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Sample records for flat sediment dynamics

  1. The role of biophysical interactions within the ijzermonding tidal flat sediment dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Backer, Annelies; Van Colen, Carl; Vincx, Magda; Degraer, Steven

    2010-05-01

    This paper focuses on the importance of biophysical interactions on short-term and long-term sediment dynamics. Therefore, various biological (macrobenthos, photopigments, colloidal EPS) and physical parameters (grain size, water content, sediment stability, bed level) were determined (bi)monthly in nine sampling plots on the IJzermonding tidal flat (Belgium, 51°08'N, 2°44'E) during three consecutive years (July 2005-June 2008). Results showed that sediment stability varied on the short timescale and was directly influenced by biota, while bed level varied mainly on the long-term due to interannual variability. The short-term dynamic relationships between mud content, water content, fucoxanthin and macrobenthos density resulted in a seasonal mud deposition and erosion cycle, and directly influenced sediment stability. Moreover, macrobenthos was proven to be the most important parameter determining sediment stability. On the long-term, a shift was observed from high fucoxanthin/chl a concentration, high mud content and zero to moderate densities of Corophium volutator towards low fucoxanthin/chl a and mud content and high Corophium densities, which resulted in a transition from net accretion to net erosion. However, most measured variables proved to be poor predictors for these long-term bed level changes, indicating that external physical forces, such as waves and storminess, probably were the most important factors triggering long-term sediment dynamics. Nevertheless, biota indirectly influenced bed level changes by mediating short-term changes in sediment stability, thereby influencing the erodability of the sediment. The macrobenthos, and especially the mud shrimp Corophium, was suggested as the (indirect) driving destabilising factor for the sampling plots in the IIzermonding when considering the long-term evolution.

  2. Processes Controlling Transfer of Fine-Grained Sediment within and Between Channels and Flats on Intertidal Flats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    asymmetry, winds, river discharge and biological activity) affect the sediment-transport dynamics that act to import fine- grained sediment. The...resulting product is the formation of mud-flat environments with complex morphology (e.g., multiple scales of tidal channels, differing geotechnical and...from rivers , erosion/deposition at the seabed, and transport of sediment in and out of each sub-environment (e.g., primary/secondary channels, flats

  3. Creation Of Constructed Tidal Flats Using Ocean Dredged Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Yi, B.; Lee, I.; Sung, K.

    2007-12-01

    The enforcement of London dumping convention (1972) and protocols (1996) which are comprehensive assessment system for ocean dumping wastes needs environmentally sound treatment and/or reuse of dredged sediment. Creation of constructed tidal flats using dredged sediments could be one of the useful alternatives among other dredged sediment treatments. In this study, the pilot-scale constructed tidal flats with 4 different mixing ratio of ocean dredged sediment were constructed in Nakdong river estuary, Korea. The reed was transplanted from the adjacent reed community after construction, and then the survival and growth rate of the planted reed was measured. Also the changes of Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), Ignition loss (IL), and the heterotrophic microbial numbers were monitored. The survival rate of the planted reed decreased as the mixing ratio of dredged sediment increased. The survival rate of reed in the constructed tidal flat with 100% dredged sediment was 54% while that in the tidal flat with 0% dredged sediment (original soil of Nakdong river estuary) was 90%. There was little difference of length and diameter of the reed shoot among the 4 different constructed tidal flats. 30% of COD and 9% of IL in the tidal flat with 100% dredged sediment decreased after 202 day, however, the consistent tendency in the change of COD and IL in the other tidal flats was not found possibly due to the open system. It was suggested that the construction of tidal flats using ocean dredged sediment can be possible considering the growth rate of transplanted reeds and the contaminated ocean dredged sediment might be biologically remediated considering the results of decrease of organic matter and increased heterotrophic microbial number in the tidal flat with 100% dredged sediment. However, the continuous monitoring on the vegetation and various environmental factors in the constructed tidal flats should be necessary to evaluate the success of creation of constructed flats using

  4. Flat Subduction and Dynamic Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. R.; Dávila, F. M.; Eakin, C. M.; Crameri, F.

    2014-12-01

    Mantle dynamics manifests at the surface via the horizontal motions of plates and the vertical deflections that influence topography and the non-hydrostatic geoid. The pioneering work of Mitrovica et al. (1989) and Gurnis (1990) on this dynamic topography revolutionized our understanding of sedimentary basin formation, sea level changes and continental flooding. The temporal evolution of subduction can explain the migration of basins and even the drainage reversal of the Amazon (Shephard et al., 2012; Eakin et al., 2014). Until recently, flat subduction has been seen as enhancing downward deflection of the overriding plate and increasing flooding. However, this interpretation depends crucially on the details of the morphology and density structure of the slab, which controls the loci and amplitude of the deflection. We tend to ignore morphological details in mantle dynamics because flow can smooth out short wavelength variations. We have shown instead that details matter! Using South America as a natural laboratory because of the large changes in morphology of the Nazca slab along strike, we show that downward deflection of the overriding plate and hence basin formation, do not occur over flat segments but at the leading edge, where slabs plunge back into the mantle. This is true in both Argentina and Peru. The temporal evolution from a 'normally' dipplng slab to a flat slab leads to uplift over flat segments rather than enhanced subsidence. Critical for this result is the use of a detailed morphological model of the present-day Nazca slab with a spatial resolution of 50-100 km and based on relocated seismicity and magnetotelluric results. The density structure of the slab, due to age and the presence of overthickened crust from aseismic ridge subduction is essential. Overthickened crust leads to buoyant slabs. We reproduce formation and deposition of the Acres-Solimoes basin and the evolution of the Amazon drainage basin in Peru as well as the Mar Chiquita

  5. Aeolian Sediment Transport on the Bonneville Salt Flat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinson, H. K.; Bowen, B. B.; Kipnis, E. L.

    2016-12-01

    The desiccation of Pleistocene Lake Bonneville in the West Desert of Utah resulted in an extensive surface halite crust known as the Bonneville Salt Flats (BSF). BSF lies amidst a landscape of vast playas heavily impacted by active aeolian sediment transport. Aeolian processes influence rates of erosion and deposition on the salt crust's surface. Stationary dust traps were distributed across the salt flat from May-September 2016 in order to quantify the rate of aeolian deposition onto the surface of BSF. The dust samples were collected bi-monthly and the sediment was rinsed from the trap and extracted using a filtration system. The amounts of both soluble and insoluble constituents collected in the traps were quantified. The sediment samples were analyzed for mineralogy, particle size, major elements, and trace elements in order to distinguish relative contributions from local and regional sediment sources, such as the Silver Island Mountain Chain. Transport directions were estimated using MesoWest weather station data and aerial surface texture imaging. Wind roses of events were plotted to visualize the wind patterns by intensity and direction relative to the dust collection sites. The wind patterns were compared to the rates of deposition and the seasonal expectations as the basin fluctuate from a flooding to desiccation stage. This research investigates the erosional and depositional effects of dust from weather patterns and anthropogenic use, and what the geomorphic impacts of aeolian processes are on the larger system. BSF is an iconic landmark, known for its mineral resources and unique landscape. The industrial and recreational value of BSF make it especially important to thoroughly understand the dynamic hydrologic, geomorphic, and aeolian processes and the role that they play in the sustainability of this environment.

  6. Use of vertical temperature gradients for prediction of tidal flat sediment characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miselis, Jennifer L.; Holland, K. Todd; Reed, Allen H.; Abelev, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    Sediment characteristics largely govern tidal flat morphologic evolution; however, conventional methods of investigating spatial variability in lithology on tidal flats are difficult to employ in these highly dynamic regions. In response, a series of laboratory experiments was designed to investigate the use of temperature diffusion toward sediment characterization. A vertical thermistor array was used to quantify temperature gradients in simulated tidal flat sediments of varying compositions. Thermal conductivity estimates derived from these arrays were similar to measurements from a standard heated needle probe, which substantiates the thermistor methodology. While the thermal diffusivities of dry homogeneous sediments were similar, diffusivities for saturated homogeneous sediments ranged approximately one order of magnitude. The thermal diffusivity of saturated sand was five times the thermal diffusivity of saturated kaolin and more than eight times the thermal diffusivity of saturated bentonite. This suggests that vertical temperature gradients can be used for distinguishing homogeneous saturated sands from homogeneous saturated clays and perhaps even between homogeneous saturated clay types. However, experiments with more realistic tidal flat mixtures were less discriminating. Relationships between thermal diffusivity and percent fines for saturated mixtures varied depending upon clay composition, indicating that clay hydration and/or water content controls thermal gradients. Furthermore, existing models for the bulk conductivity of sediment mixtures were improved only through the use of calibrated estimates of homogeneous end-member conductivity and water content values. Our findings suggest that remotely sensed observations of water content and thermal diffusivity could only be used to qualitatively estimate tidal flat sediment characteristics.

  7. Child dermal sediment loads following play in a tide flat.

    PubMed

    Shoaf, Marley B; Shirai, Jeffry H; Kedan, Golan; Schaum, John; Kissel, John C

    2005-09-01

    Dermal contact with sediment is sometimes identified as a pathway of concern in risk assessments. Dermal exposure to sediment is poorly characterized and exposure assessors may rely on default soil adherence values. The purpose of this study was to obtain sediment adherence data for a genuine exposure scenario, child play in a tide flat. This study reports direct measurements of sediment loadings on five body parts (face, forearms, hands, lower legs and feet) after play in a tide flat. Each of nine subjects participated in two timed sessions and pre- and post-activity sediment loading data were collected. Geometric mean (geometric standard deviation) dermal loadings (mg/cm(2)) on the face, forearm, hands, lower legs and feet for the combined sessions were 0.04 (2.9), 0.17 (3.1), 0.49 (8.2), 0.70 (3.6) and 21 (1.9), respectively. Participants' parents completed questionnaires regarding their child's typical activity patterns during tide flat play, exposure frequency and duration, clothing choices, bathing practices and clothes laundering. Data presented in this paper supplement very limited prior adherence data for sediment contact scenarios. Results will be useful to risk assessors considering exposure scenarios involving child activities at a coastal shoreline or tide flat.

  8. A numerical investigation of fine sediment transport at intertidal flat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, T.; Chen, S.; Ogston, A. S.

    2010-12-01

    A detailed numerical model is developed to study the hydrodynamic and fine sediment transport processes at tidal flats. The critical science issues to be investigated here are to quantify the main mechanisms causing landward and seaward transports. Prior modeling studies have identified the settling-lag effects as the main mechanism causing landward fine sediment transport. Field studies have also observed pronounced landward transport due to the movement of shallow-water’s turbid edge which is associated with bed erodibility and wetting-drying process. Recent 3D coastal numerical modeling of Skagit tidal flat (Chen et al. 2010, J. Geophys. Res., in press) is able to model settling-lag-induced landward transport. However, the observed short residence time for river-delivered sediment cannot be reproduced by the model, suggesting that a key offshore transport mechanism is not captured by the exiting coastal models. Field studies carried out in the ongoing Tidal Flat DRI have observed the so-called ebb tide sediment pulse, which seems to support the export of sediment through channels (Nowacki et al. 2010, this meeting) that balances landward fluxes. Both the bed erosion at water’s edge and ebb tide sediment pulse occur at a very shallow water depths. Conventional coastal models have difficulties in resolving the shallow flow at the wetting and drying seabed and some numerical approximations, such as specifying a minimum artificial flow depth, are often adopted. Therefore, a small-scale study is necessary before an appropriate parameterization for these transport mechanisms can be adopted by an estuarine/coastal model. In this study, a two-dimensional-vertical numerical model solving Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with a Volume of Fluid (VOF) scheme to track the free surface evolution is adopted. The VOF scheme allows a more realistic simulation of the wetting and drying processes. For the simulation of tidal flow over a flat of constant slope (slope

  9. Transformations of sulfur compounds in marsh-flat sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Swider, K.T.; Mackin, J.E. )

    1989-09-01

    Measurements were made in mud-flat sediments from Flax Pond salt marsh to characterize the rates and mechanisms of sulfur cycling in an organic-rich coastal marine environment. Approximately 13 mmoles/m{sup 2} of reduced sulfur are generated annually in the mud flat and the dominant solid-phase product is pyrite. Ion activity products involving dissolved iron and sulfide species indicate approximate saturation with respect to metastable iron sulfide phases, showing that pyrite is not likely to be the first-formed Fe-bearing sulfide. Comparison of {Sigma}H{sub 2}S vs. SO{sup =}{sub 4} relationships in anoxic incubation experiments with those occurring in the undisturbed sediment permits evaluation of possible mechanisms involved in the transformation of metastable iron monosulfides to pyrite. Oxidants (e.g. MnO{sub 2}) that are introduced into the surface sediment, either by animal activity or physical events, are apparently necessary to cause major oxidation of FeS and {Sigma}H{sub 2}S to pyrite and sulfate. Solid-phase sulfur analyses and net {Sigma}H{sub 2}S accumulation in sediment pore waters are consistent with major sulfide oxidation, indicating that approximately 95% of the sulfide generated in the mud flat is reoxidized to sulfate and roughly half of this oxidation involves dissolved sulfide. The major factors limiting reduced sulfur burial are physical and biological disturbances and a low abundance of reactive solid-phase iron (2 wt%).

  10. Temporal and spatial variability in the flow and dispersal of suspended-sediment on a fringing reef flat, Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Presto, M.K.; Ogston, A.S.; Storlazzi, C.D.; Field, M.E.

    2006-01-01

    A multi-year study was conducted on a shallow fringing reef flat on Molokai, Hawaii to determine the temporal and spatial dispersal patterns of terrigenous suspended sediment. During this study, trade-wind conditions existed for the majority of the year on the reef flat. The trade-wind conditions produced strong currents and resuspended moderate amounts of sediment on the reef flat on a daily basis during the year of study, resulting in an overwhelming contribution to the total sediment flux. The magnitude and direction of the trade winds relative to the orientation of the coastline, the shallow-relief and broad morphology, and tidal elevation, provided the primary control of the physical processes that resuspended and transported sediment on the reef flat over the period of record. Spatial data indicate that much of the terrigenous sediment resuspended on the reef flat is transported predominantly alongshore and is confined to the inner- to mid-reef flat. Evidence for the limited across-shore mixing and transport is provided by the dominantly alongshore wind-driven currents during trade-wind conditions and the well-defined across-shore gradient in percentage calcium carbonate of the suspended sediment. Regions of slightly offshore suspended-sediment transport along the reef flat can be attributed to the circulation pattern set up by the interaction between the trade winds, coastal morphology, and anthropogenic coastal structures (i.e., fish ponds and wharf). The regions in which sediment were seen to move offshore provide the strongest link between the sediment dynamics on reef flat and fore reef, and qualitatively appears to be correlated with low coral coverage on the fore reef. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Temporal and spatial variability in the flow and dispersal of suspended-sediment on a fringing reef flat, Molokai, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presto, M. K.; Ogston, A. S.; Storlazzi, C. D.; Field, M. E.

    2006-03-01

    A multi-year study was conducted on a shallow fringing reef flat on Molokai, Hawaii to determine the temporal and spatial dispersal patterns of terrigenous suspended sediment. During this study, trade-wind conditions existed for the majority of the year on the reef flat. The trade-wind conditions produced strong currents and resuspended moderate amounts of sediment on the reef flat on a daily basis during the year of study, resulting in an overwhelming contribution to the total sediment flux. The magnitude and direction of the trade winds relative to the orientation of the coastline, the shallow-relief and broad morphology, and tidal elevation, provided the primary control of the physical processes that resuspended and transported sediment on the reef flat over the period of record. Spatial data indicate that much of the terrigenous sediment resuspended on the reef flat is transported predominantly alongshore and is confined to the inner- to mid-reef flat. Evidence for the limited across-shore mixing and transport is provided by the dominantly alongshore wind-driven currents during trade-wind conditions and the well-defined across-shore gradient in percentage calcium carbonate of the suspended sediment. Regions of slightly offshore suspended-sediment transport along the reef flat can be attributed to the circulation pattern set up by the interaction between the trade winds, coastal morphology, and anthropogenic coastal structures (i.e., fish ponds and wharf). The regions in which sediment were seen to move offshore provide the strongest link between the sediment dynamics on reef flat and fore reef, and qualitatively appears to be correlated with low coral coverage on the fore reef.

  12. Nitrogen turnover in a tidal flat sediment: assimilation and dissimilation by bacteria and benthic microalgae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dähnke, K.; Moneta, A.; Veuger, B.; Soetaert, K.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2012-06-01

    In a short-term (24 h) 15N-labeling experiment, we investigated reactive nitrogen cycling in a tidal flat sediment, focusing on the relative importance of assimilatory versus dissimilatory processes and the role of benthic microalgae therein. 15N-labeled ammonium and nitrate were added separately to homogenized sediment, and 15N was subsequently traced into sediment and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) pools. Integration of results in a N-cycle model allowed us to quantify rates for the major assimilatory and dissimilatory processes in the sediment. Overall, results indicate that the balance between assimilation and dissimilation in this tidal mudflat was mainly dependent on the nitrogen source. Nitrate was utilized almost exclusively dissimilatory via denitrification, whereas ammonium was rapidly assimilated, with about a quarter of this assimilation due to benthic microalgae (BMA). Benthic microalgae significantly affect assimilation of ammonium, because in the absence of BMA activity the sediments turns from a net ammonium sink to a net source. Nitrification rates were initially very high, but declined rapidly suggesting that nitrification rates are low in undisturbed sediments, and that in a dynamic environment like tidal flats, intense and fast nitrification/denitrification of ammonium is common. The driving mechanisms for assimilation or dissimilation accordingly appear to be ruled to a large extent by external physical forcing, with the entire system being capable of rapid shifts following environmental changes.

  13. Numerical study of sediment transport on a tidal flat with a patch of vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Gangfeng; Han, Yun; Niroomandi, Arash; Lou, Sha; Liu, Shuguang

    2015-02-01

    To understand how vegetation canopies affect sediment transport on tidal flats, a numerical study of tidal flow and sediment transport on an idealized tidal flat with a patch of vegetation is conducted. The numerical model is firstly validated by laboratory measurements of flow and sediment deposition in a partially vegetated open channel. The idealized study shows that a finite patch of vegetation may produce circulation on the tidal flat with converging flow during flood and diverging flow during ebb. The vegetation patch can also generate a tidal phase lag between the vegetated and bare flats. Tidal currents in both zones are asymmetric, with stronger flood current in the vegetated zone and stronger ebb current on the bare flat. The duration of ebb is longer than that of flood. Computed sediment concentration on the bare flat is higher during ebb due to stronger ebb current and larger bottom shear stress. This is in contrast to the tidal flat without a vegetation canopy, where suspended sediment concentration is higher during flood. On the tidal flat without a vegetation canopy, landward net sediment transport occurs on the upper flat, while seaward net sediment transport occurs on the lower flat and subtidal region. On the partially vegetated tidal flat, however, net sediment transport on both the upper and lower flats are in seaward direction. It increases with increasing vegetation density. Alongshore net sediment flux converges inside the canopy and diverges on the bare flat. Sediment exchange rate between the vegetated and bare flats increases with decreasing vegetation density and sediment settling velocity.

  14. A one-dimensional biomorphodynamic model of tidal flats: Sediment sorting, marsh distribution, and carbon accumulation under sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zeng; Ye, Qinghua; Coco, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    We develop a biomorphodynamic model to investigate sediment and vegetation dynamics on a schematic intertidal flat characterized by an initially well-mixed sand-mud mixture. Major interactions between tides, wind waves, salt marshes, sediment transport and sea level rise (SLR) are taken into account. For a bare flat under only tidal action, the model predicts a convex cross-shore profile with the surficial distribution of mud and sand on the upper and lower part of the intertidal flat, respectively. When wind waves are strong, the intertidal flat is highly eroded resulting in a concave profile near the high water mark. This behavior is pronouncedly altered when the intertidal flat is vegetated with the presence of salt marshes. Numerical results suggest that a considerable amount of mud can still remain in the vegetated region even when wave action is strong. A steeper transition zone forms at the boundary between salt marshes and bare flats because of the differential sediment deposition in the two neighboring regions. The inclusion of wind waves is found to considerably enhance the size of the marsh-edge transition zone. For the numerical experiments designed in this study, the profile shape and sediment sorting behavior of tidal flats are not significantly modified by a gradual rising sea level. However, the impacts of SLR on vegetated tidal flats are still manifold: (a) driving the landward migration of intertidal zone and salt marshes; (b) enhancing sediment erosion on intertidal flats; and (c) drowning salt marshes under limited sediment supply with the constrain of seawalls. Finally, model results suggest that organic carbon accumulation on marshlands may be enhanced with an increasing SLR rate provided that salt marshes are not drowned.

  15. Processes Controlling Transfer of Fine-Grained Sediment Within and Between Channels and Flats on Intertidal Flats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    rivers , precipitation on exposed flat surfaces, erosion/deposition at the seabed, and transport of sediment in and out of each sub-environment (e.g...e.g., wind, precipitation, river discharge), sedimentological (sediment grain size and erodibility) and biological (vegetation and benthic biota...influence. This study area allows us to focus on asymmetries in tidal processes. In comparison, the Skagit River tidal flats (NW Washington; see

  16. Clostridium ganghwense sp. nov., isolated from tidal flat sediment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seil; Jeong, Hyunyoung; Kim, Sanggoo; Chun, Jongsik

    2006-04-01

    A Gram-negative, strictly anaerobic, halophilic, motile, sporulating and rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain HY-42-06T, was isolated from tidal flat sediment from Ganghwa Island in South Korea. The isolate produced glycerol, ethanol and CO2 as fermentation end-products from glucose. Strain HY-42-06T grew optimally at 35 degrees C, pH 7.5 and 3 % (w/v) artificial sea salts. No growth was observed in the absence of sea salts. In phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequence, strain HY-42-06T showed a distinct phyletic line within the members of cluster I of the order Clostridiales. The closest phylogenetic neighbour to strain HY-42-06T was Clostridium novyi ATCC 17861T (94.91 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). Several phenotypic characters readily differentiate the tidal flat isolate from phylogenetically related clostridia. On the basis of polyphasic evidence, strain HY-42-06T should be classified as a representative of a novel species, for which the name Clostridium ganghwense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is HY-42-06T (=IMSNU 40127T = KCTC 5146T = JCM 13193T).

  17. Forced Convection and Sedimentation Past a Flat Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelekasis, Nikolaos A.; Acrivos, Andreas

    1995-01-01

    The steady laminar flow of a well-mixed suspension of monodisperse solid spheres, convected steadily past a horizontal flat plate and sedimenting under the action of gravity, is examined. It is shown that, in the limit as Re approaches infinity and epsilon approaches 0, where Re is the bulk Reynolds number and epsilon is the ratio of the particle radius a to the characteristic length scale L, the analysis for determining the particle concentration profile has several aspects in common with that of obtaining the temperature profile in forced-convection heat transfer from a wall to a fluid stream moving at high Reynolds and Prandtl numbers. Specifically, it is found that the particle concentration remains uniform throughout the O(Re(exp -1/2)) thick Blasius boundary layer except for two O(epsilon(exp 2/3)) thin regions on either side of the plate, where the concentration profile becomes non-uniform owing to the presence of shear-induced particle diffusion which balances the particle flux due to convection and sedimentation. The system of equations within this concentration boundary layer admits a similarity solution near the leading edge of the plate, according to which the particle concentration along the top surface of the plate increases from its value in the free stream by an amount proportional to X(exp 5/6), with X measuring the distance along the plate, and decreases in a similar fashion along the underside. But, unlike the case of gravity settling on an inclined plate in the absence of a bulk flow at infinity considered earlier, here the concentration profile remains continuous everywhere. For values of X beyond the region near the leading edge, the particle concentration profile is obtained through the numerical solution of the relevant equations. It is found that, as predicted from the similarity solution, there exists a value of X at which the particle concentration along the top side of the plate attains its maximum value phi(sub m) and that, beyond this

  18. Flavihumibacter sediminis sp. nov., isolated from tidal flat sediment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Do-Hoon; Cha, Chang-Jun

    2016-11-01

    A yellow, Gram-staining-positive, aerobic, rod-shaped and non-motile bacterial strain, designated CJ663T, was isolated from the tidal flat sediment in Ganghwa-do, South Korea. Strain CJ663T grew optimally on R2A at 30 °C and pH 7.0 and did not require NaCl for growth. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity showed that strain CJ663T belonged to the genus Flavihumibacter within the family Chitinophagaceae and was most closely related to Flavihumibacter cheonanensis KACC 17467T (98.3 % similarity), followed by Flavihumibacter solisilvae KACC 17917T (97.4 %). DNA-DNA relatedness levels of strain CJ663T were 42.9 % to F. cheonanensis KACC 17467T and 48.6 % to F. solisilvae KACC 17917T. The major isoprenoid quinone was menaquinone 7 (MK-7). The predominant polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, aminophospholipid and two unidentified lipids. The major cellular fatty acids of strain CJ663T were iso-C15 : 0, anteiso-C15 : 0 and iso-C17 : 0 3-OH. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 47.7 mol%. On the basis of data from this polyphasic taxonomic study, strain CJ663T represents a novel species in the genus Flavihumibacter, for which name Flavihumibacter sediminis sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is CJ663T (=KACC 18874T=JCM 31431T).

  19. Thermal Diffusivity and Strength of Tidal Flat Sediments During a Tidal Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    saturated) were determined for each sediment type (i.e., kaolinite , quartz sand, bentonite, strontium carbonate and iron oxide). Because tidal...flat sediments are often distributed across grain size classes, mixtures of sand and clay (clay being either kaolinite or bentonite) were also

  20. Heavy metal pollution and assessment in the tidal flat sediments of Haizhou Bay, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Zhou, Li; Zhang, Fan; Ding, Yingjun; Gao, Jinrong; Chen, Jing; Yan, Hongqiang; Shao, Wei

    2013-09-15

    The heavy metal inventory and the ecological risk of the tidal flat sediments in Haizhou Bay were investigated. Results show that the average concentrations of heavy metals in the surface sediments exceeded the environment background values of Jiangsu Province coastal soil, suggesting that the surface sediments were mainly polluted by heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Pb and Zn). In addition, the profiles of heavy metals fluxes can reflect the socio-economic development of Lianyungang City, and heavy metals inputs were attributed to anthropogenic activities. Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn were mainly present in the non-bioavailable residual form in surface sediments, whereas Cd and Mn were predominantly in the highly mobile acid soluble and reducible fractions. The ecological risk of the polluted sediments stemmed mainly from Cd and Pb. According to the Sediment quality guidelines (SQGs), however, the adverse biological effects caused by the heavy metals occasionally occurred in tidal flat.

  1. Historical sediment record and distribution of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in sediments from tidal flats of Haizhou Bay, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Tiancheng; Yan, Hongqiang; Shao, Wei; Zhou, Li; Tong, Hebing

    2014-12-15

    The spatial and temporal variations and sources of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in sediment of tidal flat from Haizhou Bay, China were investigated. PCBs concentrations in surface sediments ranged from 1.33 to 6.27ngg(-1) dry weight. Low-chlorinated PCBs, dominated by the tri-PCB homologs, were identified as the prevalent contaminate of surface sediments. These results were in agreement with the fact that tri-PCB homologs are the dominant contaminants in China. In surface sediment, the highest level appeared in the estuary, and it decreased with distance from the Linhong River estuary. PCBs concentrations started to rise from the mid-1950s, and reached a maximum in 2005. PCBs in sediment might originate from surface runoff and discharges of local source as well as slight atmospheric deposition, based on PCA. Additionally, the PCBs levels in the sediments were considered to rarely pose hazard to the aquatic and human health, based on Sediment Quality Guidelines (SQGs).

  2. Site-specific features influence sediment stability of intertidal flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defew, Emma C.; Tolhurst, Trevor J.; Paterson, David M.

    The factors that influence the sediment stability and the transport of estuarine mudflats are not yet fully understood but knowledge of them is essential in coastal engineering applications and pollution ecology studies. The suggestion that variation in predictive models of sediment stability might be due to site-specific characteristics is investigated using data from four estuarine mudflats (Eden Estuary, Scotland, the Biezelingsche Ham, Zandkreek, and Molenplaat mudflats in The Netherlands). These estuaries differ in their environmental conditions, macrofaunal species composition and local features (e.g. Enteromorpha mats, migratory biofilms). Stable and unstable sediments were compared, and mean chlorophyll-a concentrations and granulometry of the sediments were significantly different between the two groups. Step-wise multiple linear regressions were applied to the sediment stability data of all sites to establish the influences on erosion threshold of microphytobenthic biomass, water content, granulometry, organic carbon content and the abundance of dominant macrofaunal species. The stability of each site was influenced by different factors. Sediment stability of the Eden Estuary was affected by the Enteromorpha bloom; Biezelingsche Ham was influenced by the highly migratory nature of the diatom biofilms and the abundance of Corophium volutator; the polychaete worm Arenicola marina had a net negative effect on sediment stability of the Zandkreek; and the Molenplaat was influenced by microphytobenthic biomass. This research highlights the need for site-specific calibration of models and suggests that a universal proxy parameter for sediment stability is unlikely to be obtained.

  3. Seasonal transfer and net accumulation of fine sediment on a muddy tidal flat: Willapa Bay, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldt, Katherine V.; Nittrouer, Charles A.; Ogston, Andrea S.

    2013-06-01

    Tidal flats act as natural laboratories in which fundamental sediment-transport processes can be directly related to resulting seabed deposits. These environments represent important repositories for terrestrial particles (including organic carbon) entering marine dispersal systems. Along the coast of the US Pacific Northwest, tides, waves, currents, and storms create year-round energetic environments that evolve on myriad time scales, from semi-diurnal to interannual. In southern Willapa Bay, WA, an extensive tidal flat is accreting at a distance away from local fluvial sources. During winter, freshwater input and the peak suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) are one-to-two orders of magnitude greater than in summer, and wind- and wave-generated shear stresses prevent sediment from accumulating on the tidal flat. Temporary deposits form as a drape across secondary channels off the Bear River Channel. Sedimentary structures from these deposits reveal 15-30cm of physically stratified sediment underlain by a discrete shell-hash layer 2-8cm thick. The presence of relatively uniform excess 210Pb activities in the sediment above the shell hash, and only supported activities below indicate rapid deposition of the surficial sediment. During summer, the distribution of bed shear stresses is not significantly weaker than in winter due to the effect of local basin geometry on fetch, yet the SSC is much less, likely due to reduced fluvial sediment supply and enhanced benthic biological factors. Progressively through the summer, tidal currents and wind waves remove the temporary channel deposits and expose the buried shell-hash layer, and concurrent seabed changes allow the tidal flats to trap this remobilized sediment. Accumulation rates determined by 210Pb analysis for cores collected on the tidal flats show mean accretion at 1.4mm/yr, which can be accounted for by local river sources. The mass of sediment stored in the temporary channel drapes during winter is

  4. Sediment dynamics in Alpine basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habersack, Helmut; Liébault, Fred; Comiti, Francesco

    2017-08-01

    In rivers and streams and of the European Alps, sediment transport processes are of great relevance due to their ecological (e.g. aquatic habitats), energy (e.g. reservoir sedimentation) and risk-related (floods and debris flows) consequences. In fact, sediment fluxes are crucial to maintain a good ecological status of watercourses (required by the EU ;Water Framework Directive;, WFD, 2000), as they provide the hydromorphological conditions supporting dynamic aquatic ecosystems (Fryirs and Brierley, 2013; Wohl et al., 2015; Gurnell et al., 2016). Indeed, the key issue to ameliorate river hydrogeomorphological - and thus ecological - status and to comply with WFD provisions lies in allowing the natural processes of sediment and wood supply and transport to take place as much as possible, given the constraints imposed by the non-eliminable uses of each river (Comiti, 2012; Liébault et al., 2013). Specifically river continuity is mentioned in the WFD not only for biota but also sediments, which is hardly discussed in river management so far and almost no concrete measures to improve sediment continuity have been implemented so far (Habersack et al., 2016).

  5. Sediment resuspension and transport patterns on a fringing reef flat, Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ogston, A.S.; Storlazzi, C.D.; Field, M.E.; Presto, M.K.

    2004-01-01

    Corals are known to flourish in various turbid environments around the world. The quantitative distinction between clear and turbid water in coral habitats is not well defined nor are the amount of sediment in suspension and rates of sedimentation used to evaluate the condition of reef environments well established. This study of sediment resuspension, transport, and resulting deposition on a fringing reef flat off Molokai, Hawaii, uses a year of time-series data from a small, instrumented tripod. It shows the importance of trade winds and ocean wave heights in controlling the movement of sediment. Sediment is typically resuspended daily and the dominant controls on the magnitude of events (10-25 mg/l) are the trade-wind-generated waves and currents and tidal elevation on the reef flat. The net flux of sediment on this reef is primarily along the reef flat in the direction of the prevailing trade winds (to the west), with a secondary direction of slightly offshore, towards a zone of low coral abundance. These results have application to reef studies and reef management in other areas in several ways. First, the observed resuspension and turbidity results from fine-grained terrigenous sediment that appears to be trapped and recycled on the reef flat. Thus corals are subjected to light attenuation by the same particles repeatedly, however small the amount. Secondly, the measurements show high temporal variability (from daily to seasonal scales) of sediment resuspension, indicating that single measurements are inadequate to accurately describe conditions on a reef flat. ?? Springer-Verlag 2004.

  6. Dynamical simulations of sedimenting spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd, A.J.C. )

    1993-02-01

    The sedimentation of monodisperse suspensions of rigid spheres has been studied by dynamical simulation; computational techniques are described and numerical results are reported. It has been found that there is a slow relaxation of the suspension microstructure during sedimentation, so that compared with the initial equilibrium distribution, there is an increased number of pairs of particles near contact; this leads to a 5%--10% increase in the average sedimentation velocity. Individual particle velocities fluctuate about the mean fall speed; these fluctuations are large and persist for long times. The resulting hydrodynamically induced dispersion of the particles can be characterized by strongly anisotropic diffusion coefficients; however, the dispersion process is non-Fickian at high solids concentrations.

  7. Hydrodynamics and sediment suspension in shallow tidal channels intersecting a tidal flat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieterse, Aline; Puleo, Jack A.; McKenna, Thomas E.

    2016-05-01

    A field study was conducted on a tidal flat intersected by small tidal channels (depth <0.1 m, width <2 m) within a tidal marsh. Data were collected in the channels, and on the adjacent tidal flat that encompasses approximately 1600 m2 in planform area. Hydrodynamic processes and sediment suspension between the channels and adjacent flat were compared. Shear stress and turbulent kinetic energy were computed from high frequency velocity measurements. Maximum water depth at the field site varied from 0.11 m during the lowest neap high tide to 0.58 m during a storm event. In the channel intersecting the tidal flat, the shear stress, turbulence and along-channel velocity were ebb dominant; e.g. 0.33 m/s peak velocity for ebb compared to 0.19 m/s peak velocity for flood. Distinct pulses in velocity occurred when the water level was near the tidal flat level. The velocity pulse during flood tide occurred at a higher water level than during ebb tide. No corresponding velocity pulse on the tidal flat was observed. Sediment concentrations peaked at the beginning and end of each tidal cycle, and often had a secondary peak close to high tide, assumed to be related to sediment advection. The influence of wind waves on bed shear stress and sediment suspension was negligible. Water levels were elevated during a storm event such that the tidal flat remained inundated for 4 tidal cycles. The water did not drain from the tidal flat into the channels during the storm, and no velocity pulses occurred. Along-channel velocities, turbulent kinetic energy, and shear stresses were therefore smaller in the channels during storm conditions than during non-storm conditions.

  8. Changing sedimentation in tidal flat sediments of the southern North Sea from the Holocene to the present: a geochemical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellwig, O.; Hinrichs, J.; Hild, A.; Brumsack, H.-J.

    2000-12-01

    This study presents geochemical evidence for a change in depositional energy conditions of tidal flat sediments (southern North Sea) from the Holocene, i.e. human unaffected, to present-day conditions. We investigated Holocene and present tidal flat sediments and suspended particulate matter (SPM) from the NW German coastal area (Spiekeroog Island back-barrier area and Jade Bay), as well as sediments from the Helgoland Island mud hole area. Samples were analysed for bulk parameters (TC, TIC), major (Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, K, P, Si, Ti), and trace elements (Ba, Pb, Rb, Sr, V, Zn, Zr). Enrichment factors versus average shale reveal four groups of elements for the investigated Holocene and present sediments. Fe, Mg, K, Ba, Rb, and V show a shale-like behaviour and enrichments of Ca and Sr reflect the occurrence of carbonate, whereas higher levels of P, Pb, and Zn in the present samples are due to pollution. The fourth group consists of Si, Ti, and Zr, which may be used as indicators of depositional energy because these elements are concentrated by particle sorting effects. The most pronounced geochemical difference between the Holocene and present tidal flat sediments is an enrichment of Zr in the present samples. As Zr is commonly associated with heavy minerals, this enrichment indicates a higher depositional energy environment in the present sediments, which can be traced to modern dike building. The same effect, i.e. increasing current velocities, is responsible for a general depletion of fine-grained, Al-rich, material in the present sediments. The examination of SPM shows that large amounts of this fine-grained material are present in the water column and may be transported from the intertidal system into the open North Sea. The comparison of a calculated Holocene clay accumulation rate with modern estimates of SPM deposition in the German Bight reveals about a two-fold higher deposition of fine material in the Holocene tidal flats. As the sediments from the Helgoland

  9. Documenting Fine-Sediment Import and Export for Two Contrasting Mesotidal Flats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    these channels. This suggests a mechanism by which sediment temporarily stored in winter channel deposits is subsequently reworked before and during...accretes over longer time scales in equilibrium with the space provided. The preservation of laminated deposits (65-90 cm thick) buried 155-230 cm...from the banks and flats (upper tier) were collected in July 2009, and show (from left to right) mottled sediment away from channels, and laminated

  10. Sediment transport and deposition on a river-dominated tidal flat: An idealized model study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherwood, Christopher R.; Chen, Shih-Nan; Geyer, W. Rockwell; Ralston, David K.

    2010-01-01

    A 3-D hydrodynamic model is used to investigate how different size classes of river-derived sediment are transported, exported and trapped on an idealized, river-dominated tidal flat. The model is composed of a river channel flanked by sloping tidal flats, a configuration motivated by the intertidal region of the Skagit River mouth in Washington State, United States. It is forced by mixed tides and a pulse of freshwater and sediment with various settling velocities. In this system, the river not only influences stratification but also contributes a significant cross-shore transport. As a result, the bottom stress is strongly ebb-dominated in the channel because of the seaward advance of strong river flow as the tidal flats drain during ebbs. Sediment deposition patterns and mass budgets are sensitive to settling velocity. The lateral sediment spreading scales with an advective distance (settling time multiplied by lateral flow speed), thereby confining the fast settling sediment classes in the channel. Residual sediment transport is landward on the flats, because of settling lag, but is strongly seaward in the channel. The seaward transport mainly occurs during big ebbs and is controlled by a length scale ratio Ld/XWL, where Ld is a cross-shore advective distance (settling time multiplied by river outlet velocity), and XWL is the immersed cross-shore length of the intertidal zone. Sediment trapping requires Ld/XWL < 1, leading to more trapping for the faster settling classes. Sensitivity studies show that including stratification and reducing tidal range both favor sediment trapping, whereas varying channel geometries and asymmetry of tides has relatively small impacts. Implications of the modeling results on the south Skagit intertidal region are discussed.

  11. Balance of assimilative and dissimilative nitrogen processes in a diatom-rich tidal flat sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dähnke, K.; Moneta, A.; Veuger, B.; Soetaert, K.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2012-10-01

    Tidal flat sediments are subject to repetitive mixing and resuspension events. In a short-term (24 h) 15N-labelling experiment, we investigated reactive nitrogen cycling in a tidal flat sediment following an experimentally induced resuspension event. We focused on (a) the relative importance of assimilatory versus dissimilatory processes and (b) the role of benthic microalgae therein. 15N-labelled substrate was added to homogenized sediment, and 15N was subsequently traced into sediment and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) pools. Integration of results in a N-cycle model allowed us to quantify the proportion of major assimilatory and dissimilatory processes in the sediment. Upon sediment disturbance, rates of dissimilatory processes like nitrification and denitrification were very high, but declined rapidly towards a steady state. Once this was reached, the balance between assimilation and dissimilation in this tidal mudflat was mainly dependent on the nitrogen source: nitrate was utilized almost exclusively dissimilatory via denitrification, whereas ammonium was rapidly assimilated, with about a quarter of this assimilation due to benthic microalgae (BMA). Benthic microalgae significantly affected the nitrogen recycling balance in sediments, because in the absence of BMA activity the recovering sediment turned from a net ammonium sink to a net source. The driving mechanisms for assimilation or dissimilation accordingly appear to be ruled to a large extent by external physical forcing, with the entire system being capable of rapid shifts following environmental changes. Assimilatory pathways gain importance under stable conditions, with a substantial contribution of BMA to total assimilation.

  12. China's Yangtze estuary. II. Phosphorus and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in tidal flat sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shiyuan; Gao, Xiaojiang; Liu, Min; Chen, Zhenlou

    2001-11-01

    Concentrations of phosphorus (P) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined in tidal flat sediments from the Yangtze estuary and Hangzhou Bay. The amount of total P in surface sediments ranges from 18.0 to 31.4 μmol g -1 along the southern coast. The spatial and temporal distribution of P in tidal flats is closely related to geomorphological location and contaminant input, especially in association with variations in hydrodynamic conditions. Speciation of P in sediments was extracted sequentially. Results show that calcium phases are dominant in the total P of tidal flat sediments, which is similar to marine sediments. The main diffusion of dissolved P is from overlying water to sediment in the coastal environment of the Yangtze estuary. Two sediment cores from the Baoshan (BS) and Donghai (DH) sites were extracted for PAH analysis. The total concentration of PAHs ranges from 0.061 to 7.618 μg g -1 at the BS site, and from 0.005 to 2.370 μg g -1 at the DH site. The distribution of total and individual PAHs in the sediment shows a subsurface maximum, following by decreased levels to the surface and with depth. The pattern of PAH abundance suggests that there has been significant petroleum contamination in the Yangtze estuary. A few individual PAHs, such as acenaphthalene and anthracene in surface samples of the two cores, are in excess of current sediment quality criteria in the Yangtze estuary. The present study suggests that anthropogenic activities enhance contaminant inputs to the estuary.

  13. Wood and Sediment Dynamics in River Corridors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, E.; Scott, D.

    2015-12-01

    Large wood along rivers influences entrainment, transport, and storage of mineral sediment and particulate organic matter. We review how wood alters sediment dynamics and explore patterns among volumes of instream wood, sediment storage, and residual pools for dispersed pieces of wood, logjams, and beaver dams. We hypothesized that: volume of sediment per unit area of channel stored in association with wood is inversely proportional to drainage area; the form of sediment storage changes downstream; sediment storage correlates most strongly with wood load; and volume of sediment stored behind beaver dams correlates with pond area. Lack of data from larger drainage areas limits tests of these hypotheses, but analyses suggest a negative correlation between sediment volume and drainage area and a positive correlation between wood and sediment volume. The form of sediment storage in relation to wood changes downstream, with wedges of sediment upstream from jammed steps most prevalent in small, steep channels and more dispersed sediment storage in lower gradient channels. Use of a published relation between sediment volume, channel width, and gradient predicted about half of the variation in sediment stored upstream from jammed steps. Sediment volume correlates well with beaver pond area. Historically more abundant instream wood and beaver populations likely equated to greater sediment storage within river corridors. This review of the existing literature on wood and sediment dynamics highlights the lack of studies on larger rivers.

  14. Tenacibaculum litoreum sp. nov., isolated from tidal flat sediment.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong Han; Kim, Yoon-Gon; Hwang, Chung Yeon; Yi, Hana; Chun, Jongsik; Cho, Byung Cheol

    2006-03-01

    A rod-shaped bacterium, designated CL-TF13T, was isolated from a tidal flat in Ganghwa, Korea. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed an affiliation with the genus Tenacibaculum. The sequence similarities between CL-TF13T and type strains of members of the genus Tenacibaculum were from 94.2 to 97.4%. Cells were motile by means of gliding. Strain CL-TF13T grew on solid medium as pale-yellow colonies with an irregular spreading edge. The strain was able to grow in NaCl at a range of 3-5%. They grew within a temperature range of 5-40 degrees C and at pH range of 6-10. The major fatty acids were summed feature 3 (C(16:1)omega7c and/or iso-C(15:0) 2-OH, 19.6%), iso-C(15:0) (18.8%) and iso-C(17:0) 3-OH (13.6%). Fatty acids such as C(18:3)omega6c (6,9,12) (1.5%) and summed feature 4 (iso I- and/or anteiso B-C(17:1), 1.3%) were uniquely found in minor quantities in CL-TF13T among Tenacibaculum species. The DNA G + C content was 30 mol%. According to physiological data, fatty-acid composition and 16S rRNA gene sequence, CL-TF13T could be assigned to the genus Tenacibaculum but distinguished from the recognized species of the genus. Therefore, strain CL-TF13T (= KCCM 42115T = JCM 13039T) represents a novel species, for which the name Tenacibaculum litoreum sp. nov. is proposed.

  15. Morphological controls in sandy estuaries: the influence of tidal flats and bathymetry on sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robins, Peter Edward; Davies, Alan G.

    2010-06-01

    The morphodynamics of shallow, vertically well-mixed estuaries, characterised by tidal flats and deeper channels, have been investigated. This paper examines what contributes to flood/ebb-dominant sediment transport in localised regions through a 2D model study (using the TELEMAC modelling system). The Dyfi Estuary in Wales, UK has been used as a case study and, together with idealised estuary shapes, shows that shallow water depths lead to flood dominance in the inner estuary whilst tidal flats and deep channels cause ebb dominance in the outer estuary. For medium sands and with an artificially ‘flattened’ bathymetry (i.e. no tidal flats), the net sediment transport switches from ebb-dominant to flood-dominant where the parameter a/ h (local tidal amplitude ÷ local tidally averaged water depth) exceeds 1.2. Sea level rise will reduce this critical value of a/ h and also reduce the ebb-directed sediment transport significantly, leading to a flood-dominated estuarine system. A similar pattern, albeit with greater transport, was simulated with tidal flats included and also with a reduced grain size. This suggests that analogous classifications for flood/ebb asymmetry of the tide in estuaries as a whole may not represent the local sediment transport in sufficient detail. Through the Dyfi simulations, the above criterion involving a/ h is shown to be complicated further by augmented flow past a spit at the estuary mouth which gives rise to a self-maintaining scour hole. Simulations of one year of bed evolution in an idealised flat-bottomed estuary, including tidal flow past a spit, recreate the flood/ebb dominance on either side of the spit and the formation of a scour hole in between. The erosion rate at the centre of the hole is reduced as the hole deepens, suggesting the establishment of a self-maintaining equilibrium state.

  16. Sediment transport on macrotidal flats in Garolim Bay, west coast of Korea: significance of wind waves and asymmetry of tidal currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hee J.; Jo, Hyung R.; Chu, Yong S.; Bahk, Kyung S.

    2004-05-01

    A self-recording instrument, named Tidal Sediment Dynamics Observational System (TISDOS), was built to monitor transport characteristics of nearbed sediments on tidal flats. It was deployed on a tidal flat in the semi-enclosed Garolim Bay, west coast of Korea, over a 15-day period between 5 and 20 January 2002 to examine sediment-transport processes during winter seasons. The measurements involved brief durations of high waves allowing for observation of wave effects upon the sediment transport on the tidal flat. Time series of various hydrodynamic parameters (water depth, current velocities, wave height, suspended sediment concentration, and bed level) from point measurements show characteristic interrelationships between parameters on both temporal and spatial scales. The tidal flat is dominated by flooding currents up to 2 times stronger than ebb currents. The current speeds measured simultaneously at two stations along a cross-shore transect varied in harmony with water depth, reaching the maximum during spring tide that was steadily decreased onshore. The onshore decrease in current speed was compatible with a fining textural trend from sand on the lower flat to mud toward the upper flat. Both the maximum water depth and current speed during individual tidal cycles also show semi-diurnal asymmetry that was highlighted during spring tide. Waves were of critical importance in resuspending bed material and thus yielding higher suspended sediment concentrations. On the middle flat, the suspended sediment concentrations were highest, exceeding 400 mg/l at 0.5 m above the seabed during large waves (relative wave height, 0.33) under weakest neap currents. In this wavy climate, the suspended sediment concentration increased over time during ebb, in strong contrast with a gradual decrease through time after mid-flood peaks under tidal currents without waves. The daily vertical flux of suspended sediments trapped in a plastic bottle also indicates the significance of

  17. Effects of natural oyster reefs (Crassostrea gigas) on the sediment balance of Oosterschelde tidal flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, João; de Vries, Mindert

    2014-05-01

    The realization of the storm surge barrier and the two secondary dams not only changed the hydrodynamics, but also the geomorphological characteristics of the Oosterschelde estuary (SW Netherlands) creating a disequilibrium between erosion and sedimentation. This has lead in the last 25 years to a sand deficit in the Oosterschelde resulting in the erosion of the tidal flats (Smaal & Nienhuis, 1992; Nienhuis & Smaal 1994). Due to these phenomena the habitat for intertidal soft-bottom benthic fauna is slowly disappearing, and with it food sources for estuarine birds that use these areas as foraging grounds (Mulder & Louters, 1994). Erosion of tidal flats also locally exposes deeper peat layers, potentially resulting in reduced water clarity and primary production (Nienhuis & Smaal 1994). Adding to these problems an increased risk of dike failures and flooding during storm surges is expected, as the dikes gradually become more exposed to wave action. In this research the effect of oysters (Crassostrea gigas) as ecosystem engineers, on the sediment balance in the Oosterschelde was studied. In our analysis we compared long term bathymetry data for transects with and without oyster reefs. Based on height differences, the transects sedimentation/erosion rates were calculated and used to determine if there was a difference between transects without oyster reefs and transects crossing oyster reefs. From the long term analysis, the overall erosional trend of the Oosterschelde tidal flats is clear. The mean observed erosion was - 0,012 m per year. When considering the sections crossing oyster reefs , a mean accumulation of sediment of + 0,007 m per year was observed. The results suggest that these ecosystem engineers, that cover large areas in the Oosterschelde slow down the erosion of the tidal flats in the Oosterschelde, as they act as sediment accumulators and stabilizers. We estimate at least 70000 m3 of sediment per year is accreted on tidal flats due to the effect of

  18. Hydromorphology of tidal flats: interactions between hydrodynamics, sediment transport, vegetation and morphology (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Hir, P.; Verney, R.; Bassoullet, P.; Cayocca, F.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrodynamics of tidal flats are first summarised, as resulting from morphology and tidal forcing. Two contrasted configurations are considered: the case where tidal flat is somehow closed and dominant currents are cross-shore, and the case where the flat is opened to a channel system (for instance in estuaries) where long-shore flow is dominant. Maximum tidal currents are discussed, using literature results (e.g. Friedrichs and Aubrey, 1996). Typical convex profiles of tidal dominated systems can be justified: the slope reduction in the upper flat induces a flow acceleration that compensates the flow decay predicted by Friedrichs and Aubrey (1996). Tidal asymmetries and their consequences on sediment transport are also discussed. The importance of wind-induced currents in very shallow waters is illustrated by field measurements (Baie du Mont St-Michel, Seine estuary) and computations. Last, a simple model of cross-shore wave propagation is presented, showing that bottom friction is likely to induce the saturation of wave heights (maximum ratio of wave height over water depth), whatever the offshore wave regime (Le Hir et al., 2000). Dealing with sediment transport, the bottom shear stress distribution is suggested as the relevant parameter for comparing tidal and wave effects. This is confirmed by process-based sediment transport models. Using morphological models that compute erosion, advection and deposition of fine sediments under currents and wave forcing, realistic cross-shore profiles can be simulated (Roberts et al., 2000; Waeles et al., 2004). Starting from any initial condition, the profile converges towards equilibrium, coherently with uniform stress distribution. Depending on the wave forcing, larger slopes appear, generating concave profiles near the low and high water levels, where waves duration is higher (Waeles et al., 2004). The shore profile also depends on the sediment characteristics (settling velocity and shear strength). Similarly, biota are

  19. Morphology and sedimentation on open-coast intertidal flats of the Changjiang Delta, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fan, D.; Li, C.; Wang, D.; Wang, P.; Archer, A.W.; Greb, S.F.

    2004-01-01

    On many intertidal flats, lateral aggradation and reworking by large tidal channels is the dominant sedimentary process. On the open-coast intertidal flats of the Changjiang Delta large laterally migrating tidal channels are absent. Instead, numerous shallow tidal creeks cut across the intertidal flats. On these flats, vertical rather than lateral migration dominates sedimentation. Observations over semidiurnal tidal cycles show that both flood and ebb tides have the potential to deposit their own mud-sand couplets, but four couplets per day are rarely preserved. Reworking by tidal currents and/or weak waves results in loss of tidal couplets or amalgamation of two or more thin couplets into a single thick couplet. Measurements of preserved couplets show that they can represent a single flooding or ebbing event (half day) to a period of several neap-spring cycles. Diastems within amalgamated couplets are generally not distinguishable. The key agent for reworking open-coast intertidal flat deposits is not tidal creek migration but seasonal storm waves. Seasonal storm deposits consist of a basal scour and sand-dominant laminae with mud pebbles, grading upward to mud-dominated layers of fair-weather deposits. Sand-dominated layers are also reworked.

  20. Dynamics of Flat Bunches with Second Harmonic RF

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Tanaji; Bhat, Chandra; Kim, Hyung Jin; Ostiguy, Jean-Francois; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    We investigate the dynamics of longitudinally flat bunches created with a second harmonic cavity in a high energy collider. We study Landau damping in a second harmonic cavity with analytical and numerical methods. The latter include particle tracking and evolution of the phase space density. The results are interpreted in the context of possible application to the LHC. A possible path to a luminosity upgrade at the LHC is through the creation of longitudinally flat bunches. They can increase the luminosity roughly by 40% when the beam intensities are at the beam-beam limit. Lower momentum spread which can reduce backgrounds and make collimation easier as well lower peak fields which can mitigate electron cloud effects are other advantages. Use of a second harmonic rf system is a frequently studied method to create such flat bunches. Here we consider some aspects of longitudinal dynamics of these bunches in the LHC at top energy. First we consider intensity limits set by the loss of Landau damping against rigid dipole oscillations. Next we describe numerical simulations using both particle tracking and evolution of the phase space density. These simulations address the consequences of driving a bunch at a frequency that corresponds to the maximum of the synchrotron frequency.

  1. The Dynamics of Sediment Oxygenation in Marsh Rhizospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koop-Jakobsen, K.

    2014-12-01

    Many marsh grasses are capable of internal oxygen transport from aboveground sources to belowground roots and rhizomes, where oxygen may leak across the rhizodermis and oxygenate the surrounding sediment. In the field, the extent of sediment oxygenation in marshes was assessed in the rhizosphere of the marsh grass; Spartina anglica, inserting 70 optical fiber oxygen sensors into the rhizosphere. Two locations with S. anglica growing in different sediment types were investigated. No oxygen was detected in the rhizospheres indicating that belowground sediment oxygenation in S. anglica has a limited effect on the bulk anoxic sediment and is restricted to sediment in the immediate vicinity of the roots. In the laboratory, the presence of 1.5mm wide and 16mm long oxic root zones was demonstrated around root tips of S. anglica growing in permeable sandy sediment using planar optodes recording 2D-images of the oxygen distribution. Oxic root zones in S. anglica growing in tidal flat deposits were significantly smaller. The size of oxic roots zones was highly dynamic and affected by tidal inundations as well as light availability. Atmospheric air was the primary oxygen source for belowground sediment oxygenation, whereas photosynthetic oxygen production only played a minor role for the size of the oxic root zones during air-exposure of the aboveground biomass. During tidal inundations (1.5 h) completely submerging the aboveground biomass cutting off access to atmospheric oxygen, the size of oxic root zones were reduced significantly in the light and oxic root zones were completely eliminated in darkness. Sediment oxygenation in the rhizospheres of marsh grasses is of significant importance for marshes ability to retain inorganic nitrogen before it reaches the coastal waters. The presence of oxic roots zones promotes coupled nitrification-denitrification at depth in the sediment, which can account for more than 80% of the total denitrification in marshes.

  2. Dynamical mean-field theory for flat-band ferromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hong-Son; Tran, Minh-Tien

    2016-09-01

    The magnetically ordered phase in the Hubbard model on the infinite-dimensional hyper-perovskite lattice is investigated within dynamical mean-field theory. It turns out for the infinite-dimensional hyper-perovskite lattice the self-consistent equations of dynamical mean-field theory are exactly solved, and this makes the Hubbard model exactly solvable. We find electron spins are aligned in the ferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic configuration at zero temperature and half filling of the edge-centered sites of the hyper-perovskite lattice. A ferromagnetic-ferrimagnetic phase transition driven by the energy level splitting is found and it occurs through a phase separation. The origin of ferromagnetism and ferrimagnetism arises from the band flatness and the virtual hybridization between macroscopically degenerate flat bands and dispersive ones. Based on the exact solution in the infinite-dimensional limit, a modified exact diagonalization as the impurity solver for dynamical mean-field theory on finite-dimensional perovskite lattices is also proposed and examined.

  3. The sediments and physical environment of the Sagadahoc Bay tidal flat, Georgetown, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Wilmot H.

    1950-01-01

    This investigation of the sediments of the Sagadohoc Bay tidal flat was undertaken at the suggestion of the State Geologist of Maine, Dr. Joseph Thefethen, in the hope that the results might be helpful to the biologists of the Maine Department of Sear and Shore Fisheries in their studies of clam productivity and the biologists of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service who are making a systematic study of the ecology and potential yields of the soft-shelled clam (Mya arenaria) in Sagadohoc and neighboring bays. The field stage of the investigation lasted from early July to the end of August 1949, during which time I was assisted by W. H. Condon of the U.S. Geological Survey. This report and the accompanying map were prepared in Washington, where the laboratory studies of the sediments were made by T. Woodward of the U.S. Geological Survey.

  4. Turnover of postlarval bivalves in sediments of tidal flats in Königshafen (German Wadden sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armonies, W.

    1994-06-01

    After larval settlement, juvenile bivalves may rapidly re-enter the water column and attain secondary dispersal by byssus-drifting. In order to estimate the quantitative importance of byssus-drifting, the abundance of drifters in the water column, their re-entry into the sediment, and their density in the ambient sediment were measured simultaneously over 3 months on a tidal flat in Königshafen near the Island of Sylt in the North Sea. Turnover of juvenile clams Macoma balthica and cockles Cerastoderma edule was more than once per week in summer, showing strong short-term variability because of semi-lunar rhythms of drifting activity. While there is currently no evidence for active habitat selection in settling M. balthica and C. edule larvae, it is suggested that habitat selection occurs following postlarval migrations.

  5. Variation in numbers and behaviour of waders during the tidal cycle: implications for the use of estuarine sediment flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granadeiro, José P.; Dias, Maria P.; Martins, Ricardo C.; Palmeirim, Jorge M.

    2006-05-01

    Estuarine sediment flats are essential feeding areas for waders, but their exploitation is constrained by the movements of tides. In this cyclic environment the exposure period of sediment flats decreases several fold from upper to lower flats, and the moving tidal waterline briefly creates particular conditions for waders and their prey. This study attempts to determine how the exposure period and the movement of the tide line influence the use of space and food resources by waders across the sediment flats. Wader counts and observations of feeding behaviour were carried out in all phases of the tidal cycle, in plots forming a transect from upper to lower flats, thus representing a gradient of exposure periods. Pecking, prey intake, and success rates varied little along the gradient. Some species actively followed the tide line while foraging, whereas others are evenly spread over the exposed flats. Black-tailed Godwit, Dunlin and Avocet were 'tide followers', whereas Grey Plover, Redshank and Bar-tailed Godwit were 'non-followers'. Densities of 'followers' near the tide line were up to five times higher than elsewhere. Species differed markedly in the way they used space on the flats, but in general the rate of biomass acquisition (in grams of ash-free dry weight per time exposed) was much higher in lower flats. However, this preference was insufficient to counter the much longer exposure of the upper flats, so the total amount of biomass consumed on the latter was greater. Therefore, it was in these upper flats that waders fulfilled most of their energetic needs. Consequently, upper flats are of particular importance for the conservation of wader assemblages, but because they are usually closer to shore they tend to suffer the highest pressure from disturbance and land reclamation.

  6. Sedimentation dynamics about salt features

    SciTech Connect

    Lowrie, A.; Blake, D.W.

    1985-02-01

    Detailed side-scan sonar and gridded bathymetric surveys on continental margins reveal the existence of numerous submarine canyons. Recently published compilations of current velocities in submarine canyons indicate that alternating and undirectionaly flows often exceed 20-30 cm/sec with peak velocities ranging from 70 to 100 cm/sec. Current meters attached to the ocean floor have been lost at current velocities of 190 cm/sec. Such velocities are ample to transport sand-size sediments. The results of DSDP Leg 96 show the existence of massive sands and gravels on the Louisiana slope, deposited during the last glacial advance. Thus, present physical oceanographic data may be an analog to conditions during glacially induced lowered sea levels. Salt ridges and domes underlie much of the Louisiana slope, determining morphology. Submarine canyons lace the slope. Given a prograding shelf, the net sediment transport routes will be down the submarine canyons. Sediment deposition patterns around the salt ridges and domes include parallel-bedded foredrifts on the upslope side, lee drifts on the downslope side, and moats along the lateral flanks of the salt features. Major differences exist between the sedimentation patterns around a ridge and a dome. The size and shape of the flow pattern will determine whether there can be a flow over the salt feature with a resulting turbulent wave that may influence sedimentation. Sedimentation patterns about salt features on the present slope should be applicable to similar paleoenvironments.

  7. The behavior of heavy metals in tidal flat sediments during fresh water leaching.

    PubMed

    Li, QuSheng; Liu, YaNan; Du, YeFeng; Cui, ZhiHong; Shi, Lei; Wang, LiLi; Li, HongJie

    2011-02-01

    Many of the coastal tidal flats in China that were polluted with heavy metals are now being reclaimed for arable land. The safety of these soils for agriculture is of great concern. The present study investigated the sediment chemical properties, concentrations, and speciation of heavy metals at different levels of desalination during a controlled leaching experiment. After leaching with fresh water, the average reductions in the heavy metal species examined in 0-65 cm depth sediment were 32.1% for Pb, 26.2% for Cd, 14.0% for Zn, 13.8% for Cu, and 11.0% for Cr, while the Ni concentration in sediment did not change significantly. The amounts of Cd, Pb, Cr, Cu, and Zn bound to the reducible fraction, the amounts of Cd, Pb, and Zn bound to the exchangeable fraction, the amounts of Pb, Cr, Cu, and Zn associated with the carbonate fraction, and the Cu associated with the oxidizable fraction all decreased significantly. Complexation with salt anions, ion exchange between the cations and the metal ions, removal of SO4(2-), dissolution of carbonate, and the redox potential variations all contributed to the decreases in Pb, Cd, Zn, Cu, and Cr. These results suggest that leaching with fresh water can also remove a fraction of the heavy metal contamination when it diminishes sediment salinity.

  8. Lagoon and tidal flat sedimentation of the Upper Devonian Nisku Formation in southern Alberta

    SciTech Connect

    Slingsby, A. ); Kissling, D.L. )

    1991-06-01

    Since 1985, 26 oil pools containing 64 million bbl of oil in place have been discovered in the Nisku Formation in southern Alberta. The thoroughly dolomitized Nisku Formation varies from 20 to 30 m thick in southern Alberta and northern Montana. It overlies anhydrites and shaly carbonates of the Southesk or Duperow formations and underlies anhydrites of the Stettler or Potlatch formation. Burrowed, nodular-bedded skeletal wackestone, deposited over a shallow marine shelf, forms the basal Nisku Formation. These strata are succedded diachronously and unconformably by several tidal-flat and lagoon facies that include (1) southeast-thinning washover fans of cross-bedded peloidal grainstone; (2) laminated mudstone to current-bedded peloidal and intraclastic grainstone sourced within the lagoon; (3) stromatolitic mudstones; (4) laminated anhydrite beds precipitated during salina episodes; (5) Amphipora and brachiopod wackestones and thrombolites containing Renalcis, serpulids, and ostracoes, marking a brief marine invasion; and (6) brackish or freshwater shale and mudstone containing fragmented lycopod leaves and antiarch fish remains. These sediments are overlain by cross-bedded, peloidal, and calcisiltite grainstone and stromatolitic mudstone deposited in tidal channels and over shoals. All facies have been subjected to periodic subareal exposure which has produced leaching, solution collapse brecciation, teepee structures, and nodular-mosaic and void-filling anhydrite. Permeable reservoirs exist where leached, dolomitized tidal flat and lagoon sediments contain intercrystalline and pelmoldic porosity and little anhydrite cement.

  9. Isolation and Characterization of Metal-Reducing Shewanella Species from Tidal Flat Sediments of Southwest Coast, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Y.; Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Hur, H.

    2005-12-01

    Although microbe-metal interactions play important roles in the metal geochemistry and organic matter mineralization in tidal flat sediments, study of microbial metal reduction by bacteria isolated from tidal flat sediments is beginning to be studied in Korea. The objective of this study was to explore Fe(III) and metal reduction by metal-reducing bacteria isolated from Tidal Flat Sediments of Southwest Coast, Korea. 10 bacteria strains were isolated from tidal flat sediments of Southwest Coast, Korea. The taxonomic characterization of these strains indicated that they belong to the genus Shewanella. These strains were able to reduce ferric iron of several ferric compounds [FeCl3, Fe-citrate, FeOOH] and metals such as As(V) and Se(VI) using short chain fatty acids as the electron donors. These bacteria exhibited diverse mineral formation capabilities including the formation of magnetite (Fe3O4), siderite (FeCO3), vivianite [Fe3(PO4)28H2O], AsS, and Se(0). One (HN-41) of the isolates reduced akaganeite (FeOOH) and formed mono-dispersed (~ 30 nm) magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles . These results indicate that microbial Fe(III) reduction may not only play important roles in iron and carbon biogeochemistry as well as immobilization of metal contaminants in tidal flat sediment.

  10. Beach and reef-flat sediments along the south shore of Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calhoun, R.S.; Field, M.E.; ,

    2000-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey's multi-disciplinary Coral Reef Project addressing the health and geological variability of coral reef systems, sediment components and their distribution along the fringing reef on the south shore of the Hawaiian island of Molokai are being examined. Particular interest is being paid to the types and origin of sediment found on the reef. The south shore of Molokai is sheltered by one of the largest fringing reefs in the US. At approximately 50 km in length, up to 1.5 km in width, and covered by 90% live coral in many locations, the reef seemingly should be able to provide ample sediment for large carbonate beaches. However, siliciclastic grains supplied by erosion of the basaltic uplands of Molokai are often the most conspicuous individual nearshore sediment type. Coralline algae and coral are the most common carbonate components of the beaches. On the nearshore reef-flat, chemically-altered carbonate grains, particularly coralline algae, are the most abundant component. Molluscs and Halimeda may be common in specific locations, but are usually minor components. Sediment calcium carbonate levels increase to the west from a minimum at Kamalo, and are high along the east shore of Molokai. However, these general island-scale trends may be overridden by local influences, such as protected stream mouths or high carbonate growth rates. Additionally, trends seen on the beach and nearshore environments may not reflect trends a few hundred meters offshore since shore normal trends are more pronounced than shore parallel ones.

  11. Statistical characterization of spatiotemporal sediment dynamics in the Venice lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniello, Luca; D'Alpaos, Andrea; Botter, Gianluca; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Characterizing the dynamics of suspended sediment is crucial when investigating the long-term evolution of tidal landscapes. Here we apply a widely tested mathematical model which describes the dynamics of cohesive and noncohesive sediments, driven by the combined effect of tidal currents and wind waves, using 1 year long time series of observed water levels and wind data from the Venice lagoon. The spatiotemporal evolution of the computed suspended sediment concentration (SSC) is analyzed on the basis of the "peak over threshold" theory. Our analysis suggests that events characterized by high SSC can be modeled as a marked Poisson process over most of the lagoon. The interarrival time between two consecutive over threshold events, the intensity of peak excesses, and the duration are found to be exponentially distributed random variables over most of tidal flats. Our study suggests that intensity and duration of over threshold events are temporally correlated, while almost no correlation exists between interarrival times and both durations and intensities. The benthic vegetation colonizing the central southern part of the Venice lagoon is found to exert a crucial role on sediment dynamics: vegetation locally decreases the frequency of significant resuspension events by affecting spatiotemporal patterns of SSCs also in adjacent areas. Spatial patterns of the mean interarrival of over threshold SSC events are found to be less heterogeneous than the corresponding patterns of mean interarrivals of over threshold bottom shear stress events because of the role of advection/dispersion processes in mixing suspended sediments within the lagoon. Implications for long-term morphodynamic modeling of tidal environments are discussed.

  12. Dynamic simulation of particle sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongzhen; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2004-11-01

    The sedimentation of 1024 spheres has been simulated via a recently developed method:Physalis Method. Particles are initially randomly distributed and periodic boundary conditions are assumed. The time evolution of the particle spatial distribution is studied by meassuering the structure factor. Properties of particles velocity distribution, e.g. variance, time autocorrelation, have been studied. The effects of particle rotation and collision are discussed.

  13. Processes Controlling Transfer of Fine-Grained Sediment within and Between Channels and Flats on Intertidal Flats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    through channel bed reworking with less transfer between channels and surrounding flats. Figure 5. Uncalibrated...surface elevation, current magnitude, and bed elevation. There is an approximately 2 cm reworking of the channel seabed when the tide is low and flow...within the braided tidal-channel system act to deliver, rework and rapidly export sand and mud to the seaward edge of the flat. Hydrodynamic

  14. Biomarkers of peat-forming plants and their signal in tidal flat sediments of the german bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wöstmann, R.; Köller, C.; Rullkötter, J.

