavior when the plate is removed. Using air as the working fluid, a single jet is considered at jet Reynolds numbers of 10000, 20000, and 30000. A three-wire anemometer probe is used to quantify the mean components of velocities as well as the Reynolds stress and the third-order moments in the flow field at various distances between the jet outlet and the impingement plate. When present, the impingement plate is placed a distance of 8, 11, 14, and 17 diameters downstream of the jet. Additionally trends in the kinetic energy and dissipation are investigated for validation with numerical models.

  15. Experimental study on the use of synthetic jet actuators for lift control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Ricardo Benjamin

    An experimental study on the use of synthetic jet actuators for lift control is conducted. The synthetic jet actuator is placed on the pressure side towards the trailing edge on a NACA 65(2)-415 airfoil representative of the cross section of an Inlet Guide Vane (IGV) in an industrial gas compressor. By redirecting or vectoring the shear layer at the trailing edge, the synthetic jet actuator increases lift and decreases drag on the airfoil without a mechanical device or flap. A compressor map that defines upper and lower bounds on operating velocities and airfoil dimensions, is compared with operating conditions of the low-speed wind tunnel at San Diego State University, to match gas compressor conditions in the wind tunnel. Realistic test conditions can range from Mach=0.12 to Mach= 0.27 and an airfoil chord from c=0.1 m to c=0.3 m. Based on the operating conditions, a final airfoil model is fabricated with a chord of c=0.1m. Several synthetic jet actuator designs are considered. A initial synthetic jet is designed to house a piezoelectric element with a material frequency of 1200 hz in a cavity with a volume of 4.47 cm3, a slot width of 0.25 mm, and a slot depth of 1.5 mm. With these dimensions, the Helmholtz frequency of the design is 1800Hz. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) experiments show that the design has a jet with a peak centerline jet velocity of 26 m/s at 750 Hz. A modified slant face synthetic jet is designed so that the cavity fits flush within the NACA airfoil surface. The slanted synthetic jet has a cavity volume of 4.67 cm3, a slot width of 0.25 mm, and a slot depth of 3.45 mm resulting in a Helmholtz frequency of 1170 hz for this design. PIV experiments show that the jet is redirected along the slant face according to the Coanda effect. A final synthetic jet actuator is directly integrated into the trailing edge of an airfoil with a cavity volume of 4.6 cm3, a slot width of 0.2 mm, and a slot depth of 1.6 mm. The Helmholtz frequency is 1450 Hz and

  16. Study of the atmospheric flashes and man-made global phenomena ultraviolet and infrared glow of the night air on the board of satellite "VERNOV"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garipov, Gali; Panasyuk, Mikhael; Svertilov, Sergey; Bogomolov, Vitaliy; Barinova, Vera; Saleev, Kirill

    2016-04-01

    The set of scientific payload for optical observation on-board of "Vernov" satellite, launched at July 8, 2014, had measured transient (millisecond) flashes in the atmosphere in two wavelength bands: ultraviolet (UV,240-380nm) and red-infrared (IR,610-800nm). Global distribution of the flashes, their frequency and time parameters are studied in this work. Transient flashes measured from the satellite frequently were detected in high latitudes in winter time. Flashes in equatorial region were observed in series which were stretched along magnetic meridian and some of them were detected in cloudless regions. At night time when the Earth atmosphere was observed in nadir direction there were registered the optical signals of artificial origin, distributed along the meridian in an extended region of latitude in the Northern and Southern hemispheres of the Earth, modulated by low frequency and at the coincidence of the orbits with the geographic location of the powerful radio stations. Examples of the waveforms of such signals in UV and IR spectral ranges and their global distribution are presented in this presentation. Particular attention is paid to man-made causes of the glow in the ionosphere under the influence of the high power radio wave transmitters of low (LF) and high frequencies (HF). The height of the luminescence source and components of the atmosphere, which can be the sources of this radiation, are discussed.

  17. Numerical Study of Gamma-Ray Burst Jet Formation in Collapsars

    SciTech Connect

    Nagataki, S.; Takahashi, R.; Mizuta, A.; Takiwaki, T.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst. /Tokyo U.

    2007-06-08

    Two-dimensional MHD simulations are performed using the ZEUS-2D code to investigate the dynamics of a collapsar that generates a GRB jet, taking account of realistic equation of state, neutrino cooling and heating processes, magnetic fields, and gravitational force from the central black hole and self-gravity. It is found that neutrino heating processes are not efficient enough to launch a jet in this study. It is also found that a jet is launched mainly by B{sub {phi}} fields that are amplified by the winding-up effect. However, since the ratio of total energy relative to the rest-mass energy in the jet is not as high as several hundred, we conclude that the jets seen in this study are not GRB jets. This result suggests that general relativistic effects will be important to generating a GRB jet. Also, the accretion disk with magnetic fields may still play an important role in launching a GRB jet, although a simulation for much longer physical time ({approx}10-100 s) is required to confirm this effect. It is shown that a considerable amount of {sup 56}Ni is synthesized in the accretion disk. Thus, there will be a possibility for the accretion disk to supply the sufficient amount of {sup 56}Ni required to explain the luminosity of a hypernova. Also, it is shown that neutron-rich matter due to electron captures with high entropy per baryon is ejected along the polar axis. Thus, there will be a possibility that r-process nucleosynthesis occurs at such a region. Finally, many neutrons will be ejected from the jet, which suggests that signals from the neutron decays may be observed as the delayed bump of the light curve of the afterglow or gamma rays.

  18. Studying the Dynamics of Non-stationary Jet Streams Formation in the Northern Hemisphere Troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emtsev, Sergey; Krasouski, Aliaksandr; Svetashev, Alexander; Turishev, Leonid; Barodka, Siarhei

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, we investigate dynamics of non-stationary jets formation in troposphere by means of mesoscale simulations in the Weather Research & Forecasting (WRF) modeling system, analyzing jet streams that affected the territory of Belarus over the time period of 2010-2012. For that purpose, we perform modeling on domains with 5 km, 3 km and 1 km grid steps and 35 vertical coordinate levels with an upper boundary of 10 hPa. We focus our attention to identification of basic regularities in formation, movements and transformations of jet streams, as well as to analysis of their characteristic features, geographical position and underlying atmospheric processes and their classification. On the basis of these regularities, we define basic meteorological parameters that can be used to directly or indirectly (as well as qualitatively and quantitatively) identify the presence of jet streams in the specific region of troposphere, and also to determine their localization, stage of development and other characteristics. Furthermore, we estimate energetic parameters of the identified jet streams and their impact on synoptic situation in the surrounding region. Analyzing meteorological fields obtained from satellite observations, we elaborate a methodology of operational detection and localization of non-stationary jet streams from satellite data. Validation of WRF modeling results with these data proves that mesoscale simulations with WRF are able to provide quite successful forecasts of non-stationary tropospheric jet streams occurrence and also determination of their localization and main characteristics up to 3 days in advance.

  19. DAMAS Processing for a Phased Array Study in the NASA Langley Jet Noise Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M.; Plassman, Gerald e.

    2010-01-01

    A jet noise measurement study was conducted using a phased microphone array system for a range of jet nozzle configurations and flow conditions. The test effort included convergent and convergent/divergent single flow nozzles, as well as conventional and chevron dual-flow core and fan configurations. Cold jets were tested with and without wind tunnel co-flow, whereas, hot jets were tested only with co-flow. The intent of the measurement effort was to allow evaluation of new phased array technologies for their ability to separate and quantify distributions of jet noise sources. In the present paper, the array post-processing method focused upon is DAMAS (Deconvolution Approach for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources) for the quantitative determination of spatial distributions of noise sources. Jet noise is highly complex with stationary and convecting noise sources, convecting flows that are the sources themselves, and shock-related and screech noise for supersonic flow. The analysis presented in this paper addresses some processing details with DAMAS, for the array positioned at 90 (normal) to the jet. The paper demonstrates the applicability of DAMAS and how it indicates when strong coherence is present. Also, a new approach to calibrating the array focus and position is introduced and demonstrated.

  20. Experimental study of elliptical jet from supercritical to subcritical conditions using planar laser induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Muthukumaran, C. K.; Vaidyanathan, Aravind

    2015-03-15

    The study of fluid jet dynamics at supercritical conditions involves strong coupling between fluid dynamic and thermodynamic phenomena. Beyond the critical point, the liquid-vapor coexistence ceases to exist, and the fluid exists as a single phase known as supercritical fluid with its properties that are entirely different from liquids and gases. At the critical point, the liquids do not possess surface tension and latent heat of evaporation. Around the critical point, the fluid undergoes large changes in density and possesses thermodynamic anomaly like enhancement in thermal conductivity and specific heat. In the present work, the transition of the supercritical and near-critical elliptical jet into subcritical as well as supercritical environment is investigated experimentally with nitrogen and helium as the surrounding environment. Under atmospheric condition, a liquid jet injected from the elliptical orifice exhibits axis switching phenomena. As the injection temperature increases, the axis switching length also increases. Beyond the critical temperature, the axis switching is not observed. The investigation also revealed that pressure plays a major role in determining the thermodynamic transition of the elliptical jet only for the case of supercritical jet injected into subcritical chamber conditions. At larger pressures, the supercritical jet undergoes disintegration and formation of droplets in the subcritical environment is observed. However, for supercritical jet injection into supercritical environment, the gas-gas like mixing behavior is observed.

  1. Model of Blue Jet Formation and Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milikh, Gennadiy; Shneider, Mikhail; Mokrov, Mikhail

    2014-05-01

    Upward-propagating luminous flashes above thunderstorms were discovered two decades ago. They were named blue jets (BJ) due to primarily blue color. It is broadly accepted that BJ are produced by a lightning leader running upward in the nonuniform atmosphere. It is also suggested that formation of a leader is governed by the contraction of the current of a streamer flash into a small radius channel. The paper presents results of simulations of the current contraction in the air as a function of the pressure, and convective heat removal time. It was shown that transition to the contracted state occurs in hysteresis mode in which contracted and diffusive stable states exist simultaneously. The critical current for the phase transition was obtained. Similarity methods were applied to the simulations of the critical contraction current, along with chosen observations of BJ, to study BJ formation and propagation in the atmosphere.

  2. A CFD study of gas-solid jet in a CFB riser flow

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Guenther, Chris

    2012-03-01

    Three-dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations of a gas–solid jet in a high-density riser flow were conducted. The impact of gas–solid injection on the riser flow hydrodynamics was investigated with respect to voidage, tracer mass fractions, and solids velocity distribution. The behaviors of a gas–solid jet in the riser crossflow were studied through the unsteady numerical simulations. Substantial separation of the jetting gas and solids in the riser crossflow was observed. Mixing of the injected gas and solids with the riser flow was investigated and backmixing of gas and solids was evaluated. In the current numerical study, both the overall hydrodynamics of riser flow and the characteristics of gas–solid jet were reasonably predicted compared with the experimental measurements made at NETL.

  3. Flash Expansion Threshold in Whirligig Swarms

    PubMed Central

    Romey, William L.; Lamb, Alicia R.

    2015-01-01

    In the selfish herd hypothesis, prey animals move toward each other to avoid the likelihood of being selected by a predator. However, many grouped animals move away from each other the moment before a predator attacks. Very little is known about this phenomenon, called flash expansion, such as whether it is triggered by one individual or a threshold and how information is transferred between group members. We performed a controlled experiment with whirligig beetles in which the ratio of sighted to unsighted individuals was systematically varied and emergent flash expansion was measured. Specifically, we examined: the percentage of individuals in a group that startled, the resulting group area, and the longevity of the flash expansion. We found that one or two sighted beetles in a group of 24 was not enough to cause a flash expansion after a predator stimulus, but four sighted beetles usually initiated a flash expansion. Also, the more beetles that were sighted the larger the resulting group area and the longer duration of the flash expansion. We conclude that flash expansion is best described as a threshold event whose adaptive value is to prevent energetically costly false alarms while quickly mobilizing an emergent predator avoidance response. This is one of the first controlled experiments of flash expansion, an important emergent property that has applications to understanding collective motion in swarms, schools, flocks, and human crowds. Also, our study is a convincing demonstration of social contagion, how the actions of one individual can pass through a group. PMID:26301958

  4. Flash Expansion Threshold in Whirligig Swarms.

    PubMed

    Romey, William L; Lamb, Alicia R

    2015-01-01

    In the selfish herd hypothesis, prey animals move toward each other to avoid the likelihood of being selected by a predator. However, many grouped animals move away from each other the moment before a predator attacks. Very little is known about this phenomenon, called flash expansion, such as whether it is triggered by one individual or a threshold and how information is transferred between group members. We performed a controlled experiment with whirligig beetles in which the ratio of sighted to unsighted individuals was systematically varied and emergent flash expansion was measured. Specifically, we examined: the percentage of individuals in a group that startled, the resulting group area, and the longevity of the flash expansion. We found that one or two sighted beetles in a group of 24 was not enough to cause a flash expansion after a predator stimulus, but four sighted beetles usually initiated a flash expansion. Also, the more beetles that were sighted the larger the resulting group area and the longer duration of the flash expansion. We conclude that flash expansion is best described as a threshold event whose adaptive value is to prevent energetically costly false alarms while quickly mobilizing an emergent predator avoidance response. This is one of the first controlled experiments of flash expansion, an important emergent property that has applications to understanding collective motion in swarms, schools, flocks, and human crowds. Also, our study is a convincing demonstration of social contagion, how the actions of one individual can pass through a group.

  5. Studies of jet thermal stability in a flowing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heneghan, S. P.; Martel, C. R.; Williams, T. F.; Ballal, D. R.

    1992-06-01

    A 'Phoenix rig' single-pass flowing heat-exchanger facility has been devised to test the carbon deposition tendencies of jet fuels in their circulation systems. Three samples each of baseline JP fuels and JP fuels blended with additives have been thus tested, and the results obtained vindicate the usefulness of the Phoenix rig. The blended fuel tests indicated significant improvement in fuel thermal stability; block temperature and test duration increased the total carbon deposits in a nonlinear manner.

  6. Flash protection controller

    DOEpatents

    Galbraith, Lee K.

    1981-01-01

    A controller provides a high voltage to maintain an electro-optic shutter in a transparent condition until a flash of light which would be harmful to personnel is sensed by a phototransistor. The controller then shorts the shutter to ground to minimize light transmission to the user and maintains light transmission at the pre-flash level for a predetermined time to allow the flash to subside. A log converter and differential trigger circuit keep the controller from being triggered by other light flashes which are not dangerous.

  7. Flash protection controller

    DOEpatents

    Galbraith, L.K.

    1979-12-07

    A controller provides a high voltage to maintain an electro-optic shutter in a transparent condition until a flash of light which would be harmful to personnel is sensed by a phototransistor. The controller then shorts the shutter to ground to minimize light transmission to the user and maintains light transmission at the pre-flash level for a predetermined time to allow the flash to subside. A log converter and differential trigger circuit keep the controller from being triggered by other light flashes which are not dangerous.

  8. Long Penetration Mode Counterflowing Jets for Supersonic Slender Configurations - A Numerical Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatachari, Balaji Shankar; Cheng, Gary; Chang, Chau-Layn; Zichettello, Benjamin; Bilyeu, David L.

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach of using counterflowing jets positioned strategically on the aircraft and exploiting its long penetration mode (LPM) of interaction towards sonic-boom mitigation forms the motivation for this study. Given that most previous studies on the counterflowing LPM jet have all been on blunt bodies and at high supersonic or hypersonic flow conditions, exploring the feasibility to obtain a LPM jet issuing from a slender body against low supersonic freestream conditions is the main focus of this study. Computational fluid dynamics computations of axisymmetric models (cone-cylinder and quartic geometry), of relevance to NASA's High Speed project, are carried out using the space-time conservation element solution element viscous flow solver with unstructured meshes. A systematic parametric study is conducted to determine the optimum combination of counterflowing jet size, mass flow rate, and nozzle geometry for obtaining LPM jets. Details from these computations will be used to assess the potential of the LPM counterflowing supersonic jet as a means of active flow control for enabling supersonic flight over land and to establish the knowledge base for possible future implementation of such technologies.

  9. An experimental study on jets issuing from elliptic inclined nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    New, T. H.

    2009-06-01

    This paper reports on an experimental flow visualisation and digital particle image velocimetry investigation on forced jets exhausting from aspect ratio equal to three elliptic nozzles with exits inclined at 30° and 60°. Flow images show that shear layer instabilities and subsequent vortex roll-ups are formed parallel to the inclined nozzle exits at 30° incline and that rapid re-orientation of the vortex roll-ups occurs at 60° incline. Flow observations also show that strong axis-switching occurs in a non-inclined elliptic nozzle. However, 30° and 60° elliptic inclined nozzles produce significant distortions to and suppression of the axis-switching behaviour, respectively. As a result, flow stresses and turbulent kinetic energy distributions become increasingly asymmetric. Their coherency and magnitudes along the shorter nozzle lengths also vary significantly. This can be attributed to the dissimilar formations of vortex roll-ups and rib structures, as well as unequal mutual interactions between them as the incline-angle increases. Lastly, results also show that unlike circular inclined nozzles, elliptic inclined nozzles do not produce serpentine-shaped jet columns nor lead to significant lateral jet-spread at large incline-angles.

  10. Study of lubricant jet flow phenomena in spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akin, L. S.; Townsend, D. P.; Mross, J. J.

    1974-01-01

    Lubricant jet flow impingement and penetration depth into a gear tooth space were measured at 4920 and 2560 rpm using a 8.89 cm (3.5 inch) pitch diameter 8 pitch spur gear at oil pressures from 70,000 to 410,000 n/sqm (10 psi to 60 psi). A high speed motion picture camera was used with xenon and high speed stroboscopic lights to slow down and stop the motion of the oil jet. An analytical model was developed for the vectorial impingement dept and for the impingement depth with tooth space windage effects included. The windage effects for oil drop size greater than .0076 cm (.003 inches). The analytical impingement dept compared favorably with experimental results above an oil jet pressure of 70,000 n/sqm (10psi). There was further penetration into the tooth space after impingement, but much of this oil was thrown out of the tooth space without further contacting the gear teeth.

  11. An experimental study of the autoignition characteristics of conventional jet fuel/oxidizer mixtures: Jet-A and JP-8

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Kamal; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2010-04-15

    Ignition delay times of Jet-A/oxidizer and JP-8/oxidizer mixtures are measured using a heated rapid compression machine at compressed charge pressures corresponding to 7, 15, and 30 bar, compressed temperatures ranging from 650 to 1100 K, and equivalence ratios varying from 0.42 to 2.26. When using air as the oxidant, two oxidizer-to-fuel mass ratios of 13 and 19 are investigated. To achieve higher compressed temperatures for fuel lean mixtures (equivalence ratio of {proportional_to}0.42), argon dilution is also used and the corresponding oxidizer-to-fuel mass ratio is 84.9. For the conditions studied, experimental results show two-stage ignition characteristics for both Jet-A and JP-8. Variations of both the first-stage and overall ignition delays with compressed temperature, compressed pressure, and equivalence ratio are reported and correlated. It is noted that the negative temperature coefficient phenomenon becomes more prominent at relatively lower pressures. Furthermore, the first-stage-ignition delay is found to be less sensitive to changes in equivalence ratio and primarily dependent on temperature. (author)

  12. Study and optimization of negative polarity rod pinch diode as flash radiography source at 4.5 MV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etchessahar, Bertrand; Bernigaud, Virgile; Caron, Michel; Cartier, Frédéric; Cartier, Stéphanie; Hourdin, Laurent; Magnin, Laurent; Nicolas, Rémi; Poulet, Frédéric; Rosol, Rodolphe; Tailleur, Yaël; Toury, Martial; Compant La Fontaine, Antoine; Bicrel, Béatrice; Cassany, Bruno; Desanlis, Thierry; Voisin, Luc; Hébert, David; Delbos, Christophe; Garrigues, Alain; Soleilhavoup, Isabelle

    2012-09-01

    The negative polarity rod pinch diode (NPRPD) is a potential millimeter spot size radiography source for high voltage generators (4 to 8 MV) [Cooperstein et al., "Considerations of rod-pinch diode operation in negative polarity for radiography," in Proceedings of the 14th IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, 2003, pp. 975-978]. The NPRPD consists of a small diameter (few mm) cylindrical anode extending from the front end of the vacuum cell through a thin annular cathode, held by a central conductor. The polarity has been inverted when compared to the original rod pinch diode [Cooperstein et al., "Theoretical modeling and experimental characterization of a rod-pinch diode," Phys. Plasmas 8(10), 4618-4636 (2001)] in order to take advantage from the maximal x-ray emission toward the anode holder at such a voltage [Swanekamp et al., "Evaluation of self-magnetically pinched diodes up to 10 MV as high resolution flash X-ray sources," IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 32(5), 2004-2016 (2004). We have studied this diode at 4.5 MV, driven by the ASTERIX generator [Raboisson et al., "ASTERIX, a high intensity X-ray generator," in Proceedings of the 7th IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, 1989, pp. 567-570.]. This generator, made up of a capacitor bank and a Blumlein line, was initially designed to test the behavior of electronic devices under irradiation. In our experiments, the vacuum diode has been modified in order to set up flash a radiographic diode [Etchessahar et al., "Negative polarity rod pinch diode experiments on the ASTERIX generator," in Conference Records-Abstracts, 37th IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science, 2010]. The experiments and numerical simulations presented here allowed the observation and analysis of various physical phenomena associated with the diode operation. Also, the influence of several experimental parameters, such as cathode and anode diameters, materials and surface states, was examined. In order to achieve the most comprehensive characterization of the

  13. Study and optimization of negative polarity rod pinch diode as flash radiography source at 4.5 MV

    SciTech Connect

    Etchessahar, Bertrand; Bicrel, Beatrice; Cassany, Bruno; Desanlis, Thierry; Voisin, Luc; Hebert, David; Bernigaud, Virgile; Magnin, Laurent; Nicolas, Remi; Poulet, Frederic; Tailleur, Yaeel; Caron, Michel; Cartier, Frederic; Cartier, Stephanie; Hourdin, Laurent; Rosol, Rodolphe; Toury, Martial; Delbos, Christophe; Garrigues, Alain; Soleilhavoup, Isabelle; and others

    2012-09-15

    The negative polarity rod pinch diode (NPRPD) is a potential millimeter spot size radiography source for high voltage generators (4 to 8 MV) [Cooperstein et al., 'Considerations of rod-pinch diode operation in negative polarity for radiography,' in Proceedings of the 14th IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, 2003, pp. 975-978]. The NPRPD consists of a small diameter (few mm) cylindrical anode extending from the front end of the vacuum cell through a thin annular cathode, held by a central conductor. The polarity has been inverted when compared to the original rod pinch diode [Cooperstein et al., 'Theoretical modeling and experimental characterization of a rod-pinch diode,' Phys. Plasmas 8(10), 4618-4636 (2001)] in order to take advantage from the maximal x-ray emission toward the anode holder at such a voltage [Swanekamp et al., 'Evaluation of self-magnetically pinched diodes up to 10 MV as high resolution flash X-ray sources,' IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 32(5), 2004-2016 (2004). We have studied this diode at 4.5 MV, driven by the ASTERIX generator [Raboisson et al., 'ASTERIX, a high intensity X-ray generator,' in Proceedings of the 7th IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, 1989, pp. 567-570.]. This generator, made up of a capacitor bank and a Blumlein line, was initially designed to test the behavior of electronic devices under irradiation. In our experiments, the vacuum diode has been modified in order to set up flash a radiographic diode [Etchessahar et al., 'Negative polarity rod pinch diode experiments on the ASTERIX generator,' in Conference Records-Abstracts, 37th IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science, 2010]. The experiments and numerical simulations presented here allowed the observation and analysis of various physical phenomena associated with the diode operation. Also, the influence of several experimental parameters, such as cathode and anode diameters, materials and surface states, was examined. In order to achieve the most comprehensive characterization of the

  14. Theoretical study of refraction effects on noise produced by turbulent jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, E. W.; Graham, B. B.

    1975-01-01

    The transmission of acoustic disturbances from the interior of a jet into the ambient air is studied. The jet is assumed infinitely long with mean velocity profile independent of streamwise location. The noise generator is a sequence of transient sources drifting with the local fluid and confined to a short length of the jet. In Part 1, supersonic jets are considered. Numerical results for mean-square pressure versus angle in the far-field show unexpected peaks which are very sharp. Analysis of simplified models indicates that these are complex quasi-resonant effects which appear to the stationary observer in a high frequency range. The peaks are real for the idealized model, but would be smoothed by mathematical integration over source position, velocity, and frequency. Subsonic jets were considered in part 2, and a preliminary study of the near-field was attempted. Mean-square radial displacements (or mean radial energy flow or space-time correlations of radial pressure gradient) are first found for very simple cases. The most difficult case studied is a sequence of transient sources at the center of a uniform-velocity circular cylindrical jet. Here a numerical triple integration is required and seems feasible although only preliminary results for mean square radial displacement are now available. These preliminary results show disturbances decreasing with increasing radial distance, and with increasing distance upstream and downstream from the source. A trend towards greater downstream disturbances appears even in the near field.

  15. Quantitative degradation studies of coal derived jet fuel using statistical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sanghani, P.C.; Boehman, A.L.

    1996-10-01

    The kinetics of coke formation from coal-derived jet fuel were studied using statistical methods. The degree of correlation between deposit (coke) growth and species concentration has been examined. Formation of deposits from the mixtures of jet fuel and tetradecane was proportional to the initial concentration of tetradecane present in the fuel. Decomposition of tetradecane was found to be first order with con-elation coefficient of 0.98. Other normal alkanes species such as dodecane, tridecane, and pentadecane which are present in very small amount also contribute significantly to deposit growth. Cycloalkanes, alkylated c1,c2,c3 benzenes, alkylated naphathalenes present in coal derived jet fuel were very stable compared to tetradecane. The statistical approach helps in identifying or arranging species in terms of their contribution to deposit formation. Grouping species on the basis of their correlation with deposit formation clarifies the required structure for a general kinetic model of the jet fuel degradation process.

  16. Plasma-wall interaction studies with optimized laser-produced jets

    SciTech Connect

    Renner, O.; Krousky, E.; Smid, M.; Pisarczyk, T.; Chodukowski, T.; Kalinowska, Z.; Pisarczyk, P.; Ullschmied, J.; Dalimier, E.

    2011-09-15

    The production of the laser-produced plasma jets at burnt-through low-Z foils was optimized by using three-frame interferometry. When striking secondary targets, these jets of energetic particles represent an efficient tool for the investigation of transient phenomena at surfaces of the plasma-exposed solids. Two sets of precisely measured x-ray spectroscopic data demonstrate diagnostic potential of the collimated jets in the plasma-wall interaction studies: Blue Doppler shifts of the Al jet self-emission visualize ion deceleration in the near-wall region. Local depressions found in Al Ly{gamma} profiles emitted from Al/Si(PMMA) targets indicate charge exchange between the Al XIII and fully stripped C ions.

  17. Study of cosmic rays and light flashes on board Space Station MIR: the SilEye experiment.

    PubMed

    Bidoli, V; Casolino, M; De Pascale, M P; Furano, G; Morselli, A; Narici, L; Picozza, P; Reali, E; Sparvoli, R; Galper, A M; Ozerov YuV; Popov, A V; Vavilov, N R; Alexandrov, A P; Avdeev, S V; Baturin, Y u; Budarin, Y u; Padalko, G; Shabelnikov, V G; Barbellini, G; Bonvicini, W; Vacchi, A; Zampa, N; Bartalucci, S; Mazzenga, G; Ricci, M; Adriani, O; Spillantini, P; Boezio, M; Carlson, P; Fuglesang, C; Castellini, G; Sannita, W G

    2000-01-01

    The SilEye experiment aims to study the cause and processes related to the anomalous Light Flashes (LF) perceived by astronauts in orbit and their relation with Cosmic Rays. These observations will be also useful in the study of the long duration manned space flight environment. Two PC-driven silicon detector telescopes have been built and placed aboard Space Station MIR. SilEye-1 was launched in 1995 and provided particles track and LF information; the data gathered indicate a linear dependence of FLF(Hz) ( 4 2) 10(3) 5.3 1.7 10(4) Fpart(Hz) if South Atlantic Anomaly fluxes are not included. Even though higher statistic is required, this is an indication that heavy ion interactions with the eye are the main LF cause. To improve quality and quantity of measurements, a second apparatus, SilEye-2, was placed on MIR in 1997, and started work from August 1998. This instrument provides energetic information, which allows nuclear identification in selected energy ranges; we present preliminary measurements of the radiation field inside MIR performed with SilEye-2 detector in June 1998.

  18. Study of cosmic rays and light flashes on board Space Station MIR: the SilEye experiment.

    PubMed

    Bidoli, V; Casolino, M; De Pascale, M P; Furano, G; Morselli, A; Narici, L; Picozza, P; Reali, E; Sparvoli, R; Galper, A M; Ozerov YuV; Popov, A V; Vavilov, N R; Alexandrov, A P; Avdeev, S V; Baturin, Y u; Budarin, Y u; Padalko, G; Shabelnikov, V G; Barbellini, G; Bonvicini, W; Vacchi, A; Zampa, N; Bartalucci, S; Mazzenga, G; Ricci, M; Adriani, O; Spillantini, P; Boezio, M; Carlson, P; Fuglesang, C; Castellini, G; Sannita, W G

    2000-01-01

    The SilEye experiment aims to study the cause and processes related to the anomalous Light Flashes (LF) perceived by astronauts in orbit and their relation with Cosmic Rays. These observations will be also useful in the study of the long duration manned space flight environment. Two PC-driven silicon detector telescopes have been built and placed aboard Space Station MIR. SilEye-1 was launched in 1995 and provided particles track and LF information; the data gathered indicate a linear dependence of FLF(Hz) ( 4 2) 10(3) 5.3 1.7 10(4) Fpart(Hz) if South Atlantic Anomaly fluxes are not included. Even though higher statistic is required, this is an indication that heavy ion interactions with the eye are the main LF cause. To improve quality and quantity of measurements, a second apparatus, SilEye-2, was placed on MIR in 1997, and started work from August 1998. This instrument provides energetic information, which allows nuclear identification in selected energy ranges; we present preliminary measurements of the radiation field inside MIR performed with SilEye-2 detector in June 1998. PMID:11542859

  19. Experimental study on spray characteristics of alternate jet fuels using Phase Doppler Anemometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannaiyan, Kumaran; Sadr, Reza

    2013-11-01

    Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) fuels have gained global attention due to their cleaner combustion characteristics. The chemical and physical properties of GTL jet fuels are different from conventional jet fuels owing to the difference in their production methodology. It is important to study the spray characteristics of GTL jet fuels as the change of physical properties can affect atomization, mixing, evaporation and combustion process, ultimately affecting emission process. In this work, spray characteristics of two GTL synthetic jet fuels are studied using a pressure-swirl nozzle at different injection pressures and atmospheric ambient condition. Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) measurements of droplet size and velocity are compared with those of regular Jet A-1 fuel at several axial and radial locations downstream of the nozzle exit. Experimental results show that although the GTL fuels have different physical properties such as viscosity, density, and surface tension, among each other the resultant change in the spray characteristics is insignificant. Furthermore, the presented results show that GTL fuel spray characteristics exhibit close similarity to those of Jet A-1 fuel. Funded by Qatar Science and Technology Park.

  20. TWO-DIMENSIONAL NUMERICAL STUDY FOR RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR AND RICHTMYER-MESHKOV INSTABILITIES IN RELATIVISTIC JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Jin; Masada, Youhei

    2013-07-20

    We study the stability of a non-rotating single-component jet using two-dimensional special relativistic hydrodynamic simulations. By assuming translational invariance along the jet axis, we exclude the destabilization effect by Kelvin-Helmholtz mode. The nonlinear evolution of the transverse structure of the jet with a normal jet velocity is highlighted. An intriguing finding in our study is that Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov type instabilities can destroy cylindrical jet configuration as a result of spontaneously induced radial oscillating motion. This is powered by in situ energy conversion between the thermal and bulk kinetic energies. The effective inertia ratio of the jet to the surrounding medium {eta} determines a threshold for the onset of instabilities. The condition {eta} < 1 should be satisfied for the transverse structure of the jet being persisted.

  1. Compilation and Review of Supersonic Business Jet Studies from 1963 through 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maglieri, Domenic J.

    2011-01-01

    This document provides a compilation of all known supersonic business jet studies/activities conducted from 1963 through 1995 by university, industry and the NASA. First, an overview is provided which chronologically displays all known supersonic business jet studies/activities conducted by universities, industry, and the NASA along with the key features of the study vehicles relative to configuration, planform, operation parameters, and the source of study. This is followed by a brief description of each study along with some comments on the study. Mention will be made as to whether the studies addressed cost, market needs, and the environmental issues of airport-community noise, sonic boom, and ozone.

  2. Systematic Studies of Relativistic Jets and Shocks in AGN and GRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    The proposed research is designed to provide a fundamental physical understanding of the role of magnetic fields in relativistic jets and shocks. Investigations will be conducted us- ing our relativistic MHD (RMHD) code. Results will be applied to the observed properties of AGN and GRB jets and via emission modeling. The research is motived by the long standing unresolved problems concerning multi-wavelength properties of AGN and GRB emission and aimed to gain true understanding of how jets are launched, evolve and develop. This research is designed to reach a fundamental understanding of the macroscopic dynamics leading to the observed emission. This research directly addresses both global jet dynamics and processes near black holes. In addition to studying the physics of jet acceleration and collimation, the proposed research will examine the differences arising from various magnetically dominated and kinetically dominated jet configurations indicated by jet acceleration and collimation process. The research includes: (1) Determination of the evolution of magnetic and kinetic struc- ture such as might arise from current driven (CD) and Kelvin-Helmholtz driven (KH) - instability via RMHD simulations. (2) Prediction of the observed motion, intensity and polar- ization of CD and KH instability structures on RMHD jets. (3) Coupling observed emission properties to the acceleration and collimation process. The content of this proposal conforms to the sub-goal 3D of NASA’s Strategic Plan, namely, “Discover the origin, structure, evolution, and destiny of the universe and the search for earth- like planets”. This research has broad impact via RMHD code development, ac- companying imaging and comparison with space-based spectral observations by current and future NASA missions, Chandra, RXTE, XMM, Integral, Suzaku, Fermi, JANUS, NuSTAR.

  3. Flash-Type Discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the significant progress made in the flash-type discrimination algorithm development. The contents include: 1) Highlights of Progress for GLM-R3 Flash-Type discrimination Algorithm Development; 2) Maximum Group Area (MGA) Data; 3) Retrieval Errors from Simulations; and 4) Preliminary Global-scale Retrieval.

  4. Experimental and Computational Study of Underexpanded Jet Impingement Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rufer, Shann J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Picetti, Donald

    2009-01-01

    An experiment was performed to assess CFD modeling of a hypersonic-vehicle breach, boundary-layer flow ingestion and internal surface impingement. Tests were conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel. Four simulated breaches were tested and impingement heat flux data was obtained for each case using both phosphor thermography and thin film gages on targets placed inside the model. A separate target was used to measure the surface pressure distribution. The measured jet impingement width and peak location are in good agreement with CFD analysis.

  5. Experimental study of ? RF plasma jet by optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBenedictis, S.; Dilecce, G.; Simek, M.; Vigliotti, M.

    1998-11-01

    An 0963-0252/7/4/013/img9 jet stream expanding from a radio-frequency discharge has been investigated by optical emission spectroscopy. The axial and lateral profiles of the expansion glow and the jet axial velocity have been measured by optical methods in order to infer the fluid-dynamic properties of the jet. The position of the shock wave is located at about 5 mm from the nozzle, and the stream velocity achieves a maximum of about 2 Mach in the supersonic region. Optical titration of N atoms and the analysis of emitting excited species 0963-0252/7/4/013/img10 and 0963-0252/7/4/013/img11) have been carried out to monitor the active species in the jet stream and their energy content. The titration of N atoms by NO, injected in the subsonic region, monitored by 0963-0252/7/4/013/img9 first positive 0963-0252/7/4/013/img13 band, 0963-0252/7/4/013/img14 NO 0963-0252/7/4/013/img15 and 0963-0252/7/4/013/img16 continuum emissions, has been examined. This latter emission has been found to give a reasonable estimation of the N density, which is in the range of about (0.1-0.2)% 0963-0252/7/4/013/img9 for a discharge power varying from 50 to 80 W. The 0963-0252/7/4/013/img9 first positive emission, NO 0963-0252/7/4/013/img15 and 0963-0252/7/4/013/img20 bands, instead, are largely affected by the presence of the 0963-0252/7/4/013/img21 metastable and by the high velocity of the N stream. The analysis of 0963-0252/7/4/013/img22 and 0963-0252/7/4/013/img11 vibrational distributions shows the presence of a significant density of the 0963-0252/7/4/013/img21 metastable as well as a non-negligible presence in the expansion of hot electrons. A quasi-one-dimensional fluid-dynamic model of the expansion gives a rough account of the measured location of the shock wave and of the velocity and temperature axial profiles.

  6. Case Study: Formal Inspections at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, J. C.; Welz, L. W.

    1993-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) of the California Institute of Technology is a federally funded research and development center operating under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). JPL's charter emphasizes the exploration of the solar system including observations of Earth as well as other stellar systems and extra-solar-system bodies. Within JPL, the Software Product Assurance (SPA) Section helps to ensure the operational integrity of the software within the system. SPA evaluates the operational requirements, the acceptability and readiness of all software, hardware/software interfaces, and the integrity of the completed software before its final release into the operational environment.

  7. Gating Kinetics of the Cyclic-GMP-Activated Channel of Retinal Rods: Flash Photolysis and Voltage-Jump Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpen, Jeffrey W.; Zimmerman, Anita L.; Stryer, Lubert; Baylor, Denis A.

    1988-02-01

    The gating kinetics of the cGMP-activated cation channel of salamander retinal rods have been studied in excised membrane patches. Relaxations in patch current were observed after two kinds of perturbation: (i) fast jumps of cGMP concentration, generated by laser flash photolysis of a cGMP ester (``caged'' cGMP), and (ii) membrane voltage jumps, which perturb activation of the channel by cGMP. In both methods the speed of activation increased with the final cGMP concentration. The results are explained by a simple kinetic model in which activation involves three sequential cGMP binding steps with bimolecular rate constants close to the diffusion-controlled limit; fully liganded channels undergo rapid open-closed transitions. Voltage perturbs activation by changing the rate constant for channel closing, which increases with hyperpolarization. Intramolecular transitions of the fully liganded channel limit the kinetics of activation at high cGMP concentrations (>50 μ M), whereas at physiological cGMP concentrations (<5 μ M), the kinetics of activation are limited by the third cGMP binding step. The channel appears to be optimized for rapid responses to changes in cytoplasmic cGMP concentration.

  8. Decay kinetics of benzophenone triplets and corresponding free radicals in soft and rigid polymers studied by laser flash photolysis.

    PubMed

    Levin, Peter P; Efremkin, Alexei F; Sultimova, Natalie B; Kasparov, Valery V; Khudyakov, Igor V

    2014-01-01

    The kinetics of transients formed under photoexcitation of benzophenone (B) dissolved in three different polymers was studied by ns laser flash photolysis. These polymers were the soft rubbers poly (ethylene-co-butylene) (EB), polystyrene block-poly(ethylene-ran-butylene)-block-polystyrene (SEBS) and hard polystyrene (PS). We monitored the decay kinetics of triplet state (3)B(*) and of ketyl radicals BH(●). We observed exponential decay of (3)B(*) and two-stage decay kinetics of BH(●) in EB. The first stage is a fast cage recombination of a radical pair (BH(●), radical of polymer R(●)). The second slow stage of BH(●) decay follows the second-order law with a relatively high rate constant, which corresponds to recombination of BH(●) in a homogeneous liquid with a viscosity of only ~0.1 P (about five times of 2-propanol viscosity). Application of a magnetic field (MF) of 0.2 T leads to deceleration of both stages of BH(●) decay in EB by approximately 20%. Decay kinetics of both transients were observed in SEBS. There was no MF effect on BH(●) decay in SEBS. We only observed (3)B(*) in PS. Decay kinetics of (3)B(*) in this case were described as polychromatic dispersive first-order kinetics. We discuss the effects of polymer structure on transient kinetics and the MF effect.

  9. Experimental studies of collisional plasma shocks and plasma interpenetration via merging supersonic plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, S. C.; Moser, A. L.; Merritt, E. C.; Adams, C. S.

    2015-11-01

    Over the past 4 years on the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at LANL, we have studied obliquely and head-on-merging supersonic plasma jets of an argon/impurity or hydrogen/impurity mixture. The jets are formed/launched by pulsed-power-driven railguns. In successive experimental campaigns, we characterized the (a) evolution of plasma parameters of a single plasma jet as it propagated up to ~ 1 m away from the railgun nozzle, (b) density profiles and 2D morphology of the stagnation layer and oblique shocks that formed between obliquely merging jets, and (c) collisionless interpenetration transitioning to collisional stagnation between head-on-merging jets. Key plasma diagnostics included a fast-framing CCD camera, an 8-chord visible interferometer, a survey spectrometer, and a photodiode array. This talk summarizes the primary results mentioned above, and highlights analyses of inferred post-shock temperatures based on observations of density gradients that we attribute to shock-layer thickness. We also briefly describe more recent PLX experiments on Rayleigh-Taylor-instability evolution with magnetic and viscous effects, and potential future collisionless shock experiments enabled by low-impurity, higher-velocity plasma jets formed by contoured-gap coaxial guns. Supported by DOE Fusion Energy Sciences and LANL LDRD.

