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Sample records for flavin reductase component

  1. Functional Analysis of the Small Component of the 4-Hydroxyphenylacetate 3-Monooxygenase of Escherichia coli W: a Prototype of a New Flavin:NAD(P)H Reductase Subfamily

    PubMed Central

    Galán, Beatriz; Díaz, Eduardo; Prieto, María A.; García, José L.

    2000-01-01

    Escherichia coli W uses the aromatic compound 4-hydroxyphenylacetate (4-HPA) as a sole source of carbon and energy for growth. The monooxygenase which converts 4-HPA into 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetate, the first intermediate of the pathway, consists of two components, HpaB (58.7 kDa) and HpaC (18.6 kDa), encoded by the hpaB and hpaC genes, respectively, that form a single transcription unit. Overproduction of the small HpaC component in E. coli K-12 cells has facilitated the purification of the protein, which was revealed to be a homodimer that catalyzes the reduction of free flavins by NADH in preference to NADPH. Subsequently, the reduced flavins diffuse to the large HpaB component or to other electron acceptors such as cytochrome c and ferric ion. Amino acid sequence comparisons revealed that the HpaC reductase could be considered the prototype of a new subfamily of flavin:NAD(P)H reductases. The construction of a fusion protein between the large HpaB oxygenase component and the choline-binding domain of the major autolysin of Streptococcus pneumoniae allowed us to develop a rapid method to efficiently purify this highly unstable enzyme as a chimeric CH-HpaB protein, which exhibited a 4-HPA hydroxylating activity only when it was supplemented with the HpaC reductase. These results suggest the 4-HPA 3-monooxygenase of E. coli W as a representative member of a novel two-component flavin-diffusible monooxygenase (TC-FDM) family. Relevant features on the evolution and structure-function relationships of these TC-FDM proteins are discussed. PMID:10633095

  2. Evidence that biliverdin-IX beta reductase and flavin reductase are identical.

    PubMed Central

    Shalloe, F; Elliott, G; Ennis, O; Mantle, T J

    1996-01-01

    A search of the database shows that human biliverdin-IX beta reductase and flavin reductase are identical. We have isolated flavin reductase from bovine erythrocytes and show that the activity co-elutes with biliverdin-IX beta reductase. Preparations of the enzyme that are electrophoretically homogeneous exhibit both flavin reductase and biliverdin-IX beta reductase activities; however, they are not capable of catalysing the reduction of biliverdin-IX alpha. Although there is little obvious sequence identity between biliverdin-IX alpha reductase (BVR-A) and biliverdin-IX beta reductase (BVR-B), they do show weak immunological cross-reactivity. Both enzymes bind to 2',5'-ADP-Sepharose. PMID:8687377

  3. The flavin inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium renders Trichomonas vaginalis resistant to metronidazole, inhibits thioredoxin reductase and flavin reductase, and shuts off hydrogenosomal enzymatic pathways.

    PubMed

    Leitsch, David; Kolarich, Daniel; Duchêne, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Infections with the microaerophilic protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis are commonly treated with metronidazole, a 5-nitroimidazole drug. Metronidazole is selectively toxic to microaerophiles and anaerobes because reduction at the drug's nitro group, which is a precondition for toxicity, occurs only quantitatively in these organisms. In our previous work we identified the flavin enzyme thioredoxin reductase as an electron donor to 5-nitroimidazole drugs in T. vaginalis and observed that highly metronidazole-resistant cell lines lack thioredoxin reductase and flavin reductase activities. In this study we added the flavin inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) to T. vaginalis cultures in order to test our hypothesis that metronidazole reduction is catalyzed by flavin enzymes, e.g. thioredoxin reductase, and intracellular free flavins. Indeed, within hours, DPI rendered T. vaginalis insensitive to metronidazole concentrations as high as 1mM and prevented the formation of metronidazole adducts with proteins. Thioredoxin reductase activity was absent from DPI-treated cells and flavin reductase activity was sharply decreased. In addition, DPI-treated cells also upregulated the expression of antioxidant enzymes, i.e. thioredoxin peroxidases and superoxide dismutases, and displayed a fundamentally altered metabolism caused by inactivation of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) and concomitant upregulation of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity. Thus, the disruption of the cellular flavin metabolism by DPI mediated metabolic steps which are similar to that of cells with metronidazole resistance induced in vitro. Finally, we present direct evidence that the increased expression of antioxidant enzymes is dispensable for acquiring resistance to metronidazole. PMID:20093143

  4. Trichomonas vaginalis flavin reductase 1 and its role in metronidazole resistance.

    PubMed

    Leitsch, David; Janssen, Brian D; Kolarich, Daniel; Johnson, Patricia J; Duchêne, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme flavin reductase 1 (FR1) from Trichomonas vaginalis, formerly known as NADPH oxidase, was isolated and identified. Flavin reductase is part of the antioxidative defence in T. vaginalis and indirectly reduces molecular oxygen to hydrogen peroxide via free flavins. Importantly, a reduced or absent flavin reductase activity has been reported in metronidazole-resistant T. vaginalis, resulting in elevated intracellular oxygen levels and futile cycling of metronidazole. Interestingly, FR1 has no close homologue in any other sequenced genome, but seven full-length and three truncated isoforms exist in the T. vaginalis genome. However, out of these, only FR1 has an affinity for flavins, i.e. FMN, FAD and riboflavin, which is high enough to be of physiological relevance. Although there are no relevant changes in the gene sequence or any alterations of the predicted FR1-mRNA structure in any of the strains studied, FR1 is not expressed in highly metronidazole-resistant strains. Transfection of a metronidazole-resistant clinical isolate (B7268), which does not express any detectable amounts of FR, with a plasmid bearing a functional FR1 gene nearly completely restored metronidazole sensitivity. Our results indicate that FR1 has a significant role in the emergence of metronidazole resistance in T. vaginalis.

  5. A docking model of human ribonucleotide reductase with flavin and phenosafranine

    PubMed Central

    Priya, Panneerselvam Lakshmi; Shanmughavel, Piramanayagam

    2009-01-01

    Ribonucleotide Reductase (RNR) is an enzyme responsible for the reduction of ribonucleotides to their corresponding Deoxyribonucleotides (DNA), which is a building block for DNA replication and repair mechanisms. The key role of RNR in DNA synthesis and control in cell growth has made this an important target for anticancer therapy. Increased RNR activity has been associated with malignant transformation and tumor cell growth. In recent years, several RNR inhibitors, including Triapine, Gemcitabine and GTI-2040, have entered the clinical trials. Our current work focuses on an attempted to dock this inhibitors Flavin and Phenosafranine to curtail the action of human RNR2. The docked inhibitor Flavin and Phenosafranine binds at the active site with THR176, which are essential for free radical formation. The inhibitor must be a radical scavenger to destroy the tyrosyl radical or iron metal scavenger. The iron or radical site of R2 protein can react with one-electron reductants, whereby the tyrosyl radical is converted to a normal tyrosine residue. However, compounds such as Flavin and Phenosafranine were used in most of the cases to reduce the radical activity. The docking study was performed for the crystal structure of human RNR with the radical scavengers Flavin and Phenosafranine to inhibit the human RNR2. This helps to understand the functional aspects and also aids in the development of novel inhibitors for the human RNR2. PMID:20198185

  6. A docking model of human ribonucleotide reductase with flavin and phenosafranine.

    PubMed

    Priya, Panneerselvam Lakshmi; Shanmughavel, Piramanayagam

    2009-09-30

    Ribonucleotide Reductase (RNR) is an enzyme responsible for the reduction of ribonucleotides to their corresponding Deoxyribonucleotides (DNA), which is a building block for DNA replication and repair mechanisms. The key role of RNR in DNA synthesis and control in cell growth has made this an important target for anticancer therapy. Increased RNR activity has been associated with malignant transformation and tumor cell growth. In recent years, several RNR inhibitors, including Triapine, Gemcitabine and GTI-2040, have entered the clinical trials. Our current work focuses on an attempted to dock this inhibitors Flavin and Phenosafranine to curtail the action of human RNR2. The docked inhibitor Flavin and Phenosafranine binds at the active site with THR176, which are essential for free radical formation. The inhibitor must be a radical scavenger to destroy the tyrosyl radical or iron metal scavenger. The iron or radical site of R2 protein can react with one-electron reductants, whereby the tyrosyl radical is converted to a normal tyrosine residue. However, compounds such as Flavin and Phenosafranine were used in most of the cases to reduce the radical activity. The docking study was performed for the crystal structure of human RNR with the radical scavengers Flavin and Phenosafranine to inhibit the human RNR2. This helps to understand the functional aspects and also aids in the development of novel inhibitors for the human RNR2.

  7. Distinguishing two groups of flavin reductases by analyzing the protonation state of an active site carboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Dumit, Verónica I; Cortez, Néstor; Matthias Ullmann, G

    2011-07-01

    Flavin-containing reductases are involved in a wide variety of physiological reactions such as photosynthesis, nitric oxide synthesis, and detoxification of foreign compounds, including therapeutic drugs. Ferredoxin-NADP(H)-reductase (FNR) is the prototypical enzyme of this family. The fold of this protein is highly conserved and occurs as one domain of several multidomain enzymes such as the members of the diflavin reductase family. The enzymes of this family have emerged as fusion of a FNR and a flavodoxin. Although the active sites of these enzymes are very similar, different enzymes function in opposite directions, that is, some reduce oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP(+)) and some oxidize reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH). In this work, we analyze the protonation behavior of titratable residues of these enzymes through electrostatic calculations. We find that a highly conserved carboxylic acid in the active site shows a different titration behavior in different flavin reductases. This residue is deprotonated in flavin reductases present in plastids, but protonated in bacterial counterparts and in diflavin reductases. The protonation state of the carboxylic acid may also influence substrate binding. The physiological substrate for plastidic enzymes is NADP(+), but it is NADPH for the other mentioned reductases. In this article, we discuss the relevance of the environment of this residue for its protonation and its importance in catalysis. Our results allow to reinterpret and explain experimental data. PMID:21538544

  8. Flavin adenine dinucleotide content of quinone reductase 2: analysis and optimization for structure-function studies.

    PubMed

    Leung, Kevin Ka Ki; Litchfield, David W; Shilton, Brian H

    2012-01-01

    Quinone reductase 2 (NQO2) is a broadly expressed enzyme implicated in responses to a number of compounds, including protein kinase inhibitors, resveratrol, and antimalarial drugs. NQO2 includes a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor, but X-ray crystallographic analysis of human NQO2 expressed in Escherichia coli showed that electron density for the isoalloxazine ring of FAD was weak and there was no electron density for the adenine mononucleotide moiety. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of the NQO2 preparation indicated that FAD was not present and only 38% of the protomers contained flavin mononucleotide (FMN), explaining the weak electron density for FAD in the crystallographic analysis. A method for purifying NQO2 and reconstituting with FAD such that the final content approaches 100% occupancy with FAD is presented here. The enzyme prepared in this manner has a high specific activity, and there is strong electron density for the FAD cofactor in the crystal structure. Analysis of NQO2 crystal structures present in the Protein Data Bank indicates that many may have sub-stoichiometric cofactor content and/or contain FMN rather than FAD. This method of purification and reconstitution will help to optimize structural and functional studies of NQO2 and possibly other flavoproteins.

  9. Expression, Purification, and Characterization of a Recombinant Flavin Reductase from the Luminescent Marine Bacterium "Photobacterium Leiognathi": A Set of Exercises for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    In "Photobacterium," the flavin reductase encoded by "lux"G regenerates the reduced form of flavin mononucleotide (FMN). Reduced FMN is one of the substrates of the luciferase enzyme that catalyzes a light-emitting reaction. A set of experiments, that employs a "lux"G-expression plasmid construct (pGhis) and is suitable for an undergraduate…

  10. Trichomonas vaginalis: metronidazole and other nitroimidazole drugs are reduced by the flavin enzyme thioredoxin reductase and disrupt the cellular redox system. Implications for nitroimidazole toxicity and resistance.

    PubMed

    Leitsch, David; Kolarich, Daniel; Binder, Marina; Stadlmann, Johannes; Altmann, Friedrich; Duchêne, Michael

    2009-04-01

    Infections with the microaerophilic parasite Trichomonas vaginalis are treated with the 5-nitroimidazole drug metronidazole, which is also in use against Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia intestinalis and microaerophilic/anaerobic bacteria. Here we report that in T. vaginalis the flavin enzyme thioredoxin reductase displays nitroreductase activity with nitroimidazoles, including metronidazole, and with the nitrofuran drug furazolidone. Reactive metabolites of metronidazole and other nitroimidazoles form covalent adducts with several proteins that are known or assumed to be associated with thioredoxin-mediated redox regulation, including thioredoxin reductase itself, ribonucleotide reductase, thioredoxin peroxidase and cytosolic malate dehydrogenase. Disulphide reducing activity of thioredoxin reductase was greatly diminished in extracts of metronidazole-treated cells and intracellular non-protein thiol levels were sharply decreased. We generated a highly metronidazole-resistant cell line that displayed only minimal thioredoxin reductase activity, not due to diminished expression of the enzyme but due to the lack of its FAD cofactor. Reduction of free flavins, readily observed in metronidazole-susceptible cells, was also absent in the resistant cells. On the other hand, iron-depleted T. vaginalis cells, expressing only minimal amounts of PFOR and hydrogenosomal malate dehydrogenase, remained fully susceptible to metronidazole. Thus, taken together, our data suggest a flavin-based mechanism of metronidazole activation and thereby challenge the current model of hydrogenosomal activation of nitroimidazole drugs. PMID:19415801

  11. Spectroscopic and kinetic properties of a recombinant form of the flavin domain of spinach NADH: nitrate reductase.

    PubMed

    Quinn, G B; Trimboli, A J; Prosser, I M; Barber, M J

    1996-03-01

    The C-terminal 268 residues of the spinach assimilatory NADH:nitrate reductase amino acid sequence that correspond to the flavin-containing domain of the enzyme have been selectively amplified and expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein, which was produced in both soluble and insoluble forms, was purified to homogeneity using a combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation, affinity chromatography on 5'-ADP-agarose and FPLC gel filtration. The purified domain exhibited a molecular weight of approximately 30 kDa, estimated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and a molecular mass of 30,169 for the apoprotein determined by mass spectrometry, which also confirmed the presence of FAD. The UV/visible spectrum was typical of a flavoprotein, with maxima at 272, 386, and 461 nm in the oxidized form while CD spectroscopy yielded both positive and negative maxima at 313 and 382 nm and 461 and 484 nm, respectively. The purified domain showed immunological cross-reactivity with anti-spinach nitrate reductase polyclonal antibodies while both N-terminal and internal amino acid sequencing of isolated peptides confirmed the fidelity of the domain's primary sequence. The protein retained NADH-ferricyanide reductase activity (Vmax=84 micromol NADH consumer/min/nmol FAD) with Km's of 17 and 34 microM for NADH and ferricyanide, respectively, with a pH optimum of approximately 6.5 A variety of NADH-analogs could also function as electron donors, though with decreased efficiency, the most effective being reduced nicotinamide hypoxanthine dinucleotide (V(max) = 35 micromol NHDH consumer/min/nmol FAD) and Km = 22 microM). NAD+ was demonstrated to be a competitive inhibitor (Ki = 1.9 mM) while analysis of inhibition by a variety of NAD+-analogs indicated the most efficient inhibitor to be ADP (Ki = 0.2 mM), with analogs devoid of either the phosphate, ribose, or adenine moieties proving to be markedly less-efficient inhibitors. The isolated domain

  12. Pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and thioredoxin reductase are involved in 5-nitroimidazole activation while flavin metabolism is linked to 5-nitroimidazole resistance in Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Leitsch, David; Burgess, Anita G.; Dunn, Linda A.; Krauer, Kenia G.; Tan, Kevin; Duchêne, Michael; Upcroft, Peter; Eckmann, Lars; Upcroft, Jacqueline A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The mechanism of action of, and resistance to, metronidazole in the anaerobic (or micro-aerotolerant) protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia has long been associated with the reduction of ferredoxin (Fd) by the enzyme pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) and the subsequent activation of metronidazole by Fd to toxic radical species. Resistance to metronidazole has been associated with down-regulation of PFOR and Fd. The aim of this study was to determine whether the PFOR/Fd couple is the only pathway involved in metronidazole activation in Giardia. Methods PFOR and Fd activities were measured in extracts of highly metronidazole-resistant (MTRr) lines and activities of recombinant G. lamblia thioredoxin reductase (GlTrxR) and NADPH oxidase were assessed for their involvement in metronidazole activation and resistance. Results We demonstrated that several lines of highly MTRr G. lamblia have fully functional PFOR and Fd indicating that PFOR/Fd-independent mechanisms are involved in metronidazole activation and resistance in these cells. Flavin-dependent GlTrxR, like TrxR of other anaerobic protozoa, reduces 5-nitroimidazole compounds including metronidazole, although expression of TrxR is not decreased in MTRr Giardia. However, reduction of flavins is suppressed in highly MTRr cells, as evidenced by as much as an 80% decrease in NADPH oxidase flavin mononucleotide reduction activity. This suppression is consistent with generalized impaired flavin metabolism in highly MTRr Trichomonas vaginalis. Conclusions These data add to the mounting evidence against the dogma that PFOR/Fd is the only couple with a low enough redox potential to reduce metronidazole in anaerobes and point to the multi-factorial nature of metronidazole resistance. PMID:21602576

  13. Defining the Role of the NADH-Cytochrome-b5 Reductase 3 in the Mitochondrial Amidoxime Reducing Component Enzyme System.

    PubMed

    Plitzko, Birte; Havemeyer, Antje; Bork, Bettina; Bittner, Florian; Mendel, Ralf; Clement, Bernd

    2016-10-01

    The importance of the mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component (mARC)-containing enzyme system in N-reductive metabolism has been studied extensively. It catalyzes the reduction of various N-hydroxylated compounds and therefore acts as the counterpart of cytochrome P450- and flavin-containing monooxygenase-catalyzed oxidations at nitrogen centers. This enzyme system was found to be responsible for the activation of amidoxime and N-hydroxyguanidine prodrugs in drug metabolism. The synergy of three components (mARC, cytochrome b5, and the appropriate reductase) is crucial to exert the N-reductive catalytic effect. Previous studies have demonstrated the involvement of the specific isoforms of the molybdoenzyme mARC and the electron transport protein cytochrome b5 in N-reductive metabolism. To date, the corresponding reductase involved in N-reductive metabolism has yet to be defined because previous investigations have presented ambiguous results. Using small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown in human cells and assessing the stoichiometry of the enzyme system reconstituted in vitro, we provide evidence that NADH-cytochrome-b5 reductase 3 is the principal reductase involved in the mARC enzyme system and is an essential component of N-reductive metabolism in human cells. In addition, only minimal levels of cytochrome-b5 reductase 3 protein are sufficient for catalysis, which impeded previous attempts to identify the reductase.

  14. Camphor Pathway Redux: Functional Recombinant Expression of 2,5- and 3,6-Diketocamphane Monooxygenases of Pseudomonas putida ATCC 17453 with Their Cognate Flavin Reductase Catalyzing Baeyer-Villiger Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Iwaki, Hiroaki; Grosse, Stephan; Bergeron, Hélène; Leisch, Hannes; Morley, Krista; Hasegawa, Yoshie

    2013-01-01

    Whereas the biochemical properties of the monooxygenase components that catalyze the oxidation of 2,5-diketocamphane and 3,6-diketocamphane (2,5-DKCMO and 3,6-DKCMO, respectively) in the initial catabolic steps of (+) and (−) isomeric forms of camphor (CAM) metabolism in Pseudomonas putida ATCC 17453 are relatively well characterized, the actual identity of the flavin reductase (Fred) component that provides the reduced flavin to the oxygenases has hitherto been ill defined. In this study, a 37-kDa Fred was purified from a camphor-induced culture of P. putida ATCC 17453 and this facilitated cloning and characterization of the requisite protein. The active Fred is a homodimer with a subunit molecular weight of 18,000 that uses NADH as an electron donor (Km = 32 μM), and it catalyzes the reduction of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) (Km = 3.6 μM; kcat = 283 s−1) in preference to flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) (Km = 19 μM; kcat = 128 s−1). Sequence determination of ∼40 kb of the CAM degradation plasmid revealed the locations of two isofunctional 2,5-DKCMO genes (camE25–1 for 2,5-DKCMO-1 and camE25–2 for 2,5-DKCMO-2) as well as that of a 3,6-DKCMO-encoding gene (camE36). In addition, by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, the CAM plasmid was established to be linear and ∼533 kb in length. To enable functional assessment of the two-component monooxygenase system in Baeyer-Villiger oxidations, recombinant plasmids expressing Fred in tandem with the respective 2,5-DKCMO- and 3,6-DKCMO-encoding genes in Escherichia coli were constructed. Comparative substrate profiling of the isofunctional 2,5-DCKMOs did not yield obvious differences in Baeyer-Villiger biooxidations, but they are distinct from 3,6-DKCMO in the stereoselective oxygenations with various mono- and bicyclic ketone substrates. PMID:23524667

  15. Aspartate 120 of Escherichia coli methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase: evidence for major roles in folate binding and catalysis and a minor role in flavin reactivity.

    PubMed

    Trimmer, Elizabeth E; Ballou, David P; Galloway, Lara J; Scannell, Sara A; Brinker, Danielle R; Casas, Katie R

    2005-05-10

    Escherichia coli methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) catalyzes the NADH-linked reduction of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate (CH(2)-H(4)folate) to 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (CH(3)-H(4)folate) using flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) as cofactor. MTHFR is unusual among flavin oxidoreductases because it contains a conserved, negatively rather than positively charged amino acid (aspartate 120) near the N1-C2=O position of the flavin. At this location, Asp 120 is expected to influence the redox properties of the enzyme-bound FAD. Modeling of the CH(3)-H(4)folate product into the enzyme active site suggests that Asp 120 may also play crucial roles in folate binding and catalysis. We have replaced Asp 120 with Asn, Ser, Ala, Val, and Lys and have characterized the mutant enzymes. Consistent with a loss of negative charge near the flavin, the midpoint potentials of the mutants increased from 17 to 30 mV. A small kinetic effect on the NADH reductive half-reaction was also observed as the mutants exhibited a 1.2-1.5-fold faster reduction rate than the wild-type enzyme. Catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) in the CH(2)-H(4)folate oxidative half-reaction was decreased significantly (up to 70000-fold) and in a manner generally consistent with the negative charge density of position 120, supporting a major role for Asp 120 in electrostatic stabilization of the putative 5-iminium cation intermediate during catalysis. Asp 120 is also intimately involved in folate binding as increases in the apparent K(d) of up to 15-fold were obtained for the mutants. Examining the E(red) + CH(2)-H(4)folate reaction at 4 degrees C, we obtained, for the first time, evidence for the rapid formation of a reduced enzyme-folate complex with wild-type MTHFR. The more active Asp120Ala mutant, but not the severely impaired Asp120Lys mutant, demonstrated the species, suggesting a connection between the extent of complex formation and catalytic efficiency. PMID:15865426

  16. Identification of Up- and Down-Regulated Proteins in Pemetrexed-Resistant Human Lung Adenocarcinoma: Flavin Reductase and Calreticulin Play Key Roles in the Development of Pemetrexed-Associated Resistance.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hsiu-Chuan; Chen, Jing-Yi; Lin, Dai-Ying; Wen, Yueh-Feng; Lin, Chi-Chen; Lin, Sheng-Hao; Lin, Ching-Hsiung; Chung, Ting-Wen; Liao, En-Chi; Chen, Ying-Jen; Wei, Yu-Shan; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Chan, Hong-Lin

    2015-11-01

    Drug resistance is one of the major causes of cancer chemotherapy failure. In the current study, we used a pair of lung adenocarcinoma cell lines, A549 and the pemetrexed-resistant A549/PEM cells, as a model to monitor resistance-dependent cellular responses and identify potential therapeutic targets. By means of 2D differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), we investigated the global protein expression alterations induced by pemetrexed treatment and resistance. The proteomic result revealed that pemetrexed exposure obviously altered the expression of 81 proteins in the A549 cells, whereas no significant response was observed in the similarly treated A549/PEM cells, hence implying an association between these proteins and the drug-specific response. Moreover, 72 proteins including flavin reductase and calreticulin demonstrated differential expression between the A549 and A549/PEM cells, indicating baseline resistance. Additional tests employed siRNA silencing, protein overexpression, cell viability analysis, and analysis of apoptosis to examine and confirm the potency of flavin reductase and calreticulin proteins in the development of pemetrexed resistance. In summary, by using a proteomic approach, we identified numerous proteins, including flavin reductase and calreticulin, involved in pemetrexed drug resistance-developing mechanisms. Our results provide useful diagnostic markers and therapeutic candidates for pemetrexed-resistant lung cancer treatment.

  17. Catalytic activity of the two-component flavin-dependent monooxygenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa toward cinnamic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Toshiki; Kino, Kuniki

    2014-02-01

    4-Hydroxyphenylacetate 3-hydroxylases (HPAHs) of the two-component flavin-dependent monooxygenase family are attractive enzymes that possess the catalytic potential to synthesize valuable ortho-diphenol compounds from simple monophenol compounds. In this study, we investigated the catalytic activity of HPAH from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1 toward cinnamic acid derivatives. We prepared Escherichia coli cells expressing the hpaB gene encoding the monooxygenase component and the hpaC gene encoding the oxidoreductase component. E. coli cells expressing HpaBC exhibited no or very low oxidation activity toward cinnamic acid, o-coumaric acid, and m-coumaric acid, whereas they rapidly oxidized p-coumaric acid to caffeic acid. Interestingly, after p-coumaric acid was almost completely consumed, the resulting caffeic acid was further oxidized to 3,4,5-trihydroxycinnamic acid. In addition, HpaBC exhibited oxidation activity toward 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)propanoic acid, ferulic acid, and coniferaldehyde to produce the corresponding ortho-diphenols. We also investigated a flask-scale production of caffeic acid from p-coumaric acid as the model reaction for HpaBC-catalyzed syntheses of hydroxycinnamic acids. Since the initial concentrations of the substrate p-coumaric acid higher than 40 mM markedly inhibited its HpaBC-catalyzed oxidation, the reaction was carried out by repeatedly adding 20 mM of this substrate to the reaction mixture. Furthermore, by using the HpaBC whole-cell catalyst in the presence of glycerol, our experimental setup achieved the high-yield production of caffeic acid, i.e., 56.6 mM (10.2 g/L) within 24 h. These catalytic activities of HpaBC will provide an easy and environment-friendly synthetic approach to hydroxycinnamic acids.

  18. Flavin-Dependent Enzymes in Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Wojcieszyńska, Danuta; Hupert-Kocurek, Katarzyna; Guzik, Urszula

    2012-01-01

    Statistical studies have demonstrated that various agents may reduce the risk of cancer’s development. One of them is activity of flavin-dependent enzymes such as flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO)GS-OX1, FAD-dependent 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and flavin-dependent monoamine oxidase. In the last decade, many papers concerning their structure, reaction mechanism and role in the cancer prevention were published. In our work, we provide a more in-depth analysis of flavin-dependent enzymes and their contribution to the cancer prevention. We present the actual knowledge about the glucosinolate synthesized by flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO)GS-OX1 and its role in cancer prevention, discuss the influence of mutations in FAD-dependent 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase on the cancer risk, and describe FAD as an important cofactor for the demethylation of histons. We also present our views on the role of riboflavin supplements in the prevention against cancer. PMID:23222680

  19. Structure and general properties of flavins.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Flavins are a family of yellow-colored compounds with the basic structure of 7,8-dimethyl-10-alkylisoalloxazine. Riboflavin, commonly known as vitamin B2, is an essential component of living organisms and is the precursor of all biologically important flavins. In this chapter, the redox properties of flavins are described, with special emphasis in their ability to participate in both one-electron and two-electron transfer processes; hence, flavins are indispensable mediators between two-electron and one-electron processes in biological systems. The photophysical and photochemical properties of flavins are also discussed. All oxidized flavins exhibit strong absorption in the ultraviolet and visible regions and an intense yellow-green fluorescence (in their neutral oxidized form). Flavins are thermostable compounds; however, they are photosensitive. In the absence of an external reductant, the isoalloxazine ring system undergoes intramolecular photoreduction. Some flavins are efficient photosensitizers; they can induce photomodifications of compounds that are not directly modified by visible light.

  20. Biochemical Characterization of Inducible 'Reductase' Component of Benzoate Dioxygenase and Phthalate Isomer Dioxygenases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PP4.

    PubMed

    Karandikar, Rohini; Badri, Abinaya; Phale, Prashant S

    2015-09-01

    The first step involved in the degradation of phthalate isomers (phthalate, isophthalate and terephthalate) is the double hydroxylation by respective aromatic-ring hydroxylating dioxygenases. These are two component enzymes consisting of 'oxygenase' and 'reductase' components. Soil isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PP4 degrades phthalate isomers via protocatechuate and benzoate via catechol 'ortho' ring cleavage pathway. Metabolic studies suggest that strain PP4 has carbon source-specific inducible phthalate isomer dioxygenase and benzoate dioxygenase. Thus, it was of interest to study the properties of reductase components of these enzymes. Reductase activity from phthalate isomer-grown cells was 3-5-folds higher than benzoate grown cells. In-gel activity staining profile showed a reductase activity band of R f 0.56 for phthalate isomer-grown cells as compared to R f 0.73 from benzoate-grown cells. Partially purified reductase components from phthalate isomer grown cells showed K m in the range of 30-40 μM and V max = 34-48 μmol min(-1) mg(-1). However, reductase from benzoate grown cells showed K m = 49 μM and V max = 10 μmol min(-1) mg(-1). Strikingly similar molecular and kinetic properties of reductase component from phthalate isomer-grown cells suggest that probably the same reductase component is employed in three phthalate isomer dioxygenases. However, reductase component is different, with respect to kinetic properties and zymogram analysis, from benzoate-grown cells when compared to that from phthalate isomer grown cells of PP4.

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of Naphthalenediimide-Functionalized Flavin Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Zainalabdeen, Nada; Fitzpatrick, Brian; Kareem, Mohanad Mousa; Nandwana, Vikas; Cooke, Graeme; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2013-01-01

    Two acceptor–acceptor dyads have been synthesized featuring a flavin moiety and a naphthalenediimide (NDI) unit. The NDI unit is linked to the flavin through a short spacer group via either the N(3) or N(10) positions of the flavin. We have investigated the UV-Vis and redox properties of these multi-electron accepting systems which indicate that these materials display the collective properties of their component systems. Fluorescence spectroscopy measurements have revealed that their emission properties are dominated by the flavin unit. PMID:23552831

  2. Synthesis and characterization of naphthalenediimide-functionalized flavin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zainalabdeen, Nada; Fitzpatrick, Brian; Kareem, Mohanad Mousa; Nandwana, Vikas; Cooke, Graeme; Rotello, Vincent M

    2013-01-01

    Two acceptor-acceptor dyads have been synthesized featuring a flavin moiety and a naphthalenediimide (NDI) unit. The NDI unit is linked to the flavin through a short spacer group via either the N(3) or N(10) positions of the flavin. We have investigated the UV-Vis and redox properties of these multi-electron accepting systems which indicate that these materials display the collective properties of their component systems. Fluorescence spectroscopy measurements have revealed that their emission properties are dominated by the flavin unit. PMID:23552831

  3. In Vitro Formation of Nitrate Reductase Using Extracts of the Nitrate Reductase Mutant of Neurospora crassa, nit-1, and Rhodospirillum rubrum

    PubMed Central

    Ketchum, Paul A.; Sevilla, Cynthia L.

    1973-01-01

    In vitro formation of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)–nitrate reductase (NADPH: nitrate oxido-reductase, EC 1.6.6.2) has been attained by using extracts of the nitrate reductase mutant of Neurospora crassa, nit-1, and extracts of either photosynthetically or heterotrophically grown Rhodospirillum rubrum, which contribute the constitutive component. The in vitro formation of NADPH-nitrate reductase is characterized by the conversion of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) stimulated NADPH-cytochrome c reductase, contributed by the N. crassa nit-1 extract from a slower sedimenting form (4.5S) to a faster sedimenting form (7.8S). The 7.8S NADPH-cytochrome c reductase peak coincides in sucrose density gradient profiles with the NADPH–nitrate reductase, FADH2–nitrate reductase and reduced methyl viologen (MVH)–nitrate reductase activities which are also formed in vitro. The constitutive component from R. rubrum is soluble (both in heterotrophically and photosynthetically grown cells), is stimulated by the addition of 10−4 M Na2MoO4 and 10−2 M NaNO3 to cell-free preparations, and has variable activity over the pH range from 3.0 to 9.5. The activity of the constitutive component in some extracts showed a threefold stimulation when the pH was lowered from 6.5 to 4.0. The constitutive activity appears to be associated with a large molecular weight component which sediments as a single peak in sucrose density gradients. However, the constitutive component from R. rubrum is dialyzable and is insensitive to trypsin and protease. These results demonstrate that R. rubrum contains the constitutive component and suggests that it is a low molecular weight, trypsin- and protease-insensitive factor which participates in the in vitro formation of NADPH nitrate reductase. PMID:4270447

  4. The 5 alpha-reductase inhibitory components from heartwood of Artocarpus incisus: structure-activity investigations.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, K; Fukuda, M; Kondo, R; Sakai, K

    2000-02-01

    The methanol extract of heartwood of Artocarpus incisus showed potent 5 alpha-reductase inhibitory activity. We investigated the 5 alpha-reductase inhibitory effects of nine compounds isolated from A. incisus. Chlorophorin (IC50 = 37 microM) and artocarpin (IC50 = 85 microM) showed more potent inhibitory effects than did alpha-linolenic acid, which is known as a naturally occurring potent inhibitor. Structure-activity investigations suggested that the presence of an isoprene substituent (prenyl and geranyl) would enhance 5 alpha-reductase inhibitory effects.

  5. Flavins secreted by roots of iron-deficient Beta vulgaris enable mining of ferric oxide via reductive mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sisó-Terraza, Patricia; Rios, Juan J; Abadía, Javier; Abadía, Anunciación; Álvarez-Fernández, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is abundant in soils but generally poorly soluble. Plants, with the exception of Graminaceae, take up Fe using an Fe(III)-chelate reductase coupled to an Fe(II) transporter. Whether or not nongraminaceous species can convert scarcely soluble Fe(III) forms into soluble Fe forms has deserved little attention so far. We have used Beta vulgaris, one among the many species whose roots secrete flavins upon Fe deficiency, to study whether or not flavins are involved in Fe acquisition. Flavins secreted by Fe-deficient plants were removed from the nutrient solution, and plants were compared with Fe-sufficient plants and Fe-deficient plants without flavin removal. Solubilization of a scarcely soluble Fe(III)-oxide was assessed in the presence or absence of flavins, NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, reduced form) or plant roots, and an Fe(II) trapping agent. The removal of flavins from the nutrient solution aggravated the Fe deficiency-induced leaf chlorosis. Flavins were able to dissolve an Fe(III)-oxide in the presence of NADH. The addition of extracellular flavins enabled roots of Fe-deficient plants to reductively dissolve an Fe(III)-oxide. We concluded that root-secretion of flavins improves Fe nutrition in B. vulgaris. Flavins allow B. vulgaris roots to mine Fe from Fe(III)-oxides via reductive mechanisms.

  6. Inhibitory effects of Zingiber officinale Roscoe derived components on aldose reductase activity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kato, Atsushi; Higuchi, Yasuko; Goto, Hirozo; Kizu, Haruhisa; Okamoto, Tadashi; Asano, Naoki; Hollinshead, Jackie; Nash, Robert J; Adachi, Isao

    2006-09-01

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) continues to be used as an important cooking spice and herbal medicine around the world. Scientific research has gradually verified the antidiabetic effects of ginger. Especially gingerols, which are the major components of ginger, are known to improve diabetes including the effect of enhancement against insulin-sensitivity. Aldose reductase inhibitors have considerable potential for the treatment of diabetes, without increased risk of hypoglycemia. The assay for aldose reductase inhibitors in ginger led to the isolation of five active compounds including 2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)ethanol (2) and 2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)ethanoic acid (3). Compounds 2 and 3 were good inhibitors of recombinant human aldose reductase, with IC50 values of 19.2 +/- 1.9 and 18.5 +/- 1.1 microM, respectively. Furthermore, these compounds significantly suppressed not only sorbitol accumulation in human erythrocytes but also lens galactitol accumulation in 30% of galactose-fed cataract rat model. A structure-activity relationship study revealed that the applicable side alkyl chain length and the presence of a C3 OCH3 group in the aromatic ring are essential features for enzyme recognition and binding. These results suggested that it would contribute to the protection against or improvement of diabetic complications for a dietary supplement of ginger or its extract containing aldose reductase inhibitors. PMID:16939321

  7. Insights into caerulomycin A biosynthesis: a two-component monooxygenase CrmH-catalyzed oxime formation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yiguang; Zhang, Qingbo; Li, Sumei; Lin, Qinheng; Fu, Peng; Zhang, Guangtao; Zhang, Haibo; Shi, Rong; Zhu, Weiming; Zhang, Changsheng

    2013-12-18

    The immunosuppressive agent caerulomycin A features a unique 2,2'-bipyridine core structure and an unusual oxime functionality. Genetic and biochemical evidence confirms that the oxime formation in caerulomycin A biosynthesis is catalyzed by CrmH, a flavin-dependent two-component monooxygenase that is compatible with multiple flavin reductases, from a primary amine via a N-hydroxylamine intermediate. Structure homologue-guided site-directed mutagenesis studies identify four amino acid residues that are essential for CrmH catalysis. This study provides the first biochemical evidence of a two-component monooxygenase that catalyzes oxime formation.

  8. Purification and Characterization of the Nitrate Reductase from the Diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana1

    PubMed Central

    Amy, Nancy K.; Garrett, Reginald H.

    1974-01-01

    The assimilatory nitrate reductase (NADH: nitrate oxidoreductase, E.C. 1.6.6.2.) from the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana, Hasle and Heimdal, has been purified 200-fold and characterized. The regulation of nitrate reductase in response to various conditions of nitrogen nutrition has been investigated. Nitrate reductase activity is repressed by the presence of ammonium in vivo, and its synthesis is derepressed when ammonium is absent. The derepression process is sensitive to cycloheximide and apparently requires protein synthesis. Repression of enzyme activity by ammonium is neither inhibited nor delayed by the presence of cycloheximide. In vitro, ammonium does not inhibit enzyme activity. NADH is the physiological electron donor for the enzyme in a flavin-dependent reaction. Spectral studies have indicated the presence of a b-type cytochrome associated with the enzyme. It is possible to observe enzymatic oxidation-reduction reactions which represent partial functions of the over-all electron transport capacity of this enzyme. Nitrate reductase will accept electrons from artificial electron donors such as reduced methyl viologen in a flavin-independent reaction. Further, dithionitereduced flavin adenine dinucleotide can donate electrons to the enzyme to reduce nitrate to nitrite. Finally, the nitrate reductase will exhibit a diaphorase activity and reduce the artificial electron acceptor mammalian cytochrome c in flavin-adeninedinucleotide-dependent reaction. Inhibition studies with potassium cyanide, sodium azide, and o-phenanthroline have yielded indirect evidence for metal component (s) of the enzyme. The inhibition of the NADH-requiring enzyme activities by p-hydroxymercuribenzoate has shown that an essential sulfhydryl group is involved in the initial portion of the electron transport. Heat treatment exerts an effect similar to the p-hydroxymercuribenzoate inhibition; namely, the NADH-requiring activities are rapidly inactivated, whereas the terminal

  9. Thioredoxin-thioredoxin reductase system of Streptomyces clavuligerus: sequences, expression, and organization of the genes.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, G; Yanko, M; Mislovati, M; Argaman, A; Schreiber, R; Av-Gay, Y; Aharonowitz, Y

    1993-01-01

    The genes that encode thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase of Streptomyces clavuligerus were cloned, and their DNA sequences were determined. Previously, we showed that S. clavuligerus possesses a disulfide reductase with broad substrate specificity that biochemically resembles the thioredoxin oxidoreductase system and may play a role in the biosynthesis of beta-lactam antibiotics. It consists consists of two components, a 70-kDa NADPH-dependent flavoprotein disulfide reductase with two identical subunits and a 12-kDa heat-stable protein general disulfide reductant. In this study, we found, by comparative analysis of their predicted amino acid sequences, that the 35-kDa protein is in fact thioredoxin reductase; it shares 48.7% amino acid sequence identity with Escherichia coli thioredoxin reductase, the 12-kDa protein is thioredoxin, and it shares 28 to 56% amino acid sequence identity with other thioredoxins. The streptomycete thioredoxin reductase has the identical cysteine redox-active region--Cys-Ala-Thr-Cys--and essentially the same flavin adenine dinucleotide- and NADPH dinucleotide-binding sites as E. coli thioredoxin reductase and is partially able to accept E. coli thioredoxin as a substrate. The streptomycete thioredoxin has the same cysteine redox-active segment--Trp-Cys-Gly-Pro-Cys--that is present in virtually all eucaryotic and procaryotic thioredoxins. However, in vivo it is unable to donate electrons to E. coli methionine sulfoxide reductase and does not serve as a substrate in vitro for E. coli thioredoxin reductase. The S. clavuligerus thioredoxin (trxA) and thioredoxin reductase (trxB) genes are organized in a cluster. They are transcribed in the same direction and separated by 33 nucleotides. In contrast, the trxA and trxB genes of E. coli, the only other organism in which both genes have been characterized, are physically widely separated. Images PMID:8349555

  10. Structural prototypes for an extended family of flavoprotein reductases: comparison of phthalate dioxygenase reductase with ferredoxin reductase and ferredoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Correll, C. C.; Ludwig, M. L.; Bruns, C. M.; Karplus, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    The structure of phthalate dioxygenase reductase (PDR), a monomeric iron-sulfur flavoprotein that delivers electrons from NADH to phthalate dioxygenase, is compared to ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase (FNR) and ferredoxin, the proteins that reduce NADP+ in the final reaction of photosystem I. The folding patterns of the domains that bind flavin, NAD(P), and [2Fe-2S] are very similar in the two systems. Alignment of the X-ray structures of PDR and FNR substantiates the assignment of features that characterize a family of flavoprotein reductases whose members include cytochrome P-450 reductase, sulfite and nitrate reductases, and nitric oxide synthase. Hallmarks of this subfamily of flavoproteins, here termed the FNR family, are an antiparallel beta-barrel that binds the flavin prosthetic group, and a characteristic variant of the classic pyridine nucleotide-binding fold. Despite the similarities between FNR and PDR, attempts to model the structure of a dissociable FNR:ferredoxin complex by analogy with PDR reveal features that are at odds with chemical crosslinking studies (Zanetti, G., Morelli, D., Ronchi, S., Negri, A., Aliverti, A., & Curti, B., 1988, Biochemistry 27, 3753-3759). Differences in the binding sites for flavin and pyridine nucleotides determine the nucleotide specificities of FNR and PDR. The specificity of FNR for NADP+ arises primarily from substitutions in FNR that favor interactions with the 2' phosphate of NADP+. Variations in the conformation and sequences of the loop adjoining the flavin phosphate affect the selectivity for FAD versus FMN. The midpoint potentials for reduction of the flavin and [2Fe-2S] groups in PDR are higher than their counterparts in FNR and spinach ferredoxin, by about 120 mV and 260 mV, respectively. Comparisons of the structure of PDR with spinach FNR and with ferredoxin from Anabaena 7120, along with calculations of electrostatic potentials, suggest that local interactions, including hydrogen bonds, are the dominant

  11. Flavin reduction activates Drosophila cryptochrome

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Anand T.; Top, Deniz; Manahan, Craig C.; Tokuda, Joshua M.; Zhang, Sheng; Pollack, Lois; Young, Michael W.; Crane, Brian R.

    2013-01-01

    Entrainment of circadian rhythms in higher organisms relies on light-sensing proteins that communicate to cellular oscillators composed of delayed transcriptional feedback loops. The principal photoreceptor of the fly circadian clock, Drosophila cryptochrome (dCRY), contains a C-terminal tail (CTT) helix that binds beside a FAD cofactor and is essential for light signaling. Light reduces the dCRY FAD to an anionic semiquinone (ASQ) radical and increases CTT proteolytic susceptibility but does not lead to CTT chemical modification. Additional changes in proteolytic sensitivity and small-angle X-ray scattering define a conformational response of the protein to light that centers at the CTT but also involves regions remote from the flavin center. Reduction of the flavin is kinetically coupled to CTT rearrangement. Chemical reduction to either the ASQ or the fully reduced hydroquinone state produces the same conformational response as does light. The oscillator protein Timeless (TIM) contains a sequence similar to the CTT; the corresponding peptide binds dCRY in light and protects the flavin from oxidation. However, TIM mutants therein still undergo dCRY-mediated degradation. Thus, photoreduction to the ASQ releases the dCRY CTT and promotes binding to at least one region of TIM. Flavin reduction by either light or cellular reductants may be a general mechanism of CRY activation. PMID:24297896

  12. Biosynthesis of flavin cofactors in man: implications in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Barile, Maria; Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Brizio, Carmen; Panebianco, Concetta; Indiveri, Cesare; Galluccio, Michele; Vergani, Lodovica; Eberini, Ivano; Gianazza, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    The primary role of the water-soluble vitamin B2, i.e. riboflavin, in cell biology is connected with its conversion into FMN and FAD, the cofactors of a large number of dehydrogenases, reductases and oxidases involved in energetic metabolism, redox homeostasis and protein folding as well as in diverse regulatory events. Deficiency of riboflavin in men and experimental animal models has been linked to several diseases, including neuromuscular and neurological disorders and cancer. Riboflavin at pharmacological doses has been shown to play unexpected and incompletely understood regulatory roles. Besides a summary on riboflavin uptake and a survey on riboflavin-related diseases, the main focus of this review is on discovery and characterization of FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2) and other components of the cellular networks that ensure flavin cofactor homeostasis.Special attention is devoted to the problem of sub-cellular compartmentalization of cofactor synthesis in eukaryotes, made possible by the existence of different FAD synthase isoforms and specific molecular components involved in flavin trafficking across sub-cellular membranes.Another point addressed in this review is the mechanism of cofactor delivery to nascent apo-proteins, especially those localized into mitochondria, where they integrate FAD in a process that involves additional mitochondrial protein(s) still to be identified. Further efforts are necessary to elucidate the role of riboflavin/FAD network in human pathologies and to exploit the structural differences between human and microbial/fungal FAD synthase as the rational basis for developing novel antibiotic/antimycotic drugs. PMID:23116402

  13. UbiX is a flavin prenyltransferase required for bacterial ubiquinone biosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Mark D.; Payne, Karl A. P.; Fisher, Karl; Marshall, Stephen A.; Parker, David; Rattray, Nicholas J. W.; Trivedi, Drupad K.; Goodacre, Royston; Rigby, Stephen E. J.; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Hay, Sam; Leys, David

    2015-06-01

    Ubiquinone (also known as coenzyme Q) is a ubiquitous lipid-soluble redox cofactor that is an essential component of electron transfer chains. Eleven genes have been implicated in bacterial ubiquinone biosynthesis, including ubiX and ubiD, which are responsible for decarboxylation of the 3-octaprenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate precursor. Despite structural and biochemical characterization of UbiX as a flavin mononucleotide (FMN)-binding protein, no decarboxylase activity has been detected. Here we report that UbiX produces a novel flavin-derived cofactor required for the decarboxylase activity of UbiD. UbiX acts as a flavin prenyltransferase, linking a dimethylallyl moiety to the flavin N5 and C6 atoms. This adds a fourth non-aromatic ring to the flavin isoalloxazine group. In contrast to other prenyltransferases, UbiX is metal-independent and requires dimethylallyl-monophosphate as substrate. Kinetic crystallography reveals that the prenyltransferase mechanism of UbiX resembles that of the terpene synthases. The active site environment is dominated by π systems, which assist phosphate-C1' bond breakage following FMN reduction, leading to formation of the N5-C1' bond. UbiX then acts as a chaperone for adduct reorientation, via transient carbocation species, leading ultimately to formation of the dimethylallyl C3'-C6 bond. Our findings establish the mechanism for formation of a new flavin-derived cofactor, extending both flavin and terpenoid biochemical repertoires.

  14. Flavin Redox Switching of Protein Functions

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Weidong; Moxley, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Flavin cofactors impart remarkable catalytic diversity to enzymes, enabling them to participate in a broad array of biological processes. The properties of flavins also provide proteins with a versatile redox sensor that can be utilized for converting physiological signals such as cellular metabolism, light, and redox status into a unique functional output. The control of protein functions by the flavin redox state is important for transcriptional regulation, cell signaling pathways, and environmental adaptation. A significant number of proteins that have flavin redox switches are found in the Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain family and include flavoproteins that act as photosensors and respond to changes in cellular redox conditions. Biochemical and structural studies of PAS domain flavoproteins have revealed key insights into how flavin redox changes are propagated to the surface of the protein and translated into a new functional output such as the binding of a target protein in a signaling pathway. Mechanistic details of proteins unrelated to the PAS domain are also emerging and provide novel examples of how the flavin redox state governs protein–membrane interactions in response to appropriate stimuli. Analysis of different flavin switch proteins reveals shared mechanistic themes for the regulation of protein structure and function by flavins. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 1079–1091. PMID:21028987

  15. Genomic and bioinformatic analysis of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase in Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Suwanchaichinda, C; Brattsten, L B

    2014-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (P450) enzyme system is a major mechanism of xenobiotic biotransformation. The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) is required for transfer of electrons from NADPH to P450. One CPR gene was identified in the genome of the malaria-transmitting mosquito Anopheles stephensi Liston (Diptera: Culicidae). The gene encodes a polypeptide containing highly conserved flavin mononucleotide-, flavin adenine dinucleotide-, and NADPH-binding domains, a unique characteristic of the reductase. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the A. stephensi and other known mosquito CPRs belong to a monophyletic group distinctly separated from other insects in the same order, Diptera. Amino acid residues of CPRs involved in binding of P450 and cytochrome c are conserved between A. stephensi and the Norway rat Rattus norvegicus Berkenhout (Rodentia: Muridae). However, gene structure particularly within the coding region is evidently different between the two organisms. Such difference might arise during the evolution process as also seen in the difference of P450 families and isoforms found in these organisms. CPR in the mosquito A. stephensi is expected to be active and serve as an essential component of the P450 system.

  16. YeeO from Escherichia coli exports flavins

    PubMed Central

    McAnulty, Michael J; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) proteins help maintain cellular homeostasis by secreting metabolic wastes. Flavins may occur as cellular waste products, with their production and secretion providing potential benefit for industrial applications related to biofuel cells. Here we find that MATE protein YeeO from Escherichia coli exports both flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Significant amounts of flavins were trapped intracellularly when YeeO was produced indicating transport limits secretion of flavins. Wild-type E. coli secreted 3 flavins (riboflavin, FMN, and FAD), so E. coli likely produces additional flavin transporters. PMID:25482085

  17. YeeO from Escherichia coli exports flavins.

    PubMed

    McAnulty, Michael J; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) proteins help maintain cellular homeostasis by secreting metabolic wastes. Flavins may occur as cellular waste products, with their production and secretion providing potential benefit for industrial applications related to biofuel cells. Here we find that MATE protein YeeO from Escherichia coli exports both flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Significant amounts of flavins were trapped intracellularly when YeeO was produced indicating transport limits secretion of flavins. Wild-type E. coli secreted 3 flavins (riboflavin, FMN, and FAD), so E. coli likely produces additional flavin transporters. PMID:25482085

  18. Loss of nitrate reductases NIA1 and NIA2 impairs stomatal closure by altering genes of core ABA signaling components in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chenchen; Cai, Shengguan; Wang, Yizhou; Chen, Zhong-Hua

    2016-06-01

    Nitrate reductases NIA1 and NIA2 determine NO production in plants and are critical to abscisic acid (ABA)-induced stomatal closure. However, the role for NIA1 and NIA2 in ABA signaling has not been paid much attention in nitrate reductase loss-of-function mutant nia1nia2. Recently, we have demonstrated that ABA-inhibited K(+)in current and ABA-enhanced slow anion current were absent in nia1nia2. Exogenous NO restored regulation of these channels for stomatal closure in nia1nia2. In this study, we found that mutating NIA1 and NIA2 impaired nearly all the key components of guard cell ABA signaling pathway in Arabidopsis. We also propose a simplified model for ABA signaling in the nia1nia2 mutant.

  19. Loss of nitrate reductases NIA1 and NIA2 impairs stomatal closure by altering genes of core ABA signaling components in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chenchen; Cai, Shengguan; Wang, Yizhou; Chen, Zhong-Hua

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nitrate reductases NIA1 and NIA2 determine NO production in plants and are critical to abscisic acid (ABA)-induced stomatal closure. However, the role for NIA1 and NIA2 in ABA signaling has not been paid much attention in nitrate reductase loss-of-function mutant nia1nia2. Recently, we have demonstrated that ABA-inhibited K+in current and ABA-enhanced slow anion current were absent in nia1nia2. Exogenous NO restored regulation of these channels for stomatal closure in nia1nia2. In this study, we found that mutating NIA1 and NIA2 impaired nearly all the key components of guard cell ABA signaling pathway in Arabidopsis. We also propose a simplified model for ABA signaling in the nia1nia2 mutant. PMID:27171851

  20. Nitrate reductase from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Kerber, N L; Cardenas, J

    1982-01-01

    The facultative phototroph Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides DSM158 was incapable of either assimilating or dissimilating nitrate, although the organism could reduce it enzymatically to nitrite either anaerobically in the light or aerobically in the dark. Reduction of nitrate was mediated by a nitrate reductase bound to chromatophores that could be easily solubilized and functioned with chemically reduced viologens or photochemically reduced flavins as electron donors. The enzyme was solubilized, and some of its kinetic and molecular parameters were determined. It seemed to be nonadaptive, ammonia did not repress its synthesis, and its activity underwent a rapid decline when the cells entered the stationary growth phase. Studies with inhibitors and with metal antagonists indicated that molybdenum and possibly iron participate in the enzymatic reduction of nitrate. The conjectural significance of this nitrate reductase in phototrophic bacteria is discussed. PMID:6978883

  1. Binding of the Covalent Flavin Assembly Factor to the Flavoprotein Subunit of Complex II.

    PubMed

    Maklashina, Elena; Rajagukguk, Sany; Starbird, Chrystal A; McDonald, W Hayes; Koganitsky, Anna; Eisenbach, Michael; Iverson, Tina M; Cecchini, Gary

    2016-02-01

    Escherichia coli harbors two highly conserved homologs of the essential mitochondrial respiratory complex II (succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase). Aerobically the bacterium synthesizes succinate:quinone reductase as part of its respiratory chain, whereas under microaerophilic conditions, the quinol:fumarate reductase can be utilized. All complex II enzymes harbor a covalently bound FAD co-factor that is essential for their ability to oxidize succinate. In eukaryotes and many bacteria, assembly of the covalent flavin linkage is facilitated by a small protein assembly factor, termed SdhE in E. coli. How SdhE assists with formation of the covalent flavin bond and how it binds the flavoprotein subunit of complex II remain unknown. Using photo-cross-linking, we report the interaction site between the flavoprotein of complex II and the SdhE assembly factor. These data indicate that SdhE binds to the flavoprotein between two independently folded domains and that this binding mode likely influences the interdomain orientation. In so doing, SdhE likely orients amino acid residues near the dicarboxylate and FAD binding site, which facilitates formation of the covalent flavin linkage. These studies identify how the conserved SdhE assembly factor and its homologs participate in complex II maturation.

  2. An essential role for UshA in processing of extracellular flavin electron shuttles by Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Covington, Elizabeth D; Gelbmann, Christopher B; Kotloski, Nicholas J; Gralnick, Jeffrey A

    2010-10-01

    The facultative anaerobe Shewanella oneidensis can reduce a number of insoluble extracellular metals. Direct adsorption of cells to the metal surface is not necessary, and it has been shown that S. oneidensis releases low concentrations flavins, including riboflavin and flavin mononucleotide (FMN), into the surrounding medium to act as extracellular electron shuttles. However, the mechanism of flavin release by Shewanella remains unknown. We have conducted a transposon mutagenesis screen to identify mutants deficient in extracellular flavin accumulation. Mutations in ushA, encoding a predicted 5'-nucleotidase, resulted in accumulation of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) in culture supernatants, with a corresponding decrease in FMN and riboflavin. Cellular extracts of S. oneidensis convert FAD to FMN, whereas extracts of ushA mutants do not, and fractionation experiments show that UshA activity is periplasmic. We hypothesize that S. oneidensis secretes FAD into the periplasmic space, where it is hydrolysed by UshA to FMN and adenosine monophosphate (AMP). FMN diffuses through outer membrane porins where it accelerates extracellular electron transfer, and AMP is dephosphorylated by UshA and reassimilated by the cell. We predict that transport of FAD into the periplasm also satisfies the cofactor requirement of the unusual periplasmic fumarate reductase found in Shewanella.

  3. Interactions between Flavins and Quadruplex Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Merkle, Tobias; Sinn, Malte; Hartig, Jörg S

    2015-11-01

    Quadruplex nucleic acids are widespread in genomes. They influence processes such as transcription, translation, replication, recombination, and the regulation of gene expression. Several synthetic ligands have been demonstrated to target quadruplex nucleic acids. However, only very few metabolites have been reported to interact with quadruplexes. In principle, an intracellular metabolite that selectively binds to four-stranded sequences could modulate quadruplex formation, stability, and thus functions in a riboswitch (or deoxyriboswitch) manner. Here we report quadruplex interactions with flavin derivatives such as FMN and FAD. The affinities were highest with parallel quadruplexes, with low (14-20 μm) dissociation constants. Taking into account combined intracellular flavin concentrations of 243 μm in E. coli, the observed interactions in principle open up the possibility of flavin levels affecting gene expression and other processes by modulating quadruplex formation.

  4. Nitrate reductase and nitrite as additional components of defense system in pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L.) against Helicoverpa armigera herbivory.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Rimaljeet; Gupta, Anil Kumar; Taggar, Gaurav Kumar

    2014-10-01

    Amylase inhibitors serve as attractive candidates of defense mechanisms against insect attack. Therefore, the impediment of Helicoverpa armigera digestion can be the effective way of controlling this pest population. Nitrite was found to be a potent mixed non-competitive competitive inhibitor of partially purified α-amylase of H. armigera gut. This observation impelled us to determine the response of nitrite and nitrate reductase (NR) towards H. armigera infestation in nine pigeonpea genotypes (four moderately resistant, three intermediate and two moderately susceptible). The significant upregulation of NR in moderately resistant genotypes after pod borer infestation suggested NR as one of the factors that determine their resistance status against insect attack. The pod borer attack caused greater reduction of nitrate and significant accumulation of nitrite in moderately resistant genotypes. The activity of nitrite reductase (NiR) was also enhanced more in moderately resistant genotypes than moderately susceptible genotypes on account of H. armigera herbivory. Expression of resistance to H. armigera was further revealed when significant negative association between NR, NiR, nitrite and percent pod damage was observed. This is the first report that suggests nitrite to be a potent inhibitor of H. armigera α-amylase and also the involvement of nitrite and NR in providing resistance against H. armigera herbivory. PMID:25307464

  5. Effect of thiol compounds and flavins on mercury and organomercurial degrading enzymes in mercury resistant aquatic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Pahan, K.; Ray, S.; Gachhui, R.; Chaudhuri, J.; Mandal, A. )

    1990-02-01

    Plasmid-determined mercuric and organomercurial resistance in microorganisms has been studied by several workers. Mercury reductase, catalyzing the reduction of mercury depends on sulfhydryl compounds. Organomercurial lyase that catalyzes the splitting of C-Hg linkages also needs thiol compounds for its activity. Until recently, no study has been reported on thiol specificity of these enzymes from various sources. In the present study, the authors report on enzymatic volatilization of HgCl{sub 2} by fourteen Hg-resistant bacterial strains. They have also studied thiol specificity of Hg-reductases and organomercurial lyases isolated from the above bacterial species. Hg-reductase is known to have FAD-moiety which stimulates enzyme activity whereas FMN and riboflavin are ineffective in this regard. The effect of flavins, namely FAD, FMN and riboflavin, on Hg-reductase and organomercurial lyase activity is also reported here.

  6. Structure of the monooxygenase component of a two-component flavoprotein monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Alfieri, Andrea; Fersini, Francesco; Ruangchan, Nantidaporn; Prongjit, Methinee; Chaiyen, Pimchai; Mattevi, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    p-Hydroxyphenylacetate hydroxylase from Acinetobacter baumannii is a two-component system consisting of a NADH-dependent FMN reductase and a monooxygenase (C2) that uses reduced FMN as substrate. The crystal structures of C2 in the ligand-free and substrate-bound forms reveal a preorganized pocket that binds reduced FMN without large conformational changes. The Phe-266 side chain swings out to provide the space for binding p-hydroxyphenylacetate that is oriented orthogonal to the flavin ring. The geometry of the substrate-binding site of C2 is significantly different from that of p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase, a single-component flavoenzyme that catalyzes a similar reaction. The C2 overall structure resembles the folding of medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase. An outstanding feature in the C2 structure is a cavity located in front of reduced FMN; it has a spherical shape with a 1.9-Å radius and a 29-Å3 volume and is interposed between the flavin C4a atom and the substrate atom to be hydroxylated. The shape and position of this cavity are perfectly fit for housing the oxygen atoms of the flavin C4a-hydroperoxide intermediate that is formed upon reaction of the C2-bound reduced flavin with molecular oxygen. The side chain of His-396 is predicted to act as a hydrogen-bond donor to the oxygen atoms of the intermediate. This architecture promotes the nucleophilic attack of the substrate onto the terminal oxygen of the hydroperoxyflavin. Comparative analysis with the structures of other flavoenzymes indicates that a distinctive feature of monooxygenases is the presence of specific cavities that encapsulate and stabilize the crucial hydroperoxyflavin intermediate. PMID:17227849

  7. Single Amino Acid Switch between a Flavin-Dependent Dehalogenase and Nitroreductase.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Arnab; Rokita, Steven E

    2015-12-16

    A single mutation within a flavoprotein is capable of switching the catalytic activity of a dehalogenase into a nitroreductase. This change in function correlates with a destabilization of the one-electron-reduced flavin semiquinone that is differentially expressed in the nitro-FMN reductase superfamily during redox cycling. The diversity of function within such a superfamily therefore has the potential to arise from rapid evolution, and its members should provide a convenient basis for developing new catalysts with an altered specificity of choice. PMID:26616824

  8. Structure and function of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase and nitric oxide synthase reductase domain

    SciTech Connect

    Iyanagi, Takashi . E-mail: iyanagi@spring8.or.jp

    2005-12-09

    NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) reductase domains are members of the FAD-FMN family of proteins. The FAD accepts two reducing equivalents from NADPH (dehydrogenase flavin) and FMN acts as a one-electron carrier (flavodoxin-type flavin) for the transfer from NADPH to the heme protein, in which the FMNH {sup {center_dot}}/FMNH{sub 2} couple donates electrons to cytochrome P450 at constant oxidation-reduction potential. Although the interflavin electron transfer between FAD and FMN is not strictly regulated in CPR, electron transfer is activated in neuronal NOS reductase domain upon binding calmodulin (CaM), in which the CaM-bound activated form can function by a similar mechanism to that of CPR. The oxygenated form and spin state of substrate-bound cytochrome P450 in perfused rat liver are also discussed in terms of stepwise one-electron transfer from CPR. This review provides a historical perspective of the microsomal mixed-function oxidases including CPR and P450. In addition, a new model for the redox-linked conformational changes during the catalytic cycle for both CPR and NOS reductase domain is also discussed.

  9. UbiX is a flavin prenyltransferase required for bacterial ubiquinone biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    White, Mark D.; Payne, Karl A.P.; Fisher, Karl; Marshall, Stephen A.; Parker, David; Rattray, Nicholas J.W.; Trivedi, Drupad K.; Goodacre, Royston; Rigby, Stephen E.J.; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Hay, Sam; Leys, David

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquinone, or coenzyme Q, is a ubiquitous lipid-soluble redox cofactor that is an essential component of electron transfer chains1. Eleven genes have been implicated in bacterial ubiquinone biosynthesis, including ubiX and ubiD, which are responsible for decarboxylation of the 3-octaprenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate precursor2. Despite structural and biochemical characterization of UbiX as an FMN-binding protein, no decarboxylase activity has been detected3–4. We report here that UbiX produces a novel flavin-derived cofactor required for the decarboxylase activity of UbiD5. UbiX acts as a flavin prenyltransferase, linking a dimethylallyl moiety to the flavin N5 and C6 atoms. This adds a fourth non-aromatic ring to the flavin isoalloxazine group. In contrast to other prenyltransferases6–7, UbiX is metal-independent and requires dimethylallyl-monophosphate as substrate. Kinetic crystallography reveals that the prenyl transferase mechanism of UbiX resembles that of the terpene synthases8. The active site environment is dominated by π-systems, which assist phosphate-C1’ bond breakage following FMN reduction, leading to formation of the N5-C1’ bond. UbiX then acts as a chaperone for adduct reorientation, via transient carbocation species, leading ultimately to formation of the dimethylallyl C3’-C6 bond. The study establishes the mechanism for formation of a new flavin-derived cofactor, extending both flavin and terpenoid biochemical repertoire. PMID:26083743

  10. The ferredoxin-thioredoxin system of a green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: identification and characterization of thioredoxins and ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huppe, H. C.; de Lamotte-Guery, F.; Buchanan, B. B.

    1990-01-01

    The components of the ferredoxin-thioredoxin (FT) system of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii have been purified and characterized. The system resembled that of higher plants in consisting of a ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR) and two types of thioredoxin, a single f and two m species, m1 and m2. The Chlamydomonas m and f thioredoxins were antigenically similar to their higher-plant counterparts, but not to one another. The m thioredoxins were recognized by antibodies to both higher plant m and bacterial thioredoxins, whereas the thioredoxin f was not. Chlamydomonas thioredoxin f reacted, although weakly, with the antibody to spinach thioredoxin f. The algal thioredoxin f differed from thioredoxins studied previously in behaving as a basic protein on ion-exchange columns. Purification revealed that the algal thioredoxins had molecular masses (Mrs) typical of thioredoxins from other sources, m1 and m2 being 10700 and f 11500. Chlamydomonas FTR had two dissimilar subunits, a feature common to all FTRs studied thus far. One, the 13-kDa ("similar") subunit, resembled its counterpart from other sources in both size and antigenicity. The other, 10-kDa ("variable") subunit was not recognized by antibodies to any FTR tested. When combined with spinach, (Spinacia oleracea L.) thylakoid membranes, the components of the FT system functioned in the light activation of the standard target enzymes from chloroplasts, corn (Zea mays L.) NADP-malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.82) and spinach fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11) as well as the chloroplast-type fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase from Chlamydomonas. Activity was greatest if ferredoxin and other components of the FT system were from Chlamydomonas. The capacity of the Chlamydomonas FT system to activate autologous FBPase indicates that light regulates the photosynthetic carbon metabolism of green algae as in other oxygenic photosynthetic organisms.

  11. Genetic Control of Biosynthesis and Transport of Riboflavin and Flavin Nucleotides and Construction of Robust Biotechnological Producers†

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Charles A.; Sibirny, Andriy A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Riboflavin [7,8-dimethyl-10-(1′-d-ribityl)isoalloxazine, vitamin B2] is an obligatory component of human and animal diets, as it serves as the precursor of flavin coenzymes, flavin mononucleotide, and flavin adenine dinucleotide, which are involved in oxidative metabolism and other processes. Commercially produced riboflavin is used in agriculture, medicine, and the food industry. Riboflavin synthesis starts from GTP and ribulose-5-phosphate and proceeds through pyrimidine and pteridine intermediates. Flavin nucleotides are synthesized in two consecutive reactions from riboflavin. Some microorganisms and all animal cells are capable of riboflavin uptake, whereas many microorganisms have distinct systems for riboflavin excretion to the medium. Regulation of riboflavin synthesis in bacteria occurs by repression at the transcriptional level by flavin mononucleotide, which binds to nascent noncoding mRNA and blocks further transcription (named the riboswitch). In flavinogenic molds, riboflavin overproduction starts at the stationary phase and is accompanied by derepression of enzymes involved in riboflavin synthesis, sporulation, and mycelial lysis. In flavinogenic yeasts, transcriptional repression of riboflavin synthesis is exerted by iron ions and not by flavins. The putative transcription factor encoded by SEF1 is somehow involved in this regulation. Most commercial riboflavin is currently produced or was produced earlier by microbial synthesis using special selected strains of Bacillus subtilis, Ashbya gossypii, and Candida famata. Whereas earlier RF overproducers were isolated by classical selection, current producers of riboflavin and flavin nucleotides have been developed using modern approaches of metabolic engineering that involve overexpression of structural and regulatory genes of the RF biosynthetic pathway as well as genes involved in the overproduction of the purine precursor of riboflavin, GTP. PMID:21646432

  12. Genetic control of biosynthesis and transport of riboflavin and flavin nucleotides and construction of robust biotechnological producers.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Charles A; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2011-06-01

    Riboflavin [7,8-dimethyl-10-(1'-d-ribityl)isoalloxazine, vitamin B₂] is an obligatory component of human and animal diets, as it serves as the precursor of flavin coenzymes, flavin mononucleotide, and flavin adenine dinucleotide, which are involved in oxidative metabolism and other processes. Commercially produced riboflavin is used in agriculture, medicine, and the food industry. Riboflavin synthesis starts from GTP and ribulose-5-phosphate and proceeds through pyrimidine and pteridine intermediates. Flavin nucleotides are synthesized in two consecutive reactions from riboflavin. Some microorganisms and all animal cells are capable of riboflavin uptake, whereas many microorganisms have distinct systems for riboflavin excretion to the medium. Regulation of riboflavin synthesis in bacteria occurs by repression at the transcriptional level by flavin mononucleotide, which binds to nascent noncoding mRNA and blocks further transcription (named the riboswitch). In flavinogenic molds, riboflavin overproduction starts at the stationary phase and is accompanied by derepression of enzymes involved in riboflavin synthesis, sporulation, and mycelial lysis. In flavinogenic yeasts, transcriptional repression of riboflavin synthesis is exerted by iron ions and not by flavins. The putative transcription factor encoded by SEF1 is somehow involved in this regulation. Most commercial riboflavin is currently produced or was produced earlier by microbial synthesis using special selected strains of Bacillus subtilis, Ashbya gossypii, and Candida famata. Whereas earlier RF overproducers were isolated by classical selection, current producers of riboflavin and flavin nucleotides have been developed using modern approaches of metabolic engineering that involve overexpression of structural and regulatory genes of the RF biosynthetic pathway as well as genes involved in the overproduction of the purine precursor of riboflavin, GTP. PMID:21646432

  13. A VOLTAMMETRIC FLAVIN MICROELECTRODE FOR USE IN BIOFILMS

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hung Duc; Renslow, Ryan; Babauta, Jerome; Ahmed, Bulbul; Beyenal, Haluk

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms used in bioelectrochemical systems are expected to transfer electrons using electron transfer mediators. One mediator type, flavins, which includes flavin mononucleotide, riboflavin, and flavin adenine dinucleotide, has been found to be endogenously produced by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. However, the presence and concentration of flavins inside a S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilm have never been reported. The goal of this study was to develop a flavin microelectrode capable of measuring flavins inside a living biofilm and apply it to a biofilm which produces flavins. Because flavins are electrochemically active molecules, the flavin microelectrode was based on detection via square-wave voltammetry. The microelectrode consisted of a carbon working electrode with a 10–30 μm tip diameter, a built-in platinum counter electrode, and a Ag/AgCl reference electrode, all enclosed in a glass outer case. The microelectrode was calibrated between 0.1 μM and 10 μM flavins and showed a linear correlation between flavin concentration and peak currents located at −424 mVAg/AgCl on a square-wave voltammogram. We also developed a model to explain the electrochemical mechanism of flavin detection, and to determine the effective surface area of the microelectrode, the standard reduction potential, and the transfer coefficient. We found that the effective surface area of the microelectrode was close to 100 times the projected surface area. The model predicted a standard reduction potential for RF/RFH2 of −419 mVAg/AgCl at 20 °C and a transfer coefficient of 0.45. Lastly, we measured flavin concentration inside a S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilm grown on a glass surface using oxygen as the electron acceptor. The flavin concentration reached 0.7 μM, increasing near the bottom of the biofilm, where no oxygen was present. This shows the possibility that flavins are produced in the anaerobic zone to act as intermediate electron acceptors in the deeper parts of the biofilm, where

  14. Structure and comparative analysis of the genes encoding component C of methyl coenzyme M reductase in the extremely thermophilic archaebacterium Methanothermus fervidus.

    PubMed Central

    Weil, C F; Cram, D S; Sherf, B A; Reeve, J N

    1988-01-01

    A 6-kilobase-pair (kbp) region of the genome of the extremely thermophilic arachaebacterium Methanothermus fervidus which encodes the alpha, beta, and gamma subunit polypeptides of component C of methyl coenzyme M reductase was cloned and sequenced. Genes encoding the beta (mcrB) and gamma (mcrG) subunits were separated by two open reading frames (designated mcrC and mcrD) which encode unknown gene products. The M. fervidus genes were preceded by ribosome-binding sites, separated by short A + T-rich intergenic regions, contained unexpectedly few NNC codons, and exhibited inflexible codon usage at some locations. Sites of transcription initiation and termination flanking the mcrBDCGA cluster of genes in M. fervidus were identified. The sequences of the genes, the encoded polypeptides, and transcription regulatory signals in M. fervidus were compared with the functionally equivalent sequences from two mesophilic methanogens (Methanococcus vannielii and Methanosarcina barkeri) and from a moderate thermophile (Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum Marburg). The amino acid sequences of the polypeptides encoded by the mcrBCGA genes in the two thermophiles were approximately 80% identical, whereas all other pairs of these gene products contained between 50 and 60% identical amino acid residues. The mcrD gene products have diverged more than the products of the other mcr genes. Identification of highly conserved regions within mcrA and mcrB suggested oligonucleotide sequences which might be developed as hybridization probes which could be used for identifying and quantifying all methanogens. Images PMID:3170483

  15. Quantitive determination of flavin nucleotide using the bacterial bioluminescent reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.

    1969-01-01

    Photometric method based on the use of bacterial luminiscent reaction quantitatively detects the presence of flavin compounds in all forms of life. Aqueous cellular dispersion of a biological sample with an aqueous perchloric acid ruptures the cells and frees the flavin coenzymes from their proteins.

  16. Remaining challenges in cellular flavin cofactor homeostasis and flavoprotein biogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Colella, Matilde; Brizio, Carmen; Difonzo, Graziana; Fiorino, Giuseppina Maria; Leone, Piero; Brandsch, Roderich; Bonomi, Francesco; Iametti, Stefania; Barile, Maria

    2015-04-01

    The primary role of the water-soluble vitamin B2 (riboflavin) in cell biology is connected with its conversion into FMN and FAD, the cofactors of a large number of dehydrogenases, oxidases and reductases involved in energetic metabolism, epigenetics, protein folding, as well as in a number of diverse regulatory processes. The problem of localisation of flavin cofactor synthesis events and in particular of the FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2) in HepG2 cells is addressed here by confocal microscopy in the frame of its relationships with kinetics of FAD synthesis and delivery to client apo-flavoproteins. FAD synthesis catalysed by recombinant isoform 2 of FADS occurs via an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which ATP binds prior to FMN, and pyrophosphate is released before FAD. Spectrophotometric continuous assays of the reconstitution rate of apo-D-aminoacid oxidase with its cofactor, allowed us to propose that besides its FAD synthesising activity, hFADS is able to operate as a FAD "chaperone". The physical interaction between FAD forming enzyme and its clients was further confirmed by dot blot and immunoprecipitation experiments carried out testing as a client either a nuclear or a mitochondrial enzyme that is lysine specific demethylase 1 (LSD1, EC 1.-.-.-) and dimethylglycine dehydrogenase (Me2GlyDH, EC 1.5.8.4), respectively which carry out similar reactions of oxidative demethylation, assisted by tetrahydrofolate used to form 5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate. A direct transfer of the cofactor from hFADS2 to apo-dimethyl glycine dehydrogenase was also demonstrated. Thus, FAD synthesis and delivery to these enzymes are crucial processes for bioenergetics and nutri-epigenetics of liver cells.

  17. TRAIL-Based High Throughput Screening Reveals a Link between TRAIL-Mediated Apoptosis and Glutathione Reductase, a Key Component of Oxidative Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Rozanov, Dmitri; Cheltsov, Anton; Sergienko, Eduard; Vasile, Stefan; Golubkov, Vladislav; Aleshin, Alexander E.; Levin, Trevor; Traer, Elie; Hann, Byron; Freimuth, Julia; Alexeev, Nikita; Alekseyev, Max A.; Budko, Sergey P; Bächinger, Hans Peter; Spellman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A high throughput screen for compounds that induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis identified ML100 as an active chemical probe, which potentiated TRAIL activity in prostate carcinoma PPC-1 and melanoma MDA-MB-435 cells. Follow-up in silico modeling and profiling in cell-based assays allowed us to identify NSC130362, pharmacophore analog of ML100 that induced 65-95% cytotoxicity in cancer cells and did not affect the viability of human primary hepatocytes. In agreement with the activation of the apoptotic pathway, both ML100 and NSC130362 synergistically with TRAIL induced caspase-3/7 activity in MDA-MB-435 cells. Subsequent affinity chromatography and inhibition studies convincingly demonstrated that glutathione reductase (GSR), a key component of the oxidative stress response, is a target of NSC130362. In accordance with the role of GSR in the TRAIL pathway, GSR gene silencing potentiated TRAIL activity in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. Inhibition of GSR activity resulted in the induction of oxidative stress, as was evidenced by an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxidation of mitochondrial membrane after NSC130362 treatment in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. The antioxidant reduced glutathione (GSH) fully protected MDA-MB-435 cells from cell lysis induced by NSC130362 and TRAIL, thereby further confirming the interplay between GSR and TRAIL. As a consequence of activation of oxidative stress, combined treatment of different oxidative stress inducers and NSC130362 promoted cell death in a variety of cancer cells but not in hepatocytes in cell-based assays and in in vivo, in a mouse tumor xenograft model. PMID:26075913

  18. Flavin Electron Shuttles Dominate Extracellular Electron Transfer by Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Kotloski, Nicholas J.; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is widely studied for its ability to respire a diverse array of soluble and insoluble electron acceptors. The ability to breathe insoluble substrates is defined as extracellular electron transfer and can occur via direct contact or by electron shuttling in S. oneidensis. To determine the contribution of flavin electron shuttles in extracellular electron transfer, a transposon mutagenesis screen was performed with S. oneidensis to identify mutants unable to secrete flavins. A multidrug and toxin efflux transporter encoded by SO_0702 was identified and renamed bfe (bacterial flavin adenine dinucleotide [FAD] exporter) based on phenotypic characterization. Deletion of bfe resulted in a severe decrease in extracellular flavins, while overexpression of bfe increased the concentration of extracellular flavins. Strains lacking bfe had no defect in reduction of soluble Fe(III), but these strains were deficient in the rate of insoluble Fe(III) oxide reduction, which was alleviated by the addition of exogenous flavins. To test a different insoluble electron acceptor, graphite electrode bioreactors were set up to measure current produced by wild-type S. oneidensis and the Δbfe mutant. With the same concentration of supplemented flavins, the two strains produced similar amounts of current. However, when exogenous flavins were not supplemented to bioreactors, bfe mutant strains produced significantly less current than the wild type. We have demonstrated that flavin electron shuttling accounts for ~75% of extracellular electron transfer to insoluble substrates by S. oneidensis and have identified the first FAD transporter in bacteria. PMID:23322638

  19. A biomimetic redox flow battery based on flavin mononucleotide

    PubMed Central

    Orita, Akihiro; Verde, Michael G.; Sakai, Masanori; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2016-01-01

    The versatility in design of redox flow batteries makes them apt to efficiently store energy in large-scale applications at low cost. The discovery of inexpensive organic electroactive materials for use in aqueous flow battery electrolytes is highly attractive, but is thus far limited. Here we report on a flow battery using an aqueous electrolyte based on the sodium salt of flavin mononucleotide. Flavins are highly versatile electroactive molecules, which catalyse a multitude of redox reactions in biological systems. We use nicotinamide (vitamin B3) as a hydrotropic agent to enhance the water solubility of flavin mononucleotide. A redox flow battery using flavin mononucleotide negative and ferrocyanide positive electrolytes in strong base shows stable cycling performance, with over 99% capacity retention over the course of 100 cycles. We hypothesize that this is enabled due to the oxidized and reduced forms of FMN-Na being stabilized by resonance structures. PMID:27767026

  20. Complexation of cyclodextrins with flavines in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhova, I. V.

    2014-01-01

    Data on the binding mode and thermodynamics of complex formation for various cyclodextrins (CDs) with flavines are summarized. It is shown that the governing factors of complexation are the size, degree of hydration, and hydrophobicity of the guest molecule. It is found that the presence of small hydrophobic substituents in a flavine's structure increases their affinity toward cyclodextrin cavities, raising the stability of a complex. In contrast, the presence of bulky and polar side groups in a flavine's structure prevents its inclusion in a macrocyclic cavity and weakens complexation. The size of a CD cavity plays a minor role in the interaction between CDs and flavines, since the inclusion of a guest molecule is only partial.

