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Sample records for flaviviruses correlating variance

  1. Flaviviruses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    Infection, 774 Infectious Agents, 764 Flaviviruses Associated Primarily with the Physical and Chemical Properties, 764 Encephalitis Syndrome , 775...but not hemoren. of other syndromes associated with human flavivirus children. infection (i.e., fever-arthralgia-rash and hemorrhagic Genetic...determinants play a central role in the path- fever). Viruses that produce these syndromes in hu- ogenesis of flavivirus infections. Studies by Webster (348

  2. Remotely sensed correlates of phylogeny: tick-borne flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Randolph, Sarah E; Rogers, David J

    2002-01-01

    Vector-borne pathogen systems are limited by climate, principally through its impact on the distribution, abundance and population dynamics of the vectors and on the interaction of vectors with their hosts. This leads to the prediction that climate has been a significant factor in the evolution of these pathogens and, by implication, will be important in future events on both evolutionary and ecological time-scales. New phylogenetic trees of organisms, that describe their evolutionary history, are routinely available, but explanations for the driving force and constraints that have shaped the evolutionary origin of new pathogen strains are rare. Under the force of environmental pressures that change in space and time, which pathogens are likely to emerge in new places and where will this be? To answer such questions, data from molecular biology can be linked with data from satellites that allow us to characterize environmental conditions on a global scale. Broad-scale patterns in the satellite imagery are consistent with the pattern of new tick-borne flaviviruses having evolved sequentially in a cline across the world. So far, the distribution of three tick-borne flaviviruses from western Europe have been captured simultaneously by the same 10 satellite-derived seasonal climatic variables. Once this procedure is extended to the remaining viruses in this clade, we shall test for significant matches between their phylogenetic tree and an independent tree derived from quantitative descriptions of the viruses' 'eco-space'. This will indicate the extent of key ecological drivers for specific evolutionary events, whose biological basis can then be explored in detail.

  3. Correlative scanning-transmission electron microscopy reveals that a chimeric flavivirus is released as individual particles in secretory vesicles.

    PubMed

    Burlaud-Gaillard, Julien; Sellin, Caroline; Georgeault, Sonia; Uzbekov, Rustem; Lebos, Claude; Guillaume, Jean-Marc; Roingeard, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular morphogenesis of flaviviruses has been well described, but flavivirus release from the host cell remains poorly documented. We took advantage of the optimized production of an attenuated chimeric yellow fever/dengue virus for vaccine purposes to study this phenomenon by microscopic approaches. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed the release of numerous viral particles at the cell surface through a short-lived process. For transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of the intracellular ultrastructure of the small number of cells releasing viral particles at a given time, we developed a new correlative microscopy method: CSEMTEM (for correlative scanning electron microscopy - transmission electron microscopy). CSEMTEM analysis suggested that chimeric flavivirus particles were released as individual particles, in small exocytosis vesicles, via a regulated secretory pathway. Our morphological findings provide new insight into interactions between flaviviruses and cells and demonstrate that CSEMTEM is a useful new method, complementary to SEM observations of biological events by intracellular TEM investigations.

  4. The Variance of Intraclass Correlations in Three and Four Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedges, Larry V.; Hedberg, Eric C.; Kuyper, Arend M.

    2012-01-01

    Intraclass correlations are used to summarize the variance decomposition in popula- tions with multilevel hierarchical structure. There has recently been considerable interest in estimating intraclass correlations from surveys or designed experiments to provide design parameters for planning future large-scale randomized experiments. The large…

  5. Genetic Variance in the SES-IQ Correlation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckland, Bruce K.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses questions dealing with genetic aspects of the correlation between IQ and socioeconomic status (SES). Questions include: How does assortative mating affect the genetic variance of IQ? Is the relationship between an individual's IQ and adult SES a causal one? And how can IQ research improve schools and schooling? (Author/DB)

  6. On computations of variance, covariance and correlation for interval data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishida, Masako

    2017-02-01

    In many practical situations, the data on which statistical analysis is to be performed is only known with interval uncertainty. Different combinations of values from the interval data usually lead to different values of variance, covariance, and correlation. Hence, it is desirable to compute the endpoints of possible values of these statistics. This problem is, however, NP-hard in general. This paper shows that the problem of computing the endpoints of possible values of these statistics can be rewritten as the problem of computing skewed structured singular values ν, for which there exist feasible (polynomial-time) algorithms that compute reasonably tight bounds in most practical cases. This allows one to find tight intervals of the aforementioned statistics for interval data.

  7. On the Mean and Variance of the Tetrachoric Correlation Coefficient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Morton B.; Benedetti, Jacqueline K.

    1977-01-01

    Estimates of the mean and standard deviation of the tetrachoric correlation are compared with their expected values in several two by two tables. Significant bias in the mean is found when the minimum cell frequency is less than five. Three formulas for the standard deviation are discussed. (Author/JKS)

  8. The concordance correlation coefficient for repeated measures estimated by variance components.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Josep L; King, Tonya S; Chinchilli, Vernon M

    2009-01-01

    The concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) is an index that is commonly used to assess the degree of agreement between observers on measuring a continuous characteristic. Here, a CCC for longitudinal repeated measurements is developed through the appropriate specification of the intraclass correlation coefficient from a variance components linear mixed model. A case example and the results of a simulation study are provided.

  9. The Variance of Intraclass Correlations in Three- and Four-Level Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedges, Larry V.; Hedberg, E. C.; Kuyper, Arend M.

    2012-01-01

    Intraclass correlations are used to summarize the variance decomposition in populations with multilevel hierarchical structure. There has recently been considerable interest in estimating intraclass correlations from surveys or designed experiments to provide design parameters for planning future large-scale randomized experiments. The large…

  10. Microscopy techniques in flavivirus research.

    PubMed

    Chong, Mun Keat; Chua, Anthony Jin Shun; Tan, Terence Tze Tong; Tan, Suat Hoon; Ng, Mah Lee

    2014-04-01

    The Flavivirus genus is composed of many medically important viruses that cause high morbidity and mortality, which include Dengue and West Nile viruses. Various molecular and biochemical techniques have been developed in the endeavour to study flaviviruses. However, microscopy techniques still have irreplaceable roles in the identification of novel virus pathogens and characterization of morphological changes in virus-infected cells. Fluorescence microscopy contributes greatly in understanding the fundamental viral protein localizations and virus-host protein interactions during infection. Electron microscopy remains the gold standard for visualizing ultra-structural features of virus particles and infected cells. New imaging techniques and combinatory applications are continuously being developed to push the limit of resolution and extract more quantitative data. Currently, correlative live cell imaging and high resolution three-dimensional imaging have already been achieved through the tandem use of optical and electron microscopy in analyzing biological specimens. Microscopy techniques are also used to measure protein binding affinities and determine the mobility pattern of proteins in cells. This chapter will consolidate on the applications of various well-established microscopy techniques in flavivirus research, and discuss how recently developed microscopy techniques can potentially help advance our understanding in these membrane viruses.

  11. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis by evaluation of normalized variances of fluorescence time correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziekan, Thomas; Weissbach, Carmen; Voigt, Jan; Ebert, Bernd; MacDonald, Rainer; Bahner, Malte L.; Mahler, Marianne; Schirner, Michael; Berliner, Michael; Berliner, Birgitt; Osel, Jens; Osel, Ilka

    2011-07-01

    Fluorescence imaging using the dye indocyanine green as a contrast agent was investigated in a prospective clinical study for the detection of rheumatoid arthritis. Normalized variances of correlated time series of fluorescence intensities describing the bolus kinetics of the contrast agent in certain regions of interest were analyzed to differentiate healthy from inflamed finger joints. These values are determined using a robust, parameter-free algorithm. We found that the normalized variance of correlation functions improves the differentiation between healthy joints of volunteers and joints with rheumatoid arthritis of patients by about 10% compared to, e.g., ratios of areas under the curves of raw data.

  12. A new interpretation and validation of variance based importance measures for models with correlated inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Wenrui; Lu, Zhenzhou; Li, Luyi

    2013-05-01

    In order to explore the contributions by correlated input variables to the variance of the output, a novel interpretation framework of importance measure indices is proposed for a model with correlated inputs, which includes the indices of the total correlated contribution and the total uncorrelated contribution. The proposed indices accurately describe the connotations of the contributions by the correlated input to the variance of output, and they can be viewed as the complement and correction of the interpretation about the contributions by the correlated inputs presented in "Estimation of global sensitivity indices for models with dependent variables, Computer Physics Communications, 183 (2012) 937-946". Both of them contain the independent contribution by an individual input. Taking the general form of quadratic polynomial as an illustration, the total correlated contribution and the independent contribution by an individual input are derived analytically, from which the components and their origins of both contributions of correlated input can be clarified without any ambiguity. In the special case that no square term is included in the quadratic polynomial model, the total correlated contribution by the input can be further decomposed into the variance contribution related to the correlation of the input with other inputs and the independent contribution by the input itself, and the total uncorrelated contribution can be further decomposed into the independent part by interaction between the input and others and the independent part by the input itself. Numerical examples are employed and their results demonstrate that the derived analytical expressions of the variance-based importance measure are correct, and the clarification of the correlated input contribution to model output by the analytical derivation is very important for expanding the theory and solutions of uncorrelated input to those of the correlated one.

  13. Variance in population firing rate as a measure of slow time-scale correlation

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Adam C.; Morais, Michael J.; Smith, Matthew A.

    2013-01-01

    Correlated variability in the spiking responses of pairs of neurons, also known as spike count correlation, is a key indicator of functional connectivity and a critical factor in population coding. Underscoring the importance of correlation as a measure for cognitive neuroscience research is the observation that spike count correlations are not fixed, but are rather modulated by perceptual and cognitive context. Yet while this context fluctuates from moment to moment, correlation must be calculated over multiple trials. This property undermines its utility as a dependent measure for investigations of cognitive processes which fluctuate on a trial-to-trial basis, such as selective attention. A measure of functional connectivity that can be assayed on a moment-to-moment basis is needed to investigate the single-trial dynamics of populations of spiking neurons. Here, we introduce the measure of population variance in normalized firing rate for this goal. We show using mathematical analysis, computer simulations and in vivo data how population variance in normalized firing rate is inversely related to the latent correlation in the population, and how this measure can be used to reliably classify trials from different typical correlation conditions, even when firing rate is held constant. We discuss the potential advantages for using population variance in normalized firing rate as a dependent measure for both basic and applied neuroscience research. PMID:24367326

  14. Estimating the Correlation in Bivariate Normal Data with Known Variances and Small Sample Sizes1

    PubMed Central

    Fosdick, Bailey K.; Raftery, Adrian E.

    2013-01-01

    We consider the problem of estimating the correlation in bivariate normal data when the means and variances are assumed known, with emphasis on the small sample case. We consider eight different estimators, several of them considered here for the first time in the literature. In a simulation study, we found that Bayesian estimators using the uniform and arc-sine priors outperformed several empirical and exact or approximate maximum likelihood estimators in small samples. The arc-sine prior did better for large values of the correlation. For testing whether the correlation is zero, we found that Bayesian hypothesis tests outperformed significance tests based on the empirical and exact or approximate maximum likelihood estimators considered in small samples, but that all tests performed similarly for sample size 50. These results lead us to suggest using the posterior mean with the arc-sine prior to estimate the correlation in small samples when the variances are assumed known. PMID:23378667

  15. Quantum variance: A measure of quantum coherence and quantum correlations for many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frérot, Irénée; Roscilde, Tommaso

    2016-08-01

    Quantum coherence is a fundamental common trait of quantum phenomena, from the interference of matter waves to quantum degeneracy of identical particles. Despite its importance, estimating and measuring quantum coherence in generic, mixed many-body quantum states remains a formidable challenge, with fundamental implications in areas as broad as quantum condensed matter, quantum information, quantum metrology, and quantum biology. Here, we provide a quantitative definition of the variance of quantum coherent fluctuations (the quantum variance) of any observable on generic quantum states. The quantum variance generalizes the concept of thermal de Broglie wavelength (for the position of a free quantum particle) to the space of eigenvalues of any observable, quantifying the degree of coherent delocalization in that space. The quantum variance is generically measurable and computable as the difference between the static fluctuations and the static susceptibility of the observable; despite its simplicity, it is found to provide a tight lower bound to most widely accepted estimators of "quantumness" of observables (both as a feature as well as a resource), such as the Wigner-Yanase skew information and the quantum Fisher information. When considering bipartite fluctuations in an extended quantum system, the quantum variance expresses genuine quantum correlations among the two parts. In the case of many-body systems, it is found to obey an area law at finite temperature, extending therefore area laws of entanglement and quantum fluctuations of pure states to the mixed-state context. Hence the quantum variance paves the way to the measurement of macroscopic quantum coherence and quantum correlations in most complex quantum systems.

  16. Weighted least-squares phase unwrapping algorithm based on derivative variance correlation map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yuangang; Wang, Xiangzhao; Zhang, Xuping

    2007-02-01

    Among different phase unwrapping approaches, the weighted least-squares minimization methods are gaining attention. In these algorithms, weighting coefficient is generated from a quality map. The intrinsic drawbacks of existing quality maps constrain the application of these algorithms. They often fail to handle wrapped phase data contains error sources, such as phase discontinuities, noise and undersampling. In order to deal with those intractable wrapped phase data, a new weighted least-squares phase unwrapping algorithm based on derivative variance correlation map is proposed. In the algorithm, derivative variance correlation map, a novel quality map, can truly reflect wrapped phase quality, ensuring a more reliable unwrapped result. The definition of the derivative variance correlation map and the principle of the proposed algorithm are present in detail. The performance of the new algorithm has been tested by use of a simulated spherical surface wrapped data and an experimental interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) wrapped data. Computer simulation and experimental results have verified that the proposed algorithm can work effectively even when a wrapped phase map contains intractable error sources.

  17. Concordance correlation coefficients estimated by generalized estimating equations and variance components for longitudinal repeated measurements.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Miao-Yu

    2017-04-15

    The concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) is a commonly accepted measure of agreement between two observers for continuous responses. This paper proposes a generalized estimating equations (GEE) approach allowing dependency between repeated measurements over time to assess intra-agreement for each observer and inter- and total agreement among multiple observers simultaneously. Furthermore, the indices of intra-, inter-, and total agreement through variance components (VC) from an extended three-way linear mixed model (LMM) are also developed with consideration of the correlation structure of longitudinal repeated measurements. Simulation studies are conducted to compare the performance of the GEE and VC approaches for repeated measurements from longitudinal data. An application of optometric conformity study is used for illustration. In conclusion, the GEE approach allowing flexibility in model assumptions and correlation structures of repeated measurements gives satisfactory results with small mean square errors and nominal 95% coverage rates for large data sets, and when the assumption of the relationship between variances and covariances for the extended three-way LMM holds, the VC approach performs outstandingly well for all sample sizes. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Minimum L0-Norm Two-Dimensional Phase Unwrapping Algorithm Based on the Derivative Variance Correlation Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y. G.; Zhang, X. P.

    2006-10-01

    A new minimum L0-norm two-dimensional phase unwrapping algorithm, based on the derivative variance correlation map, is proposed. In the algorithm, the novel derivative variance correlation map can truly reflect wrapped phase quality, ensuring a more reliable unwrapped result. After the definition of the derivative variance correlation map and the principle of the proposed algorithm are present, the performance of the new algorithm has been tested by use of wrapped phase data from an interferometric synthetic aperture radar experiment. Experimental result has verified that the proposed algorithm can cope well with the intractable noisy wrapped data.

  19. Disentangling Stability, Variability and Adaptability in Human Performance: Focus on the Interplay between Local Variance and Serial Correlation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torre, Kjerstin; Balasubramaniam, Ramesh

    2011-01-01

    We address the complex relationship between the stability, variability, and adaptability of psychological systems by decomposing the global variance of serial performance into two independent parts: the local variance (LV) and the serial correlation structure. For two time series with equal LV, the presence of persistent long-range correlations…

  20. Minimum variance imaging based on correlation analysis of Lamb wave signals.

    PubMed

    Hua, Jiadong; Lin, Jing; Zeng, Liang; Luo, Zhi

    2016-08-01

    In Lamb wave imaging, MVDR (minimum variance distortionless response) is a promising approach for the detection and monitoring of large areas with sparse transducer network. Previous studies in MVDR use signal amplitude as the input damage feature, and the imaging performance is closely related to the evaluation accuracy of the scattering characteristic. However, scattering characteristic is highly dependent on damage parameters (e.g. type, orientation and size), which are unknown beforehand. The evaluation error can degrade imaging performance severely. In this study, a more reliable damage feature, LSCC (local signal correlation coefficient), is established to replace signal amplitude. In comparison with signal amplitude, one attractive feature of LSCC is its independence of damage parameters. Therefore, LSCC model in the transducer network could be accurately evaluated, the imaging performance is improved subsequently. Both theoretical analysis and experimental investigation are given to validate the effectiveness of the LSCC-based MVDR algorithm in improving imaging performance.

  1. Estimation of breeding values for mean and dispersion, their variance and correlation using double hierarchical generalized linear models.

    PubMed

    Felleki, M; Lee, D; Lee, Y; Gilmour, A R; Rönnegård, L

    2012-12-01

    The possibility of breeding for uniform individuals by selecting animals expressing a small response to environment has been studied extensively in animal breeding. Bayesian methods for fitting models with genetic components in the residual variance have been developed for this purpose, but have limitations due to the computational demands. We use the hierarchical (h)-likelihood from the theory of double hierarchical generalized linear models (DHGLM) to derive an estimation algorithm that is computationally feasible for large datasets. Random effects for both the mean and residual variance parts of the model are estimated together with their variance/covariance components. An important feature of the algorithm is that it can fit a correlation between the random effects for mean and variance. An h-likelihood estimator is implemented in the R software and an iterative reweighted least square (IRWLS) approximation of the h-likelihood is implemented using ASReml. The difference in variance component estimates between the two implementations is investigated, as well as the potential bias of the methods, using simulations. IRWLS gives the same results as h-likelihood in simple cases with no severe indication of bias. For more complex cases, only IRWLS could be used, and bias did appear. The IRWLS is applied on the pig litter size data previously analysed by Sorensen & Waagepetersen (2003) using Bayesian methodology. The estimates we obtained by using IRWLS are similar to theirs, with the estimated correlation between the random genetic effects being -0·52 for IRWLS and -0·62 in Sorensen & Waagepetersen (2003).

  2. Impact of apolipoprotein E genotype variation on means, variances, and correlations of plasma lipid, lipoprotein, and apolipoprotein traits in octogenarians

    SciTech Connect

    Haviland, M.B.; Sing, C.F.; Lussier-Cacan, S.; Davignon, J.

    1995-09-25

    The impact of apolipoprotein (apo) E genotype variation on means, variances and correlations between plasma lipid traits was studied in male and female octogenarians. Females had significantly higher mean levels of all 10 of the measured plasma lipid traits than males. The subset of concomitants (i.e., age, height, weight, body mass index, glucose and uric acid) that made a statistically significant contribution to interindividual variability was different in males and females for every trait considered. Gender-specific associations between variation in apo E genotype and variation in particular measures of lipid metabolism, adjusted for concomitant variation, were observed: in females there were no statistically significant associations while in males the means of the three common apo E genotypes were significantly different for adjusted measures of total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol and low density lipoprotein-apo B. The common apo E genotypes were heterogeneous with respect to intragenotypic variance for adjusted log-transformed triglyceride levels in females only. Finally, the three common apo E genotypes were heterogeneous with respect to the correlation between traits, adjusted for concomitant variation, and gender influenced the manner in which the genotypes differed for specific correlations. This study documents that variation in the apo E gene has a significant impact on means, variances and correlations of plasma lipid traits in octogenarians, but the effects are context-, that is, gender- and age-, dependent. 65 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Commonality and the Common Man: Understanding Variance Contributions to Overall Canonical Correlation Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capraro, Robert M.

    Canonical correlation analysis is the most general linear model subsuming all other univariate and multivariate cases (N. Kerlinger & E. Pedhazur, 1973; B. Thompson, 1985, 1991). Because "reality" is a complex place, a multivariate analysis such as canonical correlation analysis is demanded to match the research design. The purpose…

  4. Zika Vaccine Development: Flavivirus Foils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    Martins, Bavari, Zika Vaccine Development 1 Zika Vaccine Development: Flavivirus Foils Martins KAO, Bavari S. The current Zika virus...contrast, work had been underway for decades on the development of an Ebola virus vaccine , laying the groundwork for a rapid response in 2014. The...broader community’s extensive experience with Dengue virus vaccine development and with the pros and cons of different vaccine platforms has led to

  5. Flavivirus transmission focusing on Zika.

    PubMed

    Vasilakis, Nikos; Weaver, Scott C

    2017-02-01

    Flaviviruses are among the most diverse viruses with over 85 species recognized. Taxonomically, this genus is one of the 4 recognized genera within the family Flaviviridae. Most flaviviruses of human public health significance, for example, dengue, yellow fever and Zika viruses, are arthropod-borne (arboviruses) and have two evolutionarily and ecologically distinct transmission cycles: a sylvatic transmission cycle, where the virus circulates between zoonotic vertebrate reservoir and amplification hosts and arboreal mosquitoes; and an urban transmission cycle, where the virus circulates between humans and peridomestic Aedes spp. mosquitoes. Zika virus (ZIKV), a flavivirus closely related to West Nile, dengue, Spondweni, Japanese encephalitis and yellow fever viruses, remained in obscurity since its discovery in 1947, but has recently emerged to cause a series of epidemics in the South Pacific, and most recently reaching nearly pandemic levels with its introduction in the Americas. Available epidemiologic and experimental evidence points to Aedes aegypti as the principal urban vector, possibly supplemented by Aedes albopictus in some locations. Unfortunately, the former is one of the most difficult mosquitoes to control owing to its highly anthropophilic behavior.

  6. Sex-specific genetic variance and the evolution of sexual dimorphism: a systematic review of cross-sex genetic correlations.

    PubMed

    Poissant, Jocelyn; Wilson, Alastair J; Coltman, David W

    2010-01-01

    The independent evolution of the sexes may often be constrained if male and female homologous traits share a similar genetic architecture. Thus, cross-sex genetic covariance is assumed to play a key role in the evolution of sexual dimorphism (SD) with consequent impacts on sexual selection, population dynamics, and speciation processes. We compiled cross-sex genetic correlations (r(MF)) estimates from 114 sources to assess the extent to which the evolution of SD is typically constrained and test several specific hypotheses. First, we tested if r(MF) differed among trait types and especially between fitness components and other traits. We also tested the theoretical prediction of a negative relationship between r(MF) and SD based on the expectation that increases in SD should be facilitated by sex-specific genetic variance. We show that r(MF) is usually large and positive but that it is typically smaller for fitness components. This demonstrates that the evolution of SD is typically genetically constrained and that sex-specific selection coefficients may often be opposite in sign due to sub-optimal levels of SD. Most importantly, we confirm that sex-specific genetic variance is an important contributor to the evolution of SD by validating the prediction of a negative correlation between r(MF) and SD.

  7. Dengue and other flavivirus infections.

    PubMed

    Choumet, V; Desprès, Ph

    2015-08-01

    Flaviviruses are responsible for yellow fever, Zika fever and dengue, all of which are major human diseases found in tropical regions of the globe. They are zoonoses with a transmission cycle that involves primates as reservoirs and mosquitoes of the genus Aedes as vectors. The recent upsurge of urban epidemics of yellow fever, Zika fever and dengue has involved human-to-human transmission with mosquitoes as the vector. This paper is primarily concerned with dengue, which has become the pre-eminent arbovirosis in terms of public health.

  8. Variance-based sensitivity indices for stochastic models with correlated inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Kala, Zdeněk

    2015-03-10

    The goal of this article is the formulation of the principles of one of the possible strategies in implementing correlation between input random variables so as to be usable for algorithm development and the evaluation of Sobol’s sensitivity analysis. With regard to the types of stochastic computational models, which are commonly found in structural mechanics, an algorithm was designed for effective use in conjunction with Monte Carlo methods. Sensitivity indices are evaluated for all possible permutations of the decorrelation procedures for input parameters. The evaluation of Sobol’s sensitivity coefficients is illustrated on an example in which a computational model was used for the analysis of the resistance of a steel bar in tension with statistically dependent input geometric characteristics.

  9. Structural and Functional Analyses of a Conserved Hydrophobic Pocket of Flavivirus Methyltransferase*

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hongping; Liu, Lihui; Zou, Gang; Zhao, Yiwei; Li, Zhong; Lim, Siew Pheng; Shi, Pei-Yong; Li, Hongmin

    2010-01-01

    The flavivirus methyltransferase (MTase) sequentially methylates the N7 and 2′-O positions of the viral RNA cap (GpppA-RNA → m7GpppA-RNA → m7GpppAm-RNA), using S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet) as a methyl donor. We report here that sinefungin (SIN), an AdoMet analog, inhibits several flaviviruses through suppression of viral MTase. The crystal structure of West Nile virus MTase in complex with SIN inhibitor at 2.0-Å resolution revealed a flavivirus-conserved hydrophobic pocket located next to the AdoMet-binding site. The pocket is functionally critical in the viral replication and cap methylations. In addition, the N7 methylation efficiency was found to correlate with the viral replication ability. Thus, SIN analogs with modifications that interact with the hydrophobic pocket are potential specific inhibitors of flavivirus MTase. PMID:20685660

  10. Joint analysis of beef growth and carcass quality traits through calculation of co-variance components and correlations.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, H R; Verbyla, A P; Pitchford, W S

    2011-03-15

    A joint growth-carcass model using random regression was used to estimate the (co)variance components of beef cattle body weights and carcass quality traits and correlations between them. During a four-year period (1994-1997) of the Australian "southern crossbreeding project", mature Hereford cows (N = 581) were mated to 97 sires of Jersey, Wagyu, Angus, Hereford, South Devon, Limousin, and Belgian Blue breeds, resulting in 1141 calves. Data included 13 (for steers) and 8 (for heifers) body weight measurements approximately every 50 days from birth until slaughter and four carcass quality traits: hot standard carcass weight, rump fat depth, rib eye muscle area, and intramuscular fat content. The mixed model included fixed effects of sex, sire breed, age (linear, quadratic and cubic), and their interactions between sex and sire breed with age. Random effects were sire, dam, management (birth location, year, post-weaning groups), and permanent environmental effects, and their interactions with linear, quadratic and cubic growth, when possible. Phenotypic, sire and dam correlations between body weights and hot standard carcass weight and rib eye muscle area were positive and moderate to high from birth to feedlot period. Management variation accounted for the largest proportion of total variation in both growth and carcass traits. Management correlations between carcass traits were high, except between rump fat depth and intramuscular fat (r = 0.26). Management correlations between body weight and carcass traits during the pre-weaning period were positive except for intramuscular fat. The correlations were low from birth to weaning, then increased dramatically and were high during the feedlot period.

  11. Flavivirus RNA Synthesis in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Radhakrishnan; Takhampunya, Ratree; Teramoto, Tadahisa; Choi, Kyung H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Establishment of in vitro systems to study mechanisms of RNA synthesis for positive strand RNA viruses have been very useful in the past and have shed light on the composition of protein and RNA components, optimum conditions, the nature of the products formed, cis-acting RNA elements and trans-acting protein factors required for efficient synthesis. In this review, we summarize our current understanding regarding the requirements for flavivirus RNA synthesis in vitro. We describe details of reaction conditions, the specificity of template used by either the multi-component membrane-bound viral replicase complex or by purified, recombinant RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. We also discuss future perspectives to extend the boundaries of our knowledge. PMID:26272247

  12. Variance components, heritability and correlation analysis of anther and ovary size during the floral development of bread wheat.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zifeng; Chen, Dijun; Schnurbusch, Thorsten

    2015-06-01

    Anther and ovary development play an important role in grain setting, a crucial factor determining wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) yield. One aim of this study was to determine the heritability of anther and ovary size at different positions within a spikelet at seven floral developmental stages and conduct a variance components analysis. Relationships between anther and ovary size and other traits were also assessed. The thirty central European winter wheat genotypes used in this study were based on reduced height (Rht) and photoperiod sensitivity (Ppd) genes with variable genetic backgrounds. Identical experimental designs were conducted in a greenhouse and field simultaneously. Heritability of anther and ovary size indicated strong genetic control. Variance components analysis revealed that anther and ovary sizes of floret 3 (i.e. F3, the third floret from the spikelet base) and floret 4 (F4) were more sensitive to the environment compared with those in floret 1 (F1). Good correlations were found between spike dry weight and anther and ovary size in both greenhouse and field, suggesting that anther and ovary size are good predictors of each other, as well as spike dry weight in both conditions. Relationships between spike dry weight and anther and ovary size at F3/4 positions were stronger than at F1, suggesting that F3/4 anther and ovary size are better predictors of spike dry weight. Generally, ovary size showed a closer relationship with spike dry weight than anther size, suggesting that ovary size is a more reliable predictor of spike dry weight.

  13. SHH Protein Variance in the Limb Bud Is Constrained by Feedback Regulation and Correlates with Altered Digit Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Lee, Chanmi; Lawson, Lisa Y.; Svete, Lillian J.; McIntyre, Lauren M.; Harfe, Brian D.

    2017-01-01

    mRNA variance has been proposed to play key roles in normal development, population fitness, adaptability, and disease. While variance in gene expression levels may be beneficial for certain cellular processes, for example in a cell’s ability to respond to external stimuli, variance may be detrimental for the development of some organs. In the bilaterally symmetric vertebrate limb buds, the amount of Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) protein present at specific stages of development is essential to ensure proper patterning of this structure. To our surprise, we found that SHH protein variance is present during the first 10 hr of limb development. The variance is virtually eliminated after the first 10 hr of limb development. By examining mutant animals, we determined that the ability of the limb bud apical ectodermal ridge (AER) to respond to SHH protein was required for reducing SHH variance during limb formation. One consequence of the failure to eliminate variance in SHH protein was the presence of polydactyly and an increase in digit length. These data suggest a potential novel mechanism in which alterations in SHH variance during evolution may have driven changes in limb patterning and digit length. PMID:28131983

  14. Zika virus: An emerging flavivirus.

    PubMed

    Yun, Sang-Im; Lee, Young-Min

    2017-03-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a previously little-known flavivirus closely related to Japanese encephalitis, West Nile, dengue, and yellow fever viruses, all of which are primarily transmitted by blood-sucking mosquitoes. Since its discovery in Uganda in 1947, ZIKV has continued to expand its geographic range, from equatorial Africa and Asia to the Pacific Islands, then further afield to South and Central America and the Caribbean. Currently, ZIKV is actively circulating not only in much of Latin America and its neighbors but also in parts of the Pacific Islands and Southeast Asia. Although ZIKV infection generally causes only mild symptoms in some infected individuals, it is associated with a range of neuroimmunological disorders, including Guillain-Barré syndrome, meningoencephalitis, and myelitis. Recently, maternal ZIKV infection during pregnancy has been linked to neonatal malformations, resulting in various degrees of congenital abnormalities, microcephaly, and even abortion. Despite its emergence as an important public health problem, however, little is known about ZIKV biology, and neither vaccine nor drug is available to control ZIKV infection. This article provides a brief introduction to ZIKV with a major emphasis on its molecular virology, in order to help facilitate the development of diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines.

  15. The Complement System in Flavivirus Infections.

    PubMed

    Conde, Jonas N; Silva, Emiliana M; Barbosa, Angela S; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of flavivirus infections has increased dramatically in recent decades in tropical and sub-tropical climates worldwide, affecting hundreds of millions of people each year. The Flaviviridae family includes dengue, West Nile, Zika, Japanese encephalitis, and yellow fever viruses that are typically transmitted by mosquitoes or ticks, and cause a wide range of symptoms, such as fever, shock, meningitis, paralysis, birth defects, and death. The flavivirus genome is composed of a single positive-sense RNA molecule encoding a single viral polyprotein. This polyprotein is further processed by viral and host proteases into three structural proteins (C, prM/M, E) and seven non-structural proteins (NS1, NS2A, NS2B, NS3, NS4A, NS4B, NS5) that are involved in viral replication and pathogenicity. The complement system has been described to play an important role in flavivirus infection either by protecting the host and/or by influencing disease pathogenesis. In this mini-review, we will explore the role of complement system inhibition and/or activation against infection by the Flavivirus genus, with an emphasis on dengue and West Nile viruses.

  16. The Complement System in Flavivirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Jonas N.; Silva, Emiliana M.; Barbosa, Angela S.; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of flavivirus infections has increased dramatically in recent decades in tropical and sub-tropical climates worldwide, affecting hundreds of millions of people each year. The Flaviviridae family includes dengue, West Nile, Zika, Japanese encephalitis, and yellow fever viruses that are typically transmitted by mosquitoes or ticks, and cause a wide range of symptoms, such as fever, shock, meningitis, paralysis, birth defects, and death. The flavivirus genome is composed of a single positive-sense RNA molecule encoding a single viral polyprotein. This polyprotein is further processed by viral and host proteases into three structural proteins (C, prM/M, E) and seven non-structural proteins (NS1, NS2A, NS2B, NS3, NS4A, NS4B, NS5) that are involved in viral replication and pathogenicity. The complement system has been described to play an important role in flavivirus infection either by protecting the host and/or by influencing disease pathogenesis. In this mini-review, we will explore the role of complement system inhibition and/or activation against infection by the Flavivirus genus, with an emphasis on dengue and West Nile viruses. PMID:28261172

  17. Nuclear entropy, angular second moment, variance and texture correlation of thymus cortical and medullar lymphocytes: grey level co-occurrence matrix analysis.

    PubMed

    Pantic, Igor; Pantic, Senka; Paunovic, Jovana; Perovic, Milan

    2013-09-01

    Grey level co-occurrence matrix analysis (GLCM) is a well-known mathematical method for quantification of cell and tissue textural properties, such as homogeneity, complexity and level of disorder. Recently, it was demonstrated that this method is capable of evaluating fine structural changes in nuclear structure that otherwise are undetectable during standard microscopy analysis. In this article, we present the results indicating that entropy, angular second moment, variance, and texture correlation of lymphocyte nuclear structure determined by GLCM method are different in thymus cortex when compared to medulla. A total of 300 thymus lymphocyte nuclei from 10 one-month-old mice were analyzed: 150 nuclei from cortex and 150 nuclei from medullar regions of thymus. Nuclear GLCM analysis was carried out using National Institutes of Health ImageJ software. For each nucleus, entropy, angular second moment, variance and texture correlation were determined. Cortical lymphocytes had significantly higher chromatin angular second moment (p < 0.001) and texture correlation (p < 0.05) compared to medullar lymphocytes. Nuclear GLCM entropy and variance of cortical lymphocytes were on the other hand significantly lower than in medullar lymphocytes (p < 0.001). These results suggest that GLCM as a method might have a certain potential in detecting discrete changes in nuclear structure associated with lymphocyte migration and maturation in thymus.

  18. Using exposure biomarkers in children to compare between-child and within-child variance and calculate correlations among siblings for multiple environmental chemicals.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Ken; Ryan, Andrew D

    2012-01-01

    Longitudinal measurements of biomarkers for metals, phthalates, environmental tobacco smoke, organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and volatile organic compounds were made in blood and/or urine from a stratified, random sample of more than 100 elementary school-aged children living in an inner-city section of Minneapolis. Repeated measures of 31 exposure biomarkers indicate that between-child variance (B-CV) was greater than within-child variance (W-CV) for 8 compounds, B-CV was a significant proportion of total variance for 9 compounds, and variances were homogeneous for 14 compounds. Among siblings living in the same household, positive correlations were observed for biomarker concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides, metals, and volatile organic chemicals in blood, and total cotinine in urine. Biologic markers confirm that children from a low-income, ethnically diverse neighborhood experienced concurrent exposure to a variety of hazardous environmental chemicals during their everyday activities. Future monitoring studies should examine the nature and magnitude of children's cumulative exposure to both chemical and non-chemical stressors, especially in disadvantaged populations.

  19. Coupling of Replication and Assembly in Flaviviruses

    PubMed Central

    Apte-Sengupta, Swapna; Sirohi, Devika; Kuhn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Flaviviruses affect hundreds of millions of people each year causing tremendous morbidity and mortality worldwide. This genus includes significant human pathogens such as dengue, West Nile, yellow fever, tick-borne encephalitis and Japanese encephalitis virus among many others. The disease caused by these viruses can range from febrile illness to hemorrhagic fever and encephalitis. A deeper understanding of the virus life cycle is required to foster development of antivirals and vaccines, which are an urgent need for many flaviviruses, especially dengue. The focus of this review is to summarize our current knowledge of flaviviral replication and assembly, the proteins and lipids involved therein, and how these processes are coordinated for efficient virus production. PMID:25462445

  20. Risk assessment of flavivirus transmission in Namibia.

    PubMed

    Noden, Bruce H; Musuuo, Milka; Aku-Akai, Larai; van der Colf, Berta; Chipare, Israel; Wilkinson, Rob

    2014-09-01

    The role of arboviruses causing acute febrile illness in sub-Saharan Africa is receiving more attention. Reports of dengue in tourists were published nearly 10 years ago in Namibia, but the current epidemiology of arboviruses is unknown and surveys of mosquito vectors have not been carried out since the 1950s. To begin addressing this knowledge gap, a prospective cross-sectional study was conducted using samples from volunteer blood donors linked to questionnaire. Serum samples were tested using a Dengue IgG Indirect ELISA which measured exposure to dengue virus/flaviviruses. Entomological samples were collected from tires during the rainy season (February-March 2012) in six locations across Namibia's capital city, Windhoek. Among 312 blood donors tested, 25 (8.0%) were positive for dengue virus/flavivirus exposure. The only significant risk factor was age group with high exposure rates among those older than 50 (29%) compared with those below 40 years old (between 2.9% and 8.3%) (P<0.002). Larvae and pupae of Aedes aegypti and Culex pipiens complex accounted for 100% of the 2751 samples collected, of which only 12.2% (n=336) were Ae. aegypti. Each site demonstrated high variability of species composition between sampling times. While the significant dengue virus/flavivirus exposure rate among those above 50 years old is likely indicative of the West Nile epidemic in the 70s and 80s, the low exposure among those under 50 suggests that flaviviruses are still circulating in Namibia. While Ae. aegypti and C. pipiens sp. may play a role in future epidemics, the significance of presence may be reduced due to short rain periods, dry, arid, cold winters and policies and social understandings that limit non-structured storage and use of tires in low income areas. Future studies should further characterize the circulating arboviruses and investigate mosquito ecology nationally to map areas at higher risk for future arbovirus outbreaks.

  1. Structure and Expression of Genes for Flavivirus Immunogens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-01

    cDNAs. Keywords: Japanese encephalitis virus; Dengue virus; Flaviviruses; Subunit vaccines; Diagnosis; Mice; Gene mapping; Biotechnology; BW; CDNA; Cloning; Dengue fever ; DNA probes; Recombinant DNA.

  2. An update on modeling dose-response relationships: Accounting for correlated data structure and heterogeneous error variance in linear and nonlinear mixed models.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, M A D; Bello, N M; Dritz, S S; Tokach, M D; DeRouchey, J M; Woodworth, J C; Goodband, R D

    2016-05-01

    Advanced methods for dose-response assessments are used to estimate the minimum concentrations of a nutrient that maximizes a given outcome of interest, thereby determining nutritional requirements for optimal performance. Contrary to standard modeling assumptions, experimental data often present a design structure that includes correlations between observations (i.e., blocking, nesting, etc.) as well as heterogeneity of error variances; either can mislead inference if disregarded. Our objective is to demonstrate practical implementation of linear and nonlinear mixed models for dose-response relationships accounting for correlated data structure and heterogeneous error variances. To illustrate, we modeled data from a randomized complete block design study to evaluate the standardized ileal digestible (SID) Trp:Lys ratio dose-response on G:F of nursery pigs. A base linear mixed model was fitted to explore the functional form of G:F relative to Trp:Lys ratios and assess model assumptions. Next, we fitted 3 competing dose-response mixed models to G:F, namely a quadratic polynomial (QP) model, a broken-line linear (BLL) ascending model, and a broken-line quadratic (BLQ) ascending model, all of which included heteroskedastic specifications, as dictated by the base model. The GLIMMIX procedure of SAS (version 9.4) was used to fit the base and QP models and the NLMIXED procedure was used to fit the BLL and BLQ models. We further illustrated the use of a grid search of initial parameter values to facilitate convergence and parameter estimation in nonlinear mixed models. Fit between competing dose-response models was compared using a maximum likelihood-based Bayesian information criterion (BIC). The QP, BLL, and BLQ models fitted on G:F of nursery pigs yielded BIC values of 353.7, 343.4, and 345.2, respectively, thus indicating a better fit of the BLL model. The BLL breakpoint estimate of the SID Trp:Lys ratio was 16.5% (95% confidence interval [16.1, 17.0]). Problems with

  3. A generalized concordance correlation coefficient based on the variance components generalized linear mixed models for overdispersed count data.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Josep L

    2010-09-01

    The classical concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) to measure agreement among a set of observers assumes data to be distributed as normal and a linear relationship between the mean and the subject and observer effects. Here, the CCC is generalized to afford any distribution from the exponential family by means of the generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs) theory and applied to the case of overdispersed count data. An example of CD34+ cell count data is provided to show the applicability of the procedure. In the latter case, different CCCs are defined and applied to the data by changing the GLMM that fits the data. A simulation study is carried out to explore the behavior of the procedure with a small and moderate sample size.

  4. Mechanism and Significance of Cell Type-Dependent Neutralization of Flaviviruses

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Swati; Dowd, Kimberly A.; Manhart, Carolyn J.; Ledgerwood, Julie E.; Durbin, Anna P.; Whitehead, Stephen S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The production of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) is a correlate of protection for many human vaccines, including currently licensed vaccines against flaviviruses. NAbs are typically measured using a plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT). Despite its extensive use, parameters that impact the performance of the PRNT have not been investigated from a mechanistic perspective. The results of a recent phase IIb clinical trial of a tetravalent dengue virus (DENV) vaccine suggest that NAbs, as measured using a PRNT performed with Vero cells, do not correlate with protection. This surprising finding highlights the importance of understanding how well the PRNT captures the complexity of the NAb response to DENV. In this study, we demonstrated that the structural heterogeneity of flaviviruses arising from inefficient virion maturation impacts the results of neutralization assays in a cell type-dependent manner. Neutralization titers of several monoclonal antibodies were significantly reduced when assayed on Vero cells compared to Raji cells expressing DC-SIGNR. This pattern can be explained by differences in the efficiency with which partially mature flaviviruses attach to each cell type, rather than a differential capacity of antibody to block infection. Vero cells are poorly permissive to the fraction of virions that are most sensitive to neutralization. Analysis of sera from recipients of live-attenuated monovalent DENV vaccine candidates revealed a strong correlation between the sensitivity of serum antibodies to the maturation state of DENV and cell type-dependent patterns of neutralization. Cross-reactive patterns of neutralization may be underrepresented by the “gold-standard” PRNT that employs Vero cells. IMPORTANCE Cell type-dependent patterns of neutralization describe a differential capacity of antibodies to inhibit virus infection when assayed on multiple cellular substrates. In this study, we established a link between antibodies that

  5. The IMPORTance of the Nucleus during Flavivirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Denman, Adam J.; Mackenzie, Jason M.

    2017-01-01

    Flaviviruses are a large group of arboviruses of significant medical concern worldwide. With outbreaks a common occurrence, the need for efficient viral control is required more than ever. It is well understood that flaviviruses modulate the composition and structure of membranes in the cytoplasm that are crucial for efficient replication and evading immune detection. As the flavivirus genome consists of positive sense RNA, replication can occur wholly within the cytoplasm. What is becoming more evident is that some viral proteins also have the ability to translocate to the nucleus, with potential roles in replication and immune system perturbation. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of flavivirus nuclear localisation, and the function it has during flavivirus infection. We also describe—while closely related—the functional differences between similar viral proteins in their nuclear translocation. PMID:28106839

  6. Usutu Virus: An Emerging Flavivirus in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Usama; Ye, Jing; Ruan, Xindi; Wan, Shengfeng; Zhu, Bibo; Cao, Shengbo

    2015-01-01

    Usutu virus (USUV) is an African mosquito-borne flavivirus belonging to the Japanese encephalitis virus serocomplex. USUV is closely related to Murray Valley encephalitis virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, and West Nile virus. USUV was discovered in South Africa in 1959. In Europe, the first true demonstration of circulation of USUV was reported in Austria in 2001 with a significant die-off of Eurasian blackbirds. In the subsequent years, USUV expanded to neighboring countries, including Italy, Germany, Spain, Hungary, Switzerland, Poland, England, Czech Republic, Greece, and Belgium, where it caused unusual mortality in birds. In 2009, the first two human cases of USUV infection in Europe have been reported in Italy, causing meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised patients. This review describes USUV in terms of its life cycle, USUV surveillance from Africa to Europe, human cases, its cellular tropism and pathogenesis, its genetic relationship with other flaviviruses, genetic diversity among USUV strains, its diagnosis, and a discussion of the potential future threat to Asian countries. PMID:25606971

  7. [When some Flaviviruses are throwing our certainties].

    PubMed

    Chastel, C

    2012-10-01

    During the past two decades, a number of mosquito-borne flaviviruses, mainly of African origin, have invaded new geographical areas where they have never been active. This was the case for the Japanese encephalitis virus which reached the northeastern part of Australia (1995) and, above all, for the West Nile virus which, since 1999, entirely colonized the American continent. Then, the Usutu virus invaded a large part of the Western Europe (2001) while the Zika virus caused a large epidemic in an island of Micronesia (2007). Finally, in 2010, the Tembusu virus devastated many duck farms in China while the Bagaza virus, after having provoked human encephalitis in India, reached the southern part of Spain. In the affected areas, new pathogenic outcomes were observed in humans and animals while new vertebrate hosts and mosquito species were infected. Moreover, unusual ways of contamination were described. The origins of this unprecedented evolution remain to be clarified.

  8. Conformational Changes of the Flavivirus E Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Wei; Ogata, Steven; Clements, David; Strauss, James H.; Baker, Timothy S.; Kuhn, Richard J.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Dengue virus, a member of the Flaviviridae family, has a surface composed of 180 copies each of the envelope (E) glycoprotein and the membrane (M) protein. The crystal structure of an N-terminal fragment of E has been determined and compared with a previously described structure. The primary difference between these structures is a 10° rotation about a hinge relating the fusion domain DII to domains DI and DIII. These two rigid body components were used for independent fitting of E into the cryo-electron microscopy maps of both immature and mature dengue viruses. The fitted E structures in these two particles showed a difference of 27° between the two components. Comparison of the E structure in its postfusion state with that in the immature and mature virions shows a rotation approximately around the same hinge. Flexibility of E is apparently a functional requirement for assembly and infection of flaviviruses. PMID:15341726

  9. Mercadeo Virus: A Novel Mosquito-Specific Flavivirus from Panama

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Jean-Paul; Guzman, Hilda; Beltrán, Davis; Díaz, Yamilka; López-Vergès, Sandra; Torres-Cosme, Rolando; Popov, Vsevolod; Widen, Steven G.; Wood, Thomas G.; Weaver, Scott C.; Cáceres-Carrera, Lorenzo; Vasilakis, Nikos; Tesh, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses in the genus Flavivirus (family Flaviviridae) include many arthropod-borne viruses of public health and veterinary importance. However, during the past two decades an explosion of novel insect-specific flaviviruses (ISFs), some closely related to vertebrate pathogens, have been discovered. Although many flavivirus pathogens of vertebrates have been isolated from naturally infected mosquitoes in Panama, ISFs have not previously been reported from the country. This report describes the isolation and characterization of a novel ISF, tentatively named Mercadeo virus (MECDV), obtained from Culex spp. mosquitoes collected in Panama. Two MECDV isolates were sequenced and cluster phylogenetically with cell-fusing agent virus (CFAV) and Nakiwogo virus (NAKV) to form a distinct lineage within the insect-specific group of flaviviruses. PMID:26304915

  10. Thermodynamic mechanism for the evasion of antibody neutralization in flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Maillard, Rodrigo A; Liu, Tong; Beasley, David W C; Barrett, Alan D T; Hilser, Vincent J; Lee, J Ching

    2014-07-23

    Mutations in the epitopes of antigenic proteins can confer viral resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization. However, the fundamental properties that characterize epitope residues and how mutations affect antibody binding to alter virus susceptibility to neutralization remain largely unknown. To address these questions, we used an ensemble-based algorithm to characterize the effects of mutations on the thermodynamics of protein conformational fluctuations. We applied this method to the envelope protein domain III (ED3) of two medically important flaviviruses: West Nile and dengue 2. We determined an intimate relationship between the susceptibility of a residue to thermodynamic perturbations and epitope location. This relationship allows the successful identification of the primary epitopes in each ED3, despite their high sequence and structural similarity. Mutations that allow the ED3 to evade detection by the antibody either increase or decrease conformational fluctuations of the epitopes through local effects or long-range interactions. Spatially distant interactions originate in the redistribution of conformations of the ED3 ensembles, not through a mechanically connected array of contiguous amino acids. These results reconcile previous observations of evasion of neutralization by mutations at a distance from the epitopes. Finally, we established a quantitative correlation between subtle changes in the conformational fluctuations of the epitope and large defects in antibody binding affinity. This correlation suggests that mutations that allow viral growth, while reducing neutralization, do not generate significant structural changes and underscores the importance of protein fluctuations and long-range interactions in the mechanism of antibody-mediated neutralization resistance.

  11. Flavivirus Infections of Bats: Potential Role in Zika Virus Ecology.

    PubMed

    Kading, Rebekah C; Schountz, Tony

    2016-11-02

    Understanding the vector and nonhuman vertebrate species contributing to Zika virus (ZIKAV) transmission is critical to understanding the ecology of this emerging arbovirus and its potential to establish in new geographic areas. This minireview summarizes what is known regarding the association of bats with flaviviruses (Flaviviridae: Flavivirus) with a particular emphasis on the potential role of bats in the sylvatic transmission of ZIKAV. Key research directions that remain to be addressed are also discussed.

  12. Analysis of variance, normal quantile-quantile correlation and effective expression support of pooled expression ratio of reference genes for defining expression stability.

    PubMed

    Priyadarshi, Himanshu; Das, Rekha; Kumar, Shivendra; Kishore, Pankaj; Kumar, Sujit

    2017-01-01

    Identification of a reference gene unaffected by the experimental conditions is obligatory for accurate measurement of gene expression through relative quantification. Most existing methods directly analyze variability in crossing point (Cp) values of reference genes and fail to account for template-independent factors that affect Cp values in their estimates. We describe the use of three simple statistical methods namely analysis of variance (ANOVA), normal quantile-quantile correlation (NQQC) and effective expression support (EES), on pooled expression ratios of reference genes in a panel to overcome this issue. The pooling of expression ratios across the genes in the panel nullify the sample specific effects uniformly affecting all genes that are falsely reflected as instability. Our methods also offer the flexibility to include sample specific PCR efficiencies in estimations, when available, for improved accuracy. Additionally, we describe a correction factor from the ANOVA method to correct the relative fold change of a target gene if no truly stable reference gene could be found in the analyzed panel. The analysis is described on a synthetic data set to simplify the explanation of the statistical treatment of data.

  13. The role of viral persistence in flavivirus biology

    PubMed Central

    Mlera, Luwanika; Melik, Wessam; Bloom, Marshall E.

    2014-01-01

    In nature, vector-borne flaviviruses are persistently cycled between either the tick or mosquito vector and small mammals such as rodents, skunks, and swine. These viruses account for considerable human morbidity and mortality worldwide. Increasing and substantial evidence of viral persistence in humans, which includes the isolation of RNA by RT-PCR and infectious virus by culture, continues to be reported. Viral persistence can also be established in vitro in various human, animal, arachnid and insect cell lines in culture. Although some research has focused on the potential roles of defective virus particles, evasion of the immune response through the manipulation of autophagy and/or apoptosis, the precise mechanism of flavivirus persistence is still not well understood. We propose additional research for further understanding of how viral persistence is established in different systems. Avenues for additional studies include determining if the multifunctional flavivirus protein NS5 has a role in viral persistence, the development of relevant animal models of viral persistence as well as investigating the host responses that allow vector borne flavivirus replication without detrimental effects on infected cells. Such studies might shed more light on the viral-host relationships, and could be used to unravel the mechanisms for establishment of persistence. PMID:24737600

  14. Degrees of maturity: the complex structure and biology of flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Theodore C; Diamond, Michael S

    2012-04-01

    Flaviviruses are small enveloped virions that enter target cells in a pH-dependent fashion. Virus attachment, entry, and membrane fusion are orchestrated by the envelope (E) and pre-membrane (prM) proteins, the two structural proteins displayed on the surface of virions. Flaviviruses assemble as an immature non-infectious form onto which prM and E form trimeric spikes. During egress from infected cells, flaviviruses undergo dramatic structural changes characterized by the formation of a herringbone arrangement of E proteins that lie flat against the surface of the virion and cleavage of the prM protein by the cellular protease furin. The result is a relatively smooth, infectious mature virion. This dynamic process is now understood in structural detail at the atomic level. However, recent studies indicate that many of the virions released from cells share structural features of both immature and mature virus particles. These mosaic partially mature virions are infectious and interact uniquely with target cells and the host immune response. Here, we will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the biology and significance of partially mature flaviviruses.

  15. Characterization of a Novel Flavivirus from Mosquitoes in Northern Europe That Is Related to Mosquito-Borne Flaviviruses of the Tropics▿

    PubMed Central

    Huhtamo, Eili; Putkuri, Niina; Kurkela, Satu; Manni, Tytti; Vaheri, Antti; Vapalahti, Olli; Uzcátegui, Nathalie Y.

    2009-01-01

    A novel flavivirus was isolated from mosquitoes in Finland, representing the first mosquito-borne flavivirus from Northern Europe. The isolate, designated Lammi virus (LAMV), was antigenically cross-reactive with other flaviviruses and exhibited typical flavivirus morphology as determined by electron microscopy. The genomic sequence of LAMV was highly divergent from the recognized flaviviruses, and yet the polyprotein properties resembled those of mosquito-borne flaviviruses. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete coding sequence showed that LAMV represented a distinct lineage related to the Aedes sp.-transmitted human pathogenic flaviviruses, similarly to the newly described Nounané virus (NOUV), a flavivirus from Africa (S. Junglen et al., J. Virol. 83:4462-4468, 2009). Despite the low sequence homology, LAMV and NOUV were phylogenetically grouped closely, likely representing separate species of a novel group of flaviviruses. Despite the biological properties preferring replication in mosquito cells, the genetic relatedness of LAMV to viruses associated with vertebrate hosts warrants a search for disease associations. PMID:19570865

  16. [Detection of flavivirus in mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) from Easter Island-Chile].

    PubMed

    Collao, Ximena; Prado, Lorena; González, Christian; Vásquez, Ana; Araki, Romina; Henríquez, Tuki; Peña, Cindy M

    2015-02-01

    Flaviviruses are arthropod-borne viruses, mainly by mosquitoes of the genera Aedes and Culex (Culicidae) that are detected in tropical and subtropical areas. Main flaviviruses of public health importance are: dengue, West Nile virus, yellow fever, among others. In continental Chile, flaviviruses has not been detected. However, there are indigenous cases of dengue detected in Easter Island since 2002, as the presence of its vector Aedes aegypti. The aim of this study was: To determine diversity of flavivirus mosquitoes present in Easter Island. Thirty pools of mosquitoes collected in Hanga Roa were analyzed; a RT-PCR nested flavivirus was performed. Thirteen positive samples were detected and the amplification products were sequenced, identifying two specific flavivirus Insect, the Cell fusing agent virus and other related viruses Kamiti River. This is the first study in Chile showed the presence of flavivirus in vectors in Easter Island.

  17. Ecuador Paraiso Escondido Virus, a New Flavivirus Isolated from New World Sand Flies in Ecuador, Is the First Representative of a Novel Clade in the Genus Flavivirus

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Sonia; Bichaud, Laurence; Moureau, Grégory; Lemey, Philippe; Firth, Andrew E.; Gritsun, Tamara S.; Gould, Ernest A.; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Depaquit, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A new flavivirus, Ecuador Paraiso Escondido virus (EPEV), named after the village where it was discovered, was isolated from sand flies (Psathyromyia abonnenci, formerly Lutzomyia abonnenci) that are unique to the New World. This represents the first sand fly-borne flavivirus identified in the New World. EPEV exhibited a typical flavivirus genome organization. Nevertheless, the maximum pairwise amino acid sequence identity with currently recognized flaviviruses was 52.8%. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete coding sequence showed that EPEV represents a distinct clade which diverged from a lineage that was ancestral to the nonvectored flaviviruses Entebbe bat virus, Yokose virus, and Sokoluk virus and also the Aedes-associated mosquito-borne flaviviruses, which include yellow fever virus, Sepik virus, Saboya virus, and others. EPEV replicated in C6/36 mosquito cells, yielding high infectious titers, but failed to reproduce either in vertebrate cell lines (Vero, BHK, SW13, and XTC cells) or in suckling mouse brains. This surprising result, which appears to eliminate an association with vertebrate hosts in the life cycle of EPEV, is discussed in the context of the evolutionary origins of EPEV in the New World. IMPORTANCE The flaviviruses are rarely (if ever) vectored by sand fly species, at least in the Old World. We have identified the first representative of a sand fly-associated flavivirus, Ecuador Paraiso Escondido virus (EPEV), in the New World. EPEV constitutes a novel clade according to current knowledge of the flaviviruses. Phylogenetic analysis of the virus genome showed that EPEV roots the Aedes-associated mosquito-borne flaviviruses, including yellow fever virus. In light of this new discovery, the New World origin of EPEV is discussed together with that of the other flaviviruses. PMID:26355096

  18. The variances of Sp1 and NF-κB elements correlate with the greater capacity of Chinese HIV-1 B′-LTR for driving gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Di; Li, Chuan; Sang, Feng; Li, Qiang; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Xu, Li-Ran; Guo, Hui-Jun; Zhang, Chiyu; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The 5′ end of HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) serves as a promoter that plays an essential role in driving viral gene transcription. Manipulation of HIV-1 LTR provides a potential therapeutic strategy for suppressing viral gene expression or excising integrated provirus. Subtype-specific genetic diversity in the LTR region has been observed. The minor variance of LTR, particularly in the transcription factor binding sites, can have a profound impact on its activity. However, the LTR profiles from major endemic Chinese subtypes are not well characterized. Here, by characterizing the sequences and functions of LTRs from endemic Chinese HIV-1 subtypes, we showed that nucleotide variances of Sp1 core promoter and NF-κB element are associated with varied LTR capacity for driving viral gene transcription. The greater responsiveness of Chinese HIV-1 B′-LTR for driving viral gene transcription upon stimulation is associated with an increased level of viral reactivation. Moreover, we demonstrated that the introduction of CRISPR/dead Cas9 targeting Sp1 or NF-κB element suppressed viral gene expression. Taken together, our study characterized LTRs from endemic HIV-1 subtypes in China and suggests a potential target for the suppression of viral gene expression and a novel strategy that facilitates the accomplishment of a functional cure. PMID:27698388

  19. The variances of Sp1 and NF-κB elements correlate with the greater capacity of Chinese HIV-1 B'-LTR for driving gene expression.

    PubMed

    Qu, Di; Li, Chuan; Sang, Feng; Li, Qiang; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Xu, Li-Ran; Guo, Hui-Jun; Zhang, Chiyu; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-10-04

    The 5' end of HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) serves as a promoter that plays an essential role in driving viral gene transcription. Manipulation of HIV-1 LTR provides a potential therapeutic strategy for suppressing viral gene expression or excising integrated provirus. Subtype-specific genetic diversity in the LTR region has been observed. The minor variance of LTR, particularly in the transcription factor binding sites, can have a profound impact on its activity. However, the LTR profiles from major endemic Chinese subtypes are not well characterized. Here, by characterizing the sequences and functions of LTRs from endemic Chinese HIV-1 subtypes, we showed that nucleotide variances of Sp1 core promoter and NF-κB element are associated with varied LTR capacity for driving viral gene transcription. The greater responsiveness of Chinese HIV-1 B'-LTR for driving viral gene transcription upon stimulation is associated with an increased level of viral reactivation. Moreover, we demonstrated that the introduction of CRISPR/dead Cas9 targeting Sp1 or NF-κB element suppressed viral gene expression. Taken together, our study characterized LTRs from endemic HIV-1 subtypes in China and suggests a potential target for the suppression of viral gene expression and a novel strategy that facilitates the accomplishment of a functional cure.