    2003-04-01

    Induced by the Holocene sea level rise a number of different peat layers developed in the surface of today´s Wadden Sea of NW Germany. Furthermore, lipid analysis of Wadden Sea sediments showed a significant component of terrestrial organic matter derived from erosion of peat layers in this highly dynamic area. In order to characterise these peats and their remnants in tidal flat sediments in a paleochemotaxonomical way, recent plant material as well as different types of peats were selected for biomarker investigation. Recent plant material was linked paleochemotaxonomically to deposited peats and Wadden Sea sediments by means of selected biomarkers. A significant variation of the n-alkane distribution pattern between raised bog plants and fen plants was detected. The raised bog plants showed an n-alkane maximum at n-C31, the fen plants at n-C27 and n-C29. This is in agreement with results of the botanical and geochemical analysis of different types of Holocene peat layers in this area. In the selected Wadden Sea sediment core the n-alkane distribution showed an odd over even carbon number predominance with maxima at n-C27, n-C29 or n-C31, indicating an origin from different peat types. In addition, pentacyclic triterpenoids are characteristic biomarkers for bog and fen plant communities. Their distribution patterns and total amounts allow a clear distinction between raised-bog-forming plants and fen-peat-forming plants. Whereas all analysed fen-peat-forming plants were barren of triterpenoids, raised-bog-forming plants like Erica tetralix contain triterpenoids at a level of more than 10% of the total lipid extract. All other bog-forming plants also contain high amounts of triterpenoids like a-amyrin, ß-amyrin, friedelin, lupeol, multiflorenon and taraxerol. However, individual triterpenoids are not plant-specific biomarkers because of possible diagenetic effects. When triterpenoids are found in fen peats they are due to the influence of non-peat-forming plant

  15. Mercury dynamics in lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feyte, Stéphane; Gobeil, Charles; Tessier, André; Cossa, Daniel

    2012-04-01

    Triplicate porewater depth-profiles of pH and concentrations of total Hg (HgT), methylmercury (MeHg), Fe, Mn, sulfate, total sulfide, total zero-valent sulfur, organic C and major ions were determined at two sampling dates in a perennially oxygenated basin and a seasonally anoxic basin from Lake Tantaré, a Canadian Shield lake. The vertical distribution of HgT, MeHg, acid volatile sulfide, total S, Fe, Mn, Al and organic C were also determined in dated sediment cores from the same lake basins and from the deepest site of two other lakes, one also located in the Canadian Shield and the other in the Northeastern part of the Appalachian Mountains. Application of a one-dimensional transport-reaction equation to the dissolved HgT and MeHg profiles constrains the depth intervals (zones) where these species are produced or consumed in the sedimentary column and yields estimates of net reaction rates of HgT or MeHg in each of the zones as well as their fluxes at the sediment-water interface. Dissolved HgT and MeHg diffused from the overlying water into the sediments, except for MeHg at one of the sampling dates in the perennially oxygenated basin. About 97% and 50% of the MeHg flux to the sediments is presently deposited with settling particles in the perennially oxygenated and seasonally anoxic basins, respectively. Removal of porewater HgT and MeHg occurred at all dates and sampling sites. Comparison of the consumption zones of porewater HgT and MeHg with the profiles of ancillary parameters, coupled with thermodynamic calculations, suggest that pure Hg mineral phases do not form in the sediments, that HgT and MeHg adsorption onto authigenic Fe oxyhydroxides occurs in minor proportions, and that the association of HgT and MeHg to Fe sulfide phases or sulfidized organic matter is possible. Assuming that the net consumption of MeHg in the porewaters was essentially due to demethylation, an apparent first-order rate constant for MeHg demethylation of 0.04-0.8 d-1 was

  16. Distribution and sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in intertidal flat surface sediments from the Yangtze estuary, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Hou, L. J.; Yang, Y.; Zou, H.; Lu, J.; Wang, X.

    2001-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in surface sediments taken from intertidal flats in the Yangtze estuary and adjacent coastal areas were determined by GC-MS. The results have shown that total PAH concentration ranged from 0.263-6.372 mg/kg in tidal flat surface sediments from the study area. Mean concentration level is 1.662 mg/kg. The concentration levels of total PAHs varied dramatically with in the region. They are characteristically at maximum near sewage discharge points. Petroleum-derived contamination may be a dominant source in the study area based on the distributions of Flu/Pyr and two and three-ringed and four-ringed congeners in surface sediments. A pyrolytic origin was responsible for higher PAH concentration levels at three sampling sites. The degree of sediment contamination by PAHs in the study area is low to moderate in comparison with other estuarine and tidal flat surface sediments elsewhere. However, anthracene and fluorene exceed the effects of low range (ER-L) values, showing a primary potential impact for the Yangtze estuarine tidal flat ecosystem.

  17. Remediation of muddy tidal flat sediments using hot air-dried crushed oyster shells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tamiji; Kondo, Shunsuke; Kim, Kyung-Hoi; Asaoka, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Hironori; Tokuoka, Makoto; Hibino, Tadashi

    2012-11-01

    In order to prove that hot air-dried crushed oyster shells (HACOS) are effective in reducing hydrogen sulfide in muddy tidal flat sediments and increasing the biomass, field experiments were carried out. The concentration of hydrogen sulfide in the interstitial water, which was 16 mg SL(-1) before the application of HACOS, decreased sharply and maintained almost zero in the experimental sites (HACOS application sites) for one year, whereas it was remained at ca. 5 mg SL(-1) in the control sites. The number of macrobenthos individuals increased to 2-4.5 times higher than that in the control site. Using a simple numerical model, the effective periods for suppression of hydrogen sulfide were estimated to be 3.2-7.6 and 6.4-15.2 years for the experimental sites with 4 and 8 tons per 10 × 10 × 0.2m area, respectively. From these results, it is concluded that HACOS is an effective material to remediate muddy tidal flats.

  18. Effects of infauna harvesting on tidal flats of a coastal lagoon (Ria Formosa, Portugal): implications on phosphorus dynamics.

    PubMed

    Falcão, M; Caetano, M; Serpa, D; Gaspar, M; Vale, C

    2006-03-01

    The systematic collection of benthic organisms in tidal flats of coastal lagoons should be taken into account for the management of these systems, once sediment disturbance affects biogeochemical processes by favouring pore water renewal during tidal inundation. The objective of the present work was to evaluate the effects of infauna harvesting on the phosphorus dynamics of muddy and sandy intertidal areas in the Ria Formosa. Sediment cores and overlying water were collected during August 2000 and February 2001 from reworked and undisturbed sediment before and after flooding. Results obtained showed that during the first minutes of flooding there was a marked decrease of phosphate in pore water of disturbed sediments. However, phosphate tidal fluxes from sandy sediment were clearly higher (17 nmol cm(-2) d(-1) in summer and 3 nmol cm(-2) d(-1) in winter) than in muddy sediment (0.4 nmol cm(-2) d(-1) in summer and -0.01 nmol cm(-2) d(-1) in winter). After muddy sediment disturbance concentrations of iron oxides increased quickly (from 5 to 16 micromol g(-1)) and phosphate was sorbed onto these iron oxides, resulting in a buffering of phosphate pore water concentrations at low values in the oxidized sediment zone. The estimated P-output from muddy sediment decreased one to two orders of magnitude after sediment disturbance in contrast to sandy sediments in which the impact of infauna harvesting was minimal. Consequently, the P-cycle is influenced by the disruption of muddy habitats in tide-driven systems. Such information could be useful for the management of the lagoon.

  19. Surface sedimentation and sediment property of 2014~2015 years on the Dongho open-coast intertidal flat, Gochang coast of southwestern Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryang, Woo Hun; Kang, Na Yeong; Kang, Sol Ip

    2016-04-01

    The Dongho intertidal flat, located on the southwestern coast of Korea, is macro-tide, open-coast, linear shoreline, and sand substrates. In the Dongho intertidal flat, this study has focused on characteristics of surface sedimentation and sediment properties during 2014~2015 years. Can cores (30×17×5 cm3) were sampled at 4 sites with 150 m interval from shoreline to lower intertidal area during the 6 seasons from spring (June) in 2014 to summer (Aug.) in 2015. The 24 can cores of the intertidal flat were analyzed for sediment texture, porosity, wet density, grain density, and shear strength at 2, 10, and 25 cm parts from the top. Sediment type is mostly sand (S) facies of the Folk scheme, and mean grain size and skewness of the sediments are 0.93~2.70 ϕ and -0.50~0.41, respectively. Sediment properties show porosity of 9~32%, wet density of 1.88~2.45 g/cm3, grain density of 2.62~3.09 g/cm3, and shear strength of 8~64 kPa. The cancore peels represent planar and inclined stratification and bioturbated faintly stratification with some shell fragments. The stratification weaken from the shoreline to the lower intertidal site. This is indicative of waning influences of sea wave in the Dongho intertidal flat. Keywords: macro-tide, open-coast, can core, intertidal flat, Gochang coast Acknowledgements: This study was supported by the research grant from the Korean Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries (PJT200538). This presentation is an interim result of the coastal research program in the study area.

  20. Nutrient dynamics in mangrove crab burrow sediments subjected to anthropogenic input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mchenga, Islam S. S.; Tsuchiya, Makoto

    2008-02-01

    Bioturbation by burrowing macroinvertebrates has a major impact on sediment properties, pollutant redistribution, and biogeochemical cycling. We assessed the impact of bioturbation on the nutrient dynamics and organic matter of sediments receiving anthropogenic inputs in the Manko wetland, located in southern Okinawa, Japan. We compared sediments that were and were not subjected to the activities of the tidal-flat crab Helice formosensis. The fatty acid composition of sediments indicated that different sources contributed to the organic matter profile. Agricultural and domestic waste discharge seemed to induce a high amount of green macroalgae and bacteria in the tidal flat. Sediments without crabs exhibited 2.1-2.4× more NH 4-N release, which was associated with a low C/N ratio during the summer. In the crab burrow sediments, NO 3-N concentrations were 1.4-1.9× more pronounced during winter. A significant correlation existed between NO 3-N and NO 2-N concentrations in sediments of the burrow chamber (r = 0.837, p < 0.02) and the mixed zone of burrow opening shaft and chamber (r = 0.885, p < 0.01). We suggest that burrow wall sediments provide ideal conditions for nitrate reduction (denitrification). H. formosensis thus contributes to balancing the effects of anthropogenic inputs by removing nitrogen loads in sediments.

  1. Numerical Experiments on Sediment Pulse Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, J. A.; Nelson, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    Local channel morphology is highly dependent on sediment supply from upstream reaches. Sediment pulses are introduced to channels during natural and anthropogenic disturbances such as landslides, dam removal, or gravel augmentation. Flume studies have shown that sediment pulses tend to evolve through some combination of translation and dispersion, but the relative importance of the sediment pulse size, the grain size of the pulse material, flow unsteadiness, and channel nonuniformity is poorly understood. Here we use a one-dimensional morphodynamic model to simulate the evolution of various sediment pulses in a straight, rectangular channel. The model is capable of determining transcritical flows, using the energy equation for subcritical nodes and a reduced momentum equation for supercritical nodes. Bed evolution and grain size sorting are handled with the mixed-grain-size Exner equation for sediment continuity. A stratigraphy submodel allows the vertical grain size distribution created during deposition to provide feedbacks on morphodynamic processes encountered during degradation. We explore how pulse characteristics such as total mass, feed timing, and grain size distribution affect pulse translation and dispersion. We also consider the influence of steady versus unsteady water discharge and the existence of background sediment feed. Finally, we examine the effect of variations in channel width by varying the amplitude and wavelength of downstream sinusoidal width undulations. Preliminary results suggest that smaller sediment pulses experience a greater degree of translation than larger pulses. Width variations, particularly those of larger amplitudes, were found to result in increased pulse dispersion. Our results suggest that morphodynamic models can facilitate understanding of what controls sediment pulse dynamics, and they may improve predictions and the potential effectiveness of river restoration techniques such as dam removal and gravel augmentation.

  2. Cultivable bacteria from bulk water, aggregates, and surface sediments of a tidal flat ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Heike; Simon, Meinhard; Brinkhoff, Thorsten

    2009-04-01

    Most-probable-number (MPN) dilution series were used to enumerate and isolate bacteria from bulk water, suspended aggregates, the oxic layer, and the oxic-anoxic transition zone of the sediment of a tidal flat ecosystem in the southern North Sea. The heterotrophic aerobic bacteria were able to grow on agar-agar, alginate, cellulose, chitin, dried and ground Fucus vesiculosus, Marine Broth 2216, palmitate, and starch. MPN counts of bulk water and aggregate samples ranged between 0.18 × 101 and 1.1 × 106 cells per milliliter and those of the sediment surface and the transition zone between 0.8 × 101 and 5.1 × 107 cells per gram dry weight. Marine Broth and F. vesiculosus yielded the highest values of all substrates tested and corresponded to 2.3-32% of 4,6-diamidinophenyl indole cell counts. Strains of seven phylogenetic classes were obtained: Actinobacteria, Bacilli, α- and γ-Proteobacteria, Sphingobacteria, Flavobacteria, and Planctomycetacia. Only with agar-agar as substrate could organisms of all seven classes be isolated.

  3. Random Forest Classification of Sediments on Exposed Intertidal Flats Using ALOS-2 Quad-Polarimetric SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Yang, X.; Liu, G.; Zhou, H.; Ma, W.; Yu, Y.; Li, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Coastal zones are one of the world's most densely populated areas and it is necessary to propose an accurate, cost effective, frequent, and synoptic method of monitoring these complex ecosystems. However, misclassification of sediments on exposed intertidal flats restricts the development of coastal zones surveillance. With the advent of SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) satellites, polarimetric SAR satellite imagery plays an increasingly important role in monitoring changes in coastal wetland. This research investigated the necessity of combining SAR polarimetric features with optical data, and their contribution in accurately sediment classification. Three experimental groups were set to make assessment of the most appropriate descriptors. (i) Several SAR polarimetric descriptors were extracted from scattering matrix using Cloude-Pottier, Freeman-Durden and Yamaguchi methods; (ii) Optical remote sensing (RS) data with R, G and B channels formed the second feature combinations; (iii) The chosen SAR and optical RS indicators were both added into classifier. Classification was carried out using Random Forest (RF) classifiers and a general result mapping of intertidal flats was generated. Experiments were implemented using ALOS-2 L-band satellite imagery and GF-1 optical multi-spectral data acquired in the same period. The weights of descriptors were evaluated by VI (RF Variable Importance). Results suggested that optical data source has few advantages on sediment classification, and even reduce the effect of SAR indicators. Polarimetric SAR feature sets show great potentials in intertidal flats classification and are promising in classifying mud flats, sand flats, bare farmland and tidal water.

  4. Short-term measurements of exposure and inundation of sediment areas in a tide-less wind flat system at the Southern Baltic Sea coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karsten, U.; Baudler, H.; Himmel, B.; Jaskulke, R.; Ewald, H.; Schumann, R.

    2012-12-01

    Wind flats are typical coastal landscape elements of the tide-less Southern Baltic Sea. These sediment areas exhibit an irregular and unpredictable pattern of emersion and flooding as a function of the prevailing wind direction and speed. Consequently, wind flats represent very specific and unique coastal habitats that, however, are ecologically poorly understood. The irregular and unpredictable water level fluctuations cause strong physico-chemical gradients which favour the development of laminated microbial mats. These micro-ecosystems accumulate organic material, enrich the sediment with nutrients and reduce erosion of sand particles. In the present study we developed a new autonomous measuring device for precise water level changes and recorded for the first time under in-situ conditions the irregular flooding events of the wind flat Bock (Zingst Peninsula, German Baltic Sea coast). The measured water level changes were compared and correlated with the closest gauging station and the prevailing wind conditions (direction, speed) to better understand the effects of hydrology and meteorology on duration and intensity of inundation. From the 12 measuring periods of over 2.5 years we noted that about half of the time the wind flat was fully exposed and dry, and the other half at least wet with < 1 cm water levels. The strongest flooding of up to 20 and 50 cm water height was a relatively rare event, which, however, depended on wind speed and direction, i.e. wind speed above 8 m s- 1 from north to northeast direction. The undertaken measurements on exposure and inundation intervals of this unique sedimentary ecosystem describe well the wind-driven high dynamics and strong gradients in the environmental parameters, and explain well the abundant occurrence of microbial mats in wind flats.

  5. Contaminated sediment dynamics in peatland headwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuttleworth, Emma; Clay, Gareth; Evans, Martin; Hutchinson, Simon; Rothwell, James

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands are an important store of soil carbon, provide multiple ecosystem services, and when located in close proximity to urban and industrial areas, can also act as sinks of atmospherically deposited heavy metals. The near-surface layer of the blanket peats of the Peak District National Park, UK, is severely contaminated with high concentrations of anthropogenically derived, atmospherically deposited lead (Pb). These peats are severely degraded, and there is increasing concern that erosion is releasing considerable quantities of this legacy pollution into surface waters. Despite substantial research into Pb dynamics in peatlands formal description of the possible mechanisms of contaminated sediment mobilisation is limited. However, there is evidence to suggest that a substantial proportion of contaminated surface sediment may be redistributed elsewhere in the catchment. This study uses the Pb contamination stored near the peat's surface as a fingerprint to trace contaminated sediment dynamics and storage in three severely degraded headwater catchments. Erosion is exposing high concentrations of Pb on interfluve surfaces, and substantial amounts of reworked contaminated material are stored on other catchment surfaces (gully walls and floors). We propose a variety of mechanisms as controls of Pb release and storage on the different surfaces, including: (i) wind action on interfluves; (ii) the aspect of gully walls, and (iii) gully depth. Vegetation also plays an important role in retaining contaminated sediment on all surfaces.

  6. Zooshikella ganghwensis gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from tidal flat sediments.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hana; Chang, Young-Hyo; Oh, Hyun Woo; Bae, Kyung Sook; Chun, Jongsik

    2003-07-01

    Two red pigment-producing bacterial strains with a metallic green sheen were isolated from a sediment sample of getbol, the Korean tidal flat. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequences showed that these isolates represent a phyletic lineage within the gamma-Proteobacteria that is distantly related to the genus Hahella. No bacterial species with validly published names showed > or = 92% 16S rRNA similarity with the getbol isolates. The strains were gram-negative, chemo-organotrophic, aerobic and required NaCl (1-7%) for growth. They produced pigments with maximum absorption at 540 nm, which indicated the presence of prodigiosin, a well-known red pigment previously detected in Serratia marcescens. The major isoprenoid quinone was ubiquinone-9. The predominant cellular fatty acids were saturated and monounsaturated straight-chain fatty acids. The DNA G + C contents ranged from 40 to 42 mol%. The combination of physiological, biochemical and chemotaxonomic data clearly separated the test strains from other phylogenetically related genera in the gamma-Proteobacteria. On the basis of polyphasic evidence from this study, it is proposed that the two getbol isolates should be classified in a novel genus, Zooshikella gen. nov., as Zooshikella ganghwensis sp. nov.

  7. Residues of organochlorine pesticides in intertidal flat surface sediments from coastal zone of Jiangsu Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiumei; Zheng, Rong; Zhao, Jiale; Ma, Chao; Gao, Xiaojiang

    2014-09-01

    Sixteen surface sediment samples were collected and analysed to evaluate the residues of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) from intertidal flat in Jiangsu Province. Overall, 22 OCPs were detected with total concentrations of OCPs ranging widely from 0.96 to 12.14 ng/g (dry wt). Total hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) and total dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) levels varied from <0.01 to 0.67 ng/g and from 0.23 to 4.85 ng/g, respectively. DDTs were the predominant compounds. The dominance of β-HCH indicated a history of HCH pollution. According to the ratios of ( p, p'-DDD+ p, p'-DDE)/ p, p'-DDT and o,p'-DDT/ p, p'-DDT, new input of DDTs did not occur in most sites, and the main sources were historical usage of technical DDTs. OCPs such as dieldrin, endrin, p, p'-DDD, and p, p'-DDT exceeded the effects range low, showing adverse biological effects that would occasionally occur at some sites of the study area.

  8. Bacillus gaemokensis sp. nov., isolated from foreshore tidal flat sediment from the Yellow Sea.

    PubMed

    Jung, Min Young; Jung, Min-Young; Paek, Woon Kee; Park, In-Soon; Han, Jeong-Ran; Sin, Yeseul; Paek, Jayoung; Rhee, Moon-Soo; Kim, Hongik; Song, Hong Seok; Chang, Young-Hyo

    2010-12-01

    A Gram-positive, rod-shaped, endospore-forming organism, strain BL3-6(T), was isolated from tidal flat sediments of the Yellow Sea in the region of Tae-An. A 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis demonstrated that this isolate belongs to the Bacillus cereus group, and is closely related to Bacillus mycoides (99.0% similarity), Bacillus thuringiensis (99.0%), Bacillus weihenstephanensis (99.0%), Bacillus cereus (98.9%), Bacillus anthracis (98.8%), and Bacillus pseudomycoides (98.1%). The phylogenetic distance from any validly described Bacillus species outside the Bacillus cereus group was less than 95.6%. The DNA G+C content of the strain was 39.4 mol% and the major respiratory quinone was menaquinone-7. The major cellular fatty acids were iso-C(14:0) (17.8%), iso-C(16:0) (15.8%), and iso-C(12:0) (11.3%). The diagnostic amino acid of the cell wall was meso-diaminopimelic acid and the major cell wall sugar was galactose. The results of DNA-DNA hybridization (<55.6%) and physiological and biochemical tests allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of strain BL3-6(T) from the published Bacillus species. BL3-6(T) therefore represents a new species, for which the name Bacillus gaemokensis sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain BL3-6(T) (=KCTC 13318(T) =JCM 15801(T)).

  9. Remobilization of Metals from Tidal Flats of the Changjiang (the Yangtze River) Estuary during Simulated Sediment Resuspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurina, I.; Pradhan, S. U.; Qu, J.; Zhu, Q.; Zhang, J.

    2016-02-01

    In rivers which endured extensive damming, as the Changjiang has, changes in suspended material concentration and transformations of the estuarine environments from depositional to erosional are expected to occur. This can result in serious environmental degradation since it allows reintroduction of sediment bound chemicals (e.g. trace metals, organic pollutants…) into the water column. To assess whether the sediments deposited within the Changjiang estuary can become a significant pollution source, this study investigates remobilization of potentially toxic metals during simulated resuspension of surface sediments from the river mouth tidal flats (Fig. 1). Experiments were carried out with river water as extracting agent. The sedimentological and geochemical characteristics of the deposits (grain size, metals concentrations in labile sediment phases, etc.), and their surface physico-chemical properties (SSA and CEC) were determined. The results revealed that adsorption/desorption behavior of metals during sediment resuspension is somewhat site-dependent. Only for Mn, Cu and Co continuous increase in concentrations was observed regardless of the sampling station, whereas behavior of Fe, Ni, Zn, Cr, Pb and Cd varied. Pronounced release of metals was observed during the resuspension of sediments with high content of fine grained particles and high concentrations of labile phase metals, e.g. MTB station (Fig. 2). Elevated concentrations of dissolved Fe and Mn under oxic conditions indicate their presence in colloidal form. The behavior of Pb, Cr, Zn and Cd follows the behavior of Fe, thus also indicating release of metals in the form of colloid complexes. Continuous release of Cd and Ni into the dissolved phase was observed at HPRM station, indicating possible enrichment of sediments with these metals. The results otherwise indicate that resuspension of the Changjiang estuary tidal flats sediments does not result in significant release of metals into the water

  10. Flat bands, Dirac cones, and atom dynamics in an optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Apaja, V.; Hyrkaes, M.; Manninen, M.

    2010-10-15

    We study atoms trapped with a harmonic confinement in an optical lattice characterized by a flat band and Dirac cones. We show that such an optical lattice can be constructed which can be accurately described with the tight-binding or Hubbard models. In the case of fermions the release of the harmonic confinement removes fast atoms occupying the Dirac cones while those occupying the flat band remain immobile. Using exact diagonalization and dynamics we demonstrate that a similar strong occupation of the flat band does not happen in the bosonic case and furthermore that the mean-field model is not capable of describing the dynamics of the boson cloud.

  11. Selection via flatness as a dynamical effect in evolution models with finite population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saakian, David B.; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2010-07-01

    We investigate the phenomenon of selection via flatness. In the static case, the finiteness of the population does not seriously influence the increase of mean fitness of population due to flatness around a peak. The effect is proportional to 1/L , where L is the genome length. We investigated the two peak model (high peak and a flat peak). We find that the selection of flatness for long genome lengths occurs as a dynamic phenomenon in the case of evolution with small populations. We found that two factors are crucial to define the role of flatness: special initial distribution (the population is located at centers of peaks) allows flat peak to attract more population, and the large value of mutations per population per virus life cycle sometimes also increases the role of flatness. We suggested simple criteria to identify the phenomenon of dynamical arresting of population around flat peak by experiment. We infer that selection via robustness is possible in evolution as a nonequilibrium phenomenon.

  12. Selection via flatness as a dynamical effect in evolution models with finite population.

    PubMed

    Saakian, David B; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2010-07-01

    We investigate the phenomenon of selection via flatness. In the static case, the finiteness of the population does not seriously influence the increase of mean fitness of population due to flatness around a peak. The effect is proportional to 1/square root(L), where L is the genome length. We investigated the two peak model (high peak and a flat peak). We find that the selection of flatness for long genome lengths occurs as a dynamic phenomenon in the case of evolution with small populations. We found that two factors are crucial to define the role of flatness: special initial distribution (the population is located at centers of peaks) allows flat peak to attract more population, and the large value of mutations per population per virus life cycle sometimes also increases the role of flatness. We suggested simple criteria to identify the phenomenon of dynamical arresting of population around flat peak by experiment. We infer that selection via robustness is possible in evolution as a nonequilibrium phenomenon.

  13. A dynamic simulation of a flat-plate collector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annino, A.

    1983-04-01

    A numerical model for the performance of a flat plate solar collector array is presented, with account taken of thermal transients and calculation on a microcomputer. The system modeled consists of a flat plate array, the heat transfer fluid, an insulated storage tank, an exchange loop for heating a secondary fluid, and a load maintained by a pump. The one-dimensional analysis includes equations for the energy balances, with consideration given to heat losses to the outside. A function is defined for the total incident solar radiation, and behavior is simulated over the entire 24-hr day, weighted by the highest and lowest recorded temperatures. Good agreement has been found with experimental data.

  14. Effects of Emergent Vegetation on Sediment Dynamics within a Retreating Coastal Marshland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stellern, C.; Grossman, E.; Fuller, R.; Wallin, D.; Linneman, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Coastal emergent vegetation in estuaries physically interrupts flow within the water column, reduces wave energy and increases sediment deposition. Previous workers conclude that wave attenuation rates decrease exponentially with distance from the marsh edge and are dependent on site and species-specific plant characteristics (Yang et al., 2011). Sediment deposition may exhibit similar patterns; however, sediment, geomorphic and habitat models seldom integrate site-specific biophysical plant parameters into change analyses. We paired vegetation and sediment dynamic studies to: (1) characterize vegetation structure, (2) estimate sediment available for deposition, (3) estimate rate, distribution and composition of sediment deposits, (4) determine sediment accumulation on vegetation, (5) compare sediment deposition within dense tidal wetland relative to non-vegetated tidal flat. These studies integrate a variety of monitoring methods, including the use of sediment traps, turbidity sensors, side-on photographs of vegetation and remote sensing image analysis. We compared sedimentation data with vegetation characteristics and spatial distribution data to examine the relative role of vegetation morphologic traits (species, stem density, biomass, distribution, tidal channels, etc.) on sediment dynamics. Our study is focused on Port Susan Bay of Washington State; a protected delta that has experienced up to 1 kilometer of marsh retreat (loss) over the past fifty years. Preliminary results show that the highest winter deposition occurred in the high marsh/mid-marsh boundary, up to 300m inland of the marsh edge, where bulrush species are most dense. These results will inform restoration efforts aimed at reestablishing sediment supply to the retreating marshland. This research is necessary to understand the vulnerability and adaptability of coastal marshlands to climate change related stressors such as, increased water levels (sea-level rise) and wave energy.

  15. Carbon, nutrient and trace metal cycling in sandy sediments: A comparison of high-energy beaches and backbarrier tidal flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckhardt, Anja; Beck, Melanie; Seidel, Michael; Riedel, Thomas; Wehrmann, Achim; Bartholomä, Alexander; Schnetger, Bernhard; Dittmar, Thorsten; Brumsack, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    In order to evaluate the importance of coastal sandy sediments and their contribution to carbon, nutrient and metal cycling we investigated two beach sites on Spiekeroog Island, southern North Sea, Germany, and a tidal flat margin, located in Spiekeroog's backbarrier area. We also analyzed seawater and fresh groundwater on Spiekeroog Island, to better define endmember concentrations, which influence our study sites. Intertidal sandy flats and beaches are characterized by pore water advection. Seawater enters the sediment during flood and pore water drains out during ebb and at low tide. This pore water circulation leads to continuous supply of fresh organic substrate to the sediments. Remineralization products of microbial degradation processes, i.e. nutrients, and dissolved trace metals from the reduction of particulate metal oxides, are enriched in the pore water compared to open seawater concentrations. The spatial distribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), nutrients (PO43-, NO3-, NO2-, NH4+, Si(OH)4 and total alkalinity), trace metals (dissolved Fe and Mn) as well as sulfate suggests that the exposed beach sites are subject to relatively fast pore water advection, which leads to organic matter and oxygen replenishment. Frequent pore water exchange further leads to comparatively low nutrient concentrations. Sulfate reduction does not appear to play a major role during organic matter degradation. High nitrate concentrations indicate that redox conditions are oxic within the duneward freshwater influenced section, while ammonification, denitrification, manganese and iron reduction seem to prevail in the ammonium-dominated seawater circulation zone. In contrast, the sheltered tidal flat margin site exhibits a different sedimentology (coarser beach sands versus finer tidal flat sands) and nutrients, dissolved manganese and DOC accumulate in the pore water. Ammonium is the dominant pore water nitrogen species and intense sulfate reduction leads to the formation

  16. Documenting Fine-Sediment Import and Export for Two Contrasting Mesotidal Flats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    muds, no thick or extensive mud deposits have been found buried within the tidal flats. Thin (~1-2 cm) lamine are found in vibracores (Fig. 3), and...studies (by Ogston), tidal reworking of the flat is documented to resuspend regularly the upper 2-3 cm of the flat surface and consequently wash out most...projects. Those studying the seabed incorporate radiochemical and textural data to document the processes (e.g., physical reworking , bioturbation

  17. Bathymetric and sediment facies maps for China Bend and Marcus Flats, Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Washington, 2008 and 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weakland, Rhonda J.; Fosness, Ryan L.; Williams, Marshall L.; Barton, Gary J.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) created bathymetric and sediment facies maps for portions of two reaches of Lake Roosevelt in support of an interdisciplinary study of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and their habitat areas within Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Washington. In October 2008, scientists from the USGS used a boat-mounted multibeam echo sounder (MBES) to describe bathymetric data to characterize surface relief at China Bend and Marcus Flats, between Northport and Kettle Falls, Washington. In March 2009, an underwater video camera was used to view and record sediment facies that were then characterized by sediment type, grain size, and areas of sand deposition. Smelter slag has been identified as having the characteristics of sand-sized black particles; the two non-invasive surveys attempted to identify areas containing black-colored particulate matter that may be elements and minerals, organic material, or slag. The white sturgeon population in Lake Roosevelt is threatened by the failure of natural recruitment, resulting in a native population that consists primarily of aging fish and that is gradually declining as fish die and are not replaced by nonhatchery reared juvenile fish. These fish spawn and rear in the riverine and upper reservoir reaches where smelter slag is present in the sediment of the river lake bed. Effects of slag on the white sturgeon population in Lake Roosevelt are largely unknown. Two recent studies demonstrated that copper and other metals are mobilized from slag in aqueous environments with concentrations of copper and zinc in bed sediments reaching levels of 10,000 and 30,000 mg/kg due to the presence of smelter slag. Copper was found to be highly toxic to 30-day-old white sturgeon with 96-h LC50 concentrations ranging from 3 to 5 (u or mu)g copper per liter. Older juvenile and adult sturgeons commonly ingest substantial amounts of sediment while foraging. Future study efforts in Lake Roosevelt should include sampling of

  18. Effects of watershed land-cover on the biogeochemical properties of estuarine tidal flat sediments: A test in a densely-populated subtropical island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Akiko; Touyama, Shouji; Kuwae, Tomohiro; Nishimura, Osamu; Sakamaki, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    The effects of watershed land cover on the biogeochemical properties of estuarine tidal flat sediment were examined in estuarine tidal flats of 16 watersheds in a densely populated, subtropical island of Japan. Despite the small sizes of the watersheds (<16.5 km2), a redundancy analysis showed that river water quality explained 62% of the cross-estuary variation in the biogeochemical properties of estuarine tidal flat sediment by the first two ordination axes. We also found that the dissolved nutrient concentrations of river water and pheophytin a content of tidal flat sediment were positively related to agricultural and urbanized land cover in the watersheds. These results indicate that human nutrient inputs significantly increase algae-derived deposits in estuaries with relatively more developed watersheds. The δ13C of particulate organic matter (POM) was negatively related to watershed forest cover. This suggests that terrestrially derived-origin POM deposits are substantial in the estuaries connected to watersheds with relatively high forest cover. However, the chemical properties of tidal flat sediment were not related to chemical indicators of POM in the base flow. We hypothesize that substantial terrestrially derived POM is discharged to estuaries of high-forest-cover watersheds during high flow, and this partially controls the chemical properties of estuarine sediments. Our results demonstrate that the chemical properties of estuarine tidal flats are associated with watershed land cover, and that the dominant processes controlling estuarine sediment properties differ among watersheds depending on land cover composition.

  19. Sediment dynamics and sources in a grazed hardwood rangeland watershed

    Treesearch

    Melvin R. George; Neil K. McDougald; Kenneth W. Tate; Royce Larsen

    2002-01-01

    From 1994 to 1998 we documented sediment transport dynamics and sources in a 137 ha grazed hardwood rangeland watershed on granitic soils at the San Joaquin Experimental Range in Madera County. Sediment transport for this watershed was determined by measuring total suspended solids, bedload and flow at an H-flume installed in 1994. Sediment movement as bedload is the...

  20. Colonization dynamics of ciliate morphotypes modified by shifting sandy sediments.

    PubMed

    Risse-Buhl, Ute; Felsmann, Katja; Mutz, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Sandy stream-bed sediments colonized by a diverse ciliate community are subject to various disturbance regimes. In microcosms, we investigated the effect of sediment shifting on the colonization dynamics of 3 ciliate morphotypes differing in morphology, behavior and feeding strategy. The dynamics of the ciliate morphotypes inhabiting sediment pore water and overlying water were observed at 3 sediment shifting frequencies: (1) stable sediments, (2) periodically shifting sediments such as migrating ripples, and (3) continuously shifting sediments as occurring during scour events of the uppermost sediment. Sediment shifting significantly affected the abundance and growth rate of the ciliate morphotypes. The free-swimming filter feeder Dexiostoma campylum was vulnerable to washout by sediment shifting since significantly higher numbers occurred in the overlying water than in pore water. Abundance of D. campylum only increased in pore water of stable sediments. On the contrary, the vagile grasper feeder Chilodonella uncinata and the sessile filter feeder Vorticella convallaria had positive growth rates and successfully colonized sediments that shifted periodically and continuously. Thus, the spatio-temporal pattern of sediment dynamics acts as an essential factor of impact on the structure, distribution and function of ciliate communities in sand-bed streams. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. The dynamic structure of a flat small intestinal mucosa studied on the explanted rat jejunum.

    PubMed

    Loehry, C A; Grace, R

    1974-04-01

    Small pieces of jejunum with an intact blood supply were explanted to the anterior abdominal wall in rats. Six weeks after explantation the mucosa appeared totally flat in many areas, both histologically and under the dissecting microscope. The structure of the flattened mucosa was shown to be identical to that in coeliac disease with hypertrophied intervillous ridges. A dynamic study with tritium-labelled thymidine demonstrated a considerably increased turnover in the flat mucosa with some disorganization of cell production and migration.

  2. A model for sedimentation in inhomogeneous media. I. Dynamic density gradients from sedimenting co-solutes.

    PubMed

    Schuck, Peter

    2004-03-01

    Macromolecular sedimentation in inhomogeneous media is of great practical importance. Dynamic density gradients have a long tradition in analytical ultracentrifugation, and are frequently used in preparative ultracentrifugation. In this paper, a new theoretical model for sedimentation in inhomogeneous media is presented, based on finite element solutions of the Lamm equation with spatial and temporal variation of the local solvent density and viscosity. It is applied to macromolecular sedimentation in the presence of a dynamic density gradient formed by the sedimentation of a co-solute at high concentration. It is implemented in the software SEDFIT for the analysis of experimental macromolecular concentration distributions. The model agrees well with the measured sedimentation profiles of a protein in a dynamic cesium chloride gradient, and may provide a measure for the effects of hydration or preferential solvation parameters. General features of protein sedimentation in dynamic density gradients are described.

  3. Characterizing Seismic Anisotropy across the Peruvian Flat-Slab Subduction Zone: Implications for the Dynamics of Flat-Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakin, Caroline; Long, Maureen; Beck, Susan; Wagner, Lara; Tavera, Hernando

    2014-05-01

    -slab anisotropy beneath all stations. Splitting is however is weakest and nulls most prevalent above the incoming Nazca Ridge where the slab is at its most shallow. This suggests the main source for the local S anisotropy may be from a thin mantle wedge layer sandwiched between the slab and upper plate. The deepest local S events sample a large volume of dipping slab material and provide increasing evidence for distinct anisotropy within the subducting slab itself that has fast polarizations parallel to the slab strike. Our detailed shear wave splitting study therefore reveals the presence of complex and multi-layered anisotropy across the Peruvian flat-slab region. We are able to characterize different sources of anisotropy in the sub-slab mantle, slab, asthenospheric wedge and the over-riding plate, each with their own implications for the regional subduction dynamics.

  4. Temperature dependent droplet impact dynamics on flat and textured surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Azar Alizadeh; Vaibhav Bahadur; Sheng Zhong; Wen Shang; Ri Li; James Ruud; Masako Yamada; Liehi Ge; Ali Dhinojwala; Manohar S Sohal

    2012-03-01

    Droplet impact dynamics determines the performance of surfaces used in many applications such as anti-icing, condensation, boiling and heat transfer. We study impact dynamics of water droplets on surfaces with chemistry/texture ranging from hydrophilic to superhydrophobic and across a temperature range spanning below freezing to near boiling conditions. Droplet retraction shows very strong temperature dependence especially for hydrophilic surfaces; it is seen that lower substrate temperatures lead to lesser retraction. Physics-based analyses show that the increased viscosity associated with lower temperatures can explain the decreased retraction. The present findings serve to guide further studies of dynamic fluid-structure interaction at various temperatures.

  5. Temporal artifacts in flat dynamic x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overdick, Michael; Solf, Torsten; Wischmann, Hans-Aloys

    2001-06-01

    Flat X-ray detectors based on CsI:Tl scintillators and amorphous silicon photodiodes are known to exhibit temporal artefacts (ghost images) which decay over time. Previously, these temporal artefacts have been attributed mainly to residual signals from the amorphous silicon photodiodes. More detailed experiments presented here show that a second class of effects, the so-called gain effects, also contributes significantly to the observed temporal artefacts. Both the residual signals and the photodiode gain effect have been characterized under various exposure conditions in the study presented here. The results of the experiments quantitatively show the decay of the temporal artefacts. Additionally, the influence of the detector's reset light on both effects in the photodiode has been studied in detail. The data from the measurements is interpreted based on a simple trapping model which suggests a strong link between the photodiode residual signals and the photodiode gain effect. For the residual signal effect a possible correction scheme is described. Furthermore, the relevance of the remaining temporal artefacts for the applications is briefly discussed for both the photodiode residual signals and the photodiode gain effect.

  6. Temperature dependent droplet impact dynamics on flat and textured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, Azar; Bahadur, Vaibhav; Zhong, Sheng; Shang, Wen; Li, Ri; Ruud, James; Yamada, Masako; Ge, Liehui; Dhinojwala, Ali; Sohal, Manohar

    2012-03-01

    Droplet impact dynamics determines the performance of surfaces used in many applications such as anti-icing, condensation, boiling, and heat transfer. We study impact dynamics of water droplets on surfaces with chemistry/texture ranging from hydrophilic to superhydrophobic and across a temperature range spanning below freezing to near boiling conditions. Droplet retraction shows very strong temperature dependence especially on hydrophilic surfaces; it is seen that lower substrate temperatures lead to lesser retraction. Physics-based analyses show that the increased viscosity associated with lower temperatures combined with an increased work of adhesion can explain the decreased retraction. The present findings serve as a starting point to guide further studies of dynamic fluid-surface interaction at various temperatures.

  7. Diverse metal reduction and nano- mineral formation by metal-reducing bacteria enriched from inter-tidal flat sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Park, B.; Seo, H.; Roh, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria utilize diverse metal oxides as electron acceptors and couple this microbial metal reduciton to growth. However, the microbe-metal interactions playing important roles in the metal geochemistry and organic matter degradation in the tidal flat sediments have not been uncovered enough to employ in various environmental and industrial applications. The objective of this study was to examine biomineralization and bioremediation by the facultative metal-reducing bacteria isolated from the inter-tidal flat sediments in southwestern of Korea. 16S-rRNA analysis showed bacterial consortium mainly consists of genus of Clostridium sp. The enriched bacteria were capable of reducing diverse metals such as iron oxide, maganese oxide, Cr(VI) and Se(VI) during glucose fermentation process at room temperature. The bacteria reduced highly toxic and reactive elements such as Cr(VI) and Se(VI) to Cr(III) and Se(0). The results showed that microbial processes induced transformation from toxic states of heavy metals to less toxic and mobile states in natural environments. Andthe bacteria also reduced iron oxyhydroxide such as ferrihydrite and akaganeite (β-FeOOH) and formed nanometer-sized magnetite (Fe3O4). This study indicates microbial processes not only can be used for bioremediation of inorganic contaminants existing in the marine environments, but also form the magnetite nanoparticles which are exhibit superparamagnetic properties that can be useful for relevant medical and industrial applications.

  8. Documenting Fine-Sediment Import and Export for Two Contrasting Mesotidal Flats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    reworking , bioturbation) impacting seabed characteristics. Researchers analyzing boundary- layer processes also utilize these data to determine...PUBLICATIONS Boldt, K., Nittrouer, C.,and Ogston, A. (2009) Linking sediment transport processes to laminated seabed deposits in a fine-grained

  9. Differential flatness properties and multivariable adaptive control of ovarian system dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigatos, Gerasimos

    2016-12-01

    The ovarian system exhibits nonlinear dynamics which is modeled by a set of coupled nonlinear differential equations. The paper proposes adaptive fuzzy control based on differential flatness theory for the complex dynamics of the ovarian system. It is proven that the dynamic model of the ovarian system, having as state variables the LH and the FSH hormones and their derivatives, is a differentially flat one. This means that all its state variables and its control inputs can be described as differential functions of the flat output. By exploiting differential flatness properties the system's dynamic model is written in the multivariable linear canonical (Brunovsky) form, for which the design of a state feedback controller becomes possible. After this transformation, the new control inputs of the system contain unknown nonlinear parts, which are identified with the use of neurofuzzy approximators. The learning procedure for these estimators is determined by the requirement the first derivative of the closed-loop's Lyapunov function to be a negative one. Moreover, Lyapunov stability analysis shows that H-infinity tracking performance is succeeded for the feedback control loop and this assures improved robustness to the aforementioned model uncertainty as well as to external perturbations. The efficiency of the proposed adaptive fuzzy control scheme is confirmed through simulation experiments.

  10. Documenting Fine-Sediment Import and Export for Two Contrasting Mesotidal Flats Sediment Flux through the Mekong Tidal River, Delta and Mangrove Shoreline Instrumentation to Support Investigation of Large Tropical Deltas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    scales), and thereby validate localized measurements and numerical models of sediment transport for diverse tidal systems (tidal flats, mangrove forests...likely transported landward from the continental shelf. 3) bathymetry – A simple single-beam depth finder gave good cross-channel bathymetric data...and A.S. Ogston, in preparation, Fluvial sediment dispersal through an insular sea: modern sedimentation associated with the Skagit River delta

  11. Sediment destabilizing and stabilizing bio-engineers on tidal flats: cascading effects of experimental exclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkenborn, Nils; Robertson, Dylan Martin; Reise, Karsten

    2009-03-01

    Bioturbating lugworms ( Arenicola marina) were excluded from 400 m² plots of intertidal sand which initiated sequences of direct and indirect changes in the structure of the benthic community. The sessile, tube-building species Polydora cornuta and Lanice conchilega took advantage of the absence of lugworms and settled preferentially on lugworm exclusion plots. The protruding tubes provided attachment for an ephemeral development of algal tufts ( Berkeleya colonies and Enteromorpha thalli) which in turn enhanced settlement of the juvenile drifting clams Mya arenaria and Macoma balthica. This causal chain of enhanced bivalve settlement in the presence of above-ground structures, like animal tubes and algae, on lugworm exclusion plots occurred in 2 years at different tidal zones with different tube builders, algae and juvenile clams. A significant response of L. conchilega in a year with relatively low lugworm abundances at the entire site suggests that not only the actual absence of large bioturbators was responsible for the establishment of tube-dwelling species, but also a cumulative change of the sediment in exclusion plots since the onset of the experiment. While the sediment on lugworm plots remained permeable, fine particles and organic matter accumulated at exclusion plots. It is suggested that these differences in sediment characteristics were the product of divergent benthic engineering by sediment destabilizing lugworms on control plots and sediment stabilizing species on exclusion plots. Cumulative changes of the sedimentary habitat and cascading effects in the benthic community may explain the persistence of patches that are dominated by either sediment stabilizing or destabilizing species in the assemblage mosaic of intertidal sediments.

  12. Short time dynamics of water coalescence on a flat water pool

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Su Jin; Gim, Bopil; Fezzaa, Kamel; Weon, Byung Mook

    2016-12-01

    Coalescence is an important hydrodynamic event that frequently takes place in nature as well as in industry. Here we provide an experimental study on short time dynamics of water coalescence, particularly when a water droplet comes in contact with a flat water surface, by utilizing high-resolution high-penetration ultrafast X-ray microscopy. Our results demonstrate a possibility that an extreme curvature difference between a drop and a flat surface can significantly modify the hydrodynamics of water coalescence, which is unexpected in the existing theory. We suggest a plausible explanation for why coalescence can be modified by an extreme curvature difference.

  13. Terrigenous sediment provenance from geochemical tracers, south Molokai reef flat, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Takesue, R.K.

    2010-01-01

    Land-derived runoff is one of the greatest threats to coral-reef health. Identification of runoff sources is an important step in erosion mitigation efforts. A geochemical sediment provenance study was done in uplands and across the adjacent fringing reef on the southeast shore of Molokai, Hawaii, to determine whether sediment runoff originated from hillsides or gulches. Source-region identification was based on geochemical differences between alkalic basalt, which outcrops on hillsides, and tholeiitic basalt, which outcrops in gulches. In Kawela watershed, copper to iron ratios (Cu/Fe) were distinct in hillside soil versus gulch sediment and suggest that hillside erosion is the predominant mechanism of sediment delivery to the nearshore. This suggests that runoff-mitigation efforts should take steps to reduce hillside erosion. Cadmium to thorium ratios (Cd/Th) in nearshore sediment suggest that there is a high-Cd source of runoff east of Kamalo Gulch. This compositional difference is consistent with the predominance of tholeiitic basalt on the eastern end of Molokai.

  14. Dynamics of flat slab subduction beneath Peru: Insights from seismic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakin, Caroline; Long, Maureen; Wagner, Lara; Beck, Susan; Tavera, Hernando

    2015-04-01

    Around 10% of subduction zones worldwide today exhibit shallow or flat subduction, but we have yet to fully understand how and why some slabs flatten. The largest flat slab segment that exists in the world today lies beneath much of Peru extending 1500 km in length from 3 °S to 15 °S. At the southern end of the Peruvian flat slab region the Nazca Ridge, an aseismic ridge feature with ~18 km thick oceanic crust, is presently being subducted. By utilising seismic anisotropy we investigate the role of this ridge in terms of the deformation of the surrounding mantle, as well as the dynamics of the broader flat slab region. To achieve this we conduct shear wave splitting analyses at 49 stations distributed across southern Peru, primarily from the PerU Lithosphere and Slab Experiment (PULSE). We present detailed shear wave splitting results for both teleseismic events (SKS, PKS, sSKS) that sample the upper mantle column beneath the stations, as well as direct S from local events that constrain anisotropy above the flat slab. Teleseismic results reveal distinct spatial variations in anisotropic structure along strike, most notably a sharp transition from coherent splitting in the north to pervasive null (non-split) arrivals in the south, with the transition coinciding with the northern limit of the Nazca Ridge. For both anisotropic domains there is evidence for complex and multi-layered anisotropy. It appears likely that the *KS splitting measurements reflect trench-normal mantle flow beneath the flat slab, but that shallower layers of anisotropy modify the splitting signal. The local S results, which are sensitive to the supra-slab anisotropy, reveal that the thin mantle layer between the flat slab and the overriding continental crust is likely the main source of shallower anisotropy. The local S splitting measurements again show dramatic variability along strike. North of the Nazca Ridge we observe consistent trench-parallel splitting, while south of the ridge fast

  15. Perfluorinated contaminants in sediments and aquatic organisms collected from shallow water and tidal flat areas of the Ariake Sea, Japan: environmental fate of perfluorooctane sulfonate in aquatic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Haruhiko; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Nasu, Tetsuya; Cho, Hyeon-Seo; Sinclair, Ewan; Takemurai, Akira

    2006-08-15

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), such as perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), perfluorononanoate (PFNA), perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHS), and perfluorooctane sulfonamide (PFOSA) are widely distributed in aquatic ecosystems. Despite studies reporting the occurrence of PFCs in aquatic organisms, the fate of PFCs in tidal flat and marine coastal ecosystems is not known. In this study, we determined concentrations of PFOS, PFOA, PFNA, PFHS, and PFOSA in sediments; benthic organisms, including lugworm, mussel, crab, clam, oyster, and mudskipper fish from tidal flat; and shallow water species, such as filefish, bream, flounder, shark, finless porpoise, gull, and mallard collected from the Ariake Sea, Japan. PFOS and PFOA were detected in most of the samples analyzed, followed by PFNA, PFOSA, and PFHS. In shallow water species, PFOS was the dominant contaminant, and elevated concentrations were found in higher trophic level species, such as marine mammals and omnivorous birds. These results suggest biomagnification of PFOS through the coastal food chain. In contrast, PFOA was the most abundant compound in tidal flat organisms and sediments. PFOA concentrations in sediments, lugworms, and omnivorous mudskippers in tidal flat were approximately 1 order of magnitude greater than the levels of PFOS. This indicates differences in exposure pattern and bioavailability of PFOS and PFOA between shallow water and tidal flat organisms. The accumulation profiles of PFCs were compared with those of organochlorines (polychlorinated biphenyls, PCB), organotin (tributyltin,TBT), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in tidal flat and shallow water samples collected from the Ariake Sea. Concentrations of PFCs in sediments and in tidal flat organisms were significantly lower than that found for PCBs, TBT, and PAHs. Nevertheless, PFOS concentrations in shallow water species were comparable to and/or significantly greater than those of other classes of

  16. On-site measurements of hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide emissions from tidal flat sediments of Ariake Sea, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abul Kalam Azad, Md.; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Oda, Mitsutomo; Toda, Kei

    Emission variability of hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide from tidal flat sediments to atmosphere in Ariake Sea, Japan was studied using a diffusion scrubber-based portable instrument. Ariake Sea is a typical closed sea consisting of a huge marsh area along the coast. Seasonal, spatial and diurnal variability in emission rates were examined. In addition, depth profiles of the gas emissions were examined with the profiles of anions, heavy metals, water and organic contents. Unexpectedly, SO 2 emission was much higher than H 2S in all measurements, while an opposite emission trend was observed in diurnal and spatial patterns of H 2S and SO 2 emissions. The mechanisms of these gas emissions are discussed. Total sulfur fluxes to the atmosphere as H 2S and SO 2 during the study averaged 7.1 μg S m -2 h -1 for muddy sites and 28 μg S m -2 h -1 for sandy sites. Sulfur fluxes from tidal flats were comparable to the artificial sulfur emission from the neighboring towns.

  17. Physical and Biological Effects on Tide Flat Sediment Stability and Strength - Phase 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    forcings, such as insolation, rainfall, benthic microalgae and seagrass (Zostera japonica) abundance, these variations did not always result in...m2 in the winter to a high of >3000 shoots/m2 in late summer. (B) Is chlorophyll a content in mg/g dry sediment (a proxy for benthic microalgae ...Another area of insight regarding physical/biological interactions involves the impact of microphytobenthos (MPB) or benthic microalgae on the

  18. White Phosphorus Contamination of Salt Marsh Pond Sediments at Eagle River Flats, Alaska.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    selected (Nudds was confined to the bottoms of the major water- and Bowlby 1984). Contaminated sediments prob- fowl feeding ponds, representing an area... Bowlby 1984). We ing duds and low-level redistribution by ducks also hypothesized that the source of these particles themselves when contaminated...the water of range of food items (Nudds and Bowlby 1984) or arctic ponds (Dodson and Egger 1980), also sug- gizzard material selected by ducks. The

  19. Remedial Investigation Report: White Phosphorus Contamination of Salt Marsh Sediments at Eagle River Flats, Alaska

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-31

    range of other food items selected by dabbling ducks (Nudds and Bowlby 1984). We also hypothesized that the source of these particles is WP-contain- ing...length (Fig. IV- 6), and thus are in the size range of food items (Nudds and Bowlby 1984) or gizzard material selected by ducks. The smallest...food items usually selected (Nudds and Bowlby 1984). Contaminated sediments probably contain many small particles and a very few large WP particles so

  20. Remedial Investigation Report: White Phosphorus Contamination of Salt Marsh Sediments at Eagle River Flats, Alaska

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-31

    shot (Friend 1987). WP particles ingested by waterfowl should be in the size range of other food items selected by dabbling ducks (Nudds and Bowlby ... Bowlby 1984) or gizzard mattial selected by ducks. The smallest particles isolated were around 0.25 mm in length. However, if the black specks observed...0.082 mm in diameter is smaller than food items usually selected (Nudds and Bowlby 1984). Contaminated sediments probably contain many small

  1. Sediment dynamics in the Adriatic Sea investigated with coupled models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherwood, Christopher R.; Book, Jeffrey W.; Carniel, Sandro; Cavaleri, Luigi; Chiggiato, Jacopo; Das, Himangshu; Doyle, James D.; Harris, Courtney K.; Niedoroda, Alan W.; Perkins, Henry; Poulain, Pierre-Marie; Pullen, Julie; Reed, Christopher W.; Russo, Aniello; Sclavo, Mauro; Signell, Richard P.; Traykovski, Peter A.; Warner, John C.

    2004-01-01

    Several large research programs focused on the Adriatic Sea in winter 2002-2003, making it an exciting place for sediment dynamics modelers (Figure 1). Investigations of atmospheric forcing and oceanic response (including wave generation and propagation, water-mass formation, stratification, and circulation), suspended material, bottom boundary layer dynamics, bottom sediment, and small-scale stratigraphy were performed by European and North American researchers participating in several projects. The goal of EuroSTRATAFORM researchers is to improve our ability to understand and simulate the physical processes that deliver sediment to the marine environment and generate stratigraphic signatures. Scientists involved in the Po and Apennine Sediment Transport and Accumulation (PASTA) experiment benefited from other major research programs including ACE (Adriatic Circulation Experiment), DOLCE VITA (Dynamics of Localized Currents and Eddy Variability in the Adriatic), EACE (the Croatian East Adriatic Circulation Experiment project), WISE (West Istria Experiment), and ADRICOSM (Italian nowcasting and forecasting) studies.

  2. Degradation of cyanobacterial biomass in anoxic tidal-flat sediments: a microcosm study of metabolic processes and community changes

    PubMed Central

    Graue, Jutta; Engelen, Bert; Cypionka, Heribert

    2012-01-01

    To follow the anaerobic degradation of organic matter in tidal-flat sediments, a stimulation experiment with 13C-labeled Spirulina biomass (130 mg per 21 g sediment slurry) was conducted over a period of 24 days. A combination of microcalorimetry to record process kinetics, chemical analyses of fermentation products and RNA-based stable-isotope probing (SIP) to follow community changes was applied. Different degradation phases could be identified by microcalorimetry: Within 2 days, heat output reached its maximum (55 μW), while primary fermentation products were formed (in μmol) as follows: acetate 440, ethanol 195, butyrate 128, propionate 112, H2 127 and smaller amounts of valerate, propanol and butanol. Sulfate was depleted within 7 days. Thereafter, methanogenesis was observed and secondary fermentation proceeded. H2 and alcohols disappeared completely, whereas fatty acids decreased in concentration. Three main degraders were identified by RNA-based SIP and denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis. After 12 h, two phylotypes clearly enriched in 13C: (i) Psychrilyobacter atlanticus, a fermenter known to produce hydrogen and acetate and (ii) bacteria distantly related to Propionigenium. A Cytophaga-related bacterium was highly abundant after day 3. Sulfate reduction appeared to be performed by incompletely oxidizing species, as only sulfate-reducing bacteria related to Desulfovibrio were labeled as long as sulfate was available. PMID:21918576

  3. Sediment dynamics in an overland flow-prone forest catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Alexander; Elsenbeer, Helmut

    2010-05-01

    Vegetation controls erosion in many respects, and it is assumed that forest cover is an effective control. Currently, most literature on erosion processes in forest ecosystems support this impression and estimates of sediment export from forested catchments serve as benchmarks to evaluate erosion processes under different land uses. Where soil properties favor near-surface flow paths, however, vegetation may not mitigate surface erosion. In the forested portion of the Panama Canal watershed overland flow is widespread and occurs frequently, and indications of active sediment transport are hard to overlook. In this area we selected a 9.7 ha catchment for a high-resolution study of suspended sediment dynamics. We equipped five nested catchments to elucidate sources, drivers, magnitude and timing of suspended sediment export by continuous monitoring of overland flow and stream flow and by simultaneous, event-based sediment sampling. The support program included monitoring throughfall, splash erosion, overland-flow connectivity and a survey of infiltrability, permeability, and aggregate stability. This dataset allowed a comprehensive view on erosion processes. We found that overland flow controls the suspended-sediment dynamics in channels. Particularly, rainfalls of high intensity at the end of the rainy season have a superior impact on the overall sediment export. During these events, overland flow occurs catchment-wide up to the divide and so does erosion. With our contribution we seek to provide evidence that forest cover and large sediment yields are no contradiction in terms even in the absence of mass movements.

  4. Gravitational collapse of thin shells of dust in asymptotically flat shape dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercati, Flavio; Gomes, Henrique; Koslowski, Tim; Napoletano, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    In a recent paper, one of us studied spherically symmetric, asymptotically flat solutions of shape dynamics, finding that the spatial metric has characteristics of a wormhole—two asymptotically flat ends and a minimal-area sphere, or "throat," in between. In this paper, we investigate whether that solution can emerge as a result of gravitational collapse of matter. With this goal, we study the simplest kind of spherically symmetric matter: an infinitely-thin shell of dust. Our system can be understood as a model of a star accreting a thin layer of matter. We solve the dynamics of the shell exactly and find that, indeed, as it collapses, the shell leaves in its wake the wormhole metric. In the maximal-slicing time we use for asymptotically flat solutions, the shell only approaches the throat asymptotically and does not cross it in a finite amount of time (as measured by a clock "at infinity"). This leaves open the possibility that a more realistic cosmological solution of shape dynamics might see this crossing happening in a finite amount of time (as measured by the change of relational or shape degrees of freedom).

  5. Sources and diagenesis of organic matter in tidal flat sediments from the German Wadden Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkman, J. K.; Rohjans, D.; Rullkötter, J.; Scholz-Böttcher, B. M.; Liebezeit, G.

    2000-07-01

    The sources and diagenesis of organic matter in a sediment core from the Swinnplate backbarrier area near Spiekeroog Island in the northwest German Wadden Sea have been examined using stable carbon isotopes, 14C-ages and lipid biomarker data. Twenty-two core sections were analysed from the surface to a depth of 90 cm, representing sedimentation over the past approximately 200 years. Total organic carbon (TOC) contents were highly variable (0.1-1%), as was the grain size with some core sections containing up to 50% of clay and silt (mud fraction). These data indicate a highly variable depositional regime in which organic matter is extensively degraded both before and after incorporation into the sediments. The TOC content was strongly correlated with the abundance of the mud fraction, indicating the importance of organic matter sorption onto particles for preservation of both marine and terrestrial organic matter. Sediments near the top of the core were enriched in marine organic matter, but terrestrial organic matter predominated in most core sections. Some samples showed higher TOC contents than might be predicted from the TOC-grain size relationship. Isotope and biomarker studies showed that these contained additional terrestrial organic matter from peats, possibly eroded from areas to the west of the investigated area. The organic matter in these layers had the lightest values of δ 13C (about -26‰ compared with a more typical mixed marine-terrestrial value of -24‰). Most of the n-alkane distributions show a strong predominance of odd-carbon-number alkanes typical of the distributions found in higher plant waxes. All core sections contained abundant long-chain alcohols and triterpenoid alcohols such as α-amyrin, β-amyrin, lupeol, taraxerol, taraxerone and friedelin from higher plants. The dihydroxy triterpenoid betulin was particularly abundant confirming that eroded peats are a major source of the lipids. Further confirmation was obtained from AMS

  6. Rock glaciers and the sediment dynamics in arid mountain belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blöthe, Jan Henrik; Höser, Thorsten; Rosenwinkel, Swenja; Korup, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Rock glaciers are common periglacial features in highest elevations of semiarid to arid mountain ranges. Rock glaciers predominate in realms where precipitation values fall below thresholds that allow for ice glacier formation, then even outranging ice glaciers in size and number. The influence of ice glaciers on high-mountain's sediment dynamics is manifold: ice-glacier-driven erosion produces large amounts of clastic material; ice glaciers act as a conveyor belt for sediments, delivering material from their source regions to their terminus; ice glaciers entering trunk valleys form efficient dams that interrupt sediment delivery. While these mechanisms have been addressed in numerous earlier studies, the role of rock glaciers for the sediment dynamics of arid mountain belts remains elusive. We address this shortcoming by analysing a rock glacier inventory that we compiled for the Himalaya-Karakoram ranges and the Tien Shan ranges in Central Asia. Our inventory comprises more than 1000 specimen, a large number of which form dams of large trunk rivers and minor tributaries, disconnecting the sediment fluxes from upstream. In certain regions that are nearly devoid of ice-glaciers, like the Gamugah surface of NW Pakistan, rock glaciers of >10^4-m length occupy valley bottoms entirely, constituting the only mode of transport for sediments produced in headwaters. In conclusion, we call for a better understanding of the role that rock glaciers take in the sediment dynamics of arid mountain belts.

  7. Sediment dynamics in semi-alluvial urban streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welber, Matilde; Ashmore, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Anthropogenic alterations of flow regime and sediment fluxes often occur in river catchments subject to urban development. Because of land use change, stormwater collection and channelization of low order tributaries, urban streams often have a flashy flow regime and limited, irregular sediment supply. In Southern Ontario, the response of riverine systems to urbanization is modulated by the glacial legacy. Many urban streams in the Greater Toronto Area show widespread erosion and incision and river beds are characterised by discontinuous alluvial cover and patches of exposed glacial till. Little is known about bedload transport in these semi-alluvial channels and a thorough understanding of sediment dynamics is needed for flood risk assessment and to design river restoration projects. We used a large physical model to simulate alluvial cover evolution in a till-bed stream and to explore the role of sediment supply, channel morphology and roughness on cover stability and sediment flux. The non-erodible concrete channel comprised a straight section and a sinuous section and was fed with graded sediment. Initial conditions included fully covered and fully uncovered beds in order to assess the role of pre-existing alluvium. Bedload flux was sampled at regular intervals and cover evolution was reconstructed from high resolution images. Model runs show that the system tends to a steady state characterised by sediment input/output balance and a constant proportion of covered bed. Equilibrium cover area increases with sediment supply, but sinuosity and roughness have a major positive effect on sediment retention.

  8. Multiple-gain-ranging readout method to extend the dynamic range of amorphous silicon flat-panel imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, Pieter G.; Colbeth, Richard E.; Mollov, Ivan; Munro, Peter; Pavkovich, John; Seppi, Edward J.; Shapiro, Edward G.; Tognina, Carlo A.; Virshup, Gary F.; Yu, J. Micheal; Zentai, George; Kaissl, Wolfgang; Matsinos, Evangelos; Richters, Jeroen; Riem, Heinrich

    2004-05-01

    The dynamic range of many flat panel imaging systems are fundamentally limited by the dynamic range of the charge amplifier and readout signal processing. We developed two new flat panel readout methods that achieve extended dynamic range by changing the read out charge amplifier feedback capacitance dynamically and on a real-time basis. In one method, the feedback capacitor is selected automatically by a level sensing circuit, pixel-by-pixel, based on its exposure level. Alternatively, capacitor selection is driven externally, such that each pixel is read out two (or more) times, each time with increased feedback capacitance. Both methods allow the acquisition of X-ray image data with a dynamic range approaching the fundamental limits of flat panel pixels. Data with an equivalent bit depth of better than 16 bits are made available for further image processing. Successful implementation of these methods requires careful matching of selectable capacitor values and switching thresholds, with the imager noise and sensitivity characteristics, to insure X-ray quantum limited operation over the whole extended dynamic range. Successful implementation also depends on the use of new calibration methods and image reconstruction algorithms, to insure artifact free rebuilding of linear image data by the downstream image processing systems. The multiple gain ranging flat panel readout method extends the utility of flat panel imagers and paves the way to new flat panel applications, such as cone beam CT. We believe that this method will provide a valuable extension to the clinical application of flat panel imagers.

  9. Tidal marsh methane dynamics: Difference in seasonal lags in emissions driven by storage in vegetated versus unvegetated sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, M. C.; Tripathee, R.; Schäfer, K. V. R.; Jaffé, P. R.

    2013-12-01

    Estuarine and coastal wetlands exhibit high rates of carbon burial and storage in anaerobic sediments, but the extent to which carbon sequestration is offset by methane (CH4) emissions from these ecosystems remains unclear. In this study we combine measurements of sediment-air CH4 fluxes with monitoring of belowground CH4 pools in a New Jersey tidal marsh in order to clarify mechanistic links between environmental drivers, subsurface dynamics, and atmospheric emissions. Measurements were conducted in an unvegetated mud flat and adjacent low marsh vegetated with Spartina alterniflora and Phragmites australis. Pore water measurements throughout the year revealed long-term CH4 storage in mud flat sediments, leading to a seasonal lag in emissions that extended into winter months. CH4 reservoirs and fluxes in vegetated sediments were well described by an empirical temperature-response model, while poor model agreement in unvegetated sediments was attributed to decouplings between production and flux due to storage processes. This study highlights the need to incorporate sediment gas exchange rates and pathways into biogeochemical process models.

  10. Dual-exposure technique for extending the dynamic range of x-ray flat panel detectors.

    PubMed

    Sisniega, A; Abella, M; Desco, M; Vaquero, J J

    2014-01-20

    This work presents an approach to extend the dynamic range of x-ray flat panel detectors by combining two acquisitions of the same sample taken with two different x-ray photon flux levels and the same beam spectral configuration. In order to combine both datasets, the response of detector pixels was modelled in terms of mean and variance using a linear model. The model was extended to take into account the effect of pixel saturation. We estimated a joint probability density function (j-pdf) of the pixel values by assuming that each dataset follows an independent Gaussian distribution. This j-pdf was used for estimating the final pixel value of the high-dynamic-range dataset using a maximum likelihood method. The suitability of the pixel model for the representation of the detector signal was assessed using experimental data from a small-animal cone-beam micro-CT scanner equipped with a flat panel detector. The potential extension in dynamic range offered by our method was investigated for generic flat panel detectors using analytical expressions and simulations. The performance of the proposed dual-exposure approach in realistic imaging environments was compared with that of a regular single-exposure technique using experimental data from two different phantoms. Image quality was assessed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, contrast, and analysis of profiles drawn on the images. The dynamic range, measured as the ratio between the exposure for saturation and the exposure equivalent to instrumentation noise, was increased from 76.9 to 166.7 when using our method. Dual-exposure results showed higher contrast-to-noise ratio and contrast resolution than the single-exposure acquisitions for the same x-ray dose. In addition, image artifacts were reduced in the combined dataset. This technique to extend the dynamic range of the detector without increasing the dose is particularly suited to image samples that contain both low and high attenuation regions.

  11. Dual-exposure technique for extending the dynamic range of x-ray flat panel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisniega, A.; Abella, M.; Desco, M.; Vaquero, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents an approach to extend the dynamic range of x-ray flat panel detectors by combining two acquisitions of the same sample taken with two different x-ray photon flux levels and the same beam spectral configuration. In order to combine both datasets, the response of detector pixels was modelled in terms of mean and variance using a linear model. The model was extended to take into account the effect of pixel saturation. We estimated a joint probability density function (j-pdf) of the pixel values by assuming that each dataset follows an independent Gaussian distribution. This j-pdf was used for estimating the final pixel value of the high-dynamic-range dataset using a maximum likelihood method. The suitability of the pixel model for the representation of the detector signal was assessed using experimental data from a small-animal cone-beam micro-CT scanner equipped with a flat panel detector. The potential extension in dynamic range offered by our method was investigated for generic flat panel detectors using analytical expressions and simulations. The performance of the proposed dual-exposure approach in realistic imaging environments was compared with that of a regular single-exposure technique using experimental data from two different phantoms. Image quality was assessed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, contrast, and analysis of profiles drawn on the images. The dynamic range, measured as the ratio between the exposure for saturation and the exposure equivalent to instrumentation noise, was increased from 76.9 to 166.7 when using our method. Dual-exposure results showed higher contrast-to-noise ratio and contrast resolution than the single-exposure acquisitions for the same x-ray dose. In addition, image artifacts were reduced in the combined dataset. This technique to extend the dynamic range of the detector without increasing the dose is particularly suited to image samples that contain both low and high attenuation regions.