  1. Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 inhibits the activity of drug-metabolizing cytochromes P450 and binds to cytochrome P450 reductase.

    PubMed

    Szczesna-Skorupa, Elzbieta; Kemper, Byron

    2011-03-01

    Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) has been shown to interact with several cytochromes P450 (P450s) and to activate enzymatic activity of P450s involved in sterol biosynthesis. We analyzed the interactions of PGRMC1 with the drug-metabolizing P450s, CYP2C2, CYP2C8, and CYP3A4, in transfected cells. Based on coimmunoprecipitation assays, PGRMC1 bound efficiently to all three P450s, and binding to the catalytic cytoplasmic domain of CYP2C2 was much more efficient than to a chimera containing only the N-terminal transmembrane domain. Down-regulation of PGRMC1 expression levels in human embryonic kidney 293 and HepG2 cell lines stably expressing PGRMC1-specific small interfering RNA had no effect on the endoplasmic reticulum localization and expression levels of P450s, whereas enzymatic activities of CYP2C2, CYP2C8, and CYP3A4 were slightly higher in PGRMC1-deficient cells. Cotransfection of cells with P450s and PGRMC1 resulted in PGRMC1 concentration-dependent inhibition of the P450 activities, and this inhibition was partially reversed by increased expression of the P450 reductase (CPR). In contrast, CYP51 activity was decreased by down-regulation of PGRMC1 and expression of PGRMC1 in the PGRMC1-deficient cells increased CYP51 activity. In cells cotransfected with CPR and PGRMC1, strong binding of CPR to PGRMC1 was observed; however, in the presence of CYP2C2, interaction of PGRMC1 with CPR was significantly reduced, suggesting that CYP2C2 competes with CPR for binding to PGRMC1. These data show that in contrast to sterol synthesizing P450, PGRMC1 is not required for the activities of several drug-metabolizing P450s, and its overexpression inhibits those P450 activities. Furthermore, PGRMC1 binds to CPR, which may influence P450 activity.

  2. Metal enhanced fluorescence of flavin mononucleotide using new plasmonic platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Synak, Anna; Grobelna, Beata; Raut, Sangram; Bojarski, Piotr; Gryczyński, Ignacy; Karczewski, Jakub; Shtoyko, Tanya

    2016-09-01

    New plasmonic platform was successfully obtained to investigate the increase of fluorescence intensity of a fluorophore in the presence of silver nanoparticles. A flavin mononucleotide, was selected by us as a fluorophore for this study as a very important biological compound playing a key role in many biochemical process. Plasmonic platforms were characterized by means of luminescence spectroscopy. Flavin mononucleotide deposited on plasmonic platform exhibits dramatic emission enhancements in presence of silver nanoparticles deposited on gold mirror.

  3. Trp(359) regulates flavin thermodynamics and coenzyme selectivity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis FprA.

    PubMed

    Neeli, Rajasekhar; Sabri, Muna; McLean, Kirsty J; Dunford, Adrian J; Scrutton, Nigel S; Leys, David; Munro, Andrew W

    2008-05-01

    Mtb (Mycobacterium tuberculosis) FprA (flavoprotein reductase A) is an NAD(P)H-dependent FAD-binding reductase that is structurally related to mammalian adrenodoxin reductase, and which supports the catalytic function of Mtb cytochrome P450s. Trp(359), proximal to the FAD, was investigated in light of its potential role in controlling coenzyme interactions, as observed for similarly located aromatic residues in diflavin reductases. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that a tryptophan residue corresponding to Trp(359) is conserved across FprA-type enzymes and in adrenodoxin reductases. W359A/H mutants of Mtb FprA were generated, expressed and the proteins characterized to define the role of Trp(359). W359A/H mutants exhibited perturbed UV-visible absorption/fluorescence properties. The FAD semiquinone formed in wild-type NADPH-reduced FprA was destabilized in the W359A/H mutants, which also had more positive FAD midpoint reduction potentials (-168/-181 mV respectively, versus the standard hydrogen electrode, compared with -230 mV for wild-type FprA). The W359A/H mutants had lower ferricyanide reductase k(cat) and NAD(P)H K(m) values, but this led to improvements in catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) with NADH as reducing coenzyme (9.6/18.8 muM(-1).min(-1) respectively, compared with 5.7 muM(-1).min(-1) for wild-type FprA). Stopped-flow spectroscopy revealed NAD(P)H-dependent FAD reduction as rate-limiting in steady-state catalysis, and to be retarded in mutants (e.g. limiting rate constants for NADH-dependent FAD reduction were 25.4 s(-1) for wild-type FprA and 4.8 s(-1)/13.4 s(-1) for W359A/H mutants). Diminished mutant FAD content (particularly in W359H FprA) highlighted the importance of Trp(359) for flavin stability. The results demonstrate that the conserved Trp(359) is critical in regulating FprA FAD binding, thermodynamic properties, catalytic efficiency and coenzyme selectivity.

  4. The reduced flavin-dependent monooxygenase SfnG converts dimethylsulfone to methanesulfinate.

    PubMed

    Wicht, Denyce K

    2016-08-15

    The biochemical pathway through which sulfur may be assimilated from dimethylsulfide (DMS) is proposed to proceed via oxidation of DMS to dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and subsequent conversion of DMSO to dimethylsulfone (DMSO2). Analogous chemical oxidation processes involving biogenic DMS in the atmosphere result in the deposition of DMSO2 into the terrestrial environment. Elucidating the enzymatic pathways that involve DMSO2 contribute to our understanding of the global sulfur cycle. Dimethylsulfone monooxygenase SfnG and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) reductase MsuE from the genome of the aerobic soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 were produced in Escherichia coli, purified, and biochemically characterized. The enzyme MsuE functions as a reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-dependent FMN reductase with apparent steady state kinetic parameters of Km = 69 μM and kcat/Km = 9 min(-1) μM (-1) using NADH as the variable substrate, and Km = 8 μM and kcat/Km = 105 min(-1) μM (-1) using FMN as the variable substrate. The enzyme SfnG functions as a flavoprotein monooxygenase and converts DMSO2 to methanesulfinate in the presence of FMN, NADH, and MsuE, as evidenced by (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The results suggest that methanesulfinate is a biochemical intermediate in sulfur assimilation. PMID:27392454

  5. Identification of the 7-Hydroxymethyl Chlorophyll a Reductase of the Chlorophyll Cycle in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Meguro, Miki; Ito, Hisashi; Takabayashi, Atsushi; Tanaka, Ryouichi; Tanaka, Ayumi

    2011-01-01

    The interconversion of chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b, referred to as the chlorophyll cycle, plays a crucial role in the processes of greening, acclimation to light intensity, and senescence. The chlorophyll cycle consists of three reactions: the conversions of chlorophyll a to chlorophyll b by chlorophyllide a oxygenase, chlorophyll b to 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a by chlorophyll b reductase, and 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a to chlorophyll a by 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a reductase. We identified 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a reductase, which is the last remaining unidentified enzyme of the chlorophyll cycle, from Arabidopsis thaliana by genetic and biochemical methods. Recombinant 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a reductase converted 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a to chlorophyll a using ferredoxin. Both sequence and biochemical analyses showed that 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a reductase contains flavin adenine dinucleotide and an iron-sulfur center. In addition, a phylogenetic analysis elucidated the evolution of 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a reductase from divinyl chlorophyllide vinyl reductase. A mutant lacking 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a reductase was found to accumulate 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a and pheophorbide a. Furthermore, this accumulation of pheophorbide a in the mutant was rescued by the inactivation of the chlorophyll b reductase gene. The downregulation of pheophorbide a oxygenase activity is discussed in relation to 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a accumulation. PMID:21934147

  6. Amphiphilic flavins in micelles and Langmuir-Blodgett films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, Shadonna Patrice

    2002-01-01

    Flavins are important natural coenzymes for a large number of redox enzymes known as flavoenzymes. The oxidation of NADH to NAD is one of many important flavoenzymes because it is a key step in respiration. Surfactants have been known to accelerate or inhibit these biological redox reactions. We used four different flavins and four different surfactants to observe the effect mixing these compounds would have on the oxidation of N-benzyldihydronicotinamide, a synthetic analog of the natural nicotinamide dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). The four surfactants used are dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB, a cationic surfactant), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, an anionic surfactant), perfluoro-1-octanesulfonicacid tetraethylammonium salt (POAT, a cation fluorinated surfactant), and [3-[[(heptadecafluorooctyl) sulfonyl]amino]propyl]trimethyl-ammonim iodide (17FOSI, an anionic fluorinated surfactant). The four flavins used are N(10)-butyl-7-trimethylflavin, N(10)-dodecylflavin-7-carboxylic acid, N(10)-butylflavin-7-carboxylic acid, and N(10)-octylflavin-7-carboxylic acid. The kinetics study demonstrated mostly an inhibitory effect on the catalytic oxidation reactions. The second part of the dissertation dealt with monolayers and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films. We used N(10)-hexadecyl-isoalloxazine-7-carboxylic acid (C16Fl) as our representative flavin and used two amino acid surfactants N-stearoyl-L-tyrosine methyl ester (STME) and N stearoyl-L-serine methyl ester (SSME) to form mixed monolayers. The monolayer studies provided information about how close in proximity the flavin's ring and the flavin's hydrocarbons are to the liquid surface. For the LB films, the transfer of the monolayers to the indium tin oxide (ITO) glass slides with the mixtures of the amino acids occurred with high transfer ratios, the ratio for STME being higher than the ratio for SSME. The electron transfer rates for LB films of flavin derivatives are slower than those reported for

  7. Cloned and expressed nitric oxide synthase structurally resembles cytochrome P-450 reductase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredt, David S.; Hwang, Paul M.; Glatt, Charles E.; Lowenstein, Charles; Reed, Randall R.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1991-06-01

    Nitric oxide is a messenger molecule, mediating the effect of endothelium-derived relaxing factor in blood vessels and the cytotoxic actions of macrophages, and playing a part in neuronal communication in the brain. Cloning of a complementary DNA for brain nitric oxide synthase reveals recognition sites for NADPH, FAD, flavin mononucleotide and calmodulin as well as phosphorylation sites, indicating that the synthase is regulated by many different factors. The only known mammalian enzyme with close homology is cytochrome P-450 reductase.

  8. Redox State of Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide Drives Substrate Binding and Product Release in Escherichia coli Succinate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Victor W.T.; Piragasam, Ramanaguru Siva; Rothery, Richard A.; Maklashina, Elena; Cecchini, Gary; Weiner, Joel H.

    2016-01-01

    The Complex II family of enzymes, comprising the respiratory succinate dehydrogenases and fumarate reductases, catalyze reversible interconversion of succinate and fumarate. In contrast to the covalent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor assembled in these enzymes, the soluble fumarate reductases (e.g. that from Shewanella frigidimarina) that assemble a noncovalent FAD cannot catalyze succinate oxidation but retain the ability to reduce fumarate. In this study, an SdhA-H45A variant that eliminates the site of the 8α-N3-histidyl covalent linkage between the protein and the FAD was examined. The variants SdhA-R286A/K/Y and -H242A/Y, that target residues thought to be important for substrate binding and catalysis were also studied. The variants SdhA-H45A and -R286A/K/Y resulted in assembly of a noncovalent FAD cofactor, which led to a significant decrease (−87 mV or more) in its reduction potential. The variant enzymes were studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy following stand-alone reduction and potentiometric titrations. The “free” and “occupied” states of the active site were linked to the reduced and oxidized states of the FAD, respectively. Our data allows for a proposed model of succinate oxidation that is consistent with tunnel diode effects observed in the succinate dehydrogenase enzyme and a preference for fumarate reduction catalysis in fumarate reductase homologues that assemble a noncovalent FAD. PMID:25569225

  9. Evidence for a Hexaheteromeric Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase in Moorella thermoacetica

    PubMed Central

    Mock, Johanna; Wang, Shuning; Huang, Haiyan; Kahnt, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Moorella thermoacetica can grow with H2 and CO2, forming acetic acid from 2 CO2 via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. All enzymes involved in this pathway have been characterized to date, except for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MetF). We report here that the M. thermoacetica gene that putatively encodes this enzyme, metF, is part of a transcription unit also containing the genes hdrCBA, mvhD, and metV. MetF copurified with the other five proteins encoded in the unit in a hexaheteromeric complex with an apparent molecular mass in the 320-kDa range. The 40-fold-enriched preparation contained per mg protein 3.1 nmol flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), 3.4 nmol flavin mononucleotide (FMN), and 110 nmol iron, almost as predicted from the primary structure of the six subunits. It catalyzed the reduction of methylenetetrahydrofolate with reduced benzyl viologen but not with NAD(P)H in either the absence or presence of oxidized ferredoxin. It also catalyzed the reversible reduction of benzyl viologen with NADH (diaphorase activity). Heterologous expression of the metF gene in Escherichia coli revealed that the subunit MetF contains one FMN rather than FAD. MetF exhibited 70-fold-higher methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase activity with benzyl viologen when produced together with MetV, which in part shows sequence similarity to MetF. Heterologously produced HdrA contained 2 FADs and had NAD-specific diaphorase activity. Our results suggested that the physiological electron donor for methylenetetrahydrofolate reduction in M. thermoacetica is NADH and that the exergonic reduction of methylenetetrahydrofolate with NADH is coupled via flavin-based electron bifurcation with the endergonic reduction of an electron acceptor, whose identity remains unknown. PMID:25002540

  10. Is the flavin-deficient red blood cell common in Maremma, Italy, an important defense against malaria in this area?

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, B. B.; Scattoni, M.; Perry, G. M.; Galvan, P.; Giuberti, M.; Buonocore, G.; Vullo, C.

    1994-01-01

    There is a high prevalence of a familial flavin-deficient red blood cell in Ferrara province in the Po delta in northern Italy, believed to have been selected for by malaria which was endemic from the 12th century. In the present study, activities of FAD-dependent red-cell glutathione reductase (EGR) in the Grosseto area of Maremma on the west coast of Italy where malaria was endemic from 300 B.C. are compared both with activities in the Ferrara area and with activities where there was no history of endemic malaria--in the Florence area and in London in people of Anglo-Saxon origin. EGR activities were similar in Grosseto and Ferrara and were significantly lower than in Florence and London. As previously found in Ferrara, low EGR activity in Grosseto was shown to be unrelated to low dietary riboflavin intake. These findings in Grosseto, suggesting selection by malaria, are particularly interesting because, unlike the situation in Ferrara and most other malarial areas, the prevalence of thalassemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency is very low, and they do not appear to have been selected for in Maremma. It is possible that a flavin-deficient red cell, known to inhibit growth of the malaria parasite, was an important protecting factor in the population of this area over the centuries. PMID:7977361

  11. Excited flavin and pterin coenzyme molecules in evolution.

    PubMed

    Kritsky, M S; Telegina, T A; Vechtomova, Y L; Kolesnikov, M P; Lyudnikova, T A; Golub, O A

    2010-10-01

    Excited flavin and pterin molecules are active in intermolecular energy transfer and in photocatalysis of redox reactions resulting in conservation of free energy. Flavin-containing pigments produced in models of the prebiotic environment are capable of converting photon energy into the energy of phosphoanhydride bonds of ATP. However, during evolution photochemical reactions involving excited FMN or FAD molecules failed to become participants of bioenergy transfer systems, but they appear in enzymes responsible for repair of UV-damaged DNA (DNA photolyases) and also in receptors of blue and UV-A light regulating vital functions of organisms. The families of these photoproteins (DNA-photolyases and cryptochromes, LOV-domain- and BLUF-domain-containing proteins) are different in the structure and in mechanisms of the photoprocesses. The excited flavin molecules are involved in photochemical processes in reaction centers of these photoproteins. In DNA photolyases and cryptochromes the excitation energy on the reaction center flavin is supplied from an antenna molecule that is bound with the same polypeptide. The role of antenna is played by MTHF or by 8-HDF in some DNA photolyases, i.e. also by molecules with known coenzyme functions in biocatalysis. Differences in the structure of chromophore-binding domains suggest an independent origin of the photoprotein families. The analysis of structure and properties of coenzyme molecules reveals some specific features that were significant in evolution for their being selected as chromophores in these proteins.

  12. Cofactor Trapping, a New Method To Produce Flavin Mononucleotide ▿

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Ulrich; Svensson, Vera; Wirtz, Astrid; Knieps-Grünhagen, Esther; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2011-01-01

    We have purified flavin mononucleotide (FMN) from a flavoprotein-overexpressing Escherichia coli strain by cofactor trapping. This approach uses an overexpressed flavoprotein to trap FMN, which is thus removed from the cascade regulating FMN production in E. coli. This, in turn, allows the isolation of highly pure FMN. PMID:21131527

  13. Covalent immobilization of a flavoprotein monooxygenase via its flavin cofactor.

    PubMed

    Krzek, Marzena; van Beek, Hugo L; Permentier, Hjalmar P; Bischoff, Rainer; Fraaije, Marco W

    2016-01-01

    A generic approach for flavoenzyme immobilization was developed in which the flavin cofactor is used for anchoring enzymes onto the carrier. It exploits the tight binding of flavin cofactors to their target apo proteins. The method was tested for phenylacetone monooxygenase (PAMO) which is a well-studied and industrially interesting biocatalyst. Also a fusion protein was tested: PAMO fused to phosphite dehydrogenase (PTDH-PAMO). The employed flavin cofactor derivative, N6-(6-carboxyhexyl)-FAD succinimidylester (FAD*), was covalently anchored to agarose beads and served for apo enzyme immobilization by their reconstitution into holo enzymes. The thus immobilized enzymes retained their activity and remained active after several rounds of catalysis. For both tested enzymes, the generated agarose beads contained 3 U per g of dry resin. Notably, FAD-immobilized PAMO was found to be more thermostable (40% activity after 1 h at 60 °C) when compared to PAMO in solution (no activity detected after 1 h at 60 °C). The FAD-decorated agarose material could be easily recycled allowing multiple rounds of immobilization. This method allows an efficient and selective immobilization of flavoproteins via the FAD flavin cofactor onto a recyclable carrier.

  14. Why flavins are not competitors of chlorophyll in the evolution of biological converters of solar energy.

    PubMed

    Kritsky, Mikhail S; Telegina, Taisiya A; Vechtomova, Yulia L; Buglak, Andrey A

    2012-12-27

    Excited flavin molecules can photocatalyze reactions, leading to the accumulation of free energy in the products, and the data accumulated through biochemical experiments and by modeling prebiological processes suggest that flavins were available in the earliest stages of evolution. Furthermore, model experiments have shown that abiogenic flavin conjugated with a polyamino acid matrix, a pigment that photocatalyzes the phosphorylation of ADP to form ATP, could have been present in the prebiotic environment. Indeed, excited flavin molecules play key roles in many photoenzymes and regulatory photoreceptors, and the substantial structural differences between photoreceptor families indicate that evolution has repeatedly used flavins as chromophores for photoreceptor proteins. Some of these photoreceptors are equipped with a light-harvesting antenna, which transfers excitation energy to chemically reactive flavins in the reaction center. The sum of the available data suggests that evolution could have led to the formation of a flavin-based biological converter to convert light energy into energy in the form of ATP.

  15. Purification and characterization of a soybean flour-inducible ferredoxin reductase of Streptomyces griseus.

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandra, M; Seetharam, R; Emptage, M H; Sariaslani, F S

    1991-01-01

    We have purified an NADH-dependent ferredoxin reductase from crude extracts of Streptomyces griseus cells grown in soybean flour-enriched medium. The purified protein has a molecular weight of 60,000 as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. The enzyme requires Mg2+ ion for catalytic activity in reconstituted assays, and its spectral properties resemble those of many other flavin adenine dinucleotide-containing flavoproteins. A relatively large number of hydrophobic amino acid residues are found by amino acid analysis, and beginning with residue 7, a consensus flavin adenine dinucleotide binding sequence, GXGXXGXXXA, is revealed in this protein. In the presence of NADH, the ferredoxin reductase reduces various electron acceptors such as cytochrome c, potassium ferricyanide, dichlorophenolindophenol, and nitroblue tetrazolium. However, only cytochrome c reduction by the ferredoxin reductase is enhanced by the addition of ferredoxin. In the presence of NADH, S. griseus ferredoxin and cytochrome P-450soy, the ferredoxin reductase mediates O dealkylation of 7-ethoxycoumarin. Images FIG. 2 PMID:1938912

  16. Identification and characterization of 2-naphthoyl-coenzyme A reductase, the prototype of a novel class of dearomatizing reductases.

    PubMed

    Eberlein, Christian; Estelmann, Sebastian; Seifert, Jana; von Bergen, Martin; Müller, Michael; Meckenstock, Rainer U; Boll, Matthias

    2013-06-01

    The enzymatic dearomatization of aromatic ring systems by reduction represents a highly challenging redox reaction in biology and plays a key role in the degradation of aromatic compounds under anoxic conditions. In anaerobic bacteria, most monocyclic aromatic growth substrates are converted to benzoyl-coenzyme A (CoA), which is then dearomatized to a conjugated dienoyl-CoA by ATP-dependent or -independent benzoyl-CoA reductases. It was unresolved whether or not related enzymes are involved in the anaerobic degradation of environmentally relevant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In this work, a previously unknown dearomatizing 2-naphthoyl-CoA reductase was purified from extracts of the naphthalene-degrading, sulphidogenic enrichment culture N47. The oxygen-tolerant enzyme dearomatized the non-activated ring of 2-naphthoyl-CoA by a four-electron reduction to 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-2-naphthoyl-CoA. The dimeric 150 kDa enzyme complex was composed of a 72 kDa subunit showing sequence similarity to members of the flavin-containing 'old yellow enzyme' family. NCR contained FAD, FMN, and an iron-sulphur cluster as cofactors. Extracts of Escherichia coli expressing the encoding gene catalysed 2-naphthoyl-CoA reduction. The identified NCR is a prototypical enzyme of a previously unknown class of dearomatizing arylcarboxyl-CoA reductases that are involved in anaerobic PAH degradation; it fundamentally differs from known benzoyl-CoA reductases.

  17. Ascorbate free radical reductase mRNA levels are induced by wounding.

    PubMed Central

    Grantz, A A; Brummell, D A; Bennett, A B

    1995-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding ascorbate free radical (AFR) reductase (EC 1.6.5.4) was isolated from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) and its mRNA levels were analyzed. The cDNA encoded a deduced protein of 433 amino acids and possessed amino acid domains characteristic of flavin adenine dinucleotide- and NAD(P)H-binding proteins but did not possess typical eukaryotic targeting sequences, suggesting that it encodes a cytosolic form of AFR reductase. Low-stringency genomic DNA gel blot analysis indicated that a single nuclear gene encoded this enzyme. Total ascorbate contents were greatest in leaves, with decreasing amounts in stems and roots and relatively constant levels in all stages of fruit. AFR reductase activity was inversely correlated with total ascorbate content, whereas the relative abundance of AFR reductase mRNA was directly correlated with enzyme activity in tissues examined. AFR reductase mRNA abundance increased dramatically in response to wounding, a treatment that is known to also induce ascorbate-dependent prolyl hydroxylation required for the accumulation of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins. In addition, AFR reductase may contribute to maintaining levels of ascorbic acid for protection against wound-induced free radical-mediated damage. Collectively, the results suggest that AFR reductase activity is regulated at the level of mRNA abundance by low ascorbate contents or by factors that promote ascorbate utilization. PMID:7784511

  18. Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenases: structure/function, genetic polymorphisms and role in drug metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Sharon K.; Williams, David E.

    2005-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) oxygenates drugs and xenobiotics containing a “soft-nucleophile”, usually nitrogen or sulfur. FMO, like cytochrome P450 (CYP), is a monooxygenase, utilizing the reducing equivalents of NADPH to reduce 1 atom of molecular oxygen to water, while the other atom is used to oxidize the substrate. FMO and CYP also exhibit similar tissue and cellular location, molecular weight, substrate specificity, and exist as multiple enzymes under developmental control. The human FMO functional gene family is much smaller (5 families each with a single member) than CYP. FMO does not require a reductase to transfer electrons from NADPH and the catalytic cycle of the 2 monooxygenases is strikingly different. Another distinction is the lack of induction of FMOs by xenobiotics. In general, CYP is the major contributor to oxidative xenobiotic metabolism. However, FMO activity may be of significance in a number of cases and should not be overlooked. FMO and CYP have overlapping substrate specificities, but often yield distinct metabolites with potentially significant toxicological/pharmacological consequences. The physiological function(s) of FMO are poorly understood. Three of the 5 expressed human FMO genes, FMO1, FMO2 and FMO3, exhibit genetic polymorphisms. The most studied of these is FMO3 (adult human liver) in which mutant alleles contribute to the disease known as trimethylaminuria. The consequences of these FMO genetic polymorphisms in drug metabolism and human health are areas of research requiring further exploration. PMID:15922018

  19. Chloramphenicol Biosynthesis: The Structure of CmlS, a Flavin-Dependent Halogenase Shwing a Covalent Flavin-Aspartate Bond

    SciTech Connect

    Podzelinska, K.; Latimer, R; Bhattacharya, A; Vining, L; Zechel, D; Jia, Z

    2010-01-01

    Chloramphenicol is a halogenated natural product bearing an unusual dichloroacetyl moiety that is critical for its antibiotic activity. The operon for chloramphenicol biosynthesis in Streptomyces venezuelae encodes the chloramphenicol halogenase CmlS, which belongs to the large and diverse family of flavin-dependent halogenases (FDH's). CmlS was previously shown to be essential for the formation of the dichloroacetyl group. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of CmlS determined at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, revealing a flavin monooxygenase domain shared by all FDHs, but also a unique 'winged-helix' C-terminal domain that creates a T-shaped tunnel leading to the halogenation active site. Intriguingly, the C-terminal tail of this domain blocks access to the halogenation active site, suggesting a structurally dynamic role during catalysis. The halogenation active site is notably nonpolar and shares nearly identical residues with Chondromyces crocatus tyrosyl halogenase (CndH), including the conserved Lys (K71) that forms the reactive chloramine intermediate. The exception is Y350, which could be used to stabilize enolate formation during substrate halogenation. The strictly conserved residue E44, located near the isoalloxazine ring of the bound flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor, is optimally positioned to function as a remote general acid, through a water-mediated proton relay, which could accelerate the reaction of the chloramine intermediate during substrate halogenation, or the oxidation of chloride by the FAD(C4{alpha})-OOH intermediate. Strikingly, the 8{alpha} carbon of the FAD cofactor is observed to be covalently attached to D277 of CmlS, a residue that is highly conserved in the FDH family. In addition to representing a new type of flavin modification, this has intriguing implications for the mechanism of FDHs. Based on the crystal structure and in analogy to known halogenases, we propose a reaction mechanism for CmlS.

  20. Metabolic pathway involved in 2-methyl-6-ethylaniline degradation by Sphingobium sp. strain MEA3-1 and cloning of the novel flavin-dependent monooxygenase system meaBA.

    PubMed

    Dong, Weiliang; Chen, Qiongzhen; Hou, Ying; Li, Shuhuan; Zhuang, Kai; Huang, Fei; Zhou, Jie; Li, Zhoukun; Wang, Jue; Fu, Lei; Zhang, Zhengguang; Huang, Yan; Wang, Fei; Cui, Zhongli

    2015-12-01

    2-Methyl-6-ethylaniline (MEA) is the main microbial degradation intermediate of the chloroacetanilide herbicides acetochlor and metolachlor. Sphingobium sp. strain MEA3-1 can utilize MEA and various alkyl-substituted aniline and phenol compounds as sole carbon and energy sources for growth. We isolated the mutant strain MEA3-1Mut, which converts MEA only to 2-methyl-6-ethyl-hydroquinone (MEHQ) and 2-methyl-6-ethyl-benzoquinone (MEBQ). MEA may be oxidized by the P450 monooxygenase system to 4-hydroxy-2-methyl-6-ethylaniline (4-OH-MEA), which can be hydrolytically spontaneously deaminated to MEBQ or MEHQ. The MEA microbial metabolic pathway was reconstituted based on the substrate spectra and identification of the intermediate metabolites in both the wild-type and mutant strains. Plasmidome sequencing indicated that both strains harbored 7 plasmids with sizes ranging from 6,108 bp to 287,745 bp. Among the 7 plasmids, 6 were identical, and pMEA02' in strain MEA3-1Mut lost a 37,000-bp fragment compared to pMEA02 in strain MEA3-1. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and protein mass fingerprinting (PMF) showed that MEA3-1Mut lost the two-component flavin-dependent monooxygenase (TC-FDM) MeaBA, which was encoded by a gene in the lost fragment of pMEA02. MeaA shared 22% to 25% amino acid sequence identity with oxygenase components of some TC-FDMs, whereas MeaB showed no sequence identity with the reductase components of those TC-FDMs. Complementation with meaBA in MEA3-1Mut and heterologous expression in Pseudomonas putida strain KT2440 resulted in the production of an active MEHQ monooxygenase.

  1. Metabolic Pathway Involved in 2-Methyl-6-Ethylaniline Degradation by Sphingobium sp. Strain MEA3-1 and Cloning of the Novel Flavin-Dependent Monooxygenase System meaBA

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Weiliang; Chen, Qiongzhen; Hou, Ying; Li, Shuhuan; Zhuang, Kai; Huang, Fei; Zhou, Jie; Li, Zhoukun; Wang, Jue; Fu, Lei; Zhang, Zhengguang; Huang, Yan; Wang, Fei

    2015-01-01

    2-Methyl-6-ethylaniline (MEA) is the main microbial degradation intermediate of the chloroacetanilide herbicides acetochlor and metolachlor. Sphingobium sp. strain MEA3-1 can utilize MEA and various alkyl-substituted aniline and phenol compounds as sole carbon and energy sources for growth. We isolated the mutant strain MEA3-1Mut, which converts MEA only to 2-methyl-6-ethyl-hydroquinone (MEHQ) and 2-methyl-6-ethyl-benzoquinone (MEBQ). MEA may be oxidized by the P450 monooxygenase system to 4-hydroxy-2-methyl-6-ethylaniline (4-OH-MEA), which can be hydrolytically spontaneously deaminated to MEBQ or MEHQ. The MEA microbial metabolic pathway was reconstituted based on the substrate spectra and identification of the intermediate metabolites in both the wild-type and mutant strains. Plasmidome sequencing indicated that both strains harbored 7 plasmids with sizes ranging from 6,108 bp to 287,745 bp. Among the 7 plasmids, 6 were identical, and pMEA02′ in strain MEA3-1Mut lost a 37,000-bp fragment compared to pMEA02 in strain MEA3-1. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and protein mass fingerprinting (PMF) showed that MEA3-1Mut lost the two-component flavin-dependent monooxygenase (TC-FDM) MeaBA, which was encoded by a gene in the lost fragment of pMEA02. MeaA shared 22% to 25% amino acid sequence identity with oxygenase components of some TC-FDMs, whereas MeaB showed no sequence identity with the reductase components of those TC-FDMs. Complementation with meaBA in MEA3-1Mut and heterologous expression in Pseudomonas putida strain KT2440 resulted in the production of an active MEHQ monooxygenase. PMID:26386060

  2. Cloning and Sequence Analysis of Two Pseudomonas Flavoprotein Xenobiotic Reductases

    PubMed Central

    Blehert, David S.; Fox, Brian G.; Chambliss, Glenn H.

    1999-01-01

    The genes encoding flavin mononucleotide-containing oxidoreductases, designated xenobiotic reductases, from Pseudomonas putida II-B and P. fluorescens I-C that removed nitrite from nitroglycerin (NG) by cleavage of the nitroester bond were cloned, sequenced, and characterized. The P. putida gene, xenA, encodes a 39,702-Da monomeric, NAD(P)H-dependent flavoprotein that removes either the terminal or central nitro groups from NG and that reduces 2-cyclohexen-1-one but did not readily reduce 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). The P. fluorescens gene, xenB, encodes a 37,441-Da monomeric, NAD(P)H-dependent flavoprotein that exhibits fivefold regioselectivity for removal of the central nitro group from NG and that transforms TNT but did not readily react with 2-cyclohexen-1-one. Heterologous expression of xenA and xenB was demonstrated in Escherichia coli DH5α. The transcription initiation sites of both xenA and xenB were identified by primer extension analysis. BLAST analyses conducted with the P. putida xenA and the P. fluorescens xenB sequences demonstrated that these genes are similar to several other bacterial genes that encode broad-specificity flavoprotein reductases. The prokaryotic flavoprotein reductases described herein likely shared a common ancestor with old yellow enzyme of yeast, a broad-specificity enzyme which may serve a detoxification role in antioxidant defense systems. PMID:10515912

  3. Quinone Reductase 2 Is a Catechol Quinone Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yue; Buryanovskyy, Leonid; Zhang, Zhongtao

    2008-09-05

    The functions of quinone reductase 2 have eluded researchers for decades even though a genetic polymorphism is associated with various neurological disorders. Employing enzymatic studies using adrenochrome as a substrate, we show that quinone reductase 2 is specific for the reduction of adrenochrome, whereas quinone reductase 1 shows no activity. We also solved the crystal structure of quinone reductase 2 in complexes with dopamine and adrenochrome, two compounds that are structurally related to catecholamine quinones. Detailed structural analyses delineate the mechanism of quinone reductase 2 specificity toward catechol quinones in comparison with quinone reductase 1; a side-chain rotational difference between quinone reductase 1 and quinone reductase 2 of a single residue, phenylalanine 106, determines the specificity of enzymatic activities. These results infer functional differences between two homologous enzymes and indicate that quinone reductase 2 could play important roles in the regulation of catecholamine oxidation processes that may be involved in the etiology of Parkinson disease.

  4. An Arabidopsis FAD pyrophosphohydrolase, AtNUDX23, is involved in flavin homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Maruta, Takanori; Yoshimoto, Tadashi; Ito, Daisuke; Ogawa, Takahisa; Tamoi, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2012-06-01

    Although flavins, riboflavin (RF), FMN and FAD, are essential for primary and secondary metabolism in plants, the metabolic regulation of flavins is still largely unknown. Recently, we found that an Arabidopsis Nudix hydrolase, AtNUDX23, has FAD pyrophosphohydrolase activity and is distributed in plastids. Levels of RF and FAD but not FMN in Arabidopsis leaves significantly increased under continuous light and decreased in the dark. The transcript levels of AtNUDX23 as well as genes involved in flavin metabolism (AtFADS, AtRibF1, AtRibF2, AtFMN/FHy, LS and AtRibA) significantly increased under continuous light. The pyrophosphohydrolase activity toward FAD was enhanced in AtNUDX23-overexpressing (OX-NUDX23) plants and reduced in AtNUDX23-suppressed (KD-nudx23) plants, compared with the control plants. Interestingly intracellular levels of RF, FMN and FAD significantly decreased in not only OX-NUDX23 but also KD-nudx23 plants. The transcript levels of the flavin metabolic genes also decreased in both plants. Similarly, the increase in intracellular levels on treatment with flavins caused a reduction in the transcript levels of genes involved in flavin metabolism. These results suggest that negative feedback regulation of the metabolism of flavins through the hydrolysis of FAD by AtNUDX23 in plastids is involved in flavin homeostasis in plant cells.

  5. Metabolism of ketoconazole and deacetylated ketoconazole by rat hepatic microsomes and flavin-containing monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, R J; Acosta, D

    1997-06-01

    Ketoconazole (KT) has been reported to cause hepatotoxicity, which is probably not mediated through an immunoallergic mechanism. Although KT is extensively metabolized by hepatic microsomal enzymes, the nature, route of formation, and toxicity of suspected metabolites are largely unknown. Recent reports indicate that N-deacetyl ketoconazole (DAK) is a major initial metabolite in mice, which, like lipophilic 4-alkylpiperazines, is susceptible to successive oxidative attacks on the N-1 position producing ring-opened dialdehydes. The rate of formation of DAK from hepatic rat microsomal incubations of KT was determined by HPLC. The rate of disappearance for KT was almost equal to the rate of DAK formation: 5.96 and 5.88 microM/hr, respectively. Also, the potential bioactivation of DAK was evaluated by measuring substrate activity of DAK with purified pig liver flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) and rat liver microsomes. Activity was measured by following DAK-dependent oxygen uptake polarographically at 37 degrees C in pyrophosphate buffer (pH 8.8) containing the glucose-6-phosphate NADPH-generating system. The K(M)'s of DAK were 34.6 and 77.4 microM for the purified FMO and rat microsomal FMO, respectively. Lastly, DAK was found to be metabolized by an NADPH-dependent rat liver microsomal monooxygenases at pH 8.8 to two metabolites as determined by HPLC. Heat inactivation of rat liver microsomal FMO abolished the formation of these metabolites from DAK. SKF-525A and anti-rat NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase did not inhibit this reaction. These results suggest that deacetylation of KT yields a major product, DAK, for further metabolism by microsomal monooxygenases that seem to be FMO-related.

  6. Characterization of Streptococcus pneumoniae enoyl-(acyl-carrier protein) reductase (FabK).

    PubMed

    Marrakchi, Hedia; Dewolf, Walter E; Quinn, Chad; West, Joshua; Polizzi, Brian J; So, Chi Y; Holmes, David J; Reed, Shannon L; Heath, Richard J; Payne, David J; Rock, Charles O; Wallis, Nicola G

    2003-03-15

    The enoyl-(acyl-carrier protein) (ACP) reductase catalyses the last step in each cycle of fatty acid elongation in the type II fatty acid synthase systems. An extensively characterized NADH-dependent reductase, FabI, is widely distributed in bacteria and plants, whereas the enoyl-ACP reductase, FabK, is a distinctly different member of this enzyme group discovered in Streptococcus pneumoniae. We were unable to delete the fabK gene from Strep. pneumoniae, suggesting that this is the only enoyl-ACP reductase in this organism. The FabK enzyme was purified and the biochemical properties of the reductase were examined. The visible absorption spectrum of the purified protein indicated the presence of a flavin cofactor that was identified as FMN by MS, and was present in a 1:1 molar ratio with protein. FabK specifically required NADH and the protein activity was stimulated by ammonium ions. FabK also exhibited NADH oxidase activity in the absence of substrate. Strep. pneumoniae belongs to the Bacillus / Lactobacillus / Streptococcus group that includes Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis. These two organisms also contain FabK-related genes, suggesting that they may also express a FabK-like enoyl-ACP reductase. However, the genes did not complement a fabI (Ts) mutant and the purified flavoproteins were unable to reduce enoyl-ACP in vitro and did not exhibit NAD(P)H oxidase activity, indicating they were not enoyl-ACP reductases. The restricted occurrence of the FabK enoyl-ACP reductase may be related to the role of substrate-independent NADH oxidation in oxygen-dependent anaerobic energy metabolism.

  7. Ultrafast 2D-IR spectroelectrochemistry of flavin mononucleotide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Khoury, Youssef; Van Wilderen, Luuk J. G. W.; Bredenbeck, Jens

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate the coupling of ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy to electrochemistry in solution and apply it to flavin mononucleotide, an important cofactor of redox proteins. For this purpose, we designed a spectroelectrochemical cell optimized for 2D-IR measurements in reflection and measured the time-dependent 2D-IR spectra of the oxidized and reduced forms of flavin mononucleotide. The data show anharmonic coupling and vibrational energy transfer between different vibrational modes in the two redox species. Such information is inaccessible with redox-controlled steady-state FTIR spectroscopy. The wide range of applications offered by 2D-IR spectroscopy, such as sub-picosecond structure determination, IR band assignment via energy transfer, disentangling reaction mixtures through band connectivity in the 2D spectra, and the measurement of solvation dynamics and chemical exchange can now be explored under controlled redox potential. The development of this technique furthermore opens new horizons for studying the dynamics of redox proteins.

  8. Ultrafast 2D-IR spectroelectrochemistry of flavin mononucleotide.

    PubMed

    El Khoury, Youssef; Van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; Bredenbeck, Jens

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate the coupling of ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy to electrochemistry in solution and apply it to flavin mononucleotide, an important cofactor of redox proteins. For this purpose, we designed a spectroelectrochemical cell optimized for 2D-IR measurements in reflection and measured the time-dependent 2D-IR spectra of the oxidized and reduced forms of flavin mononucleotide. The data show anharmonic coupling and vibrational energy transfer between different vibrational modes in the two redox species. Such information is inaccessible with redox-controlled steady-state FTIR spectroscopy. The wide range of applications offered by 2D-IR spectroscopy, such as sub-picosecond structure determination, IR band assignment via energy transfer, disentangling reaction mixtures through band connectivity in the 2D spectra, and the measurement of solvation dynamics and chemical exchange can now be explored under controlled redox potential. The development of this technique furthermore opens new horizons for studying the dynamics of redox proteins.

  9. Thioredoxin reductase from Escherichia coli: evidence of restriction to a single conformation upon formation of a crosslink between engineered cysteines.

    PubMed Central

    Veine, D. M.; Ohnishi, K.; Williams, C. H.

    1998-01-01

    Thioredoxin reductase is a flavoprotein which catalyzes the reduction of the small protein thioredoxin by NADPH. It contains a redox active disulfide and an FAD in each subunit of its dimeric structure. Each subunit is further divided into two domains, the FAD and the pyridine nucleotide binding domains. The orientation of the two domains determined from the crystal structure and the flow of electrons determined from mechanistic studies suggest that thioredoxin reductase requires a large conformational change to carry out catalysis (Williams CH Jr, 1995, FASEB J 9:1267-1276). The constituent amino acids of an ion pair, E48/R130, between the FAD and pyridine nucleotide binding domains, were mutagenized to cysteines to form E48C,R130C (CC mutant). Formation of a stable bridge between these cysteines was expected to restrict the enzyme largely in the conformation observed in the crystal structure. Crosslinking with the bifunctional reagent N,N,1,2 phenylenedimaleimide, spanning 4-9 A, resulted in a >95 % decrease in thioredoxin reductase and transhydrogenase activity. SDS-PAGE confirmed that the crosslink in the CC-mutant was intramolecular. Dithionite titration showed an uptake of electrons as in wild-type enzyme, but anaerobic reduction of the flavin with NADPH was found to be impaired. This indicates that the crosslinked enzyme is in the conformation where the flavin and the active site disulfide are in close proximity but the flavin and pyridinium rings are too far apart for effective electron transfer. The evidence is consistent with the hypothesis that thioredoxin reductase requires a conformational change to complete catalysis. PMID:9521113

  10. Cloning, sequencing, and analysis of a gene cluster from Chelatobacter heintzii ATCC 29600 encoding nitrilotriacetate monooxygenase and NADH:flavin mononucleotide oxidoreductase.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Y; Mortimer, M W; Fisher, T S; Kahn, M L; Brockman, F J; Xun, L

    1997-01-01

    Nitrilotriacetate (NTA) is an important chelating agent in detergents and has also been used extensively in processing radionuclides. In Chelatobacter heintzii ATCC 29600, biodegradation of NTA is initiated by NTA monooxygenase that oxidizes NTA to iminodiacetate and glyoxylate. The NTA monooxygenase activity requires two component proteins, component A and component B, but the function of each component is unclear. We have cloned and sequenced a gene cluster encoding components A and B (nmoA and nmoB) and two additional open reading frames, nmoR and nmoT, downstream of nmoA. Based on sequence similarities, nmoR and nmoT probably encode a regulatory protein and a transposase, respectively. The NmoA sequence was similar to a monooxygenase that uses reduced flavin mononucleotide (FMNH2) as reductant; NmoB was similar to an NADH:flavin mononucleotide (FMN) oxidoreductase. On the basis of this information, we tested the function of each component. Purified component B was shown to be an NADH:FMN oxidoreductase, and its activity could be separated from that of component A. When the Photobacterium fischeri NADH:FMN oxidoreductase was substituted for component B in the complete reaction, NTA was oxidized, showing that the substrate specificity of the reaction resides in component A. Component A is therefore an NTA monooxygenase that uses FMNH2 and O2 to oxidize NTA, and component B is an NADH:FMN oxidoreductase that provides FMNH2 for NTA oxidation. PMID:9023192

  11. The N-Reductive System Composed of Mitochondrial Amidoxime Reducing Component (mARC), Cytochrome b5 (CYB5B) and Cytochrome b5 Reductase (CYB5R) Is Regulated by Fasting and High Fat Diet in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jakobs, Heyka H.; Mikula, Michal; Havemeyer, Antje; Strzalkowska, Adriana; Borowa-Chmielak, Monika; Dzwonek, Artur; Gajewska, Marta; Hennig, Ewa E.; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Clement, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component mARC is the fourth mammalian molybdenum enzyme. The protein is capable of reducing N-oxygenated structures, but requires cytochrome b5 and cytochrome b5 reductase for electron transfer to catalyze such reactions. It is well accepted that the enzyme is involved in N-reductive drug metabolism such as the activation of amidoxime prodrugs. However, the endogenous function of the protein is not fully understood. Among other functions, an involvement in lipogenesis is discussed. To study the potential involvement of the protein in energy metabolism, we tested whether the mARC protein and its partners are regulated due to fasting and high fat diet in mice. We used qRT-PCR for expression studies, Western Blot analysis to study protein levels and an N-reductive biotransformation assay to gain activity data. Indeed all proteins of the N-reductive system are regulated by fasting and its activity decreases. To study the potential impact of these changes on prodrug activation in vivo, another mice experiment was conducted. Model compound benzamidoxime was injected to mice that underwent fasting and the resulting metabolite of the N-reductive reaction, benzamidine, was determined. Albeit altered in vitro activity, no changes in the metabolite concentration in vivo were detectable and we can dispel concerns that fasting alters prodrug activation in animal models. With respect to high fat diet, changes in the mARC proteins occur that result in increased N-reductive activity. With this study we provide further evidence that the endogenous function of the mARC protein is linked with lipid metabolism. PMID:25144769

  12. Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Crystallographic Studies of the Alkanesulfonate FMN Reductase from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Gao,B.; Bertrand, A.; Boles, W.; Ellis, H.; Mallett, T.

    2005-01-01

    The alkanesulfonate FMN reductase (SsuE) from Escherichia coli catalyzes the reduction of FMN by NADPH to provide reduced flavin for the monooxygenase (SsuD) enzyme. The vapor-diffusion technique yielded single crystals that grow as hexagonal rods and diffract to 2.9 Angstrom resolution using synchrotron X-ray radiation. The protein crystallizes in the primitive hexagonal space group P622. The SsuE protein lacks any cysteine or methionine residues owing to the role of the SsuE enzyme in the acquisition of sulfur during sulfate starvation. Therefore, substitution of two leucine residues (Leu114 and Leu165) to methionine was performed to obtain selenomethionine-containing SsuE for MAD phasing. The selenomethionine derivative of SsuE has been expressed and purified and crystals of the protein have been obtained with and without bound FMN. These preliminary studies should lead to the structure solution of SsuE. It is anticipated that this new protein structure will provide detailed structural information on specific active-site regions of the protein and insight into the mechanism of flavin reduction and transfer of reduced flavin.

  13. Crystal Structure of ChrR -- A Quinone Reductase with the Capacity to Reduce Chromate

    SciTech Connect

    Eswaramoorthy S.; Poulain, S.; Hienerwadel, R.; Bremond, N.; Sylvester, M. D.; Zhang, Y.-B.; Berthomieu, C.; van der Lelie, D.; Matin, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Escherichia coli ChrR enzyme is an obligatory two-electron quinone reductase that has many applications, such as in chromate bioremediation. Its crystal structure, solved at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, shows that it belongs to the flavodoxin superfamily in which flavin mononucleotide (FMN) is firmly anchored to the protein. ChrR crystallized as a tetramer, and size exclusion chromatography showed that this is the oligomeric form that catalyzes chromate reduction. Within the tetramer, the dimers interact by a pair of two hydrogen bond networks, each involving Tyr128 and Glu146 of one dimer and Arg125 and Tyr85 of the other; the latter extends to one of the redox FMN cofactors. Changes in each of these amino acids enhanced chromate reductase activity of the enzyme, showing that this network is centrally involved in chromate reduction.

  14. Crystal Structure of ChrR—A Quinone Reductase with the Capacity to Reduce Chromate

    PubMed Central

    Hienerwadel, Rainer; Bremond, Nicolas; Sylvester, Matthew D.; Zhang, Yian-Biao; Berthomieu, Catherine; Van Der Lelie, Daniel; Matin, A.

    2012-01-01

    The Escherichia coli ChrR enzyme is an obligatory two-electron quinone reductase that has many applications, such as in chromate bioremediation. Its crystal structure, solved at 2.2 Å resolution, shows that it belongs to the flavodoxin superfamily in which flavin mononucleotide (FMN) is firmly anchored to the protein. ChrR crystallized as a tetramer, and size exclusion chromatography showed that this is the oligomeric form that catalyzes chromate reduction. Within the tetramer, the dimers interact by a pair of two hydrogen bond networks, each involving Tyr128 and Glu146 of one dimer and Arg125 and Tyr85 of the other; the latter extends to one of the redox FMN cofactors. Changes in each of these amino acids enhanced chromate reductase activity of the enzyme, showing that this network is centrally involved in chromate reduction. PMID:22558308

  15. Why Flavins Are not Competitors of Chlorophyll in the Evolution of Biological Converters of Solar Energy

    PubMed Central

    Kritsky, Mikhail S.; Telegina, Taisiya A.; Vechtomova, Yulia L.; Buglak, Andrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Excited flavin molecules can photocatalyze reactions, leading to the accumulation of free energy in the products, and the data accumulated through biochemical experiments and by modeling prebiological processes suggest that flavins were available in the earliest stages of evolution. Furthermore, model experiments have shown that abiogenic flavin conjugated with a polyamino acid matrix, a pigment that photocatalyzes the phosphorylation of ADP to form ATP, could have been present in the prebiotic environment. Indeed, excited flavin molecules play key roles in many photoenzymes and regulatory photoreceptors, and the substantial structural differences between photoreceptor families indicate that evolution has repeatedly used flavins as chromophores for photoreceptor proteins. Some of these photoreceptors are equipped with a light-harvesting antenna, which transfers excitation energy to chemically reactive flavins in the reaction center. The sum of the available data suggests that evolution could have led to the formation of a flavin-based biological converter to convert light energy into energy in the form of ATP. PMID:23271372

  16. Rate enhancement of bacterial extracellular electron transport involves bound flavin semiquinones

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Akihiro; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Nakamura, Ryuhei

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular redox-active compounds, flavins and other quinones, have been hypothesized to play a major role in the delivery of electrons from cellular metabolic systems to extracellular insoluble substrates by a diffusion-based shuttling two-electron-transfer mechanism. Here we show that flavin molecules secreted by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 enhance the ability of its outer-membrane c-type cytochromes (OM c-Cyts) to transport electrons as redox cofactors, but not free-form flavins. Whole-cell differential pulse voltammetry revealed that the redox potential of flavin was reversibly shifted more than 100 mV in a positive direction, in good agreement with increasing microbial current generation. Importantly, this flavin/OM c-Cyts interaction was found to facilitate a one-electron redox reaction via a semiquinone, resulting in a 103- to 105-fold faster reaction rate than that of free flavin. These results are not consistent with previously proposed redox-shuttling mechanisms but suggest that the flavin/OM c-Cyts interaction regulates the extent of extracellular electron transport coupled with intracellular metabolic activity. PMID:23576738

  17. Time- and spectrally resolved characteristics of flavin fluorescence in U87MG cancer cells in culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horilova, Julia; Cunderlikova, Beata; Marcek Chorvatova, Alzbeta

    2015-05-01

    Early detection of cancer is crucial for the successful diagnostics of its presence and its subsequent treatment. To improve cancer detection, we tested the progressive multimodal optical imaging of U87MG cells in culture. A combination of steady-state spectroscopic methods with the time-resolved approach provides a new insight into the native metabolism when focused on endogenous tissue fluorescence. In this contribution, we evaluated the metabolic state of living U87MG cancer cells in culture by means of endogenous flavin fluorescence. Confocal microscopy and time-resolved fluorescence imaging were employed to gather spectrally and time-resolved images of the flavin fluorescence. We observed that flavin fluorescence in U87MG cells was predominantly localized outside the cell nucleus in mitochondria, while exhibiting a spectral maximum under 500 nm and fluorescence lifetimes under 1.4 ns, suggesting the presence of bound flavins. In some cells, flavin fluorescence was also detected inside the cell nuclei in the nucleoli, exhibiting longer fluorescence lifetimes and a red-shifted spectral maximum, pointing to the presence of free flavin. Extra-nuclear flavin fluorescence was diminished by 2-deoxyglucose, but failed to increase with 2,4-dinitrophenol, the uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation, indicating that the cells use glycolysis, rather than oxidative phosphorylation for functioning. These gathered data are the first step toward monitoring the metabolic state of U87MG cancer cells.

  18. Production of flavin mononucleotide by metabolically engineered yeast Candida famata.

    PubMed

    Yatsyshyn, Valentyna Y; Ishchuk, Olena P; Voronovsky, Andriy Y; Fedorovych, Daria V; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2009-05-01

    Recombinant strains of the flavinogenic yeast Candida famata able to overproduce flavin mononucleotide (FMN) that contain FMN1 gene encoding riboflavin (RF) kinase driven by the strong constitutive promoter TEF1 (translation elongation factor 1alpha) were constructed. Transformation of these strains with the additional plasmid containing the FMN1 gene under the TEF1 promoter resulted in the 200-fold increase in the riboflavin kinase activity and 100-fold increase in FMN production as compared to the wild-type strain (last feature was found only in iron-deficient medium). Overexpression of the FMN1 gene in the mutant that has deregulated riboflavin biosynthesis pathway and high level of riboflavin production in iron-sufficient medium led to the 30-fold increase in the riboflavin kinase activity and 400-fold increase in FMN production of the resulted transformants. The obtained C. famata recombinant strains can be used for the further construction of improved FMN overproducers. PMID:19558965

  19. Inhibition of NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase by the model sulfur mustard vesicant 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide is associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Gray, Joshua P; Mishin, Vladimir; Heck, Diane E; Laskin, Debra L; Laskin, Jeffrey D

    2010-09-01

    Inhalation of vesicants including sulfur mustard can cause significant damage to the upper airways. This is the result of vesicant-induced modifications of proteins important in maintaining the integrity of the lung. Cytochrome P450s are the major enzymes in the lung mediating detoxification of sulfur mustard and its metabolites. NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase is a flavin-containing electron donor for cytochrome P450. The present studies demonstrate that the sulfur mustard analog, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), is a potent inhibitor of human recombinant cytochrome P450 reductase, as well as native cytochrome P450 reductase from liver microsomes of saline and beta-naphthoflavone-treated rats, and cytochrome P450 reductase from type II lung epithelial cells. Using rat liver microsomes from beta-naphthoflavone-treated rats, CEES was found to inhibit CYP 1A1 activity. This inhibition was overcome by microsomal cytochrome P450 reductase from saline-treated rats, which lack CYP 1A1 activity, demonstrating that the CEES inhibitory activity was selective for cytochrome P450 reductase. Cytochrome P450 reductase also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) via oxidation of NADPH. In contrast to its inhibitory effects on the reduction of cytochrome c and CYP1A1 activity, CEES was found to stimulate ROS formation. Taken together, these data demonstrate that sulfur mustard vesicants target cytochrome P450 reductase and that this effect may be an important mechanism mediating oxidative stress and lung injury.

  20. Inhibition of NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase by the model sulfur mustard vesicant 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide is associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Joshua P.; Mishin, Vladimir; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2010-09-01

    Inhalation of vesicants including sulfur mustard can cause significant damage to the upper airways. This is the result of vesicant-induced modifications of proteins important in maintaining the integrity of the lung. Cytochrome P450s are the major enzymes in the lung mediating detoxification of sulfur mustard and its metabolites. NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase is a flavin-containing electron donor for cytochrome P450. The present studies demonstrate that the sulfur mustard analog, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), is a potent inhibitor of human recombinant cytochrome P450 reductase, as well as native cytochrome P450 reductase from liver microsomes of saline and {beta}-naphthoflavone-treated rats, and cytochrome P450 reductase from type II lung epithelial cells. Using rat liver microsomes from {beta}-naphthoflavone-treated rats, CEES was found to inhibit CYP 1A1 activity. This inhibition was overcome by microsomal cytochrome P450 reductase from saline-treated rats, which lack CYP 1A1 activity, demonstrating that the CEES inhibitory activity was selective for cytochrome P450 reductase. Cytochrome P450 reductase also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) via oxidation of NADPH. In contrast to its inhibitory effects on the reduction of cytochrome c and CYP1A1 activity, CEES was found to stimulate ROS formation. Taken together, these data demonstrate that sulfur mustard vesicants target cytochrome P450 reductase and that this effect may be an important mechanism mediating oxidative stress and lung injury.

  1. Inhibition of NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase by the model sulfur mustard vesicant 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide is associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Gray, Joshua P; Mishin, Vladimir; Heck, Diane E; Laskin, Debra L; Laskin, Jeffrey D

    2010-09-01

    Inhalation of vesicants including sulfur mustard can cause significant damage to the upper airways. This is the result of vesicant-induced modifications of proteins important in maintaining the integrity of the lung. Cytochrome P450s are the major enzymes in the lung mediating detoxification of sulfur mustard and its metabolites. NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase is a flavin-containing electron donor for cytochrome P450. The present studies demonstrate that the sulfur mustard analog, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), is a potent inhibitor of human recombinant cytochrome P450 reductase, as well as native cytochrome P450 reductase from liver microsomes of saline and beta-naphthoflavone-treated rats, and cytochrome P450 reductase from type II lung epithelial cells. Using rat liver microsomes from beta-naphthoflavone-treated rats, CEES was found to inhibit CYP 1A1 activity. This inhibition was overcome by microsomal cytochrome P450 reductase from saline-treated rats, which lack CYP 1A1 activity, demonstrating that the CEES inhibitory activity was selective for cytochrome P450 reductase. Cytochrome P450 reductase also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) via oxidation of NADPH. In contrast to its inhibitory effects on the reduction of cytochrome c and CYP1A1 activity, CEES was found to stimulate ROS formation. Taken together, these data demonstrate that sulfur mustard vesicants target cytochrome P450 reductase and that this effect may be an important mechanism mediating oxidative stress and lung injury. PMID:20561902

  2. Bacterial flavin-containing monooxygenase is trimethylamine monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yin; Patel, Nisha A.; Crombie, Andrew; Scrivens, James H.; Murrell, J. Colin

    2011-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) are one of the most important monooxygenase systems in Eukaryotes and have many important physiological functions. FMOs have also been found in bacteria; however, their physiological function is not known. Here, we report the identification and characterization of trimethylamine (TMA) monooxygenase, termed Tmm, from Methylocella silvestris, using a combination of proteomic, biochemical, and genetic approaches. This bacterial FMO contains the FMO sequence motif (FXGXXXHXXXF/Y) and typical flavin adenine dinucleotide and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-binding domains. The enzyme was highly expressed in TMA-grown M. silvestris and absent during growth on methanol. The gene, tmm, was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified recombinant protein had high Tmm activity. Mutagenesis of this gene abolished the ability of M. silvestris to grow on TMA as a sole carbon and energy source. Close homologs of tmm occur in many Alphaproteobacteria, in particular Rhodobacteraceae (marine Roseobacter clade, MRC) and the marine SAR11 clade (Pelagibacter ubique). We show that the ability of MRC to use TMA as a sole carbon and/or nitrogen source is directly linked to the presence of tmm in the genomes, and purified Tmm of MRC and SAR11 from recombinant E. coli showed Tmm activities. The tmm gene is highly abundant in the metagenomes of the Global Ocean Sampling expedition, and we estimate that 20% of the bacteria in the surface ocean contain tmm. Taken together, our results suggest that Tmm, a bacterial FMO, plays an important yet overlooked role in the global carbon and nitrogen cycles. PMID:22006322

  3. Control of redox reactivity of flavin and pterin coenzymes by metal ion coordination and hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Kojima, Takahiko

    2008-03-01

    The electron-transfer activities of flavin and pterin coenzymes can be fine-tuned by coordination of metal ions, protonation and hydrogen bonding. Formation of hydrogen bonds with a hydrogen-bond receptor in metal-flavin complexes is made possible depending on the type of coordination bond that can leave the hydrogen-bonding sites. The electron-transfer catalytic functions of flavin and pterin coenzymes are described by showing a number of examples of both thermal and photochemical redox reactions, which proceed by controlling the electron-transfer reactivity of coenzymes with metal ion binding, protonation and hydrogen bonding.

  4. Biliverdin reductase isozymes in metabolism.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Luke; Hosick, Peter A; John, Kezia; Stec, David E; Hinds, Terry D

    2015-04-01

    The biliverdin reductase (BVR) isozymes BVRA and BVRB are cell surface membrane receptors with pleiotropic functions. This review compares, for the first time, the structural and functional differences between the isozymes. They reduce biliverdin, a byproduct of heme catabolism, to bilirubin, display kinase activity, and BVRA, but not BVRB, can act as a transcription factor. The binding motifs present in the BVR isozymes allow a wide range of interactions with components of metabolically important signaling pathways such as the insulin receptor kinase cascades, protein kinases (PKs), and inflammatory mediators. In addition, serum bilirubin levels have been negatively associated with abdominal obesity and hypertriglyceridemia. We discuss the roles of the BVR isozymes in metabolism and their potential as therapeutic targets. PMID:25726384

  5. Surface enhanced Raman scattering investigation of protein-bound flavin adenine dinucleotide structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskevich, S. A.; Strekal, N. D.; Artsukevich, I. M.; Kivach, L. N.; Chernikevich, I. P.

    1995-04-01

    The SERS spectra of alcohol oxidase from Pichia pastoris adsorbed on a silver electrode were obtained. The similarities and differences of these spectra with the SERS spectrum of free flavin adenine dinucleiotide were considered. The dependence of relative intensity of 1258 cm -1 band from the electrode potential in the protein SERS spectra differed from that of free flavin. From the data on this band being sensitive to the protein-flavin interaction a suggestion was made about incomplete dissociation of flavin from the protein. This conclusion is confirmed both by the fluorescence data and the SERS data on alcohol oxidase purified from Candida boidinii. The results of the SERS investigation of the interaction between the substrate, ethanol and the cofactor, FAD, as well as between protein-bound cofactor with the substrate are presented. The problem of retaining the protein enzyme activity is discussed.

  6. A study of solvent effects on the phosphorescence properties of flavins.

    PubMed Central

    Brunk, G R; Martin, K A; Nishimura, A M

    1976-01-01

    A combination of zero field triplet state techniques are used to study the excited electronic states of a series of flavin and flavin related molecules both in single crystals and glass matrices. Particular attention is given to the effects of solvent interaction on the triplet state properties of the flavin molecules. The total phosphorescence decay rate constants at 1.4 degrees K are reported for the flavin molecules in polar and nonpolar solvents. The rate constants are then correlated to the degree of solvent interaction. Results indicate possible complex formation between the isoalloxazine and adenine groups in FAD. Finally, the results and possible interpretation on the study of a flavoenzyme, L-amino acid oxidase are presented. PMID:990392

  7. A STD-NMR study of the interaction of the Anabaena ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase with the coenzyme.

    PubMed

    Antonini, Lara V; Peregrina, José R; Angulo, Jesús; Medina, Milagros; Nieto, Pedro M

    2014-01-07

    Ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase (FNR) catalyzes the electron transfer from ferredoxin to NADP+ via its flavin FAD cofactor. To get further insights in the architecture of the transient complexes produced during the hydride transfer event between the enzyme and the NADP+ coenzyme we have applied NMR spectroscopy using Saturation Transfer Difference (STD) techniques to analyze the interaction between FNRox and the oxidized state of its NADP+ coenzyme. We have found that STD NMR, together with the use of selected mutations on FNR and of the non-FNR reacting coenzyme analogue NAD+, are appropriate tools to provide further information about the the interaction epitope.

  8. Mechanism of Action of a Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Eswaramoorthy,S.; Bonanno, J.; Burley, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2006-01-01

    Elimination of nonnutritional and insoluble compounds is a critical task for any living organism. Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) attach an oxygen atom to the insoluble nucleophilic compounds to increase solubility and thereby increase excretion. Here we analyze the functional mechanism of FMO from Schizosaccharomyces pombe using the crystal structures of the wild type and protein-cofactor and protein-substrate complexes. The structure of the wild-type FMO revealed that the prosthetic group FAD is an integral part of the protein. FMO needs NADPH as a cofactor in addition to the prosthetic group for its catalytic activity. Structures of the protein-cofactor and protein-substrate complexes provide insights into mechanism of action. We propose that FMOs exist in the cell as a complex with a reduced form of the prosthetic group and NADPH cofactor, readying them to act on substrates. The 4{alpha}-hydroperoxyflavin form of the prosthetic group represents a transient intermediate of the monooxygenation process. The oxygenated and reduced forms of the prosthetic group help stabilize interactions with cofactor and substrate alternately to permit continuous enzyme turnover.

  9. KDM1 Class Flavin-Dependent Protein Lysine Demethylases

    PubMed Central

    Burg, Jonathan M.; Link, Jennifer E.; Morgan, Brittany S.; Heller, Frederick J.; Hargrove, Amanda E.; McCafferty, Dewey G.

    2015-01-01

    Flavin-dependent, lysine-specific protein demethylases (KDM1s) are a subfamily of amine oxidases that catalyze the selective posttranslational oxidative demethylation of methyllysine side chains within protein and peptide substrates. KDM1s participate in the widespread epigenetic regulation of both normal and disease state transcriptional programs. Their activities are central to various cellular functions, such as hematopoietic and neuronal differentiation, cancer proliferation and metastasis, and viral lytic replication and establishment of latency. Interestingly, KDM1s function as catalytic subunits within complexes with coregulatory molecules that modulate enzymatic activity of the demethylases and coordinate their access to specific substrates at distinct sites within the cell and chromatin. Although several classes of KDM1 -selective small molecule inhibitors have been recently developed, these pan-active site inhibition strategies lack the ability to selectively discriminate between KDM1 activity in specific, and occasionally opposing, functional contexts within these complexes. Here we review the discovery of this class of demethylases, their structures, chemical mechanisms, and specificity. Additionally, we review inhibition of this class of enzymes as well as emerging interactions with coregulatory molecules that regulate demethylase activity in highly specific functional contexts of biological and potential therapeutic importance. PMID:25787087

  10. Coenzyme Recognition and Gene Regulation by a Flavin Mononucleotide Riboswitch

    SciTech Connect

    Serganov, A.; Huang, L; Patel, D

    2009-01-01

    The biosynthesis of several protein cofactors is subject to feedback regulation by riboswitches. Flavin mononucleotide (FMN)-specific riboswitches also known as RFN elements, direct expression of bacterial genes involved in the biosynthesis and transport of riboflavin (vitamin B2) and related compounds. Here we present the crystal structures of the Fusobacterium nucleatum riboswitch bound to FMN, riboflavin and antibiotic roseoflavin. The FMN riboswitch structure, centred on an FMN-bound six-stem junction, does not fold by collinear stacking of adjacent helices, typical for folding of large RNAs. Rather, it adopts a butterfly-like scaffold, stapled together by opposingly directed but nearly identically folded peripheral domains. FMN is positioned asymmetrically within the junctional site and is specifically bound to RNA through interactions with the isoalloxazine ring chromophore and direct and Mg{sup 2+}-mediated contacts with the phosphate moiety. Our structural data, complemented by binding and footprinting experiments, imply a largely pre-folded tertiary RNA architecture and FMN recognition mediated by conformational transitions within the junctional binding pocket. The inherent plasticity of the FMN-binding pocket and the availability of large openings make the riboswitch an attractive target for structure-based design of FMN-like antimicrobial compounds. Our studies also explain the effects of spontaneous and antibiotic-induced deregulatory mutations and provided molecular insights into FMN-based control of gene expression in normal and riboflavin-overproducing bacterial strains.

  11. Mechanism of action of a flavin-containing monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Eswaramoorthy, Subramaniam; Bonanno, Jeffrey B.; Burley, Stephen K.; Swaminathan, Subramanyam

    2006-01-01

    Elimination of nonnutritional and insoluble compounds is a critical task for any living organism. Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) attach an oxygen atom to the insoluble nucleophilic compounds to increase solubility and thereby increase excretion. Here we analyze the functional mechanism of FMO from Schizosaccharomyces pombe using the crystal structures of the wild type and protein–cofactor and protein–substrate complexes. The structure of the wild-type FMO revealed that the prosthetic group FAD is an integral part of the protein. FMO needs NADPH as a cofactor in addition to the prosthetic group for its catalytic activity. Structures of the protein–cofactor and protein–substrate complexes provide insights into mechanism of action. We propose that FMOs exist in the cell as a complex with a reduced form of the prosthetic group and NADPH cofactor, readying them to act on substrates. The 4α-hydroperoxyflavin form of the prosthetic group represents a transient intermediate of the monooxygenation process. The oxygenated and reduced forms of the prosthetic group help stabilize interactions with cofactor and substrate alternately to permit continuous enzyme turnover. PMID:16777962

  12. A major integral protein of the plant plasma membrane binds flavin.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Astrid; Kaldenhoff, Ralf; Hertel, Rainer

    2003-05-01

    Abundant flavin binding sites have been found in membranes of plants and fungi. With flavin mononucleotide-agarose affinity columns, riboflavin-binding activity from microsomes of Cucurbita pepoL. hypocotyls was purified and identified as a specific PIP1-homologous protein of the aquaporin family. Sequences such as gi|2149955 in Phaseolus vulgaris, PIP1b of Arabidopsis thaliana, and NtAQP1 of tobacco are closely related. The identification as a riboflavin-binding protein was confirmed by binding tests with an extract of Escherichia coli cells expressing the tobacco NtAQP1 as well as leaves of transgenic tobacco plants that overexpress NtAQP1 or were inhibited in PIP1 expression by antisense constructs. When binding was assayed in the presence of dithionite, the reduced flavin formed a relatively stable association with the protein. Upon dilution under oxidizing conditions, the adduct was resolved, and free flavin reappeared with a half time of about 30 min. Such an association can also be induced photochemically, with oxidized flavin by blue light at 450 nm, in the presence of an electron donor. Several criteria, localization in the plasma membrane, high abundance, affinity to roseoflavin, and photochemistry, argue for a role of the riboflavin-binding protein PIP1 as a photoreceptor. PMID:12768338

  13. Flavin Derivatives with Tailored Redox Properties: Synthesis, Characterization, and Electrochemical Behavior.

    PubMed

    Kormányos, Attila; Hossain, Mohammad S; Ghadimkhani, Ghazaleh; Johnson, Joe J; Janáky, Csaba; de Tacconi, Norma R; Foss, Frank W; Paz, Yaron; Rajeshwar, Krishnan

    2016-06-27

    This study establishes structure-property relationships for four synthetic flavin molecules as bioinspired redox mediators in electro- and photocatalysis applications. The studied flavin compounds were disubstituted with polar substituents at the N1 and N3 positions (alloxazine) or at the N3 and N10 positions (isoalloxazines). The electrochemical behavior of one such synthetic flavin analogue was examined in detail in aqueous solutions of varying pH in the range from 1 to 10. Cyclic voltammetry, used in conjunction with hydrodynamic (rotating disk electrode) voltammetry, showed quasi-reversible behavior consistent with freely diffusing molecules and an overall global 2e(-) , 2H(+) proton-coupled electron transfer scheme. UV/Vis spectroelectrochemical data was also employed to study the pH-dependent electrochemical behavior of this derivative. Substituent effects on the redox behavior were compared and contrasted for all the four compounds, and visualized within a scatter plot framework to afford comparison with prior knowledge on mostly natural flavins in aqueous media. Finally, a preliminary assessment of one of the synthetic flavins was performed of its electrocatalytic activity toward dioxygen reduction as a prelude to further (quantitative) studies of both freely diffusing and tethered molecules on various electrode surfaces. PMID:27243969

  14. Resolution of strongly competitive product channels with optimal dynamic discrimination: Application to flavins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roslund, Jonathan; Roth, Matthias; Guyon, Laurent; Boutou, Véronique; Courvoisier, Francois; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Rabitz, Herschel

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental molecular selectivity limits are probed by exploiting laser-controlled quantum interferences for the creation of distinct spectral signatures in two flavin molecules, erstwhile nearly indistinguishable via steady-state methods. Optimal dynamic discrimination (ODD) uses optimally shaped laser fields to transiently amplify minute molecular variations that would otherwise go unnoticed with linear absorption and fluorescence techniques. ODD is experimentally demonstrated by combining an optimally shaped UV pump pulse with a time-delayed, fluorescence-depleting IR pulse for discrimination amongst riboflavin and flavin mononucleotide in aqueous solution, which are structurally and spectroscopically very similar. Closed-loop, adaptive pulse shaping discovers a set of UV pulses that induce disparate responses from the two flavins and allows for concomitant flavin discrimination of ˜16σ. Additionally, attainment of ODD permits quantitative, analytical detection of the individual constituents in a flavin mixture. The successful implementation of ODD on quantum systems of such high complexity bodes well for the future development of the field and the use of ODD techniques in a variety of demanding practical applications.

  15. Flavins contained in yeast extract are exploited for anodic electron transfer by Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Masaki; Freguia, Stefano; Wang, Yung-Fu; Tsujimura, Seiya; Kano, Kenji

    2010-06-01

    Cyclic voltammograms of yeast extract-containing medium exhibit a clear redox peak around -0.4V vs. Ag|AgCl. Fermentative bacterium Lactococcus lactis was hereby shown to exploit this redox compound for extracellular electron transfer towards a graphite anode using glucose as an electron donor. High performance liquid chromatography revealed that this may be a flavin-type compound. The ability of L. lactis to exploit exogenous flavins for anodic glucose oxidation was confirmed by tests where flavin-type compounds were supplied to the bacterium in well defined media. Based on its mid-point potential, riboflavin can be regarded as a near-optimal mediator for microbially catalyzed anodic electron transfer. Riboflavin derivative flavin mononucleotide (FMN) was also exploited by L. lactis as a redox shuttle, unlike flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), possibly due to the absence of a specific transporter for the latter. The use of yeast extract in microbial fuel cell media is herein discouraged based on the related unwanted artificial addition of redox mediators which may distort experimental results.

  16. BluB cannibalizes flavin to form the lower ligand of vitamin B12

    PubMed Central

    Taga, Michiko E.; Larsen, Nicholas A.; Howard-Jones, Annaleise R.; Walsh, Christopher T.; Walker, Graham C.

    2009-01-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is among the largest known non-polymeric natural products, and the only vitamin synthesized exclusively by microorganisms1. The biosynthesis of the lower ligand of vitamin B12, 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB), is poorly understood1–3. Recently, we discovered that a Sinorhizobium meliloti gene, bluB, is necessary for DMB biosynthesis4. Here we show that BluB triggers the unprecedented fragmentation and contraction of the bound flavin mononucleotide cofactor and cleavage of the ribityl tail to form DMB and D-erythrose 4-phosphate. Our structural analysis shows that BluB resembles an NAD(P)H-flavin oxidoreductase, except that its unusually tight binding pocket accommodates flavin mononucleotide but not NAD(P)H. We characterize crystallographically an early intermediate along the reaction coordinate, revealing molecular oxygen poised over reduced flavin. Thus, BluB isolates and directs reduced flavin to activate molecular oxygen for its own cannibalization. This investigation of the biosynthesis of DMB provides clarification of an aspect of vitamin B12 that was otherwise incomplete, and may contribute to a better understanding of vitamin B12-related disease. PMID:17377583

  17. Flavin Charge Transfer Transitions Assist DNA Photolyase Electron Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skourtis, Spiros S.; Prytkova, Tatiana; Beratan, David N.

    2007-12-01

    This contribution describes molecular dynamics, semi-empirical and ab-initio studies of the primary photo-induced electron transfer reaction in DNA photolyase. DNA photolyases are FADH--containing proteins that repair UV-damaged DNA by photo-induced electron transfer. A DNA photolyase recognizes and binds to cyclobutatne pyrimidine dimer lesions of DNA. The protein repairs a bound lesion by transferring an electron to the lesion from FADH-, upon photo-excitation of FADH- with 350-450 nm light. We compute the lowest singlet excited states of FADH- in DNA photolyase using INDO/S configuration interaction, time-dependent density-functional, and time-dependent Hartree-Fock methods. The calculations identify the lowest singlet excited state of FADH- that is populated after photo-excitation and that acts as the electron donor. For this donor state we compute conformationally-averaged tunneling matrix elements to empty electron-acceptor states of a thymine dimer bound to photolyase. The conformational averaging involves different FADH--thymine dimer confromations obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of the solvated protein with a thymine dimer docked in its active site. The tunneling matrix element computations use INDO/S-level Green's function, energy splitting, and Generalized Mulliken-Hush methods. These calculations indicate that photo-excitation of FADH- causes a π→π* charge-transfer transition that shifts electron density to the side of the flavin isoalloxazine ring that is adjacent to the docked thymine dimer. This shift in electron density enhances the FADH--to-dimer electronic coupling, thus inducing rapid electron transfer.

  18. Characterization of Flavin-Containing Opine Dehydrogenase from Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Seiya; Sueda, Rui; Fukumori, Fumiyasu; Watanabe, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Opines, in particular nopaline and octopine, are specific compounds found in crown gall tumor tissues induced by infections with Agrobacterium species, and are synthesized by well-studied NAD(P)H-dependent dehydrogenases (synthases), which catalyze the reductive condensation of α-ketoglutarate or pyruvate with L-arginine. The corresponding genes are transferred into plant cells via a tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid. In addition to the reverse oxidative reaction(s), the genes noxB-noxA and ooxB-ooxA are considered to be involved in opine catabolism as (membrane-associated) oxidases; however, their properties have not yet been elucidated in detail due to the difficulties associated with purification (and preservation). We herein successfully expressed Nox/Oox-like genes from Pseudomonas putida in P. putida cells. The purified protein consisted of different α-, β-, and γ-subunits encoded by the OdhA, OdhB, and OdhC genes, which were arranged in tandem on the chromosome (OdhB-C-A), and exhibited dehydrogenase (but not oxidase) activity toward nopaline in the presence of artificial electron acceptors such as 2,6-dichloroindophenol. The enzyme contained FAD, FMN, and [2Fe-2S]-iron sulfur as prosthetic groups. On the other hand, the gene cluster from Bradyrhizobium japonicum consisted of OdhB1-C-A-B2, from which two proteins, OdhAB1C and OdhAB2C, appeared through the assembly of each β-subunit together with common α- and γ-subunits. A poor phylogenetic relationship was detected between OdhB1 and OdhB2 in spite of them both functioning as octopine dehydrogenases, which provided clear evidence for the acquisition of novel functions by "subunit-exchange". To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to have examined flavin-containing opine dehydrogenase. PMID:26382958

  19. Biotransformation of lepidocrocite in the presence of quinones and flavins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Sungjun; Lee, Woojin

    2013-08-01

    This study investigated the bioreduction of lepidocrocite (γ-FeIIIOOH) and its mineral transformation in the presence of exogenous (quinones) and endogenous (flavins) electron transfer mediators (ETMs) at low concentrations of the ETMs and bacterial cells (Shewanella putrefaciens CN32). It is very important to investigate the bioreduction of lepidocrocite in the presence of different ETMs because biotransformation of Fe(III)-containing minerals can be stimulated by ETMs and affect fate and transport of contaminants in contaminated environments. In the absence of phosphate, green rust formation was observed with fast Fe(II) production rate (0.44-0.56 mM d-1) during the bioreduction of lepidocrocite with exogenous ETMs, while goethite formed at slow Fe(II) production rate (0.24-0.29 mM d-1) with endogenous ETMs. In the presence of phosphate, formation of green rust and vivianite was observed with fast Fe(II) production rate (0.54-0.74 mM d-1) during the bioreduction of lepidocrocite with exogenous ETMs, while vivianite formed at moderate Fe(II) production rate (0.36-0.40 mM d-1) with endogenous ETMs. Vivianite formed in all experimental cases with phosphate in a broad range of Fe(II) production rates (0.23-0.74 mM d-1). Our results (1) suggest that exogenous and endogenous ETMs can significantly but differently affect the biotransformation of lepidocrocite, especially at low concentrations of the ETMs and bacterial cells, (2) highlight the importance of Fe(II) production rate to determine the formation of specific biogenic minerals, (3) provide additional evidence that phosphate can significantly affect the bioreduction rate and the mineral transformation, and (4) help to understand the basic knowledge about complex interactions among microbial cell, soil mineral, and ETM in natural environments and engineered systems.