  10. Experiment and simulation study of laser dicing silicon with water-jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Jiading; Long, Yuhong; Tong, Youqun; Yang, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Bin; Zhou, Zupeng

    2016-11-01

    Water-jet laser processing is an internationally advanced technique, which combines the advantages of laser processing with water jet cutting. In the study, the experiment of water-jet laser dicing are conducted with ns pulsed laser of 1064 nm irradiating, and Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) technique by AUTODYN software was modeled to research the fluid dynamics of water and melt when water jet impacting molten material. The silicon surface morphology of the irradiated spots has an appearance as one can see in porous formation. The surface morphology exhibits a large number of cavities which indicates as bubble nucleation sites. The observed surface morphology shows that the explosive melt expulsion could be a dominant process for the laser ablating silicon in liquids with nanosecond pulse laser of 1064 nm irradiating. Self-focusing phenomenon was found and its causes are analyzed. Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) modeling technique was employed to understand the effect of water and water-jet on debris removal during water-jet laser machining.

  11. Three-dimensional study of turbulent flow characteristics of an offset plane jet with variable density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assoudi, Ali; Habli, Sabra; Mahjoub Saïd, Nejla; Bournot, Hervé; Le Palec, Georges

    2016-11-01

    An experimental and numerical investigation of the flow field of variable density turbulent offset jet is presented. The velocity measurements are performed using a Velocimetry Laser Doppler technique for an offset height h. Three cases of variable-density turbulent plane jets discharging from a rectangular nozzle into a quiescent medium are studied. The variation density jets considered were revealed at different Reynolds numbers. In the second step of this work, a numerical three-dimensional model of the problem is simulated through the resolution of the Navier-Stokes equations by means of the finite volume method and the Reynolds stress model second-order turbulent closure model. A non-uniform mesh system tightened close to the emitting nozzle and both the vertical and horizontal walls is also adopted. A good level of agreement was achieved, between the experiments and the calculations. Once the model validated, our model allowed the evaluation of the influence of the variation density on the characterizing features of the resulting flow filed. It is found that the centerline velocity and concentration of the heavier jet decays much faster than in the two other jets, and a similar behavior for the vertical profiles in the three variable-density jets is well reproduced in the simulation.

  12. An HST Proper-motion Study of the Large-scale Jet of 3C273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Eileen T.; Sparks, William B.; Georganopoulos, Markos; Anderson, Jay; van der Marel, Roeland; Biretta, John; Sohn, Sangmo Tony; Chiaberge, Marco; Perlman, Eric; Norman, Colin

    2016-02-01

    The radio galaxy 3C 273 hosts one of the nearest and best-studied powerful quasar jets. Having been imaged repeatedly by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) over the past twenty years, it was chosen for an HST program to measure proper motions in the kiloparsec-scale resolved jets of nearby radio-loud active galaxies. The jet in 3C 273 is highly relativistic on sub-parsec scales, with apparent proper motions up to 15c observed by very long baseline interferometry. In contrast, we find that the kiloparsec-scale knots are compatible with being stationary, with a mean speed of -0.2 ± 0.5c over the whole jet. Assuming the knots are packets of moving plasma, an upper limit of 1c implies a bulk Lorentz factor Γ < 2.9. This suggests that the jet has either decelerated significantly by the time it reaches the kiloparsec scale, or that the knots in the jet are standing shock features. The second scenario is incompatible with the inverse Compton off the Cosmic Microwave Background (IC/CMB) model for the X-ray emission of these knots, which requires the knots to be in motion, but IC/CMB is also disfavored in the first scenario due to energetic considerations, in agreement with the recent finding of Meyer & Georganopoulos which ruled out the IC/CMB model for the X-ray emission of 3C 273 via gamma-ray upper limits.

  13. A comparative study of sound generation by laminar, combusting and non-combusting jet flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talei, Mohsen; Brear, Michael J.; Hawkes, Evatt R.

    2014-08-01

    Sound production by two-dimensional, laminar jet flows with and without combustion is studied numerically and theoretically. The compressible Navier-Stokes, energy and progress variable equations are solved by resolving both the near field and the acoustics. The combusting jet flows are compared to non-combusting jets of the same jet Mach number, with the non-combusting, non-isothermal jets having the same steady temperature difference as the combusting jets. This infers that the magnitude of entropic and density disturbances is similar in some of the combusting and non-combusting cases. The flows are perturbed by a sinusoidal inlet velocity fluctuation at different Strouhal numbers. The computational domain is resolved to the far field in all cases, allowing direct examination of the sound radiated and its sources. Lighthill's acoustic analogy is then solved numerically using Green's functions. The radiated sound calculated using Lighthill's equation is in good agreement with that from the simulations for all cases, validating the numerical solution of Lighthill's equation. The contribution of the source terms in Dowling's reformulation of Lighthill's equation is then investigated. It is shown that the source term relating to changes in the momentum of density inhomogeneities is the dominant source term for all non-reacting, non-isothermal cases. Further, this source term has similar magnitude in the combusting cases and is one of the several source terms that have similar magnitude to the source term involving fluctuations in the heat release rate.

  14. Three-dimensional study of turbulent flow characteristics of an offset plane jet with variable density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assoudi, Ali; Habli, Sabra; Mahjoub Saïd, Nejla; Bournot, Hervé; Le Palec, Georges

    2015-12-01

    An experimental and numerical investigation of the flow field of variable density turbulent offset jet is presented. The velocity measurements are performed using a Velocimetry Laser Doppler technique for an offset height h. Three cases of variable-density turbulent plane jets discharging from a rectangular nozzle into a quiescent medium are studied. The variation density jets considered were revealed at different Reynolds numbers. In the second step of this work, a numerical three-dimensional model of the problem is simulated through the resolution of the Navier-Stokes equations by means of the finite volume method and the Reynolds stress model second-order turbulent closure model. A non-uniform mesh system tightened close to the emitting nozzle and both the vertical and horizontal walls is also adopted. A good level of agreement was achieved, between the experiments and the calculations. Once the model validated, our model allowed the evaluation of the influence of the variation density on the characterizing features of the resulting flow filed. It is found that the centerline velocity and concentration of the heavier jet decays much faster than in the two other jets, and a similar behavior for the vertical profiles in the three variable-density jets is well reproduced in the simulation.

  15. Pulse radiolysis, flash photolysis, and shock wave study of the recombination H + benzyl yields toluene at 300 and 1,300-1,650 K

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, L.; Hippler, H.; Pagsberg, P.; Reihs, C.; Troe, J. Riso National Laboratory )

    1990-06-28

    Pulse radiolysis, discharge flash photolysis, and laser flash photolysis have been employed to study the recombination reaction H + benzyl {yields} toluene at room temperature. Both H atoms and benzyl radicals were monitored. The same reaction was studied directly in shock waves between 1,300 and 1.650 K. The value of the high-pressure recombination rate constant of (2.5 {plus minus} 0.8) {times} 10{sup 14} cm{sup 3} mol{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} was found to be independent of the temperature between 300 and 1,650 K. It is argued that high-pressure rate constants for other recombination reactions should also have very small temperature coefficients over wide temperature ranges. Room temperature rate constants for addition of H atoms to toluene, cycloheptatriene, p-xylene, benzene, phenyl, and p-methylbenzyl are also reported.

  16. The Sileye-3/Alteino experiment for the study of light flashes, radiation environment and astronaut brain activity on board the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Bidoli, Vittorio; Casolino, Marco; De Pascale, Maria Pia; Furano, Gianluca; Minori, Mario; Morselli, Aldo; Narici, Livio; Picozza, Piergiorigio; Reali, Enzo; Sparvoli, Roberta; Fuglesang, Christer; Sannita, Walter; Carlson, Per; Castellini, Guido; Galper, Arkady; Korotkov, Mikhail; Popov, Alexander; Navilov, Nikita; Avdeev, Sergei; Benghin, Victor; Salnitskii, Victor; Shevchenko, Olga; Boezio, Mirko; Bonvicini, Walter; Vacchi, Andrea; Zampa, Gianluigi; Zampa, Nicola; Mazzenga, Giuseppe; Ricci, Marco; Spillantini, Piero; Vittori, Roberto

    2002-12-01

    In this work we describe the instrument Sileye-3/Alteino, placed on board the International Space Station in April 2002. The instrument is constituted by an Electroencephalograph and a cosmic ray silicon detector. The scientific aims include the investigation of the Light Flash phenomenon, the measurement of the radiation environment and the nuclear abundance inside the ISS and the study of astronaut brain activity in space when subject to cosmic rays. PMID:12793729

  17. Oil in Water: An Experimental Study of Splashing and Entrainment from Droplets and Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Raina; Halper, Kristen; Mittal, Rajat

    2015-11-01

    This study is motivated by the interaction between oil and water that is associated with events such as oil spills, oil slicks and underwater oil leaks. For instance, the impact of rain drops on a floating oil slick can lead to the formation of satellite droplets and oil entrainment into the water, that could subsequently lead to further dispersion of the oil slick. Furthermore, the dynamics of high speed jets of oil in water is relevant to underwater oil leaks, but the motion of such oil jets is not well studied. In the current study, we use high-speed videography with various types of commonly available oils to study the impact of water droplets on oil slicks of varying thicknesses. Results show that an oil slick with intermediate thickness leads to the most significant formation of satellite droplets. This behavior seems to be related to the competing effect of oil viscosity and surface tension on the dynamics of splashing. We also use high-speed videography to study the motion and dispersion of underwater oil jets and correlate the breakup of the jet with the inclination of the jet.

  18. Initiation Locations of Lightning Flashes in Two Florida Thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, T. C.; Karunarathna, N.; Stolzenburg, M.; Karunarathne, S.

    2015-12-01

    In this presentation we investigate the initiation locations of all intracloud (IC) and cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning flashes in two small thunderstorms which occurred over NASA/Kennedy Space Center on July 22, 2011. Initiation points of 47 of the 58 lightning flashes (19 IC and 28 CG) were identified using the first initial breakdown (IB) pulse of each flash measured with E-change data. In this study 32 of the flashes had an LDAR2 (VHF) location coincident with the first IB pulse. For 15 flashes we used Position By Fast Antenna or PBFA [Karunarathne et al., 2013, JGR Atmospheres] to determine the location of the first IB pulse. (The remaining flashes had neither LDAR2 nor PBFA locations of the first IB pulse.) All these initiation points were then mapped onto radar reflectivity of the parent thundercloud. The initiation points of the flashes tend to cluster in specific regions in thundercloud. Lightning activity in both thunderstorms lasted 35 minutes, and all the flash initiation points in each storm occurred within a horizontal region of 4 km by 8 km. Flash initiation altitudes for IC flashes of the two thunderstorms ranged from 5.1 km to 12.1 km altitude while for CG flashes the altitude ranged from 4.6 km to 8.1 km. Based on available radar data for 14 IC flashes and 27 CG flashes, all but one of the IC flashes originated in 10 dBZ - 30 dBZ reflectivity regions while 22 of the CG flashes originated in 30 dBZ - 40 dBZ reflectivities. During the lifetimes of these two storms, no Narrow Bipolar Events occurred.

  19. Identification of spatial and temporal contributions of rainfalls to flash floods using neural network modelling: case study on the Lez basin (southern France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darras, T.; Borrell Estupina, V.; Kong-A-Siou, L.; Vayssade, B.; Johannet, A.; Pistre, S.

    2015-10-01

    Flash floods pose significant hazards in urbanised zones and have important implications financially and for humans alike in both the present and future due to the likelihood that global climate change will exacerbate their consequences. It is thus of crucial importance to improve the models of these phenomena especially when they occur in heterogeneous and karst basins where they are difficult to describe physically. Toward this goal, this paper applies a recent methodology (Knowledge eXtraction (KnoX) methodology) dedicated to extracting knowledge from a neural network model to better determine the contributions and time responses of several well-identified geographic zones of an aquifer. To assess the interest of this methodology, a case study was conducted in southern France: the Lez hydrosystem whose river crosses the conurbation of Montpellier (400 000 inhabitants). Rainfall contributions and time transfers were estimated and analysed in four geologically delimited zones to estimate the sensitivity of flash floods to water coming from the surface or karst. The Causse de Viols-le-Fort is shown to be the main contributor to flash floods and the delay between surface and underground flooding is estimated to be 3 h. This study will thus help operational flood warning services to better characterise critical rainfall and develop measurements to design efficient flood forecasting models. This generic method can be applied to any basin with sufficient rainfall-run-off measurements.

  20. Identification of spatial and temporal contributions of rainfalls to flash floods using neural network modelling: case study on the Lez Basin (Southern France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darras, T.; Borrell Estupina, V.; Kong-A-Siou, L.; Vayssade, B.; Johannet, A.; Pistre, S.

    2015-04-01

    Flash floods pose significant hazards in urbanised zones and have important human and financial implications in both the present and future due to the likelihood that global climate change will exacerbate their consequences. It is thus of crucial importance to better model these phenomena especially when they occur in heterogeneous and karst basins where they are difficult to describe physically. Toward this goal, this paper applies a recent methodology (KnoX methodology) dedicated to extracting knowledge from a neural network model to better determine the contributions and time responses of several well-identified geographic zones of an aquifer. To assess the interest of this methodology, a case study was conducted in Southern France: the Lez hydrosystem whose river crosses the conurbation of Montpellier (400 000 inhabitants). Rainfall contributions and time transfers were estimated and analysed in four geologically-delimited zones to estimate the sensitivity of flash floods to water coming from the surface or karst. The Causse de Viol-le-Fort is shown to be the main contributor to flash floods and the delay between surface and underground flooding is estimated to be three hours. This study will thus help operational flood warning services to better characterise critical rainfall and develop measurements to design efficient flood forecasting models. This generic method can be applied to any basin with sufficient rainfall-runoff measurements.

  1. Study of High Energy Emission from Relativistic Jets with VERITAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, R.

    2013-12-01

    VERITAS is an imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope array carrying out observations of the gamma-ray sky at energies above 100 GeV. Located in southern Arizona, VERITAS consists of an array of four telescopes, and carries out a comprehensive observing program for Galactic and extragalactic high energy sources. Observations of astrophysical objects in the TeV band are sensitive probes of highly energetic processes occurring in these sources. The majority of the extragalactic sources detected at TeV energies are active galaxies of the blazar class, sources where we view the jet nearly along its axis. In this report we present recent results from the VERITAS extragalactic program, focusing on blazars.

  2. Jet-underlying event studies with ALICE detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, Betty

    2011-10-01

    Relativistic heavy ion collisions produce a state of strongly interacting matter of quarks and gluons, called the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Measuring particle production via fragmentation (specifically in jets) and understanding parton energy loss in the QGP enables one to directly probe the medium. One of the necessary components in studying jets in heavy ion events is the ability to isolate jets from the soft physics background, i.e., the underlying event. Thus it is important to understand the underlying event properties, in particular, energy fluctuations. This presentation will address the initial studies done to map out the underlying event in √{ s} = 7 TeV pp collisions measured with the ALICE detector at the LHC, as preparation for extending these studies to Pb-Pb collisions. The focus will be on the analyses performed with the ALICE Electro-Magnetic Calorimeter (EMCal). EMCal is especially well-suited for the measurement of high-momentum particles which are produced predominantly in jets and therefore is a useful tool in subtracting the jet cone from the underlying event. For the ALICE Collaboration.

  3. The Flash Grab Effect

    PubMed Central

    Cavanagh, Patrick; Anstis, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    When an object moves back and forth, its trajectory appears significantly shorter than it actually is. The object appears to stop and reverse well before its actual reversal point, as if there is some averaging of location within a window of about 100 ms (Sinico et al, 2009). Surprisingly, if a bar is flashed at the physical end point of the trajectory, right on top of the object, just as it reverses direction, the flash is also shifted – grabbed by the object – and is seen at the perceived endpoint of the trajectory rather than the physical endpoint. This can shift the perceived location of the flash by as much as 2 or 3 times its physical size and by up to several degrees of visual angle. We first show that the position shift of the flash is generated by the trajectory shortening, as the same shift is seen with or without the flash. The flash itself is only grabbed if it is presented within a small spatiotemporal attraction zone around the physical end point of the trajectory. Any flash falling in that zone is pulled toward the perceived endpoint. The effect scales linearly with speed, up to a maximum, and is independent of the contrast of the moving stimulus once it is above 5%. Finally, we demonstrate that this position shift requires attention. These results reveal a new “flash grab” effect in the family of motion-induced position shifts. Although it most resembles the flash drag effect, it differs from this in the following ways: 1) it has a different temporal profile, 2) it requires attention, 3) it is about 10 times larger. PMID:23872166

  4. An analytical study of the effects of jets located more than one jet diameter above a wing at subsonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, L. E.

    1974-01-01

    A procedure has been developed to calculate the effects of blowing two jets over a swept tapered wing at low subsonic speeds. The algorithm used is based on a vortex lattice representation of the wing lifting surface and a line sink-source distribution to simulate the effects of the jet exhaust on the wing lift and drag. The method is limited to those cases where the jet exhaust does not intersect or wash the wing. The predictions of this relatively simple procedure are in remarkably good agreement with experimentally measured interference lift and interference induced drag.

  5. An analytical study of the effects of jets located more than one jet diameter above a wing at subsonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, L. E.

    1974-01-01

    A procedure has been developed for calculating the effects of blowing two jets over a swept tapered wing at low subsonic speeds. The algorithm used is based on a vortex-lattice representation of the wing lifting surface and a line sink-source distribution to simulate the effects of the jet exhaust on the wing lift and drag. The method is limited to those cases in which the jet exhaust does not intersect or wash the wing. The predictions of this relatively simple procedure are in remarkably good agreement with experimentally measured interference lift and interference induced drag.

  6. Kinetic studies on the temperature dependence of the BrO + BrO reaction using laser flash photolysis.

    PubMed

    Ferracci, Valerio; Hino, Kaori; Rowley, David M

    2011-05-01

    The BrO self-reaction, BrO + BrO → products (1), has been studied using laser flash photolysis coupled with UV absorption spectroscopy over the temperature range T = 266.5-321.6 K, under atmospheric pressure. BrO radicals were generated via laser photolysis of Br(2) in the presence of excess ozone. Both BrO and O(3) were monitored via UV absorption spectroscopy using charge-coupled device (CCD) detection. Simultaneous fitting to both temporal concentration traces allowed determination of the rate constant of the two channels of , BrO + BrO → 2Br + O(2) (1a); BrO + BrO → Br(2) + O(2) (1b), hence the calculation of the overall rate of and the branching ratio, α: k(1a)/cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) = (1.92 ± 1.54) × 10(-12) exp[(126 ± 214)/T], k(1b)/cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) = (3.4 ± 0.8) × 10(-13) exp[(181 ± 70)/T], k(1)/cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) = (2.3 ± 1.5) × 10(-12) exp(134 ± 185 /T) and α = k(1a)/k(1) = (0.84 ± 0.09) exp[(-7 ± 32)/T]. Errors are 1σ, statistical only. Results from this work show a weaker temperature dependence of the branching ratio for channel (1a) than that found in previous work, leading to values of α at temperatures typical of the Polar Boundary Layer higher than those reported by previous studies. This implies a shift of the partitioning between the two channels of the BrO self-reaction towards the bromine atom and hence directly ozone-depleting channel (1a).

  7. Laser flash photolysis studies of radical-radical reaction kinetics: The HO{sub 2} + IO reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cronkhite, J.M.; Stickel, R.E.; Nicovich, J.M.; Wine, P.H.

    1999-04-29

    Reactive iodine as a potential tropospheric O{sub 3} sink has received considerable attention recently. Laser flash photolysis of Cl{sub 2}/CH{sub 3}OH/O{sub 2}/I{sub 2}/NO{sub 2}/SF{sub 6}N{sub 2} mixtures at 308 nm has been coupled with simultaneous time-resolved detection of HO{sub 2} (by infrared tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy) and IO (by visible absorption spectroscopy) to investigate the kinetics of the atmospherically important reaction HO{sub 2} + IO {r_arrow} products over the temperature range 274--373 K in N{sub 2} buffer gas at pressures of 12 and 25 Torr. All experiments were performed under near pseudo-first-order conditions with HO{sub 2} in excess over IO. At 298 K, the rate coefficient was determined to be (9.7 {+-} 2.9) {times} 10{sup {minus}11} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1}s{sup {minus}1}, with the primary source of uncertainty being knowledge of the infrared line strength(s) required to convert measured HO{sub 2} absorbances to absolute concentrations. The temperature dependence of the HO{sub 2} + IO rate coefficient was found to be adequately described by the Arrhenius expression k = 9.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} exp(680/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. The results reported in this study are compared with other recent studies of HO{sub 2} + IO kinetics, and the potential roles of this reaction in atmospheric chemistry are discussed.

  8. Computational study of a contoured plug-nozzle as a supersonic jet noise suppressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, A.; Das, A. P.; Das, I.S.

    1996-01-01

    The report summarizes a computational jet noise study of an ideal contoured plug-nozzle (CPN). The gasdynamics of the jet flows have been predicted using the CFD code, NPARC with k-epsilon turbulence model; these data are then used as inputs to perform the noise computations based on the modified version of General Electric MGB code. The study covers a range of operating pressure ratio, 2.0 less than xi less than 5.0 (shockless flow at design pressure ratio, xi(d) = 3.62). The agreement of the computational aeroacoustics results with the available experimental data may be considered to be favorable. The computational results indicate consistent noise reduction effectiveness of the CPN at all operating pressure ratios. At the design pressure ratio (shockless), the codes predict overall sound pressure levels within +3.O dB of the experimental data. But at the off-design pressure ratios (flaws with shocks), the agreement is rather mixed. The theory overpredicts the OASPL's at all pressure ratios except at lower angles to the jet axis in overexpanded mode (xi less than xi(d)), the deviations being within 4.5 dB. The mechanism of shock formations in the CPN jet flows is noted to be basically different from those in the convergent-divergent nozzle jet flows.

  9. A case study of a low-level jet during OPALE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallée, H.; Barral, H.; Vignon, E.; Genthon, C.

    2015-06-01

    A case study of a low-level jet (LLJ) during the OPALE (Oxidant Production over Antarctic Land and its Export) summer campaign is presented. It has been observed at Dome C (East Antarctica) and is simulated accurately by the three-dimensional version of the Modèle Atmosphérique Régional (MAR). It is found that this low-level jet is not related to an episode of thermal wind, suggesting that Dome C may be a place where turbulence on flat terrain can be studied.

  10. Phenomenology of the sound-induced flash illusion.

    PubMed

    Abadi, Richard V; Murphy, Jonathan S

    2014-07-01

    Past studies, using pairings of auditory tones and visual flashes, which were static and coincident in space but variable in time, demonstrated errors in judging the temporal patterning of the visual flashes-the sound-induced flash illusion. These errors took one of the two forms: under-reporting (sound-induced fusion) or over-reporting (sound-induced fission) of the flash numbers. Our study had three objectives: to examine the robustness of both illusions and to consider the effects of stimulus set and response bias. To this end, we used an extended range of fixed spatial location flash-tone pairings, examined stimuli that were variable in space and time and measured confidence in judging flash numbers. Our results indicated that the sound-induced flash illusion is a robust percept, a finding underpinned by the confidence measures. Sound-induced fusion was found to be more robust than sound-induced fission and a most likely outcome when high numbers of flashes were incorporated within an incongruent flash-tone pairing. Conversely, sound-induced fission was the most likely outcome for the flash-tone pairing which contained two flashes. Fission was also shown to be strongly driven by stimuli confounds such as categorical boundary conditions (e.g. flash-tone pairings with ≤2 flashes) and compressed response options. These findings suggest whilst both fission and fusion are associated with 'auditory driving', the differences in the occurrence and strength of the two illusions not only reflect the separate neuronal mechanisms underlying audio and visual signal processing, but also the test conditions that have been used to investigate the sound-induced flash illusion.

  11. Shear-layer acoustic radiation in an excited subsonic jet: experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Vincent; Bailly, Christophe; Juvé, Daniel

    2005-10-01

    The subharmonic acoustic radiation of a tone excited subsonic jet shear-layer has been investigated experimentally. Two jet velocities U=20 mṡs and U=40 mṡs were studied. For U=20 mṡs, the natural boundary-layer at the nozzle exit is laminar. When the perturbation is applied, the fluctuations of the first and the second subharmonics of the excitation frequency are detected in the shear-layer. In addition, the first subharmonic near pressure field along the spreading jet is constituted of two strong maxima of sinusoidal shape. The far-field directivity pattern displays two lobes separated by an extinction angle θ at around 85° from the jet axis. These observations follow the results of Bridges about the vortex pairing noise. On the other hand, for U=40 mṡs, the initial boundary-layer is transitional and only the first subharmonic is observed in the presence of the excitation. The near pressure field is of Gaussian shape in the jet periphery and the acoustic far-field is superdirective as observed by Laufer and Yen. The state of the initial shear-layer seems to be the key feature to distinguish these two different radiation patterns. To cite this article: V. Fleury et al., C. R. Mecanique 333 (2005).

  12. An Experimental/Modeling Study of Jet Attachment during Counterflow Thrust Vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strykowski, Paul J.

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies have shown the applicability of vectoring rectangular jets using asymmetrically applied counterflow in the presence of a short collar. This novel concept has applications in the aerospace industry where counterflow can be used to vector the thrust of a jet's exhaust, shortening take-off and landing distances and enhancing in-flight maneuverability of the aircraft. Counterflow thrust vectoring, 'CFTV' is desirable due to its fast time response, low thrust loss, and absence of moving parts. However, implementation of a CFTV system is only possible if bistable jet attachment can be prevented. This can be achieved by properly designing the geometry of the collar. An analytical model is developed herein to predict the conditions under which a two-dimensional jet will attach to an offset curved wall. Results from this model are then compared with experiment; for various jet exit Mach numbers, collar offset distances, and radii of curvature. Their excellent correlation permits use of the model as a tool for designing a CFTV system.

  13. An experimental burn wound-healing study of non-thermal atmospheric pressure microplasma jet arrays.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ok Joo; Ju, Hyung Woo; Khang, Gilson; Sun, Peter P; Rivera, Jose; Cho, Jin Hoon; Park, Sung-Jin; Eden, J Gary; Park, Chan Hum

    2016-04-01

    In contrast with a thermal plasma surgical instrument based on coagulative and ablative properties, low-temperature (non-thermal) non-equilibrium plasmas are known for novel medicinal effects on exposed tissue while minimizing undesirable tissue damage. In this study we demonstrated that arrays of non-thermal microplasma jet devices fabricated from a transparent polymer can efficiently inactivate fungi (Candida albicans) as well as bacteria (Escherichia coli), both in vitro and in vivo, and that this leads to a significant wound-healing effect. Microplasma jet arrays offer several advantages over conventional single-jet devices, including superior packing density, inherent scalability for larger treatment areas, unprecedented material flexibility in a plasma jet device, and the selective generation of medically relevant reactive species at higher plasma densities. The therapeutic effects of our multi-jet device were verified on second-degree burns in animal rat models. Reduction of the wound area and the histology of the wound after treatment have been investigated, and expression of interleukin (IL)-1α, -6 and -10 was verified to evaluate the healing effects. The consistent effectiveness of non-thermal plasma treatment has been observed especially in decreasing wound size and promoting re-epithelialization through collagen arrangement and the regulation of expression of inflammatory genes.

  14. Flashes and Floaters

    MedlinePlus

    ... either in the form of lightening bolts, shooting stars, sparks, or an arc of light to the ... against it that causes the sparks and shooting stars phenomenon. But flashes and floaters may have more ...

  15. A study of reacting free and ducted hydrogen/air jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, H. L., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The mixing and reaction of a supersonic jet of hydrogen in coaxial free and ducted high temperature test gases were investigated. The importance of chemical kinetics on computed results, and the utilization of free-jet theoretical approaches to compute enclosed flow fields were studied. Measured pitot pressure profiles were correlated by use of a parabolic mixing analysis employing an eddy viscosity model. All computations, including free, ducted, reacting, and nonreacting cases, use the same value of the empirical constant in the viscosity model. Equilibrium and finite rate chemistry models were utilized. The finite rate assumption allowed prediction of observed ignition delay, but the equilibrium model gave the best correlations downstream from the ignition location. Ducted calculations were made with finite rate chemistry; correlations were, in general, as good as the free-jet results until problems with the boundary conditions were encountered.

  16. Oxygen and Fuel Jet Diffusion Flame Studies in Microgravity Motivated by Spacecraft Oxygen Storage Fire Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunderland, P. B.; Yuan, Z.-G.; Krishnan, S. S.; Abshire, J. M.; Gore, J. P.

    2003-01-01

    Owing to the absence of past work involving flames similar to the Mir fire namely oxygen-enhanced, inverse gas-jet diffusion flames in microgravity the objectives of this work are as follows: 1. Observe the effects of enhanced oxygen conditions on laminar jet diffusion flames with ethane fuel. 2. Consider both earth gravity and microgravity. 3. Examine both normal and inverse flames. 4. Compare the measured flame lengths and widths with calibrated predictions of several flame shape models. This study expands on the work of Hwang and Gore which emphasized radiative emissions from oxygen-enhanced inverse flames in earth gravity, and Sunderland et al. which emphasized the shapes of normal and inverse oxygen-enhanced gas-jet diffusion flames in microgravity.

  17. An experimental and numerical study of particle-laden coaxial jet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mostafa, A. A.; Mongia, H. C.; Mcdonell, V. G.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    1990-01-01

    A detailed experimental and numerical study of the developing region of coaxial jet flows with and without glass beads is performed. A two-component phase/Doppler interferometer is used to measure mean and fluctuating velocity components for each phase and particle-number density. The numerical calculation is based on a stochastic Lagrangian treatment for the particles and a recently proposed two-equation turbulence model for two-phase flows. Results show that the particle-number density profile becomes narrower than the corresponding profile for round jet flow and that the particles attain a uniform velocity across the jet radius. The particles attenuate the level of gas turbulence and increase their anisotropy level. The numerical calculations yield reasonable and encouraging agreement with the measurements.

  18. Numerical and experimental study on a pulsed-dc plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. Y.; Pei, X. K.; Lu, X. P.; Liu, D. W.

    2014-06-01

    A numerical and experimental study of plasma jet propagation in a low-temperature, atmospheric-pressure, helium jet in ambient air is presented. A self-consistent, multi-species, two-dimensional axially symmetric plasma model with detailed finite-rate chemistry of helium-air mixture composition is used to provide insights into the propagation of the plasma jet. The obtained simulation results suggest that the sheath forms near the dielectric tube inner surface and shields the plasma channel from the tube surface. The strong electric field at the edge of the dielectric field enhances the ionization in the air mixing layer; therefore, the streamer head becomes ring-shaped when the streamer runs out of the tube. The avalanche-to-streamer transition is the main mechanism of streamer advancement. Penning ionization dominates the ionization reactions and increases the electrical conductivity of the plasma channel. The simulation results are supported by experimental observations under similar discharge conditions.

  19. Study of secondary electrons and positrons produced by Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarria, D.; Blelly, P.-L.; Forme, F.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial Gamma ray Flahes are emissions of X and gamma rays, correlated to thunderstorms. By interacting with the atmosphere, the photons produce a large number of electrons and positrons. Some of these reach altitudes above ˜ 100 km that their interactions with the atmosphere become negligible, and they are then guided by Earth's magnetic field lines, forming the so called Terrestrial Electron Beams. The GBM instrument of the Fermi Space Telescope made a particularly interesting measurement of such an event that happened the 12/09/2009. We perform Monte-Carlo simulations to study this event in detail and we focus on the resulting time histograms. In agreement with previous works, we show that the histogram measured by Fermi GBM can be reproduced from simulations. We then show that the time histogram can be decomposed into three populations of leptons, coming from the hemisphere opposite from the TGF, and mirroring back to the satellite with interactions with the atmosphere or not, and that these we can be clearly distinguished both with their pitch angles.

  20. Experimental Study of an Inclined Jet-In-Cross-Flow Interacting with a Vortex Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Rigby, D. L.; Heidmann, J. D.

    2010-01-01

    An experiment is conducted on the effectiveness of a vortex generator (VG) in preventing lift-off of a jet-in-cross-flow (JICF), with film-cooling application in mind. The jet issues into the boundary layer at an angle of 20 to the free-stream. The effect of a triangular ramp-shaped VG is studied while varying its geometry and location. Detailed flow-field properties are documented for a specific case in which the height of the VG and the diameter of the orifice are comparable to the approach boundary layer thickness. This combination of VG and JICF produce a streamwise vortex pair with vorticity magnitude three times larger (and of opposite sense) than that found in the JICF alone. Such a VG appears to be most effective in keeping the jet attached to the wall. While most of the data are taken at a jet-to-freestream momentum flux ratio (J) of 2, limited surveys are done for varying J. The VG is found to have a significant effect even at the highest J (=11) covered in the experiment. Effect of parametric variation is studied mostly from surveys ten diameters downstream from the orifice. When the VG height is halved there is a lift-off of the jet. On the other hand, when the height is doubled, the jet core is dissipated due to larger turbulence intensities. Varying the location of the VG, over a distance of three diameters from the orifice, is found to have little impact. Rounding off the edges of the VG with increasing radius of curvature progressively diminishes the effect. However, a small radius of curvature may be quite tolerable in practice.

  1. Formation of curcumin nanoparticles by flash nanoprecipitation from emulsions.

    PubMed

    Margulis, Katherine; Magdassi, Shlomo; Lee, Han Seung; Macosko, Christopher W

    2014-11-15

    Nanometric particles of a model hydrophobic substance curcumin were prepared by a novel method, namely, flash nanoprecipitation from a coarse oil-in-water emulsion. The method employs turbulent co-mixing of water with curcumin-loaded emulsion using manually-operated confined impingement jets mixer. A clear and stable dispersion of nanoparticles was formed in this process, and could be converted to dry, easily water-dispersible powder by spray drying. The mean size of the particles was about 40 nm by DLS, confirmed by Cryo-TEM. The obtained particles contained 20.4 wt% curcumin, X-ray analysis showed it was amorphous. The significant advantages of the studied process are its feasibility, speed and low cost. It does not require any special high-energy input equipment to reduce the droplet size of the initial emulsion as required by the vast majority of other methods, and relies on rapid turbulent mixing and on flow-induced shear stress formed in the simple, manually-operated mixer. Control experiments clearly indicate that employing emulsion, instead of a plain solution and flash nanoprecipitation instead of a simple antisolvent precipitation are advantageous in terms of particle size and stability. PMID:25168584

  2. Photoinactivation of photosystem II by flashing light.

    PubMed

    Szilárd, András; Sass, László; Hideg, Eva; Vass, Imre

    2005-06-01

    Inhibition of Photosystem II (PS II) activity by single turnover visible light flashes was studied in thylakoid membranes isolated form spinach. Flash illumination results in decreased oxygen evolving activity of PS II, which effect is most pronounced when the water-oxidizing complex is in the S2 and S3 states, and increases with increasing time delay between the subsequent flashes. By applying the fluorescent spin-trap DanePy, we detected the production of singlet oxygen, whose amount was increasing with increasing flash spacing. These findings were explained in the framework of a model, which assumes that recombination of the S2QB - and S3QB - states generate the triplet state of the reaction center chlorophyll and lead to the production of singlet oxygen.

  3. BREATH MEASUREMENT OF TOTAL BODY BURDEN OF JP-8 JET FUEL FOR EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A complex epidemiological investigation of the effects of acute exposure to JP-8 jet fuel in the U.S. Air Force was performed through the study of about 350 human subjects across six Air Force bases. The focus was on fuels system maintenance personnel as the "exposed"...

  4. Laboratory and field studies in rotational spectroscopy at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drouin, Brian J.

    2004-01-01

    Rotational spectroscopy of atmospheric molecules has long been a hallmark of laboratory and field studies at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. in addition to maintenance of the millimeter and submillimeter spectral line catalog, the laboratory has actively purued the challenging laboratory tasks of quantitative linewidth measurements and transient species identification.

  5. An Experimental Study of the Structure of Turbulent Non-Premixed Jet Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxx, Isaac; Idicheria, Cherian; Clemens, Noel

    2000-11-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the structure of transitional and turbulent non-premixed jet flames under microgravity conditions. The microgravity experiments are being conducted using a newly developed drop rig and the University of Texas 1.5 second drop tower. The rig itself measures 16”x33”x38” and contains a co-flowing round jet flame facility, flow control system, CCD camera, and data/image acquisition computer. These experiments are the first phase of a larger study being conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center 2.2 second drop tower facility. The flames being studied include methane and propane round jet flames at jet exit Reynolds numbers as high as 10,000. The primary diagnostic technique employed is emission imaging of flame luminosity using a relatively high-speed (350 fps) CCD camera. The high-speed images are used to study flame height, flame tip dynamics and burnout characteristics. Results are compared to normal gravity experimental results obtained in the same apparatus.

  6. Flash fire propensity of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    Flash fire test results on 86 materials, evaluated using the USF flash fire screening test, are presented. The materials which appear least prone to flash fires are PVC, polyphenylene oxide and sulfide, and polyether and polyaryl sulfone; these did not produce flash fires under these particular test conditions. The principal value of these screening tests at the present time is in identifying materials which appear prone to flash fires, and in identifying which formulations of a generic material are more or less prone to flash fires.

  7. Computational Noise Study of a Supersonic Short Conical Plug-Nozzle Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, Indu S.; Khavaran, Abbas; Das, A. P.

    1996-01-01

    A computational jet noise study of a short conical plug-nozzle (CPN) is presented. The CPN has an exit diameter of 45 mm and the geometrical configuration closely approximates that of an ideal contoured plug-nozzle having shockless flow at pressure ratio xi(sub d) = 3.62. The gasdynamics of the jet flows have been predicted using the CFD code, NPARC with k-epsilon turbulence model; these data are then used for noise computations based on the modified GE/MGB code. The study covers a range of pressure ratio, 2.0 less than or equal to xi less than or equal to 5.0. The agreement of the computational results with the available experimental data is favorable. The results indicate consistent noise reduction effectiveness of the CPN as compared to equivalent convergent, convergent-divergent and ideal contoured plug nozzles at all pressure ratios. At design pressure ratio, codes predict noise levels within 4.0 dB of the measurements; and at off-design pressure ratios, in general, within 5.0 dB except at very high frequencies when deviations up to 10 dB are noted. The shock formation mechanism in the CPN jet is noted to be basically different from those in the convergent and CD nozzle jets.

  8. Numerical study of the interaction of a helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet with a dielectric material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijun; Zheng, Yashuang; Jia, Shenli

    2016-10-01

    This is a computational modeling study of a cold atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet impinging on a dielectric surface placed normal to the jet axis. This study provides insights into the propagation mechanism of the plasma jet, the electrical properties, and the total accumulated charge density at the dielectric surface. For the radial streamer propagation along the dielectric surface, Penning ionization and the electron impact ionization of helium atoms are the major ionization reactions in the streamer head, while Penning ionization is the only dominant contributor along the streamer body. In addition, the plasma bullet velocity along the dielectric surface is 10-100 times lower than that in the plasma column. Increasing tube radius or helium flow rate lowers air entrainment in the plasma jet, leading to a decrease of the radial electric field and the accumulated charge density at the dielectric surface. Furthermore, the tube radius has weaker influence on the plasma properties as tube radius increases. For a target dielectric with lower relative permittivity, a higher radial electric field penetrates into the material, and the surface ionization wave along the dielectric surface extends farther. Higher relative permittivity of the treated dielectric results in more charging at the dielectric surface and more electron density in the plasma column.

  9. Study on Turbulent Behavior of Water Jet in Supersonic Steam Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuichi, Akira; Abe, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Akiko; Kawamoto, Yujiro; Iwaki, Chikako; Narabayashi, Tadashi; Mori, Michitsugu; Ohmori, Shuichi

    One of the most interesting devices for light water reactor systems aimed at simplified system, improvement of safety and reliability is a supersonic steam injector. Supersonic steam injector is a passive jet pump without rotating machine and high efficient heat exchanger because of direct contact condensation between supersonic steam and a subcooled water jet. It is considered that flow behavior in the supersonic steam injector is related to complicated turbulent flow with large shear stress induced by velocity difference between steam and water and direct contact condensation. However, studies about turbulent flow under large shear stress with direct contact condensation are not enough. Especially, mechanisms of momentum and heat transfer are not clarified in detail. Objective of the present study is to investigate turbulent behaviors of a water jet and interface that play an important role in heat transfer and momentum transfer. Radial distribution of streamwise velocity and fluctuation of total pressure are measured by a pitot measurement. Visual measurement of the turbulent water jet is conducted by a high speed camera in order to identify location of unstable interface and its behavior. It is found that streamwise velocity increases as it approaches downstream of the mixing nozzle. Fluctuation of total pressure is large at water-steam mixture region. It is confirmed that waves propagated on the interface. And its velocity is obtained.

  10. Numerical study of a delta planform with multiple jets in ground effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chawla, K.; Van Dalsem, W. R.; Rao, K. V.