  20. Salicylates Inhibit Flavivirus Replication Independently of Blocking Nuclear Factor Kappa B Activation

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Ching-Len; Lin, Yi-Ling; Wu, Bi-Ching; Tsao, Chang-Huei; Wang, Mei-Chuan; Liu, Chiu-I; Huang, Yue-Ling; Chen, Jui-Hui; Wang, Jia-Pey; Chen, Li-Kuang

    2001-01-01

    Flaviviruses comprise a positive-sense RNA genome that replicates exclusively in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Whether flaviviruses require an activated nuclear factor(s) to complete their life cycle and trigger apoptosis in infected cells remains elusive. Flavivirus infections quickly activate nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), and salicylates have been shown to inhibit NF-κB activation. In this study, we investigated whether salicylates suppress flavivirus replication and virus-induced apoptosis in cultured cells. In a dose-dependent inhibition, we found salicylates within a range of 1 to 5 mM not only restricted flavivirus replication but also abrogated flavivirus-triggered apoptosis. However, flavivirus replication was not affected by a specific NF-κB peptide inhibitor, SN50, and a proteosome inhibitor, lactacystin. Flaviviruses also replicated and triggered apoptosis in cells stably expressing IκBα-ΔN, a dominant-negative mutant that antagonizes NF-κB activation, as readily as in wild-type BHK-21 cells, suggesting that NF-κB activation is not essential for either flavivirus replication or flavivirus-induced apoptosis. Salicylates still diminished flavivirus replication and blocked apoptosis in the same IκBα-ΔN cells. This inhibition of flaviviruses by salicylates could be partially reversed by a specific p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase inhibitor, SB203580. Together, these results show that the mechanism by which salicylates suppress flavivirus infection may involve p38 MAP kinase activity but is independent of blocking the NF-κB pathway. PMID:11483726

  1. Visualization of a neurotropic flavivirus infection in mouse reveals unique viscerotropism controlled by host type I interferon signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Feng; Li, Xiao-Dan; Deng, Cheng-Lin; Dong, Hao-Long; Zhang, Qiu-Yan; Ye, Qing; Ye, Han-Qing; Huang, Xing-Yao; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Zhang, Bo; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Flavivirus includes a large group of human pathogens with medical importance. Especially, neurotropic flaviviruses capable of invading central and peripheral nervous system, e.g. Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and Zika virus (ZIKV), are highly pathogenic to human and constitute major global health problems. However, the dynamic dissemination and pathogenesis of neurotropic flavivirus infections remain largely unknown. Here, using JEV as a model, we rationally designed and constructed a recombinant reporter virus that stably expressed Renilla luciferase (Rluc). The resulting JEV reporter virus (named Rluc-JEV) and parental JEV exhibited similar replication and infection characteristics, and the magnitude of Rluc activity correlated well with progeny viral production in vitro and in vivo. By using in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) technology, we dissected the replication and dissemination dynamics of JEV infection in mice upon different inoculation routes. Interestingly, besides replicating in mouse brain, Rluc-JEV predominantly invaded the abdominal organs in mice with typical viscerotropism. Further tests in mice deficient in type I interferon (IFN) receptors demonstrated robust and prolonged viral replication in the intestine, spleen, liver, kidney and other abdominal organs. Combined with histopathological and immunohistochemical results, the host type I IFN signaling was evidenced as the major barrier to the viscerotropism and pathogenicity of this neurotropic flavivirus. Additionally, the Rluc-JEV platform was readily adapted for efficacy assay of known antiviral compounds and a live JE vaccine. Collectively, our study revealed abdominal organs as important targets of JEV infection in mice and profiled the unique viscerotropism trait controlled by the host type I IFN signaling. This in vivo visualization technology described here provides a powerful tool for testing antiviral agents and vaccine candidates for flaviviral infection. PMID:28382163

  2. Structure and Function of Flavivirus NS5 Methyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou,Y.; Ray, D.; Zhao, Y.; Dong, H.; Ren, S.; Li, Z.; Guo, Y.; Bernard, K.; Shi, P.; Li, H.

    2007-01-01

    The plus-strand RNA genome of flavivirus contains a 5' terminal cap 1 structure (m{sup 7}GpppAmG). The flaviviruses encode one methyltransferase, located at the N-terminal portion of the NS5 protein, to catalyze both guanine N-7 and ribose 2'-OH methylations during viral cap formation. Representative flavivirus methyltransferases from dengue, yellow fever, and West Nile virus (WNV) sequentially generate GpppA {yields} m{sup 7}GpppA {yields} m{sup 7}GpppAm. The 2'-O methylation can be uncoupled from the N-7 methylation, since m{sup 7}GpppA-RNA can be readily methylated to m{sup 7}GpppAm-RNA. Despite exhibiting two distinct methylation activities, the crystal structure of WNV methyltransferase at 2.8 {angstrom} resolution showed a single binding site for S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM), the methyl donor. Therefore, substrate GpppA-RNA should be repositioned to accept the N-7 and 2'-O methyl groups from SAM during the sequential reactions. Electrostatic analysis of the WNV methyltransferase structure showed that, adjacent to the SAM-binding pocket, is a highly positively charged surface that could serve as an RNA binding site during cap methylations. Biochemical and mutagenesis analyses show that the N-7 and 2'-O cap methylations require distinct buffer conditions and different side chains within the K{sub 61}-D{sub 146}-K{sub 182}-E{sub 218} motif, suggesting that the two reactions use different mechanisms. In the context of complete virus, defects in both methylations are lethal to WNV; however, viruses defective solely in 2'-O methylation are attenuated and can protect mice from later wild-type WNV challenge. The results demonstrate that the N-7 methylation activity is essential for the WNV life cycle and, thus, methyltransferase represents a novel target for flavivirus therapy.

  3. Structure and Expression of Genes for Flavivirus Immunogens.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    alternative approaches to the development of vaccines for JE and DHS-DSS. In deciding which dengue serotype to study, we initially considered the advantages of...progress in the development of a synthetic hepatitis B vaccine from genetically engineered yeast (see Newa and Views section - Nature 304, 395, 1983...noceasmy and Identify by block number) Flavivirus, Japanese encephalitis, Dengue , gene cloning, neutralizing antibody, monoclonal antibody, synthetic

  4. Flavivirus Infection Uncouples Translation Suppression from Cellular Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Hanna; Magg, Vera; Uch, Fabian; Mutz, Pascal; Klein, Philipp; Haneke, Katharina; Lohmann, Volker; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Fackler, Oliver T.; Locker, Nicolas; Stoecklin, Georg

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT As obligate parasites, viruses strictly depend on host cell translation for the production of new progeny, yet infected cells also synthesize antiviral proteins to limit virus infection. Modulation of host cell translation therefore represents a frequent strategy by which viruses optimize their replication and spread. Here we sought to define how host cell translation is regulated during infection of human cells with dengue virus (DENV) and Zika virus (ZIKV), two positive-strand RNA flaviviruses. Polysome profiling and analysis of de novo protein synthesis revealed that flavivirus infection causes potent repression of host cell translation, while synthesis of viral proteins remains efficient. Selective repression of host cell translation was mediated by the DENV polyprotein at the level of translation initiation. In addition, DENV and ZIKV infection suppressed host cell stress responses such as the formation of stress granules and phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2α (α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2). Mechanistic analyses revealed that translation repression was uncoupled from the disruption of stress granule formation and eIF2α signaling. Rather, DENV infection induced p38-Mnk1 signaling that resulted in the phosphorylation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E and was essential for the efficient production of virus particles. Together, these results identify the uncoupling of translation suppression from the cellular stress responses as a conserved strategy by which flaviviruses ensure efficient replication in human cells. PMID:28074025

  5. Inverse modeling for seawater intrusion in coastal aquifers: Insights about parameter sensitivities, variances, correlations and estimation procedures derived from the Henry problem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanz, E.; Voss, C.I.

    2006-01-01

    Inverse modeling studies employing data collected from the classic Henry seawater intrusion problem give insight into several important aspects of inverse modeling of seawater intrusion problems and effective measurement strategies for estimation of parameters for seawater intrusion. Despite the simplicity of the Henry problem, it embodies the behavior of a typical seawater intrusion situation in a single aquifer. Data collected from the numerical problem solution are employed without added noise in order to focus on the aspects of inverse modeling strategies dictated by the physics of variable-density flow and solute transport during seawater intrusion. Covariances of model parameters that can be estimated are strongly dependent on the physics. The insights gained from this type of analysis may be directly applied to field problems in the presence of data errors, using standard inverse modeling approaches to deal with uncertainty in data. Covariance analysis of the Henry problem indicates that in order to generally reduce variance of parameter estimates, the ideal places to measure pressure are as far away from the coast as possible, at any depth, and the ideal places to measure concentration are near the bottom of the aquifer between the center of the transition zone and its inland fringe. These observations are located in and near high-sensitivity regions of system parameters, which may be identified in a sensitivity analysis with respect to several parameters. However, both the form of error distribution in the observations and the observation weights impact the spatial sensitivity distributions, and different choices for error distributions or weights can result in significantly different regions of high sensitivity. Thus, in order to design effective sampling networks, the error form and weights must be carefully considered. For the Henry problem, permeability and freshwater inflow can be estimated with low estimation variance from only pressure or only

  6. The flavivirus capsid protein: Structure, function and perspectives towards drug design.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Edson R A; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo; de Alencastro, Ricardo B; Horta, Bruno A C

    2017-01-02

    Flaviviruses, such as dengue and zika viruses, are etiologic agents transmitted to humans mainly by arthropods and are of great epidemiological interest. The flavivirus capsid protein is a structural element required for the viral nucleocapsid assembly that presents the classical function of sheltering the viral genome. After decades of research, many reports have shown its different functionalities and influence over cell normal functioning. The subcellular distribution of this protein, which involves accumulation around lipid droplets and nuclear localization, also corroborates with its multi-functional characteristic. As flavivirus diseases are still in need of global control and in view of the possible key functionalities that the capsid protein promotes over flavivirus biology, novel considerations arise towards anti-flavivirus drug research. This review covers the main aspects concerning structural and functional features of the flavivirus C protein, ultimately, highlighting prospects in drug discovery based on this viral target.

  7. Efficacy and Mode of Action of Immune Response Modifying Compounds against Alphaviruses and Flaviviruses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    UTJC RE F mnpv Lfl AD _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 0 N Efficacy and Node of A-tion of Imune Response Modifying Compounds Against Alphaviruses and Flaviviruses...Against Alphaviruses and Flaviviruses 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Page S. Morahan, Margo Brinton, Angelo J. Pinto 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14...prophylactic and/or therapeutic treatment with immunomodulators alone and in combination with antiviral drugs against alphavirus , flavivirus, bunyavirus and

  8. Discovery of flavivirus-derived endogenous viral elements in Anopheles mosquito genomes supports the existence of Anopheles-associated insect-specific flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Lequime, Sebastian; Lambrechts, Louis

    2017-01-01

    The Flavivirus genus encompasses several arboviruses of public health significance such as dengue, yellow fever, and Zika viruses. It also includes insect-specific flaviviruses (ISFs) that are only capable of infecting insect hosts. The vast majority of mosquito-infecting flaviviruses have been associated with mosquito species of the Aedes and Culex genera in the Culicinae subfamily, which also includes most arbovirus vectors. Mosquitoes of the Anophelinae subfamily are not considered significant arbovirus vectors; however, flaviviruses have occasionally been detected in field-caught Anopheles specimens. Whether such observations reflect occasional spillover or laboratory contamination or whether Anopheles mosquitoes are natural hosts of flaviviruses is unknown. Here, we provide in silico and in vivo evidence of transcriptionally active, flavivirus-derived endogenous viral elements (EVEs) in the genome of Anopheles minimus and Anopheles sinensis. Such non-retroviral endogenization of RNA viruses is consistent with a shared evolutionary history between flaviviruses and Anopheles mosquitoes. Phylogenetic analyses of the two newly described EVEs support the existence of a distinct clade of Anopheles-associated ISFs.

  9. Discovery of flavivirus-derived endogenous viral elements in Anopheles mosquito genomes supports the existence of Anopheles-associated insect-specific flaviviruses

    PubMed Central

    Lequime, Sebastian; Lambrechts, Louis

    2017-01-01

    The Flavivirus genus encompasses several arboviruses of public health significance such as dengue, yellow fever, and Zika viruses. It also includes insect-specific flaviviruses (ISFs) that are only capable of infecting insect hosts. The vast majority of mosquito-infecting flaviviruses have been associated with mosquito species of the Aedes and Culex genera in the Culicinae subfamily, which also includes most arbovirus vectors. Mosquitoes of the Anophelinae subfamily are not considered significant arbovirus vectors; however, flaviviruses have occasionally been detected in field-caught Anopheles specimens. Whether such observations reflect occasional spillover or laboratory contamination or whether Anopheles mosquitoes are natural hosts of flaviviruses is unknown. Here, we provide in silico and in vivo evidence of transcriptionally active, flavivirus-derived endogenous viral elements (EVEs) in the genome of Anopheles minimus and Anopheles sinensis. Such non-retroviral endogenization of RNA viruses is consistent with a shared evolutionary history between flaviviruses and Anopheles mosquitoes. Phylogenetic analyses of the two newly described EVEs support the existence of a distinct clade of Anopheles-associated ISFs. PMID:28078104

  10. Rapid Identification of Vector-Borne Flaviviruses by Mass Spectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    from a known titer and tested in replicates of 10. All six mosquito-borne primer sets (VIR2215, VIR2217, VIR2211, VIR2216, VIR1026, VIR1028) had 100...Flavivirus RT-PCR primer pairs. From a known West Nile virus (WNV) titer, the RNA was serially diluted ten-fold. Ten replicates were performed to...219e228 225 Author’s personal copy alphaviruses (assuming that 30 genome equivalents is approxi- mately equal to 3 PFU) [10]. One benefit of the pan

  11. Rapid Identification of Vector-Borne Flaviviruses by Mass Spectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    replicates of 10. All six mosquito-borne primer sets (VIR2215, VIR2217, VIR2211, VIR2216, VIR1026, VIR1028) had 100% sensitivity (10/10 reactions were...borne Flavivirus RT-PCR primer pairs. From a known West Nile virus (WNV) titer, the RNA was serially diluted ten-fold. Ten replicates were performed...mass spectrometry, Molecular and Cellular Probes (2010), doi:10.1016/j.mcp.2010.04.003 alphaviruses (assuming that 30 genome equivalents is approxi

  12. The quantum Allan variance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabuda, Krzysztof; Leroux, Ian D.; Demkowicz-Dobrzański, Rafał

    2016-08-01

    The instability of an atomic clock is characterized by the Allan variance, a measure widely used to describe the noise of frequency standards. We provide an explicit method to find the ultimate bound on the Allan variance of an atomic clock in the most general scenario where N atoms are prepared in an arbitrarily entangled state and arbitrary measurement and feedback are allowed, including those exploiting coherences between succeeding interrogation steps. While the method is rigorous and general, it becomes numerically challenging for large N and long averaging times.

  13. Characterization of a novel insect-specific flavivirus from Brazil: potential for inhibition of infection of arthropod cells with medically important flaviviruses

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Joan L.; Solberg, Owen D.; Langevin, Stanley A.; Brault, Aaron C.

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade there has been an upsurge in the number of newly described insect-specific flaviviruses isolated pan-globally. We recently described the isolation of a novel flavivirus (tentatively designated “Nhumirim virus”; NHUV) (Pauvolid-Correa et al., in review) that represents an example of a unique subset of apparently insect-specific viruses that phylogenetically affiliate with dual-host mosquito-borne flaviviruses despite appearing to be limited to replication in mosquito cells. We characterized the in vitro growth potential, 3’ untranslated region (UTR) sequence homology with alternative flaviviruses, and evaluated the virus’s capacity to suppress replication of representative Culex spp. vectored pathogenic flaviviruses in mosquito cells. Only mosquito cell lines were found to support NHUV replication, further reinforcing the insect-specific phenotype of this virus. Analysis of the sequence and predicted RNA secondary structures of the 3’ UTR indicate NHUV to be most similar to viruses within the yellow fever serogroup, Japanese encephalitis serogroup, and viruses in the tick-borne flavivirus clade. NHUV was found to share the fewest conserved sequence elements when compared to traditional insect-specific flaviviruses. This suggests that, despite being apparently insect-specific, this virus likely diverged from an ancestral mosquito-borne flavivirus. Co-infection experiments indicated that prior or concurrent infection of mosquito cells with NHUV resulted in significant reduction in viral production of West Nile virus (WNV), St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) and Japanese encephalitis virus. The inhibitory effect was most effective against WNV and SLEV with over a million-fold and 10,000-fold reduction in peak titers, respectively. PMID:25146007

  14. Characterization of a novel insect-specific flavivirus from Brazil: Potential for inhibition of infection of arthropod cells with medically important flaviviruses.

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, Joan L.; Solberg, Owen D.; Langevin, Stanley A.; Brault, Aaron C.

    2014-01-12

    In the past decade, there has been an upsurge in the number of newly described insect-specific flaviviruses isolated pan-globally. We recently described the isolation of a novel flavivirus (tentatively designated ‘Nhumirim virus’; NHUV) that represents an example of a unique subset of apparently insect-specific viruses that phylogenetically affiliate with dual-host mosquito-borne flaviviruses despite appearing to be limited to replication in mosquito cells. We characterized the in vitro growth potential and 3' untranslated region (UTR) sequence homology with alternative flaviviruses, and evaluated the virus’s capacity to suppress replication of representative Culex spp.-vectored pathogenic flaviviruses in mosquito cells. Only mosquito cell lines were found to support NHUV replication, further reinforcing the insect-specific phenotype of this virus. Analysis of the sequence and predicted RNA secondary structures of the 3' UTR indicated NHUV to be most similar to viruses within the yellow fever serogroup and Japanese encephalitis serogroup, and viruses in the tick-borne flavivirus clade. NHUV was found to share the fewest conserved sequence elements when compared with traditional insect-specific flaviviruses. This suggests that, despite apparently being insect specific, this virus probably diverged from an ancestral mosquito-borne flavivirus. Co-infection experiments indicated that prior or concurrent infection of mosquito cells with NHUV resulted in a significant reduction in virus production of West Nile virus (WNV), St Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) and Japanese encephalitis virus. As a result, the inhibitory effect was most effective against WNV and SLEV with over a 106-fold and 104-fold reduction in peak titres, respectively.

  15. Characterization of a novel insect-specific flavivirus from Brazil: Potential for inhibition of infection of arthropod cells with medically important flaviviruses.

    DOE PAGES

    Kenney, Joan L.; Solberg, Owen D.; Langevin, Stanley A.; ...

    2014-01-12

    In the past decade, there has been an upsurge in the number of newly described insect-specific flaviviruses isolated pan-globally. We recently described the isolation of a novel flavivirus (tentatively designated ‘Nhumirim virus’; NHUV) that represents an example of a unique subset of apparently insect-specific viruses that phylogenetically affiliate with dual-host mosquito-borne flaviviruses despite appearing to be limited to replication in mosquito cells. We characterized the in vitro growth potential and 3' untranslated region (UTR) sequence homology with alternative flaviviruses, and evaluated the virus’s capacity to suppress replication of representative Culex spp.-vectored pathogenic flaviviruses in mosquito cells. Only mosquito cell linesmore » were found to support NHUV replication, further reinforcing the insect-specific phenotype of this virus. Analysis of the sequence and predicted RNA secondary structures of the 3' UTR indicated NHUV to be most similar to viruses within the yellow fever serogroup and Japanese encephalitis serogroup, and viruses in the tick-borne flavivirus clade. NHUV was found to share the fewest conserved sequence elements when compared with traditional insect-specific flaviviruses. This suggests that, despite apparently being insect specific, this virus probably diverged from an ancestral mosquito-borne flavivirus. Co-infection experiments indicated that prior or concurrent infection of mosquito cells with NHUV resulted in a significant reduction in virus production of West Nile virus (WNV), St Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) and Japanese encephalitis virus. As a result, the inhibitory effect was most effective against WNV and SLEV with over a 106-fold and 104-fold reduction in peak titres, respectively.« less

  16. Serologic Evidence of Flavivirus Infections in Peridomestic Rodents in Merida, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cigarroa-Toledo, Nohemi; Talavera-Aguilar, Lourdes G; Baak-Baak, Carlos M; García-Rejón, Julián E; Hernandez-Betancourt, Silvia; Blitvich, Bradley J; Machain-Williams, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    We conducted surveillance for flavivirus infection in peridomestic rodents in Merida, Mexico in 2011-12. We captured 161 rodents inside private residences, using Sherman traps, including 86 house mice (Mus musculus) and 75 black rats (Rattus rattus). Serum from each animal was assayed by plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) using two vertebrate-specific flaviviruses (Apoi and Modoc viruses) and five mosquito-borne flaviviruses (dengue 2, dengue 4, St. Louis encephalitis virus, West Nile, and yellow fever viruses). Sixty-one (37.9%) rodents had antibodies that neutralized at least one virus. Prevalences for flaviviruses were 64.0% and 15.1% for black rats and house mice, respectively. None of the PRNT90 titers exceeded 80, and often they were highest for Modoc virus. These data suggest that a subset of rodents had been infected with Modoc virus or a closely related flavivirus that was not included in the PRNT analysis.

  17. Conversations across Meaning Variance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordero, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Progressive interpretations of scientific theories have long been denounced as naive, because of the inescapability of meaning variance. The charge reportedly applies to recent realist moves that focus on theory-parts rather than whole theories. This paper considers the question of what "theory-parts" of epistemic significance (if any) relevantly…

  18. Detection of Culex flavivirus and Aedes flavivirus nucleotide sequences in mosquitoes from parks in the city of São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Licia Natal; de Paula, Marcia Bicudo; Araújo, Alessandra Bergamo; Gonçalves, Elisabeth Fernandes Bertoletti; Romano, Camila Malta; Natal, Delsio; Malafronte, Rosely dos Santos; Marrelli, Mauro Toledo; Levi, José Eduardo

    2016-05-01

    The dengue viruses are widespread in Brazil and are a major public health concern. Other flaviviruses also cause diseases in humans, although on a smaller scale. The city of São Paulo is in a highly urbanized area with few green spaces apart from its parks, which are used for recreation and where potential vertebrate hosts and mosquito vectors of pathogenic Flavivirus species can be found. Although this scenario can contribute to the transmission of Flavivirus to humans, little is known about the circulation of members of this genus in these areas. In light of this, the present study sought to identify Flavivirus infection in mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) collected in parks in the city of São Paulo. Seven parks in different sectors of the city were selected. Monthly mosquito collections were carried out in each park from March 2011 to February 2012 using aspiration and traps (Shannon and CD C-CO2). Nucleic acids were extracted from the mosquitoes collected and used for reverse-transcriptase and real-time polymerase chain reactions with genus-specific primers targeting a 200-nucleotide region in the Flavivirus NS5 gene. Positive samples were sequenced, and phylogenetic analyses were performed. Culex and Aedes were the most frequent genera of Culicidae collected. Culex flavivirus (CxFV)-related and Aedes flavivirus (AEFV)- related nucleotide sequences were detected in 17 pools of Culex and two pools of Aedes mosquitoes, respectively, among the 818 pools of non-engorged females analyzed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of CxFV and AEFV in the city of São Paulo and Latin America, respectively. Both viruses are insect- specific flaviviruses, a group known to replicate only in mosquito cells and induce a cytopathic effect in some situations. Hence, our data suggests that CxFV and AEFV are present in Culex and Aedes mosquitoes, respectively, in parks in the city of São Paulo. Even though Flavivirus species of medical importance were not

  19. Spectral Ambiguity of Allan Variance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    We study the extent to which knowledge of Allan variance and other finite-difference variances determines the spectrum of a random process. The variance of first differences is known to determine the spectrum. We show that, in general, the Allan variance does not. A complete description of the ambiguity is given.

  20. Characterization of a novel flavivirus isolated from Culex (Melanoconion) ocossa mosquitoes from Iquitos, Peru.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Julio; Cruz, Cristhopher; Guevara, Carolina; Astete, Helvio; Carey, Cristiam; Kochel, Tadeusz J; Morrison, Amy C; Williams, Maya; Halsey, Eric S; Forshey, Brett M

    2013-06-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of a novel flavivirus, isolated from a pool of Culex (Melanoconion) ocossa Dyar and Knab mosquitoes collected in 2009 in an urban area of the Amazon basin city of Iquitos, Peru. Flavivirus infection was detected by indirect immunofluorescent assay of inoculated C6/36 cells using polyclonal flavivirus antibodies (St. Louis encephalitis virus, yellow fever virus and dengue virus type 1) and confirmed by RT-PCR. Based on partial sequencing of the E and NS5 gene regions, the virus isolate was most closely related to the mosquito-borne flaviviruses but divergent from known species, with less than 45 and 71 % pairwise amino acid identity in the E and NS5 gene products, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of E and NS5 amino acid sequences demonstrated that this flavivirus grouped with mosquito-borne flaviviruses, forming a clade with Nounané virus (NOUV). Like NOUV, no replication was detected in a variety of mammalian cells (Vero-76, Vero-E6, BHK, LLCMK, MDCK, A549 and RD) or in intracerebrally inoculated newborn mice. We tentatively designate this genetically distinct flavivirus as representing a novel species, Nanay virus, after the river near where it was first detected.

  1. New Insights into Flavivirus Evolution, Taxonomy and Biogeographic History, Extended by Analysis of Canonical and Alternative Coding Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Moureau, Gregory; Cook, Shelley; Lemey, Philippe; Nougairede, Antoine; Forrester, Naomi L.; Khasnatinov, Maxim; Charrel, Remi N.; Firth, Andrew E.; Gould, Ernest A.; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    To generate the most diverse phylogenetic dataset for the flaviviruses to date, we determined the genomic sequences and phylogenetic relationships of 14 flaviviruses, of which 10 are primarily associated with Culex spp. mosquitoes. We analyze these data, in conjunction with a comprehensive collection of flavivirus genomes, to characterize flavivirus evolutionary and biogeographic history in unprecedented detail and breadth. Based on the presumed introduction of yellow fever virus into the Americas via the transatlantic slave trade, we extrapolated a timescale for a relevant subset of flaviviruses whose evolutionary history, shows that different Culex-spp. associated flaviviruses have been introduced from the Old World to the New World on at least five separate occasions, with 2 different sets of factors likely to have contributed to the dispersal of the different viruses. We also discuss the significance of programmed ribosomal frameshifting in a central region of the polyprotein open reading frame in some mosquito-associated flaviviruses. PMID:25719412

  2. New insights into flavivirus evolution, taxonomy and biogeographic history, extended by analysis of canonical and alternative coding sequences.

    PubMed

    Moureau, Gregory; Cook, Shelley; Lemey, Philippe; Nougairede, Antoine; Forrester, Naomi L; Khasnatinov, Maxim; Charrel, Remi N; Firth, Andrew E; Gould, Ernest A; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    To generate the most diverse phylogenetic dataset for the flaviviruses to date, we determined the genomic sequences and phylogenetic relationships of 14 flaviviruses, of which 10 are primarily associated with Culex spp. mosquitoes. We analyze these data, in conjunction with a comprehensive collection of flavivirus genomes, to characterize flavivirus evolutionary and biogeographic history in unprecedented detail and breadth. Based on the presumed introduction of yellow fever virus into the Americas via the transatlantic slave trade, we extrapolated a timescale for a relevant subset of flaviviruses whose evolutionary history, shows that different Culex-spp. associated flaviviruses have been introduced from the Old World to the New World on at least five separate occasions, with 2 different sets of factors likely to have contributed to the dispersal of the different viruses. We also discuss the significance of programmed ribosomal frameshifting in a central region of the polyprotein open reading frame in some mosquito-associated flaviviruses.

  3. Nominal analysis of "variance".

    PubMed

    Weiss, David J

    2009-08-01

    Nominal responses are the natural way for people to report actions or opinions. Because nominal responses do not generate numerical data, they have been underutilized in behavioral research. On those occasions in which nominal responses are elicited, the responses are customarily aggregated over people or trials so that large-sample statistics can be employed. A new analysis is proposed that directly associates differences among responses with particular sources in factorial designs. A pair of nominal responses either matches or does not; when responses do not match, they vary. That analogue to variance is incorporated in the nominal analysis of "variance" (NANOVA) procedure, wherein the proportions of matches associated with sources play the same role as do sums of squares in an ANOVA. The NANOVA table is structured like an ANOVA table. The significance levels of the N ratios formed by comparing proportions are determined by resampling. Fictitious behavioral examples featuring independent groups and repeated measures designs are presented. A Windows program for the analysis is available.

  4. Identification and Characterization of Novel Broad-Spectrum Inhibitors of the Flavivirus Methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Brecher, Matthew; Chen, Hui; Li, Zhong; Banavali, Nilesh K.; Jones, Susan A.; Zhang, Jing; Kramer, Laura D.; Li, Hongmin

    2015-01-01

    Flavivirus methyltransferase (MTase) is essential for viral replication. Here we report the identification of small molecules through virtual screening that putatively bind to the SAM-binding site of flavivirus MTase and inhibit its function. Six of these computationally predicted binders were identified to show significant MTase inhibition with low micromolar inhibitory activity. The most active compounds showed broad-spectrum activity against the MTase proteins of other flaviviruses. Two of these compounds also showed low cytotoxicity and high antiviral efficacy in cell-based assays. Competitive binding analyses indicated that the inhibitors performed their inhibitory function through competitive binding to the SAM cofactor binding site of the MTase. The crystal structure of the MTase–inhibitor complex further supports the mode of action and provides routes for their further optimization as flavivirus MTase inhibitors. PMID:26726314

  5. Deployable Pan-Flavivirus and Pan-alphavirus Assays for Screening Pools of Medically Relevant Arthropod

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-C-0046 “Deployable Pan-flavivirus and Pan- alphavirus Assays 5b. GRANT NUMBER for Screening Pools of...hybridization, detection and data analysis. We used our bioinformatic system called Genotyper to create an updated pan-flavivirus and pan- alphavirus ... alphaviruses , with near single copy detection in a single reaction/detection assay. The detection device itself is hand-held and requires only a USB

  6. Detection of Flaviviruses and Orthobunyaviruses in Mosquitoes in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico in 2008

    PubMed Central

    Farfan-Ale, Jose A.; Loroño-Pino, Maria A.; Garcia-Rejon, Julian E.; Soto, Victor; Lin, Ming; Staley, Molly; Dorman, Karin S.; Bartholomay, Lyric C.; Hovav, Einat

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A total of 191,244 mosquitoes from 24 species were collected in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico from January to December 2008, and tested for the presence of cytopathic virus by virus isolation in Vero cells. Eighteen virus isolates were obtained, all of which were orthobunyaviruses. These were identified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and nucleotide sequencing as Cache Valley virus (n = 17) and South River virus (n = 1). A subset (n = 20,124) of Culex quinquefasciatus collected throughout the year was further tested by RT-PCR using flavivirus-specific primers. Flavivirus RNA was present in this mosquito species year-round. The overall flavivirus minimal infection rate, expressed as the number of positive mosquito pools per 1000 mosquitoes tested, was 7.7 and the monthly flavivirus minimal infection rates ranged from 4.3 to 16.6. Approximately one-third of the RT-PCR products were sequenced and all corresponded to Culex flavivirus, a recently discovered insect-specific flavivirus. PMID:20370430

  7. Serological evidence for the circulation of flaviviruses in seabird populations of the western Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, A; Lecollinet, S; Beck, C; Bastien, M; Le Corre, M; Dellagi, K; Pascalis, H; Boulinier, T; Lebarbenchon, C

    2016-02-01

    Birds play a central role in the epidemiology of several flaviviruses of concern for public and veterinary health. Seabirds represent the most abundant and widespread avifauna in the western Indian Ocean and may play an important role as host reservoirs and spreaders of arthropod-borne pathogens such as flaviviruses. We report the results of a serological investigation based on blood samples collected from nine seabird species from seven islands in the Indian Ocean. Using a commercial competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay directed against the prototypic West Nile flavivirus, antibodies against flaviviruses were detected in the serum of 47 of the 855 seabirds tested. They were detected in bird samples from three islands and from four bird species. Seroneutralization tests on adults and chicks suggested that great frigatebirds (Fregata minor) from Europa were infected by West Nile virus during their non-breeding period, and that Usutu virus probably circulated within bird colonies on Tromelin and on Juan de Nova. Real-time polymerase chain reactions performed on bird blood samples did not yield positive results precluding the genetic characterization of flavivirus using RNA sequencing. Our findings stress the need to further investigate flavivirus infections in arthropod vectors present in seabird colonies.

  8. Antibody Responses to Zika Virus Infections in Environments of Flavivirus Endemicity.

    PubMed

    Keasey, Sarah L; Pugh, Christine L; Jensen, Stig M R; Smith, Jessica L; Hontz, Robert D; Durbin, Anna P; Dudley, Dawn M; O'Connor, David H; Ulrich, Robert G

    2017-04-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infections occur in areas where dengue virus (DENV), West Nile virus (WNV), yellow fever virus (YFV), and other viruses of the genus Flavivirus cocirculate. The envelope (E) proteins of these closely related flaviviruses induce specific long-term immunity, yet subsequent infections are associated with cross-reactive antibody responses that may enhance disease susceptibility and severity. To gain a better understanding of ZIKV infections against a background of similar viral diseases, we examined serological immune responses to ZIKV, WNV, DENV, and YFV infections of humans and nonhuman primates (NHPs). Using printed microarrays, we detected very specific antibody responses to primary infections with probes of recombinant E proteins from 15 species and lineages of flaviviruses pathogenic to humans, while high cross-reactivity between ZIKV and DENV was observed with 11 printed native viruses. Notably, antibodies from human primary ZIKV or secondary DENV infections that occurred in areas where flavivirus is endemic broadly recognized E proteins from many flaviviruses, especially DENV, indicating a strong influence of infection history on immune responses. A predictive algorithm was used to tentatively identify previous encounters with specific flaviviruses based on serum antibody interactions with the multispecies panel of E proteins. These results illustrate the potential impact of exposure to related viruses on the outcome of ZIKV infection and offer considerations for development of vaccines and diagnostics.

  9. Serologic Evidence of Flavivirus Infection in Bats in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Machain-Williams, Carlos; López-Uribe, Mildred; Talavera-Aguilar, Lourdes; Carrillo-Navarrete, Jaquelin; Vera-Escalante, Luis; Puerto-Manzano, Fernando; Ulloa, Armando; Farfán-Ale, José Arturo; Garcia-Rejon, Julián; Blitvich, Bradley J.; Loroño-Pino, María Alba

    2013-01-01

    We captured 140 bats of seven species in Merida City in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico in 2010. Serum was collected from each bat and assayed by plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) using six flaviviruses: West Nile virus, St. Louis encephalitis virus, and dengue viruses 1–4. Flavivirus-specific antibodies were detected in 26 bats (19%). The antibody-positive bats belonged to three species: the Pallas's long-tongued bat (Glossophaga soricina), Jamaican fruit bat (Artibeus jamaicensis), and great fruit-eating bat (Artibeus lituratus), and their flavivirus antibody prevalences were 33%, 24%, and 9%, respectively. The PRNT titers were usually highest for dengue virus 2 or dengue virus 4, but none of the titers exceeded 80. These data could indicate that most of the antibody-positive bats had been infected with dengue virus. However, because all titers were low, it is possible that the bats had been infected with another (perhaps unrecognized) flavivirus not included in the PRNT analysis, possibly a virus more closely related to dengue virus than to other flaviviruses. Each serum sample was assayed for flavivirus RNA by reverse transcription PCR, but all were negative. PMID:23778622

  10. Serologic evidence of flavivirus infection in bats in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Machain-Williams, Carlos; López-Uribe, Mildred; Talavera-Aguilar, Lourdes; Carrillo-Navarrete, Jaquelin; Vera-Escalante, Luis; Puerto-Manzano, Fernando; Ulloa, Armando; Farfán-Ale, José Arturo; Garcia-Rejon, Julián; Blitvich, Bradley J; Loroño-Pino, María Alba

    2013-07-01

    We captured 140 bats of seven species in Merida City in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico in 2010. Serum was collected from each bat and assayed by plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) using six flaviviruses: West Nile virus, St. Louis encephalitis virus, and dengue viruses 1-4. Flavivirus-specific antibodies were detected in 26 bats (19%). The antibody-positive bats belonged to three species: the Pallas's long-tongued bat (Glossophaga soricina), Jamaican fruit bat (Artibeus jamaicensis), and great fruit-eating bat (Artibeus lituratus), and their flavivirus antibody prevalences were 33%, 24%, and 9%, respectively. The PRNT titers were usually highest for dengue virus 2 or dengue virus 4, but none of the titers exceeded 80. These data could indicate that most of the antibody-positive bats had been infected with dengue virus. However, because all titers were low, it is possible that the bats had been infected with another (perhaps unrecognized) flavivirus not included in the PRNT analysis, possibly a virus more closely related to dengue virus than to other flaviviruses. Each serum sample was assayed for flavivirus RNA by reverse transcription PCR, but all were negative.

  11. The mysterious Zika virus: Adding to the tropical flavivirus mayhem.

    PubMed

    Mishra, B; Behera, B

    2016-01-01

    Until now, known as the demure cousin of dengue virus (DENV) inhabiting Africa, Zika virus (ZIKV) has reinvented itself to cause explosive epidemics captivating the Western hemisphere. The outbreak causing potential for ZIKV was realized when it made its way from Africa to Yap Island Micronesia in 2007, and in French Polynesia in 2013. From there, it moved on to Brazil in 2015. Now ZIKV has infected people in more than 33 countries in Central and South America and the Caribbean. Moreover the epidemiological and subsequent virological association with microcephaly cases in Brazil has prompted the World Health Organization to declare a public health emergency of International Concern. ZIKV shares not only its vector Aedes aegypti with dengue and chikungunya but also the geographic distribution and clinical features, which makes the laboratory confirmation mandatory for definitive diagnosis. The serological cross-reactivity with other Flavivirus, particularly with DENV makes laboratory confirmation challenging and will place additional burden on health systems to establish molecular diagnostic facilities. The evidence of additional nonvector modes of transmission, such as perinatal, sexual as well as transfusion has made preventative strategies more difficult. As ZIKV disease continues to mystify us with several unanswered questions, it calls for coordinated effort of global scientific community to address the ever growing arboviral threat to mankind.

  12. The mysterious Zika virus: Adding to the tropical flavivirus mayhem.

    PubMed

    Mishra, B; Behera, B

    2016-09-21

    Until now, known as the demure cousin of dengue virus (DENV) inhabiting Africa, Zika virus (ZIKV) has reinvented itself to cause explosive epidemics captivating the Western hemisphere. The outbreak causing potential for ZIKV was realized when it made its way from Africa to Yap Island Micronesia in 2007, and in French Polynesia in 2013. From there, it moved on to Brazil in 2015. Now ZIKV has infected people in more than 33 countries in Central and South America and the Caribbean. Moreover the epidemiological and subsequent virological association with microcephaly cases in Brazil has prompted the World Health Organization to declare a public health emergency of International Concern. ZIKV shares not only its vector Aedes aegypti with dengue and chikungunya but also the geographic distribution and clinical features, which makes the laboratory confirmation mandatory for definitive diagnosis. The serological cross-reactivity with other Flavivirus, particularly with DENV makes laboratory confirmation challenging and will place additional burden on health systems to establish molecular diagnostic facilities. The evidence of additional nonvector modes of transmission, such as perinatal, sexual as well as transfusion has made preventative strategies more difficult. As ZIKV disease continues to mystify us with several unanswered questions, it calls for coordinated effort of global scientific community to address the ever growing arboviral threat to mankind.

  13. The Golgi associated ERI3 is a Flavivirus host factor

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Alex Michael; Calvert, Meredith E. K.; Read, Leah R.; Kang, Seokyoung; Levitt, Brandt E.; Dimopoulos, George; Bradrick, Shelton S.; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A.

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-borne Flavivirus classified into four serotypes (DENV-1-4) that causes Dengue fever (DF), Dengue hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) or Dengue shock syndrome (DSS). An estimated 390 million people are at risk for infection with DENV and there are no effective vaccines or therapeutics. We utilized RNA chromatography coupled with quantitative mass spectrometry (qMS) to identify host RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that interact with DENV-2 RNA. We identified ERI3 (also PRNPIP and PINT1), a putative 3′–5′ RNA exonuclease, which preferentially associates with DENV-2 genomic RNA via interactions with dumbbell structures in the 3′ UTR. ERI3 is required for accumulation of DENV-2 genomic RNA and production of infectious particles. Furthermore, the mosquito homologue of ERI3 is required for DENV-2 replication in adult Aedes aegypti mosquitos implying that the requirement for ERI3 is conserved in both DENV hosts. In human cells ERI3 localizes to the Golgi in uninfected cells, but relocalizes near sites of DENV-2 replication in infected cells. ERI3 is not required for maintaining DENV-2 RNA stability or translation of the viral polyprotein, but is required for viral RNA synthesis. Our results define a specific role for ERI3 and highlight the importance of Golgi proteins in DENV-2 replication. PMID:27682269

  14. Assessing ubiquitination of viral proteins: lessons from flavivirus NS5

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, R. Travis; Best, Sonja M.

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub) conjugation to a substrate protein is a widely used cellular mechanism for control of protein stability and function, modulation of signal transduction pathways and antiviral responses. Identification and characterization of ubiquitinated viral proteins is an important step in understanding novel mechanisms of viral protein regulation as well as elucidating cellular antiviral strategies. Here we describe a protocol to easily detect and characterize the ubiquitination status of a viral substrate protein expressed either during infection or ectopically expressed as a fusion with a biotinylatable epitope tag. This tag provides advantages over current immunoprecipitation techniques by making use of the extremely tight biotin-streptavidin interaction. We provide an example of this protocol using the nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) from Langat virus (LGTV), a member of the tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) serocomplex within the Flavivirus genus. Using the protocols outlined here, we describe some of the pitfalls inherent in determination of Ub linkage and demonstrate that NS5 is modified by at least two distinct ubiquitination types, multiubiquitination and K48-linked polyubiquitin chains. PMID:21855635

  15. Stability of a Tick-Borne Flavivirus in Milk.

    PubMed

    Offerdahl, Danielle K; Clancy, Niall G; Bloom, Marshall E

    2016-01-01

    The tick-borne flaviviruses (TBFV) occur worldwide and the tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) members of the group often cause severe, debilitating neurological disease in humans. Although the primary route of infection is through the bite of an infected tick, alimentary infection through the consumption of TBEV-contaminated dairy products is also well-documented and is responsible for some disease in endemic areas. Experimental infection of goats, cattle, and sheep with TBEV shows that the virus can be excreted in the milk of infected animals. Additionally, the virus remains infectious after exposure to low pH levels, similar to those found in the stomach. To evaluate the survival of virus in milk, we studied the stability of the BSL-2 TBFV, Langat virus, in unpasteurized goat milk over time and after different thermal treatments. Virus was stable in milk maintained under refrigeration conditions; however, there was a marked reduction in virus titer after incubation at room temperature. High temperature, short time pasteurization protocols completely inactivated the virus. Interestingly, simulation of a typical thermal regime utilized for cheese did not completely inactivate the virus in milk. These findings stress the importance of proper milk handling and pasteurization processes in areas endemic for TBEV.

  16. The mysterious Zika virus: Adding to the tropical flavivirus mayhem

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, B; Behera, B

    2016-01-01

    Until now, known as the demure cousin of dengue virus (DENV) inhabiting Africa, Zika virus (ZIKV) has reinvented itself to cause explosive epidemics captivating the Western hemisphere. The outbreak causing potential for ZIKV was realized when it made its way from Africa to Yap Island Micronesia in 2007, and in French Polynesia in 2013. From there, it moved on to Brazil in 2015. Now ZIKV has infected people in more than 33 countries in Central and South America and the Caribbean. Moreover the epidemiological and subsequent virological association with microcephaly cases in Brazil has prompted the World Health Organization to declare a public health emergency of International Concern. ZIKV shares not only its vector Aedes aegypti with dengue and chikungunya but also the geographic distribution and clinical features, which makes the laboratory confirmation mandatory for definitive diagnosis. The serological cross-reactivity with other Flavivirus, particularly with DENV makes laboratory confirmation challenging and will place additional burden on health systems to establish molecular diagnostic facilities. The evidence of additional nonvector modes of transmission, such as perinatal, sexual as well as transfusion has made preventative strategies more difficult. As ZIKV disease continues to mystify us with several unanswered questions, it calls for coordinated effort of global scientific community to address the ever growing arboviral threat to mankind. PMID:27763483

  17. Development of a novel protocol for generating flavivirus reporter particles.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Igor Velado; Okamoto, Natsumi; Ito, Aki; Fukuda, Miki; Someya, Azusa; Nishino, Yosii; Sasaki, Nobuya; Maeda, Akihiko

    2014-11-01

    Infection with West Nile virus (WNV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, is a growing public and animal health concern worldwide. Prevention, diagnosis and treatment strategies for the infection are urgently required. Recently, viral reverse genetic systems have been developed and applied to clinical WNV virology. We developed a protocol for generating reporter virus particles (RVPs) of WNV with the aim of overcoming two major problems associated with conventional protocols, the difficulty in generating RVPs due to the specific skills required for handling RNAs, and the potential for environmental contamination by antibiotic-resistant genes encoded within the genome RNA of the RVPs. By using the proposed protocol, cells were established in which the RVP genome RNA is replicated constitutively and does not encode any antibiotic-resistant genes, and used as the cell supply for RVP genome RNA. Generation of the WNV RVPs requires only the simple transfection of the expression vectors for the viral structural proteins into the cells. Therefore, no RNA handling is required in this protocol. The WNV RVP yield obtained using this protocol was similar that obtained using the conventional protocol. According to these results, the newly developed protocol appears to be a good alternative for the generation of WNV RVPs, particularly for clinical applications.

  18. Assessing ubiquitination of viral proteins: Lessons from flavivirus NS5.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R Travis; Best, Sonja M

    2011-10-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub) conjugation to a substrate protein is a widely used cellular mechanism for control of protein stability and function, modulation of signal transduction pathways and antiviral responses. Identification and characterization of ubiquitinated viral proteins is an important step in understanding novel mechanisms of viral protein regulation as well as elucidating cellular antiviral strategies. Here we describe a protocol to easily detect and characterize the ubiquitination status of a viral substrate protein expressed either during infection or ectopically expressed as a fusion with a biotinylatable epitope tag. This tag provides advantages over current immunoprecipitation techniques by making use of the extremely tight biotin-streptavidin interaction. We provide an example of this protocol using the nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) from Langat virus (LGTV), a member of the tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) serocomplex within the Flavivirus genus. Using the protocols outlined here, we describe some of the pitfalls inherent in determination of Ub linkage and demonstrate that NS5 is modified by at least two distinct ubiquitination types, multiubiquitination and K48-linked polyubiquitin chains.

  19. Cosmology without cosmic variance

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, Gary M.; Cai, Yan -Chuan

    2011-10-01

    The growth of structures in the Universe is described by a function G that is predicted by the combination of the expansion history of the Universe and the laws of gravity within it. We examine the improvements in constraints on G that are available from the combination of a large-scale galaxy redshift survey with a weak gravitational lensing survey of background sources. We describe a new combination of such observations that in principle this yields a measure of the growth rate that is free of sample variance, i.e. the uncertainty in G can be reduced without bound by increasing the number of redshifts obtained within a finite survey volume. The addition of background weak lensing data to a redshift survey increases information on G by an amount equivalent to a 10-fold increase in the volume of a standard redshift-space distortion measurement - if the lensing signal can be measured to sub-per cent accuracy. This argues that a combined lensing and redshift survey over a common low-redshift volume of the Universe is a more powerful test of general relativity than an isolated redshift survey over larger volume at high redshift, especially as surveys begin to cover most of the available sky.

  20. Cosmology without cosmic variance

    DOE PAGES

    Bernstein, Gary M.; Cai, Yan -Chuan

    2011-10-01

    The growth of structures in the Universe is described by a function G that is predicted by the combination of the expansion history of the Universe and the laws of gravity within it. We examine the improvements in constraints on G that are available from the combination of a large-scale galaxy redshift survey with a weak gravitational lensing survey of background sources. We describe a new combination of such observations that in principle this yields a measure of the growth rate that is free of sample variance, i.e. the uncertainty in G can be reduced without bound by increasing themore » number of redshifts obtained within a finite survey volume. The addition of background weak lensing data to a redshift survey increases information on G by an amount equivalent to a 10-fold increase in the volume of a standard redshift-space distortion measurement - if the lensing signal can be measured to sub-per cent accuracy. This argues that a combined lensing and redshift survey over a common low-redshift volume of the Universe is a more powerful test of general relativity than an isolated redshift survey over larger volume at high redshift, especially as surveys begin to cover most of the available sky.« less

  1. Extrinsic MAVS signaling is critical for Treg maintenance of Foxp3 expression following acute flavivirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Da Costa, Andreia; Garza, Esteban; Graham, Jessica B.; Swarts, Jessica L.; Soerens, Andrew G.; Gale, Michael; Lund, Jennifer M.

    2017-01-01

    Given the rapid spread of flaviviruses such as West Nile virus (WNV) and Zika virus, it is critical that we develop a complete understanding of the key mediators of an effective anti-viral response. We previously demonstrated that WNV infection of mice deficient in mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS), the signaling adaptor for RNA helicases such as RIG-I, resulted in increased death and dysregulated immunity, which correlated with a failure of Treg expansion following infection. Thus, we sought to determine if intrinsic MAVS signaling is required for participation of Tregs in anti-WNV immunity. Despite evidence of increased Treg cell division, Foxp3 expression was not stably maintained after WNV infection in MAVS-deficient mice. However, intrinsic MAVS signaling was dispensable for Treg proliferation and suppressive capacity. Further, we observed generation of an effective anti-WNV immune response when Tregs lacked MAVS, thereby demonstrating that Treg detection of the presence of WNV through the MAVS signaling pathway is not required for generation of effective immunity. Together, these data suggest that while MAVS signaling has a considerable impact on Treg identity, this effect is not mediated by intrinsic MAVS signaling but rather is likely an effect of the overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines generated in MAVS-deficient mice after WNV infection. PMID:28094802

  2. Extrinsic MAVS signaling is critical for Treg maintenance of Foxp3 expression following acute flavivirus infection.

    PubMed

    Da Costa, Andreia; Garza, Esteban; Graham, Jessica B; Swarts, Jessica L; Soerens, Andrew G; Gale, Michael; Lund, Jennifer M

    2017-01-17

    Given the rapid spread of flaviviruses such as West Nile virus (WNV) and Zika virus, it is critical that we develop a complete understanding of the key mediators of an effective anti-viral response. We previously demonstrated that WNV infection of mice deficient in mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS), the signaling adaptor for RNA helicases such as RIG-I, resulted in increased death and dysregulated immunity, which correlated with a failure of Treg expansion following infection. Thus, we sought to determine if intrinsic MAVS signaling is required for participation of Tregs in anti-WNV immunity. Despite evidence of increased Treg cell division, Foxp3 expression was not stably maintained after WNV infection in MAVS-deficient mice. However, intrinsic MAVS signaling was dispensable for Treg proliferation and suppressive capacity. Further, we observed generation of an effective anti-WNV immune response when Tregs lacked MAVS, thereby demonstrating that Treg detection of the presence of WNV through the MAVS signaling pathway is not required for generation of effective immunity. Together, these data suggest that while MAVS signaling has a considerable impact on Treg identity, this effect is not mediated by intrinsic MAVS signaling but rather is likely an effect of the overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines generated in MAVS-deficient mice after WNV infection.

  3. Variance Decomposition Using an IRT Measurement Model

    PubMed Central

    Glas, Cees A. W.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2007-01-01

    Large scale research projects in behaviour genetics and genetic epidemiology are often based on questionnaire or interview data. Typically, a number of items is presented to a number of subjects, the subjects’ sum scores on the items are computed, and the variance of sum scores is decomposed into a number of variance components. This paper discusses several disadvantages of the approach of analysing sum scores, such as the attenuation of correlations amongst sum scores due to their unreliability. It is shown that the framework of Item Response Theory (IRT) offers a solution to most of these problems. We argue that an IRT approach in combination with Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) estimation provides a flexible and efficient framework for modelling behavioural phenotypes. Next, we use data simulation to illustrate the potentially huge bias in estimating variance components on the basis of sum scores. We then apply the IRT approach with an analysis of attention problems in young adult twins where the variance decomposition model is extended with an IRT measurement model. We show that when estimating an IRT measurement model and a variance decomposition model simultaneously, the estimate for the heritability of attention problems increases from 40% (based on sum scores) to 73%. PMID:17534709

  4. Structures of the Zika Virus Envelope Protein and Its Complex with a Flavivirus Broadly Protective Antibody.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lianpan; Song, Jian; Lu, Xishan; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Musyoki, Abednego Moki; Cheng, Huijun; Zhang, Yanfang; Yuan, Yuan; Song, Hao; Haywood, Joel; Xiao, Haixia; Yan, Jinghua; Shi, Yi; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Qi, Jianxun; Gao, George F

    2016-05-11

    Zika virus (ZIKV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, is a current global public health concern. The flavivirus envelope (E) glycoprotein is responsible for virus entry and represents a major target of neutralizing antibodies for other flaviviruses. Here, we report the structures of ZIKV E protein at 2.0 Å and in complex with a flavivirus broadly neutralizing murine antibody 2A10G6 at 3.0 Å. ZIKV-E resembles all the known flavivirus E structures but contains a unique, positively charged patch adjacent to the fusion loop region of the juxtaposed monomer, which may influence host attachment. The ZIKV-E-2A10G6 complex structure reveals antibody recognition of a highly conserved fusion loop. 2A10G6 binds to ZIKV-E with high affinity in vitro and neutralizes currently circulating ZIKV strains in vitro and in mice. The E protein fusion loop epitope represents a potential candidate for therapeutic antibodies against ZIKV.

  5. Tick-borne flaviviruses: dissecting host immune responses and virus countermeasures.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Shelly J; Mitzel, Dana N; Taylor, R Travis; Best, Sonja M; Bloom, Marshall E

    2009-01-01

    The tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) serocomplex of viruses, genus Flavivirus, includes a number of important human pathogens that cause serious neurological illnesses and hemorrhagic fevers. These viruses pose a significant public health problem due to high rates of morbidity and mortality, their emergence to new geographic areas, and the recent rise in the incidence of human infections. The most notable member of the TBE serocomplex is tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), a neurotropic flavivirus that causes debilitating and sometimes fatal encephalitis. Although effective prophylactic anti-TBEV vaccines have been developed, there is currently no specific treatment for infection. To identify new targets for therapeutical intervention, it is imperative to understand interactions between TBEV and the host immune response to infection. Interferon (IFN) has a critical role in controlling flavivirus replication. Dendritic cells (DCs) represent an early target of TBEV infection and are major producers of IFN. Thus, interactions between DCs, IFN responses, and the virus are likely to substantially influence the outcome of infection. Early IFN and DC responses are modulated not only by the virus, but also by the tick vector and immunomodulatory compounds of tick saliva inoculated with virus into the skin. Our laboratory is examining interactions between the triad of virus, tick vector, and mammalian host that contribute to the pathogenesis of tick-borne flaviviruses. This work will provide a more detailed understanding of early events in virus infection and their impact on flavivirus pathogenesis.

  6. Tick-borne flaviviruses: dissecting host immune responses and virus countermeasures

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Shelly J.; Mitzel, Dana N.; Taylor, R. Travis; Best, Sonja M.

    2009-01-01

    The tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) serocomplex of viruses, genus Flavivirus, includes a number of important human pathogens that cause serious neurological illnesses and hemorrhagic fevers. These viruses pose a significant public health problem due to high rates of morbidity and mortality, their emergence to new geographic areas, and the recent rise in the incidence of human infections. The most notable member of the TBE serocomplex is tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), a neurotropic flavivirus that causes debilitating and sometimes fatal encephalitis. Although effective prophylactic anti-TBEV vaccines have been developed, there is currently no specific treatment for infection. To identify new targets for therapeutical intervention, it is imperative to understand interactions between TBEV and the host immune response to infection. Interferon (IFN) has a critical role in controlling flavivirus replication. Dendritic cells (DCs) represent an early target of TBEV infection and are major producers of IFN. Thus, interactions between DCs, IFN responses, and the virus are likely to substantially influence the outcome of infection. Early IFN and DC responses are modulated not only by the virus, but also by the tick vector and immunomodulatory compounds of tick saliva inoculated with virus into the skin. Our laboratory is examining interactions between the triad of virus, tick vector, and mammalian host that contribute to the pathogenesis of tick-borne flaviviruses. This work will provide a more detailed understanding of early events in virus infection and their impact on flavivirus pathogenesis. PMID:18841330

  7. A CRISPR screen defines a signal peptide processing pathway required by flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Miner, Jonathan J; Gorman, Matthew J; Rausch, Keiko; Ramage, Holly; White, James P; Zuiani, Adam; Zhang, Ping; Fernandez, Estefania; Zhang, Qiang; Dowd, Kimberly A; Pierson, Theodore C; Cherry, Sara; Diamond, Michael S

    2016-07-07

    Flaviviruses infect hundreds of millions of people annually, and no antiviral therapy is available. We performed a genome-wide CRISPR/Cas9-based screen to identify host genes that, when edited, resulted in reduced flavivirus infection. Here, we validated nine human genes required for flavivirus infectivity, and these were associated with endoplasmic reticulum functions including translocation, protein degradation, and N-linked glycosylation. In particular, a subset of endoplasmic reticulum-associated signal peptidase complex (SPCS) proteins was necessary for proper cleavage of the flavivirus structural proteins (prM and E) and secretion of viral particles. Loss of SPCS1 expression resulted in markedly reduced yield of all Flaviviridae family members tested (West Nile, Dengue, Zika, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, and hepatitis C viruses), but had little impact on alphavirus, bunyavirus, or rhabdovirus infection or the surface expression or secretion of diverse host proteins. We found that SPCS1 dependence could be bypassed by replacing the native prM protein leader sequences with a class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigen leader sequence. Thus, SPCS1, either directly or indirectly via its interactions with unknown host proteins, preferentially promotes the processing of specific protein cargo, and Flaviviridae have a unique dependence on this signal peptide processing pathway. SPCS1 and other signal processing pathway members could represent pharmacological targets for inhibiting infection by the expanding number of flaviviruses of medical concern.

  8. A CRISPR screen defines a signal peptide processing pathway required by flaviviruses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rong; Miner, Jonathan J.; Gorman, Matthew J.; Rausch, Keiko; Ramage, Holly; White, James P.; Zuiani, Adam; Zhang, Ping; Fernandez, Estefania; Zhang, Qiang; Dowd, Kimberly A.; Pierson, Theodore C.; Cherry, Sara; Diamond, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Flaviviruses infect hundreds of millions of people annually, with no antiviral therapy available1,2. We performed a genome-wide CRISPR/Cas9-based screen to identify host genes that when edited resulted in reduced flavivirus infection. We validated nine human genes required for flavivirus infectivity, and these were associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) functions including translocation, protein degradation, and N-linked glycosylation. In particular, a subset of ER-associated signal peptidase complex (SPCS) proteins was necessary for the proper cleavage of the flavivirus structural proteins (prM and E) and secretion of viral particles. Loss of SPCS1 expression resulted in markedly reduced yield of all Flaviviridae family members tested (West Nile, Dengue, Zika, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, and hepatitis C viruses), yet had little impact on alphavirus, bunyavirus, or rhabdovirus infection or the surface expression or secretion of diverse host proteins. We found that SPCS1 dependence could be bypassed by replacing the native prM protein leader sequences with a class I MHC antigen leader sequence. Thus, SPCS1, either directly or indirectly via its interactions with unknown host proteins, preferentially promotes the processing of specific protein cargo, and Flaviviridae have a unique dependence on this signal peptide processing pathway. SPCS1 and other signal processing pathway members could represent pharmacological targets for inhibiting infection of the expanding number of flaviviruses of medical concern. PMID:27383988

  9. Sampling Errors of Variance Components.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Piet F.

    A study on sampling errors of variance components was conducted within the framework of generalizability theory by P. L. Smith (1978). The study used an intuitive approach for solving the problem of how to allocate the number of conditions to different facets in order to produce the most stable estimate of the universe score variance. Optimization…

  10. Variances and Covariances of Kendall's Tau and Their Estimation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cliff, Norman; Charlin, Ventura

    1991-01-01

    Variance formulas of H. E. Daniels and M. G. Kendall (1947) are generalized to allow for the presence of ties and variance of the sample tau correlation. Applications of these generalized formulas are discussed and illustrated using data from a 1965 study of contraceptive use in 15 developing countries. (SLD)

  11. Detection of flaviviruses by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction with the universal primer set.

    PubMed

    Meiyu, F; Huosheng, C; Cuihua, C; Xiaodong, T; Lianhua, J; Yifei, P; Weijun, C; Huiyu, G

    1997-01-01

    Using a universal primer set designed to match the sequence of the NS1 gene of flaviviruses, the virus RNA of dengue (DEN), Japanese encephalitis (JEV), powassan and langat of Flaviviridae were successfully amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) via cDNA; and with different internal primers, the serotypes of the dengue viruses were identified. Of the 78 clinically diagnosed dengue fever patients, 18 patients were positive for DEN 1, 48 patients for DEN 2 and 8 patients concurrently infected with DEN 4. Of the 52 patients admitted with Japanese encephalitis (JE), 45 were determined to be JEV infections. By nested PCR, we completed the identification of flaviviruses within 2 days. The results show that seven primers have a potential value for rapid clinical diagnosis of flavivirus infections.

  12. Flaviviruses, an expanding threat in public health: focus on dengue, West Nile, and Japanese encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Daep, Carlo Amorin; Muñoz-Jordán, Jorge L; Eugenin, Eliseo Alberto

    2014-12-01

    The flaviviruses dengue, West Nile, and Japanese encephalitis represent three major mosquito-borne viruses worldwide. These pathogens impact the lives of millions of individuals and potentially could affect non-endemic areas already colonized by mosquito vectors. Unintentional transport of infected vectors (Aedes and Culex spp.), traveling within endemic areas, rapid adaptation of the insects into new geographic locations, climate change, and lack of medical surveillance have greatly contributed to the increase in flaviviral infections worldwide. The mechanisms by which flaviviruses alter the immune and the central nervous system have only recently been examined despite the alarming number of infections, related deaths, and increasing global distribution. In this review, we will discuss the expansion of the geographic areas affected by flaviviruses, the potential threats to previously unaffected countries, the mechanisms of pathogenesis, and the potential therapeutic interventions to limit the devastating consequences of these viruses.