  12. A Buoy for Continuous Monitoring of Suspended Sediment Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Philip; Thoss, Heiko; Kaempf, Lucas; Güntner, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of Suspended Sediments Dynamics (SSD) across spatial scales is relevant for several fields of hydrology, such as eco-hydrological processes, the operation of hydrotechnical facilities and research on varved lake sediments as geoarchives. Understanding the connectivity of sediment flux between source areas in a catchment and sink areas in lakes or reservoirs is of primary importance to these fields. Lacustrine sediments may serve as a valuable expansion of instrumental hydrological records for flood frequencies and magnitudes, but depositional processes and detrital layer formation in lakes are not yet fully understood. This study presents a novel buoy system designed to continuously measure suspended sediment concentration and relevant boundary conditions at a high spatial and temporal resolution in surface water bodies. The buoy sensors continuously record turbidity as an indirect measure of suspended sediment concentrations, water temperature and electrical conductivity at up to nine different water depths. Acoustic Doppler current meters and profilers measure current velocities along a vertical profile from the water surface to the lake bottom. Meteorological sensors capture the atmospheric boundary conditions as main drivers of lake dynamics. It is the high spatial resolution of multi-point turbidity measurements, the dual-sensor velocity measurements and the temporally synchronous recording of all sensors along the water column that sets the system apart from existing buoy systems. Buoy data collected during a 4-month field campaign in Lake Mondsee demonstrate the potential and effectiveness of the system in monitoring suspended sediment dynamics. Observations were related to stratification and mixing processes in the lake and increased turbidity close to a catchment outlet during flood events. The rugged buoy design assures continuous operation in terms of stability, energy management and sensor logging throughout the study period. We conclude that

  13. A buoy for continuous monitoring of Suspended Sediment Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Philip; Thoss, Heiko; Kaempf, Lucas; Güntner, Andreas

    2013-10-14

    Knowledge of Suspended Sediments Dynamics (SSD) across spatial scales is relevant for several fields of hydrology, such as eco-hydrological processes, the operation of hydrotechnical facilities and research on varved lake sediments as geoarchives. Understanding the connectivity of sediment flux between source areas in a catchment and sink areas in lakes or reservoirs is of primary importance to these fields. Lacustrine sediments may serve as a valuable expansion of instrumental hydrological records for flood frequencies and magnitudes, but depositional processes and detrital layer formation in lakes are not yet fully understood. This study presents a novel buoy system designed to continuously measure suspended sediment concentration and relevant boundary conditions at a high spatial and temporal resolution in surface water bodies. The buoy sensors continuously record turbidity as an indirect measure of suspended sediment concentrations, water temperature and electrical conductivity at up to nine different water depths. Acoustic Doppler current meters and profilers measure current velocities along a vertical profile from the water surface to the lake bottom. Meteorological sensors capture the atmospheric boundary conditions as main drivers of lake dynamics. It is the high spatial resolution of multi-point turbidity measurements, the dual-sensor velocity measurements and the temporally synchronous recording of all sensors along the water column that sets the system apart from existing buoy systems. Buoy data collected during a 4-month field campaign in Lake Mondsee demonstrate the potential and effectiveness of the system in monitoring suspended sediment dynamics. Observations were related to stratification and mixing processes in the lake and increased turbidity close to a catchment outlet during flood events. The rugged buoy design assures continuous operation in terms of stability, energy management and sensor logging throughout the study period. We conclude that

  14. Turbulent Flow and Sand Dune Dynamics: Identifying Controls on Aeolian Sediment Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, C. M.; Wiggs, G.

    2007-12-01

    Sediment transport models are founded on cubic power relationships between the transport rate and time averaged flow parameters. These models have achieved limited success and recent aeolian and fluvial research has focused on the modelling and measurement of sediment transport by temporally varying flow conditions. Studies have recognised turbulence as a driving force in sediment transport and have highlighted the importance of coherent flow structures in sediment transport systems. However, the exact mechanisms are still unclear. Furthermore, research in the fluvial environment has identified the significance of turbulent structures for bedform morphology and spacing. However, equivalent research in the aeolian domain is absent. This paper reports the findings of research carried out to characterise the importance of turbulent flow parameters in aeolian sediment transport and determine how turbulent energy and turbulent structures change in response to dune morphology. The relative importance of mean and turbulent wind parameters on aeolian sediment flux was examined in the Skeleton Coast, Namibia. Measurements of wind velocity (using sonic anemometers) and sand transport (using grain impact sensors) at a sampling frequency of 10 Hz were made across a flat surface and along transects on a 9 m high barchan dune. Mean wind parameters and mass sand flux were measured using cup anemometers and wedge-shaped sand traps respectively. Vertical profile data from the sonic anemometers were used to compute turbulence and turbulent stress (Reynolds stress; instantaneous horizontal and vertical fluctuations; coherent flow structures) and their relationship with respect to sand transport and evolving dune morphology. On the flat surface time-averaged parameters generally fail to characterise sand transport dynamics, particularly as the averaging interval is reduced. However, horizontal wind speed correlates well with sand transport even with short averaging times. Quadrant

  15. Aceticlastic and NaCl-Requiring Methanogen “Methanosaeta pelagica” sp. nov., Isolated from Marine Tidal Flat Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Iino, Takao; Suzuki, Ken-Ichiro; Yamaguchi, Kaoru; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2012-01-01

    Among methanogens, only 2 genera, Methanosaeta and Methanosarcina, are known to contribute to methanogenesis from acetate, and Methanosaeta is a specialist that uses acetate specifically. However, Methanosaeta strains so far have mainly been isolated from anaerobic digesters, despite the fact that it is widespread, not only in anaerobic methanogenic reactors and freshwater environments, but also in marine environments, based upon extensive 16S rRNA gene-cloning analyses. In this study, we isolated an aceticlastic methanogen, designated strain 03d30qT, from a tidal flat sediment. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA and mcrA genes revealed that the isolate belongs to the genus Methanosaeta. Unlike the other known Methanosaeta species, this isolate grows at Na+ concentrations of 0.20 to 0.80 M, with an optimum concentration of 0.28 M. Quantitative estimation using real-time PCR detected the 16S rRNA gene of the genus Methanosaeta in the marine sediment, and relative abundance ranged from 3.9% to 11.8% of the total archaeal 16S rRNA genes. In addition, the number of Methanosaeta organisms increased with increasing depth and was much higher than that of Methanosarcina organisms, suggesting that aceticlastic methanogens contribute to acetate metabolism to a greater extent than previously thought in marine environments, where sulfate-reducing acetate oxidation prevails. This is the first report on marine Methanosaeta species, and based on phylogenetic and characteristic studies, the name “Methanosaeta pelagica” sp. nov. is proposed for this novel species, with type strain 03d30q. PMID:22344667

  16. Static and Dynamic Parameters in Patients With Degenerative Flat Back and Change After Corrective Fusion Surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate characteristics of static and dynamic parameters in patients with degenerative flat back (DFB) and to compare degree of their improvement between successful and unsuccessful surgical outcome groups. Forty-seven patients with DFB were included who took whole spine X-ray and three-dimensional motion analysis before and 6 months after corrective surgery. Forty-four subjects were selected as a control group. As static parameters, thoracic kyphosis (TK), thoracolumbar junction (TLJ), lumbar lordosis (LL), pelvic incidence (PI), sacral slope (SS), and pelvic tilt (PT) were measured. As dynamic parameters, maximal and minimal angle of pelvic tilt, lower limb joints, and thoracic and lumbar vertebrae column (dynamic TK and LL) in sagittal plane were obtained. The DFB group showed smaller TK and larger LL, pelvic posterior tilt, hip flexion, knee flexion, and ankle dorsiflexion than the control group. Most of these parameters were significantly corrected by fusion surgery. Dynamic spinal parameters correlated with static spinal parameters. The successful group obtained significant improvement in maximal and minimal dynamic LL than the unsuccessful group. The DFB group showed characteristic lower limb and spinal angles in dynamic and static parameters. Correlation between static and dynamic parameters was found in spinal segment. Dynamic LL was good predictor of successful surgical outcomes.

  17. Static and Dynamic Parameters in Patients With Degenerative Flat Back and Change After Corrective Fusion Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate characteristics of static and dynamic parameters in patients with degenerative flat back (DFB) and to compare degree of their improvement between successful and unsuccessful surgical outcome groups Methods Forty-seven patients with DFB were included who took whole spine X-ray and three-dimensional motion analysis before and 6 months after corrective surgery. Forty-four subjects were selected as a control group. As static parameters, thoracic kyphosis (TK), thoracolumbar junction (TLJ), lumbar lordosis (LL), pelvic incidence (PI), sacral slope (SS), and pelvic tilt (PT) were measured. As dynamic parameters, maximal and minimal angle of pelvic tilt, lower limb joints, and thoracic and lumbar vertebrae column (dynamic TK and LL) in sagittal plane were obtained. Results The DFB group showed smaller TK and larger LL, pelvic posterior tilt, hip flexion, knee flexion, and ankle dorsiflexion than the control group. Most of these parameters were significantly corrected by fusion surgery. Dynamic spinal parameters correlated with static spinal parameters. The successful group obtained significant improvement in maximal and minimal dynamic LL than the unsuccessful group. Conclusion The DFB group showed characteristic lower limb and spinal angles in dynamic and static parameters. Correlation between static and dynamic parameters was found in spinal segment. Dynamic LL was good predictor of successful surgical outcomes. PMID:27606275

  18. Seasonal Variations of Topography and Surface Sediments in 2014-2015 on Open-Coast Intertidal Flat of the Gochang, Southwestern Coast of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryang, W. H.

    2016-12-01

    The Gochang open-coast, intertidal flat is located in the southwestern coast of Korea (the eastern part of the Yellow Sea), characterized by macro-tide in tidal range, an open-coast in its type, and sand substrates. This study has investigated seasonal variations in surface topography and sedimentary facies of surface sediments in the Gochang intertidal flat. During the nine seasons of winter (Feb.), spring (May), summer (Aug.), and fall (Nov.) in 2014-2015 and winter (Feb.) in 2016, the topographic elevation of total 525 sites was measured along three survey lines. It consists of 21 sites at 30 m intervals in each transverse line perpendicular to the shoreline, respectively. During the eight seasons of the year 2014-2015 such as winter (February), spring (May), summer (August), and fall (November), surface sediments of total 504 sites were sampled and analyzed along the three survey lines. The surface sediments of the Gochang intertidal flat in 2014-2015 consisted mainly of fine-grained sand sediments showing a trend in grain size to be coarser in winter and finer in summer. Based seasonal wave and tidal level data recorded near the study area, it was interpreted that seasonal effects of wave were stronger than those of tide as a factor controlling surface sedimentation. High waves in winter may result in the coarsening trend of grain size in surface sediments, whereas, in summer, the sediments may get finer by relatively low waves. Spatial sedimentary facies of the Gochang intertidal flat in 2014-2015 represented that seasonal deviation of the upper tidal zone was larger than that of the lower tidal zone, hence sediments getting coarser in grain size and poorly sorted in the upper tidal zone. From upper to lower tidal zone, grain size became finer and sediments were better-sorted, showing smaller seasonal deviations. Acknowledgements: This study was supported by the research grant from the Korean Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries (PJT200538). This presentation is

  19. Entamoeba marina n. sp.; a New Species of Entamoeba Isolated from Tidal Flat Sediment of Iriomote Island, Okinawa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Shiratori, Takashi; Ishida, Ken-Ichiro

    2016-05-01

    The genus Entamoeba includes anaerobic lobose amoebae, most of which are parasites of various vertebrates and invertebrates. We report a new Entamoeba species, E. marina n. sp. that was isolated from a sample of tidal flat sediment collected at Iriomote Island, Okinawa, Japan. Trophozoites of E. marina were 12.8-32.1 μm in length and 6.8-15.9 μm in width, whereas the cysts were 8.9-15.8 μm in diam. and contained four nuclei. The E. marina cells contained a rounded nucleus with a small centric karyosome and uniformly arranged peripheral chromatin. Although E. marina is morphologically indistinguishable from other tetranucleated cyst-forming Entamoeba species, E. marina can be distinguished from them based on the combination of molecular phylogenetic analyses using SSU rDNA gene and the difference of collection sites. Therefore, we propose E. marina as a new species of the genus Entamoeba. © 2015 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2015 International Society of Protistologists.

  20. Can Human-made Saltpans Represent an Alternative Habitat for Shorebirds? Implications for a Predictable Loss of Estuarine Sediment Flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Maria P.; Lecoq, Miguel; Moniz, Filipe; Rabaça, João E.

    2014-01-01

    Estuarine areas worldwide are under intense pressure due to human activities such as upstream dam building. Shorebirds strongly depend on estuarine intertidal flats during migration and wintering periods and so are particularly vulnerable to such impacts, whose magnitude will depend on the availability of alternative feeding habitats. In this study we analyze if man-made saltpans can represent an alternative habitat for wintering and migrating shorebirds in the Guadiana estuary, a wetland that is already experiencing environmental changes due to the building of the Alqueva reservoir, the largest in Western Europe. We compared the use of mudflats and saltpans as feeding areas by several shorebird species before the construction of the dam. A dataset with 26 years of counts data was also analyzed in order to detect any long-term trend in shorebirds abundance. We concluded that saltpans, in particular the fully mechanized, can be used as an alternative habitat by larger species during winter and southward migration, thus playing a major role in minimizing the possible effects of sediment loss due to dam building. In contrast, smaller species were particularly dependent on mudflats to feed. A significant change in population trends, from positive to negative, was detected for two species. Although we still have no evidence that this is directly linked to dam building, this result and documented changes that limit primary productivity justifies the implementation of a long-term monitoring scheme of shorebird populations in this estuary. We also reinforce the need to manage the saltpans as key habitats for shorebirds.

  1. Monitoring Large-Scale Sediment Transport Dynamics with Multibeam Sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, D. R.; Simmons, S. M.; Best, J. L.; Keevil, G. M.; Oberg, K.; Czuba, J. A.

    2009-05-01

    Multibeam Echo-Sounder systems have developed rapidly over recent decades and are routinely deployed to provide high-resolution bathymetric information in and range of environments. Modern data handling and storage technologies now facilitate the logging of the raw acoustic back-scatter information that was previously discarded by these systems. This paper describes methodologies that exploit this logging capability to quantify both the concentration and dynamics of suspended sediment within the water column. This development provides a multi-purpose tool for the holistic surveying of sediment transport dynamics by imaging suspended sediment concentration, the associated flows and providing concurrent high-resolution bathymetry. Results obtained a RESON 7125 MBES are presented from both well constrained dock-side testing and full field deployment over dune bedforms in the Mississippi. The capacity of the system to image suspended sediment structures is demonstrated and a novel methodology for estimating 2D flow velocities, based on frame cross-correlation methods, is introduced. The results demonstrate the capability of MBES systems to successfully map spatial and temporal variations in suspended sediment concentration throughout a 2D swath and application of the velocity estimation algorithms allow real-time holistic monitoring of turbulent flow processes and suspended sediment fluxes at a scale previously unrealisable. Turbulent flow over a natural dune bedform on the Mississippi is used to highlight the process information provided and the insights that can be gleaned for this technical development.

  2. Sediment pollution and dynamic in the Mar Piccolo of Taranto (southern Italy): insights from bottom sediment traps and surficial sediments.

    PubMed

    Bellucci, Luca Giorgio; Cassin, Daniele; Giuliani, Silvia; Botter, Margherita; Zonta, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    Major and trace element, PAH, and PCB concentrations were measured in surface sediments and particles from sediment traps collected in the First and Second Basin of the Mar Piccolo (Gulf of Taranto) in two periods (June-July and August-September, 2013). The aim of the study was to evaluate pollution degree, sediment transport and particle redistribution dynamic within the area. Results confirm the higher contamination of sediments from the First Basin observed by previous researches, particularly for Cu, Hg, Pb, total PAHs, and total PCBs. Advective transport from the First to the Second Basin appears to be the leading transfer mechanism of particles and adsorbed contaminants, as evidenced by measured fluxes and statistical analyses of contaminant concentrations in surficial sediments and particles from sediment traps. Long-range selective transports of PAHs and microbial anaerobic degradation processes for PCBs have been also observed. These results are limited to a restricted time window but are consistent with the presence of transport fluxes at the bottom of the water column. This mechanism deserves further investigation and monitoring activities, potentially being the main responsible of pollutant delivering to the less contaminated sectors of the Mar Piccolo.

  3. The flatness of Lamellipodia explained by the interaction between actin dynamics and membrane deformation.

    PubMed

    Schmeiser, Christian; Winkler, Christoph

    2015-09-07

    The crawling motility of many cell types relies on lamellipodia, flat protrusions spreading on flat substrates but (on cells in suspension) also growing into three-dimensional space. Lamellipodia consist of a plasma membrane wrapped around an oriented actin filament meshwork. It is well known that the actin density is controlled by coordinated polymerization, branching, and capping processes, but the mechanisms producing the small aspect ratios of lamellipodia (hundreds of nm thickness vs. several μm lateral and inward extension) remain unclear. The main hypothesis of this work is a strong influence of the local geometry of the plasma membrane on the actin dynamics. This is motivated by observations of co-localization of proteins with I-BAR domains (like IRSp53) with polymerization and branching agents along the membrane. The I-BAR domains are known to bind to the membrane and to prefer and promote membrane curvature. This hypothesis is translated into a stochastic mathematical model where branching and capping rates, and polymerization speeds depend on the local membrane geometry and branching directions are influenced by the principal curvature directions. This requires the knowledge of the deformation of the membrane, being described in a quasi-stationary approximation by minimization of a modified Helfrich energy, subject to the actin filaments acting as obstacles. Simulations with this model predict pieces of flat lamellipodia without any prescribed geometric restrictions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Sediment dynamics in Darwin Harbour, Northern Territory, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Wang, X. H.; Williams, D. K.

    2012-12-01

    The sediment dynamics of Darwin Harbour is studied by a sediment model (Wang, 2002) and a hydrodynamic model based on FVCOM. The sediment model bathymetry includes the high resolution Darwin Harbour coastal lines and sea surface area. The hydrodynamic model is forced by tides at the ocean open boundary with constant salinity and temperature. 20 sigma layers with 3/4 logarithmic layers near the surface/bottom and 13 evenly distributed layers in the middle are used in the model. The sediment model focuses on suspended fine sediment, and is initialized with limited bed thickness and one sediment type. The observed tidal elevation, currents and the suspended sediment concentration (SSC) data were used to calibrate the model. The simulation finds that the SSC in the harbour reaches its maximum at the bottom near Nightcliff Jetty and in the channel at spring and neap tide with a value of 10.0 and 0.1 g m-3, respectively. During spring tides, vertical averaged residual flux of SSC is mainly landward with a value of 0.8 g m-2s-1. During neap tide, vertical averaged residual flux of SSC is seaward with peak value of 0.05 g m-2s-1. Erosion happens near Darwin City and deposition appears near East Arm Wharf. An eddy in the East Arm found by David (2009) is also well reproduced by the model.

  5. Dynamical interaction effects on an electric dipole moving parallel to a flat solid surface

    SciTech Connect

    Villo-Perez, Isidro; Abril, Isabel; Garcia-Molina, Rafael; Arista, Nestor R.

    2005-05-15

    The interaction experienced by a fast electric dipole moving parallel and close to a flat solid surface is studied using the dielectric formalism. Analytical expressions for the force acting on the dipole, for random and for particular orientations, are obtained. Several features related to the dynamical effects on the induced forces are discussed, and numerical values are obtained for the different cases. The calculated energy loss of the electric dipole provides useful estimations which could be of interest for small-angle scattering experiments using polar molecules.

  6. Seasonal sediment dynamics shape temperate bedrock reef communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Figurski, Jared D.; Freiwald, Jan; Lonhart, Steve I.; Storlazzi, Curt

    2016-01-01

    Mobilized seafloor sediment can impact benthic reef communities through burial, scour, and turbidity. These processes are ubiquitous in coastal oceans and, through their influence on the survival, fitness, and interactions of species, can alter the structure and function of benthic communities. In northern Monterey Bay, California, USA, as much as 30% of the seafloor is buried or exposed seasonally, making this an ideal location to test how subtidal temperate rocky reef communities vary in the presence and absence of chronic sediment-based disturbances. Designated dynamic plots were naturally inundated by sediment in summer (50 to 100% cover) and swept clean in winter, whereas designated stable plots remained free of sediment during our study. Multivariate analyses indicated significant differences in the structure of sessile and mobile communities between dynamic and stable reef habitats. For sessile species, community structure in disturbed plots was less variable in space and time than in stable plots due to the maintenance of an early successional state. In contrast, community structure of mobile species varied more in disturbed plots than in stable plots, reflecting how mobile species distribute in response to sediment dynamics. Some species were found only in these disturbed areas, suggesting that the spatial mosaic of disturbance could increase regional diversity. We discuss how the relative ability of species to tolerate disturbance at different life history stages and their ability to colonize habitat translate into community-level differences among habitats, and how this response varies between mobile and sessile communities.

  7. A distributed analysis of Human impact on global sediment dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, S.; Kettner, A.; Syvitski, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding riverine sediment dynamics is an important undertaking for both socially-relevant issues such as agriculture, water security and infrastructure management and for scientific analysis of landscapes, river ecology, oceanography and other disciplines. Providing good quantitative and predictive tools in therefore timely particularly in light of predicted climate and landuse changes. Ever increasing human activity during the Anthropocene have affected sediment dynamics in two major ways: (1) an increase is hillslope erosion due to agriculture, deforestation and landscape engineering and (2) trapping of sediment in dams and other man-made reservoirs. The intensity and dynamics between these man-made factors vary widely across the globe and in time and are therefore hard to predict. Using sophisticated numerical models is therefore warranted. Here we use a distributed global riverine sediment flux and water discharge model (WBMsed) to compare a pristine (without human input) and disturbed (with human input) simulations. Using these 50 year simulations we will show and discuss the complex spatial and temporal patterns of human effect on riverine sediment flux and water discharge.

  8. Deciphering dynamical proxy responses from lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramisch, Arne; Tjallingii, Rik; Hartmann, Kai; Brauer, Achim; Diekmann, Bernhard; Haberzettl, Torsten; Kasper, Thomas; Ahlborn, Marieke

    2017-04-01

    Lakes form a reliable archive of paleoenvironmental change in the terrestrial realm. Non-destructive XRF scans provide high-resolution records of element concentrations that are commonly related to past environmental change. However, XRF records of lake sediments enclose paleoenvironmental information that originates from multiple lake external and internal forcing. The variety of environmental forcing factors can complicate a direct identification of single mechanisms like climatic change from XRF or other proxy records. Here we present XRF records from several Asian lake archives, which indicate asynchronous variations of similar geochemical records since the late glacial/early Holocene. All XRF time series are characterized by damped harmonic oscillations of relative element concentrations through time. The asynchronous variations can be expressed by the frequency and the rate of damping of theses oscillations that differ between the lakes. We argue that the oscillatory behavior is a result of a feedback between the physical removal and dissolution of mineral phases in catchment soils and their subsequent enrichment and deposition within the lake. We present a numerical model, which accurately simulates major Holocene variations in the element concentration of lake records and discuss implications for the reconstruction of environmental signals from lake sediments.

  9. Dynamics of suspended sediment in Lake Ontario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pluhowski, E. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The suspended sediment plumes generated by the Welland Canal and the Genesee River are identifiable in most band 5 frames received from ERTS-1. In descending order of value for plume detection in Lake Ontario are bands 4, 6, and 7. Little or no information content relative to plume detection is available in band 7. The Oswego River plume was not visible during low flow periods; however, it was identifiable immediately following storms. Increased suspended sediment loading emanating from storm runoff increases turbidity levels to the point where the plume becomes visible in the ERTS-1 imagery. Despite the fact that it is detectable from high altitude (60,000 feet) photography, the Niagara River plume was not visible in any of the ERTS-1 frames. Numerous examples of shoreline erosion were evident in the December 7, 1972, imagery of western Lake Ontario. Near shore lake circulation patterns are usually apparent whenever turbidity plumes are sensed by the satellite.

  10. Contribution of hydrodynamic conditions during shallow water stages to the sediment balance on a tidal flat: Mont-Saint-Michel Bay, Normandy, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desguée, R.; Robin, N.; Gluard, L.; Monfort, O.; Anthony, E. J.; Levoy, F.

    2011-10-01

    Field measurements were conducted in Mont-Saint-Michel Bay, a megatidal embayment (spring tidal range of 15 m), in order to monitor, over the course of a tidal cycle, sediment transport variability due to waves and tides on the upper part of a tidal flat characterised by shallow water depths. Sensors used to measure currents, water depth and turbidity were installed just above the bed (0.04 m). Two experiments were conducted under contrasting hydrodynamic conditions. The results highlight wave activity over the tidal flat even though observed wind waves were largely dissipated due to the very shallow water depths. Very high suspended sediment concentrations (up to 6 kg/m 3) were recorded in the presence of wave activity at the beginning of the local flood, when significant sediment transport occurred, up to 7 times as much as under conditions of no wave activity. This influence may be attributed to the direct action of waves on bed sediments, to wave-induced liquefaction, and to the erosive action of waves on tidal channel banks. The sediment composition, comprising a clay fraction of 2-5%, may also enhance sediment transport by reducing critical shear stress through the sand lubrication effect. The results also show that antecedent meteorological conditions play an important role in suspended sediment transport on the tidal flat. Total sediment flux directions show a net transport towards the inner part of the bay that contributes to deposition over the adjacent salt marshes, and this tendency also prevails during strong wave conditions. Such sediment transport is characterised by significant variability over the course of the tidal cycle. During fair and moderate weather conditions, 83% and 71% of the total flux was observed, respectively, over only 11% and 28% of the duration of the local tidal cycle and with water depths between 0.04 and 0.3 m. These results suggest that in order to improve our understanding of sediment budgets in this type of coastal

  11. Temporal dynamics and spatial heterogeneity of microalgal biomass in recently reclaimed intertidal flats of the Saemangeum area, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Bong-Oh; Lee, Yeonjung; Park, Jinsoon; Ryu, Jongseong; Hong, Seongjin; Son, SeungHyun; Lee, Shing Yip; Nam, Jungho; Koh, Chul-Hwan; Khim, Jong Seong

    2016-10-01

    Trophodynamics of intertidal mudflats are significantly driven by microphytobenthos (MPB) production but spatial and temporal dynamics of this production source is poorly known. To understand the temporal dynamics and spatial heterogeneity of intertidal MPB, benthic chlorophyll a, phaeopigments, and sediment properties were determined in Gyehwa (sandy) and Gwanghwal (muddy) tidal flats of Saemangeum area over a year at 97 stations. This study set out to: (i) characterize the spatial-temporal patterns in MPB biomass on a year-round basis, (ii) identify the abiotic and biotic factors associated with MPB distributions, (iii) investigate the use of satellite-derived chlorophyll a data and verify with in field measurements, and (iv) determine minimum required sample size for in situ biomass measurement. Concentrations of benthic chlorophyll a and phaeopigments were greater in winter and spring with a high magnitude of variance than in summer and fall at both areas. Benthic chlorophyll a and phaeopigments tended to decrease approaching lower tidal zone, being associated with the corresponding decrease in shore level and/or exposure duration. Compared to available data on macrozoobenthos distribution, the spatial variation of microalgal biomass seems to be attributed to distribution of deposit-feeders. A significant positive correlation (p < 0.001) between in situ MPB biomass and satellite-derived normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) values was observed, but was much weaker in the lower tidal zone. Mirroring algal heterogeneity, the minimum required sample size for in situ biomass measurement were greater in blooming season and sandy bottom, suggesting that sampling design for spatio-temporal mapping of MPB should consider the sampling season and/or abiotic and biotic features of study area. Overall, spatio-temporal dynamics of intertidal MPB seem to be influenced by a combination of abiotic and biotic factors.

  12. Continuous monitoring bed-level dynamics on an intertidal flat: introducing novel stand-alone high-resolution SED-sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhan; Lenting, Walther; van der Wal, Daphne; Bouma, Tjeerd

    2015-04-01

    Tidal flat morphology is continuously shaped by hydrodynamic force, resulting in highly dynamic bed elevations. The knowledge of short-term bed-level changes is important both for understanding sediment transport processes as well as for assessing critical ecological processes such as e.g. vegetation recruitment chances on tidal flats. Due to the labour involved, manual discontinuous measurements lack the ability to continuously monitor bed-elevation changes. Existing methods for automated continuous monitoring of bed-level changes lack vertical accuracy (e.g., Photo-Electronic Erosion Pin sensor and resistive rod) or limited in spatial application by using expensive technology (e.g., acoustic bed level sensors). A method provides sufficient accuracy with a reasonable cost is needed. In light of this, a high-accuracy sensor (2 mm) for continuously measuring short-term Surface-Elevation Dynamics (SED-sensor) was developed. This SED-sensor makes use of photovoltaic cells and operates stand-alone using internal power supply and data logging system. The unit cost and the labour in deployments is therefore reduced, which facilitates monitoring with a number of units. In this study, the performance of a group of SED-sensors is tested against data obtained with precise manual measurements using traditional Sediment Erosion Bars (SEB). An excellent agreement between the two methods was obtained, indicating the accuracy and precision of the SED-sensors. Furthermore, to demonstrate how the SED-sensors can be used for measuring short-term bed-level dynamics, two SED-sensors were deployed for 1 month at two sites with contrasting wave exposure conditions. Daily bed-level changes were obtained including a severe storm erosion event. The difference in observed bed-level dynamics at both sites was statistically explained by their different hydrodynamic conditions. Thus, the stand-alone SED-sensor can be applied to monitor sediment surface dynamics with high vertical and temporal

  13. Dynamic interaction between a fingerpad and a flat surface: experiments and analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, J Z; Dong, R G; Smutz, W P; Rakheja, S

    2003-06-01

    Many neural and vascular diseases in hands and fingers have been related to the degenerative responses of local neural and vascular systems in fingers to excessive dynamic loading. Since fingerpads serve as a coupling element between the hand and the objects, the investigation of the dynamic coupling between fingertip and subjects could provide important information for the understanding of the pathomechanics of these neural and vascular diseases. In the present study, the nonlinear and time-dependent force responses of fingertips during dynamic contact have been investigated experimentally and theoretically. Four subjects (2 male and 2 female) with an average age of 24 years participated in the study. The index fingers of right and left hands of each subject were compressed using a flat platen via a micro testing machine. A physical model was proposed to simulate the nonlinear and time-dependent force responses of fingertips during dynamic contact. Using a force relaxation test and a fast loading test at constant loading speed, the material/structural parameters underlying the proposed physical model could be identified. The predicted rate-dependent force/displacement curves and time-histories of force responses of fingertips were compared with those measured in the corresponding experiments. Our results suggest that the force responses of fingertips during the dynamic contacts are nonlinear and time-dependent. The physical model was verified to characterize the nonlinear, rate-dependent force-displacement behaviors, force relaxations, and time-histories of force responses of fingertips during dynamic contact.

  14. Dynamic chest radiography: flat-panel detector (FPD) based functional X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic chest radiography is a flat-panel detector (FPD)-based functional X-ray imaging, which is performed as an additional examination in chest radiography. The large field of view (FOV) of FPDs permits real-time observation of the entire lungs and simultaneous right-and-left evaluation of diaphragm kinetics. Most importantly, dynamic chest radiography provides pulmonary ventilation and circulation findings as slight changes in pixel value even without the use of contrast media; the interpretation is challenging and crucial for a better understanding of pulmonary function. The basic concept was proposed in the 1980s; however, it was not realized until the 2010s because of technical limitations. Dynamic FPDs and advanced digital image processing played a key role for clinical application of dynamic chest radiography. Pulmonary ventilation and circulation can be quantified and visualized for the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases. Dynamic chest radiography can be deployed as a simple and rapid means of functional imaging in both routine and emergency medicine. Here, we focus on the evaluation of pulmonary ventilation and circulation. This review article describes the basic mechanism of imaging findings according to pulmonary/circulation physiology, followed by imaging procedures, analysis method, and diagnostic performance of dynamic chest radiography.

  15. Strings matter: Dynamics and evolution of cosmic string networks in flat spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakellariadou, Maria

    1990-12-01

    This research inquires into the dynamics and evolution of cosmic string networks in flat spacetime. It involves the study of the statistical properties of string networks and the dynamics of long strings, including the scaling density; the fractal nature of string substructure; and the effectiveness of the gravitational damping mechanism, regarding the long strings' wiggles. Methodologically, it employs both numerical (within the framework of an exact soluble model in flat spacetime) and analytical analyses. The central propositions of this research are a follows: (1) for a string network in equilibrium, when the energy density of the network is low, the dominant part of the string is in the form of closed loops of the smallest allowed size, and a certain critical density the system undergoes a phase transition characterized by formation of very long strings; (2) for an evolving network, the typical curvature radius of long strings, and the characteristic distance between them, are both comparable to the evolution time, and at the same time, long strings possess a significant small-scale structure, which plays an important role in the energy distribution of the produced loops: and (3) gravitational radiation is rather effective in damping the small-scale structure, but only for large amplitude waves.

  16. Strings matter: Dynamics and evolution of cosmic string networks in flat spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Sakellariadou, M.

    1990-01-01

    This research inquires into the dynamics and evolution of cosmic string networks in flat spacetime. It involves the study of the statistical properties of string networks and the dynamics of long strings, including the scaling density; the fractal nature of string substructure; and the effectiveness of the gravitational damping mechanism, regarding the long strings' wiggles. Methodologically, it employs both numerical (within the framework of an exact soluble model in flat spacetime) and analytical analyses. The central propositions of this research are a follows: (1) for a string network in equilibrium, when the energy density of the network is low, the dominant part of the string is in the form of closed loops of the smallest allowed size, and a certain critical density the system undergoes a phase transition characterized by formation of very long strings; (2) for an evolving network, the typical curvature radius of long strings, and the characteristic distance between them, are both comparable to the evolution time, and at the same time, long strings possess a significant small-scale structure, which plays an important role in the energy distribution of the produced loops: and (3) gravitational radiation is rather effective in damping the small-scale structure, but only for large amplitude waves.

  17. Signal crayfish as zoogeomorphic agents: diel patterns of fine sediment suspension in a crayfish-affected river and the implications for fine sediment fluxes and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Stephen; Johnson, Matthew; Reeds, Jake; Longstaff, Holly; Extence, Chris

    2013-04-01

    The signal crayfish (Pacifasticus leniusculus) is a formidable invasive species that has had a deleterious impact on native freshwater fauna across Europe. We contend that the impact of this animal extends beyond ecology into geomorphology and hypothesise that crayfish are significant agents of fine sediment recruitment and mobilisation, with potentially profound impacts on water quality, substrate quality and fine sediment fluxes. Building on pioneering work by colleagues at Queen Mary University, London this poster considers the role of crayfish in fine sediment suspension in a lowland, gravel-bed river. The hypothesis that nocturnal increases in crayfish activity are associated with a greater frequency of sediment suspension events and increases in ambient turbidity, is tested. Strong diel fluctuations in water turbidity were recorded at several sites on the Brampton Arm of the River Nene in England, a river heavily populated by signal crayfish, during August and September 2012. With the exception of three summer flood events, stage measurements during the same period were essentially flat, ruling out a hydraulic cause for overnight rises in turbidity. Water samples collected at midnight and at midday at one site confirm this diel pattern for suspended sediment concentration. Higher mean turbidity values overnight are associated with an increase in the magnitude and frequency of isolated turbidity spikes or events and this is consistent with crayfish nocturnalism. In particular, we suspect that turbidity events are caused by the construction and maintenenance of burrows and by interactions between crayfish and the river bed while foraging, fighting and avoiding each other. Tying the diel SSC signal directly to crayfish activity proved difficult, but several lines of argument presented here suggest that crayfish are the most likely cause of the diel pattern. These results provide substantial support for the idea that signal crayfish are important zoogeomorphic

  18. A dynamic wheel-rail impact analysis of railway track under wheel flat by finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Jian; Gu, Yuantong; Murray, Martin Howard

    2013-06-01

    Wheel-rail interaction is one of the most important research topics in railway engineering. It involves track impact response, track vibration and track safety. Track structure failures caused by wheel-rail impact forces can lead to significant economic loss for track owners through damage to rails and to the sleepers beneath. Wheel-rail impact forces occur because of imperfections in the wheels or rails such as wheel flats, irregular wheel profiles, rail corrugations and differences in the heights of rails connected at a welded joint. A wheel flat can cause a large dynamic impact force as well as a forced vibration with a high frequency, which can cause damage to the track structure. In the present work, a three-dimensional finite element (FE) model for the impact analysis induced by the wheel flat is developed by the use of the FE analysis (FEA) software package ANSYS and validated by another validated simulation. The effect of wheel flats on impact forces is thoroughly investigated. It is found that the presence of a wheel flat will significantly increase the dynamic impact force on both rail and sleeper. The impact force will monotonically increase with the size of wheel flats. The relationships between the impact force and the wheel flat size are explored from this FEA and they are important for track engineers to improve their understanding of the design and maintenance of the track system.

  19. Large tropical river mouth sediment-transport dynamics and linkages to coastal sediment transport and deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogston, A. S.; Nowacki, D. J.; Fricke, A. T.; Marks, J.; Nittrouer, C. A.; Souza Filho, P. W.; Van, T. P. D., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Rivers are the largest suppliers of particulate material to the world ocean, and we must understand the dynamics of tidal river and shallow coastal environments in order to contrast and constrain the sediment budgets of major rivers and their adjacent marine sinks. Studies in large tropical tidal rivers elucidate the processes in these regions that modify the source signal of sediment particles to nearshore environments and vegetated shorelines. Here we focus on processes within the river mouth region of the Amazon and Mekong tidal rivers in order to understand the modulation of sediment-transport signals (magnitude, grain size, pathways) between the river mouth regions and coastal environments. The immense Amazon River mouth experiences no salinity effects (e.g., buoyancy driven flows, physiochemical aggregation) as estuarine processes occur offshore. Mouth channel-bed morphology is variable, and although near surface suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) is relatively constant across the 15-km distributary width, near-bed SSC ranges widely over the tidal cycle depending on sub-channel sediment routing. Sediment pathways differ between ebb and flood conditions inducing a spatially and temporally heterogeneous supply of sediment to the nearshore. In the Mekong River, the mouth region changes from salt-wedge conditions to a partially mixed estuary with seasonal discharge, and there has been an anthropogenic reduction in connections between river and intertidal floodplains. SSC varies throughout the water column and is seasonally modified by estuarine processes. Differences between ebb and flood flows and sediment pathways within and between distributary channels are important to the overall sediment budget, and water-column processes seasonally modify the characteristics of the river bed. These two river-mouth systems differ in channel morphology and sediment-transport mechanisms. Both systems, however, deliver sediment to the nearshore in a spatially and

  20. Micrometer-sized water droplet impingement dynamics and evaporation on a flat dry surface.

    PubMed

    Briones, Alejandro M; Ervin, Jamie S; Putnam, Shawn A; Byrd, Larry W; Gschwender, Lois

    2010-08-17

    A comprehensive numerical and experimental investigation on micrometer-sized water droplet impact dynamics and evaporation on an unheated, flat, dry surface is conducted from the standpoint of spray-cooling technology. The axisymmetric time-dependent governing equations of continuity, momentum, energy, and species are solved. Surface tension, wall adhesion effect, gravitational body force, contact line dynamics, and evaporation are accounted for in the governing equations. The explicit volume of fluid (VOF) model with dynamic meshing and variable-time stepping in serial and parallel processors is used to capture the time-dependent liquid-gas interface motion throughout the computational domain. The numerical model includes temperature- and species-dependent thermodynamic and transport properties. The contact line dynamics and the evaporation rate are predicted using Blake's and Schrage's molecular kinetic models, respectively. An extensive grid independence study was conducted. Droplet impingement and evaporation data are acquired with a standard dispensing/imaging system and high-speed photography. The numerical results are compared with measurements reported in the literature for millimeter-size droplets and with current microdroplet experiments in terms of instantaneous droplet shape and temporal spread (R/D(0) or R/R(E)), flatness ratio (H/D(0)), and height (H/H(E)) profiles, as well as temporal volume (inverted A) profile. The Weber numbers (We) for impinging droplets vary from 1.4 to 35.2 at nearly constant Ohnesorge number (Oh) of approximately 0.025-0.029. Both numerical and experimental results show that there is air bubble entrapment due to impingement. Numerical results indicate that Blake's formulation provides better results than the static (SCA) and dynamic contact angle (DCA) approach in terms of temporal evolution of R/D(0) and H/D(0) (especially at the initial stages of spreading) and equilibrium flatness ratio (H(E)/D(0)). Blake's contact line

  1. Spatial dynamics of overbank sedimentation in floodplain systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierce, A.R.; King, S.L.

    2008-01-01

    Floodplains provide valuable social and ecological functions, and understanding the rates and patterns of overbank sedimentation is critical for river basin management and rehabilitation. Channelization of alluvial systems throughout the world has altered hydrological and sedimentation processes within floodplain ecosystems. In the loess belt region of the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley of the United States, channelization, the geology of the region, and past land-use practices have resulted in the formation of dozens of valley plugs in stream channels and the formation of shoals at the confluence of stream systems. Valley plugs completely block stream channels with sediment and debris and can result in greater deposition rates on floodplain surfaces. Presently, however, information is lacking on the rates and variability of overbank sedimentation associated with valley plugs and shoals. We quantified deposition rates and textures in floodplains along channelized streams that contained valley plugs and shoals, in addition to floodplains occurring along an unchannelized stream, to improve our understanding of overbank sedimentation associated with channelized streams. Feldspar clay marker horizons and marker poles were used to measure floodplain deposition from 2002 to 2005 and data were analyzed with geospatial statistics to determine the spatial dynamics of sedimentation within the floodplains. Mean sediment deposition rates ranged from 0.09 to 0.67??cm/y at unchannelized sites, 0.16 to 2.27??cm/y at shoal sites, and 3.44 to 6.20??cm/y at valley plug sites. Valley plug sites had greater rates of deposition, and the deposited sediments contained more coarse sand material than either shoal or unchannelized sites. A total of 59 of 183 valley plug study plots had mean deposition rates > 5??cm/y. The geospatial analyses showed that the spatial dynamics of sedimentation can be influenced by the formation of valley plugs and shoals on channelized streams; however

  2. Remote Sensing of Suspended Sediment Dynamics in the Mississippi Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, D. N.; Skarke, A. D.; Silwal, S.; Dash, P.

    2016-02-01

    The Mississippi Sound is a semi-enclosed estuary between the coast of Mississippi and a chain of offshore barrier islands with relatively shallow water depths and high marine biodiversity that is wildly utilized for commercial fishing and public recreation. The discharge of sediment-laden rivers into the Mississippi Sound and the adjacent Northern Gulf of Mexico creates turbid plumes that can extend hundreds of square kilometers along the coast and persist for multiple days. The concentration of suspended sediment in these coastal waters is an important parameter in the calculation of regional sediment budgets as well as analysis of water-quality factors such as primary productivity, nutrient dynamics, and the transport of pollutants as well as pathogens. The spectral resolution, sampling frequency, and regional scale spatial domain associated with satellite based sensors makes remote sensing an ideal tool to monitor suspended sediment dynamics in the Northern Gulf of Mexico. Accordingly, the presented research evaluates the validity of published models that relate remote sensing reflectance with suspended sediment concentrations (SSC), for similar environmental settings, with 51 in situ observations of SSC from the Mississippi Sound. Additionally, regression analysis is used to correlate additional in situ observations of SSC in Mississippi Sound with coincident observations of visible and near-infrared band reflectance collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor aboard the Aqua satellite, in order to develop a site-specific empirical predictive model for SSC. Finally, specific parameters of the sampled suspended sediment such as grain size and mineralogy are analyzed in order to quantify their respective contributions to total remotely sensed reflectance.

  3. Variation of topography and surface sediments before and after the typhoon Kompasu on open-coast intertidal flat of the Gochang, southwestern coast of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryang, Woo Hun

    2017-04-01

    The Gochang open-coast, intertidal flat is located in the southwestern coast of Korea (the eastern part of the Yellow Sea), characterized by macro-tide in tidal range, an open-coast in its type, and sand substrates. In the Gochang intertidal flat, this study has investigated the typhoon effects of topography, surface sediment, and sedimentary environment, appeared before and after the typhoon Kompasu. The typhoon Kompasu moved along the southwestern coasts and across midlands of the Korean Peninsula from 1 to 2 September in 2010. This route of the typhoon, moving across the eastern Yellow Sea and the peninsula, was a rare case in the southwestern coast of Korea, and there was not the similar route case in the study area since the typhoon Kompasu. The surface topography in the middle-to-lower tidal zone became lower after the typhoon rather than that before the typhoon. The lower topographic change is indicative of surface sediment erosion caused by the typhoon wave. The Gochang intertidal flat is mainly composed of fine to coarse sands, and the ratio of fine sand is the largest. Spatial distribution pattern of sedimentary facies before the typhoon showed a trend of coast-parallel bands of fine sand facies and medium sand facies, whereas that after the typhoon represented a simple distribution of fine sand facies, not showing the coast-parallel bands. Keywords: typhoon effect, surface sediment, open-coast, intertidal flat, macro-tide Acknowledgements: This study was supported by the research grant from the Korean Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries (PJT200538).

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of atomically flat and nanoporous electrodes with a molten salt electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Vatamanu, Jenel; Borodin, Oleg; Smith, Grant D

    2010-01-07

    The electric double layer (EDL) structure and capacitance have been studied for atomically flat and nanoporous conductive electrodes with a molten LiCl electrolyte using an electroactive interface molecular dynamics simulation methodology. For the atomically flat electrodes the electrolyte was observed to form a multilayer structure near the electrode described by exponentially decaying sinusoidal oscillations in ion and charge densities perpendicular to the electrode/electrolyte interface. The differential EDL capacitance vs. electrode potential was found to exhibit "U-shaped" behavior while the EDL capacitance exhibited complex dependence on electrode potential including regions of negative capacitance near zero electrode potential. Increased capacitance and an enhanced degree of electrode-electrolyte interface structure were observed with decreasing temperature. For nanoporous electrodes with both slit and cylindrical pore geometries, the electrolyte was observed to form highly structured alternating charged layers within the electrode nanopores. A maximum in the normalized (per unit electrode area) EDL capacitance was found for pore widths that accommodate several charged layers inside the pores. The observed dependence of capacitance on pore size appears to be a compromise between increasing structure/charge imbalance and decreasing ion density with decreasing pore width/diameter.

  5. Sediment Transport Dynamics and Bedform Evolution During Unsteady Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, H.; Parsons, D. R.; Ockelford, A.; Hardy, R. J.; Ashworth, P. J.; Best, J.

    2016-12-01

    Dunes are ubiquitous features in sand bed rivers and estuaries, and their formation, growth and kinematics play a dominant role in boundary flow structure, flow resistance and sediment transport processes. However, bedform evolution and dynamics during the rising/falling limb of a flood wave remain poorly understood. Herein, we report on a series of flume experiments, undertaken at the University of Hull's Total Environment Simulator flume/wave tank facility, with imposed flow variations and different hydrographs: i) a sudden (shock) change, ii) a fast flood wave and iii) a slow flood wave. Our analysis shows that, because of changes of sediment transport mechanisms with discharge, the sediment flux rather than bedform migration rate is a more appropriate parameter to relate to transport stage. This is particularly the case during bedload transport dominated periods at lower flow discharge, where a strong power law relationship was detected. In terms of varying processes across the hydrograph limbs, bedform evolution during the rising limb is dominated not only by bedform amalgamation but also by the washing out of smaller-scale bedforms. Furthermore, bedform growth is independent of the rising rate of the hydrograph limb, while evolution of bedform decay is affected by the rate of discharge decrease. This results in an anticlockwise hysteresis between transport stage and total flux was found in fast wave experiment, indicating a significant role of the change in sediment transport mechanisms on bedform evolution. Moreover, analysis on the variation of deformation fraction (F, ratio of the deformation flux to the total bed material flux) suggests that net degradation of the bed enhances bedform deformation and leads to a higher F ( 0.65). This work extends our knowledge on how dunes generate and develop under variable flows and has begun to explore how variations in transport stage can be coupled with the variation in sediment transport mechanisms, and/or sediment

  6. Recognition and dynamics of syntectonic sediment routing systems, southern Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, P. A.; Duller, R.; Fordyce, S.; Smithells, R.; Springett, J.; Whitchurch, A.; Whittaker, A.; Carter, A.; Fedele, J.-J.

    2009-04-01

    The erosional, transportational and depositional aspects of the biogeochemical cycles involving particulate sediment and solutes are integrated in sediment routing systems. The component parts of these tectonic-geomorphic systems communicate with each other, especially in response to changes in external forcing mechanisms such as tectonic perturbations and climate change; that is, sediment routing systems are characterized by important teleconnections. We are only just beginning to understand how these teleconnections work, and what it means for the spatial and temporal scales of system behaviour. One strategy for investigating the dynamics of sediment routing systems is to link information on the denudation of upstream source regions with downstream patterns of deposition. This is most likely to be fruitful where upstream catchments are tectonically active. Sediment is released into basins whose long-term subsidence is also controlled by tectonic activity. The spatial distribution of subsidence and the magnitude of the sediment discharge from the catchment are critical factors in the dispersal of sediment of different grain size and composition away from a mountain front. We investigate the coarse clastic sediment routing systems of mid-late Eocene age (40-34 Ma) that were deposited in basins located at the boundary of the Axial Zone and the thrust belt of the South-Central Unit on the southern flank of the Pyrenees, Spain. Most of the fan deposits of interest are found in the Pobla Basin, situated north of Tremp, which benefits from outstanding exposure conditions and rigorous previous work on biostratigraphy, magnetostratigraphy and sedimentology (Mellere 1993; Beamud et al. 2003). Distinct fan depositional systems can be identified and mapped on the basis of their sediment composition, detrital thermochronology, facies and architectures, which can be related to correspondingly distinct catchment properties (size, location, exhumational history, lithologies

  7. Computerized methods for determining respiratory phase on dynamic chest radiographs obtained by a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD) system.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Masayuki; Matsui, Takeshi; Matsui, Osamu

    2006-03-01

    Chest radiography using a dynamic flat-panel detector with a large field of view can provide sequential chest radiographs during respiration. These images provide information regarding respiratory kinetics, which is effective for diagnosis of pulmonary diseases. For valid analysis of respiratory kinetics in diagnosis of pulmonary diseases, it is crucial to determine the association between the kinetics and respiratory phase. We developed four methods to determine the respiratory phase based on image information associated with respiration and compared the results in dynamic chest radiographs of 37 subjects. Here, the properties of each method and future tasks are discussed. The method based on the change in size of the lung gave the most stable results, and that based on the change in distance from the lung apex to the diaphragm was the most promising method for determining the respiratory phase.

  8. Sediment transport dynamics in steep, tropical volcanic catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkel, Christian; Solano Rivera, Vanessa; Granados Bolaños, Sebastian; Brenes Cambronero, Liz; Sánchez Murillo, Ricardo; Geris, Josie

    2017-04-01

    How volcanic landforms in tropical mountainous regions are eroded, and how eroded materials move through these mostly steep landscapes from the headwaters to affect sediment fluxes are critical to water resources management in their downstream rivers. Volcanic landscapes are of particular importance because of the short timescales (< years) over which they transform. Owing to volcanism and seismic activity, landslides and other mass movements frequently occur. These processes are amplified by high intensity precipitation inputs resulting in significant, but natural runoff, erosion and sediment fluxes. Sediment transport is also directly linked to carbon and solute export. However, knowledge on the sediment sources and transport dynamics in the humid tropics remains limited and their fluxes largely unquantified. In order to increase our understanding of the dominant erosion and sediment transport dynamics in humid tropical volcanic landscapes, we conducted an extensive monitoring effort in a pristine and protected (biological reserve Alberto Manuel Brenes, ReBAMB) tropical forest catchment (3.2 km2), located in the Central Volcanic Cordillera of Costa Rica (Figure 1A). Typical for tropical volcanic and montane regions, deeply incised V-form headwaters (Figure 1B) deliver the majority of water (>70%) and sediments to downstream rivers. At the catchment outlet (Figure 1C) of the San Lorencito stream, we established high temporal resolution (5min) water quantity and sediment monitoring (turbidity). We also surveyed the river network on various occasions to characterize fluvial geomorphology including material properties. We could show that the rainfall-runoff-sediment relationships and their characteristic hysteresis patterns are directly linked to variations in the climatic input (storm intensity and duration) and the size, form and mineralogy of the transported material. Such a relationship allowed us to gain the following insights: (i) periodic landslides contribute

  9. Upper mantle anisotropy beneath Peru from SKS splitting: Constraints on flat slab dynamics and interaction with the Nazca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakin, Caroline M.; Long, Maureen D.; Wagner, Lara S.; Beck, Susan L.; Tavera, Hernando

    2015-02-01

    The Peruvian flat slab is by far the largest region of flat subduction in the world today, but aspects of its structure and dynamics remain poorly understood. In particular, questions remain over whether the relatively narrow Nazca Ridge subducting beneath southern Peru provides dynamic support for the flat slab or it is just a passive feature. We investigate the dynamics and interaction of the Nazca Ridge and the flat slab system by studying upper mantle seismic anisotropy across southern Peru. We analyze shear wave splitting of SKS, sSKS, and PKS phases at 49 stations distributed across the area, primarily from the PerU Lithosphere and Slab Experiment (PULSE). We observe distinct spatial variations in anisotropic structure along strike, most notably a sharp transition from coherent splitting in the north to pervasive null (non-split) arrivals in the south, with the transition coinciding with the northern limit of the Nazca Ridge. For both anisotropic domains there is evidence for complex and multi-layered anisotropy. To the north of the ridge our *KS splitting measurements likely reflect trench-normal mantle flow beneath the flat slab. This signal is then modified by shallower anisotropic layers, most likely in the supra-slab mantle, but also potentially from within the slab. To the south the sub-slab mantle is similarly anisotropic, with a trench-oblique fast direction, but widespread nulls appear to reflect dramatic heterogeneity in anisotropic structure above the flat slab. Overall the regional anisotropic structure, and thus the pattern of deformation, appears to be closely tied to the location of the Nazca Ridge, which further suggests that the ridge plays a key role in the mantle dynamics of the Peruvian flat slab system.

  10. Criteria to optimise a dynamic flat detector system used for interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Simon, R; Vano, E; Prieto, C; Fernandez, J M; Ordiales, J M; Martinez, D

    2008-01-01

    An analysis of the relationship between image quality and incident air kerma has been carried out for a dynamic flat detector X-ray system used for interventional radiology. A phantom of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) to simulate patients and two different image test objects, Leeds TOR 18FG and NEMA XR 21, were used to evaluate the quality of the obtained images. Measurements were made simulating clinical configuration with different PMMA thicknesses (16, 20, 24 and 28 cm), available fields of view of 22, 31, 42 and 48 cm (diagonal dimension), in the three default fluoroscopy modes and in one of the most used digital subtraction angiography image acquisition modes. The obtained results are being used to help in the optimisation of clinical procedures.

  11. Flexible star polymer chain adsorption by a flat surface: a molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenak, Siham; Guenachi, Aicha; Sabeur, Sid Ahmed

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we have studied the adsorption of a single flexible star polymer chain by a flat surface. The molecular dynamics simulation has been validated for the case of a free star polymer chain using the diffusion experiment. The scaling laws found are in agreement with the Flory theory predictions and the Rouse model. For the adsorption, preliminary results were obtained for chains of different sizes N=31 to N=199 and different functionalities (f=3,4,6,8,10). For the case of semi-flexible star polymer chains, further investigation is needed to locate the critical point of adsorption when varying the potential interaction strength between the chain and the surface.

  12. Dynamic behaviour of coastal sedimentation in the Lions Gulf. [France

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, M. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A number of ERTS-1 images covering this geographical zone were studied and compared with cartographic maps, air photographs, and thermal-IR images. Old and recent sediments leave traces in the landscape which are decoded by interpreting the shapes of the clear zones forming a network against the black background representing water and humid zones. Current sedimentation and its mechanism were investigated. It had been hoped that a regular sequence of images would make it possible to follow the dynamics of the Rhone and the coastal rivers in relation to meteorological conditions. In any event only a small number of images spread over a wide period of time were obtained, and a complete study was therefore impossible. However, in comparing some of the ERTS-1 images certain thermal-IR images and information on the flow of the Rhone provided some clarification of mechanisms associated with river dynamics.

  13. Dynamic wetting model for the isotropic-to-nematic transition over a flat substrate.

    PubMed

    Rey, Alejandro D; Herrera-Valencia, E E

    2014-03-14

    Phase ordering over solid substrates is a ubiquitous and important soft material transformation process whose description incorporates wetting, anchoring and phase transition kinetics. In this paper the kinetics of the isotropic-to-nematic isothermal phase transition over a flat solid surface in a growing spherical drop is analyzed based on the Landau-de Gennes Q-tensor order parameter equations. The model, based on a previously derived interface force balance and a newly derived contact line force balance, is shown to be consistent with the generic model of conservative interface and contact line motions. The advancing dynamic contact angle equation is extracted from kinematic compatibility between the moving isotropic-nematic interface and contact line. A tractable surface phase transition kinetic model obtained by focusing on the dominant phase transition and wetting driving forces yields: (i) the constant advancing dynamic contact angle θ, and (ii) the contact line speed as a function of undercooling ΔT. It is shown that as undercooling increases, the surface phase transition mode approaches the bulk phase transition mode, such that θ approaches π. The elastic and wetting parameters that control the phase transformation process are identified and experiments for their determination are defined. These dynamic wetting and surface phase transition results significantly expand existing characterization methods of LC-substrate interfaces based on static phase transition droplet methods.

  14. Breathing chest radiography using a dynamic flat-panel detector combined with computer analysis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Suzuki, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Matsui, Takeshi; Inoue, Hitoshi; Yoshihisa, Nakano

    2004-08-01

    Kinetic information is crucial when evaluating certain pulmonary diseases. When a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD) can be used for a chest examination, kinetic information can be obtained simply and cost-effectively. The purpose of this study was to develop methods for analyzing respiratory kinetics, such as movement of the diaphragm and lung structures, and the respiratory changes in x-ray translucency in local lung fields. Postero-anterior dynamic chest radiographs during respiration were obtained with a modified FPD, which provided dynamic chest radiographs at a rate of 3 frames/s. Image registration for correction of physical motion was followed by measurement of the distance from the lung apex to the diaphragm. Next, we used a cross-correlation technique to measure the vectors of respiratory movement in specific lung areas. Finally, the average pixel value for a given local area was calculated by tracing the same local area in the lung field. This method of analysis was used for six healthy volunteers and one emphysema patient. The results reported here represent the initial stage in the development of a method that may constitute a new method for diagnosing certain pulmonary diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, fibroid lung, and pneumonia. A clinical evaluation of our method is now in progress.

  15. Characterizing methane ebullition (bubbling) dynamics from aquatic sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Sontro, T.; Ostrovsky, I.; McGinnis, D. F.; Eugster, W.; Maeck, A.; Lorke, A.; Wehrli, B.

    2013-05-01

    Ebullition (bubbling) is one of the most efficient, yet understudied, transport pathways of CH4 from aquatic sediments to the atmosphere. The spatiotemporal variability of ebullition has hindered gaining knowledge of the dynamics of this phenomenon as it is quite complex and difficult to measure accurately. Here we discuss the characterization of ebullition in several systems using various techniques, but focusing on the hydroacoustic evaluation of ebullition with an echosounder. The spatial variability of ebullition in a small Swiss hydropower reservoir was explored in detail and revealed that bathymetry, perhaps as a proxy for sedimentation, heavily dictates the variability. Since an echosounder can be calibrated for bubble volume, the importance of bubble size was elucidated, particularly the significance of large bubbles for gas transport. With knowledge of bubble size, atmospheric ebullition fluxes can be estimated from the hydroacoustic ebulltion fluxes near the sediment bottom combined with a discrete bubble model to estimate dissolution of rising bubbles. Explicit hotspots of ebullition emission were thus distinguished using hydroacoustic data. Results from a somewhat similar reservoir system in Germany identified increased sediment accumulation as the most probable cause for locations of ebullition hot spots. The effect river inflow and sedimentation have on ebullition has also been seen in the Rhone River delta of Lake Geneva, Switzerland, where ebullition focused on certain sedimentalogical features characterizing the complex bathymetry of the delta. We propose that areas of intense sediment accumulation are conducive to ebullition formation and release, and that this realization aids in predicting the location of ebullition hot spots. In the future, predicting hotspot locations with knowledge of typical bubble sizes and plume types found in those various environments will help in approximating the atmospheric methane emission due to ebullition within a

  16. Sediment dynamics of a sediment-starved, open-marine marsh embayment: Waccasassa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Nathan J.; Hine, Albert C.

    2003-01-01

    Although the Big Bend region of Florida's Gulf of Mexico coast is considered sediment-starved, the open marine marshes that characterize the area are keeping pace with sea level rise. Waccasassa Bay, an embayment within this region, also contains unique subtidal mudbanks that thicken with increasing proximity to embayment head, while the remainder of the bayfloor is characterized by exposed carbonate bedrock or by a thin veneer of sediment. Hydro- dynamic data sets were collected to determine the primary sedimentary processes within Waccasassa Bay capable of creating such geomorphic features. Data suggest that the embayment is a flood-dominated system influenced primarily by semi-diurnal tides with flood-stage intensification towards the river-mouth. Subtidal mudbanks are believed to be the result of tidal time-velocity asymmetries and the convergence of sediment transport pathways. Flood dominance for potential bedload transport suggests a gradual infilling of the bay interior for the short time scale of this study. With no mechanism for seaward transport, Waccasassa Bay can be considered a sediment sink for the remainder of the Big Bend re

  17. Sediment dynamics in restored riparian forest with agricultural surroundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stucchi Boschi, Raquel; Cooper, Miguel; Alencar de Matos, Vitor; Ortega Gomes, Matheus; Ribeiro Rodrigues, Ricardo

    2017-04-01

    The riparian forests are considered Permanent Preservation Areas due to the ecological services provided by these forests. One of these services is the interception of the sediments before they reach the water bodies, which is essential to preserve water quality. The maintenance and restoration of riparian forests are mandatory, and the extent of these areas is defined based on water body width, following the Brazilian Forest Code. The method used to define the size of riparian forest areas elucidates the lack of accurate scientific data of the influence of the riparian forest in maintaining their ecological functions, particularly regarding the retention of sediments. In this study, we investigate the dynamics of erosion and sedimentation in restored riparian forests of a Semideciduous Tropical Forest situated in agricultural areas inserted in sugarcane landscapes in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. We defined two sites with soils of contrasting texture to monitor the dynamics and amount of deposited sediments. Site A is in the municipality of Araras and the soil is mainly clay. Site B is in the municipality of São Manuel and is dominated by sandy soils. In both areas, we defined plots to install graded metal stakes that were partially buried to monitor the dynamics of sediments. In site A, we defined eight plots and installed 27 metal stakes in each one. Three of the plots presented 30 m of riparian forest, two presented 15 m of riparian forest and three, 15 m of pasture followed by 15 m of forest. The design of the metal stakes was similar for all plots and was defined based on the type of erosion observed in site A. In site B, we defined seven points to monitor the sediments inside the reforested areas. Here, we observed erosive processes of great magnitude inside the forests, which results in a different design for the metal stakes. A total of nearly 150 metal stakes were installed to monitor these processes and also to verify the deposition in areas not yet

  18. STAND, A DYNAMIC MODEL FOR SEDIMENT TRANSPORT AND WATER QUALITY. (R825758)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We introduce a new model–STAND (Sediment-Transport-Associated Nutrient Dynamics)–for simulating stream flow, sediment transport, and the interactions of sediment with other attributes of water quality. In contrast to other models, STAND employs a fully dynamic ba...

  19. Dynamics of the Methanogenic Archaea in Tropical Estuarine Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Alvarado, María del Rocío; Fernández, Francisco José; Ramírez Vives, Florina; Varona-Cordero, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Methanogenesis may represent a key process in the terminal phases of anaerobic organic matter mineralization in sediments of coastal lagoons. The aim of the present work was to study the temporal and spatial dynamics of methanogenic archaea in sediments of tropical coastal lagoons and their relationship with environmental changes in order to determine how these influence methanogenic community. Sediment samples were collected during the dry (February, May, and early June) and rainy seasons (July, October, and November). Microbiological analysis included the quantification of viable methanogenic archaea (MA) with three substrates and the evaluation of kinetic activity from acetate in the presence and absence of sulfate. The environmental variables assessed were temperature, pH, Eh, salinity, sulfate, solids content, organic carbon, and carbohydrates. MA abundance was significantly higher in the rainy season (106–107 cells/g) compared with the dry season (104–106 cells/g), with methanol as an important substrate. At spatial level, MA were detected in the two layers analyzed, and no important variations were observed either in MA abundance or activity. Salinity, sulfate, solids, organic carbon, and Eh were the environmental variables related to methanogenic community. A conceptual model is proposed to explain the dynamics of the MA. PMID:23401664

  20. Dynamics of the methanogenic archaea in tropical estuarine sediments.

    PubMed

    Torres-Alvarado, María del Rocío; Fernández, Francisco José; Ramírez Vives, Florina; Varona-Cordero, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Methanogenesis may represent a key process in the terminal phases of anaerobic organic matter mineralization in sediments of coastal lagoons. The aim of the present work was to study the temporal and spatial dynamics of methanogenic archaea in sediments of tropical coastal lagoons and their relationship with environmental changes in order to determine how these influence methanogenic community. Sediment samples were collected during the dry (February, May, and early June) and rainy seasons (July, October, and November). Microbiological analysis included the quantification of viable methanogenic archaea (MA) with three substrates and the evaluation of kinetic activity from acetate in the presence and absence of sulfate. The environmental variables assessed were temperature, pH, Eh, salinity, sulfate, solids content, organic carbon, and carbohydrates. MA abundance was significantly higher in the rainy season (10(6)-10(7) cells/g) compared with the dry season (10(4)-10(6) cells/g), with methanol as an important substrate. At spatial level, MA were detected in the two layers analyzed, and no important variations were observed either in MA abundance or activity. Salinity, sulfate, solids, organic carbon, and Eh were the environmental variables related to methanogenic community. A conceptual model is proposed to explain the dynamics of the MA.

  1. Efficient dynamical correction of the transition state theory rate estimate for a flat energy barrier.

    PubMed

    Mökkönen, Harri; Ala-Nissila, Tapio; Jónsson, Hannes

    2016-09-07

    The recrossing correction to the transition state theory estimate of a thermal rate can be difficult to calculate when the energy barrier is flat. This problem arises, for example, in polymer escape if the polymer is long enough to stretch between the initial and final state energy wells while the polymer beads undergo diffusive motion back and forth over the barrier. We present an efficient method for evaluating the correction factor by constructing a sequence of hyperplanes starting at the transition state and calculating the probability that the system advances from one hyperplane to another towards the product. This is analogous to what is done in forward flux sampling except that there the hyperplane sequence starts at the initial state. The method is applied to the escape of polymers with up to 64 beads from a potential well. For high temperature, the results are compared with direct Langevin dynamics simulations as well as forward flux sampling and excellent agreement between the three rate estimates is found. The use of a sequence of hyperplanes in the evaluation of the recrossing correction speeds up the calculation by an order of magnitude as compared with the traditional approach. As the temperature is lowered, the direct Langevin dynamics simulations as well as the forward flux simulations become computationally too demanding, while the harmonic transition state theory estimate corrected for recrossings can be calculated without significant increase in the computational effort.

  2. Dynamic flat panel detector versus image intensifier in cardiac imaging: dose and image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vano, E.; Geiger, B.; Schreiner, A.; Back, C.; Beissel, J.

    2005-12-01

    The practical aspects of the dosimetric and imaging performance of a digital x-ray system for cardiology procedures were evaluated. The system was configured with an image intensifier (II) and later upgraded to a dynamic flat panel detector (FD). Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) to phantoms of 16, 20, 24 and 28 cm of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and the image quality of a test object were measured. Images were evaluated directly on the monitor and with numerical methods (noise and signal-to-noise ratio). Information contained in the DICOM header for dosimetry audit purposes was also tested. ESAK values per frame (or kerma rate) for the most commonly used cine and fluoroscopy modes for different PMMA thicknesses and for field sizes of 17 and 23 cm for II, and 20 and 25 cm for FD, produced similar results in the evaluated system with both technologies, ranging between 19 and 589 µGy/frame (cine) and 5 and 95 mGy min-1 (fluoroscopy). Image quality for these dose settings was better for the FD version. The 'study dosimetric report' is comprehensive, and its numerical content is sufficiently accurate. There is potential in the future to set those systems with dynamic FD to lower doses than are possible in the current II versions, especially for digital cine runs, or to benefit from improved image quality.

  3. Earth surface dynamics - dispatches from the flats (Ralph Alger Bagnold Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovius, Niels

    2016-04-01

    Earth's surface is shaped by the physical, chemical and biological processes operating on it and the interactions amongst them. No single discipline can lay claim to this surface, nor offer a full explanation of its dynamics. Only interdisciplinary approaches can unlock answers to key questions such as how do erosion and tectonics interact to build mountains, how do landscapes respond to climate change, how can we read processes from the sedimentary record, what is the role of erosion in Earth's carbon cycle, and how can we give reliable early warning of damaging earth surface process events? The wastelands between established academic fields are rich and bountiful and replete with steep learning curves and pitfalls for the naïve. In this lecture, I shall scour the interfaces of geophysics, geochemistry and geomorphology for understanding of the mechanisms, controls and impacts of mass wasting in steep mountain settings, ending up in remarkably flat places to find new insight into the dynamics of Earth's surface.

  4. Temporal-spatial characteristic evaluation in a dynamic flat-panel detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, H.; Tanaka, R.; Matsubara, K.; Ichikawa, K.; Sakuta, K.; Minami, S.; Hayashi, N.; Sanada, S.; Kawamura, M.; Yamamoto, T.

    2010-04-01

    This report presents the fundamental temporospatial characteristics of a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD) system. We investigated the relationship between pixel value and X-ray pulse output, and examined reproducibility, dependence on pulse width, tube voltage, and pulse rate. Sequential images were obtained using a direct conversion-type dynamic FPD. The exposure conditions were: 110 kV, 80 mA, 6.3 ms, 7.5 fps, source-to-image distance (SID) 1.5 m. X-ray pulse output was measured using a dosimetry system with a sampling interval of 70 μs, to determine temporal changes in each X-ray pulse output. Temporal changes in pixel value were measured in the obtained images, and the relationship between pixel value and X-ray pulse output was examined. Reproducibility was assessed by comparing the results in two sequential images obtained under the same exposure conditions. Moreover, the relationships and properties were evaluated by changing the pulse width (12 ms and 25 ms), tube voltage (80 kV, 90 kV, and 100 kV), and pulse rate (3.75 fps and 15 fps). The results showed a good correlation between the X-ray pulse output and pixel values. Fluctuation of the pixel value measured in sequential images is thought to be mainly due to changes in X-ray pulse output, and is not caused by FPD.

  5. Flat panel detector-based cone beam CT for dynamic imaging: system evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Ruola; Conover, David; Yu, Yong; Zhang, Yan; Cai, Weixing; Yang, Dong; Lu, Xianghua

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize a newly built flat panel detector (FPD)-based cone beam CT (CBCT) prototype for dynamic imaging. A CBCT prototype has been designed and constructed by completely modifying a GE HiSpeed Advantage (HSA) CT gantry, incorporating a newly acquired large size real-time FPD (Varian PaxScan 4030CB), a new x-ray generator and a dual focal spot angiography x-ray tube that allows the full coverage of the detector. During data acquisition, the x-ray tube and the FPD can be rotated on the gantry over Nx360 degrees due to integrated slip ring technology with the rotation speed of one second/revolution. With a single scan time of up to 40 seconds , multiple sets of reconstructions can be performed for dynamic studies. The upgrade of this system has been completed. The prototype was used for a series of preliminary phantom studies: different sizes of breast phantoms, a Humanoid chest phantom and scatter correction studies. The results of the phantom studies demonstrate that good image quality can be achieved with this newly built prototype.

  6. Dynamic chest radiography with a flat-panel detector (FPD): ventilation-perfusion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, R.; Sanada, S.; Fujimura, M.; Yasui, M.; Tsuji, S.; Hayashi, N.; Okamoto, H.; Nanbu, Y.; Matsui, O.