    1989-01-01

    The flow past a 60-deg delta wing equipped with two thrust-reverser jets near the inboard trailing edge has been analyzed by numerical solution of the 3D thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. An implicit, partially flux-split, approximately-factored Navier-Stokes solver coupled with a multiple grid embedding scheme has been adapted to this problem. Studies of the impact of numerical parameters (e.g., grid refinement and dissipation levels), and flow-field parameters such as the height of the delta wing above the ground plane and the jet size on the solution, were performed. Results of these numerical studies indicate some challenges in the accurate resolution of complex 3D free shear layers and jets. Nevertheless, flow features such as jet deformation and ground vortex formation observed in experimental flow visualizations are captured. Further, comparisons with experimental data confirm the ability to simulate the loss of wing-borne lift, commonly referred to 'suckdown, as the delta planform flies at slow speeds in close proximity to the ground. Detailed analysis of the numerical results has also given additional insight into the structure of the ground vortex and the mechanisms of lift loss.

  11. Flash photography-induced maculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Veugelen, Tim; Coutteel, Carine; Leys, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To report a flash photography-induced maculopathy. Methods: A professional photographer blinded himself accidentally and he consulted 3 days after the event with a scotoma in his dominant left eye. A unilateral acute light-induced maculopathy with hemorrhage was observed. The lesion was studied with colour photography, fluorescein and indocyanin angiography, autofluorescence imaging and repeated optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. Results: At age 43, this professional photographer was blinded by the flash light of his camera and subsequently realized he had a scotoma in his dominant eye. Three days after the event visual acuity (VA) was 20/70 and an acute light-induced maculopathy was noted. Another three days later, VA was 20/50 and the lesions were less prominent. After one month, the photographer still had problems making sharp pictures, VA was 20/25 and a macular scar was observed. During further follow-up, he regained full vision and experienced no professional problems. Conclusions: This case illustrates that the light of flash photography can accidentally hit an eye and induce a light-induced maculopathy.

  12. Flash photography-induced maculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Veugelen, Tim; Coutteel, Carine; Leys, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To report a flash photography-induced maculopathy. Methods: A professional photographer blinded himself accidentally and he consulted 3 days after the event with a scotoma in his dominant left eye. A unilateral acute light-induced maculopathy with hemorrhage was observed. The lesion was studied with colour photography, fluorescein and indocyanin angiography, autofluorescence imaging and repeated optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. Results: At age 43, this professional photographer was blinded by the flash light of his camera and subsequently realized he had a scotoma in his dominant eye. Three days after the event visual acuity (VA) was 20/70 and an acute light-induced maculopathy was noted. Another three days later, VA was 20/50 and the lesions were less prominent. After one month, the photographer still had problems making sharp pictures, VA was 20/25 and a macular scar was observed. During further follow-up, he regained full vision and experienced no professional problems. Conclusions: This case illustrates that the light of flash photography can accidentally hit an eye and induce a light-induced maculopathy. PMID:27625926

  13. Do All Lightning Flashes Have Initial Breakdown Pulses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Thomas; Stolzenburg, Maribeth; Karunarathne, Sumedhe; Karunarathna, Nadeeka

    2013-04-01

    The initial breakdown (IB) stage of lightning flashes typically occurs in the first 5-15 ms of a flash. The IB stage is characterized in electric field change (E-change) records by a sequence of pulses (called "classic" IB pulses), each with relatively large amplitude and duration of tens of microseconds. Nag and Rakov [JGR, 2008] investigated the IB stage of cloud to ground (CG) lightning flashes in Florida thunderstorms and found that only 18% of CG flashes had classic IB pulses. Nag and Rakov [GRL, 2009] hypothesized that CG flashes without classic IB pulses initiated in thunderstorms with a weak or non-existent lower positive cloud charge. In this presentation we show the results of studying E-change data of 127 negative CG flashes and 90 intracloud (IC) flashes recorded at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida in the summers of 2010 and 2011. In 2011 we deployed 10 E-change sensors spread across an area of 70 km x 100 km; in 2010 5 E-change sensors were deployed over a smaller area. The bandwidth of the E-change sensors was 0.16 Hz - 2.6 MHz; the data were digitized at 12 bits with a sampling rate of 1, 5, or 10 MHz and a typical record length of 500 ms, including 150 ms of pre-trigger data. The analysis focuses on flashes that occurred within 30 km of at least one sensor. We find that all 127 CG flashes and all 90 IC flashes began with classic IB pulses, though the amplitude of these pulses varies significantly from flash to flash. For flashes with weak IB pulses, the more distant sensors did not always detect the IB pulses seen by closer sensors.

  14. 14. INTERIOR VIEW, DETAIL OF TRIMMED FLASH; FLASH IS EXCESS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. INTERIOR VIEW, DETAIL OF TRIMMED FLASH; FLASH IS EXCESS METAL EXTRUDED BETWEEN THE DIES USED TO FORGE THE BLADE END OF THE POST HOLE DIGGER - Warwood Tool Company, Foot of Nineteenth Street, Wheeling, Ohio County, WV

  15. Two-dimensional numerical study of two counter-propagating helium plasma jets in air at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Wen; Sang, Chaofeng; Wang, Dezhen; Liu, Fucheng

    2014-06-15

    In this paper, a computational study of two counter-propagating helium plasma jets in ambient air is presented. A two-dimensional fluid model is applied to investigate the physical processes of the two plasma jets interaction (PJI) driven by equal and unequal voltages, respectively. In all studied cases, the PJI results in a decrease of both plasma bullets propagation velocity. When the two plasma jets are driven by equal voltages, they never merge but rather approach each other around the middle of the gas gap at a minimum approach distance, and the minimal distance decreases with the increase of both the applied voltages and initial electron density, but increases with the increase of the relative permittivity. When the two plasma jets are driven by unequal voltages, we observe the two plasma jets will merge at the position away from the middle of the gas gap. The effect of applied voltage difference on the PJI is also studied.

  16. An Experimental Study on Active Flow Control Using Synthetic Jet Actuators over S809 Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul, M.; Uzol, O.; Akmandor, I. S.

    2014-06-01

    This study investigates the effect of periodic excitation from individually controlled synthetic jet actuators on the dynamics of the flow within the separation and re-attachment regions of the boundary layer over the suction surface of a 2D model wing that has S809 airfoil profile. Experiments are performed in METUWIND's C3 open-loop suction type wind tunnel that has a 1 m × 1 m cross-section test section. The synthetic jet array on the wing consists of three individually controlled actuators driven by piezoelectric diaphragms located at 28% chord location near the mid-span of the wing. In the first part of the study, surface pressure, Constant Temperature Anemometry (CTA) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements are performed over the suction surface of the airfoil to determine the size and characteristics of the separated shear layer and the re-attachment region, i.e. the laminar separation bubble, at 2.3x105 Reynolds number at zero angle of attack and with no flow control as a baseline case. For the controlled case, CTA measurements are carried out under the same inlet conditions at various streamwise locations along the suction surface of the airfoil to investigate the effect of the synthetic jet on the boundary layer properties. During the controlled case experiments, the synthetic jet actuators are driven with a sinusoidal frequency of 1.45 kHz and 300Vp-p. Results of this study show that periodic excitation from the synthetic jet actuators eliminates the laminar separation bubble formed over the suction surface of the airfoil at 2.3x105 Reynolds number at zero angle of attack.

  17. Triplet excitation dynamics of two keto-carotenoids in n-hexane and in methanol as studied by ns flash photolysis spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Hu, Feng; Chang, Yu-Qiang; Zhou, Yan; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Jian-Ping

    2015-07-01

    Siphonaxanthin and siphonein are two keto-carotenoids. Upon anthracene-sensitizing, triplet excitation dynamics of these two carotenoids were studied in n-hexane and in methanol, respectively, by ns flash photolysis spectroscopy. In n-hexane, bleaching of the ground state absorption (GSB) and the excitation triplet (3Car*) absorption were observed. In methanol, upon the decay of the 3Car*, the cation dehydrodimer of carotenoid, #[Car]2+, generated by the same rate, while an additional GSB generated synchronously, a polar solvent assisted and anthracene-sensitized mechanism was addressed based on the discussion. The environment-sensitive triplet excitation dynamics imply their potential role in photo-protection in vivo.

  18. A Comparison of Sprite Locations to Flash Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, M. A.; Ashcraft, T.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.; Edens, H. E.; Cummer, S. A.; Lyons, W. A.

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that sprites can be horizontally offset byover 40 km from the parent stroke while VHF lightning maps show thatthe center of a sprite cluster generally occurs above recent portionsof the flash. However, a detailed comparison of individual spriteelement locations in relation to flash structure is currently lacking.In this presentation, I will show the results of such comparisons forvarious sprite-producing flashes in a 3 year study period between 2012and 2014. It will be shown that while there is a general correlationbetween the sprites and the active portion of a flash, it is notuncommon for the individual sprite element plan positions to belocated outside of the flash boundary. The horizontal distancebetween such sprite elements and the flash boundary rarely exceedsmuch more than 10 km. The implications of these results in regards tovarious potential seeding mechanisms for sprites will be discussed.

  19. Control of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreck, Stefan

    1993-01-01

    This reports describes experiments conducted at the High-Speed Jet Facility at the University of Southern California on supersonic jets. The goal of the study was to develop methods for controlling the noise emitted from supersonic jets by passive and/or active means. Work by Seiner et al (1991) indicates that eddy Mach wave radiation is the dominant noise source in a heated high speed jet. Eddy Mach radiation is caused by turbulent eddies traveling at supersonic speed in the shear layer of the jet. The convection velocity of the eddies decays with increasing distance from the nozzle exit due to the mixing of the jet stream with the ambient fluid. Once the convection speed reaches subsonic velocities, eddy Mach wave radiation ceases. To control noise, a rapid decay of the convection velocity is desired. This may be accomplished by enhanced mixing in the jet. In this study, small aspect ratio rectangular jet nozzles were tested. A flapping mode was noticed in the jets. By amplifying screech components of the jets and destabilizing the jet columns with a collar device, the flapping mode was excited. The result was a rapid decay of the jet velocity. A reduction in eddy Mach radiation in rectangular supersonic jets may be achieved with this device.

  20. Control of jet noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, Stefan

    This reports describes experiments conducted at the High-Speed Jet Facility at the University of Southern California on supersonic jets. The goal of the study was to develop methods for controlling the noise emitted from supersonic jets by passive and/or active means. Work by Seiner et al (1991) indicates that eddy Mach wave radiation is the dominant noise source in a heated high speed jet. Eddy Mach radiation is caused by turbulent eddies traveling at supersonic speed in the shear layer of the jet. The convection velocity of the eddies decays with increasing distance from the nozzle exit due to the mixing of the jet stream with the ambient fluid. Once the convection speed reaches subsonic velocities, eddy Mach wave radiation ceases. To control noise, a rapid decay of the convection velocity is desired. This may be accomplished by enhanced mixing in the jet. In this study, small aspect ratio rectangular jet nozzles were tested. A flapping mode was noticed in the jets. By amplifying screech components of the jets and destabilizing the jet columns with a collar device, the flapping mode was excited. The result was a rapid decay of the jet velocity. A reduction in eddy Mach radiation in rectangular supersonic jets may be achieved with this device.

  1. Wind Tunnel Model Design for Sonic Boom Studies of Nozzle Jet Flows with Shock Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, Susan E.; Denison, Marie; Moini-Yekta, Shayan; Morr, Donald E.; Durston, Donald A.

    2016-01-01

    NASA and the U.S. aerospace industry are performing studies of supersonic aircraft concepts with low sonic boom pressure signatures. The computational analyses of modern aircraft designs have matured to the point where there is confidence in the prediction of the pressure signature from the front of the vehicle, but uncertainty remains in the aft signatures due to boundary layer and nozzle exhaust jet effects. Wind tunnel testing without inlet and nozzle exhaust jet effects at lower Reynolds numbers than in-flight make it difficult to accurately assess the computational solutions of flight vehicles. A wind tunnel test in the NASA Ames 9- by 7-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel is planned for February 2016 to address the nozzle jet effects on sonic boom. The experiment will provide pressure signatures of test articles that replicate waveforms from aircraft wings, tails, and aft fuselage (deck) components after passing through cold nozzle jet plumes. The data will provide a variety of nozzle plume and shock interactions for comparison with computational results. A large number of high-fidelity numerical simulations of a variety of shock generators were evaluated to define a reduced collection of suitable test models. The computational results of the candidate wind tunnel test models as they evolved are summarized, and pre-test computations of the final designs are provided.

  2. High-Energy-Density, Laboratory-Astrophysics Studies of Jets and Bow Shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, J M; Wilde, B H; Rosen, P A; Perry, T S; Khokhlov, A M; Coker, R F; Frank, A; Keiter, P A; Blue, B E; Drake, R P; Knauer, J P; Williams, R R

    2005-01-24

    Large-scale directional outflows of supersonic plasma, also known as ''jets'', are ubiquitous phenomena in astrophysics [1]. The interaction of such jets with surrounding matter often results in spectacular bow shocks, and intense radiation from radio to gamma-ray wavelengths. The traditional approach to understanding such phenomena is through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. However, such numerical simulations have limited resolution, often assume axial symmetry, do not include all relevant physical processes, and fail to scale correctly in Reynolds number and perhaps other key dimensionless parameters. Additionally, they are frequently not tested by comparison with laboratory experiments. Recent advances in high-energy-density physics using large inertial-confinement-fusion devices now allow controlled laboratory experiments on macroscopic volumes of plasma of direct relevance relevant to astrophysics [2]. In this Letter we report the first results of experiments designed to study the evolution of supersonic plasma jets and the bow shocks they drive into a surrounding medium. Our experiments reveal both regular and highly complex flow patterns in the bow shock, thus opening a new window--complementary to computer simulations--into understanding the nature of three-dimensional astrophysical jets.

  3. An Experimental Study of the Near Field Region of a Free Jet with Passive Mixing Tabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohl, D. G.; Foss, J. F.

    1997-01-01

    An experimental study was performed to determine the flow characteristics of a tabbed free jet. Results were acquired in the near field (nominally 2 tab widths upstream to 2 tab widths downstream of the exit plane) of a tabbed jet. Upstream pressure results showed static pressure distributions in both the x-and y-directions along the top surface of the tunnel. Hot-wire measurements showed rapid expansion of the core fluid into the ambient region. Two counter rotating regions of streamwise vorticity were shown on each side of the primary tab. An enhancement of the tabbed jet concept was proposed and tested. Specifically, two tabs, half the scale of the primary tab, were added to the primary tab to provide attachment surfaces for the normally occurring ejection of fluid. The secondary tabs caused a slight increase in the streamwise vorticity created from the upstream static pressure gradient while significantly increasing the re-oriented boundary layer vorticity. The combined pumping effect of the two counter rotating regions of vorticity caused a significant increase in the transport of the jet core fluid into the surrounding region.

  4. JET confinement studies and their scaling to high βN, ITER scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, D. C.; Laborde, L.; DeBoo, J. C.; Ryter, F.; Brix, M.; Challis, C. D.; de Vries, P.; Giroud, C.; Hobirk, J.; Howell, D.; Joffrin, E.; Luce, T. C.; Mailloux, J.; Pericoli-Ridolfini, V.; Sips, A. C. C.; Thomsen, K.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2008-12-01

    The ITER hybrid scenario aims to exploit non-inductive current drive to enable burn times in excess of 1000 s. To achieve this, and optimize fusion performance, requires high βN (the plasma pressure normalized to a stability scaling) and energy confinement equal to or greater than that predicted for the baseline scenario. This paper discusses results from the JET candidate hybrid scenario, where βN,MHD <= 3.6 plasmas have been produced. Despite a different initial phase, confinement relevant plasma parameters evolve rapidly towards those of equivalent ELMy H-modes and are well described by IPB98(y, 2). In contrast to previous ELMy H-mode studies, a dedicated β scan experiment in the JET hybrid candidate scenario shows a strong negative dependence of global confinement on βN. Analysis indicates that the core transport remains consistent with weakly dependent electrostatic transport, whilst the edge confinement decreases strongly with increasing βN. By combining global confinement data from ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D and JET hybrid scenario discharges, a multi-machine database is produced. In contrast to the JET case, confinement in ASDEX Upgrade and DIII-D is shown to be inconsistent with IPB98(y, 2) and alternative dependences are explored.

  5. Collective Interaction in a Linear Array of Supersonic Rectangular Jets: A Linear Spatial Instability Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    1999-01-01

    A linear spatial instability model for multiple spatially periodic supersonic rectangular jets is solved using Floquet-Bloch theory. It is assumed that in the region of interest a coherent wave can propagate. For the case studied large spatial growth rates are found. This work is motivated by an increase in mixing found in experimental measurements of spatially periodic supersonic rectangular jets with phase-locked screech and edge tone feedback locked subsonic jets. The results obtained in this paper suggests that phase-locked screech or edge tones may produce correlated spatially periodic jet flow downstream of the nozzles which creates a large span wise multi-nozzle region where a coherent wave can propagate. The large spatial growth rates for eddies obtained by model calculation herein are related to the increased mixing since eddies are the primary mechanism that transfer energy from the mean flow to the large turbulent structures. Calculations of spacial growth rates will be presented for a set of relative Mach numbers and spacings for which experimental measurements have been made. Calculations of spatial growth rates are presented for relative Mach numbers from 1.25 to 1.75 with ratios of nozzle spacing to nozzle width ratios from s/w(sub N) = 4 to s/w(sub N) = 13.7. The model may be of significant scientific and engineering value in the quest to understand and construct supersonic mixer-ejector nozzles which provide increased mixing and reduced noise.

  6. Core helium flash

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, P.W.; Deupree, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    The role of convection in the core helium flash is simulated by two-dimensional eddies interacting with the thermonuclear runaway. These eddies are followed by the explicit solution of the 2D conservation laws with a 2D finite difference hydrodynamics code. Thus, no phenomenological theory of convection such as the local mixing length theory is required. The core helium flash is violent, producing a deflagration wave. This differs from the detonation wave (and subsequent disruption of the entire star) produced in previous spherically symmetric violent core helium flashes as the second dimension provides a degree of relief which allows the expansion wave to decouple itself from the burning front. Our results predict that a considerable amount of helium in the core will be burned before the horizontal branch is reached and that some envelope mass loss is likely.

  7. Conjugate heat transfer study of a turbulent slot jet impinging on a moving plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achari, A. Madhusudana; Das, Manab Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Numerical simulation of the flow field and conjugate heat transfer in an impinging jet with moving impingement plate is one of the important problems as it mimics closely with practical applications in industries. The Yang-Shih version of low Reynolds number k-ɛ model has been used to resolve the flow field and the temperature field in a two-dimensional, steady, incompressible, confined, turbulent slot jet impinging normally on a moving flat plate of finite thickness. The turbulence intensity and the Reynolds number considered at the inlet are 2 % and 15,000, respectively. The bottom face of the impingement plate has been maintained at a constant temperature higher than the nozzle exit temperature. The confinement plate has been considered to be adiabatic. The nozzle-to-surface spacing for the above study has been taken to be 6 and the surface-to-jet velocity ratios have been taken over a range of 0.25-1. The effects of impingement plate motion on the flow field and temperature field have been discussed elaborately with reference to stationary impingement plate. The dependence of flow field and fluid temperature field on impingement plate motion has been analyzed by plotting streamlines, isotherms for different plate speeds. A thorough study of flow characteristics for different surface-to-jet velocity ratios has been carried out by plotting profiles of mean vertical and horizontal components of velocity, pressure distribution, local shear stress distribution. The isotherms in the impingement plate of finite thickness, the distributions of solid-fluid interface temperature, the local Nusselt number, and the local heat flux for different surface-to-jet velocity ratios added to the understanding of conjugate heat transfer phenomenon.

  8. Parallel data analysis in a multichannel flash-ADC-system

    SciTech Connect

    Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Schmitt, H.V.D.; Wagner, A.; Walter, P.V.; Zimmer, M.

    1987-02-01

    Parallel analysis of drift chamber signals with M68000 processors has proven to be an efficient way to deal with the tremendous data flow generated by high speed (100 MHz) Flash-ADCs in real time. The authors report on the experience gained with a network of 34 processors, placed in 3 VME crates, to read out the 3072 Flash-ADC channels of the JADE Jet-Chamber at PETRA (1). The properties of such a system are compared to more conventional readout schemes for drift chambers.

  9. Study on the influences of interaction behaviors between multiple combustion-gas jets on expansion characteristics of Taylor cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Xiaochun; Yu, Yonggang; Zhang, Qi

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate means of controlling the interior ballistic stability of a bulk-loaded propellant gun (BLPG). Experiments on the interaction of twin combustion gas jets and liquid medium in a cylindrical stepped-wall combustion chamber are conducted in detail to obtain time series processes of jet expansion, and a numerical simulation under the same working conditions is also conducted to verify the reliability of the numerical method by comparing numerical results and experimental results. From this, numerical simulations on mutual interference and expansion characteristics of multiple combustion gas jets (four, six, and eight jets) in liquid medium are carried out, and the distribution characteristic of pressure, velocity, temperature, and evolutionary processes of Taylor cavities and streamlines of jet flow field are obtained in detail. The results of numerical simulations show that when different numbers of combustion gas jets expand in liquid medium, there are two different types of vortices in the jet flow field, including corner vortices of liquid phase near the step and backflow vortices of gas phase within Taylor cavities. Because of these two types of vortices, the radial expansion characteristic of the jets is increased, while changing numbers of combustion gas jets can restrain Kelvin-Helmholtz instability to a certain degree in jet expansion processes, which can at last realize the goal of controlling the interior ballistic stability of a BLPG. The optimum method for both suppressing Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and promoting radial expansion of Taylor cavities can be determined by analyzing the change of characteristic parameters in a jet flow field.

  10. Synthetic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milanovic, Ivana M.

    2003-01-01

    Current investigation of synthetic jets and synthetic jets in cross-flow examined the effects of orifice geometry and dimensions, momentum-flux ratio, cluster of orifices, pitch and yaw angles as well as streamwise development of the flow field. This comprehensive study provided much needed experimental information related to the various control strategies. The results of the current investigation on isolated and clustered synthetic jets with and without cross-flow will be further analyzed and documented in detail. Presentations at national conferences and publication of peer- reviewed journal articles are also expected. Projected publications will present both the mean and turbulent properties of the flow field, comparisons made with the data available in an open literature, as well as recommendations for the future work.

  11. Study of t$\\bar{t}$ production in tau jets channel at CDFII using neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Amerio, Silvia

    2005-12-01

    CDF (Collider Detector at Fermilab) is a particle detector located at Fermi National Laboratories, near Chicago. it allows to study decay products of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. During its first period of data taking (RunI), CDF observed for the first time the top quark (1995). The current period of data taking (RunII) is devoted to precise measurements of top properties and to search for new physics. This thesis work is about the top decay channel named τ + jets. A t$\\bar{t}$ pair decays in two W bosons and two b quarks. In a τ + jets event, one out of the two W decays into two jets of hadrons, while the other produces a τ lepton and a neutrino; the τ decays semileptonically in one or more charged and neutral pions while b quarks hadronize producing two jets of particles. Thus the final state of a τ + jets event has this specific signature: five jets, one τ-like, i.e. narrow and with low track multiplicity, two from b quarks, two from a W boson and a large amount of missing energy from two τ neutrinos. They search for this signal in 311 pb-1 of data collected with TOP{_}MULTIJET trigger. They use neural networks to separate signal from background and on the selected sample they perform a t$\\bar{t}$ production cross section measurement. The thesis is structured as follows: in Chapter 1 they outline the physics of top and τ, concentrating on their discovery, production mechanisms and current physics results involving them. Chapter 2 is devoted to the description of the experimental setup: the accelerator complex first and CDF detector then. The trigger system is described in Chapter 3, while Chapter 4 shows how particles are reconstructed exploiting information from different CDF subdetectors. With Chapter 5 they begin to present their analysis: we use a feed forward neural network based on a minimization algorithm developed in Trento University, called Reactive Taboo Search (RTS), especially designed to rapidly

  12. Downstream development of baroclinic waves in the midlatitude jet induced by extratropical transition: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua

    2015-04-01

    This study uses eddy kinetic energy analysis and a targeting method to investigate how an extratropical transition (ET) event induced downstream development (the modification of the midlatitude flow downstream of the ET system) in the midlatitude jet environment. The downstream development showed distinct characteristics of "coupling development" and being "boundary-trapped". Eddies (potential disturbances) first developed at the upper levels, and these triggered lower-level eddy development, with all eddies decaying away from the tropopause and the surface. Thereafter, a lower-level eddy caught up with the upper-level eddy ahead of it, and they coupled to form a cyclone extending through the whole troposphere. Vertical ageostrophic geopotential flux may be a crucial dynamic factor throughout the eddy's lower-level growth, boundary-trapping, and coupling development. Together with barotropic conversion, the ageostrophic geopotential fluxes that were transported from Hurricane Fabian (2003) to the midlatitudes by the outflow led to downstream ridge development in the upper-level jet. The strong downstream advection of eddy kinetic energy in the exit region of the jet streak triggered downstream trough development. The well-known ridge-trough couplet thus formed. The vertical ageostrophic fluxes that were transported downward from the developed upper-level systems converged near the surface and resulted in lower-level eddy growth. Baroclinic conversion was negligible near the boundaries, while it was the main source of eddy kinetic energy at mid-levels. In the upper-level jet, potential energy was converted to the mean kinetic energy of the jet, which in turn was converted to eddy kinetic energy through barotropic conversion.

  13. Cartographic production for the Florida Shelf Habitat (FLaSH) map study: generation of surface grids, contours, and KMZ files

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, Lisa L.; Hansen, Mark; Raabe, Ellen; Knorr, Paul O.; Browne, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The Florida shelf represents a finite source of economic resources, including commercial and recreational fisheries, tourism, recreation, sand and gravel resources, phosphate, and freshwater reserves. Yet the basic information needed to locate resources, or to interpret and utilize existing data, comes from many sources, dates, and formats. A multi-agency effort is underway to coordinate and prioritize the compilation of suitable datasets for an integrated information system of Florida’s coastal and ocean resources. This report and the associated data files represent part of the effort to make data accessible and useable with computer-mapping systems, web-based technologies, and user-friendly visualization tools. Among the datasets compiled and developed are seafloor imagery, marine sediment data, and existing bathymetric data. A U.S. Geological Survey-sponsored workshop in January 2007 resulted in the establishment of mapping priorities for the state. Bathymetry was identified as a common priority among agencies and researchers. State-of-the-art computer-mapping techniques and data-processing tools were used to develop shelf-wide raster and vector data layers. Florida Shelf Habitat (FLaSH) Mapping Project (http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/flash) endeavors to locate available data, identify data gaps, synthesize existing information, and expand our understanding of geologic processes in our dynamic coastal and marine systems.

  14. Application of digital speckle photography to flash X-ray studies of internal deformation fields in impact experiments.

    PubMed

    Synnergren, P; Goldrein, H T; Proud, W G

    1999-07-01

    A technique to measure two-dimensional deformation fields of a layer inside materials during dynamic events such as impact experiments is presented. Even optically opaque materials like cement can be evaluated when flash x rays are used. Blocks of polyester and cement were prepared with a layer of x-ray-absorbing lead particles. The specimens were then hit by a 9-mm-diameter steel sphere (ball bearing) fired from a 9-mm-bore gas gun at a velocity of 373.5 +/- 3.0 ms(-1). A 30-ns-long x-ray pulse exposed one radiograph before impact; another radiograph was exposed a short time after the impact on the specimen. The two-dimensional displacement field was obtained when the x-ray radiographs were digitized by a conventional flatbed scanner, and a digital speckle photography algorithm was used to calculate the displacements. The flash x-ray technique allowed examination of the deformation at the layer inside the material during failure, thus giving interesting data about the material flow field around the impactor. PMID:18323879

  15. A theoretical study of the application of jet flap circulation control for reduction of rotor vibratory forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piziali, R. A.; Trenka, A. R.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a study to investigate the theoretical potential of a jet-flap control system for reducing the vertical and horizontal non-cancelling helicopter rotor blade root shears are presented. A computer simulation describing the jet-flap control rotor system was developed to examine the reduction of each harmonic of the transmitted shears as a function of various rotor and jet parameters, rotor operating conditions and rotor configurations. The computer simulation of the air-loads included the influences of nonuniform inflow and blade elastic motions. (no hub motions were allowed.) The rotor trim and total rotor power (including jet compressor power) were also determined. It was found that all harmonics of the transmitted horizontal and vertical shears could be suppressed simultaneously using a single jet control.

  16. Second Interim Report NASA - easyJet Collaboration on the Human Factors Monitoring Program (HFMP) Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivistava, Ashok N.; Barton, Phil

    2012-01-01

    This is the second interim report jointly prepared by NASA and easyJet on the work performed under the agreement to collaborate on a study of the factors entailed in flight and cabin-crew fatigue, and decreases in performance associated with fatigue. The objective of this Agreement is to generate reliable procedures that aid in understanding the levels and characteristics of flight and cabin-crew fatigue factors, both latent and proximate, whose confluence will likely result in unacceptable crew performance. This study entails the analyses of numerical and textual data collected during operational flights. NASA and easyJet are both interested in assessing and testing NASA s automated capabilities for extracting operationally significant information from very large, diverse (textual and numerical) databases; much larger than can be handled practically by human experts.

  17. NASA - easyJet Collaboration on the Human Factors Monitoring Program (HFMP) Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivistava, Ashok N.; Barton, Phil

    2012-01-01

    This is the first annual report jointly prepared by NASA and easyJet on the work performed under the agreement to collaborate on a study of the many factors entailed in flight - and cabin-crew fatigue and documenting the decreases in performance associated with fatigue. The objective of this Agreement is to generate reliable, automated procedures that improve understanding of the levels and characteristics of flight - and cabin-crew fatigue factors, both latent and proximate, whose confluence will likely result in unacceptable flight crew performance. This study entails the analyses of numerical and textual data collected during operational flights. NASA and easyJet are both interested in assessing and testing NASA s automated capabilities for extracting operationally significant information from very large, diverse (textual and numerical) databases, much larger than can be handled practically by human experts.

  18. Electrical studies and plasma characterization of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet operated at low frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Giuliani, L.; Xaubet, M.; Grondona, D.; Minotti, F.; Kelly, H.

    2013-06-15

    Low-temperature, high-pressure plasma jets have an extensive use in medical and biological applications. Much work has been devoted to study these applications while comparatively fewer studies appear to be directed to the discharge itself. In this work, in order to better understand the kind of electrical discharge and the plasma states existing in those devices, a study of the electrical characteristics of a typical plasma jet, operated at atmospheric pressure, using either air or argon, is reported. It is found that the experimentally determined electrical characteristics are consistent with the model of a thermal arc discharge, with a highly collisional cathode sheet. The only exception is the case of argon at the smallest electrode separation studied, around 1 mm in which case the discharge is better modeled as either a non-thermal arc or a high-pressure glow. Also, variations of the electrical behavior at different gas flow rates are interpreted, consistently with the arc model, in terms of the development of fluid turbulence in the external jet.

  19. The Spectroscopic Study of Estrogen and its Hydrated Clusters in a Super Sonic Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishima, Fumiya; Inokuchi, Yoshiya; Ebata, Takayuki

    2012-06-01

    Structures of estrogen and its hydrated clusters have been studied by several laser spectroscopies in supersonic jet. The electronic spectrum of estrogen shows several origin bands. By observing UV-UV hole-burning and IR-UV spectra, it is concluded they are due to different conformers originating from difference of orientation of OH group(s). We also observed electronic and IR spectra of estrogen-H_2O. By aids of DFT calculations, the conformations and hydrated structures are determined.

  20. A study of the efficiency of hydrogen liquefaction. [jet aircraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, C. R.; Shaner, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    The search for an environmentally acceptable fuel to eventually replace petroleum-based fuels for long-range jet aircraft has singled out liquid hydrogen as an outstanding candidate. Hydrogen liquefaction is discussed, along with the effect of several operating parameters on process efficiency. A feasible large-scale commercial hydrogen liquefaction facility based on the results of the efficiency study is described. Potential future improvements in hydrogen liquefaction are noted.

  1. Simulating spatial aspects of a flash flood using the Monte Carlo method and GRASS GIS: a case study of the Malá Svinka Basin (Slovakia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofierka, Jaroslav; Knutová, Monika

    2015-04-01

    This paper focuses on the flash flood assessment using a spatially-distributed hydrological model based on the Monte Carlo simulation method. The model is implemented as r.sim.water module in GRASS GIS and was applied to the Malá Svinka Basin in Eastern Slovakia where a heavy rainfall (100 mm/hr.) caused a flash flood event with deadly consequences in July 1998. The event was simulated using standard datasets representing elevation, soils and land cover. The results were captured in time series of water depth maps showing gradual changes in water depths across the basin. The hydrological effects of roads in the study area were simulated using the preferential flow feature of the model. This simulation helped to identify source areas contributing to flooding in built-up areas. The implementation in a GIS environment simplifies the data preparation and eventual modification for various scenarios and flood protection measures. The simulation confirmed excellent robustness and flexibility of the method.

  2. Laboratory studies of the deposition of alkali sulfate vapors from combustion gases using a flash-evaporation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, Daniel E.; Liang, Baishen

    1986-01-01

    A relatively simple experimental technique is proposed and demonstrated for making measurements of absolute dewpoints and relative deposition rates from flowing combustion gases containing condensible inorganic vapors. The method involves first accumulating condensate on a Pt ribbon target maintained below the dewpoint and then flash-evaporating the condensate into the filament wake, where its alkali content is monitored by alkali-atom emission spectroscopy. The advantages of the method over others are demonstrated; in particular, the method can detect liquid condensate inventories which are small enough to be negligibly influenced by surface runoff produced by gas-side shear stress and liquid condensate surface tension gradients. Illustrative Na2SO4 and K2SO4 deposition rate data and corresponding dewpoint data obtained in a series of alkali-seeded propane/air atmospheric flames are presented and discussed.

  3. Experimental studies of shock wave/wall jet interaction in hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Michael S.; Rodriguez, Kathleen M.; Nowak, Robert; Olsen, George

    1990-01-01

    The interaction between a planar shock wave and a wall jet produced by slot cooling in turbulent hypersonic flow was experimentally studied. Detailed distributions of heat transfer and pressure are obtained in the incident shock/wall jet interaction region for a series of shock strengths and impingement positions for two nozzle heights. The major result is that the cooling film could be readily dispersed by relatively weak incident shocks such that the peak heating in the recompression region was not significantly reduced by even the largest levels of film cooling. Regions of boundary layer separation were induced in the film cooling layer, the size of which first increased and then decreased with increasing film cooling. The size of the separated regions and magnitude of the recompression heating were not strongly influenced by the thickness of the cooling film or point of shock impingement relative to the exit plane of the nozzles.

  4. Application of the Bernoulli enthalpy concept to the study of vortex noise and jet impingement noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    A complete theory of aeroacoustics of homentropic fluid media is developed and compared with previous theories. The theory is applied to study the interaction of sound with vortex flows, for the DC-9 in a standard take-off configuration. The maximum engine-wake interference noise is estimated to be 3 or 4 db in the ground plane. It is shown that the noise produced by a corotating vortex pair departs significantly from the compact M scaling law for eddy Mach numbers (M) greater than 0.1. An estimate of jet impingement noise is given that is in qualitative agreement with experimental results. The increased noise results primarily from the nonuniform acceleration of turbulent eddies through the stagnation point flow. It is shown that the corotating vortex pair can be excited or de-excited by an externally applied sound field. The model is used to qualitatively explain experimental results on excited jets.

  5. Liquid helium inertial jet for comparative study of classical and quantum turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Duri, D.; Charvin, P.; Rousset, B.; Poncet, J.-M.; Diribarne, P.

    2011-11-15

    We present a new cryogenic wind tunnel facility developed to study the high Reynolds number developed classical or quantum turbulence in liquid {sup 4}He. A stable inertial round jet flow with a Reynolds number of 4 x 10{sup 6} can be sustained in both He I and He II down to a minimum temperature of 1.7 K. The circuit can be pressurized up to 3.5 x 10{sup 5} Pa. The system has been designed to exploit the self-similar properties of the jet far field in order to adapt to the spatial resolution of the existing probes. Multiple and complementary sensors can be simultaneously installed to obtain spatial and time resolved measurements. The technical difficulties and design details are described and the system performance is presented.

  6. Modelling third harmonic ion cyclotron acceleration of deuterium beams for JET fusion product studies experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, M.; Johnson, T.; Dumont, R.; Eriksson, J.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Giacomelli, L.; Girardo, J.-B.; Hellsten, T.; Khilkevitch, E.; Kiptily, V. G.; Koskela, T.; Mantsinen, M.; Nocente, M.; Salewski, M.; Sharapov, S. E.; Shevelev, A. E.; Contributors, JET

    2016-11-01

    Recent JET experiments have been dedicated to the studies of fusion reactions between deuterium (D) and Helium-3 (3He) ions using neutral beam injection (NBI) in synergy with third harmonic ion cyclotron radio-frequency heating (ICRH) of the beam. This scenario generates a fast ion deuterium tail enhancing DD and D3He fusion reactions. Modelling and measuring the fast deuterium tail accurately is essential for quantifying the fusion products. This paper presents the modelling of the D distribution function resulting from the NBI+ICRF heating scheme, reinforced by a comparison with dedicated JET fast ion diagnostics, showing an overall good agreement. Finally, a sawtooth activity for these experiments has been observed and interpreted using SPOT/RFOF simulations in the framework of Porcelli’s theoretical model, where NBI+ICRH accelerated ions are found to have a strong stabilizing effect, leading to monster sawteeth.

  7. Experimental study of near-field entrainment of moderately overpressured jets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solovitz, S.A.; Mastin, L.G.; Saffaraval, F.

    2011-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments have been conducted to study the velocity flow fields in the developing flow region of high-speed jets. These velocity distributions were examined to determine the entrained mass flow over a range of geometric and flow conditions, including overpressured cases up to an overpressure ratio of 2.83. In the region near the jet exit, all measured flows exhibited the same entrainment up until the location of the first shock when overpressured. Beyond this location, the entrainment was reduced with increasing overpressure ratio, falling to approximately 60 of the magnitudes seen when subsonic. Since entrainment ratios based on lower speed, subsonic results are typically used in one-dimensional volcanological models of plume development, the current analytical methods will underestimate the likelihood of column collapse. In addition, the concept of the entrainment ratio normalization is examined in detail, as several key assumptions in this methodology do not apply when overpressured.

  8. Studies of QCD B-physics and jet handedness at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, P.N.; The SLD Collaboration

    1993-06-01

    We present tests of the flavor independence of strong interactions via preliminary measurements of the ratios {alpha}{sub s}/{sub alpha}{sub s}(udsc) and {alpha}{sub s}(uds)/{alpha}{sub s}(bc) using data collected by the SLD experiment at SLAC during the 1992 SLD/SLC run. In addition, we have measured the difference in charged particle multiplicity between Z{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b} and Z{sup 0} {yields} u{bar u}, d{bar d}, s{bar s} events, and find that it supports the prediction of perturbative QCD that the multiplicity difference be independent of center-of-mass energy. We have also made a preliminary study of jet polarization and find, using a charge-signed definition, a small net handedness in our sample of hadronic jets.

  9. A study of the glow discharge plasma jet of the novel Hamburger-electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenzheng; Ma, Chuanlong; Yang, Xiao; Cui, Weisheng; Chen, Xiuyang

    2016-08-01

    To generate atmospheric pressure glow discharge plasma jets (APGDPJs), a novel Hamburger-electrode was proposed. Through the study on electric field distributions, flow field distributions, and characteristics of the discharge and jet, we found that adopting the mode of dielectric barrier discharge with non-uniform thickness of dielectric, it was easy to form the strong electric field areas which were conducive to generate discharge and electric field distributions with large electric field intensity in the narrow gap and weak electric field intensity in the wide gap that were not inclined to form a filament discharge. Using the structure of evenly distributed inner electrodes, it was easy to weaken the pressure of strong electric field areas and form flow field distributions which is beneficial for taking out the high density charged particles and generating APGDPJs. Stable APGDPJs in nitrogen with 3.5 mm in diameter and 9 mm in length were formed by using the novel Hamburger-electrode.

  10. A Study on Aircraft Structure and Jet Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Gil Moon; Park, Hwan Kyu; Kim, Jong Il; Kim, Jin Won; Kim, Jin Heung; Lee, Moo Seok; Chung, Nak Kyu

    1985-12-01

    The one of critical factor in gas turbine engine performance is high turbine inlet gas temperature. Therefore, the turbine rotor has so many problems which must be considered such as the turbine blade cooling, thermal stress of turbine disk due to severe temperature gradient, turbine rotor tip clearance, under the high operation temperature. The purpose of this study is to provide the temperature distribution and heat flux in turbine disk which is required to considered premensioned problem by the Finite Difference Method and the Finite Element Methods on the steady state condition.

  11. A numerical and experimental study of confined swirling jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikjooy, M.; Mongia, H. C.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Mcdonell, V. G.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical and experimental study of a confined strong swirling flow is presented. Detailed velocity measurements are made using a two-component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) technique. Computations are performed using a differential second-moment (DSM) closure. The effect of inlet dissipation rate on calculated mean and turbulence fields is investigated. Various model constants are employed in the pressure-strain model to demonstrate their influences on the predicted results. Finally, comparison of the DSM calculations with the algebraic second-monent (ASM) closure results shows that the DSM is better suited for complex swirling flow analysis.