  13. Production and characterization of vaccines based on flaviviruses defective in replication

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Peter W.; Shustov, Alexandr V.; Frolov, Ilya . E-mail: ivfrolov@utmb.edu

    2006-08-01

    To develop new vaccine candidates for flavivirus infections, we have engineered two flaviviruses, yellow fever virus (YFV) and West Nile virus (WNV), that are deficient in replication. These defective pseudoinfectious viruses (PIVs) lack a functional copy of the capsid (C) gene in their genomes and are incapable of causing spreading infection upon infection of cells both in vivo and in vitro. However, they produce extracellular E protein in form of secreted subviral particles (SVPs) that are known to be an effective immunogen. PIVs can be efficiently propagated in trans-complementing cell lines making high levels of C or all three viral structural proteins. PIVs derived from YFV and WNV, demonstrated very high safety and immunization produced high levels of neutralizing antibodies and protective immune response. Such defective flaviviruses can be produced in large scale under low biocontainment conditions and should be useful for diagnostic or vaccine applications.

  14. Flaviviruses, an expanding threat in public health: focus on Dengue, West Nile, and Japanese encephalitis virus

    PubMed Central

    Daep, Carlo Amorin; Muñoz-Jordán, Jorge L.; Eugenin, Eliseo Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The flaviviruses Dengue, West Nile, and Japanese encephalitis represent three major mosquito-borne viruses worldwide. These pathogens impact the lives of millions of individuals and potentially could affect non-endemic areas already colonized by mosquito vectors. Unintentional transport of infected vectors (Aedes and Culex sp), traveling within endemic areas, rapid adaptation of the insects into new geographic locations, climate change, and lack of medical surveillance have greatly contributed to the increase in flaviviral infections worldwide. The mechanisms by which flaviviruses alter the immune and the central nervous system have only recently been examined despite the alarming number of infections, related deaths, and increasing global distribution. In this review, we will discuss the expansion of the geographic areas affected by flaviviruses, the potential threats to previously unaffected countries, the mechanisms of pathogenesis, and the potential therapeutic interventions to limit the devastating consequences of these viruses. PMID:25287260

  15. Genetic characterization of tick-borne flaviviruses: new insights into evolution, pathogenetic determinants and taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Grard, Gilda; Moureau, Grégory; Charrel, Rémi N; Lemasson, Jean-Jacques; Gonzalez, Jean-Paul; Gallian, Pierre; Gritsun, Tamara S; Holmes, Edward C; Gould, Ernest A; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2007-04-25

    Here, we analyze the complete coding sequences of all recognized tick-borne flavivirus species, including Gadgets Gully, Royal Farm and Karshi virus, seabird-associated flaviviruses, Kadam virus and previously uncharacterized isolates of Kyasanur Forest disease virus and Omsk hemorrhagic fever virus. Significant taxonomic improvements are proposed, e.g. the identification of three major groups (mammalian, seabird and Kadam tick-borne flavivirus groups), the creation of a new species (Karshi virus) and the assignment of Tick-borne encephalitis and Louping ill viruses to a unique species (Tick-borne encephalitis virus) including four viral types (i.e. Western Tick-borne encephalitis virus, Eastern Tick-borne encephalitis virus, Turkish sheep Tick-borne encephalitis virus and Louping ill Tick-borne encephalitis virus). The analyses also suggest a complex relationship between viruses infecting birds and those infecting mammals. Ticks that feed on both categories of vertebrates may constitute the evolutionary bridge between the three distinct identified lineages.

  16. Lipids and flaviviruses, present and future perspectives for the control of dengue, Zika, and West Nile viruses.

    PubMed

    Martín-Acebes, Miguel A; Vázquez-Calvo, Ángela; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2016-10-01

    Flaviviruses are emerging arthropod-borne pathogens that cause life-threatening diseases such as yellow fever, dengue, West Nile encephalitis, tick-borne encephalitis, Kyasanur Forest disease, tick-borne encephalitis, or Zika disease. This viral genus groups >50 viral species of small enveloped plus strand RNA virus that are phylogenetically closely related to hepatitis C virus. Importantly, the flavivirus life cycle is intimately associated to host cell lipids. Along this line, flaviviruses rearrange intracellular membranes from the endoplasmic-reticulum of the infected cells to develop adequate platforms for viral replication and particle biogenesis. Moreover, flaviviruses dramatically orchestrate a profound reorganization of the host cell lipid metabolism to create a favorable environment for viral multiplication. Consistently, recent work has shown the importance of specific lipid classes in flavivirus infections. For instances, fatty acid synthesis is linked to viral replication, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine are involved on the entry of flaviviruses, sphingolipids (ceramide and sphingomyelin) play a key role on virus assembly and pathogenesis, and cholesterol is essential for innate immunity evasion in flavivirus-infected cells. Here, we revise the current knowledge on the interactions of the flaviviruses with the cellular lipid metabolism to identify potential targets for future antiviral development aimed to combat these relevant health-threatening pathogens.

  17. Variance and skewness in the FIRST survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magliocchetti, M.; Maddox, S. J.; Lahav, O.; Wall, J. V.

    1998-10-01

    We investigate the large-scale clustering of radio sources in the FIRST 1.4-GHz survey by analysing the distribution function (counts in cells). We select a reliable sample from the the FIRST catalogue, paying particular attention to the problem of how to define single radio sources from the multiple components listed. We also consider the incompleteness of the catalogue. We estimate the angular two-point correlation function w(theta), the variance Psi_2 and skewness Psi_3 of the distribution for the various subsamples chosen on different criteria. Both w(theta) and Psi_2 show power-law behaviour with an amplitude corresponding to a spatial correlation length of r_0~10h^-1Mpc. We detect significant skewness in the distribution, the first such detection in radio surveys. This skewness is found to be related to the variance through Psi_3=S_3(Psi_2)^alpha, with alpha=1.9+/-0.1, consistent with the non-linear gravitational growth of perturbations from primordial Gaussian initial conditions. We show that the amplitude of variance and the skewness are consistent with realistic models of galaxy clustering.

  18. Flavivirus NS1 protein in infected host sera enhances viral acquisition by mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianying; Liu, Yang; Nie, Kaixiao; Du, Senyan; Qiu, Jingjun; Pang, Xiaojing; Wang, Penghua; Cheng, Gong

    2016-01-01

    Summary The arbovirus life cycle involves viral transfer between a vertebrate host and an arthropod vector, and acquisition of virus from an infected mammalian host by a vector is an essential step in this process. Here, we report that flavivirus nonstructural protein-1 (NS1), which is abundantly secreted into the serum of an infected host, plays a critical role in flavivirus acquisition by mosquitoes. The presence of dengue virus (DENV) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) NS1s in the blood of infected interferon alpha and gamma receptor-deficient mice (AG6) facilitated virus acquisition by their native mosquito vectors because the protein enabled the virus to overcome the immune barrier of the mosquito midgut. Active immunization of AG6 mice with a modified DENV NS1 reduced DENV acquisition by mosquitoes and protected mice against a lethal DENV challenge, suggesting that immunization with NS1 could reduce the number of virus-carrying mosquitoes as well as the incidence of flaviviral diseases. Our study demonstrates that flaviviruses utilize NS1 proteins produced during their vertebrate phases to enhance their acquisition by vectors, which might be a result of flavivirus evolution to adapt to multiple host environments. PMID:27562253

  19. The Many Faces of the Flavivirus NS5 Protein in Antagonism of Type I Interferon Signaling.

    PubMed

    Best, Sonja M

    2017-02-01

    The vector-borne flaviviruses cause severe disease in humans on every inhabited continent on earth. Their transmission by arthropods, particularly mosquitoes, facilitates large emergence events such as witnessed with Zika virus (ZIKV) or West Nile virus in the Americas. Every vector-borne flavivirus examined thus far that causes disease in humans, from dengue virus to ZIKV, antagonizes the host type I interferon (IFN-I) response by preventing JAK-STAT signaling, suggesting that suppression of this pathway is an important determinant of infection. The most direct and potent viral inhibitor of this pathway is the nonstructural protein NS5. However, the mechanisms utilized by NS5 from different flaviviruses are often quite different, sometimes despite close evolutionary relationships between viruses. The varied mechanisms of NS5 as an IFN-I antagonist are also surprising given that the evolution of NS5 is restrained by the requirement to maintain function of two enzymatic activities critical for virus replication, the methyltransferase and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. This review discusses the different strategies used by flavivirus NS5 to evade the antiviral effects of IFN-I and how this information can be used to better model disease and develop antiviral countermeasures.

  20. Structure and functionality in flavivirus NS-proteins: Perspectives for drug design

    PubMed Central

    Bollati, Michela; Alvarez, Karin; Assenberg, René; Baronti, Cécile; Canard, Bruno; Cook, Shelley; Coutard, Bruno; Decroly, Etienne; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Gould, Ernest A.; Grard, Gilda; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Hilgenfeld, Rolf; Jansson, Anna M.; Malet, Hélène; Mancini, Erika J.; Mastrangelo, Eloise; Mattevi, Andrea; Milani, Mario; Moureau, Grégory; Neyts, Johan; Owens, Raymond J.; Ren, Jingshan; Selisko, Barbara; Speroni, Silvia; Steuber, Holger; Stuart, David I.; Unge, Torsten; Bolognesi, Martino

    2010-01-01

    Flaviviridae are small enveloped viruses hosting a positive-sense single-stranded RNA genome. Besides yellow fever virus, a landmark case in the history of virology, members of the Flavivirus genus, such as West Nile virus and dengue virus, are increasingly gaining attention due to their re-emergence and incidence in different areas of the world. Additional environmental and demographic considerations suggest that novel or known flaviviruses will continue to emerge in the future. Nevertheless, up to few years ago flaviviruses were considered low interest candidates for drug design. At the start of the European Union VIZIER Project, in 2004, just two crystal structures of protein domains from the flaviviral replication machinery were known. Such pioneering studies, however, indicated the flaviviral replication complex as a promising target for the development of antiviral compounds. Here we review structural and functional aspects emerging from the characterization of two main components (NS3 and NS5 proteins) of the flavivirus replication complex. Most of the reviewed results were achieved within the European Union VIZIER Project, and cover topics that span from viral genomics to structural biology and inhibition mechanisms. The ultimate aim of the reported approaches is to shed light on the design and development of antiviral drug leads. PMID:19945487

  1. Genetic recombination of tick-borne flaviviruses among wild-type strains.

    PubMed

    Norberg, Peter; Roth, Anette; Bergström, Tomas

    2013-06-05

    Genetic recombination has been suggested to occur in mosquito-borne flaviviruses. In contrast, tick-borne flaviviruses have been thought to evolve in a clonal manner, although recent studies suggest that recombination occurs also for these viruses. We re-analyzed the data and found that previous conclusions on wild type recombination were probably falsely drawn due to misalignments of nucleotide sequences, ambiguities in GenBank sequences, or different laboratory culture histories suggestive of recombination events in laboratory. To evaluate if reliable predictions of wild type recombination of tick-borne flaviviruses can be made, we analyzed viral strains sequenced exclusively for this study, and other flavivirus sequences retrieved from GenBank. We detected genetic signals supporting recombination between viruses within the three clades of TBEV-Eu, TBEV-Sib and TBEV-Fe, respectively. Our results suggest that the tick-borne encephalitis viruses may undergo recombination under natural conditions, but that geographic barriers restrict most recombination events to involve only closely genetically related viruses.

  2. Viral RNA switch mediates the dynamic control of flavivirus replicase recruitment by genome cyclization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhong-Yu; Li, Xiao-Feng; Jiang, Tao; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Ye, Qing; Zhao, Hui; Yu, Jiu-Yang; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Viral replicase recruitment and long-range RNA interactions are essential for RNA virus replication, yet the mechanism of their interplay remains elusive. Flaviviruses include numerous important human pathogens, e.g., dengue virus (DENV) and Zika virus (ZIKV). Here, we revealed a highly conserved, conformation-tunable cis-acting element named 5′-UAR-flanking stem (UFS) in the flavivirus genomic 5′ terminus. We demonstrated that the UFS was critical for efficient NS5 recruitment and viral RNA synthesis in different flaviviruses. Interestingly, stabilization of the DENV UFS impaired both genome cyclization and vRNA replication. Moreover, the UFS unwound in response to genome cyclization, leading to the decreased affinity of NS5 for the viral 5′ end. Thus, we propose that the UFS is switched by genome cyclization to regulate dynamic RdRp binding for vRNA replication. This study demonstrates that the UFS enables communication between flavivirus genome cyclization and RdRp recruitment, highlighting the presence of switch-like mechanisms among RNA viruses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17636.001 PMID:27692070

  3. Noncoding flavivirus RNA displays RNA interference suppressor activity in insect and Mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Schnettler, Esther; Sterken, Mark G; Leung, Jason Y; Metz, Stefan W; Geertsema, Corinne; Goldbach, Rob W; Vlak, Just M; Kohl, Alain; Khromykh, Alexander A; Pijlman, Gorben P

    2012-12-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) and dengue virus (DENV) are highly pathogenic, mosquito-borne flaviviruses (family Flaviviridae) that cause severe disease and death in humans. WNV and DENV actively replicate in mosquitoes and human hosts and thus encounter different host immune responses. RNA interference (RNAi) is the predominant antiviral response against invading RNA viruses in insects and plants. As a countermeasure, plant and insect RNA viruses encode RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) proteins to block the generation/activity of small interfering RNA (siRNA). Enhanced flavivirus replication in mosquitoes depleted for RNAi factors suggests an important biological role for RNAi in restricting virus replication, but it has remained unclear whether or not flaviviruses counteract RNAi via expression of an RSS. First, we established that flaviviral RNA replication suppressed siRNA-induced gene silencing in WNV and DENV replicon-expressing cells. Next, we showed that none of the WNV encoded proteins displayed RSS activity in mammalian and insect cells and in plants by using robust RNAi suppressor assays. In contrast, we found that the 3'-untranslated region-derived RNA molecule known as subgenomic flavivirus RNA (sfRNA) efficiently suppressed siRNA- and miRNA-induced RNAi pathways in both mammalian and insect cells. We also showed that WNV sfRNA inhibits in vitro cleavage of double-stranded RNA by Dicer. The results of the present study suggest a novel role for sfRNA, i.e., as a nucleic acid-based regulator of RNAi pathways, a strategy that may be conserved among flaviviruses.

  4. The Influence of Urbanization Modes on the Spatial Circulation of Flaviviruses within Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso)

    PubMed Central

    Fournet, Florence; Rican, Stéphane; Vaillant, Zoé; Roudot, Anna; Meunier-Nikiema, Aude; Kassié, Daouda; Dabiré, Roch K.; Salem, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is an emerging infectious disease of global significance. Although this virus has been reported for a long time, its significance within the burden of diseases in West Africa is not obvious, especially in Burkina Faso. Our objective was to evaluate flavivirus presence in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso) and the link between anti-flavivirus antibody seroprevalence and urbanization modes. A population-based cross-sectional survey was conducted and 3015 children were enrolled from Ouagadougou districts with different types and degrees of urbanization (with/without equipment and high/low building density). Flavivirus (FLAV) IgM MAC-ELISA and FLAV indirect IgG ELISA were performed. Associations between FLAV IgG presence (sign of past infection) and various independent variables were assessed using the chi-square test and a multivariate logistic regression analysis. The apparent prevalence of past flavivirus infections among the enrolled children was 22.7% (95% CI: 22.4–26.7) (n = 685). Eleven children (0.4%; 95% CI: 0.61–2.14) were positive for FLAV IgM, indicating active transmission. Factors associated with flavivirus infection were identified among the enrolled children (age, sex), householders (educational level, asset index) and in the environment (building density, water access, waste management and house appearance); however, they showed great variability according to the city districts. The water access modality did not significantly influence FLAV IgG positivity. Conversely, apparently good practices of waste management had unexpected consequences (increased risk related to municipal dumpsters). Given the scale of ongoing urbanization and the spread of arboviral diseases, close collaboration between health and city stakeholders is needed. PMID:27973402

  5. The Influence of Urbanization Modes on the Spatial Circulation of Flaviviruses within Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso).

    PubMed

    Fournet, Florence; Rican, Stéphane; Vaillant, Zoé; Roudot, Anna; Meunier-Nikiema, Aude; Kassié, Daouda; Dabiré, Roch K; Salem, Gérard

    2016-12-10

    Dengue is an emerging infectious disease of global significance. Although this virus has been reported for a long time, its significance within the burden of diseases in West Africa is not obvious, especially in Burkina Faso. Our objective was to evaluate flavivirus presence in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso) and the link between anti-flavivirus antibody seroprevalence and urbanization modes. A population-based cross-sectional survey was conducted and 3015 children were enrolled from Ouagadougou districts with different types and degrees of urbanization (with/without equipment and high/low building density). Flavivirus (FLAV) IgM MAC-ELISA and FLAV indirect IgG ELISA were performed. Associations between FLAV IgG presence (sign of past infection) and various independent variables were assessed using the chi-square test and a multivariate logistic regression analysis. The apparent prevalence of past flavivirus infections among the enrolled children was 22.7% (95% CI: 22.4-26.7) (n = 685). Eleven children (0.4%; 95% CI: 0.61-2.14) were positive for FLAV IgM, indicating active transmission. Factors associated with flavivirus infection were identified among the enrolled children (age, sex), householders (educational level, asset index) and in the environment (building density, water access, waste management and house appearance); however, they showed great variability according to the city districts. The water access modality did not significantly influence FLAV IgG positivity. Conversely, apparently good practices of waste management had unexpected consequences (increased risk related to municipal dumpsters). Given the scale of ongoing urbanization and the spread of arboviral diseases, close collaboration between health and city stakeholders is needed.

  6. Saturation of number variance in embedded random-matrix ensembles.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Ravi; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2016-05-01

    We study fluctuation properties of embedded random matrix ensembles of noninteracting particles. For ensemble of two noninteracting particle systems, we find that unlike the spectra of classical random matrices, correlation functions are nonstationary. In the locally stationary region of spectra, we study the number variance and the spacing distributions. The spacing distributions follow the Poisson statistics, which is a key behavior of uncorrelated spectra. The number variance varies linearly as in the Poisson case for short correlation lengths but a kind of regularization occurs for large correlation lengths, and the number variance approaches saturation values. These results are known in the study of integrable systems but are being demonstrated for the first time in random matrix theory. We conjecture that the interacting particle cases, which exhibit the characteristics of classical random matrices for short correlation lengths, will also show saturation effects for large correlation lengths.

  7. VPSim: Variance propagation by simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, T.; Coulter, C.A.; Prommel, J.

    1997-12-01

    One of the fundamental concepts in a materials control and accountability system for nuclear safeguards is the materials balance (MB). All transfers into and out of a material balance area are measured, as are the beginning and ending inventories. The resulting MB measures the material loss, MB = T{sub in} + I{sub B} {minus} T{sub out} {minus} I{sub E}. To interpret the MB, the authors must estimate its measurement error standard deviation, {sigma}{sub MB}. When feasible, they use a method usually known as propagation of variance (POV) to estimate {sigma}{sub MB}. The application of POV for estimating the measurement error variance of an MB is straightforward but tedious. By applying POV to individual measurement error standard deviations they can estimate {sigma}{sub MB} (or more generally, they can estimate the variance-covariance matrix, {Sigma}, of a sequence of MBs). This report describes a new computer program (VPSim) that uses simulation to estimate the {Sigma} matrix of a sequence of MBs. Given the proper input data, VPSim calculates the MB and {sigma}{sub MB}, or calculates a sequence of n MBs and the associated n-by-n covariance matrix, {Sigma}. The covariance matrix, {Sigma}, contains the variance of each MB in the diagonal entries and the covariance between pairs of MBs in the off-diagonal entries.

  8. Analysis of Variance: Variably Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummond, Gordon B.; Vowler, Sarah L.

    2012-01-01

    These authors have previously described how to use the "t" test to compare two groups. In this article, they describe the use of a different test, analysis of variance (ANOVA) to compare more than two groups. ANOVA is a test of group differences: do at least two of the means differ from each other? ANOVA assumes (1) normal distribution…

  9. Genotypic-specific variance in Caenorhabditis elegans lifetime fecundity

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, S Anaid; Viney, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Organisms live in heterogeneous environments, so strategies that maximze fitness in such environments will evolve. Variation in traits is important because it is the raw material on which natural selection acts during evolution. Phenotypic variation is usually thought to be due to genetic variation and/or environmentally induced effects. Therefore, genetically identical individuals in a constant environment should have invariant traits. Clearly, genetically identical individuals do differ phenotypically, usually thought to be due to stochastic processes. It is now becoming clear, especially from studies of unicellular species, that phenotypic variance among genetically identical individuals in a constant environment can be genetically controlled and that therefore, in principle, this can be subject to selection. However, there has been little investigation of these phenomena in multicellular species. Here, we have studied the mean lifetime fecundity (thus a trait likely to be relevant to reproductive success), and variance in lifetime fecundity, in recently-wild isolates of the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that these genotypes differed in their variance in lifetime fecundity: some had high variance in fecundity, others very low variance. We find that this variance in lifetime fecundity was negatively related to the mean lifetime fecundity of the lines, and that the variance of the lines was positively correlated between environments. We suggest that the variance in lifetime fecundity may be a bet-hedging strategy used by this species. PMID:25360248

  10. Blood meal analysis, flavivirus screening, and influence of meteorological variables on the dynamics of potential mosquito vectors of West Nile virus in northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Roiz, David; Vazquez, Ana; Rosà, Roberto; Muñoz, Joaquin; Arnoldi, Daniele; Rosso, Fausta; Figuerola, Jordi; Tenorio, Antonio; Rizzoli, Annapaola

    2012-06-01

    An extended area of northern Italy has experienced several West Nile virus (WNV) outbreaks and the emergence of Usutu virus (USUV) during previous years. Our aim was to study some of the factors that could explain disease patterns in the Trentino region, where circulation was detected in human sera and sentinel chickens, but no human or equine cases were reported. We collected Culex species (Diptera: Culicidae) in peridomestic environments. The collected specimens were analyzed for feeding behavior, the influence of temperature and rainfall on the abundance of mosquitoes, and the occurrence of flaviviruses. Analysis of blood meals showed that Culex pipiens fed mainly on blackbirds (Turdus merula) and house sparrows (Passer domesticus), while Culex hortensis fed strictly on lizards. The abundance of Cx. pipiens females correlated positively with mean temperature and negatively with rainfall (one to four weeks before capture). This negative relationship could be due to the direct effect of the flushing of habitats together with an indirect effect of oviposition repellency. The mean weekly temperature influenced the abundance of Cx. hortensis. No flaviviruses were detected in the analyzed Culex mosquitoes. These data suggest a silent cycle at low enzootic transmission levels in the area. Furthermore, we present the first contribution to understanding the transmission role of Cx. pipiens mosquitoes in Italy by identifying vertebrate hosts to species level.

  11. Evidence for ribosomal frameshifting and a novel overlapping gene in the genomes of insect-specific flaviviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Firth, Andrew E.; Blitvich, Bradley J.; Wills, Norma M.; Miller, Cathy L.; Atkins, John F.

    2010-03-30

    Flaviviruses have a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genome of approx11 kb, encoding a large polyprotein that is cleaved to produce approx10 mature proteins. Cell fusing agent virus, Kamiti River virus, Culex flavivirus and several recently discovered flaviviruses have no known vertebrate host and apparently infect only insects. We present compelling bioinformatic evidence for a 253-295 codon overlapping gene (designated fifo) conserved throughout these insect-specific flaviviruses and immunofluorescent detection of its product. Fifo overlaps the NS2A/NS2B coding sequence in the - 1/+ 2 reading frame and is most likely expressed as a trans-frame fusion protein via ribosomal frameshifting at a conserved GGAUUUY slippery heptanucleotide with 3'-adjacent RNA secondary structure (which stimulates efficient frameshifting in vitro). The discovery bears striking parallels to the recently discovered ribosomal frameshifting site in the NS2A coding sequence of the Japanese encephalitis serogroup of flaviviruses and suggests that programmed ribosomal frameshifting may be more widespread in flaviviruses than currently realized.

  12. Flavivirus infection from mosquitoes in vitro reveals cell entry at the plasma membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Vancini, Ricardo; Kramer, Laura D.; Ribeiro, Mariana; Hernandez, Raquel; Brown, Dennis

    2013-01-20

    Dengue and West Nile viruses are enveloped RNA viruses that belong to genus Flavivirus (family Flaviviridae) and are considered important mosquito-borne viral pathogenic agents worldwide. A potential target for intervention strategies is the virus cell entry mechanism. Previous studies of flavivirus entry have focused on the effects of biochemical and molecular inhibitors on viral entry leading to controversial conclusions suggesting that the process is dependent upon endocytosis and low pH mediated membrane fusion. In this study we analyzed the early events in the infection process by means of electron microscopy and immuno-gold labeling of viral particles during cell entry, and used as a new approach for infecting cells with viruses obtained directly from mosquitoes. The results show that Dengue and West Nile viruses may infect cells by a mechanism that involves direct penetration of the host cell plasma membrane as proposed for alphaviruses.

  13. [Prevalence of Flavivirus antibodies in Alouatta caraya primate autochthonous of Argentina].

    PubMed

    Contigiani, M S; Fernández, C; Spinsanti, L I; Díaz, G E

    2000-01-01

    Flavivirus constitute a human health problem in our country. Primates are known to participate in the maintenance of Dengue and Yellow Fever viruses. However, these animals play a role which still remains to be determined in the maintenance of other viruses with potential pathogenicity for human beings and/or animals. Detección of antibodies was performed for different flavivirus in 105 sera samples of Alouatta caraya primates by the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test. The neutralization (NT) test confirmed only infections caused by St. Louis Encephalitis (SLE) virus with a high prevalence in HI (35.23%) and NT (32.38%) antibodies. No antibody titres indicative of infections by Yellow Fever, Dengue and Bussuquara viruses were registered. Infection by the liheus virus could not be confirmed in these primates. There is a need for studies to detect new or reemergent viral infections in Argentina and the role that these primates could play in the maintenance of such infections.

  14. Zoonotic encephalitides caused by arboviruses: transmission and epidemiology of alphaviruses and flaviviruses

    PubMed Central

    Balasuriya, Udeni B. R.; Lee, Chong-kyo

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we mainly focus on zoonotic encephalitides caused by arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) of the families Flaviviridae (genus Flavivirus) and Togaviridae (genus Alphavirus) that are important in both humans and domestic animals. Specifically, we will focus on alphaviruses (Eastern equine encephalitis virus, Western equine encephalitis virus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus) and flaviviruses (Japanese encephalitis virus and West Nile virus). Most of these viruses were originally found in tropical regions such as Africa and South America or in some regions in Asia. However, they have dispersed widely and currently cause diseases around the world. Global warming, increasing urbanization and population size in tropical regions, faster transportation and rapid spread of arthropod vectors contribute in continuous spreading of arboviruses into new geographic areas causing reemerging or resurging diseases. Most of the reemerging arboviruses also have emerged as zoonotic disease agents and created major public health issues and disease epidemics. PMID:24427764

  15. Zika virus NS1 structure reveals diversity of electrostatic surfaces among flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Song, Hao; Qi, Jianxun; Haywood, Joel; Shi, Yi; Gao, George F

    2016-05-01

    The association of Zika virus (ZIKV) infections with microcephaly has resulted in an ongoing public-health emergency. Here we report the crystal structure of a C-terminal fragment of ZIKV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1), a major host-interaction molecule that functions in flaviviral replication, pathogenesis and immune evasion. Comparison with West Nile and dengue virus NS1 structures reveals conserved features but diverse electrostatic characteristics at host-interaction interfaces, thus possibly implying different modes of flavivirus pathogenesis.

  16. Isolation of a Novel Insect-Specific Flavivirus from Culiseta melanura in the Northeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Misencik, Michael J.; Grubaugh, Nathan D.; Andreadis, Theodore G.; Ebel, Gregory D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The genus Flavivirus includes a number of newly recognized viruses that infect and replicate only within mosquitoes. To determine whether insect-specific flaviviruses (ISFs) may infect Culiseta (Cs.) melanura mosquitoes, we screened pools of field-collected mosquitoes for virus infection by RT-PCR targeting conserved regions of the NS5 gene. NS5 nucleotide sequences amplified from Cs. melanura pools were genetically similar to other ISFs and most closely matched Calbertado virus from Culex tarsalis, sharing 68.7% nucleotide and 76.1% amino acid sequence identity. The complete genome of one virus isolate was sequenced to reveal a primary open reading frame (ORF) encoding a viral polyprotein characteristic of the genus Flavivirus. Phylogenetic analysis showed that this virus represents a distinct evolutionary lineage that belongs to the classical ISF group. The virus was detected solely in Cs. melanura pools, occurred in sampled populations from Connecticut, New York, New Hampshire, and Maine, and infected both adult and larval stages of the mosquito. Maximum likelihood estimate infection rates (MLE-IR) were relatively stable in overwintering Cs. melanura larvae collected monthly from November of 2012 through May of 2013 (MLE-IR = 0.7–2.1/100 mosquitoes) and in host-seeking females collected weekly from June through October of 2013 (MLE-IR = 3.8–11.5/100 mosquitoes). Phylogenetic analysis of viral sequences revealed limited genetic variation that lacked obvious geographic structure among strains in the northeastern United States. This new virus is provisionally named Culiseta flavivirus on the basis of its host association with Cs. melanura. PMID:26807512

  17. Detection of Flavivirus Antibodies in Human Serum by Epitope-Blocking Immunoassay

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    Molecular Biology, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Washington, DC (M.K. G.) _ Human flavivirus group-reactive, dengue complex-reactive, and... dengue , to Japanese encephalitis, or both viruses. Key words. dengue virus, Japanese encephalitis virs, sermn antihodles, rapid viral dgsis...neutralization tests. One such complex is comprised of the four serotypes of dengue viruses: dengue -I, dengue -2, Accepted for publication February 17

  18. Nonstructural Proteins Are Preferential Positive Selection Targets in Zika Virus and Related Flaviviruses

    PubMed Central

    Sironi, Manuela; Forni, Diego; Clerici, Mario; Cagliani, Rachele

    2016-01-01

    The Flavivirus genus comprises several human pathogens such as dengue virus (DENV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), and Zika virus (ZIKV). Although ZIKV usually causes mild symptoms, growing evidence is linking it to congenital birth defects and to increased risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome. ZIKV encodes a polyprotein that is processed to produce three structural and seven nonstructural (NS) proteins. We investigated the evolution of the viral polyprotein in ZIKV and in related flaviviruses (DENV, Spondweni virus, and Kedougou virus). After accounting for saturation issues, alignment uncertainties, and recombination, we found evidence of episodic positive selection on the branch that separates DENV from the other flaviviruses. NS1 emerged as the major selection target, and selected sites were located in immune epitopes or in functionally important protein regions. Three of these sites are located in an NS1 region that interacts with structural proteins and is essential for virion biogenesis. Analysis of the more recent evolutionary history of ZIKV lineages indicated that positive selection acted on NS5 and NS4B, this latter representing the preferential target. All selected sites were located in the N-terminal portion of NS4B, which inhibits interferon response. One of the positively selected sites (26M/I/T/V) in ZIKV also represents a selection target in sylvatic DENV2 isolates, and a nearby residue evolves adaptively in JEV. Two additional positively selected sites are within a protein region that interacts with host (e.g. STING) and viral (i.e. NS1, NS4A) proteins. Notably, mutations in the NS4B region of other flaviviruses modulate neurovirulence and/or neuroinvasiveness. These results suggest that the positively selected sites we identified modulate viral replication and contribute to immune evasion. These sites should be prioritized in future experimental studies. However, analyses herein detected no selective events associated to the spread of the Asian

  19. Variance decomposition in stochastic simulators

    SciTech Connect

    Le Maître, O. P.; Knio, O. M.; Moraes, A.

    2015-06-28

    This work aims at the development of a mathematical and computational approach that enables quantification of the inherent sources of stochasticity and of the corresponding sensitivities in stochastic simulations of chemical reaction networks. The approach is based on reformulating the system dynamics as being generated by independent standardized Poisson processes. This reformulation affords a straightforward identification of individual realizations for the stochastic dynamics of each reaction channel, and consequently a quantitative characterization of the inherent sources of stochasticity in the system. By relying on the Sobol-Hoeffding decomposition, the reformulation enables us to perform an orthogonal decomposition of the solution variance. Thus, by judiciously exploiting the inherent stochasticity of the system, one is able to quantify the variance-based sensitivities associated with individual reaction channels, as well as the importance of channel interactions. Implementation of the algorithms is illustrated in light of simulations of simplified systems, including the birth-death, Schlögl, and Michaelis-Menten models.

  20. Variance and Skewness in the FIRST Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magliocchetti, M.; Maddox, S. J.; Lahav, O.; Wall, J. V.

    We investigate the large-scale clustering of radio sources by analysing the distribution function of the FIRST 1.4 GHz survey. We select a reliable galaxy sample from the FIRST catalogue, paying particular attention to the definition of single radio sources from the multiple components listed in the FIRST catalogue. We estimate the variance, Ψ2, and skewness, Ψ3, of the distribution function for the best galaxy subsample. Ψ2 shows power-law behaviour as a function of cell size, with an amplitude corresponding a spatial correlation length of r0 ~10 h-1 Mpc. We detect significant skewness in the distribution, and find that it is related to the variance through the relation Ψ3 = S3 (Ψ2)α with α = 1.9 +/- 0.1 consistent with the non-linear growth of perturbations from primordial Gaussian initial conditions. We show that the amplitude of clustering (corresponding to a spatial correlation length of r0 ~10 h-1 Mpc) and skewness are consistent with realistic models of galaxy clustering.

  1. Estimating the Modified Allan Variance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, Charles

    1995-01-01

    The third-difference approach to modified Allan variance (MVAR) leads to a tractable formula for a measure of MVAR estimator confidence, the equivalent degrees of freedom (edf), in the presence of power-law phase noise. The effect of estimation stride on edf is tabulated. A simple approximation for edf is given, and its errors are tabulated. A theorem allowing conservative estimates of edf in the presence of compound noise processes is given.

  2. Identification and molecular characterization of a novel flavivirus isolated from geese in China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinmei; Han, Kaikai; Zhao, Dongmin; Liu, Yuzhuo; Zhang, Jingfeng; Niu, Huimin; Zhang, Kangning; Zhu, Jiangning; Wu, Dongming; Gao, Lei; Li, Yin

    2013-06-01

    Since April 2010, a novel contagious disease in ducks and geese, with egg drop, feed uptake decline and neurological signs, caused by a newly emerged virus has spread around Eastern China. Dissection conducted on the dead geese demonstrated hemorrhage in brain, lung, liver, heart, ovary, and enlarged and necrotic spleen. A new virus, named Goose/Jiangsu/804/2010 (JS804) virus, was isolated in Jiangsu area from geese. Then the virus was re-isolated from the affected geese and replicated well in duck embryo fibroblasts and Vero cells, causing the cytopathic effect. The virus was identified as an enveloped positive stranded RNA virus with a size of approximately 40-60 nm in diameter. The full-length genome of this isolated virus was determined, showing that it is closely related to Tembusu virus (a mosquito-borne Ntaya group flavivirus) than other members of the Flaviviridae based on the data of phylogenetic analyses. Our systematic studies fulfill Koch's postulates precisely, and therefore, the causative agent of geese occurring in Eastern China is a new flavivirus. This is the first report that flavivirus infects not only egg-laying and breeder ducks but also geese. The findings extend our understanding of how the virus spreads and causes disease.

  3. Physico-chemical requirements and kinetics of membrane fusion of flavivirus-like particles

    PubMed Central

    Espósito, Danillo L. A.; Nguyen, Jennifer B.; DeWitt, David C.; Rhoades, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Flaviviruses deliver their RNA genome into the host-cell cytoplasm by fusing their lipid envelope with a cellular membrane. Expression of the flavivirus pre-membrane and envelope glycoprotein genes in the absence of other viral genes results in the spontaneous assembly and secretion of virus-like particles (VLPs) with membrane fusion activity. Here, we examined the physico-chemical requirements for membrane fusion of VLPs from West Nile and Japanese encephalitis viruses. In a bulk fusion assay, optimal hemifusion (or lipid mixing) efficiencies were observed at 37 °C. Fusion efficiency increased with decreasing pH; half-maximal hemifusion was attained at pH 5.6. The anionic lipids bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate and phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate, when present in the target membrane, significantly enhanced fusion efficiency, consistent with the emerging model that flaviviruses fuse with intermediate-to-late endosomal compartments, where these lipids are most abundant. In a single-particle fusion assay, VLPs catalysed membrane hemifusion, tracked as lipid mixing with the cellular membrane, on a timescale of 7–20 s after acidification. Lipid mixing kinetics suggest that hemifusion is a kinetically complex, multistep process. PMID:25740960

  4. Unique Requirement for ESCRT Factors in Flavivirus Particle Formation on the Endoplasmic Reticulum.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Keisuke; Arimoto, Masaru; Arakawa, Masashi; Nara, Atsuki; Saito, Kazunobu; Omori, Hiroko; Arai, Arisa; Ishikawa, Tomohiro; Konishi, Eiji; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Morita, Eiji

    2016-08-30

    Flavivirus infection induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane rearrangements to generate a compartment for replication of the viral genome and assembly of viral particles. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we identified several ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) proteins that are recruited to sites of virus replication on the ER. Systematic small interfering RNA (siRNA) screening revealed that release of both dengue virus and Japanese encephalitis virus was dramatically decreased by single depletion of TSG101 or co-depletion of specific combinations of ESCRT-III proteins, resulting in ≥1,000-fold titer reductions. By contrast, release was unaffected by depletion of some core ESCRTs, including VPS4. Reintroduction of ESCRT proteins to siRNA-depleted cells revealed interactions among ESCRT proteins that are crucial for flavivirus budding. Electron-microscopy studies revealed that the CHMP2 and CHMP4 proteins function directly in membrane deformation at the ER. Thus, a unique and specific subset of ESCRT contributes to ER membrane biogenesis during flavivirus infection.

  5. Viral Membrane Fusion and Nucleocapsid Delivery into the Cytoplasm are Distinct Events in Some Flaviviruses

    PubMed Central

    Nour, Adel M.; Li, Yue; Wolenski, Joseph; Modis, Yorgo

    2013-01-01

    Flaviviruses deliver their genome into the cell by fusing the viral lipid membrane to an endosomal membrane. The sequence and kinetics of the steps required for nucleocapsid delivery into the cytoplasm remain unclear. Here we dissect the cell entry pathway of virions and virus-like particles from two flaviviruses using single-particle tracking in live cells, a biochemical membrane fusion assay and virus infectivity assays. We show that the virus particles fuse with a small endosomal compartment in which the nucleocapsid remains trapped for several minutes. Endosomal maturation inhibitors inhibit infectivity but not membrane fusion. We propose a flavivirus cell entry mechanism in which the virus particles fuse preferentially with small endosomal carrier vesicles and depend on back-fusion of the vesicles with the late endosomal membrane to deliver the nucleocapsid into the cytoplasm. Virus entry modulates intracellular calcium release and phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate kinase signaling. Moreover, the broadly cross-reactive therapeutic antibody scFv11 binds to virus-like particles and inhibits fusion. PMID:24039574

  6. A single mutation in the envelope protein modulates flavivirus antigenicity, stability, and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Goo, Leslie; VanBlargan, Laura A.; Dowd, Kimberly A.; Diamond, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    The structural flexibility or ‘breathing’ of the envelope (E) protein of flaviviruses allows virions to sample an ensemble of conformations at equilibrium. The molecular basis and functional consequences of virus conformational dynamics are poorly understood. Here, we identified a single mutation at residue 198 (T198F) of the West Nile virus (WNV) E protein domain I-II hinge that regulates virus breathing. The T198F mutation resulted in a ~70-fold increase in sensitivity to neutralization by a monoclonal antibody targeting a cryptic epitope in the fusion loop. Increased exposure of this otherwise poorly accessible fusion loop epitope was accompanied by reduced virus stability in solution at physiological temperatures. Introduction of a mutation at the analogous residue of dengue virus (DENV), but not Zika virus (ZIKV), E protein also increased accessibility of the cryptic fusion loop epitope and decreased virus stability in solution, suggesting that this residue modulates the structural ensembles sampled by distinct flaviviruses at equilibrium in a context dependent manner. Although the T198F mutation did not substantially impair WNV growth kinetics in vitro, studies in mice revealed attenuation of WNV T198F infection. Overall, our study provides insight into the molecular basis and the in vitro and in vivo consequences of flavivirus breathing. PMID:28207910

  7. Modeling the Role of Epitope Arrangement on Antibody Binding Stoichiometry in Flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Ripoll, Daniel R; Khavrutskii, Ilja; Wallqvist, Anders; Chaudhury, Sidhartha

    2016-10-18

    Cryo-electron-microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of flaviviruses reveal significant variation in epitope occupancy across different monoclonal antibodies that have largely been attributed to epitope-level differences in conformation or accessibility that affect antibody binding. The consequences of these variations for macroscopic properties such as antibody binding and neutralization are the results of the law of mass action-a stochastic process of innumerable binding and unbinding events between antibodies and the multiple binding sites on the flavivirus in equilibrium-that cannot be directly imputed from structure alone. We carried out coarse-grained spatial stochastic binding simulations for nine flavivirus antibodies with epitopes defined by cryo-EM or x-ray crystallography to assess the role of epitope spatial arrangement on antibody-binding stoichiometry, occupancy, and neutralization. In our simulations, all epitopes were equally competent for binding, representing the upper limit of binding stoichiometry that results from epitope spatial arrangement alone. Surprisingly, our simulations closely reproduced the relative occupancy and binding stoichiometry observed in cryo-EM, without having to account for differences in epitope accessibility or conformation, suggesting that epitope spatial arrangement alone may be sufficient to explain differences in binding occupancy and stoichiometry between antibodies. Furthermore, we found that there was significant heterogeneity in binding configurations even at saturating antibody concentrations, and that bivalent antibody binding may be more common than previously thought. Finally, we propose a structure-based explanation for the stoichiometric threshold model of neutralization.

  8. The Emerging Duck Flavivirus Is Not Pathogenic for Primates and Is Highly Sensitive to Mammalian Interferon Antiviral Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-Jiang; Li, Xiao-Feng; Liu, Long; Xu, Yan-Peng; Ye, Qing; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Huang, Xing-Yao; Zhao, Hui; Qin, E-De; Shi, Pei-Yong; Gao, George F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Flaviviruses pose a significant threat to both animals and humans. Recently, a novel flavivirus, duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV), was identified to be the causative agent of a serious duck viral disease in Asia. Its rapid spread, expanding host range, and uncertain transmission routes have raised substantial concerns regarding its potential threats to nonavian hosts, including humans. Here, we demonstrate that DTMUV is not pathogenic for nonhuman primates and is highly sensitive to mammal type I interferon (IFN) signaling. In vitro assays demonstrated that DTMUV infected and replicated efficiently in various mammalian cell lines. Further tests in mice demonstrated high neurovirulence and the age-dependent neuroinvasiveness of the virus. In particular, the inoculation of DTMUV into rhesus monkeys did not result in either viremia or apparent clinical symptoms, although DTMUV-specific humoral immune responses were detected. Furthermore, we revealed that although avian IFN failed to inhibit DTMUV in avian cells, DTMUV was more sensitive to the antiviral effects of type I interferon than other known human-pathogenic flaviviruses. Knockout of the type I IFN receptor in mice caused apparent viremia, viscerotropic disease, and mortality, indicating a vital role of IFN signaling in protection against DTMUV infection. Collectively, we provide direct experimental evidence that this novel avian-origin DTMUV possesses a limited capability to establish infection in immunocompetent primates due to its decreased antagonistic activity in the mammal IFN system. Furthermore, our findings highlight the potential risk of DTMUV infection in immunocompromised individuals and warrant studies on the cross-species transmission and pathogenesis of this novel flavivirus. IMPORTANCE Mosquito-borne flaviviruses comprise a large group of pathogenic and nonpathogenic members. The pathogenic flaviviruses include dengue, West Nile, and Japanese encephalitis viruses, and the nonpathogenic

  9. The Influence of Therapist Variance on the Dependability of Therapists' Alliance Scores: A Brief Comment on "The Dependability of Alliance Assessments: The Alliance-Outcome Correlation Is Larger than You Think" (Crits-Christoph et al., 2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Scott A.; Imel, Zac E.; Atkins, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Crits-Christoph, Connolly Gibbons, Hamilton, Ring-Kurtz, and Gallop (2011) used generalizability theory to critique the measurement of the therapeutic alliance in psychotherapy research, showing that the dependability of alliance scores may be quite low, which in turn can lead to attenuated alliance-outcome correlation estimates. Method…

  10. Flavivirus NS3 and NS5 proteins interaction network: a high-throughput yeast two-hybrid screen

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The genus Flavivirus encompasses more than 50 distinct species of arthropod-borne viruses, including several major human pathogens, such as West Nile virus, yellow fever virus, Japanese encephalitis virus and the four serotypes of dengue viruses (DENV type 1-4). Each year, flaviviruses cause more than 100 million infections worldwide, some of which lead to life-threatening conditions such as encephalitis or haemorrhagic fever. Among the viral proteins, NS3 and NS5 proteins constitute the major enzymatic components of the viral replication complex and are essential to the flavivirus life cycle. Results We report here the results of a high-throughput yeast two-hybrid screen to identify the interactions between human host proteins and the flavivirus NS3 and NS5 proteins. Using our screen results and literature curation, we performed a global analysis of the NS3 and NS5 cellular targets based on functional annotation with the Gene Ontology features. We finally created the first flavivirus NS3 and NS5 proteins interaction network and analysed the topological features of this network. Our proteome mapping screen identified 108 human proteins interacting with NS3 or NS5 proteins or both. The global analysis of the cellular targets revealed the enrichment of host proteins involved in RNA binding, transcription regulation, vesicular transport or innate immune response regulation. Conclusions We proposed that the selective disruption of these newly identified host/virus interactions could represent a novel and attractive therapeutic strategy in treating flavivirus infections. Our virus-host interaction map provides a basis to unravel fundamental processes about flavivirus subversion of the host replication machinery and/or immune defence strategy. PMID:22014111

  11. Estimating the Modified Allan Variance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, Charles

    1995-01-01

    A paper at the 1992 FCS showed how to express the modified Allan variance (mvar) in terms of the third difference of the cumulative sum of time residuals. Although this reformulated definition was presented merely as a computational trick for simplifying the calculation of mvar estimates, it has since turned out to be a powerful theoretical tool for deriving the statistical quality of those estimates in terms of their equivalent degrees of freedom (edf), defined for an estimator V by edf V = 2(EV)2/(var V). Confidence intervals for mvar can then be constructed from levels of the appropriate 2 distribution.

  12. Mitral disc-valve variance

    PubMed Central

    Berroya, Renato B.; Escano, Fernando B.

    1972-01-01

    This report deals with a rare complication of disc-valve prosthesis in the mitral area. A significant disc poppet and struts destruction of mitral Beall valve prostheses occurred 20 and 17 months after implantation. The resulting valve incompetence in the first case contributed to the death of the patient. The durability of Teflon prosthetic valves appears to be in question and this type of valve probably will be unacceptable if there is an increasing number of disc-valve variance in the future. Images PMID:5017573

  13. A Wavelet Perspective on the Allan Variance.

    PubMed

    Percival, Donald B

    2016-04-01

    The origins of the Allan variance trace back 50 years ago to two seminal papers, one by Allan (1966) and the other by Barnes (1966). Since then, the Allan variance has played a leading role in the characterization of high-performance time and frequency standards. Wavelets first arose in the early 1980s in the geophysical literature, and the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) became prominent in the late 1980s in the signal processing literature. Flandrin (1992) briefly documented a connection between the Allan variance and a wavelet transform based upon the Haar wavelet. Percival and Guttorp (1994) noted that one popular estimator of the Allan variance-the maximal overlap estimator-can be interpreted in terms of a version of the DWT now widely referred to as the maximal overlap DWT (MODWT). In particular, when the MODWT is based on the Haar wavelet, the variance of the resulting wavelet coefficients-the wavelet variance-is identical to the Allan variance when the latter is multiplied by one-half. The theory behind the wavelet variance can thus deepen our understanding of the Allan variance. In this paper, we review basic wavelet variance theory with an emphasis on the Haar-based wavelet variance and its connection to the Allan variance. We then note that estimation theory for the wavelet variance offers a means of constructing asymptotically correct confidence intervals (CIs) for the Allan variance without reverting to the common practice of specifying a power-law noise type a priori. We also review recent work on specialized estimators of the wavelet variance that are of interest when some observations are missing (gappy data) or in the presence of contamination (rogue observations or outliers). It is a simple matter to adapt these estimators to become estimators of the Allan variance. Finally we note that wavelet variances based upon wavelets other than the Haar offer interesting generalizations of the Allan variance.

  14. Hybrid biasing approaches for global variance reduction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zeyun; Abdel-Khalik, Hany S

    2013-02-01

    A new variant of Monte Carlo-deterministic (DT) hybrid variance reduction approach based on Gaussian process theory is presented for accelerating convergence of Monte Carlo simulation and compared with Forward-Weighted Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (FW-CADIS) approach implemented in the SCALE package from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The new approach, denoted the Gaussian process approach, treats the responses of interest as normally distributed random processes. The Gaussian process approach improves the selection of the weight windows of simulated particles by identifying a subspace that captures the dominant sources of statistical response variations. Like the FW-CADIS approach, the Gaussian process approach utilizes particle importance maps obtained from deterministic adjoint models to derive weight window biasing. In contrast to the FW-CADIS approach, the Gaussian process approach identifies the response correlations (via a covariance matrix) and employs them to reduce the computational overhead required for global variance reduction (GVR) purpose. The effective rank of the covariance matrix identifies the minimum number of uncorrelated pseudo responses, which are employed to bias simulated particles. Numerical experiments, serving as a proof of principle, are presented to compare the Gaussian process and FW-CADIS approaches in terms of the global reduction in standard deviation of the estimated responses.

  15. Wide detection of Aedes flavivirus in north-eastern Italy--a European hotspot of emerging mosquito-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Grisenti, Michela; Vázquez, Ana; Herrero, Laura; Cuevas, Laureano; Perez-Pastrana, Esperanza; Arnoldi, Daniele; Rosà, Roberto; Capelli, Gioia; Tenorio, Antonio; Sánchez-Seco, Maria Paz; Rizzoli, Annapaola

    2015-02-01

    The pattern of flavivirus infection in mosquitoes belonging to the genera Aedes and Culex collected in two regions of north-eastern Italy (Trentino and Veneto) was assessed. Mosquitoes were collected during 2012 and screened for flaviviruses using a generic reverse transcription-nested-PCR targeted on a region of the non-structural NS5 gene. The phylogenetic analysis was performed on a fragment of ~1000 bp. Virus isolation was attempted in C6/36 insect cell lines and the infected cell cultures were studied by electron microscopy. We detected a wide distribution of Aedes flavivirus (AeFV) in Aedes albopictus, with higher infection prevalence in Trentino than in Veneto. In Culex pipiens collected in Veneto, we detected a new sequence of an insect-specific flavivirus and one of Usutu virus. Interestingly, we detected AeFV in C. pipiens, for the first time to our knowledge, in both regions. Viral isolation in cell culture was successful for AeFV. AeFV sequences found in Veneto showed a high percentage of similarity to those detected in Trentino and to those previously reported in other areas of northern Italy. Co-infections with different flaviviruses were not detected.

  16. The Impact of Prior Flavivirus Infections on the Development of Type 2 Diabetes Among the Indigenous Australians.

    PubMed

    Sorenson, Alanna; Owens, Leigh; Caltabiano, Marie; Cadet-James, Yvonne; Hall, Roy; Govan, Brenda; Clancy, Paula

    2016-08-03

    It is estimated that 5% of Australians over the age of 18 have diabetes, with the number of new cases increasing every year. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) also represents a significant disease burden in the Australian indigenous population, where prevalence is three times greater than that of non-indigenous Australians. Prevalence of T2D has been found to be higher in rural and remote indigenous Australian populations compared with urban indigenous Australian populations. Several studies have also found that body mass index and waist circumference are not appropriate for the prediction of T2D risk in indigenous Australians. Regional and remote areas of Australia are endemic for a variety of mosquito-borne flaviviruses. Studies that have investigated seroprevalence of flaviviruses in remote aboriginal communities have found high proportions of seroconversion. The family Flaviviridae comprises several genera of viruses with non-segmented single-stranded positive sense RNA genomes, and includes the flaviviruses and hepaciviruses. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been shown to be associated with insulin resistance and subsequent development of T2D. Flaviviruses and HCV possess conserved proteins and subgenomic RNA structures that may play similar roles in the development of insulin resistance. Although dietary and lifestyle factors are associated with increased risk of developing T2D, the impact of infectious diseases such as arboviruses has not been assessed. Flaviviruses circulating in indigenous Australian communities may play a significant role in inducing glucose intolerance and exacerbating T2D.

  17. Warped functional analysis of variance.

    PubMed

    Gervini, Daniel; Carter, Patrick A

    2014-09-01

    This article presents an Analysis of Variance model for functional data that explicitly incorporates phase variability through a time-warping component, allowing for a unified approach to estimation and inference in presence of amplitude and time variability. The focus is on single-random-factor models but the approach can be easily generalized to more complex ANOVA models. The behavior of the estimators is studied by simulation, and an application to the analysis of growth curves of flour beetles is presented. Although the model assumes a smooth latent process behind the observed trajectories, smootheness of the observed data is not required; the method can be applied to irregular time grids, which are common in longitudinal studies.

  18. Cyclostationary analysis with logarithmic variance stabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghesani, Pietro; Shahriar, Md Rifat

    2016-03-01

    Second order cyclostationary (CS2) components in vibration or acoustic emission signals are typical symptoms of a wide variety of faults in rotating and alternating mechanical systems. The square envelope spectrum (SES), obtained via Hilbert transform of the original signal, is at the basis of the most common indicators used for detection of CS2 components. It has been shown that the SES is equivalent to an autocorrelation of the signal's discrete Fourier transform, and that CS2 components are a cause of high correlations in the frequency domain of the signal, thus resulting in peaks in the SES. Statistical tests have been proposed to determine if peaks in the SES are likely to belong to a normal variability in the signal or if they are proper symptoms of CS2 components. Despite the need for automated fault recognition and the theoretical soundness of these tests, this approach to machine diagnostics has been mostly neglected in industrial applications. In fact, in a series of experimental applications, even with proper pre-whitening steps, it has been found that healthy machines might produce high spectral correlations and therefore result in a highly biased SES distribution which might cause a series of false positives. In this paper a new envelope spectrum is defined, with the theoretical intent of rendering the hypothesis test variance-free. This newly proposed indicator will prove unbiased in case of multiple CS2 sources of spectral correlation, thus reducing the risk of false alarms.

  19. Correcting an analysis of variance for clustering.

    PubMed

    Hedges, Larry V; Rhoads, Christopher H

    2011-02-01

    A great deal of educational and social data arises from cluster sampling designs where clusters involve schools, classrooms, or communities. A mistake that is sometimes encountered in the analysis of such data is to ignore the effect of clustering and analyse the data as if it were based on a simple random sample. This typically leads to an overstatement of the precision of results and too liberal conclusions about precision and statistical significance of mean differences. This paper gives simple corrections to the test statistics that would be computed in an analysis of variance if clustering were (incorrectly) ignored. The corrections are multiplicative factors depending on the total sample size, the cluster size, and the intraclass correlation structure. For example, the corrected F statistic has Fisher's F distribution with reduced degrees of freedom. The corrected statistic reduces to the F statistic computed by ignoring clustering when the intraclass correlations are zero. It reduces to the F statistic computed using cluster means when the intraclass correlations are unity, and it is in between otherwise. A similar adjustment to the usual statistic for testing a linear contrast among group means is described.

  20. Speed Variance and Its Influence on Accidents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garber, Nicholas J.; Gadirau, Ravi

    A study was conducted to investigate the traffic engineering factors that influence speed variance and to determine to what extent speed variance affects accident rates. Detailed analyses were carried out to relate speed variance with posted speed limit, design speeds, and other traffic variables. The major factor identified was the difference…

  1. Variance in Math Achievement Attributable to Visual Cognitive Constructs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oehlert, Jeremy J.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has reported positive correlations between math achievement and the cognitive constructs of spatial visualization, working memory, and general intelligence; however, no single study has assessed variance in math achievement attributable to all three constructs, examined in combination. The current study fills this gap in the…

  2. Explaining Common Variance Shared by Early Numeracy and Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidse, N. J.; De Jong, M. T.; Bus, A. G.

    2014-01-01

    How can it be explained that early literacy and numeracy share variance? We specifically tested whether the correlation between four early literacy skills (rhyming, letter knowledge, emergent writing, and orthographic knowledge) and simple sums (non-symbolic and story condition) reduced after taking into account preschool attention control,…

  3. Preparation of pure, high titer, pseudoinfectious Flavivirus particles by hollow fiber tangential flow filtration and anion exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mundle, Sophia T; Giel-Moloney, Maryann; Kleanthous, Harry; Pugachev, Konstantin V; Anderson, Stephen F

    2015-08-20

    Purification of enveloped viruses such as live flavivirus vaccine candidates poses a challenge as one must retain viral infectivity to preserve immunogenicity. Here we describe a laboratory-scale purification procedure for two replication defective (single-cycle) flavivirus variants for use in a pre-clinical setting. The two step purification scheme based on hollow fiber tangential flow filtration (TFF) followed by anion exchange chromatography using convective interaction media (CIM(®)) monoliths results in a ∼60% recovery of infectious virus titer and can be used to prepare nearly homogenous, highly purified vaccine viruses with titers as high as 1×10(9) focus forming units per mL. Flavivirus virions prepared by this method are 2 and 3 orders of magnitude more pure with respect to dsDNA and BHK host cell proteins, respectively, as compared to the raw feed stream.

  4. Identification and characterization of a novel tick-borne flavivirus subtype in goats (Capra hircus) in Spain.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Karen L; Morales, Ana Balseiro; Johnson, Nicholas; Ayllón, Nieves; Höfle, Ursula; Alberdi, Pilar; Fernández de Mera, Isabel G; Marín, Juan Francisco García; Gortázar, Christian; de la Fuente, José; Fooks, Anthony R

    2015-07-01

    In 2011, a neurological disease was reported in a herd of goats (Capra hircus) in Asturias, Spain. Initial sequencing identified the causative agent as louping ill virus (LIV). Subsequently, with the application of whole genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, empirical data demonstrates that the LIV-like virus detected is significantly divergent from LIV and Spanish sheep encephalitis virus (SSEV). This virus encoded an amino acid sequence motif at the site of a previously identified marker for differentiating tick-borne flaviviruses that was shared with a virus previously isolated in Ireland in 1968. The significance of these observations reflects the diversity of tick-borne flaviviruses in Europe. These data also contribute to our knowledge of the evolution of tick-borne flaviviruses and could reflect the movement of viruses throughout Europe. Based on these observations, the proposed name for this virus is Spanish goat encephalitis virus (SGEV), to distinguish it from SSEV.

  5. Ivermectin is a potent inhibitor of flavivirus replication specifically targeting NS3 helicase activity: new prospects for an old drug

    PubMed Central

    Mastrangelo, Eloise; Pezzullo, Margherita; De Burghgraeve, Tine; Kaptein, Suzanne; Pastorino, Boris; Dallmeier, Kai; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Neyts, Johan; Hanson, Alicia M.; Frick, David N.; Bolognesi, Martino; Milani, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Infection with yellow fever virus (YFV), the prototypic mosquito-borne flavivirus, causes severe febrile disease with haemorrhage, multi-organ failure and a high mortality. Moreover, in recent years the Flavivirus genus has gained further attention due to re-emergence and increasing incidence of West Nile, dengue and Japanese encephalitis viruses. Potent and safe antivirals are urgently needed. Methods Starting from the crystal structure of the NS3 helicase from Kunjin virus (an Australian variant of West Nile virus), we identified a novel, unexploited protein site that might be involved in the helicase catalytic cycle and could thus in principle be targeted for enzyme inhibition. In silico docking of a library of small molecules allowed us to identify a few selected compounds with high predicted affinity for the new site. Their activity against helicases from several flaviviruses was confirmed in in vitro helicase/enzymatic assays. The effect on the in vitro replication of flaviviruses was then evaluated. Results Ivermectin, a broadly used anti-helminthic drug, proved to be a highly potent inhibitor of YFV replication (EC50 values in the sub-nanomolar range). Moreover, ivermectin inhibited, although less efficiently, the replication of several other flaviviruses, i.e. dengue fever, Japanese encephalitis and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. Ivermectin exerts its effect at a timepoint that coincides with the onset of intracellular viral RNA synthesis, as expected for a molecule that specifically targets the viral helicase. Conclusions The well-tolerated drug ivermectin may hold great potential for treatment of YFV infections. Furthermore, structure-based optimization may result in analogues exerting potent activity against flaviviruses other than YFV. PMID:22535622

  6. Increasing selection response by Bayesian modeling of heterogeneous environmental variances

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heterogeneity of environmental variance among genotypes reduces selection response because genotypes with higher variance are more likely to be selected than low-variance genotypes. Modeling heterogeneous variances to obtain weighted means corrected for heterogeneous variances is difficult in likel...

  7. Molecular detection of flaviviruses and alphaviruses in mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) from coastal ecosystems in the Colombian Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Hoyos-López, Richard; Suaza-Vasco, Juan; Rúa-Uribe, Guillermo; Uribe, Sandra; Gallego-Gómez, Juan Carlos

    2016-10-01

    Arboviruses belonging to the genera Flavivirus and Alphavirus were detected in mosquitoes in a rural area of San Bernardo del Viento (Córdoba, Colombia). A total of 22,180 mosquitoes were collected, sorted into 2,102 pools, and tested by generic/nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, dengue virus, West Nile virus, St. Louis encephalitis virus, yellow fever virus, and Culex flavivirus were detected and identified by sequencing. The detection of arboviral pathogens in this zone represents possible circulation and indicates a human health risk, demonstrating the importance of virological surveillance activities.