  20. Reductive Dissolution of Goethite and Hematite by Reduced Flavins

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zhi; Zachara, John M.; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2013-10-02

    The abiotic reductive dissolution of goethite and hematite by the reduced forms of flavin mononucleotide (FMNH2) and riboflavin (RBFH2), electron transfer mediators (ETM) secreted by the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella, was investigated under stringent anaerobic conditions. In contrast to the rapid redox reaction rate observed for ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite (Shi et al., 2012), the reductive dissolution of crystalline goethite and hematite was slower, with the extent of reaction limited by the thermodynamic driving force at circumneutral pH. Both the initial reaction rate and reaction extent increased with decreasing pH. On a unit surface area basis, goethite was less reactive than hematite between pH 4.0 and 7.0. AH2DS, the reduced form of the well-studied synthetic ETM anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), yielded higher rates than FMNH2 under most reaction conditions, despite the fact that FMNH2 was a more effective reductant than AH2DS for ferryhydrite and lepidocrocite. Two additional model compounds, methyl viologen and benzyl viologen, were investigated under similar reaction conditions to explore the relationship between reaction rate and thermodynamic properties. Relevant kinetic data from the literature were also included in the analysis to span a broad range of half-cell potentials. Other conditions being equal, the surface area normalized initial reaction rate (ra) increased as the redox potential of the reductant became more negative. A non-linear, parabolic relationship was observed between log ra and the redox potential for eight reducants at pH 7.0, as predicted by Marcus theory for electron transfer. When pH and reductant concentration were fixed, log ra was positively correlated to the redox potential of four Fe(III) oxides over a wide pH range, following a non-linear parabolic relationship as well.

  1. Characterization of Flavin-Containing Opine Dehydrogenase from Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Seiya; Sueda, Rui; Fukumori, Fumiyasu; Watanabe, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Opines, in particular nopaline and octopine, are specific compounds found in crown gall tumor tissues induced by infections with Agrobacterium species, and are synthesized by well-studied NAD(P)H-dependent dehydrogenases (synthases), which catalyze the reductive condensation of α-ketoglutarate or pyruvate with L-arginine. The corresponding genes are transferred into plant cells via a tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid. In addition to the reverse oxidative reaction(s), the genes noxB-noxA and ooxB-ooxA are considered to be involved in opine catabolism as (membrane-associated) oxidases; however, their properties have not yet been elucidated in detail due to the difficulties associated with purification (and preservation). We herein successfully expressed Nox/Oox-like genes from Pseudomonas putida in P. putida cells. The purified protein consisted of different α-, β-, and γ-subunits encoded by the OdhA, OdhB, and OdhC genes, which were arranged in tandem on the chromosome (OdhB-C-A), and exhibited dehydrogenase (but not oxidase) activity toward nopaline in the presence of artificial electron acceptors such as 2,6-dichloroindophenol. The enzyme contained FAD, FMN, and [2Fe-2S]-iron sulfur as prosthetic groups. On the other hand, the gene cluster from Bradyrhizobium japonicum consisted of OdhB1-C-A-B2, from which two proteins, OdhAB1C and OdhAB2C, appeared through the assembly of each β-subunit together with common α- and γ-subunits. A poor phylogenetic relationship was detected between OdhB1 and OdhB2 in spite of them both functioning as octopine dehydrogenases, which provided clear evidence for the acquisition of novel functions by “subunit-exchange”. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to have examined flavin-containing opine dehydrogenase. PMID:26382958

  2. Nitrate and periplasmic nitrate reductases

    PubMed Central

    Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney; Stolz, John F.; Basu, Partha

    2014-01-01

    The nitrate anion is a simple, abundant and relatively stable species, yet plays a significant role in global cycling of nitrogen, global climate change, and human health. Although it has been known for quite some time that nitrate is an important species environmentally, recent studies have identified potential medical applications. In this respect the nitrate anion remains an enigmatic species that promises to offer exciting science in years to come. Many bacteria readily reduce nitrate to nitrite via nitrate reductases. Classified into three distinct types – periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), respiratory nitrate reductase (Nar) and assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas), they are defined by their cellular location, operon organization and active site structure. Of these, Nap proteins are the focus of this review. Despite similarities in the catalytic and spectroscopic properties Nap from different Proteobacteria are phylogenetically distinct. This review has two major sections: in the first section, nitrate in the nitrogen cycle and human health, taxonomy of nitrate reductases, assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, cellular locations of nitrate reductases, structural and redox chemistry are discussed. The second section focuses on the features of periplasmic nitrate reductase where the catalytic subunit of the Nap and its kinetic properties, auxiliary Nap proteins, operon structure and phylogenetic relationships are discussed. PMID:24141308

  3. Synthesis of 10-Ethyl Flavin: A Multistep Synthesis Organic Chemistry Laboratory Experiment for Upper-Division Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sichula, Vincent A.

    2015-01-01

    A multistep synthesis of 10-ethyl flavin was developed as an organic chemistry laboratory experiment for upper-division undergraduate students. Students synthesize 10-ethyl flavin as a bright yellow solid via a five-step sequence. The experiment introduces students to various hands-on experimental organic synthetic techniques, such as column…

  4. Hydrogen-bonding modulation of excited-state properties of flavins in a model of aqueous confined environment.

    PubMed

    Valle, Lorena; Vieyra, Faustino E Morán; Borsarelli, Claudio D

    2012-06-01

    The singlet and triplet excited states properties of lumiflavin (LF), riboflavin (RF), flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) in reversed micelles (RM) of sodium docusate (AOT) in n-hexane solutions were evaluated as a function of the water to surfactant molar ratio, w(0) = [H(2)O]/[AOT], by both steady-state and time-resolved absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The results indicated that hydrogen-bonding interactions between the isoalloxazine ring of the flavins with the water molecules of the micellar interior play a crucial role on the modulation of the excited state properties of the flavins. Fluorescence dynamic experiments in the RM, allowed the calculation of similar values for both the internal rotational time of the flavins (θ(i)) and the hydrogen-bonding relaxation time (τ(HB)), e.g.≈ 7 and 1.5 ns at w(0) = 1 and 20, respectively. In turn, the triplet state lifetimes of the flavins were also enlarged in RM solutions at low w(0), without modifications of their quantum yields. A hydrogen bonding relaxation model is proposed to explain the singlet excited state properties of the flavins, while the changes of the triplet state decays of the flavins were related with the global composition and strength of the hydrogen bonding network inside of the RM.

  5. The Occurrence of Nitrate Reductase in Leaves of Prunus Species 1

    PubMed Central

    Leece, D. R.; Dilley, David R.; Kenworthy, A. L.

    1972-01-01

    Nitrate reductase was found in leaves of apricot Prunus armeniaca, sour cherry P. cerasus, sweet cherry P. avium, and plum P. domestica, but not in peach P. persica, from trees grown in sand culture receiving a nitrate containing nutrient solution. Nitrate was found in the leaves of all species. Nitrate and nitrate reductase were found in leaves of field-grown apricot, sour cherry, and plum trees. The enzyme-extracting medium contained insoluble polyvinylpyrrolidone, and including dithiothreitol or mercaptobenzothiazole did not improve enzyme recovery. Inclusion of cherry leaf extract diminished, and peach leaf extract abolished, recovery of nitrate reductase from oat tissue. Low molecular weight phenols liberated during extraction were probably responsible for inactivation of the enzyme. The enzyme from apricot was two to three times as active as from the other species. Both nicotine adenine diphosphopyridine nucleotide and flavin mononucleotide were effective electron donors. The enzyme was readily induced in apricot leaves by 10 mm nitrate supplied through the leaf petiole. PMID:16658037

  6. Whence flavins? Redox-active ribonucleotides link metabolism and genome repair to the RNA world.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khiem Van; Burrows, Cynthia J

    2012-12-18

    Present-day organisms are under constant environmental stress that damages bases in DNA, leading to mutations. Without DNA repair processes to correct these errors, such damage would be catastrophic. Organisms in all kingdoms have repair processes ranging from direct reversal to base excision and nucleotide excision repair, and the recently characterized giant viruses also include these mechanisms. At what point in the evolution of genomes did active repair mechanisms become critical? In particular, how did early RNA genomes protect themselves from UV photodamage that would have hampered nonenzymatic replication and led to a mutation rate too high to pass on accurate sequence information from one generation to the next? Photolyase is a widespread and phylogenetically ancient enzyme that utilizes longer wavelength light to cleave thymine dimers in DNA produced via photodamage. The protein serves as a binding scaffold but does not contribute to the catalytic chemistry; the action of the dinucleotide cofactor FADH(2) breaks the chemical bonds. This small bit of RNA, hailed as a "fossil of the RNA World," contains the flavin heterocycle, whose redox activity has been harnessed for myriad functions of life from metabolism to DNA repair. In present-day biochemistry, flavin biosynthesis begins with guanosine and proceeds through seven steps catalyzed by protein-based enzymes. This leads to the question of how flavins originally evolved. Did the RNA world include ancestral RNA bases with greater redox activity than G, A, C, and U that were capable of photorepair of uracil dimers? Could those ancestral bases have chemically evolved to the current flavin structure? Or did flavins already exist from prebiotic chemical synthesis? And were they then co-opted as catalysts for repair sometime after metabolism was established? In this Account, we analyze simple derivatives of guanosine and other bases that show two prerequisites for flavin-like photolyase activity: a significantly

  7. Differential contributions of NADPH-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase FAD binding site residues to flavin binding and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, A L; Kasper, C B

    2000-12-29

    Transfer of reducing equivalents from NADPH to the cytochromes P450 is mediated by NADPH-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase, which contains stoichiometric amounts of tightly bound FMN and FAD. Hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions between FAD and amino acid residues in the FAD binding site of the reductase serve to regulate both flavin binding and reactivity. The precise orientation of key residues (Arg(454), Tyr(456), Cys(472), Gly(488), Thr(491), and Trp(677)) has been defined by x-ray crystallography (Wang, M., Roberts, D. L., Paschke, R., Shea, T. M., Masters, B. S., Kim, J.-J. P. (1997) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 94, 8411-8416). The current study examines the relative contributions of these residues to FAD binding and catalysis by site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic analysis. Mutation of either Tyr(456), which makes van der Waals contact with the FAD isoalloxazine ring and also hydrogen-bonds to the ribityl 4'-hydroxyl, or Arg(454), which bonds to the FAD pyrophosphate, decreases the affinity for FAD 8000- and 25,000-fold, respectively, with corresponding decreases in cytochrome c reductase activity. In contrast, substitution of Thr(491), which also interacts with the pyrophosphate grouping, had a relatively modest effect on both FAD binding (100-fold decrease) and catalytic activity (2-fold decrease), while the G488L mutant exhibited, respectively, 800- and 50-fold decreases in FAD binding and catalytic activity. Enzymic activity of each of these mutants could be restored by addition of FAD. Kinetic properties and the FMN content of these mutants were not affected by these substitutions, with the exception of a 3-fold increase in Y456S K(m)(cyt )(c) and a 70% decrease in R454E FMN content, suggesting that the FMN- and FAD-binding domains are largely, but not completely, independent. Even though Trp(677) is stacked against the re-face of FAD, suggesting an important role in FAD binding, deletion of both Trp(677) and the carboxyl-terminal Ser(678

  8. Reductive dissolution of goethite and hematite by reduced flavins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhi; Zachara, John M.; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2013-11-01

    The abiotic reductive dissolution of goethite and hematite by the reduced forms of flavin mononucleotide (FMNH2) and riboflavin (RBFH2), electron shuttles secreted by the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella, was investigated under stringent anaerobic conditions. At pH 7.0, the reductive dissolution rates of goethite were 3.5 μmoles m-2 h-1 by 50 μM FMNH2 and 0.27 μmoles m-2 h-1 by 50 μM RBFH2; the reductive dissolution rates of hematite were 29 μmoles m-2 h-1 by 50 μM FMNH2 and 151 μmoles m-2 h-1 by 50 μM RBFH2. The extent of reaction was limited by the thermodynamic driving force at circumneutral pH. Both the initial reaction rate and reaction extent increased with decreasing pH. On a unit surface area basis, goethite was less reactive than hematite between pH 4.0 and 7.0. AH2DS, the reduced form of the well-studied synthetic electron shuttle anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate, yielded higher rates than FMNH2 under most reaction conditions. Two additional model compounds, methyl viologen and benzyl viologen, were investigated under similar reaction conditions to explore the relationship between reaction rate and thermodynamic properties. Relevant kinetic data from the literature were also included in the analysis to span a large range in half-cell potentials. Other conditions being equal, the surface area normalized initial reaction rate (ra) increased as the redox potential of the reductant became more negative. A non-linear relationship was observed between log ra and the redox potential for eight reductants at pH 7.0. When pH and reductant concentration were fixed, log ra was positively correlated to the redox potential of four Fe(III) oxides over a wide pH range, following a non-linear relationship as well.

  9. Electrochemical sensor with flavin-containing monooxygenase for triethylamine solution.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hirokazu; Shirai, Takeshi; Kudo, Hiroyuki; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2008-06-01

    A bioelectronic sensor for triethylamine (TEA) was developed with a flavin-containing monooxygenase type 3 (FMO-3). The TEA biosensor consisted of a Clark-type dissolved-oxygen electrode and an FMO-3 immobilized membrane. The FMO-3 solution was mixed with a poly(vinyl alcohol) containing stilbazolium groups (PVA-SbQ), coated on to the dialysis membrane, and the membrane was irradiated with a fluorescent light to immobilize the enzyme. In order to amplify the biosensor output, a substrate regeneration cycle, obtained by coupling the monooxygenase with L-ascorbic acid (AsA) as reducing reagent system, was applied. The effect of pH on the determination of TEA was studied. The maximum response was achieved at pH >9.0. A drop of the phosphate buffer solution with the AsA was put on the sensing area of the oxygen electrode, and the FMO-3 immobilized membrane was placed on the oxygen electrode and covered with a supporting Nylon mesh net which was secured with a silicone O-ring. A measurement system for TEA solution was constructed using the FMO-3 biosensor, a personal computer, a computer-controlled potentiostat, and an A/D converter. The FMO-3 biosensor was used to measure TEA solution from 0.5 to 4.0 mmol L(-1) with 10.0 mmol L(-1) AsA. The biosensor also had good reproducibility, for example a 6.31% coefficient of variation for five measurements, and the output current was maintained over a few hours. In order to improve the selectivity of the TEA biosensor, three type of biosensor with FMO isomer types 1, 3, and 5 were constructed and used to measure nitrogen and sulfur compounds. The outputs of the isomer biosensors indicated individual patterns for each sample solution. The selectivity of TEA biosensor would be improved, and determination of sulfur and nitrogen compounds would be possible, by using the different output of biosensors prepared from different FMO isomers. PMID:18157663

  10. Flavodiiron protein from Trichomonas vaginalis hydrogenosomes: the terminal oxygen reductase.

    PubMed

    Smutná, Tamara; Gonçalves, Vera L; Saraiva, Lígia M; Tachezy, Jan; Teixeira, Miguel; Hrdy, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is one of a few eukaryotes that have been found to encode several homologues of flavodiiron proteins (FDPs). Widespread among anaerobic prokaryotes, these proteins are believed to function as oxygen and/or nitric oxide reductases to provide protection against oxidative/nitrosative stresses and host immune responses. One of the T. vaginalis FDP homologues is equipped with a hydrogenosomal targeting sequence and is expressed in the hydrogenosomes, oxygen-sensitive organelles that participate in carbohydrate metabolism and assemble iron-sulfur clusters. The bacterial homologues characterized thus far have been dimers or tetramers; the trichomonad protein is a dimer of identical 45-kDa subunits, each noncovalently binding one flavin mononucleotide. The protein reduces dioxygen to water but is unable to utilize nitric oxide as a substrate, similarly to its closest homologue from another human parasite Giardia intestinalis and related archaebacterial proteins. T. vaginalis FDP is able to accept electrons derived from pyruvate or NADH via ferredoxin and is proposed to play a role in the protection of hydrogenosomes against oxygen. PMID:19011120

  11. Structural Basis for Activation of Class Ib Ribonucleotide Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Boal, Amie K.; Cotruvo, Jr., Joseph A.; Stubbe, JoAnne; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-12-03

    The class Ib ribonucleotide reductase of Escherichia coli can initiate reduction of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides with either a Mn{sub 2}{sup III}-tyrosyl radical (Y{sm_bullet}) or a Fe{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet} cofactor in the NrdF subunit. Whereas Fe{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet} can self-assemble from Fe{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF and O{sub 2}, activation of Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF requires a reduced flavoprotein, NrdI, proposed to form the oxidant for cofactor assembly by reduction of O{sub 2}. The crystal structures reported here of E. coli Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF and Fe{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF reveal different coordination environments, suggesting distinct initial binding sites for the oxidants during cofactor activation. In the structures of Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF in complex with reduced and oxidized NrdI, a continuous channel connects the NrdI flavin cofactor to the NrdF Mn{sub 2}{sup II} active site. Crystallographic detection of a putative peroxide in this channel supports the proposed mechanism of Mn{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet} cofactor assembly.

  12. The mechanism of the effect of U18666a on blocking the activity of 3β-hydroxysterol Δ-24-reductase (DHCR24): molecular dynamics simulation study and free energy analysis.

    PubMed

    Quan, Xiaoping; Chen, Xiuqiang; Sun, Deliang; Xu, Bo; Zhao, Linlin; Shi, Xiaoqian; Liu, Hongsheng; Gao, Bing; Lu, Xiuli

    2016-02-01

    DHCR24 encodes 3β-hydroxysterol-Δ(24)-reductase (DHCR24) catalyzing the cholesterol synthesis from desmosterol using the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) as a co-factor. It is generally accepted that U18666a inhibits the reductase activity of DHCR24, but the detailed mechanism remains elusive. To explore the mechanism of the inhibitory effect of U18666a on DHCR24, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of two complexes including complexes of DHCR24-FAD-desmosterol enzymatic reactive components with and without the inhibitor U18666a. We found that the U18666a bound into the hydrophobic package near the FAD package of DHCR24. Furthermore, binding free energy of DHCR24 and desmosterol without U18666a is -54.86 kcal/mol, while the system with U18666a is -62.23 kcal/mol, suggesting that the affinity of the substrate desmosterol to DHCR24 was increased in response to the U18666a. In addition, U18666a interacts with FAD by newly forming three hydrogen bonds with Lys292, Lys367, and Gly438 of DHCR24. Finally, secondary structural analysis data obtained from the surrounding hot spots showed that U18666a induced dramatic secondary structural changes around the key residues in the interaction of DHCR24, FAD, and desmosterol. Taken together, these results for the first time demonstrate at the molecular structure level that U18666a blocks DHCR24 activity through an allosteric inhibiting mechanism, which may provide new insight into the development of a new type of cholesterol-lowering drug targeting to block the activity of DHCR24. PMID:26815033

  13. The transient catalytically competent coenzyme allocation into the active site of Anabaena ferredoxin NADP+ -reductase.

    PubMed

    Peregrina, José Ramón; Lans, Isaías; Medina, Milagros

    2012-01-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR) catalyses the electron transfer from ferredoxin to NADP(+) via its flavin FAD cofactor. A molecular dynamics theoretical approach is applied here to visualise the transient catalytically competent interaction of Anabaena FNR with its coenzyme, NADP(+). The particular role of some of the residues identified as key in binding and accommodating the 2'P-AMP moiety of the coenzyme is confirmed in molecular terms. Simulations also indicate that the architecture of the active site precisely contributes to the orientation of the N5 of the FAD isoalloxazine ring and the C4 of the coenzyme nicotinamide ring in the conformation of the catalytically competent hydride transfer complex and, therefore, contributes to the efficiency of the process. In particular, the side chain of the C-terminal Y303 in Anabaena FNR appears key to providing the optimum geometry by reducing the stacking probability between the isoalloxazine and nicotinamide rings, thus providing the required co-linearity and distance among the N5 of the flavin cofactor, the C4 of the coenzyme nicotinamide and the hydride that has to be transferred between them. All these factors are highly related to the reaction efficiency, mechanism and reversibility of the process.

  14. Purification and properties of glutathione reductase from the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain 7119

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano, A.; Rivas, J.; Losada, M.

    1984-04-01

    An NADPH-glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) has been purified 6000-fold to electrophoretic homogeneity from the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain 7119. The purified enzyme exhibits a specific activity of 249 U/mg and is characterized by being a dimeric flavin adenine dinucleotide-containing protein with a ratio of absorbance at 280 nm to absorbance at 462 nm of 5.8, a native molecular weight of 104,000, a Stokes radius of 4.13 nm, and a pI of 4.02. The enzyme activity is inhibited by sulfhydryl reagents and heavy-metal ions, especially in the presence of NADPH, with oxidized glutathione behaving as a protective agent. As is the case with the same enzyme from other sources, the kinetic data are consistent with a branched mechanism. Nevertheless, the cyanobacterial enzyme presents three distinctive

  15. FAD binding, cobinamide binding and active site communication in the corrin reductase (CobR)

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Andrew D.; Taylor, Samantha L.; Scott, Alan; Rowe, Michelle L.; Johnson, Christopher M.; Rigby, Stephen E. J.; Geeves, Michael A.; Pickersgill, Richard W.; Howard, Mark J.; Warren, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosylcobalamin, the coenzyme form of vitamin B12, is one Nature's most complex coenzyme whose de novo biogenesis proceeds along either an anaerobic or aerobic metabolic pathway. The aerobic synthesis involves reduction of the centrally chelated cobalt metal ion of the corrin ring from Co(II) to Co(I) before adenosylation can take place. A corrin reductase (CobR) enzyme has been identified as the likely agent to catalyse this reduction of the metal ion. Herein, we reveal how Brucella melitensis CobR binds its coenzyme FAD (flavin dinucleotide) and we also show that the enzyme can bind a corrin substrate consistent with its role in reduction of the cobalt of the corrin ring. Stopped-flow kinetics and EPR reveal a mechanistic asymmetry in CobR dimer that provides a potential link between the two electron reduction by NADH to the single electron reduction of Co(II) to Co(I). PMID:24909839

  16. Flavin-mediated dual oxidation controls an enzymatic Favorskii-type rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Gordon; Noel, Joseph P.; Baran, Phil S.; Palfey, Bruce; Moore, Bradley S.

    2013-01-01

    Flavoproteins catalyze a diversity of fundamental redox reactions and are one of the most studied enzyme families1,2. As monooxygenases, they are universally thought to control oxygenation by means of a peroxyflavin species that transfers a single atom of molecular oxygen to an organic substrate1,3,4. Here we report that the bacterial flavoenzyme EncM5,6 catalyzes the peroxyflavin-independent oxygenation-dehydrogenation dual oxidation of a highly reactive poly(β-carbonyl). The crystal structure of EncM with bound substrate mimics coupled with isotope labeling studies reveal previously unknown flavin redox biochemistry. We show that EncM maintains an unanticipated stable flavin oxygenating species, proposed to be a flavin-N5-oxide, to promote substrate oxidation and trigger a rare Favorskii-type rearrangement that is central to the biosynthesis of the antibiotic enterocin. This work provides new insight into the fine-tuning of the flavin cofactor in offsetting the innate reactivity of a polyketide substrate to direct its efficient electrocyclization. PMID:24162851

  17. Flavin-mediated dual oxidation controls an enzymatic Favorskii-type rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Teufel, Robin; Miyanaga, Akimasa; Michaudel, Quentin; Stull, Frederick; Louie, Gordon; Noel, Joseph P; Baran, Phil S; Palfey, Bruce; Moore, Bradley S

    2013-11-28

    Flavoproteins catalyse a diversity of fundamental redox reactions and are one of the most studied enzyme families. As monooxygenases, they are universally thought to control oxygenation by means of a peroxyflavin species that transfers a single atom of molecular oxygen to an organic substrate. Here we report that the bacterial flavoenzyme EncM catalyses the peroxyflavin-independent oxygenation-dehydrogenation dual oxidation of a highly reactive poly(β-carbonyl). The crystal structure of EncM with bound substrate mimics and isotope labelling studies reveal previously unknown flavin redox biochemistry. We show that EncM maintains an unexpected stable flavin-oxygenating species, proposed to be a flavin-N5-oxide, to promote substrate oxidation and trigger a rare Favorskii-type rearrangement that is central to the biosynthesis of the antibiotic enterocin. This work provides new insight into the fine-tuning of the flavin cofactor in offsetting the innate reactivity of a polyketide substrate to direct its efficient electrocyclization. PMID:24162851

  18. Human Cryptochrome-1 Confers Light Independent Biological Activity in Transgenic Drosophila Correlated with Flavin Radical Stability

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Jacqueline; Jones, Alex R.; Danon, Antoine; Sakuma, Michiyo; Hoang, Nathalie; Robles, David; Tait, Shirley; Heyes, Derren J.; Picot, Marie; Yoshii, Taishi; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte; Soubigou, Guillaume; Coppee, Jean-Yves; Klarsfeld, André; Rouyer, Francois; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Ahmad, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Cryptochromes are conserved flavoprotein receptors found throughout the biological kingdom with diversified roles in plant development and entrainment of the circadian clock in animals. Light perception is proposed to occur through flavin radical formation that correlates with biological activity in vivo in both plants and Drosophila. By contrast, mammalian (Type II) cryptochromes regulate the circadian clock independently of light, raising the fundamental question of whether mammalian cryptochromes have evolved entirely distinct signaling mechanisms. Here we show by developmental and transcriptome analysis that Homo sapiens cryptochrome - 1 (HsCRY1) confers biological activity in transgenic expressing Drosophila in darkness, that can in some cases be further stimulated by light. In contrast to all other cryptochromes, purified recombinant HsCRY1 protein was stably isolated in the anionic radical flavin state, containing only a small proportion of oxidized flavin which could be reduced by illumination. We conclude that animal Type I and Type II cryptochromes may both have signaling mechanisms involving formation of a flavin radical signaling state, and that light independent activity of Type II cryptochromes is a consequence of dark accumulation of this redox form in vivo rather than of a fundamental difference in signaling mechanism. PMID:22427812

  19. Structure of Hordeum vulgare NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase 2. Unwinding the reaction mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkensgaard, Kristine G.; Hägglund, Per; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte; Henriksen, Anette

    2009-09-01

    The first crystal structure of a cereal NTR, a protein involved in seed development and germination, has been determined. The structure is in a conformation that excludes NADPH binding and indicates that a domain reorientation facilitated by Trx binding precedes NADPH binding in the reaction mechanism. Thioredoxins (Trxs) are protein disulfide reductases that regulate the intracellular redox environment and are important for seed germination in plants. Trxs are in turn regulated by NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRs), which provide reducing equivalents to Trx using NADPH to recycle Trxs to the active form. Here, the first crystal structure of a cereal NTR, HvNTR2 from Hordeum vulgare (barley), is presented, which is also the first structure of a monocot plant NTR. The structure was determined at 2.6 Å resolution and refined to an R{sub cryst} of 19.0% and an R{sub free} of 23.8%. The dimeric protein is structurally similar to the structures of AtNTR-B from Arabidopsis thaliana and other known low-molecular-weight NTRs. However, the relative position of the two NTR cofactor-binding domains, the FAD and the NADPH domains, is not the same. The NADPH domain is rotated by 25° and bent by a 38% closure relative to the FAD domain in comparison with AtNTR-B. The structure may represent an intermediate between the two conformations described previously: the flavin-oxidizing (FO) and the flavin-reducing (FR) conformations. Here, analysis of interdomain contacts as well as phylogenetic studies lead to the proposal of a new reaction scheme in which NTR–Trx interactions mediate the FO to FR transformation.

  20. A highly efficient ADH-coupled NADH-recycling system for the asymmetric bioreduction of carbon-carbon double bonds using enoate reductases.

    PubMed

    Tauber, Katharina; Hall, Melanie; Kroutil, Wolfgang; Fabian, Walter M F; Faber, Kurt; Glueck, Silvia M

    2011-06-01

    The asymmetric bioreduction of activated alkenes catalyzed by flavin-dependent enoate reductases from the OYE-family represents a powerful method for the production of optically active compounds. For its preparative-scale application, efficient and economic NADH-recycling is crucial. A novel enzyme-coupled NADH-recycling system is proposed based on the concurrent oxidation of a sacrificial sec-alcohol catalyzed by an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-A). Due to the highly favorable position of the equilibrium of ene-reduction versus alcohol-oxidation, the cosubstrate is only required in slight excess.

  1. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of a self-stabilized synthetic flavin anchored on a TiO2 surface.

    PubMed

    Pandiri, Manjula; Hossain, Mohammad S; Foss, Frank W; Rajeshwar, Krishnan; Paz, Yaron

    2016-07-21

    Synthetic flavin molecules were anchored on Degussa P25 titanium dioxide (TiO2). The effect of their presence on the photocatalytic (PC) activity of TiO2 was studied. Under UV light, an increase in the degradation rate of ethanol was observed. This increase was accompanied by stabilization of the anchored flavin against self-degradation. The unprecedented stabilization effect was found also in the absence of a reducing agent such as ethanol. In contrast, under the less energetic visible light, fast degradation of the anchored flavin was observed. These rather surprising observations were attributed to the propensity for charge transport from excited flavin molecules to the semiconductor and to the role that such charge transfer may play in stabilizing the overall assembly. Anchored flavins excited by UV light to their S2, S3 electronic states were able to transfer the excited electrons to the TiO2 phase whereas anchored flavin molecules that were excited by visible light to the S1 state were less likely to transfer the photo-excited electrons and therefore were destabilized. These findings may be relevant not only to anchored flavins in general but to other functionalized photocatalysts, and may open up new vistas in the implementation of sensitizers in PC systems. PMID:27346787

  2. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of a self-stabilized synthetic flavin anchored on a TiO2 surface.

    PubMed

    Pandiri, Manjula; Hossain, Mohammad S; Foss, Frank W; Rajeshwar, Krishnan; Paz, Yaron

    2016-07-21

    Synthetic flavin molecules were anchored on Degussa P25 titanium dioxide (TiO2). The effect of their presence on the photocatalytic (PC) activity of TiO2 was studied. Under UV light, an increase in the degradation rate of ethanol was observed. This increase was accompanied by stabilization of the anchored flavin against self-degradation. The unprecedented stabilization effect was found also in the absence of a reducing agent such as ethanol. In contrast, under the less energetic visible light, fast degradation of the anchored flavin was observed. These rather surprising observations were attributed to the propensity for charge transport from excited flavin molecules to the semiconductor and to the role that such charge transfer may play in stabilizing the overall assembly. Anchored flavins excited by UV light to their S2, S3 electronic states were able to transfer the excited electrons to the TiO2 phase whereas anchored flavin molecules that were excited by visible light to the S1 state were less likely to transfer the photo-excited electrons and therefore were destabilized. These findings may be relevant not only to anchored flavins in general but to other functionalized photocatalysts, and may open up new vistas in the implementation of sensitizers in PC systems.

  3. 15N solid-state NMR provides a sensitive probe of oxidized flavin reactive sites.

    PubMed

    Koder, Ronald L; Walsh, Joseph D; Pometun, Maxim S; Dutton, P Leslie; Wittebort, Richard J; Miller, Anne-Frances

    2006-11-29

    Flavins are central to the reactivity of a wide variety of enzymes and electron transport proteins. There is great interest in understanding the basis for the different reactivities displayed by flavins in different protein contexts. We propose solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SS-NMR) as a tool for directly observing reactive positions of the flavin ring and thereby obtaining information on their frontier orbitals. We now report the SS-NMR signals of the redox-active nitrogens N1 and N5, as well as that of N3. The chemical shift tensor of N5 is over 720 ppm wide, in accordance with the predictions of theory and our calculations. The signal of N3 can be distinguished on the basis of coupling to 1H absent for N1 and N5, as well as the shift tensor span of only 170 ppm, consistent with N3's lower aromaticity and lack of a nonbonding lone pair. The isotropic shifts and spans of N5 and N1 reflect two opposite extremes of the chemical shift range for "pyridine-type" N's, consistent with their electrophilic and nucleophilic chemical reactivities, respectively. Upon flavin reduction, N5's chemical shift tensor contracts dramatically to a span of less than 110 ppm, and the isotropic chemical shift changes by approximately 300 ppm. Both are consistent with loss of N5's nonbonding lone pair and decreased aromaticity, and illustrate the responsiveness of the 15N chemical shift principal values to electronic structure. Thus. 15N chemical shift principal values promise to be valuable tools for understanding electronic differences that underlie variations in flavin reactivity, as well as the reactivities of other heterocyclic cofactors. PMID:17117871

  4. Isolated menthone reductase and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney B; Davis, Edward M; Ringer, Kerry L

    2013-04-23

    The present invention provides isolated menthone reductase proteins, isolated nucleic acid molecules encoding menthone reductase proteins, methods for expressing and isolating menthone reductase proteins, and transgenic plants expressing elevated levels of menthone reductase protein.

  5. Zeatin reductase in Phaseolus embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.; Mok, David, W.S.; Mok, M.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Zeatin was converted to O-xylosylzeatin in embryos of Phaseolus vulgaris . O-xylosyldihydrozeatin was also identified as a zeatin metabolite. Incubation of embryo extracts with {sup 14}C-zeatin and {sup 14}C-O-xylosylzeatin revealed that reduction preceeds the O-xylosylation of zeatin. An enzyme responsible for reducing the N{sup 6}-side chain was isolated and partially purified using ammonium sulfate fractionation and affinity, gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. The NADPH dependent reductase was zeatin specific and did not recognize cis-zeatin, ribosylzeatin, i{sup 6}Ade or i{sup 6}Ado. Two forms of the reductase could be separated by either gel filtration or anion exchange HPLC. The HMW isozyme (Mr. 55,000) eluted from the anion exchange column later than the LMW isozyme (Mr. 25,000). Interspecific differences in zeatin reductase activity were also detected.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: 5-alpha reductase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... gene provides instructions for making an enzyme called steroid 5-alpha reductase 2. This enzyme is involved ... external genitalia. Mutations in the SRD5A2 gene prevent steroid 5-alpha reductase 2 from effectively converting testosterone ...

  7. Remaining challenges in cellular flavin cofactor homeostasis and flavoprotein biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Giancaspero, Teresa A; Colella, Matilde; Brizio, Carmen; Difonzo, Graziana; Fiorino, Giuseppina M; Leone, Piero; Brandsch, Roderich; Bonomi, Francesco; Iametti, Stefania; Barile, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The primary role of the water-soluble vitamin B2 (riboflavin) in cell biology is connected with its conversion into FMN and FAD, the cofactors of a large number of dehydrogenases, oxidases and reductases involved in a broad spectrum of biological activities, among which energetic metabolism and chromatin remodeling. Subcellular localisation of FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2, FADS), the second enzyme in the FAD forming pathway, is addressed here in HepG2 cells by confocal microscopy, in the frame of its relationships with kinetics of FAD synthesis and delivery to client apo-flavoproteins. FAD synthesis catalyzed by recombinant isoform 2 of FADS occurs via an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which ATP binds prior to FMN, and pyrophosphate is released before FAD. Spectrophotometric continuous assays of the reconstitution rate of apo-D-aminoacid oxidase with its cofactor, allowed us to propose that besides its FAD synthesizing activity, hFADS is able to operate as a FAD "chaperone." The physical interaction between FAD forming enzyme and its clients was further confirmed by dot blot and immunoprecipitation experiments carried out testing as a client either a nuclear lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) or a mitochondrial dimethylglycine dehydrogenase (Me2GlyDH, EC 1.5.8.4). Both enzymes carry out similar reactions of oxidative demethylation, in which tetrahydrofolate is converted into 5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate. A direct transfer of the cofactor from hFADS2 to apo-dimethyl glycine dehydrogenase was also demonstrated. Thus, FAD synthesis and delivery to these enzymes are crucial processes for bioenergetics and nutri-epigenetics of liver cells. PMID:25954742

  8. Remaining challenges in cellular flavin cofactor homeostasis and flavoprotein biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Giancaspero, Teresa A.; Colella, Matilde; Brizio, Carmen; Difonzo, Graziana; Fiorino, Giuseppina M.; Leone, Piero; Brandsch, Roderich; Bonomi, Francesco; Iametti, Stefania; Barile, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The primary role of the water-soluble vitamin B2 (riboflavin) in cell biology is connected with its conversion into FMN and FAD, the cofactors of a large number of dehydrogenases, oxidases and reductases involved in a broad spectrum of biological activities, among which energetic metabolism and chromatin remodeling. Subcellular localisation of FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2, FADS), the second enzyme in the FAD forming pathway, is addressed here in HepG2 cells by confocal microscopy, in the frame of its relationships with kinetics of FAD synthesis and delivery to client apo-flavoproteins. FAD synthesis catalyzed by recombinant isoform 2 of FADS occurs via an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which ATP binds prior to FMN, and pyrophosphate is released before FAD. Spectrophotometric continuous assays of the reconstitution rate of apo-D-aminoacid oxidase with its cofactor, allowed us to propose that besides its FAD synthesizing activity, hFADS is able to operate as a FAD “chaperone.” The physical interaction between FAD forming enzyme and its clients was further confirmed by dot blot and immunoprecipitation experiments carried out testing as a client either a nuclear lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) or a mitochondrial dimethylglycine dehydrogenase (Me2GlyDH, EC 1.5.8.4). Both enzymes carry out similar reactions of oxidative demethylation, in which tetrahydrofolate is converted into 5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate. A direct transfer of the cofactor from hFADS2 to apo-dimethyl glycine dehydrogenase was also demonstrated. Thus, FAD synthesis and delivery to these enzymes are crucial processes for bioenergetics and nutri-epigenetics of liver cells. PMID:25954742

  9. Natural variation in arsenate tolerance identifies an arsenate reductase in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Bermejo, Eduardo; Castrillo, Gabriel; del Llano, Bárbara; Navarro, Cristina; Zarco-Fernández, Sonia; Martinez-Herrera, Dannys Jorge; Leo-del Puerto, Yolanda; Muñoz, Riansares; Cámara, Carmen; Paz-Ares, Javier; Alonso-Blanco, Carlos; Leyva, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The enormous amount of environmental arsenic was a major factor in determining the biochemistry of incipient life forms early in the Earth's history. The most abundant chemical form in the reducing atmosphere was arsenite, which forced organisms to evolve strategies to manage this chemical species. Following the great oxygenation event, arsenite oxidized to arsenate and the action of arsenate reductases became a central survival requirement. The identity of a biologically relevant arsenate reductase in plants nonetheless continues to be debated. Here we identify a quantitative trait locus that encodes a novel arsenate reductase critical for arsenic tolerance in plants. Functional analyses indicate that several non-additive polymorphisms affect protein structure and account for the natural variation in arsenate reductase activity in Arabidopsis thaliana accessions. This study shows that arsenate reductases are an essential component for natural plant variation in As(V) tolerance. PMID:25099865

  10. An AP-1-like transcription factor, NAP-1, regulates expression of the glutathione S-transferase and NADH:flavin oxidoreductase genes in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masakazu; Yamashita, Kazuhiro; Shiozawa, Azusa; Ichiishi, Akihiko; Fukumori, Fumiyasu; Fujimura, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    AP-1-like transcription factors play crucial roles in oxidative stress responses in yeast and filamentous fungi. The deletion of an AP-1-like transcription factor gene, nap-1, in Neurospora crassa slightly increased its sensitivity to oxidative stressors, including menadione. Microarray and quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR analyses were employed to identify menadione-inducible genes (migs) and the roles of NAP-1 in their regulation. N. crassa migs include three putative glutathione S-transferase genes and two NADH:flavin oxidoreductase genes, orthologs of OYE2 and OYE3, both of which play roles in menadione tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Menadione induced nuclear localization of NAP-1, and oxidative upregulation of many of migs were NAP-1 dependent. Genes for a thioredoxin, a glutathione reductase, and a glutathione peroxidase were slightly upregulated by the chemical only in the wild-type strain, suggesting that NAP-1 is involved in their oxidative induction and probably dose not contribute to high-level constitutive expressions of such genes.

  11. Human augmenter of liver regeneration: probing the catalytic mechanism of a flavin-dependent sulfhydryl oxidase.

    PubMed

    Schaefer-Ramadan, Stephanie; Gannon, Shawn A; Thorpe, Colin

    2013-11-19

    Augmenter of liver regeneration is a member of the ERV family of small flavin-dependent sulfhydryl oxidases that contain a redox-active CxxC disulfide bond in redox communication with the isoalloxazine ring of bound FAD. These enzymes catalyze the oxidation of thiol substrates with the reduction of molecular oxygen to hydrogen peroxide. This work studies the catalytic mechanism of the short, cytokine form of augmenter of liver regeneration (sfALR) using model thiol substrates of the enzyme. The redox potential of the proximal disulfide in sfALR was found to be approximately 57 mV more reducing than the flavin chromophore, in agreement with titration experiments. Rapid reaction studies show that dithiothreitol (DTT) generates a transient mixed disulfide intermediate with sfALR signaled by a weak charge-transfer interaction between the thiolate of C145 and the oxidized flavin. The subsequent transfer of reducing equivalents to the flavin ring is relatively slow, with a limiting apparent rate constant of 12.4 s(-1). However, reoxidation of the reduced flavin by molecular oxygen is even slower (2.3 s(-1) at air saturation) and thus largely limits turnover at 5 mM DTT. The nature of the charge-transfer complexes observed with DTT was explored using a range of simple monothiols to mimic the initial nucleophilic attack on the proximal disulfide. While β-mercaptoethanol is a very poor substrate of sfALR (∼0.3 min(-1) at 100 mM thiol), it rapidly generates a mixed disulfide intermediate allowing the thiolate of C145 to form a strong charge-transfer complex with the flavin. Unlike the other monothiols tested, glutathione is unable to form charge-transfer complexes and is an undetectable substrate of the oxidase. These data are rationalized on the basis of the stringent steric requirements for thiol-disulfide exchange reactions. The inability of the relatively bulky glutathione to attain the in-line geometry required for efficient disulfide exchange in sfALR may be

  12. 3-Oxoacyl-[ACP] reductase from oilseed rape (Brassica napus).

    PubMed

    Sheldon, P S; Kekwick, R G; Smith, C G; Sidebottom, C; Slabas, A R

    1992-04-01

    3-Oxoacyl-[ACP] reductase (E.C. 1.1.1.100, alternatively known as beta-ketoacyl-[ACP] reductase), a component of fatty acid synthetase has been purified from seeds of rape by ammonium sulphate fractionation, Procion Red H-E3B chromatography, FPLC gel filtration and high performance hydroxyapatite chromatography. The purified enzyme appears on SDS-PAGE as a number of 20-30 kDa components and has a strong tendency to exist in a dimeric form, particularly when dithiothreitol is not present to reduce disulphide bonds. Cleveland mapping and cross-reactivity with antiserum raised against avocado 3-oxoacyl-[ACP] reductase both indicate that the multiple components have similar primary structures. On gel filtration the enzyme appears to have a molecular mass of 120 kDa suggesting that the native structure is tetrameric. The enzyme has a strong preference for the acetoacetyl ester of acyl carrier protein (Km = 3 microM) over the corresponding esters of the model substrates N-acetyl cysteamine (Km = 35 mM) and CoA (Km = 261 microM). It is inactivated by dilution but this can be partly prevented by the inclusion of NADPH. Using an antiserum prepared against avocado 3-oxoacyl-[ACP] reductase, the enzyme has been visualised inside the plastids of rape embryo and leaf tissues by immunoelectron microscopy. Amino acid sequencing of two peptides prepared by digestion of the purified enzyme with trypsin showed strong similarities with 3-oxoacyl-[ACP] reductase from avocado pear and the Nod G gene product from Rhizobium meliloti.

  13. X-ray Crystallography Reveals a Reduced Substrate Complex of UDP-Galactopyranose Mutase Poised for Covalent Catalysis by Flavin

    SciTech Connect

    Gruber, Todd D.; Westler, William M.; Kiessling, Laura L.; Forest, Katrina T.

    2009-11-04

    The flavoenzyme uridine 5'-diphosphate galactopyranose mutase (UGM or Glf) catalyzes the interconversion of UDP-galactopyranose and UDP-galactofuranose. The latter is a key building block for cell wall construction in numerous pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mechanistic studies of UGM suggested a novel role for the flavin, and we previously provided evidence that the catalytic mechanism proceeds through a covalent flavin-galactose iminium. Here, we describe 2.3 and 2.5 {angstrom} resolution X-ray crystal structures of the substrate-bound enzyme in oxidized and reduced forms, respectively. In the latter, C1 of the substrate is 3.6 {angstrom} from the nucleophilic flavin N5 position. This orientation is consistent with covalent catalysis by flavin.

  14. Correction: Enhanced photocatalytic activity of a self-stabilized synthetic flavin anchored on a TiO2 surface.

    PubMed

    Pandiri, Manjula; Shaham-Waldmann, Nurit; Hossain, Mohammad S; Foss, Frank W; Rajeshwar, Krishnan; Paz, Yaron

    2016-09-14

    Correction for 'Enhanced photocatalytic activity of a self-stabilized synthetic flavin anchored on a TiO2 surface' by Manjula Pandiri et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, 18, 18575-18583. PMID:27509005

  15. Distortion of Flavin Geometry Is Linked to Ligand Binding in Cholesterol Oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubimov, A.Y.; Heard, K.; Tang, H.; Sampson, N.S.; Vrielink, A.

    2009-06-03

    Two high-resolution structures of a double mutant of bacterial cholesterol oxidase in the presence or absence of a ligand, glycerol, are presented, showing the trajectory of glycerol as it binds in a Michaelis complex-like position in the active site. A group of three aromatic residues forces the oxidized isoalloxazine moiety to bend along the N5-N10 axis as a response to the binding of glycerol in the active site. Movement of these aromatic residues is only observed in the glycerol-bound structure, indicating that some tuning of the FAD redox potential is caused by the formation of the Michaelis complex during regular catalysis. This structural study suggests a possible mechanism of substrate-assisted flavin activation, improves our understanding of the interplay between the enzyme, its flavin cofactor and its substrate, and is of use to the future design of effective cholesterol oxidase inhibitors.

  16. Photoactivation mechanisms of flavin-binding photoreceptors revealed through ultrafast spectroscopy and global analysis methods.

    PubMed

    Mathes, Tilo; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Kennis, John T M

    2014-01-01

    Flavin-binding photoreceptor proteins use the isoalloxazine moiety of flavin cofactors to absorb light in the blue/UV-A wavelength region and subsequently translate it into biological information. The underlying photochemical reactions and protein structural dynamics are delicately tuned by the protein environment and represent fundamental reactions in biology and chemistry. Due to their photo-switchable nature, these proteins can be studied efficiently with laser-flash induced transient absorption and emission spectroscopy with temporal precision down to the femtosecond time domain. Here, we describe the application of both visible and mid-IR ultrafast transient absorption and time-resolved fluorescence methods in combination with sophisticated global analysis procedures to elucidate the photochemistry and signal transduction of BLUF (Blue light receptors using FAD) and LOV (Light oxygen voltage) photoreceptor domains.

  17. Use of flavins as catalyst for the remediation of halogenated compounds.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Deepshikha; Singh, Ram; Geetanjali; Srivastava, Richa

    2014-10-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) are an important monooxygenase system present in living organisms starting from eukaryotes to human beings. They are involved in catalysing wide variety of oxygenation reactions including bioremediation process. The central reaction in these enzymes is always the formation of a peroxyflavin intermediate by reaction of reduced flavin with molecular oxygen. The microenvironment of the peroxyflavin regulates the reactive character of the peroxyflavin. Utilizing this aspect of the biology, chemremediation of aromatic halogenated phenols have been initiated and achieved using flavinium perchlorate salt as catalyst in 38 % yield. The flavinium perchlorate during the reaction gets converted to peroxyflavin with H2O2. This method will be useful in the removal of halogens from aromatic halogenated phenols.

  18. Role of Valine 464 in the Flavin Oxidation Reaction Catalyzed by Choline Oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Finnegan, Steffan; Agniswamy, Johnson; Weber, Irene T.; Gadda, Giovanni

    2010-11-03

    The oxidation of reduced flavin cofactors by oxygen is a very important reaction that is central to the chemical versatility of hundreds of flavoproteins classified as monooxygenases and oxidases. These enzymes are characterized by bimolecular rate constants {ge} 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} and produce water and hydrogen peroxide, respectively. A hydrophobic cavity close to the reactive flavin C(4a) atom has been previously identified in the 3D structure of monooxygenases but not in flavoprotein oxidases. In the present study, we have investigated by X-ray crystallography, mutagenesis, steady-state, and rapid reaction approaches the role of Val464, which is <6 {angstrom} from the flavin C(4a) atom in choline oxidase. The 3D structure of the Val464Ala enzyme was essentially identical to that of the wild-type enzyme as shown by X-ray crystallography. Time-resolved anaerobic substrate reduction of the enzymes showed that replacement of Val464 with alanine or threonine did not affect the reductive half-reaction. Steady-state and rapid kinetics as well as enzyme-monitored turnovers indicated that the oxidative half-reaction in the Ala464 and Thr464 enzymes was decreased by 50-fold with respect to the wild-type enzyme. We propose that the side chain of Val464 in choline oxidase provides a nonpolar site that is required to guide oxygen in proximity of the C(4a) atom of the flavin, where it will subsequently react via electrostatic catalysis. Visual analysis of available structures suggests that analogous nonpolar sites are likely present in most flavoprotein oxidases. Mechanistic considerations provide rationalization for the differences between sites in monooxygenases and oxidases.

  19. Role of key residues at the flavin mononucleotide (FMN):adenylyltransferase catalytic site of the bifunctional riboflavin kinase/flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) Synthetase from Corynebacterium ammoniagenes.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Ana; Frago, Susana; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Medina, Milagros

    2012-11-08

    In mammals and in yeast the conversion of Riboflavin (RF) into flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is catalysed by the sequential action of two enzymes: an ATP:riboflavin kinase (RFK) and an ATP:FMN adenylyltransferase (FMNAT). However, most prokaryotes depend on a single bifunctional enzyme, FAD synthetase (FADS), which folds into two modules: the C-terminal associated with RFK activity and the N-terminal associated with FMNAT activity. Sequence and structural analysis suggest that the 28-HxGH-31, 123-Gx(D/N)-125 and 161-xxSSTxxR-168 motifs from FADS must be involved in ATP stabilisation for the adenylylation of FMN, as well as in FAD stabilisation for FAD phyrophosphorolysis. Mutants were produced at these motifs in the Corynebacterium ammoniagenes FADS (CaFADS). Their effects on the kinetic parameters of CaFADS activities (RFK, FMNAT and FAD pyrophosphorilase), and on substrates and product binding properties indicate that H28, H31, N125 and S164 contribute to the geometry of the catalytically competent complexes at the FMNAT-module of CaFADS.

  20. One of the fumarate reductase isoenzymes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is encoded by the OSM1 gene.

    PubMed

    Muratsubaki, H; Enomoto, K

    1998-04-15

    Soluble fumarate reductase from yeast irreversibly catalyzes the reduction of fumarate to succinate and has noncovalently bound flavin adenine dinucleotide. In yeast, there are two isoenzymes of fumarate reductase, which can be distinguished on the basis of their absorption or nonabsorption to DE-52 columns. Previously, we have purified FRDS1 and isolated its gene (FRDS) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the present study, FRDS2 was purified to homogeneity by four chromatography steps. The N-terminal and C-terminal amino acid sequences of FRDS2 were identical to the deduced amino acid sequence of the OSM1 gene (EMBL Database Accession No. L-26347), whose isolation and biochemical properties have not been studied up until now. From these results, we conclude that FRDS2 is encoded by the OSM1 gene. The deduced amino acid sequence of the OSM1 gene revealed that FRDS2 is synthesized as a precursor protein containing a presequence composed of 32 amino acid residues. The mature enzyme consists of a protein of 469 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 51,370. The N-terminal extension had the characteristics of a typical signal sequence required for targeting and sorting to a noncytosolic destination. In fact, FRDS2 was found to be located in promitochondria.

  1. Functional expression and characterization of recombinant NADPH-P450 reductase from Malassezia globosa.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwayoun; Park, Hyoung-Goo; Lim, Young-Ran; Lee, Im-Soon; Kim, Beom Joon; Seong, Cheul-Hun; Chun, Young-Jin; Kim, Donghak

    2012-01-01

    Malassezia globosa is a common pathogenic fungus that causes skin diseases including dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis in humans. Analysis of its genome identified a gene (MGL_1677) coding for a putative NADPH-P450 reductase (NPR) to support the fungal cytochrome P450 enzymes. The heterologously expressed recombinant M. globosa NPR protein was purified, and its functional features were characterized. The purified protein generated a single band on SDS-PAGE at 80.74 kDa and had an absorption maximum at 452 nm, indicating its possible function as an oxidized flavin cofactor. It evidenced NADPH-dependent reducing activity for cytochrome c or nitroblue tetrazolium. Human P450 1A2 and 2A6 were able to successfully catalyze the O-deethylation of 7- ethoxyresorufin and the 7-hydroxylation of coumarin, respectively, with the support of the purified NPR. These results demonstrate that purified NPR is an orthologous reductase protein that supports cytochrome P450 enzymes in M. globosa. PMID:22297231

  2. Modifying the collagen framework of costal cartilage under the impact of UV and a flavin mononucleotide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignat'eva, N. Yu.; Zakharkina, O. L.; Semchishen, V. A.; Molchanov, M. D.; Lunin, V. V.; Bagratashvili, V. N.

    2016-03-01

    Modifications of the matrix of the tissue of costal cartilage under the impact of UV (λ = 365 nm) and a flavin mononucleotide (FMN) is studied. The changes in the macroscopic properties of the tissue are detected by means of differential scanning calorimetry and under the conditions of uniaxial compression during mechanical testing. The endothermic effects of the denaturation of the collagen framework of the tissue and the Young's modulus are determined. It is shown that the presence of a flavin mononucleotide in the interstitial fluid leads lowers the temperature of collagen denaturation by 2.5°C and doubles the Young's modulus. It is found that the temperature of denaturation and the Young's modulus grow gradually after treating the tissue with the UV radiation, and their values ultimately exceed by far the corresponding values for intact samples. It is concluded that the obtained data indicate the possibility of stabilizing the framework of the matrix of costal cartilage under the impact of UV radiation and a flavin mononucleotide.

  3. FAD synthesis and degradation in the nucleus create a local flavin cofactor pool.

    PubMed

    Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Busco, Giovanni; Panebianco, Concetta; Carmone, Claudia; Miccolis, Angelica; Liuzzi, Grazia Maria; Colella, Matilde; Barile, Maria

    2013-10-01

    FAD is a redox cofactor ensuring the activity of many flavoenzymes mainly located in mitochondria but also relevant for nuclear redox activities. The last enzyme in the metabolic pathway producing FAD is FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2), a protein known to be localized both in cytosol and in mitochondria. FAD degradation to riboflavin occurs via still poorly characterized enzymes, possibly belonging to the NUDIX hydrolase family. By confocal microscopy and immunoblotting experiments, we demonstrate here the existence of FAD synthase in the nucleus of different experimental rat models. HPLC experiments demonstrated that isolated rat liver nuclei contain ∼300 pmol of FAD·mg(-1) protein, which was mainly protein-bound FAD. A mean FAD synthesis rate of 18.1 pmol·min(-1)·mg(-1) protein was estimated by both HPLC and continuous coupled enzymatic spectrophotometric assays. Rat liver nuclei were also shown to be endowed with a FAD pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD with an optimum at alkaline pH and is significantly inhibited by adenylate-containing nucleotides. The coordinate activity of these FAD forming and degrading enzymes provides a potential mechanism by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is created in the nucleus. These data, which significantly add to the biochemical comprehension of flavin metabolism and its subcellular compartmentation, may also provide the basis for a more detailed comprehension of the role of flavin homeostasis in biologically and clinically relevant epigenetic events. PMID:23946482

  4. FAD Synthesis and Degradation in the Nucleus Create a Local Flavin Cofactor Pool*

    PubMed Central

    Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Busco, Giovanni; Panebianco, Concetta; Carmone, Claudia; Miccolis, Angelica; Liuzzi, Grazia Maria; Colella, Matilde; Barile, Maria

    2013-01-01

    FAD is a redox cofactor ensuring the activity of many flavoenzymes mainly located in mitochondria but also relevant for nuclear redox activities. The last enzyme in the metabolic pathway producing FAD is FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2), a protein known to be localized both in cytosol and in mitochondria. FAD degradation to riboflavin occurs via still poorly characterized enzymes, possibly belonging to the NUDIX hydrolase family. By confocal microscopy and immunoblotting experiments, we demonstrate here the existence of FAD synthase in the nucleus of different experimental rat models. HPLC experiments demonstrated that isolated rat liver nuclei contain ∼300 pmol of FAD·mg−1 protein, which was mainly protein-bound FAD. A mean FAD synthesis rate of 18.1 pmol·min−1·mg−1 protein was estimated by both HPLC and continuous coupled enzymatic spectrophotometric assays. Rat liver nuclei were also shown to be endowed with a FAD pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD with an optimum at alkaline pH and is significantly inhibited by adenylate-containing nucleotides. The coordinate activity of these FAD forming and degrading enzymes provides a potential mechanism by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is created in the nucleus. These data, which significantly add to the biochemical comprehension of flavin metabolism and its subcellular compartmentation, may also provide the basis for a more detailed comprehension of the role of flavin homeostasis in biologically and clinically relevant epigenetic events. PMID:23946482

  5. The binding sites on human heme oxygenase-1 for cytochrome p450 reductase and biliverdin reductase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinling; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz

    2003-05-30

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) catalyzes the NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-dependent oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. The biliverdin is subsequently reduced to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. Earlier kinetic studies suggested that biliverdin reductase facilitates the release of biliverdin from hHO-1 (Liu, Y., and Ortiz de Montellano, P. R. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 5297-5307). We have investigated the binding of P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase to truncated, soluble hHO-1 by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and site-specific mutagenesis. P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase bind to truncated hHO-1 with Kd = 0.4 +/- 0.1 and 0.2 +/- 0.1 microm, respectively. FRET experiments indicate that biliverdin reductase and P450 reductase compete for binding to truncated hHO-1. Mutation of surface ionic residues shows that hHO-1 residues Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, Arg198, Glu19, Glu127, and Glu190 contribute to the binding of cytochrome P450 reductase. The mutagenesis results and a computational analysis of the protein surfaces partially define the binding site for P450 reductase. An overlapping binding site including Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, and Arg185 is similarly defined for biliverdin reductase. These results confirm the binding of biliverdin reductase to hHO-1 and define binding sites of the two reductases.

  6. The Thiol Reductase Activity of YUCCA6 Mediates Delayed Leaf Senescence by Regulating Genes Involved in Auxin Redistribution.

    PubMed

    Cha, Joon-Yung; Kim, Mi R; Jung, In J; Kang, Sun B; Park, Hee J; Kim, Min G; Yun, Dae-Jin; Kim, Woe-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Auxin, a phytohormone that affects almost every aspect of plant growth and development, is biosynthesized from tryptophan via the tryptamine, indole-3-acetamide, indole-3-pyruvic acid, and indole-3-acetaldoxime pathways. YUCCAs (YUCs), flavin monooxygenase enzymes, catalyze the conversion of indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPA) to the auxin (indole acetic acid). Arabidopsis thaliana YUC6 also exhibits thiol-reductase and chaperone activity in vitro; these activities require the highly conserved Cys-85 and are essential for scavenging of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the drought tolerance response. Here, we examined whether the YUC6 thiol reductase activity also participates in the delay in senescence observed in YUC6-overexpressing (YUC6-OX) plants. YUC6 overexpression delays leaf senescence in natural and dark-induced senescence conditions by reducing the expression of SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENE 12 (SAG12). ROS accumulation normally occurs during senescence, but was not observed in the leaves of YUC6-OX plants; however, ROS accumulation was observed in YUC6-OX(C85S) plants, which overexpress a mutant YUC6 that lacks thiol reductase activity. We also found that YUC6-OX plants, but not YUC6-OX(C85S) plants, show upregulation of three genes encoding NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRA, NTRB, and NTRC), and GAMMA-GLUTAMYLCYSTEINE SYNTHETASE 1 (GSH1), encoding an enzyme involved in redox signaling. We further determined that excess ROS accumulation caused by methyl viologen treatment or decreased glutathione levels caused by buthionine sulfoximine treatment can decrease the levels of auxin efflux proteins such as PIN2-4. The expression of PINs is also reduced in YUC6-OX plants. These findings suggest that the thiol reductase activity of YUC6 may play an essential role in delaying senescence via the activation of genes involved in redox signaling and auxin availability.

  7. The Thiol Reductase Activity of YUCCA6 Mediates Delayed Leaf Senescence by Regulating Genes Involved in Auxin Redistribution

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Joon-Yung; Kim, Mi R.; Jung, In J.; Kang, Sun B.; Park, Hee J.; Kim, Min G.; Yun, Dae-Jin; Kim, Woe-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Auxin, a phytohormone that affects almost every aspect of plant growth and development, is biosynthesized from tryptophan via the tryptamine, indole-3-acetamide, indole-3-pyruvic acid, and indole-3-acetaldoxime pathways. YUCCAs (YUCs), flavin monooxygenase enzymes, catalyze the conversion of indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPA) to the auxin (indole acetic acid). Arabidopsis thaliana YUC6 also exhibits thiol-reductase and chaperone activity in vitro; these activities require the highly conserved Cys-85 and are essential for scavenging of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the drought tolerance response. Here, we examined whether the YUC6 thiol reductase activity also participates in the delay in senescence observed in YUC6-overexpressing (YUC6-OX) plants. YUC6 overexpression delays leaf senescence in natural and dark-induced senescence conditions by reducing the expression of SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENE 12 (SAG12). ROS accumulation normally occurs during senescence, but was not observed in the leaves of YUC6-OX plants; however, ROS accumulation was observed in YUC6-OXC85S plants, which overexpress a mutant YUC6 that lacks thiol reductase activity. We also found that YUC6-OX plants, but not YUC6-OXC85S plants, show upregulation of three genes encoding NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRA, NTRB, and NTRC), and GAMMA-GLUTAMYLCYSTEINE SYNTHETASE 1 (GSH1), encoding an enzyme involved in redox signaling. We further determined that excess ROS accumulation caused by methyl viologen treatment or decreased glutathione levels caused by buthionine sulfoximine treatment can decrease the levels of auxin efflux proteins such as PIN2-4. The expression of PINs is also reduced in YUC6-OX plants. These findings suggest that the thiol reductase activity of YUC6 may play an essential role in delaying senescence via the activation of genes involved in redox signaling and auxin availability. PMID:27242830

  8. The Thiol Reductase Activity of YUCCA6 Mediates Delayed Leaf Senescence by Regulating Genes Involved in Auxin Redistribution.

    PubMed

    Cha, Joon-Yung; Kim, Mi R; Jung, In J; Kang, Sun B; Park, Hee J; Kim, Min G; Yun, Dae-Jin; Kim, Woe-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Auxin, a phytohormone that affects almost every aspect of plant growth and development, is biosynthesized from tryptophan via the tryptamine, indole-3-acetamide, indole-3-pyruvic acid, and indole-3-acetaldoxime pathways. YUCCAs (YUCs), flavin monooxygenase enzymes, catalyze the conversion of indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPA) to the auxin (indole acetic acid). Arabidopsis thaliana YUC6 also exhibits thiol-reductase and chaperone activity in vitro; these activities require the highly conserved Cys-85 and are essential for scavenging of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the drought tolerance response. Here, we examined whether the YUC6 thiol reductase activity also participates in the delay in senescence observed in YUC6-overexpressing (YUC6-OX) plants. YUC6 overexpression delays leaf senescence in natural and dark-induced senescence conditions by reducing the expression of SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENE 12 (SAG12). ROS accumulation normally occurs during senescence, but was not observed in the leaves of YUC6-OX plants; however, ROS accumulation was observed in YUC6-OX(C85S) plants, which overexpress a mutant YUC6 that lacks thiol reductase activity. We also found that YUC6-OX plants, but not YUC6-OX(C85S) plants, show upregulation of three genes encoding NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRA, NTRB, and NTRC), and GAMMA-GLUTAMYLCYSTEINE SYNTHETASE 1 (GSH1), encoding an enzyme involved in redox signaling. We further determined that excess ROS accumulation caused by methyl viologen treatment or decreased glutathione levels caused by buthionine sulfoximine treatment can decrease the levels of auxin efflux proteins such as PIN2-4. The expression of PINs is also reduced in YUC6-OX plants. These findings suggest that the thiol reductase activity of YUC6 may play an essential role in delaying senescence via the activation of genes involved in redox signaling and auxin availability. PMID:27242830

  9. Thioredoxin and NADP-thioredoxin reductase from cultured carrot cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. C.; Cao, R. Q.; Kung, J. E.; Buchanan, B. B.

    1987-01-01

    Dark-grown carrot (Daucus carota L.) tissue cultures were found to contain both protein components of the NADP/thioredoxin system--NADP-thioredoxin reductase and the thioredoxin characteristic of heterotrophic systems, thioredoxin h. Thioredoxin h was purified to apparent homogeneity and, like typical bacterial counterparts, was a 12-kdalton (kDa) acidic protein capable of activating chloroplast NADP-malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.82) more effectively than fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11). NADP-thioredoxin reductase (EC 1.6.4.5) was partially purified and found to be an arsenite-sensitive enzyme composed of two 34-kDa subunits. Carrot NADP-thioredoxin reductase resembled more closely its counterpart from bacteria rather than animal cells in acceptor (thioredoxin) specificity. Upon greening of the cells, the content of NADP-thioredoxin-reductase activity, and, to a lesser extent, thioredoxin h decreased. The results confirm the presence of a heterotrophic-type thioredoxin system in plant cells and raise the question of its physiological function.

  10. Ribonucleotide Reductase-- a Radical Enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichard, Peter; Ehrenberg, Anders

    1983-08-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases catalyze the enzymatic formation of deoxyribonucleotides, an obligatory step in DNA synthesis. The native form of the enzyme from Escherichia coli or from mammalian sources contains as part of its polypeptide structure a free tyrosyl radical, stabilized by an iron center. The radical participates in all probability in the catalytic process during the substitution of the hydroxyl group at C-2 of ribose by a hydrogen atom. A second, inactive form of the E. coli reductase lacks the tyrosyl radical. Extracts from E. coli contain activities that interconvert the two forms. The tyrosyl radical is introduced in the presence of oxygen, while anaerobiosis favors its removal, suggesting a regulatory role in DNA synthesis for oxygen.

  11. Mechanistic insights into ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductase catalysis involving the conserved glutamate in the active site.

    PubMed

    Dumit, Verónica I; Essigke, Timm; Cortez, Néstor; Ullmann, G Matthias

    2010-04-01

    Plant-type ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductases (FNRs) are flavoenzymes harboring one molecule of noncovalently bound flavin adenine dinucleotide that catalyze reversible reactions between obligatory one-electron carriers and obligatory two-electron carriers. A glutamate next to the C-terminus is strictly conserved in FNR and has been proposed to function as proton donor/acceptor during catalysis. However, experimental studies of this proposed function led to contradicting conclusions about the role of this glutamate in the catalytic mechanism. In the present work, we study the titration behavior of the glutamate in the active site of FNR using theoretical methods. Protonation probabilities for maize FNR were computed for the reaction intermediates of the catalytic cycle by Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatic calculations and Metropolis Monte Carlo titration. The titration behavior of the highly conserved glutamate was found to vary depending on the bound substrates NADP(H) and ferredoxin and also on the redox states of these substrates and the flavin adenine dinucleotide. Our results support the involvement of the glutamate in the FNR catalytic mechanism not only as a proton donor but also as a key residue for stabilizing and destabilizing reaction intermediates. On the basis of our findings, we propose a model rationalizing the function of the glutamate in the reaction cycle, which allows reinterpretation of previous experimental results.

  12. Hydrogen-1, carbon-13, and nitrogen-15 NMR spectroscopy of Anabaena 7120 flavodoxin: Assignment of. beta. -sheet and flavin binding site resonances and analysis of protein-flavin interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Stockman, B.J.; Krezel, A.M.; Markley, J.L. ); Leonhardt, K.G.; Straus, N.A. )

    1990-10-01

    Sequence-specific {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR assignments have been made for residues that form the five-stranded parallel {beta}-sheet and the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) binding site of oxidized Anabaena 7120 flavodoxin. Interstrand nuclear Overhauser enhancements (NOEs) indicate that the {beta}-sheet arrangement is similar to that observed in the crystal structure of the 70% homologous long-chain flavodoxin from Anacystis nidulans. A total of 62 NOEs were identified: 8 between protons of bound FMN, 29 between protons of the protein in the flavin binding site, and 25 between protons of bound FMN and protons of the protein. These constraints were used to determine the localized solution structure of the FMN binding site. The electronic environment and conformation of the protein-bound flavin isoalloxazine ring were investigated by determining {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H coupling constants. The carbonyl edge of the flavin ring was found to be slightly polarized. The xylene ring was found to be nonplanar. Tyrosine 94, located adjacent to the flavin isoalloxazine ring, was shown to have a hindered aromatic ring flip rate.

  13. Expression and characterization of truncated human heme oxygenase (hHO-1) and a fusion protein of hHO-1 with human cytochrome P450 reductase.

    PubMed

    Wilks, A; Black, S M; Miller, W L; Ortiz de Montellano, P R

    1995-04-01

    A human heme oxygenase (hHO-1) gene without the sequence coding for the last 23 amino acids has been expressed in Escherichia coli behind the pho A promoter. The truncated enzyme is obtained in high yields as a soluble, catalytically-active protein, making it available for the first time for detailed mechanistic studies. The purified, truncated hHO-1/heme complex is spectroscopically indistinguishable from that of the rat enzyme and converts heme to biliverdin when reconstituted with rat liver cytochrome P450 reductase. A self-sufficient heme oxygenase system has been obtained by fusing the truncated hHO-1 gene to the gene for human cytochrome P450 reductase without the sequence coding for the 20 amino acid membrane binding domain. Expression of the fusion protein in pCWori+ yields a protein that only requires NADPH for catalytic turnover. The failure of exogenous cytochrome P450 reductase to stimulate turnover and the insensitivity of the catalytic rate toward changes in ionic strength establish that electrons are transferred intramolecularly between the reductase and heme oxygenase domains of the fusion protein. The Vmax for the fusion protein is 2.5 times higher than that for the reconstituted system. Therefore, either the covalent tether does not interfere with normal docking and electron transfer between the flavin and heme domains or alternative but equally efficient electron transfer pathways are available that do not require specific docking.

  14. Fatty acyl-CoA reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, Steven E.; Somerville, Chris R.

    1998-12-01

    The present invention relates to bacterial enzymes, in particular to an acyl-CoA reductase and a gene encoding an acyl-CoA reductase, the amino acid and nucleic acid sequences corresponding to the reductase polypeptide and gene, respectively, and to methods of obtaining such enzymes, amino acid sequences and nucleic acid sequences. The invention also relates to the use of such sequences to provide transgenic host cells capable of producing fatty alcohols and fatty aldehydes.

  15. Structure of Dihydromethanopterin Reductase, a Cubic Protein Cage for Redox Transfer*

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Dan E.; Cascio, Duilio; Jorda, Julien; Bustos, Cheene; Wang, Tzu-Chi; Rasche, Madeline E.; Yeates, Todd O.; Bobik, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Dihydromethanopterin reductase (Dmr) is a redox enzyme that plays a key role in generating tetrahydromethanopterin (H4MPT) for use in one-carbon metabolism by archaea and some bacteria. DmrB is a bacterial enzyme understood to reduce dihydromethanopterin (H2MPT) to H4MPT using flavins as the source of reducing equivalents, but the mechanistic details have not been elucidated previously. Here we report the crystal structure of DmrB from Burkholderia xenovorans at a resolution of 1.9 Å. Unexpectedly, the biological unit is a 24-mer composed of eight homotrimers located at the corners of a cubic cage-like structure. Within a homotrimer, each monomer-monomer interface exhibits an active site with two adjacently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) ligands, one deeply buried and tightly bound and one more peripheral, for a total of 48 ligands in the biological unit. Computational docking suggested that the peripheral site could bind either the observed FMN (the electron donor for the overall reaction) or the pterin, H2MPT (the electron acceptor for the overall reaction), in configurations ideal for electron transfer to and from the tightly bound FMN. On this basis, we propose that DmrB uses a ping-pong mechanism to transfer reducing equivalents from FMN to the pterin substrate. Sequence comparisons suggested that the catalytic mechanism is conserved among the bacterial homologs of DmrB and partially conserved in archaeal homologs, where an alternate electron donor is likely used. In addition to the mechanistic revelations, the structure of DmrB could help guide the development of anti-obesity drugs based on modification of the ecology of the human gut. PMID:24523405

  16. Sinorhizobium meliloti flavin secretion and bacteria-host interaction: role of the bifunctional RibBA protein.

    PubMed

    Yurgel, Svetlana N; Rice, Jennifer; Domreis, Elizabeth; Lynch, Joseph; Sa, Na; Qamar, Zeeshan; Rajamani, Sathish; Gao, Mengsheng; Roje, Sanja; Bauer, Wolfgang D

    2014-05-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti, the nitrogen-fixing bacterial symbiont of Medicago spp. and other legumes, secretes a considerable amount of riboflavin. This precursor of the cofactors flavin mononucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide is a bioactive molecule that has a beneficial effect on plant growth. The ribBA gene of S. meliloti codes for a putative bifunctional enzyme with dihydroxybutanone phosphate synthase and guanosine triphosphate (GTP) cyclohydrolase II activities, catalyzing the initial steps of the riboflavin biosynthesis pathway. We show here that an in-frame deletion of ribBA does not cause riboflavin auxotrophy or affect the ability of S. meliloti to establish an effective symbiosis with the host plant but does affect the ability of the bacteria to secrete flavins, colonize host-plant roots, and compete for nodulation. A strain missing the RibBA protein retains considerable GTP cyclohydrolase II activity. Based on these results, we hypothesize that S. meliloti has two partly interchangeable modules for biosynthesis of riboflavin, one fulfilling the internal need for flavins in bacterial metabolism and the other producing riboflavin for secretion. Our data also indicate that bacteria-derived flavins play a role in communication between rhizobia and the legume host and that the RibBA protein is important in this communication process even though it is not essential for riboflavin biosynthesis and symbiosis.

  17. Production of a covalent flavin linkage in lipoamide dehydrogenase. Reaction with 8-Cl-FAD.

    PubMed

    Moore, E G; Cardemil, E; Massey, V

    1978-09-25

    A method is described for preparation of apolipoamide dehydrogenase which gives quantitative removal of FAD. Active holoenzyme can be reconstituted by incubation with FAD. Reconstitution of apoenzyme with 8-Cl-FAD results in the fixation of most of the flavin to the protein in a covalently bound form. The portion noncovalently bound was shown to be unmodified 8-Cl-FAD. The covalently bound flavin has an absorption spectrum quite different from that of 8-Cl-FAD. It has a single band in the visible with a maximum at 459 nm (extinction coefficient of 22 mM-1 cm-1) and a shoulder at 480 nm. Model reactions between 8-Cl-Flavin (riboflavin or FAD) and organic thiols (thiophenol, beta-mercaptoethanol, or N-acetylcysteine) give products with spectra which are similar to that of FAD covalently bound to lipoamide dehydrogenase. The products of the model reactions have a single visible band with a maximum at 480 nm (extinction coefficient of 23.6 mM-1 cm-1 to 28.4 mM-1 cm-1) and a shoulder at 460 nm. The products of the model reaction and the covalently bound FAD of lipoamide dehydrogenase appear to be the result of a nucleophilic attack on the carbon at position 8 of the flavin ring by a thiolate anion, displacing the chloride. Thus, the product of the model reaction is 8-(RS)-flavin, and the product of the reaction between 8-Cl-FAD and protein probably has a cysteinyl residue covalently attacked at position 8 of FAD. Reconstitution of apoliopoamide dehydrogenase with 8-Cl-FAD gives two enzyme products which are fractionated by ammonium sulfate. Enzyme fractionating between 20% and 45% ammonium sulfate is monomeric and contains covanently bound FAD. Enzyme fractionating between 55% and 75% ammonium sulfate is dimeric and contains both covalently bound FAD and noncovalently bound 8-Cl-FAD. Both protein fractions contain one FAD per protein subunit and both are active with physiological substrates with Km values for NAD and dihydrolipoamide similar to those of native lipoamide

  18. Production of a covalent flavin linkage in lipoamide dehydrogenase. Reaction with 8-Cl-FAD.

    PubMed

    Moore, E G; Cardemil, E; Massey, V

    1978-09-25

    A method is described for preparation of apolipoamide dehydrogenase which gives quantitative removal of FAD. Active holoenzyme can be reconstituted by incubation with FAD. Reconstitution of apoenzyme with 8-Cl-FAD results in the fixation of most of the flavin to the protein in a covalently bound form. The portion noncovalently bound was shown to be unmodified 8-Cl-FAD. The covalently bound flavin has an absorption spectrum quite different from that of 8-Cl-FAD. It has a single band in the visible with a maximum at 459 nm (extinction coefficient of 22 mM-1 cm-1) and a shoulder at 480 nm. Model reactions between 8-Cl-Flavin (riboflavin or FAD) and organic thiols (thiophenol, beta-mercaptoethanol, or N-acetylcysteine) give products with spectra which are similar to that of FAD covalently bound to lipoamide dehydrogenase. The products of the model reactions have a single visible band with a maximum at 480 nm (extinction coefficient of 23.6 mM-1 cm-1 to 28.4 mM-1 cm-1) and a shoulder at 460 nm. The products of the model reaction and the covalently bound FAD of lipoamide dehydrogenase appear to be the result of a nucleophilic attack on the carbon at position 8 of the flavin ring by a thiolate anion, displacing the chloride. Thus, the product of the model reaction is 8-(RS)-flavin, and the product of the reaction between 8-Cl-FAD and protein probably has a cysteinyl residue covalently attacked at position 8 of FAD. Reconstitution of apoliopoamide dehydrogenase with 8-Cl-FAD gives two enzyme products which are fractionated by ammonium sulfate. Enzyme fractionating between 20% and 45% ammonium sulfate is monomeric and contains covanently bound FAD. Enzyme fractionating between 55% and 75% ammonium sulfate is dimeric and contains both covalently bound FAD and noncovalently bound 8-Cl-FAD. Both protein fractions contain one FAD per protein subunit and both are active with physiological substrates with Km values for NAD and dihydrolipoamide similar to those of native lipoamide

  19. Flavin-derived self-organization and chirality separation of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Sang-Yong

    2008-07-01

    Formed by rolling up a two-dimensional sheet of one or more layer of graphite, graphene, carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are the marvel materials of modern materials science. They are phenomenally strong and stiff, and have the unusual property of being excellent conductors of heat along the tube's axis, but good thermal insulators across it. But it is their electrical characteristics that excite the most interest. Especially, single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNTs), formed by one layer of cylindrical graphene, has better physical properties over multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) having over two layer of graphene. Depending on the precise way they are rolled up, which is defined by ( n,m) vector, SWNTs can be made into either metals or semiconductors. So far, SWNTs can generally only be fabricated in batches that vary widely, both in the diameter of the individual tubes and in the orientation of their graphene lattice relative to the tube axis, the property known as chirality. Separating out these various conformations is a challenging, but one that must be solved if nanotubes are ever to fulfill their electrifying potential in devices. This thesis presents that flavin-based helical self-assembly can impart multi degrees of SWNTs separation (i.e., metallicity, diameter, chirality, and handedness). As opening chapters for carbon nanotube and flavin derivative, Chapter 1 provide the introduction of carbon nanotubes, especially single-walled tubes, and the current state-of-the-art nanotube separation. Also, Chapter 1 presents a variety of naturally-occurring flavin derivatives, their redox behavior, and their biological utilization as cofactors for various proteins. Motivated by chemoluminescence of flavin mononucleotide (FMN, phosphorylated form of Vitamin B2) with bacterial luciferase, Chapter 2 discuss about the synthesis and covalent attachment of flavin mononucleotide (FMN, phosphorylated form of Vitamin B2) analogue to oxidized SWNTs. Along with nine step synthesis

  20. Identification of a flavin-containing S-oxygenating monooxygenase involved in alliin biosynthesis in garlic.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Naoko; Onuma, Misato; Mizuno, Shinya; Sugino, Yuka; Nakabayashi, Ryo; Imai, Shinsuke; Tsuneyoshi, Tadamitsu; Sumi, Shin-ichiro; Saito, Kazuki

    2015-09-01

    S-Alk(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides are cysteine-derived secondary metabolites highly accumulated in the genus Allium. Despite pharmaceutical importance, the enzymes that contribute to the biosynthesis of S-alk-(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides in Allium plants remain largely unknown. Here, we report the identification of a flavin-containing monooxygenase, AsFMO1, in garlic (Allium sativum), which is responsible for the S-oxygenation reaction in the biosynthesis of S-allyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide (alliin). Recombinant AsFMO1 protein catalyzed the stereoselective S-oxygenation of S-allyl-l-cysteine to nearly exclusively yield (RC SS )-S-allylcysteine sulfoxide, which has identical stereochemistry to the major natural form of alliin in garlic. The S-oxygenation reaction catalyzed by AsFMO1 was dependent on the presence of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), consistent with other known flavin-containing monooxygenases. AsFMO1 preferred S-allyl-l-cysteine to γ-glutamyl-S-allyl-l-cysteine as the S-oxygenation substrate, suggesting that in garlic, the S-oxygenation of alliin biosynthetic intermediates primarily occurs after deglutamylation. The transient expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion proteins indicated that AsFMO1 is localized in the cytosol. AsFMO1 mRNA was accumulated in storage leaves of pre-emergent nearly sprouting bulbs, and in various tissues of sprouted bulbs with green foliage leaves. Taken together, our results suggest that AsFMO1 functions as an S-allyl-l-cysteine S-oxygenase, and contributes to the production of alliin both through the conversion of stored γ-glutamyl-S-allyl-l-cysteine to alliin in storage leaves during sprouting and through the de novo biosynthesis of alliin in green foliage leaves.