    2011-03-01

    Pulmonary ventilation and blood flow are reflected in dynamic chest radiographs as changes in X-ray translucency, i.e., pixel values. This study was performed to investigate the feasibility of ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) study based on the changes in pixel value. Sequential chest radiographs of a patient with ventilation-perfusion mismatch were obtained during respiration using a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD) system. The lung area was recognized and average pixel value was measured in each area, tracking and deforming the region of interest. Inter-frame differences were then calculated, and the absolute values were summed in each respiratory phase. The results were visualized as ventilation, blood flow, V/Q ratio distribution map and compared to distribution of radioactive counts on ventilation and perfusion scintigrams. In the results, abnormalities were appeared as a reduction of changes in pixel values, and a correlation was observed between the distribution of changes in pixel value and those of radioactivity counts (Ventilation; r=0.78, Perfusion; r=0.77). V/Q mismatch was also indicated as mismatch of changes in pixel value, and a correlation with V/Q calculated by radioactivity counts (r=0.78). These results indicated that the present method is potentially useful for V/Q study as an additional examination in conventional chest radiography.

  7. Dynamic flat panel detector versus image intensifier in cardiac imaging: dose and image quality.

    PubMed

    Vano, E; Geiger, B; Schreiner, A; Back, C; Beissel, J

    2005-12-07

    The practical aspects of the dosimetric and imaging performance of a digital x-ray system for cardiology procedures were evaluated. The system was configured with an image intensifier (II) and later upgraded to a dynamic flat panel detector (FD). Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) to phantoms of 16, 20, 24 and 28 cm of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and the image quality of a test object were measured. Images were evaluated directly on the monitor and with numerical methods (noise and signal-to-noise ratio). Information contained in the DICOM header for dosimetry audit purposes was also tested. ESAK values per frame (or kerma rate) for the most commonly used cine and fluoroscopy modes for different PMMA thicknesses and for field sizes of 17 and 23 cm for II, and 20 and 25 cm for FD, produced similar results in the evaluated system with both technologies, ranging between 19 and 589 microGy/frame (cine) and 5 and 95 mGy min(-1) (fluoroscopy). Image quality for these dose settings was better for the FD version. The 'study dosimetric report' is comprehensive, and its numerical content is sufficiently accurate. There is potential in the future to set those systems with dynamic FD to lower doses than are possible in the current II versions, especially for digital cine runs, or to benefit from improved image quality.

  8. [Reproducibility of dynamic chest radiography with a flat-panel detector - respiratory changes in pixel value].

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Hiroki; Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru

    2009-06-20

    Dynamic chest radiography using a flat panel detector (FPD) with a large field of view is expected to be a useful pulmonary functional evaluation method based on the respiratory changes in pixel value. For clinical use as a follow-up and therapeutic evaluation tool, the system must have a high degree of reproducibility in measurements of pixel values. The present study was performed to investigate the reproducibility of respiratory changes in pixel values. Dynamic chest radiographs of five normal subjects and one patient were obtained. Imaging was performed twice in each subject. The slope (X-ray translucency variation) was then calculated from the changes in pixel value from distance lung apex-diaphragm, and the slopes of two sequences were compared. The results showed there were no significant differences in changes in pixel value between the two sequences in all normal subject (5 males, p>0.05). The results indicated that the present method has reproducibility for measuring pulmonary function and also has potential as a tool for follow-up and therapeutic evaluation.

  9. Impacts of storm events on salt marsh sediment dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castagno, K. A.; Jiménez-Robles, A. M.; Fagherazzi, S.; Donnelly, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    Salt marshes have long been lauded as buffers to storm surges, wind-generated waves, and elevated water levels. Following Redfield's bi-directional model of salt marsh evolution, salt marshes along the eastern coast of the United States keep pace with moderate sea-level rise. Recent geological evidence, however, suggests that some extreme storm events may cause significant marsh erosion. This has major implications for coastal inundation risk to lives and property, as well as the resilience of these coastal wetlands to a changing climate. This study analyzes the relationship between storm intensity and net sediment fluxes in the Virginia Coast Reserve (VCR), a system of salt marshes and coastal bays along the Atlantic side of the Delmarva Peninsula, USA. The study explores the differences in sediment dynamics between tropical cyclones and nor'easters, both of which regularly impact the VCR. To investigate the processes that determine sediment fluxes both between the VCR and open sea and between the different coastal bays of VCR, we used the fully coupled coastal hydrodynamic, sediment transport and wave model Delft3D-SWAN. This work builds on previous sediment composition results based on the framework of the VCR LTER program. During the period from 2009 to 2016, a total of 52 storm events where identified using a Peaks Over Threshold method. For each storm, wind characteristics, water levels, and wave conditions data were obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). A model calibration process achieved good agreement between field data and Delft3D-SWAN results, using water levels inside the VCR and wave height and directions in the closest NOAA buoy to VCR. The results of this study will be useful in determining the response of marsh systems to extreme storm events.

  10. Sediment phosphorus speciation and mobility under dynamic redox conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Chris T.; Rezanezhad, Fereidoun; O'Connell, David W.; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2017-07-01

    Anthropogenic nutrient enrichment has caused phosphorus (P) accumulation in many freshwater sediments, raising concerns that internal loading from legacy P may delay the recovery of aquatic ecosystems suffering from eutrophication. Benthic recycling of P strongly depends on the redox regime within surficial sediment. In many shallow environments, redox conditions tend to be highly dynamic as a result of, among others, bioturbation by macrofauna, root activity, sediment resuspension and seasonal variations in bottom-water oxygen (O2) concentrations. To gain insight into the mobility and biogeochemistry of P under fluctuating redox conditions, a suspension of sediment from a hypereutrophic freshwater marsh was exposed to alternating 7-day periods of purging with air and nitrogen gas (N2), for a total duration of 74 days, in a bioreactor system. We present comprehensive data time series of bulk aqueous- and solid-phase chemistry, solid-phase phosphorus speciation and hydrolytic enzyme activities demonstrating the mass balanced redistribution of P in sediment during redox cycling. Aqueous phosphate concentrations remained low ( ˜ 2.5 µM) under oxic conditions due to sorption to iron(III) oxyhydroxides. During anoxic periods, once nitrate was depleted, the reductive dissolution of iron(III) oxyhydroxides released P. However, only 4.5 % of the released P accumulated in solution while the rest was redistributed between the MgCl2 and NaHCO3 extractable fractions of the solid phase. Thus, under the short redox fluctuations imposed in the experiments, P remobilization to the aqueous phase remained relatively limited. Orthophosphate predominated at all times during the experiment in both the solid and aqueous phase. Combined P monoesters and diesters accounted for between 9 and 16 % of sediment particulate P. Phosphatase activities up to 2.4 mmol h-1 kg-1 indicated the potential for rapid mineralization of organic P (Po), in particular during periods of aeration when the

  11. Predicting the dynamic impact behaviour of spray droplets on flat plant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Delele, M A; Nuyttens, D; Duga, A T; Ambaw, A; Lebeau, F; Nicolai, B M; Verboven, P

    2016-09-14

    The dynamic impact behaviour of water droplets on plant surfaces was investigated based on a multiphase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. The study was conducted using the Volume Of Fluid (VOF) approach. The static contact angle of water droplets on leaf surfaces of different plants (apple, pear, leek and cabbage) was measured and found to vary between 54.9 and 138.2°. Impact experiments were conducted by monitoring the flow and impact characteristics of water droplets on leaves in still air with a high speed camera. Droplets were generated by an agricultural flat fan spray nozzle moving across the leaf at constant speed. The nozzle produced droplets with diameters ranging from 20.6 up to 550.8 μm, and droplet velocity values near the impact between 0.03 and 13.2 m s(-1). The CFD model was capable of predicting the observed dynamic impact behaviour of droplets on the plant surfaces. The fate of the droplets after the impact process for adhesion, bouncing or splashing was accurately predicted for Weber numbers (We) in the range of 0.007 to 1096 and droplet Reynolds numbers (Re) between 5 to 8000. The process was highly dependent on the surface and droplet flow characteristics during the impact. Combinations of We, Re and Ohnesorge (Oh) numbers defined the droplet maximum spread factor, the number of secondary droplets generated as a result of the splashing process and the transition between the different impact outcomes. These criteria can then be used in field scale spray deposition and drift models to better understand agricultural spray operations.

  12. Functional shoulder radiography with use of a dynamic flat panel detector.

    PubMed

    Sakuda, Keita; Sanada, Shigeru; Tanaka, Rie; Kitaoka, Katsuhiko; Hayashi, Norio; Matsuura, Yukihiro

    2014-07-01

    Our purpose in this study was to develop a functional form of radiography and to perform a quantitative analysis for the shoulder joint using a dynamic flat panel detector (FPD) system. We obtained dynamic images at a rate of 3.75 frames per second (fps) using an FPD system. Three patients and 5 healthy controls were studied with a clinically established frontal projection, with abduction of the arms. The arm angle, glenohumeral angle (G-angle), and scapulothoracic angle (S-angle) were measured on dynamic images. The ratio of the G-angle to the S-angle (GSR) was also evaluated quantitatively. In normal subjects, the G-angle and S-angle changed gradually along with the arm angle. The G-angle was approximately twice as large as the S-angle, resulting in a GSR of 2 throughout the abduction of the shoulder. Changes in G-angle and S-angle tended to be irregular in patients with shoulder disorders. The GSR of the thoracic outlet syndrome, recurrent dislocation of the shoulder joint, and anterior serratus muscle paralysis were 3-7.5, 4-9.5, and 3.5-7.5, respectively. The GSR of the anterior serratus muscle paralysis improved to approximately 2 after orthopedic treatment. Our preliminary results indicated that functional radiography by FPD and computer-aided quantitative analysis is useful for diagnosis of some shoulder disorders, such as the thoracic outlet syndrome, recurrent dislocation of the shoulder joint, and anterior serratus muscle paralysis. The technique and procedures described comprise a simple, functional shoulder radiographic method for evaluation of the therapeutic effects of surgery and/or rehabilitation.

  13. Genome-wide transcriptional responses of Alteromonas naphthalenivorans SN2 to contaminated seawater and marine tidal flat sediment

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hyun Mi; Jeong, Hye Im; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Madsen, Eugene L.; Jeon, Che Ok

    2016-01-01

    A genome-wide transcriptional analysis of Alteromonas naphthalenivorans SN2 was performed to investigate its ecophysiological behavior in contaminated tidal flats and seawater. The experimental design mimicked these habitats that either added naphthalene or pyruvate; tidal flat-naphthalene (TF-N), tidal flat-pyruvate (TF-P), seawater-naphthalene (SW-N), and seawater-pyruvate (SW-P). The transcriptional profiles clustered by habitat (TF-N/TF-P and SW-N/SW-P), rather than carbon source, suggesting that the former may exert a greater influence on genome-wide expression in strain SN2 than the latter. Metabolic mapping of cDNA reads from strain SN2 based on KEGG pathway showed that metabolic and regulatory genes associated with energy metabolism, translation, and cell motility were highly expressed in all four test conditions, probably highlighting the copiotrophic properties of strain SN2 as an opportunistic marine r-strategist. Differential gene expression analysis revealed that strain SN2 displayed specific cellular responses to environmental variables (tidal flat, seawater, naphthalene, and pyruvate) and exhibited certain ecological fitness traits –– its notable PAH degradation capability in seasonally cold tidal flat might be reflected in elevated expression of stress response and chaperone proteins, while fast growth in nitrogen-deficient and aerobic seawater probably correlated with high expression of glutamine synthetase, enzymes utilizing nitrite/nitrate, and those involved in the removal of reactive oxygen species. PMID:26887987

  14. Dynamic sagittal imbalance of the spine in degenerative flat back: significance of pelvic tilt in surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, C S; Lee, C K; Kim, Y T; Hong, Y M; Yoo, J H

    2001-09-15

    A retrospective study of 26 patients with degenerative flat back treated with corrective osteotomy. To analyze dynamic sagittal imbalance and to elucidate the cause of postoperative persistent stooping in degenerative flat back. Sagittal spinal imbalance in degenerative flat back was more evident on walking, suggesting its dynamic nature. The most puzzling complication in its surgical treatment was postoperative persistent stooping. This study analyzed 26 surgically treated patients with preoperative gait analysis. Patients were divided into two groups according to postoperative improvement in stooping: Group 1 with marked improvement in stooping and Group 2 with persistent stooping. Various radiographic and gait parameters were compared between the two groups. Comparison of radiographic parameters, representing the static status of the spine, did not indicate any clue to the mechanism for persistent stooping. However, comparison of gait parameters, representing the dynamic status of the spine, revealed meaningful differences between the two groups. Among various gait parameters compared, pelvic tilt seemed to be the most important clue. Patients in Group 1 showed posterior pelvic tilt, whereas those in Group 2 showed marked anterior pelvic tilt. Degenerative flat back could be classified into two types based on pelvic position during walking: one with posterior pelvic tilt and the other with marked anterior pelvic tilt. In the former type, corrective surgery improved the stooping. In the latter, corrective surgery was ineffective, resulting in postoperative persistent stooping.

  15. Coastal sediment dynamics: Introduction to the thematic issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weill, Pierre; Tessier, Bernadette

    2016-07-01

    This thematic issue of Comptes rendus Geoscience gives an overview of the works presented in the frame of a session dedicated to "Coastal sediment dynamics" at the 14th Congress of the French Association of Sedimentologists, held in Paris, France, from 5 to 7 November 2013. In total, 23 papers were presented in this session, both in the form of oral communications and posters. This national conference is traditionally a gateway for PhD and Master students to share their first results and sharpen their oral skills in front of an audience of specialists.

  16. Visualizing sediment dynamics through repeated high-resolution multibeam mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, J. J.; Greinert, J.; Maierhofer, T.

    2013-12-01

    Multibeam mapping has become a common method for mapping the seafloor in shallow and great water depths with different spatial resolutions depending on the system platform (ship-based, AUV- or ROV-based), the beam angle of the system itself, the survey speed, and the distance to the seafloor. Significant advances in system accuracy, processing power and new software make multibeam mapping a powerful tool for studying sediment dynamics in 4D through repeated surveys that are ideally linked to additional studies on currents and sediment load in the water column. The Texelstroom channel, which is part of the Marsdiep between the city of Den Helder and the island of Texel (North Holland, the Netherlands), has been investigated in such a way for many years using water depth estimates from an ADCP installed on a ferry shuttling 24 times a day between the mainland and the island. Since 2009, repeated multibeam surveys have been undertaken up to three times per year as part of a student course, revealing sediment dynamics in much more detail than could be previously seen with the water depth estimates from the ferry-based ADCP. In the Texelstroom channel, the water depth ranges from a few meters to 45 meters. In the highly variable bathymetry, a series of large, bended sand waves exist mainly perpendicular to the direction of the main current. The shape of the sand waves changes from asymmetrical to symmetrical depending on the time of year, with more symmetrical shapes in spring and summer. Perpendicular to the large sand waves, smaller ripples develop during autumn. In addition to these changes in sand wave characteristics, sand wave crests sometimes migrate more than 30m in two months with an average movement of half a meter per day. The migration direction changes during the year resulting in a non-constant back-and-forth movement of the large sand waves. These intra-annual variations are characterized by changes in the slope of the sand waves, variations in the

  17. Effect of dispersant on asphaltene suspension dynamics: aggregation and sedimentation.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Sara M; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2010-12-09

    When oil is mixed with light alkanes, asphaltenes can precipitate out of oil solutions in a multistep process that involves the formation of nano and colloidal scale particles, the aggregation of asphaltene colloids, and their eventual sedimentation. Amphiphilic dispersants can greatly affect this process. The mechanism of the dispersant action in colloidal asphaltene suspensions in heptane has been shown through previous work to be due in part to a reduction in the size of the colloidal asphaltene particles with the addition of dispersant. However, previous studies of the sedimentation behavior revealed evidence of aggregation processes in the colloidal asphaltenes in heptane that has yet to be investigated fully. We investigate the effect of dispersants on this aggregation behavior through the use of dynamic light scattering, showing that both the amount of dispersant and the amount of heptane dilution can slow the onset of aggregation in colloidal asphaltene suspensions. An effective dispersant acts by suppressing colloidal aggregation in asphaltene suspensions, as shown by light scattering, and therefore also slows separation from the bulk, as revealed through macroscopic sedimentation experiments.

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Water Nanodroplet Bounce Back from Flat and Nanopillared Surface.

    PubMed

    Koishi, Takahiro; Yasuoka, Kenji; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2017-10-03

    Molecular dynamics simulations of impinging nanodroplets were performed to study the bounce-back condition for flat and nanopillared surfaces. We found that the bounce-back condition can be closely related to the degree of droplet deformation upon collision with the solid surface. When the droplets have little or small deformation, the bounce-back condition solely depends on the hydrophobicity of the surface. On the other hand, when the droplet deformation is large, the impinging velocity dependence of the bounce-back condition becomes stronger due to the increase of the liquid-vapor interfacial area of colliding droplet, which is proportional to the liquid-vapor surface energy. The impinging droplet simulations with nanopillared hydrophobic surfaces were also performed. The contribution of droplet deformation in this case is relatively small because the surface hydrophobicity is enhanced due to the existence of pillars. Finally, we find that the maximum spreading diameter of the impinging droplets exhibits a consistent trend, in terms of the Weber number dependence, as the experimental measurements with macrodroplets.

  19. Response of reef corals on a fringing reef flat to elevated suspended-sediment concentrations: Moloka'i, Hawai'i.

    PubMed

    Jokiel, Paul L; Rodgers, Kuʻulei S; Storlazzi, Curt D; Field, Michael E; Lager, Claire V; Lager, Dan

    2014-01-01

    A long-term (10 month exposure) experiment on effects of suspended sediment on the mortality, growth, and recruitment of the reef corals Montipora capitata and Porites compressa was conducted on the shallow reef flat off south Moloka'i, Hawai'i. Corals were grown on wire platforms with attached coral recruitment tiles along a suspended solid concentration (SSC) gradient that ranged from 37 mg l(-1) (inshore) to 3 mg l(-1) (offshore). Natural coral reef development on the reef flat is limited to areas with SSCs less than 10 mg l(-1) as previously suggested in the scientific literature. However, the experimental corals held at much higher levels of turbidity showed surprisingly good survivorship and growth. High SSCs encountered on the reef flat reduced coral recruitment by one to three orders of magnitude compared to other sites throughout Hawai'i. There was a significant correlation between the biomass of macroalgae attached to the wire growth platforms at the end of the experiment and percentage of the corals showing mortality. We conclude that lack of suitable hard substrate, macroalgal competition, and blockage of recruitment on available substratum are major factors accounting for the low natural coral coverage in areas of high turbidity. The direct impact of high turbidity on growth and mortality is of lesser importance.

  20. Response of reef corals on a fringing reef flat to elevated suspended-sediment concentrations: Molokaʻi, Hawaiʻi

    PubMed Central

    Jokiel, Paul L.; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Field, Michael E.; Lager, Claire V.; Lager, Dan

    2014-01-01

    A long-term (10 month exposure) experiment on effects of suspended sediment on the mortality, growth, and recruitment of the reef corals Montipora capitata and Porites compressa was conducted on the shallow reef flat off south Molokaʻi, Hawaiʻi. Corals were grown on wire platforms with attached coral recruitment tiles along a suspended solid concentration (SSC) gradient that ranged from 37 mg l−1 (inshore) to 3 mg l−1 (offshore). Natural coral reef development on the reef flat is limited to areas with SSCs less than 10 mg l−1 as previously suggested in the scientific literature. However, the experimental corals held at much higher levels of turbidity showed surprisingly good survivorship and growth. High SSCs encountered on the reef flat reduced coral recruitment by one to three orders of magnitude compared to other sites throughout Hawaiʻi. There was a significant correlation between the biomass of macroalgae attached to the wire growth platforms at the end of the experiment and percentage of the corals showing mortality. We conclude that lack of suitable hard substrate, macroalgal competition, and blockage of recruitment on available substratum are major factors accounting for the low natural coral coverage in areas of high turbidity. The direct impact of high turbidity on growth and mortality is of lesser importance. PMID:25653896

  1. Response of reef corals on a fringing reef flat to elevated suspended-sediment concentrations: Moloka‘i, Hawai‘i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jokiel, Paul L.; Rodgers, Ku'ulei S.; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Field, Michael E.; Lager, Claire V.; Lager, Dan

    2014-01-01

    A long-term (10 month exposure) experiment on effects of suspended sediment on the mortality, growth, and recruitment of the reef corals Montipora capitata and Porites compressa was conducted on the shallow reef flat off south Molokaʻi, Hawaiʻi. Corals were grown on wire platforms with attached coral recruitment tiles along a suspended solid concentration (SSC) gradient that ranged from 37 mg l−1 (inshore) to 3 mg l−1(offshore). Natural coral reef development on the reef flat is limited to areas with SSCs less than 10 mg l−1 as previously suggested in the scientific literature. However, the experimental corals held at much higher levels of turbidity showed surprisingly good survivorship and growth. High SSCs encountered on the reef flat reduced coral recruitment by one to three orders of magnitude compared to other sites throughout Hawaiʻi. There was a significant correlation between the biomass of macroalgae attached to the wire growth platforms at the end of the experiment and percentage of the corals showing mortality. We conclude that lack of suitable hard substrate, macroalgal competition, and blockage of recruitment on available substratum are major factors accounting for the low natural coral coverage in areas of high turbidity. The direct impact of high turbidity on growth and mortality is of lesser importance.

  2. Effects of sandy vs muddy sediments on the vertical distribution of microphytobenthos in intertidal flats of the Fraser River Estuary, Canada.

    PubMed

    Yin, Kedong; Zetsche, Eva-Maria; Harrison, Paul J

    2016-07-01

    Benthic algae or microphytobenthos (MPB) in intertidal flats play an important role in the sediment and overlying water ecosystems. We hypothesize that there are effects of sediment texture on the vertical distribution of MPB using chlorophyll a (chl a) as a proxy for MPB biomass and present results over a 2.5-year period. Four sites were sampled monthly: two sandy sites (A10 and A12) and two muddy sites (A0 and A14) on the intertidal flats of the Fraser River Estuary. At the two sandy sites, pigments were distributed down to 10 cm. High ratios of depth-integrated chl a to phaeopigments suggest that the chl a had been recently buried. In contrast, at the muddy sites, pigments were limited to the top 4 cm, with MBP in the top 1 cm contributing up to 60 % of the whole sediment core pigments. As a result, the depth-integrated chl a values were on average 2,044 mg m(-2) (160-4,200) at A10 and 882 mg m(-2) (183-2,569) at A12, the two sandy sites, and much higher than at the two muddy sites where averages of 84 mg m(-2) (41-174) and 235 mg m(-2) (77-854) were measured at A0 and A14, respectively. Despite these lower concentrations at the muddy sites than at the sandy sites, particulate organic carbon (POC) and nitrogen (PON) concentrations showed a homogenous vertical distribution at the two sandy sites. Such a homogeneous vertical distribution of chl a, POC, and PON suggests that vertical transport mechanisms were actively transporting organic material into and out of the sediment. These results suggest that MBP on sandy sediments play a very active role in providing food for herbivores and are interacting with the overlying water column in the sediment-water exchange processes during tidal cycles.

  3. [Distribution patterns of heavy metals in surficial sediment and their influence on the environment quality of the intertidal flat of Luoyuan Bay, Fujian coast].

    PubMed

    Gao, Wen-Hua; Du, Yong-Fen; Wang, Dan-Dan; Gao, Shu

    2012-09-01

    Intertidal flats represent a typical environmentally fragile and sensitive zone. In order to investigate the environmental quality of the intertidal zone in Luoyuan Bay, field survey was carried out in 2009. Contents of heavy metals (Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, V and Zn) in the surficial sediment were measured using an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). Moreover, the impact on the environment quality was evaluated with the potential ecological risk method. The average contents of the heavy metals Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, V and Zn in the surficial sediment were 20.48, 77.82, 23.24, 40.67, 36.25, 134.75 and 111.21 mg x kg(-1), respectively. The heavy metal contents in the Spartina alterniflora salt-marsh were apparently higher than those in the bare flat. Further, the heavy metal concentrations found in the present study were generally higher than the background values of the coastal regions of Fujian Province, but lower than those associated with the Pearl River estuary. According to principal component and correlation analyses, industrial wastewater, mineral exploration and degradation of organic matter were the main sources of heavy metals in the area investigated. The results of potential ecological risk evaluation indicated that the intertidal zone as a whole can be ranked as "moderate potential ecological risk". Ni and Co were the major pollutants among the metals in consideration; the pollution related to Pb was less significant. The level of potential ecological risk of the Spartina alterniflora slat-marsh was higher than that of the bare flat. The sequence of potential ecological risk for the heavy metals was Ni > Co > Cu > Pb > Cr > V > Zn.

  4. Cosmological dynamics of spatially flat Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet models in various dimensions: Vacuum case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavluchenko, Sergey A.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we perform a systematic study of vacuum spatially flat anisotropic [(3 +D )+1 ]-dimensional Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet cosmological models. We consider models that topologically are the product of two flat isotropic submanifolds with different scale factors. One of these submanifolds is three dimensional and represents our 3D space and the other is D dimensional and represents extra dimensions. We consider no Ansatz on the scale factors, which makes our results quite general. With both Einstein-Hilbert and Gauss-Bonnet contributions in play and with the symmetry involved, the cases with D =1 , D =2 , D =3 , and D ≥4 have different dynamics due to the different structures of the equations of motion. We analytically analyze equations of motion in all cases and describe all possible regimes. It appears that the only regimes with nonsingular future asymptotes are the Kasner regime in general relativity and exponential regimes. As of the past asymptotes, for a smooth transition only the Kasner regime in Gauss-Bonnet is an option. With this at hand, we are down to only two viable regimes: the "pure" Kasner regime [transition from a high-energy (Gauss-Bonnet) to a low-energy (general relativity) Kasner regime] and a transition from a high-energy Kasner regime to an anisotropic exponential solution. It appears that these regimes take place for different signs of the Gauss-Bonnet coupling α : the "pure" Kasner regime occurs for α >0 at low D and α <0 for high D ; the anisotropic exponential regime is reached only for α >0 . So if we restrain ourselves with α >0 solutions (which would be the case, say, if we identify α with inverse string tension in heterotic string theory), the only late-time regimes are Kasner for D =1 , 2 and anisotropic exponential for D ≥2 . Also, low-energy Kasner regimes [a (t )∝tp] have expansion rates for (3 +1 )-dimensional subspace ("our Universe") ranging from p =0.5 (D =1 ) to p =1 /√{3 }≈0.577 (D →∞ ), which

  5. 40 CFR 230.42 - Mud flats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Aquatic Sites § 230.42 Mud flats. (a) Mud flats are broad flat areas along the sea coast and in coastal rivers to the head of tidal influence and in inland lakes, ponds, and riverine systems. When mud flats are inundated, wind and wave action may resuspend bottom sediments. Coastal mud flats are exposed...

  6. Quantifying the eroded volume of mercury-contaminated sediment using terrestrial laser scanning at Stocking Flat, Deer Creek, Nevada County, California, 2010–13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howle, James F.; Alpers, Charles N.; Bawden, Gerald W.; Bond, Sandra

    2016-07-28

    High-resolution ground-based light detection and ranging (lidar), also known as terrestrial laser scanning, was used to quantify the volume of mercury-contaminated sediment eroded from a stream cutbank at Stocking Flat along Deer Creek in the Sierra Nevada foothills, about 3 kilometers west of Nevada City, California. Terrestrial laser scanning was used to collect sub-centimeter, three-dimensional images of the complex cutbank surface, which could not be mapped non-destructively or in sufficient detail with traditional surveying techniques.The stream cutbank, which is approximately 50 meters long and 8 meters high, was surveyed on four occasions: December 1, 2010; January 20, 2011; May 12, 2011; and February 4, 2013. Volumetric changes were determined between the sequential, three-dimensional lidar surveys. Volume was calculated by two methods, and the average value is reported. Between the first and second surveys (December 1, 2010, to January 20, 2011), a volume of 143 plus or minus 15 cubic meters of sediment was eroded from the cutbank and mobilized by Deer Creek. Between the second and third surveys (January 20, 2011, to May 12, 2011), a volume of 207 plus or minus 24 cubic meters of sediment was eroded from the cutbank and mobilized by the stream. Total volumetric change during the winter and spring of 2010–11 was 350 plus or minus 28 cubic meters. Between the third and fourth surveys (May 12, 2011, to February 4, 2013), the differencing of the three-dimensional lidar data indicated that a volume of 18 plus or minus 10 cubic meters of sediment was eroded from the cutbank. The total volume of sediment eroded from the cutbank between the first and fourth surveys was 368 plus or minus 30 cubic meters.

  7. Infection dynamics of Marteilia refringens in flat oyster Ostrea edulis and copepod Paracartia grani in a claire pond of Marennes-Oléron Bay.

    PubMed

    Audemard, Corinne; Sajus, Marie-Céline; Barnaud, Antoine; Sautour, Benoit; Sauriau, Pierre-Guy; Berthe, Frank J C

    2004-10-21

    The protozoan parasite Marteilia refringens has been partly responsible for the severe decrease in the production of the European flat oyster Ostrea edulis Linnaeus in France since the 1970s. The calanoid copepod Paracartia grani Sars was recently found to be a host for M. refringens in French shallow-water oyster ponds ('claires'). This study reconsidered M. refringens transmission dynamics in the light of this finding, taking into account not only oyster infection dynamics and environmental factors but also data concerning the copepod host. P. grani population dynamics in the claire under study revealed that this species is the dominant planktonic copepod in this confined ecosystem. During winter, M. refringens overwintered in O. edulis, with P. grani existing only as resting eggs in the sediment. The increase in temperature in spring controlled and synchronized both the release of M. refringens sporangia in the oyster feces, and the hatching of the benthic resting eggs of the copepod. Infection of oysters by M. refringens was limited to June, July and August, coinciding with (1) the highest temperature recorded in the claire, and (2) the highest abundance of P. grani. PCR detection of M. refringens in P. grani during the summer period was linked to the release of parasite sporangia by the oyster. Our results are supported by previous results on the effective transmission of this parasite from the oyster to the copepod.

  8. Dynamics and constraints of the massive graviton dark matter flat cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Basilakos, S.; Plionis, M.; Alves, M. E. S.; Lima, J. A. S.

    2011-05-15

    We discuss the dynamics of the Universe within the framework of the massive graviton cold dark matter scenario (MGCDM) in which gravitons are geometrically treated as massive particles. In this modified gravity theory, the main effect of the gravitons is to alter the density evolution of the cold dark matter component in such a way that the Universe evolves to an accelerating expanding regime, as presently observed. Tight constraints on the main cosmological parameters of the MGCDM model are derived by performing a joint likelihood analysis involving the recent supernovae type Ia data, the cosmic microwave background shift parameter, and the baryonic acoustic oscillations as traced by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey red luminous galaxies. The linear evolution of small density fluctuations is also analyzed in detail. It is found that the growth factor of the MGCDM model is slightly different ({approx}1-4%) from the one provided by the conventional flat {Lambda}CDM cosmology. The growth rate of clustering predicted by MGCDM and {Lambda}CDM models are confronted to the observations and the corresponding best fit values of the growth index ({gamma}) are also determined. By using the expectations of realistic future x-ray and Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster surveys we derive the dark matter halo mass function and the corresponding redshift distribution of cluster-size halos for the MGCDM model. Finally, we also show that the Hubble flow differences between the MGCDM and the {Lambda}CDM models provide a halo redshift distribution departing significantly from the those predicted by other dark energy models. These results suggest that the MGCDM model can observationally be distinguished from {Lambda}CDM and also from a large number of dark energy models recently proposed in the literature.

  9. Detectability of regional lung ventilation with flat-panel detector-based dynamic radiography.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Okazaki, Nobuo; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Masayuki; Matsui, Takeshi; Matsui, Osamu

    2008-03-01

    This study was performed to investigate the ability of breathing chest radiography using flat-panel detector (FPD) to quantify relative local ventilation. Dynamic chest radiographs during respiration were obtained using a modified FPD system. Imaging was performed in three different positions, ie, standing and right and left decubitus positions, to change the distribution of local ventilation. We measured the average pixel value in the local lung area. Subsequently, the interframe differences, as well as difference values between maximum inspiratory and expiratory phases, were calculated. The results were visualized as images in the form of a color display to show more or less x-ray translucency. Temporal changes and spatial distribution of the results were then compared to lung physiology. In the results, the average pixel value in each lung was associated with respiratory phase. In all positions, respiratory changes of pixel value in the lower area were greater than those in the upper area (P < 0.01), which was the same tendency as the regional differences in ventilation determined by respiratory physiology. In addition, in the decubitus position, it was observed that areas with large respiratory changes in pixel value moved up in the vertical direction during expiration, which was considered to be airway closure. In conclusion, breathing chest radiography using FPD was shown to be capable of quantifying relative ventilation in local lung area and detecting regional differences in ventilation and timing of airway closure. This method is expected to be useful as a new diagnostic imaging modality for evaluating relative local ventilation.

  10. Dynamics of peat accumulation and marl flat formation in a calcareous fen, midwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miner, J.J.; Ketterling, D.B.

    2003-01-01

    The age and sequence of peat accumulation were investigated at a calcareous fen in northeastern Illinois, USA. The purpose of this study was to identify the processes that form and sustain marl flats, which are areas of marl or tufa substrate within the fen that contain numerous rare plant species. Geomorphic, stratigraphic, and radiocarbon evidence was used to establish the processes and chronology of peat accumulation and erosion adjacent to each marl flat. The age of the base of the peat deposit varies greatly throughout the fen, ranging from 14,679 calibrated years before present (cal. years BP) to nearly modern, indicating that colonization of the sand and gravel substrate by peat occurred throughout the period from the Late Pleistocene to present. Adjacent to one marl flat, trends in basal peat age and thickness show that peat accumulation has progressed laterally inward from both sides, suggesting that the marl flat has been infilling with peat progressively by accumulation at the margins since at least 5,370 cal. years BP or longer. A second marl flat in the fen is surrounded by older, thick peat of differing ages on either edge and is bounded by fresh scarps, indicating that the marl flat currently is expanding laterally by erosion into the preexisting peat blanket. These two examples suggest a continuously repeating process, where erosion of the accumulated peat blanket forms a marl flat, which is later covered by peat accumulation. Trends in basal peat age elsewhere in the fen suggest that other marl flats may have existed in the past that have been completely infilled with peat. This study suggests that marl flat formation is a natural process that has been occurring for millennia, continuously creating habitat for the rare plant species that occupy marl flats. There is no evidence that the marl flats at this site are indicative of anthropogenic disturbance, so that management options for these areas are limited to maintaining the quality and quantity

  11. Continental-Margin Processes Recorded in Shelf and Canyon Sediments. Sediment Deposition, Erosion and Accumulation on a Tidal Flat Adjacent to a River Mouth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Sequence Stratigraphy , IAS Spec. Pub. 37, Blackwell Publishing, Oxford, 549 pp. (2007). C.A. Nittrouer, J.A. Austin, M.E. Field, J.H. Kravitz, J.P.M...Continental Margin Sedimentation: From Sediment Transport to Sequence Stratigraphy , IAS Spec. Pub. 37, Blackwell Publishing, Oxford, 1-48 (2007... Stratigraphy , IAS Spec. Pub. 37, Blackwell Publishing, Oxford, 157-212 (2007). L.F. Pratson, C.A. Nittrouer, P.L.Wiberg, M.S. Steckler, J.B. Swenson

  12. Dynamic Hydraulic Conductivity, Streambed Sediment, and Biogeochemistry Following Stream Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, S.; Jefferson, A.; Kinsman-Costello, L. E.

    2015-12-01

    Stream restoration projects strive to improve water quality and degraded habitat, yet restoration projects often fall short of achieving their goals. Hyporheic exchange facilitates biogeochemical interaction which can contribute to positive water quality and habitat, but there are limited data on how restoration affects hyporheic processes. Hyporheic flowpaths can be altered by the processes and products of stream restoration, as well as the transport of fine sediment through the stream bed post-restoration. In two northeastern Ohio headwater streams, variations in hydraulic conductivity and pore water chemistry were monitored following restoration, as measures of hyporheic functioning. A second-order stream restored in August 2013, had a slight decrease in average hydraulic conductivity but an increase in heterogeneity from pre-restoration to four months post-restoration. Data collected 10 and 15 months post-restoration show continued declines in hydraulic conductivity throughout large constructed riffles. These piezometers also indicate dominance of downwelling throughout the riffles with only isolated upwelling locations. Grain size analysis of freeze cores collected in streambed sediments show differences suggesting fluvial transport and sorting have occurred since construction was completed. Pore water sampled from piezometers within the riffles had Mn2+ concentrations ten times higher than surface water, suggesting redox transformations are occurring along hyporheic flowpaths. A first-order stream reach, immediately downstream of a dam, restored in April 2014 had no significant change in average hydraulic conductivity between 1 and 2 months post-restoration, but many individual piezometers had increases of over 100% in high gradient positions or decreases of over 50% in low gradient positions. Changes in hydraulic conductivities in both restored streams are thought to be an adjustments from disturbance to a new dynamic equilibrium influenced by the morphology

  13. A novel tracer technique for the assessment of fine sediment dynamics in urban water management systems.

    PubMed

    Spencer, K L; Droppo, I G; He, C; Grapentine, L; Exall, K

    2011-04-01

    Urban storm water run off can reduce the quality of receiving waters due to high sediment load and associated sediment-bound contaminants. Consequently, urban water management systems, such as detention ponds, that both modify water quantity through storage and improve water quality through sediment retention are frequently-used best management practices. To manage such systems effectively and to improve their efficiency, there is a need to understand the dynamics (transport and settling) of sediment, and in particular the fine sediment fraction (<63 μm) and its associated contaminants within urban storm water management systems. This can be difficult to achieve, as modelling the transport behaviour of fine-grained and cohesive sediment is problematic and field-based measurements can be costly, time-consuming and unrepresentative. The aim of this study was to test the application of a novel cohesive sediment tracer and to determine fine sediment transport dynamics within a storm water detention pond. The cohesive sediment tracer used was a holmium labelled montmorillonite clay which flocculated and had similar size and settling velocity to the natural pond sediment it was intended to mimic. The tracer demonstrated that fine sediment was deposited across the entire pond, with the presence of reed beds and water depth being important factors for maximising sediment retention. The results of the sediment tracer experiment were in good agreement with those of a mathematical sediment transport model. Here, the deposited sediment tracer was sampled by collecting and analysing surface pond sediments for holmium. However, analysis and sampling of the three dimensional suspended tracer 'cloud' may provide more accurate information regarding internal pond sediment dynamics.

  14. Process-based distributed modeling approach for analysis of sediment dynamics in a river basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, M. A.; Dutta, D.; Hironaka, S.

    2011-04-01

    Modeling of sediment dynamics for developing best management practices of reducing soil erosion and of sediment control has become essential for sustainable management of watersheds. Precise estimation of sediment dynamics is very important since soils are a major component of enormous environmental processes and sediment transport controls lake and river pollution extensively. Different hydrological processes govern sediment dynamics in a river basin, which are highly variable in spatial and temporal scales. This paper presents a process-based distributed modeling approach for analysis of sediment dynamics at river basin scale by integrating sediment processes (soil erosion, sediment transport and deposition) with an existing process-based distributed hydrological model. In this modeling approach, the watershed is divided into an array of homogeneous grids to capture the catchment spatial heterogeneity. Hillslope and river sediment dynamic processes have been modeled separately and linked to each other consistently. Water flow and sediment transport at different land grids and river nodes are modeled using one dimensional kinematic wave approximation of Saint-Venant equations. The mechanics of sediment dynamics are integrated into the model using representative physical equations after a comprehensive review. The model has been tested on river basins in two different hydro climatic areas, the Abukuma River Basin, Japan and Latrobe River Basin, Australia. Sediment transport and deposition are modeled using Govers transport capacity equation. All spatial datasets, such as, Digital Elevation Model (DEM), land use and soil classification data, etc., have been prepared using raster "Geographic Information System (GIS)" tools. The results of relevant statistical checks (Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency and R-squared value) indicate that the model simulates basin hydrology and its associated sediment dynamics reasonably well. This paper presents the model including descriptions

  15. Process-based distributed modeling approach for analysis of sediment dynamics in a river basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, M. A.; Dutta, D.; Hironaka, S.

    2010-08-01

    Modeling of sediment dynamics for developing best management practices of reducing soil erosion and of sediment control has become essential for sustainable management of watersheds. Precise estimation of sediment dynamics is very important since soils are a major component of enormous environmental processes and sediment transport controls lake and river pollution extensively. Different hydrological processes govern sediment dynamics in a river basin, which are highly variable in spatial and temporal scales. This paper presents a process-based distributed modeling approach for analysis of sediment dynamics at river basin scale by integrating sediment processes (soil erosion, sediment transport and deposition) with an existing process-based distributed hydrological model. In this modeling approach, the watershed is divided into an array of homogeneous grids to capture the catchment spatial heterogeneity. Hillslope and river sediment dynamic processes have been modeled separately and linked to each other consistently. Water flow and sediment transport at different surface grids and river nodes are modeled using one-dimensional kinematic wave approximation of Saint-Venant equations. The mechanics of sediment dynamics are integrated into the model using representative physical equations after a comprehensive review. The model has been tested on river basins in two different hydro climatic areas, the Abukuma River Basin, Japan and Latrobe River Basin, Australia. Sediment transport and deposition are modeled using Govers transport capacity equation. All spatial datasets, such as, Digital Elevation Model (DEM), land use and soil classification data, etc., have been prepared using raster "Geographic Information System (GIS)" tools. The results of relevant statistical checks (Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency and R-squared value) indicate that the model simulates basin hydrology and its associated sediment dynamics reasonably well. This paper presents the model including

  16. Continental-Margin Processes Recorded in Shelf and Canyon Sediments Documenting Fine-Sediment Import and Export for Two Contrasting Mesotidal Flats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    are the foundation for understanding and interpreting sedimentary processes and seabed stratigraphy . To investigate the relationship between... Sedimentological Congress, Fukuoka (2006). T.M. Drexler, C.A. Nittrouer, A.S. Ogston, P. Puig, Sediment record on the Rhone prodelta and processes controlling

  17. Farallon plate dynamics prior to the Laramide orogeny: Numerical models of flat subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sibiao; Currie, Claire A.

    2016-01-01

    The Laramide orogeny (~ 80-50 Ma) was an anomalous period of mountain-building in the western United States that occurred more than 1000 km inboard of the Farallon Plate subduction margin. It is widely believed that this orogeny is coincident with a period of flat (subhorizontal) subduction. However, the factors that caused the Farallon Plate to evolve from a normal (steep) geometry to flat subduction are not well understood. Three proposed factors are: (1) a westward (trenchward) increase in North America motion, (2) an increased slab suction force owing to the presence of thick Colorado Plateau lithosphere, and (3) subduction of a low-density oceanic plateau. This study uses 2D upper mantle scale numerical models to investigate these factors. The models show that trenchward continental motion is the primary control on subduction geometry, with decreasing slab dip as velocity increases. However, this can only create low-angle subduction, as the Farallon Plate was old (> 100 Myr) and denser than the mantle. A transition to flat subduction requires: (1) subduction of a buoyant oceanic plateau that includes an 18-km-thick crust that does not undergo metamorphic densification and an underlying depleted harzburgite layer, and (2) a slab break-off at the landward side of the plateau. The break-off removes the dense frontal slab, and flat subduction develops as the buoyant plateau deflects the slab upward. The slab suction force has only a minor effect on slab flattening, but the thickness of the Colorado Plateau lithosphere controls the depth of the flat slab. With a continental velocity of 4 cm/yr and a 400-km-wide oceanic plateau, flat subduction develops within 15 Ma after plateau subduction. The flat slab underthrusts the continent at ~ 200 km depth, eventually extending > 1500 km inboard of the trench.

  18. A network model for simulating sediment dynamics within a small watershed (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, S.; Ye, S.; Xu, X.; Harman, C. J.; Sivapalan, M.; Hassan, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    Although sediment transport is extensively studied at the scale of a river reach, sediment dynamics at the watershed scale are still poorly understood. Sediment dynamics at this scale are largely determined by the propagation of sediment pulses through the river network which are driven mostly by the variability in flow conditions. Here, we develop a model which simulates sediment export from small to medium size basins in two stages: (1) delivery of sediments from hillslope and bank erosion into the river channel, and (2) propagation of the sediments in the channel through the river network towards watershed outlet. The model conceptualizes a watershed as a collection of reaches or representative elementary watersheds (REW) that are connected to each other through the river network structure, and each REW comprises a lumped representation of a hillslope and channel component. The flow of water along the stream network is modeled through mass and momentum balance equations applied in all the REWs and sediment transport within each REW is simulated through sediment balance equations. Every reach receives inputs of sediments from upstream REWs and also from the erosion of adjacent hillslopes, banks and the channel bed. We tested the model using data from Goodwin Creek, a small (21.3 sq. km) watershed in Mississippi, USA. The model yields good estimates of the timing and magnitude of sediment events as well as event-scale hysteresis in the sediment concentration-discharge relationship. The model also captures reach scale degradation/aggradation dynamics at different locations within the watershed, which are useful in identifying primary erosion/deposition zones and the spatio-temporal patterns of sediment supply and depletion. As a next step, we will use this model to assess the impacts of changing land-use/climate scenarios on sediment dynamics, and also facilitate in modeling the transport of nutrients (e.g., Phosphorus) that propagate along the river system through

  19. Miocene-Recent sediment flux in the south-central Alaskan fore-arc basin governed by flat-slab subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finzel, Emily S.; Enkelmann, Eva

    2017-04-01

    The Cook Inlet in south-central Alaska contains the early Oligocene to Recent stratigraphic record of a fore-arc basin adjacent to a shallowly subducting oceanic plateau. Our new measured stratigraphic sections and detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology and Hf isotopes from Neogene strata and modern rivers illustrate the effects of flat-slab subduction on the depositional environments, provenance, and subsidence in fore-arc sedimentary systems. During the middle Miocene, fluvial systems emerged from the eastern, western, and northern margins of the basin. The axis of maximum subsidence was near the center of the basin, suggesting equal contributions from subsidence drivers on both margins. By the late Miocene, the axis of maximum subsidence had shifted westward and fluvial systems originating on the eastern margin of the basin above the flat-slab traversed the entire width of the basin. These mud-dominated systems reflect increased sediment flux from recycling of accretionary prism strata. Fluvial systems with headwaters above the flat-slab region continued to cross the basin during Pliocene time, but a change to sandstone-dominated strata with abundant volcanogenic grains signals a reactivation of the volcanic arc. The axis of maximum basin subsidence during late Miocene to Pliocene time is parallel to the strike of the subducting slab. Our data suggest that the character and strike-orientation of the down-going slab may provide a fundamental control on the nature of depositional systems, location of dominant provenance regions, and areas of maximum subsidence in fore-arc basins.

  20. Two-dimensional generalization of Gaussian rings and dynamics of the central regions of flat galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondratyev, B. P.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, the idea of a single Gaussian elliptical ring on a circular two-dimensional ring or, in the limit, a continuous disc is generalized. Such a ring (hereafter, the R-ring) can consist of identical Keplerian elliptic orbits, of fixed a and e, uniformly portioned on the azimuth angle, or/and filled with orbits that precess around a central star or black hole. The special method of radially averaging the mass of moving bodies is developed. For this wide annulus, we compute the surface density, the two-dimensional and three-dimensional potentials, the mutual gravitational energy and the rotational energy. The surface density has two sharp peaks at the edges of the R-ring and a deep internal minimum. The Newtonian potential of the R-ring is carefully studied and the spatial equipotential surfaces are calculated. The force of attraction at the edges of the R-ring strives for infinity, and in cavity the circular orbits do not exist. The R-rings can be formed naturally in systems of bodies with a large central mass and play a dynamical role. The model is applied to the assessment of some properties of the clockwise disc in the centre of the Galaxy. For the relation of the rotational energy to the module of mutual gravitational energy, we found τ ≈ 0.29. The R-ring model offers an explanation for the existence of sharp local minima on rotation curves, which are observed in many flat galaxies. We discuss the physical sources of apsidal precession, and of the associated time-scales. We have found the relations of time-scales of apsidal precession from the supermassive black hole and the nuclear star cluster for orbits inside and outside the cluster. The apsidal precession rate of stars can largely be determined not to be a relativistic effect from the black hole and the Newtonian gravitational influence of the densest stellar cluster around the supermassive black hole.

  1. Influence of sediment cohesion on deltaic shoreline dynamics and bulk sediment retention: A laboratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Kyle M.; Li, Qi; Benson, W. Matthew

    2015-11-01

    While boundary and forcing conditions influence the average location of a shoreline in deltaic systems, internal morphodynamics can drive high-magnitude deviations from the long-term trend. Here we explore the role of sediment cohesion on these morphodynamics using physical experiments. Specifically, we explore the role of sediment cohesion on the scales of autogenic shoreline transgressions and regressions. Results indicate that sediment cohesion enhances the time and space scales associated with autogenic cycles of channel formation, elongation, and abandonment. In systems with high sediment cohesion, this cycle can drive shoreline transgressions that produce flooding surfaces in the resulting stratigraphy which could be confused with surfaces produced by increases in sea level rise or subsidence rates. Enhanced channelization resulting from sediment cohesion also increases the pumping of fine-grained sediment into the marine realm, where it can bypass the delta foreset, thus decreasing total delta sediment retention rate.

  2. The influence of sea-level rise on fringing reef sediment dynamics: field observations and numerical modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Field, Michael E.; Elias, Edwin; Presto, M. Katherine

    2011-01-01

    While most climate projections suggest that sea level may rise on the order of 0.5-1.0 m by 2100, it is not clear how fluid flow and sediment transport on fringing reefs might change in response to this rapid sea-level rise. Field observations and numerical modeling suggest that an increase in water depth on the order of 0.5-1.0 m on a fringing reef flat would result in larger significant wave heights and wave-driven shear stresses, which, in turn, would result in an increase in both the size and quantity of sediment that can be resuspended from the seabed or eroded from coastal plain deposits. Greater wave- and wind-driven currents would develop on the reef flat with increasing water depth, increasing the offshore flux of water and sediment from the inner reef flat to the outer reef flat and fore reef where coral growth is typically greatest.

  3. Sediment dynamics and their potential influence on insular-slope mesophotic coral ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, C.; Schmidt, W.; Appeldoorn, R.; Hutchinson, Y.; Ruiz, H.; Nemeth, M.; Bejarano, I.; Motta, J. J. Cruz; Xu, H.

    2016-10-01

    Although sediment dynamics exert a fundamental control on the character and distribution of reefs, data on sediment dynamics in mesophotic systems are scarce. In this study, sediment traps and benthic photo-transects were used to document spatial and temporal patterns of suspended-sediment and bed-load dynamics at two geomorphically distinct mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs) on the upper insular slope of southwest Puerto Rico. Trap accumulation rates of suspended sediment were relatively low and spatiotemporally uniform, averaging <1 mg cm-2 d-1 and never exceeding 3 mg cm-2 d-1 over the sampled period. In contrast, trap accumulation rates of downslope bed-load movement were orders of magnitude higher than suspended-sediment accumulation rates and highly variable, by orders of magnitude, both spatially and temporally. Percent sand cover within photo-transects varied over time from 10% to more than 40% providing further evidence of downslope sediment movement. In general, the more exposed, lower gradient site had higher rates of downslope sediment movement, higher sand cover and lower coral cover than the more sheltered and steep site that exhibited lower rates of downslope sediment movement, lower sand cover and higher coral cover. In most cases, trap accumulation rates of suspended sediment and bed load varied together and peaks in trap accumulation rates correspond to peaks in SWAN-modeled wave-orbital velocities, suggesting that surface waves may influence sediment dynamics even in mesophotic settings. Though variable, off-shelf transport of sediment is a continuous process occurring even during non-storm conditions. Continuous downslope sediment movement in conjunction with degree of exposure to prevailing seas and slope geomorphology are proposed to exert an important influence on the character and distribution of insular-slope MCEs.

  4. Muddy Seafloors and Tidal Flats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    gravity waves, circulation, sediment transport , and the subsequent morphological response in shallow waters on sandy and muddy coasts and on macrotidal...water, and for circulation, sediment transport , and morphological change on macrotidal flats. Specific goals relating to waves over muddy seafloors...Investigate the relative importance to the circulation of riverine and tidal flows, - Test and improve models for circulation, sediment transport

  5. Carbonate sediment dynamics and compartmentalisation of a highly modified coast: Geraldton, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tecchiato, Sira; Collins, Lindsay; Stevens, Alexandra; Soldati, Michela; Pevzner, Roman

    2016-02-01

    The coastal zone off Geraldton in temperate Midwestern Australia was investigated to identify sediment dynamics and sediment budget components of two main embayments. An integrated analysis of hydrodynamics, geomorphology, sediments and habitat data was required to overcome a lack of previous examinations of sediment dynamics in the region. The seaward extent of the nearshore transport system was assessed. An improved understanding of coastal sediment dynamics and its relationship to coastal stability and assets was also achieved. The system is complex, with biogenic sediment input, as well as carbonate dune and river-derived sediments. Coastal erosion at Geraldton is mitigated by nourishment activities which require sand bypassing. Natural and artificial sediment sinks were identified, and are mainly located in the northern embayment where beach erosion is more significant. A dredged shipping channel needed to provide access to port facilities modifies the local sediment dynamics. This study provides new information for managing the Geraldton coast, which may be applicable to similar regions of Western Australia and carbonate coasts elsewhere.

  6. Dynamic stiffness of the contact between a carbon nanotube and a flat substrate in a peeling geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tianjun; Champougny, Lorène; Bellon, Ludovic

    2017-03-01

    We study the physics of adhesion and the contact mechanics at the nanoscale with a peeling experiment of a carbon nanotube on a flat substrate. Using an interferometric atomic force microscope and an extended force modulation protocol, we investigate the frequency response of the stiffness of the nano-contact from DC to 20 kHz. We show that this dynamic stiffness is only weakly frequency dependent, increasing by a factor 2 when the frequency grows by 3 orders of magnitude. Such behavior may be the signature of amorphous relaxations during the mechanical solicitation at the nano-scale.

  7. Controls of Sediment Nitrogen Dynamics in Tropical Coastal Lagoons.

    PubMed

    Enrich-Prast, Alex; Figueiredo, Viviane; Esteves, Francisco de Assis; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2016-01-01

    Sediment denitrification rates seem to be lower in tropical environments than in temperate environments. Using the isotope pairing technique, we measured actual denitrification rates in the sediment of tropical coastal lagoons. To explain the low denitrification rates observed at all study sites (<5 μmol N2 m-2 h-1), we also evaluated potential oxygen (O2) consumption, potential nitrification, potential denitrification, potential anammox, and estimated dissimilatory nitrate (NO3-) reduction to ammonium (NH4+; DNRA) in the sediment. 15NO3- and 15NH4+ conversion was measured in oxic and anoxic slurries from the sediment surface. Sediment potential O2 consumption was used as a proxy for overall mineralization activity. Actual denitrification rates and different potential nitrogen (N) oxidation and reduction processes were significantly correlated with potential O2 consumption. The contribution of potential nitrification to total O2 consumption decreased from contributing 9% at sites with the lowest sediment mineralization rates to less than 0.1% at sites with the highest rates. NO3- reduction switched completely from potential denitrification to estimated DNRA. Ammonium oxidation and nitrite (NO2-) reduction by potential anammox contributed up to 3% in sediments with the lowest sediment mineralization rates. The majority of these patterns could be explained by variations in the microbial environments from stable and largely oxic conditions at low sediment mineralization sites to more variable conditions and the prevalences of anaerobic microorganisms at high sediment mineralization sites. Furthermore, the presence of algal and microbial mats on the sediment had a significant effect on all studied processes. We propose a theoretical model based on low and high sediment mineralization rates to explain the growth, activity, and distribution of microorganisms carrying out denitrification and DNRA in sediments that can explain the dominance or coexistence of DNRA and

  8. Controls of Sediment Nitrogen Dynamics in Tropical Coastal Lagoons

    PubMed Central

    Enrich-Prast, Alex; Figueiredo, Viviane; Esteves, Francisco de Assis; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2016-01-01

    Sediment denitrification rates seem to be lower in tropical environments than in temperate environments. Using the isotope pairing technique, we measured actual denitrification rates in the sediment of tropical coastal lagoons. To explain the low denitrification rates observed at all study sites (<5 μmol N2 m-2 h-1), we also evaluated potential oxygen (O2) consumption, potential nitrification, potential denitrification, potential anammox, and estimated dissimilatory nitrate (NO3-) reduction to ammonium (NH4+; DNRA) in the sediment. 15NO3- and 15NH4+ conversion was measured in oxic and anoxic slurries from the sediment surface. Sediment potential O2 consumption was used as a proxy for overall mineralization activity. Actual denitrification rates and different potential nitrogen (N) oxidation and reduction processes were significantly correlated with potential O2 consumption. The contribution of potential nitrification to total O2 consumption decreased from contributing 9% at sites with the lowest sediment mineralization rates to less than 0.1% at sites with the highest rates. NO3- reduction switched completely from potential denitrification to estimated DNRA. Ammonium oxidation and nitrite (NO2-) reduction by potential anammox contributed up to 3% in sediments with the lowest sediment mineralization rates. The majority of these patterns could be explained by variations in the microbial environments from stable and largely oxic conditions at low sediment mineralization sites to more variable conditions and the prevalences of anaerobic microorganisms at high sediment mineralization sites. Furthermore, the presence of algal and microbial mats on the sediment had a significant effect on all studied processes. We propose a theoretical model based on low and high sediment mineralization rates to explain the growth, activity, and distribution of microorganisms carrying out denitrification and DNRA in sediments that can explain the dominance or coexistence of DNRA and

  9. Application of wave mechanics theory to fluid dynamics problems: Flat plate flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krzywoblocki, M. Z. V.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of the flow in the laminar boundary layer along an infinitely long flat plate are discussed. The flow may be disturbed or not, depending on the situation. The physical, natural aspects of the flow, either a laminar flow free from disturbances or a flow which originally is a laminar one with disturbances superimposed upon it. Oscillograms of turbulence in wind tunnel tests and in the wake of a cylinder are presented.

  10. Multiple-method approaches for quantifying fine sediment dynamics in river catchments over contemporary timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Hugh

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the patterns and processes of contemporary fine sediment dynamics in river catchments constitutes a key research challenge for catchment scientists. Such knowledge has considerable value for the targeting of management resources to reduce excess fine sediment supply and its impacts on water resources and aquatic ecosystems. Many past studies tended to focus on a single compartment of the fine sediment cascade and utilised a limited range of research methods. For more holistic understanding, the use of multiple-method approaches is required to provide data on the sources, transfer, storage, and transit times of fine sediment in river catchments. Such approaches would allow scientists to better conceptualise catchment processes controlling the movement of fine sediment across a range of spatial scales. It may also enhance the scientific quality of catchment-scale studies through the acquisition of multiple lines of evidence concerning a particular research problem. The specific combination of fine sediment tracing and fingerprinting procedures with catchment sediment flux measurements and sediment budget modelling has considerable potential to enhance our knowledge of contemporary sediment dynamics. This combination of techniques offers complementary information and the opportunity to compare datasets, such as estimates of catchment sediment source contributions obtained using sediment tracers with direct measurements of sediment fluxes or catchment model outputs. This contribution explores the potential for such combinations of methods to yield distinctive insights not otherwise available from the use of only one of these techniques. It draws on published examples of multiple-method studies by the author from small agricultural and wildfire-affected forest catchments (1-2 km2) in south-east Australia and from larger agricultural river catchments (38-920 km2) in south-west England. It will also identify possible directions for catchment research based

  11. Dynamic sediment trapping and episodic sediment accretion in fluviodeltaic environments: Implications for coastal restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Z.; Tornqvist, T. E.; Chamberlain, E. L.; Esposito, C. R.; Marshak, J.; Nijhuis, A.; Sandoval, L.; Mauz, B.

    2013-12-01

    Many large river deltas are experiencing severe land loss because of various natural and anthropogenic causes. This is truly the case for the Mississippi Delta where ~40 km2/yr land loess have been documented for the last 25 years. A solid understanding about fluviodeltaic sediment dispersion and accretion is essential to improve management of fluviodeltaic landscapes. Here we present field data collected from the Bayou Lafourche subdelta in the Mississippi Delta to investigate the sedimentary and chronologic development of the Bayou Lafourche floodplain. The textural composition of the floodplain deposits shows dramatic changes along Bayou Lafourche. In the upstream portion where Bayou Lafourche cut through swamp environments, the floodplain deposits are dominantly mud, similar in composition to sediment load of the Lower Mississippi River. This suggests that the floodplain in this reach has a relatively high sediment trapping efficiency, which is confirmed by a >50% sediment trapping efficiency estimated for a crevasse splay there. In contrast, Bayou Lafourche floodplain deposits are sand dominant in the downstream portion where the subdelta extended into an open water environment, which suggests a relatively low sediment trapping efficiency in open water environments, similar to the Wax Lake Delta in the Mississippi Delta. Optical chronology for the Bayou Lafourche floodplain deposits demonstrates that fluviodeltaic sedimentation is episodic at a centennial time scale. As a consequence of relatively high sediment trapping efficiency and the episodic pattern of fluviodeltaic deposition, sediment accretion rates on the upstream portion of Bayou Lafourche are on the order of cm/yr at a centennial time scale. Our data suggest that mud, which constitutes ~80% of the Lower Mississippi River sediment load, can be used efficiently for wetland creation if being diverted to locations favor a high trapping efficiency, such as inland vegetated swamps. The sediment accretion

  12. Seagrass dynamics in shallow coastal lagoons: Interactions with fluid dynamics, sediment resuspension and light conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, J. A.; D'Odorico, P.; McGlathery, K.; Wiberg, P. L.

    2010-12-01

    Sea grasses have been recognized for their ability to stabilize the benthic sediments of shallow coastal lagoons, thereby reducing the turbidity of the water column and providing a light environment that is more favorable for sea grass establishment and growth. Sea grasses are complex, in that they involve different strategies of carbon allocation between below and above ground biomass, and the partitioning of the overall biomass into a discrete number of stems and leaves. Stem density and canopy height, in turn, modify the flow field, sediment resuspension, and the light environment. It is still unclear how these seasonal and interannual dynamics of seagrass vegetation may be affected by and interact with the process of sediment resuspension under fluctuating climatic and hydrologic conditions. To this end, a coupled model hydrodynamic model of vegetation-sediment-water flow interactions and vegetation growth is developed and used to examine the feedback between seagrass vegetation density and sediment resuspension and water column turbidity. The daily growth model is designed to capture underground biomass and the growth and senescence of above ground biomass structural components (e.g., leaves and stems). This allows for investigating how the interseasonal and seasonal variability in shoot and leaf density within a meadow affects the strength of positive feedback between seagrass and their light environment. Eight years of hourly wind, light, tides and water temperature are used to drive the coupled model from an initial mature meadow state as well as a seedling state. The model demonstrates both the emergence of bistable behavior as well as the limited resilience of seagrass meadows due to the strength of the positive feedback. The effects of increased water depths and water temperatures on the health and resilience of a seagrass meadow were also investigated. As both water depth and water temperatures increase, the system only exhibits bistable behavior with

  13. Lutibacter litoralis gen. nov., sp. nov., a marine bacterium of the family Flavobacteriaceae isolated from tidal flat sediment.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong H; Cho, Byung C

    2006-04-01

    A rod-shaped marine bacterium, designated strain CL-TF09T, isolated from a tidal flat in Ganghwa, Korea, was characterized based on its physiological and biochemical features, fatty acid profile and phylogenetic position. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed a clear affiliation with the family Flavobacteriaceae. Strain CL-TF09T showed the closest phylogenetic relationship with the genera Tenacibaculum and Polaribacter; sequence similarities between CL-TF09T and the type strains of Tenacibaculum and Polaribacter species ranged from 90.7 to 91.8 %. Cells of strain CL-TF09T were non-motile and grew on solid media as yellow colonies. The strain grew in the presence of 1-5 % sea salts, within a temperature range of 5-30 degrees C and at pH 7-8. The strain had iso-C(15 : 0) 3-OH (17.4 %), iso-C(15 : 0) (16.7 %), anteiso-C(15 : 0) (15.1 %) and iso-C(16 : 0) 3-OH (13.4 %) as predominant fatty acids. The DNA G+C content was 33.9 mol%. Based on the physiological, fatty acid composition and phylogenetic data presented, strain CL-TF09T is considered to represent a novel genus and species of the family Flavobacteriaceae, for which the name Lutibacter litoralis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CL-TF09T (=KCCM 42118T = JCM 13034T).

  14. Modelling of cohesive sediment dynamics in tidal estuarine systems: Case study of Tagus estuary, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, G.; Pinto, L.; Ascione, I.; Mateus, M.; Fernandes, R.; Leitão, P.; Neves, R.

    2014-12-01

    Cohesive sediment dynamics in estuarine systems is a major issue in water quality and engineering problems. Numerical models can help to assess the complex dynamics of cohesive sediments, integrating the information collected in monitoring studies. Following a numerical approach we investigated the main factors that influence the cohesive sediment dynamics in an estuarine system composed of large mudflats (Tagus estuary, Portugal). After a spin up period of the bottom layer and considering the combined effect of waves and currents on the bottom shear stress, the dynamics of cohesive sediment during the fortnightly and daily erosion-sedimentation cycle was properly reproduced by the model. The results of cohesive suspended sediments were validated with data from sixteen monitoring stations located along the estuary and turbidity data measured by two multiparametric probes. The hydrodynamics were previously validated by harmonic analysis and with ADCP data. Although tidal currents are the major cause of cohesive sediment erosion, the results suggest that wind waves also play an important role. The simulated sediment mass involved in the fortnightly tidal cycle was in the same order of magnitude of the annual load from the rivers, as observed in previous studies based on field data.

  15. Elephant trail runoff and sediment dynamics in northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sidle, Roy C; Ziegler, Alan D

    2010-01-01

    Although elephants may exert various impacts on the environment, no data are available on the effects of elephant trails on runoff, soil erosion, and sediment transport to streams during storms. We monitored water and sediment fluxes from an elephant trail in northern Thailand during seven monsoon storms representing a wide range of rainfall energies. Runoff varied from trivial amounts to 353 mm and increased rapidly in tandem with expanding contributing areas once a threshold of wetting occurred. Runoff coefficients during the two largest storms were much higher than could be generated from the trail itself, implying a 4.5- to 7.9-fold increase in the drainage areas contributing to storm runoff. Clockwise hysteresis patterns of suspended sediment observed during most storms was amplified by a "first flush" of sediment early on the hydrograph in which easily entrained sediment was transported. As runoff areas expanded during the latter part of large storms, discharge increased but sediment concentrations declined. Thus, sediment flux was better correlated to kinetic energy of rainfall on the falling limbs of most storm hydrographs compared to rising limbs. Based on a power function relationship between sediment flux and storm kinetic energy, the estimated annual sediment yield from the trail for 135 storms in 2005 was 308 to 375 Mg ha(-1) yr(-1), higher than from most disturbed land surfaces in the tropics. The eight largest storms (30% of total storm energy) in 2005 transported half of the total annual sediment. These measurements together with site investigations reveal that highly interconnected elephant trails, together with other source areas, directly link runoff and sediment to streams.

  16. The use of lipid markers to define sources of organic matter in sediment and food web of the intertidal salt-marsh-flat ecosystem of Mont-Saint-Michel Bay, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meziane, Tarik; Bodineau, Laurent; Retiere, Christian; Thoumelin, Guy

    1997-12-01

    Salt marsh plants and seven surface sediment samples along a transect in the intertidal flat area of Mont-Saint-Michel Bay were analysed for fatty acids and sterols. The presence of lipid markers of halophytes (long-chain fatty acids, 18:3ω3, and phytosterols) in the surface layers of the sediment confirms the export of organic matter from the salt marsh to the intertidal flat. The spatial distribution of this organic matter over the tidal-flat area was controlled by the tidal currents and the presence of mussel beds. Lipid markers of diatoms (20:5ω3 and brassicasterol) and bacteria (18:1ω7 and odd, linear and branched, fatty acids) were also found in the surface sediments. Diatoms and benthic bacteria as well as organic matter from the salt marsh were the significant food sources available to the macrozoobenthos on the intertidal flat. The ingestion of these food types by the dominant species of the macrozoobenthos was confirmed by the presence of their respective lipid markers in the animals. The presence of these markers in animals subjected to a starvation experiment confirmed that these food types are really assimilated. The lipid composition of the starved animals indicated that the species studied were able to accumulate the fatty acid 20:5ω3 (considered to be a diatom marker), and that the annelid Nereis diversicolor supported an internal bacterial population.

  17. Vortex dynamics and wall shear stress behaviour associated with an elliptic jet impinging upon a flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, J.; New, T. H.

    2016-07-01

    Vortical structures and dynamics of a Re h = 2100 elliptic jet impinging upon a flat plate were studied at H/ d h = 1, 2 and 4 jet-to-plate separation distances. Flow investigations were conducted along both its major and minor planes using laser-induced fluorescence and digital particle image velocimetry techniques. Results show that the impingement process along the major plane largely consists of primary jet ring-vortex and wall-separated secondary vortex formations, where they subsequently separate from the flat plate at smaller H/ d h = 1 and 2 separation distances. Key vortex formation locations occur closer to the impingement point as the separation distance increases. Interestingly, braid vortices and rib structures begin to take part in the impingement process at H/ d h = 4 and wave instabilities dominate the flow field. In contrast, significantly more coherent primary and secondary vortices with physically larger vortex core sizes and higher vortex strengths are observed along the minor plane, with no signs of braid vortices and rib structures. Lastly, influences of these different flow dynamics on the major and minor plane instantaneous and mean skin friction coefficient levels are investigated to shed light on the effects of separation distance on the wall shear stress distributions.

  18. Alteromonas naphthalenivorans sp. nov., a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium isolated from tidal-flat sediment.

    PubMed

    Mi Jin, Hyun; Hyun Kim, Kyung; Ok Jeon, Che

    2015-11-01

    A Gram-staining-negative and halotolerant bacterium, designated SN2T, capable of biodegrading polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, was isolated from a tidal flat contaminated with crude oil in Korea. Cells were strictly aerobic, catalase- and oxidase-positive, motile rods, with a single polar flagellum. Growth was observed at 4-37 °C (optimum, 25-30 °C) at pH 6.0-9.0 (optimum, pH 7.0-7.5) and in the presence of 0.5-9.0% (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 2.0%). Only ubiquinone 8 was detected as the isoprenoid quinone, and summed feature 3 (comprising C16:1ω7c and/or iso-C15:0 2-OH), C16:0, C18:1ω7c and C12:0 were observed as the major cellular fatty acids. The major polar lipids consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, a glycolipid, an aminolipid and three unidentified lipids. The DNA G+C content was 43.5 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain SN2T formed a phylogenetic lineage with Alteromonas stellipolaris and Alteromonas addita within the genus Alteromonas, which was consistent with multilocus phylogenetic and MALDI-TOF MS analyses. Strain SN2T was most closely related to the type strains of A. stellipolaris, A. addita and Alteromonas macleodii, with 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities of 99.5, 99.3 and 98.4% and DNA-DNA relatedness of 48.7 ± 6.6, 24.9 ± 7.5 and 27.9 ± 8.4%, respectively. In conclusion, strain SN2T represents a novel species of the genus Alteromonas, for which the name Alteromonas naphthalenivorans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SN2T ( = KCTC 11700BPT = JCM 17741T =KACC 18427T).