  8. Molecular detection of flaviviruses and alphaviruses in mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) from coastal ecosystems in the Colombian Caribbean

    PubMed Central

    Hoyos-López, Richard; Suaza-Vasco, Juan; Rúa-Uribe, Guillermo; Uribe, Sandra; Gallego-Gómez, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Arboviruses belonging to the genera Flavivirus and Alphavirus were detected in mosquitoes in a rural area of San Bernardo del Viento (Córdoba, Colombia). A total of 22,180 mosquitoes were collected, sorted into 2,102 pools, and tested by generic/nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, dengue virus, West Nile virus, St. Louis encephalitis virus, yellow fever virus, and Culex flavivirus were detected and identified by sequencing. The detection of arboviral pathogens in this zone represents possible circulation and indicates a human health risk, demonstrating the importance of virological surveillance activities. PMID:27706377

  9. Restricted sample variance reduces generalizability.

    PubMed

    Lakes, Kimberley D

    2013-06-01

    One factor that affects the reliability of observed scores is restriction of range on the construct measured for a particular group of study participants. This study illustrates how researchers can use generalizability theory to evaluate the impact of restriction of range in particular sample characteristics on the generalizability of test scores and to estimate how changes in measurement design could improve the generalizability of the test scores. An observer-rated measure of child self-regulation (Response to Challenge Scale; Lakes, 2011) is used to examine scores for 198 children (Grades K through 5) within the generalizability theory (GT) framework. The generalizability of ratings within relatively developmentally homogeneous samples is examined and illustrates the effect of reduced variance among ratees on generalizability. Forecasts for g coefficients of various D study designs demonstrate how higher generalizability could be achieved by increasing the number of raters or items. In summary, the research presented illustrates the importance of and procedures for evaluating the generalizability of a set of scores in a particular research context.

  10. Bicluster pattern of codon context usages between flavivirus and vector mosquito Aedes aegypti: relevance to infection and transcriptional response of mosquito genes.

    PubMed

    Behura, Susanta K; Severson, David W

    2014-10-01

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti is the primary vector of dengue virus (DENV) infection in most of the subtropical and tropical countries. Besides DENV, yellow fever virus (YFV) is also transmitted by A. aegypti. Susceptibility of A. aegypti to West Nile virus (WNV) has also been confirmed. Although studies have indicated correlation of codon bias between flaviviridae and their animal/insect hosts, it is not clear if codon sequences have any relation to susceptibility of A. aegypti to DENV, YFV and WNV. In the current study, usages of codon context sequences (codon pairs for neighboring amino acids) of the vector (A. aegypti) genome as well as the flaviviral genomes are investigated. We used bioinformatics methods to quantify codon context bias in a genome-wide manner of A. aegypti as well as DENV, WNV and YFV sequences. Mutual information statistics was applied to perform bicluster analysis of codon context bias between vector and flaviviral sequences. Functional relevance of the bicluster pattern was inferred from published microarray data. Our study shows that codon context bias of DENV, WNV and YFV sequences varies in a bicluster manner with that of specific sets of genes of A. aegypti. Many of these mosquito genes are known to be differentially expressed in response to flaviviral infection suggesting that codon context sequences of A. aegypti and the flaviviruses may play a role in the susceptible interaction between flaviviruses and this mosquito. The bias in usages of codon context sequences likely has a functional association with susceptibility of A. aegypti to flaviviral infection. The results from this study will allow us to conduct hypothesis-driven tests to examine the role of codon context bias in evolution of vector-virus interactions at the molecular level.

  11. Characterizing the Conformational Landscape of Flavivirus Fusion Peptides via Simulation and Experiment.

    PubMed

    Marzinek, Jan K; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Goh, Eunice; Huber, Roland G; Panzade, Sadhana; Verma, Chandra; Bond, Peter J

    2016-01-20

    Conformational changes in the envelope proteins of flaviviruses help to expose the highly conserved fusion peptide (FP), a region which is critical to membrane fusion and host cell infection, and which represents a significant target for antiviral drugs and antibodies. In principle, extended timescale atomic-resolution simulations may be used to characterize the dynamics of such peptides. However, the resultant accuracy is critically dependent upon both the underlying force field and sufficient conformational sampling. In the present study, we report a comprehensive comparison of three simulation methods and four force fields comprising a total of more than 40 μs of sampling. Additionally, we describe the conformational landscape of the FP fold across all flavivirus family members. All investigated methods sampled conformations close to available X-ray structures, but exhibited differently populated ensembles. The best force field / sampling combination was sufficiently accurate to predict that the solvated peptide fold is less ordered than in the crystallographic state, which was subsequently confirmed via circular dichroism and spectrofluorometric measurements. Finally, the conformational landscape of a mutant incapable of membrane fusion was significantly shallower than wild-type variants, suggesting that dynamics should be considered when therapeutically targeting FP epitopes.

  12. Characterizing the Conformational Landscape of Flavivirus Fusion Peptides via Simulation and Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Marzinek, Jan K.; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Goh, Eunice; Huber, Roland G.; Panzade, Sadhana; Verma, Chandra; Bond, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Conformational changes in the envelope proteins of flaviviruses help to expose the highly conserved fusion peptide (FP), a region which is critical to membrane fusion and host cell infection, and which represents a significant target for antiviral drugs and antibodies. In principle, extended timescale atomic-resolution simulations may be used to characterize the dynamics of such peptides. However, the resultant accuracy is critically dependent upon both the underlying force field and sufficient conformational sampling. In the present study, we report a comprehensive comparison of three simulation methods and four force fields comprising a total of more than 40 μs of sampling. Additionally, we describe the conformational landscape of the FP fold across all flavivirus family members. All investigated methods sampled conformations close to available X-ray structures, but exhibited differently populated ensembles. The best force field / sampling combination was sufficiently accurate to predict that the solvated peptide fold is less ordered than in the crystallographic state, which was subsequently confirmed via circular dichroism and spectrofluorometric measurements. Finally, the conformational landscape of a mutant incapable of membrane fusion was significantly shallower than wild-type variants, suggesting that dynamics should be considered when therapeutically targeting FP epitopes. PMID:26785994

  13. Preliminary characterization of (nucleoside-2′-O-)-methyltransferase crystals from Meaban and Yokose flaviviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Mastrangelo, Eloise; Bollati, Michela; Milani, Mario; Lamballeire, Xavier de; Brisbare, Nadege; Dalle, Karen; Lantez, Violaine; Egloff, Marie-Pierre; Coutard, Bruno; Canard, Bruno; Gould, Ernest; Forrester, Naomi; Bolognesi, Martino

    2006-08-01

    Two methyltransferases from flaviviruses (Meaban and Yokose viruses) have been overexpressed and crystallized. Diffraction data and characterization of the two crystal forms are presented, together with a preliminary molecular-replacement solution for both enzymes. Viral methyltranferases (MTase) are involved in the third step of the mRNA-capping process, transferring a methyl group from S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) to the capped mRNA. MTases are classified into two groups: (guanine-N7)-methyltransferases (N7MTases), which add a methyl group onto the N7 atom of guanine, and (nucleoside-2′-O-)-methyltransferases (2′OMTases), which add a methyl group to a ribose hydroxyl. The MTases of two flaviviruses, Meaban and Yokose viruses, have been overexpressed, purified and crystallized in complex with SAM. Characterization of the crystals together with details of preliminary X-ray diffraction data collection (at 2.8 and 2.7 Å resolution, respectively) are reported here. The sequence homology relative to Dengue virus 2′OMTase and the structural conservation of specific residues in the putative active sites suggest that both enzymes belong to the 2′OMTase subgroup.

  14. Standing your Ground to Exoribonucleases: Function of Flavivirus Long Non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Charley, Phillida A.; Wilusz, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Members of the Flaviviridae (e.g. Dengue virus, West Nile virus, and Hepatitis C virus) contain a positive-sense RNA genome that encodes a large polyprotein. It is now also clear most if not all of these viruses also produce an abundant subgenomic long non-coding RNA. These non-coding RNAs, which are called subgenomicflavivirus RNAs (sfRNAs) or Xrn1-resistant RNAs (xrRNAs), are stable decay intermediates generated from the viral genomic RNA through the stalling of the cellular exoribonuclease Xrn1 at highly structured regions. Several functions of these flavivirus long non-coding RNAs have been revealed in recent years. The generation of these sfRNAs/xrRNAs from viral transcripts results in the repression of Xrn1 and the dysregulation of cellular mRNA stability. The abundant sfRNAs also serve directly as a decoy for important cellular protein regulators of the interferon and RNA interference antiviral pathways. Thus the generation of long non-coding RNAs from flaviviruses, hepaciviruses and pestiviruses likely disrupts aspects of innate immunity and may directly contribute to viral replication, cytopathology and pathogenesis. PMID:26368052

  15. AXL-dependent infection of human fetal endothelial cells distinguishes Zika virus from other pathogenic flaviviruses

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Audrey Stéphanie; Shim, Byoung-Shik; Kwon, Young-Chan; Zhang, Rong; Otsuka, Yuka; Schmitt, Kimberly; Berri, Fatma; Diamond, Michael S.; Choe, Hyeryun

    2017-01-01

    Although a causal relationship between Zika virus (ZIKV) and microcephaly has been established, it remains unclear why ZIKV, but not other pathogenic flaviviruses, causes congenital defects. Here we show that when viruses are produced in mammalian cells, ZIKV, but not the closely related dengue virus (DENV) or West Nile virus (WNV), can efficiently infect key placental barrier cells that directly contact the fetal bloodstream. We show that AXL, a receptor tyrosine kinase, is the primary ZIKV entry cofactor on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and that ZIKV uses AXL with much greater efficiency than does DENV or WNV. Consistent with this observation, only ZIKV, but not WNV or DENV, bound the AXL ligand Gas6. In comparison, when DENV and WNV were produced in insect cells, they also infected HUVECs in an AXL-dependent manner. Our data suggest that ZIKV, when produced from mammalian cells, infects fetal endothelial cells much more efficiently than other pathogenic flaviviruses because it binds Gas6 more avidly, which in turn facilitates its interaction with AXL. PMID:28167751

  16. Direct Complement Restriction of Flavivirus Infection Requires Glycan Recognition by Mannose Binding Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Anja; Lin, Tsai-Yu; Beasley, David W.; Stover, Cordula M.; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J.; Pierson, Theodore C.; Diamond, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY An intact complement system is crucial for limiting West Nile virus (WNV) dissemination. Herein, we define how complement directly restricts flavivirus infection in an antibody-independent fashion. Mannose binding lectin (MBL) recognized N-linked glycans on the structural proteins of WNV and Dengue virus (DENV), resulting in neutralization through a C3 and C4-dependent mechanism that utilized both the canonical and bypass lectin activation pathways. For WNV, neutralization occurred with virus produced in insect cells, whereas for DENV, neutralization of insect and mammalian cell-derived virus was observed. Mechanism of action studies suggested that the MBL-dependent neutralization occurred in part, by blocking viral fusion. Experiments in mice showed an MBL-dependent accelerated intravascular clearance of DENV or a WNV mutant with two N-linked glycans on its E protein, but not with wild type WNV. Our studies show that MBL recognizes terminal mannose containing carbohydrates on flaviviruses, resulting in neutralization and efficient clearance in vivo. PMID:20709295

  17. AXL-dependent infection of human fetal endothelial cells distinguishes Zika virus from other pathogenic flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Richard, Audrey Stéphanie; Shim, Byoung-Shik; Kwon, Young-Chan; Zhang, Rong; Otsuka, Yuka; Schmitt, Kimberly; Berri, Fatma; Diamond, Michael S; Choe, Hyeryun

    2017-02-21

    Although a causal relationship between Zika virus (ZIKV) and microcephaly has been established, it remains unclear why ZIKV, but not other pathogenic flaviviruses, causes congenital defects. Here we show that when viruses are produced in mammalian cells, ZIKV, but not the closely related dengue virus (DENV) or West Nile virus (WNV), can efficiently infect key placental barrier cells that directly contact the fetal bloodstream. We show that AXL, a receptor tyrosine kinase, is the primary ZIKV entry cofactor on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and that ZIKV uses AXL with much greater efficiency than does DENV or WNV. Consistent with this observation, only ZIKV, but not WNV or DENV, bound the AXL ligand Gas6. In comparison, when DENV and WNV were produced in insect cells, they also infected HUVECs in an AXL-dependent manner. Our data suggest that ZIKV, when produced from mammalian cells, infects fetal endothelial cells much more efficiently than other pathogenic flaviviruses because it binds Gas6 more avidly, which in turn facilitates its interaction with AXL.

  18. Characterizing the Conformational Landscape of Flavivirus Fusion Peptides via Simulation and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzinek, Jan K.; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Goh, Eunice; Huber, Roland G.; Panzade, Sadhana; Verma, Chandra; Bond, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Conformational changes in the envelope proteins of flaviviruses help to expose the highly conserved fusion peptide (FP), a region which is critical to membrane fusion and host cell infection, and which represents a significant target for antiviral drugs and antibodies. In principle, extended timescale atomic-resolution simulations may be used to characterize the dynamics of such peptides. However, the resultant accuracy is critically dependent upon both the underlying force field and sufficient conformational sampling. In the present study, we report a comprehensive comparison of three simulation methods and four force fields comprising a total of more than 40 μs of sampling. Additionally, we describe the conformational landscape of the FP fold across all flavivirus family members. All investigated methods sampled conformations close to available X-ray structures, but exhibited differently populated ensembles. The best force field / sampling combination was sufficiently accurate to predict that the solvated peptide fold is less ordered than in the crystallographic state, which was subsequently confirmed via circular dichroism and spectrofluorometric measurements. Finally, the conformational landscape of a mutant incapable of membrane fusion was significantly shallower than wild-type variants, suggesting that dynamics should be considered when therapeutically targeting FP epitopes.

  19. Generalized analysis of molecular variance.

    PubMed

    Nievergelt, Caroline M; Libiger, Ondrej; Schork, Nicholas J

    2007-04-06

    Many studies in the fields of genetic epidemiology and applied population genetics are predicated on, or require, an assessment of the genetic background diversity of the individuals chosen for study. A number of strategies have been developed for assessing genetic background diversity. These strategies typically focus on genotype data collected on the individuals in the study, based on a panel of DNA markers. However, many of these strategies are either rooted in cluster analysis techniques, and hence suffer from problems inherent to the assignment of the biological and statistical meaning to resulting clusters, or have formulations that do not permit easy and intuitive extensions. We describe a very general approach to the problem of assessing genetic background diversity that extends the analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) strategy introduced by Excoffier and colleagues some time ago. As in the original AMOVA strategy, the proposed approach, termed generalized AMOVA (GAMOVA), requires a genetic similarity matrix constructed from the allelic profiles of individuals under study and/or allele frequency summaries of the populations from which the individuals have been sampled. The proposed strategy can be used to either estimate the fraction of genetic variation explained by grouping factors such as country of origin, race, or ethnicity, or to quantify the strength of the relationship of the observed genetic background variation to quantitative measures collected on the subjects, such as blood pressure levels or anthropometric measures. Since the formulation of our test statistic is rooted in multivariate linear models, sets of variables can be related to genetic background in multiple regression-like contexts. GAMOVA can also be used to complement graphical representations of genetic diversity such as tree diagrams (dendrograms) or heatmaps. We examine features, advantages, and power of the proposed procedure and showcase its flexibility by using it to analyze a

  20. Variance in the reproductive success of dominant male mountain gorillas.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Andrew M; Gray, Maryke; Uwingeli, Prosper; Mburanumwe, Innocent; Kagoda, Edwin; Robbins, Martha M

    2014-10-01

    Using 30 years of demographic data from 15 groups, this study estimates how harem size, female fertility, and offspring survival may contribute to variance in the siring rates of dominant male mountain gorillas throughout the Virunga Volcano Region. As predicted for polygynous species, differences in harem size were the greatest source of variance in the siring rate, whereas differences in female fertility and offspring survival were relatively minor. Harem size was positively correlated with offspring survival, even after removing all known and suspected cases of infanticide, so the correlation does not seem to reflect differences in the ability of males to protect their offspring. Harem size was not significantly correlated with female fertility, which is consistent with the hypothesis that mountain gorillas have minimal feeding competition. Harem size, offspring survival, and siring rates were not significantly correlated with the proportion of dominant tenures that occurred in multimale groups versus one-male groups; even though infanticide is less likely when those tenures end in multimale groups than one-male groups. In contrast with the relatively small contribution of offspring survival to variance in the siring rates of this study, offspring survival is a major source of variance in the male reproductive success of western gorillas, which have greater predation risks and significantly higher rates of infanticide. If differences in offspring protection are less important among male mountain gorillas than western gorillas, then the relative importance of other factors may be greater for mountain gorillas. Thus, our study illustrates how variance in male reproductive success and its components can differ between closely related species.

  1. Practice reduces task relevant variance modulation and forms nominal trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osu, Rieko; Morishige, Ken-Ichi; Nakanishi, Jun; Miyamoto, Hiroyuki; Kawato, Mitsuo

    2015-12-01

    Humans are capable of achieving complex tasks with redundant degrees of freedom. Much attention has been paid to task relevant variance modulation as an indication of online feedback control strategies to cope with motor variability. Meanwhile, it has been discussed that the brain learns internal models of environments to realize feedforward control with nominal trajectories. Here we examined trajectory variance in both spatial and temporal domains to elucidate the relative contribution of these control schemas. We asked subjects to learn reaching movements with multiple via-points, and found that hand trajectories converged to stereotyped trajectories with the reduction of task relevant variance modulation as learning proceeded. Furthermore, variance reduction was not always associated with task constraints but was highly correlated with the velocity profile. A model assuming noise both on the nominal trajectory and motor command was able to reproduce the observed variance modulation, supporting an expression of nominal trajectories in the brain. The learning-related decrease in task-relevant modulation revealed a reduction in the influence of optimal feedback around the task constraints. After practice, the major part of computation seems to be taken over by the feedforward controller around the nominal trajectory with feedback added only when it becomes necessary.

  2. Increased spatial variance accompanies reorganization of two continental shelf ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Litzow, Michael A; Urban, J Daniel; Laurel, Benjamin J

    2008-09-01

    Phase transitions between alternate stable states in marine ecosystems lead to disruptive changes in ecosystem services, especially fisheries productivity. We used trawl survey data spanning phase transitions in the North Pacific (Gulf of Alaska) and the North Atlantic (Scotian Shelf) to test for increases in ecosystem variability that might provide early warning of such transitions. In both time series, elevated spatial variability in a measure of community composition (ratio of cod [Gadus sp.] abundance to prey abundance) accompanied transitions between ecosystem states, and variability was negatively correlated with distance from the ecosystem transition point. In the Gulf of Alaska, where the phase transition was apparently the result of a sudden perturbation (climate regime shift), variance increased one year before the transition in mean state occurred. On the Scotian Shelf, where ecosystem reorganization was the result of persistent overfishing, a significant increase in variance occurred three years before the transition in mean state was detected. However, we could not reject the alternate explanation that increased variance may also have simply been inherent to the final stable state in that ecosystem. Increased variance has been previously observed around transition points in models, but rarely in real ecosystems, and our results demonstrate the possible management value in tracking the variance of key parameters in exploited ecosystems.

  3. 40 CFR 59.106 - Variance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Automobile Refinish Coatings § 59.106 Variance. (a) Any regulated...

  4. 40 CFR 59.106 - Variance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Automobile Refinish Coatings § 59.106 Variance. (a) Any regulated...

  5. 40 CFR 59.106 - Variance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Automobile Refinish Coatings § 59.106 Variance. (a) Any regulated...

  6. 40 CFR 59.106 - Variance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Automobile Refinish Coatings § 59.106 Variance. (a) Any regulated...

  7. 40 CFR 59.106 - Variance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Automobile Refinish Coatings § 59.106 Variance. (a) Any regulated...

  8. Serological Evidence of Widespread Circulation of West Nile Virus and Other Flaviviruses in Equines of the Pantanal, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pauvolid-Corrêa, Alex; Campos, Zilca; Juliano, Raquel; Velez, Jason; Nogueira, Rita Maria Ribeiro; Komar, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    A recent study reported neutralizing antibodies to West Nile virus (WNV) in horses from four ranches of southern Pantanal. To extend that study, a serosurvey for WNV and 11 Brazilian flaviviruses was conducted with 760 equines, 238 sheep and 61 caimans from 17 local cattle ranches. Among the tested equines, 32 were collected from a ranch where a neurologic disorder outbreak had been recently reported. The sera were initially screened by using a blocking ELISA and then titrated by 90% plaque-reduction neutralization test (PRNT90) for 12 flaviviruses. Employing the criterion of 4-fold greater titer, 78 (10.3%) equines were seropositive for Ilheus virus, 59 (7.8%) for Saint Louis encephalitis virus, 24 (3.2%) for WNV, two (0.3%) for Cacipacore virus and one (0.1%) for Rocio virus. No serological evidence was found linking the neurological disease that affected local equines to WNV. All caimans and sheep were negative by blocking ELISA for flaviviruses. There were no seropositive equines for Bussuquara, Iguape, Yellow fever and all four Dengue virus serotypes. The detection of WNV-seropositive equines in ten ranches and ILHV and SLEV-seropositive equines in fourteen ranches of two different sub-regions of Pantanal is strong evidence of widespread circulation of these flaviviruses in the region. PMID:24551266

  9. Membrane Anchors of the Structural Flavivirus Proteins and Their Role in Virus Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Blazevic, Janja; Rouha, Harald; Bradt, Victoria; Heinz, Franz X.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The structural proteins of flaviviruses carry a unique set of transmembrane domains (TMDs) at their C termini that are derived from the mode of viral polyprotein processing. They function as internal signal and stop-transfer sequences during protein translation, but possible additional roles in protein interactions required during assembly and maturation of viral particles are ill defined. To shed light on the role of TMDs in these processes, we engineered a set of tick-borne encephalitis virus mutants in which these structural elements were replaced in different combinations by the homologous sequences of a distantly related flavivirus (Japanese encephalitis virus). The effects of these modifications were analyzed with respect to protein synthesis, viral particle secretion, specific infectivity, and acidic-pH-induced maturation processes. We provide evidence that interactions involving the double-membrane anchor of the envelope protein E (a unique feature compared to other viral fusion proteins) contribute substantially to particle assembly, stability, and maturation. Disturbances of the inter- and intra-TMD interactions of E resulted in the secretion of a larger proportion of capsidless subviral particles at the expense of whole virions, suggesting a possible role in the still incompletely understood mechanism of capsid integration during virus budding. In contrast, the TMD initially anchoring the C protein to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane does not appear to take part in envelope protein interactions. We also show that E TMDs are involved in the envelope protein rearrangements that are triggered by acidic pH in the trans-Golgi network and represent a hallmark of virus maturation. IMPORTANCE The assembly of flaviviruses occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum and leads to the formation of immature, noninfectious particles composed of an RNA-containing capsid surrounded by a lipid membrane, with the two integrated envelope proteins, prM and E, arranged in

  10. Detection of RNA from a Novel West Nile-like Virus and High Prevalence of an Insect-specific Flavivirus in Mosquitoes in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Farfan-Ale, Jose A.; Loroño-Pino, Maria A.; Garcia-Rejon, Julian E.; Hovav, Einat; Powers, Ann M.; Lin, Ming; Dorman, Karin S.; Platt, Kenneth B.; Bartholomay, Lyric C.; Soto, Victor; Beaty, Barry J.; Lanciotti, Robert S.; Blitvich, Bradley J.

    2009-01-01

    As part of our ongoing surveillance efforts for West Nile virus (WNV) in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico, 96,687 mosquitoes collected from January through December 2007 were assayed by virus isolation in mammalian cells. Three mosquito pools caused cytopathic effect. Two isolates were orthobunyaviruses (Cache Valley virus and Kairi virus) and the identity of the third infectious agent was not determined. A subset of mosquitoes was also tested by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using WNV-, flavivirus-, alphavirus-, and orthobunyavirus-specific primers. A total of 7,009 Culex quinquefasciatus in 210 pools were analyzed. Flavivirus RNA was detected in 146 (70%) pools, and all PCR products were sequenced. The nucleotide sequence of one PCR product was most closely related (71–73% identity) with homologous regions of several other flaviviruses, including WNV, St. Louis encephalitis virus, and Ilheus virus. These data suggest that a novel flavivirus (tentatively named T’Ho virus) is present in Mexico. The other 145 PCR products correspond to Culex flavivirus, an insect-specific flavivirus first isolated in Japan in 2003. Culex flavivirus was isolated in mosquito cells from approximately one in four homogenates tested. The genomic sequence of one isolate was determined. Surprisingly, heterogeneous sequences were identified at the distal end of the 5′ untranslated region. PMID:19141845

  11. Variance Design and Air Pollution Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrar, Terry A.; Brownstein, Alan B.

    1975-01-01

    Air pollution control authorities were forced to relax air quality standards during the winter of 1972 by granting variances. This paper examines the institutional characteristics of these variance policies from an economic incentive standpoint, sets up desirable structural criteria for institutional design and arrives at policy guidelines for…

  12. 10 CFR 1022.16 - Variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Variances. 1022.16 Section 1022.16 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.16 Variances. (a) Emergency actions. DOE may...

  13. 10 CFR 1022.16 - Variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Variances. 1022.16 Section 1022.16 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.16 Variances. (a) Emergency actions. DOE may...

  14. 10 CFR 1022.16 - Variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Variances. 1022.16 Section 1022.16 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.16 Variances. (a) Emergency actions. DOE may...

  15. 10 CFR 1022.16 - Variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Variances. 1022.16 Section 1022.16 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.16 Variances. (a) Emergency actions. DOE may...

  16. 10 CFR 1022.16 - Variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Variances. 1022.16 Section 1022.16 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.16 Variances. (a) Emergency actions. DOE may...

  17. 40 CFR 142.41 - Variance request.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....41 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION Variances Issued by the Administrator Under Section 1415(a) of the Act § 142.41 Variance request. A supplier of water may request the granting of...

  18. 40 CFR 142.41 - Variance request.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....41 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION Variances Issued by the Administrator Under Section 1415(a) of the Act § 142.41 Variance request. A supplier of water may request the granting of...

  19. 40 CFR 142.41 - Variance request.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....41 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION Variances Issued by the Administrator Under Section 1415(a) of the Act § 142.41 Variance request. A supplier of water may request the granting of...

  20. Nonlinear Epigenetic Variance: Review and Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kan, Kees-Jan; Ploeger, Annemie; Raijmakers, Maartje E. J.; Dolan, Conor V.; van Der Maas, Han L. J.

    2010-01-01

    We present a review of empirical evidence that suggests that a substantial portion of phenotypic variance is due to nonlinear (epigenetic) processes during ontogenesis. The role of such processes as a source of phenotypic variance in human behaviour genetic studies is not fully appreciated. In addition to our review, we present simulation studies…

  1. Consistent Small-Sample Variances for Six Gamma-Family Measures of Ordinal Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol M.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-family measures are bivariate ordinal correlation measures that form a family because they all reduce to Goodman and Kruskal's gamma in the absence of ties (1954). For several gamma-family indices, more than one variance estimator has been introduced. In previous research, the "consistent" variance estimator described by Cliff and…

  2. Small Variance in Growth Rate in Annual Plants has Large Effects on Genetic Drift

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When plant size is strongly correlated with plant reproduction, variance in growth rates results in a lognormal distribution of seed production within a population. Fecundity variance affects effective population size (Ne), which reflects the ability of a population to maintain beneficial mutations ...

  3. The Flavivirus Precursor Membrane-Envelope Protein Complex: Structure and Maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Long; Lok, Shee-Mei; Yu, I-Mei; Zhang, Ying; Kuhn, Richard J.; Chen, Jue; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2008-09-17

    Many viruses go through a maturation step in the final stages of assembly before being transmitted to another host. The maturation process of flaviviruses is directed by the proteolytic cleavage of the precursor membrane protein (prM), turning inert virus into infectious particles. We have determined the 2.2 angstrom resolution crystal structure of a recombinant protein in which the dengue virus prM is linked to the envelope glycoprotein E. The structure represents the prM-E heterodimer and fits well into the cryo-electron microscopy density of immature virus at neutral pH. The pr peptide {beta}-barrel structure covers the fusion loop in E, preventing fusion with host cell membranes. The structure provides a basis for identifying the stages of its pH-directed conformational metamorphosis during maturation, ending with release of pr when budding from the host.

  4. Molecular characterization of three Zika flaviviruses obtained from sylvatic mosquitoes in the Central African Republic.

    PubMed

    Berthet, Nicolas; Nakouné, Emmanuel; Kamgang, Basile; Selekon, Benjamin; Descorps-Declère, Stéphane; Gessain, Antoine; Manuguerra, Jean-Claude; Kazanji, Mirdad

    2014-12-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging pathogen belonging to the Spondweni serocomplex within the genus Flavivirus. It has been isolated from several mosquito species. Two lineages of ZIKV have been defined by polyprotein homology. Using high-throughput sequencing, we obtained and characterized three complete genomes of ZIKV isolated between 1976 and 1980 in the Central African Republic. The three viruses were isolated from two species of mosquito, Aedes africanus and Ae. opok. Two sequences from Ae. africanus had 99.9% nucleotide sequence identity and 100% amino acid identity, whereas the complete genome obtained from Ae. opok had 98.3% nucleotide identity and 99.4% amino acid identity with the other two genomes. Phylogenetic analysis based on the amino acid sequence of the polyprotein showed that the three ZIKV strains clustered together but diverged from all other ZIKV strains. Our molecular data suggest that a different subtype of West African ZIKV strains circulated in Aedes species in Central Africa.

  5. Portfolio optimization with mean-variance model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoe, Lam Weng; Siew, Lam Weng

    2016-06-01

    Investors wish to achieve the target rate of return at the minimum level of risk in their investment. Portfolio optimization is an investment strategy that can be used to minimize the portfolio risk and can achieve the target rate of return. The mean-variance model has been proposed in portfolio optimization. The mean-variance model is an optimization model that aims to minimize the portfolio risk which is the portfolio variance. The objective of this study is to construct the optimal portfolio using the mean-variance model. The data of this study consists of weekly returns of 20 component stocks of FTSE Bursa Malaysia Kuala Lumpur Composite Index (FBMKLCI). The results of this study show that the portfolio composition of the stocks is different. Moreover, investors can get the return at minimum level of risk with the constructed optimal mean-variance portfolio.

  6. Rational design of a flavivirus vaccine by abolishing viral RNA 2'-O methylation.

    PubMed

    Li, Shi-Hua; Dong, Hongping; Li, Xiao-Feng; Xie, Xuping; Zhao, Hui; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Wang, Xiao-Yu; Ye, Qing; Zhu, Shun-Ya; Wang, Hong-Jiang; Zhang, Bo; Leng, Qi-Bin; Zuest, Roland; Qin, E-De; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2013-05-01

    Viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm cannot access the host nuclear capping machinery. These viruses have evolved viral methyltransferase(s) to methylate N-7 and 2'-O cap of their RNA; alternatively, they "snatch" host mRNA cap to form the 5' end of viral RNA. The function of 2'-O methylation of viral RNA cap is to mimic cellular mRNA and to evade host innate immune restriction. A cytoplasmic virus defective in 2'-O methylation is replicative, but its viral RNA lacks 2'-O methylation and is recognized and eliminated by the host immune response. Such a mutant virus could be rationally designed as a live attenuated vaccine. Here, we use Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), an important mosquito-borne flavivirus, to prove this novel vaccine concept. We show that JEV methyltransferase is responsible for both N-7 and 2'-O cap methylations as well as evasion of host innate immune response. Recombinant virus completely defective in 2'-O methylation was stable in cell culture after being passaged for >30 days. The mutant virus was attenuated in mice, elicited robust humoral and cellular immune responses, and retained the engineered mutation in vivo. A single dose of immunization induced full protection against lethal challenge with JEV strains in mice. Mechanistically, the attenuation phenotype was attributed to the enhanced sensitivity of the mutant virus to the antiviral effects of interferon and IFIT proteins. Collectively, the results demonstrate the feasibility of using 2'-O methylation-defective virus as a vaccine approach; this vaccine approach should be applicable to other flaviviruses and nonflaviviruses that encode their own viral 2'-O methyltransferases.

  7. Flaviviruses as a Cause of Undifferentiated Fever in Sindh Province, Pakistan: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Erum; Farooqi, Joveria Q.; Barr, Kelli L.; Prakoso, Dhani; Nasir, Amna; Kanji, Akbar; Shakoor, Sadia; Malik, Faisal Riaz; Hasan, Rumina; Lednicky, John A.; Long, Maureen T.

    2016-01-01

    Arboviral diseases are expanding worldwide, yet global surveillance is often limited due to diplomatic and cultural barriers between nations. With human encroachment into new habitats, mosquito-borne viruses are also invading new areas. The actual prevalence of expanding arboviruses is unknown in Pakistan due to inappropriate diagnosis and poor testing for arboviral diseases. The primary objective of this study was to document evidence of flavivirus infections as the cause of undifferentiated fever in Pakistan. Through a cooperative effort between the USA and Pakistan, patient exposure to dengue virus (DENV), West Nile virus (WNV), and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) was examined in Sindh Province for the first time in decades. Initial results from the 2015 arbovirus season consisting of a cross-sectional study of 467 patients in 5 sites, DENV NS1 antigen was identified in 63 of the screened subjects, WNV IgM antibodies in 16 patients, and JEV IgM antibodies in 32 patients. In addition, a number of practical findings were made including (1) in silico optimization of RT-PCR primers for flavivirus strains circulating in the Middle East, (2) shipping and storage of RT-PCR master mix and other reagents at ambient temperature, (3) Smart phone applications for the collection of data in areas with limited infrastructure, and (4) fast and reliable shipping for transport of reagents and specimens to and from the Middle East. Furthermore, this work is producing a group of highly trained local scientists and medical professionals disseminating modern scientific methods and more accurate diagnostic procedures to the community. PMID:26909342

  8. The mean and variance of phylogenetic diversity under rarefaction.

    PubMed

    Nipperess, David A; Matsen, Frederick A

    2013-06-01

    Phylogenetic diversity (PD) depends on sampling depth, which complicates the comparison of PD between samples of different depth. One approach to dealing with differing sample depth for a given diversity statistic is to rarefy, which means to take a random subset of a given size of the original sample. Exact analytical formulae for the mean and variance of species richness under rarefaction have existed for some time but no such solution exists for PD.We have derived exact formulae for the mean and variance of PD under rarefaction. We confirm that these formulae are correct by comparing exact solution mean and variance to that calculated by repeated random (Monte Carlo) subsampling of a dataset of stem counts of woody shrubs of Toohey Forest, Queensland, Australia. We also demonstrate the application of the method using two examples: identifying hotspots of mammalian diversity in Australasian ecoregions, and characterising the human vaginal microbiome.There is a very high degree of correspondence between the analytical and random subsampling methods for calculating mean and variance of PD under rarefaction, although the Monte Carlo method requires a large number of random draws to converge on the exact solution for the variance.Rarefaction of mammalian PD of ecoregions in Australasia to a common standard of 25 species reveals very different rank orderings of ecoregions, indicating quite different hotspots of diversity than those obtained for unrarefied PD. The application of these methods to the vaginal microbiome shows that a classical score used to quantify bacterial vaginosis is correlated with the shape of the rarefaction curve.The analytical formulae for the mean and variance of PD under rarefaction are both exact and more efficient than repeated subsampling. Rarefaction of PD allows for many applications where comparisons of samples of different depth is required.

  9. Variance Assistance Document: Land Disposal Restrictions Treatability Variances and Determinations of Equivalent Treatment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document provides assistance to those seeking to submit a variance request for LDR treatability variances and determinations of equivalent treatment regarding the hazardous waste land disposal restrictions program.

  10. Negative ulnar variance is not a risk factor for Kienböck's disease.

    PubMed

    D'Hoore, K; De Smet, L; Verellen, K; Vral, J; Fabry, G

    1994-03-01

    Ulnar variance was measured in standardized conditions in 125 normal wrists and in 52 patients with Kienböck's disease. No significant difference in ulnar variance between a sex/age-matched control group and a group of patients affected with Kienböck's disease was found. A positive correlation was found between age and ulnar variance. No significant difference was found between men and women. Based on these results, negative ulnar variance does not seem to be an important factor in the etiology of Kienböck's disease.

  11. Selection and genetic (co)variance in bighorn sheep.

    PubMed

    Coltman, David W; O'Donoghue, Paul; Hogg, John T; Festa-Bianchet, Marco

    2005-06-01

    Genetic theory predicts that directional selection should deplete additive genetic variance for traits closely related to fitness, and may favor the maintenance of alleles with antagonistically pleiotropic effects on fitness-related traits. Trait heritability is therefore expected to decline with the degree of association with fitness, and some genetic correlations between selected traits are expected to be negative. Here we demonstrate a negative relationship between trait heritability and association with lifetime reproductive success in a wild population of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) at Ram Mountain, Alberta, Canada. Lower heritability for fitness-related traits, however, was not wholly a consequence of declining genetic variance, because those traits showed high levels of residual variance. Genetic correlations estimated between pairs of traits with significant heritability were positive. Principal component analyses suggest that positive relationships between morphometric traits constitute the main axis of genetic variation. Trade-offs in the form of negative genetic or phenotypic correlations among the traits we have measured do not appear to constrain the potential for evolution in this population.

  12. Portfolio optimization using median-variance approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan Mohd, Wan Rosanisah; Mohamad, Daud; Mohamed, Zulkifli

    2013-04-01

    Optimization models have been applied in many decision-making problems particularly in portfolio selection. Since the introduction of Markowitz's theory of portfolio selection, various approaches based on mathematical programming have been introduced such as mean-variance, mean-absolute deviation, mean-variance-skewness and conditional value-at-risk (CVaR) mainly to maximize return and minimize risk. However most of the approaches assume that the distribution of data is normal and this is not generally true. As an alternative, in this paper, we employ the median-variance approach to improve the portfolio optimization. This approach has successfully catered both types of normal and non-normal distribution of data. With this actual representation, we analyze and compare the rate of return and risk between the mean-variance and the median-variance based portfolio which consist of 30 stocks from Bursa Malaysia. The results in this study show that the median-variance approach is capable to produce a lower risk for each return earning as compared to the mean-variance approach.

  13. Neural field theory with variance dynamics.

    PubMed

    Robinson, P A

    2013-06-01

    Previous neural field models have mostly been concerned with prediction of mean neural activity and with second order quantities such as its variance, but without feedback of second order quantities on the dynamics. Here the effects of feedback of the variance on the steady states and adiabatic dynamics of neural systems are calculated using linear neural field theory to estimate the neural voltage variance, then including this quantity in the total variance parameter of the nonlinear firing rate-voltage response function, and thus into determination of the fixed points and the variance itself. The general results further clarify the limits of validity of approaches with and without inclusion of variance dynamics. Specific applications show that stability against a saddle-node bifurcation is reduced in a purely cortical system, but can be either increased or decreased in the corticothalamic case, depending on the initial state. Estimates of critical variance scalings near saddle-node bifurcation are also found, including physiologically based normalizations and new scalings for mean firing rate and the position of the bifurcation.

  14. Variance estimation for stratified propensity score estimators.

    PubMed

    Williamson, E J; Morley, R; Lucas, A; Carpenter, J R

    2012-07-10

    Propensity score methods are increasingly used to estimate the effect of a treatment or exposure on an outcome in non-randomised studies. We focus on one such method, stratification on the propensity score, comparing it with the method of inverse-probability weighting by the propensity score. The propensity score--the conditional probability of receiving the treatment given observed covariates--is usually an unknown probability estimated from the data. Estimators for the variance of treatment effect estimates typically used in practice, however, do not take into account that the propensity score itself has been estimated from the data. By deriving the asymptotic marginal variance of the stratified estimate of treatment effect, correctly taking into account the estimation of the propensity score, we show that routinely used variance estimators are likely to produce confidence intervals that are too conservative when the propensity score model includes variables that predict (cause) the outcome, but only weakly predict the treatment. In contrast, a comparison with the analogous marginal variance for the inverse probability weighted (IPW) estimator shows that routinely used variance estimators for the IPW estimator are likely to produce confidence intervals that are almost always too conservative. Because exact calculation of the asymptotic marginal variance is likely to be complex, particularly for the stratified estimator, we suggest that bootstrap estimates of variance should be used in practice.

  15. Host Range Restriction of Insect-Specific Flaviviruses Occurs at Several Levels of the Viral Life Cycle.

    PubMed

    Junglen, Sandra; Korries, Marvin; Grasse, Wolfgang; Wieseler, Janett; Kopp, Anne; Hermanns, Kyra; León-Juárez, Moises; Drosten, Christian; Kümmerer, Beate Mareike

    2017-01-01

    The genus Flavivirus contains emerging arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) infecting vertebrates, as well as insect-specific viruses (ISVs) (i.e., viruses whose host range is restricted to insects). ISVs are evolutionary precursors to arboviruses. Knowledge of the nature of the ISV infection block in vertebrates could identify functions necessary for the expansion of the host range toward vertebrates. Mapping of host restrictions by complementation of ISV and arbovirus genome functions could generate knowledge critical to predicting arbovirus emergence. Here we isolated a novel flavivirus, termed Niénokoué virus (NIEV), from mosquitoes sampled in Côte d'Ivoire. NIEV groups with insect-specific flaviviruses (ISFs) in phylogeny and grows in insect cells but not in vertebrate cells. We generated an infectious NIEV cDNA clone and a NIEV reporter replicon to study growth restrictions of NIEV in comparison to yellow fever virus (YFV), for which the same tools are available. Efficient RNA replication of the NIEV reporter replicon was observed in insect cells but not in vertebrate cells. Initial translation of the input replicon RNA in vertebrate cells was functional, but RNA replication did not occur. Chimeric YFV carrying the envelope proteins of NIEV was recovered via electroporation in C6/36 insect cells but did not infect vertebrate cells, indicating a block at the level of entry. Since the YF/NIEV chimera readily produced infectious particles in insect cells but not in vertebrate cells despite efficient RNA replication, restriction is also determined at the level of assembly/release. Taking the results together, the ability of ISF to infect vertebrates is blocked at several levels, including attachment/entry and RNA replication as well as assembly/release. IMPORTANCE Most viruses of the genus Flavivirus, e.g., YFV and dengue virus, are mosquito borne and transmitted to vertebrates during blood feeding of mosquitoes. Within the last decade, an increasing number

  16. Host Range Restriction of Insect-Specific Flaviviruses Occurs at Several Levels of the Viral Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Junglen, Sandra; Korries, Marvin; Grasse, Wolfgang; Wieseler, Janett; Kopp, Anne; Hermanns, Kyra; León-Juárez, Moises; Drosten, Christian

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genus Flavivirus contains emerging arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) infecting vertebrates, as well as insect-specific viruses (ISVs) (i.e., viruses whose host range is restricted to insects). ISVs are evolutionary precursors to arboviruses. Knowledge of the nature of the ISV infection block in vertebrates could identify functions necessary for the expansion of the host range toward vertebrates. Mapping of host restrictions by complementation of ISV and arbovirus genome functions could generate knowledge critical to predicting arbovirus emergence. Here we isolated a novel flavivirus, termed Niénokoué virus (NIEV), from mosquitoes sampled in Côte d’Ivoire. NIEV groups with insect-specific flaviviruses (ISFs) in phylogeny and grows in insect cells but not in vertebrate cells. We generated an infectious NIEV cDNA clone and a NIEV reporter replicon to study growth restrictions of NIEV in comparison to yellow fever virus (YFV), for which the same tools are available. Efficient RNA replication of the NIEV reporter replicon was observed in insect cells but not in vertebrate cells. Initial translation of the input replicon RNA in vertebrate cells was functional, but RNA replication did not occur. Chimeric YFV carrying the envelope proteins of NIEV was recovered via electroporation in C6/36 insect cells but did not infect vertebrate cells, indicating a block at the level of entry. Since the YF/NIEV chimera readily produced infectious particles in insect cells but not in vertebrate cells despite efficient RNA replication, restriction is also determined at the level of assembly/release. Taking the results together, the ability of ISF to infect vertebrates is blocked at several levels, including attachment/entry and RNA replication as well as assembly/release. IMPORTANCE Most viruses of the genus Flavivirus, e.g., YFV and dengue virus, are mosquito borne and transmitted to vertebrates during blood feeding of mosquitoes. Within the last decade, an

  17. Reducing variance in batch partitioning measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mariner, Paul E.

    2010-08-11

    The partitioning experiment is commonly performed with little or no attention to reducing measurement variance. Batch test procedures such as those used to measure K{sub d} values (e.g., ASTM D 4646 and EPA402 -R-99-004A) do not explain how to evaluate measurement uncertainty nor how to minimize measurement variance. In fact, ASTM D 4646 prescribes a sorbent:water ratio that prevents variance minimization. Consequently, the variance of a set of partitioning measurements can be extreme and even absurd. Such data sets, which are commonplace, hamper probabilistic modeling efforts. An error-savvy design requires adjustment of the solution:sorbent ratio so that approximately half of the sorbate partitions to the sorbent. Results of Monte Carlo simulations indicate that this simple step can markedly improve the precision and statistical characterization of partitioning uncertainty.

  18. 78 FR 14122 - Revocation of Permanent Variances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-04

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Revocation of Permanent Variances AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Notice of revocation. SUMMARY: With this notice, OSHA is... into consideration these newly corrected cross references. DATES: The effective date of the...

  19. 40 CFR 59.206 - Variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Consumer Products § 59.206 Variances. (a) Any regulated entity who...

  20. 40 CFR 59.206 - Variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Consumer Products § 59.206 Variances. (a) Any regulated entity who...

  1. 40 CFR 59.206 - Variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Consumer Products § 59.206 Variances. (a) Any regulated entity who...

  2. 40 CFR 59.206 - Variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Consumer Products § 59.206 Variances. (a) Any regulated entity who...

  3. 40 CFR 59.206 - Variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Consumer Products § 59.206 Variances. (a) Any regulated entity who...

  4. Variance of wind estimates using spaced antenna techniques with the MU radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassenpflug, G.; Yamamoto, M.; Fukao, S.

    2004-11-01

    Variance of horizontal wind estimates in conditions of anisotropic scattering are obtained for the Spaced Antenna (SA) Full Correlation Analysis (FCA) method of Holloway et al. (1997b) and Doviak et al. (1996), but are equally applicable to the Briggs method of FCA. Variance and covariance of cross-correlation magnitudes are theoretically estimated, and the standard theory of error propagation is used to estimate the variance of the wind components for the infinite SNR case. The effect of baseline orientation is investigated, and experimental data from the MU radar in Japan is presented.

  5. Phonocardiographic diagnosis of aortic ball variance.

    PubMed

    Hylen, J C; Kloster, F E; Herr, R H; Hull, P Q; Ames, A W; Starr, A; Griswold, H E

    1968-07-01

    Fatty infiltration causing changes in the silastic poppet of the Model 1000 series Starr-Edwards aortic valve prostheses (ball variance) has been detected with increasing frequency and can result in sudden death. Phonocardiograms were recorded on 12 patients with ball variance confirmed by operation and of 31 controls. Ten of the 12 patients with ball variance were distinguished from the controls by an aortic opening sound (AO) less than half as intense as the aortic closure sound (AC) at the second right intercostal space (AO/AC ratio less than 0.5). Both AO and AC were decreased in two patients with ball variance, with the loss of the characteristic high frequency and amplitude of these sounds. The only patient having a diminished AO/AC ratio (0.42) without ball variance at reoperation had a clot extending over the aortic valve struts. The phonocardiographic findings have been the most reliable objective evidence of ball variance in patients with Starr-Edwards aortic prosthesis of the Model 1000 series.

  6. Single-cell tracking of flavivirus RNA uncovers species-specific interactions with the immune system dictating disease outcome.

    PubMed

    Douam, Florian; Hrebikova, Gabriela; Albrecht, Yentli E Soto; Sellau, Julie; Sharon, Yael; Ding, Qiang; Ploss, Alexander

    2017-03-14

    Positive-sense RNA viruses pose increasing health and economic concerns worldwide. Our limited understanding of how these viruses interact with their host and how these processes lead to virulence and disease seriously hampers the development of anti-viral strategies. Here, we demonstrate the tracking of (+) and (-) sense viral RNA at single-cell resolution within complex subsets of the human and murine immune system in different mouse models. Our results provide insights into how a prototypic flavivirus, yellow fever virus (YFV-17D), differentially interacts with murine and human hematopoietic cells in these mouse models and how these dynamics influence distinct outcomes of infection. We detect (-) YFV-17D RNA in specific secondary lymphoid compartments and cell subsets not previously recognized as permissive for YFV replication, and we highlight potential virus-host interaction events that could be pivotal in regulating flavivirus virulence and attenuation.

  7. FLAVIdB: A data mining system for knowledge discovery in flaviviruses with direct applications in immunology and vaccinology

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Lars Rønn; Zhang, Guang Lan; Reinherz, Ellis L.; Brusic, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Background The flavivirus genus is unusually large, comprising more than 70 species, of which more than half are known human pathogens. It includes a set of clinically relevant infectious agents such as dengue, West Nile, yellow fever, and Japanese encephalitis viruses. Although these pathogens have been studied extensively, safe and efficient vaccines lack for the majority of the flaviviruses. Results We have assembled a database that combines antigenic data of flaviviruses, specialized analysis tools, and workflows for automated complex analyses focusing on applications in immunology and vaccinology. FLAVIdB contains 12,858 entries of flavivirus antigen sequences, 184 verified T-cell epitopes, 201 verified B-cell epitopes, and 4 representative molecular structures of the dengue virus envelope protein. FLAVIdB was assembled by collection, annotation, and integration of data from GenBank, GenPept, UniProt, IEDB, and PDB. The data were subject to extensive quality control (redundancy elimination, error detection, and vocabulary consolidation). Further annotation of selected functionally relevant features was performed by organizing information extracted from the literature. The database was incorporated into a web-accessible data mining system, combining specialized data analysis tools for integrated analysis of relevant data categories (protein sequences, macromolecular structures, and immune epitopes). The data mining system includes tools for variability and conservation analysis, T-cell epitope prediction, and characterization of neutralizing components of B-cell epitopes. FLAVIdB is accessible at cvc.dfci.harvard.edu/flavi/ Conclusion FLAVIdB represents a new generation of databases in which data and tools are integrated into a data mining infrastructures specifically designed to aid rational vaccine design by discovery of vaccine targets. PMID:25544857

  8. A conserved region in the prM protein is a critical determinant in the assembly of flavivirus particles.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Kentaro; Igarashi, Manabu; Ichii, Osamu; Yokozawa, Kana; Ito, Kimihito; Kariwa, Hiroaki; Takashima, Ikuo

    2012-01-01

    Flaviviruses are assembled to bud into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are secreted through the vesicle transport pathway, but the details of the molecular mechanism of virion assembly remain largely unknown. In this study, a highly conserved region in the prM protein was identified among flaviviruses. In the subviral particle (SP) system of tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) and Japanese encephalitis virus, secretion of SPs was impaired by a mutation in the conserved region in the prM protein. Viral proteins were sparse in the Golgi complex and accumulated in the ER. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that long filamentous structures, rather than spherical SPs, were observed in the lumen of the ER as a result of the mutation. The production of infectious virions derived from infectious cDNA of TBEV was also reduced by mutations in the conserved region. Molecular modelling analysis suggested that the conserved region is important for the association of prM-envelope protein heterodimers in the formation of a spike of immature virion. These results are the first demonstration that the conserved region in the prM protein is a molecular determinant for the flavivirus assembly process.

  9. Identifying Candidate Targets of Immune Responses in Zika Virus Based on Homology to Epitopes in Other Flavivirus Species

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojun; Vaughan, Kerrie; Weiskopf, Daniela; Grifoni, Alba; Diamond, Michael S.; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The current outbreak of Zika virus has resulted in a massive effort to accelerate the development of ZIKV-specific diagnostics and vaccines. These efforts would benefit greatly from the definition of the specific epitope targets of immune responses in ZIKV, but given the relatively recent emergence of ZIKV as a pandemic threat, few such data are available. Methods: We used a large body of epitope data for other Flaviviruses that was available from the IEDB for a comparative analysis against the ZIKV proteome in order to project targets of immune responses in ZIKV. Results: We found a significant level of overlap between known antigenic sites from other Flavivirus proteins with residues on the ZIKV polyprotein. The E and NS1 proteins shared functional antibody epitope sites, whereas regions of T cell reactivity were conserved within NS3 and NS5 for ZIKV.  Discussion: Our epitope based analysis provides guidance for which regions of the ZIKV polyprotein are most likely unique targets of ZIKV-specific antibodies, and which targets in ZIKV are most likely to be cross-reactive with other Flavivirus species. These data may therefore provide insights for the development of antibody- and T cell-based ZIKV-specific diagnostics, therapeutics and prophylaxis. PMID:28018746

  10. Response variance in functional maps: neural darwinism revisited.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hirokazu; Yokota, Ryo; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which functional maps and map plasticity contribute to cortical computation remain controversial. Recent studies have revisited the theory of neural Darwinism to interpret the learning-induced map plasticity and neuronal heterogeneity observed in the cortex. Here, we hypothesize that the Darwinian principle provides a substrate to explain the relationship between neuron heterogeneity and cortical functional maps. We demonstrate in the rat auditory cortex that the degree of response variance is closely correlated with the size of its representational area. Further, we show that the response variance within a given population is altered through training. These results suggest that larger representational areas may help to accommodate heterogeneous populations of neurons. Thus, functional maps and map plasticity are likely to play essential roles in Darwinian computation, serving as effective, but not absolutely necessary, structures to generate diverse response properties within a neural population.

  11. Discrimination of frequency variance for tonal sequences.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Andrew J; Viemeister, Neal F; Stellmack, Mark A

    2014-12-01

    Real-world auditory stimuli are highly variable across occurrences and sources. The present study examined the sensitivity of human listeners to differences in global stimulus variability. In a two-interval, forced-choice task, variance discrimination was measured using sequences of five 100-ms tone pulses. The frequency of each pulse was sampled randomly from a distribution that was Gaussian in logarithmic frequency. In the non-signal interval, the sampled distribution had a variance of σSTAN (2), while in the signal interval, the variance of the sequence was σSIG (2) (with σSIG (2) >  σSTAN (2)). The listener's task was to choose the interval with the larger variance. To constrain possible decision strategies, the mean frequency of the sampling distribution of each interval was randomly chosen for each presentation. Psychometric functions were measured for various values of σSTAN (2). Although the performance was remarkably similar across listeners, overall performance was poorer than that of an ideal observer (IO) which perfectly compares interval variances. However, like the IO, Weber's Law behavior was observed, with a constant ratio of ( σSIG (2)- σSTAN (2)) to σSTAN (2) yielding similar performance. A model which degraded the IO with a frequency-resolution noise and a computational noise provided a reasonable fit to the real data.

  12. Variance estimation for nucleotide substitution models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weishan; Wang, Hsiuying

    2015-09-01

    The current variance estimators for most evolutionary models were derived when a nucleotide substitution number estimator was approximated with a simple first order Taylor expansion. In this study, we derive three variance estimators for the F81, F84, HKY85 and TN93 nucleotide substitution models, respectively. They are obtained using the second order Taylor expansion of the substitution number estimator, the first order Taylor expansion of a squared deviation and the second order Taylor expansion of a squared deviation, respectively. These variance estimators are compared with the existing variance estimator in terms of a simulation study. It shows that the variance estimator, which is derived using the second order Taylor expansion of a squared deviation, is more accurate than the other three estimators. In addition, we also compare these estimators with an estimator derived by the bootstrap method. The simulation shows that the performance of this bootstrap estimator is similar to the estimator derived by the second order Taylor expansion of a squared deviation. Since the latter one has an explicit form, it is more efficient than the bootstrap estimator.

  13. Functions of the 3' and 5' genome RNA regions of members of the genus Flavivirus.

    PubMed

    Brinton, Margo A; Basu, Mausumi

    2015-08-03

    The positive sense genomes of members of the genus Flavivirus in the family Flaviviridae are ∼ 11 kb in length and have a 5' type I cap but no 3' poly-A. The 3' and 5' terminal regions contain short conserved sequences that are proposed to be repeated remnants of an ancient sequence. However, the functions of most of these conserved sequences have not yet been determined. The terminal regions of the genome also contain multiple conserved RNA structures. Functional data for many of these structures have been obtained. Three sets of complementary 3' and 5' terminal region sequences, some of which are located in conserved RNA structures, interact to form a panhandle structure that is required for initiation of minus strand RNA synthesis with the 5' terminal structure functioning as the promoter. How the switch from the terminal RNA structure base pairing to the long distance RNA-RNA interaction is triggered and regulated is not well understood but evidence suggests involvement of a cell protein binding to three sites on the 3' terminal RNA structures and a cis-acting metastable 3' RNA element in the 3' terminal RNA structure. Cell proteins may also be involved in facilitating exponential replication of nascent genomic RNA within replication vesicles at later times of the infection cycle. Other conserved RNA structures and/or sequences in the 3' and 5' terminal regions have been proposed to regulate genome translation. Additional functions of the 3' and 5' terminal sequences have also been reported.

  14. Defining Hsp70 Subnetworks in Dengue Virus Replication Reveals Key Vulnerability in Flavivirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Taguwa, Shuhei; Maringer, Kevin; Li, Xiaokai; Bernal-Rubio, Dabeiba; Rauch, Jennifer N.; Gestwicki, Jason E.; Andino, Raul; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Frydman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Summary Viral protein homeostasis depends entirely on the machinery of the infected cell. Accordingly, viruses can illuminate the interplay between cellular proteostasis components and their distinct substrates. Here we define how the Hsp70 chaperone network mediates the dengue virus life cycle. Cytosolic Hsp70 isoforms are required at distinct steps of the viral cycle, including entry, RNA replication and virion biogenesis. Hsp70 function at each step is specified by nine distinct DNAJ cofactors. Of these, DnaJB11 relocalizes to virus-induced replication complexes to promote RNA synthesis, while DnaJB6 associates with capsid protein and facilitates virion biogenesis. Importantly, an allosteric Hsp70 inhibitor, JG40, potently blocks infection of different dengue serotypes in human primary blood cells without eliciting viral resistance or exerting toxicity to the host cells. JG40 also blocks replication of other medically-important flaviviruses including yellow fever, West Nile and Japanese encephalitis viruses. Thus, targeting host Hsp70 subnetworks provides a path for broad-spectrum antivirals. PMID:26582131

  15. Wolbachia restricts insect-specific flavivirus infection in Aedes aegypti cells

    PubMed Central

    Sreenu, Vatipally B.; Mottram, Timothy; McFarlane, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Mosquito-borne viruses are known to cause disease in humans and livestock and are often difficult to control due to the lack of specific antivirals and vaccines. The Wolbachia endosymbiont has been widely studied for its ability to restrict positive-strand RNA virus infection in mosquitoes, although little is known about the precise antiviral mechanism. In recent years, a variety of insect-specific viruses have been discovered in mosquitoes and an interaction with mosquito-borne viruses has been reported for some of them; however, nothing is known about the effect of Wolbachia on insect-specific virus infection in mosquitoes. Here, we show that transinfection of the Drosophila-derived wMelPop Wolbachia strain into Aedes aegypti-derived cells resulted in inhibition and even clearance of the persistent cell-fusing agent flavivirus infection in these cells. This broadens the antiviral activity of Wolbachia from acute infections to persistent infections and from arboviruses to mosquito-specific viruses. In contrast, no effect on the Phasi Charoen-like bunyavirus persistent infection in these cells was observed, suggesting a difference in Wolbachia inhibition between positive- and negative-strand RNA viruses. PMID:27692043

  16. Transmission bottlenecks and RNAi collectively influence tick-borne flavivirus evolution

    PubMed Central

    Grubaugh, Nathan D.; Rückert, Claudia; Armstrong, Philip M.; Bransfield, Angela; Anderson, John F.; Ebel, Gregory D.; Brackney, Doug E.

    2016-01-01

    Arthropod-borne RNA viruses exist within hosts as heterogeneous populations of viral variants and, as a result, possess great genetic plasticity. Understanding the micro-evolutionary forces shaping these viruses can provide insights into how they emerge, adapt, and persist in new and changing ecological niches. While considerable attention has been directed toward studying the population dynamics of mosquito-borne viruses, little is known about tick-borne virus populations. Therefore, using a mouse and Ixodes scapularis tick transmission model, we examined Powassan virus (POWV; Flaviviridae, Flavivirus) populations in and between both the vertebrate host and arthropod vector. We found that genetic bottlenecks, RNAi-mediated diversification, and selective constraints collectively influence POWV evolution. Together, our data provide a mechanistic explanation for the slow, long-term evolutionary trends of POWV, and suggest that all arthropod-borne viruses encounter similar selective pressures at the molecular level (i.e. RNAi), yet evolve much differently due to their unique rates and modes of transmission. PMID:28058113

  17. Eared dove (Zenaida auriculata, Columbidae) as host for St. Louis encephalitis virus (Flaviviridae, Flavivirus).

    PubMed

    Diaz, Luis A; Occelli, Maricel; Almeida, Francisco Ludueña; Almirón, Walter R; Contigiani, Marta S

    2008-04-01

    St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) is an emerging Flavivirus in South American countries. Its ecology and biological transmission cycles are scarcely known. Eared doves (Zenaida auriculata) have frequently been found infected by SLEV, and therefore, could be suspected as SLEV hosts. Thirty post-hatch-year eared doves were subcutaneously inoculated with the genotype V SLEV 78V-6507 viral strain and subsequently bled. No deaths or clinical signs of illness were observed in the inoculated doves. The viremia titers ranged from 2 to 5.5 log(10) plaque-forming units (PFU)/mL during 1-7 days postinoculation (dpi), the highest being observed on the 4th dpi. Mosquitoes were collected using can traps baited with chicken and eared doves for comparison. A total of 2792 mosquitoes belonging to 5 species were collected. Ninety percent of the mosquitoes collected in eared dove-baited can traps were Culex quinquefasciatus. Statistical differences were not observed in either Cx. quinquefasciatus (Chi(2) = 0.86; df = 1; p = 0.354) or in Cx. interfor (Chi(2) = 0.63; df = 1; p = 0.426) mosquitoes collected in both chicken- and eared dove-baited can traps. Considering that eared doves were frequently found naturally infected by SLEV, that they developed viremia titers higher than the minimum infection threshold needed to infect Cx. quinquefasciatus, and that these mosquitoes also fed on eared doves, they could be considered competent hosts for SLEV.