  1. The structure of flavin-dependent tryptophan 7-halogenase RebH

    SciTech Connect

    Bitto, Eduard; Huang, Yu; Bingman, Craig A.; Singh, Shanteri; Thorson, Jon S.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2010-02-19

    Enzyme catalyzed regio- and stereo-specific halogenations influence the biological activity of a diverse array of therapeutically important natural products, including the antibiotics vancomycin and chloramphenicol as well as the anticancer agents calicheamicin and rebeccamycin. The major class of enzymes responsible for this challenging synthetic reaction, the flavin-dependent halogenases, catalyzes the formation of carbon-halogen bonds using flavin, a halide ion (Cl{sup -}, Br{sup -} or I{sup -}), and O{sub 2}. Recent mechanistic and structural advances achieved with the model flavin-dependent tryptophan 7-halogenases PrnA and RebH have greatly enhanced the level of understanding of this unique reaction. According to these studies, the mechanism for tryptophan halogenation proceeds via FAD(C4a)-OOH activation of a chloride ion into the transient chlorinating species HOCl. The key evidence for the requirement of a transient chlorinating species is the discovery that a {approx}10-{angstrom}-long tunnel separates FAD and tryptophan in the ligand-bound form of PrnA. In a recent compelling study to elucidate the strategy by which RebH controls this highly reactive and indiscriminant oxidant, a Lys79-{var_epsilon}NH-Cl chloramine intermediate was implicated as the actual chlorinating species within RebH and a structural investigation of RebH was reported. Here we report our independent structural analysis of Lechevalieria aerocolonigenes RebH (Uni-Prot accession number Q8KHZ8, 530 amino acids) in its apo-form as well as in a complex with both tryptophan and FAD.

  2. Sub-millitesla magnetic field effects on the recombination reaction of flavin and ascorbic acid radicals.

    PubMed

    Evans, Emrys W; Kattnig, Daniel R; Henbest, Kevin B; Hore, P J; Mackenzie, Stuart R; Timmel, Christiane R

    2016-08-28

    Even though the interaction of a <1 mT magnetic field with an electron spin is less than a millionth of the thermal energy at room temperature (kBT), it still can have a profound effect on the quantum yields of radical pair reactions. We present a study of the effects of sub-millitesla magnetic fields on the photoreaction of flavin mononucleotide with ascorbic acid. Direct control of the reaction pathway is achieved by varying the rate of electron transfer from ascorbic acid to the photo-excited flavin. At pH 7.0, we verify the theoretical prediction that, apart from a sign change, the form of the magnetic field effect is independent of the initial spin configuration of the radical pair. The data agree well with model calculations based on a Green's function approach that allows multinuclear spin systems to be treated including the diffusive motion of the radicals, their spin-selective recombination reactions, and the effects of the inter-radical exchange interaction. The protonation states of the radicals are uniquely determined from the form of the magnetic field-dependence. At pH 3.0, the effects of two chemically distinct radical pair complexes combine to produce a pronounced response to ∼500 μT magnetic fields. These findings are relevant to the magnetic responses of cryptochromes (flavin-containing proteins proposed as magnetoreceptors in birds) and may aid the evaluation of effects of weak magnetic fields on other biologically relevant electron transfer processes. PMID:27586950

  3. Sub-millitesla magnetic field effects on the recombination reaction of flavin and ascorbic acid radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Emrys W.; Kattnig, Daniel R.; Henbest, Kevin B.; Hore, P. J.; Mackenzie, Stuart R.; Timmel, Christiane R.

    2016-08-01

    Even though the interaction of a <1 mT magnetic field with an electron spin is less than a millionth of the thermal energy at room temperature (kBT), it still can have a profound effect on the quantum yields of radical pair reactions. We present a study of the effects of sub-millitesla magnetic fields on the photoreaction of flavin mononucleotide with ascorbic acid. Direct control of the reaction pathway is achieved by varying the rate of electron transfer from ascorbic acid to the photo-excited flavin. At pH 7.0, we verify the theoretical prediction that, apart from a sign change, the form of the magnetic field effect is independent of the initial spin configuration of the radical pair. The data agree well with model calculations based on a Green's function approach that allows multinuclear spin systems to be treated including the diffusive motion of the radicals, their spin-selective recombination reactions, and the effects of the inter-radical exchange interaction. The protonation states of the radicals are uniquely determined from the form of the magnetic field-dependence. At pH 3.0, the effects of two chemically distinct radical pair complexes combine to produce a pronounced response to ˜500 μT magnetic fields. These findings are relevant to the magnetic responses of cryptochromes (flavin-containing proteins proposed as magnetoreceptors in birds) and may aid the evaluation of effects of weak magnetic fields on other biologically relevant electron transfer processes.

  4. Aspergillus fumigatus SidA is a highly specific ornithine hydroxylase with bound flavin cofactor.

    PubMed

    Chocklett, Samuel W; Sobrado, Pablo

    2010-08-10

    Ferrichrome is a hydroxamate-containing siderophore produced by the pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus under iron-limiting conditions. This siderophore contains N(5)-hydroxylated l-ornithines essential for iron binding. A. fumigatus siderophore A (Af SidA) catalyzes the flavin- and NADPH-dependent hydroxylation of l-ornithine in ferrichrome biosynthesis. Af SidA was recombinantly expressed and purified as a soluble tetramer and is the first member of this class of flavin monooxygenases to be isolated with a bound flavin cofactor. The enzyme showed typical saturation kinetics with respect to l-ornithine while substrate inhibition was observed at high concentrations of NADPH and NADH. Increasing amounts of hydrogen peroxide were measured as a function of reduced nicotinamide coenzyme concentration, indicating that inhibition was caused by increased uncoupling. Af SidA is highly specific for its amino acid substrate, only hydroxylating l-ornithine. An 8-fold preference in the catalytic efficiency was determined for NADPH compared to NADH. In the absence of substrate, Af SidA can be reduced by NADPH, and a C4a-(hydro)peroxyflavin intermediate is observed. The decay of this intermediate is accelerated by l-ornithine binding. This intermediate was only stabilized by NADPH and not by NADH, suggesting a role for NADP(+) in the stabilization of intermediates in the reaction of Af SidA. NADP(+) is a competitive inhibitor with respect to NADPH, demonstrating that Af SidA forms a ternary complex with NADP(+) and l-ornithine during catalysis. The data suggest that Af SidA likely proceeds by a sequential kinetic mechanism.

  5. Binding of scandium ions to metalloporphyrin-flavin complexes for long-lived charge separation.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Takahiko; Kobayashi, Ryosuke; Ishizuka, Tomoya; Yamakawa, Shinya; Kotani, Hiroaki; Nakanishi, Tatsuaki; Ohkubo, Kei; Shiota, Yoshihito; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2014-11-17

    A porphyrin-flavin-linked dyad and its zinc and palladium complexes (MPor-Fl: 2-M, M=2 H, Zn, and Pd) were newly synthesized and the X-ray crystal structure of 2-Pd was determined. The photodynamics of 2-M were examined by femto- and nanosecond laser flash photolysis measurements. Photoinduced electron transfer (ET) in 2-H2 occurred from the singlet excited state of the porphyrin moiety (H2 Por) to the flavin (Fl) moiety to produce the singlet charge-separated (CS) state (1) (H2 Por(.+) -Fl(.-) ), which decayed through back ET (BET) to form (3) [H2 Por]*-Fl with rate constants of 1.2×10(10) and 1.2×10(9)  s(-1) , respectively. Similarly, photoinduced ET in 2-Pd afforded the singlet CS state, which decayed through BET to form (3) [PdPor]*Fl with rate constants of 2.1×10(11) and 6.0×10(10)  s(-1) , respectively. The rate constant of photoinduced ET and BET of 2-M were related to the ET and BET driving forces by using the Marcus theory of ET. One and two Sc(3+) ions bind to the flavin moiety to form the Fl-Sc(3+) and Fl-(Sc(3+) )2 complexes with binding constants of K1 =2.2×10(5)  M(-1) and K2 =1.8×10(3)  M(-1) , respectively. Other metal ions, such as Y(3+) , Zn(2+) , and Mg(2+) , form only 1:1 complexes with flavin. In contrast to 2-M and the 1:1 complexes with metal ions, which afforded the short-lived singlet CS state, photoinduced ET in 2-Pd⋅⋅⋅Sc(3+) complexes afforded the triplet CS state ((3) [PdPor(.+) -Fl(.-) (Sc(3+) )2 ]), which exhibited a remarkably long lifetime of τ=110 ms (kBET =9.1 s(-1) ).

  6. Flavin and porphyrin-micro optical fibre biosensor: analysis and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez-Gonzalez, J. S.; Mujica-Ascencio, S.; Aguilar Morales, A. I.; Marrujo-Garcia, S.; Alvarez-Chavez, J. A.; Martinez-Pinon, F.

    2014-05-01

    Micro Optical Fibre Biosensors (MOFBs) are emerging as one of the most sensitive bio-detection system technologies which do not require of labelling or amplification of the analyte. In these devices, a short region of the fibre core is exposed to the external environment so that the evanescent field can interact with biological species such as cells, proteins, and DNA. In order to increase the sensitivity and selectivity, MOFBs are often used in combination with other optical transduction mechanisms such as changes in refractive index, absorption, fluorescence and surface plasmon resonance. In this work we present the full characteristics, analysis and design of a MOFBs for Flavin and Porphyrin detection.

  7. [Flavin pool in Propionibacterium shermanii and the formation of corrinoids by bacterial cultures].

    PubMed

    Datsiuk, N M; Kucheras, R V; Rurik, V D; Gudz', S P; Kostruba, M F; Kremenetskaia, S Ia

    1978-01-01

    The content of flavins and vitamin B12 was studied in the cultures of Propionibacterium shermanii. The limited ability of propionic bacteria to synthesize 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole, the nucleotide base in the true forms of vitamin B12, was found to be caused by a deficiency of the biogenetic precursor (riboflavin). Exogenous 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole had no effect on the processes of flavinogenesis. In the absence of the nucleotide base, the yield of the true forms of vitamin B12 increased upon aeration of cultures which were grown for four days on an iron-deficient medium in the anaerobic conditions.

  8. Nitrate Reductase Regulates Expression of Nitrite Uptake and Nitrite Reductase Activities in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii 1

    PubMed Central

    Galván, Aurora; Cárdenas, Jacobo; Fernández, Emilio

    1992-01-01

    In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants defective at the structural locus for nitrate reductase (nit-1) or at loci for biosynthesis of the molybdopterin cofactor (nit-3, nit-4, or nit-5 and nit-6), both nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities were repressed in ammonium-grown cells and expressed at high amounts in nitrogen-free media or in media containing nitrate or nitrite. In contrast, wild-type cells required nitrate induction for expression of high levels of both activities. In mutants defective at the regulatory locus for nitrate reductase (nit-2), very low levels of nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities were expressed even in the presence of nitrate or nitrite. Both restoration of nitrate reductase activity in mutants defective at nit-1, nit-3, and nit-4 by isolating diploid strains among them and transformation of a structural mutant upon integration of the wild-type nit-1 gene gave rise to the wild-type expression pattern for nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities. Conversely, inactivation of nitrate reductase by tungstate treatment in nitrate, nitrite, or nitrogen-free media made wild-type cells respond like nitrate reductase-deficient mutants with respect to the expression of nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities. Our results indicate that nit-2 is a regulatory locus for both the nitrite uptake system and nitrite reductase, and that the nitrate reductase enzyme plays an important role in the regulation of the expression of both enzyme activities. PMID:16668656

  9. Flavin-Induced Oligomerization in Escherichia coli Adaptive Response Protein AidB

    SciTech Connect

    Hamill, Michael J.; Jost, Marco; Wong, Cintyu; Elliott, Sean J.; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2011-11-21

    The process known as 'adaptive response' allows Escherichia coli to respond to small doses of DNA-methylating agents by upregulating the expression of four proteins. While the role of three of these proteins in mitigating DNA damage is well understood, the function of AidB is less clear. Although AidB is a flavoprotein, no catalytic role has been established for the bound cofactor. Here we investigate the possibility that flavin plays a structural role in the assembly of the AidB tetramer. We report the generation and biophysical characterization of deflavinated AidB and of an AidB mutant that has greatly reduced affinity for flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Using fluorescence quenching and analytical ultracentrifugation, we find that apo AidB has a high affinity for FAD, as indicated by an apparent dissociation constant of 402.1 {+-} 35.1 nM, and that binding of substoichiometric amounts of FAD triggers a transition in the AidB oligomeric state. In particular, deflavinated AidB is dimeric, whereas the addition of FAD yields a tetramer. We further investigate the dimerization and tetramerization interfaces of AidB by determining a 2.8 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure in space group P3{sub 2} that contains three intact tetramers in the asymmetric unit. Taken together, our findings provide strong evidence that FAD plays a structural role in the formation of tetrameric AidB.

  10. Flavin-Induced Oligomerization in Escherichia coli Adaptive Response Protein AidB

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The process known as “adaptive response” allows Escherichia coli to respond to small doses of DNA-methylating agents by upregulating the expression of four proteins. While the role of three of these proteins in mitigating DNA damage is well understood, the function of AidB is less clear. Although AidB is a flavoprotein, no catalytic role has been established for the bound cofactor. Here we investigate the possibility that flavin plays a structural role in the assembly of the AidB tetramer. We report the generation and biophysical characterization of deflavinated AidB and of an AidB mutant that has greatly reduced affinity for flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Using fluorescence quenching and analytical ultracentrifugation, we find that apo AidB has a high affinity for FAD, as indicated by an apparent dissociation constant of 402.1 ± 35.1 nM, and that binding of substoichiometric amounts of FAD triggers a transition in the AidB oligomeric state. In particular, deflavinated AidB is dimeric, whereas the addition of FAD yields a tetramer. We further investigate the dimerization and tetramerization interfaces of AidB by determining a 2.8 Å resolution crystal structure in space group P32 that contains three intact tetramers in the asymmetric unit. Taken together, our findings provide strong evidence that FAD plays a structural role in the formation of tetrameric AidB. PMID:22004173

  11. Thermodynamics of the quasi-epitaxial flavin assembly around various-chirality carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Roholah; Samaraweera, Milinda; Gascón, José A; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios

    2014-05-21

    Establishing methods to accurately assess and model the binding strength of surfactants around a given-chirality single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) are crucial for selective enrichment, targeted functionalization, and spectrally sharp nanodevices. Unlike surfactant exchange, which is subject to interferences from the second surfactant, we herein introduce a thermal dissociation method based on reversible H(+)/O2 doping to determine SWNT/surfactant thermodynamic stability values with greater fidelity. Thermodynamic values were reproduced using molecular mechanics augmented by ab initio calculations in order to better assess π-π interactions. This afforded detailed quantification of the flavin binding strength in terms of π-π stacking (55-58%), with the remaining portion roughly split 3:1 between electrostatic plus van der Waals flavin mononucleotide (FMN) interdigitation and H-bonding interactions, respectively. Quasi-epitaxial π-π alignment between the near-armchair FMN helix and the underlying nanotube lattice plays a crucial role in stabilizing these assemblies. The close resemblance of the thermal dissociation method to helix-coil and ligand-binding transitions of DNA opens up a unique insight into the molecular engineering of self-organizing surfactants around various-chirality nanotubes.

  12. Chopping and Changing: the Evolution of the Flavin-dependent Monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Mascotti, Maria Laura; Juri Ayub, Maximiliano; Furnham, Nicholas; Thornton, Janet M; Laskowski, Roman A

    2016-07-31

    Flavin-dependent monooxygenases play a variety of key physiological roles and are also very powerful biotechnological tools. These enzymes have been classified into eight different classes (A-H) based on their sequences and biochemical features. By combining structural and sequence analysis, and phylogenetic inference, we have explored the evolutionary history of classes A, B, E, F, and G and demonstrate that their multidomain architectures reflect their phylogenetic relationships, suggesting that the main evolutionary steps in their divergence are likely to have arisen from the recruitment of different domains. Additionally, the functional divergence within in each class appears to have been the result of other mechanisms such as a complex set of single-point mutations. Our results reinforce the idea that a main constraint on the evolution of cofactor-dependent enzymes is the functional binding of the cofactor. Additionally, a remarkable feature of this family is that the sequence of the key flavin adenine dinucleotide-binding domain is split into at least two parts in all classes studied here. We propose a complex set of evolutionary events that gave rise to the origin of the different classes within this family. PMID:27423402

  13. Revealing the moonlighting role of NADP in the structure of a flavin-containing monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Alfieri, Andrea; Malito, Enrico; Orru, Roberto; Fraaije, Marco W; Mattevi, Andrea

    2008-05-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) are, after cytochromes P450, the most important monooxygenase system in humans and are involved in xenobiotics metabolism and variability in drug response. The x-ray structure of a soluble prokaryotic FMO from Methylophaga sp. strain SK1 has been solved at 2.6-A resolution and is now the protein of known structure with the highest sequence similarity to human FMOs. The structure possesses a two-domain architecture, with both FAD and NADP(+) well defined by the electron density maps. Biochemical analysis shows that the prokaryotic enzyme shares many functional properties with mammalian FMOs, including substrate specificity and the ability to stabilize the hydroperoxyflavin intermediate that is crucial in substrate oxygenation. On the basis of their location in the structure, the nicotinamide ring and the adjacent ribose of NADP(+) turn out to be an integral part of the catalytic site being actively engaged in the stabilization of the oxygenating intermediate. This feature suggests that NADP(H) has a moonlighting role, in that it adopts two binding modes that allow it to function in both flavin reduction and oxygen reactivity modulation, respectively. We hypothesize that a relative domain rotation is needed to bring NADP(H) to these distinct positions inside the active site. Localization of mutations in human FMO3 that are known to cause trimethylaminuria (fish-odor syndrome) in the elucidated FMO structure provides a structural explanation for their biological effects.

  14. Revealing the moonlighting role of NADP in the structure of a flavin-containing monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Alfieri, Andrea; Malito, Enrico; Orru, Roberto; Fraaije, Marco W.; Mattevi, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) are, after cytochromes P450, the most important monooxygenase system in humans and are involved in xenobiotics metabolism and variability in drug response. The x-ray structure of a soluble prokaryotic FMO from Methylophaga sp. strain SK1 has been solved at 2.6-Å resolution and is now the protein of known structure with the highest sequence similarity to human FMOs. The structure possesses a two-domain architecture, with both FAD and NADP+ well defined by the electron density maps. Biochemical analysis shows that the prokaryotic enzyme shares many functional properties with mammalian FMOs, including substrate specificity and the ability to stabilize the hydroperoxyflavin intermediate that is crucial in substrate oxygenation. On the basis of their location in the structure, the nicotinamide ring and the adjacent ribose of NADP+ turn out to be an integral part of the catalytic site being actively engaged in the stabilization of the oxygenating intermediate. This feature suggests that NADP(H) has a moonlighting role, in that it adopts two binding modes that allow it to function in both flavin reduction and oxygen reactivity modulation, respectively. We hypothesize that a relative domain rotation is needed to bring NADP(H) to these distinct positions inside the active site. Localization of mutations in human FMO3 that are known to cause trimethylaminuria (fish-odor syndrome) in the elucidated FMO structure provides a structural explanation for their biological effects. PMID:18443301

  15. The role of threonine 37 in flavin reactivity of the old yellow enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dong; Kohli, Rahul M.; Massey, Vincent

    1999-01-01

    Threonine 37 is conserved among all the members of the old yellow enzyme (OYE) family. The hydroxyl group of this residue forms a hydrogen bond with the C-4 oxygen atom of the FMN reaction center of the enzyme [Fox, K. M. & Karplus, P. A. (1994) Structure 2, 1089–1105]. The position of Thr-37 and its interaction with flavin allow for speculations about its role in enzyme activity. This residue was mutated to alanine and the mutant enzyme was studied and compared with the wild-type OYE1 to evaluate its mechanistic function. The mutation has different effects on the two separate half-reactions of the enzyme. The mutant enzyme has enhanced activity in the oxidative half-reaction but the reductive half-reaction is slowed down by more than one order of magnitude. The peaks of the absorption spectra for enzyme bound with phenolic compounds are shifted toward shorter wavelengths than those of wild-type OYE1, consistent with its lower redox potential. It is suggested that Thr-37 in the wild-type OYE1 increases the redox potential of the enzyme by stabilizing the negative charge of the reduced flavin through hydrogen bonding with it. PMID:10097075

  16. An electrogenic nitric oxide reductase.

    PubMed

    Al-Attar, Sinan; de Vries, Simon

    2015-07-22

    Nitric oxide reductases (Nors) are members of the heme-copper oxidase superfamily that reduce nitric oxide (NO) to nitrous oxide (N₂O). In contrast to the proton-pumping cytochrome oxidases, Nors studied so far have neither been implicated in proton pumping nor have they been experimentally established as electrogenic. The copper-A-dependent Nor from Bacillus azotoformans uses cytochrome c₅₅₁ as electron donor but lacks menaquinol activity, in contrast to our earlier report (Suharti et al., 2001). Employing reduced phenazine ethosulfate (PESH) as electron donor, the main NO reduction pathway catalyzed by Cu(A)Nor reconstituted in liposomes involves transmembrane cycling of the PES radical. We show that Cu(A)Nor reconstituted in liposomes generates a proton electrochemical gradient across the membrane similar in magnitude to cytochrome aa₃, highlighting that bacilli using Cu(A)Nor can exploit NO reduction for increased cellular ATP production compared to organisms using cNor. PMID:26149211

  17. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth.

  18. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth. PMID:26940877

  19. 5 alpha-reductase deficiency without hypospadias.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, W K; Taylor, N F; Hughes, I A; Taylor, J; Ransley, P G; Grant, D B

    1990-01-01

    A boy aged 4 with penoscrotal hypospadias and his brother aged 12 with micropenis had typical changes of homozygous 5 alpha-reductase deficiency. After three injections of chorionic gonadotrophin there was a trivial rise in plasma dihydrotestosterone with a normal increase in plasma testosterone. Urine steroid chromatography showed abnormally high 5 beta: 5 alpha ratios and 5 alpha-reductase activity was appreciably reduced in genital skin fibroblasts. The results indicate that 5 alpha-reductase deficiency is not invariably associated with genital ambiguity. PMID:2248513

  20. Flavin-derived self-organization and chirality separation of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Sang-Yong

    2008-07-01

    Formed by rolling up a two-dimensional sheet of one or more layer of graphite, graphene, carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are the marvel materials of modern materials science. They are phenomenally strong and stiff, and have the unusual property of being excellent conductors of heat along the tube's axis, but good thermal insulators across it. But it is their electrical characteristics that excite the most interest. Especially, single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNTs), formed by one layer of cylindrical graphene, has better physical properties over multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) having over two layer of graphene. Depending on the precise way they are rolled up, which is defined by ( n,m) vector, SWNTs can be made into either metals or semiconductors. So far, SWNTs can generally only be fabricated in batches that vary widely, both in the diameter of the individual tubes and in the orientation of their graphene lattice relative to the tube axis, the property known as chirality. Separating out these various conformations is a challenging, but one that must be solved if nanotubes are ever to fulfill their electrifying potential in devices. This thesis presents that flavin-based helical self-assembly can impart multi degrees of SWNTs separation (i.e., metallicity, diameter, chirality, and handedness). As opening chapters for carbon nanotube and flavin derivative, Chapter 1 provide the introduction of carbon nanotubes, especially single-walled tubes, and the current state-of-the-art nanotube separation. Also, Chapter 1 presents a variety of naturally-occurring flavin derivatives, their redox behavior, and their biological utilization as cofactors for various proteins. Motivated by chemoluminescence of flavin mononucleotide (FMN, phosphorylated form of Vitamin B2) with bacterial luciferase, Chapter 2 discuss about the synthesis and covalent attachment of flavin mononucleotide (FMN, phosphorylated form of Vitamin B2) analogue to oxidized SWNTs. Along with nine step synthesis

  1. Dual role of NADP(H) in the reaction of a flavin dependent N-hydroxylating monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Romero, Elvira; Fedkenheuer, Michael; Chocklett, Samuel W; Qi, Jun; Oppenheimer, Michelle; Sobrado, Pablo

    2012-06-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus siderophore A (Af SidA) is a flavin-dependent monooxygenase that catalyzes the hydroxylation of ornithine, producing N(5)-hydroxyornithine. This is the first step in the biosynthesis of hydroxamate-containing siderophores in A. fumigatus. Af SidA is essential for virulence, validating this enzyme as a drug target. Af SidA can accept reducing equivalents from either NADPH or NADH and displays similar kinetic parameters when using either coenzyme. When the enzyme is reduced with NADPH and reacted with molecular oxygen, a C4a-hydroperoxyflavin intermediate is observed. When the enzyme is reduced with NADH, the intermediate is 2-fold less stable. Steady-state kinetic isotope effect values of 3 and 2 were determined for NADPH and NADH, respectively. The difference in the isotope effect values is due to differences in the rate of flavin reduction by these coenzymes. A difference in the binding mode between these coenzymes was observed by monitoring flavin fluorescence. Limited proteolysis studies show that NADP(+), and not NAD(+), protects Af SidA from proteolysis, suggesting that it induces conformational changes upon binding. Together, these results are consistent with NADPH having a role in flavin reduction and in the modulation of conformational changes, which positions NADP(+) to also play a role in stabilization of the C4a-hydroperoxyflavin.

  2. Identification and characterization of two families of F420H2-dependent reductases from Mycobacteria that catalyse aflatoxin degradation

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Matthew C; Jackson, Colin J; Tattersall, David B; French, Nigel; Peat, Thomas S; Newman, Janet; Briggs, Lyndall J; Lapalikar, Gauri V; Campbell, Peter M; Scott, Colin; Russell, Robyn J; Oakeshott, John G

    2010-01-01

    Aflatoxins are polyaromatic mycotoxins that contaminate a range of food crops as a result of fungal growth and contribute to serious health problems in the developing world because of their toxicity and mutagenicity. Although relatively resistant to biotic degradation, aflatoxins can be metabolized by certain species of Actinomycetales. However, the enzymatic basis for their breakdown has not been reported until now. We have identified nine Mycobacterium smegmatis enzymes that utilize the deazaflavin cofactor F420H2 to catalyse the reduction of the α,β-unsaturated ester moiety of aflatoxins, activating the molecules for spontaneous hydrolysis and detoxification. These enzymes belong to two previously uncharacterized F420H2 dependent reductase (FDR-A and -B) families that are distantly related to the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) dependent pyridoxamine 5′-phosphate oxidases (PNPOxs). We have solved crystal structures of an enzyme from each FDR family and show that they, like the PNPOxs, adopt a split barrel protein fold, although the FDRs also possess an extended and highly charged F420H2 binding groove. A general role for these enzymes in xenobiotic metabolism is discussed, including the observation that the nitro-reductase Rv3547 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis that is responsible for the activation of bicyclic nitroimidazole prodrugs belongs to the FDR-A family. PMID:20807200

  3. Effects of 3G cell phone exposure on the structure and function of the human cytochrome P450 reductase.

    PubMed

    Tanvir, Shazia; Thuróczy, György; Selmaoui, Brahim; Silva Pires Antonietti, Viviane; Sonnet, Pascal; Arnaud-Cormos, Delia; Lévêque, Philippe; Pulvin, Sylviane; de Seze, René

    2016-10-01

    Cell phones increase exposure to radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMFs). Whether EMFs exert specific effects on biological systems remains debatable. This study investigated the effect of cell phone exposure on the structure and function of human NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR). CPR plays a key role in the electron transfer to cytochrome P450, which takes part in a wide range of oxidative metabolic reactions in various organisms from microbes to humans. Human CPR was exposed for 60min to 1966-MHz RF inside a transverse electromagnetic cell (TEM-cell) placed in an incubator. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was 5W·kg(-1). Conformation changes have been detected through fluorescent spectroscopy of flavin and tryptophan residues, and investigated through circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering and microelectrophoresis. These showed that CPR was narrowed. By using cytochrome C reductase activity to assess the electron flux through the CPR, the Michaelis Menten constant (Km) and the maximum initial velocity (Vmax) decreased by 22% as compared with controls. This change was due to small changes in the tertiary and secondary structures of the protein at 37°C. The relevance of these findings to an actual RF exposure scenario demands further biochemical and in-vivo confirmation.

  4. Effects of 3G cell phone exposure on the structure and function of the human cytochrome P450 reductase.

    PubMed

    Tanvir, Shazia; Thuróczy, György; Selmaoui, Brahim; Silva Pires Antonietti, Viviane; Sonnet, Pascal; Arnaud-Cormos, Delia; Lévêque, Philippe; Pulvin, Sylviane; de Seze, René

    2016-10-01

    Cell phones increase exposure to radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMFs). Whether EMFs exert specific effects on biological systems remains debatable. This study investigated the effect of cell phone exposure on the structure and function of human NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR). CPR plays a key role in the electron transfer to cytochrome P450, which takes part in a wide range of oxidative metabolic reactions in various organisms from microbes to humans. Human CPR was exposed for 60min to 1966-MHz RF inside a transverse electromagnetic cell (TEM-cell) placed in an incubator. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was 5W·kg(-1). Conformation changes have been detected through fluorescent spectroscopy of flavin and tryptophan residues, and investigated through circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering and microelectrophoresis. These showed that CPR was narrowed. By using cytochrome C reductase activity to assess the electron flux through the CPR, the Michaelis Menten constant (Km) and the maximum initial velocity (Vmax) decreased by 22% as compared with controls. This change was due to small changes in the tertiary and secondary structures of the protein at 37°C. The relevance of these findings to an actual RF exposure scenario demands further biochemical and in-vivo confirmation. PMID:27243445

  5. Effects of methodological variation on assessment of riboflavin status using the erythrocyte glutathione reductase activation coefficient assay.

    PubMed

    Hill, Marilyn H E; Bradley, Angela; Mushtaq, Sohail; Williams, Elizabeth A; Powers, Hilary J

    2009-07-01

    Riboflavin status is usually measured as the in vitro stimulation with flavin adenine dinucleotide of the erythrocyte enzyme glutathione reductase, and expressed as an erythrocyte glutathione reductase activation coefficient (EGRAC). This method is used for the National Diet and Nutrition Surveys (NDNS) of the UK. In the period between the 1990 and 2003 surveys of UK adults, the estimated prevalence of riboflavin deficiency, expressed as an EGRAC value > or = 1.30, increased from 2 to 46 % in males and from 1 to 34 % in females. We hypothesised that subtle but important differences in the detail of the methodology between the two NDNS accounted for this difference. We carried out an evaluation of the performance of the methods used in the two NDNS and compared against an 'in-house' method, using blood samples collected from a riboflavin intervention study. Results indicated that the method used for the 1990 NDNS gave a significantly lower mean EGRAC value than both the 2003 NDNS method and the 'in-house' method (P < 0.0001). The key differences between the methods relate to the concentration of FAD used in the assay and the duration of the period of incubation of FAD with enzyme. The details of the EGRAC method should be standardised for use in different laboratories and over time. Additionally, it is proposed that consideration be given to re-evaluating the basis of the EGRAC threshold for riboflavin deficiency.

  6. Cuminaldehyde: Aldose Reductase and alpha-Glucosidase Inhibitor Derived from Cuminum cyminum L. Seeds.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hoi-Seon

    2005-04-01

    The inhibitory activity of Cuminum cyminum seed-isolated component was evaluated against lens aldose reductase and alpha-glucosidase isolated from Sprague-Dawley male rats and compared to that of 11 commercially available components derived from C. cyminum seed oil, as well as quercitrin as an aldose reductase inhibitor and acarbose as an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor. The biologically active constituent of C. cyminum seed oil was characterized as cuminaldehyde by various spectral analyses. The IC(50) value of cuminaldehyde is 0.00085 mg/mL against aldose reductase and 0.5 mg/mL against alpha-glucosidase, respectively. Cuminaldehyde was about 1.8 and 1.6 times less in inhibitory activity than acarbose and quercitin, respectively. Nonetheless, cuminaldehyde may be useful as a lead compound and a new agent for antidiabetic therapeutics.

  7. Joint functions of protein residues and NADP(H) in oxygen activation by flavin-containing monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Orru, Roberto; Pazmiño, Daniel E Torres; Fraaije, Marco W; Mattevi, Andrea

    2010-11-01

    The reactivity of flavoenzymes with dioxygen is at the heart of a number of biochemical reactions with far reaching implications for cell physiology and pathology. Flavin-containing monooxygenases are an attractive model system to study flavin-mediated oxygenation. In these enzymes, the NADP(H) cofactor is essential for stabilizing the flavin intermediate, which activates dioxygen and makes it ready to react with the substrate undergoing oxygenation. Our studies combine site-directed mutagenesis with the usage of NADP(+) analogues to dissect the specific roles of the cofactors and surrounding protein matrix. The highlight of this "double-engineering" approach is that subtle alterations in the hydrogen bonding and stereochemical environment can drastically alter the efficiency and outcome of the reaction with oxygen. This is illustrated by the seemingly marginal replacement of an Asn to Ser in the oxygen-reacting site, which inactivates the enzyme by effectively converting it into an oxidase. These data rationalize the effect of mutations that cause enzyme deficiency in patients affected by the fish odor syndrome. A crucial role of NADP(+) in the oxygenation reaction is to shield the reacting flavin N5 atom by H-bond interactions. A Tyr residue functions as backdoor that stabilizes this crucial binding conformation of the nicotinamide cofactor. A general concept emerging from this analysis is that the two alternative pathways of flavoprotein-oxygen reactivity (oxidation versus monooxygenation) are predicted to have very similar activation barriers. The necessity of fine tuning the hydrogen-bonding, electrostatics, and accessibility of the flavin will represent a challenge for the design and development of oxidases and monoxygenases for biotechnological applications.

  8. The dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase of Aeromonas caviae ST exhibits NADH-dependent tellurite reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Castro, Miguel E; Molina, Roberto; Díaz, Waldo; Pichuantes, Sergio E; Vásquez, Claudio C

    2008-10-10

    Potassium tellurite (K(2)TeO(3)) is extremely toxic for most forms of life and only a limited number of organisms are naturally resistant to the toxic effects of this compound. Crude extracts prepared from the environmental isolate Aeromonas caviae ST catalize the in vitro reduction of TeO32- in a NADH-dependent reaction. Upon fractionation by ionic exchange column chromatography three major polypeptides identified as the E1, E2, and E3 components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex were identified in fractions exhibiting tellurite-reducing activity. Tellurite reductase and pyruvate dehydrogenase activities co-eluted from a Sephadex gel filtration column. To determine which component(s) of the PDH complex has tellurite reductase activity, the A. caviae ST structural genes encoding for E1 (aceE), E2 (aceF), and E3 (lpdA) were independently cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and their gene products purified. Results indicated that tellurite reductase activity lies almost exclusively in the E3 component, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase. The E3 component of the PDH complex from E. coli, Zymomonas mobilis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus also showed NADH-dependent tellurite reductase in vitro suggesting that this enzymatic activity is widely distributed among microorganisms. PMID:18675788

  9. Genetics Home Reference: sepiapterin reductase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... reductase enzyme. This enzyme is involved in the production of a molecule called tetrahydrobiopterin (also known as ... is responsible for the last step in the production of tetrahydrobiopterin. Tetrahydrobiopterin helps process several building blocks ...

  10. A dissimilatory nitrite reductase in Paracoccus halodenitrificans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, M. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1984-01-01

    Paracoccus halodenitrificans produced a membrane-associated nitrite reductase. Spectrophotometric analysis showed it to be associated with a cd-cytochrome and located on the inner side of the cytoplasmic membrane. When supplied with nitrite, membrane preparations produced nitrous oxide and nitric oxide in different ratios depending on the electron donor employed. The nitrite reductase was maximally active at relatively low concentrations of sodium chloride and remained attached to the membranes at 100 mM sodium chloride.

  11. Cell nonautonomous activation of flavin-containing monooxygenase promotes longevity and health span.

    PubMed

    Leiser, Scott F; Miller, Hillary; Rossner, Ryan; Fletcher, Marissa; Leonard, Alison; Primitivo, Melissa; Rintala, Nicholas; Ramos, Fresnida J; Miller, Dana L; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2015-12-11

    Stabilization of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) increases life span and health span in nematodes through an unknown mechanism. We report that neuronal stabilization of HIF-1 mediates these effects in Caenorhabditis elegans through a cell nonautonomous signal to the intestine, which results in activation of the xenobiotic detoxification enzyme flavin-containing monooxygenase-2 (FMO-2). This prolongevity signal requires the serotonin biosynthetic enzyme TPH-1 in neurons and the serotonin receptor SER-7 in the intestine. Intestinal FMO-2 is also activated by dietary restriction (DR) and is necessary for DR-mediated life-span extension, which suggests that this enzyme represents a point of convergence for two distinct longevity pathways. FMOs are conserved in eukaryotes and induced by multiple life span-extending interventions in mice, which suggests that these enzymes may play a critical role in promoting health and longevity across phyla.

  12. Cell Non-Autonomous Activation of Flavin-containing Monooxygenase Promotes Longevity and Healthspan

    PubMed Central

    Leiser, Scott F.; Fletcher, Marissa; Leonard, Alison; Primitivo, Melissa; Rintala, Nicholas; Ramos, Fresnida J.; Miller, Dana L.; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Stabilization of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) increases lifespan and healthspan in nematodes through an unknown mechanism. We report that neuronal stabilization of HIF-1 mediates these effects in C. elegans through a cell non-autonomous signal to the intestine resulting in activation of the xenobiotic detoxification enzyme flavin-containing monooxygenase-2 (FMO-2). This pro-longevity signal requires the serotonin biosynthetic enzyme TPH-1 in neurons and the serotonin receptor SER-7 in the intestine. Intestinal FMO-2 is also activated by dietary restriction (DR) and necessary for DR-mediated lifespan extension, suggesting that this enzyme represents a point of convergence for two distinct longevity pathways. FMOs are conserved in eukaryotes and induced by multiple lifespan-extending interventions in mice, suggesting that these enzymes may play a critical role in promoting health and longevity across phyla. PMID:26586189

  13. A prebiotic role for 8-oxoguanosine as a flavin mimic in pyrimidine dimer photorepair.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khiem Van; Burrows, Cynthia J

    2011-09-21

    Redox-active enzyme cofactors derived from ribonucleotides have been called "fossils of the RNA world," suggesting that early catalysts employed modified nucleobases to facilitate redox chemistry in primitive metabolism. Here, we show that the common oxidative damage product 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (OG), when incorporated into a DNA or RNA strand in proximity to a cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer, can mimic the function of a flavin in photorepair. The OG nucleotide acts catalytically in a mechanism consistent with that of photolyase in which the photoexcited state of the purine donates an electron to a pyrimidine dimer to initiate bond cleavage; subsequent back electron transfer regenerates OG. This unusual example of one form of DNA damage, oxidation, functioning to repair another, photodimerization, may provide insight into the origins of prebiotic redox processes. PMID:21877686

  14. Role of inorganic phosphate during electron transfer in the redox system NADH+flavin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozinova, T. A.; Brzhevskaya, O. N.; Kisin, A. V.; Nosova, V. M.; Rykov, S. V.; Tychinskaya, L. Yu.

    2006-05-01

    We have used 31P NMR and EPR to study the effect of inorganic phosphate (Pi) on the process of electron transfer in oxidation of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) by flavin in aqueous solutions. Observation of a significant (up to 40%) drop in the integrated intensity of the 31P NMR signal for the inorganic phosphate over the course of the reaction is interpreted as a manifestation of the effect of chemically induced polarization of the phosphorus nuclei during singlet-triplet conversion in charge-transfer complexes [NADH…Pi], and is evidence for a possible catalytic role for Pi in processes involving transfer of an electron (hydrogen atom) from NADH to appropriate acceptors. The results presented support the possibility of direct involvement of Pi in a chain of one-electron conversions in chemical systems.

  15. How pH Modulates the Reactivity and Selectivity of a Siderophore-Associated Flavin Monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) catalyze the oxygenation of diverse organic molecules using O2, NADPH, and the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor. The fungal FMO SidA initiates peptidic siderophore biosynthesis via the highly selective hydroxylation of l-ornithine, while the related amino acid l-lysine is a potent effector of reaction uncoupling to generate H2O2. We hypothesized that protonation states could critically influence both substrate-selective hydroxylation and H2O2 release, and therefore undertook a study of SidA’s pH-dependent reaction kinetics. Consistent with other FMOs that stabilize a C4a-OO(H) intermediate, SidA’s reductive half reaction is pH independent. The rate constant for the formation of the reactive C4a-OO(H) intermediate from reduced SidA and O2 is likewise independent of pH. However, the rate constants for C4a-OO(H) reactions, either to eliminate H2O2 or to hydroxylate l-Orn, were strongly pH-dependent and influenced by the nature of the bound amino acid. Solvent kinetic isotope effects of 6.6 ± 0.3 and 1.9 ± 0.2 were measured for the C4a-OOH/H2O2 conversion in the presence and absence of l-Lys, respectively. A model is proposed in which l-Lys accelerates H2O2 release via an acid–base mechanism and where side-chain position determines whether H2O2 or the hydroxylation product is observed. PMID:24490904

  16. Protein motifs involved in coenzyme interaction and enzymatic efficiency in anabaena ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase.

    PubMed

    Peregrina, José R; Herguedas, Beatriz; Hermoso, Juan A; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Medina, Milagros

    2009-04-14

    Ferredoxin-NADP+ reductases (FNRs) must determine the coenzyme specificity and allow the transient encounter between N5 of its flavin cofactor and C4 of the coenzyme nicotinamide for efficient hydride transfer. Combined site-directed replacements in different putative determinants of the FNR coenzyme specificity were simultaneously produced. The resulting variants were structurally and functionally analyzed for their binding and hydride transfer abilities to the FNR physiological coenzyme NADP+/H, as well as to NAD+/H. The previously studied Y303S mutation is the only one that significantly enhances specificity for NAD+. Combination of mutations from the pyrophosphate or 2'-phosphate regions, even including Y303S, does not improve activity with NAD+, despite structures of these FNRs show how particular coenzyme-binding regions resembled motifs found in NAD+/H-dependent enzymes of the FNR family. Therefore, the "rational approach" did not succeed well, and coenzyme specificity redesign in the FNR family will be more complex than that anticipated in other NADP+/NAD+ families.

  17. Thioredoxin Reductase and its Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Saccoccia, Fulvio; Angelucci, Francesco; Boumis, Giovanna; Carotti, Daniela; Desiato, Gianni; Miele, Adriana E; Bellelli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Thioredoxin plays a crucial role in a wide number of physiological processes, which span from reduction of nucleotides to deoxyriboucleotides to the detoxification from xenobiotics, oxidants and radicals. The redox function of Thioredoxin is critically dependent on the enzyme Thioredoxin NADPH Reductase (TrxR). In view of its indirect involvement in the above mentioned physio/pathological processes, inhibition of TrxR is an important clinical goal. As a general rule, the affinities and mechanisms of binding of TrxR inhibitors to the target enzyme are known with scarce precision and conflicting results abound in the literature. A relevant analysis of published results as well as the experimental procedures is therefore needed, also in view of the critical interest of TrxR inhibitors. We review the inhibitors of TrxR and related flavoreductases and the classical treatment of reversible, competitive, non competitive and uncompetitive inhibition with respect to TrxR, and in some cases we are able to reconcile contradictory results generated by oversimplified data analysis. PMID:24875642

  18. Role of the C-terminal extension stacked on the re-face of the isoalloxazine ring moiety of the flavin adenine dinucleotide prosthetic group in ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase from Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Seo, Daisuke; Asano, Tomoya; Komori, Hirofumi; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2014-08-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase [EC 1.18.1.2] from Bacillus subtilis (BsFNR) is homologous to the bacterial NADPH-thioredoxin reductase, but possesses a unique C-terminal extension that covers the re-face of the isoalloxazine ring moiety of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) prosthetic group. In this report, we utilize BsFNR mutants depleted of their C-terminal residues to examine the importance of the C-terminal extension in reactions with NADPH and ferredoxin (Fd) from B. subtilis by spectroscopic and steady-state reaction analyses. The depletions of residues Y313 to K332 (whole C-terminal extension region) and S325 to K332 (His324 intact) resulted in significant increases in the catalytic efficiency with NADPH in diaphorase assay with ferricyanide, whereas Km values for ferricyanide were increased. In the cytochrome c reduction assay in the presence of B. subtilis ferredoxin, the S325-K332 depleted mutant displayed a significant decrease in the turnover rate with an Fd concentration range of 1-10 μM. The Y313-K332 depleted mutant demonstrated an increase in the rate of the direct reduction of horse heart cytochrome c in the absence of Fd. These data indicated that depletion of the C-terminal extension plays an important role in the reaction of BsFNR with ferredoxin.

  19. Conformational change in cytochrome P450 reductase adsorbed at a Au(110)—phosphate buffer interface induced by interaction with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. I.; Convery, J. H.; Harrison, P.; Khara, B.; Scrutton, N. S.; Weightman, P.

    2014-08-01

    Changes observed in the reflection anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) profiles of monolayers of cytochrome P450 reductase adsorbed at Au(110)-electrolyte interfaces at 0.056 V following the addition of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP+) are explained in terms of a simple model as arising from changes in the orientation of an isoalloxazine ring located in the flavin mononucleotide binding domain of the protein. The model also accounts for the changes observed in the RAS as the potential applied to the Au(110) surface is varied and suggests that differences in the dependence of the RAS profile of the adsorbed protein on the potential applied to the electrode in the absence and presence of NADP+ are explicable as arising from a competition between the applied potential acting to reduce the protein and the NADP+ to oxidize it.

  20. Effects of soluble flavin on heterogeneous electron transfer between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and iron oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zheming; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; White, Gaye F.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.

    2015-08-01

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria can utilize insoluble Fe(Mn)-oxides as a terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. For Shewanella species specifically, evidence suggests that iron reduction is associated with the secretion of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and riboflavin. However, the exact mechanism of flavin involvement is unclear; while some indicate that flavins mediate electron transfer (Marsili et al., 2008), others point to flavin serving as co-factors to outer membrane proteins (Okamoto et al., 2013). In this work, we used methyl viologen (MVrad +)-encapsulated, porin-cytochrome complex (MtrCAB) embedded liposomes (MELs) as a synthetic model of the Shewanella outer membrane to investigate the proposed mediating behavior of microbially produced flavins. The reduction kinetics of goethite, hematite and lepidocrocite (200 μM) by MELs ([MVrad +] ∼ 40 μM and MtrABC ⩽ 1 nM) were determined in the presence FMN at pH 7.0 in N2 atmosphere by monitoring the concentrations of MVrad + and FMN through their characteristic UV-visible absorption spectra. Experiments were performed where (i) FMN and Fe(III)-oxide were mixed and then reacted with the reduced MELs and (ii) FMN was reacted with the reduced MELs followed by addition of Fe(III)-oxide. The redox reactions proceeded in two steps: a fast step that was completed in a few seconds, and a slower one lasting over 400 s. For all three Fe(III)-oxides, the initial reaction rate in the presence of a low concentration of FMN (⩽1 μM) was at least a factor of five faster than those with MELs alone, and orders of magnitude faster than those by FMNH2, suggesting that FMN may serve as a co-factor that enhances electron transfer from outer-membrane c-cytochromes to Fe(III)-oxides. The rate and extent of the initial reaction followed the order of lepidocrocite > hematite > goethite, the same as their reduction potentials, implying thermodynamic control on reaction rate. For LEP, with the highest reduction

  1. Distribution of seawater fluorescence and dissolved flavins in the Almeria-Oran front (Alboran Sea, western Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momzikoff, A.; Dallot, S.; Gondry, G.

    1994-08-01

    Seawater fluorescence in the blue region of the spectrum (excitation at 360 nm) due to fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM), and dissolved flavins were investigated in the Almeria-Oran geostrophic front (western Mediterranean) in the 0-200 m layer. Seawater fluorescence increased with depth from a minimum in the jet divergence, increasing towards the oligotrophic waters located outside the jet zone, and reaching a maximum in the right side of the jet, a convergence zone. Comparisons with other recorded parameters suggested both physical and biological factors were involved in its distribution along the transect. Photodegradation due to light-penetration and seawater enrichment with FDOM due to biological activity appeared as driving factors of fluorescence distribution. Fluorescence increase along the secondary circulation of the jet was attributed to the combined effects of aging of a bloom (where it was suggested that both auto- and heterotrophic populations were involved) and photodegradation. FDOM of deeper waters (found in the divergence zone) was inferred to be less photodegradable than that generated in the productive layers (the convergence zone). From these data fluorescence in the oligotrophic sites was deduced to originate from prevaling biological activity. Three flavins were investigated: riboflavin and its photoproducts (lumichrome and lumiflavin). The vertical distribution of flavins was marked by a stratification into two layers of enhanced concentrations. The upper one was found to coincide with the upper chlorophyll layer (DCM or DCM1), the lower one with the lower chlorophyll layer (DCM2, where it occurred) and/or with the base of the halocline. From these depth coincidences both auto- and heterotrophic populations were inferred to be sources of flavins although their respective contributions were hard to determine. As for fluorescence, an increase of flavins was found in the jet zone. However significant differences were found between the

  2. The aldo-keto reductase superfamily homepage.

    PubMed

    Hyndman, David; Bauman, David R; Heredia, Vladi V; Penning, Trevor M

    2003-02-01

    The aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are one of the three enzyme superfamilies that perform oxidoreduction on a wide variety of natural and foreign substrates. A systematic nomenclature for the AKR superfamily was adopted in 1996 and was updated in September 2000 (visit www.med.upenn.edu/akr). Investigators have been diligent in submitting sequences of functional proteins to the Web site. With the new additions, the superfamily contains 114 proteins expressed in prokaryotes and eukaryotes that are distributed over 14 families (AKR1-AKR14). The AKR1 family contains the aldose reductases, the aldehyde reductases, the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases and steroid 5beta-reductases, and is the largest. Other families of interest include AKR6, which includes potassium channel beta-subunits, and AKR7 the aflatoxin aldehyde reductases. Two new families include AKR13 (yeast aldose reductase) and AKR14 (Escherichia coli aldehyde reductase). Crystal structures of many AKRs and their complexes with ligands are available in the PDB and accessible through the Web site. Each structure has the characteristic (alpha/beta)(8)-barrel motif of the superfamily, a conserved cofactor binding site and a catalytic tetrad, and variable loop structures that define substrate specificity. Although the majority of AKRs are monomeric proteins of about 320 amino acids in length, the AKR2, AKR6 and AKR7 family may form multimers. To expand the nomenclature to accommodate multimers, we recommend that the composition and stoichiometry be listed. For example, AKR7A1:AKR7A4 (1:3) would designate a tetramer of the composition indicated. The current nomenclature is recognized by the Human Genome Project (HUGO) and the Web site provides a link to genomic information including chromosomal localization, gene boundaries, human ESTs and SNPs and much more.

  3. C4a-hydroperoxyflavin formation in N-hydroxylating flavin monooxygenases is mediated by the 2'-OH of the nicotinamide ribose of NADP⁺.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Reeder; Badieyan, Somayesadat; Sobrado, Pablo

    2013-12-23

    Flavin-dependent monooxygenases must stabilize a C4a-hydroperoxyflavin intermediate to hydroxylate their respective substrates. Formation and decay of the C4a-hydroperoxyflavin were monitored under rapid reaction kinetic conditions in SidA, an N-hydroxylating monooxygenase involved in siderophore biosynthesis. Solvent kinetic isotope effect studies of flavin oxidation indicate that both hydrogen peroxide elimination and water elimination occur via abstraction of hydrogen from the N5 of the flavin. Kinetic isotope effect and density functional theory results are consistent with the transfer of a proton from the 2'-OH of the nicotinamide ribose of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP⁺) to the C4a-peroxyflavin to form the C4a-hydroperoxyflavin. This represents a novel role for NADP⁺ in the reaction of flavin-dependent enzymes.

  4. The C-terminal extension of bacterial flavodoxin-reductases: involvement in the hydride transfer mechanism from the coenzyme.

    PubMed

    Bortolotti, Ana; Sánchez-Azqueta, Ana; Maya, Celia M; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Hermoso, Juan A; Medina, Milagros; Cortez, Néstor

    2014-01-01

    To study the role of the mobile C-terminal extension present in bacterial class of plant type NADP(H):ferredoxin reductases during catalysis, we generated a series of mutants of the Rhodobacter capsulatus enzyme (RcFPR). Deletion of the six C-terminal amino acids beyond alanine 266 was combined with the replacement A266Y, emulating the structure present in plastidic versions of this flavoenzyme. Analysis of absorbance and fluorescence spectra suggests that deletion does not modify the general geometry of FAD itself, but increases exposure of the flavin to the solvent, prevents a productive geometry of FAD:NADP(H) complex and decreases the protein thermal stability. Although the replacement A266Y partially coats the isoalloxazine from solvent and slightly restores protein stability, this single change does not allow formation of active charge-transfer complexes commonly present in the wild-type FPR, probably due to restraints of C-terminus pliability. A proton exchange process is deduced from ITC measurements during coenzyme binding. All studied RcFPR variants display higher affinity for NADP(+) than wild-type, evidencing the contribution of the C-terminus in tempering a non-productive strong (rigid) interaction with the coenzyme. The decreased catalytic rate parameters confirm that the hydride transfer from NADPH to the flavin ring is considerably hampered in the mutants. Although the involvement of the C-terminal extension from bacterial FPRs in stabilizing overall folding and bent-FAD geometry has been stated, the most relevant contributions to catalysis are modulation of coenzyme entrance and affinity, promotion of the optimal geometry of an active complex and supply of a proton acceptor acting during coenzyme binding.

  5. Structural and mechanistic insights on nitrate reductases.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Catarina; Romão, Maria João

    2015-12-01

    Nitrate reductases (NR) belong to the DMSO reductase family of Mo-containing enzymes and perform key roles in the metabolism of the nitrogen cycle, reducing nitrate to nitrite. Due to variable cell location, structure and function, they have been divided into periplasmic (Nap), cytoplasmic, and membrane-bound (Nar) nitrate reductases. The first crystal structure obtained for a NR was that of the monomeric NapA from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans in 1999. Since then several new crystal structures were solved providing novel insights that led to the revision of the commonly accepted reaction mechanism for periplasmic nitrate reductases. The two crystal structures available for the NarGHI protein are from the same organism (Escherichia coli) and the combination with electrochemical and spectroscopic studies also lead to the proposal of a reaction mechanism for this group of enzymes. Here we present an overview on the current advances in structural and functional aspects of bacterial nitrate reductases, focusing on the mechanistic implications drawn from the crystallographic data. PMID:26362109

  6. Interflavin electron transfer in human cytochrome P450 reductase is enhanced by coenzyme binding. Relaxation kinetic studies with coenzyme analogues.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Aldo; Munro, Andrew W; Grunau, Alex; Wolf, C Roland; Scrutton, Nigel S; Roberts, Gordon C K

    2003-06-01

    The role of coenzyme binding in regulating interflavin electron transfer in human cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) has been studied using temperature-jump spectroscopy. Previous studies [Gutierrez, A., Paine, M., Wolf, C.R., Scrutton, N.S., & Roberts, G.C.K. Biochemistry (2002) 41, 4626-4637] have shown that the observed rate, 1/tau, of interflavin electron transfer (FADsq - FMNsq-->FADox - FMNhq) in CPR reduced at the two-electron level with NADPH is 55 +/- 2 s-1, whereas with dithionite-reduced enzyme the observed rate is 11 +/- 0.5 s-1, suggesting that NADPH (or NADP+) binding has an important role in controlling the rate of internal electron transfer. In relaxation experiments performed with CPR reduced at the two-electron level with NADH, the observed rate of internal electron transfer (1/tau = 18 +/- 0.7 s-1) is intermediate in value between those seen with dithionite-reduced and NADPH-reduced enzyme, indicating that the presence of the 2'-phosphate is important for enhancing internal electron transfer. To investigate this further, temperature jump experiments were performed with dithionite-reduced enzyme in the presence of 2',5'-ADP and 2'-AMP. These two ligands increase the observed rate of interflavin electron transfer in two-electron reduced CPR from 1/tau = 11 s-1 to 35 +/- 0.2 s-1 and 32 +/- 0.6 s-1, respectively. Reduction of CPR at the two-electron level by NADPH, NADH or dithionite generates the same spectral species, consistent with an electron distribution that is equivalent regardless of reductant at the initiation of the temperature jump. Spectroelectrochemical experiments establish that the redox potentials of the flavins of CPR are unchanged on binding 2',5'-ADP, supporting the view that enhanced rates of interdomain electron transfer have their origin in a conformational change produced by binding NADPH or its fragments. Addition of 2',5'-ADP either to the isolated FAD-domain or to full-length CPR (in their oxidized and reduced forms) leads to

  7. A flavin-dependent halogenase catalyzes the chlorination step in the biosynthesis of Dictyostelium differentiation-inducing factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Christopher S.; Walsh, Christopher T.; Kay, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    Differentiation-inducing factor 1 (DIF-1) is a polyketide-derived morphogen which drives stalk cell formation in the developmental cycle of Dictyostelium discoideum. Previous experiments demonstrated that the biosynthetic pathway proceeds via dichlorination of the precursor molecule THPH, but the enzyme responsible for this transformation has eluded characterization. Our recent studies on prokaryotic flavin-dependent halogenases and insights from the sequenced Dd genome led us to a candidate gene for this transformation. In this work, we present in vivo and in vitro evidence that chlA from Dd encodes a flavin-dependent halogenase capable of catalyzing both chlorinations in the biosynthesis of DIF-1. The results provide in vitro characterization of a eukaryotic oxygen-dependent halogenase and demonstrate a broad reach in biology for this molecular tailoring strategy, notably its involvement in the differentiation program of a social amoeba. PMID:20231486

  8. A nomenclature for the mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenase gene family based on amino acid sequence identities.

    PubMed

    Lawton, M P; Cashman, J R; Cresteil, T; Dolphin, C T; Elfarra, A A; Hines, R N; Hodgson, E; Kimura, T; Ozols, J; Phillips, I R

    1994-01-01

    A nomenclature based on comparisons of amino acid sequences is proposed for the members of the mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) gene family. This nomenclature is based on evidence of a single gene family composed of five genes. The percentage identities of the amino acid sequences of the five known forms of mammalian FMO are between 52 and 57% in rabbit and between 50 and 58% across species lines. The identities of all orthologs are greater than 82%. There is no evidence for multiple, highly related forms of the enzyme or for more than one mammalian FMO gene family. In the proposed system, the mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenase gene family is designated as "FMO" and the individual genes are distinguished by an Arabic numeral. The FMOs known as the "liver" and "lung" enzymes become FMO1 and FMO2, and the more recently described forms of the enzymes become FMO3, FMO4, and FMO5. Human FMO gene designations, FMO1 and FMO3, remain unchanged, but the gene designated FMO2 becomes FMO4. Following convention, the genes and cDNA designations will be italicized and the mRNA and protein designations will be nonitalicized. The purpose of the proposed nomenclature is to provide for the unambiguous identification of orthologous forms of mammalian FMOs, regardless of the species or tissue in question. The proposed classification considers only members of the mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenase gene family and has no bearing on the generally accepted definition of a multisubstrate flavin-containing monooxygenase.

  9. The superoxide-generating oxidase of leucocytes. NADPH-dependent reduction of flavin and cytochrome b in solubilized preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Cross, A R; Parkinson, J F; Jones, O T

    1984-01-01

    An NADPH-dependent O2.- -generating oxidase was solubilized from phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-activated pig neutrophils by using a mixture of detergents. Recovery of oxidase was approx. 40%. The extract contained cytochrome b-245 (331 pmol/mg of protein) and FAD (421 pmol/mg of protein); approx. 30% of each was reduced within 60s when NADPH was added to anaerobic incubations. Three different additives, quinacrine, p-chloromercuribenzoate and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, strongly inhibited O2.- generation; they also inhibited the reduction by NADPH of cytochrome b at the same low concentrations. In the presence of p-chloromercuribenzoate cytochrome b reduction was strongly inhibited and flavin reduction was less inhibited. A detergent extract prepared from non-stimulated neutrophils also contained flavin and cytochrome b, but its rate of O2.- production was less than 1% of that from activated cells; its initial rate of cytochrome b and flavin reduction was low, although the state of reduction at equilibrium was similar to that of extracts of activated cells. Even in the non-activated cell extract the reduction of flavin and cytochrome was made fast and complete when Methyl Viologen was added to the anaerobic incubations. The oxidase was temperature-sensitive, with a sharp maximum at 25 degrees C; temperatures above this caused loss of O2.- generation, and this coincided with loss of the characteristic cytochrome b spectrum, indicate of denaturation of the cytochrome. The cytochrome b formed a complex with butyl isocyanide (close to 100% binding at 10mM); butyl isocyanide also inhibited the oxidase activity of stimulated whole neutrophils (22.5% inhibition at 10mM). Photoreduced FMN stimulated O2 uptake by the oxidase. The results support a scheme of electron transport within the oxidase complex involving NADPH, FAD, cytochrome b-245 and O2 in that sequence. PMID:6497852

  10. Multinuclear NMR studies of the flavodoxin from Anabaena 7120:. beta. -sheet structure and the flavin mononucleotide binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Stockman, B.J.

    1989-01-01

    A concerted approach to primary {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N nuclear magnetic resonance assignments in proteins was developed. The method requires enrichment of the protein with {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N. The technique relies on the comparison of data sets from NMR experiments that correlate various nuclei: {sup 13}C({sup 13}C) double quantum correlations, {sup 1}H({sup 13}C) and {sup 1}H({sup 15}N) single bond correlations, and {sup 1}H({sup 13}C) and {sup 1}H({sup 15}N) multiple bond correlations. Comparison of data sets increases the number of resonances that can be assigned and improves assignment confidence. By combined use of these and conventional NMR techniques, sequential assignments were made for the {beta}-sheet and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) binding site residues in flavodoxin from Anabaena 7120. The {beta}-sheet structure was found to be similar to that seen in the crystal structure of Anacystis nidulans flavodoxin. In the FMN binding site, a total of 69 NOEs were identified: eight between protons of FMN, 36 between protons of binding site residues, and 25 between protons of FMN and protein. These constraints were used to determine the localized solution structure of the flavin binding site. The electronic environment and conformation of the protein-bound isoalloxazine ring were investigated by determining chemical shifts and coupling constants for the ring atoms. The carbonyl edge of the flavin ring was found to be slightly polarized by hydrogen bonding to the protein. The xylene ring was found to be nonplanar. The C{sup 6}-N{sup 5} region of the flavin appears to be solvent accessible.

  11. Mechanistic studies on the flavin-dependent N⁶-lysine monooxygenase MbsG reveal an unusual control for catalysis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Reeder M; Rodriguez, Pedro J; Sobrado, Pablo

    2014-05-15

    The mechanism of Mycobacterium smegmatis G (MbsG), a flavin-dependent l-lysine monooxygenase, was investigated under steady-state and rapid reaction conditions using primary and solvent kinetic isotope effects, substrate analogs, pH and solvent viscosity effects as mechanistic probes. The results suggest that l-lysine binds before NAD(P)H, which leads to a decrease in the rate constant for flavin reduction. l-lysine binding has no effect on the rate of flavin oxidation, which occurs in a one-step process without the observation of a C4a-hydroperoxyflavin intermediate. Similar effects were determined with several substrate analogs. Flavin oxidation is pH independent while the kcat/Km and kred/KD pH profiles for NAD(P)H exhibit single pKa values of ∼6.0, with increasing activity as the pH decreases. At lower pH, the enzyme becomes more uncoupled, producing more hydrogen peroxide and superoxide. Hydride transfer is partially rate-limiting at neutral pH and becomes more rate-limiting at low pH. An inverse solvent viscosity effect on kcat/Km for NAD(P)H was observed at neutral pH whereas a normal solvent viscosity effect was observed at lower pH. Together, the results indicate a unique mechanism where a rate-limiting and pH-sensitive conformational change occurs in the reductive half-reaction, which affects the efficiency of lysine hydroxylation.

  12. Arg279 is the key regulator of coenzyme selectivity in the flavin-dependent ornithine monooxygenase SidA.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Reeder; Franceschini, Stefano; Fedkenheuer, Michael; Rodriguez, Pedro J; Ellerbrock, Jacob; Romero, Elvira; Echandi, Maria Paulina; Martin Del Campo, Julia S; Sobrado, Pablo

    2014-04-01

    Siderophore A (SidA) is a flavin-dependent monooxygenase that catalyzes the NAD(P)H- and oxygen-dependent hydroxylation of ornithine in the biosynthesis of siderophores in Aspergillus fumigatus and is essential for virulence. SidA can utilize both NADPH or NADH for activity; however, the enzyme is selective for NADPH. Structural analysis shows that R279 interacts with the 2'-phosphate of NADPH. To probe the role of electrostatic interactions in coenzyme selectivity, R279 was mutated to both an alanine and a glutamate. The mutant proteins were active but highly uncoupled, oxidizing NADPH and producing hydrogen peroxide instead of hydroxylated ornithine. For wtSidA, the catalytic efficiency was 6-fold higher with NADPH as compared to NADH. For the R279A mutant the catalytic efficiency was the same with both coenyzmes, while for the R279E mutant the catalytic efficiency was 5-fold higher with NADH. The effects are mainly due to an increase in the KD values, as no major changes on the kcat or flavin reduction values were observed. Thus, the absence of a positive charge leads to no coenzyme selectivity while introduction of a negative charge leads to preference for NADH. Flavin fluorescence studies suggest altered interaction between the flavin and NADP⁺ in the mutant enzymes. The effects are caused by different binding modes of the coenzyme upon removal of the positive charge at position 279, as no major conformational changes were observed in the structure for R279A. The results indicate that the positive charge at position 279 is critical for tight binding of NADPH and efficient hydroxylation.

  13. The two-domain structure of 5'-adenylylsulfate (APS) reductase from Enteromorpha intestinalis is a requirement for efficient APS reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Kun; Gomes, Varinnia; Gao, Yu; Chandramouli, Kala; Johnson, Michael K; Knaff, David B; Leustek, Thomas

    2007-01-16

    5'-Adenylylsulfate (APS) reductase from Enteromorpha intestinalis (EiAPR) is composed of two domains that function together to reduce APS to sulfite. The carboxyl-terminal domain functions as a glutaredoxin that mediates the transfer of electrons from glutathione to the APS reduction site on the amino-terminal domain. To study the basis for the interdomain interaction, a heterologous system was constructed in which the C domain of EiAPR was fused to the carboxyl terminus of the APS reductase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PaAPR), an enzyme that normally uses thioredoxin as an electron donor and is incapable of using glutathione for this function. The hybrid enzyme, which retains the [4Fe-4S] cluster from PaAPR, was found to use both thioredoxin and glutathione as an electron donor for APS reduction. The ability to use glutathione was enhanced by the addition of Na2SO4 to the reaction buffer, a property that the hybrid enzyme shares with EiAPR. When the C domain was added as a separate component, it was much less efficient in conferring PaAPR with the ability to use glutathione as an electron donor, despite the fact that the separately expressed C domain functioned in two activities that are typical for glutaredoxins, hydroxyethyl disulfide reduction and electron donation to ribonucleotide reductase. These results suggest that the physical connection of the reductase and C domain on a single polypeptide is critical for the electron-transfer reaction. Moreover, the effect of Na2SO4 suggests that a water-ordering component of the reaction milieu is critical for the catalytic function of plant-type APS reductases by promoting the interdomain interaction.

  14. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richey, C.; Chovanec, P.; Hoeft, S.E.; Oremland, R.S.; Basu, P.; Stolz, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe–S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  15. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Richey, Christine; Chovanec, Peter; Hoeft, Shelley E.; Oremland, Ronald S.; Basu, Partha; Stolz, John F.

    2009-05-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe-S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  16. Bound Flavin-Cytochrome Model of Extracellular Electron Transfer in Shewanella oneidensis: Analysis by Free Energy Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Hong, Gongyi; Pachter, Ruth

    2016-06-30

    Flavins are known to enhance extracellular electron transfer (EET) in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 bacteria, which reduce electron acceptors through outer-membrane (OM) cytochromes c. Free-shuttle and bound-redox cofactor mechanisms were proposed to explain this enhancement, but recent electrochemical reports favor a flavin-bound model, proposing two one-electron reductions of flavin, namely, oxidized (Ox) to semiquinone (Sq) and semiquinone to hydroquinone (Hq), at anodic and cathodic conditions, respectively. In this work, to provide a mechanistic understanding of riboflavin (RF) binding at the multiheme OM cytochrome OmcA, we explored binding configurations at hemes 2, 5, 7, and 10. Subsequently, on the basis of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, binding free energies and redox potential shifts upon RF binding for the Ox/Sq and Sq/Hq reductions were analyzed. Our results demonstrated an upshift in the Ox/Sq and a downshift in the Sq/Hq redox potentials, consistent with a bound RF-OmcA model. Furthermore, binding free energy MD simulations indicated an RF binding preference at heme 7. MD simulations of the OmcA-MtrC complex interfacing at hemes 5 revealed a small interprotein redox potential difference with an electron transfer rate of 10(7)-10(8)/s. PMID:27266856

  17. Convenient microtiter plate-based, oxygen-independent activity assays for flavin-dependent oxidoreductases based on different redox dyes.

    PubMed

    Brugger, Dagmar; Krondorfer, Iris; Zahma, Kawah; Stoisser, Thomas; Bolivar, Juan M; Nidetzky, Bernd; Peterbauer, Clemens K; Haltrich, Dietmar

    2014-04-01

    Flavin-dependent oxidoreductases are increasingly recognized as important biocatalysts for various industrial applications. In order to identify novel activities and to improve these enzymes in engineering approaches, suitable screening methods are necessary. We developed novel microtiter-plate-based assays for flavin-dependent oxidases and dehydrogenases using redox dyes as electron acceptors for these enzymes. 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol, methylene green, and thionine show absorption changes between their oxidized and reduced forms in the visible range, making it easy to judge visually changes in activity. A sample set of enzymes containing both flavoprotein oxidases and dehydrogenases - pyranose 2-oxidase, pyranose dehydrogenase, cellobiose dehydrogenase, D-amino acid oxidase, and L-lactate oxidase - was selected. Assays for these enzymes are based on a direct enzymatic reduction of the redox dyes and not on the coupled detection of a reaction product as in the frequently used assays based on hydrogen peroxide formation. The different flavoproteins show low Michaelis constants with these electron acceptor substrates, and therefore these dyes need to be added in only low concentrations to assure substrate saturation. In conclusion, these electron acceptors are useful in selective, reliable and cheap MTP-based screening assays for a range of flavin-dependent oxidoreductases, and offer a robust method for library screening, which could find applications in enzyme engineering programs. PMID:24376171

  18. A theoretical multiscale treatment of protein-protein electron transfer: The ferredoxin/ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase and flavodoxin/ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase systems.

    PubMed

    Saen-Oon, Suwipa; Cabeza de Vaca, Israel; Masone, Diego; Medina, Milagros; Guallar, Victor

    2015-12-01

    In the photosynthetic electron transfer (ET) chain, two electrons transfer from photosystem I to the flavin-dependent ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR) via two sequential independent ferredoxin (Fd) electron carriers. In some algae and cyanobacteria (as Anabaena), under low iron conditions, flavodoxin (Fld) replaces Fd as single electron carrier. Extensive mutational studies have characterized the protein-protein interaction in FNR/Fd and FNR/Fld complexes. Interestingly, even though Fd and Fld share the interaction site on FNR, individual residues on FNR do not participate to the same extent in the interaction with each of the protein partners, pointing to different electron transfer mechanisms. Despite of extensive mutational studies, only FNR/Fd X-ray structures from Anabaena and maize have been solved; structural data for FNR/Fld remains elusive. Here, we present a multiscale modelling approach including coarse-grained and all-atom protein-protein docking, the QM/MM e-Pathway analysis and electronic coupling calculations, allowing for a molecular and electronic comprehensive analysis of the ET process in both complexes. Our results, consistent with experimental mutational data, reveal the ET in FNR/Fd proceeding through a bridge-mediated mechanism in a dominant protein-protein complex, where transfer of the electron is facilitated by Fd loop-residues 40-49. In FNR/Fld, however, we observe a direct transfer between redox cofactors and less complex specificity than in Fd; more than one orientation in the encounter complex can be efficient in ET. PMID:26385068

  19. [Properties of 2,5-diamino-4-oxy-6-ribosylaminopyrimidine-5'- phosphate reductase, a enzyme of the second stage of flavinogenesis in Pichia guilliermondii yeasts].

    PubMed

    Logvinenko, E M; Shavlovskiĭ, G M; Zakal'skiĭ, A E; Kontorovskaia, N Iu

    1989-01-01

    2,5-Diamino-4-oxy-6-ribosylaminopyrimidine-5'-phosphate reductase has been isolated from cells of Pichia guilliermondii and subjected to 20-fold purification by treating extracts with streptomycin sulphate, frationating proteins (NH4)2SO4 at 45-75% of saturation and chromatography on blue sepharose CL-6B. The use of gel filtration through Sephadex G-150 and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose proved to be less effective for the enzyme purification. It has been established that it is 2,5-diamino-4-oxy-6-ribosylaminopyrimidine-5-phosphate but not its dephosphorylated form that is the substrate of the given reductase; Km is equal to 7.10(-5) M. The reaction proceeds in the presence of NADPH or NADH. The enzyme affinity to NADPH (Km = 4.7.10(-5) M) is approximately one order higher than that to NADPH (Km = 5.5.10(-4) M). The enzyme manifests the optimum of action at pH 7.2 and the temperature of 37 degrees C; the molecular weight is 140 kD. EDTA as well as flavins in the concentration of 1.10(-3) M exert no effect on the reductase activity. The enzyme is labile at 4 degrees C and is inactivated in the frozen state at -15 degrees C. The 2.5-diamino-4-oxy-6-ribosylaminopyrimidine-5'-phosphate reductase has been also revealed in Torulopsis candida, Debaryomyces klöckeri, Schwanniomyces occidentalis, Eremothecium ashbyii (flavinogenic species) and Candida utilis. Aspergillus nidulans, Neurospora crassa (nonflavinogenic species). The synthesis of this enzyme contrary to other enzymes of the riboflavin biosynthesis is not regulated in flavinogenic yeast by iron ions. PMID:2511652

  20. [Properties of 2,5-diamino-4-oxy-6-ribosylaminopyrimidine-5'- phosphate reductase, a enzyme of the second stage of flavinogenesis in Pichia guilliermondii yeasts].

    PubMed

    Logvinenko, E M; Shavlovskiĭ, G M; Zakal'skiĭ, A E; Kontorovskaia, N Iu

    1989-01-01

    2,5-Diamino-4-oxy-6-ribosylaminopyrimidine-5'-phosphate reductase has been isolated from cells of Pichia guilliermondii and subjected to 20-fold purification by treating extracts with streptomycin sulphate, frationating proteins (NH4)2SO4 at 45-75% of saturation and chromatography on blue sepharose CL-6B. The use of gel filtration through Sephadex G-150 and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose proved to be less effective for the enzyme purification. It has been established that it is 2,5-diamino-4-oxy-6-ribosylaminopyrimidine-5-phosphate but not its dephosphorylated form that is the substrate of the given reductase; Km is equal to 7.10(-5) M. The reaction proceeds in the presence of NADPH or NADH. The enzyme affinity to NADPH (Km = 4.7.10(-5) M) is approximately one order higher than that to NADPH (Km = 5.5.10(-4) M). The enzyme manifests the optimum of action at pH 7.2 and the temperature of 37 degrees C; the molecular weight is 140 kD. EDTA as well as flavins in the concentration of 1.10(-3) M exert no effect on the reductase activity. The enzyme is labile at 4 degrees C and is inactivated in the frozen state at -15 degrees C. The 2.5-diamino-4-oxy-6-ribosylaminopyrimidine-5'-phosphate reductase has been also revealed in Torulopsis candida, Debaryomyces klöckeri, Schwanniomyces occidentalis, Eremothecium ashbyii (flavinogenic species) and Candida utilis. Aspergillus nidulans, Neurospora crassa (nonflavinogenic species). The synthesis of this enzyme contrary to other enzymes of the riboflavin biosynthesis is not regulated in flavinogenic yeast by iron ions.

  1. Evolution of plant defense mechanisms. Relationships of phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductases to pinoresinol-lariciresinol and isoflavone reductases.

    PubMed

    Gang, D R; Kasahara, H; Xia, Z Q; Vander Mijnsbrugge, K; Bauw, G; Boerjan, W; Van Montagu, M; Davin, L B; Lewis, N G

    1999-03-12

    Pinoresinol-lariciresinol and isoflavone reductase classes are phylogenetically related, as is a third, the so-called "isoflavone reductase homologs." This study establishes the first known catalytic function for the latter, as being able to engender the NADPH-dependent reduction of phenylcoumaran benzylic ethers. Accordingly, all three reductase classes are involved in the biosynthesis of important and related phenylpropanoid-derived plant defense compounds. In this investigation, the phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase from the gymnosperm, Pinus taeda, was cloned, with the recombinant protein heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme reduces the benzylic ether functionalities of both dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol and dihydrodehydrodiconiferyl alcohol, with a higher affinity for the former, as measured by apparent Km and Vmax values and observed kinetic 3H-isotope effects. It abstracts the 4R-hydride of the required NADPH cofactor in a manner analogous to that of the pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductases and isoflavone reductases. A similar catalytic function was observed for the corresponding recombinant reductase whose gene was cloned from the angiosperm, Populus trichocarpa. Interestingly, both pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductases and isoflavone reductases catalyze enantiospecific conversions, whereas the phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase only shows regiospecific discrimination. A possible evolutionary relationship among the three reductase classes is proposed, based on the supposition that phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductases represent the progenitors of pinoresinol-lariciresinol and isoflavone reductases.

  2. Evaluation of nitrate reductase activity in Rhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, J.G.; DeVine, P.J.