  19. Recent sediment dynamics in hadal trenches: Evidence for the influence of higher-frequency (tidal, near-inertial) fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnewitsch, Robert; Falahat, Saeed; Stehlikova, Jirina; Oguri, Kazumasa; Glud, Ronnie N.; Middelboe, Mathias; Kitazato, Hiroshi; Wenzhöfer, Frank; Ando, Kojiro; Fujio, Shinzou; Yanagimoto, Daigo

    2014-08-01

    In addition to high hydrostatic pressure, scarcity of food is viewed as a factor that limits the abundance and activity of heterotrophic organisms at great ocean depths, including hadal trenches. Supply of nutritious food largely relies on the flux of organic-rich particulate matter from the surface ocean. It has been speculated that the shape of hadal trenches helps to ‘funnel' particulate matter into the deeper parts of the trench, leading to sediment ‘focussing' and improved benthic food supply. Here we investigate for five Northwest Pacific trenches the efficiency of sediment focussing by evaluating ratios of measured (sediment-derived) and expected (water-column-derived) sedimentary inventories of the naturally occurring and radioactive particulate-matter tracer 210Pbxs. The sites comprise a broad range of surface-ocean productivity and physical-oceanographic regimes. Across the five trench-axis settings the inventory ratio varies between 0.5 and 4.1, with four trench-axis settings having ratios>1 (sediment focussing) and one trench-axis setting a ratio<1 (sediment winnowing). Although the fluid- and sediment-dynamical forcing behind sediment focussing remains unclear, this study finds evidence for another mechanism that is superimposed on, and counteracts, the focussing mechanism. This superimposed mechanism is related to higher-frequency (tidal, near-inertial) fluid dynamics. In particular, there is evidence for a strong and negative relation between the intensity of propagating internal tides and the extent of sediment focussing in the trench-axis. The relation can be approximated by a power function and the most intense drop in sediment focussing already occurs at moderate internal-tide intensities. This suggests that propagating internal tides may have a subtle but significant influence on particulate-matter dynamics and food supply in hadal trenches in particular, but possibly also in the deep seas in general. A mechanism for the influence of

  20. Examining Sediment-bound Radiocesium Dynamics in Two Fukushima Coastal Catchments with Sediment Fingerprinting Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laceby, J. P.; Lepage, H.; Bonté, P.; Joron, J. L.; Onda, Y.; Lefèvre, I.; Ayrault, S.; Evrard, O.

    2015-12-01

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident resulted in the significant fallout of radiocesium (137Cs and 134Cs) over the Fukushima region. After deposition on the soil surface, radiocesium is primarily bound to fine soil particles. Subsequently, rainfall and snow melt run-off events result in the downstream migration of radiocesium. Understanding the spatial distribution and relative contribution of different sediment sources is therefore fundamental to the management of radiocesium migration. Sediment fingerprinting techniques were used to determine the location and relative contributions of different sediment sources in the Mano and Niida Rivers, in the Fukushima region. First, we modelled the relative contributions of radiocesium from the upstream portions of the catchment, that received greater proportions of the fallout (e.g. >20 kBq kg-1), to sediment sampled in the downstream coastal regions. Second, we examined the elemental geochemistry of the major soil types (e.g. Andosols, Cambisols, Fluvisols) within these catchments and modelled their relative contribution to sediment sampled throughout these catchments. Elemental composition was measured with neutron activation analysis, radiocesium with gamma-spectrometry and a distribution modelling approach quantified source contributions. In the Mano River ~20% of the radiocesium sampled was modelled to be derived from the upstream area compared to ~50% in the Niida River. The highest contribution of upstream radiocesium was modelled after the typhoon seasons in 2011 and 2013. Fluvisols were found to be the dominant source of sediment (76%). The dominance of Fluvisols indicates that sediments are likely derived from sources that are highly connected to the river network (e.g. rice paddy fields). Understanding the relative contributions of these different sediment sources will allow for more direct management of sediment and thus radiocesium transfers in these Fukushima coastal catchments.

  1. Dynamics of suspended sediment exchange and transport in a degraded mangrove creek in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kitheka, Johnson U; Ongwenyi, George S; Mavuti, Kenneth M

    2002-12-01

    This study focuses on sediment exchange dynamics in Mwache Creek, a shallow tidal mangrove wetland in Kenya. The surface area of the creek is 17 km2 at high water spring. The creek experiences semidiurnal tides with tidal ranges of 3.2 m and 1.4 m during spring and neap tides, respectively. The creek is ebb dominant in the frontwater zone main channel and is flood dominant in the backwater zone main channel. During rainy season, the creek receives freshwater and terrigenous sediments from the seasonal Mwache River. Heavy supply of terrigenous sediments during the El Niño of 1997-1998 led to the huge deposition of sediments (10(60 tonnes) in the wetland that caused massive destruction of the mangrove forest in the upper region. In this study, sea level, tidal discharges, tidal current velocities, salinity, total suspended sediment concentrations (TSSC) and particulate organic sediment concentrations (POSC) measured in stations established within the main channel and also within the mangrove forests, were used to determine the dynamics of sediment exchange between the frontwater and backwater zones of the main channel including also the exchange with mangrove forests. The results showed that during wet seasons, the high suspended sediment concentration associated with river discharge and tidal resuspension of fine channel-bed sediment accounts for the inflow of highly turbid water into the degraded mangrove forest. Despite the degradation of the mangrove forest, sediment outflow from the mangrove forest was considerably less than the inflow. This caused a net trapping of sediment in the wetland. The net import of the sediment dominated in spring tide during both wet and dry season and during neap tide in the wet season. However, as compared to heavily vegetated mangrove wetlands, the generally degraded Mwache Creek mangrove wetland sediment trapping efficiency is low as the average is about 30% for the highly degraded backwater zone mangrove forest and 65% in the

  2. Dynamics of a bubbly turbulent boundary layer along a surface piercing flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliseda, Alberto; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2003-11-01

    The behaviour of a bubble-laden turbulent boundary layer has been studied experimentally in an open channel water flow with Reynolds number up to 10^6. A poly-dispersed bubble cloud with mean diameter around 200 μ m is injected at the leading edge of a vertical, surface piercing flat plate. The high void fraction bubble layer rises along the plate, developing a Kelvin Helmholtz type instability due to the vertical shear. As a result of this instability, streamwise vorticity is generated that combines with the vertical vorticity associated with the boundary layer, tilting the vortex lines. Bubbles are, for the most part, confined to the boundary layer and accumulate as they interact with the turbulent structures present in this type of flows. The flow at the junction between the flat plate and the free surface is also studied in the presence of bubbles. An streamwise submerged vortex is observed, in agreement with previous studies of single phase junction flows. Vorticity originated by the bouyancy-driven instability of the bubbly layer is convected away from the plate when it reaches the surface, and reconects with the streamwise vortex. Thus, the vortex gains strength and starts to accumulate bubbles stripped from the boundary layer, becoming a dominant feature of the flow.

  3. Sedimentation

    Treesearch

    Cliff R. Hupp; Michael R. Schening

    2000-01-01

    Sedimentation is arguably the most important water-quality concern in the United States. Sediment trapping is cited frequently as a major function of riverine-forested wetlands, yet little is known about sedimcntation rates at the landscape scale in relation to site parameters, including woody vegetation type, elevation, velocity, and hydraulic connection to the river...

  4. Sediment sources and channel dynamics, Daly River, Northern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasson, R. J.; Furlonger, L.; Parry, D.; Pietsch, T.; Valentine, E.; Williams, D.

    2010-01-01

    The Daly River occupies a mainly undisturbed large catchment in the Australian wet-dry tropics. Concerns about possible increased sediment input to the River from clearing and cropping have motivated this study of fine sediment sources. Using geochemical tracers for both modern sediments and alluvial bench deposits, it is shown that, for the last ~ 30 years, 89-97% of the fine sediment originates from erosion by gullying and channel change. There is no discernible input of top soil from the cleared land adjacent to the Daly River in the study area. The analysis and OSL dating of the alluvial benches have also provided data on the age of (and inferences about the causes of) bench formation, flood frequency change, sedimentation rate change, and episodes of sand transport. The benches are being destroyed as the channel widens (contributing sediment to the river) and the bed of the Daly appears to be shallowing, both responses to increased overbank flows. The sediment source created by channel widening is almost all the result of hydrologic change, with no discernible role for land use.

  5. Sediment dynamics of an artificially deepened mesotidal coastal lagoon: An environmental magnetic investigation of Tauranga Harbour, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badesab, Firoz; von Dobeneck, Tilo; Briggs, Roger M.; Bryan, Karin R.; Just, Janna; Müller, Hendrik

    2017-07-01

    Tauranga Harbour, New Zealand's largest barrier-enclosed coastal lagoon, comprises two sub-basins with separate catchments, inlets and tidal channel systems. This study sets out to assess and investigate the sediment dispersal system of Tauranga Harbour using standard environmental magnetic and sedimentological methods. Compilations of rock magnetic and grain size data of surficial sediments collected from inflowing rivers, various estuarine environments (estuaries, tidal flats and tidal channels) and the adjacent nearshore mirror the net and differential sediment fluxes into and through the two sub-basins of this lagoon. For all studied depositional environments, the magnetogranulometric ratios SIRM/κ and ARM/κ are positively correlated with magnetic mineral content (SIRM, ARM, χ) in the sense that larger magnetic particles are associated with higher magnetic enrichment. Grain-size analyses show that magnetic enrichment during particle transport and deposition can result from grain-size as well as from grain-density fractionation. The periodically changing accumulation/erosion conditions provide for a selective retention of specific grain sizes and an enhancement of the heavier magnetic mineral particles. Magnetic crystal size and clastic grain size correlate poorly over the whole study area, but group within similar depositional environments. Coarser magnetic and clastic grain sizes and higher magnetite enrichment in the southern sub-basin can be reconciled with episodic flood runoff of the Wairoa River and a much larger, artificially deepened southern tidal inlet which likely enables higher tidal current velocities. Our approach of combining magnetic and clastic grain-size could be successfully implemented to establish a conceptual model of sediment dynamics and gravitational sorting within Tauranga Harbour.

  6. Coral reef metabolism and carbon chemistry dynamics of a coral reef flat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, Rebecca; Benthuysen, Jessica; Cantin, Neal; Caldeira, Ken; Anthony, Ken

    2015-05-01

    Global carbon emissions continue to acidify the oceans, motivating growing concern for the ability of coral reefs to maintain net positive calcification rates. Efforts to develop robust relationships between coral reef calcification and carbonate parameters such as aragonite saturation state (Ωarag) aim to facilitate meaningful predictions of how reef calcification will change in the face of ocean acidification. Here we investigate natural trends in carbonate chemistry of a coral reef flat over diel cycles and relate these trends to benthic carbon fluxes by quantifying net community calcification and net community production. We find that, despite an apparent dependence of calcification on Ωarag seen in a simple pairwise relationship, if the dependence of net calcification on net photosynthesis is accounted for, knowing Ωarag does not add substantial explanatory value. This suggests that, over short time scales, the control of Ωarag on net calcification is weak relative to factors governing net photosynthesis.

  7. Dynamics of a Flat Multidimensional Anisotropic Universe in the Gauss-Bonnet Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toporensky, Alexey; Kirnos, Ilya; Pavluchenko, Sergyey

    We consider a flat anisotropic metric in (4+1)- and (5+1)-dimensional space-time in Gauss-Bonnet gravity. In the present presentation we are interesting in the behavior mostly in the vicinity of the cosmological singularity, which allows us to take into account only corrections of the highest possible order. In our case it is the Gauss-Bonnet contribution, so we neglect Einstein terms. In the absence of matter sources this problem have been studied in Ref. 1,2, in the present presentation we take matter into account. The full Einstein - Gauss-Bonnet system shows a complicated behavior even in the vacuum case3,4 and we leave investigation of such system with matter for a future work.

  8. Sediment Dynamics Within Buffer Zone and Sinkhole Splay Areas Under Extreme Soil Disturbance Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonover, Jon E.; Crim, Jackie F.; Williard, Karl W. J.; Groninger, John W.; Zaczek, James J.; Pattumma, Klairoong

    2015-09-01

    Sedimentation dynamics were assessed in sinkholes within training areas at Ft. Knox Military Installation, a karst landscape subjected to decades of tracked vehicle use and extreme soil disturbance. Sinkholes sampled were sediment-laden and behaved as intermittent ponds. Dendrogeomorphic analyses were conducted using willow trees ( Salix spp.) located around the edge of 18 sinkholes to estimate historical sedimentation rates, and buried bottles were installed in 20 sinkholes at the center, outer edge, and at the midpoint between the center and edge to estimate annual sedimentation rates. Sedimentation data were coupled with vegetation characteristics of sinkhole buffers to determine relationships among these variables. The dendrogeomorphic method estimated an average accumulation rate of 1.27 cm year-1 translating to a sediment loss rate of 46.1 metric ton year-1 from the training areas. However, sediment export to sinkholes was estimated to be much greater (118.6 metric ton year-1) via the bottle method. These data suggest that the latter method provided a more accurate estimate since accumulation was greater in the center of sinkholes compared to the periphery where dendrogeomorphic data were collected. Vegetation data were not tightly correlated with sedimentation rates, suggesting that further research is needed to identify a viable proxy for direct measures of sediment accumulation in this extreme deposition environment. Mitigation activities for the sinkholes at Ft. Knox's tank training area, and other heavily disturbed karst environments where extreme sedimentation exists, should consider focusing on flow path and splay area management.

  9. A network model for prediction and diagnosis of sediment dynamics at the watershed scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Sopan; Sivapalan, Murugesu; Hassan, Marwan A.; Ye, Sheng; Harman, Ciaran J.; Xu, Xiangyu

    2012-12-01

    We present a semi-distributed model that simulates suspended sediment export from a watershed in two stages: (1) delivery of sediments from hillslope and bank erosion into the river channel, and (2) propagation of the channel sediments through the river network toward the watershed outlet. The model conceptualizes a watershed as the collection of reaches, or representative elementary watersheds (REW), that are connected to each other through the river network, and each REW comprises a lumped representation of a hillslope and channel component. The flow of water along the stream network is modeled through coupled mass and momentum balance equations applied in all REWs and sediment transport within each REW is simulated through the sediment balance equations. Every reach receives sediment inputs from upstream REWs (if present) and from the erosion of adjacent hillslopes, banks and channel bed. We tested this model using 12 years (1982-1993) of high temporal resolution data from Goodwin Creek, a 21.3 km2 watershed in Mississippi, USA. The model yields good estimates of sediment export patterns at the watershed outlet, with Pearson correlation coefficient (R value) of 0.85, 0.87, and 0.95 at daily, monthly, and annual resolution, respectively. Furthermore, the model shows that the dynamics of sediment transport are controlled to a large extent by the differences in the behavior of coarse and fine sediment particles, temporary channel storage, and the spatial variability in climatic forcing. These processes have a bearing on the patterns of sediment delivery with increasing scale.

  10. Human impacts on sediment dynamics within the Rhine delta, the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobo, Noortje; Middelkoop, Hans; Makaske, Bart

    2015-04-01

    The Rhine delta in the Netherlands has a long history of human impacts, of which large-scale land reclamation, drainage, embankment and river channelization have been the most prominent. On-going plans for river and floodplain restoration will lead to renewed - but yet unknown - sediment dynamics along the lower Rhine branches in the coming century. Here we address the consequences of human impacts for the sediment dynamics in the Rhine delta during three major phases in the past: 1) the pristine high-stand delta before land reclamation and embankment (~4000 BP - 1300 AD, 2) the period of embanked rivers (~1350-1850 AD), and 3) the period after the river channels were normalized to a fixed standard width by arrays of groynes and riprap (~1870 AD-present). For each of these periods we quantitatively reconstructed the amounts of sediment deposited within the delta, internal sediment reworking, and associated sediment residence times. The results show that sediment trapping varied across the delta during the pre-embankment period, and demonstrate how avulsions caused small sediment pulses within the system. Estimated average residence times of overbank fines were in the order of 10 ka. Embankment has dramatically reduced the spatial extent where sediment deposition occurred, while internal sediment reworking along the embanked rivers remained locally very active. Channel normalization not only ceased re-erosion of previously deposited floodplain sediment along the channel banks, but implied an ultimate shift of the depo-centre of both overbank and channel sediments from the floodplain to the lower river channels and the estuary. To date, the Rhine sediment has to be dredged from its lower reaches, while the old floodplain surface presently protected by embankments suffers from increasing soil subsidence.

  11. Seasonal variations in suspended-sediment dynamics in the tidal reach of an estuarine tributary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Downing-Kunz, Maureen A.; Schoellhamer, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying sediment supply from estuarine tributaries is an important component of developing a sediment budget, and common techniques for estimating supply are based on gages located above tidal influence. However, tidal interactions near tributary mouths can affect the magnitude and direction of sediment supply to the open waters of the estuary. We investigated suspended-sediment dynamics in the tidal reach of Corte Madera Creek, an estuarine tributary of San Francisco Bay, using moored acoustic and optical instruments. Flux of both water and suspended-sediment were calculated from observed water velocity and turbidity for two periods in each of wet and dry seasons during 2010. During wet periods, net suspended-sediment flux was seaward; tidally filtered flux was dominated by the advective component. In contrast, during dry periods, net flux was landward; tidally filtered flux was dominated by the dispersive component. The mechanisms generating this landward flux varied; during summer we attributed wind–wave resuspension in the estuary and subsequent transport on flood tides, whereas during autumn we attributed increased spring tide flood velocity magnitude leading to local resuspension. A quadrant analysis similar to that employed in turbulence studies was developed to summarize flux time series by quantifying the relative importance of sediment transport events. These events are categorized by the direction of velocity (flood vs. ebb) and the magnitude of concentration relative to tidally averaged conditions (relatively turbid vs. relatively clear). During wet periods, suspended-sediment flux was greatest in magnitude during relatively turbid ebbs, whereas during dry periods it was greatest in magnitude during relatively turbid floods. A conceptual model was developed to generalize seasonal differences in suspended-sediment dynamics; model application to this study demonstrated the importance of few, relatively large events on net suspended-sediment flux

  12. An investigation of rainwater tanks quality and sediment dynamics.

    PubMed

    Magyar, M I; Mitchell, V G; Ladson, A R; Diaper, C

    2007-01-01

    Rainwater tanks are being introduced into urban areas in Australia to supplement centralised potable supply systems. A pilot scale tank study and a full-scale field tank study found that heavy metal concentrations in water samples taken from the tank's supply point can, in some cases, exceed levels recommended by guidelines. Both studies also found very high concentrations of heavy metals in the sediments accumulated at the base of rainwater tanks. Laboratory experiments are underway to investigate sediment transport processes within a full-scale tank. Preliminary results demonstrate the effect of sediment resuspension on the quality of water released from the tank outlet. Improved tank designs that reduce sediment resuspension and mitigate impacts on water quality are the focus of future work.

  13. Dynamic transport of suspended sediment by solitary wave: Experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    cho, JaeNam; Kim, DongHyun; Hwang, KyuNam; Lee, SeungOh

    2016-04-01

    Solitary waves are able to transport a large amount of suspended sediment when approaching on the beach, which sometimes causes - serious beach erosion, especially in the east and south coastal lines in Korea. But it has rarely been known about the method how to evaluate or estimate the amount of beach erosion caused by solitary waves. Experimental assessment is necessary to comprehend the process of sediment transport on a slope. The prismatic rectangular channel is 12 m long, 0.8 m wide, and 0.75 m high. A sluice gate is applied at prismatic channel in order to produce the solitary waves. Upstream water depth is more than channel water depth and the sluice gate is suddenly opened to simulate conditions of solitary waves. A sand slope with a 1/6 and a sediment thickness is 0.03 m. The experimental sediments are used anthracite (d_50=1.547 mm ,C_u=1.38) and Jumoonjin sand (d_50=0.627 mm ,C_u=1.68). Specific laboratory equipment are designed to collect suspended sediment samples at the same time along the wave propagation at 5 points with evenly space. Each amount of sampling is approximately 25 ml and they are completely dried in oven over 24 hours according to the USGS (Guideline and standard techniques and method 3-C4). Two video cameras (Model No. : Sony, HDR-XR550) are mounted for capturing images at top and side-view when the processes of solitary wave and run up/down on slope. Also, this study are analyzed the correlation between Suspended sediment concentration and turbidity. Also, this study are analyzed the correlation between suspended sediment concentration and turbidity. Turbidity is used to verify suspended sediment concentration. Dimensionless analyses of experimental results carried out in this study. One dimensionless parameter is expressed with pressure of solitary wave on a slope to suspended sediment concentration, which is concerned about lifting force. The other is relate to drag force presenting with run up/down velocity on a slope and

  14. Molecular Approaches to Understanding C & N Dynamics in MArine Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Arturo Massol; James Tiedje; Jizhong Zhou; Allan Devol

    2007-05-16

    Continental margin sediments constitute only about 10% of the total sediment surface area in the world’s oceans, nevertheless they are the dominant sites of nitrogen (N) cycling. Recent studies suggest that the oceanic nitrogen budget is unbalanced, primarily due to a higher nitrogen removal rate in contrast to the fixation rate, and it has been suggested that denitrification activity contributes significantly to this imbalance. Although denitrification in marine environments has been studied intensively at the process level, little is known about the species abundance, composition, distribution, and functional differences of the denitrifying population. Understanding the diversity of microbial populations in marine environments, their responses to various environmental factors such as NO3-, and how this impact the rate of denitrification is critical to predict global N dynamics. Environmental Microbiology has the prompt to study the influence of each microbial population on a biogeochemical process within a given ecosystem. Culture-dependent and –independent techniques using nucleic acid probes can access the identity and activity of cultured and uncultured microorganisms. Nucleic acid probes can target distintict genes which set phylogenetic relationships, such as rDNA 16S, DNA gyrase (gyrB) and RNA polymerase sigma 70 factor (rpoD). In the other hand, the genetic capabilities and their expression could be tracked using probes that target several functional genes, such as nirS, nirK, nosZ, and nifH, which are genes involved in denitrification. Selective detection of cells actively expressing functional genes within a community using In Situ Reverse Transcription-PCR (ISRT-PCR) could become a powerful culture-independent technique in microbial ecology. Here we describe an approach to study the expression of nirS genes in denitrifying bacteria. Pure cultures of Pseudomonas stutzeri and Paracoccus denitrificans, as well as co-cultures with non

  15. Application of Sediment Trend Analysis in the Examination of Sediment Transport Dynamics of Missisquoi Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, M. P.; Manley, P.; Singer, J.; Manley, T.; McLaren, P.

    2013-12-01

    Missisquoi Bay is located between Vermont and Quebec in the northeast sector of the Restricted Arm of Lake Champlain. The average depth of the Bay is slightly less than 3 meters with a surface area covering 77.5 km2. The Bay receives water from eastern and western catchment basins, most notably via the Missisquoi, Rock, and Pike Rivers. Circulation within Missisquoi Bay has been altered by the construction of railroad causeways in the late 19th century and highway construction in the early 20th century. Over the past several decades there have also been changes in land-use practices, including the intensification of agriculture, increased animal husbandry, and urbanization. As a consequence of construction and changing land use, loadings of nitrogen and phosphorus to the Bay have increased seasonal oxygen depletion causing eutrophication. Since monitoring began in 1992, Missisquoi Bay has displayed the highest mean total phosphorus concentrations and chlorophyll a concentrations in Lake Champlain. Various efforts have taken place to reduce nutrient loading to Missisquoi Bay, but persistent release of phosphorus from bottom sediments will continue to delay for decades the recovery from nutrient diversion. To better understand the causes and timing of eutrophication in Missisquoi Bay, one component of a 5-year integrated VT EPSCoR - RACC program included an examination of N and P loadings and their distribution throughout the Bay. Internal circulation patterns are also being studied. To determine the pattern of net sediment transport and determine sediment behavior (erosion and accretion), a Sediment Trend Analysis (STA) was performed using 369 grab samples collected in the Bay. Grain size distributions for the surface sediment samples were determined using a Malvern Mastersizer 2000 particle size analyzer. Sediment maps showing the proportion of gravel, sand, and mud show that near major river distributaries sand-sized sediment was dominant with muds becoming more

  16. The carbon cycle and biogeochemical dynamics in lake sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, W.E.

    1999-01-01

    The concentrations of organic carbon (OC) and CaCO3 in lake sediments are often inversely related. This relation occurs in surface sediments from different locations in the same lake, surface sediments from different lakes, and with depth in Holocene sediments. Where data on accumulation rates are available, the relation holds for organic carbon and CaCO3 accumulation rates as well. An increase of several percent OC is accompanied by a decrease of several tens of percent CaCO3 indicating that the inverse relation is not due to simple dilution of one component by another. It appears from core data that once the OC concentration in the sediments becomes greater than about 12%, the CO2 produced by decomposition of that OC and production of organic acids lowers the pH of anoxic pore waters enough to dissolve any CaCO3 that reaches the sediment-water interface. In a lake with a seasonally anoxic hypolimnion, processes in the water column also can produce an inverse relation between OC and CaCO3 over time. If productivity of the lake increases, the rain rate of OC from the epilimnion increases. Biogenic removal of CO2 and accompanying increase in pH also may increase the production of CaCO3. However, the decomposition of organic matter in the hypolimnion will decrease the pH of the hypolimnion causing greater dissolution of CaCO3 and therefore a decrease in the rain rate of CaCO3 to the sediment-water interface.

  17. Vegetation composition, nutrient, and sediment dynamics along a floodplain landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rybicki, Nancy B.; Noe, Gregory; Hupp, Cliff R.; Robinson, Myles

    2015-01-01

    Forested floodplains are important landscape features for retaining river nutrients and sediment loads but there is uncertainty in how vegetation influences nutrient and sediment retention. In order to understand the role of vegetation in nutrient and sediment trapping, we quantified species composition and the uptake of nutrients in plant material relative to landscape position and ecosystem attributes in an urban, Piedmont watershed in Virginia, USA. We investigated in situ interactions among vegetative composition, abundance, carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fluxes and ecosystem attributes such as water level, shading, soil nutrient mineralization, and sediment deposition. This study revealed strong associations between vegetation and nutrient and sediment cycling processes at the plot scale and in the longitudinal dimension, but there were few strong patterns between these aspects at the scale of geomorphic features (levee, backswamp, and toe-slope). Patterns reflected the nature of the valley setting rather than a simple downstream continuum. Plant nutrient uptake and sediment trapping were greatest at downstream sites with the widest floodplain and lowest gradient where the hydrologic connection between the floodplain and stream is greater. Sediment trapping increased in association with higher herbaceous plant coverage and lower tree canopy density that, in turn, was associated with a more water tolerant tree community found in the lower watershed but not at the most downstream site in the watershed. Despite urbanization effects on the hydrology, this floodplain functioned as an efficient nutrient trap. N and P flux rates of herbaceous biomass and total litterfall more than accounted for the N and P mineralization flux rate, indicating that vegetation incorporated nearly all mineralized nutrients into biomass.

  18. Modelling-based assessment of suspended sediment dynamics in a hypertidal estuarine channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoudry, Laurent O.; Ramirez-Mendoza, Rafael; Souza, Alejandro J.; Brown, Jennifer M.

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the dynamics of suspended sediment transport in a hypertidal estuarine channel which displays a vertically sheared exchange flow. We apply a three-dimensional process-based model coupling hydrodynamics, turbulence and sediment transport to the Dee Estuary, in the north-west region of the UK. The numerical model is used to reproduce observations of suspended sediment and to assess physical processes responsible for the observed suspended sediment concentration patterns. The study period focuses on a calm period during which wave-current interactions can reasonably be neglected. Good agreement between model and observations has been obtained. A series of numerical experiments aim to isolate specific processes and confirm that the suspended sediment dynamics result primarily from advection of a longitudinal gradient in concentration during our study period, combined with resuspension and vertical exchange processes. Horizontal advection of sediment presents a strong semi-diurnal variability, while vertical exchange processes (including time-varying settling as a proxy for flocculation) exhibit a quarter-diurnal variability. Sediment input from the river is found to have very little importance, and spatial gradients in suspended concentration are generated by spatial heterogeneity in bed sediment characteristics and spatial variations in turbulence and bed shear stress.

  19. Sediment dynamics within the intertidal floodplain of the lower Amazon River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricke, A. T.; Nittrouer, C. A.; Ogston, A. S.; Nowacki, D. J.; Asp, N. E.; Souza Filho, P. W.

    2014-12-01

    Tidal influence extends ~800 kilometers upstream of the Amazon River mouth, producing semidiurnal oscillations in water elevation and slowing or reversing the flow of the world's largest river. This tidally influenced reach, known as the tidal river, is flanked by an expansive intertidal floodplain, and includes confluences with two large tributaries, the Xingu and Tapajós. The relative magnitude of the seasonal and tidal signals changes along the length of the tidal river, yielding diverse floodplain environments that span a range of seasonal and tidal influence. Near the upstream limit of tides, natural levees isolate the river from the floodplain during low to moderate flows, while in the lower tidal river, natural levees are absent and river-floodplain exchange is dominated by the tides rather than seasonal variation in river stage. This difference between fluvial and tidal systems strongly affects the nature of sediment exchange between the channel and floodplain, including frequency, duration, and depth of inundation. Here we present data on the impact of this fluvial-tidal continuum on sedimentary processes in the floodplain and resultant depositional signatures. Changes in levee prominence, grain size, and sediment accumulation combine to produce the distinct morphologies of floodplain lakes, intertidal backswamps, and intertidal flats. In addition to sediment accumulation on the periodically exposed floodplain, Amazon River sediment accumulates within the drowned tributary confluences of the Xingu and Tapajós Rivers. Here seasonal and tidal changes in water temperature, discharge, and suspended-sediment concentration drive barotropic and baroclinic flows that transport Amazon River sediment into tributary basins. These findings help to constrain the fate of sediment within the ungauged Amazon tidal river, and will help in understanding the response of the lower Amazon River to changes in accommodation space associated with rising sea level, and changes

  20. Acoustic measurement of sediment dynamics in the coastal zones using wireless sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhakaran, A., II; Paramasivam, A.; Seshachalam, S.; A, C.

    2014-12-01

    Analyzing of the impact of constructive or low energy waves and deconstructive or high energy waves in the ocean are very much significant since they deform the geometry of seashore. The deformation may lead to productive result and also to the end of deteriorate damage. Constructive waves results deposition of sediment which widens the beach where as deconstructive waves results erosion which narrows the beach. Validation of historic sediment transportation and prediction of the direction of movement of seashore is essential to prevent unrecoverable damages by incorporating precautionary measurements to identify the factors that influence sediment transportation if feasible. The objective of this study is to propose a more reliable and energy efficient Information and communication system to model the Coastal Sediment Dynamics. Various factors influencing the sediment drift at a particular region is identified. Consequence of source depth and frequency dependencies of spread pattern in the presence of sediments is modeled. Property of source depth and frequency on sensitivity to values of model parameters are determined. Fundamental physical reasons for these sediment interaction effects are given. Shallow to deep water and internal and external wave model of ocean is obtained intended to get acoustic data assimilation (ADA). Signal processing algorithms are used over the observed data to form a full field acoustic propagation model and construct sound speed profile (SSP). The inversions of data due to uncertainties at various depths are compared. The impact of sediment drift over acoustic data is identified. An energy efficient multipath routing scheme Wireless sensor networks (WSN) is deployed for the well-organized communication of data. The WSN is designed considering increased life time, decreased power consumption, free of threats and attacks. The practical data obtained from the efficient system to model the ocean sediment dynamics are evaluated with remote

  1. Sediment transport dynamics in the swash zone under large-scale laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruju, Andrea; Conley, Daniel; Masselink, Gerd; Puleo, Jack

    2016-06-01

    A laboratory experiment was carried out to study sediment transport dynamics occurring in the swash zone of a coarse-sandy beach built in a large-scale wave flume. Hydro- and morpho-dynamic as well as sediment transport data were collected using sensors mounted on a scaffold rig deployed in the lower swash zone close to the moving bed. The high resolution of near-bed data permitted quantitative evaluation of suspended and sheet flow contributions to the total sediment transport. Although sheet flow sediment fluxes were higher than suspended fluxes, the vertically integrated suspended sediment load overcame the sheet flow load during uprush and it was on the same order of magnitude during backwash. The observed cumulative sediment transport was generally larger than the morphological changes occurring shoreward of the rig location implying either an underestimation of the offshore sediment transport or an overestimation of the onshore fluxes obtained from concentration and velocity profile data. Low correlations were found between net swash profile changes and runup parameters suggesting that local hydrodynamic parameters provide little or no predictability of accretion and erosion of an upper beach which is near equilibrium. The balance between erosion and deposition induced by individual swash events brought a dynamic equilibrium with small differences between the profiles measured at the start and at the end of the run.

  2. Dynamic defectoscopy with flat panel and CdTe Timepix X-ray detectors combined with an optical camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavrik, D.; Fauler, A.; Fiederle, M.; Jandejsek, I.; Jakubek, M.; Turecek, D.; Zwerger, A.

    2013-04-01

    Damage of gradually loaded ductile materials involves a number of physical processes which are highly nonlinear and have different intensity and extent. Dynamic defectoscopy (i.e. defectoscopy of time changing damage processes) combining an X-ray/optical imaging system is proposed for online visualization and analysis of the complex behaviour of such materials. A large area flat panel detector with rather long read out time is used for overall observation of slow damage processes. On the other hand, a semiconductor CdTe Timepix detector with small active area allows following the rapid damage processes occurring in the final phase of specimen failure. Optical imaging of the specimen surface was utilized for analysing the specimen deformations.

  3. Improving performance of flat-plate photobioreactors by installation of novel internal mixers optimized with computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianke; Feng, Fei; Wan, Minxi; Ying, Jiangguo; Li, Yuanguang; Qu, Xiaoxing; Pan, Ronghua; Shen, Guomin; Li, Wei

    2015-04-01

    A novel mixer was developed to improve the performance of flat-plate photobioreactors (PBRs). The effects of mixer were theoretically evaluated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) according to radial velocity of fluid and light/dark cycles within reactors. The structure parameters, including the riser width, top clearance, clearance between the baffles and walls, and number of the chambers were further optimized. The microalgae culture test aiming at validating the simulated results was conducted indoor. The results showed the maximum biomass concentrations in the optimized and archetype reactors were 32.8% (0.89 g L(-1)) and 19.4% (0.80 g L(-1)) higher than that in the control reactor (0.67 g L(-1)). Therefore, the novel mixer can significantly increase the fluid velocity along the light attenuation and light/dark cycles, thus further increased the maximum biomass concentration. The PBRs with novel mixers are greatly applicable for high-efficiency cultivation of microalgae.

  4. Methane Dynamics in Sediments from Mangrove-dominated Costal Lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, P. C.; Paytan, A.; Young, M. B.

    2014-12-01

    Porewater methane and sulfate concentrations from cored sediments have been measured in two coastal mangrove ecosystems (Celestún and Chelem Lagoons) on the Yucatán Peninsula, Mexico. Methane exists in shallow sediments while sulfate is not depleted and stable carbon isotopes of methane (-87.27‰ ~ -62.08‰) imply high methane fluxes/production rates below and within the cored sediment depths. The preliminary results from a transport-reaction model show that methane emitted to the water column from these sediments could be 17.8 mg m-2 d-1 in Celestún Lagoon and much higher (565 mg m-2 d-1) in Chelem Lagoon. Since the water depths are shallow (mostly less than 100 cm), the high fluxes of methane could contribute to the atmosphere. The objectives of this study will aim to understand the biogeochemical cycles for methane and sulfate in sediments. A numerical transport-reaction model will be applied to the sedimentary geochemical data (methane, sulfate, chloride, particulate organic carbon (POC) and stable carbon isotopes of headspace methane) from the two lagoons to estimate sulfate reduction, methane oxidation and production rates and advective methane fluxes. The modeled results will be used to discuss the role of methane from mangrove areas and their potential contribution to the global methane cycle.

  5. Vortex dynamics and surface pressure fluctuations on a normal flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmati, Arman; Wood, David H.; Martinuzzi, Robert J.; Ferrari, Simon W.; Hu, Yaoping

    2016-11-01

    The effect of vortex formation and interactions on surface pressure fluctuations is examined in the wake of a normal flat plate by analyzing Direct Numerical Simulations at Re =1200. A novel local maximum score-based 3D method is used to track vortex development in the region close to the plate where the major contributions to the surface pressure are generated. Three distinct vortex shedding regimes are identified by changes in the lift and drag fluctuations. The instances of maximum drag coincide with impingement of newly formed vortices on the plate. This results in large and concentrated areas of rotational and strain contributions to generation of pressure fluctuations. Streamwise vortex straining and chordwise stretching are correlated with the large ratios of streamwise to chordwise normal stresses and regions of significant rotational contribution to the pressure. In contrast at the minimum drag, the vorticity field close to the plate is disorganized, and vortex roll-up occurs farther downstream. This leads to a uniform distribution of pressure. This study was supported by Alberta Innovates Technology Futures (AITF) and Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC).

  6. Redox dynamics in the Chesapeake Bay: The effect on sediment/water uranium exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, T.J.; Sholkovitz, E.R.; Klinkhammer, G. )

    1994-07-01

    The effect of seasonal variations in productivity and redox dynamics on the sediment/water exchange of uranium was investigated on a twelve cruise time series in the Chesapeake Bay. The deep waters of the bay undergo seasonal anoxia in response to high primary productivity and water column stratification from late spring to early fall. Dissolved oxygen was used to monitor sediment redox conditions. Dissolved [sup 238]U was measured in the water column and sediment porewaters to monitor water column/sediment exchange. Uranium incorporation in bay sediments results from two distinct processes: productivity-dependent scavenging from the water column and redox-dependent cycling of uranium between sediments and bottomwater. Uranium is removed from surface waters of the bay by scavenging with biodetritus during periods of high primary productivity. Bottomwater and sediment redox conditions determine whether this particle-bound uranium is buried or released to overlying water. Particulate uranium is released to bottomwaters and porewaters during the degradation of biodetritus and oxidation of authigenic uranium. Low oxygen in bottomwaters in the summer results in minimal exchange of uranium between the sediments and bottomwater, due to the stability of reduced U(IV). High bottomwater oxygen concentrations associated with bay turnover in the fall results in release of authigenic uranium by oxidation to the soluble (VI) form. Enrichment of uranium in fall bottomwater suggests that authigenic uranium is very labile when exposed to oxic environmental conditions. This process is enhanced by physical mixing when anoxic sediments are resuspended into the oxic bottomwaters.

  7. Continental shelf sediment dynamics in the Anthropocene: A global shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberle, Ferdinand K. J.; Puig, Pere; Martin, Jacobo

    2017-04-01

    Recent technological advances in remote sensing and deep marine sampling have revealed the extent and magnitude of the anthropogenic impacts to the seafloor. In particular, bottom trawling, a fishing technique consisting of dragging a net and fishing gear over the seafloor to capture bottom-dwelling living resources has gained attention due to its destructive effects on the seabed. Trawling gear produces acute impacts on biota and the physical substratum of the seafloor by disrupting the sediment column structure, overturning boulders, resuspending sediments and imprinting deep scars on muddy bottoms. Also, the repetitive passage of trawling gear over the same areas creates long-lasting, cumulative impacts that modify the cohesiveness and texture of sediments. It can be asserted nowadays that due to its recurrence, mobility and wide geographical extent, industrial trawling has become a major force driving seafloor change and affecting not only its physical integrity on short spatial scales but also imprinting measurable modifications to the geomorphology of entire continental margins.

  8. On the modeling and nonlinear dynamics of autonomous Silva-Young type chaotic oscillators with flat power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Kengne, Jacques; Kenmogne, Fabien

    2014-12-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of fourth-order Silva-Young type chaotic oscillators with flat power spectrum recently introduced by Tamaseviciute and collaborators is considered. In this type of oscillators, a pair of semiconductor diodes in an anti-parallel connection acts as the nonlinear component necessary for generating chaotic oscillations. Based on the Shockley diode equation and an appropriate selection of the state variables, a smooth mathematical model (involving hyperbolic sine and cosine functions) is derived for a better description of both the regular and chaotic dynamics of the system. The complex behavior of the oscillator is characterized in terms of its parameters by using time series, bifurcation diagrams, Lyapunov exponents' plots, Poincaré sections, and frequency spectra. It is shown that the onset of chaos is achieved via the classical period-doubling and symmetry restoring crisis scenarios. Some PSPICE simulations of the nonlinear dynamics of the oscillator are presented in order to confirm the ability of the proposed mathematical model to accurately describe/predict both the regular and chaotic behaviors of the oscillator.

  9. [Pulmonary functional diagnostic imaging using a dynamic flat-panel detector: comparison with findings in pulmonary scintigraphy].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Fujimura, Masaki; Yasui, Masahide; Tsuji, Shiro; Hayashi, Norio; Nanbu, Yuko; Matsui, Osamu

    2009-06-20

    Pulmonary ventilation and circulation dynamics are reflected on dynamic chest radiographs as changes in X-ray translucency,i.e., pixel values. The present study was performed to develop a pulmonary functional evaluation method based on the changes in pixel value, and to investigate the clinical usefulness of our method. Sequential chest radiographs of 20 subjects (abnormal,n=12; normal,n=8) during respiration were obtained with a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD) system. The average pixel value in each local area was measured tracking the same area. To facilitate visual evaluation, the results were mapped on the original image using a grayscale in which small changes were shown in black and large changes were shown in white. In our clinical evaluation in comparison with a pulmonary scintigraphy, pulmonary ventilation disorder was indicated as a reduction of changes in pixel values. In many patients, there was a correlation between our result and a pulmonary scintigraphy (0.7

  10. On the modeling and nonlinear dynamics of autonomous Silva-Young type chaotic oscillators with flat power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kengne, Jacques; Kenmogne, Fabien

    2014-12-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of fourth-order Silva-Young type chaotic oscillators with flat power spectrum recently introduced by Tamaseviciute and collaborators is considered. In this type of oscillators, a pair of semiconductor diodes in an anti-parallel connection acts as the nonlinear component necessary for generating chaotic oscillations. Based on the Shockley diode equation and an appropriate selection of the state variables, a smooth mathematical model (involving hyperbolic sine and cosine functions) is derived for a better description of both the regular and chaotic dynamics of the system. The complex behavior of the oscillator is characterized in terms of its parameters by using time series, bifurcation diagrams, Lyapunov exponents' plots, Poincaré sections, and frequency spectra. It is shown that the onset of chaos is achieved via the classical period-doubling and symmetry restoring crisis scenarios. Some PSPICE simulations of the nonlinear dynamics of the oscillator are presented in order to confirm the ability of the proposed mathematical model to accurately describe/predict both the regular and chaotic behaviors of the oscillator.

  11. New chronology for the southern Kalahari Group sediments - implications for sediment-cycle dynamics and basin development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matmon, Ari; Hidy, Alan; Vainer, Shlomy; Crouvi, Onn; Fink, David; Erel, Yigal; Aster Team; Horwitz, Liora; Chazan, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Kalahari Group sediments accumulated in the Kalahari basin, which started forming during the breakup of Gondwana in the early Cretaceous. These sediments cover an extensive part of southern Africa and form a low-relief landscape. Current models assume that the Kalahari Group accumulated throughout the entire Cenozoic. However, chronology has been restricted to early-middle Cenozoic biostratigraphic correlations and to OSL dating of only the past ~300 ka. We present a new chronological framework that reveals a dynamic nature of sedimentation in the southern Kalahari. Cosmogenic burial ages obtained from a 55 m section of Kalahari Group sediments from the Mamatwan Mine, southern Kalahari, indicate that the majority of deposition at this location occurred rapidly at 1-1.2 Ma. This Pleistocene sequence overlies the Archaean basement, forming a significant hiatus that permits the possibility of many Phanerozoic cycles of deposition and erosion no longer preserved in the sedimentary record. Our data also establish the existence of a shallow early-middle Pleistocene water body that persisted for >450 ka prior to this rapid period of deposition and suggesting an Okavango-like environment. Evidence from neighboring archaeological excavations in southern Africa suggests an association of high-density hominin occupation with this water body.

  12. Hydrologic characteristics and suspended sediment dynamics in the Gradašica river basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogoj, Mojca; Rusjan, Simon; Vidmar, Andrej; Mikoš, Matjaž

    2013-04-01

    Sediment transport in catchments is an important aspect of environmental research because of its role in the transport of sediment-associated nutrients, pesticides and other contaminants. High turbidity levels in water bodies affect stream morphology, aquatic organisms and their habitats, cause siltation of water reservoirs and have other side effects. For maintaining adequate water quality, reducing excessive soil erosion and proper estimation of the amount of transported material it is necessary to define and understand main factors that control sediment production and transport in rivers. Understanding the hydrological response of catchments on hydrometeorological phenomena and their influences on changes in suspended sediment concentrations require measurements of the processes at time scales that correspond to hydrological dynamics of a catchment. Our research aims to investigate hydrological and seasonal controls over suspended sediment production and obtain an insight into a suspended sediment concentration dynamics and total loads in a forested catchment. For this purpose, we study several factors actively controlling suspended sediment mobilization and transport in a small experimental catchment in Polhov Gradec mountainous area in the central part of Slovenia, drained by the Gradaščica river. Steep slopes, relatively high altitudes and abundance of precipitation (average yearly sums between 1600 to 1700 mm) result in a quick rise in the water level and consequently, in torrential response of the Gradaščica river. The studied headwaters lay on dolomite and limestone with a mainly natural land cover. The area is a subject to erosion with debris sources in the dolomite and additional catchment characteristics that contribute to high sediment transport rates. The main categories of factors that actively control sediment mobilization and transport from catchments, studied in our research, are hydrological and meteorological controls, physiographic factors

  13. Flow Dynamics and Sediment Entrainment in Natural Turbidity Currents Inferred from Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traer, M. M.; Hilley, G. E.; Fildani, A.

    2009-12-01

    Submarine turbidity currents derive their momentum from gravity acting upon the density contrast between sediment-laden and clear water, and so unlike fluvial systems, the dynamics of such flows are inextricably linked to the rates at which they deposit and entrain sediment. We have analyzed the sensitivity of the growth and maintenance of turbidity currents to sediment entrainment and deposition using the layer-averaged equations of conservation of fluid and sediment mass, and conservation of momentum and turbulent kinetic energy. Our model results show that the dynamics of turbidity currents are extremely sensitive to the functional form and empirical constants of the relationship between sediment entrainment and friction velocity. Data on the relationship between sediment entrainment and friction velocity for submarine density flows are few and as a result, entrainment formulations are populated with data from sub-aerial flows not driven by the density contrast between clear and turbid water. If we entertain the possibility that sediment entrainment in sub-aerial rivers is different than in dense underflows, flow parameters such as velocity, height, and concentration were found nearly impossible to predict beyond a few hundred meters based on the limited laboratory data available that constrain the sediment entrainment process in turbidity currents. The sensitivity of flow dynamics to the functional relationship between friction velocity and sediment entrainment indicates that independent calibration of a sediment entrainment law in the submarine environment is necessary to realistically predict the dynamics of these flows and the resulting patterns of erosion and deposition. To calibrate such a relationship, we have developed an inverse methodology that utilizes existing submarine channel morphology as a means of constraining the sediment entrainment function parameters. We use a Bayesian Metropolis-Hastings sampler to determine the sediment entrainment

  14. Sediment- and hydro-dynamics of the Mekong Delta: From tidal river to continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogston, A. S.; Allison, M. A.; Mullarney, J. C.; Nittrouer, C. A.

    2017-09-01

    This introduction to the special issue entitled, "Sediment- and hydro-dynamics of the Mekong Delta: from tidal river to continental shelf", describes the setting and program design of collaborative studies with integrated field and modeling experiments in 2014-2015, along with associated research in the region. The Mekong River is among the largest on Earth in terms of water discharge, and much of the sediment delivered from the Tibetan Plateau has accumulated in the subaerial and subaqueous components of the Mekong Delta. As a group, the papers in this special issue describe the portion of the system where the sediment source signal is altered along the tidally influenced river and is delivered to the shorelines and continental shelf. The linked studies provide a holistic view of the system, and emphasize the interactions between hydrodynamics and sediment transport processes in sub-environments as sediment makes its way along the path from source to sink.

  15. Temporal variation of trace metal geochemistry in floodplain lake sediment subject to dynamic hydrological conditions.

    PubMed

    van Griethuysen, Corine; Luitwieler, Marloes; Joziasse, Jan; Koelmans, Albert A

    2005-09-01

    Climate change and land use may significantly influence metal cycling in dynamic river systems. We studied temporal variation of sediment characteristics in a floodplain lake, including concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, acid volatile sulfide and trace metals. The sampling period included a severe winter inundation and a dramatic water level drop during summer. Temporal changes were interpreted using multivariate analysis and chemical equilibrium calculations. Metal concentrations in sediment increased with depth, indicating a gradual improvement of sediment quality. In contrast, dissolved metal concentrations were highest in top layers due to mobilization from oxyhydroxides and precipitation with sulfides in deeper layers. Inundation had a mobilizing effect as it stimulated resuspension and oxygenation of sediment top layers. Water table lowering combined with organic matter decomposition led to immobilization due to sulfide formation. The chemistry of the sediments was consistent with model calculations, especially for macro-elements. The results illustrate the importance of seasonality for metal risk assessment.

  16. Sandia National Laboratories environmental fluid dynamics code : sediment transport user manual.

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, Matthew D.; Thanh, Phi Hung X.; James, Scott Carlton

    2008-09-01

    This document describes the sediment transport subroutines and input files for the Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (SNL-EFDC). Detailed descriptions of the input files containing data from Sediment Erosion at Depth flume (SEDflume) measurements are provided along with the description of the source code implementing sediment transport. Both the theoretical description of sediment transport employed in SNL-EFDC and the source code are described. This user manual is meant to be used in conjunction with the EFDC manual (Hamrick 1996) because there will be no reference to the hydrodynamics in EFDC. Through this document, the authors aim to provide the necessary information for new users who wish to implement sediment transport in EFDC and obtain a clear understanding of the source code.

  17. Grazing Land Management Strongly Controls Water Quality, Sediment and Channel Dynamics in Tallgrass Prairie Headwater Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grudzinski, B. G.; Daniels, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    In the prairie remnants of North America, watershed sediment regimes are heavily influenced by livestock grazing practices. Despite dramatic declines in stream water quality and ecosystem function concomitant with increasing gazing pressures, there have been no studies to quantitatively assess the relationship between various grazing treatments and sediment production in natural grassland ecosystems. In this study, we evaluate suspended sediment transport and channel morphology in the Flint Hills physiographic province using a paired whole-watershed approach, including 2 replicates of high density cattle grazing, 2 replicates of low density cattle grazing, 3 replicates of bison grazing and 3 replicates of no grazing. As expected, results demonstrate that cattle grazing operations increase e-coli, sediment concentrations and increase channel width. However, no significant differences in e-coli, suspended sediment dynamics or channel geomorphology were found between bison grazed and ungrazed watersheds.

  18. Escape paths for biogenic methane gas in lake sediments: morphology and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandella, B. P.; Hemond, H.; Ruppel, C. D.; Juanes, R.

    2011-12-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas that is generated geothermally and biologically in lake and ocean sediments. Free gas bubbles grow in saturated pore water and escape more readily as the absolute pressure (due to changes in water level or atmospheric pressure) falls, but neither the morphology of gas flow paths nor the dynamics controlling them have been well-constrained. We present laboratory experiments in which methanogens are incubated in lacustrine sediments and the subsequent gas release is triggered by hydrostatic unloading. Image analysis shows the morphology and persistence of the network of gas release paths, and records of the pressures and stresses help to identify the dynamics that control ebullition from gassy sediments. This work is fundamental to constraining the parameterization of large-scale models of methane venting from submerged, organic-rich sediments.

  19. Fluvial Anchor Ice/Sediment Dynamics and Ice Rafting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-30

    Siberia . Journal of Geophysical Research. Eicken, H. et al., in press. Sediment transport by sea ice in the Chukchi and Beafort Seas: increasing...U.S.A.; Kara Sea, Siberia . Journal of Geophysical Research: [refereed]. Kempema, E.W. and Dethleff, D., submitted. The roll of Langmuir

  20. Analog Modeling of the Juan Fernández Ridge, Central Chile, and Implications for Flat-Slab Subduction Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodell, D.; Anderson, M. L.

    2009-12-01

    This study compares the strain experienced by the subducting lithosphere in analog models to the strain recorded by earthquakes in the subduction zone that includes the Juan Fernández Ridge (JFR), near 33 S, 73 W, off the coast of central Chile. The JFR is an aseismic hot spot ridge that has a thickened oceanic crust. The overthickened crust reduces the total density of the slab when compared to the surrounding slab areas, and thus increases the buoyancy of the subducting Nazca plate at this particular location. It is hypothesized that the Nazca plate experiences “flat-slab” subduction at the JFR subduction zone due to this buoyancy. Brudzinski and Chen (2005) argue that, due to the poorly aligned direction of maximum extension (T axes) for earthquakes in the subducting slab in flat-slab subduction zones, the theory of “slab pull” may not be valid for flat-slab subduction zones, and there must be other forces at work. However, Anderson et al. (2007) develop new, more precise slab contours from newly determined earthquake locations and use these contours to qualitatively compare the earthquake data to slab dip directions and thus expected slab-pull directions. They conclude that T axes are parallel to slab dip, and thus slab pull is the only force necessary for explaining the T axis direction. In this study, we quantitatively compare extension produced in analog "flat-slab" models in the laboratory to T axes from the Anderson et al. (2007) study, extending and further testing their idea. Several materials comprise the analog models. Light corn syrup represents the asthenosphere, while silicon putty represents the lithosphere. Recreating the dynamics of the buoyant JFR necessitates two different densities of silly putty: a denser one for the bulk of the slab, and a less dense one for the buoyant ridge. Shallow circular indentations (strain ellipses) on the slab facilitate recording of the strain in the subducting slab. Video and still pictures record each

  1. Evaluation of sediment dynamics in coastal systems via short-lived radioisotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giffin, Dan; Corbett, D. Reide

    2003-08-01

    The Neuse and Pamlico River Estuaries are shallow, dynamic systems that have been plagued with symptoms of eutrophication over the past two decades. Extensive research has been conducted over the last 5-10 years to better understand the complex nutrient dynamics of these systems. However, most of these studies have concentrated on nutrient cycling in the water column. Only recently have studies focused on the benthic environment, and most sediment studies have neglected the dynamic nature of the benthos, focusing instead on diffusion as the dominant transport process delivering nutrients to the water column. Although diffusion of nutrients across the sediment-water interface may be important during quiescent periods of sediment deposition and short-term storage, wind events associated with storms throughout the year will resuspend newly deposited sediments resulting in the advective transport of sediment porewater, rich with nitrogen, phosphorus and carbon, into the water column. Sediment resuspension may increase water column nutrient concentrations, and therefore present estimates of nutrient and carbon inputs from the sediments may be too low. This study evaluated short-term sediment dynamics of natural resuspension events and deposition rates in these two estuaries with the use of short-lived radioisotopes, 7Be, 137Cs, and 234Th. Sediment cores at nine sites in the estuaries have been collected at least bimonthly since May 2001. In general, tracers indicate a depositional environment with minimal episodes of removal. The largest sediment removal occurred in August 2001 in the Neuse River where an estimated 2.2 cm of sediment were removed over the previous 6-week period. This removal mechanism essentially advects porewater nutrients into the water column. Calculated advective fluxes of ammonium and phosphate based on this resuspension event were approximately six times greater than the average diffusive flux measured in the same general area of the river. Longer

  2. Development of functional chest imaging with a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD).

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Fujimura, Masaki; Yasui, Masahide; Nakayama, Kazuya; Matsui, Takeshi; Hayashi, Norio; Matsui, Osamu

    2008-07-01

    Dynamic FPD permits the acquisition of distortion-free radiographs with a large field of view and high image quality. In the present study, we investigated the feasibility of functional imaging for evaluating the pulmonary sequential blood distribution with an FPD, based on changes in pixel values during cardiac pumping. Dynamic chest radiographs of seven normal subjects were obtained in the expiratory phase by use of an FPD system. We measured the average pixel value in each region of interest that was located manually in the heart and lung areas. Subsequently, inter-frame differences and differences from a minimum-intensity projection image, which was created from one cardiac cycle, were calculated. These difference values were then superimposed on dynamic chest radiographs in the form of a color display, and sequential blood distribution images and a blood distribution map were created. The results were compared to typical data on normal cardiac physiology. The clinical effectiveness of our method was evaluated in a patient who had abnormal pulmonary blood flow. In normal cases, there was a strong correlation between the cardiac cycle and changes in pixel value. Sequential blood distribution images showed a normal pattern at determined by the physiology of pulmonary blood flow, with a symmetric distribution and no blood flow defects throughout the entire lung region. These findings indicated that pulmonary blood flow was reflected on dynamic chest radiographs. In an abnormal case, a defect in blood flow was shown as defective in color in a blood distribution map. The present method has the potential for evaluation of local blood flow as an optional application in general chest radiography.

  3. Strong dynamics in a classically scale invariant extension of the standard model with a flat potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haba, Naoyuki; Yamada, Toshifumi

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the scenario where the standard model is extended with classical scale invariance, which is broken by chiral symmetry breaking and confinement in a new strongly coupled gauge theory that resembles QCD. The standard model Higgs field emerges as a result of the mixing of a scalar meson in the new strong dynamics and a massless elementary scalar field. The mass and scalar decay constant of that scalar meson, which are generated dynamically in the new gauge theory, give rise to the Higgs field mass term, automatically possessing the correct negative sign by the bosonic seesaw mechanism. Using analogy with QCD, we evaluate the dynamical scale of the new gauge theory and further make quantitative predictions for light pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons associated with the spontaneous breaking of axial symmetry along chiral symmetry breaking in the new gauge theory. A prominent consequence of the scenario is that there should be a standard model gauge singlet pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson with mass below 220 GeV, which couples to two electroweak gauge bosons through the Wess-Zumino-Witten term, whose strength is thus determined by the dynamical scale of the new gauge theory. Other pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons, charged under the electroweak gauge groups, also appear. Concerning the theoretical aspects, it is shown that the scalar quartic coupling can vanish at the Planck scale with the top quark pole mass as large as 172.5 GeV, realizing the flatland scenario without being in tension with the current experimental data.

  4. Approaching a flat boundary with a block copolymer coated emulsion drop: late stage drainage dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozairo, Damith; Croll, Andrew

    Understanding the dynamics of the formation and drainage of the thin fluid film that becomes trapped by a deformable droplet as it approaches another object is crucial to the advancement of many industrial and biomedical applications. Adding amphiphilic diblock copolymers, which are becoming more commonly used in drug delivery and oil recovery, only add to the complexity. Despite their increased use, little is known about how long polymer chains fill an emulsion drop's interface or how the molecules influence hydrodynamic processes. We study the drainage dynamics of a thin water film trapped between mica and a diblock copolymer saturated oil droplet. Specifically, we examine several different polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-PEO) molecules self-assembled at a toluene-water interface using laser scanning confocal microscopy. Our experiments reveal that the molecular details of the polymer chains deeply influence the drainage times, indicating that they are not acting as a 'simple' surfactant. The presence of the chains creates a much slower dynamic as fluid is forced to drain through an effective polymer brush, the brush itself determined by chain packing at the interface. We present a simple model which accounts for the basic physics of the interface.

  5. Sediment dynamics in the lower Mekong River: Transition from tidal river to estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowacki, Daniel J.; Ogston, Andrea S.; Nittrouer, Charles A.; Fricke, Aaron T.; Van, Pham Dang Tri

    2015-09-01

    A better understanding of flow and sediment dynamics in the lowermost portions of large-tropical rivers is essential to constraining estimates of worldwide sediment delivery to the ocean. Flow velocity, salinity, and suspended-sediment concentration were measured for 25 h at three cross sections in the tidal Song Hau distributary of the Mekong River, Vietnam. Two campaigns took place during comparatively high-seasonal and low-seasonal discharge, and estuarine conditions varied dramatically between them. The system transitioned from a tidal river with ephemeral presence of a salt wedge during high flow to a partially mixed estuary during low flow. The changing freshwater input, sediment sources, and estuarine characteristics resulted in seaward sediment export during high flow and landward import during low flow. The Dinh An channel of the Song Hau distributary exported sediment to the coast at a rate of about 1 t s-1 during high flow and imported sediment in a spatially varying manner at approximately 0.3 t s-1 during low flow. Scaling these values results in a yearly Mekong sediment discharge estimate about 65% smaller than a generally accepted estimate of 110 Mt yr-1, although the limited temporal and spatial nature of this study implies a relatively high degree of uncertainty for the new estimate. Fluvial advection of sediment was primarily responsible for the high-flow sediment export. Exchange-flow and tidal processes, including local resuspension, were principally responsible for the low-flow import. The resulting bed-sediment grain size was coarser and more variable during high flow and finer during low, and the residual flow patterns support the maintenance of mid-channel islands. This article was corrected on 7 OCT 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  6. Cosmological dynamics of spatially flat Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet models in various dimensions: high-dimensional Λ -term case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavluchenko, Sergey A.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we perform a systematic study of spatially flat [(3+D)+1]-dimensional Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet cosmological models with Λ -term. We consider models that topologically are the product of two flat isotropic subspaces with different scale factors. One of these subspaces is three-dimensional and represents our space and the other is D-dimensional and represents extra dimensions. We consider no ansatz of the scale factors, which makes our results quite general. With both Einstein-Hilbert and Gauss-Bonnet contributions in play, D=3 and the general D≥ 4 cases have slightly different dynamics due to the different structure of the equations of motion. We analytically study the equations of motion in both cases and describe all possible regimes with special interest on the realistic regimes. Our analysis suggests that the only realistic regime is the transition from high-energy (Gauss-Bonnet) Kasner regime, which is the standard cosmological singularity in that case, to the anisotropic exponential regime with expanding three and contracting extra dimensions. Availability of this regime allows us to put a constraint on the value of Gauss-Bonnet coupling α and the Λ -term - this regime appears in two regions on the (α , Λ ) plane: α < 0, Λ > 0, α Λ ≤ -3/2 and α > 0, α Λ ≤ (3D^2 - 7D + 6)/(4D(D-1)), including the entire Λ < 0 region. The obtained bounds are confronted with the restrictions on α and Λ from other considerations, like causality, entropy-to-viscosity ratio in AdS/CFT and others. Joint analysis constrains (α , Λ ) even further: α > 0, D ≥ 2 with (3D^2 - 7D + 6)/(4D(D-1)) ≥ α Λ ≥ - (D+2)(D+3)(D^2 + 5D + 12)/(8(D^2 + 3D + 6)^2).

  7. Assessing sediment connectivity to understand dynamics of contaminated sediment within coastal catchments of Fukushima Prefecture (Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartin, Caroline; Evrard, Olivier; Onda, Yuichi; Ottlé, Catherine; Brossoni, Camille; Lefèvre, Irène; Lepage, Hugo; Bonté, Philippe; Patin, Jeremy; Ayrault, Sophie

    2013-04-01

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident has led to the release of large radionuclide quantities (e.g., about 20 PBq of Cs-137 and 200 PBq of I-131) into the atmosphere. About 80% of the release was blown out and over the Pacific Ocean. The remaining 20% of emissions were deposited as wet and dry deposits on soils of Fukushima Prefecture, mainly between 15-16 March. As most radionuclides are strongly sorbed by fine particles, they are likely to be redistributed within the landscape in association with soil and sediment particles transported by runoff and erosion processes. A spatial analysis of Ag-110m:Cs-137 ratio in soils and river sediments provided a way to trace those transfers. This fingerprinting study showed that particles eroded from inland mountain ranges exposed to the highest initial radionuclide fallout were already dispersed along coastal rivers, most likely during summer typhoons and spring snowmelt. Those results suggest that hillslopes and rivers have become a perennial source of radioactive contaminants to the Pacific Ocean off Fukushima Prefecture. This study aims to specify the location and nature of the preferential sources supplying contaminated material to the main rivers draining the Fukushima contamination plume. To this end, important parameters controlling soil erosion and sediment transfers within catchments, i.e. landscape morphology and land use characteristics, were preliminary derived from DEM data and satellite images for the River Mano, Nitta and Ota catchments (ca. 525 km²) draining the most radioactive part of the contamination plume that formed across Fukushima Prefecture. Then, those data were used to compute indices assessing the potential sediment connectivity (i) between hillslopes and rivers and (ii) between hillslopes and catchment outlets. Finally, spatially-distributed values of connectivity indices were confronted to gamma-emitting radionuclide activities (Cs-134, Cs-137 and Ag-110m) measured in riverbed

  8. Modeling Motu: Using hydrodynamic modeling to parameterize morphodynamic interactions between reef flats and reef islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashton, A. D.; Ortiz, A. C.; Lorenzo-Trueba, J.; Donnelly, J. P.

    2016-02-01

    Between the deep open ocean and backing lagoon, atolls and barrier reefs are comprised of a series of linked environments, from the coral-dominated and carbonate-producing fore-reef, the shallow reef flat typically consisting of sediment and/or concreted carbonate, to, in some cases, detrital reef islands. Using the hydrodynamic components of the XBeach model, we have developed a consistent conceptual model that can be used to explain the development of a constant-depth reef flat that subsequently extends lagoonward as sediment is produced at the reef edge. As reef flats widen, shear stresses are minimized mid-flat, which could lead to the development of incipient islands that form at a distance from the ocean. Emergent islands block across-reef flow, and subsequently are expected to prograde seawards until reaching a steady-state distance from the shore. To quantify this conceptual model, and to better understand how interconnected reef systems may respond to climate change effects, including sea-level rise, change in storminess, and different carbonate production rates, we use XBeach model results spanning a variety of forcing conditions (offshore wave height) and reef geometries (reef flat width and depth, presence of reef island) to parameterize a numerical model of coupled reef flat and reef island dynamics. Model results demonstrate that during rising sea levels, the reef flat can serve as a sediment trap, starving reef islands of detrital sediment that would otherwise fortify the shore against sea-level-rise-driven erosion. On the other hand, if reef flats are currently shallow (likely due to geologic inheritance), such that sea-level rise does not result in sediment accumulation on the flat, sea-level rise will have less of an effect of reef island shorelines. Overall, the model allows a parameterized framework that can be applied to understand the interconnected response of coupled reef environments to climate change, with potential application to atolls

  9. Experimental Validation Data for Computational Fluid Dynamics of Forced Convection on a Vertical Flat Plate

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Jeff R.; Lance, Blake W.; Smith, Barton L.

    2015-08-10

    We present computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation dataset for turbulent forced convection on a vertical plate. The design of the apparatus is based on recent validation literature and provides a means to simultaneously measure boundary conditions (BCs) and system response quantities (SRQs). Important inflow quantities for Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS). CFD are also measured. Data are acquired at two heating conditions and cover the range 40,000 < Rex < 300,000, 357 < Reδ2 < 813, and 0.02 < Gr/Re2 < 0.232.

  10. Experimental Validation Data for Computational Fluid Dynamics of Forced Convection on a Vertical Flat Plate

    DOE PAGES

    Harris, Jeff R.; Lance, Blake W.; Smith, Barton L.

    2015-08-10

    We present computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation dataset for turbulent forced convection on a vertical plate. The design of the apparatus is based on recent validation literature and provides a means to simultaneously measure boundary conditions (BCs) and system response quantities (SRQs). Important inflow quantities for Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS). CFD are also measured. Data are acquired at two heating conditions and cover the range 40,000 < Rex < 300,000, 357 < Reδ2 < 813, and 0.02 < Gr/Re2 < 0.232.

  11. Suspended sediment dynamics in a tidal channel network under peak river flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achete, Fernanda Minikowski; van der Wegen, Mick; Roelvink, Dano; Jaffe, Bruce

    2016-05-01

    Peak river flows transport fine sediment, nutrients, and contaminants that may deposit in the estuary. This study explores the importance of peak river flows on sediment dynamics with special emphasis on channel network configurations. The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, which is connected to San Francisco Bay (California, USA), motivates this study and is used as a validation case. Besides data analysis of observations, we applied a calibrated process-based model (D-Flow FM) to explore and analyze high-resolution (˜100 m, ˜1 h) dynamics. Peak river flows supply the vast majority of sediment into the system. Data analysis of six peak flows (between 2012 and 2014) shows that on average, 40 % of the input sediment in the system is trapped and that trapping efficiency depends on timing and magnitude of river flows. The model has 90 % accuracy reproducing these trapping efficiencies. Modeled deposition patterns develop as the result of peak river flows after which, during low river flow conditions, tidal currents are not able to significantly redistribute deposited sediment. Deposition is quite local and mainly takes place at a deep junction. Tidal movement is important for sediment resuspension, but river induced, tide residual currents are responsible for redistributing the sediment towards the river banks and to the bay. We applied the same forcing for four different channel configurations ranging from a full delta network to a schematization of the main river. A higher degree of network schematization leads to higher peak-sediment export downstream to the bay. However, the area of sedimentation is similar for all the configurations because it is mostly driven by geometry and bathymetry.