  18. Patterns of Flavivirus Seroprevalence in the Human Population of Northern Laos

    PubMed Central

    Conlan, James V.; Vongxay, Khamphouth; Khamlome, Boualam; Jarman, Richard G.; Gibbons, Robert V.; Fenwick, Stanley G.; Thompson, R. C. A.; Blacksell, Stuart D.

    2015-01-01

    A total of 1,136 samples from 289 households in four provinces in northern Laos were subjected to Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and dengue virus hemagglutination inhibition (DENV HI). Overall, antibodies to JEV were detected by HI in 620 (54.6%) of 1,136 people; of which 217 (19.1%) had HI activity against JEV only. Antibodies to DENV4 were detected by HI in 526 (46.3%) of 1,136 people; of which 124 (10.9%) had HI activity against DENV4 only. Antibodies to DENV1–3 were detected by HI in 296 (26.1%), 274 (24.1%), and 283 (24.9) of 1,136 people, respectively; of which 7, 1, and 0, respectively, had HI activity against DENV1–3 only. JEV was the most prevalent Flavivirus in Oudomxay, Luangprabang, and Huaphan provinces and DENV4 was the most prevalent in Xiengkhouang province. Seroprevalence for JEV increased with increasing age and wealth and was higher in villages where rice was cultivated in paddy fields and highest for people of Lao-Tai ethnicity. PMID:26304925

  19. Structural Differences Observed in Arboviruses of the Alphavirus and Flavivirus Genera

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Raquel; Brown, Dennis T.; Paredes, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Arthropod borne viruses have developed a complex life cycle adapted to alternate between insect and vertebrate hosts. These arthropod-borne viruses belong mainly to the families Togaviridae, Flaviviridae, and Bunyaviridae. This group of viruses contains many pathogens that cause febrile, hemorrhagic, and encephalitic disease or arthritic symptoms which can be persistent. It has been appreciated for many years that these viruses were evolutionarily adapted to function in the highly divergent cellular environments of both insect and mammalian phyla. These viruses are hybrid in nature, containing viral-encoded RNA and proteins which are glycosylated by the host and encapsulate viral nucleocapsids in the context of a host-derived membrane. From a structural perspective, these virus particles are macromolecular machines adapted in design to assemble into a packaging and delivery system for the virus genome and, only when associated with the conditions appropriate for a productive infection, to disassemble and deliver the RNA cargo. It was initially assumed that the structures of the virus from both hosts were equivalent. New evidence that alphaviruses and flaviviruses can exist in more than one conformation postenvelopment will be discussed in this review. The data are limited but should refocus the field of structural biology on the metastable nature of these viruses. PMID:25309597

  20. A variance-decomposition approach to investigating multiscale habitat associations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawler, J.J.; Edwards, T.C.

    2006-01-01

    The recognition of the importance of spatial scale in ecology has led many researchers to take multiscale approaches to studying habitat associations. However, few of the studies that investigate habitat associations at multiple spatial scales have considered the potential effects of cross-scale correlations in measured habitat variables. When cross-scale correlations in such studies are strong, conclusions drawn about the relative strength of habitat associations at different spatial scales may be inaccurate. Here we adapt and demonstrate an analytical technique based on variance decomposition for quantifying the influence of cross-scale correlations on multiscale habitat associations. We used the technique to quantify the variation in nest-site locations of Red-naped Sapsuckers (Sphyrapicus nuchalis) and Northern Flickers (Colaptes auratus) associated with habitat descriptors at three spatial scales. We demonstrate how the method can be used to identify components of variation that are associated only with factors at a single spatial scale as well as shared components of variation that represent cross-scale correlations. Despite the fact that no explanatory variables in our models were highly correlated (r < 0.60), we found that shared components of variation reflecting cross-scale correlations accounted for roughly half of the deviance explained by the models. These results highlight the importance of both conducting habitat analyses at multiple spatial scales and of quantifying the effects of cross-scale correlations in such analyses. Given the limits of conventional analytical techniques, we recommend alternative methods, such as the variance-decomposition technique demonstrated here, for analyzing habitat associations at multiple spatial scales. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2006.

  1. Integrating Variances into an Analytical Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    For this project, I enrolled in numerous SATERN courses that taught the basics of database programming. These include: Basic Access 2007 Forms, Introduction to Database Systems, Overview of Database Design, and others. My main job was to create an analytical database that can handle many stored forms and make it easy to interpret and organize. Additionally, I helped improve an existing database and populate it with information. These databases were designed to be used with data from Safety Variances and DCR forms. The research consisted of analyzing the database and comparing the data to find out which entries were repeated the most. If an entry happened to be repeated several times in the database, that would mean that the rule or requirement targeted by that variance has been bypassed many times already and so the requirement may not really be needed, but rather should be changed to allow the variance's conditions permanently. This project did not only restrict itself to the design and development of the database system, but also worked on exporting the data from the database to a different format (e.g. Excel or Word) so it could be analyzed in a simpler fashion. Thanks to the change in format, the data was organized in a spreadsheet that made it possible to sort the data by categories or types and helped speed up searches. Once my work with the database was done, the records of variances could be arranged so that they were displayed in numerical order, or one could search for a specific document targeted by the variances and restrict the search to only include variances that modified a specific requirement. A great part that contributed to my learning was SATERN, NASA's resource for education. Thanks to the SATERN online courses I took over the summer, I was able to learn many new things about computers and databases and also go more in depth into topics I already knew about.

  2. Variance in binary stellar population synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breivik, Katelyn; Larson, Shane L.

    2016-03-01

    In the years preceding LISA, Milky Way compact binary population simulations can be used to inform the science capabilities of the mission. Galactic population simulation efforts generally focus on high fidelity models that require extensive computational power to produce a single simulated population for each model. Each simulated population represents an incomplete sample of the functions governing compact binary evolution, thus introducing variance from one simulation to another. We present a rapid Monte Carlo population simulation technique that can simulate thousands of populations in less than a week, thus allowing a full exploration of the variance associated with a binary stellar evolution model.

  3. Insect-Specific Flaviviruses: A Systematic Review of Their Discovery, Host Range, Mode of Transmission, Superinfection Exclusion Potential and Genomic Organization

    PubMed Central

    Blitvich, Bradley J.; Firth, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    There has been a dramatic increase in the number of insect-specific flaviviruses (ISFs) discovered in the last decade. Historically, these viruses have generated limited interest due to their inability to infect vertebrate cells. This viewpoint has changed in recent years because some ISFs have been shown to enhance or suppress the replication of medically important flaviviruses in co-infected mosquito cells. Additionally, comparative studies between ISFs and medically important flaviviruses can provide a unique perspective as to why some flaviviruses possess the ability to infect and cause devastating disease in humans while others do not. ISFs have been isolated exclusively from mosquitoes in nature but the detection of ISF-like sequences in sandflies and chironomids indicates that they may also infect other dipterans. ISFs can be divided into two distinct phylogenetic groups. The first group currently consists of approximately 12 viruses and includes cell fusing agent virus, Kamiti River virus and Culex flavivirus. These viruses are phylogenetically distinct from all other known flaviviruses. The second group, which is apparently not monophyletic, currently consists of nine viruses and includes Chaoyang virus, Nounané virus and Lammi virus. These viruses phylogenetically affiliate with mosquito/vertebrate flaviviruses despite their apparent insect-restricted phenotype. This article provides a review of the discovery, host range, mode of transmission, superinfection exclusion ability and genomic organization of ISFs. This article also attempts to clarify the ISF nomenclature because some of these viruses have been assigned more than one name due to their simultaneous discoveries by independent research groups. PMID:25866904

  4. A Simple Algorithm for Approximating Confidence on the Modified Allan Variance and the Time Variance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Marc A.; Greenhall, Charles A.

    1996-01-01

    An approximating algorithm for computing equvalent degrees of freedom of the Modified Allan Variance and its square root, the Modified Allan Deviation (MVAR and MDEV), and the Time Variance and Time Deviation (TVAR and TDEV) is presented, along with an algorithm for approximating the inverse chi-square distribution.

  5. Cosmic variance of the galaxy cluster weak lensing signal

    DOE PAGES

    Gruen, D.; Seitz, S.; Becker, M. R.; ...

    2015-04-13

    Intrinsic variations of the projected density profiles of clusters of galaxies at fixed mass are a source of uncertainty for cluster weak lensing. We present a semi-analytical model to account for this effect, based on a combination of variations in halo concentration, ellipticity and orientation, and the presence of correlated haloes. We calibrate the parameters of our model at the 10 per cent level to match the empirical cosmic variance of cluster profiles at M200m ≈ 1014…1015h–1M⊙, z = 0.25…0.5 in a cosmological simulation. We show that weak lensing measurements of clusters significantly underestimate mass uncertainties if intrinsic profile variationsmore » are ignored, and that our model can be used to provide correct mass likelihoods. Effects on the achievable accuracy of weak lensing cluster mass measurements are particularly strong for the most massive clusters and deep observations (with ≈20 per cent uncertainty from cosmic variance alone at M200m ≈ 1015h–1M⊙ and z = 0.25), but significant also under typical ground-based conditions. We show that neglecting intrinsic profile variations leads to biases in the mass-observable relation constrained with weak lensing, both for intrinsic scatter and overall scale (the latter at the 15 per cent level). Furthermore, these biases are in excess of the statistical errors of upcoming surveys and can be avoided if the cosmic variance of cluster profiles is accounted for.« less

  6. Testing Interaction Effects without Discarding Variance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Kay A.

    Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and multiple regression are two of the most commonly used methods of data analysis in behavioral science research. Although ANOVA was intended for use with experimental designs, educational researchers have used ANOVA extensively in aptitude-treatment interaction (ATI) research. This practice tends to make researchers…

  7. 29 CFR 1920.2 - Variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Variances. 1920.2 Section 1920.2 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE FOR VARIATIONS FROM SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS UNDER THE LONGSHOREMEN'S AND HARBOR...

  8. 21 CFR 1010.4 - Variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Dockets Management, except for information regarded as confidential under section 537(e) of the act. (d... Management (HFA-305), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, rm. 1061, Rockville, MD 20852. (1) The application for variance shall include the following information: (i) A description of the product and...

  9. Formative Use of Intuitive Analysis of Variance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trumpower, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Students' informal inferential reasoning (IIR) is often inconsistent with the normative logic underlying formal statistical methods such as Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), even after instruction. In two experiments reported here, student's IIR was assessed using an intuitive ANOVA task at the beginning and end of a statistics course. In both…

  10. Understanding gender variance in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Simons, Lisa K; Leibowitz, Scott F; Hidalgo, Marco A

    2014-06-01

    Gender variance is an umbrella term used to describe gender identity, expression, or behavior that falls outside of culturally defined norms associated with a specific gender. In recent years, growing media coverage has heightened public awareness about gender variance in childhood and adolescence, and an increasing number of referrals to clinics specializing in care for gender-variant youth have been reported in the United States. Gender-variant expression, behavior, and identity may present in childhood and adolescence in a number of ways, and youth with gender variance have unique health needs. For those experiencing gender dysphoria, or distress encountered by the discordance between biological sex and gender identity, puberty is often an exceptionally challenging time. Pediatric primary care providers may be families' first resource for education and support, and they play a critical role in supporting the health of youth with gender variance by screening for psychosocial problems and health risks, referring for gender-specific mental health and medical care, and providing ongoing advocacy and support.

  11. 10 CFR 1021.343 - Variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Variances. 1021.343 Section 1021.343 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT IMPLEMENTING PROCEDURES Implementing... arrangements for emergency actions having significant environmental impacts. DOE shall document,...

  12. 21 CFR 1010.4 - Variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the study was conducted in compliance with the good laboratory practice regulations set forth in part... application for variance shall include the following information: (i) A description of the product and its... equipment, the proposed location of each unit. (viii) Such other information required by regulation or...

  13. Parameterization of Incident and Infragravity Swash Variance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockdon, H. F.; Holman, R. A.; Sallenger, A. H.

    2002-12-01

    By clearly defining the forcing and morphologic controls of swash variance in both the incident and infragravity frequency bands, we are able to derive a more complete parameterization for extreme runup that may be applicable to a wide range of beach and wave conditions. It is expected that the dynamics of the incident and infragravity bands will have different dependencies on offshore wave conditions and local beach slopes. For example, previous studies have shown that swash variance in the incident band depends on foreshore beach slope while the infragravity variance depends more on a weighted mean slope across the surf zone. Because the physics of each band is parameterized differently, the amount that each frequency band contributes to the total swash variance will vary from site to site and, often, at a single site as the profile configuration changes over time. Using water level time series (measured at the shoreline) collected during nine dynamically different field experiments, we test the expected behavior of both incident and infragravity swash and the contribution each makes to total variance. At the dissipative sites (Iribarren number, \\xi0, <0.3) located in Oregon and the Netherlands, the incident band swash is saturated with respect to offshore wave height. Conversely, on the intermediate and reflective beaches, the amplitudes of both incident and infragravity swash variance grow with increasing offshore wave height. While infragravity band swash at all sites appears to increase linearly with offshore wave height, the magnitudes of the response are somewhat greater on reflective beaches than on dissipative beaches. This means that for the same offshore wave conditions the swash on a steeper foreshore will be larger than that on a more gently sloping foreshore. The potential control of the surf zone slope on infragravity band swash is examined at Duck, North Carolina, (0.3 < \\xi0 < 4.0), where significant differences in the relationship between swash

  14. 42 CFR 456.525 - Request for renewal of variance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Review Plans: FFP, Waivers, and Variances for Hospitals and Mental Hospitals Ur Plan: Remote Facility Variances from...

  15. 42 CFR 456.525 - Request for renewal of variance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Review Plans: FFP, Waivers, and Variances for Hospitals and Mental Hospitals Ur Plan: Remote Facility Variances from...

  16. 42 CFR 456.521 - Conditions for granting variance requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Review Plans: FFP, Waivers, and Variances for Hospitals and Mental Hospitals Ur Plan: Remote Facility Variances from...

  17. 42 CFR 456.521 - Conditions for granting variance requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Review Plans: FFP, Waivers, and Variances for Hospitals and Mental Hospitals Ur Plan: Remote Facility Variances from...

  18. Ulnar variance and Kienböck's disease. An investigation in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, W S; Shih, C H

    1990-06-01

    The correlation between negative ulnar variance and the occurrence of Kienböck's disease was evaluated in Taiwan. Two groups of subjects were studied. The first group consisted of 1000 normal subjects and the second of 18 patients with Kienböck's disease. Student's t-test was used to evaluate the significance of the difference between this and other published series. The mean was 0.313 mm in Group 1 and -1.222 mm in Group 2. The percentage with significant negative ulnar variance (the distal ulnar was at least 2 mm shorter than the radius) was 6.0% in Group 1 and 55.6% in Group 2. The difference between the two groups was significant. The mean ulnar variance of normal subjects in Taiwan differed significantly from the variance in Swedes and American blacks but not American whites. In Chinese patients with Kienböck's disease, the ulnar variance was predominantly negative, and the distribution of ulnar variance was similar to that of Swedish or American white patients. This study confirmed the association between negative ulnar variance and the occurrence of Kienböck's disease. This supports Hultén's hypothesis that negative ulnar variance may predispose certain individuals to the occurrence of Kienböck's disease.

  19. Molecular archaeology of Flaviviridae untranslated regions: duplicated RNA structures in the replication enhancer of flaviviruses and pestiviruses emerged via convergent evolution.

    PubMed

    Gritsun, Dmitri J; Jones, Ian M; Gould, Ernest A; Gritsun, Tamara S

    2014-01-01

    RNA secondary structures in the 3'untranslated regions (3'UTR) of the viruses of the family Flaviviridae, previously identified as essential (promoters) or beneficial (enhancers) for replication, have been analysed. Duplicated enhancer elements are revealed as a global feature in the evolution of the 3'UTR of distantly related viruses within the genera Flavivirus and Pestivirus. For the flaviviruses, duplicated structures occur in the 3'UTR of all four distantly related ecological virus subgroups (tick-borne, mosquito-borne, no known vector and insect-specific flaviviruses (ISFV). RNA structural differences distinguish tick-borne flaviviruses with discrete pathogenetic characteristics. For Aedes- and Culex-associated ISFV, secondary RNA structures with different conformations display numerous short ssRNA direct repeats, exposed as loops and bulges. Long quadruplicate regions comprise almost the entire 3'UTR of Culex-associated ISFV. Extended duplicated sequence and associated RNA structures were also discovered in the 3'UTR of pestiviruses. In both the Flavivirus and Pestivirus genera, duplicated RNA structures were localized to the enhancer regions of the 3'UTR suggesting an adaptive role predominantly in wild-type viruses. We propose sequence reiteration might act as a scaffold for dimerization of proteins involved in assembly of viral replicase complexes. Numerous nucleotide repeats exposed as loops/bulges might also interfere with host immune responses acting as a molecular sponge to sequester key host proteins or microRNAs.

  20. Molecular Archaeology of Flaviviridae Untranslated Regions: Duplicated RNA Structures in the Replication Enhancer of Flaviviruses and Pestiviruses Emerged via Convergent Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gritsun, Dmitri J.; Jones, Ian M.; Gould, Ernest A.; Gritsun, Tamara S.

    2014-01-01

    RNA secondary structures in the 3′untranslated regions (3′UTR) of the viruses of the family Flaviviridae, previously identified as essential (promoters) or beneficial (enhancers) for replication, have been analysed. Duplicated enhancer elements are revealed as a global feature in the evolution of the 3′UTR of distantly related viruses within the genera Flavivirus and Pestivirus. For the flaviviruses, duplicated structures occur in the 3′UTR of all four distantly related ecological virus subgroups (tick-borne, mosquito-borne, no known vector and insect-specific flaviviruses (ISFV). RNA structural differences distinguish tick-borne flaviviruses with discrete pathogenetic characteristics. For Aedes- and Culex-associated ISFV, secondary RNA structures with different conformations display numerous short ssRNA direct repeats, exposed as loops and bulges. Long quadruplicate regions comprise almost the entire 3′UTR of Culex-associated ISFV. Extended duplicated sequence and associated RNA structures were also discovered in the 3′UTR of pestiviruses. In both the Flavivirus and Pestivirus genera, duplicated RNA structures were localized to the enhancer regions of the 3′UTR suggesting an adaptive role predominantly in wild-type viruses. We propose sequence reiteration might act as a scaffold for dimerization of proteins involved in assembly of viral replicase complexes. Numerous nucleotide repeats exposed as loops/bulges might also interfere with host immune responses acting as a molecular sponge to sequester key host proteins or microRNAs. PMID:24647143

  1. Gravity Wave Variance in LIMS Temperatures. Part II: Comparison with the Zonal-Mean Momentum Balance.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetzer, Eric J.; Gille, John C.

    1996-02-01

    Zonal-mean gravity wave variance in the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) temperature data is seen to correlate strongly with the residual term in the LIMS zonal-mean momentum budget throughout much of the observed mesosphere. This momentum residual is attributed to gravity wave momentum transport at scales that cannot be directly sampled by the LIMS instrument Correlation is highest in the vicinity of the fall and winter mesospheric jets, where both gravity wave variance and momentum residual reach their largest values. Correlation is also high in the Southern Hemisphere subtropical mesophere, where gravity wave variance and the momentum residual have broad temporal maxima during the easterly acceleration of the stratopause semi-annual oscillation (SAO). This subtropical correlation has important implications for the SAO eastward acceleration, which several studies suggest is forced by gravity wave momentum flux divergence. Correlation between gravity wave variance and inferred gravity wave momentum flux divergence is unexpected because variance is dominated by large scales and long periods (inertio-gravity waves), while both theoretical arguments and ground-based observations indicate that momentum transport is dominated by periods under 1 h. The results of this study suggest a broadband gravity wave field experiencing forcing and loss processes, which are largely independent of frequency.

  2. On Stabilizing the Variance of Dynamic Functional Brain Connectivity Time Series

    PubMed Central

    Fransson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Assessment of dynamic functional brain connectivity based on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data is an increasingly popular strategy to investigate temporal dynamics of the brain's large-scale network architecture. Current practice when deriving connectivity estimates over time is to use the Fisher transformation, which aims to stabilize the variance of correlation values that fluctuate around varying true correlation values. It is, however, unclear how well the stabilization of signal variance performed by the Fisher transformation works for each connectivity time series, when the true correlation is assumed to be fluctuating. This is of importance because many subsequent analyses either assume or perform better when the time series have stable variance or adheres to an approximate Gaussian distribution. In this article, using simulations and analysis of resting-state fMRI data, we analyze the effect of applying different variance stabilization strategies on connectivity time series. We focus our investigation on the Fisher transformation, the Box–Cox (BC) transformation and an approach that combines both transformations. Our results show that, if the intention of stabilizing the variance is to use metrics on the time series, where stable variance or a Gaussian distribution is desired (e.g., clustering), the Fisher transformation is not optimal and may even skew connectivity time series away from being Gaussian. Furthermore, we show that the suboptimal performance of the Fisher transformation can be substantially improved by including an additional BC transformation after the dynamic functional connectivity time series has been Fisher transformed. PMID:27784176

  3. Inheritance of dermatoglyphic traits in twins: univariate and bivariate variance decomposition analysis.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Bibha; Malkin, Ida; Kobyliansky, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    Dermatoglyphic traits in a sample of twins were analyzed to estimate the resemblance between MZ and DZ twins and to evaluate the mode of inheritance by using the maximum likelihood-based Variance decomposition analysis. The additive genetic variance component was significant in both sexes for four traits--PII, AB_RC, RC_HB, and ATD_L. AB RC and RC_HB had significant sex differences in means, whereas PII and ATD_L did not. The results of the Bivariate Variance decomposition analysis revealed that PII and RC_HB have a significant correlation in both genetic and residual components. Significant correlation in the additive genetic variance between AB_RC and ATD_L was observed. The same analysis only for the females sub-sample in the three traits RBL, RBR and AB_DIS shows that the additive genetic RBR component was significant and the AB_DIS sibling component was not significant while others cannot be constrained to zero. The additive variance for AB DIS sibling component was not significant. The three components additive, sibling and residual were significantly correlated between each pair of traits revealed by the Bivariate Variance decomposition analysis.

  4. On Stabilizing the Variance of Dynamic Functional Brain Connectivity Time Series.

    PubMed

    Thompson, William Hedley; Fransson, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Assessment of dynamic functional brain connectivity based on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data is an increasingly popular strategy to investigate temporal dynamics of the brain's large-scale network architecture. Current practice when deriving connectivity estimates over time is to use the Fisher transformation, which aims to stabilize the variance of correlation values that fluctuate around varying true correlation values. It is, however, unclear how well the stabilization of signal variance performed by the Fisher transformation works for each connectivity time series, when the true correlation is assumed to be fluctuating. This is of importance because many subsequent analyses either assume or perform better when the time series have stable variance or adheres to an approximate Gaussian distribution. In this article, using simulations and analysis of resting-state fMRI data, we analyze the effect of applying different variance stabilization strategies on connectivity time series. We focus our investigation on the Fisher transformation, the Box-Cox (BC) transformation and an approach that combines both transformations. Our results show that, if the intention of stabilizing the variance is to use metrics on the time series, where stable variance or a Gaussian distribution is desired (e.g., clustering), the Fisher transformation is not optimal and may even skew connectivity time series away from being Gaussian. Furthermore, we show that the suboptimal performance of the Fisher transformation can be substantially improved by including an additional BC transformation after the dynamic functional connectivity time series has been Fisher transformed.

  5. Cell-mediated immunity induced by chimeric tetravalent dengue vaccine in naive or flavivirus-primed subjects.

    PubMed

    Guy, Bruno; Nougarede, Nolwenn; Begue, Sarah; Sanchez, Violette; Souag, Nadia; Carre, Murielle; Chambonneau, Laurent; Morrisson, Dennis N; Shaw, David; Qiao, Ming; Dumas, Rafaele; Lang, Jean; Forrat, Remi

    2008-10-23

    Three independent, phase 1 clinical trials were conducted in Australia and in USA to assess the safety and immunogenicity of sanofi pasteur dengue vaccine candidates. In this context, Dengue 1-4 and Yellow Fever 17D-204 (YF 17D)-specific CD4 and CD8 cellular responses induced by tetravalent chimeric dengue vaccines (CYD) were analyzed in flavivirus-naive or flavivirus-immune patients. Tetravalent CYD vaccine did not trigger detectable changes in serum pro-inflammatory cytokines, whatever the vaccinees immune status, while inducing significant YF 17D NS3-specific CD8 responses and dengue serotype-specific T helper responses. These responses were dominated by serotype 4 in naive individuals, but a booster vaccination (dose #2) performed 4 months following dose #1 broadened serotype-specific responses. A similar, broader response was seen after primary tetravalent immunization in subjects with pre-existing dengue 1 or 2 immunity caused by prior monovalent live-attenuated dengue vaccination. In all three trials, the profile of induced response was similar, whatever the subjects' immune status, i.e. an absence of Th2 response, and an IFN-gamma/TNF-alpha ratio dominated by IFN-gamma, for both CD4 and CD8 responses. Our results also showed an absence of cross-reactivity between YF 17D or Dengue NS3-specific CD8 responses, and allowed the identification of 3 new CD8 epitopes in the YF 17D NS3 antigen. These data are consistent with the previously demonstrated excellent safety of these dengue vaccines in flavivirus-naive and primed individuals.

  6. Exploring of Primate Models of Tick-Borne Flaviviruses Infection for Evaluation of Vaccines and Drugs Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Pripuzova, Natalia S.; Gmyl, Larissa V.; Romanova, Lidiya Iu.; Tereshkina, Natalia V.; Rogova, Yulia V.; Terekhina, Liubov L.; Kozlovskaya, Liubov I.; Vorovitch, Mikhail F.; Grishina, Karina G.; Timofeev, Andrey V.; Karganova, Galina G.

    2013-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is one of the most prevalent and medically important tick-borne arboviruses in Eurasia. There are overlapping foci of two flaviviruses: TBEV and Omsk hemorrhagic fever virus (OHFV) in Russia. Inactivated vaccines exist only against TBE. There are no antiviral drugs for treatment of both diseases. Optimal animal models are necessary to study efficacy of novel vaccines and treatment preparations against TBE and relative flaviviruses. The models for TBE and OHF using subcutaneous inoculation were tested in Cercopithecus aethiops and Macaca fascicularis monkeys with or without prior immunization with inactivated TBE vaccine. No visible clinical signs or severe pathomorphological lesions were observed in any monkey infected with TBEV or OHFV. C. aethiops challenged with OHFV showed massive hemolytic syndrome and thrombocytopenia. Infectious virus or viral RNA was revealed in visceral organs and CNS of C. aethiops infected with both viruses; however, viremia was low. Inactivated TBE vaccines induced high antibody titers against both viruses and expressed booster after challenge. The protective efficacy against TBE was shown by the absence of virus in spleen, lymph nodes and CNS of immunized animals after challenge. Despite the absence of expressed hemolytic syndrome in immunized C. aethiops TBE vaccine did not prevent the reproduction of OHFV in CNS and visceral organs. Subcutaneous inoculation of M. fascicularis with two TBEV strains led to a febrile disease with well expressed viremia, fever, and virus reproduction in spleen, lymph nodes and CNS. The optimal terms for estimation of the viral titers in CNS were defined as 8–16 days post infection. We characterized two animal models similar to humans in their susceptibility to tick-borne flaviviruses and found the most optimal scheme for evaluation of efficacy of preventive and therapeutic preparations. We also identified M. fascicularis to be more susceptible to TBEV than C

  7. Exploring of primate models of tick-borne flaviviruses infection for evaluation of vaccines and drugs efficacy.

    PubMed

    Pripuzova, Natalia S; Gmyl, Larissa V; Romanova, Lidiya Iu; Tereshkina, Natalia V; Rogova, Yulia V; Terekhina, Liubov L; Kozlovskaya, Liubov I; Vorovitch, Mikhail F; Grishina, Karina G; Timofeev, Andrey V; Karganova, Galina G

    2013-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is one of the most prevalent and medically important tick-borne arboviruses in Eurasia. There are overlapping foci of two flaviviruses: TBEV and Omsk hemorrhagic fever virus (OHFV) in Russia. Inactivated vaccines exist only against TBE. There are no antiviral drugs for treatment of both diseases. Optimal animal models are necessary to study efficacy of novel vaccines and treatment preparations against TBE and relative flaviviruses. The models for TBE and OHF using subcutaneous inoculation were tested in Cercopithecus aethiops and Macaca fascicularis monkeys with or without prior immunization with inactivated TBE vaccine. No visible clinical signs or severe pathomorphological lesions were observed in any monkey infected with TBEV or OHFV. C. aethiops challenged with OHFV showed massive hemolytic syndrome and thrombocytopenia. Infectious virus or viral RNA was revealed in visceral organs and CNS of C. aethiops infected with both viruses; however, viremia was low. Inactivated TBE vaccines induced high antibody titers against both viruses and expressed booster after challenge. The protective efficacy against TBE was shown by the absence of virus in spleen, lymph nodes and CNS of immunized animals after challenge. Despite the absence of expressed hemolytic syndrome in immunized C. aethiops TBE vaccine did not prevent the reproduction of OHFV in CNS and visceral organs. Subcutaneous inoculation of M. fascicularis with two TBEV strains led to a febrile disease with well expressed viremia, fever, and virus reproduction in spleen, lymph nodes and CNS. The optimal terms for estimation of the viral titers in CNS were defined as 8-16 days post infection. We characterized two animal models similar to humans in their susceptibility to tick-borne flaviviruses and found the most optimal scheme for evaluation of efficacy of preventive and therapeutic preparations. We also identified M. fascicularis to be more susceptible to TBEV than C. aethiops.

  8. Analysis of variance of microarray data.

    PubMed

    Ayroles, Julien F; Gibson, Greg

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of variance (ANOVA) is an approach used to identify differentially expressed genes in complex experimental designs. It is based on testing for the significance of the magnitude of effect of two or more treatments taking into account the variance within and between treatment classes. ANOVA is a highly flexible analytical approach that allows investigators to simultaneously assess the contributions of multiple factors to gene expression variation, including technical (dye, batch) effects and biological (sex, genotype, drug, time) ones, as well as interactions between factors. This chapter provides an overview of the theory of linear mixture modeling and the sequence of steps involved in fitting gene-specific models and discusses essential features of experimental design. Commercial and open-source software for performing ANOVA is widely available.

  9. Analysis of Variance of Multiply Imputed Data.

    PubMed

    van Ginkel, Joost R; Kroonenberg, Pieter M

    2014-01-01

    As a procedure for handling missing data, Multiple imputation consists of estimating the missing data multiple times to create several complete versions of an incomplete data set. All these data sets are analyzed by the same statistical procedure, and the results are pooled for interpretation. So far, no explicit rules for pooling F-tests of (repeated-measures) analysis of variance have been defined. In this paper we outline the appropriate procedure for the results of analysis of variance for multiply imputed data sets. It involves both reformulation of the ANOVA model as a regression model using effect coding of the predictors and applying already existing combination rules for regression models. The proposed procedure is illustrated using three example data sets. The pooled results of these three examples provide plausible F- and p-values.

  10. Variance of the Quantum Dwell Time for a Nonrelativistic Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Munoz, Seidel, and Muga [Phys. Rev. A 79, 012108 (2009)], following an earlier proposal by Pollak and Miller [Phys. Rev. Lett. 53, 115 (1984)] in the context of a theory of a collinear chemical reaction, showed that suitable moments of a two-flux correlation function could be manipulated to yield expressions for the mean quantum dwell time and mean square quantum dwell time for a structureless particle scattering from a time-independent potential energy field between two parallel lines in a two-dimensional spacetime. The present work proposes a generalization to a charged, nonrelativistic particle scattering from a transient, spatially confined electromagnetic vector potential in four-dimensional spacetime. The geometry of the spacetime domain is that of the slab between a pair of parallel planes, in particular those defined by constant values of the third (z) spatial coordinate. The mean Nth power, N = 1, 2, 3, . . ., of the quantum dwell time in the slab is given by an expression involving an N-flux-correlation function. All these means are shown to be nonnegative. The N = 1 formula reduces to an S-matrix result published previously [G. E. Hahne, J. Phys. A 36, 7149 (2003)]; an explicit formula for N = 2, and of the variance of the dwell time in terms of the S-matrix, is worked out. A formula representing an incommensurability principle between variances of the output-minus-input flux of a pair of dynamical variables (such as the particle s time flux and others) is derived.

  11. Systems Engineering Programmatic Estimation Using Technology Variance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mog, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    Unique and innovative system programmatic estimation is conducted using the variance of the packaged technologies. Covariance analysis is performed on the subsystems and components comprising the system of interest. Technological "return" and "variation" parameters are estimated. These parameters are combined with the model error to arrive at a measure of system development stability. The resulting estimates provide valuable information concerning the potential cost growth of the system under development.

  12. Systems Engineering Programmatic Estimation Using Technology Variance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mog, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    Unique and innovative system programmatic estimation is conducted using the variance of the packaged technologies. Covariance analysis is performed oil the subsystems and components comprising the system of interest. Technological "returns" and "variation" parameters, are estimated. These parameters are combined with the model error to arrive at a measure of system development stability. The resulting estimates provide valuable information concerning the potential cost growth of the system under development.

  13. Directional variance analysis of annual rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumpulainen, P.; Marjanen, K.

    2010-07-01

    The wood quality measurement methods are of increasing importance in the wood industry. The goal is to produce more high quality products with higher marketing value than is produced today. One of the key factors for increasing the market value is to provide better measurements for increased information to support the decisions made later in the product chain. Strength and stiffness are important properties of the wood. They are related to mean annual ring width and its deviation. These indicators can be estimated from images taken from the log ends by two-dimensional power spectrum analysis. The spectrum analysis has been used successfully for images of pine. However, the annual rings in birch, for example are less distinguishable and the basic spectrum analysis method does not give reliable results. A novel method for local log end variance analysis based on Radon-transform is proposed. The directions and the positions of the annual rings can be estimated from local minimum and maximum variance estimates. Applying the spectrum analysis on the maximum local variance estimate instead of the original image produces more reliable estimate of the annual ring width. The proposed method is not limited to log end analysis only. It is usable in other two-dimensional random signal and texture analysis tasks.

  14. Hypothesis exploration with visualization of variance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Consortium for Neuropsychiatric Phenomics (CNP) at UCLA was an investigation into the biological bases of traits such as memory and response inhibition phenotypes—to explore whether they are linked to syndromes including ADHD, Bipolar disorder, and Schizophrenia. An aim of the consortium was in moving from traditional categorical approaches for psychiatric syndromes towards more quantitative approaches based on large-scale analysis of the space of human variation. It represented an application of phenomics—wide-scale, systematic study of phenotypes—to neuropsychiatry research. Results This paper reports on a system for exploration of hypotheses in data obtained from the LA2K, LA3C, and LA5C studies in CNP. ViVA is a system for exploratory data analysis using novel mathematical models and methods for visualization of variance. An example of these methods is called VISOVA, a combination of visualization and analysis of variance, with the flavor of exploration associated with ANOVA in biomedical hypothesis generation. It permits visual identification of phenotype profiles—patterns of values across phenotypes—that characterize groups. Visualization enables screening and refinement of hypotheses about variance structure of sets of phenotypes. Conclusions The ViVA system was designed for exploration of neuropsychiatric hypotheses by interdisciplinary teams. Automated visualization in ViVA supports ‘natural selection’ on a pool of hypotheses, and permits deeper understanding of the statistical architecture of the data. Large-scale perspective of this kind could lead to better neuropsychiatric diagnostics. PMID:25097666

  15. Variance Reduction Factor of Nuclear Data for Integral Neutronics Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, G. Tsuji, M.; Narabayashi, T.

    2015-01-15

    We propose a new quantity, a variance reduction factor, to identify nuclear data for which further improvements are required to reduce uncertainties of target integral neutronics parameters. Important energy ranges can be also identified with this variance reduction factor. Variance reduction factors are calculated for several integral neutronics parameters. The usefulness of the variance reduction factors is demonstrated.

  16. Applications of non-parametric statistics and analysis of variance on sample variances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    Nonparametric methods that are available for NASA-type applications are discussed. An attempt will be made here to survey what can be used, to attempt recommendations as to when each would be applicable, and to compare the methods, when possible, with the usual normal-theory procedures that are avavilable for the Gaussion analog. It is important here to point out the hypotheses that are being tested, the assumptions that are being made, and limitations of the nonparametric procedures. The appropriateness of doing analysis of variance on sample variances are also discussed and studied. This procedure is followed in several NASA simulation projects. On the surface this would appear to be reasonably sound procedure. However, difficulties involved center around the normality problem and the basic homogeneous variance assumption that is mase in usual analysis of variance problems. These difficulties discussed and guidelines given for using the methods.

  17. Minimum variance and variance of outgoing quality limit MDS-1(c1, c2) plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, C.; Vidya, R.

    2016-06-01

    In this article, the outgoing quality (OQ) and total inspection (TI) of multiple deferred state sampling plans MDS-1(c1,c2) are studied. It is assumed that the inspection is rejection rectification. Procedures for designing MDS-1(c1,c2) sampling plans with minimum variance of OQ and TI are developed. A procedure for obtaining a plan for a designated upper limit for the variance of the OQ (VOQL) is outlined.

  18. [Taxonomy of the Sokuluk virus (SOKV) (Flaviviridae, Flavivirus, Entebbe bat virus group) isolated from bats (Vespertilio pipistrellus Schreber, 1774), ticks (Argasidae Koch, 1844), and birds in Kyrgyzstan].

    PubMed

    L'vov, D K; Al'khovskiĭ, S V; Shchelkanov, M Iu; Shchetinin, A M; Deriabin, P G; Gitel'man, A K; Samokhvalov, E I; Botikov, A G

    2014-01-01

    Complete genome sequencing of the Sokuluk virus (SOKV) isolated in Kyrgyzstan from bats Vespertilio pipistrellus and their obligatory parasites--Argasidae Koch, 1844, ticks was carried out. SOKV was classified as attributed to the Flaviviridae family, Flavivirus genus. The maximum homology (71% for nucleotide and 79% for amino acid sequences) was detected with respect to the Entebbe bat virus (ENTV). ENTV and SOKV form a group joining to the yellow fever virus (YFV) within the limits of the mosquito flavivirus branch. Close relation of SOKV with bat covers and human housings permits to assume SOKV potentially patogenic to human health.

  19. [Secondary serologic responses to dengue epidemic in 1998 in Salta, Argentina, where other flavivirus co-circulate].

    PubMed

    Aviles, G; Rangeon, G; Paz, M V; Baroni, P; Sabattini, M S; Enría, D

    2001-01-01

    In 1998, a dengue outbreak (serotype 2) occurred in Salta province in Northern Argentina, following the first detection of dengue in the same area in 1997. We classified the serologic response of cases from 1998 as primary or secondary, since the risk of severe disease is greater for secondary cases. We studied 154 cases by plaque reduction neutralization and hemagglutination inhibition tests. Thirty-eight cases (25%) were classified as primary serologic responses and 84 cases (54%) as secondary responses. Thirty-two cases (21%) with borderline IgG titers could not be classified. Previous exposure to potentially cross-reacting flaviviruses (Saint Louis Encephalitis [SLE] and Yellow Fever [YF] viruses) was analyzed, as a possible cause of the secondary response pattern. Our results indicated that among cases classified as dengue secondary response, 83% could be attributed to previous SLE or YF exposure or serologic cross-reactivity. Vaccination against YF virus was at most a minor contributor to the secondary response pattern. The finding of a positive YF serologic result among persons not vaccinated may indicate silent circulation of YF in a region that can support both urban and jungle cycles. Other cases showing dengue secondary responses remained unexplained, suggesting the unrecognized occurrence of a previous infection with other dengue serotypes or of flaviviruses other than SLE or YF.

  20. Comparative Analysis Between Flaviviruses Reveals Specific Neural Stem Cell Tropism for Zika Virus in the Mouse Developing Neocortex.

    PubMed

    Brault, Jean-Baptiste; Khou, Cécile; Basset, Justine; Coquand, Laure; Fraisier, Vincent; Frenkiel, Marie-Pascale; Goud, Bruno; Manuguerra, Jean-Claude; Pardigon, Nathalie; Baffet, Alexandre D

    2016-08-01

    The recent Zika outbreak in South America and French Polynesia was associated with an epidemic of microcephaly, a disease characterized by a reduced size of the cerebral cortex. Other members of the Flavivirus genus, including West Nile virus (WNV), can cause encephalitis but were not demonstrated to cause microcephaly. It remains unclear whether Zika virus (ZIKV) and other flaviviruses may infect different cell populations in the developing neocortex and lead to distinct developmental defects. Here, we describe an assay to infect mouse E15 embryonic brain slices with ZIKV, WNV and dengue virus serotype 4 (DENV-4). We show that this tissue is able to support viral replication of ZIKV and WNV, but not DENV-4. Cell fate analysis reveals a remarkable tropism of ZIKV infection for neural stem cells. Closely related WNV displays a very different tropism of infection, with a bias towards neurons. We further show that ZIKV infection, but not WNV infection, impairs cell cycle progression of neural stem cells. Both viruses inhibited apoptosis at early stages of infection. This work establishes a powerful comparative approach to identify ZIKV-specific alterations in the developing neocortex and reveals specific preferential infection of neural stem cells by ZIKV.

  1. Flavivirus Antagonism of Type I Interferon Signaling Reveals Prolidase as a Regulator of IFNAR1 Surface Expression.

    PubMed

    Lubick, Kirk J; Robertson, Shelly J; McNally, Kristin L; Freedman, Brett A; Rasmussen, Angela L; Taylor, R Travis; Walts, Avram D; Tsuruda, Seitaro; Sakai, Mizuki; Ishizuka, Mariko; Boer, Elena F; Foster, Erin C; Chiramel, Abhilash I; Addison, Conrad B; Green, Richard; Kastner, Daniel L; Katze, Michael G; Holland, Steven M; Forlino, Antonella; Freeman, Alexandra F; Boehm, Manfred; Yoshii, Kentaro; Best, Sonja M

    2015-07-08

    Type I interferon (IFN-α/β or IFN-I) signals through two receptor subunits, IFNAR1 and IFNAR2, to orchestrate sterile and infectious immunity. Cellular pathways that regulate IFNAR1 are often targeted by viruses to suppress the antiviral effects of IFN-I. Here we report that encephalitic flaviviruses, including tick-borne encephalitis virus and West Nile virus, antagonize IFN-I signaling by inhibiting IFNAR1 surface expression. Loss of IFNAR1 was associated with binding of the viral IFN-I antagonist, NS5, to prolidase (PEPD), a cellular dipeptidase implicated in primary immune deficiencies in humans. Prolidase was required for IFNAR1 maturation and accumulation, activation of IFNβ-stimulated gene induction, and IFN-I-dependent viral control. Human fibroblasts derived from patients with genetic prolidase deficiency exhibited decreased IFNAR1 surface expression and reduced IFNβ-stimulated signaling. Thus, by understanding flavivirus IFN-I antagonism, prolidase is revealed as a central regulator of IFN-I responses.

  2. The Antigenic Structure of Zika Virus and Its Relation to Other Flaviviruses: Implications for Infection and Immunoprophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Franz X; Stiasny, Karin

    2017-03-01

    Zika virus was discovered ∼70 years ago in Uganda and maintained a low profile as a human disease agent in Africa and Asia. Only recently has it caused explosive outbreaks in previously unaffected regions, first in Oceania and then in the Americas since 2015. Of special concern is the newly identified link between congenital malformations (especially microcephaly) and Zika virus infections during pregnancy. At present, it is unclear whether Zika virus changed its pathogenicity or whether the huge number of infections allowed the recognition of a previously cryptic pathogenic property. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent data on the molecular antigenic structure of Zika virus in the context of antibody-mediated neutralization and antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection, a phenomenon that has been implicated in the development of severe disease caused by the related dengue viruses. Emphasis is given to epitopes of antibodies that potently neutralize Zika virus and also to epitopes that provide antigenic links to other important human-pathogenic flaviviruses such as dengue, yellow fever, West Nile, Japanese encephalitis, and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. The antigenic cross talk between Zika and dengue viruses appears to be of special importance, since they cocirculate in many regions of endemicity and sequential infections are likely to occur frequently. New insights into the molecular antigenic structure of Zika virus and flaviviruses in general have provided the foundation for great progress made in developing Zika virus vaccines and antibodies for passive immunization.

  3. Visual SLAM Using Variance Grid Maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Andrew B.; Marks, Tim K.

    2011-01-01

    An algorithm denoted Gamma-SLAM performs further processing, in real time, of preprocessed digitized images acquired by a stereoscopic pair of electronic cameras aboard an off-road robotic ground vehicle to build accurate maps of the terrain and determine the location of the vehicle with respect to the maps. Part of the name of the algorithm reflects the fact that the process of building the maps and determining the location with respect to them is denoted simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM). Most prior real-time SLAM algorithms have been limited in applicability to (1) systems equipped with scanning laser range finders as the primary sensors in (2) indoor environments (or relatively simply structured outdoor environments). The few prior vision-based SLAM algorithms have been feature-based and not suitable for real-time applications and, hence, not suitable for autonomous navigation on irregularly structured terrain. The Gamma-SLAM algorithm incorporates two key innovations: Visual odometry (in contradistinction to wheel odometry) is used to estimate the motion of the vehicle. An elevation variance map (in contradistinction to an occupancy or an elevation map) is used to represent the terrain. The Gamma-SLAM algorithm makes use of a Rao-Blackwellized particle filter (RBPF) from Bayesian estimation theory for maintaining a distribution over poses and maps. The core idea of the RBPF approach is that the SLAM problem can be factored into two parts: (1) finding the distribution over robot trajectories, and (2) finding the map conditioned on any given trajectory. The factorization involves the use of a particle filter in which each particle encodes both a possible trajectory and a map conditioned on that trajectory. The base estimate of the trajectory is derived from visual odometry, and the map conditioned on that trajectory is a Cartesian grid of elevation variances. In comparison with traditional occupancy or elevation grid maps, the grid elevation variance

  4. The latitude dependence of the variance of zonally averaged quantities. [in polar meteorology with attention to geometrical effects of earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    North, G. R.; Bell, T. L.; Cahalan, R. F.; Moeng, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    Geometric characteristics of the spherical earth are shown to be responsible for the increase of variance with latitude of zonally averaged meteorological statistics. An analytic model is constructed to display the effect of a spherical geometry on zonal averages, employing a sphere labeled with radial unit vectors in a real, stochastic field expanded in complex spherical harmonics. The variance of a zonally averaged field is found to be expressible in terms of the spectrum of the vector field of the spherical harmonics. A maximum variance is then located at the poles, and the ratio of the variance to the zonally averaged grid-point variance, weighted by the cosine of the latitude, yields the zonal correlation typical of the latitude. An example is provided for the 500 mb level in the Northern Hemisphere compared to 15 years of data. Variance is determined to increase north of 60 deg latitude.

  5. Cosmic variance of the galaxy cluster weak lensing signal

    SciTech Connect

    Gruen, D.; Seitz, S.; Becker, M. R.; Friedrich, O.; Mana, A.

    2015-04-13

    Intrinsic variations of the projected density profiles of clusters of galaxies at fixed mass are a source of uncertainty for cluster weak lensing. We present a semi-analytical model to account for this effect, based on a combination of variations in halo concentration, ellipticity and orientation, and the presence of correlated haloes. We calibrate the parameters of our model at the 10 per cent level to match the empirical cosmic variance of cluster profiles at M200m ≈ 1014…1015h–1M, z = 0.25…0.5 in a cosmological simulation. We show that weak lensing measurements of clusters significantly underestimate mass uncertainties if intrinsic profile variations are ignored, and that our model can be used to provide correct mass likelihoods. Effects on the achievable accuracy of weak lensing cluster mass measurements are particularly strong for the most massive clusters and deep observations (with ≈20 per cent uncertainty from cosmic variance alone at M200m ≈ 1015h–1M and z = 0.25), but significant also under typical ground-based conditions. We show that neglecting intrinsic profile variations leads to biases in the mass-observable relation constrained with weak lensing, both for intrinsic scatter and overall scale (the latter at the 15 per cent level). Furthermore, these biases are in excess of the statistical errors of upcoming surveys and can be avoided if the cosmic variance of cluster profiles is accounted for.

  6. The defect variance of random spherical harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinucci, Domenico; Wigman, Igor

    2011-09-01

    The defect of a function f:M\\rightarrow {R} is defined as the difference between the measure of the positive and negative regions. In this paper, we begin the analysis of the distribution of defect of random Gaussian spherical harmonics. By an easy argument, the defect is non-trivial only for even degree and the expected value always vanishes. Our principal result is evaluating the defect variance, asymptotically in the high-frequency limit. As other geometric functionals of random eigenfunctions, the defect may be used as a tool to probe the statistical properties of spherical random fields, a topic of great interest for modern cosmological data analysis.

  7. River meanders - Theory of minimum variance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langbein, Walter Basil; Leopold, Luna Bergere

    1966-01-01

    Meanders are the result of erosion-deposition processes tending toward the most stable form in which the variability of certain essential properties is minimized. This minimization involves the adjustment of the planimetric geometry and the hydraulic factors of depth, velocity, and local slope.The planimetric geometry of a meander is that of a random walk whose most frequent form minimizes the sum of the squares of the changes in direction in each successive unit length. The direction angles are then sine functions of channel distance. This yields a meander shape typically present in meandering rivers and has the characteristic that the ratio of meander length to average radius of curvature in the bend is 4.7.Depth, velocity, and slope are shown by field observations to be adjusted so as to decrease the variance of shear and the friction factor in a meander curve over that in an otherwise comparable straight reach of the same riverSince theory and observation indicate meanders achieve the minimum variance postulated, it follows that for channels in which alternating pools and riffles occur, meandering is the most probable form of channel geometry and thus is more stable geometry than a straight or nonmeandering alinement.

  8. Multivariate Granger causality and generalized variance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Adam B.; Barnett, Lionel; Seth, Anil K.

    2010-04-01

    Granger causality analysis is a popular method for inference on directed interactions in complex systems of many variables. A shortcoming of the standard framework for Granger causality is that it only allows for examination of interactions between single (univariate) variables within a system, perhaps conditioned on other variables. However, interactions do not necessarily take place between single variables but may occur among groups or “ensembles” of variables. In this study we establish a principled framework for Granger causality in the context of causal interactions among two or more multivariate sets of variables. Building on Geweke’s seminal 1982 work, we offer additional justifications for one particular form of multivariate Granger causality based on the generalized variances of residual errors. Taken together, our results support a comprehensive and theoretically consistent extension of Granger causality to the multivariate case. Treated individually, they highlight several specific advantages of the generalized variance measure, which we illustrate using applications in neuroscience as an example. We further show how the measure can be used to define “partial” Granger causality in the multivariate context and we also motivate reformulations of “causal density” and “Granger autonomy.” Our results are directly applicable to experimental data and promise to reveal new types of functional relations in complex systems, neural and otherwise.

  9. Multivariate Granger causality and generalized variance.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Adam B; Barnett, Lionel; Seth, Anil K

    2010-04-01

    Granger causality analysis is a popular method for inference on directed interactions in complex systems of many variables. A shortcoming of the standard framework for Granger causality is that it only allows for examination of interactions between single (univariate) variables within a system, perhaps conditioned on other variables. However, interactions do not necessarily take place between single variables but may occur among groups or "ensembles" of variables. In this study we establish a principled framework for Granger causality in the context of causal interactions among two or more multivariate sets of variables. Building on Geweke's seminal 1982 work, we offer additional justifications for one particular form of multivariate Granger causality based on the generalized variances of residual errors. Taken together, our results support a comprehensive and theoretically consistent extension of Granger causality to the multivariate case. Treated individually, they highlight several specific advantages of the generalized variance measure, which we illustrate using applications in neuroscience as an example. We further show how the measure can be used to define "partial" Granger causality in the multivariate context and we also motivate reformulations of "causal density" and "Granger autonomy." Our results are directly applicable to experimental data and promise to reveal new types of functional relations in complex systems, neural and otherwise.

  10. Hidden temporal order unveiled in stock market volatility variance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapira, Y.; Kenett, D. Y.; Raviv, Ohad; Ben-Jacob, E.

    2011-06-01

    When analyzed by standard statistical methods, the time series of the daily return of financial indices appear to behave as Markov random series with no apparent temporal order or memory. This empirical result seems to be counter intuitive since investor are influenced by both short and long term past market behaviors. Consequently much effort has been devoted to unveil hidden temporal order in the market dynamics. Here we show that temporal order is hidden in the series of the variance of the stocks volatility. First we show that the correlation between the variances of the daily returns and means of segments of these time series is very large and thus cannot be the output of random series, unless it has some temporal order in it. Next we show that while the temporal order does not show in the series of the daily return, rather in the variation of the corresponding volatility series. More specifically, we found that the behavior of the shuffled time series is equivalent to that of a random time series, while that of the original time series have large deviations from the expected random behavior, which is the result of temporal structure. We found the same generic behavior in 10 different stock markets from 7 different countries. We also present analysis of specially constructed sequences in order to better understand the origin of the observed temporal order in the market sequences. Each sequence was constructed from segments with equal number of elements taken from algebraic distributions of three different slopes.

  11. Flavivirus cross-reactivity in serological tests and Guillain-Barré syndrome in a hematopoietic stem cell transplant patient: A case report.

    PubMed

    Raboni, Sonia M; Bonfim, Carmem; Almeida, Bernardo M; Zanluca, Camila; Koishi, Andrea C; Rodrigues, Paula R V P; Kay, Claudia K; Ribeiro, Lisandro L; Scola, Rosana H; Duarte Dos Santos, Claudia N

    2017-03-17

    Serological diagnosis of flavivirus infection is a challenge, particularly in the context of a disease associated with immune response enhancement in a transplant patient, where aspects such as previous flavivirus infections may be involved with the outcome. We report a case of a pediatric patient who developed Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) after matched-unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The patient lives in a Brazilian region that is experiencing an epidemic of Zika virus (ZIKV) and dengue virus (DENV). Because an increasing number of cases of GBS, likely triggered by ZIKV infection, are being reported in Brazil, samples from the patient were tested for both ZIKV and DENV infection. Serological assays strongly suggested a recent ZIKV infection, although infection by DENV or co-infection with both viruses cannot be ruled out. The presence of anti-DENV immunoglobulin-G in donor serum led to the hypothesis that antibodies from the donor could have enhanced the severity of the ZIKV infection. This hypothesis is in agreement with the recent findings that DENV sero-cross-reactivity drives antibody-dependent enhancement of ZIKV infection. These findings highlight the need for discussion of the indication to perform previous flavivirus tests in HSCT donors, especially in areas where ZIKV and other flaviviruses co-circulate. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Flavivirus-cross-reactive, HLA-DR15-restricted epitope on NS3 recognized by human CD4+ CD8- cytotoxic T lymphocyte clones.

    PubMed

    Kurane, I; Okamoto, Y; Dai, L C; Zeng, L L; Brinton, M A; Ennis, F A

    1995-09-01

    The role of flavivirus-cross-reactive T lymphocytes in recovery from and pathogenesis of flavivirus infections is not known. In the present paper, we have defined a flavivirus-cross-reactive epitope recognized by two CD4+ CD8- cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clones, JK4 and JK43. The T cell clones were established from the peripheral blood T lymphocytes of a dengue-4-immune donor, using a limiting-dilution method with dengue-4 antigen. These two T cell clones were cross-reactive for dengue virus types 1, 2, 3 and 4, yellow fever virus and West Nile virus, and recognized NS3 protein. The smallest synthetic peptide recognized by these T cell clones was an identical 9 amino acid peptide which contains amino acids 146 to 154 (VIGLYGNGV) of dengue-4 NS3. HLA-DR15 was the restriction allele for recognition of this epitope by JK4 and JK43. JK4 and JK43 both used T cell receptor V alpha 8, but JK4 used V beta 8 and JK43 used V beta 2. This result indicates that this epitope is recognized by two flavivirus-cross-reactive CD4+ T cell clones which originated from different T cells in vivo.

  13. Approaches for the Development of Rapid Serological Assays for Surveillance and Diagnosis of Infections Caused by Zoonotic Flaviviruses of the Japanese Encephalitis Virus Serocomplex

    PubMed Central

    Hobson-Peters, Jody

    2012-01-01

    Flaviviruses are responsible for a number of important mosquito-borne diseases of man and animals globally. The short vireamic period in infected hosts means that serological assays are often the diagnostic method of choice. This paper will focus on the traditional methods to diagnose flaviviral infections as well as describing the modern rapid platforms and approaches for diagnostic antigen preparation. PMID:22570528

  14. Variance estimation for the Federal Waterfowl Harvest Surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geissler, P.H.

    1988-01-01

    The Federal Waterfowl Harvest Surveys provide estimates of waterfowl harvest by species for flyways and states, harvests of most other migratory game bird species (by waterfowl hunters), crippling losses for ducks, geese, and coots, days hunted, and bag per hunter. The Waterfowl Hunter Questionnaire Survey separately estimates the harvest of ducks and geese using cluster samples of hunters who buy duck stamps at sample post offices. The Waterfowl Parts Collection estimates species, age, and sex ratios from parts solicited from successful hunters who responded to the Waterfowl Hunter Questionnaire Survey in previous years. These ratios are used to partition the duck and goose harvest into species, age, and sex specific harvest estimates. Annual estimates are correlated because successful hunters who respond to the Questionnaire Survey in one year may be asked to contribute to the Parts Collection for the next three years. Bootstrap variance estimates are used because covariances among years are difficult to estimate.

  15. 40 CFR 59.509 - Can I get a variance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... its application is complete. (d) The Administrator will issue a variance if the criteria specified in... entity will achieve compliance with this subpart. (f) A variance will cease to be effective upon...

  16. 40 CFR 59.509 - Can I get a variance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... its application is complete. (d) The Administrator will issue a variance if the criteria specified in... entity will achieve compliance with this subpart. (f) A variance will cease to be effective upon...

  17. Variance of the quantum dwell time for a nonrelativistic particle

    SciTech Connect

    Hahne, G. E.

    2013-01-15

    Munoz, Seidel, and Muga [Phys. Rev. A 79, 012108 (2009)], following an earlier proposal by Pollak and Miller [Phys. Rev. Lett. 53, 115 (1984)] in the context of a theory of a collinear chemical reaction, showed that suitable moments of a two-flux correlation function could be manipulated to yield expressions for the mean quantum dwell time and mean square quantum dwell time for a structureless particle scattering from a time-independent potential energy field between two parallel lines in a two-dimensional spacetime. The present work proposes a generalization to a charged, nonrelativistic particle scattering from a transient, spatially confined electromagnetic vector potential in four-dimensional spacetime. The geometry of the spacetime domain is that of the slab between a pair of parallel planes, in particular, those defined by constant values of the third (z) spatial coordinate. The mean Nth power, N= 1, 2, 3, Horizontal-Ellipsis , of the quantum dwell time in the slab is given by an expression involving an N-flux-correlation function. All these means are shown to be nonnegative. The N= 1 formula reduces to an S-matrix result published previously [G. E. Hahne, J. Phys. A 36, 7149 (2003)]; an explicit formula for N= 2, and of the variance of the dwell time in terms of the S-matrix, is worked out. A formula representing an incommensurability principle between variances of the output-minus-input flux of a pair of dynamical variables (such as the particle's time flux and others) is derived.

  18. Applications of Variance Fractal Dimension: a Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phinyomark, Angkoon; Phukpattaranont, Pornchai; Limsakul, Chusak

    2012-04-01

    Chaotic dynamical systems are pervasive in nature and can be shown to be deterministic through fractal analysis. There are numerous methods that can be used to estimate the fractal dimension. Among the usual fractal estimation methods, variance fractal dimension (VFD) is one of the most significant fractal analysis methods that can be implemented for real-time systems. The basic concept and theory of VFD are presented. Recent research and the development of several applications based on VFD are reviewed and explained in detail, such as biomedical signal processing and pattern recognition, speech communication, geophysical signal analysis, power systems and communication systems. The important parameters that need to be considered in computing the VFD are discussed, including the window size and the window increment of the feature, and the step size of the VFD. Directions for future research of VFD are also briefly outlined.

  19. A new insect-specific flavivirus from northern Australia suppresses replication of West Nile virus and Murray Valley encephalitis virus in co-infected mosquito cells.