    1983-08-01

    Nitrate reductase activity was evaluated by four approaches, using four strains of Rhizobium japonicum and 11 chlorate-resistant mutants of the four strains. It was concluded that in vitro assays with bacteria or bacteroids provide the most simple and reliable assessment of the presence or absence of nitrate reductase. Nitrite reductase activity with methyl viologen and dithionite was found, but the enzyme activity does not confound the assay of nitrate reductase. 18 references

  3. Interaction of Biologically Active Flavins inside Bile Salt Aggregates: Molecular Level Investigation.

    PubMed

    Maity, Banibrata; Ahmed, Sayeed Ashique; Seth, Debabrata

    2016-09-22

    In this work we have studied the photophysics of biologically active flavin molecule lumichrome (LCM) in different bile-salt aggregates. With alteration of the functional groups of the bile salts, the photophysics of confined fluorophore is largely affected and shows difference in their spectral behavior. This study also reveals the selective prototropic species of LCM present in bile salt aggregates. In the presence of the bile salt aggregates, LCM molecule shows excitation and emission wavelength-dependent emission properties, indicating switch over of the structural change of different prototropic form of the LCM molecule. The observation of higher rotational relaxation time in NaDC aggregates compared to NaTC aggregates clearly reflects that NaDC aggregates are more rigid due to its greater hydrophobicity and large in size, which is capable to bind the guest molecule more into their nanoconfined medium. Moreover, due to less acidic nature, NaDC aggregates have more ability to accept hydrogen bond from the LCM molecule and show the selective formation of isoalloxazine N10 anion (A1 monoanionic form) of LCM. PMID:27557394

  4. The non-enzymatic reduction of azo dyes by flavin and nicotinamide cofactors under varying conditions.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Jessica M; John, Gilbert H

    2013-10-01

    Azo dyes are ubiquitous in products and often become environmental pollutants due to their anthropogenic nature. Azoreductases are enzymes which are present within many bacteria and are capable of breaking down the azo dyes via reduction of the azo bond. Often, though, carcinogenic aromatic amines are formed as metabolites and are of concern to humans. Azoreductases function via an oxidation-reduction reaction and require cofactors (a nicotinamide cofactor and sometimes a flavin cofactor) to perform their function. Non-enzymatic reduction of azo dyes in the absence of an azoreductase enzyme has been suggested in previous studies, but has never been studied in detail in terms of varying cofactor combinations, different oxygen states or pHs, nor has the enzymatic reduction been compared to azoreduction in terms of dye reduction or metabolites produced, which was the aim of this study. Reduction of azo dyes by different cofactor combinations was found to occur under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions and under physiologically-relevant pHs to produce the same metabolites as an azoreductase. Our results show that, in some cases, the non-enzymatic reduction by the cofactors was found to be equal to that seen with the azoreductase, suggesting that all dye reduction in these cases is due to the cofactors themselves. This study details the importance of the use of a cofactor-only control when studying azoreductase enzymes.

  5. Flavin containing monooxygenase 3 exerts broad effects on glucose and lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Shih, Diana M; Wang, Zeneng; Lee, Richard; Meng, Yonghong; Che, Nam; Charugundla, Sarada; Qi, Hannah; Wu, Judy; Pan, Calvin; Brown, J Mark; Vallim, Thomas; Bennett, Brian J; Graham, Mark; Hazen, Stanley L; Lusis, Aldons J

    2015-01-01

    We performed silencing and overexpression studies of flavin containing monooxygenase (FMO) 3 in hyperlipidemic mouse models to examine its effects on trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) levels and atherosclerosis. Knockdown of hepatic FMO3 in LDL receptor knockout mice using an antisense oligonucleotide resulted in decreased circulating TMAO levels and atherosclerosis. Surprisingly, we also observed significant decreases in hepatic lipids and in levels of plasma lipids, ketone bodies, glucose, and insulin. FMO3 overexpression in transgenic mice, on the other hand, increased hepatic and plasma lipids. Global gene expression analyses suggested that these effects of FMO3 on lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis may be mediated through the PPARα and Kruppel-like factor 15 pathways. In vivo and in vitro results were consistent with the concept that the effects were mediated directly by FMO3 rather than trimethylamine/TMAO; in particular, overexpression of FMO3 in the human hepatoma cell line, Hep3B, resulted in significantly increased glucose secretion and lipogenesis. Our results indicate a major role for FMO3 in modulating glucose and lipid homeostasis in vivo, and they suggest that pharmacologic inhibition of FMO3 to reduce TMAO levels would be confounded by metabolic interactions. PMID:25378658

  6. How can EPR spectroscopy help to unravel molecular mechanisms of flavin-dependent photoreceptors?

    PubMed Central

    Nohr, Daniel; Rodriguez, Ryan; Weber, Stefan; Schleicher, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a well-established spectroscopic method for the examination of paramagnetic molecules. Proteins can contain paramagnetic moieties in form of stable cofactors, transiently formed intermediates, or spin labels artificially introduced to cysteine sites. The focus of this review is to evaluate potential scopes of application of EPR to the emerging field of optogenetics. The main objective for EPR spectroscopy in this context is to unravel the complex mechanisms of light-active proteins, from their primary photoreaction to downstream signal transduction. An overview of recent results from the family of flavin-containing, blue-light dependent photoreceptors is given. In detail, mechanistic similarities and differences are condensed from the three classes of flavoproteins, the cryptochromes, LOV (Light-oxygen-voltage), and BLUF (blue-light using FAD) domains. Additionally, a concept that includes spin-labeled proteins and examination using modern pulsed EPR is introduced, which allows for a precise mapping of light-induced conformational changes. PMID:26389123

  7. A regulatory role of NAD redox status on flavin cofactor homeostasis in S. cerevisiae mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Locato, Vittoria; Barile, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) are two redox cofactors of pivotal importance for mitochondrial functionality and cellular redox balance. Despite their relevance, the mechanism by which intramitochondrial NAD(H) and FAD levels are maintained remains quite unclear in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We investigated here the ability of isolated mitochondria to degrade externally added FAD and NAD (in both its reduced and oxidized forms). A set of kinetic experiments demonstrated that mitochondrial FAD and NAD(H) destroying enzymes are different from each other and from the already characterized NUDIX hydrolases. We studied here, in some detail, FAD pyrophosphatase (EC 3.6.1.18), which is inhibited by NAD(+) and NADH according to a noncompetitive inhibition, with Ki values that differ from each other by an order of magnitude. These findings, together with the ability of mitochondrial FAD pyrophosphatase to metabolize endogenous FAD, presumably deriving from mitochondrial holoflavoproteins destined to degradation, allow for proposing a novel possible role of mitochondrial NAD redox status in regulating FAD homeostasis and/or flavoprotein degradation in S. cerevisiae. PMID:24078860

  8. Oxygen-dependent photochemistry and photophysics of "miniSOG," a protein-encased flavin.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Frederico M; Jensen, Rasmus L; Breitenbach, Thomas; Etzerodt, Michael; Ogilby, Peter R

    2013-01-01

    Selected photochemical and photophysical parameters of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) have been examined under conditions in which FMN is (1) solvated in a buffered aqueous solution, and (2) encased in a protein likewise solvated in a buffered aqueous solution. The latter was achieved using the so-called "mini Singlet Oxygen Generator" (miniSOG), an FMN-containing flavoprotein engineered from Arabidopsis thaliana phototropin 2. Although FMN is a reasonably good singlet oxygen photosensitizer in bulk water (ϕΔ = 0.65 ± 0.04), enclosing FMN in this protein facilitates photoinitiated electron-transfer reactions (Type-I chemistry) at the expense of photosensitized singlet oxygen production (Type-II chemistry) and results in a comparatively poor yield of singlet oxygen (ϕΔ = 0.030 ± 0.002). This observation on the effect of the local environment surrounding FMN is supported by a host of spectroscopic and chemical trapping experiments. The results of this study not only elucidate the behavior of miniSOG but also provide useful information for the further development of well-characterized chromophores suitable for use as intracellular sensitizers in mechanistic studies of reactive oxygen species.

  9. Localization of genes encoding three distinct flavin-containing monooxygenases to human chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Shephard, E.A.; Fox, M.F.; Povey, S. ); Dolphin, C.T.; Phillips, I.R.; Smith, R. )

    1993-04-01

    The authors have used the polymerase chain reaction to map the gene encoding human flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) form II (N. Lomri, Q. Gu, and J. R. Cashman, 1992, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89: 1685--1689) to chromosome 1. They propose the designation FMO3 for this gene as it is the third FMO gene to be mapped. The two other human FMO genes identified to date, FMO1 and FMO2, are also located on chromosome 1 (C. Dolphin, E. A. Shephard, S. Povey, C. N. A. Palmer, D. M. Ziegler, R. Ayesh, R. L. Smith, and 1. R. Phillips, 1991, J. Biol. Chem. 266: 12379--12385; C. Dolphin, E. A. Shephard, S. F. Povey, R. L. Smith, and I. R. Phillips, 1992, Biochem. J. 286: 261--267). The localization of FMO1, FMO2, and FMO3 has been refined to the long arm of chromosome 1. Analysis of human metaphase chromosomes by in situ hybridization confirmed the mapping of FMO1 and localized this gene more precisely to 1 q23-q25. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Mechanism of N-hydroxylation catalyzed by flavin-dependent monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Badieyan, Somayesadat; Bach, Robert D; Sobrado, Pablo

    2015-02-20

    Aspergillus fumigatus siderophore (SidA), a member of class B flavin-dependent monooxygenases, was selected as a model system to investigate the hydroxylation mechanism of heteroatom-containing molecules by this group of enzymes. SidA selectively hydroxylates ornithine to produce N(5)-hydroxyornithine. However, SidA is also able to hydroxylate lysine with lower efficiency. In this study, the hydroxylation mechanism and substrate selectivity of SidA were systematically studied using DFT calculations. The data show that the hydroxylation reaction is initiated by homolytic cleavage of the O-O bond in the C(4a)-hydroperoxyflavin intermediate, resulting in the formation of an internal hydrogen-bonded hydroxyl radical (HO(•)). As the HO(•) moves to the ornithine N(5) atom, it rotates and donates a hydrogen atom to form the C(4a)-hydroxyflavin. Oxygen atom transfer yields an aminoxide, which is subsequently converted to hydroxylamine via water-mediated proton shuttling, with the water molecule originating from dehydration of the C(4a)-hydroxyflavin. The selectivity of SidA for ornithine is predicted to be the result of the lower energy barrier for oxidation of ornithine relative to that of lysine (16 vs 24 kcal/mol, respectively), which is due to the weaker stabilizing hydrogen bond between the incipient HO(•) and O3' of the ribose ring of NADP(+) in the transition state for lysine.

  11. Redox linked flavin sites in extracellular decaheme proteins involved in microbe-mineral electron transfer.

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Edwards, Marcus J.; White, Gaye F.; Norman, Michael; Tome-Fernandez, Alice; Ainsworth, Emma; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.; et al

    2015-07-01

    Extracellular microbe-mineral electron transfer is a major driving force for the oxidation of organic carbon in many subsurface environments. Extracellular multi-heme cytochromes of the Shewenella genus play a major role in this process but the mechanism of electron exchange at the interface between cytochrome and acceptor is widely debated. The 1.8 Å x-ray crystal structure of the decaheme MtrC revealed a highly conserved CX₈C disulfide that, when substituted for AX₈A, severely compromised the ability of S. oneidensis to grow under aerobic conditions. Reductive cleavage of the disulfide in the presence of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) resulted in the reversible formation ofmore » a stable flavocytochrome. Similar results were also observed with other decaheme cytochromes, OmcA, MtrF and UndA. The data suggest that these decaheme cytochromes can transition between highly reactive flavocytochromes or less reactive cytochromes, and that this transition is controlled by a redox active disulfide that responds to the presence of oxygen.« less

  12. Redox linked flavin sites in extracellular decaheme proteins involved in microbe-mineral electron transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Marcus J.; White, Gaye F.; Norman, Michael; Tome-Fernandez, Alice; Ainsworth, Emma; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2015-07-01

    Extracellular microbe-mineral electron transfer is a major driving force for the oxidation of organic carbon in many subsurface environments. Extracellular multi-heme cytochromes of the Shewenella genus play a major role in this process but the mechanism of electron exchange at the interface between cytochrome and acceptor is widely debated. The 1.8 Å x-ray crystal structure of the decaheme MtrC revealed a highly conserved CX₈C disulfide that, when substituted for AX₈A, severely compromised the ability of S. oneidensis to grow under aerobic conditions. Reductive cleavage of the disulfide in the presence of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) resulted in the reversible formation of a stable flavocytochrome. Similar results were also observed with other decaheme cytochromes, OmcA, MtrF and UndA. The data suggest that these decaheme cytochromes can transition between highly reactive flavocytochromes or less reactive cytochromes, and that this transition is controlled by a redox active disulfide that responds to the presence of oxygen.

  13. C. elegans flavin-containing monooxygenase-4 is essential for osmoregulation in hypotonic stress

    PubMed Central

    Hirani, Nisha; Westenberg, Marcel; Seed, Paul T.; Petalcorin, Mark I. R.; Dolphin, Colin T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Studies in Caenorhabditis elegans have revealed osmoregulatory systems engaged when worms experience hypertonic conditions, but less is known about measures employed when faced with hypotonic stress. Inactivation of fmo-4, which encodes flavin-containing monooxygenase-4, results in dramatic hypoosmotic hypersensitivity; worms are unable to prevent overwhelming water influx and swell rapidly, finally rupturing due to high internal hydrostatic pressure. fmo-4 is expressed prominently in hypodermis, duct and pore cells but is excluded from the excretory cell. Thus, FMO-4 plays a crucial osmoregulatory role by promoting clearance of excess water that enters during hypotonicity, perhaps by synthesizing an osmolyte that acts to establish an osmotic gradient from excretory cell to duct and pore cells. C. elegans FMO-4 contains a C-terminal extension conserved in all nematode FMO-4s. The coincidently numbered human FMO4 also contains an extended C-terminus with features similar to those of FMO-4. Although these shared sequence characteristics suggest potential orthology, human FMO4 was unable to rescue the fmo-4 osmoregulatory defect. Intriguingly, however, mammalian FMO4 is expressed predominantly in the kidney – an appropriate site if it too is, or once was, involved in osmoregulation. PMID:27010030

  14. Performance of Protein-Ligand Force Fields for the Flavodoxin-Flavin Mononucleotide System.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Michael J; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Jorgensen, William L

    2016-08-01

    The ability to accurately perform molecular dynamics and free energy perturbation calculations for protein-ligand systems is of broad interest to the biophysical and pharmaceutical sciences. In this work, several popular force fields are evaluated for reproducing experimental properties of the flavodoxin/flavin mononucleotide system. Calculated (3)J couplings from molecular dynamics simulations probing φ and χ1 dihedral angles are compared to over 1000 experimental measurements. Free energy perturbation calculations were also executed between different protein mutants for comparison with experimental data for relative free energies of binding. Newer versions of popular protein force fields reproduced (3)J backbone and side chain couplings with good accuracy, with RMSD values near or below one hertz in most cases. OPLS-AA/M paired with CM5 charges for the ligand performed particularly well, both for the (3)J couplings and FEP results, with a mean unsigned error for relative free energies of binding of 0.36 kcal/mol. PMID:27441982

  15. A Regulatory Role of NAD Redox Status on Flavin Cofactor Homeostasis in S. cerevisiae Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Barile, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) are two redox cofactors of pivotal importance for mitochondrial functionality and cellular redox balance. Despite their relevance, the mechanism by which intramitochondrial NAD(H) and FAD levels are maintained remains quite unclear in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We investigated here the ability of isolated mitochondria to degrade externally added FAD and NAD (in both its reduced and oxidized forms). A set of kinetic experiments demonstrated that mitochondrial FAD and NAD(H) destroying enzymes are different from each other and from the already characterized NUDIX hydrolases. We studied here, in some detail, FAD pyrophosphatase (EC 3.6.1.18), which is inhibited by NAD+ and NADH according to a noncompetitive inhibition, with Ki values that differ from each other by an order of magnitude. These findings, together with the ability of mitochondrial FAD pyrophosphatase to metabolize endogenous FAD, presumably deriving from mitochondrial holoflavoproteins destined to degradation, allow for proposing a novel possible role of mitochondrial NAD redox status in regulating FAD homeostasis and/or flavoprotein degradation in S. cerevisiae. PMID:24078860

  16. Redox Linked Flavin Sites in Extracellular Decaheme Proteins Involved in Microbe-Mineral Electron Transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Marcus J.; White, Gaye F.; Norman, Michael; Tome-Fernandez, Alice; Ainsworth, Emma; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular microbe-mineral electron transfer is a major driving force for the oxidation of organic carbon in many subsurface environments. Extracellular multi-heme cytochromes of the Shewenella genus play a major role in this process but the mechanism of electron exchange at the interface between cytochrome and acceptor is widely debated. The 1.8 Å x-ray crystal structure of the decaheme MtrC revealed a highly conserved CX8C disulfide that, when substituted for AX8A, severely compromised the ability of S. oneidensis to grow under aerobic conditions. Reductive cleavage of the disulfide in the presence of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) resulted in the reversible formation of a stable flavocytochrome. Similar results were also observed with other decaheme cytochromes, OmcA, MtrF and UndA. The data suggest that these decaheme cytochromes can transition between highly reactive flavocytochromes or less reactive cytochromes, and that this transition is controlled by a redox active disulfide that responds to the presence of oxygen. PMID:26126857

  17. How can EPR spectroscopy help to unravel molecular mechanisms of flavin-dependent photoreceptors?

    PubMed

    Nohr, Daniel; Rodriguez, Ryan; Weber, Stefan; Schleicher, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a well-established spectroscopic method for the examination of paramagnetic molecules. Proteins can contain paramagnetic moieties in form of stable cofactors, transiently formed intermediates, or spin labels artificially introduced to cysteine sites. The focus of this review is to evaluate potential scopes of application of EPR to the emerging field of optogenetics. The main objective for EPR spectroscopy in this context is to unravel the complex mechanisms of light-active proteins, from their primary photoreaction to downstream signal transduction. An overview of recent results from the family of flavin-containing, blue-light dependent photoreceptors is given. In detail, mechanistic similarities and differences are condensed from the three classes of flavoproteins, the cryptochromes, LOV (Light-oxygen-voltage), and BLUF (blue-light using FAD) domains. Additionally, a concept that includes spin-labeled proteins and examination using modern pulsed EPR is introduced, which allows for a precise mapping of light-induced conformational changes.

  18. Functional Characterization of the re-Face Loop Spanning Residues 536 to 541 and its Interactions with the Cofactor in the Flavin Mononucleotide-Binding Domain of the Flavocytochrome P450 from Bacillus megaterium†

    PubMed Central

    Kasim, Mumtaz; Chen, Huai-Chun; Swenson, Richard P.

    2009-01-01

    Flavocytochrome P450BM-3, a bacterial monooxygenase, contains a flavin mononucleotide (FMN) binding domain bearing a strong structural homology to the bacterial flavodoxin. The FMN serves as the one-electron donor to the heme iron but, in contrast to the electron transfer mechanism of mammalian cytochrome P450 reductase, the FMN semiquinone state is not thermodynamically stable and appears transiently as the anionic rather than the neutral form. A unique loop region comprised of residues -536Y-N-G-H-P-P541-, which forms a Type I′ reverse turn, provides several interactions with the FMN isoalloxazine ring, was targeted in this study. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies support the presence of a strong hydrogen bond between the backbone amide of Asn537 and FMN N5, the anionic ionization state of the hydroquinone, and for a change in the hybridization state of the N5 upon reduction. Replacement of Tyr536, which flanks the flavin ring, by the basic residues histidine or arginine did not significantly influence the redox properties of the FMN or the accumulation of the anionic semiquinone. The central residues of the Type I′ turn (-Asn-Gly-) were replaced with various combinations of glycine and alanine as a means to alter the turn and its interactions. Gly538 was found to be crucial in maintaining the type I′ turn conformation of the loop and the strong H-bonding interaction at N5. The functional role of the tandem –Pro-Pro- sequence which anchors and possible “rigidifies” the loop was investigated through alanine replacements. Despite changes in stabilities of the oxidized and hydroquinone redox states of the FMN, none of the replacements studied significantly altered the two-electron midpoint potentials. Pro541 does contribute to some degree to the strength of the N5 interaction, the formation of the anionic semiquinone. Unlike the flavodoxin, it would appear that the conformation of the FMN rather than the loop changes in response to reduction in this

  19. Promiscuity and diversity in 3-ketosteroid reductases

    PubMed Central

    Penning, Trevor M.; Chen, Mo; Jin, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Many steroid hormones contain a Δ4-3-ketosteroid functionality that undergoes sequential reduction by 5α- or 5β- steroid reductases to produce 5α- or 5β-dihydrosteroids; and a subsequent 3-keto-reduction to produce a series of isomeric tetrahydrosteroids. Apart from steroid 5α-reductase all the remaining enzymes involved in the two step reduction process in humans belong to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. The enzymes involved in 3-ketosteroid reduction are AKR1C1–AKR1C4. These enzymes are promiscuous and also catalyze 20-keto- and 17-keto-steroid reduction. Interest in these reactions exist since they regulate steroid hormone metabolism in the liver, and in steroid target tissues, they may regulate steroid hormone receptor occupancy. In addition many of the dihydrosteroids are not biologically inert. The same enzymes are also involved in the metabolism of synthetic steroids e.g., hormone replacement therapeutics, contraceptive agents and inhaled glucocorticoids, and may regulate drug efficacy at their cognate receptors. This article reviews these reactions and the structural basis for substrate diversity in AKR1C1–AKR1C4, ketosteroid reductases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled ‘Steroid/Sterol signaling’. PMID:25500069

  20. Promiscuity and diversity in 3-ketosteroid reductases.

    PubMed

    Penning, Trevor M; Chen, Mo; Jin, Yi

    2015-07-01

    Many steroid hormones contain a Δ(4)-3-ketosteroid functionality that undergoes sequential reduction by 5α- or 5β- steroid reductases to produce 5α- or 5β-dihydrosteroids; and a subsequent 3-keto-reduction to produce a series of isomeric tetrahydrosteroids. Apart from steroid 5α-reductase all the remaining enzymes involved in the two step reduction process in humans belong to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. The enzymes involved in 3-ketosteroid reduction are AKR1C1-AKR1C4. These enzymes are promiscuous and also catalyze 20-keto- and 17-keto-steroid reduction. Interest in these reactions exist since they regulate steroid hormone metabolism in the liver, and in steroid target tissues, they may regulate steroid hormone receptor occupancy. In addition many of the dihydrosteroids are not biologically inert. The same enzymes are also involved in the metabolism of synthetic steroids e.g., hormone replacement therapeutics, contraceptive agents and inhaled glucocorticoids, and may regulate drug efficacy at their cognate receptors. This article reviews these reactions and the structural basis for substrate diversity in AKR1C1-AKR1C4, ketosteroid reductases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Steroid/Sterol signaling'.

  1. Post-translational Regulation of Nitrate Reductase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrate reductase (NR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrate to nitrite, which is the first step in the nitrate assimilation pathway, but can also reduce nitrite to nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule that is thought to mediate a wide array of of developmental and physiological processes...

  2. Synthesis of Nitrate Reductase in Chlorella

    PubMed Central

    Funkhouser, Edward A.; Shen, Teh-Chien; Ackermann, Renate

    1980-01-01

    Synthesis of nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.1) in Chlorella vulgaris was studied under inducing conditions, i.e. with cells grown on ammonia and then transferred to nitrate medium. Cycloheximide (but not chloramphenicol) completely inhibited synthesis of the enzyme, but only if it was added at the start (i.e. at the time of nitrate addition) of the induction period. Cycloheximide inhibition became less effective as induction by nitrate proceeded. Enzyme from small quantities of culture (1 to 3 milliliters of packed cells) was purified to homogeneity with the aid of blue dextran-Sepharose chromatography. Incorporation of radioactivity from labeled arginine into nitrate reductase was measured in the presence and absence of cycloheximide. Conditions were found under which the inhibitor completely blocked the incorporation of labeled amino acid, but only slightly decreased the increase in nitrate reductase activity. The results indicate that synthesis of nitrate reductase from amino acids proceeds by way of a protein precursor which is inactive enzymically. PMID:16661310

  3. Periplasmic Nitrate Reductase (NapABC Enzyme) Supports Anaerobic Respiration by Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Valley; Lu, Yiran; Darwin, Andrew J.

    2002-01-01

    Periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapABC enzyme) has been characterized from a variety of proteobacteria, especially Paracoccus pantotrophus. Whole-genome sequencing of Escherichia coli revealed the structural genes napFDAGHBC, which encode NapABC enzyme and associated electron transfer components. E. coli also expresses two membrane-bound proton-translocating nitrate reductases, encoded by the narGHJI and narZYWV operons. We measured reduced viologen-dependent nitrate reductase activity in a series of strains with combinations of nar and nap null alleles. The napF operon-encoded nitrate reductase activity was not sensitive to azide, as shown previously for the P. pantotrophus NapA enzyme. A strain carrying null alleles of narG and narZ grew exponentially on glycerol with nitrate as the respiratory oxidant (anaerobic respiration), whereas a strain also carrying a null allele of napA did not. By contrast, the presence of napA+ had no influence on the more rapid growth of narG+ strains. These results indicate that periplasmic nitrate reductase, like fumarate reductase, can function in anaerobic respiration but does not constitute a site for generating proton motive force. The time course of Φ(napF-lacZ) expression during growth in batch culture displayed a complex pattern in response to the dynamic nitrate/nitrite ratio. Our results are consistent with the observation that Φ(napF-lacZ) is expressed preferentially at relatively low nitrate concentrations in continuous cultures (H. Wang, C.-P. Tseng, and R. P. Gunsalus, J. Bacteriol. 181:5303-5308, 1999). This finding and other considerations support the hypothesis that NapABC enzyme may function in E. coli when low nitrate concentrations limit the bioenergetic efficiency of nitrate respiration via NarGHI enzyme. PMID:11844760

  4. Homology Modeling of Dissimilatory APS Reductases (AprBA) of Sulfur-Oxidizing and Sulfate-Reducing Prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Birte; Kuever, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Background The dissimilatory adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate (APS) reductase (cofactors flavin adenine dinucleotide, FAD, and two [4Fe-4S] centers) catalyzes the transformation of APS to sulfite and AMP in sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRP); in sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) it has been suggested to operate in the reverse direction. Recently, the three-dimensional structure of the Archaeoglobus fulgidus enzyme has been determined in different catalytically relevant states providing insights into its reaction cycle. Methodology/Principal Findings Full-length AprBA sequences from 20 phylogenetically distinct SRP and SOB species were used for homology modeling. In general, the average accuracy of the calculated models was sufficiently good to allow a structural and functional comparison between the beta- and alpha-subunit structures (78.8–99.3% and 89.5–96.8% of the AprB and AprA main chain atoms, respectively, had root mean square deviations below 1 Å with respect to the template structures). Besides their overall conformity, the SRP- and SOB-derived models revealed the existence of individual adaptations at the electron-transferring AprB protein surface presumably resulting from docking to different electron donor/acceptor proteins. These structural alterations correlated with the protein phylogeny (three major phylogenetic lineages: (1) SRP including LGT-affected Archaeoglobi and SOB of Apr lineage II, (2) crenarchaeal SRP Caldivirga and Pyrobaculum, and (3) SOB of the distinct Apr lineage I) and the presence of potential APS reductase-interacting redox complexes. The almost identical protein matrices surrounding both [4Fe-4S] clusters, the FAD cofactor, the active site channel and center within the AprB/A models of SRP and SOB point to a highly similar catalytic process of APS reduction/sulfite oxidation independent of the metabolism type the APS reductase is involved in and the species it has been originated from. Conclusions Based on the comparative models

  5. Control of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid production

    SciTech Connect

    Leys, E.J.; Kellems, R.E.

    1981-11-01

    The authors used methotrexate-resistant mouse cells in which dihydrofolate reductase levels are approximately 500 times normal to study the effect of growth stimulation on dihydrofolate reductase gene expression. As a result of growth stimulation, the relative rate of dihydrofolate reductase protein synthesis increased threefold, reaching a maximum between 25 and 30 h after stimulation. The relative rate of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid production (i.e., the appearance of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid in the cytoplasm) increased threefold after growth stimulation and was accompanied by a corresponding increase in the relative steady-state level of dihydrofolate reductase ribonucleic acid in the nucleus. However, the increase in the nuclear level of dihydrofolate reductase ribonucleic acid was not accompanied by a significant increase in the relative rate of transcription of the dihydrofolate reductase genes. These data indicated that the relative rate of appearance of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid in the cytoplasm depends on the relative stability of the dihydrofolate reductase ribonucleic acid sequences in the nucleus and is not dependent on the relative rate of transcription of the dihydrofolate reductase genes.

  6. Functional studies of aldo-keto reductases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qing; Griest, Terry A; Harter, Theresa M; Petrash, J Mark

    2007-03-01

    We utilized the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model to systematically explore physiological roles for yeast and mammalian aldo-keto reductases. Six open reading frames encoding putative aldo-keto reductases were identified when the yeast genome was queried against the sequence for human aldose reductase, the prototypical mammalian aldo-keto reductase. Recombinant proteins produced from five of these yeast open reading frames demonstrated NADPH-dependent reductase activity with a variety of aldehyde and ketone substrates. A triple aldo-keto reductase null mutant strain demonstrated a glucose-dependent heat shock phenotype which could be rescued by ectopic expression of human aldose reductase. Catalytically-inactive mutants of human or yeast aldo-keto reductases failed to effect a rescue of the heat shock phenotype, suggesting that the phenotype results from either an accumulation of one or more unmetabolized aldo-keto reductase substrates or a synthetic deficiency of aldo-keto reductase products generated in response to heat shock stress. These results suggest that multiple aldo-keto reductases fulfill functionally redundant roles in the stress response in yeast. PMID:17140678

  7. Functional studies of aldo-keto reductases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Qing; Griest, Terry A.; Harter, Theresa M.; Petrash, J. Mark

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY We utilized the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model to systematically explore physiological roles for yeast and mammalian aldo-keto reductases. Six open reading frames encoding putative aldo-keto reductases were identified when the yeast genome was queried against the sequence for human aldose reductase, the prototypical mammalian aldo-keto reductase. Recombinant proteins produced from five of these yeast open reading frames demonstrated NADPH-dependent reductase activity with a variety of aldehyde and ketone substrates. A triple aldo-keto reductase null mutant strain demonstrated a glucose-dependent heat shock phenotype which could be rescued by ectopic expression of human aldose reductase. Catalytically-inactive mutants of human or yeast aldo-keto reductases failed to effect a rescue of the heat shock phenotype, suggesting that the phenotype results from either an accumulation of one or more unmetabolized aldo-keto reductase substrates or a synthetic deficiency of aldo-keto reductase products generated in response to heat shock stress. These results suggest that multiple aldo-keto reductases fulfill functionally redundant roles in the stress response in yeast. PMID:17140678

  8. Augmentation of CFTR maturation by S-nitrosoglutathione reductase.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Khalequz; Sawczak, Victoria; Zaidi, Atiya; Butler, Maya; Bennett, Deric; Getsy, Paulina; Zeinomar, Maryam; Greenberg, Zivi; Forbes, Michael; Rehman, Shagufta; Jyothikumar, Vinod; DeRonde, Kim; Sattar, Abdus; Smith, Laura; Corey, Deborah; Straub, Adam; Sun, Fei; Palmer, Lisa; Periasamy, Ammasi; Randell, Scott; Kelley, Thomas J; Lewis, Stephen J; Gaston, Benjamin

    2016-02-01

    S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) reductase regulates novel endogenous S-nitrosothiol signaling pathways, and mice deficient in GSNO reductase are protected from airways hyperreactivity. S-nitrosothiols are present in the airway, and patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) tend to have low S-nitrosothiol levels that may be attributed to upregulation of GSNO reductase activity. The present study demonstrates that 1) GSNO reductase activity is increased in the cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial (CFBE41o(-)) cells expressing mutant F508del-cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) compared with the wild-type CFBE41o(-) cells, 2) GSNO reductase expression level is increased in the primary human bronchial epithelial cells expressing mutant F508del-CFTR compared with the wild-type cells, 3) GSNO reductase colocalizes with cochaperone Hsp70/Hsp90 organizing protein (Hop; Stip1) in human airway epithelial cells, 4) GSNO reductase knockdown with siRNA increases the expression and maturation of CFTR and decreases Stip1 expression in human airway epithelial cells, 5) increased levels of GSNO reductase cause a decrease in maturation of CFTR, and 6) a GSNO reductase inhibitor effectively reverses the effects of GSNO reductase on CFTR maturation. These studies provide a novel approach to define the subcellular location of the interactions between Stip1 and GSNO reductase and the role of S-nitrosothiols in these interactions.

  9. Linear free energy relationships demonstrate a catalytic role for the flavin mononucleotide coenzyme of the type II isopentenyl diphosphate:dimethylallyl diphosphate isomerase.

    PubMed

    Thibodeaux, Christopher J; Chang, Wei-chen; Liu, Hung-wen

    2010-07-28

    The type II isopentenyl diphosphate:dimethylallyl diphosphate isomerase (IDI-2) catalyzes the reversible isomerization of the two ubiquitous isoprene units, isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl pyrophosphate (DMAPP), which are required to initiate the biosynthesis of all isoprenoid compounds found in nature. The overall chemical transformation catalyzed by IDI-2 involves a net 1,3-proton addition/elimination reaction. Surprisingly, IDI-2 requires a reduced flavin mononucleotide (FMN) coenzyme to carry out this redox neutral isomerization. The exact function of FMN in catalysis has not yet been clearly defined. To provide mechanistic insight into the role of the reduced flavin in IDI-2 catalysis, several FMN analogues with altered electronic properties were chemoenzymatically prepared, and their effects on the kinetic properties of the IDI-2 catalyzed reaction were investigated. Linear free energy relationships (LFERs) between the electronic properties of the flavin and the steady state kinetic parameters of the IDI-2 catalyzed reaction were observed. The LFER studies are complemented with kinetic isotope effect studies and kinetic characterization of an active site mutant enzyme (Q154N). Cumulatively, the data presented in this work (and in other studies) suggest that the reduced FMN coenzyme of IDI-2 functions as an acid/base catalyst, with the N5 atom of the flavin likely playing a critical role in the deprotonation of IPP en route to DMAPP formation. Several potential chemical mechanisms involving the reduced flavin as an acid/base catalyst are presented and discussed.

  10. Two Novel Flavin-Containing Monooxygenases Involved in Biosynthesis of Aliphatic Glucosinolates.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wenwen; Li, Jing; Yu, Qingyue; Cang, Wei; Xu, Rui; Wang, Yang; Ji, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Glucosinolates, a class of secondary metabolites from cruciferous plants, are derived from amino acids and have diverse biological activities, such as in biotic defense, depending on their side chain modification. The first structural modification step in the synthesis of aliphatic (methionine-derived) glucosinolates-S-oxygenation of methylthioalkyl glucosinolates to methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates-was found to be catalyzed by five flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs), FMOGS-OX1-5. Here, we report two additional FMOGS-OX enzymes, FMOGS-OX6, and FMOGS-OX7, encoded by At1g12130 and At1g12160, respectively. The overexpression of both FMOGS-OX6 and FMOGS-OX7 decreased the ratio of methylthioalkyl glucosinolates to the sum of methylthioalkyl and methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates, suggesting that the introduction of the two genes converted methylthioalkyl glucosinolates into methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates. Analysis of expression pattern revealed that the spatial expression of the two genes is quite similar and partially overlapped with the other FMOGS-OX genes, which are primarily expressed in vascular tissue. We further analyzed the responsive expression pattern of all the seven FMOGS-OX genes to exogenous treatment with abscisic acid, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), jasmonic acid (JA), salicylic acid, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and low and high temperatures. Although these genes showed same tendency toward the changing stimulus, the sensitivity of each gene was quite different. The variety in spatial expression among the FMOGS-OX genes while responding to environmental stimulus indicated a complex and finely tuned regulation of glucosinolates modifications. Identification of these two novel FMOGS-OX enzymes will enhance the understanding of glucosinolates modifications and the importance of evolution of these duplicated genes. PMID:27621741

  11. Two Novel Flavin-Containing Monooxygenases Involved in Biosynthesis of Aliphatic Glucosinolates

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Wenwen; Li, Jing; Yu, Qingyue; Cang, Wei; Xu, Rui; Wang, Yang; Ji, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Glucosinolates, a class of secondary metabolites from cruciferous plants, are derived from amino acids and have diverse biological activities, such as in biotic defense, depending on their side chain modification. The first structural modification step in the synthesis of aliphatic (methionine-derived) glucosinolates—S-oxygenation of methylthioalkyl glucosinolates to methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates—was found to be catalyzed by five flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs), FMOGS-OX1-5. Here, we report two additional FMOGS-OX enzymes, FMOGS-OX6, and FMOGS-OX7, encoded by At1g12130 and At1g12160, respectively. The overexpression of both FMOGS-OX6 and FMOGS-OX7 decreased the ratio of methylthioalkyl glucosinolates to the sum of methylthioalkyl and methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates, suggesting that the introduction of the two genes converted methylthioalkyl glucosinolates into methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates. Analysis of expression pattern revealed that the spatial expression of the two genes is quite similar and partially overlapped with the other FMOGS-OX genes, which are primarily expressed in vascular tissue. We further analyzed the responsive expression pattern of all the seven FMOGS-OX genes to exogenous treatment with abscisic acid, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), jasmonic acid (JA), salicylic acid, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and low and high temperatures. Although these genes showed same tendency toward the changing stimulus, the sensitivity of each gene was quite different. The variety in spatial expression among the FMOGS-OX genes while responding to environmental stimulus indicated a complex and finely tuned regulation of glucosinolates modifications. Identification of these two novel FMOGS-OX enzymes will enhance the understanding of glucosinolates modifications and the importance of evolution of these duplicated genes.

  12. Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase S-Oxygenation of a Series of Thioureas and Thiones

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Marilyn C.; Siddens, Lisbeth K.; Krueger, Sharon K.; Stevens, J. Fred; Kedzie, Karen; Fang, Ken; Heidelbaugh, Todd; Nguyen, Phong; Chow, Ken; Garst, Michael; Gil, Daniel; Williams, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) is active towards many drugs with a heteroatom having the properties of a soft nucleophile. Thiocarbamides and thiones are S-oxygenated to the sulfenic acid which can either react with glutathione and initiate a redox-cycle or be oxygenated a second time to the unstable sulfinic acid. In this study, we utilized LC-MS/MS to demonstrate that the oxygenation by hFMO of the thioureas under test terminated at the sulfenic acid. With thiones, hFMO catalyzed the second reaction and the sulfinic acid rapidly lost sulfite to form the corresponding imidazole. Thioureas are often pulmonary toxicants in mammals and, as previously reported by our laboratory, are excellent substrates for hFMO2. This isoform is expressed at high levels in the lung of most mammals, including non-human primates. Genotyping to date indicates that individuals of African (up to 49%) or Hispanic (2–7%) ancestry have at least one allele for functional hFMO2 in lung, but not Caucasians nor Asians. In this study the major metabolite formed by hFMO2 with thioureas from Allergan, Inc. was the sulfenic acid that reacted with glutathione. The majority of thiones were poor substrates for hFMO3, the major form in adult human liver. However, hFMO1, the major isoform expressed in infant and neonatal liver and adult kidney and intestine, readily S-oxygenated thiones under test, with Kms ranging from 7–160 μM and turnover numbers of 30–40 min−1. The product formed was identified by LC-MS/MS as the imidazole. The activities of the mouse and human FMO1 and FMO3 orthologs were in good agreement with the exception of some thiones for which activity was much greater with hFMO1 than mFMO1. PMID:24727368

  13. Flavin-containing monooxygenase S-oxygenation of a series of thioureas and thiones.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Marilyn C; Siddens, Lisbeth K; Krueger, Sharon K; Stevens, J Fred; Kedzie, Karen; Fang, Wenkui K; Heidelbaugh, Todd; Nguyen, Phong; Chow, Ken; Garst, Michael; Gil, Daniel; Williams, David E

    2014-07-15

    Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) is active towards many drugs with a heteroatom having the properties of a soft nucleophile. Thiocarbamides and thiones are S-oxygenated to the sulfenic acid which can either react with glutathione and initiate a redox-cycle or be oxygenated a second time to the unstable sulfinic acid. In this study, we utilized LC-MS/MS to demonstrate that the oxygenation by hFMO of the thioureas under test terminated at the sulfenic acid. With thiones, hFMO catalyzed the second reaction and the sulfinic acid rapidly lost sulfite to form the corresponding imidazole. Thioureas are often pulmonary toxicants in mammals and, as previously reported by our laboratory, are excellent substrates for hFMO2. This isoform is expressed at high levels in the lung of most mammals, including non-human primates. Genotyping to date indicates that individuals of African (up to 49%) or Hispanic (2-7%) ancestry have at least one allele for functional hFMO2 in lung, but not Caucasians nor Asians. In this study the major metabolite formed by hFMO2 with thioureas from Allergan, Inc. was the sulfenic acid that reacted with glutathione. The majority of thiones were poor substrates for hFMO3, the major form in adult human liver. However, hFMO1, the major isoform expressed in infant and neonatal liver and adult kidney and intestine, readily S-oxygenated thiones under test, with Kms ranging from 7 to 160 μM and turnover numbers of 30-40 min(-1). The product formed was identified by LC-MS/MS as the imidazole. The activities of the mouse and human FMO1 and FMO3 orthologs were in good agreement with the exception of some thiones for which activity was much greater with hFMO1 than mFMO1. PMID:24727368

  14. Flavin-Dependent Monooxygenases as a Detoxification Mechanism in Insects: New Insights from the Arctiids (Lepidoptera)

    PubMed Central

    Langel, Dorothee; Heckel, David G.; Mohagheghi, Hoda; Petschenka, Georg; Ober, Dietrich

    2010-01-01

    Insects experience a wide array of chemical pressures from plant allelochemicals and pesticides and have developed several effective counterstrategies to cope with such toxins. Among these, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are crucial in plant-insect interactions. Flavin-dependent monooxygenases (FMOs) seem not to play a central role in xenobiotic detoxification in insects, in contrast to mammals. However, the previously identified senecionine N-oxygenase of the arctiid moth Tyria jacobaeae (Lepidoptera) indicates that FMOs have been recruited during the adaptation of this insect to plants that accumulate toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids. Identification of related FMO-like sequences of various arctiids and other Lepidoptera and their combination with expressed sequence tag (EST) data and sequences emerging from the Bombyx mori genome project show that FMOs in Lepidoptera form a gene family with three members (FMO1 to FMO3). Phylogenetic analyses suggest that FMO3 is only distantly related to lepidopteran FMO1 and FMO2 that originated from a more recent gene duplication event. Within the FMO1 gene cluster, an additional gene duplication early in the arctiid lineage provided the basis for the evolution of the highly specific biochemical, physiological, and behavioral adaptations of these butterflies to pyrrolizidine-alkaloid-producing plants. The genes encoding pyrrolizidine-alkaloid-N-oxygenizing enzymes (PNOs) are transcribed in the fat body and the head of the larvae. An N-terminal signal peptide mediates the transport of the soluble proteins into the hemolymph where PNOs efficiently convert pro-toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids into their non-toxic N-oxide derivatives. Heterologous expression of a PNO of the generalist arctiid Grammia geneura produced an N-oxygenizing enzyme that shows noticeably expanded substrate specificity compared with the related enzyme of the specialist Tyria jacobaeae. The data about the evolution of FMOs within lepidopteran insects and the

  15. Flavin-containing monooxygenase-mediated metabolism of N-deacetyl ketoconazole by rat hepatic microsomes.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, R J; Proteau, P J; Marquez, B L; Hetherington, C L; Buckholz, C J; O'Connell, K L

    1999-08-01

    Although ketoconazole is extensively metabolized by hepatic microsomal enzymes, the route of formation and toxicity of suspected metabolites are largely unknown. Reports indicate that N-deacetyl ketoconazole (DAK) is a major initial metabolite in mice. DAK may be susceptible to successive oxidative attacks on the N-1 position by flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMO) producing potentially toxic metabolites. Previous laboratory findings have demonstrated that postnatal rat hepatic microsomes metabolize DAK by NADPH-dependent monooxygenases to two metabolites as determined by HPLC. Our current investigation evaluated DAK's metabolism in adult male and female rats and identified metabolites that may be responsible for ketoconazole's hepatotoxicity. DAK was extensively metabolized by rat liver microsomal monooxygenases at pH 8.8 in pyrophosphate buffer containing the glucose 6-phosphate NADPH-generating system to three metabolites as determined by HPLC. The initial metabolite of DAK was a secondary hydroxylamine, N-deacetyl-N-hydroxyketoconazole, which was confirmed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. Extensive metabolism of DAK occurred at pH 8.8 in pyrophosphate buffer (female 29% and male 53% at 0.25 h; female 55% and male 57% at 0.5 h; and female 62% and male 66% at 1.0 h). Significantly less metabolism of DAK occurred at pH 7.4 in phosphate buffer (female 11%, male 17% at 0.25 h; female 20%, male 31% at 0.5 h; and female 27%, male 37% at 1 h). Heat inactivation of microsomal-FMO abolished the formation of these metabolites from DAK. SKF-525A did not inhibit this reaction. These results suggest that DAK appears to be extensively metabolized by adult FMO-mediated monooxygenation.

  16. Isoform specificity of N-deacetyl ketoconazole by human and rabbit flavin-containing monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, R J; Miranda, C L

    2000-09-01

    N-Deacetyl ketoconazole (DAK) is the major metabolite of orally administered ketoconazole. This major metabolite has been demonstrated to be further metabolized predominately by the flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) to the secondary hydroxylamine, N-deacetyl-N-hydroxyketoconazole (N-hydroxy-DAK) by adult and postnatal rat hepatic microsomes. Our current investigation evaluated the FMO isoform specificity of DAK in a pyrophosphate buffer (pH 8.8) containing the glucose 6-phosphate NADPH-generating system. cDNA-expressed human FMOs (FMO1, FMO3, and FMO5) and cDNA-expressed rabbit FMOs (FMO1, FMO2, FMO3, and FMO5) were used to assess the metabolism of DAK to its subsequent FMO-mediated metabolites by HPLC analysis. Human and rabbit cDNA-expressed FMO3 resulted in extensive metabolism of DAK in 1 h (71.2 and 64.5%, respectively) to N-hydroxy-DAK (48.2 and 47.7%, respectively) and two other metabolites, metabolite 1 (11.7 and 7.8%, respectively) and metabolite 3 (10.5 and 10.0%, respectively). Previous studies suggest that metabolite 1 is the nitrone formed after successive FMO-mediated metabolism of N-hydroxy-DAK. Moreover, these studies display similar metabolic profiles seen with adult and postnatal rat hepatic microsomes. The human and rabbit FMO1 metabolized DAK predominately to the N-hydroxy-DAK in 1 h (36.2 and 25.3%, respectively) with minimal metabolism to the other metabolites (

  17. Flavin and iron-sulfur containing ferredoxin-linked glutamate synthase from spinach leaves.

    PubMed

    Hirasawa, M; Tamura, G

    1984-04-01

    Ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase (native enzyme) [EC 1.4.7.1] of spinach has been purified to homogeneity in the presence of 2-oxoglutarate and sodium chloride and the properties of the enzyme have been studied. The molecular weight of the enzyme was estimated to be 140,000 by gel filtration. Subunit analysis by SDS-gel electrophoresis yielded a single protein band whose molecular weight was about 170,000. This purified enzyme showed a flavo-protein-like absorption spectrum having maxima at 279 and 438 nm with shoulders at 415 and 460 nm and a broad band around 360 nm. Fluorometric data indicated the presence of 2 mol of flavin per mol of the enzyme. Preliminary paper chromatography results indicated the presence of FAD and FMN in the purified enzyme. The enzyme also contained 4 mol of acid-labile sulfide and 4 g-atoms iron per mol of enzyme. In the absence of 2-oxoglutarate and/or sodium chloride, the purified enzyme was separated by either DE-52 cellulose chromatography or gel filtration with Ultrogel AcA 34 into two molecular forms (modified enzymes) with considerable inactivation. When reduced methyl viologen plus ferredoxin was used as the electron donor, the purified (native) enzyme showed high ferredoxin-dependent activity with a specific activity of 100 units/mg protein. Methyl viologen-dependent activity was negligible in the absence of ferredoxin. Kinetic properties and results of ESR studies were described. The results indicate that ferredoxin-linked glutamate synthase of spinach leaves is an iron-sulfur flavoprotein.

  18. Flavin-containing monooxygenase S-oxygenation of a series of thioureas and thiones

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Marilyn C.; Siddens, Lisbeth K.; Krueger, Sharon K.; Stevens, J. Fred; Kedzie, Karen; Fang, Wenkui K.; Heidelbaugh, Todd; Nguyen, Phong; Chow, Ken; Garst, Michael; Gil, Daniel; Williams, David E.

    2014-07-15

    Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) is active towards many drugs with a heteroatom having the properties of a soft nucleophile. Thiocarbamides and thiones are S-oxygenated to the sulfenic acid which can either react with glutathione and initiate a redox-cycle or be oxygenated a second time to the unstable sulfinic acid. In this study, we utilized LC–MS/MS to demonstrate that the oxygenation by hFMO of the thioureas under test terminated at the sulfenic acid. With thiones, hFMO catalyzed the second reaction and the sulfinic acid rapidly lost sulfite to form the corresponding imidazole. Thioureas are often pulmonary toxicants in mammals and, as previously reported by our laboratory, are excellent substrates for hFMO2. This isoform is expressed at high levels in the lung of most mammals, including non-human primates. Genotyping to date indicates that individuals of African (up to 49%) or Hispanic (2–7%) ancestry have at least one allele for functional hFMO2 in lung, but not Caucasians nor Asians. In this study the major metabolite formed by hFMO2 with thioureas from Allergan, Inc. was the sulfenic acid that reacted with glutathione. The majority of thiones were poor substrates for hFMO3, the major form in adult human liver. However, hFMO1, the major isoform expressed in infant and neonatal liver and adult kidney and intestine, readily S-oxygenated thiones under test, with K{sub m}s ranging from 7 to 160 μM and turnover numbers of 30–40 min{sup −1}. The product formed was identified by LC–MS/MS as the imidazole. The activities of the mouse and human FMO1 and FMO3 orthologs were in good agreement with the exception of some thiones for which activity was much greater with hFMO1 than mFMO1.

  19. Novel Variants of the Human Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase 3 (FMO3) Gene Associated with Trimethylaminuria

    PubMed Central

    Motika, Meike S.; Zhang, Jun; Zheng, Xueying; Riedler, Kiersten; Cashman, John R.

    2009-01-01

    The disorder trimethylaminuria (TMAu) often manifests itself in a body odor for individuals affected. TMAu is due to decreased metabolism of dietary-derived trimethylamine (TMA). In a healthy individual, 95% or more of TMA is converted by the flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3, EC 1.14.13.8) to non-odorous trimethylamine N-oxide (TMA N-oxide). Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the FMO3 gene have been described and result in an enzyme with decreased or abolished functional activity for TMA N-oxygenation thus leading to TMAu. Herein, we report two novel mutations observed from phenotyping and genotyping two self-reporting individuals. Sequence analysis of the exon regions of the FMO3 gene of a young woman with severe TMAu revealed heterozygous mutations at positions 187 (V187A), 158 (E158K), 308 (E308G), and 305 (E305X). Familial genetic analysis showed that the E158K/V187A/E308G derived from the same allele from the mother, and the E305X was derived from the father. FMO3 variants V187A and V187A/E158K were characterized for oxygenation of several common FMO3 substrates (i.e., 5- and 8-DPT, mercaptoimidazole (MMI), TMA, and sulindac sulfide) and for its thermal stability. Our findings show that with the combination of V187A/E158K mutations in FMO3, the enzyme activity is severely affected and possibly contributes to the TMAu observed. In another study, genotyping analysis of a 17 year old female revealed a mutation that caused a frame shift after K415 and resulted in a protein variant with only 486 amino acid residues that was associated with severe TMAu. PMID:19321370

  20. Two Novel Flavin-Containing Monooxygenases Involved in Biosynthesis of Aliphatic Glucosinolates

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Wenwen; Li, Jing; Yu, Qingyue; Cang, Wei; Xu, Rui; Wang, Yang; Ji, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Glucosinolates, a class of secondary metabolites from cruciferous plants, are derived from amino acids and have diverse biological activities, such as in biotic defense, depending on their side chain modification. The first structural modification step in the synthesis of aliphatic (methionine-derived) glucosinolates—S-oxygenation of methylthioalkyl glucosinolates to methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates—was found to be catalyzed by five flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs), FMOGS-OX1-5. Here, we report two additional FMOGS-OX enzymes, FMOGS-OX6, and FMOGS-OX7, encoded by At1g12130 and At1g12160, respectively. The overexpression of both FMOGS-OX6 and FMOGS-OX7 decreased the ratio of methylthioalkyl glucosinolates to the sum of methylthioalkyl and methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates, suggesting that the introduction of the two genes converted methylthioalkyl glucosinolates into methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates. Analysis of expression pattern revealed that the spatial expression of the two genes is quite similar and partially overlapped with the other FMOGS-OX genes, which are primarily expressed in vascular tissue. We further analyzed the responsive expression pattern of all the seven FMOGS-OX genes to exogenous treatment with abscisic acid, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), jasmonic acid (JA), salicylic acid, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and low and high temperatures. Although these genes showed same tendency toward the changing stimulus, the sensitivity of each gene was quite different. The variety in spatial expression among the FMOGS-OX genes while responding to environmental stimulus indicated a complex and finely tuned regulation of glucosinolates modifications. Identification of these two novel FMOGS-OX enzymes will enhance the understanding of glucosinolates modifications and the importance of evolution of these duplicated genes. PMID:27621741

  1. Contribution of flavin covalent linkage with histidine 99 to the reaction catalyzed by choline oxidase.

    PubMed

    Quaye, Osbourne; Cowins, Sharonda; Gadda, Giovanni

    2009-06-19

    The FAD-dependent choline oxidase has a flavin cofactor covalently attached to the protein via histidine 99 through an 8alpha-N(3)-histidyl linkage. The enzyme catalyzes the four-electron oxidation of choline to glycine betaine, forming betaine aldehyde as an enzyme-bound intermediate. The variant form of choline oxidase in which the histidine residue has been replaced with asparagine was used to investigate the contribution of the 8alpha-N(3)-histidyl linkage of FAD to the protein toward the reaction catalyzed by the enzyme. Decreases of 10-fold and 30-fold in the k(cat)/K(m) and k(cat) values were observed as compared with wild-type choline oxidase at pH 10 and 25 degrees C, with no significant effect on k(cat)/K(O) using choline as substrate. Both the k(cat)/K(m) and k(cat) values increased with increasing pH to limiting values at high pH consistent with the participation of an unprotonated group in the reductive half-reaction and the overall turnover of the enzyme. The pH independence of both (D)(k(cat)/K(m)) and (D)k(cat), with average values of 9.2 +/- 3.3 and 7.4 +/- 0.5, respectively, is consistent with absence of external forward and reverse commitments to catalysis, and the chemical step of CH bond cleavage being rate-limiting for both the reductive half-reaction and the overall enzyme turnover. The temperature dependence of the (D)k(red) values suggests disruption of the preorganization in the asparagine variant enzyme. Altogether, the data presented in this study are consistent with the FAD-histidyl covalent linkage being important for the optimal positioning of the hydride ion donor and acceptor in the tunneling reaction catalyzed by choline oxidase.

  2. Trimethylamine and Trimethylamine N-Oxide, a Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase 3 (FMO3)-Mediated Host-Microbiome Metabolic Axis Implicated in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fennema, Diede; Phillips, Ian R.

    2016-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3) is known primarily as an enzyme involved in the metabolism of therapeutic drugs. On a daily basis, however, we are exposed to one of the most abundant substrates of the enzyme trimethylamine (TMA), which is released from various dietary components by the action of gut bacteria. FMO3 converts the odorous TMA to nonodorous TMA N-oxide (TMAO), which is excreted in urine. Impaired FMO3 activity gives rise to the inherited disorder primary trimethylaminuria (TMAU). Affected individuals cannot produce TMAO and, consequently, excrete large amounts of TMA. A dysbiosis in gut bacteria can give rise to secondary TMAU. Recently, there has been much interest in FMO3 and its catalytic product, TMAO, because TMAO has been implicated in various conditions affecting health, including cardiovascular disease, reverse cholesterol transport, and glucose and lipid homeostasis. In this review, we consider the dietary components that can give rise to TMA, the gut bacteria involved in the production of TMA from dietary precursors, the metabolic reactions by which bacteria produce and use TMA, and the enzymes that catalyze the reactions. Also included is information on bacteria that produce TMA in the oral cavity and vagina, two key microbiome niches that can influence health. Finally, we discuss the importance of the TMA/TMAO microbiome-host axis in health and disease, considering factors that affect bacterial production and host metabolism of TMA, the involvement of TMAO and FMO3 in disease, and the implications of the host-microbiome axis for management of TMAU. PMID:27190056

  3. Crystal Structures of SgcE6 and SgcC, the Two-Component Monooxygenase That Catalyzes Hydroxylation of a Carrier Protein-Tethered Substrate during the Biosynthesis of the Enediyne Antitumor Antibiotic C-1027 in Streptomyces globisporus.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chin-Yuan; Lohman, Jeremy R; Cao, Hongnan; Tan, Kemin; Rudolf, Jeffrey D; Ma, Ming; Xu, Weijun; Bingman, Craig A; Yennamalli, Ragothaman M; Bigelow, Lance; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Yan, Xiaohui; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Phillips, George N; Shen, Ben

    2016-09-13

    C-1027 is a chromoprotein enediyne antitumor antibiotic produced by Streptomyces globisporus. In the last step of biosynthesis of the (S)-3-chloro-5-hydroxy-β-tyrosine moiety of the C-1027 enediyne chromophore, SgcE6 and SgcC compose a two-component monooxygenase that hydroxylates the C-5 position of (S)-3-chloro-β-tyrosine. This two-component monooxygenase is remarkable for two reasons. (i) SgcE6 specifically reacts with FAD and NADH, and (ii) SgcC is active with only the peptidyl carrier protein (PCP)-tethered substrate. To address the molecular details of substrate specificity, we determined the crystal structures of SgcE6 and SgcC at 1.66 and 2.63 Å resolution, respectively. SgcE6 shares a similar β-barrel fold with the class I HpaC-like flavin reductases. A flexible loop near the active site of SgcE6 plays a role in FAD binding, likely by providing sufficient space to accommodate the AMP moiety of FAD, when compared to that of FMN-utilizing homologues. SgcC shows structural similarity to a few other known FADH2-dependent monooxygenases and sheds light on some biochemically but not structurally characterized homologues. The crystal structures reported here provide insights into substrate specificity, and comparison with homologues provides a catalytic mechanism of the two-component, FADH2-dependent monooxygenase (SgcE6 and SgcC) that catalyzes the hydroxylation of a PCP-tethered substrate. PMID:27560143

  4. Redox Reactions of Reduced Flavin Mononucleotide (FMN), Riboflavin (RBF), and Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) with Ferrihydrite and Lepidocrocite

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zhi; Zachara, John M.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Moore, Dean A.; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2012-09-17

    Flavins are secreted by the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella and can function as endogenous electron transfer mediators (ETM). In order to assess the potential importance of flavins in Fe(III) bioreduction, we investigated the redox reaction kinetics of reduced flavins (FMNH2 and RBFH2) with ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite. The organic reductants rapidly reduced and dissolved ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite in the pH range 4-8. The rate constant k for 2-line ferrihydrite reductive dissolution by FMNH2 was 87.5 ± 3.5 M-1∙s-1 at pH 7.0 in batch reactors, and the k was similar for RBFH2. For lepidocrocite, the k was 500 ± 61 M-1∙s-1 for FMNH2, and 236 ± 22 M-1∙s-1 for RBFH2. The surface area normalized initial reaction rates (ra) were between 0.08 and 77 μmoles∙m-2∙s-1 for various conditions in stopped-flow experiments. Initial rates (ro) were first-order with respect to Fe(III) oxide concentration, and ra increased with decreasing pH. Poorly crystalline 2-line ferrihydrite yielded the highest ra, followed by more crystalline 6-line ferrihydrite, and crystalline lepidocrocite. Compared to a previous whole-cell study with Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, our findings suggest that ETM reduction by the Mtr pathway coupled to lactate oxidation are rate limiting, rather than heterogeneous electron transfer to the Fe(III) oxide.

  5. Biochemical characterization of a flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent monooxygenase, ornithine hydroxylase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, suggests a novel reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Meneely, Kathleen M; Lamb, Audrey L

    2007-10-23

    Pyoverdin is the hydroxamate siderophore produced by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa under the iron-limiting conditions of the human host. This siderophore includes derivatives of ornithine in the peptide backbone that serve as iron chelators. PvdA is the ornithine hydroxylase, which performs the first enzymatic step in preparation of these derivatives. PvdA requires both flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) for activity; it was found to be a soluble monomer most active at pH 8.0. The enzyme demonstrated Michaelis-Menten kinetics in an NADPH oxidation assay, but a hydroxylation assay indicated substrate inhibition at high ornithine concentration. PvdA is highly specific for both substrate and coenzyme, and lysine was shown to be a nonsubstrate effector and mixed inhibitor of the enzyme with respect to ornithine. Chloride is a mixed inhibitor of PvdA with respect to ornithine but a competitive inhibitor with respect to NADPH, and a bulky mercurial compound (p-chloromercuribenzoate) is a mixed inhibitor with respect to ornithine. Steady-state experiments indicate that PvdA/FAD forms a ternary complex with NADPH and ornithine for catalysis. PvdA in the absence of ornithine shows slow substrate-independent flavin reduction by NADPH. Biochemical comparison of PvdA to p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase (PHBH, from Pseudomonas fluorescens) and flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs, from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and hog liver microsomes) leads to the hypothesis that PvdA catalysis proceeds by a novel reaction mechanism. PMID:17900176

  6. A flavin-mononucleotide-binding site in Hansenula anomala nicked flavocytochrome b2, requiring the association of two domains.

    PubMed

    Gervais, M; Labeyrie, F; Risler, Y; Vergnes, O

    1980-10-01

    Previous experiments in our laboratory with Saccharomyces cervisiae flavocytochrom b2 indicated that both fragments alpha and beta of the enzyme after cleavage by yeast proteases are required to form the flavin site. More detailed experiments have not been carried out on the nicked Hansenula anomala enzyme obtained by tryptic cleavage. A method has been devised that gives a quantitative separation in 4 M urea of beta, and alpha with its heme still bound. The characteristics of the various species: isolated alpha and beta and mixed alpha + beta were studied in 4 M urea and after elimination of this reagent by dialysis in the presence of FMN and 2-mercaptoethanol. Several methods, including heme spectroscopy, tryptophan fluorescence, sedimentation studies, and titration of bound flavin, were used. The results indicate that isolated alpha and beta have a folded globular structure after renaturation. The flavin binding to the alpha + beta mixture was important (50-100%) with recovery of the flavodehydrogenase activity. In contrast, binding was not detectable (< 0.5%, Kf > 10 mM) for isolated alpha and beta. As far as mononucleotide binding is concerned, such a cooperative requirement for two folding domains has never been reported in other enzymes. The present results are discussed together with others obtained in our laboratory which demonstrate that, as deduced from their sensitivity to trypsin, the structure of S. cerevisiae and H. anomala flavocytochrome b2 protomers is triglobular 'n-x-beta' (n and x combined within alpha). The tetramer assembly, which remains intact as a nicked enzyme (alpha beta)4 after the first trypsin cleavage, is broken down following a second cleavage of the chain into four cytochrome cores (n) and a functional T-flavodehydrogenase entity, a tetramer of the type (x beta)4. PMID:7439181

  7. Structure of Coenzyme A-Disulfide Reductase from Staphylococcus aureus at 1.54 Angstrom Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Mallett,T.; Wallen, J.; Karplus, P.; Sakai, H.; Tsukihara, T.; Claiborne, A.

    2006-01-01

    Coenzyme A (CoASH) replaces glutathione as the major low molecular weight thiol in Staphylococcus aureus; it is maintained in the reduced state by coenzyme A-disulfide reductase (CoADR), a homodimeric enzyme similar to NADH peroxidase but containing a novel Cys43-SSCoA redox center. The crystal structure of S. aureus CoADR has been solved using multiwavelength anomalous dispersion data and refined at a resolution of 1.54 {angstrom}. The resulting electron density maps define the Cys43-SSCoA disulfide conformation, with Cys43-S{gamma} located at the flavin si face, 3.2 {angstrom} from FAD-C4aF, and the CoAS- moiety lying in an extended conformation within a cleft at the dimer interface. A well-ordered chloride ion is positioned adjacent to the Cys43-SSCoA disulfide and receives a hydrogen bond from Tyr361'-OH of the complementary subunit, suggesting a role for Tyr361' as an acid-base catalyst during the reduction of CoAS-disulfide. Tyr419'-OH is located 3.2 {angstrom} from Tyr361'-OH as well and, based on its conservation in known functional CoADRs, also appears to be important for activity. Identification of residues involved in recognition of the CoAS-disulfide substrate and in formation and stabilization of the Cys43-SSCoA redox center has allowed development of a CoAS-binding motif. Bioinformatics analyses indicate that CoADR enzymes are broadly distributed in both bacterial and archaeal kingdoms, suggesting an even broader significance for the CoASH/CoAS-disulfide redox system in prokaryotic thiol/disulfide homeostasis.

  8. Identification and molecular characterization of mitochondrial ferredoxins and ferredoxin reductase from Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Takubo, Keiko; Morikawa, Tomomi; Nonaka, Yasuki; Mizutani, Masaharu; Takenaka, Shigeo; Takabe, Keiji; Takahashi, Masa-aki; Ohta, Daisaku

    2003-07-01

    We have identified and characterized novel types of ferredoxin and ferredoxin reductase from Arabidopsis. Among a number of potential ferredoxin reductase genes in the Arabidopsis genome, AtMFDR was identified to encode a homologue of mitochondrial ferredoxin reductase, and AtMFDX1 and AtMFDX2 were predicted to code for proteins similar to mitochondrial ferredoxin. First, we isolated cDNAs for these proteins and expressed them in heterologous systems of insect cells and Escherichia coli, respectively. The recombinant AtMFDX1 and AtMFDR proteins exhibited spectral properties characteristic of ferredoxin and ferredoxin reductase, respectively, and a pair of recombinant AtMFDX1 and AtMFDR proteins was sufficient to transfer electrons from NAD(P)H to cytochrome c in vitro. Subcellular fractionation analyses suggested membrane association of AtMFDR protein, and protein-gel blot analyses and transient expression studies of green fluorescence protein fusions indicated mitochondrial localization of AtMFDX1 and AtMFDR. RNA-gel blot analyses revealed that the accumulation levels of AtMFDXs and AtMFDR gene transcripts were specifically high in flowers, while protein-gel blot analysis demonstrated substantial accumulation of AtMFDR protein in leaf, stem, and flower. Possible physiological roles of these mitochondrial electron transfer components are discussed in relation to redox dependent metabolic pathways in plants.

  9. Structure of aldose reductase from Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Ferrell, M.; Abendroth, J.; Zhang, Y.; Sankaran, B.; Edwards, T. E.; Staker, B. L.; Van Voorhis, W. C.; Stewart, L. J.; Myler, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    Giardia lamblia is an anaerobic aerotolerant eukaryotic parasite of the intestines. It is believed to have diverged early from eukarya during evolution and is thus lacking in many of the typical eukaryotic organelles and biochemical pathways. Most conspicuously, mitochondria and the associated machinery of oxidative phosphorylation are absent; instead, energy is derived from substrate-level phosphorylation. Here, the 1.75 Å resolution crystal structure of G. lamblia aldose reductase heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli is reported. As in other oxidoreductases, G. lamblia aldose reductase adopts a TIM-barrel conformation with the NADP+-binding site located within the eight β-strands of the interior. PMID:21904059

  10. Steroid 5α-reductase 2 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mendonca, Berenice B; Batista, Rafael Loch; Domenice, Sorahia; Costa, Elaine M F; Arnhold, Ivo J P; Russell, David W; Wilson, Jean D

    2016-10-01

    Dihydrotestosterone is a potent androgen metabolite formed from testosterone by action of 5α-reductase isoenzymes. Mutations in the type 2 isoenzyme cause a disorder of 46,XY sex development, termed 5α-reductase type 2 deficiency and that was described forty years ago. Many mutations in the encoding gene have been reported in different ethnic groups. In affected 46,XY individuals, female external genitalia are common, but Mullerian ducts regress, and the internal urogenital tract is male. Most affected males are raised as females, but virilization occurs at puberty, and male social sex develops thereafter with high frequency. Fertility can be achieved in some affected males with assisted reproduction techniques, and adults with male social sex report a more satisfactory sex life and quality of life as compared to affected individuals with female social sex. PMID:27224879

  11. Photoactivation of the flavin cofactor in Xenopus laevis (6–4) photolyase: Observation of a transient tyrosyl radical by time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Stefan; Kay, Christopher W. M.; Mögling, Heike; Möbius, Klaus; Hitomi, Kenichi; Todo, Takeshi

    2002-01-01

    The light-induced electron transfer reaction of flavin cofactor photoactivation in Xenopus laevis (6–4) photolyase has been studied by continuous-wave and time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. When the photoactivation is initiated from the fully oxidized form of the flavin, a neutral flavin radical is observed as a long-lived paramagnetic intermediate of two consecutive single-electron reductions under participation of redox-active amino acid residues. By time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance, a spin-polarized transient radical-pair signal was detected that shows remarkable differences to the signals observed in the related cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase enzyme. In (6–4) photolyase, a neutral tyrosine radical has been identified as the final electron donor, on the basis of the characteristic line width, hyperfine splitting pattern, and resonance magnetic field position of the tyrosine resonances of the transient radical pair. PMID:11805294

  12. A novel thiol-reductase activity of Arabidopsis YUC6 confers drought tolerance independently of auxin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Joon-Yung; Kim, Woe-Yeon; Kang, Sun Bin; Kim, Jeong Im; Baek, Dongwon; Jung, In Jung; Kim, Mi Ri; Li, Ning; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Asami, Tadao; Sabir, Jamal S. M.; Park, Hyeong Cheol; Lee, Sang Yeol; Bohnert, Hans J.; Bressan, Ray A.; Pardo, Jose M.; Yun, Dae-Jin

    2015-01-01

    YUCCA (YUC) proteins constitute a family of flavin monooxygenases (FMOs), with an important role in auxin (IAA) biosynthesis. Here we report that Arabidopsis plants overexpressing YUC6 display enhanced IAA-related phenotypes and exhibit improved drought stress tolerance, low rate of water loss and controlled ROS accumulation under drought and oxidative stresses. Co-overexpression of an IAA-conjugating enzyme reduces IAA levels but drought stress tolerance is unaffected, indicating that the stress-related phenotype is not based on IAA overproduction. YUC6 contains a previously unrecognized FAD- and NADPH-dependent thiol-reductase activity (TR) that overlaps with the FMO domain involved in IAA biosynthesis. Mutation of a conserved cysteine residue (Cys-85) preserves FMO but suppresses TR activity and stress tolerance, whereas mutating the FAD- and NADPH-binding sites, that are common to TR and FMO domains, abolishes all outputs. We provide a paradigm for a single protein playing a dual role, regulating plant development and conveying stress defence responses. PMID:26314500

  13. Discovery of pinoresinol reductase genes in sphingomonads.

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Y; Kamimura, N; Nakajima, M; Hishiyama, S; Hara, H; Kasai, D; Tsuji, Y; Narita-Yamada, S; Nakamura, S; Katano, Y; Fujita, N; Katayama, Y; Fukuda, M; Kajita, S; Masai, E

    2013-01-10

    Bacterial genes for the degradation of major dilignols produced in lignifying xylem are expected to be useful tools for the structural modification of lignin in plants. For this purpose, we isolated pinZ involved in the conversion of pinoresinol from Sphingobium sp. strain SYK-6. pinZ showed 43-77% identity at amino acid level with bacterial NmrA-like proteins of unknown function, a subgroup of atypical short chain dehydrogenases/reductases, but revealed only 15-21% identity with plant pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. PinZ completely converted racemic pinoresinol to lariciresinol, showing a specific activity of 46±3 U/mg in the presence of NADPH at 30°C. In contrast, the activity for lariciresinol was negligible. This substrate preference is similar to a pinoresinol reductase, AtPrR1, of Arabidopsis thaliana; however, the specific activity of PinZ toward (±)-pinoresinol was significantly higher than that of AtPrR1. The role of pinZ and a pinZ ortholog of Novosphingobium aromaticivorans DSM 12444 were also characterized.

  14. A Ferredoxin Disulfide Reductase Delivers Electrons to the Methanosarcina barkeri Class III Ribonucleotide Reductase.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yifeng; Li, Bin; Prakash, Divya; Ferry, James G; Elliott, Sean J; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2015-12-01

    Two subtypes of class III anaerobic ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) studied so far couple the reduction of ribonucleotides to the oxidation of formate, or the oxidation of NADPH via thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase. Certain methanogenic archaea contain a phylogenetically distinct third subtype of class III RNR, with distinct active-site residues. Here we report the cloning and recombinant expression of the Methanosarcina barkeri class III RNR and show that the electrons required for ribonucleotide reduction can be delivered by a [4Fe-4S] protein ferredoxin disulfide reductase, and a conserved thioredoxin-like protein NrdH present in the RNR operon. The diversity of class III RNRs reflects the diversity of electron carriers used in anaerobic metabolism.

  15. Role of the Dinitrogenase Reductase Arginine 101 Residue in Dinitrogenase Reductase ADP-Ribosyltransferase Binding, NAD Binding, and Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Ludden, Paul W.

    2001-01-01

    Dinitrogenase reductase is posttranslationally regulated by dinitrogenase reductase ADP-ribosyltransferase (DRAT) via ADP-ribosylation of the arginine 101 residue in some bacteria. Rhodospirillum rubrum strains in which the arginine 101 of dinitrogenase reductase was replaced by tyrosine, phenylalanine, or leucine were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis of the nifH gene. The strain containing the R101F form of dinitrogenase reductase retains 91%, the strain containing the R101Y form retains 72%, and the strain containing the R101L form retains only 28% of in vivo nitrogenase activity of the strain containing the dinitrogenase reductase with arginine at position 101. In vivo acetylene reduction assays, immunoblotting with anti-dinitrogenase reductase antibody, and [adenylate-32P]NAD labeling experiments showed that no switch-off of nitrogenase activity occurred in any of the three mutants and no ADP-ribosylation of altered dinitrogenase reductases occurred either in vivo or in vitro. Altered dinitrogenase reductases from strains UR629 (R101Y) and UR630 (R101F) were purified to homogeneity. The R101F and R101Y forms of dinitrogenase reductase were able to form a complex with DRAT that could be chemically cross-linked by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide. The R101F form of dinitrogenase reductase and DRAT together were not able to cleave NAD. This suggests that arginine 101 is not critical for the binding of DRAT to dinitrogenase reductase but that the availability of arginine 101 is important for NAD cleavage. Both DRAT and dinitrogenase reductase can be labeled by [carbonyl-14C]NAD individually upon UV irradiation, but most 14C label is incorporated into DRAT when both proteins are present. The ability of R101F dinitrogenase reductase to be labeled by [carbonyl-14C]NAD suggested that Arg 101 is not absolutely required for NAD binding. PMID:11114923

  16. The structure of a Xanthomonas general stress protein involved in citrus canker reveals its flavin-binding property.

    PubMed

    Hilario, Eduardo; Li, Yang; Niks, Dimitri; Fan, Li

    2012-07-01

    Xanthomonas citri pv. citri (Xac) causes citrus canker and affects citrus agriculture worldwide. Functional genetic analysis has indicated that a putative general stress protein (XacGSP) encoded by the Xac2369 gene is involved in the bacterial infection. In this report, the crystal structure of XacGSP was determined to 2.5 Å resolution. There are four XacGSP molecules in the crystal asymmetric unit. Each XacGSP monomer folds into a six-stranded antiparallel β-barrel flanked by five α-helices. A C-terminal extension protrudes from the sixth β-strand of the β-barrel and pairs with its counterpart from another monomer to form a bridge between the two subunits of an XacGSP dimer. Two XacGSP dimers cross over each other to form a tetramer; the β-barrels from one dimer contact the β-barrels of the other, while the two bridges are distant from each other and do not make contacts. The three-dimensional structure of the XacGSP monomer is very similar to those of pyridoxine 5-phosphate oxidases, a group of enzymes that use flavin mononucleotide (FMN) as a cofactor. Consistent with this, purified XacGSP protein binds to both FMN and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), suggesting that XacGSP may help the bacteria to react against the oxidative stress induced by the defense mechanisms of the plant. PMID:22751670

  17. MNDO-MOCIC evaluation of the uracil force field: Application to the interpretation of flavin vibrational spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, W. David; Spiro, Thomas G.

    1980-12-01

    A normal mode analysis has been carried out on the in-plane vibrations of uracil and three isotopic molecules, N,N-dideutero, C,C-dideutero, and perdeutero uracil, using a molecular orbital calculation (MNDO) to constrain the ratios of off-diagonal to diagonal elements in the compliance matrix (MOCIC). The 81 observed frequencies are calculated with a mean error of 9.7 cm-1. The force constants and normal mode patterns are discussed. The characteristic up-shift of the 1236 cm-1 mode upon N,N deuteration is reproduced by the calculation, and is ascribable to a change in mode composition from predominantly C=O deformation to predominantly C-N stretching, in agreement with the pattern observed for other cyclic imides. The analogous mode in flavin is variable in different flavoproteins and has been suggested to be sensitive to hydrogen bonding at flavin N3. This effect of hydrogen bonding is modeled in the present calculation by increasing the N-H deformation force constant. A similar perturbation of the C=O deformation constants shows that the 1236 cm-1 mode frequency may also be somewhat sensitive to hydrogen bonding at C4=0, but not at C2=0.

  18. Crystallographic Evidence of Drastic Conformational Changes in the Active Site of a Flavin-Dependent N-Hydroxylase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The soil actinomycete Kutzneria sp. 744 produces a class of highly decorated hexadepsipeptides, which represent a new chemical scaffold that has both antimicrobial and antifungal properties. These natural products, known as kutznerides, are created via nonribosomal peptide synthesis using various derivatized amino acids. The piperazic acid moiety contained in the kutzneride scaffold, which is vital for its antibiotic activity, has been shown to derive from the hydroxylated product of l-ornithine, l-N5-hydroxyornithine. The production of this hydroxylated species is catalyzed by the action of an FAD- and NAD(P)H-dependent N-hydroxylase known as KtzI. We have been able to structurally characterize KtzI in several states along its catalytic trajectory, and by pairing these snapshots with the biochemical and structural data already available for this enzyme class, we propose a structurally based reaction mechanism that includes novel conformational changes of both the protein backbone and the flavin cofactor. Further, we were able to recapitulate these conformational changes in the protein crystal, displaying their chemical competence. Our series of structures, with corroborating biochemical and spectroscopic data collected by us and others, affords mechanistic insight into this relatively new class of flavin-dependent hydroxylases and adds another layer to the complexity of flavoenzymes. PMID:25184411

  19. Reaction of organic nitrate esters and S-nitrosothiols with reduced flavins: a possible mechanism of bioactivation.

    PubMed

    Wong, P S; Fukuto, J M

    1999-04-01

    Organic nitrate esters, such as glyceryl trinitrate and isosorbide dinitrate, are a class of compounds used to treat a variety of vascular ailments. Their effectiveness relies on their ability to be bioactivated to nitric oxide (NO) which, in turn, relaxes vascular smooth muscle. Although there have been many biological studies that indicate that NO can be formed from organic nitrate esters in a biological environment, the chemical mechanism by which this occurs has yet to be established. Previous studies have implicated both flavins and thiols in organic nitrate ester bioactivation. Thus, we examined the chemical interactions of flavins and thiols with organic nitrate esters as a means of determining the role these species may play in NO production. Based on these studies we concluded that a reasonable chemical mechanism for organic nitrate ester bioactivation involves reduction to the organic nitrite ester followed by conversion to a nitrosothiol. The release of NO from nitrosothiols can occur via a variety of processes including reaction with dihydroflavins and NADH. PMID:10232931

  20. Molecular simulation to investigate the cofactor specificity for pichia stipitis Xylose reductase.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiao-Le; Cong, Shan; Weng, Xiao-Rong; Chen, Jin-Hua; Wang, Jing-Fang; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-11-01

    Xylose is one of the most abundant carbohydrates in nature, and widely used to produce bioethanol via fermentation in industry. Xylulose can produce two key enzymes: xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase. Owing to the disparate cofactor specificities of xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase, intracellular redox imbalance is detected during the xylose fermentation, resulting in low ethanol yields. To overcome this barrier, a common strategy is applied to artificially modify the cofactor specificity of xylose reductase. In this study, we utilized molecular simulation approaches to construct a 3D (three-dimensional) structural model for the NADP-dependent Pichia stipitis xylose reductase (PsXR). Based on the 3D model, the favourable binding modes for both cofactors NAD and NADP were obtained using the flexible docking procedure and molecular dynamics simulation. Structural analysis of the favourable binding modes showed that the cofactor binding site of PsXR was composed of 3 major components: a hydrophilic pocket, a hydrophobic pocket as well as a linker channel between the aforementioned two pockets. The hydrophilic pocket could recognize the nicotinamide moiety of the cofactors by hydrogen bonding networks, while the hydrophobic pocket functioned to position the adenine moiety of the cofactors by hydrophobic and Π-Π stacking interactions. The linker channel contained some key residues for ligand-binding; their mutation could have impact to the specificity of PsXR. Finally, it was found that any of the two single mutations, K21A and K270N, might reverse the cofactor specificity of PsXR from major NADP- to NADdependent, which was further confirmed by the additional experiments. Our findings may provide useful insights into the cofactor specificity of PsXR, stimulating new strategies for better designing xylose reductase and improving ethanol production in industry.