  12. Development of a national, dynamic reservoir-sedimentation database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, J.R.; Bernard, J.M.; Stewart, D.W.; McFaul, E.J.; Laurent, K.W.; Schwarz, G.E.; Stinson, J.T.; Jonas, M.M.; Randle, T.J.; Webb, J.W.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of dependable, long-term water supplies, coupled with the need to quantify rates of capacity loss of the Nation’s re servoirs due to sediment deposition, were the most compelling reasons for developing the REServoir- SEDimentation survey information (RESSED) database and website. Created under the auspices of the Advisory Committee on Water Information’s Subcommittee on Sedimenta ion by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Natural Resources Conservation Service, the RESSED database is the most comprehensive compilation of data from reservoir bathymetric and dry-basin surveys in the United States. As of March 2010, the database, which contains data compiled on the 1950s vintage Soil Conservation Service’s Form SCS-34 data sheets, contained results from 6,616 surveys on 1,823 reservoirs in the United States and two surveys on one reservoir in Puerto Rico. The data span the period 1755–1997, with 95 percent of the surveys performed from 1930–1990. The reservoir surface areas range from sub-hectare-scale farm ponds to 658 km2 Lake Powell. The data in the RESSED database can be useful for a number of purposes, including calculating changes in reservoir-storage characteristics, quantifying sediment budgets, and estimating erosion rates in a reservoir’s watershed. The March 2010 version of the RESSED database has a number of deficiencies, including a cryptic and out-of-date database architecture; some geospatial inaccuracies (although most have been corrected); other data errors; an inability to store all data in a readily retrievable manner; and an inability to store all data types that currently exist. Perhaps most importantly, the March 2010 version of RESSED database provides no publically available means to submit new data and corrections to existing data. To address these and other deficiencies, the Subcommittee on Sedimentation, through the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, began a collaborative project in

  13. Holocene sediment dynamics on a cool-water carbonate shelf: Otway, southeastern Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Boreen, T.D.; James, N.P. )

    1993-07-01

    The Otway Shelf is covered by cool waters and veneered by bryozoan-dominated carbonate sediments. Radiocarbon dating and stratigraphy of shelf vibracores and slope gravity cores document late Pleistocene/Holocene deposition. Shelf sediments of the late Pleistocene high-stand are rare, either never having been deposited or having been removed during the following sea-level fall. During the subsequent lowstand the shelf was exposed, facies shifted basinward, and beach/dune complexes were constructed near the shelf edge. The deep shelf was characterized by nondeposition and hardground formation, and the shelf margin became locally erosional. Upper-slope bryozoan/sponge assemblages continued to grow actively, and lower-slope foraminifera and nannofossil ooze was increasingly enriched in hemipelagic terrigenous mud swept off the wide shelf. Coarse shelf debris and lowstand dune sands were erosively reworked and transported onto the upper slope and redistributed to deep-slope aprons during early transgression. The late Quaternary shelf record resembles that of flat-topped, warm-water platforms with Holocene sediment overlying Pleistocene/Tertiary limestone, but for different reasons. The slow growth potential, uniform profile of sediment production and distribution, and inability of constituent organisms to construct rigid frameworks favor maintenance of a shallow ramp profile and makes the cool-water carbonate system an excellent modern analog for interpretation of many ancient ramp successions.

  14. Dynamic linear models to explore time-varying suspended sediment-discharge rating curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kuk-Hyun; Yellen, Brian; Steinschneider, Scott

    2017-06-01

    This study presents a new method to examine long-term dynamics in sediment yield using time-varying sediment-discharge rating curves. Dynamic linear models (DLMs) are introduced as a time series filter that can assess how the relationship between streamflow and sediment concentration or load changes over time in response to a wide variety of natural and anthropogenic watershed disturbances or long-term changes. The filter operates by updating parameter values using a recursive Bayesian design that responds to 1 day-ahead forecast errors while also accounting for observational noise. The estimated time series of rating curve parameters can then be used to diagnose multiscale (daily-decadal) variability in sediment yield after accounting for fluctuations in streamflow. The technique is applied in a case study examining changes in turbidity load, a proxy for sediment load, in the Esopus Creek watershed, part of the New York City drinking water supply system. The results show that turbidity load exhibits a complex array of variability across time scales. The DLM highlights flood event-driven positive hysteresis, where turbidity load remained elevated for months after large flood events, as a major component of dynamic behavior in the rating curve relationship. The DLM also produces more accurate 1 day-ahead loading forecasts compared to other static and time-varying rating curve methods. The results suggest that DLMs provide a useful tool for diagnosing changes in sediment-discharge relationships over time and may help identify variability in sediment concentrations and loads that can be used to inform dynamic water quality management.

  15. Deltas as Ecomorphodynamic Systems: Effects of Vegetation Gradients on Sediment Trapping and Channel Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piliouras, A.; Kim, W.; Goggin, H.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the feedbacks between water, sediment, and vegetation in deltas is an important part of understanding deltas as ecomorphodynamic systems. We conducted a set of laboratory experiments using alfalfa (Medicago sativa) as a proxy for delta vegetation to determine (1) the effects of plants on delta growth and channel dynamics and (2) the influence of fine material on delta evolution. Vegetated experiments were compared to a control run without plants to isolate the effects of vegetation, and experiments with fine sediment were compared to a set of similar experiments with only sand. We found that alfalfa increased sediment trapping on the delta topset, and that the plants were especially effective at retaining fine material. Compared to the control run, the vegetated experiments showed an increased retention of fine sediment on the floodplain that resulted in increased delta relief and stronger pulses of shoreline progradation when channel avulsion and migration occurred. In other words, a higher amount of sediment storage with the addition of vegetation corresponded to a higher amount of sediment excavation during channelization events. In natural systems, dense bank vegetation is typically expected to help confine flow. We seeded our delta uniformly, which eliminated typical vegetation density gradients from riverbank to island center and therefore diminished the gradient in overbank sedimentation that best confines channels by creating levees. Dense clusters of alfalfa throughout the interior of the floodplain and delta islands were therefore able to induce flow splitting, where channels diverged around a stand of plants. This created several smaller channels that were then able to more widely distribute sediment at the delta front compared to unvegetated experiments. We conclude that plants are efficient sediment trappers that change the rate and amount of sediment storage in the delta topset, and that gradients in vegetation density are an important

  16. Sediment Retention Dynamics and Vegetation Along Three Tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, K.; Ross, K.; Hupp, C.; Alexander, L.; Alexander, L.

    2001-12-01

    Coastal Plain riparian wetlands in the Mid-Atlantic United States are the last place for sediment and contaminant storage before reaching critical estuarine and marine environments. The deteriorating health of the Chesapeake Bay has been attributed in part to elevated sediment loads. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of channelization and urbanization on sediment deposition and geomorphic processes along the Pocomoke and Chickahominy Rivers and Dragon Run, three Coastal Plain tributaries. Floodplain microtopography was surveyed in 100 x 100 m grids at three characteristic reaches along each river and woody vegetation analyses were conducted. Floodplain suspended sediment concentrations and short and long-term sedimentation rates were estimated at each reach using single stage sediment sampler arrays, clay pads and dendrogeomorphic techniques, respectively. Site hydroperiod and flow characteristics were determined from USGS gaging station records, floodplain water level recorders, and field observations. Channelized floodplain reaches along the Pocomoke River are flooded less frequently, have lower mineral sedimentation rates (2 mm/yr to 6 mm/yr) and woody species diversity than the unchannelized reaches. Along the Chickahominy River, floodplain wetlands close to urban centers are flooded more frequently, but have shorter hydroperiods (3.5 days/yr compared to more than 45 days/yr), lower sedimentation rates (1.8 mm/yr to 6.8 mm/yr), and lower woody species diversity (0.51 to 1.95 on the Shannon-Weiner diversity index) than floodplains further downstream. Suspended sediment delivery and deposition rates are significantly influenced by floodplain hydroperiod duration and channel-floodplain connectivity. These results suggest that understanding floodplain sediment dynamics and geomorphic processes with respect to dominant watershed landuse patterns is critical for effective water quality management and restoration efforts.

  17. Nitrogen dynamics in sediment during water level manipulation on the Upper Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cavanaugh, Jennifer C.; Richardson, William B.; Strauss, Eric A.; Bartsch, Lynn

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) has been linked to increasing eutrophication in the Gulf of Mexico and as a result there is increased interest in managing and improving water quality in the Mississippi River system. Water level reductions, or 'drawdowns', are being used more frequently in large river impoundments to improve vegetation growth and sediment compaction. We selected two areas of the Upper Mississippi River system (Navigation Pool 8 and Swan Lake) to examine the effects of water level drawdown on N dynamics. Navigation Pool 8 experienced summer drawdowns in 2001 and 2002. Certain areas of Swan Lake have been drawn down annually since the early 1970s where as other areas have remained inundated. In the 2002 Pool 8 study we determined the effects of sediment drying and rewetting resulting from water level drawdown on (1) patterns of sediment nitrification and denitrification and (2) concentrations of sediment and surface water total N (TN), nitrate, and ammonium (NH4+). In 2001, we only examined sediment NH4+ and TN. In the Swan Lake study, we determined the long-term effects of water level drawdowns on concentrations of sediment NH4+ and TN in sediments that dried annually and those that remained inundated. Sediment NH4+ decreased significantly in the Pool 8 studies during periods of desiccation, although there were no consistent trends in nitrification and denitrification or a reduction in total sediment N. Ammonium in sediments that have dried annually in Swan Lake appeared lower but was not significantly different from sediments that remain wet. The reduction in sediment NH4+ in parts of Pool 8 was likely a result of increased plant growth and N assimilation, which is then redeposited back to the sediment surface upon plant senescence. Similarly, the Swan Lake study suggested that drawdowns do not result in long term reduction in sediment N. Water level drawdowns may actually reduce water retention time and river-floodplain connectivity, while promoting significant

  18. Algoriphagus aestuarii sp. nov., a member of the Cyclobacteriaceae isolated from a tidal-flat sediment of the Yellow Sea in Korea.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yong-Taek; Lee, Jung-Sook; Yoon, Jung-Hoon

    2015-10-01

    A Gram-strain-negative, coccoid or oval-shaped, non-motile bacterial strain, designated MDM-1T, was isolated from a tidal-flat sediment on the Korean peninsula. Strain MDM-1T was found to grow optimally at pH 7.0-8.0, at 30 °C and in the presence of 2-3 % (w/v) NaCl. A neighbour-joining phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain MDM-1T falls within the clade comprising species of the genus Algoriphagus, clustering with the type strains of Algoriphagus halophilus, A. lutimaris, A. chungangensis and A. machipongonensis, with which it exhibited 97.2-98.5 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. Sequence similarities to the type strains of the other recognized species of the genus Algoriphagus were 92.8-97.6 %. Strain MDM-1T was found to contain MK-7 as the predominant menaquinone and iso-C15 : 0 and summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω6c and/or C16 : 1ω7c) as the major fatty acids. The major polar lipids were identified as phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and two unidentified lipids. The DNA G+C content of strain MDM-1T was determined to be 42.7 mol% and the mean DNA-DNA relatedness with A. halophilus KCTC 12051T, A. lutimaris S1-3T, A. chungangensis KCTC 23759T, A. machipongonensis DSM 24695T and A. ratkowskyi CIP 107452T was 19.7-5.2 %. Differential phenotypic properties, together with the phylogenetic and genetic distinctiveness, revealed that strain MDM-1T is distinguishable from recognized species of the genus Algoriphagus. On the basis of the data presented, strain MDM-1T is proposed to represent a novel species of the genus Algoriphagus, for which the name Algoriphagus aestuarii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MDM-1T ( = KCTC 42199T = NBRC 110552T).

  19. Dynamics of sediment disturbance by periodic artificial discharges from the world's largest tidal power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. W.; Ha, H. K.; Woo, S. B.

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the dynamics of sediment disturbance near the world's largest Sihwa tidal power plant (TPP), two mooring observations have been conducted. The mooring results show that current velocity and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) were significantly disturbed over various time scales. On the short-term (flood-ebb) time scale, resuspension of bottom sediment is mainly controlled by the strong jet-flow (>2 m s-1) and resulting anticlockwise rotating vortex associated with the artificial discharge. During ebb phase, the strong flow resulted in suspension of high-concentration near-bed sediment and seaward transport of the suspended sediment. After turning to flood phase, the vortex produced secondary SSC peaks, transporting the suspended sediment toward the Sihwa TPP. The most active suspension of bed sediment predominantly occurred during 1-2 h immediately after the start of artificial discharge. For the fortnightly (spring-neap) time scale, SSC during spring tide was approximately 2-5 times higher than that during neap tide. During the combined period of ebb and spring tides, in particular, the periodic artificial discharge can enhance the responses of SSC in the vicinity of Sihwa TPP.

  20. Impact of ice-shelf sediment content on the dynamics of plumes under melting ice shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, A.

    2015-12-01

    When a floating ice shelf melts into an underlying warm salty ocean, the resulting fresh meltwater can rise in a buoyant Ice-Shelf-Water plume under the ice. In certain settings, ice flowing across the grounding line carries a basal layer of debris rich ice, entrained via basal freezing around till in the upstream ice sheet. Melting of this debris-laden ice from floating ice shelves provides a flux of dense sediment to the ocean, in addition to the release of fresh buoyant meltwater. This presentation considers the impact of the resulting suspended sediment on the dynamics of ice shelf water plumes, and identifies two key flow regimes depending on the sediment concentration frozen into the basal ice layer. For large sediment concentration, melting of the debris-laden ice shelf generates dense convectively unstable waters that drive convective overturning into the underlying ocean. For lower sediment concentration, the sediment initially remains suspended in a buoyant meltwater plume rising along the underside of the ice shelf, before slowly depositing into the underlying ocean. A theoretical plume model is used to evaluate the significance of the negatively buoyant sediment on circulation strength and the feedbacks on melting rate, along with the expected depositional patterns under the ice shelf.

  1. Assessing surface sediment dynamics along the north-west coast of Marsa Dhouiba (Tunisia, southern Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khiari, Nouha; Atoui, Abdelfattah; Brahim, Mouldi; Sammari, Chérif; Charef, Abdelkrim; Aleya, Lotfi

    2016-04-01

    An investigation was conducted from summer 2012 to winter 2013 at 25 stations along the Tunisian coast near Kef Abbed at Marsa Dhouiba (north-east Mediterranean Sea) to analyse grain size, sediment mineralogy and currents. Particle-size analysis shows that sand deposits at shallow depths are characterised by S-shaped curves, indicating a degree of agitation and possible transport by rip currents near the bottom. At greater depths (between 10 and 30 m), the bottom is covered by coarse sand and gravel. A current was observed transporting sediment eastward along the coast; another seaward current was also noted. Generated by wind, swell and especially waves from west to north-west, the two currents transport clay and silt-sized sediment seaward. An Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler showed Marsa Dhouiba's coastal current to follow a direction 175° East, with its main axis running north/north-west parallel to the coast and its minor axis also running north/north-west. Analysis of current components indicates that the velocities u and v are oriented north to south. Sediment evolution in shallow waters is dependent on detrital inputs from streams and winds. The coarse fraction of surface sediments in Marsa Dhouiba presents 87% of total sediments and is located at depths of 10-30 m. Sediment dynamics in the Marsa Dhouiba region are closely related to the west/north-west swell.

  2. Dynamics of copper and zinc sedimentation in a lagooning system receiving landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Guigue, Julien; Mathieu, Olivier; Lévêque, Jean; Denimal, Sophie; Steinmann, Marc; Milloux, Marie-Jeanne; Grisey, Hervé

    2013-11-01

    This study characterises the sediment dredged from a lagooning system composed of a settling pond and three lagoons that receive leachates from a municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill in France. Organic carbon, carbonate, iron oxyhydroxides, copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) concentrations were measured in the sediment collected from upstream to downstream in the lagooning system. In order to complete our investigation of sedimentation mechanisms, leachates were sampled in both dry (spring) and wet (winter) seasonal conditions. Precipitation of calcite and amorphous Fe-oxyhydroxides and sedimentation of organic matter occurred in the settling pond. Since different distributions of Zn and Cu concentrations are measured in sediment samples collected downstream in the lagooning system, it is suggested that these elements were not distributed in a similar way in the leachate fractions during the first stage of treatment in the settling pond, so that their sedimentation dynamics in the lagooning system differ. In the lagoons, it was found that organic carbon plays a major role in Cu and Zn mobility and trapping. The presence of macrophytes along the edges provided an input of organic matter that enhanced Cu and Zn scavenging. This edge effect resulted in a two-fold increase in Cu and Zn concentrations in the sediment deposited near the banks of the lagoons, thus confirming the importance of vegetation for the retention of Cu and Zn in lagooning systems.

  3. Computational Fluid Dynamics Uncertainty Analysis Applied to Heat Transfer over a Flat Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groves, Curtis Edward; Ilie, Marcel; Schallhorn, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    There have been few discussions on using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) without experimental validation. Pairing experimental data, uncertainty analysis, and analytical predictions provides a comprehensive approach to verification and is the current state of the art. With pressed budgets, collecting experimental data is rare or non-existent. This paper investigates and proposes a method to perform CFD uncertainty analysis only from computational data. The method uses current CFD uncertainty techniques coupled with the Student-T distribution to predict the heat transfer coefficient over a at plate. The inputs to the CFD model are varied from a specified tolerance or bias error and the difference in the results are used to estimate the uncertainty. The variation in each input is ranked from least to greatest to determine the order of importance. The results are compared to heat transfer correlations and conclusions drawn about the feasibility of using CFD without experimental data. The results provide a tactic to analytically estimate the uncertainty in a CFD model when experimental data is unavailable

  4. Seasonal sediment dynamics on the Barcelona inner shelf (NW Mediterranean): A small Mediterranean river- and wave-dominated system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, L.; Guillén, J.; Palanques, A.; Grifoll, M.

    2017-08-01

    The seasonal pattern of sediment dynamics on an inner shelf characterized by the presence of sediment delivered by a small, mountainous river (with a ;flash-flood; regime) was investigated. Near-bottom suspended sediment fluxes across the shelf (i.e. 20, 30 and 40 m water depth) were estimated using observations from three benthic tripods deployed from September 2007 to June 2008. Near-bottom sediment resuspension was controlled by wave-induced currents and river-born sediment availability, whereas the shelf currents played a secondary role. Fourteen sediment transport events were identified (eight in autumn, two in winter and four in spring), with transport rates according to storm intensity and sediment availability. These few energetic events induced a large percentage of the cumulative sediment transport near the bottom. However, the lack of proportionality between suspended sediment transport rates and the combined wave-current bottom shear stress in some events highlights the importance of the sequence of events in sediment dynamics. Since wave activity, hydrography and river discharges display a strong seasonal pattern in the NW Mediterranean, the resulting sediment dynamics across the shelf also correspond to a seasonal cycle. This seasonal variability leads to a temporal evolution of the bottom grain size (coarser in winter) and the near-bottom sediment transport rates (higher in spring and autumn) which is consistent with the seasonal pattern of the hydrodynamic events and the river discharge load.

  5. Dynamics and recovery of a sediment-exposed Chironomus riparius population: A modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Diepens, Noël J; Beltman, Wim H J; Koelmans, Albert A; Van den Brink, Paul J; Baveco, Johannes M

    2016-06-01

    Models can be used to assess long-term risks of sediment-bound contaminants at the population level. However, these models usually lack the coupling between chemical fate in the sediment, toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic processes in individuals and propagation of individual-level effects to the population. We developed a population model that includes all these processes, and used it to assess the importance of chemical uptake routes on a Chironomus riparius population after pulsed exposure to the pesticide chlorpyrifos. We show that particle ingestion is an important additional exposure pathway affecting C. riparius population dynamics and recovery. Models ignoring particle ingestion underestimate the impact and the required recovery times, which implies that they underestimate risks of sediment-bound chemicals. Additional scenario studies showed the importance of selecting the biologically relevant sediment layer and showed population effects in the long term.

  6. In-Well Sediment Incubators to Evaluate Microbial Community Stability and Dynamics following Bioimmobilization of Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, Brett R.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Gan, M.; Resch, Charles T.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Smithgall, A. N.; Pfiffner, S.; Freifeld, Barry M.; White, D. C.; Long, Philip E.

    2009-09-23

    An in-situ incubation device (ISI) was developed in order to investigate the stability and dynamics of sediment associated microbial communities to prevailing subsurface oxidizing or reducing conditions. Here we describe the use of these devices at the Old Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) site. During the 7 month deployment oxidized Rifle aquifer background sediments (RABS) were deployed in previously biostimulated wells under iron reducing conditions, cell densities of known iron reducing bacteria including Geobacteraceae increased significantly showing the microbial community response to local subsurface conditions. PLFA profiles of RABS following in situ deployment were strikingly similar to those of adjacent sediment cores suggesting ISI results could be extrapolated to the native material of the test plots. Results for ISI deployed reduced sediments showed only slight changes in community composition and pointed toward the ability of the ISIs to monitor microbial community stability and response to subsurface conditions.

  7. An application of a Markov-chain model of shore erosion for describing the dynamics of sediment flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroumov, V.; Rachold, V.; Vasiliev, A.; Sorokovikov, V.

    2005-06-01

    Acquisition of coastline retreat rate time sequences (RRTS) is an important component of Arctic coastal monitoring. These data can be used not only to estimate sediment input into the sea during a fixed time period, but also to dynamically simulate sediment flux intensity. The RRTS were investigated at the Marre-Sale (Kara Sea) and Malii Chukochii Cape (East Siberian Sea) key sites. Statistical analysis demonstrated that the RRTS possess Markov characteristic. This allowed coastline dynamics to be described using a Markov-chain model. A model is discussed that combines Markov characteristic and information about the composition and structure of the permafrost sediments to describe sediment flux dynamics.

  8. Interplay between spatially explicit sediment sourcing, hierarchical river-network structure, and in-channel bed material sediment transport and storage dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czuba, Jonathan A.; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi; Gran, Karen B.; Belmont, Patrick; Wilcock, Peter R.

    2017-05-01

    Understanding how sediment moves along source to sink pathways through watersheds—from hillslopes to channels and in and out of floodplains—is a fundamental problem in geomorphology. We contribute to advancing this understanding by modeling the transport and in-channel storage dynamics of bed material sediment on a river network over a 600 year time period. Specifically, we present spatiotemporal changes in bed sediment thickness along an entire river network to elucidate how river networks organize and process sediment supply. We apply our model to sand transport in the agricultural Greater Blue Earth River Basin in Minnesota. By casting the arrival of sediment to links of the network as a Poisson process, we derive analytically (under supply-limited conditions) the time-averaged probability distribution function of bed sediment thickness for each link of the river network for any spatial distribution of inputs. Under transport-limited conditions, the analytical assumptions of the Poisson arrival process are violated (due to in-channel storage dynamics) where we find large fluctuations and periodicity in the time series of bed sediment thickness. The time series of bed sediment thickness is the result of dynamics on a network in propagating, altering, and amalgamating sediment inputs in sometimes unexpected ways. One key insight gleaned from the model is that there can be a small fraction of reaches with relatively low-transport capacity within a nonequilibrium river network acting as "bottlenecks" that control sediment to downstream reaches, whereby fluctuations in bed elevation can dissociate from signals in sediment supply.

  9. Dynamics of the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion from Black Sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowaczyk, N. R.; Arz, H. W.; Frank, U.; Kind, J.; Plessen, B.

    2012-10-01

    Investigated sediment cores from the southeastern Black Sea provide a high-resolution record from mid latitudes of the Laschamp geomagnetic polarity excursion. Age constraints are provided by 16 AMS 14C ages, identification of the Campanian Ignimbrite tephra (39.28±0.11 ka), and by detailed tuning of sedimentologic parameters of the Black Sea sediments to the oxygen isotope record from the Greenland NGRIP ice core. According to the derived age model, virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) positions during the Laschamp excursion persisted in Antarctica for an estimated 440 yr, making the Laschamp excursion a short-lived event with fully reversed polarity directions. The reversed phase, centred at 41.0 ka, is associated with a significant field intensity recovery to 20% of the preceding strong field maximum at ˜50 ka. Recorded field reversals of the Laschamp excursion, lasting only an estimated ˜250 yr, are characterized by low relative paleointensities (5% relative to 50 ka). The central, fully reversed phase of the Laschamp excursion is bracketed by VGP excursions to the Sargasso Sea (˜41.9 ka) and to the Labrador Sea (˜39.6 ka). Paleomagnetic results from the Black Sea are in excellent agreement with VGP data from the French type locality which facilitates the chronological ordering of the non-superposed lavas that crop out at Laschamp-Olby. In addition, VGPs between 34 and 35 ka reach low northerly to equatorial latitudes during a clockwise loop, inferred to be the Mono lake excursion.

  10. Spatial patterns of sediment dynamics within a medium-sized watershed over an extreme storm event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng; Zhang, Zhirou

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we quantified spatial patterns of sediment dynamics in a watershed of 311 km2 over an extreme storm event using watershed modeling and statistical analyses. First, we calibrated a watershed model, Dynamic Watershed Simulation Model (DWSM) by comparing the predicted with calculated hydrograph and sedigraph at the outlet for this event. Then we predicted values of event runoff volume (V), peak flow (Qpeak), and two types of event sediment yields for lumped morphological units that contain 42 overland elements and 21 channel segments within the study watershed. Two overland elements and the connected channel segment form a first-order subwatershed, several of which constitute a larger nested subwatershed. Next we examined (i) the relationships between these variables and area (A), precipitation (P), mean slope (S), soil erodibility factor, and percent of crop and pasture lands for all overland elements (i.e., the small spatial scale, SSS), and (ii) those between sediment yield, Qpeak, A, P, and event runoff depth (h) for the first-order and nested subwatersheds along two main creeks of the study watershed (i.e., the larger spatial scales, LSS). We found that at the SSS, sediment yield was nonlinearly well related to A and P, but not Qpeak and h; whereas at the LSS, linear relationships between sediment yield and Qpeak existed, so did the Qpeak-A, and Qpeak-P relationships. This linearity suggests the increased connectivity from the SSS to LSS, which was caused by ignorance of channel processes within overland elements. It also implies that sediment was transported at capacity during the extreme event. So controlling sediment supply from the most erodible overland elements may not efficiently reduce the downstream sediment load.

  11. Spatio-temporal dynamics of sediment sources in a peri-urban Mediterranean catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Carla; Walsh, Rory; Blake, William; Kikuchi, Ryunosuke; Ferreira, António

    2017-04-01

    Sediment fluxes driven by hydrological processes lead to natural soil losses, but human activities, such as urbanization, influence hydrology and promote erosion, altering the landscape and sediment fluxes. In peri-urban areas, comprising a mixture of semi-natural and man-made land-uses, understanding sediment fluxes is still a research challenge. This study investigates spatial and temporal dynamics of fluvial sediments in a rapidly urbanizing catchment. Specific objectives are to understand the main sources of sediments relating to different types of urban land disturbance, and their variability driven by (i) weather, season and land-use changes through time, and (ii) sediment particle size. The study was carried out Ribeira dos Covões, a peri-urban catchment (6.2km2) in central Portugal. The climate is humid Mediterranean, with mean annual temperature and rainfall of 15˚ C and 892 mm, respectively. The geology comprises sandstone (56%), limestone (41%) and alluvial deposits (3%). The catchment has an average slope of 9˚ , but includes steep slopes of up to 46˚ . The land-use is a complex mosaic of woodland (56%), urban (40%) and agricultural (4%) land parcels, resulting from urbanization occurring progressively since 1973. Urbanization since 2010 has mainly comprised the building of a major road, covering 1% of the catchment area, and the ongoing construction of an enterprise park, occupying 5% of the catchment. This study uses a multi-proxy sediment fingerprinting approach, based on X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analyses to characterize the elemental geochemistry of sediments collected within the stream network after three storm events in 2012 and 2015. A range of statistical techniques, including hierarchical cluster analysis, was used to identify discriminant sediment properties and similarities between fine bed-sediment samples of tributaries and downstream sites. Quantification of sediment supply from upstream sub-catchments was undertaken using a Bayesian

  12. Phosphorus dynamics in lake sediments: Insights from field study and reactive-transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, Maria; Markovic, Stefan; Cadena, Sandra; Doan, Phuong T. K.; Watson, Sue; Mugalingam, Shan

    2016-04-01

    Phosphorus is an indispensable nutrient for organisms in aquatic systems and its availability often controls primary productivity. At the sediment-water interface, intensive microbiological, geochemical and physical processes determine the fraction of organic matter, nutrients and pollutants released into the overlying water. Therefore, detailed understanding of the processes occurring in the top centimeters of the sediment is essential for the assessment of water quality and the management of surface waters. In cases where measurements are impossible or expensive, diagenetic modelling is required to investigate the interplay among the processes, verify concepts and predict potential system behavior. The main aims of this study are to identify and predict the dynamics of phosphorus (P) in sediments and gain insight into the mechanism of P release from sediments under varying environmental conditions. We measured redox, O2 and pH profiles with micro-sensors at the sediment-water interface; analyzed phosphate and metals (Fe, Mn, Al, Ca) content in pore waters collected using in situ samplers, so called "peepers"; determined P binding forms using sequential extraction and analyzed metals associated with each fraction. Following the sediment analysis, P binding forms were divided in five groups: inert, carbonate-bound, organic, redox-sensitive, and labile P. Using the flux of organic and inorganic matter as dynamic boundary conditions, the diagenetic model simulates P internal loading and predicts P retention. This presentation will discuss the results of two years studies on P dynamics at the sediment-water interface in three different lakes ranging from heavy-polluted Hamilton Harbor and Bay of Quinte to pristine Georgian Bay in Ontario, Canada.

  13. Classification and Prediction of Event-based Suspended Sediment Dynamics using Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamshaw, S. D.; Underwood, K.; Wemple, B. C.; Rizzo, D.

    2016-12-01

    Sediment transport can be an immensely complex process, yet plays a vital role in the transport of substances and nutrients that can impact receiving waters. Advancements in the use of sensors for indirect measurement of suspended sediments have allowed access to high frequency sediment data. This has promoted the use of more advanced computational tools to identify patterns in sediment data to improve our understanding of physical processes occurring in the watershed. In this study, a network of weather stations and in-stream turbidity sensors were deployed to capture more than three years of sediment dynamics and meteorological data in the Mad River watershed in central Vermont. Monitoring sites were located along the main stem of the the Mad River and on five tributaries. Separate storm events were identified from the data at each site to study event sediment dynamics associated with erosion and deposition over space and time. Two types of artificial neural networks (ANNs), a self-organizing map (SOM) and a radial basis function (RBF), were used to cluster the storm event data based on hydrometeorological metrics and were subsequently compared to traditional classes of hysteresis patterns in suspended sediment concentration - discharge (SSC-Q) relationships. Hysteresis patterns were also directly used as inputs to both ANNs to identify distinct patterns and test the applicability of performing pattern recognition on hysteresis patterns. The results of this study will be used to gain insight into the dynamic physical processes (both spatial and temporal) occurring in the watershed based on patterns observed in SSQ-Q data.

  14. Denoising and artefact reduction in dynamic flat detector CT perfusion imaging using high speed acquisition: first experimental and clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manhart, Michael T.; Aichert, André; Struffert, Tobias; Deuerling-Zheng, Yu; Kowarschik, Markus; Maier, Andreas K.; Hornegger, Joachim; Doerfler, Arnd

    2014-08-01

    Flat detector CT perfusion (FD-CTP) is a novel technique using C-arm angiography systems for interventional dynamic tissue perfusion measurement with high potential benefits for catheter-guided treatment of stroke. However, FD-CTP is challenging since C-arms rotate slower than conventional CT systems. Furthermore, noise and artefacts affect the measurement of contrast agent flow in tissue. Recent robotic C-arms are able to use high speed protocols (HSP), which allow sampling of the contrast agent flow with improved temporal resolution. However, low angular sampling of projection images leads to streak artefacts, which are translated to the perfusion maps. We recently introduced the FDK-JBF denoising technique based on Feldkamp (FDK) reconstruction followed by joint bilateral filtering (JBF). As this edge-preserving noise reduction preserves streak artefacts, an empirical streak reduction (SR) technique is presented in this work. The SR method exploits spatial and temporal information in the form of total variation and time-curve analysis to detect and remove streaks. The novel approach is evaluated in a numerical brain phantom and a patient study. An improved noise and artefact reduction compared to existing post-processing methods and faster computation speed compared to an algebraic reconstruction method are achieved.

  15. Denoising and artefact reduction in dynamic flat detector CT perfusion imaging using high speed acquisition: first experimental and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Manhart, Michael T; Aichert, André; Struffert, Tobias; Deuerling-Zheng, Yu; Kowarschik, Markus; Maier, Andreas K; Hornegger, Joachim; Doerfler, Arnd

    2014-08-21

    Flat detector CT perfusion (FD-CTP) is a novel technique using C-arm angiography systems for interventional dynamic tissue perfusion measurement with high potential benefits for catheter-guided treatment of stroke. However, FD-CTP is challenging since C-arms rotate slower than conventional CT systems. Furthermore, noise and artefacts affect the measurement of contrast agent flow in tissue. Recent robotic C-arms are able to use high speed protocols (HSP), which allow sampling of the contrast agent flow with improved temporal resolution. However, low angular sampling of projection images leads to streak artefacts, which are translated to the perfusion maps. We recently introduced the FDK-JBF denoising technique based on Feldkamp (FDK) reconstruction followed by joint bilateral filtering (JBF). As this edge-preserving noise reduction preserves streak artefacts, an empirical streak reduction (SR) technique is presented in this work. The SR method exploits spatial and temporal information in the form of total variation and time-curve analysis to detect and remove streaks. The novel approach is evaluated in a numerical brain phantom and a patient study. An improved noise and artefact reduction compared to existing post-processing methods and faster computation speed compared to an algebraic reconstruction method are achieved.

  16. Fine sediment dynamics in unsteady open-channel flow studied with acoustic and optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagherimiyab, Fereshteh; Lemmin, Ulrich

    2012-09-01

    In order to simulate fine sediment dynamics over an armored bed in a tidal river, unsteady accelerating, then steady open-channel flow over a movable (but not moving) coarse gravel bed (D50=5.5 mm) was studied. A layer of fine sediment (D50=120 μm) was placed on the coarse gravel bed. The thickness of the fine sediment layer on the gravel bed was varied between 4 and 6 mm, but it was found that the thickness of the layer had no effect on the results. Quasi-instantaneous profiles of velocity and sediment concentration were taken simultaneously and co-located. An Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler (ADVP) was combined with Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) for suspended sediment particle tracking. Measurements resolved turbulence scales. During the final phase of the accelerating flow range, fine sediment suspension from the bed started in packets and rapidly created a ripple pattern that remained nearly stationary. Thereafter, vortex shedding produced most of the sediment suspension into the water column in the form of events or packets, making suspension intermittent. Simultaneously, sediment particles rolled along the bed following the ripple structure, thus slowly advancing the ripple pattern in the direction of the flow without altering ripple geometry. Fine sediment particles and hydrogen bubbles were used individually or combined as flow tracers in the acoustic measurements. When used individually, hydrogen bubbles provided full depth flow and backscattering information, whereas sediment particles traced only the lower layers of the flow, indicating sediment suspension. When both tracers were combined, hydrogen bubbles could only be distinguished from sediment particles when results at two different acoustic carrier frequencies were compared. The intermittency was observed in the backscattering of the acoustic system. The event structure in fine sediment suspension is seen by the PTV method. PTV velocity vectors varied in speed and orientation, were

  17. Better budgeting by redundancy, context, and coupling of coarse and fine sediment dynamics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmont, P.

    2013-12-01

    The core principles of sediment budgeting are simple, involving a careful accounting of sediment sources and sinks over a specified spatial extent and time period. However, a long history of sediment budgeting has shown that such numbers are difficult to constrain due to uncertainty in measurements and immense variability in water and sediment fluxes in time and space. As a result, many budgets compiled at the reach or watershed scales are indeterminate with respect to net erosion or deposition. Further, budgets can be highly sensitive to bias if critical processes or contingencies in the landscape are not considered. Over the past decade many new tools and techniques have been developed that can be used to constrain sediment budgets, including software for analysis of high resolution topography data and imagery, in situ monitoring instrumentation, geochemical fingerprinting and particle tracking devices, and increasingly sophisticated models that describe erosion, transport, and deposition in a physically meaningful way. These approaches have the potential to substantially advance budgeting capabilities by providing multiple, redundant sources of information that must be reconciled within the hard constraint of a mass balance. Each independent source of information can add to the level of certainty with which the budget can inform our understanding of sediment inputs, outputs and net change in storage. However, a key technical challenge lies in developing meaningful estimates of uncertainty for each approach. Once developed, rigorous estimates of uncertainty can serve as scaling factors to close the budget in a transparent and parsimonious manner. More broadly, two key conceptual challenges for the future of sediment budgeting include a) placing the components of the budget into the appropriate landscape context with a focus on identifying critical locations where erosion and deposition processes may be amplified or dampened, and b) linking the dynamics of coarse

  18. Redox dynamics in the Chesapeake Bay: The effect on sediment/water uranium exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, T. J.; Sholkovitz, E. R.; Klinkhammer, G.

    1994-07-01

    The effect of seasonal variations in productivity and redox dynamics on the sediment/water exchange of uranium was investigated on a twelve cruise time series in the Chesapeake Bay. The deep waters of the bay undergo seasonal anoxia in response to high primary productivity and water column stratification from late spring to early fall. Dissolved oxygen was used to monitor water column redox conditions and dissolved iron, manganese, and sulfide were measured to monitor sediment redox conditions. Dissolved 238U was measured in the water column and sediment porewaters to monitor water column/sediment exchange. Uranium incorporation in bay sediments results from two distinct processes: productivity-dependent scavenging from the water column and redox-dependent cycling of uranium between sediments and bottomwater. Uranium is removed from surface waters of the bay by scavenging with biodetritus during periods of high primary productivity. Bottomwater and sediment redox conditions determine whether this particle-bound uranium is buried or released to overlying water. Particulate uranium is released to bottomwaters and porewaters during the degradation of biodetritus and oxidation of authigenic uranium. Low oxygen in bottomwaters in the summer results in minimal exchange of uranium between the sediments and bottomwater, due to the stability of reduced U(IV). High bottomwater oxygen concentrations associated with bay turnover in the fall results in release of authigenic uranium by oxidation to the soluble (VI) form. Enrichment of uranium in fall bottomwater suggests that authigenic uranium is very labile when exposed to oxic environmental conditions. This process is enhanced by physical mixing when anoxic sediments are resuspended into the oxic bottomwaters.

  19. REMOVAL OF TANK AND SEWER SEDIMENT BY GATE FLUSHING: COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODEL STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will discuss the application of a computational fluid dynamics 3D flow model to simulate gate flushing for removing tank/sewer sediments. The physical model of the flushing device was a tank fabricated and installed at the head-end of a hydraulic flume. The fl...

  20. Potential effects of timber harvest and water management on streamflow dynamics and sediment transport

    Treesearch

    C. A. Troendle; W. K. Olsen

    1994-01-01

    The sustainability of aquatic and riparian ecological systems is strongly tied to the dynamics of the streamflow regime. Timber harvest can influence the flow regime by increasing total flow, altering peak discharge rate, and changing the duration of flows of differing frequency of occurrence. These changes in the energy and sediment transporting capability of the...

  1. Phosphorus Dynamics in Soil, Runoff, and Sediment from Three Management Systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Land application of poultry litter can lead to increased phosphorus (P) level in surface runoff and sediment, which in turn, potentially accelerates the eutrophication in the water bodies. The objective of this research was to study the P dynamics in two poultry litter amended soils using three mana...

  2. Dynamics of suspended sediment plumes in Lake Ontario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pluhowski, E. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Enhancement of ERTS-1 imagery yielded excellent quality 35-mm color slides and prints of several prominent turbidity plumes in Lake Ontario. Selected ERTS-1 frames of the Welland Canal and Genesee River plumes will be used to develop time-lapse sequences showing the impact of wind stress on each plume. Unusually high lake levels during the spring resulted in extensive beach erosion along the entire Lake Ontario shoreline. The resulting high concentrations of suspended matter generated highly turbid (up to 420 JTU) nearshore conditions that appeared milky white in the imagery obtained April 12 and 29th, 1973. During the shipping season, both the Welland Canal and a diversion channel at Port Dalhousie, Ontario, produced readily identifiable turbidity plumes in Lake Ontario. However, in the winter neither plume was visible in the ERTS-1 imagery suggesting sharply lower sediment discharge into Lake Ontario from these sources.

  3. Observational and numerical particle tracking to examine sediment dynamics in a Mississippi River delta diversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Mead A.; Yuill, Brendan T.; Meselhe, Ehab A.; Marsh, Jonathan K.; Kolker, Alexander S.; Ameen, Alexander D.

    2017-07-01

    River diversions may serve as useful restoration tools along coastal deltas experiencing land loss due to high rates of relative sea-level rise and the disruption of natural sediment supply. Diversions mitigate land loss by serving as new sediment sources for land building areas in basins proximal to river channels. However, because of the paucity of active diversions, little is known about how diversion receiving-basins evacuate or retain the sediment required to build new land. This study uses observational and numerical particle tracking to investigate the behavior of riverine sand and silt as it enters and passes through the West Bay diversion receiving-basin located on the lowermost Mississippi River delta, USA. Fluorescent sediment tracer was deployed and tracked within the bed sediment over a five-month period to identify locations of sediment deposition in the receiving-basin and nearby river channel. A computational fluid dynamics model with a Lagrangian sediment transport module was employed to predict selective pathways for riverine flow and sand and silt particles through the receiving-basin. Observations of the fluorescent tracer provides snapshots of the integrated sediment response to the full range of drivers in the natural system; the numerical model results offer a continuous map of sediment advection vectors through the receiving basin in response to river-generated currents. Together, these methods provide insight into local and basin-wide values of sediment retention as influenced by grain size, transport time, and basin morphology. Results show that after two weeks of low Mississippi River discharge, basin silt retention was approximately 60% but was reduced to 4% at the conclusion of the study. Riverine sand retention was approximately near 100% at two weeks and 40% over the study period. Modeled sediment storage was predicted to be greatest at the margins of the primary basin transport pathway; this matched the observed dynamics of the silt

  4. Distribution of Surface Sediment in the Bohai Sea and its Relationship with Sediment Supply and Sedimentary Dynamic Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, P.; Wang, H.; Bi, N.; WU, X.

    2016-02-01

    The Bohai Sea is a semi-enclosed sea surrounded by the mainland and the Liaodong Peninsula. Numerous rivers flow into the Bohai Sea from mainland China, carrying lots of terrestrial sediment. Moreover, the hydrodynamic environment in the Bohai Sea has significant seasonal variability as modulated by the monsoonal climate. Therefore, the distribution and dispersal mechanism of the terrestrial sediment are very complicated and attract a wide spread attention. Based on the grain-size analysis of surface sediment recently sampled in the Bohai Sea, we discovered that owing to the influence of sediment supply and hydrodynamic environment, the surface sediment in the Bohai Sea were primarily composed of silty sand and clayey silt. In addition, the Yellow River delivered the highest amount of water and sediment discharge to the Bohai Sea, and thus affected the distribution of surface sediment in many areas, such as the Bohai Bay, the center of the Bohai Sea, etc. The coarse-grained areas were mainly distributed in the river mouth with relatively coarse river-laden sediment and strong hydrodynamics. Meanwhile, combined with the published sedimentation rate in the Bohai Sea, we found that there was an obvious spatial corresponding relationship in the Bohai Sea among the modern sedimentation rate, the grain-size distribution characteristic of surface sediment and sediment transport pattern. When the grain-size of the surface sediment was relatively coarse, the sedimentation rate of the region became low and the sediment converged towards fine-grained sediment areas; whereas the sedimentation rate was relatively high at the fine-grained sediment areas. Furthermore, the grain-size trend analysis showed that the fine-grained sediment areas, such as the center of the Bohai Sea and the northern of the Liaodong Bay where sedimentation rate was high, were the convergent center of surface sediment, except for the Bohai Bay and the subaqueous Yellow River Delta where offshore sediment

  5. Nonlinear Dynamics of Biofilm Growth on Sediment Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molz, F. J.; Murdoch, L. C.; Faybishenko, B.

    2013-12-01

    Bioclogging often begins with the establishment of small colonies (microcolonies), which then form biofilms on the surfaces of a porous medium. These biofilm-porous media surfaces are not simple coatings of single microbes, but complex assemblages of cooperative and competing microbes, interacting with their chemical environment. This leads one to ask: what are the underlying dynamics involved with biofilm growth? To begin answering this question, we have extended the work of Kot et al. (1992, Bull. Mathematical Bio.) from a fully mixed chemostat to an idealized, one-dimensional, biofilm environment, taking into account a simple predator-prey microbial competition, with the prey feeding on a specified food source. With a variable (periodic) food source, Kot et al. (1992) were able to demonstrate chaotic dynamics in the coupled substrate-prey-predator system. Initially, deterministic chaos was thought by many to be mainly a mathematical phenomenon. However, several recent publications (e.g., Becks et al, 2005, Nature Letters; Graham et al. 2007, Int. Soc Microb. Eco. J.; Beninca et al., 2008, Nature Letters; Saleh, 2011, IJBAS) have brought together, using experimental studies and relevant mathematics, a breakthrough discovery that deterministic chaos is present in relatively simple biochemical systems. Two of us (Faybishenko and Molz, 2013, Procedia Environ. Sci)) have numerically analyzed a mathematical model of rhizosphere dynamics (Kravchenko et al., 2004, Microbiology) and detected patterns of nonlinear dynamical interactions supporting evidence of synchronized synergetic oscillations of microbial populations, carbon and oxygen concentrations driven by root exudation into a fully mixed system. In this study, we have extended the application of the Kot et al. model to investigate a spatially-dependent biofilm system. We will present the results of numerical simulations obtained using COMSOL Multi-Physics software, which we used to determine the nature of the

  6. Sediment Transport Dynamic in a Meandering Fluvial System: Case Study of Chini River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazir, M. H. M.; Awang, S.; Shaaban, A. J.; Yahaya, N. K. E. M.; Jusoh, A. M.; Arumugam, M. A. R. M. A.; Ghani, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    Sedimentation in river reduces the flood carrying capacity which lead to the increasing of inundation area in the river basin. Basic sediment transport can predict the fluvial processes in natural rivers and stream through modeling approaches. However, the sediment transport dynamic in a small meandering and low-lying fluvial system is considered scarce in Malaysia. The aim of this study was to analyze the current riverbed erosion and sedimentation scenarios along the Chini River, Pekan, Pahang. The present study revealed that silt and clay has potentially been eroded several parts of the river. Sinuosity index (1.98) indicates that Chini River is very unstable and continuous erosion process in waterways has increase the riverbank instability due to the meandering factors. The riverbed erosional and depositional process in the Chini River is a sluggish process since the lake reduces the flow velocity and causes the deposited particles into the silt and clay soil at the bed of the lake. Besides, the bed layer of the lake comprised of cohesive silt and clayey composition that tend to attach the larger grain size of sediment. The present study estimated the total sediment accumulated along the Chini River is 1.72 ton. The HEC-RAS was employed in the simulations and in general the model performed well, once all parameters were set within their effective ranges.

  7. Sediment dynamics over multiple time scales in Dyke Marsh Preserve (Potomac River, VA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palinkas, C. M.; Walters, D.

    2010-12-01

    Tidal freshwater marshes are critical components of fluvial and estuarine ecosystems, yet sediment dynamics within them have not received as much attention as their saltwater counterparts. This study examines sedimentation in Dyke Marsh Preserve, located on the Potomac River (VA), focusing on understanding the spatial variability present over multiple time scales. Bimonthly sediment data were collected using ceramic tiles, and seasonal- and decadal-scale sedimentation was determined via 7Be (half-life 53.3 days) and 210Pb (half-life 22.3 years), respectively. Results were also compared to SET data collected by the National Park Service since 2006. Preliminary data indicate that sites at lower elevations have higher sedimentation rates, likely related to their close proximity to the sediment source. Mass accumulation rates generally decreased with increasing time scale, such that the seasonal rates were greater than the SET-derived accretion rates, which were in turn greater than the decadal-scale rates. However, the bimonthly rates were the lowest observed, probably because the sampling period (May-October 2010) did not include the main depositional period of the year, which would be integrated by the other techniques.

  8. Modelling suspended sediment dynamics on the subaqueous delta of the Mekong River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanh, Vo Quoc; Reyns, Johan; Wackerman, Chris; Eidam, Emily F.; Roelvink, Dano

    2017-09-01

    Fluvial sediment is the major source for the formation and development of the Mekong Delta. This paper aims to analyse the dynamics of suspended sediment and to investigate the roles of different processes in order to explore flux pattern changes. We applied modelling on two scales, comprising a large-scale model (the whole delta) to consider the upstream characteristics, particularly the Tonle Sap Lake's flood regulation, and a smaller-scale model (tidal rivers and shelf) to understand the sediment processes on the subaqueous delta. A comprehensive comparison to in-situ measurements and remote sensing data demonstrated that the model is capable of qualitatively simulating sediment dynamics on the subaqueous delta. It estimates that the Mekong River supplied an amount of 41.5 mil tons from April 2014 to April 2015. A substantial amount of sediment delivered by the Mekong River is deposited in front of the river mouths in the high flow season and resuspended in the low flow season. A sensitivity analysis shows that waves, baroclinic effects and bed composition strongly influence suspended sediment distribution and transport on the shelf. Waves in particular play an essential role in sediment resuspension. The development of this model is an important step towards an operational model for scientific and engineering applications, since the model is capable of predicting tidal propagation and discharge distribution through the main branches, and in predicting the seasonal SSC and erosion/deposition patterns on the shelf, while it is forced by readily available inputs: discharge at Kratie (Cambodia), GFS winds, ERA40 reanalysis waves, and TPXO 8v1 HR tidal forcing.

  9. Sedimentation dynamics and equilibrium profiles in multicomponent mixtures of colloidal particles.

    PubMed

    Spruijt, E; Biesheuvel, P M

    2014-02-19

    In this paper we give a general theoretical framework that describes the sedimentation of multicomponent mixtures of particles with sizes ranging from molecules to macroscopic bodies. Both equilibrium sedimentation profiles and the dynamic process of settling, or its converse, creaming, are modeled. Equilibrium profiles are found to be in perfect agreement with experiments. Our model reconciles two apparently contradicting points of view about buoyancy, thereby resolving a long-lived paradox about the correct choice of the buoyant density. On the one hand, the buoyancy force follows necessarily from the suspension density, as it relates to the hydrostatic pressure gradient. On the other hand, sedimentation profiles of colloidal suspensions can be calculated directly using the fluid density as apparent buoyant density in colloidal systems in sedimentation-diffusion equilibrium (SDE) as a result of balancing gravitational and thermodynamic forces. Surprisingly, this balance also holds in multicomponent mixtures. This analysis resolves the ongoing debate of the correct choice of buoyant density (fluid or suspension): both approaches can be used in their own domain. We present calculations of equilibrium sedimentation profiles and dynamic sedimentation that show the consequences of these insights. In bidisperse mixtures of colloids, particles with a lower mass density than the homogeneous suspension will first cream and then settle, whereas particles with a suspension-matched mass density form transient, bimodal particle distributions during sedimentation, which disappear when equilibrium is reached. In all these cases, the centers of the distributions of the particles with the lowest mass density of the two, regardless of their actual mass, will be located in equilibrium above the so-called isopycnic point, a natural consequence of their hard-sphere interactions. We include these interactions using the Boublik-Mansoori-Carnahan-Starling-Leland (BMCSL) equation of

  10. Sediment dynamics in restored riparian forest with different widths and agricultural surroundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stucchi Boschi, Raquel; Simões da Silva, Laura; Ribeiro Rodrigues, Ricardo; Cooper, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    The riparian forests are essential to maintaining the quality of water resources, aquifer recharge and biodiversity. Due to the ecological services provided by riparian forests, these areas are considered by the law as Permanent Preservation Areas, being mandatory maintenance and restoration. However, the obligation of restoration and the extent of the Permanent Preservation Areas as defined by the Brazilian Forest Code, based on water body width, elucidates the lack of accurate scientific data on the influence of the size of the riparian forest in maintaining their ecological functions, particularly regarding the retention of sediments. Studies that evaluate the ideal width of riparian forests to guarantee their ecological functions are scarce and not conclusive, especially when we consider newly restored forests, located in agricultural areas. In this study, we investigate the dynamics of erosion and sedimentation in restored riparian forests with different widths situated in agricultural areas. The two study areas are located in a Semideciduous Tropical Forest inserted in sugarcane landscapes of São Paulo state, Brazil. The installed plots had 60 and 100 m in length and the riparian forest has a width of 15, 30 and 50 m. The characteristics of the sediments inside the plots were evaluated by detailed morphological and micromorphological studies as well as physical characterization. The dynamics of deposition and the amount of deposited sediments have been assessed with graded metal stakes partially buried inside the plots. The intensity, frequency and distribution of rainfall, as well as the occurrence of extreme events, have been evaluated by data collected from rain gauges installed in the areas. We expect that smaller widths are not able to retain sediments originated from the adjacent sugarcane areas. We also believe that extreme events are responsible for generating most of the sediments. The results will be important to support the discussion about an

  11. Towards a Holistic Model for Simulating Sediment Dynamics at Watershed Scales: Partitioning of Sediment Sources and Uncertainty Quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abban, Benjamin; Papanicolaou, Thanos; Cowles, Kate; Wilson, Christopher; Abaci, Ozan; Wacha, Kenneth

    2016-04-01

    The challenge remains to understand watershed sediment source dynamics for planning and evaluating mitigation measures on anthropogenic activities such as intensive agriculture, which exacerbates soil erosion from the landscape. To this end, our research aims to develop a cross-scale model, capable of simulating sediment transport from the plot scale to the watershed scale while effectively capturing the important feedback effects across the scales. Our approach combines numerical modeling with physical observations and measurements to not only provide a tool capable of mimicking cause and effect relationships, but also capable of quantifying uncertainty related to source dynamics predictions. We present herein a key component of the cross-scale model that quantifies source partitioning and the associated uncertainty. This component is based on a Bayesian un-mixing framework and is particularly useful for watersheds characterized by considerable spatiotemporal heterogeneity. The Bayesian un-mixing framework utilizes two key parameters, namely α and β, that explicitly accounts for spatial origin attributes and the time history of sediments delivered to the watershed outlet, respectively. These parameters are treated probabilistically so as to account for variability in source erosion processes, as well as the delivery times and storage of eroded material within the watershed. The use of Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations for determining posterior probability density functions in the framework allows uncertainty in source contribution estimates to be quantified naturally as part of the solution process. We demonstrate the utility of the Bayesian un-mixing framework in a predominantly agricultural watershed in the US Midwest known as the Clear Creek Watershed, IA, which is part of the Critical Zone Observatory for Intensively Managed Landscapes (IML-CZO). Stable isotopes of Carbon and Nitrogen are used as tracers since they have been found to be appropriate for

  12. Assessing sediment dynamics of the Middle St. Johns River Basin, Lake Jesup, Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, W. T.; Nielsen, S. M.; Scinto, L. J.; Thomas, S.; Fugate, D. C.; Corbett, D. R.; Brandt-Williams, S.

    2010-12-01

    Lake Jesup is a shallow, hypereutrophic lake located in the middle St. Johns River basin that received large loads of secondary effluent prior to 1985 and experiences tidal, tributary and wind influenced flow. To date we have assessed the use of several different types of sediment traps at different water depths within this shallow basin (typically less than 2.5 m). Each system deployed has its advantages, but deployments in shallow systems present unique challenges. We have augmented our sediment traps with additional observation and data collection systems to evaluate our approach for studying sedimentation rates in the basin. These systems include a floating barge platform to collect daily water samples for suspended particles, weather stations for wind direction and velocity current (flow) meter and acoustic Doppler water velocity systems (ADVs). Results from 2009 to 2010 show mass accumulation rates ranging between 200 g dw m-2 d-1 to 1200 g dw m-2 d-1. Trap material was analyzed for nutrients to better understand fluxes of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus. Sediment oxygen demand was measured during incubation experiments to determine potential effects on water column oxygen concentrations during resuspension events. In the second phase of this project (2010 to 2011) we will measure radioisotopes to better estimate the source of resuspended particles. Our goal is to use the deployed instrumentation to show how hydrodynamics affect sediment transport in this basin. Studying the sediment dynamics of highly productive fresh water end members of estuary systems is critical to better quantify biogeochemical fluxes necessary for effective restoration management. This paper will present a model of nutrient flux and accumulation rates, sediment oxygen demand, correlations between sediment flux and potential driving forces, and initial results from radioisotope sourcing.

  13. Sediment Dynamics in Shallow Tidal Landscapes: The Role of Wind Waves and Tidal Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniello, L.; D'Alpaos, A.

    2014-12-01

    A precise description of sediment dynamics (resuspension and re-distribution of sediments) is crucial when investigating the long term evolution of the different morphological entities characterizing tidal landscapes. It has been demonstrated that wind waves are the main responsible for sediment resuspension in shallow micro-tidal lagoons where tidal currents, which produce shear stresses large enough to carry sediments into suspension only within the main channels, are mainly responsible for sediment redistribution. A mathematical model has been developed to describe sediment entrainment, transport and deposition due to the combined effect of tidal currents and wind waves in shallow lagoons considering both cohesive and non-cohesive sediments. The model was calibrated and tested using both in situ point observations and turbidity maps obtained analyzing satellite images. Once calibrated the model can integrate the high temporal resolution of point observations with the high spatial resolution of remote sensing, overcoming the intrinsic limitation of these two types of observations. The model was applied to the specific test case of the Venice lagoon simulating an entire year (2005) which was shown to be a "representative" year for wind and tide characteristics. The time evolution of the computed total bottom shear stresses (BSS) and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) was analyzed on the basis of a "Peaks Over Threshold" method once a critical value for shear stress and turbidity were chosen. The analyses of the numerical results enabled us to demonstrate that resuspension events can be modeled as marked Poisson processes: interarrival time, intensity of peak excesses and duration being exponentially distributed random variable. The probability distributions of the interarrival time of overthreshold exceedances in both BSS and SSC as well as their intensity and duration can be used in long-term morphodynamic studies to generate synthetic series statistically

  14. Headwater sediment dynamics in a debris flow catchment constrained by high-resolution topographic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loye, Alexandre; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Theule, Joshua Isaac; Liébault, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    Debris flows have been recognized to be linked to the amounts of material temporarily stored in torrent channels. Hence, sediment supply and storage changes from low-order channels of the Manival catchment, a small tributary valley with an active torrent system located exclusively in sedimentary rocks of the Chartreuse Massif (French Alps), were surveyed periodically for 16 months using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to study the coupling between sediment dynamics and torrent responses in terms of debris flow events, which occurred twice during the monitoring period. Sediment transfer in the main torrent was monitored with cross-section surveys. Sediment budgets were generated seasonally using sequential TLS data differencing and morphological extrapolations. Debris production depends strongly on rockfall occurring during the winter-early spring season, following a power law distribution for volumes of rockfall events above 0.1 m3, while hillslope sediment reworking dominates debris recharge in spring and autumn, which shows effective hillslope-channel coupling. The occurrence of both debris flow events that occurred during the monitoring was linked to recharge from previous debris pulses coming from the hillside and from bedload transfer. Headwater debris sources display an ambiguous behaviour in sediment transfer: low geomorphic activity occurred in the production zone, despite rainstorms inducing debris flows in the torrent; still, a general reactivation of sediment transport in headwater channels was observed in autumn without new debris supply, suggesting that the stored debris was not exhausted. The seasonal cycle of sediment yield seems to depend not only on debris supply and runoff (flow capacity) but also on geomorphic conditions that destabilize remnant debris stocks. This study shows that monitoring the changes within a torrent's in-channel storage and its debris supply can improve knowledge on recharge thresholds leading to debris flow.

  15. Interannual dynamics of viriobenthos abundance and morphological diversity in Chesapeake Bay sediments.

    PubMed

    Helton, Rebekah R; Wang, Kui; Kan, Jinjun; Powell, Deborah H; Wommack, K Eric

    2012-02-01

    Despite significant implications of viral activity in sediment ecosystems, there are limited data describing how sediment viral assemblages respond to broader ecosystem changes. To document this, the spatial and temporal dynamics of viral and bacterial abundance (BA) and changes in the morphological distribution of viruses were examined within three salinity regions over 2 years. Viral abundances (VA) ranged from 0.2 to 17 × 10(10) viruses mL(-1) sediment while direct bacterial counts ranged from 3.8 to 37 × 10(8) cells mL(-1) sediment. Peaks and valleys in the abundance of extracted viruses and bacteria from surface sediments occurred simultaneously, with lows in February 2004 and highs in April 2003. Across all samples, viral and BA were positively correlated (P < 0.001). Vertical profiles showed a decrease in viral and BA with depth in sediments. Based on transmission electron microscopy results, viruses with diminutive capsids (20-50 nm) and from the Myoviridae and Podoviridae viral family types were dominant within surface sediments. The most morphologically diverse viral assemblages occurred in autumn samples from the sandy, polyhaline station and spring samples from the mesohaline station. Seasonal changes showed an average 72% decrease in VA from spring to winter. These observations support the view that viriobenthos assemblages are responsive to seasonal environmental changes and that viral processes have significant implications for the biogeochemical processes mediated by bacterial communities within Bay sediments. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Variability of in situ sediment strength and pore pressure behavior of tidal estuary surface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucking, Greg; Stark, Nina; Lippmann, Thomas; Smyth, Stephen

    2017-10-01

    Tidal estuaries feature spatially and temporally varying sediment dynamics and characteristics. Particularly, the variability of geotechnical sediment parameters is still poorly understood, limiting the prediction of long-term sediment stability and dynamics. This paper presents results from an in situ investigation of surficial sediments (≤50 cm) in a tidal estuary in New Hampshire (USA), using a portable free fall penetrometer. The aim is to investigate variations in sediment strength and pore pressure behavior with regard to sediment type and seabed morphology. The study also provides a detailed analysis of high velocity impact pore pressure data to derive information about sediment type and permeability. The penetrometer was deployed 227 times, and the findings are correlated to 78 sediment samples. Differences in sediment strength and type were found when transitioning from tidal flats to the deeper channels. Finer-grained sediments located predominantly on the tidal flats appeared well consolidated with noticeable and spatially consistent sediment strength (reflected in an estimate of quasi-static bearing capacity qsbcmax 10 kPa). Sediments with higher sand content (>75%) showed more variations in strength relating to differences in gradation, and likely represent loose and poorly consolidated sands (qsbcmax 10-55 kPa). The rate at which the recorded excess pore pressures approached equilibrium after penetration was classified and related to sediment type. The data indicate that the development of excess pore pressures upon impact and during penetration may provide additional insight into the nature and layering of bed material, such as identifying a desiccated or over-consolidated dilative surficial layer. In summary, with varying sediment grain size distributions, bulk densities and morphology, sediment strength and pore pressure behavior can vary significantly within a tidal estuary.

  17. Variability of in situ sediment strength and pore pressure behavior of tidal estuary surface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucking, Greg; Stark, Nina; Lippmann, Thomas; Smyth, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Tidal estuaries feature spatially and temporally varying sediment dynamics and characteristics. Particularly, the variability of geotechnical sediment parameters is still poorly understood, limiting the prediction of long-term sediment stability and dynamics. This paper presents results from an in situ investigation of surficial sediments (≤50 cm) in a tidal estuary in New Hampshire (USA), using a portable free fall penetrometer. The aim is to investigate variations in sediment strength and pore pressure behavior with regard to sediment type and seabed morphology. The study also provides a detailed analysis of high velocity impact pore pressure data to derive information about sediment type and permeability. The penetrometer was deployed 227 times, and the findings are correlated to 78 sediment samples. Differences in sediment strength and type were found when transitioning from tidal flats to the deeper channels. Finer-grained sediments located predominantly on the tidal flats appeared well consolidated with noticeable and spatially consistent sediment strength (reflected in an estimate of quasi-static bearing capacity qsbcmax 10 kPa). Sediments with higher sand content (>75%) showed more variations in strength relating to differences in gradation, and likely represent loose and poorly consolidated sands (qsbcmax 10-55 kPa). The rate at which the recorded excess pore pressures approached equilibrium after penetration was classified and related to sediment type. The data indicate that the development of excess pore pressures upon impact and during penetration may provide additional insight into the nature and layering of bed material, such as identifying a desiccated or over-consolidated dilative surficial layer. In summary, with varying sediment grain size distributions, bulk densities and morphology, sediment strength and pore pressure behavior can vary significantly within a tidal estuary.

  18. The distribution dynamics and desorption behaviour of mobile pharmaceuticals and caffeine to combined sewer sediments.

    PubMed

    Hajj-Mohamad, M; Darwano, H; Duy, S Vo; Sauvé, S; Prévost, M; Arp, H P H; Dorner, S

    2017-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals are discharged to the environment from wastewater resource recovery facilities, sewer overflows, and illicit sewer connections. To understand the fate of pharmaceuticals, there is a need to better understand their sorption dynamics to suspended sediments (SS) and settled sediments (StS) in sewer systems. In this study, such sorption dynamics to both SS and StS were assessed using a batch equilibrium method under both static and dynamic conditions. Experiments were performed with natively occurring and artificially modified concentrations of sewer pharmaceuticals (acetaminophen, theophylline, carbamazepine, and a metabolite of carbamazepine) and caffeine. Differences in apparent distribution coefficients, Kd,app, between SS and StS were related to differences in their organic carbon (OC) content, and the practice of artificially modifying the concentration. Kd,app values of modified contaminant concentrations and high OC sediments were substantially higher. Pseudo-second order desorption rates for these mobile compounds were also quantified. Successive flushing events to simulate the addition of stormwater to sewer networks revealed that aqueous concentrations would not necessarily decrease, because the added water will rapidly return to equilibrium concentrations with the sediments. Sorption and desorption kinetics must be considered in addition to dilution, to avoid underestimating the influence of dilution on concentrations of pharmaceuticals discharged to the environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Martian aeolian slipface dynamics: 3D airflow modelling and sediment surface changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornwall, Carin; Jackson, Derek; Bourke, Mary; Cooper, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    In December 2015, the Curiosity rover relayed images of the Namib dune slipface in Gale Crater and presented a unique opportunity for direct comparison to terrestrial aeolian dynamics. These images delivered critical ground truth data of martian aeolian dynamics improving morphometric studies of slipface grainflow activity and aeolian modelling. The Namib dune slipface images reveal many comparable grainflow morphologies to that of terrestrial slipfaces suggesting similar mechanisms for sediment transportation and dune migration. However, much is still unknown about the specifics of martian dune migration including possible 'seasonality' of activity, the contribution of actively migrating ripples to sediment redistribution, and estimates of sediment volume moved annually. One of the leading goals in investigating aeolian processes on Mars is to explore the boundary conditions of sediment transport, accumulation, and dune morphology in relation to wind regime as well as to quantify migration rates and sediment flux. We plan to address these goals by combining terrestrial field observations, 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling and remote sensing data. Complex, small scale wind patterns and grainflow processes on terrestrial and martian dunes will be investigated to constrain grain flow magnitudes and frequencies that occur on slipface slopes of dunes to improve estimates of martian dune field migration and sediment flux related to wind velocity and flow patterns. Using CFD modelling, we will investigate the interaction between wind velocity, flow patterns and sediment transport at the bedform scale using real wind data collected on Mars to provide a way to examine potential triggers of processes on slipface slopes of dunes. A series of ground-based, high resolution laser scans have been collected in the Maspalomas dune field in Gran Canaria, Spain to investigate grainflow frequency, morphology and slipface advancement. Analysis of these laser scans and

  20. The symbiotic relationship of sediment and biofilm dynamics at the sediment water interface of oil sands industrial tailings ponds.

    PubMed

    Reid, T; VanMensel, D; Droppo, I G; Weisener, C G

    2016-09-01

    Within the oil sands industry, tailings ponds are used as a means of retaining tailings until a reclamation technology such as end pit lakes (EPLs) can be developed and optimized to remediate such tailings with a water cap (although dry-land strategies for tailing reclamation are also being developed). EPLs have proven successful for other mining ventures (e.g. metal rock mines) in eventually mitigating contaminant loads to receiving waters once biochemical remediation has taken place (although the duration for this to occur may be decades). While the biological interactions at the sediment water interface of tailings ponds or EPLs have been shown to control biogeochemical processes (i.e. chemical fluxes and redox profiles), these have often been limited to static microcosm conditions. Results from such experiments may not tell the whole story given that the sediment water interface often represents a dynamic environment where erosion and deposition may be occurring in association with microbial growth and decay. Mobilization of sediments and associated contaminants may therefore have a profound effect on remediation rates and, as such, may decrease the effectiveness of EPLs as viable reclamation strategies for mining industries. Using a novel core erosion system (U-GEMS), this paper examines how the microbial community can influence sediment water interface stability and how the biofilm community may change with tailings age and after disturbance (biofilm reestablishment). Shear strength, eroded mass measurements, density gradients, high-resolution microscopy, and microbial community analyses were made on 2 different aged tailings (fresh and ∼38 years) under biotic and abiotic conditions. The same experiments were repeated as duplicates with both sets of experiments having consolidation/biostabilization periods of 21 days. Results suggest that the stability of the tailings varies between types and conditions with the fresh biotic tailings experiencing up to 75

  1. Investigating suspended sediment dynamics in contrasting agricultural catchments using ex situ turbidity-based suspended sediment monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherriff, S. C.; Rowan, J. S.; Melland, A. R.; Jordan, P.; Fenton, O.; hUallachain, D. O.

    2015-08-01

    Soil erosion and suspended sediment (SS) pose risks to chemical and ecological water quality. Agricultural activities may accelerate erosional fluxes from bare, poached or compacted soils, and enhance connectivity through modified channels and artificial drainage networks. Storm-event fluxes dominate SS transport in agricultural catchments; therefore, high temporal-resolution monitoring approaches are required, but can be expensive and technically challenging. Here, the performance of in situ turbidity sensors, conventionally installed submerged at the river bankside, is compared with installations where river water is delivered to sensors ex situ, i.e. within instrument kiosks on the riverbank, at two experimental catchments (Grassland B and Arable B). The in situ and ex situ installations gave comparable results when calibrated against storm-period, depth-integrated SS data, with total loads at Grassland B estimated at 12 800 and 15 400 t, and 22 600 and 24 900 t at Arable B, respectively. The absence of spurious turbidity readings relating to bankside debris around the in situ sensor and its greater security make the ex situ sensor more robust. The ex situ approach was then used to characterise SS dynamics and fluxes in five intensively managed agricultural catchments in Ireland which feature a range of landscape characteristics and land use pressures. Average annual suspended sediment concentration (SSC) was below the Freshwater Fish Directive (78/659/EEC) guideline of 25 mg L-1, and the continuous hourly record demonstrated that exceedance occurred less than 12 % of the observation year. Soil drainage class and proportion of arable land were key controls determining flux rates, but all catchments reported a high degree of inter-annual variability associated with variable precipitation patterns compared to the long-term average. Poorly drained soils had greater sensitivity to runoff and soil erosion, particularly in catchments with periods of bare soils. Well

  2. A reduced complexity discrete particle model for understanding the sediment dynamics of steep upland river confluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tancock, M. J.; Lane, S. N.; Hardy, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    There has been a significant amount of research conducted in order to understand the flow fields at natural river confluences. Much of this has been made possible due to advances in the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). However, much of this research has been conducted on river confluences with negligible water surface slopes and any understanding of the sediment dynamics is largely implied from the flow fields. Therefore, a key challenge is to understand the flow and sediment dynamics of steep river confluences with dynamic boundaries. Two numerical modelling developments are presented which together are capable of increasing our understanding of the sediment dynamics of steep river confluences. The first is the application of a Height-of-Liquid (HOL) model within a CFD framework to explicitly solve the water surface elevation. This is a time-dependent, multiphase treatment of the fluid dynamics which solves for the change in volume of water and air in each vertical column of the mesh. The second is the development of a reduced complexity discrete particle transport model which uses the change in momentum on a spherical particle to predict the transport paths through the flow field determined from CFD simulations. The performance of the two models is tested using field data from a series of highly dynamic, steep gravel-bed confluences on a braidplain of the Borgne d'Arolla, Switzerland. The HOL model is validated against the water surface elevation and flow velocity data and is demonstrated to provide a reliable representation of the flow field in fast-flowing, supercritical flows. In order to validate the discrete particle model, individual particles were tracked using electronic tacheometry. The model is demonstrated to accurately represent the particle tracks obtained in the field and provides a new methodology to understand the dynamic morphology of braid plains.