  12. Developments towards in-gas-jet laser spectroscopy studies of actinium isotopes at LISOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeder, S.; Bastin, B.; Block, M.; Creemers, P.; Delahaye, P.; Ferrer, R.; Fléchard, X.; Franchoo, S.; Ghys, L.; Gaffney, L. P.; Granados, C.; Heinke, R.; Hijazi, L.; Huyse, M.; Kron, T.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Laatiaoui, M.; Lecesne, N.; Luton, F.; Moore, I. D.; Martinez, Y.; Mogilevskiy, E.; Naubereit, P.; Piot, J.; Rothe, S.; Savajols, H.; Sels, S.; Sonnenschein, V.; Traykov, E.; Van Beveren, C.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P.; Wendt, K.; Zadvornaya, A.

    2016-06-01

    To study exotic nuclides at the borders of stability with laser ionization and spectroscopy techniques, highest efficiencies in combination with a high spectral resolution are required. These usually opposing requirements are reconciled by applying the in-gas-laser ionization and spectroscopy (IGLIS) technique in the supersonic gas jet produced by a de Laval nozzle installed at the exit of the stopping gas cell. Carrying out laser ionization in the low-temperature and low density supersonic gas jet eliminates pressure broadening, which will significantly improve the spectral resolution. This article presents the required modifications at the Leuven Isotope Separator On-Line (LISOL) facility that are needed for the first on-line studies of in-gas-jet laser spectroscopy. Different geometries for the gas outlet and extraction ion guides have been tested for their performance regarding the acceptance of laser ionized species as well as for their differential pumping capacities. The specifications and performance of the temporarily installed high repetition rate laser system, including a narrow bandwidth injection-locked Ti:sapphire laser, are discussed and first preliminary results on neutron-deficient actinium isotopes are presented indicating the high capability of this novel technique.

  13. Wind Tunnel Model Design for Sonic Boom Studies of Nozzle Jet with Shock Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, Susan E.; Denison, Marie; Sozer, Emre; Moini-Yekta, Shayan

    2016-01-01

    NASA and Industry are performing vehicle studies of configurations with low sonic boom pressure signatures. The computational analyses of modern configuration designs have matured to the point where there is confidence in the prediction of the pressure signature from the front of the vehicle, but uncertainty in the aft signatures with often greater boundary layer effects and nozzle jet pressures. Wind tunnel testing at significantly lower Reynolds numbers than in flight and without inlet and nozzle jet pressures make it difficult to accurately assess the computational solutions of flight vehicles. A wind tunnel test in the NASA Ames 9- by 7-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel from Mach 1.6 to 2.0 will be used to assess the effects of shocks from components passing through nozzle jet plumes on the sonic boom pressure signature and provide datasets for comparison with CFD codes. A large number of high-fidelity numerical simulations of wind tunnel test models with a variety of shock generators that simulate horizontal tails and aft decks have been studied to provide suitable models for sonic boom pressure measurements using a minimally intrusive pressure rail in the wind tunnel. The computational results are presented and the evolution of candidate wind tunnel models is summarized and discussed in this paper.

  14. Experimental and Modeling Studies of the Combustion Characteristics of Conventional and Alternative Jet Fuels. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meeks, Ellen; Naik, Chitral V.; Puduppakkam, Karthik V.; Modak, Abhijit; Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.; Tsotsis, Theo; Westbrook, Charles K.

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this project have been to develop a comprehensive set of fundamental data regarding the combustion behavior of jet fuels and appropriately associated model fuels. Based on the fundamental study results, an auxiliary objective was to identify differentiating characteristics of molecular fuel components that can be used to explain different fuel behavior and that may ultimately be used in the planning and design of optimal fuel-production processes. The fuels studied in this project were Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) fuels and biomass-derived jet fuels that meet certain specifications of currently used jet propulsion applications. Prior to this project, there were no systematic experimental flame data available for such fuels. One of the key goals has been to generate such data, and to use this data in developing and verifying effective kinetic models. The models have then been reduced through automated means to enable multidimensional simulation of the combustion characteristics of such fuels in real combustors. Such reliable kinetic models, validated against fundamental data derived from laminar flames using idealized flow models, are key to the development and design of optimal combustors and fuels. The models provide direct information about the relative contribution of different molecular constituents to the fuel performance and can be used to assess both combustion and emissions characteristics.

  15. Experimental and numerical study on the dynamic pressure caused by the bubble jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Zhang, A. M.; Yao, X. L.

    2015-12-01

    The high speed liquid jet is an important mechanism of damage to hydraulic machinery by cavitation bubbles, as well as damage to vessels by underwater explosion bubble. In this study, the bubble motion near a wall and the pressure impulse are investigated through experimental and numerical methods. In the experiment, the bubble is generated by the electric discharge, and a high speed camera is used to capture the bubble motion. Numerical studies are conducted using the boundary element method, and the vortex ring model is adopted to deal with the discontinued potential of the toroidal bubble. Calculated results show excellent agreement with experimental observations. Meanwhile, the dynamic pressure caused by the bubble in the flow domain is calculated by an auxiliary function, which improves the accuracy of the results. A highly localized pressure region will be generated on the wall by the bubble jet. The optimal stand-off parameter (the ratio of the distance the bubble center at inception from the wall to the maximum bubble radius) for a most damaging jet formation is around 0.9.

  16. Protostellar Jets: Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitorino, B. F.; Jatenco-Pereira, V.; Opher, R.

    1998-11-01

    Numerical simulations of astrophysical jets have been made in order to study their collimation and internal structure. Recently Ouyed & Pudritz (1997) did numerical simulations of axi-simetric magnetocentrifugal jets from a keplerian acretion disk employing the eulerian finite difference code Zeus-2D. During their simulation, it was raised a steady state jet confirming a lot of results of the MHD winds steady state theory. Following this scenario we did tridimensional numerial simulations of this model allowing the jet, after a perturbation, evolve into a not steady state producing the helical features observed in some protostellar jets.

  17. Lightning flash multiplicity in eastern Mediterranean thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yair, Y.; Shalev, S.; Erlich, Z.; Agrachov, A.; Katz, E.; Saaroni, H.; Price, C.; Ziv, B.

    2014-02-01

    Cloud-to-ground lightning flashes usually consist of one or several strokes coming in very short temporal succession and close spatial proximity. A commonly used method for converting stroke data into flashes is using the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) thresholds of maximum temporal separation of 0.5 s and maximum lateral distance of 10 km radius between successive strokes. In the present study, we tested a location-based algorithm with several spatial and temporal ranges, and analyzed stroke data obtained by the Israel Lightning Location System (ILLS) during one year (1.8.2009-31.7.2010). We computed the multiplicity, the percentage of single stroke flashes and the geographical distribution of average multiplicity values for thunderstorms in the Eastern Mediterranean region. Results show that for the NLDN thresholds, the percentage of single stroke flashes in Israel was 37% and the average multiplicity was 1.7. We reanalyzed the data with a spatial range that equals twice the ILLS location error and shorter times. For the new thresholds of maximum distance of 2.5 km and maximum allowed temporal separation of 0.2 s we find that the mean multiplicity of negative CGs is lowered to 1.4 and find a percentage of 58% of single stroke flashes. A unique severe storm from 30 October 2009 is analyzed and compared with the annual average of 2009/2010, showing that large deviations from the mean values can occur in specific events.

  18. Experimental studies on the physico-mechanical properties of jet-grout columns in sandy and silty soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akin, Muge K.

    2016-04-01

    The term of ground improvement states to the modification of the engineering properties of soils. Jet-grouting is one of the grouting methods among various ground improvement techniques. During jet-grouting, different textures of columns can be obtained depending on the characteristics of surrounding subsoil as well as the adopted jet-grouting system for each site is variable. In addition to textural properties, strength and index parameters of jet-grout columns are highly affected by the adjacent soil. In this study, the physical and mechanical properties of jet-grout columns constructed at two different sites in silty and sandy soil conditions were determined by laboratory tests. A number of statistical relationships between physical and mechanical properties of soilcrete were established in this study in order to investigate the dependency of numerous variables. The relationship between qu and γd is more reliable for sandy soilcrete than that of silty columns considering the determination coefficients. Positive linear relationships between Vp and γd with significantly high determination coefficients were obtained for the jet-grout columns in silt and sand. The regression analyses indicate that the P-wave velocity is a very dominant parameter for the estimation of physical and mechanical properties of jet-grout columns and should be involved during the quality control of soilcrete material despite the intensive use of uniaxial compressive strength test. Besides, it is concluded that the dry unit weight of jet-grout column is a good indicator of the efficiency of employed operational parameters during jet-grouting.

  19. Study of Jet-Propulsion System Comprising Blower, Burner, and Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Eldon W

    1944-01-01

    A study was made of the performance of a jet-propulsion system composed of an engine-driven blower, a combustion chamber, and a discharge nozzle. A simplified analysis is made of this system for the purpose of showing in concise form the effect of the important design variables and operating conditions on jet thrust, thrust horsepower, and fuel consumption. Curves are presented that permit a rapid evaluation of the performance of this system for a range of operating conditions. The performance for an illustrative case of a power plant of the type under consideration id discussed in detail. It is shown that for a given airplane velocity the jet thrust horsepower depends mainly on the blower power and the amount of fuel burned in the jet; the higher the thrust horsepower is for a given blower power, the higher the fuel consumption per thrust horsepower. Within limits the amount of air pumped has only a secondary effect on the thrust horsepower and efficiency. A lower limit on air flow for a given fuel flow occurs where the combustion-chamber temperature becomes excessive on the basis of the strength of the structure. As the air-flow rate is increased, an upper limit is reached where, for a given blower power, fuel-flow rate, and combustion-chamber size, further increase in air flow causes a decrease in power and efficiency. This decrease in power is caused by excessive velocity through the combustion chamber, attended by an excessive pressure drop caused by momentum changes occurring during combustion.

  20. CONSTRAINING JET PRODUCTION SCENARIOS BY STUDIES OF NARROW-LINE RADIO GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Sikora, Marek; Stasinska, Grazyna; Koziel-Wierzbowska, Dorota; Madejski, Greg M.; Asari, Natalia V.

    2013-03-01

    We study a large sample of narrow-line radio galaxies (NLRGs) with extended radio structures. Using 1.4 GHz radio luminosities L {sub 1.4}, narrow optical emission line luminosities L {sub [OIII]} and L{sub H{sub {alpha}}}, as well as black hole masses M {sub BH} derived from stellar velocity dispersions measured from the optical spectra obtained with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we find that (1) NLRGs cover about four decades of the Eddington ratio, {lambda} {identical_to} L {sub bol}/L {sub Edd}{proportional_to}L {sub line}/M {sub BH}; (2) L {sub 1.4}/M {sub BH} strongly correlates with {lambda}; and (3) radio loudness, R{identical_to}L{sub 1.4}/L{sub line}, strongly anti-correlates with {lambda}. A very broad range of the Eddington ratio indicates that the parent population of NLRGs includes both radio-loud quasars (RLQs) and broad-line radio galaxies (BLRGs). The correlations they obey and their high jet production efficiencies favor a jet production model which involves the so-called magnetically choked accretion scenario. In this model, production of the jet is dominated by the Blandford-Znajek mechanism, and the magnetic fields in the vicinity of the central black hole are confined by the ram pressure of the accretion flow. Since large net magnetic flux accumulated in central regions of the accretion flow required by the model can take place only via geometrically thick accretion, we speculate that the massive, 'cold' accretion events associated with luminous emission-line active galactic nucleus can be accompanied by an efficient jet production only if preceded by a hot, very sub-Eddington accretion phase.

  1. "Know What to Do If You Encounter a Flash Flood": Mental Models Analysis for Improving Flash Flood Risk Communication and Public Decision Making.

    PubMed

    Lazrus, Heather; Morss, Rebecca E; Demuth, Julie L; Lazo, Jeffrey K; Bostrom, Ann

    2016-02-01

    Understanding how people view flash flood risks can help improve risk communication, ultimately improving outcomes. This article analyzes data from 26 mental models interviews about flash floods with members of the public in Boulder, Colorado, to understand their perspectives on flash flood risks and mitigation. The analysis includes a comparison between public and professional perspectives by referencing a companion mental models study of Boulder-area professionals. A mental models approach can help to diagnose what people already know about flash flood risks and responses, as well as any critical gaps in their knowledge that might be addressed through improved risk communication. A few public interviewees mentioned most of the key concepts discussed by professionals as important for flash flood warning decision making. However, most interviewees exhibited some incomplete understandings and misconceptions about aspects of flash flood development and exposure, effects, or mitigation that may lead to ineffective warning decisions when a flash flood threatens. These include important misunderstandings about the rapid evolution of flash floods, the speed of water in flash floods, the locations and times that pose the greatest flash flood risk in Boulder, the value of situational awareness and environmental cues, and the most appropriate responses when a flash flood threatens. The findings point to recommendations for ways to improve risk communication, over the long term and when an event threatens, to help people quickly recognize and understand threats, obtain needed information, and make informed decisions in complex, rapidly evolving extreme weather events such as flash floods.

  2. "Know What to Do If You Encounter a Flash Flood": Mental Models Analysis for Improving Flash Flood Risk Communication and Public Decision Making.

    PubMed

    Lazrus, Heather; Morss, Rebecca E; Demuth, Julie L; Lazo, Jeffrey K; Bostrom, Ann

    2016-02-01

    Understanding how people view flash flood risks can help improve risk communication, ultimately improving outcomes. This article analyzes data from 26 mental models interviews about flash floods with members of the public in Boulder, Colorado, to understand their perspectives on flash flood risks and mitigation. The analysis includes a comparison between public and professional perspectives by referencing a companion mental models study of Boulder-area professionals. A mental models approach can help to diagnose what people already know about flash flood risks and responses, as well as any critical gaps in their knowledge that might be addressed through improved risk communication. A few public interviewees mentioned most of the key concepts discussed by professionals as important for flash flood warning decision making. However, most interviewees exhibited some incomplete understandings and misconceptions about aspects of flash flood development and exposure, effects, or mitigation that may lead to ineffective warning decisions when a flash flood threatens. These include important misunderstandings about the rapid evolution of flash floods, the speed of water in flash floods, the locations and times that pose the greatest flash flood risk in Boulder, the value of situational awareness and environmental cues, and the most appropriate responses when a flash flood threatens. The findings point to recommendations for ways to improve risk communication, over the long term and when an event threatens, to help people quickly recognize and understand threats, obtain needed information, and make informed decisions in complex, rapidly evolving extreme weather events such as flash floods. PMID:26369521

  3. Nonlinear eddy viscosity modeling and experimental study of jet spreading rates.

    PubMed

    Heschl, C; Inthavong, K; Sanz, W; Tu, J

    2014-02-01

    Indoor airflow pattern is strongly influenced by turbulent shear and turbulent normal stresses that are responsible for entrainment effects and turbulence-driven secondary motion. Therefore, an accurate prediction of room airflows requires reliable modeling of these turbulent quantities. The most widely used turbulence models include RANS-based models that provide quick solutions but are known to fail in turbulent free shear and wall-affected flows. In order to cope with this deficiency, this study presents a nonlinear k-ε turbulence model and evaluates it along with linear k-ε models for an indoor isothermal linear diffuser jet flow measured in two model rooms using PIV. The results show that the flow contains a free jet near the inlet region and a wall-affected region downstream where the jet is pushed toward the ceiling by entrainment through the well-known Coanda effect. The CFD results show that an accurate prediction of the entrainment process is very important and that the nonlinear eddy viscosity model is able to predict the turbulence-driven secondary motions. Furthermore, turbulence models that are calibrated for high Reynolds free shear layer flows were not able to reproduce the measured velocity distributions, and it is suggested that the model constants of turbulence models should be adjusted before they are used for room airflow simulations. PMID:23668473

  4. Study of Events with a Muon Accompanied by Jets at the CERN Proton-Antiproton Collider.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xin

    1990-01-01

    During the 1988 and 1989 running periods of the CERN Proton-Antiproton Collider, at sqrt {s} = 630 GeV, the UA1 experiment collected 4.7 pb^{-1} data with muon triggers. Events containing an energetic muon and hadronic jets are studied in detail. The data is found to be in good agreement with expectations from known physics processes, mainly from beauty and charm quark production and decay, and from backgrounds such as pion and kaon decays in flight. Based on the understanding of the sources of the muon+jet data sample, a search is carried out for the sixth quark, the top quark. No evidence of top quark production is found in this data sample. Combining this result with those from searches in other UA1 data samples (a total of 5.4 pb^{-1}, a lower limit on the mass of the top quark is obtained: m _{rm top} > 60 GeV/c^2 (95% confidence level). The muon+jet data sample is also used for a search for Z^0 to tau^+tau^- production in pp collisions, by selecting events where one tau decays to a muon and the other tau decays to hadrons. The data is found to be consistent with lepton universality. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253 -1690.).

  5. Slit-Jet Discharge Studies of Polyacetylenic Molecules: Synthesis and High Resolution Infrared Spectroscopy of Diacetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chih-Hsuan; Roberts, Melanie A.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2013-06-01

    Polyacetylenic molecules play an important role in both combustion chemistry as well as chemistry of the interstellar medium. This talk presents first high resolution infrared spectroscopic efforts on the simplest jet-cooled polyacetylene, namely diacetylene (C_4H_2). Specifically, the fundamental anti-symmetric C-H stretching mode (near 3333 cm^{-1}) and several hot combination bands of diacetylene have been investigated under sub-Doppler, jet cooled conditions in a pulsed supersonic slit discharge. Local Coriolis perturbations in the fundamental anti-symmetric C-H stretch manifold are observed and analyzed. Six hot bands are observed, including the H-C-C bending mode (v_8) not observed in previous room temperature studies. The observation of these hot bands under rotationally jet cooled conditions (T_{rot}=15.7(4) K) indicate the presence of highly non-equilibrium relaxation processes between vibration and rotation. G. Guelachvili, A. M. Craig, and D. A. Ramsay, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 105, 156 (1984)

  6. Aging, Spatial Disparity, and the Sound-Induced Flash Illusion

    PubMed Central

    DeLoss, Denton J.; Andersen, George J.

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined age-related differences in multisensory integration and the effect of spatial disparity on the sound-induced flash illusion—-an illusion used in previous research to assess age-related differences in multisensory integration. Prior to participation in the study, both younger and older participants demonstrated their ability to detect 1–2 visual flashes and 1–2 auditory beep presented unimodally. After passing the pre-test, participants were then presented 1–2 flashes paired with 0–2 beeps that originated from one of five speakers positioned equidistantly 100cm from the participant. One speaker was positioned directly below the screen, two speakers were positioned 50cm to the left and right from the center of the screen, and two more speakers positioned to the left and right 100cm from the center of the screen. Participants were told to report the number of flashes presented and to ignore the beeps. Both age groups showed a significant effect of the beeps on the perceived number of flashes. However, neither younger nor older individuals showed any significant effect of spatial disparity on the sound-induced flash illusion. The presence of a congruent number of beeps increased accuracy for both older and younger individuals. Reaction time data was also analyzed. As expected, older individuals showed significantly longer reaction times when compared to younger individuals. In addition, both older and younger individuals showed a significant increase in reaction time for fusion trials, where two flashes and one beep are perceived as a single flash, as compared to congruent single flash trials. This increase in reaction time was not found for fission trials, where one flash and two beeps were perceived as two flashes. This suggests that processing may differ for the two forms for fission as compared to fusion illusions. PMID:26619352

  7. Assessment of Vulnerability to Extreme Flash Floods in Design Storms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eung Seok; Choi, Hyun Il

    2011-01-01

    There has been an increase in the occurrence of sudden local flooding of great volume and short duration caused by heavy or excessive rainfall intensity over a small area, which presents the greatest potential danger threat to the natural environment, human life, public health and property, etc. Such flash floods have rapid runoff and debris flow that rises quickly with little or no advance warning to prevent flood damage. This study develops a flash flood index through the average of the same scale relative severity factors quantifying characteristics of hydrographs generated from a rainfall-runoff model for the long-term observed rainfall data in a small ungauged study basin, and presents regression equations between rainfall characteristics and the flash flood index. The aim of this study is to develop flash flood index-duration-frequency relation curves by combining the rainfall intensity-duration-frequency relation and the flash flood index from probability rainfall data in order to evaluate vulnerability to extreme flash floods in design storms. This study is an initial effort to quantify the flash flood severity of design storms for both existing and planned flood control facilities to cope with residual flood risks due to extreme flash floods that have ocurred frequently in recent years. PMID:21845165

  8. Assessment of vulnerability to extreme flash floods in design storms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eung Seok; Choi, Hyun Il

    2011-07-01

    There has been an increase in the occurrence of sudden local flooding of great volume and short duration caused by heavy or excessive rainfall intensity over a small area, which presents the greatest potential danger threat to the natural environment, human life, public health and property, etc. Such flash floods have rapid runoff and debris flow that rises quickly with little or no advance warning to prevent flood damage. This study develops a flash flood index through the average of the same scale relative severity factors quantifying characteristics of hydrographs generated from a rainfall-runoff model for the long-term observed rainfall data in a small ungauged study basin, and presents regression equations between rainfall characteristics and the flash flood index. The aim of this study is to develop flash flood index-duration-frequency relation curves by combining the rainfall intensity-duration-frequency relation and the flash flood index from probability rainfall data in order to evaluate vulnerability to extreme flash floods in design storms. This study is an initial effort to quantify the flash flood severity of design storms for both existing and planned flood control facilities to cope with residual flood risks due to extreme flash floods that have ocurred frequently in recent years.

  9. Coherent imaging at FLASH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, H. N.; Bajt, S.; Barty, A.; Benner, W. H.; Bogan, M. J.; Boutet, S.; Cavalleri, A.; Duesterer, S.; Frank, M.; Hajdu, J.; Hau-Riege, S. P.; Iwan, B.; Marchesini, S.; Sakdinawat, A.; Sokolowski-Tinten, K.; Seibert, M. M.; Timneanu, N.; Treusch, R.; Woods, B. W.

    2009-09-01

    We have carried out high-resolution single-pulse coherent diffractive imaging at the FLASH free-electron laser. The intense focused FEL pulse gives a high-resolution low-noise coherent diffraction pattern of an object before that object turns into a plasma and explodes. In particular we are developing imaging of biological specimens beyond conventional radiation damage resolution limits, developing imaging of ultrafast processes, and testing methods to characterize and perform single-particle imaging.

  10. Laser flash photolysis and magnetic-field-effect studies on interaction of thymine and thymidine with menadione: role of sugar in controlling reaction pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Adity; Dey, Debarati; Basu, Samita

    2008-04-01

    The magnetic field effect (MFE) in conjunction with laser flash photolysis has been used for the study of the interaction of one of the small drug like quinone molecules, 2-methyl, 1,4-naphthoquinone, commonly known as menadione (MQ), with one of the DNA bases, thymine (THN), and its corresponding nucleoside, thymidine (THDN), in acetonitrile (ACN) and sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) micelles. It has been observed that THN undergoes electron transfer (ET) and hydrogen (H) abstraction with MQ, while THDN undergoes only H abstraction in both the media. However, our earlier studies showed that a purine base, adenine (ADN), and its nucleoside, 2'-deoxyadenosine (ADS), undergo ET in ACN and H abstraction in SDS. Here we have attempted to explain the differences in the reactions of these DNA bases with MQ. We also reveal the crucial role of a sugar unit in altering the behavior of purine and pyrimidine bases with respect to ET and H abstraction.

  11. [Water jet cutting for bones and bone cement--parameter study of possibilities and limits of a new method].

    PubMed

    Honl, M; Rentzsch, R; Lampe, F; Müller, V; Dierk, O; Hille, E; Louis, H; Morlock, M

    2000-09-01

    Water jet techniques have been used in industrial cutting, drilling and cleaning applications for more than 30 years. Plain water is typically used for the cutting of non-metallic materials. The addition of abrasive substances to the stream allows almost any material to be cut. The first medical applications were reported in the early 1980s, when the water jet was used to cut organs. The present study investigates the use of water jet cutting technology for endoprosthesis revision surgery. Bone and PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) samples were cut at different pressures using an industrial water jet cutting device. Using plain water at 400 bar, PMMA was cut selectively without damaging the bone; above 400 bar, bone was also cut, but the cutting depths in PMMA were significantly greater (p < 0.05). Adding a water-soluble abrasive disaccharide to the water results in a significantly higher removal rate for both materials (p < 0.05), but selectivity is lost, although the differences in cutting depth between the two materials was significant (p < 0.05). With an abrasive, the quality of the cut was better for both materials. The water jet technology--in particular the abrasive technique--can be used to cut biomaterials such as bone and bone cement. The diameter of the jet is a great advantage when working in the confined area at the prosthesis interface. The cutting process is essentially cold, thus eliminating a thermal effect, and the jet reaction forces are relatively low. Accurate manipulation of the hydro jet nozzle is possible both manually and by robot. The results obtained show that it is possible to remove prostheses with this cutting technique, rapidly and with little damage to the surrounding tissue. Problem areas are the development of sterile pumps and the "depth control" of the jet.

  12. A flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence study of the formation of O/1D/ in the photolysis of water and the reaction of O/1D/ with H2, Ar, and He

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stief, L. J.; Payne, W. A.; Klemm, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    The technique employed in the study utilizes the vacuum ultraviolet flash photolysis of H2O combined with time resolved, simultaneous detection of H and O via resonance fluorescence at 121.6 and 130.2 nm respectively. The measurements were made by means of photon counting and multichannel scaling. The sensitivity of the system for H and O is discussed. Experiments are reported in which signals due to H and O were accumulated from the flash photolysis of a mixture of 0.1 torr H2O and 100 torr Ar. Attention is given to the relative importance of two primary processes in the photolysis of water.

  13. Characteristics of flash initiations in a supercell cluster with tornadoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Dong; MacGorman, Donald R.

    2016-01-01

    Flash initiations within a supercell cluster during 10-11 May 2010 in Oklahoma were investigated based on observations from the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array and the Norman, Oklahoma, polarimetric radar (KOUN). The flash initiations at positions dominated by graupel, dry snow, small hail and crystals accounted for 44.3%, 44.1%, 8.0% and 3.0% of the total flashes, respectively. During the tornadic stage of the southern supercell in the cluster, flash initiations associated with graupel occupied the main body, the right flank and the forward flank of the supercell, while those associated with dry snow dominated the outskirts of the adjacent forward anvil, right anvil and rear anvil. The flash initiations associated with small hail were concentrated around the main updraft, particularly toward its front side. Highly dense flash initiations were located in the regions overlying the differential reflectivity (ZDR) arc and right anvil. The average initial height of the flashes decreased gradually from the rear to the front and from the right to the left flanks, while the height range over which initiations occurred reached a maximum at the front of the updraft. The flashes that were initiated in the adjacent forward anvils were largest on average, followed by those in the regions ahead of the updraft and near the ZDR arc. This study supports the concept of charge pockets and further deduces that the pockets in the right anvil are the most abundant and compact due to the frequent flash initiations, small-sized flashes and thin layers including flash initiations.

  14. Investigation of spray characteristics for flashing injection of fuels containing dissolved air and superheated fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, A. S. P.; Chen, L. D.; Faeth, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    The flow, atomization and spreading of flashing injector flowing liquids containing dissolved gases (jet/air) as well as superheated liquids (Freon II) were considered. The use of a two stage expansion process separated by an expansion chamber, ws found to be beneficial for flashing injection particularly for dissolved gas systems. Both locally homogeneous and separated flow models provided good predictions of injector flow properties. Conventional correlations for drop sizes from pressure atomized and airblast injectors were successfully modified, using the separated flow model to prescribe injector exit conditions, to correlate drop size measurements. Additional experimental results are provided for spray angle and combustion properties of sprays from flashing injectors.

  15. Optimal flash rate and duty cycle for flashing visual indicators.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowitz, J.

    1971-01-01

    This experiment examined the ability of observers to determine, as quickly as possible, whether a visual indicator was steadily on or flashing. Six flash rates (periods) were combined factorially with three duty cycles (on-off ratios) to define 18 ?types' of intermittent signals. Experimental sessions were divided into six runs of 100 trials, each run utilizing one of the six flash rates. On any given trial in a run, the probability of a steady signal occurring was 0.5 and the probability of a flashing signal occurring was 0.5. A different duty cycle was employed daily for each experimental session. In all, 400 trials were devoted to each of the flash rates at each duty cycle. Accuracy and latency of response were the dependent variables of interest. The results show that the observers view the light for an interval of time appropriate to the expected flash rate and duty cycle; whether they judge the light to be steady or intermittent depends upon whether the light is extinguished during the predetermined waiting period. Adoption of this temporal criterion delays responding in comparison to those tasks involving responses to light onset. The decision or response criteria held by the observers are also sensitive to the parameters of the flashing light: observers become increasingly willing to call a flashing light ?steady' as flash duration increases.

  16. Topical absorption and toxicity studies of jet fuel hydrocarbons in skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, Faqir

    Kerosene-based fuels have been used for many decades. Over 2 million military and civilian personnel each year are occupationally exposed to various jet fuel mixtures. Dermatitis is one of the major health concerns associated with these exposures. In the past, separate absorption and toxicity studies have been conducted to find the etiology of such skin disorders. There was a need for integrated absorption and toxicity studies to define the causative constituents of jet fuel responsible for skin irritation. The focus of this thesis was to study the percutaneous absorption and to identify the hydrocarbons (HC) causing irritation in jet fuels so that preventive measures could be taken in the future. The initial study was conducted to understand the possible mechanism for additive interactions on hydrocarbon absorption/disposition in silastic, porcine skin and isolated perfused porcine skin flap (IPPSF) models. The influence of JP-8 (100) additives (MDA, BHT, 8Q405) on the dermal kinetics of 14C-naphthalene and 14C/3H-dodecane as markers of HC absorption was evaluated. This study indicated that individual and combination of additives influenced marker disposition in different membranes. MDA was a significant suppressor while BHT was a significant enhancer of naphthalene absorption in IPPSF. The 8Q405 significantly reduced naphthalene content in dosed silastic and skin indicating a direct interaction between additive and marker HC. Similarly, the individual MDA and BHT significantly retained naphthalene in the stratum corneum of porcine skin, but the combination of both of these additives statistically decreased the marker retention in the stratum corneum suggesting a potential biological interaction. This study concluded that all components of a chemical mixture should be assessed since the effects of single components administered alone or as pairs may be confounded when all are present in the complete mixture. However, this study indicated that the marker HC

  17. Treatment of Menopausal Hot Flashes with 5-Hydroxytryptophan

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Much recent research has focused on nonhormonal treatments for menopausal hot flashes. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of 5-Hydroxytroptophan (5-HTP), the immediate precursor of serotonin, upon menopausal hot flashes. Selective, serotonergic, reuptake inhibitors (SSRI’s), which increase the amount of serotonin in the synaptic gap, have shown some promise in the amelioration of hot flashes. Methods We administered 5-HTP or placebo, in double-blind fashion, to 24 postmenopausal women reporting frequent hot flashes. Treatment outcome was measured using a miniature, electronic, hot flash recorder. Results No significant effects of 150 mg/day 5-HTP upon hot flash frequency were found. The 5-HTP group had 23.8 ± 5.7 (SD) hot flashes/24 hours prior to treatment and 18.5 ± 9.6 at the end of treatment. The placebo group had 18.5 ± 9.6 before treatment and 22.6 ± 12.4 at treatment completion. Conclusions At the dose given, 5-HTP does not significantly ameliorate frequency of menopausal hot flashes, as measured objectively with an electronic recorder. Given the small size, this study must be considered preliminary in nature. PMID:20031347

  18. Genetic Polymorphisms, Hormone Levels, and Hot Flashes in Midlife Women

    PubMed Central

    Schilling, Chrissy; Gallicchio, Lisa; Miller, Susan R.; Langenberg, Patricia; Zacur, Howard; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective Hot flashes disrupt the lives of millions of women each year. Although hot flashes are a public health concern, little is known about risk factors that predispose women to hot flashes. Thus, the objective of this study was to examine whether sex steroid hormone levels and genetic polymorphisms in hormone biosynthesis and degradation enzymes are associated with the risk of hot flashes. Methods In a cross-sectional study design, midlife women aged 45 to 54 years (n=639) were recruited from Baltimore and its surrounding counties. Participants completed a questionnaire and donated a blood sample for steroid hormone analysis and genotyping. The associations between genetic polymorphisms and hormone levels, as well as the associations between genetic polymorphisms, hormone levels, and hot flashes were examined using statistical models. Results A polymorphism in CYP1B1 was associated with lower dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S) and progesterone levels, while a polymorphism in CYP19 (aromatase) was associated with higher testosterone and DHEA-S levels. Lower progesterone and sex hormone binding globulin levels, lower free estradiol index, and a higher ratio of total androgens to total estrogens were associated with the experiencing of hot flashes. A polymorphism in CYP1B1 and a polymorphism in 3βHSD were both associated with hot flashes. Conclusion Some genetic polymorphisms may be associated with altered levels of hormones in midlife women. Further, selected genetic polymorphisms and altered hormone levels may be associated with the risk of hot flashes in midlife women. PMID:17187946

  19. NASA-easyJet Collaboration on the Human Factors Monitoring Program (HFMP) Study, Second Interim Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Ashok N.; Barton, Phil

    2012-01-01

    This is the second interim report jointly prepared by NASA and easyJet on the work performed under the agreement to collaborate on a study of the factors entailed in flight- and cabin-crew fatigue and decreases in performance associated with fatigue. The objective of this Agreement is to generate reliable procedures that aid in understanding the levels and characteristics of flight- and cabin-crew fatigue factors, both latent and proximate, whose confluence will likely result in unacceptable crew performance. This study entails the analyses of numerical and textual data collected during operational flights.

  20. Solvent polarity effect on photoinduced electron transfer between C{sub 60} and tetramethylbenzidine studied by laser flash photolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Watanabe, Akira; Sasaki, Yoshiko

    1995-06-15

    The photoinduced electron transfer between C{sub 60} and N,N,N{prime},N{prime}-tetramethylbenzidine (NTMB) in polar and nonpolar solvents and their mixtures has been investigated by nanosecond laser flash photolysis/transient absorption spectroscopy in the visible and near-IR regions. The transient absorption bands of the C{sub 60} triplet state ({sup T}C{sub 60}*) and the NTMB radical cation were observed in both nonpolar and polar solvents. In polar solvents such as benzonitrile, the reaction rate constants were determined from the decay of {sup T}C{sub 60}* at 740 nm, which were consistent with the rate constants evaluated from the growth of the NTMB radical cation, suggesting that direct electron transfer occurs from ground-state NTMB to {sup T}C{sub 60}*. In nonpolar solvents such as benzene, the NTMB radical cation and C{sub 60} radical anion were produced immediately after the nanosecond laser pulse, simultaneous with the formation of {sup T}C{sub 60}*, indicating that a different electron transfer mechanism exists in nonpolar solvents. In the solvent mixtures, two simultaneous reaction routes are present for both forward and back electron transfer reactions. Pronounced solvent effects found for electron transfer reaction kinetics and rates are characteristic of the photoinduced electron transfer reactions between C{sub 60} and some kinds of aromatic amines. 25 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Stability and Resolution Studies of HOMBPMs for the 1.3 GHz Superconducting Accelerating Cavities at FLASH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, L.; Baboi, N.; Jones, R. M.

    HOMBPMs (HOM based Beam Position Monitors) are installed at the FLASH facility at DESY, Hamburg. These are aimed at aligning the beam and monitoring the beam position. Over time, the accuracy of beam position prediction is degraded. This is due to instability issues in the 1.3 GHz and 3.9 GHz superconducting cavities and associated electronics. In this paper, we demonstrate for the first time a measurement technique which is stable and can be relied upon over a period of three months with unprecedented resolution (below 4 μm horizontally and 2 μm vertically). We attribute this improvement in stability to a focused campaign on various signal processing and analysis techniques. These techniques include SVD (Singular Value Decomposition), ANN (Artificial Neural Network) and PLS (Partial Least Square). We found the best resolution and computational power using the latter method, PLS. These techniques are directly applicable to the HOMBPM system at the European XFEL that is currently under construction. However, they are in many ways generic and hence applicable to other measurement methods.

  2. Quenching and radical formation in the reaction of photoexcited benzophenone with thiols and thioethers (sulfides). Nanosecond flash studies

    SciTech Connect

    Inbar, S.; Linschitz, H.; Cohen, S.G.

    1982-01-01

    Laser flash measurements have been made of rate constants and primary radical yields in the reactions of triplet benzophenone with aliphatic and aromatic thiols and with dialkyl and aryl alkyl sulfides. Reaction with n-pentylthiol in benzene leads mainly to quenching, with k/sub ir/ = 9 x 10/sup 6/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ and radical yield (ketyl) = 0.14; with mesitylene-2 thiol in benzene k/sub ir/ = 7 x 10/sup 8/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ and hydrogen transfer is efficient, radical yield (ketyl) approx. 1.0. In reactions with both p-chlorophenyl ethyl and diisopropyl sulfides, k/sub ir/ increases and radical yield (ketyl) decreases with increasing solvent polarity. Values of k/sub ir/ are higher and those of radical yield (ketyl) are lower for the dialkyl than for the aryl alkyl sulfide. Results are discussed in terms of rapid interaction of the triplet with S, followed by quenching and/or hydrogen transfer. Quenching without hydrogen transfer occurs to a much greater extent with sulfides and aliphatic thiols than with amines.

  3. Numerical study of jets produced by conical wire arrays on the Magpie pulsed power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocchi, Matteo; Chittenden, Jerry P.; Ciardi, Andrea; Suzuki-Vidal, Francisco; Hall, Gareth N.; de Grouchy, Phil; Lebedev, Sergei V.; Bott, Simon C.

    2011-06-01

    With the aim to model jets produced by conical wire arrays on the MAGPIE generator, and to strengthen the link between laboratory and astrophysical jets, we performed three-dimensional magneto-hydro-dynamic numerical simulations using the code GORGON and successfully reproduced the experiments. We found that a minimum resolution of ~100 μm is required to retrieve the unstable character of the jet. Moreover, arrays with less wires produce more unstable jets with stronger magnetic fields around them.

  4. Study of the glow dynamics in a laser-produced plasma jet expanding across the magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessarab, A. V.; Bondarenko, G. A.; Garanin, S. G.; Zhidkov, N. V.; Nikitin, I. N.; Starodubtsev, V. A.; Sungatullin, R. R.

    2011-09-01

    Results are presented from experimental studies of the glow dynamics of a plasma jet generated during the irradiation of a plane aluminum target by an iodine laser pulse with the wavelength 1.315 μm. The laser pulse energy was 330-480 J, the pulse duration was 0.5 ns, and the focal spot diameter was 3 mm, the laser intensity on the target surface being ˜1013 W/cm2. The jet expanded across an external magnetic field with the strength ˜1 kOe. The residual air pressure in the vacuum chamber was ˜10-5 Torr. The spatiotemporal behavior of the jet glow was investigated using a nine-frame camera in two mutually perpendicular directions (along and across the magnetic field). The results of measurements indicate azimuthal asymmetry of the jet expansion.

  5. NCCTG N10C2 (Alliance) – A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study of Magnesium Supplements to Reduce Menopausal Hot Flashes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Haeseong; Qin, Rui; Smith, Thomas J.; Atherton, Pamela J.; Barton, Debra L.; Sturtz, Keren; Dakhil, Shaker R.; Anderson, Daniel M.; Flynn, Kathleen; Puttabasavaiah, Suneetha; Le-Lindqwister, Nguyet Anh; Padula, Gilbert D.A.; Loprinzi, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Hot flashes (HFs) are a common symptom in breast cancer survivors that can negatively impact quality of life. Preliminary data suggested that magnesium might be an effective, low-cost treatment for HFs with minimal side effects. Methods A four-arm, double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trial was conducted. Postmenopausal women with a history of breast cancer and bothersome HFs were randomized into treatment groups of 800 or 1200 mg daily magnesium oxide, or corresponding placebo groups in 2:2:(1:1) ratios. HF frequency and scores (number times mean severity) were measured using a validated HF diary. A one-week baseline period preceded initiation of study medication. The primary endpoint was the intra-patient difference in average hot flash score between the baseline and the treatment periods, comparing each magnesium group to the combined placebo groups using a gate-keeping procedure. Results were analyzed using repeated measures and growth curve models on weekly HF score, based on a modified intent-to-treat principle. Results 289 women enrolled between 12/2011 and 03/2013. The study groups were well balanced for baseline characteristics. Mean HF scores, frequencies, and associated changes during the treatment period were similar for each group. An increased incidence of diarrhea and a corresponding lower incidence of constipation were reported in magnesium arms compared to placebo. No statistically significant difference occurred in other toxicities or quality of life measures. Conclusions The results of this trial do not support the use of magnesium oxide for HFs. PMID:25423327

  6. Resonant Interaction of a Linear Array of Supersonic Rectangular Jets: an Experimental Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, Ganesh; Taghavi, Ray

    1994-01-01

    This paper examines a supersonic multi jet interaction problem that we believe is likely to be important for mixing enhancement and noise reduction in supersonic mixer-ejector nozzles. We demonstrate that it is possible to synchronize the screech instability of four rectangular jets by precisely adjusting the inter jet spacing. Our experimental data agrees with a theory that assumes that the phase-locking of adjacent jets occurs through a coupling at the jet lip. Although the synchronization does not change the frequency of the screech tone, its amplitude is augmented by 10 dB. The synchronized multi jets exhibit higher spreading than the unsynchronized jets, with the single jet spreading the least. We compare the nearfield noise of the four jets with synchronized screech to the noise of the sum of four jets operated individually. Our noise measurements reveal that the more rapid mixing of the synchronized multi jets causes the peak jet noise source to move up stream and to radiate noise at larger angles to the flow direction. Based on our results, we believe that screech synchronization is advantageous for noise reduction internal to a mixer-ejector nozzle, since the noise can now be suppressed by a shorter acoustically lined ejector.