  1. Monoterpene metabolism. Cloning, expression, and characterization of menthone reductases from peppermint.

    PubMed

    Davis, Edward M; Ringer, Kerry L; McConkey, Marie E; Croteau, Rodney

    2005-03-01

    these menthone reductases account for all of the menthol isomers found in the essential oil of peppermint. Biotechnological exploitation of these genes could lead to improved production yields of (-)-menthol, the principal and characteristic flavor component of peppermint.

  2. The modulation of carbonyl reductase 1 by polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Boušová, Iva; Skálová, Lenka; Souček, Pavel; Matoušková, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1), an enzyme belonging to the short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases family, has been detected in all human tissues. CBR1 catalyzes the reduction of many xenobiotics, including important drugs (e.g. anthracyclines, nabumetone, bupropion, dolasetron) and harmful carbonyls and quinones. Moreover, it participates in the metabolism of a number of endogenous compounds and it may play a role in certain pathologies. Plant polyphenols are not only present in many human food sources, but are also a component of many popular dietary supplements and herbal medicines. Many studies reviewed herein have demonstrated the potency of certain flavonoids, stilbenes and curcuminoids in the inhibition of the activity of CBR1. Interactions of these polyphenols with transcriptional factors, which regulate CBR1 expression, have also been reported in several studies. As CBR1 plays an important role in drug metabolism as well as in the protection of the organism against potentially harmful carbonyls, the modulation of its expression/activity may have significant pharmacological and/or toxicological consequences. Some polyphenols (e.g. luteolin, apigenin and curcumin) have been shown to be very potent CBR1 inhibitors. The inhibition of CBR1 seems useful regarding the increased efficacy of anthracycline therapy, but it may cause the worse detoxification of reactive carbonyls. Nevertheless, all known information about the interactions of polyphenols with CBR1 have only been based on the results of in vitro studies. With respect to the high importance of CBR1 and the frequent consumption of polyphenols, in vivo studies would be very helpful for the evaluation of risks/benefits of polyphenol interactions with CBR1.

  3. Redox activation of Fe(III)-thiosemicarbazones and Fe(III)-bleomycin by thioredoxin reductase: specificity of enzymatic redox centers and analysis of reactive species formation by ESR spin trapping

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Judith M.; Cheng, Qing; Antholine, William E.; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Arnér, ArnerElias S.J.; Myers, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Thiosemicarbazones such as triapine (Tp) and Dp44mT are tridentate iron (Fe) chelators that have well-documented anti-neoplastic activity. While Fe-thiosemicarbazones can undergo redox-cycling to generate reactive species that may have important roles in their cytotoxicity, there is only limited insight into specific cellular agents that can rapidly reduce Fe(III)-thiosemicarbazones and thereby promote their redox activity. Here we report that thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR1) and glutathione reductase (GR) have this activity, and that there is considerable specificity to the interactions between specific redox centers in these enzymes and different Fe(III) complexes. Site-directed variants of TrxR1 demonstrate that the selenocysteine (Sec) of the enzyme is not required, whereas the C59 residue and the flavin have important roles. While TrxR1 and GR have analogous C59/flavin motifs, TrxR is considerably faster than GR. For both enzymes, Fe(III)(Tp)2 is reduced faster than Fe(III)(Dp44mT)2. This reduction promotes redox cycling and the generation of hydroxyl radical (HO•) in a peroxide-dependent manner, even with low μM levels of Fe(Tp)2. TrxR also reduces Fe(III)-bleomycin and this activity is Sec-dependent. TrxR cannot reduce Fe(III)-EDTA at significant rates. Our findings are the first to demonstrate pro-oxidant reductive activation of Fe(III)-based antitumor thiosemicarbazones by interactions with specific enzyme species. The marked elevation of TrxR in many tumors could contribute to the selective tumor toxicity of these drugs by enhancing the redox activation of Fe(III)-thiosemicarbazones and the generation of reactive oxygen species such as HO• PMID:23485585

  4. Isolation and Expression Analysis of CYP9A11 and Cytochrome P450 Reductase Gene in the Beet Armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chunqing; Feng, Xiaoyun; Tang, Tao; Qiu, Lihong

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs), as an enzyme superfamily, is widely distributed in organisms and plays a vital function in the metabolism of exogenous and endogenous compounds by interacting with its obligatory redox partner, CYP reductase (CPR). A novel CYP gene (CYP9A11) and CPR gene from the agricultural pest insect Spodoptera exigua were cloned and characterized. The complete cDNA sequences of SeCYP9A11 and SeCPR are 1,931 and 3,919 bp in length, respectively, and contain open reading frames of 1,593 and 2,070 nucleotides, respectively. Analysis of the putative protein sequences indicated that SeCYP9A11 contains a heme-binding domain and the unique characteristic sequence (SRFALCE) of the CYP9 family, in addition to a signal peptide and transmembrane segment at the N-terminal. Alignment analysis revealed that SeCYP9A11 shares the highest sequence similarity with CYP9A13 from Mamestra brassicae, which is 66.54%. The putative protein sequence of SeCPR has all of the classical CPR features, such as an N-terminal membrane anchor; three conserved domain flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), flavin mononucleotide (FMN), and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) domain; and characteristic binding motifs. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that SeCPR shares the highest identity with HaCPR, which is 95.21%. The SeCYP9A11 and SeCPR genes were detected in the midgut, fat body, and cuticle tissues, and throughout all of the developmental stages of S. exigua. The mRNA levels of SeCYP9A11 and SeCPR decreased remarkably after exposure to plant secondary metabolites quercetin and tannin. The results regarding SeCYP9A11 and SeCPR genes in the current study provide foundation for the further study of S. exigua P450 system. PMID:26320261

  5. Testosterone induction of microsomal acyl-CoA reductase and a cytosolic regulatory protein in mouse preputial glands.

    PubMed

    Lee, T C; Kirk, P; Snyder, F

    1986-01-01

    Alkyl and alk-1-enyl (plasmalogens) ether-linked glycerolipids are prominent components of many mammalian cells; moreover, an acetylated form of an alkyl phospholipid was recently found to possess potent hypotensive, inflammatory and allergic properties. In our studies, preputial glands of mice were selected as a model to investigate the regulation of factors involved in the biosynthesis of ether-linked lipids, since these glands contain high concentrations of ether-linked neutral lipids that are under the influence of hormonal control. We found that a key enzyme in the ether-lipid metabolic pathway, microsomal acyl-CoA reductase that catalyzes the formation of long-chain fatty alcohols (precursor of the O-alkyl chain), was increased 16-fold after injecting testosterone into male, castrated mice. This induction was highly specific, since testosterone did not affect another microsomal enzyme, NADPH-cytochrome c reductase. Based on kinetics of enzyme activity changes, the half-life of acyl-CoA reductase was calculated to be 61-70 h. In addition, the activity of a cytosolic stimulatory protein for the acyl-CoA reductase (but not for a different cytosolic protein, lactate dehydrogenase) was also enhanced in the testosterone-treated, male, castrated mice. These findings indicate that acyl-CoA reductase is an important regulatory enzyme in the reactions that lead to the formation of the ether bond in glycerolipids and that it is modulated through hormonal control. PMID:3940533

  6. Radical scavengers as ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Basu, Arijit; Sinha, Barij Nayan

    2012-01-01

    This paper compiled all the previous reports on radical scavengers, an interesting class of ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors. We have highlighted three key research areas: chemical classification of radical scavengers, structural and functional aspects of the radical site, and progress in drug designing for radical scavengers. Under the chemical classification section, we have recorded the discovery of hydroxyurea followed by discussions on hydroxamic acids, amidoximes, hydroxyguanidines, and phenolic compounds. In the next section, we have compiled the structural information for the radical site obtained from different crystallographic and theoretical studies. Finally, we have included the reported ligand based and structure based drug-designing studies.

  7. EXPRESSION OF BRANCHIAL FLAVIN-CONTAINING MONOOXYGENASE IS DIRECTLY CORRELATED WITH SALINITY-INDUCED ALDICARB TOXICITY IN THE EURYHALINE FISH (ORYZIAS LATIPES). (R826109)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Earlier studies in our laboratory have demonstrated a reduction of flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) activity when salt-water adapted euryhaline fish were transferred to water of less salinity. Since FMOs have been shown to be responsible for the bioact...

  8. Tolerance to Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity in the Mouse Model of Autoprotection is Associated with Induction of Flavin-containing Monooxygenase-3 (FMO3) in Hepatocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acetaminophen (APAP) pretreatment with a low hepatotoxic dose in mice results in resistance to a second, higher dose of APAP (APAP autoprotection). Recent microarray work by our group showed a drastic induction of liver flavin containing monooxygenase-3 (Fmo3) mRNA expression in...

  9. Biphasic Kinetic Behavior of Nitrate Reductase from Heterocystous, Nitrogen-Fixing Cyanobacteria 1

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Nieto, José; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    1992-01-01

    Nitrate reductase activity from filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria showed a biphasic kinetic behavior with respect to nitrate as the variable substrate. Two kinetic components were detected, the first showing a higher affinity for nitrate (Km, 0.05-0.25 mm) and a lower catalytic activity and the second showing a lower affinity for nitrate (Km, 5-25 mm) and a higher (3- to 5-fold) catalytic activity. In contrast, among unicellular cyanobacteria, most representatives studied exhibited a monophasic, Michaelis-Menten kinetic pattern for nitrate reductase activity. Biphasic kinetics remained unchanged with the use of different assay conditions (i.e. cell disruption or permeabilization, two different electron donors) or throughout partial purification of the enzyme. PMID:16652939

  10. Effects of soluble flavin on heterogeneous electron transfer between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and iron oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zheming; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; White, Gaye F.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.

    2015-08-25

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria can utilize insoluble Fe(Mn)-oxides as a terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. For Shewanella species specifically, some evidence suggests that iron reduction is associated with the secretion of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and riboflavin that are proposed to mediate electron transfer (Marsili et al., 2008). In this work, we used methyl viologen (MV•+)-encapsulated, porin-cytochrome complex (MtrCAB) embedded liposomes (MELs) as a synthetic model of the Shewanella outer membrane to investigate the proposed mediating behavior of secreted flavins. The reduction kinetics of goethite, hematite and lepidocrocite (200 µM) by MELs ([MV•+] ~ 42 µM and MtrABC ≤ 1 nM) were determined in the presence FMN at pH 7.0 in N2 atmosphere by monitoring the concentrations of MV•+ and FMN through their characteristic UV-visible absorption spectra. Experiments were performed where i) FMN and Fe(III)-oxide were mixed and then reacted with the reduced MELs and ii) FMN was reacted with the reduced MELs followed by addition of Fe(III)-oxide. The redox reactions proceeded in two steps: a fast step that was completed in a few seconds, and a slower one lasting over 400 seconds. For all three Fe(III)-oxides, the initial reaction rate in the presence of a low concentration of FMN (≤ 1 µM) was at least a factor of five faster than those with MELs alone, and orders of magnitude faster than those by FMNH2, suggesting that FMN may serve as a co-factor that enhances electron transfer from outer-membrane c-cytochromes to Fe(III)-oxides. The rate and extent of the initial reaction followed the order of lepidocrocite > hematite > goethite, the same as their reduction potentials, implying thermodynamic control on reaction rate. However, at higher FMN concentrations (> 1 µM), the reaction rates for both steps decreased and varied inversely with FMN concentration, indicating that FMN inhibited the MEL to Fe(III)-oxide electron transfer

  11. Structure of an integral membrane sterol reductase from Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaochun; Roberti, Rita; Blobel, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Sterols are essential biological molecules in the majority of life forms. Sterol reductases1 including Delta-14 sterol reductase (C14SR), 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR7) and 24-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR24) reduce specific carbon-carbon double bonds of the sterol moiety using a reducing cofactor during sterol biosynthesis. Lamin B Receptor2 (LBR), an integral inner nuclear membrane protein, also contains a functional C14SR domain. Here we report the crystal structure of a Delta-14 sterol reductase (maSR1) from the methanotrophic bacterium Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z, a homolog of human C14SR, LBR, and DHCR7, with the cofactor NADPH. The enzyme contains 10 transmembrane segments (TM). Its catalytic domain comprises the C-terminal half (containing TM6-10) and envelops two interconnected pockets, one of which faces the cytoplasm and houses NADPH, while the other one is accessible from the lipid bilayer. Comparison with a soluble steroid 5β-reductase structure3 suggests that the reducing end of NADPH meets the sterol substrate at the juncture of the two pockets. A sterol reductase activity assay proves maSR1 can reduce the double bond of a cholesterol biosynthetic intermediate demonstrating functional conservation to human C14SR. Therefore, our structure as a prototype of integral membrane sterol reductases provides molecular insight into mutations in DHCR7 and LBR for inborn human diseases. PMID:25307054

  12. Biliverdin reductase: a target for cancer therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Peter E. M.; Miralem, Tihomir; Maines, Mahin D.

    2015-01-01

    Biliverdin reductase (BVR) is a multifunctional protein that is the primary source of the potent antioxidant, bilirubin. BVR regulates activities/functions in the insulin/IGF-1/IRK/PI3K/MAPK pathways. Activation of certain kinases in these pathways is/are hallmark(s) of cancerous cells. The protein is a scaffold/bridge and intracellular transporter of kinases that regulate growth and proliferation of cells, including PKCs, ERK and Akt, and their targets including NF-κB, Elk1, HO-1, and iNOS. The scaffold and transport functions enable activated BVR to relocate from the cytosol to the nucleus or to the plasma membrane, depending on the activating stimulus. This enables the reductase to function in diverse signaling pathways. And, its expression at the transcript and protein levels are increased in human tumors and the infiltrating T-cells, monocytes and circulating lymphocytes, as well as the circulating and infiltrating macrophages. These functions suggest that the cytoprotective role of BVR may be permissive for cancer/tumor growth. In this review, we summarize the recent developments that define the pro-growth activities of BVR, particularly with respect to its input into the MAPK signaling pathway and present evidence that BVR-based peptides inhibit activation of protein kinases, including MEK, PKCδ, and ERK as well as downstream targets including Elk1 and iNOS, and thus offers a credible novel approach to reduce cancer cell proliferation. PMID:26089799

  13. Ageing of glutathione reductase in the lens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W Z; Augusteyn, R C

    1994-07-01

    The distribution of glutathione reductase activity in concentric layers from the lens has been determined as a function of age for 16 species. Primate lenses have almost ten times the level of glutathione reductase found in other species. Comparison with the activity of hexokinase revealed that this is not due to a higher overall rate of metabolism in these lenses. By contrast, the higher activity found in bird and fish lenses reflects a higher metabolic activity in these tissues. In all species, a gradient of activity was observed with the highest specific activity in the outermost cortical fibres, decreasing to virtually no activity in the inner parts of the tissue. No alterations were found in this gradient with increasing age, other than an increase in the amount of nuclear tissue essentially devoid of activity. The maximum activity in the outer cortical fibres was the same, regardless of the age of the lens. The time taken, in different species, for the specific activity to decrease by half, was estimated from the rate of protein accumulation. This time was found to vary from a few days to several years, indicating that the decrease in activity is not due to ageing but rather, it is related to the maturation of fibre cells. These observations are discussed in terms of current concepts of lens ageing and cataract formation. PMID:7835401

  14. Localization of human flavin-containing monooxygenase genes FMO2 and FMO5 to chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    McCombie, R.R.; Shephard, E.A.; Dolphin, C.T.

    1996-06-15

    The human flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) gene family comprises at least five distinct members (FMO1 to FMO5) that code for enzymes responsible for the oxidation of a wide variety of soft nucleophilic substrates, including drugs and environmental pollutants. Three of these genes (FMO1, FMO3, and FMO4) have previously been localized to human chromosome 1q, raising the possibility that the entire gene family is clustered in this chromosomal region. Analysis by polymerase chain reaction of DNA isolated from a panel of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids demonstrates that the two remaining identified members of the FMO gene family, FMO2 and FMO5, also are located on chromosome 1q. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Identification of the Lomofungin Biosynthesis Gene Cluster and Associated Flavin-Dependent Monooxygenase Gene in Streptomyces lomondensis S015

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunxiao; Sheng, Chaolan; Wang, Wei; Hu, Hongbo; Peng, Huasong; Zhang, Xuehong

    2015-01-01

    Streptomyces lomondensis S015 synthesizes the broad-spectrum phenazine antibiotic lomofungin. Whole genome sequencing of this strain revealed a genomic locus consisting of 23 open reading frames that includes the core phenazine biosynthesis gene cluster lphzGFEDCB. lomo10, encoding a putative flavin-dependent monooxygenase, was also identified in this locus. Inactivation of lomo10 by in-frame partial deletion resulted in the biosynthesis of a new phenazine metabolite, 1-carbomethoxy-6-formyl-4,9-dihydroxy-phenazine, along with the absence of lomofungin. This result suggests that lomo10 is responsible for the hydroxylation of lomofungin at its C-7 position. This is the first description of a phenazine hydroxylation gene in Streptomyces, and the results of this study lay the foundation for further investigation of phenazine metabolite biosynthesis in Streptomyces. PMID:26305803

  16. The aldo-keto reductases (AKRs): Overview.

    PubMed

    Penning, Trevor M

    2015-06-01

    The aldo-keto reductase (AKR) protein superfamily contains >190 members that fall into 16 families and are found in all phyla. These enzymes reduce carbonyl substrates such as: sugar aldehydes; keto-steroids, keto-prostaglandins, retinals, quinones, and lipid peroxidation by-products. Exceptions include the reduction of steroid double bonds catalyzed by AKR1D enzymes (5β-reductases); and the oxidation of proximate carcinogen trans-dihydrodiol polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; while the β-subunits of potassium gated ion channels (AKR6 family) control Kv channel opening. AKRs are usually 37kDa monomers, have an (α/β)8-barrel motif, display large loops at the back of the barrel which govern substrate specificity, and have a conserved cofactor binding domain. AKRs catalyze an ordered bi bi kinetic mechanism in which NAD(P)H cofactor binds first and leaves last. In enzymes that favor NADPH, the rate of release of NADP(+) is governed by a slow isomerization step which places an upper limit on kcat. AKRs retain a conserved catalytic tetrad consisting of Tyr55, Asp50, Lys84, and His117 (AKR1C9 numbering). There is conservation of the catalytic mechanism with short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) even though they show different protein folds. There are 15 human AKRs of these AKR1B1, AKR1C1-1C3, AKR1D1, and AKR1B10 have been implicated in diabetic complications, steroid hormone dependent malignancies, bile acid deficiency and defects in retinoic acid signaling, respectively. Inhibitor programs exist world-wide to target each of these enzymes to treat the aforementioned disorders. Inherited mutations in AKR1C and AKR1D1 enzymes are implicated in defects in the development of male genitalia and bile acid deficiency, respectively, and occur in evolutionarily conserved amino acids. The human AKRs have a large number of nsSNPs and splice variants, but in many instances functional genomics is lacking. AKRs and their variants are now poised to be interrogated using

  17. Docking and molecular dynamics studies at trypanothione reductase and glutathione reductase active sites.

    PubMed

    Iribarne, Federico; Paulino, Margot; Aguilera, Sara; Murphy, Miguel; Tapia, Orlando

    2002-05-01

    A theoretical docking study on the active sites of trypanothione reductase (TR) and glutathione reductase (GR) with the corresponding natural substrates, trypanothione disulfide (T[S]2) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG), is reported. Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in order to check the robustness of the docking results. The energetic results are in agreement with previous experimental findings and show the crossed complexes have lower stabilization energies than the natural ones. To test DOCK3.5, four nitro furanic compounds, previously designed as potentially active anti-chagasic molecules, were docked at the GR and TR active sites with the DOCK3.5 procedure. A good correlation was found between differential inhibitory activity and relative interaction energy (affinity). The results provide a validation test for the use of DOCK3.5 in connection with the design of anti-chagasic drugs.

  18. Transcripts of anthocyanidin reductase and leucoanthocyanidin reductase and measurement of catechin and epicatechin in tartary buckwheat.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon Bok; Thwe, Aye Aye; Kim, Yeji; Li, Xiaohua; Cho, Jin Woong; Park, Phun Bum; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Abdullah Al-Dhabi, Naif; Kim, Sun-Ju; Suzuki, Tastsuro; Hyun Jho, Kwang; Park, Sang Un

    2014-01-01

    Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR) play an important role in the monomeric units biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins (PAs) such as catechin and epicatechin in several plants. The aim of this study was to clone ANR and LAR genes involved in PAs biosynthesis and examine the expression of these two genes in different organs under different growth conditions in two tartary buckwheat cultivars, Hokkai T8 and T10. Gene expression was carried out by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and catechin and epicatechin content was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The expression pattern of ANR and LAR did not match the accumulation pattern of PAs in different organs of two cultivars. Epicatechin content was the highest in the flowers of both cultivars and it was affected by light in only Hokkai T8 sprouts. ANR and LAR levels in tartary buckwheat might be regulated by different mechanisms for catechin and epicatechin biosynthesis under light and dark conditions.

  19. Transcripts of Anthocyanidin Reductase and Leucoanthocyanidin Reductase and Measurement of Catechin and Epicatechin in Tartary Buckwheat

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Bok; Thwe, Aye Aye; Kim, YeJi; Li, Xiaohua; Cho, Jin Woong; Park, Phun Bum; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Abdullah Al-Dhabi, Naif; Kim, Sun-Ju; Suzuki, Tastsuro; Hyun Jho, Kwang; Park, Sang Un

    2014-01-01

    Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR) play an important role in the monomeric units biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins (PAs) such as catechin and epicatechin in several plants. The aim of this study was to clone ANR and LAR genes involved in PAs biosynthesis and examine the expression of these two genes in different organs under different growth conditions in two tartary buckwheat cultivars, Hokkai T8 and T10. Gene expression was carried out by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and catechin and epicatechin content was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The expression pattern of ANR and LAR did not match the accumulation pattern of PAs in different organs of two cultivars. Epicatechin content was the highest in the flowers of both cultivars and it was affected by light in only Hokkai T8 sprouts. ANR and LAR levels in tartary buckwheat might be regulated by different mechanisms for catechin and epicatechin biosynthesis under light and dark conditions. PMID:24605062

  20. Transcripts of anthocyanidin reductase and leucoanthocyanidin reductase and measurement of catechin and epicatechin in tartary buckwheat.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon Bok; Thwe, Aye Aye; Kim, Yeji; Li, Xiaohua; Cho, Jin Woong; Park, Phun Bum; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Abdullah Al-Dhabi, Naif; Kim, Sun-Ju; Suzuki, Tastsuro; Hyun Jho, Kwang; Park, Sang Un

    2014-01-01

    Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR) play an important role in the monomeric units biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins (PAs) such as catechin and epicatechin in several plants. The aim of this study was to clone ANR and LAR genes involved in PAs biosynthesis and examine the expression of these two genes in different organs under different growth conditions in two tartary buckwheat cultivars, Hokkai T8 and T10. Gene expression was carried out by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and catechin and epicatechin content was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The expression pattern of ANR and LAR did not match the accumulation pattern of PAs in different organs of two cultivars. Epicatechin content was the highest in the flowers of both cultivars and it was affected by light in only Hokkai T8 sprouts. ANR and LAR levels in tartary buckwheat might be regulated by different mechanisms for catechin and epicatechin biosynthesis under light and dark conditions. PMID:24605062

  1. Ribonucleotide reductases: essential enzymes for bacterial life

    PubMed Central

    Torrents, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is a key enzyme that mediates the synthesis of deoxyribonucleotides, the DNA precursors, for DNA synthesis in every living cell. This enzyme converts ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides, the building blocks for DNA replication, and repair. Clearly, RNR enzymes have contributed to the appearance of genetic material that exists today, being essential for the evolution of all organisms on Earth. The strict control of RNR activity and dNTP pool sizes is important, as pool imbalances increase mutation rates, replication anomalies, and genome instability. Thus, RNR activity should be finely regulated allosterically and at the transcriptional level. In this review we examine the distribution, the evolution, and the genetic regulation of bacterial RNRs. Moreover, this enzyme can be considered an ideal target for anti-proliferative compounds designed to inhibit cell replication in eukaryotic cells (cancer cells), parasites, viruses, and bacteria. PMID:24809024

  2. Ribonucleotide reductases: essential enzymes for bacterial life.

    PubMed

    Torrents, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is a key enzyme that mediates the synthesis of deoxyribonucleotides, the DNA precursors, for DNA synthesis in every living cell. This enzyme converts ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides, the building blocks for DNA replication, and repair. Clearly, RNR enzymes have contributed to the appearance of genetic material that exists today, being essential for the evolution of all organisms on Earth. The strict control of RNR activity and dNTP pool sizes is important, as pool imbalances increase mutation rates, replication anomalies, and genome instability. Thus, RNR activity should be finely regulated allosterically and at the transcriptional level. In this review we examine the distribution, the evolution, and the genetic regulation of bacterial RNRs. Moreover, this enzyme can be considered an ideal target for anti-proliferative compounds designed to inhibit cell replication in eukaryotic cells (cancer cells), parasites, viruses, and bacteria. PMID:24809024

  3. Ribonucleotide reductases: essential enzymes for bacterial life.

    PubMed

    Torrents, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is a key enzyme that mediates the synthesis of deoxyribonucleotides, the DNA precursors, for DNA synthesis in every living cell. This enzyme converts ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides, the building blocks for DNA replication, and repair. Clearly, RNR enzymes have contributed to the appearance of genetic material that exists today, being essential for the evolution of all organisms on Earth. The strict control of RNR activity and dNTP pool sizes is important, as pool imbalances increase mutation rates, replication anomalies, and genome instability. Thus, RNR activity should be finely regulated allosterically and at the transcriptional level. In this review we examine the distribution, the evolution, and the genetic regulation of bacterial RNRs. Moreover, this enzyme can be considered an ideal target for anti-proliferative compounds designed to inhibit cell replication in eukaryotic cells (cancer cells), parasites, viruses, and bacteria.

  4. Monodehydroascorbate reductase mediates TNT toxicity in plants.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Emily J; Rylott, Elizabeth L; Beynon, Emily; Lorenz, Astrid; Chechik, Victor; Bruce, Neil C

    2015-09-01

    The explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) is a highly toxic and persistent environmental pollutant. Due to the scale of affected areas, one of the most cost-effective and environmentally friendly means of removing explosives pollution could be the use of plants. However, mechanisms of TNT phytotoxicity have been elusive. Here, we reveal that phytotoxicity is caused by reduction of TNT in the mitochondria, forming a nitro radical that reacts with atmospheric oxygen, generating reactive superoxide. The reaction is catalyzed by monodehydroascorbate reductase 6 (MDHAR6), with Arabidopsis deficient in MDHAR6 displaying enhanced TNT tolerance. This discovery will contribute toward the remediation of contaminated sites. Moreover, in an environment of increasing herbicide resistance, with a shortage in new herbicide classes, our findings reveal MDHAR6 as a valuable plant-specific target.

  5. The cytochrome bd respiratory oxygen reductases

    PubMed Central

    Borisov, Vitaliy B.; Gennis, Robert B.; Hemp, James; Verkhovsky, Michael I.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cytochrome bd is a respiratory quinol:O2 oxidoreductase found in many prokaryotes, including a number of pathogens. The main bioenergetic function of the enzyme is the production of a proton motive force by the vectorial charge transfer of protons. The sequences of cytochromes bd are not homologous to those of the other respiratory oxygen reductases, i.e., the heme-copper oxygen reductases or alternative oxidases (AOX). Generally, cytochromes bd are noteworthy for their high affinity for O2 and resistance to inhibition by cyanide. In E. coli, for example, cytochrome bd (specifically, cytochrome bd-I) is expressed under O2-limited conditions. Among the members of the bd-family are the so-called cyanide-insensitive quinol oxidases (CIO) which often have a low content of the eponymous heme d but, instead, have heme b in place of heme d in at least a majority of the enzyme population. However, at this point, no sequence motif has been identified to distinguish cytochrome bd (with a stoichiometric complement of heme d) from an enzyme designated as CIO. Members of the bd-family can be subdivided into those which contain either a long or a short hydrophilic connection between transmembrane helices 6 and 7 in subunit I, designated as the Q-loop. However, it is not clear whether there is a functional consequence of this difference. This review summarizes current knowledge on the physiological functions, genetics, structural and catalytic properties of cytochromes bd. Included in this review are descriptions of the intermediates of the catalytic cycle, the proposed site for the reduction of O2, evidence for a proton channel connecting this active site to the bacterial cytoplasm, and the molecular mechanism by which a membrane potential is generated. PMID:21756872

  6. The cytochrome bd respiratory oxygen reductases.

    PubMed

    Borisov, Vitaliy B; Gennis, Robert B; Hemp, James; Verkhovsky, Michael I

    2011-11-01

    Cytochrome bd is a respiratory quinol: O₂ oxidoreductase found in many prokaryotes, including a number of pathogens. The main bioenergetic function of the enzyme is the production of a proton motive force by the vectorial charge transfer of protons. The sequences of cytochromes bd are not homologous to those of the other respiratory oxygen reductases, i.e., the heme-copper oxygen reductases or alternative oxidases (AOX). Generally, cytochromes bd are noteworthy for their high affinity for O₂ and resistance to inhibition by cyanide. In E. coli, for example, cytochrome bd (specifically, cytochrome bd-I) is expressed under O₂-limited conditions. Among the members of the bd-family are the so-called cyanide-insensitive quinol oxidases (CIO) which often have a low content of the eponymous heme d but, instead, have heme b in place of heme d in at least a majority of the enzyme population. However, at this point, no sequence motif has been identified to distinguish cytochrome bd (with a stoichiometric complement of heme d) from an enzyme designated as CIO. Members of the bd-family can be subdivided into those which contain either a long or a short hydrophilic connection between transmembrane helices 6 and 7 in subunit I, designated as the Q-loop. However, it is not clear whether there is a functional consequence of this difference. This review summarizes current knowledge on the physiological functions, genetics, structural and catalytic properties of cytochromes bd. Included in this review are descriptions of the intermediates of the catalytic cycle, the proposed site for the reduction of O₂, evidence for a proton channel connecting this active site to the bacterial cytoplasm, and the molecular mechanism by which a membrane potential is generated.

  7. Comparative modeling of thioredoxin glutathione reductase from Schistosoma mansoni: a multifunctional target for antischistosomal therapy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Monika; Khanna, Smriti; Bulusu, Gopalakrishnan; Mitra, Abhijit

    2009-02-01

    Schistosoma mansoni, a trematode parasite, which causes schistosomiasis and affects more than 200 million people worldwide, lives in an aerobic environment and therefore needs an effective redox mechanism for surviving reactive oxygen species from its host. Although, the host has two different redox systems: glutaredoxin and thioredoxin, the parasite has only one unique multifunctional enzyme, thioredoxin glutathione reductase (TGR) involving a fusion of two proteins, glutaredoxin (Grx) and thioredoxin reductase (TR), for performing all the redox activities. This dependence of S. mansoni on a single protein, TGR, for its protection from oxidative stress, makes it a promising drug target. Here, we describe a suitably validated, homology model for S. mansoni TGR (SmTGR), developed using both TR and Grx templates, functionally complete in the dimeric form with cofactors NADP(H) and FAD. Comparative analysis of substrate and inhibitor binding pockets of our model with crystal structures of parent TR as well as with that of glutathione reductase (GR), which is an essential component of the Grx system, appears to provide greater insight into the functioning of TGR. This also augments recent observations reported on the basis of X-ray structure data on SmTGR monomer lacking the C-terminal selenocysteine tail. PMID:19070522

  8. Nitrate Reductase-Deficient Mutants in Barley 1

    PubMed Central

    Somers, David A.; Kuo, Tsung-Min; Kleinhofs, Andris; Warner, Robert L.

    1983-01-01

    Nitrate reductase-deficient barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) mutants were assayed for the presence of a functional molybdenum cofactor determined from the activity of the molybdoenzyme, xanthine dehydrogenase, and for nitrate reductase-associated activities. Rocket immunoelectrophoresis was used to detect nitrate reductase cross-reacting material in the mutants. The cross-reacting material levels of the mutants ranged from 8 to 136% of the wild type and were correlated with their nitrate reductase-associated activities, except for nar 1c, which lacked all associated nitrate reductase activities but had 38% of the wild-type cross-reacting material. The cross-reacting material of two nar 1 mutants, as well as nar 2a, Xno 18, Xno 19, and Xno 29, exhibited rocket immunoprecipitates that were similar to the wild-type enzyme indicating structural homology between the mutant and wild-type nitrate reductase proteins. The cross-reacting materials of the seven remaining nar 1 alleles formed rockets only in the presence of purified wild-type nitrate reductase, suggesting structural modifications of the mutant cross-reacting materials. All nar 1 alleles and Xno 29 had xanthine dehydrogenase activity indicating the presence of functional molybdenum cofactors. These results suggest that nar 1 is the structural gene for nitrate reductase. Mutants nar 2a, Xno 18, and Xno 19 lacked xanthine dehydrogenase activity and are considered to be molybdenum cofactor deficient mutants. Cross-reacting material was not detected in uninduced wild-type or mutant extracts, suggesting that nitrate reductase is synthesized de novo in response to nitrate. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:16662774

  9. The gene encoding dinitrogenase reductase 2 is required for expression of the second alternative nitrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed Central

    Joerger, R D; Wolfinger, E D; Bishop, P E

    1991-01-01

    Under diazotrophic conditions in the absence of molybdenum (Mo) and vanadium (V), Azotobacter vinelandii reduces N2 to NH4+ by using nitrogenase 3 (encoded by anfHDGK). However, dinitrogenase reductase 2 (encoded by vnfH) is also expressed under these conditions even though this protein is a component of the V-containing alternative nitrogenase. Mutant strains that lack dinitrogenase reductase 2 (VnfH-) grow slower than the wild-type strain in N-free, Mo-, and V-deficient medium. In this medium, these strains synthesize dinitrogenase reductase 1 (a component of the Mo-containing nitrogenase encoded by nifH), even though this component is not normally synthesized in the absence of Mo. Strains that lack both dinitrogenase reductases 1 and 2 (NifH-VnfH-) are unable to grow diazotrophically in Mo- and V-deficient medium. In this medium, NifH- VnfH- strains containing an anfH-lacZ transcriptional fusion exhibited less than 3% of the beta-galactosidase activity observed in the wild type with the same fusion. Beta-Galactosidase activity expressed by VnfH- mutants containing the anfH-lacZ fusion ranged between 57 and 78% of that expressed by the wild type containing the same fusion. Thus, expression of dinitrogenase reductase 2 seems to be required for transcription of the anfHDGK operon, although, in VnfH-mutants, dinitrogenase reductase 1 appears to serve this function. Active dinitrogenase reductase 1 or 2 is probably required for this function since a nifM deletion mutant containing the anfH-lacZ fusion was unable to synthesize beta-galactosidase above background levels. An anfA deletion strain containing the anfH-lacZ fusion exhibited beta-galactosidase activity at 16% of that of the wild type containing the same fusion. However, in the presence of NH4+, the beta-galactosidase activity expressed by this strain more than doubled. This indicates that AnfA is required not only for normal levels of anfHDGK transcription but also for NH4+ -and, to a lesser extent, Mo

  10. The gene encoding dinitrogenase reductase 2 is required for expression of the second alternative nitrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Joerger, R D; Wolfinger, E D; Bishop, P E

    1991-07-01

    Under diazotrophic conditions in the absence of molybdenum (Mo) and vanadium (V), Azotobacter vinelandii reduces N2 to NH4+ by using nitrogenase 3 (encoded by anfHDGK). However, dinitrogenase reductase 2 (encoded by vnfH) is also expressed under these conditions even though this protein is a component of the V-containing alternative nitrogenase. Mutant strains that lack dinitrogenase reductase 2 (VnfH-) grow slower than the wild-type strain in N-free, Mo-, and V-deficient medium. In this medium, these strains synthesize dinitrogenase reductase 1 (a component of the Mo-containing nitrogenase encoded by nifH), even though this component is not normally synthesized in the absence of Mo. Strains that lack both dinitrogenase reductases 1 and 2 (NifH-VnfH-) are unable to grow diazotrophically in Mo- and V-deficient medium. In this medium, NifH- VnfH- strains containing an anfH-lacZ transcriptional fusion exhibited less than 3% of the beta-galactosidase activity observed in the wild type with the same fusion. Beta-Galactosidase activity expressed by VnfH- mutants containing the anfH-lacZ fusion ranged between 57 and 78% of that expressed by the wild type containing the same fusion. Thus, expression of dinitrogenase reductase 2 seems to be required for transcription of the anfHDGK operon, although, in VnfH-mutants, dinitrogenase reductase 1 appears to serve this function. Active dinitrogenase reductase 1 or 2 is probably required for this function since a nifM deletion mutant containing the anfH-lacZ fusion was unable to synthesize beta-galactosidase above background levels. An anfA deletion strain containing the anfH-lacZ fusion exhibited beta-galactosidase activity at 16% of that of the wild type containing the same fusion. However, in the presence of NH4+, the beta-galactosidase activity expressed by this strain more than doubled. This indicates that AnfA is required not only for normal levels of anfHDGK transcription but also for NH4+ -and, to a lesser extent, Mo

  11. In Situ Association of Calvin Cycle Enzymes, Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase Activase, Ferredoxin-NADP+ Reductase, and Nitrite Reductase with Thylakoid and Pyrenoid Membranes of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Chloroplasts as Revealed by Immunoelectron Microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Suss, K. H.; Prokhorenko, I.; Adler, K.

    1995-01-01

    The in situ localization of the chloroplast enzymes ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco), Rubisco activase, ribose-5-phosphate isomerase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, aldolase, nitrite reductase, ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase, and H+-ATP synthase was studied by immunoelectron microscopy in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Immunogold labeling revealed that, despite Rubisco in the pyrenoid matrix, Calvin cycle enzymes, Rubisco activase, nitrite reductase, ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase, and H+-ATP synthase are associated predominantly with chloroplast thylakoid membranes and the inner surface of the pyrenoid membrane. This is in accord with previous enzyme localization studies in higher plants (K.H. Suss, C. Arkona, R. Manteuffel, K. Adler [1993] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 90: 5514-5518). Pyrenoid tubules do not contain these enzymes. The pyrenoid matrix consists of Rubisco but is devoid of the other photosynthetic enzymes investigated. Evidence for the occurrence of two Rubisco forms differing in their spatial localization has also been obtained: Rubisco form I appears to be membrane associated like other Calvin cycle components, whereas Rubisco form II is confined to the pyrenoid matrix. It is proposed that enzyme form I represents an active Rubisco when assembled into Calvin cycle enzyme complexes, whereas Rubisco form II may be part of a CO2-concentrating mechanism. Pyrenoidal Calvin cycle complexes are thought to be highly active in CO2 fixation and important for the synthesis of starch around the pyrenoid. PMID:12228443

  12. In Situ Association of Calvin Cycle Enzymes, Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase Activase, Ferredoxin-NADP+ Reductase, and Nitrite Reductase with Thylakoid and Pyrenoid Membranes of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Chloroplasts as Revealed by Immunoelectron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Suss, K. H.; Prokhorenko, I.; Adler, K.

    1995-04-01

    The in situ localization of the chloroplast enzymes ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco), Rubisco activase, ribose-5-phosphate isomerase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, aldolase, nitrite reductase, ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase, and H+-ATP synthase was studied by immunoelectron microscopy in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Immunogold labeling revealed that, despite Rubisco in the pyrenoid matrix, Calvin cycle enzymes, Rubisco activase, nitrite reductase, ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase, and H+-ATP synthase are associated predominantly with chloroplast thylakoid membranes and the inner surface of the pyrenoid membrane. This is in accord with previous enzyme localization studies in higher plants (K.H. Suss, C. Arkona, R. Manteuffel, K. Adler [1993] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 90: 5514-5518). Pyrenoid tubules do not contain these enzymes. The pyrenoid matrix consists of Rubisco but is devoid of the other photosynthetic enzymes investigated. Evidence for the occurrence of two Rubisco forms differing in their spatial localization has also been obtained: Rubisco form I appears to be membrane associated like other Calvin cycle components, whereas Rubisco form II is confined to the pyrenoid matrix. It is proposed that enzyme form I represents an active Rubisco when assembled into Calvin cycle enzyme complexes, whereas Rubisco form II may be part of a CO2-concentrating mechanism. Pyrenoidal Calvin cycle complexes are thought to be highly active in CO2 fixation and important for the synthesis of starch around the pyrenoid.

  13. Solubilization and Resolution of the Membrane-Bound Nitrite Reductase from Paracoccus Halodenitrificans into Nitrite and Nitric Oxide Reductases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Michael A.; Cronin, Sonja E.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1984-01-01

    Membranes prepared from Paracoccus halodenitrificans reduced nitrite or nitric oxide to nitrous oxide. Extraction of these membranes with the detergent CHAPSO [3-(3-Chlolamidoporopyldimethylammonio)-1-(2- hydroxy-1-propanesulfonate)], followed by ammonium sulfate fractionation of the solubilized proteins, resulted in the separation of nitrite and nitric oxide reductase activities. The fraction containing nitrite reductase activity spectrally resembled a cd-type cytochrome. Several cytochromes were detected in the nitric oxide reductase fraction. Which, if any, of these cytochromes is associated with the reduction of nitric oxide is not clear at this time.

  14. Determination of the g-matrix orientation in flavin radicals by high-field/high-frequency electron-nuclear double resonance.

    PubMed

    Kay, Christopher W M; Schleicher, Erik; Hitomi, Kenichi; Todo, Takeshi; Bittl, Robert; Weber, Stefan

    2005-11-01

    A high-microwave-frequency/high-magnetic-field pulsed electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) study performed at 94 GHz on the flavin semiquinone cofactor of Xenopus laevis (6-4) photolyase in its neutral radical state is presented. Although the principal values of the flavin radical's g-matrix are not fully resolved in the 94-GHz EPR spectrum in a nonoriented sample, the orientation of the principal axes of g is obtained by exploiting the orientation selection of the proton ENDOR signals from the methyl protons at C-8alpha and the deuteron ENDOR signals from D-5 in an enzyme sample in deuterated buffer. This procedure for assigning the orientation of g relative to the molecular frame makes use of commercially available ENDOR instrumentation without the necessity to perform single-crystal studies.

  15. Extracellular Electron Transport-Mediated Fe(III) Reduction by a Community of Alkaliphilic Bacteria That Use Flavins as Electron Shuttles

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Samuel J.; McMillan, Duncan G. G.; Renz, Marc B.; Schmidt, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The biochemical and molecular mechanisms used by alkaliphilic bacterial communities to reduce metals in the environment are currently unknown. We demonstrate that an alkaliphilic (pH > 9) consortium dominated by Tissierella, Clostridium, and Alkaliphilus spp. is capable of using iron (Fe3+) as a final electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. Iron reduction is associated with the production of a freely diffusible species that, upon rudimentary purification and subsequent spectroscopic, high-performance liquid chromatography, and electrochemical analysis, has been identified as a flavin species displaying properties indistinguishable from those of riboflavin. Due to the link between iron reduction and the onset of flavin production, it is likely that riboflavin has an import role in extracellular metal reduction by this alkaliphilic community. PMID:24141133

  16. Substrate induction of nitrate reductase in barley aleurone layers.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, T E; Varner, J E

    1969-01-01

    Nitrate induces the formation of nitrate reductase activity in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Himalaya) aleurone layers. Previous work has demonstrated de novo synthesis of alpha-amylase by gibberellic acid in the same tissue. The increase in nitrate reductase activity is inhibited by cycloheximide and 6-methylpurine, but not by actinomycin D. Nitrate does not induce alpha-amylase synthesis, and it has no effect on the gibberellic acid-induced synthesis of alpha-amylase. Also, there is little or no direct effect of gibberellic acid (during the first 6 hr of induction) or of abscisic acid on the nitrate-induced formation of nitrate reductase. Gibberellic acid does interfere with nitrate reductase activity during long-term experiments (greater than 6 hr). However, the time course of this inhibition suggests that the inhibition may be a secondary one. Barley aleurone layers therefore provide a convenient tissue for the study of both substrate- and hormone-induced enzyme formation.

  17. Mutations in the 3β-Hydroxysterol Δ24-Reductase Gene Cause Desmosterolosis, an Autosomal Recessive Disorder of Cholesterol Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Waterham, Hans R.; Koster, Janet; Romeijn, Gerrit Jan; Hennekam, Raoul C.M.; Vreken, Peter; Andersson, Hans C.; FitzPatrick, David R.; Kelley, Richard. I.; Wanders, Ronald J. A.

    2001-01-01

    Desmosterolosis is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by multiple congenital anomalies. Patients with desmosterolosis have elevated levels of the cholesterol precursor desmosterol, in plasma, tissue, and cultured cells; this abnormality suggests a deficiency of the enzyme 3β-hydroxysterol Δ24-reductase (DHCR24), which, in cholesterol biosynthesis, catalyzes the reduction of the Δ24 double bond of sterol intermediates. We identified the human DHCR24 cDNA, by the similarity between the encoded protein and a recently characterized plant enzyme—DWF1/DIM, from Arabidopsis thaliana—catalyzing a different but partially similar reaction in steroid/sterol biosynthesis in plants. Heterologous expression, in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, of the DHCR24 cDNA, followed by enzyme-activity measurements, confirmed that it encodes DHCR24. The encoded DHCR24 protein has a calculated molecular weight of 60.1 kD, contains a potential N-terminal secretory-signal sequence as well as at least one putative transmembrane helix, and is a member of a recently defined family of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)–dependent oxidoreductases. Conversion of desmosterol to cholesterol by DHCR24 in vitro is strictly dependent on reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate and is increased twofold by the addition of FAD to the assay. The corresponding gene, DHCR24, was identified by database searching, spans ∼46.4 kb, is localized to chromosome 1p31.1-p33, and comprises nine exons and eight introns. Sequence analysis of DHCR24 in two patients with desmosterolosis revealed four different missense mutations, which were shown, by functional expression, in yeast, of the patient alleles, to be disease causing. Our data demonstrate that desmosterolosis is a cholesterol-biosynthesis disorder caused by mutations in DHCR24. PMID:11519011

  18. Function of S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) in plant development and under biotic/abiotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Leterrier, Marina; Chaki, Mounira; Airaki, Morad; Valderrama, Raquel; Palma, José M; Barroso, Juan B

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, it was established that the class III alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH3) enzyme, also known as glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FALDH; EC 1.2.1.1), catalyzes the NADH-dependent reduction of S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and therefore was also designated as GSNO reductase. This finding has opened new aspects in the metabolism of nitric oxide (NO) and NO-derived molecules where GSNO is a key component. In this article, current knowledge of the involvement and potential function of this enzyme during plant development and under biotic/abiotic stress is briefly reviewed. PMID:21543898

  19. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity and phytocomponent investigation of Basella alba leaf extract as a treatment for hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Gunasekaran; Salvamani, Shamala; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima; Shaharuddin, Noor Azmi; Pattiram, Parveen Devi; Shukor, Mohd Yunus

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase is the key enzyme of the mevalonate pathway that produces cholesterol. Inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase reduces cholesterol biosynthesis in the liver. Synthetic drugs, statins, are commonly used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Due to the side effects of statins, natural HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors of plant origin are needed. In this study, 25 medicinal plant methanol extracts were screened for anti-HMG-CoA reductase activity. Basella alba leaf extract showed the highest inhibitory effect at about 74%. Thus, B. alba was examined in order to investigate its phytochemical components. Gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry and reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed the presence of phenol 2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl), 1-heptatriacotanol, oleic acid, eicosyl ester, naringin, apigenin, luteolin, ascorbic acid, and α-tocopherol, which have been reported to possess antihypercholesterolemic effects. Further investigation of in vivo models should be performed in order to confirm its potential as an alternative treatment for hypercholesterolemia and related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25609924

  20. Comparison of regulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase in hepatoma cells grown in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Beirne, O R; Watson, J A

    1976-01-01

    Unlike the normal liver, numerous transplantable rodent and human hepatomas are unable to alter their rate of sterol synthesis and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-GoA) reductase [mevalonate: NADP+ oxidoreductase (CoA-acylating), EC 1.1.1.34] activity in response to a dietary cholesterol challenge. It has been suggested that this metabolic defect is linked to the process of malignant transformation. Hepatoma 7288C "lacks" feedback regulation of cholesterol synthesis when grown in vivo but expresses this regulatory property when grown in vitro (then called HTC). Therefore, it was used as a model system to answer whether an established hepatoma cell line that modulates its rate of cholesterol synthesis in vitro can express this property when grown in vivo, and whether cells reisolated from the tumor mass have the same regulatory phenotype as before transplantation. Our results show that long-term growth of hepatoma 7288C in tissue culture has not caused a biotransformation that permits feedback regulation of HMG-CoA reductase when the cells are transplanted back into host animals. In addition, HTC cells reisolated from the tumor mass and established in tissue culture continue to have the ability to regulate HMG-CoA reductase activity. Therefore, malignant transformation is not categorically linked to the loss of the cellular components necessary to regulate sterol synthesis and HMG-CoA reductase activity. Images PMID:183207

  1. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity and phytocomponent investigation of Basella alba leaf extract as a treatment for hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Baskaran, Gunasekaran; Salvamani, Shamala; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima; Shaharuddin, Noor Azmi; Pattiram, Parveen Devi; Shukor, Mohd Yunus

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase is the key enzyme of the mevalonate pathway that produces cholesterol. Inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase reduces cholesterol biosynthesis in the liver. Synthetic drugs, statins, are commonly used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Due to the side effects of statins, natural HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors of plant origin are needed. In this study, 25 medicinal plant methanol extracts were screened for anti-HMG-CoA reductase activity. Basella alba leaf extract showed the highest inhibitory effect at about 74%. Thus, B. alba was examined in order to investigate its phytochemical components. Gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry and reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed the presence of phenol 2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl), 1-heptatriacotanol, oleic acid, eicosyl ester, naringin, apigenin, luteolin, ascorbic acid, and α-tocopherol, which have been reported to possess antihypercholesterolemic effects. Further investigation of in vivo models should be performed in order to confirm its potential as an alternative treatment for hypercholesterolemia and related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25609924

  2. Evidence for posttranslational protein flavinylation in the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum: Structural and biochemical insights from the catalytic core of a periplasmic flavin-trafficking protein

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2015-05-05

    The syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum is an important human pathogen but a highly enigmatic bacterium that cannot be cultivated in vitro. T. pallidum lacks many biosynthetic pathways and therefore has evolved the capability to exploit host-derived metabolites via its periplasmic lipoprotein repertoire. We recently reported a flavin-trafficking protein in T. pallidum (Ftp_Tp; TP0796) as the first bacterial metal-dependent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD into AMP and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the spirochete’s periplasm. However, orthologs of Ftp_Tp from other bacteria appear to lack this hydrolytic activity; rather, they bind and flavinylate subunits of a cytoplasmic membrane redoxmore » system (Nqr/Rnf). To further explore this dichotomy, biochemical analyses, protein crystallography, and structure-based mutagenesis were used to show that a single amino acid change (N55Y) in Ftp_Tp converts it from an Mg²⁺-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase to an FAD-binding protein. We also demonstrated that Ftp_Tp has a second enzymatic activity (Mg²⁺-FMN transferase); it flavinylates protein(s) covalently with FMN on a threonine side chain of an appropriate sequence motif using FAD as the substrate. Moreover, mutation of a metal-binding residue (D284A) eliminates Ftp_Tp’s dual activities, thereby underscoring the role of Mg²⁺ in the enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The posttranslational flavinylation activity that can target a periplasmic lipoprotein (TP0171) has not previously been described. The observed activities reveal the catalytic flexibility of a treponemal protein to perform multiple functions. Together, these findings imply mechanisms by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is maintained and how flavoproteins are generated by Ftp_Tp locally in the T. pallidum periplasm.« less

  3. Evidence for Posttranslational Protein Flavinylation in the Syphilis Spirochete Treponema pallidum: Structural and Biochemical Insights from the Catalytic Core of a Periplasmic Flavin-Trafficking Protein

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum is an important human pathogen but a highly enigmatic bacterium that cannot be cultivated in vitro. T. pallidum lacks many biosynthetic pathways and therefore has evolved the capability to exploit host-derived metabolites via its periplasmic lipoprotein repertoire. We recently reported a flavin-trafficking protein in T. pallidum (Ftp_Tp; TP0796) as the first bacterial metal-dependent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD into AMP and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the spirochete’s periplasm. However, orthologs of Ftp_Tp from other bacteria appear to lack this hydrolytic activity; rather, they bind and flavinylate subunits of a cytoplasmic membrane redox system (Nqr/Rnf). To further explore this dichotomy, biochemical analyses, protein crystallography, and structure-based mutagenesis were used to show that a single amino acid change (N55Y) in Ftp_Tp converts it from an Mg2+-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase to an FAD-binding protein. We also demonstrated that Ftp_Tp has a second enzymatic activity (Mg2+-FMN transferase); it flavinylates protein(s) covalently with FMN on a threonine side chain of an appropriate sequence motif using FAD as the substrate. Moreover, mutation of a metal-binding residue (D284A) eliminates Ftp_Tp’s dual activities, thereby underscoring the role of Mg2+ in the enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The posttranslational flavinylation activity that can target a periplasmic lipoprotein (TP0171) has not previously been described. The observed activities reveal the catalytic flexibility of a treponemal protein to perform multiple functions. Together, these findings imply mechanisms by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is maintained and how flavoproteins are generated by Ftp_Tp locally in the T. pallidum periplasm. PMID:25944861

  4. Structural and Functional Investigation of Flavin Binding Center of the NqrC Subunit of Sodium-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase from Vibrio harveyi

    PubMed Central

    Bertsova, Yulia; Polovinkin, Vitaly; Gushchin, Ivan; Ishchenko, Andrii; Kovalev, Kirill; Mishin, Alexey; Kachalova, Galina; Popov, Alexander; Bogachev, Alexander; Gordeliy, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQR) is a redox-driven sodium pump operating in the respiratory chain of various bacteria, including pathogenic species. The enzyme has a unique set of redox active prosthetic groups, which includes two covalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) residues attached to threonine residues in subunits NqrB and NqrC. The reason of FMN covalent bonding in the subunits has not been established yet. In the current work, binding of free FMN to the apo-form of NqrC from Vibrio harveyi was studied showing very low affinity of NqrC to FMN in the absence of its covalent bonding. To study structural aspects of flavin binding in NqrC, its holo-form was crystallized and its 3D structure was solved at 1.56 Å resolution. It was found that the isoalloxazine moiety of the FMN residue is buried in a hydrophobic cavity and that its pyrimidine ring is squeezed between hydrophobic amino acid residues while its benzene ring is extended from the protein surroundings. This structure of the flavin-binding pocket appears to provide flexibility of the benzene ring, which can help the FMN residue to take the bended conformation and thus to stabilize the one-electron reduced form of the prosthetic group. These properties may also lead to relatively weak noncovalent binding of the flavin. This fact along with periplasmic location of the FMN-binding domains in the vast majority of NqrC-like proteins may explain the necessity of the covalent bonding of this prosthetic group to prevent its loss to the external medium. PMID:25734798

  5. Structure of the Proline Utilization A Proline Dehydrogenase Domain Inactivated by N-propargylglycine Provides Insight into Conformational Changes Induced by Substrate Binding and Flavin Reduction†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Dhiraj; Zhu, Weidong; Johnson, William H.; Whitman, Christian P.; Becker, Donald F.; Tanner, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Proline utilization A (PutA) from Escherichia coli is a flavoprotein that has mutually exclusive roles as a transcriptional repressor of the put regulon and a membrane-associated enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of proline to glutamate. Previous studies have shown that the binding of proline in the proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) active site and subsequent reduction of the FAD trigger global conformational changes that enhance PutA-membrane affinity. These events cause PutA to switch from its repressor to enzymatic role, but the mechanism by which this signal is propagated from the active site to the distal membrane-binding domain is largely unknown. Here, it is shown that N-propargylglycine irreversibly inactivates PutA by covalently linking the flavin N(5) atom to the ε-amino of Lys329. Furthermore, inactivation locks PutA into a conformation that may mimic the proline reduced, membrane-associated form. The 2.15 Å resolution structure of the inactivated PRODH domain suggests that the initial events involved in broadcasting the reduced flavin state to the distal membrane binding domain include major reorganization of the flavin ribityl chain, severe (35 degree) butterfly bending of the isoalloxazine ring, and disruption of an electrostatic network involving the flavin N(5), Arg431, and Asp370. The structure also provides information about conformational changes associated with substrate binding. This analysis suggests that the active site is incompletely assembled in the absence of the substrate, and the binding of proline draws together conserved residues in helix 8 and the β1-αl loop to complete the active site. PMID:19994913

  6. Comparative anatomy of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Jez, J M; Bennett, M J; Schlegel, B P; Lewis, M; Penning, T M

    1997-01-01

    The aldo-keto reductases metabolize a wide range of substrates and are potential drug targets. This protein superfamily includes aldose reductases, aldehyde reductases, hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases and dihydrodiol dehydrogenases. By combining multiple sequence alignments with known three-dimensional structures and the results of site-directed mutagenesis studies, we have developed a structure/function analysis of this superfamily. Our studies suggest that the (alpha/beta)8-barrel fold provides a common scaffold for an NAD(P)(H)-dependent catalytic activity, with substrate specificity determined by variation of loops on the C-terminal side of the barrel. All the aldo-keto reductases are dependent on nicotinamide cofactors for catalysis and retain a similar cofactor binding site, even among proteins with less than 30% amino acid sequence identity. Likewise, the aldo-keto reductase active site is highly conserved. However, our alignments indicate that variation ofa single residue in the active site may alter the reaction mechanism from carbonyl oxidoreduction to carbon-carbon double-bond reduction, as in the 3-oxo-5beta-steroid 4-dehydrogenases (Delta4-3-ketosteroid 5beta-reductases) of the superfamily. Comparison of the proposed substrate binding pocket suggests residues 54 and 118, near the active site, as possible discriminators between sugar and steroid substrates. In addition, sequence alignment and subsequent homology modelling of mouse liver 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and rat ovary 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase indicate that three loops on the C-terminal side of the barrel play potential roles in determining the positional and stereo-specificity of the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases. Finally, we propose that the aldo-keto reductase superfamily may represent an example of divergent evolution from an ancestral multifunctional oxidoreductase and an example of convergent evolution to the same active-site constellation as the short

  7. Regulation of the Neurospora crassa assimilatory nitrate reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Ketchum, P A; Zeeb, D D; Owens, M S

    1977-01-01

    Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-nitrate reductase from Neurospora crassa was purified and found to be stimulated by certain amino acids, citrate, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Stimulation by citrate and the amino acids was dependent upon the prior removal of EDTA from the enzyme preparations, since low quantities of EDTA resulted in maximal stimulation. Removal of EDTA from enzyme preparations by dialysis against Chelex-containing buffer resulted in a loss of nitrate reductase activity. Addition of alanine, arginine, glycine, glutamine, glutamate, histidine, tryptophan, and citrate restored and stimulated nitrate reductase activity from 29- to 46-fold. The amino acids tested altered the Km of NADPH-nitrate reductase for NADPH but did not significantly change that for nitrate. The Km of nitrate reductase for NADPH increased with increasing concentrations of histidine but decreased with increasing concentrations of glutamine. Amino acid modulation of NADPH-nitrate reductase activity is discussed in relation to the conservation of energy (NADPH) by Neurospora when nitrate is the nitrogen source. PMID:19423

  8. An overview on 5alpha-reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Thareja, Suresh; Verma, Abhilasha; Bhardwaj, Tilak Raj; Kumar, Manoj

    2010-02-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the noncancerous proliferation of the prostate gland associated with benign prostatic obstruction and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) such as frequency, hesitancy, urgency, etc. Its prevalence increases with age affecting around 70% by the age of 70 years. High activity of 5alpha-reductase enzyme in humans results in excessive dihydrotestosterone levels in peripheral tissues and hence suppression of androgen action by 5alpha-reductase inhibitors is a logical treatment for BPH as they inhibit the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone. Finasteride (13) was the first steroidal 5alpha-reductase inhibitor approved by U.S. Food and Drug Administration (USFDA). In human it decreases the prostatic DHT level by 70-90% and reduces the prostatic size. Dutasteride (27) another related analogue has been approved in 2002. Unlike Finasteride, Dutasteride is a competitive inhibitor of both 5alpha-reductase type I and type II isozymes, reduced DHT levels >90% following 1 year of oral administration. A number of classes of non-steroidal inhibitors of 5alpha-reductase have also been synthesized generally by removing one or more rings from the azasteroidal structure or by an early non-steroidal lead (ONO-3805) (261). In this review all categories of inhibitors of 5alpha-reductase have been covered. PMID:19879888

  9. Effects of thioredoxin reductase-1 deletion on embryogenesis and transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Bondareva, Alla A.; Capecchi, Mario R.; Iverson, Sonya V.; Li, Yan; Lopez, Nathan I.; Lucas, Olivier; Merrill, Gary F.; Prigge, Justin R.; Siders, Ashley M.; Wakamiya, Maki; Wallin, Stephanie L.; Schmidt, Edward E.

    2007-01-01

    Thioredoxin reductases (Txnrd)1 maintain intracellular redox homeostasis in most organisms. Metazoans Txnrds also participate in signal transduction. Mouse embryos homozygous for a targeted null mutation of the txnrd1 gene, encoding the cytosolic thioredoxin reductase, were viable at embryonic day 8.5 (E8.5) but not at E9.5. Histology revealed that txnrd1−/− cells were capable of proliferation and differentiation; however, mutant embryos were smaller than wild-type littermates and failed to gastrulate. In situ marker gene analyses indicated primitive streak mesoderm did not form. Microarray analyses on E7.5 txnrd−/− and txnrd+/+ littermates showed similar mRNA levels for peroxiredoxins, glutathione reductases, mitochondrial Txnrd2, and most markers of cell proliferation. Conversely, mRNAs encoding sulfiredoxin, IGF-binding protein 1, carbonyl reductase 3, glutamate cysteine ligase, glutathione S-transferases, and metallothioneins were more abundant in mutants. Many gene expression responses mirrored those in thioredoxin reductase 1-null yeast; however mice exhibited a novel response within the peroxiredoxin catalytic cycle. Thus, whereas yeast induce peroxiredoxin mRNAs in response to thioredoxin reductase disruption, mice induced sulfiredoxin mRNA. In summary, Txnrd1 was required for correct patterning of the early embryo and progression to later development. Conserved responses to Txnrd1 disruption likely allowed proliferation and limited differentiation of the mutant embryo cells. PMID:17697936

  10. Oxygen uptake after electron transfer from amines, amino acids and ascorbic acid to triplet flavins in air-saturated aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Görner, Helmut

    2007-05-25

    The photolysis of lumichrome, riboflavin, flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) was studied in air-saturated aqueous solution at room temperature in the presence of appropriate electron donors: ascorbic acid, aromatic amino acids or amines, e.g. ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA). The overall reaction is conversion of oxygen via the hydroperoxyl/superoxide radical into hydrogen peroxide. The quantum yield of oxygen uptake increases with the donor concentration, e.g. up to 0.3 for riboflavin, FMN or FAD in the presence of EDTA or ascorbic acid (0.3-10mM). The formation of H(2)O(2) is initiated by quenching of the acceptor triplet state by the electron donor and subsequent reaction of the semiquinone radical with oxygen. Specific properties of flavins are discussed including the radicals involved and the pH and concentration dependences. The quantum yield of photodegradation is low under air, but substantial under argon, where the major product absorbing in the visible spectral range is the corresponding hydroquinone. PMID:17395476

  11. Photoelectric Properties Based on Electric Field Modulation of Photoinduced Electron Transfer Processes in Flavin-Porphyrin Hetero-type Langmuir-Blodgett Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isoda, Satoru; Hanazato, Yoshio; Ueyama, Satoshi; Nishikawa, Satoshi; Akiyama, Kouich

    2004-05-01

    Metal-insulator-meal devices composed of flavin-porphyrin hetero-type Langmuir-Blodgett films showed highly efficient photoelectric properties mainly attributable to the fast charge separation process at a molecular heterojunction (MHJ) between flavin and porphyrin. The photoelectric properties of the MHJ devices showed different characteristics depending on the redox state of the central metal of porphyrin, i.e., Ru(III) or Ru(II). The rectifying behavior of the photocurrent was observed for the Ru(III)-MHJ device, whereas the Ru(II)-MHJ device did not show the rectifying behavior. We concluded that the rectifying behavior was mainly controlled by the electric field dependence of the charge recombination process. Furthermore, a bell-shaped photocurrent-voltage curve was observed for the Ru(II)-MHJ device. The mechanism underlying the negative resistance might be based on the electric field dependence of the charge shift process in flavin monolayers controlled by the inverted region mechanism of the Marcus electron transfer theory.

  12. Anaerobic degradation of nitrilotriacetate (NTA) in a denitrifying bacterium: purification and characterization of the NTA dehydrogenase-nitrate reductase enzyme complex.

    PubMed Central

    Jenal-Wanner, U; Egli, T

    1993-01-01

    The initial step in the anoxic metabolism of nitrilotriacetate (NTA) was investigated in a denitrifying member of the gamma subgroup of the Proteobacteria. In membrane-free cell extracts, the first step of NTA oxidation was catalyzed by a protein complex consisting of two enzymes, NTA dehydrogenase (NTADH) and nitrate reductase (NtR). The products formed were iminodiacetate and glyoxylate. Electrons derived from the oxidation of NTA were transferred to nitrate only via the artificial dye phenazine methosulfate, and nitrate was stoichiometrically reduced to nitrite. NTADH activity could be measured only in the presence of NtrR and vice versa. The NTADH-NtrR enzyme complex was purified and characterized. NTADH and NtrR were both alpha 2 dimers and had molecular weights of 170,000 and 105,000, respectively. NTADH contained covalently bound flavin cofactor, and NtrR contained a type b cytochrome. Optimum NTA-oxidizing activity was achieved at a molar ratio of NTADH to NtrR of approximately 1:1. So far, NTA is the only known substrate for NTADH. This is the first report of a redox enzyme complex catalyzing the oxidation of a substrate and concomitantly reducing nitrate. Images PMID:8250558

  13. Aldose Reductase, Oxidative Stress, and Diabetic Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wai Ho; Martin, Kathleen A.; Hwa, John

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a complex metabolic disorder arising from lack of insulin production or insulin resistance (Diagnosis and classification of diabetes mellitus, 2007). DM is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed world, particularly from vascular complications such as atherothrombosis in the coronary vessels. Aldose reductase (AR; ALR2; EC 1.1.1.21), a key enzyme in the polyol pathway, catalyzes nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent reduction of glucose to sorbitol, leading to excessive accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in various tissues of DM including the heart, vasculature, neurons, eyes, and kidneys. As an example, hyperglycemia through such polyol pathway induced oxidative stress, may have dual heart actions, on coronary blood vessel (atherothrombosis) and myocardium (heart failure) leading to severe morbidity and mortality (reviewed in Heather and Clarke, 2011). In cells cultured under high glucose conditions, many studies have demonstrated similar AR-dependent increases in ROS production, confirming AR as an important factor for the pathogenesis of many diabetic complications. Moreover, recent studies have shown that AR inhibitors may be able to prevent or delay the onset of cardiovascular complications such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, atherosclerosis, and atherothrombosis. In this review, we will focus on describing pivotal roles of AR in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases as well as other diabetic complications, and the potential use of AR inhibitors as an emerging therapeutic strategy in preventing DM complications. PMID:22582044

  14. Aldose reductase, oxidative stress, and diabetic mellitus.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wai Ho; Martin, Kathleen A; Hwa, John

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a complex metabolic disorder arising from lack of insulin production or insulin resistance (Diagnosis and classification of diabetes mellitus, 2007). DM is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed world, particularly from vascular complications such as atherothrombosis in the coronary vessels. Aldose reductase (AR; ALR2; EC 1.1.1.21), a key enzyme in the polyol pathway, catalyzes nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent reduction of glucose to sorbitol, leading to excessive accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in various tissues of DM including the heart, vasculature, neurons, eyes, and kidneys. As an example, hyperglycemia through such polyol pathway induced oxidative stress, may have dual heart actions, on coronary blood vessel (atherothrombosis) and myocardium (heart failure) leading to severe morbidity and mortality (reviewed in Heather and Clarke, 2011). In cells cultured under high glucose conditions, many studies have demonstrated similar AR-dependent increases in ROS production, confirming AR as an important factor for the pathogenesis of many diabetic complications. Moreover, recent studies have shown that AR inhibitors may be able to prevent or delay the onset of cardiovascular complications such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, atherosclerosis, and atherothrombosis. In this review, we will focus on describing pivotal roles of AR in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases as well as other diabetic complications, and the potential use of AR inhibitors as an emerging therapeutic strategy in preventing DM complications. PMID:22582044

  15. Aldose reductase mediates retinal microglia activation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kun-Che; Shieh, Biehuoy; Petrash, J Mark

    2016-04-29

    Retinal microglia (RMG) are one of the major immune cells in charge of surveillance of inflammatory responses in the eye. In the absence of an inflammatory stimulus, RMG reside predominately in the ganglion layer and inner or outer plexiform layers. However, under stress RMG become activated and migrate into the inner nuclear layer (INL) or outer nuclear layer (ONL). Activated RMG in cell culture secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines in a manner sensitive to downregulation by aldose reductase inhibitors. In this study, we utilized CX3CR1(GFP) mice carrying AR mutant alleles to evaluate the role of AR on RMG activation and migration in vivo. When tested on an AR(WT) background, IP injection of LPS induced RMG activation and migration into the INL and ONL. However, this phenomenon was largely prevented by AR inhibitors or in AR null mice, or was exacerbated in transgenic mice that over-express AR. LPS-induced increases in ocular levels of TNF-α and CX3CL-1 in WT mice were substantially lower in AR null mice or were reduced by AR inhibitor treatment. These studies demonstrate that AR expression in RMG may contribute to the proinflammatory phenotypes common to various eye diseases such as uveitis and diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27033597

  16. Aldose reductase mediates retinal microglia activation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kun-Che; Shieh, Biehuoy; Petrash, J Mark

    2016-04-29

    Retinal microglia (RMG) are one of the major immune cells in charge of surveillance of inflammatory responses in the eye. In the absence of an inflammatory stimulus, RMG reside predominately in the ganglion layer and inner or outer plexiform layers. However, under stress RMG become activated and migrate into the inner nuclear layer (INL) or outer nuclear layer (ONL). Activated RMG in cell culture secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines in a manner sensitive to downregulation by aldose reductase inhibitors. In this study, we utilized CX3CR1(GFP) mice carrying AR mutant alleles to evaluate the role of AR on RMG activation and migration in vivo. When tested on an AR(WT) background, IP injection of LPS induced RMG activation and migration into the INL and ONL. However, this phenomenon was largely prevented by AR inhibitors or in AR null mice, or was exacerbated in transgenic mice that over-express AR. LPS-induced increases in ocular levels of TNF-α and CX3CL-1 in WT mice were substantially lower in AR null mice or were reduced by AR inhibitor treatment. These studies demonstrate that AR expression in RMG may contribute to the proinflammatory phenotypes common to various eye diseases such as uveitis and diabetic retinopathy.

  17. Role of 5 alpha-reductase in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Randall, V A

    1994-04-01

    The mechanism of androgen action varies in different tissues, but in the majority of androgen target tissues either testosterone or 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) binds to a specific androgen receptor to form a complex that can regulate gene expression. Testosterone is metabolized to DHT by the enzyme 5 alpha-reductase. The autosomal recessive genetic disorder of 5 alpha-reductase deficiency has clearly shown that the requirement for DHT formation varies with different tissues. In this syndrome genetic males contain normal male internal structures including testes, but exhibit ambiguous or female external genitalia at birth; at puberty they undergo partial virilization which includes development of a male gender identity even if brought up as females. Their development suggests that testosterone itself is able to stimulate psychosexual behaviour, development of the embryonic wolffian duct, muscle development, voice deepening, spermatogenesis, and axillary and pubic hair growth; DHT seems to be essential for prostate development and growth, the development of the external genitalia and male patterns of facial and body hair growth or male-pattern baldness. How different hormones operate to regulate genes via the same receptor is currently unknown, but appears to involve cell-specific factors. The 5-alpha-reductase enzyme has proved difficult to isolate biochemically, but recently at least two human isoenzymes have been identified using molecular biological methods. All the various 5 alpha-reductase-deficient kindreds have been shown to have mutations in 5 alpha-reductase 2, the predominant form in the prostate. The biological role of 5 alpha-reductase 1 has not yet been ascertained, but at present it cannot be ruled out that some of the actions ascribed to testosterone are indeed in cells producing DHT via this enzyme. The activity of 5 alpha-reductase is also implicated in benign prostatic hypertrophy, hirsutism and possibly male-pattern baldness; recent evidence

  18. Structure of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Flavin Dependent Thymidylate Synthase (MtbThyX) at 2.0 Å Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Turley, Stewart; Ulmer, Jonathan E.; Rhie, Ho Gun; Hopkins Sibley, Carol; Hol, Wim G.J.

    2010-07-20

    A novel flavin-dependent thymidylate synthase was identified recently as an essential gene in many archaebacteria and some pathogenic eubacteria. This enzyme, ThyX, is a potential antibacterial drug target, since humans and most eukaryotes lack the thyX gene and depend upon the conventional thymidylate synthase (TS) for their dTMP requirements. We have cloned and overexpressed the thyX gene (Rv2754c) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Escherichia coli. The M. tuberculosis ThyX (MtbThyX) enzyme complements the E. coli {chi}2913 strain that lacks its conventional TS activity. The crystal structure of the homotetrameric MtbThyX was determined in the presence of the cofactor FAD and the substrate analog, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-5'-monophosphate (BrdUMP). In the active site, which is formed by three monomers, FAD is bound in an extended conformation with the adenosine ring in a deep pocket and BrdUMP in a closed conformation near the isoalloxazine ring. Structure-based mutational studies have revealed a critical role played by residues Lys165 and Arg168 in ThyX activity, possibly by governing access to the carbon atom to be methylated of a totally buried substrate dUMP.

  19. Interaction of Flavin-Dependent Fructose Dehydrogenase with Cytochrome c as Basis for the Construction of Biomacromolecular Architectures on Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Wettstein, Christoph; Kano, Kenji; Schäfer, Daniel; Wollenberger, Ulla; Lisdat, Fred

    2016-06-21

    The creation of electron transfer (ET) chains based on the defined arrangement of enzymes and redox proteins on electrode surfaces represents an interesting approach within the field of bioelectrocatalysis. In this study, we investigated the ET reaction of the flavin-dependent enzyme fructose dehydrogenase (FDH) with the redox protein cytochrome c (cyt c). Two different pH optima were found for the reaction in acidic and neutral solutions. When cyt c was adsorbed on an electrode surface while the enzyme remained in solution, ET proceeded efficiently in media of neutral pH. Interprotein ET was also observed in acidic media; however, it appeared to be less efficient. These findings suggest that two different ET pathways between the enzyme and cyt c may occur. Moreover, cyt c and FDH were immobilized in multiple layers on an electrode surface by means of another biomacromolecule: DNA (double stranded) using the layer-by-layer technique. The biprotein multilayer architecture showed a catalytic response in dependence on the fructose concentration, indicating that the ET reaction between both proteins is feasible even in the immobilized state. The electrode showed a defined response to fructose and a good storage stability. Our results contribute to the better understanding of the ET reaction between FDH and cyt c and provide the basis for the creation of all-biomolecule based fructose sensors the sensitivity of which can be controlled by the layer preparation. PMID:27213223

  20. The first step in polyethylene glycol degradation by sphingomonads proceeds via a flavoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase containing flavin adenine dinucleotide.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, M; Tanabe, M; Hataya, M; Enokibara, S; Duine, J A; Kawai, F

    2001-11-01

    Several Sphingomonas spp. utilize polyethylene glycols (PEGs) as a sole carbon and energy source, oxidative PEG degradation being initiated by a dye-linked dehydrogenase (PEG-DH) that oxidizes the terminal alcohol groups of the polymer chain. Purification and characterization of PEG-DH from Sphingomonas terrae revealed that the enzyme is membrane bound. The gene encoding this enzyme (pegA) was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant enzyme was vulnerable to aggregation and inactivation, but this could be prevented by addition of detergent. It is as a homodimeric protein with a subunit molecular mass of 58.8 kDa, each subunit containing 1 noncovalently bound flavin adenine dinucleotide but not Fe or Zn. PEG-DH recognizes a broad variety of primary aliphatic and aromatic alcohols as substrates. Comparison with known sequences revealed that PEG-DH belongs to the group of glucose-methanol-choline (GMC) flavoprotein oxidoreductases and that it is a novel type of flavoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase related (percent identical amino acids) to other, so far uncharacterized bacterial, membrane-bound, dye-linked dehydrogenases: alcohol dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas oleovorans (46%); choline dehydrogenase from E. coli (40%); L-sorbose dehydrogenase from Gluconobacter oxydans (38%); and 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol dehydrogenase from a Pseudomonas species (35%). PMID:11673442

  1. Photophysics of flavin derivatives absorbing in the blue-green region: thioflavins as potential cofactors of photoswitches.

    PubMed

    Marian, Christel M; Nakagawa, Setsuko; Rai-Constapel, Vidisha; Karasulu, Bora; Thiel, Walter

    2014-02-20

    The purpose of this study was to find flavin derivatives with absorption maxima in the blue-green region of the visible spectrum that might be used as alternative cofactors in blue-light photoreceptors. To this end, the vertical absorption spectra of eight lumiflavin-related compounds were calculated by means of quantum chemical methods. The compounds differ from lumiflavin by the subsitution of an S atom for an O atom at the 2- and/or 4-positions of the isoalloxazine core, the substitution of an N atom for a CH group in the 6- and/or 9-positions, or an extension of the π system at the 7- and 8-positions. For the three most promising compounds, 2-thio-lumiflavin, 4-thio-lumiflavin, and 2,4-dithio-lumiflavin, the quantum chemical investigations were extended to include geometry relaxations in the excited states, rates for spin-forbidden transitions and an estimate of spectral shifts brought about by polar protic environments. We find these thiocarbonyl compounds to have very promising excited-state properties. They absorb in the blue-green wavelength regime around 500 nm, i.e., substantially red-shifted with respect to lumiflavin that is the cofactor of natural blue-light photoreceptors. Their triplet quantum yields are predicted to be close to unity while their triplet lifetimes are long enough to enable bimolecular photochemical reactions. The combination of these properties makes the thioflavins potentially suitable candidates as cofactors in biomimetic photoswitches.