  3. Sediment Dynamics in the Upper McKenzie River Basin, Central Oregon Cascade Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stallman, J. D.; Bowers, R. J.; Cabrera, N. C.; Real de Asua, R.; Wooster, J. K.

    2005-12-01

    Reference and current sediment budgets were developed to evaluate the extent to which hydroelectric dams alter sediment dynamics in the upper McKenzie River basin of central Oregon. The 647 km2 study area straddles the western boundary of the High Cascades graben separating the High Cascades and Western Cascades geologic terrains. Permeable Quaternary volcanics forming the low-gradient High Cascades plateau promote surface hydrologic disconnection, nearly constant discharge controlled by groundwater emergence, and low sediment yield. In contrast, deeply weathered Tertiary volcanics, rugged topography, and a dense network of steep channels in the Western Cascades terrain promote peaked storm responses and high sediment yield by deep-seated mass movement, debris slides, and debris flows. Three independent estimates of sediment yield (application of published surface process rates, extrapolation of regional suspended load and bedload flux rates, and extrapolation of reservoir sedimentation rates) illustrate the dominant role of geologic terrains in determining the longitudinal pattern of sediment supply to the McKenzie River. Average reference yields from High Cascades and Western Cascades sources were 9 t km-2y-1 and 200 t km-2y-1, respectively. Downstream of Trail Bridge Dam, High Cascades sources (241 km2) account for 12% of the total reference yield, while Western Cascades sources (67 km2) account for 62%. Estimates of current sediment yield illustrate the offsetting effects of reservoir sediment trapping and accelerated yield related to forest management. Average current yields from High Cascades and Western Cascades sources were 17 t km-2y-1 and 300 t km-2y-1, respectively. Current yield to the McKenzie River arm of Trail Bridge Reservoir (42 km2 sourced in High Cascades terrain) was 17 t km-2y-1, while current yield to Smith Reservoir (48 km2 sourced in Western Cascades terrain) was 251 t km-2y-1. The relation between hydroelectric project effects and forest

  4. Suspended Sediment Dynamics at High and Low Flows in Mining - Affected Catchments in Zambales Province, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingo, J. P. T.

    2016-12-01

    One of the critical issues linked to mining is the exacerbation of soil erosion. This problem is further aggravated in tropical areas as intensified rainfall usually result to an upsurge in suspended sediment concentrations (SSC) and total sediment yield. In this study, the discharge-SSC behavior in four river systems with nickel mining operations was analyzed during low flow and high flow conditions. Point sources with high SSC were correlated with existing mining activity and natural erosion susceptibility. Interestingly, the SSCs in all river systems were found to significantly decrease away from the mining areas but abruptly increase at the most downstream stations, indicating the significant contribution of other downstream sources in the total sediment yield. Aside from providing current `baseline' data for the catchments, the analysis of both low and high flow conditions have effectively pinpointed specific areas that significantly influence SSC dynamics, and thus provides insight for effective assessment of existing mine environmental structures.

  5. Measurement of Large-Scale Sediment Transport Dynamics Using Multibeam Sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, S. M.; Parsons, D. R.; Best, J. L.; Malzone, C.; Keevil, G.

    2007-12-01

    Multibeam Echo-Sounder (MBES) sonar systems have developed rapidly over recent decades and are now routinely deployed to provide high-resolution object detection and bathymetric surveying in a range of aquatic environments, from the deep-sea to lakes and rivers. MBES systems were developed for bottom-detection and measurement of bed morphology, and have previously discarded the received acoustic back-scatter from the water column after the bottom-detection algorithms have been performed. However, modern data handling and storage technologies have facilitated the logging of this large quantity of acoustic intensity and phase information, and commercial MBES systems are now available that provide this capability. This paper develops a novel methodology to exploit this logging capability to quantify the concentration and dynamics of suspended sediment within the water column. This development provides a multi-purpose tool for the holistic surveying of sediment transport by imaging suspended sediment concentration, associated coherent flow structures and providing concurrent high-resolution bathymetry. This paper presents methods of data analysis and results obtained from deployment of the RESON SeaBat 8125 and 7125 MBES systems in the field and during testing in a controlled environment. The field results were obtained from sites on the Paraná river, Argentina, with the aim of examining the dynamics of suspended sediment transport over dune bedforms and in the region of flow mixing between large rivers of significantly different suspended sediment concentration. Controlled testing was performed in a former ship dry-dock by creating flows density currents of known suspended sediment concentration with different types and mixes of sediment. The results demonstrate the capability of the RESON MBES systems to successfully resolve the contrast in suspended sediment concentration, and hence the spatio-temporal monitoring of the associated coherent flow structures. The

  6. Modelling the effects of Zostera noltei meadows on sediment dynamics: application to the Arcachon lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kombiadou, Katerina; Ganthy, Florian; Verney, Romaric; Plus, Martin; Sottolichio, Aldo

    2014-10-01

    A three-dimensional model has been modified to describe the complex interactions between hydrodynamics, sediment dynamics and biological parameters in the presence of Zostera noltei. The model treats seagrass leafs as flexible blades that bend under hydrodynamic forcing and alter the local momentum and turbulence fluxes and, therefore, the benthic shear conditions; these changes cause related changes to the mass balance at the boundary of the bed, in turn affecting the suspended matter in the column and ultimately primary productivity and the growth of the dwarf-grass. Modelling parameters related to the impact of Z. noltei to the local flow and to erosion and deposition rates were calibrated using flume experimental measurements; results from the calibration of the model are presented and discussed. The coupled model is applied in the Arcachon Bay, an area with high environmental significance and large abundance of dwarf-grass meadows. In the present paper, results from preliminary applications of the model are presented and discussed; the effectiveness of the coupled model is assessed comparing modelling results with available field measurements of suspended sediment concentrations and seagrass growth parameters. The model generally reproduces sediment dynamics and dwarf-grass seasonal growth in the domain efficiently. Investigations regarding the effects of the vegetation to the near-bed hydrodynamics and to the sediment suspension in the domain show that dwarf-grass meadows play an important part to velocity attenuation and to sediment stabilisation, with flow and suspended sediment concentrations damping, compared to an unvegetated state, to reach 35-50 and 65 %, respectively, at peak seagrass growth.

  7. Is flat fair?

    SciTech Connect

    Bunzl, Martin

    2010-07-15

    Dynamic pricing holds out the promise of shifting peak demand as well as reducing overall demand. But it also raises thorny issues of fairness. All practical pricing systems involve tradeoffs between equity and efficiency. I examine the circumstances under which equity ought to be allowed to trump efficiency and whether or not this constitutes a defense of flat pricing. (author)

  8. Microbiome Dynamics of a Polychlorobiphenyl (PCB) Historically Contaminated Marine Sediment under Conditions Promoting Reductive Dechlorination

    PubMed Central

    Matturro, Bruna; Ubaldi, Carla; Rossetti, Simona

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) can be efficiently reduced in contaminated marine sediments through the reductive dechlorination (RD) process lead by anaerobic organohalide bacteria. Although the process has been extensively investigated on PCB-spiked sediments, the knowledge on the identity and metabolic potential of PCB-dechlorinating microorganisms in real contaminated matrix is still limited. Aim of this study was to explore the composition and the dynamics of the microbial communities of the marine sediment collected from one of the largest Sites of National Interest (SIN) in Italy (Mar Piccolo, Taranto) under conditions promoting the PCBs RD. A long-term microcosm study revealed that autochthonous bacteria were able to sustain the PCB dechlorination at a high extent and the successive addition of an external fermentable organic substrate (lactate) caused the further depletion of the high-chlorinated PCBs (up to 70%). Next Generation Sequencing was used to describe the core microbiome of the marine sediment and to follow the changes caused by the treatments. OTUs affiliated to sulfur-oxidizing ε-proteobacteria, Sulfurovum, and Sulfurimonas, were predominant in the original sediment and increased up to 60% of total OTUs after lactate addition. Other OTUs detected in the sediment were affiliated to sulfate reducing (δ-proteobacteria) and to organohalide respiring bacteria within Chloroflexi phylum mainly belonging to Dehalococcoidia class. Among others, Dehalococcoides mccartyi was enriched during the treatments even though the screening of the specific reductive dehalogenase genes revealed the occurrence of undescribed strains, which deserve further investigations. Overall, this study highlighted the potential of members of Dehalococcoidia class in reducing the contamination level of the marine sediment from Mar Piccolo with relevant implications on the selection of sustainable bioremediation strategies to clean-up the site. PMID:27708637

  9. The dynamics of fine-grain sediment dredged from Santa Cruz Harbor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Conaway, Christopher H.; Presto, M. Katherine; Logan, Joshua B.; Cronin, Katherine; van Ormondt, Maarten; Lescinski, Jamie; Harden, E. Lynne; Lacy, Jessica R.; Tonnon, Pieter K.

    2011-01-01

    In the fall and early winter of 2009, a demonstration project was done at Santa Cruz Harbor, California, to determine if 450 m3/day of predominantly (71 percent) mud-sized sediment could be dredged from the inner portion of the harbor and discharged to the coastal ocean without significant impacts to the beach and inner shelf. During the project, more than 7600 m3 of sediment (~5400 m3 of fine-grain material) was dredged during 17 days and discharged approximately 60 m offshore of the harbor at a depth of 2 m on the inner shelf. The U.S. Geological Survey's Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center was funded by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Santa Cruz Port District to do an integrated mapping and process study to investigate the fate of the mud-sized sediment dredged from the inner portion of Santa Cruz Harbor and to determine if any of the fine-grain material settled out on the shoreline and/or inner shelf during the fall and early winter of 2009. This was done by collecting highresolution oceanographic and sediment geochemical measurements along the shoreline and on the continental shelf of northern Monterey Bay to monitor the fine-grain sediment dredged from Santa Cruz Harbor and discharged onto the inner shelf. These in place measurements, in conjunction with beach, water column, and seabed surveys, were used as boundary and calibration information for a three-dimensional numerical circulation and sediment dynamics model to better understand the fate of the fine-grain sediment dredged from Santa Cruz Harbor and the potential consequences of disposing this type of material on the beach and on the northern Monterey Bay continental shelf.

  10. Terrestrial slopes in northern high latitudes: A paradigm shift regarding sediment origin, composition, and dynamic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lønne, Ida

    2017-01-01

    High-Arctic terrestrial slopes have received limited systematic research interest, but increased vulnerability related to regional warming has driven the call for better knowledge of the dynamics of these systems. Studies of sediment transport from a plateau area in Adventdalen, Svalbard, and associated slopes extending to sea level demonstrate that glacial processes play a more prominent role than earlier anticipated, - especially the impact of glacial meltwater. Traces of drainage at the plateau and the dissection of the plateau edge and upper slope were clearly initiated during various stages of Late Glacial runoff. Further, there is a close association between the sediment distribution and composition at the plateau and the evolution of various types of slopes. The reconstructed sedimentation history shows that the landscape will undergo four stages with contrasting modes of sediment transport: 1) subglacial processes related to active ice, 2) processes related to the margin of active ice, 3) processes related to the melting of inactive ice, and 4) nonglacial processes. These stages form four successions, referred to as supply regimes A-D, which control the supply of water and sediments to a given slope segment. In this landscape, traces of glacial meltwater occur at most altitudes, in "odd" positions and in slope segments "without" catchments. The associated depocenters (isolated, composite or coalescing into aprons), are often outsized compared to the apparent slope catchment. Reworked glacial sediments form a significant part of the slope-debris but are covered partly or entirely by products of physical weathering. Colluvium, senso stricto, thus masks a distinct system shift related to the local termination of glacial meltwater. Consequently, the weathering part of the slope sediment budget in this region is considerably overestimated.

  11. Modeling a dynamically varying mixed sediment bed with erosion, deposition, bioturbation, consolidation, and armoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, Lawrence P.

    2008-10-01

    Erosion and deposition of bottom sediments reflect a continual, dynamic adjustment between the fluid forces applied to a sediment bed and the condition of the bed itself. Erosion of fine and mixed sediment beds depends on their composition, their vertical structure, their disturbance/recovery history, and the biota that inhabit them. This paper presents a new one-dimensional (1D), multi-layer sediment bed model for simulating erosion and deposition of fine and mixed sediments subject to consolidation, armoring, and bioturbation. The distinguishing characteristics of this model are a greatly simplified first-order relaxation treatment for consolidation, a mud erosion formulation that adapts to both Type I and II erosion behavior and is based directly on observations, a continuous deposition formulation for mud that can mimic exclusive erosion and deposition behavior, and straightforward inclusion of bioturbation effects. Very good agreement with two laboratory data sets on consolidation effects is achieved by adjusting only the first-order consolidation rate r c. Full model simulations of three idealized cases based on upper Chesapeake Bay, USA observations are presented. In the mud only case, fluid stresses match mud critical stresses at maximum erosion. A consolidation lag results in higher suspended sediment concentrations after erosional events. Erosion occurs only during accelerating currents and deposition does not occur until just before slack water. In the mixed mud and sand case without bioturbation, distinct layers of high and low sand content form and mud suspension is strongly limited by sand armoring. In the mixed mud and sand case with bioturbation, suspended mud concentrations are greater than or equal to either of the other cases. Low surface critical stresses are mixed down into the bed, constrained by the tendency to return towards equilibrium. Sand layers and the potential for armoring of the bed develop briefly, but mix rapidly. This model offers

  12. Spatio-temporal patterns of soil erosion and suspended sediment dynamics in the Mekong River Basin.

    PubMed

    Suif, Zuliziana; Fleifle, Amr; Yoshimura, Chihiro; Saavedra, Oliver

    2016-10-15

    Understanding of the distribution patterns of sediment erosion, concentration and transport in river basins is critically important as sediment plays a major role in river basin hydrophysical and ecological processes. In this study, we proposed an integrated framework for the assessment of sediment dynamics, including soil erosion (SE), suspended sediment load (SSL) and suspended sediment concentration (SSC), and applied this framework to the Mekong River Basin. The Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) model was adopted with a geographic information system to assess SE and was coupled with a sediment accumulation and a routing scheme to simulate SSL. This framework also analyzed Landsat imagery captured between 1987 and 2000 together with ground observations to interpolate spatio-temporal patterns of SSC. The simulated SSL results from 1987 to 2000 showed the relative root mean square error of 41% and coefficient of determination (R(2)) of 0.89. The polynomial relationship of the near infrared exoatmospheric reflectance and the band 4 wavelength (760-900nm) to the observed SSC at 9 sites demonstrated the good agreement (overall relative RMSE=5.2%, R(2)=0.87). The result found that the severe SE occurs in the upper (China and Lao PDR) and lower (western part of Vietnam) regions. The SSC in the rainy season (June-November) showed increasing and decreasing trends longitudinally in the upper (China and Lao PDR) and lower regions (Cambodia), respectively, while the longitudinal profile of SSL showed a fluctuating trend along the river in the early rainy season. Overall, the results described the unique spatio-temporal patterns of SE, SSL and SSC in the Mekong River Basin. Thus, the proposed integrated framework is useful for elucidating complex process of sediment generation and transport in the land and river systems of large river basins.

  13. Sediment dynamics and heavy metal pollution history of the Cruhlig Lake (Danube Delta, Romania).

    PubMed

    Begy, Róbert-Csaba; Preoteasa, Luminita; Timar-Gabor, Alida; Mihăiescu, Radu; Tănăselia, Claudiu; Kelemen, Szabolcs; Simon, Hedvig

    2016-03-01

    This is the first study reporting recent sedimentation rates data (e.g. the past 120-150 years) for the Cruhlig Lake situated in the Danube Delta. The aim of this study is to analyse the recent sedimentation rates using the (210)Pb dating method and identifying the heavy metal pollutants and their variability in time. Five sediment cores were taken with a gravity corer and - after drying the sliced samples-physical parameters, organic material and inorganic carbon content were determined. The total (210)Pb content was measured via (210)Po by alpha spectrometry, while supported (210)Pb was measured by (226)Ra (trough short life (222)Rn daughters) with HPGe detectors. Heavy metals were determined by ICP-MS; from the 64 measured elements, only exceeding values of Al, As, Cd, Co, Cs, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn are discussed. After applying the CRS model, ages and sedimentation rates were calculated. The average sedimentation rate of the Cruhlig Lake is 0.21 ± 0.02 g/cm(2)y, Minimum values (0.05 ± 0.003 g/cm(2)y) are registered along the eastern shoreline of the lake before 1913, while maximum values are recorded due to the flooding in 2006 in the western side (1.34 ± 0.12 g/cm(2)y). Recent sedimentation rates divide the lake into three areas: the secluded eastern near shore part (0.63 ± 0.07 g/cm(2)y), the centre of the lake (0.92 ± 0.05 g/cm(2)y) and the dynamic western area, where most sediment transport takes place (1.13 ± 0.01 g/cm(2)y). The sedimentation pattern proves this lake to be very sensitive to fluvial discharge fluctuations. The building of the Iron Gate dams (1972 and 1985) had a negative impact on the sedimentation decreasing it with 58.74%, while after 1989 these values grew 2.25 times. The lake received a quantity of sediment rich in heavy metals in 1992 ± 3 y, which settled mostly on the eastern part. Values for Cd, Co, Cr, Hg, Pb and Zn are up to five times higher in 1980 ± 5 y in the eastern part of the lake, while Cd, Co

  14. A mesocosm study of oxygen and trace metal dynamics in sediment microniches of reactive organic material.

    PubMed

    Lehto, Niklas J; Larsen, Morten; Zhang, Hao; Glud, Ronnie N; Davison, William

    2017-09-12

    Deposition of particulate organic matter (POM) induces diagenetic hot spots at the sediment-water interface (SWI). Here we explore the effects of intensive POM degradation for metal mobilization at the SWI. By using a combined planar optode-DGT (diffusive gradient in thin-films) sensor we obtained simultaneous measurements of dissolved O2 and trace metal dynamics around an aggregate of reactive organic matter placed on the SWI of a sediment mesocosm. The aggregate induced a rapid, highly localized, decrease in O2 concentration, resulting in an anoxic feature at the SWI. Co-located with this feature, we observed intense Fe and Mn mobilization, removal of Co, Ni and Zn and found evidence for the concurrent release and precipitation of Pb within a small confined volume. We also identified two small microniches in the anoxic sediment below the SWI, defined by elevated trace metal mobilization. Differences between the metal release rates in these two microniches indicate that they were formed by the mineralisation of different types of organic matter buried in the sediment. Our results provide direct empirical evidence for the potential importance of POM-induced reactive microniches when considering the fluxes of metals from and within aquatic sediments, and suggest that other elements' cycles may also be affected.

  15. Laboratory Study on the Effect of Tidal Stream Turbines on Hydrodynamics and Sediment Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoudry, L.; Ramirez-Mendoza, R.; Peter, T.; McLelland, S.; Simmons, S.; Parsons, D. R.; Vybulkova, L.

    2016-02-01

    Tidal stream turbines (TST) are one potential technology for harnessing tidal energy, and the measurement and characterisation of their wakes is important both for environmental and development reasons. Indeed, wake recovery length is an important parameter for appropriate design of arrays, and wakes may result in altered dynamics both in the water column and at the seabed. We will report on laboratory scale experiments over a mobile sediment bed, which aim to quantify the detailed wake structure and its impact on sediment transport dynamics. A 0.2 m diameter model turbine was installed in a large-scale flume (16 m long, 1.6 m wide, 0.6 m deep) at the University of Hull's Total Environment Simulator and a steady current was driven over an artificial sediment bed using recirculating pumps. A high-resolution pulse-coherent acoustic Doppler profiler (Nortek Aquadopp HR) was used to measure vertical profiles of the three-dimensional mean current at different locations downstream of the model turbine. A three-dimensional Acoustic Ripple Profiler was used to map the bed and its evolution during the experiments. Acoustic backscatter systems were also deployed in two-dimensional arrays both along the flume and across the flume. These measurements revealed that the presence of the model turbine resulted in an expected reduction of the mean current and in changes in the vertical shear profiles. The bed mapping highlighted a horseshoe-shaped scour near the model turbine, and sediment deposition in the far wake region. The model turbine significantly influenced the suspension patterns, and generated significant asymmetry in the process, which was also evident from the other measurements (flow and sediment bed). These results highlight the effects induced by TSTs on near-bed hydrodynamics, suspension dynamics, and geomorphology, which may all have to be considered prior to large-scale deployments of arrays of TSTs in shelf seas.

  16. Future sediment dynamics in the Mekong Delta floodplains: Impacts of hydropower development, climate change and sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manh, Nguyen Van; Dung, Nguyen Viet; Hung, Nguyen Nghia; Kummu, Matti; Merz, Bruno; Apel, Heiko

    2015-04-01

    The Mekong Delta is under threat due to human activities that are endangering livelihood of millions of people. Hydropower development, climate change and the combined effects of sea level rise and deltaic subsidence are the main drivers impacting future flow regimes and sedimentation patterns in the Mekong Delta. We develop a sensitivity-based approach to assess the response of the floodplain hydrology and sediment dynamics in the delta to these drivers. A quasi-2D hydrodynamic model of suspended sediment dynamics is used to simulate the sediment transport and sediment deposition in the delta, including Tonle Sap Lake, for a baseline (2000-2010) and a future (2050-2060) period. For each driver we derive a plausible range of future states and discretize it into different levels, resulting in 216 combinations. Our results thus cover all plausible future pathways of sediment dynamics in the delta based on current knowledge. Our results indicate that hydropower development dominates the changes in floodplain sediment dynamics of the Mekong Delta, while sea level rise has the smallest effect. The floodplains of the Vietnamese Mekong Delta are much more sensitive to the changes compared to the other subsystems of the delta. The median changes of the three drivers combined indicate that the inundation extent would increase slightly, but the overall floodplain sedimentation would decrease by approximately 40%, and the sediment load to the South China Sea would diminish to half of the current rates. The maximum changes in all drivers would mean a nearly 90% reduction of delta sedimentation and a 95% reduction of the sediment reaching the sea. Our findings provide new and valuable information on the possible future development of floodplain hydraulics and sedimentation in the Mekong Delta and identify the areas that are most vulnerable to these changes.

  17. DENITRIFICATION AND NITROGEN DYNAMICS IN SEDIMENTS OF A MID-ATLANTIC INCISED STREAM DEPOSITED WITH DEEP LEGACY SEDIMENTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess legacy sediments deposited in former impounded streams frequently bury Holocene pre-settlement wetlands, decrease in-situ nitrogen removal, and increase nitrogen transport downstream, particularly where deep incised channels limit sediment-water interactions. This has prom...

  18. DENITRIFICATION AND NITROGEN DYNAMICS IN SEDIMENTS OF A MID-ATLANTIC INCISED STREAM DEPOSITED WITH DEEP LEGACY SEDIMENTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess legacy sediments deposited in former impounded streams frequently bury Holocene pre-settlement wetlands, decrease in-situ nitrogen removal, and increase nitrogen transport downstream, particularly where deep incised channels limit sediment-water interactions. This has prom...

  19. The influence of saltmarsh restoration on sediment dynamics and the potential impact on carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Benjamin; Paterson, David

    2017-04-01

    Coastal wetland ecosystems can act as large-capacity carbon sinks, providing a valuable climate change mitigation function. Globally, saltmarshes are estimated to accumulate an average of 244.7g C m-2 yr-1 (Ouyang & Lee 2014). Saltmarsh areas have experienced rapid loss in the recent past of approximately 1-2% per year (Duarte et al. 2008). Efforts to restore these areas could result in additional carbon storage due to extended vegetation cover and altered burial due to changing sediment dynamics. The influence of restoration through transplantation on sediment dynamics within a small estuary on the east coast of Scotland was assessed. Restoration efforts have been implemented since the early 2000s providing examples of old established sites ("old", >10years), young recently planted sites ("young", <5years), and 'business-as-usual' mudflats and natural marsh areas. In each of these area types seasonal data of sediment deposition and settlement were collected and sediment accretion rates measured. Deposition and settlement samples were taken four times a season, provided total sediment weight and organic content information. Elevation changes were measured once per season, quantifying sediment accretion rates. All data were collected between summer 2015 and spring 2016. Data suggest a positive correlation between sediment settlement and deposition quantities (dry weight) across the estuary (r2=0.64), with restored areas displaying a slightly stronger relationship (old r2=0.67, young r2=0.68) compared to natural marsh and mudflats (r2=0.54 and 0.59 respectively). Suggesting restored areas which are developing or expanding are retaining more from the potential sediment load in the water column. However average amounts of actual deposited material are significantly greater in mudflat and young areas with old and natural areas significantly lower; potentially as a result of those being of a lower elevation. Nevertheless, percentage organic matter content of deposited

  20. Oxygen dynamics in periphyton communities and associated effects on phosphorus release from lake sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    Periphyton is typically a heterogeneous assemblage of filamentous and single celled photoautotrophic and heterotrophic micoorganisms suspended in a mucopolysaccharide matrix which they produce. By definition, the assemblage is attached to a substratum such as rock, sediment, or plant in an aquatic environment. Microtechniques with high spatial and temporal resolution are required to define metabolic interactions among the heterotrophic and autotrophic constituents, and between periphyton and its environment. This study used oxygen sensitive microelectrodes with tip diameters of < 30 m to investigate the effects of photosynthesis and respiration on the oxygen dynamics of several diverse periphyton communities both in situ and in laboratory microcosms. A novel flow-through system that utilized TSP radiotracer and that permitted manipulation of the velocity, flushing rate, and oxygen concentration of overlying water was developed to investigate the role of photosynthetic oxygen production on the phosphorus dynamics in lake sediments colonized by epipelic periphyton. 89 refs., 20 figs.

  1. Long-term agricultural non-point source pollution loading dynamics and correlation with outlet sediment geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Wei; Jiao, Wei; Li, Xiaoming; Giubilato, Elisa; Critto, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Some agricultural non-point source (NPS) pollutants accumulate in sediments in the outlet sections of watersheds. It is crucial to evaluate the historical interactions between sediment properties and watershed NPS loading. Therefore, a sediment core from the outlet of an agricultural watershed was collected. The core age was dated using the 210Pb method, and sedimentation rates were determined using the constant rate of supply (CRS) model. The total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), Cd, Pb, Cu, Ni and Cr accumulations in the sediment generally showed fluctuating increases, with the highest sedimentation fluxes all occurring in approximately 1998. The measurement of specific mass sedimentation rates reflected a record of watershed soil erosion dynamics. Using SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) to simulate long-term watershed agricultural NPS pollution loadings, the historical interactions between sediment properties and NPS loadings were further evaluated. The N leaching process weakened these interactions, but the historical accumulations of TP and heavy metals in sediments generally correlated well with watershed NPS TP loading. The regression analysis suggested that Pb and Cr were the most suitable indexes for assessing long-term NPS TN and TP pollution, respectively. Assessing the NPS loading dynamics using the vertical characteristics of sediment geochemistry is a new method.

  2. Supported Membranes Meet Flat Fluidics: Monitoring Dynamic Cell Adhesion on Pump-Free Microfluidics Chips Functionalized with Supported Membranes Displaying Mannose Domains

    PubMed Central

    Oelke, Jochen; Kaindl, Thomas; Pasc, Andreea; Guttenberg, Zeno; Wixforth, Achim; Tanaka, Motomu

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the combination of supported membranes and so-called flat microfluidics, which enables one to manipulate liquids on flat chip surfaces via “inverse piezoelectric effect”. Here, an alternating external electric field applied to the inter-digital transducers excites a surface acoustic wave on a piezoelectric substrate. Employing lithographic patterning of self-assembled monolayers of alkoxysilanes, we successfully confine a free-standing, hemi-cylindrical channel with the volume of merely 7 µL . The experimentally determined maximum flow velocity scales linearly with the acoustic power, suggesting that our current setup can drive liquids at the speed of up to 7 cm/s (corresponding to a shear rate of 280 s−1) without applying high pressures using a fluidic pump. After the establishment of the functionalization of fluidic chip surfaces with supported membranes, we deposited asymmetric supported membranes displaying well-defined mannose domains and monitored the dynamic adhesion of E. Coli HB101 expressing mannose-binding receptors. Despite of the further technical optimization required for the quantitative analysis, the obtained results demonstrate that the combination of supported membranes and flat fluidics opens a large potential to investigate dynamic adhesion of cells on biofunctional membrane surfaces with the minimum amount of samples, without any fluidic pump. PMID:28809333

  3. Supported Membranes Meet Flat Fluidics: Monitoring Dynamic Cell Adhesion on Pump-Free Microfluidics Chips Functionalized with Supported Membranes Displaying Mannose Domains.

    PubMed

    Oelke, Jochen; Kaindl, Thomas; Pasc, Andreea; Guttenberg, Zeno; Wixforth, Achim; Tanaka, Motomu

    2013-02-22

    In this paper we demonstrate the combination of supported membranes and so-called flat microfluidics, which enables one to manipulate liquids on flat chip surfaces via "inverse piezoelectric effect". Here, an alternating external electric field applied to the inter-digital transducers excites a surface acoustic wave on a piezoelectric substrate. Employing lithographic patterning of self-assembled monolayers of alkoxysilanes, we successfully confine a free-standing, hemi-cylindrical channel with the volume of merely 7 µL . The experimentally determined maximum flow velocity scales linearly with the acoustic power, suggesting that our current setup can drive liquids at the speed of up to 7 cm/s (corresponding to a shear rate of 280 s(-1)) without applying high pressures using a fluidic pump. After the establishment of the functionalization of fluidic chip surfaces with supported membranes, we deposited asymmetric supported membranes displaying well-defined mannose domains and monitored the dynamic adhesion of E.Coli HB101 expressing mannose-binding receptors. Despite of the further technical optimization required for the quantitative analysis, the obtained results demonstrate that the combination of supported membranes and flat fluidics opens a large potential to investigate dynamic adhesion of cells on biofunctional membrane surfaces with the minimum amount of samples, without any fluidic pump.

  4. Sediment yield dynamics during the 1950s multi-year droughts from two ungauged basins in the Edwards Plateau, Texas

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sediment yield dynamics on the Edwards Plateau region of Texas was dramatically influenced by a multi-year drought that occurred there during the 1950s. To assess the effect of this drought on sediment yield, we used the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to identify the factors that contributed...

  5. Spatial and temporal variability of CO2 fluxes at the sediment-air interface in a tidal flat of a temperate lagoon (Arcachon Bay, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migné, Aline; Davoult, Dominique; Spilmont, Nicolas; Ouisse, Vincent; Boucher, Guy

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to explore the spatial and temporal variability of benthic metabolism in a temperate mesotidal lagoon. This was achieved by measuring fluxes of CO2 in static chambers during emersion, both under light and dark conditions. Three sample sites were selected according to their tidal level (upper or mid), their sediment type (sand or mud) and the presence/absence of the seagrass Zostera noltei. The three sites were investigated at three seasons (end of winter, spring and beginning of autumn). At each site and each season, three benthic chambers were used simultaneously in successive incubations over the emersion period. The sediment chlorophyll-a content varied seasonally in the upper sands (reaching 283 mg.m- 2 in spring) but not in the mid muds (averaging 142 mg m- 2 in bare muds and 186 mg m- 2 in muds covered by seagrass). The maximum sediment CO2-uptake under light was 9.89 mmol m- 2 h- 1 in the mid-bare muds, in early autumn. The maximum sediment CO2-release under darkness was 6.97 mmol m- 2 h- 1 in the mid muds covered by seagrass, in spring. Both CO2-fluxes measured in the light and in the dark increased over periods of emersion. This increase, not related to light nor temperature variations, could be explained by changes in the amount and chemistry of pore water during the air exposure of sediments. The benthic trophic state index, based on the maximum light CO2-flux versus maximum dark CO2-flux ratio, assigned to each site at each season indicated that the sediments were net autotrophic in spring in upper sands and in mid muds covered by seagrass and highly autotrophic in other cases. The most autotrophic sediments were the mid-level bare muds whatever the season. The relevance of this index is discussed compared to carbon annual budget.

  6. Fortnightly tidal asymmetry inversions and perspectives on sediment dynamics in a macrotidal estuary (Charente, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toublanc, F.; Brenon, I.; Coulombier, T.; Le Moine, O.

    2015-02-01

    Tidal asymmetry is a phenomenon that characterises estuarine hydrodynamics and has a strong impact on sediment dynamics. Extensive research has been dedicated to studying tidal dynamics in semidiurnal macrotidal estuaries, highlighting several general principles. The ratio of flood to ebb peak velocities and differences in ebb and flood durations are often used to characterise the asymmetry encountered in estuaries. In the Charente estuary (French Atlantic coast), water surface elevation data obtained using an ADCP (Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler) and a tide gauge show that the duration asymmetry undergoes inversions during the spring-neap tidal cycle. A two-dimensional hydrodynamics model is used to investigate the connection between spring-neap inversions of the tidal asymmetry and the harmonic composition of the tide. Different constituents (M2, S2, M4 and MS4) are considered at the open boundary. The results show that M4 and MS4 play a key role in the occurrence of these inversions. The influence of the morphology is also discussed and modifications of the bathymetry are performed to evaluate its impact. In the Charente estuary, the existence of both externally and internally generated overtides thus results in a spatially and fortnightly variable tidal asymmetry. The modelled barotropic tidal currents are used to estimate the possible impact on sediment dynamics. The results suggest that asymmetry inversions tend to create sediment accumulation in an intermediate zone between the river mouth and Rochefort, located approximately 20 km upstream.

  7. Sediment dynamics modulated by burrowing crab activities in contrasting SW Atlantic intertidal habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escapa, Mauricio; Perillo, Gerardo M. E.; Iribarne, Oscar

    2008-11-01

    Biogenic bottom features, animal burrows and biological activities interact with the hydrodynamics of the sediment-water interface to produce altered patterns of sediment erosion, transport and deposition which have consequences for large-scale geomorphologic features. It has been suggested that depending on the hydrodynamic status of the habitat, the biological activity on the bottom may have a variety of effects. In some cases, different bioturbation activities by the same organism can result in different consequences. The burrowing crab Neohelice granulata is the most important bioturbator at SW Atlantic saltmarshes and tidal plains. Because of the great variety of habitats that this species may inhabit, it is possible to compare its bioturbation effects between zones dominated by different hydrodynamic conditions. Internal marsh microhabitats, tidal creeks bottoms and basins, and open mudflats were selected as contrasting zones for the comparison on a large saltmarsh at Bahía Blanca Estuary (Argentina). Crab burrows act as passive traps of sediment in all zones, because their entrances remain open during inundation periods at high tide. Mounds are generated when crabs remove sediments from the burrows to the surface and become distinctive features in all the zones. Two different mechanisms of sediment transport utilizing mounds as sediment sources were registered. In the first one, parts of fresh mound sediments were transported when exposed to water flow during flooding and ebbing tide, with higher mound erosion where currents were higher as compared to internal marsh habitats and open mudflats. In the second mechanism, mounds exposed to atmospheric influence during low tide became desiccated and cracked forming ellipsoidal blocks, which were then transported by currents in zones of intense water flow in the saltmarsh edge. Sedimentary dynamics varied between zones; crabs were promoting trapping of sediments in the internal saltmarsh (380 g m -2 day -1) and

  8. Dynamics of sediment transport in large tropical tidal rivers via observations in the Mekong and Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowacki, D. J.; Ogston, A. S.; Nittrouer, C. A.; Fricke, A. T.; Van, P.; Souza Filho, P. W.; Silva, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    Of the ten largest-discharge river systems worldwide, freshwater delivery to the ocean from tropical rivers comprises approximately 72% of the total. Tropical-river suspended-sediment loads make up about 45% of the total among the same ten largest rivers. In this context, flow and sediment dynamics of tropical river systems are crucial to a comprehensive understanding of global river budgets. The processes by which sediment is eroded, transported, trapped, and ultimately exported from tidal rivers--where tides propagate but oceanic salinity is absent or only ephemerally present--are poorly understood, even though previous research suggests up to one-third of riverine sediment loads may be trapped within tidal rivers. In an effort to better understand these processes, we present and contrast results from several campaigns along two large tropical tidal rivers: the Mekong and Amazon. Under conditions of high and low seasonal discharge, three cross-sections within the Mekong tidal river were each occupied for a 25-hour tidal cycle, during which ADCP and CTD transects were completed every 15-30 minutes. In this transitional environment between fluvial and estuarine conditions, flow reversed throughout the water column during both low and high flow at all locations, and a strongly sheared flow was present during lesser flood tides. Salinity was spatially variable over seasons: during low flow, salinity in excess of 10 PSU was observed 30 km upstream during maximum flood, while at the same location during high flow, salinity was less than 0.5 PSU at all times. Conditions were partially stratified during low flow. When present, stratification was in the form of a salt wedge during high flow. Suspended sediment was well mixed or exhibited a Rouse-like profile in fresh regions; suspended-sediment concentration within the salt wedge was generally less, except during periods of strong near-bottom flow within the salt-wedge water mass. During both seasons and at all locations

  9. Land claim and loss of tidal flats in the Yangtze Estuary

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Dong, Jinwei; Xiao, Xiangming; Zhang, Min; Tian, Bo; Zhou, Yunxuan; Li, Bo; Ma, Zhijun

    2016-01-01

    Tidal flats play a critical role in supporting biodiversity and in providing ecosystem services but are rapidly disappearing because of human activities. The Yangtze Estuary is one of the world’s largest alluvial estuaries and is adjacent to the most developed economic zone in China. Using the Yangtze Estuary as a study region, we developed an automatic algorithm to estimate tidal flat areas based on the Land Surface Water Index and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index. The total area of tidal flats in the Yangtze Estuary has decreased by 36% over the past three decades, including a 38% reduction in saltmarshes and a 31% reduction in barren mudflats. Meanwhile, land claim has accumulated to 1077 km2, a value that exceeds the area of the remaining tidal flats. We divided the Yangtze Estuary into Shanghai and Jiangsu areas, which differ in riverine sediment supply and tidal flat management patterns. Although land claim has accelerated in both areas, the decline in tidal flat area has been much greater in Jiangsu than in Shanghai because of abundant supplies of sediment and artificial siltation in the latter area. The results highlight the need for better coastal planning and management based on tidal flat dynamics. PMID:27035525

  10. Land claim and loss of tidal flats in the Yangtze Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Dong, Jinwei; Xiao, Xiangming; Zhang, Min; Tian, Bo; Zhou, Yunxuan; Li, Bo; Ma, Zhijun

    2016-04-01

    Tidal flats play a critical role in supporting biodiversity and in providing ecosystem services but are rapidly disappearing because of human activities. The Yangtze Estuary is one of the world’s largest alluvial estuaries and is adjacent to the most developed economic zone in China. Using the Yangtze Estuary as a study region, we developed an automatic algorithm to estimate tidal flat areas based on the Land Surface Water Index and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index. The total area of tidal flats in the Yangtze Estuary has decreased by 36% over the past three decades, including a 38% reduction in saltmarshes and a 31% reduction in barren mudflats. Meanwhile, land claim has accumulated to 1077 km2, a value that exceeds the area of the remaining tidal flats. We divided the Yangtze Estuary into Shanghai and Jiangsu areas, which differ in riverine sediment supply and tidal flat management patterns. Although land claim has accelerated in both areas, the decline in tidal flat area has been much greater in Jiangsu than in Shanghai because of abundant supplies of sediment and artificial siltation in the latter area. The results highlight the need for better coastal planning and management based on tidal flat dynamics.

  11. A sandpile model of grain blocking and consequences for sediment dynamics in step-pool streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, P.

    2012-04-01

    Coarse grains (cobbles to boulders) are set in motion in steep mountain streams by floods with sufficient energy to erode the particles locally and transport them downstream. During transport, grains are often blocked and form width-spannings structures called steps, separated by pools. The step-pool system is a transient, self-organizing and self-sustaining structure. The temporary storage of sediment in steps and the release of that sediment in avalanche-like pulses when steps collapse, leads to a complex nonlinear threshold-driven dynamics in sediment transport which has been observed in laboratory experiments (e.g., Zimmermann et al., 2010) and in the field (e.g., Turowski et al., 2011). The basic question in this paper is if the emergent statistical properties of sediment transport in step-pool systems may be linked to the transient state of the bed, i.e. sediment storage and morphology, and to the dynamics in sediment input. The hypothesis is that this state, in which sediment transporting events due to the collapse and rebuilding of steps of all sizes occur, is analogous to a critical state in self-organized open dissipative dynamical systems (Bak et al., 1988). To exlore the process of self-organization, a cellular automaton sandpile model is used to simulate the processes of grain blocking and hydraulically-driven step collapse in a 1-d channel. Particles are injected at the top of the channel and are allowed to travel downstream based on various local threshold rules, with the travel distance drawn from a chosen probability distribution. In sandpile modelling this is a simple 1-d limited non-local model, however it has been shown to have nontrivial dynamical behaviour (Kadanoff et al., 1989), and it captures the essence of stochastic sediment transport in step-pool systems. The numerical simulations are used to illustrate the differences between input and output sediment transport rates, mainly focussing on the magnification of intermittency and

  12. A dynamic analysis of the motion of a low-wing general aviation aircraft about its calculated equilibrium flat spin mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. B.; Barlow, J. B.

    1980-01-01

    The properties of the flat spin mode of a general aviation configuration have been studied through analysis of rotary balance data, numerical simulation, and analytical study of the equilibrium state. The equilibrium state is predicted well from rotary balance data. The variations of yawing moment and pitching moment as functions of sideslip have been shown to be of great importance in obtaining accurate modeling. These dependencies are not presently available with sufficient accuracy from previous tests or theories. The stability of the flat spin mode has been examined extensively using numerical linearization, classical perturbation methods, and reduced order modeling. The stability exhibited by the time histories and the eigenvalue analyses is shown to be strongly dependent on certain static cross derivatives and more so on the dynamic derivatives. Explicit stability criteria are obtained from the reduced order models.

  13. Short-range surface plasmonics: Localized electron emission dynamics from a 60-nm spot on an atomically flat single-crystalline gold surface.

    PubMed

    Frank, Bettina; Kahl, Philip; Podbiel, Daniel; Spektor, Grisha; Orenstein, Meir; Fu, Liwei; Weiss, Thomas; Horn-von Hoegen, Michael; Davis, Timothy J; Meyer Zu Heringdorf, Frank-J; Giessen, Harald

    2017-07-01

    We experimentally and theoretically visualize the propagation of short-range surface plasmon polaritons using atomically flat single-crystalline gold platelets on silicon substrates. We study their excitation and subfemtosecond dynamics via normal-incidence two-photon photoemission electron microscopy. By milling a plasmonic disk and grating structure into a single-crystalline gold platelet, we observe nanofocusing of the short-range surface plasmon polariton. Localized two-photon ultrafast electron emission from a spot with a smallest dimension of 60 nm is observed. Our novel approach opens the door toward reproducible plasmonic nanofocusing devices, which do not degrade upon high light intensity or heating due to the atomically flat surface without any tips, protrusions, or holes. Our nanofoci could also be used as local emitters for ultrafast electron bunches in time-resolved electron microscopes.

  14. Post-fire suspended sediment dynamics in a Mediterranean terraced catchment using a nested approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Comendador, Julián; Fortesa, Josep; Calsamiglia, Aleix; Calvo-Cases, Adolfo; Estrany, Joan

    2017-04-01

    Wildfires promote serious disturbances in the hydrological and sediment dynamics at catchment scale modifying the runoff generation response and the sediment delivery. The hysteretic loops analyses can help to clarify some landscape changes induced by fire. Accordingly, these spatio-temporal relationships between discharge and sediment transport at event scale enable the location of sediment sources, the availability or depletion of sediment and the precipitation threshold necessary to generate functional hillslope-channel connectivity. In addition, a nested catchment approach allows the characterization of the hydro-sedimentological dynamics in different landscape compartments, observing the incidence of the changes generated in the landscape and its evolution to control soil erosion and to implement useful mitigation practices after fire. In July 2013 a large wildfire (2,450 ha) severely affected the western part of Mallorca (Balearic Islands, Spain). The hydrological and sediment delivery processes were assessed in the first three post-fire hydrological years in a representative catchment when the window of disturbance is typically more open. A nested approach was applied in which two gauging stations (i.e., US 1.2 km2 and DS 4.8 km2) were established in September 2013 with continuous measurement of rainfall, water and sediment yield. At DS, a minimal runoff (i.e., 11 mm with 2% of coefficient) and low sediment yield (i.e., 6.3 t km2 yr-1) were generated on average in the study period in which rainfall averaged amount (i.e., 468 mm ± 141) and intensities were representative of long-term records. The hysteretic analysis allowed a better understanding of the effects of wildfires and terraces in sediment yields. For the whole study period, the percentage distribution was 43% (US; two monitored years) and 40% (DS; three monitored years) for clockwise loops in front of 57% (US) and 60% (DS) for counter clockwise loops. This percentage of counter clockwise loops was

  15. Characterizing Landslide and River Bed Sediments Grain Size after a Large Earthquake with Insight into Post-earthquake Sediment Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; West, A. J.; Densmore, A.; Hammond, D. E.; Jin, Z.; Zhang, F.; Wang, J.; Hilton, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    Landslides are important fluvial sediment sources, often characterized by distinct grain size distributions that may be useful for tracking sediment transport and channel bed evolution and understanding associated size fractionation. Landslide grain sizes may also leave an imprint of past triggering events in sedimentary archives. Here we investigate the grain size characteristics of landslide and river bed sediments in the Min Jiang river basin draining the Longmen Shan range, in Sichuan, China. The large number of landslides triggered by the 2008 Mw7.9 Wenchuan earthquake provides a natural experiment for exploring sediment transport and grain size evolution. We report new grain size information for landslide and river bed sediments from field work (pit digging, sieving and photographing) and lab work (wet sieving, photo analysis and statistical processing). We constrain the grain size of sediment sources by combining previously published grain size data from >100 earthquake-triggered landslides with new data collected from river bed sediments from several low-order, small catchments. We track the spatial evolution of grain size in river sediment across the Longmen Shan range, from the upper Min Jiang with little influence from co-seismic landslides to the epicentral region with intensive landsliding, and we explore how landslides modulate the grain size signal carried by river sediment. Overall, this work contributes a key dataset for modeling post-earthquake sediment transport and sheds light on how sediment grain sizes evolve in response to a large earthquake.

  16. Oxygen dynamics in periphyton communities and associated effects on phosphorus release from lake sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    This study used oxygen sensitive microelectrodes with tip diameters of < 30 um to investigate the effects of photosynthesis and respiration on the oxygen dynamics of several diverse periphyton communities both in situ and in laboratory microcosms. A novel flow-through system that utilized /sup 32/P radiotracer and that permitted manipulation of the velocity, flushing rate, and oxygen concentration of overlying water was developed to investigate the role of photosynthetic oxygen production on the phosphorus dynamics in lake sediments colonized by epipelic periphyton.

  17. The Temporal and Spatial Quantification of Holocene Sediment Dynamics in a meso-scale catchment in northern Bavaria/Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Markus; Will, Mathias; Kreutzer, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    The Aufsess River catchment (97 km2) in northern Bavaria, Germany, is studied to establish a Holocene sediment budget and to investigate the sediment dynamics since the early times of farming in the 3rd millennium BCE. The temporal characterization of the sediment dynamics is based on an intensive dating program with 73 OSL and 14 14C ages. To estimate soil erosion and deposition, colluvial and alluvial archives are investigated in the field by piling and trenching, supported by laboratory analyses. The sediment budget shows that 58% of these sediments are stored as colluvium in on- and foot-slope positions, 9% are stored as alluvium in the floodplains and 33% are exported from the Aufsess River catchment. Colluviation starts in the End-Neolithic (ca. 3100 BCE), while first indicators of soil erosion derived alluviation is recorded ca. 2-3 ka later. The pattern of sedimentation rates also displays differences between the colluvial and alluvial system, with a distinct increase in the Middle Ages (ca. 1000 CE) for the alluvial system, while the colluvial system records low sedimentation rates for this period. A contrast is also observed since Modern Times (ca. 1500 CE), with increasing sedimentation rates for the colluvial system, whereas the alluvial system records decreasing rates. The different behavior of the colluvial and alluvial system clearly shows the non-linear behavior of the catchment's fluvial system. The results further suggest that human impact is most probably the dominant factor influencing the sediment dynamics of the catchment since the introduction of farming. Fuchs, M., Will, M., Kunert, E., Kreutzer, S., Fischer, M. & Reverman, R. 2011. The temporal and spatial quantification of Holocene sediment dynamics in a meso-scale catchment in northern Bavaria / Germany. The Holocene 21, 1093-1104. Fuchs, M., Fischer, M. & Reverman, R. 2010. Colluvial and alluvial sediment archives temporally resolved by OSL dating: Implications for reconstructing soil

  18. Sediment transport dynamics and its relation to primary production in mountain headwater streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, S.; Segura, C.; Warren, D.

    2015-12-01

    This study explores how the spatial and temporal variability of stream flow and sediment transport influence the growth and recovery rate of benthic primary producers in a rainfall dominated mountain stream over different seasons. Primary producers sustain higher trophic levels and thus understanding how sediment transport impacts their growth is important for efficient river management. The control of sediment transport processes on suitable habitat for these organisms depends on the frequency of high flows capable of mobilizing material and the spatial distribution of forces throughout the stream. However there other factors such as light, nutrient availability, and temperature that are also important. We hypothesize that the control physical processes exert on the growth dynamics of these organisms varies both according to the amount of localized bed disturbance caused by sediment transport and the flow field and seasonal variations in additional growth factors. This hypothesis is tested in a 160m reach of Oak Creek, OR draining 7 km2. Habitat disturbance maps were developed based on the spatial and temporal variability of velocity and shear stress and estimated sediment transport rates. These maps are used to select habitat patches with contrasting disturbance levels for benthic chlorophyll a monitoring. Velocity and shear stress were modeled using the two dimensional hydraulic model FaSTMECH, developed by the USGS. Sediment transport rates were estimated using spatially variable magnitudes of shear stress and grain size distributions and validated using both field measurements and historical data. Preliminary results during the spring indicate an inverse correlation between disturbance and algal growth, however there were no flow events above the critical threshold for motion during this time. It is likely that increased nutrient fluxes in areas of higher velocity resulted in increased algal growth rates during these period.

  19. Organic matter dynamics and stable isotope signature as tracers of the sources of suspended sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler Wildhaber, Y.; Liechti, R.; Alewell, C.

    2012-06-01

    Suspended sediment (SS) and organic matter in rivers can harm brown trout Salmo trutta by affecting the health and fitness of free swimming fish and by causing siltation of the riverbed. The temporal and spatial dynamics of sediment, carbon (C), and nitrogen (N) during the brown trout spawning season in a small river of the Swiss Plateau were assessed and C isotopes as well as the C/N atomic ratio were used to distinguish autochthonous and allochthonous sources of organic matter in SS loads. The visual basic program IsoSource with 13Ctot and 15N as input isotopes was used to quantify the temporal and spatial sources of SS. Organic matter concentrations in the infiltrated and suspended sediment were highest during low flow periods with small sediment loads and lowest during high flow periods with high sediment loads. Peak values in nitrate and dissolved organic C were measured during high flow and high rainfall, probably due to leaching from pasture and arable land. The organic matter was of allochthonous sources as indicated by the C/N atomic ratio and δ13Corg. Organic matter in SS increased from up- to downstream due to an increase of pasture and arable land downstream of the river. The mean fraction of SS originating from upper watershed riverbed sediment decreased from up to downstream and increased during high flow at all measuring sites along the course of the river. During base flow conditions, the major sources of SS are pasture, forest and arable land. The latter increased during rainy and warmer winter periods, most likely because both triggered snow melt and thus erosion. The measured increase in DOC and nitrate concentrations during high flow support these modeling results. Enhanced soil erosion processes on pasture and arable land are expected with increasing heavy rain events and less snow during winter seasons due to climate change. Consequently, SS and organic matter in the river will increase, which will possibly affect brown trout negatively.

  20. Organic matter dynamics and stable isotopes for tracing sources of suspended sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler Wildhaber, Y.; Liechti, R.; Alewell, C.

    2012-01-01

    Suspended sediment (SS) and organic matter in rivers can harm brown trout Salmo trutta by impact on health and fitness of free swimming fish and siltation of the riverbed. The later results in a decrease of hydraulic conductivity and therefore smaller oxygen supply to the salmonid embryos. Additionally, oxygen demand within riverbeds will increase as the pool of organic matter increases. We assessed the temporal and spatial dynamics of sediment, carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) during the brown trout spawning season and used C isotopes as well as the C/N atomic ratio to distinguish autochthonous and allochthonous sources of organic matter in SS loads. The visual basic program IsoSource with 13Ctot and 15N as input isotopes was used to quantify the sources of SS in respect of time and space. Organic matter fractions in the infiltrated and suspended sediment were highest during low flow periods with small sediment loads and lowest during high flow periods with high sediment loads. Peak values in nitrate and dissolved organic C were measured during high flow and precipitation probably due to leaching from pasture and arable land. The organic matter was of allochthonous sources as indicated by the C/N atomic ratio and δ13Corg. Organic matter in SS increased from up- to downstream due to pasture and arable land. The fraction of SS originating from upper watershed riverbed sediment increased at all sites during high flow. Its mean fraction decreased from up- to downstream. During base flow conditions, the major sources of SS are pasture and arable land. The later increased during rainy and warmer periods probably due to snow melting and erosion processes. These modeling results support the measured increased DOC and NO3 concentrations during high flow.

  1. Quantifying Flocculation Settling Dynamics of Natural Fine-grained Suspended Sediments: "Floccin' Across the USA!"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, A. J.; Schoellhamer, D. H.; Mehta, A. J.; Schladow, G.; Monismith, S. G.; Huang, I. B.; Kuwabara, J. S.; Carter, J. L.; Sheremet, A.; Parsons, D. R.; Whitehouse, R. J. S.; Todd, D.; Benson, T.; Spearman, J.

    2016-12-01

    Many coastal and inland waterways are dominated by muddy sediments; typically a mixture of clay minerals and various types of organic matter. When cohesive sediment is entrained into suspension, the particles tend to flocculate. Flocs are less dense, but faster settling than their constituent particles thus affecting their depositional characteristics. As flocs grow, their effective densities generally decrease, but their settling rates rise due to the Stokes' Law relationship. Flocculation effects become even more complex when purely cohesive sediments are mixed with different ratios of non-cohesive sediments, and if biological activity (e.g., exudate production) affects the resultant cohesion. Developing instrumentation that can provide key physical and dynamical data on depositional rates of flocculating sediments is extremely important in advancing our understanding of natural flocculation processes. Complementary qualitative and quantitative data improve our understanding of the depositional and aggregational physical processes through parameterization. This presentation will demonstrate recent advances in the study of the flocculation process through the use of video image technology. One such device pioneered at HR Wallingford, and implemented with co-authors, is the high-resolution floc video camera, LabSFLOC - Laboratory Spectral Flocculation Characteristics (developed by Prof. Manning). LabSFLOC can observe (directly or indirectly) floc spectral physical properties, including: floc size, settling velocity, effective density, porosity, shape, mass, and settling flux (using controlled volume referencing). These data are highly desirable for sediment transport modelers. Examples of floc measurements from locations in estuaries, tidal lagoons, river deltas, and lakes from locations across the US will be presented. In addition, we will demonstrate how video floc data can be used to parameterize floc settling characteristics for use in modeling.

  2. How can climate change and engineered water conveyance affect sediment dynamics in the San Francisco Bay-Delta system?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Achete, Fernanda; Van der Wegen, Mick; Roelvink, Jan Adriaan; Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2017-01-01

    Suspended sediment concentration is an important estuarine health indicator. Estuarine ecosystems rely on the maintenance of habitat conditions, which are changing due to direct human impact and climate change. This study aims to evaluate the impact of climate change relative to engineering measures on estuarine fine sediment dynamics and sediment budgets. We use the highly engineered San Francisco Bay-Delta system as a case study. We apply a process-based modeling approach (Delft3D-FM) to assess the changes in hydrodynamics and sediment dynamics resulting from climate change and engineering scenarios. The scenarios consider a direct human impact (shift in water pumping location), climate change (sea level rise and suspended sediment concentration decrease), and abrupt disasters (island flooding, possibly as the results of an earthquake). Levee failure has the largest impact on the hydrodynamics of the system. Reduction in sediment input from the watershed has the greatest impact on turbidity levels, which are key to primary production and define habitat conditions for endemic species. Sea level rise leads to more sediment suspension and a net sediment export if little room for accommodation is left in the system due to continuous engineering works. Mitigation measures like levee reinforcement are effective for addressing direct human impacts, but less effective for a persistent, widespread, and increasing threat like sea level rise. Progressive adaptive mitigation measures to the changes in sediment and flow dynamics resulting from sea level rise may be a more effective strategy. Our approach shows that a validated process-based model is a useful tool to address long-term (decades to centuries) changes in sediment dynamics in highly engineered estuarine systems. In addition, our modeling approach provides a useful basis for long-term, process-based studies addressing ecosystem dynamics and health.

  3. In-Stream Sediment Dynamics for predicted environmental concentration calculations of plant protection products in the FOCUSSW Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strehmel, Alexander; Erzgräber, Beate; Gottesbüren, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    The exposure assessment for the EU registration procedure of plant protection products (PPP), which is based on the 'Forum for the co-ordination of pesticide fate models and their use' (FOCUS), currently considers only periods of 12-16 months for the exposure assessment in surface water bodies. However, in a recent scientific opinion of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) it is argued that in a multi-year exposure assessment, the accumulation of PPP substances in river sediment may be a relevant process. Therefore, the EFSA proposed to introduce a sediment accumulation factor in order to account for enrichment of PPP substances over several years in the sediment. The calculation of this accumulation factor, however, would consider degradation in sediment as the only dissipation path, and does not take into account riverine sediment dynamics. In order to assess the influence of deposition and the possible extent of substance accumulation in the sediment phase, the hydraulic model HEC-RAS was employed for an assessment of in-stream sediment dynamics of the FOCUS stream scenarios. The model was parameterized according to the stream characteristics of the FOCUS scenarios and was run over a period of 20 years. The results show that with the distribution of grain sizes and the ranges of flow velocity in the FOCUS streams the main sediment process in the streams is transport. First modeling results suggest that about 80% of the eroded sediment mass from the adjacent field are transported to the downstream end of the stream and out of the system, while only about 20% are deposited in the river bed. At the same time, only about 30% of in-stream sediment mass stems from the adjacent field and is associated with PPP substance, while the remaining sediment consists of the substance-free base sediment concentration regarded in the scenarios. With this, the hydraulic modelling approach is able to support the development of a meaningful sediment accumulation factor by

  4. Simulating complex storm surge dynamics: Three-dimensionality, vegetation effect, and onshore sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapetina, Andrew; Sheng, Y. Peter

    2015-11-01

    The 3-D hydrodynamics of storm surge events, including the effects of vegetation and impact on onshore transport of marine sediment, have important consequences for coastal communities. Here, complex storm surge dynamics during Hurricane Ike are investigated using a three-dimensional (3-D), vegetation-resolving storm surge-wave model (CH3D-SWAN) which includes such effects of vegetation as profile drag, skin friction, and production, dissipation, and transport of turbulence. This vegetation-resolving 3-D model features a turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) closure model, which uses momentum equations with vegetation-induced profile and skin friction drags, a dynamic q2 equation including turbulence production and dissipation by vegetation, as well as vegetation-dependent algebraic length-scale equations, and a Smagorinsky-type horizontal turbulence model. This vegetation model has been verified using extensive laboratory tests, but this study is a comparison of 2-D and 3-D simulations of complex storm surge dynamics during Hurricane Ike. We examine the value of 3-D storm surge models relative to 2-D models for simulating coastal currents, effects of vegetation on surge, and sediment transport during storm events. Comparisons are made between results obtained using simple 2-D formulations for bottom friction, the Manning coefficient (MC) approach, and physics-based 3-D vegetation-modeling (VM) approach. Last, the role that the 3-D hydrodynamics on onshore transport and deposition of marine sediments during the storm is investigated. While both the 3-D and 2-D results simulated the water level dynamics, results of the physics-based 3-D VM approach, as compared to the 2-D MC approach, more accurately captures the complex storm surge dynamics.

  5. Back-barrier and seabed sediment dynamics in the Albemarle-Pamlico estuarine system, North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. P.; Corbett, D. R.

    2016-02-01

    Estuaries are critical habitats as well as places where people live, recreate, and make their livelihood. Additionally, they are sites where land and sea interact, and sediments, and associated pollutants and carbon, are deposited, remobilized and accumulated. Many processes, such as river discharge, waves, tides, and sea-level rise, are operating in estuaries to cause sediment dynamics, impacting humans and organisms as a result. Recent research we have been engaged in across the Albemarle-Pamlico Estuarine System (APES) has investigated the sediments dynamics of this important estuary. The APES is the second largest estuary in the continental United States, consisting of the Albemarle and Pamlico sounds and the Pamlico River and Neuse River sub-estuaries. Although expansive in size, the system is shallow with minimal tidal range. Water and sediment discharge into the APES is modest, and the existence of few inlets along the Outer Banks limits mixing with the Atlantic Ocean. Human impact on the drainage basin and estuarine system is moderate and increasing over time. Over the last five years, a considerable volume of sedimentary process data has been collected over various timescales and locations in the APES. More specifically, work has included: deployments of instrumented tripods to examine seabed dynamics; collection and analysis of shallow cores and GIS investigation of aerial photographs and other data. This wealth of data highlights several insights: 1) shorelines are generally eroding ( 0.25 m/y and rapidly >3 m/y in places), but rates are temporally and spatially variable; 2) seabed resuspension is frequent, yet net accumulation of 2-4 mm/y is widespread in deeper locations; and 3) storms cause episodic, localized impacts (e.g., barrier breaches) on this large, shallow estuarine system.

  6. Charlie Flats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera shows a region of the rock outcrop at Meridiani Planum, Mars, dubbed 'Charlie Flats.' This region is a rich science target for Opportunity because it contains a diverse assortment of small grains, pebbles and spherules, as well as both dark and light soil deposits. The area seen here measures approximately 0.6 meters (2 feet) across. The smallest grains visible in this image are only a few millimeters in size. The approximate true color image was acquired on Sol 20 of Opportunity's mission with panoramic camera filters red, green and blue. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger view Charlie Flats Spectra The chart above shows examples of spectra, or light wave patterns, extracted from the region of the Meridiani Planum rock outcrop dubbed 'Charlie Flats,' a rich science target for the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The spectra were extracted from the similarly colored regions in the image on the left, taken by the rover's panoramic camera. The green circle identifies a bright, dust-like soil deposit. The red circle identifies a dark soil region. The yellow identifies a small, angular rock chip with a strong near-infrared band. The pink identifies a sphere-shaped pebble with a different strong near-infrared band. The cyan circle shows a dark, grayish pebble.

  7. Charlie Flats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera shows a region of the rock outcrop at Meridiani Planum, Mars, dubbed 'Charlie Flats.' This region is a rich science target for Opportunity because it contains a diverse assortment of small grains, pebbles and spherules, as well as both dark and light soil deposits. The area seen here measures approximately 0.6 meters (2 feet) across. The smallest grains visible in this image are only a few millimeters in size. The approximate true color image was acquired on Sol 20 of Opportunity's mission with panoramic camera filters red, green and blue. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger view Charlie Flats Spectra The chart above shows examples of spectra, or light wave patterns, extracted from the region of the Meridiani Planum rock outcrop dubbed 'Charlie Flats,' a rich science target for the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The spectra were extracted from the similarly colored regions in the image on the left, taken by the rover's panoramic camera. The green circle identifies a bright, dust-like soil deposit. The red circle identifies a dark soil region. The yellow identifies a small, angular rock chip with a strong near-infrared band. The pink identifies a sphere-shaped pebble with a different strong near-infrared band. The cyan circle shows a dark, grayish pebble.

  8. Stormwater sediment and bioturbation influences on hydraulic functioning, biogeochemical processes, and pollutant dynamics in laboratory infiltration systems.

    PubMed

    Nogaro, Geraldine; Mermillod-Blondin, Florian

    2009-05-15

    Stormwater sediments that accumulate at the surface of infiltration basins reduce infiltration efficiencies by physical clogging and produce anoxification in the subsurface. The present study aimed to quantify the influence of stormwater sediment origin (urban vs industrial catchments) and the occurrence of bioturbators (tubificid worms) on the hydraulic functioning, aerobic/anaerobic processes, and pollutant dynamics in stormwater infiltration systems. In laboratory sediment columns, effects of stormwater sediments and tubificids were examined on hydraulic conductivity, microbial processes, and pollutant releases. Significant differences in physical (particle size distribution) and chemical characteristics betoveen the two stormwater sediments led to distinct effects of these sediments on hydraulic and biogeochemical processes. Bioturbation by tubificid worms could increase the hydraulic conductivity in stormwater infiltration columns, but this effect depended on the characteristics of the stormwater sediments. Bioturbation-driven increases in hydraulic conductivity stimulated aerobic microbial processes and enhanced vertical fluxes of pollutants in the sediment layer. Our results showed that control of hydraulic functioning by stormwater sediment characteristics and/ or biological activities (such as bioturbation) determined the dynamics of organic matter and pollutants in stormwater infiltration devices.

  9. A new instrument system to investigate sediment dynamics on continental shelves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cacchione, D.A.; Drake, D.E.

    1979-01-01

    A new instrumented tripod, the GEOPROBE system, has been constructed and used to collect time-series data on physical and geological parameters that are important in bottom sediment dynamics on continental shelves. Simultaneous in situ digital recording of pressure, temperature, light scattering, and light transmission, in combination with current velocity profiles measured with a near-bottom vertical array of electromagnetic current meters, is used to correlate bottom shear generated by a variety of oceanic processes (waves, tides, mean flow, etc.) with incipient movement and resuspension of bottom sediment. A bottom camera system that is activated when current speeds exceed preset threshold values provides a unique method to identify initial sediment motion and bed form development. Data from a twenty day deployment of the GEOPROBE system in Norton Sound, Alaska, during the period September 24 - October 14, 1976 show that threshold conditions for sediment movement are commonly exceeded, even in calm weather periods, due to the additive effects of tidal currents, mean circulation, and surface waves. ?? 1979.

  10. Experimental and molecular dynamic simulation study of perfluorooctane sulfonate adsorption on soil and sediment components.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruiming; Yan, Wei; Jing, Chuanyong

    2015-03-01

    Soil and sediment play a crucial role in the fate and transport of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in the environment. However, the molecular mechanisms of major soil/sediment components on PFOS adsorption remain unclear. This study experimentally isolated three major components in soil/sediment: humin/kerogen, humic/fulvic acid (HA/FA), and inorganic component after removing organics, and explored their contributions to PFOS adsorption using batch adsorption experiments and molecular dynamic simulations. The results suggest that the humin/kerogen component dominated the PFOS adsorption due to its aliphatic features where hydrophobic effect and phase transfer are the primary adsorption mechanism. Compared with the humin/kerogen, the HA/FA component contributed less to the PFOS adsorption because of its hydrophilic and polar characteristics. The electrostatic repulsion between the polar groups of HA/FA and PFOS anions was attributable to the reduced PFOS adsorption. When the soil organic matter was extracted, the inorganic component also plays a non-negligible role because PFOS molecules might form surface complexes on SiO2 surface. The findings obtained in this study illustrate the contribution of organic matters in soils and sediments to PFOS adsorption and provided new perspective to understanding the adsorption process of PFOS on micro-interface in the environment.

  11. Spacial and temporal dynamic of fine sediment input in a small Swiss River in the foothills of the Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Yael; Michel, Christian; Alewell, Christine

    2010-05-01

    Fine sediments are an often overlooked threat to our rivers and can determine stream quality to a large extent. Sediments in rivers cause increases in turbidity and sedimentation and can ultimately lead to clogging of the river bed. In general fine sediment loads in rivers are increasing throughout the world in catchments that are impacted both directly and indirectly by human activities. For European and alpine countries increased erosion has been reported over the last decades. Potential causes of increased erosion and sediment loads to rivers include global climate change with increased temperatures, altered precipitation patterns, changes in snow cover, seasonal snow melting and consequently discharge regimes. These may have led to increased river runoff, especially in winter and in spring, and altered seasonal and regional patterns of sediment input and clogging of river beds. A further cause of increased erosion and sediment loads in rivers are changes in land use and management, for example, changes in pasture management in uplands and changes in agricultural practices in lowlands. Several methods have been developed to determine the amount of fine sediments in rivers: Turbidity measurements, suspended sediment sampler, bedload sampler and several types of sediment baskets to measure the deposition of fine sediment. But never have they been compared to each other. We adopted multiple established methods to a smaller scale to measure the sediment input in a small, typical Swiss river (Enziwigger, Canton of Luzern) with a strongly modified morphology. These methods were used to study the temporal and spatial dynamics of fine sediments in three locations representing a high, medium and low fine-sediment load. Turbidity was measured continuously at all sites with optical backscatter sensor as well as 18 suspended sediment samplers, which were emptied weekly. The bedload was investigated with 18 bedload samplers and the fine sediment deposition was determined

  12. Carbon isotope dynamics in the water column and surface sediments of marginal seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipka, Marko; Liu, Bo; Schmiedinger, Iris; Böttcher, Michael E.

    2017-04-01

    winter time. Element fluxes across the sediment-water interface depend on bottom water redox conditions, sedimentology and organic contents. Advective fluxes induced by sedimentation events, macro zoobenthos and wave action can affect the top sections of the sediment, thereby modifying shallow concentration gradients. By means of non-steady state modelling of pore water profiles we were able to identify the impact of mixing processes and sedimentation events in the oxic part of the Baltic Sea. In the Black Sea, on the other hand, anaerobic processes control the dynamics in DI13C under permanent euxinic conditions. A Keeling plot analysis was performed on pore waters to identify the δ13C of DIC released upon oxidation of DOC or methane. The carbon isotope composition of DIC is found to be a highly sensitive tool for understanding carbon cycling in the water column and sediments. Acknowledgements: The study is supported by BMBF during FONA-SECOS project, DFG (cruises MSM33, MSM50 and MSM51) and Leibniz IOW.

  13. Sensitivity analysis of a sediment dynamics model applied in a Mediterranean river basin: global change and management implications.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Canales, M; López-Benito, A; Acuña, V; Ziv, G; Hamel, P; Chaplin-Kramer, R; Elorza, F J

    2015-01-01

    Climate change and land-use change are major factors influencing sediment dynamics. Models can be used to better understand sediment production and retention by the landscape, although their interpretation is limited by large uncertainties, including model parameter uncertainties. The uncertainties related to parameter selection may be significant and need to be quantified to improve model interpretation for watershed management. In this study, we performed a sensitivity analysis of the InVEST (Integrated Valuation of Environmental Services and Tradeoffs) sediment retention model in order to determine which model parameters had the greatest influence on model outputs, and therefore require special attention during calibration. The estimation of the sediment loads in this model is based on the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE). The sensitivity analysis was performed in the Llobregat basin (NE Iberian Peninsula) for exported and retained sediment, which support two different ecosystem service benefits (avoided reservoir sedimentation and improved water quality). Our analysis identified the model parameters related to the natural environment as the most influential for sediment export and retention. Accordingly, small changes in variables such as the magnitude and frequency of extreme rainfall events could cause major changes in sediment dynamics, demonstrating the sensitivity of these dynamics to climate change in Mediterranean basins. Parameters directly related to human activities and decisions (such as cover management factor, C) were also influential, especially for sediment exported. The importance of these human-related parameters in the sediment export process suggests that mitigation measures have the potential to at least partially ameliorate climate-change driven changes in sediment exportation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Combining multiple fallout radionuclides (137Cs, 7Be, 210Pbxs) improves our understanding of sediment source dynamics in tropical rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrard, O.; Laceby, J. P.; Huon, S.; Lefèvre, I.; Sengtaheuanghoung, O.; Ribolzi, O.