  7. Probabilistic Flash Flood Forecasting using Stormscale Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, J.; Gourley, J. J.; Kain, J. S.; Clark, A.; Novak, D.; Hong, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Flash flooding is one of the most costly and deadly natural hazards in the US and across the globe. The loss of life and property from flash floods could be mitigated with better guidance from hydrological models, but these models have limitations. For example, they are commonly initialized using rainfall estimates derived from weather radars, but the time interval between observations of heavy rainfall and a flash flood can be on the order of minutes, particularly for small basins in urban settings. Increasing the lead time for these events is critical for protecting life and property. Therefore, this study advances the use of quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPFs) from a stormscale NWP ensemble system into a distributed hydrological model setting to yield basin-specific, probabilistic flash flood forecasts (PFFFs). Rainfall error characteristics of the individual members are first diagnosed and quantified in terms of structure, amplitude, and location (SAL; Wernli et al., 2008). Amplitude and structure errors are readily correctable due to their diurnal nature, and the fine scales represented by the CAPS QPF members are consistent with radar-observed rainfall, mainly showing larger errors with afternoon convection. To account for the spatial uncertainty of the QPFs, we use an elliptic smoother, as in Marsh et al. (2012), to produce probabilistic QPFs (PQPFs). The elliptic smoother takes into consideration underdispersion, which is notoriously associated with stormscale ensembles, and thus, is good for targeting the approximate regions that may receive heavy rainfall. However, stormscale details contained in individual members are still needed to yield reasonable flash flood simulations. Therefore, on a case study basis, QPFs from individual members are then run through the hydrological model with their predicted structure and corrected amplitudes, but the locations of individual rainfall elements are perturbed within the PQPF elliptical regions using Monte

  8. Negative cloud-to-ground lightning flashes in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baharudin, Z. A.; Ahmad, Noor Azlinda; Mäkelä, J. S.; Fernando, Mahendra; Cooray, Vernon

    2014-02-01

    The characteristics of the negative cloud-to-ground lightning flashes in Malaysia are studied by analyzing the electric fields generated by the whole flash in nanosecond resolution. A total of 405 strokes obtained from 100 successive negative cloud-to-ground lightning flashes were analyzed, which were recorded from seven convective thunderstorms during the southwest monsoon period, i.e. from April to June 2009. It was found that the total number of interstroke intervals has an arithmetic mean value of 86 ms, a geometric mean value of 67 ms and does not depend on the return stroke order. Of the 100 negative ground flashes, 38 flashes (38%) have at least one subsequent return-stroke (SRS) whose electric field peak was greater than that of the first return-stroke (RS). Furthermore, 58 (19%) out of 305 SRS have electric field peak larger than those of the first RS. The arithmetic and geometric mean ratio between the peak electric field of the SRS and the peak electric field of the first RS are 0.7 and 0.6, respectively. The percentage of single-stroke flashes was 16% while the mean number of strokes per flash and maximum number of stroke per flash were 4 and 14, respectively.

  9. A Study of the Contribution from Non-Perturbative Effects to Di-jet Yields at Forward Rapidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulsen, Anna; Chang, Zilong; Gagliardi, Carl; Gagliardi Team

    2015-10-01

    It is well known that the proton's spin is equal to ℏ/2, but its internal structure and the spin contributions made by its parton constituents, especially gluons, remain enigmatic. By studying asymmetric di-jets produced in polarized proton-proton collisions at forward rapidity, more information about the spin contribution of the gluon can be attained. Next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations indicate that measurements of di-jets at forward rapidity with transverse momenta of 5 and 8 GeV/c can provide valuable information regarding the gluon polarization. However these calculations do not include background contributions from initial state-radiation, underlying events and beam remnants that can create additional particles which appear in the detector as jets. In this study, PYTHIA simulations were used to analyze jets of stable final state hadrons. A simple procedure is found to reject the background. Most of the di-jets that remain can be matched to initial hard scattered partons with momentum fractions x2 of the order 10-3 and x1 of 0.4 or greater. These kinematics indicate that the remaining di-jets will provide relevant information about the gluon's polarization and lead to a better understanding of the proton's structure at the partonic level. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. 1263281.

  10. Safety and efficacy of low-dose esterified estrogens and methyltestosterone, alone or combined, for the treatment of hot flashes in menopausal women: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Liu, James; Allgood, Adam; Derogatis, Leonard R; Swanson, Stephen; O'Mahony, Michael; Nedoss, Bertrand; Soper, Herbert; Zbella, Edward; Prokofieva, Svetlana Vladimirovna; Zipfel, Lisa; Guo, Chun-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated safety and efficacy of esterified estrogens and methyltestosterone administered alone or in combination for the treatment of hot flashes in menopausal women. The 0.30-mg esterified estrogens and 0.30-mg methyltestosterone combination was the lowest effective dose, and our results are consistent with the known safety profile of estrogen and androgen combination products.

  11. Laser Flash Photolysis Studies of Radical-Radical Reaction Kinetics: The O((sup 3)P(sub J)) + BrO Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorn, R. P.; Cronkhite, J. M.; Nicovich, J. M.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    A novel dual laser flash photolysis-long path absorption-resonance fluorescence technique has been employed to study the kinetics of the important stratospheric reaction 0((sup 3)P(sub j)) + Br yields(k1) BrO((sup 2)P(sub J)) + O2 as a function of temperature (231-328 K) and pressure (25-150 Torr) in N2 buffer gas. The experimental approach preserves the principal advantages of the flash photolysis method, i.e., complete absence of surface reactions and a wide range of accessible pressures, but also employs techniques which are characteristic of the discharge flow method, namely chemical titration as a means for deducing the absolute concentration of a radical reactant and use of multiple detection axes. We find that k1 is independent of pressure, and that the temperature dependence of k1 is adequately described by the Arrhenius expression k1(T) = 1.91 x 10(exp -11)(230/J) cu cm/ molecule.s; the absolute accuracy of measured values for k1 is estimated to vary from +/- 20 percent at at T approximately 230 K to +/- 30 percent at T approximately 330 K. Our results demonstrate that the O((sup 3)P(sub j)) + BrO rate coefficient is significantly faster than previously 'guesstimated,' and suggest that the catalytic cycle with the O((sup 3)P(sub j)) + BrO reaction as its rate-limiting step is the dominant stratospheric BrO(x), odd-oxygen destruction cycle at altitudes above 24 km.

  12. Feasibility study of tuned-resonator, pulsating cavitating water jet for deep-hole drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, V.E. Jr.; Lindenmuth, W.T.; Conn, A.F.; Frederick, G.S.

    1981-08-01

    This study presents the advantages of pulsing a submerged jet to increase its erosion capability (particularly as caused by cavitation) in augmenting deep-hole drill bits. Various methods of accomplishing the pulsation are presented and discussed. The most attractive systems uncovered are acoustic oscillators which passively accomplish pulsations in the flow at frequencies corresponding to a Strouhal number in the range of 0.2 to 1.0. Such passive oscillators are assessed to be feasible candidates for development into practical deep hole drill bit systems and a long range plan for this research and development is presented and discussed.

  13. Study of the dijet invariant mass in w + 2 jet events

    SciTech Connect

    Sekaric, Jadranka; /Kansas U.

    2011-11-01

    The D0 Collaboration presents a study of the dijet invariant mass spectrum, M{sub jj}, in events with two jets produced in association with a W {yields} {ell}{nu} boson. The goal is to verify a claim from the CDF Collaboration about the possible existence of an anomalous dijet resonance at M{sub jj} {approx} 145 GeV. Thus, we investigate the 110 GeV < M{sub jj} < 170 GeV mass range and report our results.

  14. Model Study of the Effect of Slag Layer on the Swirl Motion of Molten Steel Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguchi, Daisuke; Hiratsuka, Akira; Ohmi, Tatsuya; Tsujino, Ryoji; Sasaki, Yasushi; Iguchi, Manabu

    Efficient agitation of molten steel and slag is requested in the steelmaking industry. The conventional agitation methods are mainly classified into Ar gas injection and electromagnetic stirring. These methods are very expensive and use much energy, and accordingly, we have proposed an alternative, cheap and effective mixing method using a swirl motion. This method does not need any driving devices in the reactor. In this study, low-density liquids and low-density particles are used as models for slag. The effects of the upper slag layer on the occurrence region and the amplitude of a swirl motion of a molten steel jet are investigated.

  15. Winter and summer-autumn flash floods as "drivers" of drought and seasonal flood characteristics (case study of European Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kireeva, Maria; Frolova, Natalia; Rets, Ekaterina; Ezerova, Natalia

    2016-04-01

    The presence of occasional flood periods on rivers is a typical feature of the hydrological regime of European Russia. Despite the fact that the main high-water phase of a hydrological year here is related to spring, flash floods in other seasons play an equally important role. For example, increased water content during autumn determines soil moisture content that determines the loss of runoff during spring flood. Winter floods caused by thaws result in a significant drawdown of a snow pack. And when it is followed by a return of cold weather an ice crust is formed on the surface of snowpack that significantly reduces rates of melt water filtration process.In recent decades, most of the rivers in the European part of Russia have experienced a significant increase of occasional flood flow share in total annual runoff. For example, in the Don basin this parameter has increased by almost 2 times, in the basin of Oka by 1.5. Though less intense, these trends can be traced in the eastern part of the region - in the basins of Kama and Vyatka. The increase here can is approximately 15-20%. In the north of the Eastern Plain (North Dvina, etc.) this tendency isn't observed. The number of flood waves has several times increased. Until 1970s 1-3 occasional floods a year were generally observed on the rivers of Central and Southern Russia. In the past three decades almost every year there are from 4 to 8 or more periods of high water. They are superimposed on each other, as well as the phase of the spring flood and low flow period. The ratio of the maximum discharge of occasional flood to maximum discharge of seasonal flood has increased several times. Now some outstanding floods can be compared with the spring flood wave or even exceed it.Thus, through winter floods an "interception" of spring flood runoff occurs. Spring floods have a lower height and volume and as a result they don't fully recharge a basin. Dry period in this case begins much earlier and though the moisture

  16. MEETING IN VANCOUVER, B.C.: MICRONUCLEUS STUDIES IN THE PERIPHERAL BLOOD AND BONE MARROW OF MICE TREATED WITH JET FUELS, JP-8 AND JET-A

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential adverse effects of dermal and inhalation exposure of jet fuels are important for health hazard evaluation in humans. In an animal model, the genotoxic potential of jet fuels, JP-8 and Jet-A, was investigated. Mice were treated dermally with either a single or multip...

  17. MICRONUCLEUS STUDIES IN THE PERIPHERAL BLOOD AND BONE MARROW OF MICE TREATED WITH JET FUELS, JP-8 AND JET-A

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential adverse effects of dermal and inhalation exposure of jet fuels are important for health hazard evaluation in humans. In an animal model, the genotoxic potential of jet fuels, JP-8 and Jet-A, was investigated. Mice were treated dermally with either a single or multip...

  18. RF Pre-Ionization to Create Faster, Hotter MHD-Driven Jets and Studies of Plasma Expansion Into a Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplin, Vernon; Bellan, Paul

    2013-10-01

    We are studying MHD-driven jets relevant to astrophysical jets and fusion plasmas. Previous experiments at Caltech have focused on plasmas created by breaking down neutral gas using high voltage. The Paschen breakdown criterion governing this process sets an undesirable lower limit for the jet density. To overcome this constraint, we have developed a pre-ionization system powered by a pulsed, battery-powered, 3 kW 13.56 MHz RF amplifier. Pre-ionization of plasma in a tube behind the jet experiment's center electrode is expected to enable the formation of lower density, hotter, faster jets. Thus far, argon jets have been created with v >30 km/s, twice as fast as was previously achievable. The expansion of the RF plasma into the chamber prior to the discharge of the main capacitor bank involves surprisingly complex dynamics. There are two phases: initially plasma expansion along the background magnetic field is inhibited and the primary source of emission away from the RF antenna appears to be neutral atoms excited by fast electrons or photons from the RF source. At a later time, either before or after RF turn-off depending on the magnetic field configuration, a relatively high density (ne >1018 m-3) , cold (Te < 0.5 eV) cloud of plasma emerges from the source tube.

  19. A 3D kinematic study of the northern ejecta `jet' of the Crab nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Christine S.; Fesen, Robert A.

    2015-03-01

    We present moderate resolution [O III] λλ4959, 5007 line emission spectra of the Crab nebula's northern ejecta jet. These data along with an [O III] image of the Crab nebula were used to build three-dimensional kinematic maps of the jet and adjacent remnant nebulosity to better understand the jet's properties and thus its likely origin. We find the jet's systemic velocity to be +170 ± 15 km s-1 with radial velocities ranging from -190 to +480 km s-1. Our data indicate that the jet consists of thin filamentary walls (Vexp ≃ 40-75 km s-1), is virtually hollow in [O III] emission, and elliptical and funnel-like in shape rather than a straight cylindrical tube as previously thought. Examination of the Crab's 3D filamentary structure along the jet's base reveals a large and nearly emission-free opening in the remnant's thick outer ejecta shell. The jet's blueshifted and redshifted sides are surprisingly well defined and, like the jet's sharp western limb, appear radially aligned with the remnant's centre of expansion. These alignments, along with the opening in the nebula at the jet's base and proper motions indicating an expansion age in line with the 1054 supernova event, suggest a direct connection between the jet's formation and the Crab's radial expansion. While our analysis supports the scenario that the jet may simply represent the highest velocity material of the remnant's N-S bipolar expansion, the nature of this expansion asymmetry remains unclear.

  20. Flood hazard assessment in areas prone to flash flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvočka, Davor; Falconer, Roger A.; Bray, Michaela

    2016-04-01

    Contemporary climate projections suggest that there will be an increase in the occurrence of high-intensity rainfall events in the future. These precipitation extremes are usually the main cause for the emergence of extreme flooding, such as flash flooding. Flash floods are among the most unpredictable, violent and fatal natural hazards in the world. Furthermore, it is expected that flash flooding will occur even more frequently in the future due to more frequent development of extreme weather events, which will greatly increase the danger to people caused by flash flooding. This being the case, there will be a need for high resolution flood hazard maps in areas susceptible to flash flooding. This study investigates what type of flood hazard assessment methods should be used for assessing the flood hazard to people caused by flash flooding. Two different types of flood hazard assessment methods were tested: (i) a widely used method based on an empirical analysis, and (ii) a new, physically based and experimentally calibrated method. Two flash flood events were considered herein, namely: the 2004 Boscastle flash flood and the 2007 Železniki flash flood. The results obtained in this study suggest that in the areas susceptible to extreme flooding, the flood hazard assessment should be conducted using methods based on a mechanics-based analysis. In comparison to standard flood hazard assessment methods, these physically based methods: (i) take into account all of the physical forces, which act on a human body in floodwater, (ii) successfully adapt to abrupt changes in the flow regime, which often occur for flash flood events, and (iii) rapidly assess a flood hazard index in a relatively short period of time.

  1. Flash evaporator systems test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    A flash evaporator heat rejection system representative of that proposed for the space shuttle orbiter underwent extensive system testing at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) to determine its operational suitability and to establish system performance/operational characteristics for use in the shuttle system. During the tests the evaporator system demonstrated its suitability to meet the shuttle requirements by: (1) efficient operation with 90 to 95% water evaporation efficiency, (2) control of outlet temperature to 40 + or - 2 F for partial heat load operation, (3) stability of control system for rapid changes in Freon inlet temperature, and (4) repeated dormant-to-active device operation without any startup procedures.

  2. Methods of flash sintering

    DOEpatents

    Raj, Rishi; Cologna, Marco; Francis, John S.

    2016-05-10

    This disclosure provides methods of flash sintering and compositions created by these methods. Methods for sintering multilayered bodies are provided in which a sintered body is produced in less than one minute. In one aspect, each layer is of a different composition, and may be constituted wholly from a ceramic or from a combination of ceramic and metallic particles. When the body includes a layer of an anode composition, a layer of an electrolyte composition and a layer of a cathode composition, the sintered body can be used to produce a solid oxide fuel cell.

  3. NAND FLASH Radiation Tolerant Intelligent Memory Stack (RTIMS FLASH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellier, Charles; Wang, Pierre

    2014-08-01

    The NAND Flash Radiation Tolerant and Intelligent Memory Stack (RTIMS FLASH) is a User's Friendly, Plug-and- Play and Radiation Protected high density NAND Flash Memory. It provides a very high density, radiation hardened by design and non-volatile memory module suitable for all space applications such as commercial or scientific geo-stationary missions, earth observation, navigation, manned space vehicles and deep space scientific exploration. The Intelligent Memory Module embeds a very high density of non-volatile NAND Flash memory and one Intelligent Flash Memory Controller (FMC). The FMC provides the module with a full protection against the radiation effects such as SEL, SEFI and SEU. It's also granting the module with bad block immunity as well as high level service functions that will benefit to the user's applications.

  4. Active Flash: Out-of-core Data Analytics on Flash Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Boboila, Simona; Kim, Youngjae; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S; Desnoyers, Peter; Shipman, Galen M

    2012-01-01

    Next generation science will increasingly come to rely on the ability to perform efficient, on-the-fly analytics of data generated by high-performance computing (HPC) simulations, modeling complex physical phenomena. Scientific computing workflows are stymied by the traditional chaining of simulation and data analysis, creating multiple rounds of redundant reads and writes to the storage system, which grows in cost with the ever-increasing gap between compute and storage speeds in HPC clusters. Recent HPC acquisitions have introduced compute node-local flash storage as a means to alleviate this I/O bottleneck. We propose a novel approach, Active Flash, to expedite data analysis pipelines by migrating to the location of the data, the flash device itself. We argue that Active Flash has the potential to enable true out-of-core data analytics by freeing up both the compute core and the associated main memory. By performing analysis locally, dependence on limited bandwidth to a central storage system is reduced, while allowing this analysis to proceed in parallel with the main application. In addition, offloading work from the host to the more power-efficient controller reduces peak system power usage, which is already in the megawatt range and poses a major barrier to HPC system scalability. We propose an architecture for Active Flash, explore energy and performance trade-offs in moving computation from host to storage, demonstrate the ability of appropriate embedded controllers to perform data analysis and reduction tasks at speeds sufficient for this application, and present a simulation study of Active Flash scheduling policies. These results show the viability of the Active Flash model, and its capability to potentially have a transformative impact on scientific data analysis.

  5. Mapping Flash Flood Severity in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saharia, M.; Kirstetter, P. E.; Gourley, J. J.; Hong, Y.; Vergara, H. J.

    2015-12-01

    Flash floods have been a major natural hazard in terms of both fatalities and property damage. In the United States, flash floods have only been characterized on a case study basis due to the lack of a comprehensive database matching flood characteristics with geospatial and geomorphologic information. To characterize the ability of a basin to produce flash floods, a new variable called "Flashiness" is derived from the slope of the rising limb in hydrograph time series. It is the basis to document and predict the flash flood potential and severity over the U.S. First a representative and long archive of flood events spanning 78 years is used to analyze the spatial and temporal variability of observed flashiness. The areas and seasons prone to flash floods are documented, highlighting the flash flood alley in Texas, Appalachians, West Coast, and North American monsoon in Arizona etc. Then the flashiness is linked to geomorphologic and climatologic attributes to identify the basin characteristics driving the ability to produce flash floods. The significant impact of characteristics such as slope, precipitation, and basin area are quantified. Next the model is used to predict flashiness all over the continental U.S., specifically over regions poorly covered by hydrological observations. It highlights ungauged areas prone to flash floods such as parts of Florida, Southern Wisconsin, Montana and South Dakota etc. Finally these findings are validated using the National Weather Service storm reports and a historical flood fatalities database. This analysis framework will serve as a baseline for evaluating distributed hydrologic model simulations such as the Flooded Locations And Simulated Hydrographs Project (FLASH) (http://flash.ou.edu).

  6. Mechanisms of cutaneous vasodilation during the postmenopausal hot flash

    PubMed Central

    Low, David A.; Hubing, Kimberley A.; Del Coso, Juan; Crandall, Craig G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Menopausal hot flashes can seriously disrupt the lives of symptomatic women. The physiological mechanisms of the hot flash efferent responses, particularly in the cutaneous circulation, are not completely understood. The aim of this study was to examine the mechanisms of increases in skin blood flow during the postmenopausal hot flash in symptomatic women. Methods Healthy postmenopausal women rested in a temperature controlled laboratory while responses prior to and during hot flashes were recorded for three unique protocols. Protocols 1 and 2: Women were locally pretreated with an intradermal injection of botulinum toxin A (BTX; blocks the release of neurotransmitters from sympathetic cholinergic nerves) in the forearm (protocol 1) and in the glabellar region (protocol 2). Protocol 3: Skin sympathetic nerve activity from the peroneal nerve was recorded, along with skin blood flow and sweating within the region innervated by that neural signal. Skin blood flow was indexed using laser-Doppler flowmetry at BTX-treated and adjacent untreated control sites. The onset of a hot flash was objectively identified as a transient and pronounced elevation of sternal sweat rate. Results The elevation in forearm (protocol 1) and glabellar skin blood flow (protocol 2) during hot flashes were attenuated at BTX sites relative to adjacent untreated sites (P<0.05 for both protocols). In protocol 3, skin sympathetic nerve activity significantly increased during hot flashes and returned to pre-flash levels following the hot flashes. Conclusion Elevations in skin blood flow during the postmenopausal hot flash are neurally mediated primarily through BTX sensitive nerves; presumably sympathetic cholinergic. PMID:21107299

  7. Assessment of flash flood warning procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Lynn E.

    2000-01-01

    Assessment of four alternate flash flood warning procedures was conducted to ascertain their suitability for forecast operations using radar-rainfall imagery. The procedures include (1) areal mean basin effective rainfall, (2) unit hydrograph, (3) time-area, and (4) 2-D numerical modeling. The Buffalo Creek flash flood of July 12, 1996, was used as a case study for application of each of the procedures. A significant feature of the Buffalo Creek event was a forest fire that occurred a few months before the flood and significantly affected watershed runoff characteristics. Objectives were to assess the applicability of the procedures for watersheds having spatial and temporal scale similarities to Buffalo Creek, to compare their technical characteristics, and to consider forecaster usability. Geographic information system techniques for hydrologic database development and flash flood potential computations are illustrated. Generalizations of the case study results are offered relative to their suitability for flash flood forecasting operations. Although all four methods have relative advantages, their application to the Buffalo Creek event resulted in mixed performance. Failure of any method was due primarily to uncertainties of the land surface response (i.e., burn area imperviousness). Results underscore the need for model calibration; a difficult requirement for real-time forecasting.

  8. Flame ignition studies of conventional and alternative jet fuels and surrogate components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning

    concentrations. As for the detailed high temperature oxidation chemistry, ignition of normal, branched, and cyclic alkane flames were found to be sensitive largely to H2/CO and C1-C4 small hydrocarbon chemistry, while for branched alkanes fuel-related reactions do have accountable effect on ignition due to the low rate of initial fuel decomposition that limits the overall reactions preceding ignition. Analyses of the computed flame structures revealed that the concentrations of ignition-promoting radicals such as H, HCO, C2H3, and OH, and ignition-inhibiting radicals such as C3H6, aC3H5, and CH3 are key to the occurrence of ignition. Finally, the ignition characteristics of conventional and alternative jet fuels were studied and were to correlate with the chemical classifications and diffusivities of the neat species that are present in the practical fuel.

  9. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D.; Gross, Mark E.

    1997-01-01

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  10. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, J.D.; Gross, M.E.

    1997-10-28

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  11. Scoping Study of Airlift Circulation Technologies for Supplemental Mixing in Pulse Jet Mixed Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Berglin, Eric J.; Boeringa, Gregory K.; Buchmiller, William C.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Minette, Michael J.

    2015-04-07

    At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a scoping study to investigate supplemental technologies for supplying vertical fluid motion and enhanced mixing in Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) vessels designed for high solids processing. The study assumed that the pulse jet mixers adequately mix and shear the bottom portion of a vessel. Given that, the primary function of a supplemental technology should be to provide mixing and shearing in the upper region of a vessel. The objective of the study was to recommend a mixing technology and configuration that could be implemented in the 8-ft test vessel located at Mid-Columbia Engineering (MCE). Several mixing technologies, primarily airlift circulator (ALC) systems, were evaluated in the study. This technical report contains a review of ALC technologies, a description of the PNNL testing and accompanying results, and recommended features of an ALC system for further study.

  12. A Study of Vertical Gas Jets in a Bubbling Fluidized Bed

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccio, Steven; Curtis, Jennifer

    2011-04-15

    A detailed experimental study of a vertical gas jet impinging a fluidized bed of particles has been conducted with the help of Laser Doppler Velocimetry measurements. Mean and fluctuating velocity profiles of the two phases have been presented and analyzed for different fluidization states of the emulsion. The results of this work would be greatly helpful in understanding the complex two-phase mixing phenomenon that occurs in bubbling beds, such as in coal and biomass gasification, and also in building more fundamental gas-solid Eulerian/Lagrangian models which can be incorporated into existing CFD codes. Relevant simulations to supplement the experimental findings have also been conducted using the Department of Energy's open source code MFIX. The goal of these simulations was two-fold. One was to check the two-dimensional nature of the experimental results. The other was an attempt to improve the existing dense phase Eulerian framework through validation with the experimental results. In particular the sensitivity of existing frictional models in predicting the flow was investigated. The simulation results provide insight on wall-bounded turbulent jets and the effect frictional models have on gas-solid bubbling flows. Additionally, some empirical minimum fluidization correlations were validated for non-spherical particles with the idea of extending the present study to non-spherical particles which are more common in industries.

  13. New supersonic gas jet target for low energy nuclear reaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favela, F.; Acosta, L.; Andrade, E.; Araujo, V.; Huerta, A.; de Lucio, O. G.; Murillo, G.; Ortiz, M. E.; Policroniades, R.; Santa Rita, P.; Varela, A.; Chávez, E.

    2015-12-01

    A windowless supersonic gas jet target (SUGAR) has been put in operation recently in Mexico. It is the first target of its kind in the country and the region. New research opportunities become available with this facility through the study of the direct beam-gas interaction: nuclear physics and astrophysics, atomic physics, interaction of radiation with matter and other interdisciplinary applications. A general description of the apparatus and its commissioning is given here. Air, nitrogen and argon jets were produced. Proton and deuteron beams were used to measure key parameters of the system to compare with theoretical estimates. In addition, as a first study case, we present data from the 14N (d ,α )12C reaction, at center of mass energies between 1.9 and 3.0 MeV with an E-Δ E telescope detector at 35°. Excitation functions for several excited states were constructed and an 16O resonance at 22.72 MeV was confirmed.

  14. Study on hairpin-shaped argon plasma jets resonantly excited by microwave pulses at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhaoquan; Xia, Guangqing; Zou, Changlin; Li, Ping; Hu, Yelin; Ye, Qiubo; Eliseev, S.; Stepanova, O.; Saifutdinov, A. I.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.; Liu, Minghai

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, atmospheric pressure argon plasma jets driven by lower-power pulsed microwaves have been proposed with a type of hairpin resonator. The plasma jet plume demonstrates distinctive characteristics, like arched plasma pattern and local plasma bullets. In order to understand how the hairpin resonator works, electromagnetic simulation of the electric field distribution and self-consistent fluid simulation of the interaction between the enhanced electric field and the pulse plasma plume are studied. Simulated spatio-temporal distributions of the electric field, the electron temperature, the electron density, and the absorbed power density have been sampled, respectively. The experimental and simulated results together suggest that the driving mechanism of the hairpin resonator works in the multiple electromagnetic modes of transmission line and microwave resonator, while the local plasma bullets are resonantly generated by local enhanced electric field of surface plasmon polaritons. Moreover, it should be noticed that the radian of the arched plasma plume is mainly affected by the input power and gas flow rate, respectively.

  15. A PIV Study of Slotted Air Injection for Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda S.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2012-01-01

    Results from acoustic and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements are presented for single and dual-stream jets with fluidic injection on the core stream. The fluidic injection nozzles delivered air to the jet through slots on the interior of the nozzle at the nozzle trailing edge. The investigations include subsonic and supersonic jet conditions. Reductions in broadband shock noise and low frequency mixing noise were obtained with the introduction of fluidic injection on single stream jets. Fluidic injection was found to eliminate shock cells, increase jet mixing, and reduce turbulent kinetic energy levels near the end of the potential core. For dual-stream subsonic jets, the introduction of fluidic injection reduced low frequency noise in the peak jet noise direction and enhanced jet mixing. For dual-stream jets with supersonic fan streams and subsonic core streams, the introduction of fluidic injection in the core stream impacted the jet shock cell structure but had little effect on mixing between the core and fan streams.

  16. An Infrared Study of the Large-Scale Jet in Quasar PKS 1136-135

    SciTech Connect

    Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Urry, C.Megan; Coppi, Paolo; Van Duyne, Jeffrey; Cheung, C.C.; Sambruna, Rita M.; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tavecchio, Fabrizio; Maraschi, Laura; /Brera Observ.

    2007-03-16

    We present Spitzer IRAC imaging of the large-scale jet in the quasar PKS 1136-135 at wavelengths of 3.6 and 5.8 {micro}m, combined with previous VLA, HST, and Chandra observations. We clearly detect infrared emission from the jet, resulting in the most detailed multifrequency data among the jets in lobe-dominated quasars. The spectral energy distributions of the jet knots have significant variations along the jet, like the archetypal jet in 3C 273. The infrared measurements with IRAC are consistent with the previous idea that the jet has two spectral components, namely (1) the low-energy synchrotron spectrum extending from radio to infrared, and (2) the high-energy component responsible for the X-ray flux. The optical fluxes may be a mixture of the two components. We consider three radiation models for the high-energy component: inverse Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons by radio-emitting electrons in a highly relativistic jet, synchrotron radiation by a second distinct electron population, and synchrotron radiation by ultra high energy protons. Each hypothesis leads to important insights into and constraints on particle acceleration in the jet, as well as the basic physical properties of the jet such as bulk velocity, transporting power, and particle contents.

  17. Study of an underexpanded annular wall jet past an axisymmetric backward-facing step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espina, Pedro Ivan

    1997-12-01

    Gas-metal atomization is a process by which liquid metal is transformed into a metal powder. The metal powders produced through gas-metal atomization exhibit chemical homogeneity and refined microstructures that cannot be obtained by conventional casting techniques. Given their enhanced properties, the products made from these powders find applications ranging from jet-engine parts to medical implants. The heart of a gas-metal atomizer is a device known as the 'atomization nozzle assembly', which forces the interaction between a high-speed gas jet and a liquid stream of molten metal. Because the control of a molten stream of metal can be difficult, atomization control strategies have historically been focused on the gas- delivery-system of the atomizers. Thus, in this investigation, the gas-only flow in a close-coupled, gas- metal atomizer is studied to determine the influence of operational parameters on the structure of the flow field. Both experimental and numerical results are presented. First, the numerical method used is evaluated by modeling flat-plate boundary layers at various free stream velocities; further validation is conducted by modeling an axisymmetric base flow for which experimental and numerical data are available for comparison. Comparisons between the Schlieren images produced experimentally and numerical results are carried out, focusing on the evaluation of turbulence model parameters. The same methodology was then used to model the gas-only atomization flow produced at conventional operational conditions. A parametric study was conducted to determine the effects of jet exit pressure ratio, jet temperature ratio, and base mass injection (to model, at least approximately, some of the effects of the liquid phase). Based on the results obtained in the validation stage, it is concluded that the Chien k-ɛ turbulence model yields excessively high production of turbulence kinetic energy dissipation rate in this type of flow. It is shown that a 10

  18. Flash flood modelling for ungauged catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garambois, P.-A.; Roux, H.; Larnier, K.; Dartus, D.

    2012-04-01

    Flash flood is a very intense and quick hydrologic response of a catchment to rainfall. This phenomenon has a high spatial-temporal variability as its generating storm, often hitting small catchments (few km2). Data collected by (Gaume et al. 2009) about 500 flash floods over the last 50 years showed that they could occur everywhere in Europe and more often in the Mediterranean regions, Alpine regions and continental Europe. Given the small spatial-temporal scales and high variability of flash floods, their prediction remains a hard exercise as the necessary data are often scarce. Flash flood prediction on ungauged catchments is one of the challenges of hydrological modelling as defined by (Sivapalan et al. 2003). Several studies have been headed up with the MARINE model (Modélisation de l'Anticipation du Ruissellement et des Inondations pour des évèNements Extrêmes) for the Gard region (France), (Roux et al. 2011), (Castaings et al. 2009). This physically based spatially distributed rainfall runoff model is dedicated to flash flood prediction. The study aims at finding a methodology for flash flood prediction at ungauged locations in the Cévennes-Vivarais region in particular. The regionalization method is based on multiple calibrations on gauged catchments in order to extract model structures (model + parameter values) for each catchment. Several mathematical methods (multiple regressions, transfer functions, krigging…) will then be tested to calculate a regional parameter set. The study also investigates the usability of additional hydrologic indices at different time scales to constrain model predictions from parameters obtained using these indices, and this independently of the model considered. These hydrologic indices gather information on hydrograph shape or catchment dynamic for instance. Results explaining global catchments behaviour are expected that way. The spatial-temporal variability of storms is also described through indices and linked with

  19. Influence of the Coanda effect on color Doppler jet area and color encoding. In vitro studies using color Doppler flow mapping.

    PubMed

    Chao, K; Moises, V A; Shandas, R; Elkadi, T; Sahn, D J; Weintraub, R

    1992-01-01

    We studied surface adherence and its effects on color Doppler jet areas and color encoding in an in vitro model with a noncompliant receiving chamber into which a steady flow jet was directed parallel to either a straight or a curved surface adjacent to and 4 mm away from the inflow orifice (1.50 mm2) with the control condition being a free jet matched for flow rates and driving pressures. Jets were imaged perpendicular to the plane of the surface, the plane in which most clinical images of jet-surface interactions are obtained. Ten different flow rates ranging from 0.13 to 0.30 l/min were used. Surface-adherent jet areas were smaller than control jets for every driving pressure-volume combination (paired t test, p less than 0.01). Computer analysis of color Doppler images showed more green and blue (reverse flow) pixels on the surface side of the adherent jets than the control jets (p less than 0.05), suggesting that viscous energy loss and flow deceleration and reversal play a role in the jet-surface interaction. Analysis of variance demonstrated that linear regression slopes of flow rate versus jet area for surface jets were lower (slopes, 11-21 cm2/l/min; r = 0.95-0.97) than those for the control (slope, 33 cm2/l/min; r = 0.97) (p less than 0.0001). Surface adherence (Coanda effect) influences jet size and color encoding, causing smaller color Doppler jet areas and greater variance and reverse velocity encoding. PMID:1728465

  20. Simulator study of vortex encounters by a twin-engine, commercial, jet transport airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, E. C., Jr.; Keyser, G. L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A simulator study of vortex encounters was conducted for a twin-engine, commercial, jet transport airplane encountering the vortex flow field of a heavy, four-engine, commercial, jet transport airplane in the final-approach configuration. The encounters were conducted with fixed controls and with a pilot using a state-of-the-art, manual-control system. Piloted encounters with the base-line vortex flow field out of ground effect (unattenuated) resulted in initial bank-angle excursions greater than 40 deg, coupled with initial sideslip-angle excursions greater than 10 deg. The severity of these initial upsets was significantly reduced when the vortex center was moved laterally or vertically away from the flight path of the encountering airplane. Smaller reductions occurred when the flow field was attenuated by the flight spoilers on the generating airplane. The largest reduction in the severity of the initial upsets, however, was from aging in ground effect. The severity of the initial upsets of the following airplane was relatively unaffected by the approach speed. Increasing the lift coefficient of the generating airplane resulted in an increase in the severity of the initial upsets.

  1. High Speed Argon PlasmaJet Merging Studies in Support of PLX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Andrew; Messer, Sarah; Brockington, Samuel; Wu, Linchun; Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Elton, Raymond

    2014-10-01

    Formation of an imploding plasma liner such as for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) requires individual plasma jets to merge into a uniform shell of plasma converging on the target region. Understanding dynamics of the merging process requires knowledge of the plasma phenomena involved. We present here results from the study of the merging of six plasma jets in three dimensional geometry. The experiments were performed using HyperV Technologies Corp. one centimeter MiniRailguns using a preionized Argon plasma armature on a vacuum chamber designed to partially reproduce the port geometry of the PLX vacuum chamber. Diagnostics include fast imaging, spectroscopy, B-dot probes, and high speed spatially resolved photodiodes, permitting measurements of temperature, velocity, and magnetic field. These experimental results are compared with simulation results from the LSP 3D hybrid PIC code. Work supported by the US DOE OFES under Grants DE-FG02-05ER54810 and DE-FG02-08ER85114.

  2. Study on Surface Modification of Polymer Films by Using Atmospheric Plasma Jet Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, Yuichiro; Yamaguchi, Naohiro; Hara, Tamio

    2008-07-01

    Reactive gas plasma treatments of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and polyimide (Kapton) have been performed using an atmospheric plasmas jet source. Characteristics of surface modification have been examined by changing the distance between the plasma jet source and the treated sample, and by changing the working gas spaces. Simultaneously, each plasma jet source has been investigated by space-resolving spectroscopy in the UV/visible region. Polymer surfaces have been analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A marked improvement in the hydrophilicity of the polymer surfaces has been made by using N2 or O2 plasma jet source with a very short exposure time of about 0.01 s, whereas the less improvement has been obtained using on air plasma jet source because of NOx compound production. Changes in the chemical states of C of the polymer surfaces have been observed in XPS spectra after N2 plasma jet spraying.

  3. Experimental study of the water jet induced by underwater electrical discharge in a narrow rectangular tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koita, T.; Zhu, Y.; Sun, M.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports an experimental investigation on the effects of explosion depth and tube width on the water jet induced by an underwater electrical discharge in a narrow rectangular tube. The water jet formation and bubble structure were evaluated from the images recorded by a high-speed video camera. Two typical patterns of jet formation and four general patterns of bubble implosion were observed, depending on the explosion depth and tube width. The velocity of the water jet was calculated from the recorded images. The jet velocity was observed to depend on not only the explosion depth and energy, but also on the tube width. We proposed an empirical formula defining the water jet velocity in the tube as a function of the tube width and explosion depth and energy.

  4. Structures and the Hydrogen Bonding Abilities of Estrogens Studied by Supersonic Jet/laser Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishima, Fumiya; Inokuchi, Yoshiya; Ebata, Takayuki

    2013-06-01

    Estrone, estradiol, estriol are known as endogenous estrogen which have the same steroidal frame with different substituent, leading to difference of physiological activity upon the formation of hydrogen bond with estrogen receptor. In the present study, structures of estrogens and their hydrated clusters in a supersonic jet have been studied by various laser spectroscopic techniques and density functional theory calculation to study how the difference of substituents affects their hydrogen bonding ability. Infrared spectra in the OH stretching region indicate a formation of intramolecular hydrogen-bond in estriol, which may lead to weaker physiological activity among the three estrogens. We also measured electronic and infrared spectra of 1:1 hydrated clusters of estrogen. The results show a switch of stable hydration site from the phenolic OH group to the five member ring by substituting one more OH group.

  5. Transmitter Upgrade for JET Alfv'en Eigenmode Fast Particle Interaction Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woskov, P.; Porkolab, M.; Fasoli, A.; Blanchard, P.

    2009-11-01

    One of the main missions of the worldwide fusion R&D effort is to develop predictive and control capability of burning plasmas in support of ITER. A unique 8-coil antenna system has been implemented on JET to study fast-ion interactions with Alfv'en eigenmodes in the 50 -- 500 kHz range that could potentially increase losses of α particles and reduce fusion gain. The single 4 kW transmitter will be replaced with eight 1 kW transmitters that will independently power each antenna to more uniformly distribute the power among the antennas. This will improve the coupling to higher order modes (n = 5 - 30) for damping studies. Independent drivers will also be used to make possible multi frequency and arbitrary phase studies of multiple modes and traveling modes. Various analog and digital driver approaches are being considered to provide the needed flexibility. A systems design will be presented.

  6. The use of a syncytium model of the crystalline lens of the eye as a new tool to study the light flashes phenomenon seen by astronauts.

    PubMed

    Nurzia, Giampietro; Scrimaglio, Renato; Spataro, Bruno; Zirilli, Francesco

    2006-11-01

    A syncytium model to study some electrical properties of the eye is proposed to study the phenomenon of anomalous light flashes (LF) perceived by astronauts in orbit. The crystalline lens is modelled as an ellipsoidal syncytium with a variable relative dielectric constant. The corresponding mathematical model is a boundary value problem for a system of two coupled elliptic partial differential equations in the two unknown syncytial electrical potentials. A numerical method to compute an approximate solution of this mathematical model is used, and some numerical results are shown. The model can be regarded as a new tool to study the LF phenomenon. In particular, the energy lost in the syncytium by a transversing cosmic charged particle is calculated and the results obtained with the syncytium model are compared with those obtained using the previously available Geant 3.21 simulation program. In addition, the interaction of antimatter-syncytium is studied, and the Creme96 computer program is used to evaluate the cosmic ray fluxes encountered by the International Space Station in its standard mission. PMID:17031662

  7. Studies of Multi-Parton Interactions in Photon+Jets Events at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Bandurin, Dmitry; /Florida State U.