  2. Tertiary amines related to brompheniramine: preferred conformations for N-oxygenation by the hog liver flavin-containing monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Cashman, J R; Celestial, J R; Leach, A; Newdoll, J; Park, S B

    1993-08-01

    The metabolism of racemic, (D)- and (L)-brompheniramine, a widely used antihistamine, was studied with microsomes and with highly purified flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) from hog liver. In addition, a number of other similar tertiary amines were evaluated as substrates for FMO activity from hog liver and the kinetic constants obtained were compared with brompheniramine. Although some N-demethylation was observed, the major metabolite of brompheniramine and the other tertiary amines examined in hog liver microsomes was the metabolite containing an aliphatic nitrogen N-oxide. Brompheniramine was extensively N-oxygenated by the highly purified FMO from hog liver. N-Oxygenation of brompheniramine in both microsomes and with highly purified FMO from hog liver was enantioselective. The Km for N-oxygenation of (D)-brompheniramine was markedly lower than the Km for (L)-brompheniramine. (E)- and (Z)-zimeldine are less conformationally flexible model compounds of brompheniramine, and these compounds were also examined and were found to be stereoselectively N-oxygenated by the highly purified FMO from hog liver. The similarities and differences in Km and Vmax values were evaluated in terms of possible conformations of the substrates determined by SYBYL molecular mechanics calculations. Distance map data indicated that FMO preferentially accommodated selected conformations of tertiary amines. Thus, (D)-brompheniramine and (Z)-zimeldine presumably have the aliphatic tertiary amine nitrogen atom and aromatic ring center at a defined distance and geometry and were more efficiently N-oxygenated than their respective isomers. PMID:8415393

  3. Tertiary amines related to brompheniramine: preferred conformations for N-oxygenation by the hog liver flavin-containing monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Cashman, J R; Celestial, J R; Leach, A; Newdoll, J; Park, S B

    1993-08-01

    The metabolism of racemic, (D)- and (L)-brompheniramine, a widely used antihistamine, was studied with microsomes and with highly purified flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) from hog liver. In addition, a number of other similar tertiary amines were evaluated as substrates for FMO activity from hog liver and the kinetic constants obtained were compared with brompheniramine. Although some N-demethylation was observed, the major metabolite of brompheniramine and the other tertiary amines examined in hog liver microsomes was the metabolite containing an aliphatic nitrogen N-oxide. Brompheniramine was extensively N-oxygenated by the highly purified FMO from hog liver. N-Oxygenation of brompheniramine in both microsomes and with highly purified FMO from hog liver was enantioselective. The Km for N-oxygenation of (D)-brompheniramine was markedly lower than the Km for (L)-brompheniramine. (E)- and (Z)-zimeldine are less conformationally flexible model compounds of brompheniramine, and these compounds were also examined and were found to be stereoselectively N-oxygenated by the highly purified FMO from hog liver. The similarities and differences in Km and Vmax values were evaluated in terms of possible conformations of the substrates determined by SYBYL molecular mechanics calculations. Distance map data indicated that FMO preferentially accommodated selected conformations of tertiary amines. Thus, (D)-brompheniramine and (Z)-zimeldine presumably have the aliphatic tertiary amine nitrogen atom and aromatic ring center at a defined distance and geometry and were more efficiently N-oxygenated than their respective isomers.

  4. Structures of almond hydroxynitrile lyase isoenzyme 5 provide a rationale for the lack of oxidoreductase activity in flavin dependent HNLs.

    PubMed

    Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Bakhuis, Janny; Steinkellner, Georg; Jolink, Fenneke; Keijmel, Esther; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Gruber, Karl

    2016-10-10

    Hydroxynitrile lyases (HNLs) catalyze the asymmetric addition of HCN to aldehydes producing enantiomerically pure cyanohydrins. These enzymes can be heterologously expressed in large quantities making them interesting candidates for industrial applications. The HNLs from Rosaceae evolved from flavin dependent dehydrogenase/oxidase structures. Here we report the high resolution X-ray structure of the highly glycosylated Prunus amygdalus HNL isoenzyme5 (PaHNL5 V317A) expressed in Aspergillus niger and its complex with benzyl alcohol. A comparison with the structure of isoenzyme PaHNL1 indicates a higher accessibility to the active site and a larger cavity for PaHNL5. Additionally, the PaHNL5 complex structure with benzyl alcohol was compared with the structurally related aryl-alcohol oxidase (AAO). Even though both enzymes contain an FAD-cofactor and histidine residues at crucial positions in the active site, PaHNL5 lacks the oxidoreductase activity. The structures indicate that in PaHNLs benzyl alcohol is bound too far away from the FAD cofactor in order to be oxidized. PMID:27067080

  5. Activation of flavin-containing oxidases underlies light-induced production of H2O2 in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Hockberger, Philip E.; Skimina, Timothy A.; Centonze, Victoria E.; Lavin, Colleen; Chu, Su; Dadras, Soheil; Reddy, Janardan K.; White, John G.

    1999-01-01

    Violet-blue light is toxic to mammalian cells, and this toxicity has been linked with cellular production of H2O2. In this report, we show that violet-blue light, as well as UVA, stimulated H2O2 production in cultured mouse, monkey, and human cells. We found that H2O2 originated in peroxisomes and mitochondria, and it was enhanced in cells overexpressing flavin-containing oxidases. These results support the hypothesis that photoreduction of flavoproteins underlies light-induced production of H2O2 in cells. Because H2O2 and its metabolite, hydroxyl radicals, can cause cellular damage, these reactive oxygen species may contribute to pathologies associated with exposure to UVA, violet, and blue light. They may also contribute to phototoxicity often encountered during light microscopy. Because multiphoton excitation imaging with 1,047-nm wavelength prevented light-induced H2O2 production in cells, possibly by minimizing photoreduction of flavoproteins, this technique may be useful for decreasing phototoxicity during fluorescence microscopy. PMID:10339574

  6. Fluorescence of the Flavin group in choline oxidase. Insights and analytical applications for the determination of choline and betaine aldehyde.

    PubMed

    Ortega, E; de Marcos, S; Sanz-Vicente, I; Ubide, C; Ostra, M; Vidal, M; Galbán, J

    2016-01-15

    Choline oxidase (ChOx) is a flavoenzyme catalysing the oxidation of choline (Ch) to betaine aldehyde (BA) and glycine betaine (GB). In this paper a fundamental study of the intrinsic fluorescence properties of ChOx due to Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide (FAD) is presented and some analytical applications are studied in detail. Firstly, an unusual alteration in the excitation spectra, in comparison with the absorption spectra, has been observed as a function of the pH. This is ascribed to a change of polarity in the excited state. Secondly, the evolution of the fluorescence spectra during the reaction seems to indicate that the reaction takes place in two consecutive, but partially overlapped, steps and each of them follows a different mechanism. Thirdly, the chemical system can be used to determine the Ch concentration in the range from 5×10(-6)M to 5×10(-5)M (univariate and multivariate calibration) in the presence of BA as interference, and the joint Ch+BA concentration in the range 5×10(-6)-5×10(-4)M (multivariate calibration) with mean errors under 10%; a semiquantitative determination of the BA concentration can be deduced by difference. Finally, Ch has been successfully determined in an infant milk sample.

  7. Local Auxin Biosynthesis Mediated by a YUCCA Flavin Monooxygenase Regulates Haustorium Development in the Parasitic Plant Phtheirospermum japonicum.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Juliane K; Wakatake, Takanori; Yoshida, Satoko; Takebayashi, Yumiko; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Wafula, Eric; dePamphilis, Claude W; Namba, Shigetou; Shirasu, Ken

    2016-08-01

    Parasitic plants in the Orobanchaceae cause serious agricultural problems worldwide. Parasitic plants develop a multicellular infectious organ called a haustorium after recognition of host-released signals. To understand the molecular events associated with host signal perception and haustorium development, we identified differentially regulated genes expressed during early haustorium development in the facultative parasite Phtheirospermum japonicum using a de novo assembled transcriptome and a customized microarray. Among the genes that were upregulated during early haustorium development, we identified YUC3, which encodes a functional YUCCA (YUC) flavin monooxygenase involved in auxin biosynthesis. YUC3 was specifically expressed in the epidermal cells around the host contact site at an early time point in haustorium formation. The spatio-temporal expression patterns of YUC3 coincided with those of the auxin response marker DR5, suggesting generation of auxin response maxima at the haustorium apex. Roots transformed with YUC3 knockdown constructs formed haustoria less frequently than nontransgenic roots. Moreover, ectopic expression of YUC3 at the root epidermal cells induced the formation of haustorium-like structures in transgenic P. japonicum roots. Our results suggest that expression of the auxin biosynthesis gene YUC3 at the epidermal cells near the contact site plays a pivotal role in haustorium formation in the root parasitic plant P. japonicum. PMID:27385817

  8. Electron-transfer studies with a new flavin adenine dinucleotide dependent glucose dehydrogenase and osmium polymers of different redox potentials.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Muhammad Nadeem; Wang, Xiaoju; Sygmund, Christoph; Ludwig, Roland; Leech, Dónal; Gorton, Lo

    2012-01-01

    A new extracellular flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent glucose dehydrogenase from Glomerella cingulata (GcGDH) was electrochemically studied as a recognition element in glucose biosensors. The redox enzyme was recombinantly produced in Pichia pastoris and homogeneously purified, and its glucose-oxidizing properties on spectrographic graphite electrodes were investigated. Six different Os polymers, the redox potentials of which ranged in a broad potential window between +15 and +489 mV versus the normal hydrogen electrode (NHE), were used to immobilize and "wire" GcGDH to the spectrographic graphite electrode's surface. The GcGDH/Os polymer modified electrodes were evaluated by chronoamperometry using flow injection analysis. The current response was investigated using a stepwisely increased applied potential. It was observed that the ratio of GcGDH/Os polymer and the overall loading of the enzyme electrode significantly affect the performance of the enzyme electrode for glucose oxidation. The best-suited Os polymer [Os(4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine)(2)(PVI)Cl](+) had a potential of +309 mV versus NHE, and the optimum GcGDH/Os polymer ratio was 1:2 yielding a maximum current density of 493 μA·cm(-2) at a 30 mM glucose concentration.

  9. Local Auxin Biosynthesis Mediated by a YUCCA Flavin Monooxygenase Regulates Haustorium Development in the Parasitic Plant Phtheirospermum japonicum[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Takebayashi, Yumiko; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Wafula, Eric; dePamphilis, Claude W.; Namba, Shigetou

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic plants in the Orobanchaceae cause serious agricultural problems worldwide. Parasitic plants develop a multicellular infectious organ called a haustorium after recognition of host-released signals. To understand the molecular events associated with host signal perception and haustorium development, we identified differentially regulated genes expressed during early haustorium development in the facultative parasite Phtheirospermum japonicum using a de novo assembled transcriptome and a customized microarray. Among the genes that were upregulated during early haustorium development, we identified YUC3, which encodes a functional YUCCA (YUC) flavin monooxygenase involved in auxin biosynthesis. YUC3 was specifically expressed in the epidermal cells around the host contact site at an early time point in haustorium formation. The spatio-temporal expression patterns of YUC3 coincided with those of the auxin response marker DR5, suggesting generation of auxin response maxima at the haustorium apex. Roots transformed with YUC3 knockdown constructs formed haustoria less frequently than nontransgenic roots. Moreover, ectopic expression of YUC3 at the root epidermal cells induced the formation of haustorium-like structures in transgenic P. japonicum roots. Our results suggest that expression of the auxin biosynthesis gene YUC3 at the epidermal cells near the contact site plays a pivotal role in haustorium formation in the root parasitic plant P. japonicum. PMID:27385817

  10. Electron-transfer studies with a new flavin adenine dinucleotide dependent glucose dehydrogenase and osmium polymers of different redox potentials.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Muhammad Nadeem; Wang, Xiaoju; Sygmund, Christoph; Ludwig, Roland; Leech, Dónal; Gorton, Lo

    2012-01-01

    A new extracellular flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent glucose dehydrogenase from Glomerella cingulata (GcGDH) was electrochemically studied as a recognition element in glucose biosensors. The redox enzyme was recombinantly produced in Pichia pastoris and homogeneously purified, and its glucose-oxidizing properties on spectrographic graphite electrodes were investigated. Six different Os polymers, the redox potentials of which ranged in a broad potential window between +15 and +489 mV versus the normal hydrogen electrode (NHE), were used to immobilize and "wire" GcGDH to the spectrographic graphite electrode's surface. The GcGDH/Os polymer modified electrodes were evaluated by chronoamperometry using flow injection analysis. The current response was investigated using a stepwisely increased applied potential. It was observed that the ratio of GcGDH/Os polymer and the overall loading of the enzyme electrode significantly affect the performance of the enzyme electrode for glucose oxidation. The best-suited Os polymer [Os(4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine)(2)(PVI)Cl](+) had a potential of +309 mV versus NHE, and the optimum GcGDH/Os polymer ratio was 1:2 yielding a maximum current density of 493 μA·cm(-2) at a 30 mM glucose concentration. PMID:22091984

  11. Insights into Flavin-based Electron Bifurcation via the NADH-dependent Reduced Ferredoxin:NADP Oxidoreductase Structure*

    PubMed Central

    Demmer, Julius K.; Huang, Haiyan; Wang, Shuning; Demmer, Ulrike; Thauer, Rudolf K.; Ermler, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    NADH-dependent reduced ferredoxin:NADP oxidoreductase (NfnAB) is found in the cytoplasm of various anaerobic bacteria and archaea. The enzyme reversibly catalyzes the endergonic reduction of ferredoxin with NADPH driven by the exergonic transhydrogenation from NADPH onto NAD+. Coupling is most probably accomplished via the mechanism of flavin-based electron bifurcation. To understand this process on a structural basis, we heterologously produced the NfnAB complex of Thermotoga maritima in Escherichia coli, provided kinetic evidence for its bifurcating behavior, and determined its x-ray structure in the absence and presence of NADH. The structure of NfnAB reveals an electron transfer route including the FAD (a-FAD), the [2Fe-2S] cluster of NfnA and the FAD (b-FAD), and the two [4Fe-4S] clusters of NfnB. Ferredoxin is presumably docked onto NfnB close to the [4Fe-4S] cluster distal to b-FAD. NAD(H) binds to a-FAD and NADP(H) consequently to b-FAD, which is positioned in the center of the NfnAB complex and the site of electron bifurcation. Arg187 is hydrogen-bonded to N5 and O4 of the bifurcating b-FAD and might play a key role in adjusting a low redox potential of the FADH•/FAD pair required for ferredoxin reduction. A mechanism of FAD-coupled electron bifurcation by NfnAB is proposed. PMID:26139605

  12. 1H NMR study of the hetero-association of flavin-mononucleotide with mutagenic dyes: ethidium bromide and proflavine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evstigneev, M. P.; Mukhina, Yu. V.; Davies, D. B.

    The hetero-association of the vitamin B2 derivative, flavin-mononucleotide (FMN), with a mutagenic dye, ethidium bromide (EB) or proflavine (PF), has been studied by 1D and 2D 500 MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy. The variations of proton chemical shifts of both the vitamin and dye as a function of concentration and temperature were analysed in terms of the structural and thermodynamical properties of the FMN-EB and FMN-PF complexes in solution. The structures of the complexes were also investigated by observed intermolecular ROE contacts and molecular mechanics calculations. The results show that the 1 : 1 hetero-association complexes in solution are more stable than the self-association complexes, which is consistent with formation of an intermolecular hydrogen-bond in the hetero-complexes of FMN-EB and FMN-PF. Hence it is possible that the toxicity of aromatic molecules such as EB and PF may be reduced in vitro by the presence of FMN, partly because of the known antimutagenic action of FMN and partly because it has been shown in this work that there is an effective intermolecular association between the mutagens and the vitamin.

  13. Spectroscopic characterization of radicals and radical pairs in fruit fly cryptochrome - protonated and nonprotonated flavin radical-states.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Bernd; Bajzath, Csaba; Melin, Frédéric; Heidinger, Lorenz; Kromm, Viktoria; Herkersdorf, Christoph; Benz, Ulrike; Mann, Lisa; Stehle, Patricia; Hellwig, Petra; Weber, Stefan; Schleicher, Erik

    2015-08-01

    Drosophila melanogaster cryptochrome is one of the model proteins for animal blue-light photoreceptors. Using time-resolved and steady-state optical spectroscopy, we studied the mechanism of light-induced radical-pair formation and decay, and the photoreduction of the FAD cofactor. Exact kinetics on a microsecond to minutes timescale could be extracted for the wild-type protein using global analysis. The wild-type exhibits a fast photoreduction reaction from the oxidized FAD to the FAD(•-) state with a very positive midpoint potential of ~ +125 mV, although no further reduction could be observed. We could also demonstrate that the terminal tryptophan of the conserved triad, W342, is directly involved in electron transfer; however, photoreduction could not be completely inhibited in a W342F mutant. The investigation of another mutation close to the FAD cofactor, C416N, rather unexpectedly reveals accumulation of a protonated flavin radical on a timescale of several seconds. The obtained data are critically discussed with the ones obtained from another protein, Escherichia coli photolyase, and we conclude that the amino acid opposite N(5) of the isoalloxazine moiety of FAD is able to (de)stabilize the protonated FAD radical but not to significantly modulate the kinetics of any light-inducted reactions.

  14. Hydrogen peroxide elimination from C4a-hydroperoxyflavin in a flavoprotein oxidase occurs through a single proton transfer from flavin N5 to a peroxide leaving group.

    PubMed

    Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Wongnate, Thanyaporn; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2011-05-13

    C4a-hydroperoxyflavin is found commonly in the reactions of flavin-dependent monooxygenases, in which it plays a key role as an intermediate that incorporates an oxygen atom into substrates. Only recently has evidence for its involvement in the reactions of flavoprotein oxidases been reported. Previous studies of pyranose 2-oxidase (P2O), an enzyme catalyzing the oxidation of pyranoses using oxygen as an electron acceptor to generate oxidized sugars and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), have shown that C4a-hydroperoxyflavin forms in P2O reactions before it eliminates H(2)O(2) as a product (Sucharitakul, J., Prongjit, M., Haltrich, D., and Chaiyen, P. (2008) Biochemistry 47, 8485-8490). In this report, the solvent kinetic isotope effects (SKIE) on the reaction of reduced P2O with oxygen were investigated using transient kinetics. Our results showed that D(2)O has a negligible effect on the formation of C4a-hydroperoxyflavin. The ensuing step of H(2)O(2) elimination from C4a-hydroperoxyflavin was shown to be modulated by an SKIE of 2.8 ± 0.2, and a proton inventory analysis of this step indicates a linear plot. These data suggest that a single-proton transfer process causes SKIE at the H(2)O(2) elimination step. Double and single mixing stopped-flow experiments performed in H(2)O buffer revealed that reduced flavin specifically labeled with deuterium at the flavin N5 position generated kinetic isotope effects similar to those found with experiments performed with the enzyme pre-equilibrated in D(2)O buffer. This suggests that the proton at the flavin N5 position is responsible for the SKIE and is the proton-in-flight that is transferred during the transition state. The mechanism of H(2)O(2) elimination from C4a-hydroperoxyflavin is consistent with a single proton transfer from the flavin N5 to the peroxide leaving group, possibly via the formation of an intramolecular hydrogen bridge.

  15. Co-expression of monodehydroascorbate reductase and dehydroascorbate reductase from Brassica rapa effectively confers tolerance to freezing-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sun-Young; Kim, Myung-Hee; Kim, Yul-Ho; Park, Hyang-Mi; Yoon, Ho-Sung

    2013-10-01

    Plants are exposed to various environmental stresses and have therefore developed antioxidant enzymes and molecules to protect their cellular components against toxicity derived from reactive oxygen species (ROS). Ascorbate is a very important antioxidant molecule in plants, and monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR; EC 1.6.5.4) and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR; EC 1.8.5.1) are essential to regeneration of ascorbate for maintenance of ROS scavenging ability. The MDHAR and DHAR genes from Brassica rapa were cloned, transgenic plants overexpressing either BrMDHAR and BrDHAR were established, and then, each transgenic plant was hybridized to examine the effects of co-expression of both genes conferring tolerance to freezing. Transgenic plants co-overexpressing BrMDHAR and BrDHAR showed activated expression of relative antioxidant enzymes, and enhanced levels of glutathione and phenolics under freezing condition. Then, these alteration caused by co-expression led to alleviated redox status and lipid peroxidation and consequently conferred improved tolerance against severe freezing stress compared to transgenic plants overexpressing single gene. The results of this study suggested that although each expression of BrMDHAR or BrDHAR was available to according tolerance to freezing, the simultaneous expression of two genes generated synergistic effects conferring improved tolerance more effectively even severe freezing.

  16. Co-Expression of Monodehydroascorbate Reductase and Dehydroascorbate Reductase from Brassica rapa Effectively Confers Tolerance to Freezing-Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sun-Young; Kim, Myung-Hee; Kim, Yul-Ho; Park, Hyang-Mi; Yoon, Ho-Sung

    2013-01-01

    Plants are exposed to various environmental stresses and have therefore developed antioxidant enzymes and molecules to protect their cellular components against toxicity derived from reactive oxygen species (ROS). Ascorbate is a very important antioxidant molecule in plants, and monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR; EC 1.6.5.4) and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR; EC 1.8.5.1) are essential to regeneration of ascorbate for maintenance of ROS scavenging ability. The MDHAR and DHAR genes from Brassica rapa were cloned, transgenic plants overexpressing either BrMDHAR and BrDHAR were established, and then, each transgenic plant was hybridized to examine the effects of co-expression of both genes conferring tolerance to freezing. Transgenic plants co-overexpressing BrMDHAR and BrDHAR showed activated expression of relative antioxidant enzymes, and enhanced levels of glutathione and phenolics under freezing condition. Then, these alteration caused by co-expression led to alleviated redox status and lipid peroxidation and consequently conferred improved tolerance against severe freezing stress compared to transgenic plants overexpressing single gene. The results of this study suggested that although each expression of BrMDHAR or BrDHAR was available to according tolerance to freezing, the simultaneous expression of two genes generated synergistic effects conferring improved tolerance more effectively even severe freezing. PMID:24170089

  17. Wolinella succinogenes quinol:fumarate reductase and its comparison to E. coli succinate:quinone reductase.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, C Roy D

    2003-11-27

    The three-dimensional structure of Wolinella succinogenes quinol:fumarate reductase (QFR), a dihaem-containing member of the superfamily of succinate:quinone oxidoreductases (SQOR), has been determined at 2.2 A resolution by X-ray crystallography [Lancaster et al., Nature 402 (1999) 377-385]. The structure and mechanism of W. succinogenes QFR and their relevance to the SQOR superfamily have recently been reviewed [Lancaster, Adv. Protein Chem. 63 (2003) 131-149]. Here, a comparison is presented of W. succinogenes QFR to the recently determined structure of the mono-haem containing succinate:quinone reductase from Escherichia coli [Yankovskaya et al., Science 299 (2003) 700-704]. In spite of differences in polypeptide and haem composition, the overall topology of the membrane anchors and their relative orientation to the conserved hydrophilic subunits is strikingly similar. A major difference is the lack of any evidence for a 'proximal' quinone site, close to the hydrophilic subunits, in W. succinogenes QFR.

  18. Isolation and Characterization of cDNAs Encoding Leucoanthocyanidin Reductase and Anthocyanidin Reductase from Populus trichocarpa

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wanxiang; Yang, Li; Karim, Abdul; Luo, Keming

    2013-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) contribute to poplar defense mechanisms against biotic and abiotic stresses. Transcripts of PA biosynthetic genes accumulated rapidly in response to infection by the fungus Marssonina brunnea f.sp. multigermtubi, treatments of salicylic acid (SA) and wounding, resulting in PA accumulation in poplar leaves. Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR) are two key enzymes of the PA biosynthesis that produce the main subunits: (+)-catechin and (−)-epicatechin required for formation of PA polymers. In Populus, ANR and LAR are encoded by at least two and three highly related genes, respectively. In this study, we isolated and functionally characterized genes PtrANR1 and PtrLAR1 from P. trichocarpa. Phylogenetic analysis shows that Populus ANR1 and LAR1 occurr in two distinct phylogenetic lineages, but both genes have little difference in their tissue distribution, preferentially expressed in roots. Overexpression of PtrANR1 in poplar resulted in a significant increase in PA levels but no impact on catechin levels. Antisense down-regulation of PtrANR1 showed reduced PA accumulation in transgenic lines, but increased levels of anthocyanin content. Ectopic expression of PtrLAR1 in poplar positively regulated the biosynthesis of PAs, whereas the accumulation of anthocyanin and flavonol was significantly reduced (P<0.05) in all transgenic plants compared to the control plants. These results suggest that both PtrANR1 and PtrLAR1 contribute to PA biosynthesis in Populus. PMID:23741362

  19. FVT-1 is a mammalian 3-ketodihydrosphingosine reductase with an active site that faces the cytosolic side of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane.

    PubMed

    Kihara, Akio; Igarashi, Yasuyuki

    2004-11-19

    Sphingolipids are essential membrane components of eukaryotic cells. Their synthesis is initiated with the condensation of l-serine with palmitoyl-CoA, producing 3-ketodihydrosphingosine (KDS), followed by a reduction to dihydrosphingosine by KDS reductase. Until now, only yeast TSC10 has been identified as a KDS reductase gene. Here, we provide evidence that the human FVT-1 (hFVT-1) and mouse FVT-1 (mFVT-1) are functional mammalian KDS reductases. The forced expression of hFVT-1 or mFVT-1 in TSC10-null yeast cells suppressed growth defects, and hFVT-1 overproduced in cultured cells exhibited KDS reductase activity in vitro. Moreover, purified recombinant hFVT-1 protein exhibited NADPH-dependent KDS reductase activity. The identification of the FVT-1 genes enabled us to characterize the mammalian KDS reductase at the molecular level. Northern blot analyses demonstrated that both hFVT-1 and mFVT-1 mRNAs are ubiquitously expressed, suggesting that FVT-1 is a major KDS reductase. We also found the presence of hFVT-1 variants, which were differentially expressed among tissues. Immunofluorescence microscopic analysis revealed that hFVT-1 is localized at the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, a proteinase K digestion assay revealed that the large hydrophilic domain of hFVT-1, which contains putative active site residues, faces the cytosol. These results suggest that KDS is converted to dihydrosphingosine in the cytosolic side of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Moreover, the topology studies provide insight into the spatial organization of the sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway.

  20. Amidoxime Reductase System Containing Cytochrome b5 Type B (CYB5B) and MOSC2 Is of Importance for Lipid Synthesis in Adipocyte Mitochondria*

    PubMed Central

    Neve, Etienne P. A.; Nordling, Åsa; Andersson, Tommy B.; Hellman, Ulf; Diczfalusy, Ulf; Johansson, Inger; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    Reduction of hydroxylamines and amidoximes is important for drug activation and detoxification of aromatic and heterocyclic amines. Such a reductase system was previously found to be of high activity in adipose tissue and liver, and furthermore, in vitro studies using recombinant truncated and purified enzymes suggested the participation of cytochrome b5 reductase (CYB5R), cytochrome b5 (CYB5), and molybdenum cofactor sulfurase C-terminal containing 1 and 2 (MOSC1 and -2). Here, we show that purified rat liver outer mitochondrial membrane contains high amidoxime reductase activity and that MOSC2 is exclusively localized to these membranes. Moreover, using the same membrane fraction, we could show direct binding of a radiolabeled benzamidoxime substrate to MOSC2. Following differentiation of murine 3T3-L1 cells into mature adipocytes, the MOSC2 levels as well as the amidoxime reductase activity were increased, indicating that the enzyme is highly regulated under lipogenic conditions. siRNA-mediated down-regulation of MOSC2 and the mitochondrial form of cytochrome b5 type B (CYB5B) significantly inhibited the reductase activity in the differentiated adipocytes, whereas down-regulation of MOSC1, cytochrome b5 type A (CYB5A), CYB5R1, CYB5R2, or CYB5R3 had no effect. Down-regulation of MOSC2 caused impaired lipid synthesis. These results demonstrate for the first time the direct involvement of MOSC2 and CYB5B in the amidoxime reductase activity in an intact cell system. We postulate the presence of a novel reductive enzyme system of importance for lipid synthesis that is exclusively localized to the outer mitochondrial membrane and is composed of CYB5B, MOSC2, and a third unknown component (a CYB5B reductase). PMID:22203676

  1. Amidoxime reductase system containing cytochrome b5 type B (CYB5B) and MOSC2 is of importance for lipid synthesis in adipocyte mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Neve, Etienne P A; Nordling, Asa; Andersson, Tommy B; Hellman, Ulf; Diczfalusy, Ulf; Johansson, Inger; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2012-02-24

    Reduction of hydroxylamines and amidoximes is important for drug activation and detoxification of aromatic and heterocyclic amines. Such a reductase system was previously found to be of high activity in adipose tissue and liver, and furthermore, in vitro studies using recombinant truncated and purified enzymes suggested the participation of cytochrome b(5) reductase (CYB5R), cytochrome b(5) (CYB5), and molybdenum cofactor sulfurase C-terminal containing 1 and 2 (MOSC1 and -2). Here, we show that purified rat liver outer mitochondrial membrane contains high amidoxime reductase activity and that MOSC2 is exclusively localized to these membranes. Moreover, using the same membrane fraction, we could show direct binding of a radiolabeled benzamidoxime substrate to MOSC2. Following differentiation of murine 3T3-L1 cells into mature adipocytes, the MOSC2 levels as well as the amidoxime reductase activity were increased, indicating that the enzyme is highly regulated under lipogenic conditions. siRNA-mediated down-regulation of MOSC2 and the mitochondrial form of cytochrome b(5) type B (CYB5B) significantly inhibited the reductase activity in the differentiated adipocytes, whereas down-regulation of MOSC1, cytochrome b(5) type A (CYB5A), CYB5R1, CYB5R2, or CYB5R3 had no effect. Down-regulation of MOSC2 caused impaired lipid synthesis. These results demonstrate for the first time the direct involvement of MOSC2 and CYB5B in the amidoxime reductase activity in an intact cell system. We postulate the presence of a novel reductive enzyme system of importance for lipid synthesis that is exclusively localized to the outer mitochondrial membrane and is composed of CYB5B, MOSC2, and a third unknown component (a CYB5B reductase). PMID:22203676

  2. Potential Role for Extracellular Glutathione-Dependent Ferric Reductase in Utilization of Environmental and Host Ferric Compounds by Histoplasma capsulatum

    PubMed Central

    Timmerman, Michelle M.; Woods, Jon P.

    2001-01-01

    The mammalian host specifically limits iron during Histoplasma capsulatum infection, and fungal acquisition of iron is essential for productive infection. H. capsulatum expresses several iron acquisition mechanisms under iron-limited conditions in vitro. These components include hydroxamate siderophores, extracellular glutathione-dependent ferric reductase enzyme, extracellular nonproteinaceous ferric reductant(s), and cell surface ferric reducing agent(s). We examined the relationship between these mechanisms and a potential role for the extracellular ferric reductase in utilization of environmental and host ferric compounds through the production of free, soluble Fe(II). Siderophores and ferric reducing agents were coproduced under conditions of iron limitation. The H. capsulatum siderophore dimerum acid and the structurally similar basidiomycete siderophore rhodotorulic acid acted as substrates for the ferric reductase, and rhodotorulic acid removed Fe(III) bound by transferrin. The mammalian Fe(III)-binding compounds hemin and transferrin served both as substrates for the ferric reductase and as iron sources for yeast-phase growth at neutral pH. In the case of transferrin, there was a correlation between the level of iron saturation and efficacy for both of these functions. Our data are not consistent with an entirely pH-dependent mechanism of iron acquisition from transferrin, as has been suggested to occur in the macrophage phagolysosome. The foreign siderophore ferrioxamine B also acted as a substrate for the ferric reductase, while the foreign siderophore ferrichrome did not. Both ferrioxamine and ferrichrome served as iron sources for yeast- and mold-phase growth, the latter presumably by some other acquisition mechanism(s). PMID:11705947

  3. Equine 5α-reductase activity and expression in epididymis.

    PubMed

    Corbin, C J; Legacki, E L; Ball, B A; Scoggin, K E; Stanley, S D; Conley, A J

    2016-10-01

    The 5α-reductase enzymes play an important role during male sexual differentiation, and in pregnant females, especially equine species where maintenance relies on 5α-reduced progesterone, 5α-dihydroprogesterone (DHP). Epididymis expresses 5α-reductases but was not studied elaborately in horses. Epididymis from younger and older postpubertal stallions was divided into caput, corpus and cauda and examined for 5α-reductase activity and expression of type 1 and 2 isoforms by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Metabolism of progesterone and testosterone to DHP and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), respectively, by epididymal microsomal protein was examined by thin-layer chromatography and verified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Relative inhibitory potencies of finasteride and dutasteride toward equine 5α-reductase activity were investigated. Pregnenolone was investigated as an additional potential substrate for 5α-reductase, suggested previously from in vivo studies in mares but never directly examined. No regional gradient of 5α-reductase expression was observed by either enzyme activity or transcript analysis. Results of PCR experiments suggested that type 1 isoform predominates in equine epididymis. Primers for the type 2 isoform were unable to amplify product from any samples examined. Progesterone and testosterone were readily reduced to DHP and DHT, and activity was effectively inhibited by both inhibitors. Using epididymis as an enzyme source, no experimental evidence was obtained supporting the notion that pregnenolone could be directly metabolized by equine 5α-reductases as has been suggested by previous investigators speculating on alternative metabolic pathways leading to DHP synthesis in placenta during equine pregnancies. PMID:27466384

  4. Equine 5α-reductase activity and expression in epididymis.

    PubMed

    Corbin, C J; Legacki, E L; Ball, B A; Scoggin, K E; Stanley, S D; Conley, A J

    2016-10-01

    The 5α-reductase enzymes play an important role during male sexual differentiation, and in pregnant females, especially equine species where maintenance relies on 5α-reduced progesterone, 5α-dihydroprogesterone (DHP). Epididymis expresses 5α-reductases but was not studied elaborately in horses. Epididymis from younger and older postpubertal stallions was divided into caput, corpus and cauda and examined for 5α-reductase activity and expression of type 1 and 2 isoforms by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Metabolism of progesterone and testosterone to DHP and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), respectively, by epididymal microsomal protein was examined by thin-layer chromatography and verified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Relative inhibitory potencies of finasteride and dutasteride toward equine 5α-reductase activity were investigated. Pregnenolone was investigated as an additional potential substrate for 5α-reductase, suggested previously from in vivo studies in mares but never directly examined. No regional gradient of 5α-reductase expression was observed by either enzyme activity or transcript analysis. Results of PCR experiments suggested that type 1 isoform predominates in equine epididymis. Primers for the type 2 isoform were unable to amplify product from any samples examined. Progesterone and testosterone were readily reduced to DHP and DHT, and activity was effectively inhibited by both inhibitors. Using epididymis as an enzyme source, no experimental evidence was obtained supporting the notion that pregnenolone could be directly metabolized by equine 5α-reductases as has been suggested by previous investigators speculating on alternative metabolic pathways leading to DHP synthesis in placenta during equine pregnancies.

  5. DNA damage induction of ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed

    Elledge, S J; Davis, R W

    1989-11-01

    RNR2 encodes the small subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the first step in the pathway for the production of deoxyribonucleotides needed for DNA synthesis. RNR2 is a member of a group of genes whose activities are cell cycle regulated and that are transcriptionally induced in response to the stress of DNA damage. An RNR2-lacZ fusion was used to further characterize the regulation of RNR2 and the pathway responsible for its response to DNA damage. beta-Galactosidase activity in yeast strains containing the RNR2-lacZ fusion was inducible in response to DNA-damaging agents (UV light, 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide [4-NQO], and methyl methanesulfonate [MMS]) and agents that block DNA replication (hydroxyurea [HU] and methotrexate) but not heat shock. When MATa cells were arrested in G1 by alpha-factor, RNR2 mRNA was still inducible by DNA damage, indicating that the observed induction can occur outside of S phase. In addition, RNR2 induction was not blocked by the presence of cycloheximide and is therefore likely to be independent of protein synthesis. A mutation, rnr2-314, was found to confer hypersensitivity to HU and increased sensitivity to MMS. In rnr2-314 mutant strains, the DNA damage stress response was found to be partially constitutive as well as hypersensitive to induction by HU but not MMS. The induction properties of RNR2 were examined in a rad4-2 mutant background; in this genetic background, RNR2 was hypersensitive to induction by 4-NQO but not MMS. Induction of the RNR2-lacZ fusion in a RAD(+) strain in response to 4-NQO was not enhanced by the presence of an equal number of rad4-2 cells that lacked the fusion, implying that the DNA damage stress response in cell autonomous. PMID:2513480

  6. Glutathione Reductase Is Essential for Host Defense against Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jing; Ralston, Melissa M.; Meng, Xiaomei; Bongiovanni, Kathleen D.; Jones, Amanda L.; Benndorf, Rainer; Nelin, Leif D.; Frazier, W. Joshua; Rogers, Lynette K.; Smith, Charles V.; Liu, Yusen

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione reductase (Gsr)1 catalyzes the reduction of glutathione disulfide to glutathione, a major cellular antioxidant. We have recently shown that Gsr is essential for host defense against the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli in a mouse model of sepsis. While we have demonstrated that Gsr is required for sustaining the oxidative burst and the development of neutrophil extracellular traps, the role of Gsr in other phagocytic functions remains unclear. It is also unclear whether Gsr-deficient mice exhibit host defense defects against Gram-positive bacteria. In the present study, we characterized the effects of Gsr deficiency on the innate immune responses to a Gram-positive bacterium, group B Streptococcus, and to the Gram-negative bacterial cell wall component lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found that like, E. coli, group B Streptococcus resulted in a substantially more robust cytokine response and a markedly higher morbidity and mortality in Gsr-deficient mice than in wildtype mice. The increased morbidity and mortality were associated with greater bacterial burden in the Gsr-deficient mice. Interestingly, Gsr-deficient mice did not exhibit a greater sensitivity to LPS than did wildtype mice. Analysis of the neutrophils of Gsr-deficient mice revealed impaired phagocytosis. In response to thioglycollate stimulation, Gsr-deficient mice mobilized far fewer phagocytes, including neutrophils, macrophages, and eosinophils, into their peritoneal cavities than did wildtype mice. The defective phagocyte mobilization is associated with profound oxidation and aggregation of ascitic proteins, particularly albumin. Our results indicate that the oxidative defense mechanism mediated by Gsr is required for an effective innate immune response against bacteria, likely by preventing phagocyte dysfunction due to oxidative damage. PMID:23623936

  7. Partial vinylphenol reductase purification and characterization from Brettanomyces bruxellensis.

    PubMed

    Tchobanov, Iavor; Gal, Laurent; Guilloux-Benatier, Michèle; Remize, Fabienne; Nardi, Tiziana; Guzzo, Jean; Serpaggi, Virginie; Alexandre, Hervé

    2008-07-01

    Brettanomyces is the major microbial cause for wine spoilage worldwide and causes significant economic losses. The reasons are the production of ethylphenols that lead to an unpleasant taint described as 'phenolic odour'. Despite its economic importance, Brettanomyces has remained poorly studied at the metabolic level. The origin of the ethylphenol results from the conversion of vinylphenols in ethylphenol by Brettanomyces hydroxycinnamate decarboxylase. However, no information is available on the vinylphenol reductase responsible for the conversion of vinylphenols in ethylphenols. In this study, a vinylphenol reductase was partially purified from Brettanomyces bruxellensis that was active towards 4-vinylguaiacol and 4-vinylphenol only among the substrates tested. First, a vinylphenol reductase activity assay was designed that allowed us to show that the enzyme was NADH dependent. The vinylphenol reductase was purified 152-fold with a recovery yield of 1.77%. The apparent K(m) and V(max) values for the hydrolysis of 4-vinylguaiacol were, respectively, 0.14 mM and 1900 U mg(-1). The optimal pH and temperature for vinylphenol reductase were pH 5-6 and 30 degrees C, respectively. The molecular weight of the enzyme was 26 kDa. Trypsic digest of the protein was performed and the peptides were sequenced, which allowed us to identify in Brettanomyces genome an ORF coding for a 210 amino acid protein.

  8. Crystal structure of red chlorophyll catabolite reductase: enlargement of the ferredoxin-dependent bilin reductase family.

    PubMed

    Sugishima, Masakazu; Kitamori, Yuka; Noguchi, Masato; Kohchi, Takayuki; Fukuyama, Keiichi

    2009-06-01

    The key steps in the degradation pathway of chlorophylls are the ring-opening reaction catalyzed by pheophorbide a oxygenase and sequential reduction by red chlorophyll catabolite reductase (RCCR). During these steps, chlorophyll catabolites lose their color and phototoxicity. RCCR catalyzes the ferredoxin-dependent reduction of the C20/C1 double bond of red chlorophyll catabolite. RCCR appears to be evolutionarily related to the ferredoxin-dependent bilin reductase (FDBR) family, which synthesizes a variety of phytobilin pigments, on the basis of sequence similarity, ferredoxin dependency, and the common tetrapyrrole skeleton of their substrates. The evidence, however, is not robust; the identity between RCCR and FDBR HY2 from Arabidopsis thaliana is only 15%, and the oligomeric states of these enzymes are different. Here, we report the crystal structure of A. thaliana RCCR at 2.4 A resolution. RCCR forms a homodimer, in which each subunit folds in an alpha/beta/alpha sandwich. The tertiary structure of RCCR is similar to those of FDBRs, strongly supporting that these enzymes evolved from a common ancestor. The two subunits are related by noncrystallographic 2-fold symmetry in which the alpha-helices near the edge of the beta-sheet unique in RCCR participate in intersubunit interaction. The putative RCC-binding site, which was derived by superimposing RCCR onto biliverdin-bound forms of FDBRs, forms an open pocket surrounded by conserved residues among RCCRs. Glu154 and Asp291 of A. thaliana RCCR, which stand opposite each other in the pocket, likely are involved in substrate binding and/or catalysis.

  9. 4-Dimethylaminoazobenzenes: carcinogenicities and reductive cleavage by microsomal azo reductase.

    PubMed

    Lambooy, J P; Koffman, B M

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-four 4-dimethylaminoazobenzenes (DABs) in which systematic structural modifications have been made in the prime ring have been studied for substrate specificity for microsomal azo reductase. The DABs were also evaluated for carcinogenicity and it was found that there was no correlation between carcinogenicity and extent of azo bond cleavage by azo reductase. While any substituent in the prime ring reduces the rate of cleavage of the azo bond relative to the unsubstituted dye, there is a correlation between substituent size and susceptibility to the enzyme. Substituent size was also found to be a significant factor in the induction of hepatomas by the dyes. Preliminary studies have shown that there appears to be a positive correlation between microsomal riboflavin content and the activity of the azo reductase.

  10. Sulfur Isotope Effects of Dissimilatory Sulfite Reductase.

    PubMed

    Leavitt, William D; Bradley, Alexander S; Santos, André A; Pereira, Inês A C; Johnston, David T

    2015-01-01

    The precise interpretation of environmental sulfur isotope records requires a quantitative understanding of the biochemical controls on sulfur isotope fractionation by the principle isotope-fractionating process within the S cycle, microbial sulfate reduction (MSR). Here we provide the only direct observation of the major ((34)S/(32)S) and minor ((33)S/(32)S, (36)S/(32)S) sulfur isotope fractionations imparted by a central enzyme in the energy metabolism of sulfate reducers, dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DsrAB). Results from in vitro sulfite reduction experiments allow us to calculate the in vitro DsrAB isotope effect in (34)S/(32)S (hereafter, [Formula: see text]) to be 15.3 ± 2‰, 2σ. The accompanying minor isotope effect in (33)S, described as [Formula: see text], is calculated to be 0.5150 ± 0.0012, 2σ. These observations facilitate a rigorous evaluation of the isotopic fractionation associated with the dissimilatory MSR pathway, as well as of the environmental variables that govern the overall magnitude of fractionation by natural communities of sulfate reducers. The isotope effect induced by DsrAB upon sulfite reduction is a factor of 0.3-0.6 times prior indirect estimates, which have ranged from 25 to 53‰ in (34)εDsrAB. The minor isotope fractionation observed from DsrAB is consistent with a kinetic or equilibrium effect. Our in vitro constraints on the magnitude of [Formula: see text] is similar to the median value of experimental observations compiled from all known published work, where (34)ε r-p = 16.1‰ (r-p indicates reactant vs. product, n = 648). This value closely matches those of MSR operating at high sulfate reduction rates in both laboratory chemostat experiments ([Formula: see text] 17.3 ± 1.5‰, 2σ) and in modern marine sediments ([Formula: see text] 17.3 ± 3.8‰). Targeting the direct isotopic consequences of a specific enzymatic processes is a fundamental step toward a biochemical foundation for reinterpreting the

  11. Sulfur Isotope Effects of Dissimilatory Sulfite Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, William D.; Bradley, Alexander S.; Santos, André A.; Pereira, Inês A. C.; Johnston, David T.

    2015-01-01

    The precise interpretation of environmental sulfur isotope records requires a quantitative understanding of the biochemical controls on sulfur isotope fractionation by the principle isotope-fractionating process within the S cycle, microbial sulfate reduction (MSR). Here we provide the only direct observation of the major (34S/32S) and minor (33S/32S, 36S/32S) sulfur isotope fractionations imparted by a central enzyme in the energy metabolism of sulfate reducers, dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DsrAB). Results from in vitro sulfite reduction experiments allow us to calculate the in vitro DsrAB isotope effect in 34S/32S (hereafter, 34εDsrAB) to be 15.3 ± 2‰, 2σ. The accompanying minor isotope effect in 33S, described as 33λDsrAB, is calculated to be 0.5150 ± 0.0012, 2σ. These observations facilitate a rigorous evaluation of the isotopic fractionation associated with the dissimilatory MSR pathway, as well as of the environmental variables that govern the overall magnitude of fractionation by natural communities of sulfate reducers. The isotope effect induced by DsrAB upon sulfite reduction is a factor of 0.3–0.6 times prior indirect estimates, which have ranged from 25 to 53‰ in 34εDsrAB. The minor isotope fractionation observed from DsrAB is consistent with a kinetic or equilibrium effect. Our in vitro constraints on the magnitude of 34εDsrAB is similar to the median value of experimental observations compiled from all known published work, where 34εr−p = 16.1‰ (r–p indicates reactant vs. product, n = 648). This value closely matches those of MSR operating at high sulfate reduction rates in both laboratory chemostat experiments (34εSO4−H2S =  17.3 ± 1.5‰, 2σ) and in modern marine sediments (34εSO4−H2S =  17.3 ± 3.8‰). Targeting the direct isotopic consequences of a specific enzymatic processes is a fundamental step toward a biochemical foundation for reinterpreting the biogeochemical and geobiological sulfur isotope records in

  12. Electrochemical behavior of flavin adenine dinucleotide adsorbed onto carbon nanotube and nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube electrodes.

    PubMed

    Goran, Jacob M; Stevenson, Keith J

    2013-11-01

    Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is a cofactor for many enzymes, but also an informative redox active surface probe for electrode materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nitrogen-doped CNTs (N-CNTs). FAD spontaneously adsorbs onto the surface of CNTs and N-CNTs, displaying Langmuir adsorption characteristics. The Langmuir adsorption model provides a means of calculating the electroactive surface area (ESA), the equilibrium constant for the adsorption and desorption processes (K), and the Gibbs free energy of adsorption (ΔG°). Traditional ESA measurements based on the diffusional flux of a redox active molecule to the electrode surface underestimate the ESA of porous materials because pores are not penetrated. Techniques such as gas adsortion (BET) overestimate the ESA because it includes both electroactive and inactive areas. The ESA determined by extrapolation of the Langmuir adsorption model with the electroactive surface probe FAD will penetrate pores and only include electroactive areas. The redox activity of adsorbed FAD also displays a strong dependency on pH, which provides a means of determining the pKa of the surface confined species. The pKa of FAD decreases as the nitrogen content in the CNTs increases, suggesting a decreased hydrophobicity of the N-CNT surface. FAD desorption at N-CNTs slowly transforms the main FAD surface redox reaction with E1/2 at -0.84 V into two new, reversible, surface confined redox reactions with E1/2 at -0.65 and -0.76 V (vs Hg/Hg2SO4), respectively (1.0 M sodium phosphate buffer pH = 6.75). This is the first time these redox reactions have been observed. The new surface confined redox reactions were not observed during FAD desorption from nondoped CNTs.

  13. Flavin mononucleotide biomolecular laser: longitudinal mode structure, polarization, and temporal characteristics as probes of local chemical environment.

    PubMed

    Rivera, José A; Eden, J Gary

    2016-05-16

    A detailed characterization of the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) biomolecular laser, optically pumped in a stable resonator, is reported here. Photoexcitation of the molecule at 355 nm results in lasing over the ~566.5-573.5 nm spectral region, and the threshold pump energy density is measured to be 110 ± 10 µJ/mm2 for a 10 mM FMN/water solution. Over twenty longitudinal modes are observed when the cavity length L and the energy pump fluence Ep are 375 µm and 300 µJ/mm2, respectively. Partial substitution of glycerol for water as the solvent results in a factor of four reduction in the threshold pump energy fluence (to < 30 µJ/mm2) and a quadrupling of the slope efficiency. This effect is attributed to the O2 - mediated photoconversion of FMN molecules in the triplet state to the singlet species. For pump intensities a factor of 2.5 above threshold, the laser pulse width is ~2 ns FWHM, and the output intensity decays exponentially with a photon lifetime of 1.7 ns. The addition of glycerol to a FMN/water solution also suppresses s-polarized emission (yielding P = 0.78 ± 0.08), presumably as a result of the inhibition of FMN rotational diffusion. The sensitivity of the spectral and optical properties of this and other biomolecular lasers to the chemical environment underscores the value of coherent emission as a biochemical or biomedical diagnostic tool, particularly insofar as molecule-molecule interactions are concerned. PMID:27409906

  14. Genetic Polymorphisms of Flavin Monooxygenase 3 in Sulindac-Induced Regression of Colorectal Adenomas in Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Hisamuddin, Irfan M.; Wehbi, Mohammad A.; Schmotzer, Brian; Easley, Kirk A.; Hylind, Linda M.; Giardiello, Francis M.; Yang, Vincent W.

    2008-01-01

    Sulindac is a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug with a chemopreventive effect in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). In vivo, the active form of sulindac is sulindac sulfide, which is inactivated by the hepatic microsomal enzyme, flavin monooxygenase 3 (FMO3). In humans, numerous polymorphisms exist in FMO3, which alter enzymatic activity and subsequent substrate metabolism. We recently showed that certain polymorphic forms of FMO3 with reduced activity were associated with a more favorable response to sulindac in preventing the formation of adenomas in patients with FAP without polyps at baseline. Here, we determined whether these FMO3 polymorphisms correlated with the ability of sulindac to regress polyposis in patients with FAP who had polyps prior to treatment. Nineteen patients were treated with 150 mg sulindac twice a day for 6 months. The size and number of polyps in each patient was assessed at baseline (prior to the administration of sulindac), and at 3 and 6 months. Genotyping was done on seven established FMO3 polymorphisms with functional significance—M66I, E158K, P153L, V257M, E305X, E308G, and R492W. Statistical analyses were done with Wilcoxon rank sum test. Of the loci examined, only E158K and E308G showed polymorphic changes. Six patients exhibited polymorphisms in both E158K and E308G loci and were designated as genotype combination 1. The remaining patients were designated as genotype combination 2. Over the course of treatment, patients with genotype combination 1 had a greater reduction in both the size and number of polyps than those with genotype combination 2. These results suggest that combined polymorphic changes in the E158K and E308G alleles may protect against polyposis in patients with FAP treated with sulindac. PMID:16214918

  15. Molecular cloning of the flavin-containing monooxygenase (form II) cDNA from adult human liver.

    PubMed Central

    Lomri, N; Gu, Q; Cashman, J R

    1992-01-01

    Complementary DNA (cDNA) clones encoding the adult human liver flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO; dimethylaniline N-oxidase, EC 1.14.13.8) were isolated from lambda gt10 and lambda gt11 libraries. The cDNA libraries were screened with three synthetic 36-mer oligonucleotide probes derived from the nucleic acid sequence of the pig liver FMO cDNA. The deduced amino acid sequence for the adult human liver FMO was quite distinct from the pig liver FMO, and adult human liver FMO was designated form II (HLFMO II). The full-length cDNA sequence of HLFMO II [2119 base pairs (bp)] had an open reading frame of 1599 nucleotides, which encoded a 533-amino acid protein of Mr 59,179, a 5'-noncoding region of 136 nucleotides and a 3'-noncoding region of 369 nucleotides excluding the poly(A) tail. The deduced amino acid sequence of HLFMO II had 80% similarity with the rabbit liver FMO II but only a 52%, 55%, and 53% amino acid similarity with the rabbit liver (form I), the pig liver (form I), and fetal human liver (form I) FMOs, respectively. RNA analysis of adult human liver RNA showed that there was one HLFMO II mRNA species. Analysis of genomic DNA indicated that HLFMO II was the product of a single gene. These results indicated that the deduced amino acid sequence for HLFMO II contained highly conserved residues and suggested that FMO enzymes were closely related and, undoubtedly, derived from the same ancestral gene. Images PMID:1542660

  16. Metabolism and pharmacokinetics of the anti-tuberculosis drug ethionamide in a flavin-containing monooxygenase null mouse.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Amy L; Leykam, Virginia L; Larkin, Andrew; Krueger, Sharon K; Phillips, Ian R; Shephard, Elizabeth A; Williams, David E

    2012-01-01

    Multiple drug resistance (MDR) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (mTB), the causative agent for tuberculosis (TB), has led to increased use of second-line drugs, including ethionamide (ETA). ETA is a prodrug bioactivated by mycobacterial and mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs). FMO2 is the major isoform in the lungs of most mammals, including primates. In humans a polymorphism exists in the expression of FMO2. FMO2.2 (truncated, inactive) protein is produced by the common allele, while the ancestral allele, encoding active FMO2.1, has been documented only in individuals of African and Hispanic origin, at an incidence of up to 50% and 7%, respectively. We hypothesized that FMO2 variability in TB-infected individuals would yield differences in concentrations and ratios of ETA prodrug and metabolites. In this study we assessed the impact of the FMO2 genetic polymorphism on the pharmacokinetics of ETA after administration of a single oral dose of ETA (125 mg/kg) to wild type and triple Fmo1/2/4-null mice, measuring levels of prodrug vs. metabolites in plasma collected from 0 to 3.5 h post-gavage. All mice metabolized ETA to ETA S-oxide (ETASO) and 2-ethyl-4-amidopyridine (ETAA). Wild type mice had higher plasma concentrations of metabolites than of parent compound (p = 0.001). In contrast, Fmo1/2/4-null mice had higher plasma concentrations of parent compound than of metabolites (p = 0.0001). Thus, the human FMO2 genotype could impact the therapeutic efficacy and/or toxicity of ETA. PMID:23580869

  17. Knockdown of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase results in reduced resistance to buprofezin in the small brown planthopper, Laodelphax striatellus (fallén).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yueliang; Wang, Yaming; Wang, Lihua; Yao, Jing; Guo, Huifang; Fang, Jichao

    2016-02-01

    NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) plays an important role in cytochrome P450 function, and CPR knockdown in several insects leads to increased susceptibility to insecticides. However, a putative CPR gene has not yet been fully characterized in the small brown planthopper Laodelphax striatellus, a notorious agricultural pest in rice that causes serious damage by transmitting rice stripe and rice black-streaked dwarf viruses. The objective of this study was to clone the cDNA and to knock down the expression of the gene that encodes L. striatellus CPR (LsCPR) to further determine whether P450s are involved in the resistance of L. striatellus to buprofezin. First, the full-length cDNA of LsCPR was cloned and found to contain an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a polypeptide of 679 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass and isoelectric point of 76.92kDa and 5.37, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequence shares high identity with the CPRs of other insects (98%, 97%, 75% and 68% for Sogatella furcifera, Nilaparvata lugens, Cimex lectularius and Anopheles gambiae, respectively) and possesses the characteristic features of classical CPRs, such as an N-terminal membrane anchor and conserved domains for flavin mononucleotide (FMN), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) binding. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that LsCPR is located in a branch along with the CPRs of other hemipteran insects. LsCPR mRNA was detectable in all examined body parts and developmental stages of L. striatellus, as determined by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR), and transcripts were most abundant in the adult abdomen and in first-instar nymphs and adults. Ingestion of 200μg/mL of LsCPR double-stranded RNA (dsLsCPR) by the planthopper for 5days significantly reduced the transcription level of LsCPR. Moreover, silencing of LsCPR caused increased susceptibility to buprofezin in a buprofezin-resistant (YN-BPF) strain but not in a

  18. Knockdown of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase results in reduced resistance to buprofezin in the small brown planthopper, Laodelphax striatellus (fallén).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yueliang; Wang, Yaming; Wang, Lihua; Yao, Jing; Guo, Huifang; Fang, Jichao

    2016-02-01

    NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) plays an important role in cytochrome P450 function, and CPR knockdown in several insects leads to increased susceptibility to insecticides. However, a putative CPR gene has not yet been fully characterized in the small brown planthopper Laodelphax striatellus, a notorious agricultural pest in rice that causes serious damage by transmitting rice stripe and rice black-streaked dwarf viruses. The objective of this study was to clone the cDNA and to knock down the expression of the gene that encodes L. striatellus CPR (LsCPR) to further determine whether P450s are involved in the resistance of L. striatellus to buprofezin. First, the full-length cDNA of LsCPR was cloned and found to contain an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a polypeptide of 679 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass and isoelectric point of 76.92kDa and 5.37, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequence shares high identity with the CPRs of other insects (98%, 97%, 75% and 68% for Sogatella furcifera, Nilaparvata lugens, Cimex lectularius and Anopheles gambiae, respectively) and possesses the characteristic features of classical CPRs, such as an N-terminal membrane anchor and conserved domains for flavin mononucleotide (FMN), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) binding. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that LsCPR is located in a branch along with the CPRs of other hemipteran insects. LsCPR mRNA was detectable in all examined body parts and developmental stages of L. striatellus, as determined by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR), and transcripts were most abundant in the adult abdomen and in first-instar nymphs and adults. Ingestion of 200μg/mL of LsCPR double-stranded RNA (dsLsCPR) by the planthopper for 5days significantly reduced the transcription level of LsCPR. Moreover, silencing of LsCPR caused increased susceptibility to buprofezin in a buprofezin-resistant (YN-BPF) strain but not in a

  19. Some physical and immunological properties of ox kidney biliverdin reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Rigney, E M; Phillips, O; Mantle, T J

    1988-01-01

    The liver, kidney and spleen of the mouse and rat and the kidney and spleen of the ox express a monomeric form of biliverdin reductase (Mr 34,000), which in the case of the ox kidney enzyme exists in two forms (pI 5.4 and 5.2) that are probably charge isomers. The livers of the mouse and rats express, in addition, a protein (Mr 46,000) that cross-reacts with antibodies raised against the ox kidney enzyme and may be related to form 2 described by Frydman, Tomaro, Awruch & Frydman [(1983) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 759, 257-263]. Higher-Mr forms appear to exist in the guinea pig and hamster. The ox kidney enzyme has three thiol groups, of which two are accessible to 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoate) in the native enzyme. Immunocytochemical analysis reveals that biliverdin reductase is localized in proximal tubules of the inner cortex of the rat kidney. Biliverdin reductase antiserum also stains proximal tubules in human and ox kidney. The staining of podocytes in glomeruli of ox kidney with antiserum to aldose reductase is particularly prominent. The localization of biliverdin reductase in the inner cortical zone of rat kidney is similar to that described for glutathione S-transferase YfYf, and it is suggested that one function of this 'intracellular binding protein' may be to maintain a low free concentration of biliverdin to allow biliverdin reductase to operate efficiently. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:3060109

  20. Structure of the detoxification catalyst mercuric ion reductase from Bacillus sp. strain RC607

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiering, N.; Kabsch, W.; Moore, M. J.; Distefano, M. D.; Walsh, C. T.; Pai, E. F.

    1991-07-01

    SEVERAL hundred million tons of toxic mercurials are dispersed in the biosphere1. Microbes can detoxify organo-mercurials and mercury salts through sequential action of two enzymes, organomercury lyase2 and mercuric ion reductase (MerA) 3-5. The latter, a homodimer with homology to the FAD-dependent disulphide oxidoreductases6, catalyses the reaction NADPH + Hg(II) --> NADP+ + H+Hg(0), one of the very rare enzymic reactions with metal substrates. Human glutathione reductase7,8 serves as a reference molecule for FAD-dependent disulphide reductases and between its primary structure9 and that of MerA from Tn501 (Pseudomonas), Tn21 (Shigella), pI258 (Staphylococcus) and Bacillus, 25-30% of the residues have been conserved10,11. All MerAs have a C-terminal extension about 15 residues long but have very varied N termini. Although the enzyme from Streptomyces lividans has no addition, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Tn5Ol and Bacillus sp. strain RC607 it has one and two copies respectively of a domain of 80-85 residues, highly homologous to MerP, the periplasmic component of proteins encoded by the mer operon11. These domains can be proteolytically cleaved off without changing the catalytic efficiency3. We report here the crystal structure of MerA from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus sp. strain RC607. Analysis of its complexes with nicotinamide dinucleotide substrates and the inhibitor Cd(II) reveals how limited structural changes enable an enzyme to accept as substrate what used to be a dangerous inhibitor. Knowledge of the mode of mercury ligation is a prerequisite for understanding this unique detoxification mechanism.

  1. Analysis of the Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae ArcA regulon identifies fumarate reductase as a determinant of virulence.

    PubMed

    Buettner, Falk F R; Bendallah, Ibrahim M; Bosse, Janine T; Dreckmann, Karla; Nash, John H E; Langford, Paul R; Gerlach, Gerald-F

    2008-06-01

    The ability of the bacterial pathogen Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae to grow anaerobically allows the bacterium to persist in the lung. The ArcAB two-component system is crucial for metabolic adaptation in response to anaerobic conditions, and we recently showed that an A. pleuropneumoniae arcA mutant had reduced virulence compared to the wild type (F. F. Buettner, A. Maas, and G.-F. Gerlach, Vet. Microbiol. 127:106-115, 2008). In order to understand the attenuated phenotype, we investigated the ArcA regulon of A. pleuropneumoniae by using a combination of transcriptome (microarray) and proteome (two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis and subsequent mass spectrometry) analyses. We show that ArcA negatively regulates the expression of many genes, including those encoding enzymes which consume intermediates during fumarate synthesis. Simultaneously, the expression of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, a component of the respiratory chain serving as a direct reduction equivalent for fumarate reductase, was upregulated. This result, together with the in silico analysis finding that A. pleuropneumoniae has no oxidative branch of the citric acid cycle, led to the hypothesis that fumarate reductase might be crucial for virulence by providing (i) energy via fumarate respiration and (ii) succinate and other essential metabolic intermediates via the reductive branch of the citric acid cycle. To test this hypothesis, an isogenic A. pleuropneumoniae fumarate reductase deletion mutant was constructed and studied by using a pig aerosol infection model. The mutant was shown to be significantly attenuated, thereby strongly supporting a crucial role for fumarate reductase in the pathogenesis of A. pleuropneumoniae infection.

  2. The role of Val-265 for flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) binding in pyruvate oxidase: FTIR, kinetic, and crystallographic studies on the enzyme variant V265A.

    PubMed

    Wille, Georg; Ritter, Michaela; Weiss, Manfred S; König, Stephan; Mäntele, Werner; Hübner, Gerhard

    2005-04-01

    In pyruvate oxidase (POX) from Lactobacillus plantarum, valine 265 participates in binding the cofactor FAD and is responsible for the strained conformation of its isoalloxazine moiety that is visible in the crystal structure of POX. The contrasting effects of the conservative amino acid exchange V265A on the enzyme's catalytic properties, cofactor affinity, and protein structure were investigated. The most prominent effect of the exchange was observed in the 2.2 A crystal structure of the mutant POX. While the overall structures of the wild-type and the variant are similar, flavin binding in particular is clearly different. Local disorder at the isoalloxazine binding site prevents modeling of the complete FAD cofactor and two protein loops of the binding site. Only the ADP moiety shows well-defined electron density, indicating an "anchor" function for this part of the molecule. This notion is corroborated by competition experiments where ADP was used to displace FAD from the variant enzyme. Despite the fact that the affinity of FAD binding in the variant is reduced, the catalytic properties are very similar to the wild-type, and the redox potential of the bound flavin is the same for both proteins. The rate of electron transfer toward the flavin during turnover is reduced to one-third compared to the wild-type, but k(cat) remains unchanged. Redox-triggered FTIR difference spectroscopy of free FAD shows the nu(C(10a)=N(1)) band at 1548 cm(-)(1). In POX-V265A, this band is found at 1538 cm(-)(1) and thus shifted less strongly than in wild-type POX where it is found at 1534 cm(-)(1). Taking these observations together, the conservative exchange V265A in POX has a surprisingly small effect on the catalytic properties of the enzyme, whereas the effect on the three-dimensional structure is rather big.

  3. The inhibitory activity of aldose reductase in vitro by constituents of Garcinia mangostana Linn.

    PubMed

    Fatmawati, Sri; Ersam, Taslim; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2015-01-15

    We investigated aldose reductase inhibition of Garcinia mangostana Linn. from Indonesia. Dichloromethane extract of the root bark of this tree was found to demonstrate an IC50 value of 11.98 µg/ml for human aldose reductase in vitro. From the dichloromethane fraction, prenylated xanthones were isolated as potent human aldose reductase inhibitors. We discovered 3-isomangostin to be most potent against aldose reductase, with an IC50 of 3.48 µM.

  4. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  5. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  6. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  7. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  8. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  9. Domain evolution and functional diversification of sulfite reductases.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Ashita; Goswami, Sulip; Riley, Monica; Teske, Andreas; Sogin, Mitchell

    2005-02-01

    Sulfite reductases are key enzymes of assimilatory and dissimilatory sulfur metabolism, which occur in diverse bacterial and archaeal lineages. They share a highly conserved domain "C-X5-C-n-C-X3-C" for binding siroheme and iron-sulfur clusters that facilitate electron transfer to the substrate. For each sulfite reductase cluster, the siroheme-binding domain is positioned slightly differently at the N-terminus of dsrA and dsrB, while in the assimilatory proteins the siroheme domain is located at the C-terminus. Our sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the siroheme-binding domain shows that sulfite reductase sequences diverged from a common ancestor into four separate clusters (aSir, alSir, dsr, and asrC) that are biochemically distinct; each serves a different assimilatory or dissimilatory role in sulfur metabolism. The phylogenetic distribution and functional grouping in sulfite reductase clusters (dsrA and dsrB vs. aSiR, asrC, and alSir) suggest that their functional diversification during evolution may have preceded the bacterial/archaeal divergence.

  10. The Kinetics and Inhibition of the Enzyme Methemoglobin Reductase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Splittgerber, A. G.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate biochemistry experiment which involves the preparation and kinetics of an oxidation-reduction enzyme system, methemoglobin reductase. A crude enzyme extract is prepared and assayed spectrophotometrically. The enzyme system obeys Michaelis-Menton kinetics with respect to both substrate and the NADH cofactor. (MLH)

  11. The arsenic hyperaccumulating Pteris vittata expresses two arsenate reductases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesaro, Patrizia; Cattaneo, Chiara; Bona, Elisa; Berta, Graziella; Cavaletto, Maria

    2015-09-01

    Enzymatic reduction of arsenate to arsenite is the first known step in arsenate metabolism in all organisms. Although the presence of one mRNA arsenate reductase (PvACR2) has been characterized in gametophytes of P. vittata, no arsenate reductase protein has been directly observed in this arsenic hyperaccumulating fern, yet. In order to assess the possible presence of arsenate reductase in P. vittata, two recombinant proteins, ACR2-His6 and Trx-His6-S-Pv2.5-8 were prepared in Escherichia coli, purified and used to produce polyclonal antibodies. The presence of these two enzymes was evaluated by qRT-PCR, immunoblotting and direct MS analysis. Enzymatic activity was detected in crude extracts. For the first time we detected and identified two arsenate reductase proteins (PvACR2 and Pv2.5-8) in sporophytes and gametophytes of P. vittata. Despite an increase of the mRNA levels for both proteins in roots, no difference was observed at the protein level after arsenic treatment. Overall, our data demonstrate the constitutive protein expression of PvACR2 and Pv2.5-8 in P. vittata tissues and propose their specific role in the complex metabolic network of arsenic reduction.

  12. Characterization of mitochondrial thioredoxin reductase from C. elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Lacey, Brian M.; Hondal, Robert J. . E-mail: Robert.Hondal@uvm.edu

    2006-08-04

    Thioredoxin reductase catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of the catalytic disulfide bond of thioredoxin. In mammals and other higher eukaryotes, thioredoxin reductases contain the rare amino acid selenocysteine at the active site. The mitochondrial enzyme from Caenorhabditis elegans, however, contains a cysteine residue in place of selenocysteine. The mitochondrial C. elegans thioredoxin reductase was cloned from an expressed sequence tag and then produced in Escherichia coli as an intein-fusion protein. The purified recombinant enzyme has a k {sub cat} of 610 min{sup -1} and a K {sub m} of 610 {mu}M using E. coli thioredoxin as substrate. The reported k {sub cat} is 25% of the k {sub cat} of the mammalian enzyme and is 43-fold higher than a cysteine mutant of mammalian thioredoxin reductase. The enzyme would reduce selenocysteine, but not hydrogen peroxide or insulin. The flanking glycine residues of the GCCG motif were mutated to serine. The mutants improved substrate binding, but decreased the catalytic rate.

  13. A detoxifying oxygen reductase in the anaerobic protozoan Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Vicente, João B; Tran, Vy; Pinto, Liliana; Teixeira, Miguel; Singh, Upinder

    2012-09-01

    We report the characterization of a bacterial-type oxygen reductase abundant in the cytoplasm of the anaerobic protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. Upon host infection, E. histolytica is confronted with various oxygen tensions in the host intestine, as well as increased reactive oxygen and nitrogen species at the site of local tissue inflammation. Resistance to oxygen-derived stress thus plays an important role in the pathogenic potential of E. histolytica. The genome of E. histolytica has four genes that encode flavodiiron proteins, which are bacterial-type oxygen or nitric oxide reductases and were likely acquired by lateral gene transfer from prokaryotes. The EhFdp1 gene has higher expression in virulent than in nonvirulent Entamoeba strains and species, hinting that the response to oxidative stress may be one correlate of virulence potential. We demonstrate that EhFdp1 is abundantly expressed in the cytoplasm of E. histolytica and that the protein levels are markedly increased (up to ~5-fold) upon oxygen exposure. Additionally, we produced fully functional recombinant EhFdp1 and demonstrated that this enzyme is a specific and robust oxygen reductase but has poor nitric oxide reductase activity. This observation represents a new mechanism of oxygen resistance in the anaerobic protozoan pathogen E. histolytica.

  14. The arsenic hyperaccumulating Pteris vittata expresses two arsenate reductases

    PubMed Central

    Cesaro, Patrizia; Cattaneo, Chiara; Bona, Elisa; Berta, Graziella; Cavaletto, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic reduction of arsenate to arsenite is the first known step in arsenate metabolism in all organisms. Although the presence of one mRNA arsenate reductase (PvACR2) has been characterized in gametophytes of P. vittata, no arsenate reductase protein has been directly observed in this arsenic hyperaccumulating fern, yet. In order to assess the possible presence of arsenate reductase in P. vittata, two recombinant proteins, ACR2-His6 and Trx-His6-S-Pv2.5–8 were prepared in Escherichia coli, purified and used to produce polyclonal antibodies. The presence of these two enzymes was evaluated by qRT-PCR, immunoblotting and direct MS analysis. Enzymatic activity was detected in crude extracts. For the first time we detected and identified two arsenate reductase proteins (PvACR2 and Pv2.5–8) in sporophytes and gametophytes of P. vittata. Despite an increase of the mRNA levels for both proteins in roots, no difference was observed at the protein level after arsenic treatment. Overall, our data demonstrate the constitutive protein expression of PvACR2 and Pv2.5–8 in P. vittata tissues and propose their specific role in the complex metabolic network of arsenic reduction. PMID:26412036

  15. Domain Evolution and Functional Diversification of Sulfite Reductases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhillon, Ashita; Goswami, Sulip; Riley, Monica; Teske, Andreas; Sogin, Mitchell

    2005-02-01

    Sulfite reductases are key enzymes of assimilatory and dissimilatory sulfur metabolism, which occur in diverse bacterial and archaeal lineages. They share a highly conserved domain "C-X5-C-n-C-X3-C" for binding siroheme and iron-sulfur clusters that facilitate electron transfer to the substrate. For each sulfite reductase cluster, the siroheme-binding domain is positioned slightly differently at the N-terminus of dsrA and dsrB, while in the assimilatory proteins the siroheme domain is located at the C-terminus. Our sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the siroheme-binding domain shows that sulfite reductase sequences diverged from a common ancestor into four separate clusters (aSir, alSir, dsr, and asrC) that are biochemically distinct; each serves a different assimilatory or dissimilatory role in sulfur metabolism. The phylogenetic distribution and functional grouping in sulfite reductase clusters (dsrA and dsrB vs. aSiR, asrC, and alSir) suggest that their functional diversification during evolution may have preceded the bacterial/archaeal divergence.

  16. Molecular genetics of steroid 5 alpha-reductase 2 deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Thigpen, A E; Davis, D L; Milatovich, A; Mendonca, B B; Imperato-McGinley, J; Griffin, J E; Francke, U; Wilson, J D; Russell, D W

    1992-01-01

    Two isozymes of steroid 5 alpha-reductase encoded by separate loci catalyze the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone. Inherited defects in the type 2 isozyme lead to male pseudohermaphroditism in which affected males have a normal internal urogenital tract but external genitalia resembling those of a female. The 5 alpha-reductase type 2 gene (gene symbol SRD5A2) was cloned and shown to contain five exons and four introns. The gene was localized to chromosome 2 band p23 by somatic cell hybrid mapping and chromosomal in situ hybridization. Molecular analysis of the SRD5A2 gene resulted in the identification of 18 mutations in 11 homozygotes, 6 compound heterozygotes, and 4 inferred compound heterozygotes from 23 families with 5 alpha-reductase deficiency. 6 apparent recurrent mutations were detected in 19 different ethnic backgrounds. In two patients, the catalytic efficiency of the mutant enzymes correlated with the severity of the disease. The high proportion of compound heterozygotes suggests that the carrier frequency of mutations in the 5 alpha-reductase type 2 gene may be higher than previously thought. Images PMID:1522235

  17. 5. cap alpha. -reductase activity in rat adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Zyirek, M.; Flood, C.; Longcope, C.

    1987-11-01

    We measured the 5 ..cap alpha..-reductase activity in isolated cell preparations of rat adipose tissue using the formation of (/sup 3/H) dihydrotestosterone from (/sup 3/H) testosterone as an endpoint. Stromal cells were prepared from the epididymal fat pad, perinephric fat, and subcutaneous fat of male rats and from perinephric fat of female rats. Adipocytes were prepared from the epididymal fat pad and perinephric fat of male rats. Stromal cells from the epididymal fat pad and perinephric fat contained greater 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity than did the adipocytes from these depots. Stromal cells from the epididymal fat pad contained greater activity than those from perinephric and subcutaneous depots. Perinephric stromal cells from female rats were slightly more active than those from male rats. Estradiol (10/sup -8/ M), when added to the medium, caused a 90% decrease in 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity. Aromatase activity was minimal, several orders of magnitude less than 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity in each tissue studied.

  18. ARSENICALS INHIBIT THIOREDOXIN REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN CULTURED RAT HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARSENICALS INHIBIT THIOREDOXIN REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN CULTURED RAT HEPATOCYTES.

    S. Lin1, L. M. Del Razo1, M. Styblo1, C. Wang2, W. R. Cullen2, and D.J. Thomas3. 1Univ. North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; 2Univ. British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 3National Health and En...

  19. Differential molecular response of monodehydroascorbate reductase and glutathione reductase by nitration and S-nitrosylation

    PubMed Central

    Begara-Morales, Juan C.; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Chaki, Mounira; Mata-Pérez, Capilla; Valderrama, Raquel; Padilla, María N.; Luque, Francisco; Corpas, Francisco J.; Barroso, Juan B.

    2015-01-01

    The ascorbate–glutathione cycle is a metabolic pathway that detoxifies hydrogen peroxide and involves enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. Proteomic studies have shown that some enzymes in this cycle such as ascorbate peroxidase (APX), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDAR), and glutathione reductase (GR) are potential targets for post-translational modifications (PMTs) mediated by nitric oxide-derived molecules. Using purified recombinant pea peroxisomal MDAR and cytosolic and chloroplastic GR enzymes produced in Escherichia coli, the effects of peroxynitrite (ONOO–) and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) which are known to mediate protein nitration and S-nitrosylation processes, respectively, were analysed. Although ONOO– and GSNO inhibit peroxisomal MDAR activity, chloroplastic and cytosolic GR were not affected by these molecules. Mass spectrometric analysis of the nitrated MDAR revealed that Tyr213, Try292, and Tyr345 were exclusively nitrated to 3-nitrotyrosine by ONOO–. The location of these residues in the structure of pea peroxisomal MDAR reveals that Tyr345 is found at 3.3 Å of His313 which is involved in the NADP-binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed Tyr345 as the primary site of nitration responsible for the inhibition of MDAR activity by ONOO–. These results provide new insights into the molecular regulation of MDAR which is deactivated by nitration and S-nitrosylation. However, GR was not affected by ONOO– or GSNO, suggesting the existence of a mechanism to conserve redox status by maintaining the level of reduced GSH. Under a nitro-oxidative stress induced by salinity (150mM NaCl), MDAR expression (mRNA, protein, and enzyme activity levels) was increased, probably to compensate the inhibitory effects of S-nitrosylation and nitration on the enzyme. The present data show the modulation of the antioxidative response of key enzymes in the ascorbate–glutathione cycle by nitric oxide (NO)-PTMs, thus indicating the close involvement

  20. Inhibition of Vibrio harveyi bioluminescence by cerulenin: In vivo evidence for covalent modification of the reductase enzyme involved in aldehyde synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Byers, D.M. ); Meighen, E.A. )

    1989-07-01

    Bacterial bioluminescence is very sensitive to cerulenin, a fungal antibiotic which is known to inhibit fatty acid synthesis. When Vibrio harveyi cells pretreated with cerulenin were incubated with ({sup 3}H)myristic acid in vivo, acylation of the 57-kilodalton reductase subunit of the luminescence-specific fatty acid reductase complex was specifically inhibited. Light emission of wild-type V. harveyi was 20-fold less sensitive to cerulenin at low concentrations (10{mu}g/ml) than that of the dark mutant strain M17, which requires exogenous myristic acid for luminescence because of a defective transferase subunit. The sensitivity of myristic acid-stimulated luminescence in the mutant strain M17 exceeded that of phospholipid synthesis from ({sup 14}C)acetate, whereas uptake and incorporation of exogenous ({sup 14}C)myristic acid into phospholipids was increased by cerulenin. The reductase subunit could be labeled by incubating M17 cells with ({sup 3}H)tetrahydrocerulenin; this labeling was prevented by preincubation with either unlabeled cerulenin or myristic acid. Labeling of the reductase subunit with ({sup 3}H)tetrahydrocerulenin was also noted in an aldehyde-stimulated mutant (A16) but not in wild-type cells or in another aldehyde-stimulated mutant (M42) in which ({sup 3}H)myristoyl turnover at the reductase subunit was found to be defective. These results indicate that (i) cerulenin specifically and covalently inhibits the reductase component of aldehyde synthesis, (ii) this enzyme is partially protected from cerulenin inhibition in the wild-type strain in vivo, and (iii) two dark mutants which exhibit similar luminescence phenotypes (mutants A16 and M42) are blocked at different stages of fatty acid reduction.

  1. Measurement of nitrous oxide reductase activity in aquatic sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, L.G.; Oremland, R.S.; Paulsen, S.

    1986-01-01

    Denitrification in aquatic sediments was measured by an N2O reductase assay. Sediments consumed small added quantities of N2O over short periods (a few hours). In experiments with sediment slurries, N2O reductase activity was inhibited by O2, C2H2, heat treatment, and by high levels of nitrate (1 mM) or sulfide (10 mM). However, ambient levels of nitrate (<100 μM) did not influence activity, and moderate levels (about 150 μM) induced only a short lag before reductase activity began. Moderate levels of sulfide (<1 mM) had no effect on N2O reductase activity. Nitrous oxide reductase displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetics in sediments from freshwater (Km = 2.17 μM), estuarine (Km = 14.5 μM), and alkaline-saline (Km = 501 μM) environments. An in situ assay was devised in which a solution of N2O was injected into sealed glass cores containing intact sediment. Two estimates of net rates of denitrification in San Francisco Bay under approximated in situ conditions were 0.009 and 0.041 mmol of N2O per m2 per h. Addition of chlorate to inhibit denitrification in these intact-core experiments (to estimate gross rates of N2O consumption) resulted in approximately a 14% upward revision of estimates of net rates. These results were comparable to an in situ estimate of 0.022 mmol of N2O per m2 per h made with the acetylene block assay.