    PubMed

    Hobson-Peters, Jody; Yam, Alice Wei Yee; Lu, Jennifer Wei Fei; Setoh, Yin Xiang; May, Fiona J; Kurucz, Nina; Walsh, Susan; Prow, Natalie A; Davis, Steven S; Weir, Richard; Melville, Lorna; Hunt, Neville; Webb, Richard I; Blitvich, Bradley J; Whelan, Peter; Hall, Roy A

    2013-01-01

    Recent reports of a novel group of flaviviruses that replicate only in mosquitoes and appear to spread through insect populations via vertical transmission have emerged from around the globe. To date, there is no information on the presence or prevalence of these insect-specific flaviviruses (ISFs) in Australian mosquito species. To assess whether such viruses occur locally, we used reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and flavivirus universal primers that are specific to the NS5 gene to detect these viruses in mosquito pools collected from the Northern Territory. Of 94 pools of mosquitoes, 13 were RT-PCR positive, and of these, 6 flavivirus isolates were obtained by inoculation of mosquito cell culture. Sequence analysis of the NS5 gene revealed that these isolates are genetically and phylogenetically similar to ISFs reported from other parts of the world. The entire coding region of one isolate (designated 56) was sequenced and shown to have approximately 63.7% nucleotide identity and 66.6% amino acid identity with its closest known relative (Nakiwogo virus) indicating that the prototype Australian ISF represents a new species. All isolates were obtained from Coquillettidia xanthogaster mosquitoes. The new virus is tentatively named Palm Creek virus (PCV) after its place of isolation. We also demonstrated that prior infection of cultured mosquito cells with PCV suppressed subsequent replication of the medically significant West Nile and Murray Valley encephalitis viruses by 10-43 fold (1 to 1.63 log) at 48 hr post-infection, suggesting that superinfection exclusion can occur between ISFs and vertebrate-infecting flaviviruses despite their high level of genetic diversity. We also generated several monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that are specific to the NS1 protein of PCV, and these represent the first ISF-specific mAbs reported to date.

  20. A New Insect-Specific Flavivirus from Northern Australia Suppresses Replication of West Nile Virus and Murray Valley Encephalitis Virus in Co-infected Mosquito Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hobson-Peters, Jody; Yam, Alice Wei Yee; Lu, Jennifer Wei Fei; Setoh, Yin Xiang; May, Fiona J.; Kurucz, Nina; Walsh, Susan; Prow, Natalie A.; Davis, Steven S.; Weir, Richard; Melville, Lorna; Hunt, Neville; Webb, Richard I.; Blitvich, Bradley J.; Whelan, Peter; Hall, Roy A.

    2013-01-01

    Recent reports of a novel group of flaviviruses that replicate only in mosquitoes and appear to spread through insect populations via vertical transmission have emerged from around the globe. To date, there is no information on the presence or prevalence of these insect-specific flaviviruses (ISFs) in Australian mosquito species. To assess whether such viruses occur locally, we used reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and flavivirus universal primers that are specific to the NS5 gene to detect these viruses in mosquito pools collected from the Northern Territory. Of 94 pools of mosquitoes, 13 were RT-PCR positive, and of these, 6 flavivirus isolates were obtained by inoculation of mosquito cell culture. Sequence analysis of the NS5 gene revealed that these isolates are genetically and phylogenetically similar to ISFs reported from other parts of the world. The entire coding region of one isolate (designated 56) was sequenced and shown to have approximately 63.7% nucleotide identity and 66.6% amino acid identity with its closest known relative (Nakiwogo virus) indicating that the prototype Australian ISF represents a new species. All isolates were obtained from Coquillettidia xanthogaster mosquitoes. The new virus is tentatively named Palm Creek virus (PCV) after its place of isolation. We also demonstrated that prior infection of cultured mosquito cells with PCV suppressed subsequent replication of the medically significant West Nile and Murray Valley encephalitis viruses by 10–43 fold (1 to 1.63 log) at 48 hr post-infection, suggesting that superinfection exclusion can occur between ISFs and vertebrate-infecting flaviviruses despite their high level of genetic diversity. We also generated several monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that are specific to the NS1 protein of PCV, and these represent the first ISF-specific mAbs reported to date. PMID:23460804

  1. Cost/variance optimization for human exposure assessment studies.

    PubMed

    Whitmore, Roy W; Pellizzari, Edo D; Zelon, Harvey S; Michael, Larry C; Quackenboss, James J

    2005-11-01

    The National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) field study in EPA Region V (one of three NHEXAS field studies) provides extensive exposure data on a representative sample of 249 residents of the Great Lakes states. Concentration data were obtained for both metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from multiple environmental media and from human biomarkers. A variance model for the logarithms of concentration measurements is used to define intraclass correlations between observations within primary sampling units (PSUs) (nominally counties) and within secondary sampling units (SSUs) (nominally Census blocks). A model for the total cost of the study is developed in terms of fixed costs and variable costs per PSU, SSU, and participant. Intraclass correlations are estimated for media and analytes with sufficient sample sizes. We demonstrate how the intraclass correlations and variable cost components can be used to determine the sample allocation that minimizes cost while achieving pre-specified precision constraints for future studies that monitor environmental concentrations and human exposures for metals and VOCs.

  2. Considering Oil Production Variance as an Indicator of Peak Production

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-07

    Acquisition Cost ( IRAC ) Oil Prices. Source: Data used to construct graph acquired from the EIA (http://tonto.eia.doe.gov/country/timeline/oil_chronology.cfm...Acquisition Cost ( IRAC ). Production vs. Price – Variance Comparison Oil production variance and oil price variance have never been so far

  3. A New Nonparametric Levene Test for Equal Variances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordstokke, David W.; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2010-01-01

    Tests of the equality of variances are sometimes used on their own to compare variability across groups of experimental or non-experimental conditions but they are most often used alongside other methods to support assumptions made about variances. A new nonparametric test of equality of variances is described and compared to current "gold…

  4. The Evolution of Human Intelligence and the Coefficient of Additive Genetic Variance in Human Brain Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Geoffrey F.; Penke, Lars

    2007-01-01

    Most theories of human mental evolution assume that selection favored higher intelligence and larger brains, which should have reduced genetic variance in both. However, adult human intelligence remains highly heritable, and is genetically correlated with brain size. This conflict might be resolved by estimating the coefficient of additive genetic…

  5. Empirical data and the variance-covariance matrix for the 1969 Smithsonian Standard Earth (2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaposchkin, E. M.

    1972-01-01

    The empirical data used in the 1969 Smithsonian Standard Earth (2) are presented. The variance-covariance matrix, or the normal equations, used for correlation analysis, are considered. The format and contents of the matrix, available on magnetic tape, are described and a sample printout is given.

  6. Tick-borne flavivirus infection in Ixodes scapularis larvae: development of a novel method for synchronous viral infection of ticks

    PubMed Central

    Mitzel, Dana N.; Wolfinbarger, James B.; Daniel Long, R.; Masnick, Max; Best, Sonja M.; Bloom, Marshall E.

    2007-01-01

    Following a bite from an infected tick, tick-borne flaviviruses cause encephalitis, meningitis and hemorrhagic fever in humans. Although these viruses spend most of their time in the tick, little is known regarding the virus-vector interactions. We developed a simple method for synchronously infecting Ixodes scapularis larvae with Langat virus (LGTV) by immersion in media containing the virus. This technique resulted in approximately 96% of ticks becoming infected. LGTV infection and replication were demonstrated by both viral antigen expression and the accumulation of viral RNA. Furthermore, ticks transmitted LGTV to 100% of the mice and maintained the virus through molting into the next life stage. This technique circumvents limitations present in the current methods by mimicking the natural route of infection and by using attenuated virus strains to infect ticks; thereby, making this technique a powerful tool to study both virus and tick determinants of replication, pathogenesis and transmission. PMID:17490700

  7. Tick-borne flavivirus infection in Ixodes scapularis larvae: development of a novel method for synchronous viral infection of ticks.

    PubMed

    Mitzel, Dana N; Wolfinbarger, James B; Long, R Daniel; Masnick, Max; Best, Sonja M; Bloom, Marshall E

    2007-09-01

    Following a bite from an infected tick, tick-borne flaviviruses cause encephalitis, meningitis and hemorrhagic fever in humans. Although these viruses spend most of their time in the tick, little is known regarding the virus-vector interactions. We developed a simple method for synchronously infecting Ixodes scapularis larvae with Langat virus (LGTV) by immersion in media containing the virus. This technique resulted in approximately 96% of ticks becoming infected. LGTV infection and replication were demonstrated by both viral antigen expression and the accumulation of viral RNA. Furthermore, ticks transmitted LGTV to 100% of the mice and maintained the virus through molting into the next life stage. This technique circumvents limitations present in the current methods by mimicking the natural route of infection and by using attenuated virus strains to infect ticks, thereby making this technique a powerful tool to study both virus and tick determinants of replication, pathogenesis and transmission.

  8. Emergence of Usutu virus, an African mosquito-borne flavivirus of the Japanese encephalitis virus group, central Europe.

    PubMed

    Weissenböck, Herbert; Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Url, Angelika; Lussy, Helga; Rebel-Bauder, Barbara; Nowotny, Norbert

    2002-07-01

    During late summer 2001 in Austria, a series of deaths in several species of birds occurred, similar to the beginning of the West Nile virus (WNV) epidemic in the United States. We necropsied the dead birds and examined them by various methods; pathologic and immunohistologic investigations suggested a WNV infection. Subsequently, the virus was isolated, identified, partially sequenced, and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. The isolates exhibited 97% identity to Usutu virus (USUV), a mosquito-borne Flavivirus of the Japanese encephalitis virus group; USUV has never previously been observed outside Africa nor associated with fatal disease in animals or humans. If established in central Europe, this virus may have considerable effects on avian populations; whether USUV has the potential to cause severe human disease is unknown.

  9. Feasibility study: protein denaturation and coagulation monitoring with speckle variance optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changho; Cheon, Gyeongwoo; Kim, Do-Hyun; Kang, Jin U.

    2016-12-01

    We performed the feasibility study using speckle variance optical coherence tomography (SvOCT) to monitor the thermally induced protein denaturation and coagulation process as a function of temperature and depth. SvOCT provided the depth-resolved image of protein denaturation and coagulation with microscale resolution. This study was conducted using egg white. During the heating process, as the temperature increased, increases in the speckle variance signal was observed as the egg white proteins coagulated. Additionally, by calculating the cross-correlation coefficient in specific areas, denaturized egg white conditions were successfully estimated. These results indicate that SvOCT could be used to monitor the denaturation process of various proteins.

  10. Kriging with Unknown Variance Components for Regional Ionospheric Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ling; Zhang, Hongping; Xu, Peiliang; Geng, Jianghui; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Jingnan

    2017-02-27

    Ionospheric delay effect is a critical issue that limits the accuracy of precise Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) positioning and navigation for single-frequency users, especially in mid- and low-latitude regions where variations in the ionosphere are larger. Kriging spatial interpolation techniques have been recently introduced to model the spatial correlation and variability of ionosphere, which intrinsically assume that the ionosphere field is stochastically stationary but does not take the random observational errors into account. In this paper, by treating the spatial statistical information on ionosphere as prior knowledge and based on Total Electron Content (TEC) semivariogram analysis, we use Kriging techniques to spatially interpolate TEC values. By assuming that the stochastic models of both the ionospheric signals and measurement errors are only known up to some unknown factors, we propose a new Kriging spatial interpolation method with unknown variance components for both the signals of ionosphere and TEC measurements. Variance component estimation has been integrated with Kriging to reconstruct regional ionospheric delays. The method has been applied to data from the Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONOC) and compared with the ordinary Kriging and polynomial interpolations with spherical cap harmonic functions, polynomial functions and low-degree spherical harmonic functions. The statistics of results indicate that the daily ionospheric variations during the experimental period characterized by the proposed approach have good agreement with the other methods, ranging from 10 to 80 TEC Unit (TECU, 1 TECU = 1 × 10(16) electrons/m²) with an overall mean of 28.2 TECU. The proposed method can produce more appropriate estimations whose general TEC level is as smooth as the ordinary Kriging but with a smaller standard deviation around 3 TECU than others. The residual results show that the interpolation precision of the new proposed

  11. Kriging with Unknown Variance Components for Regional Ionospheric Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ling; Zhang, Hongping; Xu, Peiliang; Geng, Jianghui; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Jingnan

    2017-01-01

    Ionospheric delay effect is a critical issue that limits the accuracy of precise Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) positioning and navigation for single-frequency users, especially in mid- and low-latitude regions where variations in the ionosphere are larger. Kriging spatial interpolation techniques have been recently introduced to model the spatial correlation and variability of ionosphere, which intrinsically assume that the ionosphere field is stochastically stationary but does not take the random observational errors into account. In this paper, by treating the spatial statistical information on ionosphere as prior knowledge and based on Total Electron Content (TEC) semivariogram analysis, we use Kriging techniques to spatially interpolate TEC values. By assuming that the stochastic models of both the ionospheric signals and measurement errors are only known up to some unknown factors, we propose a new Kriging spatial interpolation method with unknown variance components for both the signals of ionosphere and TEC measurements. Variance component estimation has been integrated with Kriging to reconstruct regional ionospheric delays. The method has been applied to data from the Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONOC) and compared with the ordinary Kriging and polynomial interpolations with spherical cap harmonic functions, polynomial functions and low-degree spherical harmonic functions. The statistics of results indicate that the daily ionospheric variations during the experimental period characterized by the proposed approach have good agreement with the other methods, ranging from 10 to 80 TEC Unit (TECU, 1 TECU = 1 × 1016 electrons/m2) with an overall mean of 28.2 TECU. The proposed method can produce more appropriate estimations whose general TEC level is as smooth as the ordinary Kriging but with a smaller standard deviation around 3 TECU than others. The residual results show that the interpolation precision of the new proposed

  12. Functional analysis of variance for association studies.

    PubMed

    Vsevolozhskaya, Olga A; Zaykin, Dmitri V; Greenwood, Mark C; Wei, Changshuai; Lu, Qing

    2014-01-01

    While progress has been made in identifying common genetic variants associated with human diseases, for most of common complex diseases, the identified genetic variants only account for a small proportion of heritability. Challenges remain in finding additional unknown genetic variants predisposing to complex diseases. With the advance in next-generation sequencing technologies, sequencing studies have become commonplace in genetic research. The ongoing exome-sequencing and whole-genome-sequencing studies generate a massive amount of sequencing variants and allow researchers to comprehensively investigate their role in human diseases. The discovery of new disease-associated variants can be enhanced by utilizing powerful and computationally efficient statistical methods. In this paper, we propose a functional analysis of variance (FANOVA) method for testing an association of sequence variants in a genomic region with a qualitative trait. The FANOVA has a number of advantages: (1) it tests for a joint effect of gene variants, including both common and rare; (2) it fully utilizes linkage disequilibrium and genetic position information; and (3) allows for either protective or risk-increasing causal variants. Through simulations, we show that FANOVA outperform two popularly used methods - SKAT and a previously proposed method based on functional linear models (FLM), - especially if a sample size of a study is small and/or sequence variants have low to moderate effects. We conduct an empirical study by applying three methods (FANOVA, SKAT and FLM) to sequencing data from Dallas Heart Study. While SKAT and FLM respectively detected ANGPTL 4 and ANGPTL 3 associated with obesity, FANOVA was able to identify both genes associated with obesity.

  13. Relative efficiency of unequal cluster sizes for variance component estimation in cluster randomized and multicentre trials.

    PubMed

    van Breukelen, Gerard Jp; Candel, Math Jjm; Berger, Martijn Pf

    2008-08-01

    Cluster randomized and multicentre trials evaluate the effect of a treatment on persons nested within clusters, for instance patients within clinics or pupils within schools. Although equal sample sizes per cluster are generally optimal for parameter estimation, they are rarely feasible. This paper addresses the relative efficiency (RE) of unequal versus equal cluster sizes for estimating variance components in cluster randomized trials and in multicentre trials with person randomization within centres, assuming a quantitative outcome. Starting from maximum likelihood estimation, the RE is investigated numerically for a range of cluster size distributions. An approximate formula is presented for computing the RE as a function of the mean and variance of cluster sizes and the intraclass correlation. The accuracy of this approximation is checked and found to be good. It is concluded that the loss of efficiency for variance component estimation due to variation of cluster sizes rarely exceeds 20% and can be compensated by sampling 25% more clusters.

  14. On discrete stochastic processes with long-lasting time dependence in the variance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queirós, S. M. D.

    2008-11-01

    In this manuscript, we analytically and numerically study statistical properties of an heteroskedastic process based on the celebrated ARCH generator of random variables whose variance is defined by a memory of qm-exponencial, form (eqm=1 x=ex). Specifically, we inspect the self-correlation function of squared random variables as well as the kurtosis. In addition, by numerical procedures, we infer the stationary probability density function of both of the heteroskedastic random variables and the variance, the multiscaling properties, the first-passage times distribution, and the dependence degree. Finally, we introduce an asymmetric variance version of the model that enables us to reproduce the so-called leverage effect in financial markets.

  15. Estimating the encounter rate variance in distance sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fewster, R.M.; Buckland, S.T.; Burnham, K.P.; Borchers, D.L.; Jupp, P.E.; Laake, J.L.; Thomas, L.

    2009-01-01

    The dominant source of variance in line transect sampling is usually the encounter rate variance. Systematic survey designs are often used to reduce the true variability among different realizations of the design, but estimating the variance is difficult and estimators typically approximate the variance by treating the design as a simple random sample of lines. We explore the properties of different encounter rate variance estimators under random and systematic designs. We show that a design-based variance estimator improves upon the model-based estimator of Buckland et al. (2001, Introduction to Distance Sampling. Oxford: Oxford University Press, p. 79) when transects are positioned at random. However, if populations exhibit strong spatial trends, both estimators can have substantial positive bias under systematic designs. We show that poststratification is effective in reducing this bias. ?? 2008, The International Biometric Society.

  16. First isolation of Aedes flavivirus in the Western Hemisphere and evidence of vertical transmission in the mosquito Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Haddow, Andrew D; Guzman, Hilda; Popov, Vsevolod L; Wood, Thomas G; Widen, Steven G; Haddow, Alastair D; Tesh, Robert B; Weaver, Scott C

    2013-06-05

    We report here the first evidence of vertical transmission of Aedes flavivirus (AEFV) and its first isolation in the Western Hemisphere. AEFV strain SPFLD-MO-2011-MP6 was isolated in C6/36 cells from a pool of male Aedes albopictus mosquitoes that were reared to adults from larvae collected in southwest Missouri, USA, in 2011. Electron micrographs of the virus showed virions of approximately 45nm in diameter with morphological characteristics associated with flaviviruses. The genomic sequence demonstrated that AEFV-SPFLD-MO-2011-MP6 shares a high degree of nucleotide and amino acid sequence identity with the AEFV Narita-21 strain, isolated in Japan in 2003. Intracerebral inoculation of newborn mice with the virus failed to produce observable illness or death and the virus did not replicate in vertebrate cells, consistent with a lack of vertebrate host range.

  17. Multiperiod Mean-Variance Portfolio Optimization via Market Cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Ankirchner, Stefan; Dermoune, Azzouz

    2011-08-15

    The problem of finding the mean variance optimal portfolio in a multiperiod model can not be solved directly by means of dynamic programming. In order to find a solution we therefore first introduce independent market clones having the same distributional properties as the original market, and we replace the portfolio mean and variance by their empirical counterparts. We then use dynamic programming to derive portfolios maximizing a weighted sum of the empirical mean and variance. By letting the number of market clones converge to infinity we are able to solve the original mean variance problem.

  18. Network Structure and Biased Variance Estimation in Respondent Driven Sampling.

    PubMed

    Verdery, Ashton M; Mouw, Ted; Bauldry, Shawn; Mucha, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores bias in the estimation of sampling variance in Respondent Driven Sampling (RDS). Prior methodological work on RDS has focused on its problematic assumptions and the biases and inefficiencies of its estimators of the population mean. Nonetheless, researchers have given only slight attention to the topic of estimating sampling variance in RDS, despite the importance of variance estimation for the construction of confidence intervals and hypothesis tests. In this paper, we show that the estimators of RDS sampling variance rely on a critical assumption that the network is First Order Markov (FOM) with respect to the dependent variable of interest. We demonstrate, through intuitive examples, mathematical generalizations, and computational experiments that current RDS variance estimators will always underestimate the population sampling variance of RDS in empirical networks that do not conform to the FOM assumption. Analysis of 215 observed university and school networks from Facebook and Add Health indicates that the FOM assumption is violated in every empirical network we analyze, and that these violations lead to substantially biased RDS estimators of sampling variance. We propose and test two alternative variance estimators that show some promise for reducing biases, but which also illustrate the limits of estimating sampling variance with only partial information on the underlying population social network.

  19. Network Structure and Biased Variance Estimation in Respondent Driven Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Verdery, Ashton M.; Mouw, Ted; Bauldry, Shawn; Mucha, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores bias in the estimation of sampling variance in Respondent Driven Sampling (RDS). Prior methodological work on RDS has focused on its problematic assumptions and the biases and inefficiencies of its estimators of the population mean. Nonetheless, researchers have given only slight attention to the topic of estimating sampling variance in RDS, despite the importance of variance estimation for the construction of confidence intervals and hypothesis tests. In this paper, we show that the estimators of RDS sampling variance rely on a critical assumption that the network is First Order Markov (FOM) with respect to the dependent variable of interest. We demonstrate, through intuitive examples, mathematical generalizations, and computational experiments that current RDS variance estimators will always underestimate the population sampling variance of RDS in empirical networks that do not conform to the FOM assumption. Analysis of 215 observed university and school networks from Facebook and Add Health indicates that the FOM assumption is violated in every empirical network we analyze, and that these violations lead to substantially biased RDS estimators of sampling variance. We propose and test two alternative variance estimators that show some promise for reducing biases, but which also illustrate the limits of estimating sampling variance with only partial information on the underlying population social network. PMID:26679927

  20. RR-Interval variance of electrocardiogram for atrial fibrillation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuryani, N.; Solikhah, M.; Nugoho, A. S.; Afdala, A.; Anzihory, E.

    2016-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a serious heart problem originated from the upper chamber of the heart. The common indication of atrial fibrillation is irregularity of R peak-to-R-peak time interval, which is shortly called RR interval. The irregularity could be represented using variance or spread of RR interval. This article presents a system to detect atrial fibrillation using variances. Using clinical data of patients with atrial fibrillation attack, it is shown that the variance of electrocardiographic RR interval are higher during atrial fibrillation, compared to the normal one. Utilizing a simple detection technique and variances of RR intervals, we find a good performance of atrial fibrillation detection.

  1. Simulations of the Hadamard Variance: Probability Distributions and Confidence Intervals.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Neil; Patla, Bijunath

    2016-04-01

    Power-law noise in clocks and oscillators can be simulated by Fourier transforming a modified spectrum of white phase noise. This approach has been applied successfully to simulation of the Allan variance and the modified Allan variance in both overlapping and nonoverlapping forms. When significant frequency drift is present in an oscillator, at large sampling times the Allan variance overestimates the intrinsic noise, while the Hadamard variance is insensitive to frequency drift. The simulation method is extended in this paper to predict the Hadamard variance for the common types of power-law noise. Symmetric real matrices are introduced whose traces-the sums of their eigenvalues-are equal to the Hadamard variances, in overlapping or nonoverlapping forms, as well as for the corresponding forms of the modified Hadamard variance. We show that the standard relations between spectral densities and Hadamard variance are obtained with this method. The matrix eigenvalues determine probability distributions for observing a variance at an arbitrary value of the sampling interval τ, and hence for estimating confidence in the measurements.

  2. A novel approach to propagate flavivirus infectious cDNA clones in bacteria by introducing tandem repeat sequences upstream of virus genome.

    PubMed

    Pu, Szu-Yuan; Wu, Ren-Huang; Tsai, Ming-Han; Yang, Chi-Chen; Chang, Chung-Ming; Yueh, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    Despite tremendous efforts to improve the methodology for constructing flavivirus infectious cDNAs, the manipulation of flavivirus cDNAs remains a difficult task in bacteria. Here, we successfully propagated DNA-launched type 2 dengue virus (DENV2) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infectious cDNAs by introducing seven repeats of the tetracycline-response element (7×TRE) and a minimal cytomegalovirus (CMVmin) promoter upstream of the viral genome. Insertion of the 7×TRE-CMVmin sequence upstream of the DENV2 or JEV genome decreased the cryptic E. coli promoter (ECP) activity of the viral genome in bacteria, as measured using fusion constructs containing DENV2 or JEV segments and the reporter gene Renilla luciferase in an empty vector. The growth kinetics of recombinant viruses derived from DNA-launched DENV2 and JEV infectious cDNAs were similar to those of parental viruses. Similarly, RNA-launched DENV2 infectious cDNAs were generated by inserting 7×TRE-CMVmin, five repeats of the GAL4 upstream activating sequence, or five repeats of BamHI linkers upstream of the DENV2 genome. All three tandem repeat sequences decreased the ECP activity of the DENV2 genome in bacteria. Notably, 7×TRE-CMVmin stabilized RNA-launched JEV infectious cDNAs and reduced the ECP activity of the JEV genome in bacteria. The growth kinetics of recombinant viruses derived from RNA-launched DENV2 and JEV infectious cDNAs displayed patterns similar to those of the parental viruses. These results support a novel methodology for constructing flavivirus infectious cDNAs, which will facilitate research in virology, viral pathogenesis and vaccine development of flaviviruses and other RNA viruses.

  3. Changes in the Proteome of Langat-Infected Ixodes scapularis ISE6 Cells: Metabolic Pathways Associated with Flavivirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Grabowski, Jeffrey M.; Perera, Rushika; Roumani, Ali M.; Hedrick, Victoria E.; Inerowicz, Halina D.; Hill, Catherine A.; Kuhn, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ticks (Family Ixodidae) transmit a variety of disease causing agents to humans and animals. The tick-borne flaviviruses (TBFs; family Flaviviridae) are a complex of viruses, many of which cause encephalitis and hemorrhagic fever, and represent global threats to human health and biosecurity. Pathogenesis has been well studied in human and animal disease models. Equivalent analyses of tick-flavivirus interactions are limited and represent an area of study that could reveal novel approaches for TBF control. Methodology/Principal Findings High resolution LC-MS/MS was used to analyze the proteome of Ixodes scapularis (Lyme disease tick) embryonic ISE6 cells following infection with Langat virus (LGTV) and identify proteins associated with viral infection and replication. Maximal LGTV infection of cells and determination of peak release of infectious virus, was observed at 36 hours post infection (hpi). Proteins were extracted from ISE6 cells treated with LGTV and non-infectious (UV inactivated) LGTV at 36 hpi and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The Omics Discovery Pipeline (ODP) identified thousands of MS peaks. Protein homology searches against the I. scapularis IscaW1 genome assembly identified a total of 486 proteins that were subsequently assigned to putative functional pathways using searches against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database. 266 proteins were differentially expressed following LGTV infection relative to non-infected (mock) cells. Of these, 68 proteins exhibited increased expression and 198 proteins had decreased expression. The majority of the former were classified in the KEGG pathways: “translation”, “amino acid metabolism”, and “protein folding/sorting/degradation”. Finally, Trichostatin A and Oligomycin A increased and decreased LGTV replication in vitro in ISE6 cells, respectively. Conclusions/Significance Proteomic analyses revealed ISE6 proteins that were differentially expressed at the peak of LGTV

  4. First isolation of Aedes flavivirus in the Western Hemisphere and evidence of vertical transmission in the mosquito Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Haddow, Andrew D.; Guzman, Hilda; Popov, Vsevolod L.; Wood, Thomas G.; Widen, Steven G.; Haddow, Alastair D.; Tesh, Robert B.; Weaver, Scott C.

    2013-06-05

    We report here the first evidence of vertical transmission of Aedes flavivirus (AEFV) and its first isolation in the Western Hemisphere. AEFV strain SPFLD-MO-2011-MP6 was isolated in C6/36 cells from a pool of male Aedes albopictus mosquitoes that were reared to adults from larvae collected in southwest Missouri, USA, in 2011. Electron micrographs of the virus showed virions of approximately 45 nm in diameter with morphological characteristics associated with flaviviruses. The genomic sequence demonstrated that AEFV-SPFLD-MO-2011-MP6 shares a high degree of nucleotide and amino acid sequence identity with the AEFV Narita-21 strain, isolated in Japan in 2003. Intracerebral inoculation of newborn mice with the virus failed to produce observable illness or death and the virus did not replicate in vertebrate cells, consistent with a lack of vertebrate host range. - Highlights: ► The first report of Aedes flavivirus (AEFV) in the Western Hemisphere. ► The first evidence of vertical transmission of AEFV in mosquitoes. ► The first electron micrograph of AEFV. ► The first attempt to infect animals with AEFV.

  5. A single-amino acid substitution in West Nile virus 2K peptide between NS4A and NS4B confers resistance to lycorine, a flavivirus inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Gang; Puig-Basagoiti, Francesc; Zhang, Bo; Qing, Min; Chen, Liqiang; Pankiewicz, Krzysztof W.; Felczak, Krzysztof; Yuan, Zhiming; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2017-01-01

    Lycorine potently inhibits flaviviruses in cell culture. At 1.2-μM concentration, lycorine reduced viral titers of West Nile (WNV), dengue, and yellow fever viruses by 102- to 104-fold. However, the compound did not inhibit an alphavirus (Western equine encephalitis virus) or a rhabdovirus (vesicular stomatitis virus), indicating a selective antiviral spectrum. The compound exerts its antiviral activity mainly through suppression of viral RNA replication. A Val→Met substitution at the 9th amino acid position of the viral 2K peptide (spanning the endoplasmic reticulum membrane between NS4A and NS4B proteins) confers WNV resistance to lycorine, through enhancement of viral RNA replication. Initial chemistry synthesis demonstrated that modifications of the two hydroxyl groups of lycorine can increase the compound’s potency, while reducing its cytotoxicity. Taken together, the results have established lycorine as a flavivirus inhibitor for antiviral development. The lycorine-resistance results demonstrate a direct role of the 2K peptide in flavivirus RNA synthesis. PMID:19062063

  6. Evaluation of a generic RT-nested-PCR for detection of flaviviruses in suspected fatal cases of dengue infection, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Josélio Maria Galvão; Gomes, Gabriella Mello; da Costa Faria, Nieli Rodrigues; de Araújo, Eliane Saraiva Machado; de Filippis, Ana Maria Bispo; dos Santos, Flávia Barreto; Schatzmayr, Hermann Gonçalves; Nogueira, Rita Maria Ribeiro

    2012-12-01

    Flaviviruses are significant causes of disease worldwide and can be classified serologically into several antigenic complexes. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a generic RT-nested-PCR for detection of flavivirus during a dengue outbreak in Brazil in 2008. A total of 105 serum samples were collected from patients with fatal outcome and examined by generic RT-PCR, conventional RT-PCR, and IgM serology. The generic RT-PCR confirmed 19 of 105 (18%) cases. Conventional RT-PCR performed on 105 serum samples detected 45 (42.8%) dengue virus infections. The IgM serology confirmed 44 of 102 (43.1%) cases. The infecting serotype was identified by generic RT-PCR in 19 cases (18 DENV-2 and 1 DENV-3) and by conventional RT-PCR in 45 cases (40 DENV-2 and 5 DENV-3). In addition, we analyzed the performance of the generic and conventional RT-PCRs and IgM serology on serum samples stratified by the day of onset of symptoms. Our results indicate that different methods should be included in flavivirus surveillance programs, including virological and serological approaches.

  7. A noncoding RNA produced by arthropod-borne flaviviruses inhibits the cellular exoribonuclease XRN1 and alters host mRNA stability

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Stephanie L.; Anderson, John R.; Kumagai, Yutaro; Wilusz, Carol J.; Akira, Shizuo; Khromykh, Alexander A.; Wilusz, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    All arthropod-borne flaviviruses generate a short noncoding RNA (sfRNA) from the viral 3′ untranslated region during infection due to stalling of the cellular 5′-to-3′ exonuclease XRN1. We show here that formation of sfRNA also inhibits XRN1 activity. Cells infected with Dengue or Kunjin viruses accumulate uncapped mRNAs, decay intermediates normally targeted by XRN1. XRN1 repression also resulted in the increased overall stability of cellular mRNAs in flavivirus-infected cells. Importantly, a mutant Kunjin virus that cannot form sfRNA but replicates to normal levels failed to affect host mRNA stability or XRN1 activity. Expression of sfRNA in the absence of viral infection demonstrated that sfRNA formation was directly responsible for the stabilization of cellular mRNAs. Finally, numerous cellular mRNAs were differentially expressed in an sfRNA-dependent fashion in a Kunjin virus infection. We conclude that flaviviruses incapacitate XRN1 during infection and dysregulate host mRNA stability as a result of sfRNA formation. PMID:23006624

  8. Serologic Surveillance for West Nile Virus and Other Flaviviruses in Febrile Patients, Encephalitic Patients, and Asymptomatic Blood Donors in Northern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, María de Lourdes Garza; Rodríguez Rodriguez, Diana R.; Blitvich, Bradley J.; López, Miguel Á. Reyes; Fernández-Salas, Ildefonso; Jimenez, Javier Ramos; Farfán-Ale, José A.; Tamez, Rogelio Cazares; Longoria, César Martinez; Aguilar, Maria I. Tavitas

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A clinical and serological investigation was performed to determine the presence of West Nile virus (WNV) among febrile and encephalitic patients in northern Mexico. In addition, asymptomatic blood donors were serologically assayed for WNV to determine the seroprevalence of WNV in the general population. The study cohort consisted of 1432 individuals (588 febrile patients, 44 encephalitic patients, and 800 asymptomatic blood donors). All subjects were negative for WNV IgM. Sixty subjects were reactive for dengue virus (DENV) IgM (16 blood donors and 44 febrile patients). A subset (n = 425) of individuals was also screened by ELISA for flavivirus IgG. The prevalence of flavivirus IgG in febrile patients, encephalitic patients, and blood donors ranged from 40% to 59%. A subset (n = 147) of sera reactive for flavivirus IgG was further tested by plaque reduction neutralization test. Six individuals with no history of travel during the preceding 12 months were seropositive for WNV. Another 65 individuals were seropositive for DENV1 and 24 were seropositive for DENV2. The high prevalence of dengue antibodies in northern Mexico appears to limit the incidence of WNV infection in this region. Article Summary Line Antibodies to WNV, DENV-1, and DENV-2 were identified in humans in northern Mexico. PMID:19492946

  9. A comparison of vertical velocity variance measurements from wind profiling radars and sonic anemometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, Katherine; Bianco, Laura; Johnston, Paul; Wilczak, James M.

    2017-03-01

    Observations of turbulence in the planetary boundary layer are critical for developing and evaluating boundary layer parameterizations in mesoscale numerical weather prediction models. These observations, however, are expensive and rarely profile the entire boundary layer. Using optimized configurations for 449 and 915 MHz wind profiling radars during the eXperimental Planetary boundary layer Instrumentation Assessment (XPIA), improvements have been made to the historical methods of measuring vertical velocity variance through the time series of vertical velocity, as well as the Doppler spectral width. Using six heights of sonic anemometers mounted on a 300 m tower, correlations of up to R2 = 0. 74 are seen in measurements of the large-scale variances from the radar time series and R2 = 0. 79 in measurements of small-scale variance from radar spectral widths. The total variance, measured as the sum of the small and large scales, agrees well with sonic anemometers, with R2 = 0. 79. Correlation is higher in daytime convective boundary layers than nighttime stable conditions when turbulence levels are smaller. With the good agreement with the in situ measurements, highly resolved profiles up to 2 km can be accurately observed from the 449 MHz radar and 1 km from the 915 MHz radar. This optimized configuration will provide unique observations for the verification and improvement to boundary layer parameterizations in mesoscale models.

  10. Analysis of variance of designed chromatographic data sets: The analysis of variance-target projection approach.

    PubMed

    Marini, Federico; de Beer, Dalene; Joubert, Elizabeth; Walczak, Beata

    2015-07-31

    Direct application of popular approaches, e.g., Principal Component Analysis (PCA) or Partial Least Squares (PLS) to chromatographic data originating from a well-designed experimental study including more than one factor is not recommended. In the case of a well-designed experiment involving two or more factors (crossed or nested), data are usually decomposed into the contributions associated with the studied factors (and with their interactions), and the individual effect matrices are then analyzed using, e.g., PCA, as in the case of ASCA (analysis of variance combined with simultaneous component analysis). As an alternative to the ASCA method, we propose the application of PLS followed by target projection (TP), which allows a one-factor representation of the model for each column in the design dummy matrix. PLS application follows after proper deflation of the experimental matrix, i.e., to what are called the residuals under the reduced ANOVA model. The proposed approach (ANOVA-TP) is well suited for the study of designed chromatographic data of complex samples. It allows testing of statistical significance of the studied effects, 'biomarker' identification, and enables straightforward visualization and accurate estimation of between- and within-class variance. The proposed approach has been successfully applied to a case study aimed at evaluating the effect of pasteurization on the concentrations of various phenolic constituents of rooibos tea of different quality grades and its outcomes have been compared to those of ASCA.

  11. The contribution of the mitochondrial genome to sex-specific fitness variance.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shane R T; Connallon, Tim

    2017-03-28

    Maternal inheritance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) facilitates the evolutionary accumulation of mutations with sex-biased fitness effects. Whereas maternal inheritance closely aligns mtDNA evolution with natural selection in females, it makes it indifferent to evolutionary changes that exclusively benefit males. The constrained response of mtDNA to selection in males can lead to asymmetries in the relative contributions of mitochondrial genes to female versus male fitness variation. Here, we examine the impact of genetic drift and the distribution of fitness effects (DFE) among mutations-including the correlation of mutant fitness effects between the sexes-on mitochondrial genetic variation for fitness. We show how drift, genetic correlations, and skewness of the DFE determine the relative contributions of mitochondrial genes to male versus female fitness variance. When mutant fitness effects are weakly correlated between the sexes, and the effective population size is large, mitochondrial genes should contribute much more to male than to female fitness variance. In contrast, high fitness correlations and small population sizes tend to equalize the contributions of mitochondrial genes to female versus male variance. We discuss implications of these results for the evolution of mitochondrial genome diversity and the genetic architecture of female and male fitness.

  12. Minding Impacting Events in a Model of Stochastic Variance

    PubMed Central

    Duarte Queirós, Sílvio M.; Curado, Evaldo M. F.; Nobre, Fernando D.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a generalization of the well-known ARCH process, widely used for generating uncorrelated stochastic time series with long-term non-Gaussian distributions and long-lasting correlations in the (instantaneous) standard deviation exhibiting a clustering profile. Specifically, inspired by the fact that in a variety of systems impacting events are hardly forgot, we split the process into two different regimes: a first one for regular periods where the average volatility of the fluctuations within a certain period of time is below a certain threshold, , and another one when the local standard deviation outnumbers . In the former situation we use standard rules for heteroscedastic processes whereas in the latter case the system starts recalling past values that surpassed the threshold. Our results show that for appropriate parameter values the model is able to provide fat tailed probability density functions and strong persistence of the instantaneous variance characterized by large values of the Hurst exponent (), which are ubiquitous features in complex systems. PMID:21483864

  13. 29 CFR 1905.5 - Effect of variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effect of variances. 1905.5 Section 1905.5 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR RULES OF PRACTICE FOR VARIANCES, LIMITATIONS, VARIATIONS, TOLERANCES, AND EXEMPTIONS UNDER THE WILLIAMS-STEIGER OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ACT...

  14. 36 CFR 27.4 - Variances and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Variances and exceptions. 27.4 Section 27.4 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR CAPE COD NATIONAL SEASHORE; ZONING STANDARDS § 27.4 Variances and exceptions. (a) Zoning bylaws...

  15. 36 CFR 27.4 - Variances and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Variances and exceptions. 27.4 Section 27.4 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR CAPE COD NATIONAL SEASHORE; ZONING STANDARDS § 27.4 Variances and exceptions. (a) Zoning bylaws...

  16. 36 CFR 27.4 - Variances and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Variances and exceptions. 27.4 Section 27.4 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR CAPE COD NATIONAL SEASHORE; ZONING STANDARDS § 27.4 Variances and exceptions. (a) Zoning bylaws...

  17. 36 CFR 27.4 - Variances and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Variances and exceptions. 27.4 Section 27.4 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR CAPE COD NATIONAL SEASHORE; ZONING STANDARDS § 27.4 Variances and exceptions. (a) Zoning bylaws...

  18. 36 CFR 27.4 - Variances and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Variances and exceptions. 27.4 Section 27.4 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR CAPE COD NATIONAL SEASHORE; ZONING STANDARDS § 27.4 Variances and exceptions. (a) Zoning bylaws...

  19. Relating the Hadamard Variance to MCS Kalman Filter Clock Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutsell, Steven T.

    1996-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) Master Control Station (MCS) currently makes significant use of the Allan Variance. This two-sample variance equation has proven excellent as a handy, understandable tool, both for time domain analysis of GPS cesium frequency standards, and for fine tuning the MCS's state estimation of these atomic clocks. The Allan Variance does not explicitly converge for the nose types of alpha less than or equal to minus 3 and can be greatly affected by frequency drift. Because GPS rubidium frequency standards exhibit non-trivial aging and aging noise characteristics, the basic Allan Variance analysis must be augmented in order to (a) compensate for a dynamic frequency drift, and (b) characterize two additional noise types, specifically alpha = minus 3, and alpha = minus 4. As the GPS program progresses, we will utilize a larger percentage of rubidium frequency standards than ever before. Hence, GPS rubidium clock characterization will require more attention than ever before. The three sample variance, commonly referred to as a renormalized Hadamard Variance, is unaffected by linear frequency drift, converges for alpha is greater than minus 5, and thus has utility for modeling noise in GPS rubidium frequency standards. This paper demonstrates the potential of Hadamard Variance analysis in GPS operations, and presents an equation that relates the Hadamard Variance to the MCS's Kalman filter process noises.

  20. 40 CFR 141.4 - Variances and exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Variances and exemptions. 141.4 Section 141.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS General § 141.4 Variances and exemptions....

  1. 40 CFR 141.4 - Variances and exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Variances and exemptions. 141.4 Section 141.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS General § 141.4 Variances and exemptions....

  2. 40 CFR 141.4 - Variances and exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Variances and exemptions. 141.4 Section 141.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS General § 141.4 Variances and exemptions....

  3. 40 CFR 141.4 - Variances and exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Variances and exemptions. 141.4 Section 141.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS General § 141.4 Variances and exemptions....

  4. 40 CFR 141.4 - Variances and exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Variances and exemptions. 141.4 Section 141.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS General § 141.4 Variances and exemptions....

  5. Determining Sample Sizes for Precise Contrast Analysis with Heterogeneous Variances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jan, Show-Li; Shieh, Gwowen

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of variance (ANOVA) is one of the most frequently used statistical analyses in practical applications. Accordingly, the single and multiple comparison procedures are frequently applied to assess the differences among mean effects. However, the underlying assumption of homogeneous variances may not always be tenable. This study…

  6. 76 FR 78698 - Proposed Revocation of Permanent Variances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Proposed Revocation of Permanent Variances AGENCY: Occupational... short and plain statement detailing (1) how the proposed revocation would affect the requesting party..., subpart L. The following table provides information about the variances proposed for revocation by...

  7. Gender Variance and Educational Psychology: Implications for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yavuz, Carrie

    2016-01-01

    The area of gender variance appears to be more visible in both the media and everyday life. Within educational psychology literature gender variance remains underrepresented. The positioning of educational psychologists working across the three levels of child and family, school or establishment and education authority/council, means that they are…

  8. 42 CFR 456.522 - Content of request for variance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Review Plans: FFP, Waivers, and Variances for Hospitals and Mental Hospitals Ur Plan: Remote Facility Variances from Time..., mental hospital, and ICF located within a 50-mile radius of the facility; (e) The distance and...

  9. A Study of Variance Estimation Methods. Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Fan; Weng, Stanley; Salvucci, Sameena; Hu, Ming-xiu

    This working paper contains reports of five studies of variance estimation methods. The first, An Empirical Study of Poststratified Estimator, by Fan Zhang uses data from the National Household Education Survey to illustrate use of poststratified estimation. The second paper, BRR Variance Estimation Using BPLX Hadamard Procedure, by Stanley Weng…

  10. Conceptual Complexity and the Bias/Variance Tradeoff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briscoe, Erica; Feldman, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we propose that the conventional dichotomy between exemplar-based and prototype-based models of concept learning is helpfully viewed as an instance of what is known in the statistical learning literature as the "bias/variance tradeoff". The bias/variance tradeoff can be thought of as a sliding scale that modulates how closely any…

  11. Zoonotic mosquito-borne flaviviruses: worldwide presence of agents with proven pathogenicity and potential candidates of future emerging diseases.

    PubMed

    Weissenböck, H; Hubálek, Z; Bakonyi, T; Nowotny, N

    2010-01-27

    An update on the mosquito-borne flavivirus species including certain subtypes, as listed in the Eighth Report of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses, is given. Special emphasis is placed on viruses which have been shown to cause diseases in animals, and viruses for which no pathogenicity has been proven yet. Several recent examples (Usutu virus and lineage-2 West Nile virus in central Europe, Zika virus in Micronesia) have shown that sources providing information on such scientifically largely neglected viruses are valuable tools for scientists and public health officials having to deal with such disease emergences. Furthermore the effects of global warming will lead to introduction of competent mosquito vectors into temperate climate zones and will increase efficiency of viral replication in less competent vector species. This, facilitated by rising global travel and trade activities, will facilitate introduction and permanent establishment of mosquito-borne viruses, some of which may become of public health or veterinary concern, into novel environments, e.g. industrialized countries worldwide.

  12. [The Alkhurma virus (family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus): an emerging pathogen responsible for hemorrhage fever in the Middle East].

    PubMed

    Charrel, R N; de Lamballerie, X

    2003-01-01

    To date tick-borne flaviviruses causing hemorrhagic fevers in humans have been isolated in Siberia (Omsk hemorrhagic fever virus), India (Kyasanur Forest disease virus), and Saudi Arabia (Akhurma virus). Because of their potential use as biological weapons for bioterrorism, these 3 viruses require level 4 biosafety handling facilities and have been listed as hypervirulent pathogens by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Alkhurma virus was isolated in 1995 from patients with hemorrhagic fever in Saudi Arabia. Current evidence suggests that transmission to humans can occur either transcutaneously either by contamination of a skin wound with the blood of an infected vertebrate or bites of an infected tick or orally by drinking unpasteurized contaminated milk. To date a total of 24 symptomatic human cases have been recorded with a mortality rate at 25% (6/24). Pauci-symptomatic or asymptomatic cases are likely but epidemiologic data are currently unavailable. The complete coding sequence of the prototype strain of Alkhurma virus was determined and published in 2001 based on international research project involving investigators from France, Great Britain, and Saudi Arabia. Phylogenetic studies demonstrate that closest known relative of Alkhurma virus is Kyasanur Forest disease virus and that both viruses share a common ancestor. Genetic analysis of several human strains sequentially isolated over a 5-year period showed a very low diversity. This finding has important potential implications for diagnosis and vaccination.

  13. Genetic Determinants of Sindbis Virus Mosquito Infection Are Associated with a Highly Conserved Alphavirus and Flavivirus Envelope Sequence▿

    PubMed Central

    Pierro, Dennis J.; Powers, Erik L.; Olson, Ken E.

    2008-01-01

    Wild-type Sindbis virus (SINV) strain MRE16 efficiently infects Aedes aegypti midgut epithelial cells (MEC), but laboratory-derived neurovirulent SINV strain TE/5′2J infects MEC poorly. SINV determinants for MEC infection have been localized to the E2 glycoprotein. The E2 amino acid sequences of MRE16 and TE/5′2J differ at 60 residue sites. To identify the genetic determinants of MEC infection of MRE16, the TE/5′2J virus genome was altered to contain either domain chimeras or more focused nucleotide substitutions of MRE16. The growth patterns of derived viruses in cell culture were determined, as were the midgut infection rates (MIR) in A. aegypti mosquitoes. The results showed that substitutions of MRE16 E2 aa 95 to 96 and 116 to 119 into the TE/5′2J virus increased MIR both independently and in combination with each other. In addition, a unique PPF/.GDS amino acid motif was located between these two sites that was found to be a highly conserved sequence among alphaviruses and flaviviruses but not other arboviruses. PMID:18160430

  14. Paper-based point-of-care testing for cost-effective diagnosis of acute flavivirus infections.

    PubMed

    Bedin, Frederic; Boulet, Laurent; Voilin, Elodie; Theillet, Gerald; Rubens, Agnes; Rozand, Christine

    2017-03-11

    Flavivirus infections are a serious healthcare concern in tropical and subtropical countries. Although well-established laboratory tests can provide early diagnosis of acute dengue or Zika infections, access to these tests is limited in developing countries, presenting an urgent need to develop simple, rapid, and robust diagnostic tools. Microfluidic Paper-based Analytical Devices (μPAD), are typically rapid, cost-effective, user-friendly, and they can be used as diagnostic tools for the diagnosis of these infections at Point of Care settings. Early and prompt diagnosis is crucial to improve patient management and reduce the risk of complications. In the present study, we developed and evaluated a wax-printed paper-based device for the detection of the dengue and Zika non-structural NS1 viral protein in blood and plasma. Experiments have been carried out to increase specificity, while maintaining the required sensitivity. As a consequence, the quality of the raw materials and the washing steps were proved to be crucial. The μPAD was able to detect specifically in 6-8 min 10 ng/mL of protein in various sample types. A prototype for the differential detection of dengue and/or Zika NS1 protein was developed. The reading of the results was simplified by using a dedicated application on a smartphone.

  15. 40 CFR 260.33 - Procedures for variances from classification as a solid waste, for variances to be classified as...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... classification as a solid waste, for variances to be classified as a boiler, or for non-waste determinations. 260... from classification as a solid waste, for variances to be classified as a boiler, or for non-waste... as boilers, or applications for non-waste determinations. (a) The applicant must apply to...

  16. 40 CFR 260.33 - Procedures for variances from classification as a solid waste, for variances to be classified as...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... classification as a solid waste, for variances to be classified as a boiler, or for non-waste determinations. 260... from classification as a solid waste, for variances to be classified as a boiler, or for non-waste... as boilers, or applications for non-waste determinations. (a) The applicant must apply to...

  17. 40 CFR 260.33 - Procedures for variances from classification as a solid waste, for variances to be classified as...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... classification as a solid waste, for variances to be classified as a boiler, or for non-waste determinations. 260... from classification as a solid waste, for variances to be classified as a boiler, or for non-waste... as boilers, or applications for non-waste determinations. (a) The applicant must apply to...

  18. 40 CFR 260.33 - Procedures for variances from classification as a solid waste, for variances to be classified as...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... classification as a solid waste, for variances to be classified as a boiler, or for non-waste determinations. 260... from classification as a solid waste, for variances to be classified as a boiler, or for non-waste... as boilers, or applications for non-waste determinations. (a) The applicant must apply to...

  19. 40 CFR 260.33 - Procedures for variances from classification as a solid waste, for variances to be classified as...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... classification as a solid waste, for variances to be classified as a boiler, or for non-waste determinations. 260... from classification as a solid waste, for variances to be classified as a boiler, or for non-waste... as boilers, or applications for non-waste determinations. (a) The applicant must apply to...

  20. Variance predicts salience in central sensory processing

    PubMed Central

    Hermundstad, Ann M; Briguglio, John J; Conte, Mary M; Victor, Jonathan D; Balasubramanian, Vijay; Tkačik, Gašper

    2014-01-01

    Information processing in the sensory periphery is shaped by natural stimulus statistics. In the periphery, a transmission bottleneck constrains performance; thus efficient coding implies that natural signal components with a predictably wider range should be compressed. In a different regime—when sampling limitations constrain performance—efficient coding implies that more resources should be allocated to informative features that are more variable. We propose that this regime is relevant for sensory cortex when it extracts complex features from limited numbers of sensory samples. To test this prediction, we use central visual processing as a model: we show that visual sensitivity for local multi-point spatial correlations, described by dozens of independently-measured parameters, can be quantitatively predicted from the structure of natural images. This suggests that efficient coding applies centrally, where it extends to higher-order sensory features and operates in a regime in which sensitivity increases with feature variability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03722.001 PMID:25396297

  1. Quantitative genetic divergence and standing genetic (co)variance in thermal reaction norms along latitude.

    PubMed

    Berger, David; Postma, Erik; Blanckenhorn, Wolf U; Walters, Richard J

    2013-08-01

    Although the potential to adapt to warmer climate is constrained by genetic trade-offs, our understanding of how selection and mutation shape genetic (co)variances in thermal reaction norms is poor. Using 71 isofemale lines of the fly Sepsis punctum, originating from northern, central, and southern European climates, we tested for divergence in juvenile development rate across latitude at five experimental temperatures. To investigate effects of evolutionary history in different climates on standing genetic variation in reaction norms, we further compared genetic (co)variances between regions. Flies were reared on either high or low food resources to explore the role of energy acquisition in determining genetic trade-offs between different temperatures. Although the latter had only weak effects on the strength and sign of genetic correlations, genetic architecture differed significantly between climatic regions, implying that evolution of reaction norms proceeds via different trajectories at high latitude versus low latitude in this system. Accordingly, regional genetic architecture was correlated to region-specific differentiation. Moreover, hot development temperatures were associated with low genetic variance and stronger genetic correlations compared to cooler temperatures. We discuss the evolutionary potential of thermal reaction norms in light of their underlying genetic architectures, evolutionary histories, and the materialization of trade-offs in natural environments.

  2. Sensitivity analyses of turbulence theory-based variance-covariance matrices of tropospheric slant delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennebusch, M.; Schön, S.

    2009-04-01

    Atmospheric turbulence induces physical correlations on any space geodetic technique based on electromagnetic waves. Thus, also GNSS phase observations are both temporally and spatially correlated due to refractivity fluctuations along the signal's path from the transmitter to the receiver. Currently, these physical correlations are rarely considered in GNSS data analysis; yielding too optimistic parameter variances and covariances. Based on turbulence theory, Schön and Brunner (2008) developed a formulation of the variances and covariances induced by refractivity fluctuations in the troposphere. This model adequately describes the variance-covariance matrix (VCM) of tropospheric slant delays. The parametrisation is mainly based on the turbulence structure constant, the outer scale length, the integration height, the wind direction and the observation geometry. The VCM can adequately be used to determine synthetic slant delay time series. In this paper, this strategy will be described by using an exemplary GPS configuration. Furthermore, the latest results of simulation studies and sensitivity analyses of this VCM model w.r.t. the model parameters are presented. As a result, the most dominant parameters (that should be either determined with special care or precisely known) will be identified.

  3. Comparing estimates of genetic variance across different relationship models.

    PubMed

    Legarra, Andres

    2016-02-01

    Use of relationships between individuals to estimate genetic variances and heritabilities via mixed models is standard practice in human, plant and livestock genetics. Different models or information for relationships may give different estimates of genetic variances. However, comparing these estimates across different relationship models is not straightforward as the implied base populations differ between relationship models. In this work, I present a method to compare estimates of variance components across different relationship models. I suggest referring genetic variances obtained using different relationship models to the same reference population, usually a set of individuals in the population. Expected genetic variance of this population is the estimated variance component from the mixed model times a statistic, Dk, which is the average self-relationship minus the average (self- and across-) relationship. For most typical models of relationships, Dk is close to 1. However, this is not true for very deep pedigrees, for identity-by-state relationships, or for non-parametric kernels, which tend to overestimate the genetic variance and the heritability. Using mice data, I show that heritabilities from identity-by-state and kernel-based relationships are overestimated. Weighting these estimates by Dk scales them to a base comparable to genomic or pedigree relationships, avoiding wrong comparisons, for instance, "missing heritabilities".

  4. Filtered kriging for spatial data with heterogeneous measurement error variances.

    PubMed

    Christensen, William F

    2011-09-01

    When predicting values for the measurement-error-free component of an observed spatial process, it is generally assumed that the process has a common measurement error variance. However, it is often the case that each measurement in a spatial data set has a known, site-specific measurement error variance, rendering the observed process nonstationary. We present a simple approach for estimating the semivariogram of the unobservable measurement-error-free process using a bias adjustment of the classical semivariogram formula. We then develop a new kriging predictor that filters the measurement errors. For scenarios where each site's measurement error variance is a function of the process of interest, we recommend an approach that also uses a variance-stabilizing transformation. The properties of the heterogeneous variance measurement-error-filtered kriging (HFK) predictor and variance-stabilized HFK predictor, and the improvement of these approaches over standard measurement-error-filtered kriging are demonstrated using simulation. The approach is illustrated with climate model output from the Hudson Strait area in northern Canada. In the illustration, locations with high or low measurement error variances are appropriately down- or upweighted in the prediction of the underlying process, yielding a realistically smooth picture of the phenomenon of interest.

  5. Global Gravity Wave Variances from Aura MLS: Characteristics and Interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Dong L.; Eckermann, Stephen D.

    2008-01-01

    The gravity wave (GW)-resolving capabilities of 118-GHz saturated thermal radiances acquired throughout the stratosphere by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Aura satellite are investigated and initial results presented. Because the saturated (optically thick) radiances resolve GW perturbations from a given altitude at different horizontal locations, variances are evaluated at 12 pressure altitudes between 21 and 51 km using the 40 saturated radiances found at the bottom of each limb scan. Forward modeling simulations show that these variances are controlled mostly by GWs with vertical wavelengths z 5 km and horizontal along-track wavelengths of y 100-200 km. The tilted cigar-shaped three-dimensional weighting functions yield highly selective responses to GWs of high intrinsic frequency that propagate toward the instrument. The latter property is used to infer the net meridional component of GW propagation by differencing the variances acquired from ascending (A) and descending (D) orbits. Because of improved vertical resolution and sensitivity, Aura MLS GW variances are 5?8 times larger than those from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) MLS. Like UARS MLS variances, monthly-mean Aura MLS variances in January and July 2005 are enhanced when local background wind speeds are large, due largely to GW visibility effects. Zonal asymmetries in variance maps reveal enhanced GW activity at high latitudes due to forcing by flow over major mountain ranges and at tropical and subtropical latitudes due to enhanced deep convective generation as inferred from contemporaneous MLS cloud-ice data. At 21-28-km altitude (heights not measured by the UARS MLS), GW variance in the tropics is systematically enhanced and shows clear variations with the phase of the quasi-biennial oscillation, in general agreement with GW temperature variances derived from radiosonde, rocketsonde, and limb-scan vertical profiles.

  6. Using pooled data to estimate variance components and breeding values for traits affected by social interactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Through social interactions, individuals affect one another’s phenotype. In such cases, an individual’s phenotype is affected by the direct (genetic) effect of the individual itself and the indirect (genetic) effects of the group mates. Using data on individual phenotypes, direct and indirect genetic (co)variances can be estimated. Together, they compose the total genetic variance that determines a population’s potential to respond to selection. However, it can be difficult or expensive to obtain individual phenotypes. Phenotypes on traits such as egg production and feed intake are, therefore, often collected on group level. In this study, we investigated whether direct, indirect and total genetic variances, and breeding values can be estimated from pooled data (pooled by group). In addition, we determined the optimal group composition, i.e. the optimal number of families represented in a group to minimise the standard error of the estimates. Methods This study was performed in three steps. First, all research questions were answered by theoretical derivations. Second, a simulation study was conducted to investigate the estimation of variance components and optimal group composition. Third, individual and pooled survival records on 12 944 purebred laying hens were analysed to investigate the estimation of breeding values and response to selection. Results Through theoretical derivations and simulations, we showed that the total genetic variance can be estimated from pooled data, but the underlying direct and indirect genetic (co)variances cannot. Moreover, we showed that the most accurate estimates are obtained when group members belong to the same family. Additional theoretical derivations and data analyses on survival records showed that the total genetic variance and breeding values can be estimated from pooled data. Moreover, the correlation between the estimated total breeding values obtained from individual and pooled data was surprisingly

  7. Testing for homogeneity of variance in time series: Long memory, wavelets, and the Nile River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitcher, B.; Byers, S. D.; Guttorp, P.; Percival, D. B.

    2002-05-01

    We consider the problem of testing for homogeneity of variance in a time series with long memory structure. We demonstrate that a test whose null hypothesis is designed to be white noise can, in fact, be applied, on a scale by scale basis, to the discrete wavelet transform of long memory processes. In particular, we show that evaluating a normalized cumulative sum of squares test statistic using critical levels for the null hypothesis of white noise yields approximately the same null hypothesis rejection rates when applied to the discrete wavelet transform of samples from a fractionally differenced process. The point at which the test statistic, using a nondecimated version of the discrete wavelet transform, achieves its maximum value can be used to estimate the time of the unknown variance change. We apply our proposed test statistic on five time series derived from the historical record of Nile River yearly minimum water levels covering 622-1922 A.D., each series exhibiting various degrees of serial correlation including long memory. In the longest subseries, spanning 622-1284 A.D., the test confirms an inhomogeneity of variance at short time scales and identifies the change point around 720 A.D., which coincides closely with the construction of a new device around 715 A.D. for measuring the Nile River. The test also detects a change in variance for a record of only 36 years.