    2011-09-01

    We consider sample of inclusive {gamma} + 3 jet events collected by the D0 experiment. The double parton fraction (f{sub DP}) and effective cross section {sigma}{sub eff}, a process-independent scale parameter related to the parton density inside the nucleon, are measured in three intervals of the second (ordered in p{sub T}) jet transverse momentum p{sub T}{sup jet2} within the 15 {le} p{sub T}{sup jet2} {le} 30 GeV range. Also we measured cross sections as a function of the angle in the plane transverse to the beam direction between the transverse momentum (p{sub T}) of the {gamma} + leading jet system and p{sub T} of the other jet for {gamma} + 2 jet, or p{sub T} sum of the two other jets for {gamma} + 3 jet events. The results are compared to different models of multiple parton interactions (MPI) in the PYTHIA and SHERPA Monte Carlo (MC) generators.

  8. Studies of jet cross-sections and production properties with the ATLAS and CMS detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjos, Nuno

    2016-07-01

    Several characteristics of jet production in pp collisions have been measured by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations at the LHC. Measurements of event shapes and multi-jet production probe the dynamics of QCD in the soft regime and can constrain parton shower and hadronisation models. Measurements of multi-jet systems with a veto on additional jets probe QCD radiation effects. Double-differential cross-sections for threeand four-jet final states are measured at different centre-of-mass energies of pp collisions and are compared to expectations based on NLO QCD calculations. The distribution of the jet charge has been measured in di-jet events and compared to predictions from different hadronisation models and tunes. Jet-jet energy correlations are sensitive to the strong coupling constant. These measurements constitute precision tests of QCD in a new energy regime. Work supported by the Beatriu de Pinós program managed by Agència de Gestió d'Ajuts Universitaris i de Recerca with the support of the Secretaria d'Universitats i Recerca of the Departament d'Economia i Coneixement of the Generalitat de Catalunya, and the Cofund program of the Marie Curie Actions of the 7th R&D Framework Program of the European Union. Work partially supported by MINECO under grants SEV-2012-0234, FPA2013-48308, and FPA2012-38713, which include FEDER funds from the European Union.

  9. Simulation Studies of the Jet and Missing Transverse Energy Performance of the Atlas Calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielers, M.

    2002-01-01

    The measurement of jets and missing transverse energy reconstruction will play an important role for many physics channels at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The performance of the ATLAS detector for reconstructing jets and missing transverse energy has been evaluated using detailed simulations. In this paper results based on these simulations will be shown for the jet energy resolution, in addition to some selected examples of the simulated jet and missing transverse energy physics performance. Special emphasis will be put on the experimental aspects like electronic and pile-up noise, non-compensation, and dead material, as well as their realisation in the simulation.

  10. Analytical and experimental study of the acoustics and the flow field characteristics of cavitating self-resonating water jets

    SciTech Connect

    Chahine, G.L.; Genoux, P.F.; Johnson, V.E. Jr.; Frederick, G.S.

    1984-09-01

    Waterjet nozzles (STRATOJETS) have been developed which achieve passive structuring of cavitating submerged jets into discrete ring vortices, and which possess cavitation incipient numbers six times higher than obtained with conventional cavitating jet nozzles. In this study we developed analytical and numerical techniques and conducted experimental work to gain an understanding of the basic phenomena involved. The achievements are: (1) a thorough analysis of the acoustic dynamics of the feed pipe to the nozzle; (2) a theory for bubble ring growth and collapse; (3) a numerical model for jet simulation; (4) an experimental observation and analysis of candidate second-generation low-sigma STRATOJETS. From this study we can conclude that intensification of bubble ring collapse and design of highly resonant feed tubes can lead to improved drilling rates. The models here described are excellent tools to analyze the various parameters needed for STRATOJET optimizations. Further analysis is needed to introduce such important factors as viscosity, nozzle-jet interaction, and ring-target interaction, and to develop the jet simulation model to describe the important fine details of the flow field at the nozzle exit.

  11. Selective photochemistry at stereogenic metal and ligand centers of cis-[Ru(diphosphine)2(H)2]: preparative, NMR, solid state, and laser flash studies.

    PubMed

    Câmpian, Marius V; Perutz, Robin N; Procacci, Barbara; Thatcher, Robert J; Torres, Olga; Whitwood, Adrian C

    2012-02-22

    Three ruthenium complexes Λ-[cis-Ru((R,R)-Me-BPE)(2)(H)(2)] Λ-R,R-Ru1H(2), Δ-[cis-Ru((S,S)-Me-DuPHOS)(2)(H)(2)] Δ-S,S-Ru2H(2), and Λ-[cis-Ru((R,R)-Me-DuPHOS)(2)(H)(2)] Λ-R,R-Ru2H(2) (1 = (Me-BPE)(2), 2 = (Me-DuPHOS)(2)) were characterized by multinuclear NMR and CD spectroscopy in solution and by X-ray crystallography. The chiral ligands allow the full control of stereochemistry and enable mechanistic studies not otherwise available. Oxidative addition of E-H bonds (E = H, B, Si, C) was studied by steady state and laser flash photolysis in the presence of substrates. Steady state photolysis shows formation of single products with one stereoisomer. Solid state structures and circular dichroism spectra reveal a change in configuration at ruthenium for some Δ-S,S-Ru2H(2)/Λ-R,R-Ru2H(2) photoproducts from Λ to Δ (or vice versa) while the configuration for Λ-R,R-Ru1H(2) products remains unchanged as Λ. The X-ray structure of silyl hydride photoproducts suggests a residual H(1)···Si(1) interaction for Δ-[cis-Ru((R,R)-Me-DuPHOS)(2)(Et(2)SiH)(H)] and Δ-[cis-Ru((R,R)-Me-DuPHOS)(2)(PhSiH(2))(H)] but not for their Ru(R,R-BPE)(2) analogues. Molecular structures were also determined for Λ-[cis-Ru((R,R)-Me-BPE)(2)(Bpin)(H)], Λ-[Ru((S,S)-Me-DuPHOS)(2)(η(2)-C(2)H(4))], Δ-[Ru((R,R)-Me-DuPHOS)(2)(η(2)-C(2)H(4))], and trans-[Ru((R,R)-Me-DuPHOS)(2)(C(6)F(5))(H)]. In situ laser photolysis in the presence of p-H(2) generates hyperpolarized NMR spectra because of magnetically inequivalent hydrides; these experiments and low temperature photolysis with D(2) reveal that the loss of hydride ligands is concerted. The reaction intermediates [Ru(DuPHOS)(2)] and [Ru(BPE)(2)] were detected by laser flash photolysis and have spectra consistent with approximate square-planar Ru(0) structures. The rates of their reactions with H(2), D(2), HBpin, and PhSiH(3) were measured by transient kinetics. Rate constants are significantly faster for [Ru(BPE)(2)] than for [Ru(DuPHOS)(2

  12. Study of interfaces in an Axisymmetric Supersonic Jet using Background Oriented Schlieren (BOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echeverría, Carlos; Porta, David; Aguayo, Alejandro; Cardoso, Hiroki; Stern, Catalina

    2014-11-01

    We have used several techniques to study a small axisymmetric supersonic jet: Rayleigh scattering, Schlieren Toepler and PIV. Each technique gives different kind of information. In this paper, a BOS set-up is used to study the structure of the shock pattern. A shadowgraph of a dot matrix is obtained with and without a flow. The displacement field of the dots is related to changes in the index of refraction, which can be related, through the Gladstone-Dale equation, to changes in density. Previous results with this technique were not conclusive because of the relative size of the dots compared to the diameter of the nozzle. Measurements have been taken for three different exit speeds. We acknowledge support from UNAM through DGAPA PAPIIT IN117712 and the Graduate Program in Mechanical Engineering.

  13. Numerical and experimental study of blowing jet on a high lift airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobonea, A.; Pricop, M. V.

    2013-10-01

    Active manipulation of separated flows over airfoils at moderate and high angles of attack in order to improve efficiency or performance has been the focus of a number of numerical and experimental investigations for many years. One of the main methods used in active flow control is the usage of blowing devices with constant and pulsed blowing. Through CFD simulation over a 2D high-lift airfoil, this study is trying to highlight the impact of pulsed blowing over its aerodynamic characteristics. The available wind tunnel data from INCAS low speed facility are also beneficial for the validation of the numerical analysis. This study intends to analyze the impact of the blowing jet velocity and slot geometry on the efficiency of an active flow control.

  14. On jet substructure methods for signal jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Mrinal; Powling, Alexander; Siodmok, Andrzej

    2015-08-01

    We carry out simple analytical calculations and Monte Carlo studies to better understand the impact of QCD radiation on some well-known jet substructure methods for jets arising from the decay of boosted Higgs bosons. Understanding differences between taggers for these signal jets assumes particular significance in situations where they perform similarly on QCD background jets. As an explicit example of this we compare the Y-splitter method to the more recently proposed Y-pruning technique. We demonstrate how the insight we gain can be used to significantly improve the performance of Y-splitter by combining it with trimming and show that this combination outperforms the other taggers studied here, at high p T . We also make analytical estimates for optimal parameter values, for a range of methods and compare to results from Monte Carlo studies.

  15. FLASH LIDAR Based Relative Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brazzel, Jack; Clark, Fred; Milenkovic, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    Relative navigation remains the most challenging part of spacecraft rendezvous and docking. In recent years, flash LIDARs, have been increasingly selected as the go-to sensors for proximity operations and docking. Flash LIDARS are generally lighter and require less power that scanning Lidars. Flash LIDARs do not have moving parts, and they are capable of tracking multiple targets as well as generating a 3D map of a given target. However, there are some significant drawbacks of Flash Lidars that must be resolved if their use is to be of long-term significance. Overcoming the challenges of Flash LIDARs for navigation-namely, low technology readiness level, lack of historical performance data, target identification, existence of false positives, and performance of vision processing algorithms as intermediaries between the raw sensor data and the Kalman filter-requires a world-class testing facility, such as the Lockheed Martin Space Operations Simulation Center (SOSC). Ground-based testing is a critical step for maturing the next-generation flash LIDAR-based spacecraft relative navigation. This paper will focus on the tests of an integrated relative navigation system conducted at the SOSC in January 2014. The intent of the tests was to characterize and then improve the performance of relative navigation, while addressing many of the flash LIDAR challenges mentioned above. A section on navigation performance and future recommendation completes the discussion.

  16. Acoustic wavefield and Mach wave radiation of flashing arcs in strombolian explosion measured by image luminance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genco, Riccardo; Ripepe, Maurizio; Marchetti, Emanuele; Bonadonna, Costanza; Biass, Sebastien

    2014-10-01

    Explosive activity often generates visible flashing arcs in the volcanic plume considered as the evidence of the shock-front propagation induced by supersonic dynamics. High-speed image processing is used to visualize the pressure wavefield associated with flashing arcs observed in strombolian explosions. Image luminance is converted in virtual acoustic signal compatible with the signal recorded by pressure transducer. Luminance variations are moving with a spherical front at a 344.7 m/s velocity. Flashing arcs travel at the sound speed already 14 m above the vent and are not necessarily the evidence of a supersonic explosive dynamics. However, seconds later, the velocity of small fragments increases, and the spherical acousto-luminance wavefront becomes planar recalling the Mach wave radiation generated by large scale turbulence in high-speed jet. This planar wavefront forms a Mach angle of 55° with the explosive jet axis, suggesting an explosive dynamics moving at Mo = 1.22 Mach number.

  17. Fueling plankton production by a meandering frontal jet: a case study for the Alboran Sea (Western Mediterranean).

    PubMed

    Oguz, Temel; Macias, Diego; Garcia-Lafuente, Jesus; Pascual, Ananda; Tintore, Joaquin

    2014-01-01

    A three dimensional biophysical model was employed to illustrate the biological impacts of a meandering frontal jet, in terms of efficiency and persistency of the autotrophic frontal production, in marginal and semi-enclosed seas. We used the Alboran Sea of the Western Mediterranean as a case study. Here, a frontal jet with a width of 15-20 km, characterized by the relatively low density Atlantic water mass, flows eastward within the upper 100 m as a marked meandering current around the western and the eastern anticyclonic gyres prior to its attachment to the North African shelf/slope topography of the Algerian basin. Its inherent nonlinearity leads to the development of a strong ageostrophic cross-frontal circulation that supplies nutrients into the nutrient-starved euphotic layer and stimulates phytoplankton growth along the jet. Biological production is larger in the western part of the basin and decreases eastwards with the gradual weakening of the jet. The higher production at the subsurface levels suggests that the Alboran Sea is likely more productive than predicted by the satellite chlorophyll data. The Mediterranean water mass away from the jet and the interiors of the western and eastern anticyclonic gyres remain unproductive. PMID:25372789

  18. A DNS study on the stabilization mechanism of a turbulent lifted ethylene jet flame in highly-heated coflow

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C. S.; Richardson, E.; Sankaran, R.; Chen, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the near-field of a three-dimensional spatially-developing turbulent ethylene jet flame in highly-heated coflow is performed with a reduced mechanism to determine the stabilization mechanism. The DNS was performed at a jet Reynolds number of 10,000 with over 1.29 billion grid points. The results show that auto-ignition in a fuel-lean mixture at the flame base is the main source of stabilization of the lifted jet flame. The Damköhler number and chemical explosive mode (CEM) analysis also verify that auto-ignition occurs at the flame base. In addition to auto-ignition, Lagrangian tracking of the flame base reveals the passage of large-scale flow structures and their correlation with the fluctuations of the flame base similar to a previous study (Yoo et al., J. Fluid Mech. 640 (2009) 453–481) with hydrogen/air jet flames. It is also observed that the present lifted flame base exhibits a cyclic ‘saw-tooth’ shaped movement marked by rapid movement upstream and slower movement downstream. This is a consequence of the lifted flame being stabilized by a balance between consecutive auto-ignition events in hot fuel-lean mixtures and convection induced by the high-speed jet and coflow velocities. This is confirmed by Lagrangian tracking of key variables including the flame-normal velocity, displacement speed, scalar dissipation rate, and mixture fraction at the stabilization point.

  19. A DNS study on the stabilization mechanism of a turbulent lifted ethylene jet flame in highly-heated coflow

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Chun S

    2011-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the near-field of a three-dimensional spatially-developing turbulent ethylene jet flame in highly-heated coflow is performed with a reduced mechanism to determine the stabilization mechanism. The DNS was performed at a jet Reynolds number of 10,000 with over 1.29 billion grid points. The results show that auto-ignition in a fuel-lean mixture at the flame base is the main source of stabilization of the lifted jet flame. The Damkoehler number and chemical explosive mode (CEM) analysis also verify that auto-ignition occurs at the flame base. In addition to auto-ignition, Lagrangian tracking of the flame base reveals the passage of large-scale flow structures and their correlation with the fluctuations of the flame base similar to a previous study (Yoo et al., J. Fluid Mech. 640 (2009) 453-481) with hydrogen/air jet flames. It is also observed that the present lifted flame base exhibits a cyclic 'saw-tooth' shaped movement marked by rapid movement upstream and slower movement downstream. This is a consequence of the lifted flame being stabilized by a balance between consecutive auto-ignition events in hot fuel-lean mixtures and convection induced by the high-speed jet and coflow velocities. This is confirmed by Lagrangian tracking of key variables including the flame-normal velocity, displacement speed, scalar dissipation rate, and mixture fraction at the stabilization point.

  20. Fundamental Study of a Jet-in-Cross-Flow Interacting with a Vortex Generator for Film Cooling Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, Khairul; Rigby, David; Heidmann, James

    2009-01-01

    Results of an experimental study are presented on the effectiveness of a vortex generator (VG) in preventing lift-off of a jet-in-cross-flow (JICF). The study is pertinent to film-cooling applications and its relevance to NASA programs is first briefly discussed. In the experiment, the jet issues into the boundary layer at an angle of 20deg to the free-stream. The effect of a triangular, ramp-shaped VG is studied while varying its geometry and location. Detailed flow-field properties are obtained for a case in which the height of the VG and the diameter of the orifice are comparable to the approach boundary layer thickness. The VG produces a streamwise vortex pair with vorticity magnitude three times larger (and of opposite sense) than that found in the JICF alone. Such a VG appears to be most effective in keeping the jet attached to the wall. The effect of parametric variation is studied mostly from surveys ten diameters downstream from the orifice. Results over a range of jet-to-freestream momentum flux ratio (1jet. On the other hand, when the height is doubled, the jet core is dissipated due to larger turbulence intensity. Varying the location of the VG, over a distance of three diameters from the orifice, is found to have little impact.

  1. Modulation of tropical cyclone flash density by environmental factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugo, A.; Abarca, S.; Kucienska, B.; Oropeza, F.; Raga, G.

    2012-12-01

    While lightning flash density has been successfully used to document azimuthal and radial distribution of convective activity in tropical cyclones, there have been less successful attempts to link flash density changes to storm intensity change. The latter efforts have been more often focused on major hurricanes and in isolation from environmental phenomena that modulate flash occurrence. Major hurricanes have more neutral vertical stratification than weaker storms and therefore, have fewer flashes. Other factors, such as the concentration of cloud condensation nuclei from continental origin, the diurnal cycle and sea surface temperature (SST), among others, will heavily modulate the lightning flash density. The Eastern Pacific basin is ideally located to study the effects of these different environmental modulators on tropical cyclones. The off-shore flow from Mexico results in a large variability of cloud condensation nuclei concentration and there is also a large range in sea surface temperatures. Note that most tropical cyclones in the basin dissipate as a result of the encounter of colder SSTs and drier air advected into the inner core . We present an analysis of lightning flash density in 96 tropical cyclones in the Eastern Pacific between 2005 and 2011. We use the best track dataset to determine location and intensity of the tropical cyclones, the World Wide Lightning Location Network to characterize flash density, MODIS (on board of the Terra and Aqua satellites) to determine the aerosol optical depth (as a proxy for cloud condensation nuclei content), and AMSR-E for sea surface temperatures. Preliminary results indicate a heavy modulation of flash density inside tropical cyclones by cloud condensation nuclei and a cap of the largest flash density as a function of sea surface temperatures.

  2. Weak positive cloud-to-ground flashes in Northeastern Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Raul E.; Maier, Michael W.; Garcia-Miguel, Juan A.; Holle, Ronald L.

    1991-01-01

    The frequency distributions of the peak magnetic field associated with the first detected return stroke of positive and negative cloud-to-ground (CG) flashes were studied using lightning data from northeastern Colorado. These data were obtained during 1985 with a medium-to-high gain network of three direction finders (DF's). The median signal strength of positive flashes was almost two times that of the negatives for flashes within 300 km of the DF's, which have an inherent detection-threshold bias that tends to discriminate against weak signals. This bias increases with range, and affects the detection of positive and negative flashes in different ways, because of the differing character of their distributions. Positive flashes appear to have a large percentage of signals clustered around very weak values that are lost to the medium-to-high gain Colorado Detection System very quickly with increasing range. The resulting median for positive signals could thus appear to be much larger than the median for negative signals, which are more clustered around intermediate values. When only flashes very close to the DF's are considered, however, the two distributions have almost identical medians. The large percentage of weak positive signals detected close to the DF's has not been explored previously. They have been suggested to come from intracloud discharges and thus are improperly classified as CG flashes. Evidence in hand, points to their being real positive, albeit weak CG flashes. Whether or not they are real positive ground flashes, it is important to be aware of their presence in data from magnetic DF networks.

  3. Studying tungsten under the cyclic action of a plasma gun jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, A. V.; Gusev, V. K.; Demina, E. V.; Novokhatskii, A. N.; Prusakova, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    We have studied the cyclic action of a plasma gun jet, which modeled nonstationary thermal load related to the edge localized modes (ELMs), on the surface of tungsten elements intended for the ITER divertor. The results revealed significant changes in both the structure and morphology of a surface layer. After 100 irradiation cycles, a columnar or "ridged" structure of elements perpendicular to the initial irradiated surface is formed. Exposure to 1000 cycles changes the mechanism of material degradation and radically modifies the character of the surface topography, since the ridges are melted with the formation of droplet structures. The surface becomes rough, a loose material layer appears under the irradiated surface, and a 100-μm-thick recrystallized layer is formed.

  4. Direct numerical simulation of a supersonic lifted hydrogen jet flame: A priori study on combustion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Tai; Luo, Kun; Lu, Shuqiang; Fan, Jianren

    2015-04-01

    In this study, a systematic assessment of turbulent combustion submodels of conditional moment closure (CMC) has been conducted using DNS data of a three-dimensional spatially-developing supersonic lifted hydrogen flame with a Mach number of 1.2 at the jet injection. It has been found that Beta pdf of mixture fraction can well capture the mixing space of the high speed reacting flow. The linear model exhibits a good performance for the axial velocity predictions. Girimaji's model for scalar dissipation rate performs well at upstream, while the AMC model presents better further downstream. The first order closure for the conditional reaction rate deviates a lot from the DNS extracted results. Second-order corrections made to temperature only or to the two rate-limiting reaction steps induce improvement, still with much discrepancy. Second order closure considering fluctuations of all the reacting species and temperature can accurately reproduce the DNS results.

  5. Studies of ICRF Discharge Conditioning (ICRF-DC) on ASDEX Upgrade, JET and TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Lyssoivan, A.; Koch, R.; Eester, D. van; Wassenhove, G. van; Vervier, M.; Weynants, R.; Gauthier, E.; Bobkov, V.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Hartmann, D.A.; Rohde, V.; Suttrop, W.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Monakhov, I.; Walden, A.

    2005-09-26

    The present paper reviews the recent results achieved in the ICRF-DC experiments performed in helium/hydrogen mixtures in the non-circular tokamaks ASDEX Upgrade and JET and first tests of the ICRF discharges in helium/oxygen mixtures in the circular tokamak TEXTOR. Special emphasis was given to study the physics of ICRF discharges. A new recipe for safe and reliable RF plasma production [{approx}(3-5)x1017 m-3, Te{approx}(3-5) eV] with improved antenna coupling efficiency (by 1.5-3 times) and improved radial/poloidal homogeneity was proposed and successfully tested: coupling the RF power in the FW-IBW mode conversion scenario in plasmas with two ion species. The first results on ICRF wall conditioning in helium/hydrogen and in helium/oxygen mixtures are analyzed.

  6. Parametric study of synthetic jet actuators on a backward facing step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassoon, Aaron M.

    The ability of synthetic jet actuators to leverage natural instabilities in the flow field due to separation is reviewed for applications towards virtual shape change. The separating flow over a backward facing step of height h is studied under the influence of an actuator upstream and downstream of separation. Experimental tests were conducted in a wind tunnel using particle imaging velocimetry and time-averaged static pressure data to measure and analyze the affected flow fields and pressure distribution. By placing a second actuator downstream of separation, the ability to influence the pressure distribution has been shown. The two actuators demonstrated the ability to affect Cp and dCp/dx in the region from 0 - 6h after the step.

  7. Introductory study of the chemical behavior of jet emissions in photochemical smog. [computerized simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitten, G. Z.; Hogo, H.

    1976-01-01

    Jet aircraft emissions data from the literature were used as initial conditions for a series of computer simulations of photochemical smog formation in static air. The chemical kinetics mechanism used in these simulations was an updated version which contains certain parameters designed to account for hydrocarbon reactivity. These parameters were varied to simulate the reaction rate constants and average carbon numbers associated with the jet emissions. The roles of surface effects, variable light sources, NO/NO2 ratio, continuous emissions, and untested mechanistic parameters were also assessed. The results of these calculations indicate that the present jet emissions are capable of producing oxidant by themselves. The hydrocarbon/nitrous oxides ratio of present jet aircraft emissions is much higher than that of automobiles. These two ratios appear to bracket the hydrocarbon/nitrous oxides ratio that maximizes ozone production. Hence an enhanced effect is seen in the simulation when jet exhaust emissions are mixed with automobile emissions.

  8. PLIF Study of Mars Science Laboratory Capsule Reaction Control System Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansen, C. T.; Danehy, P. M.; Ashcraft, S. W.; Bathel, B. F.; Inman, J. A.; Jones, S. B.

    2011-01-01

    Nitric-oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence (NO PLIF) was used to visualize the flow in the wake of a Mars Science Lab (MSL) entry capsule with activated reaction control system (RCS) jets in NASA Langley Research Center's 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel facility. Images were processed using the Virtual Diagnostics Interface (ViDI) method, which brings out the three-dimensional nature of the flow visualization data while showing the relative location of the data with respect to the model. Comparison of wind-on and wind-off results illustrates the effect that the hypersonic crossflow has on the trajectory and structure of individual RCS jets. The visualization and comparison of both single and multiple activated RCS jets indicate low levels of jet-jet interaction. Quantitative streamwise velocity was also obtained via NO PLIF molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV).

  9. PLIF Study of Mars Science Laboratory Capsule Reaction Control System Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansen, C. T.; Danehy, P. M.; Ashcraft, S. W.; Bathel, B. F.; Inman, J. A.; Jones, S. B.

    2011-01-01

    Nitric-oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence (NO PLIF) was used to visualize the flow in the wake of a Mars Science Lab (MSL) entry capsule with activated reaction control system (RCS) jets in NASA Langley Research Center s 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel facility. Images were processed using the Virtual Diagnostics Interface (ViDI) method, which brings out the three-dimensional nature of the flow visualization data while showing the relative location of the data with respect to the model. Comparison of wind-on and wind-off results illustrates the effect that the hypersonic crossflow has on the trajectory and structure of individual RCS jets. The visualization and comparison of both single and multiple activated RCS jets indicate low levels of jet-jet interaction. Quantitative streamwise velocity was also obtained via NO PLIF molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV).

  10. An experimental and numerical study of gas jet diffusion flames enveloped by a cascade of venturis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qubbaj, Ala Rafat

    1999-06-01

    A new technique to control carbon monoxide, nitric oxide, and soot emissions of a propane diffusion flame by modifying the air infusion rate into the flame was developed. In this study, the effectiveness of the ``venturi-cascading'' technique was experimentally as well numerically investigated. Propane jet diffusion flames at three burner-exit Reynolds numbers ( 3600, 5100 and 6500) corresponding to burner-rim-attached, undergoing transition from attached to lifted, and fully-lifted configurations were examined with several sets of venturis of different sizes and spacing arrangements. Temperature, and the concentrations of carbon dioxide, oxygen, carbon monoxide and nitric oxide in the exhaust products were measured before and after the modification, and optimal conditions to minimize pollutant emissions were obtained. The optimal value of venturi throat/burner-exit diameter ratio (D/d) was 32 +/- 3, which corresponded to an approximate clearance of 5 +/- 2 mm between the venturi throat and the burning jet width at the mid-flame height. The venturi-cascading technique at its optimal conditions resulted in a decrease of 87% and 33% in CO and NO emission indices along with a 24% decrease in soot emission from a propane jet flame, compared to the baseline condition (same flame without venturis). The reduction of NO without increasing CO was the main attraction of this technique. The temperature and composition measurements, at the optimal conditions, showed that, in the near-burner region, the venturi-cascaded flame had lower temperature and CO2 concentration by an average of 5% and 7%, respectively, than the baseline flame. However, in the mid-flame and far-burner regions, it has higher temperature by 13% and 12%, and higher CO2 concentration by 16% and 13%, in average values, respectively. Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) measurements, in the near-burner region of the venturi-cascaded flame, indicated an average decrease of 18%, 24% and 12% in OH, CH and CN radical

  11. CFD study of Jet Impingement Test erosion using Ansys Fluent® and OpenFOAM®

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Alejandro; Nicholls, William; Stickland, Matthew T.; Dempster, William M.

    2015-12-01

    The initial aim of this study was to compare OpenFoam and Ansys Fluent in order to verify OpenFoam's Lagrangian Library and erosion capabilities. However, it was found that previous versions of Fluent have been providing wrong results for the discrete phase and the differences with the latest version (Ansys Fluent 15) are shown. A Submerged Jet Impingement Test is an effective method for studying erosion created by solid particles entrained in a liquid. When considering low particle concentrations a Lagrangian modeling of the particulate phase is a reasonable approach. Proper linkage between OpenFOAM's Lagrangian library and the solver pimpleFoam for incompressible transient flows allows two-phase simulations to be undertaken for comparison with Ansys Fluent with the aim of verifying OpenFoam's accuracy. Steady state convergence for the fluid flow is first accomplished and the results are compared, confirming a good agreement between the two packages. A transient simulation was then set up and spherical particles incorporated into the fluid flow. An assessment of the two codes' discrete phase models was carried out, focusing on the differences between impact angles and velocities yielded at the impingement plate's surface employing a similar strategy to that outlined first by Hattori et al. (2008) and later by Gnanavelu et al. (2009, 2011). In the comparison of OpenFoam with the latest version of Fluent, the main differences between the injection models are highlighted and the coupling possibilities between phases are taken into consideration. Agreement between trends for both impact angles and velocities is satisfactory when the last version of the commercial package is considered and the average discrepancy between numerical values is very low, verifying OpenFoam's Lagrangian library. Two different Jet Impingement Test configurations are also compared and the differences highlighted.

  12. A laser flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence kinetics study of the reaction Cl/2P/ + CH4 yields CH3 + HCl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravishankara, A. R.; Wine, P. H.

    1980-01-01

    The technique of laser flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence is employed to study the kinetics of the reaction Cl(2P) + CH4 yields CH3 + HCl over the temperature range 221-375 K. At temperatures less than or equal to 241 K the apparent bimolecular rate constant is found to be dependent upon the identity of the chemically inert gases in the reaction mixture. For Cl2/CH4/He reaction mixtures (total pressure = 50 torr) different bimolecular rate constants are measured at low and high methane concentrations. For Cl2/CH4/CCl/He and Cl2/CH4/Ar reaction mixtures, the bimolecular rate constant is independent of methane concentration, being approximately equal to the rate constant measured at low methane concentrations for Cl2/CH4/He mixtures. These rate constants are in good agreement with previous results obtained using the discharge flow-resonance fluorescence and competitive chlorination techniques. At 298 K the measured bimolecular rate constant is independent of the identity of the chemically inert gases in the reaction mixture and in good agreement with all previous investigations. The low-temperature results obtained in this investigation and all previous investigations can be rationalized in terms of a model which assumes that the Cl(2P 1/2) state reacts with CH4 much faster than the Cl(2P 3/2) state. Extrapolation of this model to higher temperatures, however, is not straightforward.

  13. Numerical modeling of laser-driven experiments of colliding jets: Turbulent amplification of seed magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeferacos, Petros; Fatenejad, Milad; Flocke, Norbert; Graziani, Carlo; Gregori, Gianluca; Lamb, Donald; Lee, Dongwook; Meinecke, Jena; Scopatz, Anthony; Weide, Klaus

    2014-10-01

    In this study we present high-resolution numerical simulations of laboratory experiments that study the turbulent amplification of magnetic fields generated by laser-driven colliding jets. The radiative magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations discussed here were performed with the FLASH code and have assisted in the analysis of the experimental results obtained from the Vulcan laser facility. In these experiments, a pair of thin Carbon foils is placed in an Argon-filled chamber and is illuminated to create counter-propagating jets. The jets carry magnetic fields generated by the Biermann battery mechanism and collide to form a highly turbulent region. The interaction is probed using a wealth of diagnostics, including induction coils that are capable of providing the field strength and directionality at a specific point in space. The latter have revealed a significant increase in the field's strength due to turbulent amplification. Our FLASH simulations have allowed us to reproduce the experimental findings and to disentangle the complex processes and dynamics involved in the colliding flows. This work was supported in part at the University of Chicago by DOE NNSA ASC.

  14. Capillary instability of jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Anuj

    This thesis studies the capillary instability of a compound jet. A compound jet comprises an inner core of a primary fluid surrounded by an annulus of an immiscible secondary fluid. The compound jet is unstable due to capillarity. A compound jet finds applications in a variety of fields, such as, ink jet printing, particle sorting, extrusion, molding, particle production etc. In some of these applications such as molding, the disturbances that could cause the jet breakup start as periodic spatial disturbances of Fourier wave number k and grow in time. This is the temporal instability. In some other applications, such as, ink-jet printing, the disturbances initiate at the edge of the nozzle from which the jet issues out. These disturbances grow in space. This is the spatial instability. At small velocities, even if the initial disturbances are periodic in time, they grow exponentially in time. This is the absolute instability. We perform the temporal, spatial and the absolute stability analysis of an inviscid compound jet in a unified framework using the theory of transforms. Further, we solve the temporal instability problem for a viscous jet to understand the effect of viscosity on breakup dynamics. In the temporal analysis, we show that each interface of the compound jet contributes one mode to the instability. The modes contributed by the inner and outer interfaces grow for waves longer than the inner and the outer circumference of the undisturbed jet, respectively. The inner interface mode has a higher growth rate and hence dominates the breakup. The two interfaces grow exactly in phase in this mode and hence it is refereed to as the stretching mode. The other mode is the squeezing mode because the two interfaces grow exactly out of phase. The same two modes are also present in the spatial analysis. At high Weber numbers the predictions of the spatial theory reduce to those of the temporal theory because the waves simply convect with the jet velocity and there

  15. Studies of dijet and photon-jet properties in pp, pPb, and PbPb collisions with CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Richard Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Studies of dijet and photon-jet properties in pPb collisions are of great importance for establishing a QCD baseline for hadronic interactions with cold nuclear matter. Dijet and photon-jet production has been measured in pPb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of 5.02 TeV. The transverse momentum balance and azimuthal angle correlations are studied in both dijet and photon-jet channels, leading to the observation that there is no significant modification, which allows these systems to be used as tools to probe the nuclear modifications of the parton distribution functions (PDFs). In the dijet system, pseudorapidity distributions are studied as a function of the transverse energy in the forward calorimeters (ETHF). The mean value of the dijet pseudorapidity is found to change monotonically with increasing ETHF, indicating a correlation between the energy emitted at large pseudorapidity and the longitudinal motion of the dijet frame. The pseudorapidity distribution of the dijet system is compared with next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD predictions obtained from both nucleon and nuclear PDFs, and the data more closely match the latter. In addition to the studies of initial state, the photon-jet measurements related to quenching in PbPb are updated to have a more precise pp reference based on the 2013 LHC run at 2.76 TeV.

  16. A preliminary study of painless and effective transdermal botulinum toxin A delivery by jet nebulization for treatment of primary hyperhidrosis

    PubMed Central

    Iannitti, Tommaso; Palmieri, Beniamino; Aspiro, Anna; Di Cerbo, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Background Hyperhidrosis is a chronic disease characterized by increased sweat production. Local injections of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) have been extensively used for treatment of primary hyperhidrosis (idiopathic). The current treatment for this condition involves several intradermal injections, resulting in poor patient compliance due to injection-related pain. Therefore, new protocols, including an improved anesthetic regimen, are required. Aim We designed the present study to determine whether JetPeel™-3, a medical device used for transdermal delivery of drugs by jet nebulization, could be used to deliver lidocaine prior to the standard multiple BTX-A injections or deliver lidocaine together with BTX-A in order to determine the protocol giving better results in terms of procedure-related pain, sweating, and patient satisfaction in subjects affected by primary axillary, palmar or plantar hyperhidrosis. Materials and methods Twenty patients with a visual analog scale (VAS) sweating score ≥ 8 cm were randomized to receive lidocaine 2% (5 mL) delivered by JetPeel™-3 followed by multiple injections of BTX-A (100 units) or lidocaine 2% (5 mL) and BTX-A (50 units) delivered together by JetPeel™-3. Effect of treatment on sweating was measured by VAS (0= minimum sweating; 10= maximum sweating) at 3-month follow-up. Pain induced by the procedure was assessed by VAS (0= minimum pain; 10= maximum pain) immediately after the procedure. Patient satisfaction was assessed at 3-month follow-up using a 5-point scale (1= not at all satisfied; 2= not satisfied; 3= partially satisfied; 4= satisfied; 5= highly satisfied). Results Both treatment modalities reduced sweating at 3-month follow-up, if compared with baseline (all P<0.001). Delivery of lidocaine and BTX-A by JetPeel™-3 resulted in lower procedure-related pain and reduced sweating, if compared with lidocaine delivered by JetPeel™-3 followed by multiple BTX-A injections (all P<0.001). Patient satisfaction with

  17. Matter Flashed at Ultra Speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-06-01

    Using a robotic telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory, astronomers have for the first time measured the velocity of the explosions known as gamma-ray bursts. The material is travelling at the extraordinary speed of more than 99.999% of the velocity of light, the maximum speed limit in the Universe. ESO PR Photo 26a/07 ESO PR Photo 26a/07 The REM Telescope "With the development of fast-slewing ground-based telescopes such as the 0.6-m REM telescope at ESO La Silla, we can now study in great detail the very first moments following these cosmic catastrophes," says Emilio Molinari, leader of the team that made the discovery. Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are powerful explosions occurring in distant galaxies, that often signal the death of stars. They are so bright that, for a brief moment, they almost rival the whole Universe in luminosity. They last, however, for only a very short time, from less than a second to a few minutes. Astronomers have long known that, in order to emit such incredible power in so little time, the exploding material must be moving at a speed comparable with that of light, namely 300 000 km per second. By studying the temporal evolution of the burst luminosity, it has now been possible for the first time to precisely measure this velocity. Gamma-ray bursts, which are unseen by our eyes, are discovered by artificial satellites. The collision of the gamma-ray burst jets into the surrounding gas generates an afterglow visible in the optical and near-infrared that can radiate for several weeks. An array of robotic telescopes were built on the ground, ready to catch this vanishing emission (see e.g. ESO 17/07). On 18 April and 7 June 2006, the NASA/PPARC/ASI Swift satellite detected two bright gamma-ray bursts. In a matter of a few seconds, their position was transmitted to the ground, and the REM telescope began automatically to observe the two GRB fields, detecting the near-infrared afterglows, and monitored the evolution of their luminosity as a

  18. An experimental study of plasma aerodynamic actuation on a round jet in cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Sheng-ji; Xiao, Yang; He, Li-ming; Jin, Tao; Zhang, Qian; Hou, Peng-hui; Zhao, Zi-chen

    2015-03-01

    The present paper is performed on the effect of plasma aerodynamic actuation on a round jet in cross flow field with a low Reynolds number by using smoke visualization. The actuator is constituted by an electrode pair separated by a dielectric Al2O3 sheet. Several AC supply conditions are utilized. The experimental result shows a closing-in tendency of the jet flow toward the wall after being induced by plasma aerodynamic actuation, and such tendency is increasingly intensified as the actuation voltage increases. Numerical simulation is also performed. The simulation results show that an induced vortex pair is generated by plasma aerodynamic actuation near the wall flow field. The rotation direction of the induced vortex pair reverses against the counter-rotating vortex pair generated by a round jet in a cross flow without plasma aerodynamic actuation. Then the strength and structural size of the counter-rotating vortex pair are significantly reduced, resulting in the intensified near-wall effect of the jet flow. Three electrode-typed actuators (straight, 150°-elliptic arc and 180°-elliptic arc with the same streamwise extent) are placed at the exit of round jet to research the influence of electrode structure on jet in cross flow. The result shows that the longer the arc electrode surrounding the hole, the stronger the induced jet that flow near the wall is.

  19. Enhanced ethylene production via flash methanolysis of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, M.S.; Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.

    1984-01-01

    In an on-going pyrolysis research project at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, the methods to increase the yield of ethylene through flash methanolysis of coal is being investigated. Flash methanolysis is defined as pyrolysis of coal under pressure in an atmosphere of methane. This study attempts to identify the influence of important process variables such as reaction temperature, gas pressure, solids residence time, gas/solids ratio etc. on the production characteristics of ethylene and other pyrolysis products.

  20. Enhanced ethylene production via flash methanolysis of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, M.S.; Fallon, P.; Steinberg, M.

    1984-04-01

    In an on-going pyrolysis research project at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, the methods to increase the yield of ethylene through flash methanolysis of coal is being investigated. Flash methanolysis is defined as pyrolysis of coal under pressure in an atmosphere of methane. This study attempts to identify the influence of important process variables such as reaction temperature, gas pressure, solids residence time, gas/solids ratio etc. on the production characteristics of ethylene and other pyrolysis products.

  1. Instability of rectangular jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Thies, Andrew T.

    1992-01-01

    The instability of rectangular jets is investigated using a vortex sheet model. It is shown that such jets support four linearly independent families of instability waves. Within each family there are infinitely many modes. A way to classify these modes according to the characteristics of their mode shapes or eigenfunctions is proposed. A parametric study of the instability wave characteristics has been carried out. A sample of the numerical results is reported here. It is found that the first and third modes of each instability wave family are corner modes. The pressure fluctuations associated with these instability waves are localized near the corners of the jet. The second mode, however, is a center mode with maximum fluctuations concentrated in the central portion of the jet flow. The center mode has the largest spatial growth rate. It is anticipated that as the instability waves propagate downstream the center mode would emerge as the dominant instability of the jet.