  2. A Mechanistic Investigation of the C-Terminal Redox Motif of Thioredoxin Reductase from Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    High-molecular mass thioredoxin reductases (TRs) are pyridine nucleotide disulfide oxidoreductases that catalyze the reduction of the disulfide bond of thioredoxin (Trx). Trx is responsible for reducing multiple protein disulfide targets in the cell. TRs utilize reduced β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate to reduce a bound flavin prosthetic group, which in turn reduces an N-terminal redox center that has the conserved sequence CICVNVGCCT, where CIC is denoted as the interchange thiol while the thiol involved in charge-transfer complexation is denoted as CCT. The reduced N-terminal redox center reduces a C-terminal redox center on the opposite subunit of the head-to-tail homodimer, the C-terminal redox center that catalyzes the reduction of the Trx-disulfide. Variations in the amino acid sequence of the C-terminal redox center differentiate high-molecular mass TRs into different types. Type Ia TRs have tetrapeptide C-terminal redox centers of with a GCUG sequence, where U is the rare amino acid selenocysteine (Sec), while the tetrapeptide sequence in type Ib TRs has its Sec residue replaced with a conventional cysteine (Cys) residue and can use small polar amino acids such as serine and threonine in place of the flanking glycine residues. The TR from Plasmodium falciparum (PfTR) is similar in structure and mechanism to type Ia and type Ib TRs except that the C-terminal redox center is different in its amino acid sequence. The C-terminal redox center of PfTR has the sequence G534CGGGKCG541, and we classify it as a type II high-molecular mass TR. The oxidized type II redox motif will form a 20-membered disulfide ring, whereas the absence of spacer amino acids in the type I motif results in the formation of a rare eight-membered ring. We used site-directed mutagenesis and protein semisynthesis to investigate features of the distinctive type II C-terminal redox motif that help it perform catalysis. Deletion of Gly541 reduces thioredoxin reductase activity by

  3. The coordinated increased expression of biliverdin reductase and heme oxygenase-2 promotes cardiomyocyte survival: a reductase-based peptide counters β-adrenergic receptor ligand-mediated cardiac dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Bo; Gibbs, Peter E. M.; Brookes, Paul S.; Maines, Mahin D.

    2011-01-01

    HO-2 oxidizes heme to CO and biliverdin; the latter is reduced to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase (BVR). In addition, HO-2 is a redox-sensitive K/Ca2-associated protein, and BVR is an S/T/Y kinase. The two enzymes are components of cellular defense mechanisms. This is the first reporting of regulation of HO-2 by BVR and that their coordinated increase in isolated myocytes and intact heart protects against cardiotoxicity of β-adrenergic receptor activation by isoproterenol (ISO). The induction of BVR mRNA, protein, and activity and HO-2 protein was maintained for ≥96 h; increase in HO-1 was modest and transient. In isolated cardiomyocytes, experiments with cycloheximide, proteasome inhibitor MG-132, and siBVR suggested BVR-mediated stabilization of HO-2. In both models, activation of BVR offered protection against the ligand's stimulation of apoptosis. Two human BVR-based peptides known to inhibit and activate the reductase, KKRILHC281 and KYCCSRK296, respectively, were tested in the intact heart. Perfusion of the heart with the inhibitory peptide blocked ISO-mediated BVR activation and augmented apoptosis; conversely, perfusion with the activating peptide inhibited apoptosis. At the functional level, peptide-mediated inhibition of BVR was accompanied by dysfunction of the left ventricle and decrease in HO-2 protein levels. Perfusion of the organ with the activating peptide preserved the left ventricular contractile function and was accompanied by increased levels of HO-2 protein. Finding that BVR and HO-2 levels, myocyte apoptosis, and contractile function of the heart can be modulated by small human BVR-based peptides offers a promising therapeutic approach for treatment of cardiac dysfunctions.—Ding, B., Gibbs, P. E. M., Brookes, P. S., Maines, M. D. The coordinated increased expression of biliverdin reductase and heme oxygenase-2 promotes cardiomyocyte survival; a reductase-based peptide counters β-adrenergic receptor ligand-mediated cardiac dysfunction

  4. Photochemical properties of the flavin mononucleotide-binding domains of the phototropins from Arabidopsis, rice, and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Masahiro; Swartz, Trevor E; Olney, Margaret A; Onodera, Akihiko; Mochizuki, Nobuyoshi; Fukuzawa, Hideya; Asamizu, Erika; Tabata, Satoshi; Kanegae, Hiromi; Takano, Makoto; Christie, John M; Nagatani, Akira; Briggs, Winslow R

    2002-06-01

    Phototropins (phot1 and phot2, formerly designated nph1 and npl1) are blue-light receptors that mediate phototropism, blue light-induced chloroplast relocation, and blue light-induced stomatal opening in Arabidopsis. Phototropins contain two light, oxygen, or voltage (LOV) domains at their N termini (LOV1 and LOV2), each a binding site for the chromophore flavin mononucleotide (FMN). Their C termini contain a serine/threonine protein kinase domain. Here, we examine the kinetic properties of the LOV domains of Arabidopsis phot1 and phot2, rice (Oryza sativa) phot1 and phot2, and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii phot. When expressed in Escherichia coli, purified LOV domains from all phototropins examined bind FMN tightly and undergo a self-contained photocycle, characterized by fluorescence and absorption changes induced by blue light (T. Sakai, T. Kagawa, M. Kasahara, T.E. Swartz, J.M. Christie, W.R. Briggs, M. Wada, K. Okada [2001] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 98: 6969-6974; M. Salomon, J.M. Christie, E. Knieb, U. Lempert, W.R. Briggs [2000] Biochemistry 39: 9401-9410). The photocycle involves the light-induced formation of a cysteinyl adduct to the C(4a) carbon of the FMN chromophore, which subsequently breaks down in darkness. In each case, the relative quantum efficiencies for the photoreaction and the rate constants for dark recovery of LOV1, LOV2, and peptides containing both LOV domains are presented. Moreover, the data obtained from full-length Arabidopsis phot1 and phot2 expressed in insect cells closely resemble those obtained for the tandem LOV-domain fusion proteins expressed in E. coli. For both Arabidopsis and rice phototropins, the LOV domains of phot1 differ from those of phot2 in their reaction kinetic properties and relative quantum efficiencies. Thus, in addition to differing in amino acid sequence, the phototropins can be distinguished on the basis of the photochemical cycles of their LOV domains. The LOV domains of C. reinhardtii phot also undergo light

  5. Effects of salinity acclimation on the pesticide-metabolizing enzyme flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Lavado, Ramon; Aparicio-Fabre, Rosaura; Schlenk, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Thioether-containing pesticides are more toxic in certain anadromous and catadromous fish species that have undergone acclimation to hypersaline environments. Enhanced toxicity has been shown to be mediated through the bioactivation of these xenobiotics by one or more flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs), which are induced by hyperosmotic conditions. To better understand the number of FMO genes that may be regulated by hyperosmotic conditions, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were maintained and acclimated to freshwater (<0.5 g/L salinity) and to 18 g/L salinity. The expression of 3 different FMO transcripts (A, B and C) and associated enzymatic activities methyl p-tolyl sulfoxidation (MTSO) and benzydamine N-oxigenation (BZNO) were measured in four tissues. In freshwater-acclimated organisms FMO catalytic activities were as follows: liver>kidney>gills=olfactory tissues; in hypersaline-acclimated animals activities were higher in liver>gills>olfactory tissues>kidney. Acclimation to 18 g/L caused a significant induction in the stereoselective formation of R-MTSO in gill. In olfactory tissues, stereoselective (100%) formation of S-MTSO was observed and was unaltered by acclimation to hypersaline water. When specific transcripts were evaluated, salinity-acclimation increased FMO A in liver (up to 2-fold) and kidney (up to 3-fold) but not in olfactory tissues and gills. FMO B mRNA was significantly down-regulated in all tissues, and FMO C was unchanged by hypersaline acclimation. FMO B and C failed to correlate with any FMO catalytic activity, but FMO A mRNA expression linearly correlated to both FMO catalytic activities (MTSO and BZNO) in liver (r(2)=0.92 and r(2)=0.88) and kidney microsomes (r(2)=0.93 and r(2)=90). FMO A only correlated with MTSO activity in gills (r(2)=0.93). These results indicate unique tissue specific expression of FMO genes in salmonids and are consistent with salinity-mediated enhancement of thioether-containing pesticide bioactivation by

  6. Effects of salinity acclimation on the pesticide-metabolizing enzyme flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    PubMed Central

    Lavado, Ramon; Aparicio-Fabre, Rosaura; Schlenk, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Thioether-containing pesticides are more toxic in certain anadromous and catadromous fish species that have undergone acclimation to hypersaline environments. Enhanced toxicity has been shown to be mediated through the bioactivation of these xenobiotics by one or more flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs), which are induced by hyperosmotic conditions. To better understand the number of FMO genes that may be regulated by hyperosmotic conditions, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were maintained and acclimated to freshwater (<0.5 g/L salinity) and to 18 g/L salinity. The expression of 3 different FMO transcripts (A, B and C) and associated enzymatic activities methyl p-tolyl sulfoxidation (MTSO) and benzydamine N-oxigenation (BZNO) were measured in four tissues. In freshwater-acclimated organisms FMO catalytic activities were as follows: liver>kidney>gills=olfactory tissues; in hypersaline-acclimated animals activities were higher in liver>gills>olfactory tissues>kidney. Acclimation to 18 g/L caused a significant induction in the stereoselective formation of R-MTSO in gill. In olfactory tissues, stereoselective (100%) formation of S-MTSO was observed and was unaltered by acclimation to hypersaline water. When specific transcripts were evaluated, salinity-acclimation increased FMO A in liver (up to 2-fold) and kidney (up to 3-fold) but not in olfactory tissues and gills. FMO B mRNA was significantly down-regulated in all tissues, and FMO C was unchanged by hypersaline acclimation. FMO B and C failed to correlate with any FMO catalytic activity, but FMO A mRNA expression linearly correlated to both FMO catalytic activities (MTSO and BZNO) in liver (r2=0.92 and r2=0.88) and kidney microsomes (r2=0.93 and r2=90). FMO A only correlated with MTSO activity in gills (r2=0.93). These results indicate unique tissue specific expression of FMO genes in salmonids and are consistent with salinity-mediated enhancement of thioether-containing pesticide bioactivation by FMO which

  7. Species Differences in the Oxidative Desulfurization of a Thiouracil-Based Irreversible Myeloperoxidase Inactivator by Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Eng, Heather; Sharma, Raman; Wolford, Angela; Di, Li; Ruggeri, Roger B; Buckbinder, Leonard; Conn, Edward L; Dalvie, Deepak K; Kalgutkar, Amit S

    2016-08-01

    N1-Substituted-6-arylthiouracils, represented by compound 1 [6-(2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-2-thioxo-2,3-dihydropyrimidin-4(1H)-one], are a novel class of selective irreversible inhibitors of human myeloperoxidase. The present account is a summary of our in vitro studies on the facile oxidative desulfurization in compound 1 to a cyclic ether metabolite M1 [5-(2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2,3-dihydro-7H-oxazolo[3,2-a]pyrimidin-7-one] in NADPH-supplemented rats (t1/2 [half-life = mean ± S.D.] = 8.6 ± 0.4 minutes) and dog liver microsomes (t1/2 = 11.2 ± 0.4 minutes), but not in human liver microsomes (t1/2 > 120 minutes). The in vitro metabolic instability also manifested in moderate-to-high plasma clearances of the parent compound in rats and dogs with significant concentrations of M1 detected in circulation. Mild heat deactivation of liver microsomes or coincubation with the flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) inhibitor imipramine significantly diminished M1 formation. In contrast, oxidative metabolism of compound 1 to M1 was not inhibited by the pan cytochrome P450 inactivator 1-aminobenzotriazole. Incubations with recombinant FMO isoforms (FMO1, FMO3, and FMO5) revealed that FMO1 principally catalyzed the conversion of compound 1 to M1. FMO1 is not expressed in adult human liver, which rationalizes the species difference in oxidative desulfurization. Oxidation by FMO1 followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with Michaelis-Menten constant, maximum rate of oxidative desulfurization, and intrinsic clearance values of 209 μM, 20.4 nmol/min/mg protein, and 82.7 μl/min/mg protein, respectively. Addition of excess glutathione essentially eliminated the conversion of compound 1 to M1 in NADPH-supplemented rat and dog liver microsomes, which suggests that the initial FMO1-mediated S-oxygenation of compound 1 yields a sulfenic acid intermediate capable of redox cycling to the parent compound in a glutathione-dependent fashion or undergoing further oxidation to a more

  8. Diversity of flavin-binding monooxygenase genes (almA) in marine bacteria capable of degradation long-chain alkanes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wanpeng; Shao, Zongze

    2012-06-01

    Many bacteria have been reported as degraders of long-chain (LC) n-alkanes, but the mechanism is poorly understood. Flavin-binding monooxygenase (AlmA) was recently found to be involved in LC-alkane degradation in bacteria of the Acinetobacter and Alcanivorax genera. However, the diversity of this gene and the role it plays in other bacteria remains unclear. In this study, we surveyed the diversity of almA in marine bacteria and in bacteria found in oil-enrichment communities. To identify the presence of this gene, a pair of degenerate PCR primers were was designed based on conserved motifs of the almA gene sequences in public databases. Using this approach, we identified diverse almA genes in the hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria and in bacterial communities from the surface seawater of the Xiamen coastal area, the South China Sea, the Indian Ocean, and the Atlantic Ocean. As a result, almA was positively detected in 35 isolates belonging to four genera, and a total of 39 different almA sequences were obtained. Five isolates were confirmed to harbor two to three almA genes. From the Xiamen coastal area and the Atlantic Ocean oil-enrichment communities, a total of 60 different almA sequences were obtained. These sequences mainly formed two clusters in the phylogenetic tree, named Class I and Class II, and these shared 45-56% identity at the amino acid level. Class I contained 11 sequences from bacteria represented by the Salinisphaera and Parvibaculum genera. Class II was larger and more diverse, and it was composed of 88 sequences from Proteobacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, and the enriched bacterial communities. These communities were represented by the Alcanivorax and Marinobacter genera, which are the two most popular genera hosting the almA gene. AlmA was also detected across a wide geographical range, as determined by the origin of the bacterial host. Our results demonstrate the diversity of almA and confirm its high rate of occurrence in hydrocarbon

  9. Crystal structures of pinoresinol-lariciresinol and phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductases and their relationship to isoflavone reductases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, Tongpil; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Bedgar, Diana L.; Youn, Buhyun; Lawrence, Paulraj K.; Gang, David R.; Halls, Steven C.; Park, HaJeung; Hilsenbeck, Jacqueline L.; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.; Kang, ChulHee

    2003-01-01

    Despite the importance of plant lignans and isoflavonoids in human health protection (e.g. for both treatment and prevention of onset of various cancers) as well as in plant biology (e.g. in defense functions and in heartwood development), systematic studies on the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis have only recently begun. In this investigation, three NADPH-dependent aromatic alcohol reductases were comprehensively studied, namely pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductase (PLR), phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase (PCBER), and isoflavone reductase (IFR), which are involved in central steps to the various important bioactive lignans and isoflavonoids. Of particular interest was in determining how differing regio- and enantiospecificities are achieved with the different enzymes, despite each apparently going through similar enone intermediates. Initially, the three-dimensional x-ray crystal structures of both PLR_Tp1 and PCBER_Pt1 were solved and refined to 2.5 and 2.2 A resolutions, respectively. Not only do they share high gene sequence similarity, but their structures are similar, having a continuous alpha/beta NADPH-binding domain and a smaller substrate-binding domain. IFR (whose crystal structure is not yet obtained) was also compared (modeled) with PLR and PCBER and was deduced to have the same overall basic structure. The basis for the distinct enantio-specific and regio-specific reactions of PCBER, PLR, and IFR, as well as the reaction mechanism and participating residues involved (as identified by site-directed mutagenesis), are discussed.

  10. Crystal structures of pinoresinol-lariciresinol and phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductases and their relationship to isoflavone reductases.

    PubMed

    Min, Tongpil; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Bedgar, Diana L; Youn, Buhyun; Lawrence, Paulraj K; Gang, David R; Halls, Steven C; Park, HaJeung; Hilsenbeck, Jacqueline L; Davin, Laurence B; Lewis, Norman G; Kang, ChulHee

    2003-12-12

    Despite the importance of plant lignans and isoflavonoids in human health protection (e.g. for both treatment and prevention of onset of various cancers) as well as in plant biology (e.g. in defense functions and in heartwood development), systematic studies on the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis have only recently begun. In this investigation, three NADPH-dependent aromatic alcohol reductases were comprehensively studied, namely pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductase (PLR), phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase (PCBER), and isoflavone reductase (IFR), which are involved in central steps to the various important bioactive lignans and isoflavonoids. Of particular interest was in determining how differing regio- and enantiospecificities are achieved with the different enzymes, despite each apparently going through similar enone intermediates. Initially, the three-dimensional x-ray crystal structures of both PLR_Tp1 and PCBER_Pt1 were solved and refined to 2.5 and 2.2 A resolutions, respectively. Not only do they share high gene sequence similarity, but their structures are similar, having a continuous alpha/beta NADPH-binding domain and a smaller substrate-binding domain. IFR (whose crystal structure is not yet obtained) was also compared (modeled) with PLR and PCBER and was deduced to have the same overall basic structure. The basis for the distinct enantio-specific and regio-specific reactions of PCBER, PLR, and IFR, as well as the reaction mechanism and participating residues involved (as identified by site-directed mutagenesis), are discussed.

  11. (+)-Pinoresinol/(+)-lariciresinol reductase from Forsythia intermedia. Protein purification, cDNA cloning, heterologous expression and comparison to isoflavone reductase.

    PubMed

    Dinkova-Kostova, A T; Gang, D R; Davin, L B; Bedgar, D L; Chu, A; Lewis, N G

    1996-11-15

    Lignans are a widely distributed class of natural products, whose functions and distribution suggest that they are one of the earliest forms of defense to have evolved in vascular plants; some, such as podophyllotoxin and enterodiol, have important roles in cancer chemotherapy and prevention, respectively. Entry into lignan enzymology has been gained by the approximately 3000-fold purification of two isoforms of (+)-pinoresinol/(+)-lariciresinol reductase, a pivotal branchpoint enzyme in lignan biosynthesis. Both have comparable ( approximately 34.9 kDa) molecular mass and kinetic (Vmax/Km) properties and catalyze sequential, NADPH-dependent, stereospecific, hydride transfers where the incoming hydride takes up the pro-R position. The gene encoding (+)-pinoresinol/(+)-lariciresinol reductase has been cloned and the recombinant protein heterologously expressed as a functional beta-galactosidase fusion protein. Its amino acid sequence reveals a strong homology to isoflavone reductase, a key branchpoint enzyme in isoflavonoid metabolism and primarily found in the Fabaceae (angiosperms). This is of great evolutionary significance since both lignans and isoflavonoids have comparable plant defense properties, as well as similar roles as phytoestrogens. Given that lignans are widespread from primitive plants onwards, whereas the isoflavone reductase-derived isoflavonoids are mainly restricted to the Fabaceae, it is tempting to speculate that this branch of the isoflavonoid pathway arose via evolutionary divergence from that giving the lignans.

  12. H₂-dependent azoreduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: involvement of secreted flavins and both [Ni-Fe] and [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Le Laz, Sébastien; Kpebe, Arlette; Lorquin, Jean; Brugna, Myriam; Rousset, Marc

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, the hydrogen (H2)-dependent discoloration of azo dye amaranth by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was investigated. Experiments with hydrogenase-deficient strains demonstrated that periplasmic [Ni-Fe] hydrogenase (HyaB) and periplasmic [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase (HydA) are both respiratory hydrogenases of dissimilatory azoreduction in S. oneidensis MR-1. These findings suggest that HyaB and HydA can function as uptake hydrogenases that couple the oxidation of H2 to the reduction of amaranth to sustain cellular growth. This constitutes to our knowledge the first report of the involvement of [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase in a bacterial azoreduction process. Assays with respiratory inhibitors indicated that a menaquinone pool and different cytochromes were involved in the azoreduction process. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that flavin mononucleotide and riboflavin were secreted in culture supernatant by S. oneidensis MR-1 under H2-dependent conditions with concentration of 1.4 and 2.4 μmol g protein(-1), respectively. These endogenous flavins were shown to significantly accelerate the reduction of amaranth at micromolar concentrations acting as electron shuttles between the cell surface and the extracellular azo dye. This work may facilitate a better understanding of the mechanisms of azoreduction by S. oneidensis MR-1 and may have practical applications for microbiological treatments of dye-polluted industrial effluents.

  13. New role of flavin as a general acid-base catalyst with no redox function in type 2 isopentenyl-diphosphate isomerase.

    PubMed

    Unno, Hideaki; Yamashita, Satoshi; Ikeda, Yosuke; Sekiguchi, Shin-Ya; Yoshida, Norie; Yoshimura, Tohru; Kusunoki, Masami; Nakayama, Toru; Nishino, Tokuzo; Hemmi, Hisashi

    2009-04-01

    Using FMN and a reducing agent such as NAD(P)H, type 2 isopentenyl-diphosphate isomerase catalyzes isomerization between isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate, both of which are elemental units for the biosynthesis of highly diverse isoprenoid compounds. Although the flavin cofactor is expected to be integrally involved in catalysis, its exact role remains controversial. Here we report the crystal structures of the substrate-free and complex forms of type 2 isopentenyl-diphosphate isomerase from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae, not only in the oxidized state but also in the reduced state. Based on the active-site structures of the reduced FMN-substrate-enzyme ternary complexes, which are in the active state, and on the data from site-directed mutagenesis at highly conserved charged or polar amino acid residues around the active site, we demonstrate that only reduced FMN, not amino acid residues, can catalyze proton addition/elimination required for the isomerase reaction. This discovery is the first evidence for this long suspected, but previously unobserved, role of flavins just as a general acid-base catalyst without playing any redox roles, and thereby expands the known functions of these versatile coenzymes.

  14. Cell-secreted flavins bound to membrane cytochromes dictate electron transfer reactions to surfaces with diverse charge and pH.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Akihiro; Kalathil, Shafeer; Deng, Xiao; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakamura, Ryuhei; Nealson, Kenneth H

    2014-01-01

    The variety of solid surfaces to and from which microbes can deliver electrons by extracellular electron transport (EET) processes via outer-membrane c-type cytochromes (OM c-Cyts) expands the importance of microbial respiration in natural environments and industrial applications. Here, we demonstrate that the bifurcated EET pathway of OM c-Cyts sustains the diversity of the EET surface in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 via specific binding with cell-secreted flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and riboflavin (RF). Microbial current production and whole-cell differential pulse voltammetry revealed that RF and FMN enhance EET as bound cofactors in a similar manner. Conversely, FMN and RF were clearly differentiated in the EET enhancement by gene-deletion of OM c-Cyts and the dependency of the electrode potential and pH. These results indicate that RF and FMN have specific binding sites in OM c-Cyts and highlight the potential roles of these flavin-cytochrome complexes in controlling the rate of electron transfer to surfaces with diverse potential and pH. PMID:25012073

  15. The Crystal Structure of Six-transmembrane Epithelial Antigen of the Prostate 4 (Steap4), a Ferri/Cuprireductase, Suggests a Novel Interdomain Flavin-binding Site*

    PubMed Central

    Gauss, George H.; Kleven, Mark D.; Sendamarai, Anoop K.; Fleming, Mark D.; Lawrence, C. Martin

    2013-01-01

    Steap4 is a cell surface metalloreductase linked to obesity-associated insulin resistance. Initial characterization of its cell surface metalloreductase activity has been reported, but thorough biochemical characterization of this activity is lacking. Here, we report detailed kinetic analysis of the Steap4 cell surface metalloreductase activities. Steap4 shows physiologically relevant Km values for both Fe3+ and Cu2+ and retains activity at acidic pH, suggesting it may also function within intracellular organelles to reduce these metals. Flavin-dependent NADPH oxidase activity that was much greater than the equivalent Steap3 construct was observed for the isolated N-terminal oxidoreductase domain. The crystal structure of the Steap4 oxidoreductase domain was determined, providing a structural explanation for these differing activities. Structure-function work also suggested Steap4 utilizes an interdomain flavin-binding site to shuttle electrons between the oxidoreductase and transmembrane domains, and it showed that the disordered N-terminal residues do not contribute to enzymatic activity. PMID:23733181

  16. Characterization of recombinant glutathione reductase from the psychrophilic Antarctic bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea.

    PubMed

    Ji, Mikyoung; Barnwell, Callie V; Grunden, Amy M

    2015-07-01

    Glutathione reductases catalyze the reduction of oxidized glutathione (glutathione disulfide, GSSG) using NADPH as the substrate to produce reduced glutathione (GSH), which is an important antioxidant molecule that helps maintain the proper reducing environment of the cell. A recombinant form of glutathione reductase from Colwellia psychrerythraea, a marine psychrophilic bacterium, has been biochemically characterized to determine its molecular and enzymatic properties. C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase was shown to be a homodimer with a molecular weight of 48.7 kDa using SDS-PAGE, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and gel filtration. The C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase sequence shows significant homology to that of Escherichia coli glutathione reductase (66 % identity), and it possesses the FAD and NADPH binding motifs, as well as absorption spectrum features which are characteristic of flavoenzymes such as glutathione reductase. The psychrophilic C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase exhibits higher k cat and k cat/K m at lower temperatures (4 °C) compared to mesophilic Baker's yeast glutathione reductase. However, C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase was able to complement an E. coli glutathione reductase deletion strain in oxidative stress growth assays, demonstrating the functionality of C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase over a broad temperature range, which suggests its potential utility as an antioxidant enzyme in heterologous systems. PMID:26101017

  17. New functional sulfide oxidase-oxygen reductase supercomplex in the membrane of the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus.

    PubMed

    Prunetti, Laurence; Infossi, Pascale; Brugna, Myriam; Ebel, Christine; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Guiral, Marianne

    2010-12-31

    Aquifex aeolicus, a hyperthermophilic and microaerophilic bacterium, obtains energy for growth from inorganic compounds alone. It was previously proposed that one of the respiratory pathways in this organism consists of the electron transfer from hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) to molecular oxygen. H(2)S is oxidized by the sulfide quinone reductase, a membrane-bound flavoenzyme, which reduces the quinone pool. We have purified and characterized a novel membrane-bound multienzyme supercomplex that brings together all the molecular components involved in this bioenergetic chain. Our results indicate that this purified structure consists of one dimeric bc(1) complex (complex III), one cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV), and one or two sulfide quinone reductases as well as traces of the monoheme cytochrome c(555) and quinone molecules. In addition, this work strongly suggests that the cytochrome c oxidase in the supercomplex is a ba(3)-type enzyme. The supercomplex has a molecular mass of about 350 kDa and is enzymatically functional, reducing O(2) in the presence of the electron donor, H(2)S. This is the first demonstration of the existence of such a respirasome carrying a sulfide oxidase-oxygen reductase activity. Moreover, the kinetic properties of the sulfide quinone reductase change slightly when integrated in the supercomplex, compared with the free enzyme. We previously purified a complete respirasome involved in hydrogen oxidation and sulfur reduction from Aquifex aeolicus. Thus, two different bioenergetic pathways (sulfur reduction and sulfur oxidation) are organized in this bacterium as supramolecular structures in the membrane. A model for the energetic sulfur metabolism of Aquifex aeolicus is proposed.

  18. Shoot-to-Root Signal Transmission Regulates Root Fe(III) Reductase Activity in the dgl Mutant of Pea.

    PubMed

    Grusak, M. A.; Pezeshgi, S.

    1996-01-01

    To understand the root, shoot, and Fe-nutritional factors that regulate root Fe-acquisition processes in dicotyledonous plants, Fe(III) reduction and net proton efflux were quantified in root systems of an Fe-hyperaccumulating mutant (dgl) and a parental (cv Dippes Gelbe Viktoria [DGV]) genotype of pea (Pisum sativum). Plants were grown with (+Fe treated) or without (-Fe treated) added Fe(III)-N,N'-ethylenebis[2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-glycine] (2 [mu]M); root Fe(III) reduction was measured in solutions containing growth nutrients, 0.1 mM Fe(III)-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and 0.1 mM Na2-bathophenanthrolinedisulfonic acid. Daily measurements of Fe(III) reduction (d 10-20) revealed initially low rates in +Fe-treated and -Fe-treated dgl, followed by a nearly 5-fold stimulation in rates by d 15 for both growth types. In DGV, root Fe(III) reductase activity increased only minimally by d 20 in +Fe-treated plants and about 3-fold in -Fe-treated plants, beginning on d 15. Net proton efflux was enhanced in roots of -Fe-treated DGV and both dgl growth types, relative to +Fe-treated DGV. In dgl, the enhanced proton efflux occurred prior to the increase in root Fe(III) reductase activity. Reductase studies using plants with reciprocal shoot:root grafts demonstrated that shoot expression of the dgl gene leads to the generation of a transmissible signal that enhances Fe(III) reductase activity in roots. The dgl gene product may alter or interfere with a normal component of a signal transduction mechanism regulating Fe homeostasis in plants.

  19. Recominant Pinoresino-Lariciresinol Reductase, Recombinant Dirigent Protein And Methods Of Use

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Norman G.; Davin, Laurence B.; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; Fujita, Masayuki , Gang; David R. , Sarkanen; Simo , Ford; Joshua D.

    2003-10-21

    Dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases have been isolated, together with cDNAs encoding dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences are provided from source species Forsythia intermedia, Thuja plicata, Tsuga heterophylla, Eucommia ulmoides, Linum usitatissimum, and Schisandra chinensis, which code for the expression of dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for dirigent proteins or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of dirigent proteins and/or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases.

  20. Recombinant pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase, recombinant dirigent protein, and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Norman G.; Davin, Laurence B.; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; Fujita, Masayuki; Gang, David R.; Sarkanen, Simo; Ford, Joshua D.

    2001-04-03

    Dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases have been isolated, together with cDNAs encoding dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences are provided which code for the expression of dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for dirigent proteins or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of dirigent proteins and/or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases.

  1. Alkaloid cluster gene ccsA of the ergot fungus Claviceps purpurea encodes chanoclavine I synthase, a flavin adenine dinucleotide-containing oxidoreductase mediating the transformation of N-methyl-dimethylallyltryptophan to chanoclavine I.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Nicole; Olsovská, Jana; Sulc, Miroslav; Tudzynski, Paul

    2010-03-01

    Ergot alkaloids are indole-derived secondary metabolites synthesized by the phytopathogenic ascomycete Claviceps purpurea. In wild-type strains, they are exclusively produced in the sclerotium, a hibernation structure; for biotechnological applications, submerse production strains have been generated by mutagenesis. It was shown previously that the enzymes specific for alkaloid biosynthesis are encoded by a gene cluster of 68.5 kb. This ergot alkaloid cluster consists of 14 genes coregulated and expressed under alkaloid-producing conditions. Although the role of some of the cluster genes in alkaloid biosynthesis could be confirmed by a targeted knockout approach, further functional analyses are needed, especially concerning the early pathway-specific steps up to the production of clavine alkaloids. Therefore, the gene ccsA, originally named easE and preliminarily annotated as coding for a flavin adenine dinucleotide-containing oxidoreductase, was deleted in the C. purpurea strain P1, which is able to synthesize ergot alkaloids in axenic culture. Five independent knockout mutants were analyzed with regard to alkaloid-producing capability. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC), ultrapressure liquid chromatography (UPLC), and mass spectrometry (MS) analyses revealed accumulation of N-methyl-dimethylallyltryptophan (Me-DMAT) and traces of dimethylallyltryptophan (DMAT), the first pathway-specific intermediate. Since other alkaloid intermediates could not be detected, we conclude that deletion of ccsA led to a block in alkaloid biosynthesis beyond Me-DMAT formation. Complementation with a ccsA/gfp fusion construct restored alkaloid biosynthesis. These data indicate that ccsA encodes the chanoclavine I synthase or a component thereof catalyzing the conversion of N-methyl-dimethylallyltryptophan to chanoclavine I. PMID:20118373

  2. The X-ray crystal structure of APR-B, an atypical adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase from Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Clare E M; Hughes, Richard K; McManus, Michael T; Lawson, David M; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2013-11-15

    Sulfonucleotide reductases catalyse the first reductive step of sulfate assimilation. Their substrate specificities generally correlate with the requirement for a [Fe4S4] cluster, where adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (APS) reductases possess a cluster and 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductases do not. The exception is the APR-B isoform of APS reductase from the moss Physcomitrella patens, which lacks a cluster. The crystal structure of APR-B, the first for a plant sulfonucleotide reductase, is consistent with a preference for APS. Structural conservation with bacterial APS reductase rules out a structural role for the cluster, but supports the contention that it enhances the activity of conventional APS reductases.

  3. Identification of aldolase and ferredoxin reductase within the dbt operon of Burkholderia fungorum DBT1.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Stefano; Andreolli, Marco; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Zordan, Fabio; Lampis, Silvia; Vallini, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    Burkholderia fungorum DBT1, first isolated from settling particulate matter of an oil refinery wastewater, is a bacterial strain which has been shown capable of utilizing several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) including dibenzothiophene (DBT). In particular, this microbe is able to efficiently degrade DBT through the Kodama pathway. Previous investigations have lead to the identification of six genes, on a total of eight, required for DBT degradation. In the present study, a combined experimental/computational approach was adopted to identify and in silico characterize the two missing genes, namely a ferredoxin reductase and a hydratase-aldolase. Thus, the finding of all enzymatic components of the Kodama pathway in B. fungorum DBT1 makes this bacterial strain amenable for possible exploitation in soil bioremediation protocols.

  4. Structure and Ligand Binding Properties of the Epoxidase Component of Styrene Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Ukaegbu, Uchechi E.; Kantz, Auric; Beaton, Michelle; Gassner, George T.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-07-23

    Styrene monooxygenase (SMO) is a two-component flavoprotein monooxygenase that transforms styrene to styrene oxide in the first step of the styrene catabolic and detoxification pathway of Pseudomonas putida S12. The crystal structure of the N-terminally histidine-tagged epoxidase component of this system, NSMOA, determined to 2.3 {angstrom} resolution, indicates the enzyme exists as a homodimer in which each monomer forms two distinct domains. The overall architecture is most similar to that of p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase (PHBH), although there are some significant differences in secondary structure. Structural comparisons suggest that a large cavity open to the surface forms the FAD binding site. At the base of this pocket is another cavity that likely represents the styrene binding site. Flavin binding and redox equilibria are tightly coupled such that reduced FAD binds apo NSMOA {approx}8000 times more tightly than the oxidized coenzyme. Equilibrium fluorescence and isothermal titration calorimetry data using benzene as a substrate analogue indicate that the oxidized flavin and substrate analogue binding equilibria of NSMOA are linked such that the binding affinity of each is increased by 60-fold when the enzyme is saturated with the other. A much weaker {approx}2-fold positive cooperative interaction is observed for the linked binding equilibria of benzene and reduced FAD. The low affinity of the substrate analogue for the reduced FAD complex of NSMOA is consistent with a preferred reaction order in which flavin reduction and reaction with oxygen precede the binding of styrene, identifying the apoenzyme structure as the key catalytic resting state of NSMOA poised to bind reduced FAD and initiate the oxygen reaction.

  5. Structural backgrounds for the formation of a catalytically competent complex with NADP(H) during hydride transfer in ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductases.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Azqueta, Ana; Musumeci, Matías A; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A; Medina, Milagros

    2012-07-01

    The role of the highly conserved C266 and L268 of pea ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR) in formation of the catalytically competent complex of the enzyme with NADP(H) was investigated. Previous studies suggest that the volume of these side-chains, situated facing the side of the C-terminal Y308 catalytic residue not stacking the flavin isoalloxazine ring, may be directly involved in the fine-tuning of the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme. Wild-type pea FNR as well as single and double mutants of C266 and L268 residues were analysed by fast transient-kinetic techniques and their midpoint reduction potentials were determined. For the C266A, C266M and C266A/L268A mutants a significant reduction in the overall hydride transfer (HT) rates was observed along with the absence of charge-transfer complex formation. The HT rate constants for NADPH oxidation were lower than those for NADP(+) reduction, reaching a 30-fold decrease in the double mutant. In agreement, these variants exhibited more negative midpoint potentials with respect to the wild-type enzyme. The three-dimensional structures of C266M and L268V variants were solved. The C266M mutant shows a displacement of E306 away from the relevant residue S90 to accommodate the bulky methionine introduced. The overall findings indicate that in FNR the volume of the residue at position 266 is essential to attain the catalytic architecture between the nicotinamide and isoalloxazine rings at the active site and, therefore, for an efficient HT process. In addition, flexibility of the 268-270 loop appears to be critical for FNR to achieve catalytically competent complexes with NADP(H).

  6. The N-terminal Domain of Escherichia coli Assimilatory NADPH-Sulfite Reductase Hemoprotein Is an Oligomerization Domain That Mediates Holoenzyme Assembly*

    PubMed Central

    Askenasy, Isabel; Pennington, Joseph M.; Tao, Yeqing; Marshall, Alan G.; Young, Nicolas L.; Shang, Weifeng; Stroupe, M. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Assimilatory NADPH-sulfite reductase (SiR) from Escherichia coli is a structurally complex oxidoreductase that catalyzes the six-electron reduction of sulfite to sulfide. Two subunits, one a flavin-binding flavoprotein (SiRFP, the α subunit) and the other an iron-containing hemoprotein (SiRHP, the β subunit), assemble to make a holoenzyme of about 800 kDa. How the two subunits assemble is not known. The iron-rich cofactors in SiRHP are unique because they are a covalent arrangement of a Fe4S4 cluster attached through a cysteine ligand to an iron-containing porphyrinoid called siroheme. The link between cofactor biogenesis and SiR stability is also ill-defined. By use of hydrogen/deuterium exchange and biochemical analysis, we show that the α8β4 SiR holoenzyme assembles through the N terminus of SiRHP and the NADPH binding domain of SiRFP. By use of small angle x-ray scattering, we explore the structure of the SiRHP N-terminal oligomerization domain. We also report a novel form of the hemoprotein that occurs in the absence of its cofactors. Apo-SiRHP forms a homotetramer, also dependent on its N terminus, that is unable to assemble with SiRFP. From these results, we propose that homotetramerization of apo-SiRHP serves as a quality control mechanism to prevent formation of inactive holoenzyme in the case of limiting cellular siroheme. PMID:26088143

  7. Pyridine Nucleotide Complexes with Bacillus anthracis Coenzyme A-Disulfide Reductase: A Structural Analysis of Dual NAD(P)H Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Wallen,J.; Paige, C.; Mallett, T.; Karplus, P.; Claiborne, A.

    2008-01-01

    We have recently reported that CoASH is the major low-molecular weight thiol in Bacillus anthracis, and we have now characterized the kinetic and redox properties of the B. anthracis coenzyme A-disulfide reductase (CoADR, BACoADR) and determined the crystal structure at 2.30 Angstroms resolution. While the Staphylococcus aureus and Borrelia burgdorferi CoADRs exhibit strong preferences for NADPH and NADH, respectively, B. anthracis CoADR can use either pyridine nucleotide equally well. Sequence elements within the respective NAD(P)H-binding motifs correctly reflect the preferences for S. aureus and Bo. burgdorferi CoADRs, but leave questions as to how BACoADR can interact with both pyridine nucleotides. The structures of the NADH and NADPH complexes at ca. 2.3 Angstroms resolution reveal that a loop consisting of residues Glu180-Thr187 becomes ordered and changes conformation on NAD(P)H binding. NADH and NADPH interact with nearly identical conformations of this loop; the latter interaction, however, involves a novel binding mode in which the 2'-phosphate of NADPH points out toward solvent. In addition, the NAD(P)H-reduced BACoADR structures provide the first view of the reduced form (Cys42-SH/CoASH) of the Cys42-SSCoA redox center. The Cys42-SH side chain adopts a new conformation in which the conserved Tyr367'-OH and Tyr425'-OH interact with the nascent thiol(ate) on the flavin si-face. Kinetic data with Y367F, Y425F, and Y367, 425F BACoADR mutants indicate that Tyr425' is the primary proton donor in catalysis, with Tyr367' functioning as a cryptic alternate donor in the absence of Tyr425'.

  8. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry (uplc-ms/ms) for the rapid, simultaneous analysis of thiamin, riboflavin, flavin adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide and pyridoxal in human milk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel, rapid and sensitive Ultra Performance Liquid-Chromatography tandem Mass-Spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous determination of several B-vitamins in human milk was developed. Resolution by retention time or multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) for thiamin, riboflavin, flavin a...

  9. A novel role of the ferric reductase Cfl1 in cell wall integrity, mitochondrial function, and invasion to host cells in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qilin; Dong, Yijie; Xu, Ning; Qian, Kefan; Chen, Yulu; Zhang, Biao; Xing, Laijun; Li, Mingchun

    2014-11-01

    Candida albicans is an important opportunistic pathogen, causing both superficial mucosal infections and life-threatening systemic diseases. Iron acquisition is an important factor for pathogen-host interaction and also a significant element for the pathogenicity of this organism. Ferric reductases, which convert ferric iron into ferrous iron, are important components of the high-affinity iron uptake system. Sequence analyses have identified at least 17 putative ferric reductase genes in C. albicans genome. CFL1 was the first ferric reductase identified in C. albicans. However, little is known about its roles in C. albicans physiology and pathogenicity. In this study, we found that disruption of CFL1 led to hypersensitivity to chemical and physical cell wall stresses, activation of the cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway, abnormal cell wall composition, and enhanced secretion, indicating a defect in CWI in this mutant. Moreover, this mutant showed abnormal mitochondrial activity and morphology, suggesting a link between ferric reductases and mitochondrial function. In addition, this mutant displayed decreased ability of adhesion to both the polystyrene microplates and buccal epithelial cells and invasion of host epithelial cells. These findings revealed a novel role of C. albicans Cfl1 in maintenance of CWI, mitochondrial function, and interaction between this pathogen and the host.

  10. The respiratory arsenate reductase from Bacillus selenitireducens strain MLS10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Afkar, E.; Lisak, J.; Saltikov, C.; Basu, P.; Oremland, R.S.; Stolz, J.F.

    2003-01-01

    The respiratory arsenate reductase from the Gram-positive, haloalkaliphile, Bacillus selenitireducens strain MLS10 was purified and characterized. It is a membrane bound heterodimer (150 kDa) composed of two subunits ArrA (110 kDa) and ArrB (34 kDa), with an apparent Km for arsenate of 34 ??M and Vmax of 2.5 ??mol min-1 mg-1. Optimal activity occurred at pH 9.5 and 150 g l-1 of NaCl. Metal analysis (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) of the holoenzyme and sequence analysis of the catalytic subunit (ArrA; the gene for which was cloned and sequenced) indicate it is a member of the DMSO reductase family of molybdoproteins. ?? 2003 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Involvement of nitrate reductase in auxin-induced NO synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Erdei, L

    2008-01-01

    It is well known for a long time, that nitric oxide (NO) functions in variable physiological and developmental processes in plants, however the source of this signaling molecule in the diverse plant responses is very obscure.1 Although existance of nitric oxide sythase (NOS) in plants is still questionable, LNMMA (NG-monomethyl-L-arginine)-sensitive NO generation was observed in different plant species.2,3 In addition, nitrate reductase (NR) is confirmed to have a major role as source of NO.4,5 This multifaced molecule acts also in auxin-induced lateral root (LR) formation, since exogenous auxin enhanced NO levels in regions of Arabidopsis LR initiatives. Our results pointed out the involvement of nitrate reductase enzyme in auxin-induced NO formation. In this addendum, we speculate on auxin-induced NO production in lateral root primordial formation. PMID:19704423

  12. Involvement of nitrate reductase in auxin-induced NO synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kolbert, Zsuzsanna; Erdei, L

    2008-11-01

    It is well known for a long time, that nitric oxide (NO) functions in variable physiological and developmental processes in plants, however the source of this signaling molecule in the diverse plant responses is very obscure.1 Although existance of nitric oxide sythase (NOS) in plants is still questionable, LNMMA (N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine)-sensitive NO generation was observed in different plant species.2,3 In addition, nitrate reductase (NR) is confirmed to have a major role as source of NO.4,5 This multifaced molecule acts also in auxin-induced lateral root (LR) formation, since exogenous auxin enhanced NO levels in regions of Arabidopsis LR initiatives. Our results pointed out the involvement of nitrate reductase enzyme in auxin-induced NO formation. In this addendum, we speculate on auxin-induced NO production in lateral root primordial formation. PMID:19704423

  13. Aldose and aldehyde reductases : structure-function studies on the coenzyme and inhibitor-binding sites.

    SciTech Connect

    El-Kabbani, O.; Old, S. E.; Ginell, S. L.; Carper, D. A.; Biosciences Division; Monash Univ.; NIH

    1999-09-03

    PURPOSE: To identify the structural features responsible for the differences in coenzyme and inhibitor specificities of aldose and aldehyde reductases. METHODS: The crystal structure of porcine aldehyde reductase in complex with NADPH and the aldose reductase inhibitor sorbinil was determined. The contribution of each amino acid lining the coenzyme-binding site to the binding of NADPH was calculated using the Discover package. In human aldose reductase, the role of the non-conserved Pro 216 (Ser in aldehyde reductase) in the binding of coenzyme was examined by site-directed mutagenesis. RESULTS: Sorbinil binds to the active site of aldehyde reductase and is hydrogen-bonded to Trp 22, Tyr 50, His 113, and the non-conserved Arg 312. Unlike tolrestat, the binding of sorbinil does not induce a change in the side chain conformation of Arg 312. Mutation of Pro 216 to Ser in aldose reductase makes the binding of coenzyme more similar to that of aldehyde reductase. CONCLUSIONS: The participation of non-conserved active site residues in the binding of inhibitors and the differences in the structural changes required for the binding to occur are responsible for the differences in the potency of inhibition of aldose and aldehyde reductases. We report that the non-conserved Pro 216 in aldose reductase contributes to the tight binding of NADPH.

  14. Using chemical approaches to study selenoproteins - focus on thioredoxin reductases

    PubMed Central

    Hondal, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    The study of selenocysteine-containing proteins is difficult due to the problems associated with the heterologous production of these proteins. These problems are due to the intricate recoding mechanism used by cells to translate the UGA codon as a sense codon for selenocysteine. The process is further complicated by the fact that eukaryotes and prokaryotes have different UGA recoding machineries. This review focuses on chemical approaches to produce selenoproteins and study the mechanism of selenoenzymes. The use of intein-mediated peptide ligation is discussed with respect to the production of the mammalian selenoenzymes thioredoxin reductase and selenoprotein R, also known as methionine sulfoxide reductase B1. New methods for removing protecting groups from selenocysteine post-synthesis and methods for selenosulfide/diselenide formation are also reviewed. Chemical approaches have also been used to study the enzymatic mechanism of thioredoxin reductase. The approach divides the enzyme into two modules, a large protein module lacking selenocysteine and a small, synthetic selenocysteine-containing peptide. Study of this semisynthetic enzyme has revealed three distinct enzymatic pathways that depend on the properties of the substrate. The enzyme utilizes a macromolecular mechanism for protein substrates, a second mechanism for small molecule substrates and a third pathway for selenium-containing substrates such as selenocystine. PMID:19406205

  15. Cloning and sequence of the human adrenodoxin reductase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, D; Shi, Y F; Miller, W L

    1990-01-01

    Adrenodoxin reductase (ferrodoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.18.1.2) is a flavoprotein mediating electron transport to all mitochondrial forms of cytochrome P450. We cloned the human adrenodoxin reductase gene and characterized it by restriction endonuclease mapping and DNA sequencing. The entire gene is approximately 12 kilobases long and consists of 12 exons. The first exon encodes the first 26 of the 32 amino acids of the signal peptide, and the second exon encodes the remainder of signal peptide and the apparent FAD binding site. The remaining 10 exons are clustered in a region of only 4.3 kilobases, separated from the first two exons by a large intron of about 5.6 kilobases. Two forms of human adrenodoxin reductase mRNA, differing by the presence or absence of 18 bases in the middle of the sequence, arise from alternate splicing at the 5' end of exon 7. This alternately spliced region is directly adjacent to the NADPH binding site, which is entirely contained in exon 6. The immediate 5' flanking region lacks TATA and CAAT boxes; however, this region is rich in G + C and contains six copies of the sequence GGGCGGG, resembling promoter sequences of "housekeeping" genes. RNase protection experiments show that transcription is initiated from multiple sites in the 5' flanking region, located about 21-91 base pairs upstream from the AUG translational initiation codon. Images PMID:2236061

  16. Structural and functional diversity of ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductases.

    PubMed

    Aliverti, Alessandro; Pandini, Vittorio; Pennati, Andrea; de Rosa, Matteo; Zanetti, Giuliana

    2008-06-15

    Although all ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductases (FNRs) catalyze the same reaction, i.e. the transfer of reducing equivalents between NADP(H) and ferredoxin, they belong to two unrelated families of proteins: the plant-type and the glutathione reductase-type of FNRs. Aim of this review is to provide a general classification scheme for these enzymes, to be used as a framework for the comparison of their properties. Furthermore, we report on some recent findings, which significantly increased the understanding of the structure-function relationships of FNRs, i.e. the ability of adrenodoxin reductase and its homologs to catalyze the oxidation of NADP(+) to its 4-oxo derivative, and the properties of plant-type FNRs from non-photosynthetic organisms. Plant-type FNRs from bacteria and Apicomplexan parasites provide examples of novel ways of FAD- and NADP(H)-binding. The recent characterization of an FNR from Plasmodium falciparum brings these enzymes into the field of drug design.

  17. Modulating hemoglobin nitrite reductase activity through allostery: a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Rong, Zimei; Alayash, Abdu I; Wilson, Michael T; Cooper, Chris E

    2013-11-30

    The production of nitric oxide by hemoglobin (Hb) has been proposed to play a major role in the control of blood flow. Because of the allosteric nature of hemoglobin, the nitrite reductase activity is a complex function of oxygen partial pressure PO2. We have previous developed a model to obtain the micro rate constants for nitrite reduction by R state (kR) and T state (kT) hemoglobin in terms of the experimental maximal macro rate constant kNmax and the corresponding oxygen concentration PO2max. However, because of the intrinsic difficulty in obtaining accurate macro rate constant kN, from available experiments, we have developed an alternative method to determine the micro reaction rate constants (kR and kT) by fitting the simulated macro reaction rate curve (kN versus PO2) to the experimental data. We then use our model to analyze the effect of pH (Bohr Effect) and blood ageing on the nitrite reductase activity, showing that the fall of bisphosphoglycerate (BPG) during red cell storage leads to increase NO production. Our model can have useful predictive and explanatory power. For example, the previously described enhanced nitrite reductase activity of ovine fetal Hb, in comparison to the adult protein, may be understood in terms of a weaker interaction with BPG and an increase in the value of kT from 0.0087M(-1)s(-1) to 0.083M(-1)s(-1).

  18. Aldo-Keto Reductases 1B in Adrenal Cortex Physiology.

    PubMed

    Pastel, Emilie; Pointud, Jean-Christophe; Martinez, Antoine; Lefrançois-Martinez, A Marie

    2016-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AKR1B) proteins are monomeric enzymes, belonging to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. They perform oxidoreduction of carbonyl groups from a wide variety of substrates, such as aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes or ketones. Due to the involvement of human aldose reductases in pathologies, such as diabetic complications and cancer, AKR1B subgroup enzymatic properties have been extensively characterized. However, the issue of AKR1B function in non-pathologic conditions remains poorly resolved. Adrenal activities generated large amount of harmful aldehydes from lipid peroxidation and steroidogenesis, including 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and isocaproaldehyde (4-methylpentanal), which can both be reduced by AKR1B proteins. More recently, some AKR1B isoforms have been shown to be endowed with prostaglandin F synthase (PGFS) activity, suggesting that, in addition to possible scavenger function, they could instigate paracrine signals. Interestingly, the adrenal gland is one of the major sites for human and murine AKR1B expression, suggesting that their detoxifying/signaling activity could be specifically required for the correct handling of adrenal function. Moreover, chronic effects of ACTH result in a coordinated regulation of genes encoding the steroidogenic enzymes and some AKR1B isoforms. This review presents the molecular mechanisms accounting for the adrenal-specific expression of some AKR1B genes. Using data from recent mouse genetic models, we will try to connect their enzymatic properties and regulation with adrenal functions.

  19. Aldo-Keto Reductases 1B in Adrenal Cortex Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Pastel, Emilie; Pointud, Jean-Christophe; Martinez, Antoine; Lefrançois-Martinez, A. Marie

    2016-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AKR1B) proteins are monomeric enzymes, belonging to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. They perform oxidoreduction of carbonyl groups from a wide variety of substrates, such as aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes or ketones. Due to the involvement of human aldose reductases in pathologies, such as diabetic complications and cancer, AKR1B subgroup enzymatic properties have been extensively characterized. However, the issue of AKR1B function in non-pathologic conditions remains poorly resolved. Adrenal activities generated large amount of harmful aldehydes from lipid peroxidation and steroidogenesis, including 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and isocaproaldehyde (4-methylpentanal), which can both be reduced by AKR1B proteins. More recently, some AKR1B isoforms have been shown to be endowed with prostaglandin F synthase (PGFS) activity, suggesting that, in addition to possible scavenger function, they could instigate paracrine signals. Interestingly, the adrenal gland is one of the major sites for human and murine AKR1B expression, suggesting that their detoxifying/signaling activity could be specifically required for the correct handling of adrenal function. Moreover, chronic effects of ACTH result in a coordinated regulation of genes encoding the steroidogenic enzymes and some AKR1B isoforms. This review presents the molecular mechanisms accounting for the adrenal-specific expression of some AKR1B genes. Using data from recent mouse genetic models, we will try to connect their enzymatic properties and regulation with adrenal functions. PMID:27499746

  20. Aldo-Keto Reductases 1B in Adrenal Cortex Physiology.

    PubMed

    Pastel, Emilie; Pointud, Jean-Christophe; Martinez, Antoine; Lefrançois-Martinez, A Marie

    2016-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AKR1B) proteins are monomeric enzymes, belonging to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. They perform oxidoreduction of carbonyl groups from a wide variety of substrates, such as aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes or ketones. Due to the involvement of human aldose reductases in pathologies, such as diabetic complications and cancer, AKR1B subgroup enzymatic properties have been extensively characterized. However, the issue of AKR1B function in non-pathologic conditions remains poorly resolved. Adrenal activities generated large amount of harmful aldehydes from lipid peroxidation and steroidogenesis, including 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and isocaproaldehyde (4-methylpentanal), which can both be reduced by AKR1B proteins. More recently, some AKR1B isoforms have been shown to be endowed with prostaglandin F synthase (PGFS) activity, suggesting that, in addition to possible scavenger function, they could instigate paracrine signals. Interestingly, the adrenal gland is one of the major sites for human and murine AKR1B expression, suggesting that their detoxifying/signaling activity could be specifically required for the correct handling of adrenal function. Moreover, chronic effects of ACTH result in a coordinated regulation of genes encoding the steroidogenic enzymes and some AKR1B isoforms. This review presents the molecular mechanisms accounting for the adrenal-specific expression of some AKR1B genes. Using data from recent mouse genetic models, we will try to connect their enzymatic properties and regulation with adrenal functions. PMID:27499746

  1. Aldose reductase inhibitory activity of compounds from Zea mays L.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hyeon; Kim, Jin Kyu; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Jae-Yong; Kang, Il Jun; Lim, Soon Sung

    2013-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AR) inhibitors have a considerable therapeutic potential against diabetes complications and do not increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Through bioassay-guided fractionation of an EtOH extract of the kernel from purple corn (Zea mays L.), 7 nonanthocyanin phenolic compounds (compound 1-7) and 5 anthocyanins (compound 8-12) were isolated. These compounds were investigated by rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR) inhibitory assays. Kinetic analyses of recombinant human aldose reductase (rhAR) were performed, and intracellular galactitol levels were measured. Hirsutrin, one of 12 isolated compounds, showed the most potent RLAR inhibitory activity (IC(50), 4.78 μ M). In the kinetic analyses using Lineweaver-Burk plots of 1/velocity and 1/substrate concentration, hirsutrin showed competitive inhibition against rhAR. Furthermore, hirsutrin inhibited galactitol formation in rat lens and erythrocytes sample incubated with a high concentration of galactose; this finding indicates that hirsutrin may effectively prevent osmotic stress in hyperglycemia. Therefore, hirsutrin derived from Zea mays L. may be a potential therapeutic agent against diabetes complications. PMID:23586057

  2. Two fatty acyl reductases involved in moth pheromone biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Antony, Binu; Ding, Bao-Jian; Moto, Ken'Ichi; Aldosari, Saleh A; Aldawood, Abdulrahman S

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acyl reductases (FARs) constitute an evolutionarily conserved gene family found in all kingdoms of life. Members of the FAR gene family play diverse roles, including seed oil synthesis, insect pheromone biosynthesis, and mammalian wax biosynthesis. In insects, FAR genes dedicated to sex pheromone biosynthesis (pheromone-gland-specific fatty acyl reductase, pgFAR) form a unique clade that exhibits substantial modifications in gene structure and possesses unique specificity and selectivity for fatty acyl substrates. Highly selective and semi-selective 'single pgFARs' produce single and multicomponent pheromone signals in bombycid, pyralid, yponomeutid and noctuid moths. An intriguing question is how a 'single reductase' can direct the synthesis of several fatty alcohols of various chain lengths and isomeric forms. Here, we report two active pgFARs in the pheromone gland of Spodoptera, namely a semi-selective, C14:acyl-specific pgFAR and a highly selective, C16:acyl-specific pgFAR, and demonstrate that these pgFARs play a pivotal role in the formation of species-specific signals, a finding that is strongly supported by functional gene expression data. The study envisages a new area of research for disclosing evolutionary changes associated with C14- and C16-specific FARs in moth pheromone biosynthesis. PMID:27427355

  3. Dissecting the kinetics of the NADP(+)-FADH2 charge transfer complex and flavin semiquinones in neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Li, Huiying; Jamal, Joumana; Chreifi, Georges; Venkatesh, Vikram; Abou-Ziab, Hoda; Poulos, Thomas L

    2013-07-01

    Electron flow within the neuronal nitric oxide synthase reductase domain (nNOSrd) includes hydride transfer from NADPH to FAD followed by two one-electron transfer reactions from FAD to FMN. We have used stopped flow spectrometry to closely monitor these electron transfer steps for both the wild type and the ΔG810 mutant of nNOSrd using a protocol involving both global analyses of the photodiode array spectral scans and curve fittings of single wavelength kinetic traces. The charge transfer complex and interflavin electron transfer events recorded at 750nm and 600nm, respectively, show the kinetics in different time frames. All electron transfer events are slow enough at 4°C to enable measurements of rate constants even for the fast charge transfer event. To our knowledge this is the first time the rate constants for the charge transfer between NADP(+) and FADH2 have been determined for NOS. These procedures allow us to conclude that (1) binding of the second NADPH is necessary to drive the full reduction of FMN and; (2) charge transfer and the subsequent interflavin electron transfer have distinct spectral features that can be monitored separately with stopped flow spectroscopy. These studies also enable us to conclude that interflavin electron transfer reported at 600nm is not limiting in NOS catalysis.

  4. Role of aromatic stacking interactions in the modulation of the two-electron reduction potentials of flavin and substrate/product in Megasphaera elsdenii short-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Pellett, J D; Becker, D F; Saenger, A K; Fuchs, J A; Stankovich, M T

    2001-06-26

    The effects of aromatic stacking interactions on the stabilization of reduced flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and substrate/product have been investigated in short-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (SCAD) from Megasphaera elsdenii. Mutations were made at the aromatic residues Phe160 and Tyr366, which flank either face of the noncovalently bound flavin cofactor. The electrochemical properties of the mutants were then measured in the presence and absence of a butyryl-CoA/crotonyl-CoA mixture. Results from these redox studies suggest that the phenylalanine and tyrosine both engage in favorable pi-sigma interactions with the isoalloxazine ring of the flavin to help stabilize formation of the anionic flavin hydroquinone. Disruption of these interactions by replacing either residue with a leucine (F160L and Y366L) causes the midpoint potential for the oxidized/hydroquinone couple (E(ox/hq)) to shift negative by 44-54 mV. The E(ox/hq) value was also found to decrease when aromatic residues containing electron-donating heteroatoms were introduced at the 160 position. Potential shifts of -32 and -43 mV for the F160Y and F160W mutants, respectively, are attributed to increased pi-pi repulsive interactions between the ring systems. This study also provides evidence for thermodynamic regulation of the substrate/product couple in the active site of SCAD. Binding to the wild-type enzyme caused the midpoint potential for the butyryl-CoA/crotonyl-CoA couple (E(BCoA/CCoA)) to shift 14 mV negative, stabilizing the oxidized product. Formation of product was found to be even more favorable in complexes with the F160Y and F160W mutants, suggesting that the electrostatic environment around the flavin plays a role in substrate/product activation.

  5. Electron transport to periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapA) of Wolinella succinogenes is independent of a NapC protein.

    PubMed

    Simon, Jörg; Sänger, Monica; Schuster, Stephan C; Gross, Roland

    2003-07-01

    The rumen bacterium Wolinella succinogenes grows by respiratory nitrate ammonification with formate as electron donor. Whereas the enzymology and coupling mechanism of nitrite respiration is well known, nitrate reduction to nitrite has not yet been examined. We report here that intact cells and cell fractions catalyse nitrate and chlorate reduction by reduced viologen dyes with high specific activities. A gene cluster encoding components of a putative periplasmic nitrate reductase system (napA, G, H, B, F, L, D) was sequenced. The napA gene was inactivated by inserting a kanamycin resistance gene cassette. The resulting mutant did not grow by nitrate respiration and did not reduce nitrate during growth by fumarate respiration, in contrast to the wild type. An antigen was detected in wild-type cells using an antiserum raised against the periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapA) from Paracoccus pantotrophus. This antigen was absent in the W. succinogenes napA mutant. It is concluded that the periplasmic nitrate reductase NapA is the only respiratory nitrate reductase in W. succinogenes, although a second nitrate-reducing enzyme is apparently induced in the napA mutant. The nap cluster of W. succinogenes lacks a napC gene whose product is thought to function in quinol oxidation and electron transfer to NapA in other bacteria. The W. succinogenes genome encodes two members of the NapC/NirT family, NrfH and FccC. Characterization of corresponding deletion mutants indicates that neither of these two proteins is required for nitrate respiration. A mutant lacking the genes encoding respiratory nitrite reductase (nrfHA) had wild-type properties with respect to nitrate respiration. A model of the electron transport chain of nitrate respiration is proposed in which one or more of the napF, G, H and L gene products mediate electron transport from menaquinol to the periplasmic NapAB complex. Inspection of the W. succinogenes genome sequence suggests that ammonia formation from

  6. Brain components

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3 major components of the brain are the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brain stem. The cerebrum is divided into left and right hemispheres, each ... gray matter) is the outside portion of the cerebrum and provides us with functions associated with conscious ...

  7. Selenite reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is mediated by fumarate reductase in periplasm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dao-Bo; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Wu, Chao; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Na; Yang, Zong-Chuang; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-01-01

    In situ reduction of selenite to elemental selenium (Se(0)), by microorganisms in sediments and soils is an important process and greatly affects the environmental distribution and the biological effects of selenium. However, the mechanism behind such a biological process remains unrevealed yet. Here we use Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a widely-distributed dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a powerful and diverse respiration capability, to evaluate the involvement of anaerobic respiration system in the microbial selenite reduction. With mutants analysis, we identify fumarate reductase FccA as the terminal reductase of selenite in periplasm. Moreover, we find that such a reduction is dependent on central respiration c-type cytochrome CymA. In contrast, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and the Mtr electron transfer pathway do not work as selenite reductases. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized role of anaerobic respiration reductases of S. oneidensis MR-1 in selenite reduction and geochemical cycles of selenium in sediments and soils.

  8. Electrochemical synthesis and characterization of TiO2 nanoparticles and their use as a platform for flavin adenine dinucleotide immobilization and efficient electrocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashok Kumar, S.; Lo, Po-Hsun; Chen, Shen-Ming

    2008-06-01

    Here, we report the electrochemical synthesis of TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) using the potentiostat method. Synthesized particles have been characterized by using x-ray diffraction (XRD) studies, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results revealed that the TiO2 film produced was mainly composed of rutile and that the particles are of a size in the range of 100 ± 50 nm. TiO2 NPs were used for the modification of a screen printed carbon electrode (SPE). The resulting TiO2 film coated SPE was used to immobilize flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). The flavin enzyme firmly attached onto the metal oxide surface and this modified electrode showed promising electrocatalytic activities towards the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in physiological conditions. The electrochemistry of FAD confined in the oxide film was investigated. The immobilized FAD displayed a pair of redox peaks with a formal potential of -0.42 V in pH 7.0 oxygen-free phosphate buffers at a scan rate of 50 mV s-1. The FAD in the nanostructured TiO2 film retained its bioactivity and exhibited excellent electrocatalytic response to the reduction of H2O2, based on which a mediated biosensor for H2O2 was achieved. The linear range for the determination of H2O2 was from 0.15 × 10-6 to 3.0 × 10-3 M with the detection limit of 0.1 × 10-6 M at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The stability and repeatability of the biosensor is also discussed.

  9. Assessment of Franck-Condon Methods for Computing Vibrationally Broadened UV-vis Absorption Spectra of Flavin Derivatives: Riboflavin, Roseoflavin, and 5-Thioflavin.

    PubMed

    Karasulu, Bora; Götze, Jan Philipp; Thiel, Walter

    2014-12-01

    We address the performance of the vertical and adiabatic Franck-Condon (VFC/AFC) approaches combined with time-independent or time-dependent (TI/TD) formalisms in simulating the one-photon absorption spectra of three flavin compounds with distinct structural features. Calculations were done in the gas phase and in two solvents (water, benzene) for which experimental reference measurements are available. We utilized the independent mode displaced harmonic oscillator model without or with frequency alteration (IMDHO/IMDHO-FA) and also accounted for Duschinsky mixing effects. In the initial validation on the first excited singlet state of riboflavin, the range-separated functionals, CAM-B3LYP and ωB97xD, showed the best performance, but B3LYP also gave a good compromise between peak positions and spectral topology. Large basis sets were not mandatory to obtain high-quality spectra for the selected systems. The presence of a symmetry plane facilitated the computation of vibrationally broadened spectra, since different FC variants yield similar results and the harmonic approximation holds rather well. Compared with the AFC approach, the VFC approach performed equally well or even better for all three flavins while offering several advantages, such as avoiding error-prone geometry optimization procedures on excited-state surfaces. We also explored the advantages of curvilinear displacements and of a Duschinsky treatment for the AFC spectra in cases when a rotatable group is present on the chromophore. Taken together, our findings indicate that the combination of the VFC approach with the TD formalism and the IMDHO-FA model offers the best overall performance. PMID:26583238

  10. Characterization of clinically identified mutations in NDUFV1, the flavin-binding subunit of respiratory complex I, using a yeast model system

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Febin; Atcheson, Erwan; Bridges, Hannah R.; Hirst, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Dysfunctions in mitochondrial complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) are both genetically and clinically highly diverse and a major cause of human mitochondrial diseases. The genetic determinants of individual clinical cases are increasingly being described, but how these genetic defects affect complex I on the molecular and cellular level, and have different clinical consequences in different individuals, is little understood. Furthermore, without molecular-level information innocent genetic variants may be misassigned as pathogenic. Here, we have used a yeast model system (Yarrowia lipolytica) to study the molecular consequences of 16 single amino acid substitutions, classified as pathogenic, in the NDUFV1 subunit of complex I. NDUFV1 binds the flavin cofactor that oxidizes NADH and is the site of complex I-mediated reactive oxygen species production. Seven mutations caused loss of complex I expression, suggesting they are detrimental but precluding further study. In two variants complex I was fully assembled but did not contain any flavin, and four mutations led to functionally compromised enzymes. Our study provides a molecular rationale for assignment of all these variants as pathogenic. However, three variants provided complex I that was functionally equivalent to the wild-type enzyme, challenging their assignment as pathogenic. By combining structural, bioinformatic and functional data, a simple scoring system for the initial evaluation of future NDUFV1 variants is proposed. Overall, our results broaden understanding of how mutations in this centrally important core subunit of complex I affect its function and provide a basis for understanding the role of NDUFV1 mutations in mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26345448

  11. Crystal Structure and Catalytic Properties of Bacillus anthracis CoADR-RHD: Implications for Flavin-Linked Sulfur Trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Wallen, J.; Mallett, T; Boles, W; Parsonage, D; Furdui, C; Karplus, A; Claiborne, A

    2009-01-01

    Rhodanese homology domains (RHDs) play important roles in sulfur trafficking mechanisms essential to the biosynthesis of sulfur-containing cofactors and nucleosides. We have now determined the crystal structure at 2.10 {angstrom} resolution for the Bacillus anthracis coenzyme A-disulfide reductase isoform (BaCoADR-RHD) containing a C-terminal RHD domain; this is the first structural representative of the multidomain proteins class of the rhodanese superfamily. The catalytic Cys44 of the CoADR module is separated by 25 {angstrom} from the active-site Cys514' of the RHD domain from the complementary subunit. In stark contrast to the B. anthracis CoADR (Wallen, J. R., Paige, C., Mallett, T. C., Karplus, P. A., and Claiborne, A. (2008) Biochemistry 47, 5182-5193), the BaCoADR-RHD isoform does not catalyze the reduction of coenzyme A-disulfide, although both enzymes conserve the Cys-SSCoA redox center. NADH titrations have been combined with a synchrotron reduction protocol for examination of the structural and redox behavior of the Cys44-SSCoA center. The synchrotron-reduced (Cys44 + CoASH) structure reveals ordered binding for the adenosine 3'-phosphate 5'-pyrophosphate moiety of CoASH, but the absence of density for the pantetheine arm indicates that it is flexible within the reduced active site. Steady-state kinetic analyses with the alternate disulfide substrates methyl methanethiolsulfonate (MMTS) and 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoate) (DTNB), including the appropriate Cys {yields} Ser mutants, demonstrate that MMTS reduction occurs within the CoADR active site. NADH-dependent DTNB reduction, on the other hand, requires communication between Cys44 and Cys514', and we propose that reduction of the Cys44-SSCoA disulfide promotes the transfer of reducing equivalents to the RHD, with the swinging pantetheine arm serving as a ca. 20 {angstrom} bridge.

  12. The mechanism of the quinone reductase reaction of pig heart lipoamide dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Vienozinskis, J; Butkus, A; Cenas, N; Kulys, J

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between the NADH:lipoamide reductase and NADH:quinone reductase reactions of pig heart lipoamide dehydrogenase (EC 1.6.4.3) was investigated. At pH 7.0 the catalytic constant of the quinone reductase reaction (kcat.) is 70 s-1 and the rate constant of the active-centre reduction by NADH (kcat./Km) is 9.2 x 10(5) M-1.s-1. These constants are almost an order lower than those for the lipoamide reductase reaction. The maximal quinone reductase activity is observed at pH 6.0-5.5. The use of [4(S)-2H]NADH as substrate decreases kcat./Km for the lipoamide reductase reaction and both kcat. and kcat./Km for the quinone reductase reaction. The kcat./Km values for quinones in this case are decreased 1.85-3.0-fold. NAD+ is a more effective inhibitor in the quinone reductase reaction than in the lipoamide reductase reaction. The pattern of inhibition reflects the shift of the reaction equilibrium. Various forms of the four-electron-reduced enzyme are believed to reduce quinones. Simple and 'hybrid ping-pong' mechanisms of this reaction are discussed. The logarithms of kcat./Km for quinones are hyperbolically dependent on their single-electron reduction potentials (E1(7]. A three-step mechanism for a mixed one-electron and two-electron reduction of quinones by lipoamide dehydrogenase is proposed. PMID:2375745

  13. Selenate reductase activity in Escherichia coli requires Isc iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis genes.

    PubMed

    Yee, Nathan; Choi, Jessica; Porter, Abigail W; Carey, Sean; Rauschenbach, Ines; Harel, Arye

    2014-12-01

    The selenate reductase in Escherichia coli is a multi-subunit enzyme predicted to bind Fe-S clusters. In this study, we examined the iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis genes that are required for selenate reductase activity. Mutants devoid of either the iscU or hscB gene in the Isc iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis pathway lost the ability to reduce selenate. Genetic complementation by the wild-type sequences restored selenate reductase activity. The results indicate the Isc biosynthetic system plays a key role in selenate reductase Fe-S cofactor assembly and is essential for enzyme activity.

  14. Novel Three-Component Rieske Non-Heme Iron Oxygenase System Catalyzing the N-Dealkylation of Chloroacetanilide Herbicides in Sphingomonads DC-6 and DC-2

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qing; Wang, Cheng-Hong; Deng, Shi-Kai; Wu, Ya-Dong; Li, Yi; Yao, Li; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Yan, Xin; Li, Shun-Peng

    2014-01-01

    Sphingomonads DC-6 and DC-2 degrade the chloroacetanilide herbicides alachlor, acetochlor, and butachlor via N-dealkylation. In this study, we report a three-component Rieske non-heme iron oxygenase (RHO) system catalyzing the N-dealkylation of these herbicides. The oxygenase component gene cndA is located in a transposable element that is highly conserved in the two strains. CndA shares 24 to 42% amino acid sequence identities with the oxygenase components of some RHOs that catalyze N- or O-demethylation. Two putative [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin genes and one glutathione reductase (GR)-type reductase gene were retrieved from the genome of each strain. These genes were not located in the immediate vicinity of cndA. The four ferredoxins share 64 to 72% amino acid sequence identities to the ferredoxin component of dicamba O-demethylase (DMO), and the two reductases share 62 to 65% amino acid sequence identities to the reductase component of DMO. cndA, the four ferredoxin genes, and the two reductases genes were expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant proteins were purified using Ni-affinity chromatography. The individual components or the components in pairs displayed no activity; the enzyme mixture showed N-dealkylase activities toward alachlor, acetochlor, and butachlor only when CndA-His6 was combined with one of the four ferredoxins and one of the two reductases, suggesting that the enzyme consists of three components, a homo-oligomer oxygenase, a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin, and a GR-type reductase, and CndA has a low specificity for the electron transport component (ETC). The N-dealkylase utilizes NADH, but not NADPH, as the electron donor. PMID:24928877

  15. Characterization of coenzyme binding and selectivity determinants in Mycobacterium tuberculosis flavoprotein reductase A: analysis of Arg(199) and Arg(200) mutants at the NADP(H) 2'-phosphate binding site.

    PubMed

    Sabri, Muna; Dunford, Adrian J; McLean, Kirsty J; Neeli, Rajasekhar; Scrutton, Nigel S; Leys, David; Munro, Andrew W

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis FprA (flavoprotein reductase A) is an NAD(P)H- and FAD-binding reductase that is structurally/evolutionarily related to adrenodoxin reductase. Structural analysis implicates Arg(199) and Arg(200) in interactions with the NADP(H) 2'-phosphate group. R199A, R200A and R199A/R200A mutants were characterized to explore the roles of these basic residues. All mutations abolished neutral FAD semiquinone stabilization in the NADPH-reduced enzyme, owing to weakened NADPH affinity. Instead, FAD hydroquinone was formed in all mutants, and each displayed substantially enhanced autooxidation rates (20-40-fold) compared with NADPH-reduced WT (wild-type) FprA. Steady-state ferricyanide reduction studies revealed diminished NADPH affinity (higher K(m) values), but lower NADH K(m) values. Despite a lowered k(cat), the R199A/R200A mutant exhibited a 200-fold coenzyme specificity switch towards NADH, although substrate inhibition was observed at high NADH concentrations (K(i)=250 microM). Stopped-flow FAD reduction studies confirmed substantially increased NADPH K(d) values, although the limiting flavin reduction rate constant was similar in all mutants. The R199A mutation abolished electron transfer between hydroquinone FprA and NADP+, while this reaction progressed (via an FADH(2)-NADP+ charge-transfer intermediate) for R200A FprA, albeit more slowly (k(lim)=58.1 s(-1) compared with >300 s(-1)) than in WT. All mutations caused positive shifts in FAD potential (approximately 40-65 mV). Binding of an NADPH analogue (tetrahydro-NADP) induced negative shifts in potential ( approximately 30-40 mV) only for variants with the R200A mutation, indicating distinctive effects of Arg(199)/Arg(200) on coenzyme binding mode and FAD potential. Collectively, these data reveal important roles for the phylogenetically conserved arginines in controlling FprA FAD environment, thermodynamics, coenzyme selectivity and reactivity.

  16. Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase C677T: Hypoplastic Left Heart and Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Spronk, Kimberly J; Olivero, Anthony D; Haw, Marcus P; Vettukattil, Joseph J

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of congenital heart defects is higher in infants with mutation of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene. The MTHFR C677T gene decreases the bioavailability of folate and increases plasma homocysteine, a risk factor for thrombosis. There have been no reported cases in the literature on the clinical implications of this procoagulable state in the setting of cyanotic heart disease, which itself has prothrombotic predisposition. Two patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome developed postoperative thrombotic complications, both were homozygous for MTHFR C677T. We present these cases and highlight the implications of MTHFR mutation in the management of complex congenital heart disease. PMID:26467879

  17. Terpenoids from Diplophyllum taxifolium with quinone reductase-inducing activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Jiao-Zhen; Zhou, Jin-Chuan; Shen, Tao; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2016-03-01

    Two new ent-prenylaromadendrane-type diterpenoids, diplotaxifols A (1) and B (2), a new ent-eudesmol, ent-eudesma-4(15),11(13)-dien-6α,12-diol (3), eight new eudesmanolides enantiomers (4-11) of the corresponding compounds from higher plants along with four known ent-eudesmanolides (12-15) were isolated from the 95% EtOH extract of Chinese liverwort Diplophyllum taxifolium. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of MS, NMR and IR spectral data, and confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The quinone reductase-inducing activity of the compounds was evaluated. PMID:26656409

  18. Differential Light Induction of Nitrate Reductases in Greening and Photobleached Soybean Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Kakefuda, Genichi; Duke, Stanley H.; Duke, Stephen O.

    1983-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) seeds were imbibed and germinated with or without NO3−, tungstate, and norflurazon (San 9789). Norflurazon is a herbicide which causes photobleaching of chlorophyll by inhibiting carotenoid synthesis and which impairs normal chloroplast development. After 3 days in the dark, seedlings were placed in white light to induce extractable nitrate reductase activity. The induction of maximal nitrate reductase activity in greening cotyledons did not require NO3− and was not inhibited by tungstate. Induction of nitrate reductase activity in norflurazon-treated cotyledons had an absolute requirement for NO3− and was completely inhibited by tungstate. Nitrate was not detected in seeds or seedlings which had not been treated with NO3−. The optimum pH for cotyledon nitrate reductase activity from norflurazon-treated seedlings was at pH 7.5, and near that for root nitrate reductase activity, whereas the optimum pH for nitrate reductase activity from greening cotyledons was pH 6.5. Induction of root nitrate reductase activity was also inhibited by tungstate and was dependent on the presence of NO3−, further indicating that the isoform of nitrate reductase induced in norflurazon-treated cotyledons is the same or similar to that found in roots. Nitrate reductases with and without a NO3− requirement for light induction appear to be present in developing leaves. In vivo kinetics (light induction and dark decay rates) and in vitro kinetics (Arrhenius energies of activation and NADH:NADPH specificities) of nitrate reductases with and without a NO3− requirement for induction were quite different. Km values for NO3− were identical for both nitrate reductases. PMID:16663185

  19. A Novel NADPH-dependent flavoprotein reductase from Bacillus megaterium acts as an efficient cytochrome P450 reductase.

    PubMed

    Milhim, Mohammed; Gerber, Adrian; Neunzig, Jens; Hannemann, Frank; Bernhardt, Rita

    2016-08-10

    Cytochromes P450 (P450s) require electron transfer partners to catalyze substrate conversions. With regard to biotechnological approaches, the elucidation of novel electron transfer proteins is of special interest, as they can influence the enzymatic activity and specific