  8. Quantitative genetic variance and multivariate clines in the Ivyleaf morning glory, Ipomoea hederacea

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Amanda J.; Campitelli, Brandon E.; Stinchcombe, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Clinal variation is commonly interpreted as evidence of adaptive differentiation, although clines can also be produced by stochastic forces. Understanding whether clines are adaptive therefore requires comparing clinal variation to background patterns of genetic differentiation at presumably neutral markers. Although this approach has frequently been applied to single traits at a time, we have comparatively fewer examples of how multiple correlated traits vary clinally. Here, we characterize multivariate clines in the Ivyleaf morning glory, examining how suites of traits vary with latitude, with the goal of testing for divergence in trait means that would indicate past evolutionary responses. We couple this with analysis of genetic variance in clinally varying traits in 20 populations to test whether past evolutionary responses have depleted genetic variance, or whether genetic variance declines approaching the range margin. We find evidence of clinal differentiation in five quantitative traits, with little evidence of isolation by distance at neutral loci that would suggest non-adaptive or stochastic mechanisms. Within and across populations, the traits that contribute most to population differentiation and clinal trends in the multivariate phenotype are genetically variable as well, suggesting that a lack of genetic variance will not cause absolute evolutionary constraints. Our data are broadly consistent theoretical predictions of polygenic clines in response to shallow environmental gradients. Ecologically, our results are consistent with past findings of natural selection on flowering phenology, presumably due to season-length variation across the range. PMID:25002704

  9. Quantitative genetic variance and multivariate clines in the Ivyleaf morning glory, Ipomoea hederacea.

    PubMed

    Stock, Amanda J; Campitelli, Brandon E; Stinchcombe, John R

    2014-08-19

    Clinal variation is commonly interpreted as evidence of adaptive differentiation, although clines can also be produced by stochastic forces. Understanding whether clines are adaptive therefore requires comparing clinal variation to background patterns of genetic differentiation at presumably neutral markers. Although this approach has frequently been applied to single traits at a time, we have comparatively fewer examples of how multiple correlated traits vary clinally. Here, we characterize multivariate clines in the Ivyleaf morning glory, examining how suites of traits vary with latitude, with the goal of testing for divergence in trait means that would indicate past evolutionary responses. We couple this with analysis of genetic variance in clinally varying traits in 20 populations to test whether past evolutionary responses have depleted genetic variance, or whether genetic variance declines approaching the range margin. We find evidence of clinal differentiation in five quantitative traits, with little evidence of isolation by distance at neutral loci that would suggest non-adaptive or stochastic mechanisms. Within and across populations, the traits that contribute most to population differentiation and clinal trends in the multivariate phenotype are genetically variable as well, suggesting that a lack of genetic variance will not cause absolute evolutionary constraints. Our data are broadly consistent theoretical predictions of polygenic clines in response to shallow environmental gradients. Ecologically, our results are consistent with past findings of natural selection on flowering phenology, presumably due to season-length variation across the range.

  10. Estimation of prediction error variances via Monte Carlo sampling methods using different formulations of the prediction error variance.

    PubMed

    Hickey, John M; Veerkamp, Roel F; Calus, Mario P L; Mulder, Han A; Thompson, Robin

    2009-02-09

    Calculation of the exact prediction error variance covariance matrix is often computationally too demanding, which limits its application in REML algorithms, the calculation of accuracies of estimated breeding values and the control of variance of response to selection. Alternatively Monte Carlo sampling can be used to calculate approximations of the prediction error variance, which converge to the true values if enough samples are used. However, in practical situations the number of samples, which are computationally feasible, is limited. The objective of this study was to compare the convergence rate of different formulations of the prediction error variance calculated using Monte Carlo sampling. Four of these formulations were published, four were corresponding alternative versions, and two were derived as part of this study. The different formulations had different convergence rates and these were shown to depend on the number of samples and on the level of prediction error variance. Four formulations were competitive and these made use of information on either the variance of the estimated breeding value and on the variance of the true breeding value minus the estimated breeding value or on the covariance between the true and estimated breeding values.

  11. Blinded sample size re-estimation in superiority and noninferiority trials: bias versus variance in variance estimation.

    PubMed

    Friede, Tim; Kieser, Meinhard

    2013-01-01

    The internal pilot study design allows for modifying the sample size during an ongoing study based on a blinded estimate of the variance thus maintaining the trial integrity. Various blinded sample size re-estimation procedures have been proposed in the literature. We compare the blinded sample size re-estimation procedures based on the one-sample variance of the pooled data with a blinded procedure using the randomization block information with respect to bias and variance of the variance estimators, and the distribution of the resulting sample sizes, power, and actual type I error rate. For reference, sample size re-estimation based on the unblinded variance is also included in the comparison. It is shown that using an unbiased variance estimator (such as the one using the randomization block information) for sample size re-estimation does not guarantee that the desired power is achieved. Moreover, in situations that are common in clinical trials, the variance estimator that employs the randomization block length shows a higher variability than the simple one-sample estimator and in turn the sample size resulting from the related re-estimation procedure. This higher variability can lead to a lower power as was demonstrated in the setting of noninferiority trials. In summary, the one-sample estimator obtained from the pooled data is extremely simple to apply, shows good performance, and is therefore recommended for application.

  12. 40 CFR 59.509 - Can I get a variance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) NATIONAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Aerosol Coatings § 59.509 Can I get a variance? (a)...

  13. 40 CFR 59.509 - Can I get a variance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) NATIONAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Aerosol Coatings § 59.509 Can I get a variance? (a)...

  14. RISK ANALYSIS, ANALYSIS OF VARIANCE: GETTING MORE FROM OUR DATA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and regression are common statistical techniques used to analyze agronomic experimental data and determine significant differences among yields due to treatments or other experimental factors. Risk analysis provides an alternate and complimentary examination of the same...

  15. Some variance reduction methods for numerical stochastic homogenization.

    PubMed

    Blanc, X; Le Bris, C; Legoll, F

    2016-04-28

    We give an overview of a series of recent studies devoted to variance reduction techniques for numerical stochastic homogenization. Numerical homogenization requires that a set of problems is solved at the microscale, the so-called corrector problems. In a random environment, these problems are stochastic and therefore need to be repeatedly solved, for several configurations of the medium considered. An empirical average over all configurations is then performed using the Monte Carlo approach, so as to approximate the effective coefficients necessary to determine the macroscopic behaviour. Variance severely affects the accuracy and the cost of such computations. Variance reduction approaches, borrowed from other contexts in the engineering sciences, can be useful. Some of these variance reduction techniques are presented, studied and tested here.

  16. Low complex subspace minimum variance beamformer for medical ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Deylami, Ali Mohades; Asl, Babak Mohammadzadeh

    2016-03-01

    Minimum variance (MV) beamformer enhances the resolution and contrast in the medical ultrasound imaging at the expense of higher computational complexity with respect to the non-adaptive delay-and-sum beamformer. The major complexity arises from the estimation of the L×L array covariance matrix using spatial averaging, which is required to more accurate estimation of the covariance matrix of correlated signals, and inversion of it, which is required for calculating the MV weight vector which are as high as O(L(2)) and O(L(3)), respectively. Reducing the number of array elements decreases the computational complexity but degrades the imaging resolution. In this paper, we propose a subspace MV beamformer which preserves the advantages of the MV beamformer with lower complexity. The subspace MV neglects some rows of the array covariance matrix instead of reducing the array size. If we keep η rows of the array covariance matrix which leads to a thin non-square matrix, the weight vector of the subspace beamformer can be achieved in the same way as the MV obtains its weight vector with lower complexity as high as O(η(2)L). More calculations would be saved because an η×L covariance matrix must be estimated instead of a L×L. We simulated a wire targets phantom and a cyst phantom to evaluate the performance of the proposed beamformer. The results indicate that we can keep about 16 from 43 rows of the array covariance matrix which reduces the order of complexity to 14% while the image resolution is still comparable to that of the standard MV beamformer. We also applied the proposed method to an experimental RF data and showed that the subspace MV beamformer performs like the standard MV with lower computational complexity.

  17. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals a Signature Profile for Tick-Borne Flavivirus Persistence in HEK 293T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Jennifer; Offerdahl, Danielle K.; Martens, Craig; Sturdevant, Daniel; Turner, Charles V.; Porcella, Stephen F.; Bloom, Marshall E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tick-borne flaviviruses (TBFVs) cause febrile illnesses, which may progress to severe encephalitis and/or death in humans globally. Most people who recover from severe acute disease suffer from debilitating neurological sequelae, which may be due to viral persistence, infection-induced neurological cell damage, host response, or some combination of these. Acute TBFV infection of human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cells in vitro results in the death of >95% of infected cells by day 5. However, replacing cell growth medium allows surviving cells to repopulate and become persistently infected for extended periods of time. The mechanisms responsible for initiation and maintenance of viral persistence remain vague. We subjected the HEK 293T cell transcriptome to deep sequencing to identify genes differentially expressed during acute infection and persistent infection. A total of 451 genes showed unique significant differential expression levels in persistently infected cells relative to the acute phase of infection. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis results suggested that the expression of prosurvival oncogenes AKT2 and ERBB2 was upregulated in persistently infected cells, whereas proapoptotic genes, such as Bad and the beta interferon 1 (IFN-β1) gene, were downregulated. Genes encoding antiviral cytokines such as the CCL5, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and CXCL10 genes were upregulated during the acute phase, but the same genes were relatively quiescent in persistently infected cells. Exogenous induction of apoptosis demonstrated that persistently infected cells were resistant to apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. In summary, the differential transcriptome profiles of acute-phase compared to persistently infected HEK 293T cells demonstrated an evasion of apoptosis, which may be critical for a chronic TBFV infection state. These results provide a basis for further study of the mechanisms of TBFV persistence. PMID:27222466

  18. Enhancement of the antibody response to flavivirus B-cell epitopes by using homologous or heterologous T-cell epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Roehrig, J T; Johnson, A J; Hunt, A R; Beaty, B J; Mathews, J H

    1992-01-01

    We have been investigating the T-helper (Th)-cell response to the flavivirus envelope (E) glycoprotein. In our studies with Murray Valley encephalitis (MVE) virus, we previously identified synthetic peptides capable of priming Th lymphocytes for an in vitro antivirus proliferative response (J. H. Mathews, J. E. Allan, J. T. Roehrig, J. R. Brubaker, and A. R. Hunt, J. Virol. 65:5141-5148, 1991). We have now characterized in vivo Th-cell priming activity of one of these peptides (MVE 17, amino acids 356 to 376) and an analogous peptide derived from the E-glycoprotein sequence of the dengue (DEN) 2, Jamaica strain (DEN 17, amino acids 352 to 368). This DEN peptide also primed the Th-cell compartment in BALB/c mice, as measured by in vitro proliferation and interleukin production. The failure of some MVE and DEN virus synthetic peptides to elicit an antibody response in BALB/c mice could be overcome if a Th-cell epitope-containing peptide was included in the immunization mixture. A more detailed analysis of the structural interactions between Th-cell and B-cell epitope donor peptides revealed that the peptides must be linked to observe the enhanced antibody response. Blockage or deletion of the free cysteine residue on either peptide abrogated the antibody response. The most efficient T-B-cell epitope interaction occurred when the peptides were colinearly synthesized. These Th-cell-stimulating peptides were also functional with the heterologous B-cell epitope-containing peptides. The Th-cell epitope on DEN 17 was more potent than the Th-cell epitope on MVE 17. PMID:1374807

  19. Hidden item variance in multiple mini-interview scores.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Nikki L Bibler; Swoboda, Christopher M; Kelcey, Benjamin M; Manuel, R Stephen

    2017-05-01

    The extant literature has largely ignored a potentially significant source of variance in multiple mini-interview (MMI) scores by "hiding" the variance attributable to the sample of attributes used on an evaluation form. This potential source of hidden variance can be defined as rating items, which typically comprise an MMI evaluation form. Due to its multi-faceted, repeated measures format, reliability for the MMI has been primarily evaluated using generalizability (G) theory. A key assumption of G theory is that G studies model the most important sources of variance to which a researcher plans to generalize. Because G studies can only attribute variance to the facets that are modeled in a G study, failure to model potentially substantial sources of variation in MMI scores can result in biased estimates of variance components. This study demonstrates the implications of hiding the item facet in MMI studies when true item-level effects exist. An extensive Monte Carlo simulation study was conducted to examine whether a commonly used hidden item, person-by-station (p × s|i) G study design results in biased estimated variance components. Estimates from this hidden item model were compared with estimates from a more complete person-by-station-by-item (p × s × i) model. Results suggest that when true item-level effects exist, the hidden item model (p × s|i) will result in biased variance components which can bias reliability estimates; therefore, researchers should consider using the more complete person-by-station-by-item model (p × s × i) when evaluating generalizability of MMI scores.

  20. Colour ornamentation in the blue tit: quantitative genetic (co)variances across sexes.

    PubMed

    Charmantier, A; Wolak, M E; Grégoire, A; Fargevieille, A; Doutrelant, C

    2017-02-01

    Although secondary sexual traits are commonly more developed in males than females, in many animal species females also display elaborate ornaments or weaponry. Indirect selection on correlated traits in males and/or direct sexual or social selection in females are hypothesized to drive the evolution and maintenance of female ornaments. Yet, the relative roles of these evolutionary processes remain unidentified, because little is known about the genetic correlation that might exist between the ornaments of both sexes, and few estimates of sex-specific autosomal or sex-linked genetic variances are available. In this study, we used two wild blue tit populations with 9 years of measurements on two colour ornaments: one structurally based (blue crown) and one carotenoid based (yellow chest). We found significant autosomal heritability for the chromatic part of the structurally based colouration in both sexes, whereas carotenoid chroma was heritable only in males, and the achromatic part of both colour patches was mostly non heritable. Power limitations, which are probably common among most data sets collected so far in wild populations, prevented estimation of sex-linked genetic variance. Bivariate analyses revealed very strong cross-sex genetic correlations in all heritable traits, although the strength of these correlations was not related to the level of sexual dimorphism. In total, our results suggest that males and females share a majority of their genetic variation underlying colour ornamentation, and hence the evolution of these sex-specific traits may depend greatly on correlated responses to selection in the opposite sex.

  1. Allan variance of time series models for measurement data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nien Fan

    2008-10-01

    The uncertainty of the mean of autocorrelated measurements from a stationary process has been discussed in the literature. However, when the measurements are from a non-stationary process, how to assess their uncertainty remains unresolved. Allan variance or two-sample variance has been used in time and frequency metrology for more than three decades as a substitute for the classical variance to characterize the stability of clocks or frequency standards when the underlying process is a 1/f noise process. However, its applications are related only to the noise models characterized by the power law of the spectral density. In this paper, from the viewpoint of the time domain, we provide a statistical underpinning of the Allan variance for discrete stationary processes, random walk and long-memory processes such as the fractional difference processes including the noise models usually considered in time and frequency metrology. Results show that the Allan variance is a better measure of the process variation than the classical variance of the random walk and the non-stationary fractional difference processes including the 1/f noise.

  2. Variance estimation in the analysis of microarray data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuedong; Ma, Yanyuan; Carroll, Raymond J

    2009-04-01

    Microarrays are one of the most widely used high throughput technologies. One of the main problems in the area is that conventional estimates of the variances that are required in the t-statistic and other statistics are unreliable owing to the small number of replications. Various methods have been proposed in the literature to overcome this lack of degrees of freedom problem. In this context, it is commonly observed that the variance increases proportionally with the intensity level, which has led many researchers to assume that the variance is a function of the mean. Here we concentrate on estimation of the variance as a function of an unknown mean in two models: the constant coefficient of variation model and the quadratic variance-mean model. Because the means are unknown and estimated with few degrees of freedom, naive methods that use the sample mean in place of the true mean are generally biased because of the errors-in-variables phenomenon. We propose three methods for overcoming this bias. The first two are variations on the theme of the so-called heteroscedastic simulation-extrapolation estimator, modified to estimate the variance function consistently. The third class of estimators is entirely different, being based on semiparametric information calculations. Simulations show the power of our methods and their lack of bias compared with the naive method that ignores the measurement error. The methodology is illustrated by using microarray data from leukaemia patients.

  3. The evolution and consequences of sex-specific reproductive variance.

    PubMed

    Mullon, Charles; Reuter, Max; Lehmann, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Natural selection favors alleles that increase the number of offspring produced by their carriers. But in a world that is inherently uncertain within generations, selection also favors alleles that reduce the variance in the number of offspring produced. If previous studies have established this principle, they have largely ignored fundamental aspects of sexual reproduction and therefore how selection on sex-specific reproductive variance operates. To study the evolution and consequences of sex-specific reproductive variance, we present a population-genetic model of phenotypic evolution in a dioecious population that incorporates previously neglected components of reproductive variance. First, we derive the probability of fixation for mutations that affect male and/or female reproductive phenotypes under sex-specific selection. We find that even in the simplest scenarios, the direction of selection is altered when reproductive variance is taken into account. In particular, previously unaccounted for covariances between the reproductive outputs of different individuals are expected to play a significant role in determining the direction of selection. Then, the probability of fixation is used to develop a stochastic model of joint male and female phenotypic evolution. We find that sex-specific reproductive variance can be responsible for changes in the course of long-term evolution. Finally, the model is applied to an example of parental-care evolution. Overall, our model allows for the evolutionary analysis of social traits in finite and dioecious populations, where interactions can occur within and between sexes under a realistic scenario of reproduction.

  4. The Evolution and Consequences of Sex-Specific Reproductive Variance

    PubMed Central

    Mullon, Charles; Reuter, Max; Lehmann, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Natural selection favors alleles that increase the number of offspring produced by their carriers. But in a world that is inherently uncertain within generations, selection also favors alleles that reduce the variance in the number of offspring produced. If previous studies have established this principle, they have largely ignored fundamental aspects of sexual reproduction and therefore how selection on sex-specific reproductive variance operates. To study the evolution and consequences of sex-specific reproductive variance, we present a population-genetic model of phenotypic evolution in a dioecious population that incorporates previously neglected components of reproductive variance. First, we derive the probability of fixation for mutations that affect male and/or female reproductive phenotypes under sex-specific selection. We find that even in the simplest scenarios, the direction of selection is altered when reproductive variance is taken into account. In particular, previously unaccounted for covariances between the reproductive outputs of different individuals are expected to play a significant role in determining the direction of selection. Then, the probability of fixation is used to develop a stochastic model of joint male and female phenotypic evolution. We find that sex-specific reproductive variance can be responsible for changes in the course of long-term evolution. Finally, the model is applied to an example of parental-care evolution. Overall, our model allows for the evolutionary analysis of social traits in finite and dioecious populations, where interactions can occur within and between sexes under a realistic scenario of reproduction. PMID:24172130

  5. Variance estimation for systematic designs in spatial surveys.

    PubMed

    Fewster, R M

    2011-12-01

    In spatial surveys for estimating the density of objects in a survey region, systematic designs will generally yield lower variance than random designs. However, estimating the systematic variance is well known to be a difficult problem. Existing methods tend to overestimate the variance, so although the variance is genuinely reduced, it is over-reported, and the gain from the more efficient design is lost. The current approaches to estimating a systematic variance for spatial surveys are to approximate the systematic design by a random design, or approximate it by a stratified design. Previous work has shown that approximation by a random design can perform very poorly, while approximation by a stratified design is an improvement but can still be severely biased in some situations. We develop a new estimator based on modeling the encounter process over space. The new "striplet" estimator has negligible bias and excellent precision in a wide range of simulation scenarios, including strip-sampling, distance-sampling, and quadrat-sampling surveys, and including populations that are highly trended or have strong aggregation of objects. We apply the new estimator to survey data for the spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta) in the Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, and find that the reported coefficient of variation for estimated density is 20% using approximation by a random design, 17% using approximation by a stratified design, and 11% using the new striplet estimator. This large reduction in reported variance is verified by simulation.

  6. Real-time monitoring of flavivirus induced cytopathogenesis using cell electric impedance technology.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ying; Ye, Peifang; Wang, Xiaobo; Xu, Xiao; Reisen, William

    2011-05-01

    A real-time cell analysis (RTCA) system based on cell-substrate electric impedance technology was used to monitor cytopathic effects (CPE) in Vero cell cultures infected with West Nile virus (WNV) and St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) at infectious doses ranging from 10(1) to 10(6) plaque forming units (PFU) of virus. A kinetic parameter characterizing virus-induced CPE, CIT(50) or the time to 50% decrease in cell impedance, was inversely proportional to virus infectious dose. In WNV-infected cells, the onset and rate of CPE was earlier and faster than in SLEV-infected cells, which was consistent with viral cytolytic activity. A mathematical model simulating impedance-based CPE kinetic curves indicated that the replication rate of WNV was about 3 times faster than SLEV. The RTCA system also was used for quantifying the level of cell protection by specific neutralizing antibodies against WNV and SLEV. The onset of WNV or SLEV-induced CPE was delayed in the presence of specific anti-sera, and this delay in the CIT(50) was well correlated with the titer of the neutralizing antibody as measured independently by plaque reduction neutralization tests (PRNT). The RTCA system provided a high throughput and quantitative method for real-time monitoring viral growth in cell culture and its inhibition by neutralizing antibodies.

  7. Analysis of Murine CD8+ T-Cell Clones Specific for the Dengue Virus NS3 Protein: Flavivirus Cross-Reactivity and Influence of Infecting Serotype

    PubMed Central

    Spaulding, Anne C.; Kurane, Ichiro; Ennis, Francis A.; Rothman, Alan L.

    1999-01-01

    Serotype-cross-reactive dengue virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) induced during a primary dengue virus infection are thought to play a role in the immunopathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) during a secondary dengue virus infection. Although there is no animal model of DHF, we previously reported that murine dengue virus-specific CTL responses are qualitatively similar to human dengue virus-specific CTL responses. We used BALB/c mice to study the specificity of the CTL response to an immunodominant epitope on the dengue virus NS3 protein. We mapped the minimal H-2Kd-restricted CTL epitope to residues 298 to 306 of the dengue type 2 virus NS3 protein. In short-term T-cell lines and clones, the predominant CD8+ CTL to this epitope in mice immunized with dengue type 2 virus or vaccinia virus expressing the dengue type 4 virus NS3 protein were cross-reactive with dengue type 2 or type 4 virus, while broadly serotype-cross-reactive CTL were a minority population. In dengue type 3 virus-immunized mice, the predominant CTL response to this epitope was broadly serotype cross-reactive. All of the dengue virus-specific CTL clones studied also recognized the homologous NS3 sequences of one or more closely related flaviviruses, such as Kunjin virus. The critical contact residues for the CTL clones with different specificities were mapped with peptides having single amino acid substitutions. These data demonstrate that primary dengue virus infection induces a complex population of flavivirus-cross-reactive NS3-specific CTL clones in mice and suggest that CTL responses are influenced by the viral serotype. These findings suggest an additional mechanism by which the order of sequential flavivirus infections may influence disease manifestations. PMID:9847344

  8. Nonlocal transform-domain denoising of volumetric data with groupwise adaptive variance estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggioni, Matteo; Foi, Alessandro

    2012-03-01

    We propose an extension of the BM4D volumetric filter to the denoising of data corrupted by spatially nonuniform noise. BM4D implements the grouping and collaborative filtering paradigm, where similar cubes of voxels are stacked into a four-dimensional "group". Each group undergoes a sparsifying four-dimensional transform, that exploits the local correlation among voxels in each cube and the nonlocal correlation between corresponding voxels of different cubes. Thus, signal and noise are effectively separated in transform domain. In this work we take advantage of the sparsity induced by the four-dimensional transform to provide a spatially adaptive estimation of the local noise variance by applying a robust median estimator of the absolute deviation to the spectrum of each filtered group. The adaptive variance estimates are then used during coefficients shrinkage. Finally, the inverse four-dimensional transform is applied to the filtered group, and each individual cube estimate is adaptively aggregated at its original location. Experiments on medical data corrupted by spatially varying Gaussian and Rician noise demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed approach in volumetric data denoising. In case of magnetic resonance signals, the adaptive variance estimate can be also used to compensate the estimation bias due to the non-zero-mean errors of the Rician-distributed data.

  9. A Practical Methodology for Quantifying Random and Systematic Components of Unexplained Variance in a Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, Richard; Obara, Clifford J.; Goodman, Wesley L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper documents a check standard wind tunnel test conducted in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (0.3M TCT) that was designed and analyzed using the Modern Design of Experiments (MDOE). The test designed to partition the unexplained variance of typical wind tunnel data samples into two constituent components, one attributable to ordinary random error, and one attributable to systematic error induced by covariate effects. Covariate effects in wind tunnel testing are discussed, with examples. The impact of systematic (non-random) unexplained variance on the statistical independence of sequential measurements is reviewed. The corresponding correlation among experimental errors is discussed, as is the impact of such correlation on experimental results generally. The specific experiment documented herein was organized as a formal test for the presence of unexplained variance in representative samples of wind tunnel data, in order to quantify the frequency with which such systematic error was detected, and its magnitude relative to ordinary random error. Levels of systematic and random error reported here are representative of those quantified in other facilities, as cited in the references.

  10. Accounting for Variance in Hyperspectral Data Coming from Limitations of the Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shurygin, B.; Shestakova, M.; Nikolenko, A.; Badasen, E.; Strakhov, P.

    2016-06-01

    Over the course of the past few years, a number of methods was developed to incorporate hyperspectral imaging specifics into generic data mining techniques, traditionally used for hyperspectral data processing. Projection pursuit methods embody the largest class of methods empoyed for hyperspectral image data reduction, however, they all have certain drawbacks making them either hard to use or inefficient. It has been shown that hyperspectral image (HSI) statistics tend to display "heavy tails" (Manolakis2003)(Theiler2005), rendering most of the projection pursuit methods hard to use. Taking into consideration the magnitude of described deviations of observed data PDFs from normal distribution, it is apparent that a priori knowledge of variance in data caused by the imaging system is to be employed in order to efficiently classify objects on HSIs (Kerr, 2015), especially in cases of wildly varying SNR. A number of attempts to describe this variance and compensating techniques has been made (Aiazzi2006), however, new data quality standards are not yet set and accounting for the detector response is made under large set of assumptions. Current paper addresses the issue of hyperspectral image classification in the context of different variance sources based on the knowledge of calibration curves (both spectral and radiometric) obtained for each pixel of imaging camera. A camera produced by ZAO NPO Lepton (Russia) was calibrated and used to obtain a test image. A priori known values of SNR and spectral channel cross-correlation were incorporated into calculating test statistics used in dimensionality reduction and feature extraction. Expectation-Maximization classification algorithm modification for non-Gaussian model as described by (Veracini2010) was further employed. The impact of calibration data coarsening by ignoring non-uniformities on false alarm rate was studied. Case study shows both regions of scene-dominated variance and sensor-dominated variance, leading

  11. Prime-boost vaccinations using recombinant flavivirus replicon and vaccinia virus vaccines: an ELISPOT analysis.

    PubMed

    Rattanasena, Paweena; Anraku, Itaru; Gardner, Joy; Le, Thuy T; Wang, Xiang Ju; Khromykh, Alexander A; Suhrbier, Andreas

    2011-03-01

    Recombinant Kunjin replicon virus-like particle (VLP), vaccinia virus (rVV) and DNA vaccines were tested in a large series of prime-boost vaccinations using interferon (IFN)γ ELISPOT assays that reflected effector (E), effector memory (EM) and central memory (CM) responses. All vaccine constructs encoded the murine polytope immunogen and responses to four CD8 T-cell epitopes (TYQRTRALV, SYIPSAEKI, YPHFMPTNL and RPQASGVYM) were measured. VLP/rVV out performed (by 14- to 20-fold) DNA/rVV for induction of CM responses, whereas EM responses were only marginally increased. DNA/VLP induced more EM, but not CM responses, than VLP alone, illustrating that DNA priming is not universally beneficial. rVV/VLP gave comparable results to VLP/rVV combinations, although the former induced approximately threefold more E responses, illustrating the utility of poxvirus priming in this setting. Although higher doses of VLP and rVV increased responses after single immunizations, such dose increases provided only marginal benefit in heterologous prime-boost settings. Triple combinations also provided no benefit over two vaccinations. DNA vaccination was associated with broad CM, but not EM responses, and the breadth of EM and E responses was significantly improved by increasing viral vector dose. VLP/rVV, rather than DNA priming, induced T cells with consistently high IFNγ secretion profiles across all ELISPOT measures. Vector-specific CD8 T-cell responses generally correlated well with immunogen-specific responses, although, as expected, single use of each vector reduced the relative levels of vector-specific responses. These experiments illustrate the utility of replicons in heterologous prime-boost vaccinations, and illustrate the diversity of data that can be obtained from ELISPOT analyses.

  12. A Serological Protein Microarray for Detection of Multiple Cross-Reactive Flavivirus Infections in Horses for Veterinary and Public Health Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Cleton, N B; van Maanen, K; Bergervoet, S A; Bon, N; Beck, C; Godeke, G-J; Lecollinet, S; Bowen, R; Lelli, D; Nowotny, N; Koopmans, M P G; Reusken, C B E M

    2016-09-15

    The genus Flavivirus in the family Flaviviridae includes some of the most important examples of emerging zoonotic arboviruses that are rapidly spreading across the globe. Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), West Nile virus (WNV), St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) and Usutu virus (USUV) are mosquito-borne members of the JEV serological group. Although most infections in humans are asymptomatic or present with mild flu-like symptoms, clinical manifestations of JEV, WNV, SLEV, USUV and tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) can include severe neurological disease and death. In horses, infection with WNV and JEV can lead to severe neurological disease and death, while USUV, SLEV and TBEV infections are mainly asymptomatic, however, and induce antibody responses. Horses often serve as sentinels to monitor active virus circulation in serological surveillance programmes specifically for WNV, USUV and JEV. Here, we developed and validated a NS1-antigen protein microarray for the serological differential diagnosis of flavivirus infections in horses using sera of experimentally and naturally infected symptomatic as well as asymptomatic horses. Using samples from experimentally infected horses, an IgG and IgM specificity of 100% and a sensitivity of 95% for WNV and 100% for JEV was achieved with a cut-off titre of 1 : 20 based on ROC calculation. In field settings, the microarray identified 93-100% of IgG-positive horses with recent WNV infections and 87% of TBEV IgG-positive horses. WNV IgM sensitivity was 80%. Differentiation between closely related flaviviruses by the NS1-antigen protein microarray is possible, even though we identified some instances of cross-reactivity among antibodies. However, the assay is not able to differentiate between naturally infected horses and animals vaccinated with an inactivated WNV whole-virus vaccine. We showed that the NS1-microarray can potentially be used for diagnosing and distinguishing flavivirus infections in horses and for public

  13. Computer analysis of antigenic domains and RGD-like sequences (RGWG) in the E glycoprotein of flaviviruses: an approach to vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Becker, Y

    1990-09-01

    Antigenic domains and RGD-like sequences in the E glycoprotein of the flaviviruses Japanese encephalitis virus, yellow fever virus, West Nile virus, dengue type 4 virus, and tick-borne encephalitis virus were analyzed by computer programs that provide information on the physical properties of the polypeptides. The use of computer programs for the development of vaccines based on the synthesis of antigenic peptides is discussed. Synthetic viral peptides are proposed to be used for topical application so as to interfere with the virus-cell interaction. Viral peptides with antigenic epitopes to protect against dengue virus infection without enhancing pathogenesis may also be developed on the basis of the computer analysis.

  14. Very low levels of direct additive genetic variance in fitness and fitness components in a red squirrel population

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, S Eryn; Gorrell, Jamieson C; Coltman, David W; Humphries, Murray M; Boutin, Stan; McAdam, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    A trait must genetically correlate with fitness in order to evolve in response to natural selection, but theory suggests that strong directional selection should erode additive genetic variance in fitness and limit future evolutionary potential. Balancing selection has been proposed as a mechanism that could maintain genetic variance if fitness components trade off with one another and has been invoked to account for empirical observations of higher levels of additive genetic variance in fitness components than would be expected from mutation–selection balance. Here, we used a long-term study of an individually marked population of North American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) to look for evidence of (1) additive genetic variance in lifetime reproductive success and (2) fitness trade-offs between fitness components, such as male and female fitness or fitness in high- and low-resource environments. “Animal model” analyses of a multigenerational pedigree revealed modest maternal effects on fitness, but very low levels of additive genetic variance in lifetime reproductive success overall as well as fitness measures within each sex and environment. It therefore appears that there are very low levels of direct genetic variance in fitness and fitness components in red squirrels to facilitate contemporary adaptation in this population. PMID:24963372

  15. Non-destructive X-ray Computed Tomography (XCT) Analysis of Sediment Variance in Marine Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oti, E.; Polyak, L. V.; Dipre, G.; Sawyer, D.; Cook, A.

    2015-12-01

    where, and to what extent, the burrow tubes deviate from the sediment matrix. Future research will correlate changes in variance due to bioturbation to other features indicating ocean temperatures and nutrient flux, such as foraminifera counts and oxygen isotope data.

  16. Quantitative Genetic Analysis of Temperature Regulation in MUS MUSCULUS. I. Partitioning of Variance

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Robert C.; Lynch, Carol Becker

    1979-01-01

    Heritabilities (from parent-offspring regression) and intraclass correlations of full sibs for a variety of traits were estimated from 225 litters of a heterogeneous stock (HS/Ibg) of laboratory mice. Initial variance partitioning suggested different adaptive functions for physiological, morphological and behavioral adjustments with respect to their thermoregulatory significance. Metabolic heat-production mechanisms appear to have reached their genetic limits, with little additive genetic variance remaining. This study provided no genetic evidence that body size has a close directional association with fitness in cold environments, since heritability estimates for weight gain and adult weight were similar and high, whether or not the animals were exposed to cold. Behavioral heat conservation mechanisms also displayed considerable amounts of genetic variability. However, due to strong evidence from numerous other studies that behavior serves an important adaptive role for temperature regulation in small mammals, we suggest that fluctuating selection pressures may have acted to maintain heritable variation in these traits. PMID:17248909

  17. Genetic selection for increased mean and reduced variance of twinning rate in Belclare ewes.

    PubMed

    Cottle, D J; Gilmour, A R; Pabiou, T; Amer, P R; Fahey, A G

    2016-04-01

    It is sometimes possible to breed for more uniform individuals by selecting animals with a greater tendency to be less variable, that is, those with a smaller environmental variance. This approach has been applied to reproduction traits in various animal species. We have evaluated fecundity in the Irish Belclare sheep breed by analyses of flocks with differing average litter size (number of lambs per ewe per year, NLB) and have estimated the genetic variance in environmental variance of lambing traits using double hierarchical generalized linear models (DHGLM). The data set comprised of 9470 litter size records from 4407 ewes collected in 56 flocks. The percentage of pedigreed lambing ewes with singles, twins and triplets was 30, 54 and 14%, respectively, in 2013 and has been relatively constant for the last 15 years. The variance of NLB increases with the mean in this data; the correlation of mean and standard deviation across sires is 0.50. The breeding goal is to increase the mean NLB without unduly increasing the incidence of triplets and higher litter sizes. The heritability estimates for lambing traits were NLB, 0.09; triplet occurrence (TRI) 0.07; and twin occurrence (TWN), 0.02. The highest and lowest twinning flocks differed by 23% (75% versus 52%) in the proportion of ewes lambing twins. Fitting bivariate sire models to NLB and the residual from the NLB model using a double hierarchical generalized linear model (DHGLM) model found a strong genetic correlation (0.88 ± 0.07) between the sire effect for the magnitude of the residual (VE ) and sire effects for NLB, confirming the general observation that increased average litter size is associated with increased variability in litter size. We propose a threshold model that may help breeders with low litter size increase the percentage of twin bearers without unduly increasing the percentage of ewes bearing triplets in Belclare sheep.

  18. Accounting for heterogeneous variances in multitrait evaluation of Jersey type traits.

    PubMed

    Gengler, N; Wiggans, G R; Thornton, L L M; Wright, J R; Druet, T

    2006-08-01

    The multitrait genetic evaluation system for type traits was modified to estimate adjustments for heterogeneous variance (HV) simultaneously with estimated breeding values (EBV) for final score and 14 linear traits. Each variance within herd, year, and parity was regressed toward a predicted variance, which was determined by fitting a model with fixed effects of the mean final score for herd, size of the contemporary group, appraisal month, and year-season and a random effect for herd-appraisal date. Herd-appraisal date was included as a random effect to regress the observed heterogeneity for a given herd-appraisal date toward the fixed effects. Method R was used to estimate variances for the heterogeneity model in each EBV iteration. To evaluate the effect of the adjustment, parent averages were calculated from evaluations with recent appraisals removed. The adjustment slightly improved correlations within birth year between those parent averages and EBV from current data on bulls for most traits, but did not improve correlations for final score, strength, dairy form, teat length, or foot angle. Annual trends for EBV were lower with HV adjustment than for unadjusted EBV for all traits except final score and rump angle for cows and rump width for bulls, which were essentially unchanged. Standard deviations of Mendelian sampling (evaluation minus mean of parent evaluations) declined less over time for HV-adjusted than for unadjusted evaluations. The slope at year 2000 of Mendelian-sampling standard deviations from HV-adjusted evaluations ranged from 10.0% for udder depth to 42.7% for teat length compared with the slope for unadjusted evaluations. This HV adjustment, which was implemented for USDA evaluations in May 2001 for Jerseys and in 2002 for other breeds, improves the accuracy of evaluations, particularly comparisons over time, by accounting for the change in variation.

  19. Detection of the mosquito-borne flaviviruses, West Nile, Dengue, Saint Louis Encephalitis, Ilheus, Bussuquara, and Yellow Fever in free-ranging black howlers (Alouatta caraya) of Northeastern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Morales, María A; Fabbri, Cintia M; Zunino, Gabriel E; Kowalewski, Martín M; Luppo, Victoria C; Enría, Delia A; Levis, Silvana C; Calderón, Gladys E

    2017-02-01

    Several medically important mosquito-borne flaviviruses have been detected in Argentina in recent years: Dengue (DENV), St. Louis encephalitis (SLEV), West Nile (WNV) and Yellow Fever (YFV) viruses. Evidence of Bussuquara virus (BSQV) and Ilheus virus (ILHV) activity were found, but they have not been associated with human disease. Non-human primates can act as important hosts in the natural cycle of flaviviruses and serological studies can lead to improved understanding of virus circulation dynamics and host susceptibility. From July-August 2010, we conducted serological and molecular surveys in free-ranging black howlers (Alouatta caraya) captured in northeastern Argentina. We used 90% plaque-reduction neutralization tests (PRNT90) to analyze 108 serum samples for antibodies to WNV, SLEV, YFV, DENV (serotypes 1and 3), ILHV, and BSQV. Virus genome detection was performed using generic reverse transcription (RT)-nested PCR to identify flaviviruses in 51 antibody-negative animals. Seventy animals had antibodies for one or more flaviviruses for a total antibody prevalence of 64.8% (70/108). Monotypic (13/70, 19%) and heterotypic (27/70, 39%) patterns were differentiated. Specific neutralizing antibodies against WNV, SLEV, DENV-1, DENV-3, ILHV, and BSQV were found. Unexpectedly, the highest flavivirus antibody prevalence detected was to WNV with 9 (8.33%) monotypic responses. All samples tested by (RT)-nested PCR were negative for viral genome. This is the first detection of WNV-specific antibodies in black howlers from Argentina and the first report in free-ranging non-human primates from Latin-American countries. Given that no animals had specific neutralizing antibodies to YFV, our results suggest that the study population remains susceptible to YFV. Monitoring of these agents should be strengthened to detect the establishment of sylvatic cycles of flaviviruses in America and evaluate risks to wildlife and human health.

  20. Detection of the mosquito-borne flaviviruses, West Nile, Dengue, Saint Louis Encephalitis, Ilheus, Bussuquara, and Yellow Fever in free-ranging black howlers (Alouatta caraya) of Northeastern Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Morales, María A.; Fabbri, Cintia M.; Zunino, Gabriel E.; Kowalewski, Martín M.; Luppo, Victoria C.; Enría, Delia A.; Levis, Silvana C.; Calderón, Gladys E.

    2017-01-01

    Several medically important mosquito-borne flaviviruses have been detected in Argentina in recent years: Dengue (DENV), St. Louis encephalitis (SLEV), West Nile (WNV) and Yellow Fever (YFV) viruses. Evidence of Bussuquara virus (BSQV) and Ilheus virus (ILHV) activity were found, but they have not been associated with human disease. Non-human primates can act as important hosts in the natural cycle of flaviviruses and serological studies can lead to improved understanding of virus circulation dynamics and host susceptibility. From July–August 2010, we conducted serological and molecular surveys in free–ranging black howlers (Alouatta caraya) captured in northeastern Argentina. We used 90% plaque-reduction neutralization tests (PRNT90) to analyze 108 serum samples for antibodies to WNV, SLEV, YFV, DENV (serotypes 1and 3), ILHV, and BSQV. Virus genome detection was performed using generic reverse transcription (RT)-nested PCR to identify flaviviruses in 51 antibody-negative animals. Seventy animals had antibodies for one or more flaviviruses for a total antibody prevalence of 64.8% (70/108). Monotypic (13/70, 19%) and heterotypic (27/70, 39%) patterns were differentiated. Specific neutralizing antibodies against WNV, SLEV, DENV-1, DENV-3, ILHV, and BSQV were found. Unexpectedly, the highest flavivirus antibody prevalence detected was to WNV with 9 (8.33%) monotypic responses. All samples tested by (RT)-nested PCR were negative for viral genome. This is the first detection of WNV-specific antibodies in black howlers from Argentina and the first report in free-ranging non-human primates from Latin-American countries. Given that no animals had specific neutralizing antibodies to YFV, our results suggest that the study population remains susceptible to YFV. Monitoring of these agents should be strengthened to detect the establishment of sylvatic cycles of flaviviruses in America and evaluate risks to wildlife and human health. PMID:28187130

  1. Measurement of Ulnar Variance in a Regional Subset of Indian Population—A Pilot Study of 30 Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Jalan, Divesh; Elhence, Abhay

    2015-01-01

    Background The variation of level of distal articulating surface of ulna with respect to distal articulating surface of radius is known as ulnar variance (UV). Positive and negative UV has been implicated in various wrist and hand pathologies. Aim To measure ulnar variance in a regional subset of Indian population and to compare two techniques of measurement of ulnar variance viz. method of perpendiculars and modification of the concentric circles method. Materials and Methods UV was measured in a regional subset of Indian population comprising of 30 subjects. The mean age of patients was 35.9 years. There were 16 males and 14 females in the study group. Antero-posterior (AP) X-rays of wrist in neutral position were taken and UV was measured using method of perpendiculars and the modified circle method. Results The mean UV using method of perpendiculars (UVA) was 0.387 mm and using modified circle method (UVB) was 0.507mm. A higher predominance of positive UV in this regional subset of Indian population was observed. There was no correlation between UV with respect to age and sex. No statistically significant difference was observed between the two methods of measurement utilized in the study. Conclusion The documentation of a negative and positive ulnar variance will help in prophylactic and timely intervention for various wrist pathologies, if required. However, a larger sample size with a longer follow up is required to suggest a correlation of ulnar variance with clinically symptomatic disease. PMID:26500970

  2. Estimation of genetic (co)variances of Gompertz growth function parameters in pigs.

    PubMed

    Coyne, J M; Matilainen, K; Berry, D P; Sevon-Aimonen, M-L; Mäntysaari, E A; Juga, J; Serenius, T; McHugh, N

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate genetic (co)variances for the Gompertz growth function parameters, asymptotic mature weight (A), the ratio of mature weight to birthweight (B) and rate of maturation (k), using alternative modelling approaches. The data set consisted of 51 893 live weight records from 10 201 growing pigs. The growth of each pig was modelled using the Gompertz model employing either a two-step fixed effect or mixed model approach or a one-step mixed model approach using restricted maximum likelihood for the estimation of genetic (co)variance. Heritability estimates for the Gompertz growth function parameters, A (0.40), B (0.69) and k (0.45), were greatest for the one-step approach, compared with the two-step fixed effects approach, A (0.10), B (0.33) and k (0.13), and the two-step mixed model approach, A (0.17), B (0.32) and k (0.18). Inferred genetic correlations (i.e. correlations of estimated breeding values) between growth function parameters within models ranged from -0.78 to 0.76, and across models ranged from 0.28 to 0.73 for parameter A, 0.75 to 0.88 for parameter B and 0.09 to 0.37 for parameter k. Correlations between predicted daily sire live weights based on the Gompertz growth curve parameters' estimated breeding values from 60 to 200 days of age between all three modelled approaches were moderately to strongly correlated (0.75 to 0.95). Results from this study provide heritability estimates for biologically interpretable parameters of pig growth through the quantification of genetic (co)variances, thereby facilitating the estimation of breeding values for inclusion in breeding objectives to aid in breeding and selection decisions.

  3. Estimating Variances of Horizontal Wind Fluctuations in Stable Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhar, Ashok K.

    2010-05-01

    Information concerning the average wind speed and the variances of lateral and longitudinal wind velocity fluctuations is required by dispersion models to characterise turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer. When the winds are weak, the scalar average wind speed and the vector average wind speed need to be clearly distinguished and both lateral and longitudinal wind velocity fluctuations assume equal importance in dispersion calculations. We examine commonly-used methods of estimating these variances from wind-speed and wind-direction statistics measured separately, for example, by a cup anemometer and a wind vane, and evaluate the implied relationship between the scalar and vector wind speeds, using measurements taken under low-wind stable conditions. We highlight several inconsistencies inherent in the existing formulations and show that the widely-used assumption that the lateral velocity variance is equal to the longitudinal velocity variance is not necessarily true. We derive improved relations for the two variances, and although data under stable stratification are considered for comparison, our analysis is applicable more generally.

  4. Analysis of Variance Components for Genetic Markers with Unphased Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    An ANOVA type general multi-allele (GMA) model was proposed in Wang (2014) on analysis of variance components for quantitative trait loci or genetic markers with phased or unphased genotypes. In this study, by applying the GMA model, we further examine estimation of the genetic variance components for genetic markers with unphased genotypes based on a random sample from a study population. In one locus and two loci cases, we first derive the least square estimates (LSE) of model parameters in fitting the GMA model. Then we construct estimators of the genetic variance components for one marker locus in a Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium population and two marker loci in an equilibrium population. Meanwhile, we explore the difference between the classical general linear model (GLM) and GMA based approaches in association analysis of genetic markers with quantitative traits. We show that the GMA model can retain the same partition on the genetic variance components as the traditional Fisher's ANOVA model, while the GLM cannot. We clarify that the standard F-statistics based on the partial reductions in sums of squares from GLM for testing the fixed allelic effects could be inadequate for testing the existence of the variance component when allelic interactions are present. We point out that the GMA model can reduce the confounding between the allelic effects and allelic interactions at least for independent alleles. As a result, the GMA model could be more beneficial than GLM for detecting allelic interactions.

  5. Monte Carlo variance reduction approaches for non-Boltzmann tallies

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, T.E.

    1992-12-01

    Quantities that depend on the collective effects of groups of particles cannot be obtained from the standard Boltzmann transport equation. Monte Carlo estimates of these quantities are called non-Boltzmann tallies and have become increasingly important recently. Standard Monte Carlo variance reduction techniques were designed for tallies based on individual particles rather than groups of particles. Experience with non-Boltzmann tallies and analog Monte Carlo has demonstrated the severe limitations of analog Monte Carlo for many non-Boltzmann tallies. In fact, many calculations absolutely require variance reduction methods to achieve practical computation times. Three different approaches to variance reduction for non-Boltzmann tallies are described and shown to be unbiased. The advantages and disadvantages of each of the approaches are discussed.

  6. Impact of Damping Uncertainty on SEA Model Response Variance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah; Cabell, Randolph; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2010-01-01

    Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) is commonly used to predict high-frequency vibroacoustic levels. This statistical approach provides the mean response over an ensemble of random subsystems that share the same gross system properties such as density, size, and damping. Recently, techniques have been developed to predict the ensemble variance as well as the mean response. However these techniques do not account for uncertainties in the system properties. In the present paper uncertainty in the damping loss factor is propagated through SEA to obtain more realistic prediction bounds that account for both ensemble and damping variance. The analysis is performed on a floor-equipped cylindrical test article that resembles an aircraft fuselage. Realistic bounds on the damping loss factor are determined from measurements acquired on the sidewall of the test article. The analysis demonstrates that uncertainties in damping have the potential to significantly impact the mean and variance of the predicted response.

  7. Utility of Japanese encephalitis virus subgenomic replicon-based single-round infectious particles as antigens in neutralization tests for Zika virus and three other flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Atsushi; Moi, Meng Ling; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Kurane, Ichiro; Matsuda, Mami; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Konishi, Eiji

    2017-05-01

    The introduction of a foreign virus into an area may cause an outbreak, as with the Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak in the Americas. Preparedness for handling a viral outbreak involves the development of tests for the serodiagnosis of foreign virus infections. We previously established a gene-based technology to generate some flaviviral antigens useful for functional antibody assays. The technology utilizes a Japanese encephalitis virus subgenomic replicon to generate single-round infectious particles (SRIPs) that possess designed surface antigens. In the present study, we successfully expanded the capacity of SRIPs to four human-pathogenic mosquito-borne flaviviruses that could potentially be introduced from endemic to non-endemic countries: ZIKV, Sepik virus, Wesselsbron virus, and Usutu virus. Flavivirus-crossreactive monoclonal antibodies dose-dependently neutralized these SRIPs. ZIKV-SRIPs also produced antibody-dose-dependent neutralization curves equivalent to those shown by authentic ZIKV particles using sera from a Zika fever patient. The faithful expression of designed surface antigens on SRIPs will allow their use in neutralization tests to diagnose foreign flaviviral infections.

  8. The Malat1 long non-coding RNA is upregulated by signalling through the PERK axis of unfolded protein response during flavivirus infection.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sankar; Vrati, Sudhanshu

    2015-12-04

    Flavivirus infection causes host cell death by initiation of an unfolded protein response (UPR). UPR is initiated following activation of three ER-membrane resident sensors, PERK, IRE1α and ATF6, which are otherwise kept inactive through association with the ER-chaperone GRP78. Activation precedes cellular and molecular changes that act to restore homeostasis but might eventually initiate apoptosis. These changes involve influencing function of multiple genes by either transcriptional or post-transcriptional or post-translational mechanisms. Transcriptional control includes expression of transcription factor cascades, which influence cognate gene expression. Malat1 is a long non-coding RNA which is over-expressed in many human oncogenic tissues and regulates cell cycle and survival. In this report, for the first time we show activation of Malat1 following infection by two flaviviruses, both of which activate the UPR in host cells. The temporal kinetics of expression was restricted to later time points. Further, Malat1 was also activated by pharmacological inducer of UPR, to a similar degree. Using drugs that specifically inhibit or activate the PERK or IRE1α sensors, we demonstrate that signalling through the PERK axis activates this expression, through a transcriptional mechanism. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an UPR pathway regulating the expression of an lncRNA.

  9. Bottleneck Effects on Genetic Variance for Courtship Repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Meffert, L. M.

    1995-01-01

    Bottleneck effects on evolutionary potential in mating behavior were addressed through assays of additive genetic variances and resulting phenotypic responses to drift in the courtship repertoires of six two-pair founder-flush lines and two control populations of the housefly. A simulation addressed the complication that an estimate of the genetic variance for a courtship trait (e.g., male performance vigor or the female requirement for copulation) must involve assays against the background behavior of the mating partners. The additive ``environmental'' effect of the mating partner's phenotype simply dilutes the net parent-offspring covariance for a trait. However, if there is an interaction with this ``environmental'' component, negative parent-offspring covariances can result under conditions of high incompatibility between the population's distributions for male performance and female choice requirements, despite high levels of genetic variance. All six bottlenecked lines exhibited significant differentiation from the controls in at least one measure of the parent-offspring covariance for male performance or female choice (estimated by 50 parent-son and 50 parent-daughter covariances for 10 courtship traits per line) which translated to significant phenotypic drift. However, the average effect across traits or across lines did not yield a significant net increase in genetic variance due to bottlenecks. Concerted phenotypic differentiation due to the founder-flush event provided indirect evidence of directional dominance in a subset of traits. Furthermore, indirect evidence of genotype-environment interactions (potentially producing genotype-genotype effects) was found in the negative parent-offspring covariances predicted by the male-female interaction simulation and by the association of the magnitude of phenotypic drift with the absolute value of the parent-offspring covariance. Hence, nonadditive genetic effects on mating behavior may be important in

  10. Enhancing area of review capabilities: Implementing a variance program

    SciTech Connect

    De Leon, F.

    1995-12-01

    The Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) has regulated oil-field injection well operations since issuing its first injection permit in 1938. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) granted the RRC primary enforcement responsibility for the Class H Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program in April 1982. At that time, the added level of groundwater protection afforded by an Area of Review (AOR) on previously permitted Class H wells was not deemed necessary or cost effective. A proposed EPA rule change will require AORs to be performed on all pre-primacy Class II wells unless a variance can be justified. A variance methodology has been developed by researchers at the University of Missouri-Rolla in conjunction with the American Petroleum Institute (API). This paper will outline the RRC approach to implementing the AOR variance methodology. The RRC`s UIC program tracks 49,256 pre-primacy wells. Approximately 25,598 of these wells have active permits and will be subject to the proposed AOR requirements. The potential workload of performing AORs or granting variances for this many wells makes the development of a Geographic Information System (GIS) imperative. The RRC has recently completed a digitized map of the entire state and has spotted 890,000 of an estimated 1.2 million wells. Integrating this digital state map into a GIS will allow the RRC to tie its many data systems together. Once in place, this integrated data system will be used to evaluate AOR variances for pre-primacy wells on a field-wide basis. It will also reduce the regulatory cost of permitting by allowing the RRC staff to perform AORs or grant variances for the approximately 3,000 new and amended permit applications requiring AORs each year.

  11. Wave variance partitioning in the trough of a barred beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howd, Peter A.; Oltman-Shay, Joan; Holman, Robert A.

    1991-07-01

    The wave-induced velocity field in the nearshore is composed of contributions from incident wind waves (ƒ > 0.05 Hz), surface infragravity waves (ƒ < 0.05 Hz, |κ| < (σ2/gβ) and shear waves (ƒ < 0.05 Hz, |κ| > σ2/gβ), where ƒ is the frequency, σ = 2πƒ, κ is the radial alongshore wavenumber (2π/L, L being the alongshore wavelength), β is the beach slope, and g is the acceleration due to gravity. Using an alongshore array of current meters located in the trough of a nearshore bar (mean depth ≈ 1.5 m), we investigate the bulk statistical behaviors of these wave bands over a wide range of incident wave conditions. The behavior of each contributing wave type is parameterized in terms of commonly measured or easily predicted variables describing the beach profile, wind waves, and current field. Over the 10-day period, the mean contributions (to the total variance) of the incident, infragravity, and shear wave bands were 71.5%, 14.3% and 13.6% for the alongshore component of flow (mean rms oscillations of 44, 20, and 19 cm s-1, respectively), and 81.9%, 10.9%, and 6.6% for the cross-shore component (mean rms oscillations of 92, 32, and 25 cm s-1, respectively). However, the values varied considerably. The contribution to the alongshore (cross-shore) component of flow ranged from 44.8-88.4% (58.5-95.8%) for the incident band, to 6.2-26.6% (2.5-32.4%) for the infragravity band, and 3.4-33.1% (0.6-14.3%) for the shear wave band. Incident wave oscillations were limited by depth-dependent saturation over the adjacent bar crest and varied only with the tide. The infragravity wave rms oscillations on this barred beach are best parameterized by the offshore wave height, consistent with previous studies on planar beaches. Comparison with data from four other beaches of widely differing geometries shows the shoreline infragravity amplitude to be a near-constant ratio of the offshore wave height. The magnitude of the ratio is found to be dependent on the Iribarren

  12. The dynamic Allan Variance IV: characterization of atomic clock anomalies.

    PubMed

    Galleani, Lorenzo; Tavella, Patrizia

    2015-05-01

    The number of applications where precise clocks play a key role is steadily increasing, satellite navigation being the main example. Precise clock anomalies are hence critical events, and their characterization is a fundamental problem. When an anomaly occurs, the clock stability changes with time, and this variation can be characterized with the dynamic Allan variance (DAVAR). We obtain the DAVAR for a series of common clock anomalies, namely, a sinusoidal term, a phase jump, a frequency jump, and a sudden change in the clock noise variance. These anomalies are particularly common in space clocks. Our analytic results clarify how the clock stability changes during these anomalies.

  13. Entropy, Fisher Information and Variance with Frost-Musulin Potenial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idiodi, J. O. A.; Onate, C. A.

    2016-09-01

    This study presents the Shannon and Renyi information entropy for both position and momentum space and the Fisher information for the position-dependent mass Schrödinger equation with the Frost-Musulin potential. The analysis of the quantum mechanical probability has been obtained via the Fisher information. The variance information of this potential is equally computed. This controls both the chemical properties and physical properties of some of the molecular systems. We have observed the behaviour of the Shannon entropy. Renyi entropy, Fisher information and variance with the quantum number n respectively.

  14. Studying Variance in the Galactic Ultra-compact Binary Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Shane; Breivik, Katelyn

    2017-01-01

    In the years preceding LISA, Milky Way compact binary population simulations can be used to inform the science capabilities of the mission. Galactic population simulation efforts generally focus on high fidelity models that require extensive computational power to produce a single simulated population for each model. Each simulated population represents an incomplete sample of the functions governing compact binary evolution, thus introducing variance from one simulation to another. We present a rapid Monte Carlo population simulation technique that can simulate thousands of populations on week-long timescales, thus allowing a full exploration of the variance associated with a binary stellar evolution model.

  15. The principle of stationary variance in quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siringo, Fabio

    2014-02-01

    The principle of stationary variance is advocated as a viable variational approach to quantum field theory (QFT). The method is based on the principle that the variance of energy should be at its minimum when the state of a quantum system reaches its best approximation for an eigenstate. While not too much popular in quantum mechanics (QM), the method is shown to be valuable in QFT and three special examples are given in very different areas ranging from Heisenberg model of antiferromagnetism (AF) to quantum electrodynamics (QED) and gauge theories.

  16. Physicochemical factors affecting the spatial variance of monomethylmercury in artificial reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Noh, Seam; Kim, Chan-Kook; Lee, Jong-Hyeon; Kim, Younghee; Choi, Kyunghee; Han, Seunghee

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify how hydrologic factors (e.g., rainfall, maximum depth, reservoir and catchment area, and water residence time) and water chemistry factors (e.g., conductivity, pH, suspended particulate matter, chlorophyll-a, dissolved organic carbon, and sulfate) interact to affect the spatial variance in monomethylmercury (MMHg) concentration in nine artificial reservoirs. We hypothesized that the MMHg concentration of reservoir water would be higher in eutrophic than in oligotrophic reservoirs because increased dissolved organic matter and sulfate in eutrophic reservoirs can promote in situ production of MMHg. Multiple tools, including Pearson correlation, a self-organizing map, and principal component analysis, were applied in the statistical modeling of Hg species. The results showed that rainfall amount and hydraulic residence time best explained the variance of dissolved Hg and dissolved MMHg in reservoir water. High precipitation events and residence time may mobilize Hg and MMHg in the catchment and reservoir sediment, respectively. On the contrary, algal biomass was a key predictor of the variance of the percentage fraction of unfiltered MMHg over unfiltered Hg (%MMHg). The creation of suboxic conditions and the supply of sulfate subsequent to the algal decomposition seemed to support enhanced %MMHg in the bloom reservoirs. Thus, the nutrient supply should be carefully managed to limit increases in the %MMHg/Hg of temperate reservoirs.

  17. A model and variance reduction method for computing statistical outputs of stochastic elliptic partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Vidal-Codina, F.; Nguyen, N.C.; Giles, M.B.; Peraire, J.

    2015-09-15

    We present a model and variance reduction method for the fast and reliable computation of statistical outputs of stochastic elliptic partial differential equations. Our method consists of three main ingredients: (1) the hybridizable discontinuous Galerkin (HDG) discretization of elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs), which allows us to obtain high-order accurate solutions of the governing PDE; (2) the reduced basis method for a new HDG discretization of the underlying PDE to enable real-time solution of the parameterized PDE in the presence of stochastic parameters; and (3) a multilevel variance reduction method that exploits the statistical correlation among the different reduced basis approximations and the high-fidelity HDG discretization to accelerate the convergence of the Monte Carlo simulations. The multilevel variance reduction method provides efficient computation of the statistical outputs by shifting most of the computational burden from the high-fidelity HDG approximation to the reduced basis approximations. Furthermore, we develop a posteriori error estimates for our approximations of the statistical outputs. Based on these error estimates, we propose an algorithm for optimally choosing both the dimensions of the reduced basis approximations and the sizes of Monte Carlo samples to achieve a given error tolerance. We provide numerical examples to demonstrate the performance of the proposed method.

  18. A model and variance reduction method for computing statistical outputs of stochastic elliptic partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal-Codina, F.; Nguyen, N. C.; Giles, M. B.; Peraire, J.

    2015-09-01

    We present a model and variance reduction method for the fast and reliable computation of statistical outputs of stochastic elliptic partial differential equations. Our method consists of three main ingredients: (1) the hybridizable discontinuous Galerkin (HDG) discretization of elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs), which allows us to obtain high-order accurate solutions of the governing PDE; (2) the reduced basis method for a new HDG discretization of the underlying PDE to enable real-time solution of the parameterized PDE in the presence of stochastic parameters; and (3) a multilevel variance reduction method that exploits the statistical correlation among the different reduced basis approximations and the high-fidelity HDG discretization to accelerate the convergence of the Monte Carlo simulations. The multilevel variance reduction method provides efficient computation of the statistical outputs by shifting most of the computational burden from the high-fidelity HDG approximation to the reduced basis approximations. Furthermore, we develop a posteriori error estimates for our approximations of the statistical outputs. Based on these error estimates, we propose an algorithm for optimally choosing both the dimensions of the reduced basis approximations and the sizes of Monte Carlo samples to achieve a given error tolerance. We provide numerical examples to demonstrate the performance of the proposed method.