    2015-12-01

    Soil erosion has accelerated as a result of land use change, increasing the sediment supply to rivers worldwide. A thorough knowledge of sediment dynamics is required to design efficient management measures to control erosion and reduce sediment delivery from catchments. Fallout radionuclides are often used separately to provide spatial (137Cs) or temporal (7Be, 210Pbxs) information on sediment sources. In this study, we examine their combined application to simultaneously model spatial and temporal sediment source dynamics. To this end, potential sediment sources (n=84) and suspended sediment (n=16) were collected at two stations in a 12 km² catchment in Northern Laos during the first flood of the 2014 wet season. Part of the source material was directly sampled in ephemeral flow occurring on hillslopes to avoid the grain size selectivity problems that may occur during erosion and river transport processes. A distribution modelling approach quantified the relative contributions of recently eroded surface (labelled with both 7Be and 137Cs), recently eroded subsurface (depleted in both 7Be and 137Cs), re-suspended surface (depleted in 7Be and labelled with 137Cs) and re-suspended subsurface sources (enriched in 7Be and depleted in 137Cs). At an upstream sampling location, surface sources contributed the majority of sediment (55%) whereas subsurface sources dominated the supply of sediment downstream (74%). Importantly, re-suspended subsurface sources, labelled with 7Be, were a significant sediment source at the catchment outlet (60%). This approach demonstrates the utility of combining multiple radionuclides when investigating spatial and temporal sediment source dynamics in tropical catchments. In the future, sampling of source material in ephemeral flows occurring on hillslopes should be encouraged. Furthermore, the proposed approach should be tested in larger catchments to guide the implementation of efficient erosion control measures.

  15. Cable Bacteria Control Iron-Phosphorus Dynamics in Sediments of a Coastal Hypoxic Basin.

    PubMed

    Sulu-Gambari, Fatimah; Seitaj, Dorina; Meysman, Filip J R; Schauer, Regina; Polerecky, Lubos; Slomp, Caroline P

    2016-02-02

    Phosphorus is an essential nutrient for life. The release of phosphorus from sediments is critical in sustaining phytoplankton growth in many aquatic systems and is pivotal to eutrophication and the development of bottom water hypoxia. Conventionally, sediment phosphorus release is thought to be controlled by changes in iron oxide reduction driven by variations in external environmental factors, such as organic matter input and bottom water oxygen. Here, we show that internal shifts in microbial communities, and specifically the population dynamics of cable bacteria, can also induce strong seasonality in sedimentary iron-phosphorus dynamics. Field observations in a seasonally hypoxic coastal basin demonstrate that the long-range electrogenic metabolism of cable bacteria leads to a dissolution of iron sulfides in winter and spring. Subsequent oxidation of the mobilized ferrous iron with manganese oxides results in a large stock of iron-oxide-bound phosphorus below the oxic zone. In summer, when bottom water hypoxia develops and cable bacteria are undetectable, the phosphorus associated with these iron oxides is released, strongly increasing phosphorus availability in the water column. Future research should elucidate whether formation of iron-oxide-bound phosphorus driven by cable bacteria, as observed in this study, contributes to the seasonality in iron-phosphorus cycling in aquatic sediments worldwide.

  16. Proglacial hydrochemistry and sediment characteristics observed across a spectrum of glacier dynamic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crompton, J. W.; Flowers, G. E.

    2015-12-01

    The broad influence of bedrock geology on glacier dynamics has received comparatively little attention in the alpine glacier literature. Geological influences vary widely from subglacial hydrochemistry to deformable till rheology, which may be governed by the mineralogy and grain size distribution within the till. In an investigation of borehole and proglacial water at an unnamed glacier in the Donjek Range of the St. Elias Mountains, Yukon, Canada, we find that subglacial mineral precipitation exerts a significant control on the proglacial hydrochemistry and suspended sediment flux. To understand if this process is common to glaciers across the range, we collected proglacial water samples from 20 glaciers in and around the Donjek Range. From each sample, we analyzed the hydrochemistry, measured the grain size distribution (GSD) using a Mastersizer laser diffraction particle size analyzer, and analyzed the mineralogy of the suspended sediments using X-ray diffraction. We also analyzed thin sections from bedrock samples collected at the glacier margins to constrain the mineralogical input to the system. This suite of measurements permits us to investigate the discrepancies between the secondary minerals predicted by the proglacial hydrochemistry and the observed mineralogy. Given that glaciers in the sample set exhibit a range of dynamic behaviour (including surging), we investigate how the mineralogy, GSDs, and hydrochemistry vary as a function of glacier dynamics. Where we have identified correlations between surging glaciers and proglacial GSDs, we investigate the possible controls of hydrochemistry and/or mineralogy on the GSDs and thus on subglacial dynamics.

  17. Digging navigable waterways through lagoon tidal flats: which short and long-term impacts on groundwater dynamics and quality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teatini, Pietro; Isotton, Giovanni; Nardean, Stefano; Ferronato, Massimiliano; Tosi, Luigi; Da Lio, Cristina; Zaggia, Luca; Bellafiore, Debora; Zecchin, Massimo; Baradello, Luca; Corami, Fabiana; Libralato, Giovanni; Morabito, Elisa; Broglia, Riccardo; Zaghi, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    Coastal lagoons are highly valued ephemeral habitats that have experienced in many cases the pressure of human activities since the development of urbanisation and economic activities within or around their boundaries. One typical intervention is dredging of canals to increase the exchange of water with the sea or for navigation purposes. In order to divert the route of large cruise liners from the historic center of Venice, Italy, the Venice Port Authority has recently proposed a project for the dredging of a new 3-km long and 10-m deep navigation canal (called Marghera-Venice Canal, MVC, in the sequel) through the shallows of the Venice Lagoon. The MVC will connect the passenger terminal located in the southwestern part of the historic center to a main channel that reaches the industrial area on the western lagoon margin. Can the new MVC facilitate saltwater intrusion below the lagoon bottom? Can the release into the lagoon of the chemicals detected in the groundwater around the industrial site be favoured by the MVC excavation? Can the depression waves generated by the ship transit (known as ship-wakes) along the MVC affect the flow and contaminant exchange between the subsurface and surficial systems? A response to these questions has been provided by the use of uncoupled and coupled density-dependent groundwater flow and transport simulators. The hydrogeological modelling has been supported by an in-depth characterization of the Venice lagoon subsurface along the MVC. Geophysical surveys, laboratory analyses on groundwater and sediment samples, in-situ measurements through piezometers and pressure sensors, and the outcome of 3D hydrodynamic and computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models have been used to set-up and calibrate the subsurface multi-model approach. The modelling results can be summarized as follows: i) the MVC has a negligible effect in relation to the propagation of the tidal regime into the subsoil; ii) the depression caused by the ship transit

  18. Observations of coastal sediment dynamics of the Tijuana Estuary Fine Sediment Fate and Transport Demonstration Project, Imperial Beach, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, Jonathan A.; Rosenberger, Kurt J.; Lam, Angela; Ferreiera, Joanne; Miller, Ian M.; Rippy, Meg; Svejkovsky, Jan; Mustain, Neomi

    2012-01-01

    Coastal restoration and management must address the presence, use, and transportation of fine sediment, yet little information exists on the patterns and/or processes of fine-sediment transport and deposition for these systems. To fill this information gap, a number of State of California, Federal, and private industry partners developed the Tijuana Estuary Fine Sediment Fate and Transport Demonstration Project ("Demonstration Project") with the purpose of monitoring the transport, fate, and impacts of fine sediment from beach-sediment nourishments in 2008 and 2009 near the Tijuana River estuary, Imperial Beach, California. The primary purpose of the Demonstration Project was to collect and provide information about the directions, rates, and processes of fine-sediment transport along and across a California beach and nearshore setting. To achieve these goals, the U.S. Geological Survey monitored water, beach, and seafloor properties during the 2008–2009 Demonstration Project. The project utilized sediment with ~40 percent fine sediment by mass so that the dispersal and transport of fine sediment would be easily recognizable. The purpose of this report is to present and disseminate the data collected during the physical monitoring of the Demonstration Project. These data are available online at the links noted in the "Additional Digital Information" section. Synthesis of these data and results will be provided in subsequent publications.

  19. Evaluation of detector dynamic range in the x-ray exposure domain in mammography: a comparison between film-screen and flat panel detector systems.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Virgil N; Oshiro, Thomas; Cagnon, Christopher H; Bassett, Lawrence W; McLeod-Stockmann, Tyler M; Bezrukiy, Nikita V

    2003-10-01

    Digital detectors in mammography have wide dynamic range in addition to the benefit of decoupled acquisition and display. How wide the dynamic range is and how it compares to film-screen systems in the clinical x-ray exposure domain are unclear. In this work, we compare the effective dynamic ranges of film-screen and flat panel mammography systems, along with the dynamic ranges of their component image receptors in the clinical x-ray exposure domain. An ACR mammography phantom was imaged using variable mAs (exposure) values for both systems. The dynamic range of the contrast-limited film-screen system was defined as that ratio of mAs (exposure) values for a 26 kVp Mo/Mo (HVL=0.34 mm Al) beam that yielded passing phantom scores. The same approach was done for the noise-limited digital system. Data from three independent observers delineated a useful phantom background optical density range of 1.27 to 2.63, which corresponded to a dynamic range of 2.3 +/- 0.53. The digital system had a dynamic range of 9.9 +/- 1.8, which was wider than the film-screen system (p<0.02). The dynamic range of the film-screen system was limited by the dynamic range of the film. The digital detector, on the other hand, had an estimated dynamic range of 42, which was wider than the dynamic range of the digital system in its entirety by a factor of 4. The generator/tube combination was the limiting factor in determining the digital system's dynamic range.

  20. High dynamic range optical scanning of sediments and rock samples: More than colour?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, Martin; Fabian, Karl; Knies, Jochen

    2015-04-01

    An automated high dynamic range (HDR) scanning procedure for cores and single sediment samples has been developed based on the GeoTek core scanner equipped with a 3* 2048 pixel CCD array GeoScan colour line-scan camera and a Sigma AF 105mm F2.8 EX DG MACRO lens. Repeated colour line scans of the same core sequence using different illumination and exposure time settings, but equal aperture, can be combined into single HDR images. This yields improved colour definition especially if layers of highly variable brightness occur in the same sequence. Colour calibration is performed automatically during image processing based on synchronization of colour charts. Polarized light is used to minimize gloss on wet surfaces. Beyond improved colour detection, high resolution scans with pixel size down to 25 µm provide the possibility of quantifying fabric, texture, and colour contrast between mottle and matrix. We present examples from marine sediments, lake sediments, hard rock cores, and individual soil samples. Due to the high resolution in sediment sequences, the improved images provide important background information to interpret synchronous measurements of density, magnetic susceptibility, or X-ray fluorescence with respect to their respective measurement footprint. If for example an XRF measurement indicates a 2% increase in Fe at a location of a thin black layer of 1/10 of the XRF measurement footprint, within an otherwise homogenous sequence, it can be inferred that the real Fe abundance within the layer is probably 20% higher than in the surrounding sediment. HDR scanning can therefore help to provide high resolution informed interpolation and deconvolution of measurements with larger sensor footprints.

  1. Hyporheic Temperature Dynamics: Predicting Hyporheic Temperatures Based on Travel Time Assuming Instantaneous Water-Sediment Conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraseski, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    Recently developed conceptual frameworks and new observations have improved our understanding of hyporheic temperature dynamics and their effects on channel temperatures. However, hyporheic temperature models that are both simple and useful remain elusive. As water moves through hyporheic pathways, it exchanges heat with hyporheic sediment through conduction, and this process dampens the diurnal temperature wave of the water entering from the channel. This study examined the mechanisms underlying this behavior, and utilized those findings to create two simple models that predict temperatures of water reentering the channel after traveling through hyporheic pathways for different lengths of time. First, we developed a laboratory experiment to represent this process and determine conduction rates for various sediment size classes (sand, fine gravel, coarse gravel, and a proportional mix of the three) by observing the time series of temperature changes between sediment and water of different initial temperatures. Results indicated that conductions rates were near-instantaneous, with heat transfer being completed on the scale of seconds to a few minutes of the initial interaction. Heat conduction rates between the sediment and water were therefore much faster than hyporheic flux rates, rendering reasonable an assumption of instantaneous conduction. Then, we developed two simple models to predict time series of hyporheic water based on the initial diurnal temperature wave and hyporheic travel distance. The first model estimates a damping coefficient based on the total water-sediment heat exchange through each diurnal cycle. The second model solves the heat transfer equation assuming instantaneous conduction using a simple finite difference algorithm. Both models demonstrated nearly complete damping of the sine wave over the distance traveled in four days. If hyporheic exchange is substantial and travel times are long, then hyporheic damping may have large effects on

  2. Field observations of cohesive sediment dynamics in a partially stratified estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, I. B.; Monismith, S. G.; Manning, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    This research focuses on understanding cohesive sediment dynamics and transport in a partially stratified estuary, the San Francisco Bay-Delta estuary. Three different datasets are used in this study: 1) Polaris transects: seven longitudinal transects collected on the R/V Polaris in collaboration with the USGS SFB monthly water monitoring project (http://sfbay.wr.usgs.gov/access/wqdata); 2) Questuary transects: two two-day transects collected on the R/V Questuary spanning from Suisun Bay to the Delta, near Sacramento, CA; and 3) Questuary stationary: a 48-hr stationary profiling experiment collected on the R/V Questuary at the low-salinity zone in Rio Vista, CA. Altogether, these cruises covered a spatial range of approximately 220 km from June 2008 to November 2015. Vertical profiles of particle size distributions (PSDs), total floc volume concentrations, pressure, salinity, temperature, fluorescence, suspended sediment concentrations (SSC via optical backscatter calibration), and photosynthetically irradiance (PAR) were collected in all experiments using a LISST 100X Type B or Type C (Sequoia Scientific) and a SBE 19+ CTD (Seabird Electronics). Background currents were monitored using a downward-looking 600 or 1200 kHz ADCP (RDI Teledyne) on all Questuary datasets, and in-situ dissipation profiles were measured using a free-falling VMP-200 (Rockland Scientific) in all datasets except for one Polaris transect. We make the following main observations. First, suspended sediment flocculation significantly enhances particle fall velocity and therefore sediment removal from the water column. Second, we argue that estuarine physics is the main driving mechanism behind floc size changes, rather than chemical or biological factors. Lastly, we show that suspended sediment and light penetration relationships can be improved by accounting for floc size changes under certain conditions.

  3. Sediment dynamics through space and time in the lower Rio Puerco arroyo, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, E. R.; Friedman, J. M.; Vincent, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    The dynamics of riverine erosion and sediment transport can be episodic, spatially and temporally non-uniform, and strongly scale dependent. Identifying the events and processes that control these sediment dynamics requires precise measurements, but overcoming spatial and temporal variability requires observations over large distances and long times. Addressing this challenge, therefore, requires integration of data collection efforts at point, cross-section, reach, and whole-river scales. From the mid-1800s to about the 1930s, extreme high flows caused incision along the Rio Puerco, an ephemeral tributary of the Rio Grande located in semi-arid north-central New Mexico. The incision created an arroyo within the 1 to 2 km wide alluvial valley that by 1927 was an average of 118 m wide and 8.5 m deep. In the early 1900s, sediment transported from the Rio Puerco into the Rio Grande contributed to widespread flooding along the Rio Grande and concerns about filling of Elephant Butte Reservoir, located 100 km downstream. We reconstructed the history of arroyo evolution in a 55 km long segment of the lower Rio Puerco by combining data from 3 trenches excavated across the arroyo bottom with arroyo-scale information from aerial imagery, aerial light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data, longitudinal profiles, and repeat surveys of cross sections. We then examined changes through time since 1927 in arroyo width, depth, volume, morphology, and vegetation. A transition to filling after the 1930s involved vegetation development, channel narrowing, increased sinuosity, and finally vertical aggradation. This strongly depositional sediment transport regime interacted with floodplain shrubs to produce a characteristic narrow, trapezoidal channel. Our study reach demonstrated upstream progression of arroyo widening and filling, but not of arroyo incision, channel narrowing, or floodplain vegetation development. Since the 1970s, arroyo wall retreat has been mostly limited to locations

  4. Metabolic versatility of toluene-degrading, iron-reducing bacteria in tidal flat sediment, characterized by stable isotope probing-based metagenomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, So-Jeong; Park, Soo-Je; Cha, In-Tae; Min, Deullae; Kim, Jin-Seog; Chung, Won-Hyung; Chae, Jong-Chan; Jeon, Che Ok; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2014-01-01

    DNA stable isotope probing and metagenomic sequencing were used to assess the metabolic potential of iron-reducing bacteria involved in anaerobic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation in oil spill-affected tidal flats. In a microcosm experiment, (13) C-toluene was degraded with the simultaneous reduction of Fe(III)-NTA, which was also verified by quasi-stoichiometric (13) C-CO2 release. The metabolic potential of the dominant member affiliated with the genus Desulfuromonas in the heavy DNA fraction was inferred using assembled scaffolds (designated TF genome, 4.40 Mbp with 58.8 GC mol%), which were obtained by Illumina sequencing. The gene clusters with peripheral pathways for toluene and benzoate conversion possessed the features of strict and facultative anaerobes. In addition to the class II-type benzoyl-CoA reductase (Bam) of strict anaerobes, the class I-type (Bcr) of facultative anaerobes was encoded. Genes related to the utilization of various anaerobic electron acceptors, including iron, nitrate (to ammonia), sulfur and fumarate, were identified. Furthermore, genes encoding terminal oxidases (caa3 , cbb3 and bd) and a diverse array of genes for oxidative stress responses were detected in the TF genome. This metabolic versatility may be an adaptation to the fluctuating availability of electron acceptors and donors in tidal flats.

  5. "Roadrunner Flats"

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-10-14

    This enhanced color image of the Pathfinder landing site shows the eastern horizon. The elongated, reddish, low contrast region in the distance is "Roadrunner Flats." This image was taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). Sojourner spent 83 days of a planned seven-day mission exploring the Martian terrain, acquiring images, and taking chemical, atmospheric and other measurements. The final data transmission received from Pathfinder was at 10:23 UTC on September 27, 1997. Although mission managers tried to restore full communications during the following five months, the successful mission was terminated on March 10, 1998. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00979

  6. Sediment transport dynamics linked to morphological evolution of the Selenga River delta, Lake Baikal, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, T. Y.; Nittrouer, J.; McElroy, B. J.; Czapiga, M. J.; Il'icheva, E.; Pavolv, M.; Parker, G.

    2014-12-01

    The Selenga River delta, Lake Baikal, Russia, is approximately 700 km2 in size and contains three active lobes that receive varying amounts of water and sediment discharge. This delta represents a unique end-member in so far that the system is positioned along the deep-water (~1500 m) margin of Lake Baikal and therefore exists as a shelf-edge delta. In order to evaluate the morphological dynamics of the Selenga delta, field expeditions were undertaken during July 2013 and 2014, to investigate the morphologic, sedimentologic, and hydraulic nature of this delta system. Single-beam bathymetry data, sidescan sonar data, sediment samples, and aerial survey data were collected and analyzed to constrain: 1) channel geometries within the delta, 2) bedform sizes and spatial distributions, 3) grain size composition of channel bed sediment as well as bank sediment, collected from both major and minor distributary channels, and 4) elevation range of the subaerial portion of the delta. Our data indicate that the delta possesses downstream sediment fining, ranging from predominantly gravel and sand near the delta apex to silt and sand at the delta-lake interface. Field surveys also indicate that the Selenga delta has both eroding and aggrading banks, and that the delta is actively incising into some banks that consist of terraces, which are defined as regions that are not inundated by typical 2- to 4-year flood discharge events. Therefore the terraces are distinct from the actively accreting regions of the delta that receive sedimentation via water inundation during regular river floods. We spatially constrain the regions of the Selenga delta that are inundated during floods versus terraced using a 1-D water-surface hydrodynamic model that produces estimates of stage for flood water discharges, whereby local water surface elevations produced with the model are compared to the measured terrestrial elevations. Our analyses show that terrace elevations steadily decrease downstream

  7. Quantifying sediment dynamics on alluvial fans, Iglesia basin, south Central Argentine Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harries, Rebekah; Kirstein, Linda; Whittaker, Alex; Attal, Mikael; Peralta, Silvio

    2017-04-01

    considering factors such as climate storminess and degree of glacial cover in having a dominant control on the variance of sediment released. These findings have significant implications for our ability to invert the fluvial stratigraphy for climatically driven changes in discharge and highlight a need to quantify the impact of sediment dynamics on modern systems so that we may better understand the limitations in applying quantitative models to ancient stratigraphy.

  8. Dynamics of daily fluctuations of suspended sediment discharge in a glacierized Andean basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carillo, Ricardo; Mao, Luca; Morche, David

    2015-04-01

    Sediment transport during flood events often reveals hysteretic patterns. Hysteresis can be clockwise (when flow discharge peaks after the peak of bedload) or counterclockwise (when flow discharge peaks before the peak of bedload), and recent indexes have been developed in order to quantify the degree of hysteretic patterns. Hysteresis patterns and degree can be used to infer the dynamics of sediment availability, as counterclockwise and clockwise hysteresis have been interpreted as representative of limited and unlimited sediment supply conditions, respectively. This work focuses on the temporal variability of suspended sediment transport measured in the Estero Morales, a 27 km² Andean catchment located in central Chile. The elevations range from 1850 m a.s.l to 3815 m a.s.l., and the basin host glaciers with a current extent of 1.8 km². Runoff is dominated by snowmelt in late spring, and glacier melt from December to March. Liquid discharge and turbidity have been measured continuously from October 2013 to March 2014 and recently from October 2014 on. The analysis of the regressions between liquid discharge and turbidity reveals that a higher discharge is progressively needed to transport the same concentration of suspended sediments as the glacier melting season progresses. In fact, the coefficient a of the regressions (NTU=a*Qb) reduces, whereas the exponent b of the regressions increases overtime. The analysis of hysteretic loops of daily discharge fluctuations of spring and summer using three indexes are quite consistent in showing that patterns are mostly clockwise during snowmelt and early glacier melt period, and counterclockwise during late glacier melting. This tendency suggests a progressive reduction of sediment supply conditions overtime. Alternatively, this tendency could be interpreted as a proxy for the type and location of the main sediment source, that is likely to be the main channel and tributaries draining snowmelt in spring, and then only

  9. Sedimentation and particle dynamics in the seasonal ice zone of the Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Kanchan; Carroll, JoLynn; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia R.

    2010-01-01

    The Barents Sea seasonal ice zone (SIZ) is one of the most dynamic areas in the world ocean. This biologically productive area undergoes extreme intra- and inter-annual variabilities in sea ice and water mass transport properties. Here, we investigate seafloor burial processes in three regions of the SIZ with different ice-cover frequencies: predominantly open water (POW), marginally ice-covered (MIC), and predominantly ice-covered (PIC) with approximately 0, 10 and 50% sea ice cover, respectively, in 2002-2003. Down-core sediment profiles of the radionuclides 234Th, 210Pb, and 137Cs, along with sediment carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations are examined in two to three cores from each region. Sedimentation rates and velocities using 210Pb ex (excess 210Pb) profiles and assuming negligible mixing below a surface mixed layer are relatively uniform throughout the study area, averaging 558 ± 154 g m - 2 y - 1 and 1.1 ± 0.4 mm y - 1 ( n = 7). These sedimentation velocities are confirmed using 137Cs (1.0 ± 0.4 mm y - 1 , n = 7). 234Th ex (excess 234Th) derived bioturbation rates are positively correlated with number of benthic individuals per 0.5 m 2 ( R2 = 0.83) and exhibit a pattern of higher rates in the MIC (14.5 ± 2.1 cm - 2 y - 1) relative to both the POW (6.3 ± 2.2 cm - 2 y - 1) and PIC (5.3 ± 1.2 cm - 2 y - 1) ( p < 0.01). 234Th ex inventories are also significantly higher ( p = 0.026) within the MIC, while both 210Pb ex and 137Cs sediment inventories are more regionally uniform. Furthermore, organic carbon (C org) and total nitrogen (N tot) concentrations are relatively high in both the MIC and PIC compared to POW. For this limited data set, higher bioturbation rate coefficients and higher 234Th ex sediment inventories in the MIC relative to the other sampled regions, suggest that the MIC exhibits a greater predominance of marine versus terrestrial sediment sources that support enhanced scavenging and benthic biological activity. These results

  10. Effect of environmental conditions on variation in the sediment-water interface created by complex macrofaunal burrows on a tidal flat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Bon Joo; Kwon, Kae Kyoung; Hyun, Jung-Ho

    2007-11-01

    We quantified the increase in the sediment-water interface created by the burrowing activities of the resident macrofaunal community and its variation with respect to the physical conditions of the habitat on a tidal fat. We investigated environmental factors and dimensions of macrofaunal burrows with respect to tidal height and vegetation during spring and summer at three sites. A resin-casting method was used to quantify the dimensions of all burrows at each site. The dimensions of macrofaunal burrows varied both temporally and spatially and the increase in the sediment-water interface reached a maximum of 311%, ranging from 20 to 255% under different habitat conditions. The sediment-water interface depended on the duration of exposure resulting from tidal height, increased temperatures resulting from seasonality, and marsh plant density. Burrows were deeper and more expansive at both higher tidal levels and higher temperatures in summer. Burrow dimensions were sharply reduced with the disappearance of adult macrofauna in areas where the roots of the marsh plant Suaeda japonica were dense. The significance of this study lies in quantifying the burrow dimensions of the entire macrofaunal community, rather than just a single population, and confirming their spatial and temporal variation with respect to physical conditions of the habitat. Environmental factors responsible for variation in burrow dimensions are discussed.

  11. Critical width of tidal flats triggers marsh collapse in the absence of sea-level rise.

    PubMed

    Mariotti, Giulio; Fagherazzi, Sergio

    2013-04-02

    High rates of wave-induced erosion along salt marsh boundaries challenge the idea that marsh survival is dictated by the competition between vertical sediment accretion and relative sea-level rise. Because waves pounding marshes are often locally generated in enclosed basins, the depth and width of surrounding tidal flats have a pivoting control on marsh erosion. Here, we show the existence of a threshold width for tidal flats bordering salt marshes. Once this threshold is exceeded, irreversible marsh erosion takes place even in the absence of sea-level rise. This catastrophic collapse occurs because of the positive feedbacks among tidal flat widening by wave-induced marsh erosion, tidal flat deepening driven by wave bed shear stress, and local wind wave generation. The threshold width is determined by analyzing the 50-y evolution of 54 marsh basins along the US Atlantic Coast. The presence of a critical basin width is predicted by a dynamic model that accounts for both horizontal marsh migration and vertical adjustment of marshes and tidal flats. Variability in sediment supply, rather than in relative sea-level rise or wind regime, explains the different critical width, and hence erosion vulnerability, found at different sites. We conclude that sediment starvation of coastlines produced by river dredging and damming is a major anthropogenic driver of marsh loss at the study sites and generates effects at least comparable to the accelerating sea-level rise due to global warming.

  12. The dynamics of an experimental gravel bed meander with constant discharge and sediment supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braudrick, C. A.; Dietrich, W.; Sklar, L. S.

    2012-12-01

    As rivers meander, channel migration and cutoffs introduce continuous and episodic changes, respectively, in local boundary shear stress and bedload flux. These changes must affect the local and reach scale channel dynamics, but assessing their influence is limited by complications associated with varying discharge as well as challenging spatial and time scales. Here we explore the dynamics of a scaled-down gravel bed meandering river with constant discharge and sediment supply in a 6.1 m by 17 m long experimental flume at UC Berkeley's Richmond Field Station. The experiments are similar to Braudrick et al. (2009), but with constant rather than varying sediment supply. The flume was filled with a sorted sand with D50 of 0.85 mm, and had an initial 40 cm wide channel with a sinuosity of 1.1. Alfalfa sprouts provided bank and floodplain strength. The alfalfa was seeded by hand throughout the floodplain while a low flow provided irrigation during the 7-day alfalfa growth period. Sand (model gravel) and a lightweight plastic sediment (model sand) were fed independently from the upstream end of the flume at constant rates of 1.8 and 5 kg/hr, respectively. Despite the steady input conditions the experimental channel was quite dynamic as channel migration and bend morphology varied spatially and temporally. The sinuosity in the downstream 10 m of the flume (away from the inlet condition) increased from 1.1 to about 1.6 over the first 75 hours of the experiment, when 3 cutoffs in 29 hours decreased the sinuosity back to just over the initial value. Bank erosion was fastest when curvature was low at the beginning of the experiment and following cutoffs, and slowed once sinuosity increased. Once curvature increased the bends became asymmetric as bank erosion occurred almost exclusively at the bend apex. As the channel migrated, the local sinuosity increased, which decreasing the water surface slope and hence shear stress. The lower shear stress caused subsequent channel

  13. Evaporation dynamics and sedimentation pattern of a sessile particle laden water droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corkidi, G.; Montoya, F.; Hernández-Cruz, G.; Vargas, M.; Luviano-Ortíz, J. L.; Ramos, E.

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of the flow inside an evaporating sessile droplet of water with polystyrene micro-spheres of 1.0 μm in diameter in suspension is described. The initial volume of the droplets is in the range from 0.6 to 1.0 μl, and observations were made in the last stages before total evaporation. The flow was recorded in a sequence of images that were analyzed with a micro-PIV system to extract quantitative information. Also, using image analysis techniques we determined the dynamics of the retreating liquid film once unpinned from the original contact line. Additionally, we have explored its correlation to the formation of the sediment pattern which is organized in elongated mounds roughly deposited in azimuthal and radial orientations. It is found that the aggregation dynamics of micro-spheres in the segments of the two orientations is different. This might have a substantial influence on the final arrangement of micro-spheres in the sediments.

  14. Morphology and Sediment Transport Dynamics of the Selenga River Delta, Lake Baikal, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, T. Y.; Il'icheva, L.; Nittrouer, J. A.; Pavolv, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Selenga River fan delta is a lacustrine system located in southeastern Siberia, Russia, where Selenga River flows into Lake Baikal. The Selenga River is the largest source of sediment and water entering Lake Baikal. Covering ~550 km2, the Selenga delta is one of the largest freshwater deltas in the world. Evaluating the Selenga delta and its morphology is very important for local residents who rely upon the delta for both ecological and agricultural welfare. However, a sediment budget remains poorly constrained, as do estimates for the partitioning of water and sediment amongst the numerous bifurcating delta channels. This information is critical for addressing how the delta morphology evolves and influences the stratigraphic composition of the delta. To investigate the morphological characteristics of the delta, a field expedition was undertaken during July 2013 in collaboration with Russian scientists. The overall goal of the field work was to constrain delta dynamics through data collection. Field measurements included single-beam bathymetry data and sidescan sonar data to characterize: 1) channel geometries of the delta; 2) bedform sizes and distribution; and 3) grain-size composition of the channel bed. Flow velocity measurements were collected within the bifurcating channels to measure water discharge. Bedload samples were obtained within the active distributary channels to measure downstream sediment fining. Additionally, channel island cores were collected in order to analyze the internal architecture of the delta. The data reveal a systematic downstream sediment fining, from a predominantly gravel bed near the delta apex, to a fine-sand bed at the delta-lake interface (~40 km total distance). Bathymetry data document how width-to-depth ratios systematically decrease downstream in association with increasing channel bifurcations and decreasing channel-bed grain size. Furthermore, the investigations reveal that the delta is actively terraced, with the

  15. Technical and clinical results of an experimental flat dynamic (digital) x-ray image detector (FDXD) system with real-time corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruijns, Tom J. C.; Alving, P. L.; Baker, Edmund L.; Bury, Robert F.; Cowen, Arnold R.; Jung, Norbert; Luijendijk, Hans A.; Meulenbrugge, Henk J.; Stouten, Hans J.

    1998-07-01

    A clinical imaging system based upon an amorphous-Silicon (a- Si) flat dynamic (digital) X-ray image detector (FDXD) has been developed. The objectives of this experimental set-up were to determine the physical image quality and to establish the clinical feasibility of a flat-panel x-ray detector for radiography and fluoroscopy (R&F) applications. The FDXD acquires dynamic X-ray images at high frame rates in both continuous and pulsed fluoroscopic modes, lower frame rate exposures and single shots. The system has been installed in a clinical research room at The General Infirmary, Leeds (UK; is being evaluated in a variety of universal R&F contrast medium aided examinations, including barium swallows, meals and enema examinations. In addition, general radiographic examinations have been performed. Both the established benefits and possible drawbacks of this type of system, together with the potential solutions, are discussed in this paper. Approach, design and set-up of the system are presented, and the dose efficiency and image quality achieved in clinical operation are explained. The technical and medical phantom images have been evaluated and analyzed. The results of the clinical examinations in mixed applications are discussed. The results of the measurements and examinations performed to date on this experimental FDXD system confirm the potential of this new type of digital X-ray image detector.

  16. Fluid dynamics, sediment transport and turbulent mixing at large confluences of the Amazon River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevethan, Mark; Gualtieri, Carlo; Filizola, Naziano; Ianniruberto, Marco

    2014-05-01

    The Clim-Amazon Project aims to study temporal sedimentary records to understand the mechanisms involved in climate and geodynamic changes and the processes involved in dissolved and suspended load evolution of the Amazon River basin from the Miocene to present. The knowledge of the present Amazon River sediment discharge and of its variability is fundamental since it can be linked to the on-going climatic and erosion processes at the regional scale. Understanding the relationships between these processes will be helpful to better interpret the observations of the past sedimentation rates. Within this general objective the aim of this study is to investigate the complex fluid dynamics, sediment transport and water quality processes occurring at the large confluences in the Amazon River, through a combination of theoretical, experimental (field) and numerical research. In the last decades a wide body of theoretical, experimental, and field research has emerged on the fluvial dynamics of river confluences, which are integral and ubiquitous features of river networks. Through this research substantial advances have been made into understanding the hydrodynamics and morphodynamics of river confluences which will be outlined here. However, to date most experimental studies have focused either on laboratory confluences or on small to medium sized natural confluences, whereas an extremely limited number of investigations about the confluences on large rivers. Presently little is understood about how river confluence hydrodynamics may vary with the size of the river, especially in the largest rivers. The Amazon River is the largest river in the World, with approximately 15,000 sub-branches joining the Amazon River within the Amazon Basin including some of the largest confluences on Earth. A study region containing three of the larger confluences between Manacapuru and Itacoatiara will be used as part of this study, with the primary focus being the confluence of the Rio

  17. Dynamics of seawater carbonate chemistry, production, and calcification of a coral reef flat, Central Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, R.; Langdon, C.; Anthony, K. R. N.

    2013-05-01

    Ocean acidification is projected to shift coral reefs from a state of net accretion to one of net dissolution this century. Presently, our ability to predict global-scale changes to coral reef calcification is limited by insufficient data relating seawater carbonate chemistry parameters to in situ rates of reef calcification. Here, we investigate natural trends in carbonate chemistry of the Davies Reef flat in the central Great Barrier Reef on diel and seasonal timescales and relate these trends to benthic carbon fluxes by quantifying net ecosystem calcification (nec) and net community production (ncp). Results show that seawater carbonate chemistry of the Davies Reef flat is highly variable over both diel and seasonal timescales. pH (total scale) ranged from 7.92 to 8.17, pCO2 ranged from 272 to 542 μatm, and aragonite saturation state (Ωarag) ranged from 2.9 to 4.1. Diel cycles in carbonate chemistry were primarily driven by ncp, and warming explained 35% and 47% of the seasonal shifts in pCO2 and pH, respectively. Daytime ncp averaged 36 ± 19 mmol C m-2 h-1 in summer and 33 ± 13 mmol C m-2 h-1 in winter; nighttime ncp averaged -22 ± 20 and -7 ± 6 mmol C m-2 h-1 in summer and winter, respectively. Daytime nec averaged 11 ± 4 mmol CaCO3 m-2 h-1 in summer and 8 ± 3 mmol CaCO3 m-2 h-1 in winter, whereas nighttime nec averaged 2 ± 4 mmol and -1 ± 3 mmol CaCO3 m-2 h-1 in summer and winter, respectively. Net ecosystem calcification was positively correlated with Ωarag for both seasons. Linear correlations of nec and Ωarag indicate that the Davies Reef flat may transition from a state of net calcification to net dissolution at Ωarag values of 3.4 in summer and 3.2 in winter. Diel trends in Ωarag indicate that the reef flat is currently below this calcification threshold 29.6% of the time in summer and 14.1% of the time in winter.

  18. An Investigation of the F-14A Departure/Flat Spin Environment as Simulated by the Dynamic Flight Simulator.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-16

    Stability Augmentation System (Roll SAS) ON/OFF, aircraft loading, and asymmetric thrust on the severity of simulated F-14A aircraft departure/spin entry; and (2) Determine the effect of increased throttle friction, Roll SAS, harness lock, and -Gx on the pilot’s capability to recover the simulated F-14A aircraft from a departure/flat spin. The time/altitude loss data, and pilot questionnaire data, indicate that the optimal recovery aid is the locking of the harness, with Roll SAS activation and throttle friction remaining as secondary recovery aids. In

  19. Abundance and Dynamics of Antibiotic Resistance Genes and Integrons in Lake Sediment Microcosms

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Björn; Khan, Ghazanfar Ali; Lindberg, Richard; Fick, Jerker; Lindgren, Per-Eric

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in bacteria causing disease is an ever growing threat to the world. Recently, environmental bacteria have become established as important both as sources of antibiotic resistance genes and in disseminating resistance genes. Low levels of antibiotics and other pharmaceuticals are regularly released into water environments via wastewater, and the concern is that such environmental contamination may serve to create hotspots for antibiotic resistance gene selection and dissemination. In this study, microcosms were created from water and sediments gathered from a lake in Sweden only lightly affected by human activities. The microcosms were exposed to a mixture of antibiotics of varying environmentally relevant concentrations (i.e., concentrations commonly encountered in wastewaters) in order to investigate the effect of low levels of antibiotics on antibiotic resistance gene abundances and dynamics in a previously uncontaminated environment. Antibiotic concentrations were measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Abundances of seven antibiotic resistance genes and the class 1 integron integrase gene, intI1, were quantified using real-time PCR. Resistance genes sulI and ermB were quantified in the microcosm sediments with mean abundances 5 and 15 gene copies/106 16S rRNA gene copies, respectively. Class 1 integrons were determined in the sediments with a mean concentration of 3.8×104 copies/106 16S rRNA gene copies. The antibiotic treatment had no observable effect on antibiotic resistance gene or integron abundances. PMID:25247418

  20. Surface-sediment dynamics in a dust source from thermal infrared remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katra, I.; Lancaster, N.

    2007-12-01

    Characteristics of surface sediments are significant factors in modeling dust entrainment and wind erosion, and it is of interest to monitor them using remote sensing in source areas at high spatial and temporal resolution. A time-series of Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data were acquired for Soda Playa (CA), a modern depositional environment associated with dust emission. Analysis of the multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) images indicates that the type and distribution of the surface sediments can be mapped by linear spectral unmixing techniques. Image-based spectral endmembers extracted from the ASTER five-band surface emissivity data were used to drive fraction images. The spectral-mixture analysis reveals that the mosaic-like pattern of the main sediment types - silica-rich, clay-rich, and salt-rich, changes in time as a consequence of interactions between hydrologic and geomorphic processes in the playa environment. The results highlight the dynamic response of the playa-surface to wind erosion, and suggest that this technique is useful for continuously detecting dust emission potential in sources characterized by a small extension and a complex surface.

  1. Temporal and Spatial Dynamics of Sediment Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (Anammox) Bacteria in Freshwater Lakes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuyin; Dai, Yu; Li, Ningning; Li, Bingxin; Xie, Shuguang; Liu, Yong

    2017-02-01

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) process can play an important role in freshwater nitrogen cycle. However, the distribution of anammox bacteria in freshwater lake and the associated environmental factors remain essentially unclear. The present study investigated the temporal and spatial dynamics of sediment anammox bacterial populations in eutrotrophic Dianchi Lake and mesotrophic Erhai Lake on the Yunnan Plateau (southwestern China). The remarkable spatial change of anammox bacterial abundance was found in Dianchi Lake, while the relatively slight spatial shift occurred in Erhai Lake. Dianchi Lake had greater anammox bacterial abundance than Erhai Lake. In both Dianchi Lake and Erhai Lake, anammox bacteria were much more abundant in summer than in spring. Anammox bacterial community richness, diversity, and structure in these two freshwater lakes were subjected to temporal and spatial variations. Sediment anammox bacterial communities in Dianchi Lake and Erhai Lake were dominated by Candidatus Brocadia and a novel phylotype followed by Candidatus Kuenenia; however, these two lakes had distinct anammox bacterial community structure. In addition, trophic status determined sediment anammox bacterial community structure.

  2. Applicability of the hodograph method for the problem of long-scale nonlinear dynamics of a thin vortex filament near a flat boundary.

    PubMed

    Ruban, V P

    2003-06-01

    Hamiltonian dynamics of a thin vortex filament in an ideal incompressible fluid near a flat fixed boundary is considered under the conditions that at any point of the curve, determining the shape of the filament, the angle between tangent vector and the boundary plane is small. Also the distance from a point on the curve to the plane is small in comparison with the curvature radius. The dynamics is shown to be effectively described by a nonlinear system of two (1+1)-dimensional partial differential equations. The hodograph transformation reduces this system to a single linear differential equation of the second order with separable variables. Simple solutions of the linear equation are investigated for real values of spectral parameter lambda, when the filament projection on the boundary plane has shape of a two-branch spiral or a smoothed angle, depending on the sign of lambda.

  3. Hydrography and bottom boundary layer dynamics: Influence on inner shelf sediment mobility, Long Bay, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, L.A.; Leonard, L.A.; Snedden, G.A.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the hydrography and bottom boundary-layer dynamics of two typical storm events affecting coastal North Carolina (NC); a hurricane and the passages of two small consecutive extratropical storms during November 2005. Two upward-looking 1200-kHz Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) were deployed on the inner shelf in northern Long Bay, NC at water depths of less than 15 m. Both instruments profiled the overlying water column in 0.35 in bins beginning at a height of 1.35 in above the bottom (mab). Simultaneous measurements of wind speed and direction, wave and current parameters, and acoustic backscatter were coupled with output from a bottom boundary layer (bbl) model to describe the hydrography and boundary layer conditions during each event. The bbl model also was used to quantify sediment transport in the boundary layer during each storm. Both study sites exhibited similar temporal variations in wave and current magnitude, however, wave heights during the November event were higher than waves associated with the hurricane. Near-bottom mean and subtidal currents, however, were of greater magnitude during the hurricane. Peak depth-integrated suspended sediment transport during the November event exceeded transport associated with the hurricane by 25-70%. Substantial spatial variations in sediment transport existed throughout both events. During both events, along-shelf sediment transport exceeded across-shelf transport and was related to the magnitude and direction of subtidal currents. Given the variations in sediment type across the bay, complex shoreline configuration, and local bathymetry, the sediment transport rates reported here are very site specific. However, the general hydrography associated with the two storms is representative of conditions across northern Long Bay. Since the beaches in the study area undergo frequent renourishment to counter the effects of beach erosion, the results of this study also are relevant to coastal

  4. Repeated surveys by acoustic Doppler current profiler for flow and sediment dynamics in a tidal river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinehart, R.L.; Burau, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    A strategy of repeated surveys by acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) was applied in a tidal river to map velocity vectors and suspended-sediment indicators. The Sacramento River at the junction with the Delta Cross Channel at Walnut Grove, California, was surveyed over several tidal cycles in the Fall of 2000 and 2001 with a vessel-mounted ADCP. Velocity profiles were recorded along flow-defining survey paths, with surveys repeated every 27 min through a diurnal tidal cycle. Velocity vectors along each survey path were interpolated to a three-dimensional Cartesian grid that conformed to local bathymetry. A separate array of vectors was interpolated onto a grid from each survey. By displaying interpolated vector grids sequentially with computer animation, flow dynamics of the reach could be studied in three-dimensions as flow responded to the tidal cycle. Velocity streamtraces in the grid showed the upwelling of flow from the bottom of the Sacramento River channel into the Delta Cross Channel. The sequential display of vector grids showed that water in the canal briefly returned into the Sacramento River after peak flood tides, which had not been known previously. In addition to velocity vectors, ADCP data were processed to derive channel bathymetry and a spatial indicator for suspended-sediment concentration. Individual beam distances to bed, recorded by the ADCP, were transformed to yield bathymetry accurate enough to resolve small bedforms within the study reach. While recording velocity, ADCPs also record the intensity of acoustic backscatter from particles suspended in the flow. Sequential surveys of backscatter intensity were interpolated to grids and animated to indicate the spatial movement of suspended sediment through the study reach. Calculation of backscatter flux through cross-sectional grids provided a first step for computation of suspended-sediment discharge, the second step being a calibrated relation between backscatter intensity and sediment

  5. Tracing and modelling water and sediment dynamics in a conventional irrigated bed system under different scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, Gema; Laguna, Ana; Cañasveras, Juan Carlos; Boulal, Hakim; Gómez-Macpherson, Helena; Barrón, Vidal; Giráldez, Juan Vicente; Gómez, José Alfonso

    2013-04-01

    soil conservation techniques in these agricultural systems. Guzmán Díaz, María Gema. Development of sediment tracers to study soil redistribution and sediment dynamic due to water erosion. 2012. Universidad de Córdoba, Servicio de Publicaciones, pp: 181

  6. Repeated surveys by acoustic Doppler current profiler for flow and sediment dynamics in a tidal river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinehart, R. L.; Burau, J. R.

    2005-11-01

    A strategy of repeated surveys by acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) was applied in a tidal river to map velocity vectors and suspended-sediment indicators. The Sacramento River at the junction with the Delta Cross Channel at Walnut Grove, California, was surveyed over several tidal cycles in the Fall of 2000 and 2001 with a vessel-mounted ADCP. Velocity profiles were recorded along flow-defining survey paths, with surveys repeated every 27 min through a diurnal tidal cycle. Velocity vectors along each survey path were interpolated to a three-dimensional Cartesian grid that conformed to local bathymetry. A separate array of vectors was interpolated onto a grid from each survey. By displaying interpolated vector grids sequentially with computer animation, flow dynamics of the reach could be studied in three-dimensions as flow responded to the tidal cycle. Velocity streamtraces in the grid showed the upwelling of flow from the bottom of the Sacramento River channel into the Delta Cross Channel. The sequential display of vector grids showed that water in the canal briefly returned into the Sacramento River after peak flood tides, which had not been known previously. In addition to velocity vectors, ADCP data were processed to derive channel bathymetry and a spatial indicator for suspended-sediment concentration. Individual beam distances to bed, recorded by the ADCP, were transformed to yield bathymetry accurate enough to resolve small bedforms within the study reach. While recording velocity, ADCPs also record the intensity of acoustic backscatter from particles suspended in the flow. Sequential surveys of backscatter intensity were interpolated to grids and animated to indicate the spatial movement of suspended sediment through the study reach. Calculation of backscatter flux through cross-sectional grids provided a first step for computation of suspended-sediment discharge, the second step being a calibrated relation between backscatter intensity and sediment

  7. A new sensor system for accurate and precise determination of sediment dynamics and position.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniatis, Georgios; Hoey, Trevor; Sventek, Joseph; Hodge, Rebecca

    2014-05-01

    Sediment transport processes control many significant geomorphological changes. Consequently, sediment transport dynamics are studied across a wide range of scales leading to application of a variety of conceptually different mathematical descriptions (models) and data acquisition techniques (sensing). For river sediment transport processes both Eulerian and Lagrangian formulations are used. Data are gathered using a very wide range of sensing techniques that are not always compatible with the conceptual formulation applied. We are concerned with small to medium sediment grain-scale motion in gravel-bed rivers, and other coarse-grained environments, and: a) are developing a customised environmental sensor capable of providing coherent data that reliably record the motion; and, b) provide a mathematical framework in which these data can be analysed and interpreted, this being compatible with current stochastic approaches to sediment transport theory. Here we present results from three different aspects of the above developmental process. Firstly, we present a requirement analysis for the sensor based on the state of the art of the existing technologies. We focus on the factors that enhance data coherence and representativeness, extending the common practice for optimization which is based exclusively on electronics/computing related criteria. This analysis leads to formalization of a method that permits accurate control on the physical properties of the sensor using contemporary rapid prototyping techniques [Maniatis et al. 2013]. Secondly the first results are presented from a series of entrainment experiments in a 5 x 0.8 m flume in which a prototype sensor was deployed to monitor entrainment dynamics under increasing flow conditions (0.037 m3.s-1). The sensor was enclosed in an idealized spherical case (111 mm diameter) and placed on a constructed bed of hemispheres of the same diameter. We measured 3-axial inertial acceleration (as a measure of flow stress

  8. Effect of high sedimentation rates on surface sediment dynamics and mangrove growth in the Porong River, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Sidik, Frida; Neil, David; Lovelock, Catherine E

    2016-06-15

    Large quantities of mud from the LUSI (Lumpur Sidoarjo) volcano in northeastern Java have been channeled to the sea causing high rates of sediment delivery to the mouth of the Porong River, which has a cover of natural and planted mangroves. This study investigated how the high rates of sediment delivery affected vertical accretion, surface elevation change and the growth of Avicennia sp., the dominant mangrove species in the region. During our observations in 2010-2011 (4-5years after the initial volcanic eruption), very high rates of sedimentation in the forests at the mouth of the river gave rise to high vertical accretion of over 10cmy(-1). The high sedimentation rates not only resulted in reduced growth of Avicennia sp. mangrove trees at the two study sites at the Porong River mouth, but also gave rise to high soil surface elevation gains.

  9. The effects of stellar dynamics on the X-ray emission of flat early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negri, Andrea; Ciotti, Luca; Pellegrini, Silvia

    2014-03-01

    Past observational and numerical studies indicated that the hot gaseous haloes of early-type galaxies may be sensitive to the stellar kinematics. With high-resolution ZEUS 2D hydrosimulations, we study the hot gas evolution in flat early-type galaxies of fixed (stellar plus dark) mass distribution, but with variable amounts of azimuthal velocity dispersion and rotational support, including the possibility of a (counter) rotating inner disc. The hot gas is fed by stellar mass-losses, and heated by supernova explosions and thermalization of stellar motions. The simulations provide γth, the ratio between the heating due to the relative velocity between the stellar streaming and the interstellar medium bulk flow, and the heating attainable by complete thermalization of the stellar streaming. We find that (1) X-ray emission-weighted temperatures and luminosities match observed values and are larger in fully velocity dispersion supported systems; X-ray isophotes are boxy where rotation is significant; (2) γth ≃ 0.1-0.2 for isotropic rotators and (3) γth ≃ 1 for systems with an inner (counter) rotating disc. The lower X-ray luminosities of isotropic rotators are not explained just by their low γth but by a complicated flow structure and evolution, consequence of the angular momentum stored at large radii. Rotation is therefore important to explain the lower average X-ray emission and temperature observed in flat and more rotationally supported galaxies.

  10. Population Dynamics of Polychlorinated Biphenyl-Dechlorinating Microorganisms in Contaminated Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J.; Rhee, G.

    1997-01-01

    The growth dynamics of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-dechlorinating microorganisms were determined for the first time, along with those of sulfate reducers and methanogens, by using the most-probable-number technique. The time course of Aroclor 1248 dechlorination mirrored the growth of dechlorinators; dechlorination ensued when the dechlorinating population increased by 2 orders of magnitude from 2.5 x 10(sup5) to 4.6 x 10(sup7) cells g of sediment(sup-1), at a specific growth rate of 6.7 day(sup-1) between 2 and 6 weeks. During this period, PCB-dechlorinating microorganisms dechlorinated Aroclor 1248 at a rate of 3.9 x 10(sup-8) mol of Cl g of sediment(sup-1) day(sup-1), reducing the average number of Cl molecules per biphenyl from 3.9 to 2.8. The growth yield was 4.2 x 10(sup13) cells mol of Cl dechlorinated(sup-1). Once dechlorination reached a plateau, after 6 weeks, the number of dechlorinators began to decrease. On the other hand, dechlorinators inoculated into PCB-free sediments decreased over time from their initial level, suggesting that PCBs are required for their selective enrichment. The numbers of sulfate reducers and methanogens increased in both PCB-free and contaminated sediments, showing little difference between them. The maximum population size of sulfate reducers was about an order of magnitude higher than that of dechlorinators, whereas that of methanogens was slightly less. Unlike those of dechlorinators, however, numbers of both sulfate reducers and methanogens remained high even when dechlorination ceased. The results of this study imply that PCB concentrations may have to exceed a certain threshold to maintain the growth of PCB dechlorinators. PMID:16535594

  11. Dynamics of Inorganic Nutrients in Intertidal Sediments: Porewater, Exchangeable, and Intracellular Pools.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Robledo, Emilio; Bohorquez, Julio; Corzo, Alfonso; Jimenez-Arias, Juan L; Papaspyrou, Sokratis

    2016-01-01

    The study of inorganic nutrients dynamics in shallow sediments usually focuses on two main pools: porewater (PW) nutrients and exchangeable (EX) ammonium and phosphate. Recently, it has been found that microphytobenthos (MPB) and other microorganisms can accumulate large amounts of nutrients intracellularly (IC), highlighting the biogeochemical importance of this nutrient pool. Storing nutrients could support the growth of autotrophs when nutrients are not available, and could also provide alternative electron acceptors for dissimilatory processes such as nitrate reduction. Here, we studied the magnitude and relative importance of these three nutrient pools (PW, IC, and EX) and their relation to chlorophylls (used as a proxy for MPB abundance) and organic matter (OM) contents in an intertidal mudflat of Cadiz Bay (Spain). MPB was localized in the first 4 mm of the sediment and showed a clear seasonal pattern; highest chlorophylls content was found during autumn and lowest during spring-summer. The temporal and spatial distribution of nutrients pools and MPB were largely correlated. Ammonium was higher in the IC and EX fractions, representing on average 59 and 37% of the total ammonium pool, respectively. Similarly, phosphate in the IC and EX fractions accounted on average for 40 and 31% of the total phosphate pool, respectively. Nitrate in the PW was low, suggesting low nitrification activity and rapid consumption. Nitrate accumulated in the IC pool during periods of moderate MPB abundance, being up to 66% of the total nitrate pool, whereas it decreased when chlorophyll concentration peaked likely due to a high nitrogen demand. EX-Nitrate accounted for the largest fraction of total sediment nitrate, 66% on average. The distribution of EX-Nitrate was significantly correlated with chlorophyll and OM, which probably indicates a relation of this pool to an increased availability of sites for ionic adsorption. This EX-Nitrate pool could represent an alternative nitrate

  12. Dynamics of Inorganic Nutrients in Intertidal Sediments: Porewater, Exchangeable, and Intracellular Pools

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Robledo, Emilio; Bohorquez, Julio; Corzo, Alfonso; Jimenez-Arias, Juan L.; Papaspyrou, Sokratis

    2016-01-01

    The study of inorganic nutrients dynamics in shallow sediments usually focuses on two main pools: porewater (PW) nutrients and exchangeable (EX) ammonium and phosphate. Recently, it has been found that microphytobenthos (MPB) and other microorganisms can accumulate large amounts of nutrients intracellularly (IC), highlighting the biogeochemical importance of this nutrient pool. Storing nutrients could support the growth of autotrophs when nutrients are not available, and could also provide alternative electron acceptors for dissimilatory processes such as nitrate reduction. Here, we studied the magnitude and relative importance of these three nutrient pools (PW, IC, and EX) and their relation to chlorophylls (used as a proxy for MPB abundance) and organic matter (OM) contents in an intertidal mudflat of Cadiz Bay (Spain). MPB was localized in the first 4 mm of the sediment and showed a clear seasonal pattern; highest chlorophylls content was found during autumn and lowest during spring-summer. The temporal and spatial distribution of nutrients pools and MPB were largely correlated. Ammonium was higher in the IC and EX fractions, representing on average 59 and 37% of the total ammonium pool, respectively. Similarly, phosphate in the IC and EX fractions accounted on average for 40 and 31% of the total phosphate pool, respectively. Nitrate in the PW was low, suggesting low nitrification activity and rapid consumption. Nitrate accumulated in the IC pool during periods of moderate MPB abundance, being up to 66% of the total nitrate pool, whereas it decreased when chlorophyll concentration peaked likely due to a high nitrogen demand. EX-Nitrate accounted for the largest fraction of total sediment nitrate, 66% on average. The distribution of EX-Nitrate was significantly correlated with chlorophyll and OM, which probably indicates a relation of this pool to an increased availability of sites for ionic adsorption. This EX-Nitrate pool could represent an alternative nitrate

  13. The Temporal and Spatial Quantification of Holocene Sediment Dynamics in a meso-scale catchment in northern Bavaria / Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, M.; Will, M.; Kreutzer, S.; Fischer, M.; Reverman, R.

    2012-04-01

    The Aufsess River catchment (97 km2) in northern Bavaria, Germany, is studied to establish a Holocene sediment budget and to investigate the sediment dynamics since the early times of farming in the 3rd millennium BCE. The temporal characterization of the sediment dynamics is based on an intensive dating program with 73 OSL and 14 14C ages. To estimate soil erosion and deposition, colluvial and alluvial archives are investigated in the field by piling and trenching, supported by laboratory analyses. The sediment budget shows that 58% of these sediments are stored as colluvium in on- and foot-slope positions, 9% are stored as alluvium in the floodplains and 33% are exported from the Aufsess River catchment. Colluviation starts in the End-Neolithic (ca. 3100 BCE), while first indicators of soil erosion derived alluviation is recorded ca. 2-3 ka later. The pattern of sedimentation rates also displays differences between the colluvial and alluvial system, with a distinct increase in the Middle Ages (ca. 1000 CE) for the alluvial system, while the colluvial system records low sedimentation rates for this period. A contrast is also observed since Modern Times (ca. 1500 CE), with increasing sedimentation rates for the colluvial system, whereas the alluvial system records decreasing rates. The different behavior of the colluvial and alluvial system clearly shows the non-linear behavior of the catchment's fluvial system. The results further suggest that human impact is most probably the dominant factor influencing the sediment dynamics of the catchment since the introduction of farming.

  14. An assessment of the fine sediment dynamics in an upland river system: INCA-Sed modifications and implications for fisheries.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Attila N; Butterfield, Dan; Futter, Martyn N; Rankinen, Katri; Thouvenot-Korppoo, Marie; Jarritt, Nick; Lawrence, Deborah S L; Wade, Andrew J; Whitehead, Paul G

    2010-05-15

    There is a need for better links between hydrology and ecology, specifically between landscapes and riverscapes to understand how processes and factors controlling the transport and storage of environmental pollution have affected or will affect the freshwater biota. Here we show how the INCA modelling framework, specifically INCA-Sed (the Integrated Catchments model for Sediments) can be used to link sediment delivery from the landscape to sediment changes in-stream. INCA-Sed is a dynamic, process-based, daily time step model. The first complete description of the equations used in the INCA-Sed software (version 1.9.11) is presented. This is followed by an application of INCA-Sed made to the River Lugg (1077 km(2)) in Wales. Excess suspended sediment can negatively affect salmonid health. The Lugg has a large and potentially threatened population of both Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and Brown Trout (Salmo trutta). With the exception of the extreme sediment transport processes, the model satisfactorily simulated both the hydrology and the sediment dynamics in the catchment. Model results indicate that diffuse soil loss is the most important sediment generation process in the catchment. In the River Lugg, the mean annual Guideline Standard for suspended sediment concentration, proposed by UKTAG, of 25 mg l(-1) is only slightly exceeded during the simulation period (1995-2000), indicating only minimal effect on the Atlantic salmon population. However, the daily time step simulation of INCA-Sed also allows the investigation of the critical spawning period. It shows that the sediment may have a significant negative effect on the fish population in years with high sediment runoff. It is proposed that the fine settled particles probably do not affect the salmonid egg incubation process, though suspended particles may damage the gills of fish and make the area unfavourable for spawning if the conditions do not improve.

  15. Short- and long-term studies of sediment dynamics in a small humid mountain Mediterranean basin with badlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallart, F.; Pérez-Gallego, N.; Latron, J.; Catari, G.; Martínez-Carreras, N.; Nord, G.

    2013-08-01

    Badland landscapes are the main sediment sources in the Vallcebre area (Eastern Pyrenees, Catalonia, Spain). Short-term studies (up to 3-years long) carried out between 1980 and 1994 were used to estimate the rates of both denudation on bare surfaces and sediment production at the plot scale, to analyse the seasonal dynamics of bedrock weathering and regolith behaviour, and to study the relationships between geomorphic activity and herbaceous plant colonisation. Since 1990, stream flow and suspended sediment loads have been monitored using three gauging stations equipped with infrared backscattering turbidimeters, ultra-sonic beam attenuation solids sensors and automatic water samplers. The combination of the two different approaches has been useful for a better perception of the dynamics of the badland systems and to assess the long-term contribution of these areas to the basin sediment loads. Badland erosion at the event scale for a period of 15 years was simulated with the KINEROS2 model and allowed the long-term comparison between badland erosion and sediment yield at the small basin scale. Badlands are the main source of sediment in the basin for most of the events, but infrequent runoff events cause the removal of sediment stores and the activation of other sediment sources. The analysis of the uncertainty of sediment yield measurements for a range of record durations demonstrated that long records are needed for obtaining acceptable results due to the high interannual variability. Relatively low-cost short-term geomorphic observations may provide information useful for assessing the long-term sediment production in these basins with badland areas only if the observations are used to implement a model able to simulate long-term observations.

  16. Sedimentation Dynamics in Bahia de Banderas Nayarit, from Ameca River to Bucerias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedroza Ruciles, S.; Cupul Magaña, A.; Escudero Ayala, C.

    2013-05-01

    At last years different actions had made it on the coast in Banderas Bay modifying its dynamics, sand process extractions in Ameca River, deforestation in the zone of estuary and extensions in urban zone affects the beach and coastal dunes. Keeping a lot of sand in circulation which has made changes in erosion process and triggering retrocession in coastline as hazard because an increment of sea level affects edifications near to the beach and estuaries. We present analysis of sedimentation dynamics in an extension approximately, 10 km from the north of the end in Ameca River until Bucerias, Nayarit. For that reason we have made topographic and bathymetric studies with total station and GPS in four zones using technics at the edge of the beach every 109.3613 yards and transversals transect and longitudinal, every 3 months starting in august 2012 and ending in march 2013;

  17. Global suspended sediment and water discharge dynamics between 1960 and 2010: Continental trends and intra-basin sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, S.; Kettner, A. J.; Syvitski, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Establishing a quantitative description of global riverine fluxes is one of themain goals of contemporary hydrol-ogy and geomorphology. Herewe study changes in global riverinewater discharge and suspended sediment fluxover a 50-year period, 1960-2010, applying a new version of theWBMsed (WBMsed v.2.0) global hydrologicalwater balancemodel. A newfloodplain component is introduced to better representwater and sediment dynam-ics during periods of overbank discharge. Validated against data from 16 globally distributed stations, WBMsedv.2.0 simulation results show considerable improvement over the original model. Normalized departure froman annual mean is used to quantify spatial and temporal dynamics in both water discharge and sediment flux.Considerable intra-basin variability in both water and sediment discharge is observed for the first time in differ-ent regions of the world. Continental-scale analysis shows considerable variability in water and sediment dis-charge fluctuations both in time and between continents. A correlation analysis between predicted continentalsuspended sediment and water discharge shows strong correspondence in Australia and Africa (R2 of 0.93 and 0.87 respectively), moderate correlation in North and South America (R2 of 0.64 and 0.73 respectively) and weak correlation in Asia and Europe (R2 of 0.35 and 0.24 respectively). We propose that yearly changes inintra-basin precipitation dynamics explain most of these differences in continental water discharge andsuspended sediment correlation. The mechanism proposed and demonstrated here (for the Ganges, Danubeand Amazon Rivers) is that regions with high relief and soft lithology will amplify the effect of higher than aver-age precipitation by producing an increase in sediment yield that greatly exceeds increase in water discharge.

  18. SDO FlatSat Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amason, David L.

    2008-01-01

    The goal of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) is to understand and, ideally, predict the solar variations that influence life and society. It's instruments will measure the properties of the Sun and will take hifh definition images of the Sun every few seconds, all day every day. The FlatSat is a high fidelity electrical and functional representation of the SDO spacecraft bus. It is a high fidelity test bed for Integration & Test (I & T), flight software, and flight operations. For I & T purposes FlatSat will be a driver to development and dry run electrical integration procedures, STOL test procedures, page displays, and the command and telemetry database. FlatSat will also serve as a platform for flight software acceptance and systems testing for the flight software system component including the spacecraft main processors, power supply electronics, attitude control electronic, gimbal control electrons and the S-band communications card. FlatSat will also benefit the flight operations team through post-launch flight software code and table update development and verification and verification of new and updated flight operations products. This document highlights the benefits of FlatSat; describes the building of FlatSat; provides FlatSat facility requirements, access roles and responsibilities; and, and discusses FlatSat mechanical and electrical integration and functional testing.

  19. Effect of permafrost thaw on the dynamics of lakes recharged by ice-jam floods: case study in Yukon Flats, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steve M. Jepsen,; Walvoord, Michelle Ann; Voss, Clifford I.; Rover, Jennifer R.

    2016-01-01

    Large river floods are a key water source for many lakes in fluvial periglacial settings. Where permeable sediments occur, the distribution of permafrost may play an important role in the routing of floodwaters across a floodplain. This relationship is explored for lakes in the discontinuous permafrost of Yukon Flats, interior Alaska, using an analysis that integrates satellite-derived gradients in water surface elevation, knowledge of hydrogeology, and hydrologic modeling. We observed gradients in water surface elevation between neighboring lakes ranging from 0.001 to 0.004. These high gradients, despite a ubiquitous layer of continuous shallow gravel across the flats, are consistent with limited groundwater flow across lake basins resulting from the presence of permafrost. Permafrost impedes the propagation of floodwaters in the shallow subsurface and constrains transmission to “fill-and-spill” over topographic depressions (surface sills), as we observed for the Twelvemile-Buddy Lake pair following a May 2013 ice-jam flood on the Yukon River. Model results indicate that permafrost table deepening of 1–11 m in gravel, depending on watershed geometry and subsurface properties, could shift important routing of floodwater to lakes from overland flow (fill-and-spill) to shallow groundwater flow (“fill-and-seep”). Such a shift is possible in the next several hundred years of ground surface warming, and may bring about more synchronous water level changes between neighboring lakes following large flood events. This relationship offers a potentially useful tool, well-suited to remote sensing, for identifying long-term changes in shallow groundwater flow resulting from thawing of permafrost.

  20. Population dynamics of dechlorinators and factors affecting the level and products of PCB dechlorination in sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.S.; Sokol, R.C.; Liu, X.; Bethoney, C.M.; Rhee, G.Y.

    1996-12-31

    Microbial dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) often stops although a significant number of removable chlorines remain. To determine the reason for the cessation, we investigated the limitation of organic carbon, PCB bioavailability, and inhibition by metabolic products. Enrichment with carbon sources did not induce additional chlorination, indicating the plateau was not due to depletion of organic carbon. The bioavailability was not limiting, since a subcritical micelle concentration of the surfactant, which enhanced desorption without inhibiting dechlorinating microorganisms, failed to lower the plateau. Neither was it due to accumulation of metabolites, since no additional dechlorination was detected when plateau sediments were incubated with fresh medium. Similarly, dechlorination was not inhibited in freshly spiked sediment slurries. Dechlorination ended up at the same level with nearly identical congener profiles, regardless of treatment. These results indicate that cessation of dechlorination was due to the accumulation of daughter congeners, which cannot be used as electron acceptors by microbes. To determine whether the decreasing availability affected the microorganisms, we determined the population dynamics of dechlorinators using the most probable number technique. The growth dynamics of the dechlorinators mirrored the time course of dechlorination. It started when the population increased by two orders of magnitude. Once dechlorination stopped the dechlorinating population also began to decrease. When dechlorinators were inoculated into PCB-free sediments, the population decreased over time. The decrease of the population as dechlorination ceased confirms that the diminishing availability of congeners was the reason for the incomplete dechlorination. Recent findings have shown that a second phase of dechlorination of certain congeners can occur after a long lag. 45 refs., 8 figs.

  1. Influence of fluvial environments on sediment archiving processes and temporal pollutant dynamics (Upper Loire River, France).

    PubMed

    Dhivert, E; Grosbois, C; Rodrigues, S; Desmet, M

    2015-02-01

    Floodplains are often cored to build long-term pollutant trends at the basin scale. To highlight the influences of depositional environments on archiving processes, aggradation rates, archived trace element signals and vertical redistribution processes, two floodplain cores were sampled near in two different environments of the Upper Loire River (France): (i) a river bank ridge and (ii) a paleochannel connected by its downstream end. The base of the river bank core is composed of sandy sediments from the end of the Little Ice Age (late 18th century). This composition corresponds to a proximal floodplain aggradation (<50 m from the river channel) and delimits successive depositional steps related to progressive disconnection degree dynamism. This temporal evolution of depositional environments is associated with mineralogical sorting and variable natural trace element signals, even in the <63-μm fraction. The paleochannel core and upper part of the river bank core are composed of fine-grained sediments that settled in the distal floodplain. In this distal floodplain environment, the aggradation rate depends on the topography and connection degree to the river channel. The temporal dynamics of anthropogenic trace element enrichments recorded in the distal floodplain are initially synchronous and present similar levels. Although the river bank core shows general temporal trends, the paleochannel core has a better resolution for short-time variations of trace element signals. After local water depth regulation began in the early 1930s, differences of connection degree were enhanced between the two cores. Therefore, large trace element signal divergences are recorded across the floodplain. The paleochannel core shows important temporal variations of enrichment levels from the 1930s to the coring date. However, the river bank core has no significant temporal variations of trace element enrichments and lower contamination levels because of a lower deposition of

  2. Linking Scales of Sediment Dynamics from Sand Grains to the Synoptic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calantoni, J.; Palmsten, M.; Penko, A.; Frank, D. P.; Simeonov, J.

    2016-12-01

    In the Sediment Dynamics Section at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory we perform basic and applied research focuse