  2. Jet Lag in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Aaron; Galvez, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Context: Prolonged transmeridian air travel can impart a physical and emotional burden on athletes in jet lag and travel fatigue. Jet lag may negatively affect the performance of athletes. Study Type: Descriptive review. Evidence Acquisition: A Medline search for articles relating to jet lag was performed (1990-present), as was a search relating to jet lag and athletes (1983-January, 2012). The results were reviewed for relevance. Eighty-nine sources were included in this descriptive review. Results: Behavioral strategies are recommended over pharmacological strategies when traveling with athletes; pharmacological aides may be used on an individual basis. Strategic sleeping, timed exposure to bright light, and the use of melatonin are encouraged. Conclusions: There is strong evidence that mood and cognition are adversely affected by jet lag. Some measures of individual and team performance are adversely affected as well. PMID:23016089

  3. Measurement of the cross-section of high transverse momentum vector bosons reconstructed as single jets and studies of jet substructure in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2014-11-04

    This article presents a measurement of the cross-section for high transverse momentum W and Z bosons produced in pp collisions and decaying to all-hadronic final states. The data used in the analysis were recorded by the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=7\\;{\\rm Te}{\\rm V}$ and correspond to an integrated luminosity of $4.6\\;{\\rm f}{{{\\rm b}}^{-1}}$. The measurement is performed by reconstructing the boosted W or Z bosons in single jets. The reconstructed jet mass is used to identify the W and Z bosons, and a jet substructure method based on energy cluster information in the jet centre-of-mass frame is used to suppress the large multi-jet background. The cross-section for events with a hadronically decaying W or Z boson, with transverse momentum ${{p}_{{\\rm T}}}\\gt 320\\;{\\rm Ge}{\\rm V}$ and pseudorapidity $|\\eta |\\lt 1.9$, is measured to be ${{\\sigma }_{W+Z}}=8.5\\pm 1.7$ pb and is compared to next-to-leading-order calculations. The selected events are further used to study jet grooming techniques.

  4. Measurement of the cross-section of high transverse momentum vector bosons reconstructed as single jets and studies of jet substructure in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.

    2014-11-04

    This article presents a measurement of the cross-section for high transverse momentum W and Z bosons produced in pp collisions and decaying to all-hadronic final states. The data used in the analysis were recorded by the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider at a centre-of-mass energy ofmore » $$\\sqrt{s}=7\\;{\\rm Te}{\\rm V}$$ and correspond to an integrated luminosity of $$4.6\\;{\\rm f}{{{\\rm b}}^{-1}}$$. The measurement is performed by reconstructing the boosted W or Z bosons in single jets. The reconstructed jet mass is used to identify the W and Z bosons, and a jet substructure method based on energy cluster information in the jet centre-of-mass frame is used to suppress the large multi-jet background. The cross-section for events with a hadronically decaying W or Z boson, with transverse momentum $${{p}_{{\\rm T}}}\\gt 320\\;{\\rm Ge}{\\rm V}$$ and pseudorapidity $$|\\eta |\\lt 1.9$$, is measured to be $${{\\sigma }_{W+Z}}=8.5\\pm 1.7$$ pb and is compared to next-to-leading-order calculations. The selected events are further used to study jet grooming techniques.« less

  5. Magnetic Probe to Study Plasma Jets for Magneto-Inertial Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, Daniel; Hsu, Scott C.

    2012-08-16

    A probe has been constructed to measure the magnetic field of a plasma jet generated by a pulsed plasma rail-gun. The probe consists of two sets of three orthogonally-oriented commercial chip inductors to measure the three-dimensional magnetic field vector at two separate positions in order to give information about the magnetic field evolution within the jet. The strength and evolution of the magnetic field is one of many factors important in evaluating the use of supersonic plasma jets for forming imploding spherical plasma liners as a standoff driver for magneto-inertial fusion.

  6. Flash x-ray radiography using imaging plates for the observation of hypervelocity objects

    SciTech Connect

    Mizusako, F.; Ogasawara, K.; Kondo, K.; Saito, F.; Tamura, H.

    2005-02-01

    Flash x-ray radiography was conducted using imaging plates (IP) to observe high-speed thermal spray jets and debris clouds produced from hypervelocity impact. The radiographs of the spray jets or debris cloud shadows on the IPs were analyzed to estimate the distribution of mass per unit area, i.e., Areal mass density, due to the distribution of the intensities of stimulated emissions from the IPs. The wide dynamic range of the IPs led to the detection of an Areal mass density one hundred times as large as the minimum Areal mass density and the very detailed densities. The availability of the IPs for the flash x-ray radiography of a high-speed thermal spray jet and a hypervelocity-impact-produced debris cloud was demonstrated.

  7. Water Jetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-01-01

    Hi-Tech Inc., a company which manufactures water jetting equipment, needed a high pressure rotating swivel, but found that available hardware for the system was unsatisfactory. They were assisted by Marshall, which had developed water jetting technology to clean the Space Shuttles. The result was a completely automatic water jetting system which cuts rock and granite and removes concrete. Labor costs have been reduced; dust is suppressed and production has been increased.

  8. Cosmic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The evidence that active galactic nuclei produce collimated plasma jets is summarised. The strongest radio galaxies are probably energised by relativistic plasma jets generated by spinning black holes interacting with magnetic fields attached to infalling matter. Such objects can produce e(+)-e(-) plasma, and may be relevant to the acceleration of the highest-energy cosmic ray primaries. Small-scale counterparts of the jet phenomenon within our own galaxy are briefly reviewed.

  9. Impact of rainfall spatial variability on Flash Flood Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douinot, Audrey; Roux, Hélène; Garambois, Pierre-André; Larnier, Kevin

    2014-05-01

    According to the United States National Hazard Statistics database, flooding and flash flooding have caused the largest number of deaths of any weather-related phenomenon over the last 30 years (Flash Flood Guidance Improvement Team, 2003). Like the storms that cause them, flash floods are very variable and non-linear phenomena in time and space, with the result that understanding and anticipating flash flood genesis is far from straightforward. In the U.S., the Flash Flood Guidance (FFG) estimates the average number of inches of rainfall for given durations required to produce flash flooding in the indicated county. In Europe, flash flood often occurred on small catchments (approximately 100 km2) and it has been shown that the spatial variability of rainfall has a great impact on the catchment response (Le Lay and Saulnier, 2007). Therefore, in this study, based on the Flash flood Guidance method, rainfall spatial variability information is introduced in the threshold estimation. As for FFG, the threshold is the number of millimeters of rainfall required to produce a discharge higher than the discharge corresponding to the first level (yellow) warning of the French flood warning service (SCHAPI: Service Central d'Hydrométéorologie et d'Appui à la Prévision des Inondations). The indexes δ1 and δ2 of Zoccatelli et al. (2010), based on the spatial moments of catchment rainfall, are used to characterize the rainfall spatial distribution. Rainfall spatial variability impacts on warning threshold and on hydrological processes are then studied. The spatially distributed hydrological model MARINE (Roux et al., 2011), dedicated to flash flood prediction is forced with synthetic rainfall patterns of different spatial distributions. This allows the determination of a warning threshold diagram: knowing the spatial distribution of the rainfall forecast and therefore the 2 indexes δ1 and δ2, the threshold value is read on the diagram. A warning threshold diagram is

  10. An experimental and numerical study into turbulent condensing steam jets in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oerlemans, S.; Badie, R.; Van Dongen, M. E. H.

    Temperatures, velocities, and droplet sizes are measured in turbulent condensing steam jets produced by a facial sauna, for varying nozzle diameters and varying initial velocities (Re=3,600-9,200). The release of latent heat due to droplet condensation causes the temperature in the two-phase jet to be significantly higher than in a single-phase jet. At some distance from the nozzle, droplets reach a maximum size and start to evaporate again, which results in a change in sign of latent heat release. The distance of maximum size is determined from droplet size measurements. The experimental results are compared with semi-analytical expressions and with a fully coupled numerical model of the turbulent condensing steam jet. The increase in centreline temperature due to droplet condensation is successfully predicted.

  11. Gun muzzle flash detection using a CMOS single photon avalanche diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merhav, Tomer; Savuskan, Vitali; Nemirovsky, Yael

    2013-10-01

    Si based sensors, in particular CMOS Image sensors, have revolutionized low cost imaging systems but to date have hardly been considered as possible candidates for gun muzzle flash detection, due to performance limitations, and low SNR in the visible spectrum. In this study, a CMOS Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) module is used to record and sample muzzle flash events in the visible spectrum, from representative weapons, common on the modern battlefield. SPADs possess two crucial properties for muzzle flash imaging - Namely, very high photon detection sensitivity, coupled with a unique ability to convert the optical signal to a digital signal at the source pixel, thus practically eliminating readout noise. This enables high sampling frequencies in the kilohertz range without SNR degradation, in contrast to regular CMOS image sensors. To date, the SPAD has not been utilized for flash detection in an uncontrolled environment, such as gun muzzle flash detection. Gun propellant manufacturers use alkali salts to suppress secondary flashes ignited during the muzzle flash event. Common alkali salts are compounds based on Potassium or Sodium, with spectral emission lines around 769nm and 589nm, respectively. A narrow band filter around the Potassium emission doublet is used in this study to favor the muzzle flash signal over solar radiation. This research will demonstrate the SPAD's ability to accurately sample and reconstruct the temporal behavior of the muzzle flash in the visible wavelength under the specified imaging conditions. The reconstructed signal is clearly distinguishable from background clutter, through exploitation of flash temporal characteristics.

  12. Inclusive spectra in the upsilon energy region and a study of quark-jet versus gluon-jet fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.N.

    1992-01-01

    A study of particle yields from [Upsilon] and [Chi][prime][sub b] states has been performed using the CLEO II detector operating at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR). The [Chi][prime][sub b] states are tagged by their associated photon lines from decay of the [Gamma](3S). Produced particle species are identified using specific ionization, time-of-flight measurements, and vertex reconstruction. The momentum spectra of [pi][sup [+-

  13. Menopausal hot flashes: Randomness or rhythmicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronenberg, Fredi

    1991-10-01

    Menopausal hot flashes are episodes of flushing, increased heart rate, skin blood flow and skin temperature, and a sensation of heat. The thermoregulatory and cardiovascular concomitants of hot flashes are associated with peaks in the levels of various hormones and neurotransmitters in the peripheral circulation. Although hot flashes affect about 75% of women, and are the primary reason that women at menopause seek medical attention, the mechanism of hot flashes is still not understood. Hot flashes vary in frequency and intensity both within and between individuals, and have been thought of as occurring randomly. Yet, some women report that their hot flashes are worse at a particular time of day or year. Initial examination of subjects' recordings of their hot flashes showed diurnal patterns of hot flash occurrence. There also seems to be a diurnal rhythm of hot flash intensity. Continuous physiological monitoring of hot flashes is facilitating the analysis of these patterns, which is revealing circadian and ultradian periodicities. The occurrence of hot flashes can be modulated by external and internal factors, including ambient temperature and fever. Rhythms of thermoregulatory and endocrine functions also may influence hot flash patterns. Examination of the interrelationships between the various systems of the body involved in hot flashes, and a multidisciplinary approach to the analysis of hot flash patterns, will aid our understanding of this complex phenomenon.

  14. Use of gabapentin in patients experiencing hot flashes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jamie N; Wright, Betsy R

    2009-01-01

    Hot flashes occur frequently in menopausal women and in women with breast cancer, diminishing their quality of life. A report from the Women's Health Initiative published in 2002 raised concerns about the long-term safety of estrogen therapy. As a result, nonhormonal alternatives have emerged as preferred treatments. Gabapentin is an anticonvulsant that the United States Food and Drug Administration approved as an adjunct therapy for partial seizures and postherpetic neuralgia. Somnolence, dizziness, ataxia, fatigue, nystagmus, and peripheral edema are adverse effects commonly associated with gabapentin in the treatment of epilepsy and postherpetic neuralgia. The North American Menopause Society and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommend the use of gabapentin as an option for managing hot flashes in women who are unwilling to take estrogen-containing supplements. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of gabapentin for the treatment of hot flashes in women with menopause and/or breast cancer, we performed a search of the MEDLINE database (1966-March 2008) and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, as well as manually searching reference articles for relevant articles and abstracts; 10 clinical studies were identified. Although the studies were few, all showed gabapentin to be safe and effective in the treatment of hot flashes. At doses used to control hot flashes, gabapentin was well tolerated, with drowsiness as its most reported adverse effect. Gabapentin can be considered effective in the treatment of hot flashes and should be considered a reasonable alternative when estrogen therapy is not desired. PMID:19113798

  15. Flash floods in the Tatra Mountain streams: frequency and triggers.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros-Cánovas, J A; Czajka, B; Janecka, K; Lempa, M; Kaczka, R J; Stoffel, M

    2015-04-01

    Flash floods represent a frequently recurring natural phenomenon in the Tatra Mountains. On the northern slopes of the mountain chain, located in Poland, ongoing and expected future changes in climate are thought to further increase the adverse impacts of flash floods. Despite the repeat occurrence of major floods in the densely populated foothills of the Polish Tatras, the headwaters have been characterized by a surprising lack of data, such that any analysis of process variability or hydrometeorological triggers has been largely hampered so far. In this study, dendrogeomorphic techniques have been employed in four poorly-gauged torrential streams of the northern slope of the Tatra Mountains to reconstruct temporal and spatial patterns of past events. Using more than 1100 increment cores of trees injured by past flash floods, we reconstruct 47 events covering the last 148 years and discuss synoptic situations leading to the triggering of flash floods with the existing meteorological and flow gauge data. Tree-ring analyses have allowed highlighting the seasonality of events, providing new insights about potential hydrometeorological triggers as well as a differentiating flash flood activity between catchments. Results of this study could be useful to design future strategies to deal with flash flood risks at the foothills of the Polish Tatras and in the Vistula River catchment. PMID:25594906

  16. Observation and studies of jet quenching in PbPb collisions at nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy = 2.76 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2011-08-01

    Jet production in PbPb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV was studied with the CMS detector at the LHC, using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.7 inverse microbarns. Jets are reconstructed using the energy deposited in the CMS calorimeters and studied as a function of collision centrality. With increasing collision centrality, a striking imbalance in dijet transverse momentum is observed, consistent with jet quenching. The observed effect extends from the lower cut-off used in this study (jet transverse momentum = 120 GeV/c) up to the statistical limit of the available data sample (jet transverse momentum approximately 210 GeV/c). Correlations of charged particle tracks with jets indicate that the momentum imbalance is accompanied by a softening of the fragmentation pattern of the second most energetic, away-side jet. The dijet momentum balance is recovered when integrating low transverse momentum particles distributed over a wide angular range relative to the direction of the away-side jet.

  17. Study of dilution, height, and lateral spread of vertical dense jets in marine shallow water.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nadeem; Suzuki, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    This study provides information for the design of sea outfalls to dispose of brine from desalination plants into shallow lagoons of the sea. The behavior of vertical dense jets was studied experimentally by discharging cold saline water vertically upward into a tank filled with hot freshwater under stagnant ambient conditions. The minimum return point dilution, μmin, was determined using thermocouples, and the maximum height, Z(m), and the lateral spread, R(sp), of the fountains were determined by observing shadowgraph pictures. The flow was turbulent and the densimetric Froude number Fr(0) varied from 9 to 18.8. Three mixing regimes were identified: deep, intermediate, and impinging mixing regimes. In the intermediate mixing regime, μ(min) and Z(m) were analyzed and compared with the results of deep water studies. The μ(min) and Z(m) values of fountains at an intermediate water depth were found to be higher than those of fountains at deep water depths. In the impinging regime, μ(min) decreases rapidly when a fountain starts to continuously impinge on the water surface, showing a noticeable disturbance in the water surface. Therefore, a good rule of thumb is to reduce the flow through multiport diffusers from desalination plants when the noticeable disturbance is observed from the top water surface.

  18. Study of dilution, height, and lateral spread of vertical dense jets in marine shallow water.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nadeem; Suzuki, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    This study provides information for the design of sea outfalls to dispose of brine from desalination plants into shallow lagoons of the sea. The behavior of vertical dense jets was studied experimentally by discharging cold saline water vertically upward into a tank filled with hot freshwater under stagnant ambient conditions. The minimum return point dilution, μmin, was determined using thermocouples, and the maximum height, Z(m), and the lateral spread, R(sp), of the fountains were determined by observing shadowgraph pictures. The flow was turbulent and the densimetric Froude number Fr(0) varied from 9 to 18.8. Three mixing regimes were identified: deep, intermediate, and impinging mixing regimes. In the intermediate mixing regime, μ(min) and Z(m) were analyzed and compared with the results of deep water studies. The μ(min) and Z(m) values of fountains at an intermediate water depth were found to be higher than those of fountains at deep water depths. In the impinging regime, μ(min) decreases rapidly when a fountain starts to continuously impinge on the water surface, showing a noticeable disturbance in the water surface. Therefore, a good rule of thumb is to reduce the flow through multiport diffusers from desalination plants when the noticeable disturbance is observed from the top water surface. PMID:27332845

  19. One-dimensional nonlinear instability study of a slightly viscoelastic, perfectly conducting liquid jet under a radial electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fang; Yin, Xie-Yuan; Yin, Xie-Zhen

    2016-05-01

    A one-dimensional electrified viscoelastic model is built to study the nonlinear behavior of a slightly viscoelastic, perfectly conducting liquid jet under a radial electric field. The equations are solved numerically using an implicit finite difference scheme together with a boundary element method. The electrified viscoelastic jet is found to evolve into a beads-on-string structure in the presence of the radial electric field. Although the radial electric field greatly enhances the linear instability of the jet, its influence on the decay of the filament thickness is limited during the nonlinear evolution of the jet. On the other hand, the radial electric field induces axial non-uniformity of the first normal stress difference within the filament. The first normal stress difference in the center region of the filament may be greatly decreased by the radial electric field. The regions with/without satellite droplets are illuminated on the χ (the electrical Bond number)-k (the dimensionless wave number) plane. Satellite droplets may be formed for larger wave numbers at larger radial electric fields.

  20. Prospective Evaluation of Hot Flashes during Pregnancy and Postpartum

    PubMed Central

    Thurston, Rebecca C.; Luther, James F.; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Eng, Heather; Wisner, Katherine L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence, course, and risk factors for hot flashes during pregnancy and postpartum. Study Design Women (N=429) were assessed prospectively during pregnancy (weeks 20, 30, 36) and up to a year after delivery (weeks 2, 12, 26, 52). A clinical interview, physical measurements, and questionnaires were administered at each visit. Results Thirty-five percent of women reported hot flashes during pregnancy and 29% reported hot flashes after delivery. In multivariable binomial mixed effects models, women who were younger (per year: OR(95%CI): 0.94(0.88–0.99)), had a higher pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI; per unit increase: OR(95%CI): 1.05(1.01–1.10)), and had less than a college education (OR(95%CI): 2.58(1.19–5.60); vs. college) were more likely to report hot flashes during pregnancy. Higher depressive symptoms were associated with hot flashes during pregnancy (per unit increase: OR(95%CI): 1.08(1.04–1.13)) and after birth (OR(95%CI): 1.19(1.14–1.25), multivariable models). Conclusion Hot flashes, typically considered a menopausal symptom, were reported by over a third of women during pregnancy and/or postpartum. Predictors of hot flashes during this reproductive transition, including depressive symptoms, low education, and higher BMI are similar to those experienced during menopause. Future work should investigate the role of hormonal and affective factors in hot flashes during pregnancy and postpartum. PMID:24035604

  1. Flash pyrolysis of coal with reactive and non-reactive gases. [Methanolysis and flash pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.; Sundaram, M.S.

    1985-06-01

    The purpose of this research is to perform a systematic study of the yield and distribution of products on the flash or rapid pyrolysis of various ranks of coal with non-reactive (N/sub 2/, Ar, He) and with reactive gases (H/sub 2/, CH/sub 4/, CO, CO/sub 2/, and H/sub 2/O) in an entrained flow reactor. A body of information has been obtained on the flash hydropyrolysis of coals with the use of H/sub 2/ gas. Data is in the process of being obtained with the other gases. The use of methane as a pyrolyzing gas has indicated a reaction with coal and has led to developing the process of flash methanolysis of coal. The addition of steam leads to the flash hydrolysis of coal. In addition to obtaining a better understanding of the gasification of coal, the developed process chemistry data can be used to design and evaluate advanced gasification processes. 7 figs.

  2. Velocity field near the jet orifice of a round jet in a crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fearn, R. L.; Benson, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    Experimentally determined velocities at selected locations near the jet orifice are presented and analyzed for a round jet in crossflow. Jet-to-crossflow velocity ratios of four and eight were studied experimentally for a round subsonic jet of air exhausting perpendicularly through a flat plate into a subsonic crosswind of the same temperature. Velocity measurements were made in cross sections to the jet plume located from one to four jet diameters from the orifice. Jet centerline and vortex properties are presented and utilized to extend the results of a previous study into the region close to the jet orifice.

  3. Review of jet reconstruction algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkin, Ryan

    2015-10-01

    Accurate jet reconstruction is necessary for understanding the link between the unobserved partons and the jets of observed collimated colourless particles the partons hadronise into. Understanding this link sheds light on the properties of these partons. A review of various common jet algorithms is presented, namely the Kt, Anti-Kt, Cambridge/Aachen, Iterative cones and the SIScone, highlighting their strengths and weaknesses. If one is interested in studying jets, the Anti-Kt algorithm is the best choice, however if ones interest is in the jet substructures then the Cambridge/Aachen algorithm would be the best option.

  4. Impacts of a flash flood on drinking water quality: case study of areas most affected by the 2012 Beijing flood.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rubao; An, Daizhi; Lu, Wei; Shi, Yun; Wang, Lili; Zhang, Can; Zhang, Ping; Qi, Hongjuan; Wang, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we present a method for identifying sources of water pollution and their relative contributions in pollution disasters. The method uses a combination of principal component analysis and factor analysis. We carried out a case study in three rural villages close to Beijing after torrential rain on July 21, 2012. Nine water samples were analyzed for eight parameters, namely turbidity, total hardness, total dissolved solids, sulfates, chlorides, nitrates, total bacterial count, and total coliform groups. All of the samples showed different degrees of pollution, and most were unsuitable for drinking water as concentrations of various parameters exceeded recommended thresholds. Principal component analysis and factor analysis showed that two factors, the degree of mineralization and agricultural runoff, and flood entrainment, explained 82.50% of the total variance. The case study demonstrates that this method is useful for evaluating and interpreting large, complex water-quality data sets. PMID:27441250

  5. Impacts of a flash flood on drinking water quality: case study of areas most affected by the 2012 Beijing flood.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rubao; An, Daizhi; Lu, Wei; Shi, Yun; Wang, Lili; Zhang, Can; Zhang, Ping; Qi, Hongjuan; Wang, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we present a method for identifying sources of water pollution and their relative contributions in pollution disasters. The method uses a combination of principal component analysis and factor analysis. We carried out a case study in three rural villages close to Beijing after torrential rain on July 21, 2012. Nine water samples were analyzed for eight parameters, namely turbidity, total hardness, total dissolved solids, sulfates, chlorides, nitrates, total bacterial count, and total coliform groups. All of the samples showed different degrees of pollution, and most were unsuitable for drinking water as concentrations of various parameters exceeded recommended thresholds. Principal component analysis and factor analysis showed that two factors, the degree of mineralization and agricultural runoff, and flood entrainment, explained 82.50% of the total variance. The case study demonstrates that this method is useful for evaluating and interpreting large, complex water-quality data sets.

  6. A laser flash photolysis kinetics study of the reaction OH + H2O2 yields HO2 + H2O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wine, P. H.; Semmes, D. H.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    Absolute rate constants for the reaction are reported as a function of temperature over the range 273-410 K. OH radicals are produced by 266 nm laser photolysis of H2O2 and detected by resonance fluorescence. H2O2 concentrations are determined in situ in the slow flow system by UV photometry. The results confirm the findings of two recent discharge flow-resonance fluorescence studies that the title reaction is considerably faster, particularly at temperatures below 300 K, than all earlier studies had indicated. A table giving kinetic data from the reaction is included.

  7. Electron spin resonance study of thermal instability reactions in jet fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeldes, H.; Livingston, R.

    1984-01-01

    Free radicals were studied by electron spin resonance (ESR) using model compounds that are representative of constituents of jet fuels. Radical formation was initiated with peroxides and hydroperoxides by using UV photolysis at and near room temperature and thermal initiation at higher temperatures. Both oxygen free and air saturated systems were studied. N-Dodecane was frequently used as a solvent, and a mixture of n-dodecyl radicals was made with a peroxide initiator in n-dodecane (free of oxygen) thermally at 212 C and photolytically at room temperature. Hydrogen abstraction from the 3,4,5 and 6-positions gives radicals that are sufficiently alike that their spectra are essentially superimposed. The radical formed by abstract of hydrogen from the 2-position gives a different spectrum. ESR parameters for these radicals were measured. The radical formed by abstraction of a primary hydrogen was not observed. Similar radicals are formed from n-decane. A variety of exploratory experiments were carried out with systems that give free radical spectra to which was added small amounts of 2,5-dimethylpyrrole.

  8. Fusion product studies via fast ion D-D and D-3He fusion on JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharapov, S. E.; Hellsten, T.; Kiptily, V. G.; Craciunescu, T.; Eriksson, J.; Fitzgerald, M.; Girardo, J.-B.; Goloborod'ko, V.; Hellesen, C.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Johnson, T.; Kazakov, Y.; Koskela, T.; Mantsinen, M.; Monakhov, I.; Nabais, F.; Nocente, M.; Perez von Thun, C.; Rimini, F.; Santala, M.; Schneider, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Tsalas, M.; Yavorskij, V.; Zoita, V.; Contributors, JET

    2016-11-01

    Dedicated fast ion D-D and D-3He fusion experiments were performed on JET with carbon wall (2008) and ITER-like wall (2014) for testing the upgraded neutron and energetic ion diagnostics of fusion products. Energy spectrum of D-D neutrons was the focus of the studies in pure deuterium plasmas. A significant broadening of the energy spectrum of neutrons born in D-D fast fusion was observed, and dependence of the maximum D and D-D neutron energies on plasma density was established. Diagnostics of charged products of aneutronic D-3He fusion reactions, 3.7 MeV alpha-particles similar to those in D-T fusion, and 14.6 MeV protons, were the focus of the studies in D-3He plasmas. Measurements of 16.4 MeV gamma-rays born in the weak secondary branch of D(3He, γ)5Li reaction were used for assessing D-3He fusion power. For achieving high yield of D-D and D-3He reactions at relatively low levels of input heating power, an acceleration of D beam up to the MeV energy range was used employing 3rd harmonic (f=3{{f}CD} ) ICRH technique. These results were compared to the techniques of D beam injection into D-3He mixture, and 3He-minority ICRH in D plasmas.

  9. A CFD study of jet mixing in reduced flow areas for lower combustor emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. E.; Talpallikar, M. V.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    The Rich-burn/Quick-mix/Lean-burn (RQL) combustor has the potential of significantly reducing NO(x) emissions in combustion chambers of High Speed Civil Transport aircraft. Previous work on RQL combustors for industrial applications suggested the benefit of necking down the mixing section. A 3-D numerical investigation was performed to study the effects of neckdown on NO(x) emissions and to develop a correlation for optimum mixing designs in terms of neckdown area ratio. The results of the study showed that jet mixing in reduced flow areas does not enhance mixing, but does decrease residence time at high flame temperatures, thus reducing NO(x) formation. By necking down the mixing flow area by 4, a potential NO(x) reduction of 16:1 is possible for annual combustors. However, there is a penalty that accompanies the mixing neckdown: reduced pressure drop across the combustor swirler. At conventional combustor loading parameters, the pressure drop penalty does not appear to be excessive.

  10. The 20 February 2010 Madeira flash flood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, P. M. A.; Tomé, R.; Azevedo, E. B.; Cardoso, R. M.

    2010-09-01

    On February 20, 2010, Madeira Island was struck by a violent rain storm, which led to a major flash flood leading to more than 50 casualties and an estimated property loss above 1G€. The storm was not well forecasted by the Institute of Meteorology, based on the global ECMWF forecast. However, the operational forecasts made by our group at the University of Lisbon, with MM5 and WRF at 2 km resolution, consistently indicated heavy precipitation for that day, starting on the 72h from 18 February at 00 UTC, and including all intermediate forecasts, issued every 12h, until the day of the event. At the same time, many important details of the forecasts, concerning in particular the timing of precipitation in low level stations, have discrepancies with observations. In the present study we analyze not only the quality of the high resolution forecasts of the rain storm, with the two models at different resolutions, but also review the MM5 model performance in all forecasts from 2006 to 2010, where other important orographic precipitation events have occurred, but no flash flood was triggered. The analysis emphasizes the relative importance of the state of the terrain, due to accumulated precipitation in days and weeks before a major rain storm, in the occurrence of flash floods.

  11. Initial results obtained from a 3D computational model of the shaped charge jet particulation process

    SciTech Connect

    Zernow, L.; Chapyak, E.J.

    1998-02-01

    In a previous paper, the authors discussed a 3D computational model for the particulation of a stretching shaped charge jet, based on the experimentally observed double-helix surface perturbations on softly recovered jet particles. The 3D problem was derived from the unperturbed 2D problem, which was first used to generate a stretching jet. A portion of this 2D jet was selected for study in the cylindrical 3D mode, and the double-helix perturbations were placed on the cylinder surface. This initial computation was greatly simplified, to make it feasible to run on a CM 200 massively parallel processor. The initial output of this computation, which is being published here for the first time, leads to a significant simplification of the analysis of the particulation process, by avoiding the search for the elusive ``most favored wavelength`` which is characteristic of 2D axi-symmetric analyses. Previously unnoticed characteristics of flash radiographs from Viper jets, appear to support the computational results obtained, despite a counter-intuitive prediction of the location of necking loci, relative to the perturbing helices. The approximations used in this initial computation are discussed critically. Planned improvements are defined. A vision of future fundamental computations, which become possible with more powerful ASCI machines, is projected.

  12. Sting jets in severe northern European wind storms: a case study of Windstorm Gudrun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Laura; Gray, Suzanne; Clark, Peter

    2010-05-01

    Extratropical cyclones often produce strong surface winds, mostly associated with low-level jets along the warm and cold fronts. Some severe extratropical cyclones have been found to produce an additional area of localised strong, and potentially very damaging, surface winds during a certain part of their development. These strong winds are associated with air that originates within the cloud head, exiting at the tip of the cloud head and descending rapidly from there to the surface. This rapidly descending air associated with the strong surface winds is known as a sting jet. The aim of this project is to determine the mechanisms that lead to sting jets and develop diagnostics for predicting their formation and development. In previous work mesoscale slantwise circulations have been found in the cloud heads of sting jet storms; these have been speculated to be due to the release of conditional symmetric instability (CSI). Here we present an analysis of the windstorm known as "Gudrun", which passed over the UK and northern Europe in January 2005. A sting jet has been identified in this case, and the relationship between this sting jet feature and the release of CSI has been examined using two diagnostics for CSI: SCAPE (slantwise convective available potential energy) and a diagnostic based on moist potential vorticity (MPV). SCAPE exists near the tip of the cloud head and decreases during the time leading up to and during the sting jet's descent, indicating that CSI is being released during this time. This is further supported by a corresponding decrease in the MPV-based CSI diagnostic during the same period.

  13. Study of jet shapes in inclusive jet production in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; et al

    2011-03-08

    Jet shapes have been measured in inclusive jet production in proton-proton collisions at s√=7  TeV using 3  pb⁻¹ of data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Jets are reconstructed using the anti-kt algorithm with transverse momentum 30  GeVT<600  GeV and rapidity in the region |y|<2.8. The data are corrected for detector effects and compared to several leading-order QCD matrix elements plus parton shower Monte Carlo predictions, including different sets of parameters tuned to model fragmentation processes and underlying event contributions in the final state. The measured jets become narrower with increasing jet transverse momentum and the jet shapes present a moderate jetmore » rapidity dependence. Within QCD, the data test a variety of perturbative and nonperturbative effects. In particular, the data show sensitivity to the details of the parton shower, fragmentation, and underlying event models in the Monte Carlo generators. For an appropriate choice of the parameters used in these models, the data are well described.« less

  14. Performance of the DTL electrode compared to the jet contact lens electrode in clinical testing.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hang; Pardue, Machelle T

    2004-01-01

    To compare the recording characteristics of the DTL fiber and Jet contact lens electrodes, ERG responses were recorded from 20 normal subjects using the ISCEV standard clinical protocol. In each subject, the DTL electrode was placed in the right eye and the Jet contact lens in the left eye after 30 min of dark-adaptation. After presenting standard dark- and light-adapted stimuli, each response was analyzed for a- and b-wave amplitude and implicit time. Each subject was then asked to rate the comfort of each electrode. Responses recorded with the DTL are larger and faster for the dark-adapted dim white and red flashes. In contrast, the Jet electrode records larger responses for the dark-adapted standard flash and light-adapted flashes. Of these differences, only the standard flash is statistically significant. However, overall the DTL electrode has greater variability than the Jet electrode across all recordings. The DTL and Jet electrodes cannot be used interchangeably as demonstrated by a Bland and Altman analysis of agreement. Thus, separate normative values need to be collected for each type of electrode to accurately assess retinal function. Based on the comfort assessment of the two electrodes, the subjects preferred the DTL electrode over the Jet electrode. Due to the superior comfort level of the DTL and its similarities to the Jet contact lens electrode in ERG recordings, the DTL electrode appears to be a good alternative to the Jet electrode in routine clinical testing when used with the appropriate normative values.

  15. A Multiwavelength Study of Cygnus X-1: The First Mid-infrared Spectroscopic Detection of Compact Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahoui, Farid; Lee, Julia C.; Heinz, Sebastian; Hines, Dean C.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Wilms, Jörn; Grinberg, Victoria

    2011-07-01

    We report on a Spitzer/InfraRed Spectrograph (mid-infrared), RXTE/PCA+HEXTE (X-ray), and Ryle (radio) simultaneous multiwavelength study of the microquasar Cygnus X-1, which aimed at an investigation of the origin of its mid-infrared emission. Compact jets were present in two out of three observations, and we show that they strongly contribute to the mid-infrared continuum. During the first observation, we detect the spectral break—where the transition from the optically thick to the optically thin regime takes place—at about 2.9 × 1013 Hz. We then show that the jet's optically thin synchrotron emission accounts for Cygnus X-1's emission beyond 400 keV, although it cannot alone explain its 3-200 keV continuum. A compact jet was also present during the second observation, but we do not detect the break, since it has likely shifted to higher frequencies. In contrast, the compact jet was absent during the last observation, and we show that the 5-30 μm mid-infrared continuum of Cygnus X-1 stems from the blue supergiant companion star HD 226868. Indeed, the emission can then be understood as the combination of the photospheric Rayleigh-Jeans tail and the bremsstrahlung from the expanding stellar wind. Moreover, the stellar wind is found to be clumpy, with a filling factor f ∞ ≈ 0.09-0.10. Its bremsstrahlung emission is likely anti-correlated to the soft X-ray emission, suggesting an anti-correlation between the mass-loss and mass-accretion rates. Nevertheless, we do not detect any mid-infrared spectroscopic evidence of interaction between the jets and Cygnus X-1's environment and/or the companion star's stellar wind.

  16. A MULTIWAVELENGTH STUDY OF CYGNUS X-1: THE FIRST MID-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC DETECTION OF COMPACT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Rahoui, Farid; Lee, Julia C.; Heinz, Sebastian; Hines, Dean C.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Wilms, Joern; Grinberg, Victoria E-mail: jclee@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: hines@stsci.edu E-mail: joern.wilms@sternwarte.uni-erlangen.de

    2011-07-20

    We report on a Spitzer/InfraRed Spectrograph (mid-infrared), RXTE/PCA+HEXTE (X-ray), and Ryle (radio) simultaneous multiwavelength study of the microquasar Cygnus X-1, which aimed at an investigation of the origin of its mid-infrared emission. Compact jets were present in two out of three observations, and we show that they strongly contribute to the mid-infrared continuum. During the first observation, we detect the spectral break-where the transition from the optically thick to the optically thin regime takes place-at about 2.9 x 10{sup 13} Hz. We then show that the jet's optically thin synchrotron emission accounts for Cygnus X-1's emission beyond 400 keV, although it cannot alone explain its 3-200 keV continuum. A compact jet was also present during the second observation, but we do not detect the break, since it has likely shifted to higher frequencies. In contrast, the compact jet was absent during the last observation, and we show that the 5-30 {mu}m mid-infrared continuum of Cygnus X-1 stems from the blue supergiant companion star HD 226868. Indeed, the emission can then be understood as the combination of the photospheric Rayleigh-Jeans tail and the bremsstrahlung from the expanding stellar wind. Moreover, the stellar wind is found to be clumpy, with a filling factor f{sub {infinity}} {approx} 0.09-0.10. Its bremsstrahlung emission is likely anti-correlated to the soft X-ray emission, suggesting an anti-correlation between the mass-loss and mass-accretion rates. Nevertheless, we do not detect any mid-infrared spectroscopic evidence of interaction between the jets and Cygnus X-1's environment and/or the companion star's stellar wind.

  17. A Multiwavelength Study of Cygnus X-1: The First Mid-Infrared Spectroscopic Detection of Compact Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahoui, Farid; Lee, Julia C.; Heinz, Sebastian; Hines, Dean C.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Wilms, Joern

    2011-01-01

    We report on a Spitzer/IRS (mid-infrared), RXTE /PCA+HEXTE (X-ray), and Ryle (radio) simultaneous multi-wavelength study of the micro quasar Cygnus X-I, which aimed at an investigation of the origin of its mid-infrared emission. Compact jets were present in two out of three observations, and we show that they strongly contribute to the mid-infrared continuum. During the first observation, we detect the spectral break - where the transition from the optically thick to the optically thin regime takes place - at about 2.9 x 10(exp 13) Hz. We then show that the jet's optically thin synchrotron emission accounts for the Cygnus X-1's emission beyond 400 keY, although it cannot alone explain its 3-200 keV continuum. A compact jet was also present during the second observation, but we do not detect the break, since it has likely shifted to higher frequencies. In contrast, the compact jet was absent during the last observation, and we show that the 5-30 micron mid-infrared continuum of Cygnus X-I stems from the blue supergiant companion star HD 226868. Indeed, the emission can then be understood as the combination of the photospheric Raleigh-Jeans tail and the bremsstrahlung from the expanding stellar wind. Moreover, the stellar wind is found to be clumpy, with a filling factor f(sub infinity) approx.= 0.09-0.10. Its bremsstrahlung emission is likely anti-correlated to the soft X-ray emission, suggesting an anticorrelation between the mass-loss and mass-accretion rates. Nevertheless, we do not detect any mid-infrared spectroscopic evidence of interaction between the jets and the Cygnus X-1's environment and/or companion star's stellar wind.

  18. Angular Scaling In Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    We introduce a jet shape observable defined for an ensemble of jets in terms of two-particle angular correlations and a resolution parameter R. This quantity is infrared and collinear safe and can be interpreted as a scaling exponent for the angular distribution of mass inside the jet. For small R it is close to the value 2 as a consequence of the approximately scale invariant QCD dynamics. For large R it is sensitive to non-perturbative effects. We describe the use of this correlation function for tests of QCD, for studying underlying event and pile-up effects, and for tuning Monte Carlo event generators.

  19. Statistical Study of Network Jets Observed in the Solar Transition Region: a Comparison Between Coronal Holes and Quiet-Sun Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narang, Nancy; Arbacher, Rebecca T.; Tian, Hui; Banerjee, Dipankar; Cranmer, Steven R.; DeLuca, Ed E.; McKillop, Sean

    2016-04-01

    Recent IRIS observations have revealed a prevalence of intermittent small-scale jets with apparent speeds of 80 - 250 km s^{-1}, emanating from small-scale bright regions inside network boundaries of coronal holes. We find that these network jets appear not only in coronal holes but also in quiet-sun regions. Using IRIS 1330 Å (C II) slit-jaw images, we extracted several parameters of these network jets, e.g. apparent speed, length, lifetime, and increase in foot-point brightness. Using several observations, we find that some properties of the jets are very similar, but others are obviously different between the quiet Sun and coronal holes. For example, our study shows that the coronal-hole jets appear to be faster and longer than those in the quiet Sun. This can be directly attributed to a difference in the magnetic configuration of the two regions, with open magnetic field lines rooted in coronal holes and magnetic loops often present in the quiet Sun. We also detected compact bright loops that are most likely transition region loops and are mostly located in quiet-Sun regions. These small loop-like regions are generally devoid of network jets. In spite of different magnetic structures in the coronal hole and quiet Sun in the transition region, there appears to be no substantial difference for the increase in footpoint brightness of the jets, which suggests that the generation mechanism of these network jets is very likely the same in both regions.

  20. Flashing light in microalgae biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Abu-Ghosh, Said; Fixler, Dror; Dubinsky, Zvy; Iluz, David

    2016-03-01

    Flashing light can enhance photosynthesis and improve the quality and quantity of microalgal biomass, as it can increase the products of interest by magnitudes. Therefore, the integration of flashing light effect into microalgal cultivation systems should be considered. However, microalgae require a balanced mix of the light/dark cycle for higher growth rates, and respond to light intensity differently according to the pigments acquired or lost during the growth. This review highlights recently published results on flashing light effect on microalgae and its applications in biotechnology, as well as the recently developed bioreactors designed to fulfill this effect. It also discusses how this knowledge can be applied in selecting the optimal light frequencies and intensities with specific technical properties for increasing biomass production and/or the yield of the chemicals of interest by microalgae belonging to different genera. PMID:26747205

  1. Flashing light in microalgae biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Abu-Ghosh, Said; Fixler, Dror; Dubinsky, Zvy; Iluz, David

    2016-03-01

    Flashing light can enhance photosynthesis and improve the quality and quantity of microalgal biomass, as it can increase the products of interest by magnitudes. Therefore, the integration of flashing light effect into microalgal cultivation systems should be considered. However, microalgae require a balanced mix of the light/dark cycle for higher growth rates, and respond to light intensity differently according to the pigments acquired or lost during the growth. This review highlights recently published results on flashing light effect on microalgae and its applications in biotechnology, as well as the recently developed bioreactors designed to fulfill this effect. It also discusses how this knowledge can be applied in selecting the optimal light frequencies and intensities with specific technical properties for increasing biomass production and/or the yield of the chemicals of interest by microalgae belonging to different genera.