  19. Combining multivariate statistics and analysis of variance to redesign a water quality monitoring network.

    PubMed

    Guigues, Nathalie; Desenfant, Michèle; Hance, Emmanuel

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this paper was to demonstrate how multivariate statistics combined with the analysis of variance could support decision-making during the process of redesigning a water quality monitoring network with highly heterogeneous datasets in terms of time and space. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA) were selected to optimise the selection of water quality parameters to be monitored as well as the number and location of monitoring stations. Sampling frequency was specifically investigated through the analysis of variance. The data used were obtained between 2007 and 2010 at the Long-term Environmental Research Monitoring and Testing System (OPE) located in the north-eastern part of France in relation with a geological disposal of radioactive waste project. PCA results showed that no substantial reduction among the parameters was possible as strong correlation only exists between electrical conductivity, calcium or bicarbonates. HCA results were geospatially represented for each field campaign and compared to one another in terms of similarities and differences allowing us to group the monitoring stations into 12 categories. This approach enabled us to take into account not only the spatial variability of water quality but also its temporal variability. Finally, the analysis of variances showed that three very different behaviours occurred: parameters with high temporal variability and low spatial variability (e.g. suspended matter), parameters with high spatial variability and average temporal variability (e.g. calcium) and finally parameters with both high temporal and spatial variability (e.g. nitrate).

  20. Image correlation and sampling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, D. J.; Mccormack, D. S.; Sedwick, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The development of analytical approaches for solving image correlation and image sampling of multispectral data is discussed. Relevant multispectral image statistics which are applicable to image correlation and sampling are identified. The general image statistics include intensity mean, variance, amplitude histogram, power spectral density function, and autocorrelation function. The translation problem associated with digital image registration and the analytical means for comparing commonly used correlation techniques are considered. General expressions for determining the reconstruction error for specific image sampling strategies are developed.

  1. 10 CFR 52.93 - Exemptions and variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exemptions and variances. 52.93 Section 52.93 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS... referencing a nuclear power reactor manufactured under a manufacturing license issued under subpart F of...

  2. 10 CFR 52.93 - Exemptions and variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exemptions and variances. 52.93 Section 52.93 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS... referencing a nuclear power reactor manufactured under a manufacturing license issued under subpart F of...

  3. 10 CFR 52.93 - Exemptions and variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exemptions and variances. 52.93 Section 52.93 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS... referencing a nuclear power reactor manufactured under a manufacturing license issued under subpart F of...

  4. 10 CFR 52.93 - Exemptions and variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exemptions and variances. 52.93 Section 52.93 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS... referencing a nuclear power reactor manufactured under a manufacturing license issued under subpart F of...

  5. 10 CFR 52.93 - Exemptions and variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exemptions and variances. 52.93 Section 52.93 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS... referencing a nuclear power reactor manufactured under a manufacturing license issued under subpart F of...

  6. Variance Components for NLS: Partitioning the Design Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folsom, Ralph E., Jr.

    This memorandum demonstrates a variance components methodology for partitioning the overall design effect (D) for a ratio mean into stratification (S), unequal weighting (W), and clustering (C) effects, so that D = WSC. In section 2, a sample selection scheme modeled after the National Longitudinal Study of the High School Class of 1972 (NKS)…

  7. Allan Variance Calculation for Nonuniformly Spaced Input Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The Allan Variance ( AV ) characterizes the...temporal randomness in sensor output data streams at various times scales. The conventional formula for calculating the AV assumes that the data...presents a modified approach to AV calculation, which accommodates nonuniformly spaced time samples. The basic concept of the modified approach is

  8. Temporal Relation Extraction in Outcome Variances of Clinical Pathways.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Takanori; Wakata, Yoshifumi; Hamai, Satoshi; Nakashima, Yasuharu; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Franagan, Brendan; Nakashima, Naoki; Hirokawa, Sachio

    2015-01-01

    Recently the clinical pathway has progressed with digitalization and the analysis of activity. There are many previous studies on the clinical pathway but not many feed directly into medical practice. We constructed a mind map system that applies the spanning tree. This system can visualize temporal relations in outcome variances, and indicate outcomes that affect long-term hospitalization.

  9. 40 CFR 142.43 - Disposition of a variance request.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....43 Section 142.43 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION Variances Issued by the... issue a denial. Such notice shall include a statement of reasons for the proposed denial, and...

  10. Numbers Of Degrees Of Freedom Of Allan-Variance Estimators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, Charles A.

    1992-01-01

    Report discusses formulas for estimation of Allan variances. Presents algorithms for closed-form approximations of numbers of degrees of freedom characterizing results obtained when various estimators applied to five power-law components of classical mathematical model of clock noise.

  11. 41 CFR 50-204.1a - Variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PUBLIC CONTRACTS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR 204-SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR FEDERAL SUPPLY CONTRACTS Scope... Public Contracts Act and the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Variances....

  12. 41 CFR 50-204.1a - Variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PUBLIC CONTRACTS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR 204-SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR FEDERAL SUPPLY CONTRACTS Scope... Public Contracts Act and the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Variances....

  13. 41 CFR 50-204.1a - Variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PUBLIC CONTRACTS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR 204-SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR FEDERAL SUPPLY CONTRACTS Scope... Public Contracts Act and the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Variances....

  14. 41 CFR 50-204.1a - Variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PUBLIC CONTRACTS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR 204-SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR FEDERAL SUPPLY CONTRACTS Scope... Public Contracts Act and the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Variances....

  15. 40 CFR 190.11 - Variances for unusual operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....11 Section 190.11 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION PROTECTION STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER OPERATIONS Environmental Standards for the Uranium Fuel Cycle § 190.11 Variances for unusual operations. The standards specified...

  16. 40 CFR 190.11 - Variances for unusual operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....11 Section 190.11 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION PROTECTION STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER OPERATIONS Environmental Standards for the Uranium Fuel Cycle § 190.11 Variances for unusual operations. The standards specified...

  17. 40 CFR 190.11 - Variances for unusual operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....11 Section 190.11 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION PROTECTION STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER OPERATIONS Environmental Standards for the Uranium Fuel Cycle § 190.11 Variances for unusual operations. The standards specified...

  18. 40 CFR 190.11 - Variances for unusual operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....11 Section 190.11 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION PROTECTION STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER OPERATIONS Environmental Standards for the Uranium Fuel Cycle § 190.11 Variances for unusual operations. The standards specified...

  19. 40 CFR 190.11 - Variances for unusual operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....11 Section 190.11 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION PROTECTION STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER OPERATIONS Environmental Standards for the Uranium Fuel Cycle § 190.11 Variances for unusual operations. The standards specified...

  20. Infinite variance in fermion quantum Monte Carlo calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hao; Zhang, Shiwei

    2016-03-01

    For important classes of many-fermion problems, quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods allow exact calculations of ground-state and finite-temperature properties without the sign problem. The list spans condensed matter, nuclear physics, and high-energy physics, including the half-filled repulsive Hubbard model, the spin-balanced atomic Fermi gas, and lattice quantum chromodynamics calculations at zero density with Wilson Fermions, and is growing rapidly as a number of problems have been discovered recently to be free of the sign problem. In these situations, QMC calculations are relied on to provide definitive answers. Their results are instrumental to our ability to understand and compute properties in fundamental models important to multiple subareas in quantum physics. It is shown, however, that the most commonly employed algorithms in such situations have an infinite variance problem. A diverging variance causes the estimated Monte Carlo statistical error bar to be incorrect, which can render the results of the calculation unreliable or meaningless. We discuss how to identify the infinite variance problem. An approach is then proposed to solve the problem. The solution does not require major modifications to standard algorithms, adding a "bridge link" to the imaginary-time path integral. The general idea is applicable to a variety of situations where the infinite variance problem may be present. Illustrative results are presented for the ground state of the Hubbard model at half-filling.

  1. 21 CFR 821.2 - Exemptions and variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE TRACKING REQUIREMENTS General Provisions § 821.2 Exemptions and variances. (a) A... following: (1) The name of the device and device class and representative labeling showing the intended...

  2. 21 CFR 821.2 - Exemptions and variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE TRACKING REQUIREMENTS General Provisions § 821.2 Exemptions and variances. (a) A... following: (1) The name of the device and device class and representative labeling showing the intended...

  3. 21 CFR 821.2 - Exemptions and variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE TRACKING REQUIREMENTS General Provisions § 821.2 Exemptions and variances. (a) A... following: (1) The name of the device and device class and representative labeling showing the intended...

  4. Perspective projection for variance pose face recognition from camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhir, M. M.; Woo, W. L.; Chambers, J. A.; Dlay, S. S.

    2016-04-01

    Variance pose is an important research topic in face recognition. The alteration of distance parameters across variance pose face features is a challenging. We provide a solution for this problem using perspective projection for variance pose face recognition. Our method infers intrinsic camera parameters of the image which enable the projection of the image plane into 3D. After this, face box tracking and centre of eyes detection can be identified using our novel technique to verify the virtual face feature measurements. The coordinate system of the perspective projection for face tracking allows the holistic dimensions for the face to be fixed in different orientations. The training of frontal images and the rest of the poses on FERET database determine the distance from the centre of eyes to the corner of box face. The recognition system compares the gallery of images against different poses. The system initially utilises information on position of both eyes then focuses principally on closest eye in order to gather data with greater reliability. Differentiation between the distances and position of the right and left eyes is a unique feature of our work with our algorithm outperforming other state of the art algorithms thus enabling stable measurement in variance pose for each individual.

  5. Dominance, Information, and Hierarchical Scaling of Variance Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceurvorst, Robert W.; Krus, David J.

    1979-01-01

    A method for computation of dominance relations and for construction of their corresponding hierarchical structures is presented. The link between dominance and variance allows integration of the mathematical theory of information with least squares statistical procedures without recourse to logarithmic transformations of the data. (Author/CTM)

  6. The Threat of Common Method Variance Bias to Theory Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reio, Thomas G., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    The need for more theory building scholarship remains one of the pressing issues in the field of HRD. Researchers can employ quantitative, qualitative, and/or mixed methods to support vital theory-building efforts, understanding however that each approach has its limitations. The purpose of this article is to explore common method variance bias as…

  7. Analysis of Variance: What Is Your Statistical Software Actually Doing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jian; Lomax, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    Users assume statistical software packages produce accurate results. In this article, the authors systematically examined Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) and Statistical Analysis System (SAS) for 3 analysis of variance (ANOVA) designs, mixed-effects ANOVA, fixed-effects analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), and nested ANOVA. For each…

  8. 40 CFR 52.1390 - Missoula variance provision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Missoula variance provision. 52.1390 Section 52.1390 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... from any requirement of an applicable implementation plan with respect to a stationary source....

  9. Comparison of Turbulent Thermal Diffusivity and Scalar Variance Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, Dennis A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, several variable turbulent Prandtl number formulations are examined for boundary layers, pipe flow, and axisymmetric jets. The model formulations include simple algebraic relations between the thermal diffusivity and turbulent viscosity as well as more complex models that solve transport equations for the thermal variance and its dissipation rate. Results are compared with available data for wall heat transfer and profile measurements of mean temperature, the root-mean-square (RMS) fluctuating temperature, turbulent heat flux and turbulent Prandtl number. For wall-bounded problems, the algebraic models are found to best predict the rise in turbulent Prandtl number near the wall as well as the log-layer temperature profile, while the thermal variance models provide a good representation of the RMS temperature fluctuations. In jet flows, the algebraic models provide no benefit over a constant turbulent Prandtl number approach. Application of the thermal variance models finds that some significantly overpredict the temperature variance in the plume and most underpredict the thermal growth rate of the jet. The models yield very similar fluctuating temperature intensities in jets from straight pipes and smooth contraction nozzles, in contrast to data that indicate the latter should have noticeably higher values. For the particular low subsonic heated jet cases examined, changes in the turbulent Prandtl number had no effect on the centerline velocity decay.

  10. Intuitive Analysis of Variance-- A Formative Assessment Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trumpower, David

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an assessment activity that can show students how much they intuitively understand about statistics, but also alert them to common misunderstandings. How the activity can be used formatively to help improve students' conceptual understanding of analysis of variance is discussed. (Contains 1 figure and 1 table.)

  11. Unbiased Estimates of Variance Components with Bootstrap Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    This article provides general procedures for obtaining unbiased estimates of variance components for any random-model balanced design under any bootstrap sampling plan, with the focus on designs of the type typically used in generalizability theory. The results reported here are particularly helpful when the bootstrap is used to estimate standard…

  12. 40 CFR 124.64 - Appeals of variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 124.64 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS PROCEDURES...) When a State issues a permit on which EPA has made a variance decision, separate appeals of the State... issues in both proceedings, the Regional Administrator will decide, in consultation with State...

  13. Exploratory Multivariate Analysis of Variance: Contrasts and Variables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barcikowski, Robert S.; Elliott, Ronald S.

    The contribution of individual variables to overall multivariate significance in a multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) is investigated using a combination of canonical discriminant analysis and Roy-Bose simultaneous confidence intervals. Difficulties with this procedure are discussed, and its advantages are illustrated using examples based…

  14. 20 CFR 901.40 - Proof; variance; amendment of pleadings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Proof; variance; amendment of pleadings. 901.40 Section 901.40 Employees' Benefits JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE PERFORMANCE OF ACTUARIAL SERVICES UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF...

  15. 40 CFR 142.43 - Disposition of a variance request.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....43 Section 142.43 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION Variances Issued by the... issue a denial. Such notice shall include a statement of reasons for the proposed denial, and...

  16. 36 CFR 30.5 - Variances, exceptions, and use permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... OF THE INTERIOR WHISKEYTOWN-SHASTA-TRINITY NATIONAL RECREATION AREA: ZONING STANDARDS FOR WHISKEYTOWN UNIT § 30.5 Variances, exceptions, and use permits. (a) Zoning ordinances or amendments thereto, for the zoning districts comprising the Whiskeytown Unit of the Whiskeytown-Shasta-Trinity...

  17. Infinite variance in fermion quantum Monte Carlo calculations.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hao; Zhang, Shiwei

    2016-03-01

    For important classes of many-fermion problems, quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods allow exact calculations of ground-state and finite-temperature properties without the sign problem. The list spans condensed matter, nuclear physics, and high-energy physics, including the half-filled repulsive Hubbard model, the spin-balanced atomic Fermi gas, and lattice quantum chromodynamics calculations at zero density with Wilson Fermions, and is growing rapidly as a number of problems have been discovered recently to be free of the sign problem. In these situations, QMC calculations are relied on to provide definitive answers. Their results are instrumental to our ability to understand and compute properties in fundamental models important to multiple subareas in quantum physics. It is shown, however, that the most commonly employed algorithms in such situations have an infinite variance problem. A diverging variance causes the estimated Monte Carlo statistical error bar to be incorrect, which can render the results of the calculation unreliable or meaningless. We discuss how to identify the infinite variance problem. An approach is then proposed to solve the problem. The solution does not require major modifications to standard algorithms, adding a "bridge link" to the imaginary-time path integral. The general idea is applicable to a variety of situations where the infinite variance problem may be present. Illustrative results are presented for the ground state of the Hubbard model at half-filling.

  18. 44 CFR 60.6 - Variances and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... pattern inconsistent with the objectives of sound flood plain management, the Federal Insurance... (i) a showing of good and sufficient cause, (ii) a determination that failure to grant the variance... public expense, create nuisances, cause fraud on or victimization of the public, or conflict...

  19. 44 CFR 60.6 - Variances and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... pattern inconsistent with the objectives of sound flood plain management, the Federal Insurance... (i) a showing of good and sufficient cause, (ii) a determination that failure to grant the variance... public expense, create nuisances, cause fraud on or victimization of the public, or conflict...

  20. 29 CFR 1905.11 - Variances and other relief under section 6(d).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR RULES OF PRACTICE FOR VARIANCES, LIMITATIONS, VARIATIONS, TOLERANCES, AND..., Limitations, Variations, Tolerances, Exemptions and Other Relief § 1905.11 Variances and other relief...

  1. Gravity Wave Variances and Propagation Derived from AIRS Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Jie; Wu, Dong L.; Eckermann, S. D.

    2012-01-01

    As the first gravity wave (GW) climatology study using nadir-viewing infrared sounders, 50 Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiance channels are selected to estimate GW variances at pressure levels between 2-100 hPa. The GW variance for each scan in the cross-track direction is derived from radiance perturbations in the scan, independently of adjacent scans along the orbit. Since the scanning swaths are perpendicular to the satellite orbits, which are inclined meridionally at most latitudes, the zonal component of GW propagation can be inferred by differencing the variances derived between the westmost and the eastmost viewing angles. Consistent with previous GW studies using various satellite instruments, monthly mean AIRS variance shows large enhancements over meridionally oriented mountain ranges as well as some islands at winter hemisphere high latitudes. Enhanced wave activities are also found above tropical deep convective regions. GWs prefer to propagate westward above mountain ranges, and eastward above deep convection. AIRS 90 field-of-views (FOVs), ranging from +48 deg. to -48 deg. off nadir, can detect large-amplitude GWs with a phase velocity propagating preferentially at steep angles (e.g., those from orographic and convective sources). The annual cycle dominates the GW variances and the preferred propagation directions for all latitudes. Indication of a weak two-year variation in the tropics is found, which is presumably related to the Quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO). AIRS geometry makes its out-tracks capable of detecting GWs with vertical wavelengths substantially shorter than the thickness of instrument weighting functions. The novel discovery of AIRS capability of observing shallow inertia GWs will expand the potential of satellite GW remote sensing and provide further constraints on the GW drag parameterization schemes in the general circulation models (GCMs).

  2. Hydrograph variances over different timescales in hydropower production networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zmijewski, Nicholas; Wörman, Anders

    2016-08-01

    The operation of water reservoirs involves a spectrum of timescales based on the distribution of stream flow travel times between reservoirs, as well as the technical, environmental, and social constraints imposed on the operation. In this research, a hydrodynamically based description of the flow between hydropower stations was implemented to study the relative importance of wave diffusion on the spectrum of hydrograph variance in a regulated watershed. Using spectral decomposition of the effluence hydrograph of a watershed, an exact expression of the variance in the outflow response was derived, as a function of the trends of hydraulic and geomorphologic dispersion and management of production and reservoirs. We show that the power spectra of involved time-series follow nearly fractal patterns, which facilitates examination of the relative importance of wave diffusion and possible changes in production demand on the outflow spectrum. The exact spectral solution can also identify statistical bounds of future demand patterns due to limitations in storage capacity. The impact of the hydraulic description of the stream flow on the reservoir discharge was examined for a given power demand in River Dalälven, Sweden, as function of a stream flow Peclet number. The regulation of hydropower production on the River Dalälven generally increased the short-term variance in the effluence hydrograph, whereas wave diffusion decreased the short-term variance over periods of <1 week, depending on the Peclet number (Pe) of the stream reach. This implies that flow variance becomes more erratic (closer to white noise) as a result of current production objectives.

  3. The link between diffusion MRI and tumor heterogeneity: Mapping cell eccentricity and density by diffusional variance decomposition (DIVIDE).

    PubMed

    Szczepankiewicz, Filip; van Westen, Danielle; Englund, Elisabet; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Lätt, Jimmy; Sundgren, Pia C; Nilsson, Markus

    2016-11-15

    The structural heterogeneity of tumor tissue can be probed by diffusion MRI (dMRI) in terms of the variance of apparent diffusivities within a voxel. However, the link between the diffusional variance and the tissue heterogeneity is not well-established. To investigate this link we test the hypothesis that diffusional variance, caused by microscopic anisotropy and isotropic heterogeneity, is associated with variable cell eccentricity and cell density in brain tumors. We performed dMRI using a novel encoding scheme for diffusional variance decomposition (DIVIDE) in 7 meningiomas and 8 gliomas prior to surgery. The diffusional variance was quantified from dMRI in terms of the total mean kurtosis (MKT), and DIVIDE was used to decompose MKT into components caused by microscopic anisotropy (MKA) and isotropic heterogeneity (MKI). Diffusion anisotropy was evaluated in terms of the fractional anisotropy (FA) and microscopic fractional anisotropy (μFA). Quantitative microscopy was performed on the excised tumor tissue, where structural anisotropy and cell density were quantified by structure tensor analysis and cell nuclei segmentation, respectively. In order to validate the DIVIDE parameters they were correlated to the corresponding parameters derived from microscopy. We found an excellent agreement between the DIVIDE parameters and corresponding microscopy parameters; MKA correlated with cell eccentricity (r=0.95, p<10(-7)) and MKI with the cell density variance (r=0.83, p<10(-3)). The diffusion anisotropy correlated with structure tensor anisotropy on the voxel-scale (FA, r=0.80, p<10(-3)) and microscopic scale (μFA, r=0.93, p<10(-6)). A multiple regression analysis showed that the conventional MKT parameter reflects both variable cell eccentricity and cell density, and therefore lacks specificity in terms of microstructure characteristics. However, specificity was obtained by decomposing the two contributions; MKA was associated only to cell eccentricity, and MKI

  4. Kissing-loop interaction between 5' and 3' ends of tick-borne Langat virus genome 'bridges the gap' between mosquito- and tick-borne flaviviruses in mechanisms of viral RNA cyclization: applications for virus attenuation and vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Tsetsarkin, Konstantin A; Liu, Guangping; Shen, Kui; Pletnev, Alexander G

    2016-04-20

    Insertion of microRNA target sequences into the flavivirus genome results in selective tissue-specific attenuation and host-range restriction of live attenuated vaccine viruses. However, previous strategies for miRNA-targeting did not incorporate a mechanism to prevent target elimination under miRNA-mediated selective pressure, restricting their use in vaccine development. To overcome this limitation, we developed a new approach for miRNA-targeting of tick-borne flavivirus (Langat virus, LGTV) in the duplicated capsid gene region (DCGR). Genetic stability of viruses with DCGR was ensured by the presence of multiple cis-acting elements within the N-terminal capsid coding region, including the stem-loop structure (5'SL6) at the 3' end of the promoter. We found that the 5'SL6 functions as a structural scaffold for the conserved hexanucleotide motif at its tip and engages in a complementary interaction with the region present in the 3' NCR to enhance viral RNA replication. The resulting kissing-loop interaction, common in tick-borne flaviviruses, supports a single pair of cyclization elements (CYC) and functions as a homolog of the second pair of CYC that is present in the majority of mosquito-borne flaviviruses. Placing miRNA targets into the DCGR results in superior attenuation of LGTV in the CNS and does not interfere with development of protective immunity in immunized mice.

  5. Discriminating between cultivars and treatments of broccoli using mass spectral fingerprinting and analysis of variance-principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Luthria, Devanand L; Lin, Long-Ze; Robbins, Rebecca J; Finley, John W; Banuelos, Gary S; Harnly, James M

    2008-11-12

    Metabolite fingerprints, obtained with direct injection mass spectrometry (MS) with both positive and negative ionization, were used with analysis of variance-principal components analysis (ANOVA-PCA) to discriminate between cultivars and growing treatments of broccoli. The sample set consisted of two cultivars of broccoli, Majestic and Legacy, the first grown with four different levels of Se and the second grown organically and conventionally with two rates of irrigation. Chemical composition differences in the two cultivars and seven treatments produced patterns that were visually and statistically distinguishable using ANOVA-PCA. PCA loadings allowed identification of the molecular and fragment ions that provided the most significant chemical differences. A standardized profiling method for phenolic compounds showed that important discriminating ions were not phenolic compounds. The elution times of the discriminating ions and previous results suggest that they were common sugars and organic acids. ANOVA calculations of the positive and negative ionization MS fingerprints showed that 33% of the variance came from the cultivar, 59% from the growing treatment, and 8% from analytical uncertainty. Although the positive and negative ionization fingerprints differed significantly, there was no difference in the distribution of variance. High variance of individual masses with cultivars or growing treatment was correlated with high PCA loadings. The ANOVA data suggest that only variables with high variance for analytical uncertainty should be deleted. All other variables represent discriminating masses that allow separation of the samples with respect to cultivar and treatment.

  6. Colour ornamentation in the blue tit: quantitative genetic (co)variances across sexes

    PubMed Central

    Charmantier, A; Wolak, M E; Grégoire, A; Fargevieille, A; Doutrelant, C

    2017-01-01

    Although secondary sexual traits are commonly more developed in males than females, in many animal species females also display elaborate ornaments or weaponry. Indirect selection on correlated traits in males and/or direct sexual or social selection in females are hypothesized to drive the evolution and maintenance of female ornaments. Yet, the relative roles of these evolutionary processes remain unidentified, because little is known about the genetic correlation that might exist between the ornaments of both sexes, and few estimates of sex-specific autosomal or sex-linked genetic variances are available. In this study, we used two wild blue tit populations with 9 years of measurements on two colour ornaments: one structurally based (blue crown) and one carotenoid based (yellow chest). We found significant autosomal heritability for the chromatic part of the structurally based colouration in both sexes, whereas carotenoid chroma was heritable only in males, and the achromatic part of both colour patches was mostly non heritable. Power limitations, which are probably common among most data sets collected so far in wild populations, prevented estimation of sex-linked genetic variance. Bivariate analyses revealed very strong cross-sex genetic correlations in all heritable traits, although the strength of these correlations was not related to the level of sexual dimorphism. In total, our results suggest that males and females share a majority of their genetic variation underlying colour ornamentation, and hence the evolution of these sex-specific traits may depend greatly on correlated responses to selection in the opposite sex. PMID:27577691

  7. Lack of identification of Flaviviruses in oral and cloacal swabs from long- and short-distance migratory birds in Trentino-Alto Adige (North-eastern Italy)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background West Nile virus (WNV) and Usutu virus (USUV), both belonging to the genus Flavivirus, are emerging in Italy as important human and animal pathogens. Migratory birds are involved in the spread of Flaviviruses over long distances, particularly from Africa to Europe. Once introduced, these viruses can be further be dispersed by short-distance migratory and resident bird species. Thus far, there is still a considerable knowledge gap on the role played by different bird species in the ecology and transmission mechanisms of these viruses. The Region of Trentino-Alto Adige (north-eastern Italy) is located on the migratory route of many of the short- and long-distance migratory birds that cross the Alps, connecting northern Europe and western Asia with southern Europe and Africa. Until now, only a silent circulation of WNV and USUV within the territory of the Province of Trento has been confirmed by serological screening, whilst no cases of infected humans or animals have so far been reported. However, continuous spillover events of both viruses have been reported in neighbouring Regions. The aim of this study was to monitor the circulation of WNV and USUV in Trentino-Alto Adige, in order to detect if active virus shedding occurs in migratory birds captured during their seasonal movements and to evaluate the role that different bird species could play in the spreading of these viruses. Methods We carried out a biomolecular survey on oral and cloacal swabs collected from migratory birds during seasonal migrations. Birds belonging to 18 transaharian and 21 intrapaleartic species were examined during spring (n = 176) and autumn (n = 146), and were tested using a generic nested-PCR. Results All samples tested negative for Flaviviruses. The possible causes of unapparent shedding, along with ecological and epidemiological implications are discussed. Conclusions The lack of detection of active virus shedding in these bird species does not exclude the

  8. Variance in prey abundance influences time budgets of breeding seabirds: Evidence from pigeon guillemots Cepphus columba

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Litzow, Michael A.; Piatt, J.F.

    2003-01-01

    We use data on pigeon guillemots Cepphus columba to test the hypothesis that discretionary time in breeding seabirds is correlated with variance in prey abundance. We measured the amount of time that guillemots spent at the colony before delivering fish to chicks ("resting time") in relation to fish abundance as measured by beach seines and bottom trawls. Radio telemetry showed that resting time was inversely correlated with time spent diving for fish during foraging trips (r = -0.95). Pigeon guillemots fed their chicks either Pacific sand lance Ammodytes hexapterus, a schooling midwater fish, which exhibited high interannual variance in abundance (CV = 181%), or a variety of non-schooling demersal fishes, which were less variable in abundance (average CV = 111%). Average resting times were 46% higher at colonies where schooling prey dominated the diet. Individuals at these colonies reduced resting times 32% during years of low food abundance, but did not reduce meal delivery rates. In contrast, individuals feeding on non-schooling fishes did not reduce resting times during low food years, but did reduce meal delivery rates by 27%. Interannual variance in resting times was greater for the schooling group than for the non-schooling group. We conclude from these differences that time allocation in pigeon guillemots is more flexible when variable schooling prey dominate diets. Resting times were also 27% lower for individuals feeding two-chick rather than one-chick broods. The combined effects of diet and brood size on adult time budgets may help to explain higher rates of brood reduction for pigeon guillemot chicks fed non-schooling fishes.

  9. Fidelity between Gaussian mixed states with quantum state quadrature variances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai-Long, Zhang; Chun, Zhou; Jian-Hong, Shi; Wan-Su, Bao

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, from the original definition of fidelity in a pure state, we first give a well-defined expansion fidelity between two Gaussian mixed states. It is related to the variances of output and input states in quantum information processing. It is convenient to quantify the quantum teleportation (quantum clone) experiment since the variances of the input (output) state are measurable. Furthermore, we also give a conclusion that the fidelity of a pure input state is smaller than the fidelity of a mixed input state in the same quantum information processing. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB338002) and the Foundation of Science and Technology on Information Assurance Laboratory (Grant No. KJ-14-001).

  10. Variable variance Preisach model for multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, A. F.; Gonzalez-Fuentes, C.; Morales, R.; Ross, C. A.; Dumas, R.; Åkerman, J.; Garcia, C.

    2016-08-01

    We present a variable variance Preisach model that fully accounts for the different magnetization processes of a multilayer structure with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy by adjusting the evolution of the interaction variance as the magnetization changes. We successfully compare in a quantitative manner the results obtained with this model to experimental hysteresis loops of several [CoFeB/Pd ] n multilayers. The effect of the number of repetitions and the thicknesses of the CoFeB and Pd layers on the magnetization reversal of the multilayer structure is studied, and it is found that many of the observed phenomena can be attributed to an increase of the magnetostatic interactions and subsequent decrease of the size of the magnetic domains. Increasing the CoFeB thickness leads to the disappearance of the perpendicular anisotropy, and such a minimum thickness of the Pd layer is necessary to achieve an out-of-plane magnetization.

  11. Variance reduction methods applied to deep-penetration problems

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, S.N.

    1984-01-01

    All deep-penetration Monte Carlo calculations require variance reduction methods. Before beginning with a detailed approach to these methods, several general comments concerning deep-penetration calculations by Monte Carlo, the associated variance reduction, and the similarities and differences of these with regard to non-deep-penetration problems will be addressed. The experienced practitioner of Monte Carlo methods will easily find exceptions to any of these generalities, but it is felt that these comments will aid the novice in understanding some of the basic ideas and nomenclature. Also, from a practical point of view, the discussions and developments presented are oriented toward use of the computer codes which are presented in segments of this Monte Carlo course.

  12. Compounding approach for univariate time series with nonstationary variances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Rudi; Barkhofen, Sonja; Guhr, Thomas; Stöckmann, Hans-Jürgen; Kuhl, Ulrich

    2015-12-01

    A defining feature of nonstationary systems is the time dependence of their statistical parameters. Measured time series may exhibit Gaussian statistics on short time horizons, due to the central limit theorem. The sample statistics for long time horizons, however, averages over the time-dependent variances. To model the long-term statistical behavior, we compound the local distribution with the distribution of its parameters. Here, we consider two concrete, but diverse, examples of such nonstationary systems: the turbulent air flow of a fan and a time series of foreign exchange rates. Our main focus is to empirically determine the appropriate parameter distribution for the compounding approach. To this end, we extract the relevant time scales by decomposing the time signals into windows and determine the distribution function of the thus obtained local variances.

  13. Analysis of variance in spectroscopic imaging data from human tissues.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Jin Tae; Reddy, Rohith; Sinha, Saurabh; Bhargava, Rohit

    2012-01-17

    The analysis of cell types and disease using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging is promising. The approach lacks an appreciation of the limits of performance for the technology, however, which limits both researcher efforts in improving the approach and acceptance by practitioners. One factor limiting performance is the variance in data arising from biological diversity, measurement noise or from other sources. Here we identify the sources of variation by first employing a high throughout sampling platform of tissue microarrays (TMAs) to record a sufficiently large and diverse set data. Next, a comprehensive set of analysis of variance (ANOVA) models is employed to analyze the data. Estimating the portions of explained variation, we quantify the primary sources of variation, find the most discriminating spectral metrics, and recognize the aspects of the technology to improve. The study provides a framework for the development of protocols for clinical translation and provides guidelines to design statistically valid studies in the spectroscopic analysis of tissue.

  14. Climate variance influence on the non-stationary plankton dynamics.

    PubMed

    Molinero, Juan Carlos; Reygondeau, Gabriel; Bonnet, Delphine

    2013-08-01

    We examined plankton responses to climate variance by using high temporal resolution data from 1988 to 2007 in the Western English Channel. Climate variability modified both the magnitude and length of the seasonal signal of sea surface temperature, as well as the timing and depth of the thermocline. These changes permeated the pelagic system yielding conspicuous modifications in the phenology of autotroph communities and zooplankton. The climate variance envelope, thus far little considered in climate-plankton studies, is closely coupled with the non-stationary dynamics of plankton, and sheds light on impending ecological shifts and plankton structural changes. Our study calls for the integration of the non-stationary relationship between climate and plankton in prognostic models on the productivity of marine ecosystems.

  15. A surface layer variance heat budget for ENSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucharel, Julien; Timmermann, Axel; Santoso, Agus; England, Matthew H.; Jin, Fei-Fei; Balmaseda, Magdalena A.

    2015-05-01

    Characteristics of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), such as frequency, propagation, spatial extent, and amplitude, strongly depend on the climatological background state of the tropical Pacific. Multidecadal changes in the ocean mean state are hence likely to modulate ENSO properties. To better link background state variations with low-frequency amplitude changes of ENSO, we develop a diagnostic framework that determines locally the contributions of different physical feedback terms on the ocean surface temperature variance. Our analysis shows that multidecadal changes of ENSO variance originate from the delicate balance between the background-state-dependent positive thermocline feedback and the atmospheric damping of sea surface temperatures anomalies. The role of higher-order processes and atmospheric and oceanic nonlinearities is also discussed. The diagnostic tool developed here can be easily applied to other tropical ocean areas and climate phenomena.

  16. Methods for variance reduction in Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bixler, Joel N.; Hokr, Brett H.; Winblad, Aidan; Elpers, Gabriel; Zollars, Byron; Thomas, Robert J.

    2016-03-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are widely considered to be the gold standard for studying the propagation of light in turbid media. However, due to the probabilistic nature of these simulations, large numbers of photons are often required in order to generate relevant results. Here, we present methods for reduction in the variance of dose distribution in a computational volume. Dose distribution is computed via tracing of a large number of rays, and tracking the absorption and scattering of the rays within discrete voxels that comprise the volume. Variance reduction is shown here using quasi-random sampling, interaction forcing for weakly scattering media, and dose smoothing via bi-lateral filtering. These methods, along with the corresponding performance enhancements are detailed here.

  17. Variance reduction for Fokker–Planck based particle Monte Carlo schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Gorji, M. Hossein Andric, Nemanja; Jenny, Patrick

    2015-08-15

    Recently, Fokker–Planck based particle Monte Carlo schemes have been proposed and evaluated for simulations of rarefied gas flows [1–3]. In this paper, the variance reduction for particle Monte Carlo simulations based on the Fokker–Planck model is considered. First, deviational based schemes were derived and reviewed, and it is shown that these deviational methods are not appropriate for practical Fokker–Planck based rarefied gas flow simulations. This is due to the fact that the deviational schemes considered in this study lead either to instabilities in the case of two-weight methods or to large statistical errors if the direct sampling method is applied. Motivated by this conclusion, we developed a novel scheme based on correlated stochastic processes. The main idea here is to synthesize an additional stochastic process with a known solution, which is simultaneously solved together with the main one. By correlating the two processes, the statistical errors can dramatically be reduced; especially for low Mach numbers. To assess the methods, homogeneous relaxation, planar Couette and lid-driven cavity flows were considered. For these test cases, it could be demonstrated that variance reduction based on parallel processes is very robust and effective.

  18. Intracellular interference of tick-borne flavivirus infection by using a single-chain antibody fragment delivered by recombinant Sindbis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, W; Venugopal, K; Gould, E A

    1995-01-01

    A single-chain antibody fragment that identifies a neutralizing epitope on the envelope protein of louping ill and some other tick-borne flaviviruses was previously expressed in soluble form from bacteria and shown to be functionally active in vitro. To see whether or not the single-chain antibody could bind and inactivate infectious virus in vivo, we have used recombinant Sindbis virus as a delivery vehicle for intracellular expression of the antibody fragment. The variable genes and interchain linker encoding the single-chain antibody were cloned into a double subgenomic Sindbis virus expression vector to generate recombinant Sindbis virus. Infection with this recombinant Sindbis virus provided high-level cytoplasmic expression of the antibody fragment in mammalian cells. We demonstrate (i) that the antibody fragment was antigen binding and (ii) that louping ill virus infectivity was significantly reduced in the presence of intracellular antibody expressed by the superinfecting recombinant Sindbis virus. PMID:7815482

  19. A Live Attenuated Chimeric West Nile Virus Vaccine, rWN/DEN4Δ30, Is Well Tolerated and Immunogenic in Flavivirus-Naive Older Adult Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Kristen K; Whitehead, Stephen S; Kirkpatrick, Beth D; Grier, Palmtama L; Jarvis, Adrienne; Kenney, Heather; Carmolli, Marya P; Reynolds, Cynthia; Tibery, Cecilia M; Lovchik, Janece; Janiak, Anna; Luke, Catherine J; Durbin, Anna P; Pletnev, Alexander G

    2017-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a major cause of mosquito-borne illness in the United States. Human disease ranges from mild febrile illness to severe fatal neurologic infection. Adults aged >60 years are more susceptible to neuroinvasive disease accompanied by a high mortality rate or long-lasting neurologic sequelae. A chimeric live attenuated West Nile virus vaccine, rWN/DEN4Δ30, was shown to be safe and immunogenic in healthy adults aged 18-50 years. This study evaluated rWN/DEN4Δ30 in flavivirus-naive adults aged 50-65 years and found it to be safe and immunogenic. Outbreaks of WNV infection tend to be unpredictable, and a safe and effective vaccine will be an important public health tool.

  20. Analysis of Variance in the Modern Design of Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a tutorial introduction to the analysis of variance (ANOVA), intended as a reference for aerospace researchers who are being introduced to the analytical methods of the Modern Design of Experiments (MDOE), or who may have other opportunities to apply this method. One-way and two-way fixed-effects ANOVA, as well as random effects ANOVA, are illustrated in practical terms that will be familiar to most practicing aerospace researchers.

  1. The Third-Difference Approach to Modified Allan Variance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    This study gives strategies for estimating the modified Allan variance (mvar) and formulas for computing the equivalent degrees of freedom (edf) of the estimators. A third-difference formulation of mvar leads to a tractable formula for edf in the presence of power-law phase noise. The effect of estimation stride on edf is tabulated. First-degree rational-function approximations for edf are derived.

  2. Evaluation of climate modeling factors impacting the variance of streamflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Aamery, N.; Fox, J. F.; Snyder, M.

    2016-11-01

    The present contribution quantifies the relative importance of climate modeling factors and chosen response variables upon controlling the variance of streamflow forecasted with global climate model (GCM) projections, which has not been attempted in previous literature to our knowledge. We designed an experiment that varied climate modeling factors, including GCM type, project phase, emission scenario, downscaling method, and bias correction. The streamflow response variable was also varied and included forecasted streamflow and difference in forecast and hindcast streamflow predictions. GCM results and the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) were used to predict streamflow for a wet, temperate watershed in central Kentucky USA. After calibrating the streamflow model, 112 climate realizations were simulated within the streamflow model and then analyzed on a monthly basis using analysis of variance. Analysis of variance results indicate that the difference in forecast and hindcast streamflow predictions is a function of GCM type, climate model project phase, and downscaling approach. The prediction of forecasted streamflow is a function of GCM type, project phase, downscaling method, emission scenario, and bias correction method. The results indicate the relative importance of the five climate modeling factors when designing streamflow prediction ensembles and quantify the reduction in uncertainty associated with coupling the climate results with the hydrologic model when subtracting the hindcast simulations. Thereafter, analysis of streamflow prediction ensembles with different numbers of realizations show that use of all available realizations is unneeded for the study system, so long as the ensemble design is well balanced. After accounting for the factors controlling streamflow variance, results show that predicted average monthly change in streamflow tends to follow precipitation changes and result in a net increase in the average annual precipitation and

  3. Stochastic variance models in discrete time with feedforward neural networks.

    PubMed

    Andoh, Charles

    2009-07-01

    The study overcomes the estimation difficulty in stochastic variance models for discrete financial time series with feedforward neural networks. The volatility function is estimated semiparametrically. The model is used to estimate market risk, taking into account not only the time series of interest but extra information on the market. As an application, some stock prices series are studied and compared with the nonlinear ARX-ARCHX model.

  4. Quantifying Systemic Risk by Solutions of the Mean-Variance Risk Model

    PubMed Central

    Morgenstern, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    The world is still recovering from the financial crisis peaking in September 2008. The triggering event was the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers. To detect such turmoils, one can investigate the time-dependent behaviour of correlations between assets or indices. These cross-correlations have been connected to the systemic risks within markets by several studies in the aftermath of this crisis. We study 37 different US indices which cover almost all aspects of the US economy and show that monitoring an average investor’s behaviour can be used to quantify times of increased risk. In this paper the overall investing strategy is approximated by the ground-states of the mean-variance model along the efficient frontier bound to real world constraints. Changes in the behaviour of the average investor is utlilized as a early warning sign. PMID:27351482

  5. The Milieu Intérieur study - an integrative approach for study of human immunological variance.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Stéphanie; Rouilly, Vincent; Patin, Etienne; Alanio, Cécile; Dubois, Annick; Delval, Cécile; Marquier, Louis-Guillaume; Fauchoux, Nicolas; Sayegrih, Seloua; Vray, Muriel; Duffy, Darragh; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Albert, Matthew L

    2015-04-01

    The Milieu Intérieur Consortium has established a 1000-person healthy population-based study (stratified according to sex and age), creating an unparalleled opportunity for assessing the determinants of human immunologic variance. Herein, we define the criteria utilized for participant enrollment, and highlight the key data that were collected for correlative studies. In this report, we analyzed biological correlates of sex, age, smoking-habits, metabolic score and CMV infection. We characterized and identified unique risk factors among healthy donors, as compared to studies that have focused on the general population or disease cohorts. Finally, we highlight sex-bias in the thresholds used for metabolic score determination and recommend a deeper examination of current guidelines. In sum, our clinical design, standardized sample collection strategies, and epidemiological data analyses have established the foundation for defining variability within human immune responses.

  6. Modality-Driven Classification and Visualization of Ensemble Variance

    SciTech Connect

    Bensema, Kevin; Gosink, Luke; Obermaier, Harald; Joy, Kenneth I.

    2016-10-01

    Advances in computational power now enable domain scientists to address conceptual and parametric uncertainty by running simulations multiple times in order to sufficiently sample the uncertain input space. While this approach helps address conceptual and parametric uncertainties, the ensemble datasets produced by this technique present a special challenge to visualization researchers as the ensemble dataset records a distribution of possible values for each location in the domain. Contemporary visualization approaches that rely solely on summary statistics (e.g., mean and variance) cannot convey the detailed information encoded in ensemble distributions that are paramount to ensemble analysis; summary statistics provide no information about modality classification and modality persistence. To address this problem, we propose a novel technique that classifies high-variance locations based on the modality of the distribution of ensemble predictions. Additionally, we develop a set of confidence metrics to inform the end-user of the quality of fit between the distribution at a given location and its assigned class. We apply a similar method to time-varying ensembles to illustrate the relationship between peak variance and bimodal or multimodal behavior. These classification schemes enable a deeper understanding of the behavior of the ensemble members by distinguishing between distributions that can be described by a single tendency and distributions which reflect divergent trends in the ensemble.

  7. Relationship between Allan variances and Kalman Filter parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandierendonck, A. J.; Mcgraw, J. B.; Brown, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    A relationship was constructed between the Allan variance parameters (H sub z, H sub 1, H sub 0, H sub -1 and H sub -2) and a Kalman Filter model that would be used to estimate and predict clock phase, frequency and frequency drift. To start with the meaning of those Allan Variance parameters and how they are arrived at for a given frequency source is reviewed. Although a subset of these parameters is arrived at by measuring phase as a function of time rather than as a spectral density, they all represent phase noise spectral density coefficients, though not necessarily that of a rational spectral density. The phase noise spectral density is then transformed into a time domain covariance model which can then be used to derive the Kalman Filter model parameters. Simulation results of that covariance model are presented and compared to clock uncertainties predicted by Allan variance parameters. A two state Kalman Filter model is then derived and the significance of each state is explained.

  8. Reduced Variance for Material Sources in Implicit Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Urbatsch, Todd J.

    2012-06-25

    Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC), a time-implicit method due to Fleck and Cummings, is used for simulating supernovae and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) systems where x-rays tightly and nonlinearly interact with hot material. The IMC algorithm represents absorption and emission within a timestep as an effective scatter. Similarly, the IMC time-implicitness splits off a portion of a material source directly into the radiation field. We have found that some of our variance reduction and particle management schemes will allow large variances in the presence of small, but important, material sources, as in the case of ICF hot electron preheat sources. We propose a modification of our implementation of the IMC method in the Jayenne IMC Project. Instead of battling the sampling issues associated with a small source, we bypass the IMC implicitness altogether and simply deterministically update the material state with the material source if the temperature of the spatial cell is below a user-specified cutoff. We describe the modified method and present results on a test problem that show the elimination of variance for small sources.

  9. Sample variance of non-Gaussian sky distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiaochun

    1995-02-01

    Non-Gaussian distributions of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anistropics have been proposed to reconcile the discrepancies between different experiments at half-degree scales (Coulson et al. 1994). Each experiment probes a different part of the sky, furthermore, sky coverage is very small, hence the sample variance of each experiment can be large, especially when the sky signal is non-Gaussian. We model the degree-scale CMB sky as a chin exp 2 field with n-degress of freedom and show that the sample variance is enhanced over that a Gaussian distribution by a factor of (n + 6)/n. The sample variance for different experiments are calculated, both for Gaussian and non-Gaussian distributions. We also show that if the distribution is highly non-Gaussian (n less than or approximately = 4) at half-degree scales, than the non-Gaussian signature of the CMB could be detected in the FIRS map, though probably not in the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) map.

  10. Analysis of micrometeorological data using a two sample variance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werle, Peter; Falge, Eva

    2010-05-01

    In ecosystem research infrared gas analyzers are increasingly used to measure fluxes of carbon dioxide, water vapour, methane, nitrous oxide and even stable carbon isotopes. As these complex measurement devices under field conditions cannot be considered as absolutely stable, drift characterisation is an issue to distinguish between atmospheric data and sensor drift. In this paper the concept of the two sample variance is utilized in analogy to previous stability investigations to characterize the stationarity of both, spectroscopic measurements of concentration time series and micrometeorological data in the time domain, which is a prerequisite for covariance calculations. As an example, the method is applied to assess the time constant for detrending of time series data and the optimum trace gas flux integration time. The method described here provides information similar to existing characterizations as the ogive analysis, the normalized error variance of the second order moment and the spectral characteristics of turbulence in the inertial subrange. The method is easy to implement and, therefore, well suited to assist as a useful tool for a routine data quality check for both, new practitioners and experts in the field. Werle, P., Time domain characterization of micrometeorological data based on a two sample variance. Agric. Forest Meteorol. (2010), doi:10.1016/j.agrformet.2009.12.007

  11. Dynamic Programming Using Polar Variance for Image Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Rosado-Toro, Jose A; Altbach, Maria I; Rodriguez, Jeffrey J

    2016-10-06

    When using polar dynamic programming (PDP) for image segmentation, the object size is one of the main features used. This is because if size is left unconstrained the final segmentation may include high-gradient regions that are not associated with the object. In this paper, we propose a new feature, polar variance, which allows the algorithm to segment objects of different sizes without the need for training data. The polar variance is the variance in a polar region between a user-selected origin and a pixel we want to analyze. We also incorporate a new technique that allows PDP to segment complex shapes by finding low-gradient regions and growing them. The experimental analysis consisted on comparing our technique with different active contour segmentation techniques on a series of tests. The tests consisted on robustness to additive Gaussian noise, segmentation accuracy with different grayscale images and finally robustness to algorithm-specific parameters. Experimental results show that our technique performs favorably when compared to other segmentation techniques.

  12. 42 CFR 488.64 - Remote facility variances for utilization review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... applicable. (c) The request for variance shall document the requesting facility's inability to meet the... the previous six months; (4) As relevant to the request, the names of all physicians on the active... variance. (h) The Secretary, in granting a variance, will specify the period for which the variance...

  13. Prevalence of antibodies to alphaviruses and flaviviruses in free-ranging game animals and nonhuman primates in the greater Congo basin.

    PubMed

    Kading, Rebekah C; Borland, Erin M; Cranfield, Mike; Powers, Ann M

    2013-07-01

    Vector-borne and zoonotic pathogens have comprised a significant proportion of the emerging infectious diseases in humans in recent decades. The role of many wildlife species as reservoirs for arthropod-borne viral pathogens is poorly understood. We investigated the exposure history of various African wildlife species from the Congo basin to mosquito-borne flaviviruses and alphaviruses by testing archived serum samples. Sera from 24 African forest buffalo (Syncerus caffer nanus), 34 African elephants (Loxodonta africana), 40 duikers (Cephalophus and Philantomba spp.), 25 mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx), 32 mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei), five Grauer's gorillas (Gorilla beringei graueri), two L'Hoest's monkeys (Cercopithecus lhoesti), two golden monkeys (Cercopithecus kandti), and three chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) sampled between 1991 and 2009 were tested for antibodies against chikungunya virus (CHIKV), o'nyong-nyong virus (ONNV), West Nile virus (WNV), dengue 2 virus (DENV-2), and yellow fever virus (YFV) by plaque reduction neutralization test. Specific neutralizing antibodies against ONNV were found in African forest buffalo in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and Gabon, duikers in the DRC, and mandrills in Gabon, providing novel evidence of enzootic circulation of ONNV in these countries. African forest buffalo in the DRC and Gabon also demonstrated evidence of exposure to CHIKV, WNV, and DENV-2, while mandrills in Gabon were antibody positive for CHIKV, DENV-2, WNV, and YFV. All of the elephants tested had a strong neutralizing antibody response to WNV. We also document results from a survey of gorillas for arboviruses, of which 4/32 (13%) had antibody to an alphavirus or flavivirus. Overall, our results demonstrate a high prevalence of neutralizing antibodies against multiple arboviruses in wildlife in equatorial Africa.

  14. Potential for Co-Infection of a Mosquito-Specific Flavivirus, Nhumirim Virus, to Block West Nile Virus Transmission in Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Goenaga, Silvina; Kenney, Joan L.; Duggal, Nisha K.; Delorey, Mark; Ebel, Gregory D.; Zhang, Bo; Levis, Silvana C.; Enria, Delia A.; Brault, Aaron C.

    2015-01-01

    Nhumirim virus (NHUV) is an insect-specific virus that phylogenetically affiliates with dual-host mosquito-borne flaviviruses. Previous in vitro co-infection experiments demonstrated prior or concurrent infection of Aedes albopictus C6/36 mosquito cells with NHUV resulted in a 10,000-fold reduction in viral production of West Nile virus (WNV). This interference between WNV and NHUV was observed herein in an additional Ae. albopictus mosquito cell line, C7-10. A WNV 2K peptide (V9M) mutant capable of superinfection with a pre-established WNV infection demonstrated a comparable level of interference from NHUV as the parental WNV strain in C6/36 and C7-10 cells. Culex quinquefasciatus and Culex pipiens mosquitoes intrathoracically inoculated with NHUV and WNV, or solely with WNV as a control, were allowed to extrinsically incubate the viruses up to nine and 14 days, respectively, and transmissibility and replication of WNV was determined. The proportion of Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes capable of transmitting WNV was significantly lower for the WNV/NHUV group than the WNV control at seven and nine days post inoculation (dpi), while no differences were observed in the Cx. pipiens inoculation group. By dpi nine, a 40% reduction in transmissibility in mosquitoes from the dual inoculation group was observed compared to the WNV-only control. These data indicate the potential that infection of some Culex spp. vectors with NHUV could serve as a barrier for efficient transmissibility of flaviviruses associated with human disease. PMID:26569286

  15. Potential for Co-Infection of a Mosquito-Specific Flavivirus, Nhumirim Virus, to Block West Nile Virus Transmission in Mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Goenaga, Silvina; Kenney, Joan L; Duggal, Nisha K; Delorey, Mark; Ebel, Gregory D; Zhang, Bo; Levis, Silvana C; Enria, Delia A; Brault, Aaron C

    2015-11-11

    Nhumirim virus (NHUV) is an insect-specific virus that phylogenetically affiliates with dual-host mosquito-borne flaviviruses. Previous in vitro co-infection experiments demonstrated prior or concurrent infection of Aedes albopictus C6/36 mosquito cells with NHUV resulted in a 10,000-fold reduction in viral production of West Nile virus (WNV). This interference between WNV and NHUV was observed herein in an additional Ae. albopictus mosquito cell line, C7-10. A WNV 2K peptide (V9M) mutant capable of superinfection with a pre-established WNV infection demonstrated a comparable level of interference from NHUV as the parental WNV strain in C6/36 and C7-10 cells. Culex quinquefasciatus and Culex pipiens mosquitoes intrathoracically inoculated with NHUV and WNV, or solely with WNV as a control, were allowed to extrinsically incubate the viruses up to nine and 14 days, respectively, and transmissibility and replication of WNV was determined. The proportion of Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes capable of transmitting WNV was significantly lower for the WNV/NHUV group than the WNV control at seven and nine days post inoculation (dpi), while no differences were observed in the Cx. pipiens inoculation group. By dpi nine, a 40% reduction in transmissibility in mosquitoes from the dual inoculation group was observed compared to the WNV-only control. These data indicate the potential that infection of some Culex spp. vectors with NHUV could serve as a barrier for efficient transmissibility of flaviviruses associated with human disease.

  16. Safety and Immunogenicity of a Live Attenuated Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine Candidate in Flavivirus-Naive Adults: A Randomized, Double-Blinded Phase 1 Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    George, Sarah L.; Wong, Mimi A.; Dube, Tina J. T.; Boroughs, Karen L.; Stovall, Janae L.; Luy, Betty E.; Haller, Aurelia A.; Osorio, Jorge E.; Eggemeyer, Linda M.; Irby-Moore, Sharon; Frey, Sharon E.; Huang, Claire Y.-H.; Stinchcomb, Dan T.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Dengue viruses (DENVs) infect >300 million people annually, causing 96 million cases of dengue disease and 22 000 deaths [1]. A safe vaccine that protects against DENV disease is a global health priority [2]. Methods. We enrolled 72 flavivirus-naive healthy adults in a phase 1 double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled dose-escalation trial (low and high dose) of a live attenuated recombinant tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate (TDV) given in 2 doses 90 days apart. Volunteers were followed for safety, vaccine component viremia, and development of neutralizing antibodies to the 4 DENV serotypes. Results. The majority of adverse events were mild, with no vaccine-related serious adverse events. Vaccinees reported injection site pain (52% vs 17%) and erythema (73% vs 25%) more frequently than placebo recipients. Low levels of TDV-serotype 2 (TDV-2), TDV-3, and TDV-4 viremia were observed after the first but not second administration of vaccine. Overall seroconversion rates and geometric mean neutralization titers after 2 doses were 84.2% and 54.1, respectively, for DENV serotype 1 (DENV-1); 92.1% and 292.8, respectively, for DENV-2; 86.8% and 32.3, respectively, for DENV-3; and 71.1% and 15.0, respectively, for DENV-4. More than 90.0% of high-dose recipients had trivalent or broader responses. Conclusions. TDV was generally well tolerated, induced trivalent or broader neutralizing antibodies to DENV in most flavivirus-naive vaccinees, and is undergoing further development. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT01110551. PMID:25791116

  17. Variance of Dispersion Coefficients in Heterogeneous Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dentz, Marco; De Barros, Felipe P. J.

    2013-04-01

    We study the dispersion of a passive solute in heterogeneous porous media using a stochastic modeling approach. Heterogeneity on one hand leads to an increase of solute spreading, which is described by the well-known macrodispersion phenomenon. On the other hand, it induces uncertainty about the dispersion behavior, which is quantified by ensemble averages over suitably defined dispersion coefficients in single medium realizations. We focus here on the sample to sample fluctuations of dispersion coefficients about their ensemble mean values for solutes evolving from point-like and extended source distributions in d = 2 and d = 3 spatial dimensions. The definition of dispersion coefficients in single medium realizations for finite source sizes is not unique, unlike for point-like sources. Thus, we first discuss a series of dispersion measures, which describe the extension of the solute plume, as well as dispersion measures that quantify the solute dispersion relative to the injection point. The sample to sample fluctuations of these observables are quantified in terms of the variance with respect to their ensemble averages. We find that the ensemble averages of these dispersion measures may be identical, their fluctuation behavior, however, may be very different. This is quantified using perturbation expansions in the fluctuations of the random flow field. We derive explicit expressions for the time evolution of the variance of the dispersion coefficients. The characteristic time scale for the variance evolution is given by the typical dispersion time over the characteristic heterogeneity scale and the dimensions of the source. We find that the dispersion variances asymptotically decrease to zero in d = 3 dimensions, which means, the dispersion coefficients are self-averaging observables, at least for moderate heterogeneity. In d = 2 dimensions, the variance converges towards a finite asymptotic value that is independent of the source distribution. Dispersion is not

  18. A proxy for variance in dense matching over homogeneous terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altena, Bas; Cockx, Liesbet; Goedemé, Toon

    2014-05-01

    Automation in photogrammetry and avionics have brought highly autonomous UAV mapping solutions on the market. These systems have great potential for geophysical research, due to their mobility and simplicity of work. Flight planning can be done on site and orientation parameters are estimated automatically. However, one major drawback is still present: if contrast is lacking, stereoscopy fails. Consequently, topographic information cannot be obtained precisely through photogrammetry for areas with low contrast. Even though more robustness is added in the estimation through multi-view geometry, a precise product is still lacking. For the greater part, interpolation is applied over these regions, where the estimation is constrained by uniqueness, its epipolar line and smoothness. Consequently, digital surface models are generated with an estimate of the topography, without holes but also without an indication of its variance. Every dense matching algorithm is based on a similarity measure. Our methodology uses this property to support the idea that if only noise is present, no correspondence can be detected. Therefore, the noise level is estimated in respect to the intensity signal of the topography (SNR) and this ratio serves as a quality indicator for the automatically generated product. To demonstrate this variance indicator, two different case studies were elaborated. The first study is situated at an open sand mine near the village of Kiezegem, Belgium. Two different UAV systems flew over the site. One system had automatic intensity regulation, and resulted in low contrast over the sandy interior of the mine. That dataset was used to identify the weak estimations of the topography and was compared with the data from the other UAV flight. In the second study a flight campaign with the X100 system was conducted along the coast near Wenduine, Belgium. The obtained images were processed through structure-from-motion software. Although the beach had a very low

  19. Estimates of genetic variance and variance of predicted genetic merits using pedigree or genomic relationship matrices in six Brown Swiss cattle populations for different traits.

    PubMed

    Loberg, A; Dürr, J W; Fikse, W F; Jorjani, H; Crooks, L

    2015-10-01

    The amount of variance captured in genetic estimations may depend on whether a pedigree-based or genomic relationship matrix is used. The purpose of this study was to investigate the genetic variance as well as the variance of predicted genetic merits (PGM) using pedigree-based or genomic relationship matrices in Brown Swiss cattle. We examined a range of traits in six populations amounting to 173 population-trait combinations. A main aim was to determine how using different relationship matrices affect variance estimation. We calculated ratios between different types of estimates and analysed the impact of trait heritability and population size. The genetic variances estimated by REML using a genomic relationship matrix were always smaller than the variances that were similarly estimated using a pedigree-based relationship matrix. The variances from the genomic relationship matrix became closer to estimates from a pedigree relationship matrix as heritability and population size increased. In contrast, variances of predicted genetic merits obtained using a genomic relationship matrix were mostly larger than variances of genetic merit predicted using pedigree-based relationship matrix. The ratio of the genomic to pedigree-based PGM variances decreased as heritability and population size rose. The increased variance among predicted genetic merits is important for animal breeding because this is one of the factors influencing genetic progress.

  20. Ultrasonic beam fluctuation and flaw signal variance in inhomogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, S.; Roberts, R.; Margetan, F.

    2000-05-01

    This paper examines the effect of forward scattering on ultrasonic beam propagation and flaw signal amplitude in inhomogeneous material microstructures. A beam propagating through a weakly-scattering, randomly inhomogeneous medium will display random fluctuations in amplitude and phase, attributable to forward scattering. Correspondingly, the signal received from a given flaw at a given position in the beam volume will fluctuate as the beam and flaw are simultaneously scanned throughout the volume of an inhomogeneous host medium. These effects have been prominently observed in the inspection of titanium. For example, maps of beam amplitude profiles after transmission through titanium reveal severe distortion of beam amplitude and phase. Similarly, signals from "identical" flat bottom holes (FBH) at equal depths but different lateral positions in titanium display a random variation in amplitude. Interestingly, it has been noted that this FBH signal variance varies inversely to the beam diameter, that is, signal variance normalized to the mean signal amplitude is a minimum when the flaw is in the focal zone of a focused bearn. As this observation has great significance to the inspection of titanium, a model, prediction of this phenomenon is being sought. In the work reported here, beam propagation is formulated as a volumetric integral equation employing the Green function for the homogeneous spatial mean of the medium. The integral equation is solved using iterative methods. Preliminary work considering scalar two-dimensional propagation in inhomogeneous media has predicted a flaw signal variance that displays an inverse relation to beam diameter, thus reproducing the qualitative behavior seen in experimental data in titanium. Current work is extending the preliminary two-dimensional scalar result to three-dimensional elasticity, representing propagation in an actual titanium microstructure. Progress on this effort will be reported.