  2. Numerical study of particle-vortex interaction and turbulence modulation in swirling jets.

    PubMed

    Gui, Nan; Fan, Jianren; Chen, Song

    2010-11-01

    This study carried out a direct numerical simulation of gas-solid swirling jet flow, focusing on the particle-vortex interaction and mechanisms of turbulence modulation. Two cases of flows with either a constant particle flow rate or a constant particle mass loading are simulated. The typical instantaneous particle-vortex interactions are illustrated and analyzed, as well as the spectrum representations and the projections of them. The results show that the small particles (St<1) and light-mass loadings augment the vortices of the large-scale range in the power spectrum representation by shifting the peaks of wave numbers from small to large values as they pass through the large vortices and break them into smaller scales. The large particles and heavy-mass loadings suppress greatly the large scales of vortices, transferring the turbulent kinetic energy from large to relatively smaller scales of vortices, resulting in turbulence augmentation in the large wave numbers and turbulence attenuation in the range of small wave numbers. Moreover, by comparison between the two cases, it is found that the turbulence modulation is more highly sensitive to the effect of mass loadings rather than the dynamical response property of particles. The well-known knowledge on modulation of turbulence is true under the condition of the same mass loading. However, the situation becomes very complicated when the mass loading changes. Finally, these conclusions are verified by the analysis of energy spectrum and dissipation.

  3. Study of a contracted glow in low-frequency plasma-jet discharges operating with argon

    SciTech Connect

    Minotti, F.; Giuliani, L.; Xaubet, M.; Grondona, D.

    2015-11-15

    In this work, we present an experimental and theoretical study of a low frequency, atmospheric plasma-jet discharge in argon. The discharge has the characteristics of a contracted glow with a current channel of submillimeter diameter and a relatively high voltage cathode layer. In order to interpret the measurements, we consider the separate modeling of each region of the discharge: main channel and cathode layer, which must then be properly matched together. The main current channel was modeled, extending a previous work, as similar to an arc in which joule heating is balanced by lateral heat conduction, without thermal equilibrium between electrons and heavy species. The cathode layer model, on the other hand, includes the emission of secondary electrons by ion impact and by additional mechanisms, of which we considered emission due to collision of atoms excited at metastable levels, and field-enhanced thermionic emission (Schottky effect). The comparison of model and experiment indicates that the discharge can be effectively sustained in its contracted form by the secondary electrons emitted by collision of excited argon atoms, whereas thermionic emission is by far insufficient to provide the necessary electrons.

  4. Study of a contracted glow in low-frequency plasma-jet discharges operating with argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minotti, F.; Giuliani, L.; Xaubet, M.; Grondona, D.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we present an experimental and theoretical study of a low frequency, atmospheric plasma-jet discharge in argon. The discharge has the characteristics of a contracted glow with a current channel of submillimeter diameter and a relatively high voltage cathode layer. In order to interpret the measurements, we consider the separate modeling of each region of the discharge: main channel and cathode layer, which must then be properly matched together. The main current channel was modeled, extending a previous work, as similar to an arc in which joule heating is balanced by lateral heat conduction, without thermal equilibrium between electrons and heavy species. The cathode layer model, on the other hand, includes the emission of secondary electrons by ion impact and by additional mechanisms, of which we considered emission due to collision of atoms excited at metastable levels, and field-enhanced thermionic emission (Schottky effect). The comparison of model and experiment indicates that the discharge can be effectively sustained in its contracted form by the secondary electrons emitted by collision of excited argon atoms, whereas thermionic emission is by far insufficient to provide the necessary electrons.

  5. Studies of Be migration in the JET tokamak using AMS with 10Be marker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, I.; Bergsåker, H.; Possnert, G.; Zhou, Y.; Heinola, K.; Pettersson, J.; Conroy, S.; Likonen, J.; Petersson, P.; Widdowson, A.

    2016-03-01

    The JET tokamak is operated with beryllium limiter tiles in the main chamber and tungsten coated carbon fiber composite tiles and solid W tiles in the divertor. One important issue is how wall materials are migrating during plasma operation. To study beryllium redistribution in the main chamber and in the divertor, a 10Be enriched limiter tile was installed prior to plasma operations in 2011-2012. Methods to take surface samples have been developed, an abrasive method for bulk Be tiles in the main chamber, which permits reuse of the tiles, and leaching with hot HCl to remove all Be deposited at W coated surfaces in the divertor. Quantitative analysis of the total amount of Be in cm2 sized samples was made with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The 10Be/9Be ratio in the samples was measured with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The experimental setup and methods are described in detail, including sample preparation, measures to eliminate contributions in AMS from the 10B isobar, possible activation due to plasma generated neutrons and effects of diffusive isotope mixing. For the first time marker concentrations are measured in the divertor deposits. They are in the range 0.4-1.2% of the source concentration, with moderate poloidal variation.

  6. A Wind Tunnel Study of Icing Effects on a Business Jet Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Broeren, Andy P.; Zoeckler, Joesph G.; Lee, Sam

    2003-01-01

    Aerodynamic wind tunnel tests were conducted to study the effects of various ice accretions on the aerodynamic performance of a 36-inch chord, two-dimensional business jet airfoil. Eight different ice shape configurations were tested. Four were castings made from molds of ice shapes accreted in an icing wind tunnel. Two were made using computationally smoothed tracings of two of the ice shapes accreted in the icing tunnel. These smoothed profiles were then extended in the spanwise direction to form a two-dimensional ice shape. The final two configurations were formed by applying grit to the smoothed ice shapes. The ice shapes resulted in as much as 48% reduction in maximum lift coefficient from that of the clean airfoil. Large increases in drag and changes in pitching moment were also observed. The castings and their corresponding smoothed counterparts yielded similar results. Little change in performance was observed with the addition of grit to the smoothed ice shapes. Changes in the Reynolds number (from 3 x 10(exp 6) to 10.5 x 10(exp 6) and Mach number (from 0.12 to 0.28) did not significantly affect the iced-airfoil performance coefficients.

  7. Needle-free jet injection of intact phospholipid vesicles across the skin: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Schlich, Michele; Lai, Francesco; Murgia, Sergio; Valenti, Donatella; Fadda, Anna Maria; Sinico, Chiara

    2016-08-01

    Needle-free liquid jet injectors are devices developed for the delivery of pharmaceutical solutions through the skin. In this paper, we investigated for the first time the ability of these devices to deliver intact lipid vesicles. Diclofenac sodium loaded phospholipid vesicles of two types, namely liposomes and transfersomes, were prepared and fully characterized. The lipid vesicles were delivered through a skin specimen using a jet injector and the collected samples were analyzed to assess vesicle structural integrity, drug retention and release kinetics after the injection. In this regard, data concerning size, size distribution, surface charge of vesicles and bilayer integrity and thickness, before and after the injections, were measured by dynamic light scattering experiments, cryo-electron microscopy, and X-ray scattering techniques. Finally, the effect of vesicle fast jet injection through the skin on drug release kinetics was checked by in vitro experiments. The retention of the morphological, physico-chemical, and technological features after injection, proved the integrity of vesicles after skin crossing as a high-speed liquid jet. The delivery of undamaged vesicular carriers beneath the skin is of utmost importance to create a controlled release drug depot in the hypoderm, which may be beneficial for several localized therapies. Overall results reported in this paper may broaden the range of application of liquid jet injectors to lipid vesicle based formulations thus combining beneficial performance of painless devices with those of liposomal drug delivery systems. PMID:27422107

  8. An approach for studying the longitudinal interaction of an underexpanded gas jet with a plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipnitskii, Iu. M.; Rodionov, A. V.

    1983-01-01

    Consideration is given to the flow of an axisymmetric jet of an ideal gas with a constant adiabatic exponent onto a plane plate in vacuum oriented parallel to the jet axis. Here, the xy plane of the xyz Cartesian coordinate system is the plane of the plate; the x axis lies in the symmetry plane and is directed along the flow direction of the jet, and the z axis passes through the center of the end of the nozzle. The governing parameters of the problem are the distance from the jet axis to the plate, the adiabatic exponent of the gas, the Mach number at the edge of the nozzle, and the half-angle of the conical nozzle. A simplified numerical solution of the problem is carried out. In the initial cross section, the flow parameters of the unperturbed jet are adopted as initial values (the flow parameters at points on the surface of the plate being found from the relations at the oblique shock). The initial cross section is selected as close as possible to the exit section of the nozzle on the condition that the flow remain supersonic after the turn. The calculations are performed by means of the MacCormack method (Kutler et al., 1973) with a smoothing step introduced to reduce the oscillations in the solution near strong discontinuities.

  9. Excitation Wavelength Dependent O2 Release from Copper(II)-Superoxide Compounds: Laser Flash-Photolysis Experiments and Theoretical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Saracini, Claudio; Liakos, Dimitrios G.; Zapata Rivera, Jhon E.; Neese, Frank; Meyer, Gerald J.; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2014-01-01

    Irradiation of the copper(II)-superoxide synthetic complexes [(TMG3tren)CuII(O2)]+ (1) and [(PV-TMPA)CuII(O2)]+ (2) with visible light resulted in direct photo-generation of O2 gas at low temperature (from −40 °C to −70°C for 1 and from −125 °C to −135 °C for 2) in 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (MeTHF) solvent. The yield of O2 release was wavelength dependent: λexc = 436 nm, ϕ = 0.29 (for 1), ϕ = 0.11 (for 2), and λexc = 683 nm, ϕ = 0.035 (for 1), ϕ = 0.078 (for 2), which was followed by fast O2-recombination with [(TMG3tren)CuI]+ (3) and [(PV-TMPA)CuI]+ (4). Enthalpic barriers for O2 re-binding to the copper(I) center (~ 10 kJ mol−1) and for O2 dissociation from the superoxide compound 1 (45 kJ mol−1) were determined. TD-DFT studies, carried out for 1, support the experimental results confirming the dissociative character of the excited states formed upon blue or red light laser excitation. PMID:24428309

  10. High resolution numerical study of the Algiers 2001 flash flood: sensitivity to the upper-level potential vorticity anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argence, S.; Lambert, D.; Richard, E.; Söhne, N.; Chaboureau, J.-P.; Crépin, F.; Arbogast, P.

    2006-03-01

    From 9 to 11 November 2001, intense cyclogenesis affected the northern coasts of Africa and more particularly the densely populated city of Algiers. During the morning of 10 November, more than 130 mm of precipitation was recorded at Bouzareah and resulted in mudslides which devastated the Bab-el-Oued district. This disaster caused more than 700 casualties and catastrophic damage. Like many other heavy rainstorms in the western Mediterranean, this event was associated with the presence of an upper-level trough materialized by a deep stratospheric intrusion and characterized by high potential vorticity values. In this study, the impact of this synoptic structure on the localization and intensity of the precipitation which affected Algiers is investigated using a potential vorticity (PV) inversion method coupled for the first time with the French non-hydrostatic MESO-NH model. A set of perturbed synoptic environments was designed by slightly modifying the extent and the intensity of the coherent potential vorticity structures in the operational ARPEGE analysis. It is shown that such modifications may have a strong impact on the fine-scale precipitation forecast in the Algiers region, thereby demonstrating the fundamental role played by the potential vorticity anomaly during this exceptional meteorological event.

  11. Acoustics of Excited Jets: A Historical Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Cliffard A.

    2005-01-01

    The idea that a jet may be excited by external forcing is not new. The first published demonstration of a jet responding to external pressure waves occurred in the mid-1800's. It was not, however, until the 1950's, with the advent of commercial jet aircraft, that interest in the subject greatly increased. Researchers first used excited jets to study the structure of the jet and attempt to determine the nature of the noise sources. The jet actuators of the time limited the range (Reynolds and Mach numbers) of jets that could be excited. As the actuators improved, more realistic jets could be studied. This has led to a better understanding of how jet excitation may be used not only as a research tool to understand the flow properties and noise generation process, but also as a method to control jet noise.

  12. Flash sintering of ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dancer, C. E. J.

    2016-10-01

    During flash sintering, ceramic materials can sinter to high density in a matter of seconds while subjected to electric field and elevated temperature. This process, which occurs at lower furnace temperatures and in shorter times than both conventional ceramic sintering and field-assisted methods such as spark plasma sintering, has the potential to radically reduce the power consumption required for the densification of ceramic materials. This paper reviews the experimental work on flash sintering methods carried out to date, and compares the properties of the materials obtained to those produced by conventional sintering. The flash sintering process is described for oxides of zirconium, yttrium, aluminium, tin, zinc, and titanium; silicon and boron carbide, zirconium diboride, materials for solid oxide fuel applications, ferroelectric materials, and composite materials. While experimental observations have been made on a wide range of materials, understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for the onset and latter stages of flash sintering is still elusive. Elements of the proposed theories to explain the observed behaviour include extensive Joule heating throughout the material causing thermal runaway, arrested by the current limitation in the power supply, and the formation of defect avalanches which rapidly and dramatically increase the sample conductivity. Undoubtedly, the flash sintering process is affected by the electric field strength, furnace temperature and current density limit, but also by microstructural features such as the presence of second phase particles or dopants and the particle size in the starting material. While further experimental work and modelling is still required to attain a full understanding capable of predicting the success of the flash sintering process in different materials, the technique non-etheless holds great potential for exceptional control of the ceramic sintering process.

  13. a Comparative Study of Sequences of Pulses Occuring Prior to the First Stroke of a Lightning Flash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolmasova, I.; Santolik, O.; Farges, T.; Rison, W.; Lan, R.; Uhlir, L.; Cavaillou, A.

    2013-12-01

    A sequence of pulses lasting from a few milliseconds to several tens of milliseconds is usually observed prior to the first return stroke. This sequence is composed of three parts. It begins with an initial larger pulse train which is believed to be connected with initial breakdown processes. The duration of the train is on the order of 1ms. The preliminary breakdown pulses (PBD pulses) are followed by a relatively low and irregular pulse activity. The sequence ends with another pulse train. This latter pulse train has a duration of several tens of microseconds to several hundreds of microseconds. It is attributed to the last stages of the stepped leader. It is not understood yet how these initial pulses are generated. Several conductive channels are probably formed inside the cloud during the preliminary breakdown. One of the channels evolves into the stepped leader. The train of PBD pulses could then identify the beginning of the stepped leader development. The occurrence and the properties of the pulses may depend on the storm type, the stage of the storm life cycle, and on the geographical conditions. We study four sequences of pulses measured by different instruments at an altitude of 1000m during one single thunderstorm close to Rustrel, France, on the 11th of October 2012. We analyze waveforms of the horizontal magnetic field measured by a broad-band analyzer with a sampling interval of 12.5 ns, the waveforms of the vertical electric field measured by an analyzer with a sampling interval of 80ns and the waveforms of the vertical electric field and two horizontal components of the magnetic field measured by a VLF analyzer with a sampling interval of 20 microseconds. The measurements recorded by these instruments were completed by the lightning mapping array data. We compare measurements of the same phenomenon observed by different antennas and in different frequency bands. The detailed analysis and comparison of different sequences of pulses can contribute to

  14. Fearsome Flashes: A Study Of The Evolution Of Flaring Rates In Cool Stars Using Kepler Cluster Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saar, Steven

    Strong solar flares can damage power grids, satellites, interrupt communications and GPS information, and threaten astronauts and high latitude air travelers. Despite the potential cost, their frequency is poorly determined. Beyond purely current terrestrial concerns, how the rate of large flares (and associated coronal mass ejections [CMEs], high-energy particle fluxes and far UV emission) varies over the stellar lifetime holds considerable astrophysical interest. These include: the contributions of flares to coronal energy budgets; the importance of flares and CMEs to terrestrial and exoplanet atmospheric and biological evolution; and importance of CME mass loss for angular momentum evolution. We will explore the rate of strong flares and its variation with stellar age, mass and rotation by studying Kepler data of cool stars in two open clusters NGC 6811 (age ~ 1 Gyr) and NGC 6819 (~2.5 Gyr). We will use two flare analysis methods to build white-light flare distributions for cluster stars. One subtracts a low-pass filtered version of the data and analyzes the residue for positive flux deviations, the other does a statistical analysis of the flux deviations vs. time lags compared with a model. For near- solar stars, a known solar relation can then be used to estimate X-ray production by the white-light flares. For stars much hotter or cooler or with significantly different chromospheric density, we will use particle code flare models including bombardment effects to estimate how the X-ray to white light scaling changes. With the X-ray values, we can estimate far UV fluxes and CME rates, building a picture of the flare effects; with the two cluster ages, we can make a first estimate of the solar rate (by projecting to the Sun's age) and begin to build up an understanding of flare rate evolution with mass and age. Our proposal falls squarely in the "Stellar Astrophysics and Exoplanets" research area, and is relevant to NASA astrophysics goals in promoting better

  15. Evaluation of Radiation Effects in Flash Memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyahira, T.; Swift, G.

    1998-01-01

    Features of flash memories: Flash memories are non-volatile; that is they do not require power to retain the information in its memory. They can be erased and written to while the device is still in the circuit.

  16. Reproductive History and Hot Flashes in Perimenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Karen; Pinnow, Ellen; Flaws, Jodi A.; Sorkin, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Hot flashes affect up to 75% of women undergoing the menopausal transition. They are among the most common health problems for perimenopausal women and are associated with a decrease in quality of life. The goal of this study was to examine the associations between reproductive history variables and midlife hot flashes. Methods Data were analyzed from 388 perimenopausal women who participated in the Midlife Health Study, a population-based, cross-sectional study of 639 women aged 45–54 years living in the Baltimore metropolitan region. Results The unadjusted analyses showed that none of the reproductive history variables analyzed, including age at menarche, number of live births, ever having been pregnant, age at first birth, age at last pregnancy, and history of oral contraceptive use, were associated with ever experiencing hot flashes. However, after adjusting for race, age group, marital status, education, employment, total family income, smoking and alcohol status, and body mass index (BMI), age at last pregnancy was significantly associated with moderate to severe hot flashes. Specifically, participants who were ≥36 years of age at last pregnancy were less likely to report moderate or severe hot flashes than those ≤35 years of age at last pregnancy (odds ratio 0.36, 95% confidence interval 0.16, 0.84). Conclusions In this study, in general, characteristics of reproductive history were not associated with midlife hot flashes. However, there are a number of potentially modifiable factors that are associated with the occurrence of hot flashes. Thus, alternatives may be available when hormone treatment is contraindicated. PMID:22283476

  17. Study of forward Z + jet production in pp collisions at = 7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Adrover, C.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bonis, I.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Dogaru, M.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; van Eijk, D.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Garosi, P.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gorbounov, P.; Gordon, H.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Hafkenscheid, T. W.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hicks, E.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luisier, J.; Luo, H.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Maratas, J.; Marconi, U.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martins Tostes, D.; Martynov, A.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Maurice, E.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Nomerotski, A.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Pessina, G.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Roberts, D. A.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Webber, A. D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-01-01

    A measurement of the Z(→ μ + μ -) + jet production cross-section in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy = 7 TeV is presented. The analysis is based on an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb-1 recorded by the LHCb experiment. Results are shown with two jet transverse momentum thresholds, 10 and 20 GeV, for both the overall cross-section within the fiducial volume, and for six differential cross-section measurements. The fiducial volume requires that both the jet and the muons from the Z boson decay are produced in the forward direction (2 .0 < η < 4 .5). The results show good agreement with theoretical predictions at the second-order expansion in the coupling of the strong interaction. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. Double-focusing mixing jet for XFEL study of chemical kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dingjie; Weierstall, Uwe; Pollack, Lois; Spence, John

    2014-01-01

    Several liquid sample injection methods have been developed to satisfy the requirements for serial femtosecond X-ray nanocrystallography, which enables radiation-damage-free determination of molecular structure at room temperature. Time-resolved nanocrystallography would combine structure analysis with chemical kinetics by determining the structures of the transient states and chemical kinetic mechanisms simultaneously. A windowless liquid mixing jet device has been designed for this purpose. It achieves fast uniform mixing of substrates and enzymes in the jet within 250 µs, with an adjustable delay between mixing and probing by the X-ray free-electron laser beam of up to 1 s for each frame of a ‘movie’. The principle of the liquid mixing jet device is illustrated using numerical simulation, and experimental results are presented using a fluorescent dye. PMID:25343806

  19. A study of the round jet/plane wall flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foss, J. F.; Kleis, S. J.

    1971-01-01

    Impingement angles, between the axisymmetric jet axis and the plane wall, from zero to 15 degrees have been examined for nozzle heights of 0.75, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 diameters and for: (1) a fully developed pipe flow, and (2) a relatively uniform exit velocity condition. Velocity measurements have been used to define isotach contours and to determine mass, momentum and energy flux values for the near field (within five diameters) of the jet. Surface pressure measurements have been used to define surface pressure forces and jet centerline trajectories. The geometric and flow conditions examined and the interpretation of the results have been motivated by the externally blown flap STOL aircraft application.

  20. Latest jet results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Darren D.

    2010-05-01

    A brief overview of the latest status of jet physics studies at the Tevatron in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV is presented. In particular, measurements of the inclusive jet production cross-section, dijet production and searches for new physics, the ratio of the 3-jet to 2-jet production cross-sections, and the three-jet mass are discussed.

  1. Experimental studies of shock-wave/wall-jet interaction in hypersonic flow, part A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Michael S.; Rodriguez, Kathleen

    1994-01-01

    Experimental studies have been conducted to examine slot film cooling effectiveness and the interaction between the cooling film and an incident planar shock wave in turbulent hypersonic flow. The experimental studies were conducted in the 48-inch shock tunnel at Calspan at a freestream Mach number of close to 6.4 and at a Reynolds number of 35 x 10(exp 6) based on the length of the model at the injection point. The Mach 2.3 planar wall jet was generated from 40 transverse nozzles (with heights of both 0.080 inch and 0.120 inch), producing a film that extended the full width of the model. The nozzles were operated at pressures and velocities close to matching the freestream, as well as at conditions where the nozzle flows were over- and under-expanded. A two-dimensional shock generator was used to generate oblique shocks that deflected the flow through total turnings of 11, 16, and 21 degrees; the flows impinged downstream of the nozzle exits. Detailed measurements of heat transfer and pressure were made both ahead and downstream of the injection station, with the greatest concentration of measurements in the regions of shock-wave/boundary layer interaction. The major objectives of these experimental studies were to explore the effectiveness of film cooling in the presence of regions of shock-wave/boundary layer interaction and, more specifically, to determine how boundary layer separation and the large recompression heating rates were modified by film cooling. Detailed distributions of heat transfer and pressure were obtained in the incident-shock/wall-jet interaction region for a series of shock strengths and impingement positions for each of the two nozzle heights. Measurements were also made to examine the effects of nozzle lip thickness on cooling effectiveness. The major conclusion from these studies was that the effect of the cooling film could be readily dispersed by relatively weak incident shocks, so the peak heating in the recompression region was not

  2. Experimental studies of shock-wave/wall-jet interaction in hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Michael S.; Rodriguez, Kathleen

    1994-01-01

    Experimental studies have been conducted to examine slot film cooling effectiveness and the interaction between the cooling film and an incident planar shock wave in turbulent hypersonic flow. The experimental studies were conducted in the 48-inch shock tunnel at Calspan at a freestream Mach number of close to 6.4 and at a Reynolds number of 35 x 10(exp 6) based on the length of the model at the injection point. The Mach 2.3 planar wall jet was generated from 40 transverse nozzles (with heights of both 0.080 inch and 0.120 inch), producing a film that extended the full width of the model. The nozzles were operated at pressures and velocities close to matching the freestream, as well as at conditions where the nozzle flows were over- and under-expanded. A two-dimensional shock generator was used to generate oblique shocks that deflected the flow through total turnings of 11, 16, and 21 degrees; the flows impinged downstream of the nozzle exits. Detailed measurements of heat transfer and pressure were made both ahead and downstream of the injection station, with the greatest concentration of measurements in the regions of shock-wave/boundary layer interaction. The major objectives of these experimental studies were to explore the effectiveness of film cooling in the presence of regions of shock-wave/boundary layer interaction and, more specifically, to determine how boundary layer separation and the large recompression heating rates were modified by film cooling. Detailed distributions of heat transfer and pressure were obtained in the incident shock/wall-jet interaction region for a series of shock strengths and impingement positions for each of the two nozzle heights. Measurements were also made to examine the effects of nozzle lip thickness on cooling effectiveness. The major conclusion from these studies was that the effect of the cooling film could be readily dispersed by relatively weak incident shocks, so the peak heating in the recompression region was not

  3. Studies on LH-generated Fast Electron Tail Using the Oblique ECE Diagnostic at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Sozzi, C.; Grossetti, G.; Farina, D.; Figini, L.; Garavaglia, S.; Nowak, S.; Baranov, Y.; Kirov, K.; Luna, E. de la

    2009-11-26

    The new Oblique ECE diagnostics of JET allows simultaneous measurement along three lines of sight at different toroidal angles. JET pulses, in which modulated LHCD power was applied, were analyzed by means of the SPECE emission code, which takes into account the fast electron tail generated by LH. The code results were compared to the ECE spectra from the oblique ECE diagnostic. The match between the computed and the experimental data from the three lines of sight provides an estimate of the density of superthermal electrons and of their maximum energy from which the fraction of the plasma current driven by LHCD is derived.

  4. Laser-driven plasma jets propagating in an ambient gas studied with optical and proton diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, C. D.; Loupias, B.; Koenig, M.; Waugh, J.; Woolsey, N. C.; Dono, S.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Sakawa, Y.; Bouquet, S.; Falize, E.; Michaut, C.; Nazarov, W.; Pikuz, S. A. Jr.

    2010-05-15

    The results of an experiment to propagate laser-generated plasma jets into an ambient medium are presented. The jets are generated via laser irradiation of a foam-filled cone target, the results and characterization of which have been reported previously [Loupias et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 265001 (2007)] for propagation in vacuum. The introduction of an ambient medium of argon at varying density is seen to result in the formation of a shock wave, and the shock front displays perturbations that appear to grow with time. The system is diagnosed with the aid of proton radiography, imaging the perturbed structure in the dense parts of the shock with high resolution.

  5. An experimental study on desulfurization of high-sulfur coal slime with free jet flotation column

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Hua; Huang Bo; Xia Qing

    1998-12-31

    A free jet flotation column gives good selectivity and high separation efficiency in treating fine and ultra-fine coal. This paper reports test results of coal desulfurization with a free jet flotation column. Test results showed that when the coal sample from Zhong Liang Shan was processed its pyritic sulfur content was reduced from 3.08% to 0.84%, with 72.22% recovery of combustible matter in clean coal. The concept of Desulfurization Efficiency Index E(ds) for a comprehensive evaluation of desulfurization process is proposed, which is defined as the product of the ratio of sulfur content reduction and the recovery of combustible matters in clean coal.

  6. Preliminary study of a hydrogen peroxide rocket for use in moving source jet noise tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plencner, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    A preliminary investigation was made of using a hydrogen peroxide rocket to obtain pure moving source jet noise data. The thermodynamic cycle of the rocket was analyzed. It was found that the thermodynamic exhaust properties of the rocket could be made to match those of typical advanced commercial supersonic transport engines. The rocket thruster was then considered in combination with a streamlined ground car for moving source jet noise experiments. When a nonthrottlable hydrogen peroxide rocket was used to accelerate the vehicle, propellant masses and/or acceleration distances became too large. However, when a throttlable rocket or an auxiliary system was used to accelerate the vehicle, reasonable propellant masses could be obtained.

  7. Numerical study of eigenmode forcing effects on jet flow development and noise generation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiderling, Felix; Kleiser, Leonhard; Bogey, Christophe

    2009-04-01

    The effect of nonlinear interaction of instability eigenmodes on jet flow transition and its near acoustic field for a high-subsonic round jet at a Reynolds number of Re=4.5×105 and a Mach number of Ma=0.9 is investigated using large-eddy simulations. At the inflow, helical perturbations of azimuthal wavenumbers |n|=4,…,8 determined from linear stability theory are superimposed on a laminar base flow in order to trigger transition to turbulence. The disturbance amplitude is varied parametrically in the range from 1.5% to 4.5% of the jet exit velocity Uj. Thereby we aim to characterize sources of noise generation and, in particular, underlying mode interactions. With increasing forcing amplitude, the transitional behavior of the jet changes which affects the mean flow and also the acoustic near-field, which are both analyzed in detail. As the forcing amplitude is increased, the axial root-mean-square peak levels along the jet centerline are reduced by approximately 7%. Simultaneously, pronounced dual-peak distributions are generated along the jet lip line which are related to the localization of vortex pairings of the jet column mode. For low-amplitude excitation the azimuthal turbulent kinetic energy spectra show that the unexcited, naturally least stable axisymmetric mode n =0 and the helical mode n =1 dominate the early nonlinear regimes between z ≈6r0 and 9r0 where r0 is the jet radius. An analysis of the Fourier mode amplitude clarifies that this energy rise is linked to the helical mode n =1. For higher forcing amplitudes, in addition to the varicose mode n =0 interactions between the excited even mode n =4 and higher azimuthal harmonics thereof dominate the azimuthal energy spectra. These differences in the early nonlinear development of the eigenmodes are found to alter the acoustic near-field. At small angles from the downstream jet axis, the peak acoustic frequency occurs at a Strouhal number based on the angular frequency ω and the jet diameter Dj

  8. Preferences for hypnotic imagery for hot-flash reduction: a brief communication.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Gary; Marcus, Joel; Bunn, Jennifer; Perfect, Michelle; Palamara, Lynn; Stearns, Vered; Dove, Jacqueline

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this brief report is to identify imagery preferences of women receiving hypnotherapy to alleviate hot flashes. As part of a larger study, 51 breast cancer survivors were asked to identify their own personal preferences for imagery for reducing hot flashes. Most of the participants identified personal imagery associated with coolness; none of the participants selected imagery for warmth or heat. The most widely used was imagery involving water associated with coolness (27.0%). It is recommended that clinicians using hypnosis for reduction of hot flashes attend to patients' preferences as specific imagery may moderate the effectiveness of hypnosis for hot flashes. PMID:20509073

  9. Characterization of Mesoscale Variability in WRF - a Coastal Low-Level Jet Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tay, K.; Lundquist, J. K.; Skote, M.; Koh, T. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Mesoscale weather models have increasingly been featured in wind resource assessment development. The incorporation of real meteorological conditions into such assessments allow a more realistic, physical determination of the wind loads that will be experienced within a wind farm site. Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) confers the advantage of representing finer scale turbulence, such as wake effects. However, nesting LES within real mesoscale simulations is still in the nascent stage of development. One of the difficulties lies in providing accurate mesoscale forcing boundaries for the LES domain. This study aims to characterize the mesoscale variability in WRF to lay the groundwork for future mesoscale-LES nested simulations. A low-level jet (LLJ) event that was observed during the CBLAST-Low 2001 campaign (07 Aug to 09 Aug) provides a robust case study to test the capabilities of and characterize the mesoscale variabilities in WRF. The dynamical interaction of a frontal passage with a stable boundary layer over a coastal region makes this an interesting and challenging case for real mesoscale simulation and future LES nested simulations. Sensitivities to vertical resolution, PBL schemes and initial forcing datasets were tested. This presentation will describe and explain the factors that influence the simulation of this frontal passage and the resulting LLJ. The initial forcing datasets have a major influence on spatial and temporal characteristics, as seen in Figure 1, introducing larger differences than the PBL schemes do. Furthermore, the mesoscale simulation also showed a strong dependence on the vertical resolution: increasing the vertical resolution within the atmospheric boundary layer resulted in a more accurate vertical profile for wind speed. Lastly, the simulations did show a dependency on the PBL scheme selected however, the variability between PBL schemes were not large, especially compared to the variability introduced by the boundary and initial

  10. Does quitting smoking decrease the risk of midlife hot flashes? A longitudinal analysis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rebecca L; Flaws, Jodi A; Gallicchio, Lisa

    2015-09-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that cigarette smoking is associated with an increased risk of midlife hot flashes; however, the effect of quitting smoking on this risk is unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of quitting smoking on hot flashes using data from 761 women aged 45 to 54 years of age at baseline followed for 1 to 7 years. Results showed that women who quit smoking were less likely to suffer from hot flashes, less likely to have severe hot flashes, and less likely to have frequent hot flashes than women who continued to smoke (OR=0.55, 0.80, 0.76), but were more likely to suffer from any hot flashes, more severe hot flashes, and more frequent hot flashes than women who never smoked (OR=2.55, 1.68, 1.46). Subset analysis of the 353 women who had ever smoked found that women who had quit smoking for longer than 5 years had significantly lower odds, severity, and frequency of hot flashes than women who had continued smoking (OR=0.36, 0.62, 0.63) or women who had quit in the previous 5 years (OR=0.66, 0.77, 0.69). These findings suggest that that early smoking cessation programs may improve women's well-being during the menopausal transition.

  11. Undergraduate Separations Utilizing Flash Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, G.

    2000-02-01

    This article describes the procedures used to carry out four flash chromatography experiments: the isolation of the carotenes, chlorophylls and xanthophylls from a spinach extract; the separation of ß-carotene from tetraphenyl cyclopentadienone; the isolation of (+) and (-) carvone from caraway and spearmint oil; and the purification of benzil from benzoin. Apparatus used is nonbreakable, easy to use, and inexpensive.

  12. Energy optimization in flash smelting

    SciTech Connect

    Partelpoeg, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    The copper smelting industry has been replacing old reverberatory furnaces with energy-efficient flash furnaces. While this in itself has been a significant move towards reduced energy costs, there is yet no industry consensus as to which mode of flash smelting is optimum. It is possible to model copper smelting, the ensuring converting step, and acid production with linear equations and inequalities. These equations include mass and heat balances, and energy and cost equations. The matrix of equations and inequalities can be entered into a linear programming routine to determine minimum costs. Such a model was developed and the results indicate that optimum smelting parameters include the following. (1) The grade of matte is 65% Cu. (2) The flash furnace operates autogenously with no air preheat. The flash furnace air is oxygen enriched to approximately 40 volume % O/sub 2/. (3) Total energy cost (1985 dollars and prices) for smelting, converting, and acid production is approximately $10 per tonne concentrate. The general model employed to obtain these optimum conditions can be modified to represent unique smelting conditions.

  13. Multi-stage flash degaser

    DOEpatents

    Rapier, P.M.

    1980-06-26

    A multi-stage flash degaser is incorporated in an energy conversion system having a direct-contact, binary-fluid heat exchanger to remove essentially all of the noncondensable gases from geothermal brine ahead of the direct-contact binary-fluid heat exchanger in order that the heat exchanger and a turbine and condenser of the system can operate at optimal efficiency.

  14. Application of photon-correlation spectroscopy and quartz-crystal microbalance to the study of thermally stressed jet fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Vilimpoc, V.; Sarka, B.

    1997-02-01

    The thermal degradation of jet fuel is characterized by the formation of particulates and gum deposits. The lack of sensitivity of previous methods of testing thermally stressed jet fuel required acceleration of the test conditions. Recently, two techniques have been integrated into a single instrumented platform to permit simultaneous in-situ real-time measurements of particle-size growth rate and surface mass-deposition rate in these fuels. With this arrangement, the particle growth rate is determined using photon-correlation spectroscopy (PCS), and the surface mass-deposition rate is measured with a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM). The resolution and sensitivity of these techniques permit the study of particle-size growth rate and mass-deposition rate at temperatures and times representative of those found in aviation fuel systems.

  15. Business Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Citation Jet, developed by Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, KS, is the first business jet to employ Langley Research Center's natural laminar flow (NLF) technology. NLF reduces drag and therefore saves fuel by using only the shape of the wing to keep the airflow smooth, or laminar. This reduces friction between the air and wing, and therefore, reduces drag. NASA's Central Industrial Applications Center, Rural Enterprises, Inc., Durant, OK, its Kansas affiliate, and Wichita State University assisted in the technology transfer.

  16. Opposed jet burner studies of hydrogen combustion with pure and N2, NO-contaminated air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerra, Rosemary; Pellett, Gerald L.; Northam, G. Burton; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    1987-01-01

    A counterflow diffusion flame formed by an argon-bathed tubular-opposed jet burner (OJB) was used to determine the 'blowoff' and 'restore' combustion characteristics for jets of various H2/N2 mixtures and for jets of air contaminated by NO (which normally occurs in high-enthalpy airflows supplied to hypersonic test facilities for scramjet combustors). Substantial divergence of 'blowoff' and 'restore' limits occurred as H2 mass flux, M(H)2, increased, the H2 jet became richer, and the M(air)/M(H2 + N2) ratio increased from 1 to 3 (molar H2/O2 from 1 to 16). Both OJB limits were sensitive to reactant composition. One to six percent NO in air led to significant N2-corrected decreases in the M(H2) values for 'blowoff' (2-8 percent) and 'restore' (6-12 percent) for mole fractions of H2 ranging from 0.5 to 0.95. However, when H2/O2 was held constant, all N2-corrected changes in M(H2) were negligible.

  17. A Preliminary Study of Some Health Hazards in the Plasma Jet Process

    PubMed Central

    Hickish, D. E.; Challen, P. J. R.

    1963-01-01

    A brief technical description is given of the plasma jet process, and reference is made to its likely practical applications in industry. An opportunity has been taken during experiments with a prototype plasma jet to assess some of the health hazards which might arise from these industrial applications and to indicate the type of precautions which should be observed in practice. Measurements and analysis of the noise emitted during the operation of a jet showed that the sound intensities ranged from 79·5 to 90·5 dB (re 0·0002 dynes/cm.2) per octave band between 300 and 10,000 cycles/second. Three male volunteers exposed to the noise for a period of one hour were subsequently found to have a mean temporary threshold shift of 19 dB at 4,000 cycles/second. Air sampling and analysis for ozone and nitrogen dioxide in the near vicinity of the jet gave a negative result for the former substance but demonstrated that the latter contaminant was present in concentrations ranging from 0·1 to 9·6 p.p.m. Images PMID:13961129

  18. A numerical study on the breakup process of laminar liquid jets into a gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yu; Suga, Kazuhiko

    2006-05-01

    Surface phenomena of liquid jets into still air are numerically investigated. The liquid and air are treated as a single continuum with dynamically evolving interfaces captured by the level-set method. The jets considered are laminar: the jet exit Reynolds number ranges from 480 to 2300, with the Weber number of 3.1-28 000. The liquid/air density ratios are about 103. In comparison with an empirical correlation, the present simulations reasonably predict the breakup lengths of round liquid jets at low Weber numbers. The development of the surface wave is captured and the breakup mechanisms are discussed referring to a conventional classification chart. The breakup phenomenon at high Weber and Ohnesorge numbers is also analyzed. It is then found that large-scale longitudinal-vortex motions, which are initially generated inside the liquid core by relaxation of the axial liquid velocity profile and surface shear, are amplified by surface motions due to instability. They grow up and eventually overcome inertial and surface-tension forces leading to a sudden breakup of the liquid column.

  19. Numerical studies of the effects of jet-induced mixing on liquid-vapor interface condensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chin-Shun

    1989-01-01

    Numerical solutions of jet-induced mixing in a partially full cryogenic tank are presented. An axisymmetric laminar jet is discharged from the central part of the tank bottom toward the liquid-vapor interface. Liquid is withdrawn at the same volume flow rate from the outer part of the tank. The jet is at a temperature lower than the interface, which is maintained at a certain saturation temperature. The interface is assumed to be flat and shear-free and the condensation-induced velocity is assumed to be negligibly small compared with radial interface velocity. Finite-difference method is used to solve the nondimensional form of steady state continuity, momentum, and energy equations. Calculations are conducted for jet Reynolds numbers ranging from 150 to 600 and Prandtl numbers ranging from 0.85 to 2.65. The effects of above stated parameters on the condensation Nusselt and Stanton numbers which characterize the steady-state interface condensation process are investigated. Detailed analysis to gain a better understanding of the fundamentals of fluid mixing and interface condensation is performed.

  20. Demonstration of digital radiographs by means of ink jet-printed paper copies: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kirkhorn, T; Kehler, M; Nilsson, J; Lyttkens, K; Andersson, B; Holmer, N G

    1992-11-01

    Different digital medical images have been printed on paper with a continuous ink jet printer, and the quality has been evaluated. The emphasis has been on digital chest radiographs from a computed radiography system. The ink jet printing technique is described as well as the handling of the image data from image source to printer. Different versions of paper prints and viewing conditions were compared to find the optimum alternative. The evaluation has been performed to maximize the quality of the paper images to make them conform with the corresponding film prints and monitor images as much as possible. The continuous ink jet technique offers high-quality prints on paper at a considerably lower cost per copy compared with the cost of a film print. With a future switch-over from diagnosing of digital images on film to diagnosing them on monitors, hard copies for demonstration purposes will occasionally be needed. This need can be filled by ink jet-printed paper